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Sample records for infections salmonella enteritidis

  1. Saccharomyces boulardii prevention of the hepatic injury induced by Salmonella Enteritidis infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Daichao; Teng, Da; Wang, Xiumin; Dai, Changsong; Wang, Jianhua

    2014-10-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) is the predominant cause of serovar-associated food-borne outbreaks in many countries and causes significant clinical symptoms of liver injury, enteritis, and diarrheal diseases. Saccharomyces boulardii is used in clinical application for prophylaxis and the treatment of a variety of diseases caused by bacterial infection. We used a mouse model of Salmonella Enteritidis infection, which included pretreatment with S. boulardii, to reveal the protection mechanisms of S. boulardii against Salmonella Enteritidis infection, including the translocation of Salmonella Enteritidis to the liver 10 days after Salmonella Enteritidis challenge, and the colonisation of Salmonella Enteritidis and the formation of hepatic tissue lesions in mice after Salmonella Enteritidis challenge on the 10th day. Compared with Salmonella Enteritidis infection in mice, S. boulardii decreased Salmonella Enteritidis translocation to the liver by 96%, and 99% of Salmonella Enteritidis colonised the cecum on the 10th day. Saccharomyces boulardii also abated hepatic tissue injury caused by the infiltration of neutrophilic granulocytes, lymphocytes, and plasmocytes by decreasing the translocation of Salmonella to the liver. These findings demonstrated that S. boulardii is an effective agent in the prevention of the hepatic injury induced by Salmonella Enteritidis infection in a mouse model.

  2. Salmonella Enteritidis Infections, United States, 1985–1999

    PubMed Central

    Adcock, Penny M.; Gomez, Thomas M.; Altekruse, Sean F.; Holland, Ben H.; Tauxe, Robert V.; Swerdlow, David L.

    2004-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis emerged as an important illness during the 1980s. Investigations showed that consumption of undercooked eggs was the major risk factor for disease, and a variety of prevention and control efforts were initiated during the 1990s. We describe sporadic infections and outbreaks of S. Enteritidis in the United States from 1985 through 1999 and discuss prevention and control efforts. After reaching a high of 3.9 per 100,000 population in 1995, S. Enteritidis infections declined to 1.98 per 100,000 in 1999. While the total number of outbreaks decreased by half, those in the western states tripled. Outbreaks of S. Enteritidis phage type 4 infections accounted for 49% of outbreaks in 1999. Outbreak-associated deaths in health facilities decreased from 14 in 1987 to 0 in 1999. Overall, rates of sporadic S. Enteritidis infection, outbreaks, and deaths have declined dramatically. For further reductions, control measures should continue to be applied along the entire farm-to-table continuum. PMID:15078589

  3. Serological detection of experimental Salmonella enteritidis infections in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Gast, R K; Beard, C W

    1990-01-01

    The antibody response of laying hens to experimental Salmonella enteritidis infection was evaluated in microagglutination, tube agglutination, and rapid whole-blood plate agglutination assays. Hens of three different ages were infected by either oral inoculation or horizontal contact transmission. Blood was collected at weekly intervals, and the presence of specific antibodies was assessed by reaction with antigens prepared from strains of S. enteritidis and S. pullorum. The sensitivity of detection of infected hens did not vary significantly between the assays, as all three tests effectively identified most exposed hens as seropositive. Within each test, however, variation was observed in the detection sensitivity when different antigens were used. The microagglutination titers of serum samples were determined by serial dilution. Antibody titers peaked at 1 to 2 weeks postinoculation and declined steadily, although most birds were still identified as seropositive at 10 weeks postinoculation. The mean microtest titers obtained with S. enteritidis antigens were higher than with an S. pullorum antigen, indicating greater test sensitivity. However, use of the S. pullorum antigen resulted in fewer false positives when sera from uninfected control hens were tested. The titers of contact-exposed hens peaked later and at lower values than did those of inoculated hens, but these two groups of hens had similar antibody titers after the third week postinoculation.

  4. Quinolone-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections associated with international travel.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Allison T; Vieira, Antonio R; Huang, Jennifer Y; Whichard, Jean; Cole, Dana; Karp, Beth E

    2014-11-01

    We found a strong association between nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections in the United States and recent international travel by linking Salmonella Enteritidis data from the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System and the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network.

  5. Salmonella enteritidis deposition in eggs after experimental infection of laying hens with different oral doses.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Guard, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The continuing attribution of human Salmonella Enteritidis infections to internally contaminated eggs has necessitated the commitment of substantial public and private resources to Salmonella Enteritidis testing and control programs in commercial laying flocks. Cost-effective risk-reduction requires a detailed and comprehensive understanding of how Salmonella Enteritidis infections in hens result in deposition of the pathogen inside eggs. The present study sought to resolve some incompletely defined aspects of the relationship between Salmonella Enteritidis oral-exposure dose levels in experimentally infected laying hens and the frequency and location of subsequent egg contamination. In two trials, groups of specific-pathogen-free hens were experimentally inoculated with oral doses of 10(4), 10(6), or 10(8) CFU of a phage type 4 Salmonella Enteritidis strain. Eggs were collected 5 to 23 days postinoculation, and the yolk and albumen of each egg were cultured separately to detect Salmonella Enteritidis contamination. Larger oral doses of Salmonella Enteritidis administered to hens were associated with significant increases in the frequencies of both yolk and albumen contamination. Moreover, Salmonella Enteritidis was found in the albumen of a far-higher proportion of contaminated eggs from hens given the largest dose than from the other two groups. Salmonella Enteritidis contamination was detected in 0.7% of yolk and 0.2% of albumen samples after inoculation of hens with 10(4) CFU, 4.0% of yolk and 1.7% of albumen samples after inoculation with 10(6) CFU, and 6.5% of yolk and 10.8% of albumen samples after inoculation with 10(8) CFU. These results demonstrate that oral-exposure doses of Salmonella Enteritidis for laying hens can significantly affect both the frequency and location of deposition of this pathogen inside eggs.

  6. Composition of Gut Microbiota Influences Resistance of Newly Hatched Chickens to Salmonella Enteritidis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Varmuzova, Karolina; Kubasova, Tereza; Davidova-Gerzova, Lenka; Sisak, Frantisek; Havlickova, Hana; Sebkova, Alena; Faldynova, Marcela; Rychlik, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Since poultry is a very common source of non-typhoid Salmonella for humans, different interventions aimed at decreasing the prevalence of Salmonella in chickens are understood as an effective measure for decreasing the incidence of human salmonellosis. One such intervention is the use of probiotic or competitive exclusion products. In this study we tested whether microbiota from donor hens of different age will equally protect chickens against Salmonella Enteritidis infection. Newly hatched chickens were therefore orally inoculated with cecal extracts from 1-, 3-, 16-, 28-, and 42-week-old donors and 7 days later, the chickens were infected with S. Enteritidis. The experiment was terminated 4 days later. In the second experiment, groups of newly hatched chickens were inoculated with cecal extracts of 35-week-old hens either on day 1 of life followed by S. Enteritidis infection on day 2 or were infected with S. Enteritidis infection on day 1 followed by therapeutic administration of the cecal extract on day 2 or were inoculated on day 1 of life with a mixture of the cecal extract and S. Enteritidis. This experiment was terminated when the chickens were 5 days old. Both Salmonella culture and chicken gene expression confirmed that inoculation of newly hatched chickens with microbiota from 3-week-old or older chickens protected them against S. Enteritidis challenge. On the other hand, microbiota from 1-week-old donors failed to protect chickens against S. Enteritidis challenge. Microbiota from 35-week-old hens protected chickens even 24 h after administration. However, simultaneous or therapeutic microbiota administration failed to protect chickens against S. Enteritidis infection. Gut microbiota can be used as a preventive measure against S. Enteritidis infection but its composition and early administration is critical for its efficacy. PMID:27379083

  7. Identification of Genes Affecting Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Infection of Chicken Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yixian; Jansen, Ruud; Gaastra, Wim; Arkesteijn, Ger; van der Zeijst, Bernard A. M.; van Putten, Jos P. M.

    2002-01-01

    Screening of 7,680 Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis mutants for attenuation in a chicken macrophage infection model yielded a series of mutants including several with defects in previously unrecognized Salmonella virulence genes. One of the newly identified genes was the pbpA2 gene, belonging to the penicillin binding protein gene family. PMID:12183592

  8. Horizontal transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Jones, Deana R; Anderson, Kenneth E

    2014-12-01

    The majority of human illnesses caused by Salmonella Enteritidis are attributed to contaminated eggs, and the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial laying flocks has been identified as a leading epidemiologic risk factor. Flock housing and management systems can affect opportunities for the introduction, transmission, and persistence of foodborne pathogens in poultry. The animal welfare implications of different types of housing for laying hens have been widely discussed in recent years, but the food safety consequences of these production systems remain incompletely understood. The present study assessed the effects of 2 different housing systems (conventional cages and colony cages enriched with perching and nesting areas) on the horizontal transmission of experimentally introduced Salmonella Enteritidis infection within groups of laying hens. In each of 2 trials, 136 hens were distributed among cages of both housing systems and approximately one-third of the hens in each cage were orally inoculated with doses of 10(8) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis (phage type 13a in one trial and phage type 4 in the other). At regular intervals through 23 d postinoculation, cloacal swabs were collected from all hens (inoculated and uninoculated) and cultured for Salmonella Enteritidis. Horizontal contact transmission of infection was observed for both Salmonella Enteritidis strains, reaching peak prevalence values of 27.1% of uninoculated hens in conventional cages and 22.7% in enriched cages. However, no significant differences (P > 0.05) in the overall frequencies of horizontal Salmonella Enteritidis transmission were evident between the 2 types of housing. These results suggest that opportunities for Salmonella Enteritidis infection to spread horizontally throughout laying flocks may be similar in conventional and enriched cage-based production systems.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacteriophage MA12, Which Infects both Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sunjin; Kwon, Taesoo; Chae, Su-Jin; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kang, Yeon Ho; Chung, Gyung Tae

    2016-01-01

    Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) bacteriophage MA12, a 41-Kb chromosome. The strain can infect both Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) and S. Enteritidis and can be used in phage therapy experiments with poultry and poultry meat. PMID:27932636

  10. TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSE OF CHICKEN MACROPHAGES TO SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEROVAR ENTERITIDIS INFECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transcriptional profiles of chicken macrophages (HD11) infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) were analyzed by using avian macrophage microarray and real time RT-PCR. Out of 4,906 array elements interrogated, 269 genes exhibited a 2-fold change (P < 0.001) over a 24-hour time...

  11. Transcriptional Response of Chicken Macrophages to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) continues to be the predominant etiologic agent of salmonellosis, with contaminated egg products being the primary source of infection. At the present time, the molecular and immunological mechanisms involved in SE colonization of chicken hosts are not we...

  12. SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEROVAR ENTERITIDIS INFECTION MODULATES DIVERSE FUNCTIONAL PROCESSES OF CHICKEN MACROPHAGE AT THE TRANSCRIPTIONAL LEVEL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) is a major etiologic agent of non-typhoid salmonellosis. The organisms colonize adult chicken hosts without causing overt clinical signs. The immunological mechanisms underlying the silent and persistent infection of chickens by SE are not clearly underst...

  13. Salmonella Enteritidis deposition in eggs after experimental infection of laying hens with different oral doses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The continuing attribution of human Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections to internally contaminated eggs has necessitated the commitment of substantial public and private resources to SE testing and control programs in commercial laying flocks. Cost-effective risk reduction requires a detailed and...

  14. Restaurant Salmonella Enteritidis outbreak associated with an asymptomatic infected food worker.

    PubMed

    Hedican, Erin; Hooker, Carol; Jenkins, Timothy; Medus, Carlota; Jawahir, Selina; Leano, Fe; Smith, Kirk

    2009-11-01

    Salmonella is the most common bacterial cause of foodborne outbreaks in the United States; approximately half of Salmonella outbreaks occur in restaurant settings. In February 2008, investigation of a cluster of Salmonella Enteritidis cases with indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns revealed that five cases had eaten at the same restaurant. Cases were identified through routine surveillance activities and by contacting meal companions of culture-confirmed cases. Well meal companions and well patrons contacted via check stubs served as controls. Illness histories and stool samples were collected from all restaurant employees. Sandwiches were the only menu item or ingredient significantly associated with illness (15 of 15 cases versus 17 of 37 controls; odds ratio, undefined; P < 0.001). None of the six restaurant employees reported experiencing recent gastrointestinal symptoms. The outbreak PFGE subtype of Salmonella Enteritidis was identified in two food workers. One of the positive employees began working at the restaurant shortly before the first exposure date reported by a case, and assisted in the preparation of sandwiches and other foods consumed by cases. The other positive employee rarely, if ever, handled food. The restaurant did not have a glove use policy. There was no evidence of ongoing transmission after exclusion of the positive food workers. This was a restaurant Salmonella Enteritidis outbreak associated with an asymptomatic infected food worker. Routine PFGE subtyping of Salmonella Enteritidis isolates, routine interviewing of cases, and an iterative approach to cluster investigations allowed for timely identification of the source of an outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections.

  15. Chicken innate immune response to oral infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Matulova, Marta; Varmuzova, Karolina; Sisak, Frantisek; Havlickova, Hana; Babak, Vladimir; Stejskal, Karel; Zdrahal, Zbynek; Rychlik, Ivan

    2013-05-20

    The characterization of the immune response of chickens to Salmonella infection is usually limited to the quantification of expression of genes coding for cytokines, chemokines or antimicrobial peptides. However, processes occurring in the cecum of infected chickens are likely to be much more diverse. In this study we have therefore characterized the transcriptome and proteome in the chicken cecum after infection with Salmonella Enteritidis. Using a combination of 454 pyrosequencing, protein mass spectrometry and quantitative real-time PCR, we identified 48 down- and 56 up-regulated chicken genes after Salmonella Enteritidis infection. The most inducible gene was that coding for MMP7, exhibiting a 5952 fold induction 9 days post-infection. An induction of greater than 100 fold was observed for IgG, IRG1, SAA, ExFABP, IL-22, TRAP6, MRP126, IFNγ, iNOS, ES1, IL-1β, LYG2, IFIT5, IL-17, AVD, AH221 and SERPIN B. Since prostaglandin D2 synthase was upregulated and degrading hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase was downregulated after the infection, prostaglandin must accumulate in the cecum of chickens infected with Salmonella Enteritidis. Finally, above mentioned signaling was dependent on the presence of a SPI1-encoded type III secretion system in Salmonella Enteritidis. The inflammation lasted for 2 weeks after which time the expression of the "inflammatory" genes returned back to basal levels and, instead, the expression of IgA and IgG increased. This points to an important role for immunoglobulins in the restoration of homeostasis in the cecum after infection.

  16. Chicken innate immune response to oral infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of the immune response of chickens to Salmonella infection is usually limited to the quantification of expression of genes coding for cytokines, chemokines or antimicrobial peptides. However, processes occurring in the cecum of infected chickens are likely to be much more diverse. In this study we have therefore characterized the transcriptome and proteome in the chicken cecum after infection with Salmonella Enteritidis. Using a combination of 454 pyrosequencing, protein mass spectrometry and quantitative real-time PCR, we identified 48 down- and 56 up-regulated chicken genes after Salmonella Enteritidis infection. The most inducible gene was that coding for MMP7, exhibiting a 5952 fold induction 9 days post-infection. An induction of greater than 100 fold was observed for IgG, IRG1, SAA, ExFABP, IL-22, TRAP6, MRP126, IFNγ, iNOS, ES1, IL-1β, LYG2, IFIT5, IL-17, AVD, AH221 and SERPIN B. Since prostaglandin D2 synthase was upregulated and degrading hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase was downregulated after the infection, prostaglandin must accumulate in the cecum of chickens infected with Salmonella Enteritidis. Finally, above mentioned signaling was dependent on the presence of a SPI1-encoded type III secretion system in Salmonella Enteritidis. The inflammation lasted for 2 weeks after which time the expression of the “inflammatory” genes returned back to basal levels and, instead, the expression of IgA and IgG increased. This points to an important role for immunoglobulins in the restoration of homeostasis in the cecum after infection. PMID:23687968

  17. Colonization and organ invasion in chicks experimentally infected with Dermanyssus gallinae contaminated by Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Moro, Claire Valiente; Fravalo, Philippe; Amelot, Michel; Chauve, Claude; Zenner, Lionel; Salvat, Gilles

    2007-08-01

    The poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae) is the most important and common ectoparasite of laying hens in Europe. This haematophagous mite has been experimentally demonstrated to be a vector of Salmonella Enteritidis by acquiring bacteria through the blood meal or cuticular contact. We have evaluated another route of infection by orally inoculating chicks with mites previously infected by S. Enteritidis. Two methods of infecting the mites were tested: mites contaminated by cuticular contact or during the blood meal. After the washing of mites with paraformaldehyde, groups of 10 Salmonella-contaminated mites were inoculated individually into 1-day-old chicks. The titre of the inoculum suspension was evaluated by crushing mites and followed by bacteriological counting. It was 3x10(4) colony-forming units/chick and 2.7x10(6) colony-forming units/chick, respectively, for cuticular contact and orally mediated contamination of mites. Each bird was found to be positive 12 days post-inoculation. Salmonella colonized the intestinal tracts and invaded the livers and spleens. The caecal content concentration reached a mean level of S. Enteritidis of 8.5x10(4) most probable number (MPN) Salmonella/g. This experiment demonstrated the ability of mites to orally infect 1-day-old chicks with subsequent colonization and multiplication of Salmonella. Consequently, mites infected by S. Enteritidis constitute potential reservoir hosts of this bacterium, allowing it to persist in the poultry house as a source of infection for newly introduced animals. If contaminated mites are found in poultry facilities, effective red mite control should be performed before new batches are introduced into the facility.

  18. Experimental infection of Salmonella Enteritidis by the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae.

    PubMed

    Valiente Moro, C; Chauve, C; Zenner, L

    2007-05-31

    Dermanyssus gallinae is an important ectoparasite of laying hens in Europe and it is suspected of being a vector of pathogens. We carried out an in vitro study to evaluate the role of D. gallinae as a vector of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Enteritidis. Two means of infecting the mite were tested: through the blood meal and after cuticular contact. Mites became carriers of Salmonella immediately after the infection with 29% and 53%, respectively, for oral route and cuticular contact. This percentage increased over time until it reached 95% (D7) and 80% (D14). The numerical identification of bacteria on the selective medium SM ID demonstrated the multiplication of Salmonella inside previously infected mites. In addition, transovarial passage as well as transstadial passage (from N1 to N2 stages) were demonstrated. Moreover, the observation of a negative effect of Salmonella on Dermanyssus oviposition was also observed. Finally, previously infected mites were able to contaminate the blood during the blood meal. Therefore, it appears that D. gallinae may act as a biological vector of S. Enteritidis under experimental conditions. It may represent a suitable environment for the development of Salmonella and could be an additional factor for the persistence of salmonellosis infection between successive flocks.

  19. Cross-protection against Salmonella Typhimurium infection conferred by a live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Nandre, Rahul M; Lee, Dajeong; Lee, John Hwa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a genetically engineered live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) vaccine was evaluated for its ability to protect against Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) infection in chickens. The birds were orally primed with the vaccine on the 1st day of life and given an oral booster at 5 wk of age. Control birds were orally inoculated with phosphate-buffered saline. Both groups of birds were orally challenged with a virulent ST strain at 9 wk of age. Compared with the control chickens, the vaccinated chickens had significantly higher levels of systemic IgG and mucosal IgA against specific ST antigens and a significantly greater lymphoproliferative response to ST antigens. The excretion of ST into the feces was significantly lower in the vaccinated group than in the control group on days 9 and 13 d after challenge. In addition, the vaccinated group had significantly fewer pronounced gross lesions in the liver and spleen and lower bacterial counts in the internal organs than the control group after challenge. These data indicate that genetically engineered live attenuated SE may induce humoral and cellular immune responses against ST antigens and may confer protection against virulent ST challenge.

  20. Cross-protection against Salmonella Typhimurium infection conferred by a live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Nandre, Rahul M.; Lee, Dajeong; Lee, John Hwa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a genetically engineered live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) vaccine was evaluated for its ability to protect against Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) infection in chickens. The birds were orally primed with the vaccine on the 1st day of life and given an oral booster at 5 wk of age. Control birds were orally inoculated with phosphate-buffered saline. Both groups of birds were orally challenged with a virulent ST strain at 9 wk of age. Compared with the control chickens, the vaccinated chickens had significantly higher levels of systemic IgG and mucosal IgA against specific ST antigens and a significantly greater lymphoproliferative response to ST antigens. The excretion of ST into the feces was significantly lower in the vaccinated group than in the control group on days 9 and 13 d after challenge. In addition, the vaccinated group had significantly fewer pronounced gross lesions in the liver and spleen and lower bacterial counts in the internal organs than the control group after challenge. These data indicate that genetically engineered live attenuated SE may induce humoral and cellular immune responses against ST antigens and may confer protection against virulent ST challenge. PMID:25673904

  1. Salmonella enteritidis in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Caffer, M I; Eiguer, T

    1994-01-01

    A significant increase in the number of isolations of Salmonella enteritidis has been observed in Argentina since 1986. Outbreaks of foodborne diseases in humans were associated with the consumption of raw or undercooked hens' eggs. Between 1986 and the first 6 months of 1993 there were 150 outbreaks reported, affecting more than 6000 persons. A total of 71.3% of these outbreaks were confirmed by stool cultures, and 47.3% by bacteriological study of the food implicated in the outbreak. A permanent surveillance of salmonellosis is imperative, taking into account the persistence of Salmonella enteritidis isolations in sporadic cases and in new outbreaks.

  2. Microencapsulated sorbic acid and nature-identical compounds reduced Salmonella Hadar and Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in experimentally infected chickens.

    PubMed

    Grilli, E; Tugnoli, B; Formigoni, A; Massi, P; Fantinati, P; Tosi, G; Piva, A

    2011-08-01

    The reduction of Salmonella prevalence in broilers is a priority in European Union agricultural policies because treatment with antibiotics is forbidden by Regulation (EC) 2160/2003. Two trials were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a microencapsulated blend of sorbic acid and nature-identical compounds (i.e., chemically synthesized botanicals; SAB) on the reduction of the cecal prevalence and contents of Salmonella enterica serovars Hadar and Enteritidis in experimentally infected chickens. In the first trial, 125 one-day-old Lohmann specific-pathogen-free chickens were assigned to one of the following treatments: negative control (not challenged and not treated), positive control (challenged and not treated), SAB0.3, SAB1, or SAB5 (challenged and treated with the microencapsulated blend included in the feed at 0.03, 0.1, or 0.5%, respectively). At 30 d of age, birds were infected with 10(6) cfu of Salmonella Hadar, and after 5, 10, or 20 d postinfection, 5, 10, and 10 birds per treatment, respectively, were killed and the cecal contents and liver and spleen samples were analyzed for Salmonella Hadar. In the second trial, 100 one-day-old Ross 708 chickens were assigned to 1 of 5 treatments: control (not treated), SAB0.3, SAB1, SAB2, or SAB5 (treated with the blend included in the feed at 0.03, 0.1, 0.2, or 0.5%, respectively). At 7 d of age, the birds were challenged with 10(5) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis, and after 7, 14, or 24 d after challenge, 5, 5, and 10 birds per treatment, respectively, were killed and cecal contents were analyzed for Salmonella Enteritidis. Results showed that in the early stage of infection Salmonella prevalence was high in both studies, whereas at the end of the observation periods, the blends at 0.03, 0.1, and 0.5 in the challenge with Salmonella Hadar and at 0.2 and 0.5% in the challenge with Salmonella Enteritidis significantly reduced (by 2 log(10) cfu) the cecal content of Salmonella. This study showed that intestinal

  3. Characterization of chicken spleen transcriptome after infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Matulova, Marta; Rajova, Jana; Vlasatikova, Lenka; Volf, Jiri; Stepanova, Hana; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Rychlik, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    In this study we were interested in identification of new markers of chicken response to Salmonella Enteritidis infection. To reach this aim, gene expression in the spleens of naive chickens and those intravenously infected with S. Enteritidis with or without previous oral vaccination was determined by 454 pyrosequencing of splenic mRNA/cDNA. Forty genes with increased expression at the level of transcription were identified. The most inducible genes encoded avidin (AVD), extracellular fatty acid binding protein (EXFABP), immune responsive gene 1 (IRG1), chemokine ah221 (AH221), trappin-6-like protein (TRAP6) and serum amyloid A (SAA). Using cDNA from sorted splenic B-lymphocytes, macrophages, CD4, CD8 and γδ T-lymphocytes, we found that the above mentioned genes were preferentially expressed in macrophages. AVD, EXFABP, IRG1, AH221, TRAP6 and SAA were induced also in the cecum of chickens orally infected with S. Enteritidis on day 1 of life or day 42 of life. Unusual results were obtained for the immunoglobulin encoding transcripts. Prior to the infection, transcripts coding for the constant parts of IgM, IgY, IgA and Ig light chain were detected in B-lymphocytes. However, after the infection, immunoglobulin encoding transcripts were expressed also by T-lymphocytes and macrophages. Expression of AVD, EXFABP, IRG1, AH221, TRAP6, SAA and all immunoglobulin genes can be therefore used for the characterization of the course of S. Enteritidis infection in chickens.

  4. Curcuma and Scutellaria plant extracts protect chickens against inflammation and Salmonella Enteritidis infection.

    PubMed

    Varmuzova, Karolina; Matulova, Marta Elsheimer; Gerzova, Lenka; Cejkova, Darina; Gardan-Salmon, Delphine; Panhéleux, Marina; Robert, Fabrice; Sisak, Frantisek; Havlickova, Hana; Rychlik, Ivan

    2015-09-01

    After a ban on the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in farm animals in the European Union in 2006, an interest in alternative products with antibacterial or anti-inflammatory properties has increased. In this study, we therefore tested the effects of extracts from Curcuma longa and Scutellaria baicalensis used as feed additives against cecal inflammation induced by heat stress or Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) infection in chickens. Curcuma extract alone was not enough to decrease gut inflammation induced by heat stress. However, a mixture of Curcuma and Scutellaria extracts used as feed additives decreased gut inflammation induced by heat or S. Enteritidis, decreased S. Enteritidis counts in the cecum but was of no negative effect on BW or humoral immune response. Using next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA we found out that supplementation of feed with the 2 plant extracts had no effect on microbiota diversity. However, if the plant extract supplementation was provided to the chickens infected with S. Enteritidis, Faecalibacterium, and Lactobacillus, both bacterial genera with known positive effects on gut health were positively selected. The supplementation of chicken feed with extracts from Curcuma and Scutelleria thus may be used in poultry production to effectively decrease gut inflammation and increase chicken performance.

  5. Gene Expression Profiles of Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts in Response to Salmonella Enteritidis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Szmolka, Ama; Wiener, Zoltán; Matulova, Marta Elsheimer; Varmuzova, Karolina; Rychlik, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The response of chicken to non-typhoidal Salmonella infection is becoming well characterised but the role of particular cell types in this response is still far from being understood. Therefore, in this study we characterised the response of chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) to infection with two different S. Enteritidis strains by microarray analysis. The expression of chicken genes identified as significantly up- or down-regulated (≥3-fold) by microarray analysis was verified by real-time PCR followed by functional classification of the genes and prediction of interactions between the proteins using Gene Ontology and STRING Database. Finally the expression of the newly identified genes was tested in HD11 macrophages and in vivo in chickens. Altogether 19 genes were induced in CEFs after S. Enteritidis infection. Twelve of them were also induced in HD11 macrophages and thirteen in the caecum of orally infected chickens. The majority of these genes were assigned different functions in the immune response, however five of them (LOC101750351, K123, BU460569, MOBKL2C and G0S2) have not been associated with the response of chicken to Salmonella infection so far. K123 and G0S2 were the only ’non-immune’ genes inducible by S. Enteritidis in fibroblasts, HD11 macrophages and in the caecum after oral infection. The function of K123 is unknown but G0S2 is involved in lipid metabolism and in β-oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria. PMID:26046914

  6. Protection activity of a novel probiotic strain of Bacillus subtilis against Salmonella Enteritidis infection.

    PubMed

    Thirabunyanon, Mongkol; Thongwittaya, Narin

    2012-08-01

    The activity of 240 bacterial isolates screened from the gastrointestinal tracts of native chickens were evaluated for use as a potential probiotic in food animal production in order to protect against animal diseases and reduce pathogenic contamination of human food products. In observing the antagonistic activity of 117 bacilli isolates, 10 of these isolates exhibited higher growth inhibition of seven foodborne pathogens, including Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Vibrio cholerae. Beneficial probiotic criteria from these isolates - which included non-pathogenicity, acid and bile salt tolerance, hydrophobicity, and adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells - exhibited that one isolate of NC11 had the most potential as a probiotic. 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that this NC11 isolate was Bacillus subtilis. This B. subtilis NC11 was sensitive to all antibiotics and was not cytotoxic to intestinal epithelial cells. Reduction of S. Enteritidis attachment to the surfaces of intestinal epithelial cells via action of a cultured medium from B. subtilis NC11 was observed by scanning electron microscopy. B. subtilis NC11 cells, as well as the bacterial cultured medium or the cultured medium adjusted to pH 7, significantly inhibited S. Enteritidis invasion (P<0.01) of intestinal epithelial cells. This study indicates that B. subtilis NC11 has characteristics of a potential probiotic, and exhibits strong inhibition activity against S. Enteritidis infection to intestinal epithelial cells.

  7. Persistence of fecal shedding of Salmonella Enteritidis by experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    : Because Salmonella Enteritidis can be deposited inside eggs laid by infected hens, the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial egg-producing flocks is an important risk factor for human illness. Opportunities for the introduction, transmission, and persistence of salmonellae in poultry are poten...

  8. Persistence of fecal shedding of Salmonella Enteritidis by experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because Salmonella Enteritidis can be deposited inside eggs laid by infected hens, the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial egg-producing flocks is an important risk factor for human illness. Opportunities for the introduction, transmission, and persistence of salmonellae in poultry are potenti...

  9. Identification of in vivo-induced genes during infection of chickens with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Geng, Shizhong; Liu, Zhicheng; Lin, Zhijie; Barrow, Paul; Pan, Zhiming; Li, Qiuchun; Jiao, Xinan

    2015-06-01

    Chickens are an important source of food worldwide and are often infected with food-poisoning serovars of Salmonella enterica, frequently Salmonella Enteritidis (SE), without exhibiting clinical signs of disease. Ivi (in vivo induced) genes identified using in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT) are expressed only during bacterial infection and have the potential value of identifying epidemic strains and antigens which can form the basis for sub-unit vaccine development. We applied IVIAT to SE strain 50041 and identified 42 ivi genes. Eight representative ivi genes were further confirmed by qRT-PCR as being expressed only in vivo within 48 h of infection compared with that of in vitro-cultured. Although our results indicated that the identified ivi genes are expressed only in vivo, further research is needed to elucidate the exact roles of these genes during infection and pathogenesis.

  10. Recovery of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis from hens initially infected with serovar Kentucky

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis and Kentucky differ greatly in epidemiology. We wanted to know if the non-pathogenic serotype Kentucky impacted the recovery of the pathogen Enteritidis from chickens. To explore this issue, 4 groups of hens were treated as follows: i) hens were inoculated or...

  11. Persistence of fecal shedding of Salmonella Enteritidis by experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Jones, Deana R; Anderson, Kenneth E

    2015-07-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis can be deposited inside eggs laid by infected hens, so the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial egg-producing flocks is an important risk factor for human illness. Opportunities for the introduction, transmission, and persistence of salmonellae in poultry are potentially influenced by flock housing and management systems. Animal welfare concerns have spurred the development of alternatives to traditional cage-based housing. However, the consequences of poultry housing systems for food safety have not been fully resolved by prior research. The present study assessed the effects of two different housing systems (conventional cages and colony cages enriched with perching and nesting areas) on the persistence of fecal shedding of Salmonella Enteritidis by groups of experimentally infected laying hens. In each of two trials, 136 hens were distributed among cages of both housing systems and orally inoculated with doses of 10(8) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis (phage type 13a in one trial and phage type 4 in the other). At weekly intervals, samples of voided feces were collected from beneath each cage and cultured to detect Salmonella Enteritidis. Fecal shedding of Salmonella Enteritidis was detected for up to 8 wk post-inoculation by hens housed in enriched colony cages and 10 wk by hens housed in conventional cages. For both trials combined, the frequency of positive fecal cultures was significantly (P < 0.05) greater for conventional cages than for enriched colony cages at 1 wk (84.7 vs. 71.5%), 2 wk (54.2 vs. 31.3%), 3 wk (21.5 vs. 7.6%), and 4 wk (9.7 vs. 2.8%) post-inoculation. These results demonstrate that the susceptibility of hens to intestinal colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis can differ between conventional and enriched cage-based production systems, although this effect does not necessarily translate into a corresponding difference in the longer-term persistence of fecal shedding.

  12. Contamination of eggs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Jones, Deana R; Anderson, Kenneth E

    2014-03-01

    Both epidemiologic analyses and active disease surveillance confirm an ongoing strong association between human salmonellosis and the prevalence of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis in commercial egg flocks. The majority of human illnesses caused by this pathogen are attributed to the consumption of contaminated eggs. Animal welfare concerns have increasingly influenced commercial poultry production practices in recent years, but the food safety implications of different housing systems for egg-laying hens are not definitively understood. The present study assessed the effects of 2 different housing systems (conventional cages and colony cages enriched with perching and nesting areas) on the frequency of Salmonella Enteritidis contamination inside eggs laid by experimentally infected laying hens. In each of 2 trials, groups of laying hens housed in each cage system were orally inoculated with doses of 1.0 × 10(8) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis. All eggs laid between 5 and 25 d postinoculation were collected and cultured to detect internal contamination with Salmonella Enteritidis. For both trials combined, Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered from 3.97% of eggs laid by hens in conventional cages and 3.58% of eggs laid by hens in enriched cages. No significant differences (P > 0.05) in the frequency of egg contamination were observed between the 2 housing systems.

  13. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Jones, Deana R; Anderson, Kenneth E

    2013-02-01

    More human illnesses caused by Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis throughout the world have been linked to the consumption of contaminated eggs than to any other food vehicle. Deposition of this pathogen in the edible contents of eggs occurs when systemic infections of laying hens involve colonization of reproductive organs. In recent years, the consequences of different housing systems for laying flocks have become the focus of international attention from both animal welfare and public health perspectives. Nevertheless, many questions remain unresolved regarding the food safety implications of various laying hen production systems. The present study assessed the effects of 2 different housing types (conventional cages and colony cages enriched with perching, nesting, and scratching areas) on the invasion of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens. In 2 trials, groups of laying hens housed in each cage system were orally inoculated with doses of 1.0 × 10(7) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis. At 5 to 6 d postinoculation, hens were euthanized and samples of internal organs were removed for bacteriologic culturing. For both trials combined, Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered from 95.3% of cecal samples, with no significant differences observed between housing systems. However, Salmonella Enteritidis was detected at significantly (P < 0.05) higher frequencies from hens in conventional cages than from hens in enriched cages for samples of livers (96.9 vs. 75.0%), spleens (93.8 vs. 53.1%), ovaries (25.0 vs. 10.4%), and oviducts (19.8 vs. 2.1%). These results demonstrate that differences in housing systems for egg-laying flocks can affect the susceptibility of hens to colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis.

  14. Isolation of Salmonella Enteritidis from Internal Organs of Experimentally Infected Laying Hens Housed in Conventional or Enriched Cages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human illness caused by Salmonella Enteritidis has been more frequently linked to the consumption of contaminated eggs than to any other food source. This pathogen can be deposited inside the edible contents of eggs when reproductive organs are colonized in systemically infected laying hens. In rece...

  15. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More human illnesses caused by Salmonella Enteritidis throughout the world have been linked to the consumption of contaminated eggs than to any other food vehicle. Deposition of this pathogen in the edible contents of eggs occurs when systemic infections of laying hens involve colonization of reprod...

  16. Reduction of Salmonella enteritidis number after infections by immunization of liposome-associated recombinant SefA.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yue; Zhang, Yanlong; Wang, Huiguo; Jin, Jinhua; Piao, Jun; Piao, Jingai; Liu, Qingping; Li, Wenzhe

    2013-09-01

    In order to generate Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) fimbriae, SEF14, the sefA gene, which encodes the main subunit of the SEF14 fimbrial protein, was amplified from Salmonella Enteritidis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subcloned into a prokaryotic expression vector pET-28a(+) to yield pET-28a(+)-sefA. The recombinant SefA (rSefA) protein was highly expressed and purified by nickel-affinity chromatography. Liposome-associated rSefA was prepared for oral immunization to seek protective efficacy for intestinal infection with Salmonella Enteritidis. The titers of the IgG and IgA in the intestinal mucus were 1:256 and 1:512, respectively. Moreover, the titers of IgG and IgA in the sera were 1:256 and 1:128, respectively. Two weeks after the booster immunization, the chickens were challenged orally with 2 x 10(6) colony-forming units (CFUs) of live Salmonella Enteritidis, and fecal samples were examined for bacterial excretion from the intestinal tract. Significantly less fecal excretion of bacteria was observed in immunized chickens for 4 wk after challenge. The numbers of bacteria in the intestinal contents (cecum and rectum) were also significantly reduced in immunized chickens, in contrast with the unimmunized controls. Oral immunization with liposome-associated rSefA therefore elicits both systemic and mucosal antibody responses and results in reduced bacterial colonization in the intestinal tract and reduced excretion of Salmonella Enteritidis in the feces.

  17. Horizontal transmission of Salmonella enteritidis in groups of experimentally infected laying hens housed in different housing systems.

    PubMed

    De Vylder, J; Dewulf, J; Van Hoorebeke, S; Pasmans, F; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Van Immerseel, F

    2011-07-01

    Concerns regarding the welfare of laying hens have led to the ban of conventional battery cages in Europe from 2012 onward and to the development of alternative housing systems that allow hens to perform a broader range of natural behaviors. Limited information is available about the consequences of alternative housing systems on transmission of zoonotic pathogens such as Salmonella Enteritidis. However, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis continues to be one of the leading causes of bacterial foodborne disease worldwide and this is mainly attributed to the consumption of contaminated eggs. A transmission experiment was performed to quantify the effect of the housing system on the spread of a Salmonella Enteritidis infection within a group of layers and on internal egg contamination. At the age of 16 wk, 126 birds housed on the floor were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis. Three weeks later, the inoculated hens were housed together with equal numbers of susceptible contact animals in 4 different housing systems: a conventional cage system, a furnished cage, an aviary, and a floor system. Transmission and egg contamination were followed during a 4-wk period. A trend toward increased bird-to-bird transmission was detected in the aviary and floor system compared with the cage systems. Also, significantly more contaminated eggs were found in the aviary compared with the cage systems and the floor system. These results suggest that there is a clear need to optimize and maintain Salmonella surveillance programs when laying hens will be moved from conventional cage systems to alternative housing systems.

  18. Allelic variation in TLR4 is linked to resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis infection in chickens.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Wang, Huihua; Zhao, Xingwang; Gou, Zhongyong; Liu, Ranran; Song, Yongmei; Li, Qinghe; Zheng, Maiqing; Cui, Huanxian; Everaert, Nadia; Zhao, Guiping; Wen, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) is a foodborne pathogen that negatively affects both animal and human health. Polymorphisms of the TLR4 gene may affect recognition by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), leading to differences in host resistance to pathogenic infections. The present study has investigated polymorphic loci of chicken TLR4 (ChTLR4) in ten chicken breeds, electrostatic potentials of mutant structures of TLR4, and a linkage analysis between allelic variation and survival ratio to infection with SE in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) White Leghorns. A total of 19 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), of which 10 were novel, were found in chicken breeds. Seven newly identified amino acid variants (C68G, G674A, G782A, A896T, T959G, T986A, and A1104C) and previously reported important mutations (G247A, G1028A, C1147T, and A1832G) were demonstrated in the extracellular domain of the ChTLR4 gene. Significant changes in surface electrostatic potential of the ectodomain of TLR4, built by homology modeling, were observed at the Glu83Lys (G247A), Arg298Ser (A896T), Ser368Arg (A1104C), and Gln611Arg (A1832G) substitutions. Linkage analysis showed that one polymorphic locus G247A of TLR4 gene, common in all breeds examined, was significantly associated with increased resistance to SE in SPF White Leghorns chicks (log-rank P-value = 0.04). The genotypes from A1832G SNPs did not show statistically significant survival differences. This study has provided the first direct evidence that G247A substitution in ChTLR4 is associated with increased resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis.

  19. Excision of an unstable pathogenicity island in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is induced during infection of phagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Tania S; Nieto, Pamela A; Tobar, Hugo E; Salazar-Echegarai, Francisco J; Lizana, Rodrigo J; Quezada, Carolina P; Santiviago, Carlos A; Araya, Daniela V; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M; Bueno, Susan M

    2011-01-01

    The availability of the complete genome sequence of several Salmonella enterica serovars has revealed the presence of unstable genetic elements in these bacteria, such as pathogenicity islands and prophages. This is the case of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis), a bacterium that causes gastroenteritis in humans and systemic infection in mice. The whole genome sequence analysis for S. Enteritidis unveiled the presence of several genetic regions that are absent in other Salmonella serovars. These regions have been denominated "regions of difference" (ROD). In this study we show that ROD21, one of such regions, behaves as an unstable pathogenicity island. We observed that ROD21 undergoes spontaneous excision by two independent recombination events, either under laboratory growth conditions or during infection of murine cells. Importantly, we also found that one type of excision occurred at higher rates when S. Enteritidis was residing inside murine phagocytic cells. These data suggest that ROD21 is an unstable pathogenicity island, whose frequency of excision depends on the environmental conditions found inside phagocytic cells.

  20. Horizontal transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The majority of human illnesses caused by Salmonella Enteritidis are attributed to contaminated eggs, and the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial laying flocks has been identified as a leading epidemiologic risk factor. Flock housing and management systems can affect opportunities for the intr...

  1. An outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 5a infection in a residential home for elderly people.

    PubMed

    Hansell, A L; Sen, S; Sufi, F; McCallum, A

    1998-09-01

    The first outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis phage type (PT) 5a infection to be reported occurred after a party in a residential home for elderly people in May 1995. The party was attended attended by 96 residents, staff and guests. S. enteritidis PT5a was isolated from 14 of the 25 clinical cases identified after the party and S. enteritidis PT4 from another clinical case. Two elderly residents with S. enteritidis PT5a infection died. Infection with S. enteritidis PT5a was associated with consumption of prawn in mayonnaise vol-au-vents, sausage rolls, corned beef sandwiches, and sausages. The investigation of this outbreak illustrated the difficulty that elderly people may have in the completion of questionnaires. It also highlighted areas for intervention; such as reminders about basic hygiene precautions to prevent secondary spread and the importance of coordinated reinforcement in the workplace of formal food hygiene training for cooks. The Food Safety Regulations 1995 came into force soon after this outbreak: their implementation would probably have prevented it.

  2. Infection of Mice by Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Involves Additional Genes That Are Absent in the Genome of Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Cecilia A.; Blondel, Carlos J.; Quezada, Carolina P.; Porwollik, Steffen; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L.; Toro, Cecilia S.; Zaldívar, Mercedes; Contreras, Inés

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis causes a systemic, typhoid-like infection in newly hatched poultry and mice. In the present study, a library of 54,000 transposon mutants of S. Enteritidis phage type 4 (PT4) strain P125109 was screened for mutants deficient in the in vivo colonization of the BALB/c mouse model using a microarray-based negative-selection screening. Mutants in genes known to contribute to systemic infection (e.g., Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 [SPI-2], aro, rfa, rfb, phoP, and phoQ) and enteric infection (e.g., SPI-1 and SPI-5) in this and other Salmonella serovars displayed colonization defects in our assay. In addition, a strong attenuation was observed for mutants in genes and genomic islands that are not present in S. Typhimurium or in most other Salmonella serovars. These genes include a type I restriction/modification system (SEN4290 to SEN4292), the peg fimbrial operon (SEN2144A to SEN2145B), a putative pathogenicity island (SEN1970 to SEN1999), and a type VI secretion system remnant SEN1001, encoding a hypothetical protein containing a lysin motif (LysM) domain associated with peptidoglycan binding. Proliferation defects for mutants in these individual genes and in exemplar genes for each of these clusters were confirmed in competitive infections with wild-type S. Enteritidis. A ΔSEN1001 mutant was defective for survival within RAW264.7 murine macrophages in vitro. Complementation assays directly linked the SEN1001 gene to phenotypes observed in vivo and in vitro. The genes identified here may perform novel virulence functions not characterized in previous Salmonella models. PMID:22083712

  3. Prophylactic Bacteriophage Administration More Effective than Post-infection Administration in Reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Shedding in Quail

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Mosab; Karimi Torshizi, M. Amir; Rahimi, Shaban; Dennehy, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by Salmonella bacteria, often through poultry products, are a serious public health issue. Because of drawbacks associated with antibiotic prophylaxis, alternative treatments are sought. Bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) may provide an effective alternative, but concerns remain with respect to bacteriophage stability and effectiveness. To this end, we assessed the stability of a novel bacteriophage isolated from poultry excreta, siphovirus PSE, and its effectiveness in reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we sought to determine how the timing (prophylactic or therapeutic) and route (oral gavage or vent lip) of PSE administration impacted its effectiveness. Here we report that significant quantities of viable PSE bacteriophages were recovered following exposure to high and low pH, high temperatures, and bile salts, testifying to its ability to survive extreme conditions. In addition, we found that ileal lactic acid bacteria and Streptococcus spp. counts increased, but colibacilli and total aerobe counts decreased, in quail receiving phage PSE through both oral gavage and vent lip routes. In other experiments, we assessed the efficiency of PSE administration, in both prophylactic and therapeutic contexts, via either oral gavage or vent lip administration, on S. Enteritidis colonization of quail cecal tonsils. Our results demonstrate that administration of PSE as a preventive agent could reduce the S. Enteritidis colonization more effectively than post-challenge administration. Furthermore, oral administration of PSE phage is a more effective prophylactic tool for reduction of S. Enteritidis shedding in poultry than is vent lip administration. PMID:27555842

  4. Frequency and persistence of fecal shedding of Salmonella Enteritidis by experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis are often attributed to the consumption of contaminated eggs, so the prevalence of this pathogen in egg-laying poultry is an important public health risk factor. Numerous and complex environmental influences on Salmonella persistence and transmission are ...

  5. Frequency and persistence of fecal shedding of Salmonella Enteritidis by experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human Salmonella Enteritidis infections are often linked with consuming contaminated eggs, so the prevalence of this pathogen in egg-laying poultry is an important risk factor for public health. Salmonella persistence and transmission in commercial egg producing flocks are influenced by the complex ...

  6. Incidence, distribution, seasonality, and demographic risk factors of Salmonella Enteritidis human infections in Ontario, Canada, 2007–2009

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Canada, surveillance systems have highlighted the increasing trend of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) human infections. Our study objectives were to evaluate the epidemiology of S. Enteritidis infections in Ontario using surveillance data from January 1, 2007 through December 31, 2009. Methods Annual age-and-sex-adjusted incidence rates (IRs), annual and mean age-adjusted sex-specific IRs, and mean age-and-sex-adjusted IRs by public health unit (PHU), were calculated for laboratory-confirmed S. Enteritidis cases across Ontario using direct standardization. Multivariable Poisson regression with PHU as a random effect was used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of S. Enteritidis infections among years, seasons, age groups, and sexes. Results The annual age-and-sex-adjusted IR per 100,000 person-years was 4.4 [95% CI 4.0-4.7] in 2007, and 5.2 [95% CI 4.8-5.6] in both 2008 and 2009. The annual age-adjusted sex-specific IRs per 100,000 person-years ranged from 4.5 to 5.5 for females and 4.2 to 5.2 for males. The mean age-adjusted sex-specific IR was 5.1 [95% CI 4.8-5.4] for females and 4.8 [95% CI 4.5-5.1] for males. High mean age-and-sex-adjusted IRs (6.001-8.10) were identified in three western PHUs, one northern PHU, and in the City of Toronto. Regression results showed a higher IRR of S. Enteritidis infections in 2009 [IRR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.06-1.32; P = 0.003] and 2008 [IRR = 1.17, 95% CI 1.05-1.31; P = 0.005] compared to 2007. Compared to the fall season, a higher IRR of S. Enteritidis infections was observed in the spring [IRR = 1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.29; P = 0.040]. Children 0–4 years of age (reference category), followed by children 5–9 years of age [IRR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.52-0.78; P < 0.001] had the highest IRRs. Adults ≥ 60 years of age and 40–49 years of age [IRR = 0.31, 95% CI 0.26-0.37; P < 0.001] had the lowest IRRs. Conclusions The study findings suggest that there was an increase in the incidence of S

  7. Adjuvant effect of a probiotic fermented milk in the protection against Salmonella enteritidis serovar typhimurium infection: mechanisms involved.

    PubMed

    De Moreno De Leblanc, A; Maldonado Galdeano, C; Dogi, C A; Carmuega, E; Weill, R; Perdigón, G

    2010-01-01

    Probiotics may offer protection against Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium infection via different mechanisms. The aim of this study is to investigate, using mouse models, the effect of the administration of fermented milk containing the probiotic bacteria L. casei DN-114 001 in the protection against Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium when this product is administered continuously before and after infection or only post-infection. The adjuvant effect of this probiotic fermented milk (PFM) against S. Typhimurium was also evaluated in newborn mice, whose mothers received the PFM during the suckling period or their offspring after weaning. The results obtained showed that PFM administration after salmonella infection was useful to decrease the severity of the infection. The best effect was obtained with continuous PFM administration. In the newborn mice model, PFM administration to the newborn mice after weaning showed the best effect against the pathogen. PFM administration to the mother during the suckling period was beneficial against this enterophatogen when their offspring did not receive probiotics after weaning. Continuous PFM administration to adult mice (before and after infection) was important to maintain the intestinal barrier and the immune surveillance in optimal conditions to diminish the pathway of entrance of salmonella and the spread of this pathogen to deeper tissues. In the newborn mice model, it was observed that PFM administration to the offspring after weaning or their mother during the suckling period had a protective effect against salmonella infection, however, in the mice from mothers that received PFM during nursing which were fed with PFM after weaning, we found a down regulated immune maturity that was not protective against this infection.

  8. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Jones, Deana R; Anderson, Kenneth E; Karcher, Darrin M

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiologic analyses have linked the frequency of human infections with Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis to the consumption of contaminated eggs and thus to the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial egg-laying flocks. Contamination of the edible contents of eggs by Salmonella Enteritidis is a consequence of the colonization of reproductive tissues in systemically infected hens. The animal welfare implications of laying hen housing systems have been widely debated, but no definitive consensus has yet emerged about the food safety significance of poultry housing options. The present study sought to determine the effects of two different bird stocking densities on the invasion of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in groups of experimentally infected laying hens housed in colony cages enriched with perching and nesting areas. In two trials, groups of laying hens were distributed at two different stocking densities into colony cages and (along with a group housed in conventional cages) orally inoculated with doses of 1.0 × 10(7) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis. At 5 to 6 d post-inoculation, hens were euthanized and samples of internal organs were removed for bacteriologic culturing. For both trials combined, Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered at a significantly (P < 0.05) greater frequency from hens in enriched colony cages at the higher stocking density than at the lower density from livers (75.0% vs. 51.4%) and ovaries (51.4% vs. 30.6%). However, spleens from hens in enriched colony cages at the higher stocking density were significantly less often positive for Salmonella Enteritidis than from hens in conventional cages at that same density (90.3% vs. 68.1%). These results suggest that stocking density can influence the susceptibility of hens to Salmonella Enteritidis, but other housing systems parameters may also contribute to the outcome of infections.

  9. Requirement for cobalamin by Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium, Pullorum, Gallinarum and Enteritidis during infection in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Jacqueline Boldrin; Penha Filho, Rafael Antonio Casarin; Junior, Angelo Berchieri; Lemos, Manoel Victor Franco

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium synthesizes cobalamin (vitamin B12) only during anaerobiosis. Two percent of the S. Typhimurium genome is devoted to the synthesis and uptake of vitamin B12 and to B12-dependent reactions. To understand the requirement for cobalamin synthesis better, we constructed mutants of Salmonella serovars Enteritidis and Pullorum that are double-defective in cobalamin biosynthesis (ΔcobSΔcbiA). We compared the virulence of these mutants to that of their respective wild type strains and found no impairment in their ability to cause disease in chickens. We then assessed B12 production in these mutants and their respective wild type strains, as well as in S. Typhimurium ΔcobSΔcbiA, Salmonella Gallinarum ΔcobSΔcbiA, and their respective wild type strains. None of the mutants was able to produce detectable B12. B12 was detectable in S. Enteritidis, S. Pullorum and S. Typhimurium wild type strains but not in S. Gallinarum. In conclusion, the production of vitamin B12in vitro differed across the tested Salmonella serotypes and the deletion of the cbiA and cobS genes resulted in different levels of alteration in the host parasite interaction according to Salmonella serotype tested. PMID:24031771

  10. Lack of flagella disadvantages Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis during the early stages of infection in the rat.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Jeanette M C; McKenzie, Norma H; Duncan, Michelle; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Woodward, Martin J; Flint, Harry J; Grant, George

    2003-01-01

    The roles of flagella and five fimbriae (SEF14, SEF17, SEF21, pef, lpf) in the early stages (up to 3 days) of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) infection have been investigated in the rat. Wild-type strains LA5 and S1400 (fim+/fla+) and insertionally inactivated mutants unable to express the five fimbriae (fim-/fla+), flagella (fim+/fla-) or fimbriae and flagella (fim-/fla-) were used. All wild-type and mutant strains were able to colonize the gut and spread to the mesenteric lymph nodes, liver and spleen. There appeared to be little or no difference between the fim-/fla+ and wild-type (fim+/fla+) strains. In contrast, the numbers of aflagellate (fim+/fla- or fim-/fla-) salmonella in the liver and spleen were transiently reduced. In addition, fim+/fla- or fim-/fla- strains were less able to persist in the upper gastrointestinal tract and the inflammatory responses they elicited in the gut were less severe. Thus, expression of SEF14, SEF17, SEF21, pef and lpf did not appear to be a prerequisite for induction of S. Enteritidis infection in the rat. Deletion of flagella did, however, disadvantage the bacterium. This may be due to the inability to produce or release the potent immunomodulating protein flagellin.

  11. FUNCTIONS EXERTED BY THE VIRULENCE ASSOCIATED TYPE THREE SECRETION SYSTEMS DURING SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEROVAR ENTERITIDIS INFECTION OF CHICKEN OVIDUCT EPITHELIAL CELLS AND MACROPHAGES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar, Enteritidis (SE) infection of chicken is a major contributing factor to non-typhoidal salmonellosis. The roles of the type three secretion systems (T3SS-1 and T3SS-2) in the pathogenesis of SE infection of chickens are poorly understood. In this study, the functions exer...

  12. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The frequency of human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) has been linked to contaminated eggs and thus to SE prevalence in commercial egg-laying flocks. Contamination of the edible contents of eggs is a consequence of SE colonization of reproductive tissues in systemically infected hens. T...

  13. A colonisation-inhibition culture consisting of Salmonella Enteritidis and Typhimurium ΔhilAssrAfliG strains protects against infection by strains of both serotypes in broilers.

    PubMed

    De Cort, W; Mot, D; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Van Immerseel, F

    2014-08-06

    Consumption of contaminated poultry meat is still an important cause of Salmonella infections in humans and there is a need for control methods that protect broilers from day-of-hatch until slaughter age against infection with Salmonella. Colonisation-inhibition, a concept in which a live Salmonella strain is orally administered to day-old chickens and protects against subsequent challenge, can potentially be used as control method. In this study, the efficacy of a Salmonella Typhimurium ΔhilAssrAfliG strain as a colonisation-inhibition strain for protection of broilers against Salmonella Typhimurium was evaluated. Administration of a Salmonella Typhimurium ΔhilAssrAfliG strain to day-old broiler chickens decreased faecal shedding and strongly reduced caecal and internal organ colonisation of a Salmonella Typhimurium challenge strain administered one day later using a seeder bird model. In addition, it was verified whether a colonisation-inhibition culture could be developed that protects against both Salmonella Enteritidis and Typhimurium. Therefore, the Salmonella Typhimurium ΔhilAssrAfliG strain was orally administered simultaneously with a Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain to day-old broiler chickens, which resulted in a decreased caecal and internal organ colonisation for both a Salmonella Enteritidis and a Salmonella Typhimurium challenge strain short after hatching, using a seeder bird model. The combined culture was not protective against Salmonella Paratyphi B varietas Java challenge, indicating serotype-specific protection mechanisms. The data suggest that colonisation-inhibition can potentially be used as a versatile control method to protect poultry against several Salmonella serotypes.

  14. Pathogenic Role of SEF14, SEF17, and SEF21 Fimbriae in Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Infection of Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Rajashekara, Gireesh; Munir, Shirin; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.; Halvorson, David A.; Wells, Carol L.; Nagaraja, Kakambi V.

    2000-01-01

    Very little is known about the contribution of surface appendages of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis to pathogenesis in chickens. This study was designed to clarify the role of SEF14, SEF17, and SEF21 fimbriae in serovar Enteritidis pathogenesis. Stable, single, defined sefA (SEF14), agfA (SEF17), and fimA (SEF21) insertionally inactivated fimbrial gene mutants of serovar Enteritidis were constructed. All mutant strains invaded Caco-2 and HT-29 enterocytes at levels similar to that of the wild type. Both mutant and wild-type strains were ingested equally well by chicken macrophage cell lines HD11 and MQ-NCSU. There were no significant differences in the abilities of these strains to colonize chicken ceca. The SEF14− strain was isolated in lower numbers from the livers of infected chickens and was cleared from the spleens faster than other strains. No significant differences in fecal shedding of these strains were observed. PMID:10742278

  15. Potential zoonotic pathways of Salmonella enteritidis in laying farms.

    PubMed

    El-Tras, Wael F; Tayel, Ahmed A; Samir, Ahmed

    2010-10-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is a communicable zoonotic bacterium. The present investigation was done to evaluate the potential occurrence of Salmonella Enteritidis in laying hen farms and its contamination pathways. Samples were collected from 10 laying hen farms located in the Delta of Egypt. Cloacal swabs (n=300), eggshell swabs (n=400), and hand swabs from egg packagers (n=38) were collected. Pools of ovary and oviduct were obtained from 150 hens; all samples were examined for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. Results indicated that Salmonella Enteritidis may initially occupy in ovary, oviduct, and cloaca. The risk for eggshell contamination is highly impending from laying hen flocks infected with Salmonella Enteritidis with percentage of >30%. Farms having eggshell contamination percentage of >60% with Salmonella Enteritidis provided a high risk for packagers' hand contamination. Questionnaire of egg packagers specified that seven out of the eight smoker packagers suffered from repeated Salmonellosis. Thus, smoking during egg packing process could be considered as an exposure factor to contract the infection via hand-cigarette-mouth route.

  16. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiologic analyses have linked the frequency of human infections with Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis to the consumption of contaminated eggs and thus to the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial egg-laying flocks. Contamination of the edible contents of eggs by S...

  17. Chicken-Specific Kinome Array Reveals that Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Modulates Host Immune Signaling Pathways in the Cecum to Establish a Persistence Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kogut, Michael H.; Swaggerty, Christina L.; Byrd, James Allen; Selvaraj, Ramesh; Arsenault, Ryan J.

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induces an early, short-lived pro-inflammatory response in chickens that is asymptomatic of clinical disease and results in a persistent colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that transmits infections to naïve hosts via fecal shedding of bacteria. The underlying mechanisms that control this persistent colonization of the ceca of chickens by Salmonella are only beginning to be elucidated. We hypothesize that alteration of host signaling pathways mediate the induction of a tolerance response. Using chicken-specific kinomic immune peptide arrays and quantitative RT-PCR of infected cecal tissue, we have previously evaluated the development of disease tolerance in chickens infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) in a persistent infection model (4–14 days post infection). Here, we have further outlined the induction of an tolerance defense strategy in the cecum of chickens infected with S. Enteritidis beginning around four days post-primary infection. The response is characterized by alterations in the activation of T cell signaling mediated by the dephosphorylation of phospholipase c-γ1 (PLCG1) that inhibits NF-κB signaling and activates nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) signaling and blockage of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production through the disruption of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway (dephosphorylation of JAK2, JAK3, and STAT4). Further, we measured a significant down-regulation reduction in IFN-γ mRNA expression. These studies, combined with our previous findings, describe global phenotypic changes in the avian cecum of Salmonella Enteritidis-infected chickens that decreases the host responsiveness resulting in the establishment of persistent colonization. The identified tissue protein kinases also represent potential targets for future antimicrobial compounds for decreasing Salmonella loads in the intestines of food animals before going to market. PMID:27472318

  18. Development of RNA aptamers for detection of Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Hyeon, Ji-Yeon; Chon, Jung-Whan; Choi, In-Soo; Park, Chankyu; Kim, Dong-Eun; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2012-04-01

    We developed and evaluated RNA aptamers to analyze their potential for use in detecting Salmonella Enteritidis. The selected aptamer was observed to specifically bind to Salmonella Enteritidis without any cross-reactivity to other Salmonella serovars. Thus, this study suggests that aptamers specific to Salmonella Enteritidis have a high potential for use in presumptive presumptive screening methods or alternative serotyping methods.

  19. Salmonella enteritidis and other Salmonella in laying hens and eggs from flocks with Salmonella in their environment.

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, C; Johnson, R P; Forsberg, C M; Irwin, R J

    1992-01-01

    Seven Canadian layer flocks with Salmonella enteritidis in their environment were investigated to determine the numbers of hens infected with S. enteritidis, the localization of S. enteritidis in organs of infected hens and the numbers of S. enteritidis-infected eggs produced by two affected flocks. By a microagglutination test (MAT) using S. pullorum antigens, these flocks had more seropositive hens (mean 51.9 +/- 16.9%) than two Salmonella-free flocks (mean 13.0 +/- 4.2%). Culture of tissues of 580 hens (433 seropositive) from the seven flocks detected 26 (4.5%) S. enteritidis-infected hens from two flocks. In one flock, 2/150 hens were infected with S. enteritidis phage type (PT) 8, which was confined to the ceca, and no Salmonella spp. were isolated from 2520 eggs (one day's lay). In the second flock, where 24/150 hens were infected with S. enteritidis PT13, extraintestinal infection was found in nine hens and involved the ovaries and/or oviduct in two hens. Salmonella enteritidis PT13 was isolated from one sample of egg contents and from one sample of cracked shells from among 14,040 eggs (one day's lay) from this flock. The overall prevalence of S. enteritidis-contaminated eggs from the two flocks with infected hens was less than 0.06%. Other Salmonella spp. isolated were S. heidelberg from 58 hens (10%), and S. hadar, S. mbandaka and S. typhimurium from one hen (0.2%) each. The MAT with antigens of S. pullorum had a sensitivity of 81% and a specificity of 24% for detecting S. enteritidis-infected hens.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1423059

  20. Characterization of Salmonella enteritidis strains.

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, C; McFadden, K A; Brouwer, A M; Demczuk, W

    1993-01-01

    A study was conducted to characterize 318 Salmonella enteritidis strains that were mainly isolated from poultry and their environment in Canada. Biotype, phagetype (PT), plasmid profile (PP), hybridization with a plasmid-derived virulence sequence probe, antibiotic resistance, outer membrane proteins (OMPs), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) profiles were determined. Relationships of these properties to one another, and their diagnostic and pathogenic significance were assessed. Biotyping indicated that failure to ferment rhamnose was sometimes useful as a marker for epidemiologically related strains. Phagetyping was the most effective method for subdividing S. enteritidis; it distinguished 12 PTs. Phagetype 13 was occasionally associated with septicemia and mortality in chickens. The strains belonged to 15 PPs. A 36 megadalton (MDa) plasmid was found in 97% of the strains. Only the 36 MDa plasmid hybridized with the probe. Seventeen percent of the strains were drug resistant; all strains were sensitive to ciprofloxacin. Thirty-five of 36 strains possessed the same OMP profile, and 36 of 41 strains contained smooth LPS. Images Fig. 1. PMID:8358678

  1. Evaluation of culture media for detecting airborne Salmonella enteritidis collected with an electrostatic sampling device from the environment of experimentally infected laying hens.

    PubMed

    Gast, R K; Mitchell, B W; Holt, P S

    2004-07-01

    Detection of Salmonella enteritidis in the environment of commercial laying hens is critical for reducing the production of contaminated eggs by infected flocks. In the present study, an inexpensive and portable electrostatic air sampling device was used to collect S. enteritidis in rooms containing experimentally infected laying hens. After hens were orally inoculated with a phage type 13a S. enteritidis strain and housed in individual cages, air samples were collected 3 times each week with electrostatic devices onto plates of 6 types of culture media (brilliant green agar, modified lysine iron agar, modified semisolid Rappaport-Vassiliadis agar, Rambach agar, XLD agar, and XLT4 agar). Air sampling plates were incubated at 37 degrees C, examined visually for presumptive identification of typical S. enteritidis colonies and then subjected to confirmatory enrichment culturing. Air samples (collected using all 6 culture media) were positive for S. enteritidis for 3 wk postinoculation. Because visual determination of the presence or absence of typical S. enteritidis colonies on air sampling plates was not consistently confirmed by enrichment culturing, the postenrichment results were used for comparing sampling strategies. The frequency of positive air sampling results using brilliant green agar (66.7% overall) was significantly greater than was obtained using most other media. A combination of several plating media (brilliant green agar, modified lysine iron agar, and XLT4 agar) allowed detection of airborne S. enteritidis at an overall frequency of 83.3% over the 3 wk of sampling. When used with appropriate culture media, electrostatic collection of airborne S. enteritidis can provide a sensitive alternative to traditional methods for detecting this pathogen in the environment of laying flocks.

  2. Contamination of eggs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both epidemiologic analyses and active disease surveillance confirm an ongoing strong association between human salmonellosis and the prevalence of Salmonella Enteritidis in commercial egg flocks. The majority of human illnesses caused by this pathogen are attributed to the consumption of contaminat...

  3. Salmonella Enteritidis organ invasion and egg contamination in experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both disease surveillance and epidemiologic analyses have confirmed a strong association between human salmonellosis and the prevalence of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in commercial egg flocks. The majority of human illnesses caused by this pathogen are attributed to contaminated eggs. Animal welfare...

  4. Comparative Virulotyping of Salmonella typhi and Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Elemfareji, Omar Ismail; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2013-12-01

    Members of Salmonella enterica are important foodborne pathogens of significant public health concern worldwide. This study aimed to determine a range of virulence genes among typhoidal (S. typhi) and non-typhoidal (S. enteritidis) strains isolated from different geographical regions and different years. A total of 87 S. typhi and 94 S. enteritidis strains were tested for presence of 22 virulence genes by employing multiplex PCR and the genetic relatedness of these strains was further characterized by REP-PCR. In S. typhi, invA, prgH, sifA, spiC, sopB, iroN, sitC, misL, pipD, cdtB, and orfL were present in all the strains, while sopE, agfC, agfA, sefC, mgtC, and sefD were present in 98.8, 97.7, 90.8, 87.4, 87.4 and 17.2 %, of the strains, respectively. No lpfA, lpfC, pefA, spvB, or spvC was detected. Meanwhile, in S. enteritidis, 15 genes, agfA, agfC, invA, lpfA, lpfC, sefD, prgH, spiC, sopB, sopE, iroN, sitC, misL, pipD, and orfL were found in all S. enteritidis strains 100 %, followed by sifA and spvC 98.9 %, pefA, spvB and mgtC 97.8 %, and sefC 90.4 %. cdtB was absent from all S. enteritidis strains tested. REP-PCR subtyped S. typhi strains into 18 REP-types and concurred with the virulotyping results in grouping the strains, while in S. enteritidis, REP-PCR subtyped the strains into eight profiles and they were poorly distinguishable between human and animal origins. The study showed that S. typhi and S. enteritidis contain a range of virulence factors associated with pathogenesis. Virulotyping is a rapid screening method to identify and profile virulence genes in Salmonella strains, and improve an understanding of potential risk for human and animal infections.

  5. Integrated farm management to prevent Salmonella Enteritidis contamination of eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in contaminated eggs is a public health hazard which may cause hospitalization or death in the elderly, infants, and individuals with impaired immune systems. Prevention of SE infection of laying hens is an essential first step in reducing SE outbreaks in humans. Multiple...

  6. Prevention of Salmonella enteritidis infection in commercial ducklings by oral chicken egg-derived antibody alone or in combination with probiotics.

    PubMed

    Fulton, R M; Nersessian, B N; Reed, W M

    2002-01-01

    Ducklings were given egg-derived antibody against Salmonella enteritidis (Ab) in drinking water daily to determine if infection could be prevented. Pekin ducklings in all experimental groups were infected on Day 1 or 5 with 0.7 x 10(6) Salmonella enteritidis (SE). Spleen, liver, and intestine of each bird were collected and cultured on Days 7, 14, 21, and 28. Only livers and spleens were culture positive for SE. Ducklings infected on Day 1 had more SE infections than controls at each observation. Ducklings infected on Day 5 had fewer SE infections than controls on Days 7, 14, and 21. The same experiment was repeated to determine if SE infection could be prevented under production conditions. Only 10 ducks per group were infected with 1.02 x 10(7) SE. In addition to Ab, one group each, infected on Day 1 or 5, received a proprietary probiotic (Pro) daily to determine if Pro was synergistic to Ab. Groups receiving Ab and Pro and infected on Day 1 had fewer birds infected than Ab alone in Day 1-infected birds. Both Day 1-infected groups had more birds infected than controls. Birds infected on Day 5 had fewer ducks infected than controls on Days 7, 14, and 21. Except for Day 14, birds receiving both Ab and Pro and infected on Day 5 had fewer birds infected than Ab alone on Day 21 and 28. Probiotics act synergistically with oral Ab. Oral antibodies may serve as a tool to prevent salmonella infection in poultry.

  7. Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Core O Polysaccharide Conjugated to H:g,m Flagellin as a Candidate Vaccine for Protection against Invasive Infection with S. Enteritidis▿†

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Raphael; Tennant, Sharon M.; Wang, Jin Y.; Schmidlein, Patrick J.; Lees, Andrew; Ernst, Robert K.; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2011-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium are a common cause of gastroenteritis but also cause invasive infections and enteric fever in certain hosts (young children in sub-Saharan Africa, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals). Salmonella O polysaccharides (OPS) and flagellar proteins are virulence factors and protective antigens. The surface polysaccharides of Salmonella are poorly immunogenic and do not confer immunologic memory, limitations overcome by covalently attaching them to carrier proteins. We conjugated core polysaccharide-OPS (COPS) of Salmonella Enteritidis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to flagellin protein from the homologous strain. COPS and flagellin were purified from a genetically attenuated (ΔguaBA) “reagent strain” (derived from an isolate from a patient with clinical bacteremia) engineered for increased flagellin production (ΔclpPX). Conjugates were constructed by linking flagellin monomers or polymers at random COPS hydroxyls with various polysaccharide/protein ratios by 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium tetrafluoroborate (CDAP) or at the 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (KDO) terminus by thioether chemistry. Mice immunized on days 0, 28, and 56 with COPS-flagellin conjugates mounted higher anti-LPS IgG levels than mice receiving unconjugated COPS and exhibited high antiflagellin IgG; anti-LPS and antiflagellin IgG levels increased following booster doses. Antibodies generated by COPS-flagellin conjugates mediated opsonophagocytosis of S. Enteritidis cells into mouse macrophages. Mice immunized with flagellin alone, COPS-CRM197, or COPS-flagellin conjugates were significantly protected from lethal challenge with wild-type S. Enteritidis (80 to 100% vaccine efficacy). PMID:21807909

  8. Control of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in laying hens by inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas Neto, Oliveiro Caetano; Mesquita, Aline Lopes; de Paiva, Jaqueline Boldrin; Zotesso, Fábio; Berchieri Júnior, Angelo

    2008-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is one of the agents that is responsible for outbreaks of human foodborne salmonellosis caused by Salmonella Enteritidis and is generally associated with the consumption of poultry products. Inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis cell vaccine is one of the available methods to control Salmonella Enteritidis in breeders and laying hens, however results in terms of efficacy vary. This vaccine has never been tested in Brazil, therefore, the present work was carried out to assess three commercial inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines allowed in Brazil. Four hundred white light variety commercial laying hens were obtained at one-day-of age. At eight weeks old, the birds were divided into four groups with one hundred animals each. Birds from three groups (V1, V2 and V3) received different intramuscular vaccines, followed by a booster dose at 16 weeks of age. Birds from another group (CG) were not vaccinated. When the laying hens were 20, 25 and 31 weeks old, 13 from each group were transferred to another room and were challenged by inoculating 2 mL neat culture of Salmonella Enteritidis. On the second day after each challenge, the caecal contents, spleen, liver and ovary of three birds from each group were analyzed for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. Twice a week a cloacal swab of each bird was taken and all eggs laid were examined for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. After four consecutive negative cloacal swabs in all the groups, the birds were sacrificed so as to examine the liver, caecal contents and ovaries. Overall, the inactivated vaccine used in group V3 reduced Salmonella Enteritidis in the feces and eggs. A very small amount of Salmonella was found in the spleen, liver, ovary and caeca of the birds in the four groups during the whole experiment. In general, inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines was able to decrease the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis in the birds and in the eggs as well. Nevertheless, they must

  9. A Salmonella Enteritidis hilAssrAfliG deletion mutant is a safe live vaccine strain that confers protection against colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis in broilers.

    PubMed

    De Cort, W; Geeraerts, S; Balan, V; Elroy, M; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Van Immerseel, F

    2013-10-17

    Consumption of contaminated poultry meat is an important cause of Salmonella infections in humans. Therefore, there is a need for control methods that protect broilers from day-of-hatch until slaughter age against infection with Salmonella. Colonization-inhibition, a concept in which a live Salmonella strain is orally administered to day-old chickens and protects against subsequent challenge, can potentially be used as control method. In this study, the safety and efficacy of a Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain as a colonization-inhibition strain for protection of broilers against Salmonella Enteritidis was evaluated. After administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain to day-old chickens, this strain could not be isolated from the gut, internal organs or faeces after 21 days of age. In addition, administration of this strain to one-day-old broiler chickens decreased faecal shedding and caecal and internal organ colonization of a Salmonella Enteritidis challenge strain administered one day later using a seeder bird model. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an attenuated Salmonella strain for which both the safety and efficacy has been shown in long-term experiments (until slaughter age) in broiler strain can potentially be used as a live colonization-inhibition strain for controlling Salmonella Enteritidis infections in broilers.

  10. Chronological recognition by chicken of antigenic polypeptides in Salmonella enteritidis with different plasmid profiles: relationship to infection rate.

    PubMed

    Barbour, E K; El Jurdi, L H; Faroo, O M; Daghir, N J; Bouljihad, M

    2000-06-01

    The antigenic polypeptides in Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) were chronologically recognized by the chicken immune system, using Western immunoblotting. Broiler chicks challenged at three days of age with SE strain carrying the most prevalent plasmid profile of 14.1 and about (approximately) 50 kb were bled at 17, 24, 31, 38 and 45 days of age. Pooled sera of blood collected at each age was reacted by Western immunoblotting with banded polypeptides of three predominant SE strains that acquired the following respective plasmid profiles: 14.1 kb; 14.1 and approximately 50.0 kb; and 1.8, 14.1 and approximately 50.0 kb. The immunoblots of each pooled sera collected at a specific age against the three SE strains were similar. More specifically, the early immune response at 17 days of age had antibodies recognizing only one polypeptide in the three SE strains namely, the 35.8 kDa. At 24 or 31 days of age, the acquired immunity to infection had antibodies recognizing five similar polypeptides in the three SE strains namely, the 14.4 (fimbriae protein), 21.5 (fimbriae protein), 30.5, 35.8, and 66.2 kDa. At 38 and 45 days of age, the antibodies recognized additional polypeptides namely, the 41.5 and 55.6 kDa, respectively. The recognition of the 41.5 and 55.6 kDa polypeptides at 45 days of age was associated with higher invasiveness of SE to spleens and livers (15.6%) and in higher cecal colonization (59.4%) in comparison to absence of recognition to the two polypeptides at 31 days of age associated with low infectivity to spleens (0%), livers (3.1%), and ceca (9.4%).

  11. Salmonella Infection

    MedlinePlus

    Salmonella infection Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Salmonella infection (salmonellosis) is a common bacterial disease that affects the intestinal tract. Salmonella bacteria typically live in animal and human intestines and are ...

  12. Reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis in the spleens of hens by bacterins that vary in fimbrial protein SefD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene sefD is part of operon sefABCD, and it is required for production of the SEF14 fimbria by Salmonella Enteritidis. We compared strains that varied in SefD content for their ability to reduce recovery of Salmonella Enteritidis from the spleens of hens infected by parenteral challenge. The two bac...

  13. In ovo evaluation of FloraMax®-B11 on Marek´s disease HVT vaccine protective efficacy, hatchability, microbiota composition, morphometric analysis, and Salmonella Enteritidis infection in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of in ovo administration of FloraMax®-B11 (FM) on Marek´s disease (MD) herpesvirus of turkeys (HVT) vaccine protective efficacy, hatchability, microbiota composition, morphometric analysis and Salmonella enteritidis (SE) infection in chickens. I...

  14. A mutation in the NLRC5 promoter limits NF-κB signaling after Salmonella Enteritidis infection in the spleen of young chickens.

    PubMed

    Chang, Guobin; Liu, Xiangping; Ma, Teng; Xu, Lu; Wang, Hongzhi; Li, Zhiteng; Guo, Xiaomin; Xu, Qi; Chen, Guohong

    2015-09-01

    To date, the functions of the NLRC5 in chickens remain undefined. In the current study, chicken NLRC5 was cloned and an A1017G mutation was detected in its promoter region. The relative expression levels of the NLRC5 and key NF-κB pathway genes, IKKα, IKKβ, NF-κB, IL-6, IL-1β and IFN-γ, in the spleens of wild and mutant type birds, AA and GG, were determined using FQ-PCR at 7 day post-infection (DPI) with Salmonella Enteritidis. Additionally, the bacterial burden in the caecum and various immune response parameters were measured to evaluate immune responses. All of the examined immune response parameters were significantly different between the AA chickens and the GG chickens. Specifically, the mRNA expression levels of IKKα, NF-κB, IL-6, IL-1β and IFN-γ were higher in AA chickens than those in GG chickens, while the mRNA expression levels of NLRC5 were lower in AA chickens than those in GG chickens (P<0.05). Moreover, the mRNA expression levels of TLR4 and MyD88 were not affected in either group. Collectively, considering former NLRC5 functional study in vitro, the wild genotype birds presented with better resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis through the actions of the NLRC5 and subsequent inhibition of the NF-κB pathway in chickens.

  15. Identification of novel attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection of egg-laying hens results in symptomless carriage but in young chicks it causes paratyphoid disease. Little is known about whether S. Enteritidis requires other genes additional to known virulence genes for systemic infection of young chickens. A transposon insertion library was created...

  16. Administration of a Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain by coarse spray to newly hatched broilers reduces colonization and shedding of a Salmonella Enteritidis challenge strain.

    PubMed

    De Cort, W; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; van Immerseel, F

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of contaminated poultry meat is still an important cause of Salmonella infections in humans. Colonization inhibition (CI) occurs when a live Salmonella strain is administered to chickens and subsequently protects against challenge with another Salmonella strain belonging to the same serotype. A Salmonella Enteritidis hilAssrAfliG deletion mutant has previously been proven to reduce colonization and shedding of a wild-type Salmonella Enteritidis strain in newly hatched broilers after experimental infection. In this study, we compared two administration routes for this strain. Administering the Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain through drinking water on the first day of life resulted in decreased fecal shedding and cecal colonization of a wild-type Salmonella Enteritidis challenge strain administered 24 h later using a seeder-bird model. When administering the CI strain by coarse spray on newly hatched broiler chicks, an even more pronounced reduction of cecal colonization was observed, and fecal shedding of the Salmonella Enteritidis challenge strain ceased during the course of the experiment. These data suggest that administering a Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain to newly hatched chicks using a coarse spray is a useful and effective method that reduces colonization and shedding of a wild-type Salmonella Enteritidis strain after early challenge.

  17. 21 CFR 118.4 - Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures. 118.4 Section 118.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....4 Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures. You must follow the SE prevention measures...

  18. 21 CFR 118.4 - Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures. 118.4 Section 118.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....4 Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures. You must follow the SE prevention measures...

  19. 21 CFR 118.4 - Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures. 118.4 Section 118.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....4 Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures. You must follow the SE prevention measures...

  20. 21 CFR 118.4 - Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures. 118.4 Section 118.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....4 Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures. You must follow the SE prevention measures...

  1. 21 CFR 118.4 - Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures. 118.4 Section 118.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....4 Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures. You must follow the SE prevention measures...

  2. Salmonella enteritidis: clinical epidemiological approaches for prevention and control of S. enteritidis in poultry production.

    PubMed

    Noordhuizen, J P; Frankena, K

    1994-01-01

    Salmonella enteritidis infections in poultry appear to be of major public concern. Prevalence levels in veal calves and pigs are rather low. Because of the complex of socio-psychological, welfare, economic and public health aspects great emphasis should be put on prevention and control. This paper deals with some clinical epidemiological approaches for prevention and control of S. enteritidis. Emphasis is set on multifactorial background of infection occurrence, epidemiological methods and features of monitoring and surveillance for evaluation of measures taken during a follow-up period. Finally, it is stated that the application of Risk Assessment & Analysis principles in this problem area, integrating the concepts previously addressed, might prove to be a valuable perspective.

  3. Acute toxoplasmosis in three wild arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus) from Svalbard; one with co-infections of Salmonella Enteritidis PT1 and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis serotype 2b.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, K K; Mørk, T; Sigurdardóttir, O G; Asbakk, K; Akerstedt, J; Bergsjø, B; Fuglei, E

    2005-04-01

    Acute disseminated toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in three wild arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus) that were found dead in the same locality on Svalbard (Norway). The animals included one adult female and two 4-months-old pups. The adult fox was severely jaundiced. Necropsy revealed multifocal, acute, necrotizing hepatitis, acute interstitial pneumonia, and scattered foci of brain gliosis, often associated with Toxoplasma tachyzoites. One pup also had Toxoplasma-associated meningitis. In addition, the latter animal was infected with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis serotype 2b and Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 1 (PT1), which may have contributed to the severity of the Toxoplasma infection in this animal. The diagnosis of toxoplasmosis was confirmed by positive immunohistochemistry and detection of anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in serum of all foxes. The animals were negative for Neospora caninum, canine distemper virus, canine adenovirus, and rabies virus on immunolabelling of tissue sections and smears.

  4. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, England and Wales, 1945-2011.

    PubMed

    Lane, Christopher R; LeBaigue, Susan; Esan, Oluwaseun B; Awofisyo, Adedoyin A; Adams, Natalie L; Fisher, Ian S T; Grant, Kathie A; Peters, Tansy M; Larkin, Lesley; Davies, Robert H; Adak, Goutam K

    2014-07-01

    In England and Wales, the emergence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis resulted in the largest and most persistent epidemic of foodborne infection attributable to a single subtype of any pathogen since systematic national microbiological surveillance was established. We reviewed 67 years of surveillance data to examine the features, underlying causes, and overall effects of S. enterica ser. Enteritidis. The epidemic was associated with the consumption of contaminated chicken meat and eggs, and a decline in the number of infections began after the adoption of vaccination and other measures in production and distribution of chicken meat and eggs. We estimate that >525,000 persons became ill during the course of the epidemic, which caused a total of 6,750,000 days of illness, 27,000 hospitalizations, and 2,000 deaths. Measures undertaken to control the epidemic have resulted in a major reduction in foodborne disease in England and Wales.

  5. Antibiotic resistance in Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhimurium, Enteritidis and Infantis from human infections, foodstuffs and farm animals in Italy.

    PubMed Central

    Busani, L.; Graziani, C.; Battisti, A.; Franco, A.; Ricci, A.; Vio, D.; Digiannatale, E.; Paterlini, F.; D'Incau, M.; Owczarek, S.; Caprioli, A.; Luzzi, I.

    2004-01-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates of Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhimurium, Enteritidis, and Infantis isolated from humans, foodstuffs and farm animals in Italy between 1999 and 2001 was examined. All the isolates were susceptible to cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin, but high rates of resistance were observed for several other drugs, especially for S. Typhimurium. The rates of resistance and multiresistance were generally higher among animal and food isolates than in human strains; conversely, no significant difference was observed between animal and food isolates. Among S. Typhimurium, multiresistance was more common in bovine, poultry and rabbit strains than in swine isolates, and was rare in strains from pigeon. Resistance to trimethoprim sulphamethoxazole was mainly found in isolates of swine and human origin. This study confirms the role of livestock as a reservoir of drug-resistant Salmonella spp. and underlines the need for integrated surveillance systems of antibiotic resistance that consider isolates not only from human disease but also from the animal reservoirs and the food vehicles. PMID:15061499

  6. Virulence and metabolic characteristics of Salmonella Enteritidis sefD variants in hens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis is one of a few pathogenic Salmonella enterica serotypes that have SEF14 fimbriae encoded by the sef operon, which consists of 4 co-transcribed genes sefABCD that are regulated by sefR. To explore the function of sefD within the infection pathway resulting in egg contamination...

  7. Salmonella enteritidis PT6: another egg-associated salmonellosis?

    PubMed Central

    Evans, M. R.; Lane, W.; Ribeiro, C. D.

    1998-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 6 (PT6) increased dramatically in the United Kingdom during 1997. The sharp rise suggests that PT6 contamination has spread rapidly throughout a basic food commodity; however, the source and food vehicle remain unknown. We present evidence from three outbreaks suggesting a possible link between PT6 and eggs. Poor documentation of the egg supply network continues to pose problems for public health investigators. Thorough investigation of all future PT6 outbreaks and case-control studies of sporadic infections are needed to confirm the etiology of PT6 infection. PMID:9866747

  8. The effects of polymorphisms in 7 candidate genes on resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis in native chickens.

    PubMed

    Tohidi, R; Idris, I B; Malar Panandam, J; Hair Bejo, M

    2013-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis infection is a common concern in poultry production for its negative effects on growth as well as food safety for humans. Identification of molecular markers that are linked to resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis may lead to appropriate solutions to control Salmonella infection in chickens. This study investigated the association of candidate genes with resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis in young chickens. Two native breeds of Malaysian chickens, namely, Village Chickens and Red Junglefowl, were evaluated for bacterial colonization after Salmonella Enteritidis inoculation. Seven candidate genes were selected on the basis of their physiological role in immune response, as determined by prior studies in other genetic lines: natural resistance-associated protein 1 (NRAMP1), transforming growth factor β3 (TGFβ3), transforming growth factor β4 (TGFβ4), inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (IAP1), caspase 1 (CASP1), lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α factor (LITAF), and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Polymerase chain reaction-RFLP was used to identify polymorphisms in the candidate genes; all genes exhibited polymorphisms in at least one breed. The NRAMP1-SacI polymorphism correlated with the differences in Salmonella Enteritidis load in the cecum (P = 0.002) and spleen (P = 0.01) of Village Chickens. Polymorphisms in the restriction sites of TGFβ3-BsrI, TGFβ4-MboII, and TRAIL-StyI were associated with Salmonella Enteritidis burden in the cecum, spleen, and liver of Village Chickens and Red Junglefowl (P < 0.05). These results indicate that the NRAMP1, TGFβ3, TGFβ4, and TRAIL genes are potential candidates for use in selection programs for increasing genetic resistance against Salmonella Enteritidis in native Malaysian chickens.

  9. Loxoribine pretreatment reduces Salmonella Enteritidis organ invasion in 1-day-old chickens.

    PubMed

    Swaggerty, C L; He, H; Genovese, K J; Duke, S E; Kogut, M H

    2012-04-01

    Young poultry exhibit a transient colonization by some food-borne pathogens, including Salmonella, during the first week of life that stems from immature innate and acquired defense mechanisms. Consequently, modulation of the hosts' natural immune response is emerging as an important area of interest for food animal producers, including the poultry industry. Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists have been shown to boost the innate immune response in young chickens and increase their resistance to colonization by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. The objective of the present study was to determine if pretreatment with loxoribine, a TLR7 agonist and immune modulator, protects young chicks from Salmonella Enteritidis organ invasion. Loxoribine (0-100 μg) was administered intra-abdominally to 1-d-old broiler chicks, and 4 h later, the birds were challenged orally with Salmonella Enteritidis. Twenty-four hours postchallenge, birds were euthanized and the liver and spleen aseptically removed and cultured for Salmonella Enteritidis. This was carried out on 3 separate occasions using 26 to 50 chicks per dose per experiment. Pretreatment of chicks with loxoribine (6.25-25 μg) significantly (P ≤ 0.05) reduced liver and spleen organ invasion by Salmonella Enteritidis. Higher doses (50-100 μg) of loxoribine had no effect. The results obtained in this study indicate that there is a potential application for using loxoribine to increase protection of young chicks when they are most susceptible to infections with Salmonella.

  10. Sodium alginate oligosaccharides from brown algae inhibit Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Yan, G L; Guo, Y M; Yuan, J M; Liu, D; Zhang, B K

    2011-07-01

    The effects of sodium alginate oligosaccharides (sAO) on growth performance, cecal microbiota, Salmonella translocation to internal organs, and mucosal immune responses to challenge with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in broiler chickens were investigated. We designed an experiment with a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement, in which 3 feed treatments with supplementation of sAO at 0 (controls), 0.04, or 0.2% were provided in the diet for birds not challenged or challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis. There were 5 randomly placed replicate pens for each treatment. At 8 to 12 d of age, one-half the poults were orally gavaged with 10(8) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis and the nonchallenged groups were inoculated with sterile PBS. Body weight loss and mortality resulting from Salmonella infection were mitigated by the addition of sAO. Supplementation of sAO at 0.2% was the most effective concentration for reducing Salmonella colonization and increasing the number of lactic acid bacteria in the cecum of chickens challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis. Cecal Salmonella Enteritidis-specific IgA production was significantly increased by sAO at 0.2% at 5 d postchallenge compared with the other treatments and was maintained at higher levels at the 2 dosages of sAO at 10 d postchallenge. With Salmonella Enteritidis challenge, sAO at 0.04% showed an anti-inflammatory effect through upregulation of interleukin (IL)-10 expression in the cecal tonsils. The supplementation level of 0.2% showed dramatic immunostimulatory activity by inducing interferon-γ, IL-10, and IL-1β mRNA expression in cecal tonsils of nonchallenged birds. However, the high level of sAO induced a robust mucosal immune response in the absence of a challenge, and this may have led to a decline in BW. These findings suggest that dietary sAO can decrease Salmonella colonization and improve intestinal barrier function and performance of chickens.

  11. Sporadic salmonellosis in Lower Saxony, Germany, 2011-2013: raw ground pork consumption is associated with Salmonella Typhimurium infections and foreign travel with Salmonella Enteritidis infections.

    PubMed

    Rettenbacher-Riefler, S; Ziehm, D; Kreienbrock, L; Campe, A; Pulz, M; Dreesman, J

    2015-10-01

    To investigate risk factors for sporadic salmonellosis, for each notified case four randomly selected population controls matched for age, sex and geographical region were interviewed via self-administered questionnaire. Conditional logistic regression analysis of 285 matched pairs revealed significant associations for raw ground pork consumption [odds ratio (OR) 6·0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·8-20·1], taking antacids (OR 5·8, 95% CI 1·4-24·5), eating meat outside the home (OR 5·7, 95% CI 2·2-14·6) and daily changing or cleaning of dishcloth (OR 2·1, 95% CI 1·2-3·9). Animal contact and ice cream consumption were negatively associated with salmonellosis (OR 0·5, 95% CI 0·2-1 and OR 0·3, 95% CI 0·1-0·6, respectively). S. Typhimurium infections were significantly associated with raw ground pork consumption (OR 16·7, 95% CI 1·4-194·4) and S. Enteritidis infections with having travelled abroad (OR 9·7, 95% CI 2·0-47·3). Raw egg consumption was not a risk factor, substantiating the success of recently implemented national control programmes in the poultry industry. Unexpectedly, hygienic behaviour was more frequently reported by cases, probably because they overestimated their hygiene precautions retrospectively. Although animal contact might enhance human immunocompetence, underreporting of salmonellosis by pet owners could have occurred. Eating raw pork products is the major risk factor for sporadic human S. Typhimurium infections in Lower Saxony.

  12. Fermented liquid feed reduces susceptibility of broilers for Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Heres, L; Engel, B; van Knapen, F; de Jong, M C M; Wagenaar, J A; Urlings, H A P

    2003-04-01

    The presence of Salmonella in chickens is a problem because poultry meat is recognized as a source of human salmonellosis. Fermented feed has characteristics like a high number of lactobacilli and high concentration of lactic acid, which could make chickens less susceptible for infection with Salmonella. Fermented feed might therefore prevent the colonization of chickens with Salmonella. Two studies were performed to quantify the effect of fermented liquid feed on the susceptibility of broilers for Salmonella. The fermented feed was prepared by fermenting a dry broiler feed supplemented with 1.4 parts of water. Lactobacillus plantarum was used for fermentation. The fermented liquid feed (FLF) contained 10(9) to 10(10) cfu lactobacilli per gram, and the pH was 4. Individually housed control chickens and FLF-fed chickens were inoculated with 10(2) to 10(7) cfu Salmonella enteritidis (SE). Colonization was estimated by cloacal swabs and quantitative caecal culture. The proportion of SE-shedding chickens was decreased in FLF-fed chickens. FLF-fed chickens required a longer time after inoculation or a higher inoculation dose to get the same proportion of infected chickens in comparison with dry feed-fed chickens. The level of cecal colonization with Salmonella in the ceca was not different at the end of the experimental period. The results indicate that FLF can hamper the introduction of Salmonella in broiler flocks because the chickens are less susceptible for infection. Fermented liquid feed might therefore be a new hurdle in the strategy to control Salmonella in chicken flocks.

  13. A review on development of novel strategies for controlling Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in laying hens: fiber-based molt diets.

    PubMed

    Ricke, S C; Dunkley, C S; Durant, J A

    2013-02-01

    Limiting Salmonella Enteritidis from table eggs can involve intervention approaches at several levels of the production cycle, beginning at the hatchery and ending at the processing or table egg production facilities. Likewise, interventions that limit Salmonella Enteritidis dissemination can be implemented at various stages during the life cycle of infection of Salmonella in the laying hen. However, achieving complete elimination of Salmonella infestation in egg products has remained elusive. There is a multitude of reasons for this, including adaptability of the organism, virulence properties, and persistence. Likewise, environmental factors in the layer house such as transmission routes, reservoirs, and feed sources can influence the exposure of susceptible laying hens to Salmonella Enteritidis. Consequently, successful applications of control measures depend not only on the timing of when they are applied but also on effective surveillance to detect frequency and level of infection of Salmonella. Several studies demonstrated that molt induction by feed withdrawal altered the immune system and the gastrointestinal tract of hens, making them susceptible to Salmonella Enteritidis colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. To alleviate this, the development of alternative methods to induce a molt became necessary. The use of several fiber-containing diets was shown to effectively induce a molt with alfalfa-based diets being the most extensively studied. Further reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis levels in eggs will probably require application of multiple interventions at several steps during egg production and processing as well as a better understanding of the mechanisms used by Salmonella Enteritidis to persist in laying flocks.

  14. Mapping B-cell responses to Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis in chickens for the discrimination of infected from vaccinated animals

    PubMed Central

    Naqid, Ibrahim A.; Owen, Jonathan P.; Maddison, Ben C.; Spiliotopoulos, Anastasios; Emes, Richard D.; Warry, Andrew; Flynn, Robin J.; Martelli, Francesca; Gosling, Rebecca J.; Davies, Robert H.; La Ragione, Roberto M.; Gough, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Serological surveillance and vaccination are important strategies for controlling infectious diseases of food production animals. However, the compatibility of these strategies is limited by a lack of assays capable of differentiating infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA tests) for established killed or attenuated vaccines. Here, we used next generation phage-display (NGPD) and a 2-proportion Z score analysis to identify peptides that were preferentially bound by IgY from chickens infected with Salmonella Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis compared to IgY from vaccinates, for both an attenuated and an inactivated commercial vaccine. Peptides that were highly enriched against IgY from at least 4 out of 10 infected chickens were selected: 18 and 12 peptides for the killed and attenuated vaccines, respectively. The ten most discriminatory peptides for each vaccine were identified in an ELISA using a training set of IgY samples. These peptides were then used in multi-peptide assays that, when analysing a wider set of samples from infected and vaccinated animals, diagnosed infection with 100% sensitivity and specificity. The data describes a method for the development of DIVA assays for conventional attenuated and killed vaccines. PMID:27510219

  15. Salmonella Enterica Serotype Enteritidis Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess Complicated with Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Oki, Masayuki; Ueda, Akihiro; Tsuda, Ayumi; Yanagi, Hidetaka; Ozawa, Hideki; Takagi, Atsushi

    2016-09-20

    Infection with non-typhoidal Salmonella often results in a self-limited acute gastroenteritis. Extra-intestinal Salmonella infection is relatively rare and occurs predominantly in infants and adults with significant underlying conditions. We describe a 54-year-old Japanese man with a history of heavy alcohol consumption and daily contact with a dog, who developed bacteremia complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis, spinal epidural abscess, and meningitis, due to Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis. This case suggests that Salmonella should be considered as an etiologic pathogen in adult patients with perivertebral infection or meningitis.

  16. Evaluation of the respiratory route as a viable portal of entry for Salmonella in poultry via intratracheal challenge of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kallapura, G; Morgan, M J; Pumford, N R; Bielke, L R; Wolfenden, A D; Faulkner, O B; Latorre, J D; Menconi, A; Hernandez-Velasco, X; Kuttappan, V A; Hargis, B M; Tellez, G

    2014-02-01

    Experimental and epidemiological evidence suggests that primary infection of Salmonella is by the oral-fecal route for poultry. However, the airborne transmission of Salmonella and similar enteric zoonotic pathogens has been historically neglected. Increasing evidence of Salmonella bioaerosol generation in production facilities and studies suggesting the vulnerabilities of the avian respiratory architecture together have indicated the possibility of the respiratory system being a potential portal of entry for Salmonella in poultry. Presently, we evaluated this hypothesis through intratracheal (IT) administration of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium, as separate challenges, in a total of 4 independent trials, followed by enumeration of cfu recovery in ceca-cecal tonsils and recovery incidence in liver and spleen. In all trials, both Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium, challenged IT colonized cecae to a similar or greater extent than oral administration at identical challenge levels. In most trials, chickens cultured for cfu enumeration from IT-challenged chicks at same dose as orally challenged, resulted in an increase of 1.5 log higher Salmonella Enteritidis from ceca-cecal tonsils and a much lower dose IT of Salmonella Enteritidis could colonize ceca to the same extent than a higher oral challenge. This trend of increased cecal colonization due to IT challenge was observed with all trails involving week-old birds (experiment 2 and 3), which are widely considered to be more difficult to infect via the oral route. Liver-spleen incidence data showed 33% of liver and spleen samples to be positive for Salmonella Enteritidis administered IT (10(6) cfu/chick), compared with 0% when administered orally (experiment 2, trial 1). Collectively, these data suggest that the respiratory tract may be a largely overlooked portal of entry for Salmonella infections in chickens.

  17. Evaluation of the respiratory route as a viable portal of entry for Salmonella in poultry via intratracheal challenge of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium1

    PubMed Central

    Kallapura, G.; Morgan, M. J.; Pumford, N. R.; Bielke, L. R.; Wolfenden, A. D.; Faulkner, O. B.; Latorre, J. D.; Menconi, A.; Hernandez-Velasco, X.; Kuttappan, V. A.; Hargis, B. M.; Tellez, G.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiological evidence suggests that primary infection of Salmonella is by the oral-fecal route for poultry. However, the airborne transmission of Salmonella and similar enteric zoonotic pathogens has been historically neglected. Increasing evidence of Salmonella bioaerosol generation in production facilities and studies suggesting the vulnerabilities of the avian respiratory architecture together have indicated the possibility of the respiratory system being a potential portal of entry for Salmonella in poultry. Presently, we evaluated this hypothesis through intratracheal (IT) administration of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium, as separate challenges, in a total of 4 independent trials, followed by enumeration of cfu recovery in ceca-cecal tonsils and recovery incidence in liver and spleen. In all trials, both Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium, challenged IT colonized cecae to a similar or greater extent than oral administration at identical challenge levels. In most trials, chickens cultured for cfu enumeration from IT-challenged chicks at same dose as orally challenged, resulted in an increase of 1.5 log higher Salmonella Enteritidis from ceca-cecal tonsils and a much lower dose IT of Salmonella Enteritidis could colonize ceca to the same extent than a higher oral challenge. This trend of increased cecal colonization due to IT challenge was observed with all trails involving week-old birds (experiment 2 and 3), which are widely considered to be more difficult to infect via the oral route. Liver-spleen incidence data showed 33% of liver and spleen samples to be positive for Salmonella Enteritidis administered IT (106 cfu/chick), compared with 0% when administered orally (experiment 2, trial 1). Collectively, these data suggest that the respiratory tract may be a largely overlooked portal of entry for Salmonella infections in chickens. PMID:24570455

  18. Pleural empyema due to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in an immunocompetent elderly patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Karachalios, Kostis; Siagris, Dimitrios; Lekkou, Alexandra; Anastassiou, Evangelos D.; Spiliopoulou, Iris; Gogos, Charalambos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pleural empyema as a focal infection due to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is rare and most commonly described among immunosuppressed patients or patients who suffer from sickle cell anaemia and lung malignancies. Case presentation: Here, we present an 81-year-old immunocompetent Greek woman with bacteraemia and pleural empyema due to Salmonella Enteritidis without any gastrointestinal symptoms. Conclusion: In our case, we suggest that patient’s pleural effusion secondary to heart failure was complicated by empyema and that focal intravascular infection was the cause of bacteraemia. PMID:28348773

  19. Multiplication of Salmonella Enteritidis on Egg Yolk Membranes and Penetration into Yolk Contents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prompt refrigeration to limit bacterial multiplication is a critical aspect of efforts to control the transmission of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) to consumers of contaminated eggs. However, a proposed national S. Enteritidis control program would allow unrefrigerated am...

  20. Contribution of Salmonella Enteritidis virulence factors to intestinal colonization and systemic dissemination in 1-day-old chickens.

    PubMed

    Addwebi, Tarek M; Call, Douglas R; Shah, Devendra H

    2014-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the most common serovars associated with poultry and poultry product contamination in the United States. We previously identified 14 mutant strains of Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 4 (PT4) with significantly reduced invasiveness in human intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2), chicken macrophages (HD-11), and chicken hepatocellular epithelial cells (LMH). These included Salmonella Enteritidis mutants with transposon insertions in 6 newly identified Salmonella Enteritidis-specific genes (pegD and SEN1393), and genes or genomic islands common to most other Salmonella serovars (SEN0803, SEN0034, SEN2278, and SEN3503) along with 8 genes previously known to contribute to enteric infection (hilA, pipA, fliH, fljB, csgB, spvR, and rfbMN). We hypothesized that Salmonella Enteritidis employs both common Salmonella enterica colonization factors and Salmonella Enteritidis-specific traits to establish infection in chickens. Four Salmonella Enteritidis mutants (SEN0034::Tn5, fliH::Tn5, SEN1393::Tn5, and spvR::Tn5) were indistinguishable from the isogenic wild-type strain when orally inoculated in 1-d-old chickens, whereas 2 mutants (CsgB::Tn5 and PegD::Tn5) were defective for intestinal colonization (P < 0.05) and 8 mutants (hilA::Tn5, SEN3503::Tn5, SEN0803::Tn5, SEN2278::Tn5, fljB::Tn5, rfbM::Tn5, rfbN::Tn5, and pipA::Tn5) showed significant in vivo attenuation in more than one organ (P < 0.05). Complementation studies confirmed the role of rfbN and SEN3503 during infection. This study should contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in Salmonella Enteritidis pathogenesis, and the target genes identified here could potentially serve as targets for the development of live-attenuated or subunit vaccine.

  1. Evaluating area-level spatial clustering of Salmonella Enteritidis infections and their socioeconomic determinants in the greater Toronto area, Ontario, Canada (2007 – 2009): a retrospective population-based ecological study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There have been only a few region-level ecological studies conducted in Canada investigating enteric infections in humans. Our study objectives were to 1) assess the spatial clustering of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) human infections in the Greater Toronto Area, and 2) identify underlying area-level associations between S. Enteritidis infection rates and socioeconomic status (SES) indicators that might explain the clustering of infections. Methods Retrospective data on S. Enteritidis infections from 2007 to 2009 were obtained from Ontario’s reportable disease surveillance database and were grouped at the forward sortation area (FSA) - level. A spatial scan statistic was employed to identify FSA-level spatial clusters of high infection rates. Negative binomial regression was used to identify FSA-level associations between S. Enteritidis infection rates and SES indicators obtained from the 2006 Census of Canada. Global Moran’s I statistic was used to evaluate the final model for residual spatial clustering. Results A spatial cluster that included nine neighbouring FSAs was identified in downtown Toronto. A significant positive curvilinear relationship was observed between S. Enteritidis infection rates and FSA-level average number of children at home per census family. Areas with high and areas with low average median family income had higher infection rates than FSAs with medium average median family income. Areas with a high proportion of visible minority population had lower infection rates than FSAs with a medium proportion of visible minority population. The Moran’s I statistic was not significant, indicating that no residual spatial autocorrelation was present after accounting for the SES variables in the final model. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that FSAs with high and low average median family income, medium proportion of visible minority population, and high average number of children at home per census

  2. Live attenuated vaccines for invasive Salmonella infections.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; Levine, Myron M

    2015-06-19

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi produces significant morbidity and mortality worldwide despite the fact that there are licensed Salmonella Typhi vaccines available. This is primarily due to the fact that these vaccines are not used in the countries that most need them. There is growing recognition that an effective invasive Salmonella vaccine formulation must also prevent infection due to other Salmonella serovars. We anticipate that a multivalent vaccine that targets the following serovars will be needed to control invasive Salmonella infections worldwide: Salmonella Typhi, Salmonella Paratyphi A, Salmonella Paratyphi B (currently uncommon but may become dominant again), Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Choleraesuis (as well as other Group C Salmonella). Live attenuated vaccines are an attractive vaccine formulation for use in developing as well as developed countries. Here, we describe the methods of attenuation that have been used to date to create live attenuated Salmonella vaccines and provide an update on the progress that has been made on these vaccines.

  3. Chaos under canvas: a Salmonella enteritidis PT 6B outbreak.

    PubMed

    Brugha, R F; Howard, A J; Thomas, G R; Parry, R; Ward, L R; Palmer, S R

    1995-12-01

    An outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis PT 6B food poisoning, the first reported of this recently described phage type, resulted in illness among 46 of 49 members of a camping group in North Wales, 33 of whom were hospitalized. Epidemiological evidence (P < 0.0001) indicated that a lemon meringue pie was the vehicle of infection. Fresh shell eggs, stored after purchase at ambient temperature, appear to be the most likely source of infection, with multiplication during preparation and subsequent storage of the pie a significant contributory factor. Campers may be at greater risk than others and should consider the use of cold boxes for the transport and storage of eggs, and avoid the preparation of lightly cooked egg products under these basic conditions.

  4. The influence of a fructooligosaccharide prebiotic combined with alfalfa molt diets on the gastrointestinal tract fermentation, Salmonella enteritidis infection, and intestinal shedding in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Donalson, L M; McReynolds, J L; Kim, W K; Chalova, V I; Woodward, C L; Kubena, L F; Nisbet, D J; Ricke, S C

    2008-07-01

    Molting is a natural process, which birds undergo to rejuvenate their reproductive organs. The US poultry egg production industry has used feed withdrawal to effectively induce molt; however, susceptibility of Salmonella Enteritidis has encouraged the development of alternative methods. Previous research conducted in our laboratory showed that alfalfa is effective at molt induction and provides equivalent postmolt production numbers and quality when compared with feed withdrawal. In the attempt to further increase the efficacy of alfalfa molt diet and decrease the chicken susceptibility to Salmonella Enteritidis during molt, fructooligosaccharide (FOS) was added to a combination of 90% alfalfa and 10% layer ration in 2 levels (0.750 and 0.375%). Ovary and liver colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis in 3 and 2 of the 4 trials, respectively, were reduced (P Salmonella Enteritidis counts were also observed in 2 of the 4 trials. In 3 of the 4 trials, the same diets did not affect (P > 0.05) the production of cecal total volatile fatty acids when compared with hens undergoing feed withdrawal. However, in all 3 alfalfa molt diets, the concentrations of lactic acid were greater (P 0.05) were observed among hens fed alfalfa combined with FOS and hens fed alfalfa/layer ration without FOS. Overall, given the similarities between hens fed 0.750% FOS (H) and 0.375% FOS (L), molt diets combined with the lower level of FOS should be sufficient.

  5. Influence of exogenous melatonin administration on Salmonella enteritidis colonization in molted layers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of exogenous melatonin on Salmonella enteritidis (SE) infection in experimentally-challenged laying hens subjected to a forced molt. Single Comb White Leghorn hens (W-36) over 50-wk-of-age were randomly placed in one of two rooms, allowed to acclima...

  6. Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis in French Polynesia, South Pacific, 2008-2013.

    PubMed

    Le Hello, Simon; Maillard, Fiona; Mallet, Henri-Pierre; Daudens, Elise; Levy, Marc; Roy, Valérie; Branaa, Philippe; Bertrand, Sophie; Fabre, Laetitia; Weill, François-Xavier

    2015-06-01

    Outbreaks of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections associated with eggs occurred in French Polynesia during 2008-2013. Molecular analysis of isolates by using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat polymorphisms and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis was performed. This subtyping made defining the epidemic strain, finding the source, and decontaminating affected poultry flocks possible.

  7. Effect of lactic acid bacteria probiotic culture treatment timing on Salmonella Enteritidis in neonatal broilers.

    PubMed

    Higgins, J P; Higgins, S E; Wolfenden, A D; Henderson, S N; Torres-Rodriguez, A; Vicente, J L; Hargis, B M; Tellez, G

    2010-02-01

    In the present study, a series of experiments were conducted to evaluate the ability of a combination of 3 ATCC lactobacilli (LAB3) or a commercially available probiotic culture (PROB) to reduce Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) in broiler chicks. Additionally, we varied the timing of PROB administration in relationship to Salmonella challenge and determined the influence on recovery of enteric Salmonella. In experiments 1 to 3, chicks were randomly assigned to treatment groups and were then challenged via oral gavage with Salmonella Enteritidis. Chicks were treated 1 h after Salmonella Enteritidis challenge with LAB3 or PROB. Twenty-four hours posttreatment, cecal tonsils were collected for recovery of enteric Salmonella. In experiments 4 to 7, day-of-hatch chicks were randomly assigned to treatment groups and were then treated with PROB via oral gavage and placed into pens. Chicks were challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis 24 h after treatment via oral gavage. At 24 h after Salmonella Enteritidis challenge, cecal tonsils were collected and recovery of enteric Salmonella was determined. In experiments 8 to 10, 1-d-old chicks were randomly assigned to treatment groups and were then challenged via oral gavage with Salmonella Enteritidis and placed into pens. Chicks were treated 24 h after challenge with PROB via oral gavage. Twenty-four hours post PROB treatment, cecal tonsils were collected and enriched as described above. It was found that PROB significantly reduced cecal Salmonella Enteritidis recovery 24 h after treatment as compared with controls or LAB3-treated chicks in experiments 1 to 3 (P<0.05). Administration of PROB 24 h before Salmonella Enteritidis challenge significantly reduced recovery of Salmonella Enteritidis in 2 out of 4 experiments and no reduction in cecal Salmonella Enteritidis was observed when chicks were challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis and treated 24 h later with PROB. These data demonstrate that PROB

  8. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis enterocolitis during late stages of gestation induces an adverse pregnancy outcome in the murine model.

    PubMed

    Noto Llana, Mariángeles; Sarnacki, Sebastián Hernán; Aya Castañeda, María del Rosario; Pustovrh, María Carolina; Gartner, Alejandra Sonia; Buzzola, Fernanda Roxana; Cerquetti, María Cristina; Giacomodonato, Mónica Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Foodborne diseases caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) are a significant health problem. Pregnancy, state of immunological tolerance, is a predisposing condition for the development of infections with intracellular pathogens. Salmonella species can cause pregnancy complications such as chorioamnionitis, transplacental fetal infection, pre term labor, abortions, neonatal and maternal septicemia. However, the specific mechanisms by which Salmonella infections trigger these alterations are not clear. In the present work, using a self-limiting enterocolitis murine model, we show that the ingestion of a low dose of S. Enteritidis at late stages of pregnancy (day 15 of gestation) is sufficient to induce massive maternal infection. We found that Salmonella infection leads to 40% of pre term delivery, 33% of abortion and fetal growth restriction. Placental dysfunction during S. Enteritidis enterocolitis was confirmed through cellular infiltration and hypoxia markers (MPO activity and COX-1 and COX-2 expression, respectively). Apoptosis in placental tissue due to Salmonella infection was also evident at day 18 of gestation when investigated by morphometric procedure, DNA fragmentation and Fas/FasL expression. Also, the expression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17 and IL-10 was up regulated in response to Salmonella not only in placenta, but also in amniotic fluid and maternal serum. Altogether, our results demonstrate that S. Enteritidis enterocolitis during late stages of gestation causes detrimental effect on pregnancy outcome.

  9. A Salmonella Enterica Subsp. Enterica Serovar Enteritidis Foodborne Outbreak after Consumption of Homemade Lasagne

    PubMed Central

    Gariano, Grazia Rosaria; Bianchi, Daniela Manila; Zuccon, Fabio; Sommariva, Marco; Nguon, Bovannrith; Malabaila, Aurelio; Gallina, Silvia; Decastelli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    In the latest year, and also in 2013, Salmonella was the most frequently detected causative agent in foodborne outbreaks (FBOs) reported in Europe. As indicated in EFSA report (2015) the serotypes mostly associated to FBOs are S. Typhimurium and Enteritidis; while Salmonella Typhimurium is generally associated with the consumption of contaminated pork and beef, FBOs due to Salmonella Enteritidis are linked to eggs and poultry meat. In this study it is described the investigation of a domestic FBO involving four adults and linked to homemade lasagne. Investigations were performed to determine the relatedness of Salmonella strains, identify the sources of infection, and trace the routes of Salmonella contamination in this FBO. Salmonella strains were isolated in 3 out of 4 patient stool samples and from lasagne and all of them were serotyped as S. Enteritidis. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis revealed the genotypical similarity of all the strains. Although serotyping and PFGE analysis identified the common food source of infection in this FBO, it was not possible to determine how or at what point during food preparation the lasagne became contaminated with Salmonella. PMID:27800418

  10. The prevalence of Salmonella enteritidis and other Salmonella sp. among Canadian registered commercial chicken broiler flocks.

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, C.; Irwin, R. J.; Messier, S.; Finley, G. G.; Oggel, J.

    1991-01-01

    A nation-wide survey was conducted to estimate the prevalence of Salmonella enteritidis and other salmonellas among Canadian commercial broiler flocks. Environmental (litter and/or water) samples from 226 of 294 (76.9%) randomly selected flocks were contaminated with salmonellas. Litter samples were more often contaminated with salmonellas than water samples (47.4 v. 12.3%). Fifty different salmonella serovars were isolated. The most prevalent serovars were S. hadar, S. infantis, and S. schwarzengrund; they were isolated from samples of 98/294 (33.3%), 26/294 (8.8%), and 21/294 (7.1%) flocks, respectively. Feed samples of 39/290 (13.4%) flocks were contaminated with salmonellas. Salmonella enteritidis was isolated from the environmental samples of 9/294 (3.1%) flocks. Salmonella enteritidis phage type (PT) 8 was isolated from seven flocks, and PT 13a from two flocks. PMID:1879484

  11. Refined live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Enteritidis vaccines mediate homologous and heterologous serogroup protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; Schmidlein, Patrick; Simon, Raphael; Pasetti, Marcela F; Galen, James E; Levine, Myron M

    2015-12-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections constitute a major health problem among infants and toddlers in sub-Saharan Africa; these infections also occur in infants and the elderly in developed countries. We genetically engineered a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of multilocus sequence type 313, the predominant genotype circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the capacities of S. Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ΔguaBA ΔclpX live oral vaccines to protect mice against a highly lethal challenge dose of the homologous serovar and determined protection against other group B and D serovars circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. The vaccines S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 were immunogenic and protected BALB/c mice against 10,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis, respectively. S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 protected mice against the group B serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Stanleyville (91% vaccine efficacy), and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 protected mice against the group D serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (85% vaccine efficacy). High rates of survival were observed when mice were infected 12 weeks postimmunization, indicating that the vaccines elicited long-lived protective immunity. Whereas CVD 1931 did not protect against S. Enteritidis R11, CVD 1944 did mediate protection against S. Typhimurium D65 (81% efficacy). These findings suggest that a bivalent (S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis) vaccine would provide broad protection against the majority of invasive NTS infections in sub-Saharan Africa.

  12. Refined Live Attenuated Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Enteritidis Vaccines Mediate Homologous and Heterologous Serogroup Protection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schmidlein, Patrick; Simon, Raphael; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections constitute a major health problem among infants and toddlers in sub-Saharan Africa; these infections also occur in infants and the elderly in developed countries. We genetically engineered a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of multilocus sequence type 313, the predominant genotype circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the capacities of S. Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ΔguaBA ΔclpX live oral vaccines to protect mice against a highly lethal challenge dose of the homologous serovar and determined protection against other group B and D serovars circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. The vaccines S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 were immunogenic and protected BALB/c mice against 10,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis, respectively. S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 protected mice against the group B serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Stanleyville (91% vaccine efficacy), and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 protected mice against the group D serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (85% vaccine efficacy). High rates of survival were observed when mice were infected 12 weeks postimmunization, indicating that the vaccines elicited long-lived protective immunity. Whereas CVD 1931 did not protect against S. Enteritidis R11, CVD 1944 did mediate protection against S. Typhimurium D65 (81% efficacy). These findings suggest that a bivalent (S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis) vaccine would provide broad protection against the majority of invasive NTS infections in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:26351285

  13. Genomic and phenotypic variation in epidemic-spanning Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis isolates

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) has caused major epidemics of gastrointestinal infection in many different countries. In this study we investigate genome divergence and pathogenic potential in S. Enteritidis isolated before, during and after an epidemic in Uruguay. Results 266 S. Enteritidis isolates were genotyped using RAPD-PCR and a selection were subjected to PFGE analysis. From these, 29 isolates spanning different periods, genetic profiles and sources of isolation were assayed for their ability to infect human epithelial cells and subjected to comparative genomic hybridization using a Salmonella pan-array and the sequenced strain S. Enteritidis PT4 P125109 as reference. Six other isolates from distant countries were included as external comparators. Two hundred and thirty three chromosomal genes as well as the virulence plasmid were found as variable among S. Enteritidis isolates. Ten out of the 16 chromosomal regions that varied between different isolates correspond to phage-like regions. The 2 oldest pre-epidemic isolates lack phage SE20 and harbour other phage encoded genes that are absent in the sequenced strain. Besides variation in prophage, we found variation in genes involved in metabolism and bacterial fitness. Five epidemic strains lack the complete Salmonella virulence plasmid. Significantly, strains with indistinguishable genetic patterns still showed major differences in their ability to infect epithelial cells, indicating that the approach used was insufficient to detect the genetic basis of this differential behaviour. Conclusion The recent epidemic of S. Enteritidis infection in Uruguay has been driven by the introduction of closely related strains of phage type 4 lineage. Our results confirm previous reports demonstrating a high degree of genetic homogeneity among S. Enteritidis isolates. However, 10 of the regions of variability described here are for the first time reported as being variable in S

  14. Salmonella Infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections with bacteria of the genus Salmonella are responsible for both acute and chronic poultry diseases. These diseases cause economically significant losses for poultry producers in many nations and absorb large investments of public and private resources in testing and control efforts. Infect...

  15. Fitness Costs and Stability of a High-Level Ciprofloxacin Resistance Phenotype in Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis: Reduced Infectivity Associated with Decreased Expression of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fitness costs associated with high-level fluoroquinolone resistance were examined in phenotypically and genotypically characterized ciprofloxacin-resistant Salmonella Enteritidis mutants (104-cip and 5408-cip, MIC > 32 µg/ml). The stability of the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype in both mut...

  16. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment of Salmonella Enteritidis inoculated eggshells.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Maike; Wiacek, Claudia; Koethe, Martin; Braun, Peggy G

    2017-03-20

    Contamination of eggshells with Salmonella Enteritidis remains a food safety concern. In many cases human salmonellosis within the EU can be traced back to raw or undercooked eggs and egg products. Atmospheric pressure plasma is a novel decontamination method that can reduce a wide range of pathogens. The aim of this work was to evaluate the possibility of using an effective short time cold plasma treatment to inactivate Salmonella Enteritidis on the eggshell. Therefore, artificially contaminated eggshells were treated with an atmospheric pressure plasma jet under different experimental settings with various exposure times (15-300s), distances from the plasma jet nozzle to the eggshell surface (5, 8 or 12mm), feed gas compositions (Ar, Ar with 0.2, 0.5 or 1.0% O2), gas flow rates (5 and 7slm) and different inoculations of Salmonella Enteritidis (10(1)-10(6)CFU/cm(2)). Atmospheric pressure plasma could reduce Salmonella Enteritidis on eggshells significantly. Reduction factors ranged between 0.22 and 2.27 log CFU (colony-forming units). Exposure time and, particularly at 10(4)CFU/cm(2) inoculation, feed gas had a major impact on Salmonella reduction. Precisely, longer exposure times led to higher reductions and Ar as feed gas was more effective than ArO2 mixtures.

  17. Distinct Salmonella Enteritidis lineages associated with enterocolitis in high-income settings and invasive disease in low-income settings

    PubMed Central

    Feasey, Nicholas A.; Hadfield, James; Keddy, Karen H.; Dallman, Timothy J; Jacobs, Jan; Deng, Xiangyu; Wigley, Paul; Barquist, Lars; Langridge, Gemma C.; Feltwell, Theresa; Harris, Simon R.; Mather, Alison E.; Fookes, Maria; Aslett, Martin; Msefula, Chisomo; Kariuki, Samuel; Maclennan, Calman A.; Onsare, Robert S.; Weill, François-Xavier; Le Hello, Simon; Smith, Anthony M.; McClelland, Michael; Desai, Prerak; Parry, Christopher M.; Cheesbrough, John; French, Neil; Campos, Josefina; Chabalgoity, Jose A.; Betancor, Laura; Hopkins, Katie L.; Nair, Satheesh; Humphrey, Tom J.; Lunguya, Octavie; Cogan, Tristan A.; Tapia, Milagritos D.; Sow, Samba O.; Tennant, Sharon M.; Bornstein, Kristin; Levine, Myron M.; Lacharme-Lora, Lizeth; Everett, Dean B.; Kingsley, Robert A.; Parkhill, Julian; Heyderman, Robert S.; Dougan, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    An epidemiological paradox surrounds Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. In high-income settings, it has been responsible for an epidemic of poultry-associated, self-limiting enterocolitis, whilst in sub-Saharan Africa it is a major cause of invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella disease, associated with high case-fatality. Whole-genome sequence analysis of 675 isolates of S. Enteritidis from 45 countries reveals the existence of a global epidemic clade and two novel clades of S. Enteritidis that are each geographically restricted to distinct regions of Africa. The African isolates display genomic degradation, a novel prophage repertoire and have an expanded, multidrug resistance plasmid. S. Enteritidis is a further example of a Salmonella serotype that displays niche plasticity, with distinct clades that enable it to become a prominent cause of gastroenteritis in association with the industrial production of eggs, and of multidrug resistant, bloodstream invasive infection in Africa. PMID:27548315

  18. Tightly regulated bacteriolysis for production of empty Salmonella Enteritidis envelope.

    PubMed

    Jawale, Chetan V; Kim, Sam Woong; Lee, John Hwa

    2014-03-14

    To avoid leaky expression of the bacterial host-toxic PhiX174 lysis gene E from the λpR promoter, a convergent promoter construct was made in which gene E was placed between a sense λpR promoter and an anti-sense P araBAD promoter. In the presence of l-arabinose, leaky transcription of lysis gene E at 28°C from the sense λpR promoter was repressed by an anti-sense RNA simultaneously expressed from the P araBAD promoter. The stringent repression of lysis gene E in the absence of induction temperature resulted into higher concentration of bacteria in culture suspension, and consequently higher and stable production of a Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) ghost. The immunogenicity of the S. Enteritidis ghost was evaluated by immunizing chickens. Chickens from the immunized group demonstrated a significant increase in the levels of S. Enteritidis-specific plasma IgG, intestinal sIgA, and lymphocyte proliferative response. After virulent S. Enteritidis challenge, the immunized group exhibited decreased bacterial recovery from organs compared with the non-immunized group. Together, these results demonstrate that the stringent molecular control over leaky transcription of lysis gene E enabled the stable production of S. Enteritidis ghost, and immunization with the S. Enteritidis ghost can protect chickens by inducing robust humoral and cellular immune responses.

  19. Reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis in the Spleens of Hens by Bacterins That Vary in Fimbrial Protein SefD

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Ingunza, Roxana; Morales, Cesar A.; Icard, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this research was to determine whether variation in the presence of fimbrial protein SefD would impact efficacy of bacterins as measured by recovery of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) from the spleens of hens. Two bacterins were prepared that varied in SefD content. Also, two adjuvants were tested, namely, water-in-oil and aluminum hydroxide gel (alum). Control groups for both adjuvant preparations included infected nonvaccinated hens and uninfected nonvaccinated hens. At 21 days postinfection, Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered from 69.7%, 53.1%, and 86.0% from the spleens of all hens vaccinated with bacterins lacking SefD, bacterins that included SefD, and infected nonvaccinated control hens, respectively. No Salmonella was recovered from uninfected nonvaccinates. Results from individual trials showed that both bacterins reduced positive spleens, but that the one with SefD was more efficacious. Alum adjuvant had fewer side effects on hens and egg production as compared to water-in-oil. However, adjuvant did not change the relative recovery of Salmonella Enteritidis from spleens. These results suggest that SefD is a promising target antigen for improving the efficacy of immunotherapy in hens, and is intended to reduce Salmonella Enteritidis in the food supply. PMID:26218804

  20. Reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis in the spleens of hens by bacterins that vary in fimbrial protein SefD.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Ingunza, Roxana; Guard, Jean; Morales, Cesar A; Icard, Alan H

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this research was to determine whether variation in the presence of fimbrial protein SefD would impact efficacy of bacterins as measured by recovery of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) from the spleens of hens. Two bacterins were prepared that varied in SefD content. Also, two adjuvants were tested, namely, water-in-oil and aluminum hydroxide gel (alum). Control groups for both adjuvant preparations included infected nonvaccinated hens and uninfected nonvaccinated hens. At 21 days postinfection, Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered from 69.7%, 53.1%, and 86.0% from the spleens of all hens vaccinated with bacterins lacking SefD, bacterins that included SefD, and infected nonvaccinated control hens, respectively. No Salmonella was recovered from uninfected nonvaccinates. Results from individual trials showed that both bacterins reduced positive spleens, but that the one with SefD was more efficacious. Alum adjuvant had fewer side effects on hens and egg production as compared to water-in-oil. However, adjuvant did not change the relative recovery of Salmonella Enteritidis from spleens. These results suggest that SefD is a promising target antigen for improving the efficacy of immunotherapy in hens, and is intended to reduce Salmonella Enteritidis in the food supply.

  1. Presence of Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella gallinarum in commercial laying hens diagnosed with fowl typhoid disease in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Pulido-Landínez, Martha; Sánchez-Ingunza, Roxana; Guard, Jean; do Nascimento, Vladimir Pinheiro

    2014-03-01

    A severe outbreak of salmonellosis in commercial brown table egg layers first occurred in Colombia in 2006. From 2008 to 2012, 35 samples collected from commercial layers farms in the states of Cundinamarca, Santander, Bolivar, and San Andres, were positive for Salmonella enterica. Salmonella was isolated from liver and spleen (71.42%), pools of organs (liver, spleen, and ovarian follicles; 25.71%), and drag swabs (2.85%). Serotype was assigned using single nucleotide polymorphisms or DNA microarray hybridization. Sixteen strains of Salmonella Enteritidis, and 13 of Salmonella Gallinarum were identified. Seven strains yielded three unique sequences, and they were designated as UN0038, UN0052, and UN0054 by intergenic sequence ribotyping. These strains were later identified as Salmonella serotypes Isangi, Braenderup, and Yoruba, respectively, by DNA microarray hybridization. The discovery that a common human pathogen (Salmonella Enteritidis) was coisolated from farms with an avian pathogen (Salmonella Gallinarum) in similar commercial brown layer hens and in different regions indicates that it is important to investigate the dynamics of Salmonella infection and determine the serotypes circulating within the same ecologic niche.

  2. Antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enteritidis, southern Italy, 1990-1998.

    PubMed Central

    Nastasi, A.; Mammina, C.; Cannova, L.

    2000-01-01

    During 1990 to 1998, we identified multidrug-resistant isolates of Salmonella Enteritidis in southern Italy. Plasmids containing class I integrons and codifying for synthesis of extended- spectrum beta-lactamases were detected. Active surveillance for resistance to antimicrobial agents is needed to guard against the possible spread of resistant clones. PMID:10905977

  3. Method for the detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    DOEpatents

    Agron, Peter G.; Andersen, Gary L.; Walker, Richard L.

    2008-10-28

    Described herein is the identification of a novel Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis locus that serves as a marker for DNA-based identification of this bacterium. In addition, three primer pairs derived from this locus that may be used in a nucleotide detection method to detect the presence of the bacterium are also disclosed herein.

  4. Bio-Control of Salmonella Enteritidis in Foods Using Bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hongduo; Zhang, Pengyu; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Ran

    2015-08-24

    Two lytic phages, vB_SenM-PA13076 (PA13076) and vB_SenM-PC2184 (PC2184), were isolated from chicken sewage and characterized with host strains Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) ATCC13076 and CVCC2184, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that they belonged to the family Myoviridae. The lytic abilities of these two phages in liquid culture showed 104 multiplicity of infection (MOI) was the best in inhibiting bacteria, with PC2184 exhibiting more activity than PA13076. The two phages exhibited broad host range within the genus Salmonella. Phage PA13076 and PC2184 had a lytic effect on 222 (71.4%) and 298 (95.8%) of the 311 epidemic Salmonella isolates, respectively. We tested the effectiveness of phage PA13076 and PC2184 as well as a cocktail combination of both in three different foods (chicken breast, pasteurized whole milk and Chinese cabbage) contaminated with SE. Samples were spiked with 1 × 10(4) CFU individual SE or a mixture of strains (ATCC13076 and CVCC2184), then treated with 1 × 10(8) PFU individual phage or a two phage cocktail, and incubated at 4 °C or 25 °C for 5 h. In general, the inhibitory effect of phage and phage cocktail was better at 4 °C than that at 25 °C, whereas the opposite result was observed in Chinese cabbage, and phage cocktail was better than either single phage. A significant reduction in bacterial numbers (1.5-4 log CFU/sample, p < 0.05) was observed in all tested foods. The two phages on the three food samples were relatively stable, especially at 4 ºC, with the phages exhibiting the greatest stability in milk. Our research shows that our phages have potential effectiveness as a bio-control agent of Salmonella in foods.

  5. Salmonella Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Salmonella Infections KidsHealth > For Parents > Salmonella Infections A A ... bathroom and before handling food in any way. Salmonella Basics Not everyone who ingests Salmonella bacteria will ...

  6. Effect of a Selected Lactobacillus spp-Based Probiotic on Salmonella Serovar Enteritidis-Infected Broiler Chicks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of a Lactobacillus-based probiotic (FM-B11**TM) on Salmonella recovery was evaluated in liquid (Exp. 1) and lyophilized (Exp. 2) forms in two separate experiments with two trials each. For each trial, eighty broiler chicks were randomly allocated into two treatments: control and probioti...

  7. The Natural Reservoirs of Salmonella Enteritidis in Populations of Wild Birds

    PubMed Central

    Obukhovska, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of our study was to identify possible natural reservoirs of Salmonella Enteritidis among wild birds. Introduction Salmonella Enteritidis is dangerous for human due the reason of toxicoinfaction. These pathogen demonstrate high virulence for small children and people with chronic pathologies and can causes people die. The main source of infection to humans is birds (poultry and wild). Wild birds represent the natural reservoir of same bacterial pathogens. It is known that Salmonella can occupy an intestinal tract of birds. This colonization in general is constant, sometimes proceeds with an alternating fever, and usually, without clinical signs. Infected birds can transmit pathogens to other isolates in close contact. This usually occurs on the nesting during seasonal migrations. In the southern region of Ukraine are several points of intersection of migration routes of wild birds on the way from Europe to Africa and Asia (National Park “Askania Nova”and others). Methods The study was conducted in populations of wild birds in National Park “Askania Nova” and peninsula “Arabat arrow” (the Azov Sea coast). From bird selected samples of blood serum and egg yolks for research in serum plate agglutination test (SPA) and litter samples for bacteriological research. Results The serological monitoring in populations of wild waterfowl in National Park “Askania Nova” (Ichthyaetus relictus, Sterna nilotica, Sterna herundo, Casarca ferruginea) has shown the presence of seropozitive individuals in adult birds (average 18%) and egg yolks (avarrage 12%). The bacteriological investigations confirmed circulation of Salmonella in this group of birds. 32.3% of all bacterial pathogens was Salmonella and more then half of them was the reprezentatives of serovar Salmonella Enteritidis. Similar studies were conducted on territory of peninsula “Arabat arrow” (the Azov Sea coast). The serological monitoring among of wild waterfowl (Ardea cinerea, Sterna

  8. In vitro penetration of Salmonella Enteritidis through yolk membranes of eggs from 6 genetically distinct commercial lines of laying hens.

    PubMed

    Gast, R K; Jones, D R; Anderson, K E; Guraya, R; Guard, J; Holt, P S

    2010-08-01

    Although deposition of Salmonella Enteritidis inside yolks is less common than deposition in albumen or on the vitelline (yolk) membrane in naturally contaminated eggs laid by infected hens, bacterial migration into the yolk to reach its nutrient-rich contents could lead to extensive multiplication. The present study used an in vitro egg contamination model to assess the ability of small initial numbers of Salmonella Enteritidis to penetrate the vitelline membrane and multiply inside yolks of eggs laid by 6 genetically distinct commercial lines of hens during 24 h of storage at 30 degrees C. Eggs from each line were tested at 4 different hen ages by inoculation of approximately 100 cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis onto the outside of the vitelline membranes of intact yolks in plastic centrifuge tubes and then adding back the albumen into each tube before incubation. Overall, the frequency of penetration of Salmonella Enteritidis into the yolk contents of eggs from individual lines of hens ranged from 30 to 58% and the mean concentration of Salmonella Enteritidis in yolk contents after incubation ranged from 0.8 to 2.0 log(10) cfu/mL. For both of these parameters, values for one hen line were significantly higher than for 2 other lines, but no other differences were observed. Hen age did not have a significant effect on egg yolk penetration by Salmonella Enteritidis. These results indicate that opportunities for the migration and growth of small initial numbers of Salmonella Enteritidis to attain more dangerous levels inside contaminated eggs during storage at warm temperatures can sometimes vary between different lines of laying hens.

  9. 21 CFR 118.6 - Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.6... testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a)(1) If the environmental test for pullets at 14 to 16 weeks of... requires that these eggs must be treated to achieve at least a 5-log destruction of Salmonella...

  10. 21 CFR 118.6 - Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.6... testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a)(1) If the environmental test for pullets at 14 to 16 weeks of... requires that these eggs must be treated to achieve at least a 5-log destruction of Salmonella...

  11. 21 CFR 118.8 - Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE....8 Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Testing of environmental samples for SE... Sampling and Detection of Salmonella in Poultry Houses,” April 2008, or an equivalent method in...

  12. 21 CFR 118.8 - Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE....8 Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Testing of environmental samples for SE... Sampling and Detection of Salmonella in Poultry Houses,” April 2008, or an equivalent method in...

  13. 21 CFR 118.8 - Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE....8 Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Testing of environmental samples for SE... Sampling and Detection of Salmonella in Poultry Houses,” April 2008, or an equivalent method in...

  14. 21 CFR 118.6 - Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.6... testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a)(1) If the environmental test for pullets at 14 to 16 weeks of... requires that these eggs must be treated to achieve at least a 5-log destruction of Salmonella...

  15. 75 FR 18849 - Small Entity Compliance Guide: Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Small Entity Compliance Guide: Prevention of Salmonella... availability of a guidance entitled ``Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During Production... producers to implement measures to prevent Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) from contaminating eggs on the...

  16. 21 CFR 118.6 - Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.6... testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a)(1) If the environmental test for pullets at 14 to 16 weeks of... requires that these eggs must be treated to achieve at least a 5-log destruction of Salmonella...

  17. 21 CFR 118.8 - Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE....8 Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Testing of environmental samples for SE... Sampling and Detection of Salmonella in Poultry Houses,” April 2008, or an equivalent method in...

  18. 21 CFR 118.6 - Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.6... testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a)(1) If the environmental test for pullets at 14 to 16 weeks of... requires that these eggs must be treated to achieve at least a 5-log destruction of Salmonella...

  19. 21 CFR 118.8 - Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE....8 Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Testing of environmental samples for SE... Sampling and Detection of Salmonella in Poultry Houses,” April 2008, or an equivalent method in...

  20. Overcrowding stress decreases macrophage activity and increases Salmonella Enteritidis invasion in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Gomes, A V S; Quinteiro-Filho, W M; Ribeiro, A; Ferraz-de-Paula, V; Pinheiro, M L; Baskeville, E; Akamine, A T; Astolfi-Ferreira, C S; Ferreira, A J P; Palermo-Neto, J

    2014-01-01

    Overcrowding stress is a reality in the poultry industry. Chickens exposed to long-term stressful situations present a reduction of welfare and immunosuppression. We designed this experiment to analyse the effects from overcrowding stress of 16 birds/m(2) on performance parameters, serum corticosterone levels, the relative weight of the bursa of Fabricius, plasma IgA and IgG levels, intestinal integrity, macrophage activity and experimental Salmonella Enteritidis invasion. The results of this study indicate that overcrowding stress decreased performance parameters, induced enteritis and decreased macrophage activity and the relative bursa weight in broiler chickens. When the chickens were similarly stressed and infected with Salmonella Enteritidis, there was an increase in feed conversion and a decrease in plasma IgG levels in the stressed and Salmonella-infected birds. We observed moderate enteritis throughout the duodenum of chickens stressed and infected with Salmonella. The overcrowding stress decreased the macrophage phagocytosis intensity and increased Salmonella Enteritidis counts in the livers of birds challenged with the pathogenic bacterium. Overcrowding stress via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that is associated with an increase in corticosterone and enteritis might influence the quality of the intestinal immune barrier and the integrity of the small intestine. This effect allowed pathogenic bacteria to migrate through the intestinal mucosa, resulting in inflammatory infiltration and decreased nutrient absorption. The data strengthen the hypothesis that control of the welfare of chickens and avoidance of stress from overcrowding in poultry production are relevant factors for the maintenance of intestinal integrity, performance and decreased susceptibility to Salmonella infection.

  1. Comparison of four molecular methods to type Salmonella Enteritidis strains.

    PubMed

    Campioni, Fábio; Pitondo-Silva, André; Bergamini, Alzira M M; Falcão, Juliana P

    2015-05-01

    This study compared the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR (ERIC-PCR), multilocus variable-number of tanden-repeat analysis (MLVA), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) methods for typing 188 Salmonella Enteritidis strains from different sources isolated over a 24-year period in Brazil. PFGE and ERIC-PCR were more efficient than MLVA for subtyping the strains. However, MLVA provided additional epidemiological information for those strains. In addition, MLST showed the Brazilian strains as belonging to the main clonal complex of S. Enteritidis, CC11, and provided the first report of two new STs in the S. enterica database but could not properly subtype the strains. Our results showed that the use of PFGE or ERIC-PCR together with MLVA is suitable to efficiently subtype S. Enteritidis strains and provide important epidemiological information.

  2. Deciphering why Salmonella Gallinarum is less invasive in vitro than Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Rossignol, Aurore; Roche, Sylvie M; Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle; Wiedemann, Agnès; Grépinet, Olivier; Fredlund, Jennifer; Trotereau, Jérôme; Marchès, Olivier; Quéré, Pascale; Enninga, Jost; Velge, Philippe

    2014-08-30

    Salmonella Gallinarum and Salmonella Enteritidis are genetically closely related however associated with different pathologies. Several studies have suggested that S. Gallinarum is less invasive in vitro than S. Enteritidis. In this study we confirm that the S. Gallinarum strains tested were much less invasive than the S. Enteritidis strains tested in cells of avian or human origin. In addition, the S. Gallinarum T3SS-1-dependent ability to invade host cells was delayed by two to three hours compared to S. Enteritidis, indicating that T3SS-1-dependent entry is less efficient in S. Gallinarum than S. Enteritidis. This was neither due to a decreased transcription of T3SS-1 related genes when bacteria come into contact with cells, as transcription of hilA, invF and sipA was similar to that observed for S. Enteritidis, nor to a lack of functionality of the S. Gallinarum T3SS-1 apparatus as this apparatus was able to secrete and translocate effector proteins into host cells. In contrast, genome comparison of four S. Gallinarum and two S. Enteritidis strains revealed that all S. Gallinarum genomes displayed the same point mutations in each of the main T3SS-1 effector genes sipA, sopE, sopE2, sopD and sopA.

  3. Oral immunisation of laying hens with the live vaccine strains of TAD Salmonella vac E and TAD Salmonella vac T reduces internal egg contamination with Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Gantois, Inne; Ducatelle, Richard; Timbermont, Leen; Boyen, Filip; Bohez, Lotte; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank; van Immerseel, Filip

    2006-09-11

    Eggs are a major source of human infections with Salmonella. Therefore controlling egg contamination in laying hen flocks is one of the main targets for control programmes. A study was carried out to assess the effect of oral vaccination with TAD Salmonella vac E, TAD Salmonella vac T and with both vaccines TAD Salmonella vac E and TAD Salmonella vac T, on colonization of the reproductive tract and internal egg contamination of laying hens with Salmonella Enteritidis. Three groups of 30 laying hens were vaccinated at 1 day, 6 weeks and 16 weeks of age with either one of the vaccine strains, or a combination of both vaccine strains, while a fourth group was left unvaccinated. At 24 weeks of age, the birds were intravenously challenged with 0.5 ml containing 5 x 10(7)cfu Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 S1400/94. The number of oviducts from which Salmonella was isolated, was significantly lower in the vaccinated than in the non-vaccinated hens at 3 weeks post-challenge. Significantly less egg contents were Salmonella positive in the birds vaccinated with TAD Salmonella vac E or TAD Salmonella vac T (12/105 batches of eggs in both groups) than in the unvaccinated birds (28/105 batches of eggs). Internal egg contamination in the hens vaccinated with both TAD Salmonella vac E and TAD Salmonella vac T was even more reduced, as over the whole experiment, only one batch of eggs was positive. In conclusion, these data indicate that vaccination of laying hens with these live vaccines could be considered as a valuable tool in controlling internal egg contamination.

  4. Interrelationships between strains of Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed Central

    Threlfall, E. J.; Chart, H.

    1993-01-01

    In contrast to S. typhimurium [19], S. enteritidis is a serotype which has its primary food-animal reservoir in poultry. To date, phage typing has been of paramount importance in studying the epidemiology of this serotype and in particular, has demonstrated the involvement of both poultry meat and whole shell eggs in the transmission of S. enteritidis PT4 to humans. The findings discussed above describe various aspects of the serotype, particularly in relation to the involvement of both LPS and plasmids in its virulence and phage type identity (Fig. 2). These findings have led to an increased understanding of the biology of this serotype, which is of major importance in human food-poisoning in England and Wales at the present time. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8348924

  5. Evaluation of a selected lactic acid bacteria-based probiotic on Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization and intestinal permeability in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Prado-Rebolledo, Omar F; Delgado-Machuca, Jaime de Jesus; Macedo-Barragan, Rafael J; Garcia-Márquez, Luis J; Morales-Barrera, Jesus E; Latorre, Juan D; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl; Tellez, Guillermo

    2017-02-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of a lactic acid bacteria-based probiotic (FloraMax-B11(®)) against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis intestinal colonization and intestinal permeability in broiler chickens. Experiment 1 consisted of two independent trials. In each trial, day-old broiler chicks were assigned to one of two groups: control + S. Enteritidis or probiotic + S. Enteritidis. At 72 h post-S. Enteritidis challenge, haematology and caecal content were evaluated for S. Enteritidis colonization. In Experiment 2, day-old broiler chicks were assigned to one of four groups: negative control; probiotic; control + S. Enteritidis; or probiotic + S. Enteritidis. At 72 h post-S. Enteritidis challenge, chickens in all groups were given an oral gavage dose of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-d). In both trials of Experiment 1, a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in colony-forming units/gram of S. Enteritidis in caecal content and a reduction in the incidence of S. Enteritidis enriched caecal samples were observed in probiotic + S. Enteritidis chickens. In addition, significant heterophilia and lymphopaenia were observed in control + S. Enteritidis chickens. In Experiment 2, a decrease in numbers of S. Enteritidis in caeca were observed in probiotic + S. Enteritidis chickens when compared to control + S. Enteritidis. Also, an increase in serum FITC-d concentration was detected in control + S. Enteritidis. These results suggest that early infection with S. Enteritidis can increase intestinal permeability, but the adverse effects can be prevented by the administration of the probiotic tested.

  6. An outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 34a infection in primary school children: the use of visual aids and food preferences to overcome recall bias in a case control study.

    PubMed Central

    Linnane, E.; Roberts, R. J.; Mannion, P. T.

    2002-01-01

    Outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease are common in schools. Case control studies are useful in the investigation of infectious disease outbreaks but the time interval between illness and investigation can lead to recall bias, particularly in young children. We describe an outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 34a infection involving 54 clinical cases in two adjacent schools, and a novel approach to overcome recall bias. The likely dates of infection were identified from the epidemic curve. We created a visual display of the menu from those days and asked 9 cases and 18 matched controls to identify their food preferences from this display. Preference for chocolate mouse was significantly associated with illness (P = 0.006). The results of the case control study agreed with the findings of the environmental investigation. We believe our approach could be used in other circumstances, where subjects are young children or recall bias is a concern. PMID:12211594

  7. Heterophils isolated from chickens resistant to extra-intestinal Salmonella enteritidis infection express higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA following infection than heterophils from susceptible chickens.

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Pamela J.; Swaggerty, Christina L.; Kaiser, Pete; Pevzner, Igal Y.; Kogut, Michael H.

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies showed differences in in vitro heterophil function between parental (A > B) broilers and F1 reciprocal crosses (D > C). Our objectives were to (1) determine if in vitro variations translate to differences in resistance to Salmonella enteritidis (SE) and (2) quantitate cytokine mRNA in heterophils from SE-infected chicks. One-day-old chicks were challenged and organs were cultured for SE. Chicks with efficient heterophils (A and D) were less susceptible to SE compared to chicks with inefficient heterophils (B and C). Heterophils were isolated from SE-infected chicks and cytokine mRNA expression was evaluated using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA was up-regulated in heterophils from SE-resistant chicks compared to susceptible chicks. This is the first report to quantitate cytokine mRNA in heterophils from SE-infected chicks. These data show a relationship between in vitro heterophil function, increased pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression, and increased resistance to SE in 1-day-old chicks. PMID:15635959

  8. High Incubation Temperature and Threonine Dietary Level Improve Ileum Response Against Post-Hatch Salmonella Enteritidis Inoculation in Broiler Chicks

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Heraldo Bezerra; Campos, Danila Barreiro; Guerra, Ricardo Romão; Costa, Fernando Guilherme Perazzo

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of both embryonic thermal manipulation and dietary threonine level on the response of broilers inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, considering bacterial counts in the cecal contents, intestinal morphology, mucin and heat shock protein 70 gene expression, body weight and weight gain. Thermal manipulation was used from 11 days of incubation until hatch, defining three treatments: standard (37.7°C), continuous high temperature (38.7°C) and continuous low temperature (36.7°C). After hatch, chicks were distributed according to a 3x2+1 factorial arrangement (three temperatures and two threonine levels and one sham-inoculated control). At two days of age, all chicks were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, except for the sham-inoculated control group. There was no interaction between the factors on any analyses. High temperature during incubation was able to reduce colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis in the first days, reducing both Salmonella counts and the number of positive birds. It also increased mucin expression and decreased Hsp70 expression compared with other inoculated groups. High temperature during incubation and high threonine level act independently to reduce the negative effects associated to Salmonella Enteritidis infection on intestinal morphology and performance, with results similar to sham-inoculated birds. The findings open new perspectives for practical strategies towards the pre-harvest Salmonella control in the poultry industry. PMID:26131553

  9. High Incubation Temperature and Threonine Dietary Level Improve Ileum Response Against Post-Hatch Salmonella Enteritidis Inoculation in Broiler Chicks.

    PubMed

    de Barros Moreira Filho, Alexandre Lemos; de Oliveira, Celso José Bruno; de Oliveira, Heraldo Bezerra; Campos, Danila Barreiro; Guerra, Ricardo Romão; Costa, Fernando Guilherme Perazzo; Givisiez, Patricia Emília Naves

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of both embryonic thermal manipulation and dietary threonine level on the response of broilers inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, considering bacterial counts in the cecal contents, intestinal morphology, mucin and heat shock protein 70 gene expression, body weight and weight gain. Thermal manipulation was used from 11 days of incubation until hatch, defining three treatments: standard (37.7°C), continuous high temperature (38.7°C) and continuous low temperature (36.7°C). After hatch, chicks were distributed according to a 3x2+1 factorial arrangement (three temperatures and two threonine levels and one sham-inoculated control). At two days of age, all chicks were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, except for the sham-inoculated control group. There was no interaction between the factors on any analyses. High temperature during incubation was able to reduce colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis in the first days, reducing both Salmonella counts and the number of positive birds. It also increased mucin expression and decreased Hsp70 expression compared with other inoculated groups. High temperature during incubation and high threonine level act independently to reduce the negative effects associated to Salmonella Enteritidis infection on intestinal morphology and performance, with results similar to sham-inoculated birds. The findings open new perspectives for practical strategies towards the pre-harvest Salmonella control in the poultry industry.

  10. The Growth Kinetics of Salmonella Enteritidis in Raw Ground Beef.

    PubMed

    Sabike, Islam I; Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Edris, Abobakr M

    2015-01-01

    The growth kinetics of Salmonella Enteritidis in raw beef has been little studied so far. Thus, this study aimed to clarify the growth kinetics of the pathogen in ground beef using a growth model. When Salmonella cells inoculated at various initial doses into ground beef were incubated at a given temperature (24℃), the maximum population (Nmax) of the microbe at the stationary phase varied with the doses. This relationship was expressed with a polynomialequation for Nmax using the initial dose. The combination of the growth model and the polynomial equation successfully predicted Salmonella growth at a given initial dose. When Salmonella cells inoculated in ground beef were incubated at various constant temperatures, the growth curves of the pathogen and natural microflora (NM) were well described with the growth model. The rate constant of growth and the Nmax values for Salmonella and NM were then analyzed kinetically. From these results, growth curves of Salmonella and NM in ground beef stored at dynamic temperatures were successfully predicted. Competition between Salmonella and NM in ground beef was also found during the storage. This study could give usable information on the growth of Salmonella and NM in ground beef at various temperatures.

  11. Detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) Antibodies in Serum Using A Polystyrene Bead/SE Flagella Agglutination Assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serologic screening of flocks can be an important method to detect Salmonella enteritidis (SE) infections but can be labor intensive or lack specificity. Our goal was to develop a rapid agglutination assay using SE flagella adsorbed to polystyrene beads as a simple, relatively specific test to dete...

  12. A genome-wide screen identifies Salmonella Enteritidis lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the HtrA heat shock protein as crucial factors involved in egg white persistence at chicken body temperature.

    PubMed

    Raspoet, R; Shearer, N; Appia-Ayme, C; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Thompson, A; Van Immerseel, F

    2014-05-01

    Eggs contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis are an important source of human foodborne Salmonella infections. Salmonella Enteritidis is able to contaminate egg white during formation of the egg within the chicken oviduct, and it has developed strategies to withstand the antimicrobial properties of egg white to survive in this hostile environment. The mechanisms involved in the persistence of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg white are likely to be complex. To address this issue, a microarray-based transposon library screen was performed to identify genes necessary for survival of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg white at chicken body temperature. The majority of identified genes belonged to the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis pathway. Additionally, we provide evidence that the serine protease/heat shock protein (HtrA) appears essential for the survival of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg white at chicken body temperature.

  13. Use of random forest to estimate population attributable fractions from a case-control study of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections.

    PubMed

    Gu, W; Vieira, A R; Hoekstra, R M; Griffin, P M; Cole, D

    2015-10-01

    To design effective food safety programmes we need to estimate how many sporadic foodborne illnesses are caused by specific food sources based on case-control studies. Logistic regression has substantive limitations for analysing structured questionnaire data with numerous exposures and missing values. We adapted random forest to analyse data of a case-control study of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis illness for source attribution. For estimation of summary population attributable fractions (PAFs) of exposures grouped into transmission routes, we devised a counterfactual estimator to predict reductions in illness associated with removing grouped exposures. For the purpose of comparison, we fitted the data using logistic regression models with stepwise forward and backward variable selection. Our results show that the forward and backward variable selection of logistic regression models were not consistent for parameter estimation, with different significant exposures identified. By contrast, the random forest model produced estimated PAFs of grouped exposures consistent in rank order with results obtained from outbreak data, with egg-related exposures having the highest estimated PAF (22·1%, 95% confidence interval 8·5-31·8). Random forest might be structurally more coherent and efficient than logistic regression models for attributing Salmonella illnesses to sources involving many causal pathways.

  14. A hotel-based outbreak of Salmonella enterica subsp. Enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) in the United Kingdom, 2006.

    PubMed

    Calvert, N; Murphy, L; Smith, A; Copeland, D

    2007-03-01

    An outbreak of food-borne Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 occurred in Cumbria, in north-west England, in the summer of 2006. Fifteen people, all with positive stool samples, met the case definition; three of these were admitted to hospital, including one patient who died. Preliminary investigations suggested a link to a meal served at a local hotel. A case control study was implemented, together with microbiological and environmental investigations. Fifteen microbiologically confirmed cases and 27 unmatched controls were included in the study, controls being randomly selected from people who had eaten at the hotel on the same day. The epidemiological evidence indicated a very strong association between infection and consumption of tiramisu made with raw shell eggs, although none were available for microbiological investigation. These results are in line with other salmonellosis outbreaks that have been associated with the use of raw shell eggs in food manufacturing and production. This paper highlights the continuing need for a greater awareness by those who work in the food industry of the health risks associated with the consumption of raw shell eggs.

  15. Prophylactic Supplementation of Caprylic Acid in Feed Reduces Salmonella Enteritidis Colonization in Commercial Broiler Chicks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis is a major foodborne pathogen for which chickens serve as reservoir hosts. Reducing Salmonella Enteritidis carriage in chickens would reduce contamination of poultry meat and eggs with this pathogen. We investigated the prophylactic efficacy of feed supplemented with caprylic ...

  16. 21 CFR 118.9 - Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.9 Section 118.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... EGGS § 118.9 Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. You must have one...

  17. 21 CFR 118.5 - Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.5 Section 118.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....5 Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental testing when laying...

  18. 21 CFR 118.5 - Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.5 Section 118.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....5 Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental testing when laying...

  19. 21 CFR 118.10 - Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.10 Section 118.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.10 Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE)...

  20. 21 CFR 118.10 - Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.10 Section 118.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.10 Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE)...

  1. 21 CFR 118.9 - Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.9 Section 118.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... EGGS § 118.9 Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. You must have one...

  2. 21 CFR 118.7 - Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.7 Section 118.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....7 Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental sampling. An...

  3. 21 CFR 118.7 - Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.7 Section 118.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....7 Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental sampling. An...

  4. 21 CFR 118.9 - Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.9 Section 118.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... EGGS § 118.9 Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. You must have one...

  5. 21 CFR 118.10 - Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.10 Section 118.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.10 Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE)...

  6. 21 CFR 118.7 - Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.7 Section 118.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....7 Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental sampling. An...

  7. 21 CFR 118.5 - Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.5 Section 118.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....5 Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental testing when laying...

  8. Improving Food Safety by Understanding the Evolution of Egg-contaminating Salmonella Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving Food Safety by Understanding the Evolution of Egg-contaminating Salmonella Enteritidis Jean Guard, Veterinary Medical Officer U. S. Department of Agriculture, Athens, GA USA (jean.guard@ars.usda.gov) The curious case of egg contamination by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis S. ...

  9. 21 CFR 118.10 - Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.10 Section 118.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.10 Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE)...

  10. 21 CFR 118.10 - Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.10 Section 118.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.10 Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE)...

  11. 21 CFR 118.5 - Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.5 Section 118.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....5 Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental testing when laying...

  12. 21 CFR 118.9 - Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.9 Section 118.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... EGGS § 118.9 Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. You must have one...

  13. 21 CFR 118.5 - Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.5 Section 118.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....5 Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental testing when laying...

  14. 21 CFR 118.9 - Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.9 Section 118.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... EGGS § 118.9 Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. You must have one...

  15. 21 CFR 118.7 - Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.7 Section 118.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....7 Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental sampling. An...

  16. 21 CFR 118.7 - Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.7 Section 118.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....7 Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental sampling. An...

  17. Vaccination of Chickens with SPI1-lon and SPI1-lon-fliC Mutant of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Matulova, Marta; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Rychlik, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is gradually decreasing in poultry flocks in the EU, which may result in the demand for a vaccine that allows for the differentiation of vaccinated flocks from those infected by wild-type S. Enteritidis. In this study, we therefore constructed a (Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1) SPI1-lon mutant with or without fliC encoding for S. Enteritidis flagellin. The combination of SPI1-lon mutations resulted in attenuated but immunogenic mutant suitable for oral vaccination of poultry. In addition, the vaccination of chickens with the SPI1-lon-fliC mutant enabled the serological differentiation of vaccinated and infected chickens. The absence of fliC therefore did not affect the immunogenicity of the vaccine strain and allowed for serological differentiation of the vaccinated chickens. The SPI1-lon-fliC mutant is therefore a suitable marker vaccine strain for oral vaccination of poultry. PMID:23785484

  18. Molecular detection assay of five Salmonella serotypes of public interest: Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Newport, Heidelberg, and Hadar.

    PubMed

    Bugarel, M; Tudor, A; Loneragan, G H; Nightingale, K K

    2017-03-01

    Foodborne illnesses due to Salmonella represent an important public-health concern worldwide. In the United States, a majority of Salmonella infections are associated with a small number of serotypes. Furthermore, some serotypes that are overrepresented among human disease are also associated with multi-drug resistance phenotypes. Rapid detection of serotypes of public-health concern might help reduce the burden of salmonellosis cases and limit exposure to multi-drug resistant Salmonella. We developed a two-step real-time PCR-based rapid method for the identification and detection of five Salmonella serotypes that are either overrepresented in human disease or frequently associated with multi-drug resistance, including serotypes Enteritidis, Typhimurium, Newport, Hadar, and Heidelberg. Two sets of four markers were developed to detect and differentiate the five serotypes. The first set of markers was developed as a screening step to detect the five serotypes; whereas, the second set was used to further distinguish serotypes Heidelberg, Newport and Hadar. The utilization of these markers on a two-step investigation strategy provides a diagnostic specificity of 97% for the detection of Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Heidelberg, Infantis, Newport and Hadar. The diagnostic sensitivity of the detection makers is >96%. The availability of this two-step rapid method will facilitate specific detection of Salmonella serotypes that contribute to a significant proportion of human disease and carry antimicrobial resistance.

  19. Characteristics of invasion-reduced hilA gene mutant of Salmonella Enteritidis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lv, Shuang; Si, Wei; Yu, Shenye; Li, Zhaoli; Wang, Xiumei; Chen, Liping; Zhang, Wanjiang; Liu, Siguo

    2015-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes huge losses in poultry industry and also food poisoning in humans due to its being a food-borne pathogen. Functions of Invasion-related genes need to be explored, as invasion is a key step for Salmonella infection. In this study, a transposon mutant library of Salmonella Enteritidis isolate SM6 was constructed and screened for the invasion-related genes via incubation with Caco-2 cells. Three stably attenuated mutants were identified for significantly reduced invasion with insertions all in hilA (hyperinvasive locus A) gene. We constructed and evaluated the hilA deletion mutant in vivo and in vitro. SM6△hilA showed significantly reduced ability to invade Caco-2 cells and decreased pathogenicity in chicks. However, the bacterial load and pathological damage in the cecum were significantly higher than those in the SM6 in vivo. Present results provide new evidences for pathogenicity research on Salmonella Enteritidis.

  20. Chicken-specific kinome array reveals that Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis modulates host immune signaling pathways in the cecum to establish a persistence infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induce an early, short-lived, pro-inflammatory response in chickens that is asymptomatic of clinical disease and results in a persistent colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that transmits infections to naïve hosts via fecal shedding of bacteria. The und...

  1. Isolation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva).

    PubMed

    Marietto-Gonçalves, Guilherme Augusto; de Almeida, Sílvia Maria; de Lima, Edna Tereza; Okamoto, Adriano Sakai; Pinczowski, Pedro; Andreatti Filho, Raphael Lucio

    2010-03-01

    Avian salmonellosis is a disease caused by bacteria of the genus Salmonella that can cause three distinct diseases in birds: pullorum diseases, fowl typhoid, and paratyphoid infection. Various wildlife species are susceptible to infections by Salmonella, regardless of whether they live in captivity or freely in the wild. The present study verified the presence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in three captive specimens of Amazona aestiva. The study involved a total of 103 birds undergoing rehabilitation to prepare for living in the wild, after having been captured from animal traffickers and delivered to the Centrofauna Project of the Floravida Institute in Sao Paulo, Brazil. This is the first report of Salmonella Enteritidis isolation in A. aestiva that originated from capture associated with animal trafficking; Salmonella was detected during the study by the serologic method of rapid serum agglutination on a plate with bacterial isolate. The antimicrobial profile exam of the isolated samples demonstrated sensitivity to ampicillin, cefaclor, ciprofloxacin, and cloranfenicol. The three samples also presented resistance to more than four antibiotics. The presence of the genes invA and spvC was verified by PCR technique and was associated with virulence and absence of class 1 integron, a gene related to antimicrobial resistance. The commercial antigen for pullorum disease was shown to be a useful tool for rapid detection in the screening of Salmonella of serogroup D1 in Psittaciformes. New studies on Salmonella carriage in birds involved in trafficking must be performed to better understand their participation in the epidemiologic cycle of salmonellosis in humans and other animals.

  2. Lessons learned from a Salmonella enteritidis phage type 4 outbreak in Austria, 2005.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Daniela; Luckner-Hornischer, Anita; Holzhammer, Gerda; Rokita, Dietmar; Federspiel, Martin; Lassnig, Heimo; Pichler, Anna-Margareta; Lederer, Ingeborg; Beranek, Andreas; Kornschober, Christian; Berghold, Christian; Allerberger, Franz

    2007-01-01

    An outbreak of gastroenteritis due to Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 4 occurred in people who attended a traditional hunting festivity in a small village in western Austria 6 through 11 November 2005. Of approximately 250 attendees, 227 had consumed dishes offered at the festival, and of these consumers 35 persons fulfilled the outbreak case definition (attack rate of 15.4%). Spätzle (traditional pastalike side dish) was most likely the contaminated part of the incriminated main course (relative risk of 18.9, 95% confidence interval of 4.6 to 76.7; P < 0.001). Thirteen eggs that remained from the preparation of the spätzle were negative for Salmonella when tested individually without shell disinfection, as were 1200 eggs collected at the egg production plant and examined with shell disinfection. The back-traced egg production farm had been initially certified as Salmonella free by a voluntary quality control program. However, an intensified environmental investigation of the incriminated egg production farm performed in the first quarter of 2006 and based on an appropriate method of sampling revealed Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 4 in 4 of 13 flocks. Although a combination of epidemiological and microbiological investigations allowed elucidation of the mode of spread, no restrictions were placed on the incriminated flocks of laying hens. These flocks were kept in production until they were stalled out due to age in August 2006. In June 2006, a cluster of 23 cases of Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 6 infection was again associated with this egg production farm. Evidence provided by epidemiological analyses is often disregarded by decision makers. However, negative results from microbiological testing of food involved in an outbreak are often weighted as strong evidence against a causal association between that food and the outbreak.

  3. Live attenuated vaccines for invasive Salmonella infections

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Sharon M.; Levine, Myron M.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi produces significant morbidity and mortality worldwide despite the fact that there are licensed S. Typhi vaccines available. This is primarily due to the fact that these vaccines are not used in the countries that most need them. There is growing recognition that an effective invasive Salmonella vaccine formulation must also prevent infection due to other Salmonella serovars. We anticipate that a multivalent vaccine that targets the following serovars will be needed to control invasive Salmonella infections worldwide: S. Typhi, S. Paratyphi A, S. Paratyphi B (currently uncommon but may become dominant again), S. Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis and S. Choleraesuis (as well as other Group C Salmonella). Live attenuated vaccines are an attractive vaccine formulation for use in developing as well as developed countries. Here, we describe the methods of attenuation that have been used to date to create live attenuated Salmonella vaccines and provide an update on the progress that has been made on these vaccines. PMID:25902362

  4. Salmonella Enteritidis with double deletion in phoPfliC--a potential live Salmonella vaccine candidate with novel characteristics for use in chickens.

    PubMed

    Methner, Ulrich; Barrow, Paul A; Berndt, Angela; Rychlik, Ivan

    2011-04-12

    Salmonella Enteritidis mutants with deletions in phoP, fliC or phoPfliC were tested for their virulence and their ability to induce parameters of the innate and adaptive immunity in addition to their potential for serological differentiation between vaccinated, non-vaccinated and infected chickens. The double phoPfliC deletion mutant was sufficiently attenuated but not diminished in its capability to inhibit the caecal colonisation and systemic invasion of homologous Salmonella Enteritidis shortly after administration of the vaccine strain to very young chicks. Immunisation with the attenuated ΔphoPfliC mutant resulted in protective effects which were only slightly and insignificantly lower than after "immunisation" with a Salmonella wild-type strain, indicating the capability to induce an intense adaptive immune response and protection against Salmonella exposure in older chickens. The deletion in fliC enabled the effective the differentiation between immunised and infected chickens using a commercially available ELISA kit. The double phoPfliC deletion mutant of Salmonella Enteritidis might be a potential and promising live Salmonella vaccine candidate with novel characteristics for use in poultry.

  5. RapidChek SELECT Salmonella enteritidis test system for the detection of Salmonella enteritidis in poultry house drag swabs, shell egg pools, and chicken carcass rinsates.

    PubMed

    Muldoon, Mark T; Gonzalez, Verapaz; Sutzko, Meredith I; Allen, Ann-Christine Olsson; Creamer, Samantha; Onisk, Dale V; Lindpaintner, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    The RapidChek SELECT Salmonella Enteritidis Test System was validated for the detection of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in poultry house drag swabs, shell egg pools, and chicken carcass rinsates. The method utilizes RapidChek SELECT Salmonella (AOAC PTM License No. 080601) proprietary primary and secondary enrichment media. Following enrichment, an immunochromatographic test strip is inserted into the tube containing the secondary enrichment broth, developed for 10 min, and interpreted. Salmonella Enteritidis-inoculated samples (1-5 CFU SE/analytical unit) were tested by the test method as well as the appropriate cultural reference method U.S. Food and Drug Administration-Bacteriological Analytical Manual (drag swabs and egg pools) or U.S. Department of Agriculture-Food Safety and Inspection Service (chicken carcass rinsates). A total of 80 samples were tested by both methods in the study. Fifty-two samples were positive by the RapidChek SELECT Salmonella Enteritidis method and 38 were found positive by the respective reference method. The sensitivity of the method was 100% and the specificity was 100%. The accuracy of the test method was 137%, indicating that the method was more sensitive than the reference method. The RapidChek SELECT Salmonella Enteritidis method was tested with 82 Salmonella Group D1 strains including 63 Salmonella Enteritidis strains as well as 32 non-Salmonella Group D1 strains representing 10 bacteria genera. The test method detected all 82 Group D1 strains (100% sensitivity). None of the non-Salmonella Group D1 or other genera of bacteria were detected, indicating a specificity of 100%. The method was shown to be highly robust and stable under control and accelerated stability conditions.

  6. Heat transfer models for predicting Salmonella enteritidis in shell eggs through supply chain distribution.

    PubMed

    Almonacid, S; Simpson, R; Teixeira, A

    2007-11-01

    Egg and egg preparations are important vehicles for Salmonella enteritidis infections. The influence of time-temperature becomes important when the presence of this organism is found in commercial shell eggs. A computer-aided mathematical model was validated to estimate surface and interior temperature of shell eggs under variable ambient and refrigerated storage temperature. A risk assessment of S. enteritidis based on the use of this model, coupled with S. enteritidis kinetics, has already been reported in a companion paper published earlier in JFS. The model considered the actual geometry and composition of shell eggs and was solved by numerical techniques (finite differences and finite elements). Parameters of interest such as local (h) and global (U) heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity, and apparent volumetric specific heat were estimated by an inverse procedure from experimental temperature measurement. In order to assess the error in predicting microbial population growth, theoretical and experimental temperatures were applied to a S. enteritidis growth model taken from the literature. Errors between values of microbial population growth calculated from model predicted compared with experimentally measured temperatures were satisfactorily low: 1.1% and 0.8% for the finite difference and finite element model, respectively.

  7. [Purulent pericarditis and colonic infiltrating to Salmonella enteritidis complicated by acute intussusception in a case of IL-12Rβ1 deficiency].

    PubMed

    Ailal, F; Tazi, A; Bustamante, J; Picard, C; Najib, J; Casanova, J-L; Bousfiha, A A

    2014-12-01

    IL-12 receptor β1 deficiency (IL-12Rβ1) predisposes patients to mycobacteria and Salmonella infections. We report a case of IL-12Rβ1 deficiency with a fatal multi-resistant Salmonella enteritidis infection. This boy was born after from a consanguineous marriage, and diagnosed as having a IL-12Rβ1 deficiency since the age of 3 months. He presented with recurrent Salmonella enteritidis essentially digestive localization, complicated by purulent pericarditis at the same germ at the age of two and a half years. At the age of 3, a colonic infiltration due to a Salmonella enteritidis resistant to antibiotics, was complicated by acute intussusception, and the child died. The IL-12Rβ1 deficiency is considered as having a good prognosis, in contrast to what happened in our patient. We review therapeutic issues in these patients.

  8. Dam methylation is required for efficient biofilm production in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Aya Castañeda, María del Rosario; Sarnacki, Sebastián Hernán; Noto Llana, Mariángeles; López Guerra, Adriana Gabriela; Giacomodonato, Mónica Nancy; Cerquetti, María Cristina

    2015-01-16

    The ecological success of Salmonella enterica to survive in different environments is due, in part, to the ability to form biofilms, something which is especially important for food industry. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the involvement of Dam methylation in biofilm production in S. Enteritidis strains. The ability to generate biofilms was analyzed in wild type and dam mutant strains. In S. Enteritidis, the absence of Dam affected the capacity to develop pellicles at the air-liquid interface and reduced the ability to form biofilm on polystyrene surfaces. Curli and cellulose production, determined by Congo red and calcofluor assays, were affected in dam mutant strains. Relative quantitative real-time PCR experiments showed that the expression of csgD and csgA genes is reduced in mutants lacking dam gene with respect to the wild type strains, whereas transcript levels of bcsA are not affected in the absence of Dam. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the participation of Dam methylation on biofilm production in Enteritidis or any other serovar of S. enterica. Results presented here suggest that changes in gene expression required for biofilm production are finely regulated by Dam methylation. Thus, Dam methylation could modulate csgD expression and upregulate the expression of factors related with biofilm production, including curli and cellulose. This study contributes to the understanding of biofilm regulation in Salmonella spp. and to the design of new strategies to prevent food contamination and humans and animals infections.

  9. Salmonella Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... reptiles like snakes, turtles, and lizards. Symptoms include Fever Diarrhea Abdominal cramps Headache Possible nausea, vomiting, and ... be serious. The usual treatment is antibiotics. Typhoid fever, a more serious disease caused by Salmonella, is ...

  10. Characterization of the ELPhiS prophage from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis strain LK5.

    PubMed

    Hanna, L Farris; Matthews, T David; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Hasty, David; Edwards, Robert A

    2012-03-01

    Phages are a primary driving force behind the evolution of bacterial pathogens by transferring a variety of virulence genes into their hosts. Similar to other bacterial genomes, the Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis LK5 genome contains several regions that are homologous to phages. Although genomic analysis demonstrated the presence of prophages, it was unable to confirm which phage elements within the genome were viable. Genetic markers were used to tag one of the prophages in the genome to allow monitoring of phage induction. Commonly used laboratory strains of Salmonella were resistant to phage infection, and therefore a rapid screen was developed to identify susceptible hosts. This approach showed that a genetically tagged prophage, ELPhiS (Enteritidis lysogenic phage S), was capable of infecting Salmonella serovars that are diverse in host range and virulence and has the potential to laterally transfer genes between these serovars via lysogenic conversion. The rapid screen approach is adaptable to any system with a large collection of isolates and may be used to test the viability of prophages found by sequencing the genomes of various bacterial pathogens.

  11. A model of Salmonella infection within industrial house hens.

    PubMed

    Prévost, K; Magal, P; Beaumont, C

    2006-10-07

    Salmonella is one of the major sources of toxi-infection in humans. Incidences of human salmonellosis have greatly increased over the past 20 years and this can largely be attributed to epidemics of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 4 within poultry. The main concern with this bacterium is the existence of silent carriers, i.e. animals harbouring S. enteritidis without expressing any visible symptoms. In this article, we formulate a model for S. enteritidis transmission in hen houses, considering both the hens and the environmental bacterium contamination. By considering the hen's individual development of the disease, we build a model for the production of eggs contaminated by S. enteritidis. The objectives are to analyse the dynamic of the disease, and to provide understanding of measures to avoid the endemicity of S. enteritidis in industrial hen houses.

  12. Rapid inactivation of Salmonella Enteritidis on shell eggs by plant-derived antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Indu; Upadhyay, Abhinav; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Baskaran, Sangeetha Ananda; Mooyottu, Shankumar; Darre, Michael J; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is a common foodborne pathogen transmitted to humans largely by consumption of contaminated eggs. The external surface of eggs becomes contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis from various sources on farms, the main sources being hens' droppings and contaminated litter. Therefore, effective egg surface disinfection is critical to reduce pathogens on eggs and potentially control egg-borne disease outbreaks. This study investigated the efficacy of GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status, plant-derived antimicrobials (PDA), namely trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC), carvacrol (CR), and eugenol (EUG), as an antimicrobial wash for rapidly killing Salmonella Enteritidis on shell eggs in the presence or absence of chicken droppings. White-shelled eggs inoculated with a 5-strain mixture of nalidixic acid (NA) resistant Salmonella Enteritidis (8.0 log cfu/mL) were washed in sterile deionized water containing each PDA (0.0, 0.25, 0.5, or 0.75%) or chlorine (200 mg/kg) at 32 or 42°C for 30 s, 3 min, or 5 min. Approximately 6.0 log cfu/mL of Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered from inoculated and unwashed eggs. The wash water control and chlorine control decreased Salmonella Enteritidis on eggs by only 2.0 log cfu/mL even after washing for 5 min. The PDA were highly effective in killing Salmonella Enteritidis on eggs compared with controls (P < 0.05). All treatments containing CR and EUG reduced Salmonella Enteritidis to undetectable levels as rapidly as within 30 s of washing, whereas TC (0.75%) completely inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis on eggs washed at 42°C for 30 s (P < 0.05). No Salmonella Enteritidis was detected in any PDA or chlorine wash solution; however, substantial pathogen populations (~4.0 log cfu/mL) survived in the antibacterial-free control wash water (P < 0.05). The CR and EUG were also able to eliminate Salmonella Enteritidis on eggs to undetectable levels in the presence of 3% chicken droppings at 32°C (P < 0.05). This study

  13. [Significance of Salmonella enteritidis in outbreaks of diseases transmitted by foods in Argentina, 1986-1988].

    PubMed

    Eiguer, T; Caffer, M I; Fronchkowsky, G B

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the outbreaks of food-borne-diseases due to Salmonella Enteritidis which occurred in Argentina between 1986 and 1988. In 39 registered episodes 210 strains were isolated from human feces (28 outbreaks) and 59 from food (23 outbreaks). More than 2,500 people in different provinces were affected, the chief characteristics of the clinical picture being the gravity of the symptoms (high temperature, vomiting, diarrhea and severe dehydration). The main source of infection was related to raw eggs, eaten in the form of home-made mayonnaise. It is considered necessary to carry out an effective control of poultry products, as well as a permanent surveillance of salmonellosis.

  14. Risks Involved in the Use of Enrofloxacin for Salmonella Enteritidis or Salmonella Heidelberg in Commercial Poultry.

    PubMed

    Morales-Barrera, Eduardo; Calhoun, Nicole; Lobato-Tapia, Jose L; Lucca, Vivian; Prado-Rebolledo, Omar; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl; Merino-Guzman, Ruben; Petrone-García, Victor M; Latorre, Juan D; Mahaffey, Brittany D; Teague, Kyle D; Graham, Lucas E; Wolfenden, Amanda D; Baxter, Mikayla F A; Hargis, Billy M; Tellez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the risks involved in the use of Enrofloxacin for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) or Salmonella Heidelberg (SH) in commercial poultry and determine the effects of a probiotic as an antibiotic alternative. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the risks involved in the use of Enrofloxacin for SE or SH in commercial poultry. Experiment 1 consisted of two trials. In each trial, chickens were assigned to one of three groups; control + SE challenged; Enrofloxacin 25 mg/kg + SE; and Enrofloxacin 50 mg/kg + SE. Chickens received Enrofloxacin in the drinking water from days 1 to 5 of age. On day 6, all groups received fresh water without any treatment. All chickens were orally gavaged with 10(7) cfu/chick of SE at 7 days of age and euthanized on 8 days of age. In Experiment 2, turkey poults were assigned to one of the three groups; control + SH; probiotic + SH; and Enrofloxacin 50 mg/kg + SH. Poults received probiotic or Enrofloxacin in the drinking water from days 1 to 5 of age. On day 6, poults received fresh water without any treatment. Poults were orally gavaged with 10(7) cfu/poult of SH at 7 days of age. Poults were weighed and humanely killed 24 h post-SH challenge to evaluate serum concentration of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran to evaluate intestinal permeability, metagenomics, and SH infection. In both trials of Experiment 1, chickens treated with Enrofloxacin were more susceptible to SE organ invasion and intestinal colonization when compared with control non-treated chickens (P < 0.05). In Experiment 2, poults treated with 50 mg/kg of Enrofloxacin showed an increase in body weight, however, this group also showed an increase in SH susceptibility, intestinal permeability, and lower proportion of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, but with control group had the highest proportion of Proteobacteria. By contrast, poults that received the probiotic had the highest

  15. Risks Involved in the Use of Enrofloxacin for Salmonella Enteritidis or Salmonella Heidelberg in Commercial Poultry

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Barrera, Eduardo; Calhoun, Nicole; Lobato-Tapia, Jose L.; Lucca, Vivian; Prado-Rebolledo, Omar; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl; Merino-Guzman, Ruben; Petrone-García, Victor M.; Latorre, Juan D.; Mahaffey, Brittany D.; Teague, Kyle D.; Graham, Lucas E.; Wolfenden, Amanda D.; Baxter, Mikayla F. A.; Hargis, Billy M.; Tellez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the risks involved in the use of Enrofloxacin for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) or Salmonella Heidelberg (SH) in commercial poultry and determine the effects of a probiotic as an antibiotic alternative. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the risks involved in the use of Enrofloxacin for SE or SH in commercial poultry. Experiment 1 consisted of two trials. In each trial, chickens were assigned to one of three groups; control + SE challenged; Enrofloxacin 25 mg/kg + SE; and Enrofloxacin 50 mg/kg + SE. Chickens received Enrofloxacin in the drinking water from days 1 to 5 of age. On day 6, all groups received fresh water without any treatment. All chickens were orally gavaged with 107 cfu/chick of SE at 7 days of age and euthanized on 8 days of age. In Experiment 2, turkey poults were assigned to one of the three groups; control + SH; probiotic + SH; and Enrofloxacin 50 mg/kg + SH. Poults received probiotic or Enrofloxacin in the drinking water from days 1 to 5 of age. On day 6, poults received fresh water without any treatment. Poults were orally gavaged with 107 cfu/poult of SH at 7 days of age. Poults were weighed and humanely killed 24 h post-SH challenge to evaluate serum concentration of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran to evaluate intestinal permeability, metagenomics, and SH infection. In both trials of Experiment 1, chickens treated with Enrofloxacin were more susceptible to SE organ invasion and intestinal colonization when compared with control non-treated chickens (P < 0.05). In Experiment 2, poults treated with 50 mg/kg of Enrofloxacin showed an increase in body weight, however, this group also showed an increase in SH susceptibility, intestinal permeability, and lower proportion of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, but with control group had the highest proportion of Proteobacteria. By contrast, poults that received the probiotic had the highest

  16. Emergence of host-adapted Salmonella Enteritidis through rapid evolution in an immunocompromised host

    PubMed Central

    Klemm, Elizabeth J; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Hadfield, James; Forbester, Jessica L; Harris, Simon R; Hale, Christine; Heath, Jennifer N; Wileman, Thomas; Clare, Simon; Kane, Leanne; Goulding, David; Otto, Thomas D; Kay, Sally; Doffinger, Rainer; Cooke, Fiona J; Carmichael, Andrew; Lever, Andrew ML; Parkhill, Julian; MacLennan, Calman A; Kumararatne, Dinakantha

    2016-01-01

    Summary Host adaptation is a key factor contributing to the emergence of new bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens. Many pathogens are considered promiscuous because they cause disease across a range of host species, while others are host-adapted, infecting particular hosts1. Host adaptation can potentially progress to host restriction where the pathogen is strictly limited to a single host species and is frequently associated with more severe symptoms. Host-adapted and host-restricted bacterial clades evolve from within a broader host-promiscuous species and sometimes target different niches within their specialist hosts, such as adapting from a mucosal to a systemic lifestyle. Genome degradation, marked by gene inactivation and deletion, is a key feature of host adaptation, although the triggers initiating genome degradation are not well understood. Here, we show that a chronic systemic non-typhoidal Salmonella infection in an immunocompromised human patient resulted in genome degradation targeting genes that are expendable for a systemic lifestyle. We present a genome-based investigation of a recurrent blood-borne Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) infection covering 15 years in an interleukin (IL)-12 β-1 receptor-deficient individual that developed into an asymptomatic chronic infection. The infecting S. Enteritidis harbored a mutation in the mismatch repair gene mutS that accelerated the genomic mutation rate. Phylogenetic analysis and phenotyping of multiple patient isolates provides evidence for a remarkable level of within-host evolution that parallels genome changes present in successful host-restricted bacterial pathogens but never before observed on this timescale. Our analysis identifies common pathways of host adaptation and demonstrates the role that immunocompromised individuals can play in this process. PMID:27127642

  17. Electron-beam-inactivated vaccine against Salmonella enteritidis colonization in molting hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electron Beam (eBeam) ionization technology has a variety of applications in modern society. The underlying hypothesis was that electron beam (eBeam) inactivated Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) cells can serve as a vaccine to control Salmonella colonization and Salmonella shedding in c...

  18. Efficacy for a new live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine candidate to reduce internal egg contamination.

    PubMed

    Nandre, R; Matsuda, K; Lee, J H

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a novel attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis (△lon△cpxR) vaccine candidate (JOL919), chickens were immunized through oral and intramuscular routes to reduce egg contamination against S. Enteritidis challenge. Birds were orally immunized with JOL919 on the first day of life and were subsequently boosted in the 6th and 16th weeks through oral (group B) or intramuscular (group C) route, while control birds were unimmunized (group A). The chickens of all groups were challenged intravenously with the virulent S. Enteritidis strain in the 24th week. The immunized groups B and C showed significantly higher plasma IgG and intestinal secretory IgA levels as compared to those of the control group. The lymphocyte proliferation response and CD45(+) CD3(+) T-cell number in the peripheral blood of the groups B and C were significantly increased. In addition, the egg contamination rates were significantly lower in the group B (0%, 10.7% and 0%) and the group C (3.6%, 14.3% and 3.6%) as compared to the group A (28.6%, 42.8% and 28.6%) in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd weeks post-challenge. All animals in the groups B and C showed lower organ lesion scores in the liver and spleen and lower bacterial counts in the liver, spleen and ovary at the 3rd week post-challenge. These results indicate that this vaccine candidate can be an efficient tool for prevention of Salmonella infections by inducing protective humoral and cellular immune responses. In addition, this vaccine did not prevent egg contamination, but did appear to reduce incidence. Booster immunizations, especially via oral administration route, showed an efficient protection against internal egg contamination with S. Enteritidis.

  19. [Use of bacteriphages against Salmonella Enteritidis: a prevention tool].

    PubMed

    García, Cristina; Marín, Clara; Catalá-Gregori, Pablo; Soriano, Jose Miguel

    2015-06-01

    Introducción: la salmonelosis es una enfermedad de alta prevalencia, siendo la búsqueda de herramientas preventivas para evitar la contaminación una prioridad a nivel de salud pública. Objetivo: en el presente trabajo se evaluó el efecto in vitro de bacteriófagos frente a Salmonella enteritidis como una herramienta de prevención. Método: se realizaron dos pruebas con tres concentraciones de bacteriófagos frente a dos cepas de Salmonella enteritidis inoculadas en muestras de heces frescas de gallinas ponedoras, y el correspondiente control positivo. Así, se testaron cuatro grupos en cada una de las dos pruebas. Cada grupo experimental contó con dos réplicas, y en cada réplica se incubaron tres placas. Las concentraciones ensayadas fueron tres: solución comercial (5 × 107 pfu/mL), y dos diluciones de la misma (1/10 y 1/30). Una de las cepas testada fue la cepa CECT 4300, cepa certificada de la Colección Española de Cultivo Tipo, y la otra una cepa de campo aislada en una explotación de ponedoras sacrificadas. Ambas cepas se inocularon en muestras de heces a la dosis de 1,3 × 105 ufc/g de heces en cada uno de los cuatro grupos. Se procedió con el aislamiento e identificación de la bacteria por ISO 6579 a varios tiempos desde la inoculación: 1 minuto, 24 h y 7 días. Resultados: en la primera prueba, con la cepa certificada, se aisló Salmonella en todos los grupos a tiempo 1 minuto. A las 24 h se aisló Salmonella en todos los grupos excepto en una de las réplicas tratada con la dilución 1/10 de bacteriófagos, en una de las placas de la otra réplica tratada con la dilución 1/10, y en dos placas de cada una de las dos réplicas tratadas con la solución comercial. A partir de los 7 días ya no se aisló la bacteria de ninguno de los grupos experimentales. En la segunda prueba, con la cepa de campo, se aisló Salmonella en todos los grupos a tiempo 1 minuto. A las 24 h se aisló Salmonella en todos los grupos excepto en una de las r

  20. Research note: Salmonella enteritidis and Arizona hinshawii isolated from wild sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windingstad, R.M.; Trainer, D.O.; Duncan, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    Salmonella enteritidis serotype Rubislaw and Arizona hinshawii were isolated from cloacal swabs of 'healthy' live-trapped sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) in Indiana and Wisconsin. These respective isolations were the first reported from wild sandhill cranes.

  1. Control of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum in birds by using live vaccine candidate containing attenuated Salmonella Gallinarum mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Penha Filho, Rafael Antonio Casarin; de Paiva, Jacqueline Boldrin; da Silva, Mariana Dias; de Almeida, Adriana Maria; Berchieri, Angelo

    2010-04-01

    The ideal live vaccine to control Salmonella in commercial chicken flocks should engender protection against various strains. The purpose of the present study was to confirm the attenuation of a Salmonella Gallinarum (SG) mutant strain with deletion on genes cobS and cbiA, that are involved in the biosynthesis of cobalamin. Furthermore, evaluate its use as a live vaccine against Salmonella. For the evaluation of the vaccine efficacy, two experiments were conducted separately. Birds from a commercial brown line of chickens were used to perform challenge with SG wild type strain and birds from a commercial white line of chickens were used to perform challenge with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) wild type strain. In both experiments, the birds were separated in three groups (A, B and C). Birds were orally vaccinated with the SG mutant as the following programme: group A, one dose at 5 days of age; group B, one dose at 5 days of age and a second dose at 25 days of age; and group C, birds were kept unvaccinated as controls. At 45 days of age, birds from all groups, including the control, were challenged orally by SG wild type (brown line) or SE wild type (white line). Lastly, another experiment was performed to evaluate the use of the SG mutant strain to prevent caecal colonization by SE wild type on 1-day-old broiler chicks. Mortality and systemic infection by SG wild type strain were assessed in brown chickens; faecal shedding and systemic infection by SE wild type were assessed in white chickens and caecal colonization was assessed in broiler chicks. Either vaccination with one or two doses of SG mutant, were capable to protect brown chickens against SG wild type. In the experiment with white chickens, only vaccination with two doses of SG mutant protected the birds against challenge with SE wild type. Although, SG mutant could not prevent caecal colonization in 1-day-old broiler chicks by the challenge strain SE wild type. Overall, the results indicated that SG mutant

  2. Potential use of caprylic acid in broiler chickens: effect on Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Skřivanová, Eva; Hovorková, Petra; Čermák, Ladislav; Marounek, Milan

    2015-01-01

    The effect of dietary caprylic acid (CA) on Salmonella Enteritidis, as well as the surface treatment of chicken skin contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis was evaluated. To evaluate the dietary effect of CA on Salmonella Enteritidis, the individually housed broiler chickens (n=48) were divided into 4 groups (positive control, negative control, 2.5 g/kg of CA in the feed, and 5 g/kg of CA in the feed). The feed of all groups, except the negative control, was artificially contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis ATCC 13076 (10(7) colony-forming units/100 g of feed). Both concentrations of dietary CA significantly decreased counts of Salmonella Enteritidis in the crop and cecum of experimental chickens (p<0.05). The effect of CA in the crop contents was more pronounced than in the cecum. Surface treatment of chilled chicken halves with CA at 1.25 and 2.5 mg/mL significantly decreased Salmonella Enteritidis contamination of chicken skin (p<0.05). The sensory evaluation of the skin and meat showed that treatment of the skin with 1.25 mg/mL of CA worsened odor and appearance of the chicken skin, while sensory traits of chicken meat were not significantly affected. Taste and overall acceptability was not influenced by CA in both meat and skin. Treatment of the skin with 2.5 mg/mL of CA resulted in more pronounced changes of the skin odor and appearance. In conclusion, dietary CA reduced carriage of Salmonella Enteritidis in chickens, whereas surface-treatment reduced or eliminated Salmonella Enteritidis contamination in the processed bird.

  3. Differentiation of Salmonella enteritidis isolates by fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Kober, Márcia Vargas; Abreu, Marina Bystronski; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Ferreira, Carlos Alexandre Sanchez; Oliveira, Sílvia Dias

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is responsible for human gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide, and the molecular characterization of isolates is an important tool for epidemiological studies. Fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (FAFLP) analysis was performed on 31 Salmonella Enteritidis strains from South Brazil isolated from human, foods, swine, broiler carcasses, and other poultry-related samples to subtype isolates in comparison to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis. Five strains of Salmonella Enteritidis from different geographical regions, Salmonella Enteritidis ATCC 13076, and four isolates of different Salmonella serovars were also tested. Among the 41 isolates tested, 96 polymorphic AFs and 40 distinct profiles were obtained, displaying a Simpson's index of diversity of 0.99; whereas the PFGE analysis presented 13 patterns and the resulting Simpson's index was 0.55. Nine FAFLP and seven PFGE clusters could be inferred based in Dice similarity coefficient. FAFLP clustering readily identified different serotypes of Salmonella but did not distinguish isolates epidemiologically nonrelated or distinct phage types. Therefore, these results indicate that FAFLP is a rapid method for epidemiological investigations of Salmonella outbreaks, presenting a high discriminatory power for subtyping of Salmonella Enteritidis.

  4. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminated eggs produced by infected commercial laying flocks are often implicated as sources of human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis, but Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium have also been significantly associated with egg-transmitted illness. Contamination of the edible conten...

  5. Inhibition of Salmonella Enteritidis by cerein 8A, EDTA and sodium lactate.

    PubMed

    Lappe, Rosiele; Motta, Amanda S; Sant'anna, Voltaire; Brandelli, Adriano

    2009-11-15

    The ability of the bacteriocin cerein 8A to inhibit Salmonella Enteritidis in combination with EDTA and sodium lactate was investigated. Salmonella Enteritidis was incubated with combinations of cerein 8A (3200AU/mL) and EDTA (20, 50, 100 mmol/L) or sodium lactate (200 mmol/L). All treatments caused a significant reduction in the OD(600) values of Salmonella Enteritidis cultures. The addition of cerein 8A plus EDTA resulted in higher inhibition in comparison with the bacteriocin alone; the greater the concentration of EDTA, the greater the inhibitory effect. The combination of cerein 8A plus 100 mmol/L EDTA results in a more efficient treatment to reduce the number of viable cells of Salmonella Enteritidis. The combination of cerein 8A plus sodium lactate also showed significant inhibition of the indicator organism. Transmission electron microscopy showed damaged cell walls and loss of protoplasmic material in treated cells. The cells of Salmonella Enteritidis treated with cerein 8A plus EDTA appeared more injured. The bacteriocin cerein 8A may be useful to inhibit Gram-negative bacteria, with enhanced effect in combination with chelating agents. Control of Salmonella Enteritidis, a Gram-negative bacterium constantly linked to food outbreaks, addresses an important aspect of food safety.

  6. Phage typing of Salmonella enteritidis from different sources in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Iolanda A; Helmuth, Reiner; Schroeter, Andreus; Mead, Geoffrey C; Santos, Manoel A A; Solari, Claude A; Silva, Oyama R; Ferreira, Antonio J Piantino

    2003-02-01

    The occurrence of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) phage types (PTs) in samples collected from healthy and diseased chickens, in outbreaks of human gastroenteritis related to the consumption of egg products, in samples of poultry meat, in pipped embryos of broiler chickens, in meat meal, in poultry-rearing environments, and in many foods (cheese, mayonnaise, cake, and bacon) is described for strains isolated from 1995 to 1997 in Brazil. SE strains were isolated, and the most common PT was found to be PT 4, followed by PTs 7, 21, 35, 6, 4a, 8, 30, 6a, 5a, 1, and 1b. Fourteen strains were classified as react-but-do-not-conform strains, and one strain was not typeable. The results of this study demonstrate that PT 4 has a wider distribution among the sources studied than do any other SE phage types and is the most important phage type in human salmonellosis.

  7. Prevention of egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis after oral vaccination of laying hens with Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC mutants.

    PubMed

    Kilroy, Sofie; Raspoet, Ruth; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2016-08-12

    Vaccination of laying hens has been successfully used to reduce egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis, decreasing human salmonellosis cases worldwide. Currently used vaccines for layers are either inactivated vaccines or live attenuated strains produced by mutagenesis. Targeted gene deletion mutants hold promise for future vaccines, because specific bacterial functions can be removed that may improve safety and allow differentiation from field strains. In this study, the efficacy of Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC strains in laying hens as live vaccines was evaluated. The mutants are deficient in either the membrane channel TolC (ΔtolC) or the multi-drug efflux systems acrAB, acrEF and mdtABC (ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC). These strains have a decreased ability for gut and tissue colonization and are unable to survive in egg white, the latter preventing transmission of the vaccine strains to humans. Two groups of 30 laying hens were orally inoculated at day 1, 6 weeks and 16 weeks of age with 10(8) cfu of either vaccine strain, while a third group was left unvaccinated. At 24 weeks of age, the birds were intravenously challenged with 5 × 10(7) cfu Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 S1400/94. The vaccine strains were not shed or detected in the gut, internal organs or eggs, 2 weeks after the third vaccination. The strains significantly protected against gut and internal organ colonization, and completely prevented egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis under the conditions of this study. This indicates that Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC strains might be valuable strains for vaccination of layers against Salmonella Enteritidis.

  8. Salmonella Enteritidis strains from poultry exhibit differential responses to acid stress, oxidative stress, and survival in the egg albumen.

    PubMed

    Shah, Devendra H; Casavant, Carol; Hawley, Quincy; Addwebi, Tarek; Call, Douglas R; Guard, Jean

    2012-03-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is the major foodborne pathogen that is primarily transmitted by contaminated chicken meat and eggs. We recently demonstrated that Salmonella Enteritidis strains from poultry differ in their ability to invade human intestinal cells and cause disease in orally challenged mice. Here we hypothesized that the differential virulence of Salmonella Enteritidis strains is due to the differential fitness in the adverse environments that may be encountered during infection in the host. The responses of a panel of six Salmonella Enteritidis strains to acid stress, oxidative stress, survival in egg albumen, and the ability to cause infection in chickens were analyzed. This analysis allowed classification of strains into two categories, stress-sensitive and stress-resistant, with the former showing significantly (p<0.05) reduced survival in acidic (gastric phase of infection) and oxidative (intestinal and systemic phase of infection) stress. Stress-sensitive strains also showed impaired intestinal colonization and systemic dissemination in orally inoculated chickens and failed to survive/grow in egg albumen. Comparative genomic hybridization microarray analysis revealed no differences at the discriminatory level of the whole gene content between stress-sensitive and stress-resistant strains. However, sequencing of rpoS, a stress-regulatory gene, revealed that one of the three stress-sensitive strains carried an insertion mutation in the rpoS resulting in truncation of σ(S). Finding that one of the stress-sensitive strains carried an easily identifiable small polymorphism within a stress-response gene suggests that the other strains may also have small polymorphisms elsewhere in the genome, which likely impact regulation of stress or virulence associated genes in some manner.

  9. Immunogenicity of a Bivalent Adjuvanted Glycoconjugate Vaccine against Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Fiorino, Fabio; Rondini, Simona; Micoli, Francesca; Lanzilao, Luisa; Alfini, Renzo; Mancini, Francesca; MacLennan, Calman A.; Medaglini, Donata

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis are the predominant causes of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease. Considering the co-endemicity of S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis, a bivalent vaccine formulation against both pathogens is necessary for protection against iNTS disease, thus investigation of glycoconjugate combination is required. In the present work, we investigated the immune responses induced by S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis monovalent and bivalent glycoconjugate vaccines adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide (alum) only or in combination with cytosine-phosphorothioate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG). Humoral and cellular, systemic and local, immune responses were characterized in two different mouse strains. All conjugate vaccines elicited high levels of serum IgG against the respective O-antigens (OAg) with bactericidal activity. The bivalent conjugate vaccine induced systemic production of antibodies against both S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis OAg. The presence of alum or alum + CpG adjuvants in vaccine formulations significantly increased the serum antigen-specific antibody production. The alum + CpG bivalent vaccine formulation triggered the highest systemic anti-OAg antibodies and also a significant increase of anti-OAg IgG in intestinal washes and fecal samples, with a positive correlation with serum levels. These data demonstrate the ability of monovalent and bivalent conjugate vaccines against S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis to induce systemic and local immune responses in different mouse strains, and highlight the suitability of a bivalent glycoconjugate formulation, especially when adjuvanted with alum + CpG, as a promising candidate vaccine against iNTS disease. PMID:28289411

  10. Analysis of Molecular Epidemiology of Chilean Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis Isolates by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and Bacteriophage Typing

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Jorge; Fica, Alberto; Ebensperger, German; Calfullan, Hector; Prat, Soledad; Fernandez, Alda; Alexandre, Marcela; Heitmann, Ingrid

    2003-01-01

    Human Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections emerged in Chile in 1994. S. enterica serotype Enteritidis phage type 1 isolates predominated in the north, and phage type 4 isolates predominated in the central and southern regions. A study was planned to characterize this epidemic using the best discriminatory typing technique. Research involved 441 S. enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates, including clinical preepidemic samples (n = 74; 1975 to 1993) and epidemic (n = 199), food (n = 72), poultry (n = 57), and some Latin American (n = 39) isolates. The best method was selected based on a sample of preepidemic isolates, analyzing the discriminatory power (DP) obtained by phage typing and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and pulsed-field gel electophoresis (PFGE) analysis. The highest DP was associated with BlnI PFGE-bacteriophage typing analysis (0.993). A total of 38 BlnI patterns (B patterns) were identified before the epidemic period, 19 since 1994, and only 4 in both periods. Two major clusters were identified by phylogenetic analysis, and the predominant B patterns clustered in the same branch. Combined analysis revealed that specific B pattern-phage type combinations (subtypes) disappeared before 1994, that different genotypes associated with S. enterica serotype Enteritidis phage type 4 had been observed since 1988, and that strain diversity increased before the expansion of S. enterica serotype Enteritidis in 1994. Predominant subtype B3-phage type 4 was associated with the central and southern regions, and subtype B38-phage type 1 was associated with the north (P < 0.0001). Food and poultry isolates matched the predominant S. enterica serotype Enteritidis subtypes, but isolates identified in neighboring countries (Peru and Bolivia) did not match S. enterica serotype Enteritidis subtypes identified in the north of Chile. The results of this work demonstrate that genetic diversity, replacement, and expansion of specific S. enterica serotype

  11. Genetic and phenotypic evidence of the Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis human-animal interface in Chile.

    PubMed

    Retamal, Patricio; Fresno, Marcela; Dougnac, Catherine; Gutierrez, Sindy; Gornall, Vanessa; Vidal, Roberto; Vernal, Rolando; Pujol, Myriam; Barreto, Marlen; González-Acuña, Daniel; Abalos, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is a worldwide zoonotic agent that has been recognized as a very important food-borne bacterial pathogen, mainly associated with consumption of poultry products. The aim of this work was to determine genotypic and phenotypic evidence of S. Enteritidis transmission among seabirds, poultry and humans in Chile. Genotyping was performed using PCR-based virulotyping, pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Pathogenicity-associated phenotypes were determined with survival to free radicals, acidic pH, starvation, antimicrobial resistance, and survival within human dendritic cells. As result of PCR and PFGE assays, some isolates from the three hosts showed identical genotypic patterns, and through MLST it was determined that all of them belong to sequence type 11. Phenotypic assays show diversity of bacterial responses among isolates. When results were analyzed according to bacterial host, statistical differences were identified in starvation and dendritic cells survival assays. In addition, isolates from seabirds showed the highest rates of resistance to gentamycin, tetracycline, and ampicillin. Overall, the very close genetic and phenotypic traits shown by isolates from humans, poultry, and seabirds suggest the inter-species transmission of S. Enteritidis bacteria between hosts, likely through anthropogenic environmental contamination that determines infection of seabirds with bacteria that are potentially pathogenic for other susceptible organism, including humans.

  12. Genetic and phenotypic evidence of the Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis human-animal interface in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Retamal, Patricio; Fresno, Marcela; Dougnac, Catherine; Gutierrez, Sindy; Gornall, Vanessa; Vidal, Roberto; Vernal, Rolando; Pujol, Myriam; Barreto, Marlen; González-Acuña, Daniel; Abalos, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is a worldwide zoonotic agent that has been recognized as a very important food-borne bacterial pathogen, mainly associated with consumption of poultry products. The aim of this work was to determine genotypic and phenotypic evidence of S. Enteritidis transmission among seabirds, poultry and humans in Chile. Genotyping was performed using PCR-based virulotyping, pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Pathogenicity-associated phenotypes were determined with survival to free radicals, acidic pH, starvation, antimicrobial resistance, and survival within human dendritic cells. As result of PCR and PFGE assays, some isolates from the three hosts showed identical genotypic patterns, and through MLST it was determined that all of them belong to sequence type 11. Phenotypic assays show diversity of bacterial responses among isolates. When results were analyzed according to bacterial host, statistical differences were identified in starvation and dendritic cells survival assays. In addition, isolates from seabirds showed the highest rates of resistance to gentamycin, tetracycline, and ampicillin. Overall, the very close genetic and phenotypic traits shown by isolates from humans, poultry, and seabirds suggest the inter-species transmission of S. Enteritidis bacteria between hosts, likely through anthropogenic environmental contamination that determines infection of seabirds with bacteria that are potentially pathogenic for other susceptible organism, including humans. PMID:26029196

  13. Genetically Similar Isolates of Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis Persistent in China for a Long-Term Period.

    PubMed

    Song, Qifa; Shen, Xuanyi; Yang, Yuanbin; Zhang, Danyang; Gao, Hong

    2016-07-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is an important causative agent of nontyphoidal salmonellosis in human populations. In this study, we collected 72 S. Enteritidis strains from 2004 to 2014 in Ningbo, mid-east China. Of the 72 strains, we identified a dominant clone of 58 strains recovered from patient's feces (n = 48), blood (n = 1), pleural effusion (n = 1), chickens (n = 3), and dessert cakes (n = 5) by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and variable-number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). The profile arrangements of MLVA were SE1-SE2-SE3-SE5-SE6-SE8-SE9: 4-4-3-11-10-1-3. These dominant strains were susceptible to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, cefotaxime and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and resistant to nalidixic acid. Additionally, all isolates harboured virulence genes invA, sipA, sopE, and spvB when tested by PCR. Our results reveal that genetically similar S. Enteritidis strains which accounted for several outbreaks as well as blood infection and pleural cavity infection are prevalent in China for a long-term period. This situation calls for further attention in the prevention and control of foodborne disease caused by Salmonella species.

  14. Transposon mutagenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis identifies genes that contribute to invasiveness in human and chicken cells and survival in egg albumen.

    PubMed

    Shah, Devendra H; Zhou, Xiaohui; Kim, Hye-Young; Call, Douglas R; Guard, Jean

    2012-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is an important food-borne pathogen, and chickens are a primary reservoir of human infection. While most knowledge about Salmonella pathogenesis is based on research conducted on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis is known to have pathobiology specific to chickens that impacts epidemiology in humans. Therefore, more information is needed about S. Enteritidis pathobiology in comparison to that of S. Typhimurium. We used transposon mutagenesis to identify S. Enteritidis virulence genes by assay of invasiveness in human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells and chicken liver (LMH) cells and survival within chicken (HD-11) macrophages as a surrogate marker for virulence. A total of 4,330 transposon insertion mutants of an invasive G1 Nal(r) strain were screened using Caco-2 cells. This led to the identification of attenuating mutations in a total of 33 different loci, many of which include genes previously known to contribute to enteric infection (e.g., Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 [SPI-1], SPI-4, SPI-5, CS54, fliH, fljB, csgB, spvR, and rfbMN) in S. Enteritidis and other Salmonella serovars. Several genes or genomic islands that have not been reported previously (e.g., SPI-14, ksgA, SEN0034, SEN2278, and SEN3503) or that are absent in S. Typhimurium or in most other Salmonella serovars (e.g., pegD, SEN1152, SEN1393, and SEN1966) were also identified. Most mutants with reduced Caco-2 cell invasiveness also showed significantly reduced invasiveness in chicken liver cells and impaired survival in chicken macrophages and in egg albumen. Consequently, these genes may play an important role during infection of the chicken host and also contribute to successful egg contamination by S. Enteritidis.

  15. Intragastric immunization with recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing flagellar antigen confers antibody-independent protective immunity against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Kajikawa, Akinobu; Satoh, Eiichi; Leer, Rob J; Yamamoto, Shigeki; Igimi, Shizunobu

    2007-05-04

    A recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing a flagellar antigen from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis was constructed and evaluated as a mucosal vaccine. Intragastric immunization of the recombinant strain conferred protective immunity against Salmonella infection in mice. This immunization did not result in antigen-specific antibody in either feces or sera but induced the release of IFN-gamma on restimulation of primed lymphocytes ex vivo. The results suggested that the protective efficacy provided by flagellin-expressing L. casei is mainly attributable to cell-mediated immune responses. In addition, an adjuvant-type effect of the antigen delivery system with L. casei was also observed.

  16. In vitro multiplication of Salmonella Enteritidis on the egg yolk membrane and penetration to the yolk contents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Refrigeration to limit bacterial multiplication is a critical aspect of efforts to control the transmission of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) to consumers of contaminated eggs. Although the nutrient-rich yolk interior is an uncommon location for S. Enteritidis contaminatio...

  17. [Salmonella enteritidis pericarditis. Apropos of a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Victor, F; Gras, D; Le Breton, H; Gras, S; Amelot, J; Pony, J C

    1997-02-01

    The authors report a case of Salmonella enteritidis pericarditis. The diagnosis was based on bacteriological analyses (blood and effusion cultures and pericardial biopsy). The microbiology of bacterial pericarditis is reviewed underlying the exceptionally rare finding of a non typhi Salmonella in this condition.

  18. Public health significance of major genotypes of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis present in both human and chicken isolates in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Su; Oh, Jae-Young; Kwon, Yong-Kuk; Lee, Deog-Yong; Jeong, Ok-Mi; Choi, Byung-Kook; Youn, So-Youn; Jeon, Byung-Woo; Lee, Hye-Jin; Lee, Hee-Soo

    2017-02-17

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the most common serotypes implicated in Salmonella infections in both humans and poultry worldwide. It has been reported that human salmonellosis is mainly associated with the consumption of poultry products contaminated with serovar Enteritidis. The present study was to extensively analyze the public health risk of serovar Enteritidis isolates from chickens in Korea. A total of 127 chicken isolates were collected from clinical cases, on-farm feces, and chicken meat between 1998 and 2012 and 20 human clinical isolates were obtained from patients with diarrhea between 2000 and 2006 in Korea. To characterize the isolates from chickens and humans, we compared the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) profiles of the isolates. We further characterized representative isolates of different genotypes using a DNA microarray. PFGE revealed 28 patterns and MLVA identified 16 allelic profiles. The DNA microarray showed high genetic variability in plasmid regions and other fimbrial subunits of the isolates although the virulence gene contents of isolates from the same source and/or of the same genotype were unrelated. PFGE and MLVA showed that major genotypes were present in both human and chicken isolates. This result suggests that chickens in Korea pose a significant risk to public health as a source of serovar Enteritidis as has been noted in other countries.

  19. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification of the sefA Gene for Rapid Detection of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jiansen; Zhuang, Linlin; Zhu, Chunhong; Shi, Shourong; Zhang, Di; Zhang, Linji; Yu, Yan; Dou, Xinhong; Xu, Bu; Wang, Chengming

    2016-04-01

    Salmonella spp. pose a threat to both human and animal health, with more than 2600 serovars having been reported to date. Salmonella serovars are usually identified by slide agglutination tests, which are labor intensive and time consuming. In an attempt to develop a more rapid screening method for the major poultry Salmonella serovars, we developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay, which directly detected the sefA gene, a fimbrial operon gene existing in several specific serovars of Salmonella enterica including the major poultry serovars, namely Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) and Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum (Salmonella Gallinarum). With the 177 bacterial strains we tested, positive reactions were only observed with 85 strains of serovar Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum. The detection limit of the LAMP assay was 4 CFU/reaction with genomic DNAs of Salmonella Enteritidis (ATCC 13076) from pure culture and 400 CFU/ reaction with DNA extracted from spiked chicken feces. The LAMP assay was more sensitive than conventional culture, especially without enrichment, in detecting Salmonella Enteritidis (CMCC 50041) in the spiked fecal samples. The results show the sefA LAMP method is a rapid, sensitive, specific, and practical method for directly detection of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum in chickens. The sefA LAMP assay can potentially serve as new on-site diagnostics in the poultry industry.

  20. Identification of Key Genes in the Response to Salmonella enterica Enteritidis, Salmonella enterica Pullorum, and Poly(I:C) in Chicken Spleen and Caecum

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Zhongwei; Dai, Aiqin; Zhai, Fei; Li, Jianchao; Xia, Mingxiu; Hua, Dengke; Xu, Lu; Wang, Hongzhi; Chen, Jing; Liu, Lu; Chen, Guohong

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) and Salmonella enterica Pullorum (S. pullorum) are regarded as a threat to poultry production. This study's aim is to characterize the expression profiles in response to three different challenges and to identify infection-related genes in the chicken spleen and caecum. Groups of the Chinese chicken breed Langshan were challenged with either S. Enteritidis, S. pullorum, or poly(I:C). The concentrations of cytokines and antibodies and the Salmonella colonization level of the caecum and liver were detected in each group at 7 days postinfection. Expression microarray experiments were conducted using mRNA isolated from both spleen and caecum. Crucial differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated with immunity were identified. Four DEGs were identified in spleen of all three challenge groups (RBM16, FAH, SOX5, and RBM9) and different four genes in caecum (SOUL, FCN2, ANLN, and ACSL1). Expression profiles were clearly different among the three challenged groups. Genes enriched in the spleen of birds infected with S. pullorum were enriched in lymphocyte proliferation related pathways, but the enriched genes in the caecum of the same group were primarily enriched in innate immunity or antibacterial responses. The DEGs that appear across all three challenge groups might represent global response factors for different pathogens. PMID:24707473

  1. Salmonella enteritidis agfBAC operon encoding thin, aggregative fimbriae.

    PubMed

    Collinson, S K; Clouthier, S C; Doran, J L; Banser, P A; Kay, W W

    1996-02-01

    Salmonella enteritidis produces thin, aggregative fimbriae, named SEF17, which are composed of polymerized AgfA fimbrin proteins. DNA sequence analysis of a 2-kb region of S. enteritidis DNA revealed three contiguous genes, agfBAC. The 453-bp agfA gene encodes the AgfA fimbrin, which was predicted to be 74% identical and 86% similar in primary sequence to the Escherichia coli curli structural protein, CsgA. pHAG, a pUC18 derivative containing a 3.0-kb HindIII fragment encoding agfBAC, directed the in vitro expression of the major AgfA fimbrin, with an M(r) of 17,000, and a minor AgfB protein, with an M(r) of 16,000, encoded by the 453-bp agfB gene. AgfA was not expressed from pDAG, a pUC18 derivative containing a 3.1-kb DraI DNA fragment encoding agfA but not agfB. Primer extension analysis identified two adjacent transcription start sites located immediately upstream of agfB in positions analogous to those of the E. coli curlin csgBA operon. No transcription start sites were located immediately upstream of agfA or agfC. Northern (RNA) blot analysis confirmed that transcription of agfA was initiated from the agfB promoter region. Secondary-structure analysis of the putative mRNA transcript for agfBAC predicted the formation of a stem-loop structure (delta Gzero, -22 kcal/mol [-91 kJ/mol]) in the intercistronic region between agfA and agfC, which may be involved in stabilization of the agfBA portion of the agfBAC transcript. agfBAC and flanking regions had a high degree of sequence similarity with those counterparts of the E. coli curlin csgBA region for which sequence data are available. These data are demonstrative of the high degree of similarity between S. enteritidis SEF17 fimbriae and E. coli curli with respect to fimbrin amino acid sequence and genetic organization and, therefore, are indicative of a common and relatively recent ancestry.

  2. Effect of in-feed supplementation of trans-cinnamaldehyde and caprylic acid on chicken cecal microbiome in response to Salmonella Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) is a major foodborne pathogen causing enteric illnesses in humans, with undercooked eggs and poultry meat as the primary sources of infection. Our previous research revealed that in-feed supplementation of two GRAS (generally recognized as safe)-status, natural compounds,...

  3. Induction of CXC chemokine mRNA expression in chicken oviduct epithelial cells by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis via the type three secretion system-1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The messenger-RNA (mRNA) expression of selected cytokines and chemokines in primary chicken oviduct epithelial cells (COEC) was determined following in vitro infection with wild type or type three secretion system (T3SS) mutant Salmonella enteritidis (SE) strains. All SE strains examined in this stu...

  4. Effect of Salmonella infection on cecal tonsil regulatory T cell properties in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to study Regulatory T cell (Treg) properties post-Salmonella infection in broiler birds. Four-day-old broiler chicks were orally infected with 5x106 CFU/ml Salmonella enteritidis or sterile PBS (control). Samples were collected at 4, 7, 10, and 14 d post-infection. ...

  5. Microarray analysis of Salmonella Enteritidis Phage Type 8 treated with subinhibitory concentrations of trans-cinnamaldehyde or eugenol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 8 (PT8) is a major poultry-associated Salmonella isolate implicated in foodborne outbreaks in the United States. We previously reported that the GRAS-status plant-derived compounds trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC) and eugenol (EG) significantly reduced S. Enteritidis colon...

  6. Fate of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Enteritidis on currency.

    PubMed

    Jiang, X; Doyle, M P

    1999-07-01

    The fate of foodborne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Enteritidis on coin surfaces was determined at room temperature (25 degrees C). A five-strain mixture of E. coli O157:H7 or Salmonella Enteritidis of approximately 5 x 10(4) CFU was applied to the surfaces of sterile U.S. coins (pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters) and to the surfaces of two control substrata (Teflon and glass coverslips). During storage at room temperature, E. coli O157:H7 survived for 7, 9, and 11 days on the surfaces of pennies, nickels, and dimes and quarters, respectively. However, the pathogen died off within 4 to 7 days on both the Teflon and glass surfaces. Salmonella Enteritidis survived for 1, 2, 4, and 9 days on the surfaces of pennies, nickels, quarters, and dimes, respectively. Unlike E. coli O157:H7, survival of Salmonella Enteritidis was greatest on both Teflon and glass coverslips, with more than 100 cells per substratum detected at the 17th day of storage. Results indicate that coins could serve as potential vehicles for transmitting both E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Enteritidis.

  7. A pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) study that suggests a major world-wide clone of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jen-Chieh; Chiu, Tsai-Hsin; Helmuth, Reiner; Schroeter, Andreas; Guerra, Beatriz; Tsen, Hau-Yang

    2007-05-30

    Since human infections by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) have been increasing world-wide over the past years and epidemiological studies have implicated the consumption of meat, poultry, eggs and egg products, elucidation of the predominant subtypes for this Salmonella spp. is important. In this study, 107 poultry and food isolates of Salmonella Enteritidis obtained from Germany were analyzed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and the subtypes were compared with those of the 124 human isolates obtained in Taiwan. Results showed that for these 107 poultry and food isolates, when XbaI, SpeI and NotI were used for chromosomal DNA digestion followed by PFGE analysis, a total of 19, 20 and 19 PFGE patterns, respectively, were identified. Of them, 51 (47.7%), 52 (48.6%) and 42 (39.3%) strains belong to a single pattern of X3, S3 and N3, respectively, and 34 strains belong to a pattern combination of X3S3N3, which was the major subtype. When PFGE patterns of these 107 German isolates were compared with those of the 124 human isolates obtained in Taiwan, pattern combination of X3S3N3 was found as the most common pattern shared by isolates from both areas. PT4 is a major phage type for German and Taiwan isolates. Although most of the X3S3N3 strains are of this phage type, some strains of other PFGE patterns are also of this phage type. Since strains used in this study were unrelated, i.e., they were isolated from different origins in areas geographically far apart from each other, the PFGE study suggests a major world-wide clone of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis.

  8. Investigation of the distribution and control of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis PT6 in layer breeding and egg production.

    PubMed

    Davies, Robert; Liebana, Ernesto; Breslin, Mark

    2003-06-01

    Investigations were carried out in a layer breeder hatchery, a layer parent rearing farm, a layer parent farm and in a commercial pullet rearing and cage layer farm where Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) PT6 had become established. PT6 was initially found in focal points in the hatchery, such as hatcher ventilation ducting, tray wash areas and waste areas, but improved disinfection was followed by a rapid disappearance of contamination. Several different phage types of S. Enteritidis were found in the hatchery but most of these proved to be genotypically identical with PT6. Investigations of contaminated layer breeder and rearing sites showed that the terminal disinfection programmes in place were effective in that no carry-over of infection occurred and the organism was rapidly eliminated from the organization. Infection with PT6 originating from chicks was investigated on a commercial pullet rearing farm. After several rounds of treatment with a fluoroquinolone antibiotic and competitive exclusion, no Salmonella was found in faeces or cloacal swabs but was present in dust in one of six houses. Sampling carried out after cleaning and disinfection confirmed clearance of the organism from the site, but infection did become established in a commercial laying house receiving the birds.

  9. Rapid real-time PCR methods to distinguish Salmonella Enteritidis wildtype field isolates from vaccine strains Salmovac SE/Gallivac SE and AviPro SALMONELLA VAC E.

    PubMed

    Maurischat, Sven; Szabo, Istvan; Baumann, Beatrice; Malorny, Burkhard

    2015-05-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a major non-typhoid Salmonella serovar causing human salmonellosis mainly associated with the consumption of poultry and products thereof. To reduce infections in poultry, S. Enteritidis live vaccine strains AviPro SALMONELLA VAC E and Salmovac SE/Gallivac SE have been licensed and used in several countries worldwide. To definitively diagnose a S. Enteritidis contamination in vaccinated herds a reliable and fast method for the differentiation between vaccine and wildtype field isolates is required. In this study, we developed and validated real-time PCR (qPCR) assays to distinguish those variants genetically. Suitable target sequences were identified by whole genome sequencing (WGS) using the Illumina MiSeq system. SNP regions in kdpA and nhaA proved to be most useful for differentiation of AviPro SALMONELLA VAC E and Salmovac SE/Gallivac SE, respectively, from wildtype strains. For each vaccine strain one TaqMan-qPCR assay and one alternative approach using High Resolution Melting (HRM) analysis was designed. All 30 Salmovac SE and 7 AviPro SALMONELLA VAC E vaccine strain reisolates tested were correctly identified by both approaches (100% inclusivity). Furthermore, all 137 (TaqMan) and 97 (HRM) Salmonella non-vaccine and related Enterobacteriaceae strains tested were excluded (100% exclusivity). The analytical detection limits were determined to be approx. 10(2) genome copies/reaction for the TaqMan and 10(4) genome copies/reaction for the HRM approach. The real-time PCR assays proved to be a reliable and fast alternative to the cultural vaccine strain identification tests helping decision makers in control measurements to take action within a shorter period of time.

  10. Italian experience in Salmonella enteritidis 1978-1988: characterization of isolates from food and man.

    PubMed

    Fantasia, M; Filetici, E; Anastasio, M P; Marcozzi, M D; Gramenzi, M P; Aureli, P

    1991-04-01

    Salmonella enteritidis accounted for 5.45% of the 118.685 Salmonella isolates from man and for 2.65% of the 3.315 Salmonella isolates from food in Italy in the eleven year period 1978 to 1988. In the years 1978-1982 no S. enteritidis strain was isolated from eggs and poultry; in the years 1983-1988 the 53% of S. enteritidis isolates from food were from eggs and poultry. In 1989 S. enteritidis accounted for 744 isolates from man and 22 from food of which 80% were from eggs and poultry (partial data). In that year 18 outbreaks caused by S. enteritidis were reported to the National Centre of Enteric Pathogens in Rome. Characteristics of 81 S. enteritidis isolates were examined of which 27 were from sporadic cases involving humans and 40 from outbreaks in humans; 14 isolates were from food, all but one connected with the outbreaks. All the isolates studied were sensitive to the antibiotics tested; plasmid profile analysis showed a predominant profile pattern in both epidemic and non-epidemic strains; lysine decarboxylase was present in all the strains tested. Although in at least three epidemics a common supplier of eggs was proved, the source was not identified. Unfortunately it was not possible to determine the phage type of isolates because of the unavailability of specific phages.

  11. Reduction of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis colonization in 20-day-old broiler chickens by the plant-derived compounds trans-cinnamaldehyde and eugenol.

    PubMed

    Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Mattson, Tyler; Baskaran, Sangeetha Ananda; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne; Babapoor, Sankhiros; March, Benjamin; Valipe, Satyender; Darre, Michael; Hoagland, Thomas; Schreiber, David; Khan, Mazhar I; Donoghue, Ann; Donoghue, Dan; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2012-04-01

    The efficacies of trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC) and eugenol (EG) for reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in broiler chickens were investigated. In three experiments for each compound, 1-day-old chicks (n = 75/experiment) were randomly assigned to five treatment groups (n = 15/treatment group): negative control (-ve S. Enteritidis, -ve TC, or EG), compound control (-ve S. Enteritidis, +ve 0.75% [vol/wt] TC or 1% [vol/wt] EG), positive control (+ve S. Enteritidis, -ve TC, or EG), low-dose treatment (+ve S. Enteritidis, +ve 0.5% TC, or 0.75% EG), and high-dose treatment (+ve S. Enteritidis, +ve 0.75% TC, or 1% EG). On day 0, birds were tested for the presence of any inherent Salmonella (n = 5/experiment). On day 8, birds were inoculated with ∼8.0 log(10) CFU S. Enteritidis, and cecal colonization by S. Enteritidis was ascertained (n = 10 chicks/experiment) after 24 h (day 9). Six birds from each treatment group were euthanized on days 7 and 10 after inoculation, and cecal S. Enteritidis numbers were determined. TC at 0.5 or 0.75% and EG at 0.75 or 1% consistently reduced (P < 0.05) S. Enteritidis in the cecum (≥3 log(10) CFU/g) after 10 days of infection in all experiments. Feed intake and body weight were not different for TC treatments (P > 0.05); however, EG supplementation led to significantly lower (P < 0.05) body weights. Follow-up in vitro experiments revealed that the subinhibitory concentrations (SICs, the concentrations that did not inhibit Salmonella growth) of TC and EG reduced the motility and invasive abilities of S. Enteritidis and downregulated expression of the motility genes flhC and motA and invasion genes hilA, hilD, and invF. The results suggest that supplementation with TC and EG through feed can reduce S. Enteritidis colonization in chickens.

  12. Reduction of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Colonization in 20-Day-Old Broiler Chickens by the Plant-Derived Compounds trans-Cinnamaldehyde and Eugenol

    PubMed Central

    Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Mattson, Tyler; Baskaran, Sangeetha Ananda; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne; Babapoor, Sankhiros; March, Benjamin; Valipe, Satyender; Darre, Michael; Hoagland, Thomas; Schreiber, David; Khan, Mazhar I.; Donoghue, Ann; Donoghue, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The efficacies of trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC) and eugenol (EG) for reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in broiler chickens were investigated. In three experiments for each compound, 1-day-old chicks (n = 75/experiment) were randomly assigned to five treatment groups (n = 15/treatment group): negative control (-ve S. Enteritidis, -ve TC, or EG), compound control (-ve S. Enteritidis, +ve 0.75% [vol/wt] TC or 1% [vol/wt] EG), positive control (+ve S. Enteritidis, -ve TC, or EG), low-dose treatment (+ve S. Enteritidis, +ve 0.5% TC, or 0.75% EG), and high-dose treatment (+ve S. Enteritidis, +ve 0.75% TC, or 1% EG). On day 0, birds were tested for the presence of any inherent Salmonella (n = 5/experiment). On day 8, birds were inoculated with ∼8.0 log10 CFU S. Enteritidis, and cecal colonization by S. Enteritidis was ascertained (n = 10 chicks/experiment) after 24 h (day 9). Six birds from each treatment group were euthanized on days 7 and 10 after inoculation, and cecal S. Enteritidis numbers were determined. TC at 0.5 or 0.75% and EG at 0.75 or 1% consistently reduced (P < 0.05) S. Enteritidis in the cecum (≥3 log10 CFU/g) after 10 days of infection in all experiments. Feed intake and body weight were not different for TC treatments (P > 0.05); however, EG supplementation led to significantly lower (P < 0.05) body weights. Follow-up in vitro experiments revealed that the subinhibitory concentrations (SICs, the concentrations that did not inhibit Salmonella growth) of TC and EG reduced the motility and invasive abilities of S. Enteritidis and downregulated expression of the motility genes flhC and motA and invasion genes hilA, hilD, and invF. The results suggest that supplementation with TC and EG through feed can reduce S. Enteritidis colonization in chickens. PMID:22327574

  13. Variation in Salmonella enteritidis RAPD-PCR patterns may not be due to genetic differences.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Demetrius L; Berghaus, Roy D; Lee, Margie D; Maurer, John J

    2011-12-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is a leading cause of gastroenteritis associated with consumption of contaminated poultry meat and eggs. Because pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) has limited utility in distinguishing between clonal Salmonella Enteritidis isolates, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR has been recommended as an alternative molecular fingerprinting tool. This study's objective was to determine whether increasing PCR stringency would improve the repeatability of RAPD DNA patterns based on assessment of target sites within the genome. An in silico PCR was performed to predict amplification products from an Salmonella Enteritidis genome sequence for three different RAPD primers (1247, 1283, and OPA4) and to determine whether any primer would be more likely to amplify variable regions within the genome. A comparison of within- and between-isolate similarities in RAPD patterns was performed using primer 1247, which was predicted by in silico analysis to yield a variable size range of amplicons. In order to reduce artifactual variability associated with the method, three different methods for template preparation were evaluated. All were found to provide comparable results with respect to the similarities observed with repeated analyses of the same Salmonella Enteritidis isolates (n = 18, P = 0.91). Although the median within-isolate similarity (76.0%) was significantly greater than the median between-isolate similarity (66.7%; P = 0.001), duplicate RAPD-PCR runs of the same Salmonella Enteritidis isolates produced DNA patterns that ranged in similarity between 61.5 and 100%. These results indicate that the repeatability of RAPD-PCR is insufficient to distinguish genetic differences among related and unrelated Salmonella Enteritidis isolates.

  14. Sustained Protection in Mice Immunized with Fractional Doses of Salmonella Enteritidis Core and O Polysaccharide-Flagellin Glycoconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Raphael; Wang, Jin Y.; Boyd, Mary A.; Tulapurkar, Mohan E.; Ramachandran, Girish; Tennant, Sharon M.; Pasetti, Marcela; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2013-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium are a major cause of invasive bacterial disease (e.g., bacteremia, meningitis) in infants and young children in sub-Saharan Africa and also occasionally cause invasive disease in highly susceptible hosts (young infants, the elderly, and immunocompromised subjects) in industrialized countries. No licensed vaccines exist against human NTS infections. NTS core and O polysaccharide (COPS) and FliC (Phase 1 flagellin subunits) each constitute protective antigens in murine models. S. Enteritidis COPS conjugated to FliC represents a promising vaccine approach that elicits binding and opsonophagocytic antibodies and protects mice against lethal challenge with virulent S. Enteritidis. We examined the protective efficacy of fractional dosages of S. Enteritidis COPS:FliC conjugate vaccines in mice, and also established that protection can be passively transferred to naïve mice by administering sera from mice immunized with conjugate. Mice were immunized with three doses of either 10 µg, 2.5 µg (full dose), 0.25 µg, or 0.025 µg S. Enteritidis COPS:FliC conjugate at 28 day intervals. Antibody titers to COPS and FliC measured by ELISA fell consonant with progressively smaller vaccine dosage levels; anti-FliC IgG responses remained robust at fractional dosages for which anti-COPS serum IgG titers were decreased. Nevertheless, >90% protection against intraperitoneal challenge was observed in mice immunized with fractional dosages of conjugate that elicited diminished titers to both FliC and COPS. Passive transfer of immune sera from mice immunized with the highest dose of COPS:FliC to naïve mice was also protective, demonstrating the role of antibodies in mediating protection. These results provide important insights regarding the potency of Salmonella glycoconjugate vaccines that use flagellin as a carrier protein. PMID:23741368

  15. Recurrent meningitis due to Salmonella enteritidis: a case report from Kashmir India.

    PubMed

    Fomda, B A; Charoo, B A; Bhat, J A; Reyaz, N; Maroof, P; Naik, M I

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent bacterial meningitis in children is potentially life-threatening and induces psychological trauma to the patients through repeated hospitalization. Here we report a case of recurrent meningitis in a one month old baby. The CSF and blood culture grew Salmonella enteritidis. Injection ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone were given for 3 weeks. Baby became symptomatically better and was afebrile at discharge. Twenty eight days after discharge baby got readmitted with complaints of fever and refusal of feeds. Blood and CSF culture again showed growth of Salmonella enteritidis. Physicians should be educated about the possibility of recurrence which may occur days or even weeks after apparent successful antibiotic treatment.

  16. Fatal Salmonellosis in Captive Maras (Dolichotis patagonum) Caused by Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S; Yoshimura, Y; Hayashidani, H; Iwata, T; Iseda, S; Une, Y

    2017-02-23

    We report epidemic occurrences of fatal salmonellosis caused by Salmonella Enteritidis in captive maras (Dolichotis patagonum) in a zoological garden in Japan. The deaths were sudden or followed a peracute course within a few hours of the first observations of clinical abnormalities. Gross lesions included haemorrhages in the subcutis and skeletal muscles, liver, spleen, lung, heart and gastrointestinal tract. Microscopically, there were haemorrhagic and necrotizing lesions with gram-negative bacilli in the liver, spleen, small intestine and Peyer's patches. These bacilli showed strong immunolabelling for Salmonella O9 antigen and S. Enteritidis was isolated from the lesions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of salmonellosis in maras.

  17. Comparison of the prevalence of Salmonella infection in layer hens from commercial layer farms with high and low rodent densities.

    PubMed

    Lapuz, Randy Rhon Simoun P; Umali, Dennis V; Suzuki, Terumasa; Shirota, Kazutoshi; Katoh, Hiromitsu

    2012-03-01

    A comparison on the prevalence of Salmonella infection in layer hens from commercial layer farms with high and low rodent densities was investigated. Out of 280 laying hens sampled from three commercial layer farms with high rodent densities, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) was isolated from 20 (7.14%) hens and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis (Salmonella Infantis) from three (1.07%) hens. In contrast, layer hens sampled from four commercial layer farms with low rodent densities were negative for any salmonellae. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in the isolation rates of Salmonella from various organs of infected layer hens were also noted. For Salmonella Enteritidis, liver (55.0%) and the oviduct (55.0%) had the highest isolation rates while all Salmonella Infantis isolates were from the oviduct. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of BlnI-digested chromosomal DNA of Salmonella Enteritidis isolated from layer hens and rodents showed similar patterns. PFGE analysis of Salmonella Infantis isolated from layer hens, rodents, eggs, and the environment yielded identical patterns. In this study, the significantly higher prevalence rate (P < 0.05) of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Infantis in layer hens from high rodent density farms could be attributed to the high rodent population density. The persistent Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Infantis infection inside layer houses may have been amplified by the increasing numbers in the rodent population over the years, which increased the opportunity for environment-rodent-chicken interaction and the transmission of salmonellae to chickens. Monitoring of salmonellae from rodents inside poultry premises is recommended to be an effective additional tool in the assessment of the Salmonella status of layer flocks.

  18. Contribution of the Type VI Secretion System Encoded in SPI-19 to Chicken Colonization by Salmonella enterica Serotypes Gallinarum and Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Blondel, Carlos J.; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Castro, Benjamín; Chiang, Sebastián; Toro, Cecilia S.; Zaldívar, Mercedes; Contreras, Inés; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L.; Santiviago, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella Gallinarum is a pathogen with a host range specific to poultry, while Salmonella Enteritidis is a broad host range pathogen that colonizes poultry sub-clinically but is a leading cause of gastrointestinal salmonellosis in humans and many other species. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the complex interplay between Salmonella and their hosts, the molecular basis of host range restriction and unique pathobiology of Gallinarum remain largely unknown. Type VI Secretion System (T6SS) represents a new paradigm of protein secretion that is critical for the pathogenesis of many Gram-negative bacteria. We recently identified a putative T6SS in the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 19 (SPI-19) of Gallinarum. In Enteritidis, SPI-19 is a degenerate element that has lost most of the T6SS functions encoded in the island. In this work, we studied the contribution of SPI-19 to the colonization of Salmonella Gallinarum strain 287/91 in chickens. Non-polar deletion mutants of SPI-19 and the clpV gene, an essential T6SS component, colonized the ileum, ceca, liver and spleen of White Leghorn chicks poorly compared to the wild-type strain after oral inoculation. Return of SPI-19 to the ΔSPI-19 mutant, using VEX-Capture, complemented this colonization defect. In contrast, transfer of SPI-19 from Gallinarum to Enteritidis resulted in transient increase in the colonization of the ileum, liver and spleen at day 1 post-infection, but at days 3 and 5 post-infection a strong colonization defect of the gut and internal organs of the experimentally infected chickens was observed. Our data indicate that SPI-19 and the T6SS encoded in this region contribute to the colonization of the gastrointestinal tract and internal organs of chickens by Salmonella Gallinarum and suggest that degradation of SPI-19 T6SS in Salmonella Enteritidis conferred an advantage in colonization of the avian host. PMID:20661437

  19. Red Seaweeds Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii and Chondrus crispus down Regulate Virulence Factors of Salmonella Enteritidis and Induce Immune Responses in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kulshreshtha, Garima; Borza, Tudor; Rathgeber, Bruce; Stratton, Glenn S.; Thomas, Nikhil A.; Critchley, Alan; Hafting, Jeff; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Red seaweeds are a rich source of unique bioactive compounds and secondary metabolites that are known to improve human and animal health. S. Enteritidis is a broad range host pathogen, which contaminates chicken and poultry products that end into the human food chain. Worldwide, Salmonella outbreaks have become an important economic and public health concern. Moreover, the development of resistance in Salmonella serovars toward multiple drugs highlights the need for alternative control strategies. This study evaluated the antimicrobial property of red seaweeds extracts against Salmonella Enteritidis using the Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. Six red seaweed species were tested for their antimicrobial activity against S. Enteritidis and two, Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii (SG) and Chondrus crispus (CC), were found to exhibit such properties. Spread plate assay revealed that SG and CC (1%, w/v) significantly reduced the growth of S. Enteritidis. Seaweed water extracts (SWE) of SG and CC, at concentrations from 0.4 to 2 mg/ml, significantly reduced the growth of S. Enteritidis (log CFU 4.5–5.3 and log 5.7–6.0, respectively). However, methanolic extracts of CC and SG did not affect the growth of S. Enteritidis. Addition of SWE (0.2 mg/ml, CC and SG) significantly decreased biofilm formation and reduced the motility of S. Enteritidis. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that SWE (CC and SG) suppressed the expression of quorum sensing gene sdiA and of Salmonella Pathogenesis Island-1 (SPI-1) associated genes sipA and invF, indicating that SWE might reduce the invasion of S. Enteritidis in the host by attenuating virulence factors. Furthermore, CC and SG water extracts significantly improved the survival of infected C. elegans by impairing the ability of S. Enteritidis to colonize the digestive tract of the nematode and by enhancing the expression of C. elegans immune responsive genes. As the innate immune response pathways of C. elegans and mammals show a

  20. Red Seaweeds Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii and Chondrus crispus down Regulate Virulence Factors of Salmonella Enteritidis and Induce Immune Responses in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Kulshreshtha, Garima; Borza, Tudor; Rathgeber, Bruce; Stratton, Glenn S; Thomas, Nikhil A; Critchley, Alan; Hafting, Jeff; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Red seaweeds are a rich source of unique bioactive compounds and secondary metabolites that are known to improve human and animal health. S. Enteritidis is a broad range host pathogen, which contaminates chicken and poultry products that end into the human food chain. Worldwide, Salmonella outbreaks have become an important economic and public health concern. Moreover, the development of resistance in Salmonella serovars toward multiple drugs highlights the need for alternative control strategies. This study evaluated the antimicrobial property of red seaweeds extracts against Salmonella Enteritidis using the Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. Six red seaweed species were tested for their antimicrobial activity against S. Enteritidis and two, Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii (SG) and Chondrus crispus (CC), were found to exhibit such properties. Spread plate assay revealed that SG and CC (1%, w/v) significantly reduced the growth of S. Enteritidis. Seaweed water extracts (SWE) of SG and CC, at concentrations from 0.4 to 2 mg/ml, significantly reduced the growth of S. Enteritidis (log CFU 4.5-5.3 and log 5.7-6.0, respectively). However, methanolic extracts of CC and SG did not affect the growth of S. Enteritidis. Addition of SWE (0.2 mg/ml, CC and SG) significantly decreased biofilm formation and reduced the motility of S. Enteritidis. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that SWE (CC and SG) suppressed the expression of quorum sensing gene sdiA and of Salmonella Pathogenesis Island-1 (SPI-1) associated genes sipA and invF, indicating that SWE might reduce the invasion of S. Enteritidis in the host by attenuating virulence factors. Furthermore, CC and SG water extracts significantly improved the survival of infected C. elegans by impairing the ability of S. Enteritidis to colonize the digestive tract of the nematode and by enhancing the expression of C. elegans immune responsive genes. As the innate immune response pathways of C. elegans and mammals show a high

  1. Thermal inactivation kinetics of Salmonella Enteritidis and Oranienberg in commercially acquired 10% salted liquid whole egg

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Liquid egg pasteurization requirements are based on time/temperature combinations in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 9, Ch. III, Sec. 590.570 from data acquired prior to 1970. These guidelines are being reevaluated in light of recent risk assessments. Heat-resistant Salmonella Enteritidi...

  2. Differential Transcriptional Regulation Between Egg-contaminating and Non-egg-contaminating Strains of Salmonella Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) is the most common cause of food-borne salmonellosis primarily transmitted by contaminated poultry eggs. Despite its genetically clonal nature, SE strains differ markedly in their ability to disseminate systemically in chickens and subsequently invade the inte...

  3. Removal of Salmonella Enteritidis from commercial† unpasteurized liquid egg white using pilot scale crossflow tangential microfiltration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effectiveness of a pilot-scale cross-flow microfiltration (MF) process for removal of Salmonella enteritidis from liquid egg white (LEW) was evaluated. To facilitate MF, 110 L of unpasteurized LEW from a local egg breaking plant was first wedge screened, homogenized and then diluted (1:2 w/w) w...

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Bacteriophage f18SE, Isolated in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Segovia, Cristopher; Vasquez, Ignacio; Maracaja-Coutinho, Vinicius; Robeson, James

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophage f18SE was isolated from poultry sewage in Olmue, Chile, and lytic activity was demonstrated against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and serovar Pullorum strains. This bacteriophage has a 41,868-bp double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) genome encoding 53 coding sequences (CDSs) and belongs to the family Siphoviridae, subfamily Jerseyvirinae. PMID:26450716

  5. Genomic epidemiology of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis based on population structure of prevalent lineages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (SE) is one of the most commonly reported causes of human salmonellosis. The low genetic diversity of SE measured by fingerprinting methods has made subtyping a challenge. In this study, we used whole genome sequencing to characterize a total of 125 SE and Sa...

  6. An outbreak of gastroenteritis caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis traced to cream cakes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Pei Pei; Kurupatham, Lalitha; Foong, Bok Huay; Ooi, Peng Lim; James, Lyn; Phua, Leslie; Tan, Ai Ling; Koh, Diana; Goh, Kee Tai

    2011-01-01

    Introduction This paper describes the epidemiological, microbiological and environmental investigations conducted during an outbreak of Salmonella gastroenteritis in Singapore. Methods A case-control study was undertaken to identify the vehicle of transmission. Microbiological testing was performed on faecal, food and environmental samples. Isolates of Salmonella were further characterized by phage typing and ribotyping. Results There were 216 gastroenteritis cases reported from 20 November to 4 December 2007. The causative agent was identified as Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype Enteritidis for 14 out of 20 cases tested. The vehicle of transmission was traced to cream cakes produced by a bakery and sold at its retail outlets (P < 0.001, OR = 143.00, 95% Cl = 27.23–759.10). More than two-thirds of the 40 Salmonella strains isolated from hospitalized cases, food samples and asymptomatic food handlers were of phage type 1; the others reacted but did not conform to any phage type. The phage types correlated well with their unique antibiograms. The ribotype patterns of 22 selected isolates tested were highly similar, indicating genetic relatedness. The dendrogram of the strains from the outbreak showed distinct clustering and correlation compared to the non-outbreak strains, confirming a common source of infection. Discussion The cream cakes were likely contaminated by one of the ingredients used in the icing. Cross-contamination down the production line and subsequent storage of cakes at ambient temperatures for a prolonged period before consumption could have contributed to the outbreak. PMID:23908880

  7. Spread of a Major Clone of Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis in Poultry and in Salmonellosis Outbreaks in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Borges, Karen Apellanis; Furian, Thales Quedi; de Souza, Sara Neves; Tondo, Eduardo César; Streck, André Felipe; Salle, Carlos Tadeu Pippi; de Souza Moraes, Hamilton Luiz; do Nascimento, Vladimir Pinheiro

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella spp. are among the most important agents of foodborne diseases all over the world. Human Salmonella outbreaks are often associated with the consumption of poultry products (meat and eggs), and one of the most prevalent serotypes associated with these products is Salmonella Enteritidis. Brazil is one of the most important poultry exporters in the world. In southern Brazil, three closely related clones of Salmonella Enteritidis have been responsible for the majority of foodborne Salmonella outbreaks over the past decade. However, until now, there has been little information regarding the clonal relationship among the Brazilian Salmonella strains of avian origin and those involved in foodborne outbreaks. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to complete the molecular characterization of Salmonella Enteritidis strains isolated from poultry and food sources involved in Salmonella outbreaks. PCR ribotyping was performed to discriminate the strains into different ribotype profiles according to the banding pattern amplification. This technique was able to differentiate the Salmonella Enteritidis strains into two banding patterns: R2 and R4. R2 accounted for 98.7% of the strains. DNA sequencing of the 600-bp fragment, present in all ribotypes, was applied to confirm this result. The sequences generated showed high levels of similarity, ranging from 99.7 to 100%, and were grouped into a single cluster. These results suggest that there is a clonal relationship among the Salmonella Enteritidis strains responsible for several salmonellosis outbreaks and the strains collected from poultry sources.

  8. Colonization of avian reproductive-tract tissues by variant subpopulations of Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Guard, Jean; Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa

    2010-06-01

    Leghorn hens were infected with Salmonella Enteritidis cultures of known genomic content and subpopulation characteristics to determine comparative abilities to colonize the avian reproductive tract. Group 1 received phage-type (PT)4 22079, which is a dimorphic subpopulation that can both contaminate eggs and form biofilm. Group 2 received a 90:10 mixture of monomorphic PT13a strains 21027 and 21046, which produce biofilm or contaminate eggs, respectively. Group 3 received a 10:90 mixture of the same two PT13a strains, respectively. Trials were repeated three times and a total of 30 hens per treatment group were infected. Dosage was by oral gavage and was calculated as 8.6 +/- 2.01 X 10(7) colony-forming units per hen. Liver, spleen, and three different sections of oviduct (ovary, upper oviduct, and lower oviduct) were cultured per bird. Results were that all three groups had livers and spleens that were mostly positive (90.0% and 94.4% of 270 hens cultured, respectively). Reproductive-tract organs yielded 75 positives from 270 hens (27.8%), and treatment groups ranged from a low of 6.7% to a high of 76.7% positive cultures in any one trial. There was no significant difference between the numbers of positive reproductive-tract samples between treatment groups due to variance. These results suggest that the status of the reproductive tract at the time of infection may impact recovery of culture-positive tissue and contribute to variance. It is suggested that Salmonella Enteritidis cultures that vary in subpopulation composition have subtle differences in colonization of reproductive tissue that contribute to variance in egg contamination. Culture of non-reproductive-tract organs such as the liver and spleen was overall more reliable for detection of infected hens. The spleen was especially useful for detection because of its small size. Further research is needed to determine how sex hormones influence the infection pathway that results in egg contamination.

  9. Inactivation kinetics of a four-strain composite of Salmonella Enteritidis and Oranienberg in commercial liquid egg yolk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this study was to develop a general model of inactivation of salmonellae in commercial liquid egg yolk for temperatures ranging from 58 to 66 deg C by studying the inactivation kinetics of Salmonella in liquid egg yolk. Heat-resistant salmonellae (three serovars of Enteritidis [two of p...

  10. Investigation of Salmonella Enteritidis Outbreak Associated with Truffle Oil - District of Columbia, 2015.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto-Crawford, S Janet; McGee, Sasha; Li, Keith; Hennenfent, Andrew K; Dassie, Kossia; Carney, Jhetari T; Gibson, Arian; Cooper, Ivory; Blaylock, Morris; Blackwell, Reginald; Fields, Angela; Davies-Cole, John

    2017-03-17

    On September 8, 2015, the District of Columbia Department of Health (DCDOH) received a call from a person who reported experiencing gastrointestinal illness after eating at a District of Columbia (DC) restaurant with multiple locations throughout the United States (restaurant A). Later the same day, a local emergency department notified DCDOH to report four persons with gastrointestinal illness, all of whom had eaten at restaurant A during August 30-September 5. Two patients had laboratory-confirmed Salmonella group D by stool culture. On the evening of September 9, a local newspaper article highlighted a possible outbreak associated with restaurant A. Investigation of the outbreak by DCDOH identified 159 patrons who were residents of 11 states and DC with gastrointestinal illness after eating at restaurant A during July 1-September 10. A case-control study was conducted, which suggested truffle oil-containing food items as a possible source of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infection. Although several violations were noted during the restaurant inspections, the environmental, laboratory, and traceback investigations did not confirm the contamination source. Because of concern about the outbreak, the restaurant's license was suspended during September 10-15. The collaboration and cooperation of the public, media, health care providers, and local, state, and federal public health officials facilitated recognition of this outbreak involving a pathogen commonly implicated in foodborne illness.

  11. The role of heat shock protein 70 in resistance to Salmonella enteritidis in broiler chickens subjected to neonatal feed restriction and thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, A F; Zulkifli, I; Hair-Bejo, M; Omar, A R; Raha, A R

    2012-02-01

    Environmental stressors may influence chicken performance and susceptibility to pathogens, such as Salmonella enteritidis. This study was conducted to determine the effects of heat shock protein (Hsp)70 expression on resistance to Salmonella enteritidis infection in broiler chickens subjected to heat exposure. Chicks were divided into 3 feeding regimens: ad libitum feeding (control); 60% feed restriction on d 4, 5, and 6 (FR60); and 60% feed restriction on d 4, 5, and 6 plus 1,500 mg/kg of quercetin (FR60Q). On d 35, all of the chickens were individually inoculated with 1 mL of Salmonella enteritidis (1.5 × 10(8) cfu/bird) and exposed to an ambient temperature of 37 ± 1°C and 70% RH for 3 h/d. The FR60 and FR60Q chickens had significantly lower Salmonella enteritidis colonization and lower Hsp70 expression than that of the control chickens following the heat exposure period. The least colonization was observed in the FR60Q group (1.38 log(10) cfu/g in the spleen and 1.96 log(10) cfu/g in the cecal content) and the highest was in the control group (2.1 log(10) cfu/g in the spleen and 4.42 log(10) cfu/g in the cecal content). It appears that neonatal feed restriction can enhance resistance to Salmonella enteritidis colonization in heat-stressed broiler chicks, and the underlying mechanism could be associated with the lower expression of Hsp70.

  12. Epidemic increase in Salmonella bloodstream infection in children, Bwamanda, the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Phoba, M-F; De Boeck, H; Ifeka, B B; Dawili, J; Lunguya, O; Vanhoof, R; Muyembe, J-J; Van Geet, C; Bertrand, S; Jacobs, J

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is the leading cause of bloodstream infection in children in sub-Saharan Africa, but few data are available from Central-Africa. We documented during the period November 2011 to May 2012 an epidemic increase in invasive Salmonella bloodstream infections in HGR Bwamanda, a referral hospital in Equateur Province, DR Congo. Salmonella spp. represented 90.4 % (103 out of 114) of clinically significant blood culture isolates and comprised Salmonella Typhimurium (54.4 %, 56 out of 103), Salmonella Enteritidis (28.2 %, 29 out of 103) and Salmonella Typhi (17.5 %, 18 out of 103), with Salmonella Enteritidis accounting for most of the increase. Most (82 out of 103, 79.6 %) isolates were obtained from children < 5 years old. Median ages of patients infected with Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis were 14 months (14 days to 64 years) and 19 months (3 months to 8 years) respectively. Clinical presentation was non-specific; the in-hospital case fatality rate was 11.1 %. More than two thirds (69.7 %, 53 out of 76) of children < 5 years for whom laboratory data were available had Plasmodium falciparum infection. Most (83/85, 97.6 %) non-typhoid Salmonella isolates as well as 6/18 (33.3 %) Salmonella Typhi isolates were multidrug resistant (i.e. resistant to the first-line oral antibiotics amoxicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and chloramphenicol), one (1.0 %) Salmonella Typhimurium had decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility owing to a point mutation in the gyrA gene (Gly81Cys). Multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (MLVA) analysis of the Salmonella Enteritidis isolates revealed closely related patterns comprising three major and four minor profiles, with differences limited to one out of five loci. These data show an epidemic increase in clonally related multidrug-resistant Salmonella bloodstream infection in children in DR Congo.

  13. Salmonella typhi sternal wound infection.

    PubMed

    Sfeir, Maroun; Youssef, Pierre; Mokhbat, Jacques E

    2013-12-01

    Samonella typhi usually causes gastrointestinal infections. Few reports in the literature described skin and soft tissue infections related to Salmonella species, especially in immunocompetent patients. Our case exhibited sternal abscess growing Salmonella typhi.

  14. Critical role of glycogen synthase kinase-3ß in regulating the avian heterophil response to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A microarray-assisted gene expression screen of chicken heterophils revealed glycogen synthase kinase-3ß (GSK-3ß), a multifunctional Ser/Thr kinase, to be consistently up-regulated 30-180 min following stimulation with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis). The present study was ...

  15. Multiplication of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg yolks after inoculation outside, on, and inside vitelline membranes and storage at different temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prompt refrigeration to restrict bacterial growth is a widely acknowledged practice for reducing the risk of egg-borne transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis to consumers. A recently published federal regulation for S. Enteritidis control requires eggs to be refrigerated within 36 after they are la...

  16. Modeling the effect of temperature on survival rate of Salmonella Enteritidis in yogurt.

    PubMed

    Szczawiński, J; Szczawińska, M E; Łobacz, A; Jackowska-Tracz, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the inactivation rates of Salmonella Enteritidis in commercially produced yogurt and to generate primary and secondary mathematical models to predict the behaviour of these bacteria during storage at different temperatures. The samples were inoculated with the mixture of three S. Enteritidis strains and stored at 5 degrees C, 10 degrees C, 15 degrees C, 20 degrees C and 25 degrees C for 24 h. The number of salmonellae was determined every two hours. It was found that the number of bacteria decreased linearly with storage time in all samples. Storage temperature and pH of yogurt significantly influenced survival rate of S. Enteritidis (p < 0.05). In samples kept at 5 degrees C the number of salmonellae decreased at the lowest rate, whereas at 25 degrees C the reduction in number of bacteria was the most dynamic. The natural logarithm of mean inactivation rates of Salmonella calculated from primary model was fitted to two secondary models: linear and polynomial. Equations obtained from both secondary models can be applied as a tool for prediction of inactivation rate of Salmonella in yogurt stored under temperature range from 5 to 25 degrees C; however, polynomial model gave the better fit to the experimental data.

  17. Development of a predictive program for Salmonella enteritidis growth in ground chicken and liquid egg products.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Sakha, Mohammad Zaher

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we developed a predictive program for Salmonella Enteritidis growth in ground chicken and liquid egg products at various temperature patterns. The ground chicken samples were sterilized chicken and raw chicken containing high and low levels of natural microflora, and the liquid egg products were pasteurized or unpasteurized. Microbial growth data published in our previous papers were used for prediction with our new logistic model. The program for the bacterial growth in those food materials was developed on a commercially available spread-sheet program. Users can instantly predict the Salmonella growth in those chicken and egg yolk products by inputting their temperature histories. The growth of natural microflora in the chicken products can also be predicted with the program. This program could be a useful tool to ensure the microbial safety of those materials with regards to Salmonella Enteritidis growth.

  18. A comparative study on invasion, survival, modulation of oxidative burst, and nitric oxide responses of macrophages (HD11), and systemic infection in chickens by prevalent poultry Salmonella serovars.

    PubMed

    He, Haiqi; Genovese, Kenneth J; Swaggerty, Christina L; Nisbet, David J; Kogut, Michael H

    2012-12-01

    Poultry is a major reservoir for foodborne Salmonella serovars. Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Kentucky, and Salmonella Senftenberg are the most prevalent serovars in U.S. poultry. Information concerning the interactions between different Salmonella species and host cells in poultry is lacking. In the present study, the above mentioned Salmonella serovars were examined for invasion, intracellular survival, and their ability to modulate oxidative burst and nitric oxide (NO) responses in chicken macrophage HD11 cells. All Salmonella serovars demonstrated similar capacity to invade HD11 cells. At 24 h post-infection, a 36-43% reduction of intracellular bacteria, in log(10)(CFU), was observed for Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Kentucky, and Salmonella Senftenberg, whereas a significantly lower reduction (16%) was observed for Salmonella Enteritidis, indicating its higher resistance to the killing by HD11 cells. Production of NO was completely diminished in HD11 cells infected with Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis, but remained intact when infected with Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Kentucky, and Salmonella Senftenberg. Phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated oxidative burst in HD11 cells was greatly impaired after infection by each of the five serovars. When newly hatched chickens were challenged orally, a high rate (86-98%) of systemic infection (Salmonella positive in liver/spleen) was observed in birds challenged with Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg, and Salmonella Kentucky, while only 14% of the birds were Salmonella Senftenberg positive. However, there was no direct correlation between systemic infection and in vitro differential intracellular survival and modulation of NO response among the tested serovars.

  19. Antimicrobial effect of blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) extracts against the growth of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied the antimicrobial effects of berry extracts obtained from four cultivars (Elliott, Darrow, Bluecrop and Duke) of blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella Enteritidis. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal conc...

  20. Rapid identification of novel antigens of Salmonella Enteritidis by microarray-based immunoscreening.

    PubMed

    Danckert, Lena; Hoppe, Sebastian; Bier, Frank F; von Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus

    2014-01-01

    We report on an approach to rapidly screen thousands of Salmonella Enteritidis proteins with the goal of identifying novel immunodominant proteins. We used a microarray-based system that warrants high throughput and easy handling. Seven immunogenic candidates were selected after screening. Comparative analyses by ELISA and microarrays manifested their immunodominant character. The large repetitive protein (SEN4030) that plays a role as a putative adhesin in initial cell surface interaction and is highly specific to Salmonella is considered to be the most suitable protein for a diagnostic approach. The results further demonstrate that the strategy applied herein is convenient for specifically identifying immunogenic proteins of pathogenic microorganisms. Consequently, it enables a sound assessment of promising candidates for diagnostic applications and vaccine development. Moreover, the elucidation of immunogenic proteins may assist in unveiling unknown virulence-associated factors, thus furthering the understanding of the underlying pathogenicity of Salmonella in general, and of S. Enteritidis, one of the most frequently detected serovars of this pathogen, in particular. FigureThe microarray-based approach was aimed at identifying novel immunodominant proteins of S. Enteritidis. Seven antigens were revealed by screening a cDNA expression library. SEN4030, a large repetitive protein specific for salmonella, is considered an optimal candidate for future applications.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of ampicillin-resistant clinical isolates of Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed Central

    Vatopoulos, A C; Mainas, E; Balis, E; Threlfall, E J; Kanelopoulou, M; Kalapothalki, V; Malamou-Lada, H; Legakis, N J

    1994-01-01

    During the last 6 years in Greece, there has been a significant increase in the number of ampicillin-resistant Salmonella clinical isolates reported. In this study 23 ampicillin-resistant Salmonella strains, consecutively isolated from patients with epidemiologically unrelated cases of food poisoning, were investigated. By serotyping and phage typing, 21 of these strains were identified as Salmonella enteritidis phage type 6a, 1 was identified as Salmonella typhimurium, and 1 was identified as Salmonella saintpaul. By plasmid pattern analysis, the 21 S. enteritidis strains were further differentiated into five groups. Group I consisted of 5 strains (carrying two plasmids of ca. 38 and 34 MDa), group II consisted of 10 strains (three plasmids of ca. 38, 34, and 2.5 MDa), group III consisted of 3 strains (four plasmids of ca. 38, 34, 15, and 2.5 MDa), group IV consisted of 1 strain (five plasmids of ca. 100, 38, 34, 24, and 15 MDa), and group V consisted of 2 strains (three plasmids of ca. 100, 38, and 24 MDa). Ampicillin resistance was easily transferred to Escherichia coli and was associated with the transfer of the 34-MDa plasmid, classified in the N incompatibility group for all strains of groups I to IV, and with the transfer of the 100-MDa plasmid for the group V strains. EcoRI restriction endonuclease digestions showed an extensive homology among the 34-MDa conjugative R plasmids. Hybridizations of the EcoRI restriction fragments of the 34-MDa plasmids with a TEM-type probe revealed the locus of the beta-lactamase gene to be situated on a ca. 6.6-MDa fragment, common in all plasmids. These results indicate that ampicillin resistance in Greece is due to the spread of a limited number of clones of S. enteritidis phage type 6A, carrying related 34-MDa R plasmids. Work is in progress to obtain a better understanding of ampicillin resistance in S. enteritidis. Images PMID:8051261

  2. Susceptibility of biofilm Escherichia coli, Salmonella Enteritidis and Staphylococcus aureus to detergents and sanitizers.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Shigeko; Kuwabara, Yoshihiro

    2007-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the susceptibility of the biofilm cells of Escherichia coli O157, Salmonella Enteritidis, and Staphylococcus aureus to some cleaning detergents and sanitizers. No weakly acidic, neutral, and weakly alkaline detergent could remove the biofilm bacteria from stainless steel chips at commonly used concentrations recommended by manufacturers. Among sanitizers, sodium hypochlorite did not completely inactivate any biofilm bacteria at active chlorine concentrations of 25 to 200 microg/ml. Benzalkonium chloride, alkyldiaminoethyl glycine hydrochloride, chlorhexidine digluconate, and polyhexamethylenebiganide inactivated the great majority of E. coli and S. Enteritidis at commonly used concentrations, but did not inactivate S. aureus effectively enough. The biofilm S. aureus population was shown to be more tolerant than the E. coli and/or S. Enteritidis populations to the sanitizers.

  3. The Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 13 contributes to pathogenesis in streptomycin pre-treated mice but not in day-old chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a human and animal pathogen that causes gastroenteritis characterized by inflammatory diarrhea and occasionally an invasive systemic infection. Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs) are horizontally acquired genomic segments known to contribute to Salmone...

  4. A comparison of transmission characteristics of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis between pair-housed and group-housed laying hens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Human cases of bacterial gastro-enteritis are often caused by the consumption of eggs contaminated with Salmonella species, mainly Salmonella enterica serovar Enteriditis (Salmonella Enteritidis). To reduce human exposure, in several countries worldwide surveillance programmes are implemented to detect colonized layer flocks. The sampling schemes are based on the within-flock prevalence, and, as this changes over time, knowledge of the within-flock dynamics of Salmonella Enteritidis is required. Transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis has been quantified in pairs of layers, but the question is whether the dynamics in pairs is comparable to transmission in large groups, which are more representative for commercial layer flocks. The aim of this study was to compare results of transmission experiments between pairs and groups of laying hens. Experimental groups of either 2 or 200 hens were housed at similar densities, and 1 or 4 hens were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, respectively. Excretion was monitored by regularly testing of fecal samples for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. Using mathematical modeling, the group experiments were simulated with transmission parameter estimates from the pairwise experiments. Transmission of the bacteria did not differ significantly between pairs or groups. This finding suggests that the transmission parameter estimates from small-scale experiments might be extrapolated to the field situation. PMID:21345201

  5. Genomic Comparison of the Closely-Related Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, T. David; Schmieder, Robert; Silva, Genivaldo G. Z.; Busch, Julia; Cassman, Noriko; Dutilh, Bas E.; Green, Dawn; Matlock, Brian; Heffernan, Brian; Olsen, Gary J.; Farris Hanna, Leigh; Schifferli, Dieter M.; Maloy, Stanley; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A.; Edwards, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain LK5 and Dublin strain SARB12 and compared these genomes to the publicly available Enteritidis P125109, Dublin CT 02021853 and Dublin SD3246 genome sequences. We also compared the publicly available Gallinarum genome sequences from biotype Gallinarum 287/91 and Pullorum RKS5078. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, and differences in prophage and pseudogene content between strains belonging to the same serovar. Through our analysis we also identified several prophage cargo genes and pseudogenes that affect virulence and may contribute to a host-specific, systemic lifestyle. These results strongly argue that the Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum serovars of Salmonella enterica evolve by acquiring new genes through horizontal gene transfer, followed by the formation of pseudogenes. The loss of genes necessary for a gastrointestinal lifestyle ultimately leads to a systemic lifestyle and niche exclusion in the host-specific serovars. PMID:26039056

  6. Genomic comparison of the closely-related Salmonella enterica serovars enteritidis, dublin and gallinarum

    DOE PAGES

    Matthews, T. David; Schmieder, Robert; Silva, Genivaldo G. Z.; ...

    2015-06-03

    The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain LK5 and Dublin strain SARB12 and compared these genomes to the publicly available Enteritidis P125109, Dublin CT 02021853 and Dublin SD3246 genome sequences. We also compared the publicly available Gallinarum genome sequences from biotype Gallinarum 287/91 and Pullorum RKS5078. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, and differences in prophage and pseudogene content betweenmore » strains belonging to the same serovar. Through our analysis we also identified several prophage cargo genes and pseudogenes that affect virulence and may contribute to a host-specific, systemic lifestyle. These results strongly argue that the Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum serovars of Salmonella enterica evolve by acquiring new genes through horizontal gene transfer, followed by the formation of pseudogenes. The loss of genes necessary for a gastrointestinal lifestyle ultimately leads to a systemic lifestyle and niche exclusion in the host-specific serovars.« less

  7. Genomic Comparison of the Closely-Related Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum.

    PubMed

    Matthews, T David; Schmieder, Robert; Silva, Genivaldo G Z; Busch, Julia; Cassman, Noriko; Dutilh, Bas E; Green, Dawn; Matlock, Brian; Heffernan, Brian; Olsen, Gary J; Farris Hanna, Leigh; Schifferli, Dieter M; Maloy, Stanley; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Edwards, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain LK5 and Dublin strain SARB12 and compared these genomes to the publicly available Enteritidis P125109, Dublin CT 02021853 and Dublin SD3246 genome sequences. We also compared the publicly available Gallinarum genome sequences from biotype Gallinarum 287/91 and Pullorum RKS5078. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, and differences in prophage and pseudogene content between strains belonging to the same serovar. Through our analysis we also identified several prophage cargo genes and pseudogenes that affect virulence and may contribute to a host-specific, systemic lifestyle. These results strongly argue that the Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum serovars of Salmonella enterica evolve by acquiring new genes through horizontal gene transfer, followed by the formation of pseudogenes. The loss of genes necessary for a gastrointestinal lifestyle ultimately leads to a systemic lifestyle and niche exclusion in the host-specific serovars.

  8. In vitro attachment and invasion of chicken ovarian granulosa cells by Salmonella enteritidis phage type 8.

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajan, D; Saeed, M; Turek, J; Asem, E

    1996-01-01

    The attachment and invasion of chicken ovarian granulosa cells by Salmonella enteritidis was examined in vitro. The attachment was inhibited by preincubation of granulosa cells with anti-chicken fibronectin antibody (approximately 70% reduction in attachment) or preincubation with a 14-kDa fimbrial protein isolated from S. enteritidis (68% reduction in attachment). Treatment of bacterial cells with the tetrapeptide RGDS before addition to granulosa cells resulted in inhibition of attachment (60% inhibition when 2 x 10(7) CFU of bacteria was treated with 500 microg of peptide). Treatment with the peptide GRGD resulted in similar magnitude of inhibition, indicating that extracellular matrix proteins play significant roles in the interaction of S. enteritidis with granulosa cells. In contrast, treatment of the bacterial cells with the peptide GRAD did not result in significant inhibition of attachment to the granulosa cells. S. enteritidis was found to attach specifically to fibronectin, collagen IV, and laminin-coated microtiter plate wells, with the rank order of attachment as follows: fibronectin > laminin > collagen IV. Light and transmission electron micrographs of S. enteritidis invasion of granulosa cells showed organisms with or without a surrounding membrane in the cytoplasm of granulosa cells. In some instances, dividing bacterial cells were observed in the cytoplasm. Results of this study demonstrated that S. enteritidis interacts with granulosa cells in a specific manner and can invade and multiply in these cells. The granulosa cell layer of the preovulatory follicles may be a preferred site for the colonization of the chicken ovaries by invasive strains of S. enteritidis. PMID:8945540

  9. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enteritidis on chicken wings using scallop-shell powder.

    PubMed

    Cagri-Mehmetoglu, A

    2011-11-01

    The present study was designed to determine the inhibitory effect of scallop-shell powder (SSP) on Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enteritidis on chicken wings. Chicken wings artificially inoculated with L. monocytogenes (8.3 log(10) cfu/g) or S. enteritidis (8.8 log(10) cfu/g) were immersed in distilled water (0.10 or 0.50% wt/vol) of SSP slurries for 10 or 30 min, respectively. The amount of L. monocytogenes, S. enteritidis, mesophilic aerobic bacteria (MAB), and yeast or mold was determined for the chicken wings at d 0 or 7 of storage at 4°C. Results indicated that 0.5% SSP decreased the amount of L. monocytogenes and S. enteritidis on chicken wings by 3.7 and 5.0 log(10) cfu/g, respectively. The growth of L. monocytogenes, S. enteritidis, MAB, and yeast or mold was inhibited by SSP during the 7-d refrigerated storage. Color and odor of chicken wings were not significantly changed by SSP treatment (P > 0.05).

  10. Molecular characterization showed limited genetic diversity among Salmonella Enteritidis isolated from humans and animals in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ngoi, Soo Tein; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2013-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is the most common causative agent of non-typhoidal salmonellosis in Malaysia. We aimed to characterize S. Enteritidis isolated from humans and animals by analyzing their antimicrobial resistance profiles and genotypes. A total of 111 strains were characterized using multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Both typing methods revealed that genetically similar S. Enteritidis strains had persisted among human and animal populations within the period of study (2003-2008). Only 39% of the strains were multi-drug resistant (i.e., resistant to 3 or more classes of antimicrobial agents), with a majority (73%) of these in low-risk phase (multiple antibiotic resistant index <0.20). Limited genetic diversity among clinical and zoonotic S. Enteritidis suggested that animals are possible sources of human salmonellosis. The degree of multi-drug resistance among the strains was generally low during the study period.

  11. Transmission of Salmonella enteritidis after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography because of inadequate endoscope decontamination.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Paul; Smith, Andrew; Anderson, Margaret; Stewart, Jackie; Hamilton, Kate; McNamee, Sandra; Curran, Evonne T

    2017-04-01

    We report a historic nosocomial outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis affecting 4 inpatients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The cause was attributed to inadequate decontamination of an on-loan endoscope used over a weekend. This report highlights the risks of using on-loan endoscopes, particularly regarding their commissioning and adherence to disinfection protocols. In an era of increasing antibiotic resistance, transmission of Enterobacteriaceae by endoscopes remains a significant concern.

  12. Persistent Salmonella Enteritidis environmental contamination on layer farms in the context of an implemented national control program with obligatory vaccination.

    PubMed

    Dewaele, I; Van Meirhaeghe, H; Rasschaert, G; Vanrobaeys, M; De Graef, E; Herman, L; Ducatelle, R; Heyndrickx, M; De Reu, K

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to closely examine the Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis environmental contamination on persistently positive layer farms in Belgium during successive laying cycles. All of the farms were required to vaccinate their layers under the national control program for Salmonella. Seven farms with previous or current Salmonella Enteritidis contamination were monitored during different stages of the laying period and after cleaning and disinfection (CD). Environmental samples, including from the equipment and vermin, were taken in the henhouse and egg-collecting area. Dilutions were performed to define the degree of Salmonella Enteritidis contamination. Eggshells, egg contents, and ceca were also tested for Salmonella. At the end of the first sampled laying period, 41.6% of the environmental samples were contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis. After CD, the prevalence dropped to 11.4%. On average, the prevalence in the second laying period increased again: 17.8, 18.4, and 22.3% at the onset, middle, and end of the lay period, respectively. After CD before the third laying period, the prevalence decreased to 6.6% and stabilized at the onset of lay (6.3%). During lay, as well as after CD, a wide variety of contaminated environmental samples were found; for example, in the henhouse, in the egg-collecting area, on mobile equipment and in or on vermin. In the henhouse during laying, the most recurrent and highly contaminated sites were the overshoes, floor, manure belt, and hen feces. The egg-collecting area had a significantly higher number of contaminated samples compared with that of the henhouse. For both sites, the floor appeared to be the most suitable sampling site to estimate the Salmonella Enteritidis status of the farms. Eggshell and egg content contamination varied between 0.18 and 1.8% and between 0.04 and 0.4%, respectively. In total, 2.2% of the analyzed ceca contained Salmonella Enteritidis. This study revealed that Salmonella

  13. Influence of commercial sanitizers on lipopolysaccharide production by Salmonella Enteritidis ATCC 13076.

    PubMed

    Venter, P; Abraham, M; Lues, J F R; Ivanov, I

    2006-12-01

    The effect of typical sanitizers on the composition and toxicity of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) produced by Salmonella Enteritidis ATCC 13076 was analyzed. Salmonella Enteritidis was propagated up to the late exponential phase in the presence of commercial sanitizing solutions. LPS was extracted and derivatized with trifluoroacetylation, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis and the chromogenic Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay were used to assess the ultrastructure and toxicity of the LPS. The viability and debris formation during growth were evaluated to verify the bactericidal and bacteriostatic effects of the sanitizers and to assess sanitizer effects on LPS formation. The LPSs produced were quantified at 1.7 x 10(4), 1.2 x 10(4), 3.6 x 10(3), and 9.6 x 10(4) [KDO] x OD(620nm)(-1) for the controls and the organisms grown in the presence of a chlorinated sanitizer, a heavy-duty alkaline cleaner, and a phenolic hand wash solution, respectively. In response to these treatments, the short-chain polysaccharide fractions of the LPSs in the Salmonella Enteritidis cells increased. This finding suggests that this organism increases the low-molecular-weight fraction of the LPS in relation to the high-molecular-weight fraction to survive these unfavorable conditions. The cumulative change in the LPS in response to the sanitizers influenced the toxicity of the LPS; however, this change could not be related to an individual compound within any of the assessed fractions.

  14. Salmonella Enteritidis flagellar mutants have a colonization benefit in the chicken oviduct.

    PubMed

    Kilroy, Sofie; Raspoet, Ruth; Martel, An; Bosseler, Leslie; Appia-Ayme, Corinne; Thompson, Arthur; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2017-02-01

    Egg borne Salmonella Enteritidis is still a major cause of human food poisoning. Eggs can become internally contaminated following colonization of the hen's oviduct. In this paper we aimed to analyze the role of flagella of Salmonella Enteritidis in colonization of the hen's oviduct. Using a transposon library screen we showed that mutants lacking functional flagella are significantly more efficient in colonizing the hen's oviduct in vivo. A micro-array analysis proved that transcription of a number of flagellar genes is down-regulated inside chicken oviduct cells. Flagella contain flagellin, a pathogen associated molecular pattern known to bind to Toll-like receptor 5, activating a pro-inflammatory cascade. In vitro tests using primary oviduct cells showed that flagellin is not involved in invasion. Using a ligated loop model, a diminished inflammatory reaction was seen in the oviduct resulting from injection of an aflagellated mutant compared to the wild-type. It is hypothesized that Salmonella Enteritidis downregulates flagellar gene expression in the oviduct and consequently prevents a flagellin-induced inflammatory response, thereby increasing its oviduct colonization efficiency.

  15. Validation of Single and Pooled Manure Drag Swabs for the Detection of Salmonella Serovar Enteritidis in Commercial Poultry Houses.

    PubMed

    Kinde, Hailu; Goodluck, Helen A; Pitesky, Maurice; Friend, Tom D; Campbell, James A; Hill, Ashley E

    2015-12-01

    Single swabs (cultured individually) are currently used in the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) official method for sampling the environment of commercial laying hens for the detection of Salmonella enterica ssp. serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis). The FDA has also granted provisional acceptance of the National Poultry Improvement Plan's (NPIP) Salmonella isolation and identification methodology for samples taken from table-egg layer flock environments. The NPIP method, as with the FDA method, requires single-swab culturing for the environmental sampling of laying houses for Salmonella Enteritidis. The FDA culture protocol requires a multistep culture enrichment broth, and it is more labor intensive than the NPIP culture protocol, which requires a single enrichment broth. The main objective of this study was to compare the FDA single-swab culturing protocol with that of the NPIP culturing protocol but using a four-swab pool scheme. Single and multi-laboratory testing of replicate manure drag swab sets (n  =  525 and 672, respectively) collected from a Salmonella Enteritidis-free commercial poultry flock was performed by artificially contaminating swabs with either Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 4, 8, or 13a at one of two inoculation levels: low, x¯  = 2.5 CFU (range 2.5-2.7), or medium, x¯  = 10.0 CFU (range 7.5-12). For each replicate, a single swab (inoculated), sets of two swabs (one inoculated and one uninoculated), and sets of four swabs (one inoculated and three uninoculated), testing was conducted using the FDA or NPIP culture method. For swabs inoculated with phage type 8, the NPIP method was more efficient (P < 0.05) for all swab sets at both inoculation levels than the reference method. The single swabs in the NPIP method were significantly (P < 0.05) better than four-pool swabs in detecting Salmonella Enteritidis at the lower inoculation level. In the collaborative study (n  =  13 labs) using Salmonella Enteritidis phage

  16. Dietary β-galactomannans have beneficial effects on the intestinal morphology of chickens challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Brufau, M T; Martín-Venegas, R; Guerrero-Zamora, A M; Pérez-Vendrell, A M; Vilà, B; Brufau, J; Ferrer, R

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the leading causes of food-borne salmonellosis in humans. Poultry is the single largest reservoir, and the consumption of incorrectly processed chicken meat and egg products is the major source of infection. Since 2006, the use of antibiotics as growth promoters has been banned in the European Union, and the dietary inclusion of β-galactomannans (βGM) has become a promising strategy to control and prevent intestinal infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of various βGM-rich products on intestinal morphology in chickens challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis. To assess this effect, a total of 280 male Ross 308 chickens were studied (40 animals per treatment housed in 5 cages). There were 7 treatments, including controls: uninoculated birds fed the basal diet (negative control) and inoculated birds fed the basal diet (positive control) or the basal diet supplemented with Salmosan (1 g/kg), Duraió gum (1 g/kg), Cassia gum (1 g/kg), the cell walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (0.5 g/kg), or the antibiotic colistine (0.8 g/kg). The birds were fed these diets from the d 1 to 23, except the animals in the colistine group, which were fed the diet containing the antibiotic only from d 5 to 11. The inoculated animals were orally infected on d 7 with 10(8) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis. Bird performance per replicate was determined for the whole study period (23 d), and the distal ileum and cecal tonsil of 5 animals per treatment (1 animal per replicate) were observed at different magnification levels (scanning electron, light, and laser confocal microscopy). In the images corresponding to the treatments containing βGM we observed more mucus, an effect that can be associated with the observation of more goblet cells. Moreover, the images also show fewer M cells, which are characteristic of infected animals. Regarding the morphometric parameters, the animals that received Duraió and Cassia gums

  17. Optical immunosensors for detection of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enteritidis from food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Arun K.; Geng, Tao; Lathrop, Amanda; Valadez, Angela; Morgan, Mark T.

    2004-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella are two major foodborne pathogens of significant concern. Two optical evanescent wave immunosensors were evaluated for detection: Antibody-coupled fiber-optic biosensor and a surface plasmon resonant (SPR) immunosensor. In the fiber-optic sensor, polyclonal antibodies for the test organisms were immobilized on polystyrene fiber wave -guides using streptavidin - biotin chemistry. Cyanine 5 -labeled monoclonal antibodies C11E9 (for L. monocytogenes) and SF-11 (for Salmonella Enteritidis) were used to generate a specific fluorescent signal. Signal acquisition was performed by launching a laser-light (635 nm) from an Analyte-2000. This immunosensor was able to detect 103 - 109 cfu/ml of L. monocytogenes or 106-109 cfu/ml of Salmonella Enteritidis and the assays were conducted at near real-time with results obtained within one hour of sampling. The assays were specific and showed signal even in the presence of other microorganisms such as E. coli, Enterococcus faecalis or Salmonella Typhimurium. In the SPR system, IAsys instrument (resonant mirror sensor) was used. Monoclonal antibody-C11E9 was directly immobilized onto a carboxylate cuvette. Whole Listeria cells at various concentrations did not yield any signal while surface protein extracts did. Crude protein extracts from L. monocytogenes and L. innocua had average binding responses of around 150 arc sec (0.25 ng/mm2), which was significantly different from L. grayi, L. ivanovii, or L. welshimeri with average responses of <48 arc sec. Both fiber-optic and SPR sensors show promise in near real-time detection of foodborne L. monocytogenes and Salmonella Enteritidis.

  18. Reduction of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis on the surface of raw shelled almonds by exposure to steam.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Young; Oh, Se-wook; Chung, Hyun-Jung; Reyes-De-Corcuera, Jose I; Powers, Joseph R; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2006-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of steam treatment on the reduction of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis on the surface of raw almonds. Two cultivars, 'Nonpareil' and 'Mission', were studied. Salmonella Enteritidis was inoculated on the surface of raw almonds, which were then treated with steam (93 degrees C +/- 1 degrees C) for 5, 15, 25, 35, 45, 55, and 65 s. After steam treatment, samples were plated on xylose lysine desoxycholate (XLD) and overlay (OV) XLD as a selective and nonselective agar for Salmonella, respectively, to investigate the extent of sublethal injury in Salmonella. Steam treatment of raw almonds effectively reduced Salmonella Enteritidis, and the effect was pronounced with increasing treatment time. After 65 s of steam treatment, reductions in Salmonella Enteritidis populations were 5.7 log and 5.8 log for 'Nonpareil' and 4.0 log and 4.1 log for 'Mission' when enumerated on XLD and OV XLD, respectively. There was no significant difference in population estimates determined with XLD and OV XLD over time (P > 0.05). The effect of the steam treatment was significantly different between two almond cultivars. Salmonella inoculated onto 'Mission' was more resistant to the steam treatment than that on 'Nonpareil', indicating that varietal differences must be considered in the application of steam for the disinfection of raw almonds. The present investigation revealed the potential usefulness of steam treatments for the control of pathogens in raw almonds.

  19. Difference in cellular damage and cell death in thermal death time disks and high hydrostatic pressure treated Salmonella Enteritidis (ATCC13076) in liquid whole egg

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in membrane damage including leakage of intracellular UV-materials and loss of viability of Salmonella Enteritidis (ATCC13076) in liquid whole egg (LWE) following thermal-death-time (TDT) disk and high hydrostatic pressure treatments were examined. Salmonella enteritidis was inoculated ...

  20. Transposon mutagenesis of Salmonella Enteritidis identifies genes that contribute to invasiveness in human and chicken cells and survival in egg albumen.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis is the world’s leading cause of food borne salmonellosis and illness in people is linked strongly to its contamination of eggs produced by otherwise healthy appearing hens. Salmonella Enteritidis is noted for generating exceptional strain heterogeneity despite having a clonal ...

  1. Investigation of rpoS and dps genes in sodium hypochlorite resistance of Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 isolated from foodborne illness outbreaks in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Ana Carolina; Bacciu, Donatella; Santi, Lucélia; Silva, Walter Orlando Beys da; Vainstein, Marilene Henning; Rubino, Salvatore; Uzzau, Sergio; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar

    2012-03-01

    In Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil, Salmonella Enteritidis is one of the principal microorganisms responsible for foodborne disease. The present study was conducted to compare the sodium hypochlorite resistance of Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 with that of other strains of Salmonella Enteritidis isolated from different regions of the world and to investigate the involvement of the rpoS and dps genes in resistance to this disinfectant. We tested five Salmonella Enteritidis wild-type (WT) strains isolated from different countries, two mutant strains of Salmonella Enteritidis SE86, and two tagged (3XFLAG) strains of Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 for their resistance to sodium hypochlorite (200 ppm). The survival of the WT and attenuated strains was determined based on bacterial counts, and tagged proteins (Dps and RpoS) were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting with anti-FLAG antibodies. None of the WT strains of Salmonella Enteritidis were totally inactivated after 20 min. The SE86 strain lacking dps was more sensitive to sodium hypochlorite than was the WT SE86 strain, with a 2-log reduction in counts after 1 min. The RpoS and Dps proteins were actively expressed under the conditions tested, indicating that in Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 these genes, which are expressed when in contact with sodium hypochlorite, are related to oxidative stress.

  2. Antimicrobial activity of basil (Ocimum basilicum) oil against Salmonella enteritidis in vitro and in food.

    PubMed

    Rattanachaikunsopon, Pongsak; Phumkhachorn, Parichat

    2010-01-01

    Nine essential oils were examined for antimicrobial activity against reference and clinical strains of Salmonella Enteritidis. Based on the size of the inhibition zone and the minimal inhibitory concentration, basil oil had the strongest antimicrobial activity against all the tested bacteria, and S. Enteritidis SE3 was the most sensitive strain to all the tested oils. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the major constituents of the oil were linalool (64.35%), 1,8-cineole (12.28%), eugenol (3.21%), germacrene D (2.07%), alpha-terpineol (1.64%), and rho-cymene (1.03%). When applied in nham, a fermented pork sausage, experimentally inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE3 and stored at 4 degrees C, basil oil inhibited the bacterium in a dose-dependent fashion. Basil oil at a concentration of 50 ppm reduced the number of bacteria in the food from 5 to 2log cfu/g after storage for 3 d. An unmeasurable level of the bacterium in the food was observed at days 2 and 3 of storage when 100 and 150 ppm of basil oil was used, respectively. Sensory evaluation suggested that the addition of 100 but not of 150 ppm to nham would be acceptable to consumers. The results from this study confirm the potential use of basil oil as an antimicrobial agent to control S. Enteritidis in food.

  3. Nicking enzyme-assisted biosensor for Salmonella enteritidis detection based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Li, Wenkai; Duan, Yingfen; Li, Zhongjie; Deng, Le

    2014-05-15

    Salmonella enteritidis (S. enteritidis) outbreaks continue to occur, and have increased public awareness of this pathogen. Nicking endonuclease Nb.BbvC I is widely used for the detection of biomolecules and displays activity for specific double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). In this study, we developed a biosensor to detect S. enteritidis based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) using nicking enzyme and carbon nanoparticles (CNPs). Because of the quenching effect of black hole quencher 1 (BHQ 1), the CNPs do not fluoresce in the reaction system. When the target bacteria are added, the nicking enzyme recognizes and cleaves the dsDNA fabricated by the interaction between probe and target. As a result, the CNPs dissociate from BHQ 1 and emit strong fluorescence. Using the nicking enzyme, the fluorescence signals of the biosensor are greatly amplified. The biosensor exhibited a linear relationship with the concentration of S. enteritidis ranging from 10(2) to 3 × 10(3)CFU/mL in water and from 1.5 × 10(2) to 3 × 10(3)CFU/mL in milk. The present results indicate that our FRET-based detection system can be widely employed for the effective detection of pathogens.

  4. Biochemically aberrant Salmonella enteritidis ser. newington from human sources in Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Carrington, G O; Cleveland, P; von Graevenitz, A; Rupp, W D

    1975-05-01

    Three isolates of a lactose-fermenting, xylose-negative variety of Salmonella enteritidis ser. newington, identical in biochemical and serological reactions and in the antibiogram, were recovered from three patients in different areas of Connecticut in January 1974. Hydrogen sulfide production was not visible in Salmonella-Shigella agar, in triple sugar iron agar, and in Kligler iron agar but was noticed in lysine iron agar and on XLD agar, among others. The amount of fermentable carbohydrates present was found to correlate with failure to show hydrogen sulfide production (pH effect). In contrast to lactose-fermenting Salmonella strains reported by other authors, we could not elicit a direct transfer of the lac(+) character at frequencies above 10(-6). An epidemiological follow-up remained unsuccessful. Recommendations for the recognition of similar strains are presented.

  5. Detection of Salmonella enteritidis Using a Miniature Optical Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, J. R.; Kim, G.; Kothapalli, A.; Morgan, M. T.; Ess, D.

    2007-04-01

    The frequent outbreaks of foodborne illness demand rapid detection of foodborne pathogens. Unfortunately, conventional methods for pathogen detection and identification are labor-intensive and take days to complete. Biosensors have shown great potential for the rapid detection of foodborne pathogens. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors have been widely adapted as an analysis tool for the study of various biological binding reactions. SPR biosensors could detect antibody-antigen bindings on the sensor surface by measuring either a resonance angle or refractive index value. In this study, the feasibility of a miniature SPR sensor (Spreeta, TI, USA) for detection of Salmonella enteritidis has been evaluated. Anti-Salmonella antibodies were immobilized on the gold sensor surface by using neutravidin. Salmonella could be detected by the Spreeta biosensor at concentrations down to 105 cfu/ml.

  6. Characterization of Salmonella Enteritidis strains isolated from poultry and farm environments in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Campioni, F; Zoldan, M M; Falcão, J P

    2014-07-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is a major causative agent of foodborne outbreaks worldwide. Using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), this study assessed the genetic relatedness, the pathogenic potential, and antimicrobial resistance in 60 strains isolated from chickens and the farm environment in Brazil between 2004 and 2010. The resulting concatenated dendrogram of the two methodologies distinguished the strains into two clusters. Some strains isolated from the two sources were indistinguishable. All the strains contained the 13 virulence markers investigated. Forty-four strains were resistant to nalidixic acid. Quinolone resistance presented by many strains suggests that quinolones may have been used to treat chickens. The high prevalence of virulence markers highlights the importance of poultry as vehicles of S. Enteritidis strains that have the potential to cause disease.

  7. Study of Salmonella Typhimurium Infection in Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Vivek V.; Devon, Rebecca L.; Sharma, Pardeep; McWhorter, Andrea R.; Chousalkar, Kapil K.

    2016-01-01

    Members of Salmonella enterica are frequently involved in egg and egg product related human food poisoning outbreaks worldwide. In Australia, Salmonella Typhimurium is frequently involved in egg and egg product related foodborne illness and Salmonella Mbandaka has also been found to be a contaminant of the layer farm environment. The ability possessed by Salmonella Enteritidis to colonize reproductive organs and contaminate developing eggs has been well-described. However, there are few studies investigating this ability for Salmonella Typhimurium. The hypothesis of this study was that the Salmonella Typhimurium can colonize the gut for a prolonged period of time and that horizontal infection through feces is the main route of egg contamination. At 14 weeks of age hens were orally infected with either S. Typhimurium PT 9 or S. Typhimurium PT 9 and Salmonella Mbandaka. Salmonella shedding in feces and eggs was monitored for 15 weeks post-infection. Egg shell surface and internal contents of eggs laid by infected hens were cultured independently for detection of Salmonella spp. The mean Salmonella load in feces ranged from 1.54 to 63.35 and 0.31 to 98.38 most probable number/g (MPN/g) in the S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka group, respectively. No correlation was found between mean fecal Salmonella load and frequency of egg shell contamination. Egg shell contamination was higher in S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka infected group (7.2% S. Typhimurium, 14.1% S. Mbandaka) compared to birds infected with S. Typhimurium (5.66%) however, co-infection had no significant impact on egg contamination by S. Typhimurium. Throughout the study Salmonella was not recovered from internal contents of eggs laid by hens. Salmonella was isolated from different segments of oviduct of hens from both the groups, however pathology was not observed on microscopic examination. This study investigated Salmonella shedding for up to 15 weeks p.i which is a longer period of time

  8. Study of Salmonella Typhimurium Infection in Laying Hens.

    PubMed

    Pande, Vivek V; Devon, Rebecca L; Sharma, Pardeep; McWhorter, Andrea R; Chousalkar, Kapil K

    2016-01-01

    Members of Salmonella enterica are frequently involved in egg and egg product related human food poisoning outbreaks worldwide. In Australia, Salmonella Typhimurium is frequently involved in egg and egg product related foodborne illness and Salmonella Mbandaka has also been found to be a contaminant of the layer farm environment. The ability possessed by Salmonella Enteritidis to colonize reproductive organs and contaminate developing eggs has been well-described. However, there are few studies investigating this ability for Salmonella Typhimurium. The hypothesis of this study was that the Salmonella Typhimurium can colonize the gut for a prolonged period of time and that horizontal infection through feces is the main route of egg contamination. At 14 weeks of age hens were orally infected with either S. Typhimurium PT 9 or S. Typhimurium PT 9 and Salmonella Mbandaka. Salmonella shedding in feces and eggs was monitored for 15 weeks post-infection. Egg shell surface and internal contents of eggs laid by infected hens were cultured independently for detection of Salmonella spp. The mean Salmonella load in feces ranged from 1.54 to 63.35 and 0.31 to 98.38 most probable number/g (MPN/g) in the S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka group, respectively. No correlation was found between mean fecal Salmonella load and frequency of egg shell contamination. Egg shell contamination was higher in S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka infected group (7.2% S. Typhimurium, 14.1% S. Mbandaka) compared to birds infected with S. Typhimurium (5.66%) however, co-infection had no significant impact on egg contamination by S. Typhimurium. Throughout the study Salmonella was not recovered from internal contents of eggs laid by hens. Salmonella was isolated from different segments of oviduct of hens from both the groups, however pathology was not observed on microscopic examination. This study investigated Salmonella shedding for up to 15 weeks p.i which is a longer period of time

  9. Interpretations of antibody responses to Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis gm flagellin in poultry flocks are enhanced by a kinetics-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    McDonough, P L; Jacobson, R H; Timoney, J F; Mutalib, A; Kradel, D C; Chang, Y F; Shin, S J; Lein, D H; Trock, S; Wheeler, K

    1998-07-01

    Many regulatory and diagnostic programs for the detection of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infection in commercial poultry flocks have relied on rapid Pullorum agglutination tests to screen birds because of the shared antigens of S. enterica Enteritidis and S. enterica Pullorum and Gallinarum; however, the use of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) format affords better analytical sensitivity than crude agglutination tests. In this study, we adapted our earlier conventional indirect ELISA, using gm flagellin as the antigen, to a kinetics-based, computer-controlled ELISA (KELA). The KELA was used to screen for flagellin antibody from three commercial flocks: (i) a large flock involved in a U.S. Department of Agriculture trace back from a human S. enterica Enteritidis foodborne outbreak (n = 3,209), (ii) a flock infected with the endemic S. enterica Enteritidis serotype but which also had multiple other Salmonella serotypes (n = 65), and (iii) an S. enterica Pullorum-infected flock (n = 12). The first flock (S. enterica Enteritidis prevalence of 2.45% based on culture) provided a field test of the KELA and allowed the calculation of diagnostic sensitivity (D-Sn) and diagnostic specificity (D-Sp). With a cutoff of 10 (used for screening flocks [i.e., high sensitivity]), the KELA has a D-Sn of 95.2% and a D-Sp of 18.5%; with a cutoff of 140 (used in confirmatory flock testing [i.e., high specificity]), the KELA has a D-Sn of 28.0% and a D-Sp of 99.1%. We found that with a cutoff of 60 (D-Sn = 63.1%; D-Sp = 91.6%), we could eliminate reactions in the KELA caused by other non-S. enterica Enteritidis salmonellae. The KELA was also compared to two commercial rapid Pullorum tests, the Solvay (D-Sn = 94.9%; D-Sp = 55.5%) and the Vineland (D-Sn = 62.0%; D-Sp = 75.3%).

  10. TRS-based PCR as a potential tool for inter-serovar discrimination of Salmonella Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, S. Infantis, S. Virchow, S. Hadar, S. Newport and S. Anatum.

    PubMed

    Majchrzak, Marta; Krzyzanowska, Anna; Kubiak, Anna B; Wojtasik, Arkadiusz; Wolkowicz, Tomasz; Szych, Jolanta; Parniewski, Pawel

    2014-11-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica comprises a number of serovars, many of which pose an epidemiological threat to humans and are a worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality. Most reported food infection outbreaks involve the serovars Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium. Rapid identification to determine the primary sources of the bacterial contamination is important to the improvement of public health. In recent years, many DNA-based techniques have been applied to genotype Salmonella. Herein, we report the use of a manual TRS-PCR approach for the differentiation of the Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovars in a single-tube assay. One hundred seventy Salmonella strains were examined in this work. These consisted of serovars S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, S. Infantis, S. Virchow, S. Hadar, S. Newport and S. Anatum. Five of the TRS-primers, N6(GTG)4, N6(CAC)4, N6(CGG)4, N6(CCG)4 and N6(CTG)4, perfectly distinguished the S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium serovars, and the N6(GTG)4 primer additionally grouped the other five frequently isolated serovars. In our opinion, the TRS-PCR methodology could be recommended for a quick and simple DNA-based test for inter-serovar discrimination of Salmonella strains.

  11. Effect of coffee filtrate, methylglyoxal, glyoxal, and caffeine on Salmonella typhimurium and S. enteritidis survival in ground chicken breasts.

    PubMed

    Maletta, Anne B; Were, Lilian M

    2012-02-01

    The antimicrobial effect of roasted coffee filtrate (CF) and dicarbonyls on Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis in raw ground chicken breast meat (GCB) was investigated. Coffee was brewed and filtered before addition to GCB. Coffee filtrate with and without added caffeine, methylglyoxal, and/or glyoxal was added to GCB and then inoculated with Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis. Ground chicken samples were stomached with peptone water at days 1, 3, 5, and 7, plated on XLD agar with a TSA overlay, and Salmonella survivors were enumerated. CF alone gave less than a 1 Log reduction in all runs compared to control GCB with no treatment. Methylglyoxal (2.28 mg/g GCB) had the greatest antimicrobial effect against Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis in GCB with average Log reductions of 2.27 to 3.23, respectively, over the 7 d duration of the experiment compared to control GCB with no treatment. A 1 Log reduction was observed in GCB with CF, 0.93 mg glyoxal, and 1 mg caffeine/g chicken compared to the control and GCB with only CF. Heat-produced coffee compounds could potentially reduce Salmonella in retail ground chicken and chicken products.

  12. Anti-infective mechanisms induced by a probiotic Lactobacillus strain against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    de LeBlanc, Alejandra de Moreno; Castillo, Natalia A; Perdigon, Gabriela

    2010-04-15

    The prevention of pathogen infections is one of the most extensively studied effects of probiotics. L. casei CRL 431 is a probiotic bacterium and its effects on the gut immune cells have been extensively studied. The aim of the present study was to determine, using a mouse model, the preventive and therapeutic effect of L. casei CRL 431 to achieve protection against Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium infection. In both previous and continuous (previous and post-infection) probiotic administration, the mechanisms induced by this lactic acid bacteria on the first line of intestinal defense (non-specific barrier and the innate immune cells associated to the gut), as a way to understand some of the mechanisms involved in the protection against Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium, were analyzed. The results obtained demonstrated that 7 days L. casei CRL 431 administration before infection decreased the severity of the infection with Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium, demonstrating that the continuous administration (even after infection) had the best effect. This continuous administration diminished the counts of the pathogen in the intestine as well as its spread outside this organ. Several mechanisms and cells are involved in this protective effect against Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium. L. casei CRL 431 acted on cells of the innate and adaptive immune response. The probiotic administration decreased the neutrophil infiltration with the consequent diminution of intestinal inflammation; activated the macrophage phagocytic activity in different sites such as Peyer's patches, spleen and peritoneum; and increased the number of IgA+cells in the lamina propria of the small intestine which was correlated with increased release of s-IgA specific against the pathogen in the intestinal fluids. The mechanism of the inhibition of cellular apoptosis was not involved.

  13. Interdigitated microelectrode based impedance biosensor for detection of salmonella enteritidis in food samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G.; Morgan, M.; Hahm, B. K.; Bhunia, A.; Mun, J. H.; Om, A. S.

    2008-03-01

    Salmonella enteritidis outbreaks continue to occur, and S. enteritidis-related outbreaks from various food sources have increased public awareness of this pathogen. Conventional methods for pathogens detection and identification are labor-intensive and take days to complete. Some immunological rapid assays are developed, but these assays still require prolonged enrichment steps. Recently developed biosensors have shown great potential for the rapid detection of foodborne pathogens. To develop the biosensor, an interdigitated microelectrode (IME) was fabricated by using semiconductor fabrication process. Anti-Salmonella antibodies were immobilized based on avidin-biotin binding on the surface of the IME to form an active sensing layer. To increase the sensitivity of the sensor, three types of sensors that have different electrode gap sizes (2 μm, 5 μm, 10 μm) were fabricated and tested. The impedimetric biosensor could detect 103 CFU/mL of Salmonella in pork meat extract with an incubation time of 5 minutes. This method may provide a simple, rapid and sensitive method to detect foodborne pathogens.

  14. First Human Isolate of Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis Harboring blaCTX-M-14 in South America

    PubMed Central

    Bado, Inés; García-Fulgueiras, Virginia; Cordeiro, Nicolás F.; Betancor, Laura; Caiata, Leticia; Seija, Verónica; Robino, Luciana; Algorta, Gabriela; Chabalgoity, José A.; Ayala, Juan A.; Gutkind, Gabriel O.

    2012-01-01

    We studied a clinical isolate of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis showing resistance to oxyiminocephalosporins. PCR analysis confirmed the presence of blaCTX-M-14 linked to IS903 in a 95-kb IncI1 conjugative plasmid. Such a plasmid is maintained on account of the presence of a pndAC addiction system. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis indicated that the strain belongs to ST11. This is the first report of blaCTX-M-14 in Salmonella Enteritidis of human origin in South America. PMID:22290976

  15. Antibiotic resistance of Moroccan strains of Salmonella enteritidis isolated between 1996 and 1997.

    PubMed

    Rouahi, N; Zouhdi, M; Zidouh, A; Elyachioui, M; Mahjour, J

    2000-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a worldwide problem. The antibiotic resistance of Moroccan strains of Salmonella enteritidis was investigated from 1996 to 1997. A total of 51 strains were collected within this period, 31 derived from human sources and 20 from food. Of the 31 human strains, 10 were resistant to antibiotics; 4 were resistant to two or more antibiotics. Of the 20 food strains, 11 were resistant to antibiotics; 6 were resistant to two or more antibiotics. The results are similar to those obtained from strains isolated from other Mediterranean countries.

  16. Comparison of Danish isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis PT9a and PT11 from hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) and humans by plasmid profiling and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Nauerby, B; Pedersen, K; Dietz, H H; Madsen, M

    2000-10-01

    During the years 1994 to 1998, 10 strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 11 (PT11) and 6 PT9a strains were isolated from Danish hedgehogs, together with 7 strains that did not yield phage susceptibility patterns conforming with any known phage type (routine dilution no conformity [RDNC]). From 1995 to 1998, five Danish patients were reported infected with serovar Enteritidis PT11 and two with PT9a. All serovar Enteritidis PT11, PT9a, and RDNC isolates from hedgehogs and humans were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), plasmid profiling, and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of plasmids. By use of S1 nuclease and HindIII, the PT11 and PT9a isolates had identical plasmid profiles and RFLP patterns, which differed from the RDNC profiles. The PFGE profiles were identical for all serovar Enteritidis PT11 and PT9a strains from hedgehogs, four of five human strains of serovar Enteritidis PT11, and two human strains of serovar Enteritidis PT9a, irrespective of restriction enzyme, whereas the last human strain deviated slightly when NotI was used but not when XbaI or SpeI was used. The results indicate that serovar Enteritidis PT9a and PT11 are closely related and that PT11 and PT9a from Danish hedgehogs and humans belong to the same clonal lineage.

  17. Identification by PCR of Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica Serovars Associated with Invasive Infections among Febrile Patients in Mali

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Sharon M.; Diallo, Souleymane; Levy, Haim; Livio, Sofie; Sow, Samba O.; Tapia, Milagritos; Fields, Patricia I.; Mikoleit, Matthew; Tamboura, Boubou; Kotloff, Karen L.; Nataro, James P.; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2010-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa, non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) are emerging as a prominent cause of invasive disease (bacteremia and focal infections such as meningitis) in infants and young children. Importantly, including data from Mali, three serovars, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin, account for the majority of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from these patients. Methods We have extended a previously developed series of polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) based on O serogrouping and H typing to identify Salmonella Typhimurium and variants (mostly I 4,[5],12:i:-), Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin. We also designed primers to detect Salmonella Stanleyville, a serovar found in West Africa. Another PCR was used to differentiate diphasic Salmonella Typhimurium and monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium from other O serogroup B, H:i serovars. We used these PCRs to blind-test 327 Salmonella serogroup B and D isolates that were obtained from the blood cultures of febrile patients in Bamako, Mali. Principal Findings We have shown that when used in conjunction with our previously described O-serogrouping PCR, our PCRs are 100% sensitive and specific in identifying Salmonella Typhimurium and variants, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Dublin and Salmonella Stanleyville. When we attempted to differentiate 171 Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[ 5],12:i:1,2) strains from 52 monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[5],12:i:-) strains, we were able to correctly identify 170 of the Salmonella Typhimurium and 51 of the Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- strains. Conclusion We have described a simple yet effective PCR method to support surveillance of the incidence of invasive disease caused by NTS in developing countries. PMID:20231882

  18. Quantitative Tracking of Salmonella Enteritidis Transmission Routes Using Barcode-Tagged Isogenic Strains in Chickens: Proof-of-Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yichao; Ricke, Steven C.; Tellez, Guillermo; Kwon, Young Min

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella is an important foodborne bacterial pathogen, however, a fundamental understanding on Salmonella transmission routes within a poultry flock remains unclear. In this study, a series of barcode-tagged strains were constructed by inserting six random nucleotides into a functionally neutral region on the chromosome of S. Enteritidis as a tool for quantitative tracking of Salmonella transmission in chickens. Six distinct barcode-tagged strains were used for infection or contamination at either low dose (103 CFUs; three strains) or high dose (105 CFUs; three strains) in three independent experiments (Experiment 1 oral gavage; Experiment 2 contaminated feed; Experiment 3 contaminated water). For all chick experiments, cecal and foot-wash samples were collected from a subset of the chickens at days 7 or/and 14, from which genomic DNA was extracted and used to amplify the barcode regions. After the resulting PCR amplicons were pooled and analyzed by MiSeq sequencing, a total of approximately 1.5 million reads containing the barcode sequences were analyzed to determine the relative frequency of every barcode-tagged strain in each sample. In Experiment 1, the high dose of oral infection was correlated with greater dominance of the strains in the ceca of the respective seeder chickens and also in the contact chickens yet at lesser degrees. When chicks were exposed to contaminated feed (Experiment 2) or water (Experiment 3), there were no clear patterns of the barcode-tagged strains in relation to the dosage, except that the strains introduced at low dose required a longer time to colonize the ceca with contaminated feed. Most foot-wash samples contained only one to three strains for the majority of the samples, suggesting potential existence of an unknown mechanism(s) for strain exclusion. These results demonstrated the proof of concept of using barcode tagged to investigate transmission dynamics of Salmonella in chickens in a quantitative manner. PMID:28261587

  19. Quantitative Tracking of Salmonella Enteritidis Transmission Routes Using Barcode-Tagged Isogenic Strains in Chickens: Proof-of-Concept Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yichao; Ricke, Steven C; Tellez, Guillermo; Kwon, Young Min

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella is an important foodborne bacterial pathogen, however, a fundamental understanding on Salmonella transmission routes within a poultry flock remains unclear. In this study, a series of barcode-tagged strains were constructed by inserting six random nucleotides into a functionally neutral region on the chromosome of S. Enteritidis as a tool for quantitative tracking of Salmonella transmission in chickens. Six distinct barcode-tagged strains were used for infection or contamination at either low dose (10(3) CFUs; three strains) or high dose (10(5) CFUs; three strains) in three independent experiments (Experiment 1 oral gavage; Experiment 2 contaminated feed; Experiment 3 contaminated water). For all chick experiments, cecal and foot-wash samples were collected from a subset of the chickens at days 7 or/and 14, from which genomic DNA was extracted and used to amplify the barcode regions. After the resulting PCR amplicons were pooled and analyzed by MiSeq sequencing, a total of approximately 1.5 million reads containing the barcode sequences were analyzed to determine the relative frequency of every barcode-tagged strain in each sample. In Experiment 1, the high dose of oral infection was correlated with greater dominance of the strains in the ceca of the respective seeder chickens and also in the contact chickens yet at lesser degrees. When chicks were exposed to contaminated feed (Experiment 2) or water (Experiment 3), there were no clear patterns of the barcode-tagged strains in relation to the dosage, except that the strains introduced at low dose required a longer time to colonize the ceca with contaminated feed. Most foot-wash samples contained only one to three strains for the majority of the samples, suggesting potential existence of an unknown mechanism(s) for strain exclusion. These results demonstrated the proof of concept of using barcode tagged to investigate transmission dynamics of Salmonella in chickens in a quantitative manner.

  20. Genetic and Phenotypic Characterization of a Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Emerging Strain with Superior Intra-macrophage Replication Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Shomer, Inna; Avisar, Alon; Desai, Prerak; Azriel, Shalhevet; Smollan, Gill; Belausov, Natasha; Keller, Nathan; Glikman, Daniel; Maor, Yasmin; Peretz, Avi; McClelland, Michael; Rahav, Galia; Gal-Mor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is one of the ubiquitous Salmonella serovars worldwide and a major cause of food-born outbreaks, which are often associated with poultry and poultry derivatives. Here we report a nation-wide S. Enteritidis clonal outbreak that occurred in Israel during the last third of 2015. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis and whole genome sequencing identified genetically related strains that were circulating in Israel as early as 2008. Global comparison linked this outbreak strain to several clinical and marine environmental isolates that were previously isolated in California and Canada, indicating that similar strains are prevalent outside of Israel. Phenotypic comparison between the 2015 outbreak strain and other clinical and reference S. Enteritidis strains showed only limited intra-serovar phenotypic variation in growth in rich medium, invasion into Caco-2 cells, uptake by J774.1A macrophages, and host cell cytotoxicity. In contrast, significant phenotypic variation was shown among different S. Enteritidis isolates when biofilm-formation, motility, invasion into HeLa cells and uptake by THP-1 human macrophages were studied. Interestingly, the 2015 outbreak clone was found to possess superior intra-macrophage replication ability within both murine and human macrophages in comparison to the other S. Enteritidis strains studied. This phenotype is likely to play a role in the virulence and host-pathogen interactions of this emerging clone. PMID:27695450

  1. Comparative evaluation of Salmonella Enteritidis ghost vaccines with a commercial vaccine for protection against internal egg contamination with Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Jawale, Chetan V; Lee, John Hwa

    2014-10-14

    The study was conducted for the comparative evaluation of the vaccine potential of Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis, SE) ghost, SE ghost carrying Escherichia coli heat labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) protein, and a commercial vaccine. Group A chickens were used as a non-vaccinated control, group B chickens were immunized with the ghost carrying LTB protein, group C chickens were immunized with the ghost and, group D chickens were immunized with a commercial vaccine. Group D chickens showed the swelling at the injection site, while no adverse reactions were observed at injection sites of the group B and C chickens. Chickens from the immunized groups B, C, and D demonstrated significant increases in plasma IgG, intestinal secretory IgA levels, and antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferative responses. After challenge with a virulent SE strain via intravenous route, groups B, C, and D showed significantly higher egg production and lower internal egg contamination and lower recovery of the challenge strain from internal organs compared to non-immunized-challenged control group A. In conclusion, these data indicate that immunization of chickens with the ghost and ghost carrying LTB is safe, without causing any adverse reaction, and is effective as the commercial vaccine in terms of reduction in internal egg contamination and internal organ colonization of Salmonella.

  2. Prospective use of whole genome sequencing (WGS) detected a multi-country outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Inns, T; Ashton, P M; Herrera-Leon, S; Lighthill, J; Foulkes, S; Jombart, T; Rehman, Y; Fox, A; Dallman, T; DE Pinna, E; Browning, L; Coia, J E; Edeghere, O; Vivancos, R

    2017-01-01

    Since April 2015, whole genome sequencing (WGS) has been the routine test for Salmonella identification, surveillance and outbreak investigation at the national reference laboratory in England and Wales. In May 2015, an outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis cases was detected using WGS data and investigated. UK cases were interviewed to obtain a food history and links between suppliers were mapped to produce a food chain network for chicken eggs. The association between the food chain network and the phylogeny was explored using a network comparison approach. Food and environmental samples were taken from premises linked to cases and tested for Salmonella. Within the outbreak single nucleotide polymorphism defined cluster, 136 cases were identified in the UK and 18 in Spain. One isolate from a food containing chicken eggs was within the outbreak cluster. There was a significant association between the chicken egg food chain of UK cases and phylogeny of outbreak isolates. This is the first published Salmonella outbreak to be prospectively detected using WGS. This outbreak in the UK was linked with contemporaneous cases in Spain by WGS. We conclude that UK and Spanish cases were exposed to a common source of Salmonella-contaminated chicken eggs.

  3. Adhesion and growth inhibitory effect of chicken egg yolk antibody (IgY) on Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chalghoumi, Raja; Théwis, André; Beckers, Yves; Marcq, Christopher; Portetelle, Daniel; Schneider, Yves-Jacques

    2009-06-01

    The protective effects of powder preparation of egg yolk immunoglobulin Y (IgY), specific to Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium outer membrane proteins (OMP), against these two Salmonella sp. serovars were investigated in vitro in two different assays: adhesion-prevention and growth-inhibition. The adhesion-prevention assay was conducted using polarized monolayers of the human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cell line. First, the conditions of Salmonella adherence to Caco-2 cells were optimized, and interferences of bacteria with the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of fully differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers and the lactate dehydrogenase release upon exposure of the cells to Salmonella were evaluated. Both Salmonella sp. serovars were able to adhere to Caco-2 cells and decreased TER. Results from the adhesion-prevention assay demonstrated that specific IgY reduced the decrease in TER of the infected Caco-2 cell monolayers and blocked the Salmonella sp. adhesion in a concentration-dependent manner (p < 0.05). Nonspecific IgY also exhibited an inhibitory effect on these two parameters, but to a lesser extent than that of the specific IgY (p < 0.05). The protective effect of nonspecific IgY could be attributed to the low-density lipoprotein component of the water-soluble fraction of egg yolks that may not have been eliminated during ultrafiltration. The growth-inhibition assay revealed that specific IgY had an inhibitory effect on the bacterial growth, markedly during the late exponential phase, whereas nonspecific IgY failed to do so. Taken together, these results suggest that the in vitro growth inhibitory effect of specific IgY on Salmonella spp. resulted from the specific binding activity of these IgY to Salmonella sp. OMP. Passive immunization with Salmonella sp. OMP-specific IgY could thus be useful to prevent Salmonella colonization in broiler chickens and the subsequent carcass contamination during processing.

  4. Egg white versus Salmonella Enteritidis! A harsh medium meets a resilient pathogen.

    PubMed

    Baron, Florence; Nau, Françoise; Guérin-Dubiard, Catherine; Bonnassie, Sylvie; Gautier, Michel; Andrews, Simon C; Jan, Sophie

    2016-02-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is the prevalent egg-product-related food-borne pathogen. The egg-contamination capacity of S. Enteritidis includes its exceptional survival capability within the harsh conditions provided by egg white. Egg white proteins, such as lysozyme and ovotransferrin, are well known to play important roles in defence against bacterial invaders. Indeed, several additional minor proteins and peptides have recently been found to play known or potential roles in protection against bacterial contamination. However, although such antibacterial proteins are well studied, little is known about their efficacy under the environmental conditions prevalent in egg white. Thus, the influence of factors such as temperature, alkalinity, nutrient restriction, viscosity and cooperative interactions on the activities of antibacterial proteins in egg white remains unclear. This review critically assesses the available evidence on the antimicrobial components of egg white. In addition, mechanisms employed by S. Enteritidis to resist egg white exposure are also considered along with various genetic studies that have shed light upon egg white resistance systems. We also consider how multiple, antibacterial proteins operate in association with specific environmental factors within egg white to generate a lethal protective cocktail that preserves sterility.

  5. Adhesion of Salmonella Enteritidis and Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel welds.

    PubMed

    Casarin, Letícia Sopeña; Brandelli, Adriano; de Oliveira Casarin, Fabrício; Soave, Paulo Azevedo; Wanke, Cesar Henrique; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar

    2014-11-17

    Pathogenic microorganisms are able to adhere on equipment surfaces, being possible to contaminate food during processing. Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes are important pathogens that can be transmitted by food, causing severe foodborne diseases. Most surfaces of food processing industry are made of stainless steel joined by welds. However currently, there are few studies evaluating the influence of welds in the microorganism's adhesion. Therefore the purpose of the present study was to investigate the adhesion of Salmonella Enteritidis and L. monocytogenes on surface of metal inert gas (MIG), and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, as well as to evaluate the cell and surface hydrophobicities. Results demonstrated that both bacteria adhered to the surface of welds and stainless steel at same levels. Despite this, bacteria and surfaces demonstrated different levels of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, results indicated that there was no correlation between adhesion to welds and stainless steel and the hydrophobicity.

  6. Growth of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella Enteritidis during Preparation and Storage of Yogurt

    PubMed Central

    Cirone, K.; Huberman, Y.; Morsella, C.; Méndez, L.; Jorge, M.; Paolicchi, F.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the viability of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), Escherichia coli (E. coli), and Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) during preparation and refrigerated storage of yogurt. Three yogurts were prepared using pasteurized commercial milk. Each yogurt was artificially contaminated with (1) MAP, (2) E. coli + S. Enteritidis, and (3) MAP + E. coli + S. Enteritidis. Samples were taken during and after the fermentation process until day 20 after inoculation. MAP was not detected during their preparation and short-term storage but was recuperated after starting at 180 min after inoculation storage. Live bacterial counts of E. coli, and S. Enteritidis increased during the first 24 hours, followed by a slight decrease towards the end of the study. In this study it was shown how MAP, E. coli, and S. Enteritidis resisted the acidic conditions generated during the preparation of yogurt and low storage temperatures. This work contributes to current knowledge regarding survival of MAP, E. coli, and S. Enteritidis during preparation and refrigerated storage of yogurt and emphasizes the need to improve hygiene measures to ensure the absence of these pathogenic microorganisms in dairy products. PMID:24455399

  7. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminated eggs produced by infected commercial laying flocks are often implicated as sources of human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis, but Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium have also been associated with egg-transmitted illness. Contamination of the edible contents of eggs is ...

  8. Acyl homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing stimulates biofilm formation by Salmonella Enteritidis in anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Felipe Alves de; Pimentel-Filho, Natan de Jesus; Pinto, Uelinton Manoel; Mantovani, Hilário Cuquetto; Oliveira, Leandro Licursi de; Vanetti, Maria Cristina Dantas

    2017-04-01

    Quorum sensing regulates a variety of phenotypes in bacteria including the production of virulence factors. Salmonella spp. have quorum sensing systems mediated by three autoinducers (AI-1, AI-2, and AI-3). The AI-1-mediated system is incomplete in that the bacterium relies on the synthesis of signaling molecules by other microorganisms. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of the AI-1 N-dodecanoyl-DL-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL) on the growth, motility, adhesion, and biofilm formation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis PT4 578 on a polystyrene surface. Experiments were conducted at 37 °C in anaerobic tryptone soy broth supplemented with C12-HSL and/or a mixture of four synthetic furanones, at the concentration of 50 nM each. The planktonic growth, adhesion, swarming, and twitching motility were not altered in the presence of C12-HSL and/or furanones under anaerobic conditions. However, C12-HSL induced biofilm formation after 36 h of cultivation as determined by quantification of biofilm formation, by enumeration of adhered cells to polystyrene coupons, and finally by imaging the presence of multilayered cells on an epifluorescence microscope. When furanones were present in the medium, an antagonistic effect against C12-HSL on the biofilm development was observed. The results demonstrate an induction of biofilm formation in Salmonella Enteritidis by AI-1 under anaerobic conditions. Considering that Salmonella does not produce AI-1 but respond to it, C12-HSL synthesized by other bacterial species could trigger biofilm formation by this pathogen in conditions that are relevant for its pathogenesis.

  9. Clinical and veterinary isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis defective in lipopolysaccharide O-chain polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Guard-Petter, J.; Parker, C.T.; Asokan, K.; Carlson, R.W.

    1999-05-01

    Twelve human and chicken isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis belonging to phage types 4, 8, 13a, and 23 were characterized for variability in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) composition. Isolates were differentiated into two groups, i.e., those that lacked immunoreactive O-chain, termed rough isolates, and those that had immunoreactive O-chain, termed smooth isolates. Isolates within these groups could be further differentiated by LPS compositional differences as detected by gel electrophoresis and gas liquid chromatography of samples extracted with water, which yielded significantly more LPS in comparison to phenol-chloroform extraction. The rough isolates were of two types, the O-antigen synthesis mutants and the O-antigen polymerization (wzy) mutants. Smooth isolates were also of two types, one producing low-molecular-weight (LMW) LPS and the other producing high-molecular-weight (HMW) LPS. To determine the genetic basis for the O-chain variability of the smooth isolates, the authors analyzed the effects of a null mutation in the O-chain length determinant gene, wzz (cld) of serovar Typhimurium. This mutation results in a loss of HMW LPS; however, the LMW LPS of this mutant was longer and more glucosylated than that from clinical isolates of serovar Enteritidis. Cluster analysis of these data and of those from two previously characterized isogenic strains of serovar Enteritidis that had different virulence attributes indicated that glucosylation of HMW LPS (via oafR function) is variable and results in two types of HMW structures, one that is highly glucosylated and one that is minimally glucosylated. These results strongly indicate that naturally occurring variability in wzy, wzz, and oafR function can be used to subtype isolates of serovar Enteritidis during epidemiological investigations.

  10. Thermal inactivation of Salmonella enteritidis PT 30 in almond kernels as influenced by water activity.

    PubMed

    Villa-Rojas, Rossana; Tang, Juming; Wang, Shaojin; Gao, Mengxiang; Kang, Dong-Hyun; Mah, Jae-Hyung; Gray, Peter; Sosa-Morales, Maria Elena; López-Malo, Aurelio

    2013-01-01

    Salmonellosis outbreaks related to consumption of raw almonds have encouraged the scientific community to study the inactivation kinetics of pathogens in this dry commodity. However, the low moisture content of the product presents a challenge for thermal control, because the time required to achieve the desired thermal inactivation of microorganisms increases sharply with reduced moisture content and water activity. In this study, we explored and modeled the heat inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis PT 30 in almond cultivar 'Nonpareil' kernel flour at four water activity (a(w)) values (0.601, 0.720, 0.888, and 0.946) using four temperatures for each a(w). The results showed that the inactivation was well fitted by both Weibull distribution (R(2) = 0.93 to 1.00) and first-order kinetics (R(2) = 0.82 to 0.96). At higher a(w) values, the rate of inactivation increased and less time was needed to achieve the required population reduction. These results suggest that, to avoid deterioration of product quality, shorter process times at lower temperatures may be used to achieve desired inactivation levels of Salmonella Enteritidis PT 30 by simply increasing the moisture content of almonds. These goals could be achieved with the use of existing procedures already practiced by the food industry, such as washing or prewetting scalding before heat inactivation.

  11. Phylogenetic structure of European Salmonella Enteritidis outbreak correlates with national and international egg distribution network

    PubMed Central

    Inns, Thomas; Jombart, Thibaut; Ashton, Philip; Loman, Nicolas; Chatt, Carol; Messelhaeusser, Ute; Rabsch, Wolfgang; Simon, Sandra; Nikisins, Sergejs; Bernard, Helen; le Hello, Simon; Jourdan da-Silva, Nathalie; Kornschober, Christian; Mossong, Joel; Hawkey, Peter; de Pinna, Elizabeth; Grant, Kathie; Cleary, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Outbreaks of Salmonella Enteritidis have long been associated with contaminated poultry and eggs. In the summer of 2014 a large multi-national outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 14b occurred with over 350 cases reported in the United Kingdom, Germany, Austria, France and Luxembourg. Egg supply network investigation and microbiological sampling identified the source to be a Bavarian egg producer. As part of the international investigation into the outbreak, over 400 isolates were sequenced including isolates from cases, implicated UK premises and eggs from the suspected source producer. We were able to show a clear statistical correlation between the topology of the UK egg distribution network and the phylogenetic network of outbreak isolates. This correlation can most plausibly be explained by different parts of the egg distribution network being supplied by eggs solely from independent premises of the Bavarian egg producer (Company X). Microbiological sampling from the source premises, traceback information and information on the interventions carried out at the egg production premises all supported this conclusion. The level of insight into the outbreak epidemiology provided by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) would not have been possible using traditional microbial typing methods. PMID:28348865

  12. Phylogenetic structure of European Salmonella Enteritidis outbreak correlates with national and international egg distribution network.

    PubMed

    Dallman, Tim; Inns, Thomas; Jombart, Thibaut; Ashton, Philip; Loman, Nicolas; Chatt, Carol; Messelhaeusser, Ute; Rabsch, Wolfgang; Simon, Sandra; Nikisins, Sergejs; Bernard, Helen; le Hello, Simon; Jourdan da-Silva, Nathalie; Kornschober, Christian; Mossong, Joel; Hawkey, Peter; de Pinna, Elizabeth; Grant, Kathie; Cleary, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Outbreaks of Salmonella Enteritidis have long been associated with contaminated poultry and eggs. In the summer of 2014 a large multi-national outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 14b occurred with over 350 cases reported in the United Kingdom, Germany, Austria, France and Luxembourg. Egg supply network investigation and microbiological sampling identified the source to be a Bavarian egg producer. As part of the international investigation into the outbreak, over 400 isolates were sequenced including isolates from cases, implicated UK premises and eggs from the suspected source producer. We were able to show a clear statistical correlation between the topology of the UK egg distribution network and the phylogenetic network of outbreak isolates. This correlation can most plausibly be explained by different parts of the egg distribution network being supplied by eggs solely from independent premises of the Bavarian egg producer (Company X). Microbiological sampling from the source premises, traceback information and information on the interventions carried out at the egg production premises all supported this conclusion. The level of insight into the outbreak epidemiology provided by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) would not have been possible using traditional microbial typing methods.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Subtyping Methods against a Whole- Genome-Sequencing Standard for Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: A retrospective investigation was performed to evaluate whole-genome sequencing as a benchmark for comparing molecular...cases collected between 2001 and 2012 were sequenced and subjected to subtyping by four different methods: (i) whole-genome single- nucleotide...distribution is unlimited. Comparative Analysis of Subtyping Methods against a Whole- Genome- Sequencing Standard for Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis

  14. Antimicrobial Efficacy of Zinc Oxide Quantum Dots Against Listeria Monocytogenes, Salmonella Enteritidis and Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc oxide quantum dots (ZnO QDs) in a powder form, a ZnO-polystyrene (PS) film form and a polyvinylprolidone capped ZnO (ZnO-PVP) gel form were prepared and their antibacterial activities against foodborne pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Enteritidis and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in cul...

  15. Dimethyl adenosine transferase (KsgA) deficiency in Salmonella Enteritidis confers susceptibility to high osmolarity and virulence attenuation in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    : Dimethyladenosine transferase (KsgA) performs diverse roles in bacteria including ribosomal maturation, DNA mismatch repair, and synthesis of KsgA is responsive to antibiotics and cold temperature. We previously showed that ksgA mutation in Salmonella Enteritidis results in impaired invasiveness i...

  16. Direct construction of predictive models for describing growth Salmonella enteritidis in liquid eggs – a one-step approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to develop a new approach using a one-step approach to directly construct predictive models for describing the growth of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in liquid egg white (LEW) and egg yolk (LEY). A five-strain cocktail of SE, induced to resist rifampicin at 100 mg/L, ...

  17. Whole-Genome Sequence and Annotation of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Enteritidis Phage Type 8 Strain EN1660

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Benjamin J.; Fitzgerald, Stephen F.; Kröger, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genome of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 8 strain EN1660, isolated from an outbreak in Thunder Bay, Canada, was sequenced to 46-fold coverage using an Illumina MiSeq with 300-bp paired-end sequencing chemistry to produce 28 contigs with an N50 value of 490,721 bp. PMID:28126943

  18. Continuing multiplication of Salmonella Enteritidis strains in egg yolk during refrigeration at 7.2° C

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The continuing attribution of human illness caused by Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) to the consumption of contaminated eggs has led to widespread implementation of risk reduction programs for commercial egg production. Prompt refrigeration of eggs to prevent bacterial multiplication to dangerously hig...

  19. Multiplication of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg yolks after inoculation outside, on, and inside vitelline membranes and storage at different temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prompt refrigeration to restrict bacterial growth is important for reducing egg-borne transmission of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE). The nutrient-rich yolk interior is a relatively infrequent location for initial SE deposition in eggs, but migration across the vitelline membrane can ...

  20. Recovery of Salmonella serovar Enteritidis from inoculated broiler hatching eggs using shell rinse and shell crush sampling methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compared the recovery of Salmonella from hatching eggs using three sampling methods (eggshell rinsing, eggshell crush following a previous rinse, and eggshell crush without previous rinse). Eggshells were drop-inoculated with approximately 10, 100, or 1,000 cfu/eggshell of S. Enteritidis...

  1. Monitoring of behavior using a video-recording system for recognition of Salmonella infection in experimentally infected growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S T; Mun, H-S; Yoe, H; Yang, C-J

    2015-01-01

    Behavior is one of the most commonly used indicators of illness; however, few studies have investigated how different common diseases affect animal behavior. This experiment was conducted to investigate behavioral and clinical alterations in growing pigs experimentally infected with Salmonella spp. during a 4-week post-infection period. A total of 48 growing pigs were divided into one of the three treatment groups (1) control, (2) infection with Salmonella Typhimurium or (3) infection with Salmonella Enteritidis. Individual pigs' behavior was recorded daily (0900 to 1100 and 1600 to 1800 h) using a video-recording system. Pigs in both infected groups had lower weight gain and feed intake during week 0 to 2 and 0 to 4 experimental period. Bacteriological data revealed that pigs in both infected groups persistently shed bacteria throughout the period of study. Oral infection of growing pigs with S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis significantly reduced the frequency of morning large (except week 1) and small movement throughout the study period. In the evening, significantly lowest frequency of movements were observed in the S. Enteritidis-infected group compared with the control. The standing and sitting frequency were significantly lower in both infected groups only at the morning of week 4. Infection with Salmonella spp. led to a significant reduction in the frequency and duration of morning eating and drinking throughout the experimental period, with the exception of 4th week drinking duration. The lowest frequency of evening eating during week 1 and 4 was recorded in both infected groups; whereas, the duration differed only at week 1. The evening drinking frequency only tended to decrease in response to S. Typhimurium infection at week 1. This study shows that, pigs infected with Salmonella spp. had poor performance, shedding high levels of Salmonella with their feces and reduced feeding and drinking activity, which are adaptive responses to infection and may help

  2. Studies on the effects of phosphine on Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in culture medium and in black pepper (Piper nigrum).

    PubMed

    Castro, M F P M; Rezende, A C B; Benato, E A; Valentini, S R T; Furlani, R P Z; Tfouni, S A V

    2011-04-01

    The effect of phosphine on Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis inoculated in culture medium and in black pepper grains (Piper nigrum), as well as on the reduction of the microbial load of the dried and moisturized product, was verified. The postfumigation effect was verified in inoculated samples with 0.92 and 0.97 water activity (a(w)) exposed to 6 g/m(3) phosphine for 72 h, dried to 0.67 a(w), and stored for 24, 48, and 72 h. No decreases were observed in Salmonella Enteritidis populations in culture medium when fumigant concentrations up to 6 g/m(3) were applied for 48 h at 35°C. However, the colonies showed reductions in size and atypical coloration as the phosphine concentration increased. No reduction in Salmonella counts occurred on the inoculated dried samples after fumigation. On the other hand, when phosphine at concentrations of 6 g/m(3) was applied on moisturized black pepper for 72 h, decreases in Salmonella counts of around 80% were observed. The counts of total aerobic mesophilic bacterium populations of the dried and moisturized black pepper were not affected by the fumigant treatment. The results of the postfumigation studies indicated that Salmonella Enteritidis was absent in the fumigated grains after drying and storage for 72 h, indicating a promising application for this technique. It was concluded that for Salmonella Enteritidis control, phosphine fumigation could be applied to black pepper grains before drying and the producers should rigidly follow good agricultural practices, mainly during the drying process, in order to avoid product recontamination. Additional work is needed to confirm the findings with more Salmonella serotypes and strains.

  3. Effect of Salmonella infection on cecal tonsil regulatory T cell properties in chickens.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasundaram, Revathi; Kogut, Michael H; Arsenault, Ryan J; Swaggerty, Christina L; Cole, Kimberly; Reddish, John M; Selvaraj, Ramesh K

    2015-08-01

    Two studies were conducted to study regulatory T cell [Treg (CD4⁺CD25⁺)] properties during the establishment of a persistent intestinal infection in broiler chickens. Four-day-old broiler chicks were orally gavaged with 5 × 10⁶ CFU/mL Salmonella enteritidis (S. enteritidis) or sterile PBS (control). Samples were collected at 4, 7, 10, and 14 d postinfection. There was a significant (P < 0.05) increase in the number of CD4⁺CD25⁺ cells by d 4 postinfection that increased steadily throughout the course of the 14-d infection, whereas the number of CD4⁺CD25⁺ cells in the noninfected controls remained steady throughout the study. CD4⁺CD25⁺ cells from cecal tonsils of S. enteritidis-infected birds had a higher (P < 0.05) IL-10 mRNA content than CD4⁺CD25⁺ cells from the noninfected controls at all time-points studied. The amount of IL-2 mRNA content in the cecal tonsil CD4⁺CD25⁻ cells from the infected birds did not differ (P > 0.05) when compared to that of noninfected control birds. At a lower effector/responder cell ratio of 0.25:1, CD4⁺CD25⁺ cells from cecal tonsils of Salmonella-infected birds suppressed T cell proliferation at d 7 and 14 post-S. enteritidis infection, while CD4⁺CD25⁺ cells from noninfected control groups did not suppress T cell proliferation. In the second studu, 1-day-old chickens were orally gavaged with PBS (control) or 1.25 × 10⁸ CFU/bird S. enteritidis. At 7 and 21 d post-Salmonella infection, CD25⁺ cells collected from cecal tonsils of S. enteritidis-infected birds and restimulated in vitro with Salmonella antigen had higher (P < 0.05) IL-10 mRNA content compared to those in the control group. Spleen CD4⁺CD25⁺, CD4⁺, and CD8⁺ cell percentage did not differ (P > 0.05) between the Salmonella-infected and control birds. In conclusion, a persistent intestinal S. enteritidis infection increased the Treg percentage, suppressive properties, and IL-10 mRNA amounts in the cecal tonsils of broiler birds.

  4. Colonisation of poultry by Salmonella Enteritidis S1400 is reduced by combined administration of Lactobacillus salivarius 59 and Enterococcus faecium PXN-33.

    PubMed

    Carter, Alun; Adams, Martin; La Ragione, Roberto M; Woodward, Martin J

    2017-02-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis remains a significant issue within the poultry industry and one potential solution is to use probiotic bacteria to prevent Salmonella colonisation through competitive exclusion (CE). We demonstrate that combined administration of Lactobacillus salivarius 59 and Enterococcus faecium PXN33 were effective competitive excluders of Salmonella Enteritidis S1400 in poultry. Two models were developed to evaluate the efficacy of probiotic where birds received Salmonella Enteritidis S1400 by a) oral gavage and b) sentinel bird to bird transmission. A statistically significant (p<0.001) 2 log reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis S1400 colonisation was observed in the ileum, caecum and colon at day 43 using combined administration of the two probiotic bacteria. However, no Salmonella Enteritidis S1400 colonisation reduction was observed when either probiotic was administered individually. In the sentinel bird model the combined probiotic administered at days 12 and 20 was more effective than one-off or double administrations at age 1 and 12days. In vitro cell free culture supernatant studies suggest the mechanism of Salmonella Enteritidis S1400 inhibition was due to a reduction in pH by the probiotic bacteria. Our current study provides further evidence that probiotics can significantly reduce pathogenic bacterial colonisation in poultry and that mixed preparation of probiotics provide superior performance when compared to individual bacterial preparations.

  5. Antibacterial effect of trans-cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, carvacrol, and thymol on Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni in chicken cecal contents in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni are two major food-borne pathogens that are transmitted through poultry products. These pathogens colonize the chicken cecum leading, to contamination of carcasses during slaughter and subsequent processing operations. We investigated the antimicrobial...

  6. Multi-locus sequence typing of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis strains in Japan between 1973 and 2004.

    PubMed

    Noda, Tamie; Murakami, Koichi; Asai, Tetsuo; Etoh, Yoshiki; Ishihara, Tomoe; Kuroki, Toshiro; Horikawa, Kazumi; Fujimoto, Shuji

    2011-06-15

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) was responsible for a worldwide pandemic during the 1980s and 1990s; however, changes in the dominant lineage before and after this event remain unknown. This study determined S. Enteritidis lineages before and after this pandemic event in Japan using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Thirty S. Enteritidis strains were collected in Japan between 1973 and 2004, consisting of 27 human strains from individual episodes, a bovine strain, a liquid egg strain and an eggshell strain. Strains showed nine phage types and 17 pulsed-field profiles with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. All strains had homologous type 11 sequences without any nucleotide differences in seven housekeeping genes. These MLST results suggest that S. Enteritidis with the diversities revealed by phage typing and pulsed-field profiling has a highly clonal population. Although type 11 S. Enteritidis may exhibit both pleiotropic surface structure and pulsed-field type variation, it is likely to be a stable lineage derived from an ancestor before the 1980s and/or 1990s pandemic in Japan.

  7. Isolation, Characterization, and Bioinformatic Analyses of Lytic Salmonella Enteritidis Phages and Tests of Their Antibacterial Activity in Food.

    PubMed

    Han, Han; Wei, Xiaoting; Wei, Yi; Zhang, Xiufeng; Li, Xuemin; Jiang, Jinzhong; Wang, Ran

    2017-02-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis remains a major threat for food safety. To take efforts to develop phage-based biocontrol for S. Enteritidis contamination in food, in this study, the phages against S. Enteritidis were isolated from sewage samples, characterized by host range assays, DNA restriction enzyme pattern analyses, and transmission electron microscope observations, and tested for antibacterial activity in food; some potent phages were further characterized by bioinformatic analyses. Results showed that based on the plaque quality and host range, seven lytic phages targeting S. Enteritidis were selected, considered as seven distinct phages through DNA physical maps, and classified as Myoviridae or Siphoviridae family by morphologic observations; the combined use of such seven strain phages as a "food additive" could succeed in controlling the artificial S. Enteritidis contamination in the different physical forms of food at a range of temperatures; by bioinformatic analyses, both selected phage BPS11Q3 and BPS15Q2 seemed to be newfound obligate lytic phage strains with no indications for any potentially harmful genes in their genomes. In conclusion, our results showed a potential of isolated phages as food additives for controlling S. Enteritidis contamination in some salmonellosis outbreak-associated food vehicles, and there could be minimized potential risk associated with using BPS11Q3 and BPS15Q2 in food.

  8. Salmonella enteritidis fimbriae displaying a heterologous epitope reveal a uniquely flexible structure and assembly mechanism.

    PubMed

    White, A P; Collinson, S K; Banser, P A; Dolhaine, D J; Kay, W W

    2000-02-18

    Two distinct Salmonella fimbrins, AgfA and SefA, comprising thin aggregative fimbriae SEF17 and SEF14, respectively, were each genetically engineered to carry PT3, an alpha-helical 16-amino acid Leishmania T-cell epitope derived from the metalloprotease gp63. To identify regions within AgfA and SefA fimbrins amenable to replacement with this epitope, PCR-generated chimeric fimbrin genes were constructed and used to replace the native chromosomal agfA and sefA genes in Salmonella enteritidis. Immunoblot analysis using anti-SEF17 and anti-PT3 sera demonstrated that all ten AgfA chimeric fimbrin proteins were expressed by S. enteritidis under normal growth conditions. Immunoelectron microscopy confirmed that eight of the AgfA::PT3 proteins were effectively assembled into cell surface-exposed fimbriae. The PT3 replacements in AgfA altered Congo red (CR) binding, cell-cell adhesion and cell surface properties of S. enteritidis to varying degrees. However, these chimeric fimbriae were still highly stable, being resistant to proteinase K digestion and requiring harsh formic acid treatment for depolymerization. In marked contrast to AgfA, none of the chimeric SefA proteins were expressed or assembled into fimbriae. Since each PT3 replacement constituted over 10% of the AgfA amino acid sequence and all ten replacements collectively represented greater than 75% of the entire AgfA primary sequence, the ability of AgfA to accept large sequence substitutions and still assemble into fibers is unique among fimbriae and other structural proteins. This structural flexibility may be related to the novel fivefold repeating sequence of AgfA and its recently proposed structure Proper formation of chimeric fimbrial fibers suggests an unusual assembly mechanism for thin aggregative fimbriae which tolerates aberrant structures. This study opens a range of possibilities for Salmonella thin aggregative fimbriae as a carrier of heterologous epitopes and as an experimental model for studies

  9. Architectural adaptation and protein expression patterns of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis biofilms under laminar flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Mangalappalli-Illathu, Anil K; Lawrence, John R; Swerhone, George D W; Korber, Darren R

    2008-03-31

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a significant biofilm-forming pathogen. The influence of a 10-fold difference in nutrient laminar flow velocity on the dynamics of Salmonella Enteritidis biofilm formation and protein expression profiles were compared in order to ascertain how flow velocity influenced biofilm structure and function. Low-flow (0.007 cm s(-1)) biofilms consisted of diffusely-arranged microcolonies which grew until merging by approximately 72 h. High-flow (0.07 cm s(-1)) biofilms were significantly thicker (36+/-3 microm (arithmetic mean+/-standard error; n=225) versus 16+/-2 microm for low-flow biofilms at 120 h) and consisted of large bacterial mounds interspersed by water channels. Lectin-binding analysis of biofilm exopolymers revealed a significantly higher (P<0.05) proportion of N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) in low-flow biofilms (55.2%), relative to only 1.2% in high-flow biofilms. Alternatively, the proportions of alpha-L-fucose and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc2)-N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuNAc) polymer-conjugates were significantly higher (P<0.05) in high-flow biofilms (69.1% and 29.6%, respectively) than low-flow biofilms (33.1% and 11.7%, respectively). Despite an apparent flow rate-based physiologic effect on biofilm structure and exopolymer composition, no major shift in whole-cell protein expression patterns was seen between 168 h-old low-flow and high-flow biofilms, and notably did not include any response involving the stress response proteins, DnaK, SodB, and Tpx. Proteins involved in degradation and energy metabolism (PduA, GapA, GpmA, Pgk, and RpiA), RNA and protein biosynthesis (Tsf, TufA, and RpoZ), cell processes (Crr, MalE, and PtsH), and adaptation (GrcA), and some hypothetical proteins (YcbL and YnaF) became up-regulated in both biofilm systems relative to a 168 h-old planktonic cell control. Our results indicate that Salmonella Enteritidis biofilms altered their structure and extracellular glycoconjugate composition

  10. Factors affecting thermal resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis ODA 99-30581-13 in shell egg contents and use of heat-ozone combinations for egg pasteurization.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jennifer J; Yousef, Ahmed E

    2013-02-01

    Infection of laying hens with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis leads to deposition of the pathogen into the albumen or yolk of forming eggs. Heat treatment can inactivate internalized Salmonella Enteritidis in shell eggs, but factors such as the nature and location of contamination may influence the efficacy of thermal treatments. In the current research, natural contamination was mimicked by introducing small inocula of Salmonella Enteritidis into different locations of shell eggs and incubating inoculated eggs. These pathogen-containing eggs were heated at 57°C for 40 min, and temperature within eggs was monitored at the locations of inocula. Comparison of inactivation at equivalent internal temperatures revealed similar levels of lethality regardless of inoculum location. Refrigeration between incubation and heat treatment did not increase thermal resistance of cells in albumen but decreased cell inactivation in yolk. Sequential application of heat and gaseous ozone allows for the development of a process capable of decontaminating shell eggs with minimal thermal treatment and impact on egg quality. Inoculated eggs were subjected to (i) an immersion heating process similar to that used in commercial pasteurization or (ii) immersion heating, at reduced duration, followed by vacuum (50.8 kPa) and treatment with ozone gas (maximum 160 g/m(3)) under pressure (∼187.5 kPa). All treatments tested produced greater than 5-log inactivation, which is required for "pasteurization" processes. Differences were observed in the visual quality of eggs depending on treatment parameters. Application of ozone subsequent to heating allows for a significant reduction in heating time without decreasing process lethality.

  11. Multiplication and motility of Salmonella enterica serovars enteritidis, infantis, and montevideo in in vitro contamination models of eggs.

    PubMed

    Murase, Toshiyuki; Fujimoto, Kazuhiko; Nakayama, Rui; Otsuki, Koichi

    2006-05-01

    The invasive ability of Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Infantis, and Montevideo in eggs was examined. Strains of these serovars originating from egg contents, laying chicken houses, and human patients were experimentally inoculated (0.1-ml dose containing 78 to 178 cells) onto the vitelline membrane of eggs collected from specific-pathogen-free chickens and incubated at 25 degrees C. The test strains were detected in 25 of 138 yolk contents by day 6, indicating the penetration of Salmonella organisms through the vitelline membrane. There were no significant differences in overall rates of penetration between serovars. The organisms were also detected in the albumen from 125 of 138 eggs tested by day 6. Growth to more than 10(6) CFU/ml was observed in 48 of the 125 albumen samples. An inoculum of 1000 Salmonella cells was added to 15 ml of albumen at the edge of a petri plate. A 10-mm-diameter cylindrical well, the bottom of which was sealed with a polycarbonate membrane with 3.0-microm pores, was filled with egg yolk and placed into the albumen at the center of the dish, which was maintained at 25 degrees C. Experiments were performed in triplicate with each strain. Salmonella organisms in all the albumen samples were detected by day 11. However, motility of the organisms toward the yolk was observed in only two dishes inoculated with the Salmonella Enteritidis strain from a human patient and in one dish inoculated with the Salmonella Infantis strain from liquid egg. The albumen samples obtained from the dishes inoculated with the Salmonella Enteritidis strain had high numbers of bacteria (>10(8) CFU/ml). The present study suggests that Salmonella organisms in egg albumen are unlikely to actively move toward the yolk, although depositionon or near the vitelline membrane can be advantageous for proliferation.

  12. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis on shell eggs by pulsed light technology.

    PubMed

    Hierro, Eva; Manzano, Susana; Ordóñez, Juan A; de la Hoz, Lorenzo; Fernández, Manuela

    2009-10-31

    This is a study on the efficacy of pulsed light (PL) technology for the inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis on shell eggs. In preliminary studies on noble agar, a PL treatment of 0.7 J/cm(2) gave an inactivation of 6.7 log CFU/cm(2). Photoreactivation of Salmonella (0.5-0.7 log CFU/cm(2)) was observed. Different results were obtained in eggs according to the state of the cuticle. When unwashed eggs were pulsed, 24 to 80% of the samples showed the maximum decontamination (3.6 log CFU/egg), depending on the fluence applied. This maximum was not obtained on washed eggs, in which the highest reduction was 1.8 log CFU/egg with a fluence of 12 J/cm(2). PL can be a useful method for egg processing since the integrity of the cuticle is preserved, and requires that the treatment should be applied as soon as possible after laying and on unwashed eggs. As Salmonella has shown the capability of photoreactivation, it is advisable to keep eggs protected from light once they have been pulsed.

  13. Salmonella Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... by chickens, cows, pigs, and reptiles (such as turtles, lizards, and iguanas). Another, rarer form — called Salmonella ... contact with a baby. Even healthy reptiles (especially turtles and iguanas) are not safe pets for small ...

  14. Colonization of a marker and field strain of Salmonella enteritidis and a marker strain of Salmonella typhimurium in vancomycin-pretreated and nonpretreated laying hens.

    PubMed

    Hannah, J F; Wilson, J L; Cox, N A; Richardson, L J; Cason, J A; Bourassa, D V; Buhr, R J

    2011-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the influence of a vancomycin pretreatment on the ability of marker (nalidixic-acid resistant) Salmonella Enteritidis (SE(M)), field Salmonella Enteritidis (SE(E)), and marker Salmonella Typhimurium (ST(M)) strains to colonize within the intestinal and reproductive tracts and translocate to other organs of leghorn laying hens. In each of three trials, caged laying hens (76, 26, and 33 wk ofage) were divided into six groups designated to receive SE(M), SE(F), or ST(M), and half were pretreated with vancomycin (n = 11-12 hens). Vancomycin-treated hens received 10 mg vancomycin in saline/kilogram body weight orally for 5 days to inhibit Gram-positive bacteria within the intestines. On Day 6, all hens were concurrently challenged by oral, intravaginal, and intracolonal routes with Salmonella and placed into separate floor chambers by Salmonella strain. Two weeks postinoculation, all hens were euthanatized and the ceca, spleen, liver/gall bladder (LGB), upper (URT), and lower (LRT) reproductive tracts, and ovarian follicles were aseptically collected, and analyzed for Salmonella. Results did not differ for the three hen's ages and were therefore combined. The vancomycin pretreatment also had no significant effect on the colonization ability of SE(M), SE(F) or ST(M), and therefore results were combined within Salmonella strain. The marker strain of Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered from 21% of ceca, 4% of LGB, 9% of LRT, and 17% of the fecal samples. The field strain of Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered from 88% of ceca, 96% of spleen, 92% of LGB, 30% of LRT, 4% of URT, 13% of follicle, and 42% of the fecal samples. The marker strain of Salmonella Typhimurium was recovered from 100% of ceca, 74% of spleen, 91% of LGB, 30% of LRT, 9% of URT, 9% of follicle, and 100% of the fecal samples. Among ceca, spleen, LGB, and fecal samples, SE(F) and ST(M) colonization was significantly greater than SE(M) colonization. Overall prevalence

  15. Adaptive Resistance and Differential Protein Expression of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Biofilms Exposed to Benzalkonium Chloride▿

    PubMed Central

    Mangalappalli-Illathu, Anil K.; Korber, Darren R.

    2006-01-01

    The development of adaptive resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ATCC 4931 biofilms following exposure to benzalkonium chloride (BC) either continuously (1 μg ml−1) or intermittently (10 μg ml−1 for 10 min daily) was examined. Biofilms adapted to BC over a 144-h period could survive a normally lethal BC challenge (500 μg ml−1 for 10 min) and then regrow, as determined by increases in biofilm thickness, total biomass, and the ratio of the viable biomass to the nonviable biomass. Exposure of untreated control biofilms to the lethal BC challenge resulted in biofilm erosion and cell death. Proteins found to be up-regulated following BC adaptation were those involved in energy metabolism (TpiA and Eno), amino acid and protein biosynthesis (WrbA, TrxA, RplL, Tsf, Tuf, DsbA, and RpoZ), nutrient binding (FruB), adaptation (CspA), detoxification (Tpx, SodB, and a probable peroxidase), and degradation of 1,2-propanediol (PduJ and PduA). A putative universal stress protein (YnaF) was also found to be up-regulated. Proteins involved in proteolysis (DegQ), cell envelope formation (RfbH), adaptation (UspA), heat shock response (DnaK), and broad regulatory functions (Hns) were found to be down-regulated following adaptation. An overall increase in cellular protein biosynthesis was deduced from the significant up-regulation of ribosomal subunit proteins, translation elongation factors, and amino acid biosynthesis protein and down-regulation of serine endoprotease. The cold shock response, stress response, and detoxification are suggested to play roles in the adaptive resistance of Salmonella serovar Enteritidis biofilms to BC. PMID:16940079

  16. Preacclimation alters Salmonella Enteritidis surface properties and its initial attachment to food contact surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yishan; Kumar, Amit; Zheng, Qianwang; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2015-04-01

    Exposure of Salmonella to environmental stress, prior to its adherence to a food contact surface, may change the cell surface properties and consequently affect its initial attachment and biofilm formation. This study investigated the influence of temperature and pH preacclimation on the initial attachment of Salmonella Enteritidis to acrylic and stainless steel. Besides, changes in physicochemical properties of cells were examined; and their surface attachment was modeled by xDLVO theory. Results showed that control cells pre-grown at 37°C had significantly (P<0.05) higher initial attachment, followed by those pre-grown at 25, 42, and 10°C. The initial attachment of cells pre-grown at pH 5.3 or 6.3 was not significantly (P>0.05) different from control cells pre-grown at pH 7.3, but they were significantly higher compared to cells pre-grown at pH 8.3 and 9.0. No significant difference was observed between cell attachment to acrylic and stainless steel, although they had different physicochemical properties. The xDLVO theory successfully explained higher attachment for cells pre-grown at optimal condition on both contact surfaces. However, the xDLVO theory could not explain the similar attachment of cells to acrylic and stainless steel. This study elucidates that commonly used intervention technologies including cold storage, thermal treatment, and alkaline antimicrobial agents might alter the physicochemical properties of S. Enteritidis cells and result in varied initial attachment levels.

  17. Adaptive resistance and differential protein expression of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis biofilms exposed to benzalkonium chloride.

    PubMed

    Mangalappalli-Illathu, Anil K; Korber, Darren R

    2006-11-01

    The development of adaptive resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ATCC 4931 biofilms following exposure to benzalkonium chloride (BC) either continuously (1 microg ml(-1)) or intermittently (10 microg ml(-1) for 10 min daily) was examined. Biofilms adapted to BC over a 144-h period could survive a normally lethal BC challenge (500 microg ml(-1) for 10 min) and then regrow, as determined by increases in biofilm thickness, total biomass, and the ratio of the viable biomass to the nonviable biomass. Exposure of untreated control biofilms to the lethal BC challenge resulted in biofilm erosion and cell death. Proteins found to be up-regulated following BC adaptation were those involved in energy metabolism (TpiA and Eno), amino acid and protein biosynthesis (WrbA, TrxA, RplL, Tsf, Tuf, DsbA, and RpoZ), nutrient binding (FruB), adaptation (CspA), detoxification (Tpx, SodB, and a probable peroxidase), and degradation of 1,2-propanediol (PduJ and PduA). A putative universal stress protein (YnaF) was also found to be up-regulated. Proteins involved in proteolysis (DegQ), cell envelope formation (RfbH), adaptation (UspA), heat shock response (DnaK), and broad regulatory functions (Hns) were found to be down-regulated following adaptation. An overall increase in cellular protein biosynthesis was deduced from the significant up-regulation of ribosomal subunit proteins, translation elongation factors, and amino acid biosynthesis protein and down-regulation of serine endoprotease. The cold shock response, stress response, and detoxification are suggested to play roles in the adaptive resistance of Salmonella serovar Enteritidis biofilms to BC.

  18. The population structure of Salmonella enterica Enteritidis in Iran analyzed by multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Rainak; Tadayon, Keyvan; Avagyan, Sargis; Khaki, Pejvak; Bidhendi, Soheila Moradi; Forbes, Ken James; Mosavari, Nader; Toroghi, Mohammad Reza; Moosakhani, Farhad; Banihashemi, Reza; Sekhavati, Mohamad; Karimnasab, Nasim

    2013-04-01

    Salmonella enterica Enteritidis is the most frequent etiological agent of salmonellosis in humans and poultry. To understand the genetic diversity of S. Enteritidis in Iran, we examined 69 chicken isolates from 18 broiler farms and six non-epidemic human isolates from six geographically distant provinces by multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Among SE2, SE3, SE5, SE7, SE8, SENTR4, and SENTR7, only SE5 with four and SENTR7 with two alleles, respectively, proved variable giving estimates of locus genetic diversity of 0.58 and 0. In all, six closely related MLVA profiles were identified among which three were commonly represented by human and chicken isolates. This population homogeneity contrasts with the high diversity at these loci reported elsewhere and is likely a consequence of a single clone of S. Enteritidis distributed across Iran.

  19. Immunomodulatory activity and control of Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in the intestinal tract of chickens by Lactobacillus based probiotic.

    PubMed

    Penha Filho, Rafael Antonio Casarin; Díaz, Silvia Juliana Acelas; Fernando, Filipe Santos; Chang, Yung-Fu; Andreatti Filho, Raphael Lucio; Berchieri Junior, Angelo

    2015-09-15

    Lactobacillus-based probiotics (LBP) are used as competitive exclusion to control pathogenic enterobacterial infections and improve the weight gain in broiler chickens. This study assessed the inhibition of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infection in one-week-old broiler chicks, using an experimental LBP containing four Lactobacillus strains isolated from chickens (L. acidophilus, L. fermentum, L. reuteri, L. salivarius). The immunomodulatory effects of this treatment were evaluated, through the analysis of cytokines and influx of macrophages, γδ, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the gut. The intestinal colonization by SE was reduced by 1.8 CFU/g (log10) in chicks treated with LBP (p<0.05). The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, LITAF) were significantly reduced in treated chicks (p<0.05), whilst untreated chicks showed elevated inflammatory stimulus and an increased population of CD8(+) T cells in the intestinal mucosa after challenge (p<0.05). Additionally, the LBP stimulated TLR2 expression in caecal tonsils. The adjuvant property of the Lactobacillus cell wall (LCW) was evaluated, demonstrating good capability to stimulate T helper 2 (Th2) cell proliferation. Pretreatment of chicks with LBP decreased the intestinal colonization by SE, minimizing the tissue lesions and inflammation after challenge and showed a potential use as adjuvant with injectable killed vaccines.

  20. Correlation of Phenotype with the Genotype of Egg-Contaminating Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Cesar A.; Porwollik, Steffen; Frye, Jonathan G.; Kinde, Hailu; McClelland, Michael; Guard-Bouldin, Jean

    2005-01-01

    The genotype of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis was correlated with the phenotype using DNA-DNA microarray hybridization, ribotyping, and Phenotype MicroArray analysis to compare three strains that differed in colony morphology and phage type. No DNA hybridization differences were found between two phage type 13A (PT13A) strains that varied in biofilm formation; however, the ribotype patterns were different. Both PT13A strains had DNA sequences similar to that of bacteriophage Fels2, whereas the PT4 genome to which they were compared, as well as a PT4 field isolate, had a DNA sequence with some similarity to the bacteriophage ST64b sequence. Phenotype MicroArray analysis indicated that the two PT13A strains and the PT4 field isolate had similar respiratory activity profiles at 37°C. However, the wild-type S. enterica serovar Enteritidis PT13A strain grew significantly better in 20% more of the 1,920 conditions tested when it was assayed at 25°C than the biofilm-forming PT13A strain grew. Statistical analysis of the respiratory activity suggested that S. enterica serovar Enteritidis PT4 had a temperature-influenced dimorphic metabolism which at 25°C somewhat resembled the profile of the biofilm-forming PT13A strain and that at 37°C the metabolism was nearly identical to that of the wild-type PT13A strain. Although it is possible that lysogenic bacteriophage alter the balance of phage types on a farm either by lytic competition or by altering the metabolic processes of the host cell in subtle ways, the different physiologies of the S. enterica serovar Enteritidis strains correlated most closely with minor, rather than major, genomic changes. These results strongly suggest that the pandemic of egg-associated human salmonellosis that came into prominence in the 1980s is primarily an example of bacterial adaptive radiation that affects the safety of the food supply. PMID:16085829

  1. Protective host immune responses to Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Pham, Oanh H; McSorley, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi are the causative agents of human typhoid fever. Current typhoid vaccines are ineffective and are not widely used in endemic areas. Greater understanding of host-pathogen interactions during Salmonella infection should facilitate the development of improved vaccines to combat typhoid and nontyphoidal Salmonellosis. This review will focus on our current understanding of Salmonella pathogenesis and the major host immune components that participate in immunity to Salmonella infection. In addition, recent findings regarding host immune mechanisms in response to Salmonella infection will be also discussed, providing a new perspective on the utility of improved tools to study the immune response to Salmonella infections.

  2. [Comparison of usefulness of lipopolysaccharides extracted by phenol and trichloroacetic acid from Salmonella Typhimurium and Enteritidis for serodiagnosis of salmonelosis].

    PubMed

    Rastawicki, Waldemar; Rokosz, Natalia; Jagielski, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis are the two predominant serogroups, responsible for about 80% of all human cases of salmonelosis in Poland. Therefore we compared the usefulness of lipopolysaccharides antigens extracted by phenol (Westphal method) and trichloroacetic acid (Boivine method) from Salmonella Typhimurium and Enteritidis in ELISA method for the determination of antibodies. We used one home - made LPS antigen and two others commercially available antigens from SIGMA - Aldrich. Our study showed that the presence of antibodies was found in 35 (74.5%) sera from 47 samples from patients with suspected salmonelosis. There was no significant statistical differences of frequency of appearance of antibodies to all three Salmonella antigens in sera from patients with salmonelosis and in sera from control group. This study showed that all three antigens are useful for determination of IgA, IgG, IgM antibodies for Salmonella serogroup B and D in routine serological diagnosis of salmonelosis. However, it should be considered possibility of cross-reaction between LPS antigen of Salmonella and antibodies to Yersinia enterocolitica which could be correlated with similarity between somatic antigens of these two pathogens.

  3. Comparison of a live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine candidate secreting Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit with a commercial vaccine for efficacy of protection against internal egg contamination by Salmonella in hens.

    PubMed

    Nandre, Rahul M; Eo, Seong Kug; Park, Sang Youel; Lee, John Hwa

    2015-07-01

    This study compared a new live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine candidate secreting Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (SE-LTB) with a commercial Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) vaccine for efficacy of protection against SE infection in laying hens. Chickens were divided into 3 groups of 20 each. Group A chickens were inoculated orally with phosphate-buffered saline and served as controls, group B chickens were inoculated orally with the vaccine candidate, and group C chickens were inoculated intramuscularly with a commercial vaccine, the primary inoculation in groups B and C being at 10 wk of age and the booster at 16 wk. Groups B and C showed significantly higher titers of plasma immunoglobulin G, intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A, and egg yolk immunoglobulin Y antibodies compared with the control group, and both vaccinated groups showed a significantly elevated cellular immune response. After virulent challenge, group B had significantly lower production of thin-shelled and/or malformed eggs and a significantly lower rate of SE contamination of eggs compared with the control group. Furthermore, the challenge strain was detected significantly less in all of the examined organs of group B compared with the control group. Group C had lower gross lesion scores only in the spleen and had lower bacterial counts only in the spleen, ceca, and ovary. These findings indicate that vaccination with the SE-LTB vaccine candidate can efficiently reduce internal egg and internal organ contamination by Salmonella and has advantages over the commercial vaccine.

  4. A 2010 Austrian Salmonella enteritidis PT4 outbreak associated with a laying hen holding previously involved in an S. enteritidis PT4 cluster: pitfalls of regulatory responses in risk management.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Lun; Schmid, Daniela; Voss, Astrid Salgado; Kasper, Sabine; Lassnig, Heimo; Ableitner, Oksana; Kornschober, Christian; Karnthaler, Ursula; Allerberger, Franz

    2012-10-01

    We report on an outbreak caused by Salmonella enteritidis phage type 4 (PT4) among 143 participants at a soccer camp in Austria in August 2010. The outbreak affected 34 persons, including 24 epidemiologically related cases and 10 laboratory-confirmed cases. Food-specific cohort analyses revealed spaetzle (homemade noodles) (relative risks (RR): 2.68; 95% CI: 1.13-6.45), hamburger (RR: 2.70; 95% CI: 1.13-6.45) and potato salad (RR: 2.91; 95% CI: 1.69-5.02) as the most biologically plausible infection sources. Eggs used as ingredients were considered to be the vehicle of infection for the outbreak strain. The sole egg producer supplying the hotel that housed the soccer camp participants with table eggs operated two flocks. One flock had been epidemiologically and microbiologically related to a previous S. enteritidis PT4 outbreak affecting the same Austrian province in the four months preceding the August outbreak. We hypothesize that eggs from this flock, already condemned for industrial use only, were falsely declared table eggs and sold among eggs from the non-banned flock causing the subsequent outbreak. In Austria, the illegal distribution of eggs designated for industrial use (i.e., false declaration of these eggs as table eggs) has been previously documented. Our findings underscore the potential of proper epidemiological outbreak investigation to identify the pitfalls of regulatory responses in risk management.

  5. Salmonella Enteritidis in meat, poultry, and pasteurized egg products regulated by the U.S. Food Safety and Inspection Service, 1998 through 2003.

    PubMed

    White, Patricia L; Naugle, Alecia L; Jackson, Charlene R; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Rose, Bonnie E; Pritchard, Katrine M; Levine, Priscilla; Saini, Parmesh K; Schroeder, Carl M; Dreyfuss, Moshe S; Tan, Regina; Holt, Kristin G; Harman, Jane; Buchanan, Stephanie

    2007-03-01

    The U.S. Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) tests for Salmonella in meat, poultry, and egg products through three regulatory testing programs: the Pathogen Reduction-Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (PR-HACCP) program, the ready-to-eat program for meat and poultry products, and the pasteurized egg products program. From 1998 through 2003, 293,938 samples collected for these testing programs were analyzed for the presence of Salmonella enterica serotypes. Of these samples, 12,699 (4.3%) were positive for Salmonella, and 167 (1.3%) of the positive samples (0.06% of all samples) contained Salmonella Enteritidis. The highest incidence of Salmonella Enteritidis was observed in ground chicken PR-HACCP samples (8 of 1,722 samples, 0.46%), and the lowest was found in steer-heifer PR-HACCP samples (0 of 12,835 samples). Salmonella Enteritidis isolates were characterized by phage type, pulsed-field gel electrophoretic pattern, and antimicrobial susceptibility. Phage typing of 94 Salmonella Enteritidis isolates identified PT13 (39 isolates) and PT8 (36 isolates) as the most common types. One isolate from a ready-to-eat ham product was characterized as PT4. Electrophoretic analysis of 148 Salmonella Enteritidis isolates indicated genetic diversity among the isolates, with 28 unique XbaI electrophoretic patterns identified. Of these 148 isolates, 136 (92%) were susceptible to each of 16 antimicrobials tested. Two isolates were resistant to ampicillin alone, and 10 isolates were resistant to two or more antimicrobials. Isolation of Salmonella Enteritidis from FSIS-regulated products emphasizes the need for continued consumer education on proper food handling and cooking practices and continued work to decrease the prevalence of Salmonella in meat, poultry, and pasteurized egg products.

  6. Genomic comparison of the closely-related Salmonella enterica serovars enteritidis, dublin and gallinarum

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, T. David; Schmieder, Robert; Silva, Genivaldo G. Z.; Busch, Julia; Cassman, Noriko; Dutilh, Bas E.; Green, Dawn; Matlock, Brian; Heffernan, Brian; Olsen, Gary J.; Hanna, Leigh Farris; Schifferli, Dieter M.; Maloy, Stanley; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A.; Edwards, Robert A.; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2015-06-03

    The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain LK5 and Dublin strain SARB12 and compared these genomes to the publicly available Enteritidis P125109, Dublin CT 02021853 and Dublin SD3246 genome sequences. We also compared the publicly available Gallinarum genome sequences from biotype Gallinarum 287/91 and Pullorum RKS5078. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, and differences in prophage and pseudogene content between strains belonging to the same serovar. Through our analysis we also identified several prophage cargo genes and pseudogenes that affect virulence and may contribute to a host-specific, systemic lifestyle. These results strongly argue that the Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum serovars of Salmonella enterica evolve by acquiring new genes through horizontal gene transfer, followed by the formation of pseudogenes. The loss of genes necessary for a gastrointestinal lifestyle ultimately leads to a systemic lifestyle and niche exclusion in the host-specific serovars.

  7. Survival of Salmonella Enteritidis on four types of stainless steel surface under a dry condition and recovery by swabbing.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Norinaga; Konuma, Hirotaka; Kumagai, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    The survival and recovery of Salmonella Enteritidis inoculated on stainless steel surfaces with different metal contents and surface finishes were examined. Two S. Enteritidis strains possessing different levels of biofilm productivity were inoculated with tryptone soya broth (TSB) and egg yolk emulsion (EY) on the surface of stainless steel squares (1 cm × 1 cm) and stored at 22℃ under a dry condition. After storage, cells were recovered from the stainless steel surfaces by swabbing with a cotton swab. The numbers of cells recovered by swabbing and the cells remaining on the stainless steel squares were counted. The survival ratio of the strain possessing high biofilm productivity was greater than that of the strain possessing low biofilm productivity. The survival ratio of S. Enteritidis suspended in TSB was often higher than that in EY. There were no significant differences in the survival and recovery ratios of S. Enteritidis based on stainless steel composition or surface finish. From all except one sample, more than 98% of viable cells of S. Enteritidis were recovered by swabbing with a cotton swab.

  8. Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance Genes Aid in Defense against Chicken Innate Immunity, Fecal Shedding, and Egg Deposition

    PubMed Central

    McKelvey, Jessica A.; Yang, Ming; Jiang, Yanhua

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major etiologic agent of nontyphoid salmonellosis in the United States. S. Enteritidis persistently and silently colonizes the intestinal and reproductive tract of laying hens, resulting in contaminated poultry products. The consumption of contaminated poultry products has been identified as a significant risk factor for human salmonellosis. To understand the mechanisms S. Enteritidis utilizes to colonize and persist in laying hens, we used selective capture of transcribed sequences to identify genes overexpressed in the HD11 chicken macrophage cell line and in primary chicken oviduct epithelial cells. From the 15 genes found to be overexpressed in both cell types, we characterized the antimicrobial peptide resistance (AMPR) genes, virK and ybjX, in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, AMPR genes were required for natural morphology, motility, secretion, defense against detergents such as EDTA and bile salts, and resistance to antimicrobial peptides polymyxin B and avian β-defensins. From this, we inferred the AMPR genes play a role in outer membrane stability and/or modulation. In the intestinal tract, AMPR genes were involved in early intestinal colonization and fecal shedding. In the reproductive tract, virK was required in early colonization whereas a deletion of ybjX caused prolonged ovary colonization and egg deposition. Data from the present study indicate that AMPR genes are differentially utilized in various host environments, which may ultimately assist S. Enteritidis in persistent and silent colonization of chickens. PMID:25267840

  9. Liver abscess caused by CTX-M-55-type extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Imoto, Akira; Ooi, Yukimasa; Edogawa, Shoko; Ogura, Takeshi; Masuda, Daisuke; Mohamed, Malak; Takii, Michiaki; Umegaki, Eiji; Kawahara, Ryuji; Ukimura, Akira; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2014-01-01

    Liver abscesses secondary to Salmonella species are rarely described in the general population. We herein describe a case of a liver abscess caused by CTX-M-55-type extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Salmonella enteritidis, which has not been reported in the literature. A 54-year-old male was admitted due to a high fever and was clinically diagnosed with a liver abscess. Culture of the fluid from the liver abscess revealed CTX-M-55-type ESBL-producing S. enteritidis. Although the patient underwent percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage and antibiotic therapy, he died one month later. It should be noted that liver abscesses are potentially fatal depending on the causative pathogen.

  10. Caprylic acid reduces Salmonella Enteritidis populations in various segments of digestive tract and internal organs of 3- and 6-week-old broiler chickens, therapeutically.

    PubMed

    Kollanoor-Johny, A; Mattson, T; Baskaran, S A; Amalaradjou, M A R; Hoagland, T A; Darre, M J; Khan, M I; Schreiber, D T; Donoghue, A M; Donoghue, D J; Venkitanarayanan, K

    2012-07-01

    We investigated the efficacy of feed supplemented with caprylic acid (CA), a natural, 8-carbon fatty acid for reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in commercial broiler chickens. In separate 3- and 6-wk trials, 1-d-old straight-run broiler chicks (n = 70 birds/trial) were assigned to a control group (challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis, no CA) and 2 replicates of 0.7 and 1% CA (n = 14 birds/group). Water and feed were provided ad libitum. On d 1, birds were tested for any inherent Salmonella (n = 2 birds/group). For the 3-wk trial, on d 5, birds were challenged with 8 log(10) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis of a 4-strain mixture by crop gavage, and after 5 d postchallenge, birds (n = 2 birds/group) were euthanized to ensure Salmonella Enteritidis colonization. Caprylic acid was supplemented the last 5 d before tissue collection (n = 10 birds/group). For the 6-wk trial, on d 25, birds were challenged and confirmed for Salmonella Enteritidis colonization. The birds (n = 10 birds/group) were euthanized for tissue samples after CA supplementation for the last 5 d. Caprylic acid at 0.7 or 1% decreased Salmonella Enteritidis populations in cecum, small intestine, cloaca, liver, and spleen in both 3- and 6-wk trials. Body weight of birds did not differ between the groups (P ≥ 0.05). Further, to elucidate a potential antibacterial mechanism of action of CA, we investigated if CA could reduce Salmonella Enteritidis invasion of an avian epithelial cell line and expression of invasion genes hilA and hilD. The cell invasion study revealed that CA reduced invasive abilities of all Salmonella Enteritidis strains by ~80% (P < 0.05). Gene expression studies indicated that CA downregulated (P < 0.001) Salmonella invasion genes hilA and hilD. These results suggest that supplementation of CA through feed could reduce Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in broiler chicken and potentially reduces the pathogen's ability to invade intestinal epithelial cells

  11. Characterization of a Novel Inactivated Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Vaccine Candidate Generated Using a Modified cI857/λ PR/Gene E Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Jawale, Chetan V.; Chaudhari, Atul A.; Jeon, Byung Woo; Nandre, Rahul M.

    2012-01-01

    A new strategy to develop an effective vaccine is essential to control food-borne Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis infections. Bacterial ghosts (BGs), which are nonliving, Gram-negative bacterial cell envelopes, are generated by expulsion of the cytoplasmic contents from bacterial cells through controlled expression using the modified cI857/λ PR/gene E expression system. In the present study, the pJHL99 lysis plasmid carrying the mutated lambda pR37-cI857 repressor and PhiX174 lysis gene E was constructed and transformed in S. Enteritidis to produce a BG. Temperature induction of the lysis gene cassette at 42°C revealed quantitative killing of S. Enteritidis. The S. Enteritidis ghost was characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy to visualize the transmembrane tunnel structure and loss of cytoplasmic materials, respectively. The efficacy of the BG as a vaccine candidate was evaluated in a chicken model using 60 10-day-old chickens, which were divided into four groups (n = 15), A, B, C, and D. Group A was designated as the nonimmunized control group, whereas the birds in groups B, C, and D were immunized via the intramuscular, subcutaneous, and oral routes, respectively. The chickens from all immunized groups showed significant increases in plasma IgG and intestinal secretory IgA levels. The lymphocyte proliferation response and CD3+ CD4+ and CD3+ CD8+ T cell subpopulations were also significantly increased in all immunized groups. The data indicate that both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses are robustly stimulated. Based on an examination of the protection efficacy measured by observations of gross lesions in the organs and bacterial recovery, the candidate vaccine can provide efficient protection against virulent challenge. PMID:22290147

  12. Incidence of Salmonella Enteritidis in chicken layer flocks in Turkey: results by real-time polymerase chain reaction and International Organization for Standardization culture methods.

    PubMed

    Temelli, S; Kahya, S; Eyigor, A; Carli, K T

    2010-07-01

    This study presents Salmonella Enteritidis incidence in chicken layer flocks in Turkey determined by real-time PCR (rPCR) and by International Organization for Standardization (ISO) method 6579:2002/Amd 1:2007. A total of 259 samples, composed of 1,036 individual samples each pooled into 4, including 175 cloacal swab, 14 intestine, 35 gizzard swab, and 35 cecal swab samples, belonging to 6 major companies, were collected from 50 layer flocks and tested by rPCR and ISO culture methods. Overall incidence of Salmonella in layer flocks by rPCR and culture was 61.0 and 55.6%, respectively, where 70.1% of these Salmonella isolates were determined as Salmonella Enteritidis. Incidences of Salmonella Enteritidis in culture-positive samples were 65.3% in cloacal swabs, 50.0% in intestines, 73.9% in gizzard swabs, and 87.5% in cecal swabs. The rPCR results were in 100% agreement (100% sensitivity and specificity) with culture results when cecal swabs were selected as the sample type. The relative accuracy of rPCR was 92.4, 91.4, and 84% for intestine, gizzard, and cloacal swab samples, respectively. As a result, by using rPCR and ISO culture, we determined that the Salmonella Enteritidis incidence in layer flocks in Turkey was high and that the use of cecal swab and intestine samples in Salmonella detection would yield reliable results. To reduce this high Salmonella Enteritidis incidence in layer flocks, Salmonella Enteritidis-specific vaccination should be implemented properly in conjunction with a well-designed biosecurity plan, including verifiable corrective actions.

  13. Limited genetic diversity and gene expression differences between egg- and non-egg-related Salmonella Enteritidis strains.

    PubMed

    Botteldoorn, N; Van Coillie, E; Goris, J; Werbrouck, H; Piessens, V; Godard, C; Scheldeman, P; Herman, L; Heyndrickx, M

    2010-08-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis strains of egg- and non-egg-related origin were characterized molecularly to find markers correlated with the egg-contaminating property of Salmonella Enteritidis. Isolates were examined by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), plasmid profiling and phage typing. Furthermore, the presence of 30 virulence genes was tested by PCR. In genetic fingerprinting and gene content, only small differences between the strains were found and no correlation was observed with the origin (egg-related versus non-egg-related). A major RADP group was present in both egg- and non-egg-related strains, but other smaller RAPD groups were present as well in both categories of strains. Phage types PT4 and PT21 were predominant. Differential mRNA expression levels of fimA and agfA under conditions of growth simulating the conditions during egg formation were determined by real-time RT-PCR. Although differences in fimA and agfA expression levels were observed between the strains, these could not be correlated with the origin of the strains (egg-related versus non-egg-related). The highest expression levels of agfA and fimA were only found in two non-egg-related strains, which seemed to be correlated with the presence of a 93 kb plasmid instead of the 60 kb virulence plasmid. Our results seem to indicate only a limited role for at least type I fimbriae (encoded by fim operon) in egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis.

  14. Effects of the Physical Form of Diet on the Outcome of an Artificial Salmonella Infection in Broilers.

    PubMed

    Ratert, C; Sander, S J; Verspohl, J; Beyerbach, M; Kamphues, J

    2015-03-01

    To prove the hypothesis that the physical form of diet affects the outcome of an artificial infection with Salmonella Enteritidis in broilers, 7-day-old birds were allotted to one of four groups and fed botanically, and nearly also chemically identical diets, differing in grinding and further compaction. In total, two birds from each group (age 14 days) were administered on average 1.06 x 10(8) colony-forming units (CFU) of Salmonella Enteritidis directly into the crop by gavage and immediately put back as "seeder birds" into their respective groups. The salmonella status of each bird was analyzed by cloacal swabs, and at postmortem examination, cecal content and liver tissue samples were taken. Shedding (measured by cloacal swabs) was reduced significantly (P < 0.05) in groups offered the coarsely ground and pelleted diet and the diet including whole wheat compared with the groups fed the finely ground and pelleted and the coarsely ground and extruded diet. Nevertheless, only broilers fed the diet containing whole wheat showed a significantly (P < 0.05) lower frequency of Salmonella Enteritidis isolation in the cecal content and liver tissue. This diet was characterized by the highest percentage of particles > 2 mm. In this study the physical form of diet affected the outcome of an artificial infection with Salmonella Enteritidis significantly.

  15. Prevalence of gyrA Mutations in Nalidixic Acid-Resistant Strains of Salmonella Enteritidis Isolated from Humans, Food, Chickens, and the Farm Environment in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Campioni, Fábio; Souza, Roberto Antonio; Martins, Vinicius Vicente; Stehling, Eliana Guedes; Bergamini, Alzira Maria Morato; Falcão, Juliana Pfrimer

    2016-08-25

    Salmonella Enteritidis strains that are resistant to nalidixic acid and exhibit reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones have been increasing worldwide. In Brazil, few studies have been conducted to elucidate the quinolone resistance mechanisms of S. Enteritidis strains. This study analyzed the profile of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE mutations and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) mechanisms in S. Enteritidis Nal(R) strains isolated in Brazil. Moreover, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of ciprofloxacin were evaluated in 84 Nal(R) strains and compared with 20 Nal(S) strains. The mutation profiles of the gyrA gene were accessed by high-resolution melting analysis and gyrB, parC, and parE by quinolone resistance-determining region sequencing. The MICs of ciprofloxacin were accessed with Etest(®). The strains were divided into five gyrA melting profiles. The Nal(R) strains exhibited the following amino acid substitutions: Ser97→Pro, Ser83→Phe, Asp87→Asn, or Asp87→Tyr. The average MICs of ciprofloxacin was 0.006 μg/ml in the Nal(S) and 0.09 μg/ml in the Nal(R) strains. No points of mutation were observed in the genes gyrB, parC, and parE. The qnrB gene was found in two strains. In conclusion, the reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin observed in Nal(R) strains may cause treatment failures once this drug is commonly used to treat Salmonella infections. Moreover, this reduced susceptibility in these Brazilian strains was provided by target alteration of gene gyrA and not by mobile elements, such as resistance plasmids.

  16. Influence of pH, temperature and storage condition on survival and growth of Salmonella Enteritidis in membrane processed liquid egg white

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Study was conducted to establish the effects of variations in liquid egg pH and membrane processing temperature on the removal and growth of Salmonella Enteritidis in liquid egg white (LEW) filtered by microfiltration (MF) process. Storage condition variations influence on growth of Salmonella in th...

  17. Yerba mate enhances probiotic bacteria growth in vitro but as a feed additive does not reduce Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gil, Francisco; Diaz-Sanchez, Sandra; Pendleton, Sean; Andino, Ana; Zhang, Nan; Yard, Carrie; Crilly, Nate; Harte, Federico; Hanning, Irene

    2014-02-01

    Yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis) is a tea known to have beneficial effects on human health and antimicrobial activity against some foodborne pathogens. Thus, the application of yerba mate as a feed additive for broiler chickens to reduce Salmonella colonization was evaluated. The first in vitro evaluation was conducted by suspending Salmonella Enteritidis and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in yerba mate extract. The in vivo evaluations were conducted using preventative and horizontal transmission experiments. In all experiments, day-of-hatch chicks were treated with one of the following 1) no treatment (control); 2) ground yerba mate in feed; 3) probiotic treatment (Lactobacillus acidophilus and Pediococcus; 9:1 administered once on day of hatch by gavage); or 4) both yerba mate and probiotic treatments. At d 3, all chicks were challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis (preventative experiment) or 5 of 20 chicks (horizontal transmission experiment). At d 10, all birds were euthanized, weighed, and cecal contents enumerated for Salmonella. For the in vitro evaluation, antimicrobial activity was observed against Salmonella and the same treatment enhanced growth of LAB. For in vivo evaluations, none of the yerba mate treatments significantly reduced Salmonella Enteritidis colonization, whereas the probiotic treatment significantly reduced Salmonella colonization in the horizontal transmission experiment. Yerba mate decreased chicken BW and decreased the performance of the probiotic treatment when used in combination. In conclusion, yerba mate had antimicrobial activity against foodborne pathogens and enhanced the growth of LAB in vitro, but in vivo yerba mate did not decrease Salmonella Enteritidis colonization.

  18. Survival and growth of Salmonella Enteritidis in membrane processed liquid egg white with pH, temperature and storage conditions as controlling factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was undertaken to determine the effect of variation in solution pH and process temperature on the removal and regrowth of Salmonella Enteritidis in liquid egg white (LEW) by microfiltration (MF) membrane process. Influence of various storage conditions on growth of Salmonella in membrane sep...

  19. Assessing the growth and recovery of Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 after sodium dichloroisocyanurate exposure.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Fernanda Stoduto; Horvath, Mariana Bandeira; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the growth and the recovery of Salmonella (S.) Enteritidis SE86 in different diluents, culture media and using different plating methods after the exposure to 200 mg/kg sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC). Before and after NaDCC exposure, SE86 was cultured at 30 °C and 7 °C in the following diluents: Peptone water (P), Saline solution (SaS), Peptone water+Saline solution (P+SaS), Peptone water+Tween 80+Lecithin+Sodium thiosulfate (P+N) and Saline solution+Tween 80+Lecithin+Sodium thiosulfate (SaS+N). The SaS diluent was chosen because it was able to maintain cells viable without growth and was further used for plating SE86 on non selective medium (Tryptic Soy Agar-TSA) and on selective media (Mannitol Lysine Crystal Violet Brilliant Green Agar-MLCB; Brilliant Green Agar-BGA; Salmonella Shigella Agar-SS and Xylose Lysine Dextrose-XLD). The Thin Agar Layer method (TAL) i.e., selective media overlayed with non selective TSA was also evaluated. Results indicated that SE86 not exposed to NaDCC was able to grow in P, P+N, SaS+N and P+SaS, but not in SaS, that was able to maintain cells viable. SE86 exposed to NaDCC demonstrated similar counts after dilution in SaS and the plating on non selective TSA, selective media MLCB, BGA, SS and XLD and on TAL media. SE86, S. Typhimurium and S. Bredeney, exposed or not exposed to NaDCC, showed no significant differences in counts on TSA, XLD and XLD overlayed with TSA, suggesting that all those media may be used to quantify NaDCC-exposed Salmonella by plating method.

  20. Extracellular polysaccharides associated with thin aggregative fimbriae of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis.

    PubMed

    White, A P; Gibson, D L; Collinson, S K; Banser, P A; Kay, W W

    2003-09-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O polysaccharide was identified as the principle factor impeding intercellular formation of intact thin aggregative fimbriae (Tafi) in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. The extracellular nucleation-precipitation assembly pathway for these organelles was investigated by quantifying fimbrial formation between deltaagfA (AgfA recipient) and deltaagfB (AgfA donor) cells harboring mutations in LPS (galE::Tn10) and/or cellulose (deltabcsA) synthesis. Intercellular complementation could be detected between deltaagfA and deltaagfB strains only when both possessed the galE mutation. LPS O polysaccharide appears to be an impenetrable barrier to AgfA assembly between cells but not within individual cells. The presence of cellulose did not restrict Tafi formation between cells. Transmission electron microscopy of w+ S. enterica serovar Enteritidis 3b cells revealed diffuse Tafi networks without discernible fine structure. In the absence of cellulose, however, individual Tafi fibers were clearly visible, appeared to be occasionally branched, and showed the generally distinctive appearance described for Escherichia coli K-12 curli. A third extracellular matrix component closely associated with cellulose and Tafi was detected on Western blots by using immune serum raised to whole, purified Tafi aggregates. Cellulose was required to tightly link this material to cells. Antigenically similar material was also detected in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and one diarrheagenic E. coli isolate. Preliminary analysis indicated that this material represented an anionic, extracellular polysaccharide that was distinct from colanic acid. Therefore, Tafi in their native state appear to exist as a complex with cellulose and at least one other component.

  1. The relationship between infecting dose and severity of disease in reported outbreaks of Salmonella infections.

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, J. R.; Bradley, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between size of the infecting dose and severity of the resulting disease has been investigated for salmonella infections by reanalysis of data within epidemics for 32 outbreaks, and comparing data between outbreaks for 68 typhoid epidemics and 49 food-poisoning outbreaks due to salmonellas. Attack rate, incubation period, amount of infected food consumed and type of vehicle are used as proxy measures of infecting dose, while case fatality rates for typhoid and case hospitalization rates for food poisoning salmonellas were used to assess severity. Limitations of the data are discussed. Both unweighted and logit analysis models are used. There is no evidence for a dose-severity relationship for Salmonella typhi, but evidence of a correlation between dose and severity is available from within-epidemic or between-epidemic analysis, or both, for Salmonella typhimurium, S. enteritidis, S. infantis, S. newport, and S. thompson. The presence of such a relationship affects the way in which control interventions should be assessed. PMID:1468522

  2. Responses of macrophages against Salmonella infection compared with phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Maozhi; Yang, Yun; Meng, Chuang; Pan, Zhiming; Jiao, Xinan

    2013-12-01

    To explore the responses of host cell after infection with live Salmonella compared with phagocytosis to dead bacteria, the responses of mouse macrophage after infection with Salmonella enteritidis C50041 and the fixed C50041 (C50041-d) were analyzed. Results indicated that the cytotoxicity induced by C50041 was stronger than C50041-d. Similar changing trends of mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular concentration of calcium ions, reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide were found between C50041 and C50041-d infection. But the cell responses against C50041 were earlier and stronger than C50041-d. LC3 expression of macrophage induced by C50041 was lower than C50041-d. C50041 significantly inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin (IL)-6. Whereas intracellular caspase-1 activation and IL-1β release induced by C50041 were stronger than C50041-d, caspase-1 activation and IL-1β release are the innate defense responses of macrophage. Therefore, it will be beneficial to explore the use of this pathway in the control of Salmonella infection.

  3. Pulsed UV light inactivation of Salmonella enteritidis on eggshells and its effects on egg quality.

    PubMed

    Keklik, Nene M; Demirci, Ali; Patterson, Paul H; Puri, Virendra M

    2010-08-01

    The majority of Salmonella Enteritidis outbreaks have been related to the consumption of raw or undercooked eggs or egg-containing foods. Therefore, the U.S. Department of Agriculture mandates egg washing for all graded eggs by use of a detergent solution and sanitizer. These agencies and the egg industry have been investigating alternative decontamination techniques, which could better serve the public, minimize costs, and benefit both the public and the industry. Pulsed UV light is an emerging technology that is used to inactivate microorganisms quickly. In this study, the effectiveness of pulsed UV light was evaluated for the decontamination of eggshells. Eggs inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis on the top surface at the equator were treated with pulsed UV light 1 to 30 s, at a distance of 9.5 and 14.5 cm from the UV lamp in a laboratory-scale, pulsed UV light chamber. Three eggs were used per treatment in each repetition, except for quality measurements, which involved six eggs per treatment in each repetition. A maximum log reduction of 5.3 CFU/cm2 was obtained after a 20-s treatment at 9.5 cm below the UV lamp at a total dose of 23.6+/-0.1 J/cm2, without any visual damage to the egg. After a 30-s treatment at 9.5 and 14.5 cm, the temperature of eggshell surfaces increased by 16.3 and 13.3 degrees C, respectively. Energy usage increased up to 35.3+/-0.1 and 24.8+/-0.1 J/cm2, after 30-s treatments at 9.5 and 14.5 cm, respectively. The effect of pulsed UV light treatments on egg quality was also evaluated. Pulsed UV-light treatments for 3, 10, and 20s at either 9.5 or 14.5 cm did not change the albumen height, eggshell strength, or cuticle presence significantly (P<0.05). This study demonstrated that pulsed UV light has potential to decontaminate eggshell surfaces.

  4. Effect of immersion and inoculation in ovo of Lactobacillus spp. in embryonated chicken eggs in the prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis after hatch.

    PubMed

    Yamawaki, R A; Milbradt, E L; Coppola, M P; Rodrigues, J C Z; Andreatti Filho, R L; Padovani, C R; Okamoto, A S

    2013-06-01

    The protection level against Salmonella Enteritidis was evaluated in chickens after in ovo treatment with different species of Lactobacillus spp. inoculated into the air cell or by immersion in broth culture. Two hundred forty embryonated eggs were distributed into 8 groups, corresponding to treatments with Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus salivarius, and control. On d 18 of incubation, 4 groups were inoculated with 0.1 mL of inoculum in the air cell and 4 groups were immersed for 3 min in culture of each treatment. Two days after hatching, 0.5 mL of Salmonella Enteritidis culture was inoculated by the intraesophageal route. On d 5 of life, the chicks were euthanized and the ceca were processed to obtain Salmonella Enteritidis counts. There was no decrease in Salmonella Enteritidis colonization of chick ceca, regardless of treatment or route of administration. Lactobacillus spp. samples used in the treatment showed no probiotic potential in chicks when inoculated in ovo, in relation to Salmonella Enteritidis inhibition in poultry ceca.

  5. Glycerol supplementation enhances the protective effect of dietary FloraMax-B11 against Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in neonate broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Delgado, R; Latorre, J D; Vicuña, E; Hernandez-Velasco, X; Vicente, J L; Menconi, A; Kallapura, G; Layton, S; Hargis, B M; Téllez, G

    2014-09-01

    Two independent trials were conducted in the present study to evaluate the effect of 5% glycerol supplementation combined with dietary FloraMax-B11 (FM) against Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in neonate broiler chickens. In each trial, 60 chicks were randomly assigned into 4 groups. Group 1 received a control diet. Group 2 received a control diet supplemented with 5% glycerol. Group 3 received a control diet supplemented with FM, and group 4 received a control diet supplemented with 5% glycerol and FM. At placement, chickens were challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis at 10(4) cfu/bird. In each trial, 12 chicks were humanely killed 72 h postchallenge, respectively, for Salmonella Enteritidis colonization. Supplementation of 5% glycerol or FM by themselves, showed no significant effect on Salmonella Enteritidis recovery or incidence when compared with control nontreated chickens in both trials. However, no detectable Salmonella Enteritidis was observed in the chickens that received the supplementation of 5% glycerol combined with FM in both trials. Further studies are in progress in older birds to substantiate these findings.

  6. Effect of native microflora on the growth kinetics of salmonella enteritidis strain 04-137 in raw ground chicken.

    PubMed

    Zaher, Sakha M; Fujikawa, Hiroshi

    2011-05-01

    Effects of native microflora (NM) on growth kinetics of Salmonella Enteritidis strain 04-137 were studied in raw ground chicken. First, samples of ground chicken with high and low levels of NM (10(7.1) and 10(4.9) CFU/g, respectively) were spiked with Salmonella at doses ranging from 10(1) to 10(4) CFU/g. The growth kinetics, including the rate constant of growth, r, and the lag period, were similar, but the maximum cell level, N(max), was higher at higher initial Salmonella doses for both NM levels. Second, samples of ground chicken with high and low NM levels (10(6.8) and 10(4.7) CFU/g, respectively) were spiked with Salmonella and then stored at various constant temperatures ranging from 8 to 32°C. Both N(max) and r for Salmonella were higher at higher temperatures for both NM levels. Although r for total bacteria, which consisted of NM and Salmonella, was also higher at higher temperatures, N(max) was constant at all temperatures for both NM levels. Further, Salmonella growth was compared among samples of ground chicken with high and low NM levels and samples of sterilized chicken. Salmonella growth, characterized by both N(max) and r, was highest in sterilized chicken, followed by chicken with the low NM level. Our growth model successfully described and analyzed the growth of Salmonella and total bacteria in chicken at constant temperatures; using the data obtained, the model also successfully predicted the growth of Salmonella and total bacteria in chicken stored at dynamic temperatures. Our study clarified the effects that different doses of NM in ground chicken had on the growth kinetics of the Salmonella strain and demonstrated the usability of the growth model for foods with NM.

  7. The Antibacterial Activity of Coriolus versicolor Methanol Extract and Its Effect on Ultrastructural Changes of Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Matijašević, Danka; Pantić, Milena; Rašković, Božidar; Pavlović, Vladimir; Duvnjak, Dunja; Sknepnek, Aleksandra; Nikšić, Miomir

    2016-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of methanol extract obtained from fruiting body of industrially grown basidiomycete Coriolus versicolor was examined. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values against various bacteria ranged from 0.625 to 20 mg mL-1. C. versicolor expressed bactericidal activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The growth curves of Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, measured at 630 nm, and confirmed with macrodilution method showed that the obtained extract could inhibit the growth of tested bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the loss of 260-nm-absorbing material were used to examine the ultrastructural changes in bacteria induced by the extract. When S. aureus was exposed to the MIC of C. versicolor, elongated and malformed cells were observed by SEM, while S. Enteritidis treated cells appeared shorter and aggregated with ruptured cell walls. TEM revealed the formation of non-membrane-enclosed bodies and depleted inner content of S. aureus. Larger and irregular periplasmic space and deformed and scattered components of the cell envelope were observed in treated S. Enteritidis. The loss of 260-nm-absorbing material indicated that the disruptive action of the extract on cytoplasmic membrane was more pronounced in S. aureus than in S. Enteritidis treated cells. The UV and FTIR spectrophotometric analyses revealed diverse composition of C. versicolor extract and high content of total phenolics. Altogether, mushroom extracts could be used to develop nutraceuticals or drugs effective against pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:27540376

  8. Marinade with thyme and orange oils reduces Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter coli on inoculated broiler breast fillets and whole wings.

    PubMed

    Thanissery, R; Smith, D P

    2014-05-01

    Essential oils have been reported to possess antimicrobial properties and therefore have potential usage as natural antimicrobials in food. In a previous study, thyme orange essential oil combination (TOC) used at the 0.5% level as a dip application on chicken cut-up parts had a significant antibacterial effect against Salmonella and Campylobacter. A study was designed to evaluate the effect of salt-phosphate marinade solution containing 0.5% TOC to 1) reduce Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter coli numbers on broiler breast fillets and whole wings marinated by vacuum tumbling, and 2) reduce cross-contamination of both pathogens between inoculated and uninoculated parts during marination. A total of 52 skinless breast fillets and 52 whole wings were used for the 2 replications. For each replication, each cut-up part was randomly assigned to 1 of 5 groups: treatment 1: uninoculated parts marinated without TOC; treatment 2: inoculated parts marinated without TOC; treatment 3: uninoculated parts marinated with TOC; treatment 4: inoculated parts marinated with TOC; and control: nonmarinated inoculated parts. Samples were dipped in an inoculum containing a mixture of Salmonella Enteritidis and C. coli. The treatment samples were marinated by vacuum tumbling. All samples were immediately evaluated to determine Salmonella Enteritidis and C. coli numbers. Results indicated that TOC at the 0.5% level in the marinade solution applied by vacuum tumbling significantly reduced (P < 0.05) numbers of viable Salmonella Enteritidis by 2.6 and 2.3 log cfu/mL on broiler breast fillets and C. coli by 3.6 and 3.1 log cfu/mL on whole wings. Cross-contamination was observed as the uninoculated chicken parts marinated with inoculated parts were positive. However, the number of bacterial cells recovered from the TOC treated samples were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than the numbers recovered from the untreated samples. Marination with a salt phosphate formulation containing 0.5% TOC

  9. Comparative analysis of virulence and resistance profiles of Salmonella Enteritidis isolates from poultry meat and foodborne outbreaks in northern Jordan.

    PubMed

    Jaradat, Ziad W; Abedel Hafiz, Leena; Ababneh, Mustafa M; Ababneh, Qotaibah O; Al Mousa, Waseem; Al-Nabulsi, Anas; Osaili, Tareq M; Holley, Richard

    2014-07-01

    This study was conducted to isolate Salmonella Enteritidis from poultry samples and compare their virulence and antibiotic resistance profiles to S. Enteritidis isolated from outbreaks in northern Jordan. Two hundred presumptive isolates were obtained from 302 raw poultry samples and were subjected to further analysis and confirmation. A phylogenic tree based on 16S rRNA sequencing was constructed and selected isolates representing each cluster were further studied for their virulence in normal adult Swiss white mice. The most virulent strains were isolated from poultry samples and had an LD 50 of 1.55 × 10 (5) CFU, while some of the outbreak isolates were avirulent in mice. Antibiotic resistance profiling revealed that the isolates were resistant to seven of eight antibiotics screened with each isolate resistant to multiple antibiotics (from two to six). Of the poultry isolates, 100%, 88.9%, 77.8%, 66.7%, and 50% showed resistance to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, ampicillin, cephalothin, and cefoperazone, respectively. Two outbreak isolates were sensitive to all tested antibiotics, while 71.4% were resistant to cefoperazone and only 28.6% showed resistance to nalidixic acid. Salmonella outbreak isolates were genetically related to poultry isolates as inferred from the 16S rRNA sequencing, yet were phenotypically different. Although outbreak strains were similar to poultry isolates, when tested in the mouse model, some of the outbreak isolates were highly virulent while others were avirulent. This might be due to a variation in susceptibility of the mouse to different S. Enteritidis isolates.

  10. Multi-laboratory validation study of multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) for Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, 2015.

    PubMed

    Peters, Tansy; Bertrand, Sophie; Björkman, Jonas T; Brandal, Lin T; Brown, Derek J; Erdõsi, Tímea; Heck, Max; Ibrahem, Salha; Johansson, Karin; Kornschober, Christian; Kotila, Saara M; Le Hello, Simon; Lienemann, Taru; Mattheus, Wesley; Nielsen, Eva Møller; Ragimbeau, Catherine; Rumore, Jillian; Sabol, Ashley; Torpdahl, Mia; Trees, Eija; Tuohy, Alma; de Pinna, Elizabeth

    2017-03-02

    Multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) is a rapid and reproducible typing method that is an important tool for investigation, as well as detection, of national and multinational outbreaks of a range of food-borne pathogens. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is the most common Salmonella serovar associated with human salmonellosis in the European Union/European Economic Area and North America. Fourteen laboratories from 13 countries in Europe and North America participated in a validation study for MLVA of S. Enteritidis targeting five loci. Following normalisation of fragment sizes using a set of reference strains, a blinded set of 24 strains with known allele sizes was analysed by each participant. The S. Enteritidis 5-loci MLVA protocol was shown to produce internationally comparable results as more than 90% of the participants reported less than 5% discrepant MLVA profiles. All 14 participating laboratories performed well, even those where experience with this typing method was limited. The raw fragment length data were consistent throughout, and the inter-laboratory validation helped to standardise the conversion of raw data to repeat numbers with at least two countries updating their internal procedures. However, differences in assigned MLVA profiles remain between well-established protocols and should be taken into account when exchanging data.

  11. Multi-laboratory validation study of multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) for Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Tansy; Bertrand, Sophie; Björkman, Jonas T; Brandal, Lin T; Brown, Derek J; Erdõsi, Tímea; Heck, Max; Ibrahem, Salha; Johansson, Karin; Kornschober, Christian; Kotila, Saara M; Le Hello, Simon; Lienemann, Taru; Mattheus, Wesley; Nielsen, Eva Møller; Ragimbeau, Catherine; Rumore, Jillian; Sabol, Ashley; Torpdahl, Mia; Trees, Eija; Tuohy, Alma; de Pinna, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) is a rapid and reproducible typing method that is an important tool for investigation, as well as detection, of national and multinational outbreaks of a range of food-borne pathogens. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is the most common Salmonella serovar associated with human salmonellosis in the European Union/European Economic Area and North America. Fourteen laboratories from 13 countries in Europe and North America participated in a validation study for MLVA of S. Enteritidis targeting five loci. Following normalisation of fragment sizes using a set of reference strains, a blinded set of 24 strains with known allele sizes was analysed by each participant. The S. Enteritidis 5-loci MLVA protocol was shown to produce internationally comparable results as more than 90% of the participants reported less than 5% discrepant MLVA profiles. All 14 participating laboratories performed well, even those where experience with this typing method was limited. The raw fragment length data were consistent throughout, and the inter-laboratory validation helped to standardise the conversion of raw data to repeat numbers with at least two countries updating their internal procedures. However, differences in assigned MLVA profiles remain between well-established protocols and should be taken into account when exchanging data. PMID:28277220

  12. phoP, SPI1, SPI2 and aroA mutants of Salmonella Enteritidis induce a different immune response in chickens.

    PubMed

    Elsheimer-Matulova, Marta; Varmuzova, Karolina; Kyrova, Kamila; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Rahman, Masudur; Rychlik, Ivan

    2015-09-17

    Poultry is the most frequent reservoir of non-typhoid Salmonella enterica for humans. Understanding the interactions between chickens and S. enterica is therefore important for vaccine design and subsequent decrease in the incidence of human salmonellosis. In this study we therefore characterized the interactions between chickens and phoP, aroA, SPI1 and SPI2 mutants of S. Enteritidis. First we tested the response of HD11 chicken macrophage-like cell line to S. Enteritidis infection monitoring the transcription of 36 genes related to immune response. All the mutants and the wild type strain induced inflammatory signaling in the HD11 cell line though the response to SPI1 mutant infection was different from the rest of the mutants. When newly hatched chickens were inoculated, the phoP as well as the SPI1 mutant did not induce an expression of any of the tested genes in the cecum. Despite this, such chickens were protected against challenge with wild-type S. Enteritidis. On the other hand, inoculation of chickens with the aroA or SPI2 mutant induced expression of 27 and 18 genes, respectively, including genes encoding immunoglobulins. Challenge of chickens inoculated with these two mutants resulted in repeated induction of 11 and 13 tested genes, respectively, including the genes encoding immunoglobulins. In conclusion, SPI1 and phoP mutants induced protective immunity without inducing an inflammatory response and antibody production. Inoculation of chickens with the SPI2 and aroA mutants also led to protective immunity but was associated with inflammation and antibody production. The differences in interaction between the mutants and chicken host can be used for a more detailed understanding of the chicken immune system.

  13. Promoting crystallisation of the Salmonella enteritidis fimbriae 14 pilin SefD using deuterium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bing; Garnett, James A.; Lee, Wei-chao; Lin, Jing; Salgado, Paula; Taylor, Jonathan; Xu, Yingqi; Lambert, Sebastian; Cota, Ernesto; Matthews, Steve

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The benefits of D{sub 2}O in screening for crystallisation was explored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structures of the SefD pilin in both H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O reveal differences. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystallisation improvements are explained by altered interactions in D{sub 2}O crystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer D{sub 2}O is useful additive in sparse-matrix screening for crystallisation. -- Abstract: The use of heavy water (D{sub 2}O) as a solvent is commonplace in many spectroscopic techniques for the study of biological macromolecules. A significant deuterium isotope effect exists where hydrogen-bonding is important, such as in protein stability, dynamics and assembly. Here we illustrate the use of D{sub 2}O in additive screening for the production of reproducible diffraction-quality crystals for the Salmonella enteritidis fimbriae 14 (SEF14) putative tip adhesin, SefD.

  14. Effect of refrigeration on in vitro penetration of Salmonella enteritidis through the egg yolk membrane.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Holt, Peter S; Guraya, Rupa

    2006-06-01

    Internally contaminated eggs have been implicated as leading sources of transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) to humans. Although SE is not often deposited inside the nutrient-rich yolks of naturally contaminated eggs, penetration through the vitelline membrane to reach the yolk contents could result in rapid bacterial multiplication. In previous studies, such penetration has been observed occasionally at warm temperatures during experiments with in vitro egg contamination models. The present study was conducted to determine whether refrigeration affects the frequency of in vitro SE penetration of the egg yolk membrane. After inoculation of small numbers of SE onto the outside of the vitelline membranes of intact yolks, immediate refrigeration of contaminated samples prevented the penetration of SE into the egg yolk contents during 24 h of storage. However, SE penetrated inside the yolk contents in 4% of contaminated egg samples refrigerated after 2 h of storage at 30 degrees C, 15% of samples refrigerated after 6 h of storage at 30 degrees C, and 40% of samples stored at 30 degrees C for 24 h (48 samples per treatment group). These results highlight the value of prompt refrigeration for restricting the opportunities for SE to multiply to high numbers inside the yolks of contaminated eggs.

  15. Usefulness of phage typing and "two-way ribotyping" to differentiate Salmonella enteritidis strains.

    PubMed

    Landeras, E; Usera, M A; Calderón, C; Mendoza, M C

    1997-12-01

    The capacity to differentiate Salmonella enteritidis strains by phage typing and "two-way ribotyping" performed with PstI and SphI was evaluated. The typeability was 96.8% in phage typing and 100% in ribotyping. The series was differentiated into 13 phage types, 19 combined ribotypes, and 39 subtypes or clonal lines by combining results from both methods (of which 11, 13, and 35, respectively, were represented by natural strains). Ribotyping differentiated strains ascribed to PTs 1, 4, 6a, 7, 8, RDNC and UPT. Conversely, some strains of PTs 1, 4, 5a, 6, 6a, 7, 34, RDNC and UPT fall into the most frequent combined ribotype. A dendrogram of genetic similarity generated from the combined ribotypes was traced, and, at a 0.82 similarity level, it showed a major cluster (including 17 combined ribotypes, 88.4% strains ascribed to all PTs tested except PT11), a minor cluster, and four additional lines more loosely related.

  16. Temperature-Sensitive Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis PT13a Expressing Essential Proteins of Psychrophilic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Duplantis, Barry N.; Puckett, Stephanie M.; Rosey, Everett L.; Ameiss, Keith A.; Hartman, Angela D.; Pearce, Stephanie C.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic genes based on deduced amino acid sequences of the NAD-dependent DNA ligase (ligA) and CTP synthetase (pyrG) of psychrophilic bacteria were substituted for their native homologues in the genome of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 13a (PT13a). The resulting strains were rendered temperature sensitive (TS) and did not revert to temperature resistance at a detectable level. At permissive temperatures, TS strains grew like the parental strain in broth medium and in macrophage-like cells, but their growth was slowed or stopped when they were shifted to a restrictive temperature. When injected into BALB/c mice at the base of the tail, representing a cool site of the body, the strains with restrictive temperatures of 37, 38.5, and 39°C persisted for less than 1 day, 4 to 7 days, and 20 to 28 days, respectively. The wild-type strain persisted at the site of inoculation for at least 28 days. The wild-type strain, but not the TS strains, was also found in spleen-plus-liver homogenates within 1 day of inoculation of the tail and was detectable in these organs for at least 28 days. Intramuscular vaccination of White Leghorn chickens with the PT13a strain carrying the psychrophilic pyrG gene provided some protection against colonization of the reproductive tract and induced an anti-S. enterica antibody response. PMID:26187965

  17. Metabolic activity of bacterial cell enumerated by direct viable count. [Escherichia coli; Salmonella enteritidis

    SciTech Connect

    Roszak, D.B.; Colwell, R.R.

    1987-12-01

    The direct viable count (DVC) method was modified by incorporation radiolabeled substrates in microautoradiographic analyses to assess bacterial survival in controlled laboratory microcosms. The DVC method, which permits enumeration of culturable and nonculturable cells, discriminates those cells that are responsive to added nutrients but in which division is inhibited by the addition of nalidixic acid. The resulting elongated cells represent all viable cells; this includes those that are culturable on routine media and those that are not. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis were employed in the microcosm studies, and radiolabeled substrates included (methyl-/sup 3/H) thymidine or (U-/sup 14/C) glutamic acid. Samples taken at selected intervals during the survival experiments were examined by epifluorescence microscopy to enumerate cells by the DVC and acridine orange direct count methods, as well as by culture methods. Good correlation was obtained for cell-associated metabolic activity, measured by microautoradiography and substrate responsiveness (by the DVC method) at various stages of survival. Of the cells responsive to nutrients by the DVC method, ca. 90% were metabolically active by the microautoradiographic method. No significant difference was observed between DVC enumerations with or without added radiolabeled substrate.

  18. A role for the non-canonical Wnt-ß-Catenin and TGF-ß signaling pathways in the induction of tolerance during the establishment of a Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis persistent cecal infection in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induce an early pro-inflammatory response in chickens. However, the response is short-lived, asymptomatic of disease, resulting in a persistent colonization of the ceca, and fecal shedding of bacteria. The underlying mechanisms that control this persistent infecti...

  19. Construction of a Pan-Genome Allele Database of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis for Molecular Subtyping and Disease Cluster Identification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yen-Yi; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Chiou, Chien-Shun

    2016-01-01

    We built a pan-genome allele database with 395 genomes of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and developed computer tools for analysis of whole genome sequencing (WGS) data of bacterial isolates for disease cluster identification. A web server (http://wgmlst.imst.nsysu.edu.tw) was set up with the database and the tools, allowing users to upload WGS data to generate whole genome multilocus sequence typing (wgMLST) profiles and to perform cluster analysis of wgMLST profiles. The usefulness of the database in disease cluster identification was demonstrated by analyzing a panel of genomes from 55 epidemiologically well-defined S. Enteritidis isolates provided by the Minnesota Department of Health. The wgMLST-based cluster analysis revealed distinct clades that were concordant with the epidemiologically defined outbreaks. Thus, using a common pan-genome allele database, wgMLST can be a promising WGS-based subtyping approach for disease surveillance and outbreak investigation across laboratories. PMID:28018331

  20. Whole-Genome Sequencing Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Isolates in Chile Provides Insights into Possible Transmission between Gulls, Poultry, and Humans.

    PubMed

    Toro, Magaly; Retamal, Patricio; Ayers, Sherry; Barreto, Marlen; Allard, Marc; Brown, Eric W; Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol

    2016-10-15

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Enteritidis is a major cause of human salmonellosis worldwide; however, little is known about the genetic relationships between S Enteritidis clinical strains and S Enteritidis strains from other sources in Chile. We compared the whole genomes of 30 S Enteritidis strains isolated from gulls, domestic chicken eggs, and humans in Chile, to investigate their phylogenetic relationships and to establish their relatedness to international strains. Core genome multilocus sequence typing (cgMLST) analysis showed that only 246/4,065 shared loci differed among these Chilean strains, separating them into two clusters (I and II), with cluster II being further divided into five subclusters. One subcluster (subcluster 2) contained strains from all surveyed sources that differed at 1 to 18 loci (of 4,065 loci) with 1 to 18 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), suggesting interspecies transmission of S Enteritidis in Chile. Moreover, clusters were formed by strains that were distant geographically, which could imply that gulls might be spreading the pathogen throughout the country. Our cgMLST analysis, using other S Enteritidis genomes available in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database, showed that S Enteritidis strains from Chile and the United States belonged to different lineages, which suggests that S Enteritidis regional markers might exist and could be used for trace-back investigations.

  1. In-feed supplementation of trans-cinnamaldehyde reduces layer-chicken egg-borne transmission of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Indu; Upadhyay, Abhinav; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Mooyottu, Shankumar; Baskaran, Sangeetha A; Yin, Hsin-Bai; Schreiber, David T; Khan, Mazhar I; Darre, Michael J; Curtis, Patricia A; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2015-05-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a major foodborne pathogen in the United States, causing gastroenteritis in humans, primarily through consumption of contaminated eggs. Chickens are the reservoir host of S. Enteritidis. In layer hens, S. Enteritidis colonizes the intestine and migrates to various organs, including the oviduct, leading to egg contamination. This study investigated the efficacy of in-feed supplementation with trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC), a generally recognized as safe (GRAS) plant compound obtained from cinnamon, in reducing S. Enteritidis cecal colonization and systemic spread in layers. Additionally, the effect of TC on S. Enteritidis virulence factors critical for macrophage survival and oviduct colonization was investigated in vitro. The consumer acceptability of eggs was also determined by a triangle test. Supplementation of TC in feed for 66 days at 1 or 1.5% (vol/wt) for 40- or 25-week-old layer chickens decreased the amounts of S. Enteritidis on eggshell and in yolk (P<0.001). Additionally, S. Enteritidis persistence in the cecum, liver, and oviduct in TC-supplemented birds was decreased compared to that in controls (P<0.001). No significant differences in feed intake, body weight, or egg production in birds or in consumer acceptability of eggs were observed (P>0.05). In vitro cell culture assays revealed that TC reduced S. Enteritidis adhesion to and invasion of primary chicken oviduct epithelial cells and reduced S. Enteritidis survival in chicken macrophages (P<0.001). Follow-up gene expression analysis using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that TC downregulated the expression of S. Enteritidis virulence genes critical for chicken oviduct colonization (P<0.001). The results suggest that TC may potentially be used as a feed additive to reduce egg-borne transmission of S. Enteritidis.

  2. In-Feed Supplementation of trans-Cinnamaldehyde Reduces Layer-Chicken Egg-Borne Transmission of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Indu; Upadhyay, Abhinav; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Mooyottu, Shankumar; Baskaran, Sangeetha A.; Yin, Hsin-Bai; Schreiber, David T.; Khan, Mazhar I.; Darre, Michael J.; Curtis, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a major foodborne pathogen in the United States, causing gastroenteritis in humans, primarily through consumption of contaminated eggs. Chickens are the reservoir host of S. Enteritidis. In layer hens, S. Enteritidis colonizes the intestine and migrates to various organs, including the oviduct, leading to egg contamination. This study investigated the efficacy of in-feed supplementation with trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC), a generally recognized as safe (GRAS) plant compound obtained from cinnamon, in reducing S. Enteritidis cecal colonization and systemic spread in layers. Additionally, the effect of TC on S. Enteritidis virulence factors critical for macrophage survival and oviduct colonization was investigated in vitro. The consumer acceptability of eggs was also determined by a triangle test. Supplementation of TC in feed for 66 days at 1 or 1.5% (vol/wt) for 40- or 25-week-old layer chickens decreased the amounts of S. Enteritidis on eggshell and in yolk (P < 0.001). Additionally, S. Enteritidis persistence in the cecum, liver, and oviduct in TC-supplemented birds was decreased compared to that in controls (P < 0.001). No significant differences in feed intake, body weight, or egg production in birds or in consumer acceptability of eggs were observed (P > 0.05). In vitro cell culture assays revealed that TC reduced S. Enteritidis adhesion to and invasion of primary chicken oviduct epithelial cells and reduced S. Enteritidis survival in chicken macrophages (P < 0.001). Follow-up gene expression analysis using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that TC downregulated the expression of S. Enteritidis virulence genes critical for chicken oviduct colonization (P < 0.001). The results suggest that TC may potentially be used as a feed additive to reduce egg-borne transmission of S. Enteritidis. PMID:25710365

  3. A multi-country Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 14b outbreak associated with eggs from a German producer: 'near real-time' application of whole genome sequencing and food chain investigations, United Kingdom, May to September 2014.

    PubMed

    Inns, T; Lane, C; Peters, T; Dallman, T; Chatt, C; McFarland, N; Crook, P; Bishop, T; Edge, J; Hawker, J; Elson, R; Neal, K; Adak, G K; Cleary, P

    2015-04-23

    We report an outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 14b (PT14b) in the United Kingdom (UK) between May and September 2014 where Public Health England launched an investigation to identify the source of infection and implement control measures. During the same period, outbreaks caused by a Salmonella Enteritidis strain with a specific multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) profile occurred in other European Union Member States. Isolates from a number of persons affected by the UK outbreak, who had initially been tested by MLVA also shared this particular profile. Cases were defined as any person infected with S. Enteritidis PT14b, resident in England or Wales and without history of travel outside of this geographical area during the incubation period, reported from 1 June 2014 onwards, with a MLVA profile of 2–11–9-7–4-3–2-8–9 or a single locus variant thereof. In total, 287 cases met the definition. Food traceback investigations in the UK and other affected European countries linked the outbreaks to chicken eggs from a German company. We undertook whole genome sequencing of isolates from UK and European cases, implicated UK premises, and German eggs: isolates were highly similar. Combined with food traceback information, this confirmed that the UK outbreak was also linked to a German producer.

  4. The global regulator ArcA controls resistance to reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sangwei; Killoran, Patrick B; Fang, Ferric C; Riley, Lee W

    2002-02-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a major cause of food-borne diseases associated with consumption of shell eggs. Clinical isolates of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis exhibit a wide spectrum of virulence in mice. A highly virulent isolate (SE2472) was previously shown to be more resistant in vitro than other clinical isolates to acidified sodium nitrite (ASN), a generator of reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates (RNI/ROI). SE2472 is also more resistant to S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) than an ASN-susceptible isolate of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE8743). To investigate the molecular basis for the RNI/ROI resistance of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, we transformed a genomic DNA library of SE2472 into SE8743. A plasmid clone conferred upon SE8743 enhanced resistance to ASN, GSNO, and H(2)O(2). The DNA insert in the clone encoded ArcA, a global regulator. An arcA mutant of SE2472 was constructed and was found to be more susceptible to GSNO and hydrogen peroxide but not more susceptible to ASN than wild-type SE2472. The susceptibility of the arcA mutant to GSNO and H(2)O(2) was complemented by a plasmid harboring arcA. The coding sequence of the arcA gene in SE2472 and the coding sequence of the arcA gene in SE8743 were identical, suggesting that the difference in resistance to RNI/ROI maybe due to the activity of genes regulated by ArcA. No significant difference in virulence between the wild type and the arcA mutant of SE2472 was observed in mice. These observations show that arcA is essential for resistance of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis to nitrosative and oxidative stress. However, additional genetic loci may contribute to the resistance to RNI/ROI and unusually high virulence for mice of SE2472.

  5. Prevalence and Spatial Distribution of Salmonella Infections in the Pennsylvania Raccoon (Procyon lotor).

    PubMed

    Very, K J; Kirchner, M K; Shariat, N; Cottrell, W; Sandt, C H; Dudley, E G; Kariyawasam, S; Jayarao, B M

    2016-05-01

    A study was conducted to determine the prevalence and spatial distribution of Salmonella infection in Pennsylvania raccoons (Procyon lotor), common wildlife mammals known to occupy overlapping habitats with humans and domestic food animals. The Pennsylvania Game Commission provided a total of 371 raccoon intestinal samples from trapped and road-killed raccoons collected between May and November 2011. Salmonella was isolated from the faeces of 56 (15.1%) of 371 raccoons in 35 (54%) of 65 counties across Pennsylvania. The five most frequently isolated serotypes were Newport (28.6%), Enteritidis (19.6%), Typhimurium (10.7%), Braenderup (8.9%) and Bareilly (7.1%). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of the Salmonella isolates and subsequent comparison to the Pennsylvania Department of Health human Salmonella PFGE database revealed 16 different pulsetypes in Salmonella isolates recovered from raccoons that were indistinguishable from pulsetypes of Salmonella collected from clinically ill humans during the study period. The pulsetypes of seven raccoon Salmonella isolates matched those of 56 human Salmonella isolates by month and geographical region of sample collection. Results from Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats and Multi-Virulence Locus Sequence Typing (CRISPR-MVLST) analysis corroborated the PFGE and serotyping data. The findings of this study show that several PFGE pulsetypes of Salmonella were shared between humans and raccoons in Pennsylvania, indicating that raccoons and humans might share the same source of Salmonella.

  6. Salmonella

    MedlinePlus

    ... outbreaks of human Salmonella infections linked to backyard poultry. Get tips to help protect you and your ... Outbreaks of Human Salmonella Infections Linked to Live Poultry in Backyard Flocks Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Virchow ...

  7. An Efficient Multiplex PCR-Based Assay as a Novel Tool for Accurate Inter-Serovar Discrimination of Salmonella Enteritidis, S. Pullorum/Gallinarum and S. Dublin

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Dan; Song, Li; Tao, Jing; Zheng, Huijuan; Zhou, Zihao; Geng, Shizhong; Pan, Zhiming; Jiao, Xinan

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Pullorum/Gallinarum, and Dublin are infectious pathogens causing serious problems for pig, chicken, and cattle production, respectively. Traditional serotyping for Salmonella is costly and labor-intensive. Here, we established a rapid multiplex PCR method to simultaneously identify three prevalent Salmonella serovars Enteritidis, Pullorum/Gallinarum, and Dublin individually for the first time. The multiplex PCR-based assay focuses on three genes tcpS, lygD, and flhB. Gene tcpS exists only in the three Salmonella serovars, and lygD exists only in S. Enteritidis, while a truncated region of flhB gene is only found in S. Pullorum/Gallinarum. The sensitivity and specificity of the multiplex PCR assay using three pairs of specific primers for these genes were evaluated. The results showed that this multiplex PCR method could accurately identify Salmonella Enteritidis, Pullorum/Gallinarum, and Dublin from eight non-Salmonella species and 27 Salmonella serovars. The least concentration of genomic DNA that could be detected was 58.5 pg/μL and the least number of cells was 100 CFU. Subsequently, this developed method was used to analyze clinical Salmonella isolates from one pig farm, one chicken farm, and one cattle farm. The results showed that blinded PCR testing of Salmonella isolates from the three farms were in concordance with the traditional serotyping tests, indicating the newly developed multiplex PCR system could be used as a novel tool to accurately distinguish the three specific Salmonella serovars individually, which is useful, especially in high-throughput screening. PMID:28360901

  8. Structure and characterization of AgfB from Salmonella enteritidis thin aggregative fimbriae.

    PubMed

    White, A P; Collinson, S K; Banser, P A; Gibson, D L; Paetzel, M; Strynadka, N C; Kay, W W

    2001-08-24

    The agfBAC operon of Salmonella enteritidis encodes thin aggregative fimbriae, fibrous, polymeric structures primarily composed of AgfA fimbrins. Although uncharacterized, AgfB shows a 51 % overall amino acid sequence similarity to AgfA. Using AgfB epitope-specific antiserum, AgfB was detected as a minor component of whole, purified fimbriae. Like AgfA, AgfB was released from purified fimbriae by >70 % formic acid, whereupon both AgfA-AgfA and AgfA-AgfB dimers as well as monomers were detected. This suggested that AgfB may form specific, highly stable, structural associations with AgfA in native fimbrial filaments, associations that were weakened in structurally unstable fibers derived from AgfA chimeric fimbrial mutants. Detailed sequence comparisons between AgfA and AgfB showed that AgfB harbored a similar fivefold repeated sequence pattern (x(6)QxGx(2)NxAx(3)Q), and contained structural motifs similar to the parallel beta helix model proposed for AgfA. Molecular modeling of AgfB revealed a 3D structure remarkably similar to that of AgfA, the structures differing principally in the surface disposition of non-conserved, basic, acidic and non-polar residues. Thus AgfB is a fimbrin-like structural homologue of AgfA and an integral, minor component of native thin aggregative fimbrial fibers. AgfB from an agfA deletion strain was detected as a non-fimbrial, SDS-insoluble form in the supernatant and was purified. AgfA from an agfB deletion strain was found in both SDS-soluble and insoluble, non-fimbrial forms. No AgfA-AgfA dimers were detected in the absence of AgfB. Fimbriae formation by intercellular complementation between agfB and agfA deletion strains could not be shown under a variety of conditions, indicating that AgfA and AgfB are not freely diffusible in S. enteritidis. This has important implications on the current assembly hypothesis for thin aggregative fimbriae.

  9. Killing of Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enteritidis and neutralization of lipopolysaccharide by 17-residue bovine lactoferricins: improved activity of Trp/Ala-containing molecules

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ya; Yang, Na; Wang, Xiumin; Teng, Da; Mao, Ruoyu; Wang, Xiao; Li, Zhanzhan; Wang, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    Bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB) has potent antibacterial, antifungal and antiparasitic activities but is also hemolytic. Our objective was to identify LfcinB17-31 derivatives with reduced hemolysis and improved antimicrobial activity via substituting Cys3, Arg4, Gln7, Met10, and Gly14 with more hydrophobic residues. Two peptides, Lfcin4 and Lfcin5, showed higher activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enteritidis and lower hemolytic activity than the parent peptide LfcinB17-31. These peptides permeabilized the outer and inner membranes of S. enteritidis; however, Lfcin5 did not permeabilize the inner membrane of S. aureus. Gel retardation and circular dichroism spectra showed that Lfcin4 and Lfcin5 bound to bacterial genomic DNA. Lfcin4 inhibited DNA, RNA and protein synthesis. Both peptides induced the peeling of membranes and the lysis of S. enteritidis. At doses of 10 and 15 mg/kg, Lfcin4 and Lfcin5 reduced the bacterial counts in infected thigh muscles by 0.03‒0.10 and 0.05‒0.63 log10 CFU/g of tissue, respectively, within 10 h. Lfcin4 and Lfcin5 enhanced the survival rate of endotoxemic mice; reduced serum IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α levels; and protected mice from lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury. These data suggest that Lfcin4 and Lfcin5 may be antimicrobial and anti-endotoxin peptides that could serve as the basis for the development of dual-function agents. PMID:28287172

  10. Killing of Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enteritidis and neutralization of lipopolysaccharide by 17-residue bovine lactoferricins: improved activity of Trp/Ala-containing molecules.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ya; Yang, Na; Wang, Xiumin; Teng, Da; Mao, Ruoyu; Wang, Xiao; Li, Zhanzhan; Wang, Jianhua

    2017-03-13

    Bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB) has potent antibacterial, antifungal and antiparasitic activities but is also hemolytic. Our objective was to identify LfcinB17-31 derivatives with reduced hemolysis and improved antimicrobial activity via substituting Cys3, Arg4, Gln7, Met10, and Gly14 with more hydrophobic residues. Two peptides, Lfcin4 and Lfcin5, showed higher activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enteritidis and lower hemolytic activity than the parent peptide LfcinB17-31. These peptides permeabilized the outer and inner membranes of S. enteritidis; however, Lfcin5 did not permeabilize the inner membrane of S. aureus. Gel retardation and circular dichroism spectra showed that Lfcin4 and Lfcin5 bound to bacterial genomic DNA. Lfcin4 inhibited DNA, RNA and protein synthesis. Both peptides induced the peeling of membranes and the lysis of S. enteritidis. At doses of 10 and 15 mg/kg, Lfcin4 and Lfcin5 reduced the bacterial counts in infected thigh muscles by 0.03‒0.10 and 0.05‒0.63 log10 CFU/g of tissue, respectively, within 10 h. Lfcin4 and Lfcin5 enhanced the survival rate of endotoxemic mice; reduced serum IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α levels; and protected mice from lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury. These data suggest that Lfcin4 and Lfcin5 may be antimicrobial and anti-endotoxin peptides that could serve as the basis for the development of dual-function agents.

  11. Application of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Chemometrics for Differentiation of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Phage Types▿

    PubMed Central

    Preisner, Ornella; Guiomar, Raquel; Machado, Jorge; Menezes, José Cardoso; Lopes, João Almeida

    2010-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and chemometric techniques were used to discriminate five closely related Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis phage types, phage type 1 (PT1), PT1b, PT4b, PT6, and PT6a. Intact cells and outer membrane protein (OMP) extracts from bacterial cell membranes were subjected to FT-IR analysis in transmittance mode. Spectra were collected over a wavenumber range from 4,000 to 600 cm−1. Partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was used to develop calibration models based on preprocessed FT-IR spectra. The analysis based on OMP extracts provided greater separation between the Salmonella Enteritidis PT1-PT1b, PT4b, and PT6-PT6a groups than the intact cell analysis. When these three phage type groups were considered, the method based on OMP extract FT-IR spectra was 100% accurate. Moreover, complementary local models that considered only the PT1-PT1b and PT6-PT6a groups were developed, and the level of discrimination increased. PT1 and PT1b isolates were differentiated successfully with the local model using the entire OMP extract spectrum (98.3% correct predictions), whereas the accuracy of discrimination between PT6 and PT6a isolates was 86.0%. Isolates belonging to different phage types (PT19, PT20, and PT21) were used with the model to test its robustness. For the first time it was demonstrated that FT-IR analysis of OMP extracts can be used for construction of robust models that allow fast and accurate discrimination of different Salmonella Enteritidis phage types. PMID:20363777

  12. Reducing Colonization and Eggborne Transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis in Layer Chickens by In-Feed Supplementation of Caprylic Acid.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Indu; Upadhyay, Abhinav; Yin, Hsin-Bai; Nair, Meera S; Bhattaram, Varun K; Karumathil, Deepti; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Khan, Mazhar I; Darre, Michael J; Curtis, Patricia A; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) is a major foodborne pathogen responsible for causing gastrointestinal infections in humans, predominantly due to the consumption of contaminated eggs. In layer hens, SE colonizes the intestine and migrates to various organs, including the oviduct, thereby leading to egg yolk and shell contamination. This study investigated the efficacy of caprylic acid (CA), a medium-chain fatty acid, in reducing SE colonization and egg contamination in layers. Caprylic acid was supplemented in the feed at 0%, 0.7%, or 1% (vol/wt) from day 1 of the experiment. Birds were challenged with 10(10) log colony-forming units (CFU)/mL of SE by crop gavage on day 10, and re-inoculated (10(10) log CFU/mL) on day 35. After 7 days post first inoculation, eggs were collected daily and tested for SE on the shell and in the yolk separately. The birds were sacrificed on day 66 to determine SE colonization in the ceca, liver, and oviduct. The consumer acceptability of eggs was also determined by triangle test. The experiment was replicated twice. In-feed supplementation of CA (0.7% and 1%) to birds consistently decreased SE on eggshell and in the yolk (p<0.05). Supplementation of CA at 1.0% decreased SE population to ≈14% on the shell and ≈10% in yolk, when compared to control birds, which yielded ≈60% positive samples on shell and ≈43% in yolk. Additionally, SE populations in the cecum and liver were reduced in treated birds compared to control (p<0.05). No significant difference in egg production, body weight, or sensory properties of eggs was observed (p>0.05). The results suggest that CA could potentially be used as a feed additive to reduce eggborne transmission of SE.

  13. Control of Salmonella infections in animals and prevention of human foodborne Salmonella infections. WHO Consultation.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    In many countries the incidence of human salmonella infections has markedly increased in recent years. To discuss recent developments and current understanding on the control of salmonella infections in animals, WHO organized a Consultation on the Control of Salmonella Infections in Animals: Prevention of Foodborne Salmonella Infections in Humans, held in Jena, Germany, on 21-26 November 1993. The present article summarizes the recommendations made by the participants on the pathoimmunogenesis, diagnosis, epidemiology, and control of salmonella infections and contaminations in animal production. PMID:7867127

  14. Blood heat shock proteins evoked by some Salmonella strains infection in ducks.

    PubMed

    Osman, Kamelia; Ibrahim, Ihab; Yousef, Ashgan; Nabil, Tanios; Nayerah, Alatfeehy

    2012-05-01

    Bacterial heat-shock response is a global regulatory system required for effective adaptation to changes (stress) in the environment. An in vitro study was conducted to investigate the impact of a sublethal temperature (42°C) on heat shock protein (HSP) expression in 6 Salmonella strains (Salmonella Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, S. Virchow, S. Shubra, S. Haifa and S. Eingedi). The 6 Salmonella strains were isolated from the tissues of ducklings that had died from avian salmonellosis. To determine the induction of HSP in the 6 Salmonella strains, they were exposed to the selected temperature level for 24 h and further kept for 48 h at culturing condition of 42°C. Growth under a sublethal temperature of 42°C increased the expression of several proteins of Salmonella, including a 63 kDa protein in addition to the generation and/or overexpression of 143 proteins which were specific to heat shock, concurrent to this acquired thermotolerance. The 6 Salmonella strains responded to 24 h of thermal stress at an elevated temperature 42°C by synthesizing different heat shock proteins (HSP) with molecular weights ranging between 13.62 and 96.61 kDa. At 48 h, the 6 Salmonella strains synthesized different HSPs with molecular weights ranging between 14.53 and 103.43 kDa. It follows that salmonellae would produce HSPs during the course of the infectious process. Salmonellosis produced several proteins after 24 and 48 h of infection. Seven of these proteins (100, 80, 60, 40, 30, 20 and 10 kDa) were recognized in the serum obtained from the ducklings infected with S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, S. Virchow, S. Shubra, S. Haifa and S. Eingedi after 24 h of infection. After 48 h, the 1-7 kDa HSP became more evident and indicated their de novo generation.

  15. Serological follow-up after non-typhoid salmonella infection in humans using a mixed lipopolysaccharide ELISA.

    PubMed

    Falkenhorst, Gerhard; Ceper, Tina H; Strid, Mette A; Mølbak, Kåre; Krogfelt, Karen A

    2013-12-01

    In industrialized countries, non-typhoid salmonella are a frequent cause of bacterial gastroenteritis. Diagnosis is usually made by stool culture, which is labour-intensive and time-consuming. Sensitivity depends on handling of stool samples and delay from illness onset to sampling. We developed an indirect mixed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of human serum antibodies against lipopolysaccharide antigens of the two predominant serovars, Salmonella serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) and S. Typhimurium. We measured IgA, IgM and IgG in 964 sera from 302 patients with stool culture-confirmed acute salmonella gastroenteritis, in 300 sera from healthy blood donors, and in 147 sera from patients with antibodies against other bacteria. Patient sera were collected within 1 month and approximately 3, 6, and 12 months after illness onset. For sera collected ≤ 30 days of onset, sensitivity of the ELISA was 92% for S. Enteritidis and 86% for S. Typhimurium, with a specificity of 95% for both serovars. The mixed ELISA is a useful additional tool for the diagnosis of acute salmonella gastroenteritis. It allows rapid analysis of multiple samples, thus can be used for sero-epidemiological studies of large population-based serum collections in order to estimate the population incidence of salmonella infections. Another application is aetiological diagnostics in patients with suspected post-infectious complications such as reactive arthritis, even when faecal shedding of salmonella has ceased.

  16. Salmonella infections associated with international travel: a Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Laura R; Gould, L Hannah; Dunn, John R; Berkelman, Ruth; Mahon, Barbara E

    2011-09-01

    Salmonella species cause an estimated 1.2 million infections per year in the United States, making it one of the most commonly reported enteric pathogens. In addition, Salmonella is an important cause of travel-associated diarrhea and enteric fever, a systemic illness commonly associated with Salmonella serotypes Typhi and Paratyphi A. We reviewed cases of Salmonella infection reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet), a sentinel surveillance network, from 2004 to 2008. We compared travelers with Salmonella infection to nontravelers with Salmonella infection with respect to demographics, clinical characteristics, and serotypes. Among 23,712 case-patients with known travel status, 11% had traveled internationally in the 7 days before illness. Travelers with Salmonella infection tended to be older (median age, 30 years) than nontravelers (median age, 24 years; p<0.0001), but were similar with respect to gender. The most common destinations reported were Mexico (38% of travel-associated infections), India (9%), Jamaica (7%), the Dominican Republic (4%), China (3%), and the Bahamas (2%). The proportions of travelers with Salmonella infection hospitalized and with invasive disease were inversely related to the income level of the destination (p<0.0001). The most commonly reported serotypes, regardless of travel status, were Enteritidis (19% of cases), Typhimurium (14%), Newport (9%), and Javiana (5%). Among infections caused by these four serotypes, 22%, 6%, 5%, and 4%, respectively, were associated with travel. A high index of clinical suspicion for Salmonella infection is appropriate when evaluating recent travelers, especially those who visited Africa, Asia, or Latin America.

  17. Comparison of Genotypes of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Phage Type 30 and 9c Strains Isolated during Three Outbreaks Associated with Raw Almonds▿

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Craig T.; Huynh, Steven; Quiñones, Beatriz; Harris, Linda J.; Mandrell, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    In 2000 to 2001, 2003 to 2004, and 2005 to 2006, three outbreaks of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis were linked with the consumption of raw almonds. The S. Enteritidis strains from these outbreaks had rare phage types (PT), PT30 and PT9c. Clinical and environmental S. Enteritidis strains were subjected to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), and DNA microarray-based comparative genomic indexing (CGI) to evaluate their genetic relatedness. All three methods differentiated these S. Enteritidis strains in a manner that correlated with PT. The CGI analysis confirmed that the majority of the differences between the S. Enteritidis PT9c and PT30 strains corresponded to bacteriophage-related genes present in the sequenced genomes of S. Enteritidis PT4 and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2. However, PFGE, MLVA, and CGI failed to discriminate between S. Enteritidis PT30 strains related to outbreaks from unrelated clinical strains or between strains separated by up to 5 years. However, metabolic fingerprinting demonstrated that S. Enteritidis PT4, PT8, PT13a, and clinical PT30 strains metabolized l-aspartic acid, l-glutamic acid, l-proline, l-alanine, and d-alanine amino acids more efficiently than S. Enteritidis PT30 strains isolated from orchards. These data indicate that S. Enteritidis PT9c and 30 strains are highly related genetically and that PT30 orchard strains differ from clinical PT30 strains metabolically, possibly due to fitness adaptations. PMID:20363782

  18. Dynamic predictive model for growth of Salmonella enteritidis in egg yolk.

    PubMed

    Gumudavelli, V; Subbiah, J; Thippareddi, H; Velugoti, P R; Froning, G

    2007-09-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) contamination of poultry eggs is a major human health concern worldwide. The risk of SE from shell eggs can be significantly reduced through rapid cooling of eggs after they are laid and their storage under safe temperature conditions. Predictive models for the growth of SE in egg yolk under varying ambient temperature conditions (dynamic) were developed. The growth of SE in egg yolk under several isothermal conditions (10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 37, 39, 41, and 43 degrees C) was determined. The Baranyi model, a primary model, was fitted with growth data for each temperature and corresponding maximum specific growth rates were estimated. Root mean squared error (RMSE) values were less than 0.44 log10 CFU/g and pseudo-R2 values were greater than 0.98 for the primary model fitting. For developing the secondary model, the estimated maximum specific growth rates were then modeled as a function of temperature using the modified Ratkowsky's equation. The RMSE and pseudo-R2 were 0.05/h and 0.99, respectively. A dynamic model was developed by integrating the primary and secondary models and solving it numerically using the 4th-order Runge-Kutta method to predict the growth of SE in egg yolk under varying temperature conditions. The integrated dynamic model was then validated with 4 temperature profiles (varying) such as linear heating, exponential heating, exponential cooling, and sinusoidal temperatures. The predicted values agreed well with the observed growth data with RMSE values less than 0.29 log10 CFU/g. The developed dynamic model can predict the growth SE in egg yolk under varying temperature profiles.

  19. Humoral and cellular immune response generated by different vaccine programs before and after Salmonella Enteritidis challenge in chickens.

    PubMed

    Penha Filho, Rafael Antonio Casarin; Moura, Bruna Silva; de Almeida, Adriana Maria; Montassier, Hélio José; Barrow, Paul A; Berchieri Junior, Angelo

    2012-12-14

    The poultry industry has a high demand for Salmonella vaccines in order to generate safer Salmonella-free food for consumers around the world. Vaccination against S. Enteritidis (SE) is vastly undertaken in many countries, although the criteria for the use of live vaccine (LV) or killed vaccine (KV) should also depend on the immune mechanisms triggered by each. In this study, a commercial bacterin (KV) and an attenuated SG mutant (LV) were used in four different vaccine programs (LV; LV+LV; KV; LV+KV). At 1 day before (dbi) and 1, 6 and 9 days after SE challenge (dpi), humoral (IgM, IgG and secretory IgA) and cellular (CD8(+) T cells) immune responses were evaluated along with the production of IL-10, IL-12 and IFN-γ. Although after challenge, all birds from each group had an influx of CD8(+) T cells, birds which received KV had lower levels of these cells in organs and significantly higher levels of immunoglobulins. The expression of the cytokines was up-regulated in all groups post-vaccination, although, after challenge, cytokine expression decreased in the vaccinated groups, and increased in the unvaccinated group A. IL-10 levels were significantly higher at 1 day post-infection in the group that received KV, which may be involved in the weak cellular immune response observed within this group. In caecal tonsils, IFN-γ expression at 1 dbi was higher in birds which received two vaccine doses, and after challenge, the population of CD8(+) T cells constantly increased in birds that were only vaccinated with the LV. This study demonstrated that the development of a mature immune response by CD8(+) T cells, provided by the use of the LV, had better efficacy in comparison to the high antibody levels in the serum stimulated by the KV. However, high secretory IgA levels in the intestinal lumen associated with influx CD8(+) T cells may be indicative of protection as noticed in group E (LV+KV).

  20. Unveiling ubiquitinome rearrangements induced by Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Bionda, Tihana; Behrends, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Ubiquitination plays a critical role in the activation of host immune responses to infection and serves as a signal for pathogen delivery to phagophores along the xenophagy pathway. We recently performed systematic ubiquitination site profiling of epithelial cells infected with Salmonella Typhimurium. Our findings specifically highlight components of the NFKB, membrane trafficking pathways and RHO GTPase systems as ubiquitination hubs during infection. In addition, a broad spectrum of bacterial effectors and several outer membrane proteins are ubiquitinated in infected cells. This comprehensive resource of ubiquitinome dynamics during Salmonella infection enables further understanding of the complex host-pathogen interplay and may reveal novel targets for the inhibition of Salmonella invasion and inflammation.

  1. Removal of Salmonella enterica Enteritidis and Escherichia coli from green peppers and melons by ultrasound and organic acids.

    PubMed

    José, Jackline Freitas Brilhante de São; de Medeiros, Hiasmyne Silva; Bernardes, Patrícia Campos; de Andrade, Nélio José

    2014-11-03

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of ultrasound treatment combined with organic acids in the decontamination step for green peppers and melons. The influence of the surface roughness of the peppers and melons on bacterial adhesion was evaluated, as measured using a profilometer. The adhesion of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and Escherichia coli to the green pepper and melon surfaces was also evaluated by measuring the hydrophobicity of the microorganisms and the surfaces. The bacteria that adhered to the surface of green peppers and melons was quantified by plate count and visualized by scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the efficiency of ultrasound and organic acids to remove bacteria from the pepper and melon surfaces was examined. The average roughness (Ra) of the green peppers (13.0±2.7 nm) was significantly different (p>0.05) from the melons (33.5±7.9 nm). Adherence of S. Enteritidis and E. coli are thermodynamically unfavorable for both surfaces studied (∆G(adhesion)>0). Despite these data, good adhesion occurred on both surfaces. The number of bacteria on green pepper slices was 7.3 and 7.0 log CFU/cm(2) for E. coli and S. enterica Enteritidis, respectively. For melon surfaces, the number of bacteria was 7.0 and 6.9 log CFU/cm(2) for E. coli and S. Enteritidis, respectively. The greater adherence of both bacteria on the green peppers can be explained by its hydrophobic surface; the hydrophilic surfaces of melons resulted in lower adherence. These results suggest that the adhesion observed in this experiment is a multifactorial process. Among the treatments evaluated for green peppers, a higher removal of pathogens was observed after use of a combination of ultrasound and 1% lactic acid; this treatment reduced E. coli and Salmonella by 2.9 and 2.8 log CFU/cm(2), respectively. For melons, the combination of ultrasound and lactic acid showed a reduction of 2.5 and 3.1 log CFU/cm(2) for E. coli and S. Enteritidis

  2. SEF14 fimbriae from Salmonella enteritidis play a role in pathogenitic to cell model in vitro and host in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chunhong; Meng, Xia; Duan, Xiaoli; Tao, Zhiyun; Gong, Jiansen; Hou, Huayan; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2013-11-01

    The role of SEF14 fimbriae in virulence remains to be elucidated and in this study, we showed that sefA mutant constructed in the wild-type (WT) Salmonella enteritidis strain 50336 displayed increased invasion to IPEC-J2 cell lines and survival in mouse peritoneal macrophages, and the lethal dose 50% (LD50) in 6-week-old Balb/c mice intra-peritoneally injected with WT S. enteritidis strain decreased significantly upon deletion of sefA indicating their role in virulence. Overall, these results demonstrated that expression of sefA of SEF14 fimbriae enhances S. enteritidis adhesion to epithelial cells and survival in macrophages and contributes to S. enteritidis virulence in mice.

  3. Salmonella Enteritidis outbreak associated with a school-lunch dessert: cross-contamination and a long incubation period, Japan, 2001.

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, T.; Suzuki, S.; Takahashi, H.; Ohyama, T.; Kobayashi, J.; Izumiya, H.; Watanabe, H.; Kasuga, F.; Kijima, H.; Shibata, K.; Okabe, N.

    2004-01-01

    A Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) outbreak in Japan was investigated with an observational study, analytical epidemiology and bacteriological examination (including phage typing). The outbreak occurred among 96 schoolchildren, and was caused by SE phage type 1. The outbreak source was dessert buns served at a school lunch (RR 42.55, 95 % CI 5.93-305.11, P < 0.001). The buns were probably cross-contaminated from eggs from a factory with a history of SE-contaminated products. The incubation period was longer than usual (3-16 days, median 8 days). A low contaminating dose may account for the long incubation period and low attack rate. Outbreak detection was hampered by the absence of routine Salmonella surveillance in Japan. The investigation was complicated by concurrent illnesses from other SE phage types. It was successful, in part, because adequate food samples were available for microbiological testing. PMID:15473150

  4. Biosurfactant Produced by Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 Can Increase Adherence and Resistance to Sanitizers on Lettuce Leaves (Lactuca sativa L., cichoraceae).

    PubMed

    Rossi, Eliandra M; Beilke, Luniele; Kochhann, Marília; Sarzi, Diana H; Tondo, Eduardo C

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 is an important foodborne pathogen in Southern Brazil and it is able to produce a biosurfactant. However, the importance of this compound for the microorganism is still unknown. This study aimed to investigate the influence of the biosurfactant produced by S. Enteritidis SE86 on adherence to slices of lettuce leaves and on resistance to sanitizers. First, lettuce leaves were inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE86 in order to determine the amount of biosurfactant produced. Subsequently, lettuce leaves were inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE86 with and without the biosurfactant, and the adherence and bacterial resistance to different sanitization methods were evaluated. S. Enteritidis SE86 produced biosurfactant after 16 h (emulsification index of 11 to 52.15 percent, P < 0.05) and showed greater adherence capability and resistance to sanitization methods when the compound was present. The scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that S. Enteritidis was able to adhere, form lumps, and invade the lettuce leaves' stomata in the presence of the biosurfactant. Results indicated that the biosurfactant produced by S. Enteritidis SE86 contributed to adherence and increased resistance to sanitizers when the microorganism was present on lettuce leaves.

  5. Biosurfactant Produced by Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 Can Increase Adherence and Resistance to Sanitizers on Lettuce Leaves (Lactuca sativa L., cichoraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Eliandra M.; Beilke, Luniele; Kochhann, Marília; Sarzi, Diana H.; Tondo, Eduardo C.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 is an important foodborne pathogen in Southern Brazil and it is able to produce a biosurfactant. However, the importance of this compound for the microorganism is still unknown. This study aimed to investigate the influence of the biosurfactant produced by S. Enteritidis SE86 on adherence to slices of lettuce leaves and on resistance to sanitizers. First, lettuce leaves were inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE86 in order to determine the amount of biosurfactant produced. Subsequently, lettuce leaves were inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE86 with and without the biosurfactant, and the adherence and bacterial resistance to different sanitization methods were evaluated. S. Enteritidis SE86 produced biosurfactant after 16 h (emulsification index of 11 to 52.15 percent, P < 0.05) and showed greater adherence capability and resistance to sanitization methods when the compound was present. The scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that S. Enteritidis was able to adhere, form lumps, and invade the lettuce leaves’ stomata in the presence of the biosurfactant. Results indicated that the biosurfactant produced by S. Enteritidis SE86 contributed to adherence and increased resistance to sanitizers when the microorganism was present on lettuce leaves. PMID:26834727

  6. Whole-Genome Sequencing Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Isolates in Chile Provides Insights into Possible Transmission between Gulls, Poultry, and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Sherry; Barreto, Marlen; Allard, Marc; Brown, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Enteritidis is a major cause of human salmonellosis worldwide; however, little is known about the genetic relationships between S. Enteritidis clinical strains and S. Enteritidis strains from other sources in Chile. We compared the whole genomes of 30 S. Enteritidis strains isolated from gulls, domestic chicken eggs, and humans in Chile, to investigate their phylogenetic relationships and to establish their relatedness to international strains. Core genome multilocus sequence typing (cgMLST) analysis showed that only 246/4,065 shared loci differed among these Chilean strains, separating them into two clusters (I and II), with cluster II being further divided into five subclusters. One subcluster (subcluster 2) contained strains from all surveyed sources that differed at 1 to 18 loci (of 4,065 loci) with 1 to 18 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), suggesting interspecies transmission of S. Enteritidis in Chile. Moreover, clusters were formed by strains that were distant geographically, which could imply that gulls might be spreading the pathogen throughout the country. Our cgMLST analysis, using other S. Enteritidis genomes available in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database, showed that S. Enteritidis strains from Chile and the United States belonged to different lineages, which suggests that S. Enteritidis regional markers might exist and could be used for trace-back investigations. IMPORTANCE This study highlights the importance of gulls in the spread of Salmonella Enteritidis in Chile. We revealed a close genetic relationship between some human and gull S. Enteritidis strains (with as few as 2 of 4,065 genes being different), and we also found that gull strains were present in clusters formed by strains isolated from other sources or distant locations. Together with previously published evidence, this suggests that gulls might be spreading this pathogen between different regions

  7. Inactivation of Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella senftenberg in liquid whole egg using generally recognized as safe additives, ionizing radiation, and heat.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Ignacio; Niemira, Brendan A; Fan, Xuetong; Sommers, Christopher H

    2007-06-01

    The effect of combining irradiation and heat (i.e., irradiation followed by heat [IR-H]) on Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Senftenberg inoculated into liquid whole egg (LWE) with added nisin, EDTA, sorbic acid, carvacrol, or combinations of these GRAS (generally recognized as safe) additives was investigated. Synergistic reductions of Salmonella populations were observed when LWE samples containing GRAS additives were treated by gamma radiation (0.3 and 1.0 kGy), heat (57 and 60 degrees C), or IR-H. The presence of additives reduced the initial radiation Dgamma -values (radiation doses required to eliminate 90% of the viable cells) by 1.2- to 1.5-fold, the thermal decimal reduction times (D,-values) by up to 3.5- and 1.8-fold at 57 and 60 degrees C, respectively, and the thermal D,-values after irradiation treatments by up to 3.4- and 1.5-fold at 57 and 60 degrees C, respectively, for both Salmonella serovars. Of all the additives investigated, nisin at a concentration of 100 IU/ml was the most effective at reducing the heat treatment times needed to obtain a 5-log reduction of Salmonella. Thus, while treatments of 21.6 min at 57 degrees C or of 5 min at 60 degrees C should be applied to achieve a 5-log reduction for Salmonella in LWE, only 5.5 min at 57 degrees C or 2.3 min at 60 degrees C after a 0.3-kGy radiation pretreatment was required when nisin at a concentration of 100 IU/ml was used. The synergistic reduction of Salmonella viability by IR-H treatments in the presence of GRAS additives could enable LWE producers to reduce the temperature or processing time of thermal treatments (current standards are 60'C for 3.5 min in the United States) or to increase the level of Salmonella inactivation.

  8. Iranian clonal population of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, characterized by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) method

    PubMed Central

    Ghaderi, Rainak; Tadayon, Keyvan; Khaki, Pejvak; Mosavari, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Some 2 million tons of chicken meat is produced by Iran per annum, positioning Iran among the top producers in the region. This study aimed to evaluate the molecular epidemiology and genetic characteristics of Salmonella enterica Enteritidis in Iran. Materials and Methods: A representative selection of isolates (n=76), initially genotyped by a 7-locus MLVA typing system, was examined by the standard MLST genotyping. Results and Conclusion: All the MLVA typed isolates, classified into six types, were gathered under a single ST11 MLST type. This is an intriguing observation as much more genome heterogeneity was expected considering the extent of diversity in the host and geography origin of the examined isolates. ST11, on the other hand is not exclusively found in Iran as it is reported also from Brazil, Denmark, Japan and the United States. In explanation of these observations, ST11 might stand for a single probably ancestral clone of Salmonella enterica Enteritidis successfully scattered in all these geographically diverse countries. Further global investigation covering more isolates and methods like whole genome sequencing would be advisable. PMID:26719781

  9. Effects of Climate Change on Salmonella Infections

    PubMed Central

    Akil, Luma; Reddy, Remata S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Climate change and global warming have been reported to increase spread of foodborne pathogens. To understand these effects on Salmonella infections, modeling approaches such as regression analysis and neural network (NN) were used. Methods: Monthly data for Salmonella outbreaks in Mississippi (MS), Tennessee (TN), and Alabama (AL) were analyzed from 2002 to 2011 using analysis of variance and time series analysis. Meteorological data were collected and the correlation with salmonellosis was examined using regression analysis and NN. Results: A seasonal trend in Salmonella infections was observed (p<0.001). Strong positive correlation was found between high temperature and Salmonella infections in MS and for the combined states (MS, TN, AL) models (R2=0.554; R2=0.415, respectively). NN models showed a strong effect of rise in temperature on the Salmonella outbreaks. In this study, an increase of 1°F was shown to result in four cases increase of Salmonella in MS. However, no correlation between monthly average precipitation rate and Salmonella infections was observed. Conclusion: There is consistent evidence that gastrointestinal infection with bacterial pathogens is positively correlated with ambient temperature, as warmer temperatures enable more rapid replication. Warming trends in the United States and specifically in the southern states may increase rates of Salmonella infections. PMID:25496072

  10. Comparative analysis of virulence and resistance profiles of Salmonella Enteritidis isolates from poultry meat and foodborne outbreaks in northern Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Jaradat, Ziad W; Abedel Hafiz, Leena; Ababneh, Mustafa M; Ababneh, Qotaibah O; Al Mousa, Waseem; Al-Nabulsi, Anas; Osaili, Tareq M; Holley, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to isolate Salmonella Enteritidis from poultry samples and compare their virulence and antibiotic resistance profiles to S. Enteritidis isolated from outbreaks in northern Jordan. Two hundred presumptive isolates were obtained from 302 raw poultry samples and were subjected to further analysis and confirmation. A phylogenic tree based on 16S rRNA sequencing was constructed and selected isolates representing each cluster were further studied for their virulence in normal adult Swiss white mice. The most virulent strains were isolated from poultry samples and had an LD50 of 1.55 × 105 CFU, while some of the outbreak isolates were avirulent in mice. Antibiotic resistance profiling revealed that the isolates were resistant to seven of eight antibiotics screened with each isolate resistant to multiple antibiotics (from two to six). Of the poultry isolates, 100%, 88.9%, 77.8%, 66.7%, and 50% showed resistance to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, ampicillin, cephalothin, and cefoperazone, respectively. Two outbreak isolates were sensitive to all tested antibiotics, while 71.4% were resistant to cefoperazone and only 28.6% showed resistance to nalidixic acid. Salmonella outbreak isolates were genetically related to poultry isolates as inferred from the 16S rRNA sequencing, yet were phenotypically different. Although outbreak strains were similar to poultry isolates, when tested in the mouse model, some of the outbreak isolates were highly virulent while others were avirulent. This might be due to a variation in susceptibility of the mouse to different S. Enteritidis isolates. PMID:24780883

  11. Intact but not denatured ovine serum immunoglobulins positively modulate mucosal immune mediators in the growing rat challenged with Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Balan, Prabhu; Moughan, Paul J

    2013-09-28

    Immunoglobulins are major glycoproteins that modulate the immune response of gut-associated lymphoid tissue. In the present study, we sought to determine whether orally administered ovine serum immunoglobulins modulate selected indices of mucosal immune function and immune mediators in the growing rat challenged with Salmonella enteritidis. Rats were fed a casein-based basal control diet (BD; unchallenged). Three groups of rats were challenged orally with 1 x 10(7) viable S. enteritidis on day 15 of the study and were fed the BD, the BD containing freeze-dried ovine immunoglobulins (FDOI), or the BD containing autoclaved ovine immunoglobulins (AOI; negative control diet). The rats were randomly allocated to one of the four groups (n 15) and consumed their diet for 18 d. In all of the intestinal segments, the challenged rats fed either the BD or AOI diet produced higher (P<0·05) mucosal levels of interferon-g, TNFa, IgA and myeloperoxidase activity than the challenged rats fed the FDOI diet. In contrast, IL-4 and IL-10 levels were higher in the challenged FDOI-fed rats compared with the other challenged groups. The challenged FDOI-fed rats had higher (P<0·05) mucosal anti-Salmonella IgA and IgG in all of the intestinal segments except the jejunum and ileum. Generally, the challenged rats receiving the FDOI diet had significantly (P<0·05) higher mucosal mucin protein content compared with challenged rats receiving either the BD or AOI diet. In conclusion, an ovine immunoglobulin fraction positively modulated some selected indices of mucosal immune function and its mediators in growing rats challenged with S. enteritidis.

  12. Reduction of Salmonella Enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in 20-day-old broiler chickens by the plant derived compounds trans-cinnamaldehyde and eugenol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the efficacy of trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC) and eugenol (EG) for reducing Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) colonization in broiler chicks. In three separate experiments for each compound, day-old, chicks (N=75/experiment) were randomly assigned to five treatments (n=15/treatment): a...

  13. Effect of elevated incubation temperature (42 Degrees C) On the multiplication and rapid detection of Salmonella Enteritidis in Egg Contents Pools.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detecting internal contamination of eggs with Salmonella enteritidis is essential for identifying laying flocks that could threaten public health. The most commone strategy for such testing is to prepare pools of the contents of 10-20 eggs adn to then incubate these pools at 25-37 degrees C to allo...

  14. Mathematical modeling and validation of growth of Salmonella Enteritidis and background microorganisms in potato salad – one-step kinetic analysis and model development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to examine the growth of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in potato salad caused by cross-contamination and temperature abuse, and develop mathematical models to predict its growth. The growth of SE was investigated under constant temperature conditions (8, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, a...

  15. Molting in Salmonella Enteritidis-challenged laying hens fed alfalfa crumbles. II. Fermentation and microbial ecology response.

    PubMed

    Dunkley, K D; McReynolds, J L; Hume, M E; Dunkley, C S; Callaway, T R; Kubena, L F; Nisbet, D J; Ricke, S C

    2007-10-01

    The objective of this study was to examine microbial population shifts and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) responses in the gastrointestinal tract of Salmonella Enteritidis-challenged molted and nonmolted hens fed different dietary regimens. Fifteen Salmonella-free Single Comb Leghorn hens (>50 wk old) were assigned to 3 treatment groups of 5 birds each based on diet in 2 trials: 100% alfalfa crumbles (ALC), full-fed (FF, nonmolted) 100% commercial layer ration, and feed withdrawal (FW). A forced molt was induced by either a 12-d alfalfa diet or FW. In all treatment groups, each hen was challenged by crop gavage orally 4 d after molt induction with a 1-mL inoculum containing 10(6) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis. Fecal and cecal samples (d 4, 6, 8, 11, and necropsy on d 12) were collected postchallenge. Microbial population shifts were evaluated by PCR-based 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and SCFA concentrations were measured. Total SCFA in fecal and cecal contents for FW molted hens were generally lower (P < or = 0.05) in the later stages of the molt period when compared to ALC and FF treatment groups. The overall trend of SCFA in cecal and fecal samples exhibited similar patterns. In trials 1 and 2, hens molted with ALC diet generally yielded more similar amplicon band patterns with the FF hens in both fecal and cecal samples by the end of the molting period than with FW hens. The results of these studies suggest that ALC molted hens supported microflora and fermentation activities, which were more comparable to FF hens than FW hens by the end of the molting period.

  16. Multi locus variable-number tandem repeat (MLVA) typing tools improved the surveillance of Salmonella enteritidis: a 6 years retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Sophie; De Lamine de Bex, Guillaume; Wildemauwe, Christa; Lunguya, Octavie; Phoba, Marie France; Ley, Benedikt; Jacobs, Jan; Vanhoof, Raymond; Mattheus, Wesley

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is generally considered to benefit from molecular techniques like multiple-locus variable-number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA), which allow early detection and confinement of outbreaks. Here, a surveillance study, including phage typing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing and MLVA on 1,535 S. Enteritidis isolates collected between 2007 and 2012, was used to evaluate the added value of MLVA for public health surveillance in Belgium. Phage types PT4, PT8, PT21, PT1, PT6, PT14b, PT28 and PT13 dominate the Belgian S. Enteritidis population. The isolates of S. Enteritidis were most frequently susceptible to all antibiotics tested. 172 different MLVA profiles were detected, of which 9 frequent profiles included 67.2% of the S. Enteritidis population. During a serial passage experiment on selected isolates to investigate the in vitro stability of the 5 MLVA loci, no variations over time were observed indicating that the MLVA profiles were stable. The MLVA profile of isolates originating from different outbreaks in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) between 2010 and 2011 were distinct from any of the MLVA profiles found in Belgian isolates throughout the six year observational period and demonstrates that MLVA improves public health surveillance of S. Enteritidis. However, MLVA should be complemented with other subtyping methods when investigating outbreaks is caused by the most common MLVA profile.

  17. Intestinal barrier function in response to abundant or depleted mucosal glutathione in Salmonella-infected rats

    PubMed Central

    van Ampting, Marleen TJ; Schonewille, Arjan J; Vink, Carolien; Brummer, Robert Jan M; Meer, Roelof van der; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg MJ

    2009-01-01

    Background Glutathione, the main antioxidant of intestinal epithelial cells, is suggested to play an important role in gut barrier function and prevention of inflammation-related oxidative damage as induced by acute bacterial infection. Most studies on intestinal glutathione focus on oxidative stress reduction without considering functional disease outcome. Our aim was to determine whether depletion or maintenance of intestinal glutathione changes susceptibility of rats to Salmonella infection and associated inflammation. Rats were fed a control diet or the same diet supplemented with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO; glutathione depletion) or cystine (glutathione maintenance). Inert chromium ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid (CrEDTA) was added to the diets to quantify intestinal permeability. At day 4 after oral gavage with Salmonella enteritidis (or saline for non-infected controls), Salmonella translocation was determined by culturing extra-intestinal organs. Liver and ileal mucosa were collected for analyses of glutathione, inflammation markers and oxidative damage. Faeces was collected to quantify diarrhoea. Results Glutathione depletion aggravated ileal inflammation after infection as indicated by increased levels of mucosal myeloperoxidase and interleukin-1β. Remarkably, intestinal permeability and Salmonella translocation were not increased. Cystine supplementation maintained glutathione in the intestinal mucosa but inflammation and oxidative damage were not diminished. Nevertheless, cystine reduced intestinal permeability and Salmonella translocation. Conclusion Despite increased infection-induced mucosal inflammation upon glutathione depletion, this tripeptide does not play a role in intestinal permeability, bacterial translocation and diarrhoea. On the other hand, cystine enhances gut barrier function by a mechanism unlikely to be related to glutathione. PMID:19374741

  18. Effects of gamma irradiation on the viability and phenotypic characteristics of Salmonella Enteritidis inoculated into specific-pathogen-free eggs.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Elizabeth C P; Souza, Mauro C L; Toledo, Sandro S; Barbosa, Celso G; Reis, Eliane M F; Rodrigues, Dalia P; Lázaro, Norma S

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effects of various levels of gamma irradiation on the phenotypic characteristics of 20 strains of Salmonella Enteritidis inoculated separately into specific-pathogen-free shell eggs. Bacterial strains were inoculated into egg yolks and exposed to (60)Co radiation at doses of 0.49 to 5.0 kGy. The eggs were maintained at 25°C and analyzed for the presence of Salmonella on days 1, 2, 4, and 7, and the recovered Salmonella isolates were characterized biochemically. All strains were resistant to doses of 0.49, 0.54, 0.59, 0.8, and 1 kGy; colony counts were ≥10(5) CFU/ml of egg yolk except for one strain, which was detected at 96 h and at 7 days after irradiation at 1 kGy, with a population reduction of 2 log CFU/ml. For the other evaluated doses, 12 strains (60.0%) were resistant at 1.5 kGy and 7 strains (35.0%) were resistant at 3.0 kGy. Among all analyzed strains, 5.0 kGy was more effective for reducing and/or eliminating the inoculated bacteria; only two (10%) strains were resistant to this level of irradiation. Salmonella colony counts were significantly reduced (P < 0.01) with increasing doses from the day 1 to 7 of observation, when microbial growth peaked. Loss of mobility, lactose fermentation, citrate utilization, and hydrogen sulfide production occurred in some strains after irradiation independent of dose and postirradiation storage time. Increases in antibiotic susceptibility also occurred: seven strains became sensitive to β-lactams, two strains became sensitive to antifolates, and one strain each became sensitive to fluoroquinolone, phenicol, nitrofurans, tetracyclines, and aminoglycosides. The results indicate that up to 5.0 kGy of radiation applied to shell eggs inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis at 4 log CFU per egg is not sufficient for complete elimination of this pathogen from this food matrix.

  19. Genomic Comparison of Non-Typhoidal Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Heidelberg, Hadar and Kentucky Isolates from Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Dhanani, Akhilesh S.; Block, Glenn; Dewar, Ken; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Topp, Edward; Beiko, Robert G.; Diarra, Moussa S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars, associated with different foods including poultry products, are important causes of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. The colonization of the chicken gut by S. enterica could result in the contamination of the environment and food chain. The aim of this study was to compare the genomes of 25 S. enterica serovars isolated from broiler chicken farms to assess their intra- and inter-genetic variability, with a focus on virulence and antibiotic resistance characteristics. Methodology/Principal Finding The genomes of 25 S. enterica isolates covering five serovars (ten Typhimurium including three monophasic 4,[5],12:i:, four Enteritidis, three Hadar, four Heidelberg and four Kentucky) were sequenced. Most serovars were clustered in strongly supported phylogenetic clades, except for isolates of serovar Enteritidis that were scattered throughout the tree. Plasmids of varying sizes were detected in several isolates independently of serovars. Genes associated with the IncF plasmid and the IncI1 plasmid were identified in twelve and four isolates, respectively, while genes associated with the IncQ plasmid were found in one isolate. The presence of numerous genes associated with Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs) was also confirmed. Components of the type III and IV secretion systems (T3SS and T4SS) varied in different isolates, which could explain in part, differences of their pathogenicity in humans and/or persistence in broilers. Conserved clusters of genes in the T3SS were detected that could be used in designing effective strategies (diagnostic, vaccination or treatments) to combat Salmonella. Antibiotic resistance genes (CMY, aadA, ampC, florR, sul1, sulI, tetAB, and srtA) and class I integrons were detected in resistant isolates while all isolates carried multidrug efflux pump systems regardless of their antibiotic susceptibility profile. Conclusions/Significance This study showed that the predominant

  20. Value of plasmid profiling, ribotyping, and detection of IS200 for tracing avian isolates of Salmonella typhimurium and S. enteritidis.

    PubMed Central

    Millemann, Y; Lesage, M C; Chaslus-Dancla, E; Lafont, J P

    1995-01-01

    Seventy selected strains of Salmonella typhimurium and S. enteritidis isolated from related poultry flocks in three independent geographical areas were characterized by phenotypic and genotypic methods to compare the usefulness of the methods in epidemiological studies. The 56 S. typhimurium isolates were poorly discriminated by their biotypes, resistance patterns, and plasmid profiles. Nine different ribotypes were obtained after DNA digestion by BglII, PvuII, and SmaI. Seven IS200 types, characterized by six to nine copies of IS200 on the chromosome, were detected after digestion of genomic DNA by PstI. These studies resulted in the definition of 15 clonal lineages distributed in three clusters. The 14 S. enteritidis strains were not discriminated either by ribotyping or by detection of IS200 (IS200 typing), but were separated on the basis of antibiotic resistance and plasmid profiling. The stability of the insertion sequence type was confirmed by inoculation of an S. typhimurium strain to axenic chickens reared for 15 weeks in sterile isolators. PMID:7699037

  1. Use of plasmid profile typing for surveillance of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 4 from humans, poultry and eggs.

    PubMed Central

    Threlfall, E. J.; Hampton, M. D.; Chart, H.; Rowe, B.

    1994-01-01

    Plasmids were found in 1022 of 1089 (94%) of drug-sensitive strains of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 4 from humans (sporadic and outbreak cases), poultry (chickens) and eggs in England and Wales in the 5-year period 1988-92 and 25 plasmid profile patterns were identified. Strains characterized by a single plasmid of 38 MDa predominated (= plasmid profile type SE 38), comprising over 90% of isolates from humans, 70% from poultry and 92% from eggs. Eleven profile types were identified in strains from humans, 21 in strains from poultry and 3 in strains from eggs. Eight of the 11 patterns identified in human isolates were found in strains from poultry and 2 in strains from eggs. In contrast 15 patterns seen in poultry were not found in strains from humans. Four percent of strains from humans and 13% from poultry did not carry the 38 MDa plasmid but all strains from eggs were found to carry this plasmid. The second most common profile type in strains isolated between 1981 and 1988 was not identified in strains isolated from 1988-92. It is concluded that plasmid profile typing is a useful method for rapid differentiation within phage type 4 of S. enteritidis but that methods which can discriminate within the predominant profile type, SE 38, are now required. PMID:8119362

  2. Chemically induced Salmonella enteritidis ghosts as a novel vaccine candidate against virulent challenge in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Vinod, Nagarajan; Oh, Sung; Kim, Seongdae; Choi, Chang Won; Kim, Sei Chang; Jung, Cheong-Hwan

    2014-05-30

    Salmonella enteritidis ghosts (SEGs), non-living empty bacterial cell envelopes were generated by using the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and investigated as a vaccine candidate in rats. To determine the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of SEG vaccine, rats were divided into four groups: group A (non-vaccinated control), group B (orally vaccinated), group C (intramuscularly vaccinated) and group D (intramuscularly vaccinated with complete Freund's adjuvant). Vaccination of rats with SEGs induced significant immune responses before and after virulent challenge. Rats vaccinated with SEGs showed significant increases in serum IgG antibodies after challenging with virulent S. enteritidis on week 8 and week 10 (P<0.01). During the vaccination period, groups B, C and D showed significantly higher serum bactericidal activity (SBA) compared to group A (P<0.01). Most importantly, bacterial loads in vaccinated groups were significantly lower than in the non-vaccinated group (P<0.01). In conclusion, these results show that the chemically induced SEGs as a vaccine candidate against virulent challenge.

  3. Detection of Salmonella enteritidis in pooled poultry environmental samples using a serotype-specific real-time-polymerase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed

    Adams, Derek R; Stensland, Wendy R; Wang, Chong H; O'Connor, Annette M; Trampel, Darrell W; Harmon, Karen M; Strait, Erin L; Frana, Timothy S

    2013-03-01

    While real-time-polymerase chain reaction (RT PCR) has been used as a rapid test for detection of Salmonella Enteritidis in recent years, little research has been done to assess the feasibility of pooling poultry environmental samples with a Salmonella Enteritidis-specific RT PCR assay. Therefore the objective of this study was to compare RT PCR Salmonella Enteritidis detection in individual and pooled (in groups of two, three, and four) poultry environmental drag swab samples to traditional cultural methods. The drag swabs were collected from poultry facilities previously confirmed positive for Salmonella Enteritidis and were cultured according to National Poultry Improvement Plan guidelines. Initial, Salmonella Enteritidis-specific RT PCR assay threshold cycle cutoff values of < or = 36, < or = 30, and < or = 28 were evaluated in comparison to culture. The average limit of detection of the RT PCR assay was 2.4 x 10(3) colony-forming units (CFUs)/ml, which corresponded to an average threshold cycle value of 36.6. Before enrichment, samples inoculated with concentrations from 10(2) to 10(5) CFUs/ml were detected by RT PCR, while after enrichment, samples inoculated from 10(0) to 10(5) CFUs/ml were detected by RT PCR. Threshold cycle cutoff values were used in the subsequent field trial from which Salmonella Enteritidis was cultured in 7 of 208 environmental samples (3.4%). Individual samples were 99.0%, 100%, and 100% in agreement with the RT PCR at threshold cycle (C(t)) cutoff values of < or = 36, < or = 30, and < or = 28 respectively. The agreement for pooled samples also followed the same trend with highest agreement at C(t) < or = 28 (pool of 2 = 100.0%, pool of 3 = 100.0%, pool of 4 = 100.0%), midrange agreement at C(t) < or = 30 (pool of 2 = 99.0%, pool of 3 = 100.0%, pool of 4 = 100.0%), and lowest agreement at C(t) < or = 36 (pool of 2 = 98.1%, pool of 3 = 97.1%, pool of 4 = 98.1%). In conclusion, regardless of the level of pooling after tetrathionate

  4. Antimicrobial drug resistance and genetic properties of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis circulating in chicken farms in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Rakia; Abbassi, Mohamed S; García, Vanesa; García-Fierro, Raquel; Fernández, Javier; Kilani, Hajer; Jaouani, Imen; Khayeche, Monia; Messadi, Lilia; Rodicio, María Rosario

    2017-02-16

    This study focused on 77 isolates of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis collected during 2009 to 2013 from healthy and sick chickens and environmental farm samples in Tunisia. Resistance to 14 antimicrobials and the encoding genes were analyzed. 66, 26, 6.5, 3.9 and 1.3% were pan-susceptible or showed resistance to nalidixic acid (Asp87 to Tyr and Asp87 to Asn substitutions in GyrA), ampicillin (blaTEM-1-like and blaSHV), sulfonamides (sul1and sul3) and streptomycin (strB), respectively. A single isolate with intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was positive for qnrB, whereas qnrA, qnrS or aac(6')-Ib-cr were not detected. The virulotype of the isolates was established by testing ten virulence genes. The orgA, ssaQ, mgtC, siiD, sopB genes, located on Salmonella pathogenicity islands, and spvC of the serotype-specific virulence plasmid, were common to all isolates. In contrast, the prophage-associated sopE-1, sodC1 and gipA genes and the fimbrial bcfC gene were variably represented. All isolates except one contained the virulence plasmid, which appeared either alone or together with one or more additional plasmids. One isolate carried a single plasmid of ca. 90Kb which may be derived from the virulence plasmid (60Kb). Overall, seven resistotypes, six virulotypes and six plasmid profiles were identified. XbaI-PFGE revealed four related pulsotypes (X1-X4), with 80% of the isolates sharing the X1 pattern. The latter isolates exhibited different resistance, virulence and plasmid profiles, suggesting that mobile genetic elements, particularly prophages and plasmids, are of central importance for the evolution and adaptation of S. Enteritidis circulating in chicken farms in Tunisia.

  5. A dual mechanism involved in membrane and nucleic acid disruption of AvBD103b, a new avian defensin from the king penguin, against Salmonella enteritidis CVCC3377.

    PubMed

    Teng, Da; Wang, Xiumin; Xi, Di; Mao, Ruoyu; Zhang, Yong; Guan, Qingfeng; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jianhua

    2014-10-01

    The food-borne bacterial gastrointestinal infection is a serious public health threat. Defensins are evolutionarily conserved innate immune components with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity that do not easily induce resistance. AvBD103b, an avian defensin with potent activity against Salmonella enteritidis, was isolated from the stomach contents of the king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus). To elucidate further the antibacterial mechanism of AvBD103b, its effect on the S. enteritidis CVCC3377 cell membrane and intracellular DNA was researched. The cell surface hydrophobicity and a N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine uptake assay demonstrated that AvBD103b treatment increased the cell surface hydrophobicity and outer membrane permeability. Atomic absorption spectrometry, ultraviolet spectrophotometry, flow cytometry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that AvBD103b treatment can lead to the release of the cellular contents and cell death through damage of the membrane. DNA gel retardation and circular dichroism analysis demonstrated that AvBD103b interacted with DNA and intercalated into the DNA base pairs. A cell cycle assay demonstrated that AvBD103b affected cellular functions, such as DNA synthesis. Our results confirmed that AvBD103b exerts its antibacterial activity by damaging the cell membrane and interfering with intracellular DNA, ultimately causing cell death, and suggested that AvBD103b may be a promising candidate as an alternative to antibiotics against S. enteritidis.

  6. Isolation and molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis from poultry house and clinical samples during 2010.

    PubMed

    Mezal, Ezat H; Sabol, Ashley; Khan, Mariam A; Ali, Nawab; Stefanova, Rossina; Khan, Ashraf A

    2014-04-01

    A total of 60 Salmonella enterica serovar (ser.) Enteritidis isolates, 28 from poultry houses and 32 from clinical samples, were isolated during 2010. These isolates were subjected to testing and analyzed for antibiotic resistance, virulence genes, plasmids and plasmid replicon types. To assess genetic diversity, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerprinting, using the XbaI restriction enzyme, Multiple-Locus Variable-Number Tandem Repeat Analysis (MLVA) and plasmid profiles were performed. All isolates from poultry, and 10 out of 32 clinical isolates were sensitive to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, kanamycin, nalidixic acid, sulfisoxazole, streptomycin, and tetracycline. Twenty-one of thirty-two clinical isolates were resistant to ampicillin and tetracycline, and one isolate was resistant to nalidixic acid. PFGE typing of sixty ser. Enteritidis isolates by XbaI resulted in 10-12 bands and grouped into six clusters each with similarity from 95% to 81%. The MLVA analysis of sixty isolates gave 18 allele profiles with the majority of isolates displayed in three groups, and two clinical isolates found to be new in the PulseNet national MLVA database. All isolates were positive for 12 or more of the 17 virulence genes mostly found in S. enterica (spvB, spiA, pagC, msgA, invA, sipB, prgH, spaN, orgA, tolC, iroN, sitC, IpfC, sifA, sopB, and pefA) and negative for one gene (cdtB). All isolates carried a typical 58 kb plasmid, type Inc/FIIA. Three poultry isolates and one clinical isolate carried small plasmids with 3.8, 6, 7.6 and 11.5 kb. Ten of the clinical isolates carried plasmids, with sizes 36 and 38 kb, types IncL/M and IncN, and one isolate carried an 81 kb plasmid, type IncI. Southern hybridization of a plasmid with an Inc/FIIA gene probe hybridized one large 58 kb plasmid in all isolates. Several large and small plasmids from poultry isolates were not typed by our PCR-based method. These results confirmed that PFGE fingerprinting has

  7. S. Enteritidis growth characteristics utilizing different enrichment broths which contain other Salmonella serovars and extraneous bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    S. Enteritidis (SE) is associated with poultry and human foodborne outbreaks. SE isolation from poultry environments can be problematic using cultural methods when other serotypes are present. The objective was to evaluate non-stressed and stressed SE marker strain growth in buffered peptone water ...

  8. Effect of gamma irradiation on commercial eggs experimentally inoculated with Salmonella enteritidis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez, I. G.; Trejo, R. M.; Sanchez, R. E.; Ceniceros, R. M.; Luna, Q. P.; Zazua, P.; Hargis, B. M.

    1995-02-01

    Using intact, fresh shell eggs, inoculated with 10 8 colony-forming units (cfu) of S. enteritidis, the effect of three doses of gamma irradiation on bacteriologic population and physical characteristics (Haugh units and yolk color) of the eggs was determinated. Penetration test area was picked at random just off the air cell of each egg. Aluminum cylinders were attached to the egg surface with a rim of molten paraffin, and 10 8S. enteritidis was then applied to inoculate the egg. Eggs were then irradiated within 2 hours using a Cobalt-60 gamma source at either 1, 2, or 3 kGy. A second set of inoculated, non-irradiated was used as controls. Following irradiation, eggs were maintained at 4°C for 42 hours prior culture. Irradiation with 1 kGy resulted in a significant (P < .05), 3.9 log reduction in detectable S. enteritidis in the shell and a higly significant (P < .025) 95% reduction in detectable S. enteritidis in the internal shell membranes. Irradiation of eggs with either 2 or 3 kGy reduced bacterial contamination to non-detectable levels in both the shell and internal membranes. However, irradiation at either 1, 2 or 3 kGy resulted in a significant (P <- .05) decrease (approximately 50%) in Haugh units. Additionally, irradiation of intact shell eggs at 2 or 3 Kgy significantly (P ≤ .05) reduced yolk color regardless of the level of irradiation exposure implemented. This data indicates that gamma irradiation of intact raw eggs is effective in reducing (1 kGy) or eliminating (2 or more kGy) S. enteritidis contamination. However, each of the levels of irradiation used in the present experiments caused marked reduction of selected measures of egg quality.

  9. Molecular clonality and antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis and Infantis from broilers in three Northern regions of Iran

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multidrug-resistant Salmonella strains are frequently encountered problems worldwide with considerable increased occurrences in recent years. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence and frequency of antimicrobial resistance and associated resistance genes in Salmonella isolates from broiler farms in different regions of Iran covering a time period of four years. Results From 2007 to 2011, 36 Salmonella strains were isolated from broiler farms located in three northern provinces of Iran. The isolates were serotyped, antimicrobial susceptibility tested, and characterized for antimicrobial resistance genes associated to the phenotype. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was applied for comparison of genetic relatedness. Two serovars were detected among the isolates; Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis (75%) and S. Enteritidis (25%). Thirty-four (94%) of the isolates exhibited resistance to nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin caused by a single mutation in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of gyrA. For all strains this mutation occurred in the codon of Asp87 leading to a Asp87-Tyr, Asp87-Gly or Asp87-Asn substitutions. All S. Infantis (n = 27) were resistant to tetracycline, spectinomycin, streptomycin, and sulfamethoxazole and harbored the associated resistance genes; tetA, dfrA14, aadA1, and sulI together with class 1 integrons. The isolates revealed highly similar PFGE patterns indicating clonal relatedness across different geographical locations. Conclusion The data provided fundamental information applicable when launching future control programs for broilers in Iran with the aim to conserve the effectiveness of important antimicrobials for treatment in humans. PMID:23561048

  10. Highly expressed amino acid biosynthesis genes revealed by global gene expression analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis during growth in whole egg are not essential for this growth.

    PubMed

    Jakočiūnė, Džiuginta; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Jelsbak, Lotte; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2016-05-02

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is the most common cause of egg borne salmonellosis in many parts of the world. This study analyzed gene expression of this bacterium during growth in whole egg, and whether highly expressed genes were essential for the growth. High quality RNA was extracted from S. Enteritidis using a modified RNA-extraction protocol. Global gene expression during growth in whole egg was compared to growth in LB-medium using DNA array method. Twenty-six genes were significantly upregulated during growth in egg; these belonged to amino acid biosynthesis, di/oligopeptide transport system, biotin synthesis, ferrous iron transport system, and type III secretion system. Significant downregulation of 15 genes related to formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) and trehalose metabolism was observed. The results suggested that S. Enteritidis is starved for amino-acids, biotin and iron when growing in egg. However, site specific mutation of amino acid biosynthesis genes asnA (17.3 fold upregulated), asnB (18.6 fold upregulated), asnA/asnB and, serA (12.0 fold upregulated) and gdhA (3.7 fold upregulated), did not result in growth attenuation, suggesting that biosynthesis using the enzymes encoded from these genes may represent the first choice for S. Enteritidis when growing in egg, but when absent, the bacterium could use alternative ways to obtain the amino acids.

  11. Genetic algorithm-artificial neural network and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system modeling of antibacterial activity of annatto dye on Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Yolmeh, Mahmoud; Habibi Najafi, Mohammad B; Salehi, Fakhreddin

    2014-01-01

    Annatto is commonly used as a coloring agent in the food industry and has antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. In this study, genetic algorithm-artificial neural network (GA-ANN) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) models were used to predict the effect of annatto dye on Salmonella enteritidis in mayonnaise. The GA-ANN and ANFIS were fed with 3 inputs of annatto dye concentration (0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4%), storage temperature (4 and 25°C) and storage time (1-20 days) for prediction of S. enteritidis population. Both models were trained with experimental data. The results showed that the annatto dye was able to reduce of S. enteritidis and its effect was stronger at 25°C than 4°C. The developed GA-ANN, which included 8 hidden neurons, could predict S. enteritidis population with correlation coefficient of 0.999. The overall agreement between ANFIS predictions and experimental data was also very good (r=0.998). Sensitivity analysis results showed that storage temperature was the most sensitive factor for prediction of S. enteritidis population.

  12. Effects of 5-hydroxytryptophan and m-hydroxybenzylhydrazine associated to Lactobacillus spp. on the humoral response of broilers challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Donato, T C; Baptista, A A S; Garcia, K C O D; Smaniotto, B D; Okamoto, A S; Sequeira, J L; Andreatti Filho, R L

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the effects of different doses of serotonin, its precursor 5-hydroxytry-ptophan (5HTP), and m-hydroxybenzylhydrazine inhibitor (NSD1015), administered via intraperitoneal for 5 consecutive days, on behavior and average body weight of broilers. We also measured the humoral immune response and quantification of Salmonella Enteritidis in broilers chickens that received the drugs evaluated and a Lactobacillus pool. The study was divided into 3 experiments: Experiment 1--administration of pharmaceuticals with choice of dosage; Experiment 2--administration of pharmaceuticals and a Lactobacillus pool in birds that were not challenged with S. Enteritidis, and Experiment 3--administration of pharmaceuticals and a Lactobacillus pool in birds challenged with S. Enteritidis. The ELISA was used to scan dosages of intestinal IgA and serum IgY. We used colony-forming units to quantify S. Enteritidis. The concentrations of IgA and IgY did not show significant differences (P>0.05) in Experiment 2. In Experiment 3, NSD1015 associated with Lactobacillus determined higher IgA concentrations, promoting greater stimulus to the immune system than 5HTP. Regarding quantification of S. Enteritidis in the cecal content of birds, 5HTP associated to Lactobacillus determined the smallest number of bacteria, showing possible interaction of 5-hydroxytryptophan and Lactobacillus spp. with the immune system of broiler chickens.

  13. Subtyping Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis isolates from different sources by using sequence typing based on virulence genes and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs).

    PubMed

    Liu, Fenyun; Kariyawasam, Subhashinie; Jayarao, Bhushan M; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Ribot, Efrain M; Knabel, Stephen J; Dudley, Edward G

    2011-07-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is a major cause of food-borne salmonellosis in the United States. Two major food vehicles for S. Enteritidis are contaminated eggs and chicken meat. Improved subtyping methods are needed to accurately track specific strains of S. Enteritidis related to human salmonellosis throughout the chicken and egg food system. A sequence typing scheme based on virulence genes (fimH and sseL) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs)-CRISPR-including multi-virulence-locus sequence typing (designated CRISPR-MVLST)-was used to characterize 35 human clinical isolates, 46 chicken isolates, 24 egg isolates, and 63 hen house environment isolates of S. Enteritidis. A total of 27 sequence types (STs) were identified among the 167 isolates. CRISPR-MVLST identified three persistent and predominate STs circulating among U.S. human clinical isolates and chicken, egg, and hen house environmental isolates in Pennsylvania, and an ST that was found only in eggs and humans. It also identified a potential environment-specific sequence type. Moreover, cluster analysis based on fimH and sseL identified a number of clusters, of which several were found in more than one outbreak, as well as 11 singletons. Further research is needed to determine if CRISPR-MVLST might help identify the ecological origins of S. Enteritidis strains that contaminate chickens and eggs.

  14. Salmonella infections in food workers identified through routine Public Health Surveillance in Minnesota: impact on outbreak recognition.

    PubMed

    Medus, Carlota; Smith, Kirk E; Bender, Jeffrey B; Leano, Fe; Hedberg, Craig W

    2010-11-01

    The frequency of Salmonella-infected food workers identified through routine surveillance from 1997 to 2004 in Minnesota was determined in order to evaluate the impact of surveillance on the detection of outbreaks in restaurants and to quantify the duration of Salmonella shedding in stool. Of 4,976 culture-confirmed Salmonella cases reported to the Minnesota Department of Health, 110 (2.2%) were identified as food workers; this was less than one-half the number expected based on the incidence of Salmonella in the general population. Twenty food workers (18%) were associated with outbreaks. Twelve were involved in nine independent outbreaks at the restaurants where they worked. The identification of the index food worker in six of these outbreaks was critical to the initiation of outbreak investigations that revealed much larger problems. Among food workers who submitted specimens until at least one negative result was obtained (n = 69), the median duration of shedding was 22 days (range, 1 to 359 days). Among the four most common serotypes (Enteritidis, Typhimurium, Heidelberg, and Newport) the median duration of shedding was significantly longer for Salmonella Newport (80 days; P = 0.02) and for Salmonella Enteritidis (32 days; P = 0.04) than for Salmonella Heidelberg (8 days). Food workers should be considered an important source of Salmonella transmission, and those identified through surveillance should raise a high index of suspicion of a possible outbreak at their place of work. Food service managers need to be alert to Salmonella-like illnesses among food workers to facilitate prevention and control efforts, including exclusion of infected food workers or restriction of their duties.

  15. Oral immunization of mice with attenuated Salmonella enteritidis containing a recombinant plasmid which codes for production of the B subunit of heat-labile Escherichia coli enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Clements, J D; Lyon, F L; Lowe, K L; Farrand, A L; el-Morshidy, S

    1986-01-01

    We used Salmonella enteritidis serotype dublin strain SL1438, a nonreverting, aromatic-dependent, histidine-requiring mutant, as a recipient for a recombinant plasmid coding for production of the nontoxic B subunit of the heat-labile Escherichia coli enterotoxin. The S. enteritidis derivative EL23 produced heat-labile enterotoxin subunit B that was indistinguishable from heat-labile enterotoxin subunit B produced by strains of E. coli or Salmonella typhi harboring the same plasmid. Mice immunized orally with strain EL23 developed progressively increasing mucosal and serum antibody responses to both heat-labile enterotoxin subunit B and to the lipopolysaccharide of the vaccine strain. The mucosal antibody response was shown to be immunoglobulin A specific and to be capable of neutralizing the biological activities of both E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin and cholera enterotoxin in vitro. Images PMID:3527989

  16. Disseminated Salmonella Infection Coexisting with Thymoma.

    PubMed

    Saheer, S; Immanuel, Subash; Balamugesh, T; Christopher, D J

    2015-01-01

    A 21-year-old boy presented with high grade fever, diffuse chest pain and exertional breathlessness of one month duration. Radiologically he had a large lobulated anterior mediastinal mass with necrotic thick enhancing septaes. Histopathology of the mass was suggestive of thymoma and culture from the necrotic aspirate yielded Salmonella typhi. The same pathogen was isolated in subsequent blood and sputum cultures. This current report describes the rare association of salmonella infection with thymoma.

  17. Conservation of Salmonella infection mechanisms in plants and animals.

    PubMed

    Schikora, Adam; Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle; Bueso, Eduardo; Garcia, Ana V; Nilau, Theodora; Charrier, Amélie; Pelletier, Sandra; Menanteau, Pierrette; Baccarini, Manuela; Velge, Philippe; Hirt, Heribert

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella virulence in animals depends on effectors injected by Type III Secretion Systems (T3SSs). In this report we demonstrate that Salmonella mutants that are unable to deliver effectors are also compromised in infection of Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Transcriptome analysis revealed that in contrast to wild type bacteria, T3SS mutants of Salmonella are compromised in suppressing highly conserved Arabidopsis genes that play a prominent role during Salmonella infection of animals. We also found that Salmonella originating from infected plants are equally virulent for human cells and mice. These results indicate a high degree of conservation in the defense and infection mechanism of animal and plant hosts during Salmonella infection.

  18. Presence of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum in commercial laying hens diagnosed with Fowl Typhoid Disease in Colombia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    : A severe outbreak of salmonellosis in commercial brown table egg layers first occurred in Colombia in 2006. From 2008 to 2012, 35 samples collected from commercial layers farms in the states of Cundinamarca, Santander, Bolivar and San Andres, were positive to Salmonella enterica. Salmonella (S) wa...

  19. Nontyphoidal Salmonella Infection, Guangdong Province, China, 2012.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xi; Huang, Qiong; Dun, Zhongjun; Huang, Wei; Wu, Shuyu; Liang, Junhua; Deng, Xiaoling; Zhang, Yonghui

    2016-04-01

    We used active and passive surveillance to estimate nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infection during 2012 in Guangdong Province, China. Under passive surveillance, for every reported NTS infection, an estimated 414.8 cases occurred annually. Under active surveillance, an estimated 35.8 cases occurred. Active surveillance provides remarkable advantages in incidence estimate.

  20. Effect of rapid product desiccation or hydration on thermal resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis PT 30 in wheat flour.

    PubMed

    Smith, Danielle F; Marks, Bradley P

    2015-02-01

    Salmonella is able to survive in low-moisture environments and is known to be more heat resistant as product water activity (aw) decreases. However, it is unknown how rapidly the resistance changes if product aw is altered rapidly, as can occur in certain processes. Therefore, the objective was to determine the effect of rapid product desiccation or hydration on Salmonella thermal resistance. Two dynamic moisture treatments were compared with two static moisture treatments to determine the effect of time-at-moisture on the thermal resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 30 (PT 30) in wheat flour. After inoculation, two static moisture groups were equilibrated to 0.3 and 0.6 aw over 4 to 7 days, and two dynamic moisture groups then were rapidly (<4 min) desiccated from 0.6 to 0.3 aw or hydrated from 0.3 to 0.6 aw. Samples then were subjected to isothermal (80°C) heat treatments, and Salmonella thermal resistance was compared via decimal reduction times (i.e., D80°C-values). The D80°C-value in flour that was rapidly desiccated from 0.6 to 0.3 aw was statistically equivalent (P > 0.05) to the D80°C-value in flour previously equilibrated to 0.3 aw, but both were greater (P < 0.05) than the D80°C-value in flour previously equilibrated to 0.6 aw. Similarly, the D80°C-value in flour rapidly hydrated from 0.3 to 0.6 aw was statistically equivalent (P > 0.05) to the D80°C-value in flour previously equilibrated to 0.6 aw, and both were less than the D80°C-value in flour previously equilibrated to 0.3 aw. Therefore, Salmonella in the rapidly desiccated flour (0.3 aw) was as thermally resistant as that which previously had been equilibrated to 0.3 aw, and Salmonella in the rapidly hydrated flour (0.6 aw) responded similarly to that in the flour previously equilibrated to 0.6 aw. These results suggest that the response period to new aw is negligible, which is critically important in applying thermal resistance data or parameters to industrial

  1. Enjoying Homemade Ice Cream without the Risk of Salmonella Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contaminants Buy, Store & Serve Safe Food Enjoying Homemade Ice Cream without the Risk of Salmonella Infection Share Tweet ... it Email Print August 2004 Every year homemade ice cream causes several outbreaks of Salmonella infection with up ...

  2. Proteomic Analysis of Outer Membrane Proteins from Salmonella Enteritidis Strains with Different Sensitivity to Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Bartłomiej; Krzyżewska, Eva; Kapczyńska, Katarzyna; Rybka, Jacek; Pawlak, Aleksandra; Korzekwa, Kamila; Klausa, Elżbieta; Bugla-Płoskońska, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Differential analysis of outer membrane composition of S. Enteritidis strains, resistant to 50% normal human serum (NHS) was performed in order to find factors influencing the resistance to higher concentrations of NHS. Ten S. Enteritidis clinical strains, resistant to 50% NHS, all producing very long lipopolysaccharide, were subjected to the challenge of 75% NHS. Five extreme strains: two resistant and three sensitive to 75% NHS, were chosen for the further analysis of outer membrane proteins composition. Substantial differences were found in the levels of particular outer membrane proteins between resistant and sensitive strains, i.e. outer membrane protease E (PgtE) was present mainly in resistant strains, while sensitive strains possessed a high level of flagellar hook-associated protein 2 (FliD) and significantly higher levels of outer membrane protein A (OmpA). PMID:27695090

  3. Application of predictive models to assess the influence of thyme essential oil on Salmonella Enteritidis behaviour during shelf life of ready-to-eat turkey products.

    PubMed

    Possas, Arícia; Posada-Izquierdo, Guiomar D; Pérez-Rodríguez, Fernando; Valero, Antonio; García-Gimeno, Rosa M; Duarte, Marta C T

    2017-01-02

    Consumers' demand for ready-to-eat (RTE) turkey meat is attributed to its convenience and healthy properties. However, as cooked meat product it is subjected to post-process contamination, thus allowing presence and growth of microbial pathogens, such as Salmonella spp.. The aim of this study was to include a natural antimicrobial, thyme essential oil (TEO), on RTE turkey products in order to evaluate its effectiveness throughout the shelf life. To do so, the effect of four different formulations of cooked RTE turkey products on Salmonella Enteritidis behaviour was investigated. Products' slices were surface inoculated with S. Enteritidis (ca. 4 to 5logcfu/g), subsequently stored at 10 and 25°C and microbiologically analysed during 18 and 12days, respectively. Predictive microbiology models fitted to count data were used to evaluate microbial behaviour. Results showed that S. Enteritidis behaviour on RTE turkey products slices during storage was strongly dependent on temperature. The pathogen was able to grow on slices at all tested conditions during storage at 25°C and no statistical differences were detected (p>0.05) between growth parameters. At 10°C, different behaviour patterns were observed. The application of TEO led to higher Salmonella inactivation rates on a product exempt of chemical preservatives. The addition of this novel antimicrobial on meat products or its incorporation on meat active packaging systems as a part of hurdle technology could increase RTE turkey products safety while satisfying the demand of more natural foods.

  4. [Evaluation of the antimicrobial action of honey against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enteritidis, Listeria monocytogenes and Aspergillus niger. Evaluation of its microbiological charge].

    PubMed

    Estrada, Heylin; Gamboa, María del Mar; Arias, Maria Laura; Chaves, Carolina

    2005-06-01

    The evaluation of the microbiological charge present in Costa Rican samples as the evaluation of its antimicrobial activity over different microorganisms, including those associated to wound infections, will allow to emit criteria referred to its use in therapeutic treatments, specially as alternative therapy for cases involving antibiotic resistant bacteria. The microbiological charge of 25 honey samples, acquired in Costa Rican markets was evaluated through several indicators including total plate aerobic count, total plate anaerobic count, total aerobic spore count, total anaerobic spore count and molds and yeast count. Also, samples were inoculated in tubes with chopped meat media and plated in egg yolk agar in order to determine the presence of Clostridium botulinum. For the antimicrobial activity evaluation, the diffusion method in Muller Hinton agar was performed, testing different honey concentrations (100, 75, 50, 25, 12,5 and 6,25 % v/v) against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), Staphylococcus epidermidis (UCR 2902), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 9027), Escherichia coli (ATCC25922), Salmonella enteritidis (ATCC 13076), Listeria monocytogenes (ATCC 19116) and Aspergillus niger. The results obtained for the microbiological characterization of honey show that 91% of samples had counts equal or lower than 1,0 x 10(1) CFU/g. No positive result was obtained for the isolation of C. botulinum. 24 of the samples analyzed inhibited the growth of S. aureus even in a 25% v/v concentration, nevertheless, A. niger was no inhibited by any of the samples tested.

  5. Nontyphoidal salmonella infection in children with acute gastroenteritis: prevalence, serotypes, and antimicrobial resistance in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuefang; Xie, Xinbao; Xu, Xuebing; Wang, Xiangshi; Chang, Hailing; Wang, Chuanqing; Wang, Aiming; He, Yanlei; Yu, Hui; Wang, Xiaohong; Zeng, Mei

    2014-03-01

    Information about nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infection in children is limited in mainland China. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence, serotypes, and antibiotic resistance patterns of NTS infection in children in Shanghai. All cases with probable bacterial diarrhea were enrolled from the enteric clinic of a tertiary pediatric hospital between July 2010 and December 2011. Salmonella isolation, serotyping, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were conducted by the microbiological laboratory. NTS were recovered from 316 (17.2%) of 1833 cases with isolation rate exceeding Campylobacter (7.1%) and Shigella (5.7%). NTS infection was prevalent year-round with a seasonal peak during summer and autumn. The median age of children with NTS gastroenteritis was 18 months. Fever and blood-in-stool were reported in 52.5% and 42.7% of cases, respectively. Salmonella Enteritidis (38.9%) and Salmonella Typhimurium (29.7%) were the most common serovars. Antimicrobial susceptibility showed 60.5% of isolates resistant to ≥1 clinically important antibiotics. Resistance to ciprofloxacin and the third-generation cephalosporins was detected in 5.5% and 7.1%-11.7% of isolates, respectively. NTS is a major enteropathogen responsible for bacterial gastroenteritis in children in Shanghai. Resistance to the current first-line antibiotics is of concern. Ongoing surveillance for NTS infection and antibiotic resistance is needed to control this pathogen in Shanghai.

  6. Yeast β-d-glucans induced antimicrobial peptide expressions against Salmonella infection in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yujing; Wang, Zhong; Tian, Xiangyu; Guo, Yuming; Zhang, Haibo

    2016-04-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of yeast β-d-glucans (YG) on gene expression of endogenous β-defensins (AvBDs), cathelicidins (Cath) and liver-expressed antimicrobial peptide-2 (LEAP-2) in broilers challenged with Salmonella enteritidis (SE). 240 day-old Cobb male broilers were randomly assigned to 2×2 factorial arrangements of treatments with two levels of dietary YG (0 or 200mg/kg in diet) and two levels of SE challenge (0 or 1×10(9) SE at 7-9 days of age). The results showed SE infection reduced growth performance,and increased salmonella cecal colonization and internal organs invasion, increased concentration of intestinal specific IgA and serum specific IgG antibody, as compared to uninfected birds. SE challenge differentially regulated AvBDs, Caths and LEAP-2 gene expression in the jejunum and spleen of broiler chickens during the infection period. However, YG supplementation inhibited the growth depression by SE challenge, and further increased level of serum specific IgG and intestinal specific IgA antibody. Higher level of salmonella colonization and internal organs invasion in the SE-infected birds were reduced by YG. SE-induced differentially expression patterns of AMPs genes was inhibited or changed by YG. Results indicated YG enhance chicken's resistance to salmonella infection.

  7. Development of hyperspectral imaging technique for salmonella enteritidis and typhimurium on agar plates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is a common cause of foodborne disease resulting from the consumption of contaminated food products. Although a direct plating method is widely used for presumptive positive screening of pathogenic Salmonella colonies on agar plates, it is labor-intensive, time-consuming and also prone to...

  8. Effectiveness of superheated steam for inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 30, and Listeria monocytogenes on almonds and pistachios.

    PubMed

    Ban, Ga-Hee; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-03-02

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of superheated steam (SHS) on the inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis phage type (PT) 30 and Listeria monocytogenes on almonds and in-shell pistachios and to determine the effect of superheated steam heating on quality by measuring color and texture changes. Almonds and in-shell pistachios inoculated with four foodborne pathogens were treated with saturated steam (SS) at 100 °C and SHS at 125, 150, 175, and 200 °C for various times. Exposure of almonds and pistachios to SHS for 15 or 30s at 200 °C achieved >5l og reductions among all tested pathogens without causing significant changes in color values or texture parameters (P>0.05). For both almonds and pistachios, acid and peroxide values (PV) following SS and SHS treatment for up to 15s and 30s, respectively, were within the acceptable range (PV<1.0 meq/kg). These results show that thermal application of 200 °C SHS treatment for 15s and 30s did not affect the quality of almonds and pistachios, respectively. Therefore, SHS treatment is a very promising alternative technology for the tree nuts industry by improving inactivation of foodborne pathogens on almonds and pistachios while simultaneously reducing processing time.

  9. Growth temperature alters Salmonella Enteritidis heat/acid resistance, membrane lipid composition and stress/virulence related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yishan; Khoo, Wei Jie; Zheng, Qianwang; Chung, Hyun-Jung; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2014-02-17

    The influence of growth temperature (10, 25, 37, and 42 °C) on the survival of Salmonella Enteritidis in simulated gastric fluid (SGF; pH=2.0) and during heat treatment (54, 56, 58, and 60 °C), on the membrane fatty acid composition, as well as on stress-/virulence-related gene expression was studied. Cells incubated at temperatures lower or higher than 37 °C did not increase their acid resistance, with the maximum D-value of 3.07 min in cells grown at 37 °C; while those incubated at higher temperature increased their heat resistance, with the maximum D60 °C-values of 1.4 min in cells grown at 42 °C. A decrease in the ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids was observed as the growth temperature increased. Compared to the control cells grown at 37 °C, the expression of rpoS was 16.5- and 14.4-fold higher in cells cultivated at 10 and 25 °C, respectively; while the expression of rpoH was 2.9-fold higher in those cultivated at 42 °C. The increased expression of stress response gene rpoH and the decreased ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids correlated with the greater heat resistance of bacteria grown at 42 °C; while the decreased expression of stress response gene rpoS at 42 °C might contribute to the decrease in acid resistance. Virulence related genes-spvR, hilA, avrA-were induced in cells cultivated at 42 °C, except sefA which was induced in the control cells. This study indicates that environmental temperature may affect the virulence potential of S. Enteritidis, thus temperature should be well controlled during food storage.

  10. Reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in chicken manure by larvae of the black soldier fly.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Marilyn C; Islam, Mahbub; Sheppard, Craig; Liao, Jean; Doyle, Michael P

    2004-04-01

    Green fluorescent protein-labeled Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis were inoculated at 10(7) CFU/g into cow, hog, or chicken manure. Ten- or 11-day-old soldier fly larvae (Hermetia illucens L.) (7 to 10 g) were added to the manure and held at 23, 27, or 32 degrees C for 3 to 6 days. Soldier fly larvae accelerated inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 in chicken manure but had no effect in cow manure and enhanced survival in hog manure. The initial pH values of the hog and chicken manure were 6.0 to 6.2 and 7.4 to 8.2, respectively, and it is surmised that these conditions affected the stability of the larval antimicrobial system. Reductions of E. coli O157:H7 populations in chicken manure by larvae were affected by storage temperature, with greater reductions in samples held for 3 days at 27 or 32 degrees C than at 23 degrees C. Pathogen inactivation in chicken manure by larvae was not affected by the indigenous microflora of chicken manure, because Salmonella Enteritidis populations in larvae-treated samples were approximately 2.5 log lower than control samples without larvae when either autoclaved or nonautoclaved chicken manure was used as the contaminated medium during 3 days of storage. Extending the storage time to 6 days, larvae again accelerated the reduction in Salmonella Enteritidis populations in chicken manure during the first 4 days of storage; however, larvae became contaminated with the pathogen. After 2 days of feeding on contaminated manure, Salmonella Enteritidis populations in larvae averaged 3.3 log CFU/g. Populations decreased to 1.9 log CFU/g after 6 days of exposure to contaminated chicken manure; however, the absence of feeding activity by the maggots in later stages of storage may be responsible for the continued presence of Salmonella Enteritidis in larvae. Transfer of contaminated larvae to fresh chicken manure restored feeding activity but led to cross-contamination of the fresh manure.

  11. Gene expression in the chicken caecum in response to infections with non-typhoid Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Rychlik, Ivan; Elsheimer-Matulova, Marta; Kyrova, Kamila

    2014-12-05

    Chickens can be infected with Salmonella enterica at any time during their life. However, infections within the first hours and days of their life are epidemiologically the most important, as newly hatched chickens are highly sensitive to Salmonella infection. Salmonella is initially recognized in the chicken caecum by TLR receptors and this recognition is followed by induction of chemokines, cytokines and many effector genes. This results in infiltration of heterophils, macrophages, B- and T-lymphocytes and changes in total gene expression in the caecal lamina propria. The highest induction in expression is observed for matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7). Expression of this gene is increased in the chicken caecum over 4000 fold during the first 10 days after the infection of newly hatched chickens. Additional highly inducible genes in the caecum following S. Enteritidis infection include immune responsive gene 1 (IRG1), serum amyloid A (SAA), extracellular fatty acid binding protein (ExFABP), serine protease inhibitor (SERPINB10), trappin 6-like (TRAP6), calprotectin (MRP126), mitochondrial ES1 protein homolog (ES1), interferon-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 5 (IFIT5), avidin (AVD) and transglutaminase 4 (TGM4). The induction of expression of these proteins exceeds a factor of 50. Similar induction rates are also observed for chemokines and cytokines such as IL1β, IL6, IL8, IL17, IL18, IL22, IFNγ, AH221 or iNOS. Once the infection is under control, which happens approx. 2 weeks after infection, expression of IgY and IgA increases to facilitate Salmonella elimination from the gut lumen. This review outlines the function of individual proteins expressed in chickens after infection with non-typhoid Salmonella serovars.

  12. 76 FR 41157 - Guidance for Industry: Questions and Answers Regarding the Final Rule, Prevention of Salmonella...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... Answers Regarding the Final Rule, Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During Production... Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During Production, Storage, and Transportation'' (the draft guidance... rule entitled ``Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During Production, Storage,...

  13. Toll-Like Receptor Activation by Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens from Lipid A Mutants of Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Omar; Caboni, Mariaelena; Negrea, Aurel; Necchi, Francesca; Alfini, Renzo; Micoli, Francesca; Saul, Allan; MacLennan, Calman A.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease is a neglected disease with high mortality in children and HIV-positive individuals in sub-Saharan Africa, caused primarily by Africa-specific strains of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. A vaccine using GMMA (generalized modules for membrane antigens) from S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis containing lipid A modifications to reduce potential in vivo reactogenicity is under development. GMMA with penta-acylated lipid A showed the greatest reduction in the level of cytokine release from human peripheral blood monocytes from that for GMMA with wild-type lipid A. Deletion of the lipid A modification genes msbB and pagP was required to achieve pure penta-acylation. Interestingly, ΔmsbB ΔpagP GMMA from S. Enteritidis had a slightly higher stimulatory potential than those from S. Typhimurium, a finding consistent with the higher lipopolysaccharide (LPS) content and Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) stimulatory potential of the former. Also, TLR5 ligand flagellin was found in Salmonella GMMA. No relevant contribution to the stimulatory potential of GMMA was detected even when the flagellin protein FliC from S. Typhimurium was added at a concentration as high as 10% of total protein, suggesting that flagellin impurities are not a major factor for GMMA-mediated immune stimulation. Overall, the stimulatory potential of S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis ΔmsbB ΔpagP GMMA was close to that of Shigella sonnei GMMA, which are currently in phase I clinical trials. PMID:26865597

  14. A comparative study of strains of salmonella isolated from irrigation waters, vegetables and human infections.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Villanova Ruiz, B.; Cueto Espinar, A.; Bolaños Carmona, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    A total of 181 samples of irrigation water from the farmlands of Granada were examined for the presence of Salmonella spp. At the same time 849 samples of the crops from these farmlands and of vegetables sold in city market-places were studied. Sampling was done regularly over the period of study which ran from March 1981 to February 1983. Isolates from these sources were compared with 93 salmonellas isolated from human pathological material at various hospitals of the city of Granada from 1979-80, and again from 1981-3. The most commonly isolated serotypes of human origin were S. typhimurium and S. enteritidis. In irrigation waters and in crops, S. typhimurium, S. kapemba, S. london and S. blockley were found to be the most common. The results indicate a close relationship between the isolates from the irrigation waters and those from the vegetables, but their relationship to prevalent human infections is less clear. PMID:3595745

  15. Outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis linked to the consumption of frozen beefburgers received from a food bank and originating from Poland: northern France, December 2014 to April 2015.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gabrielle; Pihier, Nathalie; Vanbockstael, Caroline; Le Hello, Simon; Cadel Six, Sabrina; Fournet, Nelly; Jourdan-da Silva, Nathalie

    2016-10-06

    A prolonged outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis occurred in northern France between December 2014 and April 2015. Epidemiological investigations following the initial notification on 30 December 2014 of five cases of salmonellosis (two confirmed S. Enteritidis) in young children residing in the Somme department revealed that all cases frequented the same food bank A. Further epidemiological, microbiological and food trace-back investigations indicated frozen beefburgers as the source of the outbreak and the suspected lot originating from Poland was recalled on 22 January 2015. On 2 March 2015 a second notification of S. Enteritidis cases in the Somme reinitiated investigations that confirmed a link with food bank A and with consumption of frozen beefburgers from the same Polish producer. In the face of a possible persistent source of contamination, all frozen beefburgers distributed by food bank A and from the same origin were blocked on 3 March 2015. Microbiological analyses confirmed contamination by S. Enteritidis of frozen beefburgers from a second lot remaining in cases' homes. A second recall was initiated on 6 March 2015 and all frozen beefburgers from the Polish producer remain blocked after analyses identified additional contaminated lots over several months of production.

  16. Outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis linked to the consumption of frozen beefburgers received from a food bank and originating from Poland: northern France, December 2014 to April 2015

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Gabrielle; Pihier, Nathalie; Vanbockstael, Caroline; Le Hello, Simon; Cadel Six, Sabrina; Fournet, Nelly; Jourdan-da Silva, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    A prolonged outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis occurred in northern France between December 2014 and April 2015. Epidemiological investigations following the initial notification on 30 December 2014 of five cases of salmonellosis (two confirmed S. Enteritidis) in young children residing in the Somme department revealed that all cases frequented the same food bank A. Further epidemiological, microbiological and food trace-back investigations indicated frozen beefburgers as the source of the outbreak and the suspected lot originating from Poland was recalled on 22 January 2015. On 2 March 2015 a second notification of S. Enteritidis cases in the Somme reinitiated investigations that confirmed a link with food bank A and with consumption of frozen beefburgers from the same Polish producer. In the face of a possible persistent source of contamination, all frozen beefburgers distributed by food bank A and from the same origin were blocked on 3 March 2015. Microbiological analyses confirmed contamination by S. Enteritidis of frozen beefburgers from a second lot remaining in cases’ homes. A second recall was initiated on 6 March 2015 and all frozen beefburgers from the Polish producer remain blocked after analyses identified additional contaminated lots over several months of production. PMID:27748250

  17. Development of a Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) - Surface Enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) Assay for the Detection of Salmonella Enterica Serotype Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Draz, Mohamed Shehata; Lu, Xiaonan

    2016-01-01

    As a major foodborne pathogen, Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is increasingly rising as a global health concern. Here, we developed an integrated assay that combines loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for DNA detection of S. Enteritidis using specifically designed Raman active Au-nanoprobes. The target DNA was amplified by LAMP and then labeled with Au-nanoprobes comprised of gold nanoparticle-modified with specific cy5/DNA probes to allow the detection by SERS. The sensitivity of the developed LAMP-SERS detection assay (66 CFU/mL) was ~100-fold higher than the conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Significantly, this technique allowed highly specific detection of the target DNA of S. Enteritidis and could differentiate it from the DNA of closely related bacterial species or non-specific contamination, making it more accurate and reliable than the standard LAMP technique. The applicability of detection of S. Enteritidis in milk samples using LAMP-SERS assay was validated as well. In sum, the developed LAMP-SERS assay is highly specific and sensitive, and has the potential to be applied for rapid detection of different foodborne pathogens and other microbial contaminants. PMID:26941845

  18. Development of a Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) - Surface Enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) Assay for the Detection of Salmonella Enterica Serotype Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Draz, Mohamed Shehata; Lu, Xiaonan

    2016-01-01

    As a major foodborne pathogen, Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is increasingly rising as a global health concern. Here, we developed an integrated assay that combines loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for DNA detection of S. Enteritidis using specifically designed Raman active Au-nanoprobes. The target DNA was amplified by LAMP and then labeled with Au-nanoprobes comprised of gold nanoparticle-modified with specific cy5/DNA probes to allow the detection by SERS. The sensitivity of the developed LAMP-SERS detection assay (66 CFU/mL) was ~100-fold higher than the conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Significantly, this technique allowed highly specific detection of the target DNA of S. Enteritidis and could differentiate it from the DNA of closely related bacterial species or non-specific contamination, making it more accurate and reliable than the standard LAMP technique. The applicability of detection of S. Enteritidis in milk samples using LAMP-SERS assay was validated as well. In sum, the developed LAMP-SERS assay is highly specific and sensitive, and has the potential to be applied for rapid detection of different foodborne pathogens and other microbial contaminants.

  19. Sexually acquired Salmonella Typhi urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Wielding, Sally; Scott, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of isolated urinary Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi in an HIV-positive man who has sex with men. He was clinically well and blood and stool cultures were negative, indicating that this may have been a sexually acquired urinary tract infection.

  20. Immune dynamics following infection of avian macrophages and epithelial cells with typhoidal and non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars; bacterial invasion and persistence, nitric oxide and oxygen production, differential host gene expression, NF-κB signalling and cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Setta, Ahmed; Barrow, Paul A; Kaiser, Pete; Jones, Michael A

    2012-05-15

    Poultry-derived food is a common source of infection of human with the non-host-adapted salmonellae while fowl typhoid and pullorum disease are serious diseases in poultry. Development of novel immune-based control strategies against Salmonella infection necessitates a better understanding of the host-pathogen interactions at the cellular level. Intestinal epithelial cells are the first line of defence against enteric infections and the role of macrophages is crucial in Salmonella infection and pathogenesis. While gene expression following Salmonella infection has been investigated, a comparison between different serovars has not been, as yet, extensively studied in poultry. In this study, chicken macrophage-like cells (HD11) and chick kidney epithelial cells (CKC) were used to study and compare the immune responses and mechanisms that develop after infection with different Salmonella serotypes. Salmonella serovars Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Hadar and Infantis showed a greater level of invasion and/or uptake characters when compared with S. Pullorum or S. Gallinarum. Nitrate and reactive oxygen species were greater in Salmonella-infected HD11 cells with the expression of iNOS and nuclear factor-κB by chicken macrophages infected with both systemic and broad host range serovars. HD11 cells revealed higher mRNA gene expression for CXCLi2, IL-6 and iNOS genes in response to S. Enteritidis infection when compared to S. Pullorum-infected cells. S. Typhimurium- and S. Hadar-infected HD11 showed higher gene expression for CXCLi2 versus S. Pullorum-infected cells. Higher mRNA gene expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6, chemokines CXCLi1 and CXCLi2 and iNOS genes were detected in S. Typhimurium- and S. Enteritidis-infected CKC followed by S. Hadar and S. Infantis while no significant changes were observed in S. Pullorum or S. Gallinarum-infected CKC.

  1. The distribution of serotype-specific plasmids among different subgroups of strains of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis: characterization of molecular variants by restriction enzyme fragmentation patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, S. C.; Benson, C. E.; Platt, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    Four hundred and thirty-four isolates of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis were studied. They were grouped into five subsets defined by either the collection criteria or the parameter which formed the basis for subsequent analysis. Seventy-seven per cent harboured the serotype-specific plasmid (SSP). In 55% of the isolates this was the sole plasmid. Molecular variation in the SSP was detected in 17 (5%) of the isolates on the basis of restriction enzyme fragmentation pattern (REFP) analysis using Pst I and Sma I. The SSP variants were further characterized using additional restriction enzymes chosen to optimize the information content and analysed using a coefficient of similarity. A variant SSP designated pOG690 showed greater resemblance to the SSP of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium than Enteritidis; 89% and 68% respectively for Pst I and 79% and 55% respectively for Sma I. In respect of the Pst I data pOG690 shared at least 55 kb of DNA with the Typhimurium SSP and 37 kb with the SSP of Enteritidis. This variant was associated with poultry (duck, goose, chicken) and all isolates belonged to phage type 9b. Other variants were associated with phage types 4, 6, 6a, 9a, 11, 15 and 24. The epidemiological implications of these results are discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7867741

  2. Genetic diversity, virulence genes and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella Enteritidis isolated from food and humans over a 24-year period in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Campioni, Fábio; Moratto Bergamini, Alzira Maria; Falcão, Juliana P

    2012-12-01

    Salmonellosis is a major health problem worldwide. Serovar Enteritidis has been a primary cause of Salmonella outbreaks in many countries. In Brazil, few molecular typing studies have been performed. The aims of this study were to molecularly type Salmonella Enteritidis strains isolated in Brazil in order to determine the genetic relationship between strains of food and human origin, as well as, to assess their pathogenic potential and antimicrobial resistance. A total of 128 S. Enteritidis strains isolated from human feces (67) and food (61) between 1986 and 2010 were studied. The genotypic diversity was assessed by ERIC-PCR and PFGE using XbaI, the antimicrobial resistance by the disc-diffusion assay and the presence of the SPI-1, SPI-2 and pSTV virulence genes assessed by PCR. The ERIC-PCR results revealed that 112 strains exhibited a similarity of >85.4% and the PFGE that 96 strains exhibited a similarity of >80.0%. Almost all strains (97.6%) harbored all 13 virulence genes investigated. Thirty-six strains (28.12%) were resistant to nalidixic acid. In conclusion, the nalidixic acid resistance observed after 1996 is indicative of an increase in the use of this drug. It may be suggested that these 128 strains might have descended from a common ancestor that differed little over 24 years and has been both contaminating food and humans and causing disease for more than two decades in Brazil.

  3. Salmonella infection and immune response in finishing pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Finishing pigs infected with Salmonella pose significant food safety risks by carrying the pathogen into abattoirs. A study was conducted to determine the dynamic of Salmonella infection in finishing pigs, and the immunological alterations that occur in Salmonella-carrier pigs, by longitudinally com...

  4. Diffuse abdominal gallium-67 citrate uptake in salmonella infections

    SciTech Connect

    Garty, I.; Koren, A.

    1987-11-01

    Two pediatric patients with salmonella infections (one with typhoid fever and the second with salmonella C2 gastroenteritis), had a diffuse abdominal uptake of Ga-67 citrate. The possible explanation for this finding is discussed. Salmonella infection should be included as a cause in the differential diagnosis of diffuse accumulation of Ga-67 citrate.

  5. Effect of operating conditions in production of diagnostic Salmonella Enteritidis O-antigen-specific monoclonal antibody in different bioreactor systems.

    PubMed

    Ayyildiz-Tamis, Duygu; Nalbantsoy, Ayse; Elibol, Murat; Deliloglu-Gurhan, Saime Ismet

    2014-01-01

    In this study, different cultivation systems such as roller bottles (RB), 5-L stirred-tank bioreactor (STR), and disposable bioreactors were used to cultivate hybridoma for lab-scale production of Salmonella Enteritidis O-antigen-specific monoclonal antibody (MAb). Hybridoma cell line was cultivated in either serum-containing or serum-free medium (SFM) culture conditions. In STR, MAb production scaled up to 4 L, and production capabilities of the cells were also evaluated in different featured production systems. Moreover, the growth parameters of the cells in all production systems such as glucose consumption, lactate and ammonia production, and also MAb productivities were determined. Collected supernatants from the reactors were concentrated by a cross-flow filtration system. In conclusion, cells were not adapted to SFM in RB and STR. Therefore, less MAb titer in both STR and RB systems with SFM was observed compared to the cultures containing fetal bovine serum-supplemented medium. A higher MAb titer was gained in the membrane-aerated system compared to those in STR and RB. Although the highest MAb titer was obtained in the static membrane bioreactor system, the highest productivity was obtained in STR operated in semicontinuous mode with overlay aeration.

  6. inhibitory effects of citral, cinnamaldehyde, and tea polyphenols on mixed biofilm formation by foodborne Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongmei; Zhou, Wenyuan; Zhang, Wenyan; Yang, Anlin; Liu, Yanlan; Jiang, Yan; Huang, Shaosong; Su, Jianyu

    2014-06-01

    Biofilms are significant hazards in the food industry. In this study, we investigated the effects of food additive such as citral, cinnamaldehyde, and tea polyphenols on mixed biofilm formation by foodborne Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella serotype Enteritidis. The adhesion rates of mixed strains in sub-MIC of additives were determined by a microtiter plate assay and bacterial communication signal autoinducer 2 (AI-2) production via a bioluminescence reporter Vibrio harveyi BB170. The structure of mixed biofilm was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The effect of the disinfectants hydrogen peroxide, sodium hypochlorite, and peracetic acid was tested on the mixed biofilm. Our results demonstrated that citral, cinnamaldehyde, and tea polyphenols were able to significantly inhibit mixed biofilm formation, while citral could reduce the synthesis of AI-2. Conversely, we observed a significant increase in AI-2 mediated by cinnamaldehyde. Tea polyphenols at lower concentrations induced AI-2 synthesis; however, AI-2 synthesis was significantly inhibited at higher concentrations (300 m g/ml). Food additives inhibited the adhesion of mixed bacteria on stainless steel chips and increased the sensitivity of the mixed biofilm to disinfectants. In conclusion, citral, cinnamaldehyde, and tea polyphenols had strong inhibitory effects on mixed biofilm formation and also enhanced the effect of disinfectant on mixed biofilm formation. This study provides a scientific basis for the application of natural food additives to control biofilm formation of foodborne bacteria.

  7. Development of classification models to detect Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium found in poultry carcass rinses by visible-near infrared hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Young Wook; Yoon, Seung Chul; Park, Bosoon; Hinton, Arthur; Windham, William R.; Lawrence, Kurt C.

    2013-05-01

    Salmonella is a major cause of foodborne disease outbreaks resulting from the consumption of contaminated food products in the United States. This paper reports the development of a hyperspectral imaging technique for detecting and differentiating two of the most common Salmonella serotypes, Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) and Salmonella Typhimurium (ST), from background microflora that are often found in poultry carcass rinse. Presumptive positive screening of colonies with a traditional direct plating method is a labor intensive and time consuming task. Thus, this paper is concerned with the detection of differences in spectral characteristics among the pure SE, ST, and background microflora grown on brilliant green sulfa (BGS) and xylose lysine tergitol 4 (XLT4) agar media with a spread plating technique. Visible near-infrared hyperspectral imaging, providing the spectral and spatial information unique to each microorganism, was utilized to differentiate SE and ST from the background microflora. A total of 10 classification models, including five machine learning algorithms, each without and with principal component analysis (PCA), were validated and compared to find the best model in classification accuracy. The five machine learning (classification) algorithms used in this study were Mahalanobis distance (MD), k-nearest neighbor (kNN), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA), and support vector machine (SVM). The average classification accuracy of all 10 models on a calibration (or training) set of the pure cultures on BGS agar plates was 98% (Kappa coefficient = 0.95) in determining the presence of SE and/or ST although it was difficult to differentiate between SE and ST. The average classification accuracy of all 10 models on a training set for ST detection on XLT4 agar was over 99% (Kappa coefficient = 0.99) although SE colonies on XLT4 agar were difficult to differentiate from background microflora. The average classification

  8. Phage and MLVA typing of Salmonella enteritidis isolated from layers and humans in Belgium from 2000-2010, a period in which vaccination of laying hens was introduced.

    PubMed

    Dewaele, I; Heyndrickx, M; Rasschaert, G; Bertrand, S; Wildemauwe, C; Wattiau, P; Imberechts, H; Herman, L; Ducatelle, R; Van Weyenberg, S; De Reu, K

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) obtained from humans and layer farms in Belgium collected during 2000-2010. Three periods were compared, namely (i) before implementation of vaccination (2000-2004), (ii) during voluntary vaccination (2005-2006) and (iii) during implementation of the national control program (NCP) for Salmonella including mandatory vaccination against S. Enteritidis (2007-2010). The characteristics compared across time periods were distributions of phage type and multiple-locus variable number tandem-repeat assay (MLVA). While PT4 and PT21 were predominantly isolated in Belgium in layers and humans before 2007, a significant reduction of those PTs was observed in both populations in the period 2007-2010. The relative proportion of PT4b, PT21c and PT6c was found to have increased considerably in the layer population since 2007. In the human population, PT8, PT1 and the group of 'other' PTs were more frequently isolated compared to the previous periods. When comparing the proportion of the predominant MLVA types Q2 and U2, no significant difference was found between the layer and human population in the three periods and between periods within each category (layer and human). A significant difference in isolate distribution among MLVA clusters I and II was found between human and layer isolates recovered during Period 3 and in the human population between Period 1 and 3. Results suggest that the association between S. Enteritidis in layers and the occurrence of the pathogen in humans changed since implementation of the NCP in 2007.

  9. A label-free ultrasensitive fluorescence detection of viable Salmonella enteritidis using enzyme-induced cascade two-stage toehold strand-displacement-driven assembly of G-quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Hui; Ma, Suzhen; Men, Shuai; Li, Qingzhou; Yang, Xin; Wang, Hongning; Zhang, Anyun

    2016-06-15

    The harm of Salmonella enteritidis (S. enteritidis ) to public health mainly by contaminating fresh food and water emphasizes the urgent need for rapid detection techniques to help control the spread of the pathogen. In this assay, an newly designed capture probe complex that contained specific S. enteritidis-aptamer and hybridized signal target sequence was used for viable S. enteritidis recognition directly. In the presence of the target S. enteritidis, single-stranded target sequences were liberated and initiated the replication-cleavage reaction, producing numerous G-quadruplex structures with a linker on the 3'-end. And then, the sensing system took innovative advantage of quadratic linker-induced strand-displacement for the first time to release target sequence in succession, leading to the cyclic reuse of the target sequences and cascade signal amplification, thereby achieving the successive production of G-quadruplex structures. The fluorescent dye, N-Methyl mesoporphyrin IX, binded to these G-quadruplex structures and generated significantly enhanced fluorescent signals to achieve highly sensitive detection of S. enteritidis down to 60 CFU/mL with a linear range from 10(2) to 10(7)CFU/mL. By coupling the cascade two-stage target sequences-recyclable toehold strand-displacement with aptamer-based target recognition successfully, it is the first report on a novel non-label, modification-free and DNA extraction-free ultrasensitive fluorescence biosensor for detecting viable S. enteritidis directly, which can discriminate from dead S. enteritidis.

  10. Loxoribine pretreatment reduces Salmonella enteritidis organ invasion in 1-day-old chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Young poultry exhibit a transient susceptibility to some infectious diseases, including Salmonella, during the first week of life that stems from immature innate and acquired defense mechanisms. Consequently, stimulation or modulation of the hosts’ natural immune response is emerging as an importan...

  11. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica Ser. Enteritidis in tomato juice by combining of high-intensity pulsed electric fields with natural antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Mosqueda-Melgar, J; Raybaudi-Massilia, R M; Martín-Belloso, O

    2008-03-01

    The effect of high-intensity pulsed electric field (HIPEF) treatment (35kV/cm, 4 mus pulse length in bipolar mode without exceeding 38 degrees C) as influenced by treatment time (200, 600, and 1000 micros) and pulse frequency (100, 150, and 200 Hz) for inactivating Salmonella enterica ser. Enteritidis inoculated in tomato juice was evaluated. Similarly, the effect of combining HIPEF treatment with citric acid (0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%, and 2.0%[wt/vol]) or cinnamon bark oil (0.05%, 0.10%, 0.2%, and 0.3%[vol/vol]) as natural antimicrobials against S. Enteritidis in tomato juice was also studied. Higher treatment time and lower pulse frequency produced the greater microbial inactivation. Maximum inactivation of S. Enteritidis (4.184 log(10) units) in tomato juice by HIPEF was achieved when 1000 micros and 100 Hz of treatment time and pulse frequency, respectively, were applied. However, a greater microbial inactivation was found when S. Enteritidis was previously exposed to citric acid or cinnamon bark oil for 1 h in tomato juice. Synergistic effects were observed in HIPEF and natural antimicrobials. Nevertheless, combinations of HIPEF treatment with 2.0% of citric acid or 0.1% of cinnamon bark oil were needed for inactivating S. Enteritidis by more than 5.0 log(10) units (5.08 and 6.04 log(10) reductions, respectively). Therefore, combinations of HIPEF with organic acids or essential oils seem to be a promising method to achieve the pasteurization in these kinds of products.

  12. Evaluation of DNA Extraction Methods for Use in Combination with SYBR Green I Real-Time PCR To Detect Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis in Poultry

    PubMed Central

    De Medici, Dario; Croci, Luciana; Delibato, Elisabetta; Di Pasquale, Simona; Filetici, Emma; Toti, Laura

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rapid, reproducible, and robust method for detecting Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in poultry samples. First, for the extraction and purification of DNA from the preenrichment culture, four methods (boiling, alkaline lysis, Nucleospin, and Dynabeads DNA Direct System I) were compared. The most effective method was then combined with a real-time PCR method based on the double-stranded DNA binding dye SYBR Green I used with the ABI Prism 7700 system. The specificity of the reaction was determined by the melting temperature (Tm) of the amplicon obtained. The experiments were conducted both on samples of chicken experimentally contaminated with serotype Enteritidis and on commercially available poultry samples, which were also used for comparisons with the standard cultural method (i.e., ISO 6579/2001). The results of comparisons among the four DNA extraction methods showed significant differences except for the results from the boiling and Nucleospin methods (the two methods that produced the lowest threshold cycles). Boiling was selected as the preferred extraction method because it is the simplest and most rapid. This method was then combined with SYBR Green I real-time PCR, using primers SEFA-1 and SEFA-2. The specificity of the reaction was confirmed by the Tm, which was consistently specific for the amplicon obtained; the mean peak Tm obtained with curves specific for serotype Enteritidis was 82.56 ± 0.22°C. The standard curve constructed using the mean threshold cycle and various concentrations of serotype Enteritidis (ranging from 103 to 108 CFU/ml) showed good linearity (R2 = 0.9767) and a sensitivity limit of less than 103 CFU/ml. The results of this study demonstrate that the SYBR Green I real-time PCR constitutes an effective and easy-to-perform method for detecting serotype Enteritidis in poultry samples. PMID:12788750

  13. Combining Lactic Acid Spray with Near-Infrared Radiation Heating To Inactivate Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis on Almond and Pine Nut Kernels.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jae-Won; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of near-infrared radiation (NIR) heating combined with lactic acid (LA) sprays for inactivating Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis on almond and pine nut kernels and to elucidate the mechanisms of the lethal effect of the NIR-LA combined treatment. Also, the effect of the combination treatment on product quality was determined. Separately prepared S. Enteritidis phage type (PT) 30 and non-PT 30 S. Enteritidis cocktails were inoculated onto almond and pine nut kernels, respectively, followed by treatments with NIR or 2% LA spray alone, NIR with distilled water spray (NIR-DW), and NIR with 2% LA spray (NIR-LA). Although surface temperatures of nuts treated with NIR were higher than those subjected to NIR-DW or NIR-LA treatment, more S. Enteritidis survived after NIR treatment alone. The effectiveness of NIR-DW and NIR-LA was similar, but significantly more sublethally injured cells were recovered from NIR-DW-treated samples. We confirmed that the enhanced bactericidal effect of the NIR-LA combination may not be attributable to cell membrane damage per se. NIR heat treatment might allow S. Enteritidis cells to become permeable to applied LA solution. The NIR-LA treatment (5 min) did not significantly (P > 0.05) cause changes in the lipid peroxidation parameters, total phenolic contents, color values, moisture contents, and sensory attributes of nut kernels. Given the results of the present study, NIR-LA treatment may be a potential intervention for controlling food-borne pathogens on nut kernel products.

  14. Combining Lactic Acid Spray with Near-Infrared Radiation Heating To Inactivate Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis on Almond and Pine Nut Kernels

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jae-Won

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of near-infrared radiation (NIR) heating combined with lactic acid (LA) sprays for inactivating Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis on almond and pine nut kernels and to elucidate the mechanisms of the lethal effect of the NIR-LA combined treatment. Also, the effect of the combination treatment on product quality was determined. Separately prepared S. Enteritidis phage type (PT) 30 and non-PT 30 S. Enteritidis cocktails were inoculated onto almond and pine nut kernels, respectively, followed by treatments with NIR or 2% LA spray alone, NIR with distilled water spray (NIR-DW), and NIR with 2% LA spray (NIR-LA). Although surface temperatures of nuts treated with NIR were higher than those subjected to NIR-DW or NIR-LA treatment, more S. Enteritidis survived after NIR treatment alone. The effectiveness of NIR-DW and NIR-LA was similar, but significantly more sublethally injured cells were recovered from NIR-DW-treated samples. We confirmed that the enhanced bactericidal effect of the NIR-LA combination may not be attributable to cell membrane damage per se. NIR heat treatment might allow S. Enteritidis cells to become permeable to applied LA solution. The NIR-LA treatment (5 min) did not significantly (P > 0.05) cause changes in the lipid peroxidation parameters, total phenolic contents, color values, moisture contents, and sensory attributes of nut kernels. Given the results of the present study, NIR-LA treatment may be a potential intervention for controlling food-borne pathogens on nut kernel products. PMID:25911473

  15. Functional properties of novel protective lactic acid bacteria and application in raw chicken meat against Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Maragkoudakis, Petros A; Mountzouris, Konstantinos C; Psyrras, Dimitris; Cremonese, Silvia; Fischer, Jana; Cantor, Mette D; Tsakalidou, Effie

    2009-04-15

    In this study 635 lactic acid bacteria of food origin were evaluated for their potential application as protective cultures in foods. A stepwise selection method was used to obtain the most appropriate strains for application as protective cultures in chicken meat. Specifically, all strains were examined for antimicrobial activity against various Gram positive and Gram negative pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. Strains exhibiting anti-bacterial activity were subsequently examined for survival in simulated food processing and gastrointestinal tract conditions, such as high temperatures, low pH, starvation and the presence of NaCl and bile salts. Selected strains where then examined for basic safety properties such as antibiotic resistance and haemolytic potential, while their antimicrobial activity was further investigated by PCR screening for possession of known bacteriocin genes. Two chosen strains were then applied on raw chicken meat to evaluate their protective ability against two common food pathogens, Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enteritidis, but also to identify potential spoilage effects by the application of the protective cultures on the food matrix. Antimicrobial activity in vitro was evident against Gram positive indicators, mainly Listeria and Brochothrix spp., while no antibacterial activity was obtained against any of the Gram negative bacteria tested. The antimicrobial activity was of a proteinaceous nature while strains with anti-listerial activity were found to possess one or more bacteriocin genes, mainly enterocins. Strains generally exhibited sensitivity to pH 2.0, but good survival at 45 degrees C, in the presence of bile salts and NaCl as well as during starvation, while variable survival rates were obtained at 55 degrees C. None of the strains was found to be haemolytic while variable antibiotic resistance profiles were obtained. Finally, when the selected strains Enterococcus faecium PCD71 and Lactobacillus fermentum ACA-DC179 were

  16. Salmonella infection in a commercial line of ducks; experimental studies on virulence, intestinal colonization and immune protection.

    PubMed Central

    Barrow, P. A.; Lovell, M. A.; Murphy, C. K.; Page, K.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental infections of different salmonella serotypes were established in a commercial line of ducks to provide baseline information on which control measures might be based. The ducks were very resistant to systemic infection with Salmonella typhimurium, S. enteritidis and S. gallinarum within 36 h of hatching. This was associated with an inherent inability of the strains to multiply in the reticulo-endothelial system. The resistance was not associated with poor invasiveness or serum sensitivity. Individual strains of S. typhimurium, S. enteritidis, S. heidelberg and S. orion colonized the gut well and were excreted in the faeces for at least 6 weeks by ducks when they were infected orally within 2 days of hatching. The main sites of colonization were the caeca and, to a lesser extent, the crop. Viable counts of each inoculated strain in the caeca remained in excess of 10(6) c.f.u. 3 weeks after infection although the organisms had been cleared from the spleen by this time. Much less excretion occurred when the birds were infected at 3 weeks of age. When infected ducks, which had cleared themselves of infection, were challenged orally with the homologous strain expressing a different genetic marker, very low levels of excretion of the challenge strain were detected when compared with a control group. After infection low titres of circulating lipopolysaccharide-specific IgG antibodies were detected by an ELISA. Intestinal colonization of newly hatched ducks with an aroA strain of S. enteritidis resulted in extensive colonization which exerted an exclusion effect on the parent strain inoculated 24 h later. PMID:10487648

  17. Transcriptional changes of cytokines in rooster testis and epididymis during sexual maturation stages and Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Anastasiadou, M; Michailidis, G

    2016-08-01

    Infection of rooster testis and epididymis by pathogens can lead to impaired fertility, resulting in economic losses in the poultry industry. Antimicrobial protection of rooster reproductive organs is, therefore, an important aspect of reproductive physiology. Salmonellosis is one of the most important zoonotic diseases, caused by Salmonella bacteria including Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) and is usually the result of infection of the reproductive organs. Thus, knowledge of the endogenous innate immune mechanisms of the rooster testis and epididymis is an emerging aspect of reproductive physiology. Cytokines are key factors for stimulating the immune response and inflammation in chickens to Salmonella infection. In the present study the expression profile of 11 pro-inflammatory cytokine genes in the rooster testis and epididymis in vivo and transcriptional changes in these organs during sexual maturation and SE infection were investigated. Gene expression analysis data revealed that in both testis and epididymis nine cytokines namely the IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-15, IL-16, IL-17 and IL-18 genes were expressed, while no mRNA transcripts were detected in both organs for IL-2 and IL-4. Furthermore, the expression of various cytokine genes during sexual maturation appeared to be developmentally regulated, while SE infection resulted in a significant up-regulation of IL-1β, -6, -12 and -18 genes in the testis and an increase in the mRNA relative abundance of IL-1β, -6, -12, -16 and -18 in the epididymis of SE-infected sexually mature 28-week-old roosters. These results suggest a cytokine-mediated immune response mechanism against Salmonella infection in the rooster reproductive tract.

  18. Inactivation of Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella Enteritidis by Cymbopogon citratus D.C. Stapf. Essential Oil in Pineapple Juice.

    PubMed

    Leite, Caroline Junqueira Barcellos; de Sousa, Jossana Pereira; Medeiros, José Alberto da Costa; da Conceição, Maria Lúcia; dos Santos Falcão-Silva, Vivyanne; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, the efficacy of Cymbopogon citratus D.C. Stapf. essential oil (CCEO) to provoke a 5-log CFU/ml (5-log) inactivation in a mixed composite of Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merril) juice (4°C) was assessed. Moreover, the effects of CCEO on the physicochemical and sensory quality parameters of pineapple juice were evaluated. The MIC of CCEO was 5 μl/ml against the composite mix examined. For L. monocytogenes and E. coli inoculated in juice containing CCEO (5, 2.5, and 1.25 μl/ml), a ≥5-log reduction was detected after 15 min of exposure. This same result was obtained for Salmonella Enteritidis incubated alone in pineapple juice containing CCEO at 5 and 2.5 μl/ml. Overall, Salmonella Enteritidis was the most tolerant and L. monocytogenes was the most sensitive to CCEO. The physicochemical properties (pH, titratable acidic [citric acid per 100 g], and soluble solids) of pineapple juice containing CCEO (2.5 and 1.25 μl/ml) were maintained. Juice containing CCEO (2.5 and 1.25 μl/ml) exhibited similar scores for odor, appearance, and viscosity compared with juice without CCEO. However, unsatisfactory changes in taste and aftertaste were observed in juices containing CCEO. These results suggest that CCEO could be used as an alternative antimicrobial compound to ensure the safety of pineapple juice, although CCEO at the tested concentrations negatively impacted its taste. Therefore, further studies are needed to determine the balance between microbial safety and taste acceptability of pineapple juice containing CCEO.

  19. Evaluation of virulence and antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis isolates from humans and chicken- and egg-associated sources.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Gokulan, Kuppan; Barnette, Dustyn; Khare, Sangeeta; Rooney, Anthony W; Deck, Joanna; Nayak, Rajesh; Stefanova, Rossina; Hart, Mark E; Foley, Steven L

    2013-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a leading cause of salmonellosis throughout the world and is most commonly associated with the consumption of contaminated poultry and egg products. Salmonella Enteritidis has enhanced ability to colonize and persist in extraintestinal sites within chickens. In this study, 54 Salmonella Enteritidis isolates from human patients (n=28), retail chicken (n=9), broiler farms (n=9), and egg production facilities (n=8) were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, plasmid analysis, genetic relatedness using XbaI and AvrII pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and the presence of putative virulence genes. Nine isolates were evaluated for their abilities to invade and survive in intestinal epithelial and macrophage cell lines. Overall, 56% (n=30) of isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent tested, yet no isolates showed resistance to more than three antimicrobials. All isolates carried a common ∼55-kb plasmid, with some strains containing additional plasmids ranging from 3 to 50 kb. PFGE analysis revealed five XbaI and AvrII clusters. There were significant overlaps in the PFGE patterns of the isolates from human, chicken, and egg houses. All isolates tested PCR positive for iacP, purR, ttrB, spi4H, rmbA, sopE, invA, sopB, spvB, pagC, msgA, spaN, orgA, tolC, and sifA, and negative for iss, virB4, and sipB. Of the isolates selected for virulence testing, those containing the iron acquisition genes, iutA, sitA, and iucA, and ∼50-kb plasmids demonstrated among the highest levels of macrophage and epithelial cell invasion, which may indicate their importance in pathogenesis.

  20. The effect of dietary fructooligosaccharide supplementation on growth performance, intestinal morphology, and immune responses in broiler chickens challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yue; Regassa, Alemu; Kim, Ji Hyuk; Kim, Woo Kyun

    2015-12-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of fructooligosaccharide (FOS) supplementation on growth performance, lymphoid organ weight, intestinal morphology, and immunological status in broilers (n=180) challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Birds were randomly assigned into a 3×2 factorial arrangement that included 1) 3 dietary treatments from d one to 21: positive control (PC), wheat-corn-soybean meal based diet contained antibiotics (virginiamycin and monensin); negative control (NC), as PC without antibiotics; and NC+FOS, as NC supplemented with 0.5% FOS, and 2) 2 intraperitoneal injections: 2 mg/kg Salmonella Enteritidis LPS or sterile phosphate buffered saline (PBS) on d 21. Growth performance and relative lymphoid organ weight were not significantly different among the treatments. Villus height, crypt depth, and total mucosa thickness were significantly increased (P<0.05) in the ileum of broiler chickens fed NC+FOS when compared to PC and NC. Birds in NC+FOS treatment had reduced heterophil but increased monocyte count when compared to NC (P<0.05). Significant diet×challenge interaction was observed on natural IgY levels (P<0.0001), and a significant dietary effect was observed on specific IgY levels in chickens fed NC+FOS (P=0.003). Supplementation of FOS also increased the expression of interleukin (IL)-1ß, -10, and interferon (IFN)-γ mRNA in the ileum of the birds. In summary, Salmonella Enteritidis LPS challenge established significant differences in the immune responses in broiler chickens. FOS supplementation increased ileal mucosa thickness and elevated the expressions of certain cytokine genes. It also led to the alteration of leukocyte compositions and serum IgY levels in response to LPS challenge, suggesting FOS supplementation may be effective to induce protective outcomes in gut health and immunity of broiler chickens.

  1. Propylparaben sensitizes heat-resistant Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Oranienburg to thermal inactivation in liquid egg albumen.

    PubMed

    Gurtler, Joshua B; Jin, Tony Z

    2012-03-01

    Propyl p-hydroxybenzoic acid (propylparaben [PRPA]) is a phenolic antioxidant, known to occur in nature and used as a microbiostat in foods, feeds, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and medications. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) requires that liquid egg white (LEW) be pasteurized at 56.7°C for 3.5 min. This study evaluated the effects of PRPA on the pasteurization sensitivity of Salmonella in LEW. When LEW (pH 7.8) was pasteurized under FSIS conditions, salmonellae declined by 0.5, 4.6, 4.5, > 7.0, and > 7.0 log CFU/ml, with 0, 125, 250, 500, or 1,000 ppm of PRPA, respectively, and D(56.7°C)-values were 2.99, 1.05, 0.68, 0.26 and ≤0.16 min. Albumen (pH 8.9) pasteurized under FSIS standards incurred salmonellae reductions of 3.3, 2.8, 5.2, > 7.0, and > 7.0 log CFU/ml, with 0, 125, 250, 500, or 1,000 ppm of PRPA, respectively, while D(56.7°C)-values were 0.87, 0.99, 0.66, 0.22, and 0.09 min. Adding 500 ppm of PRPA to albumen (pH 7.8) reduced D(56.7°C)-values more than 11-fold, and reduced the time to achieve a 5-log reduction from 15.0 to only 1.3 min. A 7-log reduction in plain LEW (pH 7.8) at 56.7°C required 20.9 min, versus only 1.8 and 1.1 min with 500 and 1,000 ppm of PRPA, respectively. Furthermore, a 7-log reduction in plain LEW (pH 8.9) required 6.1 min, versus only 1.5 and 0.6 min with 500 and 1,000 ppm of PRPA, respectively. This study is the first to report the efficacy of PRPA (pK(a) = 8.4) in sensitizing Salmonella in LEW to thermal pasteurization, while documenting that PRPA retains its antibacterial efficacy at pH levels as high as 8.9.

  2. Acyl homoserine lactone changes the abundance of proteins and the levels of organic acids associated with stationary phase in Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Felipe Alves; Pimentel-Filho, Natan de Jesus; Carrijo, Lanna Clícia; Bento, Cláudia Braga Pereira; Baracat-Pereira, Maria Cristina; Pinto, Uelinton Manoel; de Oliveira, Leandro Licursi; Vanetti, Maria Cristina Dantas

    2017-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is cell-cell communication mechanism mediated by signaling molecules known as autoinducers (AIs) that lead to differential gene expression. Salmonella is unable to synthesize the AI-1 acyl homoserine lactone (AHL), but is able to recognize AHLs produced by other microorganisms through SdiA protein. Our study aimed to evaluate the influence of AI-1 on the abundance of proteins and the levels of organic acids of Salmonella Enteritidis. The presence of N-dodecyl-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL) did not interfere on the growth or the total amount of extracted proteins of Salmonella. However, the abundance of the proteins PheT, HtpG, PtsI, Adi, TalB, PmgI (or GpmI), Eno, and PykF enhanced while the abundance of the proteins RplB, RplE, RpsB, Tsf, OmpA, OmpC, OmpD, and GapA decreased when Salmonella Enteritidis was anaerobically cultivated in the presence of C12-HSL. Additionally, the bacterium produced less succinic, lactic, and acetic acids in the presence of C12-HSL. However, the concentration of extracellular formic acid reached 20.46 mM after 24 h and was not detected when the growth was in the absence of AI-1. Considering the cultivation period for protein extraction, their abundance, process and function, as well as the levels of organic acids, we observed in cells cultivated in presence of C12-HSL a correlation with what is described in the literature as entry into the stationary phase of growth, mainly related to nitrogen and amino acid starvation and acid stress. Further studies are needed in order to determine the specific role of the differentially abundant proteins and extracellular organic acids secreted by Salmonella in the presence of quorum sensing signaling molecules.

  3. Outer membrane vesicles derived from Salmonella Typhimurium mutants with truncated LPS induce cross-protective immune responses against infection of Salmonella enterica serovars in the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiong; Liu, Qing; Yi, Jie; Liang, Kang; Liu, Tian; Roland, Kenneth L; Jiang, Yanlong; Kong, Qingke

    2016-12-01

    Salmonella enterica cause diarrheal and systemic diseases and are of considerable concern worldwide. Vaccines that are cross-protective against multiple serovars could provide effective control of Salmonella-mediated diseases. Bacteria-derived outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are highly immunogenic and are capable of eliciting protective immune responses. Alterations in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) length can result in outer membrane remodeling and composition of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) changing. In this study, we investigated the impact of truncated LPS on both the production and immunogenicity of Salmonella OMVs, including the ability of OMVs to elicit cross-protection against challenge by heterologous Salmonella strains. We found that mutations in waaJ and rfbP enhanced vesiculation, while mutations in waaC, waaF and waaG inhibited this process. Animal experiments indicated that OMVs from waaC, rfaH and rfbP mutants induced stronger serum immune responses compared to OMVs from the parent strain, while all elicited protective responses against the wild-type S. Typhimurium challenge. Furthermore, intranasal or intraperitoneal immunization with OMVs derived from the waaC and rfbP mutants elicited significantly higher cross-reactive IgG responses and provided enhanced cross-protection against S. Choleraesuis and S. Enteritidis challenge than the wild-type OMVs. These results indicate that truncated-LPS OMVs are capable of conferring cross protection against multiple serotypes of Salmonella infection.

  4. Colonization of marker and field strains of Salmonella Enteritidis and Typhimurium in antibiotic treated and non-treated laying hen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In each of three trials, caged laying hens (76, 26, and 33 wk-of-age) were divided into 6 groups designated to receive either maker (nalidixic acid resistance) S. Enteritidis (SE-M), field S. Enteritidis (SE-F), or marker S. Typhimurium (ST-M), and half pretreated with vancomycin (VNC) (n=12). VNC t...

  5. Differential Adaptive Response and Survival of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Planktonic and Biofilm Cells Exposed to Benzalkonium Chloride▿

    PubMed Central

    Mangalappalli-Illathu, Anil K.; Vidović, Sinisa; Korber, Darren R.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the adaptive response and survival of planktonic and biofilm phenotypes of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis adapted to benzalkonium chloride (BC). Planktonic cells and biofilms were continuously exposed to 1 μg ml−1 of BC for 144 h. The proportion of BC-adapted biofilm cells able to survive a lethal BC treatment (30 μg ml−1) was significantly higher (4.6-fold) than that of BC-adapted planktonic cells. Similarly, there were 18.3-fold more survivors among the BC-adapted biofilm cells than among their nonadapted (i.e., without prior BC exposure) cell counterparts at the lethal BC concentration, and this value was significantly higher than the value for BC-adapted planktonic cells versus nonadapted cells (3.2-fold). A significantly higher (P < 0.05) proportion of surviving cells was noticed among BC-adapted biofilm cells relative to BC-