Science.gov

Sample records for infectious junin viruses

  1. Junin virus structural proteins.

    PubMed Central

    De Martínez Segovia, Z M; De Mitri, M I

    1977-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of purified Junin virus revealed six distinct structural polypeptides, two major and four minor ones. Four of these polypeptides appeared to be covalently linked with carbohydrate. The molecular weights of the six proteins, estimated by coelectrophoresis with marker proteins, ranged from 25,000 to 91,000. One of the two major components (number 3) was identified as a nucleoprotein and had a molecular weight of 64,000. It was the most prominent protein and was nonglycosylated. The other major protein (number 5), with a molecular weight of 38,000, was a glucoprotein and a component of the viral envelope. The location on the virion of three additional glycopeptides with molecular weights of 91,000, 72,000, and 52,000, together with a protein with a molecular weight of 25,000, was not well defined. PMID:189088

  2. RNA composition of Junin virus.

    PubMed Central

    Añón, M C; Grau, O; Segovia, Z M; Franzefernández, M T

    1976-01-01

    Junin virus grown in BHK-21 cells was labeled with [3H]uridine and highly purified by differential and isopycnic centrifugation. The RNAs extracted with phenol and analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were shown to be composed of four large species (33, 28, and 18S) and three small ones (4, 5, and 5.5S). This pattern was similar to ones already reported for other arenaviruses. However, there was a striking difference when the virus labeling was performed in the presence of actinomycin D. Labeling of viral rRNA was as much as 60% of the levels obtained in the absence of the drug under conditions in which cellular rRNA's were inhibited by 95% or more. PMID:178925

  3. Reverse genetics generation of chimeric infectious Junin/Lassa virus is dependent on interaction of homologous glycoprotein stable signal peptide and G2 cytoplasmic domains.

    PubMed

    Albariño, César G; Bird, Brian H; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Dodd, Kimberly A; White, David M; Bergeron, Eric; Shrivastava-Ranjan, Punya; Nichol, Stuart T

    2011-01-01

    The Arenaviridae are a diverse and globally distributed collection of viruses that are maintained primarily by rodent reservoirs. Junin virus (JUNV) and Lassa virus (LASV) can both cause significant outbreaks of severe and often fatal human disease throughout their respective areas of endemicity. In an effort to improve upon the existing live attenuated JUNV Candid1 vaccine, we generated a genetically homogenous stock of this virus from cDNA copies of the virus S and L segments by using a reverse genetics system. Further, these cDNAs were used in combination with LASV cDNAs to successfully generate two recombinant Candid1 JUNV/LASV chimeric viruses (via envelope glycoprotein [GPC] exchange). It was found that while the GPC extravirion domains were readily exchangeable, homologous stable signal peptide (SSP) and G2 transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail domains were essential for correct GPC maturation and production of infectious chimeric viruses. The switching of the JUNV and LASV G1/G2 ectodomains within the Candid1 vaccine background did not alter the attenuated phenotype of the vaccine strain in a lethal mouse model. These recombinant chimeric viruses shed light on the fundamental requirements of arenavirus GPC maturation and may serve as a strategy for the development of bivalent JUNV and LASV vaccine candidates.

  4. Molecular Characterization of Attenuated Junin Virus Variants.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-14

    No. DAMD17-89-Z-9024 Area de Quimica Biologica y Biologia Molecular Facultad de Ciencias Exactas Universidad Nacional de La Plata Calles 47 y 115, 1900...MONITORING ORGANIZATION Area de Quimica Biologica (If applicable) y Biologia Molecular I 6c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIPCode) 7b. ADDRESS (City, State...etc. 3. "Detecci6n temprana de virus Junin en muestras clinicas por amplificaci6n de ,cidos nucleicos" M.E. Lozano, P.D. Ghiringhelli, V. Romanowski

  5. Crystal structure of Junin virus nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinjie; Li, Le; Liu, Xiang; Dong, Shishang; Wang, Wenming; Huo, Tong; Guo, Yu; Rao, Zihe; Yang, Cheng

    2013-10-01

    Junin virus (JUNV) has been identified as the aetiological agent of Argentine haemorrhagic fever (AHF), which is a serious public health problem with approximately 5 million people at risk. It is treated as a potential bioterrorism agent because of its rapid transmission by aerosols. JUNV is a negative-sense ssRNA virus that belongs to the genus Arenavirus within the family Arenaviridae, and its genomic RNA contains two segments encoding four proteins. Among these, the nucleoprotein (NP) has essential roles in viral RNA synthesis and immune suppression, but the molecular mechanisms of its actions are only partially understood. Here, we determined a 2.2 Å crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of JUNV NP. This structure showed high similarity to the Lassa fever virus (LASV) NP C-terminal domain. However, both the structure and function of JUNV NP showed differences compared with LASV NP. This study extends our structural insight into the negative-sense ssRNA virus NPs.

  6. Pathogenesis of XJ and Romero strains of Junin virus in two strains of guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Linde, Nathaniel S; Dziuba, Natallia; Zacks, Michele A; Smith, Jeanon N; Smith, Jennifer K; Aronson, Judy F; Chumakova, Olga V; Lander, Heather M; Peters, Clarence J; Paessler, Slobodan

    2008-08-01

    Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), a systemic infectious disease caused by infection with Junin virus, affects several organs, and patients can show hematologic, cardiovascular, renal, or neurologic symptoms. We compared the virulence of two Junin virus strains in inbred and outbred guinea pigs with the aim of characterizing this animal model better for future vaccine/antiviral efficacy studies. Our data indicate that this passage of the XJ strain is attenuated in guinea pigs. In contrast, the Romero strain is highly virulent in Strain 13 as well as in Hartley guinea pigs, resulting in systemic infection, thrombocytopenia, elevated aspartate aminotransferase levels, and ultimately, uniformly lethal disease. We detected viral antigen in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Thus, both guinea pig strains are useful animal models for lethal Junin virus (Romero strain) infection and potentially can be used for preclinical trials in vaccine or antiviral drug development.

  7. Pathogenesis of XJ and Romero Strains of Junin Virus in Two Strains of Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Nadezhda E.; Linde, Nathaniel S.; Dziuba, Natallia; Zacks, Michele A.; Smith, Jeanon N.; Smith, Jennifer K.; Aronson, Judy F.; Chumakova, Olga V.; Lander, Heather M.; Peters, Clarence J.; Paessler, Slobodan

    2008-01-01

    Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), a systemic infectious disease caused by infection with Junin virus, affects several organs, and patients can show hematologic, cardiovascular, renal, or neurologic symptoms. We compared the virulence of two Junin virus strains in inbred and outbred guinea pigs with the aim of characterizing this animal model better for future vaccine/antiviral efficacy studies. Our data indicate that this passage of the XJ strain is attenuated in guinea pigs. In contrast, the Romero strain is highly virulent in Strain 13 as well as in Hartley guinea pigs, resulting in systemic infection, thrombocytopenia, elevated apartate aminotransferase levels, and ultimately, uniformly lethal disease. We detected viral antigen in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Thus, both guinea pig strains are useful animal models for lethal Junin virus (Romero strain) infection and potentially can be used for preclinical trials in vaccine or antiviral drug development. PMID:18689636

  8. Experimental biology and pathogenesis of Junin virus infection in animals and man*

    PubMed Central

    Weissenbacher, M. C.; De Guerrero, L. B.; Boxaca, M. C.

    1975-01-01

    A fatal disease resembling Argentine haemorrhagic fever of man has been produced in guinea-pigs and mice by inoculation with Junin virus. Infected guinea-pigs show macroscopic and microscopic haemorrhagic lesions, marked bone marrow changes, decreased leukocytes and platelets in the peripheral blood, and impairment of immunological response. This response permits differentiation between pathogenic (XJ) and attenuated (XJ Cl3) strains. Guinea-pigs inoculated with the XJ Cl3 strain develop an inapparent infection accompanied by slight haematological changes, the appearance of antibody, and protection against challenge with the pathogenic strain. The attenuated strain has been used successfully as an immunizing antigen in 636 human volunteers. Guinea-pigs infected with Tacaribe virus show cross-protection against Junin virus, with the presence of heterologous neutralizing antibodies. Suckling mice infected with Junin virus develop a typical viral encephalitis; the pathogenicity of the virus decreases with increasing age of the mice. Experiments with thymectomized mice and with mice treated with antithymocyte serum suggest that the pathogenicity of Junin virus in this host is related to the integrity of the thymus-dependent immune system. There is evidence that humoral antibodies do not play any role in the development of the encephalitic lesions but rather protect mice against Junin virus infection. A recent serological survey among laboratory workers and inhabitants of the endemic area has demonstrated the presence of inapparent infection with Junin virus. PMID:182401

  9. A Host-Oriented Inhibitor of Junin Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Egress

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianhong; Han, Ziying; Liu, Yuliang; Liu, Wenbo; Lee, Michael S.; Olson, Mark A.; Ruthel, Gordon; Freedman, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT There are currently no U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved vaccines or therapeutics to prevent or treat Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF). The causative agent of AHF is Junin virus (JUNV); a New World arenavirus classified as a National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention category A priority pathogen. The PTAP late (L) domain motif within JUNV Z protein facilitates virion egress and transmission by recruiting host Tsg101 and other ESCRT complex proteins to promote scission of the virus particle from the plasma membrane. Here, we describe a novel compound (compound 0013) that blocks the JUNV Z-Tsg101 interaction and inhibits budding of virus-like particles (VLPs) driven by ectopic expression of the Z protein and live-attenuated JUNV Candid-1 strain in cell culture. Since inhibition of the PTAP-Tsg101 interaction inhibits JUNV egress, compound 0013 serves as a prototype therapeutic that could reduce virus dissemination and disease progression in infected individuals. Moreover, since PTAP l-domain-mediated Tsg101 recruitment is utilized by other RNA virus pathogens (e.g., Ebola virus and HIV-1), PTAP inhibitors such as compound 0013 have the potential to function as potent broad-spectrum, host-oriented antiviral drugs. IMPORTANCE There are currently no FDA-approved vaccines or therapeutics to prevent or treat Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF). The causative agent of AHF is Junin virus (JUNV); a New World arenavirus classified as an NIAID/CDC category A priority pathogen. Here, we describe a prototype therapeutic that blocks budding of JUNV and has the potential to function as a broad-spectrum antiviral drug. PMID:24522922

  10. A host-oriented inhibitor of Junin Argentine hemorrhagic fever virus egress.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianhong; Han, Ziying; Liu, Yuliang; Liu, Wenbo; Lee, Michael S; Olson, Mark A; Ruthel, Gordon; Freedman, Bruce D; Harty, Ronald N

    2014-05-01

    There are currently no U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved vaccines or therapeutics to prevent or treat Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF). The causative agent of AHF is Junin virus (JUNV); a New World arenavirus classified as a National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention category A priority pathogen. The PTAP late (L) domain motif within JUNV Z protein facilitates virion egress and transmission by recruiting host Tsg101 and other ESCRT complex proteins to promote scission of the virus particle from the plasma membrane. Here, we describe a novel compound (compound 0013) that blocks the JUNV Z-Tsg101 interaction and inhibits budding of virus-like particles (VLPs) driven by ectopic expression of the Z protein and live-attenuated JUNV Candid-1 strain in cell culture. Since inhibition of the PTAP-Tsg101 interaction inhibits JUNV egress, compound 0013 serves as a prototype therapeutic that could reduce virus dissemination and disease progression in infected individuals. Moreover, since PTAP l-domain-mediated Tsg101 recruitment is utilized by other RNA virus pathogens (e.g., Ebola virus and HIV-1), PTAP inhibitors such as compound 0013 have the potential to function as potent broad-spectrum, host-oriented antiviral drugs. There are currently no FDA-approved vaccines or therapeutics to prevent or treat Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF). The causative agent of AHF is Junin virus (JUNV); a New World arenavirus classified as an NIAID/CDC category A priority pathogen. Here, we describe a prototype therapeutic that blocks budding of JUNV and has the potential to function as a broad-spectrum antiviral drug.

  11. Junin virus replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with Argentine haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, M; Vallejos, A; Saavedra, C; Maiztegui, J I

    1990-02-01

    To study the relationship of Junin virus (JV) to populations of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with Argentine Haemorrhagic Fever (AHF), blood samples were obtained during the acute period of disease and cultured as total, adherent, and non-adherent cell populations. JV was sequentially sought in these cell populations by using an Infectious Centre (IC) assay, whereas free JV in the supernatants was evaluated by plaque formation. IC were obtained in cultures of total PBMC from 8 out of 19 patients. Maximum numbers of IC showed high variation among patients, ranging from 3 to 410 IC per 10(6) viable PBMC. In contrast, IC were sporadically demonstrated in the non-adherent cell population. The release of JV into culture supernatants was detected only in total PBMC cultures, thus in the presence of macrophages. These results demonstrate that circulating monocytes (macrophages) are targets for JV replication contributing to the viral spread in the acute phase of AHF.

  12. In vivo replication of pathogenic and attenuated strains of Junin virus in different cell populations of lymphatic tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Laguens, M; Chambó, J G; Laguens, R P

    1983-01-01

    Lymphatic tissue is one of the main sites for replication of Junin virus. To characterize which cells are involved in that replication, the presence of Junin virus in purified populations of macrophages and dendritic cells from the spleens of guinea pigs infected with pathogenic and attenuated strains was investigated by immunofluorescence and intracerebral inoculation into newborn mice. The pathogenic strain was present both in macrophages and in dendritic cells, but the attenuated strain selectively infected dendritic cells. These observations suggest that the pathogenic behavior and replication efficiency of these two strains of Junin virus may be related to a difference in cell targets. Images PMID:6309667

  13. Superinfection exclusion is absent during acute Junin virus infection of Vero and A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, Raphaël; Kirchhausen, Tomas

    2015-11-09

    Many viruses have evolved strategies of so-called "superinfection exclusion" to prevent re-infection of a cell that the same virus has already infected. Although Old World arenavirus infection results in down-regulation of its viral receptor and thus superinfection exclusion, whether New World arenaviruses have evolved such a mechanism remains unclear. Here we show that acute infection by the New World Junin virus (JUNV) failed to down-regulate the transferrin receptor and did not induce superinfection exclusion. We observed that Vero cells infected by a first round of JUNV (Candid1 strain) preserve an ability to internalize new incoming JUNV particles that is comparable to that of non-infected cells. Moreover, we developed a dual infection assay with the wild-type Candid1 JUNV and a recombinant JUNV-GFP virus to discriminate between first and second infections at the transcriptional and translational levels. We found that Vero and A549 cells already infected by JUNV were fully competent to transcribe viral RNA from a second round of infection. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis of viral protein expression indicated that viral translation was normal, regardless of whether cells were previously infected or not. We conclude that in acutely infected cells, Junin virus lacks a superinfection exclusion mechanism.

  14. Superinfection exclusion is absent during acute Junin virus infection of Vero and A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaudin, Raphaël; Kirchhausen, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Many viruses have evolved strategies of so-called “superinfection exclusion” to prevent re-infection of a cell that the same virus has already infected. Although Old World arenavirus infection results in down-regulation of its viral receptor and thus superinfection exclusion, whether New World arenaviruses have evolved such a mechanism remains unclear. Here we show that acute infection by the New World Junin virus (JUNV) failed to down-regulate the transferrin receptor and did not induce superinfection exclusion. We observed that Vero cells infected by a first round of JUNV (Candid1 strain) preserve an ability to internalize new incoming JUNV particles that is comparable to that of non-infected cells. Moreover, we developed a dual infection assay with the wild-type Candid1 JUNV and a recombinant JUNV-GFP virus to discriminate between first and second infections at the transcriptional and translational levels. We found that Vero and A549 cells already infected by JUNV were fully competent to transcribe viral RNA from a second round of infection. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis of viral protein expression indicated that viral translation was normal, regardless of whether cells were previously infected or not. We conclude that in acutely infected cells, Junin virus lacks a superinfection exclusion mechanism. PMID:26549784

  15. Tacaribe Virus but Not Junin Virus Infection Induces Cytokine Release from Primary Human Monocytes and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Groseth, Allison; Hoenen, Thomas; Weber, Michaela; Wolff, Svenja; Herwig, Astrid; Kaufmann, Andreas; Becker, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the development of disease during arenavirus infection are poorly understood. However, common to all hemorrhagic fever diseases is the involvement of macrophages as primary target cells, suggesting that the immune response in these cells may be of paramount importance during infection. Thus, in order to identify features of the immune response that contribute to arenavirus pathogenesis, we have examined the growth kinetics and cytokine profiles of two closely related New World arenaviruses, the apathogenic Tacaribe virus (TCRV) and the hemorrhagic fever-causing Junin virus (JUNV), in primary human monocytes and macrophages. Both viruses grew robustly in VeroE6 cells; however, TCRV titres were decreased by approximately 10 fold compared to JUNV in both monocytes and macrophages. Infection of both monocytes and macrophages with TCRV also resulted in the release of high levels of IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α, while levels of IFN-α, IFN-β and IL-12 were not affected. However, we could show that the presence of these cytokines had no direct effect on growth of either TCRV of JUNV in macrophages. Further analysis also showed that while the production of IL-6 and IL-10 are dependent on viral replication, production of TNF-α also occurs after exposure to UV-inactivated TCRV particles and is thus independent of productive virus infection. Surprisingly, JUNV infection did not have an effect on any of the cytokines examined indicating that, in contrast to other viral hemorrhagic fever viruses, macrophage-derived cytokine production is unlikely to play an active role in contributing to the cytokine dysregulation observed in JUNV infected patients. Rather, these results suggest that an early, controlled immune response by infected macrophages may be critical for the successful control of infection of apathogenic viruses and prevention of subsequent disease, including systemic cytokine dysregulation. PMID:21572983

  16. Evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies to Junin virus in rodents.

    PubMed

    Morales, María A; Calderón, Gladys E; Riera, Laura M; Ambrosio, Ana M; Enría, Delia A; Sabattini, Marta S

    2002-05-01

    Junin virus is the etiological agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever, a serious rodent-borne disease. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect Junin virus IgG antibodies in rodents was evaluated using sera from 27 Calomys musculinus and five Calomys laucha, inoculated experimentally with a live attenuated strain of this arenavirus. The test performance was compared against an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The ELISA had a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and a reproducibility of 87.9% for samples with titers above the selected cut-off value. IFA had lower sensitivity (53%) with the same specificity. The ELISA results were similar, whether carried out on whole blood or serum samples, thus eliminating the need for serum separation. A high correlation (K=0.86) between ELISA and IFA results was obtained from 1011 wild sigmodontine and murine rodents collected within and outside of the Argentine hemorrhagic fever endemic area. These results indicate that Junin virus IgG ELISA is the most suitable assay for detection of Junin virus antibodies in rodent samples.

  17. [Sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA Kit for the detection of antidobies to Junin virus].

    PubMed

    Pirozhkov, A P; Timofeev, M A; Borisevich, I V; Syromiatnikova, S I; Shatokhina, I V; Pantyukhov, V B; Kovalchuk, A V; Borisevich, S V

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this work was to describe methodological approaches to determination of sensitivity and specificity of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit (ELISA Kit) for detection of the specific anti-Junin virus (JV) antibody. Comparison of ELISA to plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) showed direct relationship between antibody titers in the samples of serum of immunized animals, determined by either PRNT or ELISA methods. The obtained results provided an opportunity to form the panels of positive and negative serum samples to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA Kit. Sensitivity of the ELISA Kit was at least 98% when studying the samples of serum of immunized guinea pigs and rabbits (determined as positive in PRNT). The sensitivity of the ELISA Kit was at least 68% when studying the samples determined by PNRT as uncertain positive. The specificity was 98%. The specificity of the ELISA Kit was 98%.

  18. Suppressor T-cell population induced by Junin virus in adult mice.

    PubMed Central

    Campetella, O E; Barrios, H A; Galassi, N V

    1988-01-01

    Intracerebral (i.c.) Junin virus (JV) infection of adult BALB/c mice is characterized by the absence of morbidity and a low mortality (barely 8-10%). In contrast, the suckling mouse model exhibits almost 100% mortality following central nervous system (CNS) alterations consistent with a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH)-like immune response. Besides, JV infection of adult (resistant) mice leads to immunosuppression of DTH to unrelated antigens. Here we present evidence demonstrating that such suppression is mediated by JV-induced cells present in spleen from 24 hr to 24 days post-infection, bearing the Thy-1+, Ly-1+2- phenotype and reactive to an unrelated antigen such as sheep red blood cells (SRBC). No evidence of suppressor factors was found. A relatively low number of total splenic cells (5 x 10(6) cells/mouse) was enough to transfer suppression. Therefore, this cell population may be involved in adult mouse survival to JV infection. PMID:2970429

  19. RIG-I enhanced interferon independent apoptosis upon Junin virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kolokoltsova, Olga A; Grant, Ashley M; Huang, Cheng; Smith, Jennifer K; Poussard, Allison L; Tian, Bing; Brasier, Allan R; Peters, Clarence J; Tseng, Chien-Te Kent; de la Torre, Juan C; Paessler, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Junin virus (JUNV) is the etiological agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), a human disease with a high case-fatality rate. It is widely accepted that arenaviral infections, including JUNV infections, are generally non-cytopathic. In contrast, here we demonstrated apoptosis induction in human lung epithelial carcinoma (A549), human hepatocarcinoma and Vero cells upon infection with the attenuated Candid#1 strain of, JUNV as determined by phosphatidylserine (PS) translocation, Caspase 3 (CASP3) activation, Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and/or chromosomal DNA fragmentation. Moreover, as determined by DNA fragmentation, we found that the pathogenic Romero strain of JUNV was less cytopathic than Candid#1 in human hepatocarcinoma and Vero, but more apoptotic in A549 and Vero E6 cells. Additionally, we found that JUNV-induced apoptosis was enhanced by RIG-I signaling. Consistent with the previously reported role of RIG-I like helicase (RLH) signaling in initiating programmed cell death, we showed that cell death or DNA fragmentation of Candid#1-infected A549 cells was decreased upon siRNA or shRNA silencing of components of RIG-I pathway in spite of increased virus production. Similarly, we observed decreased DNA fragmentation in JUNV-infected human hepatocarcinoma cells deficient for RIG-I when compared with that of RIG-I-competent cells. In addition, DNA fragmentation detected upon Candid#1 infection of type I interferon (IFN)-deficient Vero cells suggested a type I IFN-independent mechanism of apoptosis induction in response to JUNV. Our work demonstrated for the first time apoptosis induction in various cells of mammalian origin in response to JUNV infection and partial mechanism of this cell death.

  20. Genetic diversity of the Junin virus in Argentina: geographic and temporal patterns.

    PubMed

    García, J B; Morzunov, S P; Levis, S; Rowe, J; Calderón, G; Enría, D; Sabattini, M; Buchmeier, M J; Bowen, M D; St Jeor, S C

    2000-06-20

    RNA was purified from 39 strains of cell-cultured Junin virus (JUN) from central Argentina, which included both human- and rodent-derived isolates (a total of 26 and 13, respectively), as well as from 2 laboratory JUN strains, XJ Cl3 and XJ #44. JUN-specific primers were used to amplify a 511-nucleotide (nt) fragment of the nucleocapsid protein gene and a 495-nt fragment of the glycoprotein 1 (GP1) gene. Genetic diversity among JUN strains studied was up to 13% at the nt level and up to 9% at the amino acid (aa) level for the GP1 gene and up to 9% (nt) and 4% (aa) for the NP gene. Phylogenetic analyses of both genes revealed three distinct clades. The first clade was composed of the JUN strains from the center of the endemic area and included the majority of JUN strains analyzed in the current study. The second clade contained 4 JUN strains isolated between 1963 and 1971 from Cordoba Province, the western-most edge of the known endemic area. The third clade contained 4 JUN strains that originated from Calomys musculinus trapped in Zarate, the northeastern edge of the known endemic area. Certain JUN sequences, which were obtained from GenBank and identified as XJ, XJ #44, and Candid #1 strains, appeared to form a separate clade. Over 400 nt of the GP1 and GP2 genes were additionally sequenced for 7 JUN strains derived from patients with different clinical presentations and outcomes of Argentine hemorrhagic fever. Analysis of the corresponding aa sequences did not allow us to attribute any particular genetic marker to the changing severity or clinical form of the human disease.

  1. Tests in mice of a dengue vaccine candidate made of chimeric Junin virus-like particles and conserved dengue virus envelope sequences.

    PubMed

    Mareze, Vania Aparecida; Borio, Cristina Silvia; Bilen, Marcos F; Fleith, Renata; Mirazo, Santiago; Mansur, Daniel Santos; Arbiza, Juan; Lozano, Mario Enrique; Bruña-Romero, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Two new vaccine candidates against dengue virus (DENV) infection were generated by fusing the coding sequences of the self-budding Z protein from Junin virus (Z-JUNV) to those of two cryptic peptides (Z/DENV-P1 and Z/DENV-P2) conserved on the envelope protein of all serotypes of DENV. The capacity of these chimeras to generate virus-like particles (VLPs) and to induce virus-neutralizing antibodies in mice was determined. First, recombinant proteins that displayed reactivity with a Z-JUNV-specific serum by immunofluorescence were detected in HEK-293 cells transfected with each of the two plasmids and VLP formation was also observed by transmission electron microscopy. Next, we determined the presence of antibodies against the envelope peptides of DENV in the sera of immunized C57BL/6 mice. Results showed that those animals that received Z/DENV-P2 DNA coding sequences followed by a boost with DENV-P2 synthetic peptides elicited significant specific antibody titers (≥6.400). Finally, DENV plaque-reduction neutralization tests (PRNT) were performed. Although no significant protective effect was observed when using sera of Z/DENV-P1-immunized animals, antibodies raised against vaccine candidate Z/DENV-P2 (diluted 1:320) were able to reduce in over 50 % the number of viral plaques generated by infectious DENV particles. This reduction was comparable to that of the 4G2 DENV-specific monoclonal cross-reactive (all serotypes) neutralizing antibody. We conclude that Z-JUNV-VLP is a valid carrier to induce antibody-mediated immune responses in mice and that Z/DENV-P2 is not only immunogenic but also protective in vitro against infection of cells with DENV, deserving further studies. On the other side, DENV's fusion peptide-derived chimera Z/DENV-P1 did not display similar protective properties.

  2. Machupo Virus Expressing GPC of the Candid#1 Vaccine Strain of Junin Virus Is Highly Attenuated and Immunogenic

    PubMed Central

    Koma, Takaaki; Patterson, Michael; Huang, Cheng; Seregin, Alexey V.; Maharaj, Payal D.; Miller, Milagros; Smith, Jeanon N.; Walker, Aida G.; Hallam, Steven

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Machupo virus (MACV) is the causative agent of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever. Our previous study demonstrated that a MACV strain with a single amino acid substitution (F438I) in the transmembrane domain of glycoprotein is attenuated but genetically unstable in mice. MACV is closely related to Junin virus (JUNV), the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever. Others and our group have identified the glycoprotein to be the major viral factor determining JUNV attenuation. In this study, we tested the compatibility of the glycoprotein of the Candid#1 live-attenuated vaccine strain of JUNV in MACV replication and its ability to attenuate MACV in vivo. Recombinant MACV with the Candid#1 glycoprotein (rMACV/Cd#1-GPC) exhibited growth properties similar to those of Candid#1 and was genetically stable in vitro. In a mouse model of lethal infection, rMACV/Cd#1-GPC was fully attenuated, more immunogenic than Candid#1, and fully protective against MACV infection. Therefore, the MACV strain expressing the glycoprotein of Candid#1 is safe, genetically stable, and highly protective against MACV infection in a mouse model. IMPORTANCE Currently, there are no FDA-approved vaccines and/or treatments for Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, which is a fatal human disease caused by MACV. The development of antiviral strategies to combat viral hemorrhagic fevers, including Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, is one of the top priorities of the Implementation Plan of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that MACV expressing glycoprotein of Candid#1 is a safe, genetically stable, highly immunogenic, and protective vaccine candidate against Bolivian hemorrhagic fever. PMID:26581982

  3. In vitro inactivation of complement by a serum factor present in Junin-virus infected guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Rimoldi, M T; de Bracco, M M

    1980-01-01

    A serum factor(s) of guinea-pigs infected with Junin virus, the etiological agent of Argentine haemorrhagic fever, is endowed with a potent anticomplementary activity. It is resistant to heat (56 degrees, 30 min) and elutes from a Sephadex G-200 column between albumin and haemoglobin. It is ineffective in the presence of EDTA or EGTA and does not sediment at 82,000 g. It has no direct effect on C4 unless functional Cl is present. However, it induces Cl activation that consumes C4 haemolytic activity in normal human and guinea-pig sera. The evidence presented in this report demonstrates that the complement activation observed in experimental Argentine haemorrhagic fever is at least in part due to a direct effect of this serum factor on the classical complement pathway. PMID:6247264

  4. Cleavage of the Junin Virus Nucleoprotein Serves a Decoy Function To Inhibit the Induction of Apoptosis during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Svenja; Groseth, Allison

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of apoptosis during infection is an important factor for host survival and, in some cases, also for the virus life cycle. At the same time, mechanisms to prevent the induction of apoptosis have been observed in numerous viral pathogens, but until now the role of apoptosis during arenavirus infection has not been investigated. Junin virus (JUNV) belongs to the New World arenavirus serogroup of the Arenaviridae and is the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever. We have demonstrated that infection with JUNV in cell culture does not induce apoptosis but leads to cleavage of the nucleoprotein (NP) into discrete products resembling caspase cleavage events. Similar specific NP degradation patterns were also observed in NP-transfected cell lines, and a closer examination of the sequence of NP showed several putative caspase cleavage motifs. Point mutations that abolished these cleavage motifs were consistent with the loss of certain cleavage products. Consistent with these data, further studies showed that treatment with a caspase inhibitor also reduced NP cleavage, indicating that the observed cleavage events were occurring as a result of caspase activity with NP as a substrate. Finally, we showed that expression of NP suppresses the cleavage of caspase 3 in cells treated with an apoptosis activator. Based on these findings, we propose that NP functions as a decoy substrate for caspase cleavage in order to inhibit the induction of apoptosis in JUNV-infected cells. PMID:23077297

  5. Evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for quantitation of antibodies to Junin virus in human sera.

    PubMed

    García Franco, S; Ambrosio, A M; Feuillade, M R; Maiztegui, J I

    1988-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was evaluated for the quantitation of anti-Junin virus (JV) antibodies, in 83 selected cases of Argentine haemorrhagic fever (AHF). Serum samples were studied in two groups to facilitate comparative analysis; the first group was ELISA with indirect immunofluorescence (IF) test, in the second ELISA with plaque reduction neutralization test (PRINT). From the results obtained by using ELISA and IF on the same serum samples, a clear tendency of ELISA to demonstrate seroconversion for JV earlier and at higher frequency than IF test was noted. Simultaneous titration of specific antibodies by ELISA and PRNT tests rendered significantly correlated titers (r = 0.81), both methods being equivalently specific (100%). The demonstration of specific antibodies by ELISA in two cases that were undetected by the PRNT test resulted in a higher sensitivity index for ELISA than for PRNT (100% vs 97%). It is concluded that ELISA could efficiently replace IF and PRNT tests for the diagnosis of AHF.

  6. [New findings on Junin virus infection in rodents inside and outside the endemic area of hemorrhagic fever in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Mills, J N; Calderón, G E; Ellis, B A; McKee, K T; Ksiazek, T G; Oro, J G; Peters, C J; Childs, J E; Maiztegui, J I

    1991-01-01

    In conjunction with field trials for a vaccine against Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever (AHF), small mammals were trapped during a 28-month period (1 November 1987 to 13 March 1990) in 3 epidemiologically defined areas of the central Argentine pampas: northern and central Buenos Aires provinces were included in the AHF "historic" area, where the disease was common 15-20 years ago, but case rates are currently low; southern Santa Fe province is the current high-incidence area for AHF; the nonendemic area was represented by two localities 60-90 km beyond the northernmost extension of human disease. Animals were live-trapped for 3 days per month in permanent "mark-recapture" grids in each of the 3 areas. Samples of blood, sera, and oral swabs were taken from these animals before they were marked and released at the site of capture. In addition, "removal" traplines provided animals from 16 localities in these 3 areas which were sacrificed to obtain samples of organs in addition to the aforementioned samples. Samples were tested for the presence of Junin virus (JV) antigen by enzyme immunoassay (ELISA). In this assay, a pool of 13 mouse anti-JV glycoprotein and nucleocapsid monoclonal antibodies adsorbed to the surface of microtiter plates was used to capture JV antigen in sample suspensions. A polyclonal rabbit anti-JV antiserum was added as a detector antibody, and an anti-rabbit antibody conjugated to horseradish peroxidase applied with substrate to complete the sandwich.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. [New transmission scenarios of the Argentine hemorrhagic fever since the introduction of the live attenuated junin virus vaccine (Candid #1): an experience in migrant workers].

    PubMed

    Briggiler, Ana; Sinchi, Anabel; Coronel, Florencia; Sánchez, Zaida; Levis, Silvana; Taylor, Jorge; Enria, Delia

    2015-01-01

    The Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF) is a severe acute viral disease caused by the Junin virus of the Arenaviridae family. The AHF endemic area coincides geographically with the largest grain export agro-industrial complex of the country [Argentina]. Since the implementation of vaccination with the Candid #1 vaccine, a significant reduction in incidence was achieved and risk patterns were modified. A previous study allowed characterizing these changes and identifying three transmission scenarios: classic, emergent-reemergent, and traveler. The latter scenario includes seasonal migrant workers who move each year, mainly from the province of Santiago del Estero, the endemic area to work in the detasseling of maize. With the objective of protecting this group of workers, a prevention campaign was initiated which included: capacity building of health personnel in the province, health education, and immunization with the vaccine Candid #1. 3,021 workers were vaccinated. Prior to vaccination, serum samples were taken from a group of 104 volunteers. Tests for neutralizing antibodies specific to the Junin virus were performed and 6 (5.76%) tested positive. The unexpected finding of a high percentage of workers with antibodies suggests the need to evaluate several hypotheses: a) that the result is the product of non-probabilistic sampling; b) that it could be people who fell ill in previous travels, c) or who were vaccinated in previous travels; or d) consider this region as an emerging scenario.

  8. The Ectodomain of Glycoprotein from the Candid#1 Vaccine Strain of Junin Virus Rendered Machupo Virus Partially Attenuated in Mice Lacking IFN-αβ/γ Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Koma, Takaaki; Huang, Cheng; Aronson, Judith F.; Walker, Aida G.; Miller, Milagros; Smith, Jeanon N.; Patterson, Michael; Paessler, Slobodan

    2016-01-01

    Machupo virus (MACV), a New World arenavirus, is the etiological agent of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever (BHF). Junin virus (JUNV), a close relative, causes Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF). Previously, we reported that a recombinant, chimeric MACV (rMACV/Cd#1-GPC) expressing glycoprotein from the Candid#1 (Cd#1) vaccine strain of JUNV is completely attenuated in a murine model and protects animals from lethal challenge with MACV. A rMACV with a single F438I substitution in the transmembrane domain (TMD) of GPC, which is equivalent to the F427I attenuating mutation in Cd#1 GPC, was attenuated in a murine model but genetically unstable. In addition, the TMD mutation alone was not sufficient to fully attenuate JUNV, indicating that other domains of the GPC may also contribute to the attenuation. To investigate the requirement of different domains of Cd#1 GPC for successful attenuation of MACV, we rescued several rMACVs expressing the ectodomain of GPC from Cd#1 either alone (MCg1), along with the TMD F438I substitution (MCg2), or with the TMD of Cd#1 (MCg3). All rMACVs exhibited similar growth curves in cultured cells. In mice, the MCg1 displayed significant reduction in lethality as compared with rMACV. The MCg1 was detected in brains and spleens of MCg1-infected mice and the infection was associated with tissue inflammation. On the other hand, all animals survived MCg2 and MCg3 infection without detectable levels of virus in various organs while producing neutralizing antibody against Cd#1. Overall our data suggest the indispensable role of each GPC domain in the full attenuation and immunogenicity of rMACV/Cd#1 GPC. PMID:27580122

  9. Collective Infectious Units in Viruses.

    PubMed

    Sanjuán, Rafael

    2017-03-03

    Increasing evidence indicates that viruses do not simply propagate as independent virions among cells, organs, and hosts. Instead, viral spread is often mediated by structures that simultaneously transport groups of viral genomes, such as polyploid virions, aggregates of virions, virion-containing proteinaceous structures, secreted lipid vesicles, and virus-induced cell-cell contacts. These structures increase the multiplicity of infection, independently of viral population density and transmission bottlenecks. Collective infectious units may contribute to the maintenance of viral genetic diversity, and could have implications for the evolution of social-like virus-virus interactions. These may include various forms of cooperation such as immunity evasion, genetic complementation, division of labor, and relaxation of fitness trade-offs, but also noncooperative interactions such as negative dominance and interference, potentially leading to conflict.

  10. Safety and Immunogenicity of a Live-Attenuated Junin (Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever) Vaccine in Rhesus Macaques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    virus from animals in every dose group. vetted 1-2.5 weeks after initial virus recovery. That the viruses recovered were Junin virus is certain: all...wild-type strains (LI 1.25). When vivo neutralization and virus clearance are com- we used this system to examine viruses recovered plex and multi...Fredertcktfarniand Abstract. The safety and immunogenicity of Candid #1. a live-attenuated Junin- virus vaccine, were evaluated in rhesus macaques. Candid #1 was

  11. Infectious laryngotracheitis virus in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Shan-Chia; Giambrone, Joseph J

    2012-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an important respiratory disease of chickens and annually causes significant economic losses in the poultry industry world-wide. ILT virus (ILTV) belongs to alphaherpesvirinae and the Gallid herpesvirus 1 species. The transmission of ILTV is via respiratory and ocular routes. Clinical and post-mortem signs of ILT can be separated into two forms according to its virulence. The characteristic of the severe form is bloody mucus in the trachea with high mortality. The mild form causes nasal discharge, conjunctivitis, and reduced weight gain and egg production. Conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), nested PCR, real-time PCR, and loop-mediated isothermal amplification were developed to detect ILTV samples from natural or experimentally infected birds. The PCR combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) can separate ILTVs into several genetic groups. These groups can separate vaccine from wild type field viruses. Vaccination is a common method to prevent ILT. However, field isolates and vaccine viruses can establish latent infected carriers. According to PCR-RFLP results, virulent field ILTVs can be derived from modified-live vaccines. Therefore, modified-live vaccine reversion provides a source for ILT outbreaks on chicken farms. Two recently licensed commercial recombinant ILT vaccines are also in use. Other recombinant and gene-deficient vaccine candidates are in the developmental stages. They offer additional hope for the control of this disease. However, in ILT endemic regions, improved biosecurity and management practices are critical for improved ILT control. PMID:24175219

  12. [EXPERIENCE OF STUDY AND POSSIBLE WAYS OF ELIMINATION OF FALSE POSITIVE AND FALSE NEGATIVE RESULTS DURING EXECUTION OF POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION ON AN EXAMPLE OF JUNIN VIRUS RNA DETECTION].

    PubMed

    Sizikova, T E; Lebedev, V N; Pantyukhov, V B; Borisevich, S V; Merkulov, V A

    2015-01-01

    Experience of study and possible ways of elimination of false positive and false negative results during execution of polymerase chain reaction on an example of Junin virus RNA detection. MATERIALSS AND METHODS: Junin virus--causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF) strain XJpR37/5787 was obtained from the State collection of pathogenicity group I causative agents of the 48th Central Research Institute. Reagent kit for detection of Junin virus RNA by RT-PCR was developed in the Institute and consists of 4 sets: for isolation of RNA, execution of reverse-transcription reaction, execution of PCR and electrophoretic detection of PCR products. RT-PCR was carried out by a standard technique. Continuous cell cultures of African green monkey Vero B, GMK-AH-1(D) were obtained from the museum of cell culture department of the Centre. An experimental study of the effect of various factors of impact on the sample under investigation ("thawing-freezing", presence of formaldehyde, heparin) on the obtaining of false negative results during Junin virus RNA detection by using RT-PCR was studied. Addition of 0.01% heparin to the samples was shown to completely inhibit PCR. Addition of 0.05% formaldehyde significantly reduces sensitivity of the method. A possibility of reduction of analysis timeframe from 15 to 5 days was shown during detection of the causative agent in samples with low concentration of the latter by growing the samples and subsequent analysis of the material obtained by using RT-PCR. During detection of causative agent by using RT-PCR false negative results could appear in the presence of formaldehyde and heparin in the sample. A possibility of elimination of false negative PCR results due to concentration of the causative agent in the sample under investigation at a level below sensitivity threshold was shown on the example of Junin virus RNA detection by using growing of the pathogen in appropriate accumulation system with subsequent analysis of the

  13. Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus: Chapter 2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leong, Jo-Ann; Kurath, Gael

    2017-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a Rhabdovirus that causes significant disease in Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and rainbow and steelhead trout (O. mykiss). IHNV causes necrosis of the haematopoietic tissues, and consequently it was named infectious haematopoietic necrosis. This virus is waterborne and may transmit horizontally and vertically through virus associated with seminal and ovarian fluids. The clinical signs of disease and diagnosis; pathology; pathophysiology; and control strategies against IHNV are discussed.

  14. Coronavirus avian infectious bronchitis virus.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Dave

    2007-01-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), the coronavirus of the chicken (Gallus gallus), is one of the foremost causes of economic loss within the poultry industry, affecting the performance of both meat-type and egg-laying birds. The virus replicates not only in the epithelium of upper and lower respiratory tract tissues, but also in many tissues along the alimentary tract and elsewhere e.g. kidney, oviduct and testes. It can be detected in both respiratory and faecal material. There is increasing evidence that IBV can infect species of bird other than the chicken. Interestingly breeds of chicken vary with respect to the severity of infection with IBV, which may be related to the immune response. Probably the major reason for the high profile of IBV is the existence of a very large number of serotypes. Both live and inactivated IB vaccines are used extensively, the latter requiring priming by the former. Their effectiveness is diminished by poor cross-protection. The nature of the protective immune response to IBV is poorly understood. What is known is that the surface spike protein, indeed the amino-terminal S1 half, is sufficient to induce good protective immunity. There is increasing evidence that only a few amino acid differences amongst S proteins are sufficient to have a detrimental impact on cross-protection. Experimental vector IB vaccines and genetically manipulated IBVs--with heterologous spike protein genes--have produced promising results, including in the context of in ovo vaccination.

  15. Enhanced detection of infectious airborne influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Blachere, Francoise M; Cao, Gang; Lindsley, William G; Noti, John D; Beezhold, Donald H

    2011-09-01

    Current screening methodologies for detecting infectious airborne influenza virus are limited and lack sensitivity. To increase the sensitivity for detecting infectious influenza virus in an aerosol sample, the viral replication assay was developed. With this assay, influenza virus is first amplified by replication in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells followed by detection with quantitative PCR (qPCR). Spanning a 20-h replication period, matrix gene expression levels from infectious virus were measured at several time points using qPCR and found to exponentially increase. Compared with the traditional culture-based viral plaque assay, the viral replication assay resulted in a 4.6 × 10(5) fold increase in influenza virus detection. Furthermore, viral replication assay results were obtained in half the time of the viral plaque assay. To demonstrate that the viral replication assay is capable of detecting airborne influenza virus, dilute preparations of strain A/WS/33 were loaded into a nebulizer, aerosolized within a calm-air settling chamber and subsequently collected using NIOSH Two-Stage Bioaerosol Samplers. At the most diluted concentration corresponding to a chicken embryo infectious dose 50% endpoint (CEID(50)) of 2.8E+02/ml, the viral replication assay was able to detect infectious influenza virus that was otherwise undetectable by viral plaque assay. The results obtained demonstrate that the viral replication assay is highly sensitive at detecting infectious influenza virus from aerosol samples. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Infectious Viral Quantification of Chikungunya Virus-Virus Plaque Assay.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Parveen; Lee, Regina Ching Hua; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2016-01-01

    The plaque assay is an essential method for quantification of infectious virus titer. Cells infected with virus particles are overlaid with a viscous substrate. A suitable incubation period results in the formation of plaques, which can be fixed and stained for visualization. Here, we describe a method for measuring Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) titers via virus plaque assays.

  17. Heterotypic protection to infectious bronchitis virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We developed Newcastle disease virus (NDV) LaSota (rLS) expressing a distinct spike (S) protein gene of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV). This recombinant vaccine technology confers cross-protection among different IBV strains. We also experimentally demonstrated that the recombinant construct main...

  18. Thermal inactivation of infectious hematopoietic necrosis and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gosting, L.; Gould, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A plaque assay was used to follow the inactivation kinetics of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus in cell culture media at various temperatures. Inactivation of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in a visceral organ slurry was compared with that in culture media.

  19. Tomato chlorosis virus and Tomato infectious chlorosis virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This presentation will help consultants, growers, and other practitioners in the Southern and Western Regions of the US, as well as Mexico and the Caribbean identify and manage Tomato infectious chlorosis virus (TICV) and Tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV) in tomato. Information will directly benefit cr...

  20. THE VIRUS OF INFECTIOUS FELINE AGRANULOCYTOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Syverton, J. T.; Lawrence, J. S.; Ackart, R. J.; Adams, W. S.; Ervin, D. M.; Haskins, A. L.; Saunders, R. H.; Stringfellow, M. B.; Wetrich, R. M.

    1943-01-01

    Thirty-two strains of an infectious filterable agent, with properties that establish it as a virus, have been isolated from a malady of cats. This disease can be readily recognized and differentiated from other feline diseases by blood studies, which make apparent the characteristic profound leucopenia and marked relative lymphocytosis in the absence of thrombopenia and appreciable anemia. (Because the cytological pictures of the bone marrow and blood are essentially similar to those which characterize human agranulocytosis, we have named the disease under study "infectious feline agranulocytosis.") The cytological reaction to the presence of the virus is further characterized by proliferation of the reticuloendothelial cells of the lymph nodes and spleen, and by the formation of intranuclear inclusion bodies in the cells of the gastro-intestinal mucosa, lymph nodes, and bronchial mucosa. The etiological agent, the virus of infectious feline agranulocytosis, is pathogenic for cats when given by the oral, intragastric, cutaneous, subcutaneous, intraperitoneal, intravenous, and intranasal routes; it can be recovered at the height of the disease from the blood, spleen, liver, lung, intestinal mucosa, nasal secretions, nasal mucosa and turbinates, feces, and urine. The virus appears to be limited in its pathogenicity to the feline species. We found that a variety of animals, as represented by albino Swiss mice, guinea pigs, domestic rabbits, and ground squirrels (Citellus richardsonii Sabine), failed entirely to react to the injection of massive doses of virus. Repeated attempts at infection of these animals regularly failed when the intranasal, intraperitoneal, subcutaneous, and intramuscular routes of inoculation were employed for single doses. The same was true when from four to six transfers in "blind" serial tissue passages were made. Moreover, attempts to propagate the virus on the chorio-allantoic membrane of the developing chick were unsuccessful. The

  1. Ribonucleoprotein of avian infectious bronchitis virus.

    PubMed

    Davies, H A; Dourmashkin, R R; Macnaughton, M R

    1981-03-01

    The ribonucleoprotein (RNP) of avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) was examined by electron microscopy after shadowing with carbon/platinum. Linear RNP strands up to 6.7 microns in length, from three IVB strains, were sensitive to both pancreatic RNase and to proteases. These strands were obtained from spontaneously disrupted complete particles but not from disrupted incomplete particles that lacked RNP. They were also released from Nonidet P40-disrupted particles and could be isolated on sucrose density gradients at a density of 1.27 g/ml. In some cases, helical RNP complexes associated with virus particles were observed that were similar to RNPs of human coronavirus strain 229E and mouse hepatitis virus strain 3.

  2. Rescue from Cloned cDNAs and In Vivo Characterization of Recombinant Pathogenic Romero and Live-Attenuated Candid #1 Strains of Junin Virus, the Causative Agent of Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever Disease ▿

    PubMed Central

    Emonet, Sebastien F.; Seregin, Alexey V.; Yun, Nadezhda E.; Poussard, Allison L.; Walker, Aida G.; de la Torre, Juan C.; Paessler, Slobodan

    2011-01-01

    The New World arenavirus Junin virus (JUNV) is the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), which is associated with high morbidity and significant mortality. Several pathogenic strains of JUNV have been documented, and a highly attenuated vaccine strain (Candid #1) was generated and used to vaccinate the human population at risk. The identification and functional characterization of viral genetic determinants associated with AHF and Candid #1 attenuation would contribute to the elucidation of the mechanisms contributing to AHF and the development of better vaccines and therapeutics. To this end, we used reverse genetics to rescue the pathogenic Romero and the attenuated Candid #1 strains of JUNV from cloned cDNAs. Both recombinant Candid #1 (rCandid #1) and Romero (rRomero) had the same growth properties and phenotypic features in cultured cells and in vivo as their corresponding parental viruses. Infection with rRomero caused 100% lethality in guinea pigs, whereas rCandid #1 infection was asymptomatic and provided protection against a lethal challenge with Romero. Notably, Romero and Candid #1 trans-acting proteins, L and NP, required for virus RNA replication and gene expression were exchangeable in a minigenome rescue assay. These findings support the feasibility of studies aimed at determining the contribution of each viral gene to JUNV pathogenesis and attenuation. In addition, we rescued Candid #1 viruses with three segments that efficiently expressed foreign genes introduced into their genomes. This finding opens the way for the development of a safe multivalent arenavirus vaccine. PMID:21123388

  3. Inactivated infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) vaccines.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E; Clouthier, S; Shewmaker, W; Weighall, A; LaPatra, S

    2008-10-01

    The inactivation dynamics of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) by b-propiolactone (BPL), binary ethylenimine (BEI), formaldehyde or heat and the antigenic and immunogenic properties of the inactivated vaccines were evaluated. Chemical treatment of IHNV with 2.7 mm BPL, 1.5 mm BEI or 50 mm formaldehyde abolished virus infectivity within 48 h whereas heat treatment at 50 or 100 degrees C rendered the virus innocuous within 30 min. The inactivated IHNV vaccines were recognized by rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, IHNV-specific antibodies and were differentially recognized by antigenic site I or antigenic site II IHNV glycoprotein-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. The BPL inactivated whole virus vaccine was highly efficacious in vaccinated rainbow trout challenged by waterborne exposure to IHNV 7, 28, 42 or 56 days (15 degrees C) after immunization. The formaldehyde inactivated whole virus vaccine was efficacious 7 or 11 days after vaccination of rainbow trout but performed inconsistently when tested at later time points. The other vaccines tested were not efficacious.

  4. Carriers of equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Coggins, L

    1984-02-01

    Presently available data continue to support the idea that once a horse is infected with equine infectious anemia virus it remains infected indefinitely. Infection may not always be demonstrated by inoculation of plasma, serum, or whole blood transfusions into susceptible recipients, but transfusions of fresh whole blood will be infective in at least 95% of the horses testing positive in the agar gel immunodiffusion test. For detection of infectivity in a small percentage of inapparent carriers, it appears necessary to inoculate washed leukocytes collected over a period of time.

  5. Newcastle disease virus as a vaccine vector for infectious laryngotracheitis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Effective, safe, and incapable of reverting to virulence are characteristics desirable for infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) vaccines. Recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) expressing foreign antigens of avian and mammalian pathogens have been demonstrated to elicit protective immunity....

  6. Equine Infectious Anemia Virus from Infected Horse Serum

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hideo; Yoshino, Tomoo; Ushimi, Chuzo

    1974-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus was purified from infected horse serum samples. Electron microscope observation on negatively stained preparations of purified virus showed roughly spherical particles sized between 100 and 200 nm in diameter. In disrupted particles, an envelope was visible but no internal structure could be resolved. Since the purified virus fraction had a strong antigenic activity to antiserum in immunodiffusion reaction, these particles are thought to be the causative virus of equine infectious anemia. Images PMID:4372175

  7. Evolution of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISA virus).

    PubMed

    Plarre, Heidrun; Nylund, Are; Karlsen, Marius; Brevik, Øyvind; Sæther, Per Anton; Vike, Siri

    2012-12-01

    Infectious salmon anaemia virus, ISA virus (genus Isavirus, family Orthomyxoviridae), emerged in Norwegian salmon culture in the mid-80s. The genome consists of eight segments coding for at least 10 proteins. ISA viruses show many of similarities to influenza A viruses but differ in many important aspects such as the number of hosts, the host population structure and the route of transmission. The only known hosts and reservoirs for ISA viruses are salmonids found in countries surrounding the North Atlantic. In this study, four different segments of the genome of about 100 ISA viruses have been sequenced in an attempt to understand the evolution of ISA viruses and how these viruses are maintained in and transmitted between populations of farmed Atlantic salmon. The four gene segments code for the nucleoprotein (NP), the putative acid polymerase (PA), the fusion protein (F) and the haemagglutinin-esterase (HE). Analysis of these four genes showed that the substitution rates of the internal proteins (NP and PA) are lower than those of the two surface proteins (F and HE). All four segments are evolving at a lower rate than similar genes in influenza A viruses. The ISA virus populations consist of avirulent viruses and pathogenic strains with variable virulence in Atlantic salmon. Recombination resulting in inserts close to the proteolytic-cleavage site of the precursor F0 protein and deletions in the stalk region of the HE protein seem to be responsible for the transition from avirulent ISA viruses to pathogenic strains. It is also shown that reassortment is a frequent event among the dominating ISA viruses in farmed Atlantic salmon. The pattern that is obtained after phylogenetic analysis of the four gene segments from ISA viruses suggests that the variation is limited to a few distinct clades and that no major changes have occurred in the ISA virus population in Norway since the first viruses were isolated. Calculation of the time of most recent common ancestor

  8. Virulence determinants of equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Payne, Susan L; Fuller, Frederick J

    2010-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a macrophage-tropic lentivirus that rapidly Induces disease in experimentally infected horses. Because EIAV infection and replication is centered on the monocyte/macrophage and has a pronounced acute disease stage, it is a useful model system for understanding the contribution of monocyte/macrophages to other lentivirus-induced diseases. Genetic mapping studies utilizing chimeric proviruses in which parental viruses are acutely virulent or avirulent have allowed the identification of important regions that influence acute virulence. U3 regions in the viral LTR, surface envelope (SU) protein and the accessory S2 gene strongly influence acute disease expression. While the chimeric proviruses provide insight into genes or genome regions that affect viral pathogenesis, it is then necessary to further dissect those regions to focus on specific virus-host mechanisms that lead to disease expression. The V6 region of the viral env protein is an example of one identified region that may interact with the ELR-1 receptor in an important way and we are currently identifying S2 protein motifs required for disease expression.

  9. Plaquing procedure for infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burke, J.A.; Mulcahy, D.

    1980-01-01

    A single overlay plaque assay was designed and evaluated for infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus. Epithelioma papillosum carpio cells were grown in normal atmosphere with tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane- or HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid)-buffered media. Plaques were larger and formed more quickly on 1- to 3-day-old cell monolayers than on older monolayers. Cell culture medium with a 10% addition of fetal calf serum (MEM 10) or without serum (MEM 0) were the most efficient virus diluents. Dilution with phosphate-buffered saline, saline, normal broth, or deionized water reduced plaque numbers. Variations in the pH (7.0 to 8.0) of a MEM 0 diluent did not affect plaque numbers. Increasing the volume of viral inoculum above 0.15 ml (15- by 60-mm plate) decreased plaquing efficiency. Significantly more plaques occurred under gum tragacanth and methylcellulose than under agar or agarose overlays. Varying the pH (6.8 to 7.4) of methylcellulose overlays did not significantly change plaque numbers. More plaques formed under the thicker overlays of both methylcellulose and gum tragacanth. Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and HEPES performed equally well, buffering either medium or overlay. Plaque numbers were reduced when cells were rinsed after virus adsorption or less than 1 h was allowed for adsorption. Variation in adsorption time between 60 and 180 min did not change plaque numbers. The mean plaque formation time was 7 days at 16 degrees C. The viral dose response was linear when the standardized assay was used.

  10. Assembly pathway of avian infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    PubMed

    Guo, P; Scholz, E; Turek, J; Nodgreen, R; Maloney, B

    1993-12-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) is the causative agent of a highly contagious upper respiratory tract infection in chickens. At present, ILTV vaccines are not satisfactory because of development of a latent carrier status in vaccinated birds. Development of recombinant virus vaccines has been hampered by the limited information available on the molecular level and organization of this virus. We isolated 3 assembly intermediates, designated A, B, and C from ILTV-infected cells. Analysis of [3H]thymidine-and [35S]methionine-labeled particles, and electron microscopic studies indicated that particle A was the empty capsid, particle B was the procapsid containing scaffolding protein, and particle C was the DNA-filled capsid. The ILTV procapsids could only be found in the nucleus, which indicated that procapsids could not translocate through the nuclear membrane until they packaged the DNA. The DNA-filled capsids migrated through the nuclear membrane and obtained an envelope from the inner membrane of the nucleus. The enveloped particles then migrated through the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum into vacuoles in the cytoplasm. Infective virions were isolated from within the infected cells, indicating that budding through the cytoplasmic membrane is not a necessary step in ILTV maturation. Abundant arrays composed of tubules about 45 to 50 nm wide were found in the cytoplasm of chicken embryonic liver cells about 30 to 38 hours after infection. Comparison of the assembly intermediates and the DNA packaging pathway of ILTV with that of bacteriophage pi 29 indicates that similarity exists.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Morphological and quantitative comparison between infectious and non-infectious forms of influenza virus.

    PubMed

    WERNER, G H; SCHLESINGER, R W

    1954-08-01

    Electron microscopic study has revealed the morphological entity responsible for the rise in viral hemagglutinin observed in brains of mice after intracerebral inoculation of non-neurotropic strains of influenza virus. This rise in hemagglutinin, although dependent on inoculation of fully infectious virus, is not associated with an increase in infectious titer. The hemagglutinating principle is functionally similar to the "incomplete" influenza virus which can be obtained from chick embryos by serial egg-to-egg transfer of undiluted, infected allantoic fluid according to the method of von Magnus. A method has been described which facilitates selective adsorption of viral particles recovered from organ extracts on saponine-lysed ghosts of fowl erythrocytes. This procedure has been utilized in studying the morphology of non-infectious, hemagglutinating virus from chorio-allantoic membranes or mouse brains and in comparing these two forms with each other and with ordinary, infectious (standard) influenza virus. Standard virus isolated from allantoic fluids or membranes of infected eggs was found to contain uniform particles of predominantly spherical shape with smooth surface and even density, resembling those described by others. The appearance of such particles was not affected by the procedure of extraction and concentration used. In contrast, non-infectious, hemagglutinating virus obtained either from allantoic sacs ("undiluted passages") or from mouse brain was pleomorphic and seemed to consist of disintegrating particles. The majority appeared flattened and bag-like and had a rough, granular surface and reduced, uneven density. 37 per cent of the non-infectious particles isolated from mouse brain infected with the non-neurotropic strain WS had diameters in excess of 170 mmicro, as compared with only 2 per cent of the particles of the parent strain itself. Regardless of whether or not the contrast in appearance of standard and of non-infectious particles was due

  12. Licensed DNA Vaccines against Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus (IHNV).

    PubMed

    Alonso, Marta; Leong, Jo-Ann C

    2013-04-01

    This article reviews some of the recent patents on DNA vaccines against fish viruses, in particular against the novirhabdovirus infectious hematopoitic necrosis virus (IHNV). Although very effective in protecting fish against IHNV, only one DNA vaccine has been approved to date for use in Canada. In Europe and in US, its commercialization is restricted due to safety concerns.

  13. Propagation of equine infectious anemia virus in horse cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Grădinaru, D A; Stirbu, C; Păltineanu, D; Mironescu, D; Manolescu, N

    1981-01-01

    The Wyoming strain of equine infectious anemia virus was adapted to cell cultures by 7 passages in horse leukocytes and 14 passages in fetal equine dermal and kidney cells. The virus was made evident by electron microscopy and immunodiffusion tests with antigens prepared from culture fluids.

  14. Coxsackie A10 Virus Infection Among Infectious Hepatitis Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Embil, J. A.; Van Rooyen, C. E.; Nagler, F. P.

    1965-01-01

    During an outbreak of infectious hepatitis at a housing development, Coxsackie A10 virus was recovered from the stools of 45 different contacts and from the blood of four others. Caution should be exercised in attributing an etiological role to any given isolate of a Group A Coxsackie virus in view of the widespread distribution of these organisms. Nevertheless, the recovery of Coxsackie A10 viruses from the blood and stools of contacts with hepatitis cases appears to warrant record. PMID:5829398

  15. Development and characterization of an equine infectious anemia virus Env-pseudotyped reporter virus.

    PubMed

    Tallmadge, R L; Brindley, M A; Salmans, J; Mealey, R H; Maury, W; Carpenter, S

    2008-07-01

    We developed a replication-defective reporter virus pseudotyped with the envelope glycoprotein of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). The in vitro host range and neutralization phenotype of EIAV Env-pseudotyped virus were similar to those of replication-competent virus. An EIAV Env pseudovirus will improve antigenic characterization of viral variants and evaluation of lentivirus vaccines.

  16. Directed evolution of adeno-associated virus to an infectious respiratory virus

    PubMed Central

    Excoffon, Katherine J. D. A.; Koerber, James T.; Dickey, David D.; Murtha, Matthew; Keshavjee, Shaf; Kaspar, Brian K.; Zabner, Joseph; Schaffer, David V.

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory viruses evolve to maintain infectivity levels that permit spread yet prevent host and virus extinction, resulting in surprisingly low infection rates. Respiratory viruses harnessed as gene therapy vectors have illustrated this limitation. We used directed evolution in an organotypic human airway model to generate a highly infectious adeno-associated virus. This virus mediated gene transfer more than 100-fold better than parental strains and corrected the cystic fibrosis epithelial Cl− transport defect. Thus, under appropriate selective pressures, viruses can evolve to be more infectious than observed in nature, a finding that holds significant implications for designing vectors for gene therapy and for understanding emerging pathogens. PMID:19237554

  17. Studies on equine infectious anemia virus transmission by insects.

    PubMed

    Issel, C J; Foil, L D

    1984-02-01

    There are several factors involved in the mechanical transmission of equine infectious anemia (EIA) virus by insects. Large hematophagous insects, especially tabanids, which feed from extravascular sites (ie, pool feeding) appear to be the most efficient vectors. The biology of the host-seeking and blood-feeding behavior of the vectors are important variables that have been overlooked in the mechanical transmission of pathogens like EIA virus. The biology, population levels, and diversity of the vectors, in addition to the clinical status and proximity of EIA virus-infected horses maintained with susceptible animals are all important variables that contribute to EIA virus transmission in nature.

  18. Zika virus: A rapidly emerging infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Borchardt, Roy A

    2016-04-01

    Zika virus is a flavivirus transmitted to humans via the bite of infected mosquitoes. A recent outbreak in Brazil has spread to several surrounding countries, and the virus also has been reported in the United States. The virus is associated with microcephaly among newborns whose mothers were infected. Because no vaccine or treatment is available, efforts have focused on preventing mosquito bites and advising pregnant women and women trying to get pregnant to avoid active areas of Zika virus transmission. Clinicians should understand the infection, its diagnosis and testing, and monitor pregnant women for travel history to outbreak regions and for the presence of clinical symptoms. Patient education on preventive measures offers the best option to avoid Zika virus infection.

  19. Immunodiffusion Studies of Purified Equine Infectious Anemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hideo; Ushimi, Chuzo

    1971-01-01

    Antigenicity of purified equine infectious anemia (EIA) virus was examined by immunodiffusion against sera obtained from horses experimentally infected with EIA virus. The purified virus reacted with the infected horse serum, and virus-specific precipitating antibody was demonstrated. Furthermore, it was found that purified EIA virus reacted against the serum of horses infected with all strains of EIA virus which were antigenically different from one another. From the result, group-specific components of the virus rather than strain-specific ones were considered to be involved in the reaction. Serological reactivity was lost by adding antiserum from the infected horse to the antigen. The precipitating antibody usually appeared in the serum 1 to 2 weeks after the first febrile attack of EIA and remained for a longer period. Some characteristics of the purified antigen and specificity of the reaction for EIA are described. Images PMID:16557982

  20. Differential effect of acute and persistent Junin virus infections on the nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking and expression of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins type A and B.

    PubMed

    Maeto, Cynthia A; Knott, María E; Linero, Florencia N; Ellenberg, Paula C; Scolaro, Luis A; Castilla, Viviana

    2011-09-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A and B (hnRNPs A/B), cellular RNA-binding proteins that participate in splicing, trafficking, translation and turnover of mRNAs, have been implicated in the life cycles of several cytoplasmic RNA viruses. Here, we demonstrate that silencing of hnRNPs A1 and A2 significantly reduces the replication of the arenavirus Junín virus (JUNV), the aetiological agent of Argentine haemorrhagic fever. While acute JUNV infection did not modify total levels of expression of hnRNPs A/B in comparison with uninfected cells, non-cytopathic persistent infection exhibited low levels of these cell proteins. Furthermore, acutely infected cells showed a cytoplasmic relocalization of overexpressed hnRNP A1, probably related to the involvement of this protein in virus replicative cycle. This cytoplasmic accumulation was also observed in cells expressing viral nucleoprotein (N), and co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed the interaction between hnRNP A1 and N protein. By contrast, a predominantly nuclear distribution of overexpressed hnRNP A1 was found during persistent infection, even in the presence of endogenous or overexpressed N protein, indicating a differential modulation of nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking in acute and persistent JUNV infections.

  1. Equine infectious anemia and equine infectious anemia virus in 2013: a review.

    PubMed

    Cook, R F; Leroux, C; Issel, C J

    2013-11-29

    A detailed description of equine infectious anemia virus and host responses to it are presented. Current control and eradication of the infection are discussed with suggestions for improvements to increase their effectiveness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. An infectious bat chimeric influenza virus harboring the entry machinery of a influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Juozapaitis, Mindaugas; Moreira, Étori Aguiar; Mena, Ignacio; Giese, Sebastian; Riegger, David; Pohlmann, Anne; Höper, Dirk; Zimmer, Gert; Beer, Martin; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Schwemmle, Martin

    2017-01-01

    In 2012 the complete genomic sequence of a new and potentially harmful influenza A-like virus from bats (H17N10) was identified. However, infectious influenza virus was neither isolated from infected bats nor reconstituted, impeding further characterization of this virus. Here we show the generation of an infectious chimeric virus containing six out of the eight bat virus genes, with the remaining two genes encoding the HA and NA proteins of a prototypic influenza A virus. This engineered virus replicates well in a broad range of mammalian cell cultures, human primary airway epithelial cells and mice, but poorly in avian cells and chicken embryos without further adaptation. Importantly, the bat chimeric virus is unable to reassort with other influenza A viruses. Although our data do not exclude the possibility of zoonotic transmission of bat influenza viruses into the human population, they indicate that multiple barriers exist that makes this an unlikely event. PMID:25055345

  3. Comparative nucleotide sequence analysis of three virulent strains of infectious laryngotracheitis virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infectious laryngotracheitis is a very serious and widespread respiratory disease of chickens caused by gallid herpesvirus type 1, commonly named infectious laryngotracheitis virus. For protection from infectious laryngotracheitis, chickens have traditionally been vaccinated with live-attenuated str...

  4. Infectious Maize rayado fino virus from cloned cDNA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Maize rayado fino virus (MRFV) is the type member of the marafiviruses within the family Tymoviridae. A cDNA clone from which infectious RNA can be transcribed was produced from a US isolate of MRFV (MRFV-US). Infectivity of transcripts derived from cDNA clones was demonstrated by infection of mai...

  5. S2 expressed from recombinant virus confers broad protection against infectious bronchitis virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We previously demonstrated that overexposing the IBV (infectious bronchitis virus) S2 to the chicken immune system by means of a vectored vaccine, followed by boost with whole virus, protects chickens against IBV showing dissimilar S1. We developed recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) LaSota (...

  6. Natural infection of turkeys by infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    PubMed

    Portz, Cristiana; Beltrão, Nilzane; Furian, Thales Quedi; Júnior, Alfredo Bianco; Macagnan, Marisa; Griebeler, Josiane; Lima Rosa, Carlos André Veiga; Colodel, Edson Moleta; Driemeier, David; Back, Alberto; Barth Schatzmayr, Ortrud Monika; Canal, Cláudio Wageck

    2008-09-18

    The infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) is an important respiratory pathogen of chickens that also infects pheasants and peafowl. Epidemiologically non-related commercial turkey flocks with clinical signs such as tracheitis, swollen sinuses, conjunctivitis and expectoration of bloody mucus were examined for the presence of the virus. Laboratory ILTV detection was performed by virus isolation in embryonated eggs and cell cultures, PCR and sequencing of amplification products, histopathology, indirect immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. One ILTV turkey isolate was also experimentally inoculated into susceptible chickens and turkeys, reproducing a mild respiratory disease. This is the first description of natural infections with ILTV in turkeys.

  7. Norwalk virus: How infectious is it?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Noroviruses are major agents of viral gastroenteritis worldwide. The infectivity of Norwalk virus, the prototype norovirus, has been studied in susceptible human volunteers. A new variant of the hit theory model of microbial infection was developed to estimate the variation in No...

  8. Norwalk virus: How infectious is it?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Noroviruses are major agents of viral gastroenteritis worldwide. The infectivity of Norwalk virus, the prototype norovirus, has been studied in susceptible human volunteers. A new variant of the hit theory model of microbial infection was developed to estimate the variation in No...

  9. Characterization of infectious dose and lethal dose of two strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV).

    PubMed

    McKenney, Douglas G; Kurath, Gael; Wargo, Andrew R

    2016-03-02

    The ability to infect a host is a key trait of a virus, and differences in infectivity could put one virus at an evolutionary advantage over another. In this study we have quantified the infectivity of two strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) that are known to differ in fitness and virulence. By exposing juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hosts to a wide range of virus doses, we were able to calculate the infectious dose in terms of ID50 values for the two genotypes. Lethal dose experiments were also conducted to confirm the virulence difference between the two virus genotypes, using a range of virus doses and holding fish either in isolation or in batch so as to calculate LD50 values. We found that infectivity is positively correlated with virulence, with the more virulent genotype having higher infectivity. Additionally, infectivity increases more steeply over a short range of doses compared to virulence, which has a shallower increase. We also examined the data using models of virion interaction and found no evidence to suggest that virions have either an antagonistic or a synergistic effect on each other, supporting the independent action hypothesis in the process of IHNV infection of rainbow trout.

  10. Characterization of infectious dose and lethal dose of two strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenney, Douglas; Kurath, Gael; Wargo, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The ability to infect a host is a key trait of a virus, and differences in infectivity could put one virus at an evolutionary advantage over another. In this study we have quantified the infectivity of two strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) that are known to differ in fitness and virulence. By exposing juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hosts to a wide range of virus doses, we were able to calculate the infectious dose in terms of ID50 values for the two genotypes. Lethal dose experiments were also conducted to confirm the virulence difference between the two virus genotypes, using a range of virus doses and holding fish either in isolation or in batch so as to calculate LD50values. We found that infectivity is positively correlated with virulence, with the more virulent genotype having higher infectivity. Additionally, infectivity increases more steeply over a short range of doses compared to virulence, which has a shallower increase. We also examined the data using models of virion interaction and found no evidence to suggest that virions have either an antagonistic or a synergistic effect on each other, supporting the independent action hypothesis in the process of IHNV infection of rainbow trout.

  11. Evaluation of endocrine and immune disruption of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus vaccinated steers challenged with infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the endocrine and immune responses of steers challenged with infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBRV). For the study, twelve crossbred beef steers weighing approximately 228.82 kg were fitted with indwelling rectal temperature monitoring devices and ...

  12. Subclinical Shed of Infectious Varicella zoster Virus in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohrs, Randall J.; Mehta, Satish K.; Schmid, D. Scott; Gilden, Donald H.; Pierson, Duane L.

    2007-01-01

    Aerosol borne varicella zoster virus (VZV) enters the nasopharynx and replicates in tonsillar T-cells, resulting in viremia and varicella (chickenpox). Virus then becomes latent in cranial nerve, dorsal root and autonomic nervous system ganglia along the entire neuraxis (1). Decades later, as cell-mediated immunity to VZV declines (4), latent VZV can reactivate to produce zoster (shingles). Infectious VZV is present in patients with varicella or zoster, but shed of infectious virus in the absence of disease has not been shown. We previously detected VZV DNA in saliva of astronauts during and shortly after spaceflight, suggesting stress induced subclinical virus reactivation (3). We show here that VZV DNA as well as infectious virus in present in astronaut saliva. VZV DNA was detected in saliva during and after a 13-day spaceflight in 2 of 3 astronauts (Fig. panel A). Ten days before liftoff, there was a rise in serum anti-VZV antibody in subjects 1 and 2, consistent with virus reactivation. In subject 3, VZV DNA was not detected in saliva, and there was no rise in anti-VZV antibody titer. Subject 3 may have been protected from virus reactivation by having zoster <10 years ago, which provides a boost in cell-medicated immunity to VZV (2). No VZV DNA was detected in astronaut saliva months before spaceflight, or in saliva of 10 age/sex-matched healthy control subjects sampled on alternate days for 3 weeks (88 saliva samples). Saliva taken 2-6 days after landing from all 3 subjects was cultured on human fetal lung cells (Fig. panel B). Infectious VZV was recovered from saliva of subjects 1 and 2 on the second day after landing. Virus specificity was confirmed by antibody staining and DNA analysis which showed it to be VZV of European descent, common in the US (5). Further, both antibody staining and DNA PCR demonstrated that no HSV-1 was detected in any infected culture. This is the first report of infectious VZV shedding in the absence of clinical disease

  13. Biological Characterization of Rev Variation in Equine Infectious Anemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Belshan, Michael; Harris, Matthew E.; Shoemaker, Anne E.; Hope, Thomas J.; Carpenter, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Sequence analysis identified significant variation in the second exon of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) rev. Functional analysis indicated that limited amino acid variation in Rev significantly altered the export activity of the protein but did not affect Rev-dependent alternative splicing. EIAV Rev can mediate export through two independent cis-acting Rev-responsive elements (RREs), and differences among Rev variants were more pronounced when both RREs were present. Variation in Rev may be an important mechanism for regulation of virus replication in vivo and may contribute to changes in clinical disease. PMID:9557734

  14. Molecular Characterization of Attenuated Junin Virus Variants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-15

    PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Victor Romanowski PI ADDRESS: Area de Quimica Biol6gica y Biologia Molecular Facultad de Ciencias Exactas , UNLP Calle 47 y 115...OFFICE SYMBOL 7a. NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION Area de Quiluca Biol6gica y Biologla (If applicable) Molecular - DOt. Ciencias Biol6gicas Facultad...Clencias Exactas , UNLP 6c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 7b. ADDRE-.S (City, State, ind ZIP Code) Callas 47 y 115 1900 - La Plata Argentina Be. NAME

  15. Development and Characterization of Recombinant Virus Generated from a New World Zika Virus Infectious Clone.

    PubMed

    Weger-Lucarelli, James; Duggal, Nisha K; Bullard-Feibelman, Kristen; Veselinovic, Milena; Romo, Hannah; Nguyen, Chilinh; Rückert, Claudia; Brault, Aaron C; Bowen, Richard A; Stenglein, Mark; Geiss, Brian J; Ebel, Gregory D

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV; family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus) is a rapidly expanding global pathogen that has been associated with severe clinical manifestations, including devastating neurological disease in infants. There are currently no molecular clones of a New World ZIKV available that lack significant attenuation, hindering progress toward understanding determinants of transmission and pathogenesis. Here we report the development and characterization of a novel ZIKV reverse genetics system based on a 2015 isolate from Puerto Rico (PRVABC59). We generated a two-plasmid infectious clone system from which infectious virus was rescued that replicates in human and mosquito cells with growth kinetics representative of wild-type ZIKV. Infectious clone-derived virus initiated infection and transmission rates in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes comparable to those of the primary isolate and displayed similar pathogenesis in AG129 mice. This infectious clone system provides a valuable resource to the research community to explore ZIKV molecular biology, vaccine development, antiviral development, diagnostics, vector competence, and disease pathogenesis.

  16. The affect of infectious bursal disease virus on avian influenza virus vaccine efficacy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Immunosuppressive viruses are known to affect vaccinal immunity, however the impact of virally induced immunosuppression on avian influenza vaccine efficacy has not been quantified. In order to determine the effect of exposure to infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) on vaccinal immunity to highly ...

  17. Virus like particle-based vaccines against emerging infectious disease viruses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinliang; Dai, Shiyu; Wang, Manli; Hu, Zhihong; Wang, Hualin; Deng, Fei

    2016-08-01

    Emerging infectious diseases are major threats to human health. Most severe viral disease outbreaks occur in developing regions where health conditions are poor. With increased international travel and business, the possibility of eventually transmitting infectious viruses between different countries is increasing. The most effective approach in preventing viral diseases is vaccination. However, vaccines are not currently available for numerous viral diseases. Virus-like particles (VLPs) are engineered vaccine candidates that have been studied for decades. VLPs are constructed by viral protein expression in various expression systems that promote the selfassembly of proteins into structures resembling virus particles. VLPs have antigenicity similar to that of the native virus, but are non-infectious as they lack key viral genetic material. VLP vaccines have attracted considerable research interest because they offer several advantages over traditional vaccines. Studies have shown that VLP vaccines can stimulate both humoral and cellular immune responses, which may offer effective antiviral protection. Here we review recent developments with VLP-based vaccines for several highly virulent emerging or re-emerging infectious diseases. The infectious agents discussed include RNA viruses from different virus families, such as the Arenaviridae, Bunyaviridae, Caliciviridae, Coronaviridae, Filoviridae, Flaviviridae, Orthomyxoviridae, Paramyxoviridae, and Togaviridae families.

  18. Infectious and Non-infectious Etiologies of Cardiovascular Disease in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chastain, Daniel B.; King, Travis S.; Stover, Kayla R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increasing rates of HIV have been observed in women, African Americans, and Hispanics, particularly those residing in rural areas of the United States. Although cardiovascular (CV) complications in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have significantly decreased following the introduction of antiretroviral therapy on a global scale, in many rural areas, residents face geographic, social, and cultural barriers that result in decreased access to care. Despite the advancements to combat the disease, many patients in these medically underserved areas are not linked to care, and fewer than half achieve viral suppression. Methods: Databases were systematically searched for peer-reviewed publications reporting infectious and non-infectious etiologies of cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients. Relevant articles cited in the retrieved publications were also reviewed for inclusion. Results: A variety of outcomes studies and literature reviews were included in the analysis. Relevant literature discussed the manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of infectious and non-infectious etiologies of cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients. Conclusion: In these medically underserved areas, it is vital that clinicians are knowledgeable in the manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of CV complications in patients with untreated HIV. This review summarizes the epidemiology and causes of CV complications associated with untreated HIV and provide recommendations for management of these complications. PMID:27583063

  19. Infectious and Non-infectious Etiologies of Cardiovascular Disease in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Chastain, Daniel B; King, Travis S; Stover, Kayla R

    2016-01-01

    Increasing rates of HIV have been observed in women, African Americans, and Hispanics, particularly those residing in rural areas of the United States. Although cardiovascular (CV) complications in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have significantly decreased following the introduction of antiretroviral therapy on a global scale, in many rural areas, residents face geographic, social, and cultural barriers that result in decreased access to care. Despite the advancements to combat the disease, many patients in these medically underserved areas are not linked to care, and fewer than half achieve viral suppression. Databases were systematically searched for peer-reviewed publications reporting infectious and non-infectious etiologies of cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients. Relevant articles cited in the retrieved publications were also reviewed for inclusion. A variety of outcomes studies and literature reviews were included in the analysis. Relevant literature discussed the manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of infectious and non-infectious etiologies of cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients. In these medically underserved areas, it is vital that clinicians are knowledgeable in the manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of CV complications in patients with untreated HIV. This review summarizes the epidemiology and causes of CV complications associated with untreated HIV and provide recommendations for management of these complications.

  20. Detection of Vaccinia Virus DNA, but not Infectious Virus, in the Blood of Smallpox Vaccine Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jeffrey I.; Hohman, Patricia; Preuss, Jeanne C.; Li, Li; Fischer, Steven H.; Fedorko, Daniel P.

    2007-01-01

    The authors of a recent study suggested that the duration of deferral for blood donations by smallpox vaccinees should be extended, based on detection of vaccinia virus DNA in 5 blood samples by PCR and the potential for viremia. We found that 4 of 202 blood specimens (from 3 of 27 smallpox vaccinees) were positive for vaccinia virus DNA by PCR; none were positive for virus by culture. Throat swabs were negative by PCR and culture. Thus, while some blood specimens contained vaccinia virus DNA, infectious virus was not detected. Current guidelines for deferral of blood donation in vaccinees seem appropriate. PMID:17493714

  1. Phylogeography of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus in North America.

    PubMed

    Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A; Troyer, Ryan M; Emmenegger, Eveline J; Einer-Jensen, Katja; Anderson, Eric D

    2003-04-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a rhabdoviral pathogen that infects wild and cultured salmonid fish throughout the Pacific Northwest of North America. IHNV causes severe epidemics in young fish and can cause disease or occur asymptomatically in adults. In a broad survey of 323 IHNV field isolates, sequence analysis of a 303 nucleotide variable region within the glycoprotein gene revealed a maximum nucleotide diversity of 8.6 %, indicating low genetic diversity overall for this virus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed three major virus genogroups, designated U, M and L, which varied in topography and geographical range. Intragenogroup genetic diversity measures indicated that the M genogroup had three- to fourfold more diversity than the other genogroups and suggested relatively rapid evolution of the M genogroup and stasis within the U genogroup. We speculate that factors influencing IHNV evolution may have included ocean migration ranges of their salmonid host populations and anthropogenic effects associated with fish culture.

  2. Phylogeography of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A.; Troyer, Ryan M.; Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Einer-Jensen, Katja; Anderson, Eric D.

    2003-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a rhabdoviral pathogen that infects wild and cultured salmonid fish throughout the Pacific Northwest of North America. IHNV causes severe epidemics in young fish and can cause disease or occur asymptomatically in adults. In a broad survey of 323 IHNV field isolates, sequence analysis of a 303 nucleotide variable region within the glycoprotein gene revealed a maximum nucleotide diversity of 8.6 %, indicating low genetic diversity overall for this virus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed three major virus genogroups, designated U, M and L, which varied in topography and geographical range. Intragenogroup genetic diversity measures indicated that the M genogroup had three- to fourfold more diversity than the other genogroups and suggested relatively rapid evolution of the M genogroup and stasis within the U genogroup. We speculate that factors influencing IHNV evolution may have included ocean migration ranges of their salmonid host populations and anthropogenic effects associated with fish culture.

  3. Transmission of equine infectious anemia virus by Tabanus fuscicostatus.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, J A; Adams, W V; Wilson, B H; Issel, C J; Roth, E E

    1976-01-01

    The mechanical transmission of equine infectious anemia (EIA) virus by Tabanus fuscicostatus was investigated. In 1 of 7 transmission trials, a single horsefly transmitted EIA virus from an acutely infected pony to a susceptible pony. Groups of horseflies isolated for 3, 10, or 30 minutes before refeeding transmitted EIA virus, whereas those isolated for 4 or 24 hours did not. Data from field studies indicate that the home range or flight distance of horseflies may exceed 4 miles. That information together with our observations suggest that segregation of infected horses (usually defined as at least 200 yards from susceptible horses) as a control measure for EIA may not be an adequate safeguard against transmission in areas where horseflies are numerous.

  4. Epidemiological characteristics of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV): a review.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Peter; Paley, Richard; Alegria-Moran, Raul; Oidtmann, Birgit

    2016-06-10

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV, Rhabdoviridae), is the causative agent of infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN), a disease notifiable to the World Organisation for Animal Health, and various countries and trading areas (including the European Union). IHNV is an economically important pathogen causing clinical disease and mortalities in a wide variety of salmonid species, including the main salmonid species produced in aquaculture, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). We reviewed the scientific literature on IHNV on a range of topics, including geographic distribution; host range; conditions required for infection and clinical disease; minimum infectious dose; subclinical infection; shedding of virus by infected fish; transmission via eggs; diagnostic tests; pathogen load and survival of IHNV in host tissues. This information is required for a range of purposes including import risk assessments; parameterisation of disease models; for surveillance planning; and evaluation of the chances of eradication of the pathogen to name just a few. The review focuses on issues that are of relevance for the European context, but many of the data summarised have relevance to IHN globally. Examples for application of the information is presented and data gaps highlighted.

  5. Transcriptome analysis of feline infectious peritonitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Mehrbod, Parvaneh; Harun, Mohammad Syamsul Reza; Shuid, Ahmad Naqib; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a lethal systemic disease caused by FIP virus (FIPV). There are no effective vaccines or treatment available, and the virus virulence determinants and pathogenesis are not fully understood. Here, we describe the sequencing of RNA extracted from Crandell Rees Feline Kidney (CRFK) cells infected with FIPV using the Illumina next-generation sequencing approach. Bioinformatics analysis, based on Felis catus 2X annotated shotgun reference genome, using CLC bio Genome Workbench is used to map both control and infected cells. Kal's Z test statistical analysis is used to analyze the differentially expressed genes from the infected CRFK cells. In addition, RT-qPCR analysis is used for further transcriptional profiling of selected genes in infected CRFK cells and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) from healthy and FIP-diagnosed cats.

  6. Development and Characterization of Recombinant Virus Generated from a New World Zika Virus Infectious Clone

    PubMed Central

    Weger-Lucarelli, James; Duggal, Nisha K.; Bullard-Feibelman, Kristen; Veselinovic, Milena; Romo, Hannah; Nguyen, Chilinh; Rückert, Claudia; Brault, Aaron C.; Bowen, Richard A.; Stenglein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zika virus (ZIKV; family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus) is a rapidly expanding global pathogen that has been associated with severe clinical manifestations, including devastating neurological disease in infants. There are currently no molecular clones of a New World ZIKV available that lack significant attenuation, hindering progress toward understanding determinants of transmission and pathogenesis. Here we report the development and characterization of a novel ZIKV reverse genetics system based on a 2015 isolate from Puerto Rico (PRVABC59). We generated a two-plasmid infectious clone system from which infectious virus was rescued that replicates in human and mosquito cells with growth kinetics representative of wild-type ZIKV. Infectious clone-derived virus initiated infection and transmission rates in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes comparable to those of the primary isolate and displayed similar pathogenesis in AG129 mice. This infectious clone system provides a valuable resource to the research community to explore ZIKV molecular biology, vaccine development, antiviral development, diagnostics, vector competence, and disease pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE ZIKV is a rapidly spreading mosquito-borne pathogen that has been linked to Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults and congenital microcephaly in developing fetuses and infants. ZIKV can also be sexually transmitted. The viral molecular determinants of any of these phenotypes are not well understood. There is no reverse genetics system available for the current epidemic virus that will allow researchers to study ZIKV immunity, develop novel vaccines, or develop antiviral drugs. Here we provide a novel infectious clone system generated from a recent ZIKV isolated from a patient infected in Puerto Rico. This infectious clone produces virus with in vitro and in vivo characteristics similar to those of the primary isolate, providing a critical tool to study ZIKV infection and disease. PMID:27795432

  7. Infection of bone marrow macrophages by equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Swardson, C J; Lichtenstein, D L; Wang, S; Montelaro, R C; Kociba, G J

    1997-12-01

    To characterize infection of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) with equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) by determining virus production, effects on viability, and induction of cytokines. BMDM obtained from bone marrow of 6 clinically normal adult horses. BMDM were infected with EIAV at a multiplicity of infection of 8. Cell viability, percentage of cells with detectable viral protein, reverse transcriptase activity, and concentrations of infective virus (focus-forming units/ml), interleukin 6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were measured in culture supernatant samples obtained at various days after infection. Cell viability was decreased on day 4 and was maximally decreased on day 8. The number of cells with detectable viral protein and supernatant reverse transcriptase activity increased significantly on day 4 and increased until day 6. Virus concentration (focus-forming units per milliliter) peaked on day 4 after infection and was constant thereafter. Infection with EIAV caused significant induction of interleukin 6 production by BMDM. The maximal difference was seen on day 4 after infection. Control and infected BMDM produced only negligible amounts of tumor necrosis factor-alpha. BMDM are useful, as a cell population, to study the effects of infection with EIAV, including cell death and induction of interleukin 6 but not tumor necrosis factor-alpha production.

  8. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of avian infectious bronchitis virus main protease

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jun; Shen, Wei; Liao, Ming; Bartlam, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The avian infectious bronchitis virus main protease has been crystallized; crystals diffract to 2.7 Å resolution. Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is the prototype of the genus Coronavirus. It causes a highly contagious disease which affects the respiratory, reproductive, neurological and renal systems of chickens, resulting great economic losses in the poultry industry worldwide. The coronavirus (CoV) main protease (M{sup pro}), which plays a pivotal role in viral gene expression and replication through a highly complex cascade involving the proteolytic processing of replicase polyproteins, is an attractive target for antiviral drug design. In this study, IBV M{sup pro} was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Crystals suitable for X-ray crystallography have been obtained using microseeding techniques and belong to space group P6{sub 1}22. X-ray diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.7 Å resolution from a single crystal. The unit-cell parameters were a = b = 119.1, c = 270.7 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. Three molecules were predicted to be present in the asymmetric unit from a calculated self-rotation function.

  9. Simplified methods for the construction of RNA and DNA virus infectious clones.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Tatsuya; Inoue-Nagata, Alice Kazuko

    2015-01-01

    Infectious virus clones are one of the most powerful tools in plant pathology, molecular biology, and biotechnology. The construction of infectious clones of RNA and DNA viruses, however, usually requires laborious cloning and subcloning steps. In addition, instability of the RNA virus genome is frequently reported after its introduction into the vector and transference to Escherichia coli. These difficulties hamper the cloning procedures, making it tedious and cumbersome. This chapter describes two protocols for a simple construction of infectious viruses, an RNA virus, the tobamovirus Pepper mild mottle virus, and a DNA virus, a bipartite begomovirus. For this purpose, the strategy of overlap-extension PCR was used for the construction of infectious tobamovirus clone and of rolling circle amplification (RCA) for the construction of a dimeric form of the begomovirus clone.

  10. Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus enters CHSE-214 cells via macropinocytosis.

    PubMed

    Levican, Jorge; Miranda-Cárdenas, Camila; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Aguayo, Francisco; Gaggero, Aldo; León, Oscar

    2017-06-08

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) is a non-enveloped virus belonging to the Birnaviridae family. IPNV produces an acute disease in salmon fingerlings, with high mortality rates and persistent infection in survivors. Although there are reports of IPNV binding to various cells, the viral receptor and entry pathways remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the endocytic pathway that allows for IPNV entry. We observed that IPNV stimulated fluid uptake and virus particles co-localysed with the uptake marker dextran in intracellular compartments, suggesting a role for macropinocytosis in viral entry. Consistent with this idea, viral infection was significantly reduced when the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 was inhibited with 5-(N-Ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA). Neither chlorpromazine nor filipin complex I affected IPNV infection. To examine the role of macropinocytosis regulators, additional inhibitors were tested. Inhibitors of the EGFR pathway and the effectors Pak1, Rac1 and PKC reduced viral infection. Together, our results indicate that IPNV is mainly internalized into CHSE-214 cells by macropinocytosis.

  11. Recombination in Avian Gamma-Coronavirus Infectious Bronchitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Thor, Sharmi W.; Hilt, Deborah A.; Kissinger, Jessica C.; Paterson, Andrew H.; Jackwood, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    Recombination in the family Coronaviridae has been well documented and is thought to be a contributing factor in the emergence and evolution of different coronaviral genotypes as well as different species of coronavirus. However, there are limited data available on the frequency and extent of recombination in coronaviruses in nature and particularly for the avian gamma-coronaviruses where only recently the emergence of a turkey coronavirus has been attributed solely to recombination. In this study, the full-length genomes of eight avian gamma-coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) isolates were sequenced and along with other full-length IBV genomes available from GenBank were analyzed for recombination. Evidence of recombination was found in every sequence analyzed and was distributed throughout the entire genome. Areas that have the highest occurrence of recombination are located in regions of the genome that code for nonstructural proteins 2, 3 and 16, and the structural spike glycoprotein. The extent of the recombination observed, suggests that this may be one of the principal mechanisms for generating genetic and antigenic diversity within IBV. These data indicate that reticulate evolutionary change due to recombination in IBV, likely plays a major role in the origin and adaptation of the virus leading to new genetic types and strains of the virus. PMID:21994806

  12. Detection of vaccinia virus DNA, but not infectious virus, in the blood of smallpox vaccine recipients.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jeffrey I; Hohman, Patricia; Preuss, Jeanne C; Li, Li; Fischer, Steven H; Fedorko, Daniel P

    2007-06-06

    The authors of a recent study [Savona MR, Dela Cruz WP, Jones MS, Thornton JA, Xia D, Hadfield TL, et al. Detection of vaccinia DNA in the blood following smallpox vaccination. JAMA 2006; 295:1898-1900] suggested that the duration of deferral for blood donations by smallpox vaccinees should be extended, based on detection of vaccinia virus DNA in five blood samples by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the potential for viremia. We found that 4 of 202 blood specimens (from 3 of 27 smallpox vaccinees) were positive for vaccinia virus DNA by PCR; none were positive for virus by culture. Throat swabs were negative by PCR and culture. Thus, while some blood specimens contained vaccinia virus DNA, infectious virus was not detected. Current guidelines for deferral of blood donation in vaccinees seem appropriate.

  13. Morphology of certain viruses of Salmonid fishes. II. In vivo studies of infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amend, Donald F.; Chambers, Velma C.

    1970-01-01

    Juvenile sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) were injected with the infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus, and tissue samples from the anterior kidney, spleen, liver, intestine, and pyloric caeca of moribund fish were prepared for electron microscopy. Bullet-shaped virus particles measuring 158 × 90 mμ were observed in the hematopoietic tissues of the anterior kidney and spleen. Virus particles were also observed in the outer connective tissues of the pancreas or pyloric caeca, or both. No virus was found in the intestine or liver. The healthy appearance of erythrocytes, reticular cells, and endothelial cells in necrotic areas of the spleen and anterior kidney, and the absence of lymphocytes in these areas, suggested that lymphocytes might be one source of the virus.

  14. Differential outcomes of Zika virus infection in Aedes aegypti orally challenged with infectious blood meals and infectious protein meals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Jang S; Lyons, Amy C; Hsu, Wei-Wen; Park, So Lee; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana L

    2017-01-01

    Infection of mosquitoes is an essential step for the transmission of mosquito-borne arboviruses in nature. Engorgement of infectious blood meals from viremic infected vertebrate hosts allows the entry of viruses and initiates infection of midgut epithelial cells. Historically, the infection process of arboviruses in mosquitoes has been studied through the engorgement of mosquitoes from viremic laboratory animals or from artificial feeders containing blood mixed with viruses harvested from cell cultures. The latter approach using so-called artificial blood meals is more frequently used since it is readily optimized to maximize viral titer, negates the use of animals and can be used with viruses for which there are no small animal models. Use of artificial blood meals has enabled numerous studies on mosquito infections with a wide variety of viruses; however, as described here, with suitable modification it can also be used to study the interplay between infection, specific blood components, and physiological consequences associated with blood engorgement. For hematophagous female mosquitoes, blood is the primary nutritional source supporting all physiological process including egg development, and also influences neurological processes and behaviors such as host-seeking. Interactions between these blood-driven vector biological processes and arbovirus infection that is mediated via blood engorgement have not yet been specifically studied. This is in part because presentation of virus in whole blood inevitably induces enzymatic digestion processes, hormone driven oogenesis, and other biological changes. In this study, the infection process of Zika virus (ZIKV) in Aedes aegypti was characterized by oral exposure via viral suspension meals within minimally bovine serum albumin complemented medium or within whole blood. The use of bovine serum albumin in infectious meals provides an opportunity to evaluate the role of serum albumin during the process of flavivirus

  15. Infectious Bronchitis Virus Variants: Molecular Analysis and Pathogenicity Investigation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Yi; Chen, Hui-Wen

    2017-09-22

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) variants constantly emerge and pose economic threats to poultry farms worldwide. Numerous studies on the molecular and pathogenic characterization of IBV variants have been performed between 2007 and 2017, which we have reviewed herein. We noted that viral genetic mutations and recombination events commonly gave rise to distinct IBV genotypes, serotypes and pathotypes. In addition to characterizing the S1 genes, full viral genomic sequencing, comprehensive antigenicity, and pathogenicity studies on emerging variants have advanced our understanding of IBV infections, which is valuable for developing countermeasures against IBV field outbreaks. This review of IBV variants provides practical value for understanding their phylogenetic relationships and epidemiology from both regional and worldwide viewpoints.

  16. Genetic determinants of pathogenesis by feline infectious peritonitis virus.

    PubMed

    Brown, Meredith A

    2011-10-15

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal, immune-augmented, and progressive viral disease of cats associated with feline coronavirus (FCoV). Viral genetic determinants specifically associated with FIPV pathogenesis have not yet been discovered. Viral gene signatures in the spike, non-structural protein 3c, and membrane of the coronavirus genome have been shown to often correlate with disease manifestation. An "in vivo mutation transition hypothesis" is widely accepted and postulates that de novo virus mutation occurs in vivo giving rise to virulence. The existence of "distinct circulating avirulent and virulent strains" is an alternative hypothesis of viral pathogenesis. It may be possible that viral dynamics from both hypotheses are at play in the occurrence of FIP. Epidemiologic data suggests that the genetic background of the cat contributes to the manifestation of FIP. Further studies exploring both viral and host genetic determinants of disease in FIP offer specific opportunities for the management of this disease.

  17. Specific detection of GII-1 lineage of infectious bronchitis virus.

    PubMed

    Domanska-Blicharz, K; Lisowska, A; Pikuła, A; Sajewicz-Krukowska, J

    2017-08-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is a worldwide prevalent RNA virus that causes highly contagious and economically devastating disease in chicken. The virus exists in many different genetic forms which made the disease control very difficult. The present study describes the development and validation of TaqMan probe-based real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) targeting the S1 coding region of S gene characteristic for the GII-1 lineage (formerly the D1466-like variant) of IBV. These strains are quite different from other European IBV belonging to different lineages of the GI genotype. The developed method was 30-fold more sensitive than used so far for standard nested RT-PCR with detection limit of 56 RNA copies per reaction. The specificity of the assay was also evaluated with a panel of different poultry pathogens. Repeatability and reproducibility of the method was very high with coefficients of variation lower than 4%. One hundred and twenty-seven IBV-positive samples were tested by this method and GII-1 strains were detected in four of them (3·15%) which indicate a decrease in the GII-1 IBV prevalence in Poland. The assay was proven to be a valuable tool for rapid diagnosis of GII-1 lineage of IBV strains and moreover it enabled the monitoring of viral loads which can be used to assess disease progression. This study reports a TaqMan probe-based real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) for rapid and accurate identification of GII-1 lineage (formerly D1466-like variant) of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV). The assay revealed to be more sensitive than standard nested RT-PCR assay, previously used for this purpose. The developed assay has been tested on numerous field samples and revealed 3·15% prevalence of this lineage of IBV in Polish chicken population. Moreover, this new assay enables the assessment of viral load measurement which might be useful for epidemiology and pathogenesis

  18. Phylogeny of the infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in European aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Cieslak, Michael; Wahli, Thomas; Diserens, Nicolas; Haenen, Olga L M; Schütze, Heike

    2017-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN)-a highly lethal infectious salmonid disease-has caused substantial economic losses in the European production of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) since the late 1980s. The causal agent of IHN is the IHN virus (IHNV) introduced from overseas. However, until today, its phylogeographic spread in Europe remains poorly understood. We therefore sought to elucidate this unresolved topic by using the largest ever compiled dataset of European IHNV isolates (E isolates) (193 GenBank E isolates and 100 isolates from this study) for the complete glycoprotein (G) gene sequence. Our results clearly revealed that the active trout trade has left its traces in the E phylogeny. For example, the spread by trade of IHNV-infected trout was apparently the cause for the exposure of the E lineage to different local scenarios of selection and genetic drift, and therefore has led to the split of this lineage into various subordinated lineages. Accordingly, we also found evidence for E isolates being mixed Europe-wide by cross-border introduction events. Moreover, there were indications that this propagation of the E lineage within Europe corresponded with an extensive and rapid spread event, already during or shortly after its formation. Finally, in accordance with the high substitution rate of IHNV determined by previous studies, our dataset indicates that the mean period of occurrence of a single E haplotype is typically not longer than one calendar year.

  19. Molecular characterization of infectious bursal disease viruses from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair; Ali, Muhammad; Abbas, Muhammad; Chaudhry, Umer Naveed; Zia-Ur-Rehman; Munir, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    Since the first report of infectious bursal disease in Pakistan in 1987, outbreaks have been common even in vaccinated flocks. Despite appropriate administration of vaccines, concerns arise if the circulating strains are different from the ones used in the vaccine. Here, we sequenced the hypervariable region (HVR) of the VP2 gene of circulating strains of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) originating from outbreaks (n = 4) in broiler flocks in Pakistan. Nucleotide sequencing followed by phylogeny and deduced amino acid sequence analysis showed the circulating strains to be very virulent (vv) and identified characteristic residues at position 222 (A), 242 (I), 256 (I), 294 (I) and 299 (S). In addition, a substitution at positions 221 (Q→H) was found to be exclusive to Pakistani strains in our analysis, although a larger dataset is required to confirm this finding. Compared to vaccine strains that are commonly used in Pakistan, substitution mutations were found at key amino acid positions in VP2 that may be responsible for potential changes in neutralization epitopes and vaccine failure.

  20. Equine infectious anemia in mules: virus isolation and pathogenicity studies.

    PubMed

    Spyrou, V; Papanastassopoulou, M; Psychas, V; Billinis, Ch; Koumbati, M; Vlemmas, J; Koptopoulos, G

    2003-08-29

    There appears to be a lack of information concerning responses of mules to natural infection or experimental inoculation with equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). In the present study EIAV was isolated from mules, for the first time, and its pathogenicity in naturally infected and experimentally inoculated animals was investigated. Two naturally infected (A and B) and three EIAV free mules (C, D and E) were used for this purpose. Mule A developed clinical signs, whereas mule B remained asymptomatic until the end of the study. Mules C and D were each inoculated with 10ml of blood from mule A and developed signs of the disease; they were euthanatized or died at day 22 and 25 post-inoculation, respectively. Mule E served as a negative control. The virus was isolated from the plasma samples of mules with clinical signs of the disease (A, C and D), but not from the asymptomatic mule B. Both proviral DNA and viral RNA were amplified from blood and tissues of the infected animals by nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR). Antibodies were not detected in the two experimentally infected mules until their natural death or euthanasia. Clinicopathological and laboratory findings showed that, in mules, EIAV produced clinical signs similar to those observed in horses and ponies. Nested PCR proved to be a rapid, sensitive and specific diagnostic method for the detection of EIAV, regardless of the disease stage.

  1. Naturally occurring reassortant infectious bursal disease virus in northern China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhen; Zhang, Lizhou; Wang, Nian; Chen, Yuming; Gao, Li; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Gao, Yulong; Li, Kai; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Xiaomei

    2015-05-04

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is a bi-segmented, double-stranded RNA virus that belongs to the genus Avibirnavirus of the family of Birnavirideae. The co-evolution of genome segments is a major evolutionary feature for IBDV. However, in recent years, some strains exhibited markedly different genetic relationships for segments A and B. In this study, we firstly isolated a new type of reassortment IBDV strain named IBD13HeB01 from northern China. The full-length genomes of segments A and B were cloned and identified. Sequence analysis revealed that IBD13HeB01 was a segment-reassortment strain, whose segment A was derived from very virulent strain and segment B from attenuated IBDV. In addition, the virulence of IBD13HeB01 strain was evaluated using SPF chickens. This study is not only beneficial for further understanding of the viral evolution but also suggests the potential risk of application of the live vaccines of IBDV.

  2. Phosphoinositides Direct Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Gag Trafficking and Release

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Fiona; Chen, Kang; Ehrlich, Lorna S.; Jin, Jing; Chen, Min H.; Medina, Gisselle N.; Symons, Marc; Montelaro, Ronald; Donaldson, Julie; Tjandra, Nico; Carter, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PI(4,5)P2), the predominant phosphoinositide on the plasma membrane, binds the matrix (MA) protein of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) and Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) with similar affinities in vitro. Interaction with PI(4,5)P2 is critical for HIV-1 assembly on the plasma membrane. EIAV has been shown to localize in internal compartments hence the significance of its interaction with PI(4,5)P2 is unclear. We therefore investigated the binding in vitro of other phosphoinositides to EIAV MA and whether intracellular association with compartments bearing these phosphoinositides was important for assembly and release of virus-like particles (VLPs) formed by Gag. In vitro, EIAV MA bound PI(3)P with higher affinity than PI(4,5)P2 as revealed by NMR spectra upon lipid titration. Gag was detected on the plasma membrane and in compartments enriched in PI(3,5)P2. Treatment of cells with YM201636, a kinase inhibitor that blocks production of PI(3,5)P2 from PI(3)P, caused Gag to co-localize with aberrant compartments and inhibited VLP release. In contrast to HIV-1, release of EIAV VLPs was not significantly diminished by co-expression with 5-phosphatase IV, an enzyme that specifically depletes PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane. However, co-expression with synaptojanin 2, a phosphatase with broader specificity, diminished VLP production. PI-binding pocket mutations caused striking budding defects, as revealed by electron microscopy. One of the mutations also modified Gag-Gag interaction, as suggested by altered bimolecular fluorescence complementation. We conclude that phosphoinositide-mediated targeting to peripheral and internal membranes is a critical factor in EIAV assembly and release. PMID:21176037

  3. Phosphoinositides direct equine infectious anemia virus gag trafficking and release.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Fiona; Chen, Kang; Ehrlich, Lorna S; Jin, Jing; Chen, Min H; Medina, Gisselle N; Symons, Marc; Montelaro, Ronald; Donaldson, Julie; Tjandra, Nico; Carter, Carol A

    2011-04-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate [PI(4,5)P(2) ], the predominant phosphoinositide (PI) on the plasma membrane, binds the matrix (MA) protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) with similar affinities in vitro. Interaction with PI(4,5)P(2) is critical for HIV-1 assembly on the plasma membrane. EIAV has been shown to localize in internal compartments; hence, the significance of its interaction with PI(4,5)P(2) is unclear. We therefore investigated the binding in vitro of other PIs to EIAV MA and whether intracellular association with compartments bearing these PIs was important for assembly and release of virus-like particles (VLPs) formed by Gag. In vitro, EIAV MA bound phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P] with higher affinity than PI(4,5)P(2) as revealed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra upon lipid titration. Gag was detected on the plasma membrane and in compartments enriched in phosphatidylinositol 3,5-biphosphate [PI(3,5)P(2) ]. Treatment of cells with YM201636, a kinase inhibitor that blocks production of PI(3,5)P(2) from PI(3)P, caused Gag to colocalize with aberrant compartments and inhibited VLP release. In contrast to HIV-1, release of EIAV VLPs was not significantly diminished by coexpression with 5-phosphatase IV, an enzyme that specifically depletes PI(4,5)P(2) from the plasma membrane. However, coexpression with synaptojanin 2, a phosphatase with broader specificity, diminished VLP production. PI-binding pocket mutations caused striking budding defects, as revealed by electron microscopy. One of the mutations also modified Gag-Gag interaction, as suggested by altered bimolecular fluorescence complementation. We conclude that PI-mediated targeting to peripheral and internal membranes is a critical factor in EIAV assembly and release. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. [Construction of an infectious clone of equine infectious anemia virus by N-glycosylation reverse-mutations].

    PubMed

    Han, Xiu'e; Quan, Yanping; Gao, Xu; Xiang, Wenhua; Zhou, Jianhua

    2008-03-01

    To elucidate the role of N-glycosylation in fetal donkey dermal cell (FDD)-attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), we constructed an N-glycosylation reverse-mutation molecular clone, pLGN191N236N246. This viral molecular clone was derived from the infectious clone pLGFD3-8 by site-directed mutagenesis. This clone was used to transfect fetal donkey dermal (FDD) cells. Infectious characteristics of transfectants were monitored by RT-PCR, indirect immune fluorescence and reverse transcriptase activity assay. After three passages in FDD cells, viral replications in the supernatant of cell cultures were detected by all the above three methods and viral particles were clearly observed by electron microscopy. The construction of the N-glycosylation reverse-mutation infectious clone provides a solid basis for further study of the mechanism of attenuated pathogenesis and increased immune protection of EIAV attenuated vaccines.

  5. Asymptomatic Reactivation and Shed of Infectious Varicella Zoster Virus in Astronauts

    PubMed Central

    Cohrs, Randall J.; Mehta, Satish K.; Schmid, D. Scott; Gilden, Donald H.; Pierson, Duane L.

    2010-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella (chickenpox), after which virus becomes latent in ganglia along the entire neuraxis. Virus reactivation produces zoster (shingles). Infectious VZV is found in vesicles of patients with zoster and varicella, but virus shed in the absence of disease has not been documented. VZV DNA was previously detected in saliva of astronauts during and after spaceflight, a uniquely stressful environment in which cell mediated immunity (CMI) is temporally dampened. The decline in CMI to VZV associated with zoster led to the hypothesis that infectious VZV would also be present in the saliva of astronauts subjected to stress of space-flight. Herein, not only was the detection of salivary VZV DNA associated with spaceflight validated, but also infectious virus was detected in saliva from 2 of 3 astronauts. This is the first demonstration of shed of infectious VZV in the absence of disease. PMID:18428120

  6. Asymptomatic reactivation and shed of infectious varicella zoster virus in astronauts.

    PubMed

    Cohrs, Randall J; Mehta, Satish K; Schmid, D Scott; Gilden, Donald H; Pierson, Duane L

    2008-06-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella (chickenpox), after which virus becomes latent in ganglia along the entire neuraxis. Virus reactivation produces zoster (shingles). Infectious VZV is found in vesicles of patients with zoster and varicella, but virus shed in the absence of disease has not been documented. VZV DNA was previously detected in saliva of astronauts during and after spaceflight, a uniquely stressful environment in which cell mediated immunity (CMI) is temporally dampened. The decline in CMI to VZV associated with zoster led to the hypothesis that infectious VZV would also be present in the saliva of astronauts subjected to stress of spaceflight. Herein, not only was the detection of salivary VZV DNA associated with spaceflight validated, but also infectious virus was detected in saliva from 2 of 3 astronauts. This is the first demonstration of shed of infectious VZV in the absence of disease.

  7. Canarypox virus expressing infectious bursal disease VP2 protein as immunogen for chickens.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Flavia Adriana; Grand, María Daniela Conte; Mitarotonda, Romina Cristina; Taboga, Oscar Alberto; Calamante, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Canarypox viruses (CNPV) carrying the coding sequence of VP2 protein from infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) were obtained. These viruses were able to express VP2 protein in vitro and to induce IBDV-neutralizing antibodies when inoculated in specific pathogen-free chickens demonstrating that CNPV platform is usefulness to develop immunogens for chickens.

  8. Canarypox virus expressing infectious bursal disease VP2 protein as immunogen for chickens

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, Flavia Adriana; Grand, María Daniela Conte; Mitarotonda, Romina Cristina; Taboga, Oscar Alberto; Calamante, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Canarypox viruses (CNPV) carrying the coding sequence of VP2 protein from infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) were obtained. These viruses were able to express VP2 protein in vitro and to induce IBDV-neutralizing antibodies when inoculated in specific pathogen-free chickens demonstrating that CNPV platform is usefulness to develop immunogens for chickens. PMID:24948937

  9. 3D rotating wall vessel and 2D cell culture of four veterinary virus pathogens: A comparison of virus yields, portions of infectious particles and virus growth curves.

    PubMed

    Malenovská, Hana

    2016-02-01

    Only very few comparative studies have been performed that evaluate general trends of virus growth under 3D in comparison with 2D cell culture conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate differences when four animal viruses are cultured in 2D and 3D. Suid herpesvirus 1 (SuHV-1), Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSIV), Bovine adenovirus (BAdV) and Bovine parainfluenza 3 virus (BPIV-3) were cultivated in 3D rotating wall vessels (RWVs) and conventional 2D cultures. The production of virus particles, the portion of infectious particles, and the infectious growth curves were compared. For all viruses, the production of virus particles (related to cell density), including the non-infectious ones, was lower in 3D than in 2D culture. The production of only infectious particles was significantly lower in BAdV and BPIV-3 in 3D cultures in relation to cell density. The two cultivation approaches resulted in significantly different virus particle-to-TCID50 ratios in three of the four viruses: lower in SuHV-1 and BPIV-3 and higher in BAdV in 3D culture. The infectious virus growth rates were not significantly different in all viruses. Although 3D RWV culture resulted in lower production of virus particles compared to 2D systems, the portion of infectious particles was higher for some viruses.

  10. Efficacy of certain disinfectants against infectious pancreatic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Diane G.; Amend, Donald F.

    1978-01-01

    The virucidal properties of iodophor, chlorine (sodium hypochlorite), formalin, thimerosal (organic mercurial compound), malachite green, and acriflavine were tested on infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV). Iodine and chlorine showed good activity, but efficacy depended on the concentration of virus, the presence of organic matter (calf serum), and water pH. Water hardness (0-300 mg 1−1 as CaCO3) did not affect virucidal activity. In a 5 min exposure, 4 mg 1−1available iodine inactivated 103.9 TCID50 m1−1 IPNV but 16 mg 1−1 iodine were needed for inactivation of 106.3TCID50m1−1. The addition of 0-5% calf serum significantly reduced the iodine concentration and the virucidal activity. In comparison, 4 mg 1−1 chlorine were needed to inactivate 1046 TCID50 m1−1 IPNV in 5 min. However, the addition of 0-07 % serum greatly reduced the chlorine concentration and extended the virucidal contact time to 30 min or more. IPNV at 106.3 TCID60 m1−1 was not inactivated by exposures for 60 min to 0-2% formalin, 10 min to 0-2% thimerosal, 60 min to 5 mg 1−1 malachite green, or 20 min to 500 mg 1−1 acriflavine. However, acriflavine at 0-5 mg 1−1 in cell culture media prevented the development of cytopathology caused by IPNV and may be useful in the treatment of the disease.

  11. The Acyclic Retinoid Peretinoin Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Replication and Infectious Virus Release in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimakami, Tetsuro; Honda, Masao; Shirasaki, Takayoshi; Takabatake, Riuta; Liu, Fanwei; Murai, Kazuhisa; Shiomoto, Takayuki; Funaki, Masaya; Yamane, Daisuke; Murakami, Seishi; Lemon, Stanley M.; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2014-04-01

    Clinical studies suggest that the oral acyclic retinoid Peretinoin may reduce the recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) following surgical ablation of primary tumours. Since hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of HCC, we assessed whether Peretinoin and other retinoids have any effect on HCV infection. For this purpose, we measured the effects of several retinoids on the replication of genotype 1a, 1b, and 2a HCV in vitro. Peretinoin inhibited RNA replication for all genotypes and showed the strongest antiviral effect among the retinoids tested. Furthermore, it reduced infectious virus release by 80-90% without affecting virus assembly. These effects could be due to reduced signalling from lipid droplets, triglyceride abundance, and the expression of mature sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c and fatty acid synthase. These negative effects of Peretinoin on HCV infection may be beneficial in addition to its potential for HCC chemoprevention in HCV-infected patients.

  12. Phylodynamic analysis of avian infectious bronchitis virus in South America.

    PubMed

    Marandino, Ana; Pereda, Ariel; Tomás, Gonzalo; Hernández, Martín; Iraola, Gregorio; Craig, María Isabel; Hernández, Diego; Banda, Alejandro; Villegas, Pedro; Panzera, Yanina; Pérez, Ruben

    2015-06-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is a coronavirus of chickens that causes great economic losses to the global poultry industry. The present study focuses on South American IBVs and their genetic relationships with global strains. We obtained full-length sequences of the S1 coding region and N gene of IBV field isolates from Uruguay and Argentina, and performed Phylodynamic analysis to characterize the strains and estimate the time of the most recent common ancestor. We identified two major South American genotypes, which were here denoted South America I (SAI) and Asia/South America II (A/SAII). The SAI genotype is an exclusive South American lineage that emerged in the 1960s. The A/SAII genotype may have emerged in Asia in approximately 1995 before being introduced into South America. Both SAI and A/SAII genotype strains clearly differ from the Massachusetts strains that are included in the vaccine formulations being used in most South American countries. © 2015 The Authors.

  13. The genetic diversity and epizootiology of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oshima, Kevin H.; Arakawa, Cindy K.; Higman, Keith H.; Landolt, Marsha L.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Winton, James R.

    1994-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a rhabdovirus which causes a serious disease in salmondd fish. The T1 ribonuclease fingerprinttin method was used to compare the RNA genomes of 26 isolates of IHNV recovered from sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha), and steelhead trout (O. mykiss) throughout the enzootic portion of western North America. Most of the isolates as a source of genetic variation. In from a single year (1987) to limit time of isolation as a source of genetic variation. In addition, isolates from different years collected at three sites were analyzed to investigate genetic drift or evolution of IHNV within specific locations. All of the isolates examined by T1 fingerprint analysis contained less than a 50% variation in spot location and were represented by a single fingerprint group. The observed variation was estimated to correspond to less than 5% variation in the nucleic acid sequence. However, sufficient variation was detected to separate the isolates into four subgroups which appeared to correlate to different geographic regions. Host species appeared not to be a significant source of variation. The evolutionary and epizootiologic significance of these findings and their relationship to other evidence of genetic variation in IHNV isolates are discussed.

  14. Detection of Infectious Influenza Virus in Cough Aerosols Generated in a Simulated Patient Examination Room

    PubMed Central

    Noti, John D.; Lindsley, William G.; Blachere, Francoise M.; Cao, Gang; Kashon, Michael L.; Thewlis, Robert E.; McMillen, Cynthia M.; King, William P.; Szalajda, Jonathan V.; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The potential for aerosol transmission of infectious influenza virus (ie, in healthcare facilities) is controversial. We constructed a simulated patient examination room that contained coughing and breathing manikins to determine whether coughed influenza was infectious and assessed the effectiveness of an N95 respirator and surgical mask in blocking transmission. Methods National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health aerosol samplers collected size-fractionated aerosols for 60 minutes at the mouth of the breathing manikin, beside the mouth, and at 3 other locations in the room. Total recovered virus was quantitated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and infectivity was determined by the viral plaque assay and an enhanced infectivity assay. Results Infectious influenza was recovered in all aerosol fractions (5.0% in >4 µm aerodynamic diameter, 75.5% in 1–4 µm, and 19.5% in <1 µm; n = 5). Tightly sealing a mask to the face blocked entry of 94.5% of total virus and 94.8% of infectious virus (n = 3). A tightly sealed respirator blocked 99.8% of total virus and 99.6% of infectious virus (n = 3). A poorly fitted respirator blocked 64.5% of total virus and 66.5% of infectious virus (n = 3). A mask documented to be loosely fitting by a PortaCount fit tester, to simulate how masks are worn by healthcare workers, blocked entry of 68.5% of total virus and 56.6% of infectious virus (n = 2). Conclusions These results support a role for aerosol transmission and represent the first reported laboratory study of the efficacy of masks and respirators in blocking inhalation of influenza in aerosols. The results indicate that a poorly fitted respirator performs no better than a loosely fitting mask. PMID:22460981

  15. Discrimination of infectious hepatitis A viruses by propidium monoazide real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Gloria; Elizaquível, Patricia; Aznar, Rosa

    2012-03-01

    The discrimination of infectious and inactivated viruses remains a key obstacle when using quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) to quantify enteric viruses. In this study, propidium monoazide (PMA) and RNase pretreatments were evaluated for the detection and quantification of infectious hepatitis A virus (HAV). For thermally inactivated HAV, PMA treatment was more effective than RNase treatment for differentiating infectious and inactivated viruses, with HAV titers reduced by more than 2.4 log(10) units. Results showed that combining 50 μM of PMA and RT-qPCR selectively quantify infectious HAV in media suspensions. Therefore, PMA treatment previous to RT-qPCR detection is a promising alternative to assess HAV infectivity.

  16. Molecular Determinants of the Ratio of Inert to Infectious Virus Particles

    PubMed Central

    Klasse, P.J.

    2016-01-01

    The ratio of virus particles to infectious units is a classic measurement in virology and ranges widely from several million to below 10 for different viruses. Much evidence suggests a distinction be made between infectious and infecting particles or virions: out of many potentially infectious virions, few infect under regular experimental conditions, largely because of diffusion barriers. Still, some virions are inert from the start; others become defective through decay. And with increasing cell- and molecular-biological knowledge of each step in the replicative cycle for different viruses, it emerges that many processes entail considerable losses of potential viral infectivity. Furthermore, all-or-nothing assumptions about virion infectivity are flawed and should be replaced by descriptions that allow for spectra of infectious propensities. A more realistic understanding of the infectivity of individual virions has both practical and theoretical implications for virus neutralization, vaccine research, antiviral therapy, and the use of viral vectors. PMID:25595808

  17. Suppression of infectious murine leukemia virus in wild mice (Mus musculus) by passive immunization.

    PubMed

    Gardner, M B; Klement, V; Estes, J D; Gilden, R V; Toni, R; Huebner, R J

    1977-06-01

    Passive immunization with heterologous antivirus antiserum beginning at birth successfully suppressed infectious murine leukemia virus expression in Lake Casitas wild mice (Musmusculus) at 5-7 weeks of age.

  18. Comparative nucleotide sequence analysis of three virulent strains of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a very serious and widespread respiratory disease of chickens caused by gallid herpesvirus type 1, commonly named infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). For protection from ILT, chickens have traditionally been vaccinated with live-attenuated strains that ha...

  19. Understanding the role of ORF-C gene in the pathogenicity of infectious laryngotracheitis virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a very serious and widespread respiratory disease of chickens caused by infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). Conventional attenuated ILT vaccines, obtained by continuous passages in chicken embryos and tissue culture, had been the main tools utilized by th...

  20. Antibody Escape Kinetics of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Infection of Horses

    PubMed Central

    Mealey, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Lentivirus escape from neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is not well understood. In this work, we quantified antibody escape of a lentivirus, using antibody escape data from horses infected with equine infectious anemia virus. We calculated antibody blocking rates of wild-type virus, fitness costs of mutant virus, and growth rates of both viruses. These quantitative kinetic estimates of antibody escape are important for understanding lentiviral control by antibody neutralization and in developing NAb-eliciting vaccine strategies. PMID:25878104

  1. Equine infectious anemia virus replication is upregulated during differentiation of blood monocytes from acutely infected horses.

    PubMed Central

    Sellon, D C; Walker, K M; Russell, K E; Perry, S T; Covington, P; Fuller, F J

    1996-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus is a lentivirus that replicates in mature tissue macrophages of horses. Ponies were infected with equine infectious anemia virus. During febrile episodes, proviral DNA was detectable, but viral mRNA was not detectable. As cultured blood monocytes from these ponies differentiated into macrophages, viral expression was upregulated. In situ hybridization confirmed that viral transcription occurred in mature macrophages. PMID:8523576

  2. Development of an improved methodology to detect infectious airborne influenza virus using the NIOSH bioaerosol sampler

    PubMed Central

    Cao, G.; Noti, J. D.; Blachere, F. M.; Lindsley, W. G.; Beezhold, D. H.

    2016-01-01

    A unique two-stage cyclone bioaerosol sampler has been developed at NIOSH that can separate aerosols into three size fractions. The ability of this sampler to collect infectious airborne viruses from a calm-air chamber loaded with influenza A virus was tested. The sampler’s efficiency at collecting aerosolized viral particles from a calm-air chamber is essentially the same as that from the high performance SKC BioSampler that collects un-fractionated particles directly into a liquid media (2.4 × 104 total viral particles per liter of sampled air (TVP/L) versus 2.6 × 104 TVP/L, respectively, after 15 min) and the efficiency is relatively constant over collection times of 15, 30 and 60 min. Approximately 34% of the aerosolized infectious virus collected after 15 min with the NIOSH bioaerosol sampler remained infectious, and infectious virus was found in all three size fractions. After 60 min of sampling, the infectious virus/liter air found in the NIOSH bioaerosol sampler was 15% of that found in the SKC BioSampler. This preservation of infectivity by the NIOSH bioaerosol sampler was maintained even when the initial infectivity prior to aerosolization was as low as 0.06%. The utility of the NIOSH bioaerosol sampler was further extended by incorporating an enhanced infectivity detection methodology developed in our laboratory, the viral replication assay, which amplified the infectious virus making it more readily detectable. PMID:21975583

  3. Minimum Infectious Dose Determination of the Arkansas Delmarva Poultry Industry Infectious Bronchitis Virus Vaccine Delivered by Hatchery Spray Cabinet.

    PubMed

    Leyson, Christina M; Hilt, Deborah A; Jordan, Brian J; Jackwood, Mark W

    2017-03-01

    The Arkansas Delmarva Poultry Industry (ArkDPI) infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) vaccine is effective when administered by eye drop, where the vaccine virus is able to infect and replicate well in birds and is able to induce protection against homologous challenge. However, accumulating evidence indicates that the ArkDPI vaccine is ineffective when applied by hatchery spray cabinet using the same manufacturer-recommended dose per bird. For this study, we aimed to determine the minimum infectious dose for the spray-administered ArkDPI vaccine, which we designate as the dose that achieves the same level of infection and replication as the eye drop-administered ArkDPI vaccine. To this end, we used increasing doses of commercial ArkDPI vaccine to vaccinate 100 commercial broiler chicks at day of hatch, using a commercial hatchery spray cabinet. The choanal cleft of each bird was swabbed at 7 and 10 days postvaccination, and real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR was performed. We observed that the level of infection and replication with spray vaccination matches with that of eye drop vaccination when chicks received 100 times the standard dose for the commercial ArkDPI vaccine. We further examined the S1 spike gene sequence from a subset of reisolated ArkDPI vaccine virus samples and observed that certain nucleotide changes arise in vaccine viruses reisolated from chicks, as previously reported. This suggests that the ArkDPI vaccine has a certain virus subpopulation that, while successful at infecting and replicating in chicks, represents only a minor virus subpopulation in the original vaccine. Thus, the minimum infectious dose for the ArkDPI vaccine using a hatchery spray cabinet appears to be dependent on the amount of this minor subpopulation reaching the chicks.

  4. Large-scale production and concentration of infectious Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, F; Rosensteel, J F; Hummer, R M; Hillman, E A; Riggs, C W; Charmella, L J

    1978-01-01

    Infectious Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was produced from suspension cultures of P3HR-1 cells. A protocol for the scaled-up production and concentration of the virus was developed. Virus from the culture fluid was concentrated by continuous-flow pelletization or continuous flow with banding in sucrose. EBV prepared by pelletization yielded 1.7 X 10(4) infectious units/ml (100 X concentration) and less than 3.4 X 10(7) EVB particles/ml (1,000 X concentration), whereas EBV prepared by banding yielded 4.6 X 10(3) infectious units/ml (100 X concentration) aand 1.3 X 10(8) EBV particles 1 ml (1,000 X concentration). The majority of the virus particles observed were "empty" membrane-associated particles. A statistical test of the correlation between infectivity and virus particle count was made. Images PMID:203227

  5. Virus mutations and their impact on vaccination against infectious bursal disease (Gumboro disease).

    PubMed

    Boudaoud, A; Mamache, B; Tombari, W; Ghram, A

    2016-12-01

    Infectious bursal disease (also known as Gumboro disease) is an immunosuppressive viral disease specific to chickens. In spite of all the information amassed on the antigenic and immunological characteristics of the virus, the disease has not yet been brought fully under control. It is still prevalent in properly vaccinated flocks carrying specific antibodies at levels normally high enough to prevent the disease. Common causes apart, failure of vaccination against infectious bursal disease is associated mainly with early vaccination in flocks of unknown immune status and with the evolution of viruses circulating in the field, leading to antigenic drift and a sharp rise in pathogenicity. Various highly sensitive molecular techniques have clarified the viral determinants of antigenicity and pathogenicity of the infectious bursal disease virus. However, these markers are not universally recognised and tend to be considered as evolutionary markers. Antigenic variants of the infectious bursal disease virus possess modified neutralising epitopes that allow them to evade the action of maternally-derived or vaccine-induced antibodies. Autogenous or multivalent vaccines are required to control antigenic variants in areas where classical and variant virus strains coexist. Pathotypic variants (very virulent viruses) remain antigenically related to classical viruses. The difficulty in controlling pathotypic variants is linked to the difficulty of eliciting an early immune response, because of the risk of the vaccine virus being neutralised by maternal antibodies. Mathematical calculation of the optimal vaccination time and the use of vaccines resistant to maternally-derived antibodies have improved the control of very virulent viruses.

  6. Apoptosis transcriptional mechanism of feline infectious peritonitis virus infected cells.

    PubMed

    Shuid, Ahmad Naqib; Safi, Nikoo; Haghani, Amin; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; Haron, Mohd Syamsul Reza; Tan, Sheau Wei; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2015-11-01

    Apoptosis has been postulated to play an important role during feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) infection; however, its mechanism is not well characterized. This study is focused on apoptosis and transcriptional profiling of FIPV-infected cells following in vitro infection of CRFK cells with FIPV 79-1146 WSU. Flow cytometry was used to determine mode of cell death in first 42 h post infection (hpi). FIPV infected cells underwent early apoptosis at 9 hpi (p < 0.05) followed by late apoptosis at 12 hpi (p < 0.05) and necrosis from 24 hpi (p < 0.05). Then, next generation sequencing was performed on 9 hpi and control uninfected cells by Illumina analyzer. An aggregate of 4546 genes (2229 down-regulated and 2317 up-regulated) from 17 cellular process, 11 molecular functions and 130 possible biological pathways were affected by FIPV. 131 genes from apoptosis cluster (80 down-regulated and 51 up-regulated) along with increase of apoptosis, p53, p38 MAPK, VEGF and chemokines/cytokines signaling pathways were probably involved in apoptosis process. Six of the de-regulated genes expression (RASSF1, BATF2, MAGEB16, PDCD5, TNFα and TRAF2) and TNFα protein concentration were analyzed by RT-qPCR and ELISA, respectively, at different time-points. Up-regulations of both pro-apoptotic (i.e. PDCD5) and anti-apoptotic (i.e. TRAF2) were detected from first hpi and continuing to deregulate during apoptosis process in the infected cells.

  7. prM-antibody renders immature West Nile virus infectious in vivo.

    PubMed

    Colpitts, Tonya M; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela; Moesker, Bastiaan; Wang, Penghua; Fikrig, Erol; Smit, Jolanda M

    2011-10-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a member of the family Flaviviridae and is a neurotropic pathogen responsible for severe human disease. Flavivirus-infected cells release virus particles that contain variable numbers of precursor membrane (prM) protein molecules at the viral surface. Consequently, antibodies are produced against the prM protein. These antibodies have been shown to activate the infectious potential of fully immature flavivirus particles in vitro. Here, we provide in vivo proof that prM antibodies render immature WNV infectious. Infection with antibody-opsonized immature WNV particles caused disease and death of mice, and infectious WNV was found in the brains and sera.

  8. Eradication of Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis Virus (Bovine Herpesvirus 1) from a Herd of Beef Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus was eradicated from a 150 cow beef herd at the Animal Diseases Research Institute, Lethbridge, Alberta. Tests used to accomplish this included standard and modified serum-virus neutralization tests and an enzymelinked immunosorbent assay. These results and those of preliminary pilot studies in the herd and in a nonvaccinated, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis-infected 450 cow beef herd suggest that eradication of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis infection can be considered as a practical control alternative to vaccination, and that young animals in purebred herds could be monitored serologically and isolated, to enhance their eligibility for entry into artificial insemination studs or for export. PMID:17422544

  9. Study of the viral interference between infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) and infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Byrne, N; Castric, J; Lamour, F; Cabon, J; Quentel, C

    2008-05-01

    The resistance of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to an infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) challenge following a preceding non-lethal infection with infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) was investigated through experimental dual infections. Trout initially infected with IPNV were inoculated 14 days later with IHNV. Single infections of trout with 1 of the 2 viruses or with cell culture supernatant were also carried out and constituted control groups. No mortality was noted in fish after a single infection with IPNV. This virus had no influence on the head kidney leucocyte phagocytic activity and plasma haemolytic complement activity. IHNV induced a high mortality (72%) and reduced the macrophage phagocytic activity and complement haemolytic activity. It also induced a late production of anti-IHNV antibodies which occurred after clearance of the virus in the fish. In trout co-infected with both viruses, a mortality rate of 2% occurred and the immune parameters were similar to those observed in the fish infected with IPNV only, demonstrating that in co-infected trout IPNV inhibits the effects of IHNV. The studied parameters did not allow us to define the mechanism of interference occurring between these 2 viruses, but some hypothesis are put forward to explain the interference between the 2 viruses.

  10. Immunogenicity of West Nile virus infectious DNA and its noninfectious derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Seregin, Alexey; Nistler, Ryan; Borisevich, Victoria; Yamshchikov, Galina; Chaporgina, Elena; Kwok, Chun Wai; Yamshchikov, Vladimir . E-mail: yaximik@ku.edu

    2006-12-20

    The exceptionally high virulence of the West Nile NY99 strain makes its suitability in the development of a live WN vaccine uncertain. The aim of this study is to investigate the immunogenicity of noninfectious virus derivatives carrying pseudolethal mutations, which preclude virion formation without affecting preceding steps of the viral infectious cycle. When administered using DNA immunization, such constructs initiate an infectious cycle but cannot lead to a viremia. While the magnitude of the immune response to a noninfectious replication-competent construct was lower than that of virus or infectious DNA, its overall quality and the protective effect were similar. In contrast, a nonreplicating construct of similar length induced only a marginally detectable immune response in the dose range used. Thus, replication-competent noninfectious constructs derived from infectious DNA may offer an advantageous combination of the safety of noninfectious formulations with the quality of the immune response characteristic of infectious vaccines.

  11. First Infectious Clone of the Propagatively Transmitted Oat Blue Dwarf Virus.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Oat blue dwarf virus (OBDV) is a relatively small, phloem-limited marafivirus that replicates in its leafhopper vector. We have developed complete cDNA clones of OBDV from which infectious transcripts may be derived – the first such clones for any propagatively transmitted plant virus. Prior to clon...

  12. Detection of Persistent Chikungunya Virus RNA but not Infectious Virus in Experimental Vertical Transmission in Aedes aegypti from Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hui Vern; Vythilingam, Indra; Sulaiman, Wan Yusof Wan; Lulla, Aleksei; Merits, Andres; Chan, Yoke Fun; Sam, I-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Vertical transmission may contribute to the maintenance of arthropod-borne viruses, but its existence in chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is unclear. Experimental vertical transmission of infectious clones of CHIKV in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes from Malaysia was investigated. Eggs and adult progeny from the second gonotrophic cycles of infected parental mosquitoes were tested. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), 56.3% of pooled eggs and 10% of adult progeny had detectable CHIKV RNA, but no samples had detectable infectious virus by plaque assay. Transfected CHIKV RNA from PCR-positive eggs did not yield infectious virus in BHK-21 cells. Thus, vertical transmission of viable CHIKV was not demonstrated. Noninfectious CHIKV RNA persists in eggs and progeny of infected Ae. aegypti, but the mechanism and significance are unknown. There is insufficient evidence to conclude that vertical transmission exists in CHIKV, as positive results reported in previous studies were almost exclusively based only on viral RNA detection. PMID:26598564

  13. Effect of maternal antibody upon vaccination with infectious bovine rhinotracheitis and bovine virus diarrhea vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Menanteau-Horta, A M; Ames, T R; Johnson, D W; Meiske, J C

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the normal rate of decay of maternal antibody and the influence of maternal antibody on responses to a single vaccination with modified-live bovine virus diarrhea and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus vaccines at 196 days of age and on response to vaccinations with the same vaccines given twice at 84 and 196 days of age. Passive immunity decreased to near zero over the first six months of life for both bovine virus diarrhea and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis controls. All calves seroconverted to bovine virus diarrhea vaccine at 84 days of age, even though high levels (greater than 1:32) of maternal antibodies were present. These calves did not seroconvert to infectious bovine rhinotracheitis vaccine at 84 days of age when high levels (less than 1:16) of maternal antibodies were present. Calves responded well to bovine virus diarrhea and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis vaccines given only once at 196 days of age after passive immunity disappeared. Calves which were revaccinated with infectious bovine rhinotracheitis seroconverted showing a more rapid response than the single vaccinates. Those revaccinated with bovine virus diarrhea showed an immediate response of small magnitude. PMID:2985214

  14. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Pseudotyped with Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Serves as a Highly Protective, Non-infectious Vaccine Against Ebola Virus Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    1 Vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotyped with Ebola virus glycoprotein serves as 1 a highly protective, non-infectious vaccine against Ebola virus...Iowa City, IA 52242 USA 16 1 319 335 8021 17 wendy-maury@uiowa.edu 18 19 Running title: Pseudovirion vaccine against Ebola virus 20...DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. UNCLASSIFIED 2 Abstract 21 An epidemic caused by Ebola virus (EBOV

  15. Advances in vaccine research against economically important viral diseases of food animals: Infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Jackwood, Daral J

    2017-07-01

    Numerous reviews have been published on infectious bursal disease (IBD) and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). Many high quality vaccines are commercially available for the control of IBD that, when used correctly, provide solid protection against infection and disease caused by IBDV. Viruses are not static however; they continue to evolve and vaccines need to keep pace with them. The evolution of IBDV has resulted in very virulent strains and new antigenic types of the virus. This review will discuss some of the limitations associated with existing vaccines, potential solutions to these problems and advances in new vaccines for the control of IBD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Rapid detection of Infectious bursal disease virus by reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chunyi; Zhang, Yun; Zhou, Qingfeng; Xu, Cong; Li, Xiaoming; Cao, Yongchang

    2009-11-01

    A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was developed for the rapid identification of Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). The RT-LAMP assay used a set of 4 primers to amplify the viral protein 2 gene of IBDV for the detection of IBDV, showing not only high efficiency but also analytic specificity. The data demonstrated that the RT-LAMP assay detected 30 different IBDV isolates, had no cross-reaction with 3 other avian viruses (Infectious bronchitis virus, Newcastle disease virus, and Avian influenza virus), and obtained a 95.45% sensitivity in 22 positive clinical samples in reference to virus isolation. Therefore, this rapid, specific, sensitive, and convenient RT-LAMP assay could be applicable to the identification of IBDV in less-equipped laboratories as well as in the field.

  17. Detection and identification of infectious bronchitis virus by RT-PCR in Iran.

    PubMed

    Homayounimehr, Alireza; Pakbin, Ahmad; Momayyez, Reza; Fatemi, Seyyedeh Mahsa Rastegar

    2016-06-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) causes severe diseases in poultry with significant economic consequences to the poultry industry in Iran. The aim of this study was the detection and identification of IBV by reverse transcription(RT)-PCR in Iran. Ten IB virus strains were detected by testing trachea, cecal tonsil, and kidney tissues collected from broiler and layer farms in Iran. In order to detect infectious bronchitis virus, an optimized RT-PCR was used. Primers targeting the conserved region of known IBV serotypes were used in the RT-PCR assay. Primers selectively detecting Massachusetts and 793/B type IB viruses were designed to amplify the S1 gene of the virus and used in the nested PCR test. Our findings indicate the circulation of at least three genotypes of IB viruses (Massachusetts, 793/B, and variant 2) among poultry flocks.

  18. Clathrin Mediates Infectious Hepatitis C Virus Particle Egress

    PubMed Central

    Benedicto, Ignacio; Gondar, Virgínia; Molina-Jiménez, Francisca; García-Buey, Luisa; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Gastaminza, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although it is well established that hepatitis C virus (HCV) entry into hepatocytes depends on clathrin-mediated endocytosis, the possible roles of clathrin in other steps of the viral cycle remain unexplored. Thus, we studied whether cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) exocytosis was altered after clathrin interference. Knockdown of clathrin or the clathrin adaptor AP-1 in HCVcc-infected human hepatoma cell cultures impaired viral secretion without altering intracellular HCVcc levels or apolipoprotein B (apoB) and apoE exocytosis. Similar reductions in HCVcc secretion were observed after treatment with specific clathrin and dynamin inhibitors. Furthermore, detergent-free immunoprecipitation assays, neutralization experiments, and immunofluorescence analyses suggested that whereas apoE associated with infectious intracellular HCV precursors in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-related structures, AP-1 participated in HCVcc egress in a post-ER compartment. Finally, we observed that clathrin and AP-1 knockdown altered the endosomal distribution of HCV core, reducing and increasing its colocalization with early endosome and lysosome markers, respectively. Our data support a model in which nascent HCV particles associate with apoE in the ER and exit cells following a clathrin-dependent transendosomal secretory route. IMPORTANCE HCV entry into hepatocytes depends on clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Here we demonstrate for the first time that clathrin also participates in HCV exit from infected cells. Our data uncover important features of HCV egress, which may lead to the development of new therapeutic interventions. Interestingly, we show that secretion of the very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) components apoB and apoE is not impaired after clathrin interference. This is a significant finding, since, to date, it has been proposed that HCV and VLDL follow similar exocytic routes. Given that lipid metabolism recently emerged as a potential target for therapies against HCV

  19. Kinetics of transcription of infectious laryngotracheitis virus genes.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudian, Alireza; Markham, Philip F; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Browning, Glenn F

    2012-03-01

    The kinetics of expression of only a few genes of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) have been determined, using northern blot analysis. We used quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR to examine the kinetics of expression of 74 ILTV genes in LMH cells. ICP4 was the only gene fully expressed in the presence of cycloheximide, and thus classified as immediate-early. The genes most highly expressed early in infection, and thus classified as early, included UL1 (gL), UL2, UL3, UL4, UL5, UL6, UL7, UL8, UL13, UL14, UL19, UL20, UL23 (TK), UL25, UL28, UL29, UL31, UL33, UL34, UL38, UL39, UL40, UL42, UL43, UL44 (gC), UL47, UL48 (α-TIF), UL49, UL54 (ICP27), US3 and US10. ORF A, ORF B, ORF C, ORF E, sORF 4/3, UL[-1], UL0, UL3.5, UL9, UL10 (gM), UL11, UL15a, UL15b, UL18, UL22 (gH), UL24, UL26, UL30, UL32, UL36, UL45, UL49.5 (gN), UL52, US2, US4 (gG), US5 (gJ) and US9 were most highly expressed late in infection and were thus considered late genes. Several genes, including ORF D, UL12, UL17, UL21, UL27 (gB), UL35, UL37, UL41, UL46, UL50, UL51, UL53 (gK), US8 (gE), US6 (gD) and US7 (gI), had features of both early and late genes and were classified as early/late. Our findings suggest transcription from most of ILTV genes is leaky or subject to more complex patterns of regulation than those classically described for herpesviruses. This is the first study examining global expression of ILTV genes and the data provide a basis for future investigations of the pathogenesis of infection with ILTV.

  20. Sequential tests for infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in individuals and populations of sockeye salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Pascho, Ron

    1986-01-01

    The incidence and titer distribution of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in cavity fluid from spent female sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) varied little when fish from a naturally spawning population were sampled three times on alternate days. However, when prespawning female sockeye salmon from a second population were individually tagged, penned, and sampled daily, the incidence and proportion of fish with high virus titer rose over a 6-d period. In 10 instances, consecutive cavity fluid samples from the same fish reverted from virus-positive to virus-negative. We suggest that spent fish should be sampled when accurate and quantitative data on the incidence and level of the virus are required.

  1. Comparative genomics of QX-like infectious bronchitis viruses in Korea.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung-Min; Kwon, Hyuk-Joon; Choi, Kang-Seuk; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2017-05-01

    To minimize the spread of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), domestic fowl have been extensively vaccinated with the KM91 strain. However, various IBV QX-like virus strains have become increasingly prevalent in Korea. We conducted comparative genomic analyses of seven QX-like viruses: early viruses (n = 2), new cluster 1 (NC1; recombinants of KM91 and the early QX-like viruses, n = 3) and recurrent viruses (n = 2), to understand their genomic backgrounds. The early and NC1 viruses had KM91-like backgrounds, but the recurrent viruses had QX-like genomic backgrounds. The absence of pure QX-like viruses before the appearance of the early viruses suggests that the viruses were introduced from other countries after recombination, but the NC1 viruses originated in Korea. The recent prevalence of recurrent viruses with different genomic backgrounds and spike genes from the early and the NC1 viruses may indicate the repeated introduction of different infectious bronchitis viruses from other countries and their successful evasion of vaccine immunity in the field. Furthermore, a 1ab gene-based phylogenetic analysis revealed three distinct lineages: North America-Europe, China/Taiwan, and China. KM91 and the early and NC1 viruses were included in the North America-Europe lineage, and the recurrent QX-like viruses were included in the China lineage. The phylogenetic positions of KM91-like 1ab and QX-like spike suggest frequent recombination between the North America-Europe and China lineages. Additional studies on the patterns of recombination, including donor-acceptor relationships, geographical sites, and non-poultry hosts, may be valuable for understanding the evolution of IBVs.

  2. Virulence of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus and Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus coinfection in rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss) and nucleotide sequence analysis of the IHNV glycoprotein gene.

    PubMed

    Alonso, M; Rodríguez Saint-Jean, S; Pérez-Prieto, S I

    2003-08-01

    The outcomes of a coinfection of rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss) with Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) strain S46 and Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) strain S46 was determined after waterborne infection. Trout infected with the IHNV/IPNV.S46 sample, (a mixed sample containing equal infectious titers of the viruses) showed 50% less mortality than fish infected with either of the reference viruses alone. Forty-five days after the coinfection, IPNV antigens were detected by flow cytometry in 49 to 63% of the leukocytes from the surviving trout; whereas, only 9-15.6% of the leukocytes expressed IHNV viral antigens. IPNV was easily detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), whereas, for IHNV, a second step of amplification of a 753 bp fragment corresponding to the internal sequences of the IHNV G gene was necessary to optimize viral detection. The sequence of the IHNV gene involved in virulence, the glycoprotein (G) gene, was determined for the IHNV.S46 and compared with other sequences available in the GenBank. Changes found were not located in the antigenic domains of the glycoprotein and were considered not significant.

  3. Detection of Infectious Virus from Field-collected Mosquitoes by Vero Cell Culture Assay

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Philip M.; Andreadis, Theodore G.; Finan, Shannon L.; Shepard, John J.; Thomas, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Mosquitoes transmit a number of distinct viruses including important human pathogens such as West Nile virus, dengue virus, and chickungunya virus. Many of these viruses have intensified in their endemic ranges and expanded to new territories, necessitating effective surveillance and control programs to respond to these threats. One strategy to monitor virus activity involves collecting large numbers of mosquitoes from endemic sites and testing them for viral infection. In this article, we describe how to handle, process, and screen field-collected mosquitoes for infectious virus by Vero cell culture assay. Mosquitoes are sorted by trap location and species, and grouped into pools containing ≤50 individuals. Pooled specimens are homogenized in buffered saline using a mixer-mill and the aqueous phase is inoculated onto confluent Vero cell cultures (Clone E6). Cell cultures are monitored for cytopathic effect from days 3-7 post-inoculation and any viruses grown in cell culture are identified by the appropriate diagnostic assays. By utilizing this approach, we have isolated 9 different viruses from mosquitoes collected in Connecticut, USA, and among these, 5 are known to cause human disease. Three of these viruses (West Nile virus, Potosi virus, and La Crosse virus) represent new records for North America or the New England region since 1999. The ability to detect a wide diversity of viruses is critical to monitoring both established and newly emerging viruses in the mosquito population. PMID:21694689

  4. Detection and transmission of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amend, Donald F.

    1975-01-01

    Detection and transmission of Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) was studied at a commercial trout hatchery. Transmission of virus was demonstrated via water, feed and contaminated eggs. If eggs from carrier females were incubated several weeks in virus-free water, the resulting fry did not become infected. However, if fry subsequently became infected they were lifetime carriers. Infectious virus was readily detectable in most tissues of moribund fish; in carriers it was detected in sex products of spawning fish, and in samples from the intestine of post-spawning fish, but not in samples from blood, feces, kidney, or liver. The carrier rate was not significantly different between sexes. It was concluded that adult carriers are the reservoir of infection and that transmission occurs primarily when carriers shed virus and expose susceptible fish or eggs.

  5. Characterization of infectious salmon anemia virus, an orthomyxo-like virus isolated from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    PubMed Central

    Falk, K; Namork, E; Rimstad, E; Mjaaland, S; Dannevig, B H

    1997-01-01

    Infectious salmon anemia (ISA) virus is the cause of infectious salmon anemia in farmed Atlantic salmon. The virus has been shown to contain RNA with structural characteristics similar to those of accepted members of the Orthomyxoviridae. Further biochemical, physiochemical, and morphological characterization of ISA virus was undertaken to clarify its taxonomic position. The virus was found to be sensitive to chloroform, heat, and low pH and agglutinated erythrocytes from fish. Erythrocytes from mammals or birds were not agglutinated. Receptor-destroying enzyme activity was detected, and the nature of this enzyme was suggested to be an acetylesterase. The buoyant density of the virus was 1.18 g/ml in sucrose and CsCl gradients. The maximum rate of virus replication was observed at 15 degrees C, while no virus was produced at 25 degrees C. Actinomycin D inhibited viral replication, and viral antigen was detected in nuclei by immunofluorescence. The addition of trypsin to the culture medium during virus replication had a beneficial effect on virus replication. ISA virus contains four major polypeptides with estimated molecular sizes of 71, 53, 43, and 24 kDa. Electron microscopy revealed structures closely resembling the nucleocapsids of influenza virus. Mushroom-shaped surface projections were a distinctive morphological feature, which differed from the rod-shaped hemagglutinin projections of the influenza viruses. The data reported here support the relationship of ISA virus to the Orthomyxoviridae, although ISA virus differs from influenza viruses in some morphological characteristics and in showing restricted hemagglutination, in different specificity of the receptor-destroying enzyme, in different polypeptide profile, in being unable to replicate at temperatures above 25 degrees C, and in host range. PMID:9371558

  6. Characterization of isolates of equine infectious anemia virus in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Tigre, Dellane Martins; Brandão, Camila Fonseca Lopes; de Paula, Fabiana Lopes; Chinalia, Fabio Alexandre; Campos, Gubio Soares; Sardi, Silvia Ines

    2017-03-01

    Equine infectious anemia is an important infectious disease that affects equids worldwide. Control of the disease is currently based on detection of anti-p26 EIAV by Agar Gel Immunodiffusion (AGID). In this work, 62 animals were examined by AGID and nested-PCR using primers for the gag gene. Fifty-three samples (85.5%) were positive by nested-PCR, whereas only 33 samples (53%) were positive for AGID. Fifteen amplicons obtained by nested-PCR were sequenced and the aligned results subjected to phylogenetic analysis. The analysis suggests that the Brazilian EIAV form a cluster with WSU5, EIAVUK and Wyoming strains from United States.

  7. Molecular characterization of chicken infectious anemia virus from contaminated live-virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Hu, Yan; Cui, Shuai; Fu, Jiayuan; Wang, Yixin; Cui, Zhizhong; Fang, Lichun; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng

    2016-11-02

    The aim of this study was to investigate possible causes of the pervasiveness of chicken infectious anemia virus ( CIAV: ) infection in chickens in recent years in China. A total of 14 batches of live-virus vaccines were examined using PCR to detect CIAV contamination, of which only 2 samples (a Newcastle disease vaccine and a fowl pox vaccine) tested positive for CIAV. These Newcastle and fowl pox vaccines were then inoculated into 1-day-old specific-pathogen-free chickens. Serum samples were collected from chickens infected with the PCR-positive vaccines, and these tested positive for CIAV-specific antibodies as tested using ELISA. In addition, DNA samples isolated from the serum samples also tested positive by PCR. The results indicated that the samples were contaminated with CIAV and identified 2 exogenous CIAV strains, designated CIAV-N22 and CIAV-F10, in the respective samples. The full genome sequences of these novel CIAV strains were sequenced and analyzed. Phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that the CIAV-F10 strain might represent a recombinant viral strain arising from the parental CIAV strains JQ690762 and KJ728816. Overall, the results suggested that vaccination with CIAV-contaminated vaccines contributed to the prevalence and spread of CIAV infection in chickens. Furthermore, the CIAV contaminant was likely subsequently transmitted to commercial chickens through congenital transmission. Our findings therefore highlight the need for more extensive screening of live-virus vaccines for poultry in China to reduce the threat of contamination with exogenous viruses.

  8. Evaluation of the minimum infectious dose of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in virus-inoculated feed.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Loni L; Woodworth, Jason C; Jones, Cassandra K; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Jianqiang; Gauger, Phillip C; Stark, Charles R; Main, Rodger G; Hesse, Richard A; Tokach, Mike D; Dritz, Steve S

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the minimum infectious dose of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) in virus-inoculated feed. ANIMALS 30 crossbred 10-day-old pigs. PROCEDURES Tissue culture PEDV was diluted to form 8 serial 10-fold dilutions. An aliquot of stock virus (5.6 × 10(5) TCID50/mL) and each serial PEDV dilution were mixed into 4.5-kg batches of feed to create 9 PEDV-inoculated feed doses; 1 virus-negative dose of culture medium in feed was also created. Pigs were challenge exposed via oral administration of PEDV-inoculated feed, and fecal swab specimens were collected. All pigs were euthanized 7 days after challenge exposure; fresh tissues were collected and used for PCR assay, histologic examination, and immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS The PCR cycle threshold (Ct) decreased by approximately 10 when PEDV was added to feed, compared with results for equivalent PEDV diluted in tissue culture medium. Pigs became infected with PEDV when challenge exposed with the 4 highest concentrations (lowest concentration to cause infection, 5.6 × 10(1) TCID50/g; Ct = 27 in tissue culture medium and 37 in feed). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, PEDV in feed with detectable Ct values of 27 to 37 was infective. The Ct was 37 for the lowest infective PEDV dose in feed, which may be above the limit of detection established for PEDV PCR assays used by some diagnostic laboratories. Overall, results indicated 5.6 × 10(1) TCID50/g was the minimum PEDV dose in feed that can lead to infection in 10-day-old pigs under the conditions of this study.

  9. Development of a high throughput, semi-automated, infectious center cell-based ELISA for Equine Infectious Anemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Craigo, Jodi K.; Ezzelarab, Corin; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary A faster semi-automated 96-well microtiter plate assay to determine viral infectivity titers, or viral focal units (vfu), of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) stocks is described. Optimization of the existing method modernizes a classic virological technique for viral titer determination by quantitating EIAV in experimentally infected cells via a cell-based ELISA. To allow for automation, multiple parameters of the current assay procedures were modified resulting in an assay that required only one quarter the original amount of virus and/or serum for infectivity or neutralization assays, respectively. Equivalent reductions in the required volumes of tissue culture, cell processing, and protein detection reagents were also achieved. Additionally, the new assay decreased the time required from start to finish from 10 days to 6 days (viral titer) or 7 days (viral neutralization), while increasing the number of samples that can be processed concurrently by transition to a 96-well microtiter plate format and by automated counting. PMID:22820072

  10. Comparison of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) isolation on monolayers and in suspended cells.

    PubMed

    Hostnik, P; Jencic, V

    2000-04-20

    A cell culture virus isolation procedure for infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in the epithelioma papulosum cyprini cell line (EPC) is described. Ovarian fluid samples were collected from fish and tested for IHNV at 9 farms. The samples were inoculated in parallel on 24 h old EPC cell monolayers and in freshly trypsinized cells. The titre of the initial virus isolation and of first passages were compared using the 2 methods for each sample. Titres were consistently higher in suspended cells and this method also proved more sensitive for isolation of IHN virus from ovarian fluids of infected fish.

  11. Antibody escape kinetics of equine infectious anemia virus infection of horses.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Elissa J; Nanda, Seema; Mealey, Robert H

    2015-07-01

    Lentivirus escape from neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is not well understood. In this work, we quantified antibody escape of a lentivirus, using antibody escape data from horses infected with equine infectious anemia virus. We calculated antibody blocking rates of wild-type virus, fitness costs of mutant virus, and growth rates of both viruses. These quantitative kinetic estimates of antibody escape are important for understanding lentiviral control by antibody neutralization and in developing NAb-eliciting vaccine strategies. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Infectious Chikungunya Virus in the Saliva of Mice, Monkeys and Humans.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Joy; Rudd, Penny A; Prow, Natalie A; Belarbi, Essia; Roques, Pierre; Larcher, Thibaut; Gresh, Lionel; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva; Schroder, Wayne A; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a reemerging, ordinarily mosquito-transmitted, alphavirus that occasionally produces hemorrhagic manifestations, such as nose bleed and bleeding gums, in human patients. Interferon response factor 3 and 7 deficient (IRF3/7-/-) mice, which are deficient for interferon α/β responses, reliably develop hemorrhagic manifestations after CHIKV infection. Here we show that infectious virus was present in the oral cavity of CHIKV infected IRF3/7-/- mice, likely due to hemorrhagic lesions in the olfactory epithelium that allow egress of infected blood into the nasal, and subsequently, oral cavities. In addition, IRF3/7-/- mice were more susceptible to infection with CHIKV via intranasal and oral routes, with IRF3/7-/- mice also able to transmit virus mouse-to-mouse without an arthropod vector. Cynomolgus macaques often show bleeding gums after CHIKV infection, and analysis of saliva from several infected monkeys also revealed the presence of viral RNA and infectious virus. Furthermore, saliva samples collected from several acute CHIKV patients with hemorrhagic manifestations were found to contain viral RNA and infectious virus. Oral fluids can therefore be infectious during acute CHIKV infections, likely due to hemorrhagic manifestations in the oral/nasal cavities.

  13. Construction of a full-length infectious cDNA clone of Cowpea mild mottle virus.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Silvia L; Nagata, Tatsuya; Junqueira, Bruna R; Zanardo, Larissa G; Paiva, Ana C S; Carvalho, Claudine M

    2017-02-01

    Infectious cDNA clones are an important tool to study the molecular and cellular process of RNA virus infection. In vitro and in vivo transcription systems are the two main strategies used in the generation of infectious cDNA clones for RNA viruses. This study describes the first generation of a full-length infectious cDNA clone of Cowpea mild mottle virus (CPMMV), a Carlavirus. The full-length genome was synthesized by Overlap Extension PCR of two overlapping fragments and cloned in a pUC-based vector under control of the SP6 RNA polymerase promoter. After in vitro run-off transcription, the produced RNA was mechanically inoculated into soybean plants cv. CD206. The systemic infection was confirmed by RT-PCR and further sequencing of amplified cDNA fragments. To simplify the transfection process, the complete genome was subcloned into a binary vector under control of the 35S promoter of cauliflower mosaic virus by the Gibson Assembly protocol. The resulting clones were inoculated by particle bombardment onto soybean seedlings and the recovery of the virus was confirmed 2 weeks later by RT-PCR. Our results indicate the constructs of the full-length cDNA of CPMMV are fully infectious in both in vitro and in vivo transcription strategies.

  14. Infectious Chikungunya Virus in the Saliva of Mice, Monkeys and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Joy; Rudd, Penny A.; Prow, Natalie A.; Belarbi, Essia; Roques, Pierre; Larcher, Thibaut; Gresh, Lionel; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva; Schroder, Wayne A.; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a reemerging, ordinarily mosquito-transmitted, alphavirus that occasionally produces hemorrhagic manifestations, such as nose bleed and bleeding gums, in human patients. Interferon response factor 3 and 7 deficient (IRF3/7-/-) mice, which are deficient for interferon α/β responses, reliably develop hemorrhagic manifestations after CHIKV infection. Here we show that infectious virus was present in the oral cavity of CHIKV infected IRF3/7-/- mice, likely due to hemorrhagic lesions in the olfactory epithelium that allow egress of infected blood into the nasal, and subsequently, oral cavities. In addition, IRF3/7-/- mice were more susceptible to infection with CHIKV via intranasal and oral routes, with IRF3/7-/- mice also able to transmit virus mouse-to-mouse without an arthropod vector. Cynomolgus macaques often show bleeding gums after CHIKV infection, and analysis of saliva from several infected monkeys also revealed the presence of viral RNA and infectious virus. Furthermore, saliva samples collected from several acute CHIKV patients with hemorrhagic manifestations were found to contain viral RNA and infectious virus. Oral fluids can therefore be infectious during acute CHIKV infections, likely due to hemorrhagic manifestations in the oral/nasal cavities. PMID:26447467

  15. S1 gene-based phylogeny of infectious bronchitis virus: An attempt to harmonize virus classification.

    PubMed

    Valastro, Viviana; Holmes, Edward C; Britton, Paul; Fusaro, Alice; Jackwood, Mark W; Cattoli, Giovanni; Monne, Isabella

    2016-04-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is the causative agent of a highly contagious disease that results in severe economic losses to the global poultry industry. The virus exists in a wide variety of genetically distinct viral types, and both phylogenetic analysis and measures of pairwise similarity among nucleotide or amino acid sequences have been used to classify IBV strains. However, there is currently no consensus on the method by which IBV sequences should be compared, and heterogeneous genetic group designations that are inconsistent with phylogenetic history have been adopted, leading to the confusing coexistence of multiple genotyping schemes. Herein, we propose a simple and repeatable phylogeny-based classification system combined with an unambiguous and rationale lineage nomenclature for the assignment of IBV strains. By using complete nucleotide sequences of the S1 gene we determined the phylogenetic structure of IBV, which in turn allowed us to define 6 genotypes that together comprise 32 distinct viral lineages and a number of inter-lineage recombinants. Because of extensive rate variation among IBVs, we suggest that the inference of phylogenetic relationships alone represents a more appropriate criterion for sequence classification than pairwise sequence comparisons. The adoption of an internationally accepted viral nomenclature is crucial for future studies of IBV epidemiology and evolution, and the classification scheme presented here can be updated and revised novel S1 sequences should become available. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Expert-Novice Differences in Mental Models of Viruses, Vaccines, and the Causes of Infectious Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Benjamin D.; Uttal, David H.; Spiegel, Amy; Diamond, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Humans are exposed to viruses everywhere they live, play, and work. Yet people’s beliefs about viruses may be confused or inaccurate, potentially impairing their understanding of scientific information. This study used semi-structured interviews to examine people’s beliefs about viruses, vaccines, and the causes of infectious disease. We compared people at different levels of science expertise: middle school students, teachers, and professional virologists. The virologists described more entities involved in microbiological processes, how these entities behaved, and why. Quantitative and qualitative analyses revealed distinctions in the cognitive organization of several concepts, including infection and vaccination. For example, some students and teachers described viral replication in terms of cell division, independent of a host. Interestingly, most students held a mental model for vaccination in which the vaccine directly attacks a virus that is present in the body. Our findings have immediate implications for how to communicate about infectious disease to young people. PMID:23959975

  17. Infectious virus replication in papillomas induced by molecularly cloned cottontail rabbit papillomavirus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Brandsma, J L; Xiao, W

    1993-01-01

    The ability to obtain infectious papillomavirus virions from molecularly cloned DNA has not been previously reported. We demonstrate here that viral genomes isolated from a recombinant++ DNA clone of cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) gave rise to infectious virus when inoculated into cottontail rabbit skin. Replication occurred in papillomas that formed at inoculation sites. Extract of a DNA-induced papilloma was serially passaged to naive rabbits with high efficiency. Complete virus was fractionated on cesium chloride density gradients, and papillomavirus particles were visualized by electron microscopy. CRPV DNA isolated from virions contained DNA sequence polymorphisms that are characteristic of the input CRPV-WA strain of virus, thereby proving that the newly generated virus originated from the molecularly cloned viral genome. These findings indicate that this will be a useful system in which to perform genetic analysis of viral gene functions involved in replication. Images PMID:8380092

  18. Failure to propagate equine infectious anemia virus in mosquitoes and Culicoides variipennis.

    PubMed

    Shen, D T; Gorham, J R; Jones, R H; Crawford, T B

    1978-05-01

    Laboratory-colonized mosquitoes, Culex tarsalis, aedes aegypti, Culiseta inornata, and Anopheles free-borni, and the biting gnat, Culicoides variipennis, were exposed to equine infectious anemia virus. Exposure to the virus was by intrathoracic inoculation for mosquitoes and by oral ingestion of an infective blood meal through a membrane for C variipennis. After various intervals, groups of 15 to 20 insects were homogenized and inoculated into susceptible ponies. Positive immunodiffusion test results were used as criterion for equine infectious anemia infection in ponies. Virus was not detected in the 4 species of mosquitoes at 3, 6, 12, and 18 days after inoculation, or in C variipennis at 6, 8, 12, 14, 21, and 26 days after oral exposure to the virus.

  19. Infectious Lassa virus, but not filoviruses, is restricted by BST-2/tetherin.

    PubMed

    Radoshitzky, Sheli R; Dong, Lian; Chi, Xiaoli; Clester, Jeremiah C; Retterer, Cary; Spurgers, Kevin; Kuhn, Jens H; Sandwick, Sarah; Ruthel, Gordon; Kota, Krishna; Boltz, Dutch; Warren, Travis; Kranzusch, Philip J; Whelan, Sean P J; Bavari, Sina

    2010-10-01

    Bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST-2/tetherin) is a cellular membrane protein that inhibits the release of HIV-1. We show for the first time, using infectious viruses, that BST-2 also inhibits egress of arenaviruses but has no effect on filovirus replication and spread. Specifically, infectious Lassa virus (LASV) release significantly decreased or increased in human cells in which BST-2 was either stably expressed or knocked down, respectively. In contrast, replication and spread of infectious Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) and Lake Victoria marburgvirus (MARV) were not affected by these conditions. Replication of infectious Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and cowpox virus (CPXV) was also not affected by BST-2 expression. Elevated cellular levels of human or murine BST-2 inhibited the release of virus-like particles (VLPs) consisting of the matrix proteins of multiple highly virulent NIAID Priority Pathogens, including arenaviruses (LASV and Machupo virus [MACV]), filoviruses (ZEBOV and MARV), and paramyxoviruses (Nipah virus). Although the glycoproteins of filoviruses counteracted the antiviral activity of BST-2 in the context of VLPs, they could not rescue arenaviral (LASV and MACV) VLP release upon BST-2 overexpression. Furthermore, we did not observe colocalization of filoviral glycoproteins with BST-2 during infection with authentic viruses. None of the arenavirus-encoded proteins rescued budding of VLPs in the presence of BST-2. Our results demonstrate that BST-2 might be a broad antiviral factor with the ability to restrict release of a wide variety of human pathogens. However, at least filoviruses, RVFV, and CPXV are immune to its inhibitory effect.

  20. Identification of a Canine Adenovirus (Infectious Canine Hepatitis Virus) Inhibitor in Dog Liver Extracts as Arginase

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    Extracts of canine liver inhibited growth of infectious canine hepatitis (ICH) virus, a canine adenovirus. Purified extracts from mammalian, but not avian, liver tissue contained the inhibitor, and evidence is presented that the inhibitory factor is the enzyme arginase (arginine ureohydrolase). This study further emphasized the need for arginine in adenovirus growth and may explain some of the difficulties in isolating small amounts of ICH virus from suspensions of liver. Images PMID:4344396

  1. Haggling over viruses: the downside risks of securitizing infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Elbe, Stefan

    2010-11-01

    This article analyses how the 'securitization' of highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1) contributed to the rise of a protracted international virus-sharing dispute between developing and developed countries. As fear about the threat of a possible human H5N1 pandemic spread across the world, many governments scrambled to stockpile anti-viral medications and vaccines, albeit in a context where there was insufficient global supply to meet such a rapid surge in demand. Realizing that they were the likely 'losers' in this international race, some developing countries began to openly question the benefits of maintaining existing forms of international health cooperation, especially the common practice of sharing national virus samples with the rest of the international community. Given that such virus samples were also crucial to the high-level pandemic preparedness efforts of the West, the Indonesian government in particular felt emboldened to use international access to its H5N1 virus samples as a diplomatic 'bargaining chip' for negotiating better access to vaccines and other benefits for developing countries. The securitized global response to H5N1 thus ended up unexpectedly entangling the long-standing international virus-sharing mechanism within a wider set of political disputes, as well as prompting governments to subject existing virus-sharing arrangements to much narrower calculations of national interest. In the years ahead, those risks to international health cooperation must be balanced with the policy attractions of the global health security agenda.

  2. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus detected by separation and incubation of cells from salmonid cavity fluid.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.; Batts, W.N.

    1987-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus is usually detected by inoculating susceptible cell cultures with cavity ("ovarian") fluid (CF) from spawning females. We identified additional adult carriers of virus in spawning populations of steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) and sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) by collecting nonerythrocytic cells from CF samples by low-speed centrifugation, culturing the cells for at least 7 d at 15 °C, and then testing the culture medium for virus. Virus appeared in the cultured cells from some samples of CF that remained negative during incubation. In additional samples of CF from these species, the virus titer increased in cultured cells compared with the titer in the original CF sample. With chinook salmon (O.tshawytscha), no negative samples converted to positive during incubation, but the virus titer was retained in incubated CF cells, but not in cell-free CF.

  3. Pathogenesis of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.M.; Burke, J.; Pascho, R.J.; Jenes, C.K.

    1982-01-01

    The concentration of infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus was determined in eight organs and two body fluids from each of 60 adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). Included in the sample were 4 males and 56 prespawning, spawning, or spent female fish. All fish were infected, and virus was present in nearly all organs. There was an overall tendency for the mean concentration to increase in many of the organs over time as the fish progressed in ripeness. In prespawning females, IHN virus could be detected in all organs and in ovarian fluid but not in serum; the incidences were highest in the gills, spleen, and pyloric ceca, and the titers were highest in the pyloric ceca and liver. Incidences of infection in the organs were higher in spawning than in prespawning females and higher still in spent females in which the incidence of virus was 100% in all organs except brains (78%) and sera (67%). Virus concentrations in organs or fluids ranged from 5 to 4.0 × 109 plaque-forming units per millilitre. In males, the highest incidences of virus were found in gills, pyloric ceca, and liver. The gills were the only organ in which the virus concentration in males exceeded that of females.Key words: infectious hematopoietic necrosis, IHN, fish virus, viral pathogenesis, sockeye salmon

  4. Establishment and characterization of a chimeric infectious cDNA clone of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, T S; Xia, Y H

    2016-06-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes a highly contagious disease among swine that has an important economic impact worldwide. There are two important CSFV strains in China, Shimen and hog cholera lapinized virus (HCLV). Shimen strain is highly virulent while HCLV, also referred to as C-strain, is a live attenuated vaccine strain considered to be one of the most effective and safest live vaccines. In this study, a chimeric infectious cDNA clone of CSFV named pT7SM-c was engineered by replacing the E(rns) genomic region of an infectious clone of CSFV Shimen strain, pT7SM, with the same region obtained from HCLV. RNA transcripts of pT7SM-c containing an engineered EcoRI site that served as a genetic marker were directly infectious in PK15 cells. The rescued virus vT7SM-c showed similar growth kinetics and cytopathic effect with the parental virus vT7SM in the cells. The chimeric infectious cDNA clone can be used as a practical tool for further studying of the virulence, protein function and pathogenesis of CSFV through genetic manipulation.

  5. Increased susceptibility to infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAv) in Lepeophtheirus salmonis – infected Atlantic salmon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The salmon louse and infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAv) are the two most significant pathogens of concern to the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) aquaculture industry. However, the interactions between sea lice and ISAv, as well as the impact of a prior sea lice infection on the susceptibility of th...

  6. Transcriptomic analysis of responses to infectious salmon anemia virus infection in macrophage-like cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The aquatic orthomyxovirus infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) is an important pathogen for salmonid aquaculture, however little is known about protective and pathological host responses to infection. We have investigated intracellular responses during cytopathic ISAV infection in the macrophage-l...

  7. Evaluation of endocrine and immune disruption of steers challenged with infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective: To evaluate the endocrine response of steers administered an immune challenge utilizing infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBRV). Animals: Twelve crossbred steers (228.82 ± 22.15 kg BW) Procedures: Steers fitted with indwelling rectal probes and randomly assigned to a Control (CON) ...

  8. Lessons in AIDS vaccine development learned from studies of equine infectious, anemia virus infection and immunity.

    PubMed

    Craigo, Jodi K; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2013-12-02

    Equine infectious anemia (EIA), identified in 1843 [1] as an infectious disease of horses and as a viral infection in 1904, remains a concern in veterinary medicine today. Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) has served as an animal model of HIV-1/AIDS research since the original identification of HIV. Similar to other lentiviruses, EIAV has a high propensity for genomic sequence and antigenic variation, principally in its envelope (Env) proteins. However, EIAV possesses a unique and dynamic disease presentation that has facilitated comprehensive analyses of the interactions between the evolving virus population, progressive host immune responses, and the definition of viral and host correlates of immune control and vaccine efficacy. Summarized here are key findings in EIAV that have provided important lessons toward understanding long term immune control of lentivirus infections and the parameters for development of an enduring broadly protective AIDS vaccine.

  9. Lessons in AIDS Vaccine Development Learned from Studies of Equine Infectious, Anemia Virus Infection and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Craigo, Jodi K.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia (EIA), identified in 1843 [1] as an infectious disease of horses and as a viral infection in 1904, remains a concern in veterinary medicine today. Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) has served as an animal model of HIV-1/AIDS research since the original identification of HIV. Similar to other lentiviruses, EIAV has a high propensity for genomic sequence and antigenic variation, principally in its envelope (Env) proteins. However, EIAV possesses a unique and dynamic disease presentation that has facilitated comprehensive analyses of the interactions between the evolving virus population, progressive host immune responses, and the definition of viral and host correlates of immune control and vaccine efficacy. Summarized here are key findings in EIAV that have provided important lessons toward understanding long term immune control of lentivirus infections and the parameters for development of an enduring broadly protective AIDS vaccine. PMID:24316675

  10. [Zika virus infection or the future of infectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Valerio Sallent, Lluís; Roure Díez, Sílvia; Fernández Rivas, Gema

    2016-10-07

    Zika virus belongs to the Flaviridae, an extended phylogenetic family containing dengue or yellow fever, viruses whose shared main vector are Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The virus originally came from Central African simian reservoirs and, from there, expanded rapidly across the Pacific to South America. The disease is an example of exantematic fever usually mild. Mortality is very low and mainly limited to secondary Guillain-Barré or fetal microcephaly cases. Diagnostic confirmation requires a RT-PCR in blood up to the 5th day from the onset or in urine up to the 10-14th day. Specific IgM are identifiable from the 5th symptomatic day. Clinically, a suspected case should comply with: a) a journey to epidemic areas; b) a clinically compatible appearance with fever and skin rash, and c) a generally normal blood count/basic biochemistry. There is some evidence that causally relates Zika virus infection with fetal microcephaly. While waiting for definitive data, all pregnant women coming from Central or South America should be tested for Zika virus.

  11. In vitro antiviral activity of red alga, Polysiphonia morrowii extract and its bromophenols against fish pathogenic infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Yeun; Kim, Seok Ryel; Oh, Myung-Joo; Jung, Sung-Ju; Kang, So Young

    2011-02-01

    Our previous investigation revealed that 80% methanolic extract of the red alga Polysiphonia morrowii has significant antiviral activities against fish pathogenic viruses, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV). The present study was conducted to identify compounds attributed for its antiviral activities and investigate their antiviral activities against IHNV and IPNV. Activity-guided fractionation for 80% methanolic extract of Polysiphonia morrowii using a cell-based assay measuring virus-induced cytopathic effect (CPE) on cells yielded a 90% methanolic fraction, which showed the highest antiviral activity against both viruses among fractions yielded from the extract. From the fraction, two bromophenols were isolated and identified as 3-bromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzyl methyl ether (1) and 3-bromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (2) based on spectroscopic analyses. For both compounds, the concentrations to inhibit 50% of flounder spleen cell (FSP cell) proliferation (CC(50)) and each viral replication (EC(50)) were measured. In the pretreatment test, 3-bromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzyl methyl ether (1) and 3-bromo-4,5-dihy-droxybenzaldehyde (2) exhibited significant antiviral activities showing selective index values (SI = CC(50)/EC(50)) of 20 to 42 against both IHNV and IPNV. In direct virucidal test, 3-bromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzyl methyl ether (1) showed significant antiviral activités against both viruses while 3-bromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (2) was significantly effective against only IHNV. Although antiviral efficacies of both compounds against IHNV and IPNV were lower than those of ribavirin used as a positive control, our findings suggested that the red alga Polysiphonia morrowii and isolated two bromophenols may have potential as a therapeutic agent against fish viral diseases.

  12. Biological and pathological consequences of feline infectious peritonitis virus infection in the cheetah.

    PubMed

    Evermann, J F; Heeney, J L; Roelke, M E; McKeirnan, A J; O'Brien, S J

    1988-01-01

    An epizootic of feline infectious peritonitis in a captive cheetah population during 1982-1983 served to focus attention on the susceptibility of the cheetah (Acinoyx jubatus) to infectious disease. Subsequent observations based upon seroepidemiological surveys and electron microscopy of fecal material verified that cheetahs were indeed capable of being infected by coronaviruses, which were antigenically related to coronaviruses affecting domestic cats, i.e. feline infectious peritonitis virus/feline enteric coronavirus. Coincident with the apparent increased susceptibility of the cheetah to infectious diseases, were observations that the cheetah was genetically unusual insofar as large amounts of enzyme-encoding loci were monomorphic, and that unrelated cheetahs were capable of accepting allogenic skin grafts. These data provided the basis for a hypothesis that the cheetah, through intensive inbreeding, had become more susceptible to viral infections as a result of genetic homogeneity.

  13. Newcastle disease virus (NDV) recombinants expressing infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) glycoproteins gB and gD protect chickens against ILTV and NDV challenges

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a highly contagious acute respiratory disease of chickens caused by infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). The disease is mainly controlled through biosecurity and vaccination with live-attenuated strains of the virus and vectored vaccines based on turkey he...

  14. Purification and characterization of equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Matheka, H D; Coggins, L; Shively, J N; Norcross, N L

    1976-01-01

    EIA virus was purified from equine fetal kidney cell cultures by PEG-precipitation, two sucrose-gradient sedimentations (5-30 per cent) and (25 to 60 per cent) centrifugation, using the immunodiffusion test to follow the procedure. Purified EIA virus had a density (20 degrees C) of 1.162 and a sedimentation constant of S20w=656. electron microscopy revealed a particle of about 100 nm in diameter with a very flexible but usually spherical shape. The dense core may be at various locations inside the membrane bound particle.

  15. Survey for infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus in Washington salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amend, Donald F.; Wood, James W.

    1972-01-01

    A virus disease of juvenile sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) has been a problem in Washington hatcheries since first reported by Rucker [9] in 1953. Presumably, the same disease has occurred in Oregon, and it is now referred to as the Oregon, and it is now referred to as the Oregon sockeye disease (OSD) or the sockeye salmon virus (SSV) [8,12]. The primary source of the disease was thought to be from the feeding of raw sockeye salmon viscera, and the incidence decreased when pasteurized diets were used [5]. However, sporadic attacks continue to occur even though pelleted diets containing pasteurized fish products are fed.  

  16. Interaction of Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein with Janus Kinase Is Required for Efficient Production of Infectious Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Choongho

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is responsible for the development of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV core protein plays not only a structural role in the virion morphogenesis by encapsidating a virus RNA genome but also a non-structural role in HCV-induced pathogenesis by blocking innate immunity. Especially, it has been shown to regulate JAK-STAT signaling pathway through its direct interaction with Janus kinase (JAK) via its proline-rich JAK-binding motif (79PGYPWP84). However, little is known about the physiological significance of this HCV core-JAK association in the context of the virus life cycle. In order to gain an insight, a mutant HCV genome (J6/JFH1-79A82A) was constructed to express the mutant core with a defective JAK-binding motif (79AGYAWP84) using an HCV genotype 2a infectious clone (J6/JFH1). When this mutant HCV genome was introduced into hepatocarcinoma cells, it was found to be severely impaired in its ability to produce infectious viruses in spite of its robust RNA genome replication. Taken together, all these results suggest an essential requirement of HCV core-JAK protein interaction for efficient production of infectious viruses and the potential of using core-JAK blockers as a new anti-HCV therapy. PMID:24009866

  17. Infectious diseases in cinema: virus hunters and killer microbes.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Georgios; Seitaridis, Savvas; Akritidis, Nikolaos; Tsianos, Epaminondas

    2003-10-01

    The world of infectious diseases has been rarely presented in the cinema with accuracy. Apart from random biographies of scientists and retellings of stories about great epidemics from the past, most films focus on the dangers presented by outbreaks of unknown agents that originate from acts of bioterrorism, from laboratory accidents, or even from space. We review these films and underline the possible effect that they have on the public's perception of infection--a perception that, when misguided, could prove to be problematic in times of epidemics.

  18. Epitope Addition and Ablation via Manipulation of a Dengue Virus Serotype 1 Infectious Clone.

    PubMed

    Gallichotte, Emily N; Menachery, Vineet D; Yount, Boyd L; Widman, Douglas G; Dinnon, Kenneth H; Hartman, Steven; de Silva, Aravinda M; Baric, Ralph S

    2017-01-01

    Despite the clinical relevance, dengue virus (DENV) research has been hampered by the absence of robust reverse genetic systems to manipulate the viral serotypes for propagation and generation of mutant viruses. In this article, we describe application of an infectious clone system for DENV serotype 1 (DENV1). Similar to previous clones in both flaviviruses and coronaviruses, the approach constructs a panel of contiguous cDNAs that span the DENV genome and can be systematically and directionally assembled to produce viable, full-length viruses. Comparison of the virus derived from the infectious clone with the original viral isolate reveals identical sequence, comparable endpoint titers, and similar focus staining. Both focus-forming assays and percent infection by flow cytometry revealed overlapping replication levels in two different cell types. Moreover, serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) bound similarly to infectious clone and the natural isolate. Using the clone, we were able to insert a DENV4 type-specific epitope recognized by primate MAb 5H2 into envelope (E) protein domain I (EDI) of DENV1 and recover a viable chimeric recombinant virus. The recombinant DENV1 virus was recognized and neutralized by the DENV4 type-specific 5H2 MAb. The introduction of the 5H2 epitope ablated two epitopes on DENV1 EDI recognized by human MAbs (1F4 and 14C10) that strongly neutralize DENV1. Together, the work demonstrates the utility of the infectious clone and provides a resource to rapidly manipulate the DENV1 serotype for generation of recombinant and mutant viruses. IMPORTANCE Dengue viruses (DENVs) are significant mosquito-transmitted pathogens that cause widespread infection and can lead to severe infection and complications. Here we further characterize a novel and robust DENV serotype 1 (DENV1) infectious clone system that can be used to support basic and applied research. We demonstrate how the system can be used to probe the antigenic relationships

  19. Epitope Addition and Ablation via Manipulation of a Dengue Virus Serotype 1 Infectious Clone

    PubMed Central

    Gallichotte, Emily N.; Menachery, Vineet D.; Yount, Boyd L.; Widman, Douglas G.; Dinnon, Kenneth H.; Hartman, Steven; de Silva, Aravinda M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the clinical relevance, dengue virus (DENV) research has been hampered by the absence of robust reverse genetic systems to manipulate the viral serotypes for propagation and generation of mutant viruses. In this article, we describe application of an infectious clone system for DENV serotype 1 (DENV1). Similar to previous clones in both flaviviruses and coronaviruses, the approach constructs a panel of contiguous cDNAs that span the DENV genome and can be systematically and directionally assembled to produce viable, full-length viruses. Comparison of the virus derived from the infectious clone with the original viral isolate reveals identical sequence, comparable endpoint titers, and similar focus staining. Both focus-forming assays and percent infection by flow cytometry revealed overlapping replication levels in two different cell types. Moreover, serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) bound similarly to infectious clone and the natural isolate. Using the clone, we were able to insert a DENV4 type-specific epitope recognized by primate MAb 5H2 into envelope (E) protein domain I (EDI) of DENV1 and recover a viable chimeric recombinant virus. The recombinant DENV1 virus was recognized and neutralized by the DENV4 type-specific 5H2 MAb. The introduction of the 5H2 epitope ablated two epitopes on DENV1 EDI recognized by human MAbs (1F4 and 14C10) that strongly neutralize DENV1. Together, the work demonstrates the utility of the infectious clone and provides a resource to rapidly manipulate the DENV1 serotype for generation of recombinant and mutant viruses. IMPORTANCE Dengue viruses (DENVs) are significant mosquito-transmitted pathogens that cause widespread infection and can lead to severe infection and complications. Here we further characterize a novel and robust DENV serotype 1 (DENV1) infectious clone system that can be used to support basic and applied research. We demonstrate how the system can be used to probe the antigenic

  20. Genotyping of Korean isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) based on the glycoprotein gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, W-S; Oh, M-J; Nishizawa, T; Park, J-W; Kurath, G; Yoshimizu, M

    2007-01-01

    Glycoprotein (G) gene nucleotide sequences of four Korean isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) were analyzed to evaluate their genetic relatedness to worldwide isolates. All Korean isolates were closely related to Japanese isolates of genogroup JRt rather than to those of North American and European genogroups. It is believed that Korean IHNV has been most likely introduced from Japan to Korea by the movement of contaminated fish eggs. Among the Korean isolates, phylogenetically distinct virus types were obtained from sites north and south of a large mountain range, suggesting the possibility of more than one introduction of virus from Japan.

  1. Genotyping of Korean isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) based on the glycoprotein gene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, W.-S.; Oh, M.-J.; Nishizawa, T.; Park, J.-W.; Kurath, G.; Yoshimizu, M.

    2007-01-01

    Glycoprotein (G) gene nucleotide sequences of four Korean isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) were analyzed to evaluate their genetic relatedness to worldwide isolates. All Korean isolates were closely related to Japanese isolates of genogroup JRt rather than to those of North American and European genogroups. It is believed that Korean IHNV has been most likely introduced from Japan to Korea by the movement of contaminated fish eggs. Among the Korean isolates, phylogenetically distinct virus types were obtained from sites north and south of a large mountain range, suggesting the possibility of more than one introduction of virus from Japan. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  2. Isolation of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus from Mustelidae.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, D D; Larsen, A E; Cox, N A

    1975-01-01

    Herpesviruses isolated from either domesticated or wild carnivores should be immunologically compared with known viruses of this group which could have been included in the diet of the animal before being considered to be previously undescribed herpesviruses native to the carnivore in question. PMID:170300

  3. Infectious Maize rayado fino virus from Cloned cDNA.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Michael C; Weiland, John J; Todd, Jane; Stewart, Lucy R

    2015-06-01

    A full-length cDNA clone was produced from a U.S. isolate of Maize rayado fino virus (MRFV), the type member of the genus Marafivirus within the family Tymoviridae. Infectivity of transcripts derived from cDNA clones was demonstrated by infection of maize plants and protoplasts, as well as by transmission via the known leafhopper vectors Dalbulus maidis and Graminella nigrifrons that transmit the virus in a persistent-propagative manner. Infection of maize plants through vascular puncture inoculation of seed with transcript RNA resulted in the induction of fine stipple stripe symptoms typical of those produced by wild-type MRFV and a frequency of infection comparable with that of the wild type. Northern and Western blotting confirmed the production of MRFV-specific RNAs and proteins in infected plants and protoplasts. An unanticipated increase in subgenomic RNA synthesis over levels in infected plants was observed in protoplasts infected with either wild-type or cloned virus. A conserved cleavage site motif previously demonstrated to function in both Oat blue dwarf virus capsid protein and tymoviral nonstructural protein processing was identified near the amino terminus of the MRFV replicase polyprotein, suggesting that cleavage at this site also may occur.

  4. Detection of Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus from the Leeches Hemiclepsis marginata and Hirudo medicinalis.

    PubMed

    Salimi, Behnam; Abdi, Kazem

    2016-12-01

    Leeches have been reported to harbor several important fish pathogens, including spring viremia of carp virus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), and also may contain blood protozoa. In the present study, leeches were collected from water bodies located in Kurdistan province, Iran. The specimens were tested for IHNV, VHSV, and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) using the PCR method. The results showed that two different species of leeches, Hemiclepsis marginata and Hirudo medicinalis, were infected by IPNV among the seven species studied. The infected leeches were found in areas that were polluted with untreated sewage coming from upstream fish farms culturing Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. In addition, the fish at fish farms in the vicinity had been infected with IPNV 9 months previously. Our results showed that the virus causing infectious pancreatic necrosis is present in the leeches H. marginata and H. medicinalis, suggesting that leeches are a potential source of IPNV in fish farms. Received October 14, 2015; accepted June 1, 2016.

  5. Effects of chicken anemia virus and infectious bursal disease virus in commercial chickens.

    PubMed

    Toro, H; van Santen, V L; Hoerr, F J; Breedlove, C

    2009-03-01

    The effects of chicken anemia virus (CAV) and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) coinfection in commercial layer-type and meat-type (broiler) chickens with specific maternal immunity were evaluated. In addition, the broiler progeny used had been vaccinated in ovo against IBDV. Layer chickens were inoculated intramuscularly on day 3 of age with CAV and orally on day 7 of age with an IBDV standard strain (APHIS). Broiler chickens were exposed to CAV and/or an IBDV variant strain (AL2) via the drinking water on days 3 and 14 of age. Following CAV and IBDV inoculation neither mortality nor overt clinical disease was observed in any layer or broiler group. In spite of maternal immunity against both IBDV and CAV, mean hematocrits of all layer groups inoculated with CAV (CAV, CAV + APHIS) were lower than uninfected chickens. IBDV APHIS alone or in combination with CAV did not affect the layer weight gain. However, on day 30 of age and concomitantly with maternal antibody decay, bursa lymphocyte depletion became evident in CAV + APHIS-infected layer chickens. These birds (CAV + APHIS) also seroconverted to IBDV on day 35 of age. CAV persisted at low levels in the layer chickens throughout the experimental period in CAV- and CAV+APHIS-infected chickens. Similarly, infected broiler chickens did not show changes in weight gain. Compared to CAV-infected or uninfected controls, CAV+AL2- and AL2-infected broiler chickens showed significant lymphocyte depletion in the bursa as assessed both by bursal indices and histomorphometry. Broilers also seroconverted to IBDV after day 30 of age confirming that bursal lymphocyte depletion was due to IBDV resuming replication. Thymus histomorphometry revealed significant lymphocyte depletion in all infected broiler groups at 30 days of age, but only in CAV+AL2-infected broiler chickens at 41 days of age, suggesting that IBDV infection delayed repopulation of the thymus.

  6. Isolation and sequencing of infectious clones of feline foamy virus and a human/feline foamy virus Env chimera.

    PubMed

    Hatama, S; Otake, K; Omoto, S; Murase, Y; Ikemoto, A; Mochizuki, M; Takahashi, E; Okuyama, H; Fujii, Y

    2001-12-01

    Full-length DNAs of the Coleman and S7801 strains (pSKY3.0, pSKY5.0) of infectious feline foamy viruses (FFVs) were cloned and sequenced. Parental viruses, designated SKY3.0 and SKY5.0, were secreted following transfection of Crandell feline kidney (CRFK) cells. Production of the rescued parental viruses was enhanced in the presence of trichostatin A. Amino acid sequence similarities between FFV and human foamy virus (HFV) are extremely low for the envelope protein and capsid antigen, as predicted from the two clones. However, a chimeric FFV clone was constructed with the HFV Env substituted for the FFV Env. The chimeric virus (HFFV, SKY4.0) was able to infect and replicate in CRFK cells as well as in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of cats in vivo. Consequently, the chimeric HFFV may be useful for the creation of FV vectors for gene transfer strategies.

  7. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF THE VIRUS OF INFECTIOUS AVIAN ENCEPHALOMYELITIS

    PubMed Central

    Olitsky, Peter K.

    1939-01-01

    The results of investigations thus far carried out on experimental avian encephalomyelitis indicate that the virus of this newly described disease conforms to the group of definitely established viruses. It was essential to determine its taxonomy since the only prior record of its study (1) defines the infective agent as a virus because the usual cultural attempts failed to reveal a visible microorganism to be identified with it, and because the transmissible agent passed through Seitz and Berkefeld N filters. At the present time such determinants fail completely to satisfy the criteria for defining a virus and their acceptance would lead to the inclusion of certain filtrable microbic agents, difficult to reveal except by special cultural procedures, as viruses (10). The virus of avian encephalomyelitis is distinct from that of equine encephalomyelitis and is clearly a virus sui generis. The striking feature of its properties is its narrow range of host susceptibility—only the avian species are responsive to inoculation; ordinary laboratory animals are apparently resistant, even to large numbers of chicken cerebral infective doses. In addition, it is probable that its size is in the range of that of the equine virus. Studies also reveal that the virus is not easily sedimented by centrifugation (that is, at 5400 R.P.M. for one hour in the angle centrifuge and at 12,000 R.P.M. for one hour in the open air centrifuge) and is resistant to the action of glycerol and to drying. It is readily filtrable through Seitz one and two disc filters, through Berkefeld V and N candles, and is active in dilutions in broth up to 10–6. It passes through gradocol membranes of 73 mµ average pore diameter at least (the end-point has not as yet been definitely determined). An attack of the experimental disease leads to development of resistance to reinoculation and of antibodies in the serum. Old birds are reported as being refractory to infection, both in nature and in the

  8. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF THE VIRUS OF INFECTIOUS AVIAN ENCEPHALOMYELITIS.

    PubMed

    Olitsky, P K

    1939-11-30

    The results of investigations thus far carried out on experimental avian encephalomyelitis indicate that the virus of this newly described disease conforms to the group of definitely established viruses. It was essential to determine its taxonomy since the only prior record of its study (1) defines the infective agent as a virus because the usual cultural attempts failed to reveal a visible microorganism to be identified with it, and because the transmissible agent passed through Seitz and Berkefeld N filters. At the present time such determinants fail completely to satisfy the criteria for defining a virus and their acceptance would lead to the inclusion of certain filtrable microbic agents, difficult to reveal except by special cultural procedures, as viruses (10). The virus of avian encephalomyelitis is distinct from that of equine encephalomyelitis and is clearly a virus sui generis. The striking feature of its properties is its narrow range of host susceptibility-only the avian species are responsive to inoculation; ordinary laboratory animals are apparently resistant, even to large numbers of chicken cerebral infective doses. In addition, it is probable that its size is in the range of that of the equine virus. Studies also reveal that the virus is not easily sedimented by centrifugation (that is, at 5400 R.P.M. for one hour in the angle centrifuge and at 12,000 R.P.M. for one hour in the open air centrifuge) and is resistant to the action of glycerol and to drying. It is readily filtrable through Seitz one and two disc filters, through Berkefeld V and N candles, and is active in dilutions in broth up to 10(-6). It passes through gradocol membranes of 73 mmicro average pore diameter at least (the end-point has not as yet been definitely determined). An attack of the experimental disease leads to development of resistance to reinoculation and of antibodies in the serum. Old birds are reported as being refractory to infection, both in nature and in the

  9. Occurrence of different types of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in fish.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Y L; Engelking, H M; Leong, J C

    1986-12-01

    The virion protein patterns of 71 isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) from the Pacific Northwest were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of [35S]-methionine-labeled virus. This analysis led to the classification of these virus isolates into four or more types. Type 1 virus was characterized by a nucleocapsid protein with an approximate molecular weight of 40,500. Type 2 and type 3 viruses have nucleocapsid proteins with molecular weights of 42,800 and 43,250, respectively. Type 2 virus was responsible for the recent epizootics of IHNV among fish in the lower Columbia River. The California IHNV isolates were type 3 with the exception of some of those isolated from fish at the Coleman Hatchery on the Sacramento River. These Coleman Hatchery isolates belonged to a type 4 virus group characterized by a larger glycoprotein of approximately 70,000 molecular weight. All other viruses examined had glycoproteins of 67,000 molecular weight. The "type 5" virus isolates were grouped together because they were not sufficiently distinct to warrant classification into a separate type. These findings have been useful in determining that a particular virus type is characteristic for a geographic area and will infect many different salmonid species in that area and the same type isolated from parental fish is responsible for the subsequent outbreak of the diseases in progeny.

  10. Occurrence of different types of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in fish

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Y.; Engelking, H.M.; Leong, J.C.

    1986-12-01

    The virion protein patterns of 71 isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) from the Pacific Northwest were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of (/sup 35/S)-methionine-labeled virus. This analysis led to the classification of these virus isolates into four or more types. Type 1 virus was characterized by a nucleocapsid protein with an approximate molecular weight of 40,500. Type 2 and type 3 viruses have nucleocapsid proteins with molecular weights of 42,800 and 43,250, respectively. Type 2 virus was responsible for the recent epizootics of IHNV among fish in the lower Columbia River. The California IHNV isolates were type 3 with the exception of some of those isolated from fish at the Coleman Hatchery on the Sacramento River. These Coleman Hatchery isolates belonged to a type 4 virus group characterized by a larger glycoprotein of approximately 70,000 molecular weight. All other viruses examined had glycoproteins of 67,000 molecular weight. The type 5 virus isolates were grouped together because they were not sufficiently distinct to warrant classification into a separate type. These findings have been useful in determining that (i) a particular virus type is characteristic for a geographic area and will infect many different salmonid species in that area and (ii) the same type isolated from parental fish is responsible for the subsequent outbreak of the diseases in progeny.

  11. Production of Infectious Dengue Virus in Aedes aegypti Is Dependent on the Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Milly M.; Sessions, October M.; Gubler, Duane J.; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) relies on host factors to complete its life cycle in its mosquito host for subsequent transmission to humans. DENV first establishes infection in the midgut of Aedes aegypti and spreads to various mosquito organs for lifelong infection. Curiously, studies have shown that infectious DENV titers peak and decrease thereafter in the midgut despite relatively stable viral genome levels. However, the mechanisms that regulate this decoupling of infectious virion production from viral RNA replication have never been determined. We show here that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) plays an important role in regulating infectious DENV production. Using RNA interference studies, we show in vivo that knockdown of selected UPP components reduced infectious virus production without altering viral RNA replication in the midgut. Furthermore, this decoupling effect could also be observed after RNAi knockdown in the head/thorax of the mosquito, which otherwise showed direct correlation between infectious DENV titer and viral RNA levels. The dependence on the UPP for successful DENV production is further reinforced by the observed up-regulation of key UPP molecules upon DENV infection that overcome the relatively low expression of these genes after a blood meal. Collectively, our findings indicate an important role for the UPP in regulating DENV production in the mosquito vector. PMID:26566123

  12. Detection of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus in river water and demonstration of waterborne transmission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.; Pascho, R.J.; Jenes, C.K.

    1983-01-01

    In a study of the possible role of waterborne infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus in transmission of the disease among spawning sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka (Walbaum), both infection rates and virus titres were higher in fish held at high density in a side channel than in fish in the adjacent river. Virus was never isolated from river water, but was found in water from the side channel at levels ranging from 32.5 to 1600 plaque-forming units (p.f.u.)/ml. Uninfected yearling sockeye salmon held in a box in the side channel developed localized gill infections with IHN virus. The disease did not progress to the viscera until a threshold titre of about 105 p.f.u./g was reached in the gill. The effectiveness of the gill as a barrier limiting development of systemic infections means that waterborne IHN virus probably does not greatly increase the infection rate in a sockeye salmon population during spawning.

  13. Detection of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in river water and demonstration of waterborne transmission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Pascho, Ronald J.; Jenes, C.K.

    1983-01-01

    In a study of the possible role of waterborne infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus in transmission of the disease among spawning sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka (Walbaum), both infection rates and virus titres were higher in fish held at high density in a side channel than in fish in the adjacent river. Virus was never isolated from river water, but was found in water from the side channel at levels ranging from 32.5 to 1600 plaque-forming units (p.f.u.)/ml. Uninfected yearling sockeye salmon held in a box in the side channel developed localized gill infections with IHN virus. The disease did not progress to the viscera until a threshold titre of about 105 p.f.u./g was reached in the gill. The effectiveness of the gill as a barrier limiting development of systemic infections means that waterborne IHN virus probably does not greatly increase the infection rate in a sockeye salmon population during spawning.

  14. Long terminal repeats are not the sole determinants of virulence for equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Tu, Y-B; Zhou, T; Yuan, X-F; Qiu, H-J; Xue, F; Sun, C-Q; Wang, L; Wu, D-L; Peng, J-M; Kong, X-G; Tong, G-Z

    2007-01-01

    The long terminal repeats (LTRs) of equine infectious anemia virus donkey leukocyte-attenuated virus (EIAV-DLA) were substituted with those of the wild-type EIAV-L (wt EIAV-L, the parent virus of EIAV-DLA). The resulting chimeric plasmid was designated pOK-LTR DLA/L. Purified pOK-LTR DLA/L was transfected into monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM) cultures prepared from EIAV-negative, heparinized whole blood from a donkey. Eighth-passage cell cultures developed the typical cytopathogenic effects (CPE) of EIAV infection, and virions with typical EIAV profiles were observed with an electron microscope. Horses were inoculated with the chimeric virus or EIAV-DLA and challenged with the wt EIAV-L strain six months later. All of the horses inoculated with either the chimeric virus or EIAV-DLA were protected from disease, whereas the control horses died with typical EIA symptoms.

  15. A simple method for developing an infectious cDNA clone of Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hao; Zheng, Xuchen; Tong, Wu; Liu, Fei; Liang, Chao; Wang, Tao; Gao, Fei; Li, Liwei; Shan, Tongling; Li, Guoxin; Tong, Guangzhi

    2017-02-01

    Flavivirus cDNA clones frequently demonstrate genetic instability in transformed bacteria, which hampers the construction and manipulation of cDNAs for infectious flaviviruses. In this study, we developed a stable, full-length cDNA clone, pJEHEN, of a GI JEV strain HEN0701 using a medium-copy-number pBR322 vector and propagating cDNA clones at room temperature. The virus vJEHEN recovered from the infectious clone was indistinguishable from the parent virus HEN0701 with respect to plaque morphology, growth kinetics, and virulence characteristics. A T-to-A silent mutation of nucleotide 24 of the NS2a gene was introduced into the infectious cDNA clone to eliminate frameshifting. The rescued mutant virus vJETA did not express NS1' in infected cells and showed reduced growth and neurovirulence in mice. This convenient method for the construction and manipulation of infectious JEV cDNA clones may be of use in further studies to improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for JEV replication and pathogenesis.

  16. Toll-like receptor 2 senses hepatitis C virus core protein but not infectious viral particles

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Marco; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Jilg, Nikolaus; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Wakita, Takaji; Hafkemeyer, Peter; Blum, Hubert E.; Barth, Heidi; Henneke, Philipp; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pathogen recognition molecules activating the innate immune system. Cell surface expressed TLRs, such as TLR2 and TLR4 have been shown to play an important role in human host defenses against viruses through sensing of viral structural proteins. In this study, we aimed to elucidate whether TLR2 and TLR4 participate in inducing antiviral immunity against hepatitis C virus by sensing viral structural proteins. We studied TLR2 and TLR4 activation by cell-culture derived infectious virions (HCVcc) and serum-derived virions in comparison to purified recombinant HCV structural proteins and enveloped virus-like particles. Incubation of TLR2 or TLR4 transfected cell lines with recombinant core protein resulted in activation of TLR2-dependent signaling. In contrast, neither infectious virions nor enveloped HCV-like particles triggered TLR2 and TLR4 signaling. These findings suggest that monomeric HCV core protein but not intact infectious particles are sensed by TLR2. Impairment of core-TLR interaction in infectious viral particles may contribute to escape from innate antiviral immune responses. PMID:20375602

  17. Infectious bronchitis virus in different avian physiological systems-a field study in Brazilian poultry flocks.

    PubMed

    Balestrin, Eder; Fraga, Aline P; Ikuta, Nilo; Canal, Cláudio W; Fonseca, André S K; Lunge, Vagner R

    2014-08-01

    Avian infectious bronchitis is a highly contagious viral disease with economic effects on poultry agribusiness. The disease presents multi-systemic clinical signs (respiratory, renal, enteric, and reproductive) and is caused by one coronavirus (infectious bronchitis virus, IBV). Infectious bronchitis virus is classified into different serotypes and genotypes (vaccine strains and field variants). This study aimed to evaluate the occurrence of IBV in commercial poultry flocks from 3 important producing regions in Brazil and to determine the tropism of the main circulating genotypes to 3 different avian physiological systems (respiratory, digestive, urinary/reproductive). Clinical samples with suggestive signs of IBV infection were collected from 432 different poultry commercial flocks (198 from broilers and 234 from breeders). The total number of biological samples consisted of organ pools from the 3 above physiological systems obtained of farms from 3 important producing regions: midwest, northeast, and south. Infectious bronchitis virus was detected by reverse-transcription, real-time PCR of the 5' untranslated region. The results showed 179 IBV-positive flocks (41.4% of the flocks), with 107 (24.8%) from broilers and 72 (16.8%) from breeders. There were similar frequencies of IBV-positive flocks in farms from different regions of the country, most often in broilers (average 54%) compared with breeders (average 30.8%). reverse-transcription was more frequently detected in the digestive system of breeders (40%), and in the digestive (43.5%) and respiratory (37.7%) systems of broilers. Infectious bronchitis virus genotyping was performed by a reverse-transcription nested PCR and sequencing of the S1 gene from a selection of 79 IBV-positive flocks (45 from broilers and 34 from breeders). The majority of the flocks were infected with Brazilian variant genotype than with Massachusetts vaccine genotype. These results demonstrate the predominance of the Brazilian variant

  18. Comparison of the pathogenicity of the USDA challenge virus strain to a field strain of infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    PubMed

    Koski, Danielle M; Predgen, Ann S; Trampel, Darrell W; Conrad, Sandra K; Narwold, Debra R; Hermann, Joseph R

    2015-07-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) causes respiratory disease in chickens. This alphaherpesvirus infects laryngeal tracheal epithelial cells and causes outbreaks culminating in decreases in egg production, respiratory distress in chickens and mortality. There are several different vaccines to combat symptoms of the virus, including chicken embryo origin, tissue culture origin and recombinant vaccines. All vaccines licensed for use in the U.S. are tested for efficacy and potency according to U.S. federal regulation using a vaccine challenge assay involving the use of an ILT challenge virus. This challenge virus is provided to biologics companies by the Center for Veterinary Biologics (CVB), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The current USDA challenge virus originated from a vaccine strain and has been subjected to multiple passages in eggs, and may not represent what is currently circulating in the field. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the pathogenicity of USDA's challenge virus strain to the pathogenicity of a recent ILT field isolate. Using the challenge virus and various dilutions of the field isolate, clinical signs, mortality and pathology were evaluated in chickens. Results indicate that the field isolate at a 1:20 dilution is comparable in pathogenicity to the USDA challenge virus at a 1:4 dilution, and that the ILTV field isolate is a viable candidate that could be used as a challenge virus when evaluating vaccine efficacy. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. First evidence of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Haenen, O L M; Schuetze, H; Cieslak, M; Oldenburg, S; Spierenburg, M A H; Roozenburg-Hengst, I; Voorbergen-Laarman, M; Engelsma, M Y; Olesen, N J

    2016-08-01

    In spring 2008, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was detected for the first time in the Netherlands. The virus was isolated from rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), from a put-and-take fishery with angling ponds. IHNV is the causative agent of a serious fish disease, infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN). From 2008 to 2011, we diagnosed eight IHNV infections in rainbow trout originating from six put-and-take fisheries (symptomatic and asymptomatic fish), and four IHNV infections from three rainbow trout farms (of which two were co-infected by infectious pancreatic necrosis virus, IPNV), at water temperatures between 5 and 15 °C. At least one farm delivered trout to four of these eight IHNV-positive farms. Mortalities related to IHNV were mostly <40%, but increased to nearly 100% in case of IHNV and IPNV co-infection. Subsequent phylogenetic analysis revealed that these 12 isolates clustered into two different monophyletic groups within the European IHNV genogroup E. One of these two groups indicates a virus-introduction event by a German trout import, whereas the second group indicates that IHNV was already (several years) in the Netherlands before its discovery in 2008.

  20. Transmission of equine infectious anemia virus from horses without clinical signs of disease.

    PubMed

    Issel, C J; Adams, W V; Meek, L; Ochoa, R

    1982-02-01

    Twenty seven adult horses positive to the agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test for equine infectious anemia (EIA), but with no history of clinical EIA, were used in transfusion studies to determine whether infectious EIA virus was present in 1 to 5 ml of their blood. Of 27 recipients, 21 (78%) became AGID test-positive at an average of 24 days after inoculation. Two horses that were initially negative when screened were retested and found to carry infectious virus in 5-300 ml of whole blood; the other 4 horses were not retested. Horse flies (Tabanus fuscicostatus Hine) were unable to transmit EIA virus from 10 AGID test-positive donors with no history of clinical EIA, but virus was transmitted from a pony with artificially induced acute EIA and from a horse that had recovered from a clinical attack of EIA 9 months earlier. Histopathologic changes indicative of EIA were noted in all test-positive recipients. The most consistent lesion was paracortical lymphoid hyperplasia in the splenic lymph node.

  1. Infectious vaccinia virus recombinants that express hepatitis B virus surface antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoffrey L.; Mackett, Michael; Moss, Bernard

    1983-04-01

    Potential live vaccines against hepatitis B virus have been produced. The coding sequence for hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) has been inserted into the vaccinia virus genome under control of vaccinia virus early promoters. Cells infected with these vaccinia virus recombinants synthesize and excrete HBsAg and vaccinated rabbits rapidly produce antibodies to HBsAg.

  2. Development of a high throughput, semi-automated, infectious center cell-based ELISA for equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Craigo, Jodi K; Ezzelarab, Corin; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2012-11-01

    A faster semi-automated 96-well microtiter plate assay to determine viral infectivity titers, or viral focal units (vfu), of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) stocks is described. Optimization of the existing method modernizes a classic virological technique for viral titer determination by quantitating EIAV in experimentally infected cells via a cell-based ELISA. To allow for automation, multiple parameters of the current assay procedures were modified resulting in an assay that required only one quarter the original amount of virus and/or serum for infectivity or neutralization assays, respectively. Equivalent reductions in the required volumes of tissue culture, cell processing, and protein detection reagents were also achieved. Additionally, the new assay decreased the time required from start to finish from 10 days to 6 days (viral titer) or 7 days (viral neutralization), while increasing the number of samples that can be processed concurrently by transition to a 96-well microtiter plate format and by automated counting. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Recombinant infectious hematopoietic necrosis viruses induce protection for rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Romero, Alejandro; Figueras, Antonio; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Bremont, Michael; Novoa, Beatriz

    2008-07-07

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) and viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) are rhabdoviruses that infect salmonids, producing serious economic losses. Two recombinant IHN viruses were generated by reverse genetics. For one (rIHNV GFP) the IHNV NV gene was replaced with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. In the other (rIHNV-Gvhsv GFP) the G gene was also exchanged for that of VHSV. No mortalities, external signs or histological lesions were observed in experimental infections conducted with the recombinant viruses. Neither the rIHNV GFP nor rIHNV-Gvhsv GFP was detected by RT-PCR in any of the examined tissues from experimentally infected fish. In order to assess their potential as vaccines against the wild type viruses, rainbow trout were vaccinated with the recombinant viruses by intraperitoneal injection and challenged 30 d later with virulent IHNV or VHSV. The GFP viruses provided protection against both wild type viruses. None of the recombinant viruses induced antibody production, and the expression of interferon (IFNalpha4) and interferon induced genes such as Mx protein and ISG-15 was not different to that of controls. The rIHNV-Gvhsv GFP did not inhibit cellular apoptosis as it was observed in an IHNV inoculated fish cell line. These studies suggest that the recombinant rIHNV-Gvhsv GFP is a promising candidate as a live recombinant vaccine and also provides a good model to further study viral pathogenicity and the molecular basis of protection against these viral infections.

  4. Characterization of an endogenous gene expressed in Aedes aegypti using an orally infectious recombinant Sindbis virus

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, L.L.; Bartholomay, L.C.; Olson, K.E.; Lowenberger, C.; Vizioli, J.; Higgs, S.; Beaty, B.J.; Christensen, B.M.

    2001-01-01

    Sindbis virus expression vectors have been used successfully to express and silence genes of interest in vivo in several mosquito species, including Aedes aegypti, Ae. albopictus, Ae. triseriatus,Culex pipiens, Armigeres subalbatus and Anopheles gambiae. Here we describe the expression of an endogenous gene, defensin, in Ae. aegypti using the orally infectious Sindbis virus, MRE/3′2J expression vector. We optimized conditions to infect mosquito larvae per os using C6/36 Ae. albopictus cells infected with the recombinant virus to maximize virus infection and expression of defensin. Infection with the parental Sindbis virus (MRE/3′2J) did not induce defensin expression. Mosquito larvae infected by ingestion of recombinant Sindbis virus-infected C6/36 cells expressed defensin when they emerged as adults. Defensin expression was observed by western analysis or indirect fluorescent assay in all developmental stages of mosquitoes infected with MRE/3′2J virus that contained the defensin insert. The multiplicity of infection of C6/36 cells and the quantity of infected cells consumed by larvae played an important role in defensin expression. Parental viruses, missing the defensin insert, and/or other defective interfering virus may have contributed to these observations. PMID:15455070

  5. Genetics and pathogenesis of feline infectious peritonitis virus.

    PubMed

    Brown, Meredith A; Troyer, Jennifer L; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Roelke, Melody E; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2009-09-01

    Feline coronavirus (FCoV) is endemic in feral cat populations and cat colonies, frequently preceding outbreaks of fatal feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). FCoV exhibits 2 biotypes: the pathogenic disease and a benign infection with feline enteric coronavirus (FECV). Uncertainty remains regarding whether genetically distinctive avirulent and virulent forms coexist or whether an avirulent form mutates in vivo, causing FIP. To resolve these alternative hypotheses, we isolated viral sequences from FCoV-infected clinically healthy and sick cats (8 FIP cases and 48 FECV-asymptomatic animals); 735 sequences from 4 gene segments were generated and subjected to phylogenetic analyses. Viral sequences from healthy cats were distinct from sick cats on the basis of genetic distances observed in the membrane and nonstructural protein 7b genes. These data demonstrate distinctive circulating virulent and avirulent strains in natural populations. In addition, 5 membrane protein amino acid residues with functional potential differentiated healthy cats from cats with FIP. These findings may have potential as diagnostic markers for virulent FIP-associated FCoV.

  6. Relative resistance of Pacific salmon to infectious salmon anaemia virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rolland, J.B.; Winton, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) is a major disease of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, caused by an orthomyxovirus (ISAV). Increases in global aqua culture and the international movement of fish made it important to determine if Pacific salmon are at risk. Steelhead trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, and chum, O. keta, Chinook, O. tshawytscha, coho, O. kisutch, and Atlantic salmon were injected intraperitoneally with a high, medium, or low dose of a Norwegian strain of ISAV. In a second challenge, the same species, except chum salmon, were injected with a high dose of either a Canadian or the Norwegian strain. Average cumulative mortality of Atlantic salmon in trial 1 was 12% in the high dose group, 20% in the medium dose group and 16% in the low dose group. The average cumulative mortality of Atlantic salmon in trial 2 was 98%. No signs typical of ISA and no ISAV-related mortality occurred among any of the groups of Oncorhynchus spp. in either experiment, although ISAV was reisolated from some fish sampled at intervals post-challenge. The results indicate that while Oncorhynchus spp. are quite resistant to ISAV relative to Atlantic salmon, the potential for ISAV to adapt to Oncorhynchus spp. should not be ignored.

  7. Genetics and Pathogenesis of Feline Infectious Peritonitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Troyer, Jennifer L.; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Roelke, Melody E.; O’Brien, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Feline coronavirus (FCoV) is endemic in feral cat populations and cat colonies, frequently preceding outbreaks of fatal feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). FCoV exhibits 2 biotypes: the pathogenic disease and a benign infection with feline enteric coronavirus (FECV). Uncertainty remains regarding whether genetically distinctive avirulent and virulent forms coexist or whether an avirulent form mutates in vivo, causing FIP. To resolve these alternative hypotheses, we isolated viral sequences from FCoV-infected clinically healthy and sick cats (8 FIP cases and 48 FECV-asymptomatic animals); 735 sequences from 4 gene segments were generated and subjected to phylogenetic analyses. Viral sequences from healthy cats were distinct from sick cats on the basis of genetic distances observed in the membrane and nonstructural protein 7b genes. These data demonstrate distinctive circulating virulent and avirulent strains in natural populations. In addition, 5 membrane protein amino acid residues with functional potential differentiated healthy cats from cats with FIP. These findings may have potential as diagnostic markers for virulent FIP-associated FCoV. PMID:19788813

  8. Vertical transmission of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka): Isolation of virus from dead eggs and fry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.; Pascho, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The control of epizootics of infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus in salmonid fishes is presently based on examination and certification of adult brood fish to prevent the introduction of virus-infected eggs into hatcheries (Canadian Fisheries and Marine Service 1976; McDaniel 1979). This strategy is based on the assumption that the virus is vertically transmitted in association with the gametes. However, evidence for vertical transmission of IHN virus is circumstantial, based mostly on the appearance of the disease outside the enzootic area (the west coast of North America) in fish hatched from eggs obtained from within that area (Plumb 1972; Holway & Smith 1973; Wolf, Quimby, Pettijohn & Landolt 1973; Sano, Nishimura, Okamoto, Yamazaki, Hanada & Watanabe1977; Carlisle, Schat & Elston 1979). An indirect demonstration of vertical transmission was made by placing known virus-free fish in the water above and below raceways containing fish that suffered an IHN epizootic in an effort to eliminate waterborne virus as a source of infection (Wingfield & Chan 1970). The fish placed below the raceway developed IHN, due to waterborne virus released from the affected fish in the raceway, but the fish placed above the raceway failed to develop IHN. These results suggested that the source of infection of the fish in the raceway was not the water supply, although it is possible that the virus was no longer present in the water supply at the time the sentinel fish were exposed to the water.

  9. Longitudinal study of viruses associated with canine infectious respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Erles, Kerstin; Dubovi, Edward J; Brooks, Harriet W; Brownlie, Joe

    2004-10-01

    In this investigation a population of dogs at a rehoming center was monitored over a period of 2 years. Despite regular vaccination of incoming dogs against distemper, canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), and canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), respiratory disease was endemic. Tissue samples from the respiratory tract as well as paired serum samples were collected for analysis. The development of PCR assays for the detection of CPIV, canine adenovirus types 1 and 2, and canine herpesvirus (CHV) is described. Surprisingly, canine adenovirus was not detected in samples from this population, whereas 19.4% of tracheal and 10.4% of lung samples were positive for CPIV and 12.8% of tracheal and 9.6% of lung samples were positive for CHV. As reported previously, a novel canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV) was detected in this population (K. Erles, C. Toomey, H. W. Brooks, and J. Brownlie, Virology 310:216-223, 2003). Infections with CRCoV occurred mostly during the first week of a dog's stay at the kennel, whereas CPIV and CHV were detected at later time points. Furthermore, the evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies to CPIV and an immunofluorescence assay for detection of antibodies to CHV is described. This study shows that CPIV is present at kennels despite vaccination. In addition, other agents such as CHV and CRCoV may play a role in the pathogenesis of canine respiratory disease, whereas CAV-2 and canine distemper virus were not present in this population, indicating that their prevalence in the United Kingdom is low due to widespread vaccination of dogs.

  10. Longitudinal Study of Viruses Associated with Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Erles, Kerstin; Dubovi, Edward J.; Brooks, Harriet W.; Brownlie, Joe

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation a population of dogs at a rehoming center was monitored over a period of 2 years. Despite regular vaccination of incoming dogs against distemper, canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), and canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), respiratory disease was endemic. Tissue samples from the respiratory tract as well as paired serum samples were collected for analysis. The development of PCR assays for the detection of CPIV, canine adenovirus types 1 and 2, and canine herpesvirus (CHV) is described. Surprisingly, canine adenovirus was not detected in samples from this population, whereas 19.4% of tracheal and 10.4% of lung samples were positive for CPIV and 12.8% of tracheal and 9.6% of lung samples were positive for CHV. As reported previously, a novel canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV) was detected in this population (K. Erles, C. Toomey, H. W. Brooks, and J. Brownlie, Virology 310:216-223, 2003). Infections with CRCoV occurred mostly during the first week of a dog's stay at the kennel, whereas CPIV and CHV were detected at later time points. Furthermore, the evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies to CPIV and an immunofluorescence assay for detection of antibodies to CHV is described. This study shows that CPIV is present at kennels despite vaccination. In addition, other agents such as CHV and CRCoV may play a role in the pathogenesis of canine respiratory disease, whereas CAV-2 and canine distemper virus were not present in this population, indicating that their prevalence in the United Kingdom is low due to widespread vaccination of dogs. PMID:15472304

  11. The preparation of an infectious full-length cDNA clone of Saffold virus.

    PubMed

    Himeda, Toshiki; Hosomi, Takushi; Asif, Naeem; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Okuwa, Takako; Muraki, Yasushi; Ohara, Yoshiro

    2011-03-09

    The pathogenicity of Saffold virus (SAFV) among humans still remains unclear, although it was identified as a novel human cardiovirus in 2007. In order to encourage the molecular pathogenetic studies of SAFV, we generated an infectious cDNA clone of SAFV type 3 (SAFV-3). The present study demonstrated that the synthesis of the full-length infectious RNA by T7 RNA polymerase was terminated by a homologous sequence motif with the human preproparathyroid hormone (PTH) signal in the SAFV-3 genome. To obtain the infectious RNA using T7 promoter, a variant of T7 RNA polymerase, which fails to recognize the PTH signal, was useful. This study will provide a valuable technical insight into the reverse genetics of SAFV.

  12. The preparation of an infectious full-length cDNA clone of Saffold virus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenicity of Saffold virus (SAFV) among humans still remains unclear, although it was identified as a novel human cardiovirus in 2007. In order to encourage the molecular pathogenetic studies of SAFV, we generated an infectious cDNA clone of SAFV type 3 (SAFV-3). The present study demonstrated that the synthesis of the full-length infectious RNA by T7 RNA polymerase was terminated by a homologous sequence motif with the human preproparathyroid hormone (PTH) signal in the SAFV-3 genome. To obtain the infectious RNA using T7 promoter, a variant of T7 RNA polymerase, which fails to recognize the PTH signal, was useful. This study will provide a valuable technical insight into the reverse genetics of SAFV. PMID:21385468

  13. Characterization of an infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN) virus carrier cell culture with resistance to superinfection with heterologous viruses.

    PubMed

    García, Inmaculada; Galiana, Antonio; Falcó, Alberto; Estepa, Amparo; Perez, Luis

    2011-04-21

    A state of persistence of a non susceptible fish cell line with infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) was established in vitro by experimental infection. The persistently infected culture showed sustained production of infectious virus and could be continuously passaged for months. A distinct feature of this culture is that only a very small fraction of the cells harbours virus replication, in contrast to other reported IPNV-persistently infected cells from salmonid fish, where nearly all the cells express viral antigens. In spite of the small number of detectable IPNV-infected cells, the carrier culture shows resistance to superinfection with homologous as well as heterologous viruses. Temperature shift-up experiments indicate that viral interference is due to continuous replication of IPNV in the culture. Quantitation of Mx gene expression suggested that the interference phenomenon could be mediated by the activation of the interferon (IFN) system. However, conditioned medium from the IPNV-infected cell cultures only marginally protected other cells against VHSV infection, indicating that other type I IFN-independent mechanism may be underlying the resistance of the persistently infected culture to infection with heterologous viruses. Our study defines a novel in vitro model of IPNV persistence and contributes to the understanding of the widespread distribution of aquabirnaviruses in marine and fresh water environments by establishing a carrier state in non susceptible fish species. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Viral fitness does not correlate with three genotype displacement events involving infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Kell, Alison M; Wargo, Andrew R; Kurath, Gael

    2014-09-01

    Viral genotype displacement events are characterized by the replacement of a previously dominant virus genotype by a novel genotype of the same virus species in a given geographic region. We examine here the fitness of three pairs of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) genotypes involved in three major genotype displacement events in Washington state over the last 30 years to determine whether increased virus fitness correlates with displacement. Fitness was assessed using in vivo assays to measure viral replication in single infection, simultaneous co-infection, and sequential superinfection in the natural host, steelhead trout. In addition, virion stability of each genotype was measured in freshwater and seawater environments at various temperatures. By these methods, we found no correlation between increased viral fitness and displacement in the field. These results suggest that other pressures likely exist in the field with important consequences for IHNV evolution.

  15. Vaccinia viruses: vaccines against smallpox and vectors against infectious diseases and tumors

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Stephen R; Dolin, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    Less than 200 years after its introduction, widespread use of vaccinia virus (VACV) as a smallpox vaccine has eradicated variola virus. Along with the remarkable success of the vaccination program, frequent and sometimes severe adverse reactions to VACV were encountered. After eradication, VACV has been reserved for select populations who might be at significant risk for orthopoxvirus infections. Events over the past decade have renewed concerns over the potential use of variola virus as a biological weapon. Accordingly, interest in VACV and attenuated derivatives has increased, both as vaccines against smallpox and as vectors for other vaccines. This article will focus on new developments in the field of orthopoxvirus immunization and will highlight recent advances in the use of vaccinia viruses as vectors for infectious diseases and malignancies. PMID:21854314

  16. Viral fitness does not correlate with three genotype displacement events involving infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kell, Alison M.; Wargo, Andrew R.; Kurath, Gael

    2014-01-01

    Viral genotype displacement events are characterized by the replacement of a previously dominant virus genotype by a novel genotype of the same virus species in a given geographic region. We examine here the fitness of three pairs of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) genotypes involved in three major genotype displacement events in Washington state over the last 30 years to determine whether increased virus fitness correlates with displacement. Fitness was assessed using in vivo assays to measure viral replication in single infection, simultaneous co-infection, and sequential superinfection in the natural host, steelhead trout. In addition, virion stability of each genotype was measured in freshwater and seawater environments at various temperatures. By these methods, we found no correlation between increased viral fitness and displacement in the field. These results suggest that other pressures likely exist in the field with important consequences for IHNV evolution.

  17. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic study of equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Gonda, M A; Charman, H P; Walker, J L; Coggins, L

    1978-05-01

    Scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to study in detail the morphogenesis and replication of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) in cultured, persistently infected equine fetal kidney fibroblasts. The EIAV was shown by thin-section electron microscopy to resemble morphologically more closely the members of the genus Lenti-virus in the family Retroviridae than other genera. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated budding virus on only about 5% of the equine fetal kidney fibroblasts; however, the entire surface of these cells was involved in viral replication. Except where virus budding was observed, EIAV-infected cells were smooth and free of the topographic surface alterations characteristic of cells transformed by type C retroviruses. The morphologic relationship of EIAV and pathologic manifestations of EIAV infection to those of other Retroviridae are discussed.

  18. Infectious Bursal Disease Virus-Host Interactions: Multifunctional Viral Proteins that Perform Multiple and Differing Jobs.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yao; Zheng, Shijun J

    2017-01-14

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is an acute, highly contagious and immunosuppressive poultry disease caused by IBD virus (IBDV). The consequent immunosuppression increases susceptibility to other infectious diseases and the risk of subsequent vaccination failure as well. Since the genome of IBDV is relatively small, it has a limited number of proteins inhibiting the cellular antiviral responses and acting as destroyers to the host defense system. Thus, these virulence factors must be multifunctional in order to complete the viral replication cycle in a host cell. Insights into the roles of these viral proteins along with their multiple cellular targets in different pathways will give rise to a rational design for safer and effective vaccines. Here we summarize the recent findings that focus on the virus-cell interactions during IBDV infection at the protein level.

  19. Recent advances in detection and control of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in aquaculture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) is one of the most important viral diseases of salmon and trout reared in culture. The disease remains untreatable with avoidance being the only control measure. Much has been learned about the chemical, physical, and serological characteristics of the rhabdovirus causing IHN, but critical gaps exist in our understanding of the biology of the virus in nature. The tools of molecular biology have provided improved methods for detection of pathogens and new strategies for control of viral diseases. This paper reviews several recent improvements in methods for detecting infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus including the application of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, development of monoclonal antibodies and DNA probes, and use of the polymerase chain reaction. New strategies for control of IHN through the use of better water treatment, more resistant fish, antiviral drugs or chemicals, and new generation vaccines are discussed.

  20. High-throughput screening and rapid inhibitor triage using an infectious chimeric Hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Wichroski, Michael J; Fang, Jie; Eggers, Betsy J; Rose, Ronald E; Mazzucco, Charles E; Pokornowski, Kevin A; Baldick, Carl J; Anthony, Monique N; Dowling, Craig J; Barber, Lauren E; Leet, John E; Beno, Brett R; Gerritz, Samuel W; Agler, Michele L; Cockett, Mark I; Tenney, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    The recent development of a Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infectious virus cell culture model system has facilitated the development of whole-virus screening assays which can be used to interrogate the entire virus life cycle. Here, we describe the development of an HCV growth assay capable of identifying inhibitors against all stages of the virus life cycle with assay throughput suitable for rapid screening of large-scale chemical libraries. Novel features include, 1) the use of an efficiently-spreading, full-length, intergenotypic chimeric reporter virus with genotype 1 structural proteins, 2) a homogenous assay format compatible with miniaturization and automated liquid-handling, and 3) flexible assay end-points using either chemiluminescence (high-throughput screening) or Cellomics ArrayScan™ technology (high-content screening). The assay was validated using known HCV antivirals and through a large-scale, high-throughput screening campaign that identified novel and selective entry, replication and late-stage inhibitors. Selection and characterization of resistant viruses provided information regarding inhibitor target and mechanism. Leveraging results from this robust whole-virus assay represents a critical first step towards identifying inhibitors of novel targets to broaden the spectrum of antivirals for the treatment of HCV.

  1. An isolate and sequence database of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV).

    PubMed

    Jonstrup, S P; Schuetze, H; Kurath, G; Gray, T; Jensen, B Bang; Olesen, N J

    2010-06-01

    In the field of fish diseases, the amount of relevant information available is enormous. Internet-based databases are an excellent tool for keeping track of the available knowledge in the field. Fishpathogens.eu was launched in June 2009 with the aim of collecting, storing and sorting data on fish pathogens. The first pathogen to be included was the rhabdovirus, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). Here, we present an extension of the database to also include infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). The database is developed, maintained and managed by the European Community Reference Laboratory for Fish Diseases and collaborators. It is available at http://www.fishpathogens.eu/ihnv.

  2. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies recognize antigenic variants among isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, J.R.; Arakawa, C.N.; Lannan, C.N.; Fryer, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    eutralizing monoclonal antibodies were developed against strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) from steelhead trout Salmo gairdneri in the Deschutes River of Oregon, chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Sacramento River of California, and rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri reared in the Hagerman Valley of Idaho, USA. These antibodies were tested for neutralization of 12 IHNV isolates obtained from salmonids in Japan, Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, and Idaho. The antibodies recognized antigenic variants among the isolates and could be used to separate the viruses into 4 groups. The members of each group tended to be related by geographic area rather than by source host species, virulence, or date of isolation.

  3. Molecular characterization of avian infectious bronchitis virus strains isolated in Colombia during 2003.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, I R; Villegas, P; Mossos, N; Jackwood, M W

    2005-12-01

    Sixteen infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) isolates were recovered from broilers and layers from five geographic poultry regions in Colombia. The viruses were isolated from tracheas, lungs, and cecal tonsils of birds, previously vaccinated with the Massachusetts strain, that were showing respiratory signs. Further analysis of the IBV isolates was achieved by phylogenetic analysis comparing their deduced amino acid sequences in the hypervariable region 1 of the S1 gene with reference strains. Four unique genotype clusters containing isolates with indigenous genotypes were observed. One isolate was found to be the Connecticut genotype and three isolates were found to be the Massachusetts genotype.

  4. Infectious Zika virus in vaginal secretions from an HIV-infected woman, France, August 2016.

    PubMed

    Penot, Pauline; Brichler, Ségolène; Guilleminot, Jean; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Taulera, Olivier; Gordien, Emmanuel; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Molina, Jean-Michel

    2017-01-19

    A woman with controlled HIV infection developed in late August 2016 a pruritic rash with fever and conjunctival hyperaemia after a trip to the French Caribbean islands. On day 3 after symptom onset, Zika virus RNA was detected in plasma, urine and vaginal samples with respective viral loads of 3.8, 6.1 and 5.3 log copies/mL. Notably, we demonstrated the presence of infectious Zika virus particles in the vaginal samples by isolation in cell culture. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  5. Infectious Zika virus in vaginal secretions from an HIV-infected woman, France, August 2016

    PubMed Central

    Penot, Pauline; Brichler, Ségolène; Guilleminot, Jean; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Taulera, Olivier; Gordien, Emmanuel; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Molina, Jean-Michel

    2017-01-01

    A woman with controlled HIV infection developed in late August 2016 a pruritic rash with fever and conjunctival hyperaemia after a trip to the French Caribbean islands. On day 3 after symptom onset, Zika virus RNA was detected in plasma, urine and vaginal samples with respective viral loads of 3.8, 6.1 and 5.3 log copies/mL. Notably, we demonstrated the presence of infectious Zika virus particles in the vaginal samples by isolation in cell culture. PMID:28128730

  6. Identification of sequence changes responsible for the attenuation of avian infectious bronchitis virus strain Arkansas DPI.

    PubMed

    Ammayappan, Arun; Upadhyay, Chitra; Gelb, Jack; Vakharia, Vikram N

    2009-01-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is the causal agent of infectious bronchitis, which still remains one of the most important poultry diseases worldwide because of numerous serotypes and variants. A virulent strain of IBV, isolated from Arkansas (Ark), was propagated in embryonated eggs (Ark DPI 11). Following 101 serial passages in embryonated eggs, an attenuated strain of IBV was established (Ark DPI 101) that does not induce histopathological lesions in the tracheae of infected chicks. To identify sequence changes responsible for the attenuation of IBV, complete genome sequences of both virulent and attenuated Ark DPI viruses were obtained. Comparison of the genome sequences of the virulent and attenuated Ark DPI viruses reveals that these viruses are similar and differ only by 21 nucleotides, resulting in 17 amino acids changes. Most of those substitutions are located in the replicase 1a and spike genes. No differences were observed in gene 3, M or 5a, and only one nucleotide substitution each was present in 5b, N and 3'UTR. By comparing the deduced amino acid sequences of virulent and attenuated viruses, we identified sequence changes responsible for the adaptation and attenuation of the IBV-Ark DPI strain.

  7. Construction of Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated tomato black ring virus infectious cDNA clones.

    PubMed

    Zarzyńska-Nowak, Aleksandra; Ferriol, Inmaculada; Falk, Bryce W; Borodynko-Filas, Natasza; Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata

    2017-02-15

    Tomato black ring virus (TBRV, genus Nepovirus) infects a wide range of economically important plants such as tomato, potato, tobacco and cucumber. Here, a successful construction of infectious full-length cDNA clones of the TBRV genomic RNAs (RNA1 and RNA2) is reported for the first time. The engineered constructs consisting of PCR-amplified DNAs were cloned into binary vector pJL89 immediately downstream of a double cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, and upstream of the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and nopaline synthase terminator (NOS). The symptoms induced on plants agroinoculated with both constructs were indistinguishable from those caused by the wild-type virus. The infectivity of obtained clones was verified by reinoculation to Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi, Chenopodium quinoa and Cucumis sativus. The presence of viral particles and RNA was confirmed by electron microscopy and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Constructed full-length infectious cDNA clones will serve as an excellent tool to study virus-host-vector interactions.

  8. Development of a high throughput TaqMan assay for the detection of infectious laryngotracheitis virus in vector vaccinated chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) causes an acute, highly contagious upper-respiratory disease of chickens. Sensitive detection of the causative alphaherpesvirus is important in clinical investigations and experimental studies. In particular, it is essential to quantify the viral genome co...

  9. Generation of stable infectious clones of plant viruses by using Rhizobium radiobacter for both cloning and inoculation.

    PubMed

    Tuo, Decai; Fu, Lanlan; Shen, Wentao; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng; Yan, Pu

    2017-10-01

    A novel Rhizobium radiobacter (synonym Agrobacterium tumefaciens)-mediated approach was developed to generate stable infectious clones of plant viruses. This method uses R. radiobacter for both cloning and inoculation of infectious clones, bypassing the requirement of cloning in E. coli to avoid the instability. Only three steps are included in this method: (i) construct viral genome-encoding plasmids in vitro by one-step Gibson assembly; (ii) transform the assembled DNA products into R. radiobacter; (iii) inoculate plants with the R. radiobacter clones containing the viral genome. Stable infectious clones were obtained from two potyviruses papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) and papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV) using this method, whereas attempts utilizing "classical" E. coli cloning system failed repeatedly. This method is simple and efficient, and is promising for a wide application in generation of infectious clones of plant virus, especially for those which are instable in E. coli. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. First infectious clone of the propagatively transmitted Oat blue dwarf virus.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Michael C; Weiland, John J

    2010-04-01

    Oat blue dwarf virus (OBDV) is a small, phloem-limited marafivirus that replicates in its leafhopper vector. We have developed complete cDNA clones of OBDV from which infectious transcripts may be derived--the first such clones for any propagatively transmitted plant virus. Prior to clone construction, the reported sequences of the 5' and 3' ends were confirmed using 5' RACE, primer extension, and ligation-anchored PCR. Using vascular puncture of maize seeds with capped transcripts, multiple clones were shown to be infectious at an average rate of 24.3% (range 14-36%). Aster leafhoppers successfully transmitted OBDV to oats and barley after feeding on detached, infected maize leaves. Proteins and RNAs consistent in size with those expected in OBDV infection were detected in young leaves via western and northern blotting, respectively. One construct, pOBDV-2r, was designated as the reference clone. An infectious clone of OBDV will be valuable in examining the interaction of this virus with both its insect and plant hosts.

  11. Survival of the salmonid viruses infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHNV) and infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPNV) in ozonated, chlorinated, and Untreated waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, Gary A.; Nelson, Nancy C.; Smith, Cathy A.

    1978-01-01

    Ozone and chlorine inactivation curves were determined in three water types at 10 °C for the fish pathogenic viruses infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHNV) and infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPNV). In phosphate-buffered, distilled water (PBDW) an ozone dose of 0.01 mg/L for 30 or 60 s inactivated IHNV or IPNV, respectively, suspended at a tissue culture 50% infective dose (TCID50) of 104–105/mL. In hard (120 mg/L as CaCO3) and soft water (30 mg/L) lake waters, an ozone application rate of 70 mg∙h−1∙L−1 for 10 min destroyed IHNV. IPNV inactivation in hard water required 90 mg∙O3∙h−1∙L−1 for 10 min but only a 30-s contact time in soft water. The IPNV was also somewhat more resistant to chlorine. In PBDW, a residual of 0.1 mg/L with contact times of 30 and 60 s, respectively, destroyed IHNV and IPNV. In soft lake water IHNV was destroyed within 5 min at 0.5 mg/L, while in hard water a 10-min contact time was required. For IPNV disinfection in soft water, 0.2 mg/L for 10 min was sufficient but this chlorine residual had essentially no effect on IPNV in hard water. Increasing this dose to 0.7 mg/L destroyed IPNV in hard water within 2 min. In untreated waters, IPNV was stable for at least 8 wk in either distilled, soft, or hard lake waters. However, IHNV survived only about 2 wk in distilled and 7 wk in the soft or hard lake waters. We suggest the serious consideration of ozone as a fish disease control agent. Key words: ozone, chlorine disinfection, fish pathogens, viruses

  12. Comparative full genome analysis of four infectious laryngotracheitis virus (gallid herpesvirus-1) virulent isolates from the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gallid herpesvirus type 1 (GaHV-1), commonly named infectious laryngotracheitis virus causes the respiratory disease in chickens known as infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT). Molecular determinants associated with differences in pathogenicity of GaHV-1 strains are not completely understood. Comparis...

  13. Non-Lytic Egression of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV) Particles from Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Fernando; Romero, Nicolás; Cubas, Liliana L; Delgui, Laura R; Rodríguez, Dolores; Rodríguez, José F

    2017-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), a member of the Birnaviridae family, is responsible for a devastating immunosuppressive disease affecting juvenile domestic chickens. IBDV particles are naked icosahedrons enclosing a bipartite double-stranded RNA genome harboring three open reading frames (ORF). One of these ORFs codes for VP5, a non-structural polypeptide dispensable for virus replication in tissue culture but essential for IBDV pathogenesis. Using two previously described recombinant viruses, whose genomes differ in a single nucleotide, expressing or not the VP5 polypeptide, we have analyzed the role of this polypeptide during the IBDV replication process. Here, we show that VP5 is not involved in house-keeping steps of the virus replication cycle; i.e. genome transcription/replication, protein translation and virus assembly. Although infection with the VP5 expressing and non-expressing viruses rendered similar intracellular infective progeny yields, striking differences were detected on the ability of their progenies to exiting infected cells. Experimental data shows that the bulk of the VP5-expressing virus progeny efficiently egresses infected cells during the early phase of the infection, when viral metabolism is peaking and virus-induced cell death rates are as yet minimal, as determined by qPCR, radioactive protein labeling and quantitative real-time cell death analyses. In contrast, the release of the VP5-deficient virus progeny is significantly abridged and associated to cell death. Taken together, data presented in this report show that IBDV uses a previously undescribed VP5-dependent non-lytic egress mechanism significantly enhancing the virus dissemination speed. Ultrastructural analyses revealed that newly assembled IBDV virions associate to a vesicular network apparently facilitating their trafficking from virus assembly factories to the extracellular milieu, and that this association requires the expression of the VP5 polypeptide.

  14. Non-Lytic Egression of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV) Particles from Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Fernando; Romero, Nicolás; Cubas, Liliana L.; Delgui, Laura R.; Rodríguez, Dolores

    2017-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), a member of the Birnaviridae family, is responsible for a devastating immunosuppressive disease affecting juvenile domestic chickens. IBDV particles are naked icosahedrons enclosing a bipartite double-stranded RNA genome harboring three open reading frames (ORF). One of these ORFs codes for VP5, a non-structural polypeptide dispensable for virus replication in tissue culture but essential for IBDV pathogenesis. Using two previously described recombinant viruses, whose genomes differ in a single nucleotide, expressing or not the VP5 polypeptide, we have analyzed the role of this polypeptide during the IBDV replication process. Here, we show that VP5 is not involved in house-keeping steps of the virus replication cycle; i.e. genome transcription/replication, protein translation and virus assembly. Although infection with the VP5 expressing and non-expressing viruses rendered similar intracellular infective progeny yields, striking differences were detected on the ability of their progenies to exiting infected cells. Experimental data shows that the bulk of the VP5-expressing virus progeny efficiently egresses infected cells during the early phase of the infection, when viral metabolism is peaking and virus-induced cell death rates are as yet minimal, as determined by qPCR, radioactive protein labeling and quantitative real-time cell death analyses. In contrast, the release of the VP5-deficient virus progeny is significantly abridged and associated to cell death. Taken together, data presented in this report show that IBDV uses a previously undescribed VP5-dependent non-lytic egress mechanism significantly enhancing the virus dissemination speed. Ultrastructural analyses revealed that newly assembled IBDV virions associate to a vesicular network apparently facilitating their trafficking from virus assembly factories to the extracellular milieu, and that this association requires the expression of the VP5 polypeptide. PMID

  15. In vitro infection of salmonid epidermal tissues by infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yamamoto, T.; Batts, W.N.; Winton, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of two rhabdoviruses, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), to infect fish skin was investigated by in vitro infection of excised tissues. Virus replication was determined by plaque assay of homogenized tissue extracts, and the virus antigen was detected by immunohistology of tissue sections. Gill, fin, and ventral abdominal skin tissues of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss that had been infected in vitro with a virulent strain of IHNV (193–110) produced substantial increases in virus titer within 24 h. Titers continued to increase up until day 3 of incubation; by this time, virus had increased 1,000-fold or more. This increase in IHNV titer occurred in epidermal tissues of fingerlings and of older fish. In another experiment, IHNV replicated in excised rainbow trout tissues whether the fish had been subject to prior infection with a virulent strain of IHNV (Western Regional Aquaculture Consortium isolate) or whether the fish had been infected previously with an attenuated strain of the virus (Nan Scott Lake, with 100 passes in culture). A virulent strain of VHSV (23/75) replicated effectively in excised gill tissues and epidermal tissues of rainbow trout and chinook salmon O. tshawytscha; however, the avirulent North American strain of VHSV (Makah) replicated poorly or not at all.

  16. Modulation of Triglyceride and Cholesterol Ester Synthesis Impairs Assembly of Infectious Hepatitis C Virus*

    PubMed Central

    Liefhebber, Jolanda M. P.; Hague, Charlotte V.; Zhang, Qifeng; Wakelam, Michael J. O.; McLauchlan, John

    2014-01-01

    In hepatitis C virus infection, replication of the viral genome and virion assembly are linked to cellular metabolic processes. In particular, lipid droplets, which store principally triacylglycerides (TAGs) and cholesterol esters (CEs), have been implicated in production of infectious virus. Here, we examine the effect on productive infection of triacsin C and YIC-C8-434, which inhibit synthesis of TAGs and CEs by targeting long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase and acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase, respectively. Our results present high resolution data on the acylglycerol and cholesterol ester species that were affected by the compounds. Moreover, triacsin C, which blocks both triglyceride and cholesterol ester synthesis, cleared most of the lipid droplets in cells. By contrast, YIC-C8-434, which only abrogates production of cholesterol esters, induced an increase in size of droplets. Although both compounds slightly reduced viral RNA synthesis, they significantly impaired assembly of infectious virions in infected cells. In the case of triacsin C, reduced stability of the viral core protein, which forms the virion nucleocapsid and is targeted to the surface of lipid droplets, correlated with lower virion assembly. In addition, the virus particles that were released from cells had reduced specific infectivity. YIC-C8-434 did not alter the association of core with lipid droplets but appeared to decrease production of infectious virus particles, suggesting a block in virion assembly. Thus, the compounds have antiviral properties, indicating that targeting synthesis of lipids stored in lipid droplets might be an option for therapeutic intervention in treating chronic hepatitis C virus infection. PMID:24917668

  17. Establishment of reverse genetics system for infectious bronchitis virus attenuated vaccine strain H120.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying Shun; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Hong Ning; Fan, Wen Qiao; Yang, Xin; Zhang, An Yun; Zeng, Fan Ya; Zhang, Zhi Kun; Cao, Hai Peng; Zeng, Cheng

    2013-02-22

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) strain H120 was successfully rescued as infectious clone by reverse genetics. Thirteen 1.5-2.8 kb fragments contiguously spanning the virus genome were amplified and cloned into pMD19-T. Transcription grade complete length cDNA was acquired by a modified "No See'm" ligation strategy, which employed restriction enzyme Bsa I and BsmB I and ligated more than two fragments in one T4 ligase reaction. The full-length genomic cDNA was transcribed and its transcript was transfected by electroporation into BHK-21 together with the transcript of nucleocapsid gene. At 48 h post transfection, the medium to culture the transfected BHK-21 cells was harvested and inoculated into 10-days old SPF embryonated chicken eggs (ECE) to replicate the rescued virus. After passage of the virus in ECE five times, the rescued H120 virus (R-H120) was successfully recovered. R-H120 was subsequently identified to possess the introduced silent mutation site in its genome. Some biological characteristics of R-H120 such as growth curve, EID50 and HA titers, were tested and all of them were very similar to its parent strain H120. In addition, both R-H120 and H120 induced a comparable titer of HA inhibition (HI) antibody in immunized chickens and also provided up to 85% of immune protection to the chickens that were challenged with Mass41 IBV strain. The present study demonstrated that construction of infectious clone from IBV vaccine strain H120 is possible and IBV-H120 can be use as a vaccine vector for the development of novel vaccines through molecular recombination and the modified reverse genetics approach.

  18. Zika Virus Infectious Cell Culture System and the In Vitro Prophylactic Effect of Interferons.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Deisy; Arumugaswami, Vaithilingaraja

    2016-08-23

    Zika Virus (ZIKV) is an emerging pathogen that is linked to fetal developmental abnormalities such as microcephaly, eye defects, and impaired growth. ZIKV is an RNA virus of the Flaviviridae family. ZIKV is mainly transmitted by mosquitoes, but can also be spread by maternal to fetal vertical transmission as well as sexual contact. To date, there are no reliable treatment or vaccine options available to protect those infected by the virus. The development of a reproducible, effective Zika virus infectious cell culture system is critical for studying the molecular mechanisms of ZIKV replication as well as drug and vaccine development. In this regard, a protocol describing a mammalian cell-based in vitro Zika virus culture system for viral production and growth analysis is reported here. Details on the formation of plaques by Zika virus on a cell monolayer and plaque assay for measuring viral titer are presented. Viral genome replication kinetics and double-stranded RNA genome replicatory intermediates are determined. This culture platform was utilized to screen against a library of a small set of cytokines resulting in the identification of interferon-α (IFN-α), IFN-β and IFN-γ as potent inhibitors of Zika viral growth. In summary, an in vitro infectious Zika viral culture system and various virological assays are demonstrated in this study, which has the potential to greatly benefit the research community in elucidating further the mechanisms of viral pathogenesis and the evolution of viral virulence. Antiviral IFN-alpha can further be evaluated as a prophylactic, post-exposure prophylactic, and treatment option for Zika virus infections in high-risk populations, including infected pregnant women.

  19. Generation and characterization of West Nile pseudo-infectious reporter virus for antiviral screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Lei; Ye, Han-Qing; Deng, Cheng-Lin; Liu, Si-Qing; Shi, Pei-Yong; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Yuan, Zhi-Ming; Zhang, Bo

    2017-05-01

    West Nile virus (WNV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, is an important neurotropic human pathogen. As a biosafety level-3 (BSL-3) agent, WNV is strictly to BSL-3 laboratories for experimentations, thus greatly hindering the development of vaccine and antiviral drug. Here, we developed a novel pseudo-infectious WNV reporter virus expressing the Gaussia luciferase (Gluc). A stable 293TNS1 cell line expressing NS1 was selected for trans-supplying NS1 protein to support the replication of WNV-ΔNS1 virus and WNV-ΔNS1-Gluc reporter virus with large-fragment deletion of NS1. WNV-ΔNS1 virus and WNV-Gluc-ΔNS1 reporter virus were confined to complete their replication cycle in this 293TNS1 cell line, displaying nearly identical growth kinetics to WT WNV although the viral titers were lower than those of WT WNV. The reporter gene was stably maintained in virus genome at least within three rounds of passage in 293TNS1 cell line. Using a known flaviviruses inhibitor, NITD008, we demonstrated that the pseudo-infectious WNV-Gluc-ΔNS1 could be used for antiviral screening. Furthermore, a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay in a 96-well format was optimized and validated using several known WNV inhibitors, indicating that the optimized HTS assay was suitable for high-throughput screening WNV inhibitors. Our work provides a stable and safe tool to handle WNV outside of a BSL-3 facility and facilitates high throughput screening for anti-WNV drugs.

  20. The Putative Polymerase Sequence of Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus Suggests a New Genus within the Orthomyxoviridae

    PubMed Central

    Krossøy, Bjørn; Hordvik, Ivar; Nilsen, Frank; Nylund, Are; Endresen, Curt

    1999-01-01

    The infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) is an orthomyxovirus-like virus infecting teleosts. The disease caused by this virus has had major economic consequences for the Atlantic salmon farming industry in Norway, Canada, and Scotland. In this work, we report the cloning and sequencing of an ISAV-specific cDNA comprising 2,245 bp with an open reading frame coding for a predicted protein with a calculated molecular weight of 80.5 kDa. The putative protein sequence shows the core polymerase motifs characteristic of all viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. Comparison of the conserved motifs with the corresponding regions of other segmented negative-stranded RNA viruses shows a closer relationship with members of the Orthomyxoviridae than with viruses in other families. The putative ISAV polymerase protein (PB1) has a length of 708 amino acids, a charge of +22 at neutral pH, and a pI of 9.9, which are consistent with the properties of the PB1 proteins of other members of the family. Calculations of the distances between the different PB1 proteins indicate that the ISAV is distantly related to the other members of the family but more closely related to the influenza viruses than to the Thogoto viruses. Based on these and previously published results, we propose that the ISAV comprises a new, fifth genus in the Orthomyxoviridae. PMID:9971796

  1. Hepatitis C Virus p7 Protein Is Crucial for Assembly and Release of Infectious Virions

    PubMed Central

    Steinmann, Eike; Penin, Francois; Kallis, Stephanie; Patel, Arvind H; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Pietschmann, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with chronic liver disease and currently affects about 3% of the world population. Although much has been learned about the function of individual viral proteins, the role of the HCV p7 protein in virus replication is not known. Recent data, however, suggest that it forms ion channels that may be targeted by antiviral compounds. Moreover, this protein was shown to be essential for infectivity in chimpanzee. Employing the novel HCV infection system and using a genetic approach to investigate the function of p7 in the viral replication cycle, we find that this protein is essential for efficient assembly and release of infectious virions across divergent virus strains. We show that p7 promotes virus particle production in a genotype-specific manner most likely due to interactions with other viral factors. Virus entry, on the other hand, is largely independent of p7, as the specific infectivity of released virions with a defect in p7 was not affected. Together, these observations indicate that p7 is primarily involved in the late phase of the HCV replication cycle. Finally, we note that p7 variants from different isolates deviate substantially in their capacity to promote virus production, suggesting that p7 is an important virulence factor that may modulate fitness and in turn virus persistence and pathogenesis. PMID:17658949

  2. Infectious salmon anemia virus RNA in fish cell cultures and in tissue sections of atlantic salmon experimentally infected with infectious salmon anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Moneke, Emeka E; Kibenge, Molly J T; Groman, David; Johnson, Gerald R; Ikede, Basil O; Kibenge, Frederick S B

    2003-09-01

    Current understanding of the etiopathogenesis of infectious salmon anemia (ISA) virus (ISAV) infection in fish comes mostly from virus detection in homogenized tissues taken from ISA-suspected mortalities. This study combined in situ hybridization (ISH) and histology to demonstrate viral RNA transcripts in different fish cell lines infected with ISAV and in tissues collected during the clinical phase of ISAV infection in Atlantic salmon. For this, a riboprobe to mRNA transcripts of ISAV RNA segment 8 was shown to detect viral mRNA in ISAV-infected TO, CHSE-214, and SHK-1 cell cultures. Specific hybridization was initially detected exclusively in the nuclei of infected cells, which is consistent with the nuclear transcription of orthomyxoviruses. For use of the riboprobe on fish tissues fixed in paraformaldehyde or formalin, the conditions used to permeabilize tissues before ISH (Proteinase K or Tween 20) were first optimized. Tissues were collected 15-20 days after challenge from 7 fresh mortalities of Atlantic salmon parr (approximately 20 g) showing severe gross and microscopic lesions, consistent with ISAV infection. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction on tissue pools confirmed the presence of ISAV in each of the 7 fish. Of the tissues examined in each fish, the heart and liver consistently showed the strongest hybridization signal and, therefore, the most in situ virus, which was located in the endothelium of small blood vessels and in macrophage-like cells.

  3. Histological, serological and virulence studies on rainbow trout experimentally infected with recombinant infectious hematopoietic necrosis viruses.

    PubMed

    Romero, Alejandro; Figueras, Antonio; Tafalla, Carolina; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Bremont, Michel; Novoa, Beatriz

    2005-12-30

    Several recombinant infectious hematopoietic necrosis viruses (IHNV) were produced by reverse genetics and their pathogenicity in trout was evaluated and compared to that of the wild type (wt) viruses IHNV and viral haemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). Recombinant IHNVs used in this study were: rIHNV, identical to the wtIHNV; rIHNV-Gvhsv, a recombinant virus expressing the VHSV G gene instead of the IHNV G gene; rIHNV-Gmut, which possesses 2 targeted mutations in the glycoprotein; and rIHNVmut-Gmut, which is similar to the rIHNV-Gmut, but exhibits additional mutations along the genome. Results obtained in experimental infections showed that the rIHNV and rIHNV-Gmut were the most virulent recombinant viruses. Severity of the lesions induced by the different recombinant viruses was in agreement with mortality data. The kidney and the liver were the organs most affected by the most pathogenic viruses, and the lesions observed resembled those produced by wtIHNV. The introduction of mutations did not alter the tissue tropism of the virus. The recombinant viruses were able to replicate in fish, as shown by immunoperoxidase assay and RT-PCR. Antibodies against IHNV were detected in the fish inoculated with IHNV, rIHNV, rIHNV-Gmut and rIHNVmut-Gmut, and antibodies against VHSV were also found in fish infected with rIHNV-Gvhsv. Finally, antibody production was highest in fish infected with the rIHNVmut-Gmut even though this virus was the least virulent.

  4. Molecular characterization of equine infectious anaemia virus from a major outbreak in southeastern France.

    PubMed

    Gaudaire, D; Lecouturier, F; Ponçon, N; Morilland, E; Laugier, C; Zientara, S; Hans, A

    2017-05-15

    In 2009, a major outbreak of equine infectious anaemia (EIA) was reported in the south-east of France. This outbreak affected three premises located in the Var region where the index case, a 10-year-old mare that exhibited clinical signs consistent with EIA, occurred at a riding school. Overall, more than 250 horses were tested for EIAV (equine infectious anaemia virus) antibodies, using agar gel immunodiffusion test, and 16 horses were positive in three different holdings. Epidemiological survey confirmed that the three premises were related through the purchase/sale of horses and the use of shared or nearby pastures. Molecular characterization of viruses was performed by sequencing the full gag gene sequence (1,400 bp) of the proviral DNAs retrieved from the spleen of infected animals collected post-mortem. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed epidemiological data from the field, as viruses isolated from the three premises were clustering together suggesting a common origin whereas some premises were 50 km apart. Moreover, viruses characterized during this outbreak are different from European strains described so far, underlying the high genetic diversity of EIAV in Europe. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Crystal Structure of Feline Infectious Peritonitis Virus Main Protease in Complex with Synergetic Dual Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fenghua; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Xuemeng; Yang, Kailin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coronaviruses (CoVs) can cause highly prevalent diseases in humans and animals. Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) belongs to the genus Alphacoronavirus, resulting in a lethal systemic granulomatous disease called feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), which is one of the most important fatal infectious diseases of cats worldwide. No specific vaccines or drugs have been approved to treat FIP. CoV main proteases (Mpros) play a pivotal role in viral transcription and replication, making them an ideal target for drug development. Here, we report the crystal structure of FIPV Mpro in complex with dual inhibitors, a zinc ion and a Michael acceptor. The complex structure elaborates a unique mechanism of two distinct inhibitors synergizing to inactivate the protease, providing a structural basis to design novel antivirals and suggesting the potential to take advantage of zinc as an adjunct therapy against CoV-associated diseases. IMPORTANCE Coronaviruses (CoVs) have the largest genome size among all RNA viruses. CoV infection causes various diseases in humans and animals, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). No approved specific drugs or vaccinations are available to treat their infections. Here, we report a novel dual inhibition mechanism targeting CoV main protease (Mpro) from feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV), which leads to lethal systemic granulomatous disease in cats. Mpro, conserved across all CoV genomes, is essential for viral replication and transcription. We demonstrated that zinc ion and a Michael acceptor-based peptidomimetic inhibitor synergistically inactivate FIPV Mpro. We also solved the structure of FIPV Mpro complexed with two inhibitors, delineating the structural view of a dual inhibition mechanism. Our study provides new insight into the pharmaceutical strategy against CoV Mpro through using zinc as an adjuvant therapy to enhance the efficacy of an irreversible

  6. Transmission potential of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in APEX-IHN®-vaccinated Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Long, Amy; Richard, Jon; Hawley, Laura; LaPatra, Scott E; Garver, Kyle A

    2017-01-24

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) outbreaks have had a significant negative impact on Atlantic salmon Salmo salar production in British Columbia, Canada, since the first outbreak was reported in 1992. In 2005, the APEX-IHN® vaccine was approved for use in Canada for prevention of IHN. The vaccine was proven to be safe and efficacious prior to approval; however, it is unknown as to whether APEX-IHN®-vaccinated Atlantic salmon infected with IHNV can support replication and virus shedding in sufficient quantities to provide an infectious dose to a nearby susceptible host. To determine whether vaccinated, infected fish are able to transmit an infectious dose of IHNV, vaccinated Atlantic salmon were injected with IHNV (104 plaque-forming units per fish) and cohabitated with either naïve Atlantic salmon or naïve sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka. APEX-IHN®-vaccinated fish were significantly protected against IHNV with mortality occurring in only 2.6% of the population as opposed to 97% in unvaccinated controls. Vaccination in IHNV-infected Atlantic salmon completely abolished disease transmission to cohabitating naïve sockeye salmon and reduced virus spread among cohabitating naïve Atlantic salmon. At 7 mo post-vaccination, IHNV-neutralizing antibodies were detected in nearly all vaccinated fish (94%) with similar titer occurring between vaccinated, infected fish and vaccinated, uninfected fish, indicating APEX-IHN® vaccination induces a robust seroconversion response. Taken together, these results demonstrate that vaccination greatly reduces the infectious load and potential for IHNV transmission. As such, APEX-IHN® should be included in fish health management strategies when culturing Atlantic salmon in IHNV endemic areas.

  7. The Complete Nucleotide Sequence and Genome Organization of Tomato Cholrosis Virus: A Distinct Crinivirus most Closely Related to Lettuce Infectious Yellow Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tomato infectious chlorosis virus (TICV), affects tomato production in many temperate to subtropical parts of the world where production is impacted by the presence of the greenhouse whitefly (Trialeurodes vaporariorum). Symptoms include interveinal yellowing, and leaves become thickened and crispy,...

  8. Generation of Newcastle diease virus (NDV) recombinants expressing the infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) glycoprotein gB or gD as dual vaccines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a highly contagious acute respiratory disease of chickens caused by infection of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). The current commercial ILT vaccines are either not safe or less effective. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop safer and more...

  9. Vaccines for Emerging Infectious Diseases: lessons from MERS coronavirus and Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Joel N

    2017-08-28

    The past decade and a half has been characterized by numerous emerging infectious diseases. With each new threat, there has been a call for rapid vaccine development. Pathogens such as the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and the Zika virus represent either new viral entities or viruses emergent in new geographic locales and characterized bywith novel complications. Both serve as paradigms for the global spread that can accompany new pathogens. In this paper, we review the epidemiology and pathogenesis of MERS-CoV and Zika virus with respect to vaccine development. The challenges in vaccine development and the approach to clinical trial design to test vaccine candidates for disease entities with a changing epidemiology are discussed.

  10. The isolation and characterisation of six avian infectious bronchitis viruses isolated in Morocco.

    PubMed

    El-Houadfi, M; Jones, R C; Cook, J K; Ambali, A G

    1986-01-01

    The first isolation and characterisation of infectious bronchitis (IB) viruses from poultry flocks in Morocco are reported. Five isolates designated D, E, F, H and M were related serologically to the Massachusetts serotype, while the sixth, isolate G, was found to be different from any previously reported serotype of IB virus. Neutralising antibodies to isolate G have been detected in sera collected from commercial flocks in Britain, although the virus has not been isolated. While all six isolates caused respiratory disease typical of IB in experimentally infected 3-week-old specified pathogen-free (SPF) chickens, isolate G was unusual in that it could be isolated from several parts of the alimentary tract for up to 21 days post inoculation, and from the duodenum up to 28 days. H120 vaccines protected chicks challenged with isolates E and F but not isolate G.

  11. Recombinant Newcastle disease virus expressing the infectious bronchitis virus S1 gene protects chickens against Newcastle disease virus and infectious bronchitis virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ran; Sun, Junfeng; Qi, Tianming; Zhao, Wen; Han, Zongxi; Yang, Xiaopu; Liu, Shengwang

    2017-04-25

    The recombinant LaSota strain expressing a chimeric IBV S1 gene (rLaSota-S1) was constructed with the S1 gene of the LX4 type IBV ck/CH/LDL/091022. The expression of the S1 protein was detected by an indirect immunofluorescence assay and Western blotting. The rLaSota-S1 strain was slightly attenuated, and its growth dynamics were similar to that of the parental LaSota strain. Vaccination of specific pathogen-free chickens with the rLaSota-S1 strain induced NDV hemagglutination inhibition antibodies, and it protected chickens from challenge with virulent NDV. In addition, vaccination with the rLaSota-S1 strain induced IBV-specific IgG antibodies and cellular immunity; however, a single vaccination provided partial protection with reduced virus shedding. Better protection efficiency was observed after a booster vaccination, which resulted in higher antibody titers, significantly fewer disease symptoms, and reduced virus replication and shedding. Our results suggest that the rLaSota-S1 strain is a bivalent vaccine candidate against both NDV and IBV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Late-Quaternary Molecular Isotopic Paleohydrology of Lake Junin, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polissar, P. J.; Liu, C.; Rodbell, D. T.; Abbott, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    There is great potential for reconstructing past changes in the hydrologic cycle using the hydrogen isotopic composition of plant-wax biomarkers. At present, empirical relationships relating plant-wax hydrogen isotope compositions (δDwax) to source water are almost exclusively based upon modern plants, soils and sediments. Relatively little is known about how plant-wax hydrogen isotopes track source water through time. Here we take advantage of existing paleoisotopic information from Lake Junin in the central Peruvian Andes to evaluate the temporal fidelity of δDwax to source water δD. In Lake Junin and the nearby region, oxygen isotopic records from lacustrine carbonates, speleothems and ice-cores provide robust constraints on the isotopic composition of lake water and precipitation in the past. Combined with new measurements of δDwax in Lake Junin sediments, these data allow us to evaluate the isotopic, climatic and vegetation influences on δDwax over the past 20,000 years. The n-alkanoic acid δDwax values exhibit trends through time that are similar to those for precipitation and lakewater δD. Highly negative δDwax values during the Last Glacial Maximum mirror depleted lakewater and precipitation δD values, more positive δDwax values at the beginning of the Holocene correspond to more enriched water δD values, and decreasing δDwax values over the past 10,000 years parallel the decreasing δD of lakewater and precipitation. However, the magnitude of the δDwax shifts are much larger than can be explained by changing δD water values. For example, the enrichment of δDwax values at the beginning of the Holocene is +30‰ and +80‰ larger than those of lakewater or precipitation δD, respectively. These differences could reflect changes in vegetation type, shifting proportions of aquatic and terrestrial plant sources, or environmental factors such as aridity. Vegetation type is an unlikely explanation as pollen abundances indicate only minor

  13. Engineering the largest RNA virus genome as an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Almazán, Fernando; González, José M.; Pénzes, Zoltan; Izeta, Ander; Calvo, Enrique; Plana-Durán, Juan; Enjuanes, Luis

    2000-01-01

    The construction of cDNA clones encoding large-size RNA molecules of biological interest, like coronavirus genomes, which are among the largest mature RNA molecules known to biology, has been hampered by the instability of those cDNAs in bacteria. Herein, we show that the application of two strategies, cloning of the cDNAs into a bacterial artificial chromosome and nuclear expression of RNAs that are typically produced within the cytoplasm, is useful for the engineering of large RNA molecules. A cDNA encoding an infectious coronavirus RNA genome has been cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome. The rescued coronavirus conserved all of the genetic markers introduced throughout the sequence and showed a standard mRNA pattern and the antigenic characteristics expected for the synthetic virus. The cDNA was transcribed within the nucleus, and the RNA translocated to the cytoplasm. Interestingly, the recovered virus had essentially the same sequence as the original one, and no splicing was observed. The cDNA was derived from an attenuated isolate that replicates exclusively in the respiratory tract of swine. During the engineering of the infectious cDNA, the spike gene of the virus was replaced by the spike gene of an enteric isolate. The synthetic virus replicated abundantly in the enteric tract and was fully virulent, demonstrating that the tropism and virulence of the recovered coronavirus can be modified. This demonstration opens up the possibility of employing this infectious cDNA as a vector for vaccine development in human, porcine, canine, and feline species susceptible to group 1 coronaviruses. PMID:10805807

  14. Release of infectious human enteric viruses by full-scale wastewater utilities.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Fredrick James; Xagoraraki, Irene

    2011-06-01

    In the United States, infectious human enteric viruses are introduced daily into the environment through the discharge of treated water and the digested sludge (biosolids). In this study, a total of 30 wastewater and 6 biosolids samples were analyzed over five months (May-September 2008-2009) from five full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Michigan using real-time PCR and cell culture assays. Samples were collected from four different locations at each WWTP (influent, pre-disinfection, post-disinfection and biosolids) using the 1MDS electropositive cartridge filter. Adenovirus (HAdV), enterovirus (EV) and norovirus genogroup II (NoV GGII) were detected in 100%, 67% and 10%, respectively of the wastewater samples using real-time PCR. Cytopathic effect (CPE) was present in 100% of the cell culture samples for influent, pre- and post-disinfection and biosolids with an average log concentration of 4.1 (2.9-4.7, range) 1.1 (0.0-2.3, range) and 0.5 (0.0-1.6, range) MPN/100 L and 2.1 (0.5-4.1) viruses/g, respectively. A significant log reduction in infectious viruses throughout the wastewater treatment process was observed at an average 4.2 (1.9-5.0, range) log units. A significant difference (p-value <0.05) was observed using real-time PCR data for HAdV but not for EV (p-value >0.05) removal in MBR as compared to conventional treatment. MBR treatment was able to achieve an additional 2 and 0.5 log reduction of HAdV and EV, respectively. This study has demonstrated the release of infectious enteric viruses in the final effluent and biosolids of wastewater treatment into the environment.

  15. Isolation of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (serotype Ab) from diverse species of estuarine fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, P. E.; Newman, M. W.; Sauber, J. H.; Owens, W. J.

    1984-03-01

    Two significant fish kills occurred in the Pamlico River estuary (North Carolina, USA), one in December 1981 and January 1982, and the other in June 1982. The first involved only the southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma). Histopathologic examination of morbid and moribund flounder revealed extensive sloughing and necrosis of the mucosa of the pyloric caeca and intestine, and inflammation of the submucosa of the pyloric caeca. Brain and internal organ homogenates from morbid and moribund flounder were assayed on CHSE-214 cells, and a virus was isolated. Virus titers ranged from≤8.4 · 102 to 6.3 · 107 TCID50 per gram of tissue. Cross-plaque neutralization assays indicated that the southern flounder virus was infectious pancreatic necrosis virus serotype Ab. Immersion challenge showed the isolate is only slightly virulent for fry of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). The second fish kill involved the southern flounder and six other species: hogchoker (Trinectes maculatus), Atlantic silverside (Menidia menidia), spot (Leiostomus xanthurus), Atlantic croaker (Micropogon undulatus), silver perch (Bairdiella chrysura), and striped mullet (Mugil cephalus). Virus was isolated from southern founder, hogchoker, Atlantic silverside, and spot. Neutralization assays indicated that the four isolates were nearly identical; however, the diversity of species affected suggests that the virus might not have been the specific cause of mortality.

  16. Full-length infectious clone of an Iranian isolate of chicken anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Kaffashi, Amir; Eshratabadi, Fatemeh; Shoushtari, Abdelhamed

    2017-04-01

    An Iranian field strain of chicken anemia virus (CAV), designated IR CAV, was isolated in the Marek's disease virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line MDCC-MSB1 (MSB1) culture for the first time. The full-length CAV DNA of this strain was cloned in the bacterial plasmid pTZ57R/T to create the molecular clone pTZ-CAV. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of viral proteins of IR CAV were compared with those of representative CAV sequences including reference and commercial vaccine strains. IR CAV was not related to vaccine strains and also found to have glutamine at positions 139 and 144 confirming previous studies in which such mutations were associated with a slow rate of virus spread in cell culture. pTZ-CAV was digested with PstI to release IR CAV DNA and then transfected into MSB1 cell by electroporation. The transfected cells showed cytopathic effect similar to virion-initiated infection. One-day old specific pathogen-free chicks were inoculated with the regenerated virus, which had been obtained from transfected MSB1 cells, and compared with the chicks inoculated with IR CAV. Gross lesions in the birds inoculated with the regenerated virus illustrated the infectious nature of the regenerated virus from the cloned IR CAV DNA.

  17. Histopathological and immunohistochemical study of air sac lesions induced by two strains of infectious bronchitis virus.

    PubMed

    Bezuidenhout, A; Mondal, S P; Buckles, E L

    2011-11-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is a highly contagious respiratory coronavirus of domestic chickens. Although mortality is low, infection with IBV results in substantial losses for the egg and meat chicken industries. Despite the economic importance of IBV and decades of research into the pathogenesis of infection, significant gaps in our knowledge exist. The aim of this study was to compare the early progression of air sac lesions in birds receiving a vaccine strain of the virus or a more virulent field strain. The air sacs are lined by different types of epithelia and are relatively isolated from the environment, so they represent a unique tissue in which to study virus-induced lesions. Both the pathogenic and vaccine strains of the virus produced significant lesions; however, the lesions progressed more rapidly in the birds receiving the pathogenic strain. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that in birds infected with the pathogenic strain of virus, IBV spike protein is detected first in the ciliated cells lining the air sac. These preliminary data provide important clues regarding potential mechanisms for IBV tissue tropism and spread and show that the nature of the virus isolate influences the early progression of IBV infection.

  18. Overwintering of infectious Buggy Creek virus (Togaviridae: Alphavirus) in Oeciacus vicarius (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) in North Dakota.

    PubMed

    Brown, Charles R; Moore, Amy T; Knutie, Sarah A; Komar, Nicholas

    2009-03-01

    Arboviruses have seldom been found overwintering in adult vectors at northern latitudes in North America. Buggy Creek virus (BCRV; Togaviridae, Alphavirus) is an ecologically unusual arbovirus vectored principally by the cimicid swallow bug (Oeciacus vicarius Horvath). The ectoparasitic bugs reside year-round in the mud nests of their host, the cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota Vieillot). We report successful overwintering of infectious BCRV in bugs at a field site in western North Dakota, where mid-winter temperatures routinely reach -11 to -15 degrees C. Approximately 21% of bug pools were positive for virus in early spring just before the cliff swallows' return to their nesting colonies; this proportion did not differ significantly from that in summer at active cliff swallow nesting colonies in the same study area. Fewer of the isolates in early spring were cytopathic on Vero cells, and those that were infectious showed less plaque formation than did summer samples. The results show that infectious BCRV commonly overwinters in the adult stages of its vector at northern latitudes in North America.

  19. Detection of infectious bronchitis virus 793B, avian metapneumovirus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae in poultry in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Hutton, S; Bettridge, J; Christley, R; Habte, T; Ganapathy, K

    2017-02-01

    A survey was conducted into respiratory infectious diseases of poultry on a chicken breeder farm run by the Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR), located in Debre Zeit, Ethiopia. Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from 117 randomly selected birds, and blood was taken from a subset of 73 of these birds. A combination of serological and molecular methods was used for detection of pathogens. For the first time in Ethiopia, we report the detection of variant infectious bronchitis virus (793B genotype), avian metapneumovirus subtype B and Mycoplasma synoviae in poultry. Mycoplasma gallisepticum was also found to be present; however, infectious laryngotracheitis virus was not detected by PCR. Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was not detected by PCR, but variable levels of anti-NDV HI antibody titres shows possible exposure to virulent strains or poor vaccine take, or both. For the burgeoning-intensive industry in Ethiopia, this study highlights several circulating infectious respiratory pathogens that can impact on poultry welfare and productivity.

  20. Use of propidium monoazide in reverse transcriptase PCR to distinguish between infectious and noninfectious enteric viruses in water samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human enteric viruses can be present in untreated and inadequately treated drinking water. Molecular methods, such as the reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), can detect viral genomes in a few hours, but they cannot distinguish between infectious and noninfectious viruses. Since o...

  1. Newcastle disease virus vectored infectious laryngotracheitis vaccines protect commercial broiler chickens in the presence of maternally derived antibodies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) recombinants expressing the infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) glycoproteins B and D have previously been demonstrated to confer complete clinical protection against virulent ILTV and NDV challenges in naive chickens. We extended this study to assess whether mate...

  2. Use of propidium monoazide in reverse transcriptase PCR to distinguish between infectious and noninfectious enteric viruses in water samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human enteric viruses can be present in untreated and inadequately treated drinking water. Molecular methods, such as the reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), can detect viral genomes in a few hours, but they cannot distinguish between infectious and noninfectious viruses. Since o...

  3. Free-virus and cell-to-cell transmission in models of equine infectious anemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Allen, Linda J S; Schwartz, Elissa J

    2015-12-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a lentivirus in the retrovirus family that infects horses and ponies. Two strains, referred to as the sensitive strain and the resistant strain, have been isolated from an experimentally-infected pony. The sensitive strain is vulnerable to neutralization by antibodies whereas the resistant strain is neutralization-insensitive. The sensitive strain mutates to the resistant strain. EIAV may infect healthy target cells via free virus or alternatively, directly from an infected target cell through cell-to-cell transfer. The proportion of transmission from free-virus or from cell-to-cell transmission is unknown. A system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is formulated for the virus-cell dynamics of EIAV. In addition, a Markov chain model and a branching process approximation near the infection-free equilibrium (IFE) are formulated. The basic reproduction number R0 is defined as the maximum of two reproduction numbers, R0s and R0r, one for the sensitive strain and one for the resistant strain. The IFE is shown to be globally asymptotically stable for the ODE model in a special case when the basic reproduction number is less than one. In addition, two endemic equilibria exist, a coexistence equilibrium and a resistant strain equilibrium. It is shown that if R0>1, the infection persists with at least one of the two strains. However, for small infectious doses, the sensitive strain and the resistant strain may not persist in the Markov chain model. Parameter values applicable to EIAV are used to illustrate the dynamics of the ODE and the Markov chain models. The examples highlight the importance of the proportion of cell-to-cell versus free-virus transmission that either leads to infection clearance or to infection persistence with either coexistence of both strains or to dominance by the resistant strain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. FORMATION OF NON-INFECTIOUS INFLUENZA VIRUS IN MOUSE LUNGS: ITS DEPENDENCE UPON EXTENSIVE PULMONARY CONSOLIDATION INITIATED BY THE VIRAL INOCULUM

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Harold S.

    1954-01-01

    Formation of non-infectious virus—particles which hemagglutinate red blood cells and react with antibody to fix complement but do not infect the chick embryo or mouse—occurred when large quantities of certain strains of influenza viruses were inoculated intranasally into mice. Dependent upon the agent employed, 106.5 to 108.5 E.I.D. was essential to elicit this phenomenon. To accomplish this unusual multiplication it was essential to use a strain of virus which effected extensive pulmonary consolidation; strains of virus which did not produce marked lung lesions, even when as much as 108.5 E.I.D. was inoculated, did not form non-infectious virus. The development of this viral form was directly dependent upon the extent of cell damage obtained: consolidation of more than 50 per cent of the lung volume was required. The majority of non-infectious particles developed during the initial cycle of viral multiplication, and concurrently with the formation of non-infectious virus there was a corresponding decrease in the number of infectious viral particles. Non-infectious virus could not be propagated on serial passage in mouse lungs: on second lung passage only fully infectious virus was detectable. The formation of the non-infectious viral form was not the result of interference with synthesis of infectious virus by inactivated virus in the inoculum; for inoculation of heated infected allantoic fluid which contained more than 99 per cent of non-infectious virus did not result in the development of new non-infectious virus. Although inoculation of a large quantity of virus resulted in infection which yielded a relatively low titer of infectious and high titer of non-infectious virus, inoculation of a small quantity of the agent resulted in a high yield of infectious virus and no non-infectious that was detectable. In both instances the total quantity of antigenic viral material synthesized in the mouse lungs was the same. These data do not support the hypothesis that

  5. Recovery of viral RNA and infectious foot-and-mouth disease virus from positive lateral-flow devices.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Veronica L; Bankowski, Bartlomiej M; Armson, Bryony; Di Nardo, Antonello; Valdazo-Gonzalez, Begoña; Reid, Scott M; Barnett, Paul V; Wadsworth, Jemma; Ferris, Nigel P; Mioulet, Valérie; King, Donald P

    2014-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease Virus (FMDV) is an economically important, highly contagious picornavirus that affects both wild and domesticated cloven hooved animals. In developing countries, the effective laboratory diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is often hindered by inadequate sample preservation due to difficulties in the transportation and storage of clinical material. These factors can compromise the ability to detect and characterise FMD virus in countries where the disease is endemic. Furthermore, the high cost of sending infectious virus material and the biosecurity risk it presents emphasises the need for a thermo-stable, non-infectious mode of transporting diagnostic samples. This paper investigates the potential of using FMDV lateral-flow devices (LFDs) for dry transportation of clinical samples for subsequent nucleic acid amplification, sequencing and recovery of infectious virus by electroporation. FMDV positive samples (epithelial suspensions and cell culture isolates) representing four FMDV serotypes were applied to antigen LFDs: after which it was possible to recover viral RNA that could be detected using real-time RT-PCR. Using this nucleic acid, it was also possible to recover VP1 sequences and also successfully utilise protocols for amplification of complete FMD virus genomes. It was not possible to recover infectious FMDV directly from the LFDs, however following electroporation into BHK-21 cells and subsequent cell passage, infectious virus could be recovered. Therefore, these results support the use of the antigen LFD for the dry, non-hazardous transportation of samples from FMD endemic countries to international reference laboratories.

  6. Acute Cerebellar Syndrome in Infectious Mononucleosis: Documentation of Two Cases With Epstein-Barr Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, David S.; Smitnik, Loretta M.; John, Kuruvilla; Drake, Miles E.

    1985-01-01

    Acute cerebellar ataxia has been described occasionally with infectious mononucleosis. Two additional cases are reported with serologic identification of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in blood and cerebrospinal fluid. As with previously described cases, the outcome was benign, and examination and laboratory studies did not indicate diffuse neurologic involvement. Visual and brainstem auditory-evoked responses were normal. Electroencephalograms (EEG) demonstrated 14 and 6 per second positive spikes in both patients. This pattern is considered a normal variant and has been recorded from depth electrodes and reported with deep midline lesions. These cases support the prognosis of benign cerebellar involvement in infectious mononucleosis and suggest that evidence of EBV infection be sought in patients with acute ataxia. The significance of 14/sec and 6/sec positive EEG spikes is uncertain. PMID:2987517

  7. Infectious Bursal Disease Virus-Host Interactions: Multifunctional Viral Proteins that Perform Multiple and Differing Jobs

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yao; Zheng, Shijun J.

    2017-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is an acute, highly contagious and immunosuppressive poultry disease caused by IBD virus (IBDV). The consequent immunosuppression increases susceptibility to other infectious diseases and the risk of subsequent vaccination failure as well. Since the genome of IBDV is relatively small, it has a limited number of proteins inhibiting the cellular antiviral responses and acting as destroyers to the host defense system. Thus, these virulence factors must be multifunctional in order to complete the viral replication cycle in a host cell. Insights into the roles of these viral proteins along with their multiple cellular targets in different pathways will give rise to a rational design for safer and effective vaccines. Here we summarize the recent findings that focus on the virus–cell interactions during IBDV infection at the protein level. PMID:28098808

  8. Inactivation of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Through Composting of Litter from Poultry Houses.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Rocio; Badcoe, Lyndon M; Williams, Cheryl; Bary, Andrew I

    2016-06-01

    Very virulent infectious bursal disease virus (vvIBDV) was diagnosed in a pullet farm in Washington in 2014. Infectious bursal disease virus is resistant to many environmental stresses and often persists on farms for months. There have been conflicting reports as to whether composting can destroy vvIBDV in the manure. This project investigated the composting of litter from the affected house using an aerated static pile to inactivate the virus. Two weeks before the affected pullet flocks were moved to the layer house, specific-pathogen-free (SPF) birds were placed in the barns. Ten days after they were placed, three SPF birds died and were positive for vvIBDV. Thirty percent of the SPF birds were positive for vvIBDV. After the pullets were moved, at 20 wk of age, the litter in the house was composted using the aerated static pile method. The pile was maintained at above 55 C for 4 wk. After this time, 30 additional SPF birds were placed on the composted material. Two weeks later, the birds were healthy and there was no evidence of vvIBDV. The subsequent pullet flock did not break with vvIBDV. These results demonstrate that this composting method can be used to decontaminate the litter from vvIBDV and help prevent the spread of vvIBDV.

  9. Infectious mononucleosis-like syndrome probably attributable to Coxsackie A virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Mickail, Nardeen; Petelin, Andrew P

    2012-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis (IM) is a clinical syndrome most often attributable to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Characteristic clinical features of EBV IM include bilateral upper lid edema, exudative or nonexudative pharyngitis, bilateral posterior cervical adenopathy, and splenomegaly ± maculopapular rash. Laboratory features of EBV IM include atypical lymphocytes and elevated levels of serum transaminases. Leukopenia and thrombocytopenia are not uncommon. The syndrome of IM may also be attributable to other infectious diseases, eg, cytomegalovirus (CMV), human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6), or Toxoplasma gondii. Less commonly, viral hepatitis, leptospirosis, brucellosis, or parvovirus B(19) may present as an IM-like infection. To the best of our knowledge, only 2 cases of IM-like infections attributable to Coxsackie B viruses (B(3) and B(4)) have been reported. We present the first reported case of an IM-like syndrome with sore throat, fatigue, atypical lymphocytes, and elevated levels of serum transaminases likely due to Coxsackie A in an immunocompetent adult. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Immune-mediated thrombocytopenia in horses infected with equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Clabough, D L; Gebhard, D; Flaherty, M T; Whetter, L E; Perry, S T; Coggins, L; Fuller, F J

    1991-11-01

    An adult horse infected with a virulent, cell culture-adapted strain of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) developed cyclical thrombocytopenia in which the nadir of platelet counts coincided with peak febrile responses. In order to investigate the mechanism of thrombocytopenia during acute febrile episodes, four adult horses were experimentally infected with the wild-type Wyoming strain of EIAV. Platelet counts decreased from baseline as rectal temperature increased. Serum reverse transcriptase activity increased above background levels in all horses, coincident with increase in rectal temperature. All horses developed an EIAV-specific immune response detectable by Western immunoblot by postinfection day 10. Increases in platelet-associated immunoglobulins G and M were detectable by direct fluorescent-antibody test and flow cytometric assay. Viral replication in bone marrow megakaryocytes was not detectable by in situ hybridization. Results suggest an immune-mediated mechanism of thrombocytopenia in horses infected with EIAV. Despite an inability to identify virion particles in association with platelet-bound antibody, the cyclical nature of the thrombocytopenia and the occurrence of a marked cell-free viremia concomitant with fever and thrombocytopenia suggest immune complex deposition on platelets. We propose that clearance of virus and antibody-coated platelets from the peripheral circulation by hepatic Kupffer cells and splenic macrophages may target infectious virus particles, in the form of immune complexes, to host cells most permissive for in vivo viral replication.

  11. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of infectious mononucleosis by Epstein-Barr virus in Mexican children

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Infectious mononucleosis (IM) or Mononucleosis syndrome is caused by an acute infection of Epstein-Barr virus. In Latin American countries, there are little information pertaining to the clinical manifestations and complications of this disease. For this reason, the purpose of this work was to describe the clinical and laboratory characteristics of infection by Epstein-Barr virus in Mexican children with infectious mononucleosis. Methods A descriptive study was carried out by reviewing the clinical files of patients less than 18 years old with clinical and serological diagnosis of IM by Epstein-Barr virus from November, 1970 to July, 2011 in a third level pediatric hospital in Mexico City. Results One hundred and sixty three cases of IM were found. The most frequent clinical signs were lymphadenopathy (89.5%), fever (79.7%), general body pain (69.3%), pharyngitis (55.2%), hepatomegaly (47.2%). The laboratory findings were lymphocytosis (41.7%), atypic lymphocytes (24.5%), and increased transaminases (30.9%), there were no rupture of the spleen and no deaths among the 163 cases. Conclusions Our results revealed that IM appeared in earlier ages compared with that reported in industrialized countries, where adolescents are the most affected group. Also, the order and frequency of the clinical manifestations were different in our country than in industrialized ones. PMID:22818256

  12. Capsid proteins from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac can coassemble into mature cores of infectious viruses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianbo; Pathak, Vinay K; Peng, Weiqun; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2008-09-01

    We have recently shown that the Gag polyproteins from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 can coassemble and functionally complement each other. During virion maturation, the Gag polyproteins undergo proteolytic cleavage to release mature proteins including capsid (CA), which refolds and forms the outer shell of a cone-shaped mature core. Less than one-half of the CA proteins present within the HIV-1 virion are required to form the mature core. Therefore, it is unclear whether the mature core in virions containing both HIV-1 and HIV-2 Gag consists of CA proteins from a single virus or from both viruses. To determine whether CA proteins from two different viruses can coassemble into mature cores of infectious viruses, we exploited the specificity of the tripartite motif 5alpha protein from the rhesus monkey (rhTRIM5alpha) for cores containing HIV-1 CA (hCA) but not the simian immunodeficiency virus SIV(mac) CA protein (sCA). If hCA and sCA cannot coassemble into the same core when equal amounts of sCA and hCA are coexpressed, the infectivities of such virus preparations in cells should be inhibited less than twofold by rhTRIM5alpha. However, if hCA and sCA can coassemble into the same core structure to form a mixed core, rhTRIM5alpha would be able to recognize such cores and significantly restrict virus infectivity. We examined the restriction phenotypes of viruses containing both hCA and sCA. Our results indicate that hCA and sCA can coassemble into the same mature core to produce infectious virus. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of functional coassembly of heterologous CA protein into the retroviral core.

  13. The role of virulence in in vivo superinfection fitness of the vertebrate RNA virus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Kell, Alison M; Wargo, Andrew R; Kurath, Gael

    2013-07-01

    We have developed a novel in vivo superinfection fitness assay to examine superinfection dynamics and the role of virulence in superinfection fitness. This assay involves controlled, sequential infections of a natural vertebrate host, Oncorhynchus mykiss (rainbow trout), with variants of a coevolved viral pathogen, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). Intervals between infections ranged from 12 h to 7 days, and both frequency of superinfection and viral replication levels were examined. Using virus genotype pairs of equal and unequal virulence, we observed that superinfection generally occurred with decreasing frequency as the interval between exposures to each genotype increased. For both the equal-virulence and unequal-virulence genotype pairs, the frequency of superinfection in most cases was the same regardless of which genotype was used in the primary exposure. The ability to replicate in the context of superinfection also did not differ between the genotypes of equal or unequal virulence tested here. For both genotype pairs, the mean viral load of the secondary virus was significantly reduced in superinfection while primary virus replication was unaffected. Our results demonstrate, for the two genotype pairs examined, that superinfection restriction does occur for IHNV and that higher virulence did not correlate with a significant difference in superinfection fitness. To our knowledge, this is the first assay to examine the role of virulence of an RNA virus in determining superinfection fitness dynamics within a natural vertebrate host.

  14. The nucleotide sequence of the coat protein genes of satsuma dwarf virus and naval orange infectious mottling virus.

    PubMed

    Iwanami, T; Kondo, Y; Makita, Y; Azeyanagi, C; Ieki, H

    1998-01-01

    The sequence of the 3'-terminal 4320 and 2409 nucleotides were determined for RNA2 of satsuma dwarf virus (SDV) and navel infectious mottling virus (NIMV). Both sequences contained a part of a long open reading frame which encodes larger and smaller coat proteins (CPs) at the 3'-terminus followed by a 3'non-coding region upstream of a poly (A) tail. Amino acid sequence identity for larger and smaller CPs ranged 81-84% and 68-78%, respectively, among SDV, NIMV and the previously sequenced citrus mosaic virus (CiMV). No significant sequence similarity was found between the CPs of SDV or NIMV and those of the como-, nepo- or other viruses. The nucleotide sequence identity of the 3' non-coding region of RNA2 were 68%-78% among SDV, CiMV and NIMV. These results suggest that SDV, CiMV and NIMV are distinct, though related, viruses. They may be assigned as members of the new genus, which is close to the genera of Comovirus and Nepovirus.

  15. Infectious Progeny of 2009 A (H1N1) Influenza Virus Replicated in and Released from Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhang; Huang, Tao; Yu, Feiyuan; Liu, Xingmu; Zhao, Conghui; Chen, Xueling; Kelvin, David J; Gu, Jiang

    2015-12-07

    Various reports have indicated that a number of viruses could infect neutrophils, but the multiplication of viruses in neutrophils was abortive. Based on our previous finding that avian influenza viral RNA and proteins were present in the nucleus of infected human neutrophils in vivo, we investigated the possibility of 2009 A (H1N1) influenza viral synthesis in infected neutrophils and possible release of infectious progeny from host cells. In this study we found that human neutrophils in vitro without detectable level of sialic acid expression could be infected by this virus strain. We also show that the infected neutrophils can not only synthesize 2009 A (H1N1) viral mRNA and proteins, but also produce infectious progeny. These findings suggest that infectious progeny of 2009 A (H1N1) influenza virus could be replicated in and released from human neutrophils with possible clinical implications.

  16. Susceptibility of Koi and Yellow Perch to infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus by experimental exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palmer, Alexander D.; Emmenegger, Eveline J.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a novirhabdoviral pathogen that originated in western North America among anadromous Pacific salmonids. Severe disease epidemics in the late 1970s resulting from IHNV's invasion into farmed Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in North America, Asia, and Europe emphasized IHNV's ability to adapt to new hosts under varying rearing conditions. Yellow Perch Perca flavescens and Koi Carp Cyprinus carpio (hereafter, “Koi”) are aquaculture-reared fish that are highly valued in sport fisheries and the ornamental fish trade, respectively, but it is unknown whether these fish species are vulnerable to IHNV infection. In this study, we exposed Yellow Perch, Koi, and steelhead (anadromous Rainbow Trout) to IHNV by intraperitoneal injection (106 PFU/fish) and by immersion (5.7×105 PFU/mL) for 7 h, and monitored fish for 28 d. The extended immersion exposure and high virus concentrations used in the challenges were to determine if the tested fish had any level of susceptibility. After experimental exposure, Yellow Perch and Koi experienced low mortality (35%). Virus was found in dead fish of all species tested and in surviving Yellow Perch by plaque assay and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), with a higher prevalence in Yellow Perch than Koi. Infectious virus was also detected in Yellow Perch out to 5 d after bath challenge. These findings indicate that Yellow Perch and Koi are highly resistant to IHNV disease under the conditions tested, but Yellow Perch are susceptible to infection and may serve as possible virus carriers.

  17. Susceptibility of Koi and Yellow Perch to infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus by experimental exposure.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Alexander D; Emmenegger, Eveline J

    2014-06-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a novirhabdoviral pathogen that originated in western North America among anadromous Pacific salmonids. Severe disease epidemics in the late 1970s resulting from IHNV's invasion into farmed Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in North America, Asia, and Europe emphasized IHNV's ability to adapt to new hosts under varying rearing conditions. Yellow Perch Perca flavescens and Koi Carp Cyprinus carpio (hereafter, "Koi") are aquaculture-reared fish that are highly valued in sport fisheries and the ornamental fish trade, respectively, but it is unknown whether these fish species are vulnerable to IHNV infection. In this study, we exposed Yellow Perch, Koi, and steelhead (anadromous Rainbow Trout) to IHNV by intraperitoneal injection (10(6) PFU/fish) and by immersion (5.7×10(5) PFU/mL) for 7 h, and monitored fish for 28 d. The extended immersion exposure and high virus concentrations used in the challenges were to determine if the tested fish had any level of susceptibility. After experimental exposure, Yellow Perch and Koi experienced low mortality (<6%) compared with steelhead (>35%). Virus was found in dead fish of all species tested and in surviving Yellow Perch by plaque assay and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), with a higher prevalence in Yellow Perch than Koi. Infectious virus was also detected in Yellow Perch out to 5 d after bath challenge. These findings indicate that Yellow Perch and Koi are highly resistant to IHNV disease under the conditions tested, but Yellow Perch are susceptible to infection and may serve as possible virus carriers.

  18. Construction of Poxviruses as Cloning Vectors: Insertion of the Thymidine Kinase Gene from Herpes Simplex Virus into the DNA of Infectious Vaccinia Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panicali, Dennis; Paoletti, Enzo

    1982-08-01

    We have constructed recombinant vaccinia viruses containing the thymidine kinase gene from herpes simplex virus. The gene was inserted into the genome of a variant of vaccinia virus that had undergone spontaneous deletion as well as into the 120-megadalton genome of the large prototypic vaccinia variant. This was accomplished via in vivo recombination by contransfection of eukaryotic tissue culture cells with cloned BamHI-digested thymidine kinase gene from herpes simplex virus containing flanking vaccinia virus DNA sequences and infectious rescuing vaccinia virus. Pure populations of the recombinant viruses were obtained by replica filter techniques or by growth of the recombinant virus in biochemically selective medium. The herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene, as an insert in vaccinia virus, is transcribed in vivo and in vitro, and the fidelity of in vivo transcription into a functional gene product was detected by the phosphorylation of 5-[125I]iodo-2'-deoxycytidine.

  19. Use of Propidium Monoazide in Reverse Transcriptase PCR To Distinguish between Infectious and Noninfectious Enteric Viruses in Water Samples▿

    PubMed Central

    Parshionikar, Sandhya; Laseke, Ian; Fout, G. Shay

    2010-01-01

    Human enteric viruses can be present in untreated and inadequately treated drinking water. Molecular methods, such as the reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), can detect viral genomes in a few hours, but they cannot distinguish between infectious and noninfectious viruses. Since only infectious viruses are a public health concern, methods that not only are rapid but also provide information on the infectivity of viruses are of interest. The intercalating dye propidium monoazide (PMA) has been used for distinguishing between viable and nonviable bacteria with DNA genomes, but it has not been used to distinguish between infectious and noninfectious enteric viruses with RNA genomes. In this study, PMA in conjunction with RT-PCR (PMA-RT-PCR) was used to determine the infectivity of enteric RNA viruses in water. Coxsackievirus, poliovirus, echovirus, and Norwalk virus were rendered noninfectious or inactivated by treatment with heat (72°C, 37°C, and 19°C) or hypochlorite. Infectious or native and noninfectious or inactivated viruses were treated with PMA. This was followed by RNA extraction and RT-PCR or quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis. The PMA-RT-PCR results indicated that PMA treatment did not interfere with detection of infectious or native viruses but prevented detection of noninfectious or inactivated viruses that were rendered noninfectious or inactivated by treatment at 72°C and 37°C and by hypochlorite treatment. However, PMA-RT-PCR was unable to prevent detection of enteroviruses that were rendered noninfectious by treatment at 19°C. After PMA treatment poliovirus that was rendered noninfectious by treatment at 37°C was undetectable by qRT-PCR, but PMA treatment did not affect detection of Norwalk virus. PMA-RT-PCR was also shown to be effective for detecting infectious poliovirus in the presence of noninfectious virus and in an environmental matrix. We concluded that PMA can be used to differentiate between potentially infectious and noninfectious

  20. Use of propidium monoazide in reverse transcriptase PCR to distinguish between infectious and noninfectious enteric viruses in water samples.

    PubMed

    Parshionikar, Sandhya; Laseke, Ian; Fout, G Shay

    2010-07-01

    Human enteric viruses can be present in untreated and inadequately treated drinking water. Molecular methods, such as the reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), can detect viral genomes in a few hours, but they cannot distinguish between infectious and noninfectious viruses. Since only infectious viruses are a public health concern, methods that not only are rapid but also provide information on the infectivity of viruses are of interest. The intercalating dye propidium monoazide (PMA) has been used for distinguishing between viable and nonviable bacteria with DNA genomes, but it has not been used to distinguish between infectious and noninfectious enteric viruses with RNA genomes. In this study, PMA in conjunction with RT-PCR (PMA-RT-PCR) was used to determine the infectivity of enteric RNA viruses in water. Coxsackievirus, poliovirus, echovirus, and Norwalk virus were rendered noninfectious or inactivated by treatment with heat (72 degrees C, 37 degrees C, and 19 degrees C) or hypochlorite. Infectious or native and noninfectious or inactivated viruses were treated with PMA. This was followed by RNA extraction and RT-PCR or quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis. The PMA-RT-PCR results indicated that PMA treatment did not interfere with detection of infectious or native viruses but prevented detection of noninfectious or inactivated viruses that were rendered noninfectious or inactivated by treatment at 72 degrees C and 37 degrees C and by hypochlorite treatment. However, PMA-RT-PCR was unable to prevent detection of enteroviruses that were rendered noninfectious by treatment at 19 degrees C. After PMA treatment poliovirus that was rendered noninfectious by treatment at 37 degrees C was undetectable by qRT-PCR, but PMA treatment did not affect detection of Norwalk virus. PMA-RT-PCR was also shown to be effective for detecting infectious poliovirus in the presence of noninfectious virus and in an environmental matrix. We concluded that PMA can be used to differentiate

  1. Mosquito Cellular Factors and Functions in Mediating the Infectious entry of Chikungunya Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Regina Ching Hua; Hapuarachchi, Hapuarachchige Chanditha; Chen, Karen Caiyun; Hussain, Khairunnisa' Mohamed; Chen, Huixin; Low, Swee Ling; Ng, Lee Ching; Lin, Raymond; Ng, Mary Mah-Lee; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2013-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthropod-borne virus responsible for recent epidemics in the Asia Pacific regions. A customized gene expression microarray of 18,760 transcripts known to target Aedes mosquito genome was used to identify host genes that are differentially regulated during the infectious entry process of CHIKV infection on C6/36 mosquito cells. Several genes such as epsin I (EPN1), epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 15 (EPS15) and Huntingtin interacting protein I (HIP1) were identified to be differentially expressed during CHIKV infection and known to be involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). Transmission electron microscopy analyses further revealed the presence of CHIKV particles within invaginations of the plasma membrane, resembling clathrin-coated pits. Characterization of vesicles involved in the endocytic trafficking processes of CHIKV revealed the translocation of the virus particles to the early endosomes and subsequently to the late endosomes and lysosomes. Treatment with receptor-mediated endocytosis inhibitor, monodansylcadaverine and clathrin-associated drug inhibitors, chlorpromazine and dynasore inhibited CHIKV entry, whereas no inhibition was observed with caveolin-related drug inhibitors. Inhibition of CHIKV entry upon treatment with low-endosomal pH inhibitors indicated that low pH is essential for viral entry processes. CHIKV entry by clathrin-mediated endocytosis was validated via overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of Eps15, in which infectious entry was reduced, while siRNA-based knockdown of genes associated with CME, low endosomal pH and RAB trafficking proteins exhibited significant levels of CHIKV inhibition. This study revealed, for the first time, that the infectious entry of CHIKV into mosquito cells is mediated by the clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway. PMID:23409203

  2. Occurrence and genetic typing of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in Kamchatka, Russia.

    PubMed

    Rudakova, Svetlana L; Kurath, Gael; Bochkova, Elena V

    2007-03-29

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a well known rhabdoviral pathogen of salmonid fish in North America that has become established in Asia and Europe. On the Pacific coast of Russia, IHNV was first detected in hatchery sockeye from the Kamchatka Peninsula in 2001. Results of virological examinations of over 10,000 wild and cultured salmonid fish from Kamchatka during 1996 to 2005 revealed IHNV in several sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka populations. The virus was isolated from spawning adults and from juveniles undergoing epidemics in both hatchery and wild sockeye populations from the Bolshaya watershed. No virus was detected in 2 other watersheds, or in species other than sockeye salmon. Genetic typing of 8 virus isolates by sequence analysis of partial glycoprotein and nucleocapsid genes revealed that they were genetically homogeneous and fell within the U genogroup of IHNV. In phylogenetic analyses, the Russian IHNV sequences were indistinguishable from the sequences of North American U genogroup isolates that occur throughout Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, and Oregon. The high similarity, and in some cases identity, between Russian and North American IHNV isolates suggests virus transmission or exposure to a common viral reservoir in the North Pacific Ocean.

  3. Inhibition of infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 particle formation by Gag protein-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Niedrig, M; Gelderblom, H R; Pauli, G; März, J; Bickhard, H; Wolf, H; Modrow, S

    1994-06-01

    Sequential overlapping Gag protein-derived oligopeptides of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) 22 to 24 amino acids long, were synthesized and tested in vitro for antiviral activity. Two synthetic peptides, one derived from the matrix protein p17 (NPGLLETSEGCRQ, amino acids 47 to 59) and one located in the capsid protein p24 (PAATLEEMMTA, amino acids 339 to 349) inhibited the production of infectious virus when added to HIV-1-infected cultures when used in the range of 20 to 200 micrograms/ml. As shown by thin section electron microscopy, peptide treatment resulted in the release of immature, deformed virus particles suggesting that the two peptides interfered with assembly and maturation. Other Gag protein-derived oligopeptides had little or no influence on virus production. To characterize further the functionally active regions we synthesized peptide derivatives with three consecutive amino acids substituted by alanine; they did not cause inhibition. Therefore the regions responsible for inhibition were located between amino acids 50 to 61 in p17, and 342 to 350 in p24. These observations might lead to the development of a new antiviral strategy affecting the late stage of virus replication.

  4. Detection of infectious laryngotracheitis virus infected cells with cloned DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, E

    1992-01-01

    A genomic library of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) DNA BamH1 fragments was prepared and two cloned fragments were evaluated for their potential as probes for the detection of ILTV infected cells. The virus was purified by a modified sucrose density gradient procedure for the isolation of pure ILTV DNA. A genomic library was constructed using BamH1-digested ILTV DNA and pGEM7 as a vector. A 1.1 kb cloned BamH1 fragment of ILTV DNA was tested in a slot or dot blot assay for the detection of ILTV infected cells. The limit of detection for this probe was at least 0.12 ng of pure ILTV DNA. The probe was able to identify both chicken embryo liver (CELi) cells and choriallantoic membranes infected with ILTV. Chicken embryo liver cells infected with several field isolates and a vaccine strain of ILTV were positive by dot blot analysis using this probe. Some qualitative differences in the degree of hybridization to cells infected by different ILTV isolates were observed. Uninfected cells and cells infected with fowlpox virus, turkey herpesvirus, Marek's disease virus or Newcastle disease virus were negative by the same assay. Compared with the 1.1 kb fragment, a larger 6 kb cloned BamH1 fragment of ILTV DNA showed a stronger hybridization signal to DNA from ILTV infected cells. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:1316798

  5. Occurrence and genetic typing of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in Kamchatka, Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rudakova, S.L.; Kurath, G.; Bochkova, E.V.

    2007-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a well known rhabdoviral pathogen of salmonid fish in North America that has become established in Asia and Europe. On the Pacific coast of Russia, IHNV was first detected in hatchery sockeye from the Kamchatka Peninsula in 2001. Results of virological examinations of over 10 000 wild and cultured salmonid fish from Kamchatka during 1996 to 2005 revealed IHNV in several sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka populations. The virus was isolated from spawning adults and from juveniles undergoing epidemics in both hatchery and wild sockeye populations from the Bolshaya watershed. No virus was detected in 2 other water-sheds, or in species other than sockeye salmon. Genetic typing of 8 virus isolates by seguence analysis of partial glycoprotein and nucleocapsid genes revealed that they were genetically homogeneous and fell within the U genogroup of IHNV. In phylogenetic analyses, the Russian IHNV sequences were indistinguishable from the sequences of North American U genogroup isolates that occur throughout Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, and Oregon. The high similarity, and in some cases identity, between Russian and North American IHNV isolates suggests virus transmission or exposure to a common viral reservoir in the North Pacific Ocean. ?? Inter-Research 2007.

  6. The complete genome structure and phylogenetic relationship of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morzunov , Sergey P.; Winton, James R.; Nichol, Stuart T.

    1995-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a member of the family Rhabdoviridae, causes a severe disease with high mortality in salmonid fish. The nucleotide sequence (11, 131 bases) of the entire genome was determined for the pathogenic WRAC strain of IHNV from southern Idaho. This allowed detailed analysis of all 6 genes, the deduced amino acid sequences of their encoded proteins, and important control motifs including leader, trailer and gene junction regions. Sequence analysis revealed that the 6 virus genes are located along the genome in the 3′ to 5′ order: nucleocapsid (N), polymerase-associated phosphoprotein (P or M1), matrix protein (M or M2), surface glycoprotein (G), a unique non-virion protein (NV) and virus polymerase (L). The IHNV genome RNA was found to have highly complementary termini (15 of 16 nucleotides). The gene junction regions display the highly conserved sequence UCURUC(U)7RCCGUG(N)4CACR (in the vRNA sense), which includes the typical rhabdovirus transcription termination/polyadenylation signal and a novel putative transcription initiation signal. Phylogenetic analysis of M, G and L protein sequences allowed insights into the evolutionary and taxonomic relationship of rhabdoviruses of fish relative to those of insects or mammals, and a broader sense of the relationship of non-segmented negative-strand RNA viruses. Based on these data, a new genus, piscivirus, is proposed which will initially contain IHNV, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus and Hirame rhabdovirus.

  7. Neutralization-resistant variants of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus have altered virulence and tissue tropism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, C.H.; Winton, J.R.; Leong, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a rhabdovirus that causes an acute disease in salmon and trout. In this study, a correlation between changes in tissue tropism and specific changes in the virus genome appeared to be made by examining four IHNV neutralization-resistant variants (RB-1, RB-2, RB-3, and RB-4) that had been selected with the glycoprotein (G)-specific monoclonal antibody RB/B5. These variants were compared with the parental strain (RB-76) for their virulence and pathogenicity in rainbow trout after waterborne challenge. Variants RB-2, RB-3, and RB-4 were only slightly attenuated and showed distributions of viral antigen in the livers and hematopoietic tissues of infected fish similar to those of the parental strain. Variant RB-1, however, was highly attenuated and the tissue distribution of viral antigen in RB-1-infected fish was markedly different, with more viral antigen in brain tissue. The sequences of the G genes of all four variants and RB-76 were determined. No significant changes were found for the slightly attenuated variants, but RB-1 G had two changes at amino acids 78 and 218 that dramatically altered its predicted secondary structure. These changes are thought to be responsible for the altered tissue tropism of the virus. Thus, IHNV G, like that of rabies virus and vesicular stomatitis virus, plays an integral part in the pathogenesis of viral infection.

  8. Demonstration of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) endocytosis in erythrocytes of Atlantic salmon

    PubMed Central

    Workenhe, Samuel T; Wadowska, Dorota W; Wright, Glenda M; Kibenge, Molly JT; Kibenge, Frederick SB

    2007-01-01

    Infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) virus (ISAV) is a fish orthomyxovirus that has recently been assigned to the new genus Isavirus within the family Orthomyxoviridae. It possesses the major functional characteristics of the virus family including haemagglutinating, receptor destroying enzyme (RDE), and fusion activities associated with the virion surface proteins. It is generally accepted that ISAV agglutinates erythrocytes of several fish species and that the ISAV RDE activity dissolves this haemagglutination reaction except for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) erythrocytes. We used electron microscopy to examine the physical interaction between ISAV and erythrocytes from Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during haemagglutination. We present evidence that ISAV enters into Atlantic salmon erythrocytes. Atlantic salmon erythrocytes incubated with ISAV for 4 hours showed endocytosis of the virus particles, which is consistent with virus infection. These observations suggest that the lack of dissolution of ISAV-induced haemagglutination of Atlantic salmon erythrocytes favours virus infection of the erythrocytes. Moreover, such a haemagglutination-infection phenotype is fundamentally different from haemagglutination by avian and mammalian orthomyxoviruses, and is indicative of a different pathogenesis for the fish orthomyxovirus. PMID:17254352

  9. Heterologous live infectious bronchitis virus vaccination in day-old commercial broiler chicks: clinical signs, ciliary health, immune responses and protection against variant infectious bronchitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Awad, Faez; Hutton, Sally; Forrester, Anne; Baylis, Matthew; Ganapathy, Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Groups of one-day-old broiler chicks were vaccinated via the oculo-nasal route with different live infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) vaccines: Massachusetts (Mass), 793B, D274 or Arkansas (Ark). Clinical signs and gross lesions were evaluated. Five chicks from each group were humanely killed at intervals and their tracheas collected for ciliary activity assessment and for the detection of CD4+, CD8+ and IgA-bearing B cells by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Blood samples were collected at intervals for the detection of anti-IBV antibodies. At 21 days post-vaccination (dpv), protection conferred by different vaccination regimes against virulent M41, QX and 793B was assessed. All vaccination programmes were able to induce high levels of CD4+, CD8+ and IgA-bearing B cells in the trachea. Significantly higher levels of CD4+ and CD8+ expression were observed in the Mass2 + 793B2-vaccinated group compared to the other groups (subscripts indicate different manufacturers). Protection studies showed that the group of chicks vaccinated with Mass2 + 793B2 produced 92% ciliary protection against QX challenge; compared to 53%, 68% and 73% ciliary protection against the same challenge virus by Mass1 + D274, Mass1 + 793B1 and Mass3 + Ark, respectively. All vaccination programmes produced more than 85% ciliary protection against M41 and 793B challenges. It appears that the variable levels of protection provided by different heterologous live IBV vaccinations are dependent on the levels of local tracheal immunity induced by the respective vaccine combination. The Mass2 + 793B2 group showed the worst clinical signs, higher mortality and severe lesions following vaccination, but had the highest tracheal immune responses and demonstrated the best protection against all three challenge viruses.

  10. Genetic relatedness of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) from cultured salmonids in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Il; Cha, Seung Joo; Lee, Chu; Baek, Harim; Hwang, Seong Don; Cho, Mi Young; Jee, Bo Young; Park, Myoung-Ae

    2016-08-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV; n = 18) was identified in the Korean national surveillance program between February 2013 and April 2015, suggesting that IHNV is a major viral pathogen in cultured salmonids. By phylogeny analysis, we found that the JRt-Nagano and JRt-Shizuoka groups could each be further subdivided into three distinct subtypes. The Korean strains were genetically similar to Japanese isolates, suggesting introduction from Japan. Interestingly, the amino acid sequences of the middle glycoprotein gene show that distinct Korean subtypes have circulated, indicating that the settled IHNVs might be evolved stably in cultured salmonid farm environments.

  11. Gene Therapy Approaches to Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Other Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Geoffrey L; Cannon, Paula M

    2017-10-01

    Advances in gene therapy technologies, particularly in gene editing, are suggesting new avenues for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus and other infectious diseases. This article outlines recent developments in antiviral gene therapies, including those based on the disruption of entry receptors or that target viral genomes using targeted nucleases, such as the CRISPR/Cas9 system. In addition, new ways to express circulating antiviral factors, such as antibodies, and approaches to harness and engineer the immune system to provide an antiviral effect that is not naturally achieved are described. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Immune response to synthetic peptides representing antigenic sites on the glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Huang, C.; LaPatra, S.; Winton, James R.

    1995-01-01

    Summary ― Monoclonal antibodies against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus have been used to react with recombinant expression products in immunoblots and to select neutralization-resistant mutants for sequence analysis. These strategies identified neutralizing and non-neutralizing antigenic sites on the viral glycoprotein. Synthetic peptides based upon the amino acid sequences of these antigenic sites were synthesized and were injected together with an adjuvant into rainbow trout. The constructs generally failed to stimulate neutralizing antibodies in the fish. These results indicate that we need to understand more about the ability of peptide antigens to stimulate fish immune systems.

  13. Development and Characterization of an In Vivo Pathogenic Molecular Clone of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Cook, R. Frank; Leroux, Caroline; Cook, Sheila J.; Berger, Sandra L.; Lichtenstein, Drew L.; Ghabrial, Nadia N.; Montelaro, Ronald C.; Issel, Charles J.

    1998-01-01

    An infectious nonpathogenic molecular clone (19-2-6A) of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) was modified by substitution of a 3.3-kbp fragment amplified by PCR techniques from a pathogenic variant (EIAVPV) of the cell culture-adapted strain of EIAV (EIAVPR). This substitution consisted of coding sequences for 77 amino acids at the carboxyl terminus of the integrase, the S1 (encoding the second exon of tat), S2, and S3 (encoding the second exon of rev) open reading frames, the complete env gene (including the first exon of rev), and the 3′ long terminal repeat (LTR). Modified 19-2-6A molecular clones were designated EIAVPV3.3, and infection of a single pony (678) with viruses derived from a mixture of five of these molecular clones induced clinical signs of acute equine infectious anemia (EIA) at 23 days postinfection (dpi). As a consequence of this initial study, a single molecular clone, EIAVPV3.3#3 (redesignated EIAVUK), was selected for further study and inoculated into two ponies (613 and 614) and two horses (700 and 764). Pony 614 and the two horses developed febrile responses by 12 dpi, which was accompanied by a 48 to 64% reduction in platelet number, whereas pony 613 did not develop fever (40.6°C) until 76 dpi. EIAV could be isolated from the plasma of these animals by 5 to 7 dpi, and all became seropositive for antibodies to this virus by 21 dpi. Analysis of the complete nucleotide sequence demonstrated that the 3.3-kbp 3′ fragment of EIAVUK differed from the consensus sequence of EIAVPV by just a single amino acid residue in the second exon of the rev gene. Complete homology with the EIAVPV consensus sequence was observed in the hypervariable region of the LTR. However, EIAVUK was found to contain an unusual 68-bp nucleotide insertion/duplication in a normally conserved region of the LTR sequence. These results demonstrate that substitution of a 3.3-kbp fragment from the EIAVPV strain into the infectious nonpathogenic molecular clone 19-2-6A leads

  14. Infectious bronchitis virus S2 expressed from recombinant virus confers broad protection against challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We developed recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) LaSota (rLS) expressing the IBV S2 gene (rLS/IBV.S2). The recombinant virus showed reduced pathogenicity compared to the parental LaSota strain but effectively elicited hemagglutination inhibition antibodies and protected chickens against lethal...

  15. The effect of infectious bursal disease virus induced immunosuppression on avian influenza virus vaccine efficacy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the field, poultry are exposed to a variety of infectious agents, many of which are immunosuppressive. Co-infections between these agents are common, and these co-infections have effects on disease, immune response, and vaccine efficacy. The effect of co-infections in poultry between immunosupp...

  16. Molecular epidemiologic evidence of homologous recombination in infectious bursal disease viruses.

    PubMed

    Jackwood, Daral J

    2012-09-01

    Nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequences of the infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) surface protein VP2 have been used to identify strains of the virus and place them into phylogenetic groups. The amino acids across the hypervariable sequence region of VP2 (hvVP2) vary, but typically variant viruses have amino acids 222T, 249K, 286I, and 318D and classic viruses have 222P, 249Q, 286T, and 318G. A molecular epidemiologic study was conducted from 2001 to 2011 in commercial chickens (Gallus gallus) from Mexico, Colombia, and Venezuela. Although many IBDVs were identified, most had the typical variant or classic amino acid sequences across the hvVP2 region. Four viruses identified in 2004, one in 2006, and 10 in 2011 from Mexico had the amino acids 222T, 249Q, 286T, and 318D. Six samples from Venezuela in 2001, one sample from Colombia in 2001, two samples from Venezuela in 2004, and one sample from Venezuela in 2005 had the amino acids 222P, 249K, 286I, and 318G. These combinations of classic and variant amino acid sequence markers had not been identified previously in any IBDV strains. The VP2 amino acid sequences in the P(BC) and P(HI) loop structures of the Venezuela and Colombia viruses were similar to most classic viruses, whereas their minor P(DE) and P(FG) loop sequences were typical of Delaware variant strains. The Mexico viruses had VP2 P(BC) loop sequences that were typical of variant IBDV strains, but their minor PDE and PFG loop structures contained amino acids that were similar but not identical to classic strains. The P(HI) loop sequences of the Mexico viruses had 318D that is typical of a Delaware variant virus, but the other amino acids in this loop structure distinguished them from all other IBDV strains. The data suggest that one or more recombination events may have occurred to create this type of sequence diversity. Because of importation regulations, immunologic studies could not be conducted in the United States to determine the

  17. Construction of an infectious full-length cDNA clone of potato virus M.

    PubMed

    Flatken, S; Ungewickell, V; Menzel, W; Maiss, E

    2008-01-01

    An infectious full-length cDNA clone of potato virus M (PVM) was produced. Total RNA was extracted from PVM-infected Nicotiana hesperis plants and used for cDNA synthesis. Subsequent RT-PCR produced two DNA fragments of about 5.5 and 3.2 kbp, which were ligated downstream of an enhanced 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter. After cloning of the enhanced 35S promoter with the PVM sequence into a modified pBIN19 plasmid and electroporation of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, the agroinoculated PVM full-length clone (pPVM-flc) led to systemic PVM infections in different host plants, causing symptoms indistinguishable from those caused by wild-type PVM.

  18. Infectious bursal disease virus antibodies in eider ducks and Herring Gulls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollmen, T.; Franson, J. Christian; Docherty, Douglas E.; Kilpi, Mikael; Hario, Martti; Creekmore, Lynn H.; Petersen, Margaret R.

    2000-01-01

    We measured antibodies to infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) in blood of nesting Common Eider (Somateria mollissima) females and immature Herring Gulls (Larus argentatus) in the Baltic Sea, and in blood of Spectacled Eider (Somateria fischeri) females nesting in a remote area of western Alaska. Positive (??? 1:16) IBDV titers occurred in 75% of the eiders and 45% of the Herring Gull chicks. In eiders, the prevalence of positive titers differed among locations. We found no evidence that IBDV exposure impaired the immune function of Herring Gull chicks, based on their response to inoculation of sheep red blood cells. We suggest that eider ducks and Herring Gulls have been exposed to IBDV, even in locations where contact with poultry is unlikely. The presence of this virus in wild bird populations is of concern because it causes mortality of up to 30% in susceptible poultry.

  19. Equine monoclonal antibodies recognize common epitopes on variants of equine infectious anaemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Perryman, L E; O'Rourke, K I; Mason, P H; McGuire, T C

    1990-01-01

    Equine-murine xenohybridoma cells were produced using SP2/0 murine myeloma cells and splenic lymph node cells obtained from horses infected with 10(6) TCID50 of single cloned variants of equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV). The xenohybridomas secreted equine IgG monoclonal antibodies reactive with EIAV in enzyme immunoassays employing purified virus. Seven antibodies were studied in detail. They bound to viral glycoproteins (gp90 or gp45) in radioimmunoprecipitation assays, and reacted with homologous EIAV as well as five other cloned variants of EIAV. When evaluated against a single cloned variant of EIAV (EIAV-WSU5), two antibodies bound to different epitopes on gp90. The five remaining antibodies reacted with the same or overlapping epitopes on gp45. None of the antibodies exhibited viral neutralizing activity. Images Figure 2 PMID:1703988

  20. Integration of replication and assembly of infectious virions in plant RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Rao, A L N; Chaturvedi, Sonali; Garmann, Rees F

    2014-12-01

    For all plant pathogenic viruses with positive-strand RNA genomes, the assembly of infectious virions is a carefully orchestrated process. The mature virions of such viruses exhibit a remarkable degree of packaging specificity, despite the opportunity that exists to package cellular RNAs. Recent technical developments in the fields of molecular and cellular biology have revealed that the processes regulating genome replication and virion assembly are integrated. The main focus of this review is to (i) apprise readers of the technical breakthroughs that have facilitated the dissection of replication from virion assembly and genome packaging in vivo and (ii) describe the critical factors that have been shown to be involved in the regulation and integration of these processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The protective immune response against infectious bronchitis virus induced by multi-epitope based peptide vaccines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tai; Wang, Hong-Ning; Wang, Xue; Tang, Jun-Ni; Lu, Dan; Zhang, Yun-Fei; Guo, Zi-Cheng; Li, Yu-Ling; Gao, Rong; Kang, Run-Min

    2009-07-01

    Peptide vaccine was found to be an effective and powerful approach to a variety of pathogens. To explore multi-epitope based peptide vaccines against infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), the immunogenic peptides were fused to the 3' terminal of glutathione S transferase gene (GST) and expressed in Escherichia coli. ELISA and Western blot analysis showed that the purified fusion proteins had excellent immune activity with chicken anti-IBV serum. During the vaccination course, the candidate peptide vaccines induced strong humoral and cellular response, and provided up to 80.0% immune protection, while all non-immunized chickens in the negative control group manifested obvious typical symptoms and died after virus challenge. Our finding provides a new way to develop multi-epitope based peptide vaccine against IBV.

  2. Hybridoma cell lines secreting monoclonal antibodies against equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Horenstein, A L; Glait, H M; Koss, A

    1987-02-01

    A monoclonal anti-equine infectious anemia virus (anti-EIAV) antibody (1B15) has been generated by fusion of X63 Ag 8.653 myeloma cells and spleen cells from mice hypersensitized with viral antigen p29. Ouchterlony double-diffusion analysis indicated that antibody 1B15 is of the IgG class. The specificity of the immune reaction for p29 was confirmed by cross-over immunoelectrophoresis and disc-gel electrophoresis. MAb 1B15 was used to devise a solid-phase 'capture' RIA for EIAV-p29 antigen. The antigen, bound by 1B15 adsorbed onto wells of flexible microtitre plates, was detected using a rabbit anti-p29 serum followed by a 125I-labelled tracer. The assay was applied to detected using a of virus in horse serum and infected cell culture fluids.

  3. Infectious bursal disease DNA vaccination conferring protection by delayed appearance and rapid clearance of invading viruses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Yi; Hsieh, Ming Kun; Tung, Chun-Yu; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2011-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the kinetics of viral load and immune response in protection against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) by DNA vaccination. Chickens were DNA-vaccinated and challenged with IBDV one week after the third vaccination. Tissues were collected at 12 hours postinfection (HPI), 1 day postinfection (DPI), 3, 5, 7 and 10 DPI. The vaccinated chickens had less viral RNA, with delayed appearance and shorter duration in the bursa of Fabricius, spleen, and cecal tonsil than the challenged control chickens. Their ELISA and neutralizing antibody titers were decreased at 12 HPI and significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those in the challenged control chickens at later time points. Their spleen IFNγ expression was up-regulated compared to that in the DNA-vaccinated chickens without IBDV challenge. These results indicate that DNA vaccination confers protection against IBDV challenge by delayed appearance and rapid clearance of the invading viruses.

  4. Human natural killer cells prevent infectious mononucleosis features by targeting lytic Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Chijioke, Obinna; Müller, Anne; Feederle, Regina; Barros, Mario Henrique M; Krieg, Carsten; Emmel, Vanessa; Marcenaro, Emanuela; Leung, Carol S; Antsiferova, Olga; Landtwing, Vanessa; Bossart, Walter; Moretta, Alessandro; Hassan, Rocio; Boyman, Onur; Niedobitek, Gerald; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Capaul, Riccarda; Münz, Christian

    2013-12-26

    Primary infection with the human oncogenic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can result in infectious mononucleosis (IM), a self-limiting disease caused by massive lymphocyte expansion that predisposes for the development of distinct EBV-associated lymphomas. Why some individuals experience this symptomatic primary EBV infection, whereas the majority acquires the virus asymptomatically, remains unclear. Using a mouse model with reconstituted human immune system components, we show that depletion of human natural killer (NK) cells enhances IM symptoms and promotes EBV-associated tumorigenesis mainly because of a loss of immune control over lytic EBV infection. These data suggest that failure of innate immune control by human NK cells augments symptomatic lytic EBV infection, which drives lymphocyte expansion and predisposes for EBV-associated malignancies.

  5. Lettuce infectious yellows virus-encoded P26 induces plasmalemma deposit cytopathology

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Lucy R.; Medina, Vicente; Sudarshana, Mysore R.; Falk, Bryce W.

    2009-05-25

    Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV) encodes a 26 kDa protein (P26) previously shown to associate with plasmalemma deposits (PLDs), unique LIYV-induced cytopathologies located at the plasmalemma over plasmodesmata pit fields in companion cells and phloem parenchyma. To further characterize the relationship of P26 and PLDs, we assessed localization and cytopathology induction of P26 expressed from either LIYV or a heterologous Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) vector using green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions, immunofluorescence microscopy, biochemical fractionation, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM analyses demonstrated that P26 not only associated with, but induced formation of PLDs in the absence of other LIYV proteins. Interestingly, PLDs induced by P26-expressing TMV were no longer confined to phloem cells. Putative P26 orthologs from two other members of the genus Crinivirus which do not induce conspicuous PLDs exhibited fractionation properties similar to LIYV P26 but were not associated with any PLD-like cytopathology.

  6. Glycan-functionalized graphene-FETs toward selective detection of human-infectious avian influenza virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Takao; Oe, Takeshi; Kanai, Yasushi; Ikuta, Takashi; Ohno, Yasuhide; Maehashi, Kenzo; Inoue, Koichi; Watanabe, Yohei; Nakakita, Shin-ichi; Suzuki, Yasuo; Kawahara, Toshio; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2017-03-01

    There are global concerns about threat of pandemic caused by the human-infectious avian influenza virus. To prevent the oncoming pandemic, it is crucial to analyze the viral affinity to human-type or avian-type sialoglycans with high sensitivity at high speed. Graphene-FET (G-FET) realizes such high-sensitive electrical detection of the targets, owing to graphene’s high carrier mobility. In the present study, G-FET was functionalized using sialoglycans and employed for the selective detection of lectins from Sambucus sieboldiana and Maackia amurensis as alternatives of the human and avian influenza viruses. Glycan-functionalized G-FET selectively monitored the sialoglycan-specific binding reactions at subnanomolar sensitivity.

  7. Mechanisms of equine infectious anemia virus escape from neutralizing antibody responses define epitope specificity.

    PubMed

    Sponseller, Brett A; Clark, Sandra K; Friedrich, Rachel A

    2012-08-01

    Determining mechanisms of viral escape to particular epitopes recognized by virus-neutralizing antibody can facilitate characterization of host-neutralizing antibody responses as type- versus group-specific, and provides necessary information for vaccine development. Our study reveals that a single N-glycan located in the 5' region of the Wyoming wild-type equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) principal neutralizing domain (PND) accounts for the differences in neutralization phenotype observed between PND variants, while variations in charged amino acids within the PND do not appear to play a key role in viral escape. Site-directed mutagenesis and peptide mapping of a conserved epitope to neutralizing antibody in the 3' region of the PND showed rapid selective pressure for acquisition of a 5' PND N-glycan responsible for defining the specificity of the neutralizing-antibody response.

  8. Regulation of the Production of Infectious Genotype 1a Hepatitis C Virus by NS5A Domain III▿

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seungtaek; Welsch, Christoph; Yi, MinKyung; Lemon, Stanley M.

    2011-01-01

    Although hepatitis C virus (HCV) assembly remains incompletely understood, recent studies with the genotype 2a JFH-1 strain suggest that it is dependent upon the phosphorylation of Ser residues near the C terminus of NS5A, a multifunctional nonstructural protein. Since genotype 1 viruses account for most HCV disease yet differ substantially in sequence from that of JFH-1, we studied the role of NS5A in the production of the H77S virus. While less efficient than JFH-1, genotype 1a H77S RNA produces infectious virus when transfected into permissive Huh-7 cells. The exchange of complete NS5A sequences between these viruses was highly detrimental to replication, while exchanges of the C-terminal domain III sequence (46% amino acid sequence identity) were well tolerated, with little effect on RNA synthesis. Surprisingly, the placement of the H77S domain III sequence into JFH-1 resulted in increased virus yields; conversely, H77S yields were reduced by the introduction of domain III from JFH-1. These changes in infectious virus yield correlated well with changes in the abundance of NS5A in RNA-transfected cells but not with RNA replication or core protein expression levels. Alanine replacement mutagenesis of selected Ser and Thr residues in the C-terminal domain III sequence revealed no single residue to be essential for infectious H77S virus production. However, virus production was eliminated by Ala substitutions at multiple residues and could be restored by phosphomimetic Asp substitutions at these sites. Thus, despite low overall sequence homology, the production of infectious virus is regulated similarly in JFH-1 and H77S viruses by a conserved function associated with a C-terminal Ser/Thr cluster in domain III of NS5A. PMID:21525356

  9. Generation of Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) Recombinants Expressing the Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus (ILTV) Glycoprotein gB or gD as Dual Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Spatz, Stephen; Zsak, Laszlo; Yu, Qingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a highly contagious acute respiratory disease of chickens caused by infection with infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), a member of the family Herpesviridae. The current commercial ILT vaccines are either unsafe or ineffective. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop safer and more efficacious vaccines. Newcastle disease (ND), caused by infection with Newcastle disease virus (NDV), a member of the family Paramyxoviridae, is one of the most serious infectious diseases of poultry. The NDV LaSota strain, a naturally occurring low-virulence NDV strain, has been routinely used as a live vaccine throughout the world. This chapter describes the generation of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) LaSota vaccine strain-based recombinant viruses expressing glycoprotein B (gB) or glycoprotein D (gD) of ILTV as dual vaccines against ND and ILT using reverse genetics technology.

  10. Zika Virus in Ontario: Evaluating a Rapid Risk Assessment Tool for Emerging Infectious Disease Threats.

    PubMed

    Van Meer, Ryan; Hohenadel, Karin; Fitzgerald-Husek, Alanna; Warshawsky, Bryna; Sider, Doug; Schwartz, Brian; Nelder, Mark P

    To determine the Ontario-specific risk of local and travel-related Zika virus transmission in the context of a public health emergency of international concern, Public Health Ontario (PHO) completed a rapid risk assessment (RRA) on January 29, 2016, using a newly developed RRA guidance tool. The RRA concluded that risk of local mosquito-borne transmission was low, with a high risk of imported cases through travel. The RRA was updated 3 times based on predetermined triggers. An independent evaluation assessed both the application of the RRA guidance tool (process evaluation) and the usefulness of the RRA (outcome evaluation). We conducted face-to-face, semi-structured interviews with 7 individuals who participated in the creation or review of the Zika virus RRA and 4 end-users at PHO and the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. An inductive thematic analysis of responses was undertaken, whereby themes were directly informed by the data. The process evaluation determined that most steps outlined in the RRA guidance tool were adhered to, including forming a cross-functional writing team, clarifying the scope and describing context, completing the RRA summary report, and updating the RRA based on predefined triggers. The outcome evaluation found that end-users judged the Zika virus RRA as evidence-informed, useful, consistent, and timely. The evaluation established that the locally tailored guidance tool, adapted from national and international approaches to RRAs, facilitated a systematic, evidence-informed, and timely formal RRA process at PHO for the Zika virus RRA, which met the needs of end-users. Based on the evaluation, PHO will modify future RRAs by incorporating some flexibility into the literature review process to support timeliness of the RRA, explicitly describing the limitations of studies used to inform the RRA, and refining risk algorithms to better suit emerging infectious disease threats. It is anticipated that these refinements will improve upon the

  11. Enhanced detection of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus by pretreatment of cell monolayers with polyethylene glycol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batts, W.N.; Winton, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    To improve quantification of very low levels of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in samples of tissue, ovarian fluid, or natural water supplies, we tested the ability of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to enhance the sensitivity and speed of the plaque assay system. We compared 4, 7, and 10% solutions of PEG of molecular weight 6,000, 8,000, or 20,000 applied at selected volumes and for various durations. When cell monolayers of epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC), fathead minnow (FHM), chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214), and bluegill fry (BF2) were pretreated with 7% PEG-20,000, they produced 4-17-fold increases in plaque assay titers of IHNV. The plaque assay titers of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, chum salmon reovirus, and chinook salmon paramyxovirus were also enhanced by exposure of CHSE-214 cells to PEG, but the titers of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus and Oncorhynchus masou virus were not substantially changed. Plaques formed by IHNV on PEG-treated EPC cells incubated at 15°C had a larger mean diameter at 6 d than those on control cells at 8 d; this suggests the assay could be shortened by use of PEG. Pretreatment of EPC cell monolayers with PEG enabled detection of IHNV in some samples that appeared negative with untreated cells. For example, when ovarian fluid samples from chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha were inoculated onto untreated monolayers of EPC cells, IHNV was detected in only 11 of 51 samples; 17 of the samples were positive when PEG-treated EPC cells were used.PDF

  12. Surveillance for infectious salmon anaemia virus HPR0 in marine Atlantic salmon farms across Scotland.

    PubMed

    McBeath, Alastair J A; Bain, Nicola; Snow, Michael

    2009-12-03

    Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) is a serious and commercially important pathogen of Atlantic salmon. Multiple viruses have been defined based on a highly polymorphic region (HPR) of the haemagglutinin-esterase (HE) protein encoded by genomic segment 6. The viruses causing disease outbreaks in farms to date all have deletions in this region with respect to a putative ancestral variant with a longer HPR (HPR0). The presence of HPR0 nucleic acid has been detected in many countries including Scotland, where it has mostly been associated with healthy wild and farmed fish. Pathogenic ISAVs appear to have been derived from HPR0 ancestors on multiple independent occasions, which suggests that the presence of HPR0 could represent a risk factor in the re-emergence of infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) disease. In order to better understand this potential risk factor, anonymous samples of gill and heart tissues from marine Atlantic salmon farms throughout Scotland were collected and screened for the presence of ISAV RNA. Since it has not been possible to isolate HPR0 in conventional ISA-permissive cell cultures, a sensitive real-time RT-PCR method was employed for the detection of viral RNA. DNA sequencing was carried out on the positive samples to determine their HPR sequence. ISAV RNA was detected in 6 samples originating from 4 different locations and sequence analysis indicated the viruses were of the HPR0 type. Full length segment 6 sequence analysis of 1 positive sample indicated that it was most similar to a European genotype sequence previously obtained from North America.

  13. Differential virulence mechanisms of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) include host entry and virus replication kinetics.

    PubMed

    Peñaranda, Ma Michelle D; Purcell, Maureen K; Kurath, Gael

    2009-09-01

    Host specificity is a phenomenon exhibited by all viruses. For the fish rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), differential specificity of virus strains from the U and M genogroups has been established both in the field and in experimental challenges. In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), M IHNV strains are consistently more prevalent and more virulent than U IHNV. The basis of the differential ability of these two IHNV genogroups to cause disease in rainbow trout was investigated in live infection challenges with representative U and M IHNV strains. When IHNV was delivered by intraperitoneal injection, the mortality caused by U IHNV increased, indicating that the low virulence of U IHNV is partly due to inefficiency in entering the trout host. Analyses of in vivo replication showed that U IHNV consistently had lower prevalence and lower viral load than M IHNV during the course of infection. In analyses of the host immune response, M IHNV-infected fish consistently had higher and longer expression of innate immune-related genes such as Mx-1. This suggests that the higher virulence of M IHNV is not due to suppression of the immune response in rainbow trout. Taken together, the results support a kinetics hypothesis wherein faster replication enables M IHNV to rapidly achieve a threshold level of virus necessary to override the strong host innate immune response.

  14. Differential virulence mechanisms of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) include host entry and virus replication kinetics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Penaranda, M.M.D.; Purcell, M.K.; Kurath, G.

    2009-01-01

    Host specificity is a phenomenon exhibited by all viruses. For the fish rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), differential specificity of virus strains from the U and M genogroups has been established both in the field and in experimental challenges. In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), M IHNV strains are consistently more prevalent and more virulent than U IHNV. The basis of the differential ability of these two IHNV genogroups to cause disease in rainbow trout was investigated in live infection challenges with representative U and M IHNV strains. When IHNV was delivered by intraperitoneal injection, the mortality caused by U IHNV increased, indicating that the low virulence of U IHNV is partly due to inefficiency in entering the trout host. Analyses of in vivo replication showed that U IHNV consistently had lower prevalence and lower viral load than M IHNV during the course of infection. In analyses of the host immune response, M IHNV-infected fish consistently had higher and longer expression of innate immune-related genes such as Mx-1. This suggests that the higher virulence of M IHNV is not due to suppression of the immune response in rainbow trout. Taken together, the results support a kinetics hypothesis wherein faster replication enables M IHNV to rapidly achieve a threshold level of virus necessary to override the strong host innate immune response. ?? 2009 SGM.

  15. Foamy Virus Pol Protein Expressed as a Gag-Pol Fusion Retains Enzymatic Activities, Allowing for Infectious Virus Production

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Gyung; Sinicrope, Amber; Jackson, Dana L.; Yu, Shuyuarn F.

    2012-01-01

    Foamy viruses (FV) synthesize Pol from a spliced pol mRNA independently of Gag, unlike orthoretroviruses, which synthesize Pol as a Gag-Pol protein that coassembles with Gag. We found that prototype FV (PFV) mutants expressing Gag and Pol only as a Gag-Pol protein without the spliced Pol contain protease activity equivalent to that of wild-type (WT) Pol. Regardless of the presence or absence of the spliced Pol, the PFV Gag-Pol proteins can assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs), in contrast to the orthoretroviral Gag-Pol proteins, which cannot form VLPs. However, the PFV Gag-Pol VLPs have aberrant morphologies and are not infectious. In the absence of the spliced Pol, coexpression of a PFV Gag-Pol protein with Gag can produce infectious virions. Our results suggest that enzymes encoded by PFV pol (protease, reverse transcriptase, and integrase) are enzymatically active if they are synthesized as part of a Gag-Pol protein. PMID:22491447

  16. Mutations within potential glycosylation sites in the capsid protein of hepatitis E virus prevent the formation of infectious virus particles.

    PubMed

    Graff, Judith; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Torian, Udana; Nguyen, Hanh; St Claire, Marisa; Yu, Claro; Purcell, Robert H; Emerson, Suzanne U

    2008-02-01

    Hepatitis E virus is a nonenveloped RNA virus. However, the single capsid protein resembles a typical glycoprotein in that it contains a signal sequence and potential glycosylation sites that are utilized when recombinant capsid protein is overexpressed in cell culture. In order to determine whether these unexpected observations were biologically relevant or were artifacts of overexpression, we analyzed capsid protein produced during a normal viral replication cycle. In vitro transcripts from an infectious cDNA clone mutated to eliminate potential glycosylation sites were transfected into cultured Huh-7 cells and into the livers of rhesus macaques. The mutations did not detectably affect genome replication or capsid protein synthesis in cell culture. However, none of the mutants infected rhesus macaques. Velocity sedimentation analyses of transfected cell lysates revealed that mutation of the first two glycosylation sites prevented virion assembly, whereas mutation of the third site permitted particle formation and RNA encapsidation, but the particles were not infectious. However, conservative mutations that did not destroy glycosylation motifs also prevented infection. Overall, the data suggested that the mutations were lethal because they perturbed protein structure rather than because they eliminated glycosylation.

  17. Chicken anemia virus and infectious bursal disease virus interfere with transcription of chicken IFN-alpha and IFN-gamma mRNA.

    PubMed

    Ragland, William L; Novak, Renata; El-Attrache, John; Savić, Vladimir; Ester, Katja

    2002-04-01

    Chicken anemia virus (CAV) and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) are the two most important viruses that cause immunosuppression in commercial chickens. Because inapparent, subclinical infections by these viruses cause immunosuppression, there is need for assessment of the immune status of chickens. Interference with induction of transcription for chicken interferon-alpha (ChIFN-alpha) and ChIFN-gamma was noted after subclinical infections with either CAV or IBDV. Because the immunosuppressive viruses of chickens may interfere with transcription for ChIFN-alpha and ChIFN-gamma, we propose using this interference to assess the immune status of chickens.

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Virus-Host Interactions in an Infectious Context Using Recombinant Viruses*

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Anastassia V.; Combredet, Chantal; Meyniel-Schicklin, Laurène; Chapelle, Manuel; Caignard, Grégory; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Lotteau, Vincent; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Tangy, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    RNA viruses exhibit small-sized genomes encoding few proteins, but still establish complex networks of interactions with host cell components to achieve replication and spreading. Ideally, these virus-host protein interactions should be mapped directly in infected cell culture, but such a high standard is often difficult to reach when using conventional approaches. We thus developed a new strategy based on recombinant viruses expressing tagged viral proteins to capture both direct and indirect physical binding partners during infection. As a proof of concept, we engineered a recombinant measles virus (MV) expressing one of its virulence factors, the MV-V protein, with a One-STrEP amino-terminal tag. This allowed virus-host protein complex analysis directly from infected cells by combining modified tandem affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry analysis. Using this approach, we established a prosperous list of 245 cellular proteins interacting either directly or indirectly with MV-V, and including four of the nine already known partners of this viral factor. These interactions were highly specific of MV-V because they were not recovered when the nucleoprotein MV-N, instead of MV-V, was tagged. Besides key components of the antiviral response, cellular proteins from mitochondria, ribosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, protein phosphatase 2A, and histone deacetylase complex were identified for the first time as prominent targets of MV-V and the critical role of the later protein family in MV replication was addressed. Most interestingly, MV-V showed some preferential attachment to essential proteins in the human interactome network, as assessed by centrality and interconnectivity measures. Furthermore, the list of MV-V interactors also showed a massive enrichment for well-known targets of other viruses. Altogether, this clearly supports our approach based on reverse genetics of viruses combined with high-throughput proteomics to probe the interaction network that

  19. Construction of infectious clones of tomato torrado virus and their delivery by agroinfiltration.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Przemysław; Budziszewska, Marta; Obrępalska-Stęplowska, Aleksandra

    2015-02-01

    The first biologically active infectious clones of tomato torrado virus (ToTV) were generated and delivered into Nicotiana benthamiana and Solanum lycopersicum plants via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The engineered constructs consisted of PCR-amplified complementary DNAs derived from the ToTV RNA1 and RNA2 components, individually inserted into an engineered pGreen binary vector between the CaMV 35S promoter and nopaline synthase terminator. These constructs were introduced into the plant hosts by means of A. tumefaciens-mediated infiltration. In the presence of the progeny virus, typical symptoms of ToTV infection developed in N. benthamiana and S. lycopersicum. Moreover, the virus was sap-transmissible when isolated from agroinfiltrated plants and induced symptoms similar to those caused by the wild-type virus. The presence of viral particles and viral genetic material was confirmed by electron microscopy and re-inoculation to S. lycopersicum and N. benthamiana, as well as by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and high-resolution melt analysis.

  20. Lithium chloride inhibits the coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Sally M; Tarpey, Ian; Rothwell, Lisa; Kaiser, Pete; Hiscox, Julian A

    2007-04-01

    The avian coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is a major economic pathogen of domestic poultry that, despite vaccination, causes mortality and significant losses in production. During replication of the RNA genome there is a high frequency of mutation and recombination, which has given rise to many strains of IBV and results in the potential for new and emerging strains. Currently the live-attenuated vaccine gives poor cross-strain immunity. Effective antiviral agents may therefore be advantageous in the treatment of IBV. Lithium chloride (LiCl) is a potent inhibitor of the DNA virus herpes simplex virus but not RNA viruses. The effect of LiCl on the replication of IBV was examined in cell culture using two model cell types; Vero cells, an African Green monkey kidney-derived epithelial cell line; and DF-1 cells, an immortalized chicken embryo fibroblast cell line. When treated with a range of LiCl concentrations, IBV RNA and protein levels and viral progeny production were reduced in a dose-dependent manner in both cell types, and the data indicated that inhibition was a cellular rather than a virucidal effect. Host cell protein synthesis still took place in LiCl-treated cells and the level of a standard cellular housekeeping protein remained unchanged, indicating that the effect of LiCl was specifically against IBV.

  1. Comparison of representative strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus by serological neutralization and cross protection assays

    SciTech Connect

    Engelking, H.M.; Leong, J.C. ); Harry, J.B. )

    1991-05-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a pathogen of young salmon and trout. Viral epizootics among these fish in private and public rearing facilities have been a problem in the northwestern United States from California to Alaska, and an IHNV vaccine has been sought by the aquaculture experts. Since an IHNV vaccine must be designed to immunize against all viral serotypes, an analysis of IHNV serotypes was made. A large number of viruses from widely separated geographic locations and different fish species had already been placed in one of five electropherotypes by the migration of the virion proteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Also, there was evidence that some of these virus isolates had differences in virulence for chinook salmon, rainbow trout, or kokanee salmon. An extensive comparison was made of 10 different IHNV isolates representing the five electropherotypes. This report shows that the glycoprotein from a single isolate of IHNV can induce a protective immune response in vivo to the five IHNV electropherotypes. Plaque reduction neutralization assays indicated that there was only one serotype. Thus, despite the differences observed in the migration of the structural proteins for IHNV isolated from separate geographic locations and different fish species, only one neutralizing virus type was identified.

  2. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus: monophyletic origin of European isolates from North American genogroup M.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, P J; Kurath, G; Fichtner, D; Bergmann, S M

    2005-09-23

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was first detected in Europe in 1987 in France and Italy, and later, in 1992, in Germany. The source of the virus and the route of introduction are unknown. The present study investigates the molecular epidemiology of IHNV outbreaks in Germany since its first introduction. The complete nucleotide sequences of the glycoprotein (G) and non-virion (NV) genes from 9 IHNV isolates from Germany have been determined, and this has allowed the identification of characteristic differences between these isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of partial G gene sequences (mid-G, 303 nucleotides) from North American IHNV isolates (Kurath et al. 2003) has revealed 3 major genogroups, designated U, M and L. Using this gene region with 2 different North American IHNV data sets, it was possible to group the European IHNV strains within the M genogroup, but not in any previously defined subgroup. Analysis of the full length G gene sequences indicated that an independent evolution of IHN viruses had occurred in Europe. IHN viruses in Europe seem to be of a monophyletic origin, again most closely related to North American isolates in the M genogroup. Analysis of the NV gene sequences also showed the European isolates to be monophyletic, but resolution of the 3 genogroups was poor with this gene region. As a result of comparative sequence analyses, several different genotypes have been identified circulating in Europe.

  3. Genetic analyses reveal unusually high diversity of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus in rainbow trout aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Troyer, R M; LaPatra, S E; Kurath, G

    2000-12-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is the most significant virus pathogen of salmon and trout in North America. Previous studies have shown relatively low genetic diversity of IHNV within large geographical regions. In this study, the genetic heterogeneity of 84 IHNV isolates sampled from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) over a 20 year period at four aquaculture facilities within a 12 mile stretch of the Snake River in Idaho, USA was investigated. The virus isolates were characterized using an RNase protection assay (RPA) and nucleotide sequence analyses. Among the 84 isolates analysed, 46 RPA haplotypes were found and analyses revealed a high level of genetic heterogeneity relative to that detected in other regions. Sequence analyses revealed up to 7.6% nucleotide divergence, which is the highest level of diversity reported for IHNV to date. Phylogenetic analyses identified four distinct monophyletic clades representing four virus lineages. These lineages were distributed across facilities, and individual facilities contained multiple lineages. These results suggest that co-circulating IHNV lineages of relatively high genetic diversity are present in the IHNV populations in this rainbow trout culture study site. Three of the four lineages exhibited temporal trends consistent with rapid evolution.

  4. Universal reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR for infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV).

    PubMed

    Purcell, Maureen K; Thompson, Rachel L; Garver, Kyle A; Hawley, Laura M; Batts, William N; Sprague, Laura; Sampson, Corie; Winton, James R

    2013-10-11

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is an acute pathogen of salmonid fishes in North America, Europe and Asia and is reportable to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). Phylogenetic analysis has identified 5 major virus genogroups of IHNV worldwide, designated U, M, L, E and J; multiple subtypes also exist within those genogroups. Here, we report the development and validation of a universal IHNV reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR (RT-rPCR) assay targeting the IHNV nucleocapsid (N) gene. Properties of diagnostic sensitivity (DSe) and specificity (DSp) were defined using laboratory-challenged steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, and the new assay was compared to the OIE-accepted conventional PCR test and virus isolation in cell culture. The IHNV N gene RT-rPCR had 100% DSp and DSe and a higher estimated diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) than virus culture or conventional PCR. The RT-rPCR assay was highly repeatable within a laboratory and highly reproducible between laboratories. Field testing of the assay was conducted on a random sample of juvenile steelhead collected from a hatchery raceway experiencing an IHN epizootic. The RT-rPCR detected a greater number of positive samples than cell culture and there was 40% agreement between the 2 tests. Overall, the RT-rPCR assay was highly sensitive, specific, repeatable and reproducible and is suitable for use in a diagnostic setting.

  5. Gene 5 of the Avian Coronavirus Infectious Bronchitis Virus Is Not Essential for Replication

    PubMed Central

    Casais, Rosa; Davies, Marc; Cavanagh, David; Britton, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The avian coronavirus Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), like other coronaviruses, expresses several small nonstructural (ns) proteins in addition to those from gene 1 (replicase) and the structural proteins. These coronavirus ns genes differ both in number and in amino acid similarity between the coronavirus groups but show some concordance within a group or subgroup. The functions and requirements of the small ns gene products remain to be elucidated. With the advent of reverse genetics for coronaviruses, the first steps in elucidating their role can be investigated. We have used our reverse genetics system for IBV (R. Casais, V. Thiel, S. G. Siddell, D. Cavanagh, and P. Britton, J. Virol. 75:12359-12369, 2001) to investigate the requirement of IBV gene 5 for replication in vivo, in ovo, and ex vivo. We produced a series of recombinant viruses, with an isogenic background, in which complete expression of gene 5 products was prevented by the inactivation of gene 5 following scrambling of the transcription-associated sequence, thereby preventing the expression of IBV subgenomic mRNA 5, or scrambling either separately or together of the translation initiation codons for the two gene 5 products. As all of the recombinant viruses replicated very similarly to the wild-type virus, Beau-R, we conclude that the IBV gene 5 products are not essential for IBV replication per se and that they are accessory proteins. PMID:15956552

  6. Inhibition of infectious bursal disease virus transmission using bioceramic derived from chicken feces.

    PubMed

    Thammakarn, Chanathip; Ishida, Yuki; Suguro, Atsushi; Hakim, Hakimullah; Nakajima, Katsuhiro; Kitazawa, Minori; Takehara, Kazuaki

    2015-06-02

    Bioceramic powder (BCX), at pH 13.0, derived from chicken feces, was evaluated for its efficacy to inactivate virus and inhibit virus horizontal transmission by fecal-oral route, using infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) vaccine strain D78 as a challenge virus. Three 1-week-old SPF chicks were vaccinated per os and used as seeder birds. Six hours later, 3 sentinel 1-week-old SPF chicks were introduced into the same cage. Results revealed that BCX had excellent efficacy to inactivate IBDV within 3 min. Treating IBDV contaminated litter in the cage with BCX could prevent transmission of IBDV to new sensitive chicks completely. Further, transmission of IBDV to the sentinel chicks was significantly inhibited by adding BCX to litter and chicken feed. These data suggest that BCX at pH 13, derived from chicken feces, has excellent efficacy to inactivate IBDV, which can be applied in bedding materials for preventing viral transmission during production round. It is a good material that can effectively be used for enhancing biosecurity system in poultry farms.

  7. Genetic analyses reveal unusually high diversity of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus in rainbow trout aquaculture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troyer, Ryan M.; LaPatra, Scott E.; Kurath, Gael

    2000-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is the most significant virus pathogen of salmon and trout in North America. Previous studies have shown relatively low genetic diversity of IHNV within large geographical regions. In this study, the genetic heterogeneity of 84 IHNV isolates sampled from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) over a 20 year period at four aquaculture facilities within a 12 mile stretch of the Snake River in Idaho, USA was investigated. The virus isolates were characterized using an RNase protection assay (RPA) and nucleotide sequence analyses. Among the 84 isolates analysed, 46 RPA haplotypes were found and analyses revealed a high level of genetic heterogeneity relative to that detected in other regions. Sequence analyses revealed up to 7·6% nucleotide divergence, which is the highest level of diversity reported for IHNV to date. Phylogenetic analyses identified four distinct monophyletic clades representing four virus lineages. These lineages were distributed across facilities, and individual facilities contained multiple lineages. These results suggest that co-circulating IHNV lineages of relatively high genetic diversity are present in the IHNV populations in this rainbow trout culture study site. Three of the four lineages exhibited temporal trends consistent with rapid evolution.

  8. Inactivation of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus by low levels of iodine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batts, William N.; Landolt, Marsha L.; Winton, James R.

    1991-01-01

    The fish rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was rapidly inactivated by extremely low concentrations of iodine in water. A 99.9% virus reduction was obtained in 7.5 s when virus (105PFU/ml) and iodine (0.1 mg/liter, final concentration) were combined in distilled-deionized or hatchery water. Iodine efficacy decreased at pHs greater than 7.5 or when proteinaceous material was added to the water. Bovine serum albumin blocked iodine inactivation of the virus more effectively than did equal concentrations of fetal bovine serum or river sediment. Sodium thiosulfate effectively neutralized free iodine. Powder, iodophor, and crystalline iodine solutions inactivated IHNV equally. Iodine rapidly inactivated IHNV isolates representing each of the five electropherotypes. Under the conditions used in this study, inactivation was not affected by temperature, salinity, or water hardness. When Dworshak National Fish Hatchery water was continuously treated to provide a free iodine concentration of 0.14 mg/liter, a 7.5-s exposure to iodine was sufficient to inactivate 99.9% of the IHNV. Iodine added to water that contained IHNV prevented infection of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fry. These results suggest that the waterborne route of IHNV transmission can be blocked by adding low iodine concentrations to the water supplies of hatcheries.

  9. Novel Strategy to Evaluate Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus Variants by High Resolution Melting

    PubMed Central

    Sepúlveda, Dagoberto; Cárdenas, Constanza; Carmona, Marisela; Marshall, Sergio H.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variability is a key problem in the prevention and therapy of RNA-based virus infections. Infectious Salmon Anemia virus (ISAv) is an RNA virus which aggressively attacks salmon producing farms worldwide and in particular in Chile. Just as with most of the Orthomyxovirus, ISAv displays high variability in its genome which is reflected by a wider infection potential, thus hampering management and prevention of the disease. Although a number of widely validated detection procedures exist, in this case there is a need of a more complex approach to the characterization of virus variability. We have adapted a procedure of High Resolution Melting (HRM) as a fine-tuning technique to fully differentiate viral variants detected in Chile and projected to other infective variants reported elsewhere. Out of the eight viral coding segments, the technique was adapted using natural Chilean variants for two of them, namely segments 5 and 6, recognized as virulence-associated factors. Our work demonstrates the versatility of the technique as well as its superior resolution capacity compared with standard techniques currently in use as key diagnostic tools. PMID:22719837

  10. Generation of infectious recombinant Adeno-associated virus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Aponte-Ubillus, Juan Jose; Akeefe, Hassibullah; Cinek, Tomas; Peltier, Joseph; Gold, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been successfully employed to establish model systems for a number of viruses. Such model systems are powerful tools to study the virus biology and in particular for the identification and characterization of host factors playing a role in the viral infection cycle. Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are heavily studied due to their use as gene delivery vectors. AAV relies on other helper viruses for successful replication and on host factors for several aspects of the viral life cycle. However the role of host and helper viral factors is only partially known. Production of recombinant AAV (rAAV) vectors for gene delivery applications depends on knowledge of AAV biology and the limited understanding of host and helper viral factors may be precluding efficient production, particularly in heterologous systems. Model systems in simpler eukaryotes like the yeast S. cerevisiae would be useful tools to identify and study the role of host factors in AAV biology. Here we show that expression of AAV2 viral proteins VP1, VP2, VP3, AAP, Rep78, Rep52 and an ITR-flanked DNA in yeast leads to capsid formation, DNA replication and encapsidation, resulting in formation of infectious particles. Many of the AAV characteristics observed in yeast resemble those in other systems, making it a suitable model system. Future findings in the yeast system could be translatable to other AAV host systems and aid in more efficient production of rAAV vectors. PMID:28355224

  11. Study of RNA-A Initiation Translation of The Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Aravena, Andrea; Muñoz, Patricio; Jorquera, Patricia; Diaz, Alvaro; Reinoso, Claudia; Catrilelbún, Sebastián González-; Sandino, Ana María

    2017-08-15

    The infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) is a salmonid pathogen that causes significant economic losses to the aquaculture industry. IPNV is a non-enveloped virus containing two uncapped and non-polyadenylated double strand RNA genomic segments, RNA-A and RNA-B. The viral protein Vpg is covalently attached to the 5' end of both segments. There is little knowledge about its viral cycle, particularly about the translation of the RNAs. Through experiments using mono and bicistronic reporters, in this work we show that the 120-nucleotide-long 5'-UTR of RNA-A contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that functions efficiently both in vitro and in salmon cells. IRES activity is strongly dependent on temperature. Also, the IRES structure is confined to the 5'UTR and is not affected by the viral coding sequence. This is the first report of IRES activity in a fish virus and can give us tools to generate antivirals to attack the virus without affecting fish directly. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus: Monophyletic origin of European isolates from North American Genogroup M

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Enzmann, P.-J.; Kurath, G.; Fichtner, D.; Bergmann, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was first detected in Europe in 1987 in France and Italy, and later, in 1992, in Germany. The source of the virus and the route of introduction are unknown. The present study investigates the molecular epidemiology of IHNV outbreaks in Germany since its first introduction. The complete nucleotide sequences of the glycoprotein (G) and non-virion (NV) genes from 9 IHNV isolates from Germany have been determined, and this has allowed the identification of characteristic differences between these isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of partial G gene sequences (mid-G, 303 nucleotides) from North American IHNV isolates (Kurath et al. 2003) has revealed 3 major genogroups, designated U, M and L. Using this gene region with 2 different North American IHNV data sets, it was possible to group the European IHNV strains within the M genogroup, but not in any previously defined subgroup. Analysis of the full length G gene sequences indicated that an independent evolution of IHN viruses had occurred in Europe. IHN viruses in Europe seem to be of a monophyletic origin, again most closely related to North American isolates in the M genogroup. Analysis of the NV gene sequences also showed the European isolates to be monophyletic, but resolution of the 3 genogroups was poor with this gene region. As a result of comparative sequence analyses, several different genotypes have been identified circulating in Europe. ?? Inter-Research 2005.

  13. Universal reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR for infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Thompson, Rachel L.; Garver, Kyle A.; Hawley, Laura M.; Batts, William N.; Sprague, Laura; Sampson, Corie; Winton, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is an acute pathogen of salmonid fishes in North America, Europe and Asia and is reportable to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). Phylogenetic analysis has identified 5 major virus genogroups of IHNV worldwide, designated U, M, L, E and J; multiple subtypes also exist within those genogroups. Here, we report the development and validation of a universal IHNV reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR (RT-rPCR) assay targeting the IHNV nucleocapsid (N) gene. Properties of diagnostic sensitivity (DSe) and specificity (DSp) were defined using laboratory-challenged steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, and the new assay was compared to the OIE-accepted conventional PCR test and virus isolation in cell culture. The IHNV N gene RT-rPCR had 100% DSp and DSe and a higher estimated diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) than virus culture or conventional PCR. The RT-rPCR assay was highly repeatable within a laboratory and highly reproducible between laboratories. Field testing of the assay was conducted on a random sample of juvenile steelhead collected from a hatchery raceway experiencing an IHN epizootic. The RT-rPCR detected a greater number of positive samples than cell culture and there was 40% agreement between the 2 tests. Overall, the RT-rPCR assay was highly sensitive, specific, repeatable and reproducible and is suitable for use in a diagnostic setting.

  14. The Polyomaviridae: Contributions of virus structure to our understanding of virus receptors and infectious entry

    SciTech Connect

    Neu, Ursula; Stehle, Thilo Atwood, Walter J.

    2009-02-20

    This review summarizes the field's major findings related to the characterization of polyomavirus structures and to the characterization of virus receptors and mechanisms of host cell invasion. The four members of the family that have received the most attention in this regard are the mouse polyomavirus (mPyV), the monkey polyomavirus SV40, and the two human polyomaviruses, JCV and BKV. The structures of both the mPyV and SV40 alone and in complex with receptor fragments have been solved to high resolution. The majority of polyomaviruses recognize terminal sialic acid in either an {alpha}2,3 linkage or an {alpha}2,6 linkage to the underlying galactose. Studies on virus structure, receptor utilization and mechanisms of entry have led to new insights into how these viruses interact in an active way with cells to ensure the nuclear delivery and expression of their genomes. Critical work on virus entry has led to the discovery of a pH neutral endocytic compartment that accepts cargo from caveolae and to novel roles for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) associated factors in virus uncoating and penetration of ER membranes. This review will summarize the major findings and compare and contrast the mechanisms used by these viruses to infect cells.

  15. Infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus from Brazil: Sequencing, comparative analysis and PCR detection.

    PubMed

    Silva, Douglas C D; Nunes, Allan R D; Teixeira, Dárlio I A; Lima, João Paulo M S; Lanza, Daniel C F

    2014-08-30

    A 3739 nucleotide fragment of Infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) from Brazil was amplified and sequenced. This fragment contains the entire coding sequences of viral proteins, the full 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) and a partial sequence of 5' untranslated region (5'UTR). The genome organization of IHHNV revealed the three typical major coding domains: a left ORF1 of 2001 bp that codes NS1, a left ORF2 (NS2) of 1091 bp that codes NS2 and a right ORF3 of 990 bp that codes VP. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the three viral proteins were compared with putative amino acid sequences of viruses reported from different regions. Comparisons among genomes from different geographic locations reveal 31 nucleotide regions that are 100% similar, distributed throughout the genome. An analysis of secondary structure of UTR regions, revealed regions with high probability to form hairpins, that may be involved in mechanisms of viral replication. Additionally, a maximum likelihood analysis indicates that Brazilian IHHNV belongs to lineage III, in the infectious IHHNV group, and is clustered with IHHNV isolates from Hawaii, China, Taiwan, Vietnam and South Korea. A new nested PCR targeting conserved nucleotide regions is proposed to detect IHHNV.

  16. Spatial and temporal heterogeneity of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in Pacific Northwest salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breyta, Rachel; Black, Allison; Kaufman, John; Kurath, Gael

    2016-01-01

    The aquatic rhaboviral pathogen infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) causes acute disease in juvenile fish of a number of populations of Pacific salmonid species. Heavily managed in both marine and freshwater environments, these fish species are cultured during the juvenile stage in freshwater conservation hatcheries, where IHNV is one of the top three infectious diseases that cause serious morbidity and mortality. Therefore, a comprehensive study of viral genetic surveillance data representing 2590 field isolates collected between 1958 and 2014 was conducted to determine the spatial and temporal patterns of IHNV in the Pacific Northwest of the contiguous United States. Prevalence of infection varied over time, fluctuating over a rough 5–7 year cycle. The genetic analysis revealed numerous subgroups of IHNV, each of which exhibited spatial heterogeneity. Within all subgroups, dominant genetic types were apparent, though the temporal patterns of emergence of these types varied among subgroups. Finally, the affinity or fidelity of subgroups to specific host species also varied, where UC subgroup viruses exhibited a more generalist profile and all other subgroups exhibited a specialist profile. These complex patterns are likely synergistically driven by numerous ecological, pathobiological, and anthropogenic factors. Since only a few anthropogenic factors are candidates for managed intervention aimed at improving the health of threatened or endangered salmonid fish populations, determining the relative impact of these factors is a high priority for future studies.

  17. Isolation of novel variants of infectious bursal disease virus from different outbreaks in Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Morla, Sudhir; Deka, Pankaj; Kumar, Sachin

    2016-04-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is a highly infectious disease of young chicken that predominantly affects the immune system. In the present study, we are reporting first comprehensive study of IBDV outbreaks from the Northeastern part of India. Northeast India shares a porous border with four different countries; and as a rule any outbreak in the neighboring countries substantially affects the poultry population in the adjoining states. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the VP2 gene of the IBDV isolates from the Northeastern part of India suggested the extreme virulent nature of the virus. The virulent marker amino acids (A222, I242, Q253, I256 and S299) in the hypervariable region of the Northeastern isolates were found identical with the reported very virulent strains of IBDV. A unique insertion of I/L294V was recorded in all the isolates of the Northeastern India. The study will be useful in understanding the circulating pathotypes of IBDV in India. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cloning the simian varicella virus genome in E. coli as an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome.

    PubMed

    Gray, Wayne L; Zhou, Fuchun; Noffke, Juliane; Tischer, B Karsten

    2011-05-01

    Simian varicella virus (SVV) is closely related to human varicella-zoster virus and causes varicella and zoster-like disease in nonhuman primates. In this study, a mini-F replicon was inserted into a SVV cosmid, and infectious SVV was generated by co-transfection of Vero cells with overlapping SVV cosmids. The entire SVV genome, cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC), was stably propagated upon serial passage in E. coli. Transfection of pSVV-BAC DNA into Vero cells yielded infectious SVV (rSVV-BAC). The mini-F vector sequences flanked by loxP sites were removed by co-infection of Vero cells with rSVV-BAC and adenovirus expressing Cre-recombinase. Recombinant SVV generated using the SVV-BAC genetic system has similar molecular and in vitro replication properties as wild-type SVV. To demonstrate the utility of this approach, a SVV ORF 10 deletion mutant was created using two-step Red-mediated recombination. The results indicate that SVV ORF 10, which encodes a homolog of the HSV-1 virion VP-16 transactivator protein, is not essential for in vitro replication but is required for optimal replication in cell culture.

  19. Development of a nested PCR assay for detection of feline infectious peritonitis virus in clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, D A; Lobbiani, A; Gramegna, M; Moore, L E; Colucci, G

    1997-01-01

    A diagnostic test for feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) infection based on a nested PCR (nPCR) assay was developed and tested with FIPV, feline enteric coronavirus (FECV), canine coronavirus (CCV), and transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and clinical fluid samples from cats with effusive feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). The target sequence for the assay is in the S1 region of the peplomer protein E2 gene. A vaccine strain of FIPV and two wild-type FIPV strains tested positive, but FECV, TGEV, and CCV tested negative. Preliminary tests with 12 cats with clinical evidence of effusive FIP and 11 cats with an illness associated with effusions, but attributed to other causes, were performed. Eleven of the 12 cats with effusive FIP tested positive, while 1 was negative. Ten of the 11 cats ill from other causes tested negative, while 1 was positive. On the basis of clinical laboratory and histopathologic criteria, the preliminary sensitivity and specificity of the assay were 91.6 and 94%, respectively. PMID:9041410

  20. Density of Infectious Virus and Complement-Fixing Antigens of Two Rhinovirus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Dans, P. E.; Forsyth, B. R.; Chanock, R. M.

    1966-01-01

    Dans, P. E. (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, Md.), B. R. Forsyth, and R. M. Chanock. Density of infectious virus and complement-fixing antigens of two rhinovirus strains. J. Bacteriol. 91:1605–1611. 1966.—Two rhinovirus serotypes (echovirus 28 and HGP) and poliovirus type 1 were banded by isopycnic centrifugation in cesium chloride. The rhinovirus virions had a density of 1.41 g/ml, whereas that of poliovirus was 1.34. Since a number of other enteroviruses also have a density of 1.34 g/ml in cesium chloride, a basic difference in density may exist between the rhinovirus and enterovirus subgroups of the picornavirus family. Whether this difference reflects differences in ribonucleic acid content or binding of cesium ions remains to be determined. In tests with echovirus 28 two peaks of CF activity were detected: one in association with the virion (1.41 g/ml), and a larger peak of lower density (1.30 g/ml). With echovirus 28 antiserum, a heterotypically reactive complement-fixing (CF) antigen was detected in the HGP virus suspension at a density less than that of the virion (1.30 g/ml). This antigen corresponded in density to the less dense CF antigen of echovirus 28. PMID:4286454

  1. Emerging infectious disease agents and blood safety in Australia: spotlight on Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Kiely, Philip; Wood, Erica M; Gambhir, Manoj; Cheng, Allen C; McQuilten, Zoe K; Seed, Clive R

    2017-06-05

    Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) are infectious diseases whose incidence has increased in humans in the past 20 years or could increase in the near future. EID agents may represent a threat to blood safety if they infect humans, cause a clinically significant illness, include an asymptomatic blood phase in the course of infection, and are transmissible by transfusion. EID agents are typically not well characterised, but there is a consensus that we can expect ongoing outbreaks. Strategies to manage the risk to blood safety from EIDs include ongoing surveillance, regular risk assessments, modelling transfusion transmission risk, and deferral of donors with a recent travel history to outbreak areas. The 2015-16 Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak in the Americas is the largest reported ZIKV outbreak to date, and it highlights the unpredictable nature of EID outbreaks and how quickly they can become a major public health problem. This ZIKV outbreak has provided evidence of a causal link between the virus and microcephaly in newborns. In assessing the potential risk of ZIKV to blood safety in Australia, it should be noted that a relatively small number of imported ZIKV infections have been reported in Australia, there have been no reported cases of local ZIKV transmission, and the geographical distribution of the potential ZIKV mosquito vector in Australia (Aedes aegypti) is limited to northern Queensland. Moreover, reported transfusion-transmitted ZIKV cases worldwide are rare. At present, ZIKV represents a low risk to blood safety in Australia.

  2. Molecular detection, epidemiology, and genetic characterization of novel European field isolates of equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Cappelli, Katia; Capomaccio, Stefano; Cook, Frank R; Felicetti, Michela; Marenzoni, Maria Luisa; Coppola, Giacomo; Verini-Supplizi, Andrea; Coletti, Mauro; Passamonti, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    The application of molecular diagnostic techniques along with nucleotide sequence determination to permit contemporary phylogenetic analysis of European field isolates of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) has not been widely reported. As a result, of extensive testing instigated following the 2006 outbreak of equine infectious anemia in Italy, 24 farms with a history of exposure to this disease were included in this study. New PCR-based methods were developed, which, especially in the case of DNA preparations from peripheral blood cells, showed excellent correlation with OIE-approved agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) tests for identifying EIAV-infected animals. In contrast, the OIE-recommended oligonucleotide primers for EIAV failed to react with any of the Italian isolates. Similar results were also obtained with samples from four Romanian farms. In addition, for the first time complete characterization of gag genes from five Italian isolates and one Romanian isolate has been achieved, along with acquisition of extensive sequence information (86% of the total gag gene) from four additional EIAV isolates (one Italian and three Romanian). Furthermore, in another 23 cases we accomplished partial characterization of gag gene sequences in the region encoding the viral matrix protein. Analysis of this information suggested that most Italian isolates were geographically restricted, somewhat reminiscent of the "clades" described for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Collectively this represents the most comprehensive genetic study of European EIAV isolates conducted to date.

  3. Genomic comparison between attenuated Chinese equine infectious anemia virus vaccine strains and their parental virulent strains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Shuai; Lin, Yuezhi; Jiang, Chenggang; Ma, Jian; Zhao, Liping; Lv, Xiaoling; Wang, Fenglong; Shen, Rongxian; Kong, Xiangang; Zhou, Jianhua

    2011-02-01

    A lentiviral vaccine, live attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine, was developed in the 1970s, and this has made tremendous contributions to the control of equine infectious anemia (EIA) in China. Four key virus strains were generated during the attenuation of the EIAV vaccine: the original Liao-Ning strain (EIAV(LN40)), a donkey-adapted virulent strain (EIAV(DV117)), a donkey-leukocyte-attenuated vaccine strain (EIAV(DLV121)), and a fetal donkey dermal cell (FDD)-adapted vaccine strain (EIAV(FDDV13)). In this study, we analyzed the proviral genomes of these four EIAV strains and found a series of consensus substitutions among these strains. These mutations provide useful information for understanding the genetic basis of EIAV attenuation. Our results suggest that multiple mutations in a variety of genes in our attenuated EIAV vaccines not only provide a basis for virulence attenuation and induction of protective immunity but also greatly reduce the risk of reversion to virulence.

  4. Avian diversity and West Nile virus: Testing associations between biodiversity and infectious disease risk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ezenwa, V.O.; Godsey, M.S.; King, R.J.; Guptill, S.C.

    2006-01-01

    The emergence of several high profile infectious diseases in recent years has focused attention on our need to understand the ecological factors contributing to the spread of infectious diseases. West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease that was first detected in the United States in 1999. The factors accounting for variation in the prevalence of WNV are poorly understood, but recent ideas suggesting links between high biodiversity and reduced vector-borne disease risk may help account for distribution patterns of this disease. Since wild birds are the primary reservoir hosts for WNV, we tested associations between passerine (Passeriform) bird diversity, non-passerine (all other orders) bird diversity and virus infection rates in mosquitoes and humans to examine the extent to which bird diversity is associated with WNV infection risk. We found that non-passerine species richness (number of non-passerine species) was significantly negatively correlated with both mosquito and human infection rates, whereas there was no significant association between passerine species richness and any measure of infection risk. Our findings suggest that non-passerine diversity may play a role in dampening WNV amplification rates in mosquitoes, minimizing human disease risk. ?? 2005 The Royal Society.

  5. Avian diversity and West Nile virus: testing associations between biodiversity and infectious disease risk.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ezenwa, V.O.; Godsey, M.S.; King, R.J.; Guptill, S.C.

    2006-01-01

    The emergence of several high profile infectious diseases in recent years has focused attention on our need to understand the ecological factors contributing to the spread of infectious diseases. West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease that was first detected in the United States in 1999. The factors accounting for variation in the prevalence of WNV are poorly understood, but recentideas suggesting links between high biodiversity and reduced vector-borne disease risk may help account for distribution patterns of this disease. Since wild birds are the primary reservoir hosts for WNV, we tested associations between passerine (Passeriform) bird diversity, non-passerine (all other orders) bird diversity and virus infection rates in mosquitoes and humans to examine the extent to which bird diversity is associated with WNV infection risk. We found t h at non-passerine species richness (number of non-passerine species) was significantly negatively correlated with both mosquito and human infection rates, whereas there was no significant association between passerine species richness and any measure of infection risk. Our findings suggest that non-passerine diversity may play a role in dampening WNV amplification rates in mosquitoes, minimizing human disease risk.

  6. Comparison of the Levels of Infectious Virus in Respirable Aerosols Exhaled by Ferrets Infected with Influenza Viruses Exhibiting Diverse Transmissibility Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Gustin, Kortney M.; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Tumpey, Terrence M.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza viruses pose a major public health burden to communities around the world by causing respiratory infections that can be highly contagious and spread rapidly through the population. Despite extensive research on influenza viruses, the modes of transmission occurring most often among humans are not entirely clear. Contributing to this knowledge gap is the lack of an understanding of the levels of infectious virus present in respirable aerosols exhaled from infected hosts. Here, we used the ferret model to evaluate aerosol shedding patterns and measure the amount of infectious virus present in exhaled respirable aerosols. By comparing these parameters among a panel of human and avian influenza viruses exhibiting diverse respiratory droplet transmission efficiencies, we are able to report that ferrets infected by highly transmissible influenza viruses exhale a greater number of aerosol particles and more infectious virus within respirable aerosols than ferrets infected by influenza viruses that do not readily transmit. Our findings improve our understanding of the ferret transmission model and provide support for the potential for influenza virus aerosol transmission. PMID:23658443

  7. Development of a novel DNA-launched dengue virus type 2 infectious clone assembled in a bacterial artificial chromosome.

    PubMed

    Usme-Ciro, Jose A; Lopera, Jaime A; Enjuanes, Luis; Almazán, Fernando; Gallego-Gomez, Juan C

    2014-02-13

    Major progress in Dengue virus (DENV) biology has resulted from the use of infectious clones obtained through reverse genetics. The construction of these clones is commonly based on high- or low-copy number plasmids, yeast artificial chromosomes, yeast-Escherichia coli shuttle vectors, and bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). Prokaryotic promoters have consistently been used for the transcription of these clones. The goal of this study was to develop a novel DENV infectious clone in a BAC under the control of the cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter and to generate a virus with the fusion envelope-green fluorescent protein in an attempt to track virus infection. The transfection of Vero cells with a plasmid encoding the DENV infectious clone facilitated the recovery of infectious particles that increased in titer after serial passages in C6/36 cells. The plaque size and syncytia phenotypes of the recombinant virus were similar to those of the parental virus. Despite the observation of autonomous replication and the detection of low levels of viral genome after two passages, the insertion of green fluorescent protein and Renilla luciferase reporter genes negatively impacted virus rescue. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study using a DENV infectious clone under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter to facilitate the recovery of recombinant viruses without the need for in vitro transcription. This novel molecular clone will be useful for establishing the molecular basis of replication, assembly, and pathogenesis, evaluating potential antiviral drugs, and the development of vaccine candidates for attenuated recombinant viruses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Geography and host species shape the evolutionary dynamics of U genogroup infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Black, Allison; Breyta, Rachel; Bedford, Trevor; Kurath, Gael

    2016-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a negative-sense RNA virus that infects wild and cultured salmonids throughout the Pacific Coastal United States and Canada, from California to Alaska. Although infection of adult fish is usually asymptomatic, juvenile infections can result in high mortality events that impact salmon hatchery programs and commercial aquaculture. We used epidemiological case data and genetic sequence data from a 303 nt portion of the viral glycoprotein gene to study the evolutionary dynamics of U genogroup IHNV in the Pacific Northwestern United States from 1971 to 2013. We identified 114 unique genotypes among 1,219 U genogroup IHNV isolates representing 619 virus detection events. We found evidence for two previously unidentified, broad subgroups within the U genogroup, which we designated ‘UC’ and ‘UP’. Epidemiologic records indicated that UP viruses were detected more frequently in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and in coastal waters of Washington and Oregon, whereas UC viruses were detected primarily in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Columbia River Basin, which is a large, complex watershed extending throughout much of interior Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. These findings were supported by phylogenetic analysis and by FST. Ancestral state reconstruction indicated that early UC viruses in the Columbia River Basin initially infected sockeye salmon but then emerged via host shifts into Chinook salmon and steelhead trout sometime during the 1980s. We postulate that the development of these subgroups within U genogroup was driven by selection pressure for viral adaptation to Chinook salmon and steelhead trout within the Columbia River Basin.

  9. Emergence of MD type infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in Washington State coastal steelhead trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breyta, Rachel; Jones, Amelia; Stewart, Bruce; Brunson, Ray; Thomas, Joan; Kerwin, John; Bertolini, Jim; Mumford, Sonia; Patterson, Chris; Kurath, Gael

    2013-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) occurs in North America as 3 major phylogenetic groups designated U, M, and L. In coastal Washington State, IHNV has historically consisted of U genogroup viruses found predominantly in sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka. M genogroup IHNV, which has host-specific virulence for rainbow and steelhead trout O. mykiss, was detected only once in coastal Washington prior to 2007, in an epidemic among juvenile steelhead trout in 1997. Beginning in 2007 and continuing through 2011, there were 8 IHNV epidemics in juvenile steelhead trout, involving 7 different fish culture facilities in 4 separate watersheds. During the same time period, IHNV was also detected in asymptomatic adult steelhead trout from 6 coastal watersheds. Genetic typing of 283 recent virus isolates from coastal Washington revealed that the great majority were in the M genogroup of IHNV and that there were 2 distinct waves of viral emergence between the years 2007 and 2011. IHNV type mG110M was dominant in coastal steelhead trout during 2007 to 2009, and type mG139M was dominant between 2010 and 2011. Phylogenetic analysis of viral isolates indicated that all coastal M genogroup viruses detected in 1997 and 2007 to 2011 were part of the MD subgroup and that several novel genetic variants related to the dominant types arose in the coastal sites. Comparison of spatial and temporal incidence of coastal MD viruses with that of the rest of the Pacific Northwest indicated that the likely source of the emergent viruses was Columbia River Basin steelhead trout. 

  10. Emergence of MD type infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in Washington State coastal steelhead trout.

    PubMed

    Breyta, Rachel; Jones, Amelia; Stewart, Bruce; Brunson, Ray; Thomas, Joan; Kerwin, John; Bertolini, Jim; Mumford, Sonia; Patterson, Chris; Kurath, Gael

    2013-06-13

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) occurs in North America as 3 major phylogenetic groups designated U, M, and L. In coastal Washington State, IHNV has historically consisted of U genogroup viruses found predominantly in sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka. M genogroup IHNV, which has host-specific virulence for rainbow and steelhead trout O. mykiss, was detected only once in coastal Washington prior to 2007, in an epidemic among juvenile steelhead trout in 1997. Beginning in 2007 and continuing through 2011, there were 8 IHNV epidemics in juvenile steelhead trout, involving 7 different fish culture facilities in 4 separate watersheds. During the same time period, IHNV was also detected in asymptomatic adult steelhead trout from 6 coastal watersheds. Genetic typing of 283 recent virus isolates from coastal Washington revealed that the great majority were in the M genogroup of IHNV and that there were 2 distinct waves of viral emergence between the years 2007 and 2011. IHNV type mG110M was dominant in coastal steelhead trout during 2007 to 2009, and type mG139M was dominant between 2010 and 2011. Phylogenetic analysis of viral isolates indicated that all coastal M genogroup viruses detected in 1997 and 2007 to 2011 were part of the MD subgroup and that several novel genetic variants related to the dominant types arose in the coastal sites. Comparison of spatial and temporal incidence of coastal MD viruses with that of the rest of the Pacific Northwest indicated that the likely source of the emergent viruses was Columbia River Basin steelhead trout.

  11. Artemia franciscana as a vector for infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV) to Litopenaeus vannamei juvenile.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Suzianny Maria Bezerra Cabral; Lavander, Henrique David; de Santana Luna, Manuella Maria; de Melo Eloi da Silva, Ana Odete; Gálvez, Alfredo Olivera; Coimbra, Maria Raquel Moura

    2015-03-01

    In 2004, the infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV) was recognized as the main cause of Litopenaeusvannamei shrimp culture's drop in Brazil. In health animal control programs, in order to reduce virus prevalence in production units it is necessary to screen live feed used. Among live diets used in aquaculture, the brine shrimp Artemia sp. is essential in crustacean larviculture and maturation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the susceptibility of Artemiafranciscana to IMNV through an immersion challenge and virus-phytoplankton adhesion route and to elucidate its role as a vector for IMNV transmission to L.vannamei. A. franciscana adults were infected with IMNV through both routes, as demonstrated by PCR-positive reactions. However, infected A. franciscana showed no signs of infection. More than 40% of L. vannamei juveniles fed with IMNV-infected A. franciscana by virus-phytoplankton adhesion route were positive by real-time PCR, whereas only a 10% infection rate was found among shrimp fed with IMNV-infected brine shrimp using the immersion challenge. Significant differences were found in mean viral load between immersion and virus-phytoplankton adhesion shrimp treatments (p ⩽ 0.05). Moreover, the mean viral loads were 1.34 × 10(2) and 1.48 × 10(4) copies/μg(-1) of total RNA for virus-phytoplankton adhesion and IMNV-infected tissue treatments, respectively, and the difference was not significant (p ⩾ 0.05). The results indicated that A. franciscana act as a vector for IMNV transmission under the experimental conditions examined. Although no mass mortalities were detected in L. vannamei fed with IMNV-infected brine shrimp, these infected shrimp should not be disregarded as a source of IMNV in grow-out units.

  12. Molecular characterization of infectious bursal disease viruses detected in vaccinated commercial broiler flocks in Lusaka, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Ndashe, Kunda; Simulundu, Edgar; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Moonga, Ladslav; Ogawa, Hirohito; Takada, Ayato; Mweene, Aaron S

    2016-03-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is an acute, highly contagious, and immunosuppressive viral disease of young chickens and remains one of the economically most important diseases threatening the poultry industry worldwide. In this study, 16 and 11 nucleotide sequences of the VP2 hypervariable region (VP2-HVR) and part of VP1, respectively, of IBD virus (IBDV) detected in vaccinated broiler chickens in Lusaka in 2012 were determined. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these Zambian IBDVs separated into three genotypes of very virulent (VV) IBDVs. Although the majority of these viruses belonged to the African VV type (VV1), which consisted of viruses from West Africa, South Africa and Zambia, one virus belonged to the East African VV type (VV2). Interestingly, a Zambian IBDV belonging to the VV3 genotype (composed of viruses from several continents) clustered with attenuated vaccine strains. Although sequence analysis of VP2-HVR showed that all detected Zambian IBDVs had conserved putative virulence marker amino acids (i.e., 222A, 242I, 256I, 294I and 299S), one virus had two unique amino acid substitutions, N280S and E300A. This study demonstrates the diversity of Zambian IBDVs and documents for the first time the possible involvement of attenuated vaccine strains in the epidemiology of IBD in Zambia. Strict biosecurity of poultry farms, monitoring of live vaccine use in the field, surveillance and characterization of IBDV in poultry and development of a vaccine from local or regional IBDV field strains are recommended for improved IBD control in Zambia.

  13. Proteomic alteration of equine monocyte-derived macrophages infected with equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Du, Cheng; Liu, Hai-Fang; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Ma, Jian; Li, Yi-Jing; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Similar to the well-studied viruses human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is another member of the Lentivirus genus in the family Retroviridae. Previous studies revealed that interactions between EIAV and the host resulted in viral evolution in pathogenicity and immunogenicity, as well as adaptation to the host. Proteomic analysis has been performed to examine changes in protein expression and/or modification in host cells infected with viruses and has revealed useful information for virus-host interactions. In this study, altered protein expression in equine monocyte-derived macrophages (eMDMs, the principle target cell of EIAV in vivo) infected with the EIAV pathogenic strain EIAV(DLV34) (DLV34) was examined using 2D-LC-MS/MS coupled with the iTRAQ labeling technique. The expression levels of 210 cellular proteins were identified to be significantly upregulated or downregulated by infection with DLV34. Alterations in protein expression were confirmed by examining the mRNA levels of eight selected proteins using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR, and by verifying the levels of ten selected proteins using parallel reaction monitoring (PRM). Further analysis of GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG)-Pathway enrichment demonstrated that these differentially expressed proteins are primarily related to the biological processes of oxidative phosphorylation, protein folding, RNA splicing, and ubiquitylation. Our results can facilitate a better understanding of the host response to EIAV infection and the cellular processes required for EIAV replication and pathogenesis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Immunogenicity of a modified-live virus vaccine against bovine viral diarrhea virus types 1 and 2, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, bovine parainfluenza-3 virus, and bovine respiratory syncytial virus when administered intranasally in young calves.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wenzhi; Ellis, John; Mattick, Debra; Smith, Linda; Brady, Ryan; Trigo, Emilio

    2010-05-14

    The immunogenicity of an intranasally-administered modified-live virus (MLV) vaccine in 3-8 day old calves was evaluated against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) types 1 and 2, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) virus, parainfluenza-3 (PI-3) virus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV). Calves were intranasally vaccinated with a single dose of a multivalent MLV vaccine and were challenged with one of the respective viruses three to four weeks post-vaccination in five separate studies. There was significant sparing of diseases in calves intranasally vaccinated with the MLV vaccine, as indicated by significantly fewer clinical signs, lower rectal temperatures, reduced viral shedding, greater white blood cell and platelet counts, and less severe pulmonary lesions than control animals. This was the first MLV combination vaccine to demonstrate efficacy against BVDV types 1 and 2, IBR, PI-3 and BRSV in calves 3-8 days of age.

  15. Attenuated Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus with Rearranged Gene Order as Potential Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Rouxel, Ronan N.; Tafalla, Carolina; Mérour, Emilie; Leal, Esther; Biacchesi, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genome of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a salmonid novirhabdovirus, has been engineered to modify the gene order and to evaluate the impact on a possible attenuation of the virus in vitro and in vivo. By reverse genetics, eight recombinant IHNVs (rIHNVs), termed NxGy according to the respective positions of the nucleoprotein (N) and glycoprotein (G) genes along the genome, have been recovered. All rIHNVs have been fully characterized in vitro for their cytopathic effects, kinetics of replication, and profiles of viral gene transcription. These rIHNVs are stable through up to 10 passages in cell culture. Following bath immersion administration of the various rIHNVs to juvenile trout, some of the rIHNVs were clearly attenuated (N2G3, N2G4, N3G4, and N4G1). The position of the N gene seems to be one of the most critical features correlated to the level of viral attenuation. The induced immune response potential in fish was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay (ELISPOT) and seroneutralization assays. The recombinant virus N2G3 induced a strong antibody response in immunized fish and conferred 86% of protection against wild-type IHNV challenge in trout, thus representing a promising starting point for the development of a live attenuated vaccine candidate. IMPORTANCE In Europe, no vaccines are available against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), one of the major economic threats in fish aquaculture. Live attenuated vaccines are conditioned by a sensible balance between attenuation and pathogenicity. Moreover, nonsegmented negative-strain RNA viruses (NNSV) are subject to a transcription gradient dictated by the order of the genes in their genomes. With the perspective of developing a vaccine against IHNV, we engineered various recombinant IHNVs with reordered genomes in order to artificially attenuate the virus. Our results validate the gene rearrangement approach as a potent and stable attenuation strategy for

  16. Infectious Progression of Canine Distemper Virus from Circulating Cerebrospinal Fluid into the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Takenaka, Akiko; Sato, Hiroki; Ikeda, Fusako; Yoneda, Misako

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the current study, we generated recombinant chimeric canine distemper viruses (CDVs) by replacing the hemagglutinin (H) and/or phosphoprotein (P) gene in an avirulent strain expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) with those of a mouse-adapted neurovirulent strain. An in vitro experimental infection indicated that the chimeric CDVs possessing the H gene derived from the mouse-adapted CDV acquired infectivity for neural cells. These cells lack the CDV receptors that have been identified to date (SLAM and nectin-4), indicating that the H protein defines infectivity in various cell lines. The recombinant viruses were administered intracerebrally to 1-week-old mice. Fatal neurological signs of disease were observed only with a recombinant CDV that possessed both the H and P genes of the mouse-adapted strain, similar to the parental mouse-adapted strain, suggesting that both genes are important to drive virulence of CDV in mice. Using this recombinant CDV, we traced the intracerebral propagation of CDV by detecting EGFP. Widespread infection was observed in the cerebral hemispheres and brainstems of the infected mice. In addition, EGFP fluorescence in the brain slices demonstrated a sequential infectious progression in the central nervous system: CDV primarily infected the neuroependymal cells lining the ventricular wall and the neurons of the hippocampus and cortex adjacent to the ventricle, and it then progressed to an extensive infection of the brain surface, followed by the parenchyma and cortex. In the hippocampal formation, CDV spread in a unidirectional retrograde pattern along neuronal processes in the hippocampal formation from the CA1 region to the CA3 region and the dentate gyrus. Our mouse model demonstrated that the main target cells of CDV are neurons in the acute phase and that the virus spreads via neuronal transmission pathways in the hippocampal formation. IMPORTANCE CDV is the etiological agent of distemper in dogs and other

  17. Epstein-Barr Virus mRNA Export Factor EB2 Is Essential for Production of Infectious Virus

    PubMed Central

    Gruffat, Henri; Batisse, Julien; Pich, Dagmar; Neuhierl, Bernhard; Manet, Evelyne; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang; Sergeant, Alain

    2002-01-01

    The splicing machinery which positions a protein export complex near the exon-exon junction mediates nuclear export of mRNAs generated from intron-containing genes. Many Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) early and late genes are intronless, and an alternative pathway, independent of splicing, must export the corresponding mRNAs. Since the EBV EB2 protein induces the cytoplasmic accumulation of intronless mRNA, it is tempting to speculate that EB2 is a viral adapter involved in the export of intronless viral mRNA. If this is true, then the EB2 protein is essential for the production of EBV infectious virions. To test this hypothesis, we generated an EBV mutant in which the BMLF1 gene, encoding the EB2 protein, has been deleted (EBVBMLF1-KO). Our studies show that EB2 is necessary for the production of infectious EBV and that its function cannot be transcomplemented by a cellular factor. In the EBVBMLF1-KO 293 cells, oriLyt-dependent DNA replication was greatly enhanced by EB2. Accordingly, EB2 induced the cytoplasmic accumulation of a subset of EBV early mRNAs coding for essential proteins implicated in EBV DNA replication during the productive cycle. Two herpesvirus homologs of the EB2 protein, the herpes simplex virus type 1 protein ICP27 and, the human cytomegalovirus protein UL69, only partly rescued the phenotype of the EBVBMLF1-KO mutant, indicating that some EB2 functions in virus production cannot be transcomplemented by ICP27 and UL69. PMID:12208942

  18. A Defective Interfering Influenza RNA Inhibits Infectious Influenza Virus Replication in Human Respiratory Tract Cells: A Potential New Human Antiviral

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Claire M.; Scott, Paul D.; O’Callaghan, Christopher; Easton, Andrew J.; Dimmock, Nigel J.

    2016-01-01

    Defective interfering (DI) viruses arise during the replication of influenza A virus and contain a non-infective version of the genome that is able to interfere with the production of infectious virus. In this study we hypothesise that a cloned DI influenza A virus RNA may prevent infection of human respiratory epithelial cells with infection by influenza A. The DI RNA (244/PR8) was derived by a natural deletion process from segment 1 of influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1); it comprises 395 nucleotides and is packaged in the DI virion in place of a full-length genome segment 1. Given intranasally, 244/PR8 DI virus protects mice and ferrets from clinical influenza caused by a number of different influenza A subtypes and interferes with production of infectious influenza A virus in cells in culture. However, evidence that DI influenza viruses are active in cells of the human respiratory tract is lacking. Here we show that 244/PR8 DI RNA is replicated by an influenza A challenge virus in human lung diploid fibroblasts, bronchial epithelial cells, and primary nasal basal cells, and that the yield of challenge virus is significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner indicating that DI influenza virus has potential as a human antiviral. PMID:27556481

  19. A Defective Interfering Influenza RNA Inhibits Infectious Influenza Virus Replication in Human Respiratory Tract Cells: A Potential New Human Antiviral.

    PubMed

    Smith, Claire M; Scott, Paul D; O'Callaghan, Christopher; Easton, Andrew J; Dimmock, Nigel J

    2016-08-22

    Defective interfering (DI) viruses arise during the replication of influenza A virus and contain a non-infective version of the genome that is able to interfere with the production of infectious virus. In this study we hypothesise that a cloned DI influenza A virus RNA may prevent infection of human respiratory epithelial cells with infection by influenza A. The DI RNA (244/PR8) was derived by a natural deletion process from segment 1 of influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1); it comprises 395 nucleotides and is packaged in the DI virion in place of a full-length genome segment 1. Given intranasally, 244/PR8 DI virus protects mice and ferrets from clinical influenza caused by a number of different influenza A subtypes and interferes with production of infectious influenza A virus in cells in culture. However, evidence that DI influenza viruses are active in cells of the human respiratory tract is lacking. Here we show that 244/PR8 DI RNA is replicated by an influenza A challenge virus in human lung diploid fibroblasts, bronchial epithelial cells, and primary nasal basal cells, and that the yield of challenge virus is significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner indicating that DI influenza virus has potential as a human antiviral.

  20. Replication and shedding kinetics of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in juvenile rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Wargo, Andrew R; Scott, Robert J; Kerr, Benjamin; Kurath, Gael

    2017-01-02

    Viral replication and shedding are key components of transmission and fitness, the kinetics of which are heavily dependent on virus, host, and environmental factors. To date, no studies have quantified the shedding kinetics of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), or how they are associated with replication, making it difficult to ascertain the transmission dynamics of this pathogen of high agricultural and conservation importance. Here, the replication and shedding kinetics of two M genogroup IHNV genotypes were examined in their naturally co-evolved rainbow trout host. Within host virus replication began rapidly, approaching maximum values by day 3 post-infection, after which viral load was maintained or gradually dropped through day 7. Host innate immune response measured as stimulation of Mx-1 gene expression generally followed within host viral loads. Shedding also began very quickly and peaked within 2days, defining a generally uniform early peak period of shedding from 1 to 4days after exposure to virus. This was followed by a post-peak period where shedding declined, such that the majority of fish were no longer shedding by day 12 post-infection. Despite similar kinetics, the average shedding rate over the course of infection was significantly lower in mixed compared to single genotype infections, suggesting a competition effect, however, this did not significantly impact the total amount of virus shed. The data also indicated that the duration of shedding, rather than peak amount of virus shed, was correlated with fish mortality. Generally, the majority of virus produced during infection appeared to be shed into the environment rather than maintained in the host, although there was more retention of within host virus during the post-peak period. Viral virulence was correlated with shedding, such that the more virulent of the two genotypes shed more total virus. This fundamental understanding of IHNV shedding

  1. Replication and shedding kinetics of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in juvenile rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wargo, Andrew R.; Scott, Robert J.; Kerr, Benjamin; Kurath, Gael

    2017-01-01

    Viral replication and shedding are key components of transmission and fitness, the kinetics of which are heavily dependent on virus, host, and environmental factors. To date, no studies have quantified the shedding kinetics of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), or how they are associated with replication, making it difficult to ascertain the transmission dynamics of this pathogen of high agricultural and conservation importance. Here, the replication and shedding kinetics of two M genogroup IHNV genotypes were examined in their naturally co-evolved rainbow trout host. Within host virus replication began rapidly, approaching maximum values by day 3 post-infection, after which viral load was maintained or gradually dropped through day 7. Host innate immune response measured as stimulation of Mx-1 gene expression generally followed within host viral loads. Shedding also began very quickly and peaked within 2 days, defining a generally uniform early peak period of shedding from 1 to 4 days after exposure to virus. This was followed by a post-peak period where shedding declined, such that the majority of fish were no longer shedding by day 12 post-infection. Despite similar kinetics, the average shedding rate over the course of infection was significantly lower in mixed compared to single genotype infections, suggesting a competition effect, however, this did not significantly impact the total amount of virus shed. The data also indicated that the duration of shedding, rather than peak amount of virus shed, was correlated with fish mortality. Generally, the majority of virus produced during infection appeared to be shed into the environment rather than maintained in the host, although there was more retention of within host virus during the post-peak period. Viral virulence was correlated with shedding, such that the more virulent of the two genotypes shed more total virus. This fundamental understanding of IHNV

  2. Comparative proteome analysis of tracheal tissues in response to infectious bronchitis coronavirus, Newcastle disease virus, and avian influenza virus H9 subtype virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Junfeng; Han, Zongxi; Shao, Yuhao; Cao, Zhongzan; Kong, Xiangang; Liu, Shengwang

    2014-06-01

    Infectious bronchitis coronavirus (IBV), Newcastle disease virus (NDV), and avian influenza virus (AIV) H9 subtype are major pathogens of chickens causing serious respiratory tract disease and heavy economic losses. To better understand the replication features of these viruses in their target organs and molecular pathogenesis of these different viruses, comparative proteomic analysis was performed to investigate the proteome changes of primary target organ during IBV, NDV, and AIV H9 infections, using 2D-DIGE followed MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. In total, 44, 39, 41, 48, and 38 proteins were identified in the tracheal tissues of the chickens inoculated with IBV (ck/CH/LDL/97I, H120), NDV (La Sota), and AIV H9, and between ck/CH/LDL/97I and H120, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis showed that IBV, NDV, and AIV H9 induced similar core host responses involved in biosynthetic, catabolic, metabolic, signal transduction, transport, cytoskeleton organization, macromolecular complex assembly, cell death, response to stress, and immune system process. Comparative analysis of host response induced by different viruses indicated differences in protein expression changes induced by IBV, NDV, and AIV H9 may be responsible for the specific pathogenesis of these different viruses. Our result reveals specific host response to IBV, NDV, and AIVH9 infections and provides insights into the distinct pathogenic mechanisms of these avian respiratory viruses. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Molecular epidemiology of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus reveals complex virus traffic and evolution within southern Idaho aquaculture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troyer, R.M.; Kurath, G.

    2003-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a rhabdovirus which infects salmon and trout and may cause disease with up to 90% mortality. In the Hagerman Valley of Idaho, IHNV is endemic or epidemic among numerous fish farms and resource mitigation hatcheries. A previous study characterizing the genetic diversity among 84 IHNV isolates at 4 virus-endemic rainbow trout farms indicated that multiple lineages of relatively high diversity co-circulated at these facilities (Troyer et al. 2000 J Gen Virol. 81:2823-2832). We tested the hypothesis that high IHNV genetic diversity and co-circulating lineages are present in aquaculture facilities throughout this region. In this study, 73 virus isolates from 14 rainbow trout farms and 3 state hatcheries in the Hagerman Valley, isolated between 1978 and 1999, were genetically characterized by sequence analysis of a 303 nucleotide region of the glycoprotein gene. Phylogenetic and epidemiological analyses showed that multiple IHNV lineages co-circulate in a complex pattern throughout private trout farms and state hatcheries in the valley. IHNV maintained within the valley appears to have evolved significantly over the 22 yr study period.

  4. Differential susceptibility in steelhead trout populations to an emergent MD strain of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Breyta, Rachel; Jones, Amelia; Kurath, Gael

    2014-11-13

    A significant emergence of trout-adapted MD subgroup infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) began in the coastal region of Washington State, USA, in 2007. This emergence event lasted until 2011 and caused both asymptomatic adult fish infection and symptomatic epidemic disease and mortality in juvenile fish. Incidence of virus during this emergence demonstrated a heterogeneous distribution among rivers of the coastal region, leaving fish populations of some rivers apparently untouched while others suffered significant and recurrent infection and mortality (Breyta et. al. 2013; Dis Aquat Org 104:179-195). In this study, we examined the possible contribution of variations in susceptibility of fish populations, age-related resistance, and virus virulence to the observed landscape heterogeneity. We found that the most significant variable was host susceptibility: by controlled experimental challenge studies steelhead trout populations with no history of IHNV infection were 1 to 3 orders of magnitude more sensitive than a fish population with a long history of IHNV infection. In addition, 2 fish populations from the same river, which descended relatively recently from a common ancestral population, demonstrated 1 to 2 orders of magnitude difference in susceptibility. Fish age-related development of resistance was most evident in the more susceptible of 2 related fish populations. Finally, the strain of virus involved in the 2007 coastal Washington emergence had high virulence but was within the range of other known M group viruses tested. These results suggest that one major driver of landscape heterogeneity in the 2007 coastal Washington IHNV emergence was variation in fish population susceptibility and that this trait may have a heritable component.

  5. Differential susceptibility in steelhead trout populations to an emergent MD strain of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breyta, R.; Jones, Amelia; Kurath, Gael

    2014-01-01

    A significant emergence of trout-adapted MD subgroup infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) began in the coastal region of Washington State, USA, in 2007. This emergence event lasted until 2011 and caused both asymptomatic adult fish infection and symptomatic epidemic disease and mortality in juvenile fish. Incidence of virus during this emergence demonstrated a heterogeneous distribution among rivers of the coastal region, leaving fish populations of some rivers apparently untouched while others suffered significant and recurrent infection and mortality (Breyta et. al. 2013; Dis Aquat Org 104:179-195). In this study, we examined the possible contribution of variations in susceptibility of fish populations, age-related resistance, and virus virulence to the observed landscape heterogeneity. We found that the most significant variable was host susceptibility: by controlled experimental challenge studies steelhead trout populations with no history of IHNV infection were 1 to 3 orders of magnitude more sensitive than a fish population with a long history of IHNV infection. In addition, 2 fish populations from the same river, which descended relatively recently from a common ancestral population, demonstrated 1 to 2 orders of magnitude difference in susceptibility. Fish age-related development of resistance was most evident in the more susceptible of 2 related fish populations. Finally, the strain of virus involved in the 2007 coastal Washington emergence had high virulence but was within the range of other known M group viruses tested. These results suggest that one major driver of landscape heterogeneity in the 2007 coastal Washington IHNV emergence was variation in fish population susceptibility and that this trait may have a heritable component.

  6. Different Domains of the RNA Polymerase of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Contribute to Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Le Nouën, Cyril; Toquin, Didier; Müller, Hermann; Raue, Rüdiger; Kean, Katherine M.; Langlois, Patrick; Cherbonnel, Martine; Eterradossi, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Background Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is a pathogen of worldwide significance to the poultry industry. IBDV has a bi-segmented double-stranded RNA genome. Segments A and B encode the capsid, ribonucleoprotein and non-structural proteins, or the virus polymerase (RdRp), respectively. Since the late eighties, very virulent (vv) IBDV strains have emerged in Europe inducing up to 60% mortality. Although some progress has been made in understanding the molecular biology of IBDV, the molecular basis for the pathogenicity of vvIBDV is still not fully understood. Methodology, Principal Findings Strain 88180 belongs to a lineage of pathogenic IBDV phylogenetically related to vvIBDV. By reverse genetics, we rescued a molecular clone (mc88180), as pathogenic as its parent strain. To study the molecular basis for 88180 pathogenicity, we constructed and characterized in vivo reassortant or mosaic recombinant viruses derived from the 88180 and the attenuated Cu-1 IBDV strains. The reassortant virus rescued from segments A of 88180 (A88) and B of Cu-1 (BCU1) was milder than mc88180 showing that segment B is involved in 88180 pathogenicity. Next, the exchange of different regions of BCU1 with their counterparts in B88 in association with A88 did not fully restore a virulence equivalent to mc88180. This demonstrated that several regions if not the whole B88 are essential for the in vivo pathogenicity of 88180. Conclusion, Significance The present results show that different domains of the RdRp, are essential for the in vivo pathogenicity of IBDV, independently of the replication efficiency of the mosaic viruses. PMID:22253687

  7. Discerning an Effective Balance between Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Attenuation and Vaccine Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Craigo, Jodi K.; Li, Feng; Steckbeck, Jonathan D.; Durkin, Shannon; Howe, Laryssa; Cook, Sheila J.; Issel, Charles; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2005-01-01

    Among the diverse experimental vaccines evaluated in various animal lentivirus models, live attenuated vaccines have proven to be the most effective, thus providing an important model for examining critical immune correlates of protective vaccine immunity. We previously reported that an experimental live attenuated vaccine for equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), based on mutation of the viral S2 accessory gene, elicited protection from detectable infection by virulent virus challenge (F. Li et al., J. Virol. 77:7244-7253, 2003). To better understand the critical components of EIAV vaccine efficacy, we examine here the relationship between the extent of virus attenuation, the maturation of host immune responses, and vaccine efficacy in a comparative study of three related attenuated EIAV proviral vaccine strains: the previously described EIAVUKΔS2 derived from a virulent proviral clone, EIAVUKΔS2/DU containing a second gene mutation in the virulent proviral clone, and EIAVPRΔS2 derived from a reference avirulent proviral clone. Inoculations of parallel groups of eight horses resulted in relatively low levels of viral replication (average of 102 to 103 RNA copies/ml) and a similar maturation of EIAV envelope-specific antibody responses as determined in quantitative and qualitative serological assays. However, experimental challenge of the experimentally immunized horses by our standard virulent EIAVPV strain by using a low-dose multiple exposure protocol (three inoculations with 10 median horse infective doses, administered intravenously) revealed a marked difference in the protective efficacy of the various attenuated proviral vaccine strains that was evidently associated with the extent of vaccine virus attenuation, time of viral challenge, and the apparent maturation of virus-specific immunity. PMID:15708986

  8. Discerning an effective balance between equine infectious anemia virus attenuation and vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Craigo, Jodi K; Li, Feng; Steckbeck, Jonathan D; Durkin, Shannon; Howe, Laryssa; Cook, Sheila J; Issel, Charles; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2005-03-01

    Among the diverse experimental vaccines evaluated in various animal lentivirus models, live attenuated vaccines have proven to be the most effective, thus providing an important model for examining critical immune correlates of protective vaccine immunity. We previously reported that an experimental live attenuated vaccine for equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), based on mutation of the viral S2 accessory gene, elicited protection from detectable infection by virulent virus challenge (F. Li et al., J. Virol. 77:7244-7253, 2003). To better understand the critical components of EIAV vaccine efficacy, we examine here the relationship between the extent of virus attenuation, the maturation of host immune responses, and vaccine efficacy in a comparative study of three related attenuated EIAV proviral vaccine strains: the previously described EIAV(UK)DeltaS2 derived from a virulent proviral clone, EIAV(UK)DeltaS2/DU containing a second gene mutation in the virulent proviral clone, and EIAV(PR)DeltaS2 derived from a reference avirulent proviral clone. Inoculations of parallel groups of eight horses resulted in relatively low levels of viral replication (average of 10(2) to 10(3) RNA copies/ml) and a similar maturation of EIAV envelope-specific antibody responses as determined in quantitative and qualitative serological assays. However, experimental challenge of the experimentally immunized horses by our standard virulent EIAV(PV) strain by using a low-dose multiple exposure protocol (three inoculations with 10 median horse infective doses, administered intravenously) revealed a marked difference in the protective efficacy of the various attenuated proviral vaccine strains that was evidently associated with the extent of vaccine virus attenuation, time of viral challenge, and the apparent maturation of virus-specific immunity.

  9. Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Genomic Evolution in Progressor and Nonprogressor Ponies

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Caroline; Craigo, Jodi K.; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2001-01-01

    A primary mechanism of lentivirus persistence is the ability of these viruses to evolve in response to biological and immunological selective pressures with a remarkable array of genetic and antigenic variations that constitute a perpetual natural experiment in genetic engineering. A widely accepted paradigm of lentivirus evolution is that the rate of genetic variation is correlated directly with the levels of virus replication: the greater the viral replication, the more opportunities that exist for genetic modifications and selection of viral variants. To test this hypothesis directly, we examined the patterns of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) envelope variation during a 2.5-year period in experimentally infected ponies that differed markedly in clinical progression and in steady-state levels of viral replication as indicated by plasma virus genomic RNA assays. The results of these comprehensive studies revealed for the first time similar extents of envelope gp90 variation in persistently infected ponies regardless of the number of disease cycles (one to six) and viremia during chronic disease. The extent of envelope variation was also independent of the apparent steady-state levels of virus replication during long-term asymptomatic infection, varying from undetectable to 105 genomic RNA copies per ml of plasma. In addition, the data confirmed the evolution of distinct virus populations (genomic quasispecies) associated with sequential febrile episodes during acute and chronic EIA and demonstrated for the first time ongoing envelope variation during long-term asymptomatic infections. Finally, comparison of the rates of evolution of the previously defined EIAV gp90 variable domains demonstrated distinct differences in the rates of nucleotide and amino acid sequence variation, presumably reflecting differences in the ability of different envelope domains to respond to immune or other biological selection pressures. Thus, these data suggest that EIAV

  10. Characterization of infectious bursal disease viruses isolated in 2007 from Delmarva commercial broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Gelb, J; Jackwood, D J; Mundt, E; Pope, C R; Hein, R; Slacum, G; Harris, J M; Ladman, B S; Lynch, P; Bautista, D A; Ruano, J M; Troeber, M M

    2012-03-01

    A study was performed in 2007 to isolate and characterize infectious bursal disease viruses (IBDVs) in commercial broilers grown in the Delmarva (DMV) Peninsula region of the United States. Bursae of Fabricius were collected weekly from 1 to 4 wk of age from broilers on 10 farms with a history of poor performance. Microscopic pathology was used to determine the infectious bursal disease (IBD) status of the broilers. Bursae from 1- and 2-wk-old broilers did not show IBD microscopic lesions. Moreover, broilers on 1 of the 10 farms were IBD lesion free at 3 and 4 wk of age. However, 3 of 9 and 9 of 9 farms yielded broilers with IBD-affected bursae from 3- and 4-wk-old commercial broilers, respectively. Ten IBDV isolates were recovered from 3 of 3 lesion-positive bursal pools at 3 wk of age and 7 of 9 lesion-positive bursal pools at 4 wk of age. Analysis of the viral protein (VP) 2 genes identified all isolates as serotype 1 Delaware (Del) variant viruses. Five field isolates, each representing different molecular clades of the Delaware variant viruses, were selected for further study. Experimental infection of specific-pathogen-free white leghorn chickens with isolates DMV/4813/07, DMV/4947/07, DMV/4955/07, DMV/5038/07, and DMV/5041/07 produced gross and microscopic pathology of the bursa consistent with Delaware variant infection. Monoclonal antibody testing showed DMV/4813/07, DMV/4947/07, DMV/ 4955/07, and DMV/5041/07 to be similar to previous recognized variant viruses. However, DMV/5038/07 was found to be unreactive with the monoclonal antibodies that typically recognize reference strains STC, Del E, GLS, RS593, and AL2. In a challenge of immunity study, 10-day-old progeny from breeders immunized with a commercially available inactivated IBDV vaccine containing the Del E and classic strains were protected to a lesser degree against isolate DMV/5038/07 compared to Del E challenge based on microscopic lesion scores (P < 0.01) of the bursa. This result suggests the

  11. Strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus may be identified by structural protein differences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leong, J.C.; Hsu, Ya Li; Engelking, H. Mark; Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Anderson, D.P.

    1981-01-01

    The development of an effective vaccine to infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in fish requires a knowledge of the virus serotypes in nature. At least two serotypes were found among three IHNV strains (12). Attempts in our laboratory to extend this study with additional virus strains by classical immunological techniques were unsatisfactory. Thus, we sought another method for comparing IHNV strains. We report here that different strains of IHNV can be distinguished by the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of the viron polypeptides. Major strain differences were noted in the molecular weights of the envelope glycoprotein, G, and the nucleocapsid protein, N.The strains of IHNV were established from samples taken at several locations in California, Oregon, Washington, and Alaska. These strains were also characterized by growth rate at 15° and 18°C and average plaque size. Distinct differences in growth rate at the two temperatures were found for the California strains. The California strains were distinguished from the other strains by the production of minute plaques.

  12. Evolutionary mechanisms involved in the virulence of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV), a piscine orthomyxovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Markussen, Turhan Jonassen, Christine Monceyron Numanovic, Sanela Braaen, Stine Hjortaas, Monika Nilsen, Hanne Mjaaland, Siri

    2008-05-10

    Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) is an orthomyxovirus causing a multisystemic, emerging disease in Atlantic salmon. Here we present, for the first time, detailed sequence analyses of the full-genome sequence of a presumed avirulent isolate displaying a full-length hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) gene (HPR0), and compare this with full-genome sequences of 11 Norwegian ISAV isolates from clinically diseased fish. These analyses revealed the presence of a virulence marker right upstream of the putative cleavage site R{sub 267} in the fusion (F) protein, suggesting a Q{sub 266} {yields} L{sub 266} substitution to be a prerequisite for virulence. To gain virulence in isolates lacking this substitution, a sequence insertion near the cleavage site seems to be required. This strongly suggests the involvement of a protease recognition pattern at the cleavage site of the fusion protein as a determinant of virulence, as seen in highly pathogenic influenza A virus H5 or H7 and the paramyxovirus Newcastle disease virus.

  13. Differential transcription patterns in wild-type and glycoprotein G-deleted infectious laryngotracheitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudian, Alireza; Markham, Philip F; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Devlin, Joanne M; Browning, Glenn F

    2013-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) causes severe respiratory disease in poultry throughout the world. Recently the role of glycoprotein G (gG) in ILTV pathogenesis has been investigated and it has been shown to have chemokine-binding activity. An ILTV vaccine candidate deficient in gG has been developed and the deletion has been shown to alter the host's immune response to the virus. To understand the effect of the gG gene on transcription of other viral genes, the global expression profile of 72 ILTV genes in gG-deleted and wild-type ILTVs were investigated both in vivo and in vitro using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Several genes were differentially expressed in the different viruses in LMH cell cultures or in the tracheas of infected birds, and the expression of a number of genes, including ICP27, gC, gJ, Ul7 and UL40, differed significantly both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that they had direct or indirect roles in virulence. This study has provided insights into the interactions between gG and other ILTV genes that may have a role in virulence.

  14. Characterization of Non-Infectious Virus-Like Particle Surrogates for Viral Clearance Applications.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah; Brorson, Kurt A; Frey, Douglas D; Dhar, Arun K; Cetlin, David A

    2017-03-09

    Viral clearance is a critical aspect of biopharmaceutical manufacturing process validation. To determine the viral clearance efficacy of downstream chromatography and filtration steps, live viral "spiking" studies are conducted with model mammalian viruses such as minute virus of mice (MVM). However, due to biosafety considerations, spiking studies are costly and typically conducted in specialized facilities. In this work, we introduce the concept of utilizing a non-infectious MVM virus-like particle (MVM-VLP) as an economical surrogate for live MVM during process development and characterization. Through transmission electron microscopy, size exclusion chromatography with multi-angle light scattering, chromatofocusing, and a novel solute surface hydrophobicity assay, we examined and compared the size, surface charge, and hydrophobic properties of MVM and MVM-VLP. The results revealed that MVM and MVM-VLP exhibited nearly identical physicochemical properties, indicating the potential utility of MVM-VLP as an accurate and economical surrogate to live MVM during chromatography and filtration process development and characterization studies.

  15. Histamine levels in embryonic chicken livers infected with very virulent infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinju; He, Lei; Cheng, Xiangchao; Li, Jing; Jia, Yanyan; Yang, Danfang

    2015-11-15

    Histamine is an endogenous nitrogenous compound with extensive effects on immunologic cells and involved in many physiological functions. The current aim was to determine histamine levels in embryonic liver and its association with the pathogenicity of a very virulent infectious bursal disease virus (vvIBDV) isolate serially passaged in chicken embryos. A vvIBDV isolate and the passaged viruses were inoculated into SPF embryonated chicken eggs (0.2 ml per egg) via the chorioallantoic membrane. Embryonic livers were collected at 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h post-inoculation and histamine contents were quantified by fluorescence spectrophotometry analyses. Results showed that the histamine content in embryonic livers infected with the original vvIBDV isolate and the early passaged viruses significantly increased 48 h post-inoculation, as compared with the adapted IBDV isolate (p<0.01) and controls (p<0.01), with the concentration peaking from 72 h to 96 h. Most of the infected chicken embryos died from 48 h to 96 h post-inoculation. Moreover, the histamine content in dead embryos was markedly increased compared with live embryos (p<0.05), peaking at 72 h post-inoculation (p<0.01). There was an association between histamine content in embryonic livers and an elevation in histidine decarboxylase activity. Taken together, our results suggest that an excess of histamine correlates with inflammatory responses during vvIBDV infection. This study provides an incremental step in the understanding of the pathogenesis of vvIBDV.

  16. Differential localization and turnover of infectious bronchitis virus 3b protein in mammalian versus avian cells.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Amanda R; Machamer, Carolyn E

    2006-02-20

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) 3b protein is highly conserved among group 3 coronaviruses, suggesting that it is important for infection. A previous report (Virology 2003, 311:16-27) indicated that transfected IBV 3b localized to the nucleus in mammalian cells using a vaccinia-virus expression system. Although we confirmed these findings, we observed cytoplasmic localization of IBV 3b with apparent exclusion from the nucleus in avian cells (IBV normally infects chickens). IBV 3b was virtually undetectable by microscopy in mammalian cells transfected without vaccinia virus and in IBV-infected mammalian cells because of a greatly reduced half-life in these cells. A proteasome inhibitor stabilized IBV 3b in mammalian cells, but had little effect on IBV 3b in avian cells, suggesting that rapid turnover of IBV 3b in mammalian cells is proteasome-dependent while turnover in avian cells may be proteasome-independent. Our results highlight the importance of using cells derived from the natural host when studying coronavirus non-structural proteins.

  17. Phylogenetic and Molecular Epidemiological Studies Reveal Evidence of Multiple Past Recombination Events between Infectious Laryngotracheitis Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Won; Devlin, Joanne M.; Markham, John F.; Noormohammadi, Amir H.; Browning, Glenn F.; Ficorilli, Nino P.; Hartley, Carol A.; Markham, Philip F.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to the RNA viruses, the genome of large DNA viruses such as herpesviruses have been considered to be relatively stable. Intra-specific recombination has been proposed as an important, but underestimated, driving force in herpesvirus evolution. Recently, two distinct field strains of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) have been shown to have arisen from independent recombination events between different commercial ILTV vaccines. In this study we sequenced the genomes of additional ILTV strains and also utilized other recently updated complete genome sequences of ILTV to confirm the existence of a number of ILTV recombinants in nature. Multiple recombination events were detected in the unique long and repeat regions of the genome, but not in the unique short region. Most recombinants contained a pair of crossover points between two distinct lineages of ILTV, corresponding to the European origin and the Australian origin vaccine strains of ILTV. These results suggest that there are two distinct genotypic lineages of ILTV and that these commonly recombine in the field. PMID:23383306

  18. Infectious salmon anaemia virus infection of Atlantic salmon gill epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV), a member of the Orthomyxoviridae family, infects and causes disease in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). Previous studies have shown Atlantic salmon endothelial cells to be the primary targets of ISAV infection. However, it is not known if cells other than endothelial cells play a role in ISAV tropism. To further assess cell tropism, we examined ISAV infection of Atlantic salmon gill epithelial cells in vivo and in vitro. We demonstrated the susceptibility of epithelial cells to ISAV infection. On comparison of primary gill epithelial cell cultures with ISAV permissive fish cell cultures, we found the virus yield in primary gill epithelial cells to be comparable with that of salmon head kidney (SHK)-1 cells, but lower than TO or Atlantic salmon kidney (ASK)-II cells. Light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the primary gill cells possessed characteristics consistent with epithelial cells. Virus histochemistry showed that gill epithelial cells expressed 4-O-acetylated sialic acid which is recognized as the ISAV receptor. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of ISAV infection in Atlantic salmon primary gill epithelial cells. This study thus broadens our understanding of cell tropism and transmission of ISAV in Atlantic salmon. PMID:23282149

  19. PKR Activation Favors Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus Replication in Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gamil, Amr A.A.; Xu, Cheng; Mutoloki, Stephen; Evensen, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    The double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase R (PKR) is a Type I interferon (IFN) stimulated gene that has important biological and immunological functions. In viral infections, in general, PKR inhibits or promotes viral replication, but PKR-IPNV interaction has not been previously studied. We investigated the involvement of PKR during infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) infection using a custom-made rabbit antiserum and the PKR inhibitor C16. Reactivity of the antiserum to PKR in CHSE-214 cells was confirmed after IFNα treatment giving an increased protein level. IPNV infection alone did not give increased PKR levels by Western blot, while pre-treatment with PKR inhibitor before IPNV infection gave decreased eukaryotic initiation factor 2-alpha (eIF2α) phosphorylation. This suggests that PKR, despite not being upregulated, is involved in eIF2α phosphorylation during IPNV infection. PKR inhibitor pre-treatment resulted in decreased virus titers, extra- and intracellularly, concomitant with reduction of cells with compromised membranes in IPNV-permissive cell lines. These findings suggest that IPNV uses PKR activation to promote virus replication in infected cells. PMID:27338445

  20. Host tropism of infectious salmon anaemia virus in marine and freshwater fish species.

    PubMed

    Aamelfot, M; Dale, O B; McBeath, A; Falk, K

    2015-08-01

    The aquatic orthomyxovirus infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) causes a severe disease in farmed Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L. Although some ISA outbreaks are caused by horizontal transmission of virus between farms, the source and reservoir of the virus is largely unknown and a wild host has been hypothesized. Atlantic salmon are farmed in open net-pens, allowing transmission of pathogens from wild fish and the surrounding environment to the farmed fish. In this study, a large number of fish species were investigated for ISAV host potential. For orthomyxoviruses, a specific receptor binding is the first requirement for infection; thus, the fish species were investigated for the presence of the ISAV receptor. The receptor was found to be widely distributed across the fish species. All salmonids expressed the receptor. However, only some of the cod-like and perch-like fish did, and all flat fish were negative. In the majority of the positive species, the receptor was found on endothelial cells and/or on red blood cells. The study forms a basis for further investigations and opens up the possibility for screening species to determine whether a wild host of ISAV exists. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Evolution of the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Long Terminal Repeat during the Alteration of Cell Tropism†

    PubMed Central

    Maury, Wendy; Thompson, Robert J.; Jones, Quentin; Bradley, Sarahann; Denke, Tara; Baccam, Prasith; Smazik, Matthew; Oaks, J. Lindsay

    2005-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a lentivirus with in vivo cell tropism primarily for tissue macrophages; however, in vitro the virus can be adapted to fibroblasts and other cell types. Tropism adaptation is associated with both envelope and long terminal repeat (LTR) changes, and findings strongly suggest that these regions of the genome influence cell tropism and virulence. Furthermore, high levels of genetic variation have been well documented in both of these genomic regions. However, specific EIAV nucleotide or amino acid changes that are responsible for cell tropism changes have not been identified. A study was undertaken with the highly virulent, macrophage-tropic strain of virus EIAVwyo to identify LTR changes associated with alterations in cell tropism. We found the stepwise generation of a new transcription factor binding motif within the enhancer that was associated with adaptation of EIAV to endothelial cells and fibroblasts. An LTR that contained the new motif had enhanced transcriptional activity in fibroblasts, whereas the new site did not alter LTR activity in a macrophage cell line. This finding supports a previous prediction that selection for new LTR genetic variants may be a consequence of cell-specific selective pressures. Additional investigations of the EIAVwyo LTR were performed in vivo to determine if LTR evolution could be detected over the course of a 3-year infection. Consistent with previous in vivo findings, we observed no changes in the enhancer region of the LTR over that time period, indicating that the EIAVwyo LTR was evolutionarily stable in vivo. PMID:15827180

  2. Viral genome RNA serves as messenger early in the infectious cycle of murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Shurtz, R; Dolev, S; Aboud, M; Salzberg, S

    1979-01-01

    When NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts were infected with the Moloney strain of murine leukemia virus, part of the viral genome RNA molecules were detected in polyribosomes of the infected cells early in the infectious cycle. The binding appears to be specific, since we could demonstrate the release of viral RNA from polyribosomes with EDTA. Moreover, when infection occurred in the presence of cycloheximide, most viral RNA molecules were detected in the free cytoplasm. Size analysis on polyribosomal viral RNA molecules indicated that two size class molecules, 38S and 23S, are present in polyribosomes at 3 h after infection. Analysis of the polyriboadenylate [poly(rA)] content of viral RNA extracted from infected polyribosomes demonstrated that such molecules bind with greatest abundance at 3 h after infection, as has been detected with total viral RNA. No molecules lacking poly(rA) stretches could be detected in polyribosomes. Furthermore, when a similar analysis was performed on unbound molecules present in the free cytoplasm, identical results were obtained. We conclude that no selection towards poly(rA)-containing viral molecules is evident on binding to polyribosomes. These findings suggest that the incoming viral genome of the Moloney strain of murine leukemia virus may serve as a messenger for the synthesis of one or more virus-specific proteins early after infection of mouse fibroblasts. PMID:117118

  3. Intracellular Proton Conductance of the Hepatitis C Virus p7 Protein and Its Contribution to Infectious Virus Production

    PubMed Central

    Wozniak, Ann L.; Griffin, Stephen; Rowlands, David; Harris, Mark; Yi, MinKyung; Lemon, Stanley M.; Weinman, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) p7 protein is critical for virus production and an attractive antiviral target. p7 is an ion channel when reconstituted in artificial lipid bilayers, but channel function has not been demonstrated in vivo and it is unknown whether p7 channel activity plays a critical role in virus production. To evaluate the contribution of p7 to organelle pH regulation and virus production, we incorporated a fluorescent pH sensor within native, intracellular vesicles in the presence or absence of p7 expression. p7 increased proton (H+) conductance in vesicles and was able to rapidly equilibrate H+ gradients. This conductance was blocked by the viroporin inhibitors amantadine, rimantadine and hexamethylene amiloride. Fluorescence microscopy using pH indicators in live cells showed that both HCV infection and expression of p7 from replicon RNAs reduced the number of highly acidic (pH<5) vesicles and increased lysosomal pH from 4.5 to 6.0. These effects were not present in uninfected cells, sub-genomic replicon cells not expressing p7, or cells electroporated with viral RNA containing a channel-inactive p7 point mutation. The acidification inhibitor, bafilomycin A1, partially restored virus production to cells electroporated with viral RNA containing the channel inactive mutation, yet did not in cells containing p7-deleted RNA. Expression of influenza M2 protein also complemented the p7 mutant, confirming a requirement for H+ channel activity in virus production. Accordingly, exposure to acid pH rendered intracellular HCV particles non-infectious, whereas the infectivity of extracellular virions was acid stable and unaffected by incubation at low pH, further demonstrating a key requirement for p7-induced loss of acidification. We conclude that p7 functions as a H+ permeation pathway, acting to prevent acidification in otherwise acidic intracellular compartments. This loss of acidification is required for productive HCV infection, possibly through

  4. Demonstration of Antigenic Identity Between Purified Equine Infectious Anemia Virus and an Antigen Extracted from Infected Horse Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hideo; Norcross, Neil L.; Coggins, Leroy

    1972-01-01

    Antigenic relationship between purified equine infectious anemia (EIA) virus and spleen-derived antigen from EIA-infected horses was examined by immunodiffusion. Identical antigenicity of these two antigens has been proven because precipitation lines formed between the two antigens and EIA antiserum connected with each other. The results indicate that the antigenic substance derived from infected spleen is a component of EIA virus. Images PMID:4629262

  5. Detection of equine infectious anemia virus in a horse with an equivocal agar gel immunodiffusion test reaction.

    PubMed

    Issel, C J; Adams, W V

    1982-02-01

    A horse whose serum reacted equivocally in the agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test for equine infectious anemia was studied over a 3-year period. The horse remained afebrile and virus was detected in only 1 of 6 horse inoculation tests. The intensity of AGID test reactions increased temporarily following this evidence for virus. Although the AGID test reaction was equivocal and 5 of the 6 transmission attempts failed, the 1 successful transmission proved the horse was infected.

  6. How the Double Spherules of Infectious Bronchitis Virus Impact Our Understanding of RNA Virus Replicative Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Benjamin W.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Powered by advances in electron tomography, recent studies have extended our understanding of how viruses construct “replication factories” inside infected cells. Their function, however, remains an area of speculation with important implications for human health. It is clear from these studies that whatever their purpose, organelle structure is dynamic (M. Ulasli, M. H. Verheije, C. A. de Haan, and F. Reggiori, Cell. Microbiol. 12:844-861, 2010) and intricate (K. Knoops, M. Kikkert, S. H. Worm, J. C. Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Y. van der Meer, et al., PLOS Biol. 6:e226, 2008). But by concentrating on medically important viruses, these studies have failed to take advantage of the genetic variation inherent in a family of viruses that is as diverse as the archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes combined (C. Lauber, J. J. Goeman, M. del Carmen Parquet, P. T. Nga, E. J. Snijder, et al., PLOS Pathog. 9:e1003500, 2013). In this climate, Maier et al. (H. J. Maier, P. C. Hawes, E. M. Cottam, J. Mantell, P. Verkade, et al., mBio 4:e00801-13, 2013) explored the replicative structures formed by an avian coronavirus that appears to have diverged at an early point in coronavirus evolution and shed light on controversial aspects of viral biology. PMID:24345746

  7. Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus Causing Clinical and Subclinical Infections in Atlantic Salmon Have Different Genetic Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Mutoloki, Stephen; Jøssund, Trude B.; Ritchie, Gordon; Munang'andu, Hetron M.; Evensen, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) is the causative agent of IPN, an important disease of salmonids. IPNV infections result in either sub-clinical or overt disease and the basis of this difference is not well-understood. The objective of the present study was to determine the VP2 gene of the virus associated with the different forms of clinical manifestation. Groups of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) reared in farms located in different IPN disease pressures were monitored from brood stock until grow-out over a 3 year period. Hatcheries A1 and B1 as well as cooperating seawater farms were located in a low disease risk area while hatcheries A2 and B2 as well as their cooperating seawater farms were in high IPN risk areas. Samples including eggs, milt, whole fry, kidney depending on the stage of production were collected during outbreaks or in apparently healthy populations where no outbreaks occurred. The virus was re-isolated in CHSE cells and the VP2 gene amplified by RT-PCR followed by sequencing. During the freshwater stage, there were no disease outbreaks at hatcheries A1, A2, and B1 (except in one fish group that originated from hatchery B2), although IPNV was isolated from some of the fish groups at all 3 hatcheries. By contrast, all fish groups at hatchery B2 suffered IPN outbreaks. In seawater, only groups of fish originating from hatchery A1 had no IPN outbreaks albeit virus being isolated from the fish. On the other hand, fish originating from hatcheries A2, B1, and B2 experienced outbreaks in seawater. The VP2 amino acid fingerprint of the virus associated with subclinical infections from A1 and co-operating seawater sites was V64A137P217T221A247N252S281D282E319. By contrast, all virus isolates associated with clinical infections had the motif I64T137T217A221T247V252T281N282A319, where underlined amino acids represent the avirulent and highly virulent motif, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences showed 2 clades, one of

  8. In vivo evaluation of the pathogenicity of field isolates of infectious bronchitis virus.

    PubMed

    Avellaneda, G E; Villegas, P; Jackwood, M W; King, D J

    1994-01-01

    The pathogenicity of 13 field isolates of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) isolated from Georgia broiler farms from 1989 to 1992 was evaluated using the IBV and Escherichia coli mixed-infection model. Based on the clinical signs, mortality, and lesions, the isolates were classified as high, intermediate, and low in pathogenicity. The in vivo classification was compared with the serotype classification results obtained by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The high-pathogenicity group was composed of five isolates representing three serotypes: Arkansas, Georgia variant (GAV), and Massachusetts. Isolates in the intermediate- and low-pathogenicity groups were all representatives of the Connecticut serotype, except for one isolate, which belonged to the Massachusetts serotype.

  9. [RT-PCR-based methods for identification and typing of infectious hemopoietic necrosis virus in salmons].

    PubMed

    Popova, A G; Oreshkova, S F; Zhchelkunov, I S; Rudakova, S L; Zhchelkunova, T I; Tikunova, N V; Blinova, N N; Il'ichev, A A

    2008-01-01

    A RT-PCR method has been developed to diagnose infectious hemopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in salmons. The authors show it possible to use the method for viral shedding in both a cell culture and a clinical sample from infected fishes. Genotyping of IHNV strains originating from North America, Europe, and Russia, by using the restriction fragment length polymerase analysis, has revealed that 10 of them belong to 3 existing genogroups (U, M, and L). Three Russian isolates are assigned into a separate subgroup. Phylogenetic analysis of several isolates has confirmed that viral strains from Katchatka belong to the North American U-genogroup whereas 3 Russian isolates from the continental zone of the country make up a separate subgroup within the same genogroup.

  10. Tetraodon nigroviridis as a nonlethal model of infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV) infection

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Xiaopeng; Huang Lichao; Weng Shaoping; Wang Jing; Lin Ting; Tang Junliang; Li Zhongsheng; Lu Qingxia; Xia Qiong; Yu Xiaoqiang; He Jianguo

    2010-10-25

    Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV) is the type species of the genus Megalocytivirus, family Iridoviridae. We have previously established a high mortality ISKNV infection model of zebrafish (Danio rerio). In this study, a nonlethal Tetraodon nigroviridis model of ISKNV infection was established. ISKNV infection did not cause lethal disease in Tetraodon but could infect almost all the organs of this species. Electron microscopy showed ISKNV particles were present in infected tissues. Immunofluorescence and quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that nearly all the virions and infected cells were cleared at 14 d postinfection. The expression profiles of interferon-{gamma} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} gene in response to ISKNV infection were significantly different in Tetraodon and zebrafish. The establishment of the nonlethal Tetraodon model of ISKNV infection can offer a valuable tool complementary to the zebrafish infection model for studying megalocytivirus disease, fish immune systems, and viral tropism.

  11. Construction and characterization of a human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 3 infectious molecular clone.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Sébastien Alain; Ko, Nga Ling; Calattini, Sara; Mallet, Adeline; Prévost, Marie-Christine; Kehn, Kylene; Brady, John N; Kashanchi, Fatah; Gessain, Antoine; Mahieux, Renaud

    2008-07-01

    We and others have uncovered the existence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 3 (HTLV-3). We have now generated an HTLV-3 proviral clone. We established that gag, env, pol, pro, and tax/rex as well as minus-strand mRNAs are present in cells transfected with the HTLV-3 clone. HTLV-3 p24(gag) protein is detected in the cell culture supernatant. Transfection of 293T-long terminal repeat (LTR)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) cells with the HTLV-3 clone promotes formation of syncytia, a hallmark of Env expression, together with the appearance of fluorescent cells, demonstrating that Tax is expressed. Viral particles are visible by electron microscopy. These particles are infectious, as demonstrated by infection experiments with purified virions.

  12. U.S. response to a report of infectious salmon anemia virus in Western North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amos, Kevin H; Gustafson, Lori; Warg, Janet; Whaley, Janet; Purcell, Maureen K.; Rolland, Jill B.; Winton, James R.; Snekvik, Kevin; Meyers, Theodore; Stewart, Bruce; Kerwin, John; Blair, Marilyn; Bader, Joel; Evered, Joy

    2014-01-01

    Federal, state, and tribal fishery managers, as well as the general public and their elected representatives in the United States, were concerned when infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) was suspected for the first time in free-ranging Pacific Salmon collected from the coastal areas of British Columbia, Canada. This article documents how national and regional fishery managers and fish health specialists of the U.S. worked together and planned and implemented actions in response to the reported finding of ISAV in British Columbia. To date, the reports by Simon Fraser University remain unconfirmed and preliminary results from collaborative U.S. surveillance indicate that there is no evidence of ISAV in U.S. populations of free-ranging or marine-farmed salmonids on the west coast of North America.

  13. Extended genome sequences of penaeid shrimp infectious myonecrosis virus strains from Brazil and Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Naim, Sidrotun; Tang, Kathy F-J; Yang, May; Lightner, Donald V; Nibert, Max L

    2015-06-01

    New sequencing studies of the nonsegmented dsRNA genome of penaeid shrimp infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV), a tentatively assigned member of the family Totiviridae, identified previously unread sequences at both genome termini in three previously analyzed IMNV strains, one from Brazil (the prototype strain of IMNV) and two from Indonesia. The new sequence determinations add >600 nt to the 5' end of the genomic plus strand of each strain, increasing the length of the 5' nontranslated region to at least 469-472 nt and the length of the upstream open reading frame (ORF1) translation product by at least 48 aa. These new findings are similar to recent ones for two other IMNV strains (GenBank KF836757.1 and KJ556923.1) and thereby corroborate important amendments to the full-length IMNV genome sequence.

  14. A simple and efficient method to rescue very virulent infectious bursal disease virus using SPF chickens.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Li; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Yulong; Qin, Liting; Gao, Honglei; Wang, Xiaomei

    2012-05-01

    Reverse genetic systems for efficient generation of very virulent infectious bursal disease virus (vvIBDV) are currently limited. In this study, we have developed a simple and efficient way to rescue vvIBDV using SPF chickens. The genome of a vvIBDV strain, HLJ0504, flanked by hammerhead and hepatitis delta ribozyme sequences, was cloned downstream of the cytomegalovirus enhancer and the chicken beta-actin promoter of the vector pCAGGS. After transfection of DF-1 cells, cell suspensions were injected into the bursa organ of three-week-old SPF chickens. Using this system, vvIBDV was recovered at high titers after one passage, and the rescued vvIBDV remained highly lethal to SPF chickens. This simple and efficient method to rescue vvIBDV will be a valuable tool for better understanding the molecular virulence determinants of vvIBDV.

  15. Molecular characterization of chicken infectious anemia viruses detected from breeder and broiler chickens in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, H-R; Kwon, Y-K; Bae, Y-C; Oem, J-K; Lee, O-S

    2010-11-01

    In South Korea, 32 sequences of chicken infectious anemia virus (CIAV) from various flocks of breeder and commercial chickens were genetically characterized for the first time. Phylogenetic analysis of the viral protein 1 gene, including a hypervariable region of the CIAV genome, indicated that Korean CIAV strains were separated into groups II, IIIa, and IIIb. Strains were commonly identified in great-grandparent and grandparent breeder farms as well as commercial chicken farms. In the field, CIAV strains from breeder farms had no clinical effects, but commercial farm strains were associated with depression, growth retardation, and anemia regardless of the group from which the strain originated. In addition, we identified 7 CIAV genomes that were similar to vaccine strains from vaccinated and unvaccinated breeder flocks. These data suggest that further studies on pathogenicity and vaccine efficacy against the different CIAV group are needed, along with continuous CIAV surveillance and genetic analysis at breeder farms.

  16. The efficacy of ELISA commercial kits for the screening of equine infectious anemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Irene; Cipolini, Fabiana; Wigdorovitz, Andrés; Trono, Karina; Barrandeguy, Maria E

    2015-01-01

    The most used and reliable indicator of Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection is the detection of its specific antibodies in horse serum. In the present study, the performance of two commercial ELISA tests for the detection of EIAV antibodies as well as the potential advantages of their use as an EIAV infection screening tool were evaluated in 302 horse serum samples. Both ELISA assays showed 100% diagnostic sensitivity, and 92.3-94.3% diagnostic specificity. Discordant results were analyzed by immunoblot. The results showed that both ELISA tests are very efficient at detecting EIAV infected animals, allowing to identify a higher number of positive horse cases. Thus, ELISA assays can be useful tools in EIA control and eradication. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Prospective study of progeny of inapparent equine carriers of equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Issel, C J; Adams, W V; Foil, L D

    1985-05-01

    Progeny of a band of horses, positive by the agar-gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test for equine infectious anemia (EIA) antibody, were observed through their weaning over a 4-year period. Sentinels (AGID test-negative) were allowed to mingle with EIA-infected mares and their foals in pasture situations in an area with high populations of potential vectors. Of 27 adult sentinels, 8 (30%) seroconverted in annual rates ranging from 0% to 75%. In contrast, only 2 of 31 (6%) foals weaned became infected. Difference in infection rates between adult sentinels and foals was significant (chi 2, P less than 0.05). Possible explanations for differences included protective value of colostral immunity and differences in attractiveness to blood feeding vectors. Detectable colostral immunity to EIA virus in the AGID test persisted for 25 to 195 days, with a mean of 124 days.

  18. Immunochromatographic lateral flow test for detection of antibodies to Equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, I; Gutierrez, G; Barrandeguy, M; Trono, K

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a simple immunochromatographic lateral flow (ICLF) test for specific detection of Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) antibodies in equine sera. Viral recombinant p26 capsid protein (rp26) was used as the capture protein in the test line and as the detector reagent conjugated to colloidal gold. The performance of rp26-ICLF was evaluated, and the results obtained were compared with a commercially available agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test used as a standard of comparison according to international guidelines. The values obtained for comparative diagnostic sensitivity (98.3%), diagnostic specificity (87.4%) and concordance (92.4%) were similar to those reported for other ICLF tests for animal infectious diseases. Very good repeatability and reproducibility, as well as a total agreement with blind previous results from three proficiency test panels, were obtained, thus indicating that rp26-ICLF is a precise test. The end point of the twofold serial dilution of serum samples was the same as, and even better than, the AGID test, thus demonstrating the same analytical sensitivity as that of the reference method for EIA diagnosis. No cross-reactivity was observed when serum samples from horses with other infectious diseases were analyzed. rp26-ICLF proved to be a precise and rapid test suitable for field screening in veterinary practice, since minimal equipment and operator expertise are required. However, further research should be carried out to increase the level of sensitivity. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Subviral Hepatitis B Virus Filaments, like Infectious Viral Particles, Are Released via Multivesicular Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bingfu; Himmelsbach, Kiyoshi; Ren, Huimei; Boller, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In addition to infectious viral particles, hepatitis B virus-replicating cells secrete large amounts of subviral particles assembled by the surface proteins, but lacking any capsid and genome. Subviral particles form spheres (22-nm particles) and filaments. Filaments contain a much larger amount of the large surface protein (LHBs) compared to spheres. Spheres are released via the constitutive secretory pathway, while viral particles are ESCRT-dependently released via multivesicular bodies (MVBs). The interaction of virions with the ESCRT machinery is mediated by α-taxilin that connects the viral surface protein LHBs with the ESCRT component tsg101. Since filaments in contrast to spheres contain a significant amount of LHBs, it is unclear whether filaments are released like spheres or like virions. To study the release of subviral particles in the absence of virion formation, a core-deficient HBV mutant was generated. Confocal microscopy, immune electron microscopy of ultrathin sections and isolation of MVBs revealed that filaments enter MVBs. Inhibition of MVB biogenesis by the small-molecule inhibitor U18666A or inhibition of ESCRT functionality by coexpression of transdominant negative mutants (Vps4A, Vps4B, and CHMP3) abolishes the release of filaments while the secretion of spheres is not affected. These data indicate that in contrast to spheres which are secreted via the secretory pathway, filaments are released via ESCRT/MVB pathway like infectious viral particles. IMPORTANCE This study revises the current model describing the release of subviral particles by showing that in contrast to spheres, which are secreted via the secretory pathway, filaments are released via the ESCRT/MVB pathway like infectious viral particles. These data significantly contribute to a better understanding of the viral morphogenesis and might be helpful for the design of novel antiviral strategies. PMID:26719264

  20. Infectious bronchitis virus and brown shell colour: Australian strains of infectious bronchitis virus affect brown eggshell colour in commercial laying hens differently.

    PubMed

    Samiullah, Sami; Roberts, Juliet; Chousalkar, Kapil

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the current study was to assess any effect of wild and vaccine Australian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) strains on shell colour in brown-shelled eggs. In Experiment 1, eggs were collected from day 1 to day 13 post-inoculation (p.i.) from unvaccinated laying hens challenged with IBV wild strains T and N1/88 and from a negative control group of hens. In Experiment 2, eggs were collected from 2 to 22 days p.i. from unvaccinated and vaccinated laying hens challenged with either a wild or a vaccine strain of IBV. In Experiment 1, there was a significant effect (P < 0.05) of day p.i. and of viral strain on shell reflectivity, L* and protoporphyrin IX (PP IX) in eggshells, with and without cuticle. The mean PP IX/g of shell with and without cuticle was significantly higher on day 1 p.i. compared to day 7, after which PP IX increased with day p.i. In Experiment 2, shell reflectivity and L* increased and PP IX decreased with increased day p.i. until day 12. Shell reflectivity and L* decreased slightly after day 12 and increased again towards day 22. Shell reflectivity, L* and PP IX were not significantly different for eggshells from unvaccinated and vaccinated laying hens in the intact eggshell, but were significantly different in shells from which cuticle had been removed. In conclusion, the IBV strains reduced the intensity of brown shell colour to different extents with a lower amount of PP IX in eggshells.

  1. Mucosal, Cellular, and Humoral Immune Responses Induced by Different Live Infectious Bronchitis Virus Vaccination Regimes and Protection Conferred against Infectious Bronchitis Virus Q1 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Rajesh; Forrester, Anne; Lemiere, Stephane; Awad, Faez; Chantrey, Julian

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to assess the mucosal, cellular, and humoral immune responses induced by two different infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) vaccination regimes and their efficacy against challenge by a variant IBV Q1. One-day-old broiler chicks were vaccinated with live H120 alone (group I) or in combination with CR88 (group II). The two groups were again vaccinated with CR88 at 14 days of age (doa). One group was kept as the control (group III). A significant increase in lachrymal IgA levels was observed at 4 doa and then peaked at 14 doa in the vaccinated groups. The IgA levels in group II were significantly higher than those in group I from 14 doa. Using immunohistochemistry to examine changes in the number of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in the trachea, it was found that overall patterns of CD8+ cells were dominant compared to those of CD4+ cells in the two vaccinated groups. CD8+ cells were significantly higher in group II than those in group I at 21 and 28 doa. All groups were challenged oculonasally with a virulent Q1 strain at 28 doa, and their protection was assessed. The two vaccinated groups gave excellent ciliary protection against Q1, although group II's histopathology lesion scores and viral RNA loads in the trachea and kidney showed greater levels of protection than those in group I. These results suggest that greater protection is achieved from the combined vaccination of H120 and CR88 of 1-day-old chicks, followed by CR88 at 14 doa. PMID:26202435

  2. Geographic variations among infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) isolates and characteristics of their infection.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kathy F J; Poulos, Bonnie T; Wang, Jun; Redman, Rita M; Shih, Hsiu-Hui; Lightner, Donald V

    2003-02-13

    Nucleotide sequence variations of a 2.9 kb fragment of infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) isolated from samples of Penaeus monodon were determined and compared with an isolate from Hawaii. The infection characteristics of these isolates were examined by histology, in situ hybridization, and laboratory challenge studies with P. vannamei. Isolates of IHHNV were obtained from samples collected from the SE Asia region (the Philippines, Thailand, and Taiwan). Isolates of putative IHHNV were obtained from African samples (Tanzania, Madagascar, and Mauritius). The Philippine isolate had a very high nucleotide sequence identity (99.8%) to Hawaii IHHNV. The Thailand isolate showed a slightly lower identity (96.2%). The putative IHHNV sequences collected from Tanzania and Madagascar showed greater divergence from Hawaii IHHNV, 8.2% difference for Tanzania and 14.1% difference for Madagascar. A phylogenetic analysis showed that the Philippine IHHNV clustered with IHHNV found in the western hemisphere. This supports the theory that the Philippines was the origin of IHHNV that was first detected in Hawaii. In the laboratory infection study, both the Philippine and Thailand IHHNV were passed into P. vannamei, and the infected shrimp did not suffer any mortalities. In another laboratory infection, P. vannamei injected with a tissue homogenate of P. monodon from Madagascar, which tested positive for IHHNV by PCR, did not demonstrate IHHNV infection, suggesting that this putative IHHNV is not infectious to P. vannamei.

  3. Major histocompatibility complex loci are associated with susceptibility of Atlantic salmon to infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Kristina M.; Winton, James R.; Schulze, Angela D.; Purcell, Maureen K.; Ming, Tobi J.

    2004-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is one of the most significant viral pathogens of salmonids and is a leading cause of death among cultured juvenile fish. Although several vaccine strategies have been developed, some of which are highly protective, the delivery systems are still too costly for general use by the aquaculture industry. More cost effective methods could come from the identification of genes associated with IHNV resistance for use in selective breeding. Further, identification of susceptibility genes may lead to an improved understanding of viral pathogenesis and may therefore aid in the development of preventive and therapeutic measures. Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), involved in the primary recognition of foreign pathogens in the acquired immune response, are associated with resistance to a variety of diseases in vertebrate organisms. We conducted a preliminary analysis of MHC disease association in which an aquaculture strain of Atlantic salmon was challenged with IHNV at three different doses and individual fish were genotyped at three MHC loci using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), followed by sequencing of all differentiated alleles. Nine to fourteen alleles per exon-locus were resolved, and alleles potentially associated with resistance or susceptibility were identified. One allele (Sasa-B-04) from a potentially non-classical class I locus was highly associated with resistance to infectious hematopoietic necrosis (p < 0.01). This information can be used to design crosses of specific haplotypes for family analysis of disease associations.

  4. Tracking the molecular epidemiology of Brazilian Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) isolates.

    PubMed

    Silva, Fernanda M F; Vidigal, Pedro M P; Myrrha, Luciana W; Fietto, Juliana L R; Silva, Abelardo; Almeida, Márcia R

    2013-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease is a highly contagious disease of young chickens caused by Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). Genome segment A encodes the capsid protein (VP2), while segment B encodes the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (VP1). In the present study, we trace the molecular epidemiology of IBDV in Brazil by analyzing 29 isolates collected in the major regions of poultry production. To genetically characterize the isolates, phylogenetic and population dynamic analyses were conducted using 68 VP1 (2634 nt) and 102 VP2 (1356 nt) coding sequences from IBDV isolates from different regions of the world. Furthermore, the evolution of IBDV was analyzed by characterizing the selective forces that operated during the diversification of viral isolates. We show that IBDV isolates were introduced into Brazil mainly from the Netherlands and the USA. These introductions were associated with all Brazilian poultry production regions analyzed in this work. In addition, we show that the evolution of IBDV has been shaped by a combination of very low recombination rates and relatively high rates of nucleotide substitution (2.988×10(-4) for VP1 and 3.2937×10(-4) for VP2), which themselves are a function of purifying selection operating on VP1 and VP2. Furthermore, our extended Bayesian skyline plot suggests that the increase in the effective population size of isolates of IBDV is consistent with its epidemiological history, with a large increase during the emergence of acute outbreaks of IBD in the 1980s.

  5. Evaluation of infectious bursal disease virus stability at different conditions of temperature and pH.

    PubMed

    Rani, Surabhi; Kumar, Sachin

    2015-11-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is one of the highly pathogenic viral diseases of poultry. The disease poses a serious threat to the economy of many developing countries where agriculture serves as the primary source of national income. Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) belongs to the family Birnaviridae. The IBDV is well characterized to cause immunosuppression in poultry. The live attenuated vaccine is the only way to protect the chickens from IBDV infection. The ineffectiveness of vaccine is one of the major causes of IBDV outbreaks in field condition. In the present study, we discuss briefly about the biology of IBDV genome and its proteins under different conditions of temperature and pH in order to evaluate its infectivity under adverse physical conditions. Our results indicate that the IBDV is non-infective above 42 °C and unstable above 72 °C. However, the change in pH does not significantly contribute to the IBDV stability. The study will be useful in estimating an optimum storage condition for IBDV vaccines without causing any deterioration in its viability and effectiveness.

  6. Freedom from equine infectious anaemia virus infection in Spanish Purebred horses

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Fatima; Fores, Paloma; Ireland, Joanne; Moreno, Miguel A.; Newton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction No cases of equine infectious anaemia (EIA) have been reported in Spain since 1983. Factors that could increase the risk of reintroducing equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) into Spain include the recent occurrence of the disease in Europe and the absence of compulsory serological testing before importation into Spain. Aims and objectives Given the importance of the Spanish Purebred (SP) horse breeding industry in Spain, the aim of this cross-sectional study was to provide evidence of freedom from EIAV in SP stud farms in Central Spain. Materials and methods Serum samples from 555 SP horses, collected between September 2011 and November 2013, were tested using a commercially available EIAV ELISA with a published sensitivity of 100 per cent. Results All 555 samples were negative for antibody to EIAV, providing evidence of a true EIAV seroprevalence between 0 per cent and 0.53 per cent (95% CIs of the sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA technique used Q10 were 100 per cent and 99.3 per cent, respectively) among the SP breeding population in Central Spain. Conclusions These findings should serve to increase confidence when exporting SP horses to other countries. PMID:26392894

  7. Interstitial lung disease associated with Equine Infectious Anemia Virus infection in horses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    EIA (Equine Infectious Anemia) is a blood-borne disease primarily transmitted by haematophagous insects or needle punctures. Other routes of transmission have been poorly explored. We evaluated the potential of EIAV (Equine Infectious Anemia Virus) to induce pulmonary lesions in naturally infected equids. Lungs from 77 EIAV seropositive horses have been collected in Romania and France. Three types of lesions have been scored on paraffin-embedded lungs: lymphocyte infiltration, bronchiolar inflammation, and thickness of the alveolar septa. Expression of the p26 EIAV capsid (CA) protein has been evaluated by immunostaining. Compared to EIAV-negative horses, 52% of the EIAV-positive horses displayed a mild inflammation around the bronchioles, 22% had a moderate inflammation with inflammatory cells inside the wall and epithelial bronchiolar hyperplasia and 6.5% had a moderate to severe inflammation, with destruction of the bronchiolar epithelium and accumulation of smooth muscle cells within the pulmonary parenchyma. Changes in the thickness of the alveolar septa were also present. Expression of EIAV capsid has been evidenced in macrophages, endothelial as well as in alveolar and bronchiolar epithelial cells, as determined by their morphology and localization. To summarize, we found lesions of interstitial lung disease similar to that observed during other lentiviral infections such as FIV in cats, SRLV in sheep and goats or HIV in children. The presence of EIAV capsid in lung epithelial cells suggests that EIAV might be responsible for the broncho-interstitial damages observed. PMID:24289102

  8. Interstitial lung disease associated with Equine Infectious Anemia Virus infection in horses.

    PubMed

    Bolfa, Pompei; Nolf, Marie; Cadoré, Jean-Luc; Catoi, Cornel; Archer, Fabienne; Dolmazon, Christine; Mornex, Jean-François; Leroux, Caroline

    2013-12-01

    EIA (Equine Infectious Anemia) is a blood-borne disease primarily transmitted by haematophagous insects or needle punctures. Other routes of transmission have been poorly explored. We evaluated the potential of EIAV (Equine Infectious Anemia Virus) to induce pulmonary lesions in naturally infected equids. Lungs from 77 EIAV seropositive horses have been collected in Romania and France. Three types of lesions have been scored on paraffin-embedded lungs: lymphocyte infiltration, bronchiolar inflammation, and thickness of the alveolar septa. Expression of the p26 EIAV capsid (CA) protein has been evaluated by immunostaining. Compared to EIAV-negative horses, 52% of the EIAV-positive horses displayed a mild inflammation around the bronchioles, 22% had a moderate inflammation with inflammatory cells inside the wall and epithelial bronchiolar hyperplasia and 6.5% had a moderate to severe inflammation, with destruction of the bronchiolar epithelium and accumulation of smooth muscle cells within the pulmonary parenchyma. Changes in the thickness of the alveolar septa were also present. Expression of EIAV capsid has been evidenced in macrophages, endothelial as well as in alveolar and bronchiolar epithelial cells, as determined by their morphology and localization. To summarize, we found lesions of interstitial lung disease similar to that observed during other lentiviral infections such as FIV in cats, SRLV in sheep and goats or HIV in children. The presence of EIAV capsid in lung epithelial cells suggests that EIAV might be responsible for the broncho-interstitial damages observed.

  9. Freedom from equine infectious anaemia virus infection in Spanish Purebred horses.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Fatima; Fores, Paloma; Ireland, Joanne; Moreno, Miguel A; Newton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    No cases of equine infectious anaemia (EIA) have been reported in Spain since 1983. Factors that could increase the risk of reintroducing equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) into Spain include the recent occurrence of the disease in Europe and the absence of compulsory serological testing before importation into Spain. Given the importance of the Spanish Purebred (SP) horse breeding industry in Spain, the aim of this cross-sectional study was to provide evidence of freedom from EIAV in SP stud farms in Central Spain. Serum samples from 555 SP horses, collected between September 2011 and November 2013, were tested using a commercially available EIAV ELISA with a published sensitivity of 100 per cent. All 555 samples were negative for antibody to EIAV, providing evidence of a true EIAV seroprevalence between 0 per cent and 0.53 per cent (95% CIs of the sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA technique used Q10 were 100 per cent and 99.3 per cent, respectively) among the SP breeding population in Central Spain. These findings should serve to increase confidence when exporting SP horses to other countries.

  10. Involvement of Hepatitis C Virus NS5A Hyperphosphorylation Mediated by Casein Kinase I-α in Infectious Virus Production

    PubMed Central

    Masaki, Takahiro; Matsunaga, Satoko; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Nakashima, Kenji; Kimura, Yayoi; Ito, Masahiko; Matsuda, Mami; Murayama, Asako; Kato, Takanobu; Hirano, Hisashi; Endo, Yaeta; Lemon, Stanley M.; Wakita, Takaji; Sawasaki, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) possesses multiple functions in the viral life cycle. NS5A is a phosphoprotein that exists in hyperphosphorylated and basally phosphorylated forms. Although the phosphorylation status of NS5A is considered to have a significant impact on its function, the mechanistic details regulating NS5A phosphorylation, as well as its exact roles in the HCV life cycle, are still poorly understood. In this study, we screened 404 human protein kinases via in vitro binding and phosphorylation assays, followed by RNA interference-mediated gene silencing in an HCV cell culture system. Casein kinase I-α (CKI-α) was identified as an NS5A-associated kinase involved in NS5A hyperphosphorylation and infectious virus production. Subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy analyses showed that CKI-α-mediated hyperphosphorylation of NS5A contributes to the recruitment of NS5A to low-density membrane structures around lipid droplets (LDs) and facilitates its interaction with core protein and the viral assembly. Phospho-proteomic analysis of NS5A with or without CKI-α depletion identified peptide fragments that corresponded to the region located within the low-complexity sequence I, which is important for CKI-α-mediated NS5A hyperphosphorylation. This region contains eight serine residues that are highly conserved among HCV isolates, and subsequent mutagenesis analysis demonstrated that serine residues at amino acids 225 and 232 in NS5A (genotype 2a) may be involved in NS5A hyperphosphorylation and hyperphosphorylation-dependent regulation of virion production. These findings provide insight concerning the functional role of NS5A phosphorylation as a regulatory switch that modulates its multiple functions in the HCV life cycle. IMPORTANCE Mechanisms regulating NS5A phosphorylation and its exact function in the HCV life cycle have not been clearly defined. By using a high-throughput screening

  11. Genotypes and phylogeographical relationships of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in California, USA.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Garry O; Bendorf, Christin M; Yun, Susan C; Kurath, Gael; Hedrick, Ronald P

    2007-08-13

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) contains 3 major genogroups in North America with discreet geographic ranges designated as upper (U), middle (M), and lower (L). A comprehensive genotyping of 237 IHNV isolates from hatchery and wild salmonids in California revealed 25 different sequence types (a to y) all in the L genogroup; specifically, the genogroup contained 14 sequence types that were unique to individual isolates as well as 11 sequence types representing 2 or more identical isolates. The most evident trend was the phylogenetic and geographical division of the L genogroup into 2 distinct subgroups designated as LI and LII. Isolates within Subgroup LI were primarily found within waterways linked to southern Oregon and northern California coastal rivers. Isolates in Subgroup LII were concentrated within inland valley watersheds that included the Sacramento River, San Joaquin River, and their tributaries. The temporal and spatial patterns of virus occurrence suggested that infections among adult Chinook salmon in the hatchery or that spawn in the river are a major source of virus potentially infecting other migrating or resident salmonids in California. Serum neutralization results of the California isolates of IHNV corroborated a temporal trend of sequence divergence; specifically, 2 progressive shifts in which more recent virus isolates represent new serotypes. A comparison of the estimates of divergence rates for Subgroup LI (1 x 10(-5) mutations per nucleotide site per year) indicated stasis similar to that observed in the U genogroup, while the Subgroup LII rate (1 x 10(-3) mutations per nucleotide site per year) suggested a more active evolution similar to that of the M genogroup.

  12. Two distinct phylogenetic clades of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus overlap within the Columbia River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garver, K.A.; Troyer, R.M.; Kurath, G.

    2003-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), an aquatic rhabdovirus, causes a highly lethal disease of salmonid fish in North America. To evaluate the genetic diversity of IHNV from throughout the Columbia River basin, excluding the Hagerman Valley, Idaho, the sequences of a 303 nt region of the glycoprotein gene (mid-G) of 120 virus isolates were determined. Sequence comparisons revealed 30 different sequence types, with a maximum nucleotide diversity of 7.3% (22 mismatches) and an intrapopulational nucleotide diversity of 0.018. This indicates that the genetic diversity of IHNV within the Columbia River basin is 3-fold higher than in Alaska, but 2-fold lower than in the Hagerman Valley, Idaho. Phylogenetic analyses separated the Columbia River basin IHNV isolates into 2 major clades, designated U and M. The 2 clades geographically overlapped within the lower Columbia River basin and in the lower Snake River and tributaries, while the upper Columbia River basin had only U clade and the upper Snake River basin had only M clade virus types. These results suggest that there are co-circulating lineages of IHNV present within specific areas of the Columbia River basin. The epidemiological significance of these findings provided insight into viral traffic patterns exhibited by IHNV in the Columbia River basin, with specific relevance to how the Columbia River basin IHNV types were related to those in the Hagerman Valley. These analyses indicate that there have likely been 2 historical events in which Hagerman Valley IHNV types were introduced and became established in the lower Columbia River basin. However, the data also clearly indicates that the Hagerman Valley is not a continuous source of waterborne virus infecting salmonid stocks downstream.

  13. Frequent detection of infectious xenotropic murine leukemia virus (XMLV) in human cultures established from mouse xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-An; Maitra, Anirban; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Rudin, Charles M; Peacock, Craig D; Karikari, Collins; Brekken, Rolf A; Stastny, Victor; Gao, Boning; Girard, Luc; Wistuba, Ignacio; Frenkel, Eugene; Minna, John D

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the frequency of xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV) presence in human cell lines established from mouse xenografts and to search for the evidence of horizontal viral spread to other cell lines. Results Six of 23 (26%) mouse DNA free xenograft cultures were strongly positive for MLV and their sequences had greater than 99% homology to known MLV strains. Four of five available supernatant fluids from these viral positive cultures were strongly positive for RT activity. Three of these supernatant fluids were studied to confirm the infectivity of the released virions for other human culture cells. Of the 78 non-xenograft derived cell lines maintained in the xenograft culture-containing facilities, 13 (17%) were positive for MLV, including XMRV, a virus strain first identified in human tissues. By contrast, all 50 cultures maintained in a xenograft culture-free facility were negative for viral sequences. Methodology We examined xenograft tumor cell lines from seven independent laboratories and 128 non-xenografted tumor cell lines. Cell line DNA was examined for mouse DNA contamination, and by 3 Taqman qPCR assays targeting the gag, env or pol regions of MLV. Sequencing was used for viral strain identification. Supernatant fluids were tested for reverse transcriptase (RT) activity. Conclusions Human cultures derived after mouse xenografting frequently contain and release highly infectious xenotropic MLV viruses. Laboratories working with xenograft-derived human cultures should be aware of the risk of contamination with potentially biohazardous human-tropic mouse viruses and their horizontal spread to other cultures. PMID:21750403

  14. Genotypes and phylogeographical relationships of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, G.O.; Bendorf, C.M.; Yun, S.C.; Kurath, G.; Hedrick, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) contains 3 major genogroups in North America with discreet geographic ranges designated as upper (U), middle (M), and lower (L). A comprehensive genotyping of 237 IHNV isolates from hatchery and wild salmonids in California revealed 25 different sequence types (a to y) all in the L genogroup; specifically, the genogroup contained 14 sequence types that were unique to individual isolates as well as 11 sequence types representing 2 or more identical isolates. The most evident trend was the phylogenetic and geographical division of the L genogroup into 2 distinct subgroups designated as LI and LII. Isolates within Subgroup LI were primarily found within waterways linked to southern Oregon and northern California coastal rivers. Isolates in Subgroup LII were concentrated within inland valley watersheds that included the Sacramento River, San Joaquin River, and their tributaries. The temporal and spatial patterns of virus occurrence suggested that infections among adult Chinook salmon in the hatchery or that spawn in the river are a major source of virus potentially infecting other migrating or resident salmonids in California. Serum neutralization results of the California isolates of IHNV corroborated a temporal trend of sequence divergence; specifically, 2 progressive shifts in which more recent virus isolates represent new serotypes. A comparison of the estimates of divergence rates for Subgroup LI (1 ?? ICT5 mutations per nucleotide site per year) indicated stasis similar to that observed in the U genogroup, while the Subgroup LII rate (1 ?? 10 3 mutations per nucleotide site per year) suggested a more active evolution similar to that of the M genogroup. ?? Inter-Research 2007.

  15. Infectious bursal disease virus capsid assembly and maturation by structural rearrangements of a transient molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Luque, Daniel; Saugar, Irene; Rodríguez, José F; Verdaguer, Nuria; Garriga, Damiá; Martín, Carmen San; Velázquez-Muriel, Javier A; Trus, Benes L; Carrascosa, José L; Castón, José R

    2007-07-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus belonging to the Birnaviridae family, is an economically important avian pathogen. The IBDV capsid is based on a single-shelled T=13 lattice, and the only structural subunits are VP2 trimers. During capsid assembly, VP2 is synthesized as a protein precursor, called pVP2, whose 71-residue C-terminal end is proteolytically processed. The conformational flexibility of pVP2 is due to an amphipathic alpha-helix located at its C-terminal end. VP3, the other IBDV major structural protein that accomplishes numerous roles during the viral cycle, acts as a scaffolding protein required for assembly control. Here we address the molecular mechanism that defines the multimeric state of the capsid protein as hexamers or pentamers. We used a combination of three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy maps at or close to subnanometer resolution with atomic models. Our studies suggest that the key polypeptide element, the C-terminal amphipathic alpha-helix, which acts as a transient conformational switch, is bound to the flexible VP2 C-terminal end. In addition, capsid protein oligomerization is also controlled by the progressive trimming of its C-terminal domain. The coordination of these molecular events correlates viral capsid assembly with different conformations of the amphipathic alpha-helix in the precursor capsid, as a five-alpha-helix bundle at the pentamers or an open star-like conformation at the hexamers. These results, reminiscent of the assembly pathway of positive single-stranded RNA viruses, such as nodavirus and tetravirus, add new insights into the evolutionary relationships of dsRNA viruses.

  16. Varicella-Zoster Virus Infectious Cycle: ER Stress, Autophagic Flux, and Amphisome-Mediated Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Grose, Charles; Buckingham, Erin M.; Carpenter, John E.; Kunkel, Jeremy P.

    2016-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) induces abundant autophagy. Of the nine human herpesviruses, the VZV genome is the smallest (~124 kbp), lacking any known inhibitors of autophagy, such as the herpes simplex virus ICP34.5 neurovirulence gene. Therefore, this review assesses the evidence for VZV-induced cellular stress, endoplasmic-reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD), and autophagic flux during the VZV infectious cycle. Even though VZV is difficult to propagate in cell culture, the biosynthesis of the both N- and O-linked viral glycoproteins was found to be abundant. In turn, this biosynthesis provided evidence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, including a greatly enlarged ER and a greatly diminished production of cellular glycoproteins. Other signs of ER stress following VZV infection included detection of the alternatively spliced higher-molecular-weight form of XBP1 as well as CHOP. VZV infection in cultured cells leads to abundant autophagosome production, as was visualized by the detection of the microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II). The degree of autophagy induced by VZV infection is comparable to that induced in uninfected cells by serum starvation. The inhibition of autophagic flux by chemicals such as 3-methyladenine or ATG5 siRNA, followed by diminished virus spread and titers, has been observed. Since the latter observation pointed to the virus assembly/trafficking compartments, we purified VZ virions by ultracentrifugation and examined the virion fraction for components of the autophagy pathway. We detected LC3-II protein (an autophagy marker) as well as Rab11 protein, a component of the endosomal pathway. We also observed that the virion-containing vesicles were single-walled; thus, they are not autophagosomes. These results suggested that some VZ virions after secondary envelopment were transported to the outer cell membrane in a vesicle derived from both the autophagy and endosomal pathways, such as an amphisome. Thus, these

  17. A NON-TRANSMISSIBLE CYTOPATHOGENIC EFFECT OF INFLUENZA VIRUS IN TISSUE CULTURE ACCOMPANIED BY FORMATION OF NON-INFECTIOUS HEMAGGLUTININS

    PubMed Central

    Henle, Gertrude; Girardi, Anthony; Henle, Werner

    1955-01-01

    Various strains of influenza virus produce a cytopathogenic effect in cultures of HeLa cells. The virus could not be passed in series. Virus partially or even completely inactivated with respect to infectivity by exposure to 37°C. or ultraviolet light retained some of its cytopathogenic effect. No evidence has been obtained of an increase in infectious virus in HeLa cultures, but an increase in hemagglutinins and in both viral and soluble complement-fixing antigens became detectable during incubation. These virus materials apparently were not released from these cells prior to their destruction. These results suggested that HeLa cells are capable of supporting an incomplete reproductive cycle of influenza virus. The fact that radioactive phosphorus was readily incorporated into the hemagglutinin supplies strong evidence for this interpretation. PMID:13211925

  18. Influenza Virus Reassortment Is Enhanced by Semi-infectious Particles but Can Be Suppressed by Defective Interfering Particles

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hui; Steel, John; Lowen, Anice C.

    2015-01-01

    A high particle to infectivity ratio is a feature common to many RNA viruses, with ~90–99% of particles unable to initiate a productive infection under low multiplicity conditions. A recent publication by Brooke et al. revealed that, for influenza A virus (IAV), a proportion of these seemingly non-infectious particles are in fact semi-infectious. Semi-infectious (SI) particles deliver an incomplete set of viral genes to the cell, and therefore cannot support a full cycle of replication unless complemented through co-infection. In addition to SI particles, IAV populations often contain defective-interfering (DI) particles, which actively interfere with production of infectious progeny. With the aim of understanding the significance to viral evolution of these incomplete particles, we tested the hypothesis that SI and DI particles promote diversification through reassortment. Our approach combined computational simulations with experimental determination of infection, co-infection and reassortment levels following co-inoculation of cultured cells with two distinct influenza A/Panama/2007/99 (H3N2)-based viruses. Computational results predicted enhanced reassortment at a given % infection or multiplicity of infection with increasing semi-infectious particle content. Comparison of experimental data to the model indicated that the likelihood that a given segment is missing varies among the segments and that most particles fail to deliver ≥1 segment. To verify the prediction that SI particles augment reassortment, we performed co-infections using viruses exposed to low dose UV. As expected, the introduction of semi-infectious particles with UV-induced lesions enhanced reassortment. In contrast to SI particles, inclusion of DI particles in modeled virus populations could not account for observed reassortment outcomes. DI particles were furthermore found experimentally to suppress detectable reassortment, relative to that seen with standard virus stocks, most likely by

  19. Estimation of Parameters Influencing Waterborne Transmission of Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus (IHNV) in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)

    PubMed Central

    Garver, Kyle A; Mahony, Amelia A. M.; Stucchi, Dario; Richard, Jon; Van Woensel, Cecile; Foreman, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how pathogenic organisms spread in the environment is crucial for the management of disease, yet knowledge of propagule dispersal and transmission in aquatic environments is limited. We conducted empirical studies using the aquatic virus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), to quantify infectious dose, shedding capacity, and virus destruction rates in order to better understand the transmission of IHN virus among Atlantic salmon marine net-pen aquaculture. Transmission of virus and subsequent mortality in Atlantic salmon post-smolts was initiated with as low as 10 plaque forming units (pfu) ml−1. Virus shedding from IHNV infected Atlantic salmon was detected before the onset of visible signs of disease with peak shed rates averaging 3.2×107 pfu fish−1 hour−1 one to two days prior to mortality. Once shed into the marine environment, the abundance of free IHNV is modulated by sunlight (UV A and B) and the growth of natural biota present in the seawater. Virus decayed very slowly in sterilized seawater while rates as high as k =  4.37 d−1 were observed in natural seawater. Decay rates were further accelerated when exposed to sunlight with virus infectivity reduced by six orders of magnitude within 3 hours of full sunlight exposure. Coupling the IHNV transmission parameter estimates determined here with physical water circulation models, will increase the understanding of IHNV dispersal and provide accurate geospatial predictions of risk for IHNV transmission from marine salmon sites. PMID:24340016

  20. Estimation of parameters influencing waterborne transmission of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Garver, Kyle A; Mahony, Amelia A M; Stucchi, Dario; Richard, Jon; Van Woensel, Cecile; Foreman, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how pathogenic organisms spread in the environment is crucial for the management of disease, yet knowledge of propagule dispersal and transmission in aquatic environments is limited. We conducted empirical studies using the aquatic virus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), to quantify infectious dose, shedding capacity, and virus destruction rates in order to better understand the transmission of IHN virus among Atlantic salmon marine net-pen aquaculture. Transmission of virus and subsequent mortality in Atlantic salmon post-smolts was initiated with as low as 10 plaque forming units (pfu) ml(-1). Virus shedding from IHNV infected Atlantic salmon was detected before the onset of visible signs of disease with peak shed rates averaging 3.2 × 10(7) pfu fish(-1) hour(-1) one to two days prior to mortality. Once shed into the marine environment, the abundance of free IHNV is modulated by sunlight (UV A and B) and the growth of natural biota present in the seawater. Virus decayed very slowly in sterilized seawater while rates as high as k =  4.37 d(-1) were observed in natural seawater. Decay rates were further accelerated when exposed to sunlight with virus infectivity reduced by six orders of magnitude within 3 hours of full sunlight exposure. Coupling the IHNV transmission parameter estimates determined here with physical water circulation models, will increase the understanding of IHNV dispersal and provide accurate geospatial predictions of risk for IHNV transmission from marine salmon sites.

  1. Comparison of the replication and transmissibility of two infectious laryngotracheitis virus chicken embryo origin vaccines delivered via drinking water.

    PubMed

    Coppo, Mauricio J C; Devlin, Joanne M; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2012-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an acute infectious viral disease that affects chickens, causing respiratory disease, loss of production and mortality in severe cases. Biosecurity measures and administration of attenuated viral vaccine strains are commonly used to prevent ILT. It is notable that most recent ILT outbreaks affecting the intensive poultry industry have been caused by vaccine-related virus strains. The purpose of this study was to characterize and compare viral replication and transmission patterns of two attenuated chicken embryo origin ILT vaccines delivered via the drinking water. Two groups of specific pathogen free chickens were each inoculated with SA-2 ILT or Serva ILT vaccine strains. Unvaccinated birds were then placed in contact with vaccinated birds at regular intervals. Tracheal swabs were collected every 4 days over a period of 60 days and examined for the presence and amount of virus using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction. A rapid increase in viral genome copy numbers was observed shortly after inoculation with SA-2 ILT virus. In contrast, a comparatively delayed virus replication was observed after vaccination with Serva ILT virus. Transmission to in-contact birds occurred soon after exposure to Serva ILT virus but only several days after exposure to SA-2 ILT virus. Results from this study demonstrate in vivo differences between ILT vaccine strains in virus replication and transmission patterns.

  2. A novel variant of the infectious bronchitis virus resulting from recombination events in Italy and Spain.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Ana; Franzo, G; Massi, P; Tosi, G; Blanco, A; Antilles, N; Biarnes, M; Majó, N; Nofrarías, M; Dolz, R; Lelli, D; Sozzi, E; Lavazza, A; Cecchinato, M

    2017-02-01

    Infectious bronchitis is considered to be one of the most devastating diseases in poultry. Control of its spread is typically attempted through biosecurity measures and extensive vaccination. However, the remarkable genetic and antigenic variability of the virus, which originate from both mutations and recombination events, represents an unsolved challenge for this disease. The present study reports on the emergence and spread of recombinant clusters detected in Italy and Spain between 2012 and 2014. A total of 36 Spanish and Italian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) field strains were investigated and genetically characterized using phylogenetic, molecular, recombination and selection pressure analyses of the complete S1 gene. Based on the partial S1 sequencing, 27 IBV strains originating from Spain and nine from Italy were initially classified as being closely related to the Guandong/Xindadi (XDN) genotype. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete S1 gene revealed that the XDN strains formed a homogeneous clade with the Spanish IBV isolates within the QX genotype, whereas there was higher variability within the Italian strains. Recombination analysis determined that these strains belonged to four groups, which originated from independent recombination events between the QX and 793B IBV genotypes. Our data support the hypothesis of two different scenarios: firstly, in Spain, the large and homogeneous clade probably originated from a single offspring of the recombinant founder, which became dominant and spread throughout the country. Secondly, the nine Italian recombinants, which are characterized by three different recombination patterns, probably represent less fitted strains, because they were less viable with respect to their recombinant parents.

  3. Western blot assay using recombinant p26 antigen for detection of equine infectious anemia virus-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, I; Gutierrez, G; Ostlund, E; Barrandeguy, M; Trono, K

    2007-12-01

    We analyzed the performance of a single-band Western blot (WB) test using recombinant p26 (rp26) capsid protein of equine infectious anemia virus. According to the results obtained, the rp26 WB test is a reliable confirmatory diagnostic tool to be used as a complementary test after an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or agar gel immunodiffusion test yielding doubtful results.

  4. Biologically Active Transcripts of Oat Blue Dwarf Virus (OBDV) – the First Infectious Clone of a Marafivirus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Marafiviruses are a small group of phloem-limited, leafhopper-borne viruses closely related to those in the Tymovirus genus. We now report the development of infectious cDNA clones of OBDV – the first such clones of any marafivirus. Prior to clone construction, the reported sequence of the 5’ and ...

  5. Continuous exposure to infectious pancreatic necrosis virus during early life stages of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss(Walbaum)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum) were exposed continuously to infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) at 0, 10, 1,000, or 100,000 pfu/L of water to estimate the effects of chronic IPNV exposure on early life stages. Fish density averaged 35 fish/L or 140 fish/L, with a tank flow rat...

  6. Continuous Exposure to Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus (IPNV) During Early Life Stages of Rainbow Trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum) were exposed continuously to infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) at 0, 10, 1,000, or 10,000 pfu/L of water to estimate the effects of chronic IPNV exposure on early life stages. Fish density averaged 35 fish/L (low) or 140 fish/L (high), and wate...

  7. Retrovirus transduction: segregation of the viral transforming function and the herpes simplex virus tk gene in infectious Friend spleen focus-forming virus thymidine kinase vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Joyner, A L; Bernstein, A

    1983-01-01

    A series of deletions and insertions utilizing the herpesvirus thymidine kinase gene (tk) were constructed in the murine retrovirus Friend spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV). In all cases, the coding region for the SFFV-specific glycoprotein (gp55), which is implicated in erythroleukemic transformation, was left intact. These SFFV-TK and SFFV deletion vectors were analyzed for expression of tk and gp55 after DNA-mediated gene transfer. In addition, virus rescued by cotransfection of these vectors with Moloney murine leukemia virus was analyzed for infectious TK-transducing virus, gp55 expression, and erythroleukemia-inducing ability. The experiments demonstrated that deletions or insertions within the intron for the gp55 env gene can interfere with expression of gp55 after both DNA-mediated gene transfer and virus infection. In contrast, the gene transfer efficiency of the tk gene was unaffected in the SFFV-TK vectors, and high-titer infectious TK virus could be recovered. Revertant viruses capable of inducing erythroleukemia and expressing gp55 were generated after cotransfection of the SFFV-TK vectors with murine leukemia virus. The revertant viruses lost both tk sequences and the ability to transduce TK- fibroblasts to a TK+ phenotype. These experiments demonstrate that segregation of the TK and erythroleukemia functions can occur in retrovirus vectors which initially carry both markers. Images PMID:6318088

  8. Retrovirus transduction: Segregation of the viral transforming function and the Herpes Simplex virus tk gene in infectious friend spleen focus-forming virus thymidine kinase vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Joyner, A.L.; Bernstein, A.

    1983-12-01

    A series of deletions and insertions utilizing the herpesvirus thymidine kinase gene (tk) were constructed in the murine retrovirus Friend spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV). In all cases, the coding region for the SFFV-specific glycoprotein (gp55), which is implicated in erythroleukemic transformation, was left intact. These SFFV-TK and SFFV deletion vectors were analyzed for expression of tk and gp55 after DNA-mediated gene transfer. In addition, virus rescued by cotranfection of these vectors with Moloney murine leukemia virus was analyzed for infectious TK-transducing virus, gp55 expression, and erythroleukemia-inducing ability. The experiments demonstrated that deletions or insertions within the intron for the gp55 env gene can interfere with expression of gp55 after both DNA-mediated gene transfer and virus infection. In contrast, the gene transfer efficiency of the tk gene was unaffected in the SFFV-TK vectors, and high-titer infectious TK virus could be recovered. Revertant viruses capable of inducing erythroleukemia and expressing gp55 were generated after cotranfection of the SFFV-TK vectors with murine leukemia virus. The revertant viruses lost both tk sequences and the ability to transduce TK/sup -/ fibroblasts to a TK/sup +/ phenotype. These experiments demonstrate that segregation of the TK and erythroleukemia functions can occur in retrovirus vectors which initially carry both markers.

  9. INFECTIOUS BOVINE RHINOTRACHEITIS VIRUS REPLICATION, CYTOPATHOLOGY, AND PLAQUE FORMATION IN THE PRESENCE AND ABSENCE OF NUCLEIC ACID ANALOGUES

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Jack G.; Groman, Neal B.

    1964-01-01

    Stevens, Jack G. (University of Washington, Seattle), and Neal B. Groman. Infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus replication, cytopathology, and plaque formation in the presence and absence of nucleic acid analogues. J. Bacteriol. 87:446–453. 1964.—Cytopathology induced by infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) virus was correlated with the one-step growth cycle. Nuclear alterations, including the development of inclusion bodies, preceded the appearance of virus. It was found that similar effects occurred in the presence of 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BUDR) and 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FUDR), compounds which depress the yield of “standard” virus from a range of 116 to 500 to less than 0.5 plaque-forming units per cell. As with known members of the herpesvirus group, IBR virus plaques developed and enlarged indefinitely in the presence of specific antibody. An analysis of the mechanism operative in this process was undertaken. The evidence suggested that neither viral nor subviral particles capable of replicating “standard” virus passed between cells during the first 8 hr of infection. This is the time preceding the release of extracellular virus from initially infected cells. With BUDR and FUDR, it was shown that plaques also developed in this system in the virtual absence of production of “standard” infectious virus. However, a class of analogue-dependent virus was found which may have been at least partly responsible for plaque formation in the analogue-treated system. The relative contributions of subviral particles or of a self-sustaining molecular disorganization to the process have not been completely assessed as yet. Images PMID:14151070

  10. Virulence and serological studies of recombinant infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Lian, G H; Zhao, L L; Wu, Y; Li, Y J; Tang, L J; Qiao, X Y; Jiang, Y P; Liu, M

    2016-07-15

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus is a highly contagious disease of juvenile salmonid species. From the IHNV HLJ-09 isolated in China, two recombinant viruses were generated by reverse genetics using the RNA polymerase II transcription system. The recombinant viruses were confirmed by RT-PCR, indirect immunofluorescence assay and electron microscopy. They were referred to as rIHNV HLJ-09 and rIHNV-EGFP. rIHNV HLJ-09 and rIHNV-EGFP could stably replicate in EPC cell lines and had the same cellular tropism as wtIHNV HLJ-09. But the titer of rIHNV-EGFP was significantly lower than rIHNV HLJ-09 and wtIHNV HLJ-09. rIHNV-EGFP strain could express EGFP stably at least in 20 passages, and the fluorescence could be observed clearly. To assess the virulence and pathogenicity of the recombinant viruses in vivo, juvenile rainbow trout were challenged by intraperitoneal injection with 20μl of rIHNV HLJ-09, rIHNV-EGFP or wtIHNV HLJ-09 (1×10(6)pfuml(-1)). Fish challenged with rIHNV HLJ-09 and wtIHNV HLJ-09 exhibited clinical signs typical of IHN disease and both produced 90% cumulative percent mortality, whlie rIHNV-EGFP produced only 5%. Pathological sectioning results showed that the tissues (liver, kidney, heart muscle, back muscle) of the fish infected with rIHNV HLJ-09 exhibited pathological changes, with the exception of cerebral neurons and the cheek. However, no lesions of liver, kidney, heart, muscle, brain in rainbow trout of rIHNV-EGFP or the control group were observed. Indirect ELISA results showed that a high level of serum antibody was detected in the experimental fish challenged with rIHNV HLJ-09, just as the same as wtIHNV HLJ-09, while a lower titer was detecred in the fish infected with rIHNV-EGFP. This indicated that the recombinant viruses could induce humoral immune response in the experimental fish. The recombinant viruses had unique genetic tags and could be used for genetic engineering, laying new ground for further investigation of IHNV

  11. Chicken infectious anemia virus infection in Israeli commercial flocks: virus amplification, clinical signs, performance, and antibody status.

    PubMed

    Davidson, I; Kedem, M; Borochovitz, H; Kass, N; Ayali, G; Hamzani, E; Perelman, B; Smith, B; Perk, S

    2004-01-01

    The impact of chicken infectious anemia virus (CIAV) infection on commercial chicken flocks in Israel was examined by analyzing flocks with or without typical CIAV signs, signs of other diseases, or apparently healthy flocks. In 23 flocks (broilers and layers) of ages up to 8 wk, typical signs of CIAV infection (stunting, gangrenous dermatitis, and secondary bacterial infections) were recorded. When permitted by flock owners, in several cases among these 23 flocks the morbidity, mortality, and performance parameters were recorded; the presence of CIAV was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR); and the antibody status of parents and broilers was measured. In addition, total mortality, number of birds sold, total kilograms of meat sold, density (kg/m2), mean age at slaughter, daily growth rate in grams, total kilogram of food consumed, food conversion rate, and the European Index were calculated. We also surveyed flocks affected by other diseases, such as tumors, respiratory diseases, or coccidiosis, and flocks with no apparent clinical signs. The latter flocks were negative by CIAV-PCR, indicating that typical CIAV clinical signs are associated with one-step PCR-CIAV amplification. However, a small amount of CIAV might still be present in these flocks, acting to induce the subclinical effects of CIAV infection. These data indicate a link between the presence of virus sequences and typical CIAV signs and strengthen the concept that CIAV infection has a negative economic impact on the chicken industry.

  12. Human Cathelicidin Compensates for the Role of Apolipoproteins in Hepatitis C Virus Infectious Particle Formation

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Basagoiti, Francesc; Fukuhara, Takasuke; Tamura, Tomokazu; Ono, Chikako; Uemura, Kentaro; Kawachi, Yukako; Yamamoto, Satomi; Mori, Hiroyuki; Kurihara, Takeshi; Okamoto, Toru; Aizaki, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Exchangeable apolipoproteins (ApoA, -C, and -E) have been shown to redundantly participate in the formation of infectious hepatitis C virus (HCV) particles during the assembly process, although their precise role in the viral life cycle is not well understood. Recently, it was shown that the exogenous expression of only short sequences containing amphipathic α-helices from various apolipoproteins is sufficient to restore the formation of infectious HCV particles in ApoB and ApoE double-gene-knockout Huh7 (BE-KO) cells. In this study, through the expression of a small library of human secretory proteins containing amphipathic α-helix structures, we identified the human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP), the only known member of the cathelicidin family of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in humans and expressed mainly in bone marrow and leukocytes. We showed that CAMP is able to rescue HCV infectious particle formation in BE-KO cells. In addition, we revealed that the LL-37 domain in CAMP containing amphipathic α-helices is crucial for the compensation of infectivity in BE-KO cells, and the expression of CAMP in nonhepatic 293T cells expressing claudin 1 and microRNA miR-122 confers complete propagation of HCV. These results suggest the possibility of extrahepatic propagation of HCV in cells with low-level or no expression of apolipoproteins but expressing secretory proteins containing amphipathic α-helices such as CAMP. IMPORTANCE Various exchangeable apolipoproteins play a pivotal role in the formation of infectious HCV during the assembly of viral particles, and amphipathic α-helix motifs in the apolipoproteins have been shown to be a key factor. To the best of our knowledge, we have identified for the first time the human cathelicidin CAMP as a cellular protein that can compensate for the role of apolipoproteins in the life cycle of HCV. We have also identified the domain in CAMP that contains amphipathic α-helices crucial for compensation and

  13. Pathogenicity of Genome Reassortant Infectious Bursal Disease Viruses in Chickens and Turkeys.

    PubMed

    Jackwood, Daral J; Stoute, Simone T; Crossley, Beate M

    2016-12-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) contains two genome segments (segment A/segment B) that can reassort among the viruses. Reassortant IBDVs have been identified in several countries including the United States. These reassortant viruses usually include at least one genome segment from a very virulent (vv)IBDV strain. In vivo virulence of six reassortant IBDV from the United States was assessed relative to the virulence of three frequently described IBDV pathotypes: vvIBDV (rB strain), classic virulent (cv)IBDV (STC strain), and subclinical (sc)IBDV (Del-E strain). Morbidity and mortality in 4-wk-old specific-pathogen-free (SPF) leghorns indicated that reassortant IBDV with a vv genome segment A and non-vv segment B were less pathogenic than the vv/vv rB strain but more pathogenic than the cv/cv STC strain. The sc/vv IBDV strain D6337 (sc/vv) was comparable to the STC strain in pathogenicity. Viruses with a serotype 2 (ser2) genome segment A, regardless of the type of genome segment B, did not cause clinical disease in SPF chickens or turkeys. None of the reassorted viruses caused morbidity, mortality, or gross lesions in SPF turkeys. Histopathologic lesions in the bursa of turkeys were not observed in any group except those challenged with the serotype 2 OH strain, which had a mild lymphocytic depletion. No mortality was observed in maternally immune broilers inoculated with any of the IBDV pathotypes at 1, 2, 3, and 4 wk of age. No bursal lesions were observed in any of the broiler chicken groups at 1 wk of age except for the D2712 (ser2/cv)-inoculated birds that had mild lymphocyte depletion. Based on evaluation of bursal lesion scores and IBDV reverse transcriptase-PCR on broilers challenged at 2 wk of age, the K669 (vv/ser2) virus broke through the maternal immunity while the STC, Del-E, rB, D2712 (ser2/cv), and 7741 (vv/cv) viruses did not. All viruses broke through maternal immunity in the broilers at 3 wk of age except the Del-E scIBDV and D2712 (ser2

  14. Genetic manipulation of porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus recovered from a full-length infectious cDNA clone.

    PubMed

    Jengarn, Juggragarn; Wongthida, Phonphimon; Wanasen, Nanchaya; Frantz, Phanramphoei Namprachan; Wanitchang, Asawin; Jongkaewwattana, Anan

    2015-08-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus (PEDV) causes acute diarrhoea and dehydration in swine of all ages, with significant mortality in neonatal pigs. The recent rise of PEDV outbreaks in Asia and North America warrants an urgent search for effective vaccines. However, PEDV vaccine research has been hampered by difficulties in isolating and propagating the virus in mammalian cells, thereby complicating the recovery of infectious PEDV using a full-length infectious clone. Here, we engineered VeroE6 cells to stably express porcine aminopeptidase N (pAPN) and used them as a platform to obtain a high-growth variant of PEDV, termed PEDVAVCT12. Subsequently, the full-length cDNA clone was constructed by assembling contiguous cDNA fragments encompassing the complete genome of PEDVAVCT12 in a bacterial artificial chromosome. Infectious PEDV could be recovered, and the rescued virus displayed phenotypic properties identical to the parental virus. Interestingly, we found that PEDVAVCT12 contained a C-terminal deletion of the spike gene, resulting in disruption of the ORF3 start codon. When a functional ORF3 gene was restored, the recombinant virus could not be rescued, suggesting that ORF3 could suppress PEDV replication in vitro. In addition, a high-growth and genetically stable recombinant PEDV expressing a foreign protein could be rescued by replacing the ORF3 gene with the mCherry gene. Together, the results of this study provide a means to generate genetically defined PEDV as a promising vaccine candidate.

  15. Recovery of duck hepatitis A virus 3 from a stable full-length infectious cDNA clone.

    PubMed

    Pan, Meng; Yang, Xiaorong; Du, Jige; Zhou, Lei; Ge, Xinna; Guo, Xin; Liu, Jinhua; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Hanchun

    2011-09-01

    Recently, duck hepatitis A virus 3 (DHAV-3) with genetically distinct characteristics from DHAV-1 and DHAV-2 was recognized in South Korea and China. In this short communication, we successfully constructed a stable full-length infectious cDNA clone derived from DHAV-3 by solving instability of cloned full-length cDNA in Escherichia coli (E. coli). The cDNA fragments amplified from the genome of DHAV-3 were assembled and inserted into a low-copy-number plasmid. Finally, a full-length cDNA clone containing an engineered SacII site that served as a genetic marker was obtained. The cDNA clone showed stable by serial passages in E. coli when propagated at 25°C under low level of antibiotic selection. BHK-21 cells were transfected with transcribed RNA from the full-length cDNA clone; infectious viral particles were rescued, showing its fatality to 10-day-old duck embryos. The results indicated that the constructed full-length cDNA clone of DHAV-3 is infectious. By various virological assays, our results indicated that the rescued virus exhibited similar biological properties with the parental virus. Animal experiments revealed that the rescued virus retained the high pathogenicity to 1-day-old ducklings and could induce a fatal hepatitis indistinguishable from its parental virus. Our present studies provide a useful tool for future research on genomic functions and molecular pathogenesis of DHAV-3.

  16. Structure-dependent efficacy of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) recombinant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L; Saubi, Narciís; Pagès-Manté, Albert; Castón, José R; Espuña, Enric; Casal, J Ignacio

    2003-07-04

    The immunogenicity and protective capability of several baculovirus-expressed infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV)-derived assemblies as VP2 capsids, VPX tubules and polyprotein (PP)-derived mixed structures, were tested. Four-week-old chickens were immunised subcutaneously with one dose of each particulate antigen. VP2 icosahedral capsids induced the highest neutralising response, followed by PP-derived structures and then VPX tubules. All vaccinated animals were protected when challenged with a very virulent IBDV (vvIBDV) isolate, however the degree of protection is directly correlated with the levels of neutralising antibodies. VP2 capsids elicited stronger protective immunity than tubular structures and 3 micrograms of them were sufficient to confer a total protection comparable to that induced by an inactivated vaccine. Therefore, VP2 capsids represent a suitable candidate recombinant vaccine instead of virus-like particles (VLPs) for IBDV infections. Our results also provide clear evidence that the recombinant IBDV-derived antigens are structure-dependent in order to be efficient as vaccine components.

  17. Structure-dependent efficacy of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) recombinant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L; Saubi, Narcis; Pagès-Manté, Albert; Castón, José R; Espuña, Enric; Casal, J Ignacio

    2003-05-16

    The immunogenicity and protective capability of several baculovirus-expressed infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV)-derived assemblies as VP2 capsids, VPX tubules and polyprotein (PP)-derived mixed structures, were tested. Four-week-old chickens were immunised subcutaneously with one dose of each particulate antigen. VP2 icosahedral capsids induced the highest neutralising response, followed by PP-derived structures and then VPX tubules. All vaccinated animals were protected when challenged with a very virulent IBDV (vvIBDV) isolate, however the degree of protection is directly correlated with the levels of neutralising antibodies. VP2 capsids elicited stronger protective immunity than tubular structures and 3& mgr;g of them were sufficient to confer a total protection comparable to that induced by an inactivated vaccine. Therefore, VP2 capsids represent a suitable candidate recombinant vaccine instead of virus-like particles (VLPs) for IBDV infections. Our results also provide clear evidence that the recombinant IBDV-derived antigens are structure-dependent in order to be efficient as vaccine components.

  18. Identification of Taiwan and China-like recombinant avian infectious bronchitis viruses in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Wen; Huang, Yuan-Pin; Wang, Ching-Ho

    2009-03-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) infections in poultry cause great economic losses to the poultry industry worldwide. The emergence of viral variants complicates disease control. The IBV strains in Taiwan were clustered into two groups, Taiwan group I and Taiwan group II, based on the S1 gene. A variant was previously identified and showed a distinct S1 gene homology with other local strains. This study investigated the 3' 7.3 kb genome of eight Taiwan strains isolated from 1992 to 2007. The genes of interest were directly sequenced. Sequence analyses were performed to detect any recombination event among IBVs. The results demonstrated that all of the examined viruses maintained the typical IBV genome organization as 5'-S-3a-3b-E-M-5a-5b-N-UTR-3'. In the phylogenetic analyses, various genes from one strain were clustered into separate groups. Moreover, frequent recombination events were identified in the Simplot analyses among the Taiwan and China CK/CH/LDL/97I-type strains. Putative crossover sites were located in the S1, S2, 3b, M genes and the intergenic region between the M and 5a genes. All of the recombinants showed chimeric IBV genome arrangements originated from Taiwan and China-like parental strains. Field IBVs in Taiwan undergo genetic recombination and evolution.

  19. Research Studies on the Life Cycle of Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus.

    SciTech Connect

    Ristow, Sandra S.; Arnzen, Jeanene M.; Leong, JoAnn Ching

    1990-11-01

    Seventeen strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) from different geographical regions and from different fish stocks were typed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, indirect fluorescence with 27 monoclonal antibodies against both the G and N proteins of the virus, and by serum neutralization with six monoclonal anti-glycoprotein antibodies. In addition, many other IHNV isolates have been examined. Studying the isolates with the antibodies has shown that a greater amount of variation exists between isolates than was first predicted by the application of the polyacrylamide technique. Isolates within electrophoretic types I-V may be further classified according to their reactions with the monoclonal antibodies in indirect fluorescence. Serum neutralization with selected anti-glycoprotein antibodies in conjunction with fluorescence analysis confirms one of the original findings of Hsu et al. (1986) that two different species in a single facility can be infected with the same isolate. Variation among isolates as measured by reactivity with the monoclonal library appears to be greater within the G protein than within the N protein sequence. 9 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Detection of infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) in Litopenaeus vannamei by ramification amplification assay.

    PubMed

    Teng, Ping-Hua; Lee, Pei-Yu; Lee, Fu-Chun; Chien, Hung-Wen; Chen, Man-Shu; Sung, Ping-Feng; Su, Chen; Ou, Bor-Rung

    2006-12-14

    Infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) is a single-stranded DNA virus that causes developmental and growth abnormalities in Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (also known as Penaeus vannamei). Nucleic acid based methods such as in situ hybridization (ISH) and PCR have been commonly used for IHHNV detection. Ramification amplification (RAM), an isothermal nucleic acid amplification approach, was used in this study to detect IHHNV in L. vannamei. RAM offers many advantages over PCR, including simple procedures and short detection time, and is labor-saving and cost-effective. RAM exponentially amplifies a circular oligonucleotide amplicon (C probe) after a target-specific ligation step through sequential primer extension and strand displacement processes. The conditions of an IHHNV RAM assay were optimized using artificial templates and targets prior to application. Using DNA of IHHNV-infected L. vannamei as targets, results revealed that RAM amplified target DNA with similar sensitivity as PCR. RAM offers competitive levels of speed, simplicity and sensitivity among various pathogen diagnostic methods.

  1. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus virological and genetic surveillance 2000-2012.

    PubMed

    Breyta, Rachel; Brito, Ilana; Kurath, Gael; LaDeau, Shannon

    2017-01-01

    Surveillance records of the acute RNA pathogen of Pacific salmonid fish infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus are combined for the first time to enable landscape-level ecological analyses and modeling. The study area is the freshwater ecosystems of the large Columbia River watershed in the U.S. states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, as well as coastal rivers in Washington and Oregon. The study period is 2000-2012, and records were contributed by all five resource management agencies that operate conservation hatcheries in the study area. Additional records from wild fish were collected from the National Wild Fish Health Survey, operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Survey. After curation and normalization, the data set consists of 6766 records, representing 1146 sample sites and 15 different fish hosts. The virus was found in an average of 12.4% of records, and of these 66.2% also have viral genetic analysis available. This data set is used to conduct univariate ecological and epidemiological analyses and develop a novel hierarchical landscape transmission model for an aquatic pathogen.

  2. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus virological and genetic surveillance 2000–2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breyta, Rachel; Brito, Ilana L.; Kurath, Gael; LaDeau, Shannon L.

    2017-01-01

    Surveillance records of the acute RNA pathogen of Pacific salmonid fish infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus are combined for the first time to enable landscape-level ecological analyses and modeling. The study area is the freshwater ecosystems of the large Columbia River watershed in the U.S. states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, as well as coastal rivers in Washington and Oregon. The study period is 2000–2012, and records were contributed by all five resource management agencies that operate conservation hatcheries in the study area. Additional records from wild fish were collected from the National Wild Fish Health Survey, operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Survey. After curation and normalization, the data set consists of 6766 records, representing 1146 sample sites and 15 different fish hosts. The virus was found in an average of 12.4% of records, and of these 66.2% also have viral genetic analysis available. This data set is used to conduct univariate ecological and epidemiological analyses and develop a novel hierarchical landscape transmission model for an aquatic pathogen.

  3. Differential effects of viroporin inhibitors against feline infectious peritonitis virus serotypes I and II.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Nakano, Kenta; Doki, Tomoyoshi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2015-05-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIP virus: FIPV), a feline coronavirus of the family Coronaviridae, causes a fatal disease called FIP in wild and domestic cat species. The genome of coronaviruses encodes a hydrophobic transmembrane protein, the envelope (E) protein. The E protein possesses ion channel activity. Viral proteins with ion channel activity are collectively termed "viroporins". Hexamethylene amiloride (HMA), a viroporin inhibitor, can inhibit the ion channel activity of the E protein and replication of several coronaviruses. However, it is not clear whether HMA and other viroporin inhibitors affect replication of FIPV. We examined the effect of HMA and other viroporin inhibitors (DIDS [4,4'-disothiocyano-2,2'-stilbenedisulphonic acid] and amantadine) on infection by FIPV serotypes I and II. HMA treatment drastically decreased the titers of FIPV serotype I strains Black and KU-2 in a dose-dependent manner, but it only slightly decreased the titer of FIPV serotype II strain 79-1146. In contrast, DIDS treatment decreased the titer of FIPV serotype II strain 79-1146 in dose-dependent manner, but it only slightly decreased the titers of FIPV serotype I strains Black and KU-2. We investigated whether there is a difference in ion channel activity of the E protein between viral serotypes using E. coli cells expressing the E protein of FIPV serotypes I and II. No difference was observed, suggesting that a viroporin other than the E protein influences the differences in the actions of HMA and DIDS on FIPV serotypes I and II.

  4. Transcriptional regulation of gene expression of infectious salmon anaemia virus segment 7.

    PubMed

    Ramly, Rimatulhana B; Olsen, Christel M; Braaen, Stine; Hansen, Elisabeth F; Rimstad, Espen

    2014-09-22

    The nuclear replication and gene splicing of orthomyxoviruses are unique among RNA viruses. Segment 7 of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) is the only segment that undergoes splicing. Two proteins are encoded by this segment, the non-structural antagonist (ISAV-NS) of the innate immune response that is translated from the unspliced collinear transcript, and a nuclear exporting protein (ISAV-NEP) that is translated from the spliced mRNA. Here we report the transcription profiles for these ISAV proteins. The appearance of the spliced ISAV-NEP mRNA was delayed and the relative amount was less but slowly accumulated to 20-30% to that of the collinear NS mRNA. In cells transfected with segment 7 the ratio between spliced and collinear mRNA was approximately 10%. A highly conserved, possible structured RNA, in the region of the 3' splicing site of the segment is speculated as being important for the regulation of the efficiency of the splicing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of the glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus using neutralizing monoclonal antibodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, Chienjin; Chien, Maw-Sheng; Landolt, Marsha; Winton, James

    1994-01-01

    To study the antigenic nature of the glycoprotein (G protein) of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), 31 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced against a reference isolate of the virus. The MAbs were compared using a neutralization assay, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and by immunoblotting of the G protein in the native, reduced, and deglycosylated forms. Hybridoma culture fluids of the various MAbs could be diluted from 1:2 to 1:512 and still completely neutralize 1 X 104 plaque-forming units of IHNV. Similarly, the end point dilutions that produced optical density readings of 0.1 or greater in the ELISA were 1:40 to 1:10240. Western blotting showed that all of the MAbs reacted with the G protein in the unreduced (i.e. native) conformation; however, only 9 nine of the MAbs were able to react with the G protein following reduction by 2-mercaptoethanol. Deglycosylation of the protein did not influence the binding ability of any of the MAbs. These data indicate that all the MAbs recognized amino acid sequences on the protein itself and that the IHNV glycoprotein contains linear as well as conformation-dependent neutralizing epitopes. When rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss fingerlings were passively immunized with MAbs against either a linear or a conformation-dependent epitope, the fish were protected against challenge with wild-type IHNV.

  6. [Dynamic distribution of the avian infectious bronchitis virus isolate strain Jin-13 in SPF chickens].

    PubMed

    Li, Huan; Yang, Xia; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Zhong-Tian; Chen, Lu; Wang, Xin-Wei; Chang, Hong-Tao; Li, Yong-Tao; Liu, Hong-Ying; Wang, Chuan-Qing

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to understand the dynamic distribution of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) Jin-13 strain in SPF chickens. Ninety-day-old SPF chickens were inoculated with Jin-13, a virulent strain, and dissected at day 1, 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, 28 or 35 post-inoculation (dpi). Samples of heart, liver, spleen, lung, trachea, kidney and duodenum were collected and the N gene was detected by Sybr Green I real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays. The established method had a good linear correlation from 7.77 x 10(8) to 10(0) copies/microL. SPF chickens developed typical clinical signs of IBV at the 4th dpi, and the IBV viral concentration of tissues and organs gradually increased with a peak of up to 7.13 x 10(4) copies/microL. The viral concentration of most organs decreased by the 10th dpi, but those of the kidney, trachea and lung remained positive for IBV at 28 dpi and the heart was still positive for IBV at > 35 dpi. The results of this study, showed that the Jin-13 strain can cause prolonged virus excertion in chickens with severe renal damage.

  7. Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus Specifically Binds to and Hydrolyzes 4-O-Acetylated Sialic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Hellebø, Audny; Vilas, Ulrike; Falk, Knut; Vlasak, Reinhard

    2004-01-01

    Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) is the causative agent of infections in farmed Atlantic salmon. ISAV presumably represents a new genus within the Orthomyxoviridae. ISAV has been shown earlier to exhibit a receptor-destroying activity, which was defined as an acetylesterase with unknown specificity. We have analyzed the substrate specificity of the ISAV esterase in detail. Purified ISAV hydrolyzed free 5-N-acetyl-4-O-acetyl neuraminic acid. In addition, the purified 9-O-acetylated sialic acid derivative was also hydrolyzed, but at lower rates. When we used a glycosidically bound substrate, ISAV was unable to hydrolyze 9-O-acetylated sialic acid, which represents the major substrate for the influenza C virus esterase. ISAV completely de-O-acetylated glycoprotein-bound 5-N-acetyl-4-O-acetyl neuraminic acid. Thus, the enzymatic activity of the hemagglutinin-esterase of ISAV is comparable to that of the sialate-4-O-esterases of murine coronaviruses and related group 2 coronaviruses. In addition, we found that ISAV specifically binds to glycoproteins containing 4-O-acetylated sialic acids. Both the ISAV esterase and recombinant rat coronavirus esterase specific for 4-O-acetylated sialic acids hydrolyzed ISAV receptors on horse and rabbit erythrocytes, indicating that this sialic acid represents a receptor determinant for ISAV. PMID:14990724

  8. Equine infectious anemia virus-infected dendritic cells retain antigen presentation capability

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Julie A.; McGuire, Travis C. . E-mail: mcguiret@vetmed.wsu.edu

    2005-05-10

    To determine if equine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) were susceptible to equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection, ex vivo-generated DC were infected with virus in vitro. EIAV antigen was detected by immunofluorescence 3 days post-infection with maximum antigen being detected on day 4, whereas there was no antigen detected in DC incubated with the same amount of heat-inactivated EIAV. No cytolytic activity was observed after EIAV{sub WSU5} infection of DC. These monocyte-derived DC were more effective than macrophages and B cells in stimulating allogenic T lymphocytes. Both infected macrophages and DC stimulated similar levels of memory CTL responses in mixtures of CD8+ and CD4+ cells as detected with {sup 51}Cr-release assays indicating that EIAV infection of DC did not alter antigen presentation. However, EIAV-infected DC were more effective than infected macrophages when used to stimulate memory CTL in isolated CD8+ cells. The maintenance of antigen processing and presenting function by EIAV-infected DC in vitro suggests that this function is maintained during in vivo infection.

  9. Molecular characterization of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) isolated in Argentina indicates a regional lineage.

    PubMed

    Vera, F; Craig, M I; Olivera, V; Rojas, F; König, G; Pereda, A; Vagnozzi, A

    2015-08-01

    In Argentina, classical vaccines are used to control infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV); however, outbreaks of IBDV are frequently observed. This could be due to failures in the vaccination programs or to the emergence of new strains, which would be able to break through the protection given by vaccines. Hence, genetic characterization of the viruses responsible for the outbreaks that occurred in recent years is crucial for the evaluation of the control programs and the understanding of the epidemiology and evolution of IBDV. In this study, we characterized 51 field samples collected in Argentina (previously identified as IBDV positive) through the analysis of previously identified apomorphic sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of regVP2 showed that 42 samples formed a unique cluster (Argentinean lineage), seven samples were typical classical strains (one of them was a vaccine strain), and two belonged to the very virulent lineage (vvIBDV). Interestingly, when the analysis was performed on the regVP1 sequences, the field samples segregated similarly to regVP2; thus, we observed no evidence of a reassortment event in the Argentinean samples. Amino acid sequence analysis of regVP2 showed a particular pattern of residues in the Argentinean lineage, particularly the presence of T272, P289 and F296, which had not been reported before as signature sequences for any IBDV phenotype. Notably, the residue S254, characteristic of the antigenic variant, was not present in any of the Argentinean samples.

  10. Fish DNA vaccine against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus: efficacy of various routes of immunization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corbeil, Serge; Kurath, Gael; LaPatra, Scott E.

    2000-01-01

    The DNA vaccine, pIHNVw-G, contains the gene for the glycoprotein (G) of the rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a major pathogen of salmon and trout. The relative efficacy of various routes of immunisation with pIHNVw-G was evaluated using 1.8 g rainbow trout fry vaccinated via intramuscular injection, scarification of the skin, intraperitoneal injection, intrabuccal administration, cutaneous particle bombardment using a gene gun, or immersion in water containing DNA vaccine-coated beads. Twenty-seven days after vaccination neutralising antibody titres were determined, and 2 days later groups of vaccinated and control unvaccinated fish were subjected to an IHNV immersion challenge. Results of the virus challenge showed that the intramuscular injection and the gene gun immunisation induced protective immunity in fry, while intraperitoneal injection provided partial protection. Neutralising antibodies were not detected in sera of vaccinated fish regardless of the route of immunisation used, suggesting that cell mediated immunity may be at least partially responsible for the observed protection.

  11. Comparative anti-infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) activity of (-)-pinene: effect on nucleocapsid (N) protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiwei; Wu, Nan; Zu, Yuangang; Fu, Yujie

    2011-01-25

    In the present study, anti-IBV (infectious bronchitis virus) activities of (-)-pinenes were studied by MTT assay, as well as docking and molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. The CC₅₀ values of (-)-α-pinene and (-)-β-pinene were above 10 mM. And the maximum noncytotoxic concentrations (TD₀) of (-)-α-pinene and (-)-β-pinene were determined as 7.88 ± 0.06 and 6.09 ± 0.31 mM, respectively. The two compounds were found to inhibit IBV with an IC₅₀ of 0.98 ± 0.25 and 1.32 ± 0.11 mM. The MTT assay showed that the inhibitions of (-)-pinenes against IBV appear to occur moderately before entering the cell but are much stronger occur after penetration of the virus into the cell. Molecular simulations indicated that (-)-α-pinene and (-)-β-pinene specifically interact with the active site which is located at the N terminus of phosphorylated nucleocapsid (N) protein, with the former being more potent than the latter. The binding energies of them are -36.83 and -35.59 kcal mol-1, respectively. Results presented here may suggest that (-)-α-pinene and (-)-β-pinene possess anti-IBV properties, and therefore are a potential source of anti-IBV ingredients for the pharmaceutical industry.

  12. Epidemiology and genetic characterization of equine infectious anaemia virus strains isolated in Belgium in 2010.

    PubMed

    Caij, A B; Tignon, M

    2014-10-01

    In January 2010, the United Kingdom notified cases of equine infectious anaemia (EIA) in two horses introduced from Belgium. The animals came from one assembly centre in Romania and had transited through Belgium with 16 other horses. Nine of them, bought by a Belgian horse breeder, were investigated in Belgium and revealed one additional EIA-positive animal. Afterwards, the Belgian Federal Agency for the Safety of the Food Chain (FASFC) organized a serological EIA survey of the horses introduced into Belgium from Romania between 2007 and 2009. Among the 95 horses identified, six additional serological positive cases were found that had been introduced into Belgium in 2008 (n = 4) and in 2009 (n = 2). The survey was extended to the horses in contact with the positive cases, but all contact animals were negative, indicating the absence of transmission. Virological examination performed on tissue samples collected from two seropositive animals demonstrated the presence of viral DNA of EIA virus. Phylogenetic analysis based on the sequences of EIA virus gag gene clustered the Belgian isolates with Romanian strains isolated in 2009. The presumption of a common Belgian origin could be rejected. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Characterization of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Integration in the Horse Genome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Wang, Xue-Feng; Ma, Jian; He, Xi-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2015-06-19

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 has a unique integration profile in the human genome relative to murine and avian retroviruses. Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is another well-studied lentivirus that can also be used as a promising retro-transfection vector, but its integration into its native host has not been characterized. In this study, we mapped 477 integration sites of the EIAV strain EIAVFDDV13 in fetal equine dermal (FED) cells during in vitro infection. Published integration sites of EIAV and HIV-1 in the human genome were also analyzed as references. Our results demonstrated that EIAVFDDV13 tended to integrate into genes and AT-rich regions, and it avoided integrating into transcription start sites (TSS), which is consistent with EIAV and HIV-1 integration in the human genome. Notably, the integration of EIAVFDDV13 favored long interspersed elements (LINEs) and DNA transposons in the horse genome, whereas the integration of HIV-1 favored short interspersed elements (SINEs) in the human genome. The chromosomal environment near LINEs or DNA transposons potentially influences viral transcription and may be related to the unique EIAV latency states in equids. The data on EIAV integration in its natural host will facilitate studies on lentiviral infection and lentivirus-based therapeutic vectors.

  14. Long terminal repeat sequences from virulent and attenuated equine infectious anemia virus demonstrate distinct promoter activities.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tao; Yuan, Xiu-Fang; Hou, Shao-Hua; Tu, Ya-Bin; Peng, Jin-Mei; Wen, Jian-Xin; Qiu, Hua-Ji; Wu, Dong-Lai; Chen, Huan-Chun; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Tong, Guang-Zhi

    2007-09-01

    In the early 1970s, the Chinese Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) vaccine, EIAV(DLA), was developed through successive passages of a wild-type virulent virus (EIAV(L)) in donkeys in vivo and then in donkey macrophages in vitro. EIAV attenuation and cell tropism adaptation are associated with changes in both envelope and long terminal repeat (LTR). However, specific LTR changes during Chinese EIAV attenuation have not been demonstrated. In this study, we compared LTR sequences from both virulent and attenuated EIAV strains and documented the diversities of LTR sequence from in vivo and in vitro infections. We found that EIAV LTRs of virulent strains were homologous, while EIAV vaccine have variable LTRs. Interestingly, experimental inoculation of EIAV(DLA) into a horse resulted in a restriction of the LTR variation. Furthermore, LTRs from EIAV(DLA) showed higher Tat transactivated activity than LTRs from virulent strains. By using chimeric clones of wild-type LTR and vaccine LTR, the main difference of activity was mapped to the changes of R region, rather than U3 region.

  15. The infectious particle of insect-borne totivirus-like Omono River virus has raised ridges and lacks fibre complexes

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Kenta; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Larsson, Daniel S. D.; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Svenda, Martin; Mühlig, Kerstin; Maia, Filipe R. N. C.; Gunn, Laura H.; Isawa, Haruhiko; Kobayashi, Mutsuo; Sawabe, Kyoko; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Hajdu, Janos

    2016-01-01

    Omono River virus (OmRV) is a double-stranded RNA virus isolated from Culex mosquitos, and it belongs to a group of unassigned insect viruses that appear to be related to Totiviridae. This paper describes electron cryo-microscopy (cryoEM) structures for the intact OmRV virion to 8.9 Å resolution and the structure of the empty virus-like-particle, that lacks RNA, to 8.3 Å resolution. The icosahedral capsid contains 120-subunits and resembles another closely related arthropod-borne totivirus-like virus, the infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV) from shrimps. Both viruses have an elevated plateau around their icosahedral 5-fold axes, surrounded by a deep canyon. Sequence and structural analysis suggests that this plateau region is mainly composed of the extended C-terminal region of the capsid proteins. In contrast to IMNV, the infectious form of OmRV lacks extensive fibre complexes at its 5-fold axes as directly confirmed by a contrast-enhancement technique, using Zernike phase-contrast cryo-EM. Instead, these fibre complexes are replaced by a short “plug” structure at the five-fold axes of OmRV. OmRV and IMNV have acquired an extracellular phase, and the structures at the five-fold axes may be significant in adaptation to cell-to-cell transmission in metazoan hosts. PMID:27616740

  16. Infection with some infectious bursal disease virus pathotypes produces virus in chicken muscle tissue and the role of humoral immunity as a mitigation strategy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) causes important economic losses to the chicken industries worldwide and impacts chicken meat trade in countries with self-declared freedom. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and titers of IBDV in primary lymphoid tissues and meat of infecte...

  17. Genotyping and pathotyping of diversified strains of infectious bronchitis viruses circulating in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Zanaty, Ali; Arafa, Abdel-Satar; Hagag, Naglaa; El-Kady, Magdy

    2016-01-01

    AIM To characterize the circulating infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) strains in Egypt depending on the sequence of the spike-1 (S1) gene [hypervariable region-3 (HVR-3)] and to study the pathotypic features of these strains. METHODS In this work, twenty flocks were sampled for IBV detection using RRT-PCR and isolation of IBV in specific pathogen free (SPF) chicks during the period from 2010 to 2015. Partial sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of 400 bp representing the HVR-3 of the S1 gene was conducted. Pathotypic characterization of one selected virus from each group (Egy/Var-I, Egy/Var-II and classic) was evaluated in one day old SPF chicks. The chicks were divided into 4 groups 10 birds each including the negative control group. Birds were inoculated at one day by intranasal instillation of 105EID50/100 μL of IBV viruses [IBV-EG/1212B-2012 (Egy/Var-II), IBV/EG/IBV1-2011 (Egy/Var-I) and IBV-EG/11539F-2011 (classic)], while the remaining negative control group was kept uninfected. The birds were observed for clinical signs, gross lesions and virus pathogenicity. The real-time rRT-PCR test was performed for virus detection in the tissues. Histopathological examinations were evaluated in both trachea and kidneys. RESULTS The results revealed that these viruses were separated into two distinct groups; variant (GI-23) and classic (GI-1), where 16 viruses belonged to a variant group, including 2 subdivisions [Egy/Var-I (6 isolates) and Egy/Var-II (10 isolates)] and 4 viruses clustered to the classic group (Mass-like). IBV isolates in the variant group were grouped with other IBV strains from the Middle East. The variant subgroup (Egy/Var-I) was likely resembling the original Egyptian variant strain (Egypt/Beni-Suif/01) and the Israeli strain (IS/1494/2006). The second subgroup (Egy/Var-II) included the viruses circulating in the Middle East (Ck/EG/BSU-2 and Ck/EG/BSU-3/2011) and the Israeli strain (IS/885/00). The two variant subgroups (Egy/Var-I and Egy

  18. Genetic diversity and epidemiology of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Emmenegger, E J; Meyers, T R; Burton, T O; Kurath, G

    2000-04-20

    Forty-two infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) isolates from Alaska were analyzed using the ribonuclease protection assay (RPA) and nucleotide sequencing. RPA analyses, utilizing 4 probes, N5, N3 (N gene), GF (G gene), and NV (NV gene), determined that the haplotypes of all 3 genes demonstrated a consistent spatial pattern. Virus isolates belonging to the most common haplotype groups were distributed throughout Alaska, whereas isolates in small haplotype groups were obtained from only 1 site (hatchery, lake, etc.). The temporal pattern of the GF haplotypes suggested a 'genetic acclimation' of the G gene, possibly due to positive selection on the glycoprotein. A pairwise comparison of the sequence data determined that the maximum nucleotide diversity of the isolates was 2.75% (10 mismatches) for the NV gene, and 1.99% (6 mismatches) for a 301 base pair region of the G gene, indicating that the genetic diversity of IHNV within Alaska is notably lower than in the more southern portions of the IHNV North American range. Phylogenetic analysis of representative Alaskan sequences and sequences of 12 previously characterized IHNV strains from Washington, Oregon, Idaho, California (USA) and British Columbia (Canada) distinguished the isolates into clusters that correlated with geographic origin and indicated that the Alaskan and British Columbia isolates may have a common viral ancestral lineage. Comparisons of multiple isolates from the same site provided epidemiological insights into viral transmission patterns and indicated that viral evolution, viral introduction, and genetic stasis were the mechanisms involved with IHN virus population dynamics in Alaska. The examples of genetic stasis and the overall low sequence heterogeneity of the Alaskan isolates suggested that they are evolutionarily constrained. This study establishes a baseline of genetic fingerprint patterns and sequence groups representing the genetic diversity of Alaskan IHNV isolates. This

  19. Detection and phylogenetic analysis of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus in Chile.

    PubMed

    Tapia, D; Eissler, Y; Torres, P; Jorquera, E; Espinoza, J C; Kuznar, J

    2015-10-27

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) is the etiological agent of a highly contagious disease that is endemic to salmon farming in Chile and causes great economic losses to the industry. Here we compared different diagnostic methods to detect IPNV in field samples, including 3 real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) assays, cell culture isolation, and indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT). Additionally, we performed a phylogenetic analysis to investigate the genogroups prevailing in Chile, as well as their geographic distribution and virulence. The 3 qRT-PCR assays used primers that targeted regions of the VP2 and VP1 genes of the virus and were tested in 46 samples, presenting a fair agreement within their results. All samples were positive for at least 2 of the qRT-PCR assays, 29 were positive for cell culture, and 23 for IFAT, showing less sensitivity for these latter 2 methods. For the phylogenetic analysis, portions of 1180 and 523 bp of the VP2 region of segment A were amplified by RT-PCR, sequenced and compared with sequences from reference strains and from isolates reported by previous studies carried out in Chile. Most of the sequenced isolates belonged to genogroup 5 (European origin), and 5 were classified within genogroup 1 (American origin). Chilean isolates formed clusters within each of the genogroups found, evidencing a clear differentiation from the reference strains. To our knowledge, this is the most extensive study completed for IPNV in Chile, covering isolates from sea- and freshwater salmon farms and showing a high prevalence of this virus in the country.

  20. Genetic characterization of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus of coastal salmonid stocks in Washington State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, E.J.; Kurath, G.

    2002-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a pathogen that infects many Pacific salmonid stocks from the watersheds of North America. Previous studies have thoroughly characterized the genetic diversity of IHNV isolates from Alaska and the Hagerman Valley in Idaho. To enhance understanding of the evolution and viral transmission patterns of IHNV within the Pacific Northwest geographic range, we analyzed the G gene of IHNV isolates from the coastal watersheds of Washington State by ribonuclease protection assay (RPA) and nucleotide sequencing. The RPA analysis of 23 isolates indicated that the Skagit basin IHNV isolates were relatively homogeneous as a result of the dominance of one G gene haplotype (S). Sequence analysis of 303 bases in the middle of the G gene (midG region) of 61 isolates confirmed the high frequency of a Skagit River basin sequence and identified another sequence commonly found in isolates from the Lake Washington basin. Overall, both the RPA and sequence analysis showed that the Washington coastal IHNV isolates are genetically homogeneous and have little genetic diversity. This is similar to the genetic diversity pattern of IHNV from Alaska and contrasts sharply with the high genetic diversity demonstrated for IHNV isolates from fish farms along the Snake River in Idaho. The high degree of sequence and haplotype similarity between the Washington coastal IHNV isolates and those from Alaska and British Columbia suggests that they have a common viral ancestor. Phylogenetic analyses of the isolates we studied and those from different regions throughout the virus's geographic range confirms a conserved pattern of evolution of the virus in salmonid stocks north of the Columbia River, which forms Washington's southern border.

  1. Envelope protein requirements for the assembly of infectious virions of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Wissink, E H J; Kroese, M V; van Wijk, H A R; Rijsewijk, F A M; Meulenberg, J J M; Rottier, P J M

    2005-10-01

    Virions of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) contain six membrane proteins: the major proteins GP5 and M and the minor proteins GP2a, E, GP3, and GP4. Here, we studied the envelope protein requirements for PRRSV particle formation and infectivity using full-length cDNA clones in which the genes encoding the membrane proteins were disrupted by site-directed mutagenesis. By transfection of RNAs transcribed from these cDNAs into BHK-21 cells and analysis of the culture medium using ultracentrifugation, radioimmunoprecipitation, and real-time reverse transcription-PCR, we observed that the production of viral particles is dependent on both major envelope proteins; no particles were released when either the GP5 or the M protein was absent. In contrast, particle production was not dependent on the minor envelope proteins. Remarkably, in the absence of any one of the latter proteins, the incorporation of all other minor envelope proteins was affected, indicating that these proteins interact with each other and are assembled into virions as a multimeric complex. Independent evidence for such complexes was obtained by coexpression of the minor envelope proteins in BHK-21 cells using a Semliki Forest virus expression system. By analyzing the maturation of their N-linked oligosaccharides, we found that the glycoproteins were each retained in the endoplasmic reticulum unless expressed together, in which case they were collectively transported through the Golgi complex to the plasma membrane and were even detected in the extracellular medium. As the PRRSV particles lacking the minor envelope proteins are not infectious, we hypothesize that the virion surface structures formed by these proteins function in viral entry by mediating receptor binding and/or virus-cell fusion.

  2. Both Genome Segments Contribute to the Pathogenicity of Very Virulent Infectious Bursal Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Escaffre, Olivier; Le Nouën, Cyril; Amelot, Michel; Ambroggio, Xavier; Ogden, Kristen M.; Guionie, Olivier; Toquin, Didier; Müller, Hermann; Islam, Mohammed R.

    2013-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) causes an economically significant disease of chickens worldwide. Very virulent IBDV (vvIBDV) strains have emerged and induce as much as 60% mortality. The molecular basis for vvIBDV pathogenicity is not understood, and the relative contributions of the two genome segments, A and B, to this phenomenon are not known. Isolate 94432 has been shown previously to be genetically related to vvIBDVs but exhibits atypical antigenicity and does not cause mortality. Here the full-length genome of 94432 was determined, and a reverse genetics system was established. The molecular clone was rescued and exhibited the same antigenicity and reduced pathogenicity as isolate 94432. Genetically modified viruses derived from 94432, whose vvIBDV consensus nucleotide sequence was restored in segment A and/or B, were produced, and their pathogenicity was assessed in specific-pathogen-free chickens. We found that a valine (position 321) that modifies the most exposed part of the capsid protein VP2 critically modified the antigenicity and partially reduced the pathogenicity of 94432. However, a threonine (position 276) located in the finger domain of the virus polymerase (VP1) contributed even more significantly to attenuation. This threonine is partially exposed in a hydrophobic groove on the VP1 surface, suggesting possible interactions between VP1 and another, as yet unidentified molecule at this amino acid position. The restored vvIBDV-like pathogenicity was associated with increased replication and lesions in the thymus and spleen. These results demonstrate that both genome segments influence vvIBDV pathogenicity and may provide new targets for the attenuation of vvIBDVs. PMID:23269788

  3. Mapping the neutralizing epitopes on the glycoprotein of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus, a fish rhabdovirus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, C.; Chien, M.S.; Landolt, M.L.; Batts, W.; Winton, J.

    1996-01-01

    Twelve neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the fish rhabdovirus, infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), were used to select 20 MAb escape mutants. The nucleotide sequence of the entire glycoprotein (G) gene was determined for six mutants representing differing cross-neutralization patterns and each had a single nucleotide change leading to a single amino acid substitution within one of three regions of the protein. These data were used to design nested PCR primers to amplify portions of the G gene of the 14 remaining mutants. When the PCR products from these mutants were sequenced, they also had single nucleotide substitutions coding for amino acid substitutions at the same, or nearby, locations. Of the 20 mutants for which all or part of the glycoprotein gene was sequenced, two MAbs selected mutants with substitutions at amino acids 230-231 (antigenic site I) and the remaining MAbs selected mutants with substitutions at amino acids 272-276 (antigenic site II). Two MAbs that selected mutants mapping to amino acids 272-276, selected other mutants that mapped to amino acids 78-81, raising the possibility that this portion of the N terminus of the protein was part of a discontinuous epitope defining antigenic site II. CLUSTAL alignment of the glycoproteins of rabies virus, vesicular stomatitis virus and IHNV revealed similarities in the location of the neutralizing epitopes and a high degree of conservation among cysteine residues, indicating that the glycoproteins of three different genera of animal rhabdoviruses may share a similar three-dimensional structure in spite of extensive sequence divergence.

  4. Genetic diversity and epidemiology of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, E.G; Meyers, T.R.; Burton, T.O.; Kurath, G.

    2000-01-01

    Forty-two infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) isolates from Alaska were analyzed using the ribonuclease protection assay (RPA) and nucleotide sequencing. RPA analyses, utilizing 4 probes, N5, N3 (N gene), GF (G gene), and NV (NV gene), determined that the haplotypes of all 3 genes demonstrated a consistent spatial pattern. Virus isolates belonging to the most common haplotype groups were distributed throughout Alaska, whereas isolates in small haplotype groups were obtained from only 1 site (hatchery, lake, etc.). The temporal pattern of the GF haplotypes suggested a 'genetic acclimation' of the G gene, possibly due to positive selection on the glycoprotein. A pairwise comparison of the sequence data determined that the maximum nucleotide diversity of the isolates was 2.75% (10 mismatches) for the NV gene, and 1.99% (6 mismatches) for a 301 base pair region of the G gene, indicating that the genetic diversity of IHNV within Alaska is notably lower than in the more southern portions of the IHNV North American range. Phylogenetic analysis of representative Alaskan sequences and sequences of 12 previously characterized IHNV strains from Washington, Oregon, Idaho, California (USA) and British Columbia (Canada) distinguished the isolates into clusters that correlated with geographic origin and indicated that the Alaskan and British Columbia isolates may have a common viral ancestral lineage. Comparisons of multiple isolates from the same site provided epidemiological insights into viral transmission patterns and indicated that viral evolution, viral introduction, and genetic stasis were the mechanisms involved with IHN virus population dynamics in Alaska. The examples of genetic stasis and the overall low sequence heterogeneity of the Alaskan isolates suggested that they are evolutionarily constrained. This study establishes a baseline of genetic fingerprint patterns and sequence groups representing the genetic diversity of Alaskan IHNV isolates. This

  5. Inhibitory Effect of a Nucleotide Analog on Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus Infection ▿

    PubMed Central

    Rivas-Aravena, Andrea; Vallejos-Vidal, Eva; Cortez-San Martin, Marcelo; Reyes-Lopez, Felipe; Tello, Mario; Mora, Patricia; Sandino, Ana María; Spencer, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    The infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV), which belongs to the Orthomyxoviridae family, has been responsible for major losses in the salmon industry, with mortalities close to 100% in areas where Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) is grown. This work studied the effect of ribavirin (1-β-d-ribofuranosyl-1,2,3-triazole-3-carbaxaide), a broad-spectrum antiviral compound with proven ability to inhibit the replicative cycle of the DNA and RNA viruses. The results show that ribavirin was able to inhibit the infectivity of ISAV in in vitro assays. In these assays, a significant inhibition of the replicative viral cycle was observed with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.02 μg/ml and an IC90 of 0.4 μg/ml of ribavirin. After ribavirin treatment, viral proteins were not detectable and a reduction of viral mRNA association with ribosomes was observed. Ribavirin does not affect the levels of EF1a, nor its association with polysomes, suggesting that the inhibition of RNA synthesis occurs specifically for the virus mRNAs and not for cellular mRNAs. Moreover, ribavirin caused a significant reduction in genomic and viral RNA messenger levels. The study of the inhibitory mechanism showed that it was not reversed by the addition of guanosine. Furthermore, in vivo assays showed a reduction in the mortality of Salmo salar by more than 90% in fish infected with ISAV and treated with ribavirin without adverse effects. In fact, these results show that ribavirin is an antiviral that could be used to prevent ISAV replication either in vitro or in vivo. PMID:21653663

  6. Covalent conjugation of the equine infectious anemia virus Gag with SUMO.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinzhong; Wen, Shuping; Zhao, Rui; Qi, Jing; Liu, Zhao; Li, Weiwei; An, Jing; Wood, Charles; Wang, Ying

    2017-05-06

    The conjugation of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) to the target protein, namely, SUMOylation, is involved in the regulation of many important biological events including host-pathogen interaction. Some viruses have evolved to exploit the host SUMOylation machinery to modify their own protein. Retroviral Gag protein plays critical roles in the viral life cycle. The HIV-1 p6 and the Moloney murine leukemia virus CA have been reported to be conjugated with SUMO. In this study, we report for the first time, to our knowledge, the covalent conjugation of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) Gag with SUMO. The C-terminal p9 domain of Gag is a main target for SUMOylation and SUMO is attached to multiple sites of p9, including K30 whose mutation abolished p9 SUMOylation completely. The SUMOylation of p9, but not the p9-K30 mutant, was also detected in equine fibroblastic cells ATCC(®) CCL-57™. Ubc9 and its C93 residue are indispensable for the SUMOylation of p9. Using confocal microscopy, it is found that EIAV Gag localizes primarily, if not exclusively, in the cytoplasm of the cell and the co-localization of EIAV Gag with Ubc9 was observed. Our findings that EIAV Gag is SUMOylated at p9-K30, together with previous findings on the defects of p9-K30 mutant in viral DNA translocation from cytoplasm to the nucleus, suggests that SUMOylation of Gag may be involved in such functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An Infectious cDNA Clone of Zika Virus to Study Viral Virulence, Mosquito Transmission, and Antiviral Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shan, Chao; Xie, Xuping; Muruato, Antonio E; Rossi, Shannan L; Roundy, Christopher M; Azar, Sasha R; Yang, Yujiao; Tesh, Robert B; Bourne, Nigel; Barrett, Alan D; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2016-06-08

    The Asian lineage of Zika virus (ZIKV) has recently caused epidemics and severe disease. Unraveling the mechanisms causing increased viral transmissibility and disease severity requires experimental systems. We report an infectious cDNA clone of ZIKV that was generated using a clinical isolate of the Asian lineage. The cDNA clone-derived RNA is infectious in cells, generating recombinant ZIKV. The recombinant virus is virulent in established ZIKV mouse models, leading to neurological signs relevant to human disease. Additionally, recombinant ZIKV is infectious for Aedes aegypti and thus provides a means to examine virus transmission. The infectious cDNA clone was further used to generate a luciferase ZIKV that exhibited sensitivity to a panflavivirus inhibitor, highlighting its potential utility for antiviral screening. This ZIKV reverse genetic system, together with mouse and mosquito infection models, may help identify viral determinants of human virulence and mosquito transmission as well as inform vaccine and therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A dual infection of infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) virus and a togavirus-like virus in ISA of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar in New Brunswick, Canada.

    PubMed

    Kibenge, F S; Whyte, S K; Hammell, K L; Rainnie, D; Kibenge, M T; Martin, C K

    2000-08-10

    Two viruses, infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) virus and a novel togavirus-like virus, were isolated from ISA disease outbreaks that were first reported as a new syndrome, haemorrhagic kidney syndrome (HKS) affecting farmed Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. on the East coast of Canada. Laboratory confirmation of ISA diagnosis was initially complicated by isolation of only the togavirus-like agent using the CHSE-214 cell line. Here we demonstrate that a clinical sample from a disease outbreak of ISA contained a mixture of ISA virus and togavirus-like virus. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirmed the presence of both viruses during serial passage of cultures in SHK-1 and CHSE-214 cells. Virus harvested at passage level 3 in both cell lines caused high mortalities and severe gross pathology consistent with ISA virus infection in experimentally inoculated Atlantic salmon parr (approximately 35 g) in freshwater, beginning 12 d post inoculation. ISA virus was detected by virus isolation from kidney and liver tissues of all dead or moribund fish tested. A comparison of virus isolation, 1-step procedure RT-PCR and RNA dot-blot hybridization for detection of ISA virus (ISAV) in fish tissues showed virus isolation to have 100% sensitivity, followed by RT-PCR (66 and 28% sensitivity in kidney and liver, respectively), with RNA dot-blot hybridization as the least sensitive method (20 and 10% sensitivity in kidney and liver, respectively). No togavirus-like virus was detected in these samples by virus isolation. Moreover, another togavirus-like virus isolate grown in CHSE-214 cells in the absence of any other detectable pathogen was non-pathogenic in experimentally inoculated fish. This study confirms that the original ISA outbreaks in New Brunswick, Canada, were caused solely by ISAV.

  9. Insights into vaccine development for acquired immune deficiency syndrome from crystal structures of human immunodeficiency virus-1 gp41 and equine infectious anemia virus gp45.

    PubMed

    Duan, Liangwei; Du, Jiansen; Liu, Xinqi

    2015-10-01

    An effective vaccine against acquired immune deficiency syndrome is still unavailable after dozens of years of striving. The glycoprotein gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus is a good candidate as potential immunogen because of its conservation and relatively low glycosylation. As a reference of human immunodeficiency virus gp41, gp45 from equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) could be used for comparison because both wild-type and vaccine strain of EIAV have been extensively studied. From structural studies of these proteins, the conformational changes during viral invasion could be unveiled, and a more effective acquired immune deficiency syndrome vaccine immunogen might be designed based on this information.

  10. Experimental co-infection of SPF chickens with low pathogenicity avian influenza virus (LPAIV) subtypes H9N2, H5N2 and H7N9, and infectious bronchitis virus (IBV)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) and infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) are two of the most important respiratory viruses affecting poultry worldwide, but little is known about the effect of co-infection of these two viruses in poultry. Low pathogenicity (LP) AIV can produce from mild to moderate upper r...

  11. A novel phosphoserine motif in the LCMV matrix protein Z regulates the release of infectious virus and defective interfering particles.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Christopher M; Eisenhauer, Philip; Bruce, Emily A; Beganovic, Vedran; King, Benjamin R; Weir, Marion E; Ballif, Bryan A; Botten, Jason

    2016-09-01

    We report that the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) matrix protein, which drives viral budding, is phosphorylated at serine 41 (S41). A recombinant (r)LCMV bearing a phosphomimetic mutation (S41D) was impaired in infectious and defective interfering (DI) particle release, while a non-phosphorylatable mutant (S41A) was not. The S41D mutant was disproportionately impaired in its ability to release DI particles relative to infectious particles. Thus, DI particle production by LCMV may be dynamically regulated via phosphorylation of S41.

  12. Recombinant infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) H120 vaccine strain expressing the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) protects chickens against IBV and NDV challenge.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Zhou, Yingshun; Li, Jianan; Fu, Li; Ji, Gaosheng; Zeng, Fanya; Zhou, Long; Gao, Wenqian; Wang, Hongning

    2016-05-01

    Infectious bronchitis (IB) and Newcastle disease (ND) are common viral diseases of chickens, which are caused by infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV), respectively. Vaccination with live attenuated strains of IBV-H120 and NDV-LaSota are important for the control of IB and ND. However, conventional live attenuated vaccines are expensive and result in the inability to differentiate between infected and vaccinated chickens. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new efficacious vaccines. In this study, using a previously established reverse genetics system, we generated a recombinant IBV virus based on the IBV H120 vaccine strain expressing the haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of NDV. The recombinant virus, R-H120-HN/5a, exhibited growth dynamics, pathogenicity and viral titers that were similar to those of the parental IBV H120, but it had acquired hemagglutination activity from NDV. Vaccination of SPF chickens with the R-H120-HN/5a virus induced a humoral response at a level comparable to that of the LaSota/H120 commercial bivalent vaccine and provided significant protection against challenge with virulent IBV and NDV. In summary, the results of this study indicate that the IBV H120 strain could serve as an effective tool for designing vaccines against IB and other infectious diseases, and the generation of IBV R-H120-HN/5a provides a solid foundation for the development of an effective bivalent vaccine against IBV and NDV.

  13. Virus-like particles of hepatitis B virus core protein containing five mimotopes of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) protect chickens against IBDV.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-shan; Ouyang, Wei; Liu, Xiao-juan; He, Kong-wang; Yu, Sheng-qing; Zhang, Hai-bin; Fan, Hong-jie; Lu, Cheng-ping

    2012-03-09

    Current infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) vaccines suffer from maternal antibody interference and mimotope vaccines might be an alternative. Previously we demonstrated an IBDV VP2 five-mimotope polypeptide, 5EPIS, elicited protective immunity in chickens. In the current study, the 5epis gene was inserted into a plasmid carrying human hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc) gene at its major immunodominant region site. The recombinant gene was efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli to produce chimeric protein HBc-5EPIS which self-assembles to virus-like particles (VLP). Two-week old specific-pathogen-free chickens were immunized intramuscularly with HBc-5EPIS VLP or 5EPIS polypeptide without adjuvant (50 μg/injection) on day 0, 7, 14 and 21. Anti-5EPIS antibody was first detected on day 7 and day 21 in HBc-5EPIS and 5EPIS groups, respectively; on day 28, anti-5EPIS titers reached 12,800 or 1600 by ELISA, and 3200 or 800 by virus neutralization assay in HBc-5EPIS and 5EPIS groups, respectively. No anti-5EPIS antibody was detected in the buffer control group throughout the experiment. Challenge on day 28 with a virulent IBDV strain (GX8/99) resulted in 100%, 40.0% and 26.7% survival for chickens immunized with HBc-5EPIS, 5EPIS and buffer, respectively. These data suggest epitope presentation on chimeric VLP is a promising approach for improving mimotope vaccines for IBDV.

  14. Genetic variation underlying resistance to infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in a steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brieuc, Marine S. O.; Purcell, Maureen K.; Palmer, Alexander D.; Naish, Kerry A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of host resistance to pathogens will allow insights into the response of wild populations to the emergence of new pathogens. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is endemic to the Pacific Northwest and infectious to Pacific salmon and trout (Oncorhynchus spp.). Emergence of the M genogroup of IHNV in steelhead trout O. mykiss in the coastal streams of Washington State, between 2007 and 2011, was geographically heterogeneous. Differences in host resistance due to genetic change were hypothesized to be a factor influencing the IHNV emergence patterns. For example, juvenile steelhead trout losses at the Quinault National Fish Hatchery (QNFH) were much lower than those at a nearby facility that cultures a stock originally derived from the same source population. Using a classical quantitative genetic approach, we determined the potential for the QNFH steelhead trout population to respond to selection caused by the pathogen, by estimating the heritability for 2 traits indicative of IHNV resistance, mortality (h2 = 0.377 (0.226 - 0.550)) and days to death (h2 = 0.093 (0.018 - 0.203)). These results confirm that there is a genetic basis for resistance and that this population has the potential to adapt to IHNV. Additionally, genetic correlation between days to death and fish length suggests a correlated response in these traits to selection. Reduction of genetic variation, as well as the presence or absence of resistant alleles, could affect the ability of populations to adapt to the pathogen. Identification of the genetic basis for IHNV resistance could allow the assessment of the susceptibility of other steelhead populations.

  15. Genetic and serological typing of European infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) isolates.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Tove; Einer-Jensen, Katja; Batts, William; Ahrens, Peter; Björkblom, Carina; Kurath, Gael; Björklund, Harry; Lorenzen, Niels

    2009-11-09

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) causes the lethal disease infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) in juvenile salmon and trout. The nucleocapsid (N) protein gene and partial glycoprotein (G) gene (nucleotides 457 to 1061) of the European isolates IT-217A, FR-32/87, DE-DF 13/98 11621, DE-DF 4/99-8/99, AU-9695338 and RU-FR1 were sequenced and compared with IHNV isolates from the North American genogroups U, M and L. In phylogenetic studies the N gene of the Italian, French, German and Austrian isolates clustered in the M genogroup, though in a different subgroup than the isolates from the USA. Analyses of the partial G gene of these European isolates clustered them in the M genogroup close to the root while the Russian isolate clustered in the U genogroup. The European isolates together with US-WRAC and US-Col-80 were also tested in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the N protein. MAbs 136-1 and 136-3 reacted equally at all concentrations with the isolates tested, indicating that these antibodies identify a common epitope. MAb 34D3 separated the M and L genogroup isolates from the U genogroup isolate. MAb 1DW14D divided the European isolates into 2 groups. MAb 1DW14D reacted more strongly with DE-DF 13/98 11621 and RU-FR1 than with IT-217A, FR-32/87, DE-DF 4/99-8/99 and AU-9695338. In the phylogenetic studies, the Italian, French, German and Austrian isolates clustered in the M genogroup, whereas in the serological studies using MAbs, the European M genogroup isolates could not be placed in the same specific group. These results indicate that genotypic and serotypic classification do not correlate.

  16. Genetic variation underlying resistance to infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in a steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) population.

    PubMed

    Brieuc, Marine S O; Purcell, Maureen K; Palmer, Alexander D; Naish, Kerry A

    2015-11-17

    Understanding the mechanisms of host resistance to pathogens will allow insights into the response of wild populations to the emergence of new pathogens. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is endemic to the Pacific Northwest and infectious to Pacific salmon and trout (Oncorhynchus spp.). Emergence of the M genogroup of IHNV in steelhead trout O. mykiss in the coastal streams of Washington State, between 2007 and 2011, was geographically heterogeneous. Differences in host resistance due to genetic change were hypothesized to be a factor influencing the IHNV emergence patterns. For example, juvenile steelhead trout losses at the Quinault National Fish Hatchery (QNFH) were much lower than those at a nearby facility that cultures a stock originally derived from the same source population. Using a classical quantitative genetic approach, we determined the potential for the QNFH steelhead trout population to respond to selection caused by the pathogen, by estimating the heritability for 2 traits indicative of IHNV resistance, mortality (h² = 0.377 (0.226 - 0.550)) and days to death (h² = 0.093 (0.018 - 0.203)). These results confirm that there is a genetic basis for resistance and that this population has the potential to adapt to IHNV. Additionally, genetic correlation between days to death and fish length suggests a correlated response in these traits to selection. Reduction of genetic variation, as well as the presence or absence of resistant alleles, could affect the ability of populations to adapt to the pathogen. Identification of the genetic basis for IHNV resistance could allow the assessment of the susceptibility of other steelhead populations.

  17. The spray-drying process is sufficient to inactivate infectious porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in plasma.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Priscilla F; Xiao, Chao-Ting; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Jianqiang; Halbur, Patrick G; Opriessnig, Tanja

    2014-11-07

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is considered an emergent pathogen associated with high economic losses in many pig rearing areas. Recently it has been suggested that PEDV could be transmitted to naïve pig populations through inclusion of spray-dried porcine plasma (SDPP) into the nursery diet which led to a ban of SDPP in several areas in North America and Europe. To determine the effect of spray-drying on PEDV infectivity, 3-week-old pigs were intragastrically inoculated with (1) raw porcine plasma spiked with PEDV (RAW-PEDV-CONTROL), (2) porcine plasma spiked with PEDV and then spray dried (SD-PEDV-CONTROL), (3) raw plasma from PEDV infected pigs (RAW-SICK), (4) spray-dried plasma from PEDV infected pigs (SD-SICK), or (5) spray-dried plasma from PEDV negative pigs (SD-NEG-CONTROL). For the spray-drying process, a tabletop spray-dryer with industry-like settings for inlet and outlet temperatures was used. In the RAW-PEDV-CONTROL group, PEDV RNA was present in feces at day post infection (dpi) 3 and the pigs seroconverted by dpi 14. In contrast, PEDV RNA in feces was not detected in any of the pigs in the other groups including the SD-PEDV-CONTROL group and none of the pigs had seroconverted by termination of the project at dpi 28. This work provides direct evidence that the experimental spray-drying process used in this study was effective in inactivating infectious PEDV in the plasma. Additionally, plasma collected from PEDV infected pigs at peak disease did not contain infectious PEDV. These findings suggest that the risk for PEDV transmission through commercially produced SDPP is minimal.

  18. Genetic and serological typing of European infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) isolates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johansson, T.; Einer-Jensen, K.; Batts, W.; Ahrens, P.; Bjorkblom, C.; Kurath, G.; Bjorklund, H.; Lorenzen, N.

    2009-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) causes the lethal disease infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) in juvenile salmon and trout. The nucleocapsid (N) protein gene and partial glycoprotein (G) gene (nucleotides 457 to 1061) of the European isolates IT-217A, FR-32/87, DE-DF 13/98 11621, DE-DF 4/99-8/99, AU-9695338 and RU-FR1 were sequenced and compared with IHNV isolates from the North American genogroups U, M and L. In phylogenetic studies the N gene of the Italian, French, German and Austrian isolates clustered in the M genogroup, though in a different subgroup than the isolates from the USA. Analyses of the partial G gene of these European isolates clustered them in the M genogroup close to the root while the Russian isolate clustered in the U genogroup. The European isolates together with US-WRAC and US-Col-80 were also tested in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the N protein. MAbs 136-1 and 136-3 reacted equally at all concentrations with the isolates tested, indicating that these antibodies identify a common epitope. MAb 34D3 separated the M and L genogroup isolates from the U genogroup isolate. MAb 1DW14D divided the European isolates into 2 groups. MAb 1DW14D reacted more strongly with DE-DF 13/98 11621 and RU-FR1 than with IT-217A, FR- 32/87, DE-DF 4/99-8/99 and AU-9695338. In the phylogenetic studies, the Italian, French, German and Austrian isolates clustered in the M genogroup, whereas in the serological studies using MAbs, the European M genogroup isolates could not be placed in the same specific group. These results indicate that genotypic and serotypic classification do not correlate. ?? 2009 Inter-Research.

  19. Retention of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus infectivity in fish tissue homogenates and fluids stored at three temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burke, J.; Mulcahy, D.

    1983-01-01

    Pools of brain, kidney, spleen, liver and gut tissues from several rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri Richardson, and whole sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka (Walbaum), fry were homogenized with a known amount of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). Virus was also added to ovarian fluids and sera pooled from several rainbow trout. The plaque assay was used to determine the retention of IHNV infectivity after different storage periods at 20°C, 4°C and -20°C. The work was used to evaluate homogenization as a remote field treatment of IHNV samples before shipment to the laboratory. Maintenance of viral infectivity varied widely among different homogenates and fluids. For short-term storage, 4°C was generally the most efficient temperature for preserving infectious virus in ovarian fluids, sera and homogenates of eggs, spleen, whole fry and brain, while infectivity was most efficiently preserved in kidney and liver homogenates by storage at -20°C. Infectious virus was not detected in any sample stored for one year at -20°C. Variations in retention of viral infec