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Sample records for infections salmonella enteritidis

  1. Composition of Gut Microbiota Influences Resistance of Newly Hatched Chickens to Salmonella Enteritidis Infection.

    PubMed

    Varmuzova, Karolina; Kubasova, Tereza; Davidova-Gerzova, Lenka; Sisak, Frantisek; Havlickova, Hana; Sebkova, Alena; Faldynova, Marcela; Rychlik, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Since poultry is a very common source of non-typhoid Salmonella for humans, different interventions aimed at decreasing the prevalence of Salmonella in chickens are understood as an effective measure for decreasing the incidence of human salmonellosis. One such intervention is the use of probiotic or competitive exclusion products. In this study we tested whether microbiota from donor hens of different age will equally protect chickens against Salmonella Enteritidis infection. Newly hatched chickens were therefore orally inoculated with cecal extracts from 1-, 3-, 16-, 28-, and 42-week-old donors and 7 days later, the chickens were infected with S. Enteritidis. The experiment was terminated 4 days later. In the second experiment, groups of newly hatched chickens were inoculated with cecal extracts of 35-week-old hens either on day 1 of life followed by S. Enteritidis infection on day 2 or were infected with S. Enteritidis infection on day 1 followed by therapeutic administration of the cecal extract on day 2 or were inoculated on day 1 of life with a mixture of the cecal extract and S. Enteritidis. This experiment was terminated when the chickens were 5 days old. Both Salmonella culture and chicken gene expression confirmed that inoculation of newly hatched chickens with microbiota from 3-week-old or older chickens protected them against S. Enteritidis challenge. On the other hand, microbiota from 1-week-old donors failed to protect chickens against S. Enteritidis challenge. Microbiota from 35-week-old hens protected chickens even 24 h after administration. However, simultaneous or therapeutic microbiota administration failed to protect chickens against S. Enteritidis infection. Gut microbiota can be used as a preventive measure against S. Enteritidis infection but its composition and early administration is critical for its efficacy. PMID:27379083

  2. Composition of Gut Microbiota Influences Resistance of Newly Hatched Chickens to Salmonella Enteritidis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Varmuzova, Karolina; Kubasova, Tereza; Davidova-Gerzova, Lenka; Sisak, Frantisek; Havlickova, Hana; Sebkova, Alena; Faldynova, Marcela; Rychlik, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Since poultry is a very common source of non-typhoid Salmonella for humans, different interventions aimed at decreasing the prevalence of Salmonella in chickens are understood as an effective measure for decreasing the incidence of human salmonellosis. One such intervention is the use of probiotic or competitive exclusion products. In this study we tested whether microbiota from donor hens of different age will equally protect chickens against Salmonella Enteritidis infection. Newly hatched chickens were therefore orally inoculated with cecal extracts from 1-, 3-, 16-, 28-, and 42-week-old donors and 7 days later, the chickens were infected with S. Enteritidis. The experiment was terminated 4 days later. In the second experiment, groups of newly hatched chickens were inoculated with cecal extracts of 35-week-old hens either on day 1 of life followed by S. Enteritidis infection on day 2 or were infected with S. Enteritidis infection on day 1 followed by therapeutic administration of the cecal extract on day 2 or were inoculated on day 1 of life with a mixture of the cecal extract and S. Enteritidis. This experiment was terminated when the chickens were 5 days old. Both Salmonella culture and chicken gene expression confirmed that inoculation of newly hatched chickens with microbiota from 3-week-old or older chickens protected them against S. Enteritidis challenge. On the other hand, microbiota from 1-week-old donors failed to protect chickens against S. Enteritidis challenge. Microbiota from 35-week-old hens protected chickens even 24 h after administration. However, simultaneous or therapeutic microbiota administration failed to protect chickens against S. Enteritidis infection. Gut microbiota can be used as a preventive measure against S. Enteritidis infection but its composition and early administration is critical for its efficacy. PMID:27379083

  3. Influence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis infection on the composition of chicken cecal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infection of newly hatched chicks with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) results in an inflammatory response in the intestinal tract which may influence the composition of gut microbiota. In this study we were therefore interested whether S. Enteritidis induced inflammation results in changes in the cecal microbiota. To reach this aim, we compared the cecal microbiota of non-infected chickens and those infected by S. Enteritidis by pyrosequencing the V3/V4 variable regions of genes coding for 16S rRNA. Results Cecal microbiota of chickens up to 19 days of life was dominated by representatives of Enterobacteriaceae, Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae, followed by Lactobacillaceae. The presence of Lachnospiraceae did not change after S. Enteritidis infection. Enterobacteriaceae increased and Ruminococcaceae decreased after S. Enteritidis infection in two independent experiments although these results were not significant. A significant increase in both experiments was observed only for the representatives of Lactobacillaceae which may correlate with their microaerophilic growth characteristic compared to the obligate anaerobes from the families Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae. Conclusions We conclude that S. Enteritidis infection influences the composition of the cecal microbiota in chickens but these changes are minor in nature and should be understood more as an indirect consequence of infection and inflammation rather than a positively selected evolutionary trait. PMID:23856245

  4. Salmonella Enteritidis deposition in eggs after experimental infection of laying hens with different oral doses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The continuing attribution of human Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections to internally contaminated eggs has necessitated the commitment of substantial public and private resources to SE testing and control programs in commercial laying flocks. Cost-effective risk reduction requires a detailed and...

  5. Salmonella Enteritidis Deposition inside Eggs after Experimental Infection of Laying Hens with Different Oral Doses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The continuing attribution of human Salmonella Enteritidis infections to internally contaminated eggs has necessitated the commitment of substantial public and private resources to risk reduction and testing programs for commercial laying flocks. Cost-effective risk reduction requires a detailed und...

  6. Transcriptional Response of Chicken Macrophages to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) continues to be the predominant etiologic agent of salmonellosis, with contaminated egg products being the primary source of infection. At the present time, the molecular and immunological mechanisms involved in SE colonization of chicken hosts are not we...

  7. SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEROVAR ENTERITIDIS INFECTION MODULATES DIVERSE FUNCTIONAL PROCESSES OF CHICKEN MACROPHAGE AT THE TRANSCRIPTIONAL LEVEL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) is a major etiologic agent of non-typhoid salmonellosis. The organisms colonize adult chicken hosts without causing overt clinical signs. The immunological mechanisms underlying the silent and persistent infection of chickens by SE are not clearly underst...

  8. TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSE OF CHICKEN MACROPHAGES TO SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEROVAR ENTERITIDIS INFECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transcriptional profiles of chicken macrophages (HD11) infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) were analyzed by using avian macrophage microarray and real time RT-PCR. Out of 4,906 array elements interrogated, 269 genes exhibited a 2-fold change (P < 0.001) over a 24-hour time...

  9. Restaurant Salmonella Enteritidis outbreak associated with an asymptomatic infected food worker.

    PubMed

    Hedican, Erin; Hooker, Carol; Jenkins, Timothy; Medus, Carlota; Jawahir, Selina; Leano, Fe; Smith, Kirk

    2009-11-01

    Salmonella is the most common bacterial cause of foodborne outbreaks in the United States; approximately half of Salmonella outbreaks occur in restaurant settings. In February 2008, investigation of a cluster of Salmonella Enteritidis cases with indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns revealed that five cases had eaten at the same restaurant. Cases were identified through routine surveillance activities and by contacting meal companions of culture-confirmed cases. Well meal companions and well patrons contacted via check stubs served as controls. Illness histories and stool samples were collected from all restaurant employees. Sandwiches were the only menu item or ingredient significantly associated with illness (15 of 15 cases versus 17 of 37 controls; odds ratio, undefined; P < 0.001). None of the six restaurant employees reported experiencing recent gastrointestinal symptoms. The outbreak PFGE subtype of Salmonella Enteritidis was identified in two food workers. One of the positive employees began working at the restaurant shortly before the first exposure date reported by a case, and assisted in the preparation of sandwiches and other foods consumed by cases. The other positive employee rarely, if ever, handled food. The restaurant did not have a glove use policy. There was no evidence of ongoing transmission after exclusion of the positive food workers. This was a restaurant Salmonella Enteritidis outbreak associated with an asymptomatic infected food worker. Routine PFGE subtyping of Salmonella Enteritidis isolates, routine interviewing of cases, and an iterative approach to cluster investigations allowed for timely identification of the source of an outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections.

  10. Butyric acid-based feed additives help protect broiler chickens from Salmonella Enteritidis infection.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rubio, C; Ordóñez, C; Abad-González, J; Garcia-Gallego, A; Honrubia, M Pilar; Mallo, J Jose; Balaña-Fouce, R

    2009-05-01

    Sodium butyrate is a sodium salt of a volatile short-chain fatty acid (butyric acid) used to prevent Salmonella Enteritidis infection in birds. Three groups of fifty 1-d-old broilers each were fed the following diets: T0 = standard broiler diet (control); T1 = standard broiler diet supplemented with 0.92 g/kg of an additive with free sodium butyrate (Gustor XXI B92); and T2 = standard broiler diet supplemented with 0.92 g/kg of an additive with sodium butyrate partially protected with vegetable fats (Gustor XXI BP70). Twenty percent of the birds were orally infected with Salmonella Enteritidis at d 5 posthatching and fecal Salmonella shedding was assessed at d 6, 9, 13, 20, 27, 34, and 41 of the trial. At d 42, all birds were slaughtered and 20 of them dissected: crop, cecum, liver, and spleen were sampled for bacteriological analyses. Both butyrate-based additives showed a significant reduction (P < 0.05) of Salmonella Enteritidis infection in birds from d 27 onward. However, the partially protected butyrate additive was more effective at the late phase of infection. Partially protected butyrate treatment successfully decreased infection not only in the crop and cecum but also in the liver. There were no differences in the spleen. These results suggest that sodium butyrate partially protected with vegetable fats offers a unique balance of free and protected active substances effective all along the gastrointestinal tract because it is slowly released during digestion.

  11. Colonization and organ invasion in chicks experimentally infected with Dermanyssus gallinae contaminated by Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Moro, Claire Valiente; Fravalo, Philippe; Amelot, Michel; Chauve, Claude; Zenner, Lionel; Salvat, Gilles

    2007-08-01

    The poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae) is the most important and common ectoparasite of laying hens in Europe. This haematophagous mite has been experimentally demonstrated to be a vector of Salmonella Enteritidis by acquiring bacteria through the blood meal or cuticular contact. We have evaluated another route of infection by orally inoculating chicks with mites previously infected by S. Enteritidis. Two methods of infecting the mites were tested: mites contaminated by cuticular contact or during the blood meal. After the washing of mites with paraformaldehyde, groups of 10 Salmonella-contaminated mites were inoculated individually into 1-day-old chicks. The titre of the inoculum suspension was evaluated by crushing mites and followed by bacteriological counting. It was 3x10(4) colony-forming units/chick and 2.7x10(6) colony-forming units/chick, respectively, for cuticular contact and orally mediated contamination of mites. Each bird was found to be positive 12 days post-inoculation. Salmonella colonized the intestinal tracts and invaded the livers and spleens. The caecal content concentration reached a mean level of S. Enteritidis of 8.5x10(4) most probable number (MPN) Salmonella/g. This experiment demonstrated the ability of mites to orally infect 1-day-old chicks with subsequent colonization and multiplication of Salmonella. Consequently, mites infected by S. Enteritidis constitute potential reservoir hosts of this bacterium, allowing it to persist in the poultry house as a source of infection for newly introduced animals. If contaminated mites are found in poultry facilities, effective red mite control should be performed before new batches are introduced into the facility.

  12. Experimental infection of Salmonella Enteritidis by the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae.

    PubMed

    Valiente Moro, C; Chauve, C; Zenner, L

    2007-05-31

    Dermanyssus gallinae is an important ectoparasite of laying hens in Europe and it is suspected of being a vector of pathogens. We carried out an in vitro study to evaluate the role of D. gallinae as a vector of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Enteritidis. Two means of infecting the mite were tested: through the blood meal and after cuticular contact. Mites became carriers of Salmonella immediately after the infection with 29% and 53%, respectively, for oral route and cuticular contact. This percentage increased over time until it reached 95% (D7) and 80% (D14). The numerical identification of bacteria on the selective medium SM ID demonstrated the multiplication of Salmonella inside previously infected mites. In addition, transovarial passage as well as transstadial passage (from N1 to N2 stages) were demonstrated. Moreover, the observation of a negative effect of Salmonella on Dermanyssus oviposition was also observed. Finally, previously infected mites were able to contaminate the blood during the blood meal. Therefore, it appears that D. gallinae may act as a biological vector of S. Enteritidis under experimental conditions. It may represent a suitable environment for the development of Salmonella and could be an additional factor for the persistence of salmonellosis infection between successive flocks.

  13. Curcuma and Scutellaria plant extracts protect chickens against inflammation and Salmonella Enteritidis infection.

    PubMed

    Varmuzova, Karolina; Matulova, Marta Elsheimer; Gerzova, Lenka; Cejkova, Darina; Gardan-Salmon, Delphine; Panhéleux, Marina; Robert, Fabrice; Sisak, Frantisek; Havlickova, Hana; Rychlik, Ivan

    2015-09-01

    After a ban on the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in farm animals in the European Union in 2006, an interest in alternative products with antibacterial or anti-inflammatory properties has increased. In this study, we therefore tested the effects of extracts from Curcuma longa and Scutellaria baicalensis used as feed additives against cecal inflammation induced by heat stress or Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) infection in chickens. Curcuma extract alone was not enough to decrease gut inflammation induced by heat stress. However, a mixture of Curcuma and Scutellaria extracts used as feed additives decreased gut inflammation induced by heat or S. Enteritidis, decreased S. Enteritidis counts in the cecum but was of no negative effect on BW or humoral immune response. Using next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA we found out that supplementation of feed with the 2 plant extracts had no effect on microbiota diversity. However, if the plant extract supplementation was provided to the chickens infected with S. Enteritidis, Faecalibacterium, and Lactobacillus, both bacterial genera with known positive effects on gut health were positively selected. The supplementation of chicken feed with extracts from Curcuma and Scutelleria thus may be used in poultry production to effectively decrease gut inflammation and increase chicken performance. PMID:26188032

  14. Curcuma and Scutellaria plant extracts protect chickens against inflammation and Salmonella Enteritidis infection.

    PubMed

    Varmuzova, Karolina; Matulova, Marta Elsheimer; Gerzova, Lenka; Cejkova, Darina; Gardan-Salmon, Delphine; Panhéleux, Marina; Robert, Fabrice; Sisak, Frantisek; Havlickova, Hana; Rychlik, Ivan

    2015-09-01

    After a ban on the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in farm animals in the European Union in 2006, an interest in alternative products with antibacterial or anti-inflammatory properties has increased. In this study, we therefore tested the effects of extracts from Curcuma longa and Scutellaria baicalensis used as feed additives against cecal inflammation induced by heat stress or Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) infection in chickens. Curcuma extract alone was not enough to decrease gut inflammation induced by heat stress. However, a mixture of Curcuma and Scutellaria extracts used as feed additives decreased gut inflammation induced by heat or S. Enteritidis, decreased S. Enteritidis counts in the cecum but was of no negative effect on BW or humoral immune response. Using next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA we found out that supplementation of feed with the 2 plant extracts had no effect on microbiota diversity. However, if the plant extract supplementation was provided to the chickens infected with S. Enteritidis, Faecalibacterium, and Lactobacillus, both bacterial genera with known positive effects on gut health were positively selected. The supplementation of chicken feed with extracts from Curcuma and Scutelleria thus may be used in poultry production to effectively decrease gut inflammation and increase chicken performance.

  15. Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis Infection Alters the Indigenous Microbiota Diversity in Young Layer Chicks.

    PubMed

    Mon, Khin K Z; Saelao, Perot; Halstead, Michelle M; Chanthavixay, Ganrea; Chang, Huai-Chen; Garas, Lydia; Maga, Elizabeth A; Zhou, Huaijun

    2015-01-01

    Avian gastrointestinal (GI) tracts are highly populated with a diverse array of microorganisms that share a symbiotic relationship with their hosts and contribute to the overall health and disease state of the intestinal tract. The microbiome of the young chick is easily prone to alteration in its composition by both exogenous and endogenous factors, especially during the early posthatch period. The genetic background of the host and exposure to pathogens can impact the diversity of the microbial profile that consequently contributes to the disease progression in the host. The objective of this study was to profile the composition and structure of the gut microbiota in young chickens from two genetically distinct highly inbred lines. Furthermore, the effect of the Salmonella Enteritidis infection on altering the composition makeup of the chicken microbiome was evaluated through the 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. One-day-old layer chicks were challenged with S. Enteritidis and the host cecal microbiota profile as well as the degree of susceptibility to Salmonella infection was examined at 2 and 7 days post infection. Our result indicated that host genotype had a limited effect on resistance to S. Enteritidis infection. Alpha diversity, beta diversity, and overall microbiota composition were analyzed for four factors: host genotype, age, treatment, and postinfection time points. S. Enteritidis infection in young chicks was found to significantly reduce the overall diversity of the microbiota population with expansion of Enterobacteriaceae family. These changes indicated that Salmonella colonization in the GI tract of the chickens has a direct effect on altering the natural development of the GI microbiota. The impact of S. Enteritidis infection on microbial communities was also more substantial in the late stage of infection. Significant inverse correlation between Enterobacteriaceae and Lachnospiraceae family in both non-infected and infected groups, suggested

  16. Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis Infection Alters the Indigenous Microbiota Diversity in Young Layer Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Mon, Khin K. Z.; Saelao, Perot; Halstead, Michelle M.; Chanthavixay, Ganrea; Chang, Huai-Chen; Garas, Lydia; Maga, Elizabeth A.; Zhou, Huaijun

    2015-01-01

    Avian gastrointestinal (GI) tracts are highly populated with a diverse array of microorganisms that share a symbiotic relationship with their hosts and contribute to the overall health and disease state of the intestinal tract. The microbiome of the young chick is easily prone to alteration in its composition by both exogenous and endogenous factors, especially during the early posthatch period. The genetic background of the host and exposure to pathogens can impact the diversity of the microbial profile that consequently contributes to the disease progression in the host. The objective of this study was to profile the composition and structure of the gut microbiota in young chickens from two genetically distinct highly inbred lines. Furthermore, the effect of the Salmonella Enteritidis infection on altering the composition makeup of the chicken microbiome was evaluated through the 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. One-day-old layer chicks were challenged with S. Enteritidis and the host cecal microbiota profile as well as the degree of susceptibility to Salmonella infection was examined at 2 and 7 days post infection. Our result indicated that host genotype had a limited effect on resistance to S. Enteritidis infection. Alpha diversity, beta diversity, and overall microbiota composition were analyzed for four factors: host genotype, age, treatment, and postinfection time points. S. Enteritidis infection in young chicks was found to significantly reduce the overall diversity of the microbiota population with expansion of Enterobacteriaceae family. These changes indicated that Salmonella colonization in the GI tract of the chickens has a direct effect on altering the natural development of the GI microbiota. The impact of S. Enteritidis infection on microbial communities was also more substantial in the late stage of infection. Significant inverse correlation between Enterobacteriaceae and Lachnospiraceae family in both non-infected and infected groups, suggested

  17. A birthday party, home-made ice cream, and an outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 6 infection.

    PubMed

    Dodhia, H; Kearney, J; Warburton, F

    1998-03-01

    An outbreak of food poisoning caused by Salmonella enteritidis phage type (PT) 6 followed a children's birthday party. Thirty of 37 (attack rate 81%) attendees were ill, with diarrhoea and fever being the most common symptoms. One child required hospital admission for rehydration. No deaths occurred. Stool specimens from 24 out of 25 people who submitted them were positive for S. enteritidis PT 6 and one was positive for S. enteritidis PT4. Epidemiological investigation indicated that home-made ice cream was the vehicle of infection. Fresh shell eggs used raw in the ice cream were the likeliest source of infection. No ice cream or eggs were available for microbiological analysis. S. enteritidis PT6 accounts for a small but increasing proportion of all salmonellas in humans and its epidemiology is thought to be similar to S. enteritidis PT4. Thus current recommendations on the use of raw eggs in cooking continue to apply.

  18. Persistence of fecal shedding of Salmonella Enteritidis by experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because Salmonella Enteritidis can be deposited inside eggs laid by infected hens, the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial egg-producing flocks is an important risk factor for human illness. Opportunities for the introduction, transmission, and persistence of salmonellae in poultry are potenti...

  19. Persistence of fecal shedding of Salmonella Enteritidis by experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    : Because Salmonella Enteritidis can be deposited inside eggs laid by infected hens, the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial egg-producing flocks is an important risk factor for human illness. Opportunities for the introduction, transmission, and persistence of salmonellae in poultry are poten...

  20. Use of bacteriophage for biological control of Salmonella Enteritidis infection in chicken.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Myung-Seob; Lee, Dong-Hun; Lee, Yu-Na; Park, Jae-Keun; Youn, Ha-Na; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Yang, Si-Yong; Cho, Young-Wook; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Choi, In-Soo; Song, Chang-Seon

    2012-12-01

    Bacteriophage ΦCJ07 with broad host ranges for Salmonella strains isolated from sewage effluent were used to reduce Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infection in chickens. One-day-old chicks challenged with 5×10(7) colony-forming units/bird of SE were cohabitated with contact chicks and treated with three concentrations (10(5), 10(7) and 10(9) plaque forming units (PFU)/g) of bacteriophage prepared as a feed additive for 21days after challenge. Salmonella in the intestine was quantified and environmental contamination level was examined at 1, 2 and 3weeks after challenge. All treatments reduced intestinal SE colonization in challenged and contact chickens and reduced the environmental contamination level, but the reductions produced by 10(7) and 10(9)PFU/g of bacteriophage were significant (P<0.05) as compared with untreated controls. In addition, seven out of 10 (70%) contact chickens treated with 10(9)PFU/g of bacteriophage had no detectable intestinal Salmonella at 3weeks after treatment, suggesting that bacteriophage therapy significantly prevented the horizontal transmission of SE. These results provide important insights into preventive and control strategies against SE infection in poultry and indicate that the use of bacteriophage could reduce the incidence of Salmonella food poisoning. PMID:22795674

  1. Four linked outbreaks of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 4 infection--the continuing egg threat.

    PubMed

    Ejidokun, O O; Killalea, D; Cooper, M; Holmyard, S; Cross, A; Kemp, C

    2000-06-01

    Four outbreaks of Salmonella enteritidis phage type (PT) 4 occurred among guests at functions for which a single commercial caterer supplied food. Retrospective cohort studies were used to describe the epidemiology of three of these outbreaks and identify the vehicle(s) responsible. Of 172 guests at these three events, 47 fitted the clinical case definition for illness and 24 cases were confirmed to have S. enteritidis PT4 infection. Food containing raw egg was identified epidemiologically as the likely vehicle of infection in two of the three outbreaks (odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals 9.1 (2.2-39.9) and 6.9 (1.2-46.4)). Logistic regression analysis yielded OR = 10.7 (p = 0.0022) and OR = 9.3 (p = 0.015) for egg consumption in two of the outbreaks. These outbreaks highlighted the continuing need to remind the public and commercial caterers of the potential high risks of contracting salmonella from shell eggs. Education of caterers includes advice to obtain eggs and other products from reputable and identifiable suppliers.

  2. Severe infections caused by Salmonella Enteritidis PT8/7 linked to a private barbecue.

    PubMed

    Mertens, E; Kreher, H; Rabsch, W; Bornhofen, B; Alpers, K; Burckhardt, F

    2013-02-01

    A cohort study on a barbecue-associated Salmonella outbreak was conducted to describe the burden of disease and to identify the outbreak vehicle. Dose-response relationships were tested with Fisher's exact and Wilcoxon rank sum tests (alpha = 0·05). S. Enteritidis isolates were cultured and phage-typed. Information was available for 11 out of 14 individuals attending the barbecue; all were healthy young adults (median age 27 years). The attack rate was 100%. Three cases were hospitalized and two developed acute pancreatitis. The exposure common to all cases was a vegetable pasta salad that had been stored unrefrigerated for 23 h. Consuming higher doses was associated with longer median symptom duration (7 days vs. 4 days, P = 0·11). S. Enteritidis was found in the stools of nine barbecue guests. Phage type 8/7 was identified in the stools of the salad preparer and one barbecue guest. This outbreak shows that S. Enteritidis can cause serious infection in young healthy individuals without well-known risk factors.

  3. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Jones, Deana R; Anderson, Kenneth E

    2013-02-01

    More human illnesses caused by Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis throughout the world have been linked to the consumption of contaminated eggs than to any other food vehicle. Deposition of this pathogen in the edible contents of eggs occurs when systemic infections of laying hens involve colonization of reproductive organs. In recent years, the consequences of different housing systems for laying flocks have become the focus of international attention from both animal welfare and public health perspectives. Nevertheless, many questions remain unresolved regarding the food safety implications of various laying hen production systems. The present study assessed the effects of 2 different housing types (conventional cages and colony cages enriched with perching, nesting, and scratching areas) on the invasion of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens. In 2 trials, groups of laying hens housed in each cage system were orally inoculated with doses of 1.0 × 10(7) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis. At 5 to 6 d postinoculation, hens were euthanized and samples of internal organs were removed for bacteriologic culturing. For both trials combined, Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered from 95.3% of cecal samples, with no significant differences observed between housing systems. However, Salmonella Enteritidis was detected at significantly (P < 0.05) higher frequencies from hens in conventional cages than from hens in enriched cages for samples of livers (96.9 vs. 75.0%), spleens (93.8 vs. 53.1%), ovaries (25.0 vs. 10.4%), and oviducts (19.8 vs. 2.1%). These results demonstrate that differences in housing systems for egg-laying flocks can affect the susceptibility of hens to colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis. PMID:23300315

  4. Egg Quality Assurance Programs and Egg-associated Salmonella Enteritidis Infections, United States

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Patricia M.; Meltzer, Martin I.; Braden, Chris R.; Tauxe, Robert V.

    2004-01-01

    A Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis epidemic in the United States began in 1978, spread to much of the country in the following decade, and began declining in 1996. We examined correlations between annual changes in S. Enteritidis incidence in humans and introductions of egg quality assurance programs (EQAPs) in some states to reduce S. Enteritidis contamination of eggs. Before EQAPs, 62% of the changes in S. Enteritidis incidence were higher than the baseline for each state. After EQAPs, 73%–84% of the changes were below the baseline. Regression analysis showed that a 1% increase in the number of eggs produced under an EQAP was associated with a 0.14% decrease in S. Enteritidis incidence (p < 0.05). These data indicate that EQAPs probably played a major role in reducing S. Enteritidis illness in these states. PMID:15504264

  5. Salmonella enteritidis, phase type 4 infection in a commercial layer flock in southern California: bacteriologic and epidemiologic findings.

    PubMed

    Kinde, H; Read, D H; Chin, R P; Bickford, A A; Walker, R L; Ardans, A; Breitmeyer, R E; Willoughby, D; Little, H E; Kerr, D; Gardner, I A

    1996-01-01

    Salmonella enteritidis, phage type 4 (SE PT4), was isolated from five of six 27-wk-old layer chickens submitted for necropsy from a flock of 43,000. Bacteriologic and epidemiologic investigations on the ranch revealed that five of the eight flocks (n = 176,000) were infected. The prevalence of SE PT4 in randomly selected healthy birds ranged from 1.7% (in caged birds) to 50% (in free-range birds) and prevalence in culled birds (kept on dirt floor houses) ranged from 14% to 42%. The estimated overall prevalence of group D Salmonella in eggs contaminated with group D Salmonella was 2.28 per 10,000. The estimated prevalence of group D Salmonella in eggs from caged birds in three infected houses ranged from 1.5 to 4.1 per 10,000, whereas in two houses of free-range birds, prevalence was 14.9 to 19.1 per 10,000. Three of the eight flocks on the ranch remained negative for Salmonella between May 1994 and December 1995 or until removed from the ranch. Salmonella enteritidis PT4 was also isolated from 12.5% (6 of 48) of mice; 57% (four of seven) of cats; and two of two skunks tested. Environmental drag swabs and well water samples yielded multiple serotypes of Salmonella (23/180 and 5/14, respectively) but not S. enteritidis.

  6. Excision of an unstable pathogenicity island in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is induced during infection of phagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Tania S; Nieto, Pamela A; Tobar, Hugo E; Salazar-Echegarai, Francisco J; Lizana, Rodrigo J; Quezada, Carolina P; Santiviago, Carlos A; Araya, Daniela V; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M; Bueno, Susan M

    2011-01-01

    The availability of the complete genome sequence of several Salmonella enterica serovars has revealed the presence of unstable genetic elements in these bacteria, such as pathogenicity islands and prophages. This is the case of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis), a bacterium that causes gastroenteritis in humans and systemic infection in mice. The whole genome sequence analysis for S. Enteritidis unveiled the presence of several genetic regions that are absent in other Salmonella serovars. These regions have been denominated "regions of difference" (ROD). In this study we show that ROD21, one of such regions, behaves as an unstable pathogenicity island. We observed that ROD21 undergoes spontaneous excision by two independent recombination events, either under laboratory growth conditions or during infection of murine cells. Importantly, we also found that one type of excision occurred at higher rates when S. Enteritidis was residing inside murine phagocytic cells. These data suggest that ROD21 is an unstable pathogenicity island, whose frequency of excision depends on the environmental conditions found inside phagocytic cells.

  7. Detecting Salmonella Enteritidis in Laying Hens and Eggs after Experimental Infection at Different Oral Dose Levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The attribution of human illness to eggs contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis has led to substantial commitments of resources (by both government and industry) to risk reduction and testing programs in egg-laying flocks. Cost-effective application of testing requires a thorough understanding of ...

  8. An outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 5a infection in a residential home for elderly people.

    PubMed

    Hansell, A L; Sen, S; Sufi, F; McCallum, A

    1998-09-01

    The first outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis phage type (PT) 5a infection to be reported occurred after a party in a residential home for elderly people in May 1995. The party was attended attended by 96 residents, staff and guests. S. enteritidis PT5a was isolated from 14 of the 25 clinical cases identified after the party and S. enteritidis PT4 from another clinical case. Two elderly residents with S. enteritidis PT5a infection died. Infection with S. enteritidis PT5a was associated with consumption of prawn in mayonnaise vol-au-vents, sausage rolls, corned beef sandwiches, and sausages. The investigation of this outbreak illustrated the difficulty that elderly people may have in the completion of questionnaires. It also highlighted areas for intervention; such as reminders about basic hygiene precautions to prevent secondary spread and the importance of coordinated reinforcement in the workplace of formal food hygiene training for cooks. The Food Safety Regulations 1995 came into force soon after this outbreak: their implementation would probably have prevented it.

  9. Infection of mice by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis involves additional genes that are absent in the genome of serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Silva, Cecilia A; Blondel, Carlos J; Quezada, Carolina P; Porwollik, Steffen; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L; Toro, Cecilia S; Zaldívar, Mercedes; Contreras, Inés; McClelland, Michael; Santiviago, Carlos A

    2012-02-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis causes a systemic, typhoid-like infection in newly hatched poultry and mice. In the present study, a library of 54,000 transposon mutants of S. Enteritidis phage type 4 (PT4) strain P125109 was screened for mutants deficient in the in vivo colonization of the BALB/c mouse model using a microarray-based negative-selection screening. Mutants in genes known to contribute to systemic infection (e.g., Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 [SPI-2], aro, rfa, rfb, phoP, and phoQ) and enteric infection (e.g., SPI-1 and SPI-5) in this and other Salmonella serovars displayed colonization defects in our assay. In addition, a strong attenuation was observed for mutants in genes and genomic islands that are not present in S. Typhimurium or in most other Salmonella serovars. These genes include a type I restriction/modification system (SEN4290 to SEN4292), the peg fimbrial operon (SEN2144A to SEN2145B), a putative pathogenicity island (SEN1970 to SEN1999), and a type VI secretion system remnant SEN1001, encoding a hypothetical protein containing a lysin motif (LysM) domain associated with peptidoglycan binding. Proliferation defects for mutants in these individual genes and in exemplar genes for each of these clusters were confirmed in competitive infections with wild-type S. Enteritidis. A ΔSEN1001 mutant was defective for survival within RAW264.7 murine macrophages in vitro. Complementation assays directly linked the SEN1001 gene to phenotypes observed in vivo and in vitro. The genes identified here may perform novel virulence functions not characterized in previous Salmonella models.

  10. Prophylactic Bacteriophage Administration More Effective than Post-infection Administration in Reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Shedding in Quail.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mosab; Karimi Torshizi, M Amir; Rahimi, Shaban; Dennehy, John J

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by Salmonella bacteria, often through poultry products, are a serious public health issue. Because of drawbacks associated with antibiotic prophylaxis, alternative treatments are sought. Bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) may provide an effective alternative, but concerns remain with respect to bacteriophage stability and effectiveness. To this end, we assessed the stability of a novel bacteriophage isolated from poultry excreta, siphovirus PSE, and its effectiveness in reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we sought to determine how the timing (prophylactic or therapeutic) and route (oral gavage or vent lip) of PSE administration impacted its effectiveness. Here we report that significant quantities of viable PSE bacteriophages were recovered following exposure to high and low pH, high temperatures, and bile salts, testifying to its ability to survive extreme conditions. In addition, we found that ileal lactic acid bacteria and Streptococcus spp. counts increased, but colibacilli and total aerobe counts decreased, in quail receiving phage PSE through both oral gavage and vent lip routes. In other experiments, we assessed the efficiency of PSE administration, in both prophylactic and therapeutic contexts, via either oral gavage or vent lip administration, on S. Enteritidis colonization of quail cecal tonsils. Our results demonstrate that administration of PSE as a preventive agent could reduce the S. Enteritidis colonization more effectively than post-challenge administration. Furthermore, oral administration of PSE phage is a more effective prophylactic tool for reduction of S. Enteritidis shedding in poultry than is vent lip administration. PMID:27555842

  11. Prophylactic Bacteriophage Administration More Effective than Post-infection Administration in Reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Shedding in Quail

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Mosab; Karimi Torshizi, M. Amir; Rahimi, Shaban; Dennehy, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by Salmonella bacteria, often through poultry products, are a serious public health issue. Because of drawbacks associated with antibiotic prophylaxis, alternative treatments are sought. Bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) may provide an effective alternative, but concerns remain with respect to bacteriophage stability and effectiveness. To this end, we assessed the stability of a novel bacteriophage isolated from poultry excreta, siphovirus PSE, and its effectiveness in reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we sought to determine how the timing (prophylactic or therapeutic) and route (oral gavage or vent lip) of PSE administration impacted its effectiveness. Here we report that significant quantities of viable PSE bacteriophages were recovered following exposure to high and low pH, high temperatures, and bile salts, testifying to its ability to survive extreme conditions. In addition, we found that ileal lactic acid bacteria and Streptococcus spp. counts increased, but colibacilli and total aerobe counts decreased, in quail receiving phage PSE through both oral gavage and vent lip routes. In other experiments, we assessed the efficiency of PSE administration, in both prophylactic and therapeutic contexts, via either oral gavage or vent lip administration, on S. Enteritidis colonization of quail cecal tonsils. Our results demonstrate that administration of PSE as a preventive agent could reduce the S. Enteritidis colonization more effectively than post-challenge administration. Furthermore, oral administration of PSE phage is a more effective prophylactic tool for reduction of S. Enteritidis shedding in poultry than is vent lip administration. PMID:27555842

  12. Salmonella enteritidis infections in France and the United States: characterization by a deterministic model.

    PubMed Central

    Watier, L; Richardson, S; Hubert, B

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Epidemiological surveillance can be used to identify problems, suggest hypotheses, and assess the effectiveness of preventive actions. These objectives are pursued in the analysis of the dynamic evolution of Salmonella enteritidis infections. In this analysis, development of the epidemic in France and the United States is compared. METHODS. This analysis is based on the formulation of a simple deterministic compartmental model, in which human contact with contaminated food is expressed in terms of a baseline transmission rate. RESULTS. In France, the baseline transmission rate, stable up until 1986, is multiplied by 2.3 in 1987 and by 4.1 in 1988. There is no evidence of a slowdown of the linear rate of increase. In the Middle Atlantic region of the United States, the linear increase of the epidemic is similar to that observed in France. From 1990 a potential effect of the preventive measures is observed. CONCLUSIONS. The pattern of increase of the baseline transmission rate is similar in France and in the Middle Atlantic region of the United States. However, preventive measures, used in both areas, appeared more effective in the United States. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:8259797

  13. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Jones, Deana R; Anderson, Kenneth E; Karcher, Darrin M

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiologic analyses have linked the frequency of human infections with Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis to the consumption of contaminated eggs and thus to the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial egg-laying flocks. Contamination of the edible contents of eggs by Salmonella Enteritidis is a consequence of the colonization of reproductive tissues in systemically infected hens. The animal welfare implications of laying hen housing systems have been widely debated, but no definitive consensus has yet emerged about the food safety significance of poultry housing options. The present study sought to determine the effects of two different bird stocking densities on the invasion of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in groups of experimentally infected laying hens housed in colony cages enriched with perching and nesting areas. In two trials, groups of laying hens were distributed at two different stocking densities into colony cages and (along with a group housed in conventional cages) orally inoculated with doses of 1.0 × 10(7) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis. At 5 to 6 d post-inoculation, hens were euthanized and samples of internal organs were removed for bacteriologic culturing. For both trials combined, Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered at a significantly (P < 0.05) greater frequency from hens in enriched colony cages at the higher stocking density than at the lower density from livers (75.0% vs. 51.4%) and ovaries (51.4% vs. 30.6%). However, spleens from hens in enriched colony cages at the higher stocking density were significantly less often positive for Salmonella Enteritidis than from hens in conventional cages at that same density (90.3% vs. 68.1%). These results suggest that stocking density can influence the susceptibility of hens to Salmonella Enteritidis, but other housing systems parameters may also contribute to the outcome of infections. PMID:26944976

  14. Effects of probiotics and maternal vaccination on Salmonella enteritidis infection in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Avila, L A F; Nascimento, V P; Salle, C T P; Moraes, H L S

    2006-12-01

    The effects of probiotics and maternal vaccination with an inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) vaccine on day-old chicks challenged with SE were evaluated. A 2 X 3 factorial arrangement was used (with or without probiotics; breeders nonvaccinated, vaccinated intramuscularly, or vaccinated intraperitoneally). Three trials were conducted in isolation cabinets and SE challenge was different between trials. The number of SE organisms per chick and the time interval between housing and introduction of seeder birds (hereafter called challenge) were 1.6 X 10(8) and 1 hr (Trial I), 1.8 X 10(6) and 12 hr (Trial II), and 1.2 X 10(4) and 24 hr (Trial III). SE recovery was assessed in ceca and liver at 3, 5, and 7 days postchallenge, and the number of colony-forming units (CFU) in ceca was evaluated at 5 and 7 days postchallenge. The number of SE (log CFU) in the ceca reduced 0.56 log (from 7.59 to 7.03) and 1.45 log (7.62 to 6.17) because of the treatment with probiotics in Trials II and III, respectively. The greater reduction in Trial III indicates the importance of the early use of probiotics on the prevention of SE infection. Treatment with probiotics resulted in a smaller number of SE-positive livers after 5 days postchallenge on Trial III. Although there was no significant effect of maternal vaccination on the number of SE CFU in the ceca, a significant effect of maternal vaccination on the SE CFU was observed in the liver, but not in the ceca at 5 days after challenge. PMID:17274302

  15. An outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis infection at a fast-food restaurant: implications for foodhandler-associated transmission.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, C W; White, K E; Johnson, J A; Edmonson, L M; Soler, J T; Korlath, J A; Theurer, L S; MacDonald, K L; Osterholm, M T

    1991-12-01

    An outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis infection occurred in patrons and employees of a fast-food restaurant. Transmission took place over a 9-day period. A single employee (employee A) was identified who had onset of gastrointestinal illness 1 day before the first reported patron exposures and had S. enteritidis isolated from stool. A case-control study of 37 ill and 20 healthy patrons who ate during shifts worked by employee A demonstrated that curly-fried potatoes and ice (odds ratio [OR], 6.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-33.7; P = .007), both food items handled bare-handed by employee A, were associated with illness. Employees who worked two or more shifts with employee A were more likely to be infected than those who did not work with employee A (OR, 4.4; CI, 1.0-19.5; P = .03). Foodhandlers who subsequently became infected apparently contaminated multiple food items with additional transmission to patrons. This outbreak illustrates the potential for foodhandlers in a fast-food restaurant setting who are infected with Salmonella to be a source of transmission.

  16. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The frequency of human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) has been linked to contaminated eggs and thus to SE prevalence in commercial egg-laying flocks. Contamination of the edible contents of eggs is a consequence of SE colonization of reproductive tissues in systemically infected hens. T...

  17. A colonisation-inhibition culture consisting of Salmonella Enteritidis and Typhimurium ΔhilAssrAfliG strains protects against infection by strains of both serotypes in broilers.

    PubMed

    De Cort, W; Mot, D; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Van Immerseel, F

    2014-08-01

    Consumption of contaminated poultry meat is still an important cause of Salmonella infections in humans and there is a need for control methods that protect broilers from day-of-hatch until slaughter age against infection with Salmonella. Colonisation-inhibition, a concept in which a live Salmonella strain is orally administered to day-old chickens and protects against subsequent challenge, can potentially be used as control method. In this study, the efficacy of a Salmonella Typhimurium ΔhilAssrAfliG strain as a colonisation-inhibition strain for protection of broilers against Salmonella Typhimurium was evaluated. Administration of a Salmonella Typhimurium ΔhilAssrAfliG strain to day-old broiler chickens decreased faecal shedding and strongly reduced caecal and internal organ colonisation of a Salmonella Typhimurium challenge strain administered one day later using a seeder bird model. In addition, it was verified whether a colonisation-inhibition culture could be developed that protects against both Salmonella Enteritidis and Typhimurium. Therefore, the Salmonella Typhimurium ΔhilAssrAfliG strain was orally administered simultaneously with a Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain to day-old broiler chickens, which resulted in a decreased caecal and internal organ colonisation for both a Salmonella Enteritidis and a Salmonella Typhimurium challenge strain short after hatching, using a seeder bird model. The combined culture was not protective against Salmonella Paratyphi B varietas Java challenge, indicating serotype-specific protection mechanisms. The data suggest that colonisation-inhibition can potentially be used as a versatile control method to protect poultry against several Salmonella serotypes. PMID:24975814

  18. Pathogenic Role of SEF14, SEF17, and SEF21 Fimbriae in Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Infection of Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Rajashekara, Gireesh; Munir, Shirin; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.; Halvorson, David A.; Wells, Carol L.; Nagaraja, Kakambi V.

    2000-01-01

    Very little is known about the contribution of surface appendages of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis to pathogenesis in chickens. This study was designed to clarify the role of SEF14, SEF17, and SEF21 fimbriae in serovar Enteritidis pathogenesis. Stable, single, defined sefA (SEF14), agfA (SEF17), and fimA (SEF21) insertionally inactivated fimbrial gene mutants of serovar Enteritidis were constructed. All mutant strains invaded Caco-2 and HT-29 enterocytes at levels similar to that of the wild type. Both mutant and wild-type strains were ingested equally well by chicken macrophage cell lines HD11 and MQ-NCSU. There were no significant differences in the abilities of these strains to colonize chicken ceca. The SEF14− strain was isolated in lower numbers from the livers of infected chickens and was cleared from the spleens faster than other strains. No significant differences in fecal shedding of these strains were observed. PMID:10742278

  19. Differences in the early response of hatchlings of different chicken breeding lines to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis infection.

    PubMed

    Schokker, D; Peters, T H F; Hoekman, A J W; Rebel, J M J; Smits, M A

    2012-02-01

    Poultry products are the major source of food-borne Salmonella infection in humans. Broiler lines selected to be more resistant to Salmonella could reduce the transfer of Salmonella to humans. To investigate differences in the susceptibility of newly hatched chicks to oral infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, 3 commercial broiler lines (A, B, and C) were infected immediately after hatch and compared to healthy controls at 0.33, 1, and 2 d postinfection. Weight, bacteriological examination, and the jejunal influx of CD4, CD8, TCRαβ, TCRγδ, and KUL01 (macrophages and dendritic cells) cells that are positive was investigated. In addition, the jejunal transcriptional response was analyzed using whole-genome chicken cDNA arrays. Salmonella colony-forming unit counts from cecal content and liver revealed that Salmonella enterica entered the body at 0.33 d postinfection. Broiler line A appeared most susceptible to intestinal colonization and the systemic spread of Salmonella. In addition, the Salmonella-induced jejunal influx of macrophages in this line showed a clear increase in time, which is in contrast to lines B and C. On the other hand, all lines showed a peak of CD4(+) cells at 1 d postinfection when infected chicks were compared to control chicks. The transcriptional response of line A clearly differed from the responses in lines B and C. Functional analysis indicated that the majority of the differentially expressed genes at 0.33 d postinfection in line A were involved in cell-cycle functions, whereas at 2 d postinfection the majority of the differentially expressed genes could be assigned to inflammatory disorder, differentiation and proliferation of (T) lymphocytes. These data indicate that hatchlings of different broiler lines differ in their systemic spread of Salmonella and suggest that intestinal barrier functions, as well as immunological responses, may be the underlying factors. We hypothesize that the differences between genetic

  20. The relationship between the numbers of Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg, or Salmonella Hadar colonizing reproductive tissues of experimentally infected laying hens and deposition inside eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of eggs by Salmonella Enteritidis has been a prominent cause of human illness for several decades and is the focus of a recently implemented national regulatory plan for egg-producing flocks in the United States. S. Heidelberg has also been identified as an egg-transmitted pathogen. Th...

  1. The Relationship between the Numbers of Salmonella Enteritidis, S. Heidelberg, or S. Hadar Colonizing Reproductive Tissues of Experimentally Infected Laying Hens and Deposition inside Eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella deposition inside eggs results from reproductive tract colonization in laying hens. In the present study, groups of hens were orally infected with S. Enteritidis, S. Heidelberg, or S. Hadar. No significant differences were observed between strains in either the frequency or numbers of Sal...

  2. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiologic analyses have linked the frequency of human infections with Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis to the consumption of contaminated eggs and thus to the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial egg-laying flocks. Contamination of the edible contents of eggs by S...

  3. Pathologic and bacteriologic findings in 27-week-old commercial laying hens experimentally infected with Salmonella enteritidis, phage type 4.

    PubMed

    Kinde, H; Shivaprasad, H L; Daft, B M; Read, D H; Ardans, A; Breitmeyer, R; Rajashekara, G; Nagaraja, K V; Gardner, I A

    2000-01-01

    Two strains of 27-wk-old commercial laying chickens (strain A, brown-egg-laying type and strain B, white-egg-laying type) were inoculated either orally (PO) or intravenously (IV) with a field isolate of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 4. Chickens were sequentially necropsied at regular intervals throughout the 17-wk observation period. Gross and microscopic lesions were most evident between 1 and 14 days postinoculation (DPI). Gross lesions consisted of enlarged livers with white foci, enlarged and mottled white spleens, fibrinous exudate in the peritoneum, and atretic, misshapen ovarian follicles. Microscopic lesions included multifocal coagulative necrosis of hepatocytes and inflammation, fibrinous exudation in vascular sinuses of the spleen, and fibrinosuppurative inflammation of the peritoneum and ovarian follicles. The proportion of reproductive organ infections (ovary and oviduct) in the IV group, 83% (20/24, P = 0.007; 50% and 33% for strains A and strain B birds, respectively), was higher than that of the PO group, 46% (11/24; 29% and 17% for strains A and B, respectively), for the first 16 days of observation postinoculation. The proportion of fecal shedding for the IV group of birds was significantly (P = 0.009) lower, 29% (7/24; 33% and 25% respectively for strain A and strain B birds, respectively), than the PO group, 67% (16/24; 75% and 58% for strain A and strain B birds, respectively). Three (2.6%) of 234 egg pools were culture-positive for group D Salmonella from strain A chickens (1 of 119 pools from the IV group and 2 of 115 pools from the PO group of birds). Chickens infected with the field strain of S. enteritidis phage type 4 harbored the organism in tissues only for a brief time, most clearing within 8 DPI and nearly all within 16 DPI. Overall the percentage of culture-positive birds did not differ significantly (P > 0.05) between birds with and without lesions, but isolation of S. enteritidis tended to be more frequent when lesions were

  4. Chicken-Specific Kinome Array Reveals that Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Modulates Host Immune Signaling Pathways in the Cecum to Establish a Persistence Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kogut, Michael H.; Swaggerty, Christina L.; Byrd, James Allen; Selvaraj, Ramesh; Arsenault, Ryan J.

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induces an early, short-lived pro-inflammatory response in chickens that is asymptomatic of clinical disease and results in a persistent colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that transmits infections to naïve hosts via fecal shedding of bacteria. The underlying mechanisms that control this persistent colonization of the ceca of chickens by Salmonella are only beginning to be elucidated. We hypothesize that alteration of host signaling pathways mediate the induction of a tolerance response. Using chicken-specific kinomic immune peptide arrays and quantitative RT-PCR of infected cecal tissue, we have previously evaluated the development of disease tolerance in chickens infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) in a persistent infection model (4–14 days post infection). Here, we have further outlined the induction of an tolerance defense strategy in the cecum of chickens infected with S. Enteritidis beginning around four days post-primary infection. The response is characterized by alterations in the activation of T cell signaling mediated by the dephosphorylation of phospholipase c-γ1 (PLCG1) that inhibits NF-κB signaling and activates nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) signaling and blockage of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production through the disruption of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway (dephosphorylation of JAK2, JAK3, and STAT4). Further, we measured a significant down-regulation reduction in IFN-γ mRNA expression. These studies, combined with our previous findings, describe global phenotypic changes in the avian cecum of Salmonella Enteritidis-infected chickens that decreases the host responsiveness resulting in the establishment of persistent colonization. The identified tissue protein kinases also represent potential targets for future antimicrobial compounds for decreasing Salmonella loads in the intestines of food animals before going to market. PMID:27472318

  5. Chicken-Specific Kinome Array Reveals that Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Modulates Host Immune Signaling Pathways in the Cecum to Establish a Persistence Infection.

    PubMed

    Kogut, Michael H; Swaggerty, Christina L; Byrd, James Allen; Selvaraj, Ramesh; Arsenault, Ryan J

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induces an early, short-lived pro-inflammatory response in chickens that is asymptomatic of clinical disease and results in a persistent colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that transmits infections to naïve hosts via fecal shedding of bacteria. The underlying mechanisms that control this persistent colonization of the ceca of chickens by Salmonella are only beginning to be elucidated. We hypothesize that alteration of host signaling pathways mediate the induction of a tolerance response. Using chicken-specific kinomic immune peptide arrays and quantitative RT-PCR of infected cecal tissue, we have previously evaluated the development of disease tolerance in chickens infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) in a persistent infection model (4-14 days post infection). Here, we have further outlined the induction of an tolerance defense strategy in the cecum of chickens infected with S. Enteritidis beginning around four days post-primary infection. The response is characterized by alterations in the activation of T cell signaling mediated by the dephosphorylation of phospholipase c-γ1 (PLCG1) that inhibits NF-κB signaling and activates nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) signaling and blockage of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production through the disruption of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway (dephosphorylation of JAK2, JAK3, and STAT4). Further, we measured a significant down-regulation reduction in IFN-γ mRNA expression. These studies, combined with our previous findings, describe global phenotypic changes in the avian cecum of Salmonella Enteritidis-infected chickens that decreases the host responsiveness resulting in the establishment of persistent colonization. The identified tissue protein kinases also represent potential targets for future antimicrobial compounds for decreasing Salmonella loads in the intestines of food animals before going to market. PMID:27472318

  6. Salmonella enteritidis infections associated with foods purchased from mobile lunch trucks--Alberta, Canada, October 2010-February 2011.

    PubMed

    2013-07-19

    During October 2010-February 2011, an outbreak of 91 Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections in Alberta, Canada, was investigated by a local public health department (Alberta Health Services, Calgary Zone). Index cases initially were linked through a common history of consumption of food purchased from mobile food-vending vehicles (lunch trucks) operating at worksites in Alberta. Further investigation implicated one catering company that supplied items for the lunch trucks and other vendors. In 85 cases, patients reported consumption of food prepared by the catering company in the 7 days before illness. Six patients were employees of the catering company, and two food samples collected from the catering company were positive for SE. Foods likely were contaminated directly or indirectly through the use of illegally sourced, SE-contaminated eggs at the implicated catering facility and by catering employees who were infected with SE. Public health interventions put into place to control the outbreak included screening employees for Salmonella, excluding those infected from food-handling duties, and training employees in safe food-handling procedures. No further outbreak cases were identified after full implementation of the interventions. This investigation highlights the potential for lunch trucks to be a source of foodborne illness and the need for robust regulatory compliance monitoring of lunch trucks and their food suppliers.

  7. Salmonella enteritidis infections associated with foods purchased from mobile lunch trucks--Alberta, Canada, October 2010-February 2011.

    PubMed

    2013-07-19

    During October 2010-February 2011, an outbreak of 91 Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections in Alberta, Canada, was investigated by a local public health department (Alberta Health Services, Calgary Zone). Index cases initially were linked through a common history of consumption of food purchased from mobile food-vending vehicles (lunch trucks) operating at worksites in Alberta. Further investigation implicated one catering company that supplied items for the lunch trucks and other vendors. In 85 cases, patients reported consumption of food prepared by the catering company in the 7 days before illness. Six patients were employees of the catering company, and two food samples collected from the catering company were positive for SE. Foods likely were contaminated directly or indirectly through the use of illegally sourced, SE-contaminated eggs at the implicated catering facility and by catering employees who were infected with SE. Public health interventions put into place to control the outbreak included screening employees for Salmonella, excluding those infected from food-handling duties, and training employees in safe food-handling procedures. No further outbreak cases were identified after full implementation of the interventions. This investigation highlights the potential for lunch trucks to be a source of foodborne illness and the need for robust regulatory compliance monitoring of lunch trucks and their food suppliers. PMID:23863703

  8. Salmonella Enteritidis organ invasion and egg contamination in experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both disease surveillance and epidemiologic analyses have confirmed a strong association between human salmonellosis and the prevalence of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in commercial egg flocks. The majority of human illnesses caused by this pathogen are attributed to contaminated eggs. Animal welfare...

  9. Contamination of eggs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both epidemiologic analyses and active disease surveillance confirm an ongoing strong association between human salmonellosis and the prevalence of Salmonella Enteritidis in commercial egg flocks. The majority of human illnesses caused by this pathogen are attributed to the consumption of contaminat...

  10. Comparative Virulotyping of Salmonella typhi and Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Elemfareji, Omar Ismail; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2013-12-01

    Members of Salmonella enterica are important foodborne pathogens of significant public health concern worldwide. This study aimed to determine a range of virulence genes among typhoidal (S. typhi) and non-typhoidal (S. enteritidis) strains isolated from different geographical regions and different years. A total of 87 S. typhi and 94 S. enteritidis strains were tested for presence of 22 virulence genes by employing multiplex PCR and the genetic relatedness of these strains was further characterized by REP-PCR. In S. typhi, invA, prgH, sifA, spiC, sopB, iroN, sitC, misL, pipD, cdtB, and orfL were present in all the strains, while sopE, agfC, agfA, sefC, mgtC, and sefD were present in 98.8, 97.7, 90.8, 87.4, 87.4 and 17.2 %, of the strains, respectively. No lpfA, lpfC, pefA, spvB, or spvC was detected. Meanwhile, in S. enteritidis, 15 genes, agfA, agfC, invA, lpfA, lpfC, sefD, prgH, spiC, sopB, sopE, iroN, sitC, misL, pipD, and orfL were found in all S. enteritidis strains 100 %, followed by sifA and spvC 98.9 %, pefA, spvB and mgtC 97.8 %, and sefC 90.4 %. cdtB was absent from all S. enteritidis strains tested. REP-PCR subtyped S. typhi strains into 18 REP-types and concurred with the virulotyping results in grouping the strains, while in S. enteritidis, REP-PCR subtyped the strains into eight profiles and they were poorly distinguishable between human and animal origins. The study showed that S. typhi and S. enteritidis contain a range of virulence factors associated with pathogenesis. Virulotyping is a rapid screening method to identify and profile virulence genes in Salmonella strains, and improve an understanding of potential risk for human and animal infections.

  11. Integrated farm management to prevent Salmonella Enteritidis contamination of eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in contaminated eggs is a public health hazard which may cause hospitalization or death in the elderly, infants, and individuals with impaired immune systems. Prevention of SE infection of laying hens is an essential first step in reducing SE outbreaks in humans. Multiple...

  12. Control of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in laying hens by inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas Neto, Oliveiro Caetano; Mesquita, Aline Lopes; de Paiva, Jaqueline Boldrin; Zotesso, Fábio; Berchieri Júnior, Angelo

    2008-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is one of the agents that is responsible for outbreaks of human foodborne salmonellosis caused by Salmonella Enteritidis and is generally associated with the consumption of poultry products. Inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis cell vaccine is one of the available methods to control Salmonella Enteritidis in breeders and laying hens, however results in terms of efficacy vary. This vaccine has never been tested in Brazil, therefore, the present work was carried out to assess three commercial inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines allowed in Brazil. Four hundred white light variety commercial laying hens were obtained at one-day-of age. At eight weeks old, the birds were divided into four groups with one hundred animals each. Birds from three groups (V1, V2 and V3) received different intramuscular vaccines, followed by a booster dose at 16 weeks of age. Birds from another group (CG) were not vaccinated. When the laying hens were 20, 25 and 31 weeks old, 13 from each group were transferred to another room and were challenged by inoculating 2 mL neat culture of Salmonella Enteritidis. On the second day after each challenge, the caecal contents, spleen, liver and ovary of three birds from each group were analyzed for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. Twice a week a cloacal swab of each bird was taken and all eggs laid were examined for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. After four consecutive negative cloacal swabs in all the groups, the birds were sacrificed so as to examine the liver, caecal contents and ovaries. Overall, the inactivated vaccine used in group V3 reduced Salmonella Enteritidis in the feces and eggs. A very small amount of Salmonella was found in the spleen, liver, ovary and caeca of the birds in the four groups during the whole experiment. In general, inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines was able to decrease the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis in the birds and in the eggs as well. Nevertheless, they must

  13. A Salmonella Enteritidis hilAssrAfliG deletion mutant is a safe live vaccine strain that confers protection against colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis in broilers.

    PubMed

    De Cort, W; Geeraerts, S; Balan, V; Elroy, M; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Van Immerseel, F

    2013-10-17

    Consumption of contaminated poultry meat is an important cause of Salmonella infections in humans. Therefore, there is a need for control methods that protect broilers from day-of-hatch until slaughter age against infection with Salmonella. Colonization-inhibition, a concept in which a live Salmonella strain is orally administered to day-old chickens and protects against subsequent challenge, can potentially be used as control method. In this study, the safety and efficacy of a Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain as a colonization-inhibition strain for protection of broilers against Salmonella Enteritidis was evaluated. After administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain to day-old chickens, this strain could not be isolated from the gut, internal organs or faeces after 21 days of age. In addition, administration of this strain to one-day-old broiler chickens decreased faecal shedding and caecal and internal organ colonization of a Salmonella Enteritidis challenge strain administered one day later using a seeder bird model. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an attenuated Salmonella strain for which both the safety and efficacy has been shown in long-term experiments (until slaughter age) in broiler strain can potentially be used as a live colonization-inhibition strain for controlling Salmonella Enteritidis infections in broilers. PMID:24012569

  14. 21 CFR 118.4 - Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... National Poultry Improvement Plan's standards for “U.S. S. Enteritidis Clean” status (9 CFR 145.23(d)) or... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures....4 Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures. You must follow the SE prevention measures...

  15. A Mexican restaurant-associated outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis type 34 infections traced to a contaminated egg farm.

    PubMed

    McNeil, M M; Sweat, L B; Carter, S L; Watson, C B; Holloway, J T; Manning, R; Altekruse, S F; Blake, P A

    1999-04-01

    In May 1996, the Georgia Division of Public Health was notified about a cluster of persons with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections in Waycross, Georgia. A matched pair case-control study to determine risk factors for illness found a statistically significant association of SE infection with a history of having eaten at Restaurant A during the 5 days before onset of illness (relative risk = 13 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 3-62, P < 0.01]). In a second case-control study, to determine specific food exposures, consumption of a deep-fried Mexican dish (chile relleno) (4 of 21 cases vs. 0 of 26 controls, odds ratio undefined, 95% CI > 1.46, P = 0.034) was found to be significantly associated with SE infection. An environmental investigation found evidence of suboptimal food storage and cooking temperatures at Restaurant A; cross contamination of foods may have contributed to the low attributable risk identified for chile rellenos. Five of 37 Restaurant A food and environment specimens yielded SE strains. All five positive specimens were from chiles rellenos. Of the seven outbreak-associated strains (six patient isolates and one food isolate from Restaurant A) for which phage typing was conducted, all were phage type 34. A FDA traceback investigation through Restaurant A's single-egg supplier identified the potential source as three interrelated farms in South Carolina. Environmental culture from one of these farms yielded SE phage type 34. As a result of this outbreak, FDA helped institute a statewide egg quality-assurance programme in South Carolina to minimize SE contamination of eggs. PMID:10355784

  16. Evaluation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis pathogenicity island-1 proteins as vaccine candidates against S. Enteritidis challenge in chickens.

    PubMed

    Desin, Taseen S; Wisner, Amanda L S; Lam, Po-King S; Berberov, Emil; Mickael, Claudia S; Potter, Andrew A; Köster, Wolfgang

    2011-03-24

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major cause of gastrointestinal disease in humans worldwide, which mainly results from the consumption of contaminated poultry meat and eggs. Vaccination of chickens is an important strategy to lower the prevalence of Salmonella in poultry flocks. The S. Enteritidis type 3 secretion system (T3SS) encoded on Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1) is an important virulence factor that plays a role in invasion and systemic spread in chickens. In this manuscript, we evaluated the efficacy of SPI-1 proteins as vaccine candidates for protection against S. Enteritidis oral challenge. Our results demonstrate for the first time that SPI-1 T3SS proteins elicit antigen specific IgG antibody responses in chickens. In one study we show that vaccination with the aforementioned proteins reduces the levels of S. Enteritidis in the liver, but not in the spleen and cecal contents of chickens. However, a second study shows that vaccination of hens with SPI-1 proteins using a seeder model of infection does not affect the levels of S. Enteritidis in the cecal contents or internal organs of progeny obtained from these hens. Hence, the SPI-1 proteins, in conjunction with other proteins, may form important components of subunit vaccines used for protection against colonization by S. Enteritidis in poultry. PMID:20888713

  17. Evaluation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis pathogenicity island-1 proteins as vaccine candidates against S. Enteritidis challenge in chickens.

    PubMed

    Desin, Taseen S; Wisner, Amanda L S; Lam, Po-King S; Berberov, Emil; Mickael, Claudia S; Potter, Andrew A; Köster, Wolfgang

    2011-03-24

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major cause of gastrointestinal disease in humans worldwide, which mainly results from the consumption of contaminated poultry meat and eggs. Vaccination of chickens is an important strategy to lower the prevalence of Salmonella in poultry flocks. The S. Enteritidis type 3 secretion system (T3SS) encoded on Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1) is an important virulence factor that plays a role in invasion and systemic spread in chickens. In this manuscript, we evaluated the efficacy of SPI-1 proteins as vaccine candidates for protection against S. Enteritidis oral challenge. Our results demonstrate for the first time that SPI-1 T3SS proteins elicit antigen specific IgG antibody responses in chickens. In one study we show that vaccination with the aforementioned proteins reduces the levels of S. Enteritidis in the liver, but not in the spleen and cecal contents of chickens. However, a second study shows that vaccination of hens with SPI-1 proteins using a seeder model of infection does not affect the levels of S. Enteritidis in the cecal contents or internal organs of progeny obtained from these hens. Hence, the SPI-1 proteins, in conjunction with other proteins, may form important components of subunit vaccines used for protection against colonization by S. Enteritidis in poultry.

  18. [Salmonella enteritidis arthritis complicating systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Marzouk, S; El Aoud, S; Hriz, H; Jallouli, M; Zribi, W; Bahloul, Z

    2013-12-01

    Septic arthritis due to Salmonella in systemic lupus erythematosus is rare. We report a case of septic arthritis by Salmonella enteritidis which occurred during the evolution of systemic lupus erythematosus. A 23-year-old man was diagnosed as suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus. This diagnosis was taken on the basis of general symptoms, skin lesions, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and glomerulonephritis (class III). He was treated with three methylprednisolone boli related by high-dose regimen of prednisolone. A month and a half later, he presented fever with monoarthritis of the left elbow without any other new sign of underlying systemic disease. Bacteriological examinations isolated S. enteritidis. The patient improved with antibiotics and joint lavage. Feverish monoarthritis in systemic lupus erythematosus should be suspect to be septic arthritis. Appropriate treatment should be promptly instituted to improve the prognosis.

  19. A national outbreak of infection with Salmonella enteritidis phage types 5c and 6a associated with Chinese food businesses in Scotland, summer 2000.

    PubMed

    Cowden, J; Hamlet, N; Locking, M; Allardice, G

    2003-06-01

    An outbreak of salmonellosis, involving cases of infection with Salmonella enteritidis phage types (PT) 5c and 6a, occurred across Scotland between May and August 2000. In total, 70 outbreak cases were microbiologically confirmed. Preliminary investigation suggested that consumption of food, especially chicken dishes, from Chinese restaurants or take-aways (food businesses) was a risk factor for infection. A matched case-control study demonstrated a statistically significant association (OR 22.4, P=0.0024) between infection and consumption of food from Chinese food businesses. A cohort study of novel design suggested that chicken was an important vehicle of infection. However the result did not reach statistical significance (OR 1.7, P=0.3). Extensive environmental investigation was unable to identify the source of the suspected contaminated chicken.

  20. IL-17A is produced by Th17, gammadelta T cells and other CD4- lymphocytes during infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and has a mild effect in bacterial clearance.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Silke M; Köhler, Gabriele; Holscher, Christoph; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Alber, Gottfried

    2008-09-01

    T(h)17 cells represent a new pro-inflammatory T(h) cell lineage distinct from T(h)1 and T(h)2 cells. T(h)17 cells have been shown to be involved in extracellular bacterial infection but their role in intracellular infection remains unclear. We found antigen-specific IL-17A production during a systemic infection of mice with the facultative intracellular bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) and examined the function and cellular source of IL-17A during the adaptive immune response to S. Enteritidis. Infected IL-17A-/- mice survived completely after inoculation with the highest infection dose found to be sub-lethal for wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice. However, at 20 and 80 days post-infection (d.p.i.), we repeatedly found mildly elevated bacterial burden in spleen and liver of IL-17A-/- mice as compared with WT mice. Overall, IL-17A-/- mice showed reduced clearance of S. Enteritidis. S. Enteritidis-specific IL-17A production was induced in splenocytes and lymph node cells of infected WT mice at both time points, 20 and 80 d.p.i. Classical CD4+ T(h)17 cells developed upon infection with Salmonella. CD4- gammadelta TCR+ and CD4- gammadelta TCR- cells were found to be additional IL-17A-producing cell populations. In infected IL-17A-/- mice, a normal T(h)1 cytokine profile was observed consistent with the overall subtle phenotype. Nevertheless, in the absence of IL-17A, recruitment of neutrophils and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactivity was significantly compromised. Our data indicate that IL-17A responses are induced by Salmonella and mildly contribute to protective immunity during S. Enteritidis infection. Thus, IL-17A complements the IL-12/IFN-gamma axis which is essential for protective immunity against salmonellosis in mice and men.

  1. Reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis in the spleens of hens by bacterins that vary in fimbrial protein SefD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene sefD is part of operon sefABCD, and it is required for production of the SEF14 fimbria by Salmonella Enteritidis. We compared strains that varied in SefD content for their ability to reduce recovery of Salmonella Enteritidis from the spleens of hens infected by parenteral challenge. The two bac...

  2. Risk factors for Salmonella Enteritidis and Typhimurium (DT104 and non-DT104) infections in The Netherlands: predominant roles for raw eggs in Enteritidis and sandboxes in Typhimurium infections.

    PubMed

    Doorduyn, Y; Van Den Brandhof, W E; Van Duynhoven, Y T H P; Wannet, W J B; Van Pelt, W

    2006-06-01

    Since 1996 Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 salmonellosis has increased in The Netherlands. This prompted a case-control study of risk factors for salmonellosis to inform transmission routes for this phage type. Cases were laboratory-confirmed patients with a Salmonella infection and controls were selected from population registries by frequency matching for age, sex, degree of urbanization and season. Cases and controls received a questionnaire on risk factors. Of the 1171 cases, 573 (49%) responded: 245 S. Enteritidis and 232 S. Typhimurium cases (both DT104 and non-DT104), of which 58 were DT104. Of the 10250 controls, 3409 (33%) responded. Use of H2 antagonists [odds ratio (OR) 4.4, 95% CI 1.6-12.2] and proton pump inhibitors (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.2-7.9), consumption of raw eggs (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.3-7.4) and products containing raw eggs (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-3.0) were associated with endemic S. Enteritidis infection. Risk factors for endemic S. Typhimurium infection were use of proton pump inhibitors (OR 8.3, 95% CI 4.3-15.9), occupational exposure to raw meat (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.1-7.9), playing in a sandbox (for children aged 4-12 years) (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.6-3.7), consumption of undercooked meat (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1-4.1) and use of antibiotics (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.0-3.4). Use of proton pump inhibitors (OR 11.2, 95% CI 3.9-31.9) and playing in a sandbox (OR 4.4, 95% CI 1.8-10.7) were the only risk factors for S. Typhimurium DT104 salmonellosis. This study confirms known risk factors for salmonellosis. However, playing in a sandbox was a predominant new risk factor for S. Typhimurium salmonellosis in children [population attributable risk (PAR) 14%], and especially for S. Typhimurium DT104 (PAR 32%).

  3. A mutation in the NLRC5 promoter limits NF-κB signaling after Salmonella Enteritidis infection in the spleen of young chickens.

    PubMed

    Chang, Guobin; Liu, Xiangping; Ma, Teng; Xu, Lu; Wang, Hongzhi; Li, Zhiteng; Guo, Xiaomin; Xu, Qi; Chen, Guohong

    2015-09-01

    To date, the functions of the NLRC5 in chickens remain undefined. In the current study, chicken NLRC5 was cloned and an A1017G mutation was detected in its promoter region. The relative expression levels of the NLRC5 and key NF-κB pathway genes, IKKα, IKKβ, NF-κB, IL-6, IL-1β and IFN-γ, in the spleens of wild and mutant type birds, AA and GG, were determined using FQ-PCR at 7 day post-infection (DPI) with Salmonella Enteritidis. Additionally, the bacterial burden in the caecum and various immune response parameters were measured to evaluate immune responses. All of the examined immune response parameters were significantly different between the AA chickens and the GG chickens. Specifically, the mRNA expression levels of IKKα, NF-κB, IL-6, IL-1β and IFN-γ were higher in AA chickens than those in GG chickens, while the mRNA expression levels of NLRC5 were lower in AA chickens than those in GG chickens (P<0.05). Moreover, the mRNA expression levels of TLR4 and MyD88 were not affected in either group. Collectively, considering former NLRC5 functional study in vitro, the wild genotype birds presented with better resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis through the actions of the NLRC5 and subsequent inhibition of the NF-κB pathway in chickens.

  4. Administration of a Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain by coarse spray to newly hatched broilers reduces colonization and shedding of a Salmonella Enteritidis challenge strain.

    PubMed

    De Cort, W; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; van Immerseel, F

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of contaminated poultry meat is still an important cause of Salmonella infections in humans. Colonization inhibition (CI) occurs when a live Salmonella strain is administered to chickens and subsequently protects against challenge with another Salmonella strain belonging to the same serotype. A Salmonella Enteritidis hilAssrAfliG deletion mutant has previously been proven to reduce colonization and shedding of a wild-type Salmonella Enteritidis strain in newly hatched broilers after experimental infection. In this study, we compared two administration routes for this strain. Administering the Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain through drinking water on the first day of life resulted in decreased fecal shedding and cecal colonization of a wild-type Salmonella Enteritidis challenge strain administered 24 h later using a seeder-bird model. When administering the CI strain by coarse spray on newly hatched broiler chicks, an even more pronounced reduction of cecal colonization was observed, and fecal shedding of the Salmonella Enteritidis challenge strain ceased during the course of the experiment. These data suggest that administering a Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain to newly hatched chicks using a coarse spray is a useful and effective method that reduces colonization and shedding of a wild-type Salmonella Enteritidis strain after early challenge. PMID:25535402

  5. Plasmid profiles as an epidemiological marker for Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis foodborne outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Luján, R; Echeita, A; Usera, M A; Martínez-Suárez, J V; Alonso, R; Sáez-Nieto, J A

    1990-06-01

    The incidence of enteritidis serotype of Salmonella enterica in salmonellae infections has steadily increased in Spain from 27.1% in 1982 up to 63.4% in 1987. Given this high incidence, we have studied the plasmid profiles of Enteritidis isolates to subclassify them. Different profiles were observed in 50 isolates. In 13 Enteritidis serotype outbreaks, up to 5 different plasmid profiles were found. Each outbreak correlated with a single plasmid profile except in one case where plasmids of two different profiles were observed in strains from the same outbreak.

  6. Protection of epithelial cells from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis invasion by antibodies against the SPI-1 type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Desin, Taseen S; Mickael, Claudia S; Lam, Po-King S; Potter, Andrew A; Köster, Wolfgang

    2010-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) is one of the major causes of bacterial food-borne illness in humans. During the course of infection, Salmonella Enteritidis uses 2 type III secretion systems (T3SS), one of which is encoded on Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). SPI-1 plays a major role in the invasion process. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of sera against the SPI-1 T3SS components on invasion in vitro using polarized human intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2). Antisera to SipD protected Caco-2 cells against entry of wild-type Salmonella Enteritidis. On the other hand, sera against InvG, PrgI, SipA, SipC, SopB, SopE, and SopE2 did not affect Salmonella Enteritidis entry. To illustrate the specificity of anti-SipD mediated inhibition, SipD-specific antibodies were depleted from the serum. Antiserum depleted of SipD-specific antibodies lost its capacity to inhibit Salmonella Enteritidis entry. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that antibodies against the SPI-1 needle tip protein (SipD) inhibit Salmonella Enteritidis invasion and that the SipD protein may be an important target in blocking SPI-1 mediated virulence of Salmonella Enteritidis.

  7. Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis, England and Wales, 1945–2011

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Christopher R.; LeBaigue, Susan; Esan, Oluwaseun B.; Awofisyo, Adedoyin A.; Adams, Natalie L.; Fisher, Ian S.T.; Grant, Kathie A.; Peters, Tansy M.; Larkin, Lesley; Davies, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    In England and Wales, the emergence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis resulted in the largest and most persistent epidemic of foodborne infection attributable to a single subtype of any pathogen since systematic national microbiological surveillance was established. We reviewed 67 years of surveillance data to examine the features, underlying causes, and overall effects of S. enterica ser. Enteritidis. The epidemic was associated with the consumption of contaminated chicken meat and eggs, and a decline in the number of infections began after the adoption of vaccination and other measures in production and distribution of chicken meat and eggs. We estimate that >525,000 persons became ill during the course of the epidemic, which caused a total of 6,750,000 days of illness, 27,000 hospitalizations, and 2,000 deaths. Measures undertaken to control the epidemic have resulted in a major reduction in foodborne disease in England and Wales. PMID:24960614

  8. Protective immunity to systemic infection with attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis in the absence of IL-12 is associated with IL-23-dependent IL-22, but not IL-17.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Silke M; Köhler, Gabriele; Schütze, Nicole; Knauer, Jens; Straubinger, Reinhard K; Chackerian, Alissa A; Witte, Ellen; Wolk, Kerstin; Sabat, Robert; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Holscher, Christoph; Müller, Uwe; Kastelein, Robert A; Alber, Gottfried

    2008-12-01

    IL-12 is essential for protective T cell-mediated immunity against Salmonella infection. To characterize the role of the related cytokine IL-23, wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 and p19(-/-) mice were infected systemically with an attenuated strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis). IL-23-deficient mice controlled infection with S. Enteritidis similarly as WT mice. Similar IFN-gamma production as compared with WT mice, but defective IL-17A and IL-22 production was found in the absence of IL-23. Nevertheless, although IL-23 is required for T cell-dependent cytokine responses, IL-23 is dispensable for protection against S. Enteritidis when IL-12 is present. To analyze the role of IL-23 in the absence of IL-12, low doses of S. Enteritidis were administered to p35(-/-) mice (lacking IL-12), p35/19(-/-) mice (lacking IL-12 and IL-23), p35/40(-/-) mice (lacking IL-12, IL-23, and homodimeric IL-12p40), or p35/IL-17A(-/-) mice (lacking IL-12 and IL-17A). We found survival of p35(-/-) and p35/IL-17A(-/-) mice, whereas p35/19(-/-) and p35/40(-/-) mice died within 3-6 wk and developed liver necrosis. This indicates that IL-23, but not homodimeric IL-12p40, is required for protection, which, surprisingly, is independent of IL-17A. Moreover, protection was associated with IL-22, but not IL-17F or IL-21 expression or with neutrophil recruitment. Finally, anti-IL-22 treatment of S. Enteritidis-infected p35(-/-) mice resulted in liver necrosis, indicating a central role of IL-22 in hepatocyte protection during salmonellosis. In conclusion, IL-23-dependent IL-22, but not IL-17 production is associated with protection against systemic infection with S. Enteritidis in the absence of IL-12.

  9. Heritability of susceptibility to Salmonella enteritidis infection in fowls and test of the role of the chromosome carrying the NRAMP1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Girard-Santosuosso, Odile; Lantier, Frédéric; Lantier, Isabelle; Bumstead, Nat; Elsen, Jean-Michel; Beaumont, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    373 thirteen-week-old chicks issued from a commercial cross and 312 chickens from the L2 line were intravenously inoculated with 106 Salmonella enteritidis and the numbers of Salmonella in the spleen, liver and genital organs were assessed 3 days later. Heritabilities of the number of Salmonella were estimated at 0.02 ± 0.04 and 0.05 ± 0.05 in the liver; at 0.29 ± 0.07 and 0.10 ± 0.06 in the spleen; and at 0.16 ± 0.05 and 0.11 ± 0.08 in the genital organs, in the first and second experiments, respectively. The difference between the two experiments could result from sampling variations and from differences in the genetic structure of the two populations possibly including both heterosis and additive effects as well as their interaction in the first experiment. Genetic correlations between the number of bacteria in the genital organs and liver (0.56 ± 0.58 and 0.76 ± 0.32 in the first and second experiments, respectively) and spleen (0.37 ± 0.24 and 0.79 ± 0.23) were positive. Moreover a significant within-sire effect of VIL1, a marker gene for NRAMP1, was observed in 117 progeny resulting from 25 informative matings. These results indicate that there are genetic differences in the resistance to visceral infection by S. enteritidis in these commercial egg-laying flocks, and suggest that these differences are at least partly due to genetic polymorphism in the NRAMP1 region. PMID:12081808

  10. The effects of polymorphisms in 7 candidate genes on resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis in native chickens.

    PubMed

    Tohidi, R; Idris, I B; Malar Panandam, J; Hair Bejo, M

    2013-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis infection is a common concern in poultry production for its negative effects on growth as well as food safety for humans. Identification of molecular markers that are linked to resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis may lead to appropriate solutions to control Salmonella infection in chickens. This study investigated the association of candidate genes with resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis in young chickens. Two native breeds of Malaysian chickens, namely, Village Chickens and Red Junglefowl, were evaluated for bacterial colonization after Salmonella Enteritidis inoculation. Seven candidate genes were selected on the basis of their physiological role in immune response, as determined by prior studies in other genetic lines: natural resistance-associated protein 1 (NRAMP1), transforming growth factor β3 (TGFβ3), transforming growth factor β4 (TGFβ4), inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (IAP1), caspase 1 (CASP1), lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α factor (LITAF), and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Polymerase chain reaction-RFLP was used to identify polymorphisms in the candidate genes; all genes exhibited polymorphisms in at least one breed. The NRAMP1-SacI polymorphism correlated with the differences in Salmonella Enteritidis load in the cecum (P = 0.002) and spleen (P = 0.01) of Village Chickens. Polymorphisms in the restriction sites of TGFβ3-BsrI, TGFβ4-MboII, and TRAIL-StyI were associated with Salmonella Enteritidis burden in the cecum, spleen, and liver of Village Chickens and Red Junglefowl (P < 0.05). These results indicate that the NRAMP1, TGFβ3, TGFβ4, and TRAIL genes are potential candidates for use in selection programs for increasing genetic resistance against Salmonella Enteritidis in native Malaysian chickens. PMID:23472012

  11. Sporadic salmonellosis in Lower Saxony, Germany, 2011-2013: raw ground pork consumption is associated with Salmonella Typhimurium infections and foreign travel with Salmonella Enteritidis infections.

    PubMed

    Rettenbacher-Riefler, S; Ziehm, D; Kreienbrock, L; Campe, A; Pulz, M; Dreesman, J

    2015-10-01

    To investigate risk factors for sporadic salmonellosis, for each notified case four randomly selected population controls matched for age, sex and geographical region were interviewed via self-administered questionnaire. Conditional logistic regression analysis of 285 matched pairs revealed significant associations for raw ground pork consumption [odds ratio (OR) 6·0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·8-20·1], taking antacids (OR 5·8, 95% CI 1·4-24·5), eating meat outside the home (OR 5·7, 95% CI 2·2-14·6) and daily changing or cleaning of dishcloth (OR 2·1, 95% CI 1·2-3·9). Animal contact and ice cream consumption were negatively associated with salmonellosis (OR 0·5, 95% CI 0·2-1 and OR 0·3, 95% CI 0·1-0·6, respectively). S. Typhimurium infections were significantly associated with raw ground pork consumption (OR 16·7, 95% CI 1·4-194·4) and S. Enteritidis infections with having travelled abroad (OR 9·7, 95% CI 2·0-47·3). Raw egg consumption was not a risk factor, substantiating the success of recently implemented national control programmes in the poultry industry. Unexpectedly, hygienic behaviour was more frequently reported by cases, probably because they overestimated their hygiene precautions retrospectively. Although animal contact might enhance human immunocompetence, underreporting of salmonellosis by pet owners could have occurred. Eating raw pork products is the major risk factor for sporadic human S. Typhimurium infections in Lower Saxony.

  12. 21 CFR 118.4 - Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures... National Poultry Improvement Plan's standards for “U.S. S. Enteritidis Clean” status (9 CFR 145.23(d)) or... environmental test required in paragraph (a)(2)(i) of this section is positive, you must begin egg testing,...

  13. The influence of a fructooligosaccharide (FOS) prebiotic combined with alfalfa molt diets on the gastrointestinal tract fermentation, Salmonella Enteritidis infection and intestinal shedding in laying hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molting is a natural process which birds undergo to rejuvenate their reproductive organs. The United States poultry egg production industry have used feed withdrawal to effectively induce molt, however, due to its correlation with increase susceptibility to Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) the developme...

  14. SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS-INDUCED ALTERATION OF INFLAMMATORY CXCL CHEMOKINE MESSENGER-RNA EXPRESSION AND HISTOLOGIC CHANGES IN THE CECA OF INFECTED CHICKS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better understand the avian host immune response to Salmonella enteritidis, we examined mRNA expression for 8 genes: CXCLi1[K60], CXCLi2 [IL-8/CAF], Interferon [IFN]-y Interleukin [IL] -1, IL-6, IL-12, IL-12, and Gallinacin [Gal] -2 in the cecum of young chicks one week post-inoculation with Sa...

  15. Mapping B-cell responses to Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis in chickens for the discrimination of infected from vaccinated animals

    PubMed Central

    Naqid, Ibrahim A.; Owen, Jonathan P.; Maddison, Ben C.; Spiliotopoulos, Anastasios; Emes, Richard D.; Warry, Andrew; Flynn, Robin J.; Martelli, Francesca; Gosling, Rebecca J.; Davies, Robert H.; La Ragione, Roberto M.; Gough, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Serological surveillance and vaccination are important strategies for controlling infectious diseases of food production animals. However, the compatibility of these strategies is limited by a lack of assays capable of differentiating infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA tests) for established killed or attenuated vaccines. Here, we used next generation phage-display (NGPD) and a 2-proportion Z score analysis to identify peptides that were preferentially bound by IgY from chickens infected with Salmonella Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis compared to IgY from vaccinates, for both an attenuated and an inactivated commercial vaccine. Peptides that were highly enriched against IgY from at least 4 out of 10 infected chickens were selected: 18 and 12 peptides for the killed and attenuated vaccines, respectively. The ten most discriminatory peptides for each vaccine were identified in an ELISA using a training set of IgY samples. These peptides were then used in multi-peptide assays that, when analysing a wider set of samples from infected and vaccinated animals, diagnosed infection with 100% sensitivity and specificity. The data describes a method for the development of DIVA assays for conventional attenuated and killed vaccines. PMID:27510219

  16. Mapping B-cell responses to Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis in chickens for the discrimination of infected from vaccinated animals.

    PubMed

    Naqid, Ibrahim A; Owen, Jonathan P; Maddison, Ben C; Spiliotopoulos, Anastasios; Emes, Richard D; Warry, Andrew; Flynn, Robin J; Martelli, Francesca; Gosling, Rebecca J; Davies, Robert H; La Ragione, Roberto M; Gough, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    Serological surveillance and vaccination are important strategies for controlling infectious diseases of food production animals. However, the compatibility of these strategies is limited by a lack of assays capable of differentiating infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA tests) for established killed or attenuated vaccines. Here, we used next generation phage-display (NGPD) and a 2-proportion Z score analysis to identify peptides that were preferentially bound by IgY from chickens infected with Salmonella Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis compared to IgY from vaccinates, for both an attenuated and an inactivated commercial vaccine. Peptides that were highly enriched against IgY from at least 4 out of 10 infected chickens were selected: 18 and 12 peptides for the killed and attenuated vaccines, respectively. The ten most discriminatory peptides for each vaccine were identified in an ELISA using a training set of IgY samples. These peptides were then used in multi-peptide assays that, when analysing a wider set of samples from infected and vaccinated animals, diagnosed infection with 100% sensitivity and specificity. The data describes a method for the development of DIVA assays for conventional attenuated and killed vaccines. PMID:27510219

  17. Deletion of sodCI and spvBC in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis reduced its virulence to the natural virulence of serovars Agona, Hadar and Infantis for mice but not for chickens early after infection.

    PubMed

    Karasova, D; Havlickova, H; Sisak, F; Rychlik, I

    2009-11-18

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Dublin, Choleraesuis or Gallinarum can colonise liver and spleen in particular hosts while infections with serovars Infantis, Agona, Hadar, etc. are usually limited to gastrointestinal tract. Reasons for this behavior are unknown, although it has been shown that sodCI and spv genes exhibit a strict distribution between more and less virulent serovars and they influence Salmonella virulence. However to what extent the presence or absence of these genes is associated with the increased virulence of serovars which possess them has never been addressed experimentally. In this study we therefore first confirmed the exclusive association of spvB and sodCI genes with the former group of serovars. In the next step we removed these two genes from S. Enteritidis genome and compared the virulence of such a mutant with the virulence of S. Infantis, S. Agona and S. Hadar for chickens and highly sensitive Balb/C mice. Single strain infection showed that the deletion of these two genes from S. Enteritidis resulted in the reduction of its virulence for mice but not for chickens. Mixed infection further confirmed these observations and indicated that in mice but not in chickens the virulence of sodCI and spv mutant was reduced to the natural virulence of serovars Infantis, Agona and Hadar. Although sodCI and spv genes do not influence S. Enteritidis virulence for chickens directly, they may be of an indirect effect through the increased persistence of S. Enteritidis in mice and increased probability of the reintroduction of S. Enteritidis into poultry flocks.

  18. Salmonella Enterica Serotype Enteritidis Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess Complicated with Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Oki, Masayuki; Ueda, Akihiro; Tsuda, Ayumi; Yanagi, Hidetaka; Ozawa, Hideki; Takagi, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Infection with non-typhoidal Salmonella often results in a self-limited acute gastroenteritis. Extra-intestinal Salmonella infection is relatively rare and occurs predominantly in infants and adults with significant underlying conditions. We describe a 54-year-old Japanese man with a history of heavy alcohol consumption and daily contact with a dog, who developed bacteremia complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis, spinal epidural abscess, and meningitis, due to Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis. This case suggests that Salmonella should be considered as an etiologic pathogen in adult patients with perivertebral infection or meningitis. PMID:27628612

  19. Evaluation of the respiratory route as a viable portal of entry for Salmonella in poultry via intratracheal challenge of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium1

    PubMed Central

    Kallapura, G.; Morgan, M. J.; Pumford, N. R.; Bielke, L. R.; Wolfenden, A. D.; Faulkner, O. B.; Latorre, J. D.; Menconi, A.; Hernandez-Velasco, X.; Kuttappan, V. A.; Hargis, B. M.; Tellez, G.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiological evidence suggests that primary infection of Salmonella is by the oral-fecal route for poultry. However, the airborne transmission of Salmonella and similar enteric zoonotic pathogens has been historically neglected. Increasing evidence of Salmonella bioaerosol generation in production facilities and studies suggesting the vulnerabilities of the avian respiratory architecture together have indicated the possibility of the respiratory system being a potential portal of entry for Salmonella in poultry. Presently, we evaluated this hypothesis through intratracheal (IT) administration of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium, as separate challenges, in a total of 4 independent trials, followed by enumeration of cfu recovery in ceca-cecal tonsils and recovery incidence in liver and spleen. In all trials, both Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium, challenged IT colonized cecae to a similar or greater extent than oral administration at identical challenge levels. In most trials, chickens cultured for cfu enumeration from IT-challenged chicks at same dose as orally challenged, resulted in an increase of 1.5 log higher Salmonella Enteritidis from ceca-cecal tonsils and a much lower dose IT of Salmonella Enteritidis could colonize ceca to the same extent than a higher oral challenge. This trend of increased cecal colonization due to IT challenge was observed with all trails involving week-old birds (experiment 2 and 3), which are widely considered to be more difficult to infect via the oral route. Liver-spleen incidence data showed 33% of liver and spleen samples to be positive for Salmonella Enteritidis administered IT (106 cfu/chick), compared with 0% when administered orally (experiment 2, trial 1). Collectively, these data suggest that the respiratory tract may be a largely overlooked portal of entry for Salmonella infections in chickens. PMID:24570455

  20. Salmonella Enteritidis strains from poultry show differential responses to acid stress, oxidative stress and survival in the egg albumen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis is the major food-borne pathogen primarily causing human infection through contaminated chicken meat and eggs. We recently demonstrated that S. Enteritidis strains from poultry differ in their ability to invade human intestinal cells and cause disease in orally challenged mice...

  1. Enjoying Homemade Ice Cream without the Risk of Salmonella Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... responsible for the outbreaks is raw or undercooked eggs. A person infected with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE), the strain of Salmonella found most frequently in raw eggs, usually has fever, diarrhea and abdominal cramps beginning ...

  2. Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis in French Polynesia, South Pacific, 2008-2013.

    PubMed

    Le Hello, Simon; Maillard, Fiona; Mallet, Henri-Pierre; Daudens, Elise; Levy, Marc; Roy, Valérie; Branaa, Philippe; Bertrand, Sophie; Fabre, Laetitia; Weill, François-Xavier

    2015-06-01

    Outbreaks of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections associated with eggs occurred in French Polynesia during 2008-2013. Molecular analysis of isolates by using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat polymorphisms and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis was performed. This subtyping made defining the epidemic strain, finding the source, and decontaminating affected poultry flocks possible. PMID:25988406

  3. Colonization of avian reproductive tract tissues by variant subpopulations of Salmonella Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leghorn hens were infected with Salmonella Enteritidis cultures to determine their comparative ability to colonize the avian reproductive tract. Group 1 received PT4 22079, which was previously shown to contaminate eggs and to form biofilm. Group 2 received a 90:10 mixture of PT13a strains 21027 and...

  4. Influence of exogenous melatonin administration on Salmonella enteritidis colonization in molted layers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of exogenous melatonin on Salmonella enteritidis (SE) infection in experimentally-challenged laying hens subjected to a forced molt. Single Comb White Leghorn hens (W-36) over 50-wk-of-age were randomly placed in one of two rooms, allowed to acclima...

  5. Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis in French Polynesia, South Pacific, 2008-2013.

    PubMed

    Le Hello, Simon; Maillard, Fiona; Mallet, Henri-Pierre; Daudens, Elise; Levy, Marc; Roy, Valérie; Branaa, Philippe; Bertrand, Sophie; Fabre, Laetitia; Weill, François-Xavier

    2015-06-01

    Outbreaks of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections associated with eggs occurred in French Polynesia during 2008-2013. Molecular analysis of isolates by using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat polymorphisms and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis was performed. This subtyping made defining the epidemic strain, finding the source, and decontaminating affected poultry flocks possible.

  6. Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis in French Polynesia, South Pacific, 2008–2013

    PubMed Central

    Maillard, Fiona; Mallet, Henri-Pierre; Daudens, Elise; Levy, Marc; Roy, Valérie; Branaa, Philippe; Bertrand, Sophie; Fabre, Laetitia; Weill, François-Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Outbreaks of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections associated with eggs occurred in French Polynesia during 2008–2013. Molecular analysis of isolates by using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat polymorphisms and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis was performed. This subtyping made defining the epidemic strain, finding the source, and decontaminating affected poultry flocks possible. PMID:25988406

  7. A Salmonella Enterica Subsp. Enterica Serovar Enteritidis Foodborne Outbreak after Consumption of Homemade Lasagne

    PubMed Central

    Gariano, Grazia Rosaria; Bianchi, Daniela Manila; Zuccon, Fabio; Sommariva, Marco; Nguon, Bovannrith; Malabaila, Aurelio; Gallina, Silvia; Decastelli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    In the latest year, and also in 2013, Salmonella was the most frequently detected causative agent in foodborne outbreaks (FBOs) reported in Europe. As indicated in EFSA report (2015) the serotypes mostly associated to FBOs are S. Typhimurium and Enteritidis; while Salmonella Typhimurium is generally associated with the consumption of contaminated pork and beef, FBOs due to Salmonella Enteritidis are linked to eggs and poultry meat. In this study it is described the investigation of a domestic FBO involving four adults and linked to homemade lasagne. Investigations were performed to determine the relatedness of Salmonella strains, identify the sources of infection, and trace the routes of Salmonella contamination in this FBO. Salmonella strains were isolated in 3 out of 4 patient stool samples and from lasagne and all of them were serotyped as S. Enteritidis. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis revealed the genotypical similarity of all the strains. Although serotyping and PFGE analysis identified the common food source of infection in this FBO, it was not possible to determine how or at what point during food preparation the lasagne became contaminated with Salmonella. PMID:27800418

  8. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis enterocolitis during late stages of gestation induces an adverse pregnancy outcome in the murine model.

    PubMed

    Noto Llana, Mariángeles; Sarnacki, Sebastián Hernán; Aya Castañeda, María del Rosario; Pustovrh, María Carolina; Gartner, Alejandra Sonia; Buzzola, Fernanda Roxana; Cerquetti, María Cristina; Giacomodonato, Mónica Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Foodborne diseases caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) are a significant health problem. Pregnancy, state of immunological tolerance, is a predisposing condition for the development of infections with intracellular pathogens. Salmonella species can cause pregnancy complications such as chorioamnionitis, transplacental fetal infection, pre term labor, abortions, neonatal and maternal septicemia. However, the specific mechanisms by which Salmonella infections trigger these alterations are not clear. In the present work, using a self-limiting enterocolitis murine model, we show that the ingestion of a low dose of S. Enteritidis at late stages of pregnancy (day 15 of gestation) is sufficient to induce massive maternal infection. We found that Salmonella infection leads to 40% of pre term delivery, 33% of abortion and fetal growth restriction. Placental dysfunction during S. Enteritidis enterocolitis was confirmed through cellular infiltration and hypoxia markers (MPO activity and COX-1 and COX-2 expression, respectively). Apoptosis in placental tissue due to Salmonella infection was also evident at day 18 of gestation when investigated by morphometric procedure, DNA fragmentation and Fas/FasL expression. Also, the expression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17 and IL-10 was up regulated in response to Salmonella not only in placenta, but also in amniotic fluid and maternal serum. Altogether, our results demonstrate that S. Enteritidis enterocolitis during late stages of gestation causes detrimental effect on pregnancy outcome.

  9. Genomic and phenotypic variation in epidemic-spanning Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis isolates

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) has caused major epidemics of gastrointestinal infection in many different countries. In this study we investigate genome divergence and pathogenic potential in S. Enteritidis isolated before, during and after an epidemic in Uruguay. Results 266 S. Enteritidis isolates were genotyped using RAPD-PCR and a selection were subjected to PFGE analysis. From these, 29 isolates spanning different periods, genetic profiles and sources of isolation were assayed for their ability to infect human epithelial cells and subjected to comparative genomic hybridization using a Salmonella pan-array and the sequenced strain S. Enteritidis PT4 P125109 as reference. Six other isolates from distant countries were included as external comparators. Two hundred and thirty three chromosomal genes as well as the virulence plasmid were found as variable among S. Enteritidis isolates. Ten out of the 16 chromosomal regions that varied between different isolates correspond to phage-like regions. The 2 oldest pre-epidemic isolates lack phage SE20 and harbour other phage encoded genes that are absent in the sequenced strain. Besides variation in prophage, we found variation in genes involved in metabolism and bacterial fitness. Five epidemic strains lack the complete Salmonella virulence plasmid. Significantly, strains with indistinguishable genetic patterns still showed major differences in their ability to infect epithelial cells, indicating that the approach used was insufficient to detect the genetic basis of this differential behaviour. Conclusion The recent epidemic of S. Enteritidis infection in Uruguay has been driven by the introduction of closely related strains of phage type 4 lineage. Our results confirm previous reports demonstrating a high degree of genetic homogeneity among S. Enteritidis isolates. However, 10 of the regions of variability described here are for the first time reported as being variable in S

  10. Refined live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Enteritidis vaccines mediate homologous and heterologous serogroup protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; Schmidlein, Patrick; Simon, Raphael; Pasetti, Marcela F; Galen, James E; Levine, Myron M

    2015-12-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections constitute a major health problem among infants and toddlers in sub-Saharan Africa; these infections also occur in infants and the elderly in developed countries. We genetically engineered a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of multilocus sequence type 313, the predominant genotype circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the capacities of S. Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ΔguaBA ΔclpX live oral vaccines to protect mice against a highly lethal challenge dose of the homologous serovar and determined protection against other group B and D serovars circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. The vaccines S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 were immunogenic and protected BALB/c mice against 10,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis, respectively. S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 protected mice against the group B serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Stanleyville (91% vaccine efficacy), and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 protected mice against the group D serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (85% vaccine efficacy). High rates of survival were observed when mice were infected 12 weeks postimmunization, indicating that the vaccines elicited long-lived protective immunity. Whereas CVD 1931 did not protect against S. Enteritidis R11, CVD 1944 did mediate protection against S. Typhimurium D65 (81% efficacy). These findings suggest that a bivalent (S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis) vaccine would provide broad protection against the majority of invasive NTS infections in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:26351285

  11. Refined live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Enteritidis vaccines mediate homologous and heterologous serogroup protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; Schmidlein, Patrick; Simon, Raphael; Pasetti, Marcela F; Galen, James E; Levine, Myron M

    2015-12-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections constitute a major health problem among infants and toddlers in sub-Saharan Africa; these infections also occur in infants and the elderly in developed countries. We genetically engineered a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of multilocus sequence type 313, the predominant genotype circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the capacities of S. Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ΔguaBA ΔclpX live oral vaccines to protect mice against a highly lethal challenge dose of the homologous serovar and determined protection against other group B and D serovars circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. The vaccines S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 were immunogenic and protected BALB/c mice against 10,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis, respectively. S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 protected mice against the group B serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Stanleyville (91% vaccine efficacy), and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 protected mice against the group D serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (85% vaccine efficacy). High rates of survival were observed when mice were infected 12 weeks postimmunization, indicating that the vaccines elicited long-lived protective immunity. Whereas CVD 1931 did not protect against S. Enteritidis R11, CVD 1944 did mediate protection against S. Typhimurium D65 (81% efficacy). These findings suggest that a bivalent (S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis) vaccine would provide broad protection against the majority of invasive NTS infections in sub-Saharan Africa.

  12. Live attenuated vaccines for invasive Salmonella infections.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; Levine, Myron M

    2015-06-19

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi produces significant morbidity and mortality worldwide despite the fact that there are licensed Salmonella Typhi vaccines available. This is primarily due to the fact that these vaccines are not used in the countries that most need them. There is growing recognition that an effective invasive Salmonella vaccine formulation must also prevent infection due to other Salmonella serovars. We anticipate that a multivalent vaccine that targets the following serovars will be needed to control invasive Salmonella infections worldwide: Salmonella Typhi, Salmonella Paratyphi A, Salmonella Paratyphi B (currently uncommon but may become dominant again), Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Choleraesuis (as well as other Group C Salmonella). Live attenuated vaccines are an attractive vaccine formulation for use in developing as well as developed countries. Here, we describe the methods of attenuation that have been used to date to create live attenuated Salmonella vaccines and provide an update on the progress that has been made on these vaccines.

  13. Distribution of Salmonella enteritidis phage types in Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Khakhria, R.; Duck, D.; Lior, H.

    1991-01-01

    The distribution of Salmonella enteritidis phage types in Canada is described; 606 of 674 strains examined were of human origin. Typable strains of all sources, constituted 99.6% (671/674) of all strains examined, and were representative of 15 different phage types. Five phage types (8, 13, 4, 13a and 1) accounted for 92.4% of the total. Phage type 8 consistently showed the highest incidence in human (69.96%) and non-human (72.05%) sources and appeared to be the most common in North America. Phage type 4, the most prevalent in the UK, is infrequent in Canada (38/674). The distribution of phage types showed regional variation among infrequent phage types, whereas the common type, 8, was observed in different frequencies in all provinces. Examination of 29 outbreaks of S. enteritidis representing 254 isolates for humans revealed 5 different phage types, the highest number of outbreaks (11) were type 8. A study of these outbreaks and the animal-host-associations of the common phage types, 8 and 13, indicated that contaminated poultry appeared to be the most common source of human infection in Canada. PMID:1993451

  14. Fitness Costs and Stability of a High-Level Ciprofloxacin Resistance Phenotype in Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis: Reduced Infectivity Associated with Decreased Expression of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fitness costs associated with high-level fluoroquinolone resistance were examined in phenotypically and genotypically characterized ciprofloxacin-resistant Salmonella Enteritidis mutants (104-cip and 5408-cip, MIC > 32 µg/ml). The stability of the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype in both mut...

  15. Distinct Salmonella Enteritidis lineages associated with enterocolitis in high-income settings and invasive disease in low-income settings.

    PubMed

    Feasey, Nicholas A; Hadfield, James; Keddy, Karen H; Dallman, Timothy J; Jacobs, Jan; Deng, Xiangyu; Wigley, Paul; Barquist Barquist, Lars; Langridge, Gemma C; Feltwell, Theresa; Harris, Simon R; Mather, Alison E; Fookes, Maria; Aslett, Martin; Msefula, Chisomo; Kariuki, Samuel; Maclennan, Calman A; Onsare, Robert S; Weill, François-Xavier; Le Hello, Simon; Smith, Anthony M; McClelland, Michael; Desai, Prerak; Parry, Christopher M; Cheesbrough, John; French, Neil; Campos, Josefina; Chabalgoity, Jose A; Betancor, Laura; Hopkins, Katie L; Nair, Satheesh; Humphrey, Tom J; Lunguya, Octavie; Cogan, Tristan A; Tapia, Milagritos D; Sow, Samba O; Tennant, Sharon M; Bornstein, Kristin; Levine, Myron M; Lacharme-Lora, Lizeth; Everett, Dean B; Kingsley, Robert A; Parkhill, Julian; Heyderman, Robert S; Dougan, Gordon; Gordon, Melita A; Thomson, Nicholas R

    2016-10-01

    An epidemiological paradox surrounds Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. In high-income settings, it has been responsible for an epidemic of poultry-associated, self-limiting enterocolitis, whereas in sub-Saharan Africa it is a major cause of invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella disease, associated with high case fatality. By whole-genome sequence analysis of 675 isolates of S. Enteritidis from 45 countries, we show the existence of a global epidemic clade and two new clades of S. Enteritidis that are geographically restricted to distinct regions of Africa. The African isolates display genomic degradation, a novel prophage repertoire, and an expanded multidrug resistance plasmid. S. Enteritidis is a further example of a Salmonella serotype that displays niche plasticity, with distinct clades that enable it to become a prominent cause of gastroenteritis in association with the industrial production of eggs and of multidrug-resistant, bloodstream-invasive infection in Africa.

  16. Distinct Salmonella Enteritidis lineages associated with enterocolitis in high-income settings and invasive disease in low-income settings.

    PubMed

    Feasey, Nicholas A; Hadfield, James; Keddy, Karen H; Dallman, Timothy J; Jacobs, Jan; Deng, Xiangyu; Wigley, Paul; Barquist Barquist, Lars; Langridge, Gemma C; Feltwell, Theresa; Harris, Simon R; Mather, Alison E; Fookes, Maria; Aslett, Martin; Msefula, Chisomo; Kariuki, Samuel; Maclennan, Calman A; Onsare, Robert S; Weill, François-Xavier; Le Hello, Simon; Smith, Anthony M; McClelland, Michael; Desai, Prerak; Parry, Christopher M; Cheesbrough, John; French, Neil; Campos, Josefina; Chabalgoity, Jose A; Betancor, Laura; Hopkins, Katie L; Nair, Satheesh; Humphrey, Tom J; Lunguya, Octavie; Cogan, Tristan A; Tapia, Milagritos D; Sow, Samba O; Tennant, Sharon M; Bornstein, Kristin; Levine, Myron M; Lacharme-Lora, Lizeth; Everett, Dean B; Kingsley, Robert A; Parkhill, Julian; Heyderman, Robert S; Dougan, Gordon; Gordon, Melita A; Thomson, Nicholas R

    2016-10-01

    An epidemiological paradox surrounds Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. In high-income settings, it has been responsible for an epidemic of poultry-associated, self-limiting enterocolitis, whereas in sub-Saharan Africa it is a major cause of invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella disease, associated with high case fatality. By whole-genome sequence analysis of 675 isolates of S. Enteritidis from 45 countries, we show the existence of a global epidemic clade and two new clades of S. Enteritidis that are geographically restricted to distinct regions of Africa. The African isolates display genomic degradation, a novel prophage repertoire, and an expanded multidrug resistance plasmid. S. Enteritidis is a further example of a Salmonella serotype that displays niche plasticity, with distinct clades that enable it to become a prominent cause of gastroenteritis in association with the industrial production of eggs and of multidrug-resistant, bloodstream-invasive infection in Africa. PMID:27548315

  17. Salmonella Infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections with bacteria of the genus Salmonella are responsible for both acute and chronic poultry diseases. These diseases cause economically significant losses for poultry producers in many nations and absorb large investments of public and private resources in testing and control efforts. Infect...

  18. A Role for the Non-Canonical Wnt-β-Catenin and TGF-β Signaling Pathways in the Induction of Tolerance during the Establishment of a Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Persistent Cecal Infection in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Kogut, Michael H.; Arsenault, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induce an early pro-inflammatory response in chickens. However, the response is short-lived, asymptomatic of disease, resulting in a persistent colonization of the ceca, and fecal shedding of bacteria. The underlying mechanisms that control this persistent infection of chickens by Salmonella are unknown. Recently, we found an expansion of the Treg population and subsequent increased in vitro immunosuppressive functions of the CD4+CD25+ cells isolated from the ceca of the Salmonella-infected chickens by day 4 post-infection that increased steadily throughout the course of the 14 days of infection, whereas the number of CD4+CD25+ cells in the non-infected controls remained steady throughout the study. CD4+CD25+ cells from cecal tonsils of S. enteritidis-infected birds had greater expression of IL-10 mRNA content than the CD4+CD25+ cells from the non-infected controls at all the time points studied. These results suggest the development of a tolerogenic immune response in the cecum of Salmonella-infected chickens may contribute to the persistance of Salmonella cecal colonization. Using a chicken-specific kinome peptide immune array, we have analyzed the signaling pathways altered during the establishment of this tolerogenic state. This analysis has revealed a role for the non-canonical Wnt signaling pathway in the cecum at 4 days post-infection. Infection induced the significant (p < 0.01) phosphorylation of the G-protein-coupled transmembrane protein, Frizzled 1 (FZD1), resulting in an influx of intracellular Ca2+ and the phosphorylation of the Ca2+-dependent effector molecules calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CamKII), β-catenin, protein kinase C, and the activation of the transcription factor, NFAT. Nuclear translocation of NFAT resulted in a significant increase in the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-β. Increased expression of TGF-β4 mRNA activates the TGF-β signaling pathway that

  19. Limited genetic diversity in Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis PT13

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis has emerged as a significant foodborne pathogen throughout the world and is commonly characterized by phage typing. In Canada phage types (PT) 4, 8 and 13 predominate and in 2005 a large foodborne PT13 outbreak occurred in the province of Ontario. The ability ...

  20. Method for the detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    DOEpatents

    Agron, Peter G.; Andersen, Gary L.; Walker, Richard L.

    2008-10-28

    Described herein is the identification of a novel Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis locus that serves as a marker for DNA-based identification of this bacterium. In addition, three primer pairs derived from this locus that may be used in a nucleotide detection method to detect the presence of the bacterium are also disclosed herein.

  1. Epidemiological differentiation of pathogenic strains of Salmonella enteritidis by ribotyping.

    PubMed Central

    Landeras, E; González-Hevia, M A; Alzugaray, R; Mendoza, M C

    1996-01-01

    The usefulness of two-way ribotyping, performed with SphI and PstI, as a genetic marker for a series of pathogenic Salmonella enteritidis strains is reported. Eighteen combined ribotypes were differentiated, a discrimination index of 0.77 was reached, a genetic relationship dendrogram was traced, and the results were applied in an epidemiological study. PMID:8862603

  2. Bio-Control of Salmonella Enteritidis in Foods Using Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Hongduo; Zhang, Pengyu; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Two lytic phages, vB_SenM-PA13076 (PA13076) and vB_SenM-PC2184 (PC2184), were isolated from chicken sewage and characterized with host strains Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) ATCC13076 and CVCC2184, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that they belonged to the family Myoviridae. The lytic abilities of these two phages in liquid culture showed 104 multiplicity of infection (MOI) was the best in inhibiting bacteria, with PC2184 exhibiting more activity than PA13076. The two phages exhibited broad host range within the genus Salmonella. Phage PA13076 and PC2184 had a lytic effect on 222 (71.4%) and 298 (95.8%) of the 311 epidemic Salmonella isolates, respectively. We tested the effectiveness of phage PA13076 and PC2184 as well as a cocktail combination of both in three different foods (chicken breast, pasteurized whole milk and Chinese cabbage) contaminated with SE. Samples were spiked with 1 × 104 CFU individual SE or a mixture of strains (ATCC13076 and CVCC2184), then treated with 1 × 108 PFU individual phage or a two phage cocktail, and incubated at 4 °C or 25 °C for 5 h. In general, the inhibitory effect of phage and phage cocktail was better at 4 °C than that at 25 °C, whereas the opposite result was observed in Chinese cabbage, and phage cocktail was better than either single phage. A significant reduction in bacterial numbers (1.5–4 log CFU/sample, p < 0.05) was observed in all tested foods. The two phages on the three food samples were relatively stable, especially at 4 °C, with the phages exhibiting the greatest stability in milk. Our research shows that our phages have potential effectiveness as a bio-control agent of Salmonella in foods. PMID:26305252

  3. Bio-Control of Salmonella Enteritidis in Foods Using Bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hongduo; Zhang, Pengyu; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Ran

    2015-08-24

    Two lytic phages, vB_SenM-PA13076 (PA13076) and vB_SenM-PC2184 (PC2184), were isolated from chicken sewage and characterized with host strains Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) ATCC13076 and CVCC2184, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that they belonged to the family Myoviridae. The lytic abilities of these two phages in liquid culture showed 104 multiplicity of infection (MOI) was the best in inhibiting bacteria, with PC2184 exhibiting more activity than PA13076. The two phages exhibited broad host range within the genus Salmonella. Phage PA13076 and PC2184 had a lytic effect on 222 (71.4%) and 298 (95.8%) of the 311 epidemic Salmonella isolates, respectively. We tested the effectiveness of phage PA13076 and PC2184 as well as a cocktail combination of both in three different foods (chicken breast, pasteurized whole milk and Chinese cabbage) contaminated with SE. Samples were spiked with 1 × 10(4) CFU individual SE or a mixture of strains (ATCC13076 and CVCC2184), then treated with 1 × 10(8) PFU individual phage or a two phage cocktail, and incubated at 4 °C or 25 °C for 5 h. In general, the inhibitory effect of phage and phage cocktail was better at 4 °C than that at 25 °C, whereas the opposite result was observed in Chinese cabbage, and phage cocktail was better than either single phage. A significant reduction in bacterial numbers (1.5-4 log CFU/sample, p < 0.05) was observed in all tested foods. The two phages on the three food samples were relatively stable, especially at 4 ºC, with the phages exhibiting the greatest stability in milk. Our research shows that our phages have potential effectiveness as a bio-control agent of Salmonella in foods.

  4. Bio-Control of Salmonella Enteritidis in Foods Using Bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hongduo; Zhang, Pengyu; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Ran

    2015-08-01

    Two lytic phages, vB_SenM-PA13076 (PA13076) and vB_SenM-PC2184 (PC2184), were isolated from chicken sewage and characterized with host strains Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) ATCC13076 and CVCC2184, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that they belonged to the family Myoviridae. The lytic abilities of these two phages in liquid culture showed 104 multiplicity of infection (MOI) was the best in inhibiting bacteria, with PC2184 exhibiting more activity than PA13076. The two phages exhibited broad host range within the genus Salmonella. Phage PA13076 and PC2184 had a lytic effect on 222 (71.4%) and 298 (95.8%) of the 311 epidemic Salmonella isolates, respectively. We tested the effectiveness of phage PA13076 and PC2184 as well as a cocktail combination of both in three different foods (chicken breast, pasteurized whole milk and Chinese cabbage) contaminated with SE. Samples were spiked with 1 × 10(4) CFU individual SE or a mixture of strains (ATCC13076 and CVCC2184), then treated with 1 × 10(8) PFU individual phage or a two phage cocktail, and incubated at 4 °C or 25 °C for 5 h. In general, the inhibitory effect of phage and phage cocktail was better at 4 °C than that at 25 °C, whereas the opposite result was observed in Chinese cabbage, and phage cocktail was better than either single phage. A significant reduction in bacterial numbers (1.5-4 log CFU/sample, p < 0.05) was observed in all tested foods. The two phages on the three food samples were relatively stable, especially at 4 ºC, with the phages exhibiting the greatest stability in milk. Our research shows that our phages have potential effectiveness as a bio-control agent of Salmonella in foods. PMID:26305252

  5. Genomic Comparison of the Closely Related Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis and Dublin.

    PubMed

    Betancor, Laura; Yim, Lucía; Martínez, Arací; Fookes, Maria; Sasias, Sebastian; Schelotto, Felipe; Thomson, Nicholas; Maskell, Duncan; Chabalgoity, José A

    2012-01-01

    The Enteritidis and Dublin serovars of Salmonella enterica are closely related, yet they differ significantly in pathogenicity and epidemiology. S. Enteritidis is a broad host range serovar that commonly causes gastroenteritis and infrequently causes invasive disease in humans. S. Dublin mainly colonizes cattle but upon infecting humans often results in invasive disease.To gain a broader view of the extent of these differences we conducted microarray-based comparative genomics between several field isolates from each serovar. Genome degradation has been correlated with host adaptation in Salmonella, thus we also compared at whole genome scale the available genomic sequences of them to evaluate pseudogene composition within each serovar.Microarray analysis revealed 3771 CDS shared by both serovars while 33 were only present in Enteritidis and 87 were exclusive to Dublin. Pseudogene evaluation showed 177 inactive CDS in S. Dublin which correspond to active genes in S. Enteritidis, nine of which are also inactive in the host adapted S. Gallinarum and S. Choleraesuis serovars. Sequencing of these 9 CDS in several S. Dublin clinical isolates revealed that they are pseudogenes in all of them, indicating that this feature is not peculiar to the sequenced strain. Among these CDS, shdA (Peyer´s patch colonization factor) and mglA (galactoside transport ATP binding protein), appear also to be inactive in the human adapted S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A, suggesting that functionality of these genes may be relevant for the capacity of certain Salmonella serovars to infect a broad range of hosts.

  6. Distribution, gene sequence and expression in vivo of the plasmid encoded fimbrial antigen of Salmonella serotype Enteritidis.

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, M. J.; Allen-Vercoe, E.; Redstone, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    The pefA gene which encoded the serotype associated plasmid (SAP) mediated fimbrial major subunit antigen of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium shared genetic identity with 128 of 706 salmonella isolates as demonstrated by dot (colony) hybridization. Seventy-seven of 113 isolates of Typhimurium and individual isolates of serotypes Bovis-morbificans, Cholerae-suis and Enteritidis phage type 9b hybridized pefA strongly, whereas 48 isolates of Enteritidis hybridized pefA weakly and one Enteritidis isolate of phage type 14b failed to hybridize. Individual isolates of 294 serotypes and 247 individual isolates of serotype Dublin did not hybridize pefA. Southern hybridization of plasmids extracted from Enteritidis demonstrated that the pefA gene probe hybridized strongly an atypical SAP of 80 kb in size harboured by one Enteritidis isolate of phage-type 9b, whereas the typical SAP of 58 kb in size harboured by 48 Enteritidis isolates hybridized weakly. One Enteritidis isolate of phage type 14b which failed to hybridize pefA in dot (colony) hybridization experiments was demonstrated to be plasmid free. A cosmid library of Enteritidis phage type 4 expressed in Escherichia coli K12 was screened by hybridization for the presence of pef sequences. Recombinant clones which were deduced to harbour the entire pef operon elaborated a PEF-like fimbrial structure at the cell surface. The PEF-like fimbrial antigen was purified from one cosmid clone and used in western blot experiments with sera from chickens infected with Enteritidis phage-type 4. Seroconversion to the fimbrial antigen was observed which indicated that the Enteritidis PEF-like fimbrial structure was expressed at some stage during infection. Nucleotide sequence analysis demonstrated that the pefA alleles of Typhimurium and Enteritidis phage-type 4 shared 76% DNA nucleotide and 82% deduced amino acid sequence identity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8760946

  7. Salmonella enteritidis induced myocarditis in a 16-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Childs, Lucy; Gupta, Sandy

    2012-11-27

    Myocarditis typically presents with non-specific clinical symptoms, and can easily be missed in the absence of a high index of clinical suspicion. Myocarditis caused by bacterial pathogens is rare in immunocompetent individuals, more commonly seen following viral infection. Although more classically associated with typhoid fever and gastroenteritis, Salmonella species are a rare cause of myocarditis. We report a case of Salmonella enteritidis-induced myocarditis after gastrointestinal infection in a 16 year-old girl, and discuss the diagnostic tools currently utilised to ascertain the diagnosis.

  8. Comparison of four molecular methods to type Salmonella Enteritidis strains.

    PubMed

    Campioni, Fábio; Pitondo-Silva, André; Bergamini, Alzira M M; Falcão, Juliana P

    2015-05-01

    This study compared the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR (ERIC-PCR), multilocus variable-number of tanden-repeat analysis (MLVA), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) methods for typing 188 Salmonella Enteritidis strains from different sources isolated over a 24-year period in Brazil. PFGE and ERIC-PCR were more efficient than MLVA for subtyping the strains. However, MLVA provided additional epidemiological information for those strains. In addition, MLST showed the Brazilian strains as belonging to the main clonal complex of S. Enteritidis, CC11, and provided the first report of two new STs in the S. enterica database but could not properly subtype the strains. Our results showed that the use of PFGE or ERIC-PCR together with MLVA is suitable to efficiently subtype S. Enteritidis strains and provide important epidemiological information. PMID:25703542

  9. Heterophils isolated from chickens resistant to extra-intestinal Salmonella enteritidis infection express higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA following infection than heterophils from susceptible chickens.

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Pamela J.; Swaggerty, Christina L.; Kaiser, Pete; Pevzner, Igal Y.; Kogut, Michael H.

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies showed differences in in vitro heterophil function between parental (A > B) broilers and F1 reciprocal crosses (D > C). Our objectives were to (1) determine if in vitro variations translate to differences in resistance to Salmonella enteritidis (SE) and (2) quantitate cytokine mRNA in heterophils from SE-infected chicks. One-day-old chicks were challenged and organs were cultured for SE. Chicks with efficient heterophils (A and D) were less susceptible to SE compared to chicks with inefficient heterophils (B and C). Heterophils were isolated from SE-infected chicks and cytokine mRNA expression was evaluated using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA was up-regulated in heterophils from SE-resistant chicks compared to susceptible chicks. This is the first report to quantitate cytokine mRNA in heterophils from SE-infected chicks. These data show a relationship between in vitro heterophil function, increased pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression, and increased resistance to SE in 1-day-old chicks. PMID:15635959

  10. High Incubation Temperature and Threonine Dietary Level Improve Ileum Response Against Post-Hatch Salmonella Enteritidis Inoculation in Broiler Chicks.

    PubMed

    de Barros Moreira Filho, Alexandre Lemos; de Oliveira, Celso José Bruno; de Oliveira, Heraldo Bezerra; Campos, Danila Barreiro; Guerra, Ricardo Romão; Costa, Fernando Guilherme Perazzo; Givisiez, Patricia Emília Naves

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of both embryonic thermal manipulation and dietary threonine level on the response of broilers inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, considering bacterial counts in the cecal contents, intestinal morphology, mucin and heat shock protein 70 gene expression, body weight and weight gain. Thermal manipulation was used from 11 days of incubation until hatch, defining three treatments: standard (37.7°C), continuous high temperature (38.7°C) and continuous low temperature (36.7°C). After hatch, chicks were distributed according to a 3x2+1 factorial arrangement (three temperatures and two threonine levels and one sham-inoculated control). At two days of age, all chicks were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, except for the sham-inoculated control group. There was no interaction between the factors on any analyses. High temperature during incubation was able to reduce colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis in the first days, reducing both Salmonella counts and the number of positive birds. It also increased mucin expression and decreased Hsp70 expression compared with other inoculated groups. High temperature during incubation and high threonine level act independently to reduce the negative effects associated to Salmonella Enteritidis infection on intestinal morphology and performance, with results similar to sham-inoculated birds. The findings open new perspectives for practical strategies towards the pre-harvest Salmonella control in the poultry industry. PMID:26131553

  11. High Incubation Temperature and Threonine Dietary Level Improve Ileum Response Against Post-Hatch Salmonella Enteritidis Inoculation in Broiler Chicks

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Heraldo Bezerra; Campos, Danila Barreiro; Guerra, Ricardo Romão; Costa, Fernando Guilherme Perazzo

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of both embryonic thermal manipulation and dietary threonine level on the response of broilers inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, considering bacterial counts in the cecal contents, intestinal morphology, mucin and heat shock protein 70 gene expression, body weight and weight gain. Thermal manipulation was used from 11 days of incubation until hatch, defining three treatments: standard (37.7°C), continuous high temperature (38.7°C) and continuous low temperature (36.7°C). After hatch, chicks were distributed according to a 3x2+1 factorial arrangement (three temperatures and two threonine levels and one sham-inoculated control). At two days of age, all chicks were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, except for the sham-inoculated control group. There was no interaction between the factors on any analyses. High temperature during incubation was able to reduce colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis in the first days, reducing both Salmonella counts and the number of positive birds. It also increased mucin expression and decreased Hsp70 expression compared with other inoculated groups. High temperature during incubation and high threonine level act independently to reduce the negative effects associated to Salmonella Enteritidis infection on intestinal morphology and performance, with results similar to sham-inoculated birds. The findings open new perspectives for practical strategies towards the pre-harvest Salmonella control in the poultry industry. PMID:26131553

  12. Use of random forest to estimate population attributable fractions from a case-control study of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections.

    PubMed

    Gu, W; Vieira, A R; Hoekstra, R M; Griffin, P M; Cole, D

    2015-10-01

    To design effective food safety programmes we need to estimate how many sporadic foodborne illnesses are caused by specific food sources based on case-control studies. Logistic regression has substantive limitations for analysing structured questionnaire data with numerous exposures and missing values. We adapted random forest to analyse data of a case-control study of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis illness for source attribution. For estimation of summary population attributable fractions (PAFs) of exposures grouped into transmission routes, we devised a counterfactual estimator to predict reductions in illness associated with removing grouped exposures. For the purpose of comparison, we fitted the data using logistic regression models with stepwise forward and backward variable selection. Our results show that the forward and backward variable selection of logistic regression models were not consistent for parameter estimation, with different significant exposures identified. By contrast, the random forest model produced estimated PAFs of grouped exposures consistent in rank order with results obtained from outbreak data, with egg-related exposures having the highest estimated PAF (22·1%, 95% confidence interval 8·5-31·8). Random forest might be structurally more coherent and efficient than logistic regression models for attributing Salmonella illnesses to sources involving many causal pathways.

  13. Detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) Antibodies in Serum Using A Polystyrene Bead/SE Flagella Agglutination Assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serologic screening of flocks can be an important method to detect Salmonella enteritidis (SE) infections but can be labor intensive or lack specificity. Our goal was to develop a rapid agglutination assay using SE flagella adsorbed to polystyrene beads as a simple, relatively specific test to dete...

  14. 21 CFR 118.9 - Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.9 Section 118.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... EGGS § 118.9 Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. You must have one...

  15. 21 CFR 118.5 - Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.5 Section 118.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....5 Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental testing when laying...

  16. 21 CFR 118.10 - Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.10 Section 118.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.10 Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE)...

  17. 21 CFR 118.6 - Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... or processed as egg products in accordance with the Egg Products Inspection Act, 21 CFR 118.6(f... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.6... testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a)(1) If the environmental test for pullets at 14 to 16 weeks...

  18. 21 CFR 118.7 - Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.7 Section 118.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....7 Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental sampling. An...

  19. Behavior of salmonella heidelberg and salmonella enteritidis strains following broiler chick inoculation: evaluation of cecal morphometry, liver and cecum bacterial counts and fecal excretion patterns.

    PubMed

    Borsoi, Anderlise; Ruschel do Santos, Luciana; Beatriz Rodrigues, Laura; Luiz de Souza Moraes, Hamilton; Tadeu Pippi Salle, Carlos; Pinheiro do Nascimento, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Over the years, Salmonella Heidelberg (SH) has gained prominence in North America poultry production and in the poultry production of other countries. Salmonella Heidelberg has been isolated and reported from poultry and poultry products in Brazil since 1962, whereas Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) has only emerged as a serious problem in poultry and public health since 1993. These strains of Salmonella can cause intestinal problems in newly hatched chicks, and infection may persist until adulthood. Upon slaughter of chickens, Salmonella can contaminate carcasses, a condition that poses a threat to human health. The aim of this study was to compare the fecal excretion of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Heidelberg in newly hatched chicks (orally inoculated with 10(5)ufc/mL each) until 20 days of age. In addition, the ratio of cecal villus height:crypt depth (morphometry) and liver and cecum cell counts was analyzed in chicks ranging from 0 to 3 days of age and infected with these two Salmonella strains. One hundred seventeen chicks were separated into one of three experimental groups: a control group, an SE-infected group and an SH-infected group. Eight chicks per group were euthanized at 6, 12 and 72 hours post-inoculation (pi) to allow for Salmonella isolation from the liver and cecum and for the collection of the cecum for villi and crypt analysis. Other birds were allowed to mature to 20 days of age and cloacal swabs were taken at 2, 6, 13 and 20 days pi to compare the fecal excretion of inoculated strains. The Salmonella Enteritidis group had a higher number of cells excreted during the trial. Both strains were isolated from the liver and cecum by 6h pi. At 12h pi the Salmonella Heidelberg group had high cell counts in the cecum. No difference was found in liver cell counts. Both strains showed lower villus height:crypt depth ratio than the control group post-infection.

  20. Vaccination of chickens with SPI1-lon and SPI1-lon-fliC mutant of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Matulova, Marta; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Rychlik, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is gradually decreasing in poultry flocks in the EU, which may result in the demand for a vaccine that allows for the differentiation of vaccinated flocks from those infected by wild-type S. Enteritidis. In this study, we therefore constructed a (Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1) SPI1-lon mutant with or without fliC encoding for S. Enteritidis flagellin. The combination of SPI1-lon mutations resulted in attenuated but immunogenic mutant suitable for oral vaccination of poultry. In addition, the vaccination of chickens with the SPI1-lon-fliC mutant enabled the serological differentiation of vaccinated and infected chickens. The absence of fliC therefore did not affect the immunogenicity of the vaccine strain and allowed for serological differentiation of the vaccinated chickens. The SPI1-lon-fliC mutant is therefore a suitable marker vaccine strain for oral vaccination of poultry.

  1. Comparison of the adhesion ability of different Salmonella enteritidis serotypes to materials used in kitchens.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Kelly; Oliveira, Tereza; Teixeira, Pilar; Azeredo, Joana; Henriques, Mariana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2006-10-01

    Contamination of kitchen surfaces due to bacteria present in foodstuffs is one of the main causes of foodborne outbreaks. Salmonella infections are an important cause of foodborne disease, and Salmonella Enteritidis is the most common isolate in the past few years. In this study, the adhesion ability of four Salmonella Enteritidis isolates to different materials (polyethylene, polypropylene, and granite) used in kitchens was compared. The results indicated that the two plastic materials were generally less prone to colonization than was the granite. As surface properties of both bacteria and materials are a determinant in the adhesion process, surface hydrophobicity was determined through contact angle measurement, and the roughness of the materials was evaluated through the R(a) and R(z) values by a noncontact laser stylus tracing. The four Salmonella strains showed similar degrees of hydrophilicity, while the materials were hydrophobic, with granite having a very low degree of hydrophobicity (deltaG(lwl) = -4.7 mJ/m2). However, the different extents of adhesion could not be explained in terms of surface hydrophobicity and roughness of the materials tested. The main conclusion to be drawn is that Salmonella adhesion is strongly strain dependent, despite the similar degree of hydrophobicity displayed by all the strains assayed, and this can constitute a factor of virulence among the different serotypes.

  2. Effects of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis on cellular recruitment and cytokine gene expression in caecum of vaccinated chickens.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, Bárbara González; Methner, Ulrich; Pieper, Jana; Berndt, Angela

    2008-10-01

    Although vaccination of poultry is a suitable method to limit human food borne gastroenteritis caused by Salmonella (S.), the immune mechanisms responsible for a longer lasting protection against Salmonella infection in birds are not completely understood. To reveal unique protection-related immune parameters, day-old chicks were vaccinated with a commercial live S. Enteritidis vaccine and challenged with wild-type S. Enteritidis 147N at day 56 of life. The bacterial cell count was determined in gut and liver, while the immune cell composition and cytokine gene expression patterns were analysed by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time RT-PCR in caecum samples. The presented data suggest that the vaccine-elicited immune protection against the Salmonella wild-type infection was rather related to the bacterial count in gut mucosa and liver than to the colonisation in gut lumen. The higher number of Salmonella wild-type organisms found in caecal wall and liver of the non-immunised compared to immunised birds after challenge correlated with a more pronounced gene expression rate for IL-8, LITAF, iNOS, IL-12 and IFN-gamma. In contrast, immunised birds exhibited higher amounts of CD8(+) T cells as well as IgA than the non-immunised chickens after S. Enteritidis 147N infection in caecum. The results demonstrated a distinctive immune reaction pattern of previously vaccinated compared to non-vaccinated chickens upon S. Enteritidis wild-type challenge.

  3. Linear antigenic mapping of flagellin (FliC) from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis with yeast surface expression system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaoling; Shi, Bingtian; Li, Tao; Zuo, Teng; Wang, Bin; Si, Wei; Xin, Jiuqing; Yang, Kongbin; Shi, Xuanlin; Liu, Siguo; Liu, Henggui

    2016-02-29

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major cause of food-borne illness around the world and can have significant health implications in humans, poultry and other animals. Flagellin (FliC) is the primary component of bacterial flagella. It has been shown that the FliC of S. Enteritidis is a significant antigenic structure and can elicit strong humoral responses against S. Enteritidis infection in chickens. Here, we constructed a FliC antigen library using a yeast surface expression system. Yeast cells expressing FliC peptide antigens were labeled with chicken sera against S. Enteritidis and sorted using FACS. The analyses of FliC peptides revealed that the FliC linear antigenicity in chickens resided on three domains which were able to elicit strong humoral responses in vivo. Animal experiments further revealed that the antibodies elicited by these antigenic domains were able to significantly inhibit the invasion of S. Enteritidis into the liver and spleen of chickens. These findings will facilitate our better understanding of the humoral responses elicited by FliC in chickens upon infection by S. Enteritidis. PMID:26854340

  4. Linear antigenic mapping of flagellin (FliC) from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis with yeast surface expression system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaoling; Shi, Bingtian; Li, Tao; Zuo, Teng; Wang, Bin; Si, Wei; Xin, Jiuqing; Yang, Kongbin; Shi, Xuanlin; Liu, Siguo; Liu, Henggui

    2016-02-29

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major cause of food-borne illness around the world and can have significant health implications in humans, poultry and other animals. Flagellin (FliC) is the primary component of bacterial flagella. It has been shown that the FliC of S. Enteritidis is a significant antigenic structure and can elicit strong humoral responses against S. Enteritidis infection in chickens. Here, we constructed a FliC antigen library using a yeast surface expression system. Yeast cells expressing FliC peptide antigens were labeled with chicken sera against S. Enteritidis and sorted using FACS. The analyses of FliC peptides revealed that the FliC linear antigenicity in chickens resided on three domains which were able to elicit strong humoral responses in vivo. Animal experiments further revealed that the antibodies elicited by these antigenic domains were able to significantly inhibit the invasion of S. Enteritidis into the liver and spleen of chickens. These findings will facilitate our better understanding of the humoral responses elicited by FliC in chickens upon infection by S. Enteritidis.

  5. Characteristics of invasion-reduced hilA gene mutant of Salmonella Enteritidis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lv, Shuang; Si, Wei; Yu, Shenye; Li, Zhaoli; Wang, Xiumei; Chen, Liping; Zhang, Wanjiang; Liu, Siguo

    2015-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes huge losses in poultry industry and also food poisoning in humans due to its being a food-borne pathogen. Functions of Invasion-related genes need to be explored, as invasion is a key step for Salmonella infection. In this study, a transposon mutant library of Salmonella Enteritidis isolate SM6 was constructed and screened for the invasion-related genes via incubation with Caco-2 cells. Three stably attenuated mutants were identified for significantly reduced invasion with insertions all in hilA (hyperinvasive locus A) gene. We constructed and evaluated the hilA deletion mutant in vivo and in vitro. SM6△hilA showed significantly reduced ability to invade Caco-2 cells and decreased pathogenicity in chicks. However, the bacterial load and pathological damage in the cecum were significantly higher than those in the SM6 in vivo. Present results provide new evidences for pathogenicity research on Salmonella Enteritidis.

  6. Immunoprotectivity of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis virulence protein, InvH, against Salmonella typhi

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Behzad; Rasooli, Iraj; Jalali-Nadoushan, Mohammadreza; Owlia, Parviz; Rasooli, Zohreh

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Typhoid fever is a dreadful disease of a major threat to public health in developing countries. Vaccination with bacterial immunodominant components such as surface proteins may prove as a potent alternative to live attenuated vaccines. InvH, an important part of needle complex in type three secretion system (TTSS) plays important role in efficient bacterial adherence and entry into epithelial cells. Materials and Methods: In this work we used a 15 kDa recombinant InvH protein of Salmonella enteric serovar Enteritidis to provoke antibody production in mouse. The mice were immunized by recombinant InvH and challenged with Salmonella typhi. Histopathology of spleen and liver were studied. Results: The immunized mice showed a significant rise of antibody after the second booster. The immunization induced protection against high doses of S. typhi. The bacterial challenge with sera showed significant protection against challenge dose of 2×109 CFU. Immunized sera reacted with S. typhi markedly. Immunoreaction of bacterially infected sera and InvH protein was significantly higher than the control group. Bacterial loads of S. typhi in spleen was more than liver. Decreased bacterial load was evident in immunized mice after 7 days. Histological examination of the liver showed the immunized mice liver remained unaffected. Conclusion: Efficacy of the virulence protein, InvH, in inhibition of this phenomenon by active immunization was shown here. It may be concluded that InvH, as an antigen, can develop protection against S. typhi infections. InvH may be exploited in protective measures as well as a diagnostic tool in Salmonella infections. PMID:25422747

  7. Chicken-specific kinome array reveals that Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis modulates host immune signaling pathways in the cecum to establish a persistence infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induce an early, short-lived, pro-inflammatory response in chickens that is asymptomatic of clinical disease and results in a persistent colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that transmits infections to naïve hosts via fecal shedding of bacteria. The und...

  8. Isolation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva).

    PubMed

    Marietto-Gonçalves, Guilherme Augusto; de Almeida, Sílvia Maria; de Lima, Edna Tereza; Okamoto, Adriano Sakai; Pinczowski, Pedro; Andreatti Filho, Raphael Lucio

    2010-03-01

    Avian salmonellosis is a disease caused by bacteria of the genus Salmonella that can cause three distinct diseases in birds: pullorum diseases, fowl typhoid, and paratyphoid infection. Various wildlife species are susceptible to infections by Salmonella, regardless of whether they live in captivity or freely in the wild. The present study verified the presence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in three captive specimens of Amazona aestiva. The study involved a total of 103 birds undergoing rehabilitation to prepare for living in the wild, after having been captured from animal traffickers and delivered to the Centrofauna Project of the Floravida Institute in Sao Paulo, Brazil. This is the first report of Salmonella Enteritidis isolation in A. aestiva that originated from capture associated with animal trafficking; Salmonella was detected during the study by the serologic method of rapid serum agglutination on a plate with bacterial isolate. The antimicrobial profile exam of the isolated samples demonstrated sensitivity to ampicillin, cefaclor, ciprofloxacin, and cloranfenicol. The three samples also presented resistance to more than four antibiotics. The presence of the genes invA and spvC was verified by PCR technique and was associated with virulence and absence of class 1 integron, a gene related to antimicrobial resistance. The commercial antigen for pullorum disease was shown to be a useful tool for rapid detection in the screening of Salmonella of serogroup D1 in Psittaciformes. New studies on Salmonella carriage in birds involved in trafficking must be performed to better understand their participation in the epidemiologic cycle of salmonellosis in humans and other animals.

  9. Survival and virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis filaments induced by reduced water activity.

    PubMed

    Stackhouse, Robert R; Faith, Nancy G; Kaspar, Charles W; Czuprynski, Charles J; Wong, Amy C Lee

    2012-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis strain E40 filaments were developed under conditions of a reduced water activity (a(w)) of 0.95 in tryptic soy broth (TSB) or tryptic soy agar (TSA) supplemented with 8% or 7% NaCl, respectively. Filament formation was accompanied by an increase of biomass without an increase in CFU and was affected by incubation temperature and the physical milieu. The greatest amount of filaments was recovered from TSA with 7% NaCl and incubation at 30°C. Within 2 h of transfer to fresh TSB, filaments started to septate into normal-sized cells, resulting in a rapid increase in CFU. S. Enteritidis E40 filaments were not more tolerant of low- or high-temperature stresses than nonfilamented control cells. However, there was greater survival of filaments in 10% bile salts after 24 to 48 h of incubation, during pH 2.0 acid challenge for 10 min, and under desiccation on stainless steel surfaces at 25°C and 75.5% relative humidity for 7 days. S. Enteritidis E40 filaments invaded and multiplied within Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial cells to a similar degree as control cells when a comparable CFU of filaments and control cells was used. S. Enteritidis E40 filaments established a successful infection in mice via intragastric inoculation. The filaments colonized the gastrointestinal tract and disseminated to the spleen and liver at levels comparable to those attained by control cells, even when animals were inoculated with 10- to 100-fold fewer CFU. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of virulence of stress-induced Salmonella filaments in vitro and in vivo. Formation of filaments by Salmonella in food products and food processing environments is significant to food safety, because detection and quantitation of the pathogen may be compromised. The finding that these filaments are virulent further enhances their potential public health impact.

  10. Heat transfer models for predicting Salmonella enteritidis in shell eggs through supply chain distribution.

    PubMed

    Almonacid, S; Simpson, R; Teixeira, A

    2007-11-01

    Egg and egg preparations are important vehicles for Salmonella enteritidis infections. The influence of time-temperature becomes important when the presence of this organism is found in commercial shell eggs. A computer-aided mathematical model was validated to estimate surface and interior temperature of shell eggs under variable ambient and refrigerated storage temperature. A risk assessment of S. enteritidis based on the use of this model, coupled with S. enteritidis kinetics, has already been reported in a companion paper published earlier in JFS. The model considered the actual geometry and composition of shell eggs and was solved by numerical techniques (finite differences and finite elements). Parameters of interest such as local (h) and global (U) heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity, and apparent volumetric specific heat were estimated by an inverse procedure from experimental temperature measurement. In order to assess the error in predicting microbial population growth, theoretical and experimental temperatures were applied to a S. enteritidis growth model taken from the literature. Errors between values of microbial population growth calculated from model predicted compared with experimentally measured temperatures were satisfactorily low: 1.1% and 0.8% for the finite difference and finite element model, respectively. PMID:18034720

  11. Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis outbreak at a long-term care facility, Connecticut, 2012.

    PubMed

    Styles, Timothy; Phan, Quyen; Rabatsky-Ehr, Therese; Applewhite, Christine; Sosa, Lynn; Cartter, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    In May of 2012, the Connecticut Department of Public Health (DPH) was notified of three hospitalized residents of a long-term care facility (LTCF) who had gastrointestinal illness, one of whom had a stool culture positive for Salmonella enterica. A multiagency outbreak investigation was initiated and identified a total of 21 possible salmonellosis cases; nine were culture-confirmed Salmonella serotype Enteritidis with an indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern (PFGE). This report describes the epidemiologic, environmental, and laboratory investigation conducted as part of DPH's response. Undercooked raw shell eggs were the likely source of infection. This investigation reemphasizes the vulnerabilityof certain populations to severe illness from Salmonella and further stresses previous recommendations in the literature to use only pasteurized egg products in long-term care and other health care facilities.

  12. Salmonella Enteritidis with double deletion in phoPfliC--a potential live Salmonella vaccine candidate with novel characteristics for use in chickens.

    PubMed

    Methner, Ulrich; Barrow, Paul A; Berndt, Angela; Rychlik, Ivan

    2011-04-12

    Salmonella Enteritidis mutants with deletions in phoP, fliC or phoPfliC were tested for their virulence and their ability to induce parameters of the innate and adaptive immunity in addition to their potential for serological differentiation between vaccinated, non-vaccinated and infected chickens. The double phoPfliC deletion mutant was sufficiently attenuated but not diminished in its capability to inhibit the caecal colonisation and systemic invasion of homologous Salmonella Enteritidis shortly after administration of the vaccine strain to very young chicks. Immunisation with the attenuated ΔphoPfliC mutant resulted in protective effects which were only slightly and insignificantly lower than after "immunisation" with a Salmonella wild-type strain, indicating the capability to induce an intense adaptive immune response and protection against Salmonella exposure in older chickens. The deletion in fliC enabled the effective the differentiation between immunised and infected chickens using a commercially available ELISA kit. The double phoPfliC deletion mutant of Salmonella Enteritidis might be a potential and promising live Salmonella vaccine candidate with novel characteristics for use in poultry.

  13. Food poisoning due to Salmonella Enteritidis--a case report.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Mamoru; Ago, Kazutoshi; Ago, Mihoko; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Takahito

    2009-04-01

    A male in his early seventies complained of abdominal pain and diarrhea at 7h after ingesting a small piece of gratin from a box lunch prepared by a caterer. He was admitted to a hospital, but died 37 h later. Dozens of people who had eaten the same box lunch also complained of diarrhea. All of them recovered after medical treatment. A later investigation demonstrated Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in the gratin from the box lunch. An autopsy revealed very severe typhloenteritis with edema and submucosal hemorrhage. The digestive tract contained fluid contents without foodstuffs. Bacteriological examination revealed SE in the contents of the lower ileum and large intestine. Based on these findings, we concluded that the cause of death was food poisoning due to SE. In this case, ingesting only a small piece of contaminated food caused fatal food poisoning due to SE. These results emphasize the importance of prevention against food poisoning due to Salmonella, particularly SE. PMID:19269228

  14. Correlation of eggshell strength and Salmonella enteritidis contamination of commercial shell eggs.

    PubMed

    Jones, D R; Musgrove, M T

    2005-10-01

    Shell quality has been identified as a heritable trait that can be manipulated by genetic selection. Previous research has concluded that many methods of determining shell quality produce variable results. With the development of newer, more precise measuring technologies, shell strength can now be assessed in a consistent, objective fashion. A research project was conducted to determine what role shell strength might play in affecting external Salmonella Enteritidis contamination of egg contents. Visibly clean eggs were collected from an in-line shell egg-processing facility at the accumulator. Eggs were inoculated by dipping in a concentrated suspension of nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella Enteritidis. After storage, eggs were assessed for shell strength and both external and internal Salmonella Enteritidis contamination. In the first study, there was a significant difference (P < 0.05) in shell strength among the three replicates. No differences between treatments were found for shell strength or Salmonella Enteritidis contamination of contents. In the second study, there were no replicate differences for any of the monitored factors. When rinsate and content samples were enriched, 100% of the rinsates were positive for Salmonella Enteritidis. No content samples were shown to be contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis during direct plating, but 3 to 5% of the samples from each replicate were positive after enrichment. Correlation analysis of the results from each study found only weak correlations between shell strength and Salmonella Enteritidis contamination on eggshell surface or contents. Within the range of shell strengths recorded in this study, the correlation analysis suggests that shell strength does not play a major role in Salmonella Enteritidis contamination. Further work with eggs that represent a greater range of shell strengths could provide a clearer indication of the interaction of shell strength and Salmonella Enteritidis contamination.

  15. Characterization of the ELPhiS prophage from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis strain LK5.

    PubMed

    Hanna, L Farris; Matthews, T David; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Hasty, David; Edwards, Robert A

    2012-03-01

    Phages are a primary driving force behind the evolution of bacterial pathogens by transferring a variety of virulence genes into their hosts. Similar to other bacterial genomes, the Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis LK5 genome contains several regions that are homologous to phages. Although genomic analysis demonstrated the presence of prophages, it was unable to confirm which phage elements within the genome were viable. Genetic markers were used to tag one of the prophages in the genome to allow monitoring of phage induction. Commonly used laboratory strains of Salmonella were resistant to phage infection, and therefore a rapid screen was developed to identify susceptible hosts. This approach showed that a genetically tagged prophage, ELPhiS (Enteritidis lysogenic phage S), was capable of infecting Salmonella serovars that are diverse in host range and virulence and has the potential to laterally transfer genes between these serovars via lysogenic conversion. The rapid screen approach is adaptable to any system with a large collection of isolates and may be used to test the viability of prophages found by sequencing the genomes of various bacterial pathogens. PMID:22247173

  16. Characterization of the ELPhiS Prophage from Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Strain LK5

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, L. Farris; Matthews, T. David; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A.; Hasty, David

    2012-01-01

    Phages are a primary driving force behind the evolution of bacterial pathogens by transferring a variety of virulence genes into their hosts. Similar to other bacterial genomes, the Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis LK5 genome contains several regions that are homologous to phages. Although genomic analysis demonstrated the presence of prophages, it was unable to confirm which phage elements within the genome were viable. Genetic markers were used to tag one of the prophages in the genome to allow monitoring of phage induction. Commonly used laboratory strains of Salmonella were resistant to phage infection, and therefore a rapid screen was developed to identify susceptible hosts. This approach showed that a genetically tagged prophage, ELPhiS (Enteritidis lysogenic phage S), was capable of infecting Salmonella serovars that are diverse in host range and virulence and has the potential to laterally transfer genes between these serovars via lysogenic conversion. The rapid screen approach is adaptable to any system with a large collection of isolates and may be used to test the viability of prophages found by sequencing the genomes of various bacterial pathogens. PMID:22247173

  17. Rapid inactivation of Salmonella Enteritidis on shell eggs by plant-derived antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Indu; Upadhyay, Abhinav; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Baskaran, Sangeetha Ananda; Mooyottu, Shankumar; Darre, Michael J; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is a common foodborne pathogen transmitted to humans largely by consumption of contaminated eggs. The external surface of eggs becomes contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis from various sources on farms, the main sources being hens' droppings and contaminated litter. Therefore, effective egg surface disinfection is critical to reduce pathogens on eggs and potentially control egg-borne disease outbreaks. This study investigated the efficacy of GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status, plant-derived antimicrobials (PDA), namely trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC), carvacrol (CR), and eugenol (EUG), as an antimicrobial wash for rapidly killing Salmonella Enteritidis on shell eggs in the presence or absence of chicken droppings. White-shelled eggs inoculated with a 5-strain mixture of nalidixic acid (NA) resistant Salmonella Enteritidis (8.0 log cfu/mL) were washed in sterile deionized water containing each PDA (0.0, 0.25, 0.5, or 0.75%) or chlorine (200 mg/kg) at 32 or 42°C for 30 s, 3 min, or 5 min. Approximately 6.0 log cfu/mL of Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered from inoculated and unwashed eggs. The wash water control and chlorine control decreased Salmonella Enteritidis on eggs by only 2.0 log cfu/mL even after washing for 5 min. The PDA were highly effective in killing Salmonella Enteritidis on eggs compared with controls (P < 0.05). All treatments containing CR and EUG reduced Salmonella Enteritidis to undetectable levels as rapidly as within 30 s of washing, whereas TC (0.75%) completely inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis on eggs washed at 42°C for 30 s (P < 0.05). No Salmonella Enteritidis was detected in any PDA or chlorine wash solution; however, substantial pathogen populations (~4.0 log cfu/mL) survived in the antibacterial-free control wash water (P < 0.05). The CR and EUG were also able to eliminate Salmonella Enteritidis on eggs to undetectable levels in the presence of 3% chicken droppings at 32°C (P < 0.05). This study

  18. Live attenuated vaccines for invasive Salmonella infections

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Sharon M.; Levine, Myron M.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi produces significant morbidity and mortality worldwide despite the fact that there are licensed S. Typhi vaccines available. This is primarily due to the fact that these vaccines are not used in the countries that most need them. There is growing recognition that an effective invasive Salmonella vaccine formulation must also prevent infection due to other Salmonella serovars. We anticipate that a multivalent vaccine that targets the following serovars will be needed to control invasive Salmonella infections worldwide: S. Typhi, S. Paratyphi A, S. Paratyphi B (currently uncommon but may become dominant again), S. Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis and S. Choleraesuis (as well as other Group C Salmonella). Live attenuated vaccines are an attractive vaccine formulation for use in developing as well as developed countries. Here, we describe the methods of attenuation that have been used to date to create live attenuated Salmonella vaccines and provide an update on the progress that has been made on these vaccines. PMID:25902362

  19. Risks Involved in the Use of Enrofloxacin for Salmonella Enteritidis or Salmonella Heidelberg in Commercial Poultry.

    PubMed

    Morales-Barrera, Eduardo; Calhoun, Nicole; Lobato-Tapia, Jose L; Lucca, Vivian; Prado-Rebolledo, Omar; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl; Merino-Guzman, Ruben; Petrone-García, Victor M; Latorre, Juan D; Mahaffey, Brittany D; Teague, Kyle D; Graham, Lucas E; Wolfenden, Amanda D; Baxter, Mikayla F A; Hargis, Billy M; Tellez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the risks involved in the use of Enrofloxacin for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) or Salmonella Heidelberg (SH) in commercial poultry and determine the effects of a probiotic as an antibiotic alternative. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the risks involved in the use of Enrofloxacin for SE or SH in commercial poultry. Experiment 1 consisted of two trials. In each trial, chickens were assigned to one of three groups; control + SE challenged; Enrofloxacin 25 mg/kg + SE; and Enrofloxacin 50 mg/kg + SE. Chickens received Enrofloxacin in the drinking water from days 1 to 5 of age. On day 6, all groups received fresh water without any treatment. All chickens were orally gavaged with 10(7) cfu/chick of SE at 7 days of age and euthanized on 8 days of age. In Experiment 2, turkey poults were assigned to one of the three groups; control + SH; probiotic + SH; and Enrofloxacin 50 mg/kg + SH. Poults received probiotic or Enrofloxacin in the drinking water from days 1 to 5 of age. On day 6, poults received fresh water without any treatment. Poults were orally gavaged with 10(7) cfu/poult of SH at 7 days of age. Poults were weighed and humanely killed 24 h post-SH challenge to evaluate serum concentration of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran to evaluate intestinal permeability, metagenomics, and SH infection. In both trials of Experiment 1, chickens treated with Enrofloxacin were more susceptible to SE organ invasion and intestinal colonization when compared with control non-treated chickens (P < 0.05). In Experiment 2, poults treated with 50 mg/kg of Enrofloxacin showed an increase in body weight, however, this group also showed an increase in SH susceptibility, intestinal permeability, and lower proportion of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, but with control group had the highest proportion of Proteobacteria. By contrast, poults that received the probiotic had the highest

  20. Risks Involved in the Use of Enrofloxacin for Salmonella Enteritidis or Salmonella Heidelberg in Commercial Poultry

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Barrera, Eduardo; Calhoun, Nicole; Lobato-Tapia, Jose L.; Lucca, Vivian; Prado-Rebolledo, Omar; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl; Merino-Guzman, Ruben; Petrone-García, Victor M.; Latorre, Juan D.; Mahaffey, Brittany D.; Teague, Kyle D.; Graham, Lucas E.; Wolfenden, Amanda D.; Baxter, Mikayla F. A.; Hargis, Billy M.; Tellez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the risks involved in the use of Enrofloxacin for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) or Salmonella Heidelberg (SH) in commercial poultry and determine the effects of a probiotic as an antibiotic alternative. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the risks involved in the use of Enrofloxacin for SE or SH in commercial poultry. Experiment 1 consisted of two trials. In each trial, chickens were assigned to one of three groups; control + SE challenged; Enrofloxacin 25 mg/kg + SE; and Enrofloxacin 50 mg/kg + SE. Chickens received Enrofloxacin in the drinking water from days 1 to 5 of age. On day 6, all groups received fresh water without any treatment. All chickens were orally gavaged with 107 cfu/chick of SE at 7 days of age and euthanized on 8 days of age. In Experiment 2, turkey poults were assigned to one of the three groups; control + SH; probiotic + SH; and Enrofloxacin 50 mg/kg + SH. Poults received probiotic or Enrofloxacin in the drinking water from days 1 to 5 of age. On day 6, poults received fresh water without any treatment. Poults were orally gavaged with 107 cfu/poult of SH at 7 days of age. Poults were weighed and humanely killed 24 h post-SH challenge to evaluate serum concentration of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran to evaluate intestinal permeability, metagenomics, and SH infection. In both trials of Experiment 1, chickens treated with Enrofloxacin were more susceptible to SE organ invasion and intestinal colonization when compared with control non-treated chickens (P < 0.05). In Experiment 2, poults treated with 50 mg/kg of Enrofloxacin showed an increase in body weight, however, this group also showed an increase in SH susceptibility, intestinal permeability, and lower proportion of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, but with control group had the highest proportion of Proteobacteria. By contrast, poults that received the probiotic had the highest

  1. Risks Involved in the Use of Enrofloxacin for Salmonella Enteritidis or Salmonella Heidelberg in Commercial Poultry.

    PubMed

    Morales-Barrera, Eduardo; Calhoun, Nicole; Lobato-Tapia, Jose L; Lucca, Vivian; Prado-Rebolledo, Omar; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl; Merino-Guzman, Ruben; Petrone-García, Victor M; Latorre, Juan D; Mahaffey, Brittany D; Teague, Kyle D; Graham, Lucas E; Wolfenden, Amanda D; Baxter, Mikayla F A; Hargis, Billy M; Tellez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the risks involved in the use of Enrofloxacin for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) or Salmonella Heidelberg (SH) in commercial poultry and determine the effects of a probiotic as an antibiotic alternative. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the risks involved in the use of Enrofloxacin for SE or SH in commercial poultry. Experiment 1 consisted of two trials. In each trial, chickens were assigned to one of three groups; control + SE challenged; Enrofloxacin 25 mg/kg + SE; and Enrofloxacin 50 mg/kg + SE. Chickens received Enrofloxacin in the drinking water from days 1 to 5 of age. On day 6, all groups received fresh water without any treatment. All chickens were orally gavaged with 10(7) cfu/chick of SE at 7 days of age and euthanized on 8 days of age. In Experiment 2, turkey poults were assigned to one of the three groups; control + SH; probiotic + SH; and Enrofloxacin 50 mg/kg + SH. Poults received probiotic or Enrofloxacin in the drinking water from days 1 to 5 of age. On day 6, poults received fresh water without any treatment. Poults were orally gavaged with 10(7) cfu/poult of SH at 7 days of age. Poults were weighed and humanely killed 24 h post-SH challenge to evaluate serum concentration of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran to evaluate intestinal permeability, metagenomics, and SH infection. In both trials of Experiment 1, chickens treated with Enrofloxacin were more susceptible to SE organ invasion and intestinal colonization when compared with control non-treated chickens (P < 0.05). In Experiment 2, poults treated with 50 mg/kg of Enrofloxacin showed an increase in body weight, however, this group also showed an increase in SH susceptibility, intestinal permeability, and lower proportion of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, but with control group had the highest proportion of Proteobacteria. By contrast, poults that received the probiotic had the highest

  2. Risks Involved in the Use of Enrofloxacin for Salmonella Enteritidis or Salmonella Heidelberg in Commercial Poultry

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Barrera, Eduardo; Calhoun, Nicole; Lobato-Tapia, Jose L.; Lucca, Vivian; Prado-Rebolledo, Omar; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl; Merino-Guzman, Ruben; Petrone-García, Victor M.; Latorre, Juan D.; Mahaffey, Brittany D.; Teague, Kyle D.; Graham, Lucas E.; Wolfenden, Amanda D.; Baxter, Mikayla F. A.; Hargis, Billy M.; Tellez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the risks involved in the use of Enrofloxacin for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) or Salmonella Heidelberg (SH) in commercial poultry and determine the effects of a probiotic as an antibiotic alternative. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the risks involved in the use of Enrofloxacin for SE or SH in commercial poultry. Experiment 1 consisted of two trials. In each trial, chickens were assigned to one of three groups; control + SE challenged; Enrofloxacin 25 mg/kg + SE; and Enrofloxacin 50 mg/kg + SE. Chickens received Enrofloxacin in the drinking water from days 1 to 5 of age. On day 6, all groups received fresh water without any treatment. All chickens were orally gavaged with 107 cfu/chick of SE at 7 days of age and euthanized on 8 days of age. In Experiment 2, turkey poults were assigned to one of the three groups; control + SH; probiotic + SH; and Enrofloxacin 50 mg/kg + SH. Poults received probiotic or Enrofloxacin in the drinking water from days 1 to 5 of age. On day 6, poults received fresh water without any treatment. Poults were orally gavaged with 107 cfu/poult of SH at 7 days of age. Poults were weighed and humanely killed 24 h post-SH challenge to evaluate serum concentration of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran to evaluate intestinal permeability, metagenomics, and SH infection. In both trials of Experiment 1, chickens treated with Enrofloxacin were more susceptible to SE organ invasion and intestinal colonization when compared with control non-treated chickens (P < 0.05). In Experiment 2, poults treated with 50 mg/kg of Enrofloxacin showed an increase in body weight, however, this group also showed an increase in SH susceptibility, intestinal permeability, and lower proportion of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, but with control group had the highest proportion of Proteobacteria. By contrast, poults that received the probiotic had the highest

  3. Emergence of host-adapted Salmonella Enteritidis through rapid evolution in an immunocompromised host.

    PubMed

    Klemm, Elizabeth J; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Hadfield, James; Forbester, Jessica L; Harris, Simon R; Hale, Christine; Heath, Jennifer N; Wileman, Thomas; Clare, Simon; Kane, Leanne; Goulding, David; Otto, Thomas D; Kay, Sally; Doffinger, Rainer; Cooke, Fiona J; Carmichael, Andrew; Lever, Andrew M L; Parkhill, Julian; MacLennan, Calman A; Kumararatne, Dinakantha; Dougan, Gordon; Kingsley, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Host adaptation is a key factor contributing to the emergence of new bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens. Many pathogens are considered promiscuous because they cause disease across a range of host species, while others are host-adapted, infecting particular hosts(1). Host adaptation can potentially progress to host restriction, where the pathogen is strictly limited to a single host species and is frequently associated with more severe symptoms. Host-adapted and host-restricted bacterial clades evolve from within a broader host-promiscuous species and sometimes target different niches within their specialist hosts, such as adapting from a mucosal to a systemic lifestyle. Genome degradation, marked by gene inactivation and deletion, is a key feature of host adaptation, although the triggers initiating genome degradation are not well understood. Here, we show that a chronic systemic non-typhoidal Salmonella infection in an immunocompromised human patient resulted in genome degradation targeting genes that are expendable for a systemic lifestyle. We present a genome-based investigation of a recurrent blood-borne Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) infection covering 15 years in an interleukin-12 β1 receptor-deficient individual that developed into an asymptomatic chronic infection. The infecting S. Enteritidis harboured a mutation in the mismatch repair gene mutS that accelerated the genomic mutation rate. Phylogenetic analysis and phenotyping of multiple patient isolates provides evidence for a remarkable level of within-host evolution that parallels genome changes present in successful host-restricted bacterial pathogens but never before observed on this timescale. Our analysis identifies common pathways of host adaptation and demonstrates the role that immunocompromised individuals can play in this process. PMID:27572160

  4. Emergence of host-adapted Salmonella Enteritidis through rapid evolution in an immunocompromised host

    PubMed Central

    Klemm, Elizabeth J; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Hadfield, James; Forbester, Jessica L; Harris, Simon R; Hale, Christine; Heath, Jennifer N; Wileman, Thomas; Clare, Simon; Kane, Leanne; Goulding, David; Otto, Thomas D; Kay, Sally; Doffinger, Rainer; Cooke, Fiona J; Carmichael, Andrew; Lever, Andrew ML; Parkhill, Julian; MacLennan, Calman A; Kumararatne, Dinakantha

    2016-01-01

    Summary Host adaptation is a key factor contributing to the emergence of new bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens. Many pathogens are considered promiscuous because they cause disease across a range of host species, while others are host-adapted, infecting particular hosts1. Host adaptation can potentially progress to host restriction where the pathogen is strictly limited to a single host species and is frequently associated with more severe symptoms. Host-adapted and host-restricted bacterial clades evolve from within a broader host-promiscuous species and sometimes target different niches within their specialist hosts, such as adapting from a mucosal to a systemic lifestyle. Genome degradation, marked by gene inactivation and deletion, is a key feature of host adaptation, although the triggers initiating genome degradation are not well understood. Here, we show that a chronic systemic non-typhoidal Salmonella infection in an immunocompromised human patient resulted in genome degradation targeting genes that are expendable for a systemic lifestyle. We present a genome-based investigation of a recurrent blood-borne Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) infection covering 15 years in an interleukin (IL)-12 β-1 receptor-deficient individual that developed into an asymptomatic chronic infection. The infecting S. Enteritidis harbored a mutation in the mismatch repair gene mutS that accelerated the genomic mutation rate. Phylogenetic analysis and phenotyping of multiple patient isolates provides evidence for a remarkable level of within-host evolution that parallels genome changes present in successful host-restricted bacterial pathogens but never before observed on this timescale. Our analysis identifies common pathways of host adaptation and demonstrates the role that immunocompromised individuals can play in this process. PMID:27127642

  5. Electron-beam-inactivated vaccine against Salmonella enteritidis colonization in molting hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electron Beam (eBeam) ionization technology has a variety of applications in modern society. The underlying hypothesis was that electron beam (eBeam) inactivated Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) cells can serve as a vaccine to control Salmonella colonization and Salmonella shedding in c...

  6. [Use of bacteriphages against Salmonella Enteritidis: a prevention tool].

    PubMed

    García, Cristina; Marín, Clara; Catalá-Gregori, Pablo; Soriano, Jose Miguel

    2015-06-01

    Introducción: la salmonelosis es una enfermedad de alta prevalencia, siendo la búsqueda de herramientas preventivas para evitar la contaminación una prioridad a nivel de salud pública. Objetivo: en el presente trabajo se evaluó el efecto in vitro de bacteriófagos frente a Salmonella enteritidis como una herramienta de prevención. Método: se realizaron dos pruebas con tres concentraciones de bacteriófagos frente a dos cepas de Salmonella enteritidis inoculadas en muestras de heces frescas de gallinas ponedoras, y el correspondiente control positivo. Así, se testaron cuatro grupos en cada una de las dos pruebas. Cada grupo experimental contó con dos réplicas, y en cada réplica se incubaron tres placas. Las concentraciones ensayadas fueron tres: solución comercial (5 × 107 pfu/mL), y dos diluciones de la misma (1/10 y 1/30). Una de las cepas testada fue la cepa CECT 4300, cepa certificada de la Colección Española de Cultivo Tipo, y la otra una cepa de campo aislada en una explotación de ponedoras sacrificadas. Ambas cepas se inocularon en muestras de heces a la dosis de 1,3 × 105 ufc/g de heces en cada uno de los cuatro grupos. Se procedió con el aislamiento e identificación de la bacteria por ISO 6579 a varios tiempos desde la inoculación: 1 minuto, 24 h y 7 días. Resultados: en la primera prueba, con la cepa certificada, se aisló Salmonella en todos los grupos a tiempo 1 minuto. A las 24 h se aisló Salmonella en todos los grupos excepto en una de las réplicas tratada con la dilución 1/10 de bacteriófagos, en una de las placas de la otra réplica tratada con la dilución 1/10, y en dos placas de cada una de las dos réplicas tratadas con la solución comercial. A partir de los 7 días ya no se aisló la bacteria de ninguno de los grupos experimentales. En la segunda prueba, con la cepa de campo, se aisló Salmonella en todos los grupos a tiempo 1 minuto. A las 24 h se aisló Salmonella en todos los grupos excepto en una de las r

  7. Efficacy for a new live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine candidate to reduce internal egg contamination.

    PubMed

    Nandre, R; Matsuda, K; Lee, J H

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a novel attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis (△lon△cpxR) vaccine candidate (JOL919), chickens were immunized through oral and intramuscular routes to reduce egg contamination against S. Enteritidis challenge. Birds were orally immunized with JOL919 on the first day of life and were subsequently boosted in the 6th and 16th weeks through oral (group B) or intramuscular (group C) route, while control birds were unimmunized (group A). The chickens of all groups were challenged intravenously with the virulent S. Enteritidis strain in the 24th week. The immunized groups B and C showed significantly higher plasma IgG and intestinal secretory IgA levels as compared to those of the control group. The lymphocyte proliferation response and CD45(+) CD3(+) T-cell number in the peripheral blood of the groups B and C were significantly increased. In addition, the egg contamination rates were significantly lower in the group B (0%, 10.7% and 0%) and the group C (3.6%, 14.3% and 3.6%) as compared to the group A (28.6%, 42.8% and 28.6%) in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd weeks post-challenge. All animals in the groups B and C showed lower organ lesion scores in the liver and spleen and lower bacterial counts in the liver, spleen and ovary at the 3rd week post-challenge. These results indicate that this vaccine candidate can be an efficient tool for prevention of Salmonella infections by inducing protective humoral and cellular immune responses. In addition, this vaccine did not prevent egg contamination, but did appear to reduce incidence. Booster immunizations, especially via oral administration route, showed an efficient protection against internal egg contamination with S. Enteritidis.

  8. Reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis in shell eggs using directional microwave technology.

    PubMed

    Lakins, D G; Alvarado, C Z; Thompson, L D; Brashears, M T; Brooks, J C; Brashears, M M

    2008-05-01

    Microwaves have been shown to cause thermal as well as nonthermal destruction of pathogens such as Salmonella Enteritidis, which is commonly found in shell eggs. The objective of this study was to examine the use of new directional microwave technology to reduce Salmonella Enteritidis without causing any detrimental effects on quality in white and brown eggs. Treatments were control and microwaved white and brown eggs. Applying directional microwave technology resulted in a 2-log reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis in both the high (10(5) cfu/g) and low (10(2) cfu/g) inoculum. At d 0, there were no differences in water activities, albumen pH, and combined pH between treatments; however, there were significant changes in yolk pH. Collectively, these results indicate that applying directional microwave technology can reduce Salmonella Enteritidis in shell eggs without causing any detrimental effects to quality.

  9. Research note: Salmonella enteritidis and Arizona hinshawii isolated from wild sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windingstad, R.M.; Trainer, D.O.; Duncan, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    Salmonella enteritidis serotype Rubislaw and Arizona hinshawii were isolated from cloacal swabs of 'healthy' live-trapped sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) in Indiana and Wisconsin. These respective isolations were the first reported from wild sandhill cranes.

  10. Microarray-Based Detection of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Genes Involved in Chicken Reproductive Tract Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Raspoet, R.; Appia-Ayme, C.; Shearer, N.; Martel, A.; Pasmans, F.; Haesebrouck, F.; Ducatelle, R.; Thompson, A.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis has developed the potential to contaminate table eggs internally, by colonization of the chicken reproductive tract and internalization in the forming egg. The serotype Enteritidis has developed mechanisms to colonize the chicken oviduct more successfully than other serotypes. Until now, the strategies exploited by Salmonella Enteritidis to do so have remained largely unknown. For that reason, a microarray-based transposon library screen was used to identify genes that are essential for the persistence of Salmonella Enteritidis inside primary chicken oviduct gland cells in vitro and inside the reproductive tract in vivo. A total of 81 genes with a potential role in persistence in both the oviduct cells and the oviduct tissue were identified. Major groups of importance include the Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1 and 2, genes involved in stress responses, cell wall, and lipopolysaccharide structure, and the region-of-difference genomic islands 9, 21, and 40. PMID:25281378

  11. Oral treatment with bacteriophages reduces the concentration of Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 in caecal contents of broilers.

    PubMed

    Fiorentin, Laurimar; Vieira, Nilson D; Barioni, Waldomiro

    2005-06-01

    Bacteriophages isolated from free-range chickens were tested as a therapeutic agent for reducing the concentration of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 4 (S. Enteritidis PT4) in caeca of broilers. One-day-old broilers infected with S. Enteritidis PT4 by a seeder bird method were orally treated on the seventh day of age with a mixture of 10(11) plaque-forming units of each of three bacteriophages. Five days after treatment the bacteriophage-treated group showed a reduction of 3.5 orders of magnitude on colony-forming units of S. Enteritidis PT4 per gram of caecal content. Samples collected at 10, 15, 20 and 25 days after treatment revealed that treated birds still had lower colony-forming units of S. Enteritidis PT4 per gram of caecal content. These data gave us compelling evidence that a mixture of bacteriophages may be efficacious in reducing S. Enteritidis PT4 concentration in broilers' caeca and therefore reducing contamination of poultry products by this food-borne pathogen.

  12. Oral treatment with bacteriophages reduces the concentration of Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 in caecal contents of broilers.

    PubMed

    Fiorentin, Laurimar; Vieira, Nilson D; Barioni, Waldomiro

    2005-06-01

    Bacteriophages isolated from free-range chickens were tested as a therapeutic agent for reducing the concentration of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 4 (S. Enteritidis PT4) in caeca of broilers. One-day-old broilers infected with S. Enteritidis PT4 by a seeder bird method were orally treated on the seventh day of age with a mixture of 10(11) plaque-forming units of each of three bacteriophages. Five days after treatment the bacteriophage-treated group showed a reduction of 3.5 orders of magnitude on colony-forming units of S. Enteritidis PT4 per gram of caecal content. Samples collected at 10, 15, 20 and 25 days after treatment revealed that treated birds still had lower colony-forming units of S. Enteritidis PT4 per gram of caecal content. These data gave us compelling evidence that a mixture of bacteriophages may be efficacious in reducing S. Enteritidis PT4 concentration in broilers' caeca and therefore reducing contamination of poultry products by this food-borne pathogen. PMID:16191711

  13. Immunogenicity of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis virulence protein, InvH, and cross-reactivity of its antisera with Salmonella strains.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Behzad; Rasooli, Iraj; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi; Nadooshan, Mohammad Reza Jalali; Owlia, Parviz; Nazarian, Shahram

    2013-02-22

    Acellular vaccines containing bacterial immunodominant components such as surface proteins may be potent alternatives to live attenuated vaccines in order to reduce salmonellosis risk to human health. invH gene, an important part of needle complex in type three secretion system (TTSS) plays important role in efficient bacterial adherence and entry into epithelial cells. In this work we hypothesize that use of a 15 kDa recombinant InvH as Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis surface protein could provoke antibody production in mouse and would help us study feasibility of its potential for diagnosis and/or a recombinant vaccine. The purified InvH provoked significant rise of IgG in mice. Active protection induced by immunization with InvH against variable doses of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, indicated that the immunized mice were completely protected against challenge with 10(4) LD(50). The immunoreaction of sera from immunized mice with other Salmonella strains or cross reaction with sera of Salmonella strains inoculated mice is indicative of possessing by Salmonella strains of the surface protein, InvH, that can be employed in both prophylactic and diagnostic measures against S. enterica. Bacteria free spleen and ileum of the immunized mice in this study indicate that the invH gene affects bacterial invasion. Efficacy of the virulence protein, InvH, in shuttling into host cells in injectisome of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis and inhibition of this phenomenon by active immunization was shown in this study. In conclusion immunization with InvH protein can develop protection against S. enterica serovar Enteritidis infections. InvH in Salmonella strains can be exploited in protective measures as well as a diagnostic tool in Salmonella infections.

  14. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis tatB and tatC mutants are impaired in Caco-2 cell invasion in vitro and show reduced systemic spread in chickens.

    PubMed

    Mickael, Claudia Silva; Lam, Po-King S; Berberov, Emil M; Allan, Brenda; Potter, Andrew A; Köster, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is a leading causative agent of gastroenteritis in humans. This pathogen also colonizes the intestinal tracts of poultry and can spread systemically in chickens. Transfer to humans usually occurs through undercooked or improperly handled poultry meat or eggs. The bacterial twin-arginine transport (Tat) pathway is responsible for the translocation of folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane. In order to study the role of the Tat system in the infection and colonization of chickens by Salmonella Enteritidis, we constructed chromosomal deletion mutants of the tatB and tatC genes, which are essential components of the Tat translocon. We observed that the tat mutations affected bacterial cell morphology, motility, and sensitivity to albomycin, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and EDTA. In addition, the mutant strains showed reduced invasion of polarized Caco-2 cells. The wild-type phenotype was restored in all our Salmonella Enteritidis tat mutants by introducing episomal copies of the tatABC genes. When tested in chickens by use of a Salmonella Enteritidis Delta tatB strain, the Tat system inactivation did not substantially affect cecal colonization, but it delayed systemic infection. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the Tat system plays a role in Salmonella Enteritidis pathogenesis.

  15. Prevention of egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis after oral vaccination of laying hens with Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC mutants.

    PubMed

    Kilroy, Sofie; Raspoet, Ruth; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination of laying hens has been successfully used to reduce egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis, decreasing human salmonellosis cases worldwide. Currently used vaccines for layers are either inactivated vaccines or live attenuated strains produced by mutagenesis. Targeted gene deletion mutants hold promise for future vaccines, because specific bacterial functions can be removed that may improve safety and allow differentiation from field strains. In this study, the efficacy of Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC strains in laying hens as live vaccines was evaluated. The mutants are deficient in either the membrane channel TolC (ΔtolC) or the multi-drug efflux systems acrAB, acrEF and mdtABC (ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC). These strains have a decreased ability for gut and tissue colonization and are unable to survive in egg white, the latter preventing transmission of the vaccine strains to humans. Two groups of 30 laying hens were orally inoculated at day 1, 6 weeks and 16 weeks of age with 10(8) cfu of either vaccine strain, while a third group was left unvaccinated. At 24 weeks of age, the birds were intravenously challenged with 5 × 10(7) cfu Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 S1400/94. The vaccine strains were not shed or detected in the gut, internal organs or eggs, 2 weeks after the third vaccination. The strains significantly protected against gut and internal organ colonization, and completely prevented egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis under the conditions of this study. This indicates that Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC strains might be valuable strains for vaccination of layers against Salmonella Enteritidis. PMID:27519174

  16. Genetic and phenotypic evidence of the Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis human-animal interface in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Retamal, Patricio; Fresno, Marcela; Dougnac, Catherine; Gutierrez, Sindy; Gornall, Vanessa; Vidal, Roberto; Vernal, Rolando; Pujol, Myriam; Barreto, Marlen; González-Acuña, Daniel; Abalos, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is a worldwide zoonotic agent that has been recognized as a very important food-borne bacterial pathogen, mainly associated with consumption of poultry products. The aim of this work was to determine genotypic and phenotypic evidence of S. Enteritidis transmission among seabirds, poultry and humans in Chile. Genotyping was performed using PCR-based virulotyping, pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Pathogenicity-associated phenotypes were determined with survival to free radicals, acidic pH, starvation, antimicrobial resistance, and survival within human dendritic cells. As result of PCR and PFGE assays, some isolates from the three hosts showed identical genotypic patterns, and through MLST it was determined that all of them belong to sequence type 11. Phenotypic assays show diversity of bacterial responses among isolates. When results were analyzed according to bacterial host, statistical differences were identified in starvation and dendritic cells survival assays. In addition, isolates from seabirds showed the highest rates of resistance to gentamycin, tetracycline, and ampicillin. Overall, the very close genetic and phenotypic traits shown by isolates from humans, poultry, and seabirds suggest the inter-species transmission of S. Enteritidis bacteria between hosts, likely through anthropogenic environmental contamination that determines infection of seabirds with bacteria that are potentially pathogenic for other susceptible organism, including humans. PMID:26029196

  17. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium in raw chicken meat at retail markets in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Thung, T Y; Mahyudin, N A; Basri, D F; Wan Mohamed Radzi, C W J; Nakaguchi, Y; Nishibuchi, M; Radu, S

    2016-08-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the major food-borne diseases in many countries. This study was carried out to determine the occurrence of Salmonella spp., Salmonella Enteritidis, and Salmonella Typhimurium in raw chicken meat from wet markets and hypermarkets in Selangor, as well as to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profile of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium. The most probable number (MPN) in combination with multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) method was used to quantify the Salmonella spp., S. Enteritidis, and S. Typhimurium in the samples. The occurrence of Salmonella spp., S. Enteritidis, and S. Typhimurium in 120 chicken meat samples were 20.80%, 6.70%, and 2.50%, respectively with estimated quantity varying from <3 to 15 MPN/g. The antibiogram testing revealed differential multi-drug resistance among S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium isolates. All the isolates were resistance to erythromycin, penicillin, and vancomycin whereas sensitivity was recorded for Amoxicillin/Clavulanic acid, Gentamicin, Tetracycline, and Trimethoprim. Our findings demonstrated that the retail chicken meat could be a source of multiple antimicrobial-resistance Salmonella and may constitute a public health concern in Malaysia. PMID:27118863

  18. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminated eggs produced by infected commercial laying flocks are often implicated as sources of human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis, but Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium have also been significantly associated with egg-transmitted illness. Contamination of the edible conten...

  19. Transposon Mutagenesis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Identifies Genes That Contribute to Invasiveness in Human and Chicken Cells and Survival in Egg Albumen

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaohui; Kim, Hye-Young; Call, Douglas R.; Guard, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is an important food-borne pathogen, and chickens are a primary reservoir of human infection. While most knowledge about Salmonella pathogenesis is based on research conducted on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis is known to have pathobiology specific to chickens that impacts epidemiology in humans. Therefore, more information is needed about S. Enteritidis pathobiology in comparison to that of S. Typhimurium. We used transposon mutagenesis to identify S. Enteritidis virulence genes by assay of invasiveness in human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells and chicken liver (LMH) cells and survival within chicken (HD-11) macrophages as a surrogate marker for virulence. A total of 4,330 transposon insertion mutants of an invasive G1 Nalr strain were screened using Caco-2 cells. This led to the identification of attenuating mutations in a total of 33 different loci, many of which include genes previously known to contribute to enteric infection (e.g., Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 [SPI-1], SPI-4, SPI-5, CS54, fliH, fljB, csgB, spvR, and rfbMN) in S. Enteritidis and other Salmonella serovars. Several genes or genomic islands that have not been reported previously (e.g., SPI-14, ksgA, SEN0034, SEN2278, and SEN3503) or that are absent in S. Typhimurium or in most other Salmonella serovars (e.g., pegD, SEN1152, SEN1393, and SEN1966) were also identified. Most mutants with reduced Caco-2 cell invasiveness also showed significantly reduced invasiveness in chicken liver cells and impaired survival in chicken macrophages and in egg albumen. Consequently, these genes may play an important role during infection of the chicken host and also contribute to successful egg contamination by S. Enteritidis. PMID:22988017

  20. Transposon mutagenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis identifies genes that contribute to invasiveness in human and chicken cells and survival in egg albumen.

    PubMed

    Shah, Devendra H; Zhou, Xiaohui; Kim, Hye-Young; Call, Douglas R; Guard, Jean

    2012-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is an important food-borne pathogen, and chickens are a primary reservoir of human infection. While most knowledge about Salmonella pathogenesis is based on research conducted on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis is known to have pathobiology specific to chickens that impacts epidemiology in humans. Therefore, more information is needed about S. Enteritidis pathobiology in comparison to that of S. Typhimurium. We used transposon mutagenesis to identify S. Enteritidis virulence genes by assay of invasiveness in human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells and chicken liver (LMH) cells and survival within chicken (HD-11) macrophages as a surrogate marker for virulence. A total of 4,330 transposon insertion mutants of an invasive G1 Nal(r) strain were screened using Caco-2 cells. This led to the identification of attenuating mutations in a total of 33 different loci, many of which include genes previously known to contribute to enteric infection (e.g., Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 [SPI-1], SPI-4, SPI-5, CS54, fliH, fljB, csgB, spvR, and rfbMN) in S. Enteritidis and other Salmonella serovars. Several genes or genomic islands that have not been reported previously (e.g., SPI-14, ksgA, SEN0034, SEN2278, and SEN3503) or that are absent in S. Typhimurium or in most other Salmonella serovars (e.g., pegD, SEN1152, SEN1393, and SEN1966) were also identified. Most mutants with reduced Caco-2 cell invasiveness also showed significantly reduced invasiveness in chicken liver cells and impaired survival in chicken macrophages and in egg albumen. Consequently, these genes may play an important role during infection of the chicken host and also contribute to successful egg contamination by S. Enteritidis.

  1. Detection of group D salmonellae including Salmonella Enteritidis in eggs by polymyxin-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Blais, Burton W; Martinez-Perez, Amalia

    2008-02-01

    A high-throughput, rapid method was devised for the detection of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg products. For each target organism, preenrichment in nutrient broth was followed by selective enrichment in Rappaport-Vassiliadis soya peptone and tetrathionate brilliant green broths or by plating on modified semisolid Rappaport Vassiliadis (MSRV) agar medium. The presence of Salmonella Enteritidis was determined by subjecting portions of the selective broth cultures or swarming growth on MSRV medium to an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) procedure using polymyxin immobilized in the wells of a microtiter plate as a high-affinity adsorbent for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigens. Sample extracts were reacted with polymyxin-coated microwells, and captured LPS antigens were detected immunoenzymatically with a commercially available Salmonella factor O9-specific antibody. The polymyxin-ELISA was 100% sensitive and 100% specific for Salmonella strains bearing the O9 antigen. When the ELISA was combined with enrichment using either the selective broths or plating on MSRV medium, the system was an effective means for detection of Salmonella Enteritidis in artificially inoculated egg products. The polymyxin-ELISA is a simple and inexpensive assay for group D salmonellae (including Salmonella Enteritidis) in a convenient 96-well microtiter plate format, making this system ideally suited for processing large numbers of samples.

  2. Detection of group D salmonellae including Salmonella Enteritidis in eggs by polymyxin-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Blais, Burton W; Martinez-Perez, Amalia

    2008-02-01

    A high-throughput, rapid method was devised for the detection of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg products. For each target organism, preenrichment in nutrient broth was followed by selective enrichment in Rappaport-Vassiliadis soya peptone and tetrathionate brilliant green broths or by plating on modified semisolid Rappaport Vassiliadis (MSRV) agar medium. The presence of Salmonella Enteritidis was determined by subjecting portions of the selective broth cultures or swarming growth on MSRV medium to an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) procedure using polymyxin immobilized in the wells of a microtiter plate as a high-affinity adsorbent for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigens. Sample extracts were reacted with polymyxin-coated microwells, and captured LPS antigens were detected immunoenzymatically with a commercially available Salmonella factor O9-specific antibody. The polymyxin-ELISA was 100% sensitive and 100% specific for Salmonella strains bearing the O9 antigen. When the ELISA was combined with enrichment using either the selective broths or plating on MSRV medium, the system was an effective means for detection of Salmonella Enteritidis in artificially inoculated egg products. The polymyxin-ELISA is a simple and inexpensive assay for group D salmonellae (including Salmonella Enteritidis) in a convenient 96-well microtiter plate format, making this system ideally suited for processing large numbers of samples. PMID:18326193

  3. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification of the sefA Gene for Rapid Detection of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jiansen; Zhuang, Linlin; Zhu, Chunhong; Shi, Shourong; Zhang, Di; Zhang, Linji; Yu, Yan; Dou, Xinhong; Xu, Bu; Wang, Chengming

    2016-04-01

    Salmonella spp. pose a threat to both human and animal health, with more than 2600 serovars having been reported to date. Salmonella serovars are usually identified by slide agglutination tests, which are labor intensive and time consuming. In an attempt to develop a more rapid screening method for the major poultry Salmonella serovars, we developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay, which directly detected the sefA gene, a fimbrial operon gene existing in several specific serovars of Salmonella enterica including the major poultry serovars, namely Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) and Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum (Salmonella Gallinarum). With the 177 bacterial strains we tested, positive reactions were only observed with 85 strains of serovar Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum. The detection limit of the LAMP assay was 4 CFU/reaction with genomic DNAs of Salmonella Enteritidis (ATCC 13076) from pure culture and 400 CFU/ reaction with DNA extracted from spiked chicken feces. The LAMP assay was more sensitive than conventional culture, especially without enrichment, in detecting Salmonella Enteritidis (CMCC 50041) in the spiked fecal samples. The results show the sefA LAMP method is a rapid, sensitive, specific, and practical method for directly detection of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum in chickens. The sefA LAMP assay can potentially serve as new on-site diagnostics in the poultry industry. PMID:26840841

  4. Salmonella Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... vegetables. You also can get infected after handling pets, especially reptiles like snakes, turtles, and lizards. Symptoms include Fever Diarrhea Abdominal cramps Headache Possible nausea, vomiting, and loss of appetite Symptoms usually last 4-7 days. ...

  5. Effect of in-feed supplementation of trans-cinnamaldehyde and caprylic acid on chicken cecal microbiome in response to Salmonella Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) is a major foodborne pathogen causing enteric illnesses in humans, with undercooked eggs and poultry meat as the primary sources of infection. Our previous research revealed that in-feed supplementation of two GRAS (generally recognized as safe)-status, natural compounds,...

  6. Microarray analysis of Salmonella Enteritidis Phage Type 8 treated with subinhibitory concentrations of trans-cinnamaldehyde or eugenol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 8 (PT8) is a major poultry-associated Salmonella isolate implicated in foodborne outbreaks in the United States. We previously reported that the GRAS-status plant-derived compounds trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC) and eugenol (EG) significantly reduced S. Enteritidis colon...

  7. A pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) study that suggests a major world-wide clone of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jen-Chieh; Chiu, Tsai-Hsin; Helmuth, Reiner; Schroeter, Andreas; Guerra, Beatriz; Tsen, Hau-Yang

    2007-05-30

    Since human infections by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) have been increasing world-wide over the past years and epidemiological studies have implicated the consumption of meat, poultry, eggs and egg products, elucidation of the predominant subtypes for this Salmonella spp. is important. In this study, 107 poultry and food isolates of Salmonella Enteritidis obtained from Germany were analyzed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and the subtypes were compared with those of the 124 human isolates obtained in Taiwan. Results showed that for these 107 poultry and food isolates, when XbaI, SpeI and NotI were used for chromosomal DNA digestion followed by PFGE analysis, a total of 19, 20 and 19 PFGE patterns, respectively, were identified. Of them, 51 (47.7%), 52 (48.6%) and 42 (39.3%) strains belong to a single pattern of X3, S3 and N3, respectively, and 34 strains belong to a pattern combination of X3S3N3, which was the major subtype. When PFGE patterns of these 107 German isolates were compared with those of the 124 human isolates obtained in Taiwan, pattern combination of X3S3N3 was found as the most common pattern shared by isolates from both areas. PT4 is a major phage type for German and Taiwan isolates. Although most of the X3S3N3 strains are of this phage type, some strains of other PFGE patterns are also of this phage type. Since strains used in this study were unrelated, i.e., they were isolated from different origins in areas geographically far apart from each other, the PFGE study suggests a major world-wide clone of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis.

  8. Investigation of the distribution and control of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis PT6 in layer breeding and egg production.

    PubMed

    Davies, Robert; Liebana, Ernesto; Breslin, Mark

    2003-06-01

    Investigations were carried out in a layer breeder hatchery, a layer parent rearing farm, a layer parent farm and in a commercial pullet rearing and cage layer farm where Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) PT6 had become established. PT6 was initially found in focal points in the hatchery, such as hatcher ventilation ducting, tray wash areas and waste areas, but improved disinfection was followed by a rapid disappearance of contamination. Several different phage types of S. Enteritidis were found in the hatchery but most of these proved to be genotypically identical with PT6. Investigations of contaminated layer breeder and rearing sites showed that the terminal disinfection programmes in place were effective in that no carry-over of infection occurred and the organism was rapidly eliminated from the organization. Infection with PT6 originating from chicks was investigated on a commercial pullet rearing farm. After several rounds of treatment with a fluoroquinolone antibiotic and competitive exclusion, no Salmonella was found in faeces or cloacal swabs but was present in dust in one of six houses. Sampling carried out after cleaning and disinfection confirmed clearance of the organism from the site, but infection did become established in a commercial laying house receiving the birds. PMID:12850912

  9. National outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 14b in England, September to December 2009: case-control study.

    PubMed

    Janmohamed, K; Zenner, D; Little, C; Lane, C; Wain, J; Charlett, A; Adak, B; Morgan, D

    2011-04-14

    We conducted an unmatched retrospective case–control study to investigate an upsurge of non-travel-related sporadic cases of infection with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Enteritidis phage type 14b with antimicrobial resistance to nalidixic acid and partial resistance to ciprofloxacin (S. Enteritidis PT 14b NxCp(L)) that was reported in England from 1 September to 31 December 2009. We analysed data from 63 cases and 108 controls to determine whether cases had the same sources of infection as those found through investigation of 16 concurrent local foodborne outbreaks in England and Wales. Multivariable logistic regression analysis adjusting for age and sex identified food consumption at restaurants serving Chinese or Thai cuisine (odds ratio (OR): 4.4; 95% CI: 1.3–14.8; p=0.02), egg consumed away from home (OR: 5.1; 95% CI: 1.3–21.2; p=0.02) and eating vegetarian foods away from home (OR: 14.6; 95% CI: 2.1–99; p=0.006) as significant risk factors for infection with S. Enteritidis PT 14b NxCp(L). These findings concurred with those from the investigation of the16 outbreaks, which identified the same Salmonella strain in eggs from a specified source outside the United Kingdom. The findings led to a prohibition of imports from this source, in order to control the outbreak.

  10. Emerging Salmonella Enteritidis anaerogenic phage type 14b: outbreak in Norwegian, Swedish and Finnish travellers returning from Greece.

    PubMed

    Guerin, P J; Nygard, K; Siitonen, A; Vold, L; Kuusi, M; de Jong, B; Rottingen, J A; Alvseike, O; Olsson, A; Lassen, J; Andersson, Y; Aavitsland, P

    2006-01-01

    In July 2001, the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (Folkehelseinstituttet, FHI) reported a cluster of Salmonella Enteritidis of phage type 14b infections in Norwegian travellers returning from Greece. An increase in the same uncommon phage type was also registered in Sweden and Finland at the same time. Cases of S. Enteritidis PT 14b in patients returning from Greece were reported in these three Nordic countries in 2001 (303 cases), 2002 (164 cases) and 2003 (199 cases). Case-control studies performed in 2001 in Norway and Sweden indicated that consumption of chicken was associated with illness. In 2002 and 2003, continuing case reports indicated that this uncommon phage type had probably become established in the Greek food chain. Tour operators were informed and contacts were made with Greek public health authorities. Because place of infection is not systematically included in most Salmonella notification systems, the S. Enteritidis phage type 14b outbreak reported here may represent only part of a larger outbreak among travellers visiting Greece. Infections are often reported only in the tourists' home countries and public health authorities in the tourist destinations may not be aware of the problem. Further collaboration between national institutes of public health in Europe is needed to detect outbreaks occurring among tourists.

  11. Inactivation of Salmonella enteritidis during boiling of eggs.

    PubMed

    Grijspeerdt, Koen; Herman, Lieve

    2003-01-26

    A series of inactivation curves for Salmonella enteritidis were determined for boiling eggs using different conditions of time and temperature. No significant influence of egg weight could be found on the temperature evolution in the yolk. The inactivation curves consistently showed an initial slow decline in bacterial number at lower temperatures, after which a very rapid inactivation took place. It was not possible to reproduce this behavior using a traditional inactivation model. A pragmatic model existing in two parts was therefore constructed. When the temperature is below a certain threshold, the inactivation follows a second order temperature dependence. Above the temperature threshold, standard Bigelow inactivation kinetics are assumed. This model could describe the data reasonably well, provided that the decimal reduction time in the Bigelow model was assumed to be different for a fast or slow heating process, respectively. The results suggest that the bacteria are more resistant towards a slower heating process, which is confirmed by analyzing the raw data. A fail-safe model can be obtained by using the parameters associated with the slow heating process. The statistical properties of the calibrated model are satisfactory, and a cross-validation shows that it can be used for egg boiling conditions outside its calibration range.

  12. Effect of Salmonella infection on cecal tonsil regulatory T cell properties in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to study Regulatory T cell (Treg) properties post-Salmonella infection in broiler birds. Four-day-old broiler chicks were orally infected with 5x106 CFU/ml Salmonella enteritidis or sterile PBS (control). Samples were collected at 4, 7, 10, and 14 d post-infection. ...

  13. Rapid real-time PCR methods to distinguish Salmonella Enteritidis wildtype field isolates from vaccine strains Salmovac SE/Gallivac SE and AviPro SALMONELLA VAC E.

    PubMed

    Maurischat, Sven; Szabo, Istvan; Baumann, Beatrice; Malorny, Burkhard

    2015-05-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a major non-typhoid Salmonella serovar causing human salmonellosis mainly associated with the consumption of poultry and products thereof. To reduce infections in poultry, S. Enteritidis live vaccine strains AviPro SALMONELLA VAC E and Salmovac SE/Gallivac SE have been licensed and used in several countries worldwide. To definitively diagnose a S. Enteritidis contamination in vaccinated herds a reliable and fast method for the differentiation between vaccine and wildtype field isolates is required. In this study, we developed and validated real-time PCR (qPCR) assays to distinguish those variants genetically. Suitable target sequences were identified by whole genome sequencing (WGS) using the Illumina MiSeq system. SNP regions in kdpA and nhaA proved to be most useful for differentiation of AviPro SALMONELLA VAC E and Salmovac SE/Gallivac SE, respectively, from wildtype strains. For each vaccine strain one TaqMan-qPCR assay and one alternative approach using High Resolution Melting (HRM) analysis was designed. All 30 Salmovac SE and 7 AviPro SALMONELLA VAC E vaccine strain reisolates tested were correctly identified by both approaches (100% inclusivity). Furthermore, all 137 (TaqMan) and 97 (HRM) Salmonella non-vaccine and related Enterobacteriaceae strains tested were excluded (100% exclusivity). The analytical detection limits were determined to be approx. 10(2) genome copies/reaction for the TaqMan and 10(4) genome copies/reaction for the HRM approach. The real-time PCR assays proved to be a reliable and fast alternative to the cultural vaccine strain identification tests helping decision makers in control measurements to take action within a shorter period of time. PMID:25794902

  14. Reduction of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Colonization in 20-Day-Old Broiler Chickens by the Plant-Derived Compounds trans-Cinnamaldehyde and Eugenol

    PubMed Central

    Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Mattson, Tyler; Baskaran, Sangeetha Ananda; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne; Babapoor, Sankhiros; March, Benjamin; Valipe, Satyender; Darre, Michael; Hoagland, Thomas; Schreiber, David; Khan, Mazhar I.; Donoghue, Ann; Donoghue, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The efficacies of trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC) and eugenol (EG) for reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in broiler chickens were investigated. In three experiments for each compound, 1-day-old chicks (n = 75/experiment) were randomly assigned to five treatment groups (n = 15/treatment group): negative control (-ve S. Enteritidis, -ve TC, or EG), compound control (-ve S. Enteritidis, +ve 0.75% [vol/wt] TC or 1% [vol/wt] EG), positive control (+ve S. Enteritidis, -ve TC, or EG), low-dose treatment (+ve S. Enteritidis, +ve 0.5% TC, or 0.75% EG), and high-dose treatment (+ve S. Enteritidis, +ve 0.75% TC, or 1% EG). On day 0, birds were tested for the presence of any inherent Salmonella (n = 5/experiment). On day 8, birds were inoculated with ∼8.0 log10 CFU S. Enteritidis, and cecal colonization by S. Enteritidis was ascertained (n = 10 chicks/experiment) after 24 h (day 9). Six birds from each treatment group were euthanized on days 7 and 10 after inoculation, and cecal S. Enteritidis numbers were determined. TC at 0.5 or 0.75% and EG at 0.75 or 1% consistently reduced (P < 0.05) S. Enteritidis in the cecum (≥3 log10 CFU/g) after 10 days of infection in all experiments. Feed intake and body weight were not different for TC treatments (P > 0.05); however, EG supplementation led to significantly lower (P < 0.05) body weights. Follow-up in vitro experiments revealed that the subinhibitory concentrations (SICs, the concentrations that did not inhibit Salmonella growth) of TC and EG reduced the motility and invasive abilities of S. Enteritidis and downregulated expression of the motility genes flhC and motA and invasion genes hilA, hilD, and invF. The results suggest that supplementation with TC and EG through feed can reduce S. Enteritidis colonization in chickens. PMID:22327574

  15. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis of Salmonella Enteritidis isolates from human and non-human sources using a single multiplex PCR

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seongbeom; Boxrud, David J; Bartkus, Joanne M; Whittam, Thomas S; Saeed, Mahdi

    2007-01-01

    Simplified multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) was developed using one-shot multiplex PCR for seven variable-number tandem repeats (VNTR) markers with high diversity capacity. MLVA, phage typing, and PFGE methods were applied on 34 diverse Salmonella Enteritidis isolates from human and non-human sources. MLVA detected allelic variations that helped to classify the S. Enteritidis isolates into more evenly distributed subtypes than other methods. MLVA-based S. Enteritidis clonal groups were largely associated with sources of the isolates. Nei's diversity indices for polymorphism ranged from 0.25 to 0.70 for seven VNTR loci markers. Based on Simpson's and Shannon's diversity indices, MLVA had a higher discriminatory power than pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), phage typing, or multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. Therefore, MLVA may be used along with PFGE to enhance the effectiveness of the molecular epidemiologic investigation of S. Enteritidis infections. PMID:17692097

  16. Biphasic Thermal Inactivation Kinetics in Salmonella enteritidis PT4

    PubMed Central

    Humpheson, L.; Adams, M. R.; Anderson, W. A.; Cole, M. B.

    1998-01-01

    The thermal inactivation kinetics of Salmonella enteritidis PT4 between 49 and 60°C were investigated. Using procedures designed to eliminate methodological artifacts, we found that the death kinetics deviated from the accepted model of first-order inactivation. When we used high-density stationary-phase populations and sensitive enumeration, the survivor curves at 60°C were reproducibly biphasic. The decimal reduction time at 60°C (D60°C) of the tail subpopulation was more than four times that of the majority population. This difference decreased with decreasing temperature; i.e., the survivor curves became more linear, but the proportion of tail cells remained a constant proportion of the initial population, about 1 in 104 to 105. Z plots (log D versus temperature) for the two populations showed that the D values coincided at 51°C, indicating that the survivor curves should be linear at this temperature, and this was confirmed experimentally. Investigations into the nature of the tails ruled out genotypic differences between the populations and protection due to leakage from early heat casualties. Heating of cells at 59°C in the presence of 5 or 100 μg of chloramphenicol per ml resulted in reductions in the levels of tailing. These reductions were greatest at the higher chloramphenicol concentration. Our results indicate that de novo protein synthesis of heat shock proteins is responsible for the observed tailing. Chemostat-cultured cells heated at 60°C also produced biphasic survivor curves in all but one instance. Cells with higher growth rates were more heat sensitive, but tailing was comparable with batch cultures. Starved cells (no dilution input) displayed linear inactivation kinetics, suggesting that during starvation a rapid heat shock response cannot be initiated. PMID:9464380

  17. Contribution of the type VI secretion system encoded in SPI-19 to chicken colonization by Salmonella enterica serotypes Gallinarum and Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Blondel, Carlos J; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Castro, Benjamín; Chiang, Sebastián; Toro, Cecilia S; Zaldívar, Mercedes; Contreras, Inés; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L; Santiviago, Carlos A

    2010-07-22

    Salmonella Gallinarum is a pathogen with a host range specific to poultry, while Salmonella Enteritidis is a broad host range pathogen that colonizes poultry sub-clinically but is a leading cause of gastrointestinal salmonellosis in humans and many other species. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the complex interplay between Salmonella and their hosts, the molecular basis of host range restriction and unique pathobiology of Gallinarum remain largely unknown. Type VI Secretion System (T6SS) represents a new paradigm of protein secretion that is critical for the pathogenesis of many gram-negative bacteria. We recently identified a putative T6SS in the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 19 (SPI-19) of Gallinarum. In Enteritidis, SPI-19 is a degenerate element that has lost most of the T6SS functions encoded in the island. In this work, we studied the contribution of SPI-19 to the colonization of Salmonella Gallinarum strain 287/91 in chickens. Non-polar deletion mutants of SPI-19 and the clpV gene, an essential T6SS component, colonized the ileum, ceca, liver and spleen of White Leghorn chicks poorly compared to the wild-type strain after oral inoculation. Return of SPI-19 to the DeltaSPI-19 mutant, using VEX-Capture, complemented this colonization defect. In contrast, transfer of SPI-19 from Gallinarum to Enteritidis resulted in transient increase in the colonization of the ileum, liver and spleen at day 1 post-infection, but at days 3 and 5 post-infection a strong colonization defect of the gut and internal organs of the experimentally infected chickens was observed. Our data indicate that SPI-19 and the T6SS encoded in this region contribute to the colonization of the gastrointestinal tract and internal organs of chickens by Salmonella Gallinarum and suggest that degradation of SPI-19 T6SS in Salmonella Enteritidis conferred an advantage in colonization of the avian host.

  18. Contribution of the Type VI Secretion System Encoded in SPI-19 to Chicken Colonization by Salmonella enterica Serotypes Gallinarum and Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Blondel, Carlos J.; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Castro, Benjamín; Chiang, Sebastián; Toro, Cecilia S.; Zaldívar, Mercedes; Contreras, Inés; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L.; Santiviago, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella Gallinarum is a pathogen with a host range specific to poultry, while Salmonella Enteritidis is a broad host range pathogen that colonizes poultry sub-clinically but is a leading cause of gastrointestinal salmonellosis in humans and many other species. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the complex interplay between Salmonella and their hosts, the molecular basis of host range restriction and unique pathobiology of Gallinarum remain largely unknown. Type VI Secretion System (T6SS) represents a new paradigm of protein secretion that is critical for the pathogenesis of many Gram-negative bacteria. We recently identified a putative T6SS in the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 19 (SPI-19) of Gallinarum. In Enteritidis, SPI-19 is a degenerate element that has lost most of the T6SS functions encoded in the island. In this work, we studied the contribution of SPI-19 to the colonization of Salmonella Gallinarum strain 287/91 in chickens. Non-polar deletion mutants of SPI-19 and the clpV gene, an essential T6SS component, colonized the ileum, ceca, liver and spleen of White Leghorn chicks poorly compared to the wild-type strain after oral inoculation. Return of SPI-19 to the ΔSPI-19 mutant, using VEX-Capture, complemented this colonization defect. In contrast, transfer of SPI-19 from Gallinarum to Enteritidis resulted in transient increase in the colonization of the ileum, liver and spleen at day 1 post-infection, but at days 3 and 5 post-infection a strong colonization defect of the gut and internal organs of the experimentally infected chickens was observed. Our data indicate that SPI-19 and the T6SS encoded in this region contribute to the colonization of the gastrointestinal tract and internal organs of chickens by Salmonella Gallinarum and suggest that degradation of SPI-19 T6SS in Salmonella Enteritidis conferred an advantage in colonization of the avian host. PMID:20661437

  19. Salmonella Infections in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Bula-Rudas, Fernando J; Rathore, Mobeen H; Maraqa, Nizar F

    2015-08-01

    Salmonella are gram-negative bacilli within the family Enterobacteriaceae. They are the cause of significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Animals (pets) are an important reservoir for nontyphoidal Salmonella, whereas humans are the only natural host and reservoir for Salmonella Typhi. Salmonella infections are a major cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. They account for an estimated 2.8 billion cases of diarrheal disease each year. The transmission of Salmonella is frequently associated with the consumption of contaminated water and food of animal origin, and it is facilitated by conditions of poor hygiene. Nontyphoidal Salmonella infections have a worldwide distribution, whereas most typhoidal Salmonella infections in the United States are acquired abroad. In the United States, Salmonella is a common agent for food-borne–associated infections. Several outbreaks have been identified and are most commonly associated with agricultural products. Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection is usually characterized by a self-limited gastroenteritis in immunocompetent hosts in industrialized countries, but it may also cause invasive disease in vulnerable individuals (eg, children less than 1 year of age, immunocompromised). Antibiotic treatment is not recommended for treatment of mild to moderate gastroenteritis by nontyphoidal Salmonella in immunocompetent adults or children more than 1 year of age. Antibiotic treatment is recommended for nontyphoidal Salmonella infections in infants less than 3 months of age, because they are at higher risk for bacteremia and extraintestinal complications. Typhoid (enteric) fever and its potential complications have a significant impact on children, especially those who live in developing countries. Antibiotic treatment of typhoid fever has become challenging because of the emergence of Salmonella Typhi strains that are resistant to classically used first-line agents: ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and chloramphenicol. The

  20. Comparison of the prevalence of Salmonella infection in layer hens from commercial layer farms with high and low rodent densities.

    PubMed

    Lapuz, Randy Rhon Simoun P; Umali, Dennis V; Suzuki, Terumasa; Shirota, Kazutoshi; Katoh, Hiromitsu

    2012-03-01

    A comparison on the prevalence of Salmonella infection in layer hens from commercial layer farms with high and low rodent densities was investigated. Out of 280 laying hens sampled from three commercial layer farms with high rodent densities, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) was isolated from 20 (7.14%) hens and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis (Salmonella Infantis) from three (1.07%) hens. In contrast, layer hens sampled from four commercial layer farms with low rodent densities were negative for any salmonellae. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in the isolation rates of Salmonella from various organs of infected layer hens were also noted. For Salmonella Enteritidis, liver (55.0%) and the oviduct (55.0%) had the highest isolation rates while all Salmonella Infantis isolates were from the oviduct. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of BlnI-digested chromosomal DNA of Salmonella Enteritidis isolated from layer hens and rodents showed similar patterns. PFGE analysis of Salmonella Infantis isolated from layer hens, rodents, eggs, and the environment yielded identical patterns. In this study, the significantly higher prevalence rate (P < 0.05) of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Infantis in layer hens from high rodent density farms could be attributed to the high rodent population density. The persistent Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Infantis infection inside layer houses may have been amplified by the increasing numbers in the rodent population over the years, which increased the opportunity for environment-rodent-chicken interaction and the transmission of salmonellae to chickens. Monitoring of salmonellae from rodents inside poultry premises is recommended to be an effective additional tool in the assessment of the Salmonella status of layer flocks.

  1. Relationship of pulsed-field profiles with key phage types of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in Europe: results of an international multi-centre study.

    PubMed

    Peters, T M; Berghold, C; Brown, D; Coia, J; Dionisi, A M; Echeita, A; Fisher, I S T; Gatto, A J; Gill, N; Green, J; Gerner-Smidt, P; Heck, M; Lederer, I; Lukinmaa, S; Luzzi, I; Maguire, C; Prager, R; Usera, M; Siitonen, A; Threlfall, E J; Torpdahl, M; Tschäpe, H; Wannet, W; Zwaluw, W K Van der

    2007-11-01

    Salmonella is one of the most common causes of foodborne infection in Europe with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) being the most commonly identified serovar. The predominant phage type for S. Enteritidis is phage type (PT) 4, although PT 8 has increased in incidence. Within these phage types, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) provides a method of further subdivision. The international project, Salm-gene, was established in 2001 to develop a database of PFGE profiles within nine European countries and to establish criteria for real-time pattern recognition. It uses DNA fingerprints of salmonellas to investigate outbreaks and to evaluate trends and emerging issues of foodborne infection within Europe. The Salm-gene database contains details of about 11 700 S. Enteritidis isolates, demonstrating more than 65 unique PFGE profiles. The clonal nature of S. Enteritidis is evidenced by the high similarity and distribution of PFGE profiles. Over 56% (6603/11 716) of the submitted isolates of several different phage types were profile SENTXB.0001, although this profile is most closely associated with PT 4. The next most common profiles, SENTXB.0002 and SENTXB.0005, were closely associated with PT 8 and PT 21 respectively. Studies to investigate the relationship of profile types with outbreaks and possible vehicles of infection suggest that the incidence of PFGE profile SENTXB.0002, and thus PT 8, in some countries may be due to importation of foods or food production animals from Eastern Europe, where PT 8 is amongst the most frequently identified phage types. Collation of subtyping data, especially in the commonly recognized phage types, is necessary in order to evaluate trends and emerging issues in salmonella infection.

  2. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms that Differentiate Two Subpopulations of Salmonella Enteritidis Within Phage Type

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is currently the world’s leading cause of salmonellosis, in part because of its ability to contaminate the internal contents of eggs. Comparative whole genome mutational mapping of two PT13a strains that historically varied in the ability to contaminate eggs a...

  3. Differential Transcriptional Regulation Between Egg-contaminating and Non-egg-contaminating Strains of Salmonella Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) is the most common cause of food-borne salmonellosis primarily transmitted by contaminated poultry eggs. Despite its genetically clonal nature, SE strains differ markedly in their ability to disseminate systemically in chickens and subsequently invade the inte...

  4. 21 CFR 118.5 - Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis... of laying hens is 40 to 45 weeks of age. (2) If the environmental test at 40 to 45 weeks is positive.... Results of egg testing must be obtained within 10-calendar days of receiving notification of the...

  5. Reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis Population Sizes on Almond Kernels with Infrared Heat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Catalytic infrared (IR) heating was investigated to determine its effect on Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis population sizes on raw almond kernels. Using a double-sided catalytic infrared heating system, a radiation intensity of 5458 W/m2 caused a fast temperature increase at the kernel surf...

  6. 21 CFR 118.8 - Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....8 Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Testing of environmental samples for SE. Testing to detect SE in environmental samples must be conducted by the method entitled “Environmental..., precision, and sensitivity in detecting SE. The April 2008 Environmental Sampling and Detection...

  7. 21 CFR 118.7 - Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.7 Section 118.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS §...

  8. 21 CFR 118.10 - Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.10 Section 118.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE,...

  9. 21 CFR 118.9 - Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.9 Section 118.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF...

  10. 21 CFR 118.9 - Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.9 Section 118.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF...

  11. 21 CFR 118.7 - Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.7 Section 118.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS §...

  12. 21 CFR 118.5 - Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.5 Section 118.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS §...

  13. 21 CFR 118.7 - Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.7 Section 118.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS §...

  14. 21 CFR 118.6 - Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.6 Section 118.6 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.6...

  15. 21 CFR 118.5 - Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.5 Section 118.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS §...

  16. 21 CFR 118.9 - Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.9 Section 118.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF...

  17. 21 CFR 118.7 - Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.7 Section 118.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS §...

  18. 21 CFR 118.5 - Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.5 Section 118.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS §...

  19. 21 CFR 118.10 - Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.10 Section 118.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE,...

  20. Genomic epidemiology of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis based on population structure of prevalent lineages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (SE) is one of the most commonly reported causes of human salmonellosis. The low genetic diversity of SE measured by fingerprinting methods has made subtyping a challenge. In this study, we used whole genome sequencing to characterize a total of 125 SE and Sa...

  1. 21 CFR 118.10 - Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.10 Section 118.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE,...

  2. 21 CFR 118.10 - Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.10 Section 118.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE,...

  3. Red Seaweeds Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii and Chondrus crispus down Regulate Virulence Factors of Salmonella Enteritidis and Induce Immune Responses in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kulshreshtha, Garima; Borza, Tudor; Rathgeber, Bruce; Stratton, Glenn S.; Thomas, Nikhil A.; Critchley, Alan; Hafting, Jeff; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Red seaweeds are a rich source of unique bioactive compounds and secondary metabolites that are known to improve human and animal health. S. Enteritidis is a broad range host pathogen, which contaminates chicken and poultry products that end into the human food chain. Worldwide, Salmonella outbreaks have become an important economic and public health concern. Moreover, the development of resistance in Salmonella serovars toward multiple drugs highlights the need for alternative control strategies. This study evaluated the antimicrobial property of red seaweeds extracts against Salmonella Enteritidis using the Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. Six red seaweed species were tested for their antimicrobial activity against S. Enteritidis and two, Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii (SG) and Chondrus crispus (CC), were found to exhibit such properties. Spread plate assay revealed that SG and CC (1%, w/v) significantly reduced the growth of S. Enteritidis. Seaweed water extracts (SWE) of SG and CC, at concentrations from 0.4 to 2 mg/ml, significantly reduced the growth of S. Enteritidis (log CFU 4.5–5.3 and log 5.7–6.0, respectively). However, methanolic extracts of CC and SG did not affect the growth of S. Enteritidis. Addition of SWE (0.2 mg/ml, CC and SG) significantly decreased biofilm formation and reduced the motility of S. Enteritidis. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that SWE (CC and SG) suppressed the expression of quorum sensing gene sdiA and of Salmonella Pathogenesis Island-1 (SPI-1) associated genes sipA and invF, indicating that SWE might reduce the invasion of S. Enteritidis in the host by attenuating virulence factors. Furthermore, CC and SG water extracts significantly improved the survival of infected C. elegans by impairing the ability of S. Enteritidis to colonize the digestive tract of the nematode and by enhancing the expression of C. elegans immune responsive genes. As the innate immune response pathways of C. elegans and mammals show a

  4. Red Seaweeds Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii and Chondrus crispus down Regulate Virulence Factors of Salmonella Enteritidis and Induce Immune Responses in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Kulshreshtha, Garima; Borza, Tudor; Rathgeber, Bruce; Stratton, Glenn S; Thomas, Nikhil A; Critchley, Alan; Hafting, Jeff; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Red seaweeds are a rich source of unique bioactive compounds and secondary metabolites that are known to improve human and animal health. S. Enteritidis is a broad range host pathogen, which contaminates chicken and poultry products that end into the human food chain. Worldwide, Salmonella outbreaks have become an important economic and public health concern. Moreover, the development of resistance in Salmonella serovars toward multiple drugs highlights the need for alternative control strategies. This study evaluated the antimicrobial property of red seaweeds extracts against Salmonella Enteritidis using the Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. Six red seaweed species were tested for their antimicrobial activity against S. Enteritidis and two, Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii (SG) and Chondrus crispus (CC), were found to exhibit such properties. Spread plate assay revealed that SG and CC (1%, w/v) significantly reduced the growth of S. Enteritidis. Seaweed water extracts (SWE) of SG and CC, at concentrations from 0.4 to 2 mg/ml, significantly reduced the growth of S. Enteritidis (log CFU 4.5-5.3 and log 5.7-6.0, respectively). However, methanolic extracts of CC and SG did not affect the growth of S. Enteritidis. Addition of SWE (0.2 mg/ml, CC and SG) significantly decreased biofilm formation and reduced the motility of S. Enteritidis. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that SWE (CC and SG) suppressed the expression of quorum sensing gene sdiA and of Salmonella Pathogenesis Island-1 (SPI-1) associated genes sipA and invF, indicating that SWE might reduce the invasion of S. Enteritidis in the host by attenuating virulence factors. Furthermore, CC and SG water extracts significantly improved the survival of infected C. elegans by impairing the ability of S. Enteritidis to colonize the digestive tract of the nematode and by enhancing the expression of C. elegans immune responsive genes. As the innate immune response pathways of C. elegans and mammals show a high

  5. Immunization of chickens with Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis pathogenicity island-2 proteins.

    PubMed

    Wisner, Amanda L S; Desin, Taseen S; Lam, Po-King S; Berberov, Emil; Mickael, Claudia S; Townsend, Hugh G; Potter, Andrew A; Köster, Wolfgang

    2011-12-15

    Several structural components of the type III secretion systems (T3SS) encoded by Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI)-1 and SPI-2 are exposed to the host's immune system prior to/during the infection/invasion process, making them potential vaccine candidates. In this study we evaluated whether chickens vaccinated with SPI-2 T3SS components could mount a significant humoral immune response (as measured by serum IgG titres) and whether these antibodies could be transferred to progeny (as measured by egg yolk IgG titres), and whether vaccinates and progeny of vaccinates could be protected against challenge with SE. The results of our studies show that vaccinated chickens do produce high levels of SPI-2 T3SS specific serum IgG that they are able to transfer to their progeny. It was demonstrated that vaccinates and progeny of vaccinates had lower overall countable recovered Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) per bird in most situations.

  6. Factors influencing inactivation of Salmonella enteritidis in hard-cooked eggs.

    PubMed

    Chantarapanont, W; Slutsker, L; Tauxe, R V; Beuchat, L R

    2000-01-01

    The inside of a hen's egg, once considered sterile, is now known to occasionally harbor Salmonella Enteritidis. At least two recent outbreaks of salmonellosis in which Salmonella Enteritidis PT34 was involved have been associated with hard-cooked eggs. This study was undertaken to compare D56 degrees C values of Salmonella Senftenberg 775W and six strains of Salmonella Enteritidis isolated from outbreaks associated with eggs. D56 degrees C values for Salmonella Enteritidis in liquid egg yolk ranged from 5.14 to 7.39 min; the D56 degrees C value for Salmonella Senftenberg was 19.96 min. The two PT34 strains from outbreaks associated with hard-cooked eggs did not exhibit significantly higher resistance to heat compared with two PT4 strains and one strain each of PT8 and PT13a. A PT4 strain and a PT34 strain of Salmonella Enteritidis were separately inoculated (10(7) to 10(8) CFU) into the yolk of medium and extra large shell eggs at 10 and 21 degrees C, and survival was monitored using two cooking methods: (i) placing eggs in water at 23 degrees C, heating to 100 degrees C, removing from heat, and holding for 15 min (American Egg Board method) and (ii) placing eggs in water at 100 degrees C, then holding for 15 min at this temperature. Within the 15-min holding periods, inactivation was more rapid using the method recommended by the American Egg Board compared with method 2. Within each cooking method, inactivation was most rapid in medium eggs initially at 21 degrees C. The PT4 strain survived in yolk of extra large eggs initially at 10 degrees C when eggs were held in boiling water 9 min using method 2. The final temperature of the yolk in these eggs was 62.3 +/- 2 degrees C. Of the two methods evaluated for hard cooking eggs, the American Egg Board method is clearly most effective in killing Salmonella Enteritidis in the yolk.

  7. Inactivation kinetics of a four-strain composite of Salmonella Enteritidis and Oranienberg in commercial liquid egg yolk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this study was to develop a general model of inactivation of salmonellae in commercial liquid egg yolk for temperatures ranging from 58 to 66 deg C by studying the inactivation kinetics of Salmonella in liquid egg yolk. Heat-resistant salmonellae (three serovars of Enteritidis [two of p...

  8. Multiplication of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg yolks after inoculation outside, on, and inside vitelline membranes and storage at different temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prompt refrigeration to restrict bacterial growth is a widely acknowledged practice for reducing the risk of egg-borne transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis to consumers. A recently published federal regulation for S. Enteritidis control requires eggs to be refrigerated within 36 after they are la...

  9. Evolutionary trends in two strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. I serovar Enteritidis PT13a that vary in virulence potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica subsp. I serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is the world's leading cause of salmonellosis. Eggs contaminated by apparently healthy hens and that have been improperly cooked can result in illness in humans who consume them. Although the incidence of this pathogen within the Uni...

  10. Evolutionary trends in two strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. I serovar Enteritidis PT13a that vary in virulence potential.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica subsp. I serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is the world's leading cause of salmonellosis. Eggs that are contaminated by apparently healthy hens and that have been improperly cooked can result in illness in humans who consume them. Although the incidence of this pathogen within...

  11. Evolutionary trends in two strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. I serovar Enteritidis PT13a that vary in virulence potential.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica subsp. I serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is the world's leading cause of salmonellosis. Eggs contaminated by apparently healthy hens and that have been improperly cooked can result in illness in humans who consume them. Although the incidence of this pathogen within the Unit...

  12. Evolutionary trends in two strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. I serovar Enteritidis PT13a that vary in virulence potential.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica subsp. I serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is the world's leading cause of salmonellosis. Eggs contaminated by apparently healthy hens can result in illness in humans who consume them. Although the incidence of this pathogen within the United States has not been as high as it ...

  13. Critical role of glycogen synthase kinase-3ß in regulating the avian heterophil response to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A microarray-assisted gene expression screen of chicken heterophils revealed glycogen synthase kinase-3ß (GSK-3ß), a multifunctional Ser/Thr kinase, to be consistently up-regulated 30-180 min following stimulation with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis). The present study was ...

  14. Detection of Polymorphism in a Diguanylate Cyclase of Egg-Contaminating Salmonella enteritidis Deficient in Biofilm Formation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. enteritidis) is a model organism for evaluating how genetic drift impacts phenotype, because mutational mapping of clonally related pathotypes has been completed and small scale evolutionary events (SSEE) are being linked to the ability of this food-borne...

  15. Modeling the effect of temperature on survival rate of Salmonella Enteritidis in yogurt.

    PubMed

    Szczawiński, J; Szczawińska, M E; Łobacz, A; Jackowska-Tracz, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the inactivation rates of Salmonella Enteritidis in commercially produced yogurt and to generate primary and secondary mathematical models to predict the behaviour of these bacteria during storage at different temperatures. The samples were inoculated with the mixture of three S. Enteritidis strains and stored at 5 degrees C, 10 degrees C, 15 degrees C, 20 degrees C and 25 degrees C for 24 h. The number of salmonellae was determined every two hours. It was found that the number of bacteria decreased linearly with storage time in all samples. Storage temperature and pH of yogurt significantly influenced survival rate of S. Enteritidis (p < 0.05). In samples kept at 5 degrees C the number of salmonellae decreased at the lowest rate, whereas at 25 degrees C the reduction in number of bacteria was the most dynamic. The natural logarithm of mean inactivation rates of Salmonella calculated from primary model was fitted to two secondary models: linear and polynomial. Equations obtained from both secondary models can be applied as a tool for prediction of inactivation rate of Salmonella in yogurt stored under temperature range from 5 to 25 degrees C; however, polynomial model gave the better fit to the experimental data.

  16. Genetic Diversity and Evolution of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Strains with Different Phage Types

    PubMed Central

    Pettengill, James; Strain, Errol; Allard, Marc W.; Ahmed, Rafiq; Zhao, Shaohua; Brown, Eric W.

    2014-01-01

    Phage typing has been used for the epidemiological surveillance of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis for over 2 decades. However, knowledge of the genetic and evolutionary relationships between phage types is very limited, making differences difficult to interpret. Here, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified from whole-genome comparisons were used to determine the relationships between some S. Enteritidis phage types (PTs) commonly associated with food-borne outbreaks in the United States. Emphasis was placed on the predominant phage types PT8, PT13a, and PT13 in North America. With >89,400 bp surveyed across 98 S. Enteritidis isolates representing 14 distinct phage types, 55 informative SNPs were discovered within 23 chromosomally anchored loci. To maximize the discriminatory and evolutionary partitioning of these highly homogeneous strains, sequences comprising informative SNPs were concatenated into a single combined data matrix and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. The resultant phylogeny allocated most S. Enteritidis isolates into two distinct clades (clades I and II) and four subclades. Synapomorphic (shared and derived) sets of SNPs capable of distinguishing individual clades/subclades were identified. However, individual phage types appeared to be evolutionarily disjunct when mapped to this phylogeny, suggesting that phage typing may not be valid for making phylogenetic inferences. Furthermore, the set of SNPs identified here represents useful genetic markers for strain differentiation of more clonal S. Enteritidis strains and provides core genotypic markers for future development of a SNP typing scheme with S. Enteritidis. PMID:24574287

  17. Molecular epidemiological characteristics of Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Typhimurium and Livingstone strains isolated in a Tunisian university hospital.

    PubMed

    Ktari, Sonia; Ksibi, Boutheina; Gharsallah, Houda; Mnif, Basma; Maalej, Sonda; Rhimi, Fouzia; Hammami, Adnene

    2016-03-01

    Enteritidis, Typhimurium and Livingstone are the main Salmonella enterica serovars recovered in Tunisia. Here, we aimed to assess the genetic diversity of fifty-seven Salmonella enterica strains from different sampling periods, origins and settings using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Salmonella Enteritidis, isolated from human and food sources from two regions in Sfax in 2007, were grouped into one cluster using PFGE. However, using MLVA these strains were divided into two clusters. Salmonella Typhimurium strains, recovered in 2012 and represent sporadic cases of human clinical isolates, were included in one PFGE cluster. Nevertheless, the MLVA technique, divided Salmonella Typhimurium isolates into six clusters with diversity index reaching (DI = 0.757). For Salmonella Livingstone which was responsible of two nosocomial outbreaks during 2000-2003, the PFGE and MLVA methods showed that these strains were genetically closely related. Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Livingstone populations showed a single ST lineage ST11 and ST543 respectively. For Salmonella Typhimurium, two MLST sequence types ST19 and ST328 were defined. Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium strains were clearly differentiated by MLVA which was not the case using PFGE.

  18. Evaluation of a French ELISA for the detection of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium in flocks of laying and breeding hens.

    PubMed

    Jouy, E; Proux, K; Humbert, F; Rose, V; Lalande, F; Houdayer, C; Picault, J-P; Salvat, G

    2005-09-30

    In France, the regular and compulsory detection of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) and Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) in flocks of breeding and laying hens is based on bacteriological examination of environmental swabs and faeces samples. The aim of this study was to compare this bacteriological examination with a serological method (ELISA) developed in our laboratory. This ELISA was first evaluated by use of artificially infected hens. During these experimental infection studies, several groups of hens were inoculated with SE, ST, different vaccines and different Salmonella serovars to calculate the experimental parameters of our ELISA. Then, in a field study, 43 flocks were followed monthly using two bacteriological samples (environmental swab and pool of faeces) and 20 serological samples (sera or yolks). Twenty-seven flocks without SE or ST gave a negative serological response throughout their surveillance. Among the 10 various serovars different from SE and ST isolated in this study, S. Heidelberg, S. Agona and S. Hadar gave seropositive results in seven flocks. Consequently, this ELISA was not specific of SE and ST as it detected serovars sharing or not common antigens with SE and ST. Seropositive results were also obtained each month for two flocks where no Salmonella could be isolated. Finally, in seven flocks found infected with SE or ST, the positive ELISA results appeared later than the bacteriological detection. Therefore, for the detection of chicken flocks recently infected with SE or ST, bacteriological examination currently used in France seems to be more appropriate than this ELISA.

  19. 21 CFR 118.4 - Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... 118.4 Section 118.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118... National Poultry Improvement Plan's standards for “U.S. S. Enteritidis Clean” status (9 CFR 145.23(d))...

  20. 21 CFR 118.4 - Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... environmental test required in paragraph (a)(2)(i) of this section is positive, you must begin egg testing, as... National Poultry Improvement Plan's standards for “U.S. S. Enteritidis Clean” status (9 CFR 145.23(d)) or equivalent standard; (2) Environmental testing. (i) The pullet environment is tested for SE when pullets...

  1. 21 CFR 118.4 - Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... environmental test required in paragraph (a)(2)(i) of this section is positive, you must begin egg testing, as... National Poultry Improvement Plan's standards for “U.S. S. Enteritidis Clean” status (9 CFR 145.23(d)) or equivalent standard; (2) Environmental testing. (i) The pullet environment is tested for SE when pullets...

  2. Susceptibility of biofilm Escherichia coli, Salmonella Enteritidis and Staphylococcus aureus to detergents and sanitizers.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Shigeko; Kuwabara, Yoshihiro

    2007-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the susceptibility of the biofilm cells of Escherichia coli O157, Salmonella Enteritidis, and Staphylococcus aureus to some cleaning detergents and sanitizers. No weakly acidic, neutral, and weakly alkaline detergent could remove the biofilm bacteria from stainless steel chips at commonly used concentrations recommended by manufacturers. Among sanitizers, sodium hypochlorite did not completely inactivate any biofilm bacteria at active chlorine concentrations of 25 to 200 microg/ml. Benzalkonium chloride, alkyldiaminoethyl glycine hydrochloride, chlorhexidine digluconate, and polyhexamethylenebiganide inactivated the great majority of E. coli and S. Enteritidis at commonly used concentrations, but did not inactivate S. aureus effectively enough. The biofilm S. aureus population was shown to be more tolerant than the E. coli and/or S. Enteritidis populations to the sanitizers. PMID:18198721

  3. Molecular epidemiology of ampicillin-resistant clinical isolates of Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed Central

    Vatopoulos, A C; Mainas, E; Balis, E; Threlfall, E J; Kanelopoulou, M; Kalapothalki, V; Malamou-Lada, H; Legakis, N J

    1994-01-01

    During the last 6 years in Greece, there has been a significant increase in the number of ampicillin-resistant Salmonella clinical isolates reported. In this study 23 ampicillin-resistant Salmonella strains, consecutively isolated from patients with epidemiologically unrelated cases of food poisoning, were investigated. By serotyping and phage typing, 21 of these strains were identified as Salmonella enteritidis phage type 6a, 1 was identified as Salmonella typhimurium, and 1 was identified as Salmonella saintpaul. By plasmid pattern analysis, the 21 S. enteritidis strains were further differentiated into five groups. Group I consisted of 5 strains (carrying two plasmids of ca. 38 and 34 MDa), group II consisted of 10 strains (three plasmids of ca. 38, 34, and 2.5 MDa), group III consisted of 3 strains (four plasmids of ca. 38, 34, 15, and 2.5 MDa), group IV consisted of 1 strain (five plasmids of ca. 100, 38, 34, 24, and 15 MDa), and group V consisted of 2 strains (three plasmids of ca. 100, 38, and 24 MDa). Ampicillin resistance was easily transferred to Escherichia coli and was associated with the transfer of the 34-MDa plasmid, classified in the N incompatibility group for all strains of groups I to IV, and with the transfer of the 100-MDa plasmid for the group V strains. EcoRI restriction endonuclease digestions showed an extensive homology among the 34-MDa conjugative R plasmids. Hybridizations of the EcoRI restriction fragments of the 34-MDa plasmids with a TEM-type probe revealed the locus of the beta-lactamase gene to be situated on a ca. 6.6-MDa fragment, common in all plasmids. These results indicate that ampicillin resistance in Greece is due to the spread of a limited number of clones of S. enteritidis phage type 6A, carrying related 34-MDa R plasmids. Work is in progress to obtain a better understanding of ampicillin resistance in S. enteritidis. Images PMID:8051261

  4. Detection of a novel fimbrial structure on the surface of Salmonella enteritidis by using a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Thorns, C J; Sojka, M G; Chasey, D

    1990-01-01

    A fimbrialike structure expressed on the surface of Salmonella enteritidis was identified by using a monoclonal antibody (69/25) produced against intact S. enteritidis cells. Fimbriae were less than 5 nm in diameter and carried a protein consisting of subunits with a molecular weight of 14,300. No hemagglutinating activity associated with the fimbriae was detected. An epitope on the fimbrial antigen identified by monoclonal antibody 69/25 was expressed by all 58 S. enteritidis strains, 12 of 36 S. dublin strains, and a single strain of S. moscow examined. None of 169 other isolates tested from 17 salmonella serogroups expressed this epitope. Images PMID:1701443

  5. Geographical information software and shopper card data, aided in the discovery of a Salmonella Enteritidis outbreak associated with Turkish pine nuts.

    PubMed

    Bedard, B; Kennedy, B S; Weimer, A C

    2014-12-01

    In 2011, from August to November, the Monroe County Department of Public Health (MCDPH) investigated 47 salmonellosis cases. Geographical information software (GIS) was used to map the address locations of these cases. The resulting GIS analysis and culture information indicated that there were two distinct clusters of Salmonella that were geographically different. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) testing was run at the New York State Department of Health Wadsworth Laboratory and identified S. Enteritidis (23 cases) and S. Typhimurium (10 cases). The epidemiological investigation identified Turkish pine nuts as the link between ill S. Enteritidis cases. Pine nut samples sent for laboratory testing were a PFGE match to human isolates with S. Enteritidis. A national recall of Turkish pine nuts ensued. A multistate outbreak was identified as a result of the initial investigation of MCDPH, in which 43 people were infected with the outbreak strain from five states. GIS software and shopper card data provided important tools in the epidemiological investigation.

  6. SPI1 defective mutants of Salmonella enterica induce cross-protective immunity in chickens against challenge with serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Matulova, Marta; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Babak, Vladimir; Rychlik, Ivan

    2013-06-28

    In this study we were interested in the serovar cross-protection potential of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI1) attenuated vaccine strains of Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium and immune response of vaccinated and naive chickens to Salmonella infection. The immune response was characterized by real time PCR quantifying transcripts of interleukins IL1β, IL17, IL22, interferon gamma (IFNγ), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), immunoglobulins IgM, IgA, IgY and Ig light chain, and six genes of acute phase response including avidin, serum amyloid A, extracellular fatty acid-binding protein (Ex-FABP), immune responsive gene 1, chemokine AH221 and trappin-6. Vaccination with SPI1 mutants of both serovars protected chickens against Salmonella infection, independent of the serovar used for the challenge and the time post infection. However, expressions of all interleukins, iNOS and Ex-FABP showed that protection against homologous serovars was significantly higher than against heterologous serovars after intravenous challenge at 4 days post infection. The vaccination with a mixture of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium SPI1 mutants induced an intermediate protection against challenge with both serovars, i.e. the mixed vaccine provided an additional protective effect when compared with the chickens vaccinated with a vaccine formed by only a single Salmonella serovar. PMID:23684831

  7. Deletion of the aceE gene (encoding a component of pyruvate dehydrogenase) attenuates Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Ervinna; Tien-Lin, Chang; Selvaraj, Madhan; Chang, Jason; Kwang, Jimmy

    2011-10-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major food-borne pathogen. From a transposon insertion mutant library created previously using S. Enteritidis 10/02, one of the mutants was identified to have a 50% lethal dose (LD(50) ) at least 100 times that of the parental strain in young chicks, with an attenuation in a poorly studied gene encoding a component of pyruvate dehydrogenase, namely the aceE gene. Evaluation of the in vitro virulence characteristics of the ΔaceE∷kan mutant revealed that it was less able to invade epithelial cells, less resistant to reactive oxygen intermediate, less able to survive within a chicken macrophage cell line and had a retarded growth rate compared with the parental strain. Young chicks vaccinated with 2 × 10(9) CFU of the ΔaceE∷kan mutant were protected from the subsequent challenge of the parental strain, with the mutant colonized in the liver and spleen in a shorter time than the group infected with the parental strain. In addition, compared with the parental strain, the ΔaceE∷kan mutant did not cause persistent eggshell contamination of vaccinated hens.

  8. A comparative study on invasion, survival, modulation of oxidative burst, and nitric oxide responses of macrophages (HD11), and systemic infection in chickens by prevalent poultry Salmonella serovars.

    PubMed

    He, Haiqi; Genovese, Kenneth J; Swaggerty, Christina L; Nisbet, David J; Kogut, Michael H

    2012-12-01

    Poultry is a major reservoir for foodborne Salmonella serovars. Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Kentucky, and Salmonella Senftenberg are the most prevalent serovars in U.S. poultry. Information concerning the interactions between different Salmonella species and host cells in poultry is lacking. In the present study, the above mentioned Salmonella serovars were examined for invasion, intracellular survival, and their ability to modulate oxidative burst and nitric oxide (NO) responses in chicken macrophage HD11 cells. All Salmonella serovars demonstrated similar capacity to invade HD11 cells. At 24 h post-infection, a 36-43% reduction of intracellular bacteria, in log(10)(CFU), was observed for Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Kentucky, and Salmonella Senftenberg, whereas a significantly lower reduction (16%) was observed for Salmonella Enteritidis, indicating its higher resistance to the killing by HD11 cells. Production of NO was completely diminished in HD11 cells infected with Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis, but remained intact when infected with Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Kentucky, and Salmonella Senftenberg. Phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated oxidative burst in HD11 cells was greatly impaired after infection by each of the five serovars. When newly hatched chickens were challenged orally, a high rate (86-98%) of systemic infection (Salmonella positive in liver/spleen) was observed in birds challenged with Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg, and Salmonella Kentucky, while only 14% of the birds were Salmonella Senftenberg positive. However, there was no direct correlation between systemic infection and in vitro differential intracellular survival and modulation of NO response among the tested serovars.

  9. A comparison of transmission characteristics of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis between pair-housed and group-housed laying hens.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ekelijn; Bouma, Annemarie; Klinkenberg, Don

    2011-02-23

    Human cases of bacterial gastro-enteritis are often caused by the consumption of eggs contaminated with Salmonella species, mainly Salmonella enterica serovar Enteriditis (Salmonella Enteritidis). To reduce human exposure, in several countries worldwide surveillance programmes are implemented to detect colonized layer flocks. The sampling schemes are based on the within-flock prevalence, and, as this changes over time, knowledge of the within-flock dynamics of Salmonella Enteritidis is required. Transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis has been quantified in pairs of layers, but the question is whether the dynamics in pairs is comparable to transmission in large groups, which are more representative for commercial layer flocks. The aim of this study was to compare results of transmission experiments between pairs and groups of laying hens. Experimental groups of either 2 or 200 hens were housed at similar densities, and 1 or 4 hens were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, respectively. Excretion was monitored by regularly testing of fecal samples for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. Using mathematical modeling, the group experiments were simulated with transmission parameter estimates from the pairwise experiments. Transmission of the bacteria did not differ significantly between pairs or groups. This finding suggests that the transmission parameter estimates from small-scale experiments might be extrapolated to the field situation.

  10. Application of random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis to differentiate strains of Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, A W; Usera, M A; Barrett, T J; Goldsby, R A

    1996-01-01

    A random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting method has been developed to differentiate Salmonella enteritidis isolates. A total of 65 arbitrary primers were screened with S. enteritidis isolates of different phage types. This allowed selection of a panel of primers capable of detecting DNA polymorphisms among S. enteritidis isolates. This panel was used to examine a panel of 29 isolates of S. enteritidis which had been previously characterized by other subtyping methods, including phage typing (PT) (n = 7), ribotyping (RT) (n = 13), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Applied collectively, these three methods resolved the collection into 20 different subtypes. However, by the RAPD fingerprinting method alone, 14 RAPD subtypes were revealed. Eight isolates of S. enteritidis phage type 8 that failed to be discriminated by other typing methods (PT, RT, and PFGE) were resolved into three different subtypes by RAPD analysis. In contrast, isolates that were derived from the same sources were not differentiated by any of the subtyping methods employed, including PT, RT, PFGE, and RAPD analysis. This RAPD approach to S. enteritidis subtyping provided more discriminatory power than did any of several other subtyping methods applied individually. Once the challenging step of primer identification was accomplished, determinations of the appropriate concentrations of arbitrary primer, DNA template, and MG2+ ion were also necessary for optimal discriminatory power. The bacterial DNA used in this RAPD protocol was obtained by boiling the bacterial sample. This simple procedure yielded DNA that produced fingerprint patterns as consistent as those obtained from phenol-chloroform-extracted DNA. Clearly, when appropriately constituted primer sets are identified and employed, RAPD analysis provides a simple, rapid, and powerful subtyping method for S. enteritidis. PMID:8815099

  11. Genomic Comparison of the Closely-Related Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum.

    PubMed

    Matthews, T David; Schmieder, Robert; Silva, Genivaldo G Z; Busch, Julia; Cassman, Noriko; Dutilh, Bas E; Green, Dawn; Matlock, Brian; Heffernan, Brian; Olsen, Gary J; Farris Hanna, Leigh; Schifferli, Dieter M; Maloy, Stanley; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Edwards, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain LK5 and Dublin strain SARB12 and compared these genomes to the publicly available Enteritidis P125109, Dublin CT 02021853 and Dublin SD3246 genome sequences. We also compared the publicly available Gallinarum genome sequences from biotype Gallinarum 287/91 and Pullorum RKS5078. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, and differences in prophage and pseudogene content between strains belonging to the same serovar. Through our analysis we also identified several prophage cargo genes and pseudogenes that affect virulence and may contribute to a host-specific, systemic lifestyle. These results strongly argue that the Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum serovars of Salmonella enterica evolve by acquiring new genes through horizontal gene transfer, followed by the formation of pseudogenes. The loss of genes necessary for a gastrointestinal lifestyle ultimately leads to a systemic lifestyle and niche exclusion in the host-specific serovars.

  12. Genomic Comparison of the Closely-Related Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, T. David; Schmieder, Robert; Silva, Genivaldo G. Z.; Busch, Julia; Cassman, Noriko; Dutilh, Bas E.; Green, Dawn; Matlock, Brian; Heffernan, Brian; Olsen, Gary J.; Farris Hanna, Leigh; Schifferli, Dieter M.; Maloy, Stanley; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A.; Edwards, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain LK5 and Dublin strain SARB12 and compared these genomes to the publicly available Enteritidis P125109, Dublin CT 02021853 and Dublin SD3246 genome sequences. We also compared the publicly available Gallinarum genome sequences from biotype Gallinarum 287/91 and Pullorum RKS5078. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, and differences in prophage and pseudogene content between strains belonging to the same serovar. Through our analysis we also identified several prophage cargo genes and pseudogenes that affect virulence and may contribute to a host-specific, systemic lifestyle. These results strongly argue that the Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum serovars of Salmonella enterica evolve by acquiring new genes through horizontal gene transfer, followed by the formation of pseudogenes. The loss of genes necessary for a gastrointestinal lifestyle ultimately leads to a systemic lifestyle and niche exclusion in the host-specific serovars. PMID:26039056

  13. Genomic comparison of the closely-related Salmonella enterica serovars enteritidis, dublin and gallinarum

    DOE PAGES

    Matthews, T. David; Schmieder, Robert; Silva, Genivaldo G. Z.; Busch, Julia; Cassman, Noriko; Dutilh, Bas E.; Green, Dawn; Matlock, Brian; Heffernan, Brian; Olsen, Gary J.; et al

    2015-06-03

    The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain LK5 and Dublin strain SARB12 and compared these genomes to the publicly available Enteritidis P125109, Dublin CT 02021853 and Dublin SD3246 genome sequences. We also compared the publicly available Gallinarum genome sequences from biotype Gallinarum 287/91 and Pullorum RKS5078. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, and differences in prophage and pseudogene content betweenmore » strains belonging to the same serovar. Through our analysis we also identified several prophage cargo genes and pseudogenes that affect virulence and may contribute to a host-specific, systemic lifestyle. These results strongly argue that the Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum serovars of Salmonella enterica evolve by acquiring new genes through horizontal gene transfer, followed by the formation of pseudogenes. The loss of genes necessary for a gastrointestinal lifestyle ultimately leads to a systemic lifestyle and niche exclusion in the host-specific serovars.« less

  14. The impact of Salmonella Enteritidis on lipid accumulation in chicken hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chia-Lan; Fan, Yang-Chi; Wang, Chinling; Tsai, Hsiang-Jung; Chou, Chung-Hsi

    2016-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) is a public health concern and infected chickens serve as a reservoir that potentially transmits to humans through food. Although SE seldom causes systemic disease in chickens, virulent SE strains can colonize in intestines and lead a persistent infection of the liver. The liver is the primary organ for lipid metabolism in chickens and the site for production and assembly of main components in yolk. We performed a time-course experiment using LMH-2A cells that were infected with SE and co-incubated with β-oestradiol to evaluate if SE infection affected lipid metabolism and subsequently changed lipoprotein formation for egg yolk. The results indicated that lipid accumulation significantly increased in infected LMH-2A cells while the viability of these cells was only slightly decreased. The mRNA expressions of lipid transportation and most lipogenetic genes including sterol regulatory element binding protein 1, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty-acid synthase, long-chain-fatty-acid-CoA ligase 1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, and very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDLs) II were significantly up-regulated while the expression of lipogenetic-related stearoyl-CoA denaturase 1 was down-regulated. Moreover, decline in lipid transportation of hepatocytes was evidenced by the down-regulation of oestrogen receptor α which promotes VLDLy formation, an increase of intra-cellular accumulation of Apoprotein B (ApoB) protein, and a decrease of cellular excretion of VLDL protein. Conclusively, SE infection could elevate lipid synthesis and reduce lipid transportation in the chicken hepatocytes. These changes may lead excessive lipid accumulation in liver and slower lipoprotein deposition in yolk.

  15. Molecular epidemiology of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 1b and 6a isolates in Portugal.

    PubMed Central

    Soares, A. R.; Machado, J.

    2003-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is an important serovar comprising 76 % of Salmonella isolates in Portugal in 2001. For better understand the epidemiology of salmonellosis, a total of 47 isolates of S. Enteritidis phage type (PT) 1b and 6a were analysed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and genomic DNA was subjected to macro restriction with XbaI. For PT 1b isolates, only three different patterns were observed, and PT6a showed a total of 10 digestion patterns. Curiously, the main pattern among PT1b isolates seams quite similar to main pattern of PT6a isolates, but when the two patterns were analysed with Bionumerics, we observed that they exhibited some differences. It was concluded that, in 2001, there was one predominant pattern for PT1b and PT6a and, possibly, we were in presence of clonal strains that exists all over the country. PMID:12948358

  16. An allelotyping PCR for identifying Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Hadar, Heidelberg, and Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Maurer, John J; Lee, Margie D; Cheng, Ying; Pedroso, Adriana

    2011-07-22

    Current commercial PCRs tests for identifying Salmonella target genes unique to this genus. However, there are two species, six subspecies, and over 2,500 different Salmonella serovars, and not all are equal in their significance to public health. For example, finding S. enterica subspecies IIIa Arizona on a table egg layer farm is insignificant compared to the isolation of S. enterica subspecies I serovar Enteritidis, the leading cause of salmonellosis linked to the consumption of table eggs. Serovars are identified based on antigenic differences in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)(O antigen) and flagellin (H1 and H2 antigens). These antigenic differences are the outward appearance of the diversity of genes and gene alleles associated with this phenotype. We have developed an allelotyping, multiplex PCR that keys on genetic differences between four major S. enterica subspecies I serovars found in poultry and associated with significant human disease in the US. The PCR primer pairs were targeted to key genes or sequences unique to a specific Salmonella serovar and designed to produce an amplicon with size specific for that gene or allele. Salmonella serovar is assigned to an isolate based on the combination of PCR test results for specific LPS and flagellin gene alleles. The multiplex PCRs described in this article are specific for the detection of S. enterica subspecies I serovars Enteritidis, Hadar, Heidelberg, and Typhimurium. Here we demonstrate how to use the multiplex PCRs to identify serovar for a Salmonella isolate.

  17. The Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 13 contributes to pathogenesis in streptomycin pre-treated mice but not in day-old chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a human and animal pathogen that causes gastroenteritis characterized by inflammatory diarrhea and occasionally an invasive systemic infection. Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs) are horizontally acquired genomic segments known to contribute to Salmone...

  18. Coconut and Salmonella Infection

    PubMed Central

    Schaffner, Carl P.; Mosbach, Klaus; Bibit, Venuso C.; Watson, Colin H.

    1967-01-01

    Raw, unprocessed coconut supports the growth of salmonellae as well as that of other enteric bacteria, salmonellae being particularly resistant to subsequent desiccation. Original contamination is not due to carriers or to polluted water supplies, but to contact with bacteria-containing soils followed by dispersion via infected coconut milk and shells. Pasteurization of raw coconut meat in a water bath at 80 C for 8 to 10 min effectively killed such bacteria, did not injure the product, and provided a prophylactic method now widely used by the coconut industry. PMID:5340650

  19. Use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to characterize the heterogeneity and clonality of Salmonella serotype Enteritidis, Typhimurium and Infantis isolates obtained from whole liquid eggs.

    PubMed

    Rivoal, Katell; Protais, Jocelyne; Quéguiner, Stéphane; Boscher, Evelyne; Chidaine, Bérengère; Rose, Valérie; Gautier, Michel; Baron, Florence; Grosset, Noël; Ermel, Gwennola; Salvat, Gilles

    2009-02-15

    Salmonella is a well-documented pathogen known to occur in a wide range of foods, especially poultry products. The most frequently reported food-sources of human infection are eggs and egg products. In this study, in order to describe Salmonella contamination of egg products, 144 liquid egg samples were collected from 3 different egg-breaking plants during the 3 sampling periods. Salmonella detection was performed on raw samples stored at 2 degrees C for 2 days (D+2) and on pasteurised samples stored at 2 degrees C at D+2 and at shelf-life date. Salmonella was detected in 130 of the 144 raw egg samples collected and in 11 of the 288 pasteurised egg samples analysed. 740 Salmonella isolates were collected and serotyped: 14 serovars were demonstrated. A great diversity, particularly during summer, was noted. The dominant serovars were S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium and S. Infantis, mainly found in whole raw egg products. Typing of 325 isolates of S. Enteritidis, 54 isolates of S. Typhimurium and 58 isolates of S. Infantis was carried out by macrorestriction of the genomic DNA with XbaI and SpeI enzymes followed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The Salmonella Enteritidis isolates could be grouped into 3 clusters. Cluster 1 was predominant at all 3 egg-breaking companies during the different sampling periods. This cluster seemed to be adapted to the egg-breaking plants. Cluster 2 was linked to plant 1 and cluster 3 to plant 3. Two main clusters of Salmonella Typhimurium were demonstrated. Cluster A was mainly found at plant 2 during autumn. Plant 3 was contaminated by all the Salmonella Typhimurium genotypes but in a more sporadic manner during the three seasons studied. Plant 1 seemed to be less contaminated by Salmonella Typhimurium than the others. Three clusters and 2 genotypes of Salmonella Infantis were shown. The main cluster, cluster alpha, consisted of 75% of the S. Infantis isolates and was mainly found during summer at plants 1 and 3. Plant 2

  20. Validation of Single and Pooled Manure Drag Swabs for the Detection of Salmonella Serovar Enteritidis in Commercial Poultry Houses.

    PubMed

    Kinde, Hailu; Goodluck, Helen A; Pitesky, Maurice; Friend, Tom D; Campbell, James A; Hill, Ashley E

    2015-12-01

    Single swabs (cultured individually) are currently used in the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) official method for sampling the environment of commercial laying hens for the detection of Salmonella enterica ssp. serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis). The FDA has also granted provisional acceptance of the National Poultry Improvement Plan's (NPIP) Salmonella isolation and identification methodology for samples taken from table-egg layer flock environments. The NPIP method, as with the FDA method, requires single-swab culturing for the environmental sampling of laying houses for Salmonella Enteritidis. The FDA culture protocol requires a multistep culture enrichment broth, and it is more labor intensive than the NPIP culture protocol, which requires a single enrichment broth. The main objective of this study was to compare the FDA single-swab culturing protocol with that of the NPIP culturing protocol but using a four-swab pool scheme. Single and multi-laboratory testing of replicate manure drag swab sets (n  =  525 and 672, respectively) collected from a Salmonella Enteritidis-free commercial poultry flock was performed by artificially contaminating swabs with either Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 4, 8, or 13a at one of two inoculation levels: low, x¯  = 2.5 CFU (range 2.5-2.7), or medium, x¯  = 10.0 CFU (range 7.5-12). For each replicate, a single swab (inoculated), sets of two swabs (one inoculated and one uninoculated), and sets of four swabs (one inoculated and three uninoculated), testing was conducted using the FDA or NPIP culture method. For swabs inoculated with phage type 8, the NPIP method was more efficient (P < 0.05) for all swab sets at both inoculation levels than the reference method. The single swabs in the NPIP method were significantly (P < 0.05) better than four-pool swabs in detecting Salmonella Enteritidis at the lower inoculation level. In the collaborative study (n  =  13 labs) using Salmonella Enteritidis phage

  1. Validation of Single and Pooled Manure Drag Swabs for the Detection of Salmonella Serovar Enteritidis in Commercial Poultry Houses.

    PubMed

    Kinde, Hailu; Goodluck, Helen A; Pitesky, Maurice; Friend, Tom D; Campbell, James A; Hill, Ashley E

    2015-12-01

    Single swabs (cultured individually) are currently used in the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) official method for sampling the environment of commercial laying hens for the detection of Salmonella enterica ssp. serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis). The FDA has also granted provisional acceptance of the National Poultry Improvement Plan's (NPIP) Salmonella isolation and identification methodology for samples taken from table-egg layer flock environments. The NPIP method, as with the FDA method, requires single-swab culturing for the environmental sampling of laying houses for Salmonella Enteritidis. The FDA culture protocol requires a multistep culture enrichment broth, and it is more labor intensive than the NPIP culture protocol, which requires a single enrichment broth. The main objective of this study was to compare the FDA single-swab culturing protocol with that of the NPIP culturing protocol but using a four-swab pool scheme. Single and multi-laboratory testing of replicate manure drag swab sets (n  =  525 and 672, respectively) collected from a Salmonella Enteritidis-free commercial poultry flock was performed by artificially contaminating swabs with either Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 4, 8, or 13a at one of two inoculation levels: low, x¯  = 2.5 CFU (range 2.5-2.7), or medium, x¯  = 10.0 CFU (range 7.5-12). For each replicate, a single swab (inoculated), sets of two swabs (one inoculated and one uninoculated), and sets of four swabs (one inoculated and three uninoculated), testing was conducted using the FDA or NPIP culture method. For swabs inoculated with phage type 8, the NPIP method was more efficient (P < 0.05) for all swab sets at both inoculation levels than the reference method. The single swabs in the NPIP method were significantly (P < 0.05) better than four-pool swabs in detecting Salmonella Enteritidis at the lower inoculation level. In the collaborative study (n  =  13 labs) using Salmonella Enteritidis phage

  2. Optical immunosensors for detection of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enteritidis from food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Arun K.; Geng, Tao; Lathrop, Amanda; Valadez, Angela; Morgan, Mark T.

    2004-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella are two major foodborne pathogens of significant concern. Two optical evanescent wave immunosensors were evaluated for detection: Antibody-coupled fiber-optic biosensor and a surface plasmon resonant (SPR) immunosensor. In the fiber-optic sensor, polyclonal antibodies for the test organisms were immobilized on polystyrene fiber wave -guides using streptavidin - biotin chemistry. Cyanine 5 -labeled monoclonal antibodies C11E9 (for L. monocytogenes) and SF-11 (for Salmonella Enteritidis) were used to generate a specific fluorescent signal. Signal acquisition was performed by launching a laser-light (635 nm) from an Analyte-2000. This immunosensor was able to detect 103 - 109 cfu/ml of L. monocytogenes or 106-109 cfu/ml of Salmonella Enteritidis and the assays were conducted at near real-time with results obtained within one hour of sampling. The assays were specific and showed signal even in the presence of other microorganisms such as E. coli, Enterococcus faecalis or Salmonella Typhimurium. In the SPR system, IAsys instrument (resonant mirror sensor) was used. Monoclonal antibody-C11E9 was directly immobilized onto a carboxylate cuvette. Whole Listeria cells at various concentrations did not yield any signal while surface protein extracts did. Crude protein extracts from L. monocytogenes and L. innocua had average binding responses of around 150 arc sec (0.25 ng/mm2), which was significantly different from L. grayi, L. ivanovii, or L. welshimeri with average responses of <48 arc sec. Both fiber-optic and SPR sensors show promise in near real-time detection of foodborne L. monocytogenes and Salmonella Enteritidis.

  3. Dietary β-galactomannans have beneficial effects on the intestinal morphology of chickens challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Brufau, M T; Martín-Venegas, R; Guerrero-Zamora, A M; Pérez-Vendrell, A M; Vilà, B; Brufau, J; Ferrer, R

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the leading causes of food-borne salmonellosis in humans. Poultry is the single largest reservoir, and the consumption of incorrectly processed chicken meat and egg products is the major source of infection. Since 2006, the use of antibiotics as growth promoters has been banned in the European Union, and the dietary inclusion of β-galactomannans (βGM) has become a promising strategy to control and prevent intestinal infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of various βGM-rich products on intestinal morphology in chickens challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis. To assess this effect, a total of 280 male Ross 308 chickens were studied (40 animals per treatment housed in 5 cages). There were 7 treatments, including controls: uninoculated birds fed the basal diet (negative control) and inoculated birds fed the basal diet (positive control) or the basal diet supplemented with Salmosan (1 g/kg), Duraió gum (1 g/kg), Cassia gum (1 g/kg), the cell walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (0.5 g/kg), or the antibiotic colistine (0.8 g/kg). The birds were fed these diets from the d 1 to 23, except the animals in the colistine group, which were fed the diet containing the antibiotic only from d 5 to 11. The inoculated animals were orally infected on d 7 with 10(8) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis. Bird performance per replicate was determined for the whole study period (23 d), and the distal ileum and cecal tonsil of 5 animals per treatment (1 animal per replicate) were observed at different magnification levels (scanning electron, light, and laser confocal microscopy). In the images corresponding to the treatments containing βGM we observed more mucus, an effect that can be associated with the observation of more goblet cells. Moreover, the images also show fewer M cells, which are characteristic of infected animals. Regarding the morphometric parameters, the animals that received Duraió and Cassia gums

  4. Dietary β-galactomannans have beneficial effects on the intestinal morphology of chickens challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Brufau, M T; Martín-Venegas, R; Guerrero-Zamora, A M; Pérez-Vendrell, A M; Vilà, B; Brufau, J; Ferrer, R

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the leading causes of food-borne salmonellosis in humans. Poultry is the single largest reservoir, and the consumption of incorrectly processed chicken meat and egg products is the major source of infection. Since 2006, the use of antibiotics as growth promoters has been banned in the European Union, and the dietary inclusion of β-galactomannans (βGM) has become a promising strategy to control and prevent intestinal infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of various βGM-rich products on intestinal morphology in chickens challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis. To assess this effect, a total of 280 male Ross 308 chickens were studied (40 animals per treatment housed in 5 cages). There were 7 treatments, including controls: uninoculated birds fed the basal diet (negative control) and inoculated birds fed the basal diet (positive control) or the basal diet supplemented with Salmosan (1 g/kg), Duraió gum (1 g/kg), Cassia gum (1 g/kg), the cell walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (0.5 g/kg), or the antibiotic colistine (0.8 g/kg). The birds were fed these diets from the d 1 to 23, except the animals in the colistine group, which were fed the diet containing the antibiotic only from d 5 to 11. The inoculated animals were orally infected on d 7 with 10(8) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis. Bird performance per replicate was determined for the whole study period (23 d), and the distal ileum and cecal tonsil of 5 animals per treatment (1 animal per replicate) were observed at different magnification levels (scanning electron, light, and laser confocal microscopy). In the images corresponding to the treatments containing βGM we observed more mucus, an effect that can be associated with the observation of more goblet cells. Moreover, the images also show fewer M cells, which are characteristic of infected animals. Regarding the morphometric parameters, the animals that received Duraió and Cassia gums

  5. Growth characteristics of Salmonella enteritidis in pasteurized and unpasteurized liquid egg products.

    PubMed

    Sakha, Mohammad Zaher; Fujikawa, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Growth characteristics of a four-strain cocktail of Salmonella Enteritidis in commercial products of pasteurized and unpasteurized liquid whole egg were studied with a growth model developed by us. The unpasteurized product contained total bacteria at 10(7.3) CFU/g, but no Salmonella. When the products were spiked with Salmonella at various doses ranging from 10(1) to 10(4) CFU/g, growth curves of the pathogen at 24°C were well described with our model. Salmonella growth curves at constant temperatures from 8°C to 36°C in the two products were also well described with the model. The Baranyi model also described well most of the growth curves. The rate constants of growth for Salmonella at various constant temperatures were well described with the square root model. The maximum cell level, N(max) of Salmonella was constant at all temperatures in the pasteurized products, while a linear relationship between log N(max) and the temperature was observed in the unpasteurized ones. Salmonella growth in the unpasteurized product was highly suppressed in comparison with that in the pasteurized. This study also suggested the suitability of our model for application in the Salmonella growth analysis in pasteurized and unpasteurized liquid egg products.

  6. Role of StdA in adhesion of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 8 to host intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Salmonella is often implicated in foodborne outbreaks, and is a major public health concern in the United States and throughout the world. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) infection in humans is often associated with the consumption of contaminated poultry products. Adhesion to epithelial cells in the intestinal mucosa is a major pathogenic mechanism of Salmonella in poultry. Transposon mutagenesis identified stdA as a potential adhesion mutant of SE. Therefore, we hypothesize StdA plays a significant role in adhesion of SE to the intestinal mucosa of poultry. Methods and results To test our hypothesis, we created a mutant of SE in which stdA was deleted. Growth and motility were assayed along with the in vitro and in vivo adhesion ability of the ∆stdA when compared to the wild-type SE strain. Our data showed a significant decrease in motility in ∆stdA when compared to the wild-type and complemented strain. A decrease in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells as well as in the small intestine and cecum of poultry was observed in ∆stdA. Furthermore, the lack of adhesion correlated to a defect in invasion as shown by a cell culture model using intestinal epithelial cells and bacterial recovery from the livers and spleens of chickens. Conclusions These studies suggest StdA is a major contributor to the adhesion of Salmonella to the intestinal mucosa of poultry. PMID:24367906

  7. Reduction of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis on the surface of raw shelled almonds by exposure to steam.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Young; Oh, Se-wook; Chung, Hyun-Jung; Reyes-De-Corcuera, Jose I; Powers, Joseph R; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2006-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of steam treatment on the reduction of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis on the surface of raw almonds. Two cultivars, 'Nonpareil' and 'Mission', were studied. Salmonella Enteritidis was inoculated on the surface of raw almonds, which were then treated with steam (93 degrees C +/- 1 degrees C) for 5, 15, 25, 35, 45, 55, and 65 s. After steam treatment, samples were plated on xylose lysine desoxycholate (XLD) and overlay (OV) XLD as a selective and nonselective agar for Salmonella, respectively, to investigate the extent of sublethal injury in Salmonella. Steam treatment of raw almonds effectively reduced Salmonella Enteritidis, and the effect was pronounced with increasing treatment time. After 65 s of steam treatment, reductions in Salmonella Enteritidis populations were 5.7 log and 5.8 log for 'Nonpareil' and 4.0 log and 4.1 log for 'Mission' when enumerated on XLD and OV XLD, respectively. There was no significant difference in population estimates determined with XLD and OV XLD over time (P > 0.05). The effect of the steam treatment was significantly different between two almond cultivars. Salmonella inoculated onto 'Mission' was more resistant to the steam treatment than that on 'Nonpareil', indicating that varietal differences must be considered in the application of steam for the disinfection of raw almonds. The present investigation revealed the potential usefulness of steam treatments for the control of pathogens in raw almonds.

  8. Antimicrobial activity of basil (Ocimum basilicum) oil against Salmonella enteritidis in vitro and in food.

    PubMed

    Rattanachaikunsopon, Pongsak; Phumkhachorn, Parichat

    2010-01-01

    Nine essential oils were examined for antimicrobial activity against reference and clinical strains of Salmonella Enteritidis. Based on the size of the inhibition zone and the minimal inhibitory concentration, basil oil had the strongest antimicrobial activity against all the tested bacteria, and S. Enteritidis SE3 was the most sensitive strain to all the tested oils. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the major constituents of the oil were linalool (64.35%), 1,8-cineole (12.28%), eugenol (3.21%), germacrene D (2.07%), alpha-terpineol (1.64%), and rho-cymene (1.03%). When applied in nham, a fermented pork sausage, experimentally inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE3 and stored at 4 degrees C, basil oil inhibited the bacterium in a dose-dependent fashion. Basil oil at a concentration of 50 ppm reduced the number of bacteria in the food from 5 to 2log cfu/g after storage for 3 d. An unmeasurable level of the bacterium in the food was observed at days 2 and 3 of storage when 100 and 150 ppm of basil oil was used, respectively. Sensory evaluation suggested that the addition of 100 but not of 150 ppm to nham would be acceptable to consumers. The results from this study confirm the potential use of basil oil as an antimicrobial agent to control S. Enteritidis in food.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of basil (Ocimum basilicum) oil against Salmonella enteritidis in vitro and in food.

    PubMed

    Rattanachaikunsopon, Pongsak; Phumkhachorn, Parichat

    2010-01-01

    Nine essential oils were examined for antimicrobial activity against reference and clinical strains of Salmonella Enteritidis. Based on the size of the inhibition zone and the minimal inhibitory concentration, basil oil had the strongest antimicrobial activity against all the tested bacteria, and S. Enteritidis SE3 was the most sensitive strain to all the tested oils. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the major constituents of the oil were linalool (64.35%), 1,8-cineole (12.28%), eugenol (3.21%), germacrene D (2.07%), alpha-terpineol (1.64%), and rho-cymene (1.03%). When applied in nham, a fermented pork sausage, experimentally inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE3 and stored at 4 degrees C, basil oil inhibited the bacterium in a dose-dependent fashion. Basil oil at a concentration of 50 ppm reduced the number of bacteria in the food from 5 to 2log cfu/g after storage for 3 d. An unmeasurable level of the bacterium in the food was observed at days 2 and 3 of storage when 100 and 150 ppm of basil oil was used, respectively. Sensory evaluation suggested that the addition of 100 but not of 150 ppm to nham would be acceptable to consumers. The results from this study confirm the potential use of basil oil as an antimicrobial agent to control S. Enteritidis in food. PMID:20530897

  10. Virulence and metabolic characteristics of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis strains with different sefD variants in hens.

    PubMed

    Morales, Cesar A; Guard, Jean; Sanchez-Ingunza, Roxana; Shah, Devendra H; Harrison, Mark

    2012-09-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of a few Salmonella enterica serotypes that has SEF14 fimbriae encoded by the sef operon, which consists of 4 cotranscribed genes, sefABCD, regulated by sefR. A parental strain was used to construct a sefD mutant and its complement, and all 3 strains were compared for gene expression, metabolic properties, and virulence characteristics in hens. Transcription of sefD by wild type was suppressed at 42°C and absent for the mutant under conditions where the complemented mutant had 10(3) times higher transcription. Growth of the complemented mutant was restricted in comparison to that of the mutant and wild type. Hens infected with the wild type and mutant showed decreased blood calcium and egg production, but infection with the complemented mutant did not. Thus, the absence of sefD correlated with increased metabolic capacity and enhanced virulence of the pathogen. These results suggest that any contribution that sefD makes to egg contamination is either unknown or would be limited to early transmission from the environment to the host. Absence of sefD, either through mutation or by suppression of transcription at the body temperature of the host, may contribute to the virulence of Salmonella enterica by facilitating growth on a wide range of metabolites.

  11. Whole-Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Phage Type 4, Isolated from a Brazilian Poultry Farm.

    PubMed

    Milanez, Guilherme Paier; Nascimento, Leandro Costa; Tirabassi, Adriane Holtz; Zuanaze, Marcelo; Rodrigues, Dália Prazeres; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães; Brocchi, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 4 (PT4) strain IOC4647/2004, isolated from a poultry farm in São Paulo state, was obtained with high-throughput Illumina sequencing platform, generating 4,173,826 paired-end reads with 251 bp. The assembly of 4,804,382 bp in 27 scaffolds shows strong similarity to other S Enteritidis strains. PMID:27174265

  12. Biochemically Aberrant Salmonella enteritidis ser. newington from Human Sources in Connecticut

    PubMed Central

    Carrington, George O.; Cleveland, Porter; von Graevenitz, Alexander; Rupp, W. Dean

    1975-01-01

    Three isolates of a lactose-fermenting, xylose-negative variety of Salmonella enteritidis ser. newington, identical in biochemical and serological reactions and in the antibiogram, were recovered from three patients in different areas of Connecticut in January 1974. Hydrogen sulfide production was not visible in Salmonella-Shigella agar, in triple sugar iron agar, and in Kligler iron agar but was noticed in lysine iron agar and on XLD agar, among others. The amount of fermentable carbohydrates present was found to correlate with failure to show hydrogen sulfide production (pH effect). In contrast to lactose-fermenting Salmonella strains reported by other authors, we could not elicit a direct transfer of the lac+ character at frequencies above 10−6. An epidemiological follow-up remained unsuccessful. Recommendations for the recognition of similar strains are presented. PMID:239492

  13. Effect of controlled atmosphere storage, modified atmosphere packaging and gaseous ozone treatment on the survival of Salmonella Enteritidis on cherry tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Daş, Elif; Gürakan, G Candan; Bayindirli, Alev

    2006-08-01

    In recent years, outbreaks of infections associated with raw and minimally processed fruits and vegetables have been reported. The objective of this study was to analyse the growth/survival of Salmonella Enteritidis at spot-inoculated or stem-injected cherry tomatoes during passive modified atmosphere packaging (MAP), controlled atmosphere (CA) and to compare the results with those of air storage at 7 and 22 degrees C. During MAP, the gas composition equilibrated to 6% O2/4% CO2. CO2 level was maintained as 5% through the term of CA storage at 7 and 22 degrees C. The results demonstrate that S. Enteritidis can survive and/or grow during the storage of tomatoes depending on the location site of the pathogen on fruit, suspension cell density and storage temperature. During MAP, CA and air storage, S. Enteritidis with initial population of 7.0 log10 cfu/tomato survived on tomato surfaces with an approximate decrease of 4.0-5.0 log10 cfu/tomato in population within the storage period; however, in the case of initial population of 3.0 log10 cfu/tomato, cells died completely on day 4 during MAP storage and on day 6 during both CA and air storage. The death rate of S. Enteritidis on the surfaces of tomatoes that were stored in MAP was faster than that of stored in air and in CA. Storage temperature was effective on the survival of S. Enteritidis for the samples stored at ambient atmosphere; cells died completely on day 6 at 7 degrees C and on day 8 at 22 degrees C. Stem scars provided protective environments for Salmonella; an approximate increase of 1.0 log10 cfu/tomato in stem-scar population was observed during MAP, CA and air storage at 22 degrees C within the period of 20 days. Cells survived with no significant change in number at 7 degrees C. During the research, the effect of ozone treatment (5-30 mg/l ozone gas for 0-20 min) was also considered for surface sanitation before storage. Gaseous ozone treatment has bactericidal effect on S. Enteritidis, inoculated on

  14. Visualisation of morphological interaction of diamond and silver nanoparticles with Salmonella Enteritidis and Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Sawosz, Ewa; Chwalibog, André; Mitura, Katarzyna; Mitura, Stanisław; Szeliga, Jacek; Niemiec, Tomasz; Rupiewicz, Marlena; Grodzik, Marta; Sokołowska, Aleksandra

    2011-09-01

    Currently, medicine intensively searches for methods to transport drugs to a target (sick) point within the body. The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate morphological characteristics of the assembles of silver or diamond nanoparticles with Salmonella Enteritidis (G-) or Listeria monocytogenes (G+), to reveal possibilities of constructing nanoparticle-bacteria vehicles. Diamond nanoparticles (nano-D) were produced by the detonation method. Hydrocolloids of silver nanoparticles (nano-Ag) were produced by electric non-explosive patented method. Hydrocolloids of nanoparticles (200 microl) were added to bacteria suspension (200 microl) in the following order: nano-D + Salmonella E.; nano-D + Listeria monocytogenes; nano-Ag + Salmonella E; nano-Ag + Listeria monocytogenes. Samples were inspected by transmission electron microscopy. Visualisation of nanoparticles and bacteria interaction showed harmful effects of both nanoparticles on bacteria morphology. The most spectacular effect of nano-D were strong links between nano-D packages and the flagella of Salmonella E. Nano-Ag were closely attached to Listeria monocytogenes but not to Salmonella E. There was no evidence of entering nano-Ag inside Listeria monocytogenes but smaller particles were placed inside Salmonella E. The ability of nano-D to attach to the flagella and the ability of nano-Ag to penetrate inside bacteria cells can be utilized to design nano-bacteria vehicles, being carriers for active substances attached to nanoparticles. PMID:22097468

  15. Salmonella enterica Enteritidis biofilm formation and viability on regular and triclosan-impregnated bench cover materials.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Diana; Teixeira, Pilar; Oliveira, Rosário; Azeredo, Joana

    2011-01-01

    Contamination of food contact surfaces by microbes such as Salmonella is directly associated with substantial industry costs and severe foodborne disease outbreaks. Several approaches have been developed to control microbial attachment; one approach is the development of food contact materials incorporating antimicrobial compounds. In the present study, Salmonella enterica Enteritidis adhesion and biofilm formation on regular and triclosan-impregnated kitchen bench stones (silestones) were assessed, as was cellular viability within biofilms. Enumeration of adhered cells on granite, marble, stainless steel, and silestones revealed that all materials were prone to bacterial colonization (4 to 5 log CFU/cm(2)), and no significant effect of triclosan was found. Conversely, results concerning biofilm formation highlighted a possible bacteriostatic activity of triclosan; smaller amounts of Salmonella Enteritidis biofilms were formed on impregnated silestones, and significantly lower numbers of viable cells (1 × 10(5) to 1 × 10(6) CFU/cm(2)) were found in these biofilms than in those on the other materials (1 × 10(7) CFU/cm(2)). All surfaces tested failed to promote food safety, and careful utilization with appropriate sanitation of these surfaces is critical in food processing environments. Nevertheless, because of its bacteriostatic activity, triclosan incorporated into silestones confers some advantage for controlling microbial contamination.

  16. Growth in Egg Yolk Enhances Salmonella Enteritidis Colonization and Virulence in a Mouse Model of Human Colitis.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Matthew R; Wijetunge, Dona Saumya S; Bailey, Megan L; Gongati, Sudharsan R; Goodfield, Laura L; Hewage, Eranda Mangala K Kurundu; Kennett, Mary J; Fedorchuk, Christine; Ivanov, Yury V; Linder, Jessica E; Jayarao, Bhushan M; Kariyawasam, Subhashinie

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) is one of the most common causes of bacterial food-borne illnesses in the world. Despite the SE's ability to colonize and infect a wide-range of host, the most common source of infection continues to be the consumption of contaminated shell eggs and egg-based products. To date, the role of the source of SE infection has not been studied as it relates to SE pathogenesis and resulting disease. Using a streptomycin-treated mouse model of human colitis, this study examined the virulence of SE grown in egg yolk and Luria Bertani (LB) broth, and mouse feces collected from mice experimentally infected with SEE1 (SEE1 passed through mice). Primary observations revealed that the mice infected with SE grown in egg yolk displayed greater illness and disease markers than those infected with SE passed through mice or grown in LB broth. Furthermore, the SE grown in egg yolk achieved higher rates of colonization in the mouse intestines and extra-intestinal organs of infected mice than the SE from LB broth or mouse feces. Our results here indicate that the source of SE infection may contribute to the overall pathogenesis of SE in a second host. These results also suggest that reservoir-pathogen dynamics may be critical for SE's ability to establish colonization and priming for virulence potential. PMID:26939126

  17. Growth in Egg Yolk Enhances Salmonella Enteritidis Colonization and Virulence in a Mouse Model of Human Colitis.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Matthew R; Wijetunge, Dona Saumya S; Bailey, Megan L; Gongati, Sudharsan R; Goodfield, Laura L; Hewage, Eranda Mangala K Kurundu; Kennett, Mary J; Fedorchuk, Christine; Ivanov, Yury V; Linder, Jessica E; Jayarao, Bhushan M; Kariyawasam, Subhashinie

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) is one of the most common causes of bacterial food-borne illnesses in the world. Despite the SE's ability to colonize and infect a wide-range of host, the most common source of infection continues to be the consumption of contaminated shell eggs and egg-based products. To date, the role of the source of SE infection has not been studied as it relates to SE pathogenesis and resulting disease. Using a streptomycin-treated mouse model of human colitis, this study examined the virulence of SE grown in egg yolk and Luria Bertani (LB) broth, and mouse feces collected from mice experimentally infected with SEE1 (SEE1 passed through mice). Primary observations revealed that the mice infected with SE grown in egg yolk displayed greater illness and disease markers than those infected with SE passed through mice or grown in LB broth. Furthermore, the SE grown in egg yolk achieved higher rates of colonization in the mouse intestines and extra-intestinal organs of infected mice than the SE from LB broth or mouse feces. Our results here indicate that the source of SE infection may contribute to the overall pathogenesis of SE in a second host. These results also suggest that reservoir-pathogen dynamics may be critical for SE's ability to establish colonization and priming for virulence potential.

  18. Growth in Egg Yolk Enhances Salmonella Enteritidis Colonization and Virulence in a Mouse Model of Human Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Matthew R.; Wijetunge, Dona Saumya S.; Bailey, Megan L.; Gongati, Sudharsan R.; Goodfield, Laura L.; Hewage, Eranda Mangala K. Kurundu; Kennett, Mary J.; Fedorchuk, Christine; Ivanov, Yury V.; Linder, Jessica E.; Jayarao, Bhushan M.; Kariyawasam, Subhashinie

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) is one of the most common causes of bacterial food-borne illnesses in the world. Despite the SE’s ability to colonize and infect a wide-range of host, the most common source of infection continues to be the consumption of contaminated shell eggs and egg-based products. To date, the role of the source of SE infection has not been studied as it relates to SE pathogenesis and resulting disease. Using a streptomycin-treated mouse model of human colitis, this study examined the virulence of SE grown in egg yolk and Luria Bertani (LB) broth, and mouse feces collected from mice experimentally infected with SEE1 (SEE1 passed through mice). Primary observations revealed that the mice infected with SE grown in egg yolk displayed greater illness and disease markers than those infected with SE passed through mice or grown in LB broth. Furthermore, the SE grown in egg yolk achieved higher rates of colonization in the mouse intestines and extra-intestinal organs of infected mice than the SE from LB broth or mouse feces. Our results here indicate that the source of SE infection may contribute to the overall pathogenesis of SE in a second host. These results also suggest that reservoir-pathogen dynamics may be critical for SE’s ability to establish colonization and priming for virulence potential. PMID:26939126

  19. Characterization of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovars Indiana and Enteritidis from chickens in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Zhao, Hongyu; Sun, Jian; Liu, Yuqi; Zhou, Xuping; Beier, Ross C; Wu, Guojuan; Hou, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    A total of 310 Salmonella isolates were isolated from 6 broiler farms in Eastern China, serotyped according to the Kauffmann-White classification. All isolates were examined for susceptibility to 17 commonly used antimicrobial agents, representative isolates were examined for resistance genes and class I integrons using PCR technology. Clonality was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). There were two serotypes detected in the 310 Salmonella strains, which included 133 Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana isolates and 177 Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis isolates. Antimicrobial sensitivity results showed that the isolates were generally resistant to sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin, tetracycline, doxycycline and trimethoprim, and 95% of the isolates sensitive to amikacin and polymyxin. Among all Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana isolates, 108 (81.2%) possessed the blaTEM, floR, tetA, strA and aac (6')-Ib-cr resistance genes. The detected carriage rate of class 1 integrons was 66.5% (206/310), with 6 strains carrying gene integron cassette dfr17-aadA5. The increasing frequency of multidrug resistance rate in Salmonella was associated with increasing prevalence of int1 genes (rs = 0.938, P = 0.00039). The int1, blaTEM, floR, tetA, strA and aac (6')-Ib-cr positive Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana isolates showed five major patterns as determined by PFGE. Most isolates exhibited the common PFGE patterns found from the chicken farms, suggesting that many multidrug-resistant isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana prevailed in these sources. Some isolates with similar antimicrobial resistance patterns represented a variety of Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana genotypes, and were derived from a different clone. PMID:24788434

  20. Development of a biosafety enhanced and immunogenic Salmonella enteritidis ghost using an antibiotic resistance gene free plasmid carrying a bacteriophage lysis system.

    PubMed

    Jawale, Chetan V; Lee, John Hwa

    2013-01-01

    In the development of genetically inactivated bacterial vaccines, plasmid retention often requires the antibiotic resistance gene markers, the presence of which can cause the potential biosafety hazards such as the horizontal spread of resistance genes. The new lysis plasmid was constructed by utilizing the approach of balanced-lethal systems based on auxotrophic gene Aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (asd). The PhiX174 lysis gene E and λPR37-cI857 temperature-sensitive regulatory system was cloned in the asd gene positive plasmid and this novel approach allowed the production of antibiotic resistance marker free Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) ghost. The immunogenic potential of the biosafety enhanced antibiotic resistance gene free S. Enteritidis ghost was evaluated in chickens by employing the prime-boost vaccination strategy using a combination of oral and intramuscular routes. A total of 75 two-week-old chickens were equally divided into five groups: group A (non-immunized control), group B (intramuscularly primed and boosted), group C (primed intramuscularly and boosted orally), group D (primed and boosted orally), and group E (primed orally and boosted intramuscularly). Chickens from all immunized groups demonstrated significant increases in plasma IgG, intestinal secretory IgA levels, and antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferative response. After a virulent S. Enteritidis challenge, all immunized groups showed fewer gross lesions and decreased bacterial recovery from organs in comparison with the non-immunized control group. Among the immunized chickens, groups B and D chickens showed optimized protection, indicating that the prime-booster immunization with the ghost via intramuscular or oral route is efficient. Taken together, our results demonstrate that an antibiotic resistance gene free lysis plasmid was successfully constructed and utilized for production of safety enhanced S. Enteritidis ghost, which can be used as a safe and effective

  1. Study of Salmonella Typhimurium Infection in Laying Hens.

    PubMed

    Pande, Vivek V; Devon, Rebecca L; Sharma, Pardeep; McWhorter, Andrea R; Chousalkar, Kapil K

    2016-01-01

    Members of Salmonella enterica are frequently involved in egg and egg product related human food poisoning outbreaks worldwide. In Australia, Salmonella Typhimurium is frequently involved in egg and egg product related foodborne illness and Salmonella Mbandaka has also been found to be a contaminant of the layer farm environment. The ability possessed by Salmonella Enteritidis to colonize reproductive organs and contaminate developing eggs has been well-described. However, there are few studies investigating this ability for Salmonella Typhimurium. The hypothesis of this study was that the Salmonella Typhimurium can colonize the gut for a prolonged period of time and that horizontal infection through feces is the main route of egg contamination. At 14 weeks of age hens were orally infected with either S. Typhimurium PT 9 or S. Typhimurium PT 9 and Salmonella Mbandaka. Salmonella shedding in feces and eggs was monitored for 15 weeks post-infection. Egg shell surface and internal contents of eggs laid by infected hens were cultured independently for detection of Salmonella spp. The mean Salmonella load in feces ranged from 1.54 to 63.35 and 0.31 to 98.38 most probable number/g (MPN/g) in the S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka group, respectively. No correlation was found between mean fecal Salmonella load and frequency of egg shell contamination. Egg shell contamination was higher in S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka infected group (7.2% S. Typhimurium, 14.1% S. Mbandaka) compared to birds infected with S. Typhimurium (5.66%) however, co-infection had no significant impact on egg contamination by S. Typhimurium. Throughout the study Salmonella was not recovered from internal contents of eggs laid by hens. Salmonella was isolated from different segments of oviduct of hens from both the groups, however pathology was not observed on microscopic examination. This study investigated Salmonella shedding for up to 15 weeks p.i which is a longer period of time

  2. Study of Salmonella Typhimurium Infection in Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Vivek V.; Devon, Rebecca L.; Sharma, Pardeep; McWhorter, Andrea R.; Chousalkar, Kapil K.

    2016-01-01

    Members of Salmonella enterica are frequently involved in egg and egg product related human food poisoning outbreaks worldwide. In Australia, Salmonella Typhimurium is frequently involved in egg and egg product related foodborne illness and Salmonella Mbandaka has also been found to be a contaminant of the layer farm environment. The ability possessed by Salmonella Enteritidis to colonize reproductive organs and contaminate developing eggs has been well-described. However, there are few studies investigating this ability for Salmonella Typhimurium. The hypothesis of this study was that the Salmonella Typhimurium can colonize the gut for a prolonged period of time and that horizontal infection through feces is the main route of egg contamination. At 14 weeks of age hens were orally infected with either S. Typhimurium PT 9 or S. Typhimurium PT 9 and Salmonella Mbandaka. Salmonella shedding in feces and eggs was monitored for 15 weeks post-infection. Egg shell surface and internal contents of eggs laid by infected hens were cultured independently for detection of Salmonella spp. The mean Salmonella load in feces ranged from 1.54 to 63.35 and 0.31 to 98.38 most probable number/g (MPN/g) in the S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka group, respectively. No correlation was found between mean fecal Salmonella load and frequency of egg shell contamination. Egg shell contamination was higher in S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka infected group (7.2% S. Typhimurium, 14.1% S. Mbandaka) compared to birds infected with S. Typhimurium (5.66%) however, co-infection had no significant impact on egg contamination by S. Typhimurium. Throughout the study Salmonella was not recovered from internal contents of eggs laid by hens. Salmonella was isolated from different segments of oviduct of hens from both the groups, however pathology was not observed on microscopic examination. This study investigated Salmonella shedding for up to 15 weeks p.i which is a longer period of time

  3. Genetic and Phenotypic Characterization of a Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Emerging Strain with Superior Intra-macrophage Replication Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Shomer, Inna; Avisar, Alon; Desai, Prerak; Azriel, Shalhevet; Smollan, Gill; Belausov, Natasha; Keller, Nathan; Glikman, Daniel; Maor, Yasmin; Peretz, Avi; McClelland, Michael; Rahav, Galia; Gal-Mor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is one of the ubiquitous Salmonella serovars worldwide and a major cause of food-born outbreaks, which are often associated with poultry and poultry derivatives. Here we report a nation-wide S. Enteritidis clonal outbreak that occurred in Israel during the last third of 2015. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis and whole genome sequencing identified genetically related strains that were circulating in Israel as early as 2008. Global comparison linked this outbreak strain to several clinical and marine environmental isolates that were previously isolated in California and Canada, indicating that similar strains are prevalent outside of Israel. Phenotypic comparison between the 2015 outbreak strain and other clinical and reference S. Enteritidis strains showed only limited intra-serovar phenotypic variation in growth in rich medium, invasion into Caco-2 cells, uptake by J774.1A macrophages, and host cell cytotoxicity. In contrast, significant phenotypic variation was shown among different S. Enteritidis isolates when biofilm-formation, motility, invasion into HeLa cells and uptake by THP-1 human macrophages were studied. Interestingly, the 2015 outbreak clone was found to possess superior intra-macrophage replication ability within both murine and human macrophages in comparison to the other S. Enteritidis strains studied. This phenotype is likely to play a role in the virulence and host-pathogen interactions of this emerging clone. PMID:27695450

  4. Genetic and Phenotypic Characterization of a Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Emerging Strain with Superior Intra-macrophage Replication Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Shomer, Inna; Avisar, Alon; Desai, Prerak; Azriel, Shalhevet; Smollan, Gill; Belausov, Natasha; Keller, Nathan; Glikman, Daniel; Maor, Yasmin; Peretz, Avi; McClelland, Michael; Rahav, Galia; Gal-Mor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is one of the ubiquitous Salmonella serovars worldwide and a major cause of food-born outbreaks, which are often associated with poultry and poultry derivatives. Here we report a nation-wide S. Enteritidis clonal outbreak that occurred in Israel during the last third of 2015. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis and whole genome sequencing identified genetically related strains that were circulating in Israel as early as 2008. Global comparison linked this outbreak strain to several clinical and marine environmental isolates that were previously isolated in California and Canada, indicating that similar strains are prevalent outside of Israel. Phenotypic comparison between the 2015 outbreak strain and other clinical and reference S. Enteritidis strains showed only limited intra-serovar phenotypic variation in growth in rich medium, invasion into Caco-2 cells, uptake by J774.1A macrophages, and host cell cytotoxicity. In contrast, significant phenotypic variation was shown among different S. Enteritidis isolates when biofilm-formation, motility, invasion into HeLa cells and uptake by THP-1 human macrophages were studied. Interestingly, the 2015 outbreak clone was found to possess superior intra-macrophage replication ability within both murine and human macrophages in comparison to the other S. Enteritidis strains studied. This phenotype is likely to play a role in the virulence and host-pathogen interactions of this emerging clone.

  5. Egg white versus Salmonella Enteritidis! A harsh medium meets a resilient pathogen.

    PubMed

    Baron, Florence; Nau, Françoise; Guérin-Dubiard, Catherine; Bonnassie, Sylvie; Gautier, Michel; Andrews, Simon C; Jan, Sophie

    2016-02-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is the prevalent egg-product-related food-borne pathogen. The egg-contamination capacity of S. Enteritidis includes its exceptional survival capability within the harsh conditions provided by egg white. Egg white proteins, such as lysozyme and ovotransferrin, are well known to play important roles in defence against bacterial invaders. Indeed, several additional minor proteins and peptides have recently been found to play known or potential roles in protection against bacterial contamination. However, although such antibacterial proteins are well studied, little is known about their efficacy under the environmental conditions prevalent in egg white. Thus, the influence of factors such as temperature, alkalinity, nutrient restriction, viscosity and cooperative interactions on the activities of antibacterial proteins in egg white remains unclear. This review critically assesses the available evidence on the antimicrobial components of egg white. In addition, mechanisms employed by S. Enteritidis to resist egg white exposure are also considered along with various genetic studies that have shed light upon egg white resistance systems. We also consider how multiple, antibacterial proteins operate in association with specific environmental factors within egg white to generate a lethal protective cocktail that preserves sterility. PMID:26678134

  6. Comparative evaluation of Salmonella Enteritidis ghost vaccines with a commercial vaccine for protection against internal egg contamination with Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Jawale, Chetan V; Lee, John Hwa

    2014-10-14

    The study was conducted for the comparative evaluation of the vaccine potential of Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis, SE) ghost, SE ghost carrying Escherichia coli heat labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) protein, and a commercial vaccine. Group A chickens were used as a non-vaccinated control, group B chickens were immunized with the ghost carrying LTB protein, group C chickens were immunized with the ghost and, group D chickens were immunized with a commercial vaccine. Group D chickens showed the swelling at the injection site, while no adverse reactions were observed at injection sites of the group B and C chickens. Chickens from the immunized groups B, C, and D demonstrated significant increases in plasma IgG, intestinal secretory IgA levels, and antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferative responses. After challenge with a virulent SE strain via intravenous route, groups B, C, and D showed significantly higher egg production and lower internal egg contamination and lower recovery of the challenge strain from internal organs compared to non-immunized-challenged control group A. In conclusion, these data indicate that immunization of chickens with the ghost and ghost carrying LTB is safe, without causing any adverse reaction, and is effective as the commercial vaccine in terms of reduction in internal egg contamination and internal organ colonization of Salmonella.

  7. Attempts to establish phage typing as an epidemiological marker for Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Alonso, R; Echeita, A; Espinosa, P; Usera, M A

    1987-01-01

    The notable increase in the number of Salmonella enteritidis strains seen in Spain in recent years (from 27.10% in 1980 to 66.36% in 1985) makes it necessary to find an additional epidemiological marker for this serotype. Phage typing was considered because of its discriminatory capacity toward other Salmonella serotypes. Wild and lysogenic bacteriophages were sought for a set of autochthonous bacteriophages. Our set consisted of 6 bacteriophages, 5 wild and 1 lysogenic. When tested on 1,500 selected strains, they produced 9 different phage types. The most abundant phage types were A (74.66%) and B (19.73%). The percentage of non-typable strains was low: only 1.4% from a total of 1,500 strains failed to produce lysis with our set. This reflects the high typability of the bacteriophage set proposed.

  8. Adhesion of Salmonella Enteritidis and Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel welds.

    PubMed

    Casarin, Letícia Sopeña; Brandelli, Adriano; de Oliveira Casarin, Fabrício; Soave, Paulo Azevedo; Wanke, Cesar Henrique; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar

    2014-11-17

    Pathogenic microorganisms are able to adhere on equipment surfaces, being possible to contaminate food during processing. Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes are important pathogens that can be transmitted by food, causing severe foodborne diseases. Most surfaces of food processing industry are made of stainless steel joined by welds. However currently, there are few studies evaluating the influence of welds in the microorganism's adhesion. Therefore the purpose of the present study was to investigate the adhesion of Salmonella Enteritidis and L. monocytogenes on surface of metal inert gas (MIG), and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, as well as to evaluate the cell and surface hydrophobicities. Results demonstrated that both bacteria adhered to the surface of welds and stainless steel at same levels. Despite this, bacteria and surfaces demonstrated different levels of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, results indicated that there was no correlation between adhesion to welds and stainless steel and the hydrophobicity. PMID:25261827

  9. Adhesion of Salmonella Enteritidis and Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel welds.

    PubMed

    Casarin, Letícia Sopeña; Brandelli, Adriano; de Oliveira Casarin, Fabrício; Soave, Paulo Azevedo; Wanke, Cesar Henrique; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar

    2014-11-17

    Pathogenic microorganisms are able to adhere on equipment surfaces, being possible to contaminate food during processing. Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes are important pathogens that can be transmitted by food, causing severe foodborne diseases. Most surfaces of food processing industry are made of stainless steel joined by welds. However currently, there are few studies evaluating the influence of welds in the microorganism's adhesion. Therefore the purpose of the present study was to investigate the adhesion of Salmonella Enteritidis and L. monocytogenes on surface of metal inert gas (MIG), and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, as well as to evaluate the cell and surface hydrophobicities. Results demonstrated that both bacteria adhered to the surface of welds and stainless steel at same levels. Despite this, bacteria and surfaces demonstrated different levels of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, results indicated that there was no correlation between adhesion to welds and stainless steel and the hydrophobicity.

  10. Persistence of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 4 in the environment and arthropod vectors on an empty free-range chicken farm.

    PubMed

    Davies, Robert H; Breslin, Mark

    2003-02-01

    The persistence of S. Enteritidis PT4 was studied on a free-range breeding chicken farm which had been depopulated following identification of the organism in breeding birds. The site was sampled periodically for 26 months after depopulation and the organism was found to persist in litter, dried faeces and feed, but not in dust within empty poultry houses, for the whole of that period. Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 was also found in soil samples after 8 months but not 13 months and in faeces from wild mice, foxes and cats but not wild birds or badgers. The organism was also found in adult and larval forms of ground beetles and centipedes. Addition of pullets to a contaminated pen or inclusion of contaminated litter, feed or beetles/larvae to feed did not result in acquisition of infection by birds. PMID:12558590

  11. Growth of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella Enteritidis during Preparation and Storage of Yogurt

    PubMed Central

    Cirone, K.; Huberman, Y.; Morsella, C.; Méndez, L.; Jorge, M.; Paolicchi, F.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the viability of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), Escherichia coli (E. coli), and Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) during preparation and refrigerated storage of yogurt. Three yogurts were prepared using pasteurized commercial milk. Each yogurt was artificially contaminated with (1) MAP, (2) E. coli + S. Enteritidis, and (3) MAP + E. coli + S. Enteritidis. Samples were taken during and after the fermentation process until day 20 after inoculation. MAP was not detected during their preparation and short-term storage but was recuperated after starting at 180 min after inoculation storage. Live bacterial counts of E. coli, and S. Enteritidis increased during the first 24 hours, followed by a slight decrease towards the end of the study. In this study it was shown how MAP, E. coli, and S. Enteritidis resisted the acidic conditions generated during the preparation of yogurt and low storage temperatures. This work contributes to current knowledge regarding survival of MAP, E. coli, and S. Enteritidis during preparation and refrigerated storage of yogurt and emphasizes the need to improve hygiene measures to ensure the absence of these pathogenic microorganisms in dairy products. PMID:24455399

  12. Clinical and veterinary isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis defective in lipopolysaccharide O-chain polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Guard-Petter, J.; Parker, C.T.; Asokan, K.; Carlson, R.W.

    1999-05-01

    Twelve human and chicken isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis belonging to phage types 4, 8, 13a, and 23 were characterized for variability in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) composition. Isolates were differentiated into two groups, i.e., those that lacked immunoreactive O-chain, termed rough isolates, and those that had immunoreactive O-chain, termed smooth isolates. Isolates within these groups could be further differentiated by LPS compositional differences as detected by gel electrophoresis and gas liquid chromatography of samples extracted with water, which yielded significantly more LPS in comparison to phenol-chloroform extraction. The rough isolates were of two types, the O-antigen synthesis mutants and the O-antigen polymerization (wzy) mutants. Smooth isolates were also of two types, one producing low-molecular-weight (LMW) LPS and the other producing high-molecular-weight (HMW) LPS. To determine the genetic basis for the O-chain variability of the smooth isolates, the authors analyzed the effects of a null mutation in the O-chain length determinant gene, wzz (cld) of serovar Typhimurium. This mutation results in a loss of HMW LPS; however, the LMW LPS of this mutant was longer and more glucosylated than that from clinical isolates of serovar Enteritidis. Cluster analysis of these data and of those from two previously characterized isogenic strains of serovar Enteritidis that had different virulence attributes indicated that glucosylation of HMW LPS (via oafR function) is variable and results in two types of HMW structures, one that is highly glucosylated and one that is minimally glucosylated. These results strongly indicate that naturally occurring variability in wzy, wzz, and oafR function can be used to subtype isolates of serovar Enteritidis during epidemiological investigations.

  13. Physiology, pathogenicity and immunogenicity of live, attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis mutants in chicks.

    PubMed

    Si, Wei; Wang, Xiumei; Liu, Huifang; Yu, Shenye; Li, Zhaoli; Chen, Liping; Zhang, Wanjiang; Liu, Siguo

    2015-01-01

    To construct a novel live, attenuated Salmonella vaccine, the lon, cpxR and cpdB genes were deleted from a wild-type Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis-6 (SM-6) strain using the phage λ Red homologous recombination system, resulting in SM-△CpxR, SM-△C/Lon and SM-△C/L/CpdB. The growth curves of strain SM-△C/Lon grew more rapidly than the other strains and had OD 600 values higher than the other strains starting at the 4 h time point. The growth curves of strain SM-△C/L/CpdB were relatively flat. The colonization time of SM-△C/L/CpdB is about 8-10 days. Deleting the lon/cpxR/cpdB (SM-6) genes resulted in an approximate 10(3)-fold attenuation in virulence assessed by the analysis of the LD50 of specific pathogen-free (SPF) chicks. This result indicated that the deletion of the lon, cpxR and cpdB genes induced significant virulence attenuation. The protective effects of SM-△C/L/CpdB vaccination in SPF chicks against 5 × 10(9) colony forming units (CFU) of S. Enteritidis were resulted from the induction of an effective immune response. These findings demonstrate the potential of mutant SM-△C/L/CpdB to be used as an effective vaccine.

  14. Dimethyl adenosine transferase (KsgA) deficiency in Salmonella Enteritidis confers susceptibility to high osmolarity and virulence attenuation in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    : Dimethyladenosine transferase (KsgA) performs diverse roles in bacteria including ribosomal maturation, DNA mismatch repair, and synthesis of KsgA is responsive to antibiotics and cold temperature. We previously showed that ksgA mutation in Salmonella Enteritidis results in impaired invasiveness i...

  15. Direct construction of predictive models for describing growth Salmonella enteritidis in liquid eggs – a one-step approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to develop a new approach using a one-step approach to directly construct predictive models for describing the growth of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in liquid egg white (LEW) and egg yolk (LEY). A five-strain cocktail of SE, induced to resist rifampicin at 100 mg/L, ...

  16. Continuing multiplication of Salmonella Enteritidis strains in egg yolk during refrigeration at 7.2° C

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The continuing attribution of human illness caused by Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) to the consumption of contaminated eggs has led to widespread implementation of risk reduction programs for commercial egg production. Prompt refrigeration of eggs to prevent bacterial multiplication to dangerously hig...

  17. Multiplication of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg yolks after inoculation outside, on, and inside vitelline membranes and storage at different temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prompt refrigeration to restrict bacterial growth is important for reducing egg-borne transmission of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE). The nutrient-rich yolk interior is a relatively infrequent location for initial SE deposition in eggs, but migration across the vitelline membrane can ...

  18. Discrimination Between Strains of Salmonella Enteritidis PT13 and PT13a by Comparative Genome Sequencing of the Virulence Plasmid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) is an important pathogen of poultry products and it appears to be increasing within broiler flocks. Subtyping of SE is commonly done by phage typing, plasmid profiling, genomic microarrays, pulsed field gel electrophoresis and other restriction-enzyme based fingerprinting...

  19. Antimicrobial Efficacy of Zinc Oxide Quantum Dots Against Listeria Monocytogenes, Salmonella Enteritidis and Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc oxide quantum dots (ZnO QDs) in a powder form, a ZnO-polystyrene (PS) film form and a polyvinylprolidone capped ZnO (ZnO-PVP) gel form were prepared and their antibacterial activities against foodborne pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Enteritidis and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in cul...

  20. Gene expression profiling in chicken heterophils with Salmonella enteritidis stimulation using a chicken 44 K Agilent microarray

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) is one of the most common food-borne pathogens that cause human salmonellosis and usually results from the consumption of contaminated poultry products. The mechanism of SE resistance in chickens remains largely unknown. Previously, heterophils isolated...

  1. Identification by PCR of Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica Serovars Associated with Invasive Infections among Febrile Patients in Mali

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Sharon M.; Diallo, Souleymane; Levy, Haim; Livio, Sofie; Sow, Samba O.; Tapia, Milagritos; Fields, Patricia I.; Mikoleit, Matthew; Tamboura, Boubou; Kotloff, Karen L.; Nataro, James P.; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2010-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa, non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) are emerging as a prominent cause of invasive disease (bacteremia and focal infections such as meningitis) in infants and young children. Importantly, including data from Mali, three serovars, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin, account for the majority of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from these patients. Methods We have extended a previously developed series of polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) based on O serogrouping and H typing to identify Salmonella Typhimurium and variants (mostly I 4,[5],12:i:-), Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin. We also designed primers to detect Salmonella Stanleyville, a serovar found in West Africa. Another PCR was used to differentiate diphasic Salmonella Typhimurium and monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium from other O serogroup B, H:i serovars. We used these PCRs to blind-test 327 Salmonella serogroup B and D isolates that were obtained from the blood cultures of febrile patients in Bamako, Mali. Principal Findings We have shown that when used in conjunction with our previously described O-serogrouping PCR, our PCRs are 100% sensitive and specific in identifying Salmonella Typhimurium and variants, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Dublin and Salmonella Stanleyville. When we attempted to differentiate 171 Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[ 5],12:i:1,2) strains from 52 monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[5],12:i:-) strains, we were able to correctly identify 170 of the Salmonella Typhimurium and 51 of the Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- strains. Conclusion We have described a simple yet effective PCR method to support surveillance of the incidence of invasive disease caused by NTS in developing countries. PMID:20231882

  2. Studies on the effects of phosphine on Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in culture medium and in black pepper (Piper nigrum).

    PubMed

    Castro, M F P M; Rezende, A C B; Benato, E A; Valentini, S R T; Furlani, R P Z; Tfouni, S A V

    2011-04-01

    The effect of phosphine on Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis inoculated in culture medium and in black pepper grains (Piper nigrum), as well as on the reduction of the microbial load of the dried and moisturized product, was verified. The postfumigation effect was verified in inoculated samples with 0.92 and 0.97 water activity (a(w)) exposed to 6 g/m(3) phosphine for 72 h, dried to 0.67 a(w), and stored for 24, 48, and 72 h. No decreases were observed in Salmonella Enteritidis populations in culture medium when fumigant concentrations up to 6 g/m(3) were applied for 48 h at 35°C. However, the colonies showed reductions in size and atypical coloration as the phosphine concentration increased. No reduction in Salmonella counts occurred on the inoculated dried samples after fumigation. On the other hand, when phosphine at concentrations of 6 g/m(3) was applied on moisturized black pepper for 72 h, decreases in Salmonella counts of around 80% were observed. The counts of total aerobic mesophilic bacterium populations of the dried and moisturized black pepper were not affected by the fumigant treatment. The results of the postfumigation studies indicated that Salmonella Enteritidis was absent in the fumigated grains after drying and storage for 72 h, indicating a promising application for this technique. It was concluded that for Salmonella Enteritidis control, phosphine fumigation could be applied to black pepper grains before drying and the producers should rigidly follow good agricultural practices, mainly during the drying process, in order to avoid product recontamination. Additional work is needed to confirm the findings with more Salmonella serotypes and strains.

  3. [An assessment of the connection between the annual population morbidity of salmonellosis due to Salmonella enteritidis and the dynamics of the epizootic process among chickens in commercial poultry plants].

    PubMed

    Sergevnin, V I; Sharipova, I S; Gladkikh, L A; Khasanov, R Kh

    1995-01-01

    The dynamics of annual morbidity in salmonellosis caused by S. enteritidis among the population of Perm during the period of 1987-1992 was analyzed. Blood sera taken from 4,689 practically healthy donors and from 6,997 hens at poultry breeding complexes were studied in the passive hemagglutination test with the use of complex Salmonella diagnosticum. The study revealed that seasonal rises in morbidity caused by S. enteritidis in winter and spring months, as well as in autumn months, were linked with the activation of the epizootic process of Salmonella infection among hens at poultry-breeding complexes during these periods of the year. A rise in the level of anti-Salmonella antibodies in poultry and human blood sera was found to be the precursor of the aggravation of the epidemic situation.

  4. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis on shell eggs by ozone and UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Romo, Luis A; Yousef, Ahmed E

    2005-04-01

    The presence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in shell eggs has serious public health implications. Several treatments have been developed to control Salmonella on eggs with mixed results. Currently, there is a need for time-saving, economical, and effective egg sanitization treatments. In this study, shell eggs externally contaminated with Salmonella (8.0 x 10(5) to 4.0 x 10(6) CFU/g of eggshell) were treated with gaseous ozone (O3) at 0 to 15 lb/in2 gauge for 0 to 20 min. In other experiments, contaminated shell eggs were exposed to UV radiation at 100 to 2,500 microW/cm2 for 0 to 5 min. Treatment combination included exposing contaminated eggs to UV (1,500 to 2,500 microW/cm2) for 1 min, followed by ozone at 5 lb/in2 gauge for 1 min. Eggs that were (i) noncontaminated and untreated, (ii) contaminated and untreated, and (iii) contaminated and treated with air were used as controls. Results indicated that treating shell eggs with ozone or UV, separately or in combination, significantly (P < 0.05) reduced Salmonella on shell eggs. For example, contaminated eggs treated with ozone at 4 to 8 degrees C and 15 lb/in2 gauge for 10 min or with UV (1,500 to 2,500 microW/cm2) at 22 to 25 degrees C for 5 min produced 5.9- or 4.3-log microbial reductions or more, respectively, when compared with contaminated untreated controls. Combinations including UV followed by ozone treatment resulted in synergistic inactivation of Salmonella by 4.6 log units or more in about 2 min of total treatment time. Salmonella was effectively inactivated on shell eggs in a short time and at low temperature with the use of a combination of UV radiation and ozone.

  5. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis on shell eggs by ozone and UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Romo, Luis A; Yousef, Ahmed E

    2005-04-01

    The presence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in shell eggs has serious public health implications. Several treatments have been developed to control Salmonella on eggs with mixed results. Currently, there is a need for time-saving, economical, and effective egg sanitization treatments. In this study, shell eggs externally contaminated with Salmonella (8.0 x 10(5) to 4.0 x 10(6) CFU/g of eggshell) were treated with gaseous ozone (O3) at 0 to 15 lb/in2 gauge for 0 to 20 min. In other experiments, contaminated shell eggs were exposed to UV radiation at 100 to 2,500 microW/cm2 for 0 to 5 min. Treatment combination included exposing contaminated eggs to UV (1,500 to 2,500 microW/cm2) for 1 min, followed by ozone at 5 lb/in2 gauge for 1 min. Eggs that were (i) noncontaminated and untreated, (ii) contaminated and untreated, and (iii) contaminated and treated with air were used as controls. Results indicated that treating shell eggs with ozone or UV, separately or in combination, significantly (P < 0.05) reduced Salmonella on shell eggs. For example, contaminated eggs treated with ozone at 4 to 8 degrees C and 15 lb/in2 gauge for 10 min or with UV (1,500 to 2,500 microW/cm2) at 22 to 25 degrees C for 5 min produced 5.9- or 4.3-log microbial reductions or more, respectively, when compared with contaminated untreated controls. Combinations including UV followed by ozone treatment resulted in synergistic inactivation of Salmonella by 4.6 log units or more in about 2 min of total treatment time. Salmonella was effectively inactivated on shell eggs in a short time and at low temperature with the use of a combination of UV radiation and ozone. PMID:15830660

  6. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminated eggs produced by infected commercial laying flocks are often implicated as sources of human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis, but Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium have also been associated with egg-transmitted illness. Contamination of the edible contents of eggs is ...

  7. Complete Genome and Plasmid Sequences of Three Canadian Strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Enteritidis Belonging to Phage Types 8, 13, and 13a

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Muhammad Attiq; Labbé, Geneviève; Ziebell, Kim; Nash, John H. E.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is a prominent cause of human salmonellosis frequently linked to poultry products. In Canada, S. Enteritidis phage types 8, 13, and 13a predominate among both clinical and poultry isolates. Here, we report the complete genome and plasmid sequences of poultry isolates of these three phage types. PMID:26404595

  8. Correlation of conversion of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis phage type 1, 4, or 6 to phage type 7 with loss of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Baggesen, D L; Wegener, H C; Madsen, M

    1997-01-01

    Studies of pairs of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis isolates from different poultry flocks showed that phage type (PT) 7 may be derived from PT 1, 4, and 6. The conversion appeared to be associated with loss of lipopolysaccharide. It is concluded that PT 7 may be of little value as an epidemiological marker of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis. PMID:8968942

  9. Antibacterial effect of trans-cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, carvacrol, and thymol on Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni in chicken cecal contents in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni are two major food-borne pathogens that are transmitted through poultry products. These pathogens colonize the chicken cecum leading, to contamination of carcasses during slaughter and subsequent processing operations. We investigated the antimicrobial...

  10. Molecular and epidemiologic analysis of a county-wide outbreak caused by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis traced to a bakery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Po-Liang; Hwang, In-Jane; Tung, Ya-Lina; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Lin, Chun-Lu; Siu, LK

    2004-01-01

    Background An increase in the number of attendees due to acute gastroenteritis and fever was noted at one hospital emergency room in Taiwan over a seven-day period from July to August, 2001. Molecular and epidemiological surveys were performed to trace the possible source of infection. Methods An epidemiological investigation was undertaken to determine the cause of the outbreak. Stool and blood samples were collected according to standard protocols per Center for Disease Control, Taiwan. Typing of the Salmonella isolates from stool, blood, and food samples was performed with serotyping, antibiotypes, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) following XbaI restriction enzyme digestion. Results Comparison of the number of patients with and without acute gastroenteritis (506 and 4467, respectively) during the six weeks before the outbreak week revealed a significant increase in the number of patients during the outbreak week (162 and 942, respectively) (relative risk (RR): 1.44, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.22–1.70, P value < 0.001). During the week of the outbreak, 34 of 162 patients with gastroenteritis were positive for Salmonella, and 28 of these 34 cases reported eating the same kind of bread. In total, 28 of 34 patients who ate this bread were positive for salmonella compared to only 6 of 128 people who did not eat this bread (RR: 17.6, 95%CI 7.9–39.0, P < 0.001). These breads were produced by the same bakery and were distributed to six different traditional Chinese markets., Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) was isolated from the stool samples of 28 of 32 individuals and from a recalled bread sample. All S. Enteritidis isolates were of the same antibiogram. PFGE typing revealed that all except two of the clinical isolates and the bread isolates were of the same DNA macrorestriction pattern. Conclusions The egg-covered bread contaminated with S. Enteritidis was confirmed as the vehicle of infection. Alertness in

  11. Factors affecting thermal resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis ODA 99-30581-13 in shell egg contents and use of heat-ozone combinations for egg pasteurization.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jennifer J; Yousef, Ahmed E

    2013-02-01

    Infection of laying hens with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis leads to deposition of the pathogen into the albumen or yolk of forming eggs. Heat treatment can inactivate internalized Salmonella Enteritidis in shell eggs, but factors such as the nature and location of contamination may influence the efficacy of thermal treatments. In the current research, natural contamination was mimicked by introducing small inocula of Salmonella Enteritidis into different locations of shell eggs and incubating inoculated eggs. These pathogen-containing eggs were heated at 57°C for 40 min, and temperature within eggs was monitored at the locations of inocula. Comparison of inactivation at equivalent internal temperatures revealed similar levels of lethality regardless of inoculum location. Refrigeration between incubation and heat treatment did not increase thermal resistance of cells in albumen but decreased cell inactivation in yolk. Sequential application of heat and gaseous ozone allows for the development of a process capable of decontaminating shell eggs with minimal thermal treatment and impact on egg quality. Inoculated eggs were subjected to (i) an immersion heating process similar to that used in commercial pasteurization or (ii) immersion heating, at reduced duration, followed by vacuum (50.8 kPa) and treatment with ozone gas (maximum 160 g/m(3)) under pressure (∼187.5 kPa). All treatments tested produced greater than 5-log inactivation, which is required for "pasteurization" processes. Differences were observed in the visual quality of eggs depending on treatment parameters. Application of ozone subsequent to heating allows for a significant reduction in heating time without decreasing process lethality.

  12. [Salmonella non-typhoid infection: new epidemiological findings

    PubMed

    Sagnelli, E.; Coppola, N.; Scolastico, C.

    1999-01-01

    Food-borne infections are the most serious food safety problem in the world. In fact, they are responsible of millions of illnesses and thousand of deaths. Non-typhoid Salmonella infection is frequent world-wide and, although mild and self-limiting illness in normal subjects, it may cause a severe disease in patients with an immune-deficiency. Changes in the agents and in the vehicles of transmission and a higher number of patients with immune-depression have determined a world-spread of non-typhoid Salmonella infection in the last decades. The increased frequency of international travels and food commerce have been associated with outbreaks of unusual serotype of Salmonella. Moreover, drug-resistant Salmonella are emerged recently, as Ampicillin and Doxiciclin-resistant S. enteritidis or DT-104 multidrug-resistant S. typhimurium. The outbreak of Salmonella disease is also linked to diffusion of HIV infection and of other immunodeficiencies. The lack of controls in food industry, the frequent contamination of mass-distributed food products and the decreased opportunities to transmit for instruction on food safety, both in school and inside the family, are the causes of large-scale outbreaks PMID:12748440

  13. Variations in biochemical phenotypes and phage types of Salmonella enteritidis in Germany 1980-92.

    PubMed Central

    Katouli, M.; Seuffer, R. H.; Wollin, R.; Kühn, I.; Möllby, R.

    1993-01-01

    The Phene Plate system for typing Salmonella serotypes (PhP-S) is a simple automated typing method based on biochemical fingerprinting. It gives a quantitative value of the metabolism of various substrates by measuring the speed and intensity of each reaction. The 'biochemical fingerprint' of each isolate is used to calculate similarities among the tested strains with a personal computer program. We used this system to examine a collection of 86 strains of Salmonella enteritidis isolated from human sporadic cases in Germany between 1980 and 1992. Twenty-three biochemical phenotypes (BPTs) consisting of 9 common (C) and 14 single (S) BPTs were identified. BPTs C2 and C4 containing 20 and 36 strains respectively accounted for 65% of the isolates. Strains of BPT C2 were found over a wide period of time whereas strains of BPT C4 were isolated during the period between 1988 and 1992. With phage typing, 11 discrete phage types (PTs) and 18 strains designated as non-specific type (NST) were identified. PTs 4 and 8 with 39 and 17 strains respectively were the dominant PTs. Strains of PT 8 were isolated over a wide period of time whereas all (except one) strains of PT 4 were isolated between 1988 and 1992. Combination of biochemical fingerprinting and phage typing divided the strains into 25 phenotypes (BPT:PTs). Whilst phenotype C2:8 was found over a number of different years, phenotype C4:4 was isolated only between 1988 and 1992. These findings indicate the presence of one persistent and one recently emerged phenotype among S. enteritidis strains in Germany.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8405148

  14. Immunomodulatory activity and control of Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in the intestinal tract of chickens by Lactobacillus based probiotic.

    PubMed

    Penha Filho, Rafael Antonio Casarin; Díaz, Silvia Juliana Acelas; Fernando, Filipe Santos; Chang, Yung-Fu; Andreatti Filho, Raphael Lucio; Berchieri Junior, Angelo

    2015-09-15

    Lactobacillus-based probiotics (LBP) are used as competitive exclusion to control pathogenic enterobacterial infections and improve the weight gain in broiler chickens. This study assessed the inhibition of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infection in one-week-old broiler chicks, using an experimental LBP containing four Lactobacillus strains isolated from chickens (L. acidophilus, L. fermentum, L. reuteri, L. salivarius). The immunomodulatory effects of this treatment were evaluated, through the analysis of cytokines and influx of macrophages, γδ, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the gut. The intestinal colonization by SE was reduced by 1.8 CFU/g (log10) in chicks treated with LBP (p<0.05). The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, LITAF) were significantly reduced in treated chicks (p<0.05), whilst untreated chicks showed elevated inflammatory stimulus and an increased population of CD8(+) T cells in the intestinal mucosa after challenge (p<0.05). Additionally, the LBP stimulated TLR2 expression in caecal tonsils. The adjuvant property of the Lactobacillus cell wall (LCW) was evaluated, demonstrating good capability to stimulate T helper 2 (Th2) cell proliferation. Pretreatment of chicks with LBP decreased the intestinal colonization by SE, minimizing the tissue lesions and inflammation after challenge and showed a potential use as adjuvant with injectable killed vaccines. PMID:26099807

  15. Altered virulence potential of Salmonella Enteritidis cultured in different foods: A cumulative effect of differential gene expression and immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Sangeeta; Sahoo, Prakash Kumar; Ryan, Daniel; Das, Jugal Kishore; Chakraborty, Eesha; Mohakud, Nirmal Kumar; Suar, Mrutyunjay

    2016-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is one of the most common causes of food borne illness. Bacterial growth environment plays an important role in regulating gene expression thereby affecting the virulence profile of the bacteria. Different foods present diverse growth conditions which may affect the pathogenic potential of the bacteria. In the present study, the effect of food environments on the pathogenic potential of S. Enteritidis has been evaluated. S. Enteritidis was grown in different foods e.g. egg white, peanut butter and milk, and virulent phenotypes were compared to those grown in Luria Bertani broth. In-vivo experiments in C57BL/6 mice revealed S. Enteritidis grown in egg white did not induce significant (p<0.001) production of proinflammatory cytokines in mice and were unable to cause colitis despite efficient colonization in cecum, mesenteric lymph node, spleen and liver. Further studies revealed that bacteria grown in LB activated MAP Kinase and NFκB pathways efficiently, while those grown in egg white poorly activated the above pathways which can account for the decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines. qRT PCR analysis revealed SPI-1 effectors were downregulated in bacteria grown in egg white. Interestingly, bacteria grown in egg white showed reversal of phenotype upon change in growth media to LB. Additionally, bacteria grown in milk and peanut butter showed different degrees of virulence in mice as compared to those grown in LB media. Thus, the present study demonstrates that, S. Enteritidis grown in egg white colonizes systemic sites without causing colitis in a mouse model, while bacteria grown in milk and peanut butter show different pathogenicity profiles suggesting that food environments significantly affect the pathogenicity of S. Enteritidis.

  16. Altered virulence potential of Salmonella Enteritidis cultured in different foods: A cumulative effect of differential gene expression and immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Sangeeta; Sahoo, Prakash Kumar; Ryan, Daniel; Das, Jugal Kishore; Chakraborty, Eesha; Mohakud, Nirmal Kumar; Suar, Mrutyunjay

    2016-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is one of the most common causes of food borne illness. Bacterial growth environment plays an important role in regulating gene expression thereby affecting the virulence profile of the bacteria. Different foods present diverse growth conditions which may affect the pathogenic potential of the bacteria. In the present study, the effect of food environments on the pathogenic potential of S. Enteritidis has been evaluated. S. Enteritidis was grown in different foods e.g. egg white, peanut butter and milk, and virulent phenotypes were compared to those grown in Luria Bertani broth. In-vivo experiments in C57BL/6 mice revealed S. Enteritidis grown in egg white did not induce significant (p<0.001) production of proinflammatory cytokines in mice and were unable to cause colitis despite efficient colonization in cecum, mesenteric lymph node, spleen and liver. Further studies revealed that bacteria grown in LB activated MAP Kinase and NFκB pathways efficiently, while those grown in egg white poorly activated the above pathways which can account for the decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines. qRT PCR analysis revealed SPI-1 effectors were downregulated in bacteria grown in egg white. Interestingly, bacteria grown in egg white showed reversal of phenotype upon change in growth media to LB. Additionally, bacteria grown in milk and peanut butter showed different degrees of virulence in mice as compared to those grown in LB media. Thus, the present study demonstrates that, S. Enteritidis grown in egg white colonizes systemic sites without causing colitis in a mouse model, while bacteria grown in milk and peanut butter show different pathogenicity profiles suggesting that food environments significantly affect the pathogenicity of S. Enteritidis. PMID:27132148

  17. Genomic comparison of the closely-related Salmonella enterica serovars enteritidis, dublin and gallinarum

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, T. David; Schmieder, Robert; Silva, Genivaldo G. Z.; Busch, Julia; Cassman, Noriko; Dutilh, Bas E.; Green, Dawn; Matlock, Brian; Heffernan, Brian; Olsen, Gary J.; Hanna, Leigh Farris; Schifferli, Dieter M.; Maloy, Stanley; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A.; Edwards, Robert A.; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2015-06-03

    The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain LK5 and Dublin strain SARB12 and compared these genomes to the publicly available Enteritidis P125109, Dublin CT 02021853 and Dublin SD3246 genome sequences. We also compared the publicly available Gallinarum genome sequences from biotype Gallinarum 287/91 and Pullorum RKS5078. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, and differences in prophage and pseudogene content between strains belonging to the same serovar. Through our analysis we also identified several prophage cargo genes and pseudogenes that affect virulence and may contribute to a host-specific, systemic lifestyle. These results strongly argue that the Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum serovars of Salmonella enterica evolve by acquiring new genes through horizontal gene transfer, followed by the formation of pseudogenes. The loss of genes necessary for a gastrointestinal lifestyle ultimately leads to a systemic lifestyle and niche exclusion in the host-specific serovars.

  18. Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance Genes Aid in Defense against Chicken Innate Immunity, Fecal Shedding, and Egg Deposition

    PubMed Central

    McKelvey, Jessica A.; Yang, Ming; Jiang, Yanhua

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major etiologic agent of nontyphoid salmonellosis in the United States. S. Enteritidis persistently and silently colonizes the intestinal and reproductive tract of laying hens, resulting in contaminated poultry products. The consumption of contaminated poultry products has been identified as a significant risk factor for human salmonellosis. To understand the mechanisms S. Enteritidis utilizes to colonize and persist in laying hens, we used selective capture of transcribed sequences to identify genes overexpressed in the HD11 chicken macrophage cell line and in primary chicken oviduct epithelial cells. From the 15 genes found to be overexpressed in both cell types, we characterized the antimicrobial peptide resistance (AMPR) genes, virK and ybjX, in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, AMPR genes were required for natural morphology, motility, secretion, defense against detergents such as EDTA and bile salts, and resistance to antimicrobial peptides polymyxin B and avian β-defensins. From this, we inferred the AMPR genes play a role in outer membrane stability and/or modulation. In the intestinal tract, AMPR genes were involved in early intestinal colonization and fecal shedding. In the reproductive tract, virK was required in early colonization whereas a deletion of ybjX caused prolonged ovary colonization and egg deposition. Data from the present study indicate that AMPR genes are differentially utilized in various host environments, which may ultimately assist S. Enteritidis in persistent and silent colonization of chickens. PMID:25267840

  19. Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis antimicrobial peptide resistance genes aid in defense against chicken innate immunity, fecal shedding, and egg deposition.

    PubMed

    McKelvey, Jessica A; Yang, Ming; Jiang, Yanhua; Zhang, Shuping

    2014-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major etiologic agent of nontyphoid salmonellosis in the United States. S. Enteritidis persistently and silently colonizes the intestinal and reproductive tract of laying hens, resulting in contaminated poultry products. The consumption of contaminated poultry products has been identified as a significant risk factor for human salmonellosis. To understand the mechanisms S. Enteritidis utilizes to colonize and persist in laying hens, we used selective capture of transcribed sequences to identify genes overexpressed in the HD11 chicken macrophage cell line and in primary chicken oviduct epithelial cells. From the 15 genes found to be overexpressed in both cell types, we characterized the antimicrobial peptide resistance (AMPR) genes, virK and ybjX, in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, AMPR genes were required for natural morphology, motility, secretion, defense against detergents such as EDTA and bile salts, and resistance to antimicrobial peptides polymyxin B and avian β-defensins. From this, we inferred the AMPR genes play a role in outer membrane stability and/or modulation. In the intestinal tract, AMPR genes were involved in early intestinal colonization and fecal shedding. In the reproductive tract, virK was required in early colonization whereas a deletion of ybjX caused prolonged ovary colonization and egg deposition. Data from the present study indicate that AMPR genes are differentially utilized in various host environments, which may ultimately assist S. Enteritidis in persistent and silent colonization of chickens.

  20. Survival of Salmonella Enteritidis on four types of stainless steel surface under a dry condition and recovery by swabbing.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Norinaga; Konuma, Hirotaka; Kumagai, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    The survival and recovery of Salmonella Enteritidis inoculated on stainless steel surfaces with different metal contents and surface finishes were examined. Two S. Enteritidis strains possessing different levels of biofilm productivity were inoculated with tryptone soya broth (TSB) and egg yolk emulsion (EY) on the surface of stainless steel squares (1 cm × 1 cm) and stored at 22℃ under a dry condition. After storage, cells were recovered from the stainless steel surfaces by swabbing with a cotton swab. The numbers of cells recovered by swabbing and the cells remaining on the stainless steel squares were counted. The survival ratio of the strain possessing high biofilm productivity was greater than that of the strain possessing low biofilm productivity. The survival ratio of S. Enteritidis suspended in TSB was often higher than that in EY. There were no significant differences in the survival and recovery ratios of S. Enteritidis based on stainless steel composition or surface finish. From all except one sample, more than 98% of viable cells of S. Enteritidis were recovered by swabbing with a cotton swab.

  1. Comparison of a live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine candidate secreting Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit with a commercial vaccine for efficacy of protection against internal egg contamination by Salmonella in hens.

    PubMed

    Nandre, Rahul M; Eo, Seong Kug; Park, Sang Youel; Lee, John Hwa

    2015-07-01

    This study compared a new live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine candidate secreting Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (SE-LTB) with a commercial Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) vaccine for efficacy of protection against SE infection in laying hens. Chickens were divided into 3 groups of 20 each. Group A chickens were inoculated orally with phosphate-buffered saline and served as controls, group B chickens were inoculated orally with the vaccine candidate, and group C chickens were inoculated intramuscularly with a commercial vaccine, the primary inoculation in groups B and C being at 10 wk of age and the booster at 16 wk. Groups B and C showed significantly higher titers of plasma immunoglobulin G, intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A, and egg yolk immunoglobulin Y antibodies compared with the control group, and both vaccinated groups showed a significantly elevated cellular immune response. After virulent challenge, group B had significantly lower production of thin-shelled and/or malformed eggs and a significantly lower rate of SE contamination of eggs compared with the control group. Furthermore, the challenge strain was detected significantly less in all of the examined organs of group B compared with the control group. Group C had lower gross lesion scores only in the spleen and had lower bacterial counts only in the spleen, ceca, and ovary. These findings indicate that vaccination with the SE-LTB vaccine candidate can efficiently reduce internal egg and internal organ contamination by Salmonella and has advantages over the commercial vaccine.

  2. Molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates from food and human samples by serotyping, antimicrobial resistance, plasmid profiling, (GTG)5-PCR and ERIC-PCR.

    PubMed

    Fardsanei, F; Nikkhahi, F; Bakhshi, B; Salehi, T Z; Tamai, I A; Soltan Dallal, M M

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis has been a primary cause of human salmonellosis in many countries. The major objective of this study was to investigate genetic diversity among Salmonella Enteritidis strains from different origins (food and human) by Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC) -PCR, as well as to assess their plasmid profiling and antimicrobial resistance. A total of 30 Salmonella Enteritidis isolates, 15 from food samples (chicken, lamb, beef and duck meats) and 15 from clinical samples were collected in Tehran. Identification of isolates as Salmonella was confirmed by using conventional standard biochemical and serological tests. Multiplex-PCR was used for serotyping of isolates to identify Salmonella Enteritidis. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing to 16 agents founds drug resistance patterns among Salmonella Enteritidis isolates. No resistance was observed to cephalexin, ceftriaxone, ceftazidime and cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, imipenem or meropenem, chloramphenicol and gentamicin. The highest resistance (96.7%) was observed to nitrofurantoin. Seven plasmid profiles (P1-P7) were detected, and a 68-kb plasmid was found in all isolates. Two different primers; ERIC and (GTG)5 were used for genotyping, which each produced four profiles. The majority of clinical and food isolates fell into two separate common types (CTs) with a similar percentage of 95% by ERIC-PCR. Using primer (GTG)5, 29 isolates incorporated in three CTs with 70% of isolates showing a single banding pattern. Limited genetic diversity among human and food isolates of Salmonella Enteritidis may indicate that contaminated foods were possibly the source of human salmonellosis. These results confirmed that ERIC-PCR genotyping has limited discriminatory power for Salmonella Enteritidis of different origin. PMID:27656286

  3. Molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates from food and human samples by serotyping, antimicrobial resistance, plasmid profiling, (GTG)5-PCR and ERIC-PCR.

    PubMed

    Fardsanei, F; Nikkhahi, F; Bakhshi, B; Salehi, T Z; Tamai, I A; Soltan Dallal, M M

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis has been a primary cause of human salmonellosis in many countries. The major objective of this study was to investigate genetic diversity among Salmonella Enteritidis strains from different origins (food and human) by Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC) -PCR, as well as to assess their plasmid profiling and antimicrobial resistance. A total of 30 Salmonella Enteritidis isolates, 15 from food samples (chicken, lamb, beef and duck meats) and 15 from clinical samples were collected in Tehran. Identification of isolates as Salmonella was confirmed by using conventional standard biochemical and serological tests. Multiplex-PCR was used for serotyping of isolates to identify Salmonella Enteritidis. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing to 16 agents founds drug resistance patterns among Salmonella Enteritidis isolates. No resistance was observed to cephalexin, ceftriaxone, ceftazidime and cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, imipenem or meropenem, chloramphenicol and gentamicin. The highest resistance (96.7%) was observed to nitrofurantoin. Seven plasmid profiles (P1-P7) were detected, and a 68-kb plasmid was found in all isolates. Two different primers; ERIC and (GTG)5 were used for genotyping, which each produced four profiles. The majority of clinical and food isolates fell into two separate common types (CTs) with a similar percentage of 95% by ERIC-PCR. Using primer (GTG)5, 29 isolates incorporated in three CTs with 70% of isolates showing a single banding pattern. Limited genetic diversity among human and food isolates of Salmonella Enteritidis may indicate that contaminated foods were possibly the source of human salmonellosis. These results confirmed that ERIC-PCR genotyping has limited discriminatory power for Salmonella Enteritidis of different origin.

  4. Protective host immune responses to Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Pham, Oanh H; McSorley, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi are the causative agents of human typhoid fever. Current typhoid vaccines are ineffective and are not widely used in endemic areas. Greater understanding of host-pathogen interactions during Salmonella infection should facilitate the development of improved vaccines to combat typhoid and nontyphoidal Salmonellosis. This review will focus on our current understanding of Salmonella pathogenesis and the major host immune components that participate in immunity to Salmonella infection. In addition, recent findings regarding host immune mechanisms in response to Salmonella infection will be also discussed, providing a new perspective on the utility of improved tools to study the immune response to Salmonella infections.

  5. Assessing the growth and recovery of Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 after sodium dichloroisocyanurate exposure.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Fernanda Stoduto; Horvath, Mariana Bandeira; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the growth and the recovery of Salmonella (S.) Enteritidis SE86 in different diluents, culture media and using different plating methods after the exposure to 200 mg/kg sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC). Before and after NaDCC exposure, SE86 was cultured at 30 °C and 7 °C in the following diluents: Peptone water (P), Saline solution (SaS), Peptone water+Saline solution (P+SaS), Peptone water+Tween 80+Lecithin+Sodium thiosulfate (P+N) and Saline solution+Tween 80+Lecithin+Sodium thiosulfate (SaS+N). The SaS diluent was chosen because it was able to maintain cells viable without growth and was further used for plating SE86 on non selective medium (Tryptic Soy Agar-TSA) and on selective media (Mannitol Lysine Crystal Violet Brilliant Green Agar-MLCB; Brilliant Green Agar-BGA; Salmonella Shigella Agar-SS and Xylose Lysine Dextrose-XLD). The Thin Agar Layer method (TAL) i.e., selective media overlayed with non selective TSA was also evaluated. Results indicated that SE86 not exposed to NaDCC was able to grow in P, P+N, SaS+N and P+SaS, but not in SaS, that was able to maintain cells viable. SE86 exposed to NaDCC demonstrated similar counts after dilution in SaS and the plating on non selective TSA, selective media MLCB, BGA, SS and XLD and on TAL media. SE86, S. Typhimurium and S. Bredeney, exposed or not exposed to NaDCC, showed no significant differences in counts on TSA, XLD and XLD overlayed with TSA, suggesting that all those media may be used to quantify NaDCC-exposed Salmonella by plating method. PMID:24516446

  6. Assessing the growth and recovery of Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 after sodium dichloroisocyanurate exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Fernanda Stoduto; Horvath, Mariana Bandeira; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the growth and the recovery of Salmonella (S.) Enteritidis SE86 in different diluents, culture media and using different plating methods after the exposure to 200 mg/kg sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC). Before and after NaDCC exposure, SE86 was cultured at 30 °C and 7 °C in the following diluents: Peptone water (P), Saline solution (SaS), Peptone water+Saline solution (P+SaS), Peptone water+Tween 80+Lecithin+Sodium thiosulfate (P+N) and Saline solution+Tween 80+Lecithin+Sodium thiosulfate (SaS+N). The SaS diluent was chosen because it was able to maintain cells viable without growth and was further used for plating SE86 on non selective medium (Tryptic Soy Agar-TSA) and on selective media (Mannitol Lysine Crystal Violet Brilliant Green Agar-MLCB; Brilliant Green Agar-BGA; Salmonella Shigella Agar-SS and Xylose Lysine Dextrose–XLD). The Thin Agar Layer method (TAL) i.e., selective media overlayed with non selective TSA was also evaluated. Results indicated that SE86 not exposed to NaDCC was able to grow in P, P+N, SaS+N and P+SaS, but not in SaS, that was able to maintain cells viable. SE86 exposed to NaDCC demonstrated similar counts after dilution in SaS and the plating on non selective TSA, selective media MLCB, BGA, SS and XLD and on TAL media. SE86, S. Typhimurium and S. Bredeney, exposed or not exposed to NaDCC, showed no significant differences in counts on TSA, XLD and XLD overlayed with TSA, suggesting that all those media may be used to quantify NaDCC-exposed Salmonella by plating method. PMID:24516446

  7. Yerba mate enhances probiotic bacteria growth in vitro but as a feed additive does not reduce Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gil, Francisco; Diaz-Sanchez, Sandra; Pendleton, Sean; Andino, Ana; Zhang, Nan; Yard, Carrie; Crilly, Nate; Harte, Federico; Hanning, Irene

    2014-02-01

    Yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis) is a tea known to have beneficial effects on human health and antimicrobial activity against some foodborne pathogens. Thus, the application of yerba mate as a feed additive for broiler chickens to reduce Salmonella colonization was evaluated. The first in vitro evaluation was conducted by suspending Salmonella Enteritidis and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in yerba mate extract. The in vivo evaluations were conducted using preventative and horizontal transmission experiments. In all experiments, day-of-hatch chicks were treated with one of the following 1) no treatment (control); 2) ground yerba mate in feed; 3) probiotic treatment (Lactobacillus acidophilus and Pediococcus; 9:1 administered once on day of hatch by gavage); or 4) both yerba mate and probiotic treatments. At d 3, all chicks were challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis (preventative experiment) or 5 of 20 chicks (horizontal transmission experiment). At d 10, all birds were euthanized, weighed, and cecal contents enumerated for Salmonella. For the in vitro evaluation, antimicrobial activity was observed against Salmonella and the same treatment enhanced growth of LAB. For in vivo evaluations, none of the yerba mate treatments significantly reduced Salmonella Enteritidis colonization, whereas the probiotic treatment significantly reduced Salmonella colonization in the horizontal transmission experiment. Yerba mate decreased chicken BW and decreased the performance of the probiotic treatment when used in combination. In conclusion, yerba mate had antimicrobial activity against foodborne pathogens and enhanced the growth of LAB in vitro, but in vivo yerba mate did not decrease Salmonella Enteritidis colonization.

  8. Design of a combined process for the inactivation of Salmonella Enteritidis in liquid whole egg at 55°C.

    PubMed

    Monfort, S; Gayán, E; Condón, S; Raso, J; Alvarez, I

    2011-02-28

    This paper is an evaluation of the lethal effectiveness of a successive application of pulsed electric fields (PEFs) and heat treatment in liquid whole egg (LWE) in the presence of different additives on the population of Salmonella serovar Enteritidis. Synergistic reductions of the Salmonella Enteritidis population were observed when LWE samples containing additives were treated with PEF (25 kV/cm; 100 and 200 kJ/kg), heat (55 °C), or PEF followed by heat. The presence of additives, such as 10 mM EDTA or 2% triethyl citrate, increased the PEF lethality 1 log₁₀ cycle and generated around 1.5 log₁₀ cycles of cell damage, resulting in the reduction of undamaged cells of 4.4 and 3.1 log₁₀ cycles, respectively. The application of PEF followed by heat treatment significantly (p < 0.05) reduced D(55 ºC) from 3.9 ± 0.2 min in LWE to 1.40 ± 0.06 min or 0.24 ± 0.02 min in the presence of 10 mM EDTA or 2% triethyl citrate, respectively. A PEF treatment of 25 kV/cm and 200 kJ/kg followed by a heat treatment of 55 °C and 2 min reduced more than 8 log₁₀ cycles of the population of Salmonella Enteritidis in LWE combined with 2% triethyl citrate, with a minimal impact on its protein soluble content. The heat sensitizing effect of PEF treatments in the presence of 2% triethyl citrate on the Salmonella population could enable LWE producers to reduce the temperature or processing time of thermal treatments (current standards are 60 °C for 3.5 min in the United States), increasing the level of Salmonella inactivation and retaining the quality of non-treated LWE.

  9. Role of SefA subunit protein of SEF14 fimbriae in the pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed Central

    Ogunniyi, A D; Kotlarski, I; Morona, R; Manning, P A

    1997-01-01

    In this study, the role of the SefA subunit protein of SEF14 fimbriae in the pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis was investigated. This was accomplished by mutating the sefA gene in the chromosome of two strains of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis by allelic exchange with a copy that has been inactivated by interruption with a nonpolar kanamycin resistance (aphA-3) cassette. The effect of this mutation on the ability of the S. enterica serovar Enteritidis strains to colonize the intestinal epithelium and to invade other tissues was assessed in BALB/c mice and in vitro by adherence and invasion of HeLa cells. Our results show that an avirulent S. enterica serovar Enteritidis vaccine strain, 11RX (no somatic antigen; flagellum antigen phase 1, g,m; flagellum antigen phase 2, -), colonized better and persisted longer in the Peyer's patches of these mice than did its SefA-deficient counterpart. However, no such difference was observed between a highly virulent S. enterica serovar Enteritidis strain, 7314 (somatic antigen, O1, O9, O12; flagellum antigen phase 1, g,m; flagellum antigen phase 2 [1,7]), and its SefA-deficient isogenic mutant. These findings were correlated with in vitro adherence and invasion of HeLa cells. Furthermore, we could not demonstrate a role for SefA in the virulence of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis as assessed by 50% lethal dose determinations. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:9009334

  10. On the Evolutionary History, Population Genetics and Diversity among Isolates of Salmonella Enteritidis PFGE Pattern JEGX01.0004

    PubMed Central

    Allard, Marc W.; Luo, Yan; Strain, Errol; Pettengill, James; Timme, Ruth; Wang, Charles; Li, Cong; Keys, Christine E.; Zheng, Jie; Stones, Robert; Wilson, Mark R.; Musser, Steven M.; Brown, Eric W.

    2013-01-01

    Facile laboratory tools are needed to augment identification in contamination events to trace the contamination back to the source (traceback) of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis). Understanding the evolution and diversity within and among outbreak strains is the first step towards this goal. To this end, we collected 106 new S. Enteriditis isolates within S. Enteriditis Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern JEGX01.0004 and close relatives, and determined their genome sequences. Sources for these isolates spanned food, clinical and environmental farm sources collected during the 2010 S. Enteritidis shell egg outbreak in the United States along with closely related serovars, S. Dublin, S. Gallinarum biovar Pullorum and S. Gallinarum. Despite the highly homogeneous structure of this population, S. Enteritidis isolates examined in this study revealed thousands of SNP differences and numerous variable genes (n = 366). Twenty-one of these genes from the lineages leading to outbreak-associated samples had nonsynonymous (causing amino acid changes) changes and five genes are putatively involved in known Salmonella virulence pathways. While chromosome synteny and genome organization appeared to be stable among these isolates, genome size differences were observed due to variation in the presence or absence of several phages and plasmids, including phage RE-2010, phage P125109, plasmid pSEEE3072_19 (similar to pSENV), plasmid pOU1114 and two newly observed mobile plasmid elements pSEEE1729_15 and pSEEE0956_35. These differences produced modifications to the assembled bases for these draft genomes in the size range of approximately 4.6 to 4.8 mbp, with S. Dublin being larger (∼4.9 mbp) and S. Gallinarum smaller (4.55 mbp) when compared to S. Enteritidis. Finally, we identified variable S. Enteritidis genes associated with virulence pathways that may be useful markers for the development of rapid surveillance and typing

  11. Effects of the Physical Form of Diet on the Outcome of an Artificial Salmonella Infection in Broilers.

    PubMed

    Ratert, C; Sander, S J; Verspohl, J; Beyerbach, M; Kamphues, J

    2015-03-01

    To prove the hypothesis that the physical form of diet affects the outcome of an artificial infection with Salmonella Enteritidis in broilers, 7-day-old birds were allotted to one of four groups and fed botanically, and nearly also chemically identical diets, differing in grinding and further compaction. In total, two birds from each group (age 14 days) were administered on average 1.06 x 10(8) colony-forming units (CFU) of Salmonella Enteritidis directly into the crop by gavage and immediately put back as "seeder birds" into their respective groups. The salmonella status of each bird was analyzed by cloacal swabs, and at postmortem examination, cecal content and liver tissue samples were taken. Shedding (measured by cloacal swabs) was reduced significantly (P < 0.05) in groups offered the coarsely ground and pelleted diet and the diet including whole wheat compared with the groups fed the finely ground and pelleted and the coarsely ground and extruded diet. Nevertheless, only broilers fed the diet containing whole wheat showed a significantly (P < 0.05) lower frequency of Salmonella Enteritidis isolation in the cecal content and liver tissue. This diet was characterized by the highest percentage of particles > 2 mm. In this study the physical form of diet affected the outcome of an artificial infection with Salmonella Enteritidis significantly. PMID:26292538

  12. The Antibacterial Activity of Coriolus versicolor Methanol Extract and Its Effect on Ultrastructural Changes of Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Matijašević, Danka; Pantić, Milena; Rašković, Božidar; Pavlović, Vladimir; Duvnjak, Dunja; Sknepnek, Aleksandra; Nikšić, Miomir

    2016-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of methanol extract obtained from fruiting body of industrially grown basidiomycete Coriolus versicolor was examined. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values against various bacteria ranged from 0.625 to 20 mg mL(-1). C. versicolor expressed bactericidal activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The growth curves of Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, measured at 630 nm, and confirmed with macrodilution method showed that the obtained extract could inhibit the growth of tested bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the loss of 260-nm-absorbing material were used to examine the ultrastructural changes in bacteria induced by the extract. When S. aureus was exposed to the MIC of C. versicolor, elongated and malformed cells were observed by SEM, while S. Enteritidis treated cells appeared shorter and aggregated with ruptured cell walls. TEM revealed the formation of non-membrane-enclosed bodies and depleted inner content of S. aureus. Larger and irregular periplasmic space and deformed and scattered components of the cell envelope were observed in treated S. Enteritidis. The loss of 260-nm-absorbing material indicated that the disruptive action of the extract on cytoplasmic membrane was more pronounced in S. aureus than in S. Enteritidis treated cells. The UV and FTIR spectrophotometric analyses revealed diverse composition of C. versicolor extract and high content of total phenolics. Altogether, mushroom extracts could be used to develop nutraceuticals or drugs effective against pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:27540376

  13. The Antibacterial Activity of Coriolus versicolor Methanol Extract and Its Effect on Ultrastructural Changes of Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Matijašević, Danka; Pantić, Milena; Rašković, Božidar; Pavlović, Vladimir; Duvnjak, Dunja; Sknepnek, Aleksandra; Nikšić, Miomir

    2016-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of methanol extract obtained from fruiting body of industrially grown basidiomycete Coriolus versicolor was examined. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values against various bacteria ranged from 0.625 to 20 mg mL-1. C. versicolor expressed bactericidal activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The growth curves of Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, measured at 630 nm, and confirmed with macrodilution method showed that the obtained extract could inhibit the growth of tested bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the loss of 260-nm-absorbing material were used to examine the ultrastructural changes in bacteria induced by the extract. When S. aureus was exposed to the MIC of C. versicolor, elongated and malformed cells were observed by SEM, while S. Enteritidis treated cells appeared shorter and aggregated with ruptured cell walls. TEM revealed the formation of non-membrane-enclosed bodies and depleted inner content of S. aureus. Larger and irregular periplasmic space and deformed and scattered components of the cell envelope were observed in treated S. Enteritidis. The loss of 260-nm-absorbing material indicated that the disruptive action of the extract on cytoplasmic membrane was more pronounced in S. aureus than in S. Enteritidis treated cells. The UV and FTIR spectrophotometric analyses revealed diverse composition of C. versicolor extract and high content of total phenolics. Altogether, mushroom extracts could be used to develop nutraceuticals or drugs effective against pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:27540376

  14. Comparative Analysis of Subtyping Methods against a Whole-Genome-Sequencing Standard for Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Shariat, Nikki; Driebe, Elizabeth M.; Roe, Chandler C.; Tolar, Beth; Trees, Eija; Keim, Paul; Zhang, Wei; Dudley, Edward G.; Fields, Patricia I.; Engelthaler, David M.

    2014-01-01

    A retrospective investigation was performed to evaluate whole-genome sequencing as a benchmark for comparing molecular subtyping methods for Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis and survey the population structure of commonly encountered S. enterica serotype Enteritidis outbreak isolates in the United States. A total of 52 S. enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates representing 16 major outbreaks and three sporadic cases collected between 2001 and 2012 were sequenced and subjected to subtyping by four different methods: (i) whole-genome single-nucleotide-polymorphism typing (WGST), (ii) multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA), (iii) clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats combined with multi-virulence-locus sequence typing (CRISPR-MVLST), and (iv) pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). WGST resolved all outbreak clusters and provided useful robust phylogenetic inference results with high epidemiological correlation. While both MLVA and CRISPR-MVLST yielded higher discriminatory power than PFGE, MLVA outperformed the other methods in delineating outbreak clusters whereas CRISPR-MVLST showed the potential to trace major lineages and ecological origins of S. enterica serotype Enteritidis. Our results suggested that whole-genome sequencing makes a viable platform for the evaluation and benchmarking of molecular subtyping methods. PMID:25378576

  15. Marinade with thyme and orange oils reduces Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter coli on inoculated broiler breast fillets and whole wings.

    PubMed

    Thanissery, R; Smith, D P

    2014-05-01

    Essential oils have been reported to possess antimicrobial properties and therefore have potential usage as natural antimicrobials in food. In a previous study, thyme orange essential oil combination (TOC) used at the 0.5% level as a dip application on chicken cut-up parts had a significant antibacterial effect against Salmonella and Campylobacter. A study was designed to evaluate the effect of salt-phosphate marinade solution containing 0.5% TOC to 1) reduce Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter coli numbers on broiler breast fillets and whole wings marinated by vacuum tumbling, and 2) reduce cross-contamination of both pathogens between inoculated and uninoculated parts during marination. A total of 52 skinless breast fillets and 52 whole wings were used for the 2 replications. For each replication, each cut-up part was randomly assigned to 1 of 5 groups: treatment 1: uninoculated parts marinated without TOC; treatment 2: inoculated parts marinated without TOC; treatment 3: uninoculated parts marinated with TOC; treatment 4: inoculated parts marinated with TOC; and control: nonmarinated inoculated parts. Samples were dipped in an inoculum containing a mixture of Salmonella Enteritidis and C. coli. The treatment samples were marinated by vacuum tumbling. All samples were immediately evaluated to determine Salmonella Enteritidis and C. coli numbers. Results indicated that TOC at the 0.5% level in the marinade solution applied by vacuum tumbling significantly reduced (P < 0.05) numbers of viable Salmonella Enteritidis by 2.6 and 2.3 log cfu/mL on broiler breast fillets and C. coli by 3.6 and 3.1 log cfu/mL on whole wings. Cross-contamination was observed as the uninoculated chicken parts marinated with inoculated parts were positive. However, the number of bacterial cells recovered from the TOC treated samples were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than the numbers recovered from the untreated samples. Marination with a salt phosphate formulation containing 0.5% TOC

  16. Marinade with thyme and orange oils reduces Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter coli on inoculated broiler breast fillets and whole wings.

    PubMed

    Thanissery, R; Smith, D P

    2014-05-01

    Essential oils have been reported to possess antimicrobial properties and therefore have potential usage as natural antimicrobials in food. In a previous study, thyme orange essential oil combination (TOC) used at the 0.5% level as a dip application on chicken cut-up parts had a significant antibacterial effect against Salmonella and Campylobacter. A study was designed to evaluate the effect of salt-phosphate marinade solution containing 0.5% TOC to 1) reduce Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter coli numbers on broiler breast fillets and whole wings marinated by vacuum tumbling, and 2) reduce cross-contamination of both pathogens between inoculated and uninoculated parts during marination. A total of 52 skinless breast fillets and 52 whole wings were used for the 2 replications. For each replication, each cut-up part was randomly assigned to 1 of 5 groups: treatment 1: uninoculated parts marinated without TOC; treatment 2: inoculated parts marinated without TOC; treatment 3: uninoculated parts marinated with TOC; treatment 4: inoculated parts marinated with TOC; and control: nonmarinated inoculated parts. Samples were dipped in an inoculum containing a mixture of Salmonella Enteritidis and C. coli. The treatment samples were marinated by vacuum tumbling. All samples were immediately evaluated to determine Salmonella Enteritidis and C. coli numbers. Results indicated that TOC at the 0.5% level in the marinade solution applied by vacuum tumbling significantly reduced (P < 0.05) numbers of viable Salmonella Enteritidis by 2.6 and 2.3 log cfu/mL on broiler breast fillets and C. coli by 3.6 and 3.1 log cfu/mL on whole wings. Cross-contamination was observed as the uninoculated chicken parts marinated with inoculated parts were positive. However, the number of bacterial cells recovered from the TOC treated samples were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than the numbers recovered from the untreated samples. Marination with a salt phosphate formulation containing 0.5% TOC

  17. Comparative analysis of virulence and resistance profiles of Salmonella Enteritidis isolates from poultry meat and foodborne outbreaks in northern Jordan.

    PubMed

    Jaradat, Ziad W; Abedel Hafiz, Leena; Ababneh, Mustafa M; Ababneh, Qotaibah O; Al Mousa, Waseem; Al-Nabulsi, Anas; Osaili, Tareq M; Holley, Richard

    2014-07-01

    This study was conducted to isolate Salmonella Enteritidis from poultry samples and compare their virulence and antibiotic resistance profiles to S. Enteritidis isolated from outbreaks in northern Jordan. Two hundred presumptive isolates were obtained from 302 raw poultry samples and were subjected to further analysis and confirmation. A phylogenic tree based on 16S rRNA sequencing was constructed and selected isolates representing each cluster were further studied for their virulence in normal adult Swiss white mice. The most virulent strains were isolated from poultry samples and had an LD 50 of 1.55 × 10 (5) CFU, while some of the outbreak isolates were avirulent in mice. Antibiotic resistance profiling revealed that the isolates were resistant to seven of eight antibiotics screened with each isolate resistant to multiple antibiotics (from two to six). Of the poultry isolates, 100%, 88.9%, 77.8%, 66.7%, and 50% showed resistance to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, ampicillin, cephalothin, and cefoperazone, respectively. Two outbreak isolates were sensitive to all tested antibiotics, while 71.4% were resistant to cefoperazone and only 28.6% showed resistance to nalidixic acid. Salmonella outbreak isolates were genetically related to poultry isolates as inferred from the 16S rRNA sequencing, yet were phenotypically different. Although outbreak strains were similar to poultry isolates, when tested in the mouse model, some of the outbreak isolates were highly virulent while others were avirulent. This might be due to a variation in susceptibility of the mouse to different S. Enteritidis isolates.

  18. Eggshell penetration of various types of hens' eggs by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Messens, Winy; Grijspeerdt, Koen; De Reu, Koen; De Ketelaere, Bart; Mertens, Kristof; Bamelis, Flip; Kemps, Bart; De Baerdemaeker, Josse; Decuypere, Eddy; Herman, Lieve

    2007-03-01

    Egg weight, shell thickness, number of pores, cuticle deposition, eggshell strength (dynamic stiffness and damping ratio), and the ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) to penetrate the eggshell were determined. Penetration was assessed by filling the eggs with a selective medium that allowed viewing of Salmonella growth on the inside of the shell and membrane complex. After inoculation of each shell with on average 2.71 log CFU, the eggs were stored for up to 14 days at 20 degrees C and 60% relative humidity. Commercially available eggs were used. At 14 days of storage, only 6.0% of the eggs from free-range hens and 16.0% of the generic (i.e., eggs from hens in conventional battery cages that were given standard feed) white eggs were penetrated. The generic brown, organic, and omega-3-enriched eggs were penetrated at a frequency of 30 to 34%. In a second experiment it was shown that the layer strains of the hen (ISA-Brown Warren versus Bovans Goldline), which were kept in furnished cages, did not affect eggshell penetration by SE. For Bovans Goldline hens, the housing system (furnished cage versus aviary) did not affect penetration, while a trend was visible toward a higher fraction of penetrated eggshells when hens were fed corncob mix rather than standard feed. Eggshell penetration was observed more frequently in the absence of cuticle spots and for eggs having lower dynamic stiffness values. Shell contamination at the end of storage was highly correlated with SE penetration.

  19. Inhibition of the early stage of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis biofilm development on stainless steel by cell-free supernatant of a Hafnia alvei culture.

    PubMed

    Chorianopoulos, Nikos G; Giaouris, Efstathios D; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Nychas, George-John E

    2010-03-01

    Compounds present in Hafnia alvei cell-free culture supernatant cumulatively negatively influence the early stage of biofilm development by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis on stainless steel while they also reduce the overall metabolic activity of S. Enteritidis planktonic cells. Although acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) were detected among these compounds, the use of several synthetic AHLs was not able to affect the initial stage of biofilm formation by this pathogen. PMID:20097823

  20. Inhibition of the Early Stage of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Biofilm Development on Stainless Steel by Cell-Free Supernatant of a Hafnia alvei Culture▿

    PubMed Central

    Chorianopoulos, Nikos G.; Giaouris, Efstathios D.; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Nychas, George-John E.

    2010-01-01

    Compounds present in Hafnia alvei cell-free culture supernatant cumulatively negatively influence the early stage of biofilm development by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis on stainless steel while they also reduce the overall metabolic activity of S. Enteritidis planktonic cells. Although acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) were detected among these compounds, the use of several synthetic AHLs was not able to affect the initial stage of biofilm formation by this pathogen. PMID:20097823

  1. Usefulness of phage typing and "two-way ribotyping" to differentiate Salmonella enteritidis strains.

    PubMed

    Landeras, E; Usera, M A; Calderón, C; Mendoza, M C

    1997-12-01

    The capacity to differentiate Salmonella enteritidis strains by phage typing and "two-way ribotyping" performed with PstI and SphI was evaluated. The typeability was 96.8% in phage typing and 100% in ribotyping. The series was differentiated into 13 phage types, 19 combined ribotypes, and 39 subtypes or clonal lines by combining results from both methods (of which 11, 13, and 35, respectively, were represented by natural strains). Ribotyping differentiated strains ascribed to PTs 1, 4, 6a, 7, 8, RDNC and UPT. Conversely, some strains of PTs 1, 4, 5a, 6, 6a, 7, 34, RDNC and UPT fall into the most frequent combined ribotype. A dendrogram of genetic similarity generated from the combined ribotypes was traced, and, at a 0.82 similarity level, it showed a major cluster (including 17 combined ribotypes, 88.4% strains ascribed to all PTs tested except PT11), a minor cluster, and four additional lines more loosely related.

  2. An agar gel enzyme assay (AGEA) for simple detection of Salmonella enteritidis antibodies in chicken sera.

    PubMed

    Kim, C J; Nagaraja, K V

    1991-01-01

    An agar gel enzyme assay (AGEA) was developed for the detection of antibodies to Salmonella enteritidis (SE). The assay was based on the ability of antibodies to diffuse through an agar gel and react with antigen coated on a polystyrene surface. The antigen-antibody reaction was then made visible by applying an enzyme-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin and the addition, subsequently, of a substrate-containing gel. The color change in circular zones was taken as the indication for the presence of antibodies. The present investigation reports identification of an antigen specific for SE and its use in the development of a relatively simple AGEA procedure. The results of AGEA were compared with those of conventional microagglutination (MA) test and serum plate (SP) test. The percentage agreement between MA and AGEA in positive serum sample was found to be 94.4%, and in negative serum samples it was found to be 88.8%. The present results suggest that the AGEA could be a very useful screening test for the detection of SE antibodies because the assay is inexpensive, specific and simple to perform without much equipment, and give results within a 3-hr period. PMID:1832368

  3. Promoting crystallisation of the Salmonella enteritidis fimbriae 14 pilin SefD using deuterium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bing; Garnett, James A.; Lee, Wei-chao; Lin, Jing; Salgado, Paula; Taylor, Jonathan; Xu, Yingqi; Lambert, Sebastian; Cota, Ernesto; Matthews, Steve

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The benefits of D{sub 2}O in screening for crystallisation was explored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structures of the SefD pilin in both H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O reveal differences. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystallisation improvements are explained by altered interactions in D{sub 2}O crystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer D{sub 2}O is useful additive in sparse-matrix screening for crystallisation. -- Abstract: The use of heavy water (D{sub 2}O) as a solvent is commonplace in many spectroscopic techniques for the study of biological macromolecules. A significant deuterium isotope effect exists where hydrogen-bonding is important, such as in protein stability, dynamics and assembly. Here we illustrate the use of D{sub 2}O in additive screening for the production of reproducible diffraction-quality crystals for the Salmonella enteritidis fimbriae 14 (SEF14) putative tip adhesin, SefD.

  4. phoP, SPI1, SPI2 and aroA mutants of Salmonella Enteritidis induce a different immune response in chickens.

    PubMed

    Elsheimer-Matulova, Marta; Varmuzova, Karolina; Kyrova, Kamila; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Rahman, Masudur; Rychlik, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Poultry is the most frequent reservoir of non-typhoid Salmonella enterica for humans. Understanding the interactions between chickens and S. enterica is therefore important for vaccine design and subsequent decrease in the incidence of human salmonellosis. In this study we therefore characterized the interactions between chickens and phoP, aroA, SPI1 and SPI2 mutants of S. Enteritidis. First we tested the response of HD11 chicken macrophage-like cell line to S. Enteritidis infection monitoring the transcription of 36 genes related to immune response. All the mutants and the wild type strain induced inflammatory signaling in the HD11 cell line though the response to SPI1 mutant infection was different from the rest of the mutants. When newly hatched chickens were inoculated, the phoP as well as the SPI1 mutant did not induce an expression of any of the tested genes in the cecum. Despite this, such chickens were protected against challenge with wild-type S. Enteritidis. On the other hand, inoculation of chickens with the aroA or SPI2 mutant induced expression of 27 and 18 genes, respectively, including genes encoding immunoglobulins. Challenge of chickens inoculated with these two mutants resulted in repeated induction of 11 and 13 tested genes, respectively, including the genes encoding immunoglobulins. In conclusion, SPI1 and phoP mutants induced protective immunity without inducing an inflammatory response and antibody production. Inoculation of chickens with the SPI2 and aroA mutants also led to protective immunity but was associated with inflammation and antibody production. The differences in interaction between the mutants and chicken host can be used for a more detailed understanding of the chicken immune system.

  5. A role for the non-canonical Wnt-ß-Catenin and TGF-ß signaling pathways in the induction of tolerance during the establishment of a Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis persistent cecal infection in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induce an early pro-inflammatory response in chickens. However, the response is short-lived, asymptomatic of disease, resulting in a persistent colonization of the ceca, and fecal shedding of bacteria. The underlying mechanisms that control this persistent infecti...

  6. The relationship between infecting dose and severity of disease in reported outbreaks of Salmonella infections.

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, J. R.; Bradley, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between size of the infecting dose and severity of the resulting disease has been investigated for salmonella infections by reanalysis of data within epidemics for 32 outbreaks, and comparing data between outbreaks for 68 typhoid epidemics and 49 food-poisoning outbreaks due to salmonellas. Attack rate, incubation period, amount of infected food consumed and type of vehicle are used as proxy measures of infecting dose, while case fatality rates for typhoid and case hospitalization rates for food poisoning salmonellas were used to assess severity. Limitations of the data are discussed. Both unweighted and logit analysis models are used. There is no evidence for a dose-severity relationship for Salmonella typhi, but evidence of a correlation between dose and severity is available from within-epidemic or between-epidemic analysis, or both, for Salmonella typhimurium, S. enteritidis, S. infantis, S. newport, and S. thompson. The presence of such a relationship affects the way in which control interventions should be assessed. PMID:1468522

  7. Salmonella

    MedlinePlus

    ... Symptoms Key Resource Enteritidis Infections Linked to Restaurant Chain A 2011 Outbreaks Typhimurium Infections Linked to Ground ... Pulp Hartford and Baildon Infections Associated with Restaurant Chain A I 4,[5],12:i:- Linked to ...

  8. In-Feed Supplementation of trans-Cinnamaldehyde Reduces Layer-Chicken Egg-Borne Transmission of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Indu; Upadhyay, Abhinav; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Mooyottu, Shankumar; Baskaran, Sangeetha A.; Yin, Hsin-Bai; Schreiber, David T.; Khan, Mazhar I.; Darre, Michael J.; Curtis, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a major foodborne pathogen in the United States, causing gastroenteritis in humans, primarily through consumption of contaminated eggs. Chickens are the reservoir host of S. Enteritidis. In layer hens, S. Enteritidis colonizes the intestine and migrates to various organs, including the oviduct, leading to egg contamination. This study investigated the efficacy of in-feed supplementation with trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC), a generally recognized as safe (GRAS) plant compound obtained from cinnamon, in reducing S. Enteritidis cecal colonization and systemic spread in layers. Additionally, the effect of TC on S. Enteritidis virulence factors critical for macrophage survival and oviduct colonization was investigated in vitro. The consumer acceptability of eggs was also determined by a triangle test. Supplementation of TC in feed for 66 days at 1 or 1.5% (vol/wt) for 40- or 25-week-old layer chickens decreased the amounts of S. Enteritidis on eggshell and in yolk (P < 0.001). Additionally, S. Enteritidis persistence in the cecum, liver, and oviduct in TC-supplemented birds was decreased compared to that in controls (P < 0.001). No significant differences in feed intake, body weight, or egg production in birds or in consumer acceptability of eggs were observed (P > 0.05). In vitro cell culture assays revealed that TC reduced S. Enteritidis adhesion to and invasion of primary chicken oviduct epithelial cells and reduced S. Enteritidis survival in chicken macrophages (P < 0.001). Follow-up gene expression analysis using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that TC downregulated the expression of S. Enteritidis virulence genes critical for chicken oviduct colonization (P < 0.001). The results suggest that TC may potentially be used as a feed additive to reduce egg-borne transmission of S. Enteritidis. PMID:25710365

  9. In-feed supplementation of trans-cinnamaldehyde reduces layer-chicken egg-borne transmission of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Indu; Upadhyay, Abhinav; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Mooyottu, Shankumar; Baskaran, Sangeetha A; Yin, Hsin-Bai; Schreiber, David T; Khan, Mazhar I; Darre, Michael J; Curtis, Patricia A; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2015-05-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a major foodborne pathogen in the United States, causing gastroenteritis in humans, primarily through consumption of contaminated eggs. Chickens are the reservoir host of S. Enteritidis. In layer hens, S. Enteritidis colonizes the intestine and migrates to various organs, including the oviduct, leading to egg contamination. This study investigated the efficacy of in-feed supplementation with trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC), a generally recognized as safe (GRAS) plant compound obtained from cinnamon, in reducing S. Enteritidis cecal colonization and systemic spread in layers. Additionally, the effect of TC on S. Enteritidis virulence factors critical for macrophage survival and oviduct colonization was investigated in vitro. The consumer acceptability of eggs was also determined by a triangle test. Supplementation of TC in feed for 66 days at 1 or 1.5% (vol/wt) for 40- or 25-week-old layer chickens decreased the amounts of S. Enteritidis on eggshell and in yolk (P<0.001). Additionally, S. Enteritidis persistence in the cecum, liver, and oviduct in TC-supplemented birds was decreased compared to that in controls (P<0.001). No significant differences in feed intake, body weight, or egg production in birds or in consumer acceptability of eggs were observed (P>0.05). In vitro cell culture assays revealed that TC reduced S. Enteritidis adhesion to and invasion of primary chicken oviduct epithelial cells and reduced S. Enteritidis survival in chicken macrophages (P<0.001). Follow-up gene expression analysis using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that TC downregulated the expression of S. Enteritidis virulence genes critical for chicken oviduct colonization (P<0.001). The results suggest that TC may potentially be used as a feed additive to reduce egg-borne transmission of S. Enteritidis.

  10. Inactivation of Salmonella Enteritidis in chicken breast fillets by single-cycle and multiple-cycle high pressure treatments.

    PubMed

    Morales, Pilar; Calzada, Javier; Rodríguez, Buenaventura; De Paz, Maximo; Nuñez, Manuel

    2009-06-01

    The effect of single-cycle and multiple-cycle high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatments on the survival of three Salmonella Enteritidis strains in chicken breast fillets was investigated. The surface of fillets was inoculated with a cocktail of three Salmonella strains at approximately 10(7) colony-forming units (CFU)/g, and held at 4 degrees C for 20 hours before HHP treatments. Reduction of Salmonella counts on tryptic soy agar (TSA) by single-cycle treatments at 300 MPa and 12 degrees C ranged from 0.58 log CFU/g for a 0-minute (no dwell time) cycle to 3.35 log CFU/g for a 20-minute cycle, whereas with 400 MPa treatments the decline ranged from 0.93 log CFU/g to more than 5 log CFU/g, respectively. The 4.8 log unit reduction in Salmonella counts on TSA achieved by a 15-minute treatment at 400 MPa should suffice to eliminate the pathogen naturally present in contaminated chicken meat. When plated on Salmonella Shigella agar (SSA), the reduction of Salmonella counts by single-cycle treatments at 300 MPa and 12 degrees C ranged from 0.69 log CFU/g for a 0-minute cycle to 4.21 log CFU/g for a 20-minute cycle, and with 400 MPa treatments from 1.25 log CFU/g to more than 5 log CFU/g, respectively. From the comparison of Salmonella counts on SSA and TSA it was concluded that not only the lethality but also the proportion of injured Salmonella cells increased with the length of HHP treatments. The use of multiple-cycle treatments instead of single-cycle treatments of the same HHP time for the inactivation of Salmonella Enteritidis inoculated on chicken breast fillets showed to be more advantageous at 400 MPa than at 300 MPa. No recovery of injured Salmonella cells was observed when fillets treated at 300 or 400 MPa for 5 minutes were held for 72 hours at 4 degrees C.

  11. Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis in England: costs to patients, their families, and primary and community health services of the NHS.

    PubMed

    Santos, A C; Roberts, J A; Cook, A J C; Simons, R; Sheehan, R; Lane, C; Adak, G K; Clifton-Hadley, F A; Rodrigues, L C

    2011-05-01

    This is the first study comparing societal costs of acute illness with Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) and Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in the UK. It included the cost and severity of the illness and explored the impact of each Salmonella serovar on the patients, their families, the NHS, and the wider economy. The study ascertained confirmed cases of ST and SE between July and November 2008. The mean costs per case were £1282 (ST) and £993 (SE). The indirect costs associated with the work-time lost by the case, parents, or carers were £409 (ST) and £228 (SE); this difference was statistically significant. The aggregate cost of ST and SE identified using laboratory test results for the UK as a whole was estimated as £6.5 million. Work-time lost and caring activities are cost categories that are not frequently investigated within the infectious intestinal disease literature, although they represent an important societal cost.

  12. Bacteriophage-induced reduction in Salmonella Enteritidis counts in the crop of broiler chickens undergoing preslaughter feed withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Guilherme Augusto Marietto; Donato, Tais Cremasco; Baptista, Ana Angelita Sampaio; Corrêa, Isadora Mainieri de Oliveira; Garcia, Keila Carolina Ornellas Dutka; Andreatti Filho, Raphael Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella food poisoning is a public health problem. Feed withdrawal from broiler chickens before slaughter can favor the multiplication of Salmonella in the cecum and crop of contaminated animals and subsequently lead to contamination of carcasses in the processing plant. In the present study, a cocktail of lytic bacteriophages isolated from sewage water was orally administered to 45-d-old broiler chickens 1 h after they received an oral dose of 10(7) cfu/mL Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype Enteritidis. Immediately after phage administration and 30 min, 1, 3, 6, and 12 h thereafter, groups of chicken were killed. Ceca and crops were analyzed for the presence of Salmonella. At 3 h posttreatment, there were 10(3) cfu/g and 10(1) cfu/g of cecal and crop suspension, respectively. At 6 h after treatment, the number of Salmonella was 10(3) cfu/g in the cecal suspension, but below the detection limit in the crops. Our results suggest that bacteriophage therapy may be able to reduce the contamination of chicken carcasses by reducing the preslaughter load of Salmonella in the birds. PMID:24570442

  13. A multi-country Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 14b outbreak associated with eggs from a German producer: 'near real-time' application of whole genome sequencing and food chain investigations, United Kingdom, May to September 2014.

    PubMed

    Inns, T; Lane, C; Peters, T; Dallman, T; Chatt, C; McFarland, N; Crook, P; Bishop, T; Edge, J; Hawker, J; Elson, R; Neal, K; Adak, G K; Cleary, P

    2015-04-23

    We report an outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 14b (PT14b) in the United Kingdom (UK) between May and September 2014 where Public Health England launched an investigation to identify the source of infection and implement control measures. During the same period, outbreaks caused by a Salmonella Enteritidis strain with a specific multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) profile occurred in other European Union Member States. Isolates from a number of persons affected by the UK outbreak, who had initially been tested by MLVA also shared this particular profile. Cases were defined as any person infected with S. Enteritidis PT14b, resident in England or Wales and without history of travel outside of this geographical area during the incubation period, reported from 1 June 2014 onwards, with a MLVA profile of 2–11–9-7–4-3–2-8–9 or a single locus variant thereof. In total, 287 cases met the definition. Food traceback investigations in the UK and other affected European countries linked the outbreaks to chicken eggs from a German company. We undertook whole genome sequencing of isolates from UK and European cases, implicated UK premises, and German eggs: isolates were highly similar. Combined with food traceback information, this confirmed that the UK outbreak was also linked to a German producer.

  14. Role of the flagellar basal-body protein, FlgC, in the binding of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis to host cells.

    PubMed

    Shippy, Daniel C; Eakley, Nicholas M; Mikheil, Dareen M; Fadl, Amin A

    2014-05-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) infection in humans is often associated with the consumption of contaminated poultry products. Binding of the bacterium to the intestinal mucosa is a major pathogenic mechanism of Salmonella in poultry. Transposon mutagenesis identified flgC as a potential binding mutant of SE. Therefore, we hypothesize FlgC which plays a significant role in the binding ability of SE to the intestinal mucosa of poultry. To test our hypothesis, we created a mutant of SE in which flgC was deleted. We then tested the in vitro and in vivo binding ability of ∆flgC when compared to the wild-type SE strain. Our data showed a significant decrease in the binding ability of ∆flgC to intestinal epithelial cells as well as in the small intestine and cecum of poultry. Furthermore, the decrease in binding correlated to a defect in invasion as shown by a cell culture model using intestinal epithelial cells and bacterial recovery from the livers and spleens of chickens. Overall, these studies indicate FlgC is a major factor in the binding ability of Salmonella to the intestinal mucosa of poultry.

  15. Poultry body temperature contributes to invasion control through reduced expression of Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 genes in Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Troxell, Bryan; Petri, Nicholas; Daron, Caitlyn; Pereira, Rafaela; Mendoza, Mary; Hassan, Hosni M; Koci, Matthew D

    2015-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) and Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) are foodborne pathogens, and outbreaks are often associated with poultry products. Chickens are typically asymptomatic when colonized by these serovars; however, the factors contributing to this observation are uncharacterized. Whereas symptomatic mammals have a body temperature between 37°C and 39°C, chickens have a body temperature of 41°C to 42°C. Here, in vivo experiments using chicks demonstrated that numbers of viable S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis bacteria within the liver and spleen organ sites were ≥4 orders of magnitude lower than those within the ceca. When similar doses of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis were given to C3H/HeN mice, the ratio of the intestinal concentration to the liver/spleen concentration was 1:1. In the avian host, this suggested poor survival within these tissues or a reduced capacity to traverse the host epithelial layer and reach liver/spleen sites or both. Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) promotes localization to liver/spleen tissues through invasion of the epithelial cell layer. Following in vitro growth at 42°C, SPI-1 genes sipC, invF, and hilA and the SPI-1 rtsA activator were downregulated compared to expression at 37°C. Overexpression of the hilA activators fur, fliZ, and hilD was capable of inducing hilA-lacZ at 37°C but not at 42°C despite the presence of similar levels of protein at the two temperatures. In contrast, overexpression of either hilC or rtsA was capable of inducing hilA and sipC at 42°C. These data indicate that physiological parameters of the poultry host, such as body temperature, have a role in modulating expression of virulence. PMID:26386070

  16. Poultry Body Temperature Contributes to Invasion Control through Reduced Expression of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 Genes in Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Petri, Nicholas; Daron, Caitlyn; Pereira, Rafaela; Mendoza, Mary; Hassan, Hosni M.; Koci, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) and Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) are foodborne pathogens, and outbreaks are often associated with poultry products. Chickens are typically asymptomatic when colonized by these serovars; however, the factors contributing to this observation are uncharacterized. Whereas symptomatic mammals have a body temperature between 37°C and 39°C, chickens have a body temperature of 41°C to 42°C. Here, in vivo experiments using chicks demonstrated that numbers of viable S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis bacteria within the liver and spleen organ sites were ≥4 orders of magnitude lower than those within the ceca. When similar doses of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis were given to C3H/HeN mice, the ratio of the intestinal concentration to the liver/spleen concentration was 1:1. In the avian host, this suggested poor survival within these tissues or a reduced capacity to traverse the host epithelial layer and reach liver/spleen sites or both. Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) promotes localization to liver/spleen tissues through invasion of the epithelial cell layer. Following in vitro growth at 42°C, SPI-1 genes sipC, invF, and hilA and the SPI-1 rtsA activator were downregulated compared to expression at 37°C. Overexpression of the hilA activators fur, fliZ, and hilD was capable of inducing hilA-lacZ at 37°C but not at 42°C despite the presence of similar levels of protein at the two temperatures. In contrast, overexpression of either hilC or rtsA was capable of inducing hilA and sipC at 42°C. These data indicate that physiological parameters of the poultry host, such as body temperature, have a role in modulating expression of virulence. PMID:26386070

  17. Poultry body temperature contributes to invasion control through reduced expression of Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 genes in Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Troxell, Bryan; Petri, Nicholas; Daron, Caitlyn; Pereira, Rafaela; Mendoza, Mary; Hassan, Hosni M; Koci, Matthew D

    2015-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) and Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) are foodborne pathogens, and outbreaks are often associated with poultry products. Chickens are typically asymptomatic when colonized by these serovars; however, the factors contributing to this observation are uncharacterized. Whereas symptomatic mammals have a body temperature between 37°C and 39°C, chickens have a body temperature of 41°C to 42°C. Here, in vivo experiments using chicks demonstrated that numbers of viable S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis bacteria within the liver and spleen organ sites were ≥4 orders of magnitude lower than those within the ceca. When similar doses of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis were given to C3H/HeN mice, the ratio of the intestinal concentration to the liver/spleen concentration was 1:1. In the avian host, this suggested poor survival within these tissues or a reduced capacity to traverse the host epithelial layer and reach liver/spleen sites or both. Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) promotes localization to liver/spleen tissues through invasion of the epithelial cell layer. Following in vitro growth at 42°C, SPI-1 genes sipC, invF, and hilA and the SPI-1 rtsA activator were downregulated compared to expression at 37°C. Overexpression of the hilA activators fur, fliZ, and hilD was capable of inducing hilA-lacZ at 37°C but not at 42°C despite the presence of similar levels of protein at the two temperatures. In contrast, overexpression of either hilC or rtsA was capable of inducing hilA and sipC at 42°C. These data indicate that physiological parameters of the poultry host, such as body temperature, have a role in modulating expression of virulence.

  18. Invasive Infections with Nontyphoidal Salmonella in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Barbara E; Fields, Patricia I

    2016-06-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections in Africa cause an enormous burden of illness. These infections are often devastating, with mortality estimated at 20%, even with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Two major groups-young children and HIV-infected adults-suffer the great majority of these infections. In children, younger age itself, as well as malaria, malnutrition, and HIV infection, are prominent risk factors. In adults, HIV infection is by far the most important risk factor. The most common serotypes in invasive infections are Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhimurium and Enteritidis. In recent years, a specific strain of Salmonella Typhimurium, multilocus sequence type 313, has caused epidemics of invasive disease. Little is known about risk factors for exposure to NTS, making the design of rational interventions to decrease exposure difficult. Antimicrobial therapy is critically important for treatment of invasive NTS infections. Thus, the emergence and spread of resistance to agents commonly used for treatment of invasive NTS infection, now including third-generation cephalosporins, is an ominous development. Already, many invasive NTS infections are essentially untreatable in many health care facilities in sub-Saharan Africa. Several candidate vaccines are in early development and, if safe and effective, could be promising. Interventions to prevent exposure to NTS (e.g., improved sanitation), to prevent the occurrence of disease if exposure does occur (e.g., vaccination, malaria control), and to prevent severe disease and death in those who become ill (e.g., preserving antimicrobial effectiveness) are all important in reducing the toll of invasive NTS disease in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27337467

  19. Invasive Infections with Nontyphoidal Salmonella in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Barbara E; Fields, Patricia I

    2016-06-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections in Africa cause an enormous burden of illness. These infections are often devastating, with mortality estimated at 20%, even with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Two major groups-young children and HIV-infected adults-suffer the great majority of these infections. In children, younger age itself, as well as malaria, malnutrition, and HIV infection, are prominent risk factors. In adults, HIV infection is by far the most important risk factor. The most common serotypes in invasive infections are Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhimurium and Enteritidis. In recent years, a specific strain of Salmonella Typhimurium, multilocus sequence type 313, has caused epidemics of invasive disease. Little is known about risk factors for exposure to NTS, making the design of rational interventions to decrease exposure difficult. Antimicrobial therapy is critically important for treatment of invasive NTS infections. Thus, the emergence and spread of resistance to agents commonly used for treatment of invasive NTS infection, now including third-generation cephalosporins, is an ominous development. Already, many invasive NTS infections are essentially untreatable in many health care facilities in sub-Saharan Africa. Several candidate vaccines are in early development and, if safe and effective, could be promising. Interventions to prevent exposure to NTS (e.g., improved sanitation), to prevent the occurrence of disease if exposure does occur (e.g., vaccination, malaria control), and to prevent severe disease and death in those who become ill (e.g., preserving antimicrobial effectiveness) are all important in reducing the toll of invasive NTS disease in sub-Saharan Africa.

  20. Procalcitonin levels in salmonella infection

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vikas; Sorabjee, Jehangir

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Procalcitonin (PCT) as a diagnostic marker for bacteremia and sepsis has been extensively studied. We aimed to study PCT levels in Salmonella infections whether they would serve as marker for early diagnosis in endemic areas to start empiric treatment while awaiting blood culture report. Materials and Methods: BACTEC blood culture was used to isolate Salmonella in suspected enteric fever patients. Serum PCT levels were estimated before starting treatment. Results: In 60 proven enteric fever patients, median value of serum PCT levels was 0.22 ng/ml, values ranging between 0.05 and 4 ng/ml. 95% of patients had near normal or mild increase (<0.5 ng/ml), only 5% of patients showed elevated levels. Notably, high PCT levels were found only in severe sepsis. Conclusion: PCT levels in Salmonella infections are near normal or minimally increased which differentiates it from other systemic Gram-negative infections. PCT cannot be used as a specific diagnostic marker of typhoid. PMID:26321807

  1. Salmonella Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of most infections start within 3 days of contamination and usually go away without medical treatment. At ... surfaces regularly. Salmonellosis also can spread through cross-contamination, so when you're preparing meals, keep uncooked ...

  2. Comparison of Genotypes of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Phage Type 30 and 9c Strains Isolated during Three Outbreaks Associated with Raw Almonds▿

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Craig T.; Huynh, Steven; Quiñones, Beatriz; Harris, Linda J.; Mandrell, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    In 2000 to 2001, 2003 to 2004, and 2005 to 2006, three outbreaks of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis were linked with the consumption of raw almonds. The S. Enteritidis strains from these outbreaks had rare phage types (PT), PT30 and PT9c. Clinical and environmental S. Enteritidis strains were subjected to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), and DNA microarray-based comparative genomic indexing (CGI) to evaluate their genetic relatedness. All three methods differentiated these S. Enteritidis strains in a manner that correlated with PT. The CGI analysis confirmed that the majority of the differences between the S. Enteritidis PT9c and PT30 strains corresponded to bacteriophage-related genes present in the sequenced genomes of S. Enteritidis PT4 and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2. However, PFGE, MLVA, and CGI failed to discriminate between S. Enteritidis PT30 strains related to outbreaks from unrelated clinical strains or between strains separated by up to 5 years. However, metabolic fingerprinting demonstrated that S. Enteritidis PT4, PT8, PT13a, and clinical PT30 strains metabolized l-aspartic acid, l-glutamic acid, l-proline, l-alanine, and d-alanine amino acids more efficiently than S. Enteritidis PT30 strains isolated from orchards. These data indicate that S. Enteritidis PT9c and 30 strains are highly related genetically and that PT30 orchard strains differ from clinical PT30 strains metabolically, possibly due to fitness adaptations. PMID:20363782

  3. Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis ghosts carrying the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit are capable of inducing enhanced protective immune responses.

    PubMed

    Jawale, Chetan V; Lee, John Hwa

    2014-06-01

    The Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) is a potent vaccine adjuvant. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ghosts carrying LTB (S. Enteritidis-LTB ghosts) were genetically constructed using a novel plasmid, pJHL187-LTB, designed for the coexpression of the LTB and E lysis proteins. S. Enteritidis-LTB ghosts were characterized using scanning electron microscopy to visualize their transmembrane tunnel structures. The expression of LTB in S. Enteritidis-LTB ghost preparations was confirmed by immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The parenteral adjuvant activity of LTB was demonstrated by immunizing chickens with either S. Enteritidis-LTB ghosts or S. Enteritidis ghosts. Chickens were intramuscularly primed at 5 weeks of age and subsequently boosted at 8 weeks of age. In total, 60 chickens were equally divided into three groups (n = 20 for each): group A, nonvaccinated control; group B, immunized with S. Enteritidis-LTB ghosts; and group C, immunized with S. Enteritidis ghosts. Compared with the nonimmunized chickens (group A), the immunized chickens (groups B and C) exhibited increased titers of plasma IgG and intestinal secretory IgA antibodies. The CD3(+) CD4(+) subpopulation of T cells was also significantly increased in both immunized groups. Among the immunized chickens, those in group B exhibited significantly increased titers of specific plasma IgG and intestinal secretory IgA (sIgA) antibodies compared with those in group C, indicating the immunomodulatory effects of the LTB adjuvant. Furthermore, both immunized groups exhibited decreased bacterial loads in their feces and internal organs. These results indicate that parenteral immunization with S. Enteritidis-LTB ghosts can stimulate superior induction of systemic and mucosal immune responses compared to immunization with S. Enteritidis ghosts alone, thus conferring efficient protection against salmonellosis. PMID:24671556

  4. Vaccine potential of a nonflagellated, virulence-plasmid-cured (fliD-, pSEVΔ) mutant of Salmonella Enteritidis for chickens.

    PubMed

    Imre, Ariel; Szmolka, Ama; Olasz, Ferenc; Nagy, Béla

    2015-09-01

    The aim of these studies was to assess residual virulence and early protective capacity of a negatively markered live attenuated vaccine candidate Salmonella Enteritidis mutant against a highly virulent S. Enteritidis strain using a dayold chicken model. Nonflagellated FliD negative mutants of Salmonella Enteritidis 11 (SE11) with and without the virulence plasmid proved to be sufficiently attenuated (limited invasiveness in vitro/in vivo) without reduced ability to colonise chicken gut. The early protective activity of a nonflagellated, virulence-plasmidcured (fliD-, pSEVΔ) mutant against organ invasion, caecal colonisation and faecal shedding by the highly virulent challenge strain S. Enteritidis 147 Nal(R) proved to be effective and safe. The innate and adaptive immunity was demonstrable during the first four weeks of life, and the serological response was clearly distinguishable from the response induced by the wild parental strain. In conclusion, we provided data for the first time about a virulence-plasmid-cured, nonflagellated mutant of S. Enteritidis to serve as a basis for development of a negatively markered potential live oral vaccine against virulent S. Enteritidis in chicken. PMID:26551419

  5. Effect of steam and lactic acid treatments on the survival of Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni inoculated on chicken skin.

    PubMed

    Chaine, Aline; Arnaud, Elodie; Kondjoyan, Alain; Collignan, Antoine; Sarter, Samira

    2013-04-01

    Campylobacteriosis and salmonellosis are the most frequently reported zoonotic infectious diseases. The present work evaluated the effectiveness of steam treatment at 100 °C for 8s, a 5% lactic acid treatment for 1 min and their combination for inactivating Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni inoculated on chicken skin. The impact of each treatment on the total aerobic mesophilic bacteria and the effect of rinsing after contact with lactic acid were also evaluated. Residual bacteria were counted immediately after treatment or after seven days of storage at 4 °C. Results demonstrated the immediate efficiency of the steam and the combined treatments with reductions of approximately 6 and 5 log cfu/cm2 respectively for S. Enteritidis and C. jejuni. They also showed significant reductions (equal to or >3.2 log cfu/cm2) in the total aerobic mesophilic plate count. Lactic acid had a persistent effect on pathogen growth during storage which was significantly higher when the skin was not rinsed, reaching reductions of 3.8 log cfu/cm2 for both S. Enteritidis and C. jejuni. Only the combined treatments significantly reduced the recovery of the total aerobic mesophilic bacteria during storage. The significant reductions in both pathogens and total aerobic mesophilic bacteria on treated chicken skins are possible ways to improve the safety and shelf life of the product although high levels of indigenous non-pathogenic bacteria may be beneficial due to their protective effect against potential re-contamination of chicken skin.

  6. Prevalence and Spatial Distribution of Salmonella Infections in the Pennsylvania Raccoon (Procyon lotor).

    PubMed

    Very, K J; Kirchner, M K; Shariat, N; Cottrell, W; Sandt, C H; Dudley, E G; Kariyawasam, S; Jayarao, B M

    2016-05-01

    A study was conducted to determine the prevalence and spatial distribution of Salmonella infection in Pennsylvania raccoons (Procyon lotor), common wildlife mammals known to occupy overlapping habitats with humans and domestic food animals. The Pennsylvania Game Commission provided a total of 371 raccoon intestinal samples from trapped and road-killed raccoons collected between May and November 2011. Salmonella was isolated from the faeces of 56 (15.1%) of 371 raccoons in 35 (54%) of 65 counties across Pennsylvania. The five most frequently isolated serotypes were Newport (28.6%), Enteritidis (19.6%), Typhimurium (10.7%), Braenderup (8.9%) and Bareilly (7.1%). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of the Salmonella isolates and subsequent comparison to the Pennsylvania Department of Health human Salmonella PFGE database revealed 16 different pulsetypes in Salmonella isolates recovered from raccoons that were indistinguishable from pulsetypes of Salmonella collected from clinically ill humans during the study period. The pulsetypes of seven raccoon Salmonella isolates matched those of 56 human Salmonella isolates by month and geographical region of sample collection. Results from Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats and Multi-Virulence Locus Sequence Typing (CRISPR-MVLST) analysis corroborated the PFGE and serotyping data. The findings of this study show that several PFGE pulsetypes of Salmonella were shared between humans and raccoons in Pennsylvania, indicating that raccoons and humans might share the same source of Salmonella.

  7. Removal of Salmonella enterica Enteritidis and Escherichia coli from green peppers and melons by ultrasound and organic acids.

    PubMed

    José, Jackline Freitas Brilhante de São; de Medeiros, Hiasmyne Silva; Bernardes, Patrícia Campos; de Andrade, Nélio José

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of ultrasound treatment combined with organic acids in the decontamination step for green peppers and melons. The influence of the surface roughness of the peppers and melons on bacterial adhesion was evaluated, as measured using a profilometer. The adhesion of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and Escherichia coli to the green pepper and melon surfaces was also evaluated by measuring the hydrophobicity of the microorganisms and the surfaces. The bacteria that adhered to the surface of green peppers and melons was quantified by plate count and visualized by scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the efficiency of ultrasound and organic acids to remove bacteria from the pepper and melon surfaces was examined. The average roughness (Ra) of the green peppers (13.0±2.7 nm) was significantly different (p>0.05) from the melons (33.5±7.9 nm). Adherence of S. Enteritidis and E. coli are thermodynamically unfavorable for both surfaces studied (∆G(adhesion)>0). Despite these data, good adhesion occurred on both surfaces. The number of bacteria on green pepper slices was 7.3 and 7.0 log CFU/cm(2) for E. coli and S. enterica Enteritidis, respectively. For melon surfaces, the number of bacteria was 7.0 and 6.9 log CFU/cm(2) for E. coli and S. Enteritidis, respectively. The greater adherence of both bacteria on the green peppers can be explained by its hydrophobic surface; the hydrophilic surfaces of melons resulted in lower adherence. These results suggest that the adhesion observed in this experiment is a multifactorial process. Among the treatments evaluated for green peppers, a higher removal of pathogens was observed after use of a combination of ultrasound and 1% lactic acid; this treatment reduced E. coli and Salmonella by 2.9 and 2.8 log CFU/cm(2), respectively. For melons, the combination of ultrasound and lactic acid showed a reduction of 2.5 and 3.1 log CFU/cm(2) for E. coli and S. Enteritidis

  8. Salmonella Enteritidis outbreak associated with a school-lunch dessert: cross-contamination and a long incubation period, Japan, 2001.

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, T.; Suzuki, S.; Takahashi, H.; Ohyama, T.; Kobayashi, J.; Izumiya, H.; Watanabe, H.; Kasuga, F.; Kijima, H.; Shibata, K.; Okabe, N.

    2004-01-01

    A Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) outbreak in Japan was investigated with an observational study, analytical epidemiology and bacteriological examination (including phage typing). The outbreak occurred among 96 schoolchildren, and was caused by SE phage type 1. The outbreak source was dessert buns served at a school lunch (RR 42.55, 95 % CI 5.93-305.11, P < 0.001). The buns were probably cross-contaminated from eggs from a factory with a history of SE-contaminated products. The incubation period was longer than usual (3-16 days, median 8 days). A low contaminating dose may account for the long incubation period and low attack rate. Outbreak detection was hampered by the absence of routine Salmonella surveillance in Japan. The investigation was complicated by concurrent illnesses from other SE phage types. It was successful, in part, because adequate food samples were available for microbiological testing. PMID:15473150

  9. Three Epidemics of Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Bloodstream Infection in Blantyre, Malawi, 1998–2014

    PubMed Central

    Feasey, Nicholas A.; Masesa, Clemens; Jassi, Chikondi; Faragher, E. Brian; Mallewa, Jane; Mallewa, Macpherson; MacLennan, Calman A.; Msefula, Chisomo; Heyderman, Robert S.; Gordon, Melita A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Malawi Liverpool Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme (MLW) has routinely collected specimens for blood culture from febrile patients, and cerebrospinal fluid from patients with suspected meningitis, presenting to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), Blantyre, Malawi, since 1998. Methods. We present bloodstream infection (BSI) and meningitis surveillance data from 1998 to 2014. Automated blood culture, manual speciation, serotyping, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed at MLW. Population data for minimum-incidence estimates in urban Blantyre were drawn from published estimates. Results. Between 1998 and 2014, 167 028 blood cultures were taken from adult and pediatric medical patients presenting to QECH; Salmonella Typhi was isolated on 2054 occasions (1.2%) and nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars were isolated 10 139 times (6.1%), of which 8017 (79.1%) were Salmonella Typhimurium and 1608 (15.8%) were Salmonella Enteritidis. There were 392 cases of NTS meningitis and 9 cases of Salmonella Typhi meningitis. There have been 3 epidemics of Salmonella BSI in Blantyre; Salmonella Enteritidis from 1999 to 2002, Salmonella Typhimurium from 2002 to 2008, and Salmonella Typhi, which began in 2011 and was ongoing in 2014. Multidrug resistance has emerged in all 3 serovars and is seen in the overwhelming majority of isolates, while resistance to third-generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones is currently uncommon but has been identified. Conclusions. Invasive Salmonella disease in Malawi is dynamic and not clearly attributable to a single risk factor, although all 3 epidemics were associated with multidrug resistance. To inform nonvaccine and vaccine interventions, reservoirs of disease and modes of transmission require further investigation. PMID:26449953

  10. Biosurfactant Produced by Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 Can Increase Adherence and Resistance to Sanitizers on Lettuce Leaves (Lactuca sativa L., cichoraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Eliandra M.; Beilke, Luniele; Kochhann, Marília; Sarzi, Diana H.; Tondo, Eduardo C.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 is an important foodborne pathogen in Southern Brazil and it is able to produce a biosurfactant. However, the importance of this compound for the microorganism is still unknown. This study aimed to investigate the influence of the biosurfactant produced by S. Enteritidis SE86 on adherence to slices of lettuce leaves and on resistance to sanitizers. First, lettuce leaves were inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE86 in order to determine the amount of biosurfactant produced. Subsequently, lettuce leaves were inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE86 with and without the biosurfactant, and the adherence and bacterial resistance to different sanitization methods were evaluated. S. Enteritidis SE86 produced biosurfactant after 16 h (emulsification index of 11 to 52.15 percent, P < 0.05) and showed greater adherence capability and resistance to sanitization methods when the compound was present. The scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that S. Enteritidis was able to adhere, form lumps, and invade the lettuce leaves’ stomata in the presence of the biosurfactant. Results indicated that the biosurfactant produced by S. Enteritidis SE86 contributed to adherence and increased resistance to sanitizers when the microorganism was present on lettuce leaves. PMID:26834727

  11. The combination of CRISPR-MVLST and PFGE provides increased discriminatory power for differentiating human clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Shariat, Nikki; DiMarzio, Michael J; Yin, Shuang; Dettinger, Lisa; Sandt, Carol H; Lute, James R; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Dudley, Edward G

    2013-05-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major cause of foodborne salmonellosis. Rapid, efficient and accurate methods for identification are required to track specific strains of S. Enteritidis during outbreaks of human salmonellosis. By exploiting the hypervariable nature of virulence genes and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs), we previously developed a powerful sequence-based subtyping approach, designated CRISPR-MVLST. To substantiate the applicability of CRISPR-MVLST, we analyzed a broad set of S. Enteritidis isolates collected over a six-year period. Among 141 isolates we defined 22 Enteritidis Sequence Types (ESTs), the majority of which were novel. Notably, strains exhibiting the common PFGE pattern, JEGX01.0004 (characteristic of ∼40% of S. Enteritidis isolates in the United States), were separated into twelve distinct sequence types. Conversely, isolates of EST4, the most predominant EST we observed, comprised eight different PFGE patterns. Importantly, we showed that some genotypes that were previously associated with the food supply chain at the farm level have now been identified in clinical samples. CRISPR sequence data shows subtle but distinct differences among different alleles of S. Enteritidis, suggesting that evolution of these loci occurs vertically, as opposed to previously reported evolution by spacer acquisition in other bacteria.

  12. Biosurfactant Produced by Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 Can Increase Adherence and Resistance to Sanitizers on Lettuce Leaves (Lactuca sativa L., cichoraceae).

    PubMed

    Rossi, Eliandra M; Beilke, Luniele; Kochhann, Marília; Sarzi, Diana H; Tondo, Eduardo C

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 is an important foodborne pathogen in Southern Brazil and it is able to produce a biosurfactant. However, the importance of this compound for the microorganism is still unknown. This study aimed to investigate the influence of the biosurfactant produced by S. Enteritidis SE86 on adherence to slices of lettuce leaves and on resistance to sanitizers. First, lettuce leaves were inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE86 in order to determine the amount of biosurfactant produced. Subsequently, lettuce leaves were inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE86 with and without the biosurfactant, and the adherence and bacterial resistance to different sanitization methods were evaluated. S. Enteritidis SE86 produced biosurfactant after 16 h (emulsification index of 11 to 52.15 percent, P < 0.05) and showed greater adherence capability and resistance to sanitization methods when the compound was present. The scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that S. Enteritidis was able to adhere, form lumps, and invade the lettuce leaves' stomata in the presence of the biosurfactant. Results indicated that the biosurfactant produced by S. Enteritidis SE86 contributed to adherence and increased resistance to sanitizers when the microorganism was present on lettuce leaves. PMID:26834727

  13. Whole-Genome Sequencing Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Isolates in Chile Provides Insights into Possible Transmission between Gulls, Poultry, and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Sherry; Barreto, Marlen; Allard, Marc; Brown, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Enteritidis is a major cause of human salmonellosis worldwide; however, little is known about the genetic relationships between S. Enteritidis clinical strains and S. Enteritidis strains from other sources in Chile. We compared the whole genomes of 30 S. Enteritidis strains isolated from gulls, domestic chicken eggs, and humans in Chile, to investigate their phylogenetic relationships and to establish their relatedness to international strains. Core genome multilocus sequence typing (cgMLST) analysis showed that only 246/4,065 shared loci differed among these Chilean strains, separating them into two clusters (I and II), with cluster II being further divided into five subclusters. One subcluster (subcluster 2) contained strains from all surveyed sources that differed at 1 to 18 loci (of 4,065 loci) with 1 to 18 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), suggesting interspecies transmission of S. Enteritidis in Chile. Moreover, clusters were formed by strains that were distant geographically, which could imply that gulls might be spreading the pathogen throughout the country. Our cgMLST analysis, using other S. Enteritidis genomes available in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database, showed that S. Enteritidis strains from Chile and the United States belonged to different lineages, which suggests that S. Enteritidis regional markers might exist and could be used for trace-back investigations. IMPORTANCE This study highlights the importance of gulls in the spread of Salmonella Enteritidis in Chile. We revealed a close genetic relationship between some human and gull S. Enteritidis strains (with as few as 2 of 4,065 genes being different), and we also found that gull strains were present in clusters formed by strains isolated from other sources or distant locations. Together with previously published evidence, this suggests that gulls might be spreading this pathogen between different regions

  14. Inactivation of Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella senftenberg in liquid whole egg using generally recognized as safe additives, ionizing radiation, and heat.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Ignacio; Niemira, Brendan A; Fan, Xuetong; Sommers, Christopher H

    2007-06-01

    The effect of combining irradiation and heat (i.e., irradiation followed by heat [IR-H]) on Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Senftenberg inoculated into liquid whole egg (LWE) with added nisin, EDTA, sorbic acid, carvacrol, or combinations of these GRAS (generally recognized as safe) additives was investigated. Synergistic reductions of Salmonella populations were observed when LWE samples containing GRAS additives were treated by gamma radiation (0.3 and 1.0 kGy), heat (57 and 60 degrees C), or IR-H. The presence of additives reduced the initial radiation Dgamma -values (radiation doses required to eliminate 90% of the viable cells) by 1.2- to 1.5-fold, the thermal decimal reduction times (D,-values) by up to 3.5- and 1.8-fold at 57 and 60 degrees C, respectively, and the thermal D,-values after irradiation treatments by up to 3.4- and 1.5-fold at 57 and 60 degrees C, respectively, for both Salmonella serovars. Of all the additives investigated, nisin at a concentration of 100 IU/ml was the most effective at reducing the heat treatment times needed to obtain a 5-log reduction of Salmonella. Thus, while treatments of 21.6 min at 57 degrees C or of 5 min at 60 degrees C should be applied to achieve a 5-log reduction for Salmonella in LWE, only 5.5 min at 57 degrees C or 2.3 min at 60 degrees C after a 0.3-kGy radiation pretreatment was required when nisin at a concentration of 100 IU/ml was used. The synergistic reduction of Salmonella viability by IR-H treatments in the presence of GRAS additives could enable LWE producers to reduce the temperature or processing time of thermal treatments (current standards are 60'C for 3.5 min in the United States) or to increase the level of Salmonella inactivation.

  15. Differential innate immune responses of bovine peripheral blood leukocytes to Salmonella enterica serovars Dublin, Typhimurium, and Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Deng; Rostagno, Marcos H; Ebner, Paul D; Eicher, Susan D

    2015-05-15

    The majority of Salmonella serovars cause no clinical disease in cattle, while some are associated with severe disease. The objective of the current study was to determine the innate immune responses of bovine peripheral blood leukocytes exposed to Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (bovine-specific), Salmonella typhimurium (murine adapted, but zoonotic), and Salmonella enteritidis (poultry host-adapted) in 3-week-old calves. All Salmonella exposures increased cell surface CD14 and CD18 regardless of serovar. The greatest CD14 marker mean fluorescence was in monocytes and the greatest mean fluorescent of the marker mean was in neutrophils. Phagocytosis increased with all serovars, but was not different among them. Neutrophils had the greatest marker mean fluorescence for phagocytosis, with all serovars being equal. Oxidative burst increased in all serovars compared to control cells, but were not different among the serovars. Neutrophils and monocytes were similar in the oxidative burst, with limited oxidative burst detected in the primarily lymphocyte population. mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-12, increased above the control cells whereas none of these serovars affected mRNA expression of TLR4. TNF-α was greatest in S. enterica and S. typhimurium, compared to Salmonella dublin. In contrast, IL-8 was expressed more in S. dublin than S. typhiurium, with S. Enteriditus intermediary. These results show while cell surface markers, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst were largely unaffected by serovar, cytokine and chemokine expression differed among the Salmonella serovars. It appears that internal responses of the cells differ, rather than cell recognition, creating pathogenicity differences among of the serovars, even in the neonate with developing immunity.

  16. Salmonella infections associated with international travel: a Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Laura R; Gould, L Hannah; Dunn, John R; Berkelman, Ruth; Mahon, Barbara E

    2011-09-01

    Salmonella species cause an estimated 1.2 million infections per year in the United States, making it one of the most commonly reported enteric pathogens. In addition, Salmonella is an important cause of travel-associated diarrhea and enteric fever, a systemic illness commonly associated with Salmonella serotypes Typhi and Paratyphi A. We reviewed cases of Salmonella infection reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet), a sentinel surveillance network, from 2004 to 2008. We compared travelers with Salmonella infection to nontravelers with Salmonella infection with respect to demographics, clinical characteristics, and serotypes. Among 23,712 case-patients with known travel status, 11% had traveled internationally in the 7 days before illness. Travelers with Salmonella infection tended to be older (median age, 30 years) than nontravelers (median age, 24 years; p<0.0001), but were similar with respect to gender. The most common destinations reported were Mexico (38% of travel-associated infections), India (9%), Jamaica (7%), the Dominican Republic (4%), China (3%), and the Bahamas (2%). The proportions of travelers with Salmonella infection hospitalized and with invasive disease were inversely related to the income level of the destination (p<0.0001). The most commonly reported serotypes, regardless of travel status, were Enteritidis (19% of cases), Typhimurium (14%), Newport (9%), and Javiana (5%). Among infections caused by these four serotypes, 22%, 6%, 5%, and 4%, respectively, were associated with travel. A high index of clinical suspicion for Salmonella infection is appropriate when evaluating recent travelers, especially those who visited Africa, Asia, or Latin America.

  17. Reduction of Salmonella Enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in 20-day-old broiler chickens by the plant derived compounds trans-cinnamaldehyde and eugenol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the efficacy of trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC) and eugenol (EG) for reducing Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) colonization in broiler chicks. In three separate experiments for each compound, day-old, chicks (N=75/experiment) were randomly assigned to five treatments (n=15/treatment): a...

  18. Caprylic acid reduces Salmonella Enteritidis populations in various segments of digestive tract and internal organs of three- and six-week-old broiler chickens, therapeutically

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the efficacy of feed supplemented with caprylic acid, a natural, 8-carbon fatty acid for reducing Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in commercial broiler chickens. In two separate 3- and 6-wk trials, day-old straight run (N=70 per trial), chicks were assigned to 5 treatment groups ...

  19. Impact of Skip a Day and Every Day Feeding Programs on the Colonization Rates of Salmonella Enteritidis in Broiler Breeder Pullets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of feeding programs in the colonization rate after challenge with Salmonella enteritidis was investigated. Broiler breeder pullets from were vaccinated at 19 d of incubation with herpesvirus of turkeys (HVT) + chicken herpesvirus (SB1), or a vector HVT (vHVT) + Infectious bursal disease (...

  20. Mathematical modeling and validation of growth of Salmonella Enteritidis and background microorganisms in potato salad – one-step kinetic analysis and model development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to examine the growth of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in potato salad caused by cross-contamination and temperature abuse, and develop mathematical models to predict its growth. The growth of SE was investigated under constant temperature conditions (8, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, a...

  1. Validation of the Reveal(®) 2.0 Group D1 Salmonella Test for Detection of Salmonella Enteritidis in Raw Shell Eggs and Poultry-Associated Matrixes.

    PubMed

    Mozola, Mark; Biswas, Preetha; Viator, Ryan; Feldpausch, Emily; Foti, Debra; Li, Lin; Le, Quynh-Nhi; Alles, Susan; Rice, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    A study was conducted to assess the performance of the Reveal(®) 2.0 Group D1 Salmonella lateral flow immunoassay for use in detection of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in raw shell eggs and poultry-associated matrixes, including chicken carcass rinse and poultry feed. In inclusivity testing, the Reveal 2.0 test detected all 37 strains of SE tested. The test also detected all but one of 18 non-Enteritidis somatic group D1 Salmonella serovars examined. In exclusivity testing, none of 42 strains tested was detected. The exclusivity panel included Salmonella strains of somatic groups other than D1, as well as strains of other genera of Gram-negative bacteria. In matrix testing, performance of the Reveal 2.0 test was compared to that of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook reference culture procedure for chicken carcass rinse and to that of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual for raw shell eggs and poultry feed. For all matrixes evaluated, there were no significant differences in the ability to detect SE when comparing the Reveal 2.0 method and the appropriate reference culture procedure as determined by probability of detection statistical analysis. The ability of the Reveal 2.0 test to withstand modest perturbations to normal operating parameters was examined in robustness experiments. Results showed that the test can withstand deviations in up to three operating parameters simultaneously without significantly affecting performance. Real-time stability testing of multiple lots of Reveal 2.0 devices established the shelf life of the test device at 16 months postmanufacture. PMID:27214854

  2. FimH adhesin from host unrestricted Salmonella Enteritidis binds to different glycoprotein ligands expressed by enterocytes from sheep, pig and cattle than FimH adhesins from host restricted Salmonella Abortus-ovis, Salmonella Choleraesuis and Salmonella Dublin.

    PubMed

    Grzymajło, Krzysztof; Ugorski, Maciej; Kolenda, Rafał; Kędzierska, Anna; Kuźmińska-Bajor, Marta; Wieliczko, Alina

    2013-10-25

    Adhesion to gut tissues and colonization of the alimentary tract, two important stages in the pathogenesis of Salmonella, are mediated by FimH adhesin of type 1 fimbriae. It was suggested that minor differences in the structure of FimH are most likely associated with differences in adhesion specificities, and may determine the tropism of various Salmonella serovars to different species and tissues. We investigated this hypothesis by comparing the binding properties of FimH proteins from three Salmonella enterica serovars with limited (Choleraesuis, Dublin) or restricted (Abortusovis) host ranges to FimH from broad host range S. Enteritidis and mannose inactive FimH from S. Gallinarum. Although all active variants of FimH protein were able to bind mannose-rich glycoproteins (RNase B, HRP and Man-BSA) with comparable affinity measured by surface plasmon resonance, there were significant differences in the binding profiles of the FimH proteins from host restricted serovars and host unrestricted serovar Enteritidis, to glycoproteins from enterocyte cell lines established in vitro and derived from sheep, pig and cattle. When low-binding FimH adhesin from S. Enteritidis was subjected to Western blot analysis, it bound to surface membrane protein of about 130 kDa, and high-binding FimH adhesins from S. Abortusovis, S. Choleraesuis and S. Dublin bound to surface membrane protein of about 55 kDa present in each cell line. Differential binding of FimH proteins from host-restricted and broad-host-range Salmonella to intestinal receptors was confirmed using mutant FimH adhesins obtained by site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that the low-binding variant of FimH from S. Choleraesuis with mutation Leu57Pro lost the ability to bind protein band of 55 kDa, but instead interacted with glycoprotein of about 130 kDa. On the other hand, the high-binding variant of FimH adhesin from S. Enteritids with mutation Asn101Ser did not bind to its receptor of 130 kDa, but instead it

  3. Effects of Climate Change on Salmonella Infections

    PubMed Central

    Akil, Luma; Reddy, Remata S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Climate change and global warming have been reported to increase spread of foodborne pathogens. To understand these effects on Salmonella infections, modeling approaches such as regression analysis and neural network (NN) were used. Methods: Monthly data for Salmonella outbreaks in Mississippi (MS), Tennessee (TN), and Alabama (AL) were analyzed from 2002 to 2011 using analysis of variance and time series analysis. Meteorological data were collected and the correlation with salmonellosis was examined using regression analysis and NN. Results: A seasonal trend in Salmonella infections was observed (p<0.001). Strong positive correlation was found between high temperature and Salmonella infections in MS and for the combined states (MS, TN, AL) models (R2=0.554; R2=0.415, respectively). NN models showed a strong effect of rise in temperature on the Salmonella outbreaks. In this study, an increase of 1°F was shown to result in four cases increase of Salmonella in MS. However, no correlation between monthly average precipitation rate and Salmonella infections was observed. Conclusion: There is consistent evidence that gastrointestinal infection with bacterial pathogens is positively correlated with ambient temperature, as warmer temperatures enable more rapid replication. Warming trends in the United States and specifically in the southern states may increase rates of Salmonella infections. PMID:25496072

  4. A novel phage element of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis P125109 contributes to accelerated type III secretion system 2-dependent early inflammation kinetics in a mouse colitis model.

    PubMed

    Vishwakarma, Vikalp; Periaswamy, Balamurugan; Bhusan Pati, Niladri; Slack, Emma; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Suar, Mrutyunjay

    2012-09-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. I serovar Enteritidis exhibits type III secretion system 2 (TTSS2)-dependent early colonization and inflammation kinetics faster than those of closely related S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. To investigate the accelerated TTSS-2-dependent pathogenic potential of S. Enteritidis, we focused on its genome. Results of a previously published comparative genomic study revealed the presence of mutually exclusive genes in both serovars. In this study, we investigated the roles of six S. Enteritidis-specific genes in vivo by using differential fluorescence induction (DFI) through putative gene-specific promoters. The promoter construct associated with the gene locus SEN1140 induced green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in the gut lumen, lamina propria, mesenteric lymph nodes, and related systemic organs. To further investigate the potential role of SEN1140, we compared a SEN1140 deletion mutant with S. Typhimurium in a TTSS1-deficient background. Interestingly, the S. Enteritidis mutant lacking SEN1140 did not show the unique TTSS-2-dependent early colonization and inflammation kinetic phenotype of S. Typhimurium. Consistent with this result, complementation of SEN1140 restored the TTSS-2-dependent accelerated inflammatory potential of S. Enteritidis. This report presents a suitable screening strategy that uses a combination of DFI, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, quantitative PCR, and wild-type isogenic tagged-strain techniques to explore the unique roles of S. Enteritidis-specific genes in bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:22753379

  5. Salmonella infections: immune and non-immune protection with vaccines.

    PubMed

    Barrow, P A

    2007-02-01

    Salmonella enterica in poultry remains a major political issue. S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, particularly, remains a world-wide problem. Control in poultry by immunity, whether acquired or innate, is a possible means of containing the problem. Widespread usage of antibiotics has led to the emergence of multiple antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This problem has indicated an increasing requirement for effective vaccines to control this important zoonotic infection. An attempt is made in the present review to explain the relatively poor success in immunizing food animals against these non-host-specific Salmonella serotypes that usually produce food-poisoning, compared with the success obtained with the small number of serotypes that more typically produce systemic "typhoid-like" diseases. New examinations of old problems such as the carrier state and vertical transmission, observed with S. Pullorum, is generating new information of relevance to immunity. Newer methods of attenuation are being developed. Live vaccines, if administered orally, demonstrate non-specific and rapid protection against infection that is of biological and practical interest. However, from the point of view of consumer safety, there is a school of thought that considers inactivated or sub-unit vaccines to be the safest. The benefits of developing effective killed or sub-unit vaccines over the use of live vaccines are enormous. Recently, there have been significant advances in the development of adjuvants (e.g. microspheres) that are capable of potent immuno-stimulation, targeting different arms of the immune system. The exploitation of such technology in conjunction with the ongoing developments in identifying key Salmonella virulence determinants should form the next generation of Salmonella sub-unit vaccines for the control of this important group of pathogens. There are additional areas of concern associated with the use of live vaccines, particularly if these are generated by genetic

  6. Genomic Comparison of Non-Typhoidal Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Heidelberg, Hadar and Kentucky Isolates from Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Dhanani, Akhilesh S.; Block, Glenn; Dewar, Ken; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Topp, Edward; Beiko, Robert G.; Diarra, Moussa S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars, associated with different foods including poultry products, are important causes of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. The colonization of the chicken gut by S. enterica could result in the contamination of the environment and food chain. The aim of this study was to compare the genomes of 25 S. enterica serovars isolated from broiler chicken farms to assess their intra- and inter-genetic variability, with a focus on virulence and antibiotic resistance characteristics. Methodology/Principal Finding The genomes of 25 S. enterica isolates covering five serovars (ten Typhimurium including three monophasic 4,[5],12:i:, four Enteritidis, three Hadar, four Heidelberg and four Kentucky) were sequenced. Most serovars were clustered in strongly supported phylogenetic clades, except for isolates of serovar Enteritidis that were scattered throughout the tree. Plasmids of varying sizes were detected in several isolates independently of serovars. Genes associated with the IncF plasmid and the IncI1 plasmid were identified in twelve and four isolates, respectively, while genes associated with the IncQ plasmid were found in one isolate. The presence of numerous genes associated with Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs) was also confirmed. Components of the type III and IV secretion systems (T3SS and T4SS) varied in different isolates, which could explain in part, differences of their pathogenicity in humans and/or persistence in broilers. Conserved clusters of genes in the T3SS were detected that could be used in designing effective strategies (diagnostic, vaccination or treatments) to combat Salmonella. Antibiotic resistance genes (CMY, aadA, ampC, florR, sul1, sulI, tetAB, and srtA) and class I integrons were detected in resistant isolates while all isolates carried multidrug efflux pump systems regardless of their antibiotic susceptibility profile. Conclusions/Significance This study showed that the predominant

  7. Effects of gamma irradiation on the viability and phenotypic characteristics of Salmonella Enteritidis inoculated into specific-pathogen-free eggs.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Elizabeth C P; Souza, Mauro C L; Toledo, Sandro S; Barbosa, Celso G; Reis, Eliane M F; Rodrigues, Dalia P; Lázaro, Norma S

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effects of various levels of gamma irradiation on the phenotypic characteristics of 20 strains of Salmonella Enteritidis inoculated separately into specific-pathogen-free shell eggs. Bacterial strains were inoculated into egg yolks and exposed to (60)Co radiation at doses of 0.49 to 5.0 kGy. The eggs were maintained at 25°C and analyzed for the presence of Salmonella on days 1, 2, 4, and 7, and the recovered Salmonella isolates were characterized biochemically. All strains were resistant to doses of 0.49, 0.54, 0.59, 0.8, and 1 kGy; colony counts were ≥10(5) CFU/ml of egg yolk except for one strain, which was detected at 96 h and at 7 days after irradiation at 1 kGy, with a population reduction of 2 log CFU/ml. For the other evaluated doses, 12 strains (60.0%) were resistant at 1.5 kGy and 7 strains (35.0%) were resistant at 3.0 kGy. Among all analyzed strains, 5.0 kGy was more effective for reducing and/or eliminating the inoculated bacteria; only two (10%) strains were resistant to this level of irradiation. Salmonella colony counts were significantly reduced (P < 0.01) with increasing doses from the day 1 to 7 of observation, when microbial growth peaked. Loss of mobility, lactose fermentation, citrate utilization, and hydrogen sulfide production occurred in some strains after irradiation independent of dose and postirradiation storage time. Increases in antibiotic susceptibility also occurred: seven strains became sensitive to β-lactams, two strains became sensitive to antifolates, and one strain each became sensitive to fluoroquinolone, phenicol, nitrofurans, tetracyclines, and aminoglycosides. The results indicate that up to 5.0 kGy of radiation applied to shell eggs inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis at 4 log CFU per egg is not sufficient for complete elimination of this pathogen from this food matrix.

  8. Invasive Nontyphoidal Salmonella Infections Among Children in Mali, 2002–2014: Microbiological and Epidemiologic Features Guide Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Milagritos D.; Tennant, Sharon M.; Bornstein, Kristin; Onwuchekwa, Uma; Tamboura, Boubou; Maiga, Almoustapha; Sylla, Mamadou B.; Sissoko, Seydou; Kourouma, Nana; Toure, Aliou; Malle, Dramane; Livio, Sofie; Sow, Samba O.; Levine, Myron M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. In 2002, following establishment of a clinical microbiology laboratory in the government hospital that admits children with severe illnesses in Bamako, Mali, surveillance to identify pathogens causing invasive bacterial infections (septicemia, bacteremia, meningitis, etc) was initiated. Methods. Parents/guardians of children aged <16 years admitted to l'Hôpital Gabriel Touré with high fever or clinical syndromes compatible with focal invasive bacterial disease were asked for consent to culture their child's blood/body fluid. Standard bacteriologic techniques speciated isolates; Salmonella serovars were determined. Results. From July 2002 through June 2014, 687 nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) isolates were obtained from 667 children; 667 yielded a single serovar and 20 grew 2 Salmonella serovars, 1 being NTS. Four serovars accounted for 87% of the 687 NTS isolates, including Salmonella Enteritidis (n = 244 [35.5%]), Salmonella Typhimurium (n = 221 [32.2%]), I:4,[5],12:i:- (n = 42 [6.1%]), and Salmonella Dublin (n = 89 [13.0%]). Of 553 patients with invasive NTS from whom 1 of the 4 predominant serovars was isolated in pure culture, 448 (81.0%) were aged <5 years and case fatality was 20.3%; Salmonella Enteritidis case fatality (27.8%) was higher than for other serovars (P = .0009). NTS disease showed a seasonal peak following the rainy season and into the cool, dry season. Since 2010, Salmonella Enteritidis cases have risen and Salmonella Typhimurium fallen. Conclusions. NTS has become the predominant invasive pathogen as Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcal vaccine use in Mali has diminished invasive disease due to those pathogens. The age distribution and limited serovars involved make control of NTS disease by vaccines epidemiologically feasible, if products under development prove safe and efficacious. PMID:26449949

  9. Changes in Fourier transform infrared spectra of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis after adaptation to stressful growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, A; Halisch, J; Prieto, M

    2010-08-15

    The effects of growth conditions (temperature in the range 10-45 degrees C, sodium chloride concentration in the range 0-4%, aerobic vs. anaerobic growth and acidification of the growth medium, up to pH 4.5) on the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis were studied using multivariate statistical methods (Hierarchical Cluster Analysis and Factor Analysis). Although all environmental factors tested affected S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis FT-IR spectra to some extent, growth temperature was the most influential factor within the five spectral regions. The w(4) spectral region (1200 to 900 cm(-1)) was the most variable region, suggesting that S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis modulate their cell wall and cell membrane composition in response to shifts in growth temperature. Changes in membrane fluidity were determined by monitoring the vibrational modes of the acyl chain v(s)CH(2) symmetric stretching band by FT-IR spectroscopy. For cells grown in unsupplemented media an increase in growth temperature was linked to a decrease in membrane fluidity. Even though the effect of NaCl concentration, pH and atmosphere was considered of less importance, cells grown in acidified media also showed a reduction in their membrane fluidity, and the addition of sodium chloride to the culture medium was associated with an increase in the bacterial membrane fluidity. These findings can help interpret how important adaptive mechanisms for the survival of pathogenic bacteria in foods are, and show that FT-IR spectroscopy is a useful tool to understand how environmental conditions mimicking those in certain food products affect the cell. Also, FT-IR can be used to perform a rapid discrimination between bacterial phenotypes with different adaptive tolerance responses to environmental stress. PMID:20633942

  10. Transfer of Salmonella Enteritidis to four types of surfaces after cleaning procedures and cross-contamination to tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Soares, Vanessa Mendonça; Pereira, Juliano Gonçalves; Viana, Cibeli; Izidoro, Thiago Braga; Bersot, Luciano dos Santos; Pinto, José Paes de Almeida Nogueira

    2012-06-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the spread of Salmonella Enteritidis to different cutting boards (wood, triclosan-treated plastic, glass, and stainless steel) from contaminated poultry skin (5 log CFU/g) and then to tomatoes and to analyze the effect of different protocols used to clean these surfaces to control contamination. The following procedures were simulated: (1) no cleaning after handling contaminated poultry skin; (2) rinsing in running water; (3) cleaning with dish soap and mechanical scrubbing; and (4) cleaning with dish soap and mechanical scrubbing, followed by disinfection with hypochlorite. The pathogen was recovered from all surfaces following procedure 1, with counts ranging from 1.90 to 2.80 log, as well as from the tomatoes handled on it. Reduced numbers of S. Enteritidis were recovered using the other procedures, both from the surfaces and from the tomatoes. Counts were undetectable after procedure 4. From all surfaces evaluated, wood was the most difficult to clean, and stainless steel was the easiest. The use of hypochlorite as a disinfecting agent helped to reduce cross-contamination. PMID:22365360

  11. Effect of gamma irradiation on commercial eggs experimentally inoculated with Salmonella enteritidis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez, I. G.; Trejo, R. M.; Sanchez, R. E.; Ceniceros, R. M.; Luna, Q. P.; Zazua, P.; Hargis, B. M.

    1995-02-01

    Using intact, fresh shell eggs, inoculated with 10 8 colony-forming units (cfu) of S. enteritidis, the effect of three doses of gamma irradiation on bacteriologic population and physical characteristics (Haugh units and yolk color) of the eggs was determinated. Penetration test area was picked at random just off the air cell of each egg. Aluminum cylinders were attached to the egg surface with a rim of molten paraffin, and 10 8S. enteritidis was then applied to inoculate the egg. Eggs were then irradiated within 2 hours using a Cobalt-60 gamma source at either 1, 2, or 3 kGy. A second set of inoculated, non-irradiated was used as controls. Following irradiation, eggs were maintained at 4°C for 42 hours prior culture. Irradiation with 1 kGy resulted in a significant (P < .05), 3.9 log reduction in detectable S. enteritidis in the shell and a higly significant (P < .025) 95% reduction in detectable S. enteritidis in the internal shell membranes. Irradiation of eggs with either 2 or 3 kGy reduced bacterial contamination to non-detectable levels in both the shell and internal membranes. However, irradiation at either 1, 2 or 3 kGy resulted in a significant (P <- .05) decrease (approximately 50%) in Haugh units. Additionally, irradiation of intact shell eggs at 2 or 3 Kgy significantly (P ≤ .05) reduced yolk color regardless of the level of irradiation exposure implemented. This data indicates that gamma irradiation of intact raw eggs is effective in reducing (1 kGy) or eliminating (2 or more kGy) S. enteritidis contamination. However, each of the levels of irradiation used in the present experiments caused marked reduction of selected measures of egg quality.

  12. A dual mechanism involved in membrane and nucleic acid disruption of AvBD103b, a new avian defensin from the king penguin, against Salmonella enteritidis CVCC3377.

    PubMed

    Teng, Da; Wang, Xiumin; Xi, Di; Mao, Ruoyu; Zhang, Yong; Guan, Qingfeng; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jianhua

    2014-10-01

    The food-borne bacterial gastrointestinal infection is a serious public health threat. Defensins are evolutionarily conserved innate immune components with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity that do not easily induce resistance. AvBD103b, an avian defensin with potent activity against Salmonella enteritidis, was isolated from the stomach contents of the king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus). To elucidate further the antibacterial mechanism of AvBD103b, its effect on the S. enteritidis CVCC3377 cell membrane and intracellular DNA was researched. The cell surface hydrophobicity and a N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine uptake assay demonstrated that AvBD103b treatment increased the cell surface hydrophobicity and outer membrane permeability. Atomic absorption spectrometry, ultraviolet spectrophotometry, flow cytometry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that AvBD103b treatment can lead to the release of the cellular contents and cell death through damage of the membrane. DNA gel retardation and circular dichroism analysis demonstrated that AvBD103b interacted with DNA and intercalated into the DNA base pairs. A cell cycle assay demonstrated that AvBD103b affected cellular functions, such as DNA synthesis. Our results confirmed that AvBD103b exerts its antibacterial activity by damaging the cell membrane and interfering with intracellular DNA, ultimately causing cell death, and suggested that AvBD103b may be a promising candidate as an alternative to antibiotics against S. enteritidis. PMID:24981062

  13. A dual mechanism involved in membrane and nucleic acid disruption of AvBD103b, a new avian defensin from the king penguin, against Salmonella enteritidis CVCC3377.

    PubMed

    Teng, Da; Wang, Xiumin; Xi, Di; Mao, Ruoyu; Zhang, Yong; Guan, Qingfeng; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jianhua

    2014-10-01

    The food-borne bacterial gastrointestinal infection is a serious public health threat. Defensins are evolutionarily conserved innate immune components with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity that do not easily induce resistance. AvBD103b, an avian defensin with potent activity against Salmonella enteritidis, was isolated from the stomach contents of the king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus). To elucidate further the antibacterial mechanism of AvBD103b, its effect on the S. enteritidis CVCC3377 cell membrane and intracellular DNA was researched. The cell surface hydrophobicity and a N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine uptake assay demonstrated that AvBD103b treatment increased the cell surface hydrophobicity and outer membrane permeability. Atomic absorption spectrometry, ultraviolet spectrophotometry, flow cytometry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that AvBD103b treatment can lead to the release of the cellular contents and cell death through damage of the membrane. DNA gel retardation and circular dichroism analysis demonstrated that AvBD103b interacted with DNA and intercalated into the DNA base pairs. A cell cycle assay demonstrated that AvBD103b affected cellular functions, such as DNA synthesis. Our results confirmed that AvBD103b exerts its antibacterial activity by damaging the cell membrane and interfering with intracellular DNA, ultimately causing cell death, and suggested that AvBD103b may be a promising candidate as an alternative to antibiotics against S. enteritidis.

  14. Genetic algorithm-artificial neural network and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system modeling of antibacterial activity of annatto dye on Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Yolmeh, Mahmoud; Habibi Najafi, Mohammad B; Salehi, Fakhreddin

    2014-01-01

    Annatto is commonly used as a coloring agent in the food industry and has antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. In this study, genetic algorithm-artificial neural network (GA-ANN) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) models were used to predict the effect of annatto dye on Salmonella enteritidis in mayonnaise. The GA-ANN and ANFIS were fed with 3 inputs of annatto dye concentration (0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4%), storage temperature (4 and 25°C) and storage time (1-20 days) for prediction of S. enteritidis population. Both models were trained with experimental data. The results showed that the annatto dye was able to reduce of S. enteritidis and its effect was stronger at 25°C than 4°C. The developed GA-ANN, which included 8 hidden neurons, could predict S. enteritidis population with correlation coefficient of 0.999. The overall agreement between ANFIS predictions and experimental data was also very good (r=0.998). Sensitivity analysis results showed that storage temperature was the most sensitive factor for prediction of S. enteritidis population. PMID:24566279

  15. Highly expressed amino acid biosynthesis genes revealed by global gene expression analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis during growth in whole egg are not essential for this growth.

    PubMed

    Jakočiūnė, Džiuginta; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Jelsbak, Lotte; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2016-05-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is the most common cause of egg borne salmonellosis in many parts of the world. This study analyzed gene expression of this bacterium during growth in whole egg, and whether highly expressed genes were essential for the growth. High quality RNA was extracted from S. Enteritidis using a modified RNA-extraction protocol. Global gene expression during growth in whole egg was compared to growth in LB-medium using DNA array method. Twenty-six genes were significantly upregulated during growth in egg; these belonged to amino acid biosynthesis, di/oligopeptide transport system, biotin synthesis, ferrous iron transport system, and type III secretion system. Significant downregulation of 15 genes related to formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) and trehalose metabolism was observed. The results suggested that S. Enteritidis is starved for amino-acids, biotin and iron when growing in egg. However, site specific mutation of amino acid biosynthesis genes asnA (17.3 fold upregulated), asnB (18.6 fold upregulated), asnA/asnB and, serA (12.0 fold upregulated) and gdhA (3.7 fold upregulated), did not result in growth attenuation, suggesting that biosynthesis using the enzymes encoded from these genes may represent the first choice for S. Enteritidis when growing in egg, but when absent, the bacterium could use alternative ways to obtain the amino acids. PMID:26945769

  16. Subtyping Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis isolates from different sources by using sequence typing based on virulence genes and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs).

    PubMed

    Liu, Fenyun; Kariyawasam, Subhashinie; Jayarao, Bhushan M; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Ribot, Efrain M; Knabel, Stephen J; Dudley, Edward G

    2011-07-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is a major cause of food-borne salmonellosis in the United States. Two major food vehicles for S. Enteritidis are contaminated eggs and chicken meat. Improved subtyping methods are needed to accurately track specific strains of S. Enteritidis related to human salmonellosis throughout the chicken and egg food system. A sequence typing scheme based on virulence genes (fimH and sseL) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs)-CRISPR-including multi-virulence-locus sequence typing (designated CRISPR-MVLST)-was used to characterize 35 human clinical isolates, 46 chicken isolates, 24 egg isolates, and 63 hen house environment isolates of S. Enteritidis. A total of 27 sequence types (STs) were identified among the 167 isolates. CRISPR-MVLST identified three persistent and predominate STs circulating among U.S. human clinical isolates and chicken, egg, and hen house environmental isolates in Pennsylvania, and an ST that was found only in eggs and humans. It also identified a potential environment-specific sequence type. Moreover, cluster analysis based on fimH and sseL identified a number of clusters, of which several were found in more than one outbreak, as well as 11 singletons. Further research is needed to determine if CRISPR-MVLST might help identify the ecological origins of S. Enteritidis strains that contaminate chickens and eggs.

  17. Effects of 5-hydroxytryptophan and m-hydroxybenzylhydrazine associated to Lactobacillus spp. on the humoral response of broilers challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Donato, T C; Baptista, A A S; Garcia, K C O D; Smaniotto, B D; Okamoto, A S; Sequeira, J L; Andreatti Filho, R L

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the effects of different doses of serotonin, its precursor 5-hydroxytry-ptophan (5HTP), and m-hydroxybenzylhydrazine inhibitor (NSD1015), administered via intraperitoneal for 5 consecutive days, on behavior and average body weight of broilers. We also measured the humoral immune response and quantification of Salmonella Enteritidis in broilers chickens that received the drugs evaluated and a Lactobacillus pool. The study was divided into 3 experiments: Experiment 1--administration of pharmaceuticals with choice of dosage; Experiment 2--administration of pharmaceuticals and a Lactobacillus pool in birds that were not challenged with S. Enteritidis, and Experiment 3--administration of pharmaceuticals and a Lactobacillus pool in birds challenged with S. Enteritidis. The ELISA was used to scan dosages of intestinal IgA and serum IgY. We used colony-forming units to quantify S. Enteritidis. The concentrations of IgA and IgY did not show significant differences (P>0.05) in Experiment 2. In Experiment 3, NSD1015 associated with Lactobacillus determined higher IgA concentrations, promoting greater stimulus to the immune system than 5HTP. Regarding quantification of S. Enteritidis in the cecal content of birds, 5HTP associated to Lactobacillus determined the smallest number of bacteria, showing possible interaction of 5-hydroxytryptophan and Lactobacillus spp. with the immune system of broiler chickens.

  18. Characterization of Foodborne Outbreaks of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis with Whole-Genome Sequencing Single Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Analysis for Surveillance and Outbreak Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lappi, Victoria; Wolfgang, William J.; Lapierre, Pascal; Palumbo, Michael J.; Medus, Carlota; Boxrud, David

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a significant cause of gastrointestinal illness in the United States; however, current molecular subtyping methods lack resolution for this highly clonal serovar. Advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have made it possible to examine whole-genome sequencing (WGS) as a potential molecular subtyping tool for outbreak detection and source trace back. Here, we conducted a retrospective analysis of S. Enteritidis isolates from seven epidemiologically confirmed foodborne outbreaks and sporadic isolates (not epidemiologically linked) to determine the utility of WGS to identify outbreaks. A collection of 55 epidemiologically characterized clinical and environmental S. Enteritidis isolates were sequenced. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based cluster analysis of the S. Enteritidis genomes revealed well supported clades, with less than four-SNP pairwise diversity, that were concordant with epidemiologically defined outbreaks. Sporadic isolates were an average of 42.5 SNPs distant from the outbreak clusters. Isolates collected from the same patient over several weeks differed by only two SNPs. Our findings show that WGS provided greater resolution between outbreak, sporadic, and suspect isolates than the current gold standard subtyping method, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Furthermore, results could be obtained in a time frame suitable for surveillance activities, supporting the use of WGS as an outbreak detection and characterization method for S. Enteritidis. PMID:26269623

  19. Highly expressed amino acid biosynthesis genes revealed by global gene expression analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis during growth in whole egg are not essential for this growth.

    PubMed

    Jakočiūnė, Džiuginta; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Jelsbak, Lotte; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2016-05-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is the most common cause of egg borne salmonellosis in many parts of the world. This study analyzed gene expression of this bacterium during growth in whole egg, and whether highly expressed genes were essential for the growth. High quality RNA was extracted from S. Enteritidis using a modified RNA-extraction protocol. Global gene expression during growth in whole egg was compared to growth in LB-medium using DNA array method. Twenty-six genes were significantly upregulated during growth in egg; these belonged to amino acid biosynthesis, di/oligopeptide transport system, biotin synthesis, ferrous iron transport system, and type III secretion system. Significant downregulation of 15 genes related to formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) and trehalose metabolism was observed. The results suggested that S. Enteritidis is starved for amino-acids, biotin and iron when growing in egg. However, site specific mutation of amino acid biosynthesis genes asnA (17.3 fold upregulated), asnB (18.6 fold upregulated), asnA/asnB and, serA (12.0 fold upregulated) and gdhA (3.7 fold upregulated), did not result in growth attenuation, suggesting that biosynthesis using the enzymes encoded from these genes may represent the first choice for S. Enteritidis when growing in egg, but when absent, the bacterium could use alternative ways to obtain the amino acids.

  20. Characterization of Foodborne Outbreaks of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis with Whole-Genome Sequencing Single Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Analysis for Surveillance and Outbreak Detection.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Angela J; Lappi, Victoria; Wolfgang, William J; Lapierre, Pascal; Palumbo, Michael J; Medus, Carlota; Boxrud, David

    2015-10-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a significant cause of gastrointestinal illness in the United States; however, current molecular subtyping methods lack resolution for this highly clonal serovar. Advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have made it possible to examine whole-genome sequencing (WGS) as a potential molecular subtyping tool for outbreak detection and source trace back. Here, we conducted a retrospective analysis of S. Enteritidis isolates from seven epidemiologically confirmed foodborne outbreaks and sporadic isolates (not epidemiologically linked) to determine the utility of WGS to identify outbreaks. A collection of 55 epidemiologically characterized clinical and environmental S. Enteritidis isolates were sequenced. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based cluster analysis of the S. Enteritidis genomes revealed well supported clades, with less than four-SNP pairwise diversity, that were concordant with epidemiologically defined outbreaks. Sporadic isolates were an average of 42.5 SNPs distant from the outbreak clusters. Isolates collected from the same patient over several weeks differed by only two SNPs. Our findings show that WGS provided greater resolution between outbreak, sporadic, and suspect isolates than the current gold standard subtyping method, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Furthermore, results could be obtained in a time frame suitable for surveillance activities, supporting the use of WGS as an outbreak detection and characterization method for S. Enteritidis. PMID:26269623

  1. Oral immunization of mice with attenuated Salmonella enteritidis containing a recombinant plasmid which codes for production of the B subunit of heat-labile Escherichia coli enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Clements, J D; Lyon, F L; Lowe, K L; Farrand, A L; el-Morshidy, S

    1986-01-01

    We used Salmonella enteritidis serotype dublin strain SL1438, a nonreverting, aromatic-dependent, histidine-requiring mutant, as a recipient for a recombinant plasmid coding for production of the nontoxic B subunit of the heat-labile Escherichia coli enterotoxin. The S. enteritidis derivative EL23 produced heat-labile enterotoxin subunit B that was indistinguishable from heat-labile enterotoxin subunit B produced by strains of E. coli or Salmonella typhi harboring the same plasmid. Mice immunized orally with strain EL23 developed progressively increasing mucosal and serum antibody responses to both heat-labile enterotoxin subunit B and to the lipopolysaccharide of the vaccine strain. The mucosal antibody response was shown to be immunoglobulin A specific and to be capable of neutralizing the biological activities of both E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin and cholera enterotoxin in vitro. Images PMID:3527989

  2. Presence of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum in commercial laying hens diagnosed with Fowl Typhoid Disease in Colombia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    : A severe outbreak of salmonellosis in commercial brown table egg layers first occurred in Colombia in 2006. From 2008 to 2012, 35 samples collected from commercial layers farms in the states of Cundinamarca, Santander, Bolivar and San Andres, were positive to Salmonella enterica. Salmonella (S) wa...

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Outer Membrane Proteins from Salmonella Enteritidis Strains with Different Sensitivity to Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Bartłomiej; Krzyżewska, Eva; Kapczyńska, Katarzyna; Rybka, Jacek; Pawlak, Aleksandra; Korzekwa, Kamila; Klausa, Elżbieta; Bugla-Płoskońska, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Differential analysis of outer membrane composition of S. Enteritidis strains, resistant to 50% normal human serum (NHS) was performed in order to find factors influencing the resistance to higher concentrations of NHS. Ten S. Enteritidis clinical strains, resistant to 50% NHS, all producing very long lipopolysaccharide, were subjected to the challenge of 75% NHS. Five extreme strains: two resistant and three sensitive to 75% NHS, were chosen for the further analysis of outer membrane proteins composition. Substantial differences were found in the levels of particular outer membrane proteins between resistant and sensitive strains, i.e. outer membrane protease E (PgtE) was present mainly in resistant strains, while sensitive strains possessed a high level of flagellar hook-associated protein 2 (FliD) and significantly higher levels of outer membrane protein A (OmpA). PMID:27695090

  4. Sensitivity to disinfection of bacterial indicator organisms for monitoring the Salmonella Enteritidis status of layer farms after cleaning and disinfection.

    PubMed

    Dewaele, I; Ducatelle, R; Herman, L; Heyndrickx, M; De Reu, K

    2011-06-01

    The present study evaluated Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterococcus hirae as potential indicator organisms for the possible Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) presence in layer farms after cleaning and disinfection by comparing their susceptibility to disinfection. A quantitative suspension disinfection test according to European Standard EN1656 was performed using disinfection products CID20 and Virocid (both from CID Lines, Ieper, Belgium). In a preliminary test, the sensitivity to both disinfection products was compared between ATCC strains of SE, E. coli, En. faecalis, and En. hirae. The sensitivity of SE to disinfection was most comparable to that of E. coli. A second disinfection test compared the elimination of E. coli to SE ATCC strains as well as field strains. Results showed no significant effect regarding the strain (P > 0.05 for CID20 and Virocid), meaning that no difference was detected in sensitivity toward disinfection. When comparing the sensitivity in general at species level for all concentrations of disinfectant used, no significant difference was found between E. coli and SE in sensitivity to Virocid (P > 0.05). In conclusion, because of its similar response to disinfection in a suspension disinfection test, E. coli could be used as an indicator for possible Salmonella presence after cleaning and disinfection.

  5. Effect of rapid product desiccation or hydration on thermal resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis PT 30 in wheat flour.

    PubMed

    Smith, Danielle F; Marks, Bradley P

    2015-02-01

    Salmonella is able to survive in low-moisture environments and is known to be more heat resistant as product water activity (aw) decreases. However, it is unknown how rapidly the resistance changes if product aw is altered rapidly, as can occur in certain processes. Therefore, the objective was to determine the effect of rapid product desiccation or hydration on Salmonella thermal resistance. Two dynamic moisture treatments were compared with two static moisture treatments to determine the effect of time-at-moisture on the thermal resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 30 (PT 30) in wheat flour. After inoculation, two static moisture groups were equilibrated to 0.3 and 0.6 aw over 4 to 7 days, and two dynamic moisture groups then were rapidly (<4 min) desiccated from 0.6 to 0.3 aw or hydrated from 0.3 to 0.6 aw. Samples then were subjected to isothermal (80°C) heat treatments, and Salmonella thermal resistance was compared via decimal reduction times (i.e., D80°C-values). The D80°C-value in flour that was rapidly desiccated from 0.6 to 0.3 aw was statistically equivalent (P > 0.05) to the D80°C-value in flour previously equilibrated to 0.3 aw, but both were greater (P < 0.05) than the D80°C-value in flour previously equilibrated to 0.6 aw. Similarly, the D80°C-value in flour rapidly hydrated from 0.3 to 0.6 aw was statistically equivalent (P > 0.05) to the D80°C-value in flour previously equilibrated to 0.6 aw, and both were less than the D80°C-value in flour previously equilibrated to 0.3 aw. Therefore, Salmonella in the rapidly desiccated flour (0.3 aw) was as thermally resistant as that which previously had been equilibrated to 0.3 aw, and Salmonella in the rapidly hydrated flour (0.6 aw) responded similarly to that in the flour previously equilibrated to 0.6 aw. These results suggest that the response period to new aw is negligible, which is critically important in applying thermal resistance data or parameters to industrial

  6. Membrane damage and viability loss of Escherichia coli K-12 and Salmonella enteritidis in liquid egg by thermal death time disk treatment.

    PubMed

    Ukuku, Dike O; Jin, Tony; Zhang, Howard

    2008-10-01

    Bacterial injury, including leakage of intracellular substance and viability loss, of Escherichia coli K-12 (ATCC 23716) and Salmonella Enteritidis (ATCC 13076) inoculated in liquid egg white and liquid whole egg was determined by thermal death time disk. E. coli K-12 and Salmonella Enteritidis were inoculated in liquid egg white and liquid whole egg to a final count of 7.8 log CFU/ml and were thermally treated with thermal death time disks at room temperature (23"C), 54, 56, 58, and 60 degrees C from 0 to 240 s. Sublethal injury, leakage of intracellular substances, and viability loss of E. coli K-12 and Salmonella Enteritidis was investigated by plating 0.1 ml on selective trypticase soy agar containing 3% NaCl, 5% NaCl, sorbitol MacConky agar, and xylose lysine sodium tetradecylsulfate and nonselective trypticase soy agar. No significant (P > 0.05) differences on percent injury or viability loss for E. coli K-12 and Salmonella populations were determined in all samples treated at 23 degrees C. Sublethal injury occurred in E. coli and Salmonella populations at 54 degrees C or above for 120 s. Viability losses for both bacteria averaged 5 log at 54 degrees C or above for 180 s, and the surviving populations were below detection (<10 CFU/ml). Thermal treatment at 40 degrees C and above led to membrane damage, leakage, and accumulation of intracellular ATP from 2 to 2.5 log fg/ml and UV-absorbing substances of 0.1 to 0.39 in the treated samples. These results indicate similar thermal injury/damage on both E. coli and Salmonella membranes as determined by the amount of inactivation, viability loss, and leakage of intracellular substances of bacteria.

  7. Use of capillary tubes and plate heat exchanger to validate U.S. Department of Agriculture pasteurization protocols for elimination of Salmonella enteritidis from liquid egg products.

    PubMed

    Michalski, C B; Brackett, R E; Hung, Y C; Ezeike, G O

    1999-02-01

    D values for a five-strain cocktail of Salmonella Enteritidis in five different liquid egg products (whole egg, egg yolk, egg white, egg yolk + 5% sucrose + 5% NaCl, and egg yolk + 10% NaCl) were determined using 100-microl capillary tubes. The egg products were inoculated with approximately 1 X 10(10) organisms/ml and heated in capillary tubes to temperatures ranging from 51 to 68 degrees C for various time intervals. Using a pilot scale plate heat exchanger, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) protocols for pasteurization were also evaluated using egg products inoculated with approximately 1 x 10(7) Salmonella Enteritidis/ml. Results of experiments with capillary tubes suggested that almost all processes would result in less than the 9D process recommended by the USDA. However, when the egg products were pasteurized using the plate heat exchanger, a greater than 9D process was achieved for Salmonella Enteritidis in all products except egg yolk containing 5% sucrose + 5% NaCl, which received approximately a 4D process.

  8. ZnO nanoparticles impose a panmetabolic toxic effect along with strong necrosis, inducing activation of the envelope stress response in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Vidovic, Sinisa; Elder, Jeff; Medihala, Prabhakara; Lawrence, John R; Predicala, Bernardo; Zhang, Haixia; Korber, Darren R

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we tested the antimicrobial activity of three metal nanoparticles (NPs), ZnO, MgO, and CaO NPs, against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in liquid medium and on solid surfaces. Out of the three tested metal NPs, ZnO NPs exhibited the most significant antimicrobial effect both in liquid medium and when embedded on solid surfaces. Therefore, we focused on revealing the mechanisms of surface-associated ZnO biocidal activity. Using the global proteome approach, we report that a great majority (79%) of the altered proteins in biofilms formed by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis were downregulated, whereas a much smaller fraction (21%) of proteins were upregulated. Intriguingly, all downregulated proteins were enzymes involved in a wide range of the central metabolic pathways, including translation; amino acid biosynthetic pathways; nucleobase, nucleoside, and nucleotide biosynthetic processes; ATP synthesis-coupled proton transport; the pentose phosphate shunt; and carboxylic acid metabolic processes, indicating that ZnO NPs exert a panmetabolic toxic effect on this prokaryotic organism. In addition to their panmetabolic toxicity, ZnO NPs induced profound changes in cell envelope morphology, imposing additional necrotic effects and triggering the envelope stress response of Salmonella serovar Enteritidis. The envelope stress response effect activated periplasmic chaperones and proteases, transenvelope complexes, and regulators, thereby facilitating protection of this prokaryotic organism against ZnO NPs. PMID:25801570

  9. Unveiling ubiquitinome rearrangements induced by Salmonella infection

    PubMed Central

    Bionda, Tihana; Behrends, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ubiquitination plays a critical role in the activation of host immune responses to infection and serves as a signal for pathogen delivery to phagophores along the xenophagy pathway. We recently performed systematic ubiquitination site profiling of epithelial cells infected with Salmonella Typhimurium. Our findings specifically highlight components of the NFKB, membrane trafficking pathways and RHO GTPase systems as ubiquitination hubs during infection. In addition, a broad spectrum of bacterial effectors and several outer membrane proteins are ubiquitinated in infected cells. This comprehensive resource of ubiquitinome dynamics during Salmonella infection enables further understanding of the complex host-pathogen interplay and may reveal novel targets for the inhibition of Salmonella invasion and inflammation. PMID:27467224

  10. Dose Determination for Acute Salmonella Infection in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Loynachan, A. T.; Harris, D. L.

    2005-01-01

    Pigs were exposed to various levels of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium by either intranasal inoculation or by subjecting them to a contaminated environment. More than 103 salmonellae were required to induce acute Salmonella infection. These results indicate that intervention against acute Salmonella infection in lairage may be more readily achieved than previously thought. PMID:15870368

  11. Strategies for Controlling Salmonella Enteritidis in Poultry Flocks: Translating Research into Action

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than 2500 distinct Salmonella serotypes have been identified, but only a small fraction of these are commonly found in poultry flocks. However, poultry products are epidemiologically important as sources of Salmonella transmission to humans and several of the serotypes that most often cause hum...

  12. Selection for pro-inflammatory mediators yields chickens with increased resistance against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella are a leading cause of foodborne illness and can be transmitted through consumption of contaminated poultry; therefore, increasing a flocks’ natural resistance to Salmonella could improve food safety. Previously, we characterized the heterophil-mediated innate immune response of two pare...

  13. Efficacy of several vaccination programmes in commercial layer and broiler breeder hens against experimental challenge with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Penha Filho, Rafael Antonio Casarin; de Paiva, Jacqueline Boldrin; Arguello, Yuli Melisa Sierra; da Silva, Mariana Dias; Gardin, Yannick; Resende, Fernando; Berchieri Junior, Angelo Berchieri; Sesti, Luiz

    2009-10-01

    Two experiments were performed to evaluate the protective effect of various vaccination combinations given at 5 and 9 weeks of age against experimental challenge with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) phage type 4 at 12 weeks of age. In Experiment 1, groups of commercial layers were vaccinated by one of the following programmes: Group 1, two doses of a SE bacterin (Layermune SE); Group 2, one dose of a live Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum vaccine (Cevac SG9R) followed by one dose of the SE bacterin; Group 3, one dose of each of two different multivalent inactivated vaccines containing SE cells (Corymune 4K and Corymune 7K; and Group 4, unvaccinated, challenged controls. In Experiment 2, groups of broiler breeders were vaccinated by the same programmes as Groups 1 and 2 above while Group 3 was an unvaccinated, challenged control group. All vaccination programmes and the challenge induced significant (P < 0.05) seroconversion as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Overall, in both experiments, all vaccination schemes were significantly effective in reducing organ (spleen, liver and caeca) colonization by the challenge strain as well as reducing faecal excretion for at least 3 weeks. Vaccinated layers in Groups 1 and 2 and broiler breeders in Group 2 showed the greatest reduction in organ colonization and the least faecal excretion. In Experiment 1, layers vaccinated with multivalent inactivated vaccines containing a SE component (Group 3) were only moderately protected, indicating that such a vaccination programme may be useful in farms with good husbandry and housing conditions and low environmental infectious pressure by Salmonella.

  14. Growth temperature alters Salmonella Enteritidis heat/acid resistance, membrane lipid composition and stress/virulence related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yishan; Khoo, Wei Jie; Zheng, Qianwang; Chung, Hyun-Jung; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2014-02-17

    The influence of growth temperature (10, 25, 37, and 42 °C) on the survival of Salmonella Enteritidis in simulated gastric fluid (SGF; pH=2.0) and during heat treatment (54, 56, 58, and 60 °C), on the membrane fatty acid composition, as well as on stress-/virulence-related gene expression was studied. Cells incubated at temperatures lower or higher than 37 °C did not increase their acid resistance, with the maximum D-value of 3.07 min in cells grown at 37 °C; while those incubated at higher temperature increased their heat resistance, with the maximum D60 °C-values of 1.4 min in cells grown at 42 °C. A decrease in the ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids was observed as the growth temperature increased. Compared to the control cells grown at 37 °C, the expression of rpoS was 16.5- and 14.4-fold higher in cells cultivated at 10 and 25 °C, respectively; while the expression of rpoH was 2.9-fold higher in those cultivated at 42 °C. The increased expression of stress response gene rpoH and the decreased ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids correlated with the greater heat resistance of bacteria grown at 42 °C; while the decreased expression of stress response gene rpoS at 42 °C might contribute to the decrease in acid resistance. Virulence related genes-spvR, hilA, avrA-were induced in cells cultivated at 42 °C, except sefA which was induced in the control cells. This study indicates that environmental temperature may affect the virulence potential of S. Enteritidis, thus temperature should be well controlled during food storage.

  15. Effectiveness of superheated steam for inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 30, and Listeria monocytogenes on almonds and pistachios.

    PubMed

    Ban, Ga-Hee; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-03-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of superheated steam (SHS) on the inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis phage type (PT) 30 and Listeria monocytogenes on almonds and in-shell pistachios and to determine the effect of superheated steam heating on quality by measuring color and texture changes. Almonds and in-shell pistachios inoculated with four foodborne pathogens were treated with saturated steam (SS) at 100 °C and SHS at 125, 150, 175, and 200 °C for various times. Exposure of almonds and pistachios to SHS for 15 or 30s at 200 °C achieved >5l og reductions among all tested pathogens without causing significant changes in color values or texture parameters (P>0.05). For both almonds and pistachios, acid and peroxide values (PV) following SS and SHS treatment for up to 15s and 30s, respectively, were within the acceptable range (PV<1.0 meq/kg). These results show that thermal application of 200 °C SHS treatment for 15s and 30s did not affect the quality of almonds and pistachios, respectively. Therefore, SHS treatment is a very promising alternative technology for the tree nuts industry by improving inactivation of foodborne pathogens on almonds and pistachios while simultaneously reducing processing time.

  16. Effectiveness of superheated steam for inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 30, and Listeria monocytogenes on almonds and pistachios.

    PubMed

    Ban, Ga-Hee; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-03-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of superheated steam (SHS) on the inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis phage type (PT) 30 and Listeria monocytogenes on almonds and in-shell pistachios and to determine the effect of superheated steam heating on quality by measuring color and texture changes. Almonds and in-shell pistachios inoculated with four foodborne pathogens were treated with saturated steam (SS) at 100 °C and SHS at 125, 150, 175, and 200 °C for various times. Exposure of almonds and pistachios to SHS for 15 or 30s at 200 °C achieved >5l og reductions among all tested pathogens without causing significant changes in color values or texture parameters (P>0.05). For both almonds and pistachios, acid and peroxide values (PV) following SS and SHS treatment for up to 15s and 30s, respectively, were within the acceptable range (PV<1.0 meq/kg). These results show that thermal application of 200 °C SHS treatment for 15s and 30s did not affect the quality of almonds and pistachios, respectively. Therefore, SHS treatment is a very promising alternative technology for the tree nuts industry by improving inactivation of foodborne pathogens on almonds and pistachios while simultaneously reducing processing time. PMID:26773253

  17. [Host defense mechanisms against Salmonella infection].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yumi

    2004-12-01

    Salmonella is one of the gram negative intracellular pathogens. The immune response to Salmonella includes innate immunity and adaptive immunity. The intestinal epithelium, neutrophil, macrophage, dendritic cell, NK cell, NK T cell and gammadelta T cell take important part in former process, and antigen specific T cell and B cell take part in the later process. Macrophages and dendritic cells increase in number early after Salmonella infection and produce variety of cytokines. Especially, IL-12, IL-15 and IL-18 play important roles in protection against Salmonella infection, proliferation of NK cell, NKT cell and gammadelta T cell, producing IFN-gamma, in addition, IL-12 and IL-18 induce IFN-gamma production by Th1 cells and adaptive immune response.

  18. Salmonella infections in food workers identified through routine Public Health Surveillance in Minnesota: impact on outbreak recognition.

    PubMed

    Medus, Carlota; Smith, Kirk E; Bender, Jeffrey B; Leano, Fe; Hedberg, Craig W

    2010-11-01

    The frequency of Salmonella-infected food workers identified through routine surveillance from 1997 to 2004 in Minnesota was determined in order to evaluate the impact of surveillance on the detection of outbreaks in restaurants and to quantify the duration of Salmonella shedding in stool. Of 4,976 culture-confirmed Salmonella cases reported to the Minnesota Department of Health, 110 (2.2%) were identified as food workers; this was less than one-half the number expected based on the incidence of Salmonella in the general population. Twenty food workers (18%) were associated with outbreaks. Twelve were involved in nine independent outbreaks at the restaurants where they worked. The identification of the index food worker in six of these outbreaks was critical to the initiation of outbreak investigations that revealed much larger problems. Among food workers who submitted specimens until at least one negative result was obtained (n = 69), the median duration of shedding was 22 days (range, 1 to 359 days). Among the four most common serotypes (Enteritidis, Typhimurium, Heidelberg, and Newport) the median duration of shedding was significantly longer for Salmonella Newport (80 days; P = 0.02) and for Salmonella Enteritidis (32 days; P = 0.04) than for Salmonella Heidelberg (8 days). Food workers should be considered an important source of Salmonella transmission, and those identified through surveillance should raise a high index of suspicion of a possible outbreak at their place of work. Food service managers need to be alert to Salmonella-like illnesses among food workers to facilitate prevention and control efforts, including exclusion of infected food workers or restriction of their duties.

  19. Cell invasion of poultry-associated Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis isolates is associated with pathogenicity, motility and proteins secreted by the type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Shah, Devendra H; Zhou, Xiaohui; Addwebi, Tarek; Davis, Margaret A; Orfe, Lisa; Call, Douglas R; Guard, Jean; Besser, Thomas E

    2011-05-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major cause of food-borne gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. Poultry and poultry products are considered the major vehicles of transmission to humans. Using cell invasiveness as a surrogate marker for pathogenicity, we tested the invasiveness of 53 poultry-associated isolates of S. Enteritidis in a well-differentiated intestinal epithelial cell model (Caco-2). The method allowed classification of the isolates into low (n = 7), medium (n = 18) and high (n = 30) invasiveness categories. Cell invasiveness of the isolates did not correlate with the presence of the virulence-associated gene spvB or the ability of the isolates to form biofilms. Testing of representative isolates with high and low invasiveness in a mouse model revealed that the former were more invasive in vivo and caused more and earlier mortalities, whereas the latter were significantly less invasive in vivo, causing few or no mortalities. Further characterization of representative isolates with low and high invasiveness showed that most of the isolates with low invasiveness had impaired motility and impaired secretion of either flagella-associated proteins (FlgK, FljB and FlgL) or type III secretion system (TTSS)-secreted proteins (SipA and SipD) encoded on Salmonella pathogenicity island-1. In addition, isolates with low invasiveness had impaired ability to invade and/or survive within chicken macrophages. These data suggest that not all isolates of S. Enteritidis recovered from poultry may be equally pathogenic, and that the pathogenicity of S. Enteritidis isolates is associated, in part, with both motility and secretion of TTSS effector proteins.

  20. Rapid screening of Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Hadar, Heidelberg and Typhimurium using a serologically-correlative allelotyping PCR targeting the O and H antigen alleles

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yang; Liu, Tongrui; Lee, Margie D; Hofacre, Charles L; Maier, Marie; White, David G; Ayers, Sherry; Wang, Lihua; Berghaus, Roy; Maurer, John J

    2008-01-01

    Background Classical Salmonella serotyping is an expensive and time consuming process that requires implementing a battery of O and H antisera to detect 2,541 different Salmonella enterica serovars. For these reasons, we developed a rapid multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based typing scheme to screen for the prevalent S. enterica serovars Enteritidis, Hadar, Heidelberg, and Typhimurium. Results By analyzing the nucleotide sequences of the genes for O-antigen biosynthesis including wba operon and the central variable regions of the H1 and H2 flagellin genes in Salmonella, designated PCR primers for four multiplex PCR reactions were used to detect and differentiate Salmonella serogroups A/D1, B, C1, C2, or E1; H1 antigen types i, g, m, r or z10; and H2 antigen complexes, I: 1,2; 1,5; 1,6; 1,7 or II: e,n,x; e,n,z15. Through the detection of these antigen gene allele combinations, we were able to distinguish among S. enterica serovars Enteritidis, Hadar, Heidelberg, and Typhimurium. The assays were useful in identifying Salmonella with O and H antigen gene alleles representing 43 distinct serovars. While the H2 multiplex could discriminate between unrelated H2 antigens, the PCR could not discern differences within the antigen complexes, 1,2; 1,5; 1,6; 1,7 or e,n,x; e,n,z15, requiring a final confirmatory PCR test in the final serovar reporting of S. enterica. Conclusion Multiplex PCR assays for detecting specific O and H antigen gene alleles can be a rapid and cost-effective alternative approach to classical serotyping for presumptive identification of S. enterica serovars Enteritidis, Hadar, Heidelberg, and Typhimurium. PMID:18845003

  1. Reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in chicken manure by larvae of the black soldier fly.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Marilyn C; Islam, Mahbub; Sheppard, Craig; Liao, Jean; Doyle, Michael P

    2004-04-01

    Green fluorescent protein-labeled Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis were inoculated at 10(7) CFU/g into cow, hog, or chicken manure. Ten- or 11-day-old soldier fly larvae (Hermetia illucens L.) (7 to 10 g) were added to the manure and held at 23, 27, or 32 degrees C for 3 to 6 days. Soldier fly larvae accelerated inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 in chicken manure but had no effect in cow manure and enhanced survival in hog manure. The initial pH values of the hog and chicken manure were 6.0 to 6.2 and 7.4 to 8.2, respectively, and it is surmised that these conditions affected the stability of the larval antimicrobial system. Reductions of E. coli O157:H7 populations in chicken manure by larvae were affected by storage temperature, with greater reductions in samples held for 3 days at 27 or 32 degrees C than at 23 degrees C. Pathogen inactivation in chicken manure by larvae was not affected by the indigenous microflora of chicken manure, because Salmonella Enteritidis populations in larvae-treated samples were approximately 2.5 log lower than control samples without larvae when either autoclaved or nonautoclaved chicken manure was used as the contaminated medium during 3 days of storage. Extending the storage time to 6 days, larvae again accelerated the reduction in Salmonella Enteritidis populations in chicken manure during the first 4 days of storage; however, larvae became contaminated with the pathogen. After 2 days of feeding on contaminated manure, Salmonella Enteritidis populations in larvae averaged 3.3 log CFU/g. Populations decreased to 1.9 log CFU/g after 6 days of exposure to contaminated chicken manure; however, the absence of feeding activity by the maggots in later stages of storage may be responsible for the continued presence of Salmonella Enteritidis in larvae. Transfer of contaminated larvae to fresh chicken manure restored feeding activity but led to cross-contamination of the fresh manure.

  2. Nontyphoidal Salmonella Infection, Guangdong Province, China, 20121

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xi; Huang, Qiong; Dun, Zhongjun; Huang, Wei; Wu, Shuyu; Liang, Junhua; Deng, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    We used active and passive surveillance to estimate nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infection during 2012 in Guangdong Province, China. Under passive surveillance, for every reported NTS infection, an estimated 414.8 cases occurred annually. Under active surveillance, an estimated 35.8 cases occurred. Active surveillance provides remarkable advantages in incidence estimate. PMID:26982074

  3. Modulation of Salmonella infection by the lectins of Canavalia ensiformis (Con A) and Galanthus nivalis (GNA) in a rat model in vivo.

    PubMed

    Naughton, P J; Grant, G; Bardocz, S; Pusztai, A

    2000-04-01

    The plant lectins, Concanavalin A (Con A) and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) have been prefed to rats for 3 d pre- and 6 d postinfection with Salmonella typhimurium S986 or Salm. enteritidis 857. Con A significantly increased numbers of Salm. typhimurium S986 in the large intestine and in faeces, and severely impaired growth of the rats, more severely than is the case of infection with Salmonella typhimurium alone. Con A had much less effect on rats infected with Salm. enteritidis 857 only showing a significant increase in numbers in the colon, accompanied by intermittent increases of Salmonella in the faeces during the study. GNA significantly reduced pathogen numbers in the lower part of the small bowel and the large intestine of rats infected with Salm. typhimurium S986 and significantly improved rat growth. GNA had little effect on infection by Salm. enteritidis 857 with slight decreases in Salmonella numbers in the small intestine and large intestine and transient increases in the faeces.

  4. Outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis linked to the consumption of frozen beefburgers received from a food bank and originating from Poland: northern France, December 2014 to April 2015

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Gabrielle; Pihier, Nathalie; Vanbockstael, Caroline; Le Hello, Simon; Cadel Six, Sabrina; Fournet, Nelly; Jourdan-da Silva, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    A prolonged outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis occurred in northern France between December 2014 and April 2015. Epidemiological investigations following the initial notification on 30 December 2014 of five cases of salmonellosis (two confirmed S. Enteritidis) in young children residing in the Somme department revealed that all cases frequented the same food bank A. Further epidemiological, microbiological and food trace-back investigations indicated frozen beefburgers as the source of the outbreak and the suspected lot originating from Poland was recalled on 22 January 2015. On 2 March 2015 a second notification of S. Enteritidis cases in the Somme reinitiated investigations that confirmed a link with food bank A and with consumption of frozen beefburgers from the same Polish producer. In the face of a possible persistent source of contamination, all frozen beefburgers distributed by food bank A and from the same origin were blocked on 3 March 2015. Microbiological analyses confirmed contamination by S. Enteritidis of frozen beefburgers from a second lot remaining in cases’ homes. A second recall was initiated on 6 March 2015 and all frozen beefburgers from the Polish producer remain blocked after analyses identified additional contaminated lots over several months of production. PMID:27748250

  5. Development of a Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) - Surface Enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) Assay for the Detection of Salmonella Enterica Serotype Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Draz, Mohamed Shehata; Lu, Xiaonan

    2016-01-01

    As a major foodborne pathogen, Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is increasingly rising as a global health concern. Here, we developed an integrated assay that combines loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for DNA detection of S. Enteritidis using specifically designed Raman active Au-nanoprobes. The target DNA was amplified by LAMP and then labeled with Au-nanoprobes comprised of gold nanoparticle-modified with specific cy5/DNA probes to allow the detection by SERS. The sensitivity of the developed LAMP-SERS detection assay (66 CFU/mL) was ~100-fold higher than the conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Significantly, this technique allowed highly specific detection of the target DNA of S. Enteritidis and could differentiate it from the DNA of closely related bacterial species or non-specific contamination, making it more accurate and reliable than the standard LAMP technique. The applicability of detection of S. Enteritidis in milk samples using LAMP-SERS assay was validated as well. In sum, the developed LAMP-SERS assay is highly specific and sensitive, and has the potential to be applied for rapid detection of different foodborne pathogens and other microbial contaminants. PMID:26941845

  6. Development of a Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) - Surface Enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) Assay for the Detection of Salmonella Enterica Serotype Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Draz, Mohamed Shehata; Lu, Xiaonan

    2016-01-01

    As a major foodborne pathogen, Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is increasingly rising as a global health concern. Here, we developed an integrated assay that combines loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for DNA detection of S. Enteritidis using specifically designed Raman active Au-nanoprobes. The target DNA was amplified by LAMP and then labeled with Au-nanoprobes comprised of gold nanoparticle-modified with specific cy5/DNA probes to allow the detection by SERS. The sensitivity of the developed LAMP-SERS detection assay (66 CFU/mL) was ~100-fold higher than the conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Significantly, this technique allowed highly specific detection of the target DNA of S. Enteritidis and could differentiate it from the DNA of closely related bacterial species or non-specific contamination, making it more accurate and reliable than the standard LAMP technique. The applicability of detection of S. Enteritidis in milk samples using LAMP-SERS assay was validated as well. In sum, the developed LAMP-SERS assay is highly specific and sensitive, and has the potential to be applied for rapid detection of different foodborne pathogens and other microbial contaminants. PMID:26941845

  7. Recovery of Salmonella serovar Enteritidis from inoculated broiler hatching eggs using shell rinse and shell crush sampling methods.

    PubMed

    Webb, M L; Spickler, J L; Bourassa, D V; Cox, N A; Wilson, J L; Buhr, R J

    2014-08-01

    This study compared the recovery of Salmonella from hatching eggs using 3 sampling methods (eggshell rinsing, eggshell crush following a previous rinse, and eggshell crush without previous rinse). Eggshells were drop-inoculated with approximately 10(1), 10(2), or 10(3) cfu/eggshell of Salmonella Enteritidis and allowed to dry at room temperature for 1 or 24 h. For the shell rinse groups, each inoculated egg was rinsed with buffered peptone water. These rinsed eggs were used for the shell crush with previous rinse groups, and each egg was aseptically cracked, the contents discarded, and the eggshell and membranes crushed with buffered peptone water. This same crush procedure was used for the shell crush without previous shell rinse eggs. The recovery of Salmonella 1 h after inoculation for shell rinse sampled eggs was 16% positive at 10(1), 49% at 10(2), and 93% at 10(3) cfu/eggshell challenge. For the shell crush with previous shell rinse, sampled egg recovery was 0% positive at 10(1), 3% at 10(2), and 17% at 10(3) cfu/eggshell. For the shell crush, sampled eggs had recovery of 23% positive at 10(1), 69% at 10(2), and 96% at 10(3) cfu/eggshell challenge. The recovery of Salmonella 24 h after inoculation for the shell rinse eggs was 3% positive at 10(1), 12% at 10(2), and 22% at 10(3) cfu/eggshell challenge; recovery for shell crush with previous shell rinse sampling was 2% positive at 10(1), 8% at 10(2), and 5% at 10(3) cfu/eggshell challenge; and for the shell crush sampling recovery was 2% at 10(1), 32% at 10(2), and 42% at 10(3) cfu/eggshell challenge. Eggshell crush was a more sensitive (∼10 percentage points) sampling method than eggshell rinse at both 1 and 24 h, but both methods were equally optimal when the inoculum was at 10(3) and samples were collected after 1 h. Waiting 24 h after inoculation to sample significantly lowered the recovery for both the shell rinse and shell crush sampling methods by ∼40 percentage points. PMID:24931964

  8. Molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates from humans by antimicrobial resistance, virulence genes, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ming; Keelara, Shivaramu; Thakur, Siddhartha

    2012-03-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major serovar associated with human salmonellosis. A total of 425 clinical S. Enteritidis isolates of human origin were collected between June 2009 and September 2010 from North Carolina. The isolates were further characterized for antimicrobial susceptibility, antimicrobial resistance coding determinants, virulence genes, and fingerprint profiles to determine whether they were similar or different to the S. Enteritidis strain responsible for the human outbreak due to consumption of contaminated eggs. Ten different antimicrobial resistance phenotypes were observed with the highest frequency of resistance exhibited to ampicillin (n=10; 2.35%). The isolates were predominantly pansusceptible (n=409; 96.23%); however, seven isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR; i.e., resistant to three or more antimicrobials). Extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) coding genes (bla(TEM) and bla(PSE)) were detected in the ampicillin-resistant isolates, whereas a single MDR isolate tested positive for class 1 integron (1 kb). The majority of the isolates (n=422; 99.3%) carried the invA, mgtC, stn, sopB, sopE1, and sefA virulence genes. However, 37 (8.7%) and 46 (10.82%) S. Enteritidis isolates tested negative for the plasmid encoded genes spvC and rck, respectively. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing of 118 S. Enteritidis isolates by restriction enzymes XbaI and BlnI resulted in seven clusters, each with a discriminatory index (DI) of 0.715 and 0.785, respectively. The combination of XbaI-BlnI patterns generated a dendrogram with 14 clusters and a higher DI of 0.914. The PFGE profile of 80 isolates matched 100% with the S. Enteritidis strain that has been cited for the recent outbreak in the United States due to consumption of contaminated eggs. In conclusion, we identified a genotypic similar S. Enteritidis population in our study based on antimicrobial susceptibility, virulence gene, and PFGE fingerprint

  9. Genetic diversity, virulence genes and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella Enteritidis isolated from food and humans over a 24-year period in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Campioni, Fábio; Moratto Bergamini, Alzira Maria; Falcão, Juliana P

    2012-12-01

    Salmonellosis is a major health problem worldwide. Serovar Enteritidis has been a primary cause of Salmonella outbreaks in many countries. In Brazil, few molecular typing studies have been performed. The aims of this study were to molecularly type Salmonella Enteritidis strains isolated in Brazil in order to determine the genetic relationship between strains of food and human origin, as well as, to assess their pathogenic potential and antimicrobial resistance. A total of 128 S. Enteritidis strains isolated from human feces (67) and food (61) between 1986 and 2010 were studied. The genotypic diversity was assessed by ERIC-PCR and PFGE using XbaI, the antimicrobial resistance by the disc-diffusion assay and the presence of the SPI-1, SPI-2 and pSTV virulence genes assessed by PCR. The ERIC-PCR results revealed that 112 strains exhibited a similarity of >85.4% and the PFGE that 96 strains exhibited a similarity of >80.0%. Almost all strains (97.6%) harbored all 13 virulence genes investigated. Thirty-six strains (28.12%) were resistant to nalidixic acid. In conclusion, the nalidixic acid resistance observed after 1996 is indicative of an increase in the use of this drug. It may be suggested that these 128 strains might have descended from a common ancestor that differed little over 24 years and has been both contaminating food and humans and causing disease for more than two decades in Brazil.

  10. Invasion of Salmonella enteritidis in the tissues of reproductive organs in laying Japanese quail: an immunocytochemical study.

    PubMed

    Takata, T; Liang, J; Nakano, H; Yoshimura, Y

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Salmonella enteritidis (SE) inoculated into the peritoneal cavity would colonize tissues of reproductive organs in Japanese quail hens. Quail hens regularly laying were intraperitoneally inoculated with 5 x 10(7) or 5 x 10(8) SE cells, and the ovary, oviduct, kidney, spleen, liver, and large intestine were excised 24 or 48 h after the treatment. Paraffin sections of these organs were immunostained for SE. Invasion of SE was found in the tissues of the ovarian stroma, the follicular wall including superficial and theca layers, and occasionally in the granulosa layer and yolk. The SE immunoreaction product frequently was found in the fibroblast-like and macrophage-like cells in the stroma and surface layer of follicles. The SE immunoreaction products were identified on the mucosal surface, in the mucosal epithelium, and in the stromal tissues in all segments of the oviduct. Many of the bacteria were contained in the cytoplasm of mucosal epithelial cells and stromal cells in those tissues. The SE immunoreactions were also found in the tissues of kidney, spleen, and liver and in the large intestine. These results suggest that SE organisms introduced into the peritoneal cavity can invade and colonize the tissues of ovary and oviduct and may be responsible in the production of contaminated eggs.

  11. Epidemiological analysis of Salmonella enterica Enteritidis isolates in Japan by phage-typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Terajima, J.; Nakamura, A.; Watanabe, H.

    1998-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates of phage types (PTs) PT1, PT4, PT13a and PT22 derived from sporadic cases and outbreaks of food poisoning in Japan during 1994 and 1995 were analysed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). While PT1 strains from 5 different outbreaks showed 14 PFGE patterns, 5 PFGE patterns were observed among PT4 isolates from 5 different outbreaks and 6 independent isolates from imported chicken. Interestingly, 8 out of 9 PT4 strains associated with foreign travel to Southeast Asia were indistinguishable in PFGE pattern from 5 independent isolates of imported chicken from England. Although both PT13a and PT22 were first reported in Japan in 1994, PT22 showed various PFGE patterns compared to PT13a which had the same pattern within an outbreak, unlike PT1. These results could indicate that multiple clonal lines of PT1 and PT22 had already spread while relatively fewer clonal lines of PT4 and PT13a might exist in Japan. PMID:9692599

  12. inhibitory effects of citral, cinnamaldehyde, and tea polyphenols on mixed biofilm formation by foodborne Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongmei; Zhou, Wenyuan; Zhang, Wenyan; Yang, Anlin; Liu, Yanlan; Jiang, Yan; Huang, Shaosong; Su, Jianyu

    2014-06-01

    Biofilms are significant hazards in the food industry. In this study, we investigated the effects of food additive such as citral, cinnamaldehyde, and tea polyphenols on mixed biofilm formation by foodborne Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella serotype Enteritidis. The adhesion rates of mixed strains in sub-MIC of additives were determined by a microtiter plate assay and bacterial communication signal autoinducer 2 (AI-2) production via a bioluminescence reporter Vibrio harveyi BB170. The structure of mixed biofilm was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The effect of the disinfectants hydrogen peroxide, sodium hypochlorite, and peracetic acid was tested on the mixed biofilm. Our results demonstrated that citral, cinnamaldehyde, and tea polyphenols were able to significantly inhibit mixed biofilm formation, while citral could reduce the synthesis of AI-2. Conversely, we observed a significant increase in AI-2 mediated by cinnamaldehyde. Tea polyphenols at lower concentrations induced AI-2 synthesis; however, AI-2 synthesis was significantly inhibited at higher concentrations (300 m g/ml). Food additives inhibited the adhesion of mixed bacteria on stainless steel chips and increased the sensitivity of the mixed biofilm to disinfectants. In conclusion, citral, cinnamaldehyde, and tea polyphenols had strong inhibitory effects on mixed biofilm formation and also enhanced the effect of disinfectant on mixed biofilm formation. This study provides a scientific basis for the application of natural food additives to control biofilm formation of foodborne bacteria. PMID:24853514

  13. Environmental contamination and detection of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis in laying flocks.

    PubMed

    Davies, R; Breslin, M

    2001-12-01

    Faecal, dust and other environmental samples were collected from the floors, droppings belts, egg-collection systems and other areas of 14 cage-layer flocks, 10 barn egg production flocks and seven free-range flocks, and cultured for Salmonella species. The distribution of the organism varied with its prevalence and with the vaccination status of the birds. No one sample type was found to be suitable for identifying all contaminated houses. Salmonella was also frequently found on egg-packing equipment and in samples from rodents and wild birds. PMID:11787781

  14. Distribution of molecular subtypes within Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis phage type 4 and S. Typhimurium definitive phage type 104 in nine European countries, 2000-2004: results of an international multi-centre study.

    PubMed

    Gatto, A J; Peters, T M; Green, J; Fisher, I S T; Gill, O N; O'brien, S J; Maguire, C; Berghold, C; Lederer, I; Gerner-Smidt, P; Torpdahl, M; Siitonen, A; Lukinmaa, S; Tschäpe, H; Prager, R; Luzzi, I; Dionisi, A M; VAN DER Zwaluw, W K; Heck, M; Coia, J; Brown, D; Usera, M; Echeita, A; Threlfall, E J

    2006-08-01

    This study investigates the distribution of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles within Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis phage type (PT) 4 and S. Typhimurium definitive phage type (DT) 104, from cases of human infection in nine European countries from 2000 to 2004. Isolates were subtyped using standardized methods and gel images submitted by each participating country to the coordinating centre (Health Protection Agency Centre for Infections, London, UK), where they were entered into a central database, developed within BioNumerics software, and designated using an agreed nomenclature. S. Enteritidis PT4 (n=3637) was differentiated into 38 different profiles. Simpson's index of diversity (D) of profiles ranged from 0.2 to 0.4. Profile SENTXB.0001 represented at least 80% of all profiles in each country. S. Typhimurium DT104 (n=1202) was differentiated into 28 different profile types. Simpson's D was at least 0.6 in all countries except in Austria and Italy. In both these countries over 74% of S. Typhimurium DT104 profiles were STYMXB.0013. Profile STYMXB.0061, was predominant in Denmark, Spain, Finland and England and Wales where it represented between 36% and 45% of profiles. Profile STYMXB.0001 represented nearly half of all profiles in Scotland and 23% in England and Wales. PFGE is proving useful for further discrimination within S. Enteritidis PT4 and S. Typhimurium DT104. Ascertainment of international outbreaks involving common serotypes and phage types may be increased by the timely pooling of PFGE profiles within a central database readily accessible to all participating countries.

  15. The rise and decline in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis outbreaks attributed to egg-containing foods in the United States, 1973-2009.

    PubMed

    Wright, A P; Richardson, L; Mahon, B E; Rothenberg, R; Cole, D J

    2016-03-01

    Salmonella enterica causes an estimated 1 million domestically acquired foodborne illnesses annually. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) is among the top three serovars of reported cases of Salmonella. We examined trends in SE foodborne outbreaks from 1973 to 2009 using Joinpoint and Poisson regression. The annual number of SE outbreaks increased sharply in the 1970s and 1980s but declined significantly after 1990. Over the study period, SE outbreaks were most frequently attributed to foods containing eggs. The average rate of SE outbreaks attributed to egg-containing foods reported by states began to decline significantly after 1990, and the proportion of SE outbreaks attributed to egg-containing foods began declining after 1997. Our results suggest that interventions initiated in the 1990s to decrease SE contamination of shell eggs may have been integral to preventing SE outbreaks.

  16. A comparative study of strains of salmonella isolated from irrigation waters, vegetables and human infections.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Villanova Ruiz, B.; Cueto Espinar, A.; Bolaños Carmona, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    A total of 181 samples of irrigation water from the farmlands of Granada were examined for the presence of Salmonella spp. At the same time 849 samples of the crops from these farmlands and of vegetables sold in city market-places were studied. Sampling was done regularly over the period of study which ran from March 1981 to February 1983. Isolates from these sources were compared with 93 salmonellas isolated from human pathological material at various hospitals of the city of Granada from 1979-80, and again from 1981-3. The most commonly isolated serotypes of human origin were S. typhimurium and S. enteritidis. In irrigation waters and in crops, S. typhimurium, S. kapemba, S. london and S. blockley were found to be the most common. The results indicate a close relationship between the isolates from the irrigation waters and those from the vegetables, but their relationship to prevalent human infections is less clear. PMID:3595745

  17. Salmonella infections including typhoid disease.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    It is estimated that more than 20 million cases of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi and 6 million cases of paratyphoid disease occur worldwide annually, with typhoid disease alone causing more than 200,000 deaths. The clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, and vaccination guidelines are discussed.

  18. Development of classification models to detect Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium found in poultry carcass rinses by visible-near infrared hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Young Wook; Yoon, Seung Chul; Park, Bosoon; Hinton, Arthur; Windham, William R.; Lawrence, Kurt C.

    2013-05-01

    Salmonella is a major cause of foodborne disease outbreaks resulting from the consumption of contaminated food products in the United States. This paper reports the development of a hyperspectral imaging technique for detecting and differentiating two of the most common Salmonella serotypes, Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) and Salmonella Typhimurium (ST), from background microflora that are often found in poultry carcass rinse. Presumptive positive screening of colonies with a traditional direct plating method is a labor intensive and time consuming task. Thus, this paper is concerned with the detection of differences in spectral characteristics among the pure SE, ST, and background microflora grown on brilliant green sulfa (BGS) and xylose lysine tergitol 4 (XLT4) agar media with a spread plating technique. Visible near-infrared hyperspectral imaging, providing the spectral and spatial information unique to each microorganism, was utilized to differentiate SE and ST from the background microflora. A total of 10 classification models, including five machine learning algorithms, each without and with principal component analysis (PCA), were validated and compared to find the best model in classification accuracy. The five machine learning (classification) algorithms used in this study were Mahalanobis distance (MD), k-nearest neighbor (kNN), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA), and support vector machine (SVM). The average classification accuracy of all 10 models on a calibration (or training) set of the pure cultures on BGS agar plates was 98% (Kappa coefficient = 0.95) in determining the presence of SE and/or ST although it was difficult to differentiate between SE and ST. The average classification accuracy of all 10 models on a training set for ST detection on XLT4 agar was over 99% (Kappa coefficient = 0.99) although SE colonies on XLT4 agar were difficult to differentiate from background microflora. The average classification

  19. 21 CFR 118.8 - Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Salmonella Web site is located at http://www.fda.gov/Food/ScienceResearch/LaboratoryMethods/ucm114716.htm... Edition, is located at http://www.fda.gov/Food/ScienceResearch/LaboratoryMethods/BacteriologicalAnalytical... with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. The FDA will request approval to incorporate by reference...

  20. 21 CFR 118.8 - Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Salmonella Web site is located at http://www.fda.gov/Food/ScienceResearch/LaboratoryMethods/ucm114716.htm... Edition, is located at http://www.fda.gov/Food/ScienceResearch/LaboratoryMethods/BacteriologicalAnalytical... with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. The FDA will request approval to incorporate by reference...

  1. Loxoribine pretreatment reduces Salmonella enteritidis organ invasion in 1-day-old chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Young poultry exhibit a transient susceptibility to some infectious diseases, including Salmonella, during the first week of life that stems from immature innate and acquired defense mechanisms. Consequently, stimulation or modulation of the hosts’ natural immune response is emerging as an importan...

  2. 21 CFR 118.8 - Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Salmonella Web site is located at http://www.fda.gov/Food/ScienceResearch/LaboratoryMethods/ucm114716.htm... with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. The FDA will request approval to incorporate by reference any... you may examine a copy at the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's Library, 5100...

  3. Combining Lactic Acid Spray with Near-Infrared Radiation Heating To Inactivate Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis on Almond and Pine Nut Kernels.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jae-Won; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of near-infrared radiation (NIR) heating combined with lactic acid (LA) sprays for inactivating Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis on almond and pine nut kernels and to elucidate the mechanisms of the lethal effect of the NIR-LA combined treatment. Also, the effect of the combination treatment on product quality was determined. Separately prepared S. Enteritidis phage type (PT) 30 and non-PT 30 S. Enteritidis cocktails were inoculated onto almond and pine nut kernels, respectively, followed by treatments with NIR or 2% LA spray alone, NIR with distilled water spray (NIR-DW), and NIR with 2% LA spray (NIR-LA). Although surface temperatures of nuts treated with NIR were higher than those subjected to NIR-DW or NIR-LA treatment, more S. Enteritidis survived after NIR treatment alone. The effectiveness of NIR-DW and NIR-LA was similar, but significantly more sublethally injured cells were recovered from NIR-DW-treated samples. We confirmed that the enhanced bactericidal effect of the NIR-LA combination may not be attributable to cell membrane damage per se. NIR heat treatment might allow S. Enteritidis cells to become permeable to applied LA solution. The NIR-LA treatment (5 min) did not significantly (P > 0.05) cause changes in the lipid peroxidation parameters, total phenolic contents, color values, moisture contents, and sensory attributes of nut kernels. Given the results of the present study, NIR-LA treatment may be a potential intervention for controlling food-borne pathogens on nut kernel products.

  4. Combining Lactic Acid Spray with Near-Infrared Radiation Heating To Inactivate Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis on Almond and Pine Nut Kernels

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jae-Won

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of near-infrared radiation (NIR) heating combined with lactic acid (LA) sprays for inactivating Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis on almond and pine nut kernels and to elucidate the mechanisms of the lethal effect of the NIR-LA combined treatment. Also, the effect of the combination treatment on product quality was determined. Separately prepared S. Enteritidis phage type (PT) 30 and non-PT 30 S. Enteritidis cocktails were inoculated onto almond and pine nut kernels, respectively, followed by treatments with NIR or 2% LA spray alone, NIR with distilled water spray (NIR-DW), and NIR with 2% LA spray (NIR-LA). Although surface temperatures of nuts treated with NIR were higher than those subjected to NIR-DW or NIR-LA treatment, more S. Enteritidis survived after NIR treatment alone. The effectiveness of NIR-DW and NIR-LA was similar, but significantly more sublethally injured cells were recovered from NIR-DW-treated samples. We confirmed that the enhanced bactericidal effect of the NIR-LA combination may not be attributable to cell membrane damage per se. NIR heat treatment might allow S. Enteritidis cells to become permeable to applied LA solution. The NIR-LA treatment (5 min) did not significantly (P > 0.05) cause changes in the lipid peroxidation parameters, total phenolic contents, color values, moisture contents, and sensory attributes of nut kernels. Given the results of the present study, NIR-LA treatment may be a potential intervention for controlling food-borne pathogens on nut kernel products. PMID:25911473

  5. A label-free ultrasensitive fluorescence detection of viable Salmonella enteritidis using enzyme-induced cascade two-stage toehold strand-displacement-driven assembly of G-quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Hui; Ma, Suzhen; Men, Shuai; Li, Qingzhou; Yang, Xin; Wang, Hongning; Zhang, Anyun

    2016-06-15

    The harm of Salmonella enteritidis (S. enteritidis ) to public health mainly by contaminating fresh food and water emphasizes the urgent need for rapid detection techniques to help control the spread of the pathogen. In this assay, an newly designed capture probe complex that contained specific S. enteritidis-aptamer and hybridized signal target sequence was used for viable S. enteritidis recognition directly. In the presence of the target S. enteritidis, single-stranded target sequences were liberated and initiated the replication-cleavage reaction, producing numerous G-quadruplex structures with a linker on the 3'-end. And then, the sensing system took innovative advantage of quadratic linker-induced strand-displacement for the first time to release target sequence in succession, leading to the cyclic reuse of the target sequences and cascade signal amplification, thereby achieving the successive production of G-quadruplex structures. The fluorescent dye, N-Methyl mesoporphyrin IX, binded to these G-quadruplex structures and generated significantly enhanced fluorescent signals to achieve highly sensitive detection of S. enteritidis down to 60 CFU/mL with a linear range from 10(2) to 10(7)CFU/mL. By coupling the cascade two-stage target sequences-recyclable toehold strand-displacement with aptamer-based target recognition successfully, it is the first report on a novel non-label, modification-free and DNA extraction-free ultrasensitive fluorescence biosensor for detecting viable S. enteritidis directly, which can discriminate from dead S. enteritidis.

  6. Functional properties of novel protective lactic acid bacteria and application in raw chicken meat against Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Maragkoudakis, Petros A; Mountzouris, Konstantinos C; Psyrras, Dimitris; Cremonese, Silvia; Fischer, Jana; Cantor, Mette D; Tsakalidou, Effie

    2009-04-15

    In this study 635 lactic acid bacteria of food origin were evaluated for their potential application as protective cultures in foods. A stepwise selection method was used to obtain the most appropriate strains for application as protective cultures in chicken meat. Specifically, all strains were examined for antimicrobial activity against various Gram positive and Gram negative pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. Strains exhibiting anti-bacterial activity were subsequently examined for survival in simulated food processing and gastrointestinal tract conditions, such as high temperatures, low pH, starvation and the presence of NaCl and bile salts. Selected strains where then examined for basic safety properties such as antibiotic resistance and haemolytic potential, while their antimicrobial activity was further investigated by PCR screening for possession of known bacteriocin genes. Two chosen strains were then applied on raw chicken meat to evaluate their protective ability against two common food pathogens, Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enteritidis, but also to identify potential spoilage effects by the application of the protective cultures on the food matrix. Antimicrobial activity in vitro was evident against Gram positive indicators, mainly Listeria and Brochothrix spp., while no antibacterial activity was obtained against any of the Gram negative bacteria tested. The antimicrobial activity was of a proteinaceous nature while strains with anti-listerial activity were found to possess one or more bacteriocin genes, mainly enterocins. Strains generally exhibited sensitivity to pH 2.0, but good survival at 45 degrees C, in the presence of bile salts and NaCl as well as during starvation, while variable survival rates were obtained at 55 degrees C. None of the strains was found to be haemolytic while variable antibiotic resistance profiles were obtained. Finally, when the selected strains Enterococcus faecium PCD71 and Lactobacillus fermentum ACA-DC179 were

  7. Whole Genome Sequence Analysis of Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 Outbreaks from a National Reference Laboratory’s Viewpoint

    PubMed Central

    Wuyts, Véronique; Denayer, Sarah; Roosens, Nancy H.C.; Mattheus, Wesley; Bertrand, Sophie; Marchal, Kathleen; Dierick, Katelijne; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C.J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In April and May 2014, two suspected egg-related outbreaks of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) were investigated by the Belgian National Reference Laboratory of Foodborne Outbreaks. Both the suspected food and human isolates being available, and this for both outbreaks, made these the ideal case study for a retrospective whole genome sequencing (WGS) analysis with the goal to investigate the feasibility of this technology for outbreak investigation by a National Reference Laboratory or National Reference Centre without thorough bioinformatics expertise. Methods: The two outbreaks were originally investigated epidemiologically with a standard questionnaire and with serotyping, phage typing, multiple-locus variable-number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing as classical microbiological methods. Retrospectively, WGS of six outbreak isolates was done on an Illumina HiSeq. Analysis of the WGS data was performed with currently available, user-friendly software and tools, namely CLC Genomics Workbench, the tools available on the server of the Center for Genomic Epidemiology and BLAST Ring Image Generator (BRIG). Results: To all collected human and food outbreak isolates, classical microbiological investigation assigned phage type PT4 (variant phage type PT4a for one human isolate) and MLVA profile 3-10-5-4-1, both of which are common for human isolates in Belgium. The WGS analysis confirmed the link between food and human isolates for each of the outbreaks and clearly discriminated between the two outbreaks occurring in a same time period, thereby suggesting a non-common source of contamination. Also, an additional plasmid carrying an antibiotic resistance gene was discovered in the human isolate with the variant phage type PT4a. Discussion: For the two investigated outbreaks occurring at geographically separated locations, the gold standard classical microbiological subtyping

  8. Diffuse abdominal gallium-67 citrate uptake in salmonella infections

    SciTech Connect

    Garty, I.; Koren, A.

    1987-11-01

    Two pediatric patients with salmonella infections (one with typhoid fever and the second with salmonella C2 gastroenteritis), had a diffuse abdominal uptake of Ga-67 citrate. The possible explanation for this finding is discussed. Salmonella infection should be included as a cause in the differential diagnosis of diffuse accumulation of Ga-67 citrate.

  9. Inactivation of Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella Enteritidis by Cymbopogon citratus D.C. Stapf. Essential Oil in Pineapple Juice.

    PubMed

    Leite, Caroline Junqueira Barcellos; de Sousa, Jossana Pereira; Medeiros, José Alberto da Costa; da Conceição, Maria Lúcia; dos Santos Falcão-Silva, Vivyanne; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, the efficacy of Cymbopogon citratus D.C. Stapf. essential oil (CCEO) to provoke a 5-log CFU/ml (5-log) inactivation in a mixed composite of Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merril) juice (4°C) was assessed. Moreover, the effects of CCEO on the physicochemical and sensory quality parameters of pineapple juice were evaluated. The MIC of CCEO was 5 μl/ml against the composite mix examined. For L. monocytogenes and E. coli inoculated in juice containing CCEO (5, 2.5, and 1.25 μl/ml), a ≥5-log reduction was detected after 15 min of exposure. This same result was obtained for Salmonella Enteritidis incubated alone in pineapple juice containing CCEO at 5 and 2.5 μl/ml. Overall, Salmonella Enteritidis was the most tolerant and L. monocytogenes was the most sensitive to CCEO. The physicochemical properties (pH, titratable acidic [citric acid per 100 g], and soluble solids) of pineapple juice containing CCEO (2.5 and 1.25 μl/ml) were maintained. Juice containing CCEO (2.5 and 1.25 μl/ml) exhibited similar scores for odor, appearance, and viscosity compared with juice without CCEO. However, unsatisfactory changes in taste and aftertaste were observed in juices containing CCEO. These results suggest that CCEO could be used as an alternative antimicrobial compound to ensure the safety of pineapple juice, although CCEO at the tested concentrations negatively impacted its taste. Therefore, further studies are needed to determine the balance between microbial safety and taste acceptability of pineapple juice containing CCEO.

  10. Inactivation of Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella Enteritidis by Cymbopogon citratus D.C. Stapf. Essential Oil in Pineapple Juice.

    PubMed

    Leite, Caroline Junqueira Barcellos; de Sousa, Jossana Pereira; Medeiros, José Alberto da Costa; da Conceição, Maria Lúcia; dos Santos Falcão-Silva, Vivyanne; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, the efficacy of Cymbopogon citratus D.C. Stapf. essential oil (CCEO) to provoke a 5-log CFU/ml (5-log) inactivation in a mixed composite of Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merril) juice (4°C) was assessed. Moreover, the effects of CCEO on the physicochemical and sensory quality parameters of pineapple juice were evaluated. The MIC of CCEO was 5 μl/ml against the composite mix examined. For L. monocytogenes and E. coli inoculated in juice containing CCEO (5, 2.5, and 1.25 μl/ml), a ≥5-log reduction was detected after 15 min of exposure. This same result was obtained for Salmonella Enteritidis incubated alone in pineapple juice containing CCEO at 5 and 2.5 μl/ml. Overall, Salmonella Enteritidis was the most tolerant and L. monocytogenes was the most sensitive to CCEO. The physicochemical properties (pH, titratable acidic [citric acid per 100 g], and soluble solids) of pineapple juice containing CCEO (2.5 and 1.25 μl/ml) were maintained. Juice containing CCEO (2.5 and 1.25 μl/ml) exhibited similar scores for odor, appearance, and viscosity compared with juice without CCEO. However, unsatisfactory changes in taste and aftertaste were observed in juices containing CCEO. These results suggest that CCEO could be used as an alternative antimicrobial compound to ensure the safety of pineapple juice, although CCEO at the tested concentrations negatively impacted its taste. Therefore, further studies are needed to determine the balance between microbial safety and taste acceptability of pineapple juice containing CCEO. PMID:26818981

  11. Evaluation of virulence and antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis isolates from humans and chicken- and egg-associated sources.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Gokulan, Kuppan; Barnette, Dustyn; Khare, Sangeeta; Rooney, Anthony W; Deck, Joanna; Nayak, Rajesh; Stefanova, Rossina; Hart, Mark E; Foley, Steven L

    2013-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a leading cause of salmonellosis throughout the world and is most commonly associated with the consumption of contaminated poultry and egg products. Salmonella Enteritidis has enhanced ability to colonize and persist in extraintestinal sites within chickens. In this study, 54 Salmonella Enteritidis isolates from human patients (n=28), retail chicken (n=9), broiler farms (n=9), and egg production facilities (n=8) were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, plasmid analysis, genetic relatedness using XbaI and AvrII pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and the presence of putative virulence genes. Nine isolates were evaluated for their abilities to invade and survive in intestinal epithelial and macrophage cell lines. Overall, 56% (n=30) of isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent tested, yet no isolates showed resistance to more than three antimicrobials. All isolates carried a common ∼55-kb plasmid, with some strains containing additional plasmids ranging from 3 to 50 kb. PFGE analysis revealed five XbaI and AvrII clusters. There were significant overlaps in the PFGE patterns of the isolates from human, chicken, and egg houses. All isolates tested PCR positive for iacP, purR, ttrB, spi4H, rmbA, sopE, invA, sopB, spvB, pagC, msgA, spaN, orgA, tolC, and sifA, and negative for iss, virB4, and sipB. Of the isolates selected for virulence testing, those containing the iron acquisition genes, iutA, sitA, and iucA, and ∼50-kb plasmids demonstrated among the highest levels of macrophage and epithelial cell invasion, which may indicate their importance in pathogenesis.

  12. Colonization of marker and field strains of Salmonella Enteritidis and Typhimurium in antibiotic treated and non-treated laying hen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In each of three trials, caged laying hens (76, 26, and 33 wk-of-age) were divided into 6 groups designated to receive either maker (nalidixic acid resistance) S. Enteritidis (SE-M), field S. Enteritidis (SE-F), or marker S. Typhimurium (ST-M), and half pretreated with vancomycin (VNC) (n=12). VNC t...

  13. Helicobacter and Salmonella Persistent Infection Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Monack, Denise M.

    2013-01-01

    Some host-adapted bacterial pathogens are capable of causing persistent infections in humans. For example, Helicobacter pylori inhabits the human gastric mucosa and persistence can be lifelong. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi causes systemic infections that involve colonization of the reticuloendothelial system and some individuals become lifelong carriers. In this review, I compare and contrast the different lifestyles of Helicobacter and Salmonella within the host and the strategies they have evolved to persist in mammalian hosts. Persistently infected carriers serve as the reservoirs for these pathogens, and the carrier state is an essential feature that is required for survival of the bacteria within a restricted host population. Therefore, investigating the chronic carrier state should provide insight into bacterial survival strategies, as well as new therapeutic approaches for treatments. PMID:24296347

  14. Phage type conversion in Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis caused by the introduction of a resistance plasmid of incompatibility group X (IncX).

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. J.; Baggesen, D. L.; Platt, D. J.; Olsen, J. E.

    1999-01-01

    The plasmid pOG670, a 54 kb, conjugative plasmid that specifies resistance to ampicillin and kanamycin and belonging to the incompatibility group X (IncX), was transferred into 10 isolates of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis belonging to 10 different phage types (PT1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 9b, 10, 11 and 13). Acquisition of the plasmid by these strains did not result in the loss of any resident plasmids but resulted in phage type conversion in 8 of the 10 strains (PT1, 2, 4, 8, 9, 9b, 10 and 11). The observed changes in phage type were found to result from the loss of sensitivity to 3 of the 10 typing phages used (phages 3, 5 and 7). Where the conversion resulted in a change to a defined phage type, both the new and original PTs belonged to the same, previously described, evolutionary lines. Enteritidis PTs 1, 4 and 8, commonly associated with poultry world-wide, were converted to PTs 21, 6 and 13a respectively. The results indicate a different route for phage type conversion Enteritidis from others reported in the literature and, although IncX plasmids are not normally present in PT8 or PT13a, may suggest a possible mechanism/link connecting these phage types. PMID:10098781

  15. A Weibull model to describe antimicrobial kinetics of oregano and lemongrass essential oils against Salmonella Enteritidis in ground beef during refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Thales Leandro Coutinho; Soares, Rodrigo de Araújo; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf

    2013-03-01

    The antimicrobial effect of oregano (Origanum vulgare L.) and lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf.) essential oils (EOs) against Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in in vitro experiments, and inoculated in ground bovine meat during refrigerated storage (4±2 °C) for 6 days was evaluated. The Weibull model was tested to fit survival/inactivation bacterial curves (estimating of p and δ parameters). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value for both EOs on S. Enteritidis was 3.90 μl/ml. The EO concentrations applied in the ground beef were 3.90, 7.80 and 15.60 μl/g, based on MIC levels and possible activity reduction by food constituents. Both evaluated EOs in all tested levels, showed antimicrobial effects, with microbial populations reducing (p≤0.05) along time storage. Evaluating fit-quality parameters (RSS and RSE) Weibull models are able to describe the inactivation curves of EOs against S. Enteritidis. The application of EOs in processed meats can be used to control pathogens during refrigerated shelf-life. PMID:23273476

  16. A Weibull model to describe antimicrobial kinetics of oregano and lemongrass essential oils against Salmonella Enteritidis in ground beef during refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Thales Leandro Coutinho; Soares, Rodrigo de Araújo; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf

    2013-03-01

    The antimicrobial effect of oregano (Origanum vulgare L.) and lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf.) essential oils (EOs) against Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in in vitro experiments, and inoculated in ground bovine meat during refrigerated storage (4±2 °C) for 6 days was evaluated. The Weibull model was tested to fit survival/inactivation bacterial curves (estimating of p and δ parameters). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value for both EOs on S. Enteritidis was 3.90 μl/ml. The EO concentrations applied in the ground beef were 3.90, 7.80 and 15.60 μl/g, based on MIC levels and possible activity reduction by food constituents. Both evaluated EOs in all tested levels, showed antimicrobial effects, with microbial populations reducing (p≤0.05) along time storage. Evaluating fit-quality parameters (RSS and RSE) Weibull models are able to describe the inactivation curves of EOs against S. Enteritidis. The application of EOs in processed meats can be used to control pathogens during refrigerated shelf-life.

  17. Transcriptional changes of cytokines in rooster testis and epididymis during sexual maturation stages and Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Anastasiadou, M; Michailidis, G

    2016-08-01

    Infection of rooster testis and epididymis by pathogens can lead to impaired fertility, resulting in economic losses in the poultry industry. Antimicrobial protection of rooster reproductive organs is, therefore, an important aspect of reproductive physiology. Salmonellosis is one of the most important zoonotic diseases, caused by Salmonella bacteria including Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) and is usually the result of infection of the reproductive organs. Thus, knowledge of the endogenous innate immune mechanisms of the rooster testis and epididymis is an emerging aspect of reproductive physiology. Cytokines are key factors for stimulating the immune response and inflammation in chickens to Salmonella infection. In the present study the expression profile of 11 pro-inflammatory cytokine genes in the rooster testis and epididymis in vivo and transcriptional changes in these organs during sexual maturation and SE infection were investigated. Gene expression analysis data revealed that in both testis and epididymis nine cytokines namely the IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-15, IL-16, IL-17 and IL-18 genes were expressed, while no mRNA transcripts were detected in both organs for IL-2 and IL-4. Furthermore, the expression of various cytokine genes during sexual maturation appeared to be developmentally regulated, while SE infection resulted in a significant up-regulation of IL-1β, -6, -12 and -18 genes in the testis and an increase in the mRNA relative abundance of IL-1β, -6, -12, -16 and -18 in the epididymis of SE-infected sexually mature 28-week-old roosters. These results suggest a cytokine-mediated immune response mechanism against Salmonella infection in the rooster reproductive tract. PMID:27289435

  18. Transcriptional changes of cytokines in rooster testis and epididymis during sexual maturation stages and Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Anastasiadou, M; Michailidis, G

    2016-08-01

    Infection of rooster testis and epididymis by pathogens can lead to impaired fertility, resulting in economic losses in the poultry industry. Antimicrobial protection of rooster reproductive organs is, therefore, an important aspect of reproductive physiology. Salmonellosis is one of the most important zoonotic diseases, caused by Salmonella bacteria including Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) and is usually the result of infection of the reproductive organs. Thus, knowledge of the endogenous innate immune mechanisms of the rooster testis and epididymis is an emerging aspect of reproductive physiology. Cytokines are key factors for stimulating the immune response and inflammation in chickens to Salmonella infection. In the present study the expression profile of 11 pro-inflammatory cytokine genes in the rooster testis and epididymis in vivo and transcriptional changes in these organs during sexual maturation and SE infection were investigated. Gene expression analysis data revealed that in both testis and epididymis nine cytokines namely the IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-15, IL-16, IL-17 and IL-18 genes were expressed, while no mRNA transcripts were detected in both organs for IL-2 and IL-4. Furthermore, the expression of various cytokine genes during sexual maturation appeared to be developmentally regulated, while SE infection resulted in a significant up-regulation of IL-1β, -6, -12 and -18 genes in the testis and an increase in the mRNA relative abundance of IL-1β, -6, -12, -16 and -18 in the epididymis of SE-infected sexually mature 28-week-old roosters. These results suggest a cytokine-mediated immune response mechanism against Salmonella infection in the rooster reproductive tract.

  19. Colonization of a marker and field strain of Salmonella Enteritidis and a marker strain of Salmonella Typhimurium in vancomycin pretreated and non-pretreated laying hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a vancomycin pre-treatment on the ability of marker (nalidixic acid-resistant) S. Enteritidis (SE-M), field S. Enteritidis (SE-F), and marker S. Typhimurium (ST-M) strains to colonize within the intestinal and reproductive tracts and translocate to...

  20. The adherence of Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 to stainless steel: the importance of the air-liquid interface and nutrient availability.

    PubMed

    Giaouris, Efstathios D; Nychas, George-John E

    2006-12-01

    Biofilm formation on stainless steel by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis PT4 during growth in three different nutritious conditions was studied. The ability of micro-organisms to generate biofilms on the stainless steel surfaces was studied for a total period of 18 days at 20 degrees C, under three different experimental treatments: (i) growth medium (tryptone soy broth) was not refreshed (no further nutrients were provided) during the incubation period, (ii) growth medium was renewed every 2 days and (iii) growth medium was renewed every 2 days and at the same time the planktonic cells from the old medium were transferred to the new fresh medium. It was found that biofilms developed better and a higher number of adherent cells (ca. 10(7) cfu/cm(2)) were recovered when the organism was grown in periodically renewed nutrient medium than when the growth medium was not refreshed. Regardless of the availability of nutrients, biofilm development was better (range 2-3 logs greater) when coupons were not totally covered by the growth medium and part of the surface was exposed to the air-liquid interface, than when coupons were submerged in the medium. The results suggest that existence of air-liquid interface and adequate nutrient conditions provide the best environment for Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 biofilm formation on stainless steel. The possible role of stationary phase planktonic cells in biofilm development by sessile/attached microbial cells is also discussed. PMID:16943077

  1. Electrochemical deoxyribonucleic acid biosensor based on electrodeposited graphene and nickel oxide nanoparticle modified electrode for the detection of salmonella enteritidis gene sequence.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Wang, Xiuli; Lu, Yongxi; Gong, Shixing; Qi, Xiaowei; Lei, Bingxin; Sun, Zhenfan; Li, Guangjiu

    2015-04-01

    In this paper a new electrochemical DNA biosensor was prepared by using graphene (GR) and nickel oxide (NiO) nanocomposite modified carbon ionic liquid electrode (CILE) as the substrate electrode. GR and NiO nanoparticles were electrodeposited on the CILE surface step-by-step to get the nanocomposite. Due to the strong affinity of NiO with phosphate groups of ssDNA, oligonucleotide probe with a terminal 5'-phosphate group could be attached on the surface of NiO/GR/CILE, which could further hybridize with the target ssDNA sequence. Methylene blue (MB) was used as the electrochemical indicator for monitoring the hybridization reaction. Under the optimal conditions the reduction peak current of MB was proportional to the concentration of salmonella enteritidis gene sequence in the range from 1.0×10(-13) to 1.0×10(-6)molL(-1) with a detection limit as 3.12×10(-14)molL(-1). This electrochemical DNA sensor exhibited good discrimination ability to one-base and three-base mismatched ssDNA sequences, and the polymerase chain reaction amplification product of salmonella enteritidis gene sequences were further detected with satisfactory results. PMID:25686924

  2. Electrochemical deoxyribonucleic acid biosensor based on electrodeposited graphene and nickel oxide nanoparticle modified electrode for the detection of salmonella enteritidis gene sequence.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Wang, Xiuli; Lu, Yongxi; Gong, Shixing; Qi, Xiaowei; Lei, Bingxin; Sun, Zhenfan; Li, Guangjiu

    2015-04-01

    In this paper a new electrochemical DNA biosensor was prepared by using graphene (GR) and nickel oxide (NiO) nanocomposite modified carbon ionic liquid electrode (CILE) as the substrate electrode. GR and NiO nanoparticles were electrodeposited on the CILE surface step-by-step to get the nanocomposite. Due to the strong affinity of NiO with phosphate groups of ssDNA, oligonucleotide probe with a terminal 5'-phosphate group could be attached on the surface of NiO/GR/CILE, which could further hybridize with the target ssDNA sequence. Methylene blue (MB) was used as the electrochemical indicator for monitoring the hybridization reaction. Under the optimal conditions the reduction peak current of MB was proportional to the concentration of salmonella enteritidis gene sequence in the range from 1.0×10(-13) to 1.0×10(-6)molL(-1) with a detection limit as 3.12×10(-14)molL(-1). This electrochemical DNA sensor exhibited good discrimination ability to one-base and three-base mismatched ssDNA sequences, and the polymerase chain reaction amplification product of salmonella enteritidis gene sequences were further detected with satisfactory results.

  3. Efficacy of soluble recombinant FliC protein from Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis as a potential vaccine candidate against homologous challenge in chickens.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Masashi; Matsumoto, Wakako; Seike, Fumio; Tanaka, Yuuya; Teratani, Chie; Tozuka, Maki; Kashimoto, Takashige; Takehara, Kazuaki; Nakamura, Masayuki; Yoshikawa, Yasuhiro

    2012-06-01

    FliC, the flagellin antigen of Salmonella Enteritidis, was tested as a vaccine candidate for protective effect against a homologous challenge in chickens. After immunization with recombinant FliC (rFliC) or administration of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 56 days old, the chickens were challenged with 10(9) colony-forming units of Salmonella Enteritidis at 76 days old. The vaccinated birds showed significantly decreased bacterial counts in the liver and cecal contents compared to those administered PBS at 7 days postchallenge, but the protection was partial. The replication experiment also showed a similar result. In both experiments, vaccination induced an increased level of serum anti-rFliC IgG, which was also reactive to the native flagella. The intestinal IgA level was slightly higher in the vaccinated birds than in the control. However, neither the proliferative response nor interferon-gamma secretion of splenic cells upon stimulation with rFliC was induced. Therefore, the effect of rFliC as a vaccine is limited, and further improvement is needed.

  4. Use of Attenuated but Metabolically Competent Salmonella as a Probiotic To Prevent or Treat Salmonella Infection.

    PubMed

    Sabag-Daigle, Anice; Blunk, Henry M; Gonzalez, Juan F; Steidley, Brandi L; Boyaka, Prosper N; Ahmer, Brian M M

    2016-07-01

    Salmonella enterica is among the most burdensome of foodborne disease agents. There are over 2,600 serovars that cause a range of disease manifestations ranging from enterocolitis to typhoid fever. While there are two vaccines in use in humans to protect against typhoid fever, there are none that prevent enterocolitis. If vaccines preventing enterocolitis were to be developed, they would likely protect against only one or a few serovars. In this report, we tested the hypothesis that probiotic organisms could compete for the preferred nutrient sources of Salmonella and thus prevent or treat infection. To this end, we added the fra locus, which encodes a utilization pathway for the Salmonella-specific nutrient source fructose-asparagine (F-Asn), to the probiotic bacterium Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (Nissle) to increase its ability to compete with Salmonella in mouse models. We also tested a metabolically competent, but avirulent, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutant for its ability to compete with wild-type Salmonella The modified Nissle strain became more virulent and less able to protect against Salmonella in some instances. On the other hand, the modified Salmonella strain was safe and effective in preventing infection with wild-type Salmonella While we tested for efficacy only against Salmonella Typhimurium, the modified Salmonella strain may be able to compete metabolically with most, if not all, Salmonella serovars, representing a novel approach to control of this pathogen. PMID:27185789

  5. Consumer-phase Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis risk assessment for egg-containing food products.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Amirhossein; Moore, Christina M; Yang, Hong; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; Morales, Roberta; Cates, Sheryl C; Cowen, Peter

    2006-06-01

    We describe a one-dimensional probabilistic model of the role of domestic food handling behaviors on salmonellosis risk associated with the consumption of eggs and egg-containing foods. Six categories of egg-containing foods were defined based on the amount of egg contained in the food, whether eggs are pooled, and the degree of cooking practiced by consumers. We used bootstrap simulation to quantify uncertainty in risk estimates due to sampling error, and sensitivity analysis to identify key sources of variability and uncertainty in the model. Because of typical model characteristics such as nonlinearity, interaction between inputs, thresholds, and saturation points, Sobol's method, a novel sensitivity analysis approach, was used to identify key sources of variability. Based on the mean probability of illness, examples of foods from the food categories ranked from most to least risk of illness were: (1) home-made salad dressings/ice cream; (2) fried eggs/boiled eggs; (3) omelettes; and (4) baked foods/breads. For food categories that may include uncooked eggs (e.g., home-made salad dressings/ice cream), consumer handling conditions such as storage time and temperature after food preparation were the key sources of variability. In contrast, for food categories associated with undercooked eggs (e.g., fried/soft-boiled eggs), the initial level of Salmonella contamination and the log10 reduction due to cooking were the key sources of variability. Important sources of uncertainty varied with both the risk percentile and the food category under consideration. This work adds to previous risk assessments focused on egg production and storage practices, and provides a science-based approach to inform consumer risk communications regarding safe egg handling practices.

  6. The relationship between the immune response and susceptibilty to Salmonella infection in the laying hen, producing safe eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chicken eggs are one of the main sources of human salmonellosis, with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis the most frequent cause of human non-typhoid salmonellosis. Laying hens colonized with S. Enteritidis generally do not show clinical signs. The bacteria colonize and invade the intestinal ...

  7. The effects of polymorphisms in IL-2, IFN-γ, TGF-β2, IgL, TLR-4, MD-2, and iNOS genes on resistance to Salmonella enteritidis in indigenous chickens.

    PubMed

    Tohidi, Reza; Idris, Ismail Bin; Panandam, Jothi Malar; Bejo, Mohd Hair

    2012-12-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is a major cause of food poisoning worldwide, and poultry products are the main source of S. Enteritidis contamination for humans. Among the numerous strategies for disease control, improving genetic resistance to S. Enteritidis has been the most effective approach. We investigated the association between S. Enteritidis burden in the caecum, spleen, and liver of young indigenous chickens and seven candidate genes, selected on the basis of their critical roles in immunological functions. The genes included those encoding interleukin 2 (IL-2), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), transforming growth factor β2 (TGF-β2), immunoglobulin light chain (IgL), toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4), myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD-2), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Two Malaysian indigenous chicken breeds were used as sustainable genetic sources of alleles that are resistant to salmonellosis. The polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment-length polymorphism technique was used to genotype the candidate genes. Three different genotypes were observed in all of the candidate genes, except for MD-2. All of the candidate genes showed the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for the two populations. The IL-2-MnlI polymorphism was associated with S. Enteritidis burden in the caecum and spleen. The TGF-β2-RsaI, TLR-4-Sau 96I, and iNOS-AluI polymorphisms were associated with the caecum S. Enteritidis load. The other candidate genes were not associated with S. Enteritidis load in any organ. The results indicate that the IL-2, TGF-β2, TLR-4, and iNOS genes are potential candidates for use in selection programmes for increasing genetic resistance against S. Enteritidis in Malaysian indigenous chickens.

  8. Induction of Cationic Chicken Liver-Expressed Antimicrobial Peptide 2 in Response to Salmonella enterica Infection

    PubMed Central

    Townes, Claire L.; Michailidis, Georgios; Nile, Christopher J.; Hall, Judith

    2004-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides constitute part of the innate immune system and provide an essential role in the defense against infection. At present there is a paucity of information regarding the antimicrobial profile of the chicken (Gallus gallus). Using in silico studies, an expressed sequence tag (EST) clone was identified which encodes a novel cationic antimicrobial peptide, chicken liver-expressed antimicrobial peptide 2 (cLEAP-2). The predicted amino acid sequence composed a prepropeptide, and the active peptide contained four conserved cysteine amino acids. The gene was localized to chromosome 13, and analysis of the genome revealed three exons separated by two introns. The cLEAP-2 gene was expressed in a number of chicken epithelial tissues including the small intestine, liver, lung, and kidney. Northern analysis identified liver-specific cLEAP-2 splice variants, suggesting some degree of tissue-specific regulation. To investigate whether cLEAP-2 expression was constitutive or induced in response to microbial infection, 4-day-old birds were orally infected with Salmonella. Analyses of cLEAP-2 expression by semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR indicated that cLEAP-2 mRNA was upregulated significantly in the small intestinal tissues and the liver, indicative of direct and systemic responses. The antimicrobial activity of cLEAP-2 against Salmonella was analyzed in vitro with a time-kill assay and recombinant cLEAP-2. Interestingly Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL1344 showed increased susceptibility to the active cationic peptide (amino acids 37 to 76) compared to S. enterica serovar Typhimurium C5 and Salmonella enteritidis. Taken together, these data suggest that cationic cLEAP-2 is part of the innate host defense mechanisms of the chicken. PMID:15557621

  9. RESISTANCE OF THE MOUSE'S INTESTINAL TRACT TO EXPERIMENTAL SALMONELLA INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Bohnhoff, Marjorie; Miller, C. Phillip; Martin, William R.

    1964-01-01

    Multiplication of Salmonella enteritidis was inhibited in vitro by buffered suspensions of fecal material freshly removed from the large intestine of normal mice. Most effective was material obtained from cecum and transverse colon. Inhibitory activity was not impaired by sterilization by heat or filtration. From such materials were isolated acetic and butyric acids in concentrations which inhibited Salmonella in vitro. The degree of inhibitory activity of suspensions of colon content and of mixtures of the two fatty acids was conditioned by pH and favored by anaerobiosis. Effective inhibition occurred at or slightly below the pH of colon content of most normal mice as determined in situ by direct measurement. Acetic and butyric acids were isolated from anaerobic cultures of several strains of Bacteroides previously demonstrated to be one of the most numerous inhabitants of the large intestine of the normal mouse. PMID:14247721

  10. Salmonella enterocolitis

    MedlinePlus

    Salmonellosis; Nontyphoidal salmonella; Food poisoning - salmonella; Gastroenteritis - salmonella ... Salmonella infection is one of the most common types of food poisoning . It occurs when you swallow food ...

  11. Effectiveness of a spontaneous carvacrol nanoemulsion against Salmonella enterica Enteritidis and Escherichia coli O157:H7 on contaminated broccoli and radish seeds.

    PubMed

    Landry, Kyle S; Micheli, Sean; McClements, David Julian; McLandsborough, Lynne

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of foodborne illness associated with the consumption of fresh produce has continued to increase over the past decade. Sprouts, such as mung bean, alfalfa, radish, and broccoli, are minimally processed and have been sources for foodborne illness. Currently, a 20,000 ppm calcium hypochlorite soak is recommended for the treatment of sprouting seeds. In this study, the efficacy of an antimicrobial carvacrol nanoemulsion was tested against Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis (ATCC BAA-1045) or EGFP expressing Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ATCC 42895) contaminated sprouting seeds. Antimicrobial treatments were performed by soaking inoculated seeds in nanoemulsions (4000 or 8000 ppm) for 30 or 60 min. Following treatment, surviving cells were determined by performing plate counts and/or Most Probable Number (MPN) enumeration. Treated seeds were sprouted and tested for the presence of pathogens. Treatment successfully inactivated low levels (2 and 3 log CFU/g) of S. Enteritidis and E. coli on radish seeds when soaked for 60 min at concentrations ≥4000 (0.4%) ppm carvacrol. This treatment method was not affective on contaminated broccoli seeds. Total sprout yield was not influenced by any treatments. These results show that carvacrol nanoemulsions may be an alternative treatment method for contaminated radish seeds. PMID:26187822

  12. Modelling the effectiveness of a natural antimicrobial on Salmonella enteritidis as a function of concentration, temperature and pH, using conductance measurements.

    PubMed

    Koutsoumanis, K; Tassou, C C; Taoukis, P S; Nychas, G J

    1998-06-01

    The growth of Salmonella enteritidis in a brain heart infusion medium was monitored using the traditional viable count method and by conductance measurements using a Rabit impedance instrument. Growth curves (log10 cfu ml-1 vs time) at three different concentrations of oleuropein (0, 0.2 and 0.8%), pH values in the range of 5-8 and incubation temperatures from 22 to 42 degrees C were modelled using the Gompertz equation. A good correlation between the maximum growth rate from the viable count method and the maximum slope of the conductance curve from the impedance instrument was established. Based on this correlation, the maximum specific growth rate of Salm. enteritidis was modelled as a function of the oleuropein concentration, initial pH values and the incubation temperature with a quadratic equation, using a new, large dataset of growth measurements by conductance. The developed model was validated by statistical comparison of predicted growth rates with growth rates determined by the viable count method, within the limits of the antimicrobial, pH and temperature domain.

  13. Effectiveness of a spontaneous carvacrol nanoemulsion against Salmonella enterica Enteritidis and Escherichia coli O157:H7 on contaminated broccoli and radish seeds.

    PubMed

    Landry, Kyle S; Micheli, Sean; McClements, David Julian; McLandsborough, Lynne

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of foodborne illness associated with the consumption of fresh produce has continued to increase over the past decade. Sprouts, such as mung bean, alfalfa, radish, and broccoli, are minimally processed and have been sources for foodborne illness. Currently, a 20,000 ppm calcium hypochlorite soak is recommended for the treatment of sprouting seeds. In this study, the efficacy of an antimicrobial carvacrol nanoemulsion was tested against Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis (ATCC BAA-1045) or EGFP expressing Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ATCC 42895) contaminated sprouting seeds. Antimicrobial treatments were performed by soaking inoculated seeds in nanoemulsions (4000 or 8000 ppm) for 30 or 60 min. Following treatment, surviving cells were determined by performing plate counts and/or Most Probable Number (MPN) enumeration. Treated seeds were sprouted and tested for the presence of pathogens. Treatment successfully inactivated low levels (2 and 3 log CFU/g) of S. Enteritidis and E. coli on radish seeds when soaked for 60 min at concentrations ≥4000 (0.4%) ppm carvacrol. This treatment method was not affective on contaminated broccoli seeds. Total sprout yield was not influenced by any treatments. These results show that carvacrol nanoemulsions may be an alternative treatment method for contaminated radish seeds.

  14. Nontyphoidal Salmonellosis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, and Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Piggott, Damani A.; Carroll, Karen C.; Lim, Michael; Melia, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection and stroke are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with increased risk in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. We report a rare case of ischemic stroke associated with Salmonella enteritidis subdural empyema in an older HIV-infected patient with multimorbidity, despite surgery and treatment with susceptible antimicrobial drugs. PMID:27419176

  15. Nontyphoidal Salmonellosis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, and Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Piggott, Damani A; Carroll, Karen C; Lim, Michael; Melia, Michael T

    2016-04-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection and stroke are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with increased risk in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. We report a rare case of ischemic stroke associated with Salmonella enteritidis subdural empyema in an older HIV-infected patient with multimorbidity, despite surgery and treatment with susceptible antimicrobial drugs. PMID:27419176

  16. Assessment of attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains in controlling experimental Salmonella Typhimurium infection in chickens.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yanlong; Parreira, Valeria R; Roland, Kenneth L; Curtiss, Roy; Prescott, John F

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella hold considerable promise as vaccine delivery vectors for heterologous antigens in chickens. Such vaccines have the potential additional benefit of also controlling Salmonella infection in immunized birds. As a way of selecting attenuated strains with optimal immunogenic potential as antigen delivery vectors, this study screened 20 novel Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine strains, differing in mutations associated with delayed antigen synthesis and delayed attenuation, for their efficacy in controlling colonization by virulent Salmonella Typhimurium, as well as for their persistence in the intestine and the spleen. Marked differences were observed between strains in these characteristics, which provide the basis for selection for further study as vaccine vectors.

  17. Inactivation by lemon juice of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Enteritidis, and Listeria monocytogenes in beef marinating for the ethnic food kelaguen.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Lee, Delores; Afaisen, Shayna; Gadi, Rama

    2013-01-01

    Lemon juice, a major source of acidulant citric acid, is frequently used in the preparation of ethnic foods. Raw or partially cooked meats are marinated with lemon juice in the preparation of a popular Chamorro dish called kelaguen, which is, unfortunately, strongly associated with foodborne illness outbreaks in Guam. We investigated the efficacy of lemon juice in reducing numbers of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Enteritidis, and Listeria monocytogenes at stationary phase during marination. Beef inoculated with a three-strain mixture of E. coli O157:H7, S. Enteritidis, or L. monocytogenes at 10(6)CFU/mL was marinated with lemon juice from 0.2 to 10mL/g for 48h at 28°C. The decline of the pathogens during marination exhibited various degrees of deviation from first-order kinetics. Based on calculations with both linear regression and Weibull models, the decimal reduction time (4-D values) over the range of lemon concentrations was 366-5.1h for E. coli O157:H7, 282-2.4h for S. Enteritidis, and 104-2.4h for L. monocytogenes, indicating that E. coli O157:H7 was the most lemon-juice-resistant of the three. The pathogen reduction time (log 4-D values) plotted against undissociated titratable citric acid exhibited a biphasic pattern. The pathogen reduction time (log 4-D or δ values) was linearly correlated with the pH of the marinating beef (R(2)=0.92 to 0.98). The Z(pH) values (pH dependence of death rate) with beef marination were 1.03 for E. coli O157:H7, 0.92 for S. Enteritidis, and 1.29 for L. monocytogenes, indicating that L. monocytogenes was the most pH resistant of the three. L. monocytogenes exhibited less resistance to lemon juice than S. Enteritidis at pH of 3.5-4.4 but more resistance at pH of 2.6-2.8. In addition, at 4°C, all three pathogens exhibited 4-D values 1.7-4.1 times greater than those at 24°C at 5mL lemon juice/g beef. In conclusion, the usual beef marinating practice for kelaguen preparation (<0.5mL lemon juice/g beef for 1-12h) did not

  18. Persistence and growth of different Salmonella serovars on pre- and postharvest tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Shi, X; Namvar, A; Kostrzynska, M; Hora, R; Warriner, K

    2007-12-01

    The interaction of a range of Salmonella serovars with pre- and postharvest tomatoes was evaluated. Serovars were selected on the basis of previous association in tomato-linked outbreaks of salmonellosis (Salmonella Javiana, Salmonella Montevideo, and Salmonella Newport) or those typically isolated from animal or clinical infections (Salmonella Dublin, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Hadar, Salmonella Infantis, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Salmonella Senftenberg). Salmonella serovars introduced onto the flowers of growing plants were recovered on and within the developing tomato fruit. Of all the Salmonella serovars tested, Montevideo appeared to be more adapted to survival within tomatoes and was recovered from 90% of the fruit screened. All of the Salmonella serovars could persist and grow when introduced onto unripened (green) tomato fruit. In general, growth (internal and external) was promoted at the high incubation temperature (25 degrees C) and high relative humidity (95%), although this was serovar dependent. The growth and persistence of Salmonella introduced on and into ripened (red) tomatoes was serovar dependent. Salmonella serovars Enteritidis, Typhimurium, and Dublin were less adapted to grow in or on intact red tomatoes than were serovars Hadar, Montevideo, or Newport. The results illustrated that a diverse range of Salmonella serovars can become established within and/or on preharvest tomatoes. The majority of Salmonella can grow and become established both on and within unripened tomatoes, but growth on ripened fruit was serovar dependent. The results provide a possible explanation why only a narrow range of Salmonella serovars are associated with foodborne illness outbreaks linked to tomatoes. PMID:18095423

  19. Persistence and growth of different Salmonella serovars on pre- and postharvest tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Shi, X; Namvar, A; Kostrzynska, M; Hora, R; Warriner, K

    2007-12-01

    The interaction of a range of Salmonella serovars with pre- and postharvest tomatoes was evaluated. Serovars were selected on the basis of previous association in tomato-linked outbreaks of salmonellosis (Salmonella Javiana, Salmonella Montevideo, and Salmonella Newport) or those typically isolated from animal or clinical infections (Salmonella Dublin, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Hadar, Salmonella Infantis, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Salmonella Senftenberg). Salmonella serovars introduced onto the flowers of growing plants were recovered on and within the developing tomato fruit. Of all the Salmonella serovars tested, Montevideo appeared to be more adapted to survival within tomatoes and was recovered from 90% of the fruit screened. All of the Salmonella serovars could persist and grow when introduced onto unripened (green) tomato fruit. In general, growth (internal and external) was promoted at the high incubation temperature (25 degrees C) and high relative humidity (95%), although this was serovar dependent. The growth and persistence of Salmonella introduced on and into ripened (red) tomatoes was serovar dependent. Salmonella serovars Enteritidis, Typhimurium, and Dublin were less adapted to grow in or on intact red tomatoes than were serovars Hadar, Montevideo, or Newport. The results illustrated that a diverse range of Salmonella serovars can become established within and/or on preharvest tomatoes. The majority of Salmonella can grow and become established both on and within unripened tomatoes, but growth on ripened fruit was serovar dependent. The results provide a possible explanation why only a narrow range of Salmonella serovars are associated with foodborne illness outbreaks linked to tomatoes.

  20. Dam Methylation Participates in the Regulation of PmrA/PmrB and RcsC/RcsD/RcsB Two Component Regulatory Systems in Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Sarnacki, Sebastián Hernán; Castañeda, María del Rosario Aya; Llana, Mariángeles Noto; Giacomodonato, Mónica Nancy; Valvano, Miguel Ángel; Cerquetti, María Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The absence of Dam in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis causes a defect in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) pattern associated to a reduced expression of wzz gene. Wzz is the chain length regulator of the LPS O-antigen. Here we investigated whether Dam regulates wzz gene expression through its two known regulators, PmrA and RcsB. Thus, the expression of rcsB and pmrA was monitored by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting using fusions with 3×FLAG tag in wild type (wt) and dam strains of S. Enteritidis. Dam regulated the expression of both rcsB and pmrA genes; nevertheless, the defect in LPS pattern was only related to a diminished expression of RcsB. Interestingly, regulation of wzz in serovar Enteritidis differed from that reported earlier for serovar Typhimurium; RcsB induces wzz expression in both serovars, whereas PmrA induces wzz in S. Typhimurium but represses it in serovar Enteritidis. Moreover, we found that in S. Enteritidis there is an interaction between both wzz regulators: RcsB stimulates the expression of pmrA and PmrA represses the expression of rcsB. Our results would be an example of differential regulation of orthologous genes expression, providing differences in phenotypic traits between closely related bacterial serovars. PMID:23418573

  1. Dam methylation participates in the regulation of PmrA/PmrB and RcsC/RcsD/RcsB two component regulatory systems in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Sarnacki, Sebastián Hernán; Castañeda, María del Rosario Aya; Noto Llana, Mariángeles; Giacomodonato, Mónica Nancy; Valvano, Miguel Ángel; Cerquetti, María Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The absence of Dam in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis causes a defect in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) pattern associated to a reduced expression of wzz gene. Wzz is the chain length regulator of the LPS O-antigen. Here we investigated whether Dam regulates wzz gene expression through its two known regulators, PmrA and RcsB. Thus, the expression of rcsB and pmrA was monitored by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting using fusions with 3×FLAG tag in wild type (wt) and dam strains of S. Enteritidis. Dam regulated the expression of both rcsB and pmrA genes; nevertheless, the defect in LPS pattern was only related to a diminished expression of RcsB. Interestingly, regulation of wzz in serovar Enteritidis differed from that reported earlier for serovar Typhimurium; RcsB induces wzz expression in both serovars, whereas PmrA induces wzz in S. Typhimurium but represses it in serovar Enteritidis. Moreover, we found that in S. Enteritidis there is an interaction between both wzz regulators: RcsB stimulates the expression of pmrA and PmrA represses the expression of rcsB. Our results would be an example of differential regulation of orthologous genes expression, providing differences in phenotypic traits between closely related bacterial serovars. PMID:23418573

  2. [Salmonella].

    PubMed

    Amo, Kiyoko

    2012-08-01

    Nontyphoidal salmonella causes infectious gastroenteritis, and sometimes causes bacteremia and meningitis. Gastroenteritis associated with nontyphoidal salmonella, in which fever, diarrhea, vomiting and abdominal cramps, is a common disease. The major way of transmittion is food of animal origin, for example egg. That is the reason why precausion is so important such as wash hands before cooking, avoid eating raw egg and wash the cooking utensils after contact raw foods. In this report, I presented the rare severe case of encephalitis caused by salmonella infection.

  3. Effectiveness of a novel spontaneous carvacrol nanoemulsion against Salmonella enterica Enteritidis and Escherichia coli O157:H7 on contaminated mung bean and alfalfa seeds.

    PubMed

    Landry, Kyle S; Chang, Yuhua; McClements, David Julian; McLandsborough, Lynne

    2014-09-18

    Outbreaks of foodborne illness from consumption of sprouts have been linked to contaminated seeds prior to germination. Due to the long sprouting period at ambient temperatures and high humidity, germinating seeds contaminated with low pathogen levels (0.1logCFU/g) can result in sprouts with high numbers (≥10(8)CFU/g) of pathogens. Currently, the recommended treatment method involves soaking seeds in 20,000ppm (2%) calcium hypochlorite prior to germination. In this study, an alternative treatment involving soaking seeds in a carvacrol nanoemulsion was tested for its efficacy against Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis (ATCC BAA-1045) or EGFP expressing E. coli O157:H7 (ATCC 42895) contaminated mung bean and alfalfa seeds. The antimicrobial treatment was performed by soaking inoculated seed batches in the spontaneous nanoemulsion (4000 or 8000ppm) for 30 or 60min. The spontaneous nanoemulsion was formed by titrating the oil phase (carvacrol and medium chain triglycerides) and water-soluble surfactant (Tween 80®) into sodium citrate buffer. Following treatment, the numbers of surviving cells were determined by suspending the seeds in TSB and performing plate counts and/or Most Probable Number (MPN) enumeration. Treated seeds were sprouted and tested for the presence of the appropriate pathogen. This treatment successfully inactivated low levels (2 and 3logCFU/g) of S. Enteritidis and E. coli on either seed types when soaked for either 30 or 60min at nanoemulsion concentrations corresponding to 4000 (0.4%) or 8000 (0.8%) ppm carvacrol. Inoculated alfalfa seeds treated with 4000ppm nanoemulsion, required a 60min treatment time to show a similar 2-3 log reduction. Complete inactivation was confirmed by germinating treated seeds and performing microbiological testing. Total sprout yield was not compromised by any of the tested treatments. These results show that carvacrol nanoemulsions may be an alternative antimicrobial treatment method for

  4. Dimethyl adenosine transferase (KsgA) deficiency in Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis confers susceptibility to high osmolarity and virulence attenuation in chickens.

    PubMed

    Chiok, Kim Lam; Addwebi, Tarek; Guard, Jean; Shah, Devendra H

    2013-12-01

    Dimethyl adenosine transferase (KsgA) performs diverse roles in bacteria, including ribosomal maturation and DNA mismatch repair, and synthesis of KsgA is responsive to antibiotics and cold temperature. We previously showed that a ksgA mutation in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis results in impaired invasiveness in human and avian epithelial cells. In this study, we tested the virulence of a ksgA mutant (the ksgA::Tn5 mutant) of S. Enteritidis in orally challenged 1-day-old chickens. The ksgA::Tn5 mutant showed significantly reduced intestinal colonization and organ invasiveness in chickens compared to those of the wild-type (WT) parent. Phenotype microarray (PM) was employed to compare the ksgA::Tn5 mutant and its isogenic wild-type strain for 920 phenotypes at 28°C, 37°C, and 42°C. At chicken body temperature (42°C), the ksgA::Tn5 mutant showed significantly reduced respiratory activity with respect to a number of carbon, nitrogen, phosphate, sulfur, and peptide nitrogen nutrients. The greatest differences were observed in the osmolyte panel at concentrations of ≥6% NaCl at 37°C and 42°C. In contrast, no major differences were observed at 28°C. In independent growth assays, the ksgA::Tn5 mutant displayed a severe growth defect in high-osmolarity (6.5% NaCl) conditions in nutrient-rich (LB) and nutrient-limiting (M9 minimum salts) media at 42°C. Moreover, the ksgA::Tn5 mutant showed significantly reduced tolerance to oxidative stress, but its survival within macrophages was not impaired. Unlike Escherichia coli, the ksgA::Tn5 mutant did not display a cold-sensitivity phenotype; however, it showed resistance to kasugamycin and increased susceptibility to chloramphenicol. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing the role of ksgA in S. Enteritidis virulence in chickens, tolerance to high osmolarity, and altered susceptibility to kasugamycin and chloramphenicol.

  5. Biocontrol of Salmonella Enteritidis in spiked chicken cuts by lytic bacteriophages ΦSP-1 and ΦSP-3.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Jeena; Bhat, Sarita G

    2015-04-01

    The ability of host specific bacteriophages ΦSP-1 and ΦSP-3 to lyse Salmonella in artificially contaminated cuts of pressure cooked chicken meat was evaluated at different temperatures -4 °C, room temperature (28 ± 0.5 °C) and 37 °C applying low and high multiplicity of infection (MOI). Bacteriophages were able to significantly reduce the bacterial counts at all the temperatures studied. At 4 °C, individual application of Φ SP-1 and Φ SP-3 resulted in significant drop in bacterial counts (log10 2.46 and 2.1 CFU/ml, respectively) at high MOI and (log10 0.98 and 0.52 CFU/ml, respectively) at low MOI, when compared to the untreated control on day 3. Similarly at room temperature the drop was log10 3.99 and 3.46 CFU/ml at high MOI and log10 2.51 and 2.3 CFU/ml at low MOI. At 37 °C the drop was log10 1.98 and 2.38 at high MOI and at low MOI it was log10 1.52 and 1.98 CFU/ml. Increased efficiency was observed when phages where applied as cocktail at high MOI as the bacterial counts at the end of day 3 dropped by log10 3.52 CFU/ml at 37 °C and to beyond detectable level at 4 °C and room temperature. The average reduction of bacterial load in the same group was -4 °C (79%), room temperature (92%) and 37 °C (78%). PMID:25588852

  6. Evaluation of effects of EarlyBird associated with FloraMax-B11 on Salmonella Enteritidis, intestinal morphology, and performance of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Biloni, A; Quintana, C F; Menconi, A; Kallapura, G; Latorre, J; Pixley, C; Layton, S; Dalmagro, M; Hernandez-Velasco, X; Wolfenden, A; Hargis, B M; Tellez, G

    2013-09-01

    A posthatch fasting period of 24 to 72 h is a common and inevitable practice in commercial poultry production. This delay in start of feed intake has been reported to negatively affect yolk utilization, gastrointestinal development, slaughter weight, breast meat yield, performance, and to also depress immunological development, making the birds more susceptible to infection from pathogens such as Salmonella. Furthermore, public concerns regarding the considerable human rates of illness reported and the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of Salmonella have doubled the challenge on the poultry industry to find alternative means of Salmonella control. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of a combination of early feeding with probiotic supplementation on morphological development of mucosa, control of Salmonella, and overall performance in broiler chickens. We used a blend of a commercially available perinatal supplement, EarlyBird (EB; Pacific Vet Group USA Inc., Fayetteville, AR), and a successful probiotic supplement, FloraMax-B11 (FM; Pacific Vet Group USA Inc.), to evaluate the effects on gut morphology, Salmonella intestinal colonization, and horizontal transmission, along with its effects on BW and related performance in broiler chickens under simulated commercial hatching management and shipping conditions. Morphometric analysis showed increased villus height, villus width, villus to crypt ratio, and villus surface area index in chickens treated with EB + FM groups. Significant reductions in Salmonella recovery, incidence, and horizontal transmission were also observed among the same groups, suggesting beneficial effects of early feeding and competitive exclusion by probiotic bacteria. Improved gut morphology and Salmonella exclusion was very well supported by BW data with significantly lower early BW loss and overall BW gains in birds treated with EB + FM mixture. The results of this study demonstrated that the combination of EB and FM

  7. A live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis secreting detoxified heat labile toxin enhances mucosal immunity and confers protection against wild-type challenge in chickens.

    PubMed

    Lalsiamthara, Jonathan; Kamble, Nitin Machindra; Lee, John Hwa

    2016-01-01

    A live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) capable of constitutively secreting detoxified double mutant Escherichia coli heat labile toxin (dmLT) was developed. The biologically adjuvanted strain was generated via transformation of a highly immunogenic SE JOL1087 with a plasmid encoding dmLT gene cassette; the resultant strain was designated JOL1641. A balanced-lethal host-vector system stably maintained the plasmid via auxotrophic host complementation with a plasmid encoded aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (asd) gene. Characterization by western blot assay revealed the dmLT subunit proteins in culture supernatants of JOL1641. For the investigation of adjuvanticity and protective efficacy, chickens were immunized via oral or intramuscular routes with PBS, JOL1087 and JOL1641. Birds immunized with JOL1641 showed significant (P ≤ 0.05) increases in intestinal SIgA production at the 1(st) and 2(nd) weeks post-immunization via oral and intramuscular routes, respectively. Interestingly, while both strains showed significant splenic protection via intramuscular immunization, JOL1641 outperformed JOL1087 upon oral immunization. Oral immunization of birds with JOL1641 significantly reduced splenic bacterial counts. The reduction in bacterial counts may be correlated with an adjuvant effect of dmLT that increases SIgA secretion in the intestines of immunized birds. The inclusion of detoxified dmLT in the strain did not cause adverse reactions to birds, nor did it extend the period of bacterial fecal shedding. In conclusion, we report here that dmLT could be biologically incorporated in the secretion system of a live attenuated Salmonella-based vaccine, and that this construction is safe and could enhance mucosal immunity, and protect immunized birds against wild-type challenge. PMID:27262338

  8. Association of INOS, TRAIL, TGF-β2, TGF-β3, and IgL genes with response to Salmonella enteritidis in poultry

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Several candidate genes were selected, based on their critical roles in the host's response to intracellular bacteria, to study the genetic control of the chicken response to Salmonella enteritidis (SE). The candidate genes were: inducible nitric oxide synthase (INOS), tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), transforming growth factor β2 (TGF-β2), transforming growth factor β3 (TGF-β3), and immunoglobulin G light chain (IgL). Responses to pathogenic SE colonization or to SE vaccination were measured in the Iowa Salmonella response resource population (ISRRP). Outbred broiler sires and three diverse, highly inbred dam lines produced 508 F1 progeny, which were evaluated as young chicks for either bacterial load isolated from spleen or cecum contents after pathogenic SE inoculation, or the circulating antibody level after SE vaccination. Fragments of each gene were sequenced from the founder lines of the resource population to identify genomic sequence variation. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were identified, then PCR-RFLP techniques were developed to genotype the F1 resource population. Linear mixed models were used for statistical analyses. Because the inbred dam lines always contributed one copy of the same allele, the heterozygous sire allele effects could be assessed in the F1 generation. Association analyses revealed significant effects of the sire allele of TRAIL-StyI on the spleen (P < 0.07) and cecum (P < 0.0002) SE bacterial load. Significant effects (P < 0.04) were found on the cecum bacterial load for TGF-β3-BsrI. Varied and moderate association was found for SE vaccine antibody response for all genes. This is the first reported study on the association of SNP in INOS, TRAIL, TGF-β2, TGF-β3, and IgL with the chicken response to SE. Identification of candidate genes to improve the immune response may be useful for marker-assisted selection to enhance disease resistance. PMID:12927083

  9. Characterization of Seven Outbreaks of Hemorrhagic Hepatopathy Syndrome in Commercial Pullets Following the Administration of a Salmonella Enteritidis Bacterin in California.

    PubMed

    Carnaccini, S; Shivaprasad, H L; Cutler, G; Bland, M; Meng, X J; Kenney, S P; Bickford, A A; Cooper, G; Charlton, B; Sentíes-Cué, C G

    2016-03-01

    Between April 2013 and April 2015, seven flocks belonging to three different major commercial egg producers inCalifornia experienced a mild increase in mortality 2 to 3 wk after administration of Salmonella Enteritidis bacterins. Strains of chickens involved were H&N (flock A1, A2, B2, C1, C2, and C3) and Lohmann white (flock B1). Vaccination was administered individually through injection either in the breast muscles or subcutis in the legs between 11 and 18 wk of age in all flocks. Clinical signs ranged from inapparent to lameness, reluctance to walk, greenish diarrhea, and retching-like symptoms. The mortality ranged from 0.16% to 1.38% per week, with the highest peaks occurring usually 2 to 3 wk postvaccination, and then declined rapidly. Postmortem examinations revealed enlarged livers with disseminated hemorrhages and pale foci of necrosis. Also, severe extensive hemorrhages in the intestine, heart, and proventriculus were observed in a few birds. Various degrees of productive, exudative giant cell granulomatous myositis were observed invading deeply the muscles and subcutis at the site of vaccination. The myositis was always associated with optically empty vacuoles positive for neutral lipids by Oil Red O stain. Droplets of Oil Red O material were also noticed in the affected livers and intestines. Congo red stain highlighted the presence of amyloid in moderate to severe amounts in the breast muscles and moderate amounts in livers, spleens, and intestines. Salmonella antigens were detected in the injection sites and livers by immunohistochemical staining. No viruses or toxic substances were recovered from the liver, spleen, intestine, and pectoral muscles, and the few bacteria isolated were interpreted as secondary postmortem invaders. In addition, livers and bile tested for hepatitis E virus were negative by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. PMID:26953941

  10. Identification and characterization of salmonella serotypes using DNA spectral characteristics by fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analysis of DNA samples of Salmonella serotypes (Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Infantis, Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella Kentucky) were performed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectrometer by placing directly in contact with a diamond attenua...

  11. A comparative study on invasion, survival, modulation of oxidative burst, and nitric oxide responses of macrophages (HD11), and systemic infection in chickens by prevalent poultry Salmonella serovars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poultry is a major reservoir for foodborne Salmonella serovars. Salmonella Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis, S. Heidelberg, S. Kentucky, and S. Senftenberg are the most prevalent serovars in poultry. Information concerning the interactions between different Salmonella species and host cells in poultry i...

  12. "Salmonella arizona" Infections in Latinos Associated with Rattlesnake Folk Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterman, Stephen H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Conducted a case-control study to determine the magnitude of the problem of Latino patients who ingested rattlesnake capsules and then developed serious "Salmonella arizona" infections. Eighty-two percent of infected Latinos in 1986-87 who were questioned reported ingesting snake capsules. Discusses the association of ingesting snake capsules with…

  13. Salmonella infection and carriage in reptiles in a zoological collection.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Meredith M; Davis, Meghan; Valitutto, Marc T; Nelson, Kenrad; Sykes, John M

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify important subspecies and serovars of Salmonella enterica in a captive reptile population and clinically relevant risk factors for and signs of illness in Salmonella-positive reptiles. DESIGN Retrospective cross-sectional study. ANIMALS 11 crocodilians (4 samples), 78 snakes (91 samples), 59 lizards (57 samples), and 34 chelonians (23 samples) at the Bronx Zoo from 2000 through 2012. PROCEDURES Data pertaining to various types of biological samples obtained from reptiles with positive Salmonella culture results and the reptiles themselves were analyzed to determine period prevalence of and risk factors for various Salmonella-related outcomes. RESULTS Serovar distribution differences were identified for sample type, reptile phylogenetic family, and reptile origin and health. Salmonella enterica subsp enterica was the most common subspecies in Salmonella cultures (78/175 [45%]), identified across all reptilian taxa. Salmonella enterica subsp diarizonae was also common (42/175 [24%]) and was recovered almost exclusively from snakes (n = 33), many of which had been clinically ill (17). Clinically ill reptiles provided 37% (64) of Salmonella cultures. Factors associated with an increased risk of illness in reptiles with a positive culture result were carnivorous diet and prior confiscation. Snakes had a higher risk of illness than other reptile groups, whereas lizards had a lower risk. Bony changes, dermatitis, and anorexia were the most common clinical signs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE This study provided new information on Salmonella infection or carriage and associated clinical disease in reptiles. Associations identified between serovars or subspecies and reptile groups or clinical disease can guide management of Salmonella-positive captive reptiles.

  14. In vivo assessment of effect of fermented milk diet on course of infection in mice with bioluminescent Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Brovko, Lubov Y; Vandenende, Chris; Chu, Byron; Ng, Kwok-Yu; Brooks, Andrew; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2003-11-01

    A novel method for assessing the effect of fermented milk and its components on the course of Salmonella infection in live mice is described. Following a period of feeding with whole fermented milk (group W), a cell-free fraction of fermented milk (group S), or saline (group C, control), mice were challenged by oral gavage with a bioluminescent strain of Salmonella Enteritidis. Colonization of the gastrointestinal tract and subsequent infection could be followed by bioluminescent imaging of live mice with a cooled slow-scan CCD camera. Each group of mice was fed for 7 days with the appropriate product. On the eighth day, all mice were orally infected with 10(6) Salmonella cells. On the sixth day after infection, mice in groups W and C showed evidence of disease. No bioluminescent signal was observed for any of the mice in group S. The physical condition of the mice in groups W and S was normal, but some deterioration in the health of the mice in the control group (group C) occurred. On the eighth day after infection, a weak bioluminescence signal was observed for the mice in group W, but still no signal was observed for any of the mice in group S. Mice in both of these groups appeared normal, but the mice in group C showed strong evidence of infection and marked deterioration in their physical condition accompanied by a bioluminescence signal. This method allows the assessment of the effects of potential nutraceutical agents on the course of infection by foodborne pathogens in live animals in real time.

  15. Salmonella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella are facultative anaerobic Gram-negative non-spore forming rods belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. Salmonellosis is a zoonotic and foodborne illness that is usually transmitted by the fecal-oral route estimated to be responsible for 1.4 million cases of human infections in 2009 in...

  16. Propyl Paraben Sensitizes Heat-Resistant Salmonella Enteritidis and Oranienburg to Thermal Pasteurization in Liquid Egg Albumen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: The USDA, Food Safety and Inspection Service requires that liquid egg albumen (or egg white, LEW) undergo pasteurization at 56.7 C for 3.5 min prior to distribution. This process is known change the physical properties of LEW. The use of antimicrobials to sensitize salmonellae to pa...

  17. AMPK and mTOR: sensors and regulators of immunometabolic changes during Salmonella infection in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Kogut, Michael H; Genovese, Kenneth J; He, Haiqi; Arsenault, Ryan J

    2016-02-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induce an early pro-inflammatory response in chickens, but the response is short-lived, asymptomatic of clinical disease, results in a persistent colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and can transmit infections to naïve hosts via fecal shedding of bacteria. The underlying mechanisms that facilitate this persistent colonization of the ceca of chickens by Salmonella are unknown. We have begun to concentrate on the convergence of metabolism and immune function as playing a major role in regulating the host responsiveness to infection. It is now recognized that the immune system monitors the metabolic state of tissues and responds by modulating metabolic function. The aim in this review is to summarize the literature that has defined a series of genotypic and phenotypic alterations in the regulatory host immune-metabolic signaling pathways in the local cecal microenvironment during the first 4 d following infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. Using chicken-specific kinomic immune-metabolism peptide arrays and quantitative real-time-PCR of cecal tissue during the early (4 to 48 h) and late stages (4 to 17 d) of a Salmonella infection in young broiler chickens, the local immunometabolic microenvironment has been ascertained. Distinct immune and metabolic pathways are altered between 2 to 4 d post-infection that dramatically changed the local immunometabolic environment. Thus, the tissue immunometabolic phenotype of the cecum plays a major role in the ability of the bacterium to establish a persistent cecal colonization. In general, our findings show that AMPK and mTOR are key players linking specific extracellular milieu and intracellular metabolism. Phenotypically, the early response (4 to 48 h) to Salmonella infection is pro-inflammatory, fueled by glycolysis and mTOR-mediated protein synthesis, whereas by the later phase (4 to 5 d), the local environment has undergone an immune-metabolic reprogramming to

  18. The commercial impact of pig Salmonella spp. infections in border-free markets during an economic recession.

    PubMed

    Evangelopoulou, G; Kritas, S; Christodoulopoulos, G; Burriel, A R

    2015-03-01

    The genus Salmonella, a group of important zoonotic pathogens, is having global economic and political importance. Its main political importance results from the pathogenicity of many of its serovars for man. Serovars Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium are currently the most frequently associated to foodborne infections, but they are not the only ones. Animal food products contaminated from subclinically infected animals are a risk to consumers. In border free markets, an example is the EU, these consumers at risk are international. This is why, economic competition could use the risk of consumer infection either to restrict or promote free border trade in animals and their products. Such use of public health threats increases during economic recessions in nations economically weak to effectively enforce surveillance. In free trade conditions, those unable to pay the costs of pathogen control are unable to effectively implement agreed regulations, centrally decided, but leaving their enforcement to individual states. Free trade of animal food products depends largely on the promotion of safety, included in "quality," when traders target foreign markets. They will overtake eventually the markets of those ineffectively implementing agreed safety regulations, if their offered prices are also attractive for recession hit consumers. Nations unable to effectively enforce safety regulations become disadvantaged partners unequally competing with producers of economically robust states when it comes to public health. Thus, surveillance and control of pathogens like Salmonella are not only quantitative. They are also political issues upon which states base national trade decisions. Hence, the quantitative calculation of costs incurring from surveillance and control of animal salmonelloses, should not only include the cost for public health protection, but also the long term international economic and political costs for an individual state. These qualitative

  19. The commercial impact of pig Salmonella spp. infections in border-free markets during an economic recession

    PubMed Central

    Evangelopoulou, G.; Kritas, S.; Christodoulopoulos, G.; Burriel, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    The genus Salmonella, a group of important zoonotic pathogens, is having global economic and political importance. Its main political importance results from the pathogenicity of many of its serovars for man. Serovars Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium are currently the most frequently associated to foodborne infections, but they are not the only ones. Animal food products contaminated from subclinically infected animals are a risk to consumers. In border free markets, an example is the EU, these consumers at risk are international. This is why, economic competition could use the risk of consumer infection either to restrict or promote free border trade in animals and their products. Such use of public health threats increases during economic recessions in nations economically weak to effectively enforce surveillance. In free trade conditions, those unable to pay the costs of pathogen control are unable to effectively implement agreed regulations, centrally decided, but leaving their enforcement to individual states. Free trade of animal food products depends largely on the promotion of safety, included in “quality,” when traders target foreign markets. They will overtake eventually the markets of those ineffectively implementing agreed safety regulations, if their offered prices are also attractive for recession hit consumers. Nations unable to effectively enforce safety regulations become disadvantaged partners unequally competing with producers of economically robust states when it comes to public health. Thus, surveillance and control of pathogens like Salmonella are not only quantitative. They are also political issues upon which states base national trade decisions. Hence, the quantitative calculation of costs incurring from surveillance and control of animal salmonelloses, should not only include the cost for public health protection, but also the long term international economic and political costs for an individual state. These

  20. The commercial impact of pig Salmonella spp. infections in border-free markets during an economic recession.

    PubMed

    Evangelopoulou, G; Kritas, S; Christodoulopoulos, G; Burriel, A R

    2015-03-01

    The genus Salmonella, a group of important zoonotic pathogens, is having global economic and political importance. Its main political importance results from the pathogenicity of many of its serovars for man. Serovars Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium are currently the most frequently associated to foodborne infections, but they are not the only ones. Animal food products contaminated from subclinically infected animals are a risk to consumers. In border free markets, an example is the EU, these consumers at risk are international. This is why, economic competition could use the risk of consumer infection either to restrict or promote free border trade in animals and their products. Such use of public health threats increases during economic recessions in nations economically weak to effectively enforce surveillance. In free trade conditions, those unable to pay the costs of pathogen control are unable to effectively implement agreed regulations, centrally decided, but leaving their enforcement to individual states. Free trade of animal food products depends largely on the promotion of safety, included in "quality," when traders target foreign markets. They will overtake eventually the markets of those ineffectively implementing agreed safety regulations, if their offered prices are also attractive for recession hit consumers. Nations unable to effectively enforce safety regulations become disadvantaged partners unequally competing with producers of economically robust states when it comes to public health. Thus, surveillance and control of pathogens like Salmonella are not only quantitative. They are also political issues upon which states base national trade decisions. Hence, the quantitative calculation of costs incurring from surveillance and control of animal salmonelloses, should not only include the cost for public health protection, but also the long term international economic and political costs for an individual state. These qualitative

  1. Temporal changes in the expression of avian β-defensins in the chicken vagina during sexual maturation and Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Anastasiadou, Maria; Avdi, Melpomeni; Theodoridis, Alexandros; Michailidis, Georgios

    2013-06-01

    Avian β-defensins (AvβDs) constitute a family of antimicrobial peptides that are critical to innate immunity in chickens, providing protection against microbial pathogens including Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). As apart from the digestive tract another main route of SE colonization in birds is via infection of the oviduct and specifically of the vagina, the aim of this study was to investigate the expression of the complete family of AvβDs, in the chicken vagina in vivo, to determine whether sexual maturation affects their mRNA abundance and to investigate whether SE infection alters the vaginal AvβDs expression. Expression analysis revealed that 11 members of the AvβD family were expressed in the chicken vagina. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that the mRNA abundance of five AvβDs was up regulated and of one AvβD was down regulated with respect to sexual maturation. In addition SE infection resulted in a significant induction of AvβD5, 7, 10, 11, 12 and 14 in the vagina of sexually mature birds, and in a significant induction of AvβD5 and 11 in the vagina of aged birds. These findings provide strong evidence to suggest that an AvβD-mediated immune response mechanism exists in the chicken vagina providing protection against bacterial pathogens including Salmonella species. PMID:23381563

  2. Heterophil Phagocytic Activity Stimulated by Lactobacillus salivarius L61 and L55 Supplementation in Broilers with Salmonella Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sornplang, Pairat; Leelavatcharamas, Vichai; Soikum, Chaiyaporn

    2015-01-01

    Newborn chicks are susceptible to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of Lactobacillus probiotic isolated from chicken feces on heterophil phagocytosis in broiler chicks. A total of 150 newborn broiler chicks were divided into 5 groups (30 chicks per group) as follows: group 1 (normal control), given feed and water only, group 2 (positive control) given feed, water and SE i