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Sample records for infections salmonella enteritidis

  1. Saccharomyces boulardii prevention of the hepatic injury induced by Salmonella Enteritidis infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Daichao; Teng, Da; Wang, Xiumin; Dai, Changsong; Wang, Jianhua

    2014-10-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) is the predominant cause of serovar-associated food-borne outbreaks in many countries and causes significant clinical symptoms of liver injury, enteritis, and diarrheal diseases. Saccharomyces boulardii is used in clinical application for prophylaxis and the treatment of a variety of diseases caused by bacterial infection. We used a mouse model of Salmonella Enteritidis infection, which included pretreatment with S. boulardii, to reveal the protection mechanisms of S. boulardii against Salmonella Enteritidis infection, including the translocation of Salmonella Enteritidis to the liver 10 days after Salmonella Enteritidis challenge, and the colonisation of Salmonella Enteritidis and the formation of hepatic tissue lesions in mice after Salmonella Enteritidis challenge on the 10th day. Compared with Salmonella Enteritidis infection in mice, S. boulardii decreased Salmonella Enteritidis translocation to the liver by 96%, and 99% of Salmonella Enteritidis colonised the cecum on the 10th day. Saccharomyces boulardii also abated hepatic tissue injury caused by the infiltration of neutrophilic granulocytes, lymphocytes, and plasmocytes by decreasing the translocation of Salmonella to the liver. These findings demonstrated that S. boulardii is an effective agent in the prevention of the hepatic injury induced by Salmonella Enteritidis infection in a mouse model.

  2. Salmonella Enteritidis Infections, United States, 1985–1999

    PubMed Central

    Adcock, Penny M.; Gomez, Thomas M.; Altekruse, Sean F.; Holland, Ben H.; Tauxe, Robert V.; Swerdlow, David L.

    2004-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis emerged as an important illness during the 1980s. Investigations showed that consumption of undercooked eggs was the major risk factor for disease, and a variety of prevention and control efforts were initiated during the 1990s. We describe sporadic infections and outbreaks of S. Enteritidis in the United States from 1985 through 1999 and discuss prevention and control efforts. After reaching a high of 3.9 per 100,000 population in 1995, S. Enteritidis infections declined to 1.98 per 100,000 in 1999. While the total number of outbreaks decreased by half, those in the western states tripled. Outbreaks of S. Enteritidis phage type 4 infections accounted for 49% of outbreaks in 1999. Outbreak-associated deaths in health facilities decreased from 14 in 1987 to 0 in 1999. Overall, rates of sporadic S. Enteritidis infection, outbreaks, and deaths have declined dramatically. For further reductions, control measures should continue to be applied along the entire farm-to-table continuum. PMID:15078589

  3. Serological detection of experimental Salmonella enteritidis infections in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Gast, R K; Beard, C W

    1990-01-01

    The antibody response of laying hens to experimental Salmonella enteritidis infection was evaluated in microagglutination, tube agglutination, and rapid whole-blood plate agglutination assays. Hens of three different ages were infected by either oral inoculation or horizontal contact transmission. Blood was collected at weekly intervals, and the presence of specific antibodies was assessed by reaction with antigens prepared from strains of S. enteritidis and S. pullorum. The sensitivity of detection of infected hens did not vary significantly between the assays, as all three tests effectively identified most exposed hens as seropositive. Within each test, however, variation was observed in the detection sensitivity when different antigens were used. The microagglutination titers of serum samples were determined by serial dilution. Antibody titers peaked at 1 to 2 weeks postinoculation and declined steadily, although most birds were still identified as seropositive at 10 weeks postinoculation. The mean microtest titers obtained with S. enteritidis antigens were higher than with an S. pullorum antigen, indicating greater test sensitivity. However, use of the S. pullorum antigen resulted in fewer false positives when sera from uninfected control hens were tested. The titers of contact-exposed hens peaked later and at lower values than did those of inoculated hens, but these two groups of hens had similar antibody titers after the third week postinoculation.

  4. Quinolone-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections associated with international travel.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Allison T; Vieira, Antonio R; Huang, Jennifer Y; Whichard, Jean; Cole, Dana; Karp, Beth E

    2014-11-01

    We found a strong association between nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections in the United States and recent international travel by linking Salmonella Enteritidis data from the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System and the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network.

  5. Salmonella enteritidis deposition in eggs after experimental infection of laying hens with different oral doses.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Guard, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The continuing attribution of human Salmonella Enteritidis infections to internally contaminated eggs has necessitated the commitment of substantial public and private resources to Salmonella Enteritidis testing and control programs in commercial laying flocks. Cost-effective risk-reduction requires a detailed and comprehensive understanding of how Salmonella Enteritidis infections in hens result in deposition of the pathogen inside eggs. The present study sought to resolve some incompletely defined aspects of the relationship between Salmonella Enteritidis oral-exposure dose levels in experimentally infected laying hens and the frequency and location of subsequent egg contamination. In two trials, groups of specific-pathogen-free hens were experimentally inoculated with oral doses of 10(4), 10(6), or 10(8) CFU of a phage type 4 Salmonella Enteritidis strain. Eggs were collected 5 to 23 days postinoculation, and the yolk and albumen of each egg were cultured separately to detect Salmonella Enteritidis contamination. Larger oral doses of Salmonella Enteritidis administered to hens were associated with significant increases in the frequencies of both yolk and albumen contamination. Moreover, Salmonella Enteritidis was found in the albumen of a far-higher proportion of contaminated eggs from hens given the largest dose than from the other two groups. Salmonella Enteritidis contamination was detected in 0.7% of yolk and 0.2% of albumen samples after inoculation of hens with 10(4) CFU, 4.0% of yolk and 1.7% of albumen samples after inoculation with 10(6) CFU, and 6.5% of yolk and 10.8% of albumen samples after inoculation with 10(8) CFU. These results demonstrate that oral-exposure doses of Salmonella Enteritidis for laying hens can significantly affect both the frequency and location of deposition of this pathogen inside eggs.

  6. Line differences in resistance to Salmonella enteritidis PT4 infection.

    PubMed

    Protais, J; Colin, P; Beaumont, C; Guillot, J F; Lantier, F; Pardon, P; Bennejean, G

    1996-05-01

    1. Four groups of hens, each of a different line, were inoculated at peak of lay, per os in the crop with 1 ml of a suspension containing 10(9) cfu/ml Salmonella enteritidis PT4 (SE). The kinetics of SE contamination in the environment, egg shell and yolk were studied during the first 28 d post inoculation. On the day of slaughter, intestines, caeca, spleen, liver, ovary, oviduct and content were investigated for SE contamination. 2. The commercial egg-type line L2 was found to be the most susceptible to SE. It laid many SE-positive yolks (13.8%) and internal and faecal organs were frequently infected. 3. Certain lines are found to exhibit a degree of resistance to SE; the cause of which is unknown and might be attributed to major genes.

  7. Composition of Gut Microbiota Influences Resistance of Newly Hatched Chickens to Salmonella Enteritidis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Varmuzova, Karolina; Kubasova, Tereza; Davidova-Gerzova, Lenka; Sisak, Frantisek; Havlickova, Hana; Sebkova, Alena; Faldynova, Marcela; Rychlik, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Since poultry is a very common source of non-typhoid Salmonella for humans, different interventions aimed at decreasing the prevalence of Salmonella in chickens are understood as an effective measure for decreasing the incidence of human salmonellosis. One such intervention is the use of probiotic or competitive exclusion products. In this study we tested whether microbiota from donor hens of different age will equally protect chickens against Salmonella Enteritidis infection. Newly hatched chickens were therefore orally inoculated with cecal extracts from 1-, 3-, 16-, 28-, and 42-week-old donors and 7 days later, the chickens were infected with S. Enteritidis. The experiment was terminated 4 days later. In the second experiment, groups of newly hatched chickens were inoculated with cecal extracts of 35-week-old hens either on day 1 of life followed by S. Enteritidis infection on day 2 or were infected with S. Enteritidis infection on day 1 followed by therapeutic administration of the cecal extract on day 2 or were inoculated on day 1 of life with a mixture of the cecal extract and S. Enteritidis. This experiment was terminated when the chickens were 5 days old. Both Salmonella culture and chicken gene expression confirmed that inoculation of newly hatched chickens with microbiota from 3-week-old or older chickens protected them against S. Enteritidis challenge. On the other hand, microbiota from 1-week-old donors failed to protect chickens against S. Enteritidis challenge. Microbiota from 35-week-old hens protected chickens even 24 h after administration. However, simultaneous or therapeutic microbiota administration failed to protect chickens against S. Enteritidis infection. Gut microbiota can be used as a preventive measure against S. Enteritidis infection but its composition and early administration is critical for its efficacy. PMID:27379083

  8. Identification of Genes Affecting Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Infection of Chicken Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yixian; Jansen, Ruud; Gaastra, Wim; Arkesteijn, Ger; van der Zeijst, Bernard A. M.; van Putten, Jos P. M.

    2002-01-01

    Screening of 7,680 Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis mutants for attenuation in a chicken macrophage infection model yielded a series of mutants including several with defects in previously unrecognized Salmonella virulence genes. One of the newly identified genes was the pbpA2 gene, belonging to the penicillin binding protein gene family. PMID:12183592

  9. Horizontal transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Jones, Deana R; Anderson, Kenneth E

    2014-12-01

    The majority of human illnesses caused by Salmonella Enteritidis are attributed to contaminated eggs, and the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial laying flocks has been identified as a leading epidemiologic risk factor. Flock housing and management systems can affect opportunities for the introduction, transmission, and persistence of foodborne pathogens in poultry. The animal welfare implications of different types of housing for laying hens have been widely discussed in recent years, but the food safety consequences of these production systems remain incompletely understood. The present study assessed the effects of 2 different housing systems (conventional cages and colony cages enriched with perching and nesting areas) on the horizontal transmission of experimentally introduced Salmonella Enteritidis infection within groups of laying hens. In each of 2 trials, 136 hens were distributed among cages of both housing systems and approximately one-third of the hens in each cage were orally inoculated with doses of 10(8) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis (phage type 13a in one trial and phage type 4 in the other). At regular intervals through 23 d postinoculation, cloacal swabs were collected from all hens (inoculated and uninoculated) and cultured for Salmonella Enteritidis. Horizontal contact transmission of infection was observed for both Salmonella Enteritidis strains, reaching peak prevalence values of 27.1% of uninoculated hens in conventional cages and 22.7% in enriched cages. However, no significant differences (P > 0.05) in the overall frequencies of horizontal Salmonella Enteritidis transmission were evident between the 2 types of housing. These results suggest that opportunities for Salmonella Enteritidis infection to spread horizontally throughout laying flocks may be similar in conventional and enriched cage-based production systems.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacteriophage MA12, Which Infects both Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sunjin; Kwon, Taesoo; Chae, Su-Jin; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kang, Yeon Ho; Chung, Gyung Tae

    2016-01-01

    Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) bacteriophage MA12, a 41-Kb chromosome. The strain can infect both Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) and S. Enteritidis and can be used in phage therapy experiments with poultry and poultry meat. PMID:27932636

  11. Occurrence of purulent arthritis broilers vertically infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in Korea.

    PubMed

    Oh, J-Y; Kang, M-S; An, B-K; Song, E-A; Kwon, J-H; Kwon, Y-K

    2010-10-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) has been associated with morbidity and mortality in broiler chickens worldwide. The present study described purulent arthritis of broilers infected with Salmonella Enteritidis and investigated antibiograms and genetic characteristics of Salmonella Enteritidis isolates from epidemiologically related properties such as a hatchery and breeder farm in an attempt to elucidate the source of contamination. Clinical disease and mortality were observed in the affected broiler flock. Mortality was 5.8% until 12 d of age. The birds typically showed lameness with moderately swollen hock joints and footpads. The most prevalent lesions were severely purulent arthritis with polyserositis. Histopathology revealed moderate to severe inflammation in the synovial membrane of leg joints and visceral organs. When the antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed against 7 isolates of Salmonella Enteritidis from broilers, and relevant hatchery and breeder farms by the disk diffusion method using 18 antimicrobial agents, isolates from broiler and breeder farms had the same antibiogram characterized by multiple drug resistance to ampicillin, ceftiofur, cephalothin, gentamycin, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, and tetracycline, whereas isolates from the hatchery were differently resistant to only nalidixic acid. Through the genetic analysis with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis using the restriction enzyme XbaI, Salmonella Enteritidis isolates from both broiler and breeder farms also showed the same PFGE pattern compared with the hatchery isolates resistant to nalidixic acid. As a result, the same PFGE profiles and antibiogram patterns among isolates from broilers and breeder farms provided direct evidence of vertical Salmonella Enteritidis transmission from the contaminated breeder farm to commercial broiler.

  12. TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSE OF CHICKEN MACROPHAGES TO SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEROVAR ENTERITIDIS INFECTION

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The transcriptional profiles of chicken macrophages (HD11) infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) were analyzed by using avian macrophage microarray and real time RT-PCR. Out of 4,906 array elements interrogated, 269 genes exhibited a 2-fold change (P < 0.001) over a 24-hour time...

  13. Transcriptional Response of Chicken Macrophages to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) continues to be the predominant etiologic agent of salmonellosis, with contaminated egg products being the primary source of infection. At the present time, the molecular and immunological mechanisms involved in SE colonization of chicken hosts are not we...

  14. SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEROVAR ENTERITIDIS INFECTION MODULATES DIVERSE FUNCTIONAL PROCESSES OF CHICKEN MACROPHAGE AT THE TRANSCRIPTIONAL LEVEL

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) is a major etiologic agent of non-typhoid salmonellosis. The organisms colonize adult chicken hosts without causing overt clinical signs. The immunological mechanisms underlying the silent and persistent infection of chickens by SE are not clearly underst...

  15. Salmonella Enteritidis deposition in eggs after experimental infection of laying hens with different oral doses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The continuing attribution of human Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections to internally contaminated eggs has necessitated the commitment of substantial public and private resources to SE testing and control programs in commercial laying flocks. Cost-effective risk reduction requires a detailed and...

  16. Restaurant Salmonella Enteritidis outbreak associated with an asymptomatic infected food worker.

    PubMed

    Hedican, Erin; Hooker, Carol; Jenkins, Timothy; Medus, Carlota; Jawahir, Selina; Leano, Fe; Smith, Kirk

    2009-11-01

    Salmonella is the most common bacterial cause of foodborne outbreaks in the United States; approximately half of Salmonella outbreaks occur in restaurant settings. In February 2008, investigation of a cluster of Salmonella Enteritidis cases with indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns revealed that five cases had eaten at the same restaurant. Cases were identified through routine surveillance activities and by contacting meal companions of culture-confirmed cases. Well meal companions and well patrons contacted via check stubs served as controls. Illness histories and stool samples were collected from all restaurant employees. Sandwiches were the only menu item or ingredient significantly associated with illness (15 of 15 cases versus 17 of 37 controls; odds ratio, undefined; P < 0.001). None of the six restaurant employees reported experiencing recent gastrointestinal symptoms. The outbreak PFGE subtype of Salmonella Enteritidis was identified in two food workers. One of the positive employees began working at the restaurant shortly before the first exposure date reported by a case, and assisted in the preparation of sandwiches and other foods consumed by cases. The other positive employee rarely, if ever, handled food. The restaurant did not have a glove use policy. There was no evidence of ongoing transmission after exclusion of the positive food workers. This was a restaurant Salmonella Enteritidis outbreak associated with an asymptomatic infected food worker. Routine PFGE subtyping of Salmonella Enteritidis isolates, routine interviewing of cases, and an iterative approach to cluster investigations allowed for timely identification of the source of an outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections.

  17. Chicken innate immune response to oral infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of the immune response of chickens to Salmonella infection is usually limited to the quantification of expression of genes coding for cytokines, chemokines or antimicrobial peptides. However, processes occurring in the cecum of infected chickens are likely to be much more diverse. In this study we have therefore characterized the transcriptome and proteome in the chicken cecum after infection with Salmonella Enteritidis. Using a combination of 454 pyrosequencing, protein mass spectrometry and quantitative real-time PCR, we identified 48 down- and 56 up-regulated chicken genes after Salmonella Enteritidis infection. The most inducible gene was that coding for MMP7, exhibiting a 5952 fold induction 9 days post-infection. An induction of greater than 100 fold was observed for IgG, IRG1, SAA, ExFABP, IL-22, TRAP6, MRP126, IFNγ, iNOS, ES1, IL-1β, LYG2, IFIT5, IL-17, AVD, AH221 and SERPIN B. Since prostaglandin D2 synthase was upregulated and degrading hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase was downregulated after the infection, prostaglandin must accumulate in the cecum of chickens infected with Salmonella Enteritidis. Finally, above mentioned signaling was dependent on the presence of a SPI1-encoded type III secretion system in Salmonella Enteritidis. The inflammation lasted for 2 weeks after which time the expression of the “inflammatory” genes returned back to basal levels and, instead, the expression of IgA and IgG increased. This points to an important role for immunoglobulins in the restoration of homeostasis in the cecum after infection. PMID:23687968

  18. Chicken innate immune response to oral infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Matulova, Marta; Varmuzova, Karolina; Sisak, Frantisek; Havlickova, Hana; Babak, Vladimir; Stejskal, Karel; Zdrahal, Zbynek; Rychlik, Ivan

    2013-05-20

    The characterization of the immune response of chickens to Salmonella infection is usually limited to the quantification of expression of genes coding for cytokines, chemokines or antimicrobial peptides. However, processes occurring in the cecum of infected chickens are likely to be much more diverse. In this study we have therefore characterized the transcriptome and proteome in the chicken cecum after infection with Salmonella Enteritidis. Using a combination of 454 pyrosequencing, protein mass spectrometry and quantitative real-time PCR, we identified 48 down- and 56 up-regulated chicken genes after Salmonella Enteritidis infection. The most inducible gene was that coding for MMP7, exhibiting a 5952 fold induction 9 days post-infection. An induction of greater than 100 fold was observed for IgG, IRG1, SAA, ExFABP, IL-22, TRAP6, MRP126, IFNγ, iNOS, ES1, IL-1β, LYG2, IFIT5, IL-17, AVD, AH221 and SERPIN B. Since prostaglandin D2 synthase was upregulated and degrading hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase was downregulated after the infection, prostaglandin must accumulate in the cecum of chickens infected with Salmonella Enteritidis. Finally, above mentioned signaling was dependent on the presence of a SPI1-encoded type III secretion system in Salmonella Enteritidis. The inflammation lasted for 2 weeks after which time the expression of the "inflammatory" genes returned back to basal levels and, instead, the expression of IgA and IgG increased. This points to an important role for immunoglobulins in the restoration of homeostasis in the cecum after infection.

  19. Colonization and organ invasion in chicks experimentally infected with Dermanyssus gallinae contaminated by Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Moro, Claire Valiente; Fravalo, Philippe; Amelot, Michel; Chauve, Claude; Zenner, Lionel; Salvat, Gilles

    2007-08-01

    The poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae) is the most important and common ectoparasite of laying hens in Europe. This haematophagous mite has been experimentally demonstrated to be a vector of Salmonella Enteritidis by acquiring bacteria through the blood meal or cuticular contact. We have evaluated another route of infection by orally inoculating chicks with mites previously infected by S. Enteritidis. Two methods of infecting the mites were tested: mites contaminated by cuticular contact or during the blood meal. After the washing of mites with paraformaldehyde, groups of 10 Salmonella-contaminated mites were inoculated individually into 1-day-old chicks. The titre of the inoculum suspension was evaluated by crushing mites and followed by bacteriological counting. It was 3x10(4) colony-forming units/chick and 2.7x10(6) colony-forming units/chick, respectively, for cuticular contact and orally mediated contamination of mites. Each bird was found to be positive 12 days post-inoculation. Salmonella colonized the intestinal tracts and invaded the livers and spleens. The caecal content concentration reached a mean level of S. Enteritidis of 8.5x10(4) most probable number (MPN) Salmonella/g. This experiment demonstrated the ability of mites to orally infect 1-day-old chicks with subsequent colonization and multiplication of Salmonella. Consequently, mites infected by S. Enteritidis constitute potential reservoir hosts of this bacterium, allowing it to persist in the poultry house as a source of infection for newly introduced animals. If contaminated mites are found in poultry facilities, effective red mite control should be performed before new batches are introduced into the facility.

  20. Emergence of new Salmonella Enteritidis phage types in Europe? Surveillance of infections in returning travellers

    PubMed Central

    Nygård, Karin; de Jong, Birgitta; Guerin, Philippe J; Andersson, Yvonne; Olsson, Agneta; Giesecke, Johan

    2004-01-01

    Background Among human Salmonella Enteritidis infections, phage type 4 has been the dominant phage type in most countries in Western Europe during the last years. This is reflected in Salmonella infections among Swedish travellers returning from abroad. However, there are differences in phage type distribution between the countries, and this has also changed over time. Methods We used data from the Swedish infectious disease register and the national reference laboratory to describe phage type distribution of Salmonella Enteritidis infections in Swedish travellers from 1997 to 2002, and have compared this with national studies conducted in the countries visited. Results Infections among Swedish travellers correlate well with national studies conducted in the countries visited. In 2001 a change in phage type distribution in S. Enteritidis infections among Swedish travellers returning from some countries in southern Europe was observed, and a previously rare phage type (PT 14b) became one of the most commonly diagnosed that year, continuing into 2002 and 2003. Conclusions Surveillance of infections among returning travellers can be helpful in detecting emerging infections and outbreaks in tourist destinations. The information needs to be communicated rapidly to all affected countries in order to expedite the implementation of appropriate investigations and preventive measures. PMID:15345058

  1. Salmonella enteritidis in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Caffer, M I; Eiguer, T

    1994-01-01

    A significant increase in the number of isolations of Salmonella enteritidis has been observed in Argentina since 1986. Outbreaks of foodborne diseases in humans were associated with the consumption of raw or undercooked hens' eggs. Between 1986 and the first 6 months of 1993 there were 150 outbreaks reported, affecting more than 6000 persons. A total of 71.3% of these outbreaks were confirmed by stool cultures, and 47.3% by bacteriological study of the food implicated in the outbreak. A permanent surveillance of salmonellosis is imperative, taking into account the persistence of Salmonella enteritidis isolations in sporadic cases and in new outbreaks.

  2. Experimental infection of Salmonella Enteritidis by the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae.

    PubMed

    Valiente Moro, C; Chauve, C; Zenner, L

    2007-05-31

    Dermanyssus gallinae is an important ectoparasite of laying hens in Europe and it is suspected of being a vector of pathogens. We carried out an in vitro study to evaluate the role of D. gallinae as a vector of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Enteritidis. Two means of infecting the mite were tested: through the blood meal and after cuticular contact. Mites became carriers of Salmonella immediately after the infection with 29% and 53%, respectively, for oral route and cuticular contact. This percentage increased over time until it reached 95% (D7) and 80% (D14). The numerical identification of bacteria on the selective medium SM ID demonstrated the multiplication of Salmonella inside previously infected mites. In addition, transovarial passage as well as transstadial passage (from N1 to N2 stages) were demonstrated. Moreover, the observation of a negative effect of Salmonella on Dermanyssus oviposition was also observed. Finally, previously infected mites were able to contaminate the blood during the blood meal. Therefore, it appears that D. gallinae may act as a biological vector of S. Enteritidis under experimental conditions. It may represent a suitable environment for the development of Salmonella and could be an additional factor for the persistence of salmonellosis infection between successive flocks.

  3. Cross-protection against Salmonella Typhimurium infection conferred by a live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Nandre, Rahul M.; Lee, Dajeong; Lee, John Hwa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a genetically engineered live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) vaccine was evaluated for its ability to protect against Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) infection in chickens. The birds were orally primed with the vaccine on the 1st day of life and given an oral booster at 5 wk of age. Control birds were orally inoculated with phosphate-buffered saline. Both groups of birds were orally challenged with a virulent ST strain at 9 wk of age. Compared with the control chickens, the vaccinated chickens had significantly higher levels of systemic IgG and mucosal IgA against specific ST antigens and a significantly greater lymphoproliferative response to ST antigens. The excretion of ST into the feces was significantly lower in the vaccinated group than in the control group on days 9 and 13 d after challenge. In addition, the vaccinated group had significantly fewer pronounced gross lesions in the liver and spleen and lower bacterial counts in the internal organs than the control group after challenge. These data indicate that genetically engineered live attenuated SE may induce humoral and cellular immune responses against ST antigens and may confer protection against virulent ST challenge. PMID:25673904

  4. Cross-protection against Salmonella Typhimurium infection conferred by a live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Nandre, Rahul M; Lee, Dajeong; Lee, John Hwa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a genetically engineered live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) vaccine was evaluated for its ability to protect against Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) infection in chickens. The birds were orally primed with the vaccine on the 1st day of life and given an oral booster at 5 wk of age. Control birds were orally inoculated with phosphate-buffered saline. Both groups of birds were orally challenged with a virulent ST strain at 9 wk of age. Compared with the control chickens, the vaccinated chickens had significantly higher levels of systemic IgG and mucosal IgA against specific ST antigens and a significantly greater lymphoproliferative response to ST antigens. The excretion of ST into the feces was significantly lower in the vaccinated group than in the control group on days 9 and 13 d after challenge. In addition, the vaccinated group had significantly fewer pronounced gross lesions in the liver and spleen and lower bacterial counts in the internal organs than the control group after challenge. These data indicate that genetically engineered live attenuated SE may induce humoral and cellular immune responses against ST antigens and may confer protection against virulent ST challenge.

  5. Microencapsulated sorbic acid and nature-identical compounds reduced Salmonella Hadar and Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in experimentally infected chickens.

    PubMed

    Grilli, E; Tugnoli, B; Formigoni, A; Massi, P; Fantinati, P; Tosi, G; Piva, A

    2011-08-01

    The reduction of Salmonella prevalence in broilers is a priority in European Union agricultural policies because treatment with antibiotics is forbidden by Regulation (EC) 2160/2003. Two trials were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a microencapsulated blend of sorbic acid and nature-identical compounds (i.e., chemically synthesized botanicals; SAB) on the reduction of the cecal prevalence and contents of Salmonella enterica serovars Hadar and Enteritidis in experimentally infected chickens. In the first trial, 125 one-day-old Lohmann specific-pathogen-free chickens were assigned to one of the following treatments: negative control (not challenged and not treated), positive control (challenged and not treated), SAB0.3, SAB1, or SAB5 (challenged and treated with the microencapsulated blend included in the feed at 0.03, 0.1, or 0.5%, respectively). At 30 d of age, birds were infected with 10(6) cfu of Salmonella Hadar, and after 5, 10, or 20 d postinfection, 5, 10, and 10 birds per treatment, respectively, were killed and the cecal contents and liver and spleen samples were analyzed for Salmonella Hadar. In the second trial, 100 one-day-old Ross 708 chickens were assigned to 1 of 5 treatments: control (not treated), SAB0.3, SAB1, SAB2, or SAB5 (treated with the blend included in the feed at 0.03, 0.1, 0.2, or 0.5%, respectively). At 7 d of age, the birds were challenged with 10(5) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis, and after 7, 14, or 24 d after challenge, 5, 5, and 10 birds per treatment, respectively, were killed and cecal contents were analyzed for Salmonella Enteritidis. Results showed that in the early stage of infection Salmonella prevalence was high in both studies, whereas at the end of the observation periods, the blends at 0.03, 0.1, and 0.5 in the challenge with Salmonella Hadar and at 0.2 and 0.5% in the challenge with Salmonella Enteritidis significantly reduced (by 2 log(10) cfu) the cecal content of Salmonella. This study showed that intestinal

  6. Curcuma and Scutellaria plant extracts protect chickens against inflammation and Salmonella Enteritidis infection.

    PubMed

    Varmuzova, Karolina; Matulova, Marta Elsheimer; Gerzova, Lenka; Cejkova, Darina; Gardan-Salmon, Delphine; Panhéleux, Marina; Robert, Fabrice; Sisak, Frantisek; Havlickova, Hana; Rychlik, Ivan

    2015-09-01

    After a ban on the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in farm animals in the European Union in 2006, an interest in alternative products with antibacterial or anti-inflammatory properties has increased. In this study, we therefore tested the effects of extracts from Curcuma longa and Scutellaria baicalensis used as feed additives against cecal inflammation induced by heat stress or Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) infection in chickens. Curcuma extract alone was not enough to decrease gut inflammation induced by heat stress. However, a mixture of Curcuma and Scutellaria extracts used as feed additives decreased gut inflammation induced by heat or S. Enteritidis, decreased S. Enteritidis counts in the cecum but was of no negative effect on BW or humoral immune response. Using next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA we found out that supplementation of feed with the 2 plant extracts had no effect on microbiota diversity. However, if the plant extract supplementation was provided to the chickens infected with S. Enteritidis, Faecalibacterium, and Lactobacillus, both bacterial genera with known positive effects on gut health were positively selected. The supplementation of chicken feed with extracts from Curcuma and Scutelleria thus may be used in poultry production to effectively decrease gut inflammation and increase chicken performance.

  7. Characterization of chicken spleen transcriptome after infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Matulova, Marta; Rajova, Jana; Vlasatikova, Lenka; Volf, Jiri; Stepanova, Hana; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Rychlik, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    In this study we were interested in identification of new markers of chicken response to Salmonella Enteritidis infection. To reach this aim, gene expression in the spleens of naive chickens and those intravenously infected with S. Enteritidis with or without previous oral vaccination was determined by 454 pyrosequencing of splenic mRNA/cDNA. Forty genes with increased expression at the level of transcription were identified. The most inducible genes encoded avidin (AVD), extracellular fatty acid binding protein (EXFABP), immune responsive gene 1 (IRG1), chemokine ah221 (AH221), trappin-6-like protein (TRAP6) and serum amyloid A (SAA). Using cDNA from sorted splenic B-lymphocytes, macrophages, CD4, CD8 and γδ T-lymphocytes, we found that the above mentioned genes were preferentially expressed in macrophages. AVD, EXFABP, IRG1, AH221, TRAP6 and SAA were induced also in the cecum of chickens orally infected with S. Enteritidis on day 1 of life or day 42 of life. Unusual results were obtained for the immunoglobulin encoding transcripts. Prior to the infection, transcripts coding for the constant parts of IgM, IgY, IgA and Ig light chain were detected in B-lymphocytes. However, after the infection, immunoglobulin encoding transcripts were expressed also by T-lymphocytes and macrophages. Expression of AVD, EXFABP, IRG1, AH221, TRAP6, SAA and all immunoglobulin genes can be therefore used for the characterization of the course of S. Enteritidis infection in chickens.

  8. Gene Expression Profiles of Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts in Response to Salmonella Enteritidis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Szmolka, Ama; Wiener, Zoltán; Matulova, Marta Elsheimer; Varmuzova, Karolina; Rychlik, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The response of chicken to non-typhoidal Salmonella infection is becoming well characterised but the role of particular cell types in this response is still far from being understood. Therefore, in this study we characterised the response of chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) to infection with two different S. Enteritidis strains by microarray analysis. The expression of chicken genes identified as significantly up- or down-regulated (≥3-fold) by microarray analysis was verified by real-time PCR followed by functional classification of the genes and prediction of interactions between the proteins using Gene Ontology and STRING Database. Finally the expression of the newly identified genes was tested in HD11 macrophages and in vivo in chickens. Altogether 19 genes were induced in CEFs after S. Enteritidis infection. Twelve of them were also induced in HD11 macrophages and thirteen in the caecum of orally infected chickens. The majority of these genes were assigned different functions in the immune response, however five of them (LOC101750351, K123, BU460569, MOBKL2C and G0S2) have not been associated with the response of chicken to Salmonella infection so far. K123 and G0S2 were the only ’non-immune’ genes inducible by S. Enteritidis in fibroblasts, HD11 macrophages and in the caecum after oral infection. The function of K123 is unknown but G0S2 is involved in lipid metabolism and in β-oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria. PMID:26046914

  9. Protection activity of a novel probiotic strain of Bacillus subtilis against Salmonella Enteritidis infection.

    PubMed

    Thirabunyanon, Mongkol; Thongwittaya, Narin

    2012-08-01

    The activity of 240 bacterial isolates screened from the gastrointestinal tracts of native chickens were evaluated for use as a potential probiotic in food animal production in order to protect against animal diseases and reduce pathogenic contamination of human food products. In observing the antagonistic activity of 117 bacilli isolates, 10 of these isolates exhibited higher growth inhibition of seven foodborne pathogens, including Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Vibrio cholerae. Beneficial probiotic criteria from these isolates - which included non-pathogenicity, acid and bile salt tolerance, hydrophobicity, and adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells - exhibited that one isolate of NC11 had the most potential as a probiotic. 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that this NC11 isolate was Bacillus subtilis. This B. subtilis NC11 was sensitive to all antibiotics and was not cytotoxic to intestinal epithelial cells. Reduction of S. Enteritidis attachment to the surfaces of intestinal epithelial cells via action of a cultured medium from B. subtilis NC11 was observed by scanning electron microscopy. B. subtilis NC11 cells, as well as the bacterial cultured medium or the cultured medium adjusted to pH 7, significantly inhibited S. Enteritidis invasion (P<0.01) of intestinal epithelial cells. This study indicates that B. subtilis NC11 has characteristics of a potential probiotic, and exhibits strong inhibition activity against S. Enteritidis infection to intestinal epithelial cells.

  10. Persistence of fecal shedding of Salmonella Enteritidis by experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    : Because Salmonella Enteritidis can be deposited inside eggs laid by infected hens, the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial egg-producing flocks is an important risk factor for human illness. Opportunities for the introduction, transmission, and persistence of salmonellae in poultry are poten...

  11. Persistence of fecal shedding of Salmonella Enteritidis by experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Because Salmonella Enteritidis can be deposited inside eggs laid by infected hens, the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial egg-producing flocks is an important risk factor for human illness. Opportunities for the introduction, transmission, and persistence of salmonellae in poultry are potenti...

  12. Identification of in vivo-induced genes during infection of chickens with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Geng, Shizhong; Liu, Zhicheng; Lin, Zhijie; Barrow, Paul; Pan, Zhiming; Li, Qiuchun; Jiao, Xinan

    2015-06-01

    Chickens are an important source of food worldwide and are often infected with food-poisoning serovars of Salmonella enterica, frequently Salmonella Enteritidis (SE), without exhibiting clinical signs of disease. Ivi (in vivo induced) genes identified using in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT) are expressed only during bacterial infection and have the potential value of identifying epidemic strains and antigens which can form the basis for sub-unit vaccine development. We applied IVIAT to SE strain 50041 and identified 42 ivi genes. Eight representative ivi genes were further confirmed by qRT-PCR as being expressed only in vivo within 48 h of infection compared with that of in vitro-cultured. Although our results indicated that the identified ivi genes are expressed only in vivo, further research is needed to elucidate the exact roles of these genes during infection and pathogenesis.

  13. Characterization of Chicken Spleen Transcriptome after Infection with Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Matulova, Marta; Rajova, Jana; Vlasatikova, Lenka; Volf, Jiri; Stepanova, Hana; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Rychlik, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    In this study we were interested in identification of new markers of chicken response to Salmonella Enteritidis infection. To reach this aim, gene expression in the spleens of naive chickens and those intravenously infected with S. Enteritidis with or without previous oral vaccination was determined by 454 pyrosequencing of splenic mRNA/cDNA. Forty genes with increased expression at the level of transcription were identified. The most inducible genes encoded avidin (AVD), extracellular fatty acid binding protein (EXFABP), immune responsive gene 1 (IRG1), chemokine ah221 (AH221), trappin-6-like protein (TRAP6) and serum amyloid A (SAA). Using cDNA from sorted splenic B-lymphocytes, macrophages, CD4, CD8 and γδ T-lymphocytes, we found that the above mentioned genes were preferentially expressed in macrophages. AVD, EXFABP, IRG1, AH221, TRAP6 and SAA were induced also in the cecum of chickens orally infected with S. Enteritidis on day 1 of life or day 42 of life. Unusual results were obtained for the immunoglobulin encoding transcripts. Prior to the infection, transcripts coding for the constant parts of IgM, IgY, IgA and Ig light chain were detected in B-lymphocytes. However, after the infection, immunoglobulin encoding transcripts were expressed also by T-lymphocytes and macrophages. Expression of AVD, EXFABP, IRG1, AH221, TRAP6, SAA and all immunoglobulin genes can be therefore used for the characterization of the course of S. Enteritidis infection in chickens. PMID:23094107

  14. Case-control study of infections with Salmonella enteritidis phage type 4 in England.

    PubMed Central

    Cowden, J. M.; Lynch, D.; Joseph, C. A.; O'Mahony, M.; Mawer, S. L.; Rowe, B.; Bartlett, C. L.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the source of indigenous sporadic infection with Salmonella enteritidis phage type 4. DESIGN--Case-control study of primary sporadic cases identified by the Public Health Laboratory Service between 1 August and 30 September 1988. SETTING--PHLS Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre, Division of Enteric Pathogens, 11 PHLS laboratories, and 42 local authority environmental health departments in England. SUBJECTS--232 Patients (cases) with confirmed primary sporadic infection, for 160 of whom (88 female) (median age 30 years, age range 4 months to 85 years) data were obtained by questionnaire about consumption of fresh eggs, egg products, precooked chicken, and minced meat in the three days and one week before onset of the symptoms. Up to three controls, matched for neighbourhood, age, and sex (if aged greater than 11 years), were asked the same questions for the same calendar period. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Association of primary sporadic infection with consumption of suspected food items. RESULTS--Illness due to S enteritidis phage type 4 was significantly associated with consumption of raw shell egg products (homemade mayonnaise, ice cream, and milk drinks containing eggs) (matched p = 0.02) and shop bought sandwiches containing mayonnaise (matched p = 0.00004) or eggs (matched p = 0.02). Illness was also significantly associated with eating lightly cooked eggs (unmatched p = 0.02), but not soft boiled eggs, and precooked hot chicken (matched p = 0.006). Reported consumption of eggs was not appreciably different between cases and controls before or after the median date of interview. CONCLUSIONS--Fresh shell eggs, egg products, and precooked hot chicken are vehicles of S enteritidis phage type 4 infection in indigenous sporadic cases. Public health education and reduction in contamination of eggs and infection of poultry with S enteritidis are needed to reduce the incidence of human infection. PMID:2508916

  15. Recovery of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis from hens initially infected with serovar Kentucky

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis and Kentucky differ greatly in epidemiology. We wanted to know if the non-pathogenic serotype Kentucky impacted the recovery of the pathogen Enteritidis from chickens. To explore this issue, 4 groups of hens were treated as follows: i) hens were inoculated or...

  16. Persistence of fecal shedding of Salmonella Enteritidis by experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Jones, Deana R; Anderson, Kenneth E

    2015-07-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis can be deposited inside eggs laid by infected hens, so the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial egg-producing flocks is an important risk factor for human illness. Opportunities for the introduction, transmission, and persistence of salmonellae in poultry are potentially influenced by flock housing and management systems. Animal welfare concerns have spurred the development of alternatives to traditional cage-based housing. However, the consequences of poultry housing systems for food safety have not been fully resolved by prior research. The present study assessed the effects of two different housing systems (conventional cages and colony cages enriched with perching and nesting areas) on the persistence of fecal shedding of Salmonella Enteritidis by groups of experimentally infected laying hens. In each of two trials, 136 hens were distributed among cages of both housing systems and orally inoculated with doses of 10(8) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis (phage type 13a in one trial and phage type 4 in the other). At weekly intervals, samples of voided feces were collected from beneath each cage and cultured to detect Salmonella Enteritidis. Fecal shedding of Salmonella Enteritidis was detected for up to 8 wk post-inoculation by hens housed in enriched colony cages and 10 wk by hens housed in conventional cages. For both trials combined, the frequency of positive fecal cultures was significantly (P < 0.05) greater for conventional cages than for enriched colony cages at 1 wk (84.7 vs. 71.5%), 2 wk (54.2 vs. 31.3%), 3 wk (21.5 vs. 7.6%), and 4 wk (9.7 vs. 2.8%) post-inoculation. These results demonstrate that the susceptibility of hens to intestinal colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis can differ between conventional and enriched cage-based production systems, although this effect does not necessarily translate into a corresponding difference in the longer-term persistence of fecal shedding. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  17. Contamination of eggs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Jones, Deana R; Anderson, Kenneth E

    2014-03-01

    Both epidemiologic analyses and active disease surveillance confirm an ongoing strong association between human salmonellosis and the prevalence of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis in commercial egg flocks. The majority of human illnesses caused by this pathogen are attributed to the consumption of contaminated eggs. Animal welfare concerns have increasingly influenced commercial poultry production practices in recent years, but the food safety implications of different housing systems for egg-laying hens are not definitively understood. The present study assessed the effects of 2 different housing systems (conventional cages and colony cages enriched with perching and nesting areas) on the frequency of Salmonella Enteritidis contamination inside eggs laid by experimentally infected laying hens. In each of 2 trials, groups of laying hens housed in each cage system were orally inoculated with doses of 1.0 × 10(8) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis. All eggs laid between 5 and 25 d postinoculation were collected and cultured to detect internal contamination with Salmonella Enteritidis. For both trials combined, Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered from 3.97% of eggs laid by hens in conventional cages and 3.58% of eggs laid by hens in enriched cages. No significant differences (P > 0.05) in the frequency of egg contamination were observed between the 2 housing systems.

  18. A rat model for dose-response relationships of Salmonella Enteritidis infection.

    PubMed

    Havelaar, A H; Garssen, J; Takumi, K; Koedam, M A; Dufrenne, J B; van Leusden, F M; de La Fonteyne, L; Bousema, J T; Vos, J G

    2001-09-01

    To develop an animal model to study dose-response relationships of enteropathogenic bacteria. Adult, male Wistar Unilever rats were exposed orally to different doses of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis after overnight starvation and neutralization of gastric acid by sodium bicarbonate. The spleen was the most sensitive and reproducible organ for detection of dose-dependent systemic infection. Illness was only observed in animals exposed to doses of 10(8) cfu or more. At lower doses, histopathological changes in the gastro-intestinal tract were observed, but these were not accompanied by illness. Marked changes in numbers and types of white blood cells, as well as delayed-type hyperresponsiveness, indicated a strong, dose-dependent cellular immune response to Salm. Enteritidis. The rat model is a sensitive and reproducible tool for studying the effects of oral exposure to Salm. Enteritidis over a wide dose range. The rat model allows controlled quantification of different factors related to the host, pathogen and food matrix on initial stages of infection by food-borne bacterial pathogens.

  19. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Jones, Deana R; Anderson, Kenneth E

    2013-02-01

    More human illnesses caused by Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis throughout the world have been linked to the consumption of contaminated eggs than to any other food vehicle. Deposition of this pathogen in the edible contents of eggs occurs when systemic infections of laying hens involve colonization of reproductive organs. In recent years, the consequences of different housing systems for laying flocks have become the focus of international attention from both animal welfare and public health perspectives. Nevertheless, many questions remain unresolved regarding the food safety implications of various laying hen production systems. The present study assessed the effects of 2 different housing types (conventional cages and colony cages enriched with perching, nesting, and scratching areas) on the invasion of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens. In 2 trials, groups of laying hens housed in each cage system were orally inoculated with doses of 1.0 × 10(7) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis. At 5 to 6 d postinoculation, hens were euthanized and samples of internal organs were removed for bacteriologic culturing. For both trials combined, Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered from 95.3% of cecal samples, with no significant differences observed between housing systems. However, Salmonella Enteritidis was detected at significantly (P < 0.05) higher frequencies from hens in conventional cages than from hens in enriched cages for samples of livers (96.9 vs. 75.0%), spleens (93.8 vs. 53.1%), ovaries (25.0 vs. 10.4%), and oviducts (19.8 vs. 2.1%). These results demonstrate that differences in housing systems for egg-laying flocks can affect the susceptibility of hens to colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis.

  20. Passive protection against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis infection from maternally derived antibodies of hens vaccinated with a ghost vaccine.

    PubMed

    Si, Wei; Yu, Shenye; Chen, Liping; Wang, Xiumei; Zhang, Wanjiang; Liu, Siguo; Li, Guangxing

    2014-10-01

    This study evaluated maternal immunity against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis acquired through the egg yolk. Two-hundred 19-week-old specific pathogen free (SPF) broiler breeders which were randomly divided into two groups of equal size were injected with S. Enteritidis ghosts (5 × 10(9) colony forming units in 0.1 ml per hen) and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, 0.01 mol ⋅ l(-1), pH 7.4) twice, respectively, with an interval of 2 weeks. An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was applied to detect specific antibodies against S. Enteritidis. S. Enteritidis-specific antibody levels in the vaccinated group increased over time and were significantly higher than those of the control group on days 28 (P < 0.001) and 35 (P < 0.001) post-vaccination. Ten 7-day-old chicks from hens that were vaccinated with a S. Enteritidis ghost vaccine were challenged at 14 days of age with 5 × 10(9) CFU of S. Enteritidis DH091 (homologous to the vaccine strain), 8/10 (80%) chicks from vaccinated hens survived, whereas 3/10 (30%) chicks from unvaccinated hens survived. The chicks acquired high levels of serum antibodies against S. Enteritidis. These results reveal that maternal antibodies in chicks acquired from vaccinated hens through eggs can confer a significant protection against S. Enteritidis infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Isolation of Salmonella Enteritidis from Internal Organs of Experimentally Infected Laying Hens Housed in Conventional or Enriched Cages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Human illness caused by Salmonella Enteritidis has been more frequently linked to the consumption of contaminated eggs than to any other food source. This pathogen can be deposited inside the edible contents of eggs when reproductive organs are colonized in systemically infected laying hens. In rece...

  2. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    More human illnesses caused by Salmonella Enteritidis throughout the world have been linked to the consumption of contaminated eggs than to any other food vehicle. Deposition of this pathogen in the edible contents of eggs occurs when systemic infections of laying hens involve colonization of reprod...

  3. Reduction of Salmonella enteritidis number after infections by immunization of liposome-associated recombinant SefA.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yue; Zhang, Yanlong; Wang, Huiguo; Jin, Jinhua; Piao, Jun; Piao, Jingai; Liu, Qingping; Li, Wenzhe

    2013-09-01

    In order to generate Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) fimbriae, SEF14, the sefA gene, which encodes the main subunit of the SEF14 fimbrial protein, was amplified from Salmonella Enteritidis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subcloned into a prokaryotic expression vector pET-28a(+) to yield pET-28a(+)-sefA. The recombinant SefA (rSefA) protein was highly expressed and purified by nickel-affinity chromatography. Liposome-associated rSefA was prepared for oral immunization to seek protective efficacy for intestinal infection with Salmonella Enteritidis. The titers of the IgG and IgA in the intestinal mucus were 1:256 and 1:512, respectively. Moreover, the titers of IgG and IgA in the sera were 1:256 and 1:128, respectively. Two weeks after the booster immunization, the chickens were challenged orally with 2 x 10(6) colony-forming units (CFUs) of live Salmonella Enteritidis, and fecal samples were examined for bacterial excretion from the intestinal tract. Significantly less fecal excretion of bacteria was observed in immunized chickens for 4 wk after challenge. The numbers of bacteria in the intestinal contents (cecum and rectum) were also significantly reduced in immunized chickens, in contrast with the unimmunized controls. Oral immunization with liposome-associated rSefA therefore elicits both systemic and mucosal antibody responses and results in reduced bacterial colonization in the intestinal tract and reduced excretion of Salmonella Enteritidis in the feces.

  4. Horizontal transmission of Salmonella enteritidis in groups of experimentally infected laying hens housed in different housing systems.

    PubMed

    De Vylder, J; Dewulf, J; Van Hoorebeke, S; Pasmans, F; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Van Immerseel, F

    2011-07-01

    Concerns regarding the welfare of laying hens have led to the ban of conventional battery cages in Europe from 2012 onward and to the development of alternative housing systems that allow hens to perform a broader range of natural behaviors. Limited information is available about the consequences of alternative housing systems on transmission of zoonotic pathogens such as Salmonella Enteritidis. However, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis continues to be one of the leading causes of bacterial foodborne disease worldwide and this is mainly attributed to the consumption of contaminated eggs. A transmission experiment was performed to quantify the effect of the housing system on the spread of a Salmonella Enteritidis infection within a group of layers and on internal egg contamination. At the age of 16 wk, 126 birds housed on the floor were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis. Three weeks later, the inoculated hens were housed together with equal numbers of susceptible contact animals in 4 different housing systems: a conventional cage system, a furnished cage, an aviary, and a floor system. Transmission and egg contamination were followed during a 4-wk period. A trend toward increased bird-to-bird transmission was detected in the aviary and floor system compared with the cage systems. Also, significantly more contaminated eggs were found in the aviary compared with the cage systems and the floor system. These results suggest that there is a clear need to optimize and maintain Salmonella surveillance programs when laying hens will be moved from conventional cage systems to alternative housing systems.

  5. Application of an indirect immunofluorescent staining method for detection of Salmonella enteritidis in paraffin slices and antigen location in infected duck tissues.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bin; Cheng, An-Chun; Wang, Ming-Shu; Deng, Shu-Xuan; Zhang, Zhen-Hua; Yin, Nian-Chun; Cao, Ping; Cao, Sheng-Yan

    2008-02-07

    To detect Salmonella enteritidis (S. enteritidis) in paraffin slices and antigen location in infected duck tissues. The rabbits were immunized with purified bacillus to obtain S. enteritidis-specific antibody, which were then extracted by the caprylic-ammonium sulphate method, purified through High-Q columns. An indirect immuno-fluorescent staining method (IFA) was established to detect the S. enteritidis antigen in paraffin slices. Detected S. enteritidis in each organ tissue of ducklings experimentally infected with S. enteritidis. The gland of Garder, heart, kidney, spleen, liver, brain, ileum, jejunum, bursa of Fabricius from S. enteritidis experimentally infected ducklings were positive or strongly positive, and the S. enteritidis antigen mainly distributed in the infected cell cytoplasm. IFA is an intuitionist, sensitive and specific method in detecting S. enteritidis antigen in paraffin wax slices, and it is a good method in diagnosis and antigen location of S. enteritidis. We also conclude that the gland of Garder, heart, kidney, spleen, liver, ileum, jejunum are target organs in S. enteritidis infections of duck, and S. enteritidis is an intracellular parasitic bacterium.

  6. Allelic variation in TLR4 is linked to resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis infection in chickens.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Wang, Huihua; Zhao, Xingwang; Gou, Zhongyong; Liu, Ranran; Song, Yongmei; Li, Qinghe; Zheng, Maiqing; Cui, Huanxian; Everaert, Nadia; Zhao, Guiping; Wen, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) is a foodborne pathogen that negatively affects both animal and human health. Polymorphisms of the TLR4 gene may affect recognition by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), leading to differences in host resistance to pathogenic infections. The present study has investigated polymorphic loci of chicken TLR4 (ChTLR4) in ten chicken breeds, electrostatic potentials of mutant structures of TLR4, and a linkage analysis between allelic variation and survival ratio to infection with SE in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) White Leghorns. A total of 19 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), of which 10 were novel, were found in chicken breeds. Seven newly identified amino acid variants (C68G, G674A, G782A, A896T, T959G, T986A, and A1104C) and previously reported important mutations (G247A, G1028A, C1147T, and A1832G) were demonstrated in the extracellular domain of the ChTLR4 gene. Significant changes in surface electrostatic potential of the ectodomain of TLR4, built by homology modeling, were observed at the Glu83Lys (G247A), Arg298Ser (A896T), Ser368Arg (A1104C), and Gln611Arg (A1832G) substitutions. Linkage analysis showed that one polymorphic locus G247A of TLR4 gene, common in all breeds examined, was significantly associated with increased resistance to SE in SPF White Leghorns chicks (log-rank P-value = 0.04). The genotypes from A1832G SNPs did not show statistically significant survival differences. This study has provided the first direct evidence that G247A substitution in ChTLR4 is associated with increased resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis.

  7. Excision of an unstable pathogenicity island in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is induced during infection of phagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Tania S; Nieto, Pamela A; Tobar, Hugo E; Salazar-Echegarai, Francisco J; Lizana, Rodrigo J; Quezada, Carolina P; Santiviago, Carlos A; Araya, Daniela V; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M; Bueno, Susan M

    2011-01-01

    The availability of the complete genome sequence of several Salmonella enterica serovars has revealed the presence of unstable genetic elements in these bacteria, such as pathogenicity islands and prophages. This is the case of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis), a bacterium that causes gastroenteritis in humans and systemic infection in mice. The whole genome sequence analysis for S. Enteritidis unveiled the presence of several genetic regions that are absent in other Salmonella serovars. These regions have been denominated "regions of difference" (ROD). In this study we show that ROD21, one of such regions, behaves as an unstable pathogenicity island. We observed that ROD21 undergoes spontaneous excision by two independent recombination events, either under laboratory growth conditions or during infection of murine cells. Importantly, we also found that one type of excision occurred at higher rates when S. Enteritidis was residing inside murine phagocytic cells. These data suggest that ROD21 is an unstable pathogenicity island, whose frequency of excision depends on the environmental conditions found inside phagocytic cells.

  8. Horizontal transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The majority of human illnesses caused by Salmonella Enteritidis are attributed to contaminated eggs, and the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial laying flocks has been identified as a leading epidemiologic risk factor. Flock housing and management systems can affect opportunities for the intr...

  9. An outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 5a infection in a residential home for elderly people.

    PubMed

    Hansell, A L; Sen, S; Sufi, F; McCallum, A

    1998-09-01

    The first outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis phage type (PT) 5a infection to be reported occurred after a party in a residential home for elderly people in May 1995. The party was attended attended by 96 residents, staff and guests. S. enteritidis PT5a was isolated from 14 of the 25 clinical cases identified after the party and S. enteritidis PT4 from another clinical case. Two elderly residents with S. enteritidis PT5a infection died. Infection with S. enteritidis PT5a was associated with consumption of prawn in mayonnaise vol-au-vents, sausage rolls, corned beef sandwiches, and sausages. The investigation of this outbreak illustrated the difficulty that elderly people may have in the completion of questionnaires. It also highlighted areas for intervention; such as reminders about basic hygiene precautions to prevent secondary spread and the importance of coordinated reinforcement in the workplace of formal food hygiene training for cooks. The Food Safety Regulations 1995 came into force soon after this outbreak: their implementation would probably have prevented it.

  10. An evaluation of the effect of sodium bisulfate as a feed additive on Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in experimentally infected broilers.

    PubMed

    Kassem, I I; Sanad, Y M; Stonerock, R; Rajashekara, G

    2012-04-01

    The colonization of broiler chickens with Salmonella can pose serious health and economic risks for both consumers and the poultry industry. Because colonization with Salmonella can lead to subsequent contamination of chicken carcasses during processing, preemptive control measures should include the reduction of this pathogen in chickens before slaughter. In this study, we evaluated the effect of sodium bisulfate, a potential antimicrobial feed additive, on Salmonella colonization of experimentally infected broiler chickens. Two hundred and forty 1-d-old chickens were infected orally with Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis and divided into 4 groups (each comprised of 60 chickens). Three groups received different concentrations of sodium bisulfate integrated into their feed, while the feed of the fourth group (positive control) was not treated. At time points before the broilers' slaughter age, different organs/tissues (liver, spleen, cecum, and bone marrow) and feces were aseptically collected and tested for the occurrence and density of Salmonella Enteritidis. Our results show that at 3 d postinfection, high colonization with Salmonella Enteritidis was detected and affected all tested tissues and fecal samples. Although colonization decreased across time, Salmonella Enteritidis persisted in the cecum, feces, spleen, and bone marrow, but not in the liver, until slaughter age. Furthermore, the addition of sodium bisulfate to the feed did not significantly reduce Salmonella Enteritidis numbers in infected chickens or affect the shedding of the pathogen.

  11. Infection of Mice by Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Involves Additional Genes That Are Absent in the Genome of Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Cecilia A.; Blondel, Carlos J.; Quezada, Carolina P.; Porwollik, Steffen; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L.; Toro, Cecilia S.; Zaldívar, Mercedes; Contreras, Inés

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis causes a systemic, typhoid-like infection in newly hatched poultry and mice. In the present study, a library of 54,000 transposon mutants of S. Enteritidis phage type 4 (PT4) strain P125109 was screened for mutants deficient in the in vivo colonization of the BALB/c mouse model using a microarray-based negative-selection screening. Mutants in genes known to contribute to systemic infection (e.g., Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 [SPI-2], aro, rfa, rfb, phoP, and phoQ) and enteric infection (e.g., SPI-1 and SPI-5) in this and other Salmonella serovars displayed colonization defects in our assay. In addition, a strong attenuation was observed for mutants in genes and genomic islands that are not present in S. Typhimurium or in most other Salmonella serovars. These genes include a type I restriction/modification system (SEN4290 to SEN4292), the peg fimbrial operon (SEN2144A to SEN2145B), a putative pathogenicity island (SEN1970 to SEN1999), and a type VI secretion system remnant SEN1001, encoding a hypothetical protein containing a lysin motif (LysM) domain associated with peptidoglycan binding. Proliferation defects for mutants in these individual genes and in exemplar genes for each of these clusters were confirmed in competitive infections with wild-type S. Enteritidis. A ΔSEN1001 mutant was defective for survival within RAW264.7 murine macrophages in vitro. Complementation assays directly linked the SEN1001 gene to phenotypes observed in vivo and in vitro. The genes identified here may perform novel virulence functions not characterized in previous Salmonella models. PMID:22083712

  12. Prophylactic Bacteriophage Administration More Effective than Post-infection Administration in Reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Shedding in Quail

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Mosab; Karimi Torshizi, M. Amir; Rahimi, Shaban; Dennehy, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by Salmonella bacteria, often through poultry products, are a serious public health issue. Because of drawbacks associated with antibiotic prophylaxis, alternative treatments are sought. Bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) may provide an effective alternative, but concerns remain with respect to bacteriophage stability and effectiveness. To this end, we assessed the stability of a novel bacteriophage isolated from poultry excreta, siphovirus PSE, and its effectiveness in reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we sought to determine how the timing (prophylactic or therapeutic) and route (oral gavage or vent lip) of PSE administration impacted its effectiveness. Here we report that significant quantities of viable PSE bacteriophages were recovered following exposure to high and low pH, high temperatures, and bile salts, testifying to its ability to survive extreme conditions. In addition, we found that ileal lactic acid bacteria and Streptococcus spp. counts increased, but colibacilli and total aerobe counts decreased, in quail receiving phage PSE through both oral gavage and vent lip routes. In other experiments, we assessed the efficiency of PSE administration, in both prophylactic and therapeutic contexts, via either oral gavage or vent lip administration, on S. Enteritidis colonization of quail cecal tonsils. Our results demonstrate that administration of PSE as a preventive agent could reduce the S. Enteritidis colonization more effectively than post-challenge administration. Furthermore, oral administration of PSE phage is a more effective prophylactic tool for reduction of S. Enteritidis shedding in poultry than is vent lip administration. PMID:27555842

  13. Frequency and persistence of fecal shedding of Salmonella Enteritidis by experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Human Salmonella Enteritidis infections are often linked with consuming contaminated eggs, so the prevalence of this pathogen in egg-laying poultry is an important risk factor for public health. Salmonella persistence and transmission in commercial egg producing flocks are influenced by the complex ...

  14. Frequency and persistence of fecal shedding of Salmonella Enteritidis by experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis are often attributed to the consumption of contaminated eggs, so the prevalence of this pathogen in egg-laying poultry is an important public health risk factor. Numerous and complex environmental influences on Salmonella persistence and transmission are ...

  15. Incidence, distribution, seasonality, and demographic risk factors of Salmonella Enteritidis human infections in Ontario, Canada, 2007–2009

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Canada, surveillance systems have highlighted the increasing trend of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) human infections. Our study objectives were to evaluate the epidemiology of S. Enteritidis infections in Ontario using surveillance data from January 1, 2007 through December 31, 2009. Methods Annual age-and-sex-adjusted incidence rates (IRs), annual and mean age-adjusted sex-specific IRs, and mean age-and-sex-adjusted IRs by public health unit (PHU), were calculated for laboratory-confirmed S. Enteritidis cases across Ontario using direct standardization. Multivariable Poisson regression with PHU as a random effect was used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of S. Enteritidis infections among years, seasons, age groups, and sexes. Results The annual age-and-sex-adjusted IR per 100,000 person-years was 4.4 [95% CI 4.0-4.7] in 2007, and 5.2 [95% CI 4.8-5.6] in both 2008 and 2009. The annual age-adjusted sex-specific IRs per 100,000 person-years ranged from 4.5 to 5.5 for females and 4.2 to 5.2 for males. The mean age-adjusted sex-specific IR was 5.1 [95% CI 4.8-5.4] for females and 4.8 [95% CI 4.5-5.1] for males. High mean age-and-sex-adjusted IRs (6.001-8.10) were identified in three western PHUs, one northern PHU, and in the City of Toronto. Regression results showed a higher IRR of S. Enteritidis infections in 2009 [IRR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.06-1.32; P = 0.003] and 2008 [IRR = 1.17, 95% CI 1.05-1.31; P = 0.005] compared to 2007. Compared to the fall season, a higher IRR of S. Enteritidis infections was observed in the spring [IRR = 1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.29; P = 0.040]. Children 0–4 years of age (reference category), followed by children 5–9 years of age [IRR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.52-0.78; P < 0.001] had the highest IRRs. Adults ≥ 60 years of age and 40–49 years of age [IRR = 0.31, 95% CI 0.26-0.37; P < 0.001] had the lowest IRRs. Conclusions The study findings suggest that there was an increase in the incidence of S

  16. Requirement for cobalamin by Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium, Pullorum, Gallinarum and Enteritidis during infection in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Jacqueline Boldrin; Penha Filho, Rafael Antonio Casarin; Junior, Angelo Berchieri; Lemos, Manoel Victor Franco

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium synthesizes cobalamin (vitamin B12) only during anaerobiosis. Two percent of the S. Typhimurium genome is devoted to the synthesis and uptake of vitamin B12 and to B12-dependent reactions. To understand the requirement for cobalamin synthesis better, we constructed mutants of Salmonella serovars Enteritidis and Pullorum that are double-defective in cobalamin biosynthesis (ΔcobSΔcbiA). We compared the virulence of these mutants to that of their respective wild type strains and found no impairment in their ability to cause disease in chickens. We then assessed B12 production in these mutants and their respective wild type strains, as well as in S. Typhimurium ΔcobSΔcbiA, Salmonella Gallinarum ΔcobSΔcbiA, and their respective wild type strains. None of the mutants was able to produce detectable B12. B12 was detectable in S. Enteritidis, S. Pullorum and S. Typhimurium wild type strains but not in S. Gallinarum. In conclusion, the production of vitamin B12in vitro differed across the tested Salmonella serotypes and the deletion of the cbiA and cobS genes resulted in different levels of alteration in the host parasite interaction according to Salmonella serotype tested. PMID:24031771

  17. Adjuvant effect of a probiotic fermented milk in the protection against Salmonella enteritidis serovar typhimurium infection: mechanisms involved.

    PubMed

    De Moreno De Leblanc, A; Maldonado Galdeano, C; Dogi, C A; Carmuega, E; Weill, R; Perdigón, G

    2010-01-01

    Probiotics may offer protection against Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium infection via different mechanisms. The aim of this study is to investigate, using mouse models, the effect of the administration of fermented milk containing the probiotic bacteria L. casei DN-114 001 in the protection against Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium when this product is administered continuously before and after infection or only post-infection. The adjuvant effect of this probiotic fermented milk (PFM) against S. Typhimurium was also evaluated in newborn mice, whose mothers received the PFM during the suckling period or their offspring after weaning. The results obtained showed that PFM administration after salmonella infection was useful to decrease the severity of the infection. The best effect was obtained with continuous PFM administration. In the newborn mice model, PFM administration to the newborn mice after weaning showed the best effect against the pathogen. PFM administration to the mother during the suckling period was beneficial against this enterophatogen when their offspring did not receive probiotics after weaning. Continuous PFM administration to adult mice (before and after infection) was important to maintain the intestinal barrier and the immune surveillance in optimal conditions to diminish the pathway of entrance of salmonella and the spread of this pathogen to deeper tissues. In the newborn mice model, it was observed that PFM administration to the offspring after weaning or their mother during the suckling period had a protective effect against salmonella infection, however, in the mice from mothers that received PFM during nursing which were fed with PFM after weaning, we found a down regulated immune maturity that was not protective against this infection.

  18. Lack of flagella disadvantages Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis during the early stages of infection in the rat.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Jeanette M C; McKenzie, Norma H; Duncan, Michelle; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Woodward, Martin J; Flint, Harry J; Grant, George

    2003-01-01

    The roles of flagella and five fimbriae (SEF14, SEF17, SEF21, pef, lpf) in the early stages (up to 3 days) of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) infection have been investigated in the rat. Wild-type strains LA5 and S1400 (fim+/fla+) and insertionally inactivated mutants unable to express the five fimbriae (fim-/fla+), flagella (fim+/fla-) or fimbriae and flagella (fim-/fla-) were used. All wild-type and mutant strains were able to colonize the gut and spread to the mesenteric lymph nodes, liver and spleen. There appeared to be little or no difference between the fim-/fla+ and wild-type (fim+/fla+) strains. In contrast, the numbers of aflagellate (fim+/fla- or fim-/fla-) salmonella in the liver and spleen were transiently reduced. In addition, fim+/fla- or fim-/fla- strains were less able to persist in the upper gastrointestinal tract and the inflammatory responses they elicited in the gut were less severe. Thus, expression of SEF14, SEF17, SEF21, pef and lpf did not appear to be a prerequisite for induction of S. Enteritidis infection in the rat. Deletion of flagella did, however, disadvantage the bacterium. This may be due to the inability to produce or release the potent immunomodulating protein flagellin.

  19. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The frequency of human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) has been linked to contaminated eggs and thus to SE prevalence in commercial egg-laying flocks. Contamination of the edible contents of eggs is a consequence of SE colonization of reproductive tissues in systemically infected hens. T...

  20. FUNCTIONS EXERTED BY THE VIRULENCE ASSOCIATED TYPE THREE SECRETION SYSTEMS DURING SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEROVAR ENTERITIDIS INFECTION OF CHICKEN OVIDUCT EPITHELIAL CELLS AND MACROPHAGES

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica serovar, Enteritidis (SE) infection of chicken is a major contributing factor to non-typhoidal salmonellosis. The roles of the type three secretion systems (T3SS-1 and T3SS-2) in the pathogenesis of SE infection of chickens are poorly understood. In this study, the functions exer...

  1. A colonisation-inhibition culture consisting of Salmonella Enteritidis and Typhimurium ΔhilAssrAfliG strains protects against infection by strains of both serotypes in broilers.

    PubMed

    De Cort, W; Mot, D; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Van Immerseel, F

    2014-08-06

    Consumption of contaminated poultry meat is still an important cause of Salmonella infections in humans and there is a need for control methods that protect broilers from day-of-hatch until slaughter age against infection with Salmonella. Colonisation-inhibition, a concept in which a live Salmonella strain is orally administered to day-old chickens and protects against subsequent challenge, can potentially be used as control method. In this study, the efficacy of a Salmonella Typhimurium ΔhilAssrAfliG strain as a colonisation-inhibition strain for protection of broilers against Salmonella Typhimurium was evaluated. Administration of a Salmonella Typhimurium ΔhilAssrAfliG strain to day-old broiler chickens decreased faecal shedding and strongly reduced caecal and internal organ colonisation of a Salmonella Typhimurium challenge strain administered one day later using a seeder bird model. In addition, it was verified whether a colonisation-inhibition culture could be developed that protects against both Salmonella Enteritidis and Typhimurium. Therefore, the Salmonella Typhimurium ΔhilAssrAfliG strain was orally administered simultaneously with a Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain to day-old broiler chickens, which resulted in a decreased caecal and internal organ colonisation for both a Salmonella Enteritidis and a Salmonella Typhimurium challenge strain short after hatching, using a seeder bird model. The combined culture was not protective against Salmonella Paratyphi B varietas Java challenge, indicating serotype-specific protection mechanisms. The data suggest that colonisation-inhibition can potentially be used as a versatile control method to protect poultry against several Salmonella serotypes.

  2. Potential zoonotic pathways of Salmonella enteritidis in laying farms.

    PubMed

    El-Tras, Wael F; Tayel, Ahmed A; Samir, Ahmed

    2010-10-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is a communicable zoonotic bacterium. The present investigation was done to evaluate the potential occurrence of Salmonella Enteritidis in laying hen farms and its contamination pathways. Samples were collected from 10 laying hen farms located in the Delta of Egypt. Cloacal swabs (n=300), eggshell swabs (n=400), and hand swabs from egg packagers (n=38) were collected. Pools of ovary and oviduct were obtained from 150 hens; all samples were examined for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. Results indicated that Salmonella Enteritidis may initially occupy in ovary, oviduct, and cloaca. The risk for eggshell contamination is highly impending from laying hen flocks infected with Salmonella Enteritidis with percentage of >30%. Farms having eggshell contamination percentage of >60% with Salmonella Enteritidis provided a high risk for packagers' hand contamination. Questionnaire of egg packagers specified that seven out of the eight smoker packagers suffered from repeated Salmonellosis. Thus, smoking during egg packing process could be considered as an exposure factor to contract the infection via hand-cigarette-mouth route.

  3. An investigation into an outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis phage-type 4 infection and the consumption of custard slices and trifles.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, G. H.; Edwards, A. T.

    1992-01-01

    Epidemiological investigation into an outbreak of food poisoning in 17 patients caused by Salmonella enteritidis phage-type 4 demonstrated a highly significant association with consumption of custard, retailed in custard slices and trifles from a bakery on one day. The bakery had changed their recipe for custard 2 weeks earlier to include fresh shell eggs and had not followed earlier national advice on cooking eggs for human consumption. The case-control study supports earlier work associating Salmonella enteritidis phage-type 4 infection with consumption of uncooked or lightly cooked shell eggs. PMID:1468524

  4. An investigation into an outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis phage-type 4 infection and the consumption of custard slices and trifles.

    PubMed

    Barnes, G H; Edwards, A T

    1992-12-01

    Epidemiological investigation into an outbreak of food poisoning in 17 patients caused by Salmonella enteritidis phage-type 4 demonstrated a highly significant association with consumption of custard, retailed in custard slices and trifles from a bakery on one day. The bakery had changed their recipe for custard 2 weeks earlier to include fresh shell eggs and had not followed earlier national advice on cooking eggs for human consumption. The case-control study supports earlier work associating Salmonella enteritidis phage-type 4 infection with consumption of uncooked or lightly cooked shell eggs.

  5. Pathogenic Role of SEF14, SEF17, and SEF21 Fimbriae in Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Infection of Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Rajashekara, Gireesh; Munir, Shirin; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.; Halvorson, David A.; Wells, Carol L.; Nagaraja, Kakambi V.

    2000-01-01

    Very little is known about the contribution of surface appendages of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis to pathogenesis in chickens. This study was designed to clarify the role of SEF14, SEF17, and SEF21 fimbriae in serovar Enteritidis pathogenesis. Stable, single, defined sefA (SEF14), agfA (SEF17), and fimA (SEF21) insertionally inactivated fimbrial gene mutants of serovar Enteritidis were constructed. All mutant strains invaded Caco-2 and HT-29 enterocytes at levels similar to that of the wild type. Both mutant and wild-type strains were ingested equally well by chicken macrophage cell lines HD11 and MQ-NCSU. There were no significant differences in the abilities of these strains to colonize chicken ceca. The SEF14− strain was isolated in lower numbers from the livers of infected chickens and was cleared from the spleens faster than other strains. No significant differences in fecal shedding of these strains were observed. PMID:10742278

  6. Differences in the early response of hatchlings of different chicken breeding lines to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis infection.

    PubMed

    Schokker, D; Peters, T H F; Hoekman, A J W; Rebel, J M J; Smits, M A

    2012-02-01

    Poultry products are the major source of food-borne Salmonella infection in humans. Broiler lines selected to be more resistant to Salmonella could reduce the transfer of Salmonella to humans. To investigate differences in the susceptibility of newly hatched chicks to oral infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, 3 commercial broiler lines (A, B, and C) were infected immediately after hatch and compared to healthy controls at 0.33, 1, and 2 d postinfection. Weight, bacteriological examination, and the jejunal influx of CD4, CD8, TCRαβ, TCRγδ, and KUL01 (macrophages and dendritic cells) cells that are positive was investigated. In addition, the jejunal transcriptional response was analyzed using whole-genome chicken cDNA arrays. Salmonella colony-forming unit counts from cecal content and liver revealed that Salmonella enterica entered the body at 0.33 d postinfection. Broiler line A appeared most susceptible to intestinal colonization and the systemic spread of Salmonella. In addition, the Salmonella-induced jejunal influx of macrophages in this line showed a clear increase in time, which is in contrast to lines B and C. On the other hand, all lines showed a peak of CD4(+) cells at 1 d postinfection when infected chicks were compared to control chicks. The transcriptional response of line A clearly differed from the responses in lines B and C. Functional analysis indicated that the majority of the differentially expressed genes at 0.33 d postinfection in line A were involved in cell-cycle functions, whereas at 2 d postinfection the majority of the differentially expressed genes could be assigned to inflammatory disorder, differentiation and proliferation of (T) lymphocytes. These data indicate that hatchlings of different broiler lines differ in their systemic spread of Salmonella and suggest that intestinal barrier functions, as well as immunological responses, may be the underlying factors. We hypothesize that the differences between genetic

  7. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Epidemiologic analyses have linked the frequency of human infections with Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis to the consumption of contaminated eggs and thus to the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial egg-laying flocks. Contamination of the edible contents of eggs by S...

  8. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Jones, Deana R; Anderson, Kenneth E; Karcher, Darrin M

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiologic analyses have linked the frequency of human infections with Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis to the consumption of contaminated eggs and thus to the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial egg-laying flocks. Contamination of the edible contents of eggs by Salmonella Enteritidis is a consequence of the colonization of reproductive tissues in systemically infected hens. The animal welfare implications of laying hen housing systems have been widely debated, but no definitive consensus has yet emerged about the food safety significance of poultry housing options. The present study sought to determine the effects of two different bird stocking densities on the invasion of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in groups of experimentally infected laying hens housed in colony cages enriched with perching and nesting areas. In two trials, groups of laying hens were distributed at two different stocking densities into colony cages and (along with a group housed in conventional cages) orally inoculated with doses of 1.0 × 10(7) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis. At 5 to 6 d post-inoculation, hens were euthanized and samples of internal organs were removed for bacteriologic culturing. For both trials combined, Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered at a significantly (P < 0.05) greater frequency from hens in enriched colony cages at the higher stocking density than at the lower density from livers (75.0% vs. 51.4%) and ovaries (51.4% vs. 30.6%). However, spleens from hens in enriched colony cages at the higher stocking density were significantly less often positive for Salmonella Enteritidis than from hens in conventional cages at that same density (90.3% vs. 68.1%). These results suggest that stocking density can influence the susceptibility of hens to Salmonella Enteritidis, but other housing systems parameters may also contribute to the outcome of infections. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science

  9. Chicken-Specific Kinome Array Reveals that Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Modulates Host Immune Signaling Pathways in the Cecum to Establish a Persistence Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kogut, Michael H.; Swaggerty, Christina L.; Byrd, James Allen; Selvaraj, Ramesh; Arsenault, Ryan J.

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induces an early, short-lived pro-inflammatory response in chickens that is asymptomatic of clinical disease and results in a persistent colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that transmits infections to naïve hosts via fecal shedding of bacteria. The underlying mechanisms that control this persistent colonization of the ceca of chickens by Salmonella are only beginning to be elucidated. We hypothesize that alteration of host signaling pathways mediate the induction of a tolerance response. Using chicken-specific kinomic immune peptide arrays and quantitative RT-PCR of infected cecal tissue, we have previously evaluated the development of disease tolerance in chickens infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) in a persistent infection model (4–14 days post infection). Here, we have further outlined the induction of an tolerance defense strategy in the cecum of chickens infected with S. Enteritidis beginning around four days post-primary infection. The response is characterized by alterations in the activation of T cell signaling mediated by the dephosphorylation of phospholipase c-γ1 (PLCG1) that inhibits NF-κB signaling and activates nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) signaling and blockage of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production through the disruption of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway (dephosphorylation of JAK2, JAK3, and STAT4). Further, we measured a significant down-regulation reduction in IFN-γ mRNA expression. These studies, combined with our previous findings, describe global phenotypic changes in the avian cecum of Salmonella Enteritidis-infected chickens that decreases the host responsiveness resulting in the establishment of persistent colonization. The identified tissue protein kinases also represent potential targets for future antimicrobial compounds for decreasing Salmonella loads in the intestines of food animals before going to market. PMID:27472318

  10. Development of RNA aptamers for detection of Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Hyeon, Ji-Yeon; Chon, Jung-Whan; Choi, In-Soo; Park, Chankyu; Kim, Dong-Eun; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2012-04-01

    We developed and evaluated RNA aptamers to analyze their potential for use in detecting Salmonella Enteritidis. The selected aptamer was observed to specifically bind to Salmonella Enteritidis without any cross-reactivity to other Salmonella serovars. Thus, this study suggests that aptamers specific to Salmonella Enteritidis have a high potential for use in presumptive presumptive screening methods or alternative serotyping methods.

  11. Salmonella enteritidis infections associated with foods purchased from mobile lunch trucks--Alberta, Canada, October 2010-February 2011.

    PubMed

    2013-07-19

    During October 2010-February 2011, an outbreak of 91 Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections in Alberta, Canada, was investigated by a local public health department (Alberta Health Services, Calgary Zone). Index cases initially were linked through a common history of consumption of food purchased from mobile food-vending vehicles (lunch trucks) operating at worksites in Alberta. Further investigation implicated one catering company that supplied items for the lunch trucks and other vendors. In 85 cases, patients reported consumption of food prepared by the catering company in the 7 days before illness. Six patients were employees of the catering company, and two food samples collected from the catering company were positive for SE. Foods likely were contaminated directly or indirectly through the use of illegally sourced, SE-contaminated eggs at the implicated catering facility and by catering employees who were infected with SE. Public health interventions put into place to control the outbreak included screening employees for Salmonella, excluding those infected from food-handling duties, and training employees in safe food-handling procedures. No further outbreak cases were identified after full implementation of the interventions. This investigation highlights the potential for lunch trucks to be a source of foodborne illness and the need for robust regulatory compliance monitoring of lunch trucks and their food suppliers.

  12. Characterization of Salmonella enteritidis strains.

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, C; McFadden, K A; Brouwer, A M; Demczuk, W

    1993-01-01

    A study was conducted to characterize 318 Salmonella enteritidis strains that were mainly isolated from poultry and their environment in Canada. Biotype, phagetype (PT), plasmid profile (PP), hybridization with a plasmid-derived virulence sequence probe, antibiotic resistance, outer membrane proteins (OMPs), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) profiles were determined. Relationships of these properties to one another, and their diagnostic and pathogenic significance were assessed. Biotyping indicated that failure to ferment rhamnose was sometimes useful as a marker for epidemiologically related strains. Phagetyping was the most effective method for subdividing S. enteritidis; it distinguished 12 PTs. Phagetype 13 was occasionally associated with septicemia and mortality in chickens. The strains belonged to 15 PPs. A 36 megadalton (MDa) plasmid was found in 97% of the strains. Only the 36 MDa plasmid hybridized with the probe. Seventeen percent of the strains were drug resistant; all strains were sensitive to ciprofloxacin. Thirty-five of 36 strains possessed the same OMP profile, and 36 of 41 strains contained smooth LPS. Images Fig. 1. PMID:8358678

  13. Salmonella enteritidis and other Salmonella in laying hens and eggs from flocks with Salmonella in their environment.

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, C; Johnson, R P; Forsberg, C M; Irwin, R J

    1992-01-01

    Seven Canadian layer flocks with Salmonella enteritidis in their environment were investigated to determine the numbers of hens infected with S. enteritidis, the localization of S. enteritidis in organs of infected hens and the numbers of S. enteritidis-infected eggs produced by two affected flocks. By a microagglutination test (MAT) using S. pullorum antigens, these flocks had more seropositive hens (mean 51.9 +/- 16.9%) than two Salmonella-free flocks (mean 13.0 +/- 4.2%). Culture of tissues of 580 hens (433 seropositive) from the seven flocks detected 26 (4.5%) S. enteritidis-infected hens from two flocks. In one flock, 2/150 hens were infected with S. enteritidis phage type (PT) 8, which was confined to the ceca, and no Salmonella spp. were isolated from 2520 eggs (one day's lay). In the second flock, where 24/150 hens were infected with S. enteritidis PT13, extraintestinal infection was found in nine hens and involved the ovaries and/or oviduct in two hens. Salmonella enteritidis PT13 was isolated from one sample of egg contents and from one sample of cracked shells from among 14,040 eggs (one day's lay) from this flock. The overall prevalence of S. enteritidis-contaminated eggs from the two flocks with infected hens was less than 0.06%. Other Salmonella spp. isolated were S. heidelberg from 58 hens (10%), and S. hadar, S. mbandaka and S. typhimurium from one hen (0.2%) each. The MAT with antigens of S. pullorum had a sensitivity of 81% and a specificity of 24% for detecting S. enteritidis-infected hens.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1423059

  14. Evaluation of culture media for detecting airborne Salmonella enteritidis collected with an electrostatic sampling device from the environment of experimentally infected laying hens.

    PubMed

    Gast, R K; Mitchell, B W; Holt, P S

    2004-07-01

    Detection of Salmonella enteritidis in the environment of commercial laying hens is critical for reducing the production of contaminated eggs by infected flocks. In the present study, an inexpensive and portable electrostatic air sampling device was used to collect S. enteritidis in rooms containing experimentally infected laying hens. After hens were orally inoculated with a phage type 13a S. enteritidis strain and housed in individual cages, air samples were collected 3 times each week with electrostatic devices onto plates of 6 types of culture media (brilliant green agar, modified lysine iron agar, modified semisolid Rappaport-Vassiliadis agar, Rambach agar, XLD agar, and XLT4 agar). Air sampling plates were incubated at 37 degrees C, examined visually for presumptive identification of typical S. enteritidis colonies and then subjected to confirmatory enrichment culturing. Air samples (collected using all 6 culture media) were positive for S. enteritidis for 3 wk postinoculation. Because visual determination of the presence or absence of typical S. enteritidis colonies on air sampling plates was not consistently confirmed by enrichment culturing, the postenrichment results were used for comparing sampling strategies. The frequency of positive air sampling results using brilliant green agar (66.7% overall) was significantly greater than was obtained using most other media. A combination of several plating media (brilliant green agar, modified lysine iron agar, and XLT4 agar) allowed detection of airborne S. enteritidis at an overall frequency of 83.3% over the 3 wk of sampling. When used with appropriate culture media, electrostatic collection of airborne S. enteritidis can provide a sensitive alternative to traditional methods for detecting this pathogen in the environment of laying flocks.

  15. Salmonella Enteritidis organ invasion and egg contamination in experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Both disease surveillance and epidemiologic analyses have confirmed a strong association between human salmonellosis and the prevalence of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in commercial egg flocks. The majority of human illnesses caused by this pathogen are attributed to contaminated eggs. Animal welfare...

  16. Contamination of eggs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Both epidemiologic analyses and active disease surveillance confirm an ongoing strong association between human salmonellosis and the prevalence of Salmonella Enteritidis in commercial egg flocks. The majority of human illnesses caused by this pathogen are attributed to the consumption of contaminat...

  17. Comparative Virulotyping of Salmonella typhi and Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Elemfareji, Omar Ismail; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2013-12-01

    Members of Salmonella enterica are important foodborne pathogens of significant public health concern worldwide. This study aimed to determine a range of virulence genes among typhoidal (S. typhi) and non-typhoidal (S. enteritidis) strains isolated from different geographical regions and different years. A total of 87 S. typhi and 94 S. enteritidis strains were tested for presence of 22 virulence genes by employing multiplex PCR and the genetic relatedness of these strains was further characterized by REP-PCR. In S. typhi, invA, prgH, sifA, spiC, sopB, iroN, sitC, misL, pipD, cdtB, and orfL were present in all the strains, while sopE, agfC, agfA, sefC, mgtC, and sefD were present in 98.8, 97.7, 90.8, 87.4, 87.4 and 17.2 %, of the strains, respectively. No lpfA, lpfC, pefA, spvB, or spvC was detected. Meanwhile, in S. enteritidis, 15 genes, agfA, agfC, invA, lpfA, lpfC, sefD, prgH, spiC, sopB, sopE, iroN, sitC, misL, pipD, and orfL were found in all S. enteritidis strains 100 %, followed by sifA and spvC 98.9 %, pefA, spvB and mgtC 97.8 %, and sefC 90.4 %. cdtB was absent from all S. enteritidis strains tested. REP-PCR subtyped S. typhi strains into 18 REP-types and concurred with the virulotyping results in grouping the strains, while in S. enteritidis, REP-PCR subtyped the strains into eight profiles and they were poorly distinguishable between human and animal origins. The study showed that S. typhi and S. enteritidis contain a range of virulence factors associated with pathogenesis. Virulotyping is a rapid screening method to identify and profile virulence genes in Salmonella strains, and improve an understanding of potential risk for human and animal infections.

  18. Carbuncle due to Salmonella Enteritidis: a novel presentation.

    PubMed

    Alfouzan, Wadha; Bulach, Dieter; Izumiya, Hidemasa; AlBassam, Khaled; Sheikh, Simin; Alrubai'aan, Nasser; Albert, M John

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis causes intestinal and extra-intestinal infections, but rarely cutaneous infections. It has never been reported to cause carbuncle (a collection of interconnected furuncles with multiple pustular openings). We report a case of carbuncle due to S. Enteritidis. An adult Bangladeshi patient with type 2 diabetes presented with a carbuncle on the left-side of his neck. A pure culture of S. Enteritidis was grown from the pus of the carbuncle. The patient was successfully treated with ciprofloxacin to which the isolate was susceptible. Whole genome sequencing of the strain showed that it possessed three additional virulence genes-pef (for plasmid-encoded fimbriae), spv (for salmonella plasmid virulence), rck (for resistance to complement killing) -responsible for systemic infections that were absent in the genome of a reference S. Enteritidis strain. In phylogenetic analysis, the strain clustered with other S. Enteritidis strains from different parts of the world. A weakened immune system of the patient due to diabetes mellitus and the additional virulence genes of the isolate may have contributed to the unusual presentation of carbuncle. The possibility of S. Enteritidis to cause carbuncle should be considered.

  19. Integrated farm management to prevent Salmonella Enteritidis contamination of eggs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in contaminated eggs is a public health hazard which may cause hospitalization or death in the elderly, infants, and individuals with impaired immune systems. Prevention of SE infection of laying hens is an essential first step in reducing SE outbreaks in humans. Multiple...

  20. Identification and quantification of granulocytes in caecal mucosa and submucosa of chickens experimentally infected with Eimeria tenella and Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Petrone, V M; Constantino, C F; Pradal-Roa, P

    2002-12-01

    1. Poultry granulocytes are not clearly distinguished from each other with haematoxylin-eosin (HE) stain; thus, histochemical techniques must be used. Three experiments were carried out using 4-week-old Leghorn chickens. 2. Three, 80-chicken groups were orally infected with (1) 10(8) colony forming units (CFUs) Salmonella enteritidis, or (2) 10(4) Eimeria tenella oocysts, or (3) 10(8) CFUs S. enteritidis + 10(4) E. tenella oocysts. Ten chickens from each group were euthanased and caecum samples obtained. Caecum samples were fixed in 10% formalin (buffered, pH 7.4) at 4, 8, 12 h, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 14 d post-inoculation (PI). 3. Samples were stained using three different staining techniques: HE for the identification of heterophils and eosinophils, Ziehl-Neelsen for mast cells, and p-phenilenediamine dihydrochloride plus pyrocatechol (PPD + PC) for eosinophils. 4. Birds from Experiment 1 showed no changes in the numbers of granulocytes. Birds from Experiments 2 and 3 showed higher numbers of heterophils in caecal mucosa and submucosa separately, on d 5 and 7. In Experiment 3, a decrease was observed in submucosal mast cells on d 3. Chickens from Experiments 2 and 3 showed increased numbers of mucosal mast cells between d 7 and 14. 5. PPD + PC positively stained eosinophils, but not heterophils. 6. Numbers of heterophils and mast cells were increased during the acute inflammatory process caused by E. tenella. Therefore, mast cells could play a role as primary inflammatory cells. Eosinophils seem not to be part of the inflammatory process caused by E. tenella.

  1. Control of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in laying hens by inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas Neto, Oliveiro Caetano; Mesquita, Aline Lopes; de Paiva, Jaqueline Boldrin; Zotesso, Fábio; Berchieri Júnior, Angelo

    2008-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is one of the agents that is responsible for outbreaks of human foodborne salmonellosis caused by Salmonella Enteritidis and is generally associated with the consumption of poultry products. Inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis cell vaccine is one of the available methods to control Salmonella Enteritidis in breeders and laying hens, however results in terms of efficacy vary. This vaccine has never been tested in Brazil, therefore, the present work was carried out to assess three commercial inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines allowed in Brazil. Four hundred white light variety commercial laying hens were obtained at one-day-of age. At eight weeks old, the birds were divided into four groups with one hundred animals each. Birds from three groups (V1, V2 and V3) received different intramuscular vaccines, followed by a booster dose at 16 weeks of age. Birds from another group (CG) were not vaccinated. When the laying hens were 20, 25 and 31 weeks old, 13 from each group were transferred to another room and were challenged by inoculating 2 mL neat culture of Salmonella Enteritidis. On the second day after each challenge, the caecal contents, spleen, liver and ovary of three birds from each group were analyzed for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. Twice a week a cloacal swab of each bird was taken and all eggs laid were examined for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. After four consecutive negative cloacal swabs in all the groups, the birds were sacrificed so as to examine the liver, caecal contents and ovaries. Overall, the inactivated vaccine used in group V3 reduced Salmonella Enteritidis in the feces and eggs. A very small amount of Salmonella was found in the spleen, liver, ovary and caeca of the birds in the four groups during the whole experiment. In general, inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines was able to decrease the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis in the birds and in the eggs as well. Nevertheless, they must

  2. The Effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus PTCC 1643 on Cultured Intestinal Epithelial Cells Infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Moshiri, Mona; Dallal, Mohammad Mehdi Soltan; Rezaei, Farhad; Douraghi, Masoumeh; Sharifi, Laleh; Noroozbabaei, Zahra; Gholami, Mehrdad; Mirshafiey, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Gastrointestinal disorders caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SesE) are a significant health problem around the globe. Probiotic bacteria have been shown to have positive effects on the immune responses. Lactobacillus acidophilus was examined for its capability to influence the innate immune response of HT29 intestinal epithelial cells towards SesE. The purpose of this work was to assess the effect of L. acidophilus PTCC 1643 on cultured intestinal epithelial cells infected with SesE. Methods HT29 cells were cultured in Roswell Park Memorial Institute medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1% penicillin/streptomycin. The cells were treated with L. acidophilus PTCC 1643 after or before challenge with SesE. At 2 and 4 hours post-infection, we measured changes in the expression levels of TLR2 and TLR4 via real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Treatment with L. acidophilus inhibited SesE-induced increases in TLR2 and TLR4 expression in the infected HT29 cells. Moreover, the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in cells that were pretreated with L. acidophilus and then infected with SesE was significantly higher than that in cells infected with SesE without pretreatment. Taken together, the results indicated that L. acidophilus had an anti-inflammatory effect and modulated the innate immune response to SesE by influencing TLR2 and TLR4 expression. Conclusion Our findings suggested that L. acidophilus PTCC 1643 was able to suppress inflammation caused by SesE infection in HT29 cells and reduce TLR2 and TLR4 expression. Additional in vivo and in vitro studies are required to further elucidate the mechanisms underlying this anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:28443224

  3. The Effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus PTCC 1643 on Cultured Intestinal Epithelial Cells Infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Moshiri, Mona; Dallal, Mohammad Mehdi Soltan; Rezaei, Farhad; Douraghi, Masoumeh; Sharifi, Laleh; Noroozbabaei, Zahra; Gholami, Mehrdad; Mirshafiey, Abbas

    2017-02-01

    Gastrointestinal disorders caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SesE) are a significant health problem around the globe. Probiotic bacteria have been shown to have positive effects on the immune responses. Lactobacillus acidophilus was examined for its capability to influence the innate immune response of HT29 intestinal epithelial cells towards SesE. The purpose of this work was to assess the effect of L. acidophilus PTCC 1643 on cultured intestinal epithelial cells infected with SesE. HT29 cells were cultured in Roswell Park Memorial Institute medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1% penicillin/streptomycin. The cells were treated with L. acidophilus PTCC 1643 after or before challenge with SesE. At 2 and 4 hours post-infection, we measured changes in the expression levels of TLR2 and TLR4 via real-time polymerase chain reaction. Treatment with L. acidophilus inhibited SesE-induced increases in TLR2 and TLR4 expression in the infected HT29 cells. Moreover, the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in cells that were pretreated with L. acidophilus and then infected with SesE was significantly higher than that in cells infected with SesE without pretreatment. Taken together, the results indicated that L. acidophilus had an anti-inflammatory effect and modulated the innate immune response to SesE by influencing TLR2 and TLR4 expression. Our findings suggested that L. acidophilus PTCC 1643 was able to suppress inflammation caused by SesE infection in HT29 cells and reduce TLR2 and TLR4 expression. Additional in vivo and in vitro studies are required to further elucidate the mechanisms underlying this anti-inflammatory effect.

  4. Prevention of Salmonella enteritidis infection in commercial ducklings by oral chicken egg-derived antibody alone or in combination with probiotics.

    PubMed

    Fulton, R M; Nersessian, B N; Reed, W M

    2002-01-01

    Ducklings were given egg-derived antibody against Salmonella enteritidis (Ab) in drinking water daily to determine if infection could be prevented. Pekin ducklings in all experimental groups were infected on Day 1 or 5 with 0.7 x 10(6) Salmonella enteritidis (SE). Spleen, liver, and intestine of each bird were collected and cultured on Days 7, 14, 21, and 28. Only livers and spleens were culture positive for SE. Ducklings infected on Day 1 had more SE infections than controls at each observation. Ducklings infected on Day 5 had fewer SE infections than controls on Days 7, 14, and 21. The same experiment was repeated to determine if SE infection could be prevented under production conditions. Only 10 ducks per group were infected with 1.02 x 10(7) SE. In addition to Ab, one group each, infected on Day 1 or 5, received a proprietary probiotic (Pro) daily to determine if Pro was synergistic to Ab. Groups receiving Ab and Pro and infected on Day 1 had fewer birds infected than Ab alone in Day 1-infected birds. Both Day 1-infected groups had more birds infected than controls. Birds infected on Day 5 had fewer ducks infected than controls on Days 7, 14, and 21. Except for Day 14, birds receiving both Ab and Pro and infected on Day 5 had fewer birds infected than Ab alone on Day 21 and 28. Probiotics act synergistically with oral Ab. Oral antibodies may serve as a tool to prevent salmonella infection in poultry.

  5. Frequency and Duration of Fecal Shedding of Salmonella Enteritidis by Experimentally Infected Laying Hens Housed in Enriched Colony Cages at Different Stocking Densities.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Jones, Deana R; Anderson, Kenneth E; Karcher, Darrin M

    2017-01-01

    Human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis are often attributed to the consumption of contaminated eggs, so the prevalence of this pathogen in egg-laying poultry is an important public health risk factor. Numerous and complex environmental influences on Salmonella persistence and transmission are exerted by management practices and housing facilities used in commercial egg production. In recent years, the animal welfare implications of poultry housing systems have guided the development of alternatives to traditional cage-based housing, but their food safety consequences are not yet fully understood. The present study assessed the effects of different bird stocking densities on the frequency and duration of fecal shedding of S. Enteritidis in groups of experimentally infected laying hens housed in colony cages enriched with perching and nesting areas. In two trials, groups of laying hens were distributed at two stocking densities (648 and 973 cm(2)/bird) into enriched colony cages and (along with a group housed in conventional cages at 648 cm(2)/bird) orally inoculated with doses of 1.0 × 10(8) cfu of S. Enteritidis. At 10 weekly postinoculation intervals, samples of voided feces were collected from beneath each cage and cultured to detect S. Enteritidis. Fecal shedding of S. Enteritidis was detected for up to 10 weeks postinoculation by hens in all three housing treatment groups. The overall frequency of positive fecal cultures was significantly (P < 0.05) greater from conventional cages than from enriched colony cages (at the lower stocking density) for the total of all sampling dates (45.0 vs. 33.3%) and also for samples collected at 4-9 weeks postinfection. Likewise, the frequency of S. Enteritidis isolation from feces from conventional cages was significantly greater than from enriched colony cages (at the higher hen stocking density) for the sum of all samples (45.0 vs. 36.7%) and at 6 weeks postinoculation. Moreover, the frequency of S

  6. Frequency and Duration of Fecal Shedding of Salmonella Enteritidis by Experimentally Infected Laying Hens Housed in Enriched Colony Cages at Different Stocking Densities

    PubMed Central

    Gast, Richard K.; Guraya, Rupa; Jones, Deana R.; Anderson, Kenneth E.; Karcher, Darrin M.

    2017-01-01

    Human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis are often attributed to the consumption of contaminated eggs, so the prevalence of this pathogen in egg-laying poultry is an important public health risk factor. Numerous and complex environmental influences on Salmonella persistence and transmission are exerted by management practices and housing facilities used in commercial egg production. In recent years, the animal welfare implications of poultry housing systems have guided the development of alternatives to traditional cage-based housing, but their food safety consequences are not yet fully understood. The present study assessed the effects of different bird stocking densities on the frequency and duration of fecal shedding of S. Enteritidis in groups of experimentally infected laying hens housed in colony cages enriched with perching and nesting areas. In two trials, groups of laying hens were distributed at two stocking densities (648 and 973 cm2/bird) into enriched colony cages and (along with a group housed in conventional cages at 648 cm2/bird) orally inoculated with doses of 1.0 × 108 cfu of S. Enteritidis. At 10 weekly postinoculation intervals, samples of voided feces were collected from beneath each cage and cultured to detect S. Enteritidis. Fecal shedding of S. Enteritidis was detected for up to 10 weeks postinoculation by hens in all three housing treatment groups. The overall frequency of positive fecal cultures was significantly (P < 0.05) greater from conventional cages than from enriched colony cages (at the lower stocking density) for the total of all sampling dates (45.0 vs. 33.3%) and also for samples collected at 4–9 weeks postinfection. Likewise, the frequency of S. Enteritidis isolation from feces from conventional cages was significantly greater than from enriched colony cages (at the higher hen stocking density) for the sum of all samples (45.0 vs. 36.7%) and at 6 weeks postinoculation. Moreover, the frequency of S

  7. Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Core O Polysaccharide Conjugated to H:g,m Flagellin as a Candidate Vaccine for Protection against Invasive Infection with S. Enteritidis▿†

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Raphael; Tennant, Sharon M.; Wang, Jin Y.; Schmidlein, Patrick J.; Lees, Andrew; Ernst, Robert K.; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2011-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium are a common cause of gastroenteritis but also cause invasive infections and enteric fever in certain hosts (young children in sub-Saharan Africa, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals). Salmonella O polysaccharides (OPS) and flagellar proteins are virulence factors and protective antigens. The surface polysaccharides of Salmonella are poorly immunogenic and do not confer immunologic memory, limitations overcome by covalently attaching them to carrier proteins. We conjugated core polysaccharide-OPS (COPS) of Salmonella Enteritidis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to flagellin protein from the homologous strain. COPS and flagellin were purified from a genetically attenuated (ΔguaBA) “reagent strain” (derived from an isolate from a patient with clinical bacteremia) engineered for increased flagellin production (ΔclpPX). Conjugates were constructed by linking flagellin monomers or polymers at random COPS hydroxyls with various polysaccharide/protein ratios by 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium tetrafluoroborate (CDAP) or at the 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (KDO) terminus by thioether chemistry. Mice immunized on days 0, 28, and 56 with COPS-flagellin conjugates mounted higher anti-LPS IgG levels than mice receiving unconjugated COPS and exhibited high antiflagellin IgG; anti-LPS and antiflagellin IgG levels increased following booster doses. Antibodies generated by COPS-flagellin conjugates mediated opsonophagocytosis of S. Enteritidis cells into mouse macrophages. Mice immunized with flagellin alone, COPS-CRM197, or COPS-flagellin conjugates were significantly protected from lethal challenge with wild-type S. Enteritidis (80 to 100% vaccine efficacy). PMID:21807909

  8. Risk factors for sporadic domestically acquired Salmonella serovar Enteritidis infections: a case-control study in Ontario, Canada, 2011.

    PubMed

    Middleton, D; Savage, R; Tighe, M K; Vrbova, L; Walton, R; Whitfield, Y; Varga, C; Lee, B; Rosella, L; Dhar, B; Johnson, C; Ahmed, R; Allen, V G; Crowcroft, N S

    2014-07-01

    In Ontario, Canada, the number of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) cases increased over the years 2005-2010. A population-based case-control study was undertaken from January to August 2011 for the purpose of identifying risk factors for acquiring illness due to SE within Ontario. A total of 199 cases and 241 controls were enrolled. After adjustment for confounders, consuming any poultry meat [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 2·24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·31-3·83], processed chicken (aOR 3·32, 95% CI 1·26-8·76) and not washing hands following handling of raw eggs (OR 2·82, 95% CI 1·48-5·37) were significantly associated with SE infection. The population attributable fraction was 46% for any poultry meat consumption and 10% for processed chicken. Poultry meat continues to be identified as a risk factor for SE illness. Control of SE at source, as well as proper food handling practices, are required to reduce the number of SE cases.

  9. Salmosan, a β-Galactomannan-Rich Product, Protects Epithelial Barrier Function in Caco-2 Cells Infected by Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Brufau, M Teresa; Campo-Sabariz, Joan; Bou, Ricard; Carné, Sergi; Brufau, Joaquim; Vilà, Borja; Marqués, Ana M; Guardiola, Francesc; Ferrer, Ruth; Martín-Venegas, Raquel

    2016-08-01

    One promising strategy for reducing human salmonellosis induced by Salmonella Enteritidis is to supplement animal diets with natural feed additives such as mannan oligosaccharides (MOSs). We sought to investigate the potential role of Salmosan (S-βGM), an MOS product extremely rich in β-galactomannan, in preventing epithelial barrier function disruption induced by S. Enteritidis colonization in an in vitro model of intestinal Caco-2 cells in culture. Differentiated Caco-2 cells were incubated for 3 h with S. Enteritidis at a multiplicity of infection of 10 in the absence or presence of 500 μg S-βGM/mL. Paracellular permeability (PP) was assessed by transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), d-mannitol, and fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD-4) flux. Tight junction proteins and cytoskeletal actin were also localized by confocal microscopy. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation products were evaluated. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to visualize S. Enteritidis adhesion to, and invasion of, the Caco-2 cell cultures. Compared with controls, TER was significantly reduced by 30%, and d-mannitol and FD-4 flux were significantly increased by 374% and 54% in S. Enteritidis-infected cultures, respectively. The presence of S-βGM in infected cultures induced total recoveries of TER and FD-4 flux to values that did not differ from the control and a partial recovery of d-mannitol flux. These effects were confirmed by immunolocalization of actin, zonula occludens protein 1, and occludin. Similar results were obtained for Salmonella Dublin. The protection of S-βGM on PP in infected cultures may be associated with a total recovery of ROS production to values that did not differ from the control. Moreover, S-βGM has the capacity to agglutinate bacteria, leading to a significant reduction of 32% in intracellular S Enteritidis. The results demonstrate that S-βGM contributes to protecting epithelial barrier function in a Caco-2 cell

  10. A Salmonella Enteritidis hilAssrAfliG deletion mutant is a safe live vaccine strain that confers protection against colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis in broilers.

    PubMed

    De Cort, W; Geeraerts, S; Balan, V; Elroy, M; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Van Immerseel, F

    2013-10-17

    Consumption of contaminated poultry meat is an important cause of Salmonella infections in humans. Therefore, there is a need for control methods that protect broilers from day-of-hatch until slaughter age against infection with Salmonella. Colonization-inhibition, a concept in which a live Salmonella strain is orally administered to day-old chickens and protects against subsequent challenge, can potentially be used as control method. In this study, the safety and efficacy of a Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain as a colonization-inhibition strain for protection of broilers against Salmonella Enteritidis was evaluated. After administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain to day-old chickens, this strain could not be isolated from the gut, internal organs or faeces after 21 days of age. In addition, administration of this strain to one-day-old broiler chickens decreased faecal shedding and caecal and internal organ colonization of a Salmonella Enteritidis challenge strain administered one day later using a seeder bird model. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an attenuated Salmonella strain for which both the safety and efficacy has been shown in long-term experiments (until slaughter age) in broiler strain can potentially be used as a live colonization-inhibition strain for controlling Salmonella Enteritidis infections in broilers.

  11. Type 1 fimbriae of Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Müller, K H; Collinson, S K; Trust, T J; Kay, W W

    1991-08-01

    Salmonella enteritidis was previously shown to produce fimbriae composed of 14,000-molecular-weight (Mr) fimbrin monomers (J. Feutrier, W. W. Kay, and T. J. Trust, J. Bacteriol. 168:221-227, 1986). Another distinct fimbrial structure, comprising 21,000-Mr fimbrin monomers, has now been identified. These fimbriae are simply designated as SEF 14 and SEF 21, respectively (for S. enteritidis fimbriae and the Mr [in thousands] of the fimbrin monomer). A simple method for the purification of both structures was developed by using the different biochemical properties of these fimbriae. SEF 21 remained intact after being boiled in sodium dodecyl sulfate but readily dissociated into subunits of 21,000 Mr at pH 2.2. The overall amino acid composition and the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the SEF 21 fimbrin were distinct from those of SEF 14 but were virtually identical to the predicted sequence for type 1 fimbrin of Salmonella typhimurium. Immunoelectron microscopy of S. enteritidis clearly revealed fimbrial structures that reacted with immune serum specific to the 21,000-Mr fimbrin. Immune sera raised against this subunit were cross-reactive with type 1 fimbrins found in whole-cell lysates of S. typhimurium, Salmonella illinois, and Salmonella cubana. However, there was no cross-reaction with Escherichia coli type 1 fimbriae or with other fimbrins produced by S. enteritidis. Under certain growth conditions, S. enteritidis produced both SEF 14 and SEF 21. However, when S. enteritidis was grown at 30 degrees C or lower, only the 21,000-Mr SEF 21 fimbrin could be detected. There was a direct correlation between mannose-sensitive hemagglutination and the presence of SEF 21.

  12. A Mexican restaurant-associated outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis type 34 infections traced to a contaminated egg farm.

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, M. M.; Sweat, L. B.; Carter, S. L.; Watson, C. B.; Holloway, J. T.; Manning, R.; Altekruse, S. F.; Blake, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    In May 1996, the Georgia Division of Public Health was notified about a cluster of persons with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections in Waycross, Georgia. A matched pair case-control study to determine risk factors for illness found a statistically significant association of SE infection with a history of having eaten at Restaurant A during the 5 days before onset of illness (relative risk = 13 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 3-62, P < 0.01]). In a second case-control study, to determine specific food exposures, consumption of a deep-fried Mexican dish (chile relleno) (4 of 21 cases vs. 0 of 26 controls, odds ratio undefined, 95% CI > 1.46, P = 0.034) was found to be significantly associated with SE infection. An environmental investigation found evidence of suboptimal food storage and cooking temperatures at Restaurant A; cross contamination of foods may have contributed to the low attributable risk identified for chile rellenos. Five of 37 Restaurant A food and environment specimens yielded SE strains. All five positive specimens were from chiles rellenos. Of the seven outbreak-associated strains (six patient isolates and one food isolate from Restaurant A) for which phage typing was conducted, all were phage type 34. A FDA traceback investigation through Restaurant A's single-egg supplier identified the potential source as three interrelated farms in South Carolina. Environmental culture from one of these farms yielded SE phage type 34. As a result of this outbreak, FDA helped institute a statewide egg quality-assurance programme in South Carolina to minimize SE contamination of eggs. PMID:10355784

  13. A Mexican restaurant-associated outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis type 34 infections traced to a contaminated egg farm.

    PubMed

    McNeil, M M; Sweat, L B; Carter, S L; Watson, C B; Holloway, J T; Manning, R; Altekruse, S F; Blake, P A

    1999-04-01

    In May 1996, the Georgia Division of Public Health was notified about a cluster of persons with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections in Waycross, Georgia. A matched pair case-control study to determine risk factors for illness found a statistically significant association of SE infection with a history of having eaten at Restaurant A during the 5 days before onset of illness (relative risk = 13 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 3-62, P < 0.01]). In a second case-control study, to determine specific food exposures, consumption of a deep-fried Mexican dish (chile relleno) (4 of 21 cases vs. 0 of 26 controls, odds ratio undefined, 95% CI > 1.46, P = 0.034) was found to be significantly associated with SE infection. An environmental investigation found evidence of suboptimal food storage and cooking temperatures at Restaurant A; cross contamination of foods may have contributed to the low attributable risk identified for chile rellenos. Five of 37 Restaurant A food and environment specimens yielded SE strains. All five positive specimens were from chiles rellenos. Of the seven outbreak-associated strains (six patient isolates and one food isolate from Restaurant A) for which phage typing was conducted, all were phage type 34. A FDA traceback investigation through Restaurant A's single-egg supplier identified the potential source as three interrelated farms in South Carolina. Environmental culture from one of these farms yielded SE phage type 34. As a result of this outbreak, FDA helped institute a statewide egg quality-assurance programme in South Carolina to minimize SE contamination of eggs.

  14. Chronological recognition by chicken of antigenic polypeptides in Salmonella enteritidis with different plasmid profiles: relationship to infection rate.

    PubMed

    Barbour, E K; El Jurdi, L H; Faroo, O M; Daghir, N J; Bouljihad, M

    2000-06-01

    The antigenic polypeptides in Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) were chronologically recognized by the chicken immune system, using Western immunoblotting. Broiler chicks challenged at three days of age with SE strain carrying the most prevalent plasmid profile of 14.1 and about (approximately) 50 kb were bled at 17, 24, 31, 38 and 45 days of age. Pooled sera of blood collected at each age was reacted by Western immunoblotting with banded polypeptides of three predominant SE strains that acquired the following respective plasmid profiles: 14.1 kb; 14.1 and approximately 50.0 kb; and 1.8, 14.1 and approximately 50.0 kb. The immunoblots of each pooled sera collected at a specific age against the three SE strains were similar. More specifically, the early immune response at 17 days of age had antibodies recognizing only one polypeptide in the three SE strains namely, the 35.8 kDa. At 24 or 31 days of age, the acquired immunity to infection had antibodies recognizing five similar polypeptides in the three SE strains namely, the 14.4 (fimbriae protein), 21.5 (fimbriae protein), 30.5, 35.8, and 66.2 kDa. At 38 and 45 days of age, the antibodies recognized additional polypeptides namely, the 41.5 and 55.6 kDa, respectively. The recognition of the 41.5 and 55.6 kDa polypeptides at 45 days of age was associated with higher invasiveness of SE to spleens and livers (15.6%) and in higher cecal colonization (59.4%) in comparison to absence of recognition to the two polypeptides at 31 days of age associated with low infectivity to spleens (0%), livers (3.1%), and ceca (9.4%).

  15. The Swiss control programme for Salmonella enteritidis in laying hens: experiences and problems.

    PubMed

    Hoop, R K

    1997-12-01

    The Swiss control programme for Salmonella Enteritidis began at the end of 1993. All efforts are focused on the elimination of infected parent and layer flocks and on the production of S. Enteritidis-free eggs. The new Zoonosis Order and more stringent import regulations help to identify S. Enteritidis-positive parent layer and layer flocks. Other measures, such as additional voluntary monitoring of parent layer flocks, hatcheries and layer flocks, increased hygiene on poultry farms and the use of heat-treated feed, serve to prevent the spread of S. Enteritidis. An important point of concern is the elimination of S. Enteritidis from contaminated poultry farms, particularly from free-range farms. In the last two years, the number of reported infections of S. Enteritidis in humans has almost fallen to the level of 1988 (the year before the onset of S. Enteritidis infection in laying hens in Switzerland).

  16. Influence of Slc11a1 on the Outcome of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Infection in Mice Is Associated with Th Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Judith; Larivière, Line; Nacache, Mayss; Tam, Mifong; Stevenson, Mary M.; McKerly, Colin; Gros, Philippe; Malo, Danielle

    2006-01-01

    Genetic analyses identified Ses1 as a significant quantitative trait locus influencing the carrier state of 129S6 mice following a sublethal challenge with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. Previous studies have determined that Slc11a1 was an excellent candidate gene for Ses1. Kinetics of infection in 129S6 mice and Slc11a1-deficient (129S6-Slc11a1tm1Mcg) mice demonstrated that the wild-type allele of Slc11a1 contributed to the S. enterica serovar Enteritidis carrier state as early as 7 days postinfection. Gene expression profiling demonstrated that 129S6 mice had a significant up-regulation of proinflammatory genes associated with macrophage activation at day 10 postinfection, followed by a gradual increase in immunoglobulin transcripts, whereas 129S6-Slc11a1tm1Mcg mice had higher levels of immunoglobulins earlier in the infection. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR revealed an increase in Th1 cytokine (Ifng and Il12) and Th1-specific transcription factor Tbx21 expression during infection in both the 129S6 and 129S6-Slc11a1tm1Mcg strains. However, the expression of Gata3, a transcription factor involved in Th2 polarization, Cd28, and Il4 was markedly increased in Slc11a1-deficient mice during infection, suggesting a predominant Th2 phenotype in 129S6-Slc11a1tm1Mcg animals following S. enterica serovar Enteritidis infection. A strong immunoglobulin G2a response, reflecting Th1 activity, was observed only in 129S6 mice. All together, these results are consistent with an impact of Slc11a1 on Th cell differentiation during chronic S. enterica serovar Enteritidis infection. The presence of a Th2 bias in Slc11a1-deficient mice is associated with improved bacterial clearance. PMID:16622216

  17. Fingerprinting of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis by ribotyping.

    PubMed

    Lippelt, Meike; de Isele, Theresa Sanabria; Kist, Manfred

    1997-04-01

    OBJECTIVE: To carry out an epidemiologic evaluation of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis outbreaks in households and small communities by means of rRNA gene restriction pattern analysis (ribotyping). METHODS: One hundred Enteritidis isolates dating from 1989 to 1994 which could be allocated epidemiologically to different sources or to small community outbreaks were investigated with ribotyping, a fingerprinting method in which bacterial DNA is hybridized with the biotin-labeled plasmid pKK 3535 containing a ribosomal RNA operon of Escherichia coli to determine the ribosomal RNA gene restriction patterns. RESULTS: Four different ribotyping patterns were found with the restriction endonuclease Smal and nine with Sphl. Ribotypes of isolates which could be allocated epidemiologically to a common source usually corresponded. Almost 60% of the Enteritidis infections had the ribotyping pattern Sphl-A. In contrast, this pattern was not found in any of the five Enteritidis strains isolated in 1989. The suspicion that Enteritidis phage type 4 infections are caused by consumption of insufficiently heated eggs is supported by the fact that the ribotyping pattern Sph1-A was found in isolates from eggs and from human specimens. CONCLUSIONS: As patterns Sphl-A and Smal-J appeared in 58% and 75% of the isolates, respectively, ribotyping cannot be used for the differentiation between various outbreaks with these two patterns. In cases where the Enteritidis strains showed less frequent patterns, ribotyping seems to be a practical tool for the identification of infection chains. In addition newly appearing ribotyping patterns can give information about the epidemiologic development of Enteritidis infection.

  18. Splenic microRNA Expression Profiles and Integration Analyses Involved in Host Responses to Salmonella enteritidis Infection in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Fan, Wenlei; Li, Qinghe; Wang, Jie; Liu, Ranran; Everaert, Nadia; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Yonghong; Zheng, Maiqing; Cui, Huanxian; Zhao, Guiping; Wen, Jie

    2017-01-01

    To understand the role of miRNAs in regulating genes involved in the host response to Salmonella enteritidis (SE) infection, next generation sequencing was applied to explore the altered splenic expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) and deregulated genes in specific-pathogen-free chickens. Birds were either infected or not (controls, C) and those challenged with SE were evaluated 24 h later and separated into two groups on the basis of the severity of clinical symptoms and blood load of SE: resistant (R, SE challenged-slight clinical symptoms and <105 cfu / 10 μL), and susceptible (S, SE challenged-severe clinical symptoms and >107 cfu/10 μL). Thirty-two differentially expressed (DE) miRNAs were identified in spleen, including 16 miRNAs between S and C, 13 between R and C, and 13 between S and R. Through integration analysis of DE miRNAs and mRNA, a total of 273 miRNA-target genes were identified. Functional annotation analysis showed that Apoptosis and NOD-like receptor signaling pathway and adaptive immune response were significantly enriched (P < 0.05). Interestingly, apoptosis pathway was significantly enriched in S vs. C, while NOD-like receptor pathway was enriched in R vs. C (P < 0.05). Two miRNAs, gga-miR-101-3p and gga-miR-155, in the hub positions of the miRNA-mRNA regulatory network, were identified as candidates potentially associated with SE infection. These 2 miRNAs directly repressed luciferase reporter gene activity via binding to 3′-untranslated regions of immune-related genes IRF4 and LRRC59; over-expressed gga-miR-155 and interference gga-miR-101-3p in chicken HD11 macrophage cells significantly altered expression of their target genes and decreased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These findings facilitate better understanding of the mechanisms of host resistance and susceptibility to SE infection in chickens.

  19. Salmonella Infection

    MedlinePlus

    Salmonella infection Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Salmonella infection (salmonellosis) is a common bacterial disease that affects the intestinal tract. Salmonella bacteria typically live in animal and human intestines and are ...

  20. Reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis in the spleens of hens by bacterins that vary in fimbrial protein SefD

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gene sefD is part of operon sefABCD, and it is required for production of the SEF14 fimbria by Salmonella Enteritidis. We compared strains that varied in SefD content for their ability to reduce recovery of Salmonella Enteritidis from the spleens of hens infected by parenteral challenge. The two bac...

  1. Identification of novel attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis mutants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infection of egg-laying hens results in symptomless carriage but in young chicks it causes paratyphoid disease. Little is known about whether S. Enteritidis requires other genes additional to known virulence genes for systemic infection of young chickens. A transposon insertion library was created...

  2. 21 CFR 118.4 - Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures....4 Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures. You must follow the SE prevention measures set forth in this section. In addition, you must have and implement a written SE prevention plan that is...

  3. 21 CFR 118.4 - Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures....4 Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures. You must follow the SE prevention measures set forth in this section. In addition, you must have and implement a written SE prevention plan that is...

  4. 21 CFR 118.4 - Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures....4 Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures. You must follow the SE prevention measures set forth in this section. In addition, you must have and implement a written SE prevention plan that is...

  5. In ovo evaluation of FloraMax®-B11 on Marek´s disease HVT vaccine protective efficacy, hatchability, microbiota composition, morphometric analysis, and Salmonella Enteritidis infection in broiler chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Four experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of in ovo administration of FloraMax®-B11 (FM) on Marek´s disease (MD) herpesvirus of turkeys (HVT) vaccine protective efficacy, hatchability, microbiota composition, morphometric analysis and Salmonella enteritidis (SE) infection in chickens. I...

  6. An outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 34a infection associated with a Chinese restaurant in Suffolk, United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Badrinath, Padmanabhan; Sundkvist, Torbjorn; Mahgoub, Hamid; Kent, Richard

    2004-09-01

    On 30th July 2002, the Suffolk Communicable Disease Control Team received notifications of gastrointestinal illness due to Salmonella Enteritidis in subjects who had eaten food from a Chinese restaurant on 27th July. An Outbreak Control Team was formed resulting in extensive epidemiological, microbiological and environmental investigations. Attempts were made to contact everybody who ate food from the restaurant on 27th July and a standard case definition was adopted. Using a pre-designed proforma information was gathered from both sick and well subjects. Food specific attack rates were calculated and two-tailed Fisher's exact test was used to test the difference between type of food consumed and the health status. Using a retrospective cohort design univariate Relative Risks and 95% Confidence Intervals were calculated for specific food items. Data was gathered on 52 people of whom 38 developed gastrointestinal symptoms; 16 male and 22 female. The mean age was 27 years. The mean incubation period was 30 hours with a range of 6 to 90 hours. Food attack rates were significantly higher for egg, special and chicken fried rice. Relative risk and the Confidence interval for these food items were 1.97 (1.11-3.48), 1.56 (1.23-1.97) and 1.48 (1.20-1.83) respectively. Interviews with the chef revealed that many eggs were used in the preparation of egg-fried rice, which was left at room temperature for seven hours and was used in the preparation of the other two rice dishes. Of the 31 submitted stool specimens 28 tested positive for S Enteritidis phage type 34a and one for S Enteritidis phage type 4. In the absence of left over food available for microbiological examination, epidemiological investigation strongly suggested the eggs used in the preparation of the egg-fried rice as the vehicle for this outbreak. This investigation highlights the importance of safe practices in cooking and handling of eggs in restaurants.

  7. Administration of a Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain by coarse spray to newly hatched broilers reduces colonization and shedding of a Salmonella Enteritidis challenge strain.

    PubMed

    De Cort, W; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; van Immerseel, F

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of contaminated poultry meat is still an important cause of Salmonella infections in humans. Colonization inhibition (CI) occurs when a live Salmonella strain is administered to chickens and subsequently protects against challenge with another Salmonella strain belonging to the same serotype. A Salmonella Enteritidis hilAssrAfliG deletion mutant has previously been proven to reduce colonization and shedding of a wild-type Salmonella Enteritidis strain in newly hatched broilers after experimental infection. In this study, we compared two administration routes for this strain. Administering the Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain through drinking water on the first day of life resulted in decreased fecal shedding and cecal colonization of a wild-type Salmonella Enteritidis challenge strain administered 24 h later using a seeder-bird model. When administering the CI strain by coarse spray on newly hatched broiler chicks, an even more pronounced reduction of cecal colonization was observed, and fecal shedding of the Salmonella Enteritidis challenge strain ceased during the course of the experiment. These data suggest that administering a Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain to newly hatched chicks using a coarse spray is a useful and effective method that reduces colonization and shedding of a wild-type Salmonella Enteritidis strain after early challenge.

  8. A mutation in the NLRC5 promoter limits NF-κB signaling after Salmonella Enteritidis infection in the spleen of young chickens.

    PubMed

    Chang, Guobin; Liu, Xiangping; Ma, Teng; Xu, Lu; Wang, Hongzhi; Li, Zhiteng; Guo, Xiaomin; Xu, Qi; Chen, Guohong

    2015-09-01

    To date, the functions of the NLRC5 in chickens remain undefined. In the current study, chicken NLRC5 was cloned and an A1017G mutation was detected in its promoter region. The relative expression levels of the NLRC5 and key NF-κB pathway genes, IKKα, IKKβ, NF-κB, IL-6, IL-1β and IFN-γ, in the spleens of wild and mutant type birds, AA and GG, were determined using FQ-PCR at 7 day post-infection (DPI) with Salmonella Enteritidis. Additionally, the bacterial burden in the caecum and various immune response parameters were measured to evaluate immune responses. All of the examined immune response parameters were significantly different between the AA chickens and the GG chickens. Specifically, the mRNA expression levels of IKKα, NF-κB, IL-6, IL-1β and IFN-γ were higher in AA chickens than those in GG chickens, while the mRNA expression levels of NLRC5 were lower in AA chickens than those in GG chickens (P<0.05). Moreover, the mRNA expression levels of TLR4 and MyD88 were not affected in either group. Collectively, considering former NLRC5 functional study in vitro, the wild genotype birds presented with better resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis through the actions of the NLRC5 and subsequent inhibition of the NF-κB pathway in chickens.

  9. Egg-related Salmonella enteritidis, Italy, 1991

    PubMed Central

    Binkin, N.; Scuderi, G.; Novaco, F.; Giovanardi, G. L.; Paganelli, G.; Ferrari, G.; Cappelli, O.; Ravaglia, L.; Zilioli, F.; Amadei, V.; Magliani, W.; Viani, I.; Riccò, D.; Borrini, B.; Magri, M.; Alessandrini, A.; Bursi, G.; Barigazzi, G.; Fantasia, M.; Filetici, E.; Salmaso, S.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, Salmonella enteritidis has become an increasingly important public health problem in Italy. In some parts of the country, the fraction of total human salmonella isolates accounted for by S. enteritidis has risen from 3-4% in the mid-1980s to more than 30% in 1990. Between 1990 and 1991, the number of reported S. enteritidis outbreaks increased more than sixfold. The 33 outbreaks reported in 1991 occurred in seven contiguous regions in northern and central Italy and were clustered in time between June and October; in the majority, products containing raw or undercooked shell eggs were implicated. Five of the egg-related outbreaks that occurred within a 30 kilometre radius over a 7-week period were investigated in detail. A phage type 1 strain containing a 38·9 MDa plasmid appeared responsible for three of the outbreaks, while in the remaining two a phage type 4 strain, also with a 38·9 MDa plasmid was isolated. Efforts are being made to enhance epidemiological surveillance and laboratory evaluation, and the use of pasteurized eggs has been recommended for high-risk populations. PMID:8472765

  10. Salmonella enteritidis: clinical epidemiological approaches for prevention and control of S. enteritidis in poultry production.

    PubMed

    Noordhuizen, J P; Frankena, K

    1994-01-01

    Salmonella enteritidis infections in poultry appear to be of major public concern. Prevalence levels in veal calves and pigs are rather low. Because of the complex of socio-psychological, welfare, economic and public health aspects great emphasis should be put on prevention and control. This paper deals with some clinical epidemiological approaches for prevention and control of S. enteritidis. Emphasis is set on multifactorial background of infection occurrence, epidemiological methods and features of monitoring and surveillance for evaluation of measures taken during a follow-up period. Finally, it is stated that the application of Risk Assessment & Analysis principles in this problem area, integrating the concepts previously addressed, might prove to be a valuable perspective.

  11. Plasmid profiles as an epidemiological marker for Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis foodborne outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Luján, R; Echeita, A; Usera, M A; Martínez-Suárez, J V; Alonso, R; Sáez-Nieto, J A

    1990-06-01

    The incidence of enteritidis serotype of Salmonella enterica in salmonellae infections has steadily increased in Spain from 27.1% in 1982 up to 63.4% in 1987. Given this high incidence, we have studied the plasmid profiles of Enteritidis isolates to subclassify them. Different profiles were observed in 50 isolates. In 13 Enteritidis serotype outbreaks, up to 5 different plasmid profiles were found. Each outbreak correlated with a single plasmid profile except in one case where plasmids of two different profiles were observed in strains from the same outbreak.

  12. MHC haplotype and susceptibility to experimental infections (Salmonella Enteritidis, Pasteurella multocida or Ascaridia galli) in a commercial and an indigenous chicken breed.

    PubMed

    Schou, T W; Labouriau, R; Permin, A; Christensen, J P; Sørensen, P; Cu, H P; Nguyen, V K; Juul-Madsen, H R

    2010-05-15

    In three independent experimental infection studies, the susceptibility and course of infection of three pathogens considered of importance in most poultry production systems, Ascaridia galli, Salmonella Enteritidis and Pasteurella multocida were compared in two chicken breeds, the indigenous Vietnamese Ri and the commercial Luong Phuong. Furthermore, the association of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) with disease-related parameters was evaluated, using alleles of the LEI0258 microsatellite as markers for MHC haplotypes. The Ri chickens were found to be more resistant to A. galli and S. Enteritidis than commercial Luong Phuong chickens. In contrast, the Ri chickens were more susceptible to P. multocida, although production parameters were more affected in the Luong Phuong chickens. Furthermore, it was shown that the individual variations observed in response to the infections were influenced by the MHC. Using marker alleles of the microsatellite LEI0258, which is located within the MHC region, several MHC haplotypes were identified as being associated with infection intensity of A. galli. An association of the MHC with the specific antibody response to S. Enteritidis was also found where four MHC haplotypes were shown to be associated with high specific antibody response. Finally, one MHC haplotype was identified as being associated with pathological lesions and mortality in the P. multocida experiment. Although not statistically significant, our analysis suggested that this haplotype might be associated with resistance. These results demonstrate the presence of local genetic resources in Vietnamese chickens, which could be utilized in breeding programmes aiming at improving disease resistance. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis, England and Wales, 1945–2011

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Christopher R.; LeBaigue, Susan; Esan, Oluwaseun B.; Awofisyo, Adedoyin A.; Adams, Natalie L.; Fisher, Ian S.T.; Grant, Kathie A.; Peters, Tansy M.; Larkin, Lesley; Davies, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    In England and Wales, the emergence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis resulted in the largest and most persistent epidemic of foodborne infection attributable to a single subtype of any pathogen since systematic national microbiological surveillance was established. We reviewed 67 years of surveillance data to examine the features, underlying causes, and overall effects of S. enterica ser. Enteritidis. The epidemic was associated with the consumption of contaminated chicken meat and eggs, and a decline in the number of infections began after the adoption of vaccination and other measures in production and distribution of chicken meat and eggs. We estimate that >525,000 persons became ill during the course of the epidemic, which caused a total of 6,750,000 days of illness, 27,000 hospitalizations, and 2,000 deaths. Measures undertaken to control the epidemic have resulted in a major reduction in foodborne disease in England and Wales. PMID:24960614

  14. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, England and Wales, 1945-2011.

    PubMed

    Lane, Christopher R; LeBaigue, Susan; Esan, Oluwaseun B; Awofisyo, Adedoyin A; Adams, Natalie L; Fisher, Ian S T; Grant, Kathie A; Peters, Tansy M; Larkin, Lesley; Davies, Robert H; Adak, Goutam K

    2014-07-01

    In England and Wales, the emergence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis resulted in the largest and most persistent epidemic of foodborne infection attributable to a single subtype of any pathogen since systematic national microbiological surveillance was established. We reviewed 67 years of surveillance data to examine the features, underlying causes, and overall effects of S. enterica ser. Enteritidis. The epidemic was associated with the consumption of contaminated chicken meat and eggs, and a decline in the number of infections began after the adoption of vaccination and other measures in production and distribution of chicken meat and eggs. We estimate that >525,000 persons became ill during the course of the epidemic, which caused a total of 6,750,000 days of illness, 27,000 hospitalizations, and 2,000 deaths. Measures undertaken to control the epidemic have resulted in a major reduction in foodborne disease in England and Wales.

  15. Association of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis YafD with Resistance to Chicken Egg Albumen

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Sangwei; Killoran, Patrick B.; Riley, Lee W.

    2003-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a major cause of food-borne diseases in industrialized countries. The incidence of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis infections has increased substantially in recent decades, and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis is now one of the leading serovars of Salmonella in the United States. A unique epidemiological characteristic of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis is its association with chicken shell eggs, since approximately 80% of all human gastrointestinal diseases can be traced to contaminated egg products. Eggs are contaminated when bacteria from reproductive tissues of infected hens are packaged into the eggs and persist inside the hostile egg albumen environment. Therefore, resistance to egg albumen is an important aspect in the transmission of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis. We identified a gene, yafD from S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, whose overexpression conferred upon S. enterica serovar Typhimurium enhanced resistance to egg albumen, while disruption of this gene in S. enterica serovar Enteritidis rendered the organism more susceptible to egg albumen. YafD is homologous to members of an exonuclease-endonuclease-phosphatase family, including some enzymes involved in DNA repair. Furthermore, we discovered that egg albumen has nuclease activities and uses both circular and linear DNA as substrates. We propose that YafD provides a survival advantage to S. enterica serovar Enteritidis in eggs by repairing DNA damage caused by egg albumen and that it may be one of the biologic determinants that contribute to the epidemiological association of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis with egg products. PMID:14638758

  16. Association of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis yafD with resistance to chicken egg albumen.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sangwei; Killoran, Patrick B; Riley, Lee W

    2003-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a major cause of food-borne diseases in industrialized countries. The incidence of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis infections has increased substantially in recent decades, and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis is now one of the leading serovars of Salmonella in the United States. A unique epidemiological characteristic of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis is its association with chicken shell eggs, since approximately 80% of all human gastrointestinal diseases can be traced to contaminated egg products. Eggs are contaminated when bacteria from reproductive tissues of infected hens are packaged into the eggs and persist inside the hostile egg albumen environment. Therefore, resistance to egg albumen is an important aspect in the transmission of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis. We identified a gene, yafD from S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, whose overexpression conferred upon S. enterica serovar Typhimurium enhanced resistance to egg albumen, while disruption of this gene in S. enterica serovar Enteritidis rendered the organism more susceptible to egg albumen. YafD is homologous to members of an exonuclease-endonuclease-phosphatase family, including some enzymes involved in DNA repair. Furthermore, we discovered that egg albumen has nuclease activities and uses both circular and linear DNA as substrates. We propose that YafD provides a survival advantage to S. enterica serovar Enteritidis in eggs by repairing DNA damage caused by egg albumen and that it may be one of the biologic determinants that contribute to the epidemiological association of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis with egg products.

  17. Acute toxoplasmosis in three wild arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus) from Svalbard; one with co-infections of Salmonella Enteritidis PT1 and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis serotype 2b.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, K K; Mørk, T; Sigurdardóttir, O G; Asbakk, K; Akerstedt, J; Bergsjø, B; Fuglei, E

    2005-04-01

    Acute disseminated toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in three wild arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus) that were found dead in the same locality on Svalbard (Norway). The animals included one adult female and two 4-months-old pups. The adult fox was severely jaundiced. Necropsy revealed multifocal, acute, necrotizing hepatitis, acute interstitial pneumonia, and scattered foci of brain gliosis, often associated with Toxoplasma tachyzoites. One pup also had Toxoplasma-associated meningitis. In addition, the latter animal was infected with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis serotype 2b and Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 1 (PT1), which may have contributed to the severity of the Toxoplasma infection in this animal. The diagnosis of toxoplasmosis was confirmed by positive immunohistochemistry and detection of anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in serum of all foxes. The animals were negative for Neospora caninum, canine distemper virus, canine adenovirus, and rabies virus on immunolabelling of tissue sections and smears.

  18. Salmonella enteritidis PT6: another egg-associated salmonellosis?

    PubMed Central

    Evans, M. R.; Lane, W.; Ribeiro, C. D.

    1998-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 6 (PT6) increased dramatically in the United Kingdom during 1997. The sharp rise suggests that PT6 contamination has spread rapidly throughout a basic food commodity; however, the source and food vehicle remain unknown. We present evidence from three outbreaks suggesting a possible link between PT6 and eggs. Poor documentation of the egg supply network continues to pose problems for public health investigators. Thorough investigation of all future PT6 outbreaks and case-control studies of sporadic infections are needed to confirm the etiology of PT6 infection. PMID:9866747

  19. Virulence and metabolic characteristics of Salmonella Enteritidis sefD variants in hens.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella Enteritidis is one of a few pathogenic Salmonella enterica serotypes that have SEF14 fimbriae encoded by the sef operon, which consists of 4 co-transcribed genes sefABCD that are regulated by sefR. To explore the function of sefD within the infection pathway resulting in egg contamination...

  20. Antibiotic resistance in Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhimurium, Enteritidis and Infantis from human infections, foodstuffs and farm animals in Italy.

    PubMed Central

    Busani, L.; Graziani, C.; Battisti, A.; Franco, A.; Ricci, A.; Vio, D.; Digiannatale, E.; Paterlini, F.; D'Incau, M.; Owczarek, S.; Caprioli, A.; Luzzi, I.

    2004-01-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates of Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhimurium, Enteritidis, and Infantis isolated from humans, foodstuffs and farm animals in Italy between 1999 and 2001 was examined. All the isolates were susceptible to cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin, but high rates of resistance were observed for several other drugs, especially for S. Typhimurium. The rates of resistance and multiresistance were generally higher among animal and food isolates than in human strains; conversely, no significant difference was observed between animal and food isolates. Among S. Typhimurium, multiresistance was more common in bovine, poultry and rabbit strains than in swine isolates, and was rare in strains from pigeon. Resistance to trimethoprim sulphamethoxazole was mainly found in isolates of swine and human origin. This study confirms the role of livestock as a reservoir of drug-resistant Salmonella spp. and underlines the need for integrated surveillance systems of antibiotic resistance that consider isolates not only from human disease but also from the animal reservoirs and the food vehicles. PMID:15061499

  1. The effects of polymorphisms in 7 candidate genes on resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis in native chickens.

    PubMed

    Tohidi, R; Idris, I B; Malar Panandam, J; Hair Bejo, M

    2013-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis infection is a common concern in poultry production for its negative effects on growth as well as food safety for humans. Identification of molecular markers that are linked to resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis may lead to appropriate solutions to control Salmonella infection in chickens. This study investigated the association of candidate genes with resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis in young chickens. Two native breeds of Malaysian chickens, namely, Village Chickens and Red Junglefowl, were evaluated for bacterial colonization after Salmonella Enteritidis inoculation. Seven candidate genes were selected on the basis of their physiological role in immune response, as determined by prior studies in other genetic lines: natural resistance-associated protein 1 (NRAMP1), transforming growth factor β3 (TGFβ3), transforming growth factor β4 (TGFβ4), inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (IAP1), caspase 1 (CASP1), lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α factor (LITAF), and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Polymerase chain reaction-RFLP was used to identify polymorphisms in the candidate genes; all genes exhibited polymorphisms in at least one breed. The NRAMP1-SacI polymorphism correlated with the differences in Salmonella Enteritidis load in the cecum (P = 0.002) and spleen (P = 0.01) of Village Chickens. Polymorphisms in the restriction sites of TGFβ3-BsrI, TGFβ4-MboII, and TRAIL-StyI were associated with Salmonella Enteritidis burden in the cecum, spleen, and liver of Village Chickens and Red Junglefowl (P < 0.05). These results indicate that the NRAMP1, TGFβ3, TGFβ4, and TRAIL genes are potential candidates for use in selection programs for increasing genetic resistance against Salmonella Enteritidis in native Malaysian chickens.

  2. DNA aptamer-based colorimetric detection platform for Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Bayraç, Ceren; Eyidoğan, Füsun; Avni Öktem, Hüseyin

    2017-12-15

    Food safety is a major issue to protect public health and a key challenge is to find detection methods for identification of hazards in food. Food borne infections affects millions of people each year and among pathogens, Salmonella Enteritidis is most widely found bacteria causing food borne diseases. Therefore, simple, rapid, and specific detection methods are needed for food safety. In this study, we demonstrated the selection of DNA aptamers with high affinity and specificity against S. Enteritidis via Cell Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (Cell-SELEX) and development of sandwich type aptamer-based colorimetric platforms for its detection. Two highly specific aptamers, crn-1 and crn-2, were developed through 12 rounds of selection with Kd of 0.971µM and 0.309µM, respectively. Both aptamers were used to construct sandwich type capillary detection platforms. With the detection limit of 10(3) CFU/mL, crn-1 and crn-2 based platforms detected target bacteria specifically based on color change. This platform is also suitable for detection of S. Enteritidis in complex food matrix. Thus, this is the first to demonstrate use of Salmonella aptamers for development of the colorimetric aptamer-based detection platform in its identification and detection with naked eye in point-of-care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Influence of spv plasmid genes group in Salmonella Enteritidis virulence for chickens. I. Occurrence of spv plasmid genes group in Salmonella Enteritidis large virulence plasmid].

    PubMed

    Madajczak, Grzegorz; Binek, Marian

    2005-01-01

    Many Salmonella Enteritidis virulence factors are encoded by genes localized on plasmids, especially large virulence plasmid, in highly conserved fragment, they create spv plasmid gene group. The aims of realized researches were spv genes occurrence evaluation and composition analysis among Salmonella Enteritidis strains caused infection in chickens. Researches were realized on 107 isolates, where in every cases large virulence plasmid 59 kbp size were detected. Specific nucleotides sequences of spv genes (spvRABCD) were detected in 47.7% of isolates. In the rest of examined bacteria spv genes occurred variably. Most often extreme genes of spv group, like spvR and spvD were absent, what could indicate that factors encoded by them are not most important for Salmonella Enteritidis live and their expressed virulence.

  4. Loxoribine pretreatment reduces Salmonella Enteritidis organ invasion in 1-day-old chickens.

    PubMed

    Swaggerty, C L; He, H; Genovese, K J; Duke, S E; Kogut, M H

    2012-04-01

    Young poultry exhibit a transient colonization by some food-borne pathogens, including Salmonella, during the first week of life that stems from immature innate and acquired defense mechanisms. Consequently, modulation of the hosts' natural immune response is emerging as an important area of interest for food animal producers, including the poultry industry. Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists have been shown to boost the innate immune response in young chickens and increase their resistance to colonization by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. The objective of the present study was to determine if pretreatment with loxoribine, a TLR7 agonist and immune modulator, protects young chicks from Salmonella Enteritidis organ invasion. Loxoribine (0-100 μg) was administered intra-abdominally to 1-d-old broiler chicks, and 4 h later, the birds were challenged orally with Salmonella Enteritidis. Twenty-four hours postchallenge, birds were euthanized and the liver and spleen aseptically removed and cultured for Salmonella Enteritidis. This was carried out on 3 separate occasions using 26 to 50 chicks per dose per experiment. Pretreatment of chicks with loxoribine (6.25-25 μg) significantly (P ≤ 0.05) reduced liver and spleen organ invasion by Salmonella Enteritidis. Higher doses (50-100 μg) of loxoribine had no effect. The results obtained in this study indicate that there is a potential application for using loxoribine to increase protection of young chicks when they are most susceptible to infections with Salmonella.

  5. Sodium alginate oligosaccharides from brown algae inhibit Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Yan, G L; Guo, Y M; Yuan, J M; Liu, D; Zhang, B K

    2011-07-01

    The effects of sodium alginate oligosaccharides (sAO) on growth performance, cecal microbiota, Salmonella translocation to internal organs, and mucosal immune responses to challenge with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in broiler chickens were investigated. We designed an experiment with a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement, in which 3 feed treatments with supplementation of sAO at 0 (controls), 0.04, or 0.2% were provided in the diet for birds not challenged or challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis. There were 5 randomly placed replicate pens for each treatment. At 8 to 12 d of age, one-half the poults were orally gavaged with 10(8) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis and the nonchallenged groups were inoculated with sterile PBS. Body weight loss and mortality resulting from Salmonella infection were mitigated by the addition of sAO. Supplementation of sAO at 0.2% was the most effective concentration for reducing Salmonella colonization and increasing the number of lactic acid bacteria in the cecum of chickens challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis. Cecal Salmonella Enteritidis-specific IgA production was significantly increased by sAO at 0.2% at 5 d postchallenge compared with the other treatments and was maintained at higher levels at the 2 dosages of sAO at 10 d postchallenge. With Salmonella Enteritidis challenge, sAO at 0.04% showed an anti-inflammatory effect through upregulation of interleukin (IL)-10 expression in the cecal tonsils. The supplementation level of 0.2% showed dramatic immunostimulatory activity by inducing interferon-γ, IL-10, and IL-1β mRNA expression in cecal tonsils of nonchallenged birds. However, the high level of sAO induced a robust mucosal immune response in the absence of a challenge, and this may have led to a decline in BW. These findings suggest that dietary sAO can decrease Salmonella colonization and improve intestinal barrier function and performance of chickens.

  6. Effect of a selected Lactobacillus spp.-based probiotic on Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis-infected broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Jose L; Torres-Rodriguez, Alberto; Higgins, Stacy E; Pixley, Christopher; Tellez, Guillermo; Donoghue, Annie M; Hargis, Billy M

    2008-03-01

    The effect of a Lactobacillus spp.-based probiotic (FM-B11) on Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) recovery was evaluated in liquid (Expt. 1) and lyophilized (Expt. 2) forms in two separate experiments with two trials each. For each trial, 80 broiler chicks were randomly allocated into two treatments: control and probiotic culture. All chicks were challenged with SE (approximately 10(4) colony-forming units [cfu]) upon arrival at our laboratory. In both experiments, probiotic culture was administered in the drinking water for 3 consecutive days at a final concentration of approximately 10(6) cfu/ml, beginning 1 hr after SE challenge. Cecal tonsils were aseptically removed at 24 and 72 hr postchallenge, followed by enrichment and plating on xylose lactose deoxycholate (XLD) agar for the presence or absence of Salmonella-typical colonies. In Expt. 1, a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in SE-positive samples was observed in both trials at 24 and 72 hr postchallenge. Additionally, in Expt. 2, the lyophilized probiotic decreased (P < 0.05) SE recovery at both 24 and 72 hr postchallenge compared with the control group in trial 1. In trial 2, SE evaluation was performed only at 72 hr after challenge and fewer (P < 0.001) treated samples were positive for SE. Results showed that application of either liquid or lyophilized probiotic culture in the drinking water for 3 consecutive days can help to reduce SE recovery from young birds, although further research is needed to elucidate the mechanism of this response.

  7. Spatial-temporal epidemiology of human Salmonella Enteritidis infections with major phage types (PTs 1, 4, 5b, 8, 13, and 13a) in Ontario, Canada, 2008-2009.

    PubMed

    Varga, Csaba; Pearl, David L; McEwen, Scott A; Sargeant, Jan M; Pollari, Frank; Guerin, Michele T

    2015-12-17

    In Ontario and Canada, the incidence of human Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) infections have increased steadily during the last decade. Our study evaluated the spatial and temporal epidemiology of the major phage types (PTs) of S. Enteritidis infections to aid public health practitioners design effective prevention and control programs. Data on S. Enteritidis infections between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2009 were obtained from Ontario's disease surveillance system. Salmonella Enteritidis infections with major phage types were classified by their annual health region-level incidence rates (IRs), monthly IRs, clinical symptoms, and exposure settings. A scan statistic was employed to detect retrospective phage type-specific spatial, temporal, and space-time clusters of S. Enteritidis infections. Space-time cluster cases' exposure settings were evaluated to identify common exposures. 1,336 cases were available for analysis. The six most frequently reported S. Enteritidis PTs were 8 (n = 398), 13a (n = 218), 13 (n = 198), 1 (n = 132), 5b (n = 83), and 4 (n = 76). Reported rates of S. Enteritidis infections with major phage types varied by health region and month. International travel and unknown exposure settings were the most frequently reported settings for PT 5b, 4, and 1 cases, whereas unknown exposure setting, private home, food premise, and international travel were the most frequently reported settings for PT 8, 13, and 13a cases. Diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fever were the most commonly reported clinical symptoms. A number of phage type-specific spatial, temporal, and space-time clusters were identified. Space-time clusters of PTs 1, 4, and 5b occurred mainly during the winter and spring months in the North West, North East, Eastern, Central East, and Central West regions. Space-time clusters of PTs 13 and 13a occurred at different times of the year in the Toronto region. Space-time clusters of PT 8

  8. Fermented liquid feed reduces susceptibility of broilers for Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Heres, L; Engel, B; van Knapen, F; de Jong, M C M; Wagenaar, J A; Urlings, H A P

    2003-04-01

    The presence of Salmonella in chickens is a problem because poultry meat is recognized as a source of human salmonellosis. Fermented feed has characteristics like a high number of lactobacilli and high concentration of lactic acid, which could make chickens less susceptible for infection with Salmonella. Fermented feed might therefore prevent the colonization of chickens with Salmonella. Two studies were performed to quantify the effect of fermented liquid feed on the susceptibility of broilers for Salmonella. The fermented feed was prepared by fermenting a dry broiler feed supplemented with 1.4 parts of water. Lactobacillus plantarum was used for fermentation. The fermented liquid feed (FLF) contained 10(9) to 10(10) cfu lactobacilli per gram, and the pH was 4. Individually housed control chickens and FLF-fed chickens were inoculated with 10(2) to 10(7) cfu Salmonella enteritidis (SE). Colonization was estimated by cloacal swabs and quantitative caecal culture. The proportion of SE-shedding chickens was decreased in FLF-fed chickens. FLF-fed chickens required a longer time after inoculation or a higher inoculation dose to get the same proportion of infected chickens in comparison with dry feed-fed chickens. The level of cecal colonization with Salmonella in the ceca was not different at the end of the experimental period. The results indicate that FLF can hamper the introduction of Salmonella in broiler flocks because the chickens are less susceptible for infection. Fermented liquid feed might therefore be a new hurdle in the strategy to control Salmonella in chicken flocks.

  9. Salmonella Enteritidis bacteriophage candidates for phage therapy of poultry.

    PubMed

    Sillankorva, S; Pleteneva, E; Shaburova, O; Santos, S; Carvalho, C; Azeredo, J; Krylov, V

    2010-04-01

    Salmonella is a worldwide foodborne pathogen causing acute enteric infections in humans. In the recent years, the use of bacteriophages has been suggested as a possible tool to combat this zoonotic pathogen in poultry farms. This work aims to isolate and perform comparative studies of a group of phages active against a collection of specific Salmonella Enteritidis strains from Portugal and England. Also, suitable phage candidates for therapy of poultry will be selected. The Salm. Enteritidis strains studied were shown to have a significantly high occurrence of defective (cryptic) prophages; however, no live phages were found in the strains. Bacteriophages isolated from different environments lysed all except one of the tested Salm. Enteritidis strains. The bacteriophages studied were divided into different groups according to their genetic homology, RFLP profiles and phenotypic features, and most of them showed no DNA homology with the bacterial hosts. The bacteriophage lytic efficacy proved to be highly dependent on the propagation host strain. Despite the evidences shown in this work that the Salm. Enteritidis strains used did not produce viable phages, we have confirmed that some phages, when grown on particular hosts, behaved as complexes of phages. This is most likely because of the presence of inactive phage-related genomes (or their parts) in the bacterial strains which are capable of being reactivated or which can recombine with lytic phages. Furthermore, changes of the bacterial hosts used for maintenance of phages must be avoided as these can drastically modify the parameters of the phage preparations, including host range and lytic activity. This work shows that the optimal host and growth conditions must be carefully studied and selected for the production of each bacteriophage candidate for animal therapy.

  10. Evaluation of avian-specific probiotic and Salmonella enteritidis-, Salmonella typhimurium-, and Salmonella heidelberg-specific antibodies on cecal colonization and organ invasion of Salmonella enteritidis in broilers.

    PubMed

    Tellez, G; Petrone, V M; Escorcia, M; Morishita, T Y; Cobb, C W; Villaseñor, L; Promsopone, B

    2001-03-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis colonizes the intestinal tract of poultry and causes foodborne illness in humans. Reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in the intestinal tract of poultry reduces potential carcass contamination during slaughter. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of an avian-specific probiotic combined with Salmonella Enteritidis-, Salmonella Typhimurium-, and Salmonella Heidelberg-specific antibodies on the cecal colonization and organ invasion of Salmonella Enteritidis in broiler as well as on body weights. The treatment group was defined as chicks spray-vaccinated with Avian Pac Plus at the hatchery and given Avian Pac Plus for the first 3 days after placement. An intermediate treatment was given at 10 and 14 days, 2 days prior to vaccination and 2 days postvaccination. All birds were vaccinated with Newcastle disease vaccine, La Sota virus (one drop/eye) at 12 days of age. A final treatment was given 3 days preslaughter. The control group was defined as chicks not given Avian Pac Plus at any time. Six hours after oral administration of the probiotic suspension (treatment group) or water (control group) at placement, the chicks were challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis. All chickens were orally inoculated with 0.25 ml of Salmonella Enteritidis that contained 4 x 10(7) CFU/1.0 ml. Cecal colonization and organ invasion were evaluated for Salmonella Enteritidis on days 0, 1, 3, 7, 10, 17, 24, 31, 38, and 41. The probiotic-treated group had a significantly lower concentration of Salmonella Enteritidis cecal colonization at days 3, 7, 10, 17, 24, 31, 38, and 41 when compared to the nontreated, control group (P < 0.05). Similarly, there was a significant difference (P < 0.05) in the isolation of Salmonella Enteritidis from the internal organs (liver and spleen) when probiotic-treated and nonprobiotic-treated groups were compared. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in the mean body weight between the two experimental

  11. Sporadic salmonellosis in Lower Saxony, Germany, 2011-2013: raw ground pork consumption is associated with Salmonella Typhimurium infections and foreign travel with Salmonella Enteritidis infections.

    PubMed

    Rettenbacher-Riefler, S; Ziehm, D; Kreienbrock, L; Campe, A; Pulz, M; Dreesman, J

    2015-10-01

    To investigate risk factors for sporadic salmonellosis, for each notified case four randomly selected population controls matched for age, sex and geographical region were interviewed via self-administered questionnaire. Conditional logistic regression analysis of 285 matched pairs revealed significant associations for raw ground pork consumption [odds ratio (OR) 6·0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·8-20·1], taking antacids (OR 5·8, 95% CI 1·4-24·5), eating meat outside the home (OR 5·7, 95% CI 2·2-14·6) and daily changing or cleaning of dishcloth (OR 2·1, 95% CI 1·2-3·9). Animal contact and ice cream consumption were negatively associated with salmonellosis (OR 0·5, 95% CI 0·2-1 and OR 0·3, 95% CI 0·1-0·6, respectively). S. Typhimurium infections were significantly associated with raw ground pork consumption (OR 16·7, 95% CI 1·4-194·4) and S. Enteritidis infections with having travelled abroad (OR 9·7, 95% CI 2·0-47·3). Raw egg consumption was not a risk factor, substantiating the success of recently implemented national control programmes in the poultry industry. Unexpectedly, hygienic behaviour was more frequently reported by cases, probably because they overestimated their hygiene precautions retrospectively. Although animal contact might enhance human immunocompetence, underreporting of salmonellosis by pet owners could have occurred. Eating raw pork products is the major risk factor for sporadic human S. Typhimurium infections in Lower Saxony.

  12. A review on development of novel strategies for controlling Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in laying hens: fiber-based molt diets.

    PubMed

    Ricke, S C; Dunkley, C S; Durant, J A

    2013-02-01

    Limiting Salmonella Enteritidis from table eggs can involve intervention approaches at several levels of the production cycle, beginning at the hatchery and ending at the processing or table egg production facilities. Likewise, interventions that limit Salmonella Enteritidis dissemination can be implemented at various stages during the life cycle of infection of Salmonella in the laying hen. However, achieving complete elimination of Salmonella infestation in egg products has remained elusive. There is a multitude of reasons for this, including adaptability of the organism, virulence properties, and persistence. Likewise, environmental factors in the layer house such as transmission routes, reservoirs, and feed sources can influence the exposure of susceptible laying hens to Salmonella Enteritidis. Consequently, successful applications of control measures depend not only on the timing of when they are applied but also on effective surveillance to detect frequency and level of infection of Salmonella. Several studies demonstrated that molt induction by feed withdrawal altered the immune system and the gastrointestinal tract of hens, making them susceptible to Salmonella Enteritidis colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. To alleviate this, the development of alternative methods to induce a molt became necessary. The use of several fiber-containing diets was shown to effectively induce a molt with alfalfa-based diets being the most extensively studied. Further reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis levels in eggs will probably require application of multiple interventions at several steps during egg production and processing as well as a better understanding of the mechanisms used by Salmonella Enteritidis to persist in laying flocks.

  13. [A nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella enteritidis outbreak in Popayán, Cauca, 2011].

    PubMed

    Díaz, Miguel Ángel; Díaz, Paula Lucía; Rodríguez, Edna Catering; Montaño, Lucy Angeline; Gartner, Doris Mabel; Vernaza, María Elisa; Eljach, Victoria; Realpe, María Elena

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is recognized worldwide as one of the main agents of human gastrointestinal infection. Several reports indicate the presence of isolates with decreased sensitivity to ciprofloxacin that can lead to a delayed response or the development of resistance during treatment. To describe and characterize isolates of Salmonella Enteritidis associated to an outbreak of food-borne diseases in Popayán, Cauca. Ten Salmonella Enteritidis isolates from nine patients and one food sample (chicken sandwich) were analyzed by biochemical tests, serotyping and antimicrobial sensitivity. The minimum inhibitory concentration to ciprofloxacin was determined by E-test and the genetic profile of the isolates was tested by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with XbaI and Blnl enzymes. Salmonella Enteritidis was identified in all isolates. They were resistant to nalidixic acid and had a decreased sensitivity to ciprofloxaxin between 0.25 and 0.5 μg/ml; all isolates were sensitive to all the other antimicrobials we tested. Ten isolates were grouped by PFGE with the XbaI enzyme in the COIN11.JEG.X01.0038 pattern, and seven isolates were confirmed with the BlnI enzyme using the COIN11.JEG.A26.0009 pattern. We report for the first time an outbreak of nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella Enteritidis in Colombia and confirmed by phenotypic and genotypic analysis the association between the isolates from patients and the chicken sandwich as the source of infection.

  14. Multiplication of Salmonella Enteritidis on Egg Yolk Membranes and Penetration into Yolk Contents

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prompt refrigeration to limit bacterial multiplication is a critical aspect of efforts to control the transmission of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) to consumers of contaminated eggs. However, a proposed national S. Enteritidis control program would allow unrefrigerated am...

  15. Evaluation of the respiratory route as a viable portal of entry for Salmonella in poultry via intratracheal challenge of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium1

    PubMed Central

    Kallapura, G.; Morgan, M. J.; Pumford, N. R.; Bielke, L. R.; Wolfenden, A. D.; Faulkner, O. B.; Latorre, J. D.; Menconi, A.; Hernandez-Velasco, X.; Kuttappan, V. A.; Hargis, B. M.; Tellez, G.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiological evidence suggests that primary infection of Salmonella is by the oral-fecal route for poultry. However, the airborne transmission of Salmonella and similar enteric zoonotic pathogens has been historically neglected. Increasing evidence of Salmonella bioaerosol generation in production facilities and studies suggesting the vulnerabilities of the avian respiratory architecture together have indicated the possibility of the respiratory system being a potential portal of entry for Salmonella in poultry. Presently, we evaluated this hypothesis through intratracheal (IT) administration of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium, as separate challenges, in a total of 4 independent trials, followed by enumeration of cfu recovery in ceca-cecal tonsils and recovery incidence in liver and spleen. In all trials, both Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium, challenged IT colonized cecae to a similar or greater extent than oral administration at identical challenge levels. In most trials, chickens cultured for cfu enumeration from IT-challenged chicks at same dose as orally challenged, resulted in an increase of 1.5 log higher Salmonella Enteritidis from ceca-cecal tonsils and a much lower dose IT of Salmonella Enteritidis could colonize ceca to the same extent than a higher oral challenge. This trend of increased cecal colonization due to IT challenge was observed with all trails involving week-old birds (experiment 2 and 3), which are widely considered to be more difficult to infect via the oral route. Liver-spleen incidence data showed 33% of liver and spleen samples to be positive for Salmonella Enteritidis administered IT (106 cfu/chick), compared with 0% when administered orally (experiment 2, trial 1). Collectively, these data suggest that the respiratory tract may be a largely overlooked portal of entry for Salmonella infections in chickens. PMID:24570455

  16. Evaluation of the respiratory route as a viable portal of entry for Salmonella in poultry via intratracheal challenge of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kallapura, G; Morgan, M J; Pumford, N R; Bielke, L R; Wolfenden, A D; Faulkner, O B; Latorre, J D; Menconi, A; Hernandez-Velasco, X; Kuttappan, V A; Hargis, B M; Tellez, G

    2014-02-01

    Experimental and epidemiological evidence suggests that primary infection of Salmonella is by the oral-fecal route for poultry. However, the airborne transmission of Salmonella and similar enteric zoonotic pathogens has been historically neglected. Increasing evidence of Salmonella bioaerosol generation in production facilities and studies suggesting the vulnerabilities of the avian respiratory architecture together have indicated the possibility of the respiratory system being a potential portal of entry for Salmonella in poultry. Presently, we evaluated this hypothesis through intratracheal (IT) administration of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium, as separate challenges, in a total of 4 independent trials, followed by enumeration of cfu recovery in ceca-cecal tonsils and recovery incidence in liver and spleen. In all trials, both Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium, challenged IT colonized cecae to a similar or greater extent than oral administration at identical challenge levels. In most trials, chickens cultured for cfu enumeration from IT-challenged chicks at same dose as orally challenged, resulted in an increase of 1.5 log higher Salmonella Enteritidis from ceca-cecal tonsils and a much lower dose IT of Salmonella Enteritidis could colonize ceca to the same extent than a higher oral challenge. This trend of increased cecal colonization due to IT challenge was observed with all trails involving week-old birds (experiment 2 and 3), which are widely considered to be more difficult to infect via the oral route. Liver-spleen incidence data showed 33% of liver and spleen samples to be positive for Salmonella Enteritidis administered IT (10(6) cfu/chick), compared with 0% when administered orally (experiment 2, trial 1). Collectively, these data suggest that the respiratory tract may be a largely overlooked portal of entry for Salmonella infections in chickens.

  17. Salmonella Enterica Serotype Enteritidis Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess Complicated with Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Oki, Masayuki; Ueda, Akihiro; Tsuda, Ayumi; Yanagi, Hidetaka; Ozawa, Hideki; Takagi, Atsushi

    2016-09-20

    Infection with non-typhoidal Salmonella often results in a self-limited acute gastroenteritis. Extra-intestinal Salmonella infection is relatively rare and occurs predominantly in infants and adults with significant underlying conditions. We describe a 54-year-old Japanese man with a history of heavy alcohol consumption and daily contact with a dog, who developed bacteremia complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis, spinal epidural abscess, and meningitis, due to Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis. This case suggests that Salmonella should be considered as an etiologic pathogen in adult patients with perivertebral infection or meningitis.

  18. Mapping B-cell responses to Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis in chickens for the discrimination of infected from vaccinated animals

    PubMed Central

    Naqid, Ibrahim A.; Owen, Jonathan P.; Maddison, Ben C.; Spiliotopoulos, Anastasios; Emes, Richard D.; Warry, Andrew; Flynn, Robin J.; Martelli, Francesca; Gosling, Rebecca J.; Davies, Robert H.; La Ragione, Roberto M.; Gough, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Serological surveillance and vaccination are important strategies for controlling infectious diseases of food production animals. However, the compatibility of these strategies is limited by a lack of assays capable of differentiating infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA tests) for established killed or attenuated vaccines. Here, we used next generation phage-display (NGPD) and a 2-proportion Z score analysis to identify peptides that were preferentially bound by IgY from chickens infected with Salmonella Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis compared to IgY from vaccinates, for both an attenuated and an inactivated commercial vaccine. Peptides that were highly enriched against IgY from at least 4 out of 10 infected chickens were selected: 18 and 12 peptides for the killed and attenuated vaccines, respectively. The ten most discriminatory peptides for each vaccine were identified in an ELISA using a training set of IgY samples. These peptides were then used in multi-peptide assays that, when analysing a wider set of samples from infected and vaccinated animals, diagnosed infection with 100% sensitivity and specificity. The data describes a method for the development of DIVA assays for conventional attenuated and killed vaccines. PMID:27510219

  19. Pleural empyema due to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in an immunocompetent elderly patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Karachalios, Kostis; Siagris, Dimitrios; Lekkou, Alexandra; Anastassiou, Evangelos D.; Spiliopoulou, Iris; Gogos, Charalambos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pleural empyema as a focal infection due to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is rare and most commonly described among immunosuppressed patients or patients who suffer from sickle cell anaemia and lung malignancies. Case presentation: Here, we present an 81-year-old immunocompetent Greek woman with bacteraemia and pleural empyema due to Salmonella Enteritidis without any gastrointestinal symptoms. Conclusion: In our case, we suggest that patient’s pleural effusion secondary to heart failure was complicated by empyema and that focal intravascular infection was the cause of bacteraemia. PMID:28348773

  20. Salmonella Enteritidis strains from poultry show differential responses to acid stress, oxidative stress and survival in the egg albumen

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella Enteritidis is the major food-borne pathogen primarily causing human infection through contaminated chicken meat and eggs. We recently demonstrated that S. Enteritidis strains from poultry differ in their ability to invade human intestinal cells and cause disease in orally challenged mice...

  1. Contribution of Salmonella Enteritidis virulence factors to intestinal colonization and systemic dissemination in 1-day-old chickens.

    PubMed

    Addwebi, Tarek M; Call, Douglas R; Shah, Devendra H

    2014-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the most common serovars associated with poultry and poultry product contamination in the United States. We previously identified 14 mutant strains of Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 4 (PT4) with significantly reduced invasiveness in human intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2), chicken macrophages (HD-11), and chicken hepatocellular epithelial cells (LMH). These included Salmonella Enteritidis mutants with transposon insertions in 6 newly identified Salmonella Enteritidis-specific genes (pegD and SEN1393), and genes or genomic islands common to most other Salmonella serovars (SEN0803, SEN0034, SEN2278, and SEN3503) along with 8 genes previously known to contribute to enteric infection (hilA, pipA, fliH, fljB, csgB, spvR, and rfbMN). We hypothesized that Salmonella Enteritidis employs both common Salmonella enterica colonization factors and Salmonella Enteritidis-specific traits to establish infection in chickens. Four Salmonella Enteritidis mutants (SEN0034::Tn5, fliH::Tn5, SEN1393::Tn5, and spvR::Tn5) were indistinguishable from the isogenic wild-type strain when orally inoculated in 1-d-old chickens, whereas 2 mutants (CsgB::Tn5 and PegD::Tn5) were defective for intestinal colonization (P < 0.05) and 8 mutants (hilA::Tn5, SEN3503::Tn5, SEN0803::Tn5, SEN2278::Tn5, fljB::Tn5, rfbM::Tn5, rfbN::Tn5, and pipA::Tn5) showed significant in vivo attenuation in more than one organ (P < 0.05). Complementation studies confirmed the role of rfbN and SEN3503 during infection. This study should contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in Salmonella Enteritidis pathogenesis, and the target genes identified here could potentially serve as targets for the development of live-attenuated or subunit vaccine.

  2. Evaluating area-level spatial clustering of Salmonella Enteritidis infections and their socioeconomic determinants in the greater Toronto area, Ontario, Canada (2007 - 2009): a retrospective population-based ecological study.

    PubMed

    Varga, Csaba; Pearl, David L; McEwen, Scott A; Sargeant, Jan M; Pollari, Frank; Guerin, Michele T

    2013-11-15

    There have been only a few region-level ecological studies conducted in Canada investigating enteric infections in humans. Our study objectives were to 1) assess the spatial clustering of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) human infections in the Greater Toronto Area, and 2) identify underlying area-level associations between S. Enteritidis infection rates and socioeconomic status (SES) indicators that might explain the clustering of infections. Retrospective data on S. Enteritidis infections from 2007 to 2009 were obtained from Ontario's reportable disease surveillance database and were grouped at the forward sortation area (FSA) - level. A spatial scan statistic was employed to identify FSA-level spatial clusters of high infection rates. Negative binomial regression was used to identify FSA-level associations between S. Enteritidis infection rates and SES indicators obtained from the 2006 Census of Canada. Global Moran's I statistic was used to evaluate the final model for residual spatial clustering. A spatial cluster that included nine neighbouring FSAs was identified in downtown Toronto. A significant positive curvilinear relationship was observed between S. Enteritidis infection rates and FSA-level average number of children at home per census family. Areas with high and areas with low average median family income had higher infection rates than FSAs with medium average median family income. Areas with a high proportion of visible minority population had lower infection rates than FSAs with a medium proportion of visible minority population. The Moran's I statistic was not significant, indicating that no residual spatial autocorrelation was present after accounting for the SES variables in the final model. Our study demonstrated that FSAs with high and low average median family income, medium proportion of visible minority population, and high average number of children at home per census family had the highest S. Enteritidis infection

  3. Evaluating area-level spatial clustering of Salmonella Enteritidis infections and their socioeconomic determinants in the greater Toronto area, Ontario, Canada (2007 – 2009): a retrospective population-based ecological study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There have been only a few region-level ecological studies conducted in Canada investigating enteric infections in humans. Our study objectives were to 1) assess the spatial clustering of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) human infections in the Greater Toronto Area, and 2) identify underlying area-level associations between S. Enteritidis infection rates and socioeconomic status (SES) indicators that might explain the clustering of infections. Methods Retrospective data on S. Enteritidis infections from 2007 to 2009 were obtained from Ontario’s reportable disease surveillance database and were grouped at the forward sortation area (FSA) - level. A spatial scan statistic was employed to identify FSA-level spatial clusters of high infection rates. Negative binomial regression was used to identify FSA-level associations between S. Enteritidis infection rates and SES indicators obtained from the 2006 Census of Canada. Global Moran’s I statistic was used to evaluate the final model for residual spatial clustering. Results A spatial cluster that included nine neighbouring FSAs was identified in downtown Toronto. A significant positive curvilinear relationship was observed between S. Enteritidis infection rates and FSA-level average number of children at home per census family. Areas with high and areas with low average median family income had higher infection rates than FSAs with medium average median family income. Areas with a high proportion of visible minority population had lower infection rates than FSAs with a medium proportion of visible minority population. The Moran’s I statistic was not significant, indicating that no residual spatial autocorrelation was present after accounting for the SES variables in the final model. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that FSAs with high and low average median family income, medium proportion of visible minority population, and high average number of children at home per census

  4. 21 CFR 118.6 - Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.6... testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a)(1) If the environmental test for pullets at 14 to 16 weeks of... requires that these eggs must be treated to achieve at least a 5-log destruction of Salmonella Enteritidis...

  5. Evaluating risk factors for endemic human Salmonella Enteritidis infections with different phage types in Ontario, Canada using multinomial logistic regression and a case-case study approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Identifying risk factors for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections in Ontario will assist public health authorities to design effective control and prevention programs to reduce the burden of SE infections. Our research objective was to identify risk factors for acquiring SE infections with various phage types (PT) in Ontario, Canada. We hypothesized that certain PTs (e.g., PT8 and PT13a) have specific risk factors for infection. Methods Our study included endemic SE cases with various PTs whose isolates were submitted to the Public Health Laboratory-Toronto from January 20th to August 12th, 2011. Cases were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire that included questions pertaining to demographics, travel history, clinical symptoms, contact with animals, and food exposures. A multinomial logistic regression method using the Generalized Linear Latent and Mixed Model procedure and a case-case study design were used to identify risk factors for acquiring SE infections with various PTs in Ontario, Canada. In the multinomial logistic regression model, the outcome variable had three categories representing human infections caused by SE PT8, PT13a, and all other SE PTs (i.e., non-PT8/non-PT13a) as a referent category to which the other two categories were compared. Results In the multivariable model, SE PT8 was positively associated with contact with dogs (OR=2.17, 95% CI 1.01-4.68) and negatively associated with pepper consumption (OR=0.35, 95% CI 0.13-0.94), after adjusting for age categories and gender, and using exposure periods and health regions as random effects to account for clustering. Conclusions Our study findings offer interesting hypotheses about the role of phage type-specific risk factors. Multinomial logistic regression analysis and the case-case study approach are novel methodologies to evaluate associations among SE infections with different PTs and various risk factors. PMID:23057531

  6. Literature Review and Clinical Presentation of Cervical Spondylitis Due to Salmonella Enteritidis in Immunocompetent

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhi-Yun; Guo, Fang

    2014-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman was presented to our clinic with some fever and neck pains for about one month. Based on the symptoms and results of image, an empirical diagnosis of tuberculous cervical spondylitis was made. The pain was not significantly decreased after anti-tuberculosis therapy. And, 3 weeks later, she was re-admitted to our hospital for the unbearable pain. An exploration of the C4/5 by the anterior medial approach was recommended to evaluate the germ and debridement. Bacteriological tests showed that the pathogen was Salmonella Enteritidis. The pain was relieved significantly after operation and sensitive antibiotic treatments. Infections with Salmonella Typhi or Salmonella Paratyphi have been well-documented, while there are few reports of cervical spondylitis caused by Salmonella Enteritidis. We reported a case of a healthy woman with whom pyogenic cervical spondylitis of Salmonella Enteritidis was corroborated and treated and reviewed according to previous reports about spondylitis caused by Salmonella Enteritidis in the literature. PMID:24761205

  7. Salmonella

    MedlinePlus

    ... Symptoms Key Resources Salmonella Oranienburg Infections Linked to Shell Eggs Recall & Advice to Consumers and Retailers Case ... Linked to Alfalfa Sprouts Enteritidis Infections Associated with Shell Eggs Chester Infections Associated with Cheesy Chicken & Rice ...

  8. Chaos under canvas: a Salmonella enteritidis PT 6B outbreak.

    PubMed

    Brugha, R F; Howard, A J; Thomas, G R; Parry, R; Ward, L R; Palmer, S R

    1995-12-01

    An outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis PT 6B food poisoning, the first reported of this recently described phage type, resulted in illness among 46 of 49 members of a camping group in North Wales, 33 of whom were hospitalized. Epidemiological evidence (P < 0.0001) indicated that a lemon meringue pie was the vehicle of infection. Fresh shell eggs, stored after purchase at ambient temperature, appear to be the most likely source of infection, with multiplication during preparation and subsequent storage of the pie a significant contributory factor. Campers may be at greater risk than others and should consider the use of cold boxes for the transport and storage of eggs, and avoid the preparation of lightly cooked egg products under these basic conditions.

  9. Effect of lactic acid bacteria probiotic culture treatment timing on Salmonella Enteritidis in neonatal broilers.

    PubMed

    Higgins, J P; Higgins, S E; Wolfenden, A D; Henderson, S N; Torres-Rodriguez, A; Vicente, J L; Hargis, B M; Tellez, G

    2010-02-01

    In the present study, a series of experiments were conducted to evaluate the ability of a combination of 3 ATCC lactobacilli (LAB3) or a commercially available probiotic culture (PROB) to reduce Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) in broiler chicks. Additionally, we varied the timing of PROB administration in relationship to Salmonella challenge and determined the influence on recovery of enteric Salmonella. In experiments 1 to 3, chicks were randomly assigned to treatment groups and were then challenged via oral gavage with Salmonella Enteritidis. Chicks were treated 1 h after Salmonella Enteritidis challenge with LAB3 or PROB. Twenty-four hours posttreatment, cecal tonsils were collected for recovery of enteric Salmonella. In experiments 4 to 7, day-of-hatch chicks were randomly assigned to treatment groups and were then treated with PROB via oral gavage and placed into pens. Chicks were challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis 24 h after treatment via oral gavage. At 24 h after Salmonella Enteritidis challenge, cecal tonsils were collected and recovery of enteric Salmonella was determined. In experiments 8 to 10, 1-d-old chicks were randomly assigned to treatment groups and were then challenged via oral gavage with Salmonella Enteritidis and placed into pens. Chicks were treated 24 h after challenge with PROB via oral gavage. Twenty-four hours post PROB treatment, cecal tonsils were collected and enriched as described above. It was found that PROB significantly reduced cecal Salmonella Enteritidis recovery 24 h after treatment as compared with controls or LAB3-treated chicks in experiments 1 to 3 (P<0.05). Administration of PROB 24 h before Salmonella Enteritidis challenge significantly reduced recovery of Salmonella Enteritidis in 2 out of 4 experiments and no reduction in cecal Salmonella Enteritidis was observed when chicks were challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis and treated 24 h later with PROB. These data demonstrate that PROB

  10. Influence of exogenous melatonin administration on Salmonella enteritidis colonization in molted layers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of exogenous melatonin on Salmonella enteritidis (SE) infection in experimentally-challenged laying hens subjected to a forced molt. Single Comb White Leghorn hens (W-36) over 50-wk-of-age were randomly placed in one of two rooms, allowed to acclima...

  11. Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis in French Polynesia, South Pacific, 2008–2013

    PubMed Central

    Maillard, Fiona; Mallet, Henri-Pierre; Daudens, Elise; Levy, Marc; Roy, Valérie; Branaa, Philippe; Bertrand, Sophie; Fabre, Laetitia; Weill, François-Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Outbreaks of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections associated with eggs occurred in French Polynesia during 2008–2013. Molecular analysis of isolates by using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat polymorphisms and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis was performed. This subtyping made defining the epidemic strain, finding the source, and decontaminating affected poultry flocks possible. PMID:25988406

  12. Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis in French Polynesia, South Pacific, 2008-2013.

    PubMed

    Le Hello, Simon; Maillard, Fiona; Mallet, Henri-Pierre; Daudens, Elise; Levy, Marc; Roy, Valérie; Branaa, Philippe; Bertrand, Sophie; Fabre, Laetitia; Weill, François-Xavier

    2015-06-01

    Outbreaks of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections associated with eggs occurred in French Polynesia during 2008-2013. Molecular analysis of isolates by using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat polymorphisms and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis was performed. This subtyping made defining the epidemic strain, finding the source, and decontaminating affected poultry flocks possible.

  13. Colonization of mature laying hens with salmonella enteritidis by oral or intracloacal inoculation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A major route of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infection is the fecal-oral route. Evidence of SE in internal organs of laying hens once they are inoculated via the oral (OR) or intracloacal (IC) route has not been reliably demonstrated. The current study evaluated OR or IC route of inoculation of a na...

  14. Optimization of Salmonella enteritidis recombinant heat shock protein 60 production.

    PubMed

    Rainczak, K; Bajzert, J; Galli, J; Selera, A; Wieliczko, A; Borkowski, J; Stefaniak, T

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to optimize conditions for producing Salmonella Enteritidis recombinant heat shock protein 60 (rHsp60). Seven Escherichia coli host strains (Rosetta, Turner, C41, C43, Origami, BL21pLys, Rosetta pLys) were transformed by a recombinant plasmid containing Hsp60 gene from Salmonella Enteritidis, and then cultured and induced by isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The highest S. Enteritidis rHsp60 yield was obtained using E. coli strain C41. Induction of this strain using IPTG allowed the yield 400 microg of S. Enteritidis Hsp60 protein/2L of culture, but by autoinduction the yield exceeded 800 microg/2L.

  15. The prevalence of Salmonella enteritidis and other Salmonella sp. among Canadian registered commercial chicken broiler flocks.

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, C.; Irwin, R. J.; Messier, S.; Finley, G. G.; Oggel, J.

    1991-01-01

    A nation-wide survey was conducted to estimate the prevalence of Salmonella enteritidis and other salmonellas among Canadian commercial broiler flocks. Environmental (litter and/or water) samples from 226 of 294 (76.9%) randomly selected flocks were contaminated with salmonellas. Litter samples were more often contaminated with salmonellas than water samples (47.4 v. 12.3%). Fifty different salmonella serovars were isolated. The most prevalent serovars were S. hadar, S. infantis, and S. schwarzengrund; they were isolated from samples of 98/294 (33.3%), 26/294 (8.8%), and 21/294 (7.1%) flocks, respectively. Feed samples of 39/290 (13.4%) flocks were contaminated with salmonellas. Salmonella enteritidis was isolated from the environmental samples of 9/294 (3.1%) flocks. Salmonella enteritidis phage type (PT) 8 was isolated from seven flocks, and PT 13a from two flocks. PMID:1879484

  16. The influence of a fructooligosaccharide prebiotic combined with alfalfa molt diets on the gastrointestinal tract fermentation, Salmonella enteritidis infection, and intestinal shedding in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Donalson, L M; McReynolds, J L; Kim, W K; Chalova, V I; Woodward, C L; Kubena, L F; Nisbet, D J; Ricke, S C

    2008-07-01

    Molting is a natural process, which birds undergo to rejuvenate their reproductive organs. The US poultry egg production industry has used feed withdrawal to effectively induce molt; however, susceptibility of Salmonella Enteritidis has encouraged the development of alternative methods. Previous research conducted in our laboratory showed that alfalfa is effective at molt induction and provides equivalent postmolt production numbers and quality when compared with feed withdrawal. In the attempt to further increase the efficacy of alfalfa molt diet and decrease the chicken susceptibility to Salmonella Enteritidis during molt, fructooligosaccharide (FOS) was added to a combination of 90% alfalfa and 10% layer ration in 2 levels (0.750 and 0.375%). Ovary and liver colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis in 3 and 2 of the 4 trials, respectively, were reduced (P Salmonella Enteritidis counts were also observed in 2 of the 4 trials. In 3 of the 4 trials, the same diets did not affect (P > 0.05) the production of cecal total volatile fatty acids when compared with hens undergoing feed withdrawal. However, in all 3 alfalfa molt diets, the concentrations of lactic acid were greater (P 0.05) were observed among hens fed alfalfa combined with FOS and hens fed alfalfa/layer ration without FOS. Overall, given the similarities between hens fed 0.750% FOS (H) and 0.375% FOS (L), molt diets combined with the lower level of FOS should be sufficient.

  17. A Salmonella Enterica Subsp. Enterica Serovar Enteritidis Foodborne Outbreak after Consumption of Homemade Lasagne

    PubMed Central

    Gariano, Grazia Rosaria; Bianchi, Daniela Manila; Zuccon, Fabio; Sommariva, Marco; Nguon, Bovannrith; Malabaila, Aurelio; Gallina, Silvia; Decastelli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    In the latest year, and also in 2013, Salmonella was the most frequently detected causative agent in foodborne outbreaks (FBOs) reported in Europe. As indicated in EFSA report (2015) the serotypes mostly associated to FBOs are S. Typhimurium and Enteritidis; while Salmonella Typhimurium is generally associated with the consumption of contaminated pork and beef, FBOs due to Salmonella Enteritidis are linked to eggs and poultry meat. In this study it is described the investigation of a domestic FBO involving four adults and linked to homemade lasagne. Investigations were performed to determine the relatedness of Salmonella strains, identify the sources of infection, and trace the routes of Salmonella contamination in this FBO. Salmonella strains were isolated in 3 out of 4 patient stool samples and from lasagne and all of them were serotyped as S. Enteritidis. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis revealed the genotypical similarity of all the strains. Although serotyping and PFGE analysis identified the common food source of infection in this FBO, it was not possible to determine how or at what point during food preparation the lasagne became contaminated with Salmonella. PMID:27800418

  18. Live attenuated vaccines for invasive Salmonella infections.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; Levine, Myron M

    2015-06-19

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi produces significant morbidity and mortality worldwide despite the fact that there are licensed Salmonella Typhi vaccines available. This is primarily due to the fact that these vaccines are not used in the countries that most need them. There is growing recognition that an effective invasive Salmonella vaccine formulation must also prevent infection due to other Salmonella serovars. We anticipate that a multivalent vaccine that targets the following serovars will be needed to control invasive Salmonella infections worldwide: Salmonella Typhi, Salmonella Paratyphi A, Salmonella Paratyphi B (currently uncommon but may become dominant again), Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Choleraesuis (as well as other Group C Salmonella). Live attenuated vaccines are an attractive vaccine formulation for use in developing as well as developed countries. Here, we describe the methods of attenuation that have been used to date to create live attenuated Salmonella vaccines and provide an update on the progress that has been made on these vaccines.

  19. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis enterocolitis during late stages of gestation induces an adverse pregnancy outcome in the murine model.

    PubMed

    Noto Llana, Mariángeles; Sarnacki, Sebastián Hernán; Aya Castañeda, María del Rosario; Pustovrh, María Carolina; Gartner, Alejandra Sonia; Buzzola, Fernanda Roxana; Cerquetti, María Cristina; Giacomodonato, Mónica Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Foodborne diseases caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) are a significant health problem. Pregnancy, state of immunological tolerance, is a predisposing condition for the development of infections with intracellular pathogens. Salmonella species can cause pregnancy complications such as chorioamnionitis, transplacental fetal infection, pre term labor, abortions, neonatal and maternal septicemia. However, the specific mechanisms by which Salmonella infections trigger these alterations are not clear. In the present work, using a self-limiting enterocolitis murine model, we show that the ingestion of a low dose of S. Enteritidis at late stages of pregnancy (day 15 of gestation) is sufficient to induce massive maternal infection. We found that Salmonella infection leads to 40% of pre term delivery, 33% of abortion and fetal growth restriction. Placental dysfunction during S. Enteritidis enterocolitis was confirmed through cellular infiltration and hypoxia markers (MPO activity and COX-1 and COX-2 expression, respectively). Apoptosis in placental tissue due to Salmonella infection was also evident at day 18 of gestation when investigated by morphometric procedure, DNA fragmentation and Fas/FasL expression. Also, the expression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17 and IL-10 was up regulated in response to Salmonella not only in placenta, but also in amniotic fluid and maternal serum. Altogether, our results demonstrate that S. Enteritidis enterocolitis during late stages of gestation causes detrimental effect on pregnancy outcome.

  20. Refined live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Enteritidis vaccines mediate homologous and heterologous serogroup protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; Schmidlein, Patrick; Simon, Raphael; Pasetti, Marcela F; Galen, James E; Levine, Myron M

    2015-12-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections constitute a major health problem among infants and toddlers in sub-Saharan Africa; these infections also occur in infants and the elderly in developed countries. We genetically engineered a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of multilocus sequence type 313, the predominant genotype circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the capacities of S. Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ΔguaBA ΔclpX live oral vaccines to protect mice against a highly lethal challenge dose of the homologous serovar and determined protection against other group B and D serovars circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. The vaccines S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 were immunogenic and protected BALB/c mice against 10,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis, respectively. S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 protected mice against the group B serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Stanleyville (91% vaccine efficacy), and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 protected mice against the group D serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (85% vaccine efficacy). High rates of survival were observed when mice were infected 12 weeks postimmunization, indicating that the vaccines elicited long-lived protective immunity. Whereas CVD 1931 did not protect against S. Enteritidis R11, CVD 1944 did mediate protection against S. Typhimurium D65 (81% efficacy). These findings suggest that a bivalent (S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis) vaccine would provide broad protection against the majority of invasive NTS infections in sub-Saharan Africa.

  1. Refined Live Attenuated Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Enteritidis Vaccines Mediate Homologous and Heterologous Serogroup Protection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schmidlein, Patrick; Simon, Raphael; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections constitute a major health problem among infants and toddlers in sub-Saharan Africa; these infections also occur in infants and the elderly in developed countries. We genetically engineered a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of multilocus sequence type 313, the predominant genotype circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the capacities of S. Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ΔguaBA ΔclpX live oral vaccines to protect mice against a highly lethal challenge dose of the homologous serovar and determined protection against other group B and D serovars circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. The vaccines S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 were immunogenic and protected BALB/c mice against 10,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis, respectively. S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 protected mice against the group B serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Stanleyville (91% vaccine efficacy), and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 protected mice against the group D serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (85% vaccine efficacy). High rates of survival were observed when mice were infected 12 weeks postimmunization, indicating that the vaccines elicited long-lived protective immunity. Whereas CVD 1931 did not protect against S. Enteritidis R11, CVD 1944 did mediate protection against S. Typhimurium D65 (81% efficacy). These findings suggest that a bivalent (S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis) vaccine would provide broad protection against the majority of invasive NTS infections in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:26351285

  2. Genomic and phenotypic variation in epidemic-spanning Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis isolates

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) has caused major epidemics of gastrointestinal infection in many different countries. In this study we investigate genome divergence and pathogenic potential in S. Enteritidis isolated before, during and after an epidemic in Uruguay. Results 266 S. Enteritidis isolates were genotyped using RAPD-PCR and a selection were subjected to PFGE analysis. From these, 29 isolates spanning different periods, genetic profiles and sources of isolation were assayed for their ability to infect human epithelial cells and subjected to comparative genomic hybridization using a Salmonella pan-array and the sequenced strain S. Enteritidis PT4 P125109 as reference. Six other isolates from distant countries were included as external comparators. Two hundred and thirty three chromosomal genes as well as the virulence plasmid were found as variable among S. Enteritidis isolates. Ten out of the 16 chromosomal regions that varied between different isolates correspond to phage-like regions. The 2 oldest pre-epidemic isolates lack phage SE20 and harbour other phage encoded genes that are absent in the sequenced strain. Besides variation in prophage, we found variation in genes involved in metabolism and bacterial fitness. Five epidemic strains lack the complete Salmonella virulence plasmid. Significantly, strains with indistinguishable genetic patterns still showed major differences in their ability to infect epithelial cells, indicating that the approach used was insufficient to detect the genetic basis of this differential behaviour. Conclusion The recent epidemic of S. Enteritidis infection in Uruguay has been driven by the introduction of closely related strains of phage type 4 lineage. Our results confirm previous reports demonstrating a high degree of genetic homogeneity among S. Enteritidis isolates. However, 10 of the regions of variability described here are for the first time reported as being variable in S

  3. Salmonella enteritidis Effector AvrA Stabilizes Intestinal Tight Junctions via the JNK Pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhijie; Zhang, Yong-Guo; Xia, Yinglin; Xu, Xiulong; Jiao, Xinan; Sun, Jun

    2016-12-23

    Salmonella pathogenesis studies to date have focused on Salmonella typhimurium, and the pathogenesis of a second major serotype, Salmonella enteritidis, is poorly understood. Salmonella spp. possess effector proteins that display biochemical activities and modulate host functions. Here, we generated a deletion mutant of the effector AvrA, S.E-AvrA(-), and a plasmid-mediated complementary strain, S.E-AvrA(-)/pAvrA(+) (S.E-AvrA(+)), in S. Enteritidis. Using in vitro and in vivo infection models, we showed that AvrA stabilizes epithelial tight junction (TJ) proteins, such as ZO-1, in human intestinal epithelial cells. Transepithelial electrical resistance was significantly higher in cells infected with S.E-AvrA(+) than in cells infected with S.E-AvrA(-) Inhibition of the JNK pathway suppresses the disassembly of TJ proteins; we found that enteritidis AvrA inhibited JNK activity in cells infected with wild type or S.E-AvrA(+) strains. Therefore, Enteritidis AvrA-induced ZO-1 stability is achieved via suppression of the JNK pathway. Furthermore, the S.E-AvrA(-) strain led to enhanced bacterial invasion, both in vitro and in vivo Taken together, our data reveal a novel role for AvrA in S. Enteritidis: Enteritidis AvrA stabilizes intestinal TJs and attenuates bacterial invasion. The manipulation of JNK activity and TJs in microbial-epithelial interactions may be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of infectious diseases. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Feed Supplementation with Red Seaweeds, Chondrus crispus and Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii, Reduce Salmonella Enteritidis in Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Kulshreshtha, Garima; Rathgeber, Bruce; MacIsaac, Janice; Boulianne, Martine; Brigitte, Lehoux; Stratton, Glenn; Thomas, Nikhil A.; Critchley, Alan T.; Hafting, Jeff; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is vertically transmitted to eggs from laying hens through infected ovaries and oviducts. S. Enteritidis can also penetrate the eggshell from contaminated feces. Reducing S. Enteritidis in laying hens is vital to provide safer eggs and minimize the spread of salmonellosis to humans. Antibiotics have been widely used to control bacterial diseases in broilers and laying hens. However, there is a major concern that the use of antibiotics leads to the development of antibiotic resistance and adverse effects on microbiota of the treated birds. Thus, there is an interest in developing alternatives to antibiotics, such as dietary prebiotics. In the present study, feed supplemented with the red seaweeds: Chondrus crispus (CC) or Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii (SG), was offered to laying hens late in production to control S. Enteritidis. Diets contained one of the following; 2% or 4% Chondrus crispus (CC2, and CC4, respectively) or Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii (SG2 and SG4, respectively). Chlortetracycline was used in the positive control diet. During week-4, 48 birds were orally challenged with 2 × 109 CFU/mL of S. Enteritidis. Eggs and fecal samples were collected 1, 3, 5, and 7 days’ post inoculation. Birds were euthanized and organs (ceca, ovary, liver, and spleen) were sampled and analyzed for the presence of S. Enteritidis, 7 days’ post inoculation. Results showed that seaweed reduced the negative effect on body weight and egg production in S. Enteritidis-challenged laying hens. Analysis of fecal samples showed that the antibiotic (CTC) reduced S. Enteritidis in the intestinal tract and fecal samples, 3 days’ post inoculation. Fecal samples from Chlortetracycline and CC4 supplemented birds tested negative for S. Enteritidis on days 5 and 7 post inoculation (lowest detection limit = 10-1). S. Enteritidis colonization in the ceca was also significantly reduced in birds fed CC (4%) and Chlortetracycline. Blood serum profiles revealed that there

  5. Fitness Costs and Stability of a High-Level Ciprofloxacin Resistance Phenotype in Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis: Reduced Infectivity Associated with Decreased Expression of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 Genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The fitness costs associated with high-level fluoroquinolone resistance were examined in phenotypically and genotypically characterized ciprofloxacin-resistant Salmonella Enteritidis mutants (104-cip and 5408-cip, MIC > 32 µg/ml). The stability of the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype in both mut...

  6. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment of Salmonella Enteritidis inoculated eggshells.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Maike; Wiacek, Claudia; Koethe, Martin; Braun, Peggy G

    2017-03-20

    Contamination of eggshells with Salmonella Enteritidis remains a food safety concern. In many cases human salmonellosis within the EU can be traced back to raw or undercooked eggs and egg products. Atmospheric pressure plasma is a novel decontamination method that can reduce a wide range of pathogens. The aim of this work was to evaluate the possibility of using an effective short time cold plasma treatment to inactivate Salmonella Enteritidis on the eggshell. Therefore, artificially contaminated eggshells were treated with an atmospheric pressure plasma jet under different experimental settings with various exposure times (15-300s), distances from the plasma jet nozzle to the eggshell surface (5, 8 or 12mm), feed gas compositions (Ar, Ar with 0.2, 0.5 or 1.0% O2), gas flow rates (5 and 7slm) and different inoculations of Salmonella Enteritidis (10(1)-10(6)CFU/cm(2)). Atmospheric pressure plasma could reduce Salmonella Enteritidis on eggshells significantly. Reduction factors ranged between 0.22 and 2.27 log CFU (colony-forming units). Exposure time and, particularly at 10(4)CFU/cm(2) inoculation, feed gas had a major impact on Salmonella reduction. Precisely, longer exposure times led to higher reductions and Ar as feed gas was more effective than ArO2 mixtures.

  7. Distinct Salmonella Enteritidis lineages associated with enterocolitis in high-income settings and invasive disease in low-income settings

    PubMed Central

    Feasey, Nicholas A.; Hadfield, James; Keddy, Karen H.; Dallman, Timothy J; Jacobs, Jan; Deng, Xiangyu; Wigley, Paul; Barquist, Lars; Langridge, Gemma C.; Feltwell, Theresa; Harris, Simon R.; Mather, Alison E.; Fookes, Maria; Aslett, Martin; Msefula, Chisomo; Kariuki, Samuel; Maclennan, Calman A.; Onsare, Robert S.; Weill, François-Xavier; Le Hello, Simon; Smith, Anthony M.; McClelland, Michael; Desai, Prerak; Parry, Christopher M.; Cheesbrough, John; French, Neil; Campos, Josefina; Chabalgoity, Jose A.; Betancor, Laura; Hopkins, Katie L.; Nair, Satheesh; Humphrey, Tom J.; Lunguya, Octavie; Cogan, Tristan A.; Tapia, Milagritos D.; Sow, Samba O.; Tennant, Sharon M.; Bornstein, Kristin; Levine, Myron M.; Lacharme-Lora, Lizeth; Everett, Dean B.; Kingsley, Robert A.; Parkhill, Julian; Heyderman, Robert S.; Dougan, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    An epidemiological paradox surrounds Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. In high-income settings, it has been responsible for an epidemic of poultry-associated, self-limiting enterocolitis, whilst in sub-Saharan Africa it is a major cause of invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella disease, associated with high case-fatality. Whole-genome sequence analysis of 675 isolates of S. Enteritidis from 45 countries reveals the existence of a global epidemic clade and two novel clades of S. Enteritidis that are each geographically restricted to distinct regions of Africa. The African isolates display genomic degradation, a novel prophage repertoire and have an expanded, multidrug resistance plasmid. S. Enteritidis is a further example of a Salmonella serotype that displays niche plasticity, with distinct clades that enable it to become a prominent cause of gastroenteritis in association with the industrial production of eggs, and of multidrug resistant, bloodstream invasive infection in Africa. PMID:27548315

  8. Distinct Salmonella Enteritidis lineages associated with enterocolitis in high-income settings and invasive disease in low-income settings.

    PubMed

    Feasey, Nicholas A; Hadfield, James; Keddy, Karen H; Dallman, Timothy J; Jacobs, Jan; Deng, Xiangyu; Wigley, Paul; Barquist, Lars; Langridge, Gemma C; Feltwell, Theresa; Harris, Simon R; Mather, Alison E; Fookes, Maria; Aslett, Martin; Msefula, Chisomo; Kariuki, Samuel; Maclennan, Calman A; Onsare, Robert S; Weill, François-Xavier; Le Hello, Simon; Smith, Anthony M; McClelland, Michael; Desai, Prerak; Parry, Christopher M; Cheesbrough, John; French, Neil; Campos, Josefina; Chabalgoity, Jose A; Betancor, Laura; Hopkins, Katie L; Nair, Satheesh; Humphrey, Tom J; Lunguya, Octavie; Cogan, Tristan A; Tapia, Milagritos D; Sow, Samba O; Tennant, Sharon M; Bornstein, Kristin; Levine, Myron M; Lacharme-Lora, Lizeth; Everett, Dean B; Kingsley, Robert A; Parkhill, Julian; Heyderman, Robert S; Dougan, Gordon; Gordon, Melita A; Thomson, Nicholas R

    2016-10-01

    An epidemiological paradox surrounds Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. In high-income settings, it has been responsible for an epidemic of poultry-associated, self-limiting enterocolitis, whereas in sub-Saharan Africa it is a major cause of invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella disease, associated with high case fatality. By whole-genome sequence analysis of 675 isolates of S. Enteritidis from 45 countries, we show the existence of a global epidemic clade and two new clades of S. Enteritidis that are geographically restricted to distinct regions of Africa. The African isolates display genomic degradation, a novel prophage repertoire, and an expanded multidrug resistance plasmid. S. Enteritidis is a further example of a Salmonella serotype that displays niche plasticity, with distinct clades that enable it to become a prominent cause of gastroenteritis in association with the industrial production of eggs and of multidrug-resistant, bloodstream-invasive infection in Africa.

  9. Tightly regulated bacteriolysis for production of empty Salmonella Enteritidis envelope.

    PubMed

    Jawale, Chetan V; Kim, Sam Woong; Lee, John Hwa

    2014-03-14

    To avoid leaky expression of the bacterial host-toxic PhiX174 lysis gene E from the λpR promoter, a convergent promoter construct was made in which gene E was placed between a sense λpR promoter and an anti-sense P araBAD promoter. In the presence of l-arabinose, leaky transcription of lysis gene E at 28°C from the sense λpR promoter was repressed by an anti-sense RNA simultaneously expressed from the P araBAD promoter. The stringent repression of lysis gene E in the absence of induction temperature resulted into higher concentration of bacteria in culture suspension, and consequently higher and stable production of a Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) ghost. The immunogenicity of the S. Enteritidis ghost was evaluated by immunizing chickens. Chickens from the immunized group demonstrated a significant increase in the levels of S. Enteritidis-specific plasma IgG, intestinal sIgA, and lymphocyte proliferative response. After virulent S. Enteritidis challenge, the immunized group exhibited decreased bacterial recovery from organs compared with the non-immunized group. Together, these results demonstrate that the stringent molecular control over leaky transcription of lysis gene E enabled the stable production of S. Enteritidis ghost, and immunization with the S. Enteritidis ghost can protect chickens by inducing robust humoral and cellular immune responses.

  10. Salmonella Infections

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infections with bacteria of the genus Salmonella are responsible for both acute and chronic poultry diseases. These diseases cause economically significant losses for poultry producers in many nations and absorb large investments of public and private resources in testing and control efforts. Infect...

  11. Method for the detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    DOEpatents

    Agron, Peter G.; Andersen, Gary L.; Walker, Richard L.

    2008-10-28

    Described herein is the identification of a novel Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis locus that serves as a marker for DNA-based identification of this bacterium. In addition, three primer pairs derived from this locus that may be used in a nucleotide detection method to detect the presence of the bacterium are also disclosed herein.

  12. Antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enteritidis, southern Italy, 1990-1998.

    PubMed Central

    Nastasi, A.; Mammina, C.; Cannova, L.

    2000-01-01

    During 1990 to 1998, we identified multidrug-resistant isolates of Salmonella Enteritidis in southern Italy. Plasmids containing class I integrons and codifying for synthesis of extended- spectrum beta-lactamases were detected. Active surveillance for resistance to antimicrobial agents is needed to guard against the possible spread of resistant clones. PMID:10905977

  13. Epigenetic Modification of TLRs in Leukocytes Is Associated with Increased Susceptibility to Salmonella enteritidis in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guiping; Zheng, Maiqing; Li, Peng; Wang, Huihua; Zhu, Yun; Chen, Jilan; Wen, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) signaling pathways are the first lines in defense against Salmonella enteritidis (S. enteritidis) infection but the molecular mechanism underlying susceptibility to S. enteritidis infection in chicken remains unclear. SPF chickens injected with S. enteritidis were partitioned into two groups, one consisted of those from Salmonella-susceptible chickens (died within 5 d after injection, n = 6), the other consisted of six Salmonella-resistant chickens that survived for 15 d after injection. The present study shows that the bacterial load in susceptible chickens was significantly higher than that in resistant chickens and TLR4, TLR2-1 and TLR21 expression was strongly diminished in the leukocytes of susceptible chickens compared with those of resistant chickens. The induction of expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes, IL-6 and IFN-β, was greatly enhanced in the resistant but not in susceptible chickens. Contrasting with the reduced expression of TLR genes, those of the zinc finger protein 493 (ZNF493) gene and Toll-interacting protein (TOLLIP) gene were enhanced in the susceptible chickens. Finally, the expression of TLR4 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) infected in vitro with S. enteritidis increased significantly as a result of treatment with 5-Aza-2-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dc) while either 5-Aza-dc or trichostatin A was effective in up-regulating the expression of TLR21 and TLR2-1. DNA methylation, in the predicted promoter region of TLR4 and TLR21 genes, and an exonic CpG island of the TLR2-1 gene was significantly higher in the susceptible chickens than in resistant chickens. Taken together, the results demonstrate that ZNF493-related epigenetic modification in leukocytes probably accounts for increased susceptibility to S. enteritidis in chickens by diminishing the expression and response of TLR4, TLR21 and TLR2-1. PMID:22438967

  14. Reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis in the Spleens of Hens by Bacterins That Vary in Fimbrial Protein SefD

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Ingunza, Roxana; Morales, Cesar A.; Icard, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this research was to determine whether variation in the presence of fimbrial protein SefD would impact efficacy of bacterins as measured by recovery of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) from the spleens of hens. Two bacterins were prepared that varied in SefD content. Also, two adjuvants were tested, namely, water-in-oil and aluminum hydroxide gel (alum). Control groups for both adjuvant preparations included infected nonvaccinated hens and uninfected nonvaccinated hens. At 21 days postinfection, Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered from 69.7%, 53.1%, and 86.0% from the spleens of all hens vaccinated with bacterins lacking SefD, bacterins that included SefD, and infected nonvaccinated control hens, respectively. No Salmonella was recovered from uninfected nonvaccinates. Results from individual trials showed that both bacterins reduced positive spleens, but that the one with SefD was more efficacious. Alum adjuvant had fewer side effects on hens and egg production as compared to water-in-oil. However, adjuvant did not change the relative recovery of Salmonella Enteritidis from spleens. These results suggest that SefD is a promising target antigen for improving the efficacy of immunotherapy in hens, and is intended to reduce Salmonella Enteritidis in the food supply. PMID:26218804

  15. Reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis in the spleens of hens by bacterins that vary in fimbrial protein SefD.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Ingunza, Roxana; Guard, Jean; Morales, Cesar A; Icard, Alan H

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this research was to determine whether variation in the presence of fimbrial protein SefD would impact efficacy of bacterins as measured by recovery of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) from the spleens of hens. Two bacterins were prepared that varied in SefD content. Also, two adjuvants were tested, namely, water-in-oil and aluminum hydroxide gel (alum). Control groups for both adjuvant preparations included infected nonvaccinated hens and uninfected nonvaccinated hens. At 21 days postinfection, Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered from 69.7%, 53.1%, and 86.0% from the spleens of all hens vaccinated with bacterins lacking SefD, bacterins that included SefD, and infected nonvaccinated control hens, respectively. No Salmonella was recovered from uninfected nonvaccinates. Results from individual trials showed that both bacterins reduced positive spleens, but that the one with SefD was more efficacious. Alum adjuvant had fewer side effects on hens and egg production as compared to water-in-oil. However, adjuvant did not change the relative recovery of Salmonella Enteritidis from spleens. These results suggest that SefD is a promising target antigen for improving the efficacy of immunotherapy in hens, and is intended to reduce Salmonella Enteritidis in the food supply.

  16. Bio-Control of Salmonella Enteritidis in Foods Using Bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hongduo; Zhang, Pengyu; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Ran

    2015-08-24

    Two lytic phages, vB_SenM-PA13076 (PA13076) and vB_SenM-PC2184 (PC2184), were isolated from chicken sewage and characterized with host strains Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) ATCC13076 and CVCC2184, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that they belonged to the family Myoviridae. The lytic abilities of these two phages in liquid culture showed 104 multiplicity of infection (MOI) was the best in inhibiting bacteria, with PC2184 exhibiting more activity than PA13076. The two phages exhibited broad host range within the genus Salmonella. Phage PA13076 and PC2184 had a lytic effect on 222 (71.4%) and 298 (95.8%) of the 311 epidemic Salmonella isolates, respectively. We tested the effectiveness of phage PA13076 and PC2184 as well as a cocktail combination of both in three different foods (chicken breast, pasteurized whole milk and Chinese cabbage) contaminated with SE. Samples were spiked with 1 × 10(4) CFU individual SE or a mixture of strains (ATCC13076 and CVCC2184), then treated with 1 × 10(8) PFU individual phage or a two phage cocktail, and incubated at 4 °C or 25 °C for 5 h. In general, the inhibitory effect of phage and phage cocktail was better at 4 °C than that at 25 °C, whereas the opposite result was observed in Chinese cabbage, and phage cocktail was better than either single phage. A significant reduction in bacterial numbers (1.5-4 log CFU/sample, p < 0.05) was observed in all tested foods. The two phages on the three food samples were relatively stable, especially at 4 ºC, with the phages exhibiting the greatest stability in milk. Our research shows that our phages have potential effectiveness as a bio-control agent of Salmonella in foods.

  17. Presence of Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella gallinarum in commercial laying hens diagnosed with fowl typhoid disease in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Pulido-Landínez, Martha; Sánchez-Ingunza, Roxana; Guard, Jean; do Nascimento, Vladimir Pinheiro

    2014-03-01

    A severe outbreak of salmonellosis in commercial brown table egg layers first occurred in Colombia in 2006. From 2008 to 2012, 35 samples collected from commercial layers farms in the states of Cundinamarca, Santander, Bolivar, and San Andres, were positive for Salmonella enterica. Salmonella was isolated from liver and spleen (71.42%), pools of organs (liver, spleen, and ovarian follicles; 25.71%), and drag swabs (2.85%). Serotype was assigned using single nucleotide polymorphisms or DNA microarray hybridization. Sixteen strains of Salmonella Enteritidis, and 13 of Salmonella Gallinarum were identified. Seven strains yielded three unique sequences, and they were designated as UN0038, UN0052, and UN0054 by intergenic sequence ribotyping. These strains were later identified as Salmonella serotypes Isangi, Braenderup, and Yoruba, respectively, by DNA microarray hybridization. The discovery that a common human pathogen (Salmonella Enteritidis) was coisolated from farms with an avian pathogen (Salmonella Gallinarum) in similar commercial brown layer hens and in different regions indicates that it is important to investigate the dynamics of Salmonella infection and determine the serotypes circulating within the same ecologic niche.

  18. Effect of a Selected Lactobacillus spp-Based Probiotic on Salmonella Serovar Enteritidis-Infected Broiler Chicks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effect of a Lactobacillus-based probiotic (FM-B11**TM) on Salmonella recovery was evaluated in liquid (Exp. 1) and lyophilized (Exp. 2) forms in two separate experiments with two trials each. For each trial, eighty broiler chicks were randomly allocated into two treatments: control and probioti...

  19. The Natural Reservoirs of Salmonella Enteritidis in Populations of Wild Birds

    PubMed Central

    Obukhovska, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of our study was to identify possible natural reservoirs of Salmonella Enteritidis among wild birds. Introduction Salmonella Enteritidis is dangerous for human due the reason of toxicoinfaction. These pathogen demonstrate high virulence for small children and people with chronic pathologies and can causes people die. The main source of infection to humans is birds (poultry and wild). Wild birds represent the natural reservoir of same bacterial pathogens. It is known that Salmonella can occupy an intestinal tract of birds. This colonization in general is constant, sometimes proceeds with an alternating fever, and usually, without clinical signs. Infected birds can transmit pathogens to other isolates in close contact. This usually occurs on the nesting during seasonal migrations. In the southern region of Ukraine are several points of intersection of migration routes of wild birds on the way from Europe to Africa and Asia (National Park “Askania Nova”and others). Methods The study was conducted in populations of wild birds in National Park “Askania Nova” and peninsula “Arabat arrow” (the Azov Sea coast). From bird selected samples of blood serum and egg yolks for research in serum plate agglutination test (SPA) and litter samples for bacteriological research. Results The serological monitoring in populations of wild waterfowl in National Park “Askania Nova” (Ichthyaetus relictus, Sterna nilotica, Sterna herundo, Casarca ferruginea) has shown the presence of seropozitive individuals in adult birds (average 18%) and egg yolks (avarrage 12%). The bacteriological investigations confirmed circulation of Salmonella in this group of birds. 32.3% of all bacterial pathogens was Salmonella and more then half of them was the reprezentatives of serovar Salmonella Enteritidis. Similar studies were conducted on territory of peninsula “Arabat arrow” (the Azov Sea coast). The serological monitoring among of wild waterfowl (Ardea cinerea, Sterna

  20. Draft genome sequences of 21 Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis strains.

    PubMed

    Timme, Ruth E; Allard, Marc W; Luo, Yan; Strain, Errol; Pettengill, James; Wang, Charles; Li, Cong; Keys, Christine E; Zheng, Jie; Stones, Robert; Wilson, Mark R; Musser, Steven M; Brown, Eric W

    2012-11-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is a common food-borne pathogen, often associated with shell eggs and poultry. Here, we report draft genomes of 21 S. Enteritidis strains associated with or related to the U.S.-wide 2010 shell egg recall. Eleven of these genomes were from environmental isolates associated with the egg outbreak, and 10 were reference isolates from previous years, unrelated to the outbreak. The whole-genome sequence data for these 21 human pathogen strains are being released in conjunction with the newly formed 100K Genome Project.

  1. Salmonella infections

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infections of poultry with bacteria of the genus Salmonella can cause clinical disease, but are of greater current concern as agents of food-borne transmission of illness to humans. However, two nonmotile organisms, S. Pullorum and S. Gallinarum, are host-specific for avian species. Pullorum disease...

  2. 21 CFR 118.6 - Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.6... testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a)(1) If the environmental test for pullets at 14 to 16 weeks of... requires that these eggs must be treated to achieve at least a 5-log destruction of Salmonella...

  3. 75 FR 18849 - Small Entity Compliance Guide: Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Small Entity Compliance Guide: Prevention of Salmonella... availability of a guidance entitled ``Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During Production... producers to implement measures to prevent Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) from contaminating eggs on the farm...

  4. 21 CFR 118.6 - Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.6... testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a)(1) If the environmental test for pullets at 14 to 16 weeks of... requires that these eggs must be treated to achieve at least a 5-log destruction of Salmonella...

  5. In vitro penetration of Salmonella Enteritidis through yolk membranes of eggs from 6 genetically distinct commercial lines of laying hens.

    PubMed

    Gast, R K; Jones, D R; Anderson, K E; Guraya, R; Guard, J; Holt, P S

    2010-08-01

    Although deposition of Salmonella Enteritidis inside yolks is less common than deposition in albumen or on the vitelline (yolk) membrane in naturally contaminated eggs laid by infected hens, bacterial migration into the yolk to reach its nutrient-rich contents could lead to extensive multiplication. The present study used an in vitro egg contamination model to assess the ability of small initial numbers of Salmonella Enteritidis to penetrate the vitelline membrane and multiply inside yolks of eggs laid by 6 genetically distinct commercial lines of hens during 24 h of storage at 30 degrees C. Eggs from each line were tested at 4 different hen ages by inoculation of approximately 100 cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis onto the outside of the vitelline membranes of intact yolks in plastic centrifuge tubes and then adding back the albumen into each tube before incubation. Overall, the frequency of penetration of Salmonella Enteritidis into the yolk contents of eggs from individual lines of hens ranged from 30 to 58% and the mean concentration of Salmonella Enteritidis in yolk contents after incubation ranged from 0.8 to 2.0 log(10) cfu/mL. For both of these parameters, values for one hen line were significantly higher than for 2 other lines, but no other differences were observed. Hen age did not have a significant effect on egg yolk penetration by Salmonella Enteritidis. These results indicate that opportunities for the migration and growth of small initial numbers of Salmonella Enteritidis to attain more dangerous levels inside contaminated eggs during storage at warm temperatures can sometimes vary between different lines of laying hens.

  6. Salmonella Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Salmonella Infections KidsHealth > For Parents > Salmonella Infections A A ... bathroom and before handling food in any way. Salmonella Basics Not everyone who ingests Salmonella bacteria will ...

  7. Comparison of four molecular methods to type Salmonella Enteritidis strains.

    PubMed

    Campioni, Fábio; Pitondo-Silva, André; Bergamini, Alzira M M; Falcão, Juliana P

    2015-05-01

    This study compared the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR (ERIC-PCR), multilocus variable-number of tanden-repeat analysis (MLVA), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) methods for typing 188 Salmonella Enteritidis strains from different sources isolated over a 24-year period in Brazil. PFGE and ERIC-PCR were more efficient than MLVA for subtyping the strains. However, MLVA provided additional epidemiological information for those strains. In addition, MLST showed the Brazilian strains as belonging to the main clonal complex of S. Enteritidis, CC11, and provided the first report of two new STs in the S. enterica database but could not properly subtype the strains. Our results showed that the use of PFGE or ERIC-PCR together with MLVA is suitable to efficiently subtype S. Enteritidis strains and provide important epidemiological information.

  8. The Salmonella Enteritidis lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis gene rfbH is required for survival in egg albumen.

    PubMed

    Gantois, I; Ducatelle, R; Pasmans, F; Haesebrouck, F; Van Immerseel, F

    2009-04-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is still a major cause of human food borne infections and can be associated with the consumption of meat and chicken eggs. It is the world's most common cause of salmonellosis in part because it has the ability to colonize the oviduct and contaminate eggs. It was shown that when stored at room temperature, S. Enteritidis bacteria can multiply extensively in contaminated eggs. Using the in vivo expression technology, it was shown that the rfbH gene, involved in lipopolysaccharide O-antigen synthesis, is transcriptionally induced during growth in whole eggs at room temperature. A S. Enteritidis DeltarfbH strain was unable to multiply in eggs at room temperature and did not survive in egg white at 42 degrees C. The attenuation was most likely caused by an increased susceptibility of the DeltarfbH mutant to yet undefined antibacterial components of the egg albumen.

  9. Integration host factor is important for biofilm formation by Salmonella enterica Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Leite, Bruna; Werle, Catierine Hirsch; Carmo, Camila Pinheiro do; Nóbrega, Diego Borin; Milanez, Guilherme Paier; Culler, Hebert Fabricio; Sircili, Marcelo Palma; Alvarez-Martinez, Cristina E; Brocchi, Marcelo

    2017-08-31

    Salmonella enterica Enteritidis forms biofilms and survives in agricultural environments, infecting poultry and eggs. Bacteria in biofilms are difficult to eradicate compared to planktonic cells, causing serious problems in industry and public health. In this study, we evaluated the role of ihfA and ihfB in biofilm formation by S. enterica Enteritidis by employing different microbiology techniques. Our data indicate that ihf mutant strains are impaired in biofilm formation, showing a reduction in matrix formation and a decrease in viability and metabolic activity. Phenotypic analysis also showed that deletion of ihf causes a deficiency in curli fimbriae expression, cellulose production and pellicle formation. These results show that integration host factor has an important regulatory role in biofilm formation by S. enterica Enteritidis. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Overcrowding stress decreases macrophage activity and increases Salmonella Enteritidis invasion in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Gomes, A V S; Quinteiro-Filho, W M; Ribeiro, A; Ferraz-de-Paula, V; Pinheiro, M L; Baskeville, E; Akamine, A T; Astolfi-Ferreira, C S; Ferreira, A J P; Palermo-Neto, J

    2014-01-01

    Overcrowding stress is a reality in the poultry industry. Chickens exposed to long-term stressful situations present a reduction of welfare and immunosuppression. We designed this experiment to analyse the effects from overcrowding stress of 16 birds/m(2) on performance parameters, serum corticosterone levels, the relative weight of the bursa of Fabricius, plasma IgA and IgG levels, intestinal integrity, macrophage activity and experimental Salmonella Enteritidis invasion. The results of this study indicate that overcrowding stress decreased performance parameters, induced enteritis and decreased macrophage activity and the relative bursa weight in broiler chickens. When the chickens were similarly stressed and infected with Salmonella Enteritidis, there was an increase in feed conversion and a decrease in plasma IgG levels in the stressed and Salmonella-infected birds. We observed moderate enteritis throughout the duodenum of chickens stressed and infected with Salmonella. The overcrowding stress decreased the macrophage phagocytosis intensity and increased Salmonella Enteritidis counts in the livers of birds challenged with the pathogenic bacterium. Overcrowding stress via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that is associated with an increase in corticosterone and enteritis might influence the quality of the intestinal immune barrier and the integrity of the small intestine. This effect allowed pathogenic bacteria to migrate through the intestinal mucosa, resulting in inflammatory infiltration and decreased nutrient absorption. The data strengthen the hypothesis that control of the welfare of chickens and avoidance of stress from overcrowding in poultry production are relevant factors for the maintenance of intestinal integrity, performance and decreased susceptibility to Salmonella infection.

  11. Distribution of Salmonella serovars and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella Enteritidis from poultry in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Makaya, P V; Matope, G; Pfukenyi, D M

    2012-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine the distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of Salmonella serovars from chickens from large-scale commercial (LSC), small-scale commercial (SSC), and rural free-range (RFR) farms of Zimbabwe. Pooled cloacal swabs were collected for culture and isolation of Salmonella spp. A chi-square test was used to assess distribution differences of salmonellas among the farming sectors. Approximately 10% (283/2833) of the swabs were positive for Salmonella enterica, with only subspecies enterica (98.6%) and arizonae (1.4%) being detected. The prevalence of S. enterica varied significantly (P<0.05) among areas, with Harare (27.8%) and Buhera (1.3%) recording the highest and the least prevalence, respectively. S. enterica was only isolated from LSC and SSC farms, with the former having a significantly (P<0.001; χ(2)=155.3) higher prevalence than the latter. S. arizonae was only isolated from the SSC farms while none were obtained from the RFR farms. The serovars isolated were Salmonella Enteritidis (72.8%), Group C (20.1%), Group B (4.2%), Salmonella Typhimurium (1.1%) and Salmonella Gallinarum (0.4%). S. Enteritidis predominated in the urban/periurban areas. Approximately 26% (53/206) of S. Enteritidis isolates were resistant to one or more antimicrobial agents. Resistance to tetracycline was the most common, while no resistance was detected for furazolidone, neomycin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. There were 12.1% multi-drug-resistant S. Enteritidis isolates, and the resistance to ampicillin/kanamycin was predominant. The identification of multi-drug-resistant S. Enteritidis is of public health concern. Thus, stringent control of S. Enteritidis will reduce the public health risk of human salmonellosis.

  12. Interrelationships between strains of Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed Central

    Threlfall, E. J.; Chart, H.

    1993-01-01

    In contrast to S. typhimurium [19], S. enteritidis is a serotype which has its primary food-animal reservoir in poultry. To date, phage typing has been of paramount importance in studying the epidemiology of this serotype and in particular, has demonstrated the involvement of both poultry meat and whole shell eggs in the transmission of S. enteritidis PT4 to humans. The findings discussed above describe various aspects of the serotype, particularly in relation to the involvement of both LPS and plasmids in its virulence and phage type identity (Fig. 2). These findings have led to an increased understanding of the biology of this serotype, which is of major importance in human food-poisoning in England and Wales at the present time. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8348924

  13. Deciphering why Salmonella Gallinarum is less invasive in vitro than Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Rossignol, Aurore; Roche, Sylvie M; Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle; Wiedemann, Agnès; Grépinet, Olivier; Fredlund, Jennifer; Trotereau, Jérôme; Marchès, Olivier; Quéré, Pascale; Enninga, Jost; Velge, Philippe

    2014-08-30

    Salmonella Gallinarum and Salmonella Enteritidis are genetically closely related however associated with different pathologies. Several studies have suggested that S. Gallinarum is less invasive in vitro than S. Enteritidis. In this study we confirm that the S. Gallinarum strains tested were much less invasive than the S. Enteritidis strains tested in cells of avian or human origin. In addition, the S. Gallinarum T3SS-1-dependent ability to invade host cells was delayed by two to three hours compared to S. Enteritidis, indicating that T3SS-1-dependent entry is less efficient in S. Gallinarum than S. Enteritidis. This was neither due to a decreased transcription of T3SS-1 related genes when bacteria come into contact with cells, as transcription of hilA, invF and sipA was similar to that observed for S. Enteritidis, nor to a lack of functionality of the S. Gallinarum T3SS-1 apparatus as this apparatus was able to secrete and translocate effector proteins into host cells. In contrast, genome comparison of four S. Gallinarum and two S. Enteritidis strains revealed that all S. Gallinarum genomes displayed the same point mutations in each of the main T3SS-1 effector genes sipA, sopE, sopE2, sopD and sopA.

  14. Oral immunisation of laying hens with the live vaccine strains of TAD Salmonella vac E and TAD Salmonella vac T reduces internal egg contamination with Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Gantois, Inne; Ducatelle, Richard; Timbermont, Leen; Boyen, Filip; Bohez, Lotte; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank; van Immerseel, Filip

    2006-09-11

    Eggs are a major source of human infections with Salmonella. Therefore controlling egg contamination in laying hen flocks is one of the main targets for control programmes. A study was carried out to assess the effect of oral vaccination with TAD Salmonella vac E, TAD Salmonella vac T and with both vaccines TAD Salmonella vac E and TAD Salmonella vac T, on colonization of the reproductive tract and internal egg contamination of laying hens with Salmonella Enteritidis. Three groups of 30 laying hens were vaccinated at 1 day, 6 weeks and 16 weeks of age with either one of the vaccine strains, or a combination of both vaccine strains, while a fourth group was left unvaccinated. At 24 weeks of age, the birds were intravenously challenged with 0.5 ml containing 5 x 10(7)cfu Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 S1400/94. The number of oviducts from which Salmonella was isolated, was significantly lower in the vaccinated than in the non-vaccinated hens at 3 weeks post-challenge. Significantly less egg contents were Salmonella positive in the birds vaccinated with TAD Salmonella vac E or TAD Salmonella vac T (12/105 batches of eggs in both groups) than in the unvaccinated birds (28/105 batches of eggs). Internal egg contamination in the hens vaccinated with both TAD Salmonella vac E and TAD Salmonella vac T was even more reduced, as over the whole experiment, only one batch of eggs was positive. In conclusion, these data indicate that vaccination of laying hens with these live vaccines could be considered as a valuable tool in controlling internal egg contamination.

  15. Biological and physicochemical characteristics of four serotypes of Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Reamer, R H; Affronti, L F; Blankenship, L C; Alford, J A

    1978-07-01

    Four serotypes of Salmonella enteritidis, Anatum ATCC 9270, Newbrunswick ATCC 1608, Oranienburg 200 E, and Pullorum RM, were studied to determine biological, chemical, or physical differences which might explain variations in Salmonella virulence as previously reported by McCullough and Eisele (J. Infect. Dis. 88:278-289, 1951; 89:259-265, 1951). These investigators found that serotype Pullorum was significantly less virulent than serotypes Newport, Derby, Barielly, Meleagridis and Anatum when fed to healthy humans. Results of our own experiments showed that serotype Pullorum RM had a generation time approximately twice that of serotype Anatum 9270. The volume of serotype Pullorum was approximately one-half the volume of the other serotypes used (Anatum 9270, Newbrunswick 1608, Oranienburg 200 E, Cubana 12007, and Meleagridis DR). The number of cells required to yield 1 g dry weight was substantially higher for serotype Pullorum RM than for serotypes Anatum 9270, Newbrunswick 1608, and Oranienburg 200 E. The yield of endotoxin per gram dry weight for serotype Pullorum RM averaged 22 mg/g, whereas yields of endotoxin for serotypes Anatum 9270, Newbrunswick 1608, and Oranienburg 200 E averaged 32 to 35 mg/g. The relative abundance of the four major fatty acids (measured by gas chromatography) also showed distinct differences among the serotypes. Pullorum RM contained less lauric and 3-hydroxymyristic acids and more myristic and palmitic acids than the other three serotypes. The identity of 3-hydroxymyristate was confirmed by mass spectroscopy. Serotype Pullorum RM required 10 times more lipopolysaccharides (endotoxin) to obtain a 50% lethal dose in mice than the other three serotypes. When the lipid part was separated from the polysaccharide and solubilized with bovine serum, the 50% lethal dose of serotype Pullorum RM was equal to that of the other three.

  16. Biological and Physicochemical Characteristics of Four Serotypes of Salmonella enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Reamer, R. H.; Affronti, L. F.; Blankenship, L. C.; Alford, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Four serotypes of Salmonella enteritidis, Anatum ATCC 9270, Newbrunswick ATCC 1608, Oranienburg 200 E, and Pullorum RM, were studied to determine biological, chemical, or physical differences which might explain variations in Salmonella virulence as previously reported by McCullough and Eisele (J. Infect. Dis. 88:278-289, 1951; 89:259-265, 1951). These investigators found that serotype Pullorum was significantly less virulent than serotypes Newport, Derby, Barielly, Meleagridis and Anatum when fed to healthy humans. Results of our own experiments showed that serotype Pullorum RM had a generation time approximately twice that of serotype Anatum 9270. The volume of serotype Pullorum was approximately one-half the volume of the other serotypes used (Anatum 9270, Newbrunswick 1608, Oranienburg 200 E, Cubana 12007, and Meleagridis DR). The number of cells required to yield 1 g dry weight was substantially higher for serotype Pullorum RM than for serotypes Anatum 9270, Newbrunswick 1608, and Oranienburg 200 E. The yield of endotoxin per gram dry weight for serotype Pullorum RM averaged 22 mg/g, whereas yields of endotoxin for serotypes Anatum 9270, Newbrunswick 1608, and Oranienburg 200 E averaged 32 to 35 mg/g. The relative abundance of the four major fatty acids (measured by gas chromatography) also showed distinct differences among the serotypes. Pullorum RM contained less lauric and 3-hydroxymyristic acids and more myristic and palmitic acids than the other three serotypes. The identity of 3-hydroxymyristate was confirmed by mass spectroscopy. Serotype Pullorum RM required 10 times more lipopolysaccharides (endotoxin) to obtain a 50% lethal dose in mice than the other three serotypes. When the lipid part was separated from the polysaccharide and solubilized with bovine serum, the 50% lethal dose of serotype Pullorum RM was equal to that of the other three. PMID:361563

  17. Evaluation of a selected lactic acid bacteria-based probiotic on Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization and intestinal permeability in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Prado-Rebolledo, Omar F; Delgado-Machuca, Jaime de Jesus; Macedo-Barragan, Rafael J; Garcia-Márquez, Luis J; Morales-Barrera, Jesus E; Latorre, Juan D; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl; Tellez, Guillermo

    2017-02-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of a lactic acid bacteria-based probiotic (FloraMax-B11(®)) against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis intestinal colonization and intestinal permeability in broiler chickens. Experiment 1 consisted of two independent trials. In each trial, day-old broiler chicks were assigned to one of two groups: control + S. Enteritidis or probiotic + S. Enteritidis. At 72 h post-S. Enteritidis challenge, haematology and caecal content were evaluated for S. Enteritidis colonization. In Experiment 2, day-old broiler chicks were assigned to one of four groups: negative control; probiotic; control + S. Enteritidis; or probiotic + S. Enteritidis. At 72 h post-S. Enteritidis challenge, chickens in all groups were given an oral gavage dose of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-d). In both trials of Experiment 1, a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in colony-forming units/gram of S. Enteritidis in caecal content and a reduction in the incidence of S. Enteritidis enriched caecal samples were observed in probiotic + S. Enteritidis chickens. In addition, significant heterophilia and lymphopaenia were observed in control + S. Enteritidis chickens. In Experiment 2, a decrease in numbers of S. Enteritidis in caeca were observed in probiotic + S. Enteritidis chickens when compared to control + S. Enteritidis. Also, an increase in serum FITC-d concentration was detected in control + S. Enteritidis. These results suggest that early infection with S. Enteritidis can increase intestinal permeability, but the adverse effects can be prevented by the administration of the probiotic tested.

  18. The Growth Kinetics of Salmonella Enteritidis in Raw Ground Beef.

    PubMed

    Sabike, Islam I; Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Edris, Abobakr M

    2015-01-01

    The growth kinetics of Salmonella Enteritidis in raw beef has been little studied so far. Thus, this study aimed to clarify the growth kinetics of the pathogen in ground beef using a growth model. When Salmonella cells inoculated at various initial doses into ground beef were incubated at a given temperature (24℃), the maximum population (Nmax) of the microbe at the stationary phase varied with the doses. This relationship was expressed with a polynomialequation for Nmax using the initial dose. The combination of the growth model and the polynomial equation successfully predicted Salmonella growth at a given initial dose. When Salmonella cells inoculated in ground beef were incubated at various constant temperatures, the growth curves of the pathogen and natural microflora (NM) were well described with the growth model. The rate constant of growth and the Nmax values for Salmonella and NM were then analyzed kinetically. From these results, growth curves of Salmonella and NM in ground beef stored at dynamic temperatures were successfully predicted. Competition between Salmonella and NM in ground beef was also found during the storage. This study could give usable information on the growth of Salmonella and NM in ground beef at various temperatures.

  19. High Incubation Temperature and Threonine Dietary Level Improve Ileum Response Against Post-Hatch Salmonella Enteritidis Inoculation in Broiler Chicks

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Heraldo Bezerra; Campos, Danila Barreiro; Guerra, Ricardo Romão; Costa, Fernando Guilherme Perazzo

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of both embryonic thermal manipulation and dietary threonine level on the response of broilers inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, considering bacterial counts in the cecal contents, intestinal morphology, mucin and heat shock protein 70 gene expression, body weight and weight gain. Thermal manipulation was used from 11 days of incubation until hatch, defining three treatments: standard (37.7°C), continuous high temperature (38.7°C) and continuous low temperature (36.7°C). After hatch, chicks were distributed according to a 3x2+1 factorial arrangement (three temperatures and two threonine levels and one sham-inoculated control). At two days of age, all chicks were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, except for the sham-inoculated control group. There was no interaction between the factors on any analyses. High temperature during incubation was able to reduce colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis in the first days, reducing both Salmonella counts and the number of positive birds. It also increased mucin expression and decreased Hsp70 expression compared with other inoculated groups. High temperature during incubation and high threonine level act independently to reduce the negative effects associated to Salmonella Enteritidis infection on intestinal morphology and performance, with results similar to sham-inoculated birds. The findings open new perspectives for practical strategies towards the pre-harvest Salmonella control in the poultry industry. PMID:26131553

  20. High Incubation Temperature and Threonine Dietary Level Improve Ileum Response Against Post-Hatch Salmonella Enteritidis Inoculation in Broiler Chicks.

    PubMed

    de Barros Moreira Filho, Alexandre Lemos; de Oliveira, Celso José Bruno; de Oliveira, Heraldo Bezerra; Campos, Danila Barreiro; Guerra, Ricardo Romão; Costa, Fernando Guilherme Perazzo; Givisiez, Patricia Emília Naves

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of both embryonic thermal manipulation and dietary threonine level on the response of broilers inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, considering bacterial counts in the cecal contents, intestinal morphology, mucin and heat shock protein 70 gene expression, body weight and weight gain. Thermal manipulation was used from 11 days of incubation until hatch, defining three treatments: standard (37.7°C), continuous high temperature (38.7°C) and continuous low temperature (36.7°C). After hatch, chicks were distributed according to a 3x2+1 factorial arrangement (three temperatures and two threonine levels and one sham-inoculated control). At two days of age, all chicks were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, except for the sham-inoculated control group. There was no interaction between the factors on any analyses. High temperature during incubation was able to reduce colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis in the first days, reducing both Salmonella counts and the number of positive birds. It also increased mucin expression and decreased Hsp70 expression compared with other inoculated groups. High temperature during incubation and high threonine level act independently to reduce the negative effects associated to Salmonella Enteritidis infection on intestinal morphology and performance, with results similar to sham-inoculated birds. The findings open new perspectives for practical strategies towards the pre-harvest Salmonella control in the poultry industry.

  1. A hotel-based outbreak of Salmonella enterica subsp. Enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) in the United Kingdom, 2006.

    PubMed

    Calvert, N; Murphy, L; Smith, A; Copeland, D

    2007-03-01

    An outbreak of food-borne Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 occurred in Cumbria, in north-west England, in the summer of 2006. Fifteen people, all with positive stool samples, met the case definition; three of these were admitted to hospital, including one patient who died. Preliminary investigations suggested a link to a meal served at a local hotel. A case control study was implemented, together with microbiological and environmental investigations. Fifteen microbiologically confirmed cases and 27 unmatched controls were included in the study, controls being randomly selected from people who had eaten at the hotel on the same day. The epidemiological evidence indicated a very strong association between infection and consumption of tiramisu made with raw shell eggs, although none were available for microbiological investigation. These results are in line with other salmonellosis outbreaks that have been associated with the use of raw shell eggs in food manufacturing and production. This paper highlights the continuing need for a greater awareness by those who work in the food industry of the health risks associated with the consumption of raw shell eggs.

  2. An outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 34a infection in primary school children: the use of visual aids and food preferences to overcome recall bias in a case control study.

    PubMed Central

    Linnane, E.; Roberts, R. J.; Mannion, P. T.

    2002-01-01

    Outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease are common in schools. Case control studies are useful in the investigation of infectious disease outbreaks but the time interval between illness and investigation can lead to recall bias, particularly in young children. We describe an outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 34a infection involving 54 clinical cases in two adjacent schools, and a novel approach to overcome recall bias. The likely dates of infection were identified from the epidemic curve. We created a visual display of the menu from those days and asked 9 cases and 18 matched controls to identify their food preferences from this display. Preference for chocolate mouse was significantly associated with illness (P = 0.006). The results of the case control study agreed with the findings of the environmental investigation. We believe our approach could be used in other circumstances, where subjects are young children or recall bias is a concern. PMID:12211594

  3. Detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) Antibodies in Serum Using A Polystyrene Bead/SE Flagella Agglutination Assay

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Serologic screening of flocks can be an important method to detect Salmonella enteritidis (SE) infections but can be labor intensive or lack specificity. Our goal was to develop a rapid agglutination assay using SE flagella adsorbed to polystyrene beads as a simple, relatively specific test to dete...

  4. 21 CFR 118.5 - Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.5 Section 118.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....5 Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental testing when laying...

  5. 21 CFR 118.7 - Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.7 Section 118.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....7 Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental sampling. An...

  6. 21 CFR 118.9 - Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.9 Section 118.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... EGGS § 118.9 Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. You must have one or...

  7. 21 CFR 118.5 - Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.5 Section 118.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....5 Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental testing when laying hens...

  8. 21 CFR 118.7 - Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.7 Section 118.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....7 Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental sampling. An environmental...

  9. 21 CFR 118.10 - Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.10 Section 118.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.10 Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention...

  10. Improving Food Safety by Understanding the Evolution of Egg-contaminating Salmonella Enteritidis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Improving Food Safety by Understanding the Evolution of Egg-contaminating Salmonella Enteritidis Jean Guard, Veterinary Medical Officer U. S. Department of Agriculture, Athens, GA USA (jean.guard@ars.usda.gov) The curious case of egg contamination by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis S. ...

  11. Evolutionary trends of Salmonella Enteritidis linked to subpopulation biology and virulence attributes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. enteritidis) is currently the world’s leading cause of food borne salmonellosis. It is the only serotype out of over 1400 within Salmonella enterica I that contaminates the internal contents of the egg by vertical transmission from the reproductive tract...

  12. 21 CFR 118.7 - Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Egg sampling. When you conduct an egg test required under § 118.6, you must collect and test the... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis....7 Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental sampling. An environmental...

  13. 21 CFR 118.7 - Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Egg sampling. When you conduct an egg test required under § 118.6, you must collect and test the... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis....7 Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental sampling. An environmental...

  14. 21 CFR 118.7 - Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Egg sampling. When you conduct an egg test required under § 118.6, you must collect and test the... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis....7 Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental sampling. An environmental...

  15. 21 CFR 118.10 - Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.10 Section 118.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.10 Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE)...

  16. Prophylactic Supplementation of Caprylic Acid in Feed Reduces Salmonella Enteritidis Colonization in Commercial Broiler Chicks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella Enteritidis is a major foodborne pathogen for which chickens serve as reservoir hosts. Reducing Salmonella Enteritidis carriage in chickens would reduce contamination of poultry meat and eggs with this pathogen. We investigated the prophylactic efficacy of feed supplemented with caprylic ...

  17. Heterophils isolated from chickens resistant to extra-intestinal Salmonella enteritidis infection express higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA following infection than heterophils from susceptible chickens.

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Pamela J.; Swaggerty, Christina L.; Kaiser, Pete; Pevzner, Igal Y.; Kogut, Michael H.

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies showed differences in in vitro heterophil function between parental (A > B) broilers and F1 reciprocal crosses (D > C). Our objectives were to (1) determine if in vitro variations translate to differences in resistance to Salmonella enteritidis (SE) and (2) quantitate cytokine mRNA in heterophils from SE-infected chicks. One-day-old chicks were challenged and organs were cultured for SE. Chicks with efficient heterophils (A and D) were less susceptible to SE compared to chicks with inefficient heterophils (B and C). Heterophils were isolated from SE-infected chicks and cytokine mRNA expression was evaluated using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA was up-regulated in heterophils from SE-resistant chicks compared to susceptible chicks. This is the first report to quantitate cytokine mRNA in heterophils from SE-infected chicks. These data show a relationship between in vitro heterophil function, increased pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression, and increased resistance to SE in 1-day-old chicks. PMID:15635959

  18. A genome-wide screen identifies Salmonella Enteritidis lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the HtrA heat shock protein as crucial factors involved in egg white persistence at chicken body temperature.

    PubMed

    Raspoet, R; Shearer, N; Appia-Ayme, C; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Thompson, A; Van Immerseel, F

    2014-05-01

    Eggs contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis are an important source of human foodborne Salmonella infections. Salmonella Enteritidis is able to contaminate egg white during formation of the egg within the chicken oviduct, and it has developed strategies to withstand the antimicrobial properties of egg white to survive in this hostile environment. The mechanisms involved in the persistence of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg white are likely to be complex. To address this issue, a microarray-based transposon library screen was performed to identify genes necessary for survival of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg white at chicken body temperature. The majority of identified genes belonged to the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis pathway. Additionally, we provide evidence that the serine protease/heat shock protein (HtrA) appears essential for the survival of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg white at chicken body temperature.

  19. Use of random forest to estimate population attributable fractions from a case-control study of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections.

    PubMed

    Gu, W; Vieira, A R; Hoekstra, R M; Griffin, P M; Cole, D

    2015-10-01

    To design effective food safety programmes we need to estimate how many sporadic foodborne illnesses are caused by specific food sources based on case-control studies. Logistic regression has substantive limitations for analysing structured questionnaire data with numerous exposures and missing values. We adapted random forest to analyse data of a case-control study of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis illness for source attribution. For estimation of summary population attributable fractions (PAFs) of exposures grouped into transmission routes, we devised a counterfactual estimator to predict reductions in illness associated with removing grouped exposures. For the purpose of comparison, we fitted the data using logistic regression models with stepwise forward and backward variable selection. Our results show that the forward and backward variable selection of logistic regression models were not consistent for parameter estimation, with different significant exposures identified. By contrast, the random forest model produced estimated PAFs of grouped exposures consistent in rank order with results obtained from outbreak data, with egg-related exposures having the highest estimated PAF (22·1%, 95% confidence interval 8·5-31·8). Random forest might be structurally more coherent and efficient than logistic regression models for attributing Salmonella illnesses to sources involving many causal pathways.

  20. Salmonella Enteritidis Phage Types 1 and 4: Pheno- and Genotypic Epidemiology of Recent Outbreaks in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Lukinmaa, Susanna; Schildt, Raili; Rinttilä, Teemu; Siitonen, Anja

    1999-01-01

    In the 1990s, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis has caused 15 outbreaks in Finland; 12 of them were caused by phage type 1 (PT1) and PT4. Thus far, there has been no clear evidence as to the source of these Salmonella Enteritidis PT1 and PT4 strains, so it was necessary to try to characterize them further. Salmonella Enteritidis PT1 (n = 57) and PT4 (n = 43) isolates from different sources were analyzed by genomic pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), plasmid profiling, and antimicrobial resistance testing to investigate the distribution of their subtypes in Finland. It was also hoped that this investigation would help in identifying the sources of the infections, especially the sources of the outbreaks caused by PT1 and PT4 in the 1990s. The results showed that both PFGE and plasmid profiling, but not antimicrobial susceptibility testing, were capable of differentiating isolates of Salmonella Enteritidis PT1 and PT4. By genotypic methods, it was possible to divide both PT1 and PT4 isolates into 12 subtypes. It could also be shown that all PT1 outbreak isolates were identical and, at least with this collection of isolates, that the outbreaks did not originate from the Baltic countries or from Russia, where this phage type predominates. It was also established that the outbreaks caused by PT4 all had different origins. Valuable information for future investigations was gained on the distribution of molecular subtypes of strains that originated from the tourist resorts that are popular among Finns and of strains that were isolated from livestock. PMID:10364582

  1. Vaccination of Chickens with SPI1-lon and SPI1-lon-fliC Mutant of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Matulova, Marta; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Rychlik, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is gradually decreasing in poultry flocks in the EU, which may result in the demand for a vaccine that allows for the differentiation of vaccinated flocks from those infected by wild-type S. Enteritidis. In this study, we therefore constructed a (Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1) SPI1-lon mutant with or without fliC encoding for S. Enteritidis flagellin. The combination of SPI1-lon mutations resulted in attenuated but immunogenic mutant suitable for oral vaccination of poultry. In addition, the vaccination of chickens with the SPI1-lon-fliC mutant enabled the serological differentiation of vaccinated and infected chickens. The absence of fliC therefore did not affect the immunogenicity of the vaccine strain and allowed for serological differentiation of the vaccinated chickens. The SPI1-lon-fliC mutant is therefore a suitable marker vaccine strain for oral vaccination of poultry. PMID:23785484

  2. [Use of bacteriphages against Salmonella Enteritidis: a prevention tool].

    PubMed

    García, Cristina; Marín, Clara; Catalá-Gregori, Pablo; Soriano, Jose Miguel

    2015-06-01

    Salmonellosis is a highly prevalent disease still searching for preventive tools to avoid contamination level priority public health. The in vitro effect of bacteriophages against Salmonella enteritidis was evaluated as a prevention tool. Two tests with three concentrations of bacteriophages were conducted against two strains of Salmonella Enteritidis inoculated in fresh faeces of laying hens. Each test had a positive control. Thus, four groups in each test were evaluated. Each experimental group included two replicates, and three plates were incubated per replicate. The concentrations tested were three: commercial solution (5 × 10(7) pfu/mL), and two dilutions (1/10 and 1/30). One of the strains tested was CECT 4300, a certified strain of Colección Española de Cultivo Tipo and the other a field isolated strain in a sacrificed hen farm. Both strains were inoculated at 1.3 × 10(5) cfu/g of faeces in each of the four groups. Isolation and identification of bacteria by ISO6579 was done at various times after inoculation: 1 minute, 24 hours and 7 days. In the first test, with certified strain, Salmonella was isolated in all groups at time 1 minute. After 24 hours, Salmonella was isolated in all groups except in one of the replicas treated with 1/10 dilution of bacteriophages, one of the other replica plate treated with 1/10 dilution, and two plates of the two replicas treated with the commercial solution. After 7 days, the bacteria were not isolated from any of the experimental groups. In the second test, with the field strain, Salmonella was isolated in all groups at time 1 minute. After 24 hours, Salmonella was isolated in all groups except in one of the replicas treated with 1/10 dilution of bacteriophages and the two replicas treated with the commercial solution. Salmonella was not isolated in any of the experimental groups at 7 days. The use of bacteriophages reduced Salmonella enteritidis isolates in faeces at 24 hours after the application, so it could be

  3. Molecular detection assay of five Salmonella serotypes of public interest: Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Newport, Heidelberg, and Hadar.

    PubMed

    Bugarel, M; Tudor, A; Loneragan, G H; Nightingale, K K

    2017-03-01

    Foodborne illnesses due to Salmonella represent an important public-health concern worldwide. In the United States, a majority of Salmonella infections are associated with a small number of serotypes. Furthermore, some serotypes that are overrepresented among human disease are also associated with multi-drug resistance phenotypes. Rapid detection of serotypes of public-health concern might help reduce the burden of salmonellosis cases and limit exposure to multi-drug resistant Salmonella. We developed a two-step real-time PCR-based rapid method for the identification and detection of five Salmonella serotypes that are either overrepresented in human disease or frequently associated with multi-drug resistance, including serotypes Enteritidis, Typhimurium, Newport, Hadar, and Heidelberg. Two sets of four markers were developed to detect and differentiate the five serotypes. The first set of markers was developed as a screening step to detect the five serotypes; whereas, the second set was used to further distinguish serotypes Heidelberg, Newport and Hadar. The utilization of these markers on a two-step investigation strategy provides a diagnostic specificity of 97% for the detection of Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Heidelberg, Infantis, Newport and Hadar. The diagnostic sensitivity of the detection makers is >96%. The availability of this two-step rapid method will facilitate specific detection of Salmonella serotypes that contribute to a significant proportion of human disease and carry antimicrobial resistance. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Salmonella enteritidis primary bacteremia in previously healthy patient from Taiwan: case report.

    PubMed

    Mileva, Sevda; Gospodinova, Margarita; Todorov, Ilian

    2016-10-01

    Diseases caused by invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella strains present with various extraintestinal manifestations, including bacteremia. Factors affecting the incidence include Salmonella serotype, geographic location, and host factors. We present an unusual case of Salmonella enteritidis primary bacteremia in a patient without any risk factors and originating from a region with the lowest burden of invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella infections. We observed an incomplete clinical response to the treatment with a third-generation cephalosporin, despite the in vitro susceptibility of the strain. The diagnosis of Salmonella bacteremia was far from expected in our previously healthy patient from Taiwan, without any preceding diarrhea and the lack of marked response to therapy with ceftriaxone. Making the diagnosis was a challenge, requiring wide range of laboratory, imaging, and consultative work to rule out alternative diagnoses and complications. Invasive Salmonella infections are uncommon in our clinical practice at the present. Air transportation, intensive migration processes, and changes in climate are able to change the burden of infectious diseases dramatically in the near future. That fact along with the raising antibacterial resistance among invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella strains make imperative the profound understanding of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of those infections.

  5. Comparison of different preenrichment broths, egg:preenrichment broth ratios, and surface disinfection for the detection of Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica serovar Enteritidis in shell eggs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G; Brown, E W; Hammack, T S

    2013-11-01

    Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is the leading reported cause of Salmonella infections. Most Salmonella Enteritidis infections are associated with whole shell eggs and egg products. This project attempted to lay the foundation for improving the Food and Drug Administration's current Bacteriological Analytical Manual method for the detection of Salmonella Enteritidis in shell eggs. Two Salmonella Enteritidis isolates were used for comparisons among different preenrichment and enrichment media and for the evaluation of egg:preenrichment broth ratios for the detection of Salmonella Enteritidis in shell eggs. The effect of surface disinfection on the detection of Salmonella Enteritidis in shell eggs was also investigated. The results indicated that tryptic soy broth (TSB) was similar to TSB plus ferrous sulfate, but significantly (α = 0.05) better than nutrient broth, Universal Preenrichment broth, and buffered peptone water when used for preenrichment of Salmonella in shell eggs. Salmonella Enteritidis populations after enrichment with Rappaport-Vassiliadis broth were 0.40 to 1.11 log cfu/mL of culture lower than those in preenrichment cultures. The reduction was statistically significant (α = 0.05). Egg:broth ratios at 1:9 and 1:2 produced significantly (α = 0.05) higher Salmonella Enteritidis populations after preenrichment with TSB with inoculum levels at 4 cfu/100 g of eggs and 40 cfu/1,000 g of eggs than the ratio at 1:1. Salmonella Enteritidis populations in TSB preenrichment cultures of shell eggs surface-disinfected with 70% alcohol:iodine/potassium iodide solution and untreated control were 9.11 ± 0.11 and 9.18 ± 0.05 log cfu/mL, respectively, for SE 13-2, and 9.20 ± 0.04 and 9.16 ± 0.05 log cfu/mL, respectively, for SE CDC_2010K_1543. Surface disinfection of eggs did not reduce the sensitivity of detection of Salmonella Enteritidis in liquid eggs. These results could improve the Food and Drug Administration's current

  6. Characteristics of invasion-reduced hilA gene mutant of Salmonella Enteritidis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lv, Shuang; Si, Wei; Yu, Shenye; Li, Zhaoli; Wang, Xiumei; Chen, Liping; Zhang, Wanjiang; Liu, Siguo

    2015-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes huge losses in poultry industry and also food poisoning in humans due to its being a food-borne pathogen. Functions of Invasion-related genes need to be explored, as invasion is a key step for Salmonella infection. In this study, a transposon mutant library of Salmonella Enteritidis isolate SM6 was constructed and screened for the invasion-related genes via incubation with Caco-2 cells. Three stably attenuated mutants were identified for significantly reduced invasion with insertions all in hilA (hyperinvasive locus A) gene. We constructed and evaluated the hilA deletion mutant in vivo and in vitro. SM6△hilA showed significantly reduced ability to invade Caco-2 cells and decreased pathogenicity in chicks. However, the bacterial load and pathological damage in the cecum were significantly higher than those in the SM6 in vivo. Present results provide new evidences for pathogenicity research on Salmonella Enteritidis.

  7. Isolation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva).

    PubMed

    Marietto-Gonçalves, Guilherme Augusto; de Almeida, Sílvia Maria; de Lima, Edna Tereza; Okamoto, Adriano Sakai; Pinczowski, Pedro; Andreatti Filho, Raphael Lucio

    2010-03-01

    Avian salmonellosis is a disease caused by bacteria of the genus Salmonella that can cause three distinct diseases in birds: pullorum diseases, fowl typhoid, and paratyphoid infection. Various wildlife species are susceptible to infections by Salmonella, regardless of whether they live in captivity or freely in the wild. The present study verified the presence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in three captive specimens of Amazona aestiva. The study involved a total of 103 birds undergoing rehabilitation to prepare for living in the wild, after having been captured from animal traffickers and delivered to the Centrofauna Project of the Floravida Institute in Sao Paulo, Brazil. This is the first report of Salmonella Enteritidis isolation in A. aestiva that originated from capture associated with animal trafficking; Salmonella was detected during the study by the serologic method of rapid serum agglutination on a plate with bacterial isolate. The antimicrobial profile exam of the isolated samples demonstrated sensitivity to ampicillin, cefaclor, ciprofloxacin, and cloranfenicol. The three samples also presented resistance to more than four antibiotics. The presence of the genes invA and spvC was verified by PCR technique and was associated with virulence and absence of class 1 integron, a gene related to antimicrobial resistance. The commercial antigen for pullorum disease was shown to be a useful tool for rapid detection in the screening of Salmonella of serogroup D1 in Psittaciformes. New studies on Salmonella carriage in birds involved in trafficking must be performed to better understand their participation in the epidemiologic cycle of salmonellosis in humans and other animals.

  8. Feed Deprivation Affects Crop Environment and Modulates Salmonella enteritidis Colonization and Invasion of Leghorn Hens

    PubMed Central

    Durant, Juliet A.; Corrier, Donald E.; Byrd, J. Allen; Stanker, Larry H.; Ricke, Steven C.

    1999-01-01

    Leghorn hens over 50 weeks of age were assigned to two treatment groups designated as either unmolted controls or molted. A forced molt was induced by a 9-day feed withdrawal, and each hen was challenged orally with 105 Salmonella enteritidis organisms on day 4 of feed withdrawal. On days 4 and 9 of molt, the numbers of lactobacilli and the concentrations of lactate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate, and total volatile fatty acids in the crops decreased while crop pH increased significantly (P < 0.05) in the molted hens compared to the controls. S. enteritidis crop and cecal colonization, in addition to spleen and liver invasion, increased significantly (P < 0.05) in the molted hens compared to the controls. The invasive phenotype of Salmonella spp. is complex and requires several virulence genes which are regulated by the transcriptional activator HilA. Samples of the crop contents from the molted and unmolted birds were pooled separately, centrifuged, and filter sterilized. The sterile crop contents were then used to measure the expression of hilA. By using a lacZY transcriptional fusion to the hilA gene in S. enteritidis, we found that hilA expression was 1.6- to 2.1-fold higher in the crop contents from molted birds than in those from control birds in vitro. The results of the study suggest that the changes in the microenvironment of the crop caused by feed deprivation are important regulators of S. enteritidis survival and influence the susceptibility of molted hens to S. enteritidis infections. Furthermore, our in vitro results on the expression of hilA suggest that the change in crop environment during feed withdrawal has the potential to significantly affect virulence by increasing the expression of genes necessary for intestinal invasion. PMID:10223980

  9. Lessons learned from a Salmonella enteritidis phage type 4 outbreak in Austria, 2005.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Daniela; Luckner-Hornischer, Anita; Holzhammer, Gerda; Rokita, Dietmar; Federspiel, Martin; Lassnig, Heimo; Pichler, Anna-Margareta; Lederer, Ingeborg; Beranek, Andreas; Kornschober, Christian; Berghold, Christian; Allerberger, Franz

    2007-01-01

    An outbreak of gastroenteritis due to Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 4 occurred in people who attended a traditional hunting festivity in a small village in western Austria 6 through 11 November 2005. Of approximately 250 attendees, 227 had consumed dishes offered at the festival, and of these consumers 35 persons fulfilled the outbreak case definition (attack rate of 15.4%). Spätzle (traditional pastalike side dish) was most likely the contaminated part of the incriminated main course (relative risk of 18.9, 95% confidence interval of 4.6 to 76.7; P < 0.001). Thirteen eggs that remained from the preparation of the spätzle were negative for Salmonella when tested individually without shell disinfection, as were 1200 eggs collected at the egg production plant and examined with shell disinfection. The back-traced egg production farm had been initially certified as Salmonella free by a voluntary quality control program. However, an intensified environmental investigation of the incriminated egg production farm performed in the first quarter of 2006 and based on an appropriate method of sampling revealed Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 4 in 4 of 13 flocks. Although a combination of epidemiological and microbiological investigations allowed elucidation of the mode of spread, no restrictions were placed on the incriminated flocks of laying hens. These flocks were kept in production until they were stalled out due to age in August 2006. In June 2006, a cluster of 23 cases of Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 6 infection was again associated with this egg production farm. Evidence provided by epidemiological analyses is often disregarded by decision makers. However, negative results from microbiological testing of food involved in an outbreak are often weighted as strong evidence against a causal association between that food and the outbreak.

  10. Characterization of a foodborne outbreak caused by Salmonella Enteritidis in Aracaju, State of Sergipe, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Maria Regina Pires; Cabello, Pedro Hernan; Albuquerque-Junior, Ricardo Luiz Cavalcanti; Jain, Sona; Candido, Alexandre Luna

    2015-01-01

    In December 2001, an outbreak of foodborne gastroenteritis infected 114 of 161 people who ate at a restaurant in Aracaju, State of Sergipe, Brazil. The epidemiological and microbiological aspects of the outbreak were characterized. Potato salad made with homemade mayonnaise and stored at unsuitable temperatures was associated with increased risk of foodborne infection. Salmonella Enteritidis was isolated from the diarrheal stools of the hospitalized patients, and genotyping of the fecal samples generated identical randomly amplified polymorphic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) profiles. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first and the only record of a gastrointestinal outbreak in Sergipe.

  11. Chicken-specific kinome array reveals that Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis modulates host immune signaling pathways in the cecum to establish a persistence infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induce an early, short-lived, pro-inflammatory response in chickens that is asymptomatic of clinical disease and results in a persistent colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that transmits infections to naïve hosts via fecal shedding of bacteria. The und...

  12. RapidChek SELECT Salmonella enteritidis test system for the detection of Salmonella enteritidis in poultry house drag swabs, shell egg pools, and chicken carcass rinsates.

    PubMed

    Muldoon, Mark T; Gonzalez, Verapaz; Sutzko, Meredith I; Allen, Ann-Christine Olsson; Creamer, Samantha; Onisk, Dale V; Lindpaintner, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    The RapidChek SELECT Salmonella Enteritidis Test System was validated for the detection of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in poultry house drag swabs, shell egg pools, and chicken carcass rinsates. The method utilizes RapidChek SELECT Salmonella (AOAC PTM License No. 080601) proprietary primary and secondary enrichment media. Following enrichment, an immunochromatographic test strip is inserted into the tube containing the secondary enrichment broth, developed for 10 min, and interpreted. Salmonella Enteritidis-inoculated samples (1-5 CFU SE/analytical unit) were tested by the test method as well as the appropriate cultural reference method U.S. Food and Drug Administration-Bacteriological Analytical Manual (drag swabs and egg pools) or U.S. Department of Agriculture-Food Safety and Inspection Service (chicken carcass rinsates). A total of 80 samples were tested by both methods in the study. Fifty-two samples were positive by the RapidChek SELECT Salmonella Enteritidis method and 38 were found positive by the respective reference method. The sensitivity of the method was 100% and the specificity was 100%. The accuracy of the test method was 137%, indicating that the method was more sensitive than the reference method. The RapidChek SELECT Salmonella Enteritidis method was tested with 82 Salmonella Group D1 strains including 63 Salmonella Enteritidis strains as well as 32 non-Salmonella Group D1 strains representing 10 bacteria genera. The test method detected all 82 Group D1 strains (100% sensitivity). None of the non-Salmonella Group D1 or other genera of bacteria were detected, indicating a specificity of 100%. The method was shown to be highly robust and stable under control and accelerated stability conditions.

  13. Salmonella Enteritidis with double deletion in phoPfliC--a potential live Salmonella vaccine candidate with novel characteristics for use in chickens.

    PubMed

    Methner, Ulrich; Barrow, Paul A; Berndt, Angela; Rychlik, Ivan

    2011-04-12

    Salmonella Enteritidis mutants with deletions in phoP, fliC or phoPfliC were tested for their virulence and their ability to induce parameters of the innate and adaptive immunity in addition to their potential for serological differentiation between vaccinated, non-vaccinated and infected chickens. The double phoPfliC deletion mutant was sufficiently attenuated but not diminished in its capability to inhibit the caecal colonisation and systemic invasion of homologous Salmonella Enteritidis shortly after administration of the vaccine strain to very young chicks. Immunisation with the attenuated ΔphoPfliC mutant resulted in protective effects which were only slightly and insignificantly lower than after "immunisation" with a Salmonella wild-type strain, indicating the capability to induce an intense adaptive immune response and protection against Salmonella exposure in older chickens. The deletion in fliC enabled the effective the differentiation between immunised and infected chickens using a commercially available ELISA kit. The double phoPfliC deletion mutant of Salmonella Enteritidis might be a potential and promising live Salmonella vaccine candidate with novel characteristics for use in poultry.

  14. Breed effect on early cytokine mRNA expression in spleen and cecum of chickens with and without Salmonella enteritidis infection.

    PubMed

    Cheeseman, Jennifer H; Kaiser, Michael G; Ciraci, Ceren; Kaiser, Pete; Lamont, Susan J

    2007-01-01

    We examined mRNA expression of 11 genes: BAK, Bcl-x, Interferon [IFN]-gamma, Interleukin [IL]-1beta, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12alpha, IL-12beta, IL-18, CXCLi2 [IL-8/CAF], and a MIP family chemokine, CCLi2, in the spleen and cecum of day-old chicks after oral inoculation with Salmonella enteritidis (SE) or medium. Three distinct chicken breeds (broiler, Fayoumi, and Leghorn) were evaluated for mRNA expression levels at 2 and 18h post-inoculation using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). SE exposure significantly increased splenic IL-18 and IFN-gamma expression. Breed effect was significant (P<0.05) for CXCLi2, IL-10, IL-12alpha, and CCLi2 mRNA expression in the spleen, and for IL-12alpha, IL-12beta, IL-18, and CCLi2 mRNA expression in the cecum. Generally, mRNA expression levels were higher in the spleen, and lower in the cecum, of Leghorns versus broilers. These results support a role for breed genetics influencing cytokine mRNA expression in young chickens and may potentially explain some generalized immune response differences between breeds.

  15. Heat transfer models for predicting Salmonella enteritidis in shell eggs through supply chain distribution.

    PubMed

    Almonacid, S; Simpson, R; Teixeira, A

    2007-11-01

    Egg and egg preparations are important vehicles for Salmonella enteritidis infections. The influence of time-temperature becomes important when the presence of this organism is found in commercial shell eggs. A computer-aided mathematical model was validated to estimate surface and interior temperature of shell eggs under variable ambient and refrigerated storage temperature. A risk assessment of S. enteritidis based on the use of this model, coupled with S. enteritidis kinetics, has already been reported in a companion paper published earlier in JFS. The model considered the actual geometry and composition of shell eggs and was solved by numerical techniques (finite differences and finite elements). Parameters of interest such as local (h) and global (U) heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity, and apparent volumetric specific heat were estimated by an inverse procedure from experimental temperature measurement. In order to assess the error in predicting microbial population growth, theoretical and experimental temperatures were applied to a S. enteritidis growth model taken from the literature. Errors between values of microbial population growth calculated from model predicted compared with experimentally measured temperatures were satisfactorily low: 1.1% and 0.8% for the finite difference and finite element model, respectively.

  16. Dam methylation is required for efficient biofilm production in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Aya Castañeda, María del Rosario; Sarnacki, Sebastián Hernán; Noto Llana, Mariángeles; López Guerra, Adriana Gabriela; Giacomodonato, Mónica Nancy; Cerquetti, María Cristina

    2015-01-16

    The ecological success of Salmonella enterica to survive in different environments is due, in part, to the ability to form biofilms, something which is especially important for food industry. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the involvement of Dam methylation in biofilm production in S. Enteritidis strains. The ability to generate biofilms was analyzed in wild type and dam mutant strains. In S. Enteritidis, the absence of Dam affected the capacity to develop pellicles at the air-liquid interface and reduced the ability to form biofilm on polystyrene surfaces. Curli and cellulose production, determined by Congo red and calcofluor assays, were affected in dam mutant strains. Relative quantitative real-time PCR experiments showed that the expression of csgD and csgA genes is reduced in mutants lacking dam gene with respect to the wild type strains, whereas transcript levels of bcsA are not affected in the absence of Dam. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the participation of Dam methylation on biofilm production in Enteritidis or any other serovar of S. enterica. Results presented here suggest that changes in gene expression required for biofilm production are finely regulated by Dam methylation. Thus, Dam methylation could modulate csgD expression and upregulate the expression of factors related with biofilm production, including curli and cellulose. This study contributes to the understanding of biofilm regulation in Salmonella spp. and to the design of new strategies to prevent food contamination and humans and animals infections.

  17. Food poisoning due to Salmonella Enteritidis--a case report.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Mamoru; Ago, Kazutoshi; Ago, Mihoko; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Takahito

    2009-04-01

    A male in his early seventies complained of abdominal pain and diarrhea at 7h after ingesting a small piece of gratin from a box lunch prepared by a caterer. He was admitted to a hospital, but died 37 h later. Dozens of people who had eaten the same box lunch also complained of diarrhea. All of them recovered after medical treatment. A later investigation demonstrated Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in the gratin from the box lunch. An autopsy revealed very severe typhloenteritis with edema and submucosal hemorrhage. The digestive tract contained fluid contents without foodstuffs. Bacteriological examination revealed SE in the contents of the lower ileum and large intestine. Based on these findings, we concluded that the cause of death was food poisoning due to SE. In this case, ingesting only a small piece of contaminated food caused fatal food poisoning due to SE. These results emphasize the importance of prevention against food poisoning due to Salmonella, particularly SE.

  18. Large outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis PT8 in Portsmouth, UK, associated with a restaurant.

    PubMed

    Severi, E; Booth, L; Johnson, S; Cleary, P; Rimington, M; Saunders, D; Cockcroft, P; Ihekweazu, C

    2012-10-01

    Seventy-five individuals with Salmonella infection were identified in the Portsmouth area during August and September 2009, predominantly Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 8. Five patients were admitted to hospital. A case-case comparison study showed that a local restaurant was the most likely source of the infection with a risk of illness among its customers 25-fold higher than that of those who did not attend the restaurant. A case-control study conducted to investigate specific risk factors for infection at the restaurant showed that eating salad was associated with a threefold increase in probability of illness. Changing from using ready washed lettuces to lettuces requiring washing and not adhering strictly to the 48 hours exclusion policy for food handlers with diarrhoea were likely to have contributed to the initiation and propagation of this outbreak. Possibilities for cross-contamination and environmental contamination were identified in the restaurant.

  19. [Purulent pericarditis and colonic infiltrating to Salmonella enteritidis complicated by acute intussusception in a case of IL-12Rβ1 deficiency].

    PubMed

    Ailal, F; Tazi, A; Bustamante, J; Picard, C; Najib, J; Casanova, J-L; Bousfiha, A A

    2014-12-01

    IL-12 receptor β1 deficiency (IL-12Rβ1) predisposes patients to mycobacteria and Salmonella infections. We report a case of IL-12Rβ1 deficiency with a fatal multi-resistant Salmonella enteritidis infection. This boy was born after from a consanguineous marriage, and diagnosed as having a IL-12Rβ1 deficiency since the age of 3 months. He presented with recurrent Salmonella enteritidis essentially digestive localization, complicated by purulent pericarditis at the same germ at the age of two and a half years. At the age of 3, a colonic infiltration due to a Salmonella enteritidis resistant to antibiotics, was complicated by acute intussusception, and the child died. The IL-12Rβ1 deficiency is considered as having a good prognosis, in contrast to what happened in our patient. We review therapeutic issues in these patients.

  20. Characterization of the ELPhiS prophage from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis strain LK5.

    PubMed

    Hanna, L Farris; Matthews, T David; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Hasty, David; Edwards, Robert A

    2012-03-01

    Phages are a primary driving force behind the evolution of bacterial pathogens by transferring a variety of virulence genes into their hosts. Similar to other bacterial genomes, the Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis LK5 genome contains several regions that are homologous to phages. Although genomic analysis demonstrated the presence of prophages, it was unable to confirm which phage elements within the genome were viable. Genetic markers were used to tag one of the prophages in the genome to allow monitoring of phage induction. Commonly used laboratory strains of Salmonella were resistant to phage infection, and therefore a rapid screen was developed to identify susceptible hosts. This approach showed that a genetically tagged prophage, ELPhiS (Enteritidis lysogenic phage S), was capable of infecting Salmonella serovars that are diverse in host range and virulence and has the potential to laterally transfer genes between these serovars via lysogenic conversion. The rapid screen approach is adaptable to any system with a large collection of isolates and may be used to test the viability of prophages found by sequencing the genomes of various bacterial pathogens.

  1. Rapid inactivation of Salmonella Enteritidis on shell eggs by plant-derived antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Indu; Upadhyay, Abhinav; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Baskaran, Sangeetha Ananda; Mooyottu, Shankumar; Darre, Michael J; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is a common foodborne pathogen transmitted to humans largely by consumption of contaminated eggs. The external surface of eggs becomes contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis from various sources on farms, the main sources being hens' droppings and contaminated litter. Therefore, effective egg surface disinfection is critical to reduce pathogens on eggs and potentially control egg-borne disease outbreaks. This study investigated the efficacy of GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status, plant-derived antimicrobials (PDA), namely trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC), carvacrol (CR), and eugenol (EUG), as an antimicrobial wash for rapidly killing Salmonella Enteritidis on shell eggs in the presence or absence of chicken droppings. White-shelled eggs inoculated with a 5-strain mixture of nalidixic acid (NA) resistant Salmonella Enteritidis (8.0 log cfu/mL) were washed in sterile deionized water containing each PDA (0.0, 0.25, 0.5, or 0.75%) or chlorine (200 mg/kg) at 32 or 42°C for 30 s, 3 min, or 5 min. Approximately 6.0 log cfu/mL of Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered from inoculated and unwashed eggs. The wash water control and chlorine control decreased Salmonella Enteritidis on eggs by only 2.0 log cfu/mL even after washing for 5 min. The PDA were highly effective in killing Salmonella Enteritidis on eggs compared with controls (P < 0.05). All treatments containing CR and EUG reduced Salmonella Enteritidis to undetectable levels as rapidly as within 30 s of washing, whereas TC (0.75%) completely inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis on eggs washed at 42°C for 30 s (P < 0.05). No Salmonella Enteritidis was detected in any PDA or chlorine wash solution; however, substantial pathogen populations (~4.0 log cfu/mL) survived in the antibacterial-free control wash water (P < 0.05). The CR and EUG were also able to eliminate Salmonella Enteritidis on eggs to undetectable levels in the presence of 3% chicken droppings at 32°C (P < 0.05). This study

  2. Lipopolysaccharide-induced biliary factors enhance invasion of Salmonella enteritidis in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Islam, A F; Moss, N D; Dai, Y; Smith, M S; Collins, A M; Jackson, G D

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the role of the hepatobiliary system in the early pathogenesis of Salmonella enteritidis infection was investigated in a rat model. Intravenous (i.v.) challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has previously been shown to enhance the translocation of normal gut flora. We first confirmed that LPS can similarly promote the invasion of S. enteritidis. Oral infection of outbred Australian Albino Wistar rats with 10(6) to 10(7) CFU of S. enteritidis led to widespread tissue invasion after days. If animals were similarly challenged after intravenous administration of S. enteritidis LPS (3 to 900 microg/kg of body weight), significant invasion of the livers and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) occurred within 24 h, with invasion of the liver increasing in a dose-dependent fashion (P < 0.01). If bile was prevented from reaching the intestine by bile duct ligation or cannulation, bacterial invasion of the liver and MLN was almost totally abrogated (P < 0.001). As i.v. challenge with LPS could induce the delivery of inflammatory mediators into the bile, biliary tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) concentrations were measured by bioassay. Biliary concentrations of TNF-alpha rose shortly after LPS challenge, peaked with a mean concentration of 27.0 ng/ml at around 1 h postchallenge, and returned to baseline levels (3.1 ng/ml) after 2.5 h. Although TNF-alpha cannot be directly implicated in the invasion process, we conclude that the invasiveness of the enteric pathogen S. enteritidis is enhanced by the presence of LPS in the blood and that this enhanced invasion is at least in part a consequence of the delivery of inflammatory mediators to the gastrointestinal tract by the hepatobiliary system.

  3. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Biliary Factors Enhance Invasion of Salmonella enteritidis in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Abul F. M. W.; Moss, Nathan D.; Dai, Yung; Smith, Murray S. R.; Collins, Andrew M.; Jackson, Graham D. F.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the role of the hepatobiliary system in the early pathogenesis of Salmonella enteritidis infection was investigated in a rat model. Intravenous (i.v.) challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has previously been shown to enhance the translocation of normal gut flora. We first confirmed that LPS can similarly promote the invasion of S. enteritidis. Oral infection of outbred Australian Albino Wistar rats with 106 to 107 CFU of S. enteritidis led to widespread tissue invasion after days. If animals were similarly challenged after intravenous administration of S. enteritidis LPS (3 to 900 μg/kg of body weight), significant invasion of the livers and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) occurred within 24 h, with invasion of the liver increasing in a dose-dependent fashion (P < 0.01). If bile was prevented from reaching the intestine by bile duct ligation or cannulation, bacterial invasion of the liver and MLN was almost totally abrogated (P < 0.001). As i.v. challenge with LPS could induce the delivery of inflammatory mediators into the bile, biliary tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) concentrations were measured by bioassay. Biliary concentrations of TNF-α rose shortly after LPS challenge, peaked with a mean concentration of 27.0 ng/ml at around 1 h postchallenge, and returned to baseline levels (3.1 ng/ml) after 2.5 h. Although TNF-α cannot be directly implicated in the invasion process, we conclude that the invasiveness of the enteric pathogen S. enteritidis is enhanced by the presence of LPS in the blood and that this enhanced invasion is at least in part a consequence of the delivery of inflammatory mediators to the gastrointestinal tract by the hepatobiliary system. PMID:10603360

  4. Live attenuated vaccines for invasive Salmonella infections

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Sharon M.; Levine, Myron M.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi produces significant morbidity and mortality worldwide despite the fact that there are licensed S. Typhi vaccines available. This is primarily due to the fact that these vaccines are not used in the countries that most need them. There is growing recognition that an effective invasive Salmonella vaccine formulation must also prevent infection due to other Salmonella serovars. We anticipate that a multivalent vaccine that targets the following serovars will be needed to control invasive Salmonella infections worldwide: S. Typhi, S. Paratyphi A, S. Paratyphi B (currently uncommon but may become dominant again), S. Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis and S. Choleraesuis (as well as other Group C Salmonella). Live attenuated vaccines are an attractive vaccine formulation for use in developing as well as developed countries. Here, we describe the methods of attenuation that have been used to date to create live attenuated Salmonella vaccines and provide an update on the progress that has been made on these vaccines. PMID:25902362

  5. Prevention of Salmonella enteritidis in shell eggs during production, storage, and transportation. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2009-07-09

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule that requires shell egg producers to implement measures to prevent Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) from contaminating eggs on the farm and from further growth during storage and transportation, and requires these producers to maintain records concerning their compliance with the rule and to register with FDA. FDA is taking this action because SE is among the leading bacterial causes of foodborne illness in the United States, and shell eggs are a primary source of human SE infections. The final rule will reduce SE-associated illnesses and deaths by reducing the risk that shell eggs are contaminated with SE.

  6. [Significance of Salmonella enteritidis in outbreaks of diseases transmitted by foods in Argentina, 1986-1988].

    PubMed

    Eiguer, T; Caffer, M I; Fronchkowsky, G B

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the outbreaks of food-borne-diseases due to Salmonella Enteritidis which occurred in Argentina between 1986 and 1988. In 39 registered episodes 210 strains were isolated from human feces (28 outbreaks) and 59 from food (23 outbreaks). More than 2,500 people in different provinces were affected, the chief characteristics of the clinical picture being the gravity of the symptoms (high temperature, vomiting, diarrhea and severe dehydration). The main source of infection was related to raw eggs, eaten in the form of home-made mayonnaise. It is considered necessary to carry out an effective control of poultry products, as well as a permanent surveillance of salmonellosis.

  7. Antagonistic activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA10 against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis SE86 in mice.

    PubMed

    Scapin, Diane; Grando, Williani Fabiola; Rossi, Eliandra Mirlei; Perez, Karla Joseane; Malheiros, Patrícia da Silva; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the main pathogens responsible for foodborne illness in Brazil. Probiotic bacteria can play a role in defense and recovery from enteropathogenic infections. In this study, the ability of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA10 to colonise and exert antagonistic effects in the gastrointestinal tract was tested before and during experimental infection in conventional mice contaminated with S. Enteritidis (SE86). A dose of 0.1 mL containing 10(8) viable cells of SE86 and L. acidophilus LA10 was orally administered by gavage to mice. The experiment was divided into groups. As a negative control, Group 1 was administered only sterile saline solution. As a positive control, Group 2 was administered only SE86. Group 3 was first administered SE86, and after 10 days, treated with L. acidophilus LA10. Group 4 was first administered L. acidophilus LA10, and after 10 days, challenged with SE86. The results demonstrated that a significant number of SE86 cells were able to colonize the gastrointestinal tract of mice, specifically in the colon and ileum. L. acidophilus LA10 demonstrated an antagonistic effect against SE86, with better results observed for Group 3 over Group 4. Thus, L. acidophilus LA10 shows potential antagonistic effects against S. Enteritidis SE86, especially if administered after infection.

  8. Risks Involved in the Use of Enrofloxacin for Salmonella Enteritidis or Salmonella Heidelberg in Commercial Poultry.

    PubMed

    Morales-Barrera, Eduardo; Calhoun, Nicole; Lobato-Tapia, Jose L; Lucca, Vivian; Prado-Rebolledo, Omar; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl; Merino-Guzman, Ruben; Petrone-García, Victor M; Latorre, Juan D; Mahaffey, Brittany D; Teague, Kyle D; Graham, Lucas E; Wolfenden, Amanda D; Baxter, Mikayla F A; Hargis, Billy M; Tellez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the risks involved in the use of Enrofloxacin for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) or Salmonella Heidelberg (SH) in commercial poultry and determine the effects of a probiotic as an antibiotic alternative. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the risks involved in the use of Enrofloxacin for SE or SH in commercial poultry. Experiment 1 consisted of two trials. In each trial, chickens were assigned to one of three groups; control + SE challenged; Enrofloxacin 25 mg/kg + SE; and Enrofloxacin 50 mg/kg + SE. Chickens received Enrofloxacin in the drinking water from days 1 to 5 of age. On day 6, all groups received fresh water without any treatment. All chickens were orally gavaged with 10(7) cfu/chick of SE at 7 days of age and euthanized on 8 days of age. In Experiment 2, turkey poults were assigned to one of the three groups; control + SH; probiotic + SH; and Enrofloxacin 50 mg/kg + SH. Poults received probiotic or Enrofloxacin in the drinking water from days 1 to 5 of age. On day 6, poults received fresh water without any treatment. Poults were orally gavaged with 10(7) cfu/poult of SH at 7 days of age. Poults were weighed and humanely killed 24 h post-SH challenge to evaluate serum concentration of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran to evaluate intestinal permeability, metagenomics, and SH infection. In both trials of Experiment 1, chickens treated with Enrofloxacin were more susceptible to SE organ invasion and intestinal colonization when compared with control non-treated chickens (P < 0.05). In Experiment 2, poults treated with 50 mg/kg of Enrofloxacin showed an increase in body weight, however, this group also showed an increase in SH susceptibility, intestinal permeability, and lower proportion of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, but with control group had the highest proportion of Proteobacteria. By contrast, poults that received the probiotic had the highest

  9. Risks Involved in the Use of Enrofloxacin for Salmonella Enteritidis or Salmonella Heidelberg in Commercial Poultry

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Barrera, Eduardo; Calhoun, Nicole; Lobato-Tapia, Jose L.; Lucca, Vivian; Prado-Rebolledo, Omar; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl; Merino-Guzman, Ruben; Petrone-García, Victor M.; Latorre, Juan D.; Mahaffey, Brittany D.; Teague, Kyle D.; Graham, Lucas E.; Wolfenden, Amanda D.; Baxter, Mikayla F. A.; Hargis, Billy M.; Tellez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the risks involved in the use of Enrofloxacin for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) or Salmonella Heidelberg (SH) in commercial poultry and determine the effects of a probiotic as an antibiotic alternative. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the risks involved in the use of Enrofloxacin for SE or SH in commercial poultry. Experiment 1 consisted of two trials. In each trial, chickens were assigned to one of three groups; control + SE challenged; Enrofloxacin 25 mg/kg + SE; and Enrofloxacin 50 mg/kg + SE. Chickens received Enrofloxacin in the drinking water from days 1 to 5 of age. On day 6, all groups received fresh water without any treatment. All chickens were orally gavaged with 107 cfu/chick of SE at 7 days of age and euthanized on 8 days of age. In Experiment 2, turkey poults were assigned to one of the three groups; control + SH; probiotic + SH; and Enrofloxacin 50 mg/kg + SH. Poults received probiotic or Enrofloxacin in the drinking water from days 1 to 5 of age. On day 6, poults received fresh water without any treatment. Poults were orally gavaged with 107 cfu/poult of SH at 7 days of age. Poults were weighed and humanely killed 24 h post-SH challenge to evaluate serum concentration of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran to evaluate intestinal permeability, metagenomics, and SH infection. In both trials of Experiment 1, chickens treated with Enrofloxacin were more susceptible to SE organ invasion and intestinal colonization when compared with control non-treated chickens (P < 0.05). In Experiment 2, poults treated with 50 mg/kg of Enrofloxacin showed an increase in body weight, however, this group also showed an increase in SH susceptibility, intestinal permeability, and lower proportion of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, but with control group had the highest proportion of Proteobacteria. By contrast, poults that received the probiotic had the highest

  10. Electron-beam-inactivated vaccine against Salmonella enteritidis colonization in molting hens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Electron Beam (eBeam) ionization technology has a variety of applications in modern society. The underlying hypothesis was that electron beam (eBeam) inactivated Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) cells can serve as a vaccine to control Salmonella colonization and Salmonella shedding in c...

  11. Emergence of host-adapted Salmonella Enteritidis through rapid evolution in an immunocompromised host

    PubMed Central

    Klemm, Elizabeth J; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Hadfield, James; Forbester, Jessica L; Harris, Simon R; Hale, Christine; Heath, Jennifer N; Wileman, Thomas; Clare, Simon; Kane, Leanne; Goulding, David; Otto, Thomas D; Kay, Sally; Doffinger, Rainer; Cooke, Fiona J; Carmichael, Andrew; Lever, Andrew ML; Parkhill, Julian; MacLennan, Calman A; Kumararatne, Dinakantha

    2016-01-01

    Summary Host adaptation is a key factor contributing to the emergence of new bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens. Many pathogens are considered promiscuous because they cause disease across a range of host species, while others are host-adapted, infecting particular hosts1. Host adaptation can potentially progress to host restriction where the pathogen is strictly limited to a single host species and is frequently associated with more severe symptoms. Host-adapted and host-restricted bacterial clades evolve from within a broader host-promiscuous species and sometimes target different niches within their specialist hosts, such as adapting from a mucosal to a systemic lifestyle. Genome degradation, marked by gene inactivation and deletion, is a key feature of host adaptation, although the triggers initiating genome degradation are not well understood. Here, we show that a chronic systemic non-typhoidal Salmonella infection in an immunocompromised human patient resulted in genome degradation targeting genes that are expendable for a systemic lifestyle. We present a genome-based investigation of a recurrent blood-borne Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) infection covering 15 years in an interleukin (IL)-12 β-1 receptor-deficient individual that developed into an asymptomatic chronic infection. The infecting S. Enteritidis harbored a mutation in the mismatch repair gene mutS that accelerated the genomic mutation rate. Phylogenetic analysis and phenotyping of multiple patient isolates provides evidence for a remarkable level of within-host evolution that parallels genome changes present in successful host-restricted bacterial pathogens but never before observed on this timescale. Our analysis identifies common pathways of host adaptation and demonstrates the role that immunocompromised individuals can play in this process. PMID:27127642

  12. A model of Salmonella infection within industrial house hens.

    PubMed

    Prévost, K; Magal, P; Beaumont, C

    2006-10-07

    Salmonella is one of the major sources of toxi-infection in humans. Incidences of human salmonellosis have greatly increased over the past 20 years and this can largely be attributed to epidemics of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 4 within poultry. The main concern with this bacterium is the existence of silent carriers, i.e. animals harbouring S. enteritidis without expressing any visible symptoms. In this article, we formulate a model for S. enteritidis transmission in hen houses, considering both the hens and the environmental bacterium contamination. By considering the hen's individual development of the disease, we build a model for the production of eggs contaminated by S. enteritidis. The objectives are to analyse the dynamic of the disease, and to provide understanding of measures to avoid the endemicity of S. enteritidis in industrial hen houses.

  13. Efficacy for a new live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine candidate to reduce internal egg contamination.

    PubMed

    Nandre, R; Matsuda, K; Lee, J H

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a novel attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis (△lon△cpxR) vaccine candidate (JOL919), chickens were immunized through oral and intramuscular routes to reduce egg contamination against S. Enteritidis challenge. Birds were orally immunized with JOL919 on the first day of life and were subsequently boosted in the 6th and 16th weeks through oral (group B) or intramuscular (group C) route, while control birds were unimmunized (group A). The chickens of all groups were challenged intravenously with the virulent S. Enteritidis strain in the 24th week. The immunized groups B and C showed significantly higher plasma IgG and intestinal secretory IgA levels as compared to those of the control group. The lymphocyte proliferation response and CD45(+) CD3(+) T-cell number in the peripheral blood of the groups B and C were significantly increased. In addition, the egg contamination rates were significantly lower in the group B (0%, 10.7% and 0%) and the group C (3.6%, 14.3% and 3.6%) as compared to the group A (28.6%, 42.8% and 28.6%) in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd weeks post-challenge. All animals in the groups B and C showed lower organ lesion scores in the liver and spleen and lower bacterial counts in the liver, spleen and ovary at the 3rd week post-challenge. These results indicate that this vaccine candidate can be an efficient tool for prevention of Salmonella infections by inducing protective humoral and cellular immune responses. In addition, this vaccine did not prevent egg contamination, but did appear to reduce incidence. Booster immunizations, especially via oral administration route, showed an efficient protection against internal egg contamination with S. Enteritidis.

  14. Complete Genome Sequences of 16 Canadian Strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Muhammad A.; Ziebell, Kim; Nash, John H. E.; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Ross, Ashley; Al-Lami, Mariam; Boerlin, Patrick; Chui, Linda; Devenish, John; Bekal, Sadjia; Graham, Morag; Amoako, Kingsley K.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is an important zoonotic food-borne pathogen causing serious human illnesses frequently linked to poultry products. Here, we report fully assembled genome sequences of 16 S. Enteritidis strains with common pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and phage types (8, 13, 13a, and 14b) that predominate in North America. PMID:24762938

  15. Whole Genome Sequence Analysis of Salmonella Enteritidis Isolated from Wild Mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella Enteritidis is a foodborne pathogen of global concern because of the high frequency isolated from foods and patients. Draft genomes of 64 S. Enteritidis strains from intestines and spleens of mice were reported. The availability of these genomes provides useful information on genomic dive...

  16. 21 CFR 118.10 - Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.10 Section 118.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.10 Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. (a) Records: You must maintain the following records documenting your SE prevention measures: (1...

  17. 21 CFR 118.10 - Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.10 Section 118.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.10 Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. (a) Records: You must maintain the following records documenting your SE prevention measures: (1...

  18. 21 CFR 118.10 - Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.10 Section 118.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.10 Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. (a) Records: You must maintain the following records documenting your SE prevention measures: (1...

  19. Salmonella Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... reptiles like snakes, turtles, and lizards. Symptoms include Fever Diarrhea Abdominal cramps Headache Possible nausea, vomiting, and ... be serious. The usual treatment is antibiotics. Typhoid fever, a more serious disease caused by Salmonella, is ...

  20. Salmonella Infections - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Salmonella Infections URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Salmonella Infections - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features ...

  1. Research note: Salmonella enteritidis and Arizona hinshawii isolated from wild sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windingstad, R.M.; Trainer, D.O.; Duncan, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    Salmonella enteritidis serotype Rubislaw and Arizona hinshawii were isolated from cloacal swabs of 'healthy' live-trapped sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) in Indiana and Wisconsin. These respective isolations were the first reported from wild sandhill cranes.

  2. Molecular subtyping of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 8 strains from the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Usera, M A; Popovic, T; Bopp, C A; Strockbine, N A

    1994-01-01

    Salmonella enteritidis is now the most common serotype of the genus Salmonella reported in the United States. Bacteriophage typing has been helpful for subdividing S. enteritidis strains from different sources in the United States. Most S. enteritidis outbreaks reported were egg related, and the majority of them were caused by strains of phage type 8. To determine whether restriction fragment length polymorphism of the rRNA genes (ribotyping) and of the genomic DNAs from two lysogenic phages from S. enteritidis could be used to discriminate between S. enteritidis phage type 8 strains, we conducted Southern hybridization studies on 24 isolates from different outbreaks and six non-outbreak-associated strains using DNA probes for 16S and 23S rRNA genes and S. enteritidis typing phages 1 and 2 from the Ward typing system (L. R. Ward, J. D. H. de Sa, and B. Rowe, Epidemiol. Infect. 99:291-294, 1987). Of seven restriction endonucleases screened with the probe for rRNA genes, AccI provided the best discrimination between strains; six distinct patterns were observed. AccI ribosomal DNA patterns 1 to 6 were detected among 76.7, 3.3, 6.7, 3.3, 3.3, and 6.7% of isolates tested, respectively. Strains of AccI ribosomal DNA pattern 3 could be further subdivided into two additional patterns by using SmaI. Epidemiologically related strains had identical patterns. No discrimination between strains was achieved by probes for phages 1 and 2. No sequences homologous to the phage I probe were detected among phage type 8 strains, and all strains tested with six restriction enzymes had the same hybridization pattern with the phage 2 probe. These findings demonstrate that ribotyping with AccI and SmaI provides an additional means of discriminating between some phage type 8 strains; however, ribotyping and the phage 2 hybridization results from egg-related outbreak strains support previous findings that these strains are closely related. Images PMID:7907343

  3. Potential use of caprylic acid in broiler chickens: effect on Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Skřivanová, Eva; Hovorková, Petra; Čermák, Ladislav; Marounek, Milan

    2015-01-01

    The effect of dietary caprylic acid (CA) on Salmonella Enteritidis, as well as the surface treatment of chicken skin contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis was evaluated. To evaluate the dietary effect of CA on Salmonella Enteritidis, the individually housed broiler chickens (n=48) were divided into 4 groups (positive control, negative control, 2.5 g/kg of CA in the feed, and 5 g/kg of CA in the feed). The feed of all groups, except the negative control, was artificially contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis ATCC 13076 (10(7) colony-forming units/100 g of feed). Both concentrations of dietary CA significantly decreased counts of Salmonella Enteritidis in the crop and cecum of experimental chickens (p<0.05). The effect of CA in the crop contents was more pronounced than in the cecum. Surface treatment of chilled chicken halves with CA at 1.25 and 2.5 mg/mL significantly decreased Salmonella Enteritidis contamination of chicken skin (p<0.05). The sensory evaluation of the skin and meat showed that treatment of the skin with 1.25 mg/mL of CA worsened odor and appearance of the chicken skin, while sensory traits of chicken meat were not significantly affected. Taste and overall acceptability was not influenced by CA in both meat and skin. Treatment of the skin with 2.5 mg/mL of CA resulted in more pronounced changes of the skin odor and appearance. In conclusion, dietary CA reduced carriage of Salmonella Enteritidis in chickens, whereas surface-treatment reduced or eliminated Salmonella Enteritidis contamination in the processed bird.

  4. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis tatB and tatC mutants are impaired in Caco-2 cell invasion in vitro and show reduced systemic spread in chickens.

    PubMed

    Mickael, Claudia Silva; Lam, Po-King S; Berberov, Emil M; Allan, Brenda; Potter, Andrew A; Köster, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is a leading causative agent of gastroenteritis in humans. This pathogen also colonizes the intestinal tracts of poultry and can spread systemically in chickens. Transfer to humans usually occurs through undercooked or improperly handled poultry meat or eggs. The bacterial twin-arginine transport (Tat) pathway is responsible for the translocation of folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane. In order to study the role of the Tat system in the infection and colonization of chickens by Salmonella Enteritidis, we constructed chromosomal deletion mutants of the tatB and tatC genes, which are essential components of the Tat translocon. We observed that the tat mutations affected bacterial cell morphology, motility, and sensitivity to albomycin, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and EDTA. In addition, the mutant strains showed reduced invasion of polarized Caco-2 cells. The wild-type phenotype was restored in all our Salmonella Enteritidis tat mutants by introducing episomal copies of the tatABC genes. When tested in chickens by use of a Salmonella Enteritidis Delta tatB strain, the Tat system inactivation did not substantially affect cecal colonization, but it delayed systemic infection. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the Tat system plays a role in Salmonella Enteritidis pathogenesis.

  5. Control of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum in birds by using live vaccine candidate containing attenuated Salmonella Gallinarum mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Penha Filho, Rafael Antonio Casarin; de Paiva, Jacqueline Boldrin; da Silva, Mariana Dias; de Almeida, Adriana Maria; Berchieri, Angelo

    2010-04-01

    The ideal live vaccine to control Salmonella in commercial chicken flocks should engender protection against various strains. The purpose of the present study was to confirm the attenuation of a Salmonella Gallinarum (SG) mutant strain with deletion on genes cobS and cbiA, that are involved in the biosynthesis of cobalamin. Furthermore, evaluate its use as a live vaccine against Salmonella. For the evaluation of the vaccine efficacy, two experiments were conducted separately. Birds from a commercial brown line of chickens were used to perform challenge with SG wild type strain and birds from a commercial white line of chickens were used to perform challenge with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) wild type strain. In both experiments, the birds were separated in three groups (A, B and C). Birds were orally vaccinated with the SG mutant as the following programme: group A, one dose at 5 days of age; group B, one dose at 5 days of age and a second dose at 25 days of age; and group C, birds were kept unvaccinated as controls. At 45 days of age, birds from all groups, including the control, were challenged orally by SG wild type (brown line) or SE wild type (white line). Lastly, another experiment was performed to evaluate the use of the SG mutant strain to prevent caecal colonization by SE wild type on 1-day-old broiler chicks. Mortality and systemic infection by SG wild type strain were assessed in brown chickens; faecal shedding and systemic infection by SE wild type were assessed in white chickens and caecal colonization was assessed in broiler chicks. Either vaccination with one or two doses of SG mutant, were capable to protect brown chickens against SG wild type. In the experiment with white chickens, only vaccination with two doses of SG mutant protected the birds against challenge with SE wild type. Although, SG mutant could not prevent caecal colonization in 1-day-old broiler chicks by the challenge strain SE wild type. Overall, the results indicated that SG mutant

  6. Differentiation of Salmonella enteritidis isolates by fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Kober, Márcia Vargas; Abreu, Marina Bystronski; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Ferreira, Carlos Alexandre Sanchez; Oliveira, Sílvia Dias

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is responsible for human gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide, and the molecular characterization of isolates is an important tool for epidemiological studies. Fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (FAFLP) analysis was performed on 31 Salmonella Enteritidis strains from South Brazil isolated from human, foods, swine, broiler carcasses, and other poultry-related samples to subtype isolates in comparison to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis. Five strains of Salmonella Enteritidis from different geographical regions, Salmonella Enteritidis ATCC 13076, and four isolates of different Salmonella serovars were also tested. Among the 41 isolates tested, 96 polymorphic AFs and 40 distinct profiles were obtained, displaying a Simpson's index of diversity of 0.99; whereas the PFGE analysis presented 13 patterns and the resulting Simpson's index was 0.55. Nine FAFLP and seven PFGE clusters could be inferred based in Dice similarity coefficient. FAFLP clustering readily identified different serotypes of Salmonella but did not distinguish isolates epidemiologically nonrelated or distinct phage types. Therefore, these results indicate that FAFLP is a rapid method for epidemiological investigations of Salmonella outbreaks, presenting a high discriminatory power for subtyping of Salmonella Enteritidis.

  7. Inhibition of Salmonella Enteritidis by cerein 8A, EDTA and sodium lactate.

    PubMed

    Lappe, Rosiele; Motta, Amanda S; Sant'anna, Voltaire; Brandelli, Adriano

    2009-11-15

    The ability of the bacteriocin cerein 8A to inhibit Salmonella Enteritidis in combination with EDTA and sodium lactate was investigated. Salmonella Enteritidis was incubated with combinations of cerein 8A (3200AU/mL) and EDTA (20, 50, 100 mmol/L) or sodium lactate (200 mmol/L). All treatments caused a significant reduction in the OD(600) values of Salmonella Enteritidis cultures. The addition of cerein 8A plus EDTA resulted in higher inhibition in comparison with the bacteriocin alone; the greater the concentration of EDTA, the greater the inhibitory effect. The combination of cerein 8A plus 100 mmol/L EDTA results in a more efficient treatment to reduce the number of viable cells of Salmonella Enteritidis. The combination of cerein 8A plus sodium lactate also showed significant inhibition of the indicator organism. Transmission electron microscopy showed damaged cell walls and loss of protoplasmic material in treated cells. The cells of Salmonella Enteritidis treated with cerein 8A plus EDTA appeared more injured. The bacteriocin cerein 8A may be useful to inhibit Gram-negative bacteria, with enhanced effect in combination with chelating agents. Control of Salmonella Enteritidis, a Gram-negative bacterium constantly linked to food outbreaks, addresses an important aspect of food safety.

  8. Lactobacillus salivarius CTC2197 Prevents Salmonella enteritidis Colonization in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Mònica; Hugas, Marta; Badiola, Jose Ignacio; Monfort, Josep Maria; Garriga, Margarita

    1999-01-01

    A rifampin-resistant Lactobacillus salivarius strain, CTC2197, was assessed as a probiotic in poultry, by studying its ability to prevent Salmonella enteritidis C-114 colonization in chickens. When the probiotic strain was dosed by oral gavage together with S. enteritidis C-114 directly into the proventriculus in 1-day-old Leghorn chickens, the pathogen was completely removed from the birds after 21 days. The same results were obtained when the probiotic strain was also administered through the feed and the drinking water apart from direct inoculation into the proventriculus. The inclusion of L. salivarius CTC2197 in the first day chicken feed revealed that a concentration of 105 CFU g−1 was enough to ensure the colonization of the gastrointestinal tract of the birds after 1 week. However, between 21 and 28 days, L. salivarius CTC2197 was undetectable in the gastrointestinal tract of some birds, showing that more than one dose would be necessary to ensure its presence till the end of the rearing time. Freeze-drying and freezing with glycerol or skim milk as cryoprotective agents, appeared to be suitable methods to preserve the probiotic strain. The inclusion of the L. salivarius CTC2197 in a commercial feed mixture seemed to be a good way to supply it on the farm, although the strain showed sensitivity to the temperatures used during the feed mixture storage and in the chicken incubator rooms. Moreover, survival had been improved after several reinoculations in chicken feed mixture. PMID:10543812

  9. Phage typing of Salmonella enteritidis from different sources in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Iolanda A; Helmuth, Reiner; Schroeter, Andreus; Mead, Geoffrey C; Santos, Manoel A A; Solari, Claude A; Silva, Oyama R; Ferreira, Antonio J Piantino

    2003-02-01

    The occurrence of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) phage types (PTs) in samples collected from healthy and diseased chickens, in outbreaks of human gastroenteritis related to the consumption of egg products, in samples of poultry meat, in pipped embryos of broiler chickens, in meat meal, in poultry-rearing environments, and in many foods (cheese, mayonnaise, cake, and bacon) is described for strains isolated from 1995 to 1997 in Brazil. SE strains were isolated, and the most common PT was found to be PT 4, followed by PTs 7, 21, 35, 6, 4a, 8, 30, 6a, 5a, 1, and 1b. Fourteen strains were classified as react-but-do-not-conform strains, and one strain was not typeable. The results of this study demonstrate that PT 4 has a wider distribution among the sources studied than do any other SE phage types and is the most important phage type in human salmonellosis.

  10. Prevention of egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis after oral vaccination of laying hens with Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC mutants.

    PubMed

    Kilroy, Sofie; Raspoet, Ruth; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2016-08-12

    Vaccination of laying hens has been successfully used to reduce egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis, decreasing human salmonellosis cases worldwide. Currently used vaccines for layers are either inactivated vaccines or live attenuated strains produced by mutagenesis. Targeted gene deletion mutants hold promise for future vaccines, because specific bacterial functions can be removed that may improve safety and allow differentiation from field strains. In this study, the efficacy of Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC strains in laying hens as live vaccines was evaluated. The mutants are deficient in either the membrane channel TolC (ΔtolC) or the multi-drug efflux systems acrAB, acrEF and mdtABC (ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC). These strains have a decreased ability for gut and tissue colonization and are unable to survive in egg white, the latter preventing transmission of the vaccine strains to humans. Two groups of 30 laying hens were orally inoculated at day 1, 6 weeks and 16 weeks of age with 10(8) cfu of either vaccine strain, while a third group was left unvaccinated. At 24 weeks of age, the birds were intravenously challenged with 5 × 10(7) cfu Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 S1400/94. The vaccine strains were not shed or detected in the gut, internal organs or eggs, 2 weeks after the third vaccination. The strains significantly protected against gut and internal organ colonization, and completely prevented egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis under the conditions of this study. This indicates that Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC strains might be valuable strains for vaccination of layers against Salmonella Enteritidis.

  11. Immunogenicity of a Bivalent Adjuvanted Glycoconjugate Vaccine against Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Fiorino, Fabio; Rondini, Simona; Micoli, Francesca; Lanzilao, Luisa; Alfini, Renzo; Mancini, Francesca; MacLennan, Calman A.; Medaglini, Donata

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis are the predominant causes of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease. Considering the co-endemicity of S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis, a bivalent vaccine formulation against both pathogens is necessary for protection against iNTS disease, thus investigation of glycoconjugate combination is required. In the present work, we investigated the immune responses induced by S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis monovalent and bivalent glycoconjugate vaccines adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide (alum) only or in combination with cytosine-phosphorothioate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG). Humoral and cellular, systemic and local, immune responses were characterized in two different mouse strains. All conjugate vaccines elicited high levels of serum IgG against the respective O-antigens (OAg) with bactericidal activity. The bivalent conjugate vaccine induced systemic production of antibodies against both S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis OAg. The presence of alum or alum + CpG adjuvants in vaccine formulations significantly increased the serum antigen-specific antibody production. The alum + CpG bivalent vaccine formulation triggered the highest systemic anti-OAg antibodies and also a significant increase of anti-OAg IgG in intestinal washes and fecal samples, with a positive correlation with serum levels. These data demonstrate the ability of monovalent and bivalent conjugate vaccines against S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis to induce systemic and local immune responses in different mouse strains, and highlight the suitability of a bivalent glycoconjugate formulation, especially when adjuvanted with alum + CpG, as a promising candidate vaccine against iNTS disease. PMID:28289411

  12. Analysis of Molecular Epidemiology of Chilean Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis Isolates by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and Bacteriophage Typing

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Jorge; Fica, Alberto; Ebensperger, German; Calfullan, Hector; Prat, Soledad; Fernandez, Alda; Alexandre, Marcela; Heitmann, Ingrid

    2003-01-01

    Human Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections emerged in Chile in 1994. S. enterica serotype Enteritidis phage type 1 isolates predominated in the north, and phage type 4 isolates predominated in the central and southern regions. A study was planned to characterize this epidemic using the best discriminatory typing technique. Research involved 441 S. enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates, including clinical preepidemic samples (n = 74; 1975 to 1993) and epidemic (n = 199), food (n = 72), poultry (n = 57), and some Latin American (n = 39) isolates. The best method was selected based on a sample of preepidemic isolates, analyzing the discriminatory power (DP) obtained by phage typing and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and pulsed-field gel electophoresis (PFGE) analysis. The highest DP was associated with BlnI PFGE-bacteriophage typing analysis (0.993). A total of 38 BlnI patterns (B patterns) were identified before the epidemic period, 19 since 1994, and only 4 in both periods. Two major clusters were identified by phylogenetic analysis, and the predominant B patterns clustered in the same branch. Combined analysis revealed that specific B pattern-phage type combinations (subtypes) disappeared before 1994, that different genotypes associated with S. enterica serotype Enteritidis phage type 4 had been observed since 1988, and that strain diversity increased before the expansion of S. enterica serotype Enteritidis in 1994. Predominant subtype B3-phage type 4 was associated with the central and southern regions, and subtype B38-phage type 1 was associated with the north (P < 0.0001). Food and poultry isolates matched the predominant S. enterica serotype Enteritidis subtypes, but isolates identified in neighboring countries (Peru and Bolivia) did not match S. enterica serotype Enteritidis subtypes identified in the north of Chile. The results of this work demonstrate that genetic diversity, replacement, and expansion of specific S. enterica serotype

  13. Salmonella Enteritidis strains from poultry exhibit differential responses to acid stress, oxidative stress, and survival in the egg albumen.

    PubMed

    Shah, Devendra H; Casavant, Carol; Hawley, Quincy; Addwebi, Tarek; Call, Douglas R; Guard, Jean

    2012-03-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is the major foodborne pathogen that is primarily transmitted by contaminated chicken meat and eggs. We recently demonstrated that Salmonella Enteritidis strains from poultry differ in their ability to invade human intestinal cells and cause disease in orally challenged mice. Here we hypothesized that the differential virulence of Salmonella Enteritidis strains is due to the differential fitness in the adverse environments that may be encountered during infection in the host. The responses of a panel of six Salmonella Enteritidis strains to acid stress, oxidative stress, survival in egg albumen, and the ability to cause infection in chickens were analyzed. This analysis allowed classification of strains into two categories, stress-sensitive and stress-resistant, with the former showing significantly (p<0.05) reduced survival in acidic (gastric phase of infection) and oxidative (intestinal and systemic phase of infection) stress. Stress-sensitive strains also showed impaired intestinal colonization and systemic dissemination in orally inoculated chickens and failed to survive/grow in egg albumen. Comparative genomic hybridization microarray analysis revealed no differences at the discriminatory level of the whole gene content between stress-sensitive and stress-resistant strains. However, sequencing of rpoS, a stress-regulatory gene, revealed that one of the three stress-sensitive strains carried an insertion mutation in the rpoS resulting in truncation of σ(S). Finding that one of the stress-sensitive strains carried an easily identifiable small polymorphism within a stress-response gene suggests that the other strains may also have small polymorphisms elsewhere in the genome, which likely impact regulation of stress or virulence associated genes in some manner.

  14. Genetic and phenotypic evidence of the Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis human-animal interface in Chile.

    PubMed

    Retamal, Patricio; Fresno, Marcela; Dougnac, Catherine; Gutierrez, Sindy; Gornall, Vanessa; Vidal, Roberto; Vernal, Rolando; Pujol, Myriam; Barreto, Marlen; González-Acuña, Daniel; Abalos, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is a worldwide zoonotic agent that has been recognized as a very important food-borne bacterial pathogen, mainly associated with consumption of poultry products. The aim of this work was to determine genotypic and phenotypic evidence of S. Enteritidis transmission among seabirds, poultry and humans in Chile. Genotyping was performed using PCR-based virulotyping, pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Pathogenicity-associated phenotypes were determined with survival to free radicals, acidic pH, starvation, antimicrobial resistance, and survival within human dendritic cells. As result of PCR and PFGE assays, some isolates from the three hosts showed identical genotypic patterns, and through MLST it was determined that all of them belong to sequence type 11. Phenotypic assays show diversity of bacterial responses among isolates. When results were analyzed according to bacterial host, statistical differences were identified in starvation and dendritic cells survival assays. In addition, isolates from seabirds showed the highest rates of resistance to gentamycin, tetracycline, and ampicillin. Overall, the very close genetic and phenotypic traits shown by isolates from humans, poultry, and seabirds suggest the inter-species transmission of S. Enteritidis bacteria between hosts, likely through anthropogenic environmental contamination that determines infection of seabirds with bacteria that are potentially pathogenic for other susceptible organism, including humans.

  15. Genetic and phenotypic evidence of the Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis human-animal interface in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Retamal, Patricio; Fresno, Marcela; Dougnac, Catherine; Gutierrez, Sindy; Gornall, Vanessa; Vidal, Roberto; Vernal, Rolando; Pujol, Myriam; Barreto, Marlen; González-Acuña, Daniel; Abalos, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is a worldwide zoonotic agent that has been recognized as a very important food-borne bacterial pathogen, mainly associated with consumption of poultry products. The aim of this work was to determine genotypic and phenotypic evidence of S. Enteritidis transmission among seabirds, poultry and humans in Chile. Genotyping was performed using PCR-based virulotyping, pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Pathogenicity-associated phenotypes were determined with survival to free radicals, acidic pH, starvation, antimicrobial resistance, and survival within human dendritic cells. As result of PCR and PFGE assays, some isolates from the three hosts showed identical genotypic patterns, and through MLST it was determined that all of them belong to sequence type 11. Phenotypic assays show diversity of bacterial responses among isolates. When results were analyzed according to bacterial host, statistical differences were identified in starvation and dendritic cells survival assays. In addition, isolates from seabirds showed the highest rates of resistance to gentamycin, tetracycline, and ampicillin. Overall, the very close genetic and phenotypic traits shown by isolates from humans, poultry, and seabirds suggest the inter-species transmission of S. Enteritidis bacteria between hosts, likely through anthropogenic environmental contamination that determines infection of seabirds with bacteria that are potentially pathogenic for other susceptible organism, including humans. PMID:26029196

  16. [Food poisoning outbreak due to the consumption of spaghetti a la carbonara caused by Salmonella enteritidis].

    PubMed

    Godoy, P; Artigues, A; Usera, M A; González, J L; Pablo, N; Agustí, M

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports a clinico-epidemiological and microbiological investigation conducted into an outbreak of gastrointestinal infection due to Salmonella enteritidis, where the most likely food vehicle was spaghetti a la carbonara. An historic cohort study was conducted out among persons exposed to menus at a school canteen. Data were gathered on age, sex, foods consumed and clinical symptoms. School premises and menus were inspected, food samples obtained (spaghetti and meat balls), and stool samples taken from 30 affected subjects and 8 food handlers. Isolated strains were studied using pulsed-field electrophoresis. Attack rates were computed, and the odds ratio adjusted for the remaining foodstuffs (ORa) used to calculate the independent contribution made by the respective foods to risk of infection. Study coverage was 75.7% (140/185). The overall attack rate was 72.1% (101/140), with 12.9% of those affected requiring hospitalisation. The multivariate analysis showed that, while the spaghetti maintained its association (ORa = 8.4; 95% CI 1.4-51.8), the meat balls registered a reduction in risk (ORa = 1.8; 95% CI 0.4-7.5). S. enteritidis was isolated in stool cultures from 28 affected subjects, and in 2 blood and 6 stool cultures from food handlers (5 of whom were classed as cases). Moreover, S. enteritidis was also isolated in the food samples. On pulsed-field electrophoresis, the strains registered the same electrophoresis pattern. This outbreak serves to underscore the gravity of Salmonella spp. food poisoning, the danger of using inadequately cooked eggs, and the importance of interviewing food handlers to ensure proper classification (i.e., as patients or carriers). Existing recommendations as to the use of pasteurised egg products ought to be extended in scope.

  17. Genetically Similar Isolates of Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis Persistent in China for a Long-Term Period.

    PubMed

    Song, Qifa; Shen, Xuanyi; Yang, Yuanbin; Zhang, Danyang; Gao, Hong

    2016-07-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is an important causative agent of nontyphoidal salmonellosis in human populations. In this study, we collected 72 S. Enteritidis strains from 2004 to 2014 in Ningbo, mid-east China. Of the 72 strains, we identified a dominant clone of 58 strains recovered from patient's feces (n = 48), blood (n = 1), pleural effusion (n = 1), chickens (n = 3), and dessert cakes (n = 5) by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and variable-number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). The profile arrangements of MLVA were SE1-SE2-SE3-SE5-SE6-SE8-SE9: 4-4-3-11-10-1-3. These dominant strains were susceptible to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, cefotaxime and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and resistant to nalidixic acid. Additionally, all isolates harboured virulence genes invA, sipA, sopE, and spvB when tested by PCR. Our results reveal that genetically similar S. Enteritidis strains which accounted for several outbreaks as well as blood infection and pleural cavity infection are prevalent in China for a long-term period. This situation calls for further attention in the prevention and control of foodborne disease caused by Salmonella species.

  18. Specific detection of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Lampel, K. A.; Keasler, S. P.; Hanes, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    An assay was developed for the specific detection of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis, using a novel application of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This PCR assay is based on the mismatch amplification mutation assay, an allele-specific reaction, and can discriminate Enteritidis from all other salmonella. PCR primers were selected to amplify a 351-base pair (bp) DNA fragment from the salmonella plasmid virulence A (spv A) gene of Enteritidis. A single base difference at position 272 is present between the nucleotide sequence of the spvA gene of Enteritidis and other salmonellae. The downstream PCR primer, that encompasses position 272 of the Enteritidis spvA gene, was designed to contain a single base mismatch at the penultimate position, resulting in a 1-base mismatch with Enteritidis and a 2-base mismatch with other salmonellae that harbour the virulence plasmid. The upstream primer was completely homologous with the region immediately 5' to the spvA gene. When these primers were used and the annealing and extension reactions were performed at the same temperature, the PCR assay was specific for Enteritidis; no PCR product was detected for 40 other serotypes and 28 different genera examined. In pure culture, 120 colony forming units (c.f.u.) could be detected; a PCR product was observed from template derived from a 5 h enrichment broth culture of chicken seeded with 1 c.f.u. per gram of Enteritidis. This PCR assay is specific, reproducible, and less time consuming than the standard bacteriological methods used to detect Enteritidis. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8620904

  19. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Contaminated eggs produced by infected commercial laying flocks are often implicated as sources of human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis, but Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium have also been significantly associated with egg-transmitted illness. Contamination of the edible conten...

  20. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium in raw chicken meat at retail markets in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Thung, T Y; Mahyudin, N A; Basri, D F; Wan Mohamed Radzi, C W J; Nakaguchi, Y; Nishibuchi, M; Radu, S

    2016-08-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the major food-borne diseases in many countries. This study was carried out to determine the occurrence of Salmonella spp., Salmonella Enteritidis, and Salmonella Typhimurium in raw chicken meat from wet markets and hypermarkets in Selangor, as well as to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profile of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium. The most probable number (MPN) in combination with multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) method was used to quantify the Salmonella spp., S. Enteritidis, and S. Typhimurium in the samples. The occurrence of Salmonella spp., S. Enteritidis, and S. Typhimurium in 120 chicken meat samples were 20.80%, 6.70%, and 2.50%, respectively with estimated quantity varying from <3 to 15 MPN/g. The antibiogram testing revealed differential multi-drug resistance among S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium isolates. All the isolates were resistance to erythromycin, penicillin, and vancomycin whereas sensitivity was recorded for Amoxicillin/Clavulanic acid, Gentamicin, Tetracycline, and Trimethoprim. Our findings demonstrated that the retail chicken meat could be a source of multiple antimicrobial-resistance Salmonella and may constitute a public health concern in Malaysia. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  1. Transposon mutagenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis identifies genes that contribute to invasiveness in human and chicken cells and survival in egg albumen.

    PubMed

    Shah, Devendra H; Zhou, Xiaohui; Kim, Hye-Young; Call, Douglas R; Guard, Jean

    2012-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is an important food-borne pathogen, and chickens are a primary reservoir of human infection. While most knowledge about Salmonella pathogenesis is based on research conducted on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis is known to have pathobiology specific to chickens that impacts epidemiology in humans. Therefore, more information is needed about S. Enteritidis pathobiology in comparison to that of S. Typhimurium. We used transposon mutagenesis to identify S. Enteritidis virulence genes by assay of invasiveness in human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells and chicken liver (LMH) cells and survival within chicken (HD-11) macrophages as a surrogate marker for virulence. A total of 4,330 transposon insertion mutants of an invasive G1 Nal(r) strain were screened using Caco-2 cells. This led to the identification of attenuating mutations in a total of 33 different loci, many of which include genes previously known to contribute to enteric infection (e.g., Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 [SPI-1], SPI-4, SPI-5, CS54, fliH, fljB, csgB, spvR, and rfbMN) in S. Enteritidis and other Salmonella serovars. Several genes or genomic islands that have not been reported previously (e.g., SPI-14, ksgA, SEN0034, SEN2278, and SEN3503) or that are absent in S. Typhimurium or in most other Salmonella serovars (e.g., pegD, SEN1152, SEN1393, and SEN1966) were also identified. Most mutants with reduced Caco-2 cell invasiveness also showed significantly reduced invasiveness in chicken liver cells and impaired survival in chicken macrophages and in egg albumen. Consequently, these genes may play an important role during infection of the chicken host and also contribute to successful egg contamination by S. Enteritidis.

  2. Transposon Mutagenesis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Identifies Genes That Contribute to Invasiveness in Human and Chicken Cells and Survival in Egg Albumen

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaohui; Kim, Hye-Young; Call, Douglas R.; Guard, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is an important food-borne pathogen, and chickens are a primary reservoir of human infection. While most knowledge about Salmonella pathogenesis is based on research conducted on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis is known to have pathobiology specific to chickens that impacts epidemiology in humans. Therefore, more information is needed about S. Enteritidis pathobiology in comparison to that of S. Typhimurium. We used transposon mutagenesis to identify S. Enteritidis virulence genes by assay of invasiveness in human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells and chicken liver (LMH) cells and survival within chicken (HD-11) macrophages as a surrogate marker for virulence. A total of 4,330 transposon insertion mutants of an invasive G1 Nalr strain were screened using Caco-2 cells. This led to the identification of attenuating mutations in a total of 33 different loci, many of which include genes previously known to contribute to enteric infection (e.g., Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 [SPI-1], SPI-4, SPI-5, CS54, fliH, fljB, csgB, spvR, and rfbMN) in S. Enteritidis and other Salmonella serovars. Several genes or genomic islands that have not been reported previously (e.g., SPI-14, ksgA, SEN0034, SEN2278, and SEN3503) or that are absent in S. Typhimurium or in most other Salmonella serovars (e.g., pegD, SEN1152, SEN1393, and SEN1966) were also identified. Most mutants with reduced Caco-2 cell invasiveness also showed significantly reduced invasiveness in chicken liver cells and impaired survival in chicken macrophages and in egg albumen. Consequently, these genes may play an important role during infection of the chicken host and also contribute to successful egg contamination by S. Enteritidis. PMID:22988017

  3. Viable but nonrecoverable stage of Salmonella enteritidis in aquatic systems.

    PubMed

    Roszak, D B; Grimes, D J; Colwell, R R

    1984-03-01

    An environmental isolate (13- 1BB ) of Salmonella enteritidis serogroup C1 was inoculated into sterile Potomac River water microcosms to observe survival and culturability of the organism by employing acridine orange direct count, fluorescent antibody direct count, direct viable count, plate count on veal infusion agar and xylose lysine decarboxylase agar, and indirect enumeration by the most-probable-number method (MPN), using media selective for Salmonella. Loss of culturability on laboratory media was observed within 48 h. However, cultures could be "resuscitated" and cultured on solid media, following addition of nutrients to the microcosms . Cells, resuscitated 4 days after apparent "die-off" (0 colony-forming units (cfu)/mL) using plate count techniques, yielded numbers of cfu in the same order of magnitude as had been observed before the onset of nutrient limitation. Microscopic techniques for direct viable counting indicated that viability is maintained for as long as 60 days after depletion of nutrients, although attempts to culture these cells, by addition of nutrient, after 21 days yielded apparently sterile plates. Thus, longer periods of "dormancy" appear to require conditions other than simple nutrient addition for resumption of cell growth and division.

  4. In vitro multiplication of Salmonella Enteritidis on the egg yolk membrane and penetration to the yolk contents

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Refrigeration to limit bacterial multiplication is a critical aspect of efforts to control the transmission of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) to consumers of contaminated eggs. Although the nutrient-rich yolk interior is an uncommon location for S. Enteritidis contaminatio...

  5. 21 CFR 118.8 - Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Salmonella Web site is located at http://www.fda.gov/Food/ScienceResearch/LaboratoryMethods/ucm114716.htm... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.8 Section 118.8 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  6. Assessing the impact of egg sweating on Salmonella Enteritidis penetration into shell eggs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevalence in eggs is a major concern to the egg industry. Some research has shown that egg sweating can increase Salmonella penetration into egg contents when refrigerated eggs are moved to a warmer temperature. This occurs when eggs are tempered before wash, to minimize...

  7. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification of the sefA Gene for Rapid Detection of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jiansen; Zhuang, Linlin; Zhu, Chunhong; Shi, Shourong; Zhang, Di; Zhang, Linji; Yu, Yan; Dou, Xinhong; Xu, Bu; Wang, Chengming

    2016-04-01

    Salmonella spp. pose a threat to both human and animal health, with more than 2600 serovars having been reported to date. Salmonella serovars are usually identified by slide agglutination tests, which are labor intensive and time consuming. In an attempt to develop a more rapid screening method for the major poultry Salmonella serovars, we developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay, which directly detected the sefA gene, a fimbrial operon gene existing in several specific serovars of Salmonella enterica including the major poultry serovars, namely Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) and Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum (Salmonella Gallinarum). With the 177 bacterial strains we tested, positive reactions were only observed with 85 strains of serovar Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum. The detection limit of the LAMP assay was 4 CFU/reaction with genomic DNAs of Salmonella Enteritidis (ATCC 13076) from pure culture and 400 CFU/ reaction with DNA extracted from spiked chicken feces. The LAMP assay was more sensitive than conventional culture, especially without enrichment, in detecting Salmonella Enteritidis (CMCC 50041) in the spiked fecal samples. The results show the sefA LAMP method is a rapid, sensitive, specific, and practical method for directly detection of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum in chickens. The sefA LAMP assay can potentially serve as new on-site diagnostics in the poultry industry.

  8. Public health significance of major genotypes of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis present in both human and chicken isolates in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Su; Oh, Jae-Young; Kwon, Yong-Kuk; Lee, Deog-Yong; Jeong, Ok-Mi; Choi, Byung-Kook; Youn, So-Youn; Jeon, Byung-Woo; Lee, Hye-Jin; Lee, Hee-Soo

    2017-02-17

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the most common serotypes implicated in Salmonella infections in both humans and poultry worldwide. It has been reported that human salmonellosis is mainly associated with the consumption of poultry products contaminated with serovar Enteritidis. The present study was to extensively analyze the public health risk of serovar Enteritidis isolates from chickens in Korea. A total of 127 chicken isolates were collected from clinical cases, on-farm feces, and chicken meat between 1998 and 2012 and 20 human clinical isolates were obtained from patients with diarrhea between 2000 and 2006 in Korea. To characterize the isolates from chickens and humans, we compared the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) profiles of the isolates. We further characterized representative isolates of different genotypes using a DNA microarray. PFGE revealed 28 patterns and MLVA identified 16 allelic profiles. The DNA microarray showed high genetic variability in plasmid regions and other fimbrial subunits of the isolates although the virulence gene contents of isolates from the same source and/or of the same genotype were unrelated. PFGE and MLVA showed that major genotypes were present in both human and chicken isolates. This result suggests that chickens in Korea pose a significant risk to public health as a source of serovar Enteritidis as has been noted in other countries.

  9. Detection of group D salmonellae including Salmonella Enteritidis in eggs by polymyxin-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Blais, Burton W; Martinez-Perez, Amalia

    2008-02-01

    A high-throughput, rapid method was devised for the detection of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg products. For each target organism, preenrichment in nutrient broth was followed by selective enrichment in Rappaport-Vassiliadis soya peptone and tetrathionate brilliant green broths or by plating on modified semisolid Rappaport Vassiliadis (MSRV) agar medium. The presence of Salmonella Enteritidis was determined by subjecting portions of the selective broth cultures or swarming growth on MSRV medium to an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) procedure using polymyxin immobilized in the wells of a microtiter plate as a high-affinity adsorbent for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigens. Sample extracts were reacted with polymyxin-coated microwells, and captured LPS antigens were detected immunoenzymatically with a commercially available Salmonella factor O9-specific antibody. The polymyxin-ELISA was 100% sensitive and 100% specific for Salmonella strains bearing the O9 antigen. When the ELISA was combined with enrichment using either the selective broths or plating on MSRV medium, the system was an effective means for detection of Salmonella Enteritidis in artificially inoculated egg products. The polymyxin-ELISA is a simple and inexpensive assay for group D salmonellae (including Salmonella Enteritidis) in a convenient 96-well microtiter plate format, making this system ideally suited for processing large numbers of samples.

  10. Salmonella enteritidis agfBAC operon encoding thin, aggregative fimbriae.

    PubMed

    Collinson, S K; Clouthier, S C; Doran, J L; Banser, P A; Kay, W W

    1996-02-01

    Salmonella enteritidis produces thin, aggregative fimbriae, named SEF17, which are composed of polymerized AgfA fimbrin proteins. DNA sequence analysis of a 2-kb region of S. enteritidis DNA revealed three contiguous genes, agfBAC. The 453-bp agfA gene encodes the AgfA fimbrin, which was predicted to be 74% identical and 86% similar in primary sequence to the Escherichia coli curli structural protein, CsgA. pHAG, a pUC18 derivative containing a 3.0-kb HindIII fragment encoding agfBAC, directed the in vitro expression of the major AgfA fimbrin, with an M(r) of 17,000, and a minor AgfB protein, with an M(r) of 16,000, encoded by the 453-bp agfB gene. AgfA was not expressed from pDAG, a pUC18 derivative containing a 3.1-kb DraI DNA fragment encoding agfA but not agfB. Primer extension analysis identified two adjacent transcription start sites located immediately upstream of agfB in positions analogous to those of the E. coli curlin csgBA operon. No transcription start sites were located immediately upstream of agfA or agfC. Northern (RNA) blot analysis confirmed that transcription of agfA was initiated from the agfB promoter region. Secondary-structure analysis of the putative mRNA transcript for agfBAC predicted the formation of a stem-loop structure (delta Gzero, -22 kcal/mol [-91 kJ/mol]) in the intercistronic region between agfA and agfC, which may be involved in stabilization of the agfBA portion of the agfBAC transcript. agfBAC and flanking regions had a high degree of sequence similarity with those counterparts of the E. coli curlin csgBA region for which sequence data are available. These data are demonstrative of the high degree of similarity between S. enteritidis SEF17 fimbriae and E. coli curli with respect to fimbrin amino acid sequence and genetic organization and, therefore, are indicative of a common and relatively recent ancestry.

  11. Identification of Key Genes in the Response to Salmonella enterica Enteritidis, Salmonella enterica Pullorum, and Poly(I:C) in Chicken Spleen and Caecum

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Zhongwei; Dai, Aiqin; Zhai, Fei; Li, Jianchao; Xia, Mingxiu; Hua, Dengke; Xu, Lu; Wang, Hongzhi; Chen, Jing; Liu, Lu; Chen, Guohong

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) and Salmonella enterica Pullorum (S. pullorum) are regarded as a threat to poultry production. This study's aim is to characterize the expression profiles in response to three different challenges and to identify infection-related genes in the chicken spleen and caecum. Groups of the Chinese chicken breed Langshan were challenged with either S. Enteritidis, S. pullorum, or poly(I:C). The concentrations of cytokines and antibodies and the Salmonella colonization level of the caecum and liver were detected in each group at 7 days postinfection. Expression microarray experiments were conducted using mRNA isolated from both spleen and caecum. Crucial differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated with immunity were identified. Four DEGs were identified in spleen of all three challenge groups (RBM16, FAH, SOX5, and RBM9) and different four genes in caecum (SOUL, FCN2, ANLN, and ACSL1). Expression profiles were clearly different among the three challenged groups. Genes enriched in the spleen of birds infected with S. pullorum were enriched in lymphocyte proliferation related pathways, but the enriched genes in the caecum of the same group were primarily enriched in innate immunity or antibacterial responses. The DEGs that appear across all three challenge groups might represent global response factors for different pathogens. PMID:24707473

  12. Fate of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Enteritidis on currency.

    PubMed

    Jiang, X; Doyle, M P

    1999-07-01

    The fate of foodborne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Enteritidis on coin surfaces was determined at room temperature (25 degrees C). A five-strain mixture of E. coli O157:H7 or Salmonella Enteritidis of approximately 5 x 10(4) CFU was applied to the surfaces of sterile U.S. coins (pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters) and to the surfaces of two control substrata (Teflon and glass coverslips). During storage at room temperature, E. coli O157:H7 survived for 7, 9, and 11 days on the surfaces of pennies, nickels, and dimes and quarters, respectively. However, the pathogen died off within 4 to 7 days on both the Teflon and glass surfaces. Salmonella Enteritidis survived for 1, 2, 4, and 9 days on the surfaces of pennies, nickels, quarters, and dimes, respectively. Unlike E. coli O157:H7, survival of Salmonella Enteritidis was greatest on both Teflon and glass coverslips, with more than 100 cells per substratum detected at the 17th day of storage. Results indicate that coins could serve as potential vehicles for transmitting both E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Enteritidis.

  13. Induction of CXC chemokine mRNA expression in chicken oviduct epithelial cells by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis via the type three secretion system-1

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The messenger-RNA (mRNA) expression of selected cytokines and chemokines in primary chicken oviduct epithelial cells (COEC) was determined following in vitro infection with wild type or type three secretion system (T3SS) mutant Salmonella enteritidis (SE) strains. All SE strains examined in this stu...

  14. Effect of in-feed supplementation of trans-cinnamaldehyde and caprylic acid on chicken cecal microbiome in response to Salmonella Enteritidis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) is a major foodborne pathogen causing enteric illnesses in humans, with undercooked eggs and poultry meat as the primary sources of infection. Our previous research revealed that in-feed supplementation of two GRAS (generally recognized as safe)-status, natural compounds,...

  15. Microarray analysis of Salmonella Enteritidis Phage Type 8 treated with subinhibitory concentrations of trans-cinnamaldehyde or eugenol

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 8 (PT8) is a major poultry-associated Salmonella isolate implicated in foodborne outbreaks in the United States. We previously reported that the GRAS-status plant-derived compounds trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC) and eugenol (EG) significantly reduced S. Enteritidis colon...

  16. A pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) study that suggests a major world-wide clone of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jen-Chieh; Chiu, Tsai-Hsin; Helmuth, Reiner; Schroeter, Andreas; Guerra, Beatriz; Tsen, Hau-Yang

    2007-05-30

    Since human infections by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) have been increasing world-wide over the past years and epidemiological studies have implicated the consumption of meat, poultry, eggs and egg products, elucidation of the predominant subtypes for this Salmonella spp. is important. In this study, 107 poultry and food isolates of Salmonella Enteritidis obtained from Germany were analyzed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and the subtypes were compared with those of the 124 human isolates obtained in Taiwan. Results showed that for these 107 poultry and food isolates, when XbaI, SpeI and NotI were used for chromosomal DNA digestion followed by PFGE analysis, a total of 19, 20 and 19 PFGE patterns, respectively, were identified. Of them, 51 (47.7%), 52 (48.6%) and 42 (39.3%) strains belong to a single pattern of X3, S3 and N3, respectively, and 34 strains belong to a pattern combination of X3S3N3, which was the major subtype. When PFGE patterns of these 107 German isolates were compared with those of the 124 human isolates obtained in Taiwan, pattern combination of X3S3N3 was found as the most common pattern shared by isolates from both areas. PT4 is a major phage type for German and Taiwan isolates. Although most of the X3S3N3 strains are of this phage type, some strains of other PFGE patterns are also of this phage type. Since strains used in this study were unrelated, i.e., they were isolated from different origins in areas geographically far apart from each other, the PFGE study suggests a major world-wide clone of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis.

  17. Nuggets of Wisdom: Salmonella Enteritidis Outbreaks and the Case for New Rules on Uncooked Frozen Processed Chicken.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, J Leigh; Warshawsky, Bryna; Maki, Anne; Zittermann, Sandra; Murphy, Allana; Majury, Anna; Middleton, Dean

    2017-04-01

    In 2014 and 2015, three Canadian Salmonella serotype Enteritidis outbreak investigations implicated uncooked, frozen, processed chicken products produced at the same establishment, namely establishment A. In November 2014, a sustained increase in the number of reported domestically acquired Salmonella Enteritidis cases in Ontario led to the first outbreak investigation, which implicated uncooked, frozen, processed chicken products produced at establishment A. In June 2015, the identification of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns that had not been previously reported in Canada led to a national Salmonella Enteritidis investigation. Of 51 cases reported nationally, 35 were from Ontario. Uncooked, frozen, processed chicken products produced at establishment A were identified as the source of the outbreak, and public health action was taken as a result of this second investigation. In September 2015, a sustained increase in the number of domestically acquired Salmonella Enteritidis PT13a cases in Ontario led to a third outbreak investigation, which identified a total of 36 PT13a cases. Uncooked, frozen, processed chicken products produced at establishment A were again identified as the source of the outbreak. Outbreaks have been linked to uncooked, frozen, processed chicken products since the late 1990s. Information collected during the three outbreak investigations, and from other jurisdictions, suggests that the breaded and prebrowned appearance of the product, as well as factors related to product packaging and marketing, result in consumer misperception that this raw product is cooked. This misperception may result in mishandling and improper cooking. The three outbreaks described in this article highlight the potential ongoing risks to consumers from these products and support interventions to prevent contamination at the source level and infection at the consumer level.

  18. [Clinical and bacteriological studies on hospital outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis food poisoning].

    PubMed

    Dohtsu, Y; Kanda, T; Kusumoto, Y; Ishizaki, T; Tomimasu, K; Kohno, S

    2001-02-01

    We experienced a hospital outbreak of salmonella food poisoning after ingestion of omelet which was the hospital evening meal on August 8, 1999. Total number of patients was sixty-two (Male 25: female 37) and the mean age was 52.1 years old. Salmonella Enteritidis was isolated from the stool in 59 cases. Twenty-one of them were associated with the immunosuppression (12 with malignancy, 6 with DM, one with nephrotic syndrome, one with chronic nephritis and one with allergic purpura). Clinical symptoms of the patients were composed of watery diarrhea (100%), fever (88.7%), abdominal pain (82.3%), nausea (45.2%) and vomiting (25.8%). The laboratory data revealed leukocytosis (15/47 = 31.9%), increased CRP (44/46 = 95.7%), elevated creatinin (1/37 = 2.7%) and hypokalemia (5/42 = 11.9%). MICs of 20 strains isolated in our laboratory almost coincided with each other indicating that the source of bacteria was probably the same. In vitro, S. Enteritidis were sensitive to OFLX, TFLX, FOM, most of PCs, CEPs, AGs but resistant to MPIPC, CAM, CLDM, VCM. Therefore we administered LVFX to 59 cases (alone in 45cases, combination with FOM in 6 cases), NFLX to two children and FMOX to one pregnant woman. Lactobacillus was administered to 28 cases (45.2%) and antidiarrhetics were given to 6 cases (9.7%). Finally all patients improved within two weeks. We suspect that the salmonella food poisoning was due to infected egg. The partially cooked omelet would permit the growth of a sufficient inoculum to cause disease. To prevent food poisoning, we have to be consistent in cooking the food well (at 75 degrees C, for more than 1 minute) and should not have omelets during the hot summer season.

  19. Investigation of the distribution and control of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis PT6 in layer breeding and egg production.

    PubMed

    Davies, Robert; Liebana, Ernesto; Breslin, Mark

    2003-06-01

    Investigations were carried out in a layer breeder hatchery, a layer parent rearing farm, a layer parent farm and in a commercial pullet rearing and cage layer farm where Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) PT6 had become established. PT6 was initially found in focal points in the hatchery, such as hatcher ventilation ducting, tray wash areas and waste areas, but improved disinfection was followed by a rapid disappearance of contamination. Several different phage types of S. Enteritidis were found in the hatchery but most of these proved to be genotypically identical with PT6. Investigations of contaminated layer breeder and rearing sites showed that the terminal disinfection programmes in place were effective in that no carry-over of infection occurred and the organism was rapidly eliminated from the organization. Infection with PT6 originating from chicks was investigated on a commercial pullet rearing farm. After several rounds of treatment with a fluoroquinolone antibiotic and competitive exclusion, no Salmonella was found in faeces or cloacal swabs but was present in dust in one of six houses. Sampling carried out after cleaning and disinfection confirmed clearance of the organism from the site, but infection did become established in a commercial laying house receiving the birds.

  20. Emerging Salmonella Enteritidis anaerogenic phage type 14b: outbreak in Norwegian, Swedish and Finnish travellers returning from Greece.

    PubMed

    Guerin, P J; Nygard, K; Siitonen, A; Vold, L; Kuusi, M; de Jong, B; Rottingen, J A; Alvseike, O; Olsson, A; Lassen, J; Andersson, Y; Aavitsland, P

    2006-01-01

    In July 2001, the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (Folkehelseinstituttet, FHI) reported a cluster of Salmonella Enteritidis of phage type 14b infections in Norwegian travellers returning from Greece. An increase in the same uncommon phage type was also registered in Sweden and Finland at the same time. Cases of S. Enteritidis PT 14b in patients returning from Greece were reported in these three Nordic countries in 2001 (303 cases), 2002 (164 cases) and 2003 (199 cases). Case-control studies performed in 2001 in Norway and Sweden indicated that consumption of chicken was associated with illness. In 2002 and 2003, continuing case reports indicated that this uncommon phage type had probably become established in the Greek food chain. Tour operators were informed and contacts were made with Greek public health authorities. Because place of infection is not systematically included in most Salmonella notification systems, the S. Enteritidis phage type 14b outbreak reported here may represent only part of a larger outbreak among travellers visiting Greece. Infections are often reported only in the tourists' home countries and public health authorities in the tourist destinations may not be aware of the problem. Further collaboration between national institutes of public health in Europe is needed to detect outbreaks occurring among tourists.

  1. Italian experience in Salmonella enteritidis 1978-1988: characterization of isolates from food and man.

    PubMed

    Fantasia, M; Filetici, E; Anastasio, M P; Marcozzi, M D; Gramenzi, M P; Aureli, P

    1991-04-01

    Salmonella enteritidis accounted for 5.45% of the 118.685 Salmonella isolates from man and for 2.65% of the 3.315 Salmonella isolates from food in Italy in the eleven year period 1978 to 1988. In the years 1978-1982 no S. enteritidis strain was isolated from eggs and poultry; in the years 1983-1988 the 53% of S. enteritidis isolates from food were from eggs and poultry. In 1989 S. enteritidis accounted for 744 isolates from man and 22 from food of which 80% were from eggs and poultry (partial data). In that year 18 outbreaks caused by S. enteritidis were reported to the National Centre of Enteric Pathogens in Rome. Characteristics of 81 S. enteritidis isolates were examined of which 27 were from sporadic cases involving humans and 40 from outbreaks in humans; 14 isolates were from food, all but one connected with the outbreaks. All the isolates studied were sensitive to the antibiotics tested; plasmid profile analysis showed a predominant profile pattern in both epidemic and non-epidemic strains; lysine decarboxylase was present in all the strains tested. Although in at least three epidemics a common supplier of eggs was proved, the source was not identified. Unfortunately it was not possible to determine the phage type of isolates because of the unavailability of specific phages.

  2. Rapid real-time PCR methods to distinguish Salmonella Enteritidis wildtype field isolates from vaccine strains Salmovac SE/Gallivac SE and AviPro SALMONELLA VAC E.

    PubMed

    Maurischat, Sven; Szabo, Istvan; Baumann, Beatrice; Malorny, Burkhard

    2015-05-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a major non-typhoid Salmonella serovar causing human salmonellosis mainly associated with the consumption of poultry and products thereof. To reduce infections in poultry, S. Enteritidis live vaccine strains AviPro SALMONELLA VAC E and Salmovac SE/Gallivac SE have been licensed and used in several countries worldwide. To definitively diagnose a S. Enteritidis contamination in vaccinated herds a reliable and fast method for the differentiation between vaccine and wildtype field isolates is required. In this study, we developed and validated real-time PCR (qPCR) assays to distinguish those variants genetically. Suitable target sequences were identified by whole genome sequencing (WGS) using the Illumina MiSeq system. SNP regions in kdpA and nhaA proved to be most useful for differentiation of AviPro SALMONELLA VAC E and Salmovac SE/Gallivac SE, respectively, from wildtype strains. For each vaccine strain one TaqMan-qPCR assay and one alternative approach using High Resolution Melting (HRM) analysis was designed. All 30 Salmovac SE and 7 AviPro SALMONELLA VAC E vaccine strain reisolates tested were correctly identified by both approaches (100% inclusivity). Furthermore, all 137 (TaqMan) and 97 (HRM) Salmonella non-vaccine and related Enterobacteriaceae strains tested were excluded (100% exclusivity). The analytical detection limits were determined to be approx. 10(2) genome copies/reaction for the TaqMan and 10(4) genome copies/reaction for the HRM approach. The real-time PCR assays proved to be a reliable and fast alternative to the cultural vaccine strain identification tests helping decision makers in control measurements to take action within a shorter period of time.

  3. Effect of Salmonella infection on cecal tonsil regulatory T cell properties in chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two experiments were conducted to study Regulatory T cell (Treg) properties post-Salmonella infection in broiler birds. Four-day-old broiler chicks were orally infected with 5x106 CFU/ml Salmonella enteritidis or sterile PBS (control). Samples were collected at 4, 7, 10, and 14 d post-infection. ...

  4. Variation in Salmonella enteritidis RAPD-PCR patterns may not be due to genetic differences.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Demetrius L; Berghaus, Roy D; Lee, Margie D; Maurer, John J

    2011-12-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is a leading cause of gastroenteritis associated with consumption of contaminated poultry meat and eggs. Because pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) has limited utility in distinguishing between clonal Salmonella Enteritidis isolates, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR has been recommended as an alternative molecular fingerprinting tool. This study's objective was to determine whether increasing PCR stringency would improve the repeatability of RAPD DNA patterns based on assessment of target sites within the genome. An in silico PCR was performed to predict amplification products from an Salmonella Enteritidis genome sequence for three different RAPD primers (1247, 1283, and OPA4) and to determine whether any primer would be more likely to amplify variable regions within the genome. A comparison of within- and between-isolate similarities in RAPD patterns was performed using primer 1247, which was predicted by in silico analysis to yield a variable size range of amplicons. In order to reduce artifactual variability associated with the method, three different methods for template preparation were evaluated. All were found to provide comparable results with respect to the similarities observed with repeated analyses of the same Salmonella Enteritidis isolates (n = 18, P = 0.91). Although the median within-isolate similarity (76.0%) was significantly greater than the median between-isolate similarity (66.7%; P = 0.001), duplicate RAPD-PCR runs of the same Salmonella Enteritidis isolates produced DNA patterns that ranged in similarity between 61.5 and 100%. These results indicate that the repeatability of RAPD-PCR is insufficient to distinguish genetic differences among related and unrelated Salmonella Enteritidis isolates.

  5. Reduction of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Colonization in 20-Day-Old Broiler Chickens by the Plant-Derived Compounds trans-Cinnamaldehyde and Eugenol

    PubMed Central

    Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Mattson, Tyler; Baskaran, Sangeetha Ananda; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne; Babapoor, Sankhiros; March, Benjamin; Valipe, Satyender; Darre, Michael; Hoagland, Thomas; Schreiber, David; Khan, Mazhar I.; Donoghue, Ann; Donoghue, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The efficacies of trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC) and eugenol (EG) for reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in broiler chickens were investigated. In three experiments for each compound, 1-day-old chicks (n = 75/experiment) were randomly assigned to five treatment groups (n = 15/treatment group): negative control (-ve S. Enteritidis, -ve TC, or EG), compound control (-ve S. Enteritidis, +ve 0.75% [vol/wt] TC or 1% [vol/wt] EG), positive control (+ve S. Enteritidis, -ve TC, or EG), low-dose treatment (+ve S. Enteritidis, +ve 0.5% TC, or 0.75% EG), and high-dose treatment (+ve S. Enteritidis, +ve 0.75% TC, or 1% EG). On day 0, birds were tested for the presence of any inherent Salmonella (n = 5/experiment). On day 8, birds were inoculated with ∼8.0 log10 CFU S. Enteritidis, and cecal colonization by S. Enteritidis was ascertained (n = 10 chicks/experiment) after 24 h (day 9). Six birds from each treatment group were euthanized on days 7 and 10 after inoculation, and cecal S. Enteritidis numbers were determined. TC at 0.5 or 0.75% and EG at 0.75 or 1% consistently reduced (P < 0.05) S. Enteritidis in the cecum (≥3 log10 CFU/g) after 10 days of infection in all experiments. Feed intake and body weight were not different for TC treatments (P > 0.05); however, EG supplementation led to significantly lower (P < 0.05) body weights. Follow-up in vitro experiments revealed that the subinhibitory concentrations (SICs, the concentrations that did not inhibit Salmonella growth) of TC and EG reduced the motility and invasive abilities of S. Enteritidis and downregulated expression of the motility genes flhC and motA and invasion genes hilA, hilD, and invF. The results suggest that supplementation with TC and EG through feed can reduce S. Enteritidis colonization in chickens. PMID:22327574

  6. Reduction of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis colonization in 20-day-old broiler chickens by the plant-derived compounds trans-cinnamaldehyde and eugenol.

    PubMed

    Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Mattson, Tyler; Baskaran, Sangeetha Ananda; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne; Babapoor, Sankhiros; March, Benjamin; Valipe, Satyender; Darre, Michael; Hoagland, Thomas; Schreiber, David; Khan, Mazhar I; Donoghue, Ann; Donoghue, Dan; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2012-04-01

    The efficacies of trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC) and eugenol (EG) for reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in broiler chickens were investigated. In three experiments for each compound, 1-day-old chicks (n = 75/experiment) were randomly assigned to five treatment groups (n = 15/treatment group): negative control (-ve S. Enteritidis, -ve TC, or EG), compound control (-ve S. Enteritidis, +ve 0.75% [vol/wt] TC or 1% [vol/wt] EG), positive control (+ve S. Enteritidis, -ve TC, or EG), low-dose treatment (+ve S. Enteritidis, +ve 0.5% TC, or 0.75% EG), and high-dose treatment (+ve S. Enteritidis, +ve 0.75% TC, or 1% EG). On day 0, birds were tested for the presence of any inherent Salmonella (n = 5/experiment). On day 8, birds were inoculated with ∼8.0 log(10) CFU S. Enteritidis, and cecal colonization by S. Enteritidis was ascertained (n = 10 chicks/experiment) after 24 h (day 9). Six birds from each treatment group were euthanized on days 7 and 10 after inoculation, and cecal S. Enteritidis numbers were determined. TC at 0.5 or 0.75% and EG at 0.75 or 1% consistently reduced (P < 0.05) S. Enteritidis in the cecum (≥3 log(10) CFU/g) after 10 days of infection in all experiments. Feed intake and body weight were not different for TC treatments (P > 0.05); however, EG supplementation led to significantly lower (P < 0.05) body weights. Follow-up in vitro experiments revealed that the subinhibitory concentrations (SICs, the concentrations that did not inhibit Salmonella growth) of TC and EG reduced the motility and invasive abilities of S. Enteritidis and downregulated expression of the motility genes flhC and motA and invasion genes hilA, hilD, and invF. The results suggest that supplementation with TC and EG through feed can reduce S. Enteritidis colonization in chickens.

  7. Salmonella Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Symptoms Key Resources Salmonella Oranienburg Infections Linked to Shell Eggs Recall & Advice to Consumers and Retailers Case ... Linked to Alfalfa Sprouts Enteritidis Infections Associated with Shell Eggs Chester Infections Associated with Cheesy Chicken & Rice ...

  8. Sustained Protection in Mice Immunized with Fractional Doses of Salmonella Enteritidis Core and O Polysaccharide-Flagellin Glycoconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Raphael; Wang, Jin Y.; Boyd, Mary A.; Tulapurkar, Mohan E.; Ramachandran, Girish; Tennant, Sharon M.; Pasetti, Marcela; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2013-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium are a major cause of invasive bacterial disease (e.g., bacteremia, meningitis) in infants and young children in sub-Saharan Africa and also occasionally cause invasive disease in highly susceptible hosts (young infants, the elderly, and immunocompromised subjects) in industrialized countries. No licensed vaccines exist against human NTS infections. NTS core and O polysaccharide (COPS) and FliC (Phase 1 flagellin subunits) each constitute protective antigens in murine models. S. Enteritidis COPS conjugated to FliC represents a promising vaccine approach that elicits binding and opsonophagocytic antibodies and protects mice against lethal challenge with virulent S. Enteritidis. We examined the protective efficacy of fractional dosages of S. Enteritidis COPS:FliC conjugate vaccines in mice, and also established that protection can be passively transferred to naïve mice by administering sera from mice immunized with conjugate. Mice were immunized with three doses of either 10 µg, 2.5 µg (full dose), 0.25 µg, or 0.025 µg S. Enteritidis COPS:FliC conjugate at 28 day intervals. Antibody titers to COPS and FliC measured by ELISA fell consonant with progressively smaller vaccine dosage levels; anti-FliC IgG responses remained robust at fractional dosages for which anti-COPS serum IgG titers were decreased. Nevertheless, >90% protection against intraperitoneal challenge was observed in mice immunized with fractional dosages of conjugate that elicited diminished titers to both FliC and COPS. Passive transfer of immune sera from mice immunized with the highest dose of COPS:FliC to naïve mice was also protective, demonstrating the role of antibodies in mediating protection. These results provide important insights regarding the potency of Salmonella glycoconjugate vaccines that use flagellin as a carrier protein. PMID:23741368

  9. Recurrent meningitis due to Salmonella enteritidis: a case report from Kashmir India.

    PubMed

    Fomda, B A; Charoo, B A; Bhat, J A; Reyaz, N; Maroof, P; Naik, M I

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent bacterial meningitis in children is potentially life-threatening and induces psychological trauma to the patients through repeated hospitalization. Here we report a case of recurrent meningitis in a one month old baby. The CSF and blood culture grew Salmonella enteritidis. Injection ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone were given for 3 weeks. Baby became symptomatically better and was afebrile at discharge. Twenty eight days after discharge baby got readmitted with complaints of fever and refusal of feeds. Blood and CSF culture again showed growth of Salmonella enteritidis. Physicians should be educated about the possibility of recurrence which may occur days or even weeks after apparent successful antibiotic treatment.

  10. Fatal Salmonellosis in Captive Maras (Dolichotis patagonum) Caused by Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S; Yoshimura, Y; Hayashidani, H; Iwata, T; Iseda, S; Une, Y

    2017-02-23

    We report epidemic occurrences of fatal salmonellosis caused by Salmonella Enteritidis in captive maras (Dolichotis patagonum) in a zoological garden in Japan. The deaths were sudden or followed a peracute course within a few hours of the first observations of clinical abnormalities. Gross lesions included haemorrhages in the subcutis and skeletal muscles, liver, spleen, lung, heart and gastrointestinal tract. Microscopically, there were haemorrhagic and necrotizing lesions with gram-negative bacilli in the liver, spleen, small intestine and Peyer's patches. These bacilli showed strong immunolabelling for Salmonella O9 antigen and S. Enteritidis was isolated from the lesions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of salmonellosis in maras.

  11. Survival and growth of Salmonella Enteritidis PT 30 in almond orchard soils.

    PubMed

    Danyluk, M D; Nozawa-Inoue, M; Hristova, K R; Scow, K M; Lampinen, B; Harris, L J

    2008-05-01

    To evaluate factors potentially contributing to the long-term persistence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type (PT) 30 in an almond orchard. Surface and subsurface soil temperatures, and air temperatures in a radiation shelter, were recorded during a 12-month period, and were used to identify relevant storage temperatures (20 or 35 degrees C) for microcosms of two different soil types (clay and sandy loams) with moisture levels near saturation or near field capacity. Salmonella Enteritidis PT 30 was inoculated into the microcosms at 6 log CFU g(-1) dry weight. Between 14 and 180 days of incubation, counts of S. Enteritidis PT 30 decreased rapidly at 35 degrees C and were significantly different (P < 0.05) from counts at 20 degrees C, regardless of the soil type or moisture level. Salmonella was detected by enrichment of 10-g samples from all microcosms after 180 days of incubation at 20 degrees C, but from none of the microcosms held at 35 degrees C. To measure the potential for the growth of S. Enteritidis PT 30 in clay loam soil, an aqueous extract of almond hulls (containing 1.6% mono and disaccharides) or equivalent volume of water was added 7 days after inoculation. Significant (P < 0.05) growth of S. Enteritidis PT 30 was observed within 8 or 24 h of adding hull extract, but not water, to soil. Opportunities may exist for S. Enteritidis PT 30 to survive for an extended time in almond orchard soils and to grow in these soils where hull nutrients are released. Temperature has a significant impact on the long-term survival of S. Enteritidis PT 30 in soil, and nutrients leached from almond hulls may result in Salmonella growth. These factors should be considered in the design of Good Agricultural Practices for almonds.

  12. Similarities between Salmonella Enteritidis isolated from humans and captive wild animals in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Smith, Anthony M; Ismail, Husna; Henton, Maryke M; Keddy, Karen H

    2014-12-15

    Salmonella is well recognized as an aetiological agent of gastrointestinal and diarrhoeal disease. Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) is one of the commonest serotypes associated with foodborne illness. In South Africa, we compared Salmonella Enteritidis strains isolated from humans with gastroenteritis and strains isolated from captive wild animals, between June 2011 and July 2012. Bacteria were phenotypically characterized using standard microbiological techniques. Genotypic relatedness of isolates was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis. a diversity of 27 PFGE patterns amongst 196 human non-invasive isolates was shown; two PFGE patterns predominated and accounted for 74% of all human isolates. Human isolates showed a 12% prevalence rate for nalidixic acid resistance. Animal isolates from 5 different sources were investigated. With the exception of an isolate from a ground hornbill, all animal isolates (jaguar, crocodile, lion and poultry) showed PFGE pattern matches to a human isolate. Animal isolates showed susceptibility to all antimicrobial agents tested, with the exception of nalidixic acid resistance in isolates from the lion and poultry source. Our data showed similarities between Salmonella Enteritidis strains isolated from humans and captive wild animals, suggesting a probable common source for strains from humans and animals.

  13. Contribution of the Type VI Secretion System Encoded in SPI-19 to Chicken Colonization by Salmonella enterica Serotypes Gallinarum and Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Blondel, Carlos J.; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Castro, Benjamín; Chiang, Sebastián; Toro, Cecilia S.; Zaldívar, Mercedes; Contreras, Inés; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L.; Santiviago, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella Gallinarum is a pathogen with a host range specific to poultry, while Salmonella Enteritidis is a broad host range pathogen that colonizes poultry sub-clinically but is a leading cause of gastrointestinal salmonellosis in humans and many other species. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the complex interplay between Salmonella and their hosts, the molecular basis of host range restriction and unique pathobiology of Gallinarum remain largely unknown. Type VI Secretion System (T6SS) represents a new paradigm of protein secretion that is critical for the pathogenesis of many Gram-negative bacteria. We recently identified a putative T6SS in the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 19 (SPI-19) of Gallinarum. In Enteritidis, SPI-19 is a degenerate element that has lost most of the T6SS functions encoded in the island. In this work, we studied the contribution of SPI-19 to the colonization of Salmonella Gallinarum strain 287/91 in chickens. Non-polar deletion mutants of SPI-19 and the clpV gene, an essential T6SS component, colonized the ileum, ceca, liver and spleen of White Leghorn chicks poorly compared to the wild-type strain after oral inoculation. Return of SPI-19 to the ΔSPI-19 mutant, using VEX-Capture, complemented this colonization defect. In contrast, transfer of SPI-19 from Gallinarum to Enteritidis resulted in transient increase in the colonization of the ileum, liver and spleen at day 1 post-infection, but at days 3 and 5 post-infection a strong colonization defect of the gut and internal organs of the experimentally infected chickens was observed. Our data indicate that SPI-19 and the T6SS encoded in this region contribute to the colonization of the gastrointestinal tract and internal organs of chickens by Salmonella Gallinarum and suggest that degradation of SPI-19 T6SS in Salmonella Enteritidis conferred an advantage in colonization of the avian host. PMID:20661437

  14. Comparison of the prevalence of Salmonella infection in layer hens from commercial layer farms with high and low rodent densities.

    PubMed

    Lapuz, Randy Rhon Simoun P; Umali, Dennis V; Suzuki, Terumasa; Shirota, Kazutoshi; Katoh, Hiromitsu

    2012-03-01

    A comparison on the prevalence of Salmonella infection in layer hens from commercial layer farms with high and low rodent densities was investigated. Out of 280 laying hens sampled from three commercial layer farms with high rodent densities, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) was isolated from 20 (7.14%) hens and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis (Salmonella Infantis) from three (1.07%) hens. In contrast, layer hens sampled from four commercial layer farms with low rodent densities were negative for any salmonellae. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in the isolation rates of Salmonella from various organs of infected layer hens were also noted. For Salmonella Enteritidis, liver (55.0%) and the oviduct (55.0%) had the highest isolation rates while all Salmonella Infantis isolates were from the oviduct. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of BlnI-digested chromosomal DNA of Salmonella Enteritidis isolated from layer hens and rodents showed similar patterns. PFGE analysis of Salmonella Infantis isolated from layer hens, rodents, eggs, and the environment yielded identical patterns. In this study, the significantly higher prevalence rate (P < 0.05) of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Infantis in layer hens from high rodent density farms could be attributed to the high rodent population density. The persistent Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Infantis infection inside layer houses may have been amplified by the increasing numbers in the rodent population over the years, which increased the opportunity for environment-rodent-chicken interaction and the transmission of salmonellae to chickens. Monitoring of salmonellae from rodents inside poultry premises is recommended to be an effective additional tool in the assessment of the Salmonella status of layer flocks.

  15. Inactivation of ribosomes by an inhibitor of protein synthesis from Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Brigotti, M; Nanetti, A; Montanaro, L; Sperti, S

    1993-01-01

    Sonic extracts of Salmonella enteritidis contain a factor which inhibits protein synthesis in cell-free systems by irreversibly inactivating ribosomes. The extent of the inactivation of ribosomes depends on the system used to assay protein synthesis, natural mRNA translation being more strongly inhibited than poly(U) translation. The inhibitory power of the Salmonella factor is destroyed by trypsin and by 5% mercaptoethanol. Placental RNase inhibitor is unable to protect ribosomes from inactivation.

  16. Removal of Salmonella Enteritidis from commercial† unpasteurized liquid egg white using pilot scale crossflow tangential microfiltration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effectiveness of a pilot-scale cross-flow microfiltration (MF) process for removal of Salmonella enteritidis from liquid egg white (LEW) was evaluated. To facilitate MF, 110 L of unpasteurized LEW from a local egg breaking plant was first wedge screened, homogenized and then diluted (1:2 w/w) w...

  17. Efficacy of jatropha curcas plant extract against the survival of salmonella enteritidis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction: The use of plant-derived antimicrobials has shown to be effective at inhibiting microbial growth. Although Jatropha curcas is known to possess antimicrobial properties, its efficacy against Salmonella Enteritidis has not yet been investigated. Purpose: The purpose of this study was...

  18. [The serological prevalence of Salmonella enteritidis amongst Tunja's canine population (a large Colombian city)].

    PubMed

    Rincón-Reyes, Oscar; Figueroa, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Determining the serological prevalence of Salmonella enteritidis in the city of Tunja's canine population (in Boyacá) from July to October 2006 and establishing the relationship between predisposed factors and seroreactivity within this canine population. 72 canine blood samples were gathered from all of the city's five areas from an estimated 9623 canine population (2002 census), assuming a 3% pre-established critical prevalence and 95% confidence level. A survey was made of each animal to determine the presence of predisposed factors and they were all given a complete clinical examination. The sera so obtained were used for titering antibody levels by means of the microagglutination plate test for Salmonella enteritidis (MAG). Salmonella enteritidis serological prevalence was 41.7%. Area prevalence within the city was 10% for the north, 10% for the west, 16.7% for the east, 36.7% the south and 26.6% for the city-center. A direct correlation was established with the presentation of previous enteric problems (p<0.05) (OR 3.5) and, to a lesser extent, with access to organic waste (p<0.05) (OR 0.4). Other factors presented positive risk levels, such as coexistence with other animals and health (OR 1.4 and OR 2) Salmonella enteritidis had a high serological prevalence in the city of Tunja, most incidents occurring in the southern area. The presentation of previous enteric problems was the main predisposed factor, this being a high risk factor in this entity's dissemination.

  19. 21 CFR 118.9 - Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) prevention plan. 118.9 Section 118.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... EGGS § 118.9 Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. You must have one or... compliance with each farm's SE prevention plan. This person must have successfully completed training on SE...

  20. 21 CFR 118.9 - Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) prevention plan. 118.9 Section 118.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... EGGS § 118.9 Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. You must have one or... compliance with each farm's SE prevention plan. This person must have successfully completed training on SE...

  1. 21 CFR 118.9 - Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) prevention plan. 118.9 Section 118.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... EGGS § 118.9 Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. You must have one or... compliance with each farm's SE prevention plan. This person must have successfully completed training on SE...

  2. Thermal inactivation kinetics of Salmonella Enteritidis and Oranienberg in commercially acquired 10% salted liquid whole egg

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Liquid egg pasteurization requirements are based on time/temperature combinations in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 9, Ch. III, Sec. 590.570 from data acquired prior to 1970. These guidelines are being reevaluated in light of recent risk assessments. Heat-resistant Salmonella Enteritidi...

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Bacteriophage f18SE, Isolated in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Segovia, Cristopher; Vasquez, Ignacio; Maracaja-Coutinho, Vinicius; Robeson, James

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophage f18SE was isolated from poultry sewage in Olmue, Chile, and lytic activity was demonstrated against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and serovar Pullorum strains. This bacteriophage has a 41,868-bp double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) genome encoding 53 coding sequences (CDSs) and belongs to the family Siphoviridae, subfamily Jerseyvirinae. PMID:26450716

  4. Differential Transcriptional Regulation Between Egg-contaminating and Non-egg-contaminating Strains of Salmonella Enteritidis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) is the most common cause of food-borne salmonellosis primarily transmitted by contaminated poultry eggs. Despite its genetically clonal nature, SE strains differ markedly in their ability to disseminate systemically in chickens and subsequently invade the inte...

  5. Genomic epidemiology of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis based on population structure of prevalent lineages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (SE) is one of the most commonly reported causes of human salmonellosis. The low genetic diversity of SE measured by fingerprinting methods has made subtyping a challenge. In this study, we used whole genome sequencing to characterize a total of 125 SE and Sa...

  6. 21 CFR 118.8 - Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.8 Section 118.8 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118...

  7. 21 CFR 118.8 - Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.8 Section 118.8 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118...

  8. 21 CFR 118.8 - Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.8 Section 118.8 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118...

  9. 21 CFR 118.8 - Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.8 Section 118.8 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118...

  10. Dynamic analysis of growth of Salmonella Enteritidis in liquid egg whites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) is a common foodborne pathogen associated with eggs and egg products. This research was conducted to study the kinetics of growth and survival of SE in liquid egg whites (LEW). A dynamic temperature profile that exposed SE to suboptimal temperatures and below the minimu...

  11. Effective characterization of Salmonella Enteritidis by most probable number (MPN) followed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods.

    PubMed

    Zappelini, Lincohn; Martone-Rocha, Solange; Dropa, Milena; Matté, Maria Helena; Tiba, Monique Ribeiro; Breternitz, Bruna Suellen; Razzolini, Maria Tereza Pepe

    2017-02-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) is a relevant pathogen involved in gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. In this study, we determined the capacity to combine the most probable number (MPN) and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods to characterize the most important Salmonella serotypes in raw sewage. A total of 499 isolates were recovered from 27 raw sewage samples and screened using two previously described multiplex PCR methods. From those, 123 isolates were selected based on PCR banding pattern-identical or similar to Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium-and submitted to conventional serotyping. Results showed that both PCR assays correctly serotyped Salmonella Enteritidis, however, they presented ambiguous results for Salmonella Typhimurium identification. These data highlight that MPN and multiplex PCR can be useful methods to describe microbial quality in raw sewage and suggest two new PCR patterns for Salmonella Enteritidis identification.

  12. Red Seaweeds Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii and Chondrus crispus down Regulate Virulence Factors of Salmonella Enteritidis and Induce Immune Responses in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kulshreshtha, Garima; Borza, Tudor; Rathgeber, Bruce; Stratton, Glenn S.; Thomas, Nikhil A.; Critchley, Alan; Hafting, Jeff; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Red seaweeds are a rich source of unique bioactive compounds and secondary metabolites that are known to improve human and animal health. S. Enteritidis is a broad range host pathogen, which contaminates chicken and poultry products that end into the human food chain. Worldwide, Salmonella outbreaks have become an important economic and public health concern. Moreover, the development of resistance in Salmonella serovars toward multiple drugs highlights the need for alternative control strategies. This study evaluated the antimicrobial property of red seaweeds extracts against Salmonella Enteritidis using the Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. Six red seaweed species were tested for their antimicrobial activity against S. Enteritidis and two, Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii (SG) and Chondrus crispus (CC), were found to exhibit such properties. Spread plate assay revealed that SG and CC (1%, w/v) significantly reduced the growth of S. Enteritidis. Seaweed water extracts (SWE) of SG and CC, at concentrations from 0.4 to 2 mg/ml, significantly reduced the growth of S. Enteritidis (log CFU 4.5–5.3 and log 5.7–6.0, respectively). However, methanolic extracts of CC and SG did not affect the growth of S. Enteritidis. Addition of SWE (0.2 mg/ml, CC and SG) significantly decreased biofilm formation and reduced the motility of S. Enteritidis. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that SWE (CC and SG) suppressed the expression of quorum sensing gene sdiA and of Salmonella Pathogenesis Island-1 (SPI-1) associated genes sipA and invF, indicating that SWE might reduce the invasion of S. Enteritidis in the host by attenuating virulence factors. Furthermore, CC and SG water extracts significantly improved the survival of infected C. elegans by impairing the ability of S. Enteritidis to colonize the digestive tract of the nematode and by enhancing the expression of C. elegans immune responsive genes. As the innate immune response pathways of C. elegans and mammals show a

  13. Red Seaweeds Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii and Chondrus crispus down Regulate Virulence Factors of Salmonella Enteritidis and Induce Immune Responses in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Kulshreshtha, Garima; Borza, Tudor; Rathgeber, Bruce; Stratton, Glenn S; Thomas, Nikhil A; Critchley, Alan; Hafting, Jeff; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Red seaweeds are a rich source of unique bioactive compounds and secondary metabolites that are known to improve human and animal health. S. Enteritidis is a broad range host pathogen, which contaminates chicken and poultry products that end into the human food chain. Worldwide, Salmonella outbreaks have become an important economic and public health concern. Moreover, the development of resistance in Salmonella serovars toward multiple drugs highlights the need for alternative control strategies. This study evaluated the antimicrobial property of red seaweeds extracts against Salmonella Enteritidis using the Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. Six red seaweed species were tested for their antimicrobial activity against S. Enteritidis and two, Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii (SG) and Chondrus crispus (CC), were found to exhibit such properties. Spread plate assay revealed that SG and CC (1%, w/v) significantly reduced the growth of S. Enteritidis. Seaweed water extracts (SWE) of SG and CC, at concentrations from 0.4 to 2 mg/ml, significantly reduced the growth of S. Enteritidis (log CFU 4.5-5.3 and log 5.7-6.0, respectively). However, methanolic extracts of CC and SG did not affect the growth of S. Enteritidis. Addition of SWE (0.2 mg/ml, CC and SG) significantly decreased biofilm formation and reduced the motility of S. Enteritidis. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that SWE (CC and SG) suppressed the expression of quorum sensing gene sdiA and of Salmonella Pathogenesis Island-1 (SPI-1) associated genes sipA and invF, indicating that SWE might reduce the invasion of S. Enteritidis in the host by attenuating virulence factors. Furthermore, CC and SG water extracts significantly improved the survival of infected C. elegans by impairing the ability of S. Enteritidis to colonize the digestive tract of the nematode and by enhancing the expression of C. elegans immune responsive genes. As the innate immune response pathways of C. elegans and mammals show a high

  14. An outbreak of gastroenteritis caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis traced to cream cakes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Pei Pei; Kurupatham, Lalitha; Foong, Bok Huay; Ooi, Peng Lim; James, Lyn; Phua, Leslie; Tan, Ai Ling; Koh, Diana; Goh, Kee Tai

    2011-01-01

    Introduction This paper describes the epidemiological, microbiological and environmental investigations conducted during an outbreak of Salmonella gastroenteritis in Singapore. Methods A case-control study was undertaken to identify the vehicle of transmission. Microbiological testing was performed on faecal, food and environmental samples. Isolates of Salmonella were further characterized by phage typing and ribotyping. Results There were 216 gastroenteritis cases reported from 20 November to 4 December 2007. The causative agent was identified as Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype Enteritidis for 14 out of 20 cases tested. The vehicle of transmission was traced to cream cakes produced by a bakery and sold at its retail outlets (P < 0.001, OR = 143.00, 95% Cl = 27.23–759.10). More than two-thirds of the 40 Salmonella strains isolated from hospitalized cases, food samples and asymptomatic food handlers were of phage type 1; the others reacted but did not conform to any phage type. The phage types correlated well with their unique antibiograms. The ribotype patterns of 22 selected isolates tested were highly similar, indicating genetic relatedness. The dendrogram of the strains from the outbreak showed distinct clustering and correlation compared to the non-outbreak strains, confirming a common source of infection. Discussion The cream cakes were likely contaminated by one of the ingredients used in the icing. Cross-contamination down the production line and subsequent storage of cakes at ambient temperatures for a prolonged period before consumption could have contributed to the outbreak. PMID:23908880

  15. Spread of a Major Clone of Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis in Poultry and in Salmonellosis Outbreaks in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Borges, Karen Apellanis; Furian, Thales Quedi; de Souza, Sara Neves; Tondo, Eduardo César; Streck, André Felipe; Salle, Carlos Tadeu Pippi; de Souza Moraes, Hamilton Luiz; do Nascimento, Vladimir Pinheiro

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella spp. are among the most important agents of foodborne diseases all over the world. Human Salmonella outbreaks are often associated with the consumption of poultry products (meat and eggs), and one of the most prevalent serotypes associated with these products is Salmonella Enteritidis. Brazil is one of the most important poultry exporters in the world. In southern Brazil, three closely related clones of Salmonella Enteritidis have been responsible for the majority of foodborne Salmonella outbreaks over the past decade. However, until now, there has been little information regarding the clonal relationship among the Brazilian Salmonella strains of avian origin and those involved in foodborne outbreaks. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to complete the molecular characterization of Salmonella Enteritidis strains isolated from poultry and food sources involved in Salmonella outbreaks. PCR ribotyping was performed to discriminate the strains into different ribotype profiles according to the banding pattern amplification. This technique was able to differentiate the Salmonella Enteritidis strains into two banding patterns: R2 and R4. R2 accounted for 98.7% of the strains. DNA sequencing of the 600-bp fragment, present in all ribotypes, was applied to confirm this result. The sequences generated showed high levels of similarity, ranging from 99.7 to 100%, and were grouped into a single cluster. These results suggest that there is a clonal relationship among the Salmonella Enteritidis strains responsible for several salmonellosis outbreaks and the strains collected from poultry sources.

  16. Effect of hydrostatic pressure pulsing on the inactivation of Salmonella enteritidis in liquid whole egg.

    PubMed

    Bari, M L; Ukuku, D O; Mori, M; Kawamoto, S; Yamamoto, K

    2008-04-01

    Eggs and egg-containing foods contaminated with bacterial human pathogens have been implicated in numerous foodborne outbreaks leading to costly recalls. Research was undertaken to investigate the use of high pressure-pulse treatment to inactivate Salmonella Enteritidis inoculated in liquid egg. Liquid egg was inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis (8.0 log colony-forming units [CFU]/mL) and exposed to hydrostatic pressures (300-400 MPa) and pressure (350 MPa) pulsing at 25 degrees C, 40 degrees C, and 50 degrees C for up to 40 minutes to determine the maximum allowable pressure that can inactivate the Salmonella with minimal injury. Pressure treatments (350 and 400 MPa) at 25 degrees C for up to 40 minutes reduced the population of Salmonella Enteritidis by approximately 4.8 and 6.0 log(10) CFU/mL, respectively. High pressure (350 MPa) treatment at 50 degrees C and 2-minute pulses at four cycles for a total of 11.4 minutes, including the come-up and come-down times, led to a significant (p < 0.05) inactivation of Salmonella Enteritidis in liquid egg without causing coagulation. However coagulation occurred in the liquid egg at 400 MPa pressure treatment for 10 minutes at 50 degrees C. No Salmonella population was recovered in this liquid egg stored at 4 degrees C, 25 degrees C, and 37 degrees C for 24 hours suggesting that 350 MPa hydrostatic pressure and pulsing treatment is a better alternative for inactivation of Salmonella in liquid egg than continuous pressure treatment.

  17. Inactivation kinetics of a four-strain composite of Salmonella Enteritidis and Oranienberg in commercial liquid egg yolk

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The goal of this study was to develop a general model of inactivation of salmonellae in commercial liquid egg yolk for temperatures ranging from 58 to 66 deg C by studying the inactivation kinetics of Salmonella in liquid egg yolk. Heat-resistant salmonellae (three serovars of Enteritidis [two of p...

  18. Colonization of avian reproductive-tract tissues by variant subpopulations of Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Guard, Jean; Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa

    2010-06-01

    Leghorn hens were infected with Salmonella Enteritidis cultures of known genomic content and subpopulation characteristics to determine comparative abilities to colonize the avian reproductive tract. Group 1 received phage-type (PT)4 22079, which is a dimorphic subpopulation that can both contaminate eggs and form biofilm. Group 2 received a 90:10 mixture of monomorphic PT13a strains 21027 and 21046, which produce biofilm or contaminate eggs, respectively. Group 3 received a 10:90 mixture of the same two PT13a strains, respectively. Trials were repeated three times and a total of 30 hens per treatment group were infected. Dosage was by oral gavage and was calculated as 8.6 +/- 2.01 X 10(7) colony-forming units per hen. Liver, spleen, and three different sections of oviduct (ovary, upper oviduct, and lower oviduct) were cultured per bird. Results were that all three groups had livers and spleens that were mostly positive (90.0% and 94.4% of 270 hens cultured, respectively). Reproductive-tract organs yielded 75 positives from 270 hens (27.8%), and treatment groups ranged from a low of 6.7% to a high of 76.7% positive cultures in any one trial. There was no significant difference between the numbers of positive reproductive-tract samples between treatment groups due to variance. These results suggest that the status of the reproductive tract at the time of infection may impact recovery of culture-positive tissue and contribute to variance. It is suggested that Salmonella Enteritidis cultures that vary in subpopulation composition have subtle differences in colonization of reproductive tissue that contribute to variance in egg contamination. Culture of non-reproductive-tract organs such as the liver and spleen was overall more reliable for detection of infected hens. The spleen was especially useful for detection because of its small size. Further research is needed to determine how sex hormones influence the infection pathway that results in egg contamination.

  19. Investigation of Salmonella Enteritidis Outbreak Associated with Truffle Oil - District of Columbia, 2015.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto-Crawford, S Janet; McGee, Sasha; Li, Keith; Hennenfent, Andrew K; Dassie, Kossia; Carney, Jhetari T; Gibson, Arian; Cooper, Ivory; Blaylock, Morris; Blackwell, Reginald; Fields, Angela; Davies-Cole, John

    2017-03-17

    On September 8, 2015, the District of Columbia Department of Health (DCDOH) received a call from a person who reported experiencing gastrointestinal illness after eating at a District of Columbia (DC) restaurant with multiple locations throughout the United States (restaurant A). Later the same day, a local emergency department notified DCDOH to report four persons with gastrointestinal illness, all of whom had eaten at restaurant A during August 30-September 5. Two patients had laboratory-confirmed Salmonella group D by stool culture. On the evening of September 9, a local newspaper article highlighted a possible outbreak associated with restaurant A. Investigation of the outbreak by DCDOH identified 159 patrons who were residents of 11 states and DC with gastrointestinal illness after eating at restaurant A during July 1-September 10. A case-control study was conducted, which suggested truffle oil-containing food items as a possible source of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infection. Although several violations were noted during the restaurant inspections, the environmental, laboratory, and traceback investigations did not confirm the contamination source. Because of concern about the outbreak, the restaurant's license was suspended during September 10-15. The collaboration and cooperation of the public, media, health care providers, and local, state, and federal public health officials facilitated recognition of this outbreak involving a pathogen commonly implicated in foodborne illness.

  20. The role of heat shock protein 70 in resistance to Salmonella enteritidis in broiler chickens subjected to neonatal feed restriction and thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, A F; Zulkifli, I; Hair-Bejo, M; Omar, A R; Raha, A R

    2012-02-01

    Environmental stressors may influence chicken performance and susceptibility to pathogens, such as Salmonella enteritidis. This study was conducted to determine the effects of heat shock protein (Hsp)70 expression on resistance to Salmonella enteritidis infection in broiler chickens subjected to heat exposure. Chicks were divided into 3 feeding regimens: ad libitum feeding (control); 60% feed restriction on d 4, 5, and 6 (FR60); and 60% feed restriction on d 4, 5, and 6 plus 1,500 mg/kg of quercetin (FR60Q). On d 35, all of the chickens were individually inoculated with 1 mL of Salmonella enteritidis (1.5 × 10(8) cfu/bird) and exposed to an ambient temperature of 37 ± 1°C and 70% RH for 3 h/d. The FR60 and FR60Q chickens had significantly lower Salmonella enteritidis colonization and lower Hsp70 expression than that of the control chickens following the heat exposure period. The least colonization was observed in the FR60Q group (1.38 log(10) cfu/g in the spleen and 1.96 log(10) cfu/g in the cecal content) and the highest was in the control group (2.1 log(10) cfu/g in the spleen and 4.42 log(10) cfu/g in the cecal content). It appears that neonatal feed restriction can enhance resistance to Salmonella enteritidis colonization in heat-stressed broiler chicks, and the underlying mechanism could be associated with the lower expression of Hsp70.

  1. Genetic analysis of Salmonella enteritidis biofilm formation: critical role of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Solano, Cristina; García, Begoña; Valle, Jaione; Berasain, Carmen; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Gamazo, Carlos; Lasa, Iñigo

    2002-02-01

    We report here a new screening method based on the fluorescence of colonies on calcofluor agar plates to identify transposon insertion mutants of Salmonella enteritidis that are defective in biofilm development. The results not only confirmed the requirement of genes already described for the modulation of multicellular behaviour in Salmonella typhimurium and other species, but also revealed new aspects of the biofilm formation process, such as two new genetic elements, named as bcsABZC and bcsEFG operons, required for the synthesis of an exopolysaccharide, digestible with cellulase. Non-polar mutations of bcsC and bcsE genes and complementation experiments demonstrated that both operons are responsible for cellulose biosynthesis in both S. enteritidis and S. typhimurium. Using two different growth media, ATM and LB, we showed that the biofilm produced by S. enteritidis is made of different constituents, suggesting that biofilm composition and regulation depends on environmental conditions. Bacterial adherence and invasion assays of eukaryotic cells and in vivo virulence studies of cellulose-deficient mutants indicated that, at least under our experimental conditions, the production of cellulose is not involved in the virulence of S. enteritidis. However, cellulose-deficient mutants were more sensitive to chlorine treatments, suggesting that cellulose production and biofilm formation may be an important factor for the survival of S. enteritidis on surface environments.

  2. Multiplication of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg yolks after inoculation outside, on, and inside vitelline membranes and storage at different temperatures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prompt refrigeration to restrict bacterial growth is a widely acknowledged practice for reducing the risk of egg-borne transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis to consumers. A recently published federal regulation for S. Enteritidis control requires eggs to be refrigerated within 36 after they are la...

  3. Critical role of glycogen synthase kinase-3ß in regulating the avian heterophil response to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A microarray-assisted gene expression screen of chicken heterophils revealed glycogen synthase kinase-3ß (GSK-3ß), a multifunctional Ser/Thr kinase, to be consistently up-regulated 30-180 min following stimulation with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis). The present study was ...

  4. Modeling the effect of temperature on survival rate of Salmonella Enteritidis in yogurt.

    PubMed

    Szczawiński, J; Szczawińska, M E; Łobacz, A; Jackowska-Tracz, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the inactivation rates of Salmonella Enteritidis in commercially produced yogurt and to generate primary and secondary mathematical models to predict the behaviour of these bacteria during storage at different temperatures. The samples were inoculated with the mixture of three S. Enteritidis strains and stored at 5 degrees C, 10 degrees C, 15 degrees C, 20 degrees C and 25 degrees C for 24 h. The number of salmonellae was determined every two hours. It was found that the number of bacteria decreased linearly with storage time in all samples. Storage temperature and pH of yogurt significantly influenced survival rate of S. Enteritidis (p < 0.05). In samples kept at 5 degrees C the number of salmonellae decreased at the lowest rate, whereas at 25 degrees C the reduction in number of bacteria was the most dynamic. The natural logarithm of mean inactivation rates of Salmonella calculated from primary model was fitted to two secondary models: linear and polynomial. Equations obtained from both secondary models can be applied as a tool for prediction of inactivation rate of Salmonella in yogurt stored under temperature range from 5 to 25 degrees C; however, polynomial model gave the better fit to the experimental data.

  5. Outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 1B associated with frozen pre-cooked chicken cubes, Finland 2012.

    PubMed

    Huusko, S; Pihlajasaari, A; Salmenlinna, S; Sõgel, J; Dontšenko, I; DE Pinna, E; Lundström, H; Toikkanen, S; Rimhanen-Finne, R

    2017-10-01

    In August to October 2012, a nationwide outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis phase type (PT) 1B with 53 cases occurred in Finland. Hypothesis generating interviews pointed toward ready-to-eat chicken salad from a Finnish company and at the same time Estonian authorities informed of a S. enteritidis PT 1B outbreak linked to chicken wrap prepared at an Estonian restaurant. We found that chicken salad was associated with the infection (odds ratio (OR) 16·1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·7-148·7 for consumption and OR 17·5. 95% CI 4·0-76·0 for purchase). The frozen pre-cooked chicken cubes used in Finnish salad and in Estonian wraps were traced back to a production plant in China. Great Britain made two Rapid Alert Systems for Food and Feed notifications on chicken cubes imported to the UK from the same Chinese production plant. Microbiological investigation confirmed that the patient isolates in Estonia and in Finland were indistinguishable from the strains isolated from chicken cubes in Estonia and in the UK. We recommend that despite certificates for tested Salmonella, food items should be analyzed when Salmonella contamination in outbreak investigations is suspected. In outbreak investigations, electronically implemented case-case study saves time, effort, and money compared with case-control study.

  6. Development of a predictive program for Salmonella enteritidis growth in ground chicken and liquid egg products.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Sakha, Mohammad Zaher

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we developed a predictive program for Salmonella Enteritidis growth in ground chicken and liquid egg products at various temperature patterns. The ground chicken samples were sterilized chicken and raw chicken containing high and low levels of natural microflora, and the liquid egg products were pasteurized or unpasteurized. Microbial growth data published in our previous papers were used for prediction with our new logistic model. The program for the bacterial growth in those food materials was developed on a commercially available spread-sheet program. Users can instantly predict the Salmonella growth in those chicken and egg yolk products by inputting their temperature histories. The growth of natural microflora in the chicken products can also be predicted with the program. This program could be a useful tool to ensure the microbial safety of those materials with regards to Salmonella Enteritidis growth.

  7. Genetic diversity of human isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Bakeri, S A; Yasin, R M; Koh, Y T; Puthucheary, S D; Thong, K L

    2003-01-01

    The study was undertaken to determine clonal relationship and genetic diversity of the human strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis isolated from 1995 to 2002 from different parts of Malaysia. Antimicrobial susceptibility test, plasmid profiling and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were applied to analyse 65 human isolates of S. Enteritidis obtained over an eight year period from different parts of Malaysia. Four nonhuman isolates were included for comparison. A total of 14 distinct XbaI-pulsed-field profiles (PFPs) were observed, although a single PFP X1 was predominant and this particular clone was found to be endemic in Malaysia. The incidence of drug resistant S. Enteritidis remained relatively low with only 37% of the strains analysed being resistant to one or more antimicrobial agents. All except one resistant strain carried at least one plasmid ranging in size from 3.7 to 62 MDa giving nine plasmid profiles. The three isolates from raw milk and one from well-water had similar PFPs to that of the human isolates. Salmonella Enteritidis strains were more diverse than was previously thought. Fourteen subtypes were noted although one predominant clone persisted in Malaysia. The combination of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, plasmid profiling and antibiograms provided additional discrimination to the highly clonal strains of S. Enteritidis. This is the first report to assess the genotypes of the predominant clinical S. Enteritidis in different parts of the country. As S. Enteritidis is highly endemic in Malaysia, the data generated would be useful for tracing the source during outbreaks of gastroenteritis in the study area.

  8. Antimicrobial effect of blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) extracts against the growth of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella Enteritidis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We studied the antimicrobial effects of berry extracts obtained from four cultivars (Elliott, Darrow, Bluecrop and Duke) of blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella Enteritidis. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal conc...

  9. Survival of Salmonella enteritidis Pt4 and Salm. typhimurium Swindon in aerosols.

    PubMed

    McDermid, A S; Lever, M S

    1996-08-01

    Small particle aerosols of plate-grown Salmonella enteritidis and Salm. typhimurium were generated and maintained within a rotating drum at 75% relative humidity and 24 degrees C for 2 h. Plate-grown organisms were found to be more aerosol-stable than broth-grown organisms. Differences were observed between the two species; plate-grown Salm. typhimurium retained 100% viability after 2 h compared to approximately 70% for plate-grown Salm. enteritidis. A large proportion of cells of both serotypes remained viable in aerosols after 2 h, confirming the potential for airborne transmission for these organisms, e.g. within henhouses and during food processing.

  10. Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis tatB and tatC Mutants Are Impaired in Caco-2 Cell Invasion In Vitro and Show Reduced Systemic Spread in Chickens▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Mickael, Claudia Silva; Lam, Po-King S.; Berberov, Emil M.; Allan, Brenda; Potter, Andrew A.; Köster, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is a leading causative agent of gastroenteritis in humans. This pathogen also colonizes the intestinal tracts of poultry and can spread systemically in chickens. Transfer to humans usually occurs through undercooked or improperly handled poultry meat or eggs. The bacterial twin-arginine transport (Tat) pathway is responsible for the translocation of folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane. In order to study the role of the Tat system in the infection and colonization of chickens by Salmonella Enteritidis, we constructed chromosomal deletion mutants of the tatB and tatC genes, which are essential components of the Tat translocon. We observed that the tat mutations affected bacterial cell morphology, motility, and sensitivity to albomycin, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and EDTA. In addition, the mutant strains showed reduced invasion of polarized Caco-2 cells. The wild-type phenotype was restored in all our Salmonella Enteritidis tat mutants by introducing episomal copies of the tatABC genes. When tested in chickens by use of a Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtatB strain, the Tat system inactivation did not substantially affect cecal colonization, but it delayed systemic infection. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the Tat system plays a role in Salmonella Enteritidis pathogenesis. PMID:20498258

  11. Epidemic increase in Salmonella bloodstream infection in children, Bwamanda, the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Phoba, M-F; De Boeck, H; Ifeka, B B; Dawili, J; Lunguya, O; Vanhoof, R; Muyembe, J-J; Van Geet, C; Bertrand, S; Jacobs, J

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is the leading cause of bloodstream infection in children in sub-Saharan Africa, but few data are available from Central-Africa. We documented during the period November 2011 to May 2012 an epidemic increase in invasive Salmonella bloodstream infections in HGR Bwamanda, a referral hospital in Equateur Province, DR Congo. Salmonella spp. represented 90.4 % (103 out of 114) of clinically significant blood culture isolates and comprised Salmonella Typhimurium (54.4 %, 56 out of 103), Salmonella Enteritidis (28.2 %, 29 out of 103) and Salmonella Typhi (17.5 %, 18 out of 103), with Salmonella Enteritidis accounting for most of the increase. Most (82 out of 103, 79.6 %) isolates were obtained from children < 5 years old. Median ages of patients infected with Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis were 14 months (14 days to 64 years) and 19 months (3 months to 8 years) respectively. Clinical presentation was non-specific; the in-hospital case fatality rate was 11.1 %. More than two thirds (69.7 %, 53 out of 76) of children < 5 years for whom laboratory data were available had Plasmodium falciparum infection. Most (83/85, 97.6 %) non-typhoid Salmonella isolates as well as 6/18 (33.3 %) Salmonella Typhi isolates were multidrug resistant (i.e. resistant to the first-line oral antibiotics amoxicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and chloramphenicol), one (1.0 %) Salmonella Typhimurium had decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility owing to a point mutation in the gyrA gene (Gly81Cys). Multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (MLVA) analysis of the Salmonella Enteritidis isolates revealed closely related patterns comprising three major and four minor profiles, with differences limited to one out of five loci. These data show an epidemic increase in clonally related multidrug-resistant Salmonella bloodstream infection in children in DR Congo.

  12. A comparative study on invasion, survival, modulation of oxidative burst, and nitric oxide responses of macrophages (HD11), and systemic infection in chickens by prevalent poultry Salmonella serovars.

    PubMed

    He, Haiqi; Genovese, Kenneth J; Swaggerty, Christina L; Nisbet, David J; Kogut, Michael H

    2012-12-01

    Poultry is a major reservoir for foodborne Salmonella serovars. Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Kentucky, and Salmonella Senftenberg are the most prevalent serovars in U.S. poultry. Information concerning the interactions between different Salmonella species and host cells in poultry is lacking. In the present study, the above mentioned Salmonella serovars were examined for invasion, intracellular survival, and their ability to modulate oxidative burst and nitric oxide (NO) responses in chicken macrophage HD11 cells. All Salmonella serovars demonstrated similar capacity to invade HD11 cells. At 24 h post-infection, a 36-43% reduction of intracellular bacteria, in log(10)(CFU), was observed for Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Kentucky, and Salmonella Senftenberg, whereas a significantly lower reduction (16%) was observed for Salmonella Enteritidis, indicating its higher resistance to the killing by HD11 cells. Production of NO was completely diminished in HD11 cells infected with Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis, but remained intact when infected with Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Kentucky, and Salmonella Senftenberg. Phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated oxidative burst in HD11 cells was greatly impaired after infection by each of the five serovars. When newly hatched chickens were challenged orally, a high rate (86-98%) of systemic infection (Salmonella positive in liver/spleen) was observed in birds challenged with Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg, and Salmonella Kentucky, while only 14% of the birds were Salmonella Senftenberg positive. However, there was no direct correlation between systemic infection and in vitro differential intracellular survival and modulation of NO response among the tested serovars.

  13. Rapid identification of novel antigens of Salmonella Enteritidis by microarray-based immunoscreening.

    PubMed

    Danckert, Lena; Hoppe, Sebastian; Bier, Frank F; von Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus

    2014-01-01

    We report on an approach to rapidly screen thousands of Salmonella Enteritidis proteins with the goal of identifying novel immunodominant proteins. We used a microarray-based system that warrants high throughput and easy handling. Seven immunogenic candidates were selected after screening. Comparative analyses by ELISA and microarrays manifested their immunodominant character. The large repetitive protein (SEN4030) that plays a role as a putative adhesin in initial cell surface interaction and is highly specific to Salmonella is considered to be the most suitable protein for a diagnostic approach. The results further demonstrate that the strategy applied herein is convenient for specifically identifying immunogenic proteins of pathogenic microorganisms. Consequently, it enables a sound assessment of promising candidates for diagnostic applications and vaccine development. Moreover, the elucidation of immunogenic proteins may assist in unveiling unknown virulence-associated factors, thus furthering the understanding of the underlying pathogenicity of Salmonella in general, and of S. Enteritidis, one of the most frequently detected serovars of this pathogen, in particular. FigureThe microarray-based approach was aimed at identifying novel immunodominant proteins of S. Enteritidis. Seven antigens were revealed by screening a cDNA expression library. SEN4030, a large repetitive protein specific for salmonella, is considered an optimal candidate for future applications.

  14. Molecular epidemiology of ampicillin-resistant clinical isolates of Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed Central

    Vatopoulos, A C; Mainas, E; Balis, E; Threlfall, E J; Kanelopoulou, M; Kalapothalki, V; Malamou-Lada, H; Legakis, N J

    1994-01-01

    During the last 6 years in Greece, there has been a significant increase in the number of ampicillin-resistant Salmonella clinical isolates reported. In this study 23 ampicillin-resistant Salmonella strains, consecutively isolated from patients with epidemiologically unrelated cases of food poisoning, were investigated. By serotyping and phage typing, 21 of these strains were identified as Salmonella enteritidis phage type 6a, 1 was identified as Salmonella typhimurium, and 1 was identified as Salmonella saintpaul. By plasmid pattern analysis, the 21 S. enteritidis strains were further differentiated into five groups. Group I consisted of 5 strains (carrying two plasmids of ca. 38 and 34 MDa), group II consisted of 10 strains (three plasmids of ca. 38, 34, and 2.5 MDa), group III consisted of 3 strains (four plasmids of ca. 38, 34, 15, and 2.5 MDa), group IV consisted of 1 strain (five plasmids of ca. 100, 38, 34, 24, and 15 MDa), and group V consisted of 2 strains (three plasmids of ca. 100, 38, and 24 MDa). Ampicillin resistance was easily transferred to Escherichia coli and was associated with the transfer of the 34-MDa plasmid, classified in the N incompatibility group for all strains of groups I to IV, and with the transfer of the 100-MDa plasmid for the group V strains. EcoRI restriction endonuclease digestions showed an extensive homology among the 34-MDa conjugative R plasmids. Hybridizations of the EcoRI restriction fragments of the 34-MDa plasmids with a TEM-type probe revealed the locus of the beta-lactamase gene to be situated on a ca. 6.6-MDa fragment, common in all plasmids. These results indicate that ampicillin resistance in Greece is due to the spread of a limited number of clones of S. enteritidis phage type 6A, carrying related 34-MDa R plasmids. Work is in progress to obtain a better understanding of ampicillin resistance in S. enteritidis. Images PMID:8051261

  15. Salmonella typhi sternal wound infection.

    PubMed

    Sfeir, Maroun; Youssef, Pierre; Mokhbat, Jacques E

    2013-12-01

    Samonella typhi usually causes gastrointestinal infections. Few reports in the literature described skin and soft tissue infections related to Salmonella species, especially in immunocompetent patients. Our case exhibited sternal abscess growing Salmonella typhi.

  16. Growth/survival of Salmonella enteritidis on fresh poultry and fish stored under vacuum or modified atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Nychas, G J; Tassou, C C

    1996-08-01

    The effect of vacuum and modified atmosphere packaging on the growth/survival of Salmonella enteritidis on fresh poultry and fish (Boops boops) is described. Salmonella enteritidis survived but did not grow significantly in all samples (poultry or fish) at 3 degrees C. At 10 degrees C the numbers of Salm. enteritidis increases rapidly in vacuum-packed samples and in samples flushed with 100% N2, 20% CO2/80% O2 of both types of proteinaceous food. Growth was also evident in fish and poultry flushed with 100% CO2; however the rate of growth was greater in fish samples rather than in poultry.

  17. Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis based on Population Structure of Prevalent Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Prerak T.; den Bakker, Henk C.; Mikoleit, Matthew; Tolar, Beth; Trees, Eija; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Frye, Jonathan G.; Porwollik, Steffen; Weimer, Bart C.; Wiedmann, Martin; Weinstock, George M.; Fields, Patricia I.; McClelland, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is one of the most commonly reported causes of human salmonellosis. Its low genetic diversity, measured by fingerprinting methods, has made subtyping a challenge. We used whole-genome sequencing to characterize 125 S. enterica Enteritidis and 3 S. enterica serotype Nitra strains. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms were filtered to identify 4,887 reliable loci that distinguished all isolates from each other. Our whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism typing approach was robust for S. enterica Enteritidis subtyping with combined data for different strains from 2 different sequencing platforms. Five major genetic lineages were recognized, which revealed possible patterns of geographic and epidemiologic distribution. Analyses on the population dynamics and evolutionary history estimated that major lineages emerged during the 17th–18th centuries and diversified during the 1920s and 1950s. PMID:25147968

  18. Susceptibility of biofilm Escherichia coli, Salmonella Enteritidis and Staphylococcus aureus to detergents and sanitizers.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Shigeko; Kuwabara, Yoshihiro

    2007-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the susceptibility of the biofilm cells of Escherichia coli O157, Salmonella Enteritidis, and Staphylococcus aureus to some cleaning detergents and sanitizers. No weakly acidic, neutral, and weakly alkaline detergent could remove the biofilm bacteria from stainless steel chips at commonly used concentrations recommended by manufacturers. Among sanitizers, sodium hypochlorite did not completely inactivate any biofilm bacteria at active chlorine concentrations of 25 to 200 microg/ml. Benzalkonium chloride, alkyldiaminoethyl glycine hydrochloride, chlorhexidine digluconate, and polyhexamethylenebiganide inactivated the great majority of E. coli and S. Enteritidis at commonly used concentrations, but did not inactivate S. aureus effectively enough. The biofilm S. aureus population was shown to be more tolerant than the E. coli and/or S. Enteritidis populations to the sanitizers.

  19. Increasing the intestinal resistance of rats to the invasive pathogen Salmonella enteritidis: additive effects of dietary lactulose and calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Bovee-Oudenhoven, I M; Termont, D S; Heidt, P J; Van der Meer, R

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Lactulose fermentation by the intestinal microflora acidifies the gut contents, resulting in an increased resistance to colonisation by acid sensitive pathogens. The extent of fermentation should be controlled to prevent acid induced epithelial cell damage. Considering the buffering capacity of calcium phosphate and its intestinal cytoprotective effects, whether supplemental calcium phosphate adds to the increased resistance to intestinal infections by lactulose fermentations was studied. METHODS: In a strictly controlled experiment, rats were fed a purified low calcium control diet, a low calcium/lactulose diet, or a high calcium/lactulose diet, and subsequently infected orally with Salmonella enteritidis. RESULTS: Lactulose fermentation lowered the pH and increased the lactic acid concentration of the intestinal contents, which significantly reduced excretion of this pathogen in faeces; thus it improved the resistance to colonisation. This agreed with the high sensitivity of S enteritidis to lactic acid (main metabolite of lactulose fermentation) in vitro. Calcium phosphate decreased translocation of S enteritidis to the systemic circulation, an effect independent of lactulose. The unfavourable increased cytotoxicity of faecal water caused by lactulose fermentation was more than counteracted by supplemental calcium phosphate. Moreover, calcium phosphate stimulated lactulose fermentation, as judged by the reduced lactulose excretion in faeces and increased lactic acid, ammonia, and faecal nitrogen excretion. CONCLUSION: Extra calcium phosphate added to a lactulose diet improves the resistance to colonisation and translocation of S enteritidis. This is probably mediated by a calcium induced stimulation of lactulose fermentation by the intestinal microflora and reversion of the lactulose mediated increased luminal cytotoxicity, which reduces damage inflicted on the intestinal mucosa. PMID:9176078

  20. A comparison of transmission characteristics of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis between pair-housed and group-housed laying hens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Human cases of bacterial gastro-enteritis are often caused by the consumption of eggs contaminated with Salmonella species, mainly Salmonella enterica serovar Enteriditis (Salmonella Enteritidis). To reduce human exposure, in several countries worldwide surveillance programmes are implemented to detect colonized layer flocks. The sampling schemes are based on the within-flock prevalence, and, as this changes over time, knowledge of the within-flock dynamics of Salmonella Enteritidis is required. Transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis has been quantified in pairs of layers, but the question is whether the dynamics in pairs is comparable to transmission in large groups, which are more representative for commercial layer flocks. The aim of this study was to compare results of transmission experiments between pairs and groups of laying hens. Experimental groups of either 2 or 200 hens were housed at similar densities, and 1 or 4 hens were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, respectively. Excretion was monitored by regularly testing of fecal samples for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. Using mathematical modeling, the group experiments were simulated with transmission parameter estimates from the pairwise experiments. Transmission of the bacteria did not differ significantly between pairs or groups. This finding suggests that the transmission parameter estimates from small-scale experiments might be extrapolated to the field situation. PMID:21345201

  1. Migration of Salmonella serotypes Heidelberg and Enteritidis in previously frozen chicken breast meat.

    PubMed

    Tozzo, Kamila; Neto, Américo F G; Spercoski, Katherinne M; Ronnau, Milton; Soares, Vanessa M; Bersot, Luciano S

    2018-02-01

    Salmonella spp. have been shown to migrate to the internal regions of meat cuts. Storage conditions and the presence of proteolytic microbiota can influence this process. Our study assessed the impact of storage time, temperature, and the presence of proteolytic psychrotrophic bacteria on migration. Samples of previously frozen chicken breast with skin and bone were then sterilized using gamma ray irradiation and a cobalt-60 source (11 KGy) and them were inoculated with cultures of S. Enteritidis, S. Enteritidis and psychrotrophs, S. Heidelberg, or S. Heidelberg and psychrotrophs. Inoculated samples were stored for 6, 12, 24, 48, or 168 h at 2, 7, or -30 °C. After treatment, samples were divided into similar-sized segments and bacterial counts were determined in different regions (A - superface, B - intermediate region, and C - internal region). S. Heidelberg and S. Enteritidis both demonstrated successful internal migration for each time, temperature, and bacterial combination (p < 0.05). Our data revealed that Salmonella migration proceeded for 24 h, but slowed at 48 h (p < 0.05). S. Enteritidis with psychrotrophs showed a low amount of internal migration (p < 0.05). We therefore conclude that Salmonella spp. are able to migrate into the internal regions of meat cuts in a short period of time, even at low temperatures. The presence of proteolytic psychrotrophs inhibits the migration of S. Enteritidis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Genomic Comparison of the Closely-Related Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, T. David; Schmieder, Robert; Silva, Genivaldo G. Z.; Busch, Julia; Cassman, Noriko; Dutilh, Bas E.; Green, Dawn; Matlock, Brian; Heffernan, Brian; Olsen, Gary J.; Farris Hanna, Leigh; Schifferli, Dieter M.; Maloy, Stanley; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A.; Edwards, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain LK5 and Dublin strain SARB12 and compared these genomes to the publicly available Enteritidis P125109, Dublin CT 02021853 and Dublin SD3246 genome sequences. We also compared the publicly available Gallinarum genome sequences from biotype Gallinarum 287/91 and Pullorum RKS5078. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, and differences in prophage and pseudogene content between strains belonging to the same serovar. Through our analysis we also identified several prophage cargo genes and pseudogenes that affect virulence and may contribute to a host-specific, systemic lifestyle. These results strongly argue that the Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum serovars of Salmonella enterica evolve by acquiring new genes through horizontal gene transfer, followed by the formation of pseudogenes. The loss of genes necessary for a gastrointestinal lifestyle ultimately leads to a systemic lifestyle and niche exclusion in the host-specific serovars. PMID:26039056

  3. Genomic Comparison of the Closely-Related Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum.

    PubMed

    Matthews, T David; Schmieder, Robert; Silva, Genivaldo G Z; Busch, Julia; Cassman, Noriko; Dutilh, Bas E; Green, Dawn; Matlock, Brian; Heffernan, Brian; Olsen, Gary J; Farris Hanna, Leigh; Schifferli, Dieter M; Maloy, Stanley; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Edwards, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain LK5 and Dublin strain SARB12 and compared these genomes to the publicly available Enteritidis P125109, Dublin CT 02021853 and Dublin SD3246 genome sequences. We also compared the publicly available Gallinarum genome sequences from biotype Gallinarum 287/91 and Pullorum RKS5078. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, and differences in prophage and pseudogene content between strains belonging to the same serovar. Through our analysis we also identified several prophage cargo genes and pseudogenes that affect virulence and may contribute to a host-specific, systemic lifestyle. These results strongly argue that the Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum serovars of Salmonella enterica evolve by acquiring new genes through horizontal gene transfer, followed by the formation of pseudogenes. The loss of genes necessary for a gastrointestinal lifestyle ultimately leads to a systemic lifestyle and niche exclusion in the host-specific serovars.

  4. Genomic comparison of the closely-related Salmonella enterica serovars enteritidis, dublin and gallinarum

    DOE PAGES

    Matthews, T. David; Schmieder, Robert; Silva, Genivaldo G. Z.; ...

    2015-06-03

    The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain LK5 and Dublin strain SARB12 and compared these genomes to the publicly available Enteritidis P125109, Dublin CT 02021853 and Dublin SD3246 genome sequences. We also compared the publicly available Gallinarum genome sequences from biotype Gallinarum 287/91 and Pullorum RKS5078. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, and differences in prophage and pseudogene content betweenmore » strains belonging to the same serovar. Through our analysis we also identified several prophage cargo genes and pseudogenes that affect virulence and may contribute to a host-specific, systemic lifestyle. These results strongly argue that the Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum serovars of Salmonella enterica evolve by acquiring new genes through horizontal gene transfer, followed by the formation of pseudogenes. As a result, the loss of genes necessary for a gastrointestinal lifestyle ultimately leads to a systemic lifestyle and niche exclusion in the host-specific serovars.« less

  5. In vitro attachment and invasion of chicken ovarian granulosa cells by Salmonella enteritidis phage type 8.

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajan, D; Saeed, M; Turek, J; Asem, E

    1996-01-01

    The attachment and invasion of chicken ovarian granulosa cells by Salmonella enteritidis was examined in vitro. The attachment was inhibited by preincubation of granulosa cells with anti-chicken fibronectin antibody (approximately 70% reduction in attachment) or preincubation with a 14-kDa fimbrial protein isolated from S. enteritidis (68% reduction in attachment). Treatment of bacterial cells with the tetrapeptide RGDS before addition to granulosa cells resulted in inhibition of attachment (60% inhibition when 2 x 10(7) CFU of bacteria was treated with 500 microg of peptide). Treatment with the peptide GRGD resulted in similar magnitude of inhibition, indicating that extracellular matrix proteins play significant roles in the interaction of S. enteritidis with granulosa cells. In contrast, treatment of the bacterial cells with the peptide GRAD did not result in significant inhibition of attachment to the granulosa cells. S. enteritidis was found to attach specifically to fibronectin, collagen IV, and laminin-coated microtiter plate wells, with the rank order of attachment as follows: fibronectin > laminin > collagen IV. Light and transmission electron micrographs of S. enteritidis invasion of granulosa cells showed organisms with or without a surrounding membrane in the cytoplasm of granulosa cells. In some instances, dividing bacterial cells were observed in the cytoplasm. Results of this study demonstrated that S. enteritidis interacts with granulosa cells in a specific manner and can invade and multiply in these cells. The granulosa cell layer of the preovulatory follicles may be a preferred site for the colonization of the chicken ovaries by invasive strains of S. enteritidis. PMID:8945540

  6. Efficiency of slightly acidic electrolyzed water for inactivation of Salmonella enteritidis and its contaminated shell eggs.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei; Zhu, Zhi Wei; Shi, Zheng Xiang; Wang, Chao Yuan; Li, Bao Ming

    2009-03-31

    The efficiency of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) at different temperatures (4, 20 and 45 degrees C) for inactivation of Salmonella enteritidis and it on the surface of shell eggs was evaluated. The bactericidal activity of SAEW, sodium hypochlorite solution (NaClO) and acidic electrolyzed water (AEW) to inactivate S. enteritidis was also compared. SAEW with a pH value of 6.0-6.5 used was generated by the electrolysis of a dilute hydrochloric acid (2.4 mM) in a chamber without a membrane. Although the pH value of SAEW was greatly higher than that of AEW (pH2.6-2.7), SAEW had a comparative powerful bactericidal activity at the same available chlorine concentrations. The efficiency of SAEW for inactivation of pure S. enteritidis cultures increased with increasing the available chlorine concentration and treatment time at the three different temperatures. The S. enteritidis counts decreased to less than 1.0 log(10) CFU/ml at available chlorine of 2 mg/l and 100% inactivation (reduction of 8.2 log(10) CFU/ml) was resulted in using SAEW with available chlorine more than 4 mg/l at 4, 20 and 45 degrees C after 2 min treatment, whereas no reduction was observed in the control samples. Moreover, SAEW was also effective for inactivating the S. enteritidis inoculated on the surface of shell eggs. A reduction of 6.5 log(10) CFU/g of S. enteritidis on shell eggs was achieved by SAEW containing 15 mg/l available chlorine for 3 min, but only a reduction of 0.9-1.2 log(10) CFU/g for the control samples. No survival of S. enteritidis was recovered in waste wash SAEW after treatment. The findings of this study indicate that SAEW may be a promising disinfectant agent for the shell egg washing processing without environmental pollution.

  7. Molecular characterization showed limited genetic diversity among Salmonella Enteritidis isolated from humans and animals in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ngoi, Soo Tein; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2013-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is the most common causative agent of non-typhoidal salmonellosis in Malaysia. We aimed to characterize S. Enteritidis isolated from humans and animals by analyzing their antimicrobial resistance profiles and genotypes. A total of 111 strains were characterized using multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Both typing methods revealed that genetically similar S. Enteritidis strains had persisted among human and animal populations within the period of study (2003-2008). Only 39% of the strains were multi-drug resistant (i.e., resistant to 3 or more classes of antimicrobial agents), with a majority (73%) of these in low-risk phase (multiple antibiotic resistant index <0.20). Limited genetic diversity among clinical and zoonotic S. Enteritidis suggested that animals are possible sources of human salmonellosis. The degree of multi-drug resistance among the strains was generally low during the study period. © 2013.

  8. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enteritidis on chicken wings using scallop-shell powder.

    PubMed

    Cagri-Mehmetoglu, A

    2011-11-01

    The present study was designed to determine the inhibitory effect of scallop-shell powder (SSP) on Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enteritidis on chicken wings. Chicken wings artificially inoculated with L. monocytogenes (8.3 log(10) cfu/g) or S. enteritidis (8.8 log(10) cfu/g) were immersed in distilled water (0.10 or 0.50% wt/vol) of SSP slurries for 10 or 30 min, respectively. The amount of L. monocytogenes, S. enteritidis, mesophilic aerobic bacteria (MAB), and yeast or mold was determined for the chicken wings at d 0 or 7 of storage at 4°C. Results indicated that 0.5% SSP decreased the amount of L. monocytogenes and S. enteritidis on chicken wings by 3.7 and 5.0 log(10) cfu/g, respectively. The growth of L. monocytogenes, S. enteritidis, MAB, and yeast or mold was inhibited by SSP during the 7-d refrigerated storage. Color and odor of chicken wings were not significantly changed by SSP treatment (P > 0.05).

  9. Molecular epidemiology of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 1b and 6a isolates in Portugal.

    PubMed Central

    Soares, A. R.; Machado, J.

    2003-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is an important serovar comprising 76 % of Salmonella isolates in Portugal in 2001. For better understand the epidemiology of salmonellosis, a total of 47 isolates of S. Enteritidis phage type (PT) 1b and 6a were analysed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and genomic DNA was subjected to macro restriction with XbaI. For PT 1b isolates, only three different patterns were observed, and PT6a showed a total of 10 digestion patterns. Curiously, the main pattern among PT1b isolates seams quite similar to main pattern of PT6a isolates, but when the two patterns were analysed with Bionumerics, we observed that they exhibited some differences. It was concluded that, in 2001, there was one predominant pattern for PT1b and PT6a and, possibly, we were in presence of clonal strains that exists all over the country. PMID:12948358

  10. Transmission of Salmonella enteritidis after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography because of inadequate endoscope decontamination.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Paul; Smith, Andrew; Anderson, Margaret; Stewart, Jackie; Hamilton, Kate; McNamee, Sandra; Curran, Evonne T

    2017-04-01

    We report a historic nosocomial outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis affecting 4 inpatients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The cause was attributed to inadequate decontamination of an on-loan endoscope used over a weekend. This report highlights the risks of using on-loan endoscopes, particularly regarding their commissioning and adherence to disinfection protocols. In an era of increasing antibiotic resistance, transmission of Enterobacteriaceae by endoscopes remains a significant concern.

  11. Toxigenicity of culture filtrates of Salmonella enteritidis isolates on three mammalian cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, H; Heaney, S B; Singer, J T

    1995-07-01

    Culture filtrates of 28 Salmonella enteritidis isolates were tested for toxicity on Vero-, CHO-, and human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cells. Cytopathic effects on HFF cells were extensive, and were observed even with some filtrates diluted 1:256. Vero cells showed effects with filtrates diluted up to 1:16, and CHO cells gave weak or no reaction. All isolates produced iron-binding siderophores as determined by reactions on chrome-azurol-S medium.

  12. Persistent Salmonella Enteritidis environmental contamination on layer farms in the context of an implemented national control program with obligatory vaccination.

    PubMed

    Dewaele, I; Van Meirhaeghe, H; Rasschaert, G; Vanrobaeys, M; De Graef, E; Herman, L; Ducatelle, R; Heyndrickx, M; De Reu, K

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to closely examine the Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis environmental contamination on persistently positive layer farms in Belgium during successive laying cycles. All of the farms were required to vaccinate their layers under the national control program for Salmonella. Seven farms with previous or current Salmonella Enteritidis contamination were monitored during different stages of the laying period and after cleaning and disinfection (CD). Environmental samples, including from the equipment and vermin, were taken in the henhouse and egg-collecting area. Dilutions were performed to define the degree of Salmonella Enteritidis contamination. Eggshells, egg contents, and ceca were also tested for Salmonella. At the end of the first sampled laying period, 41.6% of the environmental samples were contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis. After CD, the prevalence dropped to 11.4%. On average, the prevalence in the second laying period increased again: 17.8, 18.4, and 22.3% at the onset, middle, and end of the lay period, respectively. After CD before the third laying period, the prevalence decreased to 6.6% and stabilized at the onset of lay (6.3%). During lay, as well as after CD, a wide variety of contaminated environmental samples were found; for example, in the henhouse, in the egg-collecting area, on mobile equipment and in or on vermin. In the henhouse during laying, the most recurrent and highly contaminated sites were the overshoes, floor, manure belt, and hen feces. The egg-collecting area had a significantly higher number of contaminated samples compared with that of the henhouse. For both sites, the floor appeared to be the most suitable sampling site to estimate the Salmonella Enteritidis status of the farms. Eggshell and egg content contamination varied between 0.18 and 1.8% and between 0.04 and 0.4%, respectively. In total, 2.2% of the analyzed ceca contained Salmonella Enteritidis. This study revealed that Salmonella

  13. The Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 13 contributes to pathogenesis in streptomycin pre-treated mice but not in day-old chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a human and animal pathogen that causes gastroenteritis characterized by inflammatory diarrhea and occasionally an invasive systemic infection. Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs) are horizontally acquired genomic segments known to contribute to Salmone...

  14. The SPR detection of Salmonella enteritidis in food using aptamers as recongnition elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, W. T.; Du, X. W.; Pan, M. F.; Wang, J. P.

    2017-09-01

    In this experiment, a fast, accurate, non-destructive, unmarked and simple-operation detection method for Salmonella enteritidis in food was established by the BI-3000 plasma resonance biosensor (SPR). This article establishes a method of using nucleic acid aptamer as immune recognition element in SPR which can be employed to detect Salmonella enteritidis in food for the first time. The experimental conditions were screened and the experimental scheme was validated and applied. The best flow rate was 5μL/min, the best concentration of the aptamers was 180mM, and the best regenerating solution was the 20mM NaOH. This method had almost no cross-reactivity. Besides, we established a standard curve of Salmonella enteritidis and SPR signal, with the detection limit of 2 cfu/mL. Finally, we tested the samples of chicken, pork, shrimp and fish purchased from supermarkets. The method has the advantages of short time, low detection limit and easy operation, which can be used for a large number of food samples.

  15. Salmonella Enteritidis flagellar mutants have a colonization benefit in the chicken oviduct.

    PubMed

    Kilroy, Sofie; Raspoet, Ruth; Martel, An; Bosseler, Leslie; Appia-Ayme, Corinne; Thompson, Arthur; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2017-02-01

    Egg borne Salmonella Enteritidis is still a major cause of human food poisoning. Eggs can become internally contaminated following colonization of the hen's oviduct. In this paper we aimed to analyze the role of flagella of Salmonella Enteritidis in colonization of the hen's oviduct. Using a transposon library screen we showed that mutants lacking functional flagella are significantly more efficient in colonizing the hen's oviduct in vivo. A micro-array analysis proved that transcription of a number of flagellar genes is down-regulated inside chicken oviduct cells. Flagella contain flagellin, a pathogen associated molecular pattern known to bind to Toll-like receptor 5, activating a pro-inflammatory cascade. In vitro tests using primary oviduct cells showed that flagellin is not involved in invasion. Using a ligated loop model, a diminished inflammatory reaction was seen in the oviduct resulting from injection of an aflagellated mutant compared to the wild-type. It is hypothesized that Salmonella Enteritidis downregulates flagellar gene expression in the oviduct and consequently prevents a flagellin-induced inflammatory response, thereby increasing its oviduct colonization efficiency.

  16. Influence of commercial sanitizers on lipopolysaccharide production by Salmonella Enteritidis ATCC 13076.

    PubMed

    Venter, P; Abraham, M; Lues, J F R; Ivanov, I

    2006-12-01

    The effect of typical sanitizers on the composition and toxicity of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) produced by Salmonella Enteritidis ATCC 13076 was analyzed. Salmonella Enteritidis was propagated up to the late exponential phase in the presence of commercial sanitizing solutions. LPS was extracted and derivatized with trifluoroacetylation, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis and the chromogenic Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay were used to assess the ultrastructure and toxicity of the LPS. The viability and debris formation during growth were evaluated to verify the bactericidal and bacteriostatic effects of the sanitizers and to assess sanitizer effects on LPS formation. The LPSs produced were quantified at 1.7 x 10(4), 1.2 x 10(4), 3.6 x 10(3), and 9.6 x 10(4) [KDO] x OD(620nm)(-1) for the controls and the organisms grown in the presence of a chlorinated sanitizer, a heavy-duty alkaline cleaner, and a phenolic hand wash solution, respectively. In response to these treatments, the short-chain polysaccharide fractions of the LPSs in the Salmonella Enteritidis cells increased. This finding suggests that this organism increases the low-molecular-weight fraction of the LPS in relation to the high-molecular-weight fraction to survive these unfavorable conditions. The cumulative change in the LPS in response to the sanitizers influenced the toxicity of the LPS; however, this change could not be related to an individual compound within any of the assessed fractions.

  17. Prediction of Salmonella Enteritidis growth in pasteurized and unpasteurized liquid egg products with a growth model.

    PubMed

    Sakha, Mohammad Zaher; Fujikawa, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Growth prediction of a four-strain cocktail of Salmonella Enteritidis in commercial products of pasteurized and unpasteurized liquid whole egg was studied with the new logistic model that we developed. The growth data of the pathogen in the liquid egg products at constant temperatures in our recent study (Sakha and Fujikawa, Biocont. Sci., 2012) were used for prediction. With estimated values of the parameters in the model, it successfully predicted the Salmonella growth in the liquid egg products at dynamic temperature conditions in the high and low ranges. The Baranyi model, which is well known worldwide, could predict Salmonella growth in the pasteurized product at the dynamic temperature conditions in the high range only. This study would be, in our knowledge, the first report on the prediction of Salmonella growth in both pasteurized and unpasteurized liquid egg products at dynamic temperature conditions with a mathematical model.

  18. Inactivation of Salmonella enteritidis on shell eggs by coating with phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Indu; Yin, H-B; Surendran Nair, M; Chen, C-H; Lang, R; Darre, M J; Venkitanarayanan, K

    2016-09-01

    Salmonella enteritidis (SE) is a major foodborne pathogen that causes human infections largely by consumption of contaminated eggs. The external surface of eggs becomes contaminated with SE from multiple sources, highlighting the need for effective egg surface disinfection methods. This study investigated the efficacy of three GRAS-status, phytochemicals, namely carvacrol (CR), eugenol (EG), and β-resorcylic acid (BR) applied as pectin or gum arabic based coating for reducing SE on shell eggs. White-shelled eggs, spot inoculated with a 5-strain mixture of nalidixic acid (NA) resistant SE (8.0 log CFU/mL) were coated with pectin or gum arabic solution containing each phytochemical (0.0, 0.25, 0.5, or 0.75%), and stored at 4°C for 7 days. SE on eggs was enumerated on days 0, 1, 3, and 7 of storage. Approximately 4.0 log CFU/egg of SE was recovered from inoculated and pectin or gum arabic coated eggs on day 0. All coating treatments containing CR and EG, and BR at 0.75% reduced SE to undetectable levels on day 3 (P < 0.05). Results suggest that the aforementioned phytochemicals could effectively be used as a coating to reduce SE on shell eggs, but detailed studies on the sensory and quality attributes of coated eggs need to be conducted before recommending their use. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  19. Validation of Single and Pooled Manure Drag Swabs for the Detection of Salmonella Serovar Enteritidis in Commercial Poultry Houses.

    PubMed

    Kinde, Hailu; Goodluck, Helen A; Pitesky, Maurice; Friend, Tom D; Campbell, James A; Hill, Ashley E

    2015-12-01

    Single swabs (cultured individually) are currently used in the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) official method for sampling the environment of commercial laying hens for the detection of Salmonella enterica ssp. serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis). The FDA has also granted provisional acceptance of the National Poultry Improvement Plan's (NPIP) Salmonella isolation and identification methodology for samples taken from table-egg layer flock environments. The NPIP method, as with the FDA method, requires single-swab culturing for the environmental sampling of laying houses for Salmonella Enteritidis. The FDA culture protocol requires a multistep culture enrichment broth, and it is more labor intensive than the NPIP culture protocol, which requires a single enrichment broth. The main objective of this study was to compare the FDA single-swab culturing protocol with that of the NPIP culturing protocol but using a four-swab pool scheme. Single and multi-laboratory testing of replicate manure drag swab sets (n  =  525 and 672, respectively) collected from a Salmonella Enteritidis-free commercial poultry flock was performed by artificially contaminating swabs with either Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 4, 8, or 13a at one of two inoculation levels: low, x¯  = 2.5 CFU (range 2.5-2.7), or medium, x¯  = 10.0 CFU (range 7.5-12). For each replicate, a single swab (inoculated), sets of two swabs (one inoculated and one uninoculated), and sets of four swabs (one inoculated and three uninoculated), testing was conducted using the FDA or NPIP culture method. For swabs inoculated with phage type 8, the NPIP method was more efficient (P < 0.05) for all swab sets at both inoculation levels than the reference method. The single swabs in the NPIP method were significantly (P < 0.05) better than four-pool swabs in detecting Salmonella Enteritidis at the lower inoculation level. In the collaborative study (n  =  13 labs) using Salmonella Enteritidis phage

  20. Coconut and Salmonella Infection

    PubMed Central

    Schaffner, Carl P.; Mosbach, Klaus; Bibit, Venuso C.; Watson, Colin H.

    1967-01-01

    Raw, unprocessed coconut supports the growth of salmonellae as well as that of other enteric bacteria, salmonellae being particularly resistant to subsequent desiccation. Original contamination is not due to carriers or to polluted water supplies, but to contact with bacteria-containing soils followed by dispersion via infected coconut milk and shells. Pasteurization of raw coconut meat in a water bath at 80 C for 8 to 10 min effectively killed such bacteria, did not injure the product, and provided a prophylactic method now widely used by the coconut industry. PMID:5340650

  1. Salmonella Diagnosis and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Symptoms Key Resources Salmonella Oranienburg Infections Linked to Shell Eggs Recall & Advice to Consumers and Retailers Case ... Linked to Alfalfa Sprouts Enteritidis Infections Associated with Shell Eggs Chester Infections Associated with Cheesy Chicken & Rice ...

  2. Growth characteristics of Salmonella enteritidis in pasteurized and unpasteurized liquid egg products.

    PubMed

    Sakha, Mohammad Zaher; Fujikawa, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Growth characteristics of a four-strain cocktail of Salmonella Enteritidis in commercial products of pasteurized and unpasteurized liquid whole egg were studied with a growth model developed by us. The unpasteurized product contained total bacteria at 10(7.3) CFU/g, but no Salmonella. When the products were spiked with Salmonella at various doses ranging from 10(1) to 10(4) CFU/g, growth curves of the pathogen at 24°C were well described with our model. Salmonella growth curves at constant temperatures from 8°C to 36°C in the two products were also well described with the model. The Baranyi model also described well most of the growth curves. The rate constants of growth for Salmonella at various constant temperatures were well described with the square root model. The maximum cell level, N(max) of Salmonella was constant at all temperatures in the pasteurized products, while a linear relationship between log N(max) and the temperature was observed in the unpasteurized ones. Salmonella growth in the unpasteurized product was highly suppressed in comparison with that in the pasteurized. This study also suggested the suitability of our model for application in the Salmonella growth analysis in pasteurized and unpasteurized liquid egg products.

  3. Optical immunosensors for detection of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enteritidis from food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Arun K.; Geng, Tao; Lathrop, Amanda; Valadez, Angela; Morgan, Mark T.

    2004-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella are two major foodborne pathogens of significant concern. Two optical evanescent wave immunosensors were evaluated for detection: Antibody-coupled fiber-optic biosensor and a surface plasmon resonant (SPR) immunosensor. In the fiber-optic sensor, polyclonal antibodies for the test organisms were immobilized on polystyrene fiber wave -guides using streptavidin - biotin chemistry. Cyanine 5 -labeled monoclonal antibodies C11E9 (for L. monocytogenes) and SF-11 (for Salmonella Enteritidis) were used to generate a specific fluorescent signal. Signal acquisition was performed by launching a laser-light (635 nm) from an Analyte-2000. This immunosensor was able to detect 103 - 109 cfu/ml of L. monocytogenes or 106-109 cfu/ml of Salmonella Enteritidis and the assays were conducted at near real-time with results obtained within one hour of sampling. The assays were specific and showed signal even in the presence of other microorganisms such as E. coli, Enterococcus faecalis or Salmonella Typhimurium. In the SPR system, IAsys instrument (resonant mirror sensor) was used. Monoclonal antibody-C11E9 was directly immobilized onto a carboxylate cuvette. Whole Listeria cells at various concentrations did not yield any signal while surface protein extracts did. Crude protein extracts from L. monocytogenes and L. innocua had average binding responses of around 150 arc sec (0.25 ng/mm2), which was significantly different from L. grayi, L. ivanovii, or L. welshimeri with average responses of <48 arc sec. Both fiber-optic and SPR sensors show promise in near real-time detection of foodborne L. monocytogenes and Salmonella Enteritidis.

  4. Identification of factors involved in recovery of heat-injured Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Takahisa; Hashimoto, Yoshikazu; Kiriki, Madoka; Motomatsu, Ai; Honjoh, Ken-Ichi; Iio, Masayoshi

    2005-05-01

    Proteins and genes involved in the recovery of heat-injured Salmonella Enteritidis were investigated. Salmonella Enteritidis cells cultured overnight in tryptic soy broth (TSB; nonselective medium) were suspended in citric acid-disodium hydrogen phosphate buffer (pH 6). After heat treatment at 55 degrees C for 15 min, the culturable counts measured by tryptic soy agar (TSA; nonselective medium) decreased from 10(8) to 10(7) CFU/ml. On the other hand, culturable counts measured by desoxycholate-hydrogen sulfite-lactose (DHL) agar (selective medium) were decreased from 10(8) to 10(4) CFU/ml by the same treatment. The results suggest that 99.9% of Salmonella Enteritidis detected on TSA were injured but recoverable. When injured Salmonella Enteritidis was incubated in TSB, the culturable count measured by TSA did not increase for 2 h, whereas that by DHL agar increased after incubation for 30 min. After incubation for 2 h, the culturable count measured by DHL agar reached a similar level with that by TSA, indicating that Salmonella Enteritidis had recovered. The two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that elongation factor G (FusA) and pyruvate kinase (PykF) specifically increased in the cells just after heat treatment and in the recovery cells. The levels of transcription of 86 stress-inducible genes were also investigated by reverse transcription PCR. Nineteen heat-inducible (clpB, clpX, degP, dnaJ, fkpA, ftsJ, gapA, hflB, hslJ, hslU, hslV, htpG, htrA, lon, mopA, mopB, mreB, rpoE, and ppiD), and 12 oxidative-stress and DNA damage-inducible (ahpC, ahpF, fldB, fur, grxA, dinF, katG, mutM, recA, soxR, trxC, and zwf) genes were transcribed extensively during recovery in TSB. The results obtained in this study will be used to develop the media or culture conditions that will promote recovery for the detection of food poisoning bacteria, including injured cells from food products.

  5. Dietary β-galactomannans have beneficial effects on the intestinal morphology of chickens challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Brufau, M T; Martín-Venegas, R; Guerrero-Zamora, A M; Pérez-Vendrell, A M; Vilà, B; Brufau, J; Ferrer, R

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the leading causes of food-borne salmonellosis in humans. Poultry is the single largest reservoir, and the consumption of incorrectly processed chicken meat and egg products is the major source of infection. Since 2006, the use of antibiotics as growth promoters has been banned in the European Union, and the dietary inclusion of β-galactomannans (βGM) has become a promising strategy to control and prevent intestinal infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of various βGM-rich products on intestinal morphology in chickens challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis. To assess this effect, a total of 280 male Ross 308 chickens were studied (40 animals per treatment housed in 5 cages). There were 7 treatments, including controls: uninoculated birds fed the basal diet (negative control) and inoculated birds fed the basal diet (positive control) or the basal diet supplemented with Salmosan (1 g/kg), Duraió gum (1 g/kg), Cassia gum (1 g/kg), the cell walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (0.5 g/kg), or the antibiotic colistine (0.8 g/kg). The birds were fed these diets from the d 1 to 23, except the animals in the colistine group, which were fed the diet containing the antibiotic only from d 5 to 11. The inoculated animals were orally infected on d 7 with 10(8) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis. Bird performance per replicate was determined for the whole study period (23 d), and the distal ileum and cecal tonsil of 5 animals per treatment (1 animal per replicate) were observed at different magnification levels (scanning electron, light, and laser confocal microscopy). In the images corresponding to the treatments containing βGM we observed more mucus, an effect that can be associated with the observation of more goblet cells. Moreover, the images also show fewer M cells, which are characteristic of infected animals. Regarding the morphometric parameters, the animals that received Duraió and Cassia gums

  6. Reduction of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis on the surface of raw shelled almonds by exposure to steam.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Young; Oh, Se-wook; Chung, Hyun-Jung; Reyes-De-Corcuera, Jose I; Powers, Joseph R; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2006-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of steam treatment on the reduction of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis on the surface of raw almonds. Two cultivars, 'Nonpareil' and 'Mission', were studied. Salmonella Enteritidis was inoculated on the surface of raw almonds, which were then treated with steam (93 degrees C +/- 1 degrees C) for 5, 15, 25, 35, 45, 55, and 65 s. After steam treatment, samples were plated on xylose lysine desoxycholate (XLD) and overlay (OV) XLD as a selective and nonselective agar for Salmonella, respectively, to investigate the extent of sublethal injury in Salmonella. Steam treatment of raw almonds effectively reduced Salmonella Enteritidis, and the effect was pronounced with increasing treatment time. After 65 s of steam treatment, reductions in Salmonella Enteritidis populations were 5.7 log and 5.8 log for 'Nonpareil' and 4.0 log and 4.1 log for 'Mission' when enumerated on XLD and OV XLD, respectively. There was no significant difference in population estimates determined with XLD and OV XLD over time (P > 0.05). The effect of the steam treatment was significantly different between two almond cultivars. Salmonella inoculated onto 'Mission' was more resistant to the steam treatment than that on 'Nonpareil', indicating that varietal differences must be considered in the application of steam for the disinfection of raw almonds. The present investigation revealed the potential usefulness of steam treatments for the control of pathogens in raw almonds.

  7. Transposon mutagenesis of Salmonella Enteritidis identifies genes that contribute to invasiveness in human and chicken cells and survival in egg albumen.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella Enteritidis is the world’s leading cause of food borne salmonellosis and illness in people is linked strongly to its contamination of eggs produced by otherwise healthy appearing hens. Salmonella Enteritidis is noted for generating exceptional strain heterogeneity despite having a clonal ...

  8. Investigation of rpoS and dps genes in sodium hypochlorite resistance of Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 isolated from foodborne illness outbreaks in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Ana Carolina; Bacciu, Donatella; Santi, Lucélia; Silva, Walter Orlando Beys da; Vainstein, Marilene Henning; Rubino, Salvatore; Uzzau, Sergio; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar

    2012-03-01

    In Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil, Salmonella Enteritidis is one of the principal microorganisms responsible for foodborne disease. The present study was conducted to compare the sodium hypochlorite resistance of Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 with that of other strains of Salmonella Enteritidis isolated from different regions of the world and to investigate the involvement of the rpoS and dps genes in resistance to this disinfectant. We tested five Salmonella Enteritidis wild-type (WT) strains isolated from different countries, two mutant strains of Salmonella Enteritidis SE86, and two tagged (3XFLAG) strains of Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 for their resistance to sodium hypochlorite (200 ppm). The survival of the WT and attenuated strains was determined based on bacterial counts, and tagged proteins (Dps and RpoS) were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting with anti-FLAG antibodies. None of the WT strains of Salmonella Enteritidis were totally inactivated after 20 min. The SE86 strain lacking dps was more sensitive to sodium hypochlorite than was the WT SE86 strain, with a 2-log reduction in counts after 1 min. The RpoS and Dps proteins were actively expressed under the conditions tested, indicating that in Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 these genes, which are expressed when in contact with sodium hypochlorite, are related to oxidative stress.

  9. Difference in cellular damage and cell death in thermal death time disks and high hydrostatic pressure treated Salmonella Enteritidis (ATCC13076) in liquid whole egg

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Differences in membrane damage including leakage of intracellular UV-materials and loss of viability of Salmonella Enteritidis (ATCC13076) in liquid whole egg (LWE) following thermal-death-time (TDT) disk and high hydrostatic pressure treatments were examined. Salmonella enteritidis was inoculated ...

  10. Antimicrobial activity of basil (Ocimum basilicum) oil against Salmonella enteritidis in vitro and in food.

    PubMed

    Rattanachaikunsopon, Pongsak; Phumkhachorn, Parichat

    2010-01-01

    Nine essential oils were examined for antimicrobial activity against reference and clinical strains of Salmonella Enteritidis. Based on the size of the inhibition zone and the minimal inhibitory concentration, basil oil had the strongest antimicrobial activity against all the tested bacteria, and S. Enteritidis SE3 was the most sensitive strain to all the tested oils. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the major constituents of the oil were linalool (64.35%), 1,8-cineole (12.28%), eugenol (3.21%), germacrene D (2.07%), alpha-terpineol (1.64%), and rho-cymene (1.03%). When applied in nham, a fermented pork sausage, experimentally inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE3 and stored at 4 degrees C, basil oil inhibited the bacterium in a dose-dependent fashion. Basil oil at a concentration of 50 ppm reduced the number of bacteria in the food from 5 to 2log cfu/g after storage for 3 d. An unmeasurable level of the bacterium in the food was observed at days 2 and 3 of storage when 100 and 150 ppm of basil oil was used, respectively. Sensory evaluation suggested that the addition of 100 but not of 150 ppm to nham would be acceptable to consumers. The results from this study confirm the potential use of basil oil as an antimicrobial agent to control S. Enteritidis in food.

  11. Nicking enzyme-assisted biosensor for Salmonella enteritidis detection based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Li, Wenkai; Duan, Yingfen; Li, Zhongjie; Deng, Le

    2014-05-15

    Salmonella enteritidis (S. enteritidis) outbreaks continue to occur, and have increased public awareness of this pathogen. Nicking endonuclease Nb.BbvC I is widely used for the detection of biomolecules and displays activity for specific double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). In this study, we developed a biosensor to detect S. enteritidis based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) using nicking enzyme and carbon nanoparticles (CNPs). Because of the quenching effect of black hole quencher 1 (BHQ 1), the CNPs do not fluoresce in the reaction system. When the target bacteria are added, the nicking enzyme recognizes and cleaves the dsDNA fabricated by the interaction between probe and target. As a result, the CNPs dissociate from BHQ 1 and emit strong fluorescence. Using the nicking enzyme, the fluorescence signals of the biosensor are greatly amplified. The biosensor exhibited a linear relationship with the concentration of S. enteritidis ranging from 10(2) to 3 × 10(3)CFU/mL in water and from 1.5 × 10(2) to 3 × 10(3)CFU/mL in milk. The present results indicate that our FRET-based detection system can be widely employed for the effective detection of pathogens.

  12. Standardized laboratory-scale preparation of mayonnaise containing low levels of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Leuschner, R G; Boughtflower, M P

    2001-05-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis PT4 and PT6 are associated with food poisoning outbreaks and are often found in food only in low concentrations. In this study a reproducible laboratory-scale procedure for preparation of mayonnaise is presented. The mayonnaise that simulates a naturally low-level contaminated product can be used for validation of new methods and is also suitable to study the behavior of low numbers of food pathogenic spoilage microorganisms in a food environment. During processing, liquid egg was artificially contaminated with low levels of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis that resulted in levels of 1 to 3 log10 CFU/g in the final mayonnaise. Cells of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis had increased stability in the mayonnaise when they were subjected to low pH in two stages, first to pH 5.8 and afterward to pH 4.5 before addition to the mayonnaise. The pH of the mayonnaise was between 4.2 to 4.5 and remained stable over the storage period. Low-level S. enterica serovar Enteritidis remained stable in artificially contaminated mayonnaise for 4 weeks at 4 degrees C.

  13. wksl3, a New Biocontrol Agent for Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium in Foods: Characterization, Application, Sequence Analysis, and Oral Acute Toxicity Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyun-Wol; Kim, Jae-Won; Jung, Tae-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Of the Salmonella enterica serovars, S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium are responsible for most of the Salmonella outbreaks implicated in the consumption of contaminated foods in the Republic of Korea. Because of the widespread occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella in foods and food processing environments, bacteriophages have recently surfaced as an alternative biocontrol tool. In this study, we isolated a virulent bacteriophage (wksl3) that could specifically infect S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, and several additional serovars. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that phage wksl3 belongs to the family Siphoviridae. Complete genome sequence analysis and bioinformatic analysis revealed that the DNA of phage wksl3 is composed of 42,766 bp with 64 open reading frames. Since it does not encode any phage lysogeny factors, toxins, pathogen-related genes, or food-borne allergens, phage wksl3 may be considered a virulent phage with no side effects. Analysis of genetic similarities between phage wksl3 and four of its relatives (SS3e, vB_SenS-Ent1, SE2, and SETP3) allowed wksl3 to be categorized as a SETP3-like phage. A single-dose test of oral toxicity with BALB/c mice resulted in no abnormal clinical observations. Moreover, phage application to chicken skin at 8°C resulted in an about 2.5-log reduction in the number of Salmonella bacteria during the test period. The strong, stable lytic activity, the significant reduction of the number of S. Enteritidis bacteria after application to food, and the lack of clinical symptoms of this phage suggest that wksl3 may be a useful agent for the protection of foods against S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium contamination. PMID:23335772

  14. Ethanol adaptation induces direct protection and cross-protection against freezing stress in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    He, S; Zhou, X; Shi, C; Shi, X

    2016-03-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salm. Enteritidis) encounters mild ethanol stress during its life cycle. However, adaptation to a stressful condition may affect bacterial resistance to subsequent stresses. Hence, this work was undertaken to investigate the influences of ethanol adaptation on stress tolerance of Salm. Enteritidis. Salmonella Enteritidis was subjected to different ethanol adaptation treatments (2·5-10% ethanol for 1 h). Cellular morphology and tolerance to subsequent environmental stresses (15% ethanol, -20°C, 4°C, 50°C and 10% NaCl) were evaluated. It was found that 10% was the maximum ethanol concentration that allowed growth of the target bacteria. Ethanol adaptation did not cause cell-surface damage in Salm. Enteritidis as revealed by membrane permeability measurements and electron micrograph analysis. Salmonella Enteritidis adapted with 2·5-10% ethanol displayed an enhanced resistance to a 15%-ethanol challenge compared with an unchallenged control. The maximum ethanol resistance was observed when ethanol concentration used for ethanol adaptation was increased to 5·0%. Additionally, pre-adaptation to 5·0% ethanol cross-protected Salm. Enteritidis against -20°C, but not against 4°C, 50°C or 10% NaCl. Ethanol adaptation provided Salm. Enteritidis direct protection from a high level ethanol challenge and cross-protection from freezing, but not other stresses tested (low temperature, high salinity or high temperature). The results are valuable in developing adequate and efficient control measures for Salm. Enteritidis in foods. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Detection of Salmonella enteritidis Using a Miniature Optical Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, J. R.; Kim, G.; Kothapalli, A.; Morgan, M. T.; Ess, D.

    2007-04-01

    The frequent outbreaks of foodborne illness demand rapid detection of foodborne pathogens. Unfortunately, conventional methods for pathogen detection and identification are labor-intensive and take days to complete. Biosensors have shown great potential for the rapid detection of foodborne pathogens. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors have been widely adapted as an analysis tool for the study of various biological binding reactions. SPR biosensors could detect antibody-antigen bindings on the sensor surface by measuring either a resonance angle or refractive index value. In this study, the feasibility of a miniature SPR sensor (Spreeta, TI, USA) for detection of Salmonella enteritidis has been evaluated. Anti-Salmonella antibodies were immobilized on the gold sensor surface by using neutravidin. Salmonella could be detected by the Spreeta biosensor at concentrations down to 105 cfu/ml.

  16. Biochemically aberrant Salmonella enteritidis ser. newington from human sources in Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Carrington, G O; Cleveland, P; von Graevenitz, A; Rupp, W D

    1975-05-01

    Three isolates of a lactose-fermenting, xylose-negative variety of Salmonella enteritidis ser. newington, identical in biochemical and serological reactions and in the antibiogram, were recovered from three patients in different areas of Connecticut in January 1974. Hydrogen sulfide production was not visible in Salmonella-Shigella agar, in triple sugar iron agar, and in Kligler iron agar but was noticed in lysine iron agar and on XLD agar, among others. The amount of fermentable carbohydrates present was found to correlate with failure to show hydrogen sulfide production (pH effect). In contrast to lactose-fermenting Salmonella strains reported by other authors, we could not elicit a direct transfer of the lac(+) character at frequencies above 10(-6). An epidemiological follow-up remained unsuccessful. Recommendations for the recognition of similar strains are presented.

  17. Effects of thermosonication on the fate of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Enteritidis in mango juice.

    PubMed

    Kiang, W-S; Bhat, R; Rosma, A; Cheng, L-H

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the effects of thermosonication and thermal treatment on Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Enteritidis in mango juice were investigated at 50 and 60°C. Besides, nonlethal injury of Salm. Enteritidis after both treatments was also examined. The highest inactivation was attained with thermosonication at 60°C. The inactivation rate was different for both pathogens, and Salm. Enteritidis was found to be more sensitive to thermosonication than E. coli O157:H7. Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered in all treated samples, except those subjected to more than 5-min thermosonication at 60°C. It was found that the introduction of high-intensity ultrasound enhanced the inactivation of pathogens compared to thermal treatment alone. On the other hand, Salm. Enteritidis was detected in a number of samples following incubation in universal pre-enrichment broth, but no growth was detected after incubation in mango juice. Fruit juices are commonly heat treated to inactivate micro-organisms and enzymes. However, excessive heat treatments may result in undesirable changes in juice quality. Treatment by power ultrasound, a nonthermal technology, may be an alternative processing technique to pasteurize fruit juices. This study highlights the effectiveness of thermosonication in inactivating Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Enteritidis in mango juice. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Characterization of Salmonella Enteritidis strains isolated from poultry and farm environments in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Campioni, F; Zoldan, M M; Falcão, J P

    2014-07-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is a major causative agent of foodborne outbreaks worldwide. Using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), this study assessed the genetic relatedness, the pathogenic potential, and antimicrobial resistance in 60 strains isolated from chickens and the farm environment in Brazil between 2004 and 2010. The resulting concatenated dendrogram of the two methodologies distinguished the strains into two clusters. Some strains isolated from the two sources were indistinguishable. All the strains contained the 13 virulence markers investigated. Forty-four strains were resistant to nalidixic acid. Quinolone resistance presented by many strains suggests that quinolones may have been used to treat chickens. The high prevalence of virulence markers highlights the importance of poultry as vehicles of S. Enteritidis strains that have the potential to cause disease.

  19. Effect of coffee filtrate, methylglyoxal, glyoxal, and caffeine on Salmonella typhimurium and S. enteritidis survival in ground chicken breasts.

    PubMed

    Maletta, Anne B; Were, Lilian M

    2012-02-01

    The antimicrobial effect of roasted coffee filtrate (CF) and dicarbonyls on Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis in raw ground chicken breast meat (GCB) was investigated. Coffee was brewed and filtered before addition to GCB. Coffee filtrate with and without added caffeine, methylglyoxal, and/or glyoxal was added to GCB and then inoculated with Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis. Ground chicken samples were stomached with peptone water at days 1, 3, 5, and 7, plated on XLD agar with a TSA overlay, and Salmonella survivors were enumerated. CF alone gave less than a 1 Log reduction in all runs compared to control GCB with no treatment. Methylglyoxal (2.28 mg/g GCB) had the greatest antimicrobial effect against Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis in GCB with average Log reductions of 2.27 to 3.23, respectively, over the 7 d duration of the experiment compared to control GCB with no treatment. A 1 Log reduction was observed in GCB with CF, 0.93 mg glyoxal, and 1 mg caffeine/g chicken compared to the control and GCB with only CF. Heat-produced coffee compounds could potentially reduce Salmonella in retail ground chicken and chicken products. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Interpretations of antibody responses to Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis gm flagellin in poultry flocks are enhanced by a kinetics-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    McDonough, P L; Jacobson, R H; Timoney, J F; Mutalib, A; Kradel, D C; Chang, Y F; Shin, S J; Lein, D H; Trock, S; Wheeler, K

    1998-07-01

    Many regulatory and diagnostic programs for the detection of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infection in commercial poultry flocks have relied on rapid Pullorum agglutination tests to screen birds because of the shared antigens of S. enterica Enteritidis and S. enterica Pullorum and Gallinarum; however, the use of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) format affords better analytical sensitivity than crude agglutination tests. In this study, we adapted our earlier conventional indirect ELISA, using gm flagellin as the antigen, to a kinetics-based, computer-controlled ELISA (KELA). The KELA was used to screen for flagellin antibody from three commercial flocks: (i) a large flock involved in a U.S. Department of Agriculture trace back from a human S. enterica Enteritidis foodborne outbreak (n = 3,209), (ii) a flock infected with the endemic S. enterica Enteritidis serotype but which also had multiple other Salmonella serotypes (n = 65), and (iii) an S. enterica Pullorum-infected flock (n = 12). The first flock (S. enterica Enteritidis prevalence of 2.45% based on culture) provided a field test of the KELA and allowed the calculation of diagnostic sensitivity (D-Sn) and diagnostic specificity (D-Sp). With a cutoff of 10 (used for screening flocks [i.e., high sensitivity]), the KELA has a D-Sn of 95.2% and a D-Sp of 18.5%; with a cutoff of 140 (used in confirmatory flock testing [i.e., high specificity]), the KELA has a D-Sn of 28.0% and a D-Sp of 99.1%. We found that with a cutoff of 60 (D-Sn = 63.1%; D-Sp = 91.6%), we could eliminate reactions in the KELA caused by other non-S. enterica Enteritidis salmonellae. The KELA was also compared to two commercial rapid Pullorum tests, the Solvay (D-Sn = 94.9%; D-Sp = 55.5%) and the Vineland (D-Sn = 62.0%; D-Sp = 75.3%).

  1. TRS-based PCR as a potential tool for inter-serovar discrimination of Salmonella Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, S. Infantis, S. Virchow, S. Hadar, S. Newport and S. Anatum.

    PubMed

    Majchrzak, Marta; Krzyzanowska, Anna; Kubiak, Anna B; Wojtasik, Arkadiusz; Wolkowicz, Tomasz; Szych, Jolanta; Parniewski, Pawel

    2014-11-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica comprises a number of serovars, many of which pose an epidemiological threat to humans and are a worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality. Most reported food infection outbreaks involve the serovars Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium. Rapid identification to determine the primary sources of the bacterial contamination is important to the improvement of public health. In recent years, many DNA-based techniques have been applied to genotype Salmonella. Herein, we report the use of a manual TRS-PCR approach for the differentiation of the Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovars in a single-tube assay. One hundred seventy Salmonella strains were examined in this work. These consisted of serovars S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, S. Infantis, S. Virchow, S. Hadar, S. Newport and S. Anatum. Five of the TRS-primers, N6(GTG)4, N6(CAC)4, N6(CGG)4, N6(CCG)4 and N6(CTG)4, perfectly distinguished the S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium serovars, and the N6(GTG)4 primer additionally grouped the other five frequently isolated serovars. In our opinion, the TRS-PCR methodology could be recommended for a quick and simple DNA-based test for inter-serovar discrimination of Salmonella strains.

  2. Interdigitated microelectrode based impedance biosensor for detection of salmonella enteritidis in food samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G.; Morgan, M.; Hahm, B. K.; Bhunia, A.; Mun, J. H.; Om, A. S.

    2008-03-01

    Salmonella enteritidis outbreaks continue to occur, and S. enteritidis-related outbreaks from various food sources have increased public awareness of this pathogen. Conventional methods for pathogens detection and identification are labor-intensive and take days to complete. Some immunological rapid assays are developed, but these assays still require prolonged enrichment steps. Recently developed biosensors have shown great potential for the rapid detection of foodborne pathogens. To develop the biosensor, an interdigitated microelectrode (IME) was fabricated by using semiconductor fabrication process. Anti-Salmonella antibodies were immobilized based on avidin-biotin binding on the surface of the IME to form an active sensing layer. To increase the sensitivity of the sensor, three types of sensors that have different electrode gap sizes (2 μm, 5 μm, 10 μm) were fabricated and tested. The impedimetric biosensor could detect 103 CFU/mL of Salmonella in pork meat extract with an incubation time of 5 minutes. This method may provide a simple, rapid and sensitive method to detect foodborne pathogens.

  3. First Human Isolate of Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis Harboring blaCTX-M-14 in South America

    PubMed Central

    Bado, Inés; García-Fulgueiras, Virginia; Cordeiro, Nicolás F.; Betancor, Laura; Caiata, Leticia; Seija, Verónica; Robino, Luciana; Algorta, Gabriela; Chabalgoity, José A.; Ayala, Juan A.; Gutkind, Gabriel O.

    2012-01-01

    We studied a clinical isolate of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis showing resistance to oxyiminocephalosporins. PCR analysis confirmed the presence of blaCTX-M-14 linked to IS903 in a 95-kb IncI1 conjugative plasmid. Such a plasmid is maintained on account of the presence of a pndAC addiction system. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis indicated that the strain belongs to ST11. This is the first report of blaCTX-M-14 in Salmonella Enteritidis of human origin in South America. PMID:22290976

  4. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils on Salmonella enteritidis, Escherichia coli, and Listeria innocua in fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Raybaudi-Massilia, Rosa M; Mosqueda-Melgar, Jonathan; Martín-Belloso, Olga

    2006-07-01

    The antimicrobial properties of essential oils (EOs) and their derivatives have been known for years. However, the information published about the minimal effective concentration of EOs against microorganisms in fruit juices is scarce. In this study, both MIC and MBC of six EOs (lemongrass, cinnamon, geraniol, palmarosa, or benzaldehyde) against Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli, and Listeria innocua were determined by the agar and broth dilution methods, respectively. All of the six EOs inhibited the microbial (Salmonella Enteritidis, E. coli, and L. innocua) growth at a concentration from 1 microl/ ml (MIC). These studies led to choosing the three most effective EOs. Lemongrass, cinnamon, and geraniol were found to be most effective in inhibiting the growth of the microorganisms and thus were used for the MBC analysis. On this last point, significant differences (P < 0.05) among EOs, their concentrations, and culture media (apple, pear, and melon juices, or tryptone soy broth medium) were found after comparing the results on MBC for each microorganism. A concentration of 2 microl/ml from lemongrass, cinnamon, or geraniol was enough to inactivate Salmonella Enteritidis, E. coli, and L. innocua in apple and pear juices. However, in melon juice and tryptone soy broth medium, concentrations of 8 and 10 microl/ml from cinnamon, respectively, or 6 microl/ml from geraniol were necessary to eliminate the three microorganisms, whereas lemongrass required only 5 micro/ml to inactivate them. These results suggest that EOs represent a good alternative to eliminate microorganisms that can be a hazard for the consumer in unpasteurized fruit juices. The present study contributes to the knowledge of MBC of EOs against pathogenic bacteria on fruit juices.

  5. Microbial quality of liquid egg and salmonella infection status in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hara-Kudo, Yukiko; Takatori, Kosuke

    2009-02-01

    Aerobic bacteria counts and contamination with Salmonella were investigated in a total of 1,327 samples of commercial liquid egg in 1992-2002. Salmonella was isolated from 8.1% of the samples, and Salmonella contamination was found in 1.7% of even the pasteurized liquid egg samples. The major Salmonella serotype was Enteritidis from more than 50% of the contaminated liquid egg samples. In addition, the aerobic bacteria counts in Salmonella-positive liquid eggs were significantly higher than those of Salmonella-negative samples. However, Salmonella was detected in liquid egg in which the aerobic bacteria counts were in the range of 10(2) to 10(6) cfu/g. Furthermore, foodborne outbreaks of Salmonella infections associated with liquid egg were analyzed. Liquid eggs should be carefully treated to avoid the possibility of Salmonella contamination. Adequate supply of pasteurized liquid eggs and controls to prevent re-contamination are needed.

  6. Antibiotic resistance of Moroccan strains of Salmonella enteritidis isolated between 1996 and 1997.

    PubMed

    Rouahi, N; Zouhdi, M; Zidouh, A; Elyachioui, M; Mahjour, J

    2000-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a worldwide problem. The antibiotic resistance of Moroccan strains of Salmonella enteritidis was investigated from 1996 to 1997. A total of 51 strains were collected within this period, 31 derived from human sources and 20 from food. Of the 31 human strains, 10 were resistant to antibiotics; 4 were resistant to two or more antibiotics. Of the 20 food strains, 11 were resistant to antibiotics; 6 were resistant to two or more antibiotics. The results are similar to those obtained from strains isolated from other Mediterranean countries.

  7. Study of Salmonella Typhimurium Infection in Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Vivek V.; Devon, Rebecca L.; Sharma, Pardeep; McWhorter, Andrea R.; Chousalkar, Kapil K.

    2016-01-01

    Members of Salmonella enterica are frequently involved in egg and egg product related human food poisoning outbreaks worldwide. In Australia, Salmonella Typhimurium is frequently involved in egg and egg product related foodborne illness and Salmonella Mbandaka has also been found to be a contaminant of the layer farm environment. The ability possessed by Salmonella Enteritidis to colonize reproductive organs and contaminate developing eggs has been well-described. However, there are few studies investigating this ability for Salmonella Typhimurium. The hypothesis of this study was that the Salmonella Typhimurium can colonize the gut for a prolonged period of time and that horizontal infection through feces is the main route of egg contamination. At 14 weeks of age hens were orally infected with either S. Typhimurium PT 9 or S. Typhimurium PT 9 and Salmonella Mbandaka. Salmonella shedding in feces and eggs was monitored for 15 weeks post-infection. Egg shell surface and internal contents of eggs laid by infected hens were cultured independently for detection of Salmonella spp. The mean Salmonella load in feces ranged from 1.54 to 63.35 and 0.31 to 98.38 most probable number/g (MPN/g) in the S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka group, respectively. No correlation was found between mean fecal Salmonella load and frequency of egg shell contamination. Egg shell contamination was higher in S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka infected group (7.2% S. Typhimurium, 14.1% S. Mbandaka) compared to birds infected with S. Typhimurium (5.66%) however, co-infection had no significant impact on egg contamination by S. Typhimurium. Throughout the study Salmonella was not recovered from internal contents of eggs laid by hens. Salmonella was isolated from different segments of oviduct of hens from both the groups, however pathology was not observed on microscopic examination. This study investigated Salmonella shedding for up to 15 weeks p.i which is a longer period of time

  8. Study of Salmonella Typhimurium Infection in Laying Hens.

    PubMed

    Pande, Vivek V; Devon, Rebecca L; Sharma, Pardeep; McWhorter, Andrea R; Chousalkar, Kapil K

    2016-01-01

    Members of Salmonella enterica are frequently involved in egg and egg product related human food poisoning outbreaks worldwide. In Australia, Salmonella Typhimurium is frequently involved in egg and egg product related foodborne illness and Salmonella Mbandaka has also been found to be a contaminant of the layer farm environment. The ability possessed by Salmonella Enteritidis to colonize reproductive organs and contaminate developing eggs has been well-described. However, there are few studies investigating this ability for Salmonella Typhimurium. The hypothesis of this study was that the Salmonella Typhimurium can colonize the gut for a prolonged period of time and that horizontal infection through feces is the main route of egg contamination. At 14 weeks of age hens were orally infected with either S. Typhimurium PT 9 or S. Typhimurium PT 9 and Salmonella Mbandaka. Salmonella shedding in feces and eggs was monitored for 15 weeks post-infection. Egg shell surface and internal contents of eggs laid by infected hens were cultured independently for detection of Salmonella spp. The mean Salmonella load in feces ranged from 1.54 to 63.35 and 0.31 to 98.38 most probable number/g (MPN/g) in the S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka group, respectively. No correlation was found between mean fecal Salmonella load and frequency of egg shell contamination. Egg shell contamination was higher in S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka infected group (7.2% S. Typhimurium, 14.1% S. Mbandaka) compared to birds infected with S. Typhimurium (5.66%) however, co-infection had no significant impact on egg contamination by S. Typhimurium. Throughout the study Salmonella was not recovered from internal contents of eggs laid by hens. Salmonella was isolated from different segments of oviduct of hens from both the groups, however pathology was not observed on microscopic examination. This study investigated Salmonella shedding for up to 15 weeks p.i which is a longer period of time

  9. Comparison of Danish isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis PT9a and PT11 from hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) and humans by plasmid profiling and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Nauerby, B; Pedersen, K; Dietz, H H; Madsen, M

    2000-10-01

    During the years 1994 to 1998, 10 strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 11 (PT11) and 6 PT9a strains were isolated from Danish hedgehogs, together with 7 strains that did not yield phage susceptibility patterns conforming with any known phage type (routine dilution no conformity [RDNC]). From 1995 to 1998, five Danish patients were reported infected with serovar Enteritidis PT11 and two with PT9a. All serovar Enteritidis PT11, PT9a, and RDNC isolates from hedgehogs and humans were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), plasmid profiling, and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of plasmids. By use of S1 nuclease and HindIII, the PT11 and PT9a isolates had identical plasmid profiles and RFLP patterns, which differed from the RDNC profiles. The PFGE profiles were identical for all serovar Enteritidis PT11 and PT9a strains from hedgehogs, four of five human strains of serovar Enteritidis PT11, and two human strains of serovar Enteritidis PT9a, irrespective of restriction enzyme, whereas the last human strain deviated slightly when NotI was used but not when XbaI or SpeI was used. The results indicate that serovar Enteritidis PT9a and PT11 are closely related and that PT11 and PT9a from Danish hedgehogs and humans belong to the same clonal lineage.

  10. Comparison of Danish Isolates of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis PT9a and PT11 from Hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) and Humans by Plasmid Profiling and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Nauerby, B.; Pedersen, K.; Dietz, H. H.; Madsen, M.

    2000-01-01

    During the years 1994 to 1998, 10 strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 11 (PT11) and 6 PT9a strains were isolated from Danish hedgehogs, together with 7 strains that did not yield phage susceptibility patterns conforming with any known phage type (routine dilution no conformity [RDNC]). From 1995 to 1998, five Danish patients were reported infected with serovar Enteritidis PT11 and two with PT9a. All serovar Enteritidis PT11, PT9a, and RDNC isolates from hedgehogs and humans were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), plasmid profiling, and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of plasmids. By use of S1 nuclease and HindIII, the PT11 and PT9a isolates had identical plasmid profiles and RFLP patterns, which differed from the RDNC profiles. The PFGE profiles were identical for all serovar Enteritidis PT11 and PT9a strains from hedgehogs, four of five human strains of serovar Enteritidis PT11, and two human strains of serovar Enteritidis PT9a, irrespective of restriction enzyme, whereas the last human strain deviated slightly when NotI was used but not when XbaI or SpeI was used. The results indicate that serovar Enteritidis PT9a and PT11 are closely related and that PT11 and PT9a from Danish hedgehogs and humans belong to the same clonal lineage. PMID:11015375

  11. Postharvest transfer and survival of Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis on living lettuce.

    PubMed

    Waitt, J A; Kuhn, D D; Welbaum, G E; Ponder, M A

    2014-02-01

    The potential for postharvest transfer of Salmonella to 'living lettuce' is not well understood. In this study, the transfer of Salmonella enterica Enteritidis (6 log CFU g(-1) ) from worker hands or contaminated roots to leaves of living lettuce was quantified. Transfer rates of Salmonella from contaminated gloves to sequentially handled lettuce heads ranged from 94% to head 1, 82% to head 2 and 69% to head 3. On average, 2.9 ± 0.1 log CFU g(-1) (64%) Salmonella was transferred from inoculated roots to leaves resulting from typical postharvest handling activities for living lettuce. Salmonella persisted on leaves stored at recommended storage temperatures (4°C) and increased 0.5 log CFU g(-1) when stored at temperature abuse conditions (12°C). Salmonella increased 1.6 log CFU g(-1) on roots after 18-day storage at 12°C, emphasizing the need to maintain temperature control to reduce the risk of human illness. Hydroponically grown lettuce packaged in plastic clamshells with intact roots, marketed as 'living lettuce', is increasing in popularity due to its extended shelf life. This study demonstrates the transfer of Salmonella from contaminated worker hands and contaminated roots to leaves where it persisted at 4°C for 18 day. Temperature abuse (12°C) increased Salmonella on roots and leaves. These findings suggest that failure to maintain temperatures below 12°C can pose a risk for consumers purchasing living lettuce at markets where recommended storage temperatures are not maintained. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Quantitative Tracking of Salmonella Enteritidis Transmission Routes Using Barcode-Tagged Isogenic Strains in Chickens: Proof-of-Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yichao; Ricke, Steven C.; Tellez, Guillermo; Kwon, Young Min

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella is an important foodborne bacterial pathogen, however, a fundamental understanding on Salmonella transmission routes within a poultry flock remains unclear. In this study, a series of barcode-tagged strains were constructed by inserting six random nucleotides into a functionally neutral region on the chromosome of S. Enteritidis as a tool for quantitative tracking of Salmonella transmission in chickens. Six distinct barcode-tagged strains were used for infection or contamination at either low dose (103 CFUs; three strains) or high dose (105 CFUs; three strains) in three independent experiments (Experiment 1 oral gavage; Experiment 2 contaminated feed; Experiment 3 contaminated water). For all chick experiments, cecal and foot-wash samples were collected from a subset of the chickens at days 7 or/and 14, from which genomic DNA was extracted and used to amplify the barcode regions. After the resulting PCR amplicons were pooled and analyzed by MiSeq sequencing, a total of approximately 1.5 million reads containing the barcode sequences were analyzed to determine the relative frequency of every barcode-tagged strain in each sample. In Experiment 1, the high dose of oral infection was correlated with greater dominance of the strains in the ceca of the respective seeder chickens and also in the contact chickens yet at lesser degrees. When chicks were exposed to contaminated feed (Experiment 2) or water (Experiment 3), there were no clear patterns of the barcode-tagged strains in relation to the dosage, except that the strains introduced at low dose required a longer time to colonize the ceca with contaminated feed. Most foot-wash samples contained only one to three strains for the majority of the samples, suggesting potential existence of an unknown mechanism(s) for strain exclusion. These results demonstrated the proof of concept of using barcode tagged to investigate transmission dynamics of Salmonella in chickens in a quantitative manner. PMID:28261587

  13. Quantitative Tracking of Salmonella Enteritidis Transmission Routes Using Barcode-Tagged Isogenic Strains in Chickens: Proof-of-Concept Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yichao; Ricke, Steven C; Tellez, Guillermo; Kwon, Young Min

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella is an important foodborne bacterial pathogen, however, a fundamental understanding on Salmonella transmission routes within a poultry flock remains unclear. In this study, a series of barcode-tagged strains were constructed by inserting six random nucleotides into a functionally neutral region on the chromosome of S. Enteritidis as a tool for quantitative tracking of Salmonella transmission in chickens. Six distinct barcode-tagged strains were used for infection or contamination at either low dose (10(3) CFUs; three strains) or high dose (10(5) CFUs; three strains) in three independent experiments (Experiment 1 oral gavage; Experiment 2 contaminated feed; Experiment 3 contaminated water). For all chick experiments, cecal and foot-wash samples were collected from a subset of the chickens at days 7 or/and 14, from which genomic DNA was extracted and used to amplify the barcode regions. After the resulting PCR amplicons were pooled and analyzed by MiSeq sequencing, a total of approximately 1.5 million reads containing the barcode sequences were analyzed to determine the relative frequency of every barcode-tagged strain in each sample. In Experiment 1, the high dose of oral infection was correlated with greater dominance of the strains in the ceca of the respective seeder chickens and also in the contact chickens yet at lesser degrees. When chicks were exposed to contaminated feed (Experiment 2) or water (Experiment 3), there were no clear patterns of the barcode-tagged strains in relation to the dosage, except that the strains introduced at low dose required a longer time to colonize the ceca with contaminated feed. Most foot-wash samples contained only one to three strains for the majority of the samples, suggesting potential existence of an unknown mechanism(s) for strain exclusion. These results demonstrated the proof of concept of using barcode tagged to investigate transmission dynamics of Salmonella in chickens in a quantitative manner.

  14. Genetic and Phenotypic Characterization of a Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Emerging Strain with Superior Intra-macrophage Replication Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Shomer, Inna; Avisar, Alon; Desai, Prerak; Azriel, Shalhevet; Smollan, Gill; Belausov, Natasha; Keller, Nathan; Glikman, Daniel; Maor, Yasmin; Peretz, Avi; McClelland, Michael; Rahav, Galia; Gal-Mor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is one of the ubiquitous Salmonella serovars worldwide and a major cause of food-born outbreaks, which are often associated with poultry and poultry derivatives. Here we report a nation-wide S. Enteritidis clonal outbreak that occurred in Israel during the last third of 2015. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis and whole genome sequencing identified genetically related strains that were circulating in Israel as early as 2008. Global comparison linked this outbreak strain to several clinical and marine environmental isolates that were previously isolated in California and Canada, indicating that similar strains are prevalent outside of Israel. Phenotypic comparison between the 2015 outbreak strain and other clinical and reference S. Enteritidis strains showed only limited intra-serovar phenotypic variation in growth in rich medium, invasion into Caco-2 cells, uptake by J774.1A macrophages, and host cell cytotoxicity. In contrast, significant phenotypic variation was shown among different S. Enteritidis isolates when biofilm-formation, motility, invasion into HeLa cells and uptake by THP-1 human macrophages were studied. Interestingly, the 2015 outbreak clone was found to possess superior intra-macrophage replication ability within both murine and human macrophages in comparison to the other S. Enteritidis strains studied. This phenotype is likely to play a role in the virulence and host-pathogen interactions of this emerging clone. PMID:27695450

  15. Comparative evaluation of Salmonella Enteritidis ghost vaccines with a commercial vaccine for protection against internal egg contamination with Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Jawale, Chetan V; Lee, John Hwa

    2014-10-14

    The study was conducted for the comparative evaluation of the vaccine potential of Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis, SE) ghost, SE ghost carrying Escherichia coli heat labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) protein, and a commercial vaccine. Group A chickens were used as a non-vaccinated control, group B chickens were immunized with the ghost carrying LTB protein, group C chickens were immunized with the ghost and, group D chickens were immunized with a commercial vaccine. Group D chickens showed the swelling at the injection site, while no adverse reactions were observed at injection sites of the group B and C chickens. Chickens from the immunized groups B, C, and D demonstrated significant increases in plasma IgG, intestinal secretory IgA levels, and antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferative responses. After challenge with a virulent SE strain via intravenous route, groups B, C, and D showed significantly higher egg production and lower internal egg contamination and lower recovery of the challenge strain from internal organs compared to non-immunized-challenged control group A. In conclusion, these data indicate that immunization of chickens with the ghost and ghost carrying LTB is safe, without causing any adverse reaction, and is effective as the commercial vaccine in terms of reduction in internal egg contamination and internal organ colonization of Salmonella.

  16. Prospective use of whole genome sequencing (WGS) detected a multi-country outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Inns, T; Ashton, P M; Herrera-Leon, S; Lighthill, J; Foulkes, S; Jombart, T; Rehman, Y; Fox, A; Dallman, T; DE Pinna, E; Browning, L; Coia, J E; Edeghere, O; Vivancos, R

    2017-01-01

    Since April 2015, whole genome sequencing (WGS) has been the routine test for Salmonella identification, surveillance and outbreak investigation at the national reference laboratory in England and Wales. In May 2015, an outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis cases was detected using WGS data and investigated. UK cases were interviewed to obtain a food history and links between suppliers were mapped to produce a food chain network for chicken eggs. The association between the food chain network and the phylogeny was explored using a network comparison approach. Food and environmental samples were taken from premises linked to cases and tested for Salmonella. Within the outbreak single nucleotide polymorphism defined cluster, 136 cases were identified in the UK and 18 in Spain. One isolate from a food containing chicken eggs was within the outbreak cluster. There was a significant association between the chicken egg food chain of UK cases and phylogeny of outbreak isolates. This is the first published Salmonella outbreak to be prospectively detected using WGS. This outbreak in the UK was linked with contemporaneous cases in Spain by WGS. We conclude that UK and Spanish cases were exposed to a common source of Salmonella-contaminated chicken eggs.

  17. Egg white versus Salmonella Enteritidis! A harsh medium meets a resilient pathogen.

    PubMed

    Baron, Florence; Nau, Françoise; Guérin-Dubiard, Catherine; Bonnassie, Sylvie; Gautier, Michel; Andrews, Simon C; Jan, Sophie

    2016-02-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is the prevalent egg-product-related food-borne pathogen. The egg-contamination capacity of S. Enteritidis includes its exceptional survival capability within the harsh conditions provided by egg white. Egg white proteins, such as lysozyme and ovotransferrin, are well known to play important roles in defence against bacterial invaders. Indeed, several additional minor proteins and peptides have recently been found to play known or potential roles in protection against bacterial contamination. However, although such antibacterial proteins are well studied, little is known about their efficacy under the environmental conditions prevalent in egg white. Thus, the influence of factors such as temperature, alkalinity, nutrient restriction, viscosity and cooperative interactions on the activities of antibacterial proteins in egg white remains unclear. This review critically assesses the available evidence on the antimicrobial components of egg white. In addition, mechanisms employed by S. Enteritidis to resist egg white exposure are also considered along with various genetic studies that have shed light upon egg white resistance systems. We also consider how multiple, antibacterial proteins operate in association with specific environmental factors within egg white to generate a lethal protective cocktail that preserves sterility.

  18. Bacteriophage cocktail reduces Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis counts in raw and smoked salmon tissues.

    PubMed

    Galarce, Nicolas E; Bravo, Jonathan L; Robeson, James P; Borie, Consuelo F

    2014-01-01

    The use of bacteriophages for the biocontrol of food-borne pathogens is increasingly gaining acceptance. In this study, the effectiveness of bacteriophages to reduce Salmonella Enteritidis counts was evaluated in raw and smoked salmon tissues. Groups of 25 samples each were contaminated with S. Enteritidis, treated with a phage mix and then incubated for ten days at 18 °C and 4 °C. A significant bacterial reduction was obtained on days 3, 6 and 10 in raw salmon samples incubated at 18 °C (from 0.75 to 3.19 log10 CFU/g) and at 4 °C (from 2.82 to 3.12 log10 CFU/g), whereas in smoked salmon lower reductions were achieved (from 1.02 to 1.96 log10 CFU/g at 18 °C and from 0.50 to 1.16 log10 CFU/g at 4 °C). These results show the potential effectiveness of this bacteriophage cocktail as a biocontrol agent against S. Enteritidis in raw and smoked salmon tissues. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Adhesion and growth inhibitory effect of chicken egg yolk antibody (IgY) on Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chalghoumi, Raja; Théwis, André; Beckers, Yves; Marcq, Christopher; Portetelle, Daniel; Schneider, Yves-Jacques

    2009-06-01

    The protective effects of powder preparation of egg yolk immunoglobulin Y (IgY), specific to Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium outer membrane proteins (OMP), against these two Salmonella sp. serovars were investigated in vitro in two different assays: adhesion-prevention and growth-inhibition. The adhesion-prevention assay was conducted using polarized monolayers of the human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cell line. First, the conditions of Salmonella adherence to Caco-2 cells were optimized, and interferences of bacteria with the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of fully differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers and the lactate dehydrogenase release upon exposure of the cells to Salmonella were evaluated. Both Salmonella sp. serovars were able to adhere to Caco-2 cells and decreased TER. Results from the adhesion-prevention assay demonstrated that specific IgY reduced the decrease in TER of the infected Caco-2 cell monolayers and blocked the Salmonella sp. adhesion in a concentration-dependent manner (p < 0.05). Nonspecific IgY also exhibited an inhibitory effect on these two parameters, but to a lesser extent than that of the specific IgY (p < 0.05). The protective effect of nonspecific IgY could be attributed to the low-density lipoprotein component of the water-soluble fraction of egg yolks that may not have been eliminated during ultrafiltration. The growth-inhibition assay revealed that specific IgY had an inhibitory effect on the bacterial growth, markedly during the late exponential phase, whereas nonspecific IgY failed to do so. Taken together, these results suggest that the in vitro growth inhibitory effect of specific IgY on Salmonella spp. resulted from the specific binding activity of these IgY to Salmonella sp. OMP. Passive immunization with Salmonella sp. OMP-specific IgY could thus be useful to prevent Salmonella colonization in broiler chickens and the subsequent carcass contamination during processing.

  20. Adhesion of Salmonella Enteritidis and Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel welds.

    PubMed

    Casarin, Letícia Sopeña; Brandelli, Adriano; de Oliveira Casarin, Fabrício; Soave, Paulo Azevedo; Wanke, Cesar Henrique; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar

    2014-11-17

    Pathogenic microorganisms are able to adhere on equipment surfaces, being possible to contaminate food during processing. Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes are important pathogens that can be transmitted by food, causing severe foodborne diseases. Most surfaces of food processing industry are made of stainless steel joined by welds. However currently, there are few studies evaluating the influence of welds in the microorganism's adhesion. Therefore the purpose of the present study was to investigate the adhesion of Salmonella Enteritidis and L. monocytogenes on surface of metal inert gas (MIG), and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, as well as to evaluate the cell and surface hydrophobicities. Results demonstrated that both bacteria adhered to the surface of welds and stainless steel at same levels. Despite this, bacteria and surfaces demonstrated different levels of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, results indicated that there was no correlation between adhesion to welds and stainless steel and the hydrophobicity.

  1. Anti-infective mechanisms induced by a probiotic Lactobacillus strain against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    de LeBlanc, Alejandra de Moreno; Castillo, Natalia A; Perdigon, Gabriela

    2010-04-15

    The prevention of pathogen infections is one of the most extensively studied effects of probiotics. L. casei CRL 431 is a probiotic bacterium and its effects on the gut immune cells have been extensively studied. The aim of the present study was to determine, using a mouse model, the preventive and therapeutic effect of L. casei CRL 431 to achieve protection against Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium infection. In both previous and continuous (previous and post-infection) probiotic administration, the mechanisms induced by this lactic acid bacteria on the first line of intestinal defense (non-specific barrier and the innate immune cells associated to the gut), as a way to understand some of the mechanisms involved in the protection against Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium, were analyzed. The results obtained demonstrated that 7 days L. casei CRL 431 administration before infection decreased the severity of the infection with Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium, demonstrating that the continuous administration (even after infection) had the best effect. This continuous administration diminished the counts of the pathogen in the intestine as well as its spread outside this organ. Several mechanisms and cells are involved in this protective effect against Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium. L. casei CRL 431 acted on cells of the innate and adaptive immune response. The probiotic administration decreased the neutrophil infiltration with the consequent diminution of intestinal inflammation; activated the macrophage phagocytic activity in different sites such as Peyer's patches, spleen and peritoneum; and increased the number of IgA+cells in the lamina propria of the small intestine which was correlated with increased release of s-IgA specific against the pathogen in the intestinal fluids. The mechanism of the inhibition of cellular apoptosis was not involved.

  2. Growth of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella Enteritidis during Preparation and Storage of Yogurt

    PubMed Central

    Cirone, K.; Huberman, Y.; Morsella, C.; Méndez, L.; Jorge, M.; Paolicchi, F.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the viability of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), Escherichia coli (E. coli), and Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) during preparation and refrigerated storage of yogurt. Three yogurts were prepared using pasteurized commercial milk. Each yogurt was artificially contaminated with (1) MAP, (2) E. coli + S. Enteritidis, and (3) MAP + E. coli + S. Enteritidis. Samples were taken during and after the fermentation process until day 20 after inoculation. MAP was not detected during their preparation and short-term storage but was recuperated after starting at 180 min after inoculation storage. Live bacterial counts of E. coli, and S. Enteritidis increased during the first 24 hours, followed by a slight decrease towards the end of the study. In this study it was shown how MAP, E. coli, and S. Enteritidis resisted the acidic conditions generated during the preparation of yogurt and low storage temperatures. This work contributes to current knowledge regarding survival of MAP, E. coli, and S. Enteritidis during preparation and refrigerated storage of yogurt and emphasizes the need to improve hygiene measures to ensure the absence of these pathogenic microorganisms in dairy products. PMID:24455399

  3. Acyl homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing stimulates biofilm formation by Salmonella Enteritidis in anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Felipe Alves de; Pimentel-Filho, Natan de Jesus; Pinto, Uelinton Manoel; Mantovani, Hilário Cuquetto; Oliveira, Leandro Licursi de; Vanetti, Maria Cristina Dantas

    2017-04-01

    Quorum sensing regulates a variety of phenotypes in bacteria including the production of virulence factors. Salmonella spp. have quorum sensing systems mediated by three autoinducers (AI-1, AI-2, and AI-3). The AI-1-mediated system is incomplete in that the bacterium relies on the synthesis of signaling molecules by other microorganisms. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of the AI-1 N-dodecanoyl-DL-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL) on the growth, motility, adhesion, and biofilm formation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis PT4 578 on a polystyrene surface. Experiments were conducted at 37 °C in anaerobic tryptone soy broth supplemented with C12-HSL and/or a mixture of four synthetic furanones, at the concentration of 50 nM each. The planktonic growth, adhesion, swarming, and twitching motility were not altered in the presence of C12-HSL and/or furanones under anaerobic conditions. However, C12-HSL induced biofilm formation after 36 h of cultivation as determined by quantification of biofilm formation, by enumeration of adhered cells to polystyrene coupons, and finally by imaging the presence of multilayered cells on an epifluorescence microscope. When furanones were present in the medium, an antagonistic effect against C12-HSL on the biofilm development was observed. The results demonstrate an induction of biofilm formation in Salmonella Enteritidis by AI-1 under anaerobic conditions. Considering that Salmonella does not produce AI-1 but respond to it, C12-HSL synthesized by other bacterial species could trigger biofilm formation by this pathogen in conditions that are relevant for its pathogenesis.

  4. Identification by PCR of Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica Serovars Associated with Invasive Infections among Febrile Patients in Mali

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Sharon M.; Diallo, Souleymane; Levy, Haim; Livio, Sofie; Sow, Samba O.; Tapia, Milagritos; Fields, Patricia I.; Mikoleit, Matthew; Tamboura, Boubou; Kotloff, Karen L.; Nataro, James P.; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2010-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa, non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) are emerging as a prominent cause of invasive disease (bacteremia and focal infections such as meningitis) in infants and young children. Importantly, including data from Mali, three serovars, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin, account for the majority of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from these patients. Methods We have extended a previously developed series of polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) based on O serogrouping and H typing to identify Salmonella Typhimurium and variants (mostly I 4,[5],12:i:-), Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin. We also designed primers to detect Salmonella Stanleyville, a serovar found in West Africa. Another PCR was used to differentiate diphasic Salmonella Typhimurium and monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium from other O serogroup B, H:i serovars. We used these PCRs to blind-test 327 Salmonella serogroup B and D isolates that were obtained from the blood cultures of febrile patients in Bamako, Mali. Principal Findings We have shown that when used in conjunction with our previously described O-serogrouping PCR, our PCRs are 100% sensitive and specific in identifying Salmonella Typhimurium and variants, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Dublin and Salmonella Stanleyville. When we attempted to differentiate 171 Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[ 5],12:i:1,2) strains from 52 monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[5],12:i:-) strains, we were able to correctly identify 170 of the Salmonella Typhimurium and 51 of the Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- strains. Conclusion We have described a simple yet effective PCR method to support surveillance of the incidence of invasive disease caused by NTS in developing countries. PMID:20231882

  5. Clinical and veterinary isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis defective in lipopolysaccharide O-chain polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Guard-Petter, J.; Parker, C.T.; Asokan, K.; Carlson, R.W.

    1999-05-01

    Twelve human and chicken isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis belonging to phage types 4, 8, 13a, and 23 were characterized for variability in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) composition. Isolates were differentiated into two groups, i.e., those that lacked immunoreactive O-chain, termed rough isolates, and those that had immunoreactive O-chain, termed smooth isolates. Isolates within these groups could be further differentiated by LPS compositional differences as detected by gel electrophoresis and gas liquid chromatography of samples extracted with water, which yielded significantly more LPS in comparison to phenol-chloroform extraction. The rough isolates were of two types, the O-antigen synthesis mutants and the O-antigen polymerization (wzy) mutants. Smooth isolates were also of two types, one producing low-molecular-weight (LMW) LPS and the other producing high-molecular-weight (HMW) LPS. To determine the genetic basis for the O-chain variability of the smooth isolates, the authors analyzed the effects of a null mutation in the O-chain length determinant gene, wzz (cld) of serovar Typhimurium. This mutation results in a loss of HMW LPS; however, the LMW LPS of this mutant was longer and more glucosylated than that from clinical isolates of serovar Enteritidis. Cluster analysis of these data and of those from two previously characterized isogenic strains of serovar Enteritidis that had different virulence attributes indicated that glucosylation of HMW LPS (via oafR function) is variable and results in two types of HMW structures, one that is highly glucosylated and one that is minimally glucosylated. These results strongly indicate that naturally occurring variability in wzy, wzz, and oafR function can be used to subtype isolates of serovar Enteritidis during epidemiological investigations.

  6. Phylogenetic structure of European Salmonella Enteritidis outbreak correlates with national and international egg distribution network

    PubMed Central

    Inns, Thomas; Jombart, Thibaut; Ashton, Philip; Loman, Nicolas; Chatt, Carol; Messelhaeusser, Ute; Rabsch, Wolfgang; Simon, Sandra; Nikisins, Sergejs; Bernard, Helen; le Hello, Simon; Jourdan da-Silva, Nathalie; Kornschober, Christian; Mossong, Joel; Hawkey, Peter; de Pinna, Elizabeth; Grant, Kathie; Cleary, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Outbreaks of Salmonella Enteritidis have long been associated with contaminated poultry and eggs. In the summer of 2014 a large multi-national outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 14b occurred with over 350 cases reported in the United Kingdom, Germany, Austria, France and Luxembourg. Egg supply network investigation and microbiological sampling identified the source to be a Bavarian egg producer. As part of the international investigation into the outbreak, over 400 isolates were sequenced including isolates from cases, implicated UK premises and eggs from the suspected source producer. We were able to show a clear statistical correlation between the topology of the UK egg distribution network and the phylogenetic network of outbreak isolates. This correlation can most plausibly be explained by different parts of the egg distribution network being supplied by eggs solely from independent premises of the Bavarian egg producer (Company X). Microbiological sampling from the source premises, traceback information and information on the interventions carried out at the egg production premises all supported this conclusion. The level of insight into the outbreak epidemiology provided by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) would not have been possible using traditional microbial typing methods. PMID:28348865

  7. Thermal inactivation of Salmonella enteritidis PT 30 in almond kernels as influenced by water activity.

    PubMed

    Villa-Rojas, Rossana; Tang, Juming; Wang, Shaojin; Gao, Mengxiang; Kang, Dong-Hyun; Mah, Jae-Hyung; Gray, Peter; Sosa-Morales, Maria Elena; López-Malo, Aurelio

    2013-01-01

    Salmonellosis outbreaks related to consumption of raw almonds have encouraged the scientific community to study the inactivation kinetics of pathogens in this dry commodity. However, the low moisture content of the product presents a challenge for thermal control, because the time required to achieve the desired thermal inactivation of microorganisms increases sharply with reduced moisture content and water activity. In this study, we explored and modeled the heat inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis PT 30 in almond cultivar 'Nonpareil' kernel flour at four water activity (a(w)) values (0.601, 0.720, 0.888, and 0.946) using four temperatures for each a(w). The results showed that the inactivation was well fitted by both Weibull distribution (R(2) = 0.93 to 1.00) and first-order kinetics (R(2) = 0.82 to 0.96). At higher a(w) values, the rate of inactivation increased and less time was needed to achieve the required population reduction. These results suggest that, to avoid deterioration of product quality, shorter process times at lower temperatures may be used to achieve desired inactivation levels of Salmonella Enteritidis PT 30 by simply increasing the moisture content of almonds. These goals could be achieved with the use of existing procedures already practiced by the food industry, such as washing or prewetting scalding before heat inactivation.

  8. Physiology, pathogenicity and immunogenicity of live, attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis mutants in chicks.

    PubMed

    Si, Wei; Wang, Xiumei; Liu, Huifang; Yu, Shenye; Li, Zhaoli; Chen, Liping; Zhang, Wanjiang; Liu, Siguo

    2015-01-01

    To construct a novel live, attenuated Salmonella vaccine, the lon, cpxR and cpdB genes were deleted from a wild-type Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis-6 (SM-6) strain using the phage λ Red homologous recombination system, resulting in SM-△CpxR, SM-△C/Lon and SM-△C/L/CpdB. The growth curves of strain SM-△C/Lon grew more rapidly than the other strains and had OD 600 values higher than the other strains starting at the 4 h time point. The growth curves of strain SM-△C/L/CpdB were relatively flat. The colonization time of SM-△C/L/CpdB is about 8-10 days. Deleting the lon/cpxR/cpdB (SM-6) genes resulted in an approximate 10(3)-fold attenuation in virulence assessed by the analysis of the LD50 of specific pathogen-free (SPF) chicks. This result indicated that the deletion of the lon, cpxR and cpdB genes induced significant virulence attenuation. The protective effects of SM-△C/L/CpdB vaccination in SPF chicks against 5 × 10(9) colony forming units (CFU) of S. Enteritidis were resulted from the induction of an effective immune response. These findings demonstrate the potential of mutant SM-△C/L/CpdB to be used as an effective vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Phylogenetic structure of European Salmonella Enteritidis outbreak correlates with national and international egg distribution network.

    PubMed

    Dallman, Tim; Inns, Thomas; Jombart, Thibaut; Ashton, Philip; Loman, Nicolas; Chatt, Carol; Messelhaeusser, Ute; Rabsch, Wolfgang; Simon, Sandra; Nikisins, Sergejs; Bernard, Helen; le Hello, Simon; Jourdan da-Silva, Nathalie; Kornschober, Christian; Mossong, Joel; Hawkey, Peter; de Pinna, Elizabeth; Grant, Kathie; Cleary, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Outbreaks of Salmonella Enteritidis have long been associated with contaminated poultry and eggs. In the summer of 2014 a large multi-national outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 14b occurred with over 350 cases reported in the United Kingdom, Germany, Austria, France and Luxembourg. Egg supply network investigation and microbiological sampling identified the source to be a Bavarian egg producer. As part of the international investigation into the outbreak, over 400 isolates were sequenced including isolates from cases, implicated UK premises and eggs from the suspected source producer. We were able to show a clear statistical correlation between the topology of the UK egg distribution network and the phylogenetic network of outbreak isolates. This correlation can most plausibly be explained by different parts of the egg distribution network being supplied by eggs solely from independent premises of the Bavarian egg producer (Company X). Microbiological sampling from the source premises, traceback information and information on the interventions carried out at the egg production premises all supported this conclusion. The level of insight into the outbreak epidemiology provided by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) would not have been possible using traditional microbial typing methods.

  10. Gene expression profiling in chicken heterophils with Salmonella enteritidis stimulation using a chicken 44 K Agilent microarray

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) is one of the most common food-borne pathogens that cause human salmonellosis and usually results from the consumption of contaminated poultry products. The mechanism of SE resistance in chickens remains largely unknown. Previously, heterophils isolated...

  11. Antimicrobial Efficacy of Zinc Oxide Quantum Dots Against Listeria Monocytogenes, Salmonella Enteritidis and Escherichia coli O157:H7

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Zinc oxide quantum dots (ZnO QDs) in a powder form, a ZnO-polystyrene (PS) film form and a polyvinylprolidone capped ZnO (ZnO-PVP) gel form were prepared and their antibacterial activities against foodborne pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Enteritidis and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in cul...

  12. Direct construction of predictive models for describing growth Salmonella enteritidis in liquid eggs – a one-step approach

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to develop a new approach using a one-step approach to directly construct predictive models for describing the growth of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in liquid egg white (LEW) and egg yolk (LEY). A five-strain cocktail of SE, induced to resist rifampicin at 100 mg/L, ...

  13. Recovery of salmonella serovar enteritidis from inoculated broiler hatching eggs using shell rinse and shell crush sampling methods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study compared the recovery of Salmonella from hatching eggs using three sampling methods (eggshell rinsing, eggshell crush following a previous rinse, and eggshell crush without previous rinse). Eggshells were drop-inoculated with approximately 10, 100, or 1,000 cfu/eggshell of S. Enteritidis...

  14. Dimethyl adenosine transferase (KsgA) deficiency in Salmonella Enteritidis confers susceptibility to high osmolarity and virulence attenuation in chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    : Dimethyladenosine transferase (KsgA) performs diverse roles in bacteria including ribosomal maturation, DNA mismatch repair, and synthesis of KsgA is responsive to antibiotics and cold temperature. We previously showed that ksgA mutation in Salmonella Enteritidis results in impaired invasiveness i...

  15. Continuing multiplication of Salmonella Enteritidis strains in egg yolk during refrigeration at 7.2° C

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The continuing attribution of human illness caused by Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) to the consumption of contaminated eggs has led to widespread implementation of risk reduction programs for commercial egg production. Prompt refrigeration of eggs to prevent bacterial multiplication to dangerously hig...

  16. Multiplication of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg yolks after inoculation outside, on, and inside vitelline membranes and storage at different temperatures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prompt refrigeration to restrict bacterial growth is important for reducing egg-borne transmission of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE). The nutrient-rich yolk interior is a relatively infrequent location for initial SE deposition in eggs, but migration across the vitelline membrane can ...

  17. CELLULAR ASSESSMENT OF CROP LYMPHOID TISSUE FROM SPECIFIC-PATHOGEN-FREE WHITE LEGHORN CHICKENS AFTER SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS CHALLENGE

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The crop may be an important site along the upper alimentary tract where a humoral immune response against SE may perhaps be elicited locally. The mucosal immune response within the crop (ingluvies) of specific-pathogen-free (SPF) White Leghorn (WL) chickens against Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) was ...

  18. Whole-Genome Sequence and Annotation of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Enteritidis Phage Type 8 Strain EN1660

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Benjamin J.; Fitzgerald, Stephen F.; Kröger, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genome of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 8 strain EN1660, isolated from an outbreak in Thunder Bay, Canada, was sequenced to 46-fold coverage using an Illumina MiSeq with 300-bp paired-end sequencing chemistry to produce 28 contigs with an N50 value of 490,721 bp. PMID:28126943

  19. Isolation of Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 30 from a single almond orchard over a 5-year period.

    PubMed

    Uesugi, Aaron R; Danyluk, Michelle D; Mandrell, Robert E; Harris, Linda J

    2007-08-01

    In 2001, Salmonella Enteritidis phage type (PT) 30 was isolated from drag swabs of 17 61-ha almond orchards on three farms linked to an outbreak of salmonellosis associated with consumption of raw almonds. The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term persistence of Salmonella Enteritidis PT 30 in one of the almond orchards associated with the outbreak. Swabs (gauze saturated with full-strength sterile evaporated skim milk and attached to string) were pulled along the orchard floor in a standardized manner for 55 m. At each sample time, two pooled samples (four swabs each) were collected from each orchard quadrant. Swabs were enriched for Salmonella using a delayed secondary enrichment procedure developed for isolation of Salmonella from poultry houses. Suspect Salmonella isolates were selected, confirmed, serotyped, and phage typed, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns were determined after cleavage with XbaI and BlnI. Salmonella was recovered infrequently from pooled samples collected from January through July (3 of 56 samples, 5.3%). In general, Salmonella isolation frequency per sample time increased during and immediately after the harvest, when large amounts of dust were generated in or near the orchard: August, 4 (20%) of 20 samples; September, 13 (20%) of 64 samples; October, 27 (42%) of 64 samples; November, 4 (25%) of 16 samples; and December, 2 (25%) of 8 samples. All 53 Salmonella isolates during the 5 years were identified as Salmonella Enteritidis PT 30, and two PFGE patterns that differed by the presence of an approximately 40-kb fragment were identified. These data demonstrate the potential for long-term environmental persistence of Salmonella in almond orchards.

  20. Preparation and evaluation of Salmonella Enteritidis antigen conjugated with nanogold for screening of poultry flocks.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hazem Mohammed; Sayed, Rafik Hamed; Abdel-Aziz, Wafaa Ragab; Soliman, Rafik Tawfik

    2017-08-01

    The present work aimed to develop lateral flow immunochromatographic strip (ICS) test for detection of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) specific antibodies in chicken sera. A rapid lateral flow immunochromatographic test (LFIT) has been developed, in which SE Group D antigen labeled with the gold chloride molecules laid on the conjugate pad. Staphylococcus aureus protein A was used as capture antibody at the test line (T) of a nitrocellulose (NC) membrane and anti-SE antigen-specific rabbit antibodies were used as capture antibody at the control line (C) of the NC strip in the lateral flow layout device. Using the developed LFIT, the minimal amount of SE-specific antibodies that can be detected in chicken serum sample was 1427 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) unit/100 µl that was equal to 0.1 µg (Ab)/100 µl sample. 100 suspected serum samples collected from a poultry flock were tested with the prepared SE-LFIT kits and the locally prepared stained Salmonella antigen, and the results were compared with those obtained from examination of these samples with Salmonella Group D antibody ELISA kit as the gold standard test. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the prepared SE-LFIT antigen kits were 94.4%, 90%, and 94%, respectively, while those obtained with stained Salmonella antigen were 88.8%, 90%, and 89%, respectively. The developed test is a simple field rapid test of high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy that can improve and facilitates rapid field surveillance of salmonellosis among chickens.

  1. Studies on the effects of phosphine on Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in culture medium and in black pepper (Piper nigrum).

    PubMed

    Castro, M F P M; Rezende, A C B; Benato, E A; Valentini, S R T; Furlani, R P Z; Tfouni, S A V

    2011-04-01

    The effect of phosphine on Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis inoculated in culture medium and in black pepper grains (Piper nigrum), as well as on the reduction of the microbial load of the dried and moisturized product, was verified. The postfumigation effect was verified in inoculated samples with 0.92 and 0.97 water activity (a(w)) exposed to 6 g/m(3) phosphine for 72 h, dried to 0.67 a(w), and stored for 24, 48, and 72 h. No decreases were observed in Salmonella Enteritidis populations in culture medium when fumigant concentrations up to 6 g/m(3) were applied for 48 h at 35°C. However, the colonies showed reductions in size and atypical coloration as the phosphine concentration increased. No reduction in Salmonella counts occurred on the inoculated dried samples after fumigation. On the other hand, when phosphine at concentrations of 6 g/m(3) was applied on moisturized black pepper for 72 h, decreases in Salmonella counts of around 80% were observed. The counts of total aerobic mesophilic bacterium populations of the dried and moisturized black pepper were not affected by the fumigant treatment. The results of the postfumigation studies indicated that Salmonella Enteritidis was absent in the fumigated grains after drying and storage for 72 h, indicating a promising application for this technique. It was concluded that for Salmonella Enteritidis control, phosphine fumigation could be applied to black pepper grains before drying and the producers should rigidly follow good agricultural practices, mainly during the drying process, in order to avoid product recontamination. Additional work is needed to confirm the findings with more Salmonella serotypes and strains.

  2. The epidemiology of travel-related Salmonella Enteritidis in Ontario, Canada, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Tighe, Mary-Kathryn; Savage, Rachel; Vrbova, Linda; Toolan, Miriam; Whitfield, Yvonne; Varga, Csaba; Lee, Brenda; Allen, Vanessa; Maki, Anne; Walton, Ryan; Johnson, Caitlin; Dhar, Badal; Ahmed, Rafiq; Crowcroft, Natasha S; Middleton, Dean

    2012-05-18

    Increases in the number of salmonellosis cases due to Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in 2010 and 2011 prompted a public health investigation in Ontario, Canada. In this report, we describe the current epidemiology of travel-related (TR) SE, compare demographics, symptoms and phage types (PTs) of TR and domestically-acquired (DA) cases, and estimate the odds of acquiring SE by region of the world visited. All incident cases of culture confirmed SE in Ontario obtained from isolates and specimens submitted to public health laboratories were included in this study. Demographic and illness characteristics of TR and DA cases were compared. A national travel survey was used to provide estimates for the number of travellers to various destinations to approximate rates of SE in travellers. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate the odds of acquiring SE when travelling to various world regions. Overall, 51.9% of SE cases were TR during the study period. This ranged from 35.7% TR cases in the summer travel period to 65.1% TR cases in the winter travel period. Compared to DA cases, TR cases were older and were less likely to seek hospital care. For Ontario travellers, the adjusted odds of acquiring SE was the highest for the Caribbean (OR 37.29, 95% CI 17.87-77.82) when compared to Europe. Certain PTs were more commonly associated with travel (e.g., 1, 4, 5b, 7a, Atypical) than with domestic infection. Of the TR cases, 88.9% were associated with travel to the Caribbean and Mexico region, of whom 90.1% reported staying on a resort. Within this region, there were distinct associations between PTs and countries. There is a large burden of TR illness from SE in Ontario. Accurate classification of cases by travel history is important to better understand the source of infections. The findings emphasize the need to make travellers, especially to the Caribbean, and health professionals who provide advice to travellers, aware of this risk. The findings may be generalized

  3. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Contaminated eggs produced by infected commercial laying flocks are often implicated as sources of human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis, but Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium have also been associated with egg-transmitted illness. Contamination of the edible contents of eggs is ...

  4. [sRNA (sraB) regulate the resistant ability of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis to egg albumen].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huiyuan; Cao, Minhui; Cao, Xuesong; Gu, Hongwei; Zeng, Ke

    2010-11-01

    Salmonella species are important food-borne pathogens of human and animal. S. enterica serovar Enteritidis is the only serovar that routinely causes human infection through intact egg, the molecular basis of its ability to survive in egg is poorly understood. The importance of post-transcriptional regulation by small non-coding RNAs (sRNA) has recently been recognized. The sRNAs play diverse physiological roles in stress responses, regulation of metabolism, control of bacterial envelope composition and bacterial virulence. In this study, we studied regulatory function of salmonella sRNA sraB associated with survival ability of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis in egg albumen. To study the contribution of sraB to the survival ability of S. Enteritidis in egg albumen, we constructed sraB deletion strain (SE2472 delta sraB) with wild type S. Enteritidis SE2472, using red recombination system. For complementation of sraB, complete fragment sraB was amplified from SE2472 and inserted into plasmid pHDB3 to overexpress sraB. We carried out the egg albumen bactericidal experiment with strains of SE2472, SE2472 delta sraB (sraB deletion), SE2472 delta sraB-comp (sraB complement) and control. To explore the regulatory role of sraB, we assayed the bactericidal activity of the two important antimicrobial components of egg albumen: lysozyme and transferrin. In the egg albumen bactericidal experiment, the survival rate of SE2472 delta sraB was only about 61%-70% of that of SE2472; while SE2472 delta sraB-comp improve the survival rate of SE2472 delta sraB by 10%-33% . In the transferrin bactericidal experiment, the survival rate of SE2472 delta sraB was 38% of that of SE2472 at 8 h incubation, and 23% at 24 h incubation. SE2472 delta sraB-comp played an important role in improving the survival rate rescued the defect by 14% than SE2472 delta sraB at 8 h of incubation, but failed to rescue the defect at 24 h incubation. In the Lysozyme experiment, the survival rate of SE2472 delta

  5. IncI1 Plasmids Carrying Various blaCTX-M Genes Contribute to Ceftriaxone Resistance in Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis in China.

    PubMed

    Wong, Marcus Ho-yin; Kan, Biao; Chan, Edward Wai-chi; Yan, Meiying; Chen, Sheng

    2016-02-01

    Resistance to extended-spectrum β-lactams in Salmonella, in particular, in serotypes such as Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis that are frequently associated with clinical infections, is a serious public health concern. In this study, phenotypic characterization of 433 clinical S. Enteritidis strains obtained from a nationwide collection of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention during the period from 2005 to 2010 depicted a trend of increasing resistance to ceftriaxone from 2008 onwards. Seventeen (4%) of the strains were found to be resistant to ceftriaxone, 7% were found to be resistant to ciprofloxacin, and 0.7% were found to be resistant to both ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone. Most of the ceftriaxone-resistant S. Enteritidis strains (15/17) were genetically unrelated and originated from Henan Province. The complete sequence of an IncI1 plasmid, pSE115, which belonged to a novel sequence type, was obtained. This 87,255-bp IncI1 plasmid was found to harbor a blaCTX-M-14 gene in a novel multidrug resistance region (MRR) within the tra locus. Although the majority of strains were also found to contain conjugative IncI1 plasmids with a size similar to that of pSE115 (∼90 kb) and harbor a variety of blaCTX-M group 1 and group 9 elements, the novel MRR site at the tra locus in pSE115 was not detectable in the other IncI1 plasmids. The findings from this study show that cephalosporin resistance in S. Enteritidis strains collected in China was mainly due to the dissemination of IncI1 plasmids carrying blaCTX-M, resembling the situation in which IncI1 plasmids serve as major vectors of blaCTX-M variants in other members of the Enterobacteriaceae. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. IncI1 Plasmids Carrying Various blaCTX-M Genes Contribute to Ceftriaxone Resistance in Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis in China

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Biao; Chan, Edward Wai-chi

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to extended-spectrum β-lactams in Salmonella, in particular, in serotypes such as Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis that are frequently associated with clinical infections, is a serious public health concern. In this study, phenotypic characterization of 433 clinical S. Enteritidis strains obtained from a nationwide collection of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention during the period from 2005 to 2010 depicted a trend of increasing resistance to ceftriaxone from 2008 onwards. Seventeen (4%) of the strains were found to be resistant to ceftriaxone, 7% were found to be resistant to ciprofloxacin, and 0.7% were found to be resistant to both ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone. Most of the ceftriaxone-resistant S. Enteritidis strains (15/17) were genetically unrelated and originated from Henan Province. The complete sequence of an IncI1 plasmid, pSE115, which belonged to a novel sequence type, was obtained. This 87,255-bp IncI1 plasmid was found to harbor a blaCTX-M-14 gene in a novel multidrug resistance region (MRR) within the tra locus. Although the majority of strains were also found to contain conjugative IncI1 plasmids with a size similar to that of pSE115 (∼90 kb) and harbor a variety of blaCTX-M group 1 and group 9 elements, the novel MRR site at the tra locus in pSE115 was not detectable in the other IncI1 plasmids. The findings from this study show that cephalosporin resistance in S. Enteritidis strains collected in China was mainly due to the dissemination of IncI1 plasmids carrying blaCTX-M, resembling the situation in which IncI1 plasmids serve as major vectors of blaCTX-M variants in other members of the Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:26643327

  7. Colonisation of poultry by Salmonella Enteritidis S1400 is reduced by combined administration of Lactobacillus salivarius 59 and Enterococcus faecium PXN-33.

    PubMed

    Carter, Alun; Adams, Martin; La Ragione, Roberto M; Woodward, Martin J

    2017-02-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis remains a significant issue within the poultry industry and one potential solution is to use probiotic bacteria to prevent Salmonella colonisation through competitive exclusion (CE). We demonstrate that combined administration of Lactobacillus salivarius 59 and Enterococcus faecium PXN33 were effective competitive excluders of Salmonella Enteritidis S1400 in poultry. Two models were developed to evaluate the efficacy of probiotic where birds received Salmonella Enteritidis S1400 by a) oral gavage and b) sentinel bird to bird transmission. A statistically significant (p<0.001) 2 log reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis S1400 colonisation was observed in the ileum, caecum and colon at day 43 using combined administration of the two probiotic bacteria. However, no Salmonella Enteritidis S1400 colonisation reduction was observed when either probiotic was administered individually. In the sentinel bird model the combined probiotic administered at days 12 and 20 was more effective than one-off or double administrations at age 1 and 12days. In vitro cell free culture supernatant studies suggest the mechanism of Salmonella Enteritidis S1400 inhibition was due to a reduction in pH by the probiotic bacteria. Our current study provides further evidence that probiotics can significantly reduce pathogenic bacterial colonisation in poultry and that mixed preparation of probiotics provide superior performance when compared to individual bacterial preparations.

  8. Complete Genome and Plasmid Sequences of Three Canadian Strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Enteritidis Belonging to Phage Types 8, 13, and 13a

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Muhammad Attiq; Labbé, Geneviève; Ziebell, Kim; Nash, John H. E.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is a prominent cause of human salmonellosis frequently linked to poultry products. In Canada, S. Enteritidis phage types 8, 13, and 13a predominate among both clinical and poultry isolates. Here, we report the complete genome and plasmid sequences of poultry isolates of these three phage types. PMID:26404595

  9. Isolation, Characterization, and Bioinformatic Analyses of Lytic Salmonella Enteritidis Phages and Tests of Their Antibacterial Activity in Food.

    PubMed

    Han, Han; Wei, Xiaoting; Wei, Yi; Zhang, Xiufeng; Li, Xuemin; Jiang, Jinzhong; Wang, Ran

    2017-02-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis remains a major threat for food safety. To take efforts to develop phage-based biocontrol for S. Enteritidis contamination in food, in this study, the phages against S. Enteritidis were isolated from sewage samples, characterized by host range assays, DNA restriction enzyme pattern analyses, and transmission electron microscope observations, and tested for antibacterial activity in food; some potent phages were further characterized by bioinformatic analyses. Results showed that based on the plaque quality and host range, seven lytic phages targeting S. Enteritidis were selected, considered as seven distinct phages through DNA physical maps, and classified as Myoviridae or Siphoviridae family by morphologic observations; the combined use of such seven strain phages as a "food additive" could succeed in controlling the artificial S. Enteritidis contamination in the different physical forms of food at a range of temperatures; by bioinformatic analyses, both selected phage BPS11Q3 and BPS15Q2 seemed to be newfound obligate lytic phage strains with no indications for any potentially harmful genes in their genomes. In conclusion, our results showed a potential of isolated phages as food additives for controlling S. Enteritidis contamination in some salmonellosis outbreak-associated food vehicles, and there could be minimized potential risk associated with using BPS11Q3 and BPS15Q2 in food.

  10. Multi-locus sequence typing of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis strains in Japan between 1973 and 2004.

    PubMed

    Noda, Tamie; Murakami, Koichi; Asai, Tetsuo; Etoh, Yoshiki; Ishihara, Tomoe; Kuroki, Toshiro; Horikawa, Kazumi; Fujimoto, Shuji

    2011-06-15

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) was responsible for a worldwide pandemic during the 1980s and 1990s; however, changes in the dominant lineage before and after this event remain unknown. This study determined S. Enteritidis lineages before and after this pandemic event in Japan using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Thirty S. Enteritidis strains were collected in Japan between 1973 and 2004, consisting of 27 human strains from individual episodes, a bovine strain, a liquid egg strain and an eggshell strain. Strains showed nine phage types and 17 pulsed-field profiles with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. All strains had homologous type 11 sequences without any nucleotide differences in seven housekeeping genes. These MLST results suggest that S. Enteritidis with the diversities revealed by phage typing and pulsed-field profiling has a highly clonal population. Although type 11 S. Enteritidis may exhibit both pleiotropic surface structure and pulsed-field type variation, it is likely to be a stable lineage derived from an ancestor before the 1980s and/or 1990s pandemic in Japan.

  11. A case study on Salmonella enteritidis (SE) origin at three egg-laying farms and its control with an S. enteritidis bacterin.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Y; Leonard, J D; Kobatake, R; Awamura, N; Toyota, Y; Ohta, H; Otsuki, K; Inoue, T

    2000-01-01

    In the early 1990s, three egg-laying farms (farms S, T, and B) were thought to have the possibility of Salmonella enteritidis (SE) contamination because positive liquid egg samples originated from those farms. The present study was therefore conducted. The first clarification for SE contamination was the study on the origin of SE contamination including its vertical transmission. The results of SE contamination profiling with dust and manure, food materials, dead embryos, and residual yolks on hatch day in regular monitoring over a few years were clearly negative. Therefore, we concluded the SE transmission/infection was attributed to horizontal infection in the egg-laying farms but not vertical transmission from parental stock, hatcheries, growth, or food materials during a 7-yr experimental period. Second, we attempted to clarify if administration of an SE bacterin (Layermune SE) to growth flocks for the egg-laying farms could reduce SE incidence in liquid egg samples from each egg-laying farm. In the first experiment, we compared SE incidence in liquid egg samples from vaccinated and nonvaccinated flocks (similar age flocks). SE incidence from vaccinated and nonvaccinated flocks showed negative and <2 most probable number (MPN)/100 ml for farm B, <2 and >1600 MPN/100 ml for farm S, and negative and >1600 MPN/100 ml for farm T, respectively. In the second experiment, we compared the SE isolation incidence in the liquid egg samples from nonvaccinated and newly replaced vaccinated flocks in the same chicken houses from each of the three egg-laying farms. SE incidence in the liquid egg samples was similar to that in the first experiment. Therefore, the SE bacterin may play an important role in reducing the SE incidence of liquid egg samples.

  12. Antibacterial effect of trans-cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, carvacrol, and thymol on Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni in chicken cecal contents in vitro

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni are two major food-borne pathogens that are transmitted through poultry products. These pathogens colonize the chicken cecum leading, to contamination of carcasses during slaughter and subsequent processing operations. We investigated the antimicrobial...

  13. Survival and growth of Salmonella Enteritidis in liquid egg products varying by temperature, product composition, and carbon dioxide concentration.

    PubMed

    Gurtler, Joshua B; Conner, Donald E

    2009-06-01

    Cryogenic cooling of shell eggs with carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is known to improve egg content quality through rapid cooling as well as by increasing internal CO(2) levels. A study was undertaken to determine the effects of variations in atmospheric CO(2) concentrations (aerobically stored, flushed with CO(2) and sealed, or bubbled with CO(2)) on the survival and growth of Salmonella Enteritidis in liquid egg products including whole egg, albumen, yolk, and albumen + 1% yolk. Egg products were inoculated with a three-strain composite of Salmonella Enteritidis at ca. 4 log colony-forming units (CFU)/mL and stored at 7 degrees C or 10 degrees C for 8 or 4 days, respectively, or at ca. 2 log CFU/mL and stored at 23 degrees C and 37 degrees C for 48 or 24 hours, respectively. Salmonella populations differed based on variations in liquid egg composition (p < 0.05). Manipulating the atmospheric concentrations of CO(2) in which liquid egg products were stored did not significantly inhibit the growth of Salmonella Enteritidis (p > 0.05) in yolk-containing egg products or affect the inhibitory activity of albumen-containing products. Populations of Salmonella were static at 7 degrees C over the entire storage period and significant growth occurred in whole egg and yolk stored at 10 degrees C. Populations in egg stored at 23 degrees C and 37 degrees C were greater in yolk than in whole egg, although whole egg had populations greater than in albumen or albumen +1% yolk (p < 0.05). Results of this investigation suggest that increasing atmospheric CO(2) to enhance egg quality should not promote the growth of Salmonella Enteritidis in eggs.

  14. Architectural adaptation and protein expression patterns of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis biofilms under laminar flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Mangalappalli-Illathu, Anil K; Lawrence, John R; Swerhone, George D W; Korber, Darren R

    2008-03-31

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a significant biofilm-forming pathogen. The influence of a 10-fold difference in nutrient laminar flow velocity on the dynamics of Salmonella Enteritidis biofilm formation and protein expression profiles were compared in order to ascertain how flow velocity influenced biofilm structure and function. Low-flow (0.007 cm s(-1)) biofilms consisted of diffusely-arranged microcolonies which grew until merging by approximately 72 h. High-flow (0.07 cm s(-1)) biofilms were significantly thicker (36+/-3 microm (arithmetic mean+/-standard error; n=225) versus 16+/-2 microm for low-flow biofilms at 120 h) and consisted of large bacterial mounds interspersed by water channels. Lectin-binding analysis of biofilm exopolymers revealed a significantly higher (P<0.05) proportion of N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) in low-flow biofilms (55.2%), relative to only 1.2% in high-flow biofilms. Alternatively, the proportions of alpha-L-fucose and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc2)-N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuNAc) polymer-conjugates were significantly higher (P<0.05) in high-flow biofilms (69.1% and 29.6%, respectively) than low-flow biofilms (33.1% and 11.7%, respectively). Despite an apparent flow rate-based physiologic effect on biofilm structure and exopolymer composition, no major shift in whole-cell protein expression patterns was seen between 168 h-old low-flow and high-flow biofilms, and notably did not include any response involving the stress response proteins, DnaK, SodB, and Tpx. Proteins involved in degradation and energy metabolism (PduA, GapA, GpmA, Pgk, and RpiA), RNA and protein biosynthesis (Tsf, TufA, and RpoZ), cell processes (Crr, MalE, and PtsH), and adaptation (GrcA), and some hypothetical proteins (YcbL and YnaF) became up-regulated in both biofilm systems relative to a 168 h-old planktonic cell control. Our results indicate that Salmonella Enteritidis biofilms altered their structure and extracellular glycoconjugate composition

  15. Salmonella enteritidis fimbriae displaying a heterologous epitope reveal a uniquely flexible structure and assembly mechanism.

    PubMed

    White, A P; Collinson, S K; Banser, P A; Dolhaine, D J; Kay, W W

    2000-02-18

    Two distinct Salmonella fimbrins, AgfA and SefA, comprising thin aggregative fimbriae SEF17 and SEF14, respectively, were each genetically engineered to carry PT3, an alpha-helical 16-amino acid Leishmania T-cell epitope derived from the metalloprotease gp63. To identify regions within AgfA and SefA fimbrins amenable to replacement with this epitope, PCR-generated chimeric fimbrin genes were constructed and used to replace the native chromosomal agfA and sefA genes in Salmonella enteritidis. Immunoblot analysis using anti-SEF17 and anti-PT3 sera demonstrated that all ten AgfA chimeric fimbrin proteins were expressed by S. enteritidis under normal growth conditions. Immunoelectron microscopy confirmed that eight of the AgfA::PT3 proteins were effectively assembled into cell surface-exposed fimbriae. The PT3 replacements in AgfA altered Congo red (CR) binding, cell-cell adhesion and cell surface properties of S. enteritidis to varying degrees. However, these chimeric fimbriae were still highly stable, being resistant to proteinase K digestion and requiring harsh formic acid treatment for depolymerization. In marked contrast to AgfA, none of the chimeric SefA proteins were expressed or assembled into fimbriae. Since each PT3 replacement constituted over 10% of the AgfA amino acid sequence and all ten replacements collectively represented greater than 75% of the entire AgfA primary sequence, the ability of AgfA to accept large sequence substitutions and still assemble into fibers is unique among fimbriae and other structural proteins. This structural flexibility may be related to the novel fivefold repeating sequence of AgfA and its recently proposed structure Proper formation of chimeric fimbrial fibers suggests an unusual assembly mechanism for thin aggregative fimbriae which tolerates aberrant structures. This study opens a range of possibilities for Salmonella thin aggregative fimbriae as a carrier of heterologous epitopes and as an experimental model for studies

  16. Monitoring of behavior using a video-recording system for recognition of Salmonella infection in experimentally infected growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S T; Mun, H-S; Yoe, H; Yang, C-J

    2015-01-01

    Behavior is one of the most commonly used indicators of illness; however, few studies have investigated how different common diseases affect animal behavior. This experiment was conducted to investigate behavioral and clinical alterations in growing pigs experimentally infected with Salmonella spp. during a 4-week post-infection period. A total of 48 growing pigs were divided into one of the three treatment groups (1) control, (2) infection with Salmonella Typhimurium or (3) infection with Salmonella Enteritidis. Individual pigs' behavior was recorded daily (0900 to 1100 and 1600 to 1800 h) using a video-recording system. Pigs in both infected groups had lower weight gain and feed intake during week 0 to 2 and 0 to 4 experimental period. Bacteriological data revealed that pigs in both infected groups persistently shed bacteria throughout the period of study. Oral infection of growing pigs with S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis significantly reduced the frequency of morning large (except week 1) and small movement throughout the study period. In the evening, significantly lowest frequency of movements were observed in the S. Enteritidis-infected group compared with the control. The standing and sitting frequency were significantly lower in both infected groups only at the morning of week 4. Infection with Salmonella spp. led to a significant reduction in the frequency and duration of morning eating and drinking throughout the experimental period, with the exception of 4th week drinking duration. The lowest frequency of evening eating during week 1 and 4 was recorded in both infected groups; whereas, the duration differed only at week 1. The evening drinking frequency only tended to decrease in response to S. Typhimurium infection at week 1. This study shows that, pigs infected with Salmonella spp. had poor performance, shedding high levels of Salmonella with their feces and reduced feeding and drinking activity, which are adaptive responses to infection and may help

  17. Multiplication and motility of Salmonella enterica serovars enteritidis, infantis, and montevideo in in vitro contamination models of eggs.

    PubMed

    Murase, Toshiyuki; Fujimoto, Kazuhiko; Nakayama, Rui; Otsuki, Koichi

    2006-05-01

    The invasive ability of Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Infantis, and Montevideo in eggs was examined. Strains of these serovars originating from egg contents, laying chicken houses, and human patients were experimentally inoculated (0.1-ml dose containing 78 to 178 cells) onto the vitelline membrane of eggs collected from specific-pathogen-free chickens and incubated at 25 degrees C. The test strains were detected in 25 of 138 yolk contents by day 6, indicating the penetration of Salmonella organisms through the vitelline membrane. There were no significant differences in overall rates of penetration between serovars. The organisms were also detected in the albumen from 125 of 138 eggs tested by day 6. Growth to more than 10(6) CFU/ml was observed in 48 of the 125 albumen samples. An inoculum of 1000 Salmonella cells was added to 15 ml of albumen at the edge of a petri plate. A 10-mm-diameter cylindrical well, the bottom of which was sealed with a polycarbonate membrane with 3.0-microm pores, was filled with egg yolk and placed into the albumen at the center of the dish, which was maintained at 25 degrees C. Experiments were performed in triplicate with each strain. Salmonella organisms in all the albumen samples were detected by day 11. However, motility of the organisms toward the yolk was observed in only two dishes inoculated with the Salmonella Enteritidis strain from a human patient and in one dish inoculated with the Salmonella Infantis strain from liquid egg. The albumen samples obtained from the dishes inoculated with the Salmonella Enteritidis strain had high numbers of bacteria (>10(8) CFU/ml). The present study suggests that Salmonella organisms in egg albumen are unlikely to actively move toward the yolk, although depositionon or near the vitelline membrane can be advantageous for proliferation.

  18. Transmission and shedding patterns of Salmonella in naturally infected captive wild roof rats (Rattus rattus) from a Salmonella-contaminated layer farm.

    PubMed

    Umali, Dennis V; Lapuz, Randy Rhon Simoun P; Suzuki, Terumasa; Shirota, Kazutoshi; Katoh, Hiromitsu

    2012-06-01

    Rodents play a major role in the transmission and maintenance of Salmonella contamination cycles in poultry facilities. However, very limited field data are available regarding the transmission routes, infection cycle, and shedding patterns of Salmonella by naturally infected wild rodents from commercial layer farms. In this study, a total of 128 resident wild roof rats (Rattus ratus) were captured from a Salmonella-contaminated layer facility. All roof rats were divided into 51 laboratory cages, and weekly monitoring of Salmonella fecal shedding patterns was conducted for 53 wk. Seven roof rats from cages that were observed to frequently shed Salmonella were isolated in individual cages, and daily Salmonella monitoring was performed for 35 days. At the end of monitoring, each roof rat was euthanatized, and isolation of Salmonella from different organs was performed. Results of weekly monitoring of Salmonella showed that 21 of 51 cages (41.2%) were positive for Salmonella Infantis, while two cages (3.92%) were positive for Salmonella Enteritidis. Moreover, 11 cages were positive for Salmonella for at least two sampling weeks. Isolation of Salmonella from fecal droppings was mainly observed during the first 12 wk of captivity. The longest interval between two Salmonella-positive fecal dropping was 24 wk. In the daily Salmonella monitoring, only Salmonella Infantis was isolated from fecal droppings, in which the highest number of Salmonella Infantis organisms per fecal dropping was at 1 x 10(8) colony-forming units (cfu), while the lowest measured quantity was 1 x 10(3) cfu. It was noted that the frequency of Salmonella shedding in fecal droppings appeared to have a linear correlation (r = 0.85) with the number of Salmonella organisms (cfu) per fecal pellet (P < 0.05). Moreover, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of Salmonella Infantis isolates revealed a single identical pulsed-field pattern. Salmonella Enteritidis isolates from fecal droppings and internal

  19. Transcriptomic Responses of Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium to Chlorine-Based Oxidative Stress▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Siyun; Phillippy, Adam M.; Deng, Kaiping; Rui, Xiaoqian; Li, Zengxin; Tortorello, Mary Lou; Zhang, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium are the leading causative agents of salmonellosis in the United States. S. Enteritidis is predominantly associated with contamination of shell eggs and egg products, whereas S. Typhimurium is frequently linked to tainted poultry meats, fresh produce, and recently, peanut-based products. Chlorine is an oxidative disinfectant commonly used in the food industry to sanitize the surfaces of foods and food processing facilities (e.g., shell eggs and poultry meats). However, chlorine disinfection is not always effective, as some S. enterica strains may resist and survive the disinfection process. To date, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of how S. enterica responds to chlorine-based oxidative stress. In this study, we designed a custom bigenome microarray that consists of 385,000 60-mer oligonucleotide probes and targets 4,793 unique gene features in the genomes of S. Enteritidis strain PT4 and S. Typhimurium strain LT2. We explored the transcriptomic responses of both strains to two different chlorine treatments (130 ppm of chlorine for 30 min and 390 ppm of chlorine for 10 min) in brain heart infusion broth. We identified 209 S. enterica core genes associated with Fe-S cluster assembly, cysteine biosynthesis, stress response, ribosome formation, biofilm formation, and energy metabolism that were differentially expressed (>1.5-fold; P < 0.05). In addition, we found that serovars Enteriditis and Typhimurium differed in the responses of 33 stress-related genes and 19 virulence-associated genes to the chlorine stress. Findings from this study suggest that the oxidative-stress response may render S. enterica resistant or susceptible to certain types of environmental stresses, which in turn promotes the development of more effective hurdle interventions to reduce the risk of S. enterica contamination in the food supply. PMID:20562293

  20. Effect of Salmonella infection on cecal tonsil regulatory T cell properties in chickens.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasundaram, Revathi; Kogut, Michael H; Arsenault, Ryan J; Swaggerty, Christina L; Cole, Kimberly; Reddish, John M; Selvaraj, Ramesh K

    2015-08-01

    Two studies were conducted to study regulatory T cell [Treg (CD4⁺CD25⁺)] properties during the establishment of a persistent intestinal infection in broiler chickens. Four-day-old broiler chicks were orally gavaged with 5 × 10⁶ CFU/mL Salmonella enteritidis (S. enteritidis) or sterile PBS (control). Samples were collected at 4, 7, 10, and 14 d postinfection. There was a significant (P < 0.05) increase in the number of CD4⁺CD25⁺ cells by d 4 postinfection that increased steadily throughout the course of the 14-d infection, whereas the number of CD4⁺CD25⁺ cells in the noninfected controls remained steady throughout the study. CD4⁺CD25⁺ cells from cecal tonsils of S. enteritidis-infected birds had a higher (P < 0.05) IL-10 mRNA content than CD4⁺CD25⁺ cells from the noninfected controls at all time-points studied. The amount of IL-2 mRNA content in the cecal tonsil CD4⁺CD25⁻ cells from the infected birds did not differ (P > 0.05) when compared to that of noninfected control birds. At a lower effector/responder cell ratio of 0.25:1, CD4⁺CD25⁺ cells from cecal tonsils of Salmonella-infected birds suppressed T cell proliferation at d 7 and 14 post-S. enteritidis infection, while CD4⁺CD25⁺ cells from noninfected control groups did not suppress T cell proliferation. In the second studu, 1-day-old chickens were orally gavaged with PBS (control) or 1.25 × 10⁸ CFU/bird S. enteritidis. At 7 and 21 d post-Salmonella infection, CD25⁺ cells collected from cecal tonsils of S. enteritidis-infected birds and restimulated in vitro with Salmonella antigen had higher (P < 0.05) IL-10 mRNA content compared to those in the control group. Spleen CD4⁺CD25⁺, CD4⁺, and CD8⁺ cell percentage did not differ (P > 0.05) between the Salmonella-infected and control birds. In conclusion, a persistent intestinal S. enteritidis infection increased the Treg percentage, suppressive properties, and IL-10 mRNA amounts in the cecal tonsils of broiler birds.

  1. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis on shell eggs by pulsed light technology.

    PubMed

    Hierro, Eva; Manzano, Susana; Ordóñez, Juan A; de la Hoz, Lorenzo; Fernández, Manuela

    2009-10-31

    This is a study on the efficacy of pulsed light (PL) technology for the inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis on shell eggs. In preliminary studies on noble agar, a PL treatment of 0.7 J/cm(2) gave an inactivation of 6.7 log CFU/cm(2). Photoreactivation of Salmonella (0.5-0.7 log CFU/cm(2)) was observed. Different results were obtained in eggs according to the state of the cuticle. When unwashed eggs were pulsed, 24 to 80% of the samples showed the maximum decontamination (3.6 log CFU/egg), depending on the fluence applied. This maximum was not obtained on washed eggs, in which the highest reduction was 1.8 log CFU/egg with a fluence of 12 J/cm(2). PL can be a useful method for egg processing since the integrity of the cuticle is preserved, and requires that the treatment should be applied as soon as possible after laying and on unwashed eggs. As Salmonella has shown the capability of photoreactivation, it is advisable to keep eggs protected from light once they have been pulsed.

  2. Factors affecting thermal resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis ODA 99-30581-13 in shell egg contents and use of heat-ozone combinations for egg pasteurization.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jennifer J; Yousef, Ahmed E

    2013-02-01

    Infection of laying hens with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis leads to deposition of the pathogen into the albumen or yolk of forming eggs. Heat treatment can inactivate internalized Salmonella Enteritidis in shell eggs, but factors such as the nature and location of contamination may influence the efficacy of thermal treatments. In the current research, natural contamination was mimicked by introducing small inocula of Salmonella Enteritidis into different locations of shell eggs and incubating inoculated eggs. These pathogen-containing eggs were heated at 57°C for 40 min, and temperature within eggs was monitored at the locations of inocula. Comparison of inactivation at equivalent internal temperatures revealed similar levels of lethality regardless of inoculum location. Refrigeration between incubation and heat treatment did not increase thermal resistance of cells in albumen but decreased cell inactivation in yolk. Sequential application of heat and gaseous ozone allows for the development of a process capable of decontaminating shell eggs with minimal thermal treatment and impact on egg quality. Inoculated eggs were subjected to (i) an immersion heating process similar to that used in commercial pasteurization or (ii) immersion heating, at reduced duration, followed by vacuum (50.8 kPa) and treatment with ozone gas (maximum 160 g/m(3)) under pressure (∼187.5 kPa). All treatments tested produced greater than 5-log inactivation, which is required for "pasteurization" processes. Differences were observed in the visual quality of eggs depending on treatment parameters. Application of ozone subsequent to heating allows for a significant reduction in heating time without decreasing process lethality.

  3. Susceptibility of suspended and surface-attached Salmonella enteritidis to biocides and elevated temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Dhir, V K; Dodd, C E

    1995-01-01

    The differential resistance of substratum-attached, detached, and planktonic cells of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 4 was studied by using several inimical processes and in vivo bioluminescence as a nondestructive, real-time reporter of metabolic activity. Bioluminescence in this strain was mediated by a construction containing the entire lux operon from Photorhabdus luminescens. An excellent correlation between bioluminescence and classical plate count data was obtained when we compared attachment profiles, biocide concentration exponents, and thermal inactivation D values (D value was the time required for a 10-fold reduction in the number of survivors). Biocide challenge of surface-adherent S. enteritidis resulted in concentration exponents that were experimentally indistinguishable from those obtained with Luria-Bertani broth-grown planktonic cells. It appears that cleansing regimes developed by using planktonic cell data are effective against surface-attached cells of this bacterium. Both attached and detached cells exhibited an approximately twofold increase in D values at 52 degrees C compared with values calculated for planktonic cells, strongly indicating that the detached cells exhibited an attached phenotype during the heating process. A model of a physiological adaptive response induced in attached cells and also reflected in detached cells is presented. PMID:7646010

  4. The fate of Salmonella enteritidis PT4 in home-made mayonnaise prepared with citric acid.

    PubMed

    Xiong, R; Xie, G; Edmondson, A S

    1999-01-01

    The fate of Salmonella enteritidis PT4 in home-made mayonnaise prepared with citric acid solution (citric acid concentration of > or = 4.98% (w/v)) was investigated. It was found that pH of mayonnaise is closely related to the ratio of egg yolk to citric acid, and the inactivation rate of the micro-organisms increases as the ratio decreases and/or incubation temperature increases. To achieve Salm. enteritidis PT4-free home-made mayonnaise prepared with pure lemon juice (citric acid concentration > or = 5% (w/v)), it is recommended that the pH should be 3.30 or below, or, in practice, at least 20 ml pure lemon juice per fresh egg yolk should be used. For the use of 20-35 ml pure lemon juice per egg yolk, the product should be held at 22 degrees C or over for at least 72 h and f