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Sample records for infectious varicella zoster

  1. Subclinical Shed of Infectious Varicella zoster Virus in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohrs, Randall J.; Mehta, Satish K.; Schmid, D. Scott; Gilden, Donald H.; Pierson, Duane L.

    2007-01-01

    Aerosol borne varicella zoster virus (VZV) enters the nasopharynx and replicates in tonsillar T-cells, resulting in viremia and varicella (chickenpox). Virus then becomes latent in cranial nerve, dorsal root and autonomic nervous system ganglia along the entire neuraxis (1). Decades later, as cell-mediated immunity to VZV declines (4), latent VZV can reactivate to produce zoster (shingles). Infectious VZV is present in patients with varicella or zoster, but shed of infectious virus in the absence of disease has not been shown. We previously detected VZV DNA in saliva of astronauts during and shortly after spaceflight, suggesting stress induced subclinical virus reactivation (3). We show here that VZV DNA as well as infectious virus in present in astronaut saliva. VZV DNA was detected in saliva during and after a 13-day spaceflight in 2 of 3 astronauts (Fig. panel A). Ten days before liftoff, there was a rise in serum anti-VZV antibody in subjects 1 and 2, consistent with virus reactivation. In subject 3, VZV DNA was not detected in saliva, and there was no rise in anti-VZV antibody titer. Subject 3 may have been protected from virus reactivation by having zoster <10 years ago, which provides a boost in cell-medicated immunity to VZV (2). No VZV DNA was detected in astronaut saliva months before spaceflight, or in saliva of 10 age/sex-matched healthy control subjects sampled on alternate days for 3 weeks (88 saliva samples). Saliva taken 2-6 days after landing from all 3 subjects was cultured on human fetal lung cells (Fig. panel B). Infectious VZV was recovered from saliva of subjects 1 and 2 on the second day after landing. Virus specificity was confirmed by antibody staining and DNA analysis which showed it to be VZV of European descent, common in the US (5). Further, both antibody staining and DNA PCR demonstrated that no HSV-1 was detected in any infected culture. This is the first report of infectious VZV shedding in the absence of clinical disease

  2. Asymptomatic reactivation and shed of infectious varicella zoster virus in astronauts.

    PubMed

    Cohrs, Randall J; Mehta, Satish K; Schmid, D Scott; Gilden, Donald H; Pierson, Duane L

    2008-06-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella (chickenpox), after which virus becomes latent in ganglia along the entire neuraxis. Virus reactivation produces zoster (shingles). Infectious VZV is found in vesicles of patients with zoster and varicella, but virus shed in the absence of disease has not been documented. VZV DNA was previously detected in saliva of astronauts during and after spaceflight, a uniquely stressful environment in which cell mediated immunity (CMI) is temporally dampened. The decline in CMI to VZV associated with zoster led to the hypothesis that infectious VZV would also be present in the saliva of astronauts subjected to stress of spaceflight. Herein, not only was the detection of salivary VZV DNA associated with spaceflight validated, but also infectious virus was detected in saliva from 2 of 3 astronauts. This is the first demonstration of shed of infectious VZV in the absence of disease.

  3. Varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed Central

    Arvin, A M

    1996-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a ubiquitous human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella (chicken pox) and herpes zoster (shingles). Varicella is a common childhood illness, characterized by fever, viremia, and scattered vesicular lesions of the skin. As is characteristic of the alphaherpesviruses, VZV establishes latency in cells of the dorsal root ganglia. Herpes zoster, caused by VZV reactivation, is a localized, painful, vesicular rash involving one or adjacent dermatomes. The incidence of herpes zoster increases with age or immunosuppression. The VZV virion consists of a nucleocapsid surrounding a core that contains the linear, double-stranded DNA genome; a protein tegument separates the capsid from the lipid envelope, which incorporates the major viral glycoproteins. VZV is found in a worldwide geographic distribution but is more prevalent in temperate climates. Primary VZV infection elicits immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM, and IgA antibodies, which bind to many classes of viral proteins. Virus-specific cellular immunity is critical for controlling viral replication in healthy and immunocompromised patients with primary or recurrent VZV infections. Rapid laboratory confirmation of the diagnosis of varicella or herpes zoster, which can be accomplished by detecting viral proteins or DNA, is important to determine the need for antiviral therapy. Acyclovir is licensed for treatment of varicella and herpes zoster, and acyclovir, valacyclovir, and famciclovir are approved for herpes zoster. Passive antibody prophylaxis with varicella-zoster immune globulin is indicated for susceptible high-risk patients exposed to varicella. A live attenuated varicella vaccine (Oka/Merck strain) is now recommended for routine childhood immunization. PMID:8809466

  4. Complications of varicella zoster.

    PubMed

    Gücüyener, Kivilcim; Citak, Elvan Cağlar; Elli, Murat; Serdaroğlu, Ayse; Citak, Funda Erkasar

    2002-02-01

    Primary infection with varicella zoster is characterzed by a generalized vesicular rash usually without significant systemic illness. Encephalitis, pneumonitis, pancreatitis, nephritis, Reye and Guillan-Barre syndrome transvers myelitis, myocarditis have been reported before, but there is not any case having all these system to be involved during the same infection in a sequential manner ending up with multiorgan failure. We wanted to represent 21-month-old boy had a multiorgan failure due to varicella zoster infection.

  5. Generation of a reporter cell line for detection of infectious varicella-zoster virus and its application to antiviral studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guan-Qing; Suzutani, Tatsuo; Yamamoto, Yumiko; Fukui, Yoshiko; Nozawa, Naoki; Schmid, D Scott; Kurane, Ichiro; Inoue, Naoki

    2006-09-01

    To simplify the titration of infectious varicella-zoster virus (VZV), we generated a reporter cell line that produced luciferase in a dose-dependent manner upon infection with cell-free VZV. A few VZV-infected cells were detectable by coculturing with the cell line. We demonstrated the usefulness of the cell line for antiviral studies.

  6. Varicella-zoster virus (chickenpox) infection in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Ronald F; Sobel, Jack D; Carrington, D; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Vaisbuch, Edi; Romero, Roberto

    2011-09-01

    Congenital varicella syndrome, maternal varicella-zoster virus pneumonia and neonatal varicella infection are associated with serious fetomaternal morbidity and, not infrequently, mortality. Vaccination against varicella-zoster virus can prevent the disease, and outbreak control limits the exposure of pregnant women to the infectious agent. Maternal varicella-zoster immunoglobulin administration before rash development, with or without antiviral medication, can modify the progression of the disease.

  7. Varicella Zoster Complications

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.; Gilden, Don

    2013-01-01

    Opinion statement Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is an exclusively human neurotropic alphaherpesvirus. Primary infection causes varicella (chickenpox), after which virus becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With advancing age or immunosuppression, cell-mediated immunity to VZV declines and virus reactivates to cause zoster (shingles), which can occur anywhere on the body. Skin lesions resolve within 1-2 weeks, while complete cessation of pain usually takes 4-6 weeks. Zoster can be followed by chronic pain (postherpetic neuralgia), cranial nerve palsies, zoster paresis, meningoencephalitis, cerebellitis, myelopathy, multiple ocular disorders and vasculopathy that can mimic giant cell arteritis. All of the neurological and ocular disorders listed above may also develop without rash. Diagnosis of VZV-induced neurological disease may require examination of CSF, serum and/ or ocular fluids. In the absence of rash in a patient with neurological disease potentially due to VZV, CSF should be examined for VZV DNA by PCR and for anti-VZV IgG and IGM. Detection of VZV IgG antibody in CSF is superior to detection of VZV DNA in CSF to diagnose vasculopathy, recurrent myelopathy, and brainstem encephalitis. Oral antiviral drugs speed healing of rash and shorten acute pain. Immunocompromised patients require intravenous acyclovir. First-line treatments for post-herpetic neuralgia include tricyclic antidepressants gabapentin, pregabalin, and topical lidocaine patches. VZV vasculopathy, meningoencephalitis, and myelitis are all treated with intravenous acyclovir. PMID:23794213

  8. Subclinical Reactivation and Shed of Infectious Varicella Zoster Virus in Saliva of Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohrs, Randall J.; Mehta, Satish K.; Schmid, D. Scott; Gilden, Donald H.; Pierson, Duane L.

    2007-01-01

    We have previously detected VZV in healthy astronauts both during spaceflight and shortly after landing. Herein, we show that VZV shed in seropositive astronauts is infectious. A total of 40 saliva samples were obtained from each of the 3 astronauts. From each astronaut, 14 samples were taken 109 to 133 days before liftoff, 1 sample was taken every day during 12 days in space, and one sample was taken for 14 consecutive days beginning the second day after landing. Quantitative PCR was used to detect VZV DNA in saliva. None of 42 preflight saliva samples contained VZV DNA. VZV DNA was detected in saliva from 2 of 3 astronauts. In 1 astronaut, 6 of 12 samples obtained during space flight contained 120 to 2,500 copies of VZV DNA per ml; after landing, 1250 copies of VZV DNA were present on day 2, 45 copies on day 3, and 110 copies on day 5. All samples taken 6 to 15 days after touchdown were negative for VZV DNA. In the second astronaut, 5 of 12 samples obtained during space flight contained 18 to 650 copies of VZV DNA per ml; after landing, 560 copies of VZV DNA were present in saliva on day 2, 340 copies on day 4, 45 copies on day 5, and 23 copes on day 6. All samples taken 7 to 15 days after touchdown were negative for VZV DNA. Saliva taken 2 to 6 days after landing from all 3 astronauts was cultured on human fetal lung cells. After one subcultivation, a cytopathic effect developed in cultures inoculated with saliva from the two astronauts whose saliva contained VZV DNA. Both PCR and immunostaining identified the isolates to be VZV and not HSV-1. Importantly, the astronaut in whom no VZV was detected had a history of zoster 9 years earlier. It is possible that a boost in cell-mediated immunity to VZV which is known to develop after zoster protected him from subclinical reactivation. The genotype of the two VZV isolates was determined by VZV ORF22-based PCR/sequencing along with FRET-based PCR assays that target specific nucleotide polymorphisms. Both VZV isolates

  9. Varicella-zoster virus: pathogenesis, incidence patterns and vaccination programs.

    PubMed

    Gabutti, Giovanni; Franchi, Michele; Maniscalco, Licia; Stefanati, Armando

    2016-06-01

    Varicella or chickenpox is a common and highly contagious exanthematic disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) that during primary infection has the ability to establish latency. VZV reactivation, even decades after primary infection, causes herpes zoster. In healthy immunocompetent subjects, children in particular, varicella results in mild to moderate illness and for this reason, regardless its high morbidity, it is not considered a public health priority. Varicella still represents the most widespread vaccine preventable childhood infectious disease in industrialized countries; due to its relevant burden on healthcare resources several countries has introduced varicella vaccination into the recommended routine childhood national immunization schedule. Nowadays, live attenuated monovalent and combined MMRV vaccines are licensed worldwide. The use of several millions of doses has demonstrated the excellent safety and efficacy level of varicella vaccines as well as of combined MMRV vaccines. Universal vaccination adopted in many countries with a two-dose strategy has allowed to significantly reducing morbidity and mortality of this infectious disease. Anyway, an ample international debate is ongoing on the time range to be used between the two doses, and on the safety issues related to the use as first-dose of MMRV vaccine. Taking into account the availability of a zoster vaccine in subjects older than 50 years of age, it will be relevant to clarify if an impact on exogenous boosters and on the epidemiology of herpes zoster can occur after the adoption of extensive varicella immunization. PMID:27125440

  10. Modelling the impact of varicella vaccination on varicella and zoster.

    PubMed

    Karhunen, M; Leino, T; Salo, H; Davidkin, I; Kilpi, T; Auranen, K

    2010-04-01

    It has been suggested that the incidence of herpes zoster may increase due to lack of natural boosting under large-scale vaccination with the varicella vaccine. To study the possibility and magnitude of such negative consequences of mass vaccination, we built a mathematical model of varicella and zoster epidemiology in the Finnish population. The model was based on serological data on varicella infection, case-notification data on zoster, and new knowledge about close contacts relevant to transmission of infection. According to the analysis, a childhood programme against varicella will increase the incidence of zoster by one to more than two thirds in the next 50 years. This will be due to increase in case numbers in the 35 years age groups. However, high vaccine coverage and a two-dose programme will be very effective in stopping varicella transmission in the population.

  11. Varicella-zoster virus: Prevention through vaccination.

    PubMed

    Gnann, John W

    2012-06-01

    Widespread use of varicella vaccine in the United States has drastically changed the epidemiology of the disease. Although chickenpox is no longer a ubiquitous childhood infection, varicella-zoster virus continues to circulate in the community and nonimmune pregnant women remain at risk. Varicella can cause severe infection in pregnant women, often complicated by viral pneumonia. Maternal varicella occurring in the first half of pregnancy can cause the rare but devastating congenital varicella syndrome, whereas infection in the late stages of pregnancy may cause neonatal varicella. The best approach to avoiding the morbidity and mortality associated with chickenpox in pregnancy is to screen and vaccinate susceptible reproductive-age women.

  12. Impact of varicella vaccine on varicella-zoster virus dynamics.

    PubMed

    Schmid, D Scott; Jumaan, Aisha O

    2010-01-01

    The licensure and recommendation of varicella vaccine in the mid-1990s in the United States have led to dramatic declines in varicella incidence and varicella-related deaths and hospitalizations. Varicella outbreaks remain common and occur increasingly in highly vaccinated populations. Breakthrough varicella in vaccinated individuals is characteristically mild, typically with fewer lesions that frequently do not progress to a vesicular stage. As such, the laboratory diagnosis of varicella has grown increasingly important, particularly in outbreak settings. In this review the impact of varicella vaccine on varicella-zoster virus (VZV) disease, arising complications in the effective diagnosis and monitoring of VZV transmission, and the relative strengths and limitations of currently available laboratory diagnostic techniques are all addressed. Since disease symptoms often resolve in outbreak settings before suitable test specimens can be obtained, the need to develop new diagnostic approaches that rely on alternative patient samples is also discussed.

  13. Varicella zoster virus: chickenpox and shingles.

    PubMed

    Gould, Dinah

    The varicella zoster virus causes two infections: varicella, also known as chickenpox occurring mostly in childhood, and herpes zoster, also known as shingles affecting mainly older people. Varicella usually occurs in children under ten years of age. It is generally a mild infection and in the UK vaccination is not offered as part of the routine immunisation programme. However, adults who develop varicella are at risk of developing complications and the infection is likely to be more severe. Serious complications are a particular risk for pregnant women, unborn children, neonates and those who are immunocompromised. Nurses whose work brings them into contact with those at risk have a vital role in providing information about the importance of avoiding varicella. After the acute infection, the varicella zoster virus gains access to the ganglia in the sensory nervous system where it can remain dormant for years. Reactivation results in herpes zoster, a common and unpleasant illness. A vaccine for herpes zoster was introduced for people aged 70-79 in the UK in September 2013.

  14. Vernet syndrome by varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yil Ryun; Chung, Chin Wook; Lee, Jung Soo; Park, Hye Jeong

    2013-06-01

    Vernet syndrome involves the IX, X, and XI cranial nerves and is most often attributable to malignancy, aneurysm or skull base fracture. Although there have been several reports on Vernet's syndrome caused by fracture and inflammation, cases related to varicella-zoster virus are rare and have not yet been reported in South Korea. A 32-year-old man, who complained of left ear pain, hoarse voice and swallowing difficulty for 5 days, presented at the emergency room. He showed vesicular skin lesions on the left auricle. On neurologic examination, his uvula was deviated to the right side, and weakness was detected in his left shoulder. Left vocal cord palsy was noted on laryngoscopy. Antibody levels to varicella-zoster virus were elevated in the serum. Electrodiagnostic studies showed findings compatible with left spinal accessory neuropathy. Based on these findings, he was diagnosed with Vernet syndrome, involving left cranial nerves, attributable to varicella-zoster virus.

  15. Varicella-zoster virus and facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Leeming, R D

    1976-04-01

    Two cases of Ramsey-Hunt Syndrome are reported, one of which presented features of the Guillain-Barré Syndrome. It is suggested that the varicella-zoster virus is an aetiological factor in the Guillain-Barré Syndrome.

  16. Varicella Zoster Virus in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Gilden, Don; Nagel, Maria; Cohrs, Randall; Mahalingam, Ravi; Baird, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a ubiquitous, exclusively human alphaherpesvirus. Primary infection usually results in varicella (chickenpox), after which VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. As VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity declines in elderly and immunocompromised individuals, VZV reactivates and causes herpes zoster (shingles), frequently complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. VZV reactivation also produces multiple serious neurological and ocular diseases, such as cranial nerve palsies, meningoencephalitis, myelopathy, and VZV vasculopathy, including giant cell arteritis, with or without associated rash. Herein, we review the clinical, laboratory, imaging, and pathological features of neurological complications of VZV reactivation as well as diagnostic tests to verify VZV infection of the nervous system. Updates on the physical state of VZV DNA and viral gene expression in latently infected ganglia, neuronal, and primate models to study varicella pathogenesis and immunity are presented along with innovations in the immunization of elderly individuals to prevent VZV reactivation. PMID:26918131

  17. Extensive extracranial and intracranial Varicella zoster vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Lalla, Rakesh; Patil, Tushar B

    2012-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV)-induced vasculopathy is an uncommon cause of stroke in a young immunocompetent host. Owing to scarcity of data of VZV-induced vasculopathy and lack of awareness about this condition and its diagnostic test, these cases may be easily missed. In this case, we report an immunocompetent host presenting right-side hemiplegia with motor aphasia and complete loss of vision in the left eye due to complete occlusion of the left common carotid artery without any history of skin rash preceding stroke. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis for varicella antibody revealed very high titres and CT aortogram demonstrated aortoarteritis with occlusion of left common carotid artery. To our knowledge, varicella zoster vasculopathy-associated aortoarteritis has not been described in the literature. PMID:23010463

  18. Varicella Zoster Virus in the Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Gilden, Don; Nagel, Maria; Cohrs, Randall; Mahalingam, Ravi; Baird, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a ubiquitous, exclusively human alphaherpesvirus. Primary infection usually results in varicella (chickenpox), after which VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. As VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity declines in elderly and immunocompromised individuals, VZV reactivates and causes herpes zoster (shingles), frequently complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. VZV reactivation also produces multiple serious neurological and ocular diseases, such as cranial nerve palsies, meningoencephalitis, myelopathy, and VZV vasculopathy, including giant cell arteritis, with or without associated rash. Herein, we review the clinical, laboratory, imaging, and pathological features of neurological complications of VZV reactivation as well as diagnostic tests to verify VZV infection of the nervous system. Updates on the physical state of VZV DNA and viral gene expression in latently infected ganglia, neuronal, and primate models to study varicella pathogenesis and immunity are presented along with innovations in the immunization of elderly individuals to prevent VZV reactivation. PMID:26918131

  19. Varicella-zoster virus in children immunized with the varicella vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chesnut, Gregory; McClain, Damon; Galeckas, Kenneth

    2012-09-01

    We present the case of a 4-year-old immunocompetent girl with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) that occurred 45 months after a single dose of the varicella vaccine. Varicella-zoster virus is rare in children, particularly those who have received the varicella vaccine. Our case illustrates the need for a continued high index of suspicion, even among vaccinated children with herpetiform rashes, for varicella reactivation or reinfection.

  20. 21 CFR 866.3900 - Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents. 866... Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents... varicella-zoster in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of diseases caused by...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3900 - Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents. 866... Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents... varicella-zoster in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of diseases caused by...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3900 - Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents. 866... Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents... varicella-zoster in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of diseases caused by...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3900 - Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents. 866... Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents... varicella-zoster in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of diseases caused by...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3900 - Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents. 866... Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents... varicella-zoster in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of diseases caused by...

  5. The neurobiology of varicella zoster virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Gilden, D.; Mahalingam, R.; Nagel, M. A.; Pugazhenthi, S.; Cohrs, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic herpesvirus that infects nearly all humans. Primary infection usually causes chickenpox (varicella), after which virus becomes latent in cranial nerve ganglia, dorsal root ganglia and autonomic ganglia along the entire neuraxis. Although VZV cannot be isolated from human ganglia, nucleic acid hybridization and, later, polymerase chain reaction proved that VZV is latent in ganglia. Declining VZV-specific host immunity decades after primary infection allows virus to reactivate spontaneously, resulting in shingles (zoster) characterized by pain and rash restricted to 1-3 dermatomes. Multiple other serious neurological and ocular disorders also result from VZV reactivation. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge of the clinical and pathological complications of neurological and ocular disease produced by VZV reactivation, molecular aspects of VZV latency, VZV virology and VZV-specific immunity, the role of apoptosis in VZV-induced cell death, and the development of an animal model provided by simian varicella virus infection of monkeys. PMID:21342215

  6. Developments in Varicella Zoster Virus Vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Maria A; Gilden, Don

    2016-02-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a highly neurotropic human herpesvirus. Primary infection usually causes varicella (chicken pox), after which virus becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. VZV reactivation results in zoster (shingles) which is frequently complicated by chronic pain (postherpetic neuralgia). VZV reactivation also causes meningoencephalitis, myelitis, ocular disorders, and vasculopathy, all of which can occur in the absence of rash. This review focuses on the association of VZV and stroke, and on the widening spectrum of disorders produced by VZV vasculopathy in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, including recipients of varicella vaccine. Aside from ischemic stroke, VZV infection of cerebral arteries may lead to development of intracerebral aneurysms, with or without hemorrhage. Moreover, recent clinical-virological case reports and retrospective pathological-virological analyses of temporal arteries positive or negative for giant cell arteritis (GCA) indicate that extracranial VZV vasculopathy triggers the immunopathology of GCA. While many patients with GCA improve after corticosteroid treatment, prolonged corticosteroid use may potentiate VZV infection, leading to fatal vasculopathy in the brain and other organs.

  7. Developments in Varicella Zoster Virus Vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Maria A; Gilden, Don

    2016-02-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a highly neurotropic human herpesvirus. Primary infection usually causes varicella (chicken pox), after which virus becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. VZV reactivation results in zoster (shingles) which is frequently complicated by chronic pain (postherpetic neuralgia). VZV reactivation also causes meningoencephalitis, myelitis, ocular disorders, and vasculopathy, all of which can occur in the absence of rash. This review focuses on the association of VZV and stroke, and on the widening spectrum of disorders produced by VZV vasculopathy in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, including recipients of varicella vaccine. Aside from ischemic stroke, VZV infection of cerebral arteries may lead to development of intracerebral aneurysms, with or without hemorrhage. Moreover, recent clinical-virological case reports and retrospective pathological-virological analyses of temporal arteries positive or negative for giant cell arteritis (GCA) indicate that extracranial VZV vasculopathy triggers the immunopathology of GCA. While many patients with GCA improve after corticosteroid treatment, prolonged corticosteroid use may potentiate VZV infection, leading to fatal vasculopathy in the brain and other organs. PMID:26750127

  8. Perspectives on optimal control of varicella and herpes zoster by mass routine varicella vaccination.

    PubMed

    Betta, Monica; Laurino, Marco; Pugliese, Andrea; Guzzetta, Giorgio; Landi, Alberto; Manfredi, Piero

    2016-03-16

    Herpes zoster arises from reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV), causing varicella in children. As reactivation occurs when cell-mediated immunity (CMI) declines, and there is evidence that re-exposure to VZV boosts CMI, mass varicella immunization might increase the zoster burden, at least for some decades. Fear of this natural zoster boom is the main reason for the paralysis of varicella immunization in Europe. We apply optimal control to a realistically parametrized age-structured model for VZV transmission and reactivation to investigate whether feasible varicella immunization paths that are optimal in controlling both varicella and zoster exist. We analyse the optimality system numerically focusing on the role of the cost functional, of the relative zoster-varicella cost and of the planning horizon length. We show that optimal programmes will mostly be unfeasible for public health owing to their complex temporal profiles. This complexity is the consequence of the intrinsically antagonistic nature of varicella immunization programmes when aiming to control both varicella and zoster. However, we show that gradually increasing-hence feasible-vaccination schedules can perform better than routine programmes with constant vaccine uptake. Finally, we show the optimal profiles of feasible programmes targeting mitigation of the post-immunization natural zoster boom with priority.

  9. Perspectives on optimal control of varicella and herpes zoster by mass routine varicella vaccination.

    PubMed

    Betta, Monica; Laurino, Marco; Pugliese, Andrea; Guzzetta, Giorgio; Landi, Alberto; Manfredi, Piero

    2016-03-16

    Herpes zoster arises from reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV), causing varicella in children. As reactivation occurs when cell-mediated immunity (CMI) declines, and there is evidence that re-exposure to VZV boosts CMI, mass varicella immunization might increase the zoster burden, at least for some decades. Fear of this natural zoster boom is the main reason for the paralysis of varicella immunization in Europe. We apply optimal control to a realistically parametrized age-structured model for VZV transmission and reactivation to investigate whether feasible varicella immunization paths that are optimal in controlling both varicella and zoster exist. We analyse the optimality system numerically focusing on the role of the cost functional, of the relative zoster-varicella cost and of the planning horizon length. We show that optimal programmes will mostly be unfeasible for public health owing to their complex temporal profiles. This complexity is the consequence of the intrinsically antagonistic nature of varicella immunization programmes when aiming to control both varicella and zoster. However, we show that gradually increasing-hence feasible-vaccination schedules can perform better than routine programmes with constant vaccine uptake. Finally, we show the optimal profiles of feasible programmes targeting mitigation of the post-immunization natural zoster boom with priority. PMID:26984627

  10. Isolated acute dysphagia due to varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Mantero, Vittorio; Rigamonti, Andrea; Valentini, Sergio; Fiumani, Anna; Piamarta, Francesca; Bonfanti, Paolo; Salmaggi, Andrea

    2014-04-01

    We present a case of zoster sine herpete causing isolated acute dysphagia in an immunocompetent patient. The interest of this paper is the atypical presentation of varicella-zoster virus reactivation. A 77-year-old woman presented with a 3-day history of fever and worsening dysphagia for both liquid and solid foods. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed lymphocytic pleocytosis and PCR amplified varicella-zoster virus DNA with high antibody titers in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid. The panel was suggestive of a cranial neuritis due to varicella-zoster virus, involved cranial nerves, even in the absence of a cutaneous and mucosal rash. Varicella-zoster virus reactivation should be included in the differential diagnosis of isolated or multiple cranial nerve palsies, with or without zosteriform skin lesions. A prompt etiologic diagnosis can lead to early administration of antiviral therapy.

  11. Varicella zoster virus transmission in youth during incarceration.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Danusia; Besney, Jonathan; Jacobs, Angela; Woods, Dan; Joffe, Mark; Ahmed, Rabia

    2016-06-13

    Purpose - Facility-based Varicella zoster virus (VZV) transmission is reported in a Canadian youth offender correctional centre (YOCC). Transmission occurred from an immunocompetent youth offender (YO) with localized Herpes zoster to another immunocompetent single dose vaccinated YO, resulting in Varicella zoster (VZ) breakthrough disease. The purpose of this paper is to identify infection prevention and control (IPAC) measures utilized in this setting. Design/methodology/approach - A retrospective chart and immunization record review was conducted for two VZV cases and 27 exposed YO contacts in order to obtain demographic, clinical and immunization data. Descriptive data analysis was performed. Findings - All VZV cases and exposed contacts were male with an average age of 14.2 and 15.6 years for cases and contacts, respectively. Both cases shared the same living unit in the YOCC. There were 28 identified YO contacts, of whom 70 percent were single dose vaccinated with univalent vaccine, followed by 22 percent with a previous history of Varicella disease. All cases and contacts were born in Canada. No foreign-born populations were involved with this event. Infection control measures included additional precaution management, enhanced surveillance and environmental cleaning. As such, no hospitalizations or post-exposure immunizations were required. Originality/value - This report highlights the role that VZ breakthrough disease could play in fueling an outbreak in a high-risk environment without rapid recognition and implementation of preventative measures. It also underscores the importance of IPAC presence and public health immunization programs within correctional centers to avoid infectious disease threats. PMID:27219908

  12. [Vaccines against varicella-zoster virus (VZV)].

    PubMed

    Salleras, Luis; Salleras, Montserrat; Soldevila, Nuria; Prat, Andreu; Garrido, Patricio; Domínguez, Ángela

    2015-01-01

    In Western countries, two attenuated varicella vaccines derived from the OKA strain are licensed: Varilrix® GlaxoSmithKline (OKA/RIT strain) and Varivax® Merck Sharp and Dohme (OKA/Merck strain). Currently, in Spain, varicella vaccination is only included in the Ministry of Health, Social Services and Equality official vaccination calendar for administration in adolescents who have not had the disease. Given the good results obtained in Navarra and Madrid with universal administration of the vaccine in children, it would be desirable to include the vaccine in the routine immunization schedule, with the administration of two doses at 15-18 months of age in the future. The protective efficacy of the attenuated herpes zoster vaccine was evaluated in the Shingles Prevention Study, which showed that in the short term (0-4 years) the vaccine reduced the incidence of herpes zoster by 53%, post-herpetic neuralgia by 66%, and the disease burden in immunocompetent persons aged ≥60 years by 61%. Another study demonstrated protective efficacy in persons aged 50-59 years. Over time, the protective efficacy decreases, but remains at acceptable levels, especially for post-herpetic neuralgia and the disease burden. Recently, the results of a controlled clinical trial (phase III) conducted in 18 countries to assess the protective efficacy of the inactivated subunit vaccine (glycoprotein E) adjuvanted with the adjuvant AS01B were published. The study inferred that the vaccine significantly reduced the incidence of herpes zoster in the short term (3.2 years) in people aged ≥50 years. Vaccine protection did not decrease with age at vaccination, ranging between 96.8% and 97.9% in all age groups.

  13. Varicella Zoster Virus in Saliva of Patients With Herpes Zoster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Satish K.; Tyring, Stephen K.; Gilden, Donald H.; Cohrs, Randall J.; Leal, Melanie J.; Castro, Victoria A.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ott, C. Mark; Pierson, Duane L.

    2007-01-01

    Background. VZV DNA is present in saliva of healthy astronauts and patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome (geniculate zoster). We hypothesized that a prospective analysis of patients with zoster would detect VZV in saliva independent of zoster location. Methods. We treated 54 patients with valacyclovir. On the first treatment day, 7- and 14-days later, pain was scored and saliva examined for VZV DNA. Saliva from six subjects with chronic pain and 14 healthy subjects was similarly studied. Results. Follow-up data was available for 50/54 patients. Pain decreased in 43/50 (86 percent), disappeared in 37 (74 percent), recurred after disappearing in three (6 percent) and increased in four (8 percent). VZV DNA was found in every patient the day treatment was started, decreased in 47/50 (94 percent), transiently increased in three (6 percent) before decreasing, increased in two (4 percent) and disappeared in 41 (82 percent). There was a positive correlation between the presence of VZV DNA and pain, as well as between the VZV DNA copy number and pain (P<0.0005). Saliva of two patients was cultured, and infectious VZV was isolated from one. VZV DNA was present in one patient before rash and in four patients after pain resolved, and not in any control subjects. Conclusion. VZV DNA is present in saliva of zoster patients.

  14. The Variegate Neurological Manifestations of Varicella Zoster Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.; Cohrs, Randall J.; Mahalingam, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is an exclusively human neurotropic alphaherpesvirus. Primary infection causes varicella (chickenpox), after which the virus becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With advancing age or immunosuppression, cell-mediated immunity to VZV declines, and the virus reactivates to cause zoster (shingles), dermatomal distribution, pain, and rash. Zoster is often followed by chronic pain (postherpetic neuralgia), cranial nerve palsies, zoster paresis, vasculopathy, meningoencephalitis, and multiple ocular disorders. This review covers clinical, laboratory, and pathological features of neurological complications of VZV reactivation, including diagnostic testing to verify active VZV infection in the nervous system. Additional perspectives are provided by discussions of VZV latency, animal models to study varicella pathogenesis and immunity, and of the value of vaccination of elderly individuals to boost cell-mediated immunity to VZV and prevent VZV reactivation. PMID:23884722

  15. Varicella Vaccination Alters the Chronological Trends of Herpes Zoster and Varicella

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Po-Yuan; Wu, Hong-Dar Isaac; Chou, Tzu-Chieh; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Background Population studies on trends of varicella and herpes zoster (HZ) associated with varicella zoster vaccination and climate is limited. Methods This study used insurance claims data to investigate the chronological changes in incident varicella and HZ associated with varicella zoster vaccination. Poisson regression was used to estimate the occurrence of varicella associated with the occurrence of HZ and vice versa by year, season, sex, temperature, and sunny hours. Results The varicella incidence declined from 7.14 to 0.76 per 1,000 person-years in 2000–2009, whereas the HZ incidence increased from 4.04 to 6.24 per 1,000 person-years. Females tended to have a higher risk than men for HZ (p<0.0001) but not varicella. The monthly mean varicella incidence was the lowest in September (160 cases) and the highest in January (425 cases), while the mean HZ incidence was lower in February (370 cases) and higher in August (470 cases). HZ was negatively associated with the incidence of varicella before and after the varicella zoster vaccination (p<0.001), increased 1.6% within one week post-vaccination. The effect of temperature on HZ was attenuated by 18.5% (p<0.0001) in association with vaccination. The varicella risk was positively associated with sun exposure hours, but negatively associated with temperature only before vaccination. Conclusions The varicella vaccination is effective in varicella prevention, but the incidence of HZ increases after vaccination. HZ has a stronger association with temperature and UV than with seasonality while varicella risk associated with temperature and UV is diminished. PMID:24204928

  16. Fatal wild-type varicella-zoster virus encephalitis without a rash in a vaccinated child.

    PubMed

    Ibraheem, Mam; Marin, Mona; Leung, Jessica; Bryce, Clare H; Schmid, D Scott; Zaki, Sherif R; Drew, Clifton; Liu, Lindy; Smelser, Chad

    2013-02-01

    Encephalitis associated with varicella-zoster virus, rare among children in the varicella vaccine era, has generally been associated with a rash. We report fatal wild-type varicella-zoster virus encephalitis without a rash in a child who had received 1 dose of varicella vaccine. Varicella-zoster virus encephalitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis for children presenting with acute neurologic symptoms, even vaccine recipients.

  17. Interdiction of a blood donation containing varicella-zoster virus by donor self-report of chickenpox.

    PubMed

    Chan, H M H; Ho, P L; Chan, K H; Lin, C K; Lee, C K

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays, risk of transfusion-transmitted infection has been substantially minimized by stringent donor eligibility screening and infectious disease testing. However, we report an interdiction of a blood donation containing varicella-zoster virus (VZV) by donor self-reporting of chickenpox. The donor developed varicella infection shortly after blood donation despite vaccination. Varicella-zoster virus DNA was detected in her fresh-frozen plasma before the blood components were issued for clinical transfusion. The report indicates the importance of donors' education and awareness of their obligation to report any symptoms developed shortly after blood donation in order to further secure blood safety.

  18. Full-Genome Sequence of a Novel Varicella-Zoster Virus Clade Isolated in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; Rodríguez-Castillo, Araceli; Ortiz-Alcántara, Joanna María; Gonzalez-Durán, Elizabeth; Segura-Candelas, José Miguel; Pérez-Agüeros, Sandra Ivette; Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Diaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto; Ramirez-González, José Ernesto

    2015-07-09

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a member of the Herpesviridae family, which causes varicella (chicken pox) and herpes zoster (shingles) in humans. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of varicella-zoster virus, isolated from a vesicular fluid sample, revealing the circulation of VZV clade VIII in Mexico.

  19. Full-Genome Sequence of a Novel Varicella-Zoster Virus Clade Isolated in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Castillo, Araceli; Ortiz-Alcántara, Joanna María; Gonzalez-Durán, Elizabeth; Segura-Candelas, José Miguel; Pérez-Agüeros, Sandra Ivette; Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Diaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a member of the Herpesviridae family, which causes varicella (chicken pox) and herpes zoster (shingles) in humans. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of varicella-zoster virus, isolated from a vesicular fluid sample, revealing the circulation of VZV clade VIII in Mexico. PMID:26159533

  20. Association of varicella zoster dermatitis with acute retinal necrosis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Browning, D J; Blumenkranz, M S; Culbertson, W W; Clarkson, J D; Tardif, Y; Gourdeau, A; Minturn, J

    1987-06-01

    The authors report seven patients in whom the acute retinal necrosis (ARN) syndrome developed shortly after cutaneous varicella zoster infection. The length of time between the skin infection and ARN varied from 5 days to 3 months. Both eyes were affected in one of seven cases. The ophthalmic branch of cranial nerve V ipsilateral to an affected eye was involved by the zoster dermatitis in only two of the seven cases. The association lends further support to the proposal that herpes zoster virus is a major cause of ARN. A history of recent zoster dermatitis should be sought in patients with ARN.

  1. Varicella zoster virus vaccines: potential complications and possible improvements.

    PubMed

    Silver, Benjamin; Zhu, Hua

    2014-10-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is the causative agent of varicella (chicken pox) and herpes zoster (shingles). After primary infection, the virus remains latent in sensory ganglia, and reactivates upon weakening of the cellular immune system due to various conditions, erupting from sensory neurons and infecting the corresponding skin tissue. The current varicella vaccine (v-Oka) is highly attenuated in the skin, yet retains its neurovirulence and may reactivate and damage sensory neurons. The reactivation is sometimes associated with postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), a severe pain along the affected sensory nerves that can linger for years, even after the herpetic rash resolves. In addition to the older population that develops a secondary infection resulting in herpes zoster, childhood breakthrough herpes zoster affects a small population of vaccinated children. There is a great need for a neuro-attenuated vaccine that would prevent not only the varicella manifestation, but, more importantly, any establishment of latency, and therefore herpes zoster. The development of a genetically-defined live-attenuated VZV vaccine that prevents neuronal and latent infection, in addition to primary varicella, is imperative for eventual eradication of VZV, and, if fully understood, has vast implications for many related herpesviruses and other viruses with similar pathogenic mechanisms.

  2. Recombination of Globally Circulating Varicella-Zoster Virus

    PubMed Central

    Depledge, Daniel P.; Kundu, Samit; Atkinson, Claire; Brown, Julianne; Haque, Tanzina; Hussaini, Yusuf; MacMahon, Eithne; Molyneaux, Pamela; Papaevangelou, Vassiliki; Sengupta, Nitu; Koay, Evelyn S. C.; Tang, Julian W.; Underhill, Gillian S.; Grahn, Anna; Studahl, Marie; Breuer, Judith; Bergström, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human herpesvirus, which during primary infection typically causes varicella (chicken pox) and establishes lifelong latency in sensory and autonomic ganglia. Later in life, the virus may reactivate to cause herpes zoster (HZ; also known as shingles). To prevent these diseases, a live-attenuated heterogeneous vaccine preparation, vOka, is used routinely in many countries worldwide. Recent studies of another alphaherpesvirus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus, demonstrate that live-attenuated vaccine strains can recombine in vivo, creating virulent progeny. These findings raised concerns about using attenuated herpesvirus vaccines under conditions that favor recombination. To investigate whether VZV may undergo recombination, which is a prerequisite for VZV vaccination to create such conditions, we here analyzed 115 complete VZV genomes. Our results demonstrate that recombination occurs frequently for VZV. It thus seems that VZV is fully capable of recombination if given the opportunity, which may have important implications for continued VZV vaccination. Although no interclade vaccine-wild-type recombinant strains were found, intraclade recombinants were frequently detected in clade 2, which harbors the vaccine strains, suggesting that the vaccine strains have already been involved in recombination events, either in vivo or in vitro during passages in cell culture. Finally, previous partial and complete genomic studies have described strains that do not cluster phylogenetically to any of the five established clades. The additional VZV strains sequenced here, in combination with those previously published, have enabled us to formally define a novel sixth VZV clade. IMPORTANCE Although genetic recombination has been demonstrated to frequently occur for other human alphaherpesviruses, herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2, only a few ancient and isolated recent recombination events have hitherto been demonstrated for VZV. In the

  3. Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome caused by varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dilip; Sinha, Manish; Kumar, Rajesh; Shukla, Rakesh; Ahuja, R C

    2010-07-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) is a rare condition that has been reported from all parts of the world. It is well recognized as a paraneoplastic syndrome in children with neuroblastoma and in adults with small-cell carcinoma of lung and some other cancers. It may also occur in association with various central nervous system infections. We report a case of OMS in a patient with varicella zoster virus infection. IgM antibody for varicella-zoster virus was detected in the serum and the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient improved after treatment with clonazepam and was asymptomatic at 1-month follow-up.

  4. [VARICELLA ZOSTER VIRUS AND DISEASES OF CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM VESSELS].

    PubMed

    Kazanova, A S; Lavrov, V F; Zverev, V V

    2015-01-01

    Systemized data on epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestation, diagnostics and therapy of VZV-vasculopathy--a disease, occurring due to damage of arteries of the central nervous system by Varicella Zoster virus, are presented in the review. A special attention in the paper is given to the effect of vaccine prophylaxis of chicken pox and herpes zoster on the frequency of development and course of VZV-vasculopathy.

  5. Herpes zoster caused by vaccine-strain varicella zoster virus in an immunocompetent recipient of zoster vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hung Fu; Schmid, D Scott; Harpaz, Rafael; LaRussa, Philip; Jensen, Nancy J; Rivailler, Pierre; Radford, Kay; Folster, Jennifer; Jacobsen, Steven J

    2014-04-01

    We report the first laboratory-documented case of herpes zoster caused by the attenuated varicella zoster virus (VZV) contained in Zostavax in a 68-year-old immunocompetent adult with strong evidence of prior wild-type VZV infection. The complete genome sequence of the isolate revealed that the strain carried 15 of 42 (36%) recognized varicella vaccine-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms, including all 5 of the fixed vaccine markers present in nearly all of the strains in the vaccine. The case of herpes zoster was relatively mild and resolved without complications.

  6. Kawasaki disease onset during concomitant infections with varicella zoster and Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Turkay, Sadi; Odemis, Ender; Karadag, Ahmet

    2006-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute systemic vasculitis that predominantly affects preschool-aged children. It has a predilection to coronary arteries, and its precise etiology is still unknown. Many infectious agents, including viruses and bacteria, have been suggested as potential causes of the disease. Here, we report a patient who met the diagnostic criteria of Kawasaki disease during concomitant Epstein-Barr virus and varicella-zoster virus infections, and we discuss the possible roles of these viruses in etiology. PMID:16916136

  7. Lineages of varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed

    McGeoch, Duncan J

    2009-04-01

    Relationships among varicella-zoster virus (VZV; Human herpesvirus 3) genome sequences were examined to evaluate descent of strains, structures of lineages and incidence of recombination events. Eighteen complete, published genome sequences were aligned and 494 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) extracted, each as two alleles. At 281 SNPs, a single sequence differed from all the others. Distributions of the remaining 213 SNPs indicated that the sequences fell into five groups, which coincided with previously recognized phylogenetic groupings, termed E1, E2, J, M1 and M2. The 213-SNP set was divisible into 104 SNPs that were specific to a single group, and 109 cross-group SNPs that defined relationships among groups. This last set was evaluated by criteria of continuities in relationships between groups and breaks in such patterns, to identify crossover points and ascribe them to lineages. For the 99 cross-group SNPs in the genome's long unique region, it was seen that the E2 and M2 groups were almost completely distinct in their SNP alleles, and the E1 group was derived from a recombinant of E2 and M2. A valid phylogenetic tree could thus be constructed for the four E2 and two M2 strains. There was no substantive evidence for recombination within the E2 group or the E1 group (ten strains). The J and M1 groups each contained only one strain, and both were interpreted as having substantial distinct histories plus possible recombinant elements from the E2 and M2 lineages. The view of VZV recombination and phylogeny reached represents a major clarification of deep relationships among VZV lineages. PMID:19264671

  8. Advances in the treatment of varicella-zoster virus infections.

    PubMed

    Andrei, G; Snoeck, R

    2013-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes two distinct diseases, varicella (chickenpox) and shingles (herpes zoster). Chickenpox occurs subsequent to primary infection, while herpes zoster (usually associated with aging and immunosuppression) appears as a consequence of reactivation of latent virus. The major complication of shingles is postherpetic neuralgia. Vaccination strategies to prevent varicella or shingles and the current status of antivirals against VZV will be discussed in this chapter. Varivax®, a live-attenuated vaccine, is available for pediatric varicella. Zostavax® is used to boost VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity in adults older than 50 years, which results in a decrease in the burden of herpes zoster and pain related to postherpetic neuralgia. Regardless of the availability of a vaccine, new antiviral agents are necessary for treatment of VZV infections. Current drugs approved for therapy of VZV infections include nucleoside analogues that target the viral DNA polymerase and depend on the viral thymidine kinase for their activation. Novel anti-VZV drugs have recently been evaluated in clinical trials, including the bicyclic nucleoside analogue FV-100, the helicase-primase inhibitor ASP2151, and valomaciclovir (prodrug of the acyclic guanosine derivative H2G). Different candidate VZV drugs have been described in recent years. New anti-VZV drugs should be as safe as and more effective than current gold standards for the treatment of VZV, that is, acyclovir and its prodrug valacyclovir.

  9. Fatal disseminated varicella zoster infection following zoster vaccination in an immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Costa, E; Buxton, J; Brown, J; Templeton, K E; Breuer, J; Johannessen, I

    2016-01-01

    A 79-year-old man with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia presented with fever and a widespread vesicular rash on 19 November 2014. The patient had not been under immunosuppressive regime for 6 months. He had received a shingles vaccine on 14th October and developed flu-like symptoms after 2 weeks. Intravenous antimicrobial therapy including aciclovir was started. He remained stable with no evidence of systemic involvement. On day 5, he developed respiratory and renal failure that required transfer to intensive care unit. Vesicle fluid, bronchoalveolar lavage and plasma were positive for varicella zoster virus by PCR. Slight clinical improvement allowed extubation on day 16. He subsequently deteriorated and died on day 25. Multiorgan failure was considered the immediate cause of death whereas disseminated varicella zoster infection was stated in the medical certificate as the other condition leading to this outcome. Varicella zoster Oka vaccine strain was detected in vesicle fluid, using PCR. PMID:27147629

  10. Varicella Zoster Virus and Internal Root Resorption: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Talebzadeh, Bita; Rahimi, Saeed; Abdollahi, Amir Ardalan; Nouroloyuni, Ahmad; Asghari, Vahide

    2015-08-01

    Herpes zoster is a viral infection caused by the reactivation of the varicella zoster virus. One of the less well-recognized maxillofacial complications is tooth root resorption. To our knowledge, this is the first case report about internal resorption associated with varicella zoster virus involving different dental quadrants. A 38-year-old woman presented with internal resorption of maxillary canine and first premolar tooth roots on the right quadrant and generalized internal resorption of second molars of both mandibular quadrants. The patient's medical history showed mild oral lichen planus and infection with varicella zoster virus (chickenpox) with severe clinical manifestations 5 years previously. The patient developed diabetes mellitus type I and hypothyroidism a short time after varicella zoster virus infection, and by the time of infection with this virus, oral lichen planus had progressed from the reticular pattern to the generalized severe erosive form. Viral etiology could also be considered in these diseases. The root canals of the affected teeth were debrided, irrigated, and dried, and calcium hydroxide paste was placed in the root canals for a week during the first treatment session. The root canals were obturated during the second session. Six-month follow-up showed improvement of oral lichen planus and resolution of widening of periodontal ligament of the affected teeth, with follow-up radiographs revealing no periapical problems. It appears some cases of internal root resorption classified as idiopathic might have viral etiology. Therefore, it is recommended that patients be questioned about a history of chickenpox and herpes zoster.

  11. Salivary Varicella Zoster Virus in Astronauts and in Patients of Herpes Zoster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Satish; Pierson, Duane L.

    2010-01-01

    Spaceflight is a uniquely stressful environment with astronauts experiencing a variety of stressors including: isolation and confinement, psychosocial, noise, sleep deprivation, anxiety, variable gravitational forces, and increased radiation. These stressors are manifested through the HPA and SAM axes resulting in increased stress hormones. Diminished T-lymphocyte functions lead to reactivation of latent herpes viruses in astronauts during spaceflight. Herpes simplex virus reactivated with symptoms during spaceflight whereas Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivate and are shed without symptoms. EBV and VZV are shed in saliva and CMV in the urine. The levels of EBV shed in astronauts increased 10-fold during the flight; CMV and VZV are not typically shed in low stressed individuals, but both were shed in astronauts during spaceflight. All herpesviruses were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Culturing revealed that VZV shed in saliva was infectious virus. The PCR technology was extended to test saliva of 54 shingles patients. All shingles patients shed VZV in their saliva, and the levels followed the course of the disease. Viremia was also found to be common during shingles. The technology may be used before zoster lesions appear allowing for prevention of disease. The technology may be used for rapid detection of VZV in doctors? offices. These studies demonstrated the value of applying technologies designed for astronauts to people on Earth.

  12. Varicella zoster with erythema multiforme in a young girl: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Kishore, B Nanda; Ankadavar, Nandini S; Kamath, Ganesh H; Martis, Jacintha

    2014-05-01

    Erythema multiforme (EM) is an acute, self-limited, mucocutaneous disorder regarded as a hypersensitivity reaction which is triggered by various factors like infection, drugs, and food. Infectious agents are considered to be a major cause of EM other than idiopathic cause. A young girl presented with fluid-filled lesions all over the body of 3 days duration with history of similar lesions with fever in her sibling 2 weeks prior to admission. This was followed by large fluid-filled lesions with halo 3 days thereafter over the trunk, extremities suggesting target lesions of EM. The diagnosis was confirmed by cytology and positive serology. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) has rarely been reported as an etiological agent, despite its high incidence in childhood. VZV as an etiology of EM in a young girl has not been reported so far. This case was reported for its rare association of EM and varicella zoster and also for its rare presentation in a young girl.

  13. Rapid Detection of the Varicella Zoster Virus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Michelle P.; Harding, Robert

    2011-01-01

    1.Technology Description-Researchers discovered that when the Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) reactivates from latency in the body, the virus is consistently present in saliva before the appearance of skin lesions. A small saliva sample is mixed with a specialized reagent in a test kit. If the virus is present in the saliva sample, the mixture turns a red color. The sensitivity and specificity emanates from an antibody-antigen reaction. This technology is a rapid, non-invasive, point of-of-care testing kit for detecting the virus from a saliva sample. The device is easy to use and can be used in clinics and in remote locations to quickly detect VZV and begin treatment with antiviral drugs. 2.Market Opportunity- RST Bioscience will be the first and only company to market a rapid, same day test kit for the detection of VZV in saliva. The RST detection test kit will have several advantages over existing, competitive technology. The test kit is self contained and laboratory equipment is not required for analysis of the sample. Only a single saliva sample is required to be taken instead of blood or cerebral spinal fluid. The test kit is portable, sterile and disposable after use. RST detection test kits require no electrical power or expensive storage equipment and can be used in remote locations. 3.Market Analysis- According to the CDC, it is estimated that 1 million cases of shingles occur each year in the U.S. with more than half over the age of sixty. There is a high demand for rapid diagnostics by the public. The point-of-care testing (POCT) market is growing faster than other segments of in vitro diagnostics. According to a July 2007 InteLab Corporation industry report the overall market for POCT was forecast to increase from $10.3 billion in 2005 to $18.7 billion by 2011. The market value of this test kit has not been determined. 4.Competition- The VZV vaccine prevents 50% of cases and reduces neuralgia by 66%. The most popular test detects VZV-specific IgM antibody

  14. Rapid Detection of the Varicella Zoster Virus in Saliva

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Mehta, Satish K.; Cohrs, Randall J.; Gilden, Don H.; Harding, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes chicken pox on first exposure (usually in children), and reactivates from latency causing shingles (usually in adults). Shingles can be extremely painful, causing nerve damage, organ damage, and blindness in some cases. The virus can be life-threatening in immune-compromised individuals. The virus is very difficult to culture for diagnosis, requiring a week or longer. This invention is a rapid test for VZV from a saliva sample and can be performed in a doctor s office. The kit is small, compact, and lightweight. Detec tion is sensitive, specific, and noninvasive (no needles); only a saliva sample is required. The test provides results in minutes. The entire test is performed in a closed system, with no exposure to infectious materials. The components are made mostly of inexpensive plastic injection molded parts, many of which can be purchased off the shelf and merely assembled. All biological waste is contained for fast, efficient disposal. This innovation was made possible because of discovery of a NASA scientists flight experiment showing the presence of VZV in saliva during high stress periods and disease. This finding enables clinicians to quickly screen patients for VZV and treat the ones that show positive results with antiviral medicines. This promotes a rapid recovery, easing of pain and symptoms, and reduces chances of complications from zoster. Screening of high-risk patients could be incorporated as part of a regular physical exam. These patients include the elderly, pregnant women, and immune-compromised individuals. In these patients, VZV can be a life-threatening disease. In both high- and low-risk patients, early detection and treatment with antiviral drugs can dramatically decrease or even eliminate the clinical manifestation of disease.

  15. [Varicella-zoster virus infection in a child complicated with bacterial pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Wolthers, Benjamin Ole; Thiested, Ebbe; Gyhrs, Anette F

    2015-01-26

    This case report describes how a three-year-old girl referred to our paediatric ward, infected with varicella-zoster virus and a bacterial pneumonia causing atelectasis. The girl did not respond to initial treatment with intravenous antibiotics. Only after a lung drain was inserted she gradually recovered. We briefly describe the incidence of bacterial pneumonia as a complication to varicella-zoster virus and raise the question whether to vaccinate against varicella-zoster virus.

  16. Central nervous system infections caused by varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Chamizo, Francisco J; Gilarranz, Raúl; Hernández, Melisa; Ramos, Diana; Pena, María José

    2016-08-01

    We carried out a clinical and epidemiological study of adult patients with varicella-zoster virus central nervous system infection diagnosed by PCR in cerebrospinal fluid. Twenty-six patients were included. Twelve (46.2 %) patients were diagnosed with meningitis and fourteen (53.8 %) with meningoencephalitis. Twelve (46.2 %) had cranial nerves involvement (mainly the facial (VII) and vestibulocochlear (VIII) nerves), six (23.1 %) had cerebellar involvement, fourteen (53.8 %) had rash, and four (15.4 %) developed Ramsay Hunt syndrome. Three (11.5 %) patients had sequelae. Length of stay was significantly lower in patients diagnosed with meningitis and treatment with acyclovir was more frequent in patients diagnosed with meningoencephalitis. We believe routine detection of varicella-zoster virus, regardless of the presence of rash, is important because the patient may benefit from a different clinical management.

  17. Surface Antigens Produced by Herpesviruses: Varicella-Zoster Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Michio; Barron, Almen L.

    1973-01-01

    Surface antigen(s) was demonstrated by the mixed agglutination technique on cell cultures infected with varicella-zoster virus (V-Z). The reactions appeared to be specific for V-Z, and no cross-reaction was obtained with herpes simplex virus (HSV). V-Z surface antigen had similar physicochemical properties to that of HSV. It was stable to heating at 56 C and treatment with 1% Formalin, 2,4-dinitrophenol, and periodate, whereas it was undetectable after exposure to acetone or ethanol. Antibodies detecting surface antigen were present in high titer in sera from varicella or herpes zoster patients and paralleled titers obtained by the complement fixation test. Images PMID:4352455

  18. Immunological evasion of immediate-early varicella zoster virus proteins.

    PubMed

    Meysman, Pieter; Fedorov, Dmitry; Van Tendeloo, Viggo; Ogunjimi, Benson; Laukens, Kris

    2016-07-01

    The varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes the childhood disease commonly known as chickenpox and can later in life reactivate as herpes zoster. The adaptive immune system is known to play an important role in suppressing VZV reactivation. A central aspect of this system is the presentation of VZV-derived peptides by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Here, we investigate if key VZV proteins have evolved their amino acid sequence to avoid presentation by MHC based on predictive models of MHC-peptide affinity. This study shows that the immediate-early proteins of all characterized VZV strains are profoundly depleted for high-affinity MHC-I-restricted epitopes. The same depletion can be found in its closest animal analog, the simian varicella virus. Further orthology analysis towards other herpes viruses suggests that the protein amino acid frequency is one of the primary drivers of targeted epitope depletion. PMID:27020058

  19. Necrotising fasciitis: a sequelae of varicella zoster infection.

    PubMed

    Shirley, Rebecca; Mackey, Simon; Meagher, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Necrotising fasciitis (NF) can complicate varicella zoster virus in children. This is rare and has not previously been reported in the plastic surgery literature. We report a case of a female toddler who developed necrotising fasciitis secondary to chicken pox. Her presentation and progress are reported, the diagnosis of necrotising fasciitis in children and the small number of case series and case control studies are discussed.

  20. Genome differences among varicella-zoster viruses isolated in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thawaranantha, D; Balachandra, K; Jongtrakulsiri, S; Yamkunthong, W; Chimabutra, K; Bhumiswasdi, J

    1995-12-01

    The DNAs of 17 isolates of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) obtained from 17 Thai individuals with normal varicella or zoster infections (no underlying diseases) were compared by restriction endonuclease analysis using BglI, PstI, EcoRI, SmaI and BamHI. The DNA of the Japanese strain, Kawaguchi, was also conducted as a reference DNA. All of virus isolates were confirmed for existence of VZV and VZV-DNA by immunofluorescent test and DNA-hybridization, respectively. Almost all of the Thai epidemiologically unrelated isolates and the Kawaguchi strain could be individually differentiated using BglI, PstI, and EcoRI. The other two isolates were identical in restriction profiles even after five endonuclease digestions which SmaI and BamHI were the two more enzymes used, therefore, they could be discriminated totally into 16 strains from overall 17 isolates. These findings demonstrate the strain variation of wild-type varicella-zoster viruses isolated in Thailand.

  1. Clinical and molecular aspects of varicella zoster virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Gilden, Don; Nagel, Maria A.; Mahalingam, Ravi; Mueller, Niklaus H.; Brazeau, Elizabeth A.; Pugazhenthi, Subbiah; Cohrs, Randall J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary A declining cell-mediated immunity to varicella zoster virus (VZV) with advancing age or immunosuppression results in virus reactivation from latently infected human ganglia anywhere along the neuraxis. Virus reactivation produces zoster, often followed by chronic pain (postherpetic neuralgia or PHN) as well as vasculopathy, myelopathy, retinal necrosis and cerebellitis. VZV reactivation also produces pain without rash (zoster sine herpete). Vaccination after age 60 reduces the incidence of shingles by 51%, PHN by 66% and the burden of illness by 61%. However, even if every healthy adult over age 60 years is vaccinated, there would still be about 500,000 zoster cases annually in the United States alone, about 200,000 of whom will experience PHN. Analyses of viral nucleic acid and gene expression in latently infected human ganglia and in an animal model of varicella latency in primates are serving to determine the mechanism(s) of VZV reactivation with the aim of preventing reactivation and the clinical sequelae. PMID:19946620

  2. The challenging patient with varicella-zoster virus disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) reactivation from latently infected ganglia causes multiple neurologic diseases. The most common is herpes zoster, which is frequently complicated by postherpetic neuralgia, meningoencephalitis, and vasculopathy, including VZV temporal arteritis, myelopathy, and retinal necrosis. All of these disorders can develop without rash. Importantly, VZV vasculopathy is emerging as a significant cause of TIAs and stroke. In particular, a subset of patients who present with symptoms and signs of giant cell arteritis (GCA), but whose temporal artery biopsies are GCA-negative, have multifocal VZV vasculopathy with temporal artery infection. Herein we focus on the specific diagnostic and therapeutic challenges that clinical neurologists encounter in diseases caused by VZV, discuss guidelines for zoster vaccine, and highlight molecular features of VZV latency with a focus on preventing the serious neurologic and ocular complications of VZV reactivation. PMID:23914320

  3. Fatal varicella due to the vaccine-strain varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Leung, Jessica; Siegel, Subhadra; Jones, James F; Schulte, Cynthia; Blog, Debra; Schmid, D Scott; Bialek, Stephanie R; Marin, Mona

    2014-01-01

    We describe a death in a 15-mo-old girl who developed a varicella-like rash 20 d after varicella vaccination that lasted for 2 mo despite acyclovir treatment. The rash was confirmed to be due to vaccine-strain varicella-zoster virus (VZV). This is the first case of fatal varicella due to vaccine-strain VZV reported from the United States. The patient developed severe respiratory complications that worsened with each new crop of varicella lesions; vaccine-strain VZV was detected in the bronchial lavage specimen. Sepsis and multi-organ failure led to death. The patient did not have a previously diagnosed primary immune deficiency, but her failure to thrive and repeated hospitalizations early in life (starting at 5 mo) for presumed infections and respiratory compromise treated with corticosteroids were suggestive of a primary or acquired immune deficiency. Providers should monitor for adverse reactions after varicella vaccination. If severe adverse events develop, acyclovir should be administered as soon as possible. The possibility of acyclovir resistance and use of foscarnet should be considered if lesions do not improve after 10 d of treatment (or if they become atypical [e.g., verrucous]). Experience with use of varicella vaccine indicates that the vaccine has an excellent safety profile and that serious adverse events are very rare and mostly described in immunocompromised patients. The benefit of vaccination in preventing severe disease and mortality outweigh the low risk of severe events occurring after vaccination.

  4. Fatal varicella due to the vaccine-strain varicella-zoster virus

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Jessica; Siegel, Subhadra; Jones, James F; Schulte, Cynthia; Blog, Debra; Scott Schmid, D; Bialek, Stephanie R; Marin, Mona

    2014-01-01

    We describe a death in a 15-mo-old girl who developed a varicella-like rash 20 d after varicella vaccination that lasted for 2 mo despite acyclovir treatment. The rash was confirmed to be due to vaccine-strain varicella-zoster virus (VZV). This is the first case of fatal varicella due to vaccine-strain VZV reported from the United States. The patient developed severe respiratory complications that worsened with each new crop of varicella lesions; vaccine-strain VZV was detected in the bronchial lavage specimen. Sepsis and multi-organ failure led to death. The patient did not have a previously diagnosed primary immune deficiency, but her failure to thrive and repeated hospitalizations early in life (starting at 5 mo) for presumed infections and respiratory compromise treated with corticosteroids were suggestive of a primary or acquired immune deficiency. Providers should monitor for adverse reactions after varicella vaccination. If severe adverse events develop, acyclovir should be administered as soon as possible. The possibility of acyclovir resistance and use of foscarnet should be considered if lesions do not improve after 10 d of treatment (or if they become atypical [e.g., verrucous]). Experience with use of varicella vaccine indicates that the vaccine has an excellent safety profile and that serious adverse events are very rare and mostly described in immunocompromised patients. The benefit of vaccination in preventing severe disease and mortality outweigh the low risk of severe events occurring after vaccination. PMID:23982221

  5. Brief communication: A 61-year-old woman with vesicular eruption after varicella zoster vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Spriet, Sarah; Banks, Taylor A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vesicular rashes are associated with a variety of infectious and noninfectious causes. Objective: To discuss the differential diagnoses of vesicular rashes. Methods: We present the clinical case of an adult woman who was immunocompetent and who developed several clear fluid-filled vesicles on her upper extremity within days of receiving the varicella zoster vaccine. Over the next several days, the skin eruption generalized, and she developed new lesions in various stages of healing. Results: After a detailed history and further studies were obtained, a final diagnosis was made. Conclusion: In patients who have recently been vaccinated, a high index of suspicion for an adverse vaccine reaction should be maintained. PMID:27349562

  6. Neonatal vaccine-strain varicella-zoster virus infection 22 days after maternal postpartum vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kluthe, Margaret; Herrera, Angel; Blanca, Haydee; Leung, Jessica; Bialek, Stephanie R; Schmid, D Scott

    2012-09-01

    A 25-day-old infant developed varicella 22 days after her mother received varicella vaccine postpartum. Infection with vaccine-strain varicella-zoster virus was confirmed by genetic analysis. The mother had no postvaccination rash nor did other contacts have rash or recent vaccination. The potential means of transmission to the infant are explored.

  7. Herpes zoster in a 2-year-old vaccinated against varicella.

    PubMed

    Ulman, Catherine A; Trevino, Julian J; Gandhi, Rishi K

    2014-01-01

    Herpes zoster is uncommon in the pediatric population. We report a case of herpes zoster in a 2-year-old boy who received the live attenuated varicella zoster virus vaccination at his 12-month pediatric visit. The child was treated with acyclovir and recovered without complications.

  8. Bilateral Retrobulbar Optic Neuritis Caused by Varicella Zoster Virus in a Patient with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Duda, Jose F.; Castro, Jose G.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To report on a case of bilateral retrobulbar optic neuritis in a patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) caused by varicella-zoster virus (VZV); and to review the literature focusing on: cases reported, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment. Presentation of Case A 38-year-old woman with AIDS presented with a 10-day history of progressive bilateral visual loss and ocular pain. She had bilateral dilated pupils with no light perception; the fundoscopic examination was normal. Facial herpes zoster lesions appeared on the second day of hospitalization Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings were compatible with a bilateral optic neuritis; the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) showed pleocytosis, increased proteins and a positive VZV-DNA PCR. She was treated with intravenous acyclovir and corticosteroids and was able, when discharged 2 weeks after admission, to carry out activities of daily living. Discussion VZV retrobulbar optic neuritis has previously been reported in 12 patients with AIDS, more than half of the cases had concomitant herpes zoster and an associated retinopathy. A positive VZV-DNA in the CSF is indicative of VZV infection, initial use of intravenous acyclovir is recommended, and the concomitant use of corticosteroids would be a prudent choice; the duration of antiviral therapy remains undefined. Conclusion VZV retrobulbar optic neuritis in AIDS patients can occur with or without herpes zoster. It is a sight-threatening infectious and inflammatory process requiring the advice of specialists in infectious diseases, ophthalmology, neurology and viral microbiology. PMID:26740936

  9. [Varicella Zoster infections in adults: beyond shingles?].

    PubMed

    Buvelot, Hélène; Lebowitz, Dan; Huttner, Benedikt; Schibler, Manuel; Kaiser, Laurent; Abbas, Mohamed

    2016-04-13

    Chickenpox is a generally benign condition during childhood, but it can cause severe complications when affecting teenage or adult patients. Immunodeficiency and pregnancy are risk factors for disseminated disease with pulmonary, neurological and/or hepatic involvement. Reinfection may be more frequent than previously thought, and management is identical to that of primary infection. The most common manifestation of viral reactivation is shingles, but it can also cause meningitis and vasculopathy, as well as disseminated herpes zoster in the immunocompromised patient. In this article, we will review the clinical manifestations and management of VZV infection in adults.

  10. [Varicella Zoster infections in adults: beyond shingles?].

    PubMed

    Buvelot, Hélène; Lebowitz, Dan; Huttner, Benedikt; Schibler, Manuel; Kaiser, Laurent; Abbas, Mohamed

    2016-04-13

    Chickenpox is a generally benign condition during childhood, but it can cause severe complications when affecting teenage or adult patients. Immunodeficiency and pregnancy are risk factors for disseminated disease with pulmonary, neurological and/or hepatic involvement. Reinfection may be more frequent than previously thought, and management is identical to that of primary infection. The most common manifestation of viral reactivation is shingles, but it can also cause meningitis and vasculopathy, as well as disseminated herpes zoster in the immunocompromised patient. In this article, we will review the clinical manifestations and management of VZV infection in adults. PMID:27263149

  11. [Varicella-zoster virus infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, H; Inoue, T; Okoshi, Y; Mori, S; Ohashi, K; Maeda, Y; Sasaki, T; Okuyama, Y; Hiruma, K; Sakamaki, H

    2000-01-01

    Of 264 patients aged 15 years or more who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation between 1989 and September 1998 at the Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, 47 were infected by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV). In 2 patients, visceral disease preceded cutaneous dissemination. One of these patients exhibited gastrointestinal symptoms followed by disseminated skin rash 6 days later. In the other patient, epigastralgia developed and was followed by seizures secondary to meningitis; the appearance of a skin rash 5 days after these initial symptoms yielded the diagnosis. Early diagnosis and treatment of VZV infection are important, especially for patients who present with visceral symptoms suspected to be due to VZV. PMID:10695394

  12. Frequency of varicella zoster virus DNA in human adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Badani, Hussain; White, Teresa; Schulick, Nicole; Raeburn, Christopher D; Topkaya, Ibrahim; Gilden, Don; Nagel, Maria A

    2016-06-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) becomes latent in ganglionic neurons derived from neural crest cells. Because the adrenal gland also contains medullary chromaffin cells of neural crest origin, we examined human adrenal glands and medullary chromaffin cell tumors (pheochromocytomas) for VZV and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). We found VZV, but not HSV-1, DNA in 4/63 (6 %) normal adrenal glands. No VZV transcripts or antigens were detected in the 4 VZV DNA-positive samples. No VZV or HSV-1 DNA was found in 21 pheochromocytomas.

  13. Neurological Disease Produced by Varicella Zoster Virus Reactivation Without Rash

    PubMed Central

    Gilden, Don; Cohrs, Randall J.; Mahalingam, Ravi; Nagel, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    Reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV) from latently infected human ganglia usually produces herpes zoster (shingles), characterized by dermatomal distribution pain and rash. Zoster is often followed by chronic pain (postherpetic neuralgia or PHN) as well as meningitis or meningoencephalitis, cerebellitts, isolated cranial nerve palsies that produce ophthalmoplegia or the Ramsay Hunt syndrome, multiple cranial nerve palsies (polyneuritis cranialis), vasculopathy. myelopathy, and various inflammatory disorders of the eye. Importantly, VZV reactivation can produce chronic radicular pain without rash (zoster sine herpete), as well as all the neurological disorders listed above without rash. The protean neurological and ocular disorders produced by VZV in the absence of rash are a challenge to the practicing clinician. The presentation of these conditions vanes from acute to subacute to chronic. Virological confirmation requires the demonstration of amplifiable VZV DNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or in blood mononuclear cells, or the presence of anti-VZV IgG antibody in CSF or of anti-VZV IgM antibody in CSF or serum. PMID:20186614

  14. ATYPICAL PRESENTATION OF RECURRENT VARICELLA ZOSTER VIRUS INFECTION: A CASE REPORT AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE.

    PubMed

    Bunyaratavej, Sumanas; Prasertyothin, Supanan; Leeyaphan, Charussri

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent varicella infection is rare but has been reported in immunocompromised patients. We present a patient with atypical recurrent varicella infection who had disseminated central crusting papular lesions without dermatomal distribution. Serology showed previous varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection and the lesions were positive for VZV DNA, consistent with recurrent VZV infection. Atypical recurrent varicella infection is probably an under-recognized condition. VZV infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of ecthyma-like lesions in an immunocompromised host.

  15. ATYPICAL PRESENTATION OF RECURRENT VARICELLA ZOSTER VIRUS INFECTION: A CASE REPORT AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE.

    PubMed

    Bunyaratavej, Sumanas; Prasertyothin, Supanan; Leeyaphan, Charussri

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent varicella infection is rare but has been reported in immunocompromised patients. We present a patient with atypical recurrent varicella infection who had disseminated central crusting papular lesions without dermatomal distribution. Serology showed previous varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection and the lesions were positive for VZV DNA, consistent with recurrent VZV infection. Atypical recurrent varicella infection is probably an under-recognized condition. VZV infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of ecthyma-like lesions in an immunocompromised host. PMID:26513902

  16. Different vaccination strategies in Spain and its impact on severe varicella and zoster.

    PubMed

    Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Walter, Stefan; Gonzalez-Escalada, Alba; Garcia-Garcia, Laura; Marín-García, Patricia; Gil-de-Miguel, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Varicella vaccines available in Spain were marketed in 1998 and 2003 for non-routine use. Since 2006 some regions decided to include varicella vaccination in their regional routine vaccination programmes at 15-18 months of age. Other regions chose the strategy of vaccinating susceptible adolescents. This study shows the trends in severe varicella zoster virus infections through the analysis of the hospital discharges related to varicella and herpes zoster in the general population from 2005 to 2010 in Spain. A total of 11,125 hospital discharges related to varicella and 27,736 related to herpes zoster were reported during the study period. The overall annual rate of hospitalization was 4.14 cases per 100,000 for varicella and 10.33 cases per 100,000 for herpes zoster. In children younger than 5 years old varicella hospitalization rate significantly decreased from 46.77 in 2005 to 26.55 per 100,000 in 2010. The hospitalization rate related to herpes zoster slightly increased from 9.71 in 2005 to 10.90 per 100,000 in 2010. This increase was mainly due to the significant increase occurring in the >84 age group, from 69.55 to 97.68 per 100,000. When gathering for regions taking into account varicella vaccine strategy, varicella related hospitalizations decreased significantly more in those regions which included the vaccine at 15-18 months of age as a routine vaccine comparing with those vaccinating at 10-14 years old. No significant differences were found in herpes zoster hospitalization rates regarding the varicella vaccination strategy among regions. Severe varicella infections decreased after implementation of varicella vaccination in Spain. This decrease was significantly higher in regions including the vaccine at 15-18 months of age compared with those vaccinating susceptible adolescents.

  17. Varicella zoster virus and relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Julio; Corona, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disorder; however, little is known about the triggering factors of the abnormal immune response. Different viruses from the herpes family have been mentioned as potential participants. Here, we review the evidences that support the association of varicella zoster virus (VZV) with MS. Epidemiological studies from geographical areas, where incidence of MS has increased in recent decades, pointed out a high frequency of varicella and zoster in the clinical antecedents of MS patients, and also laboratory investigations have found large quantities of DNA from VZV in leucocytes and cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients restricted to the ephemeral period of MS relapse, followed by disappearance of the virus during remission. The above observations and the peculiar features of VZV, mainly characterized by its neurotropism and long periods of latency followed by viral reactivation, support the idea on the participation of VZV in the etiology of MS. However, as with reports from studies with other viruses, particularly Epstein Barr virus, conflicting results on confirmatory studies about the presence of viral gene products in brain tissue indicate the need for further research on the potential participation of VZV in the etiology of MS.

  18. Varicella zoster meningitis complicating combined anti-tumor necrosis factor and corticosteroid therapy in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Christopher; Walters, Brennan; Fedorak, Richard N

    2013-06-01

    Opportunistic viral infections are a well-recognized complication of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Cases of severe or atypical varicella zoster virus infection, both primary and latent reactivation, have been described in association with immunosuppression of Crohn's disease (CD) patients. However, central nervous system varicella zoster virus infections have been rarely described, and there are no previous reports of varicella zoster virus meningitis associated with anti-TNF therapy among the CD population. Here, we present the case of a 40-year-old male with severe ileocecal-CD who developed a reactivation of dermatomal herpes zoster after treatment with prednisone and adalimumab. The reactivation presented as debilitating varicella zoster virus meningitis, which was not completely resolved despite aggressive antiviral therapy with prolonged intravenous acyclovir and subsequent oral valacyclovir. This is the first reported case of opportunistic central nervous system varicella zoster infection complicating anti-TNF therapy in the CD population. This paper also reviews the literature on varicella zoster virus infections of immunosuppressed IBD patients and the importance of vaccination prior to initiation of anti-TNF therapy.

  19. Varicella-zoster virus-specific antibody responses in 50-59-year-old recipients of zoster vaccine.

    PubMed

    Levin, Myron J; Schmader, Kenneth E; Gnann, John W; McNeil, Shelly A; Vesikari, Timo; Betts, Robert F; Keay, Susan; Stek, Jon E; Bundick, Nickoya D; Su, Shu-Chih; Zhao, Yanli; Li, Xiaoming; Chan, Ivan S F; Annunziato, Paula W; Parrino, Janie

    2013-11-01

    Prevaccination and 6-week postvaccination samples from the immunogenicity substudy (n = 2269) of the zoster vaccine (ZV) efficacy trial (N = 22 439) in 50-59-year-old subjects were examined for varicella-zoster virus-specific antibody responses to vaccination. The varicella-zoster virus geometric mean titer (GMT) and geometric mean fold rise were higher in ZV recipients than in placebo recipients (GMT, 660.0 vs 293.1 glycoprotein enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay units/mL [P < .001], respectively; geometric mean fold rise, 2.31 vs 1.00 [P < .025]). In each group there was a strong inverse correlation between postvaccination GMT and risk of subsequent herpes zoster. Although these data provide strong evidence that relates ZV-induced antibody and the risk of herpes zoster, a protective threshold was not determined. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00534248.

  20. Microbiology laboratory and the management of mother-child varicella-zoster virus infection

    PubMed Central

    De Paschale, Massimo; Clerici, Pierangelo

    2016-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus, which is responsible for varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (shingles), is ubiquitous and causes an acute infection among children, especially those aged less than six years. As 90% of adults have had varicella in childhood, it is unusual to encounter an infected pregnant woman but, if the disease does appear, it can lead to complications for both the mother and fetus or newborn. The major maternal complications include pneumonia, which can lead to death if not treated. If the virus passes to the fetus, congenital varicella syndrome, neonatal varicella (particularly serious if maternal rash appears in the days immediately before or after childbirth) or herpes zoster in the early years of life may occur depending on the time of infection. A Microbiology laboratory can help in the diagnosis and management of mother-child infection at four main times: (1) when a pregnant woman has been exposed to varicella or herpes zoster, a prompt search for specific antibodies can determine whether she is susceptible to, or protected against infection; (2) when a pregnant woman develops clinical symptoms consistent with varicella, the diagnosis is usually clinical, but a laboratory can be crucial if the symptoms are doubtful or otherwise unclear (atypical patterns in immunocompromised subjects, patients with post-vaccination varicella, or subjects who have received immunoglobulins), or if there is a need for a differential diagnosis between varicella and other types of dermatoses with vesicle formation; (3) when a prenatal diagnosis of uterine infection is required in order to detect cases of congenital varicella syndrome after the onset of varicella in the mother; and (4) when the baby is born and it is necessary to confirm a diagnosis of varicella (and its complications), make a differential diagnosis between varicella and other diseases with similar symptoms, or confirm a causal relationship between maternal varicella and malformations in a newborn

  1. Microbiology laboratory and the management of mother-child varicella-zoster virus infection.

    PubMed

    De Paschale, Massimo; Clerici, Pierangelo

    2016-08-12

    Varicella-zoster virus, which is responsible for varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (shingles), is ubiquitous and causes an acute infection among children, especially those aged less than six years. As 90% of adults have had varicella in childhood, it is unusual to encounter an infected pregnant woman but, if the disease does appear, it can lead to complications for both the mother and fetus or newborn. The major maternal complications include pneumonia, which can lead to death if not treated. If the virus passes to the fetus, congenital varicella syndrome, neonatal varicella (particularly serious if maternal rash appears in the days immediately before or after childbirth) or herpes zoster in the early years of life may occur depending on the time of infection. A Microbiology laboratory can help in the diagnosis and management of mother-child infection at four main times: (1) when a pregnant woman has been exposed to varicella or herpes zoster, a prompt search for specific antibodies can determine whether she is susceptible to, or protected against infection; (2) when a pregnant woman develops clinical symptoms consistent with varicella, the diagnosis is usually clinical, but a laboratory can be crucial if the symptoms are doubtful or otherwise unclear (atypical patterns in immunocompromised subjects, patients with post-vaccination varicella, or subjects who have received immunoglobulins), or if there is a need for a differential diagnosis between varicella and other types of dermatoses with vesicle formation; (3) when a prenatal diagnosis of uterine infection is required in order to detect cases of congenital varicella syndrome after the onset of varicella in the mother; and (4) when the baby is born and it is necessary to confirm a diagnosis of varicella (and its complications), make a differential diagnosis between varicella and other diseases with similar symptoms, or confirm a causal relationship between maternal varicella and malformations in a newborn.

  2. Microbiology laboratory and the management of mother-child varicella-zoster virus infection.

    PubMed

    De Paschale, Massimo; Clerici, Pierangelo

    2016-08-12

    Varicella-zoster virus, which is responsible for varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (shingles), is ubiquitous and causes an acute infection among children, especially those aged less than six years. As 90% of adults have had varicella in childhood, it is unusual to encounter an infected pregnant woman but, if the disease does appear, it can lead to complications for both the mother and fetus or newborn. The major maternal complications include pneumonia, which can lead to death if not treated. If the virus passes to the fetus, congenital varicella syndrome, neonatal varicella (particularly serious if maternal rash appears in the days immediately before or after childbirth) or herpes zoster in the early years of life may occur depending on the time of infection. A Microbiology laboratory can help in the diagnosis and management of mother-child infection at four main times: (1) when a pregnant woman has been exposed to varicella or herpes zoster, a prompt search for specific antibodies can determine whether she is susceptible to, or protected against infection; (2) when a pregnant woman develops clinical symptoms consistent with varicella, the diagnosis is usually clinical, but a laboratory can be crucial if the symptoms are doubtful or otherwise unclear (atypical patterns in immunocompromised subjects, patients with post-vaccination varicella, or subjects who have received immunoglobulins), or if there is a need for a differential diagnosis between varicella and other types of dermatoses with vesicle formation; (3) when a prenatal diagnosis of uterine infection is required in order to detect cases of congenital varicella syndrome after the onset of varicella in the mother; and (4) when the baby is born and it is necessary to confirm a diagnosis of varicella (and its complications), make a differential diagnosis between varicella and other diseases with similar symptoms, or confirm a causal relationship between maternal varicella and malformations in a newborn

  3. On the viral hypothesis of multiple sclerosis: participation of varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Julio

    2007-11-15

    Recent studies, including our own, have accumulated evidence suggesting the etiological participation of varicella-zoster virus in multiple sclerosis. If confirmed, complex issues of individual susceptibility and immunopathogenesis would have to be unveiled.

  4. Decreased varicella and increased herpes zoster incidence at a sentinel medical deputising service in a setting of increasing varicella vaccine coverage in Victoria, Australia, 1998 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Kelly, H A; Grant, K A; Gidding, H; Carville, K S

    2014-10-16

    We performed an ecological study using sentinel consultation data from a medical deputising service to assess the impact of increasing coverage with childhood varicella vaccine on the incidence risk of varicella and zoster in the population served by the deputising service in Victoria, Australia from 1998 to 2012. Following a successful vaccination programme, the incidence of varicella in Australia was modelled to decrease and the incidence of zoster to increase, based on a theoretical decrease in boosting of zoster immunity following a decrease in wild varicella virus circulation due to vaccination. Incidence risks (consultation proportions for varicella and zoster) were directly age-standardised to the Melbourne population in 2000, when varicella vaccine was first available. Age-standardised varicella incidence risk peaked in 2000 and halved by 2012. Age-standardised zoster incidence risk remained constant from 1998 to 2002, but had almost doubled by 2012. The increase in zoster consultations largely reflected increases in people younger than 50 years-old. Although causality cannot be inferred from ecological studies, it is generally agreed that the decrease in varicella incidence is due to increasing varicella vaccine coverage. The possible indirect effect of the vaccine on zoster incidence is less clear and ongoing monitoring of zoster is required.

  5. Varicella-Zoster Virus Vasculopathy: A Case Report Demonstrating Vasculitis using Black-Blood MRI

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jay; Poonawala, Husain; Keay, Susan K; Serulle, Yafell; Steven, Andrew; Gandhi, Dheeraj; Cole, John W

    2016-01-01

    Infections are rare but important causes of stroke. Among these, varicella zoster virus has been known to cause ischemic stroke. During an attack of herpes zoster ophthalmicus, it has been hypothesized that the virus replicates in the trigeminal ganglion and travels via the trigeminal nerve centrally to cause cerebral vasculopathy. Here we present a case of a 69 year-old Caucasian immunocompromised woman who suffered recurrent ischemic infarcts within the same vascular distribution following an episode of zoster ophthalmicus three months prior. An imaging technique termed black-blood magnetic resonance imaging was utilized to aid in the diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis. The case is used to provide a literature review of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of cerebral varicella zoster vasculopathy. In situations where an isolated unilateral cerebral vasculopathy is identified, neurologists are urged to consider varicella zoster as a treatable etiologic agent, as untreated vasculopathy can lead to further strokes. PMID:27065314

  6. Mycobacterium fortuitum-related lymphadenitis associated with the varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Luz, Kleber Giovanni; Britto, Maria Helena Marques Fonseca de; Farias, Domitila Costa de; Almeida, Mayara Varaschim; Figueirêdo, Nastassja Morgana de Sousa; Silva, Paula de Medeiros Nacácio E

    2014-01-01

    Lymphadenitis caused by non-tuberculous mycobacteria is an uncommon manifestation in immunocompetent individuals. Here, we report a case of Mycobacterium fortuitum infection in a previously healthy 9-year-old patient who developed cervical lymphadenitis evolving to a suppurative ulcer associated with a varicella-zoster virus infection. We discuss the relationship between the varicella-zoster virus and the immune response of the host as an explanation for the unusual progression of the case.

  7. Varicella Zoster Aseptic Meningitis: Report of an Atypical Case and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Walid; Elzouki, Abdel-Naser; Husain, Ahmed; Osman, Lubna

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 15 Final Diagnosis: Varicella Zoster aseptic meningitis Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Lumber punctur Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Neurologic complications can occur with varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection, usually after vesicular exanthem. A review of the literature revealed 3 cases of viral meningitis associated with 6th nerve palsy but without significantly increased intracranial pressure. Case Report: We report a case of a previously healthy 15-year-old girl with aseptic meningitis as a result of reactivated-VZV infection with symptoms of increased intracranial pressure and reversible 6th cranial nerve palsy but without exanthema. Diagnosis was made by detection of VZV-DNA in cerebrospinal fluid using polymerase chain reaction and documented high intracranial pressure. Full recovery was achieved after a course of acyclovir and acetazolamide. Conclusions: This case demonstrates that VZV may be considered in cases of aseptic meningitis in immunocompetent individuals, even without exanthema, and it may increase the intracranial pressure, leading to symptoms, and causing reversible neurological deficit. PMID:26342350

  8. Severe meningoencephalitis due to late reactivation of Varicella-Zoster virus in an immunocompetent child.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Ronen; Miron, Dan; Lumelsky, Dmitry; Horovitz, Yoseph

    2010-01-01

    Recurrent reactivation of latent Varicella-Zoster virus may cause various neurological complications including encephalitis, myelitis, stroke episodes, and meningitis. It occurs mainly in elderly or immunocompromised patients and is very rare in children. We report a 14-year girl who presented with meningoencephalitis due to reactivation of Varicella-Zoster virus 10 years after she had chickenpox and 4 years after she had zoster. Characteristic skin lesions of varicella were absent. Varicella-Zoster virus DNA was detected in cerebrospinal fluid and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings were consistent with small vessel cerebral vasculitis. Treatment with acyclovir and high dose methylprednisolone resulted in near-complete neurological recovery. Although rare, Varicella-Zoster virus may reactivate to cause significant central nervous system disease even in immunocompetent children. Diagnosis depends on a high degree of suspicion because the typical rash may not associate the disease. Characteristic lesions on MRI and the presence of Varicella-Zoster virus DNA in cerebrospinal fluid are key findings for the correct diagnosis.

  9. Varicella zoster virus in American Samoa: seroprevalence and predictive value of varicella disease history in elementary and college students.

    PubMed

    Mahamud, A; Leung, J; Masunu-Faleafaga, Y; Teshale, E; Williams, R; Dulski, T; Thieme, M; Garcia, P; Schmid, D S; Bialek, S R

    2014-05-01

    The epidemiology of varicella is believed to differ between temperate and tropical countries. We conducted a varicella seroprevalence study in elementary and college students in the US territory of American Samoa before introduction of a routine varicella vaccination programme. Sera from 515 elementary and 208 college students were tested for the presence of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) IgG antibodies. VZV seroprevalence increased with age from 76·0% in the 4-6 years group to 97·7% in those aged ⩾23 years. Reported history of varicella disease for elementary students was significantly associated with VZV seropositivity. The positive and negative predictive values of varicella disease history were 93·4% and 36·4%, respectively, in elementary students and 97·6% and 3·0%, respectively, in college students. VZV seroprevalence in this Pacific island appears to be similar to that in temperate countries and suggests endemic VZV circulation.

  10. Herpes zoster and meningitis due to reactivation of varicella vaccine virus in an immunocompetent child.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin-Young; Hanson, David C; Way, Sing Sing

    2011-03-01

    Neurologic complications from varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation are rare. In this article, we describe a previously immunized child who developed herpes zoster with meningitis. Vaccine strain of VZV was recovered from a skin swab and the cerebrospinal fluid. Reactivation of the vaccine strain of VZV should be recognized as a potential cause of meningitis in children.

  11. Processing of virus-specific glycoproteins of varicella zoster virus

    SciTech Connect

    Namazue, J.; Campo-Vera, H.; Kitamura, K.; Okuno, T.; Yamanishi, K.

    1985-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to varicella zoster virus (VZV) glycoproteins were used to study the processing of three glycoproteins with molecular weights of 83K-94K (gp 2), 64K (gp 3), and 55K (gp 5). Immunoprecipitation experiments performed with VZV-infected cells, pulse labeled with (/sup 3/H)glucosamine in the presence of tunicamycin, suggest that O-linked oligosaccharide is present on the glycoprotein of gp 2. Use of the enzyme endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H revealed that the fully processed form of gp 3 had high-mannose type and that of gp 5 had only complex type of N-linked oligosaccharides. Experiments with monensin suggest that the precursor form (116K) of gp 3 is cleaved during the processing from Golgi apparatus to cell surface membrane. The extension of O-linked oligosaccharide chain and the complex type of N-linked oligosaccharide chains also occurs during this processing.

  12. Varicella-zoster virus at relapses of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Julio; Ordoñez, Graciela; Pineda, Benjamin

    2007-04-01

    The possible participation of different herpes viruses was studied during exacerbations of multiple sclerosis (MS). We searched for the presence of DNA from the following herpes viruses: varicella zoster virus (VZV), herpes-simplex viruses 1 and 2; Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human herpes-virus-6 (HHV6) in mononuclear cells from patients with MS during relapse (n = 40), MS during remission (n = 131) and controls (n = 125). Additionally, immune cells containing viral antigens were quantified by flow cytometry, and VZV load was determined by real time PCR in 2 MS patients at various times during relapse and remission. DNA from VZV was found in 95% of MS patients during relapse and in 17% during remission; all controls were negative; by contrast, DNA from HHV6 was found in 24% of MS patients during relapse and in 2% during remission; DNA from herpes simplex viruses was not found in any subject; and DNA from EBV was found in a similar percentage of subjects from all groups. Sequential quantification of VZV-load showed a curve that increased during relapse and disappeared at remission. Also, VZV antigens were found inside a large number of immune cells from MS patients during relapse as compared with MS patients on remission and controls. In the typical forms of VZV infection, varicella and herpes-zoster, DNA from VZV is found in mononuclear cells exclusively during brief periods at the beginning of the active infection, but not during latency; thus, the conspicuous presence of VZV during relapses of MS may indicate a period of active infection and suggests the participation of VZV in the pathogenesis of MS.

  13. Seroepidemiology of varicella-zoster virus in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunju; Cho, Hye Kyung; Kim, Kyung-Hyo

    2013-02-01

    This study was designed to assess the immune status of the Korean population against varicella-zoster virus (VZV) through a seroepidemiologic study. Residual blood samples were collected from diagnostic laboratories throughout Korea. Samples were collected in October 2009 to March 2010 from persons 0-79 yr of age and were tested by ELISA (Enzygnost®; Dade Behring, Schwalbach, Germany). Total seroprevalence in subjects 1-79 yr of age was 89.6%. Seroprevalence increased as age increased from 67.3% in subjects 1-4 yr of age to 94.2% in subjects 10-14 yr of age and in subjects over 20 yr of age seroprevalence ranged from 98.0% to 100%. In children under 1 yr of age, passive immunity waned after birth with none of the subjects having antibodies from 7 months of age and over. Among subjects 1-79 yr of age, susceptible subjects to VZV were mainly under 20 yr of age. These results provide information in understanding the dynamics of varicella disease in Korea, which is important in building up strategies for disease control.

  14. Varicella-zoster virus vaccine, successes and difficulties.

    PubMed

    Sarkadi, Julia

    2013-12-01

    Despite intensive efforts in recent decades to develop preventive or therapeutic vaccines against diseases caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV), or varicella-zoster virus (VZV), members of the Alpha herpes virinae subfamily of human herpes viruses,a safe and efficient vaccine has been approved for commercial development only against VZV. The VZV vaccine contains a live attenuated strain, OKA. It consists of amixture of at least 13 subpopulations of viruses, all with deletions, insertions or mutations in the genome; the most common mutations are observed in the open reading frame 62 (ORF62). Experience over more than 30 years in Japan, the USA and other countries where VZV vaccination is provided has demonstrated that the vaccine is safe and the effectiveness of two doses compared to unvaccinated children is 98-99%. When administered in a higher dose to stimulate the declining cell-mediated immunity, the same vaccine has been shown to reduce the incidence and severity of herpes zoster in immunocompetent individuals older than 60 years. Vaccination of immuno-compromised subjects with this VZV vaccine is problematic and various strategies need to be explored. Differences in the pathomechanisms of infection, latency and immune evasion of VZV and HSV, together with host genetic factors, may explain the availability of the successful VZV vaccine and the failures of the past HSV vaccine candidates.

  15. Clinical and biological differences between recurrent herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus infections

    SciTech Connect

    Straus, S.E. )

    1989-12-01

    The major features that distinguish recurrent herpes simplex virus infections from zoster are illustrated in this article by two case histories. The clinical and epidemiologic features that characterize recurrent herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus infections are reviewed. It is noted that herpesvirus infections are more common and severe in patients with cellular immune deficiency. Each virus evokes both humoral and cellular immune response in the course of primary infection. DNA hybridization studies with RNA probes labelled with sulfur-35 indicate that herpes simplex viruses persist within neurons, and that varicella-zoster virus is found in the satellite cells that encircle the neurons.

  16. Pathogenesis and current approaches to control of varicella-zoster virus infections.

    PubMed

    Gershon, Anne A; Gershon, Michael D

    2013-10-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) was once thought to be a fairly innocuous pathogen. That view is no longer tenable. The morbidity and mortality due to the primary and secondary diseases that VZV causes, varicella and herpes zoster (HZ), are significant. Fortunately, modern advances, including an available vaccine to prevent varicella, a therapeutic vaccine to diminish the incidence and ameliorate sequelae of HZ, effective antiviral drugs, a better understanding of VZV pathogenesis, and advances in diagnostic virology have made it possible to control VZV in the United States. Occult forms of VZV-induced disease have been recognized, including zoster sine herpete and enteric zoster, which have expanded the field. Future progress should include development of more effective vaccines to prevent HZ and a more complete understanding of the consequences of VZV latency in the enteric nervous system.

  17. Pathogenesis and Current Approaches to Control of Varicella-Zoster Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) was once thought to be a fairly innocuous pathogen. That view is no longer tenable. The morbidity and mortality due to the primary and secondary diseases that VZV causes, varicella and herpes zoster (HZ), are significant. Fortunately, modern advances, including an available vaccine to prevent varicella, a therapeutic vaccine to diminish the incidence and ameliorate sequelae of HZ, effective antiviral drugs, a better understanding of VZV pathogenesis, and advances in diagnostic virology have made it possible to control VZV in the United States. Occult forms of VZV-induced disease have been recognized, including zoster sine herpete and enteric zoster, which have expanded the field. Future progress should include development of more effective vaccines to prevent HZ and a more complete understanding of the consequences of VZV latency in the enteric nervous system. PMID:24092852

  18. Titration of IgG antibodies against varicella zoster virus before bone marrow transplantation is not predictive of future zoster.

    PubMed

    Webster, A; Grint, P; Brenner, M K; Prentice, H G; Griffiths, P D

    1989-02-01

    Serum antibodies to varicella zoster virus (VZV) were measured in 77 patients about to undergo allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, and in 65 of their donors. Ten patients developed zoster within the first 6 months following transplant. There was no significant difference in the mean pretransplant antibody titre between those patients who did or did not subsequently develop zoster. Likewise, the level of antibody to VZV amongst donors had no effect on the subsequent development of zoster. We conclude that the pretransplant level of antibody to VZV is not predictive of subsequent zoster infection, and would not be helpful in identifying patients for trials of antiviral prophylaxis. These results contrast with those previously found for another herpesvirus, herpes simplex (HSV), where antibody level pretransplant is predictive of future HSV recurrence.

  19. Analysis of T Cell Responses during Active Varicella-Zoster Virus Reactivation in Human Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Steain, Megan; Sutherland, Jeremy P.; Rodriguez, Michael; Cunningham, Anthony L.; Slobedman, Barry

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is responsible for both varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (shingles). During varicella, the virus establishes latency within the sensory ganglia and can reactivate to cause herpes zoster, but the immune responses that occur in ganglia during herpes zoster have not previously been defined. We examined ganglia obtained from individuals who, at the time of death, had active herpes zoster. Ganglia innervating the site of the cutaneous herpes zoster rash showed evidence of necrosis, secondary to vasculitis, or localized hemorrhage. Despite this, there was limited evidence of VZV antigen expression, although a large inflammatory infiltrate was observed. Characterization of the infiltrating T cells showed a large number of infiltrating CD4+ T cells and cytolytic CD8+ T cells. Many of the infiltrating T cells were closely associated with neurons within the reactivated ganglia, yet there was little evidence of T cell-induced neuronal apoptosis. Notably, an upregulation in the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) and MHC-II molecules was observed on satellite glial cells, implying these cells play an active role in directing the immune response during herpes zoster. This is the first detailed characterization of the interaction between T cells and neuronal cells within ganglia obtained from patients suffering herpes zoster at the time of death and provides evidence that CD4+ and cytolytic CD8+ T cell responses play an important role in controlling VZV replication in ganglia during active herpes zoster. IMPORTANCE VZV is responsible for both varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (shingles). During varicella, the virus establishes a life-long dormant infection within the sensory ganglia and can reawaken to cause herpes zoster, but the immune responses that occur in ganglia during herpes zoster have not previously been defined. We examined ganglia obtained from individuals who, at the time of death, had

  20. Varicella zoster vaccines and their implications for development of HSV vaccines

    SciTech Connect

    Gershon, Anne A.

    2013-01-05

    Live attenuated vaccines to prevent varicella and zoster have been available in the US for the past 17 years, with a resultant dramatic decrease in varicella incidence and a predicted future decrease in the incidence of zoster. The pathogenesis and immune responses to varicella zoster virus (VZV) as well as the safety and effectiveness of VZV vaccines are reviewed. The lack of sterilizing immunity provided by VZV vaccines has not prevented them from being safe and effective. Virological and pathological information concerning parallels and differences between VZV and herpes simplex virus (HSV) are highlighted. Although VZV and HSV are distinct pathogens, they appear to have similarities in target organs and immunity that provide an expectation of a high likelihood for the success of vaccination against HSV, and predicted to be similar to that of VZV.

  1. Varicella zoster vaccines and their implications for development of HSV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gershon, Anne A

    2013-01-01

    Live attenuated vaccines to prevent varicella and zoster have been available in the US for the past 17 years, with a resultant dramatic decrease in varicella incidence and a predicted future decrease in the incidence of zoster. The pathogenesis and immune responses to varicella zoster virus (VZV) as well as the safety and effectiveness of VZV vaccines are reviewed. The lack of sterilizing immunity provided by VZV vaccines has not prevented them from being safe and effective. Virological and pathological information concerning parallels and differences between VZV and herpes simplex virus (HSV) are highlighted. Although VZV and HSV are distinct pathogens, they appear to have similarities in target organs and immunity that provide an expectation of a high likelihood for the success of vaccination against HSV, and predicted to be similar to that of VZV.

  2. Varicella-zoster virus encephalomyelitis with a prominent demyelinating component.

    PubMed

    Berth, Sarah; Carbunar, Olimpia; Yang, Ning Sarah; Fredericks, Brian; Lipton, Howard L; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor

    2015-12-01

    The histopathologic presentation of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection of the central nervous system is varied and is not well understood. Here we report a case of VZV encephalomyelitis with prominent demyelinating pathology in a patient with a history of follicular lymphoma treated with allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The patient presented with waxing and waning bilateral limb weakness and mental status changes. MRI showed leptomeningeal, peripheral spinal cord and periventricular cerebral white matter lesions in the brain, and polymerase chain reaction on cerebrospinal fluid detected VZV DNA. The patient expired from developing atrial fibrillation that rapidly progressed to ventricular fibrillation 10 days after admission to our hospital. Autopsy revealed macrophage-rich areas of demyelination in the spinal cord and cerebrum with relative preservation of axons associated with inclusion bodies and positive immunostaining for VZV. This case represents a rare example of VZV encephalomyelitis presenting with a predominantly demyelinating, "multiple sclerosis-like" pathology. The clinical and histopathologic findings and relevant literature are presented and discussed.

  3. Herpes Simplex Virus and Varicella-Zoster Virus.

    PubMed

    Levin, Myron J; Weinberg, Adriana; Schmid, D Scott

    2016-06-01

    The most common specimens from immunocompromised patients that are analyzed for detection of herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella-zoster virus (VZV) are from skin lesions. Many types of assays are applicable to these samples, but some, such as virus isolation and direct fluorescent antibody testing, are useful only in the early phases of the lesions. In contrast, nucleic acid (NA) detection methods, which generally have superior sensitivity and specificity, can be applied to skin lesions at any stage of progression. NA methods are also the best choice, and sometimes the only choice, for detecting HSV or VZV in blood, cerebrospinal fluid, aqueous or vitreous humor, and from mucosal surfaces. NA methods provide the best performance when reliability and speed (within 24 hours) are considered together. They readily distinguish the type of HSV detected or the source of VZV detected (wild type or vaccine strain). Nucleic acid detection methods are constantly being improved with respect to speed and ease of performance. Broader applications are under study, such as the use of quantitative results of viral load for prognosis and to assess the efficacy of antiviral therapy. PMID:27337486

  4. Immunogenicity of varicella zoster virus glycoprotein E DNA vaccine

    PubMed Central

    BAO, LIDAO; WEI, GUOMIN; GAN, HONGMEI; REN, XIANHUA; MA, RUILIAN; WANG, YI; LV, HAIJUN

    2016-01-01

    In the present study a eukaryotic expression vector of varicella zoster virus (VZV) glycoprotein E (gE) was constructed and enabled to express in COS7 cells. Furthermore, a specific immune response against the VZV gE eukaryotic expression plasmid was induced in BALB/c mice. The VZV gE gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector, pcDNA3.1. The recombinant vector was subsequently transfected into COS7 cells using a liposome transfection reagent. The recombinant protein was instantaneously expressed by the transfected cells, as detected by immunohistochemistry, and the recombinant pcDNA-VZV gE plasmid was subsequently used to immunize mice. Tissue expression levels were analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR. In addition, the levels of serum antibodies and spleen lymphocyte proliferation activity were investigated. The amplified target gene included the full-length gE gene (~2.7 kb), and the recombinant expression vector induced gE expression in COS7 cells. In addition, the expression plasmid induced sustained expression in vivo following immunization of mice. Furthermore, the plasmid was capable of inducing specific antibody production and effectively stimulating T cell proliferation. Effective humoral and cellular immunity was triggered in the mice immunized with the VZV gE eukaryotic expression vector. The results of the present study laid the foundation for future research into a VZV DNA vaccine. PMID:27168804

  5. The positive duration of varicella zoster immunoglobulin M antibody test in herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Min, Seong-Won; Kim, Yung Suk; Nahm, Francis Sahngun; Yoo, Da Hye; Choi, Eunjoo; Lee, Pyung-Bok; Choo, Hyunjung; Park, Zee-Yong; Yang, Catherine Seonghee

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory tests for herpes zoster (HZ) are required to confirm varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection, especially when a skin lesion is not typical or apparent. The serological test for VZV IgM antibody is simple and cost-effective; however, the change in the VZV IgM-positive rate over the time course of the disease has not been investigated. Therefore, we conducted an observational study to evaluate the positive rate of VZV IgM results during the time course of HZ and estimate the VZV IgM-positive period.After obtaining serum from patients with typical HZ, the VZV IgM titer was examined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. After logarithmic transformation of the VZV IgM titer and the period after the onset of HZ, regression analysis was performed with the 2 transformed variables.A total of 62 patients were included in this study, and VZV IgM antibody was positive only in 23 patients (37%). The estimated antibody-positive period after HZ onset was 3.5 weeks (95% confidence interval 2.8-4.6 weeks).These findings suggest that the serological diagnosis of VZV IgM to confirm HZ is only useful within 3.5 weeks after the onset of symptoms. PMID:27537598

  6. Varicella-Zoster Virus–Specific Immune Responses in Elderly Recipients of a Herpes Zoster Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Levin, M. J; Oxman, M. N; Zhang, J. H; Johnson, G. R; Stanley, H; Hayward, A. R; Caulfield, M. J; Irwin, M. R; Smith, J. G; Clair, J; Chan, I. S. F; Williams, H; Harbecke, R; Marchese, R; Straus, S. E; Gershon, A; Weinberg, A

    2008-01-01

    BackgroundA double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that involved 38,546 subjects ⩾60 years old demonstrated efficacy of a high-potency live-attenuated Oka/Merck varicella-zoster virus (VZV) vaccine. The trial included an immunology substudy to determine the relationship of VZV-specific immune responses to vaccination and clinical outcome MethodsThe immunology substudy enrolled 1395 subjects at 2 sites where blood samples obtained prior to vaccination, at 6 weeks after vaccination, and at 1, 2, and 3 years thereafter were tested for VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity (VZV-CMI) by γ-interferon ELISPOT and responder cell frequency assays and for VZV antibody by glycoprotein ELISA ResultsVZV-CMI and VZV antibodies were significantly increased in vaccine recipients at 6 weeks after vaccination. The vaccine-induced increases in VZV-CMI persisted during the 3 years of follow-up, although their magnitude decreased over time. The magnitude of these VZV-specific immune responses was greater in subjects 60–69 years old than in subjects ⩾70 years old ConclusionsThe zoster vaccine induced a significant increase in VZV-CMI and VZV antibody. The magnitude and duration of the boost in VZV-CMI in vaccine recipients and the relationship of this boost to age paralleled the clinical effects of the vaccine observed during the efficacy trial. These findings support the hypothesis that boosting VZV-CMI protects older adults against herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia PMID:18419349

  7. [A case of adult-onset varicella pneumonia and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) meningitis resulting from a reoccurrence of varicella].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Yo; Takahashi, Yuko; Akio, Mimori

    2012-05-01

    The patient was a 74-year old male who presented with a skin rash, cough, and impaired consciousness. A diffuse, systemic, dark red rash was observed and he was admitted. Varicella infection was diagnosed based on the varicella-zoster virus (VZV)-IgM levels. The extremely high VZV- IgG levels observed were unlikely to be present in an initial infection and the infection was thought to be a reoccurrence. Diffuse nodular shadows measuring < or = 5 mm in diameter were observed on chest computed tomography (CT);this was consistent with the typical imaging findings of varicella pneumonia. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was positive for CSF VZV-IgM antibody, CSF VZV-PCR, and CSF antibody titer index. A diagnosis of varicella meningitis was made. When both respiratory and neurological symptoms are observed in patients with varicella infection, it is necessary to consider a combined diagnosis of varicella pneumonia and varicella meningitis/encephalitis and perform chest imaging and a CSF examination. Repeated asymptomatic re-infection is considered necessary in order to maintain a lifelong immunity to varicella; however, the opportunities for asymptomatic re-infection are decreasing with the declining birth rate and trend toward small families. As a result, reoccurrences of varicella infection in the elderly are expected to increase with rapidly increasing longevity.

  8. Varicella-zoster virus vaccination under the exogenous boosting hypothesis: two ethical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Luyten, Jeroen; Ogunjimi, Benson; Beutels, Philippe

    2014-12-12

    The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes two diseases: varicella ('chickenpox') and herpes zoster ('shingles'). VZV vaccination of children reduces exposure to chickenpox in the population and it has been hypothesized that this could increase the prevalence of shingles. This 'exogenous boosting' effect of VZV raises an important equity concern: introducing a vaccination program could advance the health of one population group (children) at the expense of another (adults and elderly). We discuss the program's justifiability from two ethical perspectives, classic utilitarianism and contractualism. Whereas the former framework might offer a foundation for the case against introducing this vaccination, the latter offers a basis to justify it.

  9. Varicella-zoster virus associated encephalitis in a patient undergoing haemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mula Abed, Yasser W.

    2015-01-01

    We describe an elderly gentleman with end stage renal disease on haemodialysis who presented with ophthalmic zoster infection and was discharged on oral acyclovir. He presented again a few days later with confusion and expressive dysphasia. Differential diagnosis was mainly between varicella-zoster virus (VZV) associated encephalitis versus acyclovir toxicity. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis confirmed the diagnosis of VZV associated encephalitis and the patient was treated with intravenous acyclovir and steroids with full recovery back to pre-admission neurological status. PMID:26865994

  10. [Sequence analysis of varicella-zoster virus gE gene in varicella-zoster virus strains with different clades].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Long-Feng; Gan, Lin; Li, Shan-Shan; Feng, Yan-Yan; Jiang, Wei; Duan, Ya-ping; Chen, Jing-Xian; Wang, Ming-Li

    2013-03-01

    To analyze the gE gene sequence of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) strains of different clades and subclades currently circulating in China. Eighteen skin lesion fluid swabs or skin scab pieces from patients with chickenpox or shingles were obtained from Beijing, Changchun, Lhasa and Urumqi between December 2010 and June 2011. The genotype of the virus strains was determined by a group of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located in 15 ORFs, and the full-length gE genes of 18 strains representing all the clades in the study was amplified by PCR and sequenced. In addition to the synonymous mutations and non-synonymous mutations that were reported in the literature, there were 3 novel non-synonymous mutations (C56T, C1109T, C917A) and 4 new synonymous mutations (C54T, T1075C, T816C, G279A) found in the 8 strains analyzed. We found the VZV strains of clade 5 in Xinjiang for the first time,and the genotypes of some VZV strains circulating in Chagnchun could not be determined by the present methods. The analysis of gE gene sequences,revealed a novel non-synonymous mutations in the e1 and c1 epitopes, corresponding to the amino acid change of serine to tyrosine.

  11. In vitro system using human neurons demonstrates that varicella-zoster vaccine virus is impaired for reactivation, but not latency.

    PubMed

    Sadaoka, Tomohiko; Depledge, Daniel P; Rajbhandari, Labchan; Venkatesan, Arun; Breuer, Judith; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2016-04-26

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) establishes latency in human sensory and cranial nerve ganglia during primary infection (varicella), and the virus can reactivate and cause zoster after primary infection. The mechanism of how the virus establishes and maintains latency and how it reactivates is poorly understood, largely due to the lack of robust models. We found that axonal infection of neurons derived from hESCs in a microfluidic device with cell-free parental Oka (POka) VZV resulted in latent infection with inability to detect several viral mRNAs by reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR, no production of infectious virus, and maintenance of the viral DNA genome in endless configuration, consistent with an episome configuration. With deep sequencing, however, multiple viral mRNAs were detected. Treatment of the latently infected neurons with Ab to NGF resulted in production of infectious virus in about 25% of the latently infected cultures. Axonal infection of neurons with vaccine Oka (VOka) VZV resulted in a latent infection similar to infection with POka; however, in contrast to POka, VOka-infected neurons were markedly impaired for reactivation after treatment with Ab to NGF. In addition, viral transcription was markedly reduced in neurons latently infected with VOka compared with POka. Our in vitro system recapitulates both VZV latency and reactivation in vivo and may be used to study viral vaccines for their ability to establish latency and reactivate. PMID:27078099

  12. In vitro system using human neurons demonstrates that varicella-zoster vaccine virus is impaired for reactivation, but not latency

    PubMed Central

    Sadaoka, Tomohiko; Depledge, Daniel P.; Rajbhandari, Labchan; Venkatesan, Arun; Breuer, Judith; Cohen, Jeffrey I.

    2016-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) establishes latency in human sensory and cranial nerve ganglia during primary infection (varicella), and the virus can reactivate and cause zoster after primary infection. The mechanism of how the virus establishes and maintains latency and how it reactivates is poorly understood, largely due to the lack of robust models. We found that axonal infection of neurons derived from hESCs in a microfluidic device with cell-free parental Oka (POka) VZV resulted in latent infection with inability to detect several viral mRNAs by reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR, no production of infectious virus, and maintenance of the viral DNA genome in endless configuration, consistent with an episome configuration. With deep sequencing, however, multiple viral mRNAs were detected. Treatment of the latently infected neurons with Ab to NGF resulted in production of infectious virus in about 25% of the latently infected cultures. Axonal infection of neurons with vaccine Oka (VOka) VZV resulted in a latent infection similar to infection with POka; however, in contrast to POka, VOka-infected neurons were markedly impaired for reactivation after treatment with Ab to NGF. In addition, viral transcription was markedly reduced in neurons latently infected with VOka compared with POka. Our in vitro system recapitulates both VZV latency and reactivation in vivo and may be used to study viral vaccines for their ability to establish latency and reactivate. PMID:27078099

  13. Varicella-zoster virus and virus DNA in the blood and oropharynx of people with latent or active varicella-zoster virus infections.

    PubMed

    Levin, Myron J

    2014-12-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) can be detected in the blood from approximately 5 days before to 4 days after varicella. VZV DNA, primarily in T-lymphocytes, is detected as early as 8-10 days prior to rash and can persist for a week. The duration and magnitude of VZV DNAemia correlates with immune status and the efficacy of antiviral therapy. VZV DNA is also readily detected in the oropharynx just prior to rash and for 1-2 weeks thereafter. Detection of VZV DNA in blood and saliva has been useful for diagnosis and prognosis in atypical cases of varicella. Herpes zoster (HZ) is also characterized by VZV DNAemia at onset and for many weeks thereafter, and VZV DNA is present in the oropharynx shortly after HZ onset. Detection of VZV DNA in blood and saliva facilitates the diagnosis of zoster sine herpete and other atypical manifestations of VZV reactivation, such as neurologic syndromes when cerebrospinal fluid is not available, Bell's palsy, and atypical pain syndromes. VZV DNA is sometimes present in the blood and saliva of asymptomatic individuals. In total these observations extend understanding of the pathophysiology and epidemiology of VZV, and increasingly contribute to the clinical management of VZV infections.

  14. Alkenyl substituted bicyclic nucleoside analogues retain nanomolar potency against Varicella Zoster Virus.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Christopher; Bidet, Olivier; Derudas, Marco; Andrei, Graciela; Snoeck, Robert; Balzarini, Jan

    2009-04-15

    Novel alkenyl substituted aryl bicyclic furano pyrimidines have been prepared and evaluated in vitro against Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV). The para-substituted analogues retain the nanomolar potency we have reported for p-alkyl analogues, while the ortho- and meta-alkenyl systems lose 3-4 orders of potency. PMID:19328697

  15. High-Resolution Vessel Wall Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Varicella-Zoster Virus Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Lachanis, Stefanos; Magoufis, Georgios; Safouris, Apostolos; Kargiotis, Odysseas; Stamboulis, Elefterios

    2016-06-01

    Varicella-zoster virus vasculopathy is a rare but potentially treatable condition. Diagnosis has been based on angiography, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. High-resolution vessel wall MRI may aid to the diagnosis by differentiating inflammation from other vessel wall pathologies. We present the characteristic MRI findings of this condition in a young patient presenting with ischemic stroke.

  16. Varicella-zoster virus infections of the central nervous system – Prognosis, diagnostics and treatment.

    PubMed

    Grahn, Anna; Studahl, Marie

    2015-09-01

    Both varicella and herpes zoster that are caused by varicella-zoster virus (VZV), are associated with central nervous system disease. Since the introduction of polymerase chain reaction, the opportunity to detect the virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has improved dramatically. As a result VZV is diagnosed as one of the most common viruses causing CNS disease and it has become evident that this disease includes a wide spectrum of different CNS manifestations. The most evaluated CNS manifestations are encephalitis which is associated with both varicella and herpes zoster and, cerebellitis which occurs predominantly in children with varicella. Other manifestations have been less widely investigated. The incidence of cerebrovascular disease caused by VZV has been only scarcely studied and, in addition, some data indicate that vasculitis might also be involved in other VZV CNS manifestations such as herpes zoster-associated encephalitis. For this reason, VZV CNS infection must be suspected in several CNS syndromes and diagnostics should be based on CSF analysis for detection of VZV DNA by PCR and/or intrathecal antibody production. The prognosis is reported as favourable in children but few follow-up studies are available. Moreover, in adults, the prognosis is reported to be good in overall terms, but later studies indicate more serious neurological sequelae including cognition. Despite considerable mortality and morbidity, so far also in vaccinating countries, few treatment studies are available. Further treatment studies including assessments of neurological and cognitive sequelae, are warranted.

  17. Acyclovir-resistant varicella-zoster virus keratitis in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Gueudry, J; Boutolleau, D; Gueudin, M; Burrel, S; Miri, A; Bodaghi, B; Muraine, M

    2013-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) resistance to acyclovir (ACV) has only been reported in rare cases of immunocompromised patients. We report the first case of an immunocompetent patient with ACV-resistant VZV keratitis associated with a nucleotide deletion in the VZV thymidine kinase gene, leading to production of a truncated protein.

  18. Investigation of varicella-zoster virus infection of lymphocytes by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Koropchak, C.M.; Solem, S.M.; Diaz, P.S.; Arvin, A.M.

    1989-05-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells harboring viral gene sequences were detected during primary varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection of the human host and the strain 2 guinea pig by in situ hybridization with a /sup 3/H-labeled VZV DNA probe. Activated T lymphocytes were permissive for VZV infection at low frequency in vitro.

  19. The Epidemiology of Herpes Zoster After Varicella Immunization Under Different Biological Hypotheses: Perspectives From Mathematical Modeling.

    PubMed

    Guzzetta, Giorgio; Poletti, Piero; Merler, Stefano; Manfredi, Piero

    2016-04-15

    The impact of varicella vaccination on the epidemiology of herpes zoster (HZ) critically depends on the mechanism of immunological boosting, through which reexposures to varicella-zoster virus are thought to reduce the individual risk of HZ development. However, the qualitative and quantitative dynamics of this process are largely unknown. Consequently, mathematical models evaluating immunization strategies need to rely on theoretical assumptions. Available varicella-zoster virus models can be classified in 3 main families according to the postulated effect of exogenous boosting: 1) progressive accumulation of immunity following repeated reexposures; 2) partial protection that wanes over time; or 3) full but temporary immunity against HZ. In this work, we review and compare quantitative predictions from the 3 modeling approaches regarding the effect of varicella immunization on HZ. All models predict a qualitatively similar, but quantitatively heterogeneous, transient increase of HZ incidence. In particular, novel estimates from the progressive immunity model predict the largest increase in natural HZ and the largest incidence of HZ cases from reactivation of the vaccine strain, which in the long term will likely outnumber prevaccination numbers. Our results reinforce the idea that a better understanding of HZ pathogenesis is required before further mass varicella immunization programs are set out.

  20. The Epidemiology of Herpes Zoster After Varicella Immunization Under Different Biological Hypotheses: Perspectives From Mathematical Modeling.

    PubMed

    Guzzetta, Giorgio; Poletti, Piero; Merler, Stefano; Manfredi, Piero

    2016-04-15

    The impact of varicella vaccination on the epidemiology of herpes zoster (HZ) critically depends on the mechanism of immunological boosting, through which reexposures to varicella-zoster virus are thought to reduce the individual risk of HZ development. However, the qualitative and quantitative dynamics of this process are largely unknown. Consequently, mathematical models evaluating immunization strategies need to rely on theoretical assumptions. Available varicella-zoster virus models can be classified in 3 main families according to the postulated effect of exogenous boosting: 1) progressive accumulation of immunity following repeated reexposures; 2) partial protection that wanes over time; or 3) full but temporary immunity against HZ. In this work, we review and compare quantitative predictions from the 3 modeling approaches regarding the effect of varicella immunization on HZ. All models predict a qualitatively similar, but quantitatively heterogeneous, transient increase of HZ incidence. In particular, novel estimates from the progressive immunity model predict the largest increase in natural HZ and the largest incidence of HZ cases from reactivation of the vaccine strain, which in the long term will likely outnumber prevaccination numbers. Our results reinforce the idea that a better understanding of HZ pathogenesis is required before further mass varicella immunization programs are set out. PMID:26994062

  1. Abortive Intrabronchial Infection of Rhesus Macaques with Varicella-Zoster Virus Provides Partial Protection against Simian Varicella Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Christine; Engelmann, Flora; Arnold, Nicole; Krah, David L.; ter Meulen, Jan; Haberthur, Kristen; Dewane, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human neurotropic alphaherpesvirus and the etiological agent of varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (HZ, shingles). Previously, inoculation of monkeys via the subcutaneous, intratracheal, intravenous, or oral-nasal-conjunctival routes did not recapitulate all the hallmarks of VZV infection, including varicella, immunity, latency, and reactivation. Intrabronchial inoculation of rhesus macaques (RMs) with simian varicella virus (SVV), a homolog of VZV, recapitulates virologic and immunologic hallmarks of VZV infection in humans. Given that VZV is acquired primarily via the respiratory route, we investigated whether intrabronchial inoculation of RMs with VZV would result in a robust model. Despite the lack of varicella and viral replication in either the lungs or whole blood, all four RMs generated an immune response characterized by the generation of VZV-specific antibodies and T cells. Two of 4 VZV-inoculated RMs were challenged with SVV to determine cross-protection. VZV-immune RMs displayed no varicella rash and had lower SVV viral loads and earlier and stronger humoral and cellular immune responses than controls. In contrast to the results for SVV DNA, no VZV DNA was detected in sensory ganglia at necropsy. In summary, following an abortive VZV infection, RMs developed an adaptive immune response that conferred partial protection against SVV challenge. These data suggest that a replication-incompetent VZV vaccine that does not establish latency may provide sufficient protection against VZV disease and that VZV vaccination of RMs followed by SVV challenge provides a model to evaluate new vaccines and therapeutics against VZV. IMPORTANCE Although VZV vaccine strain Oka is attenuated, it can cause mild varicella, establish latency, and in rare cases, reactivate to cause herpes zoster (HZ). Moreover, studies suggest that the HZ vaccine (Zostavax) only confers short-lived immunity. The development of more efficacious

  2. Varicella zoster meningitis complicating combined anti-tumor necrosis factor and corticosteroid therapy in Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Christopher; Walters, Brennan; Fedorak, Richard N

    2013-01-01

    Opportunistic viral infections are a well-recognized complication of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Cases of severe or atypical varicella zoster virus infection, both primary and latent reactivation, have been described in association with immunosuppression of Crohn’s disease (CD) patients. However, central nervous system varicella zoster virus infections have been rarely described, and there are no previous reports of varicella zoster virus meningitis associated with anti-TNF therapy among the CD population. Here, we present the case of a 40-year-old male with severe ileocecal-CD who developed a reactivation of dermatomal herpes zoster after treatment with prednisone and adalimumab. The reactivation presented as debilitating varicella zoster virus meningitis, which was not completely resolved despite aggressive antiviral therapy with prolonged intravenous acyclovir and subsequent oral valacyclovir. This is the first reported case of opportunistic central nervous system varicella zoster infection complicating anti-TNF therapy in the CD population. This paper also reviews the literature on varicella zoster virus infections of immunosuppressed IBD patients and the importance of vaccination prior to initiation of anti-TNF therapy. PMID:23745038

  3. Association of progressive outer retinal necrosis and varicella zoster encephalitis in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    van den Horn, G J; Meenken, C; Troost, D

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A patient with AIDS who developed the clinical picture of bilateral progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) in combination with varicella zoster encephalitis is described. The picture developed more than 2 years after an episode of ophthalmic zoster infection, and following intermittent exposure to oral acyclovir because of recurrent episodes of cutaneous herpes simplex infection. METHODS: Aqueous humour, obtained by paracentesis of the anterior chamber, was analysed using immunofluorescence and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Postmortem analysis of eye and brain tissue was performed by using conventional techniques and in situ hybridisation. RESULTS: While conventional techniques all failed to detect a causative agent, analysis of the aqueous humour using PCR, and histological examination of necropsy specimens from eyes and brain using in situ hybridisation were conclusive for the diagnosis varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection. CONCLUSION: This case documents the presumed association of PORN and VZV encephalitis in a severely immunocompromised AIDS patient. Images PMID:8976726

  4. Monoarthritis of the knee with unusual lesions in adults associated with varicella-zoster virus infection.

    PubMed

    Luna-Pizarro, Daniel; Rodríguez-Castillo, Araceli; Pérez-Hernández, Elizabeth; Pérez-Hernández, Jorge; Hernández-Salgado, Armando; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus-associated arthritis has not been well documented in adults. We present the case of a 27-year-old female patient with monoarthritis of the knee associated with clinical symptoms typical of varicella. Arthroscopic examination showed unusual oval and circular lesions in cartilage, some of which measured 5 +/- 3 mm in diameter in weight-supporting zones. Such lesions have not been described previously and were type III-A lesions on the Noyes scale or grade IV on the Outerbridge scale. On microscopic observation, synovial fluid cultures and hemocultures were negative for the presence of bacteria. A biopsy sample and synovial liquid from the affected knee produced a positive polymerase chain reaction for varicella-zoster virus, genotype E. These findings suggest a strong relation between clinical varicella infection and important lesion invasion in the knee articulation of such a young adult, probably related to the virus. However, it remains necessary to corroborate this relation between cartilage destruction and clinical symptoms of varicella associated with monoarthritis of an adult knee. Nevertheless, it is advisable to initiate the appropriate antiviral treatment in adults with varicella-related gonalgia because the lesions produce the most severe effects on exposure to the knee bone.

  5. Management and prevention of varicella-zoster virus infection in pregnancy: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Noce, Nikki; Berger, Emily M; Pomeranz, Miriam K

    2013-08-01

    Primary infection with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) during pregnancy can lead to devastating outcomes for both the mother and fetus. We describe a case of VZV infection in a pregnant woman who presented at 38 weeks' gestation. We also review the literature regarding management and prevention. Varicella-zoster virus-associated pneumonia in the mother is important to recognize. Outcomes in the newborn largely are dependent on gestational age at the time of infection. Prevention is paramount to management.

  6. A highly conserved epitope-vaccine candidate against varicella-zoster virus induces neutralizing antibodies in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rui; Liu, Jian; Chen, Chunye; Ye, Xiangzhong; Xu, Longfa; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Qinjian; Zhu, Hua; Cheng, Tong; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-03-18

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a highly infectious agent of varicella and herpes zoster (HZ). Vaccination is by far the most effective way to prevent these diseases. More safe, stable and efficient vaccines, such as epitope-based vaccines, now have been increasingly investigated by many researchers. However, only a few VZV neutralizing epitopes have been identified to date. We have previously identified a linear epitope between amino acid residues 121 and 135 of gE. In this study, we validated that this epitope is highly conserved amongst different VZV strains that covered five existing phylogenetic clades with an identity of 100%. We evaluated the immunogenicity of the recombinant hepatitis B virus core (HBc) virus-like particles (VLPs) which included amino acids (121-135). VZV-gE-specific antibodies were detected in immunized mouse serum using ELISA. The anti-peptide antiserum positively detected VZV via Western blot and immunofluorescent staining assays. More importantly, these peptides could neutralize VZV, indicating that these peptides represented neutralizing epitopes. These findings have important implications for the development of epitope-based protective VZV vaccines.

  7. Varicella and herpes zoster vaccines: WHO position paper, June 2014--Recommendations.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the World Health Organization's (WHO) recommendations for the use of varicella and herpes zoster vaccination from the WHO position paper on varicella and herpes zoster vaccines - June 2014, published in the Weekly Epidemiological Record [1]. This position paper summarizes the WHO position on the use of varicella and herpes zoster vaccines. The current document replaces the position paper on the use of varicella vaccines published in 1998 [2]. Footnotes to this paper provide a number of core references. In accordance with its mandate to provide guidance to Member States on health policy matters, WHO issues a series of regularly updated position papers on vaccines and combinations of vaccines against diseases that have an international public health impact. These papers are concerned primarily with the use of vaccines in large-scale immunization programmes; they summarize essential background information on diseases and vaccines, and conclude with WHO's current position on the use of vaccines in the global context. This paper reflects the recommendations of WHO's Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on immunization. These recommendations were discussed by SAGE at its April 2014 meeting. Evidence presented at the meeting can be accessed at http://www.who.int/immunization/sage/previous/en/index.html.

  8. FV-100: the most potent and selective anti-varicella zoster virus agent reported to date.

    PubMed

    Migliore, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Bicyclic aryl furano pyrimidines represent the most potent anti-varicella zoster virus (VZV) agents reported to date. Lead compounds have 50% effective concentration (EC(50)) values in vitro that are in the subnanomolar range and selectivity index values that exceed 1 million. They have an absolute requirement for VZV thymidine kinase and most likely act as their phosphate forms. Some structural modification (such as aryl substitution in the base moiety) is tolerated, whereas little sugar modification is acceptable. The Cf1743 compound has proved to be significantly more potent than all reference anti-VZV compounds, as measured either by inhibition of infectious virus particles and/or viral DNA production; however, the high lipophilicity and very low water solubility of this compound gives poor oral bioavailability (<14%). Use of the modified cyclodextrin captisol and the synthesis of the 5'-monophosphate prodrug of Cf1743 has significantly improved water solubility, but does not give any enhancement in oral bioavailability. By contrast, the synthesis of the ether series does not give any further improvement in terms of solubility. The most promising prodrug to emerge to date is the hydrochloric salt of the 5'-valyl-ester, designated as FV-100. Its uptake into cells has been studied using fluorescent microscopy and biological assays, which have indicated that the compound is efficiently taken up by the cells after a short period of incubation. PMID:20054098

  9. Aberrant virion assembly and limited glycoprotein C production in varicella-zoster virus-infected neurons.

    PubMed

    Grose, Charles; Yu, Xiaoli; Cohrs, Randall J; Carpenter, John E; Bowlin, Jacqueline L; Gilden, Don

    2013-09-01

    Highly pure (>95%) terminally differentiated neurons derived from pluripotent stem cells appear healthy at 2 weeks after infection with varicella-zoster virus (VZV), and the cell culture medium contains no infectious virus. Analysis of the healthy-appearing neurons revealed VZV DNA, transcripts, and proteins corresponding to the VZV immediate early, early, and late kinetic phases of replication. Herein, we further characterized virus in these neuronal cells, focusing on (i) transcription and expression of late VZV glycoprotein C (gC) open reading frame 14 (ORF14) and (ii) ultrastructural features of virus particles in neurons. The analysis showed that gC was not expressed in most infected neurons and gC expression was markedly reduced in a minority of VZV-infected neurons. In contrast, expression of the early-late VZV gE glycoprotein (ORF68) was abundant. Transcript analysis also showed decreased gC transcription compared with gE. Examination of viral structure by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed fewer viral particles than typically observed in cells productively infected with VZV. Furthermore, viral particles were more aberrant, in that most capsids in the nuclei lacked a dense core and most enveloped particles in the cytoplasm were light particles (envelopes without capsids). Together, these results suggest a considerable deficiency in late-phase replication and viral assembly during VZV infection of neurons in culture.

  10. Infectibility of separated peripheral blood mononuclear cell subpopulations by varicella-zoster virus (VZV).

    PubMed

    Koenig, Andreas; Wolff, Manfred H

    2003-01-01

    Varicella zoster-virus (VZV) is a humanpathogenic alpha-Herpesvirus that causes chickenpox after primary infection. The virus spreads by aerosol or direct contact with infectious vesical fluids, it enters the body via the respiratory tract. In a first viremic stage it replicates in local lymph nodes, followed by a secondary viremic stage. In the course it spreads through the body to endothelial cells in the periphery. During acute viremia of chickenpox viral DNA can be detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by PCR and in situ hybridization. Recently published results quantified the viral DNA load in PBMC and subpopulations by real-time PCR. In the animal SCID-hu mouse model system VZV showed a tropism for T-lymphocytes. The aim of this work was the investigation of viral ability to infect and to replicate in purified primary subtypes of PBMC, i.e., T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes, and monocytes. These cells were isolated from whole peripheral blood or tonsils and infected with cell-free VZV for different time periods. In all cell types, transcriptional activity was shown by amplification and detection of immediate early (IE) and late (L) viral mRNA by NASBA or RT-PCR. Expression of viral glycoproteins was analyzed and proved in lymphocytes by immunofluorescence microscopy. PMID:12627490

  11. Focal encephalitis following varicella-zoster virus reactivation without rash in a healthy immunized young adult.

    PubMed

    Halling, Geoffrey; Giannini, Caterina; Britton, Jeffrey W; Lee, Ricky W; Watson, Robert E; Terrell, Christine L; Parney, Ian F; Buckingham, Erin M; Carpenter, John E; Grose, Charles

    2014-09-01

    Herein we describe an episode of focal varicella-zoster virus (VZV) encephalitis in a healthy young man with neither rash nor radicular pain. The symptoms began with headaches and seizures, after which magnetic resonance imaging detected a single hyperintense lesion in the left temporal lobe. Because of the provisional diagnosis of a brain tumor, the lesion was excised and submitted for pathological examination. No tumor was found. But the tissue immunostained positively for VZV antigens, and wild-type VZV sequences were detected. In short, this case represents VZV reactivation, most likely in the trigeminal ganglion, in the absence of clinical herpes zoster.

  12. Focal Encephalitis Following Varicella-Zoster Virus Reactivation Without Rash in a Healthy Immunized Young Adult

    PubMed Central

    Halling, Geoffrey; Giannini, Caterina; Britton, Jeffrey W.; Lee, Ricky W.; Watson, Robert E.; Terrell, Christine L.; Parney, Ian F.; Buckingham, Erin M.; Carpenter, John E.; Grose, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Herein we describe an episode of focal varicella-zoster virus (VZV) encephalitis in a healthy young man with neither rash nor radicular pain. The symptoms began with headaches and seizures, after which magnetic resonance imaging detected a single hyperintense lesion in the left temporal lobe. Because of the provisional diagnosis of a brain tumor, the lesion was excised and submitted for pathological examination. No tumor was found. But the tissue immunostained positively for VZV antigens, and wild-type VZV sequences were detected. In short, this case represents VZV reactivation, most likely in the trigeminal ganglion, in the absence of clinical herpes zoster. PMID:24604820

  13. Brain PET metabolic abnormalities in a case of varicella-zoster virus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Coiffard, Benjamin; Guedj, Eric; Daumas, Aurélie; Leveque, Pierre; Villani, Patrick

    2014-09-01

    The role of brain 18F-FDG PET in the diagnostic evaluation of encephalitis has been recently suggested, especially in limbic encephalitis, but descriptions are mainly limited to small case reports. However, the evaluation of cerebral metabolism by 18F-FDG PET has never been described for varicella-zoster virus encephalitis. We report the first case of varicella-zoster virus encephalitis in which 18F-FDG PET revealed brain metabolic abnormalities. Brain metabolic PET imaging was analyzed by comparing the patient's brain 18F-FDG PET scans to that of 12 healthy subjects. Compared with healthy subjects, significant hypometabolism and hypermetabolism were found and evolved over time with treatment.

  14. Modulation of host CD59 expression by varicella-zoster virus in human xenografts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Xin; Yang, Lianwei; Fu, Wenkun; Pan, Dequan; Liu, Jian; Ye, Jianghui; Zhao, Qinjian; Zhu, Hua; Cheng, Tong; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-04-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is the causative agent of both chickenpox (varicella) and shingles (zoster). VZV survives host defenses, even with an intact immune system, and disseminates in the host before causing disease. To date, several diverse immunomodulatory strategies used by VZV to undermine host immunity have been identified; however, few studies have addressed the complement evasion strategies used by this virus. Here, we show that expression of CD59, which is a key member of host regulators of complement activation (RCA), is significantly upregulated in response to VZV infection in human T cells and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) but not in human skin xenografts in SCID-hu mice in vivo. This is the first report demonstrating that VZV infection upregulates host CD59 expression in a tissue-specific manner in vivo, which may aid VZV in complement evasion and pathogenesis. PMID:26891237

  15. Vaccines for measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, and herpes zoster: immunization guidelines for adults.

    PubMed

    Hendriksz, Tami; Malouf, Philip; Foy, James E

    2011-10-01

    Although vaccinations are most commonly associated with the pediatric population, it is important for healthcare professionals to be familiar with the vaccines that are recommended for adults. The authors discuss 3 vaccines-the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine, the varicella vaccine, and the herpes zoster vaccine-including information about the diseases and complications that they protect against. Two doses, separated by 4 weeks, of both the MMR and varicella vaccines are recommended for all adults who do not have immunization or contraindications. All adults aged 60 years or older should receive a single dose of the herpes zoster vaccine unless they have contraindications. These 3 vaccines offer protection from illnesses that can have serious sequelae and substantial public health implications.

  16. Varicella zoster virus encephalomyelitis as a late complication following haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shahani, Lokesh

    2014-12-19

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes the primary infection manifesting as varicella or chickenpox, with possibility of reactivation later in life. A 71-year-old man presented with headache and lower extremity weakness. There was no evidence of skin lesions to suggest a recent zoster infection. The patient had a history of multiple myeloma diagnosed 2 years earlier, treated with chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant. Antimicrobial prophylaxis was discontinued 12 months after the transplant. MRI of the brain demonstrated areas of T2/fluid-attenuated inversion recovery hyperintensity in bilateral cerebral white matter and MRI of the spine demonstrated enhancement along the cauda equine. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed lymphocytic pleocytosis and VZV DNA was detected by PCR in the CSF. The patient was treated with 8 weeks of antiviral therapy with complete resolution of symptoms. VZV should be considered in patients with haematopoietic stem cell transplantation presenting with similar neurological manifestations even in the absence of dermatological signs.

  17. Modulation of host CD59 expression by varicella-zoster virus in human xenografts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Xin; Yang, Lianwei; Fu, Wenkun; Pan, Dequan; Liu, Jian; Ye, Jianghui; Zhao, Qinjian; Zhu, Hua; Cheng, Tong; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-04-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is the causative agent of both chickenpox (varicella) and shingles (zoster). VZV survives host defenses, even with an intact immune system, and disseminates in the host before causing disease. To date, several diverse immunomodulatory strategies used by VZV to undermine host immunity have been identified; however, few studies have addressed the complement evasion strategies used by this virus. Here, we show that expression of CD59, which is a key member of host regulators of complement activation (RCA), is significantly upregulated in response to VZV infection in human T cells and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) but not in human skin xenografts in SCID-hu mice in vivo. This is the first report demonstrating that VZV infection upregulates host CD59 expression in a tissue-specific manner in vivo, which may aid VZV in complement evasion and pathogenesis.

  18. Anti-NMDA Receptor antibody encephalitis with concomitant detection of Varicella zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Solís, Natalia; Salazar, Lucrecia; Hasbun, Rodrigo

    2016-10-01

    The typical presentation of anti-NMDA (N-Methyl-d-Aspartate) receptor encephalitis involves young women with psychiatric, neurologic and autonomic symptoms; it is often associated with mature ovarian teratomas. NMDA receptor encephalitis has been described following Herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis. This case describes a classic presentation of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis with the concomitant presence of Varicella zoster virus in the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:27529308

  19. Dendritic cells as Achilles' heel and Trojan horse during varicella zoster virus infection.

    PubMed

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV), a human alphaherpesvirus, causes varicella and subsequently establishes latency within sensory nerve ganglia. Later in life VZV can reactivate to cause herpes zoster. A reduced frequency of VZV-specific T cells is strongly associated with herpes zoster illustrating that these immune cells are central to control latency. Dendritic cells (DCs) are required for the generation of VZV-specific T cells. However, DCs can also be infected in vitro and in vivo allowing VZV to evade the antiviral immune response. Thus, DCs represent the immune systems' Achilles heel. Uniquely among the human herpesviruses, VZV infects both DCs and T cells, and exploits both as Trojan horses. During primary infection VZV-infected DCs traffic to the draining lymph nodes and tonsils, where the virus is transferred to T cells. VZV-infected T cells subsequently spread infection throughout the body to give the typical varicella skin rash. The delicate interplay between VZV and DCs and its consequences for viral immune evasion and viral dissemination will be discussed in this article. PMID:26005438

  20. Dendritic cells as Achilles’ heel and Trojan horse during varicella zoster virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV), a human alphaherpesvirus, causes varicella and subsequently establishes latency within sensory nerve ganglia. Later in life VZV can reactivate to cause herpes zoster. A reduced frequency of VZV-specific T cells is strongly associated with herpes zoster illustrating that these immune cells are central to control latency. Dendritic cells (DCs) are required for the generation of VZV-specific T cells. However, DCs can also be infected in vitro and in vivo allowing VZV to evade the antiviral immune response. Thus, DCs represent the immune systems’ Achilles heel. Uniquely among the human herpesviruses, VZV infects both DCs and T cells, and exploits both as Trojan horses. During primary infection VZV-infected DCs traffic to the draining lymph nodes and tonsils, where the virus is transferred to T cells. VZV-infected T cells subsequently spread infection throughout the body to give the typical varicella skin rash. The delicate interplay between VZV and DCs and its consequences for viral immune evasion and viral dissemination will be discussed in this article. PMID:26005438

  1. Evolution of Cocirculating Varicella-Zoster Virus Genotypes during a Chickenpox Outbreak in Guinea-Bissau

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Eleanor R.; Kundu, Samit; Cooray, Samantha; Poulsen, Anja; Aaby, Peter; Breuer, Judith

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Varicella-zoster virus (VZV), a double-stranded DNA alphaherpesvirus, is associated with seasonal outbreaks of varicella in nonimmunized populations. Little is known about whether these outbreaks are associated with a single or multiple viral genotypes and whether new mutations rapidly accumulate during transmission. Here, we take advantage of a well-characterized population cohort in Guinea-Bissau and produce a unique set of 23 full-length genome sequences, collected over 7 months from eight households. Comparative sequence analysis reveals that four distinct genotypes cocirculated among the population, three of which were present during the first week of the outbreak, although no patients were coinfected, which indicates that exposure to infectious virus from multiple sources is common during VZV outbreaks. Transmission of VZV was associated with length polymorphisms in the R1 repeat region and the origin of DNA replication. In two cases, these were associated with the formation of distinct lineages and point to the possible coevolution of these loci, despite the lack of any known functional link in VZV or related herpesviruses. We show that these and all other sequenced clade 5 viruses possess a distinct R1 repeat motif that increases the acidity of an ORF11p protein domain and postulate that this has either arisen or been lost following divergence of the major clades. Thus, sequencing of whole VZV genomes collected during an outbreak has provided novel insights into VZV biology, transmission patterns, and (recent) natural history. IMPORTANCE VZV is a highly infectious virus and the causative agent of chickenpox and shingles, the latter being particularly associated with the risk of painful complications. Seasonal outbreaks of chickenpox are very common among young children, yet little is known about the dynamics of the virus during person-to-person to transmission or whether multiple distinct viruses seed and/or cocirculate during an outbreak. In this

  2. Varicella-zoster virus epidemiology--a changing scene?

    PubMed

    Fairley, C K; Miller, E

    1996-11-01

    Chickenpox is a relatively mild disease in healthy children but may be life threatening in immuno-suppressed patents, neonates, and normal adults, especially smokers-for whom the risk of varicella pneumonia is high. The epidemiology of chickenpox appears to be changing: There has been an unexplained upward shift in the age distribution of cases over the last 20 years. This is reflected by increased consultations for chickenpox in general practices and more deaths in England and Wales. On the basis of hospital admissions for chickenpox in young adults, there is evidence of a similar trend in the United States. This epidemiologic change has important consequences for future mortality rates and for risk of infection in health care workers and pregnant women. The potential use of the varicella vaccine should be considered as a measure to reduce the risk of nosocomial transmission in view of the possible changing epidemiology of varicella.

  3. Closure of varicella-zoster virus-containing vaccines pregnancy registry - United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Marin, Mona; Willis, English D; Marko, Ann; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Bialek, Stephanie R; Dana, Adrian

    2014-08-22

    Vaccines that contain live attenuated varicella-zoster virus (VZV) (Varivax, ProQuad, and Zostavax [all products of Merck & Co., Inc.]) are contraindicated during pregnancy. To monitor the pregnancy outcomes of women inadvertently vaccinated with VZV-containing vaccines immediately before or during pregnancy, Merck and CDC established the Merck/CDC Pregnancy Registry for VZV-Containing Vaccines in 1995. This report updates previously published summaries of registry data, provides the rationale for the closure of the registry, and describes plans for continued monitoring of the safety of these vaccines when inadvertently administered to pregnant women or immediately before pregnancy. From inception of the registry in 1995 through March 2012, no cases of congenital varicella syndrome and no increased prevalence of other birth defects have been detected among women vaccinated within 3 months before or during pregnancy. Although a small risk for congenital varicella syndrome cannot be ruled out, the number of exposures being registered each year (approximately two varicella-susceptible women exposed during the high-risk period for congenital varicella syndrome) is now too low to improve on the current estimate of the risk.

  4. Ultra-violet radiation is responsible for the differences in global epidemiology of chickenpox and the evolution of varicella-zoster virus as man migrated out of Africa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Of the eight human herpes viruses, varicella-zoster virus, which causes chickenpox and zoster, has a unique epidemiology. Primary infection is much less common in children in the tropics compared with temperate areas. This results in increased adult susceptibility causing outbreaks, for example in health-care workers migrating from tropical to temperate countries. The recent demonstration that there are different genotypes of varicella-zoster virus and their geographic segregation into tropical and temperate areas suggests a distinct, yet previously unconsidered climatic factor may be responsible for both the clinical and molecular epidemiological features of this virus infection. Presentation of the hypothesis Unlike other human herpes viruses, varicella-zoster virus does not require intimate contact for infection to occur indicating that transmission may be interrupted by a geographically restricted climatic factor. The factor with the largest difference between tropical and temperate zones is ultra-violet radiation. This could reduce the infectiousness of chickenpox cases by inactivating virus in vesicles, before or after rupture. This would explain decreased transmissibility in the tropics and why the peak chickenpox incidence in temperate zones occurs during winter and spring, when ultra-violet radiation is at its lowest. The evolution of geographically restricted genotypes is also explained by ultra-violet radiation driving natural selection of different virus genotypes with varying degrees of resistance to inactivation, tropical genotypes being the most resistant. Consequently, temperate viruses should be more sensitive to its effects. This is supported by the observation that temperate genotypes are found in the tropics only in specific circumstances, namely where ultra-violet radiation has either been excluded or significantly reduced in intensity. Testing the Hypothesis The hypothesis is testable by exposing different virus genotypes to ultra

  5. Varicella zoster virus-associated morbidity and mortality in Africa: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Hussey, Hannah S; Abdullahi, Leila H; Collins, Jamie E; Muloiwa, Rudzani; Hussey, Gregory D; Kagina, Benjamin M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella (chicken pox) and herpes zoster (shingles). Worldwide, these diseases are associated with significant morbidity. Most of the epidemiological data on VZV come from high income countries. There are few data on VZV in Africa, where tropical climates and high HIV/AIDS prevalence rates are expected to impact the epidemiology of VZV. Safe and effective vaccinations for both varicella and herpes zoster exist, but are not routinely used in Africa. There are very few data available on VZV disease burden in Africa to guide the introduction of these vaccines on the continent. Our aim is to conduct a systematic review of the VZV-associated morbidity and mortality in Africa, which will provide critical information that could be used to develop vaccination policies against these diseases in Africa. Methods and analysis Electronic databases will be searched and all studies published after 1974 that meet predefined criteria will be assessed. The primary outcomes for the study are VZV incidence/prevalence, hospitalisation rates and total death rates. The secondary outcome for this study is the proportion of VZV hospitalisations and/or deaths associated with HIV/AIDS. Two reviewers will screen the titles and abstracts, and then independently review the full texts, to determine if studies are eligible for inclusion. A risk of bias and quality assessment tool will be used to score all included studies. Following standardised data extraction, a trend analysis using R-programming software will be conducted to investigate the trend of VZV. Depending on the characteristics of included studies, subgroup analyses will be performed. This review will be reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Ethics and dissemination As this is a protocol for a systematic review, which will use already published data, no ethics approval is required. Findings will be disseminated

  6. Disseminated Varicella-Zoster Virus After Vaccination in an Immunocompetent Patient.

    PubMed

    Scotch, Allison H; Hoss, Elika; Orenstein, Robert; Budavari, Adriane I

    2016-06-01

    Severe adverse events associated with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) vaccination are rare. The authors describe a 53-year-old woman with no known immunodeficiency who presented with diffuse pruritic rash 17 days after receiving the varicella virus vaccine live. She had a low level of white blood cells and received a diagnosis of thrombocytopenia with elevated aminotransferase levels. Punch biopsy demonstrated positive VZV immunostaining and viral culture positive for VZV. After treatment with acyclovir, her rash improved and her white blood cell and platelet counts returned to normal. Mild reactions to vaccines including localized rash are well recognized. Disseminated infections have been reported in patients with congenital and acquired immunodeficiency, but systemic postvaccination infections are rare in immunocompetent adults. This case highlights the importance of recognizing adverse events associated with vaccination. PMID:27214778

  7. Multiple Apical Radiolucencies and External Cervical Resorption Associated with Varicella Zoster Virus: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kreena; Schirru, Elia; Niazi, Sadia; Mitchell, Philip; Mannocci, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is responsible for the primary infection chickenpox. After the initial infection, it remains latent but can reactivate, resulting in shingles (herpes zoster). Previous reports have implicated VZV in the pathogenesis of apical periodontitis, but the involvement of the virus has not been investigated fully. The present case describes a patient who suffered from a severe episode of shingles and subsequently developed periapical radiolucencies of all the teeth in the affected nerve distribution. Molecular and culture techniques showed the presence of VZV DNA in the root canal system in the absence of bacteria. This confirms that VZV can cause localized pulp necrosis and apical periodontitis. The lesions healed after endodontic treatment, implying chemomechanical debridement using sodium hypochlorite irrigation and a calcium hydroxide interim dressing may be effective against the virus. PMID:27133503

  8. Time trends in pediatric Herpes zoster hospitalization rate after Varicella immunization.

    PubMed

    Critselis, Elena; Theodoridou, Kalliopi; Alexopoulou, Zoi; Theodoridou, Maria; Papaevangelou, Vassiliki

    2016-06-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is an emerging concern for public health officials. The aim of this study was to determine whether universal Varicella immunization implemented in 2004 had an impact on HZ hospitalization in immunocompetent children in Greece. All HZ hospitalizations were recorded during the period 1999-2011. The overall attributable hospitalization rate was 13.89 cases/1000 hospital admissions (95%CI: 11.69-16.38 cases/1000 hospital admissions). HZ hospitalization rate remained unchanged during the study period. These data provide a basis for monitoring HZ hospitalization rate among children following universal toddler immunization.

  9. Expression of varicella-zoster virus and herpes simplex virus in normal human trigeminal ganglia

    SciTech Connect

    Vafai, A.; Wellish, M.; Devlin, M.; Gilden, D.H. ); Murray, R.S. Veterans Administration Medical Center, Denver, CO )

    1988-04-01

    Lysates of radiolabeled explants from four human trigeminal ganglia were immunoprecipitated with antibodies to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and to herpes simplex virus. Both herpes simplex virus- and VZV-specific proteins were detected in lysates of all four ganglia. Absence of reactivity in ganglion explants with monoclonal antibodies suggested that herpes simplex virus and VZV were not reactivated during the culture period. In situ hybridization studies demonstrated the presence of RNA transcripts from the VZV immediate early gene 63. This approach to the detection of herpes simplex virus and VZV expression in human ganglia should facilitate analysis of viral RNA and proteins in human sensory ganglia.

  10. Dissecting the Molecular Mechanisms of the Tropism of Varicella-Zoster Virus for Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Studies of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) tropism for T cells support their role in viral transport to the skin during primary infection. Multiparametric single-cell mass cytometry demonstrates that, instead of preferentially infecting skin-homing T cells, VZV alters cell signaling and remodels surface proteins to enhance T cell skin trafficking. Viral proteins dispensable in skin, such as that encoded by open reading frame 66, are necessary in T cells. Interference with VZV T cell tropism may offer novel strategies for drug and vaccine design. PMID:26792747

  11. Exocytosis of Varicella-Zoster Virus Virions Involves a Convergence of Endosomal and Autophagy Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, Erin M.; Jarosinski, Keith W.; Jackson, Wallen; Carpenter, John E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is an extremely cell-associated herpesvirus with limited egress of viral particles. The induction of autophagy in VZV-infected monolayers is easily detectable; inhibition of autophagy leads to decreased VZV glycoprotein biosynthesis and diminished viral titers. To explain how autophagic flux could exert a proviral effect on the VZV infectious cycle, we postulated that the VZV exocytosis pathway following secondary envelopment may converge with the autophagy pathway. This hypothesis depended on known similarities between VZV gE and autophagy-related (Atg) Atg9/Atg16L1 trafficking pathways. Investigations were carried out with highly purified fractions of VZV virions. When the virion fraction was tested for the presence of autophagy and endosomal proteins, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain (MAP1LC3B) and Ras-like GTPase 11 (Rab11) were detected. By two-dimensional (2D) and 3D imaging after immunolabeling, both proteins also colocalized with VZV gE in a proportion of cytoplasmic vesicles. When purified VZV virions were enumerated after immunoelectron microscopy, gold beads were detected on viruses following incubation with antibodies to VZV gE (∼100%), Rab11 (50%), and LC3B (30%). Examination of numerous electron micrographs demonstrated that enveloped virions were housed in single-membraned vesicles; viral particles were not observed in autophagosomes. Taken together, our data suggested that some viral particles after secondary envelopment accumulated in a heterogeneous population of single-membraned vesicular compartments, which were decorated with components from both the endocytic pathway (Rab11) and the autophagy pathway (LC3B). The latter cytoplasmic viral vesicles resembled an amphisome. IMPORTANCE VZV infection leads to increased autophagic flux, while inhibition of autophagy leads to a marked reduction in virus spread. In this investigation of the proviral role of autophagy, we found evidence for an

  12. Burning mouth syndrome associated with varicella zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Maria A; Gilden, Don

    2016-01-01

    We present two cases of burning mouth syndrome (BMS)-of 8-month duration in a 61-year-old woman and of 2-year duration in a 63-year-old woman-both associated with increased levels of antivaricella zoster virus (VZV) IgM antibodies in serum and with pain that improved with antiviral treatment. Combined with our previous finding of BMS due to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection, we recommend evaluation of patients with BMS not only for VZV or HSV-1 DNA in the saliva, but also for serum anti-VZV and anti-HSV-1 IgM antibodies. Both infections are treatable with oral antiviral agents. PMID:27382016

  13. Superior Orbital Fissure Syndrome and Ophthalmoplegia Caused by Varicella Zoster Virus with No Skin Eruption in a Patient Treated with Tumor Necrosis Alpha Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Helene; Thomsen, Sidsel Thorup; Hansen, Stine Scott; Munksgaard, Signe Bruun; Lindelof, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus lies dormant in the dorsal root ganglia after symptomatic chicken pox infection, usually in childhood. If the virus reactivates in the trigeminal ganglia, it can cause varicella zoster ophthalmicus, which can have severe ocular complications. We report a case of a 73-year-old woman in severe immunosuppression due to treatment with mycophenolate mofetil, glucocorticosteroids and a tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitor. The reactivation caused superior orbital fissure syndrome, which has only rarely been described in relation to varicella zoster virus reactivation. In our case, the syndrome was seen along with severe encephalitis.

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid HIV-1 compartmentalization in a patient with AIDS and acute varicella-zoster virus meningomyeloradiculitis.

    PubMed

    Falcone, E Liana; Adegbulugbe, Ademiposi A; Sheikh, Virginia; Imamichi, Hiromi; Dewar, Robin L; Hammoud, Dima A; Sereti, Irini; Lane, H Clifford

    2013-09-01

    We report a case of AIDS presenting as varicella-zoster virus (VZV) meningomyeloradiculitis associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) quasispecies compartmentalization within the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and a CSF viral load that was 1 log higher than in peripheral blood. Prolonged antiviral therapy for both VZV and HIV type 1 was associated with partial resolution.

  15. Twenty Years of Medically-Attended Pediatric Varicella and Herpes Zoster in Ontario, Canada: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Wormsbecker, Anne E.; Wang, Jun; Rosella, Laura C.; Kwong, Jeffrey C.; Seo, Chi Yon; Crowcroft, Natasha S.; Deeks, Shelley L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if reductions in medically-attended pediatric varicella and herpes zoster occurred in Ontario, Canada, after publicly-funded varicella immunization was implemented in 2004. Methods For fiscal years (FY) 1992-2011, we examined data on varicella and herpes zoster physician office visits, emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations (including for varicella-associated skin and soft tissue infections [SSTI]), and intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, among those aged <18 years. The pre-vaccine, privately-available, and vaccine program eras were FY1992-1998, FY1999-2003, and FY2004-2011, respectively. We used Poisson regressionand Kruskal-Wallis tests (all at the p<0.05 level of significance), and compared rates using incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results Incidence of varicella office visits declined over the study period from a high of 25.1/1,000 in FY1994 to a low of 3.2/1,000 in FY2011. ED visits and hospitalizations followed similar patterns of decreasing rates later in the study period. IRRs comparing the vaccine program versus pre-vaccine eras were 0.29 (95%CI: 0.26-0.32) for office visits, 0.29 (95%CI: 0.21-0.40) for ED visits, and 0.41 (95%CI: 0.10-1.69) for hospitalizations. Annual declines in varicella office visits were 7.7%, 9.1%, 8.4%, and 8.4% per year among children aged <1 year, 1-4 years, 5-11 years, and ≥12 years, respectively (all p<0.001). Age-specific rates of varicella-associated SSTI declined significantly among children <12 years (p<0.001) and rates of ICU admissions decreased significantly for children <1 year (p = 0.02). (p<0.001) over the study period. For children aged 5-17 years, herpes zoster office visits decreased whereas ED visits increased (both p<0.001) and there was a small, non-significant (p = 0.07), decrease in hospitalizations. Conclusion Medically-attended varicella decreased during the study period, particularly since varicella vaccine was publicly-funded. Results

  16. Prolonged varicella-zoster virus reinfection in an adult after unrelated cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Oka, Masahiro; Kunisada, Makoto; Oba, Yuichiro; Okamura, Atsuo; Nishigori, Chikako

    2012-09-01

    Most varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections after cord blood transplantation (CBT) present as localized herpes zoster. Here, we report a case of VZV reinfection in an adult patient after CBT that appeared clinically to be varicella. A 50-year-old Japanese man underwent CBT for the management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Seventeen months later, he developed a small number of vesicles with umbilicated centers. A skin biopsy showed an intraepidermal blister containing degenerated balloon cells. Subsequently, the skin eruption developed over his entire body. The patient was treated with intravenous acyclovir for 5 days, followed by oral valacyclovir for 9 days. It took more than 3 weeks for most of the skin lesions to scab. Serum levels of anti-VZV IgG on days 3 and 33 after the onset of the skin eruption were negative and 260 mIU/ml, respectively. Serum anti-VZV IgM on days 3 and 33 was not detected. Our patient was diagnosed with VZV reinfection.

  17. Anticomplement immunofluorescence for the titration of antibody to varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, S; Baba, M; Ogata, M; Iijima, S; Murai, C

    1981-01-01

    Anticomplement immunofluorescence (ACIF) was tested for its use for the titration of antibody against varicella-zoster virus (VZV). ACIF antibody responses of patients with VZV infection were specific for VZV antigen and heterotypic responses to herpes simplex virus type-1 and cytomegalovirus antigens were not observed. Comparative studies of ACIF, membrane immunofluorescence (MIF) and indirect immunofluorescence (IF), using acetone-fixed antigen, were carried out with nonimmune sera and convalescent sera of patients who had recovered from varicella, herpes zoster and Rumsey Hunt disease. Nonspecific staining occurred with some nonimmune sera at a 1:4 dilution in the MIF and IF tests, after freezing and thawing of the serum, but not in the ACIF test. The antibody titers in convalescent sera agreed well in these three methods and the highest titer was obtained by MIF. The titers in ACIF and IF were similar but the ACIF antibody decreased earlier than the IF antibody during convalescence. On the other hand there was a discrepancy between the titers of ACIF and those of MIF and IF antibody in the sera of healthy adults, all sera with titers higher than 10 in the MIF and IF tests had titers below 10 in the ACIF test. The average titer of ACIF antibody declined to less than 10 with increasing age (13 to more than 20 years), whereas the MIF antibody increased during the same period of life.

  18. Varicella-Zoster Virus in Perth, Western Australia: Seasonality and Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Korostil, Igor A.; Regan, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of the factors affecting reactivation of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) largely remains an open question. Exposure to solar ultra violet (UV) radiation is speculated to facilitate reactivation. Should the role of UV in reactivation be significant, VZV reactivation patterns would generally be expected to be synchronous with seasonal UV profiles in temperate climates. Methods We analysed age and gender specific VZV notification time series data from Perth, Western Australia (WA). This city has more daily sunshine hours than any other major Australian city. Using the cosinor and generalized linear models, we tested these data for seasonality and correlation with UV and temperature. Results We established significant seasonality of varicella notifications and showed that while herpes-zoster (HZ) was not seasonal it had a more stable seasonal component in males over 60 than in any other subpopulation tested. We also detected significant association between HZ notifications and UV for the entire Perth population as well as for females and males separately. In most cases, temperature proved to be a significant factor as well. Conclusions Our findings suggest that UV radiation may be important for VZV reactivation, under the assumption that notification data represent an acceptably accurate qualitative measure of true VZV incidence. PMID:26963841

  19. Current and future effects of varicella and herpes zoster vaccination in Germany - Insights from a mathematical model in a country with universal varicella vaccination.

    PubMed

    Horn, Johannes; Karch, André; Damm, Oliver; Kretzschmar, Mirjam E; Siedler, Anette; Ultsch, Bernhard; Weidemann, Felix; Wichmann, Ole; Hengel, Hartmut; Greiner, Wolfgang; Mikolajczyk, Rafael T

    2016-07-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is primarily known for causing varicella in childhood, but can reactivate again as herpes zoster (HZ) after a period of latency, mainly in persons older than 50 years. Universal varicella vaccination was introduced in Germany in 2004, while HZ vaccination has not been recommended yet. We aimed to quantify the potential long-term effects of universal childhood varicella vaccination and HZ vaccination of the elderly on varicella and HZ incidence in Germany over a time horizon of 100 years, using a transmission model calibrated to pre-vaccination data and validated against early post-vaccination data. Using current vaccination coverage rates of 87% (64%) with one (two) varicella vaccine dose(s), the model predicts a decrease in varicella cases by 89% for the year 2015. In the long run, the incidence reduction will stabilize at about 70%. Under the assumption of the boosting hypothesis of improved HZ protection caused by exposure to VZV, the model predicts a temporary increase in HZ incidence of up to 20% for around 50 years. HZ vaccination of the elderly with an assumed coverage of 20% has only limited effects in counteracting this temporary increase in HZ incidence. However, HZ incidence is shown to decrease in the long-term by 58% as vaccinated individuals get older and finally reach age-classes with originally high HZ incidence. Despite substantial uncertainties around several key variables, the model's results provide valuable insights that support decision-making regarding national VZV vaccination strategies.

  20. Effect of time delay after necropsy on analysis of simian varicella-zoster virus expression in latently infected ganglia of rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, Ravi; Traina-Dorge, Vicki; Wellish, Mary; Deharo, Eileen; Golive, Anjani; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Gilden, Don

    2010-12-01

    Studies of varicella-zoster virus gene expression during latency require the acquisition of human ganglia at autopsy. Concerns have been raised that the virus might reactivate immediately after death. Because features of varicella-zoster virus latency are similar in primate and human ganglia, we examined virus gene expression in tissues either processed immediately or kept at 4°C for 30 h before necropsy of two monkeys inoculated with simian varicella-zoster virus and euthanized 117 days later. Virus transcription and the detection of open reading frame (ORF) 63 protein in the cytoplasm of neurons were comparable. Thus, a 30-h delay after death did not affect varicella-zoster virus expression in latently infected ganglia.

  1. Varicella-Zoster Virus-Specific Enzyme-Linked Immunospot Assay Responses and Zoster-Associated Pain in Herpes Zoster Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Tyring, Stephen K.; Stek, Jon E.; Smith, Jeffrey G.; Xu, Jin; Pagnoni, Marco; Chan, Ivan S. F.; Silber, Jeffrey L.; Levin, Myron J.

    2012-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV)-specific cell-mediated immunity (CMI) responses were compared over time following an episode of herpes zoster (HZ) with those of age-, race-, and gender-matched healthy controls (HC) without HZ, using a validated gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay. The zoster brief-pain inventory (ZBPI) was used to assess zoster-associated pain. HZ patients (n = 140) had significantly higher IFN-γ ELISPOT responses to VZV antigen than did HC (n = 140). ELISPOT geometric mean count (GMC) responses (with 95% confidence intervals [CI]) for subjects who presented within 72 h were as follows: for HZ patients ≥ 60 years of age, at day 0 the GMC was 110 and at week 2 the GMC was 235; for HZ patients 21 to 59 years of age, at day 0 the GMC was 111 and at week 2 the GMC was 198; for HC ≥ 60 years of age, at day 0 the GMC was 19 and at week 2 the GMC was 18; and for HC 21 to 59 years of age, at day 0 the GMC was 59 and at week 2 the GMC was 56. The mean pain score (95% CI) across age groups at 1 week postrash (n = 106) was 6.0 (5.5, 6.5) and at 2 weeks postrash (n = 119) was 3.5 (2.9, 4.0). The percentage of HZ patients with substantial pain (score ≥ 3) at 6 weeks postrash increased with age from 8% for patients 21 to 49 years of age to 16% for patients 50 to 59 years of age to 22% for patients ≥ 60 years of age. The VZV-specific CMI response was substantially boosted by an episode of HZ, as measured by ELISPOT results. Older adults had lower VZV-specific cellular immunity than younger subjects at baseline, but the boosting effect of HZ was substantial for all age groups. HZ patients experienced considerable zoster-associated acute (1 to 2 weeks after rash) pain across age groups, while chronic pain increased with age. PMID:22787198

  2. Rapid and sensitive detection of varicella zoster virus in saliva of patients with herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Satish K; Tyring, Stephen K; Cohrs, Randall J; Gilden, Don; Feiveson, Alan H; Lechler, Kayla J; Pierson, Duane L

    2013-10-01

    VZV reactivation produces zoster (shingles) which may be further complicated by meningoencephalitis, myelopathy, vasculopathy and multiple ocular disorders. Importantly, these neurological and ocular complications of VZV reactivation can occur without rash. In such instances, virological verification relies on detection of VZV DNA or anti-VZV IgG antibody in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), or less often, the presence of VZV DNA in blood mononuclear cells or anti-VZV IgM antibody in serum or CSF. If VZV were readily detected in other tissue samples (e.g., saliva or tears) in patients with neurological disease in the absence of rash and shown to correlate with the standard tests listed above, more invasive tests such as lumbar puncture might be obviated. In patients with acute herpes zoster, the yield of cell DNA was greater in saliva collected by passive drool or synthetic swab than by cotton swab. The time to process saliva from collection to obtaining DNA was 1h. VZV DNA was present exclusively in the pelleted fraction of saliva and was found in 100% of patients before antiviral treatment. This rapid sensitive method can be applied readily to saliva from humans with neurologic and other disease that might be caused by VZV in the absence of rash.

  3. A rapid radioimmunoassay using /sup 125/I-labeled staphylococcal protein A for antibody to varicella-zoster virus

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, D.D.; Cleveland, P.H.; Oxman, M.N.; Zaia, J.A.

    1981-05-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay for serum antibody to varicella-zoster virus is described; it uses 125I-labeled staphylococcal protein A and a specially designed immunofiltration apparatus. The assay accurately distinguishes between individuals who are susceptible and those who are immune to infection with varicella-zoster virus. In addition, it can detect passive antibody in recipients of varicella-zoster immune globulin. This radioimmunoassay also detects the heterologous antibody responses that occasionally occur in patients infected with herpes simplex virus, which also have been detected by other antibody assays. The particular advantages of this assay are the use of noninfectious reagents, the speed of execution (less than 3 hr), the requirement for only small quantities of serum (30 microliters), the objectivity of end-point determination, and the capability of screening large numbers of sera. Consequently, this radioimmunoassay is especially useful for the rapid identification of susceptible individuals, which is essential for the appropriate management of patients and hospital personnel after exposure to varicella.

  4. Safety of Live Attenuated High-Titer Varicella-Zoster Virus Vaccine in Pediatric Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Recipients.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Takahiro; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Kawano, Yutaka; Mori, Makiko; Arakawa, Yuki; Kato, Motohiro; Hanada, Ryoji

    2016-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients have a high risk of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections. Although VZV vaccination may be beneficial in preventing VZV infections, data on safety and efficacy of VZV vaccines in HSCT recipients, particularly of zoster vaccine, are limited. We report our experience with the use of a single dose of an Oka strain high-titer zoster-equivalent varicella vaccine in pediatric allogeneic HSCT recipients. We administered the high-titer VZV vaccine to 31 pediatric allogeneic HSCT recipients without vaccine-type VZV infections. One patient developed varicella due to wild-type VZV 13 days after vaccination. No zoster developed after vaccination during a median follow-up period of 4.8 years from vaccination. No other adverse effects were observed. Eighteen of the 31 patients (58.1%) were seropositive after vaccination. Seventeen patients were vaccinated within 24 months after HSCT; the seropositivity of these patients did not significantly differ from that of patients vaccinated > 24 months after HSCT. VZV vaccination may be a safe and beneficial approach in preventing VZV infections after HSCT.

  5. An analysis of infection control of varicella-zoster virus infections in Addenbrooke's Hospital Cambridge over a 5-year period, 1987-92.

    PubMed Central

    Wreghitt, T. G.; Whipp, J.; Redpath, C.; Hollingworth, W.

    1996-01-01

    This prospective study analyses infections with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge during 1987-92 and examines the spread of infection. In total, 93 patients and staff experienced VZV infection. Twenty-one patients had varicella and 49 experienced zoster. None of 101 patients and 1 of 625 staff members in contact with varicella cases acquired infection. By contrast, 2 of 227 patients, and 5 of 1039 staff in contact with zoster cases acquired varicella. One out of 28 (3.6%) VZV antibody-negative patients and staff in contact with varicella acquired infection, compared with 5 out of 29 (17.2%) VZV antibody-negative patients and staff in contact with zoster. Thus, zoster was found to be a more frequent cause of nosocomial infection than varicella. Fourteen members of staff had VZV infection during the study period. One of 99 patients and none of 389 staff members in contact with these cases developed varicella. The cost of dealing with infection control for VZV infections in our hospital is estimated to be Pounds 714 per patient case and a total of Pounds 13,204 per year. PMID:8760965

  6. Focus assay for varicella-zoster virus in human embryo cells stained with immunoperoxidase method.

    PubMed

    Schmidtmayerová, H; Mayer, V; Zachar, V

    1986-11-01

    Rapid titration of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in human embryonic fibroblasts (HEF) based on staining of virus-infected cells by indirect immunoperoxidase technique (IPA) is described. Cell monolayers were grown in wells of plastic plates (two different diameters). Foci of virus-infected cells as revealed by IPA could be counted either 48 hr post-infection, if cell-associated virus (VZV infected cells) was used as inoculum, or 72 hr p. i. if cell-free virus was used. A linear relationship was observed between virus dilution and number of foci. The first virus was detected 12 hr p. i., the highest titre at 36 hr, when cytopathic effect (CPE) involved about 50% of the monolayer.

  7. Oesophagobronchial fistula caused by varicella zoster virus in a patient with AIDS: a unique case

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, F; Uberti-Foppa, C; Quiros-Roldan, E; Fanti, L; Lillo, F; Lazzarin, A

    2002-01-01

    Human herpesvirus oesophagitis in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients is caused by cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus; no cases of oesophagitis and oesophagobrochial fistula as a result of varicella zoster virus (VZV) have been reported to date. This report describes the case of a patient with a 2–3 mm deep oesophageal ulcer whose viral culture was positive for VZV. The patient was treated with acyclovir with resolution of the symptomatology. After the end of the induction treatment, because of the onset of fever and fits of coughing during eating, the patient underwent oesophagography, which showed an ulcer with an oesophagobronchial fistula in the middle and lower third of the oesophagus. This case report stresses the role of VZV infection as a possible cause of oesophagobronchial fistula, a rare but benign condition in patients with AIDS. PMID:11986352

  8. Bromovinyldeoxyurdine treatment of outer retinal necrosis due to varicella-zoster virus: a case-report.

    PubMed

    Dullaert, H; Maudgal, P C; Leys, A; Dralands, L; Clercq, E

    1996-01-01

    In December 1995, a 70-years old male was referred to us because of rapid visual loss in the right eye, one month after a central retinal artery occlusion in the left eye. This renal transplant patient, with limited renal function, was on immunosuppressive therapy. The diagnosis of bilateral progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) due to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of VZV DNA in the aqueous fluid. As retinitis progressed despite of intravenous acyclovir administration, the antiviral therapy was switched to oral bromovinyldeoxyuridine (BVDU). This case-report demonstrates that oral BVDU can be a good alternative to acyclovir for the treatment of VZV retinal infections.

  9. Effects of human alpha, beta and gamma interferons on varicella zoster virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Balachandra, K; Thawaranantha, D; Ayuthaya, P I; Bhumisawasdi, J; Shiraki, K; Yamanishi, K

    1994-06-01

    The antiviral effects of interferon (IFN) on varicella zoster virus (VZV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) in vitro were examined. The values for the 50% inhibitory dose (ID50) of IFN-alpha, beta and gamma determined by plaque reduction assay, were 0.813, 0.650 and 13.750 IU/ml, respectively, against VZV and 18.00, 10.38 and 115.0 IU/ml, respectively, against HSV. Thus IFN-alpha and beta were more effective than IFN-gamma against both VZV and HSV and VZV was more sensitive than HSV to the IFNs. Five mutants of VZV which were resistant to acyclovir (ACV), phosphonoacetic acid (PAA) or bromodeoxyuridine (BUDR) were also sensitive to IFN beta, their average ID50 being 1.31 IU/ml. Analysis of virus-specific proteins by the immunofluorescent technique with various antisera showed that IFN had a significant effect before early protein synthesis.

  10. Varicella zoster virus infection of the pharynx and larynx with multiple cranial neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan-Yung; Kao, Chuan-Hsiang; Wang, Chih-Hung

    2011-08-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection of the head and neck region may present with various clinical symptoms, involving different entities and different routes of viral spreading. We present a case of VZV infection of the pharynx and larynx with multiple cranial nerve (CN) neuropathies (CN VII, VIII, IX, and X) of a 52-year-old woman who complained of the sudden onset of hoarseness, odynophagia, dysphagia, and hearing loss in the left ear, followed by left-side facial weakness lasting for 1 week. Endoscopic examination revealed multiple mucosal erosions over the oropharynx, with extension upward to the nasopharynx and downward to the mucosa overlying the epiglottis, arytenoid, and vocal cord. All of these lesions tended to lateralize to the left side, suggesting a VZV infection diagnosis; this was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction on eruptional exudates, as well as serologic examination.

  11. Sialic Acids on Varicella-Zoster Virus Glycoprotein B Are Required for Cell-Cell Fusion.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Tadahiro; Matsumoto, Maki; Arisawa, Fuminori; Kohyama, Masako; Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Mori, Yasuko; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-08-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a member of the human Herpesvirus family that causes varicella (chicken pox) and zoster (shingles). VZV latently infects sensory ganglia and is also responsible for encephalomyelitis. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), a member of the sialic acid (SA)-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin family, is mainly expressed in neural tissues. VZV glycoprotein B (gB) associates with MAG and mediates membrane fusion during VZV entry into host cells. The SA requirements of MAG when associating with its ligands vary depending on the specific ligand, but it is unclear whether the SAs on gB are involved in the association with MAG. In this study, we found that SAs on gB are essential for the association with MAG as well as for membrane fusion during VZV infection. MAG with a point mutation in the SA-binding site did not bind to gB and did not mediate cell-cell fusion or VZV entry. Cell-cell fusion and VZV entry mediated by the gB-MAG interaction were blocked by sialidase treatment. N-glycosylation or O-glycosylation inhibitors also inhibited the fusion and entry mediated by gB-MAG interaction. Furthermore, gB with mutations in N-glycosylation sites, i.e. asparagine residues 557 and 686, did not associate with MAG, and the cell-cell fusion efficiency was low. Fusion between the viral envelope and cellular membrane is essential for host cell entry by herpesviruses. Therefore, these results suggest that SAs on gB play important roles in MAG-mediated VZV infection.

  12. Rapid strip assay for detection of anti-herpes simplex virus antibodies: application to prediction of varicella-zoster virus reactivation in patients with acute peripheral facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, F; Furuta, Y; Horal, P; Bergström, T

    2000-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) reactivation causes acute peripheral facial palsy in the majority (88%) of patients who lack anti-herpes simplex virus (HSV) antibodies, suggesting that an absence of anti-HSV antibodies is a reliable serological marker for the diagnosis of VZV reactivation in patients who are diagnosed initially as idiopathic peripheral facial palsy (Bell's palsy) [Furuta et al., 2000] Clinical Infectious Diseases]. A simple and rapid immunoassay for detection of anti-HSV antibodies based on HSV type 1 glycoprotein D was developed by modifying the conventional Western blot technique. The assay was evaluated by comparing the results with those of conventional Western blot. In total, 100 sera obtained from patients with acute peripheral facial palsy were tested and judged blindly by two investigators. Twenty-four of 26 HSV-seronegative sera were obtained from patients with VZV reactivation (Ramsay Hunt syndrome or zoster sine herpete). The sensitivity of the assay was over 95% and the specificity was 100%. The two investigators agreed on the diagnosis in 99 of the 100 sera. These results indicate that the rapid strip assay is applicable to prediction of VZV reactivation in patients diagnosed clinically with Bell's palsy before zoster lesions appear or PCR using saliva samples indicates VZV reactivation.

  13. Neuronal changes induced by Varicella Zoster Virus in a rat model of Postherpetic Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Guedon, Jean-Marc G.; Yee, Michael B.; Zhang, Mingdi; Harvey, Stephen A. K.; Goins, William F.; Kinchington, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    A significant fraction of patients with herpes zoster, caused by varicella zoster virus (VZV), experience chronic pain termed postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). VZV-inoculated rats develop prolonged nocifensive behaviors and serve as a model of PHN. We demonstrate that primary rat cultures show a post-entry block for VZV replication, suggesting the rat is not fully permissive. However, footpads of VZV infected animals show reduced peripheral innervation and innervating dorsal root ganglia (DRG) contained VZV DNA and transcripts of candidate immediate early and early genes. The VZV-infected DRG showed changes in host gene expression patterns, with 84 up-regulated and 116 down-regulated genes seen in gene array studies. qRT-PCR validated the modulation of nociception-associated genes Ntrk2, Trpv1, and Calca (CGRP). The data suggests that VZV inoculation of the rat results in a single round, incomplete infection that is sufficient to induce pain behaviors, and this involves infection of and changes induced in neuronal populations. PMID:25880108

  14. Quantitative measurement of varicella-zoster virus infection by semiautomated flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Gates, Irina V; Zhang, Yuhua; Shambaugh, Cindy; Bauman, Meredith A; Tan, Charles; Bodmer, Jean-Luc

    2009-04-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV; human herpesvirus 3) is the etiological cause of chickenpox and, upon reactivation from latency, zoster. Currently, vaccines are available to prevent both diseases effectively. A critical requirement for the manufacturing of safe and potent vaccines is the measurement of the biological activity to ensure proper dosing and efficacy, while minimizing potentially harmful secondary effects induced by immunization. In the case of live virus-containing vaccines, such as VZV-containing vaccines, biological activity is determined using an infectivity assay in a susceptible cellular host in vitro. Infectivity measurements generally rely on the enumeration of plaques by visual inspection of an infected cell monolayer. These plaque assays are generally very tedious and labor intensive and have modest throughput and high associated variability. In this study, we have developed a flow cytometry assay to measure the infectivity of the attenuated vaccine strain (vOka/Merck) of VZV in MRC-5 cells with improved throughput. The assay is performed in 96-well tissue culture microtiter plates and is based on the detection and quantification of infected cells expressing VZV glycoproteins on their surfaces. Multiple assay parameters have been investigated, including specificity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, range of linear response, signal-to-noise ratio, and precision. This novel assay appears to be in good concordance with the classical plaque assay results and therefore provides a viable, higher-throughput alternative to the plaque assay.

  15. Quantitative Measurement of Varicella-Zoster Virus Infection by Semiautomated Flow Cytometry▿

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Irina V.; Zhang, Yuhua; Shambaugh, Cindy; Bauman, Meredith A.; Tan, Charles; Bodmer, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV; human herpesvirus 3) is the etiological cause of chickenpox and, upon reactivation from latency, zoster. Currently, vaccines are available to prevent both diseases effectively. A critical requirement for the manufacturing of safe and potent vaccines is the measurement of the biological activity to ensure proper dosing and efficacy, while minimizing potentially harmful secondary effects induced by immunization. In the case of live virus-containing vaccines, such as VZV-containing vaccines, biological activity is determined using an infectivity assay in a susceptible cellular host in vitro. Infectivity measurements generally rely on the enumeration of plaques by visual inspection of an infected cell monolayer. These plaque assays are generally very tedious and labor intensive and have modest throughput and high associated variability. In this study, we have developed a flow cytometry assay to measure the infectivity of the attenuated vaccine strain (vOka/Merck) of VZV in MRC-5 cells with improved throughput. The assay is performed in 96-well tissue culture microtiter plates and is based on the detection and quantification of infected cells expressing VZV glycoproteins on their surfaces. Multiple assay parameters have been investigated, including specificity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, range of linear response, signal-to-noise ratio, and precision. This novel assay appears to be in good concordance with the classical plaque assay results and therefore provides a viable, higher-throughput alternative to the plaque assay. PMID:19201967

  16. Defective T Memory Cell Differentiation after Varicella Zoster Vaccination in Older Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Wagar, Lisa E.; Mackey, Sally; Hu, Jinyu; Maecker, Holden; Davis, Mark M.; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Tian, Lu; Weyand, Cornelia M.; Goronzy, Jörg J.

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination with attenuated live varicella zoster virus (VZV) can prevent zoster reactivation, but protection is incomplete especially in an older population. To decipher the molecular mechanisms underlying variable vaccine responses, T- and B-cell responses to VZV vaccination were examined in individuals of different ages including identical twin pairs. Contrary to the induction of VZV-specific antibodies, antigen-specific T cell responses were significantly influenced by inherited factors. Diminished generation of long-lived memory T cells in older individuals was mainly caused by increased T cell loss after the peak response while the expansion of antigen-specific T cells was not affected by age. Gene expression in activated CD4 T cells at the time of the peak response identified gene modules related to cell cycle regulation and DNA repair that correlated with the contraction phase of the T cell response and consequently the generation of long-lived memory cells. These data identify cell cycle regulatory mechanisms as targets to reduce T cell attrition in a vaccine response and to improve the generation of antigen-specific T cell memory, in particular in an older population. PMID:27764254

  17. Stress-induced subclinical reactivation of varicella zoster virus in astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Satish K.; Cohrs, Randall J.; Forghani, Bagher; Zerbe, Gary; Gilden, Donald H.; Pierson, Duane L.

    2004-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) becomes latent in human ganglia after primary infection. VZV reactivation occurs primarily in elderly individuals, organ transplant recipients, and patients with cancer and AIDS, correlating with a specific decline in cell-mediated immunity to the virus. VZV can also reactivate after surgical stress. The unexpected occurrence of thoracic zoster 2 days before space flight in a 47-year-old healthy astronaut from a pool of 81 physically fit astronauts prompted our search for VZV reactivation during times of stress to determine whether VZV can also reactivate after non-surgical stress. We examined total DNA extracted from 312 saliva samples of eight astronauts before, during, and after space flight for VZV DNA by polymerase chain reaction: 112 samples were obtained 234-265 days before flight, 84 samples on days 2 through 13 of space flight, and 116 samples on days 1 through 15 after flight. Before space flight, only one of the 112 saliva samples from a single astronaut was positive for VZV DNA. In contrast, during and after space flight, 61 of 200 (30%) saliva samples were positive in all eight astronauts. No VZV DNA was detected in any of 88 saliva samples from 10 healthy control subjects. These results indicate that VZV can reactivate subclinically in healthy individuals after non-surgical stress. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Genotyping of clinical varicella-zoster virus isolates collected from Yunnan in Southwestern China

    PubMed Central

    LI, YUNLONG; ZHU, BAOSHENG

    2016-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) belongs to the α-herpesvirus family. Genetically, it is stable and is divided into several genotypes based upon the genetic variations. The genotypes of VZV are rarely studied in the Southwestern region of China. In the present study, the common genetic variations in the VZV genes were examined in 42 VZV isolates collected from the patients with herpes zoster in the Yunnan province (Southwestern China). The restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of open reading frames (ORFs) 38, 54 and 62 in the VZV genes showed that all the collected VZV isolates were PstI, BglI and SmaI positive. The R5 variable-repeat region in these isolates was variable (R5A: 46.4%; R5B: 53.6%). The sequencing data of ORFs 1, 21, 22 and 54 indicated that 41 of the 42 collected VZV isolates could be grouped into genotype J or J1. Only one VZV isolate was identified as genotype A1 or M2. No new substitutions in the sequenced fragments were found in the collected VZV isolates. The results of the present study provided a preliminary genetic characterization of the VZV strains in the Yunnan province of Southwestern China. PMID:26893840

  19. Stress-induced subclinical reactivation of varicella zoster virus in astronauts.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Satish K; Cohrs, Randall J; Forghani, Bagher; Zerbe, Gary; Gilden, Donald H; Pierson, Duane L

    2004-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) becomes latent in human ganglia after primary infection. VZV reactivation occurs primarily in elderly individuals, organ transplant recipients, and patients with cancer and AIDS, correlating with a specific decline in cell-mediated immunity to the virus. VZV can also reactivate after surgical stress. The unexpected occurrence of thoracic zoster 2 days before space flight in a 47-year-old healthy astronaut from a pool of 81 physically fit astronauts prompted our search for VZV reactivation during times of stress to determine whether VZV can also reactivate after non-surgical stress. We examined total DNA extracted from 312 saliva samples of eight astronauts before, during, and after space flight for VZV DNA by polymerase chain reaction: 112 samples were obtained 234-265 days before flight, 84 samples on days 2 through 13 of space flight, and 116 samples on days 1 through 15 after flight. Before space flight, only one of the 112 saliva samples from a single astronaut was positive for VZV DNA. In contrast, during and after space flight, 61 of 200 (30%) saliva samples were positive in all eight astronauts. No VZV DNA was detected in any of 88 saliva samples from 10 healthy control subjects. These results indicate that VZV can reactivate subclinically in healthy individuals after non-surgical stress.

  20. Chronic varicella-zoster virus ganglionitis--a possible cause of postherpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Gilden, Donald H; Cohrs, Randall J; Hayward, Anthony R; Wellish, Mary; Mahalingam, Ravi

    2003-06-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is dermatomal distribution pain that persists for months to years after the resolution of herpes zoster rash. The cause of PHN is unknown. Herein, we report clinical, molecular virological, and immunological findings over an 11-year period in an immunocompetent elderly woman with PHN. Initially, blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) contained varicella-zoster virus (VZV) DNA on two consecutive occasions. Random testing after treatment with famciclovir to relieve pain did not detect VZV DNA. However, the patient was reluctant to continue famciclovir indefinitely and voluntarily stopped drug treatment five times. Pain always recurred within 1 week, and blood MNCs contained many, but not all, regions of the VZV genome on all five occasions. Immunological analysis revealed increased cell-mediated immunity to VZV. Chronic VZV ganglionitis-induced PHN best explains the recurrence of VZV DNA in MNCs whenever famciclovir was discontinued; the detection of only some regions of the viral genome in MNCs, compared to the detection of all regions of the VZV genome in latently infected ganglia; the increased cell-mediated immunity to VZV; and a gratifying clinical response to famciclovir. The presence of fragments of VZV DNA in MNCs likely represents partial degradation of viral DNA in MNCs that trafficked through ganglia during productive infection.

  1. Major depressive disorder and immunity to varicella-zoster virus in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Michael R; Levin, Myron J; Carrillo, Carmen; Olmstead, Richard; Lucko, Anne; Lang, Nancy; Caulfield, Michael J; Weinberg, Adriana; Chan, Ivan S F; Clair, Jim; Smith, Jeff G; Marchese, R D; Williams, Heather M; Beck, Danielle J; McCook, Patricia T; Johnson, Gary; Oxman, Michael N

    2011-05-01

    Major depressive disorder has been associated with activation of inflammatory processes as well as with reductions in innate, adaptive and non-specific immune responses. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between major depression and a disease-relevant immunologic response, namely varicella-zoster virus (VZV)-specific immunity, in elderly adults. A cross-sectional cohort study was conducted in 104 elderly community dwelling adults ≥ 60years of age who were enrolled in the depression substudy of the shingles prevention study, a double blind, placebo-controlled vaccine efficacy trial. Fifty-two subjects had a current major depressive disorder, and 52 age- and sex-matched controls had no history of depression or any mental illness. VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity (VZV-CMI) was measured by VZV responder cell frequency (VZV-RCF) and interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays, and antibody to VZV was measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay against affinity-purified VZV glycoproteins (gpELISA). VZV-CMI, measured by VZV-RCF, was significantly lower in the depressed group than in the controls (p<0.001), and VZV-RCF was inversely correlated with the severity of depressive symptoms in the depressed patients. In addition, an age-related reduction in VZV-RCF was observed in the depressed patients, but not in the controls. Furthermore, there was a trend for depressive symptom severity to be associated with lower ELISPOT counts. Finally, VZV-RCF was higher in depressed patients treated with antidepressant medications as compared to untreated depressed patients. Since lower levels of VZV-RCF appear to explain the increased risk and severity of herpes zoster observed in older adults, these findings suggest that, in addition to increasing age, depression may increase the risk and severity of herpes zoster.

  2. Incidence, risk factors, and implemented prophylaxis of varicella zoster virus infection, including complicated varicella zoster virus and herpes simplex virus infections, in lenalidomide-treated multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    König, C; Kleber, M; Reinhardt, H; Knop, S; Wäsch, R; Engelhardt, M

    2014-03-01

    In the era of high-dose chemotherapy and novel antimyeloma agents, the survival of multiple myeloma (MM) patients has substantially improved. Adverse effects, including infections, may however arise in the era of combination antimyeloma therapies. In general, MM patients have shown a risk of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection of 1-4 %, increasing with bortezomib treatment or transplants, but whether immunomodulatory drugs also bear a risk of VZV/complicated herpes simplex virus (HSV) (e.g., VZV-encephalitis [VZV-E], disseminated VZV-infection [d-VZV-i], or conus-cauda syndrome [CCS]) has not been elucidated. We here assessed VZV, VZV-E, d-VZV-i, and CCS in 93 lenalidomide-treated MM patients, consecutively seen and treated in our department. Patients' data were analyzed via electronic medical record retrieval within our research data warehouse as described previously. Of the 93 MM patients receiving lenalidomide, 10 showed VZV or other complicated VZV/HSV infections. These VZV patients showed defined risk factors as meticulously assessed, including suppressed lymphocyte subsets, substantial cell-mediated immune defects, and compromised humoral immune response. Due to our findings-and in line with an aciclovir prophylaxis in bortezomib and stem cell transplant protocols-we introduced a routine aciclovir prophylaxis in our lenalidomide protocols in May 2012 to minimize adverse events and to avoid discontinuation of lenalidomide treatment. Since then, we have observed no case of VZV/complicated HSV infection. Based on our data, we encourage other centers to also focus on these observations, assess viral infections, and-in those centers facilitating a research data warehouse-advocate an analogue data review as an appropriate multicenter approach.

  3. Measurement of antibodies to varicella-zoster virus using a virus-free fluorescent-antibody-to-membrane-antigen (FAMA) test.

    PubMed

    Park, Rackhyun; Hwang, Ji Young; Lee, Kang Il; Namkoong, Sim; Choi, Seuk-Keun; Park, Songyong; Park, Hosun; Park, Junsoo

    2015-02-01

    The fluorescent-antibody-to-membrane-antigen (FAMA) test is regarded as the "gold standard" to detect protective antibodies to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) because of its high sensitivity and specificity. Because the classic FAMA test uses an infectious virus for detection of antibodies to VZV, it is labor-intensive, and also requires special equipment for handling the virus. For this reason, we attempted to develop a simple and safe FAMA assay. Because VZV glycoprotein E (gE) is one of the major VZV glycoproteins, we used the gE protein for the FAMA test (gE FAMA). Here, we demonstrate that overexpression of gE in HEK293T cells can be used to measure antibodies in human serum, and that gE FAMA titers are closely correlated with gpEIA ELISA data. These results indicate that our gE FAMA test has the potential to measure antibodies to VZV.

  4. Perspectives on the impact of varicella immunization on herpes zoster. A model-based evaluation from three European countries.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Piero; Melegaro, Alessia; Ajelli, Marco; Del Fava, Emanuele; Guzzetta, Giorgio; Faustini, Luca; Scalia Tomba, Giampaolo; Lopalco, Pierluigi; Rizzo, Caterina; Merler, Stefano; Manfredi, Piero

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of mass vaccination against Varicella-Zoster-Virus (VZV) is being delayed in many European countries because of, among other factors, the possibility of a large increase in Herpes Zoster (HZ) incidence in the first decades after the initiation of vaccination, due to the expected decline of the boosting of Cell Mediated Immunity caused by the reduced varicella circulation. A multi-country model of VZV transmission and reactivation, is used to evaluate the possible impact of varicella vaccination on HZ epidemiology in Italy, Finland and the UK. Despite the large uncertainty surrounding HZ and vaccine-related parameters, surprisingly robust medium-term predictions are provided, indicating that an increase in HZ incidence is likely to occur in countries where the incidence rate is lower in absence of immunization, possibly due to a higher force of boosting (e.g. Finland), whereas increases in HZ incidence might be minor where the force of boosting is milder (e.g. the UK). Moreover, a convergence of HZ post vaccination incidence levels in the examined countries is predicted despite different initial degrees of success of immunization policies. Unlike previous model-based evaluations, our investigation shows that after varicella immunization an increase of HZ incidence is not a certain fact, rather depends on the presence or absence of factors promoting a strong boosting intensity and which might or not be heavily affected by changes in varicella circulation due to mass immunization. These findings might explain the opposed empirical evidences observed about the increases of HZ in sites where mass varicella vaccination is ongoing.

  5. Detection of antibodies to varicella-zoster virus in recipients of the varicella vaccine by using a luciferase immunoprecipitation system assay.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jeffrey I; Ali, Mir A; Bayat, Ahmad; Steinberg, Sharon P; Park, Hosun; Gershon, Anne A; Burbelo, Peter D

    2014-09-01

    A high-throughput test to detect varicella-zoster virus (VZV) antibodies in varicella vaccine recipients is not currently available. One of the most sensitive tests for detecting VZV antibodies after vaccination is the fluorescent antibody to membrane antigen (FAMA) test. Unfortunately, this test is labor-intensive, somewhat subjective to read, and not commercially available. Therefore, we developed a highly quantitative and high-throughput luciferase immunoprecipitation system (LIPS) assay to detect antibody to VZV glycoprotein E (gE). Tests of children who received the varicella vaccine showed that the gE LIPS assay had 90% sensitivity and 70% specificity, a viral capsid antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) had 67% and 87% specificity, and a glycoprotein ELISA (not commercially available in the United States) had 94% sensitivity and 74% specificity compared with the FAMA test. The rates of antibody detection by the gE LIPS and glycoprotein ELISA were not statistically different. Therefore, the gE LIPS assay may be useful for detecting VZV antibodies in varicella vaccine recipients. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00921999.).

  6. Trends in hospitalizations with primary varicella and herpes zoster during the prevaricella and initial postvaricella and herpes zoster vaccine eras, connecticut, 1994-2012.

    PubMed

    Humes, Elizabeth A; Weinberger, Daniel M; Kudish, Kathy S; Hadler, James L

    2015-01-01

    Background.  The introductions of the varicella vaccine in 1995 and herpes zoster (HZ) vaccine in 2006 have an ongoing potential to modify the epidemiology of both diseases. Analysis of data on hospitalizations can be conducted to examine trends in the occurrence of severe disease over time and to assess the possible impact of vaccination on the incidence of hospitalization. Methods.  Statewide hospital discharge data 1994-2012 in Connecticut were used to identify individuals discharged with a diagnosis of varicella and the initial admissions of persons with a discharge diagnosis of HZ in the first or second diagnostic position. Trends in overall age-standardized and age group-specific hospitalization rates for preselected time intervals before and after the introduction of vaccines were examined using Poisson regression models or Mantel-Haenszel χ(2) tests. Results.  Beginning in 2001, 5 years after the introduction of varicella vaccine, HZ hospitalization rates decreased significantly in individuals <15 years at an average rate of 19.4% per year through 2012. Among individuals ≥60 years, HZ hospitalization rates increased by 5.1% per year from 2001 to 2006 but decreased by 4.2% per year from 2007 to 2012. Primary varicella hospitalization rates declined 82.9% from the prevaccine era (1994-1995) to the 1-dose era (2001-2005) (P < .001). Rates further decreased significantly in the 2-dose era (2010-2012) among 5 to 9 year olds (100% decrease). Conclusions.  Varicella vaccine seems to have had an impact on both varicella and HZ hospitalizations, and introduction of the HZ vaccine may be having an impact on HZ hospitalizations.

  7. A comparison of herpes simplex virus type 1 and varicella-zoster virus latency and reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Peter G. E.; Rovnak, Joel; Badani, Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1; human herpesvirus 1) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV; human herpesvirus 3) are human neurotropic alphaherpesviruses that cause lifelong infections in ganglia. Following primary infection and establishment of latency, HSV-1 reactivation typically results in herpes labialis (cold sores), but can occur frequently elsewhere on the body at the site of primary infection (e.g. whitlow), particularly at the genitals. Rarely, HSV-1 reactivation can cause encephalitis; however, a third of the cases of HSV-1 encephalitis are associated with HSV-1 primary infection. Primary VZV infection causes varicella (chickenpox) following which latent virus may reactivate decades later to produce herpes zoster (shingles), as well as an increasingly recognized number of subacute, acute and chronic neurological conditions. Following primary infection, both viruses establish a latent infection in neuronal cells in human peripheral ganglia. However, the detailed mechanisms of viral latency and reactivation have yet to be unravelled. In both cases latent viral DNA exists in an ‘end-less’ state where the ends of the virus genome are joined to form structures consistent with unit length episomes and concatemers, from which viral gene transcription is restricted. In latently infected ganglia, the most abundantly detected HSV-1 RNAs are the spliced products originating from the primary latency associated transcript (LAT). This primary LAT is an 8.3 kb unstable transcript from which two stable (1.5 and 2.0 kb) introns are spliced. Transcripts mapping to 12 VZV genes have been detected in human ganglia removed at autopsy; however, it is difficult to ascribe these as transcripts present during latent infection as early-stage virus reactivation may have transpired in the post-mortem time period in the ganglia. Nonetheless, low-level transcription of VZV ORF63 has been repeatedly detected in multiple ganglia removed as close to death as possible. There is

  8. Varicella-zoster immunization in pediatric liver transplant recipients: safe and immunogenic.

    PubMed

    Posfay-Barbe, K M; Pittet, L F; Sottas, C; Grillet, S; Wildhaber, B E; Rodriguez, M; Kaiser, L; Belli, D C; McLin, V A; Siegrist, C A

    2012-11-01

    Varicella can have a severe course in immunosuppressed patients. Although prevention is fundamental, live-attenuated varicella-zoster (VZV) vaccine is not currently recommended in transplant recipients. Our aims were to (1) evaluate VZV immunity in pediatric liver transplant (LT) recipients; (2) immunize (two doses) seronegative patients post-LT; (3) monitor vaccine safety, (4) assess B and T cell vaccine responses. All patients followed at the Swiss National Pediatric LT Center were approached and 77/79 (97.5%) were enrolled (median age 7.8 years). Vaccine safety was monitored by standardized diary cards and phone calls. VZV-specific serology and CD4(+) T cells were assessed before and after immunization. Thirty-nine patients (51.1%) were seronegative including 14 children immunized pre-LT. Thirty-six of 39 seronegative patients were immunized post-LT (median 3.0 years post LT). Local (54.8%) and systemic (64.5%) reactions were mild and transient. The frequency of VZV-specific CD4(+) T cells and antibody titers increased significantly (respectively from 0.085% to 0.16%, p = 0.04 and 21.0 to 1134.5 IU/L, p < 0.001). All children reached seroprotective titers and 31/32 (97%) patients assessed remained seroprotected at follow-up (median 1.7 years). No breakthrough disease was reported during follow-up (median 4.1 years). Thereby, VZV vaccine appears to be safe, immunogenic and provide protection against disease in pediatric LT patients. PMID:22994936

  9. Immunogenic glycoproteins of laboratory and vaccine strains of Varicella-Zoster virus.

    PubMed Central

    Grose, C; Edmond, B J; Friedrichs, W E

    1981-01-01

    High-titered antisera were prepared in guinea pigs and rabbits against two strains of varicella-zoster virus (VZV): VZV-32, a low-passage laboratory strain, and VZV-Oka, a vaccine strain attenuated by passage in both human and guinea pig embryo cells. When the animal VZV-immune sera, as well as a human zoster serum, were used to precipitate radiolabeled glycoproteins from VZV-infected cells and the immune precipitates were analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography, it was observed that cell cultures infected with either strain had similar electrophoretic profiles containing major glycoproteins of approximate molecular weights 62,000, 98,000, and 118,000. A prominent high-molecular-weight (approximately 150,000) nonglycosylated polypeptide was identified in both strains also. These determinants were demonstrable by both indirect (staphylococcal protein A-antibody adsorbent) and direct immunoprecipitation, as long as VZV-immune sera with an antibody titer greater than or equal to 1:128 were used. Further analysis of individual caviid VZV antisera demonstrated some heterogeneity which appeared to be related to the method of immunization rather than the level of virus-specific antibody. VZV extracts emulsified with complete Freund adjuvant elicited an antibody response to all major immunogenic viral glycoproteins, whereas guinea pigs inoculated with virus alone during the primary immunization initially produced VZV antibody which failed to precipitate the highest-molecular-weight glycoprotein (gp118). Thus, Freund-type adjuvants promoted the maturation of the humoral immune response after VZV immunization in outbred guinea pigs. Images PMID:6262245

  10. Defensive Perimeter in the Central Nervous System: Predominance of Astrocytes and Astrogliosis during Recovery from Varicella-Zoster Virus Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, John E.; Clayton, Amy C.; Halling, Kevin C.; Bonthius, Daniel J.; Buckingham, Erin M.; Jackson, Wallen; Dotzler, Steven M.; Card, J. Patrick; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a highly neurotropic virus that can cause infections in both the peripheral nervous system and the central nervous system. Several studies of VZV reactivation in the peripheral nervous system (herpes zoster) have been published, while exceedingly few investigations have been carried out in a human brain. Notably, there is no animal model for VZV infection of the central nervous system. In this report, we characterized the cellular environment in the temporal lobe of a human subject who recovered from focal VZV encephalitis. The approach included not only VZV DNA/RNA analyses but also a delineation of infected cell types (neurons, microglia, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes). The average VZV genome copy number per cell was 5. Several VZV regulatory and structural gene transcripts and products were detected. When colocalization studies were performed to determine which cell types harbored the viral proteins, the majority of infected cells were astrocytes, including aggregates of astrocytes. Evidence of syncytium formation within the aggregates included the continuity of cytoplasm positive for the VZV glycoprotein H (gH) fusion-complex protein within a cellular profile with as many as 80 distinct nuclei. As with other causes of brain injury, these results suggested that astrocytes likely formed a defensive perimeter around foci of VZV infection (astrogliosis). Because of the rarity of brain samples from living humans with VZV encephalitis, we compared our VZV results with those found in a rat encephalitis model following infection with the closely related pseudorabies virus and observed similar perimeters of gliosis. IMPORTANCE Investigations of VZV-infected human brain from living immunocompetent human subjects are exceedingly rare. Therefore, much of our knowledge of VZV neuropathogenesis is gained from studies of VZV-infected brains obtained at autopsy from immunocompromised patients. These are not optimal samples with which

  11. Pangaea and the Out-of-Africa Model of Varicella-Zoster Virus Evolution and Phylogeography

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this minireview is to provide an overview of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) phylogenetics and phylogeography when placed in the broad context of geologic time. Planet Earth was formed over 4 billion years ago, and the supercontinent Pangaea coalesced around 400 million years ago (mya). Based on detailed tree-building models, the base of the phylogenetic tree of the Herpesviridae family has been estimated at 400 mya. Subsequently, Pangaea split into Laurasia and Gondwanaland; in turn, Africa rifted from Gondwanaland. Based on available data, the hypothesis of this minireview is that the ancestral alphaherpesvirus VZV coevolved in simians, apes, and hominins in Africa. When anatomically modern humans first crossed over the Red Sea 60,000 years ago, VZV was carried along in their dorsal root ganglia. Currently, there are five VZV clades, distinguishable by single nucleotide polymorphisms. These clades likely represent continued VZV coevolution, as humans with latent VZV infection left Arabia and dispersed into Asia (clades 2 and 5) and Europe (clades 1, 3, and 4). The prototype VZV sequence contains nearly 125,000 bp, divided into 70 open reading frames. Generally, isolates within a clade display >99.9% identity to one another, while members of one clade compared to a second clade show 99.8% identity to one another. Recently, four different VZV genotypes that do not segregate into the previously defined five clades have been identified, a result indicating a wider than anticipated diversity among newly collected VZV strains around the world. PMID:22761371

  12. Rates of Vaccine Evolution Show Strong Effects of Latency: Implications for Varicella Zoster Virus Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Weinert, Lucy A.; Depledge, Daniel P.; Kundu, Samit; Gershon, Anne A.; Nichols, Richard A.; Balloux, Francois; Welch, John J.; Breuer, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes chickenpox and shingles, and is found in human populations worldwide. The lack of temporal signal in the diversity of VZV makes substitution rate estimates unreliable, which is a barrier to understanding the context of its global spread. Here, we estimate rates of evolution by studying live attenuated vaccines, which evolved in 22 vaccinated patients for known periods of time, sometimes, but not always undergoing latency. We show that the attenuated virus evolves rapidly (∼10−6 substitutions/site/day), but that rates decrease dramatically when the virus undergoes latency. These data are best explained by a model in which viral populations evolve for around 13 days before becoming latent, but then undergo no replication during latency. This implies that rates of viral evolution will depend strongly on transmission patterns. Nevertheless, we show that implausibly long latency periods are required to date the most recent common ancestor of extant VZV to an “out-of-Africa” migration with humans, as has been previously suggested. PMID:25568346

  13. Stress-Induced Subclinical Reactivation of Varicella Zoster Virus in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Satish K.; Pierson, Duane L.; Forghani, Bagher; Zerbe, Gary; Cohrs, Randall J.; Gilden, Donald H.

    2003-01-01

    After primary infection, varicella-zoster virus (VZV) becomes latent in ganglia. VZV reactivation occurs primarily in elderly individuals, organ transplant recipients, and patients with cancer and AIDS, correlating with a specific decline in cell-mediated immunity to VZV. VZV can also reactivate after surgical stress. To determine whether VZV can also reactivate after acute non-surgical stress, we examined total DNA extracted from 312 saliva samples of eight astronauts before, during and after space flight for VZV DNA by PCR: 112 samples were obtained 234 to 265 days before flight, 84 samples on days 2 through 13 of space flight, and 116 samples on days 1 through 15 after flight. Before space flight only one of the 112 saliva samples from a single astronaut was positive for VZV DNA. In contrast, during and after space flight, 61 of 200 (30%) saliva samples were positive in all 8 astronauts. No VZV DNA was detected in any of 88 saliva samples from 10 healthy control subjects. These data indicate that VZV can reactivate subclinically in healthy individuals after acute stress.

  14. Complementary assays for monitoring susceptibility of varicella-zoster virus resistance to antivirals.

    PubMed

    Perrier, Marine; Désiré, Nathalie; Deback, Claire; Agut, Henri; Boutolleau, David; Burrel, Sonia

    2016-07-01

    The emergence of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) resistance to current antivirals as acyclovir (ACV) constitutes a hindrance to antiviral treatment effectiveness of VZV infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. The molecular mechanisms of VZV resistance reported so far rely on the presence of mutations within thymidine kinase (TK, ORF36) and DNA polymerase (ORF28) viral genes. The aim of this work was to develop reliable and complementary diagnostic methods to detect VZV antiviral resistance: (i) a genotypic assay based on TK and DNA polymerase genes sequencing, (ii) a plaque reduction assay to determine antiviral 50% effective concentrations, and (iii) a functional assay to evaluate in vitro phosphorylation activity of recombinant TKs. As a whole, this study included the analysis of 21 VZV clinical isolates and 62 biological samples from patients experiencing VZV infection. Genetic analysis revealed 3 and 9 new amino acid changes that have not been previously described within the highly conserved TK and DNA polymerase, respectively. Then, VZV isolates bearing newly identified mutations considered as natural polymorphisms were characterized as susceptible to ACV using plaque-reduction assay in MeWo cells. In parallel, the impact of TK changes on ACV phosphorylation activity was examined using a nonradioactive in vitro enzymatic assay.

  15. A Young Woman with Ischemic Stroke: Should We Pay More Attention to Varicella Zoster Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Borbinha, Cláudia; Marto, João Pedro; Calado, Sofia; Viana-Baptista, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke are recognized complications of Varicella zoster virus (VZV) infections, although uncommon and poorly documented. The authors report the case of a 31-year-old woman admitted with acute ischemic stroke of the right posterior cerebral artery and a history of a thoracic rash 1 month before. Aspirin and simvastatin were prescribed, but the patient suffered a stepwise deterioration the following days, with new areas of infarction on brain imaging. Despite no evidence of cardiac or large vessel embolic sources, anticoagulation was started empirically 6 days after stroke onset. One week later, symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation occurred. The diagnosis of VZV vasculopathy was then considered, and treatment with acyclovir and prednisolone was started with no further vascular events. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis and digital subtraction angiography findings corroborated the diagnosis. The patient was discharged to the rehabilitation center with a modified Rankin scale (mRS) score of 4. On the 6-month follow-up, she presented only a slight disability (mRS score 2). In conclusion, VZV vasculopathy needs to be considered in young adults with stroke. A high index of suspicion and early treatment seem to be important to minimize morbidity and mortality. Anticoagulation should probably be avoided in stroke associated with VZV vasculopathy. PMID:27504091

  16. Pangaea and the Out-of-Africa Model of Varicella-Zoster Virus Evolution and Phylogeography.

    PubMed

    Grose, Charles

    2012-09-01

    The goal of this minireview is to provide an overview of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) phylogenetics and phylogeography when placed in the broad context of geologic time. Planet Earth was formed over 4 billion years ago, and the supercontinent Pangaea coalesced around 400 million years ago (mya). Based on detailed tree-building models, the base of the phylogenetic tree of the Herpesviridae family has been estimated at 400 mya. Subsequently, Pangaea split into Laurasia and Gondwanaland; in turn, Africa rifted from Gondwanaland. Based on available data, the hypothesis of this minireview is that the ancestral alphaherpesvirus VZV coevolved in simians, apes, and hominins in Africa. When anatomically modern humans first crossed over the Red Sea 60,000 years ago, VZV was carried along in their dorsal root ganglia. Currently, there are five VZV clades, distinguishable by single nucleotide polymorphisms. These clades likely represent continued VZV coevolution, as humans with latent VZV infection left Arabia and dispersed into Asia (clades 2 and 5) and Europe (clades 1, 3, and 4). The prototype VZV sequence contains nearly 125,000 bp, divided into 70 open reading frames. Generally, isolates within a clade display >99.9% identity to one another, while members of one clade compared to a second clade show 99.8% identity to one another. Recently, four different VZV genotypes that do not segregate into the previously defined five clades have been identified, a result indicating a wider than anticipated diversity among newly collected VZV strains around the world.

  17. Bioinformatics of varicella-zoster virus: Single nucleotide polymorphisms define clades and attenuated vaccine genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Vincent T.; Tipples, Graham A.; Grose, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is one of the human herpesviruses. To date, over 40 complete VZV genomes have been sequenced and analyzed. The VZV genome contains around 125,000 base pairs including 70 open reading frames (ORFs). Enumeration of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has determined that the following ORFs are the most variable (in descending order): 62, 22, 29, 28, 37, 21, 54, 31, 1 and 55. ORF 62 is the major immediate early regulatory VZV gene. Further SNP analysis across the entire genome has led to the observation that VZV strains can be broadly grouped into clades within a phylogenetic tree. VZV strains collected in Singapore provided important sequence data for construction of the phylogenetic tree. Currently 5 VZV clades are recognized; they have been designated clades 1 through 5. Clades 1 and 3 include European/North American strains; clade 2 includes Asian strains, especially from Japan; and clade 5 includes strains from India. Clade 4 includes some strains from Europe, but its geographic origins need further documentation.. Within clade 1, five variant viruses have been isolated with a missense mutation in the gE (ORF 68) glycoprotein; these strains have an altered increased cell spread phenotype. Bioinformatics analyses of the attenuated vaccine strains have also been performed, with a subsequent discovery of a stop-codon SNP in ORFO as a likely attenuation determinant. Taken together, these VZV bioinformatics analyses have provided enormous insights into VZV phylogenetics as well as VZV SNPs associated with attenuation. PMID:23183312

  18. Search for varicella zoster virus DNA in saliva of healthy individuals aged 20-59 years.

    PubMed

    Birlea, Marius; Cohrs, Randall J; Bos, Nathan; Mehta, Satish K; Pierson, Duane L; Gilden, Don

    2014-02-01

    All neurological and ocular complications of varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation can occur without rash. Virological verification requires detection of VZV DNA or anti-VZV IgG antibody in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), or anti-VZV IgM antibody in serum or CSF. If VZV were readily detected in other tissue in patients with neurological disease without rash and found to correlate with tests listed above, more invasive tests such as lumbar puncture might be obviated. Saliva is a potential source of VZV DNA. To study the potential diagnostic value of detecting VZV DNA in saliva from patients with neurological disease, saliva of healthy adults was searched for VZV DNA. A single saliva sample obtained by passive drool was centrifuged at 16,000g for 20 min. DNA was extracted from the supernatant and cell pellet and examined in triplicate for VZV DNA by real time PCR. A single random saliva sample from 80 healthy men and women aged 20-59 years revealed no VZV DNA (Table ), but was uniformly positive for cell (GAPdH) DNA. Because VZV DNA was not found in a random saliva sample from 80 individuals 20-59-year-old, a VZV-positive sample during neurologic disease may have potential significance. Further studies will determine whether VZV DNA in saliva correlates with VZV DNA or anti-VZV antibody in CSF in patients with neurological disease.

  19. Importance of anticomplement immunofluorescence antibody titration for diagnosing varicella-zoster virus infection in Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, S; Baba, M; Ogata, M; Nozaki, H; Okuaki, A; Nakamura, S

    1986-11-01

    Anticomplement Immunofluorescence was used for antibody titration against varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in 43 patients with peripheral facial palsy. Nine of 31 patients (29%) with Bell's palsy and eight of 12 patients (75%) with Ramsey-Hunt syndrome had anticomplement immunofluorescence antibody titres of greater than or equal to 1/10. On the other hand, none of 14 patients with herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection and 51 healthy adults showed anticomplement immunofluorescence antibody titres of greater than or equal to 1/10. The anticomplement immunofluorescence antibody titre in two patients with Ramsey-Hunt syndrome increased later and decreased sooner than the indirect immunofluorescence antibody titre, becoming undetectable at 66 and 104 days, respectively, after onset of the disease. There was no cross reaction between anti-VZV and anti-HSV antibodies in the patients who showed a positive antibody rise for VZV. As the acute stage of VZV infection is obscure in the patients with peripheral facial palsy without herpes the screening of anticomplement immunofluorescence antibody to VZV at titres greater than or equal to 1/10 may be useful for the diagnosis of VZV infection in patients with peripheral facial palsy.

  20. Diversification of the antigen-specific T cell receptor repertoire after varicella zoster vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qian; Cavanagh, Mary M.; Le Saux, Sabine; NamKoong, Hong; Kim, Chulwoo; Turgano, Emerson; Liu, Yi; Wang, Chen; Mackey, Sally; Swan, Gary E.; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Olshen, Richard A.; Boyd, Scott D.; Weyand, Cornelia M.; Tian, Lu; Goronzy, Jörg J.

    2016-01-01

    Diversity and size of the antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire are two critical determinants for successful control of chronic infection. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) that establishes latency during childhood is able to escape control mechanisms, in particular with increasing age. We examined the TCR diversity of VZV-reactive CD4 T cells in individuals older than 50 years by studying three identical twin pairs and three unrelated individuals before and after vaccination with live attenuated VZV. While all individuals had a small number of dominant T cell clones, the breadth of the VZV-specific repertoire differed markedly. A genetic influence was seen for the sharing of individual TCR sequences from antigen-reactive cells, but not for repertoire richness or the selection of dominant clones. VZV vaccination favored the expansion of infrequent VZV antigen-reactive TCRs including those from naïve T cells with lesser boosting of dominant T cell clones. Thus, vaccination does not reinforce the in vivo selection occurred during chronic infection but leads to a diversification of the VZV-reactive T cell repertoire. However, a single booster immunization seems insufficient to establish new clonal dominance. Our results suggest that repertoire analysis of antigen-specific TCRs can be an important read-out to assess whether a vaccination was able to generate memory cells in clonal sizes that are necessary for immune protection. PMID:27030598

  1. The Characterization of Varicella Zoster Virus Specific T Cells In Skin and Blood During Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Vukmanovic-Stejic, Milica; Sandhu, Daisy; Seidel, Judith A.; Patel, Neil; Sobande, Toni O.; Agius, Elaine; Jackson, Sarah E.; Fuentes-Duculan, Judilyn; Suarez-Farinas, Mayte; Mabbott, Neil A.; Lacy, Katie E.; Ogg, Graham; Nestle, Frank O; Krueger, James G.; Rustin, Malcolm H.A.; Akbar, Arne N.

    2015-01-01

    The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) re-activation increases during ageing. Although the effects of VZV re-activation are observed in the skin (shingles) the number or functional capacity of cutaneous VZV specific T cells have not been investigated. The numbers of circulating IFN-γ secreting VZV specific CD4+ T cells are significantly decreased in old subjects however other measures of VZV-specific CD4+ T cells, including proliferative capacity to VZV antigen stimulation and identification of VZV-specific CD4+ T cells with a MHC class II tetramer (epitope of IE-63 protein), were similar in both age groups. The majority of T cells in the skin of both age groups expressed CD69, a characteristic of skin resident T cells. VZV-specific CD4+ T cells were significantly increased in the skin compared to the blood in young and old subjects and their function was similar in both age groups. In contrast the number of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and expression of the inhibitory receptor PD-1 on CD4+ T cells were significantly increased in the skin of older humans. Therefore VZV-specific CD4+ T cells in the skin of older individuals are functionally competent. However their activity may be restricted by multiple inhibitory influences in situ. PMID:25734814

  2. Seroprevalence of Varicella zoster virus antibody among young women before marriage in Sanandaj, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Majidy, Parviz; Khodabandehloo, Mazaher; Azadi, Nammam-Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) infection in pregnant women can cause complications for the mother and fetus. The aim of this study was to assess the immunity against VZV among young women before marriage. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study 250 women attending health centers in Sanandaj, Iran, for pre-marital medical check-up were randomly selected. The VZV IgG measured by ELISA and demographic characteristics of participants including their age, place of residence, number of siblings, occupation, education and history of chickenpox were also recorded. Data were analyzed using R statistical software. Association between VZV infection and participants’ characteristics was assessed using Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests. Results: Out of 250 participants, 178 individuals (71.2%) diagnosed as antibody positive and 72 (28.8%) negative. Our findings revealed that the immunity against VZV increased with individuals’ age (P<0.0001) and their number of siblings (P= 0.03). Significant association was found between history of chickenpox and immunity (P <0.001). Positive and negative predictive values of self-reported history of chickenpox obtained by 94.60% and 49.25%, respectively. Conclusion: A notable percentage of women were found to be susceptible to VZV, hence they are at risk of getting infected during pregnancy which in turn may result in fetus abnormalities. Screening the immunity and further studies on the need of vaccination before marriage are recommended. PMID:27307981

  3. Rates of vaccine evolution show strong effects of latency: implications for varicella zoster virus epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Lucy A; Depledge, Daniel P; Kundu, Samit; Gershon, Anne A; Nichols, Richard A; Balloux, Francois; Welch, John J; Breuer, Judith

    2015-04-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes chickenpox and shingles, and is found in human populations worldwide. The lack of temporal signal in the diversity of VZV makes substitution rate estimates unreliable, which is a barrier to understanding the context of its global spread. Here, we estimate rates of evolution by studying live attenuated vaccines, which evolved in 22 vaccinated patients for known periods of time, sometimes, but not always undergoing latency. We show that the attenuated virus evolves rapidly (∼ 10(-6) substitutions/site/day), but that rates decrease dramatically when the virus undergoes latency. These data are best explained by a model in which viral populations evolve for around 13 days before becoming latent, but then undergo no replication during latency. This implies that rates of viral evolution will depend strongly on transmission patterns. Nevertheless, we show that implausibly long latency periods are required to date the most recent common ancestor of extant VZV to an "out-of-Africa" migration with humans, as has been previously suggested.

  4. Unusually severe varicella zoster (VZV) virus viral (aseptic) meningitis in an unimmunized, immunocompetent host with chickenpox.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Warren-Favorito, Heather; Mickail, Nardeen

    2011-01-01

    Chickenpox is caused by the varicella zoster virus (VZV) and may be more severe in adults than in children. Central nervous system (CNS) manifestations of chickenpox and VZV are uncommon, for example, encephalitis and cerebellar ataxis. Viral (aseptic) meningitis is a rare CNS complication of VZV. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profile in VZV viral (aseptic) meningitis is indistinguishable from other causes of viral meningitis. The clue to most of the diagnoses of VZV aseptic meningitis is based on the temporal relationship between antecedent or concomitant chickenpox. Chickenpox is a clinical diagnosis based on the appearance and distribution of the rash. The rash of chickenpox is vesicular/pruritic and typically appears in crops over 3 successive days. VZV vesicles are fragile, superficial, and surrounded by a erythematous halo. Common nonspecific laboratory findings in chickenpox include leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated serum transaminases (serum glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase/serum glutamate-pyruvate transaminase). The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) is not highly elevated in chickenpox. In VZV aseptic meningitis, the CSF shows a lymphocytic pleocytosis with normal protein, glucose, and lactic acid levels. CSF red blood cells are not a feature of VZV meningitis. We present the case of a healthy unimmunized adult who was hospitalized with chickenpox complicated by VZV aseptic meningitis with an unusually severe headache and nuchal rigidity that occurred during hospitalization.

  5. Diversification of the antigen-specific T cell receptor repertoire after varicella zoster vaccination.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qian; Cavanagh, Mary M; Le Saux, Sabine; NamKoong, Hong; Kim, Chulwoo; Turgano, Emerson; Liu, Yi; Wang, Chen; Mackey, Sally; Swan, Gary E; Dekker, Cornelia L; Olshen, Richard A; Boyd, Scott D; Weyand, Cornelia M; Tian, Lu; Goronzy, Jörg J

    2016-03-30

    Diversity and size of the antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire are two critical determinants for successful control of chronic infection. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) that establishes latency during childhood can escape control mechanisms, in particular with increasing age. We examined the TCR diversity of VZV-reactive CD4 T cells in individuals older than 50 years by studying three identical twin pairs and three unrelated individuals before and after vaccination with live attenuated VZV. Although all individuals had a small number of dominant T cell clones, the breadth of the VZV-specific repertoire differed markedly. A genetic influence was seen for the sharing of individual TCR sequences from antigen-reactive cells but not for repertoire richness or the selection of dominant clones. VZV vaccination favored the expansion of infrequent VZV antigen-reactive TCRs, including those from naïve T cells with lesser boosting of dominant T cell clones. Thus, vaccination does not reinforce the in vivo selection that occurred during chronic infection but leads to a diversification of the VZV-reactive T cell repertoire. However, a single-booster immunization seems insufficient to establish new clonal dominance. Our results suggest that repertoire analysis of antigen-specific TCRs can be an important readout to assess whether a vaccination was able to generate memory cells in clonal sizes that are necessary for immune protection.

  6. Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) in AIDS patients: a different appearance of varicella-zoster retinitis.

    PubMed

    Pavesio, C E; Mitchell, S M; Barton, K; Schwartz, S D; Towler, H M; Lightman, S

    1995-01-01

    Retinal infections caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) have been reported in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. Two cases of a VZV-related retinitis are described with the characteristic features of the recently described progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) syndrome. Both patients suffered from the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) with greatly reduced peripheral blood CD4+ T lymphocyte counts, and presented with macular retinitis without vitritis. The disease was bilateral in one case and unilateral in the other. The clinical course was rapidly progressive with widespread retinal involvement and the development of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment with complete loss of vision in the affected eyes despite intensive intravenous antiviral therapy. VZV DNA was identified in vitreous biopsies, by molecular techniques based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in both patients. At present, the use of very high-dose intravenous acyclovir may be the best therapeutic option in these patients for whom the visual prognosis is poor. Intravitreal antiviral drugs could also contribute to the management of these cases.

  7. Seroprevalence of varicella-zoster virus in five US-bound refugee populations

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Jessica; Lopez, Adriana; Mitchell, Tarissa; Weinberg, Michelle; Lee, Deborah; Thieme, Martha; Schmid, D. Scott; Bialek, Stephanie R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about varicella-zoster virus (VZV) susceptibility in US-bound refugee populations, although published data suggest that VZV seroprevalence in these refugee populations may be lower than US populations. We describe VZV seroprevalence in 5 U.S.-bound refugee groups: (1) Bhutanese in Nepal, (2) Burmese on the Thailand-Burma (Myanmar) border, (3) Burmese in Malaysia, (4) Iraqi in Jordan, and (5) Somali in Kenya. Methods Sera were tested for presence of VZV IgG antibodies among adults aged 18–45 years. Results Overall VZV seroprevalence was 97% across all refugee groups. VZV seroprevalence was also high across all age groups, with seroprevalence ranging from 92–100% for 18–26 year-olds depending on refugee group and 93–100% for 27–45 year-olds. Discussion VZV seroprevalence was unexpectedly high in these 5 US-bound refugee groups, though may not reflect seroprevalence in other refugee groups. Additional studies are needed to better understand VZV seroprevalence in refugee populations over time and by region. PMID:24271111

  8. Complementary assays for monitoring susceptibility of varicella-zoster virus resistance to antivirals.

    PubMed

    Perrier, Marine; Désiré, Nathalie; Deback, Claire; Agut, Henri; Boutolleau, David; Burrel, Sonia

    2016-07-01

    The emergence of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) resistance to current antivirals as acyclovir (ACV) constitutes a hindrance to antiviral treatment effectiveness of VZV infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. The molecular mechanisms of VZV resistance reported so far rely on the presence of mutations within thymidine kinase (TK, ORF36) and DNA polymerase (ORF28) viral genes. The aim of this work was to develop reliable and complementary diagnostic methods to detect VZV antiviral resistance: (i) a genotypic assay based on TK and DNA polymerase genes sequencing, (ii) a plaque reduction assay to determine antiviral 50% effective concentrations, and (iii) a functional assay to evaluate in vitro phosphorylation activity of recombinant TKs. As a whole, this study included the analysis of 21 VZV clinical isolates and 62 biological samples from patients experiencing VZV infection. Genetic analysis revealed 3 and 9 new amino acid changes that have not been previously described within the highly conserved TK and DNA polymerase, respectively. Then, VZV isolates bearing newly identified mutations considered as natural polymorphisms were characterized as susceptible to ACV using plaque-reduction assay in MeWo cells. In parallel, the impact of TK changes on ACV phosphorylation activity was examined using a nonradioactive in vitro enzymatic assay. PMID:26994966

  9. Diversification of the antigen-specific T cell receptor repertoire after varicella zoster vaccination.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qian; Cavanagh, Mary M; Le Saux, Sabine; NamKoong, Hong; Kim, Chulwoo; Turgano, Emerson; Liu, Yi; Wang, Chen; Mackey, Sally; Swan, Gary E; Dekker, Cornelia L; Olshen, Richard A; Boyd, Scott D; Weyand, Cornelia M; Tian, Lu; Goronzy, Jörg J

    2016-03-30

    Diversity and size of the antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire are two critical determinants for successful control of chronic infection. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) that establishes latency during childhood can escape control mechanisms, in particular with increasing age. We examined the TCR diversity of VZV-reactive CD4 T cells in individuals older than 50 years by studying three identical twin pairs and three unrelated individuals before and after vaccination with live attenuated VZV. Although all individuals had a small number of dominant T cell clones, the breadth of the VZV-specific repertoire differed markedly. A genetic influence was seen for the sharing of individual TCR sequences from antigen-reactive cells but not for repertoire richness or the selection of dominant clones. VZV vaccination favored the expansion of infrequent VZV antigen-reactive TCRs, including those from naïve T cells with lesser boosting of dominant T cell clones. Thus, vaccination does not reinforce the in vivo selection that occurred during chronic infection but leads to a diversification of the VZV-reactive T cell repertoire. However, a single-booster immunization seems insufficient to establish new clonal dominance. Our results suggest that repertoire analysis of antigen-specific TCRs can be an important readout to assess whether a vaccination was able to generate memory cells in clonal sizes that are necessary for immune protection. PMID:27030598

  10. Molecular detection of varicella zoster virus while keeping an eye on the budget.

    PubMed

    Binkhamis, Khalifa; Al-Siyabi, Turkiya; Heinstein, Charles; Hatchette, Todd F; LeBlanc, Jason J

    2014-06-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) PCR is highly sensitive compared to traditional detection methods like culture and direct fluorescent antibody testing (DFA); however, the high cost of commercial assays prohibits their use in many clinical laboratories. Major contributors to cost are the nucleic acid extraction and the PCR reagents. This study evaluated an "in-house" qualitative real-time PCR where the nucleic acid extraction was replaced by a crude extraction, homogenization and heat treatment. Three methods were compared: virus culture and DFA and real-time PCR following each extraction methods. The real-time PCR was highly specific for VZV, and the analytical sensitivity was equivalent following both extraction methods. In contrast, virus culture and DFA was approximately 10,000-fold less sensitive. Using 200 clinical specimens, the sensitivity for the real-time PCR following nucleic acid extraction or homogenization and heat treatment was essentially equivalent at 100% and 97.2%, respectively; whereas, virus culture and DFA was significantly less sensitive at 54.8%. Overall, homogenization and heat treatment combined with a qualitative in-house real-time PCR is a rapid, accurate and cost effective method for the detection of VZV.

  11. Varicella zoster virus vasculopathies: diverse clinical manifestations, laboratory features, pathogenesis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gilden, Don; Cohrs, Randall J; Mahalingam, Ravi; Nagel, Maria A

    2009-01-01

    Vasculopathies caused by varicella zoster virus (VZV) are indicative of a productive virus infection in cerebral arteries after either reactivation of VZV (shingles) or primary infection (chickenpox). VZV vasculopathy can cause ischaemic infarction of the brain and spinal cord, as well as aneurysm, subarachnoid and cerebral haemorrhage, carotid dissection, and, rarely, peripheral arterial disease. VZV vasculopathy in immunocompetent or immunocompromised individuals can be unifocal or multifocal with deep-seated and superficial infarctions. Lesions at the grey–white matter junction on brain imaging are a clue to diagnosis. Involvement of both large and small arteries is more common than that of either alone. Most patients have a mononuclear cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, often with red blood cells. Cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis and rash are absent in about a third of cases. Anti-VZV IgG antibody in the cerebrospinal fluid is found more frequently than VZV DNA. In recent years, the number of recognised VZV vasculopathies has grown, and accurate diagnosis is important for the effective treatment of these disorders. PMID:19608099

  12. Modelling the impact of one-dose vs. two-dose vaccination regimens on the epidemiology of varicella zoster virus in Australia.

    PubMed

    Gao, Z; Gidding, H F; Wood, J G; MacIntyre, C R

    2010-04-01

    We examined the impact of one-dose vs. two-dose vaccination strategies on the epidemiology of varicella zoster virus (VZV) in Australia, using a mathematical model. Strategies were assessed in terms of varicella (natural and breakthrough) and zoster incidence, morbidity, average age of infection and vaccine effectiveness (VE). Our modelling results suggest that compared to a one-dose vaccination strategy (Australia's current vaccination schedule), a two-dose strategy is expected to not only produce less natural varicella cases (5% vs. 13% of pre-vaccination state, respectively) but also considerably fewer breakthrough varicella cases (only 11.4% of one-dose strategy). Therefore a two-dose infant vaccination programme would be a better long-term strategy for Australia.

  13. Comparison of the Raji cell line fluorescent antibody to membrane antigen test and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for determination of immunity to varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed Central

    Iltis, J P; Castellano, G A; Gerber, P; Le, C; Vujcic, L K; Quinnan, G V

    1982-01-01

    A prospective study was performed comparing the fluorescent antibody to membrane antigen (FAMA) test and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for identifying susceptibility and seroconversion to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection. A total of 75 sera were collected from index cases and from sibling and parent contacts in 10 families. Varicella-zoster virus-infected human diploid embryonic fibroblasts and continuous lymphoblastoid cells (Raji cells) were compared as indicator cells in the FAMA test. Equivalent results were obtained with both types of cell. Results of the FAMA test and the ELISA were identical in two ways. (i) The same 11 individuals were initally defined as susceptible (seronegative), and 9 of them (82%) developed fourfold rises in antibody titers, clinical varicella, or both. (ii) Of 21 immune (seropositive) individuals, 4 developed fourfold antibody rises by FAMA tests, and 3 of these 4 responded by ELISA. Infection was asymptomatic in these individuals. The geometric mean titer by ELISA was significantly higher than by the FAMA test. The results indicated that the ELISA and the FAMA test have similar capacities to define susceptibility to varicella-zoster virus and that subclinical infection with varicella-zoster virus may be common. PMID:6759530

  14. Debilitating clinical disease in a wild-born captive western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) co-infected with varicella zoster virus (VZV) and simian T-lymphotropic virus (STLV).

    PubMed

    Masters, Nicholas; Niphuis, Henk; Verschoor, Ernst; Breuer, Judith; Quinlivan, Mark; Wawrzynczyk, Teresa; Stidworthy, Mark

    2010-12-01

    A wild-born, 34-yr-old female western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) was transferred between zoologic collections in the United Kingdom. Adjustment to its new environment was difficult and a series of health problems ensued. Progressive severe illness of multiple etiologies, and a failure to respond to multiple therapies, led to its euthanasia 5 mo later. Disease processes included severe thoracic and axillary cutaneous ulceration of T2-3 dermatome distribution, gastroenteritis, ulcerative stomatitis, emaciation, hind limb weakness or paresis, and decubitus ulcers of the ankles and elbows. Ante- and postmortem infectious disease screening revealed that this animal was not infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, simian varicella virus (SVV), simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), or hepatitis B virus; but was infected with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and simian T-lymphotropic virus (STLV). It is hypothesized that recrudescence of VZV and other disease processes described were associated with chronic STLV infection and the end of a characteristically long incubation period.

  15. Titration of varicella-zoster virus DNA in throat swabs from varicella patients by combined use of PCR and microplate hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hondo, R; Ito, S; Inouye, S

    1995-01-01

    We devised a simple procedure for titration of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) DNA in throat swabs from varicella patients. DNA which was extracted from throat swabs, together with known copy numbers of a cloned VZV DNA fragment, were 10-fold serially diluted and used as template in PCR. The PCR products, after heat denaturation, again serially diluted in 1.5 M NaCl and adsorbed to microplate wells. Then, biotin-labeled DNA probes were hybridized with the immobilized DNA. The hybridization signal was produced by streptavidin-conjugated beta-galactosidase and a fluorogenic enzyme substrate. By comparing the titration curves of a clinical specimen with those of the cloned fragment, of which detection limit was about 10 copies, we estimated the copy numbers of VZV DNA in the specimen. With this technique, we evaluated the degree of potential contagiousness of the patient along the course of infection: we found that varicella patients possessed highest quantity of VZV DNA in the throat on the first day of illness.

  16. Tropism of varicella-zoster virus for human CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and epidermal cells in SCID-hu mice.

    PubMed Central

    Moffat, J F; Stein, M D; Kaneshima, H; Arvin, A M

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the cell tropism and pathogenicity of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) strains, we analyzed VZV replication by using SCID-hu mice that carry human fetal thymus/liver implants under the kidney capsule or as subcutaneous fetal skin implants. MRC-5 cells infected with wild-type VZV or the Oka strain, used in the live attenuated varicella vaccine, were injected into the implants. The implants were surgically removed 2, 7, 14, and 21 days postinfection. The VZV titer from infected thymus/liver implants peaked on day 7 for the wild-type strain and on day 14 for the Oka strain. Histological analysis showed necrotic areas characterized by thymocyte depletion and fibrosis. VZV protein synthesis was detectable by immunohistochemical staining in the necrotic areas and in distant regions that did not show cytopathic changes, and VZV DNA was detected by in situ hybridization in the same distribution. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of thymocytes harvested at day 7 postinfection showed that VZV proteins were expressed in CD4+, CD8+, and CD4+ CD8+ T cells; VZV was cultured from each T-cell subpopulation. The Oka strain had tropism for human cell types similar to that of wild-type VZV. T lymphocytes released infectious VZV, which is a novel and important observation about the replication of this otherwise highly cell associated virus. VZV-infected skin implants exhibited microscopic epidermal lesions that were indistinguishable histologically from the characteristic lesions of varicella. These experiments demonstrate a unique tropism of VZV for human T lymphocytes, explaining its capacity to cause viremia in natural disease, and demonstrate the value of the SCID-hu model for studies of VZV pathogenesis. PMID:7636965

  17. Differentiation of strains of varicella-zoster virus by changes in neutral lipid metabolism in infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jerkofsky, M.; De Siervo, A.J.

    1986-03-01

    Eleven isolates of varicella-zoster virus were tested for their effects on the incorporation of (/sup 14/C)acetate into lipids in infected human embryonic lung cells. By relative percent, all virus isolates demonstrated a shift from polar lipid synthesis to neutral lipid, especially triglyceride, synthesis. By data expressed as counts per minute per microgram of protein, the VZV strains could be separated into two groups: those strains which depressed lipid synthesis and those strains which did not depress, and may even have stimulated, lipid, especially triglyceride, synthesis. These results may be useful in understanding the development of lipid changes seen in children affected with Reye's syndrome following chickenpox.

  18. Inhibitory activity of oxyresveratrol on wild-type and drug-resistant varicella-zoster virus replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sasivimolphan, Pattaraporn; Lipipun, Vimolmas; Likhitwitayawuid, Kittisak; Takemoto, Masaya; Pramyothin, Pornpen; Hattori, Masao; Shiraki, Kimiyasu

    2009-10-01

    The anti-herpes simplex virus (HSV) compound, oxyresveratrol, purified from a Thai traditional medicinal plant of Artocarpus lakoocha, was evaluated for its anti-varicella-zoster virus (VZV) activity. This compound exhibited IC(50) values (50%-inhibitory concentrations for virus plaque formation) of 12.82, 12.80, 12.99 and 12.82 microg/ml against wild type, thymidine kinase-deficient and two types of DNA polymerase mutants with acyclovir-resistance, respectively. Thus oxyresveratrol showed a broad spectrum of anti-VZV activity with a mechanism of action different from that of acyclovir.

  19. Live attenuated varicella vaccine use in immunocompromised children and adults.

    PubMed

    Gershon, A A; Steinberg, S P; Gelb, L

    1986-10-01

    Live attenuated varicella vaccine has been administered to 307 children with leukemia in remission and to 86 healthy adults. The vaccine was well tolerated and immunogenic. The major side effect in leukemic children receiving maintenance chemotherapy was development of a vaccine-associated rash. Vaccinees in whom a rash developed were potentially somewhat infectious to others about 1 month after immunization. Vaccination was not associated with an increase in the incidence of herpes zoster or in relapse of leukemia. Vaccination provided excellent protection against severe varicella. It was associated with a significant decrease in the attack rate of chickenpox following an intimate exposure to varicella-zoster virus, conferring about 80% protection in leukemic children. The cases of breakthrough varicella that occurred were mild. Thus, the vaccine may either prevent or modify varicella in high-risk individuals. It may also have use for prevention of nosocomial varicella.

  20. B-cell repertoire responses to varicella-zoster vaccination in human identical twins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Liu, Yi; Cavanagh, Mary M; Le Saux, Sabine; Qi, Qian; Roskin, Krishna M; Looney, Timothy J; Lee, Ji-Yeun; Dixit, Vaishali; Dekker, Cornelia L; Swan, Gary E; Goronzy, Jörg J; Boyd, Scott D

    2015-01-13

    Adaptive immune responses in humans rely on somatic genetic rearrangements of Ig and T-cell receptor loci to generate diverse antigen receptors. It is unclear to what extent an individual's genetic background affects the characteristics of the antibody repertoire used in responding to vaccination or infection. We studied the B-cell repertoires and clonal expansions in response to attenuated varicella-zoster vaccination in four pairs of adult identical twins and found that the global antibody repertoires of twin pair members showed high similarity in antibody heavy chain V, D, and J gene segment use, and in the length and features of the complementarity-determining region 3, a major determinant of antigen binding. These twin similarities were most pronounced in the IgM-expressing B-cell pools, but were seen to a lesser extent in IgG-expressing B cells. In addition, the degree of antibody somatic mutation accumulated in the B-cell repertoire was highly correlated within twin pair members. Twin pair members had greater numbers of shared convergent antibody sequences, including mutated sequences, suggesting similarity among memory B-cell clonal lineages. Despite these similarities in the memory repertoire, the B-cell clones used in acute responses to ZOSTAVAX vaccination were largely unique to each individual. Taken together, these results suggest that the overall B-cell repertoire is significantly shaped by the underlying germ-line genome, but that stochastic or individual-specific effects dominate the selection of clones in response to an acute antigenic stimulus. PMID:25535378

  1. Low prevalence of human herpesvirus-6 and varicella zoster virus in blood of multiple sclerosis patients, irrespective of inflammatory status or disease progression.

    PubMed

    Hon, Gloudina M; Erasmus, Rajiv T; Matsha, Tandi

    2014-08-01

    Herpesviruses, including human herpesvirus-6 and varicella zoster virus, have been implicated in the disease aetiology of multiple sclerosis. These viruses are capable of reactivation, reminiscent of the relapsing-remitting nature of multiple sclerosis. However, viral DNA has also been reported present in healthy controls, often at similar prevalence rates. This study aimed to determine whether prevalence could be associated with different stages of activity of the disease as well as the inflammatory status of the patients. Polymerase chain reaction assays were used to screen for human herpesvirus-6 and varicella zoster virus DNA in blood from 31 Caucasian patients with multiple sclerosis and 30 healthy age, sex and race matched control subjects. The patients were screened for inflammation using C-reactive protein as a marker and were also categorized according to their remitting/relapsing status. Results were positive for human herpesvirus-6 in blood from only one patient (3.2%) and human herpesvirus-6 DNA was not present in any control subjects. Varicella zoster virus was not detected in either the patients or control subjects. Similar to some other studies we saw an absence or very low viral positivity in blood from both patients and controls. These findings were irrespective of relapse episodes, increased inflammatory status or duration of the disease. Results therefore do not support a causative role for either human herpesvirus-6 or varicella zoster virus in the disease aetiology of multiple sclerosis, but rather that prevalence in patients may be linked to that of the general population.

  2. Review of the United States universal varicella vaccination program: Herpes zoster incidence rates, cost-effectiveness, and vaccine efficacy based primarily on the Antelope Valley Varicella Active Surveillance Project data

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, G.S.; King, P.G.

    2013-01-01

    In a cooperative agreement starting January 1995, prior to the FDA's licensure of the varicella vaccine on March 17, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) funded the Los Angeles Department of Health Services’ Antelope Valley Varicella Active Surveillance Project (AV-VASP). Since only varicella case reports were gathered, baseline incidence data for herpes zoster (HZ) or shingles was lacking. Varicella case reports decreased 72%, from 2834 in 1995 to 836 in 2000 at which time approximately 50% of children under 10 years of age had been vaccinated. Starting in 2000, HZ surveillance was added to the project. By 2002, notable increases in HZ incidence rates were reported among both children and adults with a prior history of natural varicella. However, CDC authorities still claimed that no increase in HZ had occurred in any US surveillance site. The basic assumptions inherent to the varicella cost–benefit analysis ignored the significance of exogenous boosting caused by those shedding wild-type VZV. Also ignored was the morbidity associated with even rare serious events following varicella vaccination as well as the morbidity from increasing cases of HZ among adults. Vaccine efficacy declined below 80% in 2001. By 2006, because 20% of vaccinees were experiencing breakthrough varicella and vaccine-induced protection was waning, the CDC recommended a booster dose for children and, in 2007, a shingles vaccination was approved for adults aged 60 years and older. In the prelicensure era, 95% of adults experienced natural chickenpox (usually as children)—these cases were usually benign and resulted in long-term immunity. Varicella vaccination is less effective than the natural immunity that existed in prevaccine communities. Universal varicella vaccination has not proven to be cost-effective as increased HZ morbidity has disproportionately offset cost savings associated with reductions in varicella disease. Universal varicella vaccination has failed to

  3. Review of the United States universal varicella vaccination program: Herpes zoster incidence rates, cost-effectiveness, and vaccine efficacy based primarily on the Antelope Valley Varicella Active Surveillance Project data.

    PubMed

    Goldman, G S; King, P G

    2013-03-25

    In a cooperative agreement starting January 1995, prior to the FDA's licensure of the varicella vaccine on March 17, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) funded the Los Angeles Department of Health Services' Antelope Valley Varicella Active Surveillance Project (AV-VASP). Since only varicella case reports were gathered, baseline incidence data for herpes zoster (HZ) or shingles was lacking. Varicella case reports decreased 72%, from 2834 in 1995 to 836 in 2000 at which time approximately 50% of children under 10 years of age had been vaccinated. Starting in 2000, HZ surveillance was added to the project. By 2002, notable increases in HZ incidence rates were reported among both children and adults with a prior history of natural varicella. However, CDC authorities still claimed that no increase in HZ had occurred in any US surveillance site. The basic assumptions inherent to the varicella cost-benefit analysis ignored the significance of exogenous boosting caused by those shedding wild-type VZV. Also ignored was the morbidity associated with even rare serious events following varicella vaccination as well as the morbidity from increasing cases of HZ among adults. Vaccine efficacy declined below 80% in 2001. By 2006, because 20% of vaccinees were experiencing breakthrough varicella and vaccine-induced protection was waning, the CDC recommended a booster dose for children and, in 2007, a shingles vaccination was approved for adults aged 60 years and older. In the prelicensure era, 95% of adults experienced natural chickenpox (usually as children)-these cases were usually benign and resulted in long-term immunity. Varicella vaccination is less effective than the natural immunity that existed in prevaccine communities. Universal varicella vaccination has not proven to be cost-effective as increased HZ morbidity has disproportionately offset cost savings associated with reductions in varicella disease. Universal varicella vaccination has failed to provide

  4. Serological Evaluation of Immunity to the Varicella-Zoster Virus Based on a Novel Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Ye, Xiangzhong; Jia, Jizong; Zhu, Rui; Wang, Lina; Chen, Chunye; Yang, Lianwei; Wang, Yongmei; Wang, Wei; Ye, Jianghui; Li, Yimin; Zhu, Hua; Zhao, Qinjian; Cheng, Tong; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a highly contagious agent of varicella and herpes zoster. Varicella can be lethal to immunocompromised patients, babies, HIV patients and other adults with impaired immunity. Serological evaluation of immunity to VZV will help determine which individuals are susceptible and evaluate vaccine effectiveness. A collection of 110 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were obtained by immunization of mice with membrane proteins or cell-free virus. The mAbs were well characterized, and a competitive sandwich ELISA (capture mAb: 8H6; labelling mAb: 1B11) was established to determine neutralizing antibodies in human serum with reference to the FAMA test. A total of 920 human sera were evaluated. The competitive sandwich ELISA showed a sensitivity of 95.6%, specificity of 99.77% and coincidence of 97.61% compared with the fluorescent-antibody-to-membrane-antigen (FAMA) test. The capture mAb 8H6 was characterized as a specific mAb for VZV ORF9, a membrane-associated tegument protein that interacts with glycoprotein E (gE), glycoprotein B (gB) and glycoprotein C (gC). The labelling mAb 1B11 was characterized as a complement-dependent neutralizing mAb specific for the immune-dominant epitope located on gE, not on other VZV glycoproteins. The established competitive sandwich ELISA could be used as a rapid and high-throughput method for evaluating immunity to VZV. PMID:26853741

  5. Serological Evaluation of Immunity to the Varicella-Zoster Virus Based on a Novel Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Ye, Xiangzhong; Jia, Jizong; Zhu, Rui; Wang, Lina; Chen, Chunye; Yang, Lianwei; Wang, Yongmei; Wang, Wei; Ye, Jianghui; Li, Yimin; Zhu, Hua; Zhao, Qinjian; Cheng, Tong; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a highly contagious agent of varicella and herpes zoster. Varicella can be lethal to immunocompromised patients, babies, HIV patients and other adults with impaired immunity. Serological evaluation of immunity to VZV will help determine which individuals are susceptible and evaluate vaccine effectiveness. A collection of 110 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were obtained by immunization of mice with membrane proteins or cell-free virus. The mAbs were well characterized, and a competitive sandwich ELISA (capture mAb: 8H6; labelling mAb: 1B11) was established to determine neutralizing antibodies in human serum with reference to the FAMA test. A total of 920 human sera were evaluated. The competitive sandwich ELISA showed a sensitivity of 95.6%, specificity of 99.77% and coincidence of 97.61% compared with the fluorescent-antibody-to-membrane-antigen (FAMA) test. The capture mAb 8H6 was characterized as a specific mAb for VZV ORF9, a membrane-associated tegument protein that interacts with glycoprotein E (gE), glycoprotein B (gB) and glycoprotein C (gC). The labelling mAb 1B11 was characterized as a complement-dependent neutralizing mAb specific for the immune-dominant epitope located on gE, not on other VZV glycoproteins. The established competitive sandwich ELISA could be used as a rapid and high-throughput method for evaluating immunity to VZV. PMID:26853741

  6. Estimating Age-Specific Immunity and Force of Infection of Varicella Zoster Virus in Norway Using Mixture Models

    PubMed Central

    Rimseliene, Grazina; Flem, Elmira; Freiesleben de Blasio, Birgitte; Scalia Tomba, Gianpaolo; Manfredi, Piero

    2016-01-01

    This study applies mixture modelling to examine age-specific immunity to varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection in Norway based on the first large-scale serological study in the general population. We estimated the seropositive proportions at different ages and calculated the underlying force of infection by using a sample of 2103 residual sera obtained from patients seeking primary and hospital care. A rapid increase in the VZV-associated immunity is observed in the first years of life with 63% of children being immune by age 5. The increase in the immunity levels slows down thereafter, with a large proportion of adults still susceptible by age 20 (around 14.5%), thus at risk of serious sequelae of varicella infection. The corresponding force of infection peaks during the preschool period, subsequently declines to a minimum between ages 10 and 20 years, and afterwards moderately increases to reach a plateau lasting throughout the childbearing period. In comparison with the traditional cut-off approach, mixture modelling used the whole data without producing any inconclusive cases, led to an unbiased classification of individuals between susceptible and immune, and provided a smoother immune profile by age. These findings represent an important step towards any decision about the introduction of varicella vaccination in Norway, as they are a primary input for mathematical transmission models aimed at evaluating potential vaccination scenarios. PMID:27689800

  7. Improving the yeast two-hybrid system with permutated fusions proteins: the Varicella Zoster Virus interactome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screens have been among the most powerful methods to detect and analyze protein-protein interactions. However, they suffer from a significant degree of false negatives, i.e. true interactions that are not detected, and to a certain degree from false positives, i.e. interactions that appear to take place only in the context of the Y2H assay. While the fraction of false positives remains difficult to estimate, the fraction of false negatives in typical Y2H screens is on the order of 70-90%. Here we present novel Y2H vectors that significantly decrease the number of false negatives and help to mitigate the false positive problem. Results We have constructed two new vectors (pGBKCg and pGADCg) that allow us to make both C-terminal fusion proteins of DNA-binding and activation domains. Both vectors can be combined with existing vectors for N-terminal fusions and thus allow four different bait-prey combinations: NN, CC, NC, and CN. We have tested all ~4,900 pairwise combinations of the 70 Varicella-Zoster-Virus (VZV) proteins for interactions, using all possible combinations. About ~20,000 individual Y2H tests resulted in 182 NN, 89 NC, 149 CN, and 144 CC interactions. Overlap between screens ranged from 17% (NC-CN) to 43% (CN-CC). Performing four screens (i.e. permutations) instead of one resulted in about twice as many interactions and thus much fewer false negatives. In addition, interactions that are found in multiple combinations confirm each other and thus provide a quality score. This study is the first systematic analysis of such N- and C-terminal Y2H vectors. Conclusions Permutations of C- and N-terminal Y2H vectors dramatically increase the coverage of interactome studies and thus significantly reduce the number of false negatives. We suggest that future interaction screens should use such vector combinations on a routine basis, not the least because they provide a built-in quality score for Y2H interactions that can provide a

  8. [Seroprevalence of rubella virus, varicella zoster virus, cytomegalovirus and parvovirus B19 among pregnant women in the Sousse region, Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Hannachi, N; Marzouk, M; Harrabi, I; Ferjani, A; Ksouri, Z; Ghannem, H; Khairi, H; Hidar, S; Boukadida, J

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate seroprevalence of rubella virus (RV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), varicella zoster virus (VZV), and parvovirus B19 (PB19) in 404 Tunisian pregnant women, and to determine reliability of maternal past history of eruption. Sociodemographic characteristics, risk factors, and past history of eruption were collected through a questionnaire. Serologic tests were performed using enzyme immunoassays. Risk factors were analyzed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Seroprevalences were 79.7% for rubella, 96.3% for CMV, 80.9% for VZV, and 76.2% for PB19. In multivariate analysis, the number of persons per room (> 2) in the house during childhood was associated with CMV infection (P = 0.004), irregular professional husband's activity was correlated with VZV infection (P = 0.04), and an age of more than 30 years was associated with PB19 infection (P = 0.02). History of rubella, varicella, and PB19 infection was unknown for, respectively, 55.8%, 20%, and 100% of women. False history of rubella and varicella were found for 7.4% and 15% of women, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) of rubella history were, respectively, 92.6% and 17.2%, and were, respectively, 84.9% and 20.9% for varicella history. Susceptibility to RV, VZV, and PB19 infection remains high in pregnancy in our population. Preventive strategies against congenital rubella must be reinforced. Vaccination against VZV should be considered in seronegative women. Systemic CMV screening is not warranted in our country where high immunity is acquired probably in childhood. Since maternal history of eruption is not reliable, we recommend serologic testing to determine immune status of women. PMID:21243459

  9. Varicella-zoster viruses associated with post-herpetic neuralgia induce sodium current density increases in the ND7-23 Nav-1.8 neuroblastoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Peter G E; Montague, Paul; Scott, Fiona; Grinfeld, Esther; Ashrafi, G H; Breuer, Judith; Rowan, Edward G

    2013-01-01

    Post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) is the most significant complication of herpes zoster caused by reactivation of latent Varicella-Zoster virus (VZV). We undertook a heterologous infection in vitro study to determine whether PHN-associated VZV isolates induce changes in sodium ion channel currents known to be associated with neuropathic pain. Twenty VZV isolates were studied blind from 11 PHN and 9 non-PHN subjects. Viruses were propagated in the MeWo cell line from which cell-free virus was harvested and applied to the ND7/23-Nav1.8 rat DRG x mouse neuroblastoma hybrid cell line which showed constitutive expression of the exogenous Nav 1.8, and endogenous expression of Nav 1.6 and Nav 1.7 genes all encoding sodium ion channels the dysregulation of which is associated with a range of neuropathic pain syndromes. After 72 hrs all three classes of VZV gene transcripts were detected in the absence of infectious virus. Single cell sodium ion channel recording was performed after 72 hr by voltage-clamping. PHN-associated VZV significantly increased sodium current amplitude in the cell line when compared with non-PHN VZV, wild-type (Dumas) or vaccine VZV strains ((POka, Merck and GSK). These sodium current increases were unaffected by acyclovir pre-treatment but were abolished by exposure to Tetrodotoxin (TTX) which blocks the TTX-sensitive fast Nav 1.6 and Nav 1.7 channels but not the TTX-resistant slow Nav 1.8 channel. PHN-associated VZV sodium current increases were therefore mediated in part by the Nav 1.6 and Nav 1.7 sodium ion channels. An additional observation was a modest increase in message levels of both Nav1.6 and Nav1.7 mRNA but not Nav 1.8 in PHN virally infected cells. PMID:23382806

  10. Varicella-Zoster Viruses Associated with Post-Herpetic Neuralgia Induce Sodium Current Density Increases in the ND7-23 Nav-1.8 Neuroblastoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Peter G. E.; Montague, Paul; Scott, Fiona; Grinfeld, Esther; Ashrafi, G. H.; Breuer, Judith; Rowan, Edward G.

    2013-01-01

    Post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) is the most significant complication of herpes zoster caused by reactivation of latent Varicella-Zoster virus (VZV). We undertook a heterologous infection in vitro study to determine whether PHN-associated VZV isolates induce changes in sodium ion channel currents known to be associated with neuropathic pain. Twenty VZV isolates were studied blind from 11 PHN and 9 non-PHN subjects. Viruses were propagated in the MeWo cell line from which cell-free virus was harvested and applied to the ND7/23-Nav1.8 rat DRG x mouse neuroblastoma hybrid cell line which showed constitutive expression of the exogenous Nav 1.8, and endogenous expression of Nav 1.6 and Nav 1.7 genes all encoding sodium ion channels the dysregulation of which is associated with a range of neuropathic pain syndromes. After 72 hrs all three classes of VZV gene transcripts were detected in the absence of infectious virus. Single cell sodium ion channel recording was performed after 72 hr by voltage-clamping. PHN-associated VZV significantly increased sodium current amplitude in the cell line when compared with non-PHN VZV, wild-type (Dumas) or vaccine VZV strains ((POka, Merck and GSK). These sodium current increases were unaffected by acyclovir pre-treatment but were abolished by exposure to Tetrodotoxin (TTX) which blocks the TTX-sensitive fast Nav 1.6 and Nav 1.7 channels but not the TTX-resistant slow Nav 1.8 channel. PHN-associated VZV sodium current increases were therefore mediated in part by the Nav 1.6 and Nav 1.7 sodium ion channels. An additional observation was a modest increase in message levels of both Nav1.6 and Nav1.7 mRNA but not Nav 1.8 in PHN virally infected cells. PMID:23382806

  11. TORCH Infections. Toxoplasmosis, Other (syphilis, varicella-zoster, parvovirus B19), Rubella, Cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Herpes infections.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, Barbara J; Carey, J Christopher

    2002-08-01

    Perinatal infections account for 2% to 3% of all congenital anomalies. TORCH, which includes Toxoplasmosis, Other (syphilis, varicella-zoster, parvovirus B19), Rubella, Cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Herpes infections, are some of the most common infections associated with congenital anomalies. Most of the TORCH infections cause mild maternal morbidity, but have serious fetal consequences, and treatment of maternal infection frequently has no impact on fetal outcome. Therefore, recognition of maternal disease and fetal monitoring once disease is recognized are important for all clinicians. Knowledge of these diseases will help the clinician appropriately counsel mothers on preventive measures to avoid these infections, and will aid in counseling parents on the potential for adverse fetal outcomes when these infections are present. PMID:12150751

  12. Varicella-Zoster Virus Open Reading Frame 66 Protein Kinase and Its Relationship to Alphaherpesvirus US3 Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Erazo, Angela

    2014-01-01

    The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) open reading frame (ORF) 66 encodes a basophilic kinase orthologous to the US3 protein kinases found in all alphaherpesviruses. This review summarizes current information on the ORF66 kinase, and outlines apparent differences from other US3 kinases, as well as some of the conserved functions. One critical difference is the VZV ORF66 kinase targeting of the major regulatory VZV IE62 protein to control its nuclear import and assembly into the VZV virion, which is so far unprecedented in the alphaherpesviruses. However, ORF66 targets some cellular targets which are also targeted by US3 kinases of other herpesviruses, including the histone deacetylase-1 and 2 proteins, pathways that lead to changes in actin dynamics, and the targeting of substrates of protein kinase A, including the nuclear matrix protein matrin 3. PMID:20186610

  13. Species-specific differentiation of variola, monkeypox, and varicella-zoster viruses by multiplex real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Maksyutov, Rinat A; Gavrilova, Elena V; Shchelkunov, Sergei N

    2016-10-01

    A method of one-stage rapid detection and differentiation of epidemiologically important variola virus (VARV), monkeypox virus (MPXV), and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) utilizing multiplex real-time TaqMan PCR assay was developed. Four hybridization probes with various fluorescent dyes and the corresponding fluorescence quenchers were simultaneously used for the assay. The hybridization probes specific for the VARV sequence contained FAM/BHQ1 as a dye/quencher pair; MPXV-specific, JOE/BHQ1; VZV-specific, TAMRA/BHQ2; and internal control-specific, Cy5/BHQ3. The specificity and sensitivity of the developed method were assessed by analyzing DNA of 32 strains belonging to orthopoxvirus and herpesvirus species.

  14. Meningitis with polymerase chain reaction for varicella zoster positivity in cerebrospinal flid of a young immunocompetent adult

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pooja; Ranjan, Rajeev; Agrawal, C. S.; Muralikrishnan, K; Dave, Nikhil; Rana, Davinder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis caused by varicella zoster virus (VZV) is quite rare among young immunocompetent adults though immunocompromised patients are often seen to be affected by reactivation of VZV presenting with primary clinical features of dermatomal rashes and neurological sequelae. Here, we report the clinical scenario of a young, healthy male who had presented with fever, headache, and onset of dermatomal rashes later than the fever and was eventually diagnosed to be a case of VZV meningitis. We would like to highlight the fact that even young immunocompetent patients though rarely, might contract VZV meningitis and clinicians should have a high index of suspicion and keen eyes to catch the more obvious features of VZV infection on complete physical examination and must not harbor any reservations in ordering polymerase chain reaction for VZV DNA or initiating aggressive antiviral therapy.

  15. Primary cutaneous precursor B cell lymphoblastic lymphoma in a child, complicated by fatal disseminated varicella zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Rashidghamat, E; Robson, A

    2015-12-01

    Precursor B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (PBLL) is a rare subtype of childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Most lymphoblastic lymphomas have a T-cell immunophenotype, but a small distinct proportion is of precursor B-cell origin. Skin and bone involvement is seen more commonly in this clinical variant. Primary cutaneous PBLL is rare. We describe an 8-year-old girl who presented with an asymptomatic nodule on the left upper arm. Histopathological features were consistent with pre-B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma, and staging investigations excluded extracutaneous disease, resulting in a diagnosis of primary cutaneous PBLL. The child was started on induction chemotherapy, UKALL 2003 regimen B. She developed disseminated varicella zoster virus and died despite treatment. We discuss previously reported cases of primary cutaneous PBLL and their outcomes. PMID:25959984

  16. Meningitis with polymerase chain reaction for varicella zoster positivity in cerebrospinal flid of a young immunocompetent adult

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pooja; Ranjan, Rajeev; Agrawal, C. S.; Muralikrishnan, K; Dave, Nikhil; Rana, Davinder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis caused by varicella zoster virus (VZV) is quite rare among young immunocompetent adults though immunocompromised patients are often seen to be affected by reactivation of VZV presenting with primary clinical features of dermatomal rashes and neurological sequelae. Here, we report the clinical scenario of a young, healthy male who had presented with fever, headache, and onset of dermatomal rashes later than the fever and was eventually diagnosed to be a case of VZV meningitis. We would like to highlight the fact that even young immunocompetent patients though rarely, might contract VZV meningitis and clinicians should have a high index of suspicion and keen eyes to catch the more obvious features of VZV infection on complete physical examination and must not harbor any reservations in ordering polymerase chain reaction for VZV DNA or initiating aggressive antiviral therapy. PMID:27695246

  17. Species-specific differentiation of variola, monkeypox, and varicella-zoster viruses by multiplex real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Maksyutov, Rinat A; Gavrilova, Elena V; Shchelkunov, Sergei N

    2016-10-01

    A method of one-stage rapid detection and differentiation of epidemiologically important variola virus (VARV), monkeypox virus (MPXV), and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) utilizing multiplex real-time TaqMan PCR assay was developed. Four hybridization probes with various fluorescent dyes and the corresponding fluorescence quenchers were simultaneously used for the assay. The hybridization probes specific for the VARV sequence contained FAM/BHQ1 as a dye/quencher pair; MPXV-specific, JOE/BHQ1; VZV-specific, TAMRA/BHQ2; and internal control-specific, Cy5/BHQ3. The specificity and sensitivity of the developed method were assessed by analyzing DNA of 32 strains belonging to orthopoxvirus and herpesvirus species. PMID:27477914

  18. Secular trends of chickenpox among military population in Israel in relation to introduction of varicella zoster vaccine 1979-2010.

    PubMed

    Mimouni, Daniel; Levine, Hagai; Tzurel Ferber, Anat; Rajuan-Galor, Inbal; Huerta-Hartal, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Chickenpox is a contagious disease caused by the varicella zoster virus. There is scarce data on long-term trends of chickenpox and its relation to vaccinations practices. We aimed to evaluate trends of chickenpox in a military population during the period 1979-2010 and to assess temporal associations in relation with the introduction of varicella zoster vaccine to the civilian population in Israel in 2000. The archives of the Epidemiology Section of the Israel Defense Forces, where chickenpox is a notifiable disease, were reviewed for all cases of chickenpox from January 1, 1979-December 31, 2010. Annual and monthly incidence rates were calculated and analyzed in relation to vaccine introduction. Between 1979-2000, incidence rates fluctuated around 10 cases per 10,000 soldiers without a clear trend. Since 2000 there has been a dramatic 10-fold decline in incidence, especially notable since 2008, from eight per 10,000 soldiers in 2000 to the lowest rate ever recorded, in 2009, of 0.57 cases per 10,000 soldiers. A seasonal sinusoidal pattern was clearly demonstrated, with rising incidence from November to May followed by a gradual decline to October. The results of this long-term study suggest that the rates of chickenpox in the military population have significantly declined since the introduction of the vaccine to the civilian population in Israel and almost disappeared completely since 2008 as the vaccine was included in the state-funded routine childhood immunization schedule. These findings underscore the need for a strong surveillance system and will aid in determing vaccination policies.

  19. Herpes Zoster.

    PubMed

    Schmader, Kenneth

    2016-08-01

    Herpes zoster causes significant suffering owing to acute and chronic pain or postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). Varicella-zoster virus-induced neuronal destruction and inflammation causes the principal problems of pain, interference with activities of daily living, and reduced quality of life in older adults. The optimal treatment of herpes zoster requires early antiviral therapy and careful pain management. For patients who have PHN, evidence-based pharmacotherapy using topical lidocaine patch, gabapentin, pregabalin, tricyclic antidepressants, or opiates can reduce pain burden. The live attenuated zoster vaccine is effective in reducing pain burden and preventing herpes zoster and PHN in older adults.

  20. Herpes Zoster.

    PubMed

    Schmader, Kenneth

    2016-08-01

    Herpes zoster causes significant suffering owing to acute and chronic pain or postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). Varicella-zoster virus-induced neuronal destruction and inflammation causes the principal problems of pain, interference with activities of daily living, and reduced quality of life in older adults. The optimal treatment of herpes zoster requires early antiviral therapy and careful pain management. For patients who have PHN, evidence-based pharmacotherapy using topical lidocaine patch, gabapentin, pregabalin, tricyclic antidepressants, or opiates can reduce pain burden. The live attenuated zoster vaccine is effective in reducing pain burden and preventing herpes zoster and PHN in older adults. PMID:27394022

  1. Varicella zoster virus reactivation during or immediately following treatment of tegumentary leishmaniasis with antimony compounds.

    PubMed

    Barros, Andrea Barbieri; Rodrigues, Alex Miranda; Batista, Mariane Pereira; Munhoz Junior, Sidney; Hueb, Marcia; Fontes, Cor Jesus

    2014-07-01

    Antimony compounds are the cornerstone treatments for tegumentary leishmaniasis. The reactivation of herpes virus is a side effect described in few reports. We conducted an observational study to describe the incidence of herpes zoster reactivation during treatment with antimony compounds. The global incidence of herpes zoster is approximately 2.5 cases per 1,000 persons per month (or 30 cases per 1,000 persons per year). The estimated incidence of herpes zoster in patients undergoing antimony therapy is higher than previously reported.

  2. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors of Varicella Zoster Infection in Iranian Adolescents: A Multilevel Analysis; The CASPIAN-III Study.

    PubMed

    Hoseini, Shervin Ghaffari; Kelishadi, Roya; Kasaeian, Amir; Ataei, Behrooz; Yaran, Majid; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeil; Heshmat, Ramin; Ardalan, Gelayol; Safari, Omid; Qorbani, Mostafa; Mostafavi, Seyed Naseredin

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the varicella zoster virus (VZV) immunity in Iranian adolescents. It was conducted as a primary study for vaccine implementation, and to investigate the association of climatic and socioeconomic factors with the epidemiology of this infection. In this cross- sectional study, anti VZV antibodies were measured in serum samples obtained in a national school-based health survey (CASPIAN- III). Association of demographic, socio-economic, and climate of the living region with the frequency of VZV was investigated by multivariate multilevel analysis. Overall, sera of 2753 individuals aged 10-18 were tested for VZV antibodies, from those 87.4% were positive. The prevalence was statistically different in four socio-geographic regions (P<0.001), varying between 85.24% in West region (mostly mountainous areas with cold climate) to 94.59% in Southeast region (subtropical climate). Among variables studied, only age and mean daily temperature of the living area were positively associated with the VZV seroprevalence. Our findings show that most Iranians develop immunity to VZV before the age of 10, but a substantial proportion of them are yet susceptible to the infection. Therefore, it seems that the best strategy to reduce the burden of the disease is to vaccinate high- risk adults, i.e. those without a history of varicella infection. The regional temperature might be the only determinant of VZV epidemiology in Iran. PMID:27355931

  3. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors of Varicella Zoster Infection in Iranian Adolescents: A Multilevel Analysis; The CASPIAN-III Study

    PubMed Central

    Hoseini, Shervin Ghaffari; Kelishadi, Roya; Kasaeian, Amir; Ataei, Behrooz; Yaran, Majid; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeil; Heshmat, Ramin; Ardalan, Gelayol; Safari, Omid

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the varicella zoster virus (VZV) immunity in Iranian adolescents. It was conducted as a primary study for vaccine implementation, and to investigate the association of climatic and socioeconomic factors with the epidemiology of this infection. In this cross- sectional study, anti VZV antibodies were measured in serum samples obtained in a national school-based health survey (CASPIAN- III). Association of demographic, socio-economic, and climate of the living region with the frequency of VZV was investigated by multivariate multilevel analysis. Overall, sera of 2753 individuals aged 10–18 were tested for VZV antibodies, from those 87.4% were positive. The prevalence was statistically different in four socio-geographic regions (P<0.001), varying between 85.24% in West region (mostly mountainous areas with cold climate) to 94.59% in Southeast region (subtropical climate). Among variables studied, only age and mean daily temperature of the living area were positively associated with the VZV seroprevalence. Our findings show that most Iranians develop immunity to VZV before the age of 10, but a substantial proportion of them are yet susceptible to the infection. Therefore, it seems that the best strategy to reduce the burden of the disease is to vaccinate high- risk adults, i.e. those without a history of varicella infection. The regional temperature might be the only determinant of VZV epidemiology in Iran. PMID:27355931

  4. Seroepidemiology of varicella-zoster virus in Korean adolescents and adults using fluorescent antibody to membrane antigen test.

    PubMed

    Han, S B; Kang, K R; Huh, D H; Lee, H C; Kim, J H; Kang, J H; Ma, S H

    2015-06-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional seroepidemiological study in 2012-2013 to determine the seroprevalence of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in adolescents and adults living in Korea, where varicella vaccination has been recommended universally at age 12-15 months since 2005. Residual serum samples were collected from 1196 healthy adults and adolescents aged ⩾10 years between November 2012 and March 2013. The fluorescent antibody to membrane antigen (FAMA) test and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were performed to determine the seroprevalence of VZV. The seroprevalences of VZV were compared between six age groups: 10-19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, and ⩾60 years. The seroprevalence of VZV in the entire study cohort was 99·1% according to the FAMA test and 93·1% as determined by ELISA. The seroprevalences of the six age groups were as follows: 96·0%, 99·5%, 99·5%, 99·5%, 100%, and 100%, respectively, by the FAMA test, and 83·3%, 93·0%, 93·0%, 97·5%, 94·5%, and 97·5%, respectively, by ELISA. Seroprevalence increased significantly with age (P < 0·001); moreover, the seroprevalence in subjects aged 10-19 years was significantly lower than in other age groups (P < 0·001), as measured by both the FAMA test and ELISA. Thus, strategies to increase protective immunity against VZV in teenagers are necessary.

  5. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism among Varicella-Zoster Virus and identification of vaccine-specific sites.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jeong Seon; Won, Youn Hee; Kim, In Kyo; Ahn, Jin Hyun; Shin, Ok Sarah; Kim, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chan Hee

    2016-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a causative agent for chickenpox and zoster. Live attenuated vaccines have been developed based on Oka and MAV/06 strains. In order to understand the molecular mechanisms of attenuation, complete genome sequences of vaccine and wild-type strains were compared and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was analyzed. ORF22 and ORF62 contained the highest number of SNPs. The detailed analysis of the SNPs suggested 24 potential vaccine-specific sites. All the mutational events found in vaccine-specific sites were transitional, and most of them were substitution of AT to GC pair. Interestingly, 18 of the vaccine-specific sites of the vaccine strains appeared to be genetically heterogeneous. The probability of a single genome of vaccine strain to contain all 24 vaccine-type sequences was calculated to be less than 4%. The average codon adaptation index (CAI) value of the vaccine strains was significantly lower than the CAI value of the clinical strains.

  6. Discordant varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein C expression and localization between cultured cells and human skin vesicles.

    PubMed

    Storlie, Johnathan; Carpenter, John E; Jackson, Wallen; Grose, Charles

    2008-12-20

    Because of its very low titer, varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infectivity is usually transferred by passage of trypsin dispersed infected cells. Previously, we observed that gC biosynthesis was markedly delayed in monolayers inoculated with cell free virus. In this report, we investigated the kinetics of gC expression in more detail and included studies of monolayers inoculated with trypsin dispersed infected cells, the more traditional method of VZV infection. Extensive imaging analyses disclosed that gC was detectable in some inoculum cells, but little gC biosynthesis occurred during the first 48 hpi in the newly infected underlying monolayer. In contrast, during the first 24-48 hpi, expression of VZV gE and gB was easily detectable. Using real-time RT-PCR, we found a delay in accumulation of VZV gC transcripts that paralleled the delay in expression of VZV gC protein. Treatment with hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA) increased expression of both gC protein and gC mRNA. HMBA treatment also increased virus titer by 4-fold, but paradoxically reduced plaque size in the titration assay. Finally, we examined skin vesicles from cases of chickenpox and zoster in humans and observed abundant amounts of gC expression. In short, this report documents an unexpected delay in both gC mRNA and protein production under all conditions of VZV infection of cultured cells.

  7. Integrating between-host transmission and within-host immunity to analyze the impact of varicella vaccination on zoster.

    PubMed

    Ogunjimi, Benson; Willem, Lander; Beutels, Philippe; Hens, Niel

    2015-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes chickenpox and reactivation of latent VZV causes herpes zoster (HZ). VZV reactivation is subject to the opposing mechanisms of declining and boosted VZV-specific cellular mediated immunity (CMI). A reduction in exogenous re-exposure 'opportunities' through universal chickenpox vaccination could therefore lead to an increase in HZ incidence. We present the first individual-based model that integrates within-host data on VZV-CMI and between-host transmission data to simulate HZ incidence. This model allows estimating currently unknown pivotal biomedical parameters, including the duration of exogenous boosting at 2 years, with a peak threefold to fourfold increase of VZV-CMI; the VZV weekly reactivation probability at 5% and VZV subclinical reactivation having no effect on VZV-CMI. A 100% effective chickenpox vaccine given to 1 year olds would cause a 1.75 times peak increase in HZ 31 years after implementation. This increase is predicted to occur mainly in younger age groups than is currently assumed.

  8. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism among Varicella-Zoster Virus and identification of vaccine-specific sites.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jeong Seon; Won, Youn Hee; Kim, In Kyo; Ahn, Jin Hyun; Shin, Ok Sarah; Kim, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chan Hee

    2016-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a causative agent for chickenpox and zoster. Live attenuated vaccines have been developed based on Oka and MAV/06 strains. In order to understand the molecular mechanisms of attenuation, complete genome sequences of vaccine and wild-type strains were compared and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was analyzed. ORF22 and ORF62 contained the highest number of SNPs. The detailed analysis of the SNPs suggested 24 potential vaccine-specific sites. All the mutational events found in vaccine-specific sites were transitional, and most of them were substitution of AT to GC pair. Interestingly, 18 of the vaccine-specific sites of the vaccine strains appeared to be genetically heterogeneous. The probability of a single genome of vaccine strain to contain all 24 vaccine-type sequences was calculated to be less than 4%. The average codon adaptation index (CAI) value of the vaccine strains was significantly lower than the CAI value of the clinical strains. PMID:27376245

  9. Development of resistance to acyclovir during chronic infection with the Oka vaccine strain of varicella-zoster virus, in an immunosuppressed child.

    PubMed

    Levin, Myron J; Dahl, Karen M; Weinberg, Adriana; Giller, Roger; Patel, Amita; Krause, Philip R

    2003-10-01

    A 1-year-old boy was vaccinated with the Oka strain of varicella just prior to the discovery of a tumor that required intensive antitumor therapy. Three months later he developed herpes zoster, which developed into chronic verrucous lesions that were refractory to treatment with acyclovir and which subsequently disseminated. DNA from a biopsy specimen of a chronic herpes-zoster lesion indicated that the Oka vaccine strain of the the virus caused this severe complication. Analysis of this viral DNA demonstrated a mutation in the viral thymidine kinase gene. Plasmids containing this altered gene were unable to produce functional thymidine kinase in an in vitro translation system. The presence of this mutation would explain the clinical resistance to acyclovir. This is the first report of Oka-strain varicella virus causing severe disease after reactivation and of resistance to acyclovir during an infection caused by this virus.

  10. Identification of a hydrophobic domain in varicella-zoster virus ORF61 necessary for ORF61 self-interaction, viral replication, and skin pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Rajamani, Jaya; Sommer, Marvin; Zerboni, Leigh; Arvin, Ann M

    2013-04-01

    The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) ORF61 protein is necessary for normal replication in vitro and virulence in human skin xenografts in the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model in vivo. These experiments identify a hydrophobic domain that mediates ORF61 self-interaction. While not needed to inhibit host cell defenses, disruption of this domain (residues 250 to 320) severely impairs VZV growth, transactivation of the immediate early 63 and glycoprotein E genes, and the pathogenesis of VZV skin infection in vivo.

  11. The potency determination of human varicella-zoster immunoglobulin by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, complement-fixation test and indirect fluorescent antibody tests.

    PubMed

    Winsnes, R; Wiger, D

    1986-10-01

    Traditionally, plasma for the production of the human varicella-zoster immunoglobulin (VZIG) has been selected on the basis of the complement-fixing antibody (CFA) titre. Since immune individuals may lack CFA to varicella-zoster virus (VZV), non-CFA may be of importance in protection. In a search for a simple and reliable method for potency determination, 24 VZIG preparations were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the complement-fixation test (CFT), the indirect fluorescent antibody test to acetone-fixed (IF) and viable (FAMA) VZV-infected cells, respectively. The antibody titres obtained by the various methods were compared. Arranged in order of decreasing agreement, the correlation coefficients (r) of the regression equations between the variables were 0.62 for CFT and FAMA, 0.50 for CFT and ELISA and 0.26 for CFT and IF in a log2 plot. There was complete agreement between the titres obtained by the commercially available Enzygnost Varicella/Zoster kits (Behring Institute, Marburg, F.R. Germany) and the ELISA microtitre plates produced at our institute (r = 1). The regression equation lines for ELISA/CFT and FAMA/CFT titres tended to be parallel to each other, while the line for IF/CFT titres had a less steep slope. Similar titration curves were obtained for VZIGs fractionated by two different methods. Furthermore, the titration curves of serum pools from varicella and zoster convalescents, respectively, had a similar shape below delta OD = 0.4. Generally, a steeper slope was observed above delta OD = 0.4. As antibody detectable by ELISA seems to correlate with protection and the method is sensitive, specific, reproduceable, simple to carry out and easily automated, it may be suitable for the potency determination of VZIGs.

  12. The role of solar ultraviolet irradiation in zoster.

    PubMed Central

    Zak-Prelich, M.; Borkowski, J. L.; Alexander, F.; Norval, M.

    2002-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) suppresses many aspects of cell-mediated immunity but it is uncertain whether solar UV exposure alters resistance to human infectious diseases. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella (chickenpox) and can reactivate from latency to cause zoster (shingles). The monthly incidence of chickenpox and zoster in a defined Polish population over 2 years was recorded and ground level solar UV was measured daily. There was a significant seasonality of UVR. Evidence of seasonal variation was found for all zoster cases and for zoster in males, with the lowest number of cases in the winter. The number of zoster cases with lesions occurring on exposed body sites (the face) demonstrated highly significant seasonality with a peak in July/August. Seasonal models for UVR and zoster cases showed similar temporal patterns. By contrast, for varicella, the maximum number of cases was found in March and the minimum in August/September, probably explained by the respiratory spread of VZV. It is tempting to speculate that the increase in solar UVR in the summer could induce suppression of cellular immunity, thus contributing to the corresponding rise in the incidence of zoster. PMID:12558343

  13. The role of solar ultraviolet irradiation in zoster.

    PubMed

    Zak-Prelich, M; Borkowski, J L; Alexander, F; Norval, M

    2002-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) suppresses many aspects of cell-mediated immunity but it is uncertain whether solar UV exposure alters resistance to human infectious diseases. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella (chickenpox) and can reactivate from latency to cause zoster (shingles). The monthly incidence of chickenpox and zoster in a defined Polish population over 2 years was recorded and ground level solar UV was measured daily. There was a significant seasonality of UVR. Evidence of seasonal variation was found for all zoster cases and for zoster in males, with the lowest number of cases in the winter. The number of zoster cases with lesions occurring on exposed body sites (the face) demonstrated highly significant seasonality with a peak in July/August. Seasonal models for UVR and zoster cases showed similar temporal patterns. By contrast, for varicella, the maximum number of cases was found in March and the minimum in August/September, probably explained by the respiratory spread of VZV. It is tempting to speculate that the increase in solar UVR in the summer could induce suppression of cellular immunity, thus contributing to the corresponding rise in the incidence of zoster. PMID:12558343

  14. Seroprevalences of varicella-zoster virus, herpes simplex virus and cytomegalovirus in a cross-sectional study in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Conde-Glez, Carlos; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Rojas, Rosalba; DeAntonio, Rodrigo; Romano-Mazzotti, Luis; Cervantes, Yolanda; Ortega-Barria, Eduardo

    2013-10-17

    We estimated the seroprevalences of varicella-zoster virus (VZV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) in this cross-sectional database study. Serum samples collected during the National Health and Nutrition survey (ENSANUT 2006) were obtained from subjects aged 1-70 years between January and October 2010. Serological assays for the determination of antibodies against VZV, HSV and CMV were performed. The overall seroprevalences of VZV, HSV-1, HSV-2 and CMV were 85.8%, 80.9%, 9.9% and 89.2%, respectively. Seroprevalences of VZV, HSV-1 and CMV were comparable between males and females. For HSV-2, although the seroprevalence rate was higher in females when compared to males, this difference in seroprevalence was not statistically significant. Seroprevalence rates for VZV, HSV-1, HSV-2 and CMV increased with age (p-value<.0001). Differences in seroprevalence rate for VZV by socioeconomic status (SES) were significant (p-value<0001). Results of the serological analyses reported high VZV seroprevalence, indicating high transmission in the Mexican population with children and adolescents at risk of acquiring VZV. Global HSV-1 seroprevalence was high, especially in adults. HSV-1 and HSV-2 seroprevalences were consistently higher in women than men, particularly for HSV-2. CMV seroprevalence was higher in Mexico when compared to developed countries. Seroepidemiological data on VZV supports the fact that varicella vaccination may serve as an alternative effective solution to reduce transmission in the Mexican population. For CMV and HSV, since no vaccines are available, activities to reduce transmission are important to reduce the risk of complications and therefore need to be considered.

  15. Enzymatic Digestion Pattern of Varicella Zoster Virus ORF38 and ORF54 in Chickenpox Patients Using RFLP Technique

    PubMed Central

    Safarnezhad Tameshkel, Fahimeh; Karbalaie Niya, Mohammad Hadi; Keyvani, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes chickenpox in children and zoster (zona) in the elderly. Using RFLP-PCR method for detection of VZV specific SNPs ORF38, 54 and 62 could distinguish the profile of VZV isolates. The aim of this study was to investigate enzymatic digestion pattern of VZV ORF38 and ORF54 in chickenpox patients using RFLP technique. Methods: Thirty-eight chickenpox patients, who referred to the hospitals of Iran University of Medical Sciences in Tehran from May 2010 to June 2015 were enrolled in this cross sectional study. After the DNA extraction, PCR amplification of 38 VZV isolates performed by specific primers of ORFs 38 and 54, then RFLP assay and digestion carried out by PstI (for ORF38) and BglI (for ORF54) restriction enzymes. Results: Of 38 positive VZV DNA, the mean age (yr)±SD was 34.4±23.3 (range: 7-89). 22 (57.9%) were female and 16 (42.1%) were male. The predominant VZV profile of BglI+PstI+ were 89.5% (34/38) followed by 10.5% (4/38) PstI+BglI‾. Statistical analysis showed that there was no significant relationship between genotype, age, sex, and year of infection variables (P value> 0.05). The common VZV genotype among Iranian patients with chickenpox and zona infection is genotype BglI+PstI+ followed by PstI+BglI‾. Conclusion: There are different VZV circulating genotypes that call for for more research on this field by widely population and other methods such as nucleotide sequencing to justify the accurate VZV genotype prevalence in Iran. PMID:26870141

  16. Incidence and clinical features of herpes simplex viruses (1 and 2) and varicella-zoster virus infections in an adult Korean population with aseptic meningitis or encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Rihwa; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Jo, Ik Joon; Sim, Min Seob; Song, Keun Jeong; Kim, Byoung Joon; Na, Duk L; Huh, Hee Jae; Kim, Jong-Won; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Nam Yong

    2014-06-01

    Since there are limited data on the incidence and clinical findings of central nervous system (CNS) infection by three α-herpesviruses including human herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), HSV-2 and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in Korea, a retrospective analysis of clinical data and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results was performed in patients who presented with suspicion of acute viral meningitis and/or encephalitis at the emergency department of a tertiary referral hospital in Seoul, Korea. During the 3-year study period, a total of 224 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 224 patients were examined. Among the 224 patients, 135 (60.3%) patients were identified as having aseptic meningitis (n = 70, 51.9%), encephalitis (n = 41, 30.4%) or meningoencephalitis (n = 24, 17.8%) at discharge. Twenty-four (17.8%) patients were identified as having VZV meningitis (n = 16, 11.9%), VZV meningoencephalitis (n = 2, 1.5%), HSV-2 meningitis (n = 4, 3.0%), or HSV-1 encephalitis (n = 2, 1.5%). Of the 24 patients infected with the three herpesviruses, immunocompromised patients accounted for 33.3% (n = 8). Skin rashes were observed in half (n = 9) of the patients with VZV, and none with HSV-1 or HSV-2. One patient with VZV meningitis and four patients with brain parenchymal involvement had neurologic sequelae. In conclusion, three herpesviruses are important causative agents of CNS infectious disease with significant morbidity in adults, regardless of the immunologic status. Therefore, CSF should be examined for HSV-1, HSV-2, and VZV using sensitive diagnostic methods in all cases of adult patients with clinical manifestations of CNS disease in order to identify the correct etiology and to determine appropriate therapy.

  17. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) mediates a delayed host shutoff independent of open reading frame (ORF) 17 expression.

    PubMed

    Waterboer, Tim; Rahaus, Markus; Wolff, Manfred H

    2002-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) open reading frame 17 (ORF 17) is the gene corresponding to Herpes simplex-virus (HSV) UL41. The UL41 gene encodes the virion host shutoff factor (vhs), a RNase that has been the object of detailed studies. In contrast to HSV, knowledge about VZV mediated shutoff effects and the role of ORF 17 is poor. We investigated the ORF 17 expression in infected cells and analyzed shutoff effects. ORF 17 expression could not be proven in infected human fibroblast cell lines and melanoma (MeWo) cells. Only after induction by Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate an ORF 17 expression became detectable in MeWo cells. Nevertheless, using stable expressed GAPDH mRNA as a marker for mRNA degradation, a VZV mediated shutoff, independent of ORF 17 expression, became measurable. Transfection experiments demonstrated that transient ORF 17 expression did not decrease the cellular GAPDH mRNA level. We examined whether the VZV shutoff factor is a tegument protein causing an early shutoff or whether it needs to be expressed (delayed shutoff). The GAPDH mRNA level in Actinomycin D pretreated and infected MeWo cells did not decrease even faster than the theoretical decay rate based on a half-life of 24 h. These findings lead to the conclusion that the VZV shutoff factor is not a mature protein localized in the virion and that VZV causes a delayed virion host shutoff effect.

  18. Potent and selective inhibition of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) by nucleoside analogues with an unusual bicyclic base.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, C; Yarnold, C J; Jones, G; Velázquez, S; Barucki, H; Brancale, A; Andrei, G; Snoeck, R; De Clercq, E; Balzarini, J

    1999-11-01

    We herein report the discovery of an entirely new category of potent antiviral agents based on novel deoxynucleoside analogues with unusual bicyclic base moieties. Target structures, previously known as byproducts in Pd-catalyzed coupling of terminal alkynes with 5-iodo-nucleosides, are recognized herein for the first time to be potent and selective inhibitors of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in vitro. As an unusual structure-activity relationship we noted the absolute requirement of a long alkyl side chain, with an optimum length of C(8)-C(10), for antiviral activity. We thus report the synthesis and characterization of a series of chain-modified analogues and their extensive in vitro evaluation. The lead compounds have a ca. 300-fold enhancement in anti-VZV activity over the reference compound acyclovir, with no detectable in vitro cytotoxicity. The novel structure of these compounds, coupled with their ease of synthesis, excellent antiviral profile, and promising physical properties, makes them of great interest for possible antiviral drug development.

  19. Functional differences between antiviral activities of sulfonated and intact intravenous immunoglobulin preparations toward varicella-zoster virus and cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Misako; Shiraki, Atsuko; Daikoku, Tohru; Oyama, Yukari; Yoshida, Yoshihiro; Shiraki, Kimiyasu

    2015-06-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is used to treat severe viral infection, especially varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections. The neutralization antibody titers of eleven IVIG preparations from four companies were examined using VZV and CMV with and without complement. The neutralizing antibody titers of intact IgG preparations were three to six times higher after addition of complement. The effectiveness of the sulfonated IgG preparation was not enhanced by complement, but desulfonated IgG regained enhanced neutralization activity with complement. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) toward VZV-infected cells was observed with both intact and sulfonated IVIG and guinea pig splenocytes, but ADCC toward CMV-infected cells was not, although NK cell activity toward cells infected with VZV or CMV was detected by splenocytes. Sulfonated IVIG had no complement-activated neutralization of VZV and CMV but retained ADCC toward VZV with less activity after dilution than with intact IVIG. Because sulfonated IVIG is converted to the intact form after intravenous administration, it would show complement-enhanced neutralization and ADCC activity similar to that of intact IVIG in vivo. In this study we showed the effects of intact and sulfonated IgG on the functional activity of IgG against VZV and CMV.

  20. Enhancement of varicella-zoster virus infection in cell lines expressing ORF4- or ORF62-encoded proteins.

    PubMed

    Schoonbroodt, S; Piette, J; Baudoux, L; Defechereux, P; Rentier, B; Merville, M P

    1996-08-01

    Varicella-Zoster virus (VZV) open reading frames 4 (ORF4) and 62 (ORF62) encode putative immediate early proteins (ORF4p and ORF62p, respectively) which are strong transactivators of other VZV genes and are involved in the very early stages of viral infection. ORF4p and ORF62p transactivate immediate-early and early gene promoters but have little or no effect on late gene promoters. To investigate the effect of ORF4p or ORF62p overexpression on the viral replication cycle, we constructed Vero cell lines expressing those genes under the control of the human cytomegalovirus major immediate-early promoter. VZV OKA infection of these stably transformed cell lines was followed-up using VZV glycoprotein E (gE) antigen quantification and virus titration. Upon serial passaging of infection in these cell lines expressing functionally active ORF4p or ORF62p, a 5- to 10-fold increase in viral gE antigen production was observed. Viral titers also demonstrated a 2- to 5-fold increase in viral production in these transformed cell lines. These results emphasize the role that both ORF4p and ORF62p play in enhancing the VZV replicative cycle.

  1. MENINGOENCEPHALITIS DUE TO VARICELLA ZOSTER VIRUS IN AIDS PATIENTS. REPORT OF ELEVEN CASES AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE.

    PubMed

    Corti, Marcelo; Villafañe, María F; Vittar, Natalia; Banco, María C; Priarone, Maia; Mammana, Lilia; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2015-12-01

    Neurological complications of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) are infrequent and include various clinical pictures. The reactivation of VZV in patients with AIDS is generally associated with an acute and severe meningoencephalitis. We report the epidemiological, clinical and virological data from 11 consecutive patients with diagnosis of HIV/AIDS and central nervous system (CNS) involvement due to VZV. All patients were male and seropositive for HIV. The primary risk factor for HIV infection was unprotected sexual contact. The median of CD4 T cell count was 142 cells/µL. All of them presented signs and symptoms of meningoencephalitis. Six patients (54.5%) presented pleocytosis; they all showed high CSF protein concentrations with a median of 2.1 g/dL. Polymerase chain reaction of cerebrospinal fluid specimen was positive for VZV in all of them and they were treated with intravenous acyclovir at doses of 30/mg/kg/day for 21 days. Overall survival was 63% (7 of 11 patients). The four dead patients had low cellular counts in CSF, below the median of this parameter. VZV should be included among the opportunistic pathogens that can involve CNS with a diffuse and severe meningoencephalitis in patients with advanced HIV/AIDS disease.

  2. Varicella-zoster reactivation after allogeneic stem cell transplantation without routine prophylaxis--the incidence remains high.

    PubMed

    Blennow, Ola; Fjaertoft, Gustav; Winiarski, Jacek; Ljungman, Per; Mattsson, Jonas; Remberger, Mats

    2014-10-01

    One-year prophylaxis with acyclovir has been shown to effectively prevent varicella-zoster virus (VZV) reactivation after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in a cohort that underwent transplantation in the beginning of the 2000s. Transplantation procedures have since changed considerably and reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) is nowadays common. We investigated VZV reactivation without routine prophylaxis in a cohort of HSCT patients, 50% of whom had received RIC. The cumulative 2-year incidence of VZV reactivation was 20.7%. Risk factors in a multivariate analysis were treatment with mesenchymal stromal cells (relative hazard [RH], 1.65; confidence interval [CI], 1.07 to 2.54; P = .02), total body irradiation ≥6 Gy (RH, 1.55; CI, 1.14 to 2.13; P = .006), engraftment later than day 16 (RH, 1.46; CI, 1.07 to 2.00; P = .02), and age 0 to 19 years (RH, 1.68; CI, 1.21 to 2.35; P = .002). There was no difference in VZV reactivation between patients receiving myeloablative conditioning or RIC. VZV-related complications occurred in 29% of the patients with reactivation; most common were disseminated disease and postherpetic neuralgia. No single low-risk group for VZV reactivation could be identified. We conclude that VZV reactivation remains common after HSCT and carries a high complication rate, warranting prophylaxis.

  3. Phosphorylation of varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein gpI by mammalian casein kinase II and casein kinase I

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, C.; Jackson, W. ); Traugh, J.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) glycoprotein gpI is the predominant viral glycoprotein within the plasma membranes of infected cells. This viral glycoprotein is phosphorylated on its polypeptide backbone during biosynthesis. In this report, the authors investigated the protein kinases which participate in the phosphorylation events. Under in vivo conditions, VZV gpI was phosphorylated on its serine and threonine residues by protein kinases present within lysates of either VZV-infected or uninfected cells. Because this activity was diminished by heparin, a known inhibitor of casein kinase II, isolated gpI was incubated with purified casein kinase II and shown to be phosphorylated in an in vitro assay containing ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP. The same glycoprotein was phosphorylated when ({sup 32}P)GTP was substituted for ({sup 32}P)ATP in the protein kinase assay. They also tested whether VZV gpI was phosphorylated by two other ubiquitous mammalian protein kinases--casein kinase I and cyclic AMP-dependent kinase--and found that only casein kinase I modified gpI. When the predicted 623-amino-acid sequence of gpI was examined, two phosphorylation sites known to be optimal for casein kinase II were observed. In summary, this study showed that VZV gpI was phosphorylated by each of two mammalian protein kinases (casein kinase I and casein kinase II) and that potential serine-threonine phosphorylation sites for each of these two kinases were present in the viral glycoprotein.

  4. An In Vitro Model of Latency and Reactivation of Varicella Zoster Virus in Human Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Markus, Amos; Lebenthal-Loinger, Ilana; Yang, In Hong; Kinchington, Paul R.; Goldstein, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) latency in sensory and autonomic neurons has remained enigmatic and difficult to study, and experimental reactivation has not yet been achieved. We have previously shown that human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived neurons are permissive to a productive and spreading VZV infection. We now demonstrate that hESC-derived neurons can also host a persistent non-productive infection lasting for weeks which can subsequently be reactivated by multiple experimental stimuli. Quiescent infections were established by exposing neurons to low titer cell-free VZV either by using acyclovir or by infection of axons in compartmented microfluidic chambers without acyclovir. VZV DNA and low levels of viral transcription were detectable by qPCR for up to seven weeks. Quiescently-infected human neuronal cultures were induced to undergo renewed viral gene and protein expression by growth factor removal or by inhibition of PI3-Kinase activity. Strikingly, incubation of cultures induced to reactivate at a lower temperature (34°C) resulted in enhanced VZV reactivation, resulting in spreading, productive infections. Comparison of VZV genome transcription in quiescently-infected to productively-infected neurons using RNASeq revealed preferential transcription from specific genome regions, especially the duplicated regions. These experiments establish a powerful new system for modeling the VZV latent state, and reveal a potential role for temperature in VZV reactivation and disease. PMID:26042814

  5. MENINGOENCEPHALITIS DUE TO VARICELLA ZOSTER VIRUS IN AIDS PATIENTS. REPORT OF ELEVEN CASES AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    PubMed Central

    CORTI, Marcelo; VILLAFAÑE, María F.; VITTAR, Natalia; BANCO, María C.; PRIARONE, Maia; MAMMANA, Lilia; GILARDI, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Neurological complications of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) are infrequent and include various clinical pictures. The reactivation of VZV in patients with AIDS is generally associated with an acute and severe meningoencephalitis. We report the epidemiological, clinical and virological data from 11 consecutive patients with diagnosis of HIV/AIDS and central nervous system (CNS) involvement due to VZV. All patients were male and seropositive for HIV. The primary risk factor for HIV infection was unprotected sexual contact. The median of CD4 T cell count was 142 cells/µL. All of them presented signs and symptoms of meningoencephalitis. Six patients (54.5%) presented pleocytosis; they all showed high CSF protein concentrations with a median of 2.1 g/dL. Polymerase chain reaction of cerebrospinal fluid specimen was positive for VZV in all of them and they were treated with intravenous acyclovir at doses of 30/mg/kg/day for 21 days. Overall survival was 63% (7 of 11 patients). The four dead patients had low cellular counts in CSF, below the median of this parameter. VZV should be included among the opportunistic pathogens that can involve CNS with a diffuse and severe meningoencephalitis in patients with advanced HIV/AIDS disease. PMID:27049704

  6. Induction of neutralizing antibodies by varicella-zoster virus gpII glycoprotein expressed from recombinant vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Massaer, M; Haumont, M; Place, M; Bollen, A; Jacobs, P

    1993-03-01

    The gpII glycoprotein of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) was produced in CV1 cells via vaccinia virus recombinants. Two different DNA constructs were expressed: the first one encodes the complete gpII protein (gpII s+a+) and the second a truncated species lacking the membrane anchorage domain (gpII s+a-). To achieve expression both coding sequences had to be engineered at the 5' end by substituting the unusually short (24 bp) natural signal sequence by a more conventional one encoding 29 amino acids. Recombinant gpII proteins were detected in vaccinia virus-infected cells by ELISA and immunoprecipitation. Both forms of recombinant gpII proteins were produced as glycosylated single-chain molecules of respectively 110K and 90K. Upon reduction these were only partially converted into subunits. A rabbit infected with the vaccinia virus recombinant expressing the complete gpII produced antibodies which recognized VZV antigens and neutralized VZV infectivity in vitro, independent of complement.

  7. Direct Transfer of Viral and Cellular Proteins from Varicella-Zoster Virus-Infected Non-Neuronal Cells to Human Axons

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryan, Sergei; Yee, Michael B; Glick, Yair; Gerber, Doron; Kepten, Eldad; Garini, Yuval; Yang, In Hong; Kinchington, Paul R.; Goldstein, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV), the alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection and Herpes zoster (shingles) following reactivation in latently infected neurons, is known to be fusogenic. It forms polynuclear syncytia in culture, in varicella skin lesions and in infected fetal human ganglia xenografted to mice. After axonal infection using VZV expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in compartmentalized microfluidic cultures there is diffuse filling of axons with GFP as well as punctate fluorescence corresponding to capsids. Use of viruses with fluorescent fusions to VZV proteins reveals that both proteins encoded by VZV genes and those of the infecting cell are transferred in bulk from infecting non-neuronal cells to axons. Similar transfer of protein to axons was observed following cell associated HSV1 infection. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments provide evidence that this transfer is by diffusion of proteins from the infecting cells into axons. Time-lapse movies and immunocytochemical experiments in co-cultures demonstrate that non-neuronal cells fuse with neuronal somata and proteins from both cell types are present in the syncytia formed. The fusogenic nature of VZV therefore may enable not only conventional entry of virions and capsids into axonal endings in the skin by classical entry mechanisms, but also by cytoplasmic fusion that permits viral protein transfer to neurons in bulk. PMID:25973990

  8. [Clinical and Epidemiological Study of Complicated Infection by Varicella-Zoster Virus in the Pediatric Age].

    PubMed

    Maia, Catarina; Fonseca, Jacinta; Carvalho, Isabel; Santos, Helena; Moreira, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: Em Portugal, a incidência da infeção complicada por vírus varicela-zoster e respetivos custos é desconhecida. O objetivo deste estudo foi descrever as características clinico-epidemiológicas dos doentes em idade pediátrica internados com o diagnóstico de infeção complicada por vírus varicela-zoster. Material e Métodos: Estudo descritivo, baseado na análise dos processos clínicos dos doentes internados entre janeiro de 1999 e julho de 2013, com diagnóstico de infeção complicada por vírus varicela-zoster. Resultados: Foram internados 94 doentes por infeção complicada a vírus varicela-zoster, dois por reativação de infeção latente. A mediana da idade foi 38 (IQR 18 - 65) meses. As complicações mais frequentes foram as infeciosas (70,2%), destacando-se a sobreinfeção bacteriana da pele/tecido celular subcut'neo (37,2%) e as complicações respiratórias (24,5%). Seguiram-se as complicações neurológicas (19,1%), gastrointestinais (9,6%), hematológicas (5,3%) e osteoarticulares (4,3%). Diagnosticaram-se 38 (40,4%) infeções bacterianas invasivas, seis com bacteriemia. A mediana da idade na admissão foi mais elevada nas complicações imunológicas relativamente às complicações infeciosas. As complicações neurológicas ocorreram preferencialmente em crianças saudáveis, enquanto as complicações infeciosas, nomeadamente as infeções bacterianas invasivas foram mais frequentes nos doentes medicados com ibuprofeno e/ou corticoide. A evolução foi favorável na maioria dos casos. Discussão: As complicações da infeção pelo vírus varicela-zoster ocorreram preferencialmente em idade pré-escolar e doentes saudáveis. As complicações infeciosas, nomeadamente as dermatológicas e respiratórias, foram as mais frequentes, tendo sido verificada associação com a terapêutica prévia com ibuprofeno e /ou corticoide.Conclusão: Estudos multicêntricos deverão ser planeados com o intuito de otimizar e ajustar as

  9. Recombinant glycoprotein E produced in mammalian cells in large-scale as an antigen for varicella-zoster-virus serology.

    PubMed

    Thomsson, Elisabeth; Persson, Linn; Grahn, Anna; Snäll, Johanna; Ekblad, Maria; Brunhage, Eva; Svensson, Frida; Jern, Christina; Hansson, Gunnar C; Bäckström, Malin; Bergström, Tomas

    2011-07-01

    A recombinant glycoprotein E (gE) from varicella-zoster virus (VZV) was generated and produced in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, in the development of a specific antigen for analysis of IgG antibodies to VZV. Several stable gE-secreting clones were established and one clone was adapted to growth in serum-free suspension culture. When the cells were cultured in a perfusion bioreactor, gE was secreted into the medium, from where it could be easily purified. The recombinant gE was then evaluated as a serological antigen in ELISA. When compared to a conventional whole virus antigen, the VZV gE showed similar results in ELISA-based seroprevalence studies of 854 samples derived from blood donors, students, ischemic stroke patients and their controls, including samples with border-line results in previous analyses. Eight samples (0.9%) were discordant, all being IgG-negative by the VZV gE ELISA and positive by the whole virus ELISA. The sensitivity and specificity of the VZV gE ELISA were 99.9% and 100%, respectively, compared to 100% and 88.9% for the VZV whole virus ELISA. The elderly subjects showed similar reactivities to both antigens, while VZV gE gave lower signals in the younger cohorts, suggesting that antibodies to gE may increase with age. It was concluded that the recombinant VZV gE from CHO cells was suitable as a serological antigen for the detection of IgG antibodies specific for VZV.

  10. An immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif in varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein B regulates cell fusion and skin pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Stefan L; Brady, Jennifer J; Sommer, Marvin H; Reichelt, Mike; Sung, Phillip; Blau, Helen M; Arvin, Ann M

    2013-01-29

    Herpesvirus entry functions of the conserved glycoproteins gB and gH-gL have been delineated, but their role in regulating cell-cell fusion is poorly understood. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection provides a valuable model for investigating cell-cell fusion because of the importance of this process for pathogenesis in human skin and sensory ganglia. The present study identifies a canonical immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) in the gB cytoplasmic domain (gBcyt) and demonstrates that the gBcyt is a tyrosine kinase substrate. Orbitrap mass spectrometry confirmed that Y881, central to the ITIM, is phosphorylated. To determine whether the gBcyt ITIM regulates gB/gH-gL-induced cell-cell fusion in vitro, tyrosine residues Y881 and Y920 in the gBcyt were substituted with phenylalanine separately or together. Recombinant viruses with these substitutions were generated to establish their effects on syncytia formation in replication in vitro and in the human skin xenograft model of VZV pathogenesis. The Y881F substitution caused significantly increased cell-cell fusion despite reduced cell-surface gB. Importantly, the Y881F or Y881/920F substitutions in VZV caused aggressive syncytia formation, reducing cell-cell spread. These in vitro effects of aggressive syncytia formation translated to severely impaired skin infection in vivo. In contrast, the Y920F substitution did not affect virus replication in vitro or in vivo. These observations suggest that gB modulates cell-cell fusion via an ITIM-mediated Y881 phosphorylation-dependent mechanism, supporting a unique concept that intracellular signaling through this gBcyt motif regulates VZV syncytia formation and is essential for skin pathogenesis.

  11. Intracellular localization of varicella-zoster virus ORF39 protein and its functional relationship to glycoprotein K

    SciTech Connect

    Govero, Jennifer; Hall, Susan; Heineman, Thomas C. . E-mail: heinemtc@slu.edu

    2007-02-20

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) encodes two multiply inserted membrane proteins, open reading frame (ORF) 39 protein (ORF39p) and glycoprotein K (gK). The HSV-1 homologs of these proteins are believed to act in conjunction with each other during viral egress and cell-cell fusion, and they directly influence each other's intracellular trafficking. However, ORF39p and VZV gK have received very limited study largely due to difficulties in producing antibodies to these highly hydrophobic proteins. To overcome this obstacle, we introduced epitope tags into both ORF39p and gK and examined their intracellular distributions in transfected and infected cells. Our data demonstrate that both ORF39p and gK accumulate predominately in the ER of cultured cells when expressed in the absence of other VZV proteins or when coexpressed in isolation from other VZV proteins. Therefore, the transport of VZV ORF39p and gK does not exhibit the functional interdependence seen in their HSV-1 homologs. However, during infection, the primary distributions of ORF39p and gK shift from the ER to the Golgi, and they are also found in the plasma membrane indicating that their intracellular trafficking during infection depends on other VZV-encoded proteins. During infection, ORF39p and gK tightly colocalize with VZV envelope glycoproteins B, E and H; however, the coexpression of ORF39p or gK with other individual viral glycoproteins is insufficient to alter the transport of either ORF39p or gK.

  12. PROTECTIVE LEVELS OF VARICELLA-ZOSTER ANTIBODY DID NOT EFFECTIVELY PREVENT CHICKENPOX IN AN X-LINKED AGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA PATIENT.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Fernanda Aimée; Gonzalez, Isabela Garrido da Silva; de Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of an eight-year-old boy with X-linked agammaglobulinemia who developed mild varicella despite regular intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He maintained protective antibody levels against varicella and the previous batches of IVIG that he received had adequate varicella-specific IgG levels. The case illustrates that IVIG may not prevent VZV infection.

  13. PROTECTIVE LEVELS OF VARICELLA-ZOSTER ANTIBODY DID NOT EFFECTIVELY PREVENT CHICKENPOX IN AN X-LINKED AGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA PATIENT.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Fernanda Aimée; Gonzalez, Isabela Garrido da Silva; de Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of an eight-year-old boy with X-linked agammaglobulinemia who developed mild varicella despite regular intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He maintained protective antibody levels against varicella and the previous batches of IVIG that he received had adequate varicella-specific IgG levels. The case illustrates that IVIG may not prevent VZV infection. PMID:26603238

  14. Herpes zoster

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Ravi Prakash Sasankoti; Verma, Sankalp; Singh, Udita; Agarwal, Neha

    2013-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) or ‘shingles’ is a painful vesicular rash resulting from reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus that also causes chickenpox. The incidence of HZ infection (HZI) increases with age and the degree of immunosuppresssion. Post herpetic neuralgia, the most common complication of HZ, occurs after the zoster rash has resolved. Conventional therapies include antivirals, corticosteroids and analgesics, both oral and topical. Here we report a case of HZ in an 80-year-old woman involving maxillary nerve and the article also reviews various treatment modalities available for the management of HZI. PMID:23771975

  15. A site of varicella-zoster virus vulnerability identified by structural studies of neutralizing antibodies bound to the glycoprotein complex gHgL.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yi; Oliver, Stefan L; Nguyen, TuongVi; Ciferri, Claudio; Nandi, Avishek; Hickman, Julie; Giovani, Cinzia; Yang, Edward; Palladino, Giuseppe; Grose, Charles; Uematsu, Yasushi; Lilja, Anders E; Arvin, Ann M; Carfí, Andrea

    2015-05-12

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV), of the family Alphaherpesvirinae, causes varicella in children and young adults, potentially leading to herpes zoster later in life on reactivation from latency. The conserved herpesvirus glycoprotein gB and the heterodimer gHgL mediate virion envelope fusion with cell membranes during virus entry. Naturally occurring neutralizing antibodies against herpesviruses target these entry proteins. To determine the molecular basis for VZV neutralization, crystal structures of gHgL were determined in complex with fragments of antigen binding (Fabs) from two human monoclonal antibodies, IgG-94 and IgG-RC, isolated from seropositive subjects. These structures reveal that the antibodies target the same site, composed of residues from both gH and gL, distinct from two other neutralizing epitopes identified by negative-stain electron microscopy and mutational analysis. Inhibition of gB/gHgL-mediated membrane fusion and structural comparisons with herpesvirus homologs suggest that the IgG-RC/94 epitope is in proximity to the site on VZV gHgL that activates gB. Immunization studies proved that the anti-gHgL IgG-RC/94 epitope is a critical target for antibodies that neutralize VZV. Thus, the gHgL/Fab structures delineate a site of herpesvirus vulnerability targeted by natural immunity.

  16. A site of varicella-zoster virus vulnerability identified by structural studies of neutralizing antibodies bound to the glycoprotein complex gHgL

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yi; Oliver, Stefan L.; Nguyen, TuongVi; Ciferri, Claudio; Nandi, Avishek; Hickman, Julie; Giovani, Cinzia; Yang, Edward; Palladino, Giuseppe; Grose, Charles; Uematsu, Yasushi; Lilja, Anders E.; Arvin, Ann M.; Carfí, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV), of the family Alphaherpesvirinae, causes varicella in children and young adults, potentially leading to herpes zoster later in life on reactivation from latency. The conserved herpesvirus glycoprotein gB and the heterodimer gHgL mediate virion envelope fusion with cell membranes during virus entry. Naturally occurring neutralizing antibodies against herpesviruses target these entry proteins. To determine the molecular basis for VZV neutralization, crystal structures of gHgL were determined in complex with fragments of antigen binding (Fabs) from two human monoclonal antibodies, IgG-94 and IgG-RC, isolated from seropositive subjects. These structures reveal that the antibodies target the same site, composed of residues from both gH and gL, distinct from two other neutralizing epitopes identified by negative-stain electron microscopy and mutational analysis. Inhibition of gB/gHgL-mediated membrane fusion and structural comparisons with herpesvirus homologs suggest that the IgG-RC/94 epitope is in proximity to the site on VZV gHgL that activates gB. Immunization studies proved that the anti-gHgL IgG-RC/94 epitope is a critical target for antibodies that neutralize VZV. Thus, the gHgL/Fab structures delineate a site of herpesvirus vulnerability targeted by natural immunity. PMID:25918416

  17. A site of varicella-zoster virus vulnerability identified by structural studies of neutralizing antibodies bound to the glycoprotein complex gHgL.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yi; Oliver, Stefan L; Nguyen, TuongVi; Ciferri, Claudio; Nandi, Avishek; Hickman, Julie; Giovani, Cinzia; Yang, Edward; Palladino, Giuseppe; Grose, Charles; Uematsu, Yasushi; Lilja, Anders E; Arvin, Ann M; Carfí, Andrea

    2015-05-12

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV), of the family Alphaherpesvirinae, causes varicella in children and young adults, potentially leading to herpes zoster later in life on reactivation from latency. The conserved herpesvirus glycoprotein gB and the heterodimer gHgL mediate virion envelope fusion with cell membranes during virus entry. Naturally occurring neutralizing antibodies against herpesviruses target these entry proteins. To determine the molecular basis for VZV neutralization, crystal structures of gHgL were determined in complex with fragments of antigen binding (Fabs) from two human monoclonal antibodies, IgG-94 and IgG-RC, isolated from seropositive subjects. These structures reveal that the antibodies target the same site, composed of residues from both gH and gL, distinct from two other neutralizing epitopes identified by negative-stain electron microscopy and mutational analysis. Inhibition of gB/gHgL-mediated membrane fusion and structural comparisons with herpesvirus homologs suggest that the IgG-RC/94 epitope is in proximity to the site on VZV gHgL that activates gB. Immunization studies proved that the anti-gHgL IgG-RC/94 epitope is a critical target for antibodies that neutralize VZV. Thus, the gHgL/Fab structures delineate a site of herpesvirus vulnerability targeted by natural immunity. PMID:25918416

  18. Neuronal Subtype and Satellite Cell Tropism Are Determinants of Varicella-Zoster Virus Virulence in Human Dorsal Root Ganglia Xenografts In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zerboni, Leigh; Arvin, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV), a human alphaherpesvirus, causes varicella during primary infection. VZV reactivation from neuronal latency may cause herpes zoster, post herpetic neuralgia (PHN) and other neurologic syndromes. To investigate VZV neuropathogenesis, we developed a model using human dorsal root ganglia (DRG) xenografts in immunodeficient (SCID) mice. The SCID DRG model provides an opportunity to examine characteristics of VZV infection that occur in the context of the specialized architecture of DRG, in which nerve cell bodies are ensheathed by satellite glial cells (SGC) which support neuronal homeostasis. We hypothesized that VZV exhibits neuron-subtype specific tropism and that VZV tropism for SGC contributes to VZV-related ganglionopathy. Based on quantitative analyses of viral and cell protein expression in DRG tissue sections, we demonstrated that, whereas DRG neurons had an immature neuronal phenotype prior to implantation, subtype heterogeneity was observed within 20 weeks and SGC retained the capacity to maintain neuronal homeostasis longterm. Profiling VZV protein expression in DRG neurons showed that VZV enters peripherin+ nociceptive and RT97+ mechanoreceptive neurons by both axonal transport and contiguous spread from SGC, but replication in RT97+ neurons is blocked. Restriction occurs even when the SGC surrounding the neuronal cell body were infected and after entry and ORF61 expression, but before IE62 or IE63 protein expression. Notably, although contiguous VZV spread with loss of SGC support would be predicted to affect survival of both nociceptive and mechanoreceptive neurons, RT97+ neurons showed selective loss relative to peripherin+ neurons at later times in DRG infection. Profiling cell factors that were upregulated in VZV-infected DRG indicated that VZV infection induced marked pro-inflammatory responses, as well as proteins of the interferon pathway and neuroprotective responses. These neuropathologic changes observed in sensory

  19. Deep Sequencing of Distinct Preparations of the Live Attenuated Varicella-Zoster Virus Vaccine Reveals a Conserved Core of Attenuating Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Yamanishi, Koichi; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Gershon, Anne A.; Breuer, Judith

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The continued success of the live attenuated varicella-zoster virus vaccine in preventing varicella-zoster and herpes zoster is well documented, as are many of the mutations that contribute to the attenuation of the vOka virus for replication in skin. At least three different preparations of vOka are marketed. Here, we show using deep sequencing of seven batches of vOka vaccine (including ZostaVax, VariVax, VarilRix, and the Oka/Biken working seed) from three different manufacturers (VariVax, GSK, and Biken) that 137 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mutations are present in all vaccine batches. This includes six sites at which the vaccine allele is fixed or near fixation, which we speculate are likely to be important for attenuation. We also show that despite differences in the vaccine populations between preparations, batch-to-batch variation is minimal, as is the number and frequency of mutations unique to individual batches. This suggests that the vaccine manufacturing processes are not introducing new mutations and that, notwithstanding the mixture of variants present, VZV live vaccines are extremely stable. IMPORTANCE The continued success of vaccinations to prevent chickenpox and shingles, combined with the extremely low incidence of adverse reactions, indicates the quality of these vaccines. The vaccine itself is comprised of a heterogeneous live attenuated virus population and thus requires deep-sequencing technologies to explore the differences and similarities in the virus populations between different preparations and batches of the vaccines. Our data demonstrate minimal variation between batches, an important safety feature, and provide new insights into the extent of the mutations present in this attenuated virus. PMID:27440875

  20. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and survivin induction by varicella-zoster virus promote replication and skin pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sen, Nandini; Che, Xibing; Rajamani, Jaya; Zerboni, Leigh; Sung, Phillip; Ptacek, Jason; Arvin, Ann M

    2012-01-10

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human α-herpesvirus that causes varicella (chickenpox) during primary infection and zoster (shingles) upon reactivation. Like other viruses, VZV must subvert the intrinsic antiviral defenses of differentiated human cells to produce progeny virions. Accordingly, VZV inhibits the activation of the cellular transcription factors IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1), thereby downregulating antiviral factors, including IFNs. Conversely, in this study, we found that VZV triggers STAT3 phosphorylation in cells infected in vitro and in human skin xenografts in SCID mice in vivo and that STAT3 activation induces the anti-apoptotic protein survivin. Small-molecule inhibitors of STAT3 phosphorylation and survivin restrict VZV replication in vitro, and VZV infection of skin xenografts in vivo is markedly impaired by the administration of the phospho-STAT3 inhibitor S3I-201. STAT3 and survivin are required for malignant transformation caused by γ-herpesviruses, such as Kaposi's sarcoma virus. We show that STAT3 activation is also critical for VZV, a nononcogenic herpesvirus, via a survivin-dependent mechanism. Furthermore, STAT3 activation is critical for the life cycle of the virus because VZV skin infection is necessary for viral transmission and persistence in the human population. Therefore, we conclude that takeover of this major cell-signaling pathway is necessary, independent of cell transformation, for herpesvirus pathogenesis and that STAT3 activation and up-regulation of survivin is a common mechanism important for the pathogenesis of lytic as well as tumorigenic herpesviruses.

  1. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and survivin induction by varicella-zoster virus promote replication and skin pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sen, Nandini; Che, Xibing; Rajamani, Jaya; Zerboni, Leigh; Sung, Phillip; Ptacek, Jason; Arvin, Ann M

    2012-01-10

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human α-herpesvirus that causes varicella (chickenpox) during primary infection and zoster (shingles) upon reactivation. Like other viruses, VZV must subvert the intrinsic antiviral defenses of differentiated human cells to produce progeny virions. Accordingly, VZV inhibits the activation of the cellular transcription factors IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1), thereby downregulating antiviral factors, including IFNs. Conversely, in this study, we found that VZV triggers STAT3 phosphorylation in cells infected in vitro and in human skin xenografts in SCID mice in vivo and that STAT3 activation induces the anti-apoptotic protein survivin. Small-molecule inhibitors of STAT3 phosphorylation and survivin restrict VZV replication in vitro, and VZV infection of skin xenografts in vivo is markedly impaired by the administration of the phospho-STAT3 inhibitor S3I-201. STAT3 and survivin are required for malignant transformation caused by γ-herpesviruses, such as Kaposi's sarcoma virus. We show that STAT3 activation is also critical for VZV, a nononcogenic herpesvirus, via a survivin-dependent mechanism. Furthermore, STAT3 activation is critical for the life cycle of the virus because VZV skin infection is necessary for viral transmission and persistence in the human population. Therefore, we conclude that takeover of this major cell-signaling pathway is necessary, independent of cell transformation, for herpesvirus pathogenesis and that STAT3 activation and up-regulation of survivin is a common mechanism important for the pathogenesis of lytic as well as tumorigenic herpesviruses. PMID:22190485

  2. Arsenic Exposure and Prevalence of the Varicella Zoster Virus in the United States: NHANES (2003–2004 and 2009–2010)

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, Andres; Smit, Ellen; Houseman, E. Andres; Kerkvliet, Nancy I.; Bethel, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Arsenic is an immunotoxicant. Clinical reports observe the reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV) in people who have recovered from arsenic poisoning and in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia that have been treated with arsenic trioxide. Objective We evaluated the association between arsenic and the seroprevalence of VZV IgG antibody in a representative sample of the U.S. population. Methods We analyzed data from 3,348 participants of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003–2004 and 2009–2010 pooled survey cycles. Participants were eligible if they were 6–49 years of age with information on both VZV IgG and urinary arsenic concentrations. We used two measures of total urinary arsenic (TUA): TUA1 was defined as the sum of arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid, and dimethylarsinic acid, and TUA2 was defined as total urinary arsenic minus arsenobetaine and arsenocholine. Results The overall weighted seronegative prevalence of VZV was 2.2% for the pooled NHANES sample. The geometric means of TUA1 and TUA2 were 6.57 μg/L and 5.64 μg/L, respectively. After adjusting for age, sex, race, income, creatinine, and survey cycle, odds ratios for a negative VZV IgG result in association with 1-unit increases in natural log-transformed (ln)-TUA1 and ln-TUA2 were 1.87 (95% CI: 1.03, 3.44) and 1.40 (95% CI: 1.0, 1.97), respectively. Conclusions In this cross-sectional analysis, urinary arsenic was inversely associated with VZV IgG seroprevalence in the U.S. population. This finding is in accordance with clinical observations of zoster virus reactivation from high doses of arsenic. Additional studies are needed to confirm the association and evaluate causal mechanisms. Citation Cardenas A, Smit E, Houseman EA, Kerkvliet NI, Bethel JW, Kile ML. 2015. Arsenic exposure and prevalence of the varicella zoster virus in the United States: NHANES (2003–2004 and 2009–2010). Environ Health Perspect 123:590–596;

  3. Antibody-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays that use enzyme-labelled antigen for detection of virus-specific immunoglobulin M, A and G in patients with varicella or herpes zoster.

    PubMed Central

    van Loon, A. M.; van der Logt, J. T.; Heessen, F. W.; Heeren, M. C.; Zoll, J.

    1992-01-01

    Antibody-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (AC-ELISA) which use enzyme-labelled antigen were developed for detection of varicella-zoster virus-(VZV) specific IgM, IgA and IgG antibody in patients with varicella or herpes zoster and in sera from healthy individuals. All 18 patients with varicella developed a VZV-IgM and a VZV-IgG response, 17 also a VZV-IgA response. In contrast, all 19 patients with herpes zoster were shown to be positive for VZV-IgA whereas only 13 of these reacted positively for VZV-IgM. A VZV-IgM response was detected in only two sera from 100 healthy individuals and an IgA response in only one. The presence of virus-specific IgA and IgG in the cerebrospinal fluid as determined by AC-ELISA was a useful indicator of VZV infection of the central nervous system. By AC-ELISA, VZV-IgG was detected predominantly in sera from patients with acute or recent VZV infection. Only 14 sera from 100 healthy individuals were positive for VZV-IgG by AC-ELISA, whereas all were positive by an indirect ELISA. These results indicate that AC-ELISA's may be useful assays for determination for acute or recurrent VZV infection, but are not suitable for determination of past infection with this virus. PMID:1312479

  4. Structural analysis of the varicella-zoster virus gp98-gp62 complex: posttranslational addition of N-linked and O-linked oligosaccharide moieties.

    PubMed

    Montalvo, E A; Parmley, R T; Grose, C

    1985-03-01

    Varicella-zoster virus specifies the formation of several glycoproteins, including the preponderant gp98-gp62 glycoprotein complex in the outer membranes of virus-infected cells. These viral glycoproteins are recognized and precipitated by a previously described monoclonal antibody designated monoclone 3B3. When an immunoblot analysis was performed, only gp98 was reactive with monoclone 3B3 antibody; likewise, titration in the presence of increased concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulfate during antigen-antibody incubations caused selective precipitation of gp98 but not gp62. Further structural analyses of gp98 were performed by using the glycosidases endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H (endoglycosidase H) and neuraminidase and two inhibitors of glycosylation (tunicamycin and monensin). In addition to gp98, antibody 3B3 reacted with several intermediate products, including gp90, gp88, gp81, and a nonglycosylated polypeptide, p73. Since gp98 was completely resistant to digestion with endoglycosidase H, it contained only complex carbohydrate moieties; conversely, gp81 contained mainly high-mannose residues. Polypeptide p73 was immunodetected in the presence of tunicamycin and designated as a nascent recipient of N-linked sugars, whereas gp88 was considered to contain O-linked oligosaccharides because its synthesis was not affected by tunicamycin. The ionophore monensin inhibited production of mature gp98, but other intermediate forms, including gp90, were detected. Since the latter product was similar in molecular weight to the desialated form of gp98, one effect of monensin treatment of varicella-zoster virus-infected cells was to block the addition of N-acetylneuraminic acid. Monensin also blocked insertion of gp98 into the plasma membrane and, as determined by electron microscopy, inhibited envelopment of the nucleocapsid and its transport within the cytoplasm. On the basis of this study, we reached the following conclusions: the primary antibody 3B3-binding

  5. High-level cellular and humoral immune responses in Guinea pigs immunized intradermally with a heat-inactivated varicella-zoster virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sarkadi, Julia; Jankovics, Mate; Fodor, Kinga; Kis, Zoltan; Takacs, Maria; Visontai, Ildiko; Jankovics, Istvan; Gonczol, Eva

    2015-05-01

    The threat of varicella and herpes zoster in immunocompromised individuals necessitates the development of a safe and effective varicella-zoster virus (VZV) vaccine. The immune responses of guinea pigs to the intradermal (i.d.) or subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of a heat-inactivated or live VZV vaccine were investigated. Relative to nonimmunized animals, a single 399-PFU dose of vaccine induced nonsignificant increases in gamma interferon (IFN-γ), granzyme B, and perforin mRNA expression in the splenocytes of all groups, while two i.d. administrations of the inactivated vaccine increased IFN-γ mRNA expression significantly (P < 0.005). A single 1,995-PFU dose significantly increased the expression of IFN-γ mRNA in the groups receiving the vaccine either i.d. (P < 0.005) or s.c. (P < 0.05), that of granzyme B mRNA in the groups immunized i.d. with the inactivated (P < 0.005) or live (P < 0.005) vaccine, and that of perforin mRNA in the animals that received the inactivated vaccine i.d. (P < 0.005). Importantly, increases in the expression of IFN-γ (P = 0.025), granzyme B (P = 0.004), and perforin (P > 0.05) mRNAs were observed in the animals immunized i.d. with 1,995 PFU of inactivated vaccine relative to those immunized s.c. with the same dose. The proportion of animals expressing IFN-γ mRNA mirrored the proportion expressing IFN-γ protein (correlation coefficient of 0.88). VZV glycoprotein-specific and virus-neutralizing antibodies were produced with no significant intergroup differences. A booster i.d. administration of the 399-PFU dose of heat-inactivated vaccine enhanced the antibody responses. These results demonstrate that i.d. administration of an inactivated VZV vaccine can be an efficient mode of immunization against VZV.

  6. Enforced expression of microRNA-21 influences the replication of varicella-zoster virus by triggering signal transducer and activator of transcription 3.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wu, Rina; Liu, Zhongrong; Fan, Jianyong; Yang, Huilan

    2014-05-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes chronic pain and serious complications, including zoster paresis. However, the mechanism of VZV replication, a critical part of VZV pathogenesis, remains largely unknown and was investigated in the present study. The upregulation of microRNA-21 (miR-21) was identified following VZV infection in vitro by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The hypothesis that the overexpression of miR-21 activates the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway was validated by measuring the mRNA expression levels of STAT3 and the anti-apoptotic protein survivin in human malignant melanoma (MeWo) and human embryonic lung fibroblast (HELF) cell lines transfected with miR-21-mimic and comparing them with those in cells transfected with miR-control. To further study the interaction of miR-21, STAT3 and VZV replication, the effects of miR-21 overexpression and STAT3 knockdown were evaluated. Higher virus titers were detected when miR-21 was upregulated in vitro. Moreover, it was identified that significantly lower virus titers were present in MeWo cells in which STAT3 was knocked down. In addition, the overexpression of miR-21 did not stimulate VZV replication in the MeWo cell line when the STAT3 gene was silenced. Therefore, the observations of the present study indicate that the enforced expression of miR-21 promotes the replication of VZV by activating STAT3 in vitro.

  7. Safety and immunogenicity of an AS01-adjuvanted varicella zoster virus subunit candidate vaccine (HZ/su): a phase-I, open-label study in Japanese adults.

    PubMed

    Lal, Himal; Zahaf, Toufik; Heineman, Thomas C

    2013-07-01

    An adjuvanted recombinant subunit candidate vaccine (HZ/su) containing varicella zoster virus envelope glycoprotein E was developed for the prevention of herpes zoster and its complications. This study evaluated safety and reactogenicity of HZ/su in an ethnic Japanese population. This was a phase I, open-label and single-center study conducted between March and November of 2010 in Australia. Twenty healthy ethnic Japanese subjects, aged 18-30 y and 50-69 y (1:1) were enrolled. Subjects were administered two doses of HZ/su vaccine according to a 0, 2-mo schedule. Local and general solicited symptoms were recorded for 7 d post-vaccination. Unsolicited symptoms were recorded for 30 d post-vaccination. Serious adverse events (SAEs), new onset of autoimmune disease (NOAD), other potential immune mediated disorders and HZ cases were recorded throughout the study period. All 20 subjects were included in the according-to-protocol cohort for safety. A total of 18 subjects were included in the according-to-protocol cohort for immunogenicity: 10 in the 18-30 y age group and 8 in the 50-69 y age group. The most commonly reported local and general solicited symptoms were pain and fatigue in both groups. Back pain (in the 18-30 y age group) and chills (in the 50-69 y age group) were the most frequently reported unsolicited symptoms. There were no reports of death, SAEs, NOADs, other autoimmune mediated inflammatory disorder or suspected HZ cases. This study indicated that the two-dose regimen of HZ/su exhibited a clinically acceptable safety profile in healthy young and older ethnic Japanese adults.

  8. A phase 1/2 study of an adjuvanted varicella-zoster virus subunit vaccine in autologous hematopoietic cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Keith M.; Marty, Francisco M.; Dadwal, Sanjeet S.; Papanicolaou, Genovefa A.; Shea, Thomas C.; Mossad, Sherif B.; Andreadis, Charalambos; Young, Jo-Anne H.; Buadi, Francis K.; El Idrissi, Mohamed; Heineman, Thomas C.; Berkowitz, Elchonon M.

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant herpes zoster (HZ) vaccines may be an alternative to the live-attenuated HZ vaccine for immunocompromised individuals. This was a phase 1/2, randomized, observer-blind, placebo-controlled study in adults with multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B- or T-cell), Hodgkin lymphoma, or acute myeloid leukemia who had undergone autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplant 50 to 70 days earlier. Subjects (N = 121) were randomized 1:1:1:1 to receive (at months 0, 1, 3) three doses of 50 μg varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein E (gE) adjuvanted with AS01B, 3 doses of gE adjuvanted with AS01E, 1 dose of saline followed by 2 doses of gE/AS01B, or 3 doses of saline. One month after the last dose (6 months after transplant), frequencies of CD4+ T cells expressing ≥2 activation markers after induction with gE and anti-gE antibody concentrations were higher with all gE/AS01 regimens than with saline. Both responses persisted up to 1 year in subjects vaccinated with gE/AS01. Immune responses were higher in the gE/AS01B 3-dose group than in the gE/AS01B 2-dose group but not higher than in the gE/AS01E 3-dose group. One serious adverse event (pneumonia) was considered vaccine related. Both formulations and both schedules were immunogenic and well tolerated in this population. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00920218. PMID:25237196

  9. A phase 1/2 study of an adjuvanted varicella-zoster virus subunit vaccine in autologous hematopoietic cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Stadtmauer, Edward A; Sullivan, Keith M; Marty, Francisco M; Dadwal, Sanjeet S; Papanicolaou, Genovefa A; Shea, Thomas C; Mossad, Sherif B; Andreadis, Charalambos; Young, Jo-Anne H; Buadi, Francis K; El Idrissi, Mohamed; Heineman, Thomas C; Berkowitz, Elchonon M

    2014-11-01

    Recombinant herpes zoster (HZ) vaccines may be an alternative to the live-attenuated HZ vaccine for immunocompromised individuals. This was a phase 1/2, randomized, observer-blind, placebo-controlled study in adults with multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B- or T-cell), Hodgkin lymphoma, or acute myeloid leukemia who had undergone autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplant 50 to 70 days earlier. Subjects (N = 121) were randomized 1:1:1:1 to receive (at months 0, 1, 3) three doses of 50 μg varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein E (gE) adjuvanted with AS01B, 3 doses of gE adjuvanted with AS01E, 1 dose of saline followed by 2 doses of gE/AS01B, or 3 doses of saline. One month after the last dose (6 months after transplant), frequencies of CD4(+) T cells expressing ≥2 activation markers after induction with gE and anti-gE antibody concentrations were higher with all gE/AS01 regimens than with saline. Both responses persisted up to 1 year in subjects vaccinated with gE/AS01. Immune responses were higher in the gE/AS01B 3-dose group than in the gE/AS01B 2-dose group but not higher than in the gE/AS01E 3-dose group. One serious adverse event (pneumonia) was considered vaccine related. Both formulations and both schedules were immunogenic and well tolerated in this population. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00920218. PMID:25237196

  10. Detection of Vero Cells Infected with Herpes Simplex Types 1 and 2 and Varicella Zoster Viruses Using Raman Spectroscopy and Advanced Statistical Methods

    PubMed Central

    Huleihel, Mahmoud; Shufan, Elad; Zeiri, Leila; Salman, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Of the eight members of the herpes family of viruses, HSV1, HSV2, and varicella zoster are the most common and are mainly involved in cutaneous disorders. These viruses usually are not life-threatening, but in some cases they might cause serious infections to the eyes and the brain that can lead to blindness and possibly death. An effective drug (acyclovir and its derivatives) is available against these viruses. Therefore, early detection and identification of these viral infections is highly important for an effective treatment. Raman spectroscopy, which has been widely used in the past years in medicine and biology, was used as a powerful spectroscopic tool for the detection and identification of these viral infections in cell culture, due to its sensitivity, rapidity and reliability. Our results showed that it was possible to differentiate, with a 97% identification success rate, the uninfected Vero cells that served as a control, from the Vero cells that were infected with HSV-1, HSV-2, and VZV. For that, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was performed on the Raman spectra after principal component analysis (PCA) with a leave one out (LOO) approach. Raman spectroscopy in tandem with PCA and LDA enable to differentiate among the different herpes viral infections of Vero cells in time span of few minutes with high accuracy rate. Understanding cell molecular changes due to herpes viral infections using Raman spectroscopy may help in early detection and effective treatment. PMID:27078266

  11. Laboratory preparation of Varicella-Zoster Virus: concentration of virus-containing supernatant, use of a debris fraction and magnetofection for consistent cell-free VZV infections.

    PubMed

    Sloutskin, Anna; Goldstein, Ronald S

    2014-09-01

    The research laboratory generation of free Varicella-Zoster Virus (VZV) from cultured yields results relatively low titers, with the result that most study of VZV infection utilizes cell-associated infection. However, important aspects of VZV-cell interaction, such as the entry mechanism and superinfection exclusion have not yet been studied in detail, in part due to the difficulty in obtaining a high titer cell free virus. Here, a method to generate relatively high-titer cell-free VZV, based on a combination of previously published techniques and subsequent concentration is described. VZV-infected cells are disrupted, sonicated and clarified by centrifugation. The cell-free virus in the supernatant is then concentrated to yield up to 10(5)PFU/ml. The cell debris pellet, which contains up to 10(6)PFU/ml can also be used for non cell-associated infection. Magnetic nanoparticles available commercially can be used to further enhance infection by cell-free-VZV. The tools described here hold promise for better understanding of important aspects of VZV-cell interactions such as entry and latency.

  12. Activation of H2AX and ATM in varicella-zoster virus (VZV)-infected cells is associated with expression of specific VZV genes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takenobu; Ali, Mir A; Liu, XueQiao; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2014-03-01

    Mammalian cells activate DNA damage response pathways in response to virus infections. Activation of these pathways can enhance replication of many viruses, including herpesviruses. Activation of cellular ATM results in phosphorylation of H2AX and recruits proteins to sites of DNA damage. We found that varicella-zoster (VZV) infected cells had elevated levels of phosphorylated H2AX and phosphorylated ATM and that these levels increased in cells infected with VZV deleted for ORF61 or ORF63, but not deleted for ORF67. Expression of VZV ORF61, ORF62, or ORF63 alone did not result in phosphorylation of H2AX. While BGLF4, the Epstein-Barr virus homolog of VZV ORF47 protein kinase, phosphorylates H2AX and ATM, neither VZV ORF47 nor ORF66 protein kinase phosphorylated H2AX or ATM. Cells lacking ATM had no reduction in VZV replication. Thus, VZV induces phosphorylation of H2AX and ATM and this effect is associated with the presence of specific VZV genes in virus-infected cells.

  13. ORF9p phosphorylation by ORF47p is crucial for the formation and egress of varicella-zoster virus viral particles.

    PubMed

    Riva, Laura; Thiry, Marc; Bontems, Sebastien; Joris, Aline; Piette, Jacques; Lebrun, Marielle; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine

    2013-03-01

    The role of the tegument during the herpesvirus lytic cycle is still not clearly established, particularly at the late phase of infection, when the newly produced viral particles need to be fully assembled before being released from the infected cell. The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) protein coded by open reading frame (ORF) 9 (ORF9p) is an essential tegument protein, and, even though its mRNA is the most expressed during the productive infection, little is known about its functions. Using a GalK positive/negative selection technique, we modified a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) containing the complete VZV genome to create viruses expressing mutant versions of ORF9p. We showed that ORF9p is hyperphosphorylated during the infection, especially through its interaction with the viral Ser/Thr kinase ORF47p; we identified a consensus site within ORF9p recognized by ORF47p and demonstrated its importance for ORF9p phosphorylation. Strikingly, an ultrastructural analysis revealed that the mutation of this consensus site (glutamate 85 to arginine) strongly affects viral assembly and release, reproducing the ORF47 kinase-dead VZV phenotype. It also slightly diminishes the infectivity toward immature dendritic cells. Taken together, our results identify ORF9p as a new viral substrate of ORF47p and suggest a determinant role of this phosphorylation for viral infectivity, especially during the process of viral particle formation and egress.

  14. Demonstration of NK cell-mediated lysis of varicella-zoster virus (VZV)-infected cells: characterization of the effector cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tilden, A.B.; Cauda, R.; Grossi, C.E.; Balch, C.M.; Lakeman, A.D.; Whitley, R.J.

    1986-06-01

    Infection with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) rendered RAJI cells more susceptible to lysis by non-adherent blood lymphocytes. At an effector to target ratio of 80:1 the mean percentage of /sup 51/Cr release of VZV-infected RAJI cells was 41 +/- 12%, whereas that of uninfected RAJI cells was 15 +/- 6%. The increased susceptibility to lysis was associated with increased effector to target conjugate formation in immunofluorescence binding assays. The effector cells cytotoxic for VZV-infected RAJI cells were predominantly Leu-11a/sup +/ Leu-4/sup -/ granular lymphocytes as demonstrated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The effector cell active against VZV-infected RAJI cells appeared similar to those active against herpes simplex virus (HSV)-infected cells, because in cold target competition experiments the lysis of /sup 51/Cr-labeled VZV-infected RAJI cells was efficiently inhibited by either unlabeled VZV-infected RAJI cells (mean 71% inhibition, 2:1 ratio unlabeled to labeled target) or HSV-infected RAJI cells (mean 69% inhibition) but not by uninfected RAJI cells (mean 10% inhibition). In contrast, competition experiments revealed donor heterogeneity in the overlap between effector cells for VZV- or HSV-infected RAJI vs K-562 cells.

  15. Varicella-zoster virus-induced apoptosis in MeWo cells is accompanied by down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Brazeau, Elizabeth; Mahalingam, Ravi; Gilden, Don; Wellish, Mary; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Pugazhenthi, Subbiah

    2010-03-01

    Varicella-zoster virus infects multiple human and monkey cells in culture. The mode of cell death appears to be autophagy or apoptosis. Analysis of VZV-infected human melanoma (MeWo) cells revealed that Bcl-2 mRNA and protein levels were decreased significantly 64 and 72 hpi (hours post infection), accompanied by the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytoplasm. Western blot analysis of virus-infected cells revealed activation of caspase-8, a marker for the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis, and caspase-9, a marker for the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis at 64 and 72 hpi. Significant increases in the levels of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved poly (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) were also seen at the height of cytopathic effect. Thus VZV induces apoptosis in MeWo cells in which Bcl-2 is down-regulated. Future studies will determine differences in the cascade of apoptotic events in non-neuronal cells compared to neurons that allow VZV to become latent. PMID:20345323

  16. [Fulminant visceral disseminated varicella-zoster virus infection without skin involvement in a patient with autoimmune hemolytic anemia on prednisolone therapy].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Megumi; Yoshifuji, Kota; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Tohda, Shuji; Miki, Tohru; Miura, Osamu; Yamamoto, Masahide

    2016-04-01

    An 80-year-old man with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) received immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone (1 mg/kg). One month later, his hemoglobin level had normalized, and the prednisolone dose was tapered. The next day, he complained of acute and progressive back pain. He was admitted to our hospital for further examination approximately 24 h after the pain had started. Computed tomography revealed only localized pneumonia. However, he showed signs of severe disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), liver dysfunction, and respiratory failure. Empiric broad-spectrum antibacterial therapy was started with a presumptive diagnosis of severe bacterial infection. However, his condition rapidly deteriorated, and he died 17 h after admission. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) was detected by quantitative PCR in the peripheral blood sample and by immunohistochemistry in all organs except for the brain at autopsy. Visceral VZV infection is a severe disease with a high mortality rate. Although appropriate diagnosis and treatment is crucial, in cases without the characteristic skin rash the diagnosis is difficult. The possibility of visceral VZV infection should be taken into consideration when administering prednisolone to patients with AIHA.

  17. Synergistic activity of amenamevir (ASP2151) with nucleoside analogs against herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 and varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Chono, Koji; Katsumata, Kiyomitsu; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Shiraki, Kimiyasu

    2013-02-01

    ASP2151 (amenamevir) is a helicase-primase complex inhibitor with antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus HSV-1, HSV-2, and varicella-zoster virus (VZV). To assess combination therapy of ASP2151 with existing antiherpes agents against HSV-1, HSV-2, and VZV, we conducted in vitro and in vivo studies of two-drug combinations. The combination activity effect of ASP2151 with nucleoside analogs acyclovir (ACV), penciclovir (PCV), or vidarabine (VDB) was tested via plaque-reduction assay and MTS assay, and the data were analyzed using isobolograms and response surface modeling. In vivo combination therapy of ASP2151 with valaciclovir (VACV) was studied in an HSV-1-infected zosteriform spread mouse model. The antiviral activity of ASP2151 combined with ACV and PCV against ACV-susceptible HSV-1, HSV-2, and VZV showed a statistically significant synergistic effect (P<0.05). ASP2151 with VDB was observed to have additive effects against ACV-susceptible HSV-2 and synergistic effects against VZV. In the mouse model of zosteriform spread, the inhibition of disease progression via combination therapy was more potent than that of either drugs as monotherapy (P<0.05). These results indicate that the combination therapies of ASP2151 with ACV and PCV have synergistic antiherpes effects against HSV and VZV infections and may be feasible in case of severe disease, such as herpes encephalitis or in patients with immunosuppression.

  18. The High Prevalence of the Varicella Zoster Virus in Patients With Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: A Case-Control Study in the North of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Saeideh; Ghane, Masood; Yousefzadeh-Chabok, Shahrokh; Amiri, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common neurological autoimmune disease, characterized by multifocal areas of inflammatory demyelination within the central nervous system. It has been hypothesized that the stimulation of the immune system by viral infections is the leading cause of MS among susceptible individuals. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of the varicella zoster virus (VZV) in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Patients and Methods Plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected from MS patients (n = 82) and controls (n = 89) were screened for the presence of anti-VZV antibodies and VZV DNA by the ELISA and PCR methods. DNA was extracted from all samples, and VZV infection was examined by the PCR technique. Statistical analysis was used to investigate the frequency of the virus in MS patients and a healthy control group. Results Of all the MS patients, 78 (95.1%) and 21 (25.6%) were positive for anti-VZV and VZV DNA, respectively. Statistical analysis of the PCR results showed a significant correlation between the abundance of VZV and MS disease (P < 0.001). However, there was no significant correlation between the abundance of anti-VZV antibodies and MS disease by the ELISA method. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that VZV may contribute to MS in establishing a systemic infection process and inducing an immune response. PMID:27226879

  19. Expression of the varicella-zoster virus origin-binding protein and analysis of its site-specific DNA-binding properties.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, D; Olivo, P D

    1994-01-01

    The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) genome contains homologs to each of the seven herpes simplex virus (HSV) genes that are required for viral DNA synthesis. VZV gene 51 is homologous to HSV UL9, which encodes an origin of DNA replication binding protein (OBP). It was previously shown, by using a protein A fusion protein, that the product of gene 51 is a site-specific DNA-binding protein which binds to sequences within the VZV origin (Stow et al., Virology 177:570-577, 1990). In this report, gene 51 was expressed in an in vitro translation system. Rabbit antiserum raised against the carboxyl-terminal 20 amino acids was used to confirm expression of the full-length gene 51 protein, and site-specific DNA-binding activity was demonstrated in a gel retardation assay. The origin-binding domain was located within a 263-amino-acid region of the carboxyl terminus by using a series of deletion mutants. The affinity of binding of the VZV OBP to the three binding sites in the VZV origin was found to be similar. In addition, as with UL9, a CGC triplet within a 10-bp consensus sequence is critical to the interaction between the OBP and the origin. The HSV and VZV OBPs, therefore, appear to have virtually identical recognition sequences despite only 33% identity and 44% similarity in the primary structure of their site-specific DNA-binding domains. Images PMID:8189521

  20. Hemorrhagic Pericarditis in a child with primary varicella infection (chickenpox).

    PubMed

    Nandeesh, B N; Mahadevan, Anita; Yasha, T C; Shankar, S K

    2009-01-01

    Chickenpox (Varicella) representing the primary infection by Varicella zoster virus is a common benign and self-limited infectious disease of childhood. Although the disease can be associated with complications, they are generally mild and tend to occur in adults and immunocompromised children. Severe and life-threatening complications are extremely rare, particularly those involving the cardiovascular system. We report a malnourished 5-year-old girl with chicken pox complicated by hemorrhagic pericarditis and deep vein thrombosis leading to fatal pulmonary thromboembolism. Though varicella infection runs a benign self-limiting course, it continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality when associated with complications, particularly in malnourished children. Hence, the importance of vaccination and early recognition of complications is emphasized.

  1. Chickenpox party or varicella vaccine?

    PubMed

    Hambleton, Sophie; Arvin, Ann M

    2005-01-01

    The most compelling rationale for introducing universal vaccination against varicella was the predicted benefits to healthy children. Current evidence from the US experience indicates that these benefits are being realized. As is true for any new vaccine, implementation of such a program necessitates disease surveillance and modifications of the vaccine regimen as needed. In the case of VZV, the epidemiology of herpes zoster must be tracked as well as varicella disease trends. The prevention of herpes zoster may be another use of live attenuated or inactivated varicella vaccines.

  2. Three-Dimensional Normal Human Neutral Progenitor Tissue-Like Assemblies: A Model for Persistent Varicella-Zoster Virus Infection and Platform to Study Oxidate Stress and Damage in Multiple Hit Scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; McCarthy, M.; Osterrieder, N.; Cohrs, R. J.; Kaufer, B. B.

    2014-01-01

    The environment of space results in a multitude of challenges to the human physiology that present barriers to extended habitation and exploration. Over 40 years of investigation to define countermeasures to address space flight adaptation has left gaps in our knowledge regarding mitigation strategies partly due to the lack of investigative tools, monitoring strategies, and real time diagnostics to understand the central causative agent(s) responsible for physiologic adaptation and maintaining homeostasis. Spaceflight-adaptation syndrome is the combination of space environmental conditions and the synergistic reaction of the human physiology. Our work addresses the role of oxidative stress and damage (OSaD) as a negative and contributing Risk Factor (RF) in the following areas of combined spaceflight related dysregulation: i) radiation induced cellular damage [1], [2] ii) immune impacts and the inflammatory response [3], [4] and iii) varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation [5]. Varicella-zoster (VZV)/Chicken Pox virus is a neurotropic human alphaherpes virus resulting in varicella upon primary infection, suppressed by the immune system becomes latent in ganglionic neurons, and reactivates under stress events to re-express in zoster and possibly shingles. Our laboratory has developed a complex three-dimensional (3D) normal human neural tissue model that emulates several characteristics of the human trigeminal ganglia (TG) and allows the study of combinatorial experimentation which addresses, simultaneously, OSaD associated with Spaceflight adaptation and habitation [6]. By combining the RFs of microgravity, radiation, and viral infection we will demonstrate that living in the space environment leads to significant physiological consequences for the peripheral and subsequently the central nervous system (PNS, CNS) associated with OSaD generation and consequentially endangers long-duration and exploration-class missions.

  3. Herpes zoster in children.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Nathan; Goodman, Seth; Peterson, Michael; Peterson, Warren

    2016-08-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) in immunocompetent children is quite uncommon. Initial exposure to the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) may be from a wild-type or vaccine-related strain. Either strain may cause a latent infection and subsequent eruption of HZ. We present a case of HZ in a 15-month-old boy after receiving the varicella vaccination at 12 months of age. A review of the literature regarding the incidence, clinical characteristics, and diagnosis of HZ in children also is provided. PMID:27622252

  4. The varicella-zoster virus-mediated delayed host shutoff: open reading frame 17 has no major function, whereas immediate-early 63 protein represses heterologous gene expression.

    PubMed

    Desloges, Nathalie; Rahaus, Markus; Wolff, Manfred H

    2005-12-01

    We reported that varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes a delayed host shutoff during its replicative cycle. VZV open reading frame 17 (ORF17) is the homologue of the herpes simplex virus (HSV) UL41 gene encoding the virion host shutoff (vhs) protein which is responsible for the shutoff effect observed in HSV-infected cells. In the present study, we demonstrated that ORF17 is expressed as a late protein during the VZV replicative cycle in different infected permissive cell lines which showed a delayed shutoff of cellular RNA. A cell line with stable expression of VZV ORF17 was infected with VZV. In these cells, VZV replication and delayed host shutoff remained unchanged when compared to normal infected cells. ORF17 was not capable of repressing the expression of the beta-gal reporter gene under the control of the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early gene promoter or to inhibit the expression of a CAT reporter gene under the control of the human GAPDH promoter, indicating that ORF17 has no major function in the VZV-mediated delayed host shutoff. To determine whether other viral factors are involved in the host shutoff, a series of cotransfection assays was performed. We found that the immediate-early 63 protein (IE63) was able to downregulate the expression of reporter genes under the control of the two heterologous promoters, indicating that this viral factor can be involved in the VZV-mediated delayed host shutoff. Other factors can be also implicated to modulate the repressing action of IE63 to achieve a precise balance between the viral and cellular gene expression.

  5. Identification of a Varicella-Zoster Virus Replication Inhibitor That Blocks Capsid Assembly by Interacting with the Floor Domain of the Major Capsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Misato; Fukui, Yoshiko; Yamada, Souichi; Tsuda, Mihoko; Higashi, Chizuka; Kaneko, Keiko; Hasegawa, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Toyofumi

    2012-01-01

    A novel anti-varicella-zoster virus compound, a derivative of pyrazolo[1,5-c]1,3,5-triazin-4-one (coded as 35B2), was identified from a library of 9,600 random compounds. This compound inhibited both acyclovir (ACV)-resistant and -sensitive strains. In a plaque reduction assay under conditions in which the 50% effective concentration of ACV against the vaccine Oka strain (V-Oka) in human fibroblasts was 4.25 μM, the 50% effective concentration of 35B2 was 0.75 μM. The selective index of the compound was more than 200. Treatment with 35B2 inhibited neither immediate-early gene expression nor viral DNA synthesis. Twenty-four virus clones resistant to 35B2 were isolated, all of which had a mutation(s) in the amino acid sequence of open reading frame 40 (ORF40), which encodes the major capsid protein (MCP). Most of the mutations were located in the regions corresponding to the “floor” domain of the MCP of herpes simplex virus 1. Treatment with 35B2 changed the localization of MCP in the fibroblasts infected with V-Oka but not in the fibroblasts infected with the resistant clones, although it did not affect steady-state levels of MCP. Overexpression of the scaffold proteins restored the normal MCP localization in the 35B2-treated infected cells. The compound did not inhibit the scaffold protein-mediated translocation of MCP from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Electron microscopic analysis demonstrated the lack of capsid formation in the 35B2-treated infected cells. These data indicate the feasibility of developing a new class of antivirals that target the herpesvirus MCPs and inhibit normal capsid formation by a mechanism that differs from those of the known protease and encapsidation inhibitors. Further biochemical studies are required to clarify the precise antiviral mechanism. PMID:22933294

  6. Varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein I is essential for spread in dorsal root ganglia and facilitates axonal localization of structural virion components in neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Jenna; Steain, Megan; Slobedman, Barry; Abendroth, Allison

    2013-12-01

    Neurons of the sensory ganglia are the major site of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) latency and may undergo productive infection during reactivation. Although the VZV glycoprotein E/glycoprotein I (gE/gI) complex is known to be critical for neurovirulence, few studies have assessed the roles of these proteins during infection of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) due to the high human specificity of the virus. Here, we show that the VZV glycoprotein I gene is an important neurotropic gene responsible for mediating the spread of virus in neuronal cultures and explanted DRG. Inoculation of differentiated SH-SY5Y neuronal cell cultures with a VZV gI gene deletion strain (VZV rOkaΔgI) showed a large reduction in the percentage of cells infected and significantly smaller plaque sizes in a comparison with cultures infected with the parental strain (VZV rOka). In contrast, VZV rOkaΔgI was not significantly attenuated in fibroblast cultures, demonstrating a cell type-specific role for VZV gI. Analysis of rOkaΔgI protein localization by immunofluorescent staining revealed aberrant localization of viral glycoprotein and capsid proteins, with little or no staining present in the axons of differentiated SH-SY5Y cells infected with rOkaΔgI, yet axonal vesicle trafficking was not impaired. Further studies utilizing explanted human DRG indicated that VZV gI is required for the spread of virus within DRG. These data demonstrate a role for VZV gI in the cell-to-cell spread of virus during productive replication in neuronal cells and a role in facilitating the access of virion components to axons.

  7. Clinical features, outcomes, and cerebrospinal fluid findings in adult patients with central nervous system (CNS) infections caused by varicella-zoster virus: comparison with enterovirus CNS infections.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyo-Lim; Lee, Eun Mi; Sung, Heungsup; Kang, Joong Koo; Lee, Sang-Ahm; Choi, Sang-Ho

    2014-12-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is known to be associated with central nervous system (CNS) infections in adults. However, the clinical characteristics of VZV CNS infections are not well characterized. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical manifestations, outcomes, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings in patients with VZV CNS infections with those in patients with enterovirus (EV) CNS infections. This retrospective cohort study was performed at a 2,700-bed tertiary care hospital. Using a clinical microbiology computerized database, all adults with CSF PCR results positive for VZV or EV that were treated between January 1999 and February 2013 were identified. Thirty-eight patients with VZV CNS infection and 68 patients with EV CNS infection were included in the study. Compared with the EV group, the median age in the VZV group was higher (VZV, 35 years vs. EV, 31 years; P = 0.02), and showed a bimodal age distribution with peaks in the third and seventh decade. Encephalitis was more commonly encountered in the VZV group (VZV, 23.7% vs. EV, 4.4%; P = 0.01). The median lymphocyte percentage in the CSF (VZV, 81% vs. EV, 36%; P < 0.001) and the CSF protein level (VZV, 100 mg/dl vs. EV, 46 mg/dl; P < 0.001) were higher in the VZV group. Compared with patients with EV CNS infection, patients with VZV CNS infection developed encephalitis more often and exhibited more intense inflammatory reaction. Nevertheless, both VZV and EV CNS infections were associated with excellent long-term prognosis.

  8. Human anti-varicella-zoster virus (VZV) recombinant monoclonal antibody produced after Zostavax immunization recognizes the gH/gL complex and neutralizes VZV infection.

    PubMed

    Birlea, Marius; Owens, Gregory P; Eshleman, Emily M; Ritchie, Alanna; Traktinskiy, Igor; Bos, Nathan; Seitz, Scott; Azarkh, Yevgeniy; Mahalingam, Ravi; Gilden, Don; Cohrs, Randall J

    2013-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a ubiquitous, highly cell-associated, and exclusively human neurotropic alphaherpesvirus. VZV infection is initiated by membrane fusion, an event dependent in part on VZV glycoproteins gH and gL. Consistent with its location on the virus envelope, the gH/gL complex is a target of neutralizing antibodies produced after virus infection. One week after immunizing a 59-year-old VZV-seropositive man with Zostavax, we sorted his circulating blood plasma blasts and amplified expressed immunoglobulin variable domain sequences by single-cell PCR. Sequence analysis identified two plasma blast clones, one of which was used to construct a recombinant monoclonal antibody (rec-RC IgG). The rec-RC IgG colocalized with VZV gE on the membranes of VZV-infected cells and neutralized VZV infection in tissue culture. Mass spectrometric analysis of proteins immunoprecipitated by rec-RC IgG identified both VZV gH and gL. Transfection experiments showed that rec-RC IgG recognized a VZV gH/gL protein complex but not individual gH or gL proteins. Overall, our recombinant monoclonal anti-VZV antibody effectively neutralizes VZV and recognizes a conformational epitope within the VZV gH/L protein complex. An unlimited supply of this antibody provides the opportunity to analyze membrane fusion events that follow virus attachment and to identify multiple epitopes on VZV-specific proteins.

  9. Comparison of a DNA probe assay with the plaque reduction assay for measuring the sensitivity of herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus to penciclovir and acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Standring-Cox, R; Bacon, T H; Howard, B A

    1996-01-01

    A DNA probe assay was compared with the plaque reduction assay to determine the sensitivity of clinical isolates of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) to penciclovir and acyclovir in MRC-5 cells. In both assays, penciclovir and acyclovir shared comparable activity against cell-free virus (CFV) preparations of VZV and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) isolates, whilst acyclovir was significantly more active than penciclovir against herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) isolates in both the DNA probe assay (P < or = 0.01) and the plaque reduction assay (P < or = 0.01). However, the 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) were generally lower in the DNA probe assay and the correlation between the plaque reduction and DNA probe assays was poor for either compound. Six acyclovir-resistant strains of HSV-1 derived in cell culture were also tested for susceptibility to penciclovir and acyclovir, in the DNA probe and plaque reduction assays. The relative susceptibilities of these strains were comparable, for example, one ACV-resistant strain was susceptible to penciclovir in both assays. Further comparisons of the assay methods were made using cell-associated VZV (CAV). As with CFV the EC50s were significantly lower in the DNA probe assay than the plaque reduction assay for penciclovir (P < or = 0.01) and acyclovir (P < or = 0.01). In the DNA probe assay there was no significant difference in the EC50s for either penciclovir or acyclovir when comparing CAV with CFV. However, in the plaque reduction assay the EC50s for CAV were significantly higher than those for CFV for both penciclovir (P < or = 0.01) and acyclovir (P < or = 0.01). Overall the DNA probe assay is objective, does not require prior titration of isolates and provides opportunities for automation. It is more suitable for sensitivity testing of large numbers of clinical isolates than the well-established plaque reduction assay.

  10. Genomic cartography of varicella-zoster virus: a complete genome-based analysis of strain variability with implications for attenuation and phenotypic differences.

    PubMed

    Tyler, S D; Peters, G A; Grose, C; Severini, A; Gray, M J; Upton, C; Tipples, G A

    2007-03-15

    In order to gain a better perspective on the true variability of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and to catalogue the location and number of differences, 11 new complete genome sequences were compared with those previously in the public domain (18 complete genomes in total). Three of the newly sequenced genomes were derived from a single strain in order to assess variations that can occur during serial passage in cell culture. The analysis revealed that while VZV is relatively stable genetically it does posses a certain degree of variability. The reiteration regions, origins of replication and intergenic homopolymer regions were all found to be variable between strains as well as within a given strain. In addition, the terminal viral sequences were found to vary within and between strains specifically at the 3' end of the genome. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified a total of 557 variable sites, 451 of which were found in coding regions and resulted in 187 different in amino acid substitutions. A comparison of the SNPs present in the two gE mutant strains, VZV-MSP and VZV-BC, suggested that the missense mutation in gE was primarily responsible for the accelerated cell spread phenotype. Some of the variations noted with high passage in cell culture are consistent with variations seen in the IE62 gene of the vaccine strains (S628G, R958G and I1260V) that may help in pinpointing variations essential for attenuation. Although VZV has been considered to be one of the most genetically stable human herpesviruses, this initial assessment of genomic VZV cartography provides insight into ORFs with previously unreported variations.

  11. Varicella-zoster virus IE4 protein interacts with SR proteins and exports mRNAs through the TAP/NXF1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Ote, Isabelle; Lebrun, Marielle; Vandevenne, Patricia; Bontems, Sébastien; Medina-Palazon, Cahora; Manet, Evelyne; Piette, Jacques; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Available data suggest that the Varicella-Zoster virus (VZV) IE4 protein acts as an important regulator on VZV and cellular genes expression and could exert its functions at post-transcriptional level. However, the molecular mechanisms supported by this protein are not yet fully characterized. In the present study, we have attempted to clarify this IE4-mediated gene regulation and identify some cellular partners of IE4. By yeast two-hybrid and immunoprecipitation analysis, we showed that IE4 interacts with three shuttling SR proteins, namely ASF/SF2, 9G8 and SRp20. We positioned the binding domain in the IE4 RbRc region and we showed that these interactions are not bridged by RNA. We demonstrated also that IE4 strongly interacts with the main SR protein kinase, SRPK1, and is phosphorylated in in vitro kinase assay on residue Ser-136 contained in the Rb domain. By Northwestern analysis, we showed that IE4 is able to bind RNA through its arginine-rich region and in immunoprecipitation experiments the presence of RNA stabilizes complexes containing IE4 and the cellular export factors TAP/NXF1 and Aly/REF since the interactions are RNase-sensitive. Finally, we determined that IE4 influences the export of reporter mRNAs and clearly showed, by TAP/NXF1 knockdown, that VZV infection requires the TAP/NXF1 export pathway to express some viral transcripts. We thus highlighted a new example of viral mRNA export factor and proposed a model of IE4-mediated viral mRNAs export. PMID:19924249

  12. Use of lambdagt11 to isolate genes for two pseudorabies virus glycoproteins with homology to herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovskis, E.A.; Timmins, J.G.; Post, L.E.

    1986-10-01

    A library of pseudorabies virus (PRV) DNA fragments was constructed in the expression cloning vector lambdagt11. The library was screened with antisera which reacted with mixtures of PRV proteins to isolate recombinant bacteriophages expressing PRV proteins. By the nature of the lambdagt11 vector, the cloned proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli as ..beta..-galactosidase fusion proteins. The fusion proteins from 35 of these phages were purified and injected into mice to raise antisera. The antisera were screened by several different assays, including immunoprecipitation of (/sup 14/C)glucosamine-labeled PRV proteins. This method identified phages expressing three different PRV glycoproteins: the secreted glycoprotein, gX; gI; and a glycoprotein that had not been previously identified, which we designate gp63. The gp63 and gI genes map adjacent to each other in the small unique region of the PRV genome. The DNA sequence was determined for the region of the genome encoding gp63 and gI. It was found that gp63 has a region of homology with a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) protein, encoded by US7, and also with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) gpIV. The gI protein sequence has a region of homology with HSV-1 gE and VZV gpI. It is concluded that PRV, HSV, and VZV all have a cluster of homologous glycoprotein genes in the small unique components of their genomes and that the organization of these genes is conserved.

  13. [Cerebral infarction and intracranial aneurysm related to the reactivation of varicella zoster virus in a Japanese acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient].

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Chiharu; Okada, Kazumasa; Ohnari, Norihiro; Akamatsu, Naoki; Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2013-01-01

    A 35-years-old right-handed man admitted to our hospital with a worsening of dysarthria, left facial palsy and left hemiparesis for 2 days. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was diagnosed when he was 28 years old. At that time, he also was treated for syphilis. After highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) was introduced at the age of 35 years old, serum level of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was not detected, but the number of CD4+ T cells was still less than 200/μl. He had no risk factors of atherosclerosis including hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia. He had neither coagulation abnormality nor autoimmune disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed acute ischemic infarction spreading from the right corona radiate to the right internal capsule without contrast enhancement. Stenosis and occlusion of intracranial arteries were not detected by MR angiography. Although argatroban and edaravone were administered, his neurological deficits were worsened to be difficult to walk independently. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed a mild mononuclear pleocytosis (16/μl). Oligoclonal band was positive. The titer of anti-varicella zoster virus (VZV) IgG antibodies was increased, that indicated VZV reactivation in the central nervous system (CNS), although VZV DNA PCR was not detected. Therefore, acyclovir (750 mg/day for 2 weeks) and valaciclovir (3,000 mg/day for 1 month) were administered in addition to stroke therapy. He recovered to be able to walk independently 2 month after the admission.Angiography uncovered a saccular aneurysm of 3 mm at the end of branch artery of right anterior cerebral artery, Heubner artery, 28 days after the admission. We speculated that VZV vasculopathy caused by VZV reactivation in CNS was involved in the pathomechanism of cerebral infarction rather than HIV vasculopathy in the case.

  14. [Is vaccination against varicella efficacious and how long does the protection last?].

    PubMed

    Ołdak, Elżbieta

    2013-01-01

    Despite the availability of varicella vaccines, few countries have introduced a  universal varicella vaccination to their national immunisation programmes. Major concerns are vaccine efficacy against varicella and herpes zoster as well as duration of post-vaccination protection. This review study presents up-to-date classification of varicella-zoster viral clades, sensitive laboratory tests used for assessment of humoral response against the vaccine-type virus OKA antigens in vaccinees, and benefits of universal varicella vaccination in the USA (since 1995) and in Germany (since 2004). Current views on potential rise in zoster incidence after implementation of routine varicella immunisation have been also analyzed.

  15. Varicella and varicella vaccination in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sung Hee; Choi, Eun Hwa; Shin, Seon Hee; Kim, Yun-Kyung; Chang, Jin Keun; Choi, Kyong Min; Hur, Jae Kyun; Kim, Kyung-Hyo; Kim, Jae Youn; Chung, Eun Hee; Lee, Soo Young; Park, Su Eun; Cha, Sungho; Kim, Kwang-Nam; Ma, Sang Hyuk; Eun, Byung Wook; Kim, Nam Hee; Jo, Dae Sun; Choi, Bo Youl; Kim, Shin Ah

    2014-05-01

    With continuing occurrence of varicella despite increasing vaccine coverage for the past 20 years, a case-based study, a case-control study, and an immunogenicity and safety study were conducted to address the impact of varicella vaccination in South Korea. Varicella patients under the age of 16 years were enrolled for the case-based study. For the case-control study, varicella patients between 12 months and 15 years of age were enrolled with one control matched for each patient. For the immunogenicity and safety study, otherwise healthy children from 12 to 24 months old were immunized with Suduvax (Green Cross, South Korea). Fluorescent antibody to membrane antigen (FAMA) varicella-zoster virus (VZV) antibody was measured before and 6 weeks after immunization. In the case-based study, the median age of the patients was 4 years. Among 152 patients between 1 and 15 years of age, 139 children received varicella vaccine and all had breakthrough infections. Clinical courses were not ameliorated in vaccinated patients, but more vaccinated patients received outpatient rather than inpatient care. In the case-control study, the adjusted overall effectiveness of varicella vaccination was 54%. In the immunogenicity and safety study, the seroconversion rate and geometric mean titer for FAMA antibody were 76.67% and 5.31. Even with increasing varicella vaccine uptake, we illustrate no upward age shift in the peak incidence, a high proportion of breakthrough disease, almost no amelioration in disease presentation by vaccination, and insufficient immunogenicity of domestic varicella vaccine. There is need to improve the varicella vaccine used in South Korea.

  16. Neurovirulence of varicella and the live attenuated varicella vaccine virus.

    PubMed

    Horien, Corey; Grose, Charles

    2012-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic herpesvirus, which can cause a variety of complications during varicella infections. These range from meningoencephalitis to polyneuritis to retinitis. After primary VZV infection, VZV enters the dorsal root ganglia in a latent state. Reactivation from latency leads to zoster. The velocity of VZV is 13 cm per day, as the virus travels from ganglion to skin. The live attenuated varicella vaccine virus is markedly less neurovirulent than the wild-type virus. Nevertheless, a few cases of herpes zoster due to the vaccine virus have been documented. Usually, herpes zoster occurs in the same arm as the vaccination, often 3 or more years after vaccination. Thus, herpes zoster in a vaccinee often represents a reactivation of vaccine virus that was carried to the cervical dorsal root ganglia from a site of local replication in the arm. Finally, the role of autophagy during VZV infection is discussed. Autophagosome formation is a prominent feature in the skin vesicles during both varicella and herpes zoster. Therefore, autophagy is one of the innate immune mechanisms associated with VZV infection in humans.

  17. Anti-IFN-γ autoantibodies in adults with disseminated nontuberculous mycobacterial infections are associated with HLA-DRB1*16:02 and HLA-DQB1*05:02 and the reactivation of latent varicella-zoster virus infection.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chih-Yu; Chu, Chen-Chung; Liu, Jing-Pei; Lin, Chia-Hao; Ho, Mao-Wang; Lo, Wen-Jyi; Lin, Po-Chang; Chen, Hung-Jen; Chou, Chia-Huei; Feng, Jia-Yih; Fung, Chang-Phone; Sher, Yuh-Pyng; Li, Chi-Yuan; Wang, Jen-Hsien; Ku, Cheng-Lung

    2013-02-21

    Adult patients with disseminated nontuberculous mycobacterial (dNTM) infections usually have severe immune system defects. Recently, several studies have shown that anti-IFN-γ autoantibodies may play an important role in the pathogenicity of dNTM infections. A considerable proportion of reported cases of anti-IFN-γ autoantibodies show either clinical or laboratory evidence of autoimmune disease. In the present study, we identified 19 formerly healthy adults who later developed dNTM infections, of whom 17 were further investigated immunologically. High-titer anti-IFN-γ autoantibodies capable of inhibiting IL-12 production in vitro were found in the plasma of all of these patients. In addition to dNTM infection, 35% and 71% of our patients also suffered from salmonellosis and herpes zoster, respectively. This observation suggests that IFN-γ may be crucial in controlling salmonella infection and reactivating latent varicella-zoster virus infection in humans. 2 HLA alleles, DRB1*16:02 DQB1*05:02 (odds ratio 8.68; 95% confidence interval, 3.47-21.90; P = 1.1 × 10(-6); Pc = 3.08 × 10(-5) and odds ratio 7.16; 95% confidence interval, 3.02-17.05; P = 1 × 10(-7); Pc = 1.4 × 10(-6), respectively), were found in 82% (14 of 17) of our patients. In conclusion, our data suggest that anti-IFN-γ autoantibodies may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of dNTM infections and reactivation of latent varicella-zoster virus infection and are associated with HLA-DRB1*16:02 and HLA-DQB1*05:02.

  18. Universal varicella vaccine immunization in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Kawamura, Yoshiki; Ohashi, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    In 1974, Japanese scientists developed a live attenuated varicella vaccine based on the Oka strain. The efficacy of the vaccine for the prevention of varicella has been primarily demonstrated in studies conducted in the United States following the adoption of universal immunization using the Oka strain varicella vaccine in 1996. Although the vaccine was developed by Japanese scientists, until recently, the vaccine has been administered on a voluntary basis in Japan resulting in a vaccine coverage rate of approximately 40%. Therefore, Japan initiated universal immunization using the Oka strain varicella vaccine in November 2014. Given the transition from voluntary to universal immunization in Japan, it will also be important to monitor the epidemiology of varicella and herpes zoster. The efficacy and safety of co-administration of the varicella vaccine and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine have been demonstrated in many countries; however, there was no data from Japan. In order to adopt the practice of universal immunization using the Oka strain varicella vaccine in Japan, data demonstrating the efficacy and safety of co-administration of varicella vaccine and measles and rubella (MR) vaccine were required. Additionally, we needed to elucidate the appropriate time interval between the first and second administrations of the vaccine. It is also important to differentiate between wild type and Oka vaccine type strains in herpes zoster patient with past history of varicella vaccine. Thus, there are many factors to consider regarding the adoption of universal immunization in Japan to control varicella zoster virus (VZV) infections.

  19. Varicella outbreak in Sudanese refugees from Calais.

    PubMed

    Lesens, O; Baud, O; Henquell, C; Lhermet Nurse, A; Beytout, J

    2016-05-01

    We describe an outbreak of varicella in 31 Sudanese refugees (all except one were male, mean age: 26 ± 1), from the Calais migrant camp and sheltered in a French transit area. The attack rate was 39%. Adults are scantly immunized against varicella zoster virus in East Africa and may be exposed to epidemics once in France. PMID:27378366

  20. Mutagenesis of varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein I (gI) identifies a cysteine residue critical for gE/gI heterodimer formation, gI structure, and virulence in skin cells.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Stefan L; Sommer, Marvin H; Reichelt, Mike; Rajamani, Jaya; Vlaycheva-Beisheim, Leonssia; Stamatis, Shaye; Cheng, Jason; Jones, Carol; Zehnder, James; Arvin, Ann M

    2011-05-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is the alphaherpesvirus that causes chicken pox (varicella) and shingles (zoster). The two VZV glycoproteins gE and gI form a heterodimer that mediates efficient cell-to-cell spread. Deletion of gI yields a small-plaque-phenotype virus, ΔgI virus, which is avirulent in human skin using the xenograft model of VZV pathogenesis. In the present study, 10 mutant viruses were generated to determine which residues were required for the typical function of gI. Three phosphorylation sites in the cytoplasmic domain of gI were not required for VZV virulence in vivo. Two deletion mutants mapped a gE binding region in gI to residues 105 to 125. A glycosylation site, N116, in this region did not affect virulence. Substitution of four cysteine residues highly conserved in the Alphaherpesvirinae established that C95 is required for gE/gI heterodimer formation. The C95A and Δ105-125 (with residues 105 to 125 deleted) viruses had small-plaque phenotypes with reduced replication kinetics in vitro similar to those of the ΔgI virus. The Δ105-125 virus was avirulent for human skin in vivo. In contrast, the C95A mutant replicated in vivo but with significantly reduced kinetics compared to those of the wild-type virus. In addition to abolished gE/gI heterodimer formation, gI from the C95A or the Δ105-125 mutant was not recognized by monoclonal antibodies that detect the canonical conformation of gI, demonstrating structural disruption of gI in these viruses. This alteration prevented gI incorporation into virus particles. Thus, residues C95 and 105 to 125 are critical for gI structure required for gE/gI heterodimer formation, virion incorporation, and ultimately, effective viral spread in human skin.

  1. Recurrent varicella in an immunocompetent woman.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Joseph; Greenfield, Melinda

    2016-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection causes 2 distinct disease processes. Primary VZV infection results in varicella (chickenpox), a common generalized eruption, and subsequent reactivation of VZV classically results in herpes zoster (shingles), which presents as a unilateral, dermatomal eruption. Although a single VZV infection typically confers protection against its reactivation, recurrent varicella rarely is reported, particularly in immunocompetent patients. We present the case of a 52-year-old black woman with an intact immune system who demonstrated 3 VZV infections. PMID:26919358

  2. Varicella vaccination: a laboured take-off.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Santisteve, P; Lopalco, P L

    2014-05-01

    Varicella vaccines are highly immunogenic, efficacious and safe in preventing varicella disease. The USA has been the first country recommending universal vaccination. In the European Union/European Economic Area countries, the use of varicella vaccine is heterogeneous, with some countries recommending universal vaccination in children at national or regional level, others only in high-risk groups and others having no recommendation at all. Uncertainties on the potential impact of varicella vaccination on the epidemiology of varicella and herpes zoster still exist. These uncertainties are the main reason behind the diverse vaccine recommendations. Surveillance systems and mathematical models could be useful to address these uncertainties. However, the lack of surveillance of varicella and herpes zoster in some countries, as well as the high variability of surveillance systems in the countries that have one, makes it difficult to assess the effect of the vaccine. On the other hand, mathematical models are based on assumptions and should be interpreted carefully. Continuous surveillance of varicella and herpes zoster is needed to identify any changes in the epidemiological presentation of the diseases. In any case, continuous surveillance will be needed to fully describe the impact of the programmes currently running and clarify some of the actual uncertainties in the near future. Additionally, increasing our understanding of the risk factors for development of herpes zoster is required.

  3. Pharmacologic management of herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed Central

    Mamdani, F. S.

    1994-01-01

    Herpes zoster is an infection caused by reactivation of dormant varicella-zoster virus. The acute course of herpes zoster is generally benign; however, some patients will experience postherpetic neuralgia characterized by severe, relentless, and at times disabling pain that is often refractory to treatment. While herpes zoster responds to acyclovir, cost-benefit considerations limit the drug's usefulness to only a select group. Postherpetic neuralgia requires a holistic approach, including pharmacologic therapy using several different classes of drugs. PMID:7907508

  4. Herpes zoster segmental paresis in an immunocompromised breast cancer woman

    PubMed Central

    Rastegar, Shirvan; Mahdavi, Sadegh Baradaran; Mahmoudi, Farhad; Basiri, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster is an infectious disease with neurological complications caused by reactivation of varicella zoster virus in dorsal root ganglia of spinal cord which is also known as “Shingles.” Suppression of immune system is the major predisposing factor for reactivation of latent virus. Disease is mainly characterized by rash, vesicles and pain along one or more dermatomes which are innervated from one or more spinal nerve roots. Complications may be present after a while despite of patient treatment. Motor involvement is included. Some previous studies showed segmental zoster paresis as a rare complication, a few weeks after first presentation, among immunocompetent individuals. We present post herpetic motor involvement of C5 and C6 in a 59-year-old woman who underwent chemotherapy and radiotherapy due to breast cancer, manifesting left upper limb weakness and paresis, 6 months after left partial mastectomy. Segmental paresis of zoster virus should be considered as a cause of motor impairment in an immunocompromised person suffering from shingles. PMID:26436084

  5. Primary varicella infection presenting with headache and elevated intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Gilad, Oded; Shefer-Averbuch, Noa; Garty, Ben Zion

    2015-05-01

    Primary varicella infection may be associated with neurologic complications, such as cerebritis and meningoencephalitis. Several cases of varicella infection with elevated intracranial pressure have been reported. We describe a 13-year-old immunocompetent girl who presented with a clinical picture of headaches and elevated intracranial pressure as the only manifestation of primary varicella zoster infection. The working diagnosis at first was pseudotumor cerebri based on complaints of headache of 2 weeks' duration, in addition to vomiting and papilledema, without fever or skin eruption. On lumbar puncture, opening pressure was 420 mmH2O, but mild pleocytosis and mildly elevated protein level ruled out the diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri. Our patient had no history of previous varicella infection, and she did not receive the varicella zoster vaccine. Serology tests, done on admission and repeated 2 months later, suggested primary varicella infection. The literature on varicella infection associated with pseudotumor cerebri or elevated intracranial pressure is reviewed.

  6. The differences in short- and long-term varicella-zoster virus (VZV) immunoglobulin G levels following varicella vaccination of healthcare workers measured by VZV fluorescent-antibody-to-membrane-antigen assay (FAMA), VZV time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay and a VZV purified glycoprotein enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Maple, P A C; Haedicke, J; Quinlivan, M; Steinberg, S P; Gershon, A A; Brown, K E; Breuer, J

    2016-08-01

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) reporting no history of varicella frequently receive varicella vaccination (vOka) if they test varicella-zoster virus (VZV) immunoglobulin G (IgG) negative. In this study, the utilities of VZV-IgG time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay (VZV-TRFIA) and a commercial VZV-IgG purified glycoprotein enzyme immunoassay (gpEIA) currently used in England for confirming VZV immunity have been compared to the fluorescent-antibody-to-membrane-antigen assay (FAMA). A total of 110 HCWs received two doses of vOka vaccine spaced 6 weeks apart and sera collected pre-vaccination (n = 100), at 6 weeks post-completion of vaccination (n = 86) and at 12-18 months follow-up (n = 73) were analysed. Pre-vaccination, by FAMA, 61·0% sera were VZV IgG negative, and compared to FAMA the sensitivities of VZV-TRFIA and gpEIA were 74·4% [95% confidence interval (CI) 57·9-87·0] and 46·2% (95% CI 30·1-62·8), respectively. Post-completion of vaccination the seroconversion rate by FAMA was 93·7% compared to rates of 95·8% and 70·8% determined by VZV-TRFIA and gpEIA, respectively. At 12-18 months follow-up seropositivity rates by FAMA, VZV-TRFIA and gpEIA were 78·1%, 74·0% and 47·9%, respectively. Compared to FAMA the sensitivities of VZV-TRFIA and gpEIA for measuring VZV IgG following vaccination were 96·4% (95% CI 91·7-98·8) and 74·6% (95% CI 66·5-81·6), respectively. Using both FAMA and VZV-TRFIA to identify healthy adult VZV susceptibles and measure seroconversion showed that vOka vaccination of HCWs is highly immunogenic.

  7. Varicella vaccination coverage inverse correlation with varicella hospitalizations in Spain.

    PubMed

    Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Garcia-Garcia, Laura; San-Martin, María; Gil-de-Miguel, Angel

    2014-12-12

    Varicella vaccines available in Spain were marketed in 1998 and 2003 for non-routine use. Since 2006 some regions included universal varicella vaccination in their regional routine vaccination programs at 15-18 months of age. Regions without universal vaccination in toddlers, but instead with the strategy of vaccinating susceptible adolescents, reached different varicella vaccination coverage through private market. This study shows the correlation between severe varicella zoster virus infections requiring hospitalization and the varicella vaccination coverage by region. A total of 3009 hospital discharges related to varicella were reported in 2009-2010. The overall annual rate of hospitalization was 3.27 cases per 100,000. In children younger than 5 years old varicella hospitalization rate was 30.73 cases per 100,000. Varicella related hospitalizations were significantly lower in the regions with universal vaccination. In those regions without universal vaccination at 15-18 months of age, those with higher coverage in private market showed lower hospitalization rates.

  8. Deep vein thrombosis: a rare signature of herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Maity, Pranab Kumar; Chakrabarti, Nandini; Mondal, Manas; Patar, Kartick; Mukhopadhyay, Mainak

    2014-01-01

    Reactivation of varicella zoster Infection is known to cause manifold complications. However, deep vein thrombosis has been rarely described as an associate. Here we present the case of a young immunocompetent male with such a predicament.

  9. Congenital varicella syndrome: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ki Hoon; Park, Yun-Jung; Hong, Soon-Cheol; Lee, Eun Hee; Lee, Ji-Sung; Oh, Min-Jeong; Kim, Hai-Joong

    2016-07-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a teratogen that can cross the placenta and cause the congenital varicella syndrome (CVS), which is characterised by multi-system anomalies. There have been 130 reported cases of CVS from 1947 to 2013. The estimated incidence of CVS was 0.59% and 0.84% for women infected with VZV during the entire pregnancy and for those infected the first 20 weeks of pregnancy, respectively. Nine cases were reported at 21-27 weeks of gestation and one case was identified at 36 weeks. Herpes zoster caused CVS in two cases. Regarding treatment, varicella zoster immunoglobulin treatment, irrespective of gestational age, should be considered in addition to antiviral drugs for women who have been exposed to or infected with virus. PMID:26965725

  10. Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Julie L; Amzat, Rianot; Martin, Nicolle

    2015-09-01

    Herpes zoster is a commonly encountered disorder. It is estimated that there are approximately 1 million new cases of herpes zoster in the United States annually, with an incidence of 3.2 per 1000 person-years. Patients with HIV have the greatest risk of developing herpes zoster ophthalmicus compared with the general population. Other risk factors include advancing age, use of immunosuppressive medications, and primary infection in infancy or in utero. Vaccination against the virus is a primary prevention modality. Primary treatments include antivirals, analgesics, and anticonvulsants. Management may require surgical intervention and comanagement with pain specialists, psychiatrists, and infectious disease specialists.

  11. Herpes zoster in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Miller, L H

    1976-09-01

    Herpes zoster is a self-limited disorder which in most cases resolves without complications. The specific defect in host immunity that permits activation of latent V-Z virus and the occurrence of herpes zoster in both healthy and debilitated individuals has not yet been identified. In some patients, particularly the aged, complications occur during the acute phase of the disease or there are sequelae that may incapacitate the patient later. The most important of these is postherpetic neuralgia. In the elderly the chance of developing neuralgia following herpes zoster is about 50%. Involvement of the eye may produce minimal scarring or permanent blindness. There is an increasing incidence and severity of herpes zoster in association with malignant disease and in particular with Hodgkin's disease. Treatment of herpes zoster in the elderly should be determined by presenting symptoms. Topical medication such as the basic shake lotion is helpful. Personal experience and published reports suggest that early systemic administration of corticosteroids to healthy patients with severe herpes zoster pain with lessen the occurrence of postherpetic neuralgia. Administration of herpes zoster immune globulin is only effective in reducing the morbidity or preventing varicella in high risk individuals. ZIG does not affect the clinical course of herpes zoster.

  12. A tyrosine-based motif and a casein kinase II phosphorylation site regulate the intracellular trafficking of the varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein I, a protein localized in the trans-Golgi network.

    PubMed Central

    Alconada, A; Bauer, U; Hoflack, B

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the intracellular trafficking of the envelope glycoprotein I (gpI) of the varicella-zoster virus, a human herpes virus whose assembly is believed to occur in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and/or in endocytic compartments. When expressed in HeLa cells in the absence of additional virally encoded factors, this type-I membrane protein localizes to the TGN and cycles between this compartment and the cell surface. The expression of gpI promotes the recruitment of the AP-1 Golgi-specific assembly proteins onto TGN membranes, strongly suggesting that gpI, like the mannose 6-phosphate receptors, can leave the TGN in clathrin-coated vesicles for subsequent transport to endosomes. Its return from the cell surface to the TGN also occurs through endosomes. The transfer of the gpI cytoplasmic domain onto a reporter molecule shows that this domain is sufficient to confer TGN localization. Mutational analysis of this domain indicates that proper subcellular localization and cycling of gpI depend on two different determinants, a tyrosine-containing tetrapeptide related to endocytosis sorting signals and a cluster of acidic amino acids containing casein kinase II phosphorylatable residues. Thus, the VZV gpI and the mannose 6-phosphate receptors, albeit localized in different intracellular compartments at steady-state, follow similar trafficking pathways and share similar sorting mechanisms. Images PMID:8947032

  13. Perspective on live varicella vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gershon, Anne A; Katz, Samuel L

    2008-03-01

    The attenuation of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) by Takahashi in 1974 was a remarkable achievement. It swiftly led to development of a live vaccine against chickenpox, which was initially tested in Japan. With its successful employment in immunocompromised children to prevent morbidity and mortality due to varicella, the vaccine began to be tested in healthy children in Japan and elsewhere. In the United States, vaccine use progressed from extensive clinical trials that demonstrated safety and efficacy to universal immunization of healthy infants and children. In the past 10 years, >30 million healthy American individuals, mostly children, have been vaccinated. With increasing use of vaccine, there has been a concomitant decrease in the incidence of disease, along with decreases in hospitalizations and deaths due to VZV. To improve protection, however, a 2-dose schedule of immunization was recommended for routine use in all children by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in June 2006. At roughly the same time, licensure of the combined measles-mumps-rubella-varicella vaccine was completed, which allowed harmonization of immunization against these 4 viruses with 1 injection given twice in childhood. Concomitantly, a version of the varicella vaccine with 10 times the titer was developed for immunization of healthy individuals >60 years of age against herpes zoster (HZ). Although elimination of VZV from human populations may not yet be possible, the combined approach of immunization against both varicella in childhood and HZ in adulthood in the developed world are predicted to dramatically increase our control of this troublesome virus.

  14. Varicella Pneumonia in a 39-year-old Female in Third Trimester Twin Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Baljic, Rusmir; Hadzovic, Meliha; Mehanic, Snjezana; Lukovac, Enra; Koluder-Cimic, Nada; Baljic, Izet; Imsirovic, Bilal

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY CONFLICT OF INTEREST: none declared. Introduction Chickenpox is disease caused by varicella-zoster virus (VZV), with possibly devastated consequences during pregnancy, for mother and neonate. Pneumonia is most common complication in pregnancy with very high mortality. Case report A 39-year-old female in third trimester twin pregnancy, referred to Clinic for infectious diseases in Sarajevo, with five days history of illness. Before the admission her condition get worse, with fatigue, exhaustion, and shortness of breath. In a first three days patient was febrile, tachydispnoic and ortopnoic. We started therapy with acyclovir and antibiotic. After four days we had detoriation in patient’s condition. Chest X-ray revealed infiltrative shadows in basal parts of lung. Antimicrobial therapy was changed and corticosteroids were associated. Significant improvement was noticed after five days of therapy. Conclusion Varicella pneumonia during third trimester may have serious consequences for mother and child, with possible fatal outcome. PMID:24493990

  15. The Uncommon Localization of Herpes Zoster

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Herpes zoster is an acute, cutaneous viral infection caused by the reactivation of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) that is the cause of varicella. It is an acute neurological disease which can often lead to serious postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). Different nerves can be included with the skin rash in the area of its enervation especially cranial nerves (CV) and intercostal nerves. Case report: In this report we present a patient with herpes zoster which involved ulnar nerve with skin rash in the region of ulnar innervations in women with no disease previously diagnosed. The failure of her immune system may be explained by great emotional stress and overwork she had been exposed to with neglecting proper nutrition in that period. Conclusion: Herpes zoster may involve any nerve with characteristic skin rash in the area of its innervations, and failure in immune system which leads reactivation of VZV may be caused by other factors besides the underlying illness. PMID:26980938

  16. A rare case of primary inoculation tuberculosis seen after varicella.

    PubMed

    Polat, Meltem; Kara, Soner Sertan; Tapısız, Anıl; Tezer, Hasan; Öğüt, Betül; Uluoğlu, Ömer

    2015-01-01

    Primary inoculation tuberculosis (TB) is a rare form of cutaneous TB resulting from direct introduction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis into the skin or mucosa of a previously uninfected, nonimmune person. We herein report the first case, to our knowledge, of primary inoculation TB to be seen after varicella; this case explains the possible mechanism of varicella-zoster virus-mediated transient cellular immune suppression that predisposed the patient to cutaneous TB. In this case, we believe that varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection predisposed the patient to primary inoculation TB by leading to direct inoculation of tuberculosis bacilli through vesicles or by suppressing cellular immunity. PMID:26690605

  17. In Vitro-Selected Drug-Resistant Varicella-Zoster Virus Mutants in the Thymidine Kinase and DNA Polymerase Genes Yield Novel Phenotype-Genotype Associations and Highlight Differences between Antiherpesvirus Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Topalis, D.; Fiten, P.; McGuigan, C.; Balzarini, J.; Opdenakker, G.; Snoeck, R.

    2012-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is usually associated with mild to moderate illness in immunocompetent patients. However, older age and immune deficiency are the most important risk factors linked with virus reactivation and severe complications. Treatment of VZV infections is based on nucleoside analogues, such as acyclovir (ACV) and its valyl prodrug valacyclovir, penciclovir (PCV) as its prodrug famciclovir, and bromovinyldeoxyuridine (BVDU; brivudin) in some areas. The use of the pyrophosphate analogue foscarnet (PFA) is restricted to ACV-resistant (ACVr) VZV infections. Since antiviral drug resistance is an emerging problem, we attempt to describe the contributions of specific mutations in the viral thymidine kinase (TK) gene identified following selection with ACV, BVDU and its derivative BVaraU (sorivudine), and the bicyclic pyrimidine nucleoside analogues (BCNAs), a new class of potent and specific anti-VZV agents. The string of 6 Cs at nucleotides 493 to 498 of the VZV TK gene appeared to function as a hot spot for nucleotide insertions or deletions. Novel amino acid substitutions (G24R and T86A) in VZV TK were also linked to drug resistance. Six mutations were identified in the “palm domain” of VZV DNA polymerase in viruses selected for resistance to PFA, PCV, and the 2-phophonylmethoxyethyl (PME) purine derivatives. The investigation of the contributions of specific mutations in VZV TK or DNA polymerase to antiviral drug resistance and their impacts on the structures of the viral proteins indicated specific patterns of cross-resistance and highlighted important differences, not only between distinct classes of antivirals, but also between ACV and PCV. PMID:22190713

  18. Varicella-Zoster Virus Immediate-Early 63 Protein Interacts with Human Antisilencing Function 1 Protein and Alters Its Ability To Bind Histones H3.1 and H3.3▿

    PubMed Central

    Ambagala, Aruna P.; Bosma, Trent; Ali, Mir A.; Poustovoitov, Maxim; Chen, Jason J.; Gershon, Michael D.; Adams, Peter D.; Cohen, Jeffrey I.

    2009-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) immediate-early 63 protein (IE63) is abundantly expressed during both acute infection in vitro and latent infection in human ganglia. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we found that VZV IE63 interacts with human antisilencing function 1 protein (ASF1). ASF1 is a nucleosome assembly factor which is a member of the H3/H4 family of histone chaperones. IE63 coimmunoprecipitated and colocalized with ASF1 in transfected cells expressing IE63 and in VZV-infected cells. IE63 also colocalized with ASF1 in both lytic and latently VZV-infected enteric neurons. ASF1 exists in two isoforms, ASF1a and ASF1b, in mammalian cells. IE63 preferentially bound to ASF1a, and the amino-terminal 30 amino acids of ASF1a were critical for its interaction with IE63. VZV IE63 amino acids 171 to 208 and putative phosphorylation sites of IE63, both of which are critical for virus replication and latency in rodents, were important for the interaction of IE63 with ASF1. Finally, we found that IE63 increased the binding of ASF1 to histone H3.1 and H3.3, which suggests that IE63 may help to regulate levels of histones in virus-infected cells. Since ASF1 mediates eviction and deposition of histones during transcription, the interaction of VZV IE63 with ASF1 may help to regulate transcription of viral or cellular genes during lytic and/or latent infection. PMID:18971269

  19. Low Prevalence of Varicella Zoster Virus and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 in Saliva from Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Persons in the Era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunmei C.; Yepes, Luis C.; Danaher, Robert J.; Berger, Joseph R.; Mootoor, Yunanan; Kryscio, Richard J.; Miller, Craig S.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Human herpesviruses (HHVs), e.g. herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1, Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus, appear in saliva at greater frequency in persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) than healthy individuals. However, it is not known if varicella zoster virus (VZV) and HSV-2 appear simultaneously during HIV infection at greater frequency in saliva during this era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and amounts of VZV and HSV-2 in the saliva of HIV-infected, orally asymptomatic patients. Study Design Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to investigate the prevalence, quantity, risk, and correlates of salivary VZV and HSV-2 from 59 HIV-seropositive individuals and 53 healthy controls in a case-control, cross-sectional study. Seventy-eight percent of the HIV-seropositive patients (46/59) were taking HAART. Results VZV DNA was detected in the saliva of 5.1% (3/59) of the HIV-positive group and in only one healthy control 1.9% (1/53; P = 0.62). The amount of VZV DNA in the expressors was low, generally less than 1,100 copies/mL with no observed difference between the HIV-positive group and the controls (P= 1.0). HSV-2 DNA was not detected in either group. In the HIV-infected group, VZV shedding occurred in those on HAART, but was not associated with oral lesions, specific CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell levels, or demographic factors. Conclusions VZV was detected at low prevalence in the saliva of HIV-infected persons whereas HSV-2 was not detected in the saliva of this cohort. HAART does not appear to diminish the risk for asymptomatic VZV shedding. PMID:20123407

  20. Zeroing in on zoster: A tale of many disorders produced by one virus.

    PubMed

    Galetta, Kristin M; Gilden, Don

    2015-11-15

    While herpes zoster infection has been recognized since antiquity, chickenpox (varicella) was confused with smallpox until the 1800s, when both illnesses became better understood. In the 20th century, varicella zoster virus (VZV) was shown to cause varicella upon primary (first-time) infection and herpes zoster (shingles) after reactivation of latent VZV. Scientific progress over the past 50 years has rapidly advanced the understanding and prevention of disease produced by VZV. Combined imaging and virological studies continue to reveal the protean neurological, ocular and visceral disorders produced by VZV. PMID:26454371

  1. [Manifestation of Zoster in the Oral Cavity].

    PubMed

    Vered, M; Zlotogorski-Hurvitz, A

    2016-01-01

    Zoster (shingles) is assumed to affect 10-20% of the individuals who have been exposed to the varicella zoster virus (VZV). It is expected to develop among the elderly, usually on the background of a weakened immune system. In those cases that the trigeminal branches are involved by zoster, unilateral mucosal and cutaneous vesiculo-ulcerative lesions will develop. Intense pain usually precedes the overt lesions of zoster, which sometimes might mimic acute pain of dental origin. Careful anamnesis and thorough clinical examination should lead to a correct diagnosis. Since zoster, in general, is associated with serious morbidity, including post-herpetic neuralgia, ocular damage and hearing deficits, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) currently recommend shingles vaccination, especially for those who are > 60-year old. PMID:27295930

  2. Herpes zoster: A clinicocytopathological insight

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Snehal; Singaraju, Sasidhar; Einstein, A; Sharma, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster or shingles is reactivation of the varicella zoster virus that had entered the cutaneous nerve endings during an earlier episode of chicken pox traveled to the dorsal root ganglia and remained in a latent form. This condition is characterized by occurrence of multiple, painful, unilateral vesicles and ulceration which shows a typical single dermatome involvement. In this case report, we present a patient with herpes zoster involving the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve, with unilateral vesicles over the right side of lower third of face along the trigeminal nerve tract, with intraoral involvement of buccal mucosa, labial mucosa and the tongue of the same side. Cytopathology revealed classic features of herpes infection including inclusion bodies, perinuclear halo and multinucleated cells. PMID:27721631

  3. Herpes Zoster Vaccination: Controversies and Common Clinical Questions.

    PubMed

    Van Epps, Puja; Schmader, Kenneth E; Canaday, David H

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster, clinically referred to as shingles, is an acute, cutaneous viral infection caused by reactivation of the varicella zoster virus, the same virus that causes chickenpox. The incidence of herpes zoster and its complications increase with decline in cell-mediated immunity, including age-associated decline. The most effective management strategy for herpes zoster is prevention of the disease through vaccination in those who are most vulnerable. Despite the demonstrated efficacy in reducing the incidence and severity of herpes zoster, the uptake of vaccine remains low. Here, we will discuss the controversies that surround the live herpes zoster vaccine and address the common clinical questions that arise. We will also discuss the new adjuvanted herpes zoster vaccine currently under investigation.

  4. Successes and challenges in varicella vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Papaloukas, Orestis; Giannouli, Georgia

    2014-01-01

    Varicella is a highly contagious disease caused by primary infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV). VZV infection, as well as varicella vaccination, induces VZV-specific antibody and T-cell-mediated immunity, essential for recovery. The immune responses developed contribute to protection following re-exposure to VZV. When cell-mediated immunity declines, as occurs with aging or immunosuppression, reactivation of VZV leads to herpes zoster (HZ). It has been almost 20 years since universal varicella vaccination has been implemented in many areas around the globe and this has resulted in a significant reduction of varicella-associated disease burden. Successes are reviewed here, whilst emphasis is put on the challenges ahead. Most countries that have not implemented routine childhood varicella vaccination have chosen to vaccinate high-risk groups alone. The main reasons for not introducing universal vaccination are discussed, including fear of age shift of peak incidence age and of HZ incidence increase. Possible reasons for not observing the predicted increase in HZ incidence are explored. The advantages and disadvantages of universal vs targeted vaccination as well as different vaccination schedules are discussed. PMID:24757524

  5. Efficacy of varicella (VZV) vaccination: an update for the clinician

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Zhu, Lucy; Zhu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection causes two distinct clinical conditions. Primary varicella infection results in chickenpox, a contagious rash illness typically seen among children. VZV can reactivate years after the initial infection to cause herpes zoster (HZ) and lead to post-herpetic neuralgia, a common complication resulting in persistent pain that may last for years after the zoster rash resolves. A person’s risk of having longer lasting and more severe pain associated with HZ increases with age. Since the introduction of VZV vaccines, the rates of infection, hospitalizations, and mortality have declined. In this review, we discuss in detail current VZV vaccines available for the prevention of VZV and HZ infections. Varilrix (GSK Biologicals, UK), Varivax (Merck, USA) and the combined measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella (MMRV) vaccine contain the live attenuated Oka strain of VZV for routine varicella vaccination. While Zostavax is the only HZ vaccine currently approved for use in the United States and the European Union [EMEA, 2011], a subunit vaccine candidate called HZ/su has recently shown improved efficacy for zoster prevention in two clinical trial phase III studies. VariZIG, a post-exposure prophylactic, uses zoster immune globulin to prevent VZV infection in those who have recently been in contact with VZV but lack evidence of varicella immunity and are contraindicated to receive the varicella vaccine. Further, we discuss the skin tropic and neurotropic factor VZV ORF7 gene and its involvement in varicella infection, reactivation and latency in ganglia. Ultimately, these studies can contribute to the development of a neuroattenuated vaccine candidate against varicella or a vector for delivery of other virus antigens. PMID:27551429

  6. Efficacy of varicella (VZV) vaccination: an update for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Zhu, Lucy; Zhu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection causes two distinct clinical conditions. Primary varicella infection results in chickenpox, a contagious rash illness typically seen among children. VZV can reactivate years after the initial infection to cause herpes zoster (HZ) and lead to post-herpetic neuralgia, a common complication resulting in persistent pain that may last for years after the zoster rash resolves. A person's risk of having longer lasting and more severe pain associated with HZ increases with age. Since the introduction of VZV vaccines, the rates of infection, hospitalizations, and mortality have declined. In this review, we discuss in detail current VZV vaccines available for the prevention of VZV and HZ infections. Varilrix (GSK Biologicals, UK), Varivax (Merck, USA) and the combined measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella (MMRV) vaccine contain the live attenuated Oka strain of VZV for routine varicella vaccination. While Zostavax is the only HZ vaccine currently approved for use in the United States and the European Union [EMEA, 2011], a subunit vaccine candidate called HZ/su has recently shown improved efficacy for zoster prevention in two clinical trial phase III studies. VariZIG, a post-exposure prophylactic, uses zoster immune globulin to prevent VZV infection in those who have recently been in contact with VZV but lack evidence of varicella immunity and are contraindicated to receive the varicella vaccine. Further, we discuss the skin tropic and neurotropic factor VZV ORF7 gene and its involvement in varicella infection, reactivation and latency in ganglia. Ultimately, these studies can contribute to the development of a neuroattenuated vaccine candidate against varicella or a vector for delivery of other virus antigens. PMID:27551429

  7. Varicella-zoster virus-specific, cell-mediated immunity with interferon-gamma release assay after vaccination of college students with no or intermediate IgG antibody response.

    PubMed

    Terada, Kihei; Itoh, Yuri; Fujii, Akihide; Kitagawa, Seiko; Ogita, Satoko; Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2015-02-01

    This study measured Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) specific cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and antibodies to clarify immune response after vaccination in 68 college students with negative or intermediate IgG antibody status. The enrolled numbers of negative, intermediate, and positive VZV-IgG antibody were 27, 41, and 28 students, respectively. The positive rates of CMI were 3.7% (1/27), 41.5% (17/41), and 96.4% (27/28) before vaccination, respectively. After vaccination, the IgG antibody titers became significantly higher in the intermediate IgG group compared to those in the negative IgG group (P < 0.01), but CMI did not differ significantly between the two groups. Ninety-three percent (38/41) of the intermediate IgG antibody group and 41% (11/27) of the negative IgG antibody group became positive for the IgG antibody after vaccination (P < 0.0001). When subjects were divided into negative, intermediate, and positive CMI by interferon-gamma values before vaccination, the IgG antibody and interferon-gamma values increased significantly in the positive CMI group compared to the negative CMI group after vaccination (P < 0.01 and P < 0.01, respectively). All (17/17) of positive CMI group and 61% (27/44) of negative CMI group became positive for the IgG antibody after vaccination (P < 0.01). Ninety-four percent (16/17) of positive CMI group and 59% (28/44) of negative CMI group became positive for CMI after vaccination (P < 0.05). Ninety-six percent (22/23) of the subjects with a history of vaccination became IgG seropositive after a second dose of vaccination, but 22% (5/23) of them remained negative for CMI. CMI is valuable information to identify potential non-responders to vaccination and to predict risk of clinical VZV infection.

  8. Occupancy of RNA Polymerase II Phosphorylated on Serine 5 (RNAP S5P) and RNAP S2P on Varicella-Zoster Virus Genes 9, 51, and 66 Is Independent of Transcript Abundance and Polymerase Location within the Gene

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Heather H.; Timberlake, Kensey B.; Austin, Zoe A.; Badani, Hussain; Sanford, Bridget; Tremblay, Keriann; Baird, Nicholas L.; Jones, Kenneth; Rovnak, Joel; Frietze, Seth; Gilden, Don

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Regulation of gene transcription in varicella-zoster virus (VZV), a ubiquitous human neurotropic alphaherpesvirus, requires coordinated binding of multiple host and virus proteins onto specific regions of the virus genome. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is widely used to determine the location of specific proteins along a genomic region. Since the size range of sheared virus DNA fragments governs the limit of accurate protein localization, particularly for compact herpesvirus genomes, we used a quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based assay to determine the efficiency of VZV DNA shearing before ChIP, after which the assay was used to determine the relationship between transcript abundance and the occupancy of phosphorylated RNA polymerase II (RNAP) on the gene promoter, body, and terminus of VZV genes 9, 51, and 66. The abundance of VZV gene 9, 51, and 66 transcripts in VZV-infected human fetal lung fibroblasts was determined by reverse transcription-linked quantitative PCR. Our results showed that the C-terminal domain of RNAP is hyperphosphorylated at serine 5 (S5P) on VZV genes 9, 51, and 66 independently of transcript abundance and the location within the virus gene at both 1 and 3 days postinfection (dpi). In contrast, phosphorylated serine 2 (S2P)-modified RNAP was not detected at any virus gene location at 3 dpi and was detected at levels only slightly above background levels at 1 dpi. IMPORTANCE Regulation of herpesvirus gene transcription is an elaborate choreography between proteins and DNA that is revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). We used a quantitative PCR-based assay to determine fragment size after DNA shearing, a critical parameter in ChIP assays, and exposed a basic difference in the mechanism of transcription between mammalian cells and VZV. We found that hyperphosphorylation at serine 5 of the C-terminal domain of RNAP along the lengths of VZV genes (the promoter, body, and transcription termination site) was independent of m

  9. Efficacy of live zoster vaccine in preventing zoster and postherpetic neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Gilden, D.

    2011-01-01

    Declining cell-mediated immunity to varicella zoster virus (VZV) in elderly individuals results in virus reactivation manifest by zoster (shingles) and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). To prevent virus reactivation, a new VZV vaccine (Zostavax, Merck) that boosts cell-mediated immunity to VZV was developed. The 3-year Shingles Prevention Study showed that Zostavax significantly reduced burden of disease due to zoster and PHN. Despite its cost-effectiveness for adults ages 65 to 75 years, as determined in the US, Canada and UK, less than 2% of immunocompetent adults over age 60 years in the US were immunized in 2007. This was due to a combination of lack of patient awareness of the vaccine, physicians’ uncertainty about the duration of protection, and different cost-sharing plans for immunization. Nevertheless, zoster vaccine is safe, effective, and highly recommended for immunization of immunocompetent individuals over age 60 years with no history of recent zoster. PMID:21294791

  10. Use of a current varicella vaccine as a live polyvalent vaccine vector.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kouki; Mori, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is the causative agent of varicella and zoster. The varicella vaccine was developed to control VZV infection in children. The currently available Oka vaccine strain is the only live varicella vaccine approved by the World Health Organization. We previously cloned the complete genome of the Oka vaccine strain into a bacterial artificial chromosome vector and then successfully reconstituted the virus. We then used this system to generate a recombinant Oka vaccine virus expressing mumps virus gene(s). The new recombinant vaccine may be an effective polyvalent live vaccine that provides protection against both varicella and mumps viruses. In this review, we discussed about possibility of polyvalent live vaccine(s) using varicella vaccine based on our recent studies.

  11. Herpes zoster on the face in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Preeti; Gharote, Harshkant; Singh, Pooja; Jain-Choudhary, Palak

    2014-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a localised disease caused by reactivation of the varicella zoster virus that enters the cutaneous nerve endings during an earlier episode of chicken pox, travels to the dorsal root ganglia, and remains in latent form. The condition is characterised by occurrence of multiple, painful, unilateral vesicles and ulceration, and shows a typical single dermatome innervated by single dorsal root or cranial sensory ganglion. Involvement of three or more dermatomes is known as disseminated zoster and seen in immunocompromised individuals. Complications of herpes zoster include ocular sequelae, bacterial superinfection of the lesions, meningoencephalitis and postherpetic neuralgia. The incidence of herpes zoster increases with age and immunosuppression, therefore prompt management is necessary to avoid morbidity and mortality in these individuals. We present two case reports of herpes zoster, one involving the maxillary and mandibular branches of the trigeminal nerve while the other involves all branches of the trigeminal nerve. PMID:25331144

  12. A case for varicella vaccination in the immunosuppressed

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Michael Vaclav; Atabani, Sowsan F; Khan, Nasser; Steiner, Kate; Haque, Tanzina; Slapak, Gabrielle

    2009-01-01

    A middle-aged man with long-standing Crohn disease maintained in remission on low-dose immunosuppression presented with abdominal pain. Over the following few days he developed a vesicular rash, became dyspnoeic, confused and had two seizures. Despite high-dose intravenous aciclovir, he died. Disseminated varicella zoster virus, the cause of his death, could potentially have been prevented had he received varicella vaccination at an earlier stage. PMID:21686799

  13. Viral Genome Sequencing Proves Nosocomial Transmission of Fatal Varicella

    PubMed Central

    Depledge, Daniel P.; Brown, Julianne; Macanovic, Jasna; Underhill, Gill; Breuer, Judith

    2016-01-01

    We report the first use of whole viral genome sequencing to identify nosocomial transmission of varicella-zoster virus with fatal outcome. The index case patient, nursed in source isolation, developed disseminated zoster with rash present for 1 day before being transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU). Two patients who had received renal transplants while inpatients in an adjacent ward developed chickenpox and 1 died; neither patient had direct contact with the index patient. PMID:27571904

  14. Rare Occurrence of Herpes Zoster of Trigeminal Nerve following Extraction of Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Christy, A. Winnifred; Raja Deva Thanmbi, T. Jones; Leelavathy, J.; Rhema Louis, Antoinette

    2015-01-01

    Herpes Zoster also known as Shingles is an acute viral infection which is an extremely painful and incapacitating ailment. It results from the reactivation of the varicella zoster virus. The triggering factors for the onset of an attack of Herpes Zoster include some form of immunosuppression. The diagnosis of Herpes Zoster can be made on proper medical history and a thorough clinical examination. Here is the report of a male patient affected by Herpes Zoster infection which followed after extraction of a lower first molar. PMID:26819783

  15. Blindness resulting from orbital complications of ophthalmic zoster

    PubMed Central

    Sosnowska, Magdalena; Zajkowska, Agata; Garkowski, Adam; Czupryna, Piotr; Pancewicz, Sławomir; Zajkowska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster ophthalmicus occurs when the latent varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivates in the trigeminal ganglion and ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve. In the elderly, there is a sharp increase in the tendency of secondary skin bacterial infections occurrence due to the deterioration of capabilities of self-care and changed sanitation. We present a case of patient who developed phlegmon of the orbit, which resulted with complete unilateral blindness. Varicella zoster virus infection in the elderly may have a severe course due to the progressive weakening of the immune system related to the age. Moreover, skin lesions around the eye socket require special care in prevention of bacterial superinfections due to the extremely high risk of life-threatening complications or disability. Neuralgia resistant to pharmacological treatment present in the course of ophthalmic zoster and difficulty in caring about skin lesions predispose to the occurrence of complications. PMID:26759550

  16. Complicated Varicella Infection at 8-year-old Boy with Pulmonary Agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hadzovic–Cengic, Meliha; Baljic, Rusmir; Hadzic, Amir; Lukovac, Enra; Mehanic, Snjezana; Ahmetspahic-Begic, Aida

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY CONFLICT OF INTEREST: none declared. Introduction Varicella or chickenpox is highly contagious, childhood infectious disease caused by primary infection with varicellazoster virus from the herpes family of viruses. Usually it has a mild clinical course, rarely with described complication, mostly affecting respiratory tract and rarely the central nervous system. Case report The case present 8 year old boy hospitalized eighth day of disease with clinical pictures of varicella complication. Upon receipt tachydyspnea, high fever, tachycardia, hypotensive with positive findings on lung auscultation in the sense of pneumonia. Extremely high values of non-specific inflammatory parameters are implied on bacterial infection which is treated using triple antimicrobial therapy and antiviral. A detailed clinical, laboratory and radiological evaluation is determined of clinical disease complication under a picture of MODS that required prolonged multidisciplinary treatment in ICU. Conclusion The disease had a favorable clinical outcome in terms of training completely without consequences but, with the detected congenital absence lower lobe of right lung and transposition of the brachiocephalic trunk. PMID:24493991

  17. Herpes zoster reactivation after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: A case report.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Krishnamoorthy; Pillai, Biju S; Bansal, Devesh

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a reactivated varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection of the sensory nerve ganglion, peripheral nerve, and its branches. Mechanical trauma to the nervous system can reactivate VZV. It is well known that extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) can produce mechanical damage to the tissue. We report a rare case of herpes zoster reactivation after SWL for treatment of 1.2 cm size renal stone in a 63-year-old male patient.

  18. Herpes zoster reactivation after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, Krishnamoorthy; Pillai, Biju S.; Bansal, Devesh

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a reactivated varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection of the sensory nerve ganglion, peripheral nerve, and its branches. Mechanical trauma to the nervous system can reactivate VZV. It is well known that extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) can produce mechanical damage to the tissue. We report a rare case of herpes zoster reactivation after SWL for treatment of 1.2 cm size renal stone in a 63-year-old male patient. PMID:27555686

  19. Herpes zoster reactivation after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: A case report.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Krishnamoorthy; Pillai, Biju S; Bansal, Devesh

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a reactivated varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection of the sensory nerve ganglion, peripheral nerve, and its branches. Mechanical trauma to the nervous system can reactivate VZV. It is well known that extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) can produce mechanical damage to the tissue. We report a rare case of herpes zoster reactivation after SWL for treatment of 1.2 cm size renal stone in a 63-year-old male patient. PMID:27555686

  20. [Herpes zoster in the pharynx].

    PubMed

    Sipari, Sini; Koivula, Irma; Löppönen, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman was suspected of having a peritonsillar abscess. She had a light-coloured coating on the pharynx and the larynx, bordering to the left of the median line, as well as laryngeal edema on the side of the lesion. On the basis of precisely unilateral findings we arrived at pharyngeal herpes zoster as the working diagnosis. The diagnosis was further supported by the detection of varicella-zoster virus DNA in the mucosa and the presence of positive IgM antibody levels. The patient was treated with an antiviral drug, an antimicrobial drug and a glucocorticoid. Mucosal lesions and edema returned to normal, and the patient was discharged. The precise unilaterality of the symptoms is essential to the diagnosis.

  1. [Herpes zoster in the pharynx].

    PubMed

    Sipari, Sini; Koivula, Irma; Löppönen, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman was suspected of having a peritonsillar abscess. She had a light-coloured coating on the pharynx and the larynx, bordering to the left of the median line, as well as laryngeal edema on the side of the lesion. On the basis of precisely unilateral findings we arrived at pharyngeal herpes zoster as the working diagnosis. The diagnosis was further supported by the detection of varicella-zoster virus DNA in the mucosa and the presence of positive IgM antibody levels. The patient was treated with an antiviral drug, an antimicrobial drug and a glucocorticoid. Mucosal lesions and edema returned to normal, and the patient was discharged. The precise unilaterality of the symptoms is essential to the diagnosis. PMID:27244933

  2. [Summary of the multidisciplinary guideline 'Varicella'].

    PubMed

    Rothbarth, Ph H Flip; Hartwig, Nico G; Opstelten, Wim

    2011-01-01

    The multidisciplinary guideline 'Varicella' provides guidelines for diagnosis, therapy, and prevention of chickenpox. At the first pregnancy check, patients should be questioned about previous chickenpox; in case of a negative or doubtful history varicella zoster virus (VZV) serology is indicated. VZV antibody determination is also indicated in patients considered for immunosuppressive therapy and for healthcare workers with a negative VZV history who are in contact with immunocompromised patients. Administration of VZV immunoglobulin within 96 hours following VZV contact can mitigate the infection in pregnant women and patients with T-cell deficiency. VZV immunoglobulin treatment should be considered for newborn infants of mothers who developed chickenpox in the period from five days before to two days after delivery. Antivirals can reduce the severity of infection and are safe during pregnancy. Varicella vaccine protects against chickenpox, but is contraindicated in immunocompromised patients and pregnant women.

  3. [Varicella vaccination in Germany. A provisional appraisal in the context of MMR vaccination].

    PubMed

    Siedler, A; Hecht, J; Rieck, T; Tolksdorf, K; Hengel, H

    2013-09-01

    In 2004, a general varicella immunization was introduced in Germany for infants from the age of 11 months, followed by the subsequent recommendation in 2009 of a second vaccine dose. The vaccination is carried out at the same time as the immunization against measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR). Results of the nationwide sentinel surveillance of varicella and herpes zoster implemented by the Varicella Working Group (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Varizellen, AGV) show that the defined goals for varicella immunization (reduction of varicella-related morbidity, complications and hospitalizations) have been reached within a few years owing to the advances in vaccine coverage. Although coverage rates for varicella have not yet reached the same levels as for MMR, varicella immunization seems to have benefited from the established MMR immunization schedule. Moreover, there is no evidence for an adverse effect on the use and acceptance of the MMR vaccine. Lessons learnt in measles epidemiology (such as trends in the incidence of the disease in adolescents and infants), as well as in the history of MMR recommendations, may be useful for the evaluation of future epidemiological changes with respect to varicella and herpes zoster. In view of a rapidly waning immunity against the varicella zoster virus after vaccination with one dose and the lifelong persistence of the virus, achieving a robust and sustainable immunity in the general population seems to be an ambitious goal. However, this accomplishment will be indispensable in preventing breakthrough infections and a shift of varicella to older ages and in avoiding an increase in herpes zoster incidence.

  4. Mitochondrial Haplogroups as a Risk Factor for Herpes Zoster

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, Rebecca T.; Hulgan, Todd; Kalams, Spyros A.; Fessel, Joshua P.; Samuels, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Herpes zoster, or shingles, is a common, painful reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus infection. Understanding host factors that predispose to herpes zoster may permit development of more effective prevention strategies. Our objective was to examine mitochondrial haplogroups as a potential host factor related to herpes zoster incidence. Methods. Study participants were drawn from BioVU, a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biobank connected to deidentified electronic medical records (EMRs) from Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Our study used 9691 Caucasian individuals with herpes zoster status determined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes 053–053.9. Cases and controls were matched on sex and date of birth within 5 years. Mitochondrial haplogroups were defined from mitochondrial DNA variants genotyped on the Illumina 660W or Illumina Infinium Human-Exome Beadchip. Sex and date of birth were extracted from the EMR. Results. European mitochondrial haplogroup H had a protective association with herpes zoster status (odds ratio [OR] = .82; 95% confidence interval [CI], .71–.94; P = .005), whereas haplogroup clade IWX was a risk factor for herpes zoster status (OR = 1.38; 95% CI, 1.07–1.77; P = .01). Conclusions. Mitochondrial haplogroup influences herpes zoster risk. Knowledge of a patient's mitochondrial haplogroup could allow for a precision approach to the management of herpes zoster risk through vaccination strategies and management of other modifiable risk factors. PMID:27807590

  5. Prevention strategies: herpes zoster, post-herpetic neuralgia and immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Levin, Myron J; Schmader, Kenneth

    2007-09-01

    Herpes zoster is a common condition that can have a significant impact on quality of life among older adults. A significant proportion of older subjects with herpes zoster develop post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN), a chronic condition that is difficult to treat. The Shingles Prevention Study was a large-scale clinical trial to determine the efficacy of a live, attenuated varicella zoster virus (VZV) vaccine ('zoster vaccine') for preventing or attenuating herpes zoster in subjects aged > or =60 years. A total of 38 546 subjects were given either zoster vaccine or placebo. The burden of illness (pain severity-by-duration), incidence of herpes zoster, and PHN decreased by 61.1%, 51.3% and 66.5% (all P<0.001), respectively, following vaccination. Vaccine efficacy was maintained for a 4-year follow-up period. A sub-study of the vaccine trial evaluated VZV-specific immunity in approximately 1200 vaccine or placebo recipients prior to vaccination, at 3 months and annually for 3 years. VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity (CMI) was boosted significantly by the zoster vaccine. This boost remained substantially intact for the 3 years of follow-up. It is likely that the vaccine-induced boost in VZV-specific CMI reversed the natural decline in these responses that occurs as part of the ageing process, thereby protecting vaccine recipients against herpes zoster and its complications.

  6. Sacral Herpes Zoster Associated with Voiding Dysfunction in a Young Patient with Scrub Typhus.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jian

    2015-06-01

    When a patient presents with acute voiding dysfunction without a typical skin rash, it may be difficult to make a diagnosis of herpes zoster. Here, we present a case of scrub typhus in a 25-year-old man with the complication of urinary dysfunction. The patient complained of loss of urinary voiding sensation and constipation. After eight days, he had typical herpes zoster eruptions on the sacral dermatomes and hypalgesia of the S1-S5 dermatomes. No cases of dual infection with varicella zoster virus and Orientia tsutsugamushi were found in the literature. In the described case, scrub typhus probably induced sufficient stress to reactivate the varicella zoster virus. Early recognition of this problem is imperative for prompt and appropriate management, as misdiagnosis can lead to long-term urinary dysfunction. It is important that a diagnosis of herpes zoster be considered, especially in patients with sudden onset urinary retention.

  7. Epidemiology and burden of herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia in Australia, Asia and South America.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Lara Quirino; Macintyre, C Raina; Vujacich, Claudia

    2007-09-01

    Following the development of a herpes zoster vaccine and the successful introduction of widespread varicella vaccination in the USA, many countries are considering similar vaccination programmes. However, before implementing such programmes, it is important to describe the regional baselines of varicella and herpes zoster epidemiology, both to aid the design of vaccination strategies and to observe trends after the introduction of vaccination. In many areas of the world, this information is difficult to gather, and the epidemiology of herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia in these regions is poorly understood. In Australia, available national data sources of varicella and herpes zoster, including serological data, provide reliable estimates of disease and reveal similar rates of incidence and complications to those in Europe and the USA. However, the average age of infection in Australia is higher than in Europe and in the USA. Epidemiological data from Asia and South America are scarce. Unexpectedly for tropical countries, the incidences of herpes zoster in Asia and South America also appear to be comparable with those in Europe and the USA, despite the delayed acquisition of varicella-zoster virus infection in Asia. In Brazil, there is some evidence for higher than expected incidence rates for herpes zoster in young adults. The epidemiology of herpes zoster in Asia and South America suggests that recommendations on treatment and prevention from Europe and the USA may be relevant to these countries.

  8. Molecular studies of the Oka varicella vaccine.

    PubMed

    Quinlivan, Mark; Breuer, Judith; Schmid, D Scott

    2011-09-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is one of eight members of the Herpesviridae family for which humans are the primary host; it causes two distinct diseases, varicella (chickenpox) and zoster (shingles). Varicella results from primary infection, during which the virus establishes latency in sensory neurons, a characteristic of all members of the Alphaherpesvirinae subfamily. Zoster is caused by reactivation of latent virus, which typically occurs when cellular immunity is impaired. VZV is the first human herpesvirus for which a vaccine has been licensed. The vaccine preparation, v-Oka, is a live-attenuated virus stock produced by the classic method of tissue culture passage in animal and human cell lines. Over 90 million doses of the vaccine have been administered in countries worldwide, including the USA, where varicella morbidity and mortality has declined dramatically. Over the last decade, several laboratories have been committed to investigating the mechanism by which the Oka vaccine is attenuated. Mutations have accumulated across the genome of the vaccine during the attenuation process; however, studies of the contribution of these changes to vaccine attenuation have been hampered by the lack of a suitable animal model of VZV disease and by the heterogeneity that exists among the viral population within the vaccine preparation. Notwithstanding, a wealth of data has been generated using various laboratory methodologies. Studies of the vaccine virus in human xenografts implanted in severe combined immunodeficiency-hu mice, have enabled analyses of the replication dynamics of the vaccine in dorsal root ganglia, T lymphocytes and skin. In vitro assays have been used to investigate the effect of vaccine mutations on viral gene expression and sequence analysis of vaccine rash viruses has permitted investigations into spread of the vaccine virus in a human host. We present here a review of what has been learned thus far about the molecular and phenotypic characteristics

  9. Varicella infection modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Katherine A.; Finley, Patrick D.; Moore, Thomas W.; Nozick, Linda Karen; Martin, Nathaniel; Bandlow, Alisa; Detry, Richard Joseph; Evans, Leland B.; Berger, Taylor Eugen

    2013-09-01

    Infectious diseases can spread rapidly through healthcare facilities, resulting in widespread illness among vulnerable patients. Computational models of disease spread are useful for evaluating mitigation strategies under different scenarios. This report describes two infectious disease models built for the US Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) motivated by a Varicella outbreak in a VA facility. The first model simulates disease spread within a notional contact network representing staff and patients. Several interventions, along with initial infection counts and intervention delay, were evaluated for effectiveness at preventing disease spread. The second model adds staff categories, location, scheduling, and variable contact rates to improve resolution. This model achieved more accurate infection counts and enabled a more rigorous evaluation of comparative effectiveness of interventions.

  10. A multicentre trial of live attenuated varicella vaccine in children with leukaemia in remission.

    PubMed

    Gershon, A A; Steinberg, S; Gelb, L; Galasso, G; Borkowsky, W; LaRussa, P; Ferrara, A

    1985-01-01

    Two hundred forty children with acute leukaemia in remission for at least 1 year were immunized with live attenuated varicella vaccine. All were susceptible to varicella before immunization. There was a seroconversion to varicella-zoster virus in approximately 85% after 1 dose, and in 97% after 2 doses. The major side effect was mild to moderate rash, seen mainly in children with maintenance chemotherapy suspended for 1 week before and 1 week after vaccination. Vaccinees with rash were at some risk (10%) to transmit vaccine virus to varicella susceptibles with whom they had close contact. Twenty-nine vaccinees were subsequently exposed to varicella in their households. The attack rate of clinical varicella in these vaccinees was 21%, which is significantly lower than the 80%-90% attack rate occurring in varicella susceptibles after household exposure. All these breakthrough cases of varicella were mild, even in leukaemics receiving chemotherapy. Varicella vaccine was approximately 80% effective in preventing clinical varicella in children with leukaemia and completely effective in preventing severe varicella in this high-risk group.

  11. Varicella vaccination in Japan: necessity of implementing a routine vaccination program.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Takao

    2013-04-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is the causative agent of varicella (chickenpox). It shows extremely high infectivity and is spread by airborne, droplet, and contact transmission. After a person is infected with VZV, the virus remains dormant in the dorsal root ganglia, but can be reactivated under circumstances where specific immunity declines, leading to the development of herpes zoster (shingles). Although varicella is a disease that usually resolves after about 1 week, it can cause various complications such as secondary bacterial skin infection, pneumonia, and encephalitis. In addition, varicella can become severe in immunocompromised persons, whereas VZV infection transmitted from an infected mother can cause the congenital varicella syndrome or serious neonatal varicella. In 1974, a live varicella vaccine (Oka strain) was developed in Japan for the prevention of varicella, and clinical trials performed during the development were mainly focused on high-risk children. In 1985, the Oka strain was recognized as the best varicella vaccine strain by the World Health Organization (WHO). Today, all the varicella vaccines used worldwide to immunize approximately 32 million people annually contain the Oka strain. In Japan, it has been commercially available since 1987 for the voluntary vaccination program, in which children over the age of 1 year with no history of previous varicella infection receive a single dose. In addition to healthy children, this vaccine can be used for immunocompromised children, and vaccination of elderly persons can also be done to enhance their immunity against VZV. Varicella vaccine is a highly safe vaccine with sufficient immunogenicity. The preventive effect of single-dose vaccination is believed to be approximately 80 % for all types of varicella, including mild cases; it is 95 % or greater for moderate to severe disease. Implementation of a two-dose vaccination schedule has proved to be effective against breakthrough varicella, which

  12. Zoster in children with cancer: radioimmune precipitation profiles of sera before and after illness.

    PubMed

    Grose, C

    1983-01-01

    Sera collected from children with cancer before and for extended periods after the onset of zoster were analyzed by radioimmune precipitation techniques. The percent recovery of both [3H]fucose- and [35S]methionine-labeled varicella-zoster virus (VZV)-specific antigens increased severalfold immediately after zoster and declined slowly during convalescence; however, within two years serum panels from two patients exhibited serologic evidence of subclinical reactivation of VZV. After electrophoretic fractionation of the immunoprecipitates, the polypeptide profile after zoster closely resembled that described for high titer xenoantisera to VZV and contained at least 16 constituents ranging in molecular weight from 32 to 174,000. In contrast, sera obtained before zoster were easily distinguished because they precipitated poorly, if at all, two major VZV glycoproteins (gp62 and gp98) and several nonglycosylated polypeptides. The emergence of zoster, therefore, was associated with the appearance of previously undetectable antibodies to VZV-specific proteins. PMID:6296242

  13. Acute hemiplegia with lacunar infarct after varicella infection in childhood.

    PubMed

    Eda, I; Takashima, S; Takeshita, K

    1983-01-01

    We report 4 cases of acute hemiplegia and a small low-density lesion on computerized tomography (CT) after varicella infection. In 3 of them, CT in the acute hemiplegic stage, and later, reveals the development of lacunar infarct around the internal capsule. Focal low density may be caused by occlusive vascular lesions of the penetrating arteries. Varicella infection may play an important role as one of the causes of acute hemiplegia in childhood producing lacunar infarct, as well as delayed hemiplegia, reported previously in herpes zoster ophthalmicus. PMID:6660422

  14. Ramsay Hunt syndrome and zoster laryngitis with multiple cranial nerve involvement.

    PubMed

    Shinha, Takashi; Krishna, Pasala

    2015-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome is characterized by varicella zoster virus infection affecting the geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve. It typically presents with vesicles in the external auditory canal associated with auricular pain and peripheral facial nerve paralysis. Although vestibulocochlear nerve is frequently co-involved during the course of Ramsay Hunt syndrome, multiple lower cranial nerve involvement has rarely been described in the literature. In addition, laryngitis due to varicella zoster virus is a diagnostic challenge due to its unfamiliarity among clinicians. We report a case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome with laryngitis involving multiple lower cranial nerves.

  15. Simian varicella virus reactivation in cynomolgus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Mahalingam, Ravi Traina-Dorge, Vicki Wellish, Mary Lorino, Rebecca Sanford, Robert Ribka, Erin P. Alleman, Scott J. Brazeau, Elizabeth Gilden, Donald H.

    2007-11-10

    SVV infection of primates closely resembles VZV infection of humans. Like VZV, SVV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons. We used this model to study the effect of immunosuppression on varicella reactivation. Cynomolgus monkeys latently infected with SVV were irradiated and treated with tacrolimus and prednisone. Of four latently infected monkeys that were immunosuppressed and subjected to the stress of transportation and isolation, one developed zoster, and three others developed features of subclinical reactivation. Another non-immunosuppressed latently infected monkey that was subjected to the same stress of travel and isolation showed features of subclinical reactivation. Virus reactivation was confirmed not only by the occurrence of zoster in one monkey, but also by the presence of late SVV RNA in ganglia, and the detection of SVV DNA in non-ganglionic tissue, and SVV antigens in skin, ganglia and lung.

  16. Varicella susceptibility and validity of history among U.S. Coast Guard recruits: an outbreak-based study.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Laura; Fajardo, Mario; Seward, Jane; Ludwig, Sharon; Johnson, Joyce; Wharton, Melinda

    2003-05-01

    During a varicella outbreak among U.S. Coast Guard recruits, we examined varicella susceptibility serologically and evaluated validity of disease history. Recruits completed a questionnaire to obtain information on demographics, history of varicella disease, and varicella vaccination. Serological testing for varicella-zoster virus immunoglobulin G antibodies was conducted using an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. Among 513 recruits, 21 (4.1%) were seronegative to varicella-zoster virus. Recruits born in Puerto Rico were more likely than recruits born in the U.S. states to be susceptible (prevalence ratio, 4.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.4%, 13.1%). A positive disease history was highly predictive of positive serology (99.1%); however, 73% of those with a negative or uncertain history were also immune. Four (19%) susceptible recruits reported a positive varicella history. Although immunity among recruits was high, varicella outbreaks may occur in closed adult settings due to the high risks of exposure and transmission. Varicella vaccination can prevent these costly, disruptive outbreaks.

  17. A gel-precipitin test for the diagnosis of varicella*

    PubMed Central

    Brunell, Philip A.; Cohen, Bernard H.; Granat, Miriam

    1971-01-01

    Varicella may be difficult to distinguish clinically from smallpox. Because of this difficulty, much anxiety has occurred when cases of chickenpox are misdiagnosed as smallpox in areas where smallpox is not endemic. Surveillance of smallpox has also been complicated in areas where eradication programmes are in progress. A gel-diffusion test has been developed that can detect varicella—zoster (V—Z) antigen in vesicular fluid. This simple test, which can be performed in the field, identified V—Z antigen in vesicular fluid in all 14 cases of varicella or zoster that were tested. No reactions were observed with vaccinia precipitin antigen. The production of V—Z precipitin antigen in tissue culture provided a positive control that yielded lines of identity with vesicle fluid. This material was also used to screen human sera for suitable antisera for the test. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:5005961

  18. Varicella (Chickenpox) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... product containing Measles Vaccine, Mumps Vaccine, Rubella Vaccine, Varicella Vaccine) ... Why get vaccinated?Chickenpox (also called varicella) is a common childhood disease. It is usually mild, but it can be serious, especially in ...

  19. Nutritional factors in herpes zoster, postherpetic neuralgia, and zoster vaccination.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jen-Yin; Chang, Chia-Yu; Lin, Yung-Song; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2012-12-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) results from a reactivation of latent varicella-zoster virus (VZV). HZ and its most common complication, termed postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), often cause long-term psychological distress and physical disabilities leading to profoundly negative impacts on the quality of patients' lives. The incidence and severity of HZ and PHN increase with advanced age as a consequence of declining cell-mediated immunity. Aging has been linked to progressive senescence of the immune system and also is associated with a greater susceptibility to nutritional deficiencies. Suppressing VZV reactivation depends on intact cell-mediated immunity, which requires adequate nutrients to maintain its efficient function. Contrarily, nutritional deficiencies may lead to dysfunction of the host immune responses. Recently, micronutrient deficiencies have been shown to increase the risk of HZ and PHN and to affect the immune response to vaccinations, whereas nutritional supplements effectively reduce herpetic pain and pain in patients with PHN. As the elderly population grows, the incidence and severity of HZ and PHN are expected to increase and cause a substantial financial burden on the health care system. Thus, enhancing knowledge of the risk factors of HZ and PHN and developing better interventions to treat and prevent HZ and PHN are important to public health. This article provides an overview of the present understanding of the association among nutritional deficiencies, diminished cell-mediated immunity, and the risk of HZ and PHN, and then illustrates the potential of nutritional intervention in the prevention, vaccination, and management of HZ and PHN.

  20. [Post-varicella keratoendothelitis].

    PubMed

    Militaru, C

    1996-01-01

    The female patient, convalescent after varicella, presented in the tenth day after disappearance of the cutaneous eruption the first ocular symptoms with perikeratic congestion, endothelial precipitations, folds of the Descemet membrane, thick stroma, endothelial edema with appearance like keratoendothelitis. Ocular manifestations in varicella are produced through sanguine circulation of the virus like a varicella uveitis. The paper insists on various ocular manifestations in varicella. PMID:8962871

  1. Risk Factors for Herpes Zoster Among Adults

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Mona; Harpaz, Rafael; Zhang, John; Wollan, Peter C.; Bialek, Stephanie R.; Yawn, Barbara P.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The causes of varicella-zoster virus reactivation and herpes zoster (HZ) are largely unknown. We assessed potential risk factors for HZ, the data for which cannot be obtained from the medical sector. Methods. We conducted a matched case-control study. We established active surveillance in Olmsted County, Minnesota to identify HZ occurring among persons age ≥50 years during 2010–2011. Cases were confirmed by medical record review. Herpes zoster-free controls were age- and sex-matched to cases. Risk factor data were obtained by telephone interview. Results. We enrolled 389 HZ case patients and 511 matched controls; the median age was 65 and 66 years, respectively. Herpes zoster was associated with family history of HZ (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.65); association was highest with first-degree or multiple relatives (aOR = 1.87 and 3.08, respectively). Herpes zoster was also associated with prior HZ episodes (aOR = 1.82), sleep disturbance (aOR = 2.52), depression (aOR = 3.81), and recent weight loss (aOR = 1.95). Stress was a risk factor for HZ (aOR = 2.80), whereas a dose-response relationship was not noted. All associations indicated were statistically significant (P < .05). Herpes zoster was not associated with trauma, smoking, tonsillectomy, diet, or reported exposure to pesticides or herbicides (P > .1). Conclusions. We identified several important risk factors for HZ; however, the key attributable causes of HZ remain unknown. PMID:27382600

  2. Risk Factors for Herpes Zoster Among Adults.

    PubMed

    Marin, Mona; Harpaz, Rafael; Zhang, John; Wollan, Peter C; Bialek, Stephanie R; Yawn, Barbara P

    2016-09-01

    Background.  The causes of varicella-zoster virus reactivation and herpes zoster (HZ) are largely unknown. We assessed potential risk factors for HZ, the data for which cannot be obtained from the medical sector. Methods.  We conducted a matched case-control study. We established active surveillance in Olmsted County, Minnesota to identify HZ occurring among persons age ≥50 years during 2010-2011. Cases were confirmed by medical record review. Herpes zoster-free controls were age- and sex-matched to cases. Risk factor data were obtained by telephone interview. Results.  We enrolled 389 HZ case patients and 511 matched controls; the median age was 65 and 66 years, respectively. Herpes zoster was associated with family history of HZ (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.65); association was highest with first-degree or multiple relatives (aOR = 1.87 and 3.08, respectively). Herpes zoster was also associated with prior HZ episodes (aOR = 1.82), sleep disturbance (aOR = 2.52), depression (aOR = 3.81), and recent weight loss (aOR = 1.95). Stress was a risk factor for HZ (aOR = 2.80), whereas a dose-response relationship was not noted. All associations indicated were statistically significant (P < .05). Herpes zoster was not associated with trauma, smoking, tonsillectomy, diet, or reported exposure to pesticides or herbicides (P > .1). Conclusions.  We identified several important risk factors for HZ; however, the key attributable causes of HZ remain unknown. PMID:27382600

  3. Risk Factors for Herpes Zoster Among Adults.

    PubMed

    Marin, Mona; Harpaz, Rafael; Zhang, John; Wollan, Peter C; Bialek, Stephanie R; Yawn, Barbara P

    2016-09-01

    Background.  The causes of varicella-zoster virus reactivation and herpes zoster (HZ) are largely unknown. We assessed potential risk factors for HZ, the data for which cannot be obtained from the medical sector. Methods.  We conducted a matched case-control study. We established active surveillance in Olmsted County, Minnesota to identify HZ occurring among persons age ≥50 years during 2010-2011. Cases were confirmed by medical record review. Herpes zoster-free controls were age- and sex-matched to cases. Risk factor data were obtained by telephone interview. Results.  We enrolled 389 HZ case patients and 511 matched controls; the median age was 65 and 66 years, respectively. Herpes zoster was associated with family history of HZ (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.65); association was highest with first-degree or multiple relatives (aOR = 1.87 and 3.08, respectively). Herpes zoster was also associated with prior HZ episodes (aOR = 1.82), sleep disturbance (aOR = 2.52), depression (aOR = 3.81), and recent weight loss (aOR = 1.95). Stress was a risk factor for HZ (aOR = 2.80), whereas a dose-response relationship was not noted. All associations indicated were statistically significant (P < .05). Herpes zoster was not associated with trauma, smoking, tonsillectomy, diet, or reported exposure to pesticides or herbicides (P > .1). Conclusions.  We identified several important risk factors for HZ; however, the key attributable causes of HZ remain unknown.

  4. Challenges with controlling varicella in prison settings: experience of California, 2010 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Leung, Jessica; Lopez, Adriana S; Tootell, Elena; Baumrind, Nikki; Mohle-Boetani, Janet; Leistikow, Bruce; Harriman, Kathleen H; Preas, Christopher P; Cosentino, Giorgio; Bialek, Stephanie R; Marin, Mona

    2014-10-01

    This article describes the epidemiology of varicella in one state prison in California during 2010 and 2011, control measures implemented, and associated costs. Eleven varicella cases were reported, of which nine were associated with two outbreaks. One outbreak consisted of three cases and the second consisted of six cases with two generations of spread. Among exposed inmates serologically tested, 98% (643/656) were varicella-zoster virus seropositive. The outbreaks resulted in > 1,000 inmates exposed, 444 staff exposures, and > $160,000 in costs. The authors documented the challenges and costs associated with controlling and managing varicella in a prison setting. A screening policy for evidence of varicella immunity for incoming inmates and staff and vaccination of susceptible persons has the potential to mitigate the impact of future outbreaks and reduce resources necessary to manage cases and outbreaks.

  5. Cerebellar mutism caused by primary varicella infection in an immunocompetent child.

    PubMed

    Erol, Ilknur; Özkale, Yasemin; Saygi, Semra; Alehan, Füsun

    2014-06-01

    Varicella (chickenpox) is a common childhood infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus, which is often self-limiting and usually benign. Although uncommon, neurologic complications of varicella have been documented that include postinfectious cerebellar ataxia, meningoencephalitis, Reye syndrome, myelitis, optic neuritis, stroke, Guillain-Barré syndrome, seventh cranial nerve palsy, and Ramsay-Hunt syndrome. In this case study, the authors describe a 7-year-old girl who presented with varicella skin rash with unsteady gait and anarthria on day 2, and her condition was attributed to cerebellar mutism. To date, this complication has never been reported in a child with primary varicella infection. Therefore, this case study documents a rare but serious complication of childhood chickenpox.

  6. β-l-1-[5-(E-2-bromovinyl)-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-(dioxolan-4-yl)] uracil (l-BHDU) prevents varicella-zoster virus replication in a SCID-Hu mouse model and does not interfere with 5-fluorouracil catabolism.

    PubMed

    De, Chandrav; Liu, Dongmei; Zheng, Bo; Singh, Uma S; Chavre, Satish; White, Catherine; Arnold, Robert D; Hagen, Fred K; Chu, Chung K; Moffat, Jennifer F

    2014-10-01

    The alphaherpesvirus varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes chickenpox and shingles. Current treatments are acyclovir (ACV) and its derivatives, foscarnet and brivudine (BVdU). Additional antiviral compounds with increased potency and specificity are needed to treat VZV, especially to treat post-herpetic neuralgia. We evaluated β-l-1-[5-(E-2-bromovinyl)-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-(dioxolan-4-yl)] uracil (l-BHDU, 1) and 5'-O-valyl-l-BHDU (2) in three models of VZV replication: primary human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs), skin organ culture (SOC) and in SCID-Hu mice with skin xenografts. The efficacy of l-BHDU in vivo and its drug-drug interactions were previously not known. In HFFs, 200μM l-BHDU was noncytotoxic over 3days, and l-BHDU treatment reduced VZV genome copy number and cell to cell spread. The EC50 in HFFs for l-BHDU and valyl-l-BHDU were 0.22 and 0.03μM, respectively. However, l-BHDU antagonized the activity of ACV, BVdU and foscarnet in cultured cells. Given its similar structure to BVdU, we asked if l-BHDU, like BVdU, inhibits 5-fluorouracil catabolism. BALB/c mice were treated with 5-FU alone or in combination with l-BHDU or BVdU. l-BHDU did not interfere with 5-FU catabolism. In SCID-Hu mice implanted with human skin xenografts, l-BHDU and valyl-l-BHDU were superior to ACV and valacyclovir. The maximum concentration (Cmax) levels of l-BHDU were determined in mouse and human tissues at 2h after dosing, and comparison of concentration ratios of tissue to plasma indicated saturation of uptake at the highest dose. For the first time, an l-nucleoside analog, l-BHDU, was found to be effective and well tolerated in mice.

  7. Live attenuated varicella vaccine. Efficacy for children with leukemia in remission.

    PubMed

    Gershon, A A; Steinberg, S P; Gelb, L; Galasso, G; Borkowsky, W; LaRussa, P; Farrara, A

    1984-07-20

    One hundred ninety-one varicella-susceptible children with leukemia in remission were immunized with live attenuated varicella vaccine. There was serological evidence of an immune response in approximately 80% after one dose and in more than 90% after two doses. The major side effect was mild to moderate rash, seen especially in children with maintenance chemotherapy suspended for one week before and one week after vaccination. Children with rash had higher antibody titers than those without rash, but those with rash were also at risk (10%) to transmit vaccine virus to others. Twenty-two vaccinees subsequently had household exposures to varicella or zoster. The attack rate of clinical varicella in these vaccinees was 18%, significantly lower than the attack rate of approximately 90% in varicella-susceptible persons with household exposures. All cases of clinical illness were extremely mild, with an average of about 50 vesicles. The mild character of the illness was clearly different than varicella in unimmunized children receiving chemotherapy for leukemia. Varicella vaccine was approximately 80% effective in preventing clinical varicella in children with leukemia and completely effective in preventing severe varicella in this high-risk group.

  8. Varicella complicated by scarlet fever.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Taner; Parlak, Ali Haydar; Kocabay, Kenan

    2003-10-01

    We report a 3-year-old boy with varicella complicated by cellulitis and scarlet fever. He developed a typical rash of scarlet fever following the onset of varicella. Streptococcus pyogenes was isolated from the ulcers due to varicella. The present case suggests that scarlet fever may rarely develop following varicella and should be considered in children with complicated varicella.

  9. A Case of Peri-Anal Varicella and Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Sabrina; Burgess, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Grouped vesicle on an erythematous base suggests a herpes virus infection and located within the anogenital region raises the possibility of sexual assault. The following case and review highlight the need to consider infection by varicella zoster virus in such cases and emphasises the importance of a prompt and accurate diagnosis.

  10. Herpes Zoster Risk Reduction through Exposure to Chickenpox Patients: A Systematic Multidisciplinary Review

    PubMed Central

    Ogunjimi, Benson; Van Damme, Pierre; Beutels, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes chickenpox and may subsequently reactivate to cause herpes zoster later in life. The exogenous boosting hypothesis states that re-exposure to circulating VZV can inhibit VZV reactivation and consequently also herpes zoster in VZV-immune individuals. Using this hypothesis, mathematical models predicted widespread chickenpox vaccination to increase herpes zoster incidence over more than 30 years. Some countries have postponed universal chickenpox vaccination, at least partially based on this prediction. After a systematic search and selection procedure, we analyzed different types of exogenous boosting studies. We graded 13 observational studies on herpes zoster incidence after widespread chickenpox vaccination, 4 longitudinal studies on VZV immunity after re-exposure, 9 epidemiological risk factor studies, 7 mathematical modeling studies as well as 7 other studies. We conclude that exogenous boosting exists, although not for all persons, nor in all situations. Its magnitude is yet to be determined adequately in any study field. PMID:23805224

  11. Contacts with children and young people and adult risk of suffering herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Salleras, M; Domínguez, A; Soldevila, N; Prat, A; Garrido, P; Torner, N; Borrás, E; Salleras, L

    2011-10-13

    We carried out a matched case-control study to analyze the possible association between exposure to the children and the risk of suffering herpes-zoster in adulthood. Cases of herpes zoster in immunocompetent healthy patients aged ≥ 25 years seen in the dermatology department of the Sagrado Corazón Hospital in 2007-2008 were matched with four controls. Data were analyzed using conditional logistic regression. 153 cases and 604 matched controls were included. Contacts with children were significantly associated with a reduction in the risk of suffering herpes zoster in adulthood (adjusted OR 0.56 [0.37-0.85]). Herpes-zoster vaccination in immunocompetent people aged ≥ 50 years could counteract the possible negative effects of mass varicella vaccination in childhood on the epidemiology of herpes zoster in adults.

  12. Herpes zoster and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Chawla, Aastha

    2016-08-01

    This review is a succinct description of the relationship between herpes zoster and diabetes. It makes a strong case for screening for diabetes in all patients of herpes zoster, and for using insulin to achieve optimal glycaemic control in persons with concomitant diabetes and herpes zoster. It highlights potential impact of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor therapy and statin usage on herpes zoster incidence. PMID:27524548

  13. Virological course of herpes zoster in otherwise normal hosts.

    PubMed

    Cevenini, R; Donati, M; Rumpianesi, F; Moroni, A; Tosti, A; Patrizi, A; Varotti, C; Negosanti, M

    1983-08-01

    The virological course of herpes zoster infection in 42 otherwise normal hosts was studied by virus isolation and antibody titration. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) was isolated from vesicle fluid from all three patients examined on the first day of the vesicular eruption and from five out of six examined on the second day. The isolation rate fell to one out of six patients on the seventh day of illness and VZV was not isolated from patients at a later stage of the illness. IgG antibodies were detected by IFAMA and ELISA, in sera from all the patients by the end of the first week of illness; IgG antibody titres were highest during the second and the third weeks. IgM antibodies to VZV were detected in sera from six of the 42 patients with herpes zoster after fractionation by ion-exchange chromatography.

  14. Varicella vaccine for immunocompromised children: results of collaborative studies in the United States and Canada.

    PubMed

    LaRussa, P; Steinberg, S; Gershon, A A

    1996-11-01

    Varicella vaccine in immunocompromised children was clinically evaluated in 575 US and Canadian children with leukemia in remission by the Varicella Vaccine Collaborative Study. Most children had chemotherapy stopped 1 week before and 1 week after immunization. Steroids were stopped for 3 weeks (1 week before to 2 weeks after vaccination). Varicella vaccine was safe, immunogenic, and effective in leukemic children at risk for serious disease or death from chickenpox. The major side effect was mild rash in 50% approximately 1 month after immunization. About 40% of children who developed rash were treated with acyclovir. Vaccine efficacy was judged by the degree of protection after a household exposure to varicella; of 123 exposed children, 17 (14%) developed a mild form of varicella. The vaccine protected completely against severe varicella. Leukemic vaccines were less likely to develop zoster than were comparable children with leukemia who had wild type varicella. Thus, varicella vaccine, administered carefully with close follow-up, is extremely beneficial for leukemic children.

  15. Clinical benefits of routine varicella vaccination for adults.

    PubMed

    Germinario, Cinzia; Gallone, Maria Serena; Cappelli, Maria Giovanna; Tafuri, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Varicella is a highly contagious disease caused by varicella zoster virus. In children, it is generally a mild to moderate illness while it is often more severe in adults, with serious complications as dehydration, pneumonia, bleeding problems, infection or inflammation of the brain, secondary bacterial infections, sepsis, toxic shock syndrome, bone infections, joint infections and deaths. Some groups of adults are at major risk of complications, in particular immunocompromised persons as subjects with impaired humoral immunity and who is receiving systemic steroids, persons who live or work in environments in which transmission of varicella is likely, health-care personnel and pregnant women. After the introduction of Universal Mass Vaccination (UMV), the first mathematical models suggested that vaccination will lead to a shift in the average age at infection from children to adults with an increasing numbers of complicated forms, nevertheless new models predicted that, although an upward shift in the age at infection may occur, the overall morbidity due to varicella is likely to decrease. Current literature seems to suggest that for public health authorities the key action to prevent an increase of varicella incidence among adults is to achieve high vaccination coverage among babies and adolescents in countries who adopted UMV.

  16. Disease burden of herpes zoster in Sweden - predominance in the elderly and in women - a register based study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The herpes zoster burden of disease in Sweden is not well investigated. There is no Swedish immunization program to prevent varicella zoster virus infections. A vaccine against herpes zoster and its complications is now available. The aim of this study was to estimate the herpes zoster burden of disease and to establish a pre-vaccination baseline of the minimum incidence of herpes zoster. Methods Data were collected from the Swedish National Health Data Registers including the Patient Register, the Pharmacy Register, and the Cause of Death Register. The herpes zoster burden of disease in Sweden was estimated by analyzing the overall, and age and gender differences in the antiviral prescriptions, hospitalizations and complications during 2006-2010 and mortality during 2006-2009. Results Annually, 270 per 100,000 persons received antiviral treatment for herpes zoster, and the prescription rate increased with age. It was approximately 50% higher in females than in males in the age 50+ population (rate ratio 1.39; 95% CI, 1.22 to 1.58). The overall hospitalization rate for herpes zoster was 6.9/100,000 with an approximately three-fold increase for patients over 80 years of age compared to the age 70-79 group. A gender difference in hospitalization rates was observed: 8.1/100,000 in females and 5.6/100,000 in males. Herpes zoster, with a registered complication, was found in about one third of the hospitalized patients and the most common complications involved the peripheral and central nervous systems. Death due to herpes zoster was a rare event. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate the significant burden of herpes zoster disease in the pre-zoster vaccination era. A strong correlation with age in the herpes zoster- related incidence, hospitalization, complications, and mortality rates was found. In addition, the study provides further evidence of the female predominance in herpes zoster disease. PMID:24330510

  17. Mandibular osteonecrosis following herpes zoster infection in the mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster virus (HZV) infections are caused by reactivation of the varicella zoster virus. Reactivation symptoms commonly affect the thoracolumbar trunk, and rarely affect the mandibular branches of the trigeminal nerve. When the mandibular branches are involved, lesions appear proximal to the innervation area. This condition may be associated with exfoliation of the teeth and osteonecrosis of the jawbone. We report a case of mandibular osteomyelitis after herpes zoster infection and we present a review of the literature on mandibular-branch involvement of HZV-related osteonecrosis. PMID:26733193

  18. Herpes zoster following cryosurgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael R; Ryman, William

    2005-02-01

    A 56-year-old man developed reactivation of herpes zoster infection on his right forehead after treatment of several solar keratoses with cryosurgery. The rash was blistering and painful. Treatment with oral aciclovir was instituted and the lesions healed within 2 weeks. Known risk factors for reactivation include age and decreased immunity. Previous case reports have indicated trauma may be a risk factor in herpes zoster. We report a case of herpes zoster as a complication of cryosurgery. PMID:15670178

  19. Breakthrough varicella in a cancer patient with persistent varicella antibody after one varicella vaccination.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masaki; Kamberos, Natalie; Grose, Charles

    2013-11-01

    A boy with Hodgkin disease contracted breakthrough varicella from his father, who had chickenpox. The boy had received a single varicella vaccination and was seropositive by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay before being diagnosed with breakthrough varicella. Seropositivity after a single varicella vaccination does not guarantee complete protection in an immunocompromised child.

  20. A Prospective Study of Herpes Zoster in Children

    PubMed Central

    Katakam, Bhumesh Kumar; Kiran, Geeta; Kumar, Udaya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Herpes zoster (HZ) is a dermatomal viral infection, caused by reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV) that persists in the posterior root ganglion. HZ is uncommonly reported in immunocompetent children. It may be due to intrauterine VZV infection or secondary to postnatal exposure to VZV at an early age. Aims: Our study was to review clinico-epidemiological data for HZ in children for early diagnosis and treatment to prevent complications. Materials and Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted from January 2013 to December 2014. Consecutive cases clinically diagnosed as HZ in the pediatric age group were taken up. Results: We report the clinico-epidemiological study of 26 cases of HZ, their benign course and recovery among children. Conclusions: HZ is a rare disease in childhood. Varicella in early childhood is a risk factor of HZ in immunocompromised and immunocompetent children. Childhood zoster occurs in either healthy or underlying immunodeficient children. The appearance of HZ in a young child does not always imply an underlying immunodeficiency or malignancy. But the identification of HZ with or without immunodeficiency is of prime importance from the treatment and prognostic point of view and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of vesicular eruptions. The prognosis is generally good in healthy children. PMID:27688444

  1. A Prospective Study of Herpes Zoster in Children

    PubMed Central

    Katakam, Bhumesh Kumar; Kiran, Geeta; Kumar, Udaya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Herpes zoster (HZ) is a dermatomal viral infection, caused by reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV) that persists in the posterior root ganglion. HZ is uncommonly reported in immunocompetent children. It may be due to intrauterine VZV infection or secondary to postnatal exposure to VZV at an early age. Aims: Our study was to review clinico-epidemiological data for HZ in children for early diagnosis and treatment to prevent complications. Materials and Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted from January 2013 to December 2014. Consecutive cases clinically diagnosed as HZ in the pediatric age group were taken up. Results: We report the clinico-epidemiological study of 26 cases of HZ, their benign course and recovery among children. Conclusions: HZ is a rare disease in childhood. Varicella in early childhood is a risk factor of HZ in immunocompromised and immunocompetent children. Childhood zoster occurs in either healthy or underlying immunodeficient children. The appearance of HZ in a young child does not always imply an underlying immunodeficiency or malignancy. But the identification of HZ with or without immunodeficiency is of prime importance from the treatment and prognostic point of view and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of vesicular eruptions. The prognosis is generally good in healthy children.

  2. Varicella myopericarditis mimicking myocardial infarction in a 17-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    De, Aliva; Myridakis, Dorothy; Kerrigan, Margot; Kiblawi, Fuad

    2011-01-01

    Varicella (chickenpox), a common childhood infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus, is self-limiting and usually benign. Although atypical manifestations of the virus are occasionally seen, it rarely presents with cardiovascular sequelae. Cardiovascular complications of varicella can include pericarditis, myocarditis, or endocarditis. Herein, we report the case of a 17-year-old boy who had varicella infection and severe chest pain. Examination revealed atypical electrocardiographic findings of pericarditis and remarkably elevated cardiac biomarker levels: peak cardiac troponin I, 37.2 ng/mL; total creatine kinase, 1,209 U/L; and creatine kinase-MB fraction, 133.6 ng/mL. After results of coronary angiography reliably excluded ischemia and myocardial infarction, the diagnosis was varicella myopericarditis. The patient was placed on a medical regimen during and after 5 days of hospitalization. In 2 weeks, he was asymptomatic, and at 6 months, he was doing well and had normal electrocardiographic and echocardiographic results.To our knowledge, cardiac enzyme elevations to these levels have not been reported in cases of cardiovascular sequelae of varicella. We discuss the diagnostic challenges of this atypical case and suggest that clinicians be aware that varicella disease is most often, but not always, benign.

  3. Herpes zoster guideline of the German Dermatology Society (DDG).

    PubMed

    Gross, G; Schöfer, H; Wassilew, S; Friese, K; Timm, A; Guthoff, R; Pau, H W; Malin, J P; Wutzler, P; Doerr, H W

    2003-04-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella (chickenpox), remains dormant in dorsal root and cranial nerve ganglia and can be reactivated as a consequence of declining VZV-specific cellular immunity leading to herpes zoster (shingles). Patients older than 50 years of age affected by herpes zoster may suffer a significant decrease of quality of life. These patients and immunocompromised individuals are at increased risks for severe complications, involving the eye, the peripheral and the central nervous system (prolonged pain, postherpetic neuralgia). Such complications occur with and without cutaneous symptoms. The German Dermatology Society (DDG) has released guidelines in order to guarantee updated management to anyone affected by herpes zoster. Diagnosis is primarily clinical. The gold standard of laboratory diagnosis comprises PCR and direct identification of VZV in cell cultures. Detection of IgM- and IgA-anti VZV antibodies may be helpful in immunocompromised patients. Therapy has become very effective in the last years. Systemic antiviral therapy is able to shorten the healing process of acute herpes zoster, to prevent or to alleviate pain and other acute and chronic complications, particularly, when given within 48 h to a maximum of 72 h after onset of the rash. Systemic antiviral therapy is urgently indicated in patients beyond the age of 50 years and in patients at any age with herpes zoster in the head and neck area, especially in patients with zoster ophthalmicus. Further urgent indications are severe herpes zoster on the trunk and on the extremities, herpes zoster in immunosuppressed patients and in patients with severe atopic dermatitis and severe ekzema. Only relative indications for antiviral therapy exist in patients younger than 50 years with zoster on the trunk and on the extremities. In Germany acyclovir, valacyclovir, famciclovir and brivudin are approved for the systemic antiviral treatment of herpes zoster. These compounds are all well

  4. [Universal vaccination against varicella in Italy: the same opportunity for all children].

    PubMed

    Gabutti, Giovanni; Azzari, Chiara; Bonanni, Paolo; Conversano, Michele; Esposito, Susanna; Prato, Rosa; Russo, Rocco; Tozzi, Alberto Eugenio; Vitali Rosati, Giovanni; Zanetti, Alessandro; Zuccotti, Gianvincenzo; Franco, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Varicella is an infectious disease still frequent in Italy, where 8 out 20 Regions have adopted universal vaccination programs starting from 2003. Accordingly to National Vaccination Plan, all Regions should introduce universal varicella vaccination in 2015. An independent multidisciplinary group of experts met to discuss some debated questions. The available evidence of varicella vaccine efficacy in the 8 Regions was evaluated and the evidence of safety of monovalent and combined varicella vaccines are presented. The strategy for introducing universal varicella vaccine in the pediatric immunization schedule is discussed. The expert group concludes that available evidence supports the active offer of varicella vaccine in all Italian Regions and that catch up programs for susceptible cohorts should be encouraged.

  5. Red eye in chickenpox: varicella-related acute anterior uveitis in a child.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Nicholas Robert

    2010-09-17

    Varicella-zoster virus is a common viral infection of childhood. This report concerns an 8-year-old girl who presented with a 5-day history of a typical varicella rash. She then developed red left eye 'conjunctivitis'. She had no discharge, mild pain and intense photophobia. She was referred to the acute eye clinic after 1 day and she was noted to have acute anterior uveitis. She was treated with gutt atropine 1% for 2 weeks until the inflammation resolved. She had no sequalae.

  6. Clinical Presentation of Herpes Zoster in Immunocompetent and Immunocompromised Hospitalized Children Treated With Acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Kuchar, Ernest; Szenborn, Leszek; Lis, Izabela; Jaroszewska, Anna; Czeladzka, Justyna

    2016-07-01

    Herpes zoster, defined as the reactivation of a latent varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection, used to be a serious disease in immunocompromised children until recently. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical presentation of herpes zoster in hospitalized immunocompromised children compared with hospitalized immunocompetent counterparts. We reviewed the hospital charts of 72 children aged 6 months to 18 years diagnosed with herpes zoster and treated with acyclovir in our department covering a 19-year period. Forty-six of the children were immunocompromised which was mainly due to hematologic diseases. There were no differences in the age at which herpes zoster occurred, length of hospitalization, and the location or extent of the skin eruption. General symptoms were observed more frequently in the hospitalized immunocompetent patients compared with the hospitalized immunocompromised children (80% vs. 56%). The average age at which primary VZV infection occurred was higher among the immunocompromised children than the immunocompetent children with the latter group suffering from significantly more primary VZV infections during infancy. The presentation of herpes zoster in immunocompromised children is similar to that of herpes zoster in hospitalized immunocompetent children. PMID:27347778

  7. Eye and Periocular Skin Involvement in Herpes Zoster Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kalogeropoulos, Chris D.; Bassukas, Ioannis D.; Moschos, Marilita M.; Tabbara, Khalid F.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) is a clinical manifestation of the reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection and is more common in people with diminished cell-mediated immunity. Lesions and pain correspond to the affected dermatomes, mostly in first or second trigeminal branch and progress from maculae, papules to vesicles and form pustules, and crusts. Complications are cutaneous, visceral, neurological, ocular, but the most debilitating is post-herpetic neuralgia. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus may affect all the ophthalmic structures, but most severe eye-threatening complications are panuveitis, acute retinal necrosis (ARN) and progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) as well. Antiviral medications remain the primary therapy, mainly useful in preventing ocular involvement when begun within 72 hours after the onset of the rash. Timely diagnosis and management of HZO are critical in limiting visual morbidity. Vaccine in adults over 60 was found to be highly effective to boost waning immunity what reduces both the burden of herpes zoster (HZ) disease and the incidence of post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN). PMID:27800502

  8. [Neuropathic pain due to herpes zoster infection with atypical localization].

    PubMed

    Sağır, Özlem; Özaslan, Sabri; Meriç, Yücel; Arslan, İsmail; Köroğlu, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Acute herpes zoster infection appears in the situation of depression of immune system and reactivation of varicella zoster virus which causes small pox. Pain and maculopapular lesion accompany clinical symptoms. Various pharmacological and invasive methods can be used for treatment. Efficient therapy is important for prevention of postherpetic neuralgia and cure of acute pain and dermatological lesions. A 55 years old, 160 cm height and 65 kg weight female patient with complaints of severe pain, sensation of burning, tingling at the right hand and forearm was admitted to our pain department. The patient who was diagnosed as cervical hernia at an other medical center had a normal physical servical spine examination. Patient history and physical examination findings with acute herpes zoster infection was considered. Right stellate ganglion blockade for diagnosis and treatment was performed because of regressed and atypically located lesions and a visual analog scale score of 10. VAS score decreased 50% at 9th min after block, VAS score at 2nd hour was 2. Antiviral, gabapentin, and tricyclic antidepressant treatment was started after stellat ganglion blockade and patient was discharged. After 3 months complaints dissapeared and drug doses were discreased and stopped. In conclusion we think that stellate ganglion blockade can be useful in diagnosis, acute pain control, improving patient comfort and compatibility to drug therapy in atypically located herpes zoster.

  9. Pathogenesis of infection with varicella vaccine.

    PubMed

    Grose, C

    1996-09-01

    Because of its exanthem, the disease varicella has been known since antiquity. Even late in the 19th century, however, there remained considerable confusion between mild smallpox and chickenpox. The name varicella itself is an irregular diminutive form of variola. Yet, early in the 20th century, detailed histologic studies began to differentiate the exanthems. The investigation of the varicella vesicle by Tyzzer 90 years ago remains a classic example (see Fig. 2). Although the pathogenesis of varicella vaccine virus infection appears to mimic that of wt VZV infection, a vaccine virus-related exanthem is more common in immunized children with an underlying immunosuppressive condition, such as leukemia, than in normal children. Those immunized children who never develop a rash presumably have an abrogated infection in which the host immune response has eliminated the virus prior to a major viremic spread. There may be a correlation between the presence of an exanthem and the ability of an immunized child to spread the varicella vaccine virus. The differences in capsid structure and assembly may explain in part the attenuation of the vaccine strain. Because the majority of varicella vaccine virus particles in the nucleus have aberrant cores lacking an electron-dense center, they are never enveloped. Therefore, they do not become infectious virions. In a recent article, Grose et al applied the technique of three-dimensional (3-D) computer modeling in an attempt to reconstruct an aberrant VZV capsid with the hubcap or pinwheel core. Each 3-D model was then sliced by computer to obtain a series of two-dimensional models that represented the images commonly seen by traditional electron microscopy. The 3-D model that best represented the capsid with a pinwheel core contained particulate matter in each of the 12 vertices of the icosahedral capsid (Fig. 14). This model strongly suggested that VZV may form in the nucleus an intermediary or end-stage capsid with an aberrant

  10. Environmental chemical exposures and risk of herpes zoster.

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, V; Vine, M F; Weigle, K

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated whether residence in Aberdeen, North Carolina, the location of the Aberdeen pesticides dumps site (a national priority list Superfund site containing organochlorine pesticides, volatile organic compounds, and metals), is associated with immune suppression as indicated by a higher incidence of herpes zoster and recent occurrences of other common infectious diseases. Study participants included 1,642 residents, 18-64 years of age, who responded to a telephone survey concerning potential occupational and recreational exposures to pesticides and other chemicals, lifetime history of herpes zoster (shingles), and the recent occurrence of other common infectious diseases. Stratified and logistic regression analyses were used to compare the cumulative incidence of herpes zoster among Aberdeen residents and residents of nearby communities. There was little evidence of an overall increased risk of herpes zoster among Aberdeen residents during the period 1951-1994 [relative risk (RR), 1.3; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.8-2.1]. However, an elevated risk of herpes zoster was noted consistently among Aberdeen residents of younger ages as compared to residents of the nearby communities. The RR was 2.0 (CI, 1.0-4.0) among those 18-40 years of age and was not affected by controlling for potential confounders. The RR of herpes zoster was also consistently elevated in all age groups for the period before 1985. No differences were noted between residents of Aberdeen and those of the nearby communities with respect to the recent occurrence of other common infectious diseases. These results support the plausibility of an association between exposure to the Aberdeen pesticides dumps site and immune suppression and the potential use of herpes zoster as a marker of immune suppression in studies of environmental chemical exposures. Images Figure 1 PMID:10504152

  11. Herpes Zoster Infection Involving Mandibular Division of Trigeminal Nerve and Ramsay Hunt Syndrome with Meningitis in an Immunocompetent Patient: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Vijayan; Kar, Suvrendu Sankar; Choudhury, Cankatika; Choudhary, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a unilateral painful vesicular cutaneous eruption caused by the reactivation of the Varicella zoster virus. It commonly affects the older people and immunocompromised individuals. The dermatomes from T3 to L3 are most frequently involved. Its three stages include prodromal stage, active stage and chronic stage. The common complications of the infection include post-herpetic neuralgia, Ramsay Hunt syndrome, Guillain-Barre syndrome, transverse myelitis and encephalomyelitis. This case report summarizes a very rare association of herpes zoster meningitis with the involvement of mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve and facial nerve. The patient improved with intravenous acyclovir and prednisolone treatment. PMID:27504334

  12. Herpes Zoster Infection Involving Mandibular Division of Trigeminal Nerve and Ramsay Hunt Syndrome with Meningitis in an Immunocompetent Patient: A Rare Association.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Vijayan; Bandyopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Kar, Suvrendu Sankar; Choudhury, Cankatika; Choudhary, Vivek

    2016-06-01

    Herpes zoster is a unilateral painful vesicular cutaneous eruption caused by the reactivation of the Varicella zoster virus. It commonly affects the older people and immunocompromised individuals. The dermatomes from T3 to L3 are most frequently involved. Its three stages include prodromal stage, active stage and chronic stage. The common complications of the infection include post-herpetic neuralgia, Ramsay Hunt syndrome, Guillain-Barre syndrome, transverse myelitis and encephalomyelitis. This case report summarizes a very rare association of herpes zoster meningitis with the involvement of mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve and facial nerve. The patient improved with intravenous acyclovir and prednisolone treatment. PMID:27504334

  13. Genomic and functional analysis of the host response to acute simian varicella infection in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Nicole; Girke, Thomas; Sureshchandra, Suhas; Nguyen, Christina; Rais, Maham; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2016-01-01

    Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) is the causative agent of varicella and herpes zoster. Although it is well established that VZV is transmitted via the respiratory route, the host-pathogen interactions during acute VZV infection in the lungs remain poorly understood due to limited access to clinical samples. To address these gaps in our knowledge, we leveraged a nonhuman primate model of VZV infection where rhesus macaques are intrabronchially challenged with the closely related Simian Varicella Virus (SVV). Acute infection is characterized by immune infiltration of the lung airways, a significant up-regulation of genes involved in antiviral-immunity, and a down-regulation of genes involved in lung development. This is followed by a decrease in viral loads and increased expression of genes associated with cell cycle and tissue repair. These data provide the first characterization of the host response required to control varicella virus replication in the lung and provide insight into mechanisms by which VZV infection can cause lung injury in an immune competent host. PMID:27677639

  14. A 2009 varicella outbreak in a Connecticut residential facility for adults with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Leung, Jessica; Kudish, Kathy; Wang, Chengbin; Moore, Latetia; Gacek, Paul; Radford, Kay; Lopez, Adriana; Sosa, Lynn; Schmid, D Scott; Cartter, Matthew; Bialek, Stephanie

    2010-11-15

    We investigated a varicella outbreak in a residential facility for adults with intellectual disabilities. A case of varicella was defined as a generalized maculopapular rash that developed in a facility resident or employee. Immunoglobulin M testing was conducted on serologic samples, and polymerase chain reaction testing was performed on environmental and skin lesion samples. Eleven cases were identified among 70 residents and 2 among ∼145 staff. An unrecognized case of herpes zoster was the likely source. Case patients first entered any residential facility at a younger age than non-case residents (9.5 vs 15.0 years; P < .01). Varicella zoster virus DNA was detected 2 months after the outbreak in environmental samples obtained from case patients' residences. This outbreak exemplifies the potential for at-risk pockets of varicella-susceptible adults, especially among those who have lived in residential facilities from a young age. Evidence of immunity should be verified for all adults and healthcare staff in similar residential settings.

  15. Herpes zoster (shingles) disseminated (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Herpes zoster (shingles) normally occurs in a limited area that follows a dermatome (see the "dermatome" picture). In individuals with damaged immune systems, herpes zoster may be widespread (disseminated), causing serious illness. ...

  16. Infectious Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Infectious uveitis is one of the most common and visually devastating causes of uveitis in the US and worldwide. This review provides a summary of the identification, treatment, and complications associated with certain forms of viral, bacterial, fungal, helminthic, and parasitic uveitis. In particular, this article reviews the literature on identification and treatment of acute retinal necrosis due to herpes simplex virus, varicella virus, and cytomegalovirus. While no agreed-upon treatment has been identified, the characteristics of Ebola virus panuveitis is also reviewed. In addition, forms of parasitic infection such as Toxoplasmosis and Toxocariasis are summarized, as well as spirochetal uveitis. Syphilitic retinitis is reviewed given its increase in prevalence over the last decade. The importance of early identification and treatment of infectious uveitis is emphasized. Early identification can be achieved with a combination of maintaining a high suspicion, recognizing certain clinical features, utilizing multi-modal imaging, and obtaining specimens for molecular diagnostic testing. PMID:26618074

  17. Experimental studies on the prevention and treatment of chickenpox and herpes zoster with measles vaccine.

    PubMed

    Li, W H; Ming, Z L; Chen, Q; Li, Y

    1989-05-01

    In 151 chickenpox patients treated with live attenuated measles vaccine, the cure rate was 100%. In 145 cases of herpes zoster, the effective rate was 100% (completely cured in 91.7% and improved in 8.3%). In the treated group, the time needed for the subsidence of fever and skin rash and the duration of the disease were markedly shorter than those in the control group (P less than 0.01). It is particularly effective for alleviating pain, preventing and relieving postherpetic neuralgia in patients with zoster. The application of measles vaccine to the patients in the chickenpox incubation period might prevent the development of the disease, and decrease the incidence and death rate of varicella zoster virus infection in highly susceptible patients. The mechanism of its anti-viral action and production of interferon in the body is discussed.

  18. Horner's syndrome and contralateral abducens nerve palsy associated with zoster meningitis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Bum-Joo; Kim, Ji-Soo; Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2013-12-01

    A 55-year-old woman presented with diplopia following painful skin eruptions on the right upper extremity. On presentation, she was found to have 35 prism diopters of esotropia and an abduction limitation in the left eye. Two weeks later, she developed blepharoptosis and anisocoria with a smaller pupil in the right eye, which increased in the darkness. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed pleocytosis and a positive result for immunoglobulin G antibody to varicella zoster virus. She was diagnosed to have zoster meningitis with Horner's syndrome and contralateral abducens nerve palsy. After intravenous antiviral and steroid treatments, the vesicular eruptions and abducens nerve palsy improved. Horner's syndrome and diplopia resolved after six months. Here we present the first report of Horner's syndrome and contralateral abducens nerve palsy associated with zoster meningitis.

  19. Management and Prevention of Herpes Zoster Ocular Disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Elisabeth J

    2015-10-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is caused by reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus (VZV) in people who have had chicken pox, usually resulting in a painful, unilateral, dermatomal, vesicular rash. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus occurs when the first division of cranial nerve V is involved. HZ is common, with approximately 1 million new cases per year in the United States, and occurs in 1 in 3 persons. Although the rate of HZ increases with age, over half of all cases occur under the age of 60 years. Complications of herpes zoster ophthalmicus include eye disease, postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), and strokes. VZV has also been found in temporal arteritis biopsies. There is growing evidence that HZ is followed by chronic active VZV infection contributing to these complications. In view of this, and the efficacy of suppressive antiviral treatment in reducing recurrent herpes simplex keratitis, a randomized controlled trial of suppressive valacyclovir to reduce new or worsening anterior segment disease and/or PHN is needed. The zoster vaccine (ZV) is safe and effective in reducing the burden of illness, severity of PHN, and incidence of HZ. It is Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended for persons aged 60 years and above without impaired cellular immunity, and Food and Drug Administration approved for those aged 50 and older. It is most effective in preventing HZ in recipients in their 50s. Because of underusage of the ZV, it has not impacted the epidemiology of the disease. Barriers to its use include cost, variable reimbursement, frozen storage, and lack of a strong recommendation by doctors.

  20. Infectious Complications during Tandem High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Children with High-Risk or Recurrent Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji-Man; Lee, Ji Won; Yoo, Keon Hee; Kim, Yae-Jean; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed infectious complications during tandem high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDCT/auto-SCT) in children and adolescents with high-risk or recurrent solid tumors. A total of 324 patients underwent their first HDCT/auto-SCT between October 2004 and September 2014, and 283 of them proceeded to their second HDCT/auto-SCT (a total of 607 HDCT/auto-SCTs). During the early transplant period of 607 HDCT/auto-SCTs (from the beginning of HDCT to day 30 post-transplant), bacteremia, urinary tract infection (UTI), respiratory virus infection, and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation occurred in 7.1%, 2.3%, 13.0%, and 2.5% of HDCT/auto-SCTs, respectively. The early transplant period of the second HDCT/auto-SCT had infectious complications similar to the first HDCT/auto-SCT. During the late transplant period of HDCT/auto-SCT (from day 31 to 1 year post-transplant), bacteremia, UTI, and VZV reactivation occurred in 7.5%, 2.5%, and 3.9% of patients, respectively. Most infectious complications in the late transplant period occurred during the first 6 months post-transplant. There were no invasive fungal infections during the study period. Six patients died from infectious complications (4 from bacterial sepsis and 2 from respiratory virus infection). Our study suggests that infectious complications are similar following second and first HDCT/auto-SCT in children. PMID:27627440

  1. Infectious Complications during Tandem High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Children with High-Risk or Recurrent Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Bae; Yi, Eun Sang; Kang, Ji-Man; Lee, Ji Won; Yoo, Keon Hee; Kim, Yae-Jean; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed infectious complications during tandem high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDCT/auto-SCT) in children and adolescents with high-risk or recurrent solid tumors. A total of 324 patients underwent their first HDCT/auto-SCT between October 2004 and September 2014, and 283 of them proceeded to their second HDCT/auto-SCT (a total of 607 HDCT/auto-SCTs). During the early transplant period of 607 HDCT/auto-SCTs (from the beginning of HDCT to day 30 post-transplant), bacteremia, urinary tract infection (UTI), respiratory virus infection, and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation occurred in 7.1%, 2.3%, 13.0%, and 2.5% of HDCT/auto-SCTs, respectively. The early transplant period of the second HDCT/auto-SCT had infectious complications similar to the first HDCT/auto-SCT. During the late transplant period of HDCT/auto-SCT (from day 31 to 1 year post-transplant), bacteremia, UTI, and VZV reactivation occurred in 7.5%, 2.5%, and 3.9% of patients, respectively. Most infectious complications in the late transplant period occurred during the first 6 months post-transplant. There were no invasive fungal infections during the study period. Six patients died from infectious complications (4 from bacterial sepsis and 2 from respiratory virus infection). Our study suggests that infectious complications are similar following second and first HDCT/auto-SCT in children. PMID:27627440

  2. [Herpes zoster in immunocompetent pregnant women and their perinatal outcome].

    PubMed

    Casanova Román, Gerardo; Reyna Figueroa, Jesús; Figueroa Damián, Ricardo; Ortiz Ibarra, Javier

    2004-02-01

    A prospective and descriptive study was done in pregnant women diagnosed with herpes zoster, to know the demographic characteristics and clinical manifestations as well as maternal and/or neonatal complications to cause by this viral infection during pregnancy. The study included all pregnant women diagnosed with herpes zoster at the Department of Infectious Diseases of the Instituto Nacional de Perinatologia México, between 1994 and 2002. A total of 17 women were included in the study. All were given clinical and ultrasound follow-up to discard any maternal or fetal complications also at the moment of birth. A review in the newborn was made to establish the demographic, anthropometric and clinical characteristics; also the data collected included mother's age, gestational age at the moment of diagnosis with herpes zoster, anatomical lesion site, treatments administered, ultrasound characteristics, newborn's gestational age, weight, height, Apgar at birth and type of delivery. The most frequent site (58.8%) for herpes zoster lesions on the mother was the intercostal area, followed by the scapular region, the lumbar region and the limbs. None of the patients experienced complications during pregnancy, including post-herpetic pain. Sixteen of the newborns had no complications and one was a stillborn due to 60% of placental separation. These findings suggest a benign evolution of herpes zoster during pregnancy, supporting similar findings in the literature. No complications during pregnancy are suggested, and no phenotypical alterations occurred in the child at the moment of birth.

  3. Epidemiological Study on the Incidence of Herpes Zoster in Nearby Cheonan

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ho Soon; Kang, Jin Ku

    2015-01-01

    Background Herpes Zoster is a disease that occurs after the virus is reactivated due to infection of the varicella virus in childhood. Risk factors are advanced age, malignant neoplasm, organ transplantation, immunosuppressive agents taking are known. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the seasonal effect and other risk factors on the incidence of herpes zoster. Methods The medical records of 1,105 patients admitted to the outpatient diagnosed with herpes zoster were retrospectively examined. The patients' sex, age, dermatome, onset, underlying disease, residential areas were collected. Results The incidence of women outnumbered men and increased for those above the age of 50. The number of occurrences of herpes zoster patients was higher in the spring and summer than in winter. Unlike men, women had the most frequent outbreaks in March. The most common occurrence of dermatome is in the thoracic region. The number of occurrence was similar on the left as the right. Conclusions In this study, herpes zoster occurs more often in women than in men and more frequently occurs in women in the spring and summer. PMID:26175879

  4. Herpes Zoster Induced Osteomyelitis in the Immunocompromised Patients: A 10-year Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizi, Reza; Dehghani Nazhvani, Ali; Vahedi, Amir; Gholami, Mehdi; Zare, Raziyeh; Etemadi Parsa, Raha

    2014-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Alveolar bone necrosis induced by Herpes zoster infection is considered as a rare manifestation of osteomyelitis and few case reports are presented in the literature. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate mandibular osteomyelitis caused by herpes zoster in the immunocompromised patients with histopathologically documented osteomyelitis in the mandible and herpes zoster infection. Materials and Method: 30 patients were recruited in this cross-sectional study. 19 patients were completely edentulous, 4 patients were partially edentulous and 7 with complete dentition. In all cases, specimens were analyzed using a conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for varicella zoster virus.  Results: 16 patients underwent dialysis, 9 patients received chemotherapy treatments and 5 patients had transplantation (four kidneys and one liver). Histopathological assessment demonstrated a nonspecific bone necrosis exhibiting an eosinophilic, homogeneous non-vital bone tissue with peripheral resorption surrounded by reactive connective tissue. PCR test was positive in 21 cases. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the frequency of osteomyelitis induced by herpes zoster could be more than the records provided by previous studies. Histopathological findings might be nonspecific in such patients. PCR test was not positive for all HZ induced osteomyelitis patients. PMID:25191659

  5. Clinical and corneal microbial profile of infectious keratitis in a high HIV prevalence setting in rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    Schaftenaar, E; Peters, R P H; Baarsma, G S; Meenken, C; Khosa, N S; Getu, S; McIntyre, J A; Osterhaus, A D M E; Verjans, G M G M

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the clinical and corneal microbial profile of infectious keratitis in a high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence setting in rural South Africa. Data in this cross-sectional study were collected from patients presenting with symptoms of infectious keratitis (n = 46) at the ophthalmology outpatient department of three hospitals in rural South Africa. Corneal swabs were tested for herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2), varicella zoster virus (VZV) and adenovirus DNA by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for bacteria and fungi by culture. Based on clinical history, disease characteristics and laboratory results, 29 (63 %) patients were diagnosed as viral keratitis, including 14 (48 %) viral keratitis cases complicated by bacterial superinfection, and 17 (37 %) as bacterial keratitis. VZV and HSV-1 DNA was detected in 11 (24 %) and 5 (11 %) corneal swabs, respectively. Among clinically defined viral keratitis cases, a negative viral swab was predominantly (93 %) observed in cases with subepithelial inflammation and was significantly associated with an increased duration of symptoms (p = 0.003). The majority of bacteria cultured were Gram-positive (24/35), including Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. aureus. Viral aetiology was significantly associated with a history of herpes zoster ophthalmicus (p < 0.001) and a trend was observed between viral aetiology and HIV infection (p = 0.06). Twenty-one (47 %) keratitis cases were complicated by anterior uveitis, of which 18 (86 %) were HIV-infected cases with viral keratitis. The data implicate a high prevalence of herpetic keratitis, in part complicated by bacterial superinfection and/or uveitis, in HIV-infected individuals presenting with infectious keratitis in rural South Africa. PMID:27236644

  6. Travelers' Health: Varicella (Chickenpox)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Global TravEpiNet Mobile Apps RSS Feeds Chapter 3 Infectious Diseases Related to Travel Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... Red Book: 2012 Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases. 29th ed. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy ...

  7. Study on the T-helper cell 1/2 cytokine profile in blister fluid of patients with herpes zoster and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meifang; Wu, Na; Yang, Li; Zhang, Jie; Sun, Xiaoyan; Zhong, Shiyu; Ma, Xueliang; Wang, Yili

    2011-12-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is a Varicella zoster virus infection disease. Previous studies have presumed the connection between development of HZ and involvement of cellular immunity in peripheral blood. However, whether cellular immunity plays a role in the local skin lesion has not been addressed. To explore the levels of T-helper cell (Th)1/Th2 type cytokine profiles in the blister fluid of the skin lesions from the patients with HZ and its role in pathogenesis, we used the cytometric bead array kit to compare the levels of cytokines (interleukin [IL]-2, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, IL-10 and IL-4) in blister fluid from 46 patients with those from the suction blister fluids from 20 volunteers without any infectious disease (the control group). The results indicated that the levels of Th1 cytokines, IL-2 and TNF-α in the blister fluid from the patients' skin lesions were significantly lower than those from the control group, whereas the levels of Th2 cytokines IL-10 and IL-4 were significantly higher than those in the control group. Moreover, significant variation of the levels of Th1/Th2 cytokines (IL-2, TNF-α, IL-10 and IL-4) in the blister fluid from the HZ patients' lesions was also observed among different stages of the disease. It is concluded that a cytokine imbalance was present in the local lesions of patients with HZ during disease development. Our data suggested that the Th immunity was associated with disease activity, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of HZ.

  8. [Necrotizing fasciitis after varicella].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, E; Furtado, F; Estrada, J; Vale, M C; Pinto, M; Santos, M; Moura, G; Vasconcelos, C

    2001-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and severe infection characterised by extremely rapid progressive involvement of the superficial fascias and deep dermal layers of the skin, with resultant vasculitis and necrosis. The authors present three clinical cases of necrotizing fasciitis; all three patients previously had varicella rash, rapid progressive spreading erythema with severe pain and toxic shock syndrome. Two patients had positive cultures of b-haemolytic streptococcus. Early stage differential diagnosis with celulitis, aggressive antibiotic treatment and pediatric intensive care support are essential. However, the main therapy is early extensive surgical approach involving all indurate areas, down to and including the muscle fascia.

  9. Herpes zoster as a cause of viral meningitis in immunocompetent patients.

    PubMed

    Kangath, Raghesh Varot; Lindeman, Tracey Einem; Brust, Karen

    2013-01-09

    A 30-year-old Caucasian woman, without significant medical history or immunosuppression, presented with a 7-day history of severe headache and neck pain. The patient was presumed to have tension headache versus migraine, but was admitted because her symptoms did not resolve. A lumbar puncture was performed showing lymphocytic pleocytosis suggestive of aseptic meningitis and the patient was started on broad-spectrum antibiotics and acyclovir. After admission, a rash was discovered on her left lumbar region with vesicles on top of an erythematous base. Varicella PCR was conducted on the patient's cerebrospinal fluid which was positive. Upon further history, patient was found to have previous varicella infection as a child, but no prior episodes of dermatomal zoster. Therefore, this patient was found to have aseptic meningitis and cutaneous manifestation of disseminated varicella-zoster despite immunocompetence. Antibacterial treatment was discontinued and she was continued on acyclovir for 7 days with transition to valacyclovir for 2 additional weeks with good treatment response and symptom resolution.

  10. Evaluation of peripheral neuropathy. Part III: vasculitic, infectious, inherited, and idiopathic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John J

    2005-01-01

    In this, the third of a 3-part series on peripheral neuropathy, the syndromes of vasculitic, infectious, inherited, and idiopathic neuropathy are discussed. Vasculitis is a frequent cause of neuropathy in the setting of a connective tissue disease. The infectious neuropathies most likely to be encountered in the United States are those due to varicella-zoster virus, human immunodeficiency virus, Lyme disease, hepatitis C virus, and, most recently, West Nile virus. Inherited neuropathies are divided into 2 main types: predominant motor or predominant sensory. The former are generally classed as the Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases and the latter as the hereditary sensory neuropathies. Each category has a number of different subtypes. If the results of routine screening tests are negative, the clinician must consider special testing for unusual disorders, including evaluations for underlying autoimmune or malignant disorders, genetic tests for inherited neuropathies, and other unusual or selectively ordered tests. These tests are very expensive and should be ordered only after the common causes of neuropathy are excluded. Unless the neuropathy can be substantially alleviated or cured, symptomatic treatment (most often for pain) plays a significant role for these patients.

  11. Acute pancreatitis associated with herpes zoster: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Ye, Jun; Han, Yue-Hua

    2014-12-21

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a type of herpes virus known to cause varicella, mainly in young children, and herpes zoster in adults. Although generally non-lethal, VZV infection can be associated with serious complications, particularly in adults. Acute pancreatitis caused by VZV infection is a rare event, with reports primarily concerning immunocompromised individuals. Here we report a 44-year-old immunocompetent female who developed acute pancreatitis associated with VZV infection. The patient presented with vomiting and persistent pain in the upper quadrant less than one week after diagnosis and treatment for a herpes zoster-related rash with stabbing pain on the abdomen and dorsal right trunk side. A diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was confirmed based on abdominal pain, elevated levels of urine and serum amylase, and findings of peri-pancreatic exudation and effusions by computed tomography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. This case highlights that, though rare, acute pancreatitis should be considered in VZV patients who complain of abdominal pain, especially in the epigastric area. Early detection and proper treatment are needed to prevent the condition from deteriorating further and to minimize mortality.

  12. Control of varicella in the post-vaccination era in Australia: a model-based assessment of catch-up and infant vaccination strategies for the future.

    PubMed

    Gao, Z; Wood, J G; Gidding, H F; Newall, A T; Menzies, R I; Wang, H; McIntyre, P B; MacIntyre, C R

    2015-05-01

    In Australia, varicella vaccine was universally funded in late 2005 as a single dose at 18 months. A school-based catch-up programme for children aged 10-13 years without a history of infection or vaccination was funded until 2015, when those eligible for universal infant vaccination would have reached the age of high school entry. This study projects the impact of discontinuing catch-up vaccination on varicella and zoster incidence and morbidity using a transmission dynamic model, in comparison with alternative policy options, including two-dose strategies. At current vaccine coverage (83% at 2 years and 90% at 5 years), ceasing the adolescent catch-up programme in 2015 was projected to increase varicella-associated morbidity between 2035 and 2050 by 39%. Although two-dose infant programmes had the lowest estimated varicella morbidity, the incremental benefit from the second dose fell by 70% if first dose coverage increased from 83% to 95% by age 24 months. Overall zoster morbidity was predicted to rise after vaccination, but differences between strategies were small. Our results suggest that feasibility of one-dose coverage approaching 95% is an important consideration in estimating incremental benefit from a second dose of varicella vaccine.

  13. [Herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Machetanz, J

    2016-08-01

    Herpes zoster develops by endogenous reactivation of varizella zoster virus (VZV). Incidence increases with age. Females are more frequently affected than males. The reactivation rate in seropositive individuals is about 20 %. After a short prodromal stage, herpetiform-grouped vesicles appear in segmental arrangement. Pain and paresthesia are typical zoster symptoms. Complications like bacterial superinfections, vasculopathy, paresis, and oculopathy may occur. During pregnancy herpes zoster is a threat for mother and child. Among elderly patients, cardiovascular risk is increased during the first week of herpes zoster infection. Postherpetic neuropathy is feared. Diagnosis can be made clinically and by the use of polymerase chain reaction. First-line treatment is systemic antiviral drug therapy with either acyclovir or brivudine. Adjuvant therapies consist of pain management and topical treatment. PMID:27389412

  14. Time Trends in Pediatric Hospitalizations for Varicella Infection Are Associated with Climatic Changes: A 22-Year Retrospective Study in a Tertiary Greek Referral Center

    PubMed Central

    Critselis, Elena; Nastos, Panagiotis T.; Theodoridou, Kalliopi; Theodoridou, Maria; Tsolia, Maria N.; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos; Papaevangelou, Vassiliki

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims The transmission rate of air-borne infectious diseases may vary secondary to climate conditions. The study assessed time trends in the seasonality of hospitalized varicella cases in a temperate region in relation to climatic parameters prior to the implementation of universal varicella immunization. Methods A retrospective descriptive study was conducted among all pediatric and adolescent varicella patients (n = 2366) hospitalized at the “Aghia Sophia” Children's Hospital during 1982–2003 in Athens, Greece. Date of infection was computed based on hospital admission date. Seasonal and monthly trends in the epidemiology of varicella infection were assessed with time series analysis (ARIMA modeling procedure). The correlation between the frequency of varicella patients and the meteorological parameters was examined by the application of Generalized Linear Models with Gamma distribution. Results During 1982–2003, the occurrence of hospitalized varicella cases increased during summer (p = 0.025) and decreased during autumn (p = 0.021), and particularly in September (p = 0.003). The frequency of hospitalized varicella cases was inversely associated with air temperature (p<0.001). In contrast, the occurrence of hospitalized varicella cases was positively associated with wind speed (p = 0.009). Conclusions Pediatric hospitalizations for varicella infection rates have increased during summer and decreased during autumn in the examined temperate region. Time trends in hospitalized varicella cases are associated with climatic variables. PMID:23284855

  15. Small fiber neuropathy following vaccination for rabies, varicella or Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Souayah, Nizar; Ajroud-Driss, Senda; Sander, Howard W; Brannagan, Thomas H; Hays, Arthur P; Chin, Russell L

    2009-12-01

    Neuropathy following vaccination has been reported; however, biopsy-confirmed small fiber neuropathy has not been described. We report five patients who developed paresthesias within one day to two months following vaccination for rabies, varicella zoster, or Lyme disease. On examination, there was mild sensory loss in distal extremities, preserved strength, normal or minimally abnormal electrodiagnostic findings, and decreased epidermal nerve fiber densities per skin biopsy. Empiric immunomodulatory therapy was tried in two patients and was ineffective. All patients' symptoms have improved, but persist. We conclude that an acute or subacute, post-vaccination small fiber neuropathy may occur and follow a chronic course.

  16. Clinical and molecular aspects of the live attenuated Oka varicella vaccine.

    PubMed

    Quinlivan, Mark; Breuer, Judy

    2014-07-01

    VZV is a ubiquitous member of the Herpesviridae family that causes varicella (chicken pox) and herpes zoster (shingles). Both manifestations can cause great morbidity and mortality and are therefore of significant economic burden. The introduction of varicella vaccination as part of childhood immunization programs has resulted in a remarkable decline in varicella incidence, and associated hospitalizations and deaths, particularly in the USA. The vaccine preparation, vOka, is a live attenuated virus produced by serial passage of a wild-type clinical isolate termed pOka in human and guinea pig cell lines. Although vOka is clinically attenuated, it can cause mild varicella, establish latency, and reactivate to cause herpes zoster. Sequence analysis has shown that vOka differs from pOka by at least 42 loci; however, not all genomes possess the novel vOka change at all positions, creating a heterogeneous population of genetically distinct haplotypes. This, together with the extreme cell-associated nature of VZV replication in cell culture and the lack of an animal model, in which the complete VZV life cycle can be replicated, has limited studies into the molecular basis for vOka attenuation. Comparative studies of vOka with pOka replication in T cells, dorsal root ganglia, and skin indicate that attenuation likely involves multiple mutations within ORF 62 and several other genes. This article presents an overview of the clinical aspects of the vaccine and current progress on understanding the molecular mechanisms that account for the clinical phenotype of reduced virulence.

  17. The health and economic burden of chickenpox and herpes zoster in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Bilcke, J; Ogunjimi, B; Marais, C; de Smet, F; Callens, M; Callaert, K; van Kerschaver, E; Ramet, J; van Damme, P; Beutels, P

    2012-11-01

    Varicella-zoster virus causes chickenpox (CP) and after reactivation herpes zoster (HZ). Vaccines are available against both diseases warranting an assessment of the pre-vaccination burden of disease. We collected data from relevant Belgian databases and performed five surveys of CP and HZ patients. The rates at which a general practitioner is visited at least once for CP and HZ are 346 and 378/100 000 person-years, respectively. The average CP and HZ hospitalization rates are 5·3 and 14·2/100 000 person-years respectively. The direct medical cost for HZ is about twice as large as the direct medical cost for CP. The quality-adjusted life years lost for ambulatory CP patients consulting a physician is more than double that of those not consulting a physician (0·010 vs. 0·004). In conclusion, both diseases cause a substantial burden in Belgium.

  18. Herpes Zoster and Postherpetic Neuralgia: Practical Consideration for Prevention and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is a transient disease caused by the reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus (VZV) in spinal or cranial sensory ganglia. It is characterized by a painful rash in the affected dermatome. Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is the most troublesome side effect associated with HZ. However, PHN is often resistant to current analgesic treatments such as antidepressants, anticonvulsants, opioids, and topical agents including lidocaine patches and capsaicin cream and can persist for several years. The risk factors for reactivation of HZ include advanced age and compromised cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Early diagnosis and treatment with antiviral agents plus intervention treatments is believed to shorten the duration and severity of acute HZ and reduce the risk of PHN. Prophylactic vaccination against VZV can be the best option to prevent or reduce the incidence of HZ and PHN. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, clinical features, and management of HZ and PHN, as well as the efficacy of the HZ vaccine. PMID:26175877

  19. A Supraglottic Pseudotumor in an Immunocompromised Patient with Nephrotic Syndrome, Herpes Zoster, and a Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Tetsu; Yamazaki, Tomoyuki; Saito, Osamu; Muto, Shigeaki; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Several viral infections may occasionally induce supraglottic mass lesions, resulting in an obstructive airway emergency. We herein report one such case in a 63-year-old male immunocompromised patient with nephrotic syndrome due to membranous nephropathy who also had ophthalmic herpes zoster with a laryngeal mass, which required urgent intubation and mechanical ventilation. The patient was initially treated with acyclovir; however, because a serological analysis revealed a concurrent cytomegalovirus infection, we discontinued the administration of acyclovir and gave priority to the simultaneous treatment of the cytomegalovirus and varicella-zoster virus infections with ganciclovir. The clinical course was favorable, and he was weaned from the ventilator 10 days later when a serial imaging analysis revealed no signs of the supraglottic mass, leading us to conclude that these two viral infections could have additively or synergistically contributed to the development of the local pseudotumor. The diagnostic and therapeutic concerns arising in the current case are also discussed. PMID:27547043

  20. A Supraglottic Pseudotumor in an Immunocompromised Patient with Nephrotic Syndrome, Herpes Zoster, and a Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Akimoto, Tetsu; Yamazaki, Tomoyuki; Saito, Osamu; Muto, Shigeaki; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Several viral infections may occasionally induce supraglottic mass lesions, resulting in an obstructive airway emergency. We herein report one such case in a 63-year-old male immunocompromised patient with nephrotic syndrome due to membranous nephropathy who also had ophthalmic herpes zoster with a laryngeal mass, which required urgent intubation and mechanical ventilation. The patient was initially treated with acyclovir; however, because a serological analysis revealed a concurrent cytomegalovirus infection, we discontinued the administration of acyclovir and gave priority to the simultaneous treatment of the cytomegalovirus and varicella-zoster virus infections with ganciclovir. The clinical course was favorable, and he was weaned from the ventilator 10 days later when a serial imaging analysis revealed no signs of the supraglottic mass, leading us to conclude that these two viral infections could have additively or synergistically contributed to the development of the local pseudotumor. The diagnostic and therapeutic concerns arising in the current case are also discussed. PMID:27547043

  1. [Is it necessary to vaccinate against varicella?].

    PubMed

    Lepage, P; Blumental, S

    2014-09-01

    Varicella is a frequent viral disease, with a substantial medical and societal impact. For many years, various industrialized countries have adopted an universal mass vaccination against varicella, using a one-dose schedule. In these countries, the global incidence of varicella has decreased by about 90%. A significant reduction in hospitalizations, outpatient visits and medical costs due to varicella has also been observed. Recently, a 2-dose schedule has demonstrated an efficacy of about 98%, as well as herd immunity.

  2. Herpes zoster infection increases the risk of peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Te-Yu; Yang, Fu-Chi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung; Lo, Hsin-Yi; Yang, Tse-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Varicella-zoster virus infection can cause meningoencephalitis, myelitis, ocular disorders, and vasculopathy. However, no study has investigated the association between herpes zoster (HZ) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We identified newly diagnosed HZ from the Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database recorded during 2000 to 2010, with a follow-up period extending until December 31, 2011. In addition, we included a comparison cohort that was randomly frequency-matched with the HZ cohort according to age, sex, and index year. We analyzed the risk of PAD with respect to sex, age, and comorbidities by using Cox proportional-hazards regression models. In total, 35,391 HZ patients and 141,556 controls were enrolled in this study. The risk of PAD was 13% increased in the HZ cohort than in the comparison cohort after adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidities. The Kaplan–Meier survival curve showed that the risk of PAD was significantly higher in the HZ cohort than in the non-HZ cohort (P < 0.001). This nationwide population-based cohort study revealed a higher risk of PAD in patients with HZ infection than in those without the infection. Careful follow-up and aggressive treatment is recommended for patients with HZ to reduce the risk of PAD. PMID:27583856

  3. Cost-effectiveness of vaccination against herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Pieter T; Wilschut, Jan C; Postma, Maarten J

    2014-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is a common disease among elderly, which may develop into a severe pain syndrome labeled postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). A live-attenuated varicella zoster virus vaccine has been shown to be effective in reducing the incidence and burden of illness of HZ and PHN, providing the opportunity to prevent significant health-related and financial consequences of HZ. In this review, we summarize the available literature on cost-effectiveness of HZ vaccination and discuss critical parameters for cost-effectiveness results. A search in PubMed and EMBASE was performed to identify full cost-effectiveness studies published before April 2013. Fourteen cost-effectiveness studies were included, all performed in western countries. All studies evaluated cost-effectiveness among elderly above 50 years and used costs per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained as primary outcome. The vast majority of studies showed vaccination of 60- to 75-year-old individuals to be cost-effective, when duration of vaccine efficacy was longer than 10 years. Duration of vaccine efficacy, vaccine price, HZ incidence, HZ incidence and discount rates were influential to the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). HZ vaccination may be a worthwhile intervention from a cost-effectiveness point of view. More extensive reporting on methodology and more detailed results of sensitivity analyses would be desirable to address uncertainty and to guarantee optimal comparability between studies, for example regarding model structure, discounting, vaccine characteristics and loss of quality of life due to HZ and PHN.

  4. Herpes zoster granulomatous dermatitis: histopathologic findings in a case series.

    PubMed

    Ferenczi, Katalin; Rosenberg, Arlene S; McCalmont, Timothy H; Kwon, Eun Ji; Elenitsas, Rosalie; Somach, Stephen C

    2015-10-01

    Several types of cutaneous reactions have been reported to arise at the site of herpes zoster (HZ) infection weeks to years after the acute disease. Among these, granulomatous reactions are the most frequently reported. In this study, we describe the spectrum of histopathologic findings of HZ granulomatous reactions observed in 26 patients with cutaneous lesions confined to the area of previous HZ eruption and compare them with biopsy specimens taken from 25 patients with acute HZ. All patients with persistent reactions from whom history was available presented within 12 weeks of the onset of the acute eruption. The most frequent findings were interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with lymphocytes, histiocytes and multinucleated giant cells displaying elastophagocytosis and a perineural, perivascular and perieccrine mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate rich in lymphocytes and plasma cells. Less common features included intra-arrector and peri-arrector pili granulomas, follicular dilatation and hyperkeratosis, and vasculitis. Specimens from patients with acute HZ were found to have small numbers of perineural plasma cells and most had subtle granulomatous inflammation, in patterns similar to the group with late granulomatous reactions. Our findings suggest that granulomatous reactions to varicella zoster virus represent a persistent evolving inflammatory reaction after acute infection.

  5. Simian Varicella Virus Is Present in Macrophages, Dendritic Cells, and T Cells in Lymph Nodes of Rhesus Macaques after Experimental Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Traina-Dorge, Vicki; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A.; Sanford, Robert; Manfredo, Jennifer; Blackmon, Anna; Wellish, Mary; James, Stephanie; Alvarez, Xavier; Midkiff, Cecily; Palmer, Brent E.; Deharo, Eileen; Gilden, Don

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Like varicella-zoster virus (VZV), simian varicella virus (SVV) reactivates to produce zoster. In the present study, 5 rhesus macaques were inoculated intrabronchially with SVV, and 5 months later, 4 monkeys were immunosuppressed; 1 monkey was not immunosuppressed but was subjected to the stress of transportation. In 4 monkeys, a zoster rash developed 7 to 12 weeks after immunosuppression, and a rash also developed in the monkey that was not immunosuppressed. Analysis at 24 to 48 h after zoster revealed SVV antigen in the lung alveolar wall, in ganglionic neurons and nonneuronal cells, and in skin and in lymph nodes. In skin, SVV was found primarily in sweat glands. In lymph nodes, the SVV antigen colocalized mostly with macrophages, dendritic cells, and, to a lesser extent, T cells. The presence of SVV in lymph nodes, as verified by quantitative PCR detection of SVV DNA, might reflect the sequestration of virus by macrophages and dendritic cells in lymph nodes or the presentation of viral antigens to T cells to initiate an immune response against SVV, or both. IMPORTANCE VZV causes varicella (chickenpox), becomes latent in ganglia, and reactivates to produce zoster and multiple other serious neurological disorders. SVV in nonhuman primates has proved to be a useful model in which the pathogenesis of the virus parallels the pathogenesis of VZV in humans. Here, we show that SVV antigens are present in sweat glands in skin and in macrophages and dendritic cells in lymph nodes after SVV reactivation in monkeys, raising the possibility that macrophages and dendritic cells in lymph nodes serve as antigen-presenting cells to activate T cell responses against SVV after reactivation. PMID:26178993

  6. CD4 T cell immunity is critical for the control of simian varicella virus infection in a nonhuman primate model of VZV infection.

    PubMed

    Haberthur, Kristen; Engelmann, Flora; Park, Byng; Barron, Alex; Legasse, Alfred; Dewane, Jesse; Fischer, Miranda; Kerns, Amelia; Brown, Monica; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2011-11-01

    Primary infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV) results in varicella (more commonly known as chickenpox) after which VZV establishes latency in sensory ganglia. VZV can reactivate to cause herpes zoster (shingles), a debilitating disease that affects one million individuals in the US alone annually. Current vaccines against varicella (Varivax) and herpes zoster (Zostavax) are not 100% efficacious. Specifically, studies have shown that 1 dose of varivax can lead to breakthrough varicella, albeit rarely, in children and a 2-dose regimen is now recommended. Similarly, although Zostavax results in a 50% reduction in HZ cases, a significant number of recipients remain at risk. To design more efficacious vaccines, we need a better understanding of the immune response to VZV. Clinical observations suggest that T cell immunity plays a more critical role in the protection against VZV primary infection and reactivation. However, no studies to date have directly tested this hypothesis due to the scarcity of animal models that recapitulate the immune response to VZV. We have recently shown that SVV infection of rhesus macaques models the hallmarks of primary VZV infection in children. In this study, we used this model to experimentally determine the role of CD4, CD8 and B cell responses in the resolution of primary SVV infection in unvaccinated animals. Data presented in this manuscript show that while CD20 depletion leads to a significant delay and decrease in the antibody response to SVV, loss of B cells does not alter the severity of varicella or the kinetics/magnitude of the T cell response. Loss of CD8 T cells resulted in slightly higher viral loads and prolonged viremia. In contrast, CD4 depletion led to higher viral loads, prolonged viremia and disseminated varicella. CD4 depleted animals also had delayed and reduced antibody and CD8 T cell responses. These results are similar to clinical observations that children with agammaglobulinemia have uncomplicated

  7. Active learning to understand infectious disease models and improve policy making.

    PubMed

    Willem, Lander; Stijven, Sean; Vladislavleva, Ekaterina; Broeckhove, Jan; Beutels, Philippe; Hens, Niel

    2014-04-01

    Modeling plays a major role in policy making, especially for infectious disease interventions but such models can be complex and computationally intensive. A more systematic exploration is needed to gain a thorough systems understanding. We present an active learning approach based on machine learning techniques as iterative surrogate modeling and model-guided experimentation to systematically analyze both common and edge manifestations of complex model runs. Symbolic regression is used for nonlinear response surface modeling with automatic feature selection. First, we illustrate our approach using an individual-based model for influenza vaccination. After optimizing the parameter space, we observe an inverse relationship between vaccination coverage and cumulative attack rate reinforced by herd immunity. Second, we demonstrate the use of surrogate modeling techniques on input-response data from a deterministic dynamic model, which was designed to explore the cost-effectiveness of varicella-zoster virus vaccination. We use symbolic regression to handle high dimensionality and correlated inputs and to identify the most influential variables. Provided insight is used to focus research, reduce dimensionality and decrease decision uncertainty. We conclude that active learning is needed to fully understand complex systems behavior. Surrogate models can be readily explored at no computational expense, and can also be used as emulator to improve rapid policy making in various settings.

  8. Active Learning to Understand Infectious Disease Models and Improve Policy Making

    PubMed Central

    Vladislavleva, Ekaterina; Broeckhove, Jan; Beutels, Philippe; Hens, Niel

    2014-01-01

    Modeling plays a major role in policy making, especially for infectious disease interventions but such models can be complex and computationally intensive. A more systematic exploration is needed to gain a thorough systems understanding. We present an active learning approach based on machine learning techniques as iterative surrogate modeling and model-guided experimentation to systematically analyze both common and edge manifestations of complex model runs. Symbolic regression is used for nonlinear response surface modeling with automatic feature selection. First, we illustrate our approach using an individual-based model for influenza vaccination. After optimizing the parameter space, we observe an inverse relationship between vaccination coverage and cumulative attack rate reinforced by herd immunity. Second, we demonstrate the use of surrogate modeling techniques on input-response data from a deterministic dynamic model, which was designed to explore the cost-effectiveness of varicella-zoster virus vaccination. We use symbolic regression to handle high dimensionality and correlated inputs and to identify the most influential variables. Provided insight is used to focus research, reduce dimensionality and decrease decision uncertainty. We conclude that active learning is needed to fully understand complex systems behavior. Surrogate models can be readily explored at no computational expense, and can also be used as emulator to improve rapid policy making in various settings. PMID:24743387

  9. Vaccines and immunotherapies for the prevention of infectious diseases having cutaneous manifestations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jashin J; Huang, David B; Pang, Katie R; Tyring, Stephen K

    2004-04-01

    Although the development of antimicrobial drugs has advanced rapidly in the past several years, such agents act against only certain groups of microbes and are associated with increasing rates of resistance. These limitations of treatment force physicians to continue to rely on prevention, which is more effective and cost-effective than therapy. From the use of the smallpox vaccine by Jenner in the 1700s to the current concerns about biologic warfare, the technology for vaccine development has seen numerous advances. The currently available vaccines for viral illnesses include Dryvax for smallpox; the combination measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine; inactivated vaccine for hepatitis A; plasma-derived vaccine for hepatitis B; and the live attenuated Oka strain vaccine for varicella zoster. Vaccines available against bacterial illnesses include those for anthrax, Haemophilus influenzae, and Neisseria meningitidis. Currently in development for both prophylactic and therapeutic purposes are vaccines for HIV, herpes simplex virus, and human papillomavirus. Other vaccines being investigated for prevention are those for cytomegalovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus, hepatitis C, and dengue fever, among many others. Fungal and protozoan diseases are also subjects of vaccine research. Among immunoglobulins approved for prophylactic and therapeutic use are those against cytomegalovirus, hepatitis A and B, measles, rabies, and tetanus. With this progress, it is hoped that effective vaccines soon will be developed for many more infectious diseases with cutaneous manifestations. PMID:15034501

  10. Efficacy of the Herpes Zoster Subunit Vaccine in Adults 70 Years of Age or Older.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Anthony L; Lal, Himal; Kovac, Martina; Chlibek, Roman; Hwang, Shinn-Jang; Díez-Domingo, Javier; Godeaux, Olivier; Levin, Myron J; McElhaney, Janet E; Puig-Barberà, Joan; Vanden Abeele, Carline; Vesikari, Timo; Watanabe, Daisuke; Zahaf, Toufik; Ahonen, Anitta; Athan, Eugene; Barba-Gomez, Jose F; Campora, Laura; de Looze, Ferdinandus; Downey, H Jackson; Ghesquiere, Wayne; Gorfinkel, Iris; Korhonen, Tiina; Leung, Edward; McNeil, Shelly A; Oostvogels, Lidia; Rombo, Lars; Smetana, Jan; Weckx, Lily; Yeo, Wilfred; Heineman, Thomas C

    2016-09-15

    Background A trial involving adults 50 years of age or older (ZOE-50) showed that the herpes zoster subunit vaccine (HZ/su) containing recombinant varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein E and the AS01B adjuvant system was associated with a risk of herpes zoster that was 97.2% lower than that associated with placebo. A second trial was performed concurrently at the same sites and examined the safety and efficacy of HZ/su in adults 70 years of age or older (ZOE-70). Methods This randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial was conducted in 18 countries and involved adults 70 years of age or older. Participants received two doses of HZ/su or placebo (assigned in a 1:1 ratio) administered intramuscularly 2 months apart. Vaccine efficacy against herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia was assessed in participants from ZOE-70 and in participants pooled from ZOE-70 and ZOE-50. Results In ZOE-70, 13,900 participants who could be evaluated (mean age, 75.6 years) received either HZ/su (6950 participants) or placebo (6950 participants). During a mean follow-up period of 3.7 years, herpes zoster occurred in 23 HZ/su recipients and in 223 placebo recipients (0.9 vs. 9.2 per 1000 person-years). Vaccine efficacy against herpes zoster was 89.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84.2 to 93.7; P<0.001) and was similar in participants 70 to 79 years of age (90.0%) and participants 80 years of age or older (89.1%). In pooled analyses of data from participants 70 years of age or older in ZOE-50 and ZOE-70 (16,596 participants), vaccine efficacy against herpes zoster was 91.3% (95% CI, 86.8 to 94.5; P<0.001), and vaccine efficacy against postherpetic neuralgia was 88.8% (95% CI, 68.7 to 97.1; P<0.001). Solicited reports of injection-site and systemic reactions within 7 days after injection were more frequent among HZ/su recipients than among placebo recipients (79.0% vs. 29.5%). Serious adverse events, potential immune-mediated diseases, and deaths occurred with similar frequencies in the

  11. Efficacy of the Herpes Zoster Subunit Vaccine in Adults 70 Years of Age or Older.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Anthony L; Lal, Himal; Kovac, Martina; Chlibek, Roman; Hwang, Shinn-Jang; Díez-Domingo, Javier; Godeaux, Olivier; Levin, Myron J; McElhaney, Janet E; Puig-Barberà, Joan; Vanden Abeele, Carline; Vesikari, Timo; Watanabe, Daisuke; Zahaf, Toufik; Ahonen, Anitta; Athan, Eugene; Barba-Gomez, Jose F; Campora, Laura; de Looze, Ferdinandus; Downey, H Jackson; Ghesquiere, Wayne; Gorfinkel, Iris; Korhonen, Tiina; Leung, Edward; McNeil, Shelly A; Oostvogels, Lidia; Rombo, Lars; Smetana, Jan; Weckx, Lily; Yeo, Wilfred; Heineman, Thomas C

    2016-09-15

    Background A trial involving adults 50 years of age or older (ZOE-50) showed that the herpes zoster subunit vaccine (HZ/su) containing recombinant varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein E and the AS01B adjuvant system was associated with a risk of herpes zoster that was 97.2% lower than that associated with placebo. A second trial was performed concurrently at the same sites and examined the safety and efficacy of HZ/su in adults 70 years of age or older (ZOE-70). Methods This randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial was conducted in 18 countries and involved adults 70 years of age or older. Participants received two doses of HZ/su or placebo (assigned in a 1:1 ratio) administered intramuscularly 2 months apart. Vaccine efficacy against herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia was assessed in participants from ZOE-70 and in participants pooled from ZOE-70 and ZOE-50. Results In ZOE-70, 13,900 participants who could be evaluated (mean age, 75.6 years) received either HZ/su (6950 participants) or placebo (6950 participants). During a mean follow-up period of 3.7 years, herpes zoster occurred in 23 HZ/su recipients and in 223 placebo recipients (0.9 vs. 9.2 per 1000 person-years). Vaccine efficacy against herpes zoster was 89.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84.2 to 93.7; P<0.001) and was similar in participants 70 to 79 years of age (90.0%) and participants 80 years of age or older (89.1%). In pooled analyses of data from participants 70 years of age or older in ZOE-50 and ZOE-70 (16,596 participants), vaccine efficacy against herpes zoster was 91.3% (95% CI, 86.8 to 94.5; P<0.001), and vaccine efficacy against postherpetic neuralgia was 88.8% (95% CI, 68.7 to 97.1; P<0.001). Solicited reports of injection-site and systemic reactions within 7 days after injection were more frequent among HZ/su recipients than among placebo recipients (79.0% vs. 29.5%). Serious adverse events, potential immune-mediated diseases, and deaths occurred with similar frequencies in the

  12. Is peptic ulcer disease a risk factor of postherpetic neuralgia in patients with herpes zoster?

    PubMed

    Chen, Jen-Yin; Chang, Chia-Yu; Lan, Kuo-Mao; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Lu, Chin-Li; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2013-11-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia is the most common complication of herpes zoster which is caused by a reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus. The pathogenesis of postherpetic neuralgia may involve peripheral and central mechanisms. Reported risk factors for postherpetic neuralgia include female gender, old age, diminished cell-mediated immunity and nutritional deficiencies. Based on our clinical observation which revealed that peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is one of the common comorbidities in patients with postherpetic neuralgia, we hypothesize that herpes zoster patients with PUD may be at a greater risk for the development of postherpetic neuralgia due to their impaired cellular immunity and depressed nutritional status. Major causes of PUD include Helicobacter pylori infection and usage of ulcerogenic medications. Patients with H. pylori infection may develop T cell dysfunctions and nutritional deficiencies including vitamin C, iron, cobalamin, carotenes and alpha-tocopherol. Ulcerogenic medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and steroids have been found not only to be ulcerogenic but also immunosuppressive to T cells. In addition, usage of steroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may cause deficiencies of alpha-tocopherol, carotenes, cobalamin, iron, zinc and vitamin C. Vitamin C, carotenes and alpha-tocopherol are anti-inflammatory and the major oxidant scavengers in the aqua phase and biomembranes. Deficiencies of these nutrients may induce dysregulated inflammation and oxidative damage leading to neuropathic pain in patients with herpes zoster. Furthermore, nutrient deficiencies including zinc, iron, cobalamin and vitamin C are associated with dysregulation of Ca(v)3.2 T-channels and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, upregulation of nitric oxide synthase, the increase of nitric oxide formation and dysfunction of central norepinephrine inhibitory pain pathway. Prospective cohort studies are suggested to test the hypothesis. We further

  13. Failure of a Single Varicella Vaccination to Protect Children With Cancer From Life-Threatening Breakthrough Varicella

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, James; Tristram, Debra; Yamada, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    We report 2 children with life-threatening breakthrough varicella. Both had received 1 varicella vaccination before onset of cancer. Despite treatment with intravenous acyclovir, 1 child died of disseminated varicella. Because similar fatal cases have been reported, high-risk immunocompromised children with 1 varicella vaccination may warrant the same varicella prophylaxis as immunocompromised children who have never been vaccinated. PMID:25955833

  14. Infectious Complications With the Use of Biologic Response Modifiers in Infants and Children.

    PubMed

    Davies, H Dele

    2016-08-01

    Biologic response modifiers (BRMs) are substances that interact with and modify the host immune system. BRMs that dampen the immune system are used to treat conditions such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, or inflammatory bowel disease and often in combination with other immunosuppressive agents, such as methotrexate and corticosteroids. Cytokines that are targeted include tumor necrosis factor α; interleukins (ILs) 6, 12, and 23; and the receptors for IL-1α (IL-1A) and IL-1β (IL-1B) as well as other molecules. Although the risk varies with the class of BRM, patients receiving immune-dampening BRMs generally are at increased risk of infection or reactivation with mycobacterial infections (Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacteria), some viral (herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, Epstein-Barr virus, hepatitis B) and fungal (histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis) infections, as well as other opportunistic infections. The use of BRMs warrants careful determination of infectious risk on the basis of history (including exposure, residence, and travel and immunization history) and selected baseline screening test results. Routine immunizations should be given at least 2 weeks (inactivated or subunit vaccines) or 4 weeks (live vaccines) before initiation of BRMs whenever feasible, and inactivated influenza vaccine should be given annually. Inactivated and subunit vaccines should be given when needed while taking BRMs, but live vaccines should be avoided unless under special circumstances in consultation with an infectious diseases specialist. If the patient develops a febrile or serious respiratory illness during BRM therapy, consideration should be given to stopping the BRM while actively searching for and treating possible infectious causes. PMID:27432853

  15. Postherpetic neuralgia - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Herpes zoster - postherpetic neuralgia; Varicella-zoster - postherpetic neuralgia ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 101. Whitley RJ. Chickenpox and herpes zoster (varicella-zoster virus). In: Bennett ...

  16. Varicella Viruses Inhibit Interferon-Stimulated JAK-STAT Signaling through Multiple Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Verweij, Marieke C; Wellish, Mary; Whitmer, Travis; Malouli, Daniel; Lapel, Martin; Jonjić, Stipan; Haas, Juergen G; DeFilippis, Victor R; Mahalingam, Ravi; Früh, Klaus

    2015-05-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes chickenpox in humans and, subsequently, establishes latency in the sensory ganglia from where it reactivates to cause herpes zoster. Infection of rhesus macaques with simian varicella virus (SVV) recapitulates VZV pathogenesis in humans thus representing a suitable animal model for VZV infection. While the type I interferon (IFN) response has been shown to affect VZV replication, the virus employs counter mechanisms to prevent the induction of anti-viral IFN stimulated genes (ISG). Here, we demonstrate that SVV inhibits type I IFN-activated signal transduction via the JAK-STAT pathway. SVV-infected rhesus fibroblasts were refractory to IFN stimulation displaying reduced protein levels of IRF9 and lacking STAT2 phosphorylation. Since previous work implicated involvement of the VZV immediate early gene product ORF63 in preventing ISG-induction we studied the role of SVV ORF63 in generating resistance to IFN treatment. Interestingly, SVV ORF63 did not affect STAT2 phosphorylation but caused IRF9 degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner, suggesting that SVV employs multiple mechanisms to counteract the effect of IFN. Control of SVV ORF63 protein levels via fusion to a dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR)-degradation domain additionally confirmed its requirement for viral replication. Our results also show a prominent reduction of IRF9 and inhibition of STAT2 phosphorylation in VZV-infected cells. In addition, cells expressing VZV ORF63 blocked IFN-stimulation and displayed reduced levels of the IRF9 protein. Taken together, our data suggest that varicella ORF63 prevents ISG-induction both directly via IRF9 degradation and indirectly via transcriptional control of viral proteins that interfere with STAT2 phosphorylation. SVV and VZV thus encode multiple viral gene products that tightly control IFN-induced anti-viral responses.

  17. Evaluation of a vaccination strategy by serosurveillance data: The case of varicella.

    PubMed

    Tafuri, Silvio; Gallone, Maria Serena; Gallone, Maria Filomena; Cappelli, Maria Giovanna; Chironna, Maria; Germinario, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    Serological studies have many important epidemiologic applications. They can be used to investigate acquisition of various infections in different populations, measure the induction of an immune response in the host, evaluate the persistence of antibody, identify appropriate target groups and the age for vaccination. Serological studies can also be used to determine the vaccine efficacy. Since 1995 a varicella vaccine is available and it has been recommended in several countries (e.g. USA, Australia, Canada, Costa Rica, Ecuador, etc.). Nevertheless few varicella seroprevalence studies in countries that adopted an URV are available. It is related to the relatively recent introduction of the vaccination and to the lack of structured and collaborative surveillance systems based on serosurvey at national or regional level. Varicella seroprevalence data collected before the introduction of vaccination strategies allowed to establish the age of vaccination (e.g., indicated the opportunity to offer the vaccine to Italian susceptible adolescents). In the post-vaccination era, seroprevalence data demonstrated vaccine as immunogenic and excluded an increase of the age of infection linked to the vaccination strategy. New seroprevalence studies should be performed to answer to open questions, such as the long-term immunity and the change of the herpes zoster epidemiological pattern related to the vaccine.

  18. Application of Oral Fluid Assays in Support of Mumps, Rubella and Varicella Control Programs

    PubMed Central

    Maple, Peter A. C.

    2015-01-01

    Detection of specific viral antibody or nucleic acid produced by infection or immunization, using oral fluid samples, offers increased potential for wider population uptake compared to blood sampling. This methodology is well established for the control of HIV and measles infections, but can also be applied to the control of other vaccine preventable infections, and this review describes the application of oral fluid assays in support of mumps, rubella and varicella national immunization programs. In England and Wales individuals with suspected mumps or rubella, based on clinical presentation, can have an oral fluid swab sample taken for case confirmation. Universal varicella immunization of children has led to a drastic reduction of chickenpox in those countries where it is used; however, in England and Wales such a policy has not been instigated. Consequently, in England and Wales most children have had chickenpox by age 10 years; however, small, but significant, numbers of adults remain susceptible. Targeted varicella zoster virus (VZV) immunization of susceptible adolescents offers the potential to reduce the pool of susceptible adults and oral fluid determination of VZV immunity in adolescents is a potential means of identifying susceptible individuals in need of VZV vaccination. The main application of oral fluid testing is in those circumstances where blood sampling is deemed not necessary, or is undesirable, and when the documented sensitivity and specificity of the oral fluid assay methodology to be used is considered sufficient for the purpose intended. PMID:26690230

  19. Application of Oral Fluid Assays in Support of Mumps, Rubella and Varicella Control Programs.

    PubMed

    Maple, Peter A C

    2015-01-01

    Detection of specific viral antibody or nucleic acid produced by infection or immunization, using oral fluid samples, offers increased potential for wider population uptake compared to blood sampling. This methodology is well established for the control of HIV and measles infections, but can also be applied to the control of other vaccine preventable infections, and this review describes the application of oral fluid assays in support of mumps, rubella and varicella national immunization programs. In England and Wales individuals with suspected mumps or rubella, based on clinical presentation, can have an oral fluid swab sample taken for case confirmation. Universal varicella immunization of children has led to a drastic reduction of chickenpox in those countries where it is used; however, in England and Wales such a policy has not been instigated. Consequently, in England and Wales most children have had chickenpox by age 10 years; however, small, but significant, numbers of adults remain susceptible. Targeted varicella zoster virus (VZV) immunization of susceptible adolescents offers the potential to reduce the pool of susceptible adults and oral fluid determination of VZV immunity in adolescents is a potential means of identifying susceptible individuals in need of VZV vaccination. The main application of oral fluid testing is in those circumstances where blood sampling is deemed not necessary, or is undesirable, and when the documented sensitivity and specificity of the oral fluid assay methodology to be used is considered sufficient for the purpose intended. PMID:26690230

  20. Epidemiology of Varicella During the 2-Dose Varicella Vaccination Program - United States, 2005-2014.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Adriana S; Zhang, John; Marin, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Before availability of varicella vaccine in the United States, an estimated 4 million varicella cases, 11,000-13,500 varicella-related hospitalizations, and 100-150 varicella-related deaths occurred annually. The varicella vaccination program was implemented in the United States in 1996 as a 1-dose routine childhood program. Based on data from two varicella active surveillance sites, the varicella vaccination program led to 90% decline in incidence over the next decade (1). However, because of continued varicella outbreaks, a routine 2-dose schedule (at ages 12-15 months and 4-6 years) was recommended and has been in place since 2006 (2). The declines in incidence (1,3-6) made it feasible for states to implement varicella case-based surveillance and to report varicella data to CDC through the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS). State data have become the primary source for monitoring trends in varicella incidence nationally (7). Using NNDSS data, CDC previously reported nationwide declines in varicella incidence of 72% from the end of the 1-dose to the early years of the 2-dose varicella vaccination program (2006-2010) (7). This report updates varicella incidence trends to include the most recent years in the 2-dose varicella vaccination program. Between the period 2005-2006 (before the 2-dose recommendation) and 2013-2014, overall varicella incidence declined 84.6%, with the largest declines reported in children aged 5-9 years (89.3%) and 10-14 years (84.8%). The availability of varicella-specific data varied over time. During the last 2 years examined (2013 and 2014), completeness of reporting of two critical variables monitored by CDC, vaccination status (receipt of at least 1 dose of varicella vaccine) of cases and severity of disease based on number of lesions, were 54.2% and 39.1%, respectively. State and local health departments, in collaboration with CDC, should continue working to improve reporting of cases and completeness of

  1. Isolated Gait Ataxia as a Sole Manifestation of Right Lateral Medullary Infarct following Ipsilateral Trigeminal Herpes Zoster

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Lee, Dong-Geun

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebral infarct related to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) has been reported in the literature. In addition, lateral medullary infarct (LMI) can be manifested rarely as isolated gait ataxia without other characteristic symptoms. Case Report A 70-year-old female was admitted to our hospital because of herpes zoster on the right trigeminal nerve distribution. On the 15th hospital day, she developed sudden vertigo and fine left-beating nystagmus with axial lateropulsion to the right side, without the other usual signs of LMI (Horner syndrome, dysarthria, swallowing difficulty or hemibody sensory change). Brain MRI showed a small infarct in the far dorsolateral portion of the right rostral medulla and pontomedullary junction. Cerebrospinal fluid study showed a positive VZV IgG antibody. Conclusions We reported a case of isolated gait ataxia as the sole manifestation of right LMI following herpes zoster on the right trigeminal distribution. A high index of clinical suspicion for concomitant central nervous system complication is necessary in patients with herpes zoster, although the concomitant neurologic symptom may be mild or less lateralized. PMID:25076896

  2. Progress in pediatrics in 2013: choices in allergology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hypertension, infectious diseases, neonatology, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Vottero, Alessandra; Dascola, Carlotta Povesi; Mirra, Virginia; Sperli, Francesco; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2014-07-12

    This review will provide new information related to pathophysiology and management of specific diseases that have been addressed by selected articles published in the Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2013, focusing on allergology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hypertension, infectious diseases, neonatology, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses in children. Recommendations for interpretation of skin prick test to foods in atopic eczema, management of allergic conjunctivitis, hypertension and breastfeeding in women treated with antiepileptic drugs and healthy breakfast have been reported. Epidemiological studies have given emphasis to high incidence of autoimmune disorders in patients with Turner syndrome, increasing prevalence of celiac disease, frequency of hypertension in adolescents, incidence and risk factor for retinopathy of prematurity. Advances in prevention include elucidation of the role of probiotics in reducing occurrence of allergies and feeding intolerance, and events of foetal life that influence later onset of diseases. Mechanistic studies suggested a role for vitamin D deficiency in asthma and type 1 diabetes and for reactivation of Varicella-Zoster virus in aseptic meningitis. Regarding diagnosis, a new mean for the diagnosis of hyperbilirubinaemia in newborns, a score for recognition of impaired nutritional status and growth and criteria for early Dyke-Davidoff-Masson Syndrome have been suggested. New therapeutic approaches consist of use of etanercept for reducing insulin dose in type 1 diabetes, probiotics in atopic eczema, and melatonin in viral infections.

  3. Functional decline and herpes zoster in older people: an interplay of multiple factors.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Herpes zoster is a frequent painful infectious disease whose incidence and severity increase with age. In older people, there is a strong bidirectional link between herpes zoster and functional decline, which refers to a decrement in ability to perform activities of daily living due to ageing and disabilities. However, the exact nature of such link remains poorly established. Based on the opinion from a multidisciplinary group of experts, we here propose a new model to account for the interplay between infection, somatic/psychiatric comorbidity, coping skills, polypharmacy, and age, which may account for the functional decline related to herpes zoster in older patients. This model integrates the risk of decompensation of underlying disease; the risk of pain becoming chronic (e.g. postherpetic neuralgia); the risk of herpes zoster non-pain complications; the detrimental impact of herpes zoster on quality of life, functioning, and mood; the therapeutic difficulties due to multimorbidity, polypharmacy, and ageing; and the role of stressful life events in the infection itself and comorbid depression. This model underlines the importance of early treatment, strengthening coping, and vaccine prevention.

  4. Immunity and the burden of herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Suk; Kwon, Soon Sun; Lee, Jacob; Choi, Su-Mi; Lee, Jin Soo; Eom, Joong Sik; Sohn, Jang Wook; Choeng, Hee Jin

    2014-03-01

    The burden of herpes zoster may be related to patients' immunity, although this has not been studied extensively. This hypothesis was tested in a matched case-control study of patients with herpes zoster who sought treatment at one of seven university hospitals in Korea from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2010. Patients diagnosed with herpes zoster were placed into three groups based on their immune status: severely immunocompromised, mild-to-moderately immunocompromised, and normal immunity. Each patient in the severely immunocompromised group was matched with one patient in the mild-to-moderately immunocompromised group and one patient in the normal immunity group in the same hospital based on age, sex, and date of herpes zoster onset. A total of 582 patients with herpes zoster were included in the analysis: 194 in each of the three groups. Patients in the severely immunocompromised group had the highest herpes zoster-related hospitalization rate as compared to patients in the mild-to-moderately immunocompromised and normal immune groups (P < 0.01). The length of hospital stay and herpes zoster-related medical cost increased significantly with the deterioration of patients' immunity (P < 0.01, respectively). Cutaneous complications occurred more frequently in the severely immunocompromised group than in the other two groups (P < 0.01). An increase in herpes zoster burden was observed as the patients' immunity decreased. Therefore, effective measures are necessary to prevent herpes zoster and reduce its burden in severely immunocompromised patients.

  5. A Rare Complication of Herpes Zoster: Segmental Zoster Paresis

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Hooi Khee; Chawla, Mayank; Kaushik, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a common presentation in both the community and emergency department; however segmental zoster paresis is a rare complication that can lead to misdiagnosis. We present a case of a 74-year-old Indian gentleman with a background of well controlled diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and ischaemic heart disease who presented with sudden right lower limb weakness. This was preceded by a 5-day history of paraesthesia starting in the right foot and ascending up the right lower limb. On examination, there was a characteristic vesicular rash in the L2/3 region with MRC grading 3/5 in the right hip flexors. The rest of the neurological examination was unremarkable. MRI of the spine did not show any evidence of spinal disease. The patient was initiated on IV acyclovir with improvement of the lower limb weakness to MRC grading 5/5 as the vesicles improved. This is an interesting case as it highlights a rare presentation of zoster: segmental motor paresis that recovered fully with resolution of the rash. It shows the importance of recognizing motor neuropathy as a complication of shingles as it has a very good prognosis with most patients regaining full motor function of the affected limb with treatment. PMID:27313622

  6. Three-Dimensional Normal Human Neural Progenitor Tissue-Like Assemblies: A Model for Persistent Varicell-Zoster Virus Infection and Platform to Study Viral Infectivity and Oxidative Stress and Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Osterrieder, N.; Cohrs, R. J.; Kaufer, B. B.

    2014-01-01

    The environment of space results in a multitude of challenges to the human physiology that present barriers to extended habitation and exploration. Over 40 years of investigation to define countermeasures to address space flight adaptation has left gaps in our knowledge regarding mitigation strategies partly due to the lack of investigative tools, monitoring strategies, and real time diagnostics to understand the central causative agent(s) responsible for physiologic adaptation and maintaining homeostasis. Spaceflight-adaptation syndrome is the combination of space environmental conditions and the synergistic reaction of the human physiology. Our work addresses the role of oxidative stress and damage (OSaD) as a negative and contributing Risk Factor (RF) in the following areas of combined spaceflight related dysregulation: i) radiation induced cellular damage [1], [2] ii) immune impacts and the inflammatory response [3], [4] and iii) varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation [5]. Varicella-zoster (VZV)/Chicken Pox virus is a neurotropic human alphaherpesvirus resulting in varicella upon primary infection, suppressed by the immune system becomes latent in ganglionic neurons, and reactivates under stress events to re-express in zoster and possibly shingles. Our laboratory has developed a complex threedimensional (3D) normal human neural tissue model that emulates several characteristics of the human trigeminal ganglia (TG) and allows the study of combinatorial experimentation which addresses, simultaneously, OSaD associated with Spaceflight adaptation and habitation [6].

  7. The immunogenicity and safety of zoster vaccine in Taiwanese adults.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chien-An; Chen, Liang-Kung; Huang, Kuo-Chin

    2015-03-24

    The efficacy and safety of ZOSTAVAX in subjects 60 years of age and older was established in the Shingles Prevention Study (SPS) and in subjects 50 to 59 years of age in the ZOSTAVAX Efficacy and Safety Trial (ZEST). We evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of ZOSTAVAX in a total of 150 Taiwanese subjects ≥50 years of age, who received a single dose of ZOSTAVAX. gpELISA was used to determine geometric mean titers (GMT) of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) antibody. The geometric mean fold rise (GMFR) of the VZV antibody from the pre-vaccination to the 4 week post-vaccination time point was calculated. There was an overall increase in GMT from 128.45 to 391.85 at 4 weeks post-vaccination. The estimated GMFR was 3.05 (95% CI: 2.60 to 3.57).There were no serious adverse events for 28 days following vaccination. This study demonstrated the safety and immunogenicity of ZOSTAVAX among healthy Taiwanese adults.

  8. Varicella vaccine uptake in Shandong province, China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Aiqiang; Xu, Qing; Fang, Xueqiang; Bialek, Stephanie; Wang, Chengbin

    2012-01-01

    Varicella vaccine has been licensed in China for decade to be used as single dose in children aged ≥ 12 mo of age in private sector. Little data were available on varicella uptake to date in China yet. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Shandong Province in May 2011 to examine varicella vaccination coverage among children aged 16–40 mo and examine factors associated with varicella vaccine uptake. The overall coverage among children eligible for varicella vaccine was 62% (range 16.7–94.7% by county), much lower than the coverage of the eight vaccines included in the national immunization program (all above 97%). Though proximity to immunization services (< 5 km) was linked with higher vaccine uptake (62.6 vs. 37.4%, p = 0.02), county-level economic development (77.8, 61.0 and 47.1% for developed, sub-developed and developing regions, respectively, p < 0.001) played an even more important role in varicella vaccination. Moreover, there was little variation in coverage of vaccines included in the national immunization program along with county-level economic development. Even though varicella vaccine uptake is relatively high for use on a private basis, the vaccination coverage is not high enough to prevent epidemiology shift to adolescents and adults who are more prone to develop severe outcomes to varicella. Further enhancement on varicella vaccination coverage is necessary and inclusion to national immunization program seems to be a promising option for achieving and maintaining high coverage. PMID:22894966

  9. NSAIDs in paediatrics: caution with varicella!

    PubMed

    Durand, L; Sachs, P; Lemaitre, C; Lorrot, M; Bassehila, J; Bourdon, O; Prot-Labarthe, S

    2015-12-01

    Anti-inflammatory drugs have been suspected on several occasions to have promoted development of bacterial infection among varicella patients. Some countries have not implemented childhood varicella vaccination. Three cases in our hospital suggested the predisposing role of NSAIDs in varicella patient deterioration. Open access to these drugs widely increases their use and patient information should be continually provided in the medical offices and at dispensing pharmacy counters. Taking account of the benefit/risk balance and applying the simple precautionary principle, it would be appropriate to be cautious about the use of NSAIDs in the paediatric population.

  10. Evaluation of Chosen Cytokine Levels among Patients with Herpes Zoster as Ability to Provide Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Zajkowska, Agata; Garkowski, Adam; Świerzbińska, Renata; Kułakowska, Alina; Król, Monika Emilia; Ptaszyńska-Sarosiek, Iwona; Nowicka-Ciełuszecka, Anna; Pancewicz, Sławomir; Czupryna, Piotr; Moniuszko, Anna; Zajkowska, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Background Herpes zoster is a viral disease caused by the reactivation of varicella–zoster virus (VZV) which remained latent in the cranial nerve or dorsal root ganglia. Cell-mediated immunity is known to decline with age as part of immunosenescence and can lead to the reactivation of VZV. Whereas herpes zoster is usually mild in healthy young persons, older patients are at increased risk for complications. In the present study we investigated the serum cytokine profile (IL-17, IL-23, IL-21, IL-4, IL-12), representing cellular and humoral immunity and assessed the level of VZV IgG antibodies in patients with herpes zoster. Methods We investigated the serum concentrations of IL-17, IL-23, IL-21, IL-4, IL-12 and the level of VZV IgG antibodies in 23 patients with herpes zoster who did not develop superinfection. The control group was represented by 21 individuals in similar age with no inflammatory and infectious diseases. Cytokine and antibodies levels were measured by ELISA method. Statistical analysis was performed using the ROC curve (receiver operating characteristic), t-test, Welch’s t-test, and nonparametric tests with STATISTICA 10 software. Results In patients with herpes zoster, the serum level of IL-17, IL-23, IL-21, IL-4 and IL-12 as well as VZV IgG antibodies titer were statistically significantly increased compared to control group. Conclusion Our results confirm the broad activation of the immune system involving humoral and cell-mediated immunity. PMID:26934574

  11. Notes from the Field: Varicella Outbreak Associated with Riding on a School Bus - Muskegon County, Michigan, 2015.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Douglas E

    2016-09-09

    On December 3, 2015, Public Health-Muskegon County (PHMC) in Michigan was notified by a local kindergarten-grade 2 school that a student aged 8 years (the index patient) had been sent home because of a rash suspected to be varicella (chickenpox); the rash had not been observed the previous day. Investigation by PHMC revealed that the student was one of five siblings in household A, none of whom had a history of having received any immunizations. During the preceding month the index patient's two older siblings (aged 12 years and 25 years) and two younger siblings (twins, aged 4 years) had been excluded from other schools in this rural district because of rashes that also were suspected to be varicella. Investigators also learned that a parent in household A had received a physician diagnosis of herpes zoster (shingles) nearly 7 weeks earlier, on October 20, after having been evaluated for a painful, unilateral trunk rash that had begun 3 days earlier, and for which acyclovir was prescribed. PHMC could not confirm whether any advice regarding prevention of possible transmission of varicella zoster virus to susceptible contacts was provided. The other children in household A had rash onsets on November 3, November 18 (two children), and November 22. The index patient rode a school bus and was the first student on and the last off each day; none of the index patient's four siblings attended the same school or rode on the same school bus as the index patient. Public health investigators subsequently linked three more cases in children to sharing the same school bus as the index patient.

  12. Notes from the Field: Varicella Outbreak Associated with Riding on a School Bus - Muskegon County, Michigan, 2015.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Douglas E

    2016-01-01

    On December 3, 2015, Public Health-Muskegon County (PHMC) in Michigan was notified by a local kindergarten-grade 2 school that a student aged 8 years (the index patient) had been sent home because of a rash suspected to be varicella (chickenpox); the rash had not been observed the previous day. Investigation by PHMC revealed that the student was one of five siblings in household A, none of whom had a history of having received any immunizations. During the preceding month the index patient's two older siblings (aged 12 years and 25 years) and two younger siblings (twins, aged 4 years) had been excluded from other schools in this rural district because of rashes that also were suspected to be varicella. Investigators also learned that a parent in household A had received a physician diagnosis of herpes zoster (shingles) nearly 7 weeks earlier, on October 20, after having been evaluated for a painful, unilateral trunk rash that had begun 3 days earlier, and for which acyclovir was prescribed. PHMC could not confirm whether any advice regarding prevention of possible transmission of varicella zoster virus to susceptible contacts was provided. The other children in household A had rash onsets on November 3, November 18 (two children), and November 22. The index patient rode a school bus and was the first student on and the last off each day; none of the index patient's four siblings attended the same school or rode on the same school bus as the index patient. Public health investigators subsequently linked three more cases in children to sharing the same school bus as the index patient. PMID:27606936

  13. Treatment of herpes zoster with Clinacanthus nutans (bi phaya yaw) extract.

    PubMed

    Sangkitporn, S; Chaiwat, S; Balachandra, K; Na-Ayudhaya, T D; Bunjob, M; Jayavasu, C

    1995-11-01

    A randomized, placebo-controlled trial of the efficacy of topical formulation of Clinacanthus nutans (Bi Phaya Yaw) extract was carried out in 51 patients with varicella-zoster virus infection. The study medication was applied five times daily for 7-14 days until the lesions were healed. The number of patients with lesion crusting within 3 days and with lesion healing within 7 days and 10 days were significantly greater in the C. nutans extract-treated group than the placebo group (p < 0.01). Pain scores were reduced more rapidly in the C. nutans extract-treated group than in the placebo group. There were no side effects of the study medication.

  14. Disseminated vaccine-strain varicella as initial presentation of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Maves, Ryan C; Tripp, Michael S; Dell, Trevor G; Bennett, Jason W; Ahluwalia, Jaspal S; Tamminga, Cindy; Baldwin, James C; Starr, Clarise Rivera; Grinkemeyer, Michael D; Dempsey, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections have declined in many industrialized countries due to vaccination with the attenuated Oka strain virus. Rare cases of severe, disseminated vaccine-strain VZV infection have occurred in the immunocompromised, although rarely in HIV-infected persons. We describe a man with previously-undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who received VZV vaccination and subsequently presented to a combat hospital in Afghanistan with disseminated varicella, respiratory failure, and sepsis. The patient recovered with ventilator and hemodynamic support, intravenous acyclovir, and empiric antibiotic therapy. DNA sequencing detected Oka strain virus from patient blood specimens. Although safe in most populations, the VZV vaccine may cause life-threatening disease in immunocompromised patients. Improved detection of HIV infection may be useful in preventing such cases.

  15. Disseminated vaccine-strain varicella as initial presentation of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Maves, Ryan C; Tripp, Michael S; Dell, Trevor G; Bennett, Jason W; Ahluwalia, Jaspal S; Tamminga, Cindy; Baldwin, James C; Starr, Clarise Rivera; Grinkemeyer, Michael D; Dempsey, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections have declined in many industrialized countries due to vaccination with the attenuated Oka strain virus. Rare cases of severe, disseminated vaccine-strain VZV infection have occurred in the immunocompromised, although rarely in HIV-infected persons. We describe a man with previously-undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who received VZV vaccination and subsequently presented to a combat hospital in Afghanistan with disseminated varicella, respiratory failure, and sepsis. The patient recovered with ventilator and hemodynamic support, intravenous acyclovir, and empiric antibiotic therapy. DNA sequencing detected Oka strain virus from patient blood specimens. Although safe in most populations, the VZV vaccine may cause life-threatening disease in immunocompromised patients. Improved detection of HIV infection may be useful in preventing such cases. PMID:24257110

  16. Combined vaccine against measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella.

    PubMed

    Brunell, P A; Novelli, V M; Lipton, S V; Pollock, B

    1988-06-01

    A combined measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella vaccine produced seroconversions for all four components similar to that found if measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine or live varicella vaccine were given separately. In addition, those exposed to varicella were completely protected or had only a mild rash. Moreover, the reaction rates were not increased if the vaccines were combined. The somewhat lower and delayed serologic response to live varicella vaccine as compared with the combined measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella may have been due to the small amount of varicella vaccine virus used or to its degree of attenuation. Persistence of antibody was observed 1 year postimmunization.

  17. A deterministic model for highly contagious diseases: The case of varicella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acedo, L.; Moraño, J.-A.; Santonja, F.-J.; Villanueva, R.-J.

    2016-05-01

    The classic nonlinear Kermack-McKendrick model based upon a system of differential equations has been widely applied to model the rise and fall of global pandemic and also seasonal epidemic by introducing a forced harmonic infectivity which would change throughout the year. These methods work well in their respective domains of applicability, and for certain diseases, but they fail when both seasonality and high infectivity are combined. In this paper we consider a Susceptible-Infected-Recovered, or SIR, model with two latent states to model the propagation and evolutionary history of varicella in humans. We show that infectivity can be calculated from real data and we find a nonstandard seasonal variation that cannot be fitted with a single harmonic. Moreover, we show that infectivity for the present strains of the virus has raised following a sigmoid function in a period of several centuries. This could allow the design of vaccination strategies and the study of the epidemiology of varicella and herpes zoster.

  18. A recombinant varicella vaccine harboring a respiratory syncytial virus gene induces humoral immunity.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kouki; Matsuura, Masaaki; Ota, Megumi; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Yamanishi, Koichi; Mori, Yasuko

    2015-11-01

    The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) Oka vaccine strain (vOka) is highly efficient and causes few adverse events; therefore, it is used worldwide. We previously constructed recombinant vOka (rvOka) harboring the mumps virus gene. Immunizing guinea pigs with rvOka induced the production of neutralizing antibodies against the mumps virus and VZV. Here, we constructed recombinant vOka viruses containing either the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) subgroup A fusion glycoprotein (RSV A-F) gene or RSV subgroup B fusion glycoprotein (RSV B-F) gene (rvOka-RSV A-F or rvOka-RSV B-F). Indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses confirmed the expression of each recombinant RSV protein in virus-infected cells. Immunizing guinea pigs with rvOka-RSV A-F or rvOka-RSV B-F led to the induction of antibodies against RSV proteins. These results suggest that the current varicella vaccine genome can be used to generate custom-made vaccine vectors to develop the next generation of live vaccines.

  19. Seroconversion status after single dose and double doses of varicella vaccination in children with leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cakir, F Betul; Timur, Cetin; Yoruk, Asim; Cakir, Erkan; Ayhan, Aylin Canbolat

    2012-03-01

    Although varicella is a benign self-limiting disease in healthy children, it can be fatal when it occurs in immunocompromised hosts. Despite that immunosuppressed children are suggested to require 2 doses of vaccine to achieve seroconversion, conflicting results are reported in the literature. The aim of this study was to investigate the seroconversion status and mean antibody titers at first year after single dose and double doses of varicella vaccination in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. Patients with leukemia in remission for at least 1 year who were seronegative for varicella-zoster virus immunoglobulin G (IgG) were vaccinated. Titers above the cutoff level (0.65) were accepted as seroconversion. Seventeen patients were vaccinated with single dose whereas 24 patients were vaccinated with double doses. Mean prevaccination antibody titers were 0.56 ± 0.05 in patients with single dose and 0.51 ± 0.08 in patients with double doses (P > .05, Student t test). The mean antibody titers at first year were 0.61 ± 0.05 in patients with single-dose vaccination (P > .05, Wilcoxon signed-rank test) and 1.48 ± 0.04 in patients with double doses (P < .001, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). Seroconversion after single-dose vaccination was achieved in 29% of patients (n = 5/17) and in 75% of patients with double doses (n = 18/24) at first year (P = .004, chi-square test). These results suggest that seroconversion after single-dose vaccination might not persist at first year in malignancy patients. Double doses should be applied in order to provide long-term seroconversion.

  20. [Successful treatment with acyclovir and a corticosteroid for lower cranial polyneuropathy in zoster sine herpete: a case report].

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Daisuke; Nakahara Ph D, Toshiki; Nakajima, Sho; Nakazato, Tomoko; Mikasa, Michitaka; Furukawa Ph D, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    A 62-year-old woman developed meningitis as well as acute paralysis of glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory nerves on the right side and also had dysfunction of the left hypoglossal nerve. Although there was no evidence of a typical cutaneous or mucosal herpetic lesion, PCR detection of varicella zoster virus (VZV)-DNA in cerebrospinal fluid confirmed the clinical diagnosis of polyneuritis cranialis due to VZV infection and zoster sine herpete. After starting intravenous acyclovir and methylprednisolone, her hypoglossal nerve palsy disappeared within a day and all other symptoms and signs dramatically improved. A rapid improvement observed in our patient suggests that the right cranial polyneuropathy could be caused by inflammation associated with epineurial edema (where the ninth, tenth, and eleventh cranial nerves pass through the right jugular foramen), whereas the exact mechanism of the twelfth cranial nerve involvement on the contralateral side is unknown. Our clinical findings indicate that acute lower cranial polyneuropathy in patients with zoster sine herpete should be treated immediately with combined administration of acyclovir and an anti-inflammatory corticosteroid. PMID:26511031

  1. [Measles, mumps, rubella and varicella: antibody titration and vaccinations in a large hospital].

    PubMed

    Cologni, L; Belotti, L; Bacis, M; Moioli, F; Goglio, A; Mosconi, G

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence contagious diseases such as measles, varicella, mumps and rubella in the hospital open creates situations of alarm, due to the potential involvement of workers, but most importantly for the oftentimes harmful consequences for critical patients, such as pregnant women or immunocompromised individuals. In 2007 antibody titration was initiated in our hospital for four infectious diseases, also pursuant to the Lombardy Region Resolution N. VIII/1587 of 22-12-2005 "Decisions regarding vaccinations in children and adults in the Lombardy Region" which indicate the departments in which a priority exists: maternity-neonatal and infectious illnesses. In 2011 a vaccination campaign was launched for unprotected operators in the Health and Medical Management departments: after an interview with the competent physician of reference, the subjects voluntary submitted themselves to vaccination. The protective antibody data encountered over the years are similar to that reported in the literature, with coverage percentages greater than 93% for varicella and rubella, over 89% for measles and over 85% for mumps. Approximately 80% of the operators are protected against all four diseases. However, the dramatic consequences of potential contagion lead us to strongly recommend vaccinations for non-protected subjects. At present 37 operators have been vaccinated with the trivalent MMR vaccine (Measles, Mumps and Rubella) and 14 for Varicella. The antibody response was verified in all cases.

  2. Genetic variation in the HLA region is associated with susceptibility to herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Crosslin, D R; Carrell, D S; Burt, A; Kim, D S; Underwood, J G; Hanna, D S; Comstock, B A; Baldwin, E; de Andrade, M; Kullo, I J; Tromp, G; Kuivaniemi, H; Borthwick, K M; McCarty, C A; Peissig, P L; Doheny, K F; Pugh, E; Kho, A; Pacheco, J; Hayes, M G; Ritchie, M D; Verma, S S; Armstrong, G; Stallings, S; Denny, J C; Carroll, R J; Crawford, D C; Crane, P K; Mukherjee, S; Bottinger, E; Li, R; Keating, B; Mirel, D B; Carlson, C S; Harley, J B; Larson, E B; Jarvik, G P

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster, commonly referred to as shingles, is caused by the varicella zoster virus (VZV). VZV initially manifests as chicken pox, most commonly in childhood, can remain asymptomatically latent in nerve tissues for many years and often re-emerges as shingles. Although reactivation may be related to immune suppression, aging and female sex, most inter-individual variability in re-emergence risk has not been explained to date. We performed a genome-wide association analyses in 22,981 participants (2280 shingles cases) from the electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network. Using Cox survival and logistic regression, we identified a genomic region in the combined and European ancestry groups that has an age of onset effect reaching genome-wide significance (P>1.0 × 10(-8)). This region tags the non-coding gene HCP5 (HLA Complex P5) in the major histocompatibility complex. This gene is an endogenous retrovirus and likely influences viral activity through regulatory functions. Variants in this genetic region are known to be associated with delay in development of AIDS in people infected by HIV. Our study provides further suggestion that this region may have a critical role in viral suppression and could potentially harbor a clinically actionable variant for the shingles vaccine.

  3. Genetic variation in the HLA region is associated with susceptibility to herpes zoster

    PubMed Central

    Crosslin, D R; Carrell, D S; Burt, A; Kim, D S; Underwood, J G; Hanna, D S; Comstock, B A; Baldwin, E; de Andrade, M; Kullo, I J; Tromp, G; Kuivaniemi, H; Borthwick, K M; McCarty, C A; Peissig, P L; Doheny, K F; Pugh, E; Kho, A; Pacheco, J; Hayes, M G; Ritchie, M D; Verma, S S; Armstrong, G; Stallings, S; Denny, J C; Carroll, R J; Crawford, D C; Crane, P K; Mukherjee, S; Bottinger, E; Li, R; Keating, B; Mirel, D B; Carlson, C S; Harley, J B; Larson, E B; Jarvik, G P

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster, commonly referred to as shingles, is caused by the varicella zoster virus (VZV). VZV initially manifests as chicken pox, most commonly in childhood, can remain asymptomatically latent in nerve tissues for many years and often re-emerges as shingles. Although reactivation may be related to immune suppression, aging and female sex, most inter-individual variability in re-emergence risk has not been explained to date. We performed a genome-wide association analyses in 22 981 participants (2280 shingles cases) from the electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network. Using Cox survival and logistic regression, we identified a genomic region in the combined and European ancestry groups that has an age of onset effect reaching genome-wide significance (P>1.0 × 10−8). This region tags the non-coding gene HCP5 (HLA Complex P5) in the major histocompatibility complex. This gene is an endogenous retrovirus and likely influences viral activity through regulatory functions. Variants in this genetic region are known to be associated with delay in development of AIDS in people infected by HIV. Our study provides further suggestion that this region may have a critical role in viral suppression and could potentially harbor a clinically actionable variant for the shingles vaccine. PMID:25297839

  4. Herpes zoster infection increases the risk of peripheral arterial disease: A nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Te-Yu; Yang, Fu-Chi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung; Lo, Hsin-Yi; Yang, Tse-Yen

    2016-08-01

    Varicella-zoster virus infection can cause meningoencephalitis, myelitis, ocular disorders, and vasculopathy. However, no study has investigated the association between herpes zoster (HZ) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD).We identified newly diagnosed HZ from the Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database recorded during 2000 to 2010, with a follow-up period extending until December 31, 2011. In addition, we included a comparison cohort that was randomly frequency-matched with the HZ cohort according to age, sex, and index year. We analyzed the risk of PAD with respect to sex, age, and comorbidities by using Cox proportional-hazards regression models.In total, 35,391 HZ patients and 141,556 controls were enrolled in this study. The risk of PAD was 13% increased in the HZ cohort than in the comparison cohort after adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidities. The Kaplan-Meier survival curve showed that the risk of PAD was significantly higher in the HZ cohort than in the non-HZ cohort (P < 0.001).This nationwide population-based cohort study revealed a higher risk of PAD in patients with HZ infection than in those without the infection. Careful follow-up and aggressive treatment is recommended for patients with HZ to reduce the risk of PAD. PMID:27583856

  5. Varicella hospitalizations in Los Angeles during the varicella vaccination era, 2003-2011: are they preventable?

    PubMed

    Agopian, Anya; Lopez, Adriana; Wilson, Dulmini; Peralta, Vi; El Amin, Alvin Nelson; Bialek, Stephanie

    2014-09-15

    Characteristics of varicella-related hospitalizations in the mature varicella vaccination era, including the proportion vaccinated and the severity of disease, are not well described. We present the vaccination status, severity and reasons for hospitalization of the hospitalized varicella cases reported to the Los Angeles County Health Department from 2003 to 2011, the period which includes the last 4 years of the mature one-dose program and the first 5 years after introduction of the routine two-dose program. A total of 158 hospitalized varicella cases were reported overall, of which 52.5% were potentially preventable and eligible for vaccination, 41.8% were not eligible for vaccination, and 5.7% were vaccinated. Most hospitalizations (72.2%) occurred among healthy persons, 54.4% occurred among persons ≥20 years of age, and 3.8% of hospitalizations resulted in death. Our data suggest that as many as half of the hospitalized varicella cases, including half of the deaths, may have been preventable given that they occurred in persons who were eligible for vaccination. More complete implementation of the routine varicella vaccination program could further reduce the disease burden of severe varicella.

  6. Intracellular transport and stability of varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein K

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Susan L.; Govero, Jennifer L.; Heineman, Thomas C. . E-mail: heinemtc@slu.edu

    2007-02-20

    VZV gK, an essential glycoprotein that is conserved among the alphaherpesviruses, is believed to participate in membrane fusion and cytoplasmic virion morphogenesis based on analogy to its HSV-1 homolog. However, the production of VZV gK-specific antibodies has proven difficult presumably due to its highly hydrophobic nature and, therefore, VZV gK has received limited study. To overcome this obstacle, we inserted a FLAG epitope into gK near its amino terminus and produced VZV recombinants expressing epitope-tagged gK (VZV gK-F). These recombinants grew indistinguishably from native VZV, and FLAG-tagged gK could be readily detected in VZV gK-F-infected cells. FACS analysis established that gK is transported to the plasma membrane of infected cells, while indirect immunofluorescence demonstrated that gK accumulates predominately in the Golgi. Using VZV gK-F-infected cells we demonstrated that VZV gK, like several other herpesvirus glycoproteins, is efficiently endocytosed from the plasma membrane. However, pulse-labeling experiments revealed that the half-life of gK is considerably shorter than that of other VZV glycoproteins including gB, gE and gH. This finding suggests that gK may be required in lower abundance than other viral glycoproteins during virion morphogenesis or viral entry.

  7. Varicella-zoster virus induces the formation of dynamic nuclear capsid aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, Marielle; Thelen, Nicolas; Thiry, Marc; Riva, Laura; Ote, Isabelle; Condé, Claude; Vandevenne, Patricia; Di Valentin, Emmanuel; Bontems, Sébastien; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine

    2014-04-15

    The first step of herpesviruses virion assembly occurs in the nucleus. However, the exact site where nucleocapsids are assembled, where the genome and the inner tegument are acquired, remains controversial. We created a recombinant VZV expressing ORF23 (homologous to HSV-1 VP26) fused to the eGFP and dually fluorescent viruses with a tegument protein additionally fused to a red tag (ORF9, ORF21 and ORF22 corresponding to HSV-1 UL49, UL37 and UL36). We identified nuclear dense structures containing the major capsid protein, the scaffold protein and maturing protease, as well as ORF21 and ORF22. Correlative microscopy demonstrated that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates and time-lapse video imaging showed that they appear prior to the accumulation of cytoplasmic capsids, presumably undergoing the secondary egress, and are highly dynamic. Our observations suggest that these structures might represent a nuclear area important for capsid assembly and/or maturation before the budding at the inner nuclear membrane. - Highlights: • We created a recombinant VZV expressing the small capsid protein fused to the eGFP. • We identified nuclear dense structures containing capsid and procapsid proteins. • Correlative microscopy showed that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates. • Procapsids and partial capsids are found within the aggregates of WT and eGFP-23 VZV. • FRAP and FLIP experiments demonstrated that they are dynamic structures.

  8. Simian Varicella Virus Expresses a Latency-Associated Transcript That Is Antisense to Open Reading Frame 61 (ICP0) mRNA in Neural Ganglia of Latently Infected Monkeys▿

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Yang; Davis, Kara A.; Traina-Dorge, Vicki; Gray, Wayne L.

    2007-01-01

    Simian varicella virus (SVV) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) are closely related alphaherpesviruses that cause varicella (chickenpox) in nonhuman primates and humans, respectively. After resolution of the primary disease, SVV and VZV establish latent infection of neural ganglia and may later reactivate to cause a secondary disease (herpes zoster). This study investigated SVV gene expression in neural ganglia derived from latently infected vervet monkeys. SVV transcripts were detected in neural ganglia, but not in liver or lung tissues, of latently infected animals. A transcript mapping to open reading frame (ORF) 61 (herpes simplex virus type 1 [HSV-1] ICP0 homolog) was consistently detected in latently infected trigeminal, cervical, and lumbar ganglia by reverse transcriptase PCR. Further analysis confirmed that this SVV latency-associated transcript (LAT) was oriented antisense to the gene 61 mRNA. SVV ORF 21 transcripts were also detected in 42% of neural ganglia during latency. In contrast, SVV ORF 28, 29, 31, 62, and 63 transcripts were not detected in ganglia, liver, or lung tissues of latently infected animals. The results demonstrate that viral gene expression is limited during SVV latency and that a LAT antisense to an ICP0 homolog is expressed. In this regard, SVV gene expression during latency is similar to that of HSV-1 and other neurotropic animal alphaherpesviruses but differs from that reported for VZV. PMID:17507490

  9. Varicella infection and toxoplasmosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Grant, A

    1996-09-01

    Varicella occurring in pregnancy can be dangerous for the fetus, the mother, and the newborn. The fetus may experience multiple system damage. The mother and newborn are at increased risk for varicella pneumonia with a 9% and 20% fatality rate, respectively. The recent introduction of the varicella vaccine will affect the occurrence of gestational infection. Toxoplasmosis is rarely dangerous for the pregnant woman, yet the fetus and newborn may be at risk for chorioretinitis, hydrocephalus, intracranial calcifications, and convulsions. The greatest challenge in the management of toxoplasmosis in pregnancy is diagnosis of the asymptomatic newborn before damage occurs. Strategies to prevent toxoplasmosis should be taught to every pregnant woman as part of parental care.

  10. Prevention of varicella: recommendations for use of varicella vaccines in children, including a recommendation for a routine 2-dose varicella immunization schedule.

    PubMed

    2007-07-01

    National varicella immunization coverage using the current 1-dose immunization strategy has increased among vaccine-eligible children 19 through 35 months of age from 27% in 1997 to 88% by 2005. These high immunization rates have resulted in a 71% to 84% decrease in the reported number of varicella cases, an 88% decrease in varicella-related hospitalizations, a 59% decrease in varicella-related ambulatory care visits, and a 92% decrease in varicella-related deaths in 1- to 4-year-old children when compared with data from the prevaccine era. Despite this significant decrease, the number of reported cases of varicella has remained relatively constant during the past 5 to 6 years. Since vaccine effectiveness for prevention of disease of any severity has been 80% to 85%, a large number of cases of varicella continue to occur among people who already have received the vaccine (breakthrough varicella), and outbreaks of varicella have been reported among highly immunized populations of schoolchildren. The peak age-specific incidence has shifted from 3- to 6-year-old children in the prevaccine era to 9- to 11-year-old children in the postvaccine era for cases in both immunized and unimmunized children during these outbreaks. Outbreaks of varicella are likely to continue with the current 1-dose immunization strategy. After administration of 2 doses of varicella vaccine in children, the immune response is markedly enhanced, with > 99% of children achieving an antibody concentration (determined by glycoprotein enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) of > or = 5 U/mL (an approximate correlate of protection) and a marked increase in geometric mean antibody titers after the second vaccine dose. The estimated vaccine efficacy over a 10-year observation period of 2 doses for prevention of any varicella disease is 98% (compared with 94% for 1 dose), with 100% efficacy for prevention of severe disease. Recipients of 2 doses of varicella vaccine are 3.3-fold less likely to have

  11. A simplified plaque assay for varicella vaccine.

    PubMed

    Husson-van Vliet, J; Colinet, G; Yane, F; Lemoine, P

    1987-11-01

    A simple and accurate plaque assay is described for potency testing of attenuated varicella vaccine. Assays were performed on the African green monkey kidney continuous cell line CV-1, in multidish-plates, under a semi-solid carboxymethylcellulose overlay. The test is economical and yields accurate individual titre estimates, the reliability of which may be assessed by parallel titration of reference preparations.

  12. [Results of Booster Vaccination in Children with Primary Vaccine Failure after Initial Varicella Vaccination].

    PubMed

    Ozakiv, Takao; Nishimura, Naoko; Gotoh, Kensei; Funahashi, Keiji; Yoshii, Hironori; Okuno, Yoshinobu

    2016-05-01

    In October 2014, the varicella vaccination policy in Japan was changed from a single voluntary inoculation to two routine inoculations. This paper reports the results of booster vaccination in children who did not show seroconversion after initial vaccination (i.e., primary vaccine failure : PVF) over a 7-year period prior to the introduction of routine varicella vaccination. Between November 2007 and May 2014, 273 healthy children aged between 1.1 and 14.5 years (median : 1.7 years) underwent varicella vaccination. Before and 4 to 6 weeks after vaccination, the antibody titers were measured using an immune adherence hemagglutination (IAHA) assay and a glycoprotein-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (gpELISA). In addition, side reactions were examined during the four-week period after vaccination. Children who did not show IAHA seroconversion (PVF) were recommended to receive a booster vaccination, and the measurement of antibody titers and an assessment of side reactions were performed after the booster dose. In May 2015, a questionnaire was mailed to each of the 273 participants to investigate whether they had developed varicella and/or herpes zoster after vaccination. After initial vaccination, the IAHA seroconversion rate was 75% and the mean antibody titer (Log2) with seroconversion was 4.7, while the gpELISA seroconversion rate was 84% and the mean antibody titer (Log10) with seroconversion was 2.4. Among children with PVF, 54 received booster vaccination within 81 to 714 days (median : 139 days) after the initial vaccination. After booster vaccination, the IAHA seroconversion rate was 98% and the mean antibody titer (Log2) with seroconversion was 5.8. Both the seroconversion rate and the antibody titer were higher compared with the values after the initial vaccination (p < 0.01). After booster vaccination, the gpELISA seropositive rate was 100% and the mean positive antibody titer (Log 10) was 3.6 ; similar results were obtained for the IAHA assay, with

  13. [Results of Booster Vaccination in Children with Primary Vaccine Failure after Initial Varicella Vaccination].

    PubMed

    Ozakiv, Takao; Nishimura, Naoko; Gotoh, Kensei; Funahashi, Keiji; Yoshii, Hironori; Okuno, Yoshinobu

    2016-05-01

    In October 2014, the varicella vaccination policy in Japan was changed from a single voluntary inoculation to two routine inoculations. This paper reports the results of booster vaccination in children who did not show seroconversion after initial vaccination (i.e., primary vaccine failure : PVF) over a 7-year period prior to the introduction of routine varicella vaccination. Between November 2007 and May 2014, 273 healthy children aged between 1.1 and 14.5 years (median : 1.7 years) underwent varicella vaccination. Before and 4 to 6 weeks after vaccination, the antibody titers were measured using an immune adherence hemagglutination (IAHA) assay and a glycoprotein-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (gpELISA). In addition, side reactions were examined during the four-week period after vaccination. Children who did not show IAHA seroconversion (PVF) were recommended to receive a booster vaccination, and the measurement of antibody titers and an assessment of side reactions were performed after the booster dose. In May 2015, a questionnaire was mailed to each of the 273 participants to investigate whether they had developed varicella and/or herpes zoster after vaccination. After initial vaccination, the IAHA seroconversion rate was 75% and the mean antibody titer (Log2) with seroconversion was 4.7, while the gpELISA seroconversion rate was 84% and the mean antibody titer (Log10) with seroconversion was 2.4. Among children with PVF, 54 received booster vaccination within 81 to 714 days (median : 139 days) after the initial vaccination. After booster vaccination, the IAHA seroconversion rate was 98% and the mean antibody titer (Log2) with seroconversion was 5.8. Both the seroconversion rate and the antibody titer were higher compared with the values after the initial vaccination (p < 0.01). After booster vaccination, the gpELISA seropositive rate was 100% and the mean positive antibody titer (Log 10) was 3.6 ; similar results were obtained for the IAHA assay, with

  14. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ... from another part of the body. Symptoms of infectious arthritis include Intense pain in the joint Joint redness ...

  15. Burden of varicella in Italy, 2001-2010: analysis of data from multiple sources and assessment of universal vaccination impact in three pilot regions.

    PubMed

    Trucchi, Cecilia; Gabutti, Giovanni; Rota, Maria Cristina; Bella, Antonino

    2015-11-01

    Varicella represents the most widespread vaccine-preventable childhood infectious disease in Italy. The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess the burden of varicella in Italy and in three regions that first implemented universal varicella vaccination. Four data sources were analysed: statutory notification data, the National Hospital Discharge Database, mortality data, and the vaccination coverage reached in Sicilia, Veneto and Apulia. The incidence rates per 100,000 population were calculated using the Italian resident population provided by the Italian Institute of Statistics in 2001-2010. In 2001-2010, the mean annual incidence of notifications of varicella was 150.7 cases per 100,000 population, reaching 948.6 cases per 100,000 population in the paediatric age group. The annual incidence declined to 102.6 per 100,000 population in 2010. During the period considered, 20,295 hospitalizations for varicella were observed. The mean annual incidence was 3.4 per 100,000 population, reaching a minimum of 2.5 per 100,000 in 2009 and 2010. Of the hospitalizations, 68.4% occurred in the paediatric age group. The median length of hospital stay was 4 days. During 2001-2003 and 2006-2010, 33 deaths were reported. In the three regions considered, vaccination coverage increased steadily, reaching 81.5% in Sicily, 79.4% in Veneto and 75.6% in Apulia in 2010. During the same period, hospitalization and notification rates decreased significantly. This study demonstrated that varicella continues to represent a relevant health problem in Italy, especially in the paediatric age group. Data obtained from the three Italian regions that first introduced universal vaccination demonstrated that vaccination reduces the incidence of varicella and hospitalization rates.

  16. Hospitalization with varicella and shingles before and after introduction of childhood varicella vaccination in Germany.

    PubMed

    Siedler, Anette; Dettmann, Marleen

    2014-01-01

    In Germany, one dose of varicella vaccination has been recommended for children aged <24 months since 2004, and 2 doses have been recommended since 2009. Vaccination coverage (VC) is above 80% for one dose and 60% for 2 doses. In this study, data on varicella- and shingles-associated hospitalizations before and after vaccine introduction were assessed. Based on ICD-coded data of the main diagnosis of hospitalized cases from 1995-2012 in Germany, annual age-adjusted and age-specific hospitalization incidences (cases/100,000; HI) were calculated. HI means 1995-2003 (pre-vaccination-period) versus 2005-2012 (post-vaccination-period) were compared. Age-specific trends and annual percentage change rates (APC) were assessed by joinpoint regression. Overall age-adjusted varicella-HI decreased from 3.3/100,000 pre-vaccination to 1.9/100,000 post vaccination. The decline was greatest in regions with the highest VC. The post-vaccination decline was greatest in children aged <1, 1-4, and 5-9 y, who had APCs of -18.2,-27.2 and -15.2, respectively, and significant joinpoints. In all other age groups no post-vaccination joinpoints were detected or they did not lead to a consistent trend. Age-adjusted shingles-HI increased from 8.8/100,000 (1995) to 16.8/100,000 (2012). Shingles-HI increased in all age groups with no significant post-vaccination joinpoints, except in children<1 and 1-4 y, where APCs of -5.6 and -3.6 were detected. Varicella vaccination significantly reduced varicella-HI in children below 10 y, but was not definitely related to varicella-HI in older age groups. A consistent increase of shingles-HI began before varicella vaccination was introduced and was not affected by vaccination.

  17. Attenuation of the adaptive immune response in rhesus macaques infected with simian varicella virus lacking open reading frame 61.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christine; Kerns, Amelia; Haberthur, Kristen; Dewane, Jesse; Walker, Joshua; Gray, Wayne; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2013-02-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic alphaherpesvirus that causes chickenpox during primary infection and establishes latency in sensory ganglia. Infection of rhesus macaques (RM) with the homologous simian varicella virus (SVV) recapitulates hallmarks of VZV infection. We have shown that an antisense transcript of SVV open reading frame 61 (ORF61), a viral transactivator, was detected most frequently in latently infected RM sensory ganglia. In this study, we compared disease progression, viral replication, immune response, and the establishment of latency following intrabronchial infection with a recombinant SVV lacking ORF61 (SVVΔORF61) to those following infection with wild-type (WT) SVV. Varicella severity and viral latency within sensory ganglia were comparable in RMs infected with SVVΔORF61 and WT SVV. In contrast, viral loads, B and T cell responses, and plasma inflammatory cytokine levels were decreased in RMs infected with SVVΔORF61. To investigate the mechanisms underlying the reduced adaptive immune response, we compared acute SVV gene expression, frequency and proliferation of dendritic cell (DC) subsets, and the expression of innate antiviral genes in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples. The abundance of SVV transcripts in all kinetic classes was significantly decreased in RMs infected with SVVΔORF61. In addition, we detected a higher frequency and proliferation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells in BAL fluid at 3 days postinfection in RMs infected with SVVΔORF61, which was accompanied by a slight increase in type I interferon gene expression. Taken together, our data suggest that ORF61 plays an important role in orchestrating viral gene expression in vivo and interferes with the host antiviral interferon response.

  18. Varicella vaccination in Europe - taking the practical approach.

    PubMed

    Bonanni, Paolo; Breuer, Judith; Gershon, Anne; Gershon, Michael; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Papaevangelou, Vana; Rentier, Bernard; Rümke, Hans; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine; Senterre, Jacques; Weil-Olivier, Catherine; Wutzler, Peter

    2009-05-28

    Varicella is a common viral disease affecting almost the entire birth cohort. Although usually self-limiting, some cases of varicella can be serious, with 2 to 6% of cases attending a general practice resulting in complications. The hospitalisation rate for varicella in Europe ranges from 1.3 to 4.5 per 100,000 population/year and up to 10.1% of hospitalised patients report permanent or possible permanent sequelae (for example, scarring or ataxia). However, in many countries the epidemiology of varicella remains largely unknown or incomplete. In countries where routine childhood vaccination against varicella has been implemented, it has had a positive effect on disease prevention and control. Furthermore, mathematical models indicate that this intervention strategy may provide economic benefits for the individual and society. Despite this evidence and recommendations for varicella vaccination by official bodies such as the World Health Organization, and scientific experts in the field, the majority of European countries (with the exception of Germany and Greece) have delayed decisions on implementation of routine childhood varicella vaccination, choosing instead to vaccinate high-risk groups or not to vaccinate at all. In this paper, members of the Working Against Varicella in Europe group consider the practicalities of introducing routine childhood varicella vaccination in Europe, discussing the benefits and challenges of different vaccination options (vaccination vs. no vaccination, routine vaccination of infants vs. vaccination of susceptible adolescents or adults, two doses vs. one dose of varicella vaccine, monovalent varicella vaccines vs. tetravalent measles, mumps, rubella and varicella vaccines, as well as the optimal interval between two doses of measles, mumps, rubella and varicella vaccines). Assessment of the epidemiology of varicella in Europe and evidence for the effectiveness of varicella vaccination provides support for routine childhood programmes

  19. Varicella breakthrough infection and vaccine effectiveness in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Chan; Huang, Li-Min; Chang, I-Shou; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Chang, Luan-Yin

    2011-03-24

    We performed this nationwide retrospective investigation among the recipients of varicella vaccine to evaluate the breakthrough varicella infection rate, factors associated with breakthrough infection and the vaccine effectiveness. The recipients of these vaccinations were identified through Taiwan's National Immunization Information System and data on breakthrough infections among these recipients were collected by using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Claims Database. From 2000 to 2007, 1,057,345 persons received varicella vaccinations in Taiwan. Varicella breakthrough infection occurred among 22,640 (2.1%) vaccinees and 170 (0.016%) required hospitalization for varicella disease. Annual breakthrough infection rates ranged from 0.12% to 2.04%. The mean age of vaccination was 1.6 years (median 1.3 years) and the mean age at breakthrough infection was 3.9 years. The mean interval between vaccination and the breakthrough infection was 2.3 years. The rate was significantly lower in regions where free varicella vaccinations were available than in regions where they were not (P<0.001). Varicella breakthrough infection was significantly more likely to occur at 5 and 6 years of age among the vaccinees, who received vaccination between 12 months and 23 months of age (P<0.001). The vaccine effectiveness against varicella was 82.6% and against varicella-related hospitalization was 85.4% from 2000 to 2005.

  20. Family Characteristics Associated with Likelihood of Varicella Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Weinmann, Sheila; Mullooly, John P; Drew, Lois; Chun, Colleen S

    2016-01-01

    Context: The introduction of the varicella vaccine as a routine pediatric immunization in the US, in 1995, provided an opportunity to assess factors associated with uptake of new vaccines in the member population of the Kaiser Permanente Northwest (KPNW) Health Plan. Objective: Identify factors associated with varicella vaccination in the KPNW population in the first five years after varicella vaccine was introduced. Design: A retrospective cohort of children under age 13 years between June 1995 and December 1999, without a history of varicella disease was identified using KPNW automated data. Membership records were linked to vaccine databases. Cox regression was used to estimate likelihood of varicella vaccination during the study period in relation to age, sex, primary clinician’s specialty, and Medicaid eligibility. For a subset whose parents answered a behavioral health survey, additional demographic and behavioral characteristics were evaluated. Main Outcome Measure: Varicella vaccination. Results: We identified 88,646 children under age 13 years without a history of varicella; 22% were vaccinated during the study period. Varicella vaccination was more likely among children who were born after 1995, were not Medicaid recipients, or had pediatricians as primary clinicians. In the survey-linked cohort, positively associated family characteristics included smaller family size; higher socioeconomic status; and parents who were older, were college graduates, reported excellent health, and received influenza vaccination. Conclusion: Understanding predictors of early varicella vaccine-era vaccine acceptance may help in planning for introduction of new vaccines to routine schedules. PMID:27104589