Science.gov

Sample records for infectivity enhanced suicide

  1. Does Suicidal History Enhance Acceptance of Other Suicidal Individuals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knott, Ena; Range, Lillian

    2001-01-01

    To see if moderately suicidal outpatients were more accepting of a suicidal person than never- or severely-suicidal outpatients, 105 respondents completed measures of suicidality, depression, acceptance, and empathy. Results indicated, unexpectedly, that net of depression, never-suicidal people were more accepting of a suicidal person than…

  2. Suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults: differences in risk factors and their implications.

    PubMed

    Kang, Cho Ryok; Bang, Ji Hwan; Cho, Sung-Il; Kim, Kui Nam; Lee, Hee-Jin; Ryu, Bo Yeong; Cho, Soo Kyung; Lee, Young Hwa; Oh, Myoung-Don; Lee, Jong-Koo

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have investigated risk factors for suicidal ideation and suicide attempt; however, most have failed to show differences in risk factors between suicidal ideation and suicide attempt among the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. This study was designed to identify differences in risk factors between suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among HIV-infected adults in Seoul. A face-to-face survey of 457 HIV-infected adults was conducted by the Seoul Metropolitan Government in 2013. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with suicidal ideation and suicide attempt. Among 422 participants, 44% had suicidal ideation, and 11% had suicide attempts. The independent risk factors for suicidal ideation were young and middle age, living with someone, history of AIDS-defining opportunistic disease, history of treatment for depression, lower social support, and psychological status. Beneficiaries of National Medical Aid, economic barriers to treatment, history of treatment for depression, and lower psychological status were independently associated with suicide attempts. Patients with HIV in Korea were treated without cost in some centers. Thus, experiencing an economic barrier to treatment might be due in part to ignorance of HIV care policies. Our findings indicate that suicide attempts are associated with socioeconomic factors and information inequality regarding medical care. In conclusion, suicidal ideation closely associated with the psychosocial factors, whereas suicide attempt demonstrates a stronger association with socioeconomic factors. Suicide prevention measures should be implemented to provide information to help HIV-infected patients.

  3. Enhanced Mental Health Interventions in the Emergency Department: Suicide and Suicide Attempt Prevention in the ED

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Jennifer L.; Asarnow, Joan R.

    2015-01-01

    Suicide is the third leading cause of death in adolescents, and often youths with suicidal behavior or ideation present to the emergency department (ED) for care. Many suicidal youths do not receive mental health care after discharge from the ED, and interventions are needed to enhance linkage to outpatient intervention. This paper describes the Family Intervention for Suicide Prevention (FISP). Designed for use in emergency settings, the FISP is a family-based cognitive-behavior therapy session designed to increase motivation for follow-up treatment, support, coping, and safety, augmented by care linkage telephone contacts after discharge. In a randomized trial of the intervention, the FISP was shown to significantly increase the likelihood of youths receiving outpatient treatment, including psychotherapy and combined medication and psychotherapy. The FISP is a brief, focused, efficacious treatment that can be delivered in the ED to improve the probability of follow-up treatment for suicidal youths. PMID:25904825

  4. A Randomized Clinical Trial of the Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality vs. Enhanced Care as Usual for Suicidal Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    of Suicidality vs. Enhanced Care as Usual for Suicidal Soldiers” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David A. Jobes, Ph.D., ABPP CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: THE...effectiveness of a novel clinical intervention developed by the PI called the Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality (CAMS). CAMS is not a...effectiveness of CAMS versus Enhanced Care As Usual (E-CAU) in a sample of n = 148 active-duty US Army Soldiers who are experiencing suicidal ideation and/or

  5. Suicide

    MedlinePlus

    Suicide is the tenth most common cause of death in the United States. People may consider suicide when they are hopeless and can't see ... event. People who have the highest risk of suicide are white men. But women and teens report ...

  6. Suicide

    MedlinePlus

    ... Care 5.1 Protective Factors 5.1.1 Personal Protective Factors 5.1.2 External/Environmental Protective ... not experienced such things. It also indicates that personal crisis may pre- sent more of a suicide ...

  7. Suicide

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help for Intense Grief Going to a Therapist Stress & Coping Center When Depression Is Severe Why Do People Get Depressed? Finding Low-Cost Mental Health Care My Friend Is Talking About Suicide. What Should I Do? Depression Cutting 5 Ways ...

  8. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: Enhancing Mental Health Care for Suicidal Individuals and Other People in Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Madelyn S.; Munfakh, Jimmie L. H.; Kleinman, Marjorie; Lake, Alison M.

    2012-01-01

    Linking at-risk callers to ongoing mental health care is a key goal of crisis hotline interventions that has not often been addressed in evaluations of hotlines' effectiveness. We conducted telephone interviews with 376 suicidal and 278 nonsuicidal crisis callers to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (Lifeline) to assess rates of mental…

  9. Altruism can evolve when relatedness is low: evidence from bacteria committing suicide upon phage infection.

    PubMed

    Refardt, Dominik; Bergmiller, Tobias; Kümmerli, Rolf

    2013-05-22

    High relatedness among interacting individuals has generally been considered a precondition for the evolution of altruism. However, kin-selection theory also predicts the evolution of altruism when relatedness is low, as long as the cost of the altruistic act is minor compared with its benefit. Here, we demonstrate evidence for a low-cost altruistic act in bacteria. We investigated Escherichia coli responding to the attack of an obligately lytic phage by committing suicide in order to prevent parasite transmission to nearby relatives. We found that bacterial suicide provides large benefits to survivors at marginal costs to committers. The cost of suicide was low, because infected cells are moribund, rapidly dying upon phage infection, such that no more opportunity for reproduction remains. As a consequence of its marginal cost, host suicide was selectively favoured even when relatedness between committers and survivors approached zero. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that low-cost suicide can evolve with ease, represents an effective host-defence strategy, and seems to be widespread among microbes. Moreover, low-cost suicide might also occur in higher organisms as exemplified by infected social insect workers leaving the colony to die in isolation.

  10. Quarrelsome family environment as an enhanced factor on child suicidal ideation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fu-Gong; Lin, Jing-Ding; Hsieh, Yu-Hsin; Chang, Chien-Yi

    2014-12-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of death in adolescents, and develops through a process leading from depression to suicidal ideation and self-injury. In this study, we analyzed and compared suicidal ideation among elementary school children from distinct families and school-related backgrounds. We conducted a cross-sectional study to investigate suicidal ideation in elementary school children in Miaoli County of Western Taiwan. Our study included 979 eligible participants and collected data, including suicidal ideation, depression scores, demographic characteristics, and family and school variables. The results revealed that 175 students (17.9%) exhibited depression, and 146 students (14.9%) had contemplated suicide. A quarrelsome family environment was found to be an important independent factor in child suicidal ideation after controlling for depression status. Children living in quarrelsome families showed a 3.7-fold risk of suicidal ideation compared with children in a harmonious family. Among boys living in quarrelsome family environments, suicidal ideation risk was 7.4-fold higher than for girls living in harmonious families. A 27-fold high increased suicidal ideation risk was also observed among the depressed children who living in the quarrelsome family environment, compared with the non-depressed in the harmonious family environment. This study provides novel evidence indicating the enhanced effects of a quarrelsome family environment combined with depression symptoms and among boys on suicidal ideation. These findings suggest of quarrels in a family environment playing an important role on elementary school children's psychological development, and may help parents in improving their mental health.

  11. All-trans retinoic acid enhances bystander effect of suicide gene therapy in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kong, Heng; Liu, Xia; Yang, Liucheng; Qi, Ke; Zhang, Haoyun; Zhang, Jingwen; Huang, Zonghai; Wang, Hongxian

    2016-03-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has been shown to enhance the expression of connexin 43 (Cx43) and the bystander effect (BSE) in suicide gene therapy. These in turn improve effects of suicide gene therapies for several tumor types. However, whether ATRA can improve BSE remains unclear in suicide gene therapy for breast cancer. In the present study, MCF-7, human breast cancer cells were treated with ATRA in combination with a VEGFP-TK/CD gene suicide system developed by our group. We found that this combination enhances the efficiency of cell killing and apoptosis of breast cancer by strengthening the BSE in vitro. ATRA also promotes gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in MCF-7 cells by upregulation of the connexin 43 mRNA and protein in MCF-7 cells. These results indicate that enhancement of GJIC by ATRA in suicide gene system might serve as an attractive and cost-effective strategy of therapy for breast cancer cells.

  12. Does a brief suicide prevention gatekeeper training program enhance observed skills?

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Wendi; Matthieu, Monica M.; Lezine, DeQuincy; Knox, Kerry L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Suicide is a significant public health problem worldwide that requires evidence-based prevention efforts. One approach to prevention is gatekeeper training. Gatekeeper training programs for community members have demonstrated positive changes in knowledge and attitudes about suicide. Changes in gatekeeper skills have not been well established. Aims To assess and predict the impact of a brief, gatekeeper training on community members’ observed skills. Methods Participants in a community gatekeeper training were employees at US universities. 50 participants were randomly selected for skills assessment and videotaped interacting with a standardized actor prior to and following training. Tapes were reliability rated for general and suicide-specific skills. Results Gatekeeper skills increased from pre- to posttest: 10% of participants met criteria for acceptable gatekeeper skills before training, while 54% met criteria after training. Pretraining variables did not predict increased skills. Limitations Results do not provide conclusions about the relationship between observed gatekeeper skills and actual use of those skills in the future. Conclusions Gatekeeper training enhances suicide-specific skills for the majority of participants. Other strategies, such as behavioral rehearsal, may be necessary to enhance skills in the remaining participants. PMID:20573609

  13. A Randomized Clinical Trial of the Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality vs. Enhanced Care as Usual for Suicidal Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    Soldiers who are experiencing suicidal ideation and/or behaviors . Research clinicians for both treatment conditions were recruited from the Army...staff. Participants were recruited from a number of sources at the ARS including the outpatient behavioral health clinic and the inpatient unit...Usual (E-CAU) in a sample of n = 148 active-duty US Army Soldiers who are experiencing suicidal ideation and/or behaviors . Research clinicians for

  14. Thoughts of suicide among HIV-infected rural persons enrolled in a telephone-delivered mental health intervention.

    PubMed

    Heckman, Timothy G; Miller, Jeffrey; Kochman, Arlene; Kalichman, Seth C; Carlson, Bruce; Silverthorn, Monica

    2002-01-01

    This study characterized rates and predictors of suicidal thoughts among HIV-infected persons living in rural communities of eight U.S. states. Self-administered surveys were completed by 201 HIV-infected persons living in communities of 50,000 or fewer that were located at least 20 miles from a city of 100,000 or more. All participants were clients of rural AIDS service organizations and had recently enrolled into a randomized clinical trial of a telephone-delivered, coping improvement-group intervention designed specifically for HIV-infected rural persons. At baseline, participants reported on thoughts of suicide, psychological symptomatology, life-stressor burden, ways of coping, coping self-efficacy, social support, and barriers to health care and social services. Thirty-eight percent of HIV-infected rural persons had engaged in thoughts of suicide during the past week. A logistic regression analysis revealed that participants who endorsed thoughts of suicide also reported more depressive symptoms (odds ratio [OR] = 2.19; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.32-3.63, p < .002), less coping self-efficacy (OR = 0.70; 95% CI = 0.56-0.88, p < .002), more frequently worried about transmitting their HIV infection to others (OR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.14-2.40, p < .008), and experienced more stress associated with AIDS-related stigma (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.07-2.35, p < .03). As AIDS prevalence rates increase in rural areas, interventions that successfully identify and treat geographically isolated HIV-infected persons who experience more frequent or serious thoughts of suicide are urgently needed.

  15. A Randomized Clinical Trial of the Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality vs. Enhanced Care as Usual for Suicidal Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    included in the conclusion of the report. In conclusion, this study—referred to as the “Operation Worth Living” ( OWL ) project—is poised to make valuable...suicidal Soldiers. The OWL study got off to a slow start due to considerable IRB-related concerns 19 and various administrative and practical

  16. Enhancing VSV oncolytic activity with an improved cytosine deaminase suicide gene strategy.

    PubMed

    Leveille, S; Samuel, S; Goulet, M-L; Hiscott, J

    2011-06-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are promising therapeutic agents for cancer treatment, with recent studies emphasizing the combined use of chemotherapeutic compounds and prodrug suicide gene strategies to improve OV efficacy. In the present study, the synergistic activity of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-MΔ51 virus expressing the cytosine deaminase/uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CD::UPRT) suicide gene and 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) prodrug was investigated in triggering tumor cell oncolysis. In a panel of VSV-sensitive and -resistant cells-prostate PC3, breast MCF7 and TSA, B-lymphoma Karpas and melanoma B16-F10-the combination treatment increased killing of non-infected bystander cells in vitro via the release of 5FC toxic derivatives. In addition, we showed a synergistic effect on cancer cell killing with VSV-MΔ51 and the active form of the drug 5-fluorouracil. Furthermore, by monitoring VSV replication at the tumor site and maximizing 5FC bioavailability, we optimized the treatment regimen and improved survival of animals bearing TSA mammary adenocarcinoma. Altogether, this study emphasizes the potency of the VSV-CD::UPRT and 5FC combination, and demonstrates the necessity of optimizing each step of a multicomponent therapy to design efficient treatment.

  17. Perceived Burdensomeness, Familism, and Suicidal Ideation among Mexican Women: Enhancing Understanding of Risk and Protective Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza, Monica J.; Pettit, Jeremy W.

    2010-01-01

    The interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide and a culturally-relevant construct, familism, was used to examine predictors of suicidal ideation among Mexican and Mexican American women in the United States. A sense of perceived burdensomeness toward others was expected to significantly predict suicidal ideation, especially among women who…

  18. Suicide Prevention Triangle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutter, Fred

    This manual provides resource tools and strategies to enhance the suicide prevention capabilities of health professionals and the health care setting in which care is provided. In the first section, terms are defined and the suicide prevention triangle model is described. Applications of the model and good practices for suicide prevention in any…

  19. Cyclophilin B enhances HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    DeBoer, Jason; Madson, Christian J.; Belshan, Michael

    2016-02-15

    Cyclophilin B (CypB) is a member of the immunophilin family and intracellular chaperone. It predominantly localizes to the ER, but also contains a nuclear localization signal and is secreted from cells. CypB has been shown to interact with the Gag protein of human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1). Several proteomic and genetic studies identified it as a potential factor involved in HIV replication. Herein, we show that over-expression of CypB enhances HIV infection by increasing nuclear import of viral DNA. This enhancement was unaffected by cyclosporine treatment and requires the N-terminus of the protein. The N-terminus contains an ER leader sequence, putative nuclear localization signal, and is required for secretion. Deletion of the N-terminus resulted in mislocalization from the ER and suppression of HIV infection. Passive transfer experiments showed that secreted CypB did not impact HIV infection. Combined, these experiments show that intracellular CypB modulates a pathway of HIV nuclear import. - Highlights: • CypB has been identified in several proteomic studies of HIV-1 infection. • CypB expression is upregulated in activated and infected T-cells. • Over-expression of CypB enhances HIV nuclear import and infection. • The N-terminus of CypB is necessary for these effects.

  20. Dengue virus antibodies enhance Zika virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Lauren M; Carlin, Eric R; Jenkins, Meagan M; Tan, Amanda L; Barcellona, Carolyn M; Nicholson, Cindo O; Michael, Scott F; Isern, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    For decades, human infections with Zika virus (ZIKV), a mosquito-transmitted flavivirus, were sporadic, associated with mild disease, and went underreported since symptoms were similar to other acute febrile diseases. Recent reports of severe disease associated with ZIKV have greatly heightened awareness. It is anticipated that ZIKV will continue to spread in the Americas and globally where competent Aedes mosquito vectors are found. Dengue virus (DENV), the most common mosquito-transmitted human flavivirus, is both well-established and the source of outbreaks in areas of recent ZIKV introduction. DENV and ZIKV are closely related, resulting in substantial antigenic overlap. Through antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE), anti-DENV antibodies can enhance the infectivity of DENV for certain classes of immune cells, causing increased viral production that correlates with severe disease outcomes. Similarly, ZIKV has been shown to undergo ADE in response to antibodies generated by other flaviviruses. We tested the neutralizing and enhancing potential of well-characterized broadly neutralizing human anti-DENV monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) and human DENV immune sera against ZIKV using neutralization and ADE assays. We show that anti-DENV HMAbs, cross-react, do not neutralize, and greatly enhance ZIKV infection in vitro. DENV immune sera had varying degrees of neutralization against ZIKV and similarly enhanced ZIKV infection. Our results suggest that pre-existing DENV immunity may enhance ZIKV infection in vivo and may lead to increased disease severity. Understanding the interplay between ZIKV and DENV will be critical in informing public health responses and will be particularly valuable for ZIKV and DENV vaccine design and implementation strategies. PMID:28090318

  1. Dengue virus antibodies enhance Zika virus infection.

    PubMed

    Paul, Lauren M; Carlin, Eric R; Jenkins, Meagan M; Tan, Amanda L; Barcellona, Carolyn M; Nicholson, Cindo O; Michael, Scott F; Isern, Sharon

    2016-12-01

    For decades, human infections with Zika virus (ZIKV), a mosquito-transmitted flavivirus, were sporadic, associated with mild disease, and went underreported since symptoms were similar to other acute febrile diseases. Recent reports of severe disease associated with ZIKV have greatly heightened awareness. It is anticipated that ZIKV will continue to spread in the Americas and globally where competent Aedes mosquito vectors are found. Dengue virus (DENV), the most common mosquito-transmitted human flavivirus, is both well-established and the source of outbreaks in areas of recent ZIKV introduction. DENV and ZIKV are closely related, resulting in substantial antigenic overlap. Through antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE), anti-DENV antibodies can enhance the infectivity of DENV for certain classes of immune cells, causing increased viral production that correlates with severe disease outcomes. Similarly, ZIKV has been shown to undergo ADE in response to antibodies generated by other flaviviruses. We tested the neutralizing and enhancing potential of well-characterized broadly neutralizing human anti-DENV monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) and human DENV immune sera against ZIKV using neutralization and ADE assays. We show that anti-DENV HMAbs, cross-react, do not neutralize, and greatly enhance ZIKV infection in vitro. DENV immune sera had varying degrees of neutralization against ZIKV and similarly enhanced ZIKV infection. Our results suggest that pre-existing DENV immunity may enhance ZIKV infection in vivo and may lead to increased disease severity. Understanding the interplay between ZIKV and DENV will be critical in informing public health responses and will be particularly valuable for ZIKV and DENV vaccine design and implementation strategies.

  2. Suicide and Suicidal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Nock, Matthew K.; Borges, Guilherme; Bromet, Evelyn J.; Cha, Christine B.; Kessler, Ronald C.; Lee, Sing

    2008-01-01

    Suicidal behavior is a leading cause of injury and death worldwide. Information about the epidemiology of such behavior is important for policy-making and prevention. The authors reviewed government data on suicide and suicidal behavior and conducted a systematic review of studies on the epidemiology of suicide published from 1997 to 2007. The authors' aims were to examine the prevalence of, trends in, and risk and protective factors for suicidal behavior in the United States and cross-nationally. The data revealed significant cross-national variability in the prevalence of suicidal behavior but consistency in age of onset, transition probabilities, and key risk factors. Suicide is more prevalent among men, whereas nonfatal suicidal behaviors are more prevalent among women and persons who are young, are unmarried, or have a psychiatric disorder. Despite an increase in the treatment of suicidal persons over the past decade, incidence rates of suicidal behavior have remained largely unchanged. Most epidemiologic research on suicidal behavior has focused on patterns and correlates of prevalence. The next generation of studies must examine synergistic effects among modifiable risk and protective factors. New studies must incorporate recent advances in survey methods and clinical assessment. Results should be used in ongoing efforts to decrease the significant loss of life caused by suicidal behavior. PMID:18653727

  3. Social Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maris, Ronald W.

    1997-01-01

    Argues that social forces and social pathologies figure prominently in the dynamics of suicide. Gives several examples of "social suicide," including mass suicide, organizational self-destruction, social analogues to individual suicide, and military suicide. Claims that suicide prevention requires social, economic, and cultural transformations at…

  4. Suicide Terrorists: Are They Suicidal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    Are suicide terrorists suicidal? A review of the worldwide literature on suicide terrorism uncovered five published empirical studies describing data collected from potential suicide terrorists or the surviving friends and families of deceased terrorists. The many discrepancies uncovered between suicide terrorists and other suicides on key factors…

  5. All-trans retinoic acid enhances bystander effect of suicide-gene therapy against medulloblastomas.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoyi; Gao, Yun; Pu, Ke; Ma, Li; Song, Xiaofu; Liu, Yunhui

    2011-10-03

    In our previous study we evaluated the antitumor effect of herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase gene (HSV-tk) on human medulloblastomas (MBs) in a therapeutic delivery system using the immortalized neural stem cell (NSC) line C17.2. However, our findings indicated that the bystander effect between C17.2tk and Daoy MB cells was weak compared to the bystander effect between NSCtk and C6 glioma cells. Gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) is the main mechanism mediating the bystander effect in HSV-tk gene therapy. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has been shown to up-regulate the expression of Connexin43 and GJIC. In this study we investigated the synergistic effect of ATRA and HSV-tk gene therapy in the treatment of MBs. We found that the expression of Connexin43 in Daoy cells was significantly increased when cells were exposed to 3μmol/l of ATRA (P<0.05). After co-culturing C17.2tk cells with Daoy cells at different ratios ranging from 1:1 to 1:16, ATRA significantly increased the bystander anti-tumor effect compared to ATRA-untreated cells (P<0.05). In intracranial co-implantation experiments, mice co-implanted with C17.2tk/Daoy cells and treated with a combination of ATRA and GCV had significantly smaller tumors compared to the animals treated with GCV alone (P<0.05). Together, our results show that ATRA enhanced the tumoricidal effect in HSVtk/GCV suicide gene therapy against Daoy MB cells by strengthening the bystander effect in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Suicide and suicidal behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Turecki, Gustavo; Brent, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Suicide is a complex public health problem of global dimension. Suicidal behaviour (SB) shows marked differences between genders, age groups, geographic regions and socio-political realities, and variably associates with different risk factors, underscoring likely etiological heterogeneity. Although there is no effective algorithm to predict suicide in clinical practice, improved recognition and understanding of clinical, psychological, sociological, and biological factors may facilitate the detection of high-risk individuals and assist in treatment selection. Psychotherapeutic, pharmacological, or neuromodulatory treatments of mental disorders can often prevent SB; additionally, regular follow-up of suicide attempters by mental health services is key to prevent future SB. PMID:26385066

  7. Suicide notes.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, I; Farmer, R; Catalan, J

    1993-07-01

    Detailed case reports of incidents of suicide and attempted suicide on the London Underground railway system between 1985 and 1989 were examined for the presence of suicide notes. The incidence of note-leaving was 15%. Notes provided little insight into the causes of suicide as subjectively perceived, or strategies for suicide prevention.

  8. A Multi-Site Randomized Clinical Trial to Reduce Suicidal Ideation in Suicidal Adult Outpatients with Major Depressive Disorder: Development of a Methodology to Enhance Safety

    PubMed Central

    McCall, W. Vaughn; Benca, Ruth; Rosenquist, Peter B; Riley, Mary Anne; Hodges, Chelsea; Gubosh, Brittany; McCloud, Laryssa; Newman, Jill C; Case, Doug; Rumble, Meredith; Mayo, Mark; White, Kaitlin Hanley; Phillips, Marjorie; Krystal, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Suicide is a major public health concern, yet there are very few randomized clinical trials that have been conducted to reduce suicidal ideation in patients at risk for suicide. We describe the rationale and refinements of such a trial that is designed to assess the effect of a hypnotic medication on suicidal ideation in adult outpatients currently experiencing suicidal ideation. Methods “Reducing Suicidal Ideation Through Insomnia Treatment (REST-IT)” is a multi-site randomized clinical trial that includes 3 recruiting sites and one data management site. This 4-year study is in its second year of recruitment. The purpose of the study is to compare hypnotic medication versus placebo as an add-on treatment to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor as a means of reducing suicidal ideation in depressed adult outpatients with insomnia and suicidal ideation. The safety features of the study follow the 2001 NIH guidelines for studies that include patients at risk of suicide. Results Five hundred and eighty-four potential participants have undergone telephone screening; 67% of these failed the phone screen, most often due to an absence of expressed suicidal ideation (26% of the telephone screen fails). One hundred and twelve persons appeared for a face-to-face baseline assessment, and 40 of these had completed a taper of their ineffective psychotropic medications before the baseline assessments. Sixty-four% of those who completed baseline assessments failed to proceed to randomization, most commonly because of no clinically significant suicidal ideation (51% of those excluded at baseline). One participant was offered and accepted voluntary psychiatric hospitalization in lieu of study participation. Thus far, 40 participants have been randomized into the study, 88.7% of scheduled visits have been attended, with 93.8% adherence for the SSRI and 91.6% adherence for the randomized hypnotic versus placebo. None of the randomized participants have required

  9. Suicide and suicidal behavior

    MedlinePlus

    ... like a victim Feelings of rejection, loss, or loneliness Suicidal behaviors may occur when there is a ... dismiss the person as just trying to get attention. Prevention Avoiding alcohol and drugs (other than prescribed ...

  10. Suicide and Suicidal Thoughts

    MedlinePlus

    ... psychiatric disorder, such as major depression, post-traumatic stress disorder or bipolar disorder Have a family history of mental disorders, substance abuse, suicide, or violence, including physical or sexual abuse Have ...

  11. Adolescent Suicide and Suicidal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridge, Jeffrey A.; Goldstein, Tina R.; Brent, David A.

    2006-01-01

    This review examines the descriptive epidemiology, and risk and protective factors for youth suicide and suicidal behavior. A model of youth suicidal behavior is articulated, whereby suicidal behavior ensues as a result of an interaction of socio-cultural, developmental, psychiatric, psychological, and family-environmental factors. On the basis of…

  12. Cytokine-enhanced vaccine and suicide gene therapy as surgery adjuvant treatments for spontaneous canine melanoma.

    PubMed

    Finocchiaro, L M E; Glikin, G C

    2008-02-01

    We evaluated the safety, efficacy and anti-tumor effects of a surgery adjuvant treatment on canine patients with malignant melanoma. This approach combined suicide gene therapy with a subcutaneous vaccine composed by formolized tumor cells and irradiated xenogeneic cells producing human interleukin-2 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The post-surgical margin of the cavity was infiltrated with lipid-complexed thymidine kinase suicide gene coadministrated with ganciclovir. Toxicity was minimal or absent in all patients. With respect to surgery-treated controls (SC), this combined treatment (CT) significantly increased the fraction of patients local disease-free from 6 to 58% and distant metastases-free from 43 to 78% (Fisher's Exact test). In addition, CT significantly improved both SC overall 78 (23-540) and metastasis-free survival 112 (0-467) days to more than 1312 days (respective ranges: 43-1312 and 0-1312) (Kaplan-Meier analysis). In those patients subjected to partial surgery or presenting local recurrence, the efficacy of CT was verified by a 49% of objective responses that averaged 85% of tumor mass loss, while 22% displayed tumor progression as 94% of SC did. Therefore, surgery adjuvant CT controlled tumor growth, delaying or preventing post-surgical recurrence and distant metastasis, significantly extending survival and recovering the quality of life.

  13. Suicide, Suicide Attempts, and Suicidal Ideation.

    PubMed

    Klonsky, E David; May, Alexis M; Saffer, Boaz Y

    2016-01-01

    Suicidal behavior is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Fortunately, recent developments in suicide theory and research promise to meaningfully advance knowledge and prevention. One key development is the ideation-to-action framework, which stipulates that (a) the development of suicidal ideation and (b) the progression from ideation to suicide attempts are distinct phenomena with distinct explanations and predictors. A second key development is a growing body of research distinguishing factors that predict ideation from those that predict suicide attempts. For example, it is becoming clear that depression, hopelessness, most mental disorders, and even impulsivity predict ideation, but these factors struggle to distinguish those who have attempted suicide from those who have only considered suicide. Means restriction is also emerging as a highly effective way to block progression from ideation to attempt. A third key development is the proliferation of theories of suicide that are positioned within the ideation-to-action framework. These include the interpersonal theory, the integrated motivational-volitional model, and the three-step theory. These perspectives can and should inform the next generation of suicide research and prevention.

  14. A High School Counselor's Leadership in Providing School-Wide Screenings for Depression and Enhancing Suicide Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Anne; Abel, Nicholas R.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of mental health issues and suicidal thoughts and actions among school-aged children and adolescents is a serious issue. This article examines the scope of the problem nationwide and provides a brief overview of the literature regarding the effectiveness of school-wide screening programs for depression and suicide risk. The authors…

  15. Using Plan-Do-Study-Act Cycle to Enhance Completeness of Suicide Firearm Reporting.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yongwen; Young, Shannon; Foss, Karen; Angeloni, Magaly; Norcini, Erica; Viner-Brown, Samara

    2017-02-01

    The Rhode Island Violent Death Reporting System (RIVDRS) collects comprehensive surveillance data on violent deaths to support violence prevention programs in Rhode Island and nationwide. Successful collection of firearm information is critical to understanding gun violence in public health. A recent quality improvement (QI) project was performed to improve gun information collection in the RIVDRS program. Our aim was to increase the presence of firearm model information for 2014 suicides from 50% to 80% by December 31, 2015. We used the 2014 RIVDRS data and the Plan-Do-Study-Act cycle for this project. Our efforts achieved a 50% increase in the number of firearm model reporting. If we work more closely with police departments, they may understand the data importance, and be more likely to include the firearm information in their reports. We describe this process and provide lessons learned that can be generalizable to other states' violent death reporting system. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2017-02.asp].

  16. Suicide neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Carl; Mechawar, Naguib; Turecki, Gustavo

    2009-12-01

    In this review, we examine the history of the neurobiology of suicide, as well as the genetics, molecular and neurochemical findings in suicide research. Our analysis begins with a summary of family, twin, and adoption studies, which provide support for the investigation of genetic variation in suicide risk. This leads to an overview of neurochemical findings restricted to neurotransmitters and their receptors, including recent findings in whole genome gene expression studies. Next, we look at recent studies investigating lipid metabolism, cell signalling with a particular emphasis on growth factors, stress systems with a focus on the role of polyamines, and finally, glial cell pathology in suicide. We conclude with a description of new ideas to study the neurobiology of suicide, including subject-specific analysis, protein modification assessment, neuroarchitecture studies, and study design strategies to investigate the complex suicide phenotype.

  17. Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Marburg Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Eri; Tomabechi, Daisuke; Matsuno, Keita; Kishida, Noriko; Yoshida, Reiko; Feldmann, Heinz

    2011-01-01

    Background. Marburg virus (MARV) and Ebola virus (EBOV) cause severe hemorrhagic fever in primates. Earlier studies demonstrated that antibodies to particular epitopes on the glycoprotein (GP) of EBOV enhanced virus infectivity in vitro. Methods. To investigate this antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) in MARV infection, we produced mouse antisera and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to the GPs of MARV strains Angola and Musoke. Results. The infectivity of vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotyped with Angola GP in K562 cells was significantly enhanced in the presence of Angola GP antisera, whereas only minimal ADE activity was seen with Musoke GP antisera. This difference correlated with the percentage of hybridoma clones producing infectivity-enhancing mAbs. Using mAbs to MARV GP, we identified 3 distinct ADE epitopes in the mucinlike region on Angola GP. Interestingly, some of these antibodies bound to both Angola and Musoke GPs but showed significantly higher ADE activity for strain Angola. ADE activity depended on epitopes in the mucinlike region and glycine at amino acid position 547, present in the Angola but absent in the Musoke GP. Conclusions. These results suggest a possible link between ADE and MARV pathogenicity and provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying ADE entry of filoviruses. PMID:21987779

  18. Suicide Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, David H.

    1975-01-01

    Interviews with seven of ten known survivors of jumps from the Golden Gate and San Francisco-Oakland Bay bridges showed a unique association between the Golden Gate Bridge and suicide. The study went beyond exploring the nature of suicidal jumps and shed new light on the experience of nearly dying. All the survivors described this experience as tranquil and peaceful. None of them experienced life events or distant memories passing through their minds or before their eyes. However, all of them experienced transcendence and spiritual rebirth phenomena. Suggestions for preventing suicides from the Golden Gate Bridge are discussed, including the construction of a suicide barrier. PMID:1171558

  19. Targeting Lung Cancer Using an Infectivity Enhanced CXCR4-CRAd

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zeng B.; Rivera, Angel A.; Makhija, Sharmila K.; Lu, Baogen; Wang, Minghui; Izumi, Miiru; Cerfolio, Robert; Stoff-Khalili, Mariam A.; Zhou, Fen; Takayama, Koichi; Siegal, Gene P.; Curiel., David T.

    2007-01-01

    Conventional treatments are not adequate for the majority of lung cancer patients. Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) represent a promising new modality for the treatment of neoplastic diseases, including non-small cell lung cancer. Specifically, following cellular infection, the virus replicates selectively in the infected tumor cells and kills the cells by cytolysis. Next, the progeny virions infect a new population of surrounding target cells, replicate again and eradicate the infected tumor cells while leaving normal cells unaffected. However, to date there have been two main limitations to successful clinical application of these CRAd agents; i.e. poor infectivity and poor tumor specificity. Here we report the construction of a CRAd agent, CRAd-CXCR4.RGD, in which the adenovirus E1 gene is driven by a tumor-specific CXCR4 promoter and the viral infectivity is enhanced by a capsid modification, RGD4C. This agent CRAd-CXCR4.RGD, as expected, improved both of the viral infectivity and tumor specificity as evaluated in an established lung tumor cell line and in primary tumor tissue from multiple patients. As an added benefit, the activity of the CXCR4 promoter was low in human liver as compared to three other promoters regularly used for targeting tumors. In addition, this agent has the potential of targeting multiple other tumor cell types. From theses data, the CRAd-CXCR4.RGD appears to be a promising novel CRAd agent for lung cancer targeting with low host toxicity. PMID:17113184

  20. Bovine herpesvirus tegument protein VP22 enhances thymidine kinase/ganciclovir suicide gene therapy for neuroblastomas compared to herpes simplex virus VP22.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhaohua; Harms, Jerome S; Zhu, Jun; Splitter, Gary A

    2004-04-01

    Herpesvirus tegument protein VP22 can enhance the effect of therapeutic proteins in gene therapy, such as thymidine kinase (tk) and p53; however, the mechanism is unclear or controversial. In this study, mammalian expression vectors carrying bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) VP22 (BVP22) or herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) VP22 (HVP22) and equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4) tk (Etk) were constructed in order to evaluate and compare the therapeutic potentials of BVP22 and HVP22 to enhance Etk/ganciclovir (Etk/GCV) suicide gene therapy for neuroblastomas by GCV cytotoxicity assays and noninvasive bioluminescent imaging in vitro and in vivo. BVP22 enhanced Etk/GCV cytotoxicity compared to that with HVP22 both in vitro and in vivo. However, assays utilizing a mixture of parental and stably transfected cells indicated that the enhancement was detected only in transfected cells. Thus, the therapeutic potential of BVP22 and HVP22 in Etk/GCV suicide gene therapy in this tumor system is not due to VP22 delivery of Etk into surrounding cells but rather is likely due to an enhanced intracellular effect.

  1. Suicide Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... responsibility for his or her actions. Offer reassurance. Stress that suicide is a permanent solution to a temporary problem. ... of anger the person has towards you later. Stress that the person's ... how his or her suicide would devastate you and others. Share personal stories ...

  2. Teen Suicide

    MedlinePlus

    ... suicidal thoughts. Your teen could have ongoing, or chronic, depression. They also might have episodes, or a mix of both types.Some teens will try to hide depression or thoughts of suicide. They might withdraw, or act out. This can ...

  3. Hispanic Suicide

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Disease Control and Prevention reported that the suicide rate for all Hispanic Americans was 5.24 per ... males and females • Hispanic adolescents may also experience stress with ... help because they feel that suicide should be dealt with by the family or ...

  4. Can Religion Protect Against Suicide?

    PubMed

    Norko, Michael A; Freeman, David; Phillips, James; Hunter, William; Lewis, Richard; Viswanathan, Ramaswamy

    2017-01-01

    The vast majority of the world's population is affiliated with a religious belief structure, and each of the major faith traditions (in its true form) is strongly opposed to suicide. Ample literature supports the protective effect of religious affiliation on suicide rates. Proposed mechanisms for this protective effect include enhanced social network and social integration, the degree of religious commitment, and the degree to which a particular religion disapproves of suicide. We review the sociological data for these effects and the general objections to suicide held by the faith traditions. We explore how clinicians may use such knowledge with individual patients, including routinely taking a religious/spiritual history. The clinician who is aware of the common themes among the faith traditions in opposition to suicide is better prepared to address religious/spiritual matters, as appropriate, in crisis situations. The clinician who understands the patient's belief system is also better prepared to request consultation with religious professionals when indicated.

  5. Hypoxia enhances antibody-dependent dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Gan, Esther Shuyi; Cheong, Wei Fun; Chan, Kuan Rong; Ong, Eugenia Ziying; Chai, Xiaoran; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Ghosh, Sujoy; Wenk, Markus R; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2017-03-20

    Dengue virus (DENV) has been found to replicate in lymphoid organs such as the lymph nodes, spleen, and liver in post-mortem analysis. These organs are known to have low oxygen levels (~0.5-4.5% O2) due to the vascular anatomy. However, how physiologically low levels of oxygen affect DENV infection via hypoxia-induced changes in the immune response remains unknown. Here, we show that monocytes adapted to 3% O2 show greater susceptibility to antibody-dependent enhancement of DENV infection. Low oxygen level induces HIF1α-dependent upregulation of fragment crystallizable gamma receptor IIA (FcγRIIA) as well as HIF1α-independent alterations in membrane ether lipid concentrations. The increased FcγRIIA expression operates synergistically with altered membrane composition, possibly through increase membrane fluidity, to increase uptake of DENV immune complexes for enhanced infection. Our findings thus indicate that the increased viral burden associated with secondary DENV infection is antibody-dependent but hypoxia-induced and suggest a role for targeting hypoxia-induced factors for anti-dengue therapy.

  6. Parameters of Mosquito-Enhanced West Nile Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Lindsey A.; Lim, Pei-Yin; Styer, Linda M.; Kramer, Laura D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The arthropod-borne West Nile virus (WNV) emerged in New York State in 1999 and quickly spread throughout the United States. Transmission is maintained in an enzootic cycle in which infected mosquitoes transmit the virus to susceptible hosts during probing and feeding. Arthropod-derived components within the viral inoculum are increasingly acknowledged to play a role in infection of vertebrate hosts. We previously showed that Culex tarsalis mosquito saliva and salivary gland extract (SGE) enhance the in vivo replication of WNV. Here, we characterized the effective dose, timing, and proximity of saliva and SGE administration necessary for enhancement of WNV viremia using a mouse model. Mosquito saliva and SGE enhanced viremia in a dose-dependent manner, and a single mosquito bite or as little as 0.01 μg of SGE was effective at enhancing viremia, suggesting a potent active salivary factor. Viremia was enhanced when SGE was injected in the same location as virus inoculation from 24 h before virus inoculation through 12 h after virus inoculation. These results were confirmed with mosquito saliva deposited by uninfected mosquitoes. When salivary treatment and virus inoculation were spatially separated, viremia was not enhanced. In summary, the effects of mosquito saliva and SGE were potent, long lasting, and localized, and these studies have implications for virus transmission in nature, where vertebrate hosts are fed upon by both infected and uninfected mosquitoes over time. Furthermore, our model provides a robust system to identify the salivary factor(s) responsible for enhancement of WNV replication. IMPORTANCE Mosquito-borne viruses are a significant class of agents causing emerging infectious diseases. WNV has caused over 18,000 cases of neuroinvasive disease in the United States since its emergence. We have shown that Culex tarsalis mosquito saliva and SGE enhance the replication of WNV. We now demonstrate that saliva and SGE have potent, long

  7. Enhancement of expression of survivin promoter-driven CD/TK double suicide genes by the nuclear matrix attachment region in transgenic gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Niu, Ying; Li, Jian-Sheng; Luo, Xian-Run

    2014-01-25

    This work aimed to study a novel transgenic expression system of the CD/TK double suicide genes enhanced by the nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) for gene therapy. The recombinant vector pMS-CD/TK containing the MAR-survivin promoter-CD/TK cassette was developed and transfected into human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. Expression of the CD/TK genes was detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and Western blot. Cell viability and apoptosis were measured using the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay and flow cytometry. When the MAR fragment was inserted into the upstream of the survivin promoter, the qPCR result showed that the expression of the CD/TK genes significantly increased 7.7-fold in the transgenic SGC-7901 cells with plasmid pMS-CD/TK compared with that without MAR. MTT and flow cytometry analyses indicated that treatment with the prodrugs (5-FC+GCV) significantly decreased the cellular survival rate and enhanced the cellular apoptosis in the SGC-7901 cells. The expression of the CD/TK double suicide genes driven by the survivin promoter can be enhanced by the MAR fragment in human gastric cancer cells.

  8. Elderly Suicide

    MedlinePlus

    ... peaking in the middle adulthood, ages 45-49). • Firearms were the most common means (72.1%) used for completing suicide among the elderly. Men use firearms more often than women. • Alcohol or substance abuse ...

  9. Suicidal ideation in pregnancy: an epidemiologic review.

    PubMed

    Gelaye, Bizu; Kajeepeta, Sandhya; Williams, Michelle A

    2016-10-01

    Suicidal behaviors are the leading causes of injury and death worldwide, and are leading causes of maternal deaths in some countries. One of the strongest risk factors, suicidal ideation, is considered a harbinger and distal predictor of later suicide attempt and completion, and also presents an opportunity for interventions prior to physical self-harm. The purpose of this systematic epidemiologic review is to synthesize available research on antepartum suicidal ideation. Original publications were identified through searches of the electronic databases using the search terms pregnancy, pregnant women, suicidal ideation, and pregnan* and suicid* as root searches. We also reviewed references of published articles. We identified a total of 2626 articles through the electronic database search. After irrelevant and redundant articles were excluded, 57 articles were selected. The selected articles were original articles that focused on pregnancy and suicidal ideation. Of the 57 included articles, 20 reported prevalence, 26 reported risk factors, 21 reported consequences of antepartum suicidal ideation, and 5 reported on screening measures. Available evidence indicates that pregnant women are more likely than the general population to endorse suicidal ideation. Additionally, a number of risk factors for antepartum suicidal ideation were identified including intimate partner violence, <12-year education, and major depressive disorder. There is a need for enhanced screening for antepartum suicidal ideation. The few screening instruments that exist are limited as they were primarily developed to measure antepartum and postpartum depression. Given a substantial proportion of women with suicidal ideation that does not meet clinical thresholds of depression and given the stress-diathesis model that shows susceptibility to suicidal behavior independent of depressive disorders, innovative approaches to improve screening and detection of antepartum suicidal ideation are urgently

  10. Immune responses and disease enhancement during respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Openshaw, Peter J M; Tregoning, John S

    2005-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the commonest and most troublesome viruses of infancy. It causes most cases of bronchiolitis, which is associated with wheezing in later childhood. In primary infection, the peak of disease typically coincides with the development of specific T- and B-cell responses, which seem, in large part, to be responsible for disease. Animal models clearly show that a range of immune responses can enhance disease severity, particularly after vaccination with formalin-inactivated RSV. Prior immune sensitization leads to exuberant chemokine production, an excessive cellular influx, and an overabundance of cytokines during RSV challenge. Under different circumstances, specific mediators and T-cell subsets and antibody-antigen immune complex deposition are incriminated as major factors in disease. Animal models of immune enhancement permit a deep understanding of the role of specific immune responses in RSV disease, assist in vaccine design, and indicate which immunomodulatory therapy might be beneficial to children with bronchiolitis.

  11. Co-expression of interleukin 12 enhances antitumor effects of a novel chimeric promoter-mediated suicide gene therapy in an immunocompetent mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yu; Liu, Zhengchun; Kong, Haiyan; Sun, Wenjie; Liao, Zhengkai; Zhou, Fuxiang; Xie, Conghua; and others

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} A novel chimeric promoter consisting of CArG element and hTERT promoter was developed. {yields} The promoter was characterized with radiation-inducibility and tumor-specificity. {yields} Suicide gene system driven by the promoter showed remarkable cytotoxicity in vitro. {yields} Co-expression of IL12 enhanced the promoter mediated suicide gene therapy in vivo. -- Abstract: The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter has been widely used in target gene therapy of cancer. However, low transcriptional activity limited its clinical application. Here, we designed a novel dual radiation-inducible and tumor-specific promoter system consisting of CArG elements and the hTERT promoter, resulting in increased expression of reporter genes after gamma-irradiation. Therapeutic and side effects of adenovirus-mediated horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/indole-3-acetic (IAA) system downstream of the chimeric promoter were evaluated in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma, combining with or without adenovirus-mediated interleukin 12 (IL12) gene driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter. The combination treatment showed more effective suppression of tumor growth than those with single agent alone, being associated with pronounced intratumoral T-lymphocyte infiltration and minor side effects. Our results suggest that the combination treatment with HRP/IAA system driven by the novel chimeric promoter and the co-expression of IL12 might be an effective and safe target gene therapy strategy of cancer.

  12. Increased sensitivity of glioma cells to 5-fluorocytosine following photo-chemical internalization enhanced nonviral transfection of the cytosine deaminase suicide gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Frederick; Zamora, Genesis; Sun, Chung-Ho; Trinidad, Anthony; Chun, Changho; Kwon, Young Jik; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen J; Hirschberg, Henry

    2014-05-01

    Despite advances in surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the outcomes of patients with GBM have not significantly improved. Tumor recurrence in the resection margins occurs in more than 80% of cases indicating aggressive treatment modalities, such as gene therapy are warranted. We have examined photochemical internalization (PCI) as a method for the non-viral transfection of the cytosine deaminase (CD) suicide gene into glioma cells. The CD gene encodes an enzyme that can convert the nontoxic antifungal agent, 5-fluorocytosine, into the chemotherapeutic drug, 5-fluorouracil. Multicell tumor spheroids derived from established rat and human glioma cell lines were used as in vitro tumor models. Plasmids containing either the CD gene alone or together with the uracil phosphoribosyl transferase (UPRT) gene combined with the gene carrier protamine sulfate were employed in all experiments.PCI was performed with the photosensitizer AlPcS2a and 670 nm laser irradiance. Protamine sulfate/CD DNA polyplexes proved nontoxic but inefficient transfection agents due to endosomal entrapment. In contrast, PCI mediated CD gene transfection resulted in a significant inhibition of spheroid growth in the presence of, but not in the absence of, 5-FC. Repetitive PCI induced transfection was more efficient at low CD plasmid concentration than single treatment. The results clearly indicate that AlPcS2a-mediated PCI can be used to enhance transfection of a tumor suicide gene such as CD, in malignant glioma cells and cells transfected with both the CD and UPRT genes had a pronounced bystander effect.

  13. Epidemiology of Youth Suicide and Suicidal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Scottye J.; Bridge, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of Review Suicide is the third leading cause of death among young people in the U.S. and represents a significant public health problem worldwide. This review focuses on recent developments in our understanding of the epidemiology and risk factors for adolescent suicide and suicidal behavior. Recent Findings The suicide rate among children and adolescents in the U.S. has increased dramatically in recent years and has been accompanied by substantial changes in the leading methods of youth suicide, especially among young girls. Much work is currently underway to elucidate the relationships between psychopathology, substance use, child abuse, bullying, internet use, and youth suicidal behavior. Recent evidence also suggests sex-specific and moderating roles of gender in influencing risk for suicide and suicidal behavior. Summary Empirical research into the causal mechanisms underlying youth suicide and suicidal behavior is needed to inform early identification and prevention efforts. PMID:19644372

  14. Socratic suicide.

    PubMed

    Warren, J

    2001-01-01

    When is it rational to commit suicide? More specifically, when is it rational for a Platonist to commit suicide, and more worryingly, is it ever not rational for a Platonist to commit suicide? If the Phaedo wants us to lear that the soul is immortal, and that philosophy is a preparation for a state better than incarnation, then why does it begin with a discussion defending the prohibition of suicide? In the course of that discussion, Socrates offers (but does not necessarily endorse) two arguments for the prohibition of self-killing, at least in most circumstances, which have exerted a long and powerful influence over subsequent discussion of the topic, particularly in theist contexts. In the context of the Phaedo itself, however, this introductory conversation plays a crucial role in setting the agenda for the remainder of the dialogue and offering an initial discussion of the major concerns of the argument as a whole. In par- ticular, the discussion of thte nature of suicide is intimately bound up with Socrates' conception of true philosophy as a 'preparation for death', the relationship between soul and body, and the immortality of the soul. My intention is to provide a reading of that passage (61e-69e) which asks whether the Phaedo can offer a philosophically satisfying distinction between suicide and philosophy and how it relates to other ancient philosophical attitudes to self-killing. I argue that Socrates does not think that being dead is always preferable to being alive, and that the religious views expressed in the passage are consistent with his general stance on the benevolence of the gods.

  15. The evolutionary puzzle of suicide.

    PubMed

    Aubin, Henri-Jean; Berlin, Ivan; Kornreich, Charles

    2013-12-09

    Mechanisms of self-destruction are difficult to reconcile with evolution's first rule of thumb: survive and reproduce. However, evolutionary success ultimately depends on inclusive fitness. The altruistic suicide hypothesis posits that the presence of low reproductive potential and burdensomeness toward kin can increase the inclusive fitness payoff of self-removal. The bargaining hypothesis assumes that suicide attempts could function as an honest signal of need. The payoff may be positive if the suicidal person has a low reproductive potential. The parasite manipulation hypothesis is founded on the rodent-Toxoplasma gondii host-parasite model, in which the parasite induces a "suicidal" feline attraction that allows the parasite to complete its life cycle. Interestingly, latent infection by T. gondii has been shown to cause behavioral alterations in humans, including increased suicide attempts. Finally, we discuss how suicide risk factors can be understood as nonadaptive byproducts of evolved mechanisms that malfunction. Although most of the mechanisms proposed in this article are largely speculative, the hypotheses that we raise accept self-destructive behavior within the framework of evolutionary theory.

  16. Acute behavioral interventions and outpatient treatment strategies with suicidal adolescents

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Kimberly H. McManama; Singer, Jonathan B.; LeCloux, Mary; Duarté-Vélez, Yovanska; Spirito, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors among adolescents, there is limited knowledge of effective interventions to use with this population. This paper reviews the findings of studies on behavioral interventions for adolescents who are at acute suicide risk, as well as outpatient treatment and risk management strategies with suicidal adolescents. The importance of addressing comorbid behaviors and enhancing protective factors are discussed. Cultural considerations in working with suicidal adolescents and strategies for conducting culturally competent treatment are explored. PMID:26279646

  17. Suicide among Secondary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coder, Tamara L.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Investigated incidence of adolescent suicide in Kansas and assessed prevention guidelines and services dealing with adolescent suicide, and perceived needs of Kansas secondary school counselors in the area of teenage suicide. Findings from 484 school counselors indicated increase in suicide rates with age and need for suicide prevention programing…

  18. The Newsworthiness of Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirkis, Jane; Burgess, Philip; Blood, R. Warwick; Francis, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    There is a paucity of studies examining which suicides are considered newsworthy. By combining data on media reports of individuals' suicides with routinely collected suicide data, it was found that 1% of Australian suicides were reported over a 1-year period. There was evidence of over-reporting of suicides by older people and females, and those…

  19. Risk for Suicidal Ideation in the U.S. Air Force: An Ecological Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langhinrichsen-Rohling, Jennifer; Snarr, Jeffery D.; Smith Slep, Amy M.; Heyman, Richard E.; Foran, Heather M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Suicidal members of the U.S. military often fail to disclose their suicidal urges and behaviors. Military suicide prevention efforts may therefore be enhanced if they also target less stigmatized psychosocial factors that may decrease risk of suicidality. In keeping with Bronfenbrenner's (1977, 1994) model, this study simultaneously…

  20. Genetically enhanced cows resist intramammary Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Wall, Robert J; Powell, Anne M; Paape, Max J; Kerr, David E; Bannerman, Douglas D; Pursel, Vernon G; Wells, Kevin D; Talbot, Neil; Hawk, Harold W

    2005-04-01

    Mastitis, the most consequential disease in dairy cattle, costs the US dairy industry billions of dollars annually. To test the feasibility of protecting animals through genetic engineering, transgenic cows secreting lysostaphin at concentrations ranging from 0.9 to 14 micrograms/ml [corrected] in their milk were produced. In vitro assays demonstrated the milk's ability to kill Staphylococcus aureus. Intramammary infusions of S. aureus were administered to three transgenic and ten nontransgenic cows. Increases in milk somatic cells, elevated body temperatures and induced acute phase proteins, each indicative of infection, were observed in all of the nontransgenic cows but in none of the transgenic animals. Protection against S. aureus mastitis appears to be achievable with as little as 3 micrograms/ml [corrected] of lysostaphin in milk. Our results indicate that genetic engineering can provide a viable tool for enhancing resistance to disease and improve the well-being of livestock.

  1. Eugenol nanocapsule for enhanced therapeutic activity against periodontal infections.

    PubMed

    Pramod, Kannissery; Aji Alex, M R; Singh, Manisha; Dang, Shweta; Ansari, Shahid H; Ali, Javed

    2016-01-01

    Eugenol is a godsend to dental care due to its analgesic, local anesthetic, and anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects. The aim of the present research work was to prepare, characterize and evaluate eugenol-loaded nanocapsules (NCs) against periodontal infections. Eugenol-loaded polycaprolactone (PCL) NCs were prepared by solvent displacement method. The nanometric size of the prepared NCs was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The in vitro drug release was found to follow a biphasic pattern and followed Michaelis-Menten like model. The percentage cell viability values near to 100 in the cell viability assay indicated that the NCs are not cytotoxic. In the in vivo studies, the eugenol NC group displayed significant difference in the continuity of epithelium of the interdental papilla in comparison to the untreated, pure eugenol and placebo groups. The in vivo performance of the eugenol-loaded NCs using ligature-induced periodontitis model in rats indicated that eugenol-loaded NCs could prevent septal bone resorption in periodontitis. On the basis of our research findings it could be concluded that eugenol-loaded PCL NCs could serve as a novel colloidal drug delivery system for enhanced therapeutic activity of eugenol in the treatment of periodontal infections.

  2. Enhanced resistance to Spodoptera litura in endophyte infected cauliflower plants.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Abhinay; Kaur, Sanehdeep; Kaur, Amarjeet; Singh, Varinder

    2013-04-01

    Endophytic fungi, which live within host plant tissues without causing any visible symptom of disease, are important mediators of plant-herbivore interactions. These endophytes enhance resistance of host plant against insect herbivores mainly by productions of various alkaloid based defensive compounds in the plant tissue or through alterations of plant nutritional quality. Two endophytic fungi, i.e., Nigrospora sp. and Cladosporium sp., were isolated from Tinospora cordifolia (Thunb.) Miers, a traditional indian medicinal plant. Cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L.) plants were inoculated with these two endophytic fungi. The effect of endophyte infected and uninfected cauliflower plants were measured on the survival and development of Spodoptera litura (Fab.), a polyphagous pest. Endophyte infected cauliflower plants showed resistance to S. litura in the form of significant increase in larval and pupal mortality in both the fungi. Inhibitory effects of endophytic fungi also were observed on adult emergence, longevity, reproductive potential, as well as hatchability of eggs. Thus, it is concluded that antibiosis to S. litura could be imparted by artificial inoculation of endophytes and this could be used to develop alternative ecologically safe control strategies.

  3. Cytomegalovirus infection enhances the immune response to influenza.

    PubMed

    Furman, David; Jojic, Vladimir; Sharma, Shalini; Shen-Orr, Shai S; Angel, Cesar J L; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Kidd, Brian A; Maecker, Holden T; Concannon, Patrick; Dekker, Cornelia L; Thomas, Paul G; Davis, Mark M

    2015-04-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a β-herpesvirus present in a latent form in most people worldwide. In immunosuppressed individuals, CMV can reactivate and cause serious clinical complications, but the effect of the latent state on healthy people remains elusive. We undertook a systems approach to understand the differences between seropositive and negative subjects and measured hundreds of immune system components from blood samples including cytokines and chemokines, immune cell phenotyping, gene expression, ex vivo cell responses to cytokine stimuli, and the antibody response to seasonal influenza vaccination. As expected, we found decreased responses to vaccination and an overall down-regulation of immune components in aged individuals regardless of CMV status. In contrast, CMV-seropositive young adults exhibited enhanced antibody responses to influenza vaccination, increased CD8(+) T cell sensitivity, and elevated levels of circulating interferon-γ compared to seronegative individuals. Experiments with young mice infected with murine CMV also showed significant protection from an influenza virus challenge compared with uninfected animals, although this effect declined with time. These data show that CMV and its murine equivalent can have a beneficial effect on the immune response of young, healthy individuals, which may explain the ubiquity of CMV infection in humans and many other species.

  4. DIESEL EXHAUST ENHANCES INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTIONS IN RESPIRATORY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several factors, such as age and nutritional status can affect the susceptibility to influenza infections. Moreover, exposure to air pollutants, such as diesel exhaust (DE), has been shown to affect respiratory virus infections in rodent models. Influenza virus primarily infects ...

  5. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

    MedlinePlus

    ... Best Practices Our Network Media Resources National Suicide Prevention Lifeline We can all help prevent suicide. The ... The Lifeline Everyone Plays A Role In Suicide Prevention Here are some helpful links: GET HELP NOW ...

  6. Antibody-dependent enhancement of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in vitro by plasma from SIV-infected rhesus macaques.

    PubMed Central

    Montefiori, D C; Robinson, W E; Hirsch, V M; Modliszewski, A; Mitchell, W M; Johnson, P R

    1990-01-01

    Plasma from two rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) experimentally infected with the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV; isolate SIVmac251) enhanced SIVmac infection of a human CD4+ lymphoblastoid cell line, MT-2. Prechallenge plasma samples from these animals and serum from SIV-negative macaques did not enhance infection. Compared with controls, infection enhancement was characterized by the rapid appearance of syncytium formation (3 to 4 days sooner), reverse transcriptase release (10-fold increase), and cytopathic effect (60% cell killing). Enhancement of activity was dependent on the presence of diluted, fresh SIV-negative macaque serum as a source of complement. A requirement for complement was shown by the absence of enhancement in heat-inactivated serum and by dose-dependent inhibition of enhancement in the presence of polyclonal antibody to monkey complement component C3. Monoclonal antibody to CD4 (OKT4a) blocked enhancement completely, while monoclonal antibody to the human complement component C3d receptor CR2 (OKB7) reduced enhancement by greater than 50%, indicating a requirement for CD4 and CR2 in mediating this phenomenon. SIV infection-enhancing activity appeared in macaques soon after experimental inoculation (28 days). The titer increased over time and peaked just prior to the death of both macaques from opportunistic infections and lymphoma. In vitro SIV infection enhancement is nearly identical to the in vitro complement-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancing (C'-ADE) activity observed in human immunodeficiency virus-positive human sera (Robinson et al., Lancet i:790-794, 1988; Robinson et al., J. Acq. Immun. Def. Synd. 2:33-42, 1989). These observations validate the macaque-SIV model for studies of C'-ADE. Images PMID:2152808

  7. Dengue virus compartmentalization during antibody-enhanced infection

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Eugenia Z.; Zhang, Summer L.; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Gan, Esther S.; Chan, Kuan Rong; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2017-01-01

    Secondary infection with a heterologous dengue virus (DENV) serotype increases the risk of severe dengue, through a process termed antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). During ADE, DENV is opsonized with non- or sub-neutralizing antibody levels that augment entry into monocytes and dendritic cells through Fc-gamma receptors (FcγRs). We previously reported that co-ligation of leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor-B1 (LILRB1) by antibody-opsonized DENV led to recruitment of SH2 domain-containing phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) to dephosphorylate spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and reduce interferon stimulated gene induction. Here, we show that LILRB1 also signals through SHP-1 to attenuate the otherwise rapid acidification for lysosomal enzyme activation following FcγR-mediated uptake of DENV. Reduced or slower trafficking of antibody-opsonized DENV to lytic phagolysosomal compartments, demonstrates how co-ligation of LILRB1 also permits DENV to overcome a cell-autonomous immune response, enhancing intracellular survival of DENV. Our findings provide insights on how antiviral drugs that modify phagosome acidification should be used for viruses such as DENV. PMID:28084461

  8. Childhood physical abuse, aggression, and suicide attempts among criminal offenders.

    PubMed

    Swogger, Marc T; You, Sungeun; Cashman-Brown, Sarah; Conner, Kenneth R

    2011-02-28

    Childhood physical abuse (CPA) has numerous short and long-term negative effects. One of the most serious consequences of CPA is an increased risk for suicide attempts. Clarifying the mechanisms by which CPA increases risk for suicidal behavior may enhance preventive interventions. One potential mechanism is a tendency toward aggression. In a sample of 266 criminal offenders, ages 18-62, we examined the relationships among CPA, lifetime aggression, and suicide attempts and tested lifetime history of aggression as a mediator of the relationship between CPA and suicide attempts. Results indicated that CPA and aggression were associated with suicide attempts. Consistent with our hypothesis, lifetime aggression mediated the CPA and suicide attempts relationship. Findings suggest that aggression may be an important mediator of the relationship between CPA and suicide attempts among criminal offenders, and are consistent with the possibility that treating aggression may reduce risk for suicide attempts.

  9. Suicide and the Suicidal Body.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orbach, Israel

    2003-01-01

    This article argues that bodily experiences and attitudes toward the body, such as rejection of the body, detachment, numbness, physical anhedonia, and lack of protection can facilitate acts of self-destruction. Demonstrates that suicidal individuals experience their body differently from other populations and that these are related to suicidal…

  10. Predicting Risk for Suicide: A Preliminary Examination of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and the Acquired Capability Construct in a College Sample.

    PubMed

    Brackman, Emily H; Morris, Blair W; Andover, Margaret S

    2016-01-01

    The interpersonal psychological theory of suicide provides a useful framework for considering the relationship between non-suicidal self-injury and suicide. Researchers propose that NSSI increases acquired capability for suicide. We predicted that both NSSI frequency and the IPTS acquired capability construct (decreased fear of death and increased pain tolerance) would separately interact with suicidal ideation to predict suicide attempts. Undergraduate students (N = 113) completed self-report questionnaires, and a subsample (n = 66) also completed a pain sensitivity task. NSSI frequency significantly moderated the association between suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. However, in a separate model, acquired capability did not moderate this relationship. Our understanding of the relationship between suicidal ideation and suicidal behavior can be enhanced by factors associated with NSSI that are distinct from the acquired capability construct.

  11. Military Suicide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    CDYA) programs. (S) Evaluate the appropriateness and, if appropriate, the Feasibility of operating a crisis hot line in all Army MTFs which maintain...Affairs), Washington, D.C., July 1985. 2. Deparatment of Health and Human Services, Helth Unitgd States. 1584, December 1S8’*. 3. Wood, Major Billy R...James E., Jr. "Suicide Prevention in the Air Force: A Training Guide For Crisis Intervention Service Volunteer Counselors". Unpublished Air Command

  12. The Evolutionary Puzzle of Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Aubin, Henri-Jean; Berlin, Ivan; Kornreich, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of self-destruction are difficult to reconcile with evolution’s first rule of thumb: survive and reproduce. However, evolutionary success ultimately depends on inclusive fitness. The altruistic suicide hypothesis posits that the presence of low reproductive potential and burdensomeness toward kin can increase the inclusive fitness payoff of self-removal. The bargaining hypothesis assumes that suicide attempts could function as an honest signal of need. The payoff may be positive if the suicidal person has a low reproductive potential. The parasite manipulation hypothesis is founded on the rodent—Toxoplasma gondii host-parasite model, in which the parasite induces a “suicidal” feline attraction that allows the parasite to complete its life cycle. Interestingly, latent infection by T. gondii has been shown to cause behavioral alterations in humans, including increased suicide attempts. Finally, we discuss how suicide risk factors can be understood as nonadaptive byproducts of evolved mechanisms that malfunction. Although most of the mechanisms proposed in this article are largely speculative, the hypotheses that we raise accept self-destructive behavior within the framework of evolutionary theory. PMID:24351787

  13. CERTAIN CONDITIONS DETERMINING ENHANCED INFECTION WITH THE RABBIT PAPILLOMA VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Friedewald, William F.

    1944-01-01

    The infection of normal or hyperplastic rabbit skin with the papilloma virus can be greatly enhanced by protecting the scarified and inoculated area with a layer of paraffined gauze until healing occurs. In this way the necrosis which follows upon scarification and also the scabbing are almost entirely prevented and in consequence epithelial regeneration is usually complete within 24 hours. Not only are many susceptible cells provided to the virus far earlier than would otherwise be the case,—and collateral tests have shown that it becomes associated with them within a few hours instead of after many,—but the inoculum is itself conserved, instead of becoming largely lost amidst necrotic tissue and scab, as under ordinary circumstances. The effective titer of the virus is increased by the procedure from 10 to 100 times over that attained when hyperplastic skin is allowed to dry after inoculation. Since the results under the latter circumstances are 10 to 100 times better than those when normal skin is treated in the same way it follows that a 100- to 10,000-fold increase in the effectiveness of the virus has now been obtained. PMID:19871399

  14. The Ethics of Suicide and Suicide Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David; Leenaars, Antoon A.

    1996-01-01

    Debates the question of suicide as a defensible choice, particularly for the terminally ill, examining the relevance of such issues as the mortality, rationality, and dynamics of the suicidal act, and the legitimacy of physician-assisted suicide. Contrasting perspectives are articulated by two prominent suicidologists as a spur to the reader's…

  15. "Suicide Machine" Seekers: Transgressing Suicidal Taboos Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seko, Yukari

    2008-01-01

    Internet-mediated joint suicides or "Net group suicides" ("Net shinju") has become a significant social problem in Japan since 2002. Despite a privileged view of suicide-related cyberspaces as a murky underworld, there has been little study about how the participants of such spaces interact and perform their…

  16. Biology of Elderly Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rifai, A. Hind; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes age-related changes in central nervous system pertinent to biology of suicide. Reviews postmortem biological studies of brains of suicides and suicide attempters. As suicide attempts in elderly are characterized by violence, discusses biological studies of impulsive violence. Describes data on effect of degenerative diseases on serotonin…

  17. Rethinking Impulsivity in Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klonsky, E. David; May, Alexis

    2010-01-01

    Elevated impulsivity is thought to facilitate the transition from suicidal thoughts to suicidal behavior. Therefore, impulsivity should distinguish those who have attempted suicide (attempters) from those who have only considered suicide (ideators-only). This hypothesis was examined in three large nonclinical samples: (1) 2,011 military recruits,…

  18. Suicide in American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David

    This book reviews present knowledge about suicidal behavior in American Indians, prevention efforts in Native communities, and recommendations for understanding suicidal behavior and developing suicide prevention efforts. Data from Canadian aboriginal groups is also included. Chapter 1 explains why suicide in American Indians is of concern to…

  19. Memes and suicide.

    PubMed

    Lester, David

    2009-08-01

    The concept of memes is analyzed, and its applicability to suicidology explored. Proposals are made for possible memes implicated in suicidal behavior. A classification of suicidal memes is proposed and the relationship between memes and archetypes of suicide is discussed. It is suggested that the terminology of meme theory can sharpen research into imitation effects in suicide.

  20. Suicidality and interrogative suggestibility.

    PubMed

    Pritchard-Boone, Lea; Range, Lillian M

    2005-01-01

    All people are subject to memory suggestibility, but suicidal individuals may be especially so. The link between suicidality and suggestibility is unclear given mixed findings and methodological weaknesses of past research. To test the link between suicidality and interrogative suggestibility, 149 undergraduates answered questions about suicidal thoughts and reasons for living, and participated in a direct suggestibility procedure. As expected, suggestibility correlated with suicidality but accounted for little overall variance (4%). Mental health professionals might be able to take advantage of client suggestibility by directly telling suicidal persons to refrain from suicidal thoughts or actions.

  1. Prevention of suicidal behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hegerl, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    More than 800 000 people die every year from suicide, and about 20 times more attempt suicide. In most countries, suicide risk is highest in older males, and risk of attempted suicide is highest in younger females. The higher lethal level of suicidal acts in males is explained by the preference for more lethal methods, as well as other factors. In the vast majority of cases, suicidal behavior occurs in the context of psychiatric disorders, depression being the most important one. Improving the treatment of depression, restricting access to lethal means, and avoiding the Werther effect (imitation suicide) are central aspects of suicide prevention programs. In several European regions, the four-level intervention concept of the European Alliance Against Depression (www.EAAD.net), simultaneously targeting depression and suicidal behavior, has been found to have preventive effects on suicidal behavior. It has already been implemented in more than 100 regions in Europe. PMID:27489458

  2. Prevention of suicidal behavior.

    PubMed

    Hegerl, Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    More than 800 000 people die every year from suicide, and about 20 times more attempt suicide. In most countries, suicide risk is highest in older males, and risk of attempted suicide is highest in younger females. The higher lethal level of suicidal acts in males is explained by the preference for more lethal methods, as well as other factors. In the vast majority of cases, suicidal behavior occurs in the context of psychiatric disorders, depression being the most important one. Improving the treatment of depression, restricting access to lethal means, and avoiding the Werther effect (imitation suicide) are central aspects of suicide prevention programs. In several European regions, the four-level intervention concept of the European Alliance Against Depression (www.EAAD.net), simultaneously targeting depression and suicidal behavior, has been found to have preventive effects on suicidal behavior. It has already been implemented in more than 100 regions in Europe.

  3. Suicide among incarcerated veterans.

    PubMed

    Wortzel, Hal S; Binswanger, Ingrid A; Anderson, C Alan; Adler, Lawrence E

    2009-01-01

    Both veterans and jail/prison inmates face an increased risk of suicide. The incarcerated veteran sits at the intersection of these two groups, yet little is known about this subpopulation, particularly its risk of suicide. A Pubmed/Medline/PsycINFO search anchored to incarcerated veteran suicide, veteran suicide, suicide in jails/prisons, and veterans incarcerated from 2000 to the present was performed. The currently available literature does not reveal the suicide risk of incarcerated veterans, nor does it enable meaningful estimates. However, striking similarities and overlapping characteristics link the data on veteran suicide, inmate suicide, and incarcerated veterans, suggesting that the veteran in jail or prison faces a level of suicide risk beyond that conferred by either veteran status or incarceration alone. There is a clear need for a better characterization of the incarcerated veteran population and the suicide rate faced by this group. Implications for clinical practice and future research are offered.

  4. Cytokine-enhanced vaccine and interferon-β plus suicide gene as combined therapy for spontaneous canine sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Finocchiaro, Liliana M E; Villaverde, Marcela S; Gil-Cardeza, María L; Riveros, María D; Glikin, Gerardo C

    2011-10-01

    Eleven soft tissue- and five osteosarcoma canine patients were subjected to: (i) periodic subcutaneous injection of irradiated xenogeneic cells secreting hGM-CSF and hIL-2 mixed with allogeneic or autologous tumor homogenates; and (ii) injections of cIFN-β and HSVtk-carrying lipoplexes and ganciclovir, marginal (after surgery) and/or intratumoral (in the case of partial tumor resection, local relapse or small surface tumors). This treatment alone (4 patients) or as surgery adjuvant (12 patients), was safe and well tolerated. In those patients presenting local disease (6/11), the suicide gene plus cIFN-β treatment induced local antitumor activity evidenced by the objective responses (3 complete, 2 partial) and stable diseases (2). In addition, the treatment prevented or delayed local relapse, regional metastases (lymph nodes developed only in 3/16) and distant metastases (0/16), suggesting a strong systemic antitumor immunity. The most encouraging result was the long survival times of 10 patients (>1 year, with good quality of life).

  5. The Suicide Prevention Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Dawn

    2010-01-01

    The suicide prevention continuum illustrates a practical approach to the complex issue of suicide prevention. The continuum evolved from discussions with two Aboriginal communities in Atlantic Canada about suicide and the different types of interventions available. The continuum offers a framework and reference tool to differentiate between the different stages of suicide risk. It illustrates where the Aboriginal Community Youth Resilience Network (ACYRN) fits into suicide prevention and how it contributes to prevention knowledge, capacity building, and policy development. PMID:20835376

  6. [Suicide and suicide tendencies in adolescent detainees].

    PubMed

    Radeloff, Daniel; Lempp, Thomas; Rauf, Amna; Bennefeld-Kersten, Katharina; Kettner, Mattias; Freitag, Christine M

    2016-01-01

    Following accidents, suicide is the second leading cause of death in adolescence. This stage of life has the most suicide attempts of all age groups. In addition to mentally ill juveniles, adolescent delinquents represent a high-risk group for suicidal behavior and completed suicide. In particular, the population of detainees, an extreme form of juvenile delinquency, have a 16- to 18-fold higher risk of suicidal behavior and suicide compared to the general population. Because the composition of juvenile detainees differs greatly from that of detained adults, age-specific scientific approaches and prevention programs are needed. This task cannot be addressed by juvenile detention staff alone, but rather demands close cooperation between adolescent psychiatrists, psychologists, prison medical staff, legal experts and prison officers to use the opportunity for suicide prevention in juvenile detention facilities.

  7. Erythroid progenitor cells (CFU-E*) from Friend virus-infected mice undergo VVFe suicide in vitro in the absence of added erythropoietin

    SciTech Connect

    Del Rizzo, D.F.; Axelrad, A.A.

    1985-11-01

    The authors have investigated the effect of VVFe on the survival in suspension of erythropoietin (epo)-independent erythroid progenitor cells (CFU-E*) induced by Friend polycythemia virus (FV). Spleen cells from C3Hf/Bi mice previously infected with FV were exposed to carrier-free VVFe, and the survival of CFU-E* as a function of time in liquid medium was determined from the number of erythroid colonies that developed from these cells seeded in plasma cultures without added epo. The results showed that spleen CFU-E* were highly vulnerable to VVFe. Marrow CFU-E* behaved in a similar manner. The VVFe responsible for their suicide had been presented to the progenitor cells only during the 4-h period of incubation, after which they were washed and plated in excess nonradioactive iron. They therefore conclude that CFU-E* themselves, and not only their progeny, are capable of actively incorporating iron. Under the same conditions in the absence of added epo, the effect of VVFe on the survival of normal spleen or marrow CFU-E could not be assessed because two few normal CFU-E survived the incubation period. Normal bone marrow cells incubated in complete medium containing epo retained their capacity for erythrocytic colony formation, and CFU-E could then be shown to be vulnerable to VVFe. Thus, either the iron-incorporating system of normal CFU-E was inducible by epo, or else epo permitted survival of the CFU-E so that the activity of a constitutive iron-incorporating system could be recognized.

  8. Suicide risk and prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) among individuals infected with HIV-1 subtype C versus B in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Sergio Monteiro; Barbosa, Francisco Jaime; Kamat, Rujvi; de Pereira, Ana Paula; Raboni, Sonia Mara; Rotta, Indianara; Ribeiro, Clea Elisa; Cherner, Mariana; Ellis, Ronald J; Atkinson, Joseph Hampton

    2016-12-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is among the most prevalent neuropsychiatric disorders associated with HIV infection; however, its risks and neurobiologic correlates in diverse cultures are poorly understood. This study aimed to examine the frequency of MDD among HIV+ participants in southern Brazil. We hypothesized that the frequency and severity of MDD would be higher among individuals with HIV+ compared with HIV- and higher in HIV subtype B compared with C. Individuals with HIV (n = 39) as well as seronegative controls (n = 22) were enrolled in a cross-sectional, prospective, observational study. Current and lifetime history of MDD was diagnosed by MINI-Plus; symptom severity was assessed by Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Current and past episodes of MDD were significantly more frequent in the HIV+ versus HIV- group: current MDD, 15 (38.5 %) vs. 0 (0 %), p = 0.0004; past MDD, 24 (61.5 %) vs. 3 (13.6 %), p = 0.0004. The median BDI-II score in the HIV+ group was significantly higher than that in the HIV- (13 (8-27.5) vs. 2.5 (1-5.5); p < 0.0001). Current suicide risk, defined as during the last month, was found in 18 % of participants in the HIV-positive and none in the HIV-negative group. Neither current MDD frequency (8 (57.1 %) vs. 6 (40 %), p = 0.47) nor BDI-II score differed across subtypes B and C. HIV+ group may be more likely to experience current MDD than HIV-. This was the first study to compare the frequency and severity of MDD in HIV subtypes B and C; we found no difference between HIV subtypes B and C.

  9. Reconsidering the link between impulsivity and suicidal behavior.

    PubMed

    Anestis, Michael D; Soberay, Kelly A; Gutierrez, Peter M; Hernández, Theresa D; Joiner, Thomas E

    2014-11-01

    It is widely accepted that suicidal behavior often occurs with little planning. We propose, however, that suicidal behavior is rarely if ever impulsive-that it is too frightening and physically distressing to engage in without forethought-and that suicidal behavior in impulsive individuals is accounted for by painful and fearsome behaviors capable of enhancing their capacity for suicide. We conducted a meta-analysis of the association between trait impulsivity and suicidal behavior and a critical review of research considering the impulsiveness of specific suicide attempts. Meta-analytic results suggest the relationship between trait impulsivity and suicidal behavior is small. Furthermore, studies examining a mediating role of painful and provocative behaviors have uniformly supported our model. Results from our review suggest that researchers have been unable to adequately measure impulsivity of attempts and that measures sensitive to episodic planning must be developed to further our understanding of this phenomenon.

  10. Streptococcus pneumoniae Enhances Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, D. Tien; Louwen, Rogier; Elberse, Karin; van Amerongen, Geert; Yüksel, Selma; Luijendijk, Ad; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Duprex, W. Paul; de Swart, Rik L.

    2015-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) and Streptococcus pneumoniae are important causative agents of respiratory tract infections. Both pathogens are associated with seasonal disease outbreaks in the pediatric population, and can often be detected simultaneously in infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis or pneumonia. It has been described that respiratory virus infections may predispose for bacterial superinfections, resulting in severe disease. However, studies on the influence of bacterial colonization of the upper respiratory tract on the pathogenesis of subsequent respiratory virus infections are scarce. Here, we have investigated whether pneumococcal colonization enhances subsequent HRSV infection. We used a newly generated recombinant subgroup B HRSV strain that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein and pneumococcal isolates obtained from healthy children in disease-relevant in vitro and in vivo model systems. Three pneumococcal strains specifically enhanced in vitro HRSV infection of primary well-differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells grown at air-liquid interface, whereas two other strains did not. Since previous studies reported that bacterial neuraminidase enhanced HRSV infection in vitro, we measured pneumococcal neuraminidase activity in these cultures but found no correlation with the observed infection enhancement in our model. Subsequently, a selection of pneumococcal strains was used to induce nasal colonization of cotton rats, the best available small animal model for HRSV. Intranasal HRSV infection three days later resulted in strain-specific enhancement of HRSV replication in vivo. One S. pneumoniae strain enhanced HRSV both in vitro and in vivo, and was also associated with enhanced syncytium formation in vivo. However, neither pneumococci nor HRSV were found to spread from the upper to the lower respiratory tract, and neither pathogen was transmitted to naive cage mates by direct contact. These results demonstrate

  11. Streptococcus pneumoniae Enhances Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D Tien; Louwen, Rogier; Elberse, Karin; van Amerongen, Geert; Yüksel, Selma; Luijendijk, Ad; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Duprex, W Paul; de Swart, Rik L

    2015-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) and Streptococcus pneumoniae are important causative agents of respiratory tract infections. Both pathogens are associated with seasonal disease outbreaks in the pediatric population, and can often be detected simultaneously in infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis or pneumonia. It has been described that respiratory virus infections may predispose for bacterial superinfections, resulting in severe disease. However, studies on the influence of bacterial colonization of the upper respiratory tract on the pathogenesis of subsequent respiratory virus infections are scarce. Here, we have investigated whether pneumococcal colonization enhances subsequent HRSV infection. We used a newly generated recombinant subgroup B HRSV strain that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein and pneumococcal isolates obtained from healthy children in disease-relevant in vitro and in vivo model systems. Three pneumococcal strains specifically enhanced in vitro HRSV infection of primary well-differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells grown at air-liquid interface, whereas two other strains did not. Since previous studies reported that bacterial neuraminidase enhanced HRSV infection in vitro, we measured pneumococcal neuraminidase activity in these cultures but found no correlation with the observed infection enhancement in our model. Subsequently, a selection of pneumococcal strains was used to induce nasal colonization of cotton rats, the best available small animal model for HRSV. Intranasal HRSV infection three days later resulted in strain-specific enhancement of HRSV replication in vivo. One S. pneumoniae strain enhanced HRSV both in vitro and in vivo, and was also associated with enhanced syncytium formation in vivo. However, neither pneumococci nor HRSV were found to spread from the upper to the lower respiratory tract, and neither pathogen was transmitted to naive cage mates by direct contact. These results demonstrate

  12. Assessment of Suicidal Intent

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Rajkumar; Ramachandran, Arul Saravanan; Periasamy, Kalaivani; Saminathan, Kala

    2016-01-01

    Background: Suicide and suicidal attempt are an important cause of mortality and denotes severe morbidity among the population. Successful suicide attempt is associated with previous suicide attempts. Identifying factors in suicide attempters will help in formulating a comprehensive response to these issues. Objective: To identify the sub group who are more vulnerable and the factors associated with this group. Setting and Design: A cross sectional observational study of this sub group was carried out. Material and Methods: study was conducted on patients who were referred to the Psychiatry department for attempted suicide. They were assessed to identify those with high suicidal intent and study the factors associated with high suicidal intent. Statistics: Epiinfo by CDC was used to analyze the results. Results: High intent was associated with history of psychiatric illness, history of previous attempts and family history of suicidal attempts. Conclusions: A sub group was identified which had a high intent and possibly higher chance of repeating an attempt. PMID:28031588

  13. Thoughts of Death and Suicidal Ideation in Nonpsychiatric Human Immunodeficiency Virus Seropositive Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Kevin; Parsons, Thomas D.; van der Horst, Charles; Hall, Colin

    2006-01-01

    The present study examines the prevalence of death thoughts and suicidality in HIV infection. Subjects (n=246) were examined for psychiatric morbidity and suicidality. Compared to high risk HIV seronegatives, HIV seropositives (HIV+) had significantly increased frequency and severity of both suicidal ideation and death thoughts. Two-thirds of…

  14. Suicide in the Middle Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs, David W.; Hodges, Debra K.; Kohler, Connie

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an overview of adult suicide in the United States and Alabama. This includes the latest available information on the prevalence of suicide in the US and Alabama, demographic characteristics of suicide victims, trends in suicide, and known reasons behind adult suicide. With respect to adult suicide in Alabama, it focuses on…

  15. Heparan Sulfate-Dependent Enhancement of Henipavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Cyrille; Dhondt, Kévin P.; Châlons, Marie; Mély, Stéphane; Raoul, Hervé; Negre, Didier; Cosset, François-Loïc; Gerlier, Denis; Vivès, Romain R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nipah virus and Hendra virus are emerging, highly pathogenic, zoonotic paramyxoviruses that belong to the genus Henipavirus. They infect humans as well as numerous mammalian species. Both viruses use ephrin-B2 and -B3 as cell entry receptors, and following initial entry into an organism, they are capable of rapid spread throughout the host. We have previously reported that Nipah virus can use another attachment receptor, different from its entry receptors, to bind to nonpermissive circulating leukocytes, thereby promoting viral dissemination within the host. Here, this attachment molecule was identified as heparan sulfate for both Nipah virus and Hendra virus. Cells devoid of heparan sulfate were not able to mediate henipavirus trans-infection and showed reduced permissivity to infection. Virus pseudotyped with Nipah virus glycoproteins bound heparan sulfate and heparin but no other glycosaminoglycans in a surface plasmon resonance assay. Furthermore, heparin was able to inhibit the interaction of the viruses with the heparan sulfate and to block cell-mediated trans-infection of henipaviruses. Moreover, heparin was shown to bind to ephrin-B3 and to restrain infection of permissive cells in vitro. Consequently, treatment with heparin devoid of anticoagulant activity improved the survival of Nipah virus-infected hamsters. Altogether, these results reveal heparan sulfate as a new attachment receptor for henipaviruses and as a potential therapeutic target for the development of novel approaches against these highly lethal infections. PMID:25759505

  16. Chlamydia trachomatis Infection of Endocervical Epithelial Cells Enhances Early HIV Transmission Events

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Lyndsey R.; Amedee, Angela M.; Albritton, Hannah L.; Kozlowski, Pamela A.; Lacour, Nedra; McGowin, Chris L.; Schust, Danny J.; Quayle, Alison J.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis causes a predominantly asymptomatic, but generally inflammatory, genital infection that is associated with an increased risk for HIV acquisition. Endocervical epithelial cells provide the major niche for this obligate intracellular bacterium in women, and the endocervix is also a tissue in which HIV transmission can occur. The mechanism by which CT infection enhances HIV susceptibility at this site, however, is not well understood. Utilizing the A2EN immortalized endocervical epithelial cell line grown on cell culture inserts, we evaluated the direct role that CT-infected epithelial cells play in facilitating HIV transmission events. We determined that CT infection significantly enhanced the apical-to-basolateral migration of cell-associated, but not cell-free, HIVBaL, a CCR5-tropic strain of virus, across the endocervical epithelial barrier. We also established that basolateral supernatants from CT-infected A2EN cells significantly enhanced HIV replication in peripheral mononuclear cells and a CCR5+ T cell line. These results suggest that CT infection of endocervical epithelial cells could facilitate both HIV crossing the mucosal barrier and subsequent infection or replication in underlying target cells. Our studies provide a mechanism by which this common STI could potentially promote the establishment of founder virus populations and the maintenance of local HIV reservoirs in the endocervix. Development of an HIV/STI co-infection model also provides a tool to further explore the role of other sexually transmitted infections in enhancing HIV acquisition. PMID:26730599

  17. Chlamydia trachomatis Infection of Endocervical Epithelial Cells Enhances Early HIV Transmission Events.

    PubMed

    Buckner, Lyndsey R; Amedee, Angela M; Albritton, Hannah L; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Lacour, Nedra; McGowin, Chris L; Schust, Danny J; Quayle, Alison J

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis causes a predominantly asymptomatic, but generally inflammatory, genital infection that is associated with an increased risk for HIV acquisition. Endocervical epithelial cells provide the major niche for this obligate intracellular bacterium in women, and the endocervix is also a tissue in which HIV transmission can occur. The mechanism by which CT infection enhances HIV susceptibility at this site, however, is not well understood. Utilizing the A2EN immortalized endocervical epithelial cell line grown on cell culture inserts, we evaluated the direct role that CT-infected epithelial cells play in facilitating HIV transmission events. We determined that CT infection significantly enhanced the apical-to-basolateral migration of cell-associated, but not cell-free, HIVBaL, a CCR5-tropic strain of virus, across the endocervical epithelial barrier. We also established that basolateral supernatants from CT-infected A2EN cells significantly enhanced HIV replication in peripheral mononuclear cells and a CCR5+ T cell line. These results suggest that CT infection of endocervical epithelial cells could facilitate both HIV crossing the mucosal barrier and subsequent infection or replication in underlying target cells. Our studies provide a mechanism by which this common STI could potentially promote the establishment of founder virus populations and the maintenance of local HIV reservoirs in the endocervix. Development of an HIV/STI co-infection model also provides a tool to further explore the role of other sexually transmitted infections in enhancing HIV acquisition.

  18. Suicides in national parks--United States, 2003-2009.

    PubMed

    2010-12-03

    In 2007, the year for which the most recent national data on fatalities are available, 34,598 suicides occurred in the United States (rate: 11.3 per 100,000 population); 79% were among males. In 2009, an estimated 374,486 visits to hospital emergency departments occurred for self-inflicted injury, of which approximately 262,000 (70%) could be attributed to suicidal behavior. The majority (58%) were among females. Most suicides (77%) occur in the home, but many occur in public places, including national parks. In addition to the loss of life, suicides consume park resources and staff time and can traumatize witnesses. To describe the characteristics of and trends in suicides in national parks, CDC and the National Park Service (NPS) analyzed reports of suicide events (suicides and attempted suicides) occurring in the parks during 2003-2009. During this 7-year span, 84 national parks reported 286 suicide events, an average of 41 events per year. Of the 286 events, 68% were fatal. The two most commonly used methods were firearms and falls. Consistent with national patterns, 83% of suicides were among males. A comprehensive, multicomponent approach is recommended to prevent suicide events, including enhanced training for park employees, site-specific barriers, and collaboration with communities.

  19. Understanding Homicide-Suicide.

    PubMed

    Knoll, James L

    2016-12-01

    Homicide-suicide is the phenomenon in which an individual kills 1 or more people and commits suicide. Research on homicide-suicide has been hampered by a lack of an accepted classification scheme and reliance on media reports. Mass murder-suicide is gaining increasing attention particularly in the United States. This article reviews the research and literature on homicide-suicide, proposing a standard classification scheme. Preventive methods are discussed and sociocultural factors explored. For a more accurate and complete understanding of homicide-suicide, it is argued that future research should use the full psychological autopsy approach, to include collateral interviews.

  20. Examining suicide: imaging's contributions.

    PubMed

    Church, Elizabeth J

    2015-01-01

    For many people, the death of hope leads inexorably to the conclusion that the only viable solution, the only way to put an end to unendurable pain, is suicide. What leads a person to commit this final, desperate act, and how might we predict, intervene, and prevent suicide? Health care workers, including radiologic technologists, can play an important role in detecting warning signs in patients and in better understanding what factors may lead to suicide. Although certain forms of suicide such as suicide bombings and assisted suicide are beyond its scope, this article explores medical imaging's contributions to the study of this phenomenon.

  1. A clinical data repository enhances hospital infection control.

    PubMed Central

    Samore, M.; Lichtenberg, D.; Saubermann, L.; Kawachi, C.; Carmeli, Y.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the benefits of a relational database of hospital clinical data (Clinical Data Repository; CDR) for an infection control program. The CDR consists of > 40 Sybase tables, and is directly accessible for ad hoc queries by members of the infection control unit who have been granted privileges for access by the Information Systems Department. The data elements and functional requirements most useful for surveillance of nosocomial infections, antibiotic use, and resistant organisms are characterized. Specific applications of the CDR are presented, including the use of automated definitions of nosocomial infection, graphical monitoring of resistant organisms with quality control limits, and prospective detection of inappropriate antibiotic use. Hospital surveillance and quality improvement activities are significantly benefited by the availability of a querable set of tables containing diverse clinical data. PMID:9357588

  2. Parasites can enhance infections of fish with bacterial pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In aquaculture systems, fish are commonly infected by multiple pathogens, including parasites. Parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) and bacterium Edwardsiella ictaluri are two common pathogens of cultured channel catfish. The objectives were to 1) evaluate the susceptibility of Ich parasitize...

  3. Personal suicidality in reception and identification with suicidal film characters.

    PubMed

    Till, Benedikt; Vitouch, Peter; Herberth, Arno; Sonneck, Gernot; Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The authors investigated the impact of suicidality on identity work during film exposure. Adults with low suicidality (n = 150) watched either It's My Party or The Fire Within, censored versions of these films not depicting the suicide, or the control film that concluded with a non-suicidal death. Baseline suicidality was measured with questionnaires before the movie. Identity work and identification with the protagonist were measured after the movie. Suicidality was directly associated with identity work during film dramas depicting suicide methods. The reception of suicide-related media content seems to partially depend on personal suicidality. Potential implications for suicide prevention are discussed.

  4. Autophagy enhances bacterial clearance during P. aeruginosa lung infection.

    PubMed

    Junkins, Robert D; Shen, Ann; Rosen, Kirill; McCormick, Craig; Lin, Tong-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen which is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among cystic fibrosis patients. Although P. aeruginosa is primarily considered an extacellular pathogen, recent reports have demonstrated that throughout the course of infection the bacterium acquires the ability to enter and reside within host cells. Normally intracellular pathogens are cleared through a process called autophagy which sequesters and degrades portions of the cytosol, including invading bacteria. However the role of autophagy in host defense against P. aeruginosa in vivo remains unknown. Understanding the role of autophagy during P. aeruginosa infection is of particular importance as mutations leading to cystic fibrosis have recently been shown to cause a blockade in the autophagy pathway, which could increase susceptibility to infection. Here we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa induces autophagy in mast cells, which have been recognized as sentinels in the host defense against bacterial infection. We further demonstrate that inhibition of autophagy through pharmacological means or protein knockdown inhibits clearance of intracellular P. aeruginosa in vitro, while pharmacologic induction of autophagy significantly increased bacterial clearance. Finally we find that pharmacological manipulation of autophagy in vivo effectively regulates bacterial clearance of P. aeruginosa from the lung. Together our results demonstrate that autophagy is required for an effective immune response against P. aeruginosa infection in vivo, and suggest that pharmacological interventions targeting the autophagy pathway could have considerable therapeutic potential in the treatment of P. aeruginosa lung infection.

  5. TOWARD SUICIDE PREVENTION

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Venkoba A.

    1999-01-01

    Suicide is an important mode of death. There are many psychiatrically ill patients in therapy running different degree of suicide risk. The risk of death by suicide is with almost all psychiatric illnesses, but it is found more with depressive disease, schizophrenia and personality disorder. Many studies have reported higher incidences of suicide attempts and suicide among alcoholics, which is often precipitated by family crises. Drug problems, low threshold for tolerance of day to day frustration, unemployement and poor parenting are major causes for youth suicide. There is biological evidence of suicidal behaviour. Fall in the level of serotonin and 5-HIAA in the CSF and in hind brain is found in subjects dying from suicide. Researchers have found decreased melatonin level in depression and suicide attempters. Long term therapy with antidepressants (Tricyclics), mood stabilizers (lithium and valproate) and new SSRIs prevent relapses and lessen suicide. It was concluded that general hospital doctors are in position of reducing suicide rates. Education of physician in detection of depression and suicide prevention will result in decline in number of suicides. The important measures include limiting the ability of methods of self-harm, antidepressants, paracetamol and insecticides. PMID:21430799

  6. F. novicida-Infected A. castellanii Does Not Enhance Bacterial Virulence in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ozanic, Mateja; Gobin, Ivana; Brezovec, Martin; Marecic, Valentina; Trobonjaca, Zlatko; Abu Kwaik, Yousef; Santic, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes tularemia in humans and animals. Epidemiology of tularemia worldwide is often associated with water-borne transmission, which includes mosquitoes and amoebae as the potential host reservoirs of the bacteria in water environment. In vitro studies showed intracellular replication of F. tularensis within Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmanella vermiformis cells. While infection of amoeba by Legionella pneumophila has been shown to enhance infectivity of L. pneumophila the role of F. tularensis-infected protozoa in the pathogenesis of tularemia is not known. We used 6 h coculture of A. castellanii and F. novicida for investigation of the effect of inhaled amoeba on the pathogenesis of tularemia on in vivo model. Balb/c mice were infected intratracheally with F. novicida or with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii. Surprisingly, infection with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii did not lead to bronchopneumonia in Balb/c mice, and Francisella did not disseminate into the liver and spleen. Upon inhalation, F. novicida infects a variety of host cells, though neutrophils are the predominant cells early during infection in the lung infiltrates of pulmonary tularemia. The numbers of neutrophils in the lungs of Balb/c mice were significantly lower in the infection of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii in comparison to group of mice infected only with F. novicida. These results demonstrate that following inoculation of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii, mice did not develop tularemia.

  7. F. novicida-Infected A. castellanii Does Not Enhance Bacterial Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ozanic, Mateja; Gobin, Ivana; Brezovec, Martin; Marecic, Valentina; Trobonjaca, Zlatko; Abu Kwaik, Yousef; Santic, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes tularemia in humans and animals. Epidemiology of tularemia worldwide is often associated with water-borne transmission, which includes mosquitoes and amoebae as the potential host reservoirs of the bacteria in water environment. In vitro studies showed intracellular replication of F. tularensis within Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmanella vermiformis cells. While infection of amoeba by Legionella pneumophila has been shown to enhance infectivity of L. pneumophila the role of F. tularensis-infected protozoa in the pathogenesis of tularemia is not known. We used 6 h coculture of A. castellanii and F. novicida for investigation of the effect of inhaled amoeba on the pathogenesis of tularemia on in vivo model. Balb/c mice were infected intratracheally with F. novicida or with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii. Surprisingly, infection with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii did not lead to bronchopneumonia in Balb/c mice, and Francisella did not disseminate into the liver and spleen. Upon inhalation, F. novicida infects a variety of host cells, though neutrophils are the predominant cells early during infection in the lung infiltrates of pulmonary tularemia. The numbers of neutrophils in the lungs of Balb/c mice were significantly lower in the infection of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii in comparison to group of mice infected only with F. novicida. These results demonstrate that following inoculation of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii, mice did not develop tularemia. PMID:27242974

  8. DoD’s Response When Psychological Health is Failing: Lessons Learned from Suicide Experiences. A survivor and clinician’s perspective on how suicide prevention efforts can be enhanced within the Department

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-26

    takes.”  National bestseller, Night Falls Fast: Understanding Suicide. “ Manic - depressive illness proved to be an enemy out of range and beyond the...coal mine” Warning – danger, trouble A Too-Painful Reminder Arizona hits on the deepest fears of families coping with mentally ill loved ones Jared...Gabrielle Giffords clinging to life. For thoseJiving with mentally ill family members or friends, the tragedy plays on their deepest fears and raises

  9. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency enhances resistance against cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Fodil-Cornu, N; Kozij, N; Wu, Q; Rozen, R; Vidal, S M

    2009-10-01

    Folates provide one-carbon units for nucleotide synthesis and methylation reactions. A common polymorphism in the MTHFR gene (677C --> T) results in reduced enzymatic activity, and is associated with an increased risk for neural tube defects and cardiovascular disease. The high prevalence of this polymorphism suggests that it may have experienced a selective advantage under environmental pressure, possibly an infectious agent. To test the hypothesis that methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genotype influences the outcome of infectious disease, we examined the response of Mthfr-deficient mice against mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Acute MCMV infection of Mthfr(-/-) mice resulted in early control of cytokine secretion, decreased viral titer and preservation of spleen immune cells, in contrast to Mthfr wild-type littermates. The phenotype was abolished in MTHFR transgenic mice carrying an extra copy of the gene. Infection of primary fibroblasts with MCMV showed a decrease in viral replication and in the number of productively infected cells in Mthfr(+/-) fibroblasts compared with wild-type cells. These results indicate that Mthfr deficiency protects against MCMV infection in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that human genetic variants may provide an advantage in the host response against certain pathogens.

  10. Serotonin and suicidality: the impact of acute fluoxetine administration. I: Serotonin and suicide.

    PubMed

    King, R A; Segman, R H; Anderson, G M

    1994-01-01

    The general enhancement of central serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission following long-term administration of serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) appears to play an important role in these drugs' anti-depressant efficacy. Because suicide and/or aggression appear linked to diminished levels of brain 5-HT and its metabolites, it has been suggested that SSRIs may be particularly effective in reducing suicidality. Case reports of increased or new suicidal ideation following administration of fluoxetine and other SSRIs, however, raise questions about how these potential side effects may relate to the SSRI's acute effects on 5-HT transmission. Part I of this review examines fluoxetine's effects on suicidality and related behaviors and reviews the relationship of suicidality to serotonergic dysregulation.

  11. The Fc and not CD4 Receptor Mediates Antibody Enhancement of HIV Infection in Human Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homsy, Jacques; Meyer, Mia; Tateno, Masatoshi; Clarkson, Sarah; Levy, Jay A.

    1989-06-01

    Antibodies that enhance human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity have been found in the blood of infected individuals and in infected or immunized animals. These findings raise serious concern for the development of a safe vaccine against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. To address the in vivo relevance and mechanism of this phenomenon, antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infectivity in peripheral blood macrophages, lymphocytes, and human fibroblastoid cells was studied. Neither Leu3a, a monoclonal antibody directed against the CD4 receptor, nor soluble recombinant CD4 even at high concentrations prevented this enhancement. The addition of monoclonal antibody to the Fc receptor III (anti-FcRIII), but not of antibodies that react with FcRI or FcRII, inhibited HIV type 1 and HIV type 2 enhancement in peripheral blood macrophages. Although enhancement of HIV infection in CD4+ lymphocytes could not be blocked by anti-FcRIII, it was inhibited by the addition of human immunoglobulin G aggregates. The results indicate that the FcRIII receptor on human macrophages and possibly another Fc receptor on human CD4+ lymphocytes mediate antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infectivity and that this phenomenon proceeds through a mechanism independent of the CD4 protein.

  12. Heautoscopy, epilepsy, and suicide.

    PubMed Central

    Brugger, P; Agosti, R; Regard, M; Wieser, H G; Landis, T

    1994-01-01

    Heautoscopy (the doppelgänger experience), epilepsy, and suicide is a triad primarily known from literary accounts. This paper reports a patient with complex partial seizures who tried to commit suicide during the experience of heautoscopy. PMID:8021672

  13. Heautoscopy, epilepsy, and suicide.

    PubMed

    Brugger, P; Agosti, R; Regard, M; Wieser, H G; Landis, T

    1994-07-01

    Heautoscopy (the doppelgänger experience), epilepsy, and suicide is a triad primarily known from literary accounts. This paper reports a patient with complex partial seizures who tried to commit suicide during the experience of heautoscopy.

  14. Suicide and PTSD

    MedlinePlus

    ... PTSD who have certain styles of coping with stress, such as not expressing feelings. Research suggests that for Veterans with PTSD, the strongest link to both suicide attempts and thinking about suicide is guilt related ...

  15. Settings for Suicide Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Primary Care Justice System Adult Justice System Juvenile Justice System ... About Suicide Effective Prevention Resources & Programs Training & Events News & Highlights Organizations The Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC) is supported ...

  16. Youth Suicidal Behavior

    MedlinePlus

    ... Exposure to friends’/family members’ suicide xii Low self-esteem xiii Protective Factors Family and school connectedness iii ... Reduced access to firearms vii Academic achievement ix Self-esteem xi Talking to teens about suicide does not ...

  17. African American Suicide

    MedlinePlus

    ... accounted for 83.8% of Caucasian elderly suicides. • Firearms were the predominant method of suicide among African ... per 100,000 annually. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Vital Statistics System. Mortality Data. ...

  18. Multivalent Presentation of Antihantavirus Peptides on Nanoparticles Enhances Infection Blockade▿

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Pamela R.; Hjelle, Brian; Brown, David C.; Ye, Chunyan; Bondu-Hawkins, Virginie; Kilpatrick, Kathleen A.; Larson, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    Viral entry into susceptible host cells typically results from multivalent interactions between viral surface proteins and host entry receptors. In the case of Sin Nombre virus (SNV), a New World hantavirus that causes hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome, infection involves the interaction between viral membrane surface glycoproteins and the human integrin αvβ3. Currently, there are no therapeutic agents available which specifically target SNV. To address this problem, we used phage display selection of cyclic nonapeptides to identify peptides that bound SNV and specifically prevented SNV infection in vitro. We synthesized cyclic nonapeptides based on peptide sequences of phage demonstrating the strongest inhibition of infection, and in all cases, the isolated peptides were less effective at blocking infection (9.0% to 27.6% inhibition) than were the same peptides presented by phage (74.0% to 82.6% inhibition). Since peptides presented by the phage were pentavalent, we determined whether the identified peptides would show greater inhibition if presented in a multivalent format. We used carboxyl linkages to conjugate selected cyclic peptides to multivalent nanoparticles and tested infection inhibition. Two of the peptides, CLVRNLAWC and CQATTARNC, showed inhibition that was improved over that of the free format when presented on nanoparticles at a 4:1 nanoparticle-to-virus ratio (9.0% to 32.5% and 27.6% to 37.6%, respectively), with CQATTARNC inhibition surpassing 50% when nanoparticles were used at a 20:1 ratio versus virus. These data illustrate that multivalent inhibitors may disrupt polyvalent protein-protein interactions, such as those utilized for viral infection of host cells, and may represent a useful therapeutic approach. PMID:18391034

  19. Dengue viruses and mononuclear phagocytes. I. Infection enhancement by non-neutralizing antibody

    PubMed Central

    Halstead, SB; O’Rourke, EJ

    1977-01-01

    Cultured mononuclear peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) from nonimmune human beings and monkeys are nonpermissive to dengue 2 virus (D2V) infection at multiplicities of infection of 0.001-0.1, but become permissive when non-neutralizing dengue antibody is added to medium. D2V infection occurred in PBL prepared from anti-coagulated but not from defibrinated plasma. Infection enhancement was produced by multiple lots of heterotypic anti-dengue raised in several mammalian species. Homotypic anti-dengue neutralized D2V at high concentrations but enhanced at low concentrations; enhancement end point in one serum was 1:320,000. The infection-enhancing factor was a noncytophilic antibody of the IgG class. D2V infection occurred in the absence of heat-labile complement components but did not occur when complexes were prepared with anti- dengue F(ab)(2). Treatment of PBL with several proteases increased permissiveness to D2V infection by immune complexes but not by virus alone. Two rhesus monkey serums collected 14 days after D2V infection contained an IgG antibody with high-titered enhancing activity but with no hemagglutination-inhibition or neutralizing activity. Virus-antibody complexes are irreversibly attached to PBL within 15 min and completely internalized in 60 min. There was considerable variation in cellular infection in different experiments, however, maximum virus yields usually exceeded 1,000 plaque-forming units per 1 x 10(6) PBL occurring between 2 and 4 days in culture. In vitro antibody-dependent infection of PBL provides a possible model for study of pathogenetic mechanisms in infants with dengue shock syndrome who passively acquire maternal anti-dengue IgG. PMID:406347

  20. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    postdoctoral pilot grants, and providing thirteen dissertation awards to expert and future leaders in the field of military suicide research. The Denver staff...from military sources), so that military issues can be informed in a comprehensive manner. 4. Train future leaders in military suicide research...Suicide, Drs. Jill Holm-Denoma and Tracy Witte, University of Denver/Auburn University, $139, 620 o Identifying Factors Associated with Future Suicidal Self

  1. Significant reduction of endemic MRSA acquisition and infection in cardiothoracic patients by means of an enhanced targeted infection control programme.

    PubMed

    Schelenz, S; Tucker, D; Georgeu, C; Daly, S; Hill, M; Roxburgh, J; French, G L

    2005-06-01

    Due to increasing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in cardiothoracic patients at St Thomas' Hospital, an enhanced infection control programme was introduced in September 2000. It was based on UK national guidelines on the control of MRSA and targeted additional identified risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI). It included recognition of the problem by senior staff and their taking responsibility for it; intensive support, education and advice from the infection control team; improved ward and theatre hygiene; pre-admission, admission and weekly MRSA screening; isolation and clearance treatment; nursing care pathways for MRSA colonized patients; and teicoplanin plus gentamicin surgical prophylaxis. The effectiveness of the programme was assessed by retrospective analysis of computerized patient data for the 16 months before and after the introduction of the programme. There was no significant change in the number of operations or the proportion of patients admitted with MRSA, although nine patients were cleared of carriage before admission. However, there were significant falls in the proportion of patients acquiring MRSA on the ward [38/1036 to 14/921, P=0.003, RR 2.4 (95%CI 1.32-4.42)] and in the rate of bloodstream MRSA infections [12/1075 to 2/956, P=0.014, RR 5.34 (95%CI 1.20-23.78)]. Sternal and leg wound infections both halved (from 28/1075 to 13/956 and 16/1075 to 7/956, respectively) but this did not reach statistical significance. These results demonstrate that an enhanced, targeted infection control programme based on the UK national guidelines, SSI prevention guidelines and local risk assessment can reduce the incidence of nosocomial MRSA acquisition and invasive infection in cardiothoracic patients in the face of continuing endemic risk.

  2. Youth Suicide Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Madelyn S.; Kramer, Rachel A.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews research literature on youth suicide that has emerged during the past two decades and examines the possibility of linking this research to the practice of suicide prevention. Such research could be used to develop and evaluate appropriate crisis centers and hotlines as well as school-based suicide awareness curriculum programs. Table…

  3. Creativity, Depression and Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salby, Andrew Edmund

    1992-01-01

    Considers relationship between suicide and creativity. Presents evidence indicating that depression, suicide, and creativity are related. Posits several hypotheses for relationship. Suggests that some changes in serotonergic system associated with depression and with impulsive suicides and homicides may be responsible for element of risk taking…

  4. Suicide. Useful Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pamela S.

    This document presents information on suicide intended for a general audience who want to understand and prevent suicide. The history of suicide in ancient cultures and its incidence in industrialized countries is discussed first. Especially concerned people, i.e, survivors, families at risk, individuals at risk, and caregivers, are defined.…

  5. Suicide. Useful Information on...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pamela S.; Lewis, Dorothy B., Ed.

    This booklet was written to provide information on suicide. It begins with a brief explanation of the role of suicide in history. A section describing those who commit suicide looks at various populations: elderly persons, children, adolescents and young adults, males, females, blacks, and persons of different marital status. The next section…

  6. Suicide by jumping.

    PubMed

    Gunnell, D; Nowers, M

    1997-07-01

    This review summarizes the published literature on suicide by jumping, in particular focusing on the social and psychological characteristics of people who have chosen this method of suicide, and the opportunities for prevention. Suicide by jumping accounts for 5% of suicides in England and Wales, and there are marked variations in the use of this method world-wide. A number of locations have gained notoriety as popular places from which to jump. Such sites include The Golden Gate Bridge and Niagara Falls in the USA, and Beachy Head and the Clifton Suspension Bridge in the UK. There is no consistent evidence that those who commit suicide by jumping differ sociodemographically or in their psychopathology from those who use other methods of suicide, although this method is more often used for in-patient suicides, possibly due to lack of access to other means. Survivors of suicidal jumps experience higher subsequent rates of suicide and mental ill health, but the majority do not go on to kill themselves, suggesting that preventive efforts may be worthwhile. This view is supported by other evidence that restricting access to the means of suicide may prevent some would-be suicides. Such measures may also reduce the emotional trauma suffered by those who witness these acts. Health authorities and coroners should consider reviewing local patterns of suicide by jumping, and if necessary institute preventive measures.

  7. College Student Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Deborah J.; Thompson, Jalonda

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among college students, and it is estimated that 1,088 college students die by suicide each year (National Mental Health Association and the Jed Foundation, 2002). This chapter presents the context of college student mental health within which the problem of college student suicide is situated. Because…

  8. Youth Suicide: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Madelyn S.; Greenberg, Ted; Velting, Drew M.; Shaffer, David

    2006-01-01

    Following a comprehensive review of the research literature on youth suicide, the authors discuss the rates and patterns of completed suicides and suicide attempts. The state of research on potential risk and protective factors is also reviewed, covering personal characteristics, family characteristics, adverse life circumstances, and…

  9. School and Teenage Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duraj, Liba

    1984-01-01

    Reports figures indicating a rise in teenage suicide in Canada. Shows how the problem is compounded by silence resulting from official and parent reactions and social taboo. Discusses some of the causes of teenage suicide and explains the role of the school and family in suicide intervention and prevention. (SB)

  10. Preventing Adolescent Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capuzzi, David

    The adolescent at risk for suicidal preoccupation and behavior has become an increasing concern for schools and communities. This paper presents some of the causes of teen suicide, things adults should know about adolescent suicide prevention, and what can be done to help such youth. The transition to adolescence is a complex time when many values…

  11. The Media and Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sudak, Howard S.; Sudak, Donna M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The authors aim to inform readers of the theory that when newspapers, film, and television describe suicidal deaths, additional suicides may result by virtue of contagion or copy-cat effects; to review data that support and refute this theory; to present some promising and recommended ways to prevent copy-cat suicide; and to cite…

  12. Suicide Clusters and Contagion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zenere, Frank J.

    2009-01-01

    Youth suicide is one of the most serious preventable health problems in the United States. It is the third leading cause of death among adolescents. According to a recent national survey of students in grades 9-12, nearly 15% of respondents had seriously considered suicide and 7% actually had attempted suicide in the previous 12 months. Moreover,…

  13. Suicide and Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Essie E.

    1978-01-01

    Suicide among young people is increasing at phenomenal rates. This article examines the problem of adolescent suicide and suicide attempts in relation to cultural factors, sex differences, and probable causes. The importance of parents, teachers, and counselors in becoming alert to conflict and stress situations in youths is delineated. (Author)

  14. Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Enhances NK Cell Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tschan-Plessl, Astrid; Stern, Martin; Schmied, Laurent; Retière, Christelle; Hirsch, Hans H.; Garzoni, Christian; van Delden, Christian; Boggian, Katia; Mueller, Nicolas J.; Berger, Christoph; Villard, Jean; Manuel, Oriol; Meylan, Pascal; Terszowski, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Background Occurring frequently after solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, cytomegalovirus (CMV) replication remains a relevant cause of mortality and morbidity in affected patients. Despite these adverse effects, an increased alloreactivity of natural killer (NK) cells after CMV infection has been assumed, but the underlying physiopathological mechanisms have remained elusive. Methods We used serial analyses of NK cells before and after CMV infection in kidney transplant recipients as an in vivo model for CMV primary infection to explore the imprint of CMV infection using every patient as their own control: We analyzed NK cell phenotype and function in 47 CMV seronegative recipients of CMV seropositive kidney grafts, who developed CMV primary infection posttransplant. Seronegative recipients of seronegative kidney grafts served as controls. Results We observed a significant increase of NKG2C expressing NK cells after CMV infection (mean increase, 17.5%; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 10.2-24.9, P < 0.001), whereas cluster of differentiation (CD)57 expressing cells decreased (mean decrease, 14.1%; 95% CI, 8.0-20.2; P < 0.001). Analysis of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) expression showed an increase of cells expressing KIR2DL1 as their only inhibitory KIR in patients carrying the cognate ligand HLA-C2 (mean increase, 10.0%; 95% CI, 1.7-18.3; P = 0.018). In C2-negative individuals, KIR2DL1 expression decreased (mean decrease, 3.9%; 95% CI, 1.6-6.2; P = 0.001). As for activating KIR, there was no conclusive change pattern. Most importantly, we observed a significantly higher NK cell degranulation and IFNγ production in response to different target cells (target K562, CD107a: mean increase, 9.9%; 95% CI, 4.8-15.0; P < 0.001; IFNγ: mean increase, 6.6%; 95% CI, 1.6-11.1; P < 0.001; target MRC-5, CD107a: mean increase, 6.9%; 95% CI, 0.7-13.1; P = 0.03; IFNγ: mean increase, 4.8%; 95% CI, 1.7-7.8; P = 0.002). Conclusions We report

  15. Gene Therapy of Breast Cancer: Studies of Selective Promoter/Enhancer-Modified Vectors to Deliver Suicide Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    antigen - expressing tu- 36. Wickham. TJ.. P. Mathias. D.A. Cheresh. and G.R. Nemerow. 1993. In- mor cells in bone marrow aspirates by polymerase chain ...transduction of Escherichia Coi lacZ. Proc." 1992. Detection of tumor cells in bone marrow of patients with primary breast Nail. Acad. Sci. USA. 85:2603-2607...tissue specific /selective promoter or enhancer to direct the expression of a therapeutic gene in the desired target

  16. Suicide and Suicidal Behavior among Transgender Persons

    PubMed Central

    Virupaksha, H. G.; Muralidhar, Daliboyina; Ramakrishna, Jayashree

    2016-01-01

    Background: Suicide rate and suicidal tendencies among transgender persons are considerably high compared to general population. Hence, this review is an attempt to understand the issues around the suicide and suicidal behavior among transgender persons. Methodology: The literature search conducted using three sources, i.e., electronic databases (PubMed, ProQuest, Google Scholar, PsycInfo), manual search (library catalog), and gray literature (consultation with experts). Results: The suicide attempt rate among transgender persons ranges from 32% to 50% across the countries. Gender-based victimization, discrimination, bullying, violence, being rejected by the family, friends, and community; harassment by intimate partner, family members, police and public; discrimination and ill treatment at health-care system are the major risk factors that influence the suicidal behavior among transgender persons. Conclusion: In spite of facing a number of hardships in their day-to-day life, the transgender community holds a number of resiliency factors. Further, this community needs to be supported to strengthen their resiliency factors and draw culturally sensitive and transgender-inclusive suicide prevention strategies and increase protective factors to tackle this high rate of suicidality. PMID:28031583

  17. Natural disasters and suicide: evidence from Japan.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Tetsuya; Sawada, Yasuyuki; Ueda, Michiko

    2013-04-01

    Previous research shows no consensus as to whether and how natural disasters affect suicide rates in their aftermath. Using prefecture-level panel data of natural disasters and suicide in Japan between 1982 and 2010, we estimate both contemporaneous and lagged effects of natural disasters on the suicide rates of various demographic groups. We find that when the damage caused by natural disasters is extremely large, as in the case of the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake in 1995, suicide rates tend to increase in the immediate aftermath of the disaster and several years later. However, when the damage by natural disasters is less severe, suicide rates tend to decrease after the disasters, especially one or two years later. Thus, natural disasters affect the suicide rates of affected populations in a complicated way, depending on the severity of damages as well as on how many years have passed since the disaster. We also find that the effects of natural disasters on suicide rates vary considerably across demographic groups, which suggests that some population subgroups are more vulnerable to the impact of natural disasters than others. We then test the possibility that natural disasters enhance people's willingness to help others in society, an effect that may work as a protective factor against disaster victims' suicidal risks. We find that natural disasters increase the level of social ties in affected communities, which may mitigate some of the adverse consequence of natural disasters, resulting in a decline in suicide rates. Our findings also indicate that when natural disasters are highly destructive and disruptive, such protective features of social connectedness are unlikely to be enough to compensate for the severe negative impact of disasters on health outcomes.

  18. Is Suicide Ideation a Surrogate Endpoint for Geriatric Suicide?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Links, Paul S.; Heisel, Marnin J.; Quastel, Adam

    2005-01-01

    The present study explored the validity of treating suicide ideation as a surrogate endpoint that can serve as a proxy for suicide in clinical intervention research with suicidal seniors. Two criteria; that suicide ideation is modulated by the proposed intervention and that modulation of suicide ideation leads to a quantitative reduction in…

  19. CSF 5-HIAA Predicts Suicide Risk after Attempted Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordstrom, Peter; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Studied suicide risk after attempted suicide, as predicted by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamine metabolite concentrations, in 92 psychiatric mood disorder inpatients admitted shortly after attempting suicide. Results revealed that low CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) predicted short-range suicide risk after attempted suicide in mood…

  20. Adolescent Suicide Attempters: What Predicts Future Suicidal Acts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groholt, Berit; Ekeberg, Oivind; Haldorsen, Tor

    2006-01-01

    Predictors for repetition of suicide attempts were evaluated among 92 adolescent suicide attempters 9 years after an index suicide attempt (90% females). Five were dead, two by suicide. Thirty-one (42%) of 73 had repeated a suicide attempt. In multiple Cox regression analysis, four factors had an independent predictive effect: comorbid disorders,…

  1. Suicide and Suicide Prevention: Greek versus Biblical Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Kalman J.

    1992-01-01

    Compares suicide in Greek tragedy and Hebrew Bible, concentrating on life situations portrayed in two sets of narratives promoting or preventing suicide. Notes frequency of suicides in Greek tragedy and infrequency of suicides in Bible. Compares stories of Narcissus and Jonah in attempt to pinpoint what is suicide-promoting in Greek narratives and…

  2. A Review of "Suicidal Intent" within the Existing Suicide Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasley, Joseph P.; Ghosh, Biswadip; Huggins, Joseph; Bell, Missy R.; Adler, Lawrence E.; Shroyer, A. Laurie W.

    2008-01-01

    The results of a systematic literature review that investigated suicide intent are presented. Of the 44 relevant articles identified, 17 investigated the relationships between various suicide risk factors and suicide intent and 25 publications investigated the relationships between suicide intent and various suicide outcomes. Despite recent…

  3. Associations between Types of Combat Violence and the Acquired Capability for Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Craig J.; Cukrowicz, Kelly C.

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that combat exposure might increase risk for suicide. The interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide (IPTS) proposes that exposure to painful and provocative experiences such as combat contribute to fearlessness about death and increased pain tolerance, which serve to enhance the individual's capability to attempt suicide.…

  4. Gene Therapy of Breast Cancer: Studies of Selective Promoter/Enhancer-Modified Vectors to Deliver Suicide Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    gene therapy strategies for breast cancer by translation of studies derived from the DF3/MUCl gene. We have completed Tasks 1 and 2 as outlined in the Statement of Work using the DF3 promoter to selectively drive transgenes in breast cancer cells. The DF3 promoter has been used in an adenoviral vector to selectively detect and eliminate breast cancer cells that contaminate hematopoietic stem cell preparations used in autologous bone marrow transplantation. More recent work has involved modification of the DF3 promoter by adding a Tet-enhancer system to increase expression

  5. Suicide among eminent artists.

    PubMed

    Preti, A; Miotto, P

    1999-02-01

    To evaluate suicide risk by profession among eminent artists data from Garzanti's Encyclopedia, a broad biographical repertory, were used. Six categories in the visual and literary arts were compared: architects, painters, sculptors, writers, poets, and playwrights. Only people whose deaths occurred in the 1800s or 1900s were included since it is likely that underestimation of suicide has been lower in the more recent centuries. A total of 59 suicides were observed in a sample of 3,093 people: this corresponds to a ratio of 1.90%. Suicides were 51 among men (ratio 1.75%) and 8 among women (ratio 4.30%). The comparison by profession indicates that poets and writers exceed the mean suicide ratio of the sample. Painters and architects, conversely, have a clearly lower risk than the mean. Mean age of suicides was 44 yr. (SD = 12), with writers being slightly older (48 yr., SD = 12) than other artists. Artists who died of causes other than suicide reach a mean of 65 yr. (SD = 10). Suicide among artists seems to have a peculiar pattern, clearly different from the pattern of the general population, wherein suicide risk is higher among men and older people. Adverse financial circumstances and the stress attributed to rejection of personal products may contribute to the specific risk of suicide among artists. The link between mental disorders, such as manic-depression, which imply a higher risk of suicide, and creativeness is discussed as a contributing factor.

  6. Alcohol and suicidal behavior.

    PubMed

    Hufford, M R

    2001-07-01

    Alcohol dependence and alcohol intoxication are important risk factors for suicidal behavior. However, the mechanism for the relationship remains unclear. This review presents a conceptual framework relating alcohol to suicidal behavior. Distal risk factors create a statistical potential for suicide. Alcohol dependence, as well as associated comorbid psychopathology and negative life events, act as distal risk factors for suicidal behavior. Proximal risk factors determine the timing of suicidal behavior by translating the statistical potential of distal risk factors into action. The acute effects of alcohol intoxication act as important proximal risk factors for suicidal behavior among the alcoholic and nonalcoholic alike. Mechanisms responsible for alcohol's ability to increase the proximal risk for suicidal behavior include alcohol's ability to: (1) increase psychological distress, (2) increase aggressiveness, (3) propel suicidal ideation into action through suicide-specific alcohol expectancies, and (4) constrict cognition which impairs the generation and implementation of alternative coping strategies. Moreover, the proximal risk factors associated with acute intoxication are consistent with Baumeister's (1990) escape theory of suicide. Suggestions for additional research are discussed, including the possibility that a nonlinear cusp catastrophe model characterizes the relationship between alcohol intoxication and suicidal behavior.

  7. Influence of Religion on Attitude Towards Suicide: An Indian Perspective.

    PubMed

    Thimmaiah, Rohini; Poreddi, Vijayalakshmi; Ramu, Rajalakshmi; Selvi, Sugavana; Math, Suresh Bada

    2016-12-01

    This cross-sectional survey was aimed to compare attitudes towards suicide and suicidal behaviour among randomly selected sample (N = 172) belonged to Hindu and Muslim religions. Data were collected through face-to-face interview. Hindus differed from Muslims regarding suicidal attempts among family (χ (2) = 12.356, p < .002) and community members (χ (2) = 20.425, p < .000). Our study also showed that suicidal behaviours were comparatively low among Muslim participants than Hindus. Further, Muslims hold more negative attitudes towards suicide than Hindus. An enhanced understanding of attitudes towards suicide among general population may be crucial to plan educational, intervention and prevention programs.

  8. Trends in suicidality amid the economic crisis in Greece.

    PubMed

    Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N; Savopoulos, Christos; Siamouli, Melina; Zaggelidou, Eleni; Mageiria, Stamatia; Iacovides, Apostolos; Hatzitolios, Apostolos I

    2013-08-01

    For the decade 2000-2010, suicidal rates appear to be both low and stable in Greece and unrelated to the socioeconomic environment. It is highly possible that the recent crisis caused a significant increase in dysphoria, stress, depression and maybe suicidal ideation in the general population, but completed suicides do not seem to have increased so far. Measures are needed to make sure there will be no increase in completed suicides in the near future, since historically, periods of socioeconomic instability might be related to increased suicidality. Community interventions reduce stigma and enhance help-seeking. However, only those including the creation of social support networks are essential in the fight against suicidality.

  9. Seasonality of Suicidal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Jong-Min; Okusaga, Olaoluwa; Postolache, Teodor T.

    2012-01-01

    A seasonal suicide peak in spring is highly replicated, but its specific cause is unknown. We reviewed the literature on suicide risk factors which can be associated with seasonal variation of suicide rates, assessing published articles from 1979 to 2011. Such risk factors include environmental determinants, including physical, chemical, and biological factors. We also summarized the influence of potential demographic and clinical characteristics such as age, gender, month of birth, socioeconomic status, methods of prior suicide attempt, and comorbid psychiatric and medical diseases. Comprehensive evaluation of risk factors which could be linked to the seasonal variation in suicide is important, not only to identify the major driving force for the seasonality of suicide, but also could lead to better suicide prevention in general. PMID:22470308

  10. Suicide: An Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is the third leading cause of death among young adults worldwide. There is a growing recognition that prevention strategies need to be tailored to the region-specific demographics of a country and to be implemented in a culturally-sensitive manner. This review explores the historical, epidemiological and demographic factors of suicide in India and examines the strategies aimed at the prevention of suicide. There has been an increase in the rates of suicide in India over the years, although trends of both increases and decline in suicide rates have been present. Distinct from global demographic risk factors, In India, marital status is not necessarily protective and the female: male ratio in the rate of suicide is higher. The motives and modes of suicide are also distinct from western countries. Preventive strategies implemented at a community level and identifying vulnerable individuals maybe more effective than global strategies. PMID:23372232

  11. Suicide and islam.

    PubMed

    Lester, David

    2006-01-01

    Much of the research on suicidal behavior in Muslim countries has been simple descriptive studies of samples of completed and attempted suicides. Despite this, and despite the possible under-reporting of suicidal behavior in countries where such behavior is illegal, suicide rates do appear to be lower in Muslims than in those of other religions, even in countries which have populations belonging to several religious groups. Rates of attempted suicide, on the other hand, do not appear to be lower in Muslims as compared to non-Muslims. Research into this topic has been quite poor, failing to take into account the ethnic background and the Islamic sect to which the suicidal subjects belonged. Reasons for the low rate of completed suicide in Muslims are reviewed, including differences in values and socio-economic status.

  12. Nef enhances HIV-1 infectivity via association with the virus assembly complex

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Mingli; Aiken, Christopher

    2008-04-10

    The HIV-1 accessory protein Nef enhances virus infectivity by facilitating an early post-entry step of infection. Nef acts in the virus producer cell, leading to a beneficial modification to HIV-1 particles. Nef itself is incorporated into HIV-1 particles, where it is cleaved by the viral protease during virion maturation. To probe the role of virion-associated Nef in HIV-1 infection, we generated a fusion protein consisting of the host protein cyclophilin A (CypA) linked to the amino terminus of Nef. The resulting CypA-Nef protein enhanced the infectivity of Nef-defective HIV-1 particles and was specifically incorporated into the virions via association with Gag during particle assembly. Pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of CypA-Nef binding to Gag prevented incorporation of CypA-Nef into virions and inhibited infectivity enhancement. Our results indicate that infectivity enhancement by Nef requires its association with a component of the assembling HIV-1 particle.

  13. Inhibition of apoptosis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells enhances virus production and facilitates persistent infection.

    PubMed Central

    Antoni, B A; Sabbatini, P; Rabson, A B; White, E

    1995-01-01

    Apoptosis is one of several mechanisms by which human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) exerts its cytopathic effects. CD4+ Jurkat T-cell lines overexpressing the adenovirus E1B 19K protein, a potent inhibitor of apoptosis, were used to examine the consequences of inhibition of apoptosis during acute and chronic HIV-1 infections. E1B 19K protein expression inhibited HIV-induced apoptosis, enhanced virus production, and established high levels of persistent viral infection. One E1B 19K-expressing line appeared to undergo HIV-induced death via a nonapoptotic mechanism, illustrating that HIV infection results in lymphocyte depletion through multiple pathways. Increased virus production associated with sustained cell viability suggests that therapeutic approaches involving inhibition of HIV-induced programmed cell death may be problematic. PMID:7884884

  14. Explaining the suicide risk of sexual minority individuals by contrasting the minority stress model with suicide models.

    PubMed

    Plöderl, Martin; Sellmeier, Maximilian; Fartacek, Clemens; Pichler, Eva-Maria; Fartacek, Reinhold; Kralovec, Karl

    2014-11-01

    Many studies have found elevated levels of suicide ideation and attempts among sexual minority (homosexual and bisexual) individuals as compared to heterosexual individuals. The suicide risk difference has mainly been explained by minority stress models (MSTM), but the application of established suicidological models and testing their interrelations with the MSTM has been lacking so far. Therefore, we have contrasted two established models explaining suicide risk, the Interpersonal Psychological Theory (IPT) (Joiner, 2005) and the Clinical Model (CM) (Mann et al., 1999), with the MSTM (Meyer, 2003) in a Bavarian online-sample of 255 adult sexual minority participants and 183 heterosexual participants. The results suggested that the CM and the IPT model can well explain suicide ideation among sexual minorities according to the factors depression, hopelessness, perceived burdensomeness, and failed belongingness. The CM and the IPT were intertwined with the MSTM via internalized homophobia, social support, and early age of coming out. Early coming out was associated with an increased suicide attempt risk, perhaps through violent experiences that enhanced the capability for suicide; however, coming out likely changed to a protective factor for suicide ideation by enhanced social support and reduced internalized homophobia. These results give more insight into the development of suicide risk among sexual minority individuals and may be helpful to tailor minority-specific suicide prevention strategies.

  15. Enhancement of Agrobacterium tumefaciens infectivity by mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Heberlein, G T; Lippincott, J A

    1967-11-01

    The ability of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to induce pinto leaf tumors may be enhanced two- to threefold after treatment with mitomycin C. The enhancement may be obtained with either lethal or nonlethal concentrations. With 10-min treatments, an optimal response was obtained with 0.005 mug of mitomycin C per ml in the absence of any change in the number of viable cells. Both the tumor induction process and the tumors induced by treated cultures appear qualitatively the same as controls. To account for these results, the antibiotic must increase the proportion of viable cells that will subsequently initiate tumors. One, or at most a few, random lesions in the bacterial chromosome seem to be the necessary requirement for this promotion. At mitomycin concentrations of 1 and 5 mug/ml, the ability of A. tumefaciens to initiate tumors is rapidly lost, indicating that a fairly intact bacterial chromosome is one of the essentials for the tumor induction process.

  16. Phosphatidylserine receptors: enhancers of enveloped virus entry and infection

    PubMed Central

    Moller-Tank, Sven; Maury, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    A variety of both RNA and DNA viruses envelop their capsids in a lipid bilayer. One of the more recently appreciated benefits this envelope is incorporation of phosphatidylserine (PtdSer). Surface exposure of PtdSer disguises viruses as apoptotic bodies; tricking cells into engulfing virions. This mechanism is termed apoptotic mimicry. Several PtdSer receptors have been identified to enhance virus entry and we have termed this group of proteins PtdSer-mediated virus entry enhancing receptors or PVEERs. These receptors enhance entry of a broad range of enveloped viruses. Internalization of virions by PVEERs provides a broad mechanism of entry with little investment by the virus itself and may allow some viruses to attach to cells, thereby making viral glycoprotein/cellular receptor interactions more probable. Alternatively, other viruses may rely entirely on PVEERs for internalization into endosomes. This review provides an overview of PtdSer receptors that serve as PVEERs and the biology behind virion/PVEER interaction. PMID:25277499

  17. Enhanced capacity of DNA repair in human cytomegalovirus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Y.; Rapp, F.

    1981-04-01

    Plaque formation in Vero cells by UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus was enhanced by infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), UV irradiation, or treatment with methylmethanesulfonate. Preinfection of Vero cells with HCMV enhanced reactivation of UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus more significantly than did treatment with UV or methylmethanesulfonate alone. A similar enhancement by HCMV was observed in human embryonic fibroblasts, but not in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP12BE) cells. It was also found that HCMV infection enhanced hydroxyurea-resistant DNA synthesis induced by UV light or methylmethanesulfonate. Alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis revealed an enhanced rate of synthesis of all size classes of DNA in UV-irradiated HCMV-infected Vero cells. However, HCMV infection did not induce repairable lesions in cellular DNA and did not significantly inhibit host cell DNA synthesis, unlike UV or methylmethanesulfonate. These results indicate that HCMV enhanced DNA repair capacity in the host cells without producing detectable lesions in cellular DNA and without inhibiting DNA synthesis. This repair appeared to be error proof for UV-damaged herpes simplex virus DNA when tested with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase-negative mutants.

  18. Poststroke suicide attempts and completed suicides

    PubMed Central

    Glader, Eva-Lotta; Norrving, Bo; Asplund, Kjell

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We examined attempted and completed suicides after stroke to determine whether they were associated with socioeconomic status, other patient characteristics, or time after stroke. Methods: This nationwide cohort study included stroke patients from Riksstroke (the Swedish Stroke Register) from 2001 to 2012. We used personal identification numbers to link the Riksstroke data with other national registers. Suicide attempts were identified by a record of hospital admission for intentional self-harm (ICD-10: X60-X84), and completed suicides were identified in the national Cause of Death Register. We used multiple Cox regression to analyze time from stroke onset to first suicide attempt. Results: We observed 220,336 stroke patients with a total follow-up time of 860,713 person-years. During follow-up, there were 1,217 suicide attempts, of which 260 were fatal. This was approximately double the rate of the general Swedish population. Patients with lower education or income (hazard ratio [HR] 1.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11–1.68) for primary vs university and patients living alone (HR 1.73, 95% CI 1.52–1.97) had an increased risk of attempted suicide, and patients born outside of Europe had a lower risk compared to patients of European origin. Male sex, young age, severe stroke, and poststroke depression were other factors associated with an increased risk of attempted suicide after stroke. The risk was highest during the first 2 years after stroke. Conclusions: Both clinical and socioeconomic factors increase the risk of poststroke suicide attempts. This suggests a need for psychosocial support and suicide preventive interventions in high-risk groups of stroke patients. PMID:25832661

  19. Cell type specificity and host genetic polymorphisms influence antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Boonnak, Kobporn; Dambach, Kaitlyn M; Donofrio, Gina C; Tassaneetrithep, Boonrat; Marovich, Mary A

    2011-02-01

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is implicated in severe, usually secondary, dengue virus (DV) infections. Preexisting heterotypic antibodies, via their Fc-gamma receptor (FcγR) interactions, may increase disease severity through enhanced target cell infection. Greater numbers of infected target cells may contribute to higher viremia and excess cytokine levels often observed in severe disease. Monocytes, macrophages, and immature and mature dendritic cells (DC) are considered major cellular targets of DV. Apheresis of multiple donors allowed isolation of autologous primary myeloid target cell types for head-to-head comparison of infection rates, viral output, and cytokine production under direct infection (without antibody) or ADE conditions (with antibody). All studied cell types except immature DC supported ADE. All cells undergoing ADE secreted proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6 [IL-6] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) at enhancement titers, but distinct cell-type-specific patterns were observed for other relevant proteins (alpha/beta interferon [IFN-α/β] and IL-10). Macrophages produced type I interferons (IFN-α/β) that were modulated by ADE. Mature DC mainly secreted IFN-β. Interestingly, only monocytes secreted IL-10, and only upon antibody-enhanced infection. While ADE infection rates were remarkably consistent in monocytes (10 to 15%) across donors, IL-10 protein levels varied according to previously described regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IL-10 promoter region. The homozygous GCC haplotype was associated with high-level IL-10 secretion, while the ACC and ATA haplotypes produced intermediate and low levels of IL-10, respectively. Our data suggest that ADE effects are cell type specific, are influenced by host genetics, and, depending on relative infection rates, may further contribute to the complexity of DV pathogenesis.

  20. Suicide: an existentialist reconceptualization.

    PubMed

    Roberts, M; Lamont, E

    2014-12-01

    The phenomenon of suicide is one of the primary concerns for mental health professions. The health-care literature is dominated by discussions that focus variously on local and national suicide prevention policies, on the assessment of those individuals judged to be at risk of committing suicide as well as the appropriateness and efficacy of interventions for those who express suicidal ideation and display suicidal behaviours. What appear less frequently in the literature, however, are critical analyses of the concept of suicide and, in particular, critical reflections on the manner in which the concept of suicide has been, and continues to be, understood or 'framed'. In an attempt to respond to this apparent omission, this paper will suggest that the work of Albert Camus, and his philosophical work The Myth of Sisyphus in particular, can be understood as providing a significant reconceptualization and reframing of suicide. In doing so, it will be suggested that Camus's work not only challenges how the concept of suicide has traditionally been situated within the context of mental illness, but can also be understood as challenging the efficacy of the interventions that have been associated with an understanding of suicide within that context.

  1. Suicide methods in Asia: implications in suicide prevention.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kevin Chien-Chang; Chen, Ying-Yeh; Yip, Paul S F

    2012-04-01

    As the largest continent in the World, Asia accounts for about 60% of World suicides. Preventing suicide by restricting access to suicide methods is one of the few evidence-based suicide prevention strategies. However, there has been a lack of systematic exploration of suicide methods in Asian countries. To amend this shortage, the current review examines the leading suicide methods in different Asian countries, their trend, their age- and sex- specific characteristics, and their implications for suicide prevention. In total, 42 articles with leading suicide methods data in 17 Asian countries/regions were retrieved. The epidemiologic characteristics and recent trends of common suicide methods reflect specific socio-cultural, economic, and religious situations in the region. Common suicide methods shift with the introduction of technologies and constructions, and have specific age- or sex-characteristics that may render the restriction of suicide methods not equally effective for all sex and age sub-groups. Charcoal burning, pesticide poisoning, native plant poisoning, self-immolation, and jumping are all prominent examples. In the information society, suicide prevention that focuses on suicide methods must monitor and control the innovation and spread of knowledge and practices of suicide "technologies". It may be more cost-effective to design safety into technologies as a way of suicide prevention while there is no rash of suicides yet by the new technologies. Further research on suicide methods is important for public health approaches to suicide prevention with sensitivity to socio-cultural, economic, and religious factors in different countries.

  2. An evolutionary hypothesis of suicide: why it could be biologically adaptive and is so prevalent in certain occupations.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Midori; Kinney, Dennis K

    2011-06-01

    From an evolutionary perspective, suicide is a puzzle, because it has serious adverse effects, yet is remarkably common and heritable. An hypothesis is proposed to explain this puzzle, by explaining how suicide could be adaptive through reducing risk that individuals will transmit infections to kin. Empirical evidence supports four predictions from the hypothesis. There are well-established mechanisms by which infections and immune factors increase risk for mental disorders that contribute to suicide. Suicide is more prevalent in occupations with greater exposure to infection and immune-compromising factors and at higher latitudes, where key environmental factors increase vulnerability to infection. In several other highly social species, suicide-like behaviors have evolved to reduce transmission of infections. If the hypothesis is correct, detection and treatment of underlying infections and immune dysfunction should help predict and prevent suicidal behavior, while also combating spread of infectious diseases.

  3. Antibodies enhance CXCL10 production during RSV infection of infant and adult immune cells.

    PubMed

    Vissers, Marloes; Schreurs, Inge; Jans, Jop; Heldens, Jacco; de Groot, Ronald; de Jonge, Marien I; Ferwerda, Gerben

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis is a major burden in infants below three months of age, when the primary immune response is mainly dependent on innate immunity and maternal antibodies. We investigated the influence of antibodies on innate immunity during RSV infection. PBMCs from infants and adults were stimulated with live RSV and inactivated RSV in combination with antibody-containing and antibody-depleted serum. The immune response was determined by transcriptome analysis and chemokine levels were measured using ELISA and flow cytometry. Microarray data showed that CXCL10 gene transcription was RSV dependent, whereas CXCL11 and IFNα were upregulated in an antibody-dependent manner. Although the presence of antibodies reduces RSV infection rate, it enhances the innate immune response. In adult immune cells, antibodies enhance CXCL10, CXCL11, IFNα and IFNγ production in response to RSV infection. Contrary, in infant immune cells only CXCL10 was enhanced in an antibody-dependent manner. Monocytes are the main source of CXCL10 and they produce CXCL10 in both an antibody- and virus-dependent manner. This study shows that antibodies enhance CXCL10 production in infant immune cells. CXCL10 has been implicated in exuberating the inflammatory response during viral infections and antibodies could therefore play a role in the pathogenesis of RSV infections.

  4. Attempts to enhance the eradication rate of Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Chang Seok; Baik, Gwang Ho

    2014-01-01

    Increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole present challenges in maintaining optimal eradication rates. Knowledge of local antibiotic resistance and consumption pattern is important in selecting a reliable regimen. In addition, adverse effect profiles of therapeutic regimens are important and must be addressed to enhance compliance rates. Various methods of enhancing the eradication rates of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) have been investigated, including changing combinations or durations of established drugs, adding adjuvant drugs, or development of new molecules or agents. Bismuth-containing quadruple, sequential, concomitant, and levofloxacin-based triple therapies are replacing the long-standing standard of the triple regimen. Despite the encouraging results of these regimens, individualized approaches like treatment after antibiotics resistance test or CYP2C19 genotyping would be the mainstream of future therapy. Because scientific, economic, and technical problems make these advance therapies unfit for widespread use, future development for H. pylori therapy should be directed to overcome individualized antibiotic resistance. Although various novel regimens and additive agents have indicated favorable outcomes, more studies or validations are needed to become a mainstream H. pylori therapy. PMID:24833855

  5. Pim kinases are upregulated during Epstein-Barr virus infection and enhance EBNA2 activity

    SciTech Connect

    Rainio, Eeva-Marja; Ahlfors, Helena; Ruuska, Marja; Kieff, Elliott; Koskinen, Paeivi J. . E-mail: paivi.koskinen@btk.fi

    2005-03-15

    Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is strongly associated with B-cell proliferative diseases such as Burkitt's lymphoma. Here we show that the oncogenic serine/threonine kinases Pim-1 and Pim-2 enhance the activity of the viral transcriptional activator EBNA2. During EBV infection of primary B-lymphocytes, the mRNA expression levels of pim genes, especially of pim-2, are upregulated and remain elevated in latently infected B-cell lines. Thus, EBV-induced upregulation of Pim kinases and Pim-stimulated EBNA2 transcriptional activity may contribute to the ability of EBV to immortalize B-cells and predispose them to malignant growth.

  6. Enhancement of intestinal eosinophilia during Hymenolepis nana infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Niwa, A; Miyazato, T

    1996-03-01

    The ability of Hymenolepis nana oncosphere extract to induce eosinophil chemotactic response was examined in vitro and in vivo. The extract showed a chemotactic activity specific for eosinophils but not for neutrophils. Partially purified eosinophil chemotactic factors (ECFs) from the oncosphere extract showed apparent molecular mass from 5.5 to 9.6kDa and 30 to 40kDa. These were resistant to heating and proteinase K digestion but sensitive to periodate oxidation. Peritoneal injection of the crude extract or partially purified ECFs to mice resulted in a preferential eosinophil infiltration. The chemotactic activity for eosinophils was not separable from the adhesion molecule expression or oxygen radical-inducing activity by means of chromatography or chemical treatments. Furthermore, histological examination demonstrated a marked tissue eosinophilia around H. nana larvae in the intestinal lamina propria of both humoral and cell-mediated immunodeficiency mice. The present findings suggest that H. nana oncosphere-derived molecules facilitate in vivo the intestinal eosinophilia during the infection.

  7. Bundle-forming pilus retraction enhances enteropathogenic Escherichia coli infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Zahavi, Eitan E.; Lieberman, Joshua A.; Donnenberg, Michael S.; Nitzan, Mor; Baruch, Kobi; Rosenshine, Ilan; Turner, Jerrold R.; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Feinstein, Naomi; Zlotkin-Rivkin, Efrat; Aroeti, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is an important human pathogen that causes acute infantile diarrhea. The type IV bundle-forming pili (BFP) of typical EPEC strains are dynamic fibrillar organelles that can extend out and retract into the bacterium. The bfpF gene encodes for BfpF, a protein that promotes pili retraction. The BFP are involved in bacterial autoaggregation and in mediating the initial adherence of the bacterium with its host cell. Importantly, BFP retraction is implicated in virulence in experimental human infection. How pili retraction contributes to EPEC pathogenesis at the cellular level remains largely obscure, however. In this study, an effort has been made to address this question using engineered EPEC strains with induced BFP retraction capacity. We show that the retraction is important for tight-junction disruption and, to a lesser extent, actin-rich pedestal formation by promoting efficient translocation of bacterial protein effectors into the host cells. A model is proposed whereby BFP retraction permits closer apposition between the bacterial and the host cell surfaces, thus enabling timely and effective introduction of bacterial effectors into the host cell via the type III secretion apparatus. Our studies hence suggest novel insights into the involvement of pili retraction in EPEC pathogenesis. PMID:21613538

  8. Suicide: a multidimensional malaise.

    PubMed

    Leenaars, A A

    1996-01-01

    No one really knows why human beings commit suicide. The goal of this paper is to provide a psychological point of view on the topic, among the many other perspectives that are needed. It addresses the question by providing a theory of suicide, arguing that it is theory that allows us to sort out the booming buzzing mess of experience (Wm. James). Suicide is a multi-dimensional malaise. Metaphorically speaking, it is an intrapsychic drama on an interpersonal stage. As sound theory must be empirically observable, the theory is next applied to research of suicide notes, studying such factors as age, sex, and method of suicide, cross-culture and cross-time. Next, because all theory must have clinical applicability, a clinical case study of Goethe's Werther is provided. Overall, it is concluded that we need to continue to develop models to understand the suicidal mind.

  9. Child abuse and suicidal ideation among adolescents in China.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Sylvia Y C L; Chai, Wenyu; He, Xuesong

    2013-11-01

    The present study examined the relationship among physical abuse, psychological abuse, perceived family functioning and adolescent suicidal ideation in Shanghai, China. Perceived family functioning was investigated as a possible moderator between physical abuse, psychological abuse and suicidal ideation. A cross sectional survey using convenience sampling was conducted. A total of 560 valid self-administered questionnaires were completed by the students aged from 12 to 17 in Shanghai. Descriptive statistical analyses, Pearson correlations analyses, and hierarchical regression analyses were adopted as methods of data analyses. Results indicated that physical abuse was significantly associated with greater adolescent suicidal ideation, while a higher level of perceived family functioning was significantly associated with lower suicidal ideation. However, psychological abuse was not associated with suicidal ideation. Perceived family functioning was shown to be a moderator between physical abuse and suicidal ideation. Specifically, mutuality and family communication moderated the relationship between physical abuse and suicidal ideation. To decrease adolescent suicidal ideation, measures are suggested to prevent physical abuse and enhance family functioning. First, it is important to increase the parents' awareness of the meaning and boundaries of physical abuse, as well as the role it plays in contributing to adolescent suicidal ideation. Second, parents should be taught appropriate parenting skills and knowledge and be guided to treat the children as individuals with their unique personality, rights and privileges. Third, it is important to promote family harmony, effective communication as well as mutual trust, concern and understanding among family members.

  10. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Joiner, T. (2008). An empirical investigation of acculturative stress and ethnic identity as moderators of depression and suicidal ideation in...2003). “Contagion” of suicidal symptoms as a function of assortative relating and shared relationship stress in college roommates. Journal of...NH. 29. Joiner, Jr., T. E. (1998, May). “Contagion” of suicidal symptoms as a function of assortative relating and shared life stress . Presented

  11. Financial loss and suicide.

    PubMed

    Pridmore, Saxby; Reddy, Anil

    2012-04-01

    The current Western psychiatric wisdom states that suicide is always or almost always associated with mental disorder. Careful Asian studies are casting doubt on this conclusion. Using information from the public record (newspapers, coroner's reports, and various web-based sources), we sought evidence that, in the absence of mental disorder, suicide may be associated with major financial loss. Reports of 15 individuals who completed suicide following major financial loss were identified, thus an association between these events is supported.

  12. Female Suicide Bombers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT FEMALE SUICIDE BOMBERS by Ms. Debra D. Zedalis Department of the Army Civilian Dr. Anna Waggener Project Advisor This... Female Suicide Bombers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Debra Zedalis 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...ii iii ABSTRACT AUTHOR: Debra D. Zedalis TITLE: Female Suicide Bombers FORMAT: Strategy Research Project DATE: 19 March 2004 PAGES: 43

  13. Enhancement of resistance to Escherichia coli infection in mice by dihydroheptaprenol, a synthetic polyprenol derivative.

    PubMed Central

    Araki, S; Kagaya, K; Kitoh, K; Kimura, M; Fukazawa, Y

    1987-01-01

    The effect of a chemically synthesized polyprenol derivative, dihydroheptaprenol (DHP), on the nonspecific resistance of mice to infection with Escherichia coli was investigated. Mice that had been injected intramuscularly with 100 mg of DHP per kg of body weight, prepared as a microemulsion with lecithin, 1 to 4 days before infection showed enhanced resistance to subcutaneous (s.c.) infection with E. coli. When DHP-injected mice were inoculated s.c. with 3 X 10(8) E. coli, which induces fatal acute systemic infection in normal mice, propagation of bacteria in the blood, liver, and spleen was significantly inhibited. Enhanced resistance of athymic (nude) mice to E. coli infection was also induced by DHP. DHP markedly stimulated the generation of peripheral blood neutrophils, significantly enhanced clearance of E. coli from the bloodstream, and activated neutrophils and peritoneal macrophages for H2O2 generation. DHP restored the resistance to E. coli infection in cyclophosphamide-treated mice over the normal level. Furthermore, DHP shortened the period of the recovery of neutrophils and also enhanced clearance of E. coli from the bloodstream in cyclophosphamide-treated mice. DHP was nontoxic for mice and rats (400 mg/kg intramuscularly and 800 mg/kg s.c.) and nonpyrogenic at a dose of 30 mg/kg when administered intravenously to rabbits. These results suggest that the mechanism of action of DHP for enhancing resistance in mice may be, at least in part, its ability to stimulate the generation of potent neutrophils and to activate macrophages in the reticuloendothelial system. PMID:3114147

  14. Preventing Suicide Among Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Sakinofsky, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    Objective Inpatient suicide comprises a proportionately small but clinically important fraction of suicide. This study is intended as a qualitative analysis of the comprehensive English literature, highlighting what is known and what can be done to prevent inpatient suicide. Method: A systematic search was conducted on the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, Web of Knowledge, and a personal database for articles on cohort series, preferably controlled, of inpatient suicide (not deliberate self-harm or attempted suicide, unless they also dealt specifically with suicide data). Results: A qualitative discussion is presented, based on the findings of the literature searched. Conclusions: The bulk of inpatient suicides actually occur not on the ward but off premises, when the patient was on leave or had absconded. Peaks occur shortly after admission and discharge. It is possible to reduce suicide risk on the ward by having a safe environment, optimizing patient visibility, supervising patients appropriately, careful assessment, awareness of and respect for suicide risk, good teamwork and communication, and adequate clinical treatment. PMID:24881161

  15. Psychological models of suicide.

    PubMed

    Barzilay, Shira; Apter, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Suicidal behavior is highly complex and multifaceted. Consequent to the pioneering work of Durkheim and Freud, theoreticians have attempted to explain the biological, social, and psychological nature of suicide. The present work presents an overview and critical discussion of the most influential theoretical models of the psychological mechanisms underlying the development of suicidal behavior. All have been tested to varying degrees and have important implications for the development of therapeutic and preventive interventions. Broader and more in-depth approaches are still needed to further our understanding of suicidal phenomena.

  16. Prevention of suicide.

    PubMed Central

    McNamee, J E; Offord, D R

    1990-01-01

    We reviewed the epidemiologic features of suicide in Canada and evaluated suicide prevention programs. Three groups were found to be at increased risk for suicide: men aged 70 years or more, women aged 65 to 69 and men aged 20 to 24. The other groups, in decreasing order of risk, were the mentally ill, people who have attempted suicide, those with a life-threatening illness, native people, people with a family history of suicide and prisoners. Studies that evaluated suicide prevention programs showed that none significantly reduced the incidence of suicide; however, the studies were found to be methodologically inadequate or used noncomparable systems of data collection. On the basis of our findings we recommend that primary care physicians routinely evaluate suicide risk among patients in high-risk groups and that intervention include counselling, follow-up and, if necessary, referral to a psychiatrist. Close follow-up is recommended for newly discharged psychiatric patients and those who recently attempted suicide. PMID:2134157

  17. Cultural aspects of suicide.

    PubMed

    Maharajh, Hari D; Abdool, Petal S

    2005-09-08

    Undefined cultural factors cannot be dismissed and significantly contribute to the worldwide incidence of death by suicide. Culture is an all embracing term and defines the relationship of an individual to his environment. This study seeks to investigate the effect of culture on suicide both regionally and internationally. Culture-bound syndrome with suicidal behaviours specific to a particular culture or geographical region are discussed. Opinions are divided as to the status of religious martyrs. The law itself is silent on many aspects of suicidal behaviour and despite decriminalization of suicide as self-murder, the latter remains on the statutes of many developing countries. The Caribbean region is of concern due to its steady rise in mean suicide rate, especially in Trinidad and Tobago where socio-cultural factors are instrumental in influencing suicidal behaviour. These include transgenerational cultural conflicts, psycho-social problems, media exposure, unemployment, social distress, religion and family structure. The methods used are attributed to accessibility and lethality. Ingestion of poisonous substances is most popular followed by hanging. The gender differences seen with regard to suicidality can also be attributed to gender related psychopathology and psychosocial differences in help-seeking behaviour. These are influenced by the cultural environment to which the individual is exposed. Culture provides coping strategies to individuals; as civilization advances many of these coping mechanisms are lost unclothing the genetic predisposition of vulnerable groups. In the management of suicidal behaviour, a system of therapeutic re-culturation is needed with an emphasis on relevant culture- based therapies.

  18. Completed suicide in childhood.

    PubMed

    Dervic, Kanita; Brent, David A; Oquendo, Maria A

    2008-06-01

    Suicide in children and young adolescents up to 14 years of age has increased in many countries, warranting research and clinical awareness. International reported suicide rates per 100,000 in this young population vary between 3.1 and 0 (mean rate worldwide, approximately 0.6/100.000; male-female ratio, 2:1). Suicide occurs only in vulnerable children; this vulnerability begins with parental mood disorder and impulsive aggression, and family history of suicide. Childhood affective and disruptive disorders and abuse are the most often reported psychiatric risk factors. Suicide becomes increasingly common after puberty, most probably because of pubertal onset of depression and substance abuse, which substantially aggravate suicide risk. Biologic findings are scarce; however, serotonergic dysfunction is assumed. The most common precipitants are school and family problems and may include actual/anticipated transitions in these environments. Suicides in children and young adolescents up to 14 years of age often follow a brief period of stress. Cognitive immaturity/misjudgment, age-related impulsivity, and availability of suicide methods play an important role. Psychologic autopsy studies that focus on suicides in this age group are needed.

  19. Core principles in treating suicidal patients.

    PubMed

    Fowler, James Christopher

    2013-09-01

    The treatment of suicidal individuals requires special attention to therapist interventions that promote a viable treatment alliance in the context of shared responsibilities for patient safety. Three core principles in the treatment process (alliance building, enhancing curiosity about the function of suicidal thoughts and urges, as well as enhancing experience and expression of intense emotions) are articulated and brief case vignettes are used to illuminate the principles. Results from open trails and randomized control trials involving suicidal patients are examined to support the evidence-based practice of these principles. The overarching principle undergirding the utility of the principles is a collaborative joining with the patient to decrease isolation and alienation when facing intense and overwhelming emotions.

  20. Emile Durkheim and altruistic suicide.

    PubMed

    Stack, Steven

    2004-01-01

    Altruistic suicides are marked by cultural approval and benefit the social order. They occur in social groups where there is a low value placed on the individual. The principle loci of altruistic suicide are primitive societies and the modern military. Subtypes of altruistic suicide (obligatory, optional, acute) are delineated and evaluated. Military suicide rates are seen as being inversely related to civilian suicide rates. Key limitations of Durkheim's model are discussed including his exaggerating the prevalence of obligatory suicide. Suggested points of departure for future research on altruistic suicide include comparative analyses of suicide in the modern military, and application of the concept of optional altruistic suicide to the impact of suicide acceptability on national suicide rates.

  1. Exposure to pairs of Aeromonas strains enhances virulence in the Caenorhabditis elegans infection model

    PubMed Central

    Mosser, Thomas; Talagrand-Reboul, Emilie; Colston, Sophie M.; Graf, Joerg; Figueras, Maria J.; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle; Lamy, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Aeromonad virulence remains poorly understood, and is difficult to predict from strain characteristics. In addition, infections are often polymicrobial (i.e., are mixed infections), and 5–10% of such infections include two distinct aeromonads, which has an unknown impact on virulence. In this work, we studied the virulence of aeromonads recovered from human mixed infections. We tested them individually and in association with other strains with the aim of improving our understanding of aeromonosis. Twelve strains that were recovered in pairs from six mixed infections were tested in a virulence model of the worm Caenorhabditis elegans. Nine isolates were weak worm killers (median time to death, TD50, ≥7 days) when administered alone. Two pairs showed enhanced virulence, as indicated by a significantly shortened TD50 after co-infection vs. infection with a single strain. Enhanced virulence was also observed for five of the 14 additional experimental pairs, and each of these pairs included one strain from a natural synergistic pair. These experiments indicated that synergistic effects were frequent and were limited to pairs that were composed of strains belonging to different species. The genome content of virulence-associated genes failed to explain virulence synergy, although some virulence-associated genes that were present in some strains were absent from their companion strain (e.g., T3SS). The synergy observed in virulence when two Aeromonas isolates were co-infected stresses the idea that consideration should be given to the fact that infection does not depend only on single strain virulence but is instead the result of a more complex interaction between the microbes involved, the host and the environment. These results are of interest for other diseases in which mixed infections are likely and in particular for water-borne diseases (e.g., legionellosis, vibriosis), in which pathogens may display enhanced virulence in the presence of the right partner. This

  2. Complicated Grief and Suicidal Ideation in Adult Survivors of Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Ann M.; Kim, Yookyung; Prigerson, Holly G.; Mortimer, Mary Kay

    2005-01-01

    While the prevalence of complicated grief has been demonstrated to be elevated in survivors of suicide, the association between complicated grief and suicidal ideation among adult survivors of suicide has not been explored. The purpose of the present study is to examine the association between complicated grief and suicidal ideation in suicide…

  3. Personal Suicidality in Reception and Identification with Suicidal Film Characters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Till, Benedikt; Vitouch, Peter; Herberth, Arno; Sonneck, Gernot; Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The authors investigated the impact of suicidality on identity work during film exposure. Adults with low suicidality ("n" = 150) watched either "It's My Party" or "The Fire Within," censored versions of these films not depicting the suicide, or the control film that concluded with a non-suicidal death. Baseline…

  4. Assessing the Effects of Peer Suicide on Youth Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feigelman, William; Gorman, Bernard S.

    2008-01-01

    Using data from all waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health, we investigated the short-term and long-term impact of an adolescent friend's suicide on an adolescent's depression and suicidality. Results suggest that a friend's suicide is associated with heightened suicide thoughts and attempts and greater depression during…

  5. Enhanced call effort in Japanese tree frogs infected by amphibian chytrid fungus

    PubMed Central

    An, Deuknam

    2016-01-01

    Some amphibians have evolved resistance to the devastating disease chytridiomycosis, associated with global population declines, but immune defences can be costly. We recorded advertisement calls of male Japanese tree frogs (Hyla japonica) in the field. We then assessed whether individuals were infected by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), the causal agent of the disease. This allowed us to analyse call properties of males as a function of their infection status. Infected males called more rapidly and produced longer calls than uninfected males. This enhanced call effort may reflect pathogen manipulation of host behaviour to foster disease transmission. Alternatively, increased calling may have resulted from selection on infected males to reproduce earlier because of their shortened expected lifespan. Our results raise the possibility that sublethal effects of Bd alter amphibian life histories, which contributes to long-term population declines. PMID:26932682

  6. Enhanced call effort in Japanese tree frogs infected by amphibian chytrid fungus.

    PubMed

    An, Deuknam; Waldman, Bruce

    2016-03-01

    Some amphibians have evolved resistance to the devastating disease chytridiomycosis, associated with global population declines, but immune defences can be costly. We recorded advertisement calls of male Japanese tree frogs (Hyla japonica) in the field. We then assessed whether individuals were infected by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), the causal agent of the disease. This allowed us to analyse call properties of males as a function of their infection status. Infected males called more rapidly and produced longer calls than uninfected males. This enhanced call effort may reflect pathogen manipulation of host behaviour to foster disease transmission. Alternatively, increased calling may have resulted from selection on infected males to reproduce earlier because of their shortened expected lifespan. Our results raise the possibility that sublethal effects of Bd alter amphibian life histories, which contributes to long-term population declines.

  7. Dengue virus infection-enhancing antibody activities against Indonesian strains in inhabitants of central Thailand.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Atsushi; Oddgun, Duangjai; Chantawat, Nantarat; Okabayashi, Tamaki; Ramasoota, Pongrama; Churrotin, Siti; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Kameoka, Masanori; Soegijanto, Soegeng; Konishi, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection-enhancing antibodies are a hypothetic factor to increase the dengue disease severity. In this study, we investigated the enhancing antibodies against Indonesian strains of DENV-1-4 in 50 healthy inhabitants of central Thailand (Bangkok and Uthai Thani). Indonesia and Thailand have seen the highest dengue incidence in Southeast Asia. The infection history of each subject was estimated by comparing his/her neutralizing antibody titers against prototype DENV-1-4 strains. To resolve the difficulty in obtaining foreign live viruses for use as assay antigens, we used a recombinant system to prepare single-round infectious dengue viral particles based on viral sequence information. Irrespective of the previously infecting serotype(s), most serum samples showed significantly higher enhancement titers against Indonesian DENV-2 strains than against Thai DENV-2 strains, whereas the opposite effect was observed for the DENV-3 strains. Equivalent enhancing activities were observed against both DENV-1 and DENV-4. These results suggest that the genotype has an impact on enhancing antibody activities against DENV-2 and DENV-3, because the predominant circulating genotypes of each serotype differ between Indonesia and Thailand.

  8. Intestinal smooth muscle cells locally enhance stem cell factor (SCF) production against gastrointestinal nematode infections.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Masahiro

    2011-06-01

    Smooth muscle cells can produce stem cell factor (SCF) in the normal state for the preservation of mast cells, but it is still unknown whether smooth muscle cells can enhance SCF production in response to the pathological stimuli. The present study showed that smooth muscle cells in mast cell-increased regions around worm cysts of intestinal nematodes significantly enhanced SCF gene expression compared with mast cell non-increased regions in same sample. SCF gene expression in mast cell non-increased regions in nematode-infected mice showed almost the same level as in non-infected control groups. These results indicate that smooth muscle cells can locally enhance SCF gene expression, and may have a role in local immunological reactions as growth factor-producing cells.

  9. Enhanced Mucosal Antibody Production and Protection against Respiratory Infections Following an Orally Administered Bacterial Extract

    PubMed Central

    Pasquali, Christian; Salami, Olawale; Taneja, Manisha; Gollwitzer, Eva S.; Trompette, Aurelien; Pattaroni, Céline; Yadava, Koshika; Bauer, Jacques; Marsland, Benjamin J.

    2014-01-01

    Secondary bacterial infections following influenza infection are a pressing problem facing respiratory medicine. Although antibiotic treatment has been highly successful over recent decades, fatalities due to secondary bacterial infections remain one of the leading causes of death associated with influenza. We have assessed whether administration of a bacterial extract alone is sufficient to potentiate immune responses and protect against primary infection with influenza, and secondary infections with either Streptococcus pneumoniae or Klebsiella pneumoniae in mice. We show that oral administration with the bacterial extract, OM-85, leads to a maturation of dendritic cells and B-cells characterized by increases in MHC II, CD86, and CD40, and a reduction in ICOSL. Improved immune responsiveness against influenza virus reduced the threshold of susceptibility to secondary bacterial infections, and thus protected the mice. The protection was associated with enhanced polyclonal B-cell activation and release of antibodies that were effective at neutralizing the virus. Taken together, these data show that oral administration of bacterial extracts provides sufficient mucosal immune stimulation to protect mice against a respiratory tract viral infection and associated sequelae. PMID:25593914

  10. Suicide and religion.

    PubMed

    Cook, Christopher C H

    2014-01-01

    Much of the evidence that religion provides a protective factor against completed suicide comes from cross-sectional studies. This issue of the Journal includes a report of a new prospective study. An understanding of the relationship between spirituality, religion and suicide is important in assessing and caring for those at risk.

  11. Teenage Suicide in Zimbabwe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David; Wilson, C.

    1990-01-01

    The teenage suicide rate in Zimbabwe did not change much during the 1970s, though the rate rose for female teenagers. Female teenagers used poison as a method of suicide more often than did adults, and self-immolation had increased in frequency among young women by the mid-1980s. (Author)

  12. Endocrinology and Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Charles L

    1986-01-01

    Concludes that thyroid and adrenal gland disease unquestionably can produce severe mental disturbances. Most of these are "organic" in nature, but depressive symptoms are common as well. Cautions that a connection between these diseases and suicide has not been established. Advises treating all depressed, suicidal persons with the same…

  13. Client Suicide: What Now?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Thomas E.; Patel, Amee B.

    2012-01-01

    The loss of a client to suicide is a painful personal and professional experience for mental health providers. Whether trainee or experienced professional, the affected clinician often reports feeling overwhelmed and unprepared for the experience of client suicide, together with significant emotional distress and diminished work performance. In…

  14. Fighting the Suicide Spirit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pember, Mary Annette

    2010-01-01

    Tribal colleges are at the forefront of a communitywide effort to combat suicide with culturally relevant methods. The Wiconi Ohitika project is one of several tribal college and mainstream university efforts to address the high rates of suicide among American Indians. According to the U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the suicide…

  15. Suicide of Japanese Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iga, Mamoru

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the uniquely intense stress in Japan due to the "Examination Hell" which contributes to a high rate of young suicide. The social structural factors are analyzed in terms of weak ego; restraint on aggression; lack of social resources; and views of life, death, and suicide. (Author)

  16. Depression and Suicidality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, C. V.

    1974-01-01

    Suicidality ratings for 90 patients in a voluntary psychiatric hospital ward are correlated with five possible indices of depression: self-ratings of depression, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Depression scale scores, depressive diagnosis, and alcohol and drug use. Both depression and suicidality emerges in the factor structure as…

  17. Preventing Adolescent Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capuzzi, Dave; Golden, Larry

    This book deals with the realities of adolescent suicide. It consists of 15 chapters organized under 5 major headings: The Problem of Adolescent Suicide (chapters 1 and 2); A Profile of the Attempter (chapters 3-6); Assessing Lethality (chapters 7 and 8); Prevention and Intervention (chapters 9-14); and Legal Issues (chapter 15). Individual…

  18. College Student Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Lisa J.; Friedman, Howard A.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the topic of college student suicide. Empirical and theoretical studies are reviewed. The research is presented in distinct sections. First, we present background information on college student suicide emphasized in a select number of cited literature reviews, followed by a review of a select number of key quantitative studies…

  19. The Adolescent Suicide Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maris, Ronald

    1985-01-01

    The suicide rate of young people in the United States rose 237 percent between 1960 and 1980. This paper addresses three related issues: epidemic versus artifact; stress in adolescence; and the distinctive traits of the lifestyles or careers of a random sample of young Chicago suicides. (Author/BL)

  20. Suicide and Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battin, Margaret P., Ed.; Maris, Ronald W., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Presents five articles by philosophers and a psychiatrist on the ethics of suicide, as well as comments and a literature review. Discusses the rationality and morality of suicide from several philosophical viewpoints including self-ownership, Kant's theories, and a libertarian perspective. (JAC)

  1. Human Aggression and Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gerald L.; Goodwin, Frederick K

    1986-01-01

    The central nervous system transmitter serontonin may be altered in aggressive/impulsive and suicidal behaviors in humans. These reports are largely consistent with animal data, and constitute one of the most highly replicated set of findings in biological psychiatry. Suggests that some suicidal behavior may be a special kind of aggressive…

  2. Murine and bovine γδ T cells enhance innate immunity against Brucella abortus infections.

    PubMed

    Skyberg, Jerod A; Thornburg, Theresa; Rollins, Maryclare; Huarte, Eduardo; Jutila, Mark A; Pascual, David W

    2011-01-01

    γδ T cells have been postulated to act as a first line of defense against infectious agents, particularly intracellular pathogens, representing an important link between the innate and adaptive immune responses. Human γδ T cells expand in the blood of brucellosis patients and are active against Brucella in vitro. However, the role of γδ T cells in vivo during experimental brucellosis has not been studied. Here we report TCRδ(-/-) mice are more susceptible to B. abortus infection than C57BL/6 mice at one week post-infection as measured by splenic colonization and splenomegaly. An increase in TCRγδ cells was observed in the spleens of B. abortus-infected C57BL/6 mice, which peaked at two weeks post-infection and occurred concomitantly with diminished brucellae. γδ T cells were the major source of IL-17 following infection and also produced IFN-γ. Depletion of γδ T cells from C57BL/6, IL-17Rα(-/-), and GMCSF(-/-) mice enhanced susceptibility to B. abortus infection although this susceptibility was unaltered in the mutant mice; however, when γδ T cells were depleted from IFN-γ(-/-) mice, enhanced susceptibility was observed. Neutralization of γδ T cells in the absence of TNF-α did not further impair immunity. In the absence of TNF-α or γδ T cells, B. abortus-infected mice showed enhanced IFN-γ, suggesting that they augmented production to compensate for the loss of γδ T cells and/or TNF-α. While the protective role of γδ T cells was TNF-α-dependent, γδ T cells were not the major source of TNF-α and activation of γδ T cells following B. abortus infection was TNF-α-independent. Additionally, bovine TCRγδ cells were found to respond rapidly to B. abortus infection upon co-culture with autologous macrophages and could impair the intramacrophage replication of B. abortus via IFN-γ. Collectively, these results demonstrate γδ T cells are important for early protection to B. abortus infections.

  3. Establishing a Suicide Prevention Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidal, John A.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines important considerations for establishing suicide prevention programs in high schools. Teenage suicide rate has doubled since 1970. To deal with this crisis schools must develop procedures for detecting potential victims and for helping students and staff cope after a suicide. Schools must not be afraid to talk about suicide; avoiding the…

  4. Suicide in Batman, Southeastern Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altindag, Abdurrahman; Ozkan, Mustafa; Oto, Remzi

    2005-01-01

    The southeastern part of Turkey has comparatively high female suicide rates. We aimed to research social, economic, cultural, and psychiatric reasons of suicides in Batman in a case-controlled psychological autopsy study comparing suicides with matched community controls. The female suicide rate was 9.3 per 100.000 and the female/male ratio was…

  5. Multiple suicide attempts.

    PubMed

    Tuckman, J; Youngman, W F; Kreizman, G

    1968-04-01

    A sample of 157 persons who attempted suicide from 2 to 6 times was compared with a sample of 1,045 single attempted suicides on a number of personal and social characteristics and other factors related to the act itself. Suicide death rates, obtained through a follow-up of both groups for a year following the last attempt, were also compared. It is concluded (1) that the two groups are essentially similar in their general characteristics and in their risk of suicide and (2) that, among multiples, little change occurs from first to second attempt. However, it is pointed out that both groups are at considerably higher risk of suicide than those who have not made attempts.

  6. Suicide and Forced Marriage

    PubMed Central

    Pridmore, Saxby; Walter, Garry

    2013-01-01

    Background: The prevailing view that the vast majority of those who complete suicide have an underlying psychiatric disorder has been recently challenged by research on the contribution of “predicaments”, in the absence of mental illness, to suicide. In this paper, we sought data to support the notion that forced marriage may lead to suicide without the presence of psychiatric disorder. Methods: Historical records, newspapers, and the electronic media were searched for examples. Results: Two examples from ancient times and six from the last hundred years were located and described. Conclusion: These cases suggest that forced marriage may lead to suicide and complements earlier findings that loss of fortune, health, liberty, and reputation may lead to suicide in the absence of mental disorder. PMID:23983577

  7. Intrinsic antibody-dependent enhancement of microbial infection in macrophages: disease regulation by immune complexes

    PubMed Central

    Halstead, Scott B; Mahalingam, Prof Suresh; Marovich, Mary A; Ubol, Sukathida; Mosser, Prof David M

    2011-01-01

    A wide range of microorganisms can replicate in macrophages, and cell entry of these pathogens via non-neutralising IgG antibody complexes can result in increased intracellular infection through idiosyncratic Fcγ-receptor signalling. The activation of Fcγ receptors usually leads to phagocytosis. Paradoxically, the ligation of monocyte or macrophage Fcγ receptors by IgG immune complexes, rather than aiding host defences, can suppress innate immunity, increase production of interleukin 10, and bias T-helper-1 (Th1) responses to Th2 responses, leading to increased infectious output by infected cells. This intrinsic antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection modulates the severity of diseases as disparate as dengue haemorrhagic fever and leishmaniasis. Intrinsic ADE is distinct from extrinsic ADE, whereby complexes of infectious agents with non-neutralising antibodies lead to an increased number of infected cells. Intrinsic ADE might be involved in many protozoan, bacterial, and viral infections. We review insights into intracellular mechanisms and implications of enhanced pathogenesis after ligation of macrophage Fcγ receptors by infectious immune complexes. PMID:20883967

  8. Children at Risk: The Association between Perceived Weight Status and Suicidal Thoughts and Attempts in Middle School Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whetstone, Lauren M.; Morrissey, Susan L.; Cummings, Doyle M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Suicide is one of the most common causes of death among young people. A report from the US Surgeon General called for strategies to prevent suicide, including increasing public awareness of suicide and risks factors, and enhancing research to understand risk and protective factors. Weight perception has been linked to depression and…

  9. Annexin II binds to capsid protein VP1 of enterovirus 71 and enhances viral infectivity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Su-Lin; Chou, Ying-Ting; Wu, Cheng-Nan; Ho, Mei-Shang

    2011-11-01

    Enterovirus type 71 (EV71) causes hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), which is mostly self-limited but may be complicated with a severe to fatal neurological syndrome in some children. Understanding the molecular basis of virus-host interactions might help clarify the largely unknown neuropathogenic mechanisms of EV71. In this study, we showed that human annexin II (Anx2) protein could bind to the EV71 virion via the capsid protein VP1. Either pretreatment of EV71 with soluble recombinant Anx2 or pretreatment of host cells with an anti-Anx2 antibody could result in reduced viral attachment to the cell surface and a reduction of the subsequent virus yield in vitro. HepG2 cells, which do not express Anx2, remained permissive to EV71 infection, though the virus yield was lower than that for a cognate lineage expressing Anx2. Stable transfection of plasmids expressing Anx2 protein into HepG2 cells (HepG2-Anx2 cells) could enhance EV71 infectivity, with an increased virus yield, especially at a low infective dose, and the enhanced infectivity could be reversed by pretreating HepG2-Anx2 cells with an anti-Anx2 antibody. The Anx2-interacting domain was mapped by yeast two-hybrid analysis to VP1 amino acids 40 to 100, a region different from the known receptor binding domain on the surface of the picornavirus virion. Our data suggest that binding of EV71 to Anx2 on the cell surface can enhance viral entry and infectivity, especially at a low infective dose.

  10. Emotional Impact of a Video-Based Suicide Prevention Program on Suicidal Viewers and Suicide Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Craig J.; Dhillon-Davis, Luther E.; Dhillon-Davis, Kieran K.

    2009-01-01

    In light of continuing concerns about iatrogenic effects associated with suicide prevention efforts utilizing video-based media, the impact of emotionally-charged videos on two vulnerable subgroups--suicidal viewers and suicide survivors--was explored. Following participation in routine suicide education as a part of the U.S. Air Force Suicide…

  11. Sleep Disturbances and Suicide Risk.

    PubMed

    Bernert, Rebecca A; Nadorff, Michael R

    2015-03-01

    Suicide occurs in the presence of psychiatric illness, and is associated with biological, psychological, and social risk factors. Insomnia symptoms and nightmares appear to present elevated risk for suicidal ideation, attempts, and death by suicide. Failure to account for the presence of psychopathology and frequent use of single item assessments of sleep and suicidal ideation are common methodological problems in this literature. Preliminary research, addressing these issues, suggests that subjective sleep complaints may confer independent risk for suicidal behaviors.

  12. Suicide bombing: a psychodynamic view.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Uday; Olsson, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The horror and macabre images of suicide bombings appear regularly on television news programs around the world. A focused literature review of psychiatric interview and demographic data about suicide bombers is presented. Of particular clinical interest are the findings from the study of potential suicide bombers who were apprehended before they could act on their suicide bombing plans. The authors offer psychodynamic and social self-psychological theories explaining the phenomenon of suicide bombing behavior.

  13. Suicide prevention competencies among urban Indian physicians: A needs assessment

    PubMed Central

    Eynan, Rahel; Reiss, Leanna; Links, Paul; Shah, Ravi; Sathyanarayana Rao, T. S.; Parkar, Shubhangi; Dutt, Lakshman; Kadam, Kranti; De Souza, Avinash; Shrivastava, Amresh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: India accounts for the highest estimated number of suicides in the World. In 2012, more than 258,000 of the 804,000 suicide deaths worldwide occurred in India. Early identification and effective management of suicidal ideation and behavior are paramount to saving lives. However, mental health resources are often scarce and limited. Throughout India, there is a severe shortage in mental health professions trained, which results in a treatment gap of about 90%. A comprehensive needs assessment was undertaken to identify the nature of the deficits in suicide prevention training for physicians in three Indian cities: Mumbai, Ahmedabad, and Mysore. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out in several concurrent phases and used a mixed-method approach of converging quantitative and qualitative methodologies. Data were collected using survey questionnaires, focus groups, consultations, and environmental scans. A total of 46 physicians completed the questionnaire. Focus groups were conducted in Mumbai and Ahmedabad with 40 physicians. Consultations were carried out with psychiatrists and psychiatric residents from hospitals and clinics in Mumbai, Ahmedabad, and Mysore. Results: Training gaps in suicide prevention exist across the health care professions. Existing training lacks in both quality and quantity and result in critical deficits in core competencies needed to detect and treat patients presenting with suicidal ideation and behavior. Only 43% of the surveyed physicians felt they were competent to treat suicidal patients. The majority of surveyed physicians believed they would greatly benefit from additional training to enhance their suicide risk assessment and intervention skills. Conclusions: There is a dire need for medical schools to incorporate suicide prevention training as a core component in their medical curricula and for continuing medical education training programs for physicians to enhance competencies in early detection and

  14. Virus-Infected Human Mast Cells Enhance Natural Killer Cell Functions.

    PubMed

    Portales-Cervantes, Liliana; Haidl, Ian D; Lee, Patrick W; Marshall, Jean S

    2017-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are protected from infection by both structural and sentinel cells, such as mast cells. The mast cell's role in antiviral responses is poorly understood; however, they selectively recruit natural killer (NK) cells following infection. Here, the ability of virus-infected mast cells to enhance NK cell functions was examined. Cord blood-derived human mast cells infected with reovirus (Reo-CBMC) and subsequent mast cell products were used for the stimulation of human NK cells. NK cells upregulated the CD69 molecule and cytotoxicity-related genes, and demonstrated increased cytotoxic activity in response to Reo-CBMC soluble products. NK cell interferon (IFN)-γ production was also promoted in the presence of interleukin (IL)-18. In vivo, SCID mice injected with Reo-CBMC in a subcutaneous Matrigel model, could recruit and activate murine NK cells, a property not shared by normal human fibroblasts. Soluble products of Reo-CBMC included IL-10, TNF, type I and type III IFNs. Blockade of the type I IFN receptor abrogated NK cell activation. Furthermore, reovirus-infected mast cells expressed multiple IFN-α subtypes not observed in reovirus-infected fibroblasts or epithelial cells. Our data define an important mast cell IFN response, not shared by structural cells, and a subsequent novel mast cell-NK cell immune axis in human antiviral host defense.

  15. Mucosal stromal fibroblasts markedly enhance HIV infection of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kohgadai, Nargis; Müller, Janis A.; Laustsen, Anders; Thavachelvam, Karthiga; Stürzel, Christina M.; Jones, Jennifer J.; Somsouk, Ma; Garcia, Maurice M.; Smith, James F.; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Münch, Jan; Jakobsen, Martin R.; Giudice, Linda C.; Greene, Warner C.; Roan, Nadia R.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding early events of HIV transmission within mucosal tissues is vital for developing effective prevention strategies. Here, we report that primary stromal fibroblasts isolated from endometrium, cervix, foreskin, male urethra, and intestines significantly increase HIV infection of CD4+ T cells–by up to 37-fold for R5-tropic HIV and 100-fold for X4-tropic HIV–without themselves becoming infected. Fibroblasts were more efficient than dendritic cells at trans-infection and mediate this response in the absence of the DC-SIGN and Siglec-1 receptors. In comparison, mucosal epithelial cells secrete antivirals and inhibit HIV infection. These data suggest that breaches in the epithelium allow external or luminal HIV to escape an antiviral environment to access the infection-favorable environment of the stromal fibroblasts, and suggest that resident fibroblasts have a central, but previously unrecognized, role in HIV acquisition at mucosal sites. Inhibiting fibroblast-mediated enhancement of HIV infection should be considered as a novel prevention strategy. PMID:28207890

  16. Amphotericin B stimulates γδ T and NK cells, and enhances protection from Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Hedges, Jodi F; Mitchell, Angela M; Jones, Kerri; Kimmel, Emily; Ramstead, Andrew G; Snyder, Deann T; Jutila, Mark A

    2015-08-01

    Amphotericin B (AmB) is a commonly used antifungal drug, with well-documented effects on cellular immune responses. We determined that AmB-stimulated γδ T-cell activation and proliferation in vitro at very low concentrations. AmB also enhanced IFN-γ production by NK cells in combination with IL-18. AmB had a greater effect on IFN-γ production in cells isolated from very young animals. Although innate immunostimulatory aspects of AmB have been defined, AmB has not been extensively applied in non-fungal infection settings. Given that γδ T cells are increased and activated in Salmonella infection in cattle, we assessed the effects of AmB in protection from Salmonella enterocolitis in calves. One injection of AmB, at approximately one-tenth of the concentration used in human patients to counter fungal infection, or saline control, was delivered intravenously to calves prior to infection with Salmonella. This single injection caused no adverse effects, reduced disease symptoms from Salmonella enterocolitis and significantly reduced Salmonella bacteria shed in feces of infected animals. Our findings suggest that AmB may be an inexpensive and readily available prophylactic approach for the prevention of bacterial infection in calves.

  17. Collective efficacy, family attachment, and urban adolescent suicide attempts.

    PubMed

    Maimon, David; Browning, Christopher R; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2010-09-01

    The suicide rate among American adolescents between the ages of 14-25 has dramatically increased during the last 50 years, and this fact has been the focus of extensive social-scientific investigation. To date, however, research focusing on the joint effects of mental health, family, and contextual-level predictors on adolescents' suicidal behaviors is scarce. Drawing on Durkheim's classic macro-level approach to suicide and collective efficacy theory, we use data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) to examine the effect of informal social controls on adolescents' suicide attempts. Analyzing reports from 990 youth, we examine the hypothesis that neighborhood-level collective efficacy and family-level integration and social control independently affect suicide attempts. We also examine the extent to which they interact in their effects on suicidal behavior. Overall, results from multilevel logit models support the Durkheimian expectation that family attachment reduces the probability that adolescents will attempt suicide. The effect of collective efficacy is interactive in nature. Specifically, we find that collective efficacy significantly enhances the protective effect of family attachment and support on adolescent suicidal behaviors. We discuss findings within the context of social control theory.

  18. Viral evasion of a bacterial suicide system by RNA-based molecular mimicry enables infectious altruism.

    PubMed

    Blower, Tim R; Evans, Terry J; Przybilski, Rita; Fineran, Peter C; Salmond, George P C

    2012-01-01

    Abortive infection, during which an infected bacterial cell commits altruistic suicide to destroy the replicating bacteriophage and protect the clonal population, can be mediated by toxin-antitoxin systems such as the Type III protein-RNA toxin-antitoxin system, ToxIN. A flagellum-dependent bacteriophage of the Myoviridae, ΦTE, evolved rare mutants that "escaped" ToxIN-mediated abortive infection within Pectobacterium atrosepticum. Wild-type ΦTE encoded a short sequence similar to the repetitive nucleotide sequence of the RNA antitoxin, ToxI, from ToxIN. The ΦTE escape mutants had expanded the number of these "pseudo-ToxI" genetic repeats and, in one case, an escape phage had "hijacked" ToxI from the plasmid-borne toxIN locus, through recombination. Expression of the pseudo-ToxI repeats during ΦTE infection allowed the phage to replicate, unaffected by ToxIN, through RNA-based molecular mimicry. This is the first example of a non-coding RNA encoded by a phage that evolves by selective expansion and recombination to enable viral suppression of a defensive bacterial suicide system. Furthermore, the ΦTE escape phages had evolved enhanced capacity to transduce replicons expressing ToxIN, demonstrating virus-mediated horizontal transfer of genetic altruism.

  19. The Phosphatidylserine and Phosphatidylethanolamine Receptor CD300a Binds Dengue Virus and Enhances Infection

    PubMed Central

    Carnec, Xavier; Meertens, Laurent; Dejarnac, Ophélie; Perera-Lecoin, Manuel; Hafirassou, Mohamed Lamine; Kitaura, Jiro; Ramdasi, Rasika; Schwartz, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus (DENV) is the etiological agent of the major human arboviral disease. We previously demonstrated that the TIM and TAM families of phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) receptors involved in the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells mediate DENV entry into target cells. We show here that human CD300a, a recently identified phospholipid receptor, also binds directly DENV particles and enhances viral entry. CD300a facilitates infection of the four DENV serotypes, as well as of other mosquito-borne viruses such as West Nile virus and Chikungunya virus. CD300a acts as an attachment factor that enhances DENV internalization through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. CD300a recognizes predominantly phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEth) and to a lesser extent PtdSer associated with viral particles. Mutation of residues in the IgV domain critical for phospholipid binding abrogate CD300a-mediated enhancement of DENV infection. Finally, we show that CD300a is expressed at the surface of primary macrophages and anti-CD300a polyclonal antibodies partially inhibited DENV infection of these cells. Overall, these data indicate that CD300a is a novel DENV binding receptor that recognizes PtdEth and PtdSer present on virions and enhance infection. IMPORTANCE Dengue disease, caused by dengue virus (DENV), has emerged as the most important mosquito-borne viral disease of humans and is a major global health concern. The molecular bases of DENV-host cell interactions during virus entry are poorly understood, hampering the discovery of new targets for antiviral intervention. We recently discovered that the TIM and TAM proteins, two receptor families involved in the phosphatidylserine (PtdSer)-dependent phagocytic removal of apoptotic cells, interact with DENV particles-associated PtdSer through a mechanism that mimics the recognition of apoptotic cells and mediate DENV infection. In this study, we show that CD300a, a novel identified phospholipid receptor, mediates DENV infection. CD300a

  20. Suicide as social logic.

    PubMed

    Kral, M J

    1994-01-01

    Although suicide is not viewed as a mental disorder per se, it is viewed by many if not most clinicians, researchers, and lay people as a real or natural symptom of depression. It is at least most typically seen as the unfortunate, severe, yet logical end result of a chain of negative self-appraisals, negative events, and hopelessness. Extending an approach articulated by the early French sociologist Gabriel Tarde, in this paper I argue that suicide is merely an idea, albeit a very bad one, having more in common with societal beliefs and norms regarding such things as divorce, abortion, sex, politics, consumer behavior, and fashion. I make a sharp contrast between perturbation and lethality, concepts central to Edwin S. Shneidman's theory of suicide. Evidence supportive of suicide as an idea is discussed based on what we are learning from the study of history and culture, and about contagion/cluster phenomena, media/communication, and choice of method. It is suggested that certain individuals are more vulnerable to incorporate the idea and act of suicide into their concepts of self, based on the same principles by which ideas are spread throughout society. Just as suicide impacts on society, so does society impact on suicide.

  1. Surviving a Suicide Attempt

    PubMed Central

    Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Al Maqbali, Mandhar; Al-Sinawi, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Suicide is a global phenomenon in all regions of the world affecting people of all age groups. It has detrimental consequences on patients, their families, and the community as a whole. There have been numerous risk factors described for suicide including mental illness, stressful life situations, loss of social support, and general despair. The association of suicide with Islam has not been extensively studied. The common impression from clinical practice is that being a practicing Muslim reduces the risk of suicide. Another factor associated with suicide is starting a patient on antidepressants. However, this has been questioned recently. This report describes a middle-aged man with depression and multiple social stressors who survived a serious suicide attempt. The discussion will focus on the factors that lead him to want to end his life and the impact of the assumed protective factors such as religious belief and family support on this act of self-harm. Such patients can be on the edge when there is an imbalance between risk factors (such as depression, insomnia, and psychosocial stressors) and protective factors (like religious affiliation and family support). All physicians are advised to assess the suicide risk thoroughly in patients with depression regardless of any presumed protective factor. PMID:27602193

  2. Suicide research before Durkheim.

    PubMed

    Goldney, Robert D; Schioldann, Johan A; Dunn, Kirsten I

    2008-01-01

    The casual reader could be forgiven for assuming that there had been little systematic research on suicide before the work of the French sociologist, Emile Durkheim, published in 1897. This historical review demonstrates that there had been extensive studies in the preceding centuries, addressing not only the importance of social factors, but also those factors which are now subsumed in the medical model. In fact, some earlier reviews can now be seen as more balanced and comprehensive than that of Durkheim. In the twentieth century. the predominant focus of suicide research was on the importance of psychosocial factors, a focus which was undoubtedly a legacy of the influential work of Durkheim. Indeed, in 1971 Alvin Alvarez stated that the study of suicide had become the subject of intensive scientific research. The change began in 1897 with the publication of Emile Durkheim's classic Suicide: A Study in Sociology, and more recently Alexander Murray noted that, if the study of suicide had its own era it would divide into two ages, before and after that book ... Le Suicide ... which, more than any other, established its subject as a specialization. Therefore it is not unexpected that many believe that there had not been any substantial suicide research before Durkheim, let alone any which had addressed illness and biological factors and their inter-relationship with society.

  3. Suicide among war veterans.

    PubMed

    Rozanov, Vsevolod; Carli, Vladimir

    2012-07-01

    Studies aiming to identify if war veterans are at higher risk of suicide have often produced inconsistent results; this could be due to the complexity of comparisons and different methodological approaches. It should be noted that this contingent has many risk factors, such as stressful exposures, wounds, brain trauma and pain syndrome. Most recent observations confirm that veterans are really more likely to die of suicide as compared to the general population; they are also more likely to experience suicidal ideation and suffer from mental health problems. Suicides are more frequent in those who develop PTSD, depression and comorbid states due to war exposure. Combat stress and its' frequency may be an important factor leading to suicide within the frame of the stress-vulnerability model. According to this model, the effects of stress may interact with social factors, interpersonal relations and psychological variables producing suicidal tendencies. Modern understanding of stress-vulnerability mechanisms based on genetic predispositions, early life development, level of exposure to stress and stress-reactivity together with interpersonal aspects may help to build more effective suicide prevention programs based on universal/selective/indicated prevention principles.

  4. Suicide in Canada

    PubMed Central

    McFaull, Steven; Rhodes, Anne E.; Bowes, Matthew; Rockett, Ian R. H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to compare Canadian suicide rates with other external causes of death to examine potential poisoning misclassifications as a contributor to suicide underreporting. Method: The study used Statistics Canada mortality data from 2000 to 2011 to calculate sex-and age-specific ratios by external cause of injury codes. Results: The overall Canadian suicide rate, as well as the poisoning suicide rate, declined over the study timeframe by an average annual percentage change (AAPC) of 1.0% each year. However, unintentional and undetermined poisonings increased significantly during the timeframe. Unintentional poisoning mortality (primarily narcotics and hallucinogens, including opioids) increased in proportion to suicides for both sexes, although females were consistently higher. The undetermined death to suicide ratio was higher and increasing for females. Poisonings of undetermined intent increased over time to comprise 47% to 80% of the undetermined death category for males and females combined. Conclusions: Canadian poisoning suicide rates declined, in contrast to rising unintentional and undetermined poisoning mortality rates. This trend is similar to that of the United States, supporting the hypothesis that misclassification of poisoning deaths may also be an issue in Canada.

  5. Completed Suicides and their Previous Attempts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David; Beck, Aaron T.

    1976-01-01

    Investigates the reliability of the findings of Ovenstone and Krietman (some completed suicides have attempted suicide previously, whereas other completed suicides have no such history) with a sample of completed suicides in the United States. (Author/RK)

  6. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy for urinary tract infection diagnosis and antibiogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastanos, Evdokia; Hadjigeorgiou, Katerina; Kyriakides, Alexandros; Pitris, Constantinos

    2010-02-01

    Urinary tract infection diagnosis and antibiogram require a minimum of 48 hours using standard laboratory practice. This long waiting period contributes to an increase in recurrent infections, rising health care costs, and a growing number of bacterial strains developing resistance to antibiotics. In this work, Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) was used as a novel method for classifying bacteria and determining their antibiogram. Five species of bacteria were classified with > 90% accuracy using their SERS spectra and a classification algorithm involving novel feature extraction and discriminant analysis. Antibiotic resistance or sensitivity was determined after just a two-hour exposure of bacteria to ciprofloxacin (sensitive) and amoxicillin (resistant) and analysis of their SERS spectra. These results can become the basis for the development of a novel method that would provide same day diagnosis and selection of the most appropriate antibiotic for most effective treatment of a urinary tract infection.

  7. Infection-induced viscerosensory signals from the gut enhance anxiety: implications for psychoneuroimmunology.

    PubMed

    Goehler, Lisa E; Lyte, Mark; Gaykema, Ronald P A

    2007-08-01

    Infection and inflammation lead to changes in mood and cognition. Although the "classic" sickness behavior syndrome, involving fatigue, social withdrawal, and loss of appetites are most familiar, other emotional responses accompany immune activation, including anxiety. Recent studies have shown that gastrointestinal bacterial infections lead to enhanced anxiety-like behavior in mice. The bacteria-induced signal is most likely carried by vagal sensory neurons, and occurs early on (within 6h) during the infection. These signals induce evidence of activation in brain regions that integrate viscerosensory information with mood, and potentiate activation in brain regions established as key players in fear and anxiety. The findings underline the importance of viscerosensory signals arising from the gastrointestinal tract in modulation of behaviors appropriate for coping with threats, and suggest that these signals may contribute to affective symptoms associated with gastrointestinal disorders.

  8. Infection with human coronavirus NL63 enhances streptococcal adherence to epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Golda, Anna; Malek, Natalia; Dudek, Bartosz; Zeglen, Slawomir; Wojarski, Jacek; Ochman, Marek; Kucewicz, Ewa; Zembala, Marian; Potempa, Jan; Pyrc, Krzysztof

    2011-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of augmented bacterial pathogenicity in post-viral infections is the first step in the development of an effective therapy. This study assessed the effect of human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63) on the adherence of bacterial pathogens associated with respiratory tract illnesses. It was shown that HCoV-NL63 infection resulted in an increased adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae to virus-infected cell lines and fully differentiated primary human airway epithelium cultures. The enhanced binding of bacteria correlated with an increased expression level of the platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R), but detailed evaluation of the bacterium-PAF-R interaction revealed a limited relevance of this process.

  9. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing with electrokinetics enhanced biosensors for diagnosis of acute bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Lu, Yi; Gau, Vincent; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2014-11-01

    Rapid pathogen detection and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) are required in diagnosis of acute bacterial infections to determine the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Molecular approaches for AST are often based on the detection of known antibiotic resistance genes. Phenotypic culture analysis requires several days from sample collection to result reporting. Toward rapid diagnosis of bacterial infection in non-traditional healthcare settings, we have developed a rapid AST approach that combines phenotypic culture of bacterial pathogens in physiological samples and electrochemical sensing of bacterial 16S rRNA. The assay determines the susceptibility of pathogens by detecting bacterial growth under various antibiotic conditions. AC electrokinetic fluid motion and Joule heating induced temperature elevation are optimized to enhance the sensor signal and minimize the matrix effect, which improve the overall sensitivity of the assay. The electrokinetics enhanced biosensor directly detects the bacterial pathogens in blood culture without prior purification. Rapid determination of the antibiotic resistance profile of Escherichia coli clinical isolates is demonstrated.

  10. Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Infection in Primary Human Macrophages; Balancing Higher Fusion against Antiviral Responses

    PubMed Central

    Flipse, Jacky; Diosa-Toro, Mayra A.; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; van de Pol, Denise P. I.; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    The dogma is that the human immune system protects us against pathogens. Yet, several viruses, like dengue virus, antagonize the hosts’ antibodies to enhance their viral load and disease severity; a phenomenon called antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. This study offers novel insights in the molecular mechanism of antibody-mediated enhancement (ADE) of dengue virus infection in primary human macrophages. No differences were observed in the number of bound and internalized DENV particles following infection in the absence and presence of enhancing concentrations of antibodies. Yet, we did find an increase in membrane fusion activity during ADE of DENV infection. The higher fusion activity is coupled to a low antiviral response early in infection and subsequently a higher infection efficiency. Apparently, subtle enhancements early in the viral life cycle cascades into strong effects on infection, virus production and immune response. Importantly, and in contrast to other studies, the antibody-opsonized virus particles do not trigger immune suppression and remain sensitive to interferon. Additionally, this study gives insight in how human macrophages interact and respond to viral infections and the tight regulation thereof under various conditions of infection. PMID:27380892

  11. Are Suicide Terrorists Suicidal? A Critical Assessment of the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Most of the research on suicide terrorism is conducted in the political science and international relations fields. The prevailing wisdom within this literature is that suicide terrorists are not suicidal. But how good is the evidence for this assumption? Knowing whether suicide terrorists are suicidal has implications for prevention, rehabilitation, and the “softer” side of counterterrorism designed to win minds and hearts. In addition it may deepen our understanding of suicide itself. Design: This article uses a review of existing literature to examine the arguments and evidence for and against the possibility that suicide terrorists could be suicidal in the context of a broad range of explanations for suicide terrorism. Results: Much of the evidence against the possibility that suicide terrorists are suicidal is based on anecdote or faulty assumptions about suicide. Relatively few formal systematic studies of suicidality in suicide terrorists have been conducted. Nonetheless, there is emerging evidence that suicidality may play a role in a significant number of cases. Conclusion: The field needs a more multidimensional approach, more systematic data at the individual level, and greater international cross-disciplinary collaboration. Would-be suicide terrorists (intercepted and arrested on their way to an attack) should be routinely interviewed using standard internationally accepted psychiatric diagnostic interviews as well as suicidality and homicidality rating scales. Psychological autopsies should also be routinely conducted worldwide. Since no one research site can collect all of the information that is needed, the creation of an internationally shared database that focuses on suicide terrorists rather than simply incidents is encouraged. PMID:25520891

  12. Suicide Methods in Asia: Implications in Suicide Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kevin Chien-Chang; Chen, Ying-Yeh; Yip, Paul S. F.

    2012-01-01

    As the largest continent in the World, Asia accounts for about 60% of World suicides. Preventing suicide by restricting access to suicide methods is one of the few evidence-based suicide prevention strategies. However, there has been a lack of systematic exploration of suicide methods in Asian countries. To amend this shortage, the current review examines the leading suicide methods in different Asian countries, their trend, their age- and sex- specific characteristics, and their implications for suicide prevention. In total, 42 articles with leading suicide methods data in 17 Asian countries/regions were retrieved. The epidemiologic characteristics and recent trends of common suicide methods reflect specific socio-cultural, economic, and religious situations in the region. Common suicide methods shift with the introduction of technologies and constructions, and have specific age- or sex-characteristics that may render the restriction of suicide methods not equally effective for all sex and age sub-groups. Charcoal burning, pesticide poisoning, native plant poisoning, self-immolation, and jumping are all prominent examples. In the information society, suicide prevention that focuses on suicide methods must monitor and control the innovation and spread of knowledge and practices of suicide “technologies”. It may be more cost-effective to design safety into technologies as a way of suicide prevention while there is no rash of suicides yet by the new technologies. Further research on suicide methods is important for public health approaches to suicide prevention with sensitivity to socio-cultural, economic, and religious factors in different countries. PMID:22690187

  13. Role of oxidative stress on diesel-enhanced influenza infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that air pollutants, including diesel exhaust (DE), reduce host defenses, resulting in decreased resistance to respiratory infections. This study sought to determine if DE exposure could affect the severity of an ongoing influenza infection in mice, and examine if this could be modulated with antioxidants. BALB/c mice were treated by oropharyngeal aspiration with 50 plaque forming units of influenza A/HongKong/8/68 and immediately exposed to air or 0.5 mg/m3 DE (4 hrs/day, 14 days). Mice were necropsied on days 1, 4, 8 and 14 post-infection and lungs were assessed for virus titers, lung inflammation, immune cytokine expression and pulmonary responsiveness (PR) to inhaled methacholine. Exposure to DE during the course of infection caused an increase in viral titers at days 4 and 8 post-infection, which was associated with increased neutrophils and protein in the BAL, and an early increase in PR. Increased virus load was not caused by decreased interferon levels, since IFN-β levels were enhanced in these mice. Expression and production of IL-4 was significantly increased on day 1 and 4 p.i. while expression of the Th1 cytokines, IFN-γ and IL-12p40 was decreased. Treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine did not affect diesel-enhanced virus titers but blocked the DE-induced changes in cytokine profiles and lung inflammation. We conclude that exposure to DE during an influenza infection polarizes the local immune responses to an IL-4 dominated profile in association with increased viral disease, and some aspects of this effect can be reversed with antioxidants. PMID:21092162

  14. Enhancement of host resistance against Listeria infection by Lactobacillus casei: Role of macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, K.

    1984-05-01

    Among the 10 species of the genus Lactobacillus, L. casei showed the strongest protective action against Listeria monocytogenes infection in mice. The activity of L. casei differed with regard to the dose of administration. The anti-L. monocytogenes resistance in mice intravenously administered 5.5 X 10(7), 2.8 X 10(8), or 1.1 X 10(9) L. casei cells was most manifest at ca. 2, 2 and 13, and 3 to 21 days after its administration, respectively. The growth of L. monocytogenes in the liver of mice injected with L. casei (10(7), 10(8), or 10(9) cells) 48 h after infection was suppressed, particularly when 10(8) or 10(9) L. casei cells were given 2 or 13 days before the induced infection, respectively. This suppression of L. monocytogenes growth was overcome by carrageenan treatment or X-ray irradiation. (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into the liver DNA increased 13 days after administration of L. casei, and augmentation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation during 6 to 48 h after infection was dependent on the dose of L. casei. Peritoneal macrophage accumulation observed 1 to 5 days after intraperitoneal injection of UV-killed L. monocytogenes was markedly enhanced when the mice were treated with L. casei cells 13 days before macrophage elicitation. Therefore, the enhanced host resistance by L. casei to L. monocytogenes infection may be mediated by macrophages migrating from the blood stream to the reticuloendothelial system in response to L. casei injection before or after L. monocytogenes infection.

  15. Enhanced neutrophil longevity and recruitment contribute to the severity of oviduct pathology during Chlamydia muridarum infection.

    PubMed

    Frazer, Lauren C; O'Connell, Catherine M; Andrews, Charles W; Zurenski, Matthew A; Darville, Toni

    2011-10-01

    Our previous studies revealed that intravaginal infection of mice with a plasmid-deficient strain of Chlamydia muridarum, CM3.1, does not induce the development of oviduct pathology. In this study, we determined that infection with CM3.1 resulted in a significantly reduced frequency and absolute number of neutrophils in the oviducts during acute infection. This reduction in neutrophils was associated with significantly lower levels of neutrophil chemokines in the oviducts and decreased production of neutrophil chemokines by oviduct epithelial cells infected with CM3.1 in vitro. Infection with CM3.1 also resulted in an increased frequency of late apoptotic/dead neutrophils in the oviduct. Examination of the ability of Chlamydia trachomatis to prevent neutrophil apoptosis in vitro revealed that C. trachomatis strain D/UW-3/Cx exhibited an enhanced ability to prevent neutrophil apoptosis compared to plasmid-deficient CTD153, and this effect was dependent on the presence of CD14(high) monocytes. The presence of monocytes also resulted in enhanced neutrophil cytokine production and increased production of tissue-damaging molecules in response to D/UW-3/Cx relative to results with CTD153. Attempts to use antibody-mediated depletion to discern the specific role of neutrophils in infection control and pathology in vivo revealed that although Ly6G(high) neutrophils were eliminated from the blood and oviducts with this treatment, immature neutrophils and high levels of tissue-damaging molecules were still detectable in the upper genital tract. These data support the role of neutrophils in chlamydia-induced pathology and reveal that novel methods of depletion must be developed before their role can be specifically determined in vivo.

  16. Enhancing best practices in ophthalmology for prevention of nosocomial epidemic keratoconjunctivitis infections.

    PubMed

    Alai, Nili

    2016-10-01

    Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) outbreaks were reported as early as the 1940s in the United States. Nearly 80 years later, EKC remains a major eye health concern in the US and worldwide. Of particular concern is that a significant number of EKC cluster outbreaks in the US are healthcare acquired infections (HAIs) at ophthalmology offices. Therefore, immediate attention to enhancing best practices of standardization and universal precautions in ophthalmology is paramount.

  17. Firearms and youth suicide.

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, J H; Mościcki, E K

    1986-01-01

    The firearm suicide rate for persons aged 10 to 24 has increased from 2.3 per 100,000 in 1933 to 5.5 per 100,000 in 1982. Over the same period, the suicide rate for this age group by all methods other than firearms has only risen from 2.5 to 3.3. The most dramatic rise in the firearm suicide rate has occurred primarily since 1970, notably among males aged 15 to 24. During the 1960s and 1970s there was a substantial increase in the number of civilian firearms in the United States. PMID:3752329

  18. Suicide on facebook.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Amir Kumar; Biesaga, Krystine; Sudak, Donna M; Draper, John; Womble, Ashley

    2014-03-01

    Current suicide assessment relies primarily on the patient's oral history. This article describes the case of a patient who was hospitalized after making an impulsive suicide attempt. Subsequently, social media was used to identify the events leading up to the attempt and to reconstruct a timeline. This evidence helped the patient gain more insight into the severity of his condition and agree to participate in treatment. Facebook and other social media may prove to be helpful adjuncts to suicide prevention efforts both in treatment and in screening for high-risk individuals who may not voluntarily come to clinical attention.

  19. Financial Loss and Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Saxby, Pridmore; Anil, Reddy

    2012-01-01

    The current Western psychiatric wisdom states that suicide is always or almost always associated with mental disorder. Careful Asian studies are casting doubt on this conclusion. Using information from the public record (newspapers, coroner’s reports, and various web-based sources), we sought evidence that, in the absence of mental disorder, suicide may be associated with major financial loss. Reports of 15 individuals who completed suicide following major financial loss were identified, thus an association between these events is supported. PMID:22973140

  20. Correlates of suicide stigma and suicide literacy in the community.

    PubMed

    Batterham, Philip J; Calear, Alison L; Christensen, Helen

    2013-08-01

    Public knowledge and attitudes toward suicide may influence help-seeking for suicidality. This study aimed to identify correlates of suicide attitudes and knowledge. Australian adults were invited to complete an online survey, with 1,286 responders. Less exposure to suicide, older age, male gender, less education, and culturally diverse backgrounds were associated with poorer knowledge; while younger age, male gender, and culturally diverse backgrounds were associated with more stigmatizing attitudes toward people who die by suicide. The results suggest suicide literacy and stigma reduction programs would benefit community members, particularly males and individuals from culturally diverse backgrounds.

  1. [Suicide and suicide prevention in Vienna from 1938 to 1945].

    PubMed

    Sonneck, Gernot; Hirnsperger, Hans; Mundschütz, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    Beginning with the inception of suicide prevention in interwar Vienna, the paper illustrates how the high number of counselling centres contrasted with a discourse of selection. Despite the fact that suicide rates proved extremely high, suicide prevention declined in importance between 1934 and 1945. Suicide was increasingly attributed to the weak and the inferior. The massive threat to Vienna's Jewish population and the high suicide rates among Viennese Jews are also outlined. The paper concludes with a synopsis of V. E. Frankl's activities in the field of suicide prevention at the Rothschild Hospital as well as the concentration camp in Theresienstadt.

  2. [Identification and assessment of suicidality].

    PubMed

    Prinz, Susanne; Egger, Stephan T

    2014-10-29

    Suicidality is a frequently observed but unfortunately frequently overlooked phenomenon. Every year over 1000 persons in Switzerland commit suicide; the number of attempted suicides is much higher. If suicidality is recognized promptly, appropriately assessed and adequate therapy initiated, suicides can be prevented. The assessment of suicidality can be facilitated by knowledge of the most important risk groups and factors, but also of protective factors. Various instruments are available which provide an overview of the influential factors, whereby some risk factors, e.g. access to suicidal methods or concrete suicide plans, involve a greater suicide risk than others. Such instruments, however, can never replace the overall assessment of a clinician which ought to arise from a dialogue characterized by empathy and transparency.

  3. Cognitive Distortions and Suicide Attempts

    PubMed Central

    Jager-Hyman, Shari; Cunningham, Amy; Wenzel, Amy; Mattei, Stephanie; Brown, Gregory K.; Beck, Aaron T.

    2014-01-01

    Although theorists have posited that suicidal individuals are more likely than non-suicidal individuals to experience cognitive distortions, little empirical work has examined whether those who recently attempted suicide are more likely to engage in cognitive distortions than those who have not recently attempted suicide. In the present study, 111 participants who attempted suicide in the 30 days prior to participation and 57 psychiatric control participants completed measures of cognitive distortions, depression, and hopelessness. Findings support the hypothesis that individuals who recently attempted suicide are more likely than psychiatric controls to experience cognitive distortions, even when controlling for depression and hopelessness. Fortune telling was the only cognitive distortion uniquely associated with suicide attempt status. However, fortune telling was no longer significantly associated with suicide attempt status when controlling for hopelessness. Findings underscore the importance of directly targeting cognitive distortions when treating individuals at risk for suicide. PMID:25294949

  4. A Brief Analysis of Suicide Methods and Trends in Virginia from 2003 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Keyser-Marcus, Lori; Crouse Breden, Ericka; Hobron, Kathrin; Bhattachan, Atit; Pandurangi, Ananda

    2015-01-01

    Background. The objective is to analyze and compare Virginia suicide data from 2003 to 2012 to US suicide data. Methods. Suicide trends by method, age, gender, and race were obtained from Virginia's Office of the Chief Medical Examiner's annual reports. Results. Similar to US suicide rates, suicide rates in Virginia increased between 2003 and 2012 from 10.9/100,000 people to 12.9/100,000 people. The most common methods were firearm, asphyxia, and intentional drug overdose, respectively. The increase in asphyxia (r = 0.77, P ≤ 0.01) and decrease in CO poisoning (r = −0.89, P ≤ 0.01) were significant. Unlike national trends, intentional drug overdoses decreased (r = −0.55, P = 0.10). Handgun suicides increased (r = 0.61, P = 0.06) and are the most common method of firearm suicide. Hanging was the most common method of asphyxia. Helium suicides also increased (r = 0.75, P = 0.05). Middle age females and males comprise the largest percentage of suicide. Unlike national data, the increase in middle age male suicides occurred only in the 55–64-year-old age group (r = 0.79, P ≤ 0.01) and decreased in the 35–44-year-old age group (r = −0.60, P = 0.07) and 10–14-year-old age group (r = −0.73, P = 0.02). Suicide in all female age ranges remained stable. Caucasians represent the highest percentage of suicide. Conclusion. There has been a rise in suicide in Virginia and suicide rates and trends have closely resembled the national average albeit some differences. Suicide prevention needs to be enhanced. PMID:25705647

  5. [Biological review of completed suicide].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Ikuo; Sora, Ichiro; Hishimoto, Akitoyo

    2016-06-01

    Family, twin and adoption studies have revealed genetic factors involved in suicide, while the accumulation of stress and mental illnesses are major contributing factors of suicide. Since higher lethality of suicidal behavior is considered to increase familial liability to suicidal behavior, we believe biological research of completed suicide is most important for a better understanding of the pathophysiology in suicide. Dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis has gained a special interest in the neurobiology of suicide, mostly because of the findings using a dexamethasone suppression test (DST), in which DST non-suppressors show a nearly 10-fold higher risk of completed suicide than DST suppressors in a depressed cohort. Other data mainly from postmortem brain studies indicate abnormalities of the noradrenergic-locus coeruleus system, serotonergic system, endogenous opioid system, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, inflammatory cytokines and omega-3 fatty acid in completed suicide. However, genetic research of complete suicide is behind other mental problems because it is extremely difficult to obtain tissue samples of completed suicide. Under the difficult situation, we now retain over 800 blood samples of suicide completers thanks to bereaved families' cooperation. We are actively working on the research of suicide, for instance, by performing a GWAS using 500 samples of suicide completers.

  6. Bacterial fight-and-flight responses enhance virulence in a polymicrobial infection.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Apollo; Everett, Jake; Jorth, Peter; Trivedi, Urvish; Rumbaugh, Kendra P; Whiteley, Marvin

    2014-05-27

    The oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) resides in infection sites with many microbes, including commensal streptococci such as Streptococcus gordonii (Sg). During infection, Sg promotes the virulence of Aa by producing its preferred carbon source, l-lactate, a phenomenon referred to as cross-feeding. However, as with many streptococci, Sg also produces high levels of the antimicrobial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), leading to the question of how Aa deals with this potent antimicrobial during coinfection. Here, we show that Aa possesses two complementary responses to H2O2: a detoxification or fight response mediated by catalase (KatA) and a dispersion or flight response mediated by Dispersin B (DspB), an enzyme that dissolves Aa biofilms. Using a murine abscess infection model, we show that both of these responses are required for Sg to promote Aa virulence. Although the role of KatA is to detoxify H2O2 during coinfection, 3D spatial analysis of mixed infections revealed that DspB is required for Aa to spatially organize itself at an optimal distance (>4 µm) from Sg, which we propose allows cross-feeding but reduces exposure to inhibitory levels of H2O2. In addition, these behaviors benefit not only Aa but also Sg, suggesting that fight and flight stimulate the fitness of the community. These results reveal that an antimicrobial produced by a human commensal bacterium enhances the virulence of a pathogenic bacterium by modulating its spatial location in the infection site.

  7. Enhancement of immunohistochemical detection of Salmonella in tissues of experimentally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Rieger, J; Janczyk, P; Hünigen, H; Plendl, J

    2015-07-09

    Salmonella Typhimurium is one of the main pathogens compromising porcine and human health as well as food safety, because it is a prevailing source of foodborne infections due to contaminated pork. A prominent problem in the management of this bacteriosis is the number of subclinically infected carrier pigs. As very little is known concerning the mechanisms allowing Salmonella to persist in pigs, the objective of this study was to develop an immunohistochemical approach for the detection of salmonellae in tissue of pigs experimentally infected with Salmonella Typhimurium. Samples were obtained from a challenge trial in which piglets of the German Landrace were intragastrically infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (1.4-2.1x1010 CFU). Piglets were sacrificed on days 2 and 28 post infection. Tissue samples of jejunum, ileum, colon, ileocecal mesenteric lymph nodes (Lnn. ileocolici), and tonsils (Tonsilla veli palatini) were fixed in Zamboni's fixative and paraffin-embedded. Different immunohistochemical staining protocols were evaluated. Salmonella was detected in varying amounts in the tissues. Brown iron-containing pigments in the lymph nodes interfered with the identification of Salmonella if DAB was used as a staining reagent. Detergents like Triton X-100 or Saponin enhanced the sensitivity. It seems advisable not to use a detection system with brown staining for bacteria in an experimental setup involving intestinal damage including haemorrhage. The use of detergents appears to result in a higher sensitivity in the immunohistochemical detection of salmonellae.

  8. Pain and suicidality: insights from reward and addiction neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Elman, Igor; Borsook, David; Volkow, Nora D

    2013-10-01

    Suicidality is exceedingly prevalent in pain patients. Although the pathophysiology of this link remains unclear, it may be potentially related to the partial congruence of physical and emotional pain systems. The latter system's role in suicide is also conspicuous during setbacks and losses sustained in the context of social attachments. Here we propose a model based on the neural pathways mediating reward and anti-reward (i.e., allostatic adjustment to recurrent activation of the reward circuitry); both are relevant etiologic factors in pain, suicide and social attachments. A comprehensive literature search on neurobiology of pain and suicidality was performed. The collected articles were critically reviewed and relevant data were extracted and summarized within four key areas: (1) physical and emotional pain, (2) emotional pain and social attachments, (3) pain- and suicide-related alterations of the reward and anti-reward circuits as compared to addiction, which is the premier probe for dysfunction of these circuits and (4) mechanistically informed treatments of co-occurring pain and suicidality. Pain-, stress- and analgesic drugs-induced opponent and proponent states of the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathways may render reward and anti-reward systems vulnerable to sensitization, cross-sensitization and aberrant learning of contents and contexts associated with suicidal acts and behaviors. These findings suggest that pain patients exhibit alterations in the brain circuits mediating reward (depressed function) and anti-reward (sensitized function) that may affect their proclivity for suicide and support pain and suicidality classification among other "reward deficiency syndromes" and a new proposal for "enhanced anti-reward syndromes". We suggest that interventions aimed at restoring the balance between the reward and anti-reward networks in patients with chronic pain may help decreasing their suicide risk.

  9. Pain and suicidality: Insights from reward and addiction neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Elman, Igor; Borsook, David; Volkow, Nora D.

    2016-01-01

    Suicidality is exceedingly prevalent in pain patients. Although the pathophysiology of this link remains unclear, it may be potentially related to the partial congruence of physical and emotional pain systems. The latter system’s role in suicide is also conspicuous during setbacks and losses sustained in the context of social attachments. Here we propose a model based on the neural pathways mediating reward and anti-reward (i.e., allostatic adjustment to recurrent activation of the reward circuitry); both are relevant etiologic factors in pain, suicide and social attachments. A comprehensive literature search on neurobiology of pain and suicidality was performed. The collected articles were critically reviewed and relevant data were extracted and summarized within four key areas: (1) physical and emotional pain, (2) emotional pain and social attachments, (3) pain-and suicide-related alterations of the reward and anti-reward circuits as compared to addiction, which is the premier probe for dysfunction of these circuits and (4) mechanistically informed treatments of co-occurring pain and suicidality. Pain-, stress- and analgesic drugs-induced opponent and proponent states of the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathways may render reward and anti-reward systems vulnerable to sensitization, cross-sensitization and aberrant learning of contents and contexts associated with suicidal acts and behaviors. These findings suggest that pain patients exhibit alterations in the brain circuits mediating reward (depressed function) and anti-reward (sensitized function) that may affect their proclivity for suicide and support pain and suicidality classification among other “reward deficiency syndromes” and a new proposal for “enhanced anti-reward syndromes”. We suggest that interventions aimed at restoring the balance between the reward and anti-reward networks in patients with chronic pain may help decreasing their suicide risk. PMID:23827972

  10. Surviving After Suicide

    MedlinePlus

    ... the best help comes from attending a support group for survivors of suicide where they can openly share their own story and their feelings with fellow survivors without pressure or fear of judgement and shame. Support gourps ...

  11. Depression and Suicide Risk

    MedlinePlus

    Depression and Suicide Risk (2014) Definition: A mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and ... i Prevalence: 1. Ranges of lifetime risk for depression: from 6.7% overall to 40% in men, ...

  12. Understanding and preventing military suicide.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Craig J; Jennings, Keith W; Jobes, David A; Bradley, John C

    2012-01-01

    The continual rise in the U.S. military's suicide rate since 2004 is one of the most vexing issues currently facing military leaders, mental health professionals, and suicide experts. Despite considerable efforts to address this problem, however, suicide rates have not decreased. The authors consider possible reasons for this frustrating reality, and question common assumptions and approaches to military suicide prevention. They further argue that suicide prevention efforts that more explicitly embrace the military culture and implement evidence-based strategies across the full spectrum of prevention and treatment could improve success. Several recommendations for augmenting current efforts to prevent military suicide are proposed.

  13. 2-deoxy-D-glucose-induced metabolic stress enhances resistance to Listeria monocytogenes infection in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. S.; Bates, R. A.; Koebel, D. A.; Fuchs, B. B.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to different forms of psychological and physiological stress can elicit a host stress response, which alters normal parameters of neuroendocrine homeostasis. The present study evaluated the influence of the metabolic stressor 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG; a glucose analog, which when administered to rodents, induces acute periods of metabolic stress) on the capacity of mice to resist infection with the facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Female BDF1 mice were injected with 2-DG (500 mg/kg b. wt.) once every 48 h prior to, concurrent with, or after the onset of a sublethal dose of virulent L. monocytogenes. Kinetics of bacterial growth in mice were not altered if 2-DG was applied concurrently or after the start of the infection. In contrast, mice exposed to 2-DG prior to infection demonstrated an enhanced resistance to the listeria challenge. The enhanced bacterial clearance in vivo could not be explained by 2-DG exerting a toxic effect on the listeria, based on the results of two experiments. First, 2-DG did not inhibit listeria replication in trypticase soy broth. Second, replication of L. monocytogenes was not inhibited in bone marrow-derived macrophage cultures exposed to 2-DG. Production of neopterin and lysozyme, indicators of macrophage activation, were enhanced following exposure to 2-DG, which correlated with the increased resistance to L. monocytogenes. These results support the contention that the host response to 2-DG-induced metabolic stress can influence the capacity of the immune system to resist infection by certain classes of microbial pathogens.

  14. Overcoming the fear of lethal injury: evaluating suicidal behavior in the military through the lens of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide.

    PubMed

    Selby, Edward A; Anestis, Michael D; Bender, Theodore W; Ribeiro, Jessica D; Nock, Matthew K; Rudd, M David; Bryan, Craig J; Lim, Ingrid C; Baker, Monty T; Gutierrez, Peter M; Joiner, Thomas E

    2010-04-01

    Suicide rates have been increasing in military personnel since the start of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom, and it is vital that efforts be made to advance suicide risk assessment techniques and treatment for members of the military who may be experiencing suicidal symptoms. One potential way to advance the understanding of suicide in the military is through the use of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide. This theory proposes that three necessary factors are needed to complete suicide: feelings that one does not belong with other people, feelings that one is a burden on others or society, and an acquired capability to overcome the fear and pain associated with suicide. This review analyzes the various ways that military service may influence suicidal behavior and integrates these findings into an overall framework with relevant practical implications. Findings suggest that although there are many important factors in military suicide, the acquired capability may be the most impacted by military experience because combat exposure and training may cause habituation to fear of painful experiences, including suicide. Future research directions, ways to enhance risk assessment, and treatment implications are also discussed.

  15. Overcoming the Fear of Lethal Injury: Evaluating Suicidal Behavior in the Military through the Lens of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Selby, Edward A.; Anestis, Michael D.; Bender, Theodore W.; Ribeiro, Jessica D.; Nock, Matthew K.; Rudd, M. David; Bryan, Craig J.; Lim, Ingrid C.; Baker, Monty T.; Gutierrez, Peter M.; Joiner, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Suicide rates have been increasing in military personnel since the start of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom, and it is vital that efforts be made to advance suicide risk assessment techniques and treatment for members of the military who may be experiencing suicidal symptoms. One potential way to advance the understanding of suicide in the military is through the use of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide. This theory proposes that three necessary factors are needed to complete suicide: feelings that one does not belong with other people, feelings that one is a burden on others or society, and an acquired capability to overcome the fear and pain associated with suicide. This review analyzes the various ways that military service may influence suicidal behavior and integrates these findings into an overall framework with relevant practical implications. Findings suggest that although there are many important factors in military suicide, the acquired capability may be the most impacted by military experience because combat exposure and training may cause habituation to fear of painful experiences, including suicide. Future research directions, ways to enhance risk assessment, and treatment implications are also discussed. PMID:20051309

  16. Sequential Exposure to Carbon Nanotubes and Bacteria Enhances Pulmonary Inflammation and Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Shvedova, Anna A.; Fabisiak, James P.; Kisin, Elena R.; Murray, Ashley R.; Roberts, Jenny R.; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Antonini, James M.; Feng, Wei Hong; Kommineni, Choudari; Reynolds, Jeffrey; Barchowsky, Aaron; Castranova, Vince; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT), with their applications in industry and medicine, may lead to new risks to human health. CNT induce a robust pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress in rodents. Realistic exposures to CNT may occur in conjunction with other pathogenic impacts (microbial infections) and trigger enhanced responses. We evaluated interactions between pharyngeal aspiration of single-walled CNT (SWCNT) and bacterial pulmonary infection of C57BL/6 mice with Listeria monocytogenes (LM). Mice were given SWCNT (0, 10, and 40 μg/mouse) and 3 days later were exposed to LM (103 bacteria/mouse). Sequential exposure to SWCNT/LM amplified lung inflammation and collagen formation. Despite this robust inflammatory response, SWCNT pre-exposure significantly decreased the pulmonary clearance of LM-exposed mice measured 3 to 7 days after microbial infection versus PBS/LM-treated mice. Decreased bacterial clearance in SWCNT-pre-exposed mice was associated with decreased phagocytosis of bacteria by macrophages and a decrease in nitric oxide production by these phagocytes. Pre-incubation of naïve alveolar macrophages with SWCNT in vitro also resulted in decreased nitric oxide generation and suppressed phagocytizing activity toward LM. Failure of SWCNT-exposed mice to clear LM led to a continued elevation in nearly all major chemokines and acute phase cytokines into the later course of infection. In SWCNT/LM-exposed mice, bronchoalveolar lavage neutrophils, alveolar macrophages, and lymphocytes, as well as lactate dehydrogenase level, were increased compared with mice exposed to SWCNT or LM alone. In conclusion, enhanced acute inflammation and pulmonary injury with delayed bacterial clearance after SWCNT exposure may lead to increased susceptibility to lung infection in exposed populations. PMID:18096873

  17. Defining New Therapeutics Using a More Immunocompetent Mouse Model of Antibody-Enhanced Dengue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Amelia K.; Brien, James D.; Lam, Chia-Ying Kao; Johnson, Syd; Chiang, Cindy; Hiscott, John; Sarathy, Vanessa V.; Barrett, Alan D.; Shresta, Sujan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT With over 3.5 billion people at risk and approximately 390 million human infections per year, dengue virus (DENV) disease strains health care resources worldwide. Previously, we and others established models for DENV pathogenesis in mice that completely lack subunits of the receptors (Ifnar and Ifngr) for type I and type II interferon (IFN) signaling; however, the utility of these models is limited by the pleotropic effect of these cytokines on innate and adaptive immune system development and function. Here, we demonstrate that the specific deletion of Ifnar expression on subsets of murine myeloid cells (LysM Cre+ Ifnarflox/flox [denoted as Ifnarf/f herein]) resulted in enhanced DENV replication in vivo. The administration of subneutralizing amounts of cross-reactive anti-DENV monoclonal antibodies to LysM Cre+ Ifnarf/f mice prior to infection with DENV serotype 2 or 3 resulted in antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection with many of the characteristics associated with severe DENV disease in humans, including plasma leakage, hypercytokinemia, liver injury, hemoconcentration, and thrombocytopenia. Notably, the pathogenesis of severe DENV-2 or DENV-3 infection in LysM Cre+ Ifnarf/f mice was blocked by pre- or postexposure administration of a bispecific dual-affinity retargeting molecule (DART) or an optimized RIG-I receptor agonist that stimulates innate immune responses. Our findings establish a more immunocompetent animal model of ADE of infection with multiple DENV serotypes in which disease is inhibited by treatment with broad-spectrum antibody derivatives or innate immune stimulatory agents. PMID:26374123

  18. Chechen Suicide Bombers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-18

    No. 4, October 2007: pp. 1–14 CHECHEN SUICIDE BOMBERS Chechen Suicide BombersR.W. Kurz and C.K. Bartles Robert W. Kurz Charles K. Bartles Foreign...2006, <http:// www.worldnetdaily.com> (Accessed 8 January 2007). Address correspondence to Robert W. Kurz and Charles K. Bartles , Foreign Military...and C.K. Bartles Given their similar religious influences and a common background in fighting Russian forces, one may be led to believe that Chechen

  19. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    Konick, L. C., Brandt, L.A., & Gutierrez, P.M. School-based suicide prevention programs: A meta - analysis . Presented at the American Association of...sites collaborated ori a secondary data analysis project resulting in the following in-press article: Ribeiro, J. D., Pease, J. L., Gutierrez, P. M...insomnia symptoms to several more traditional, well-established suicide risk factors: depression severity, hopelessness, PTSD diagnosis, as well as

  20. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    non- clinical samples . In A. M. Columbus (Ed.), Advances in Psychology Research, Volume 85 (pp. 51- 70). New York: Nova Science Publishers...and sample size for each group (suicidal behavior vs. no suicidal behavior) was recorded for each effect in each study. When such data were not...available, odds ratios with 95% confidence inter- vals, p values with total sample size, or Cohen’s d with sam- ple size were recorded and imputed into the

  1. Proximal Influences on the Trajectory of Suicidal Behaviors and Suicide during the Transition from Adolescence to Young Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Sood, Aradhana Bela; Linker, Julie

    2017-04-01

    Youth transitioning to adulthood have unique developmental tasks that make them vulnerable to suicide. Brain development, life stressors, and psychological adjustments during the transition contribute to a high rate of suicidal gestures. To reduce the incidence of self-harm in this age group, a public health approach that identifies and reduces risk factors and enhances protective factors should be used. Institutions and employment arenas should consider structural supports to facilitate this transition of youth into adulthood, with a particular focus on youth with self-harm thoughts, and should provide education about suicide, evidence-based resources, and intervention programs to encourage help seeking.

  2. The Pathogenic Potential of Proteus mirabilis Is Enhanced by Other Uropathogens during Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Armbruster, Chelsie E; Smith, Sara N; Johnson, Alexandra O; DeOrnellas, Valerie; Eaton, Kathryn A; Yep, Alejandra; Mody, Lona; Wu, Weisheng; Mobley, Harry L T

    2017-02-01

    Urinary catheter use is prevalent in health care settings, and polymicrobial colonization by urease-positive organisms, such as Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii, commonly occurs with long-term catheterization. We previously demonstrated that coinfection with P. mirabilis and P. stuartii increased overall urease activity in vitro and disease severity in a model of urinary tract infection (UTI). In this study, we expanded these findings to a murine model of catheter-associated UTI (CAUTI), delineated the contribution of enhanced urease activity to coinfection pathogenesis, and screened for enhanced urease activity with other common CAUTI pathogens. In the UTI model, mice coinfected with the two species exhibited higher urine pH values, urolithiasis, bacteremia, and more pronounced tissue damage and inflammation compared to the findings for mice infected with a single species, despite having a similar bacterial burden within the urinary tract. The presence of P. stuartii, regardless of urease production by this organism, was sufficient to enhance P. mirabilis urease activity and increase disease severity, and enhanced urease activity was the predominant factor driving tissue damage and the dissemination of both organisms to the bloodstream during coinfection. These findings were largely recapitulated in the CAUTI model. Other uropathogens also enhanced P. mirabilis urease activity in vitro, including recent clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa We therefore conclude that the underlying mechanism of enhanced urease activity may represent a widespread target for limiting the detrimental consequences of polymicrobial catheter colonization, particularly by P. mirabilis and other urease-positive bacteria.

  3. Suicidal Ideation of Probationers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Background: Gender is often related to different life stressors and mental health disorders, but a limited amount of research examines risks of suicidal ideation of probationers by gender. Aims: The aim of this study was to examine gender differences in suicidal ideation of probationers. Method: Using a national sample of 3,014 male and 1,306 female probationers with data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (2009–2011), multivariate regression analysis was conducted. Results: Male and female probationers display similar demographic characteristics although their life circumstances and experiences seem different. Female probationers in the study were more likely to experience financial, psychological, and residential stressors than male probationers were. Female probationers were also more likely to have received medical and/or psychiatric treatments. Female probationers were exposed to more suicidal ideation risks than male probationers were. Additionally, no protective factors to suicidal ideation were found for female probationers. Conclusion: The findings suggest that a gender-specific approach to suicidal ideation of probationers may lessen the prevalence of suicidal ideation of this largely neglected population. PMID:26648230

  4. Adolescent suicide prevention.

    PubMed

    Novick, Lloyd F; Cibula, Donald A; Sutphen, Sally M

    2003-05-01

    This case-prevention of adolescent suicide-is one of a series of teaching cases in the Case-Based Series in Population-Oriented Prevention (C-POP). It has been developed for use in medical school and residency prevention curricula. The complete set of cases is presented in this supplement to the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. This teaching case examines the issue of prevention of adolescent and young adult suicide both at an individual and at a population or community level, using data from the Onondaga County Health Department. In the first section of the case, students are asked to determine whether five deaths related to falling or jumping at a local shopping mall should be considered to be suicidal deaths. Students then develop skills in the reporting as well as in the epidemiology of adolescent suicidal deaths in Onondaga County. As the case progresses, students analyze the results of a local surveillance study of suicidal attempts and ideation. The case concludes with students evaluating a hypothetical screening study intended to reduce the risk of suicidal death and discussing a research design to examine the effectiveness of this prevention strategy.

  5. Suicide and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Siris, S G

    2001-06-01

    Suicide and suicide attempts occur at a significantly greater rate in schizophrenia than in the general population. Common estimates are that 10% of people with schizophrenia will eventually have a completed suicide, and that attempts are made at two to five times that rate. Demographically associated with suicidality in schizophrenia are being young, being early in the course of the illness, being male, coming from a high socioeconomic family background, having high intelligence, having high expectations, not being married, lacking social supports, having awareness of symptoms, and being recently discharged from the hospital. Also associated are reduced self-esteem, stigma, recent loss or stress, hopelessness, isolation, treatment non-compliance and substance abuse. Clinically, the most common correlates of suicidality in schizophrenia are depressive symptoms and the depressive syndrome, although severe psychotic and panic-like symptoms may contribute as well. This review specifically explores the issue of depression in schizophrenia, in relation to suicide, by organizing the differential diagnosis of this state and highlighting their potentially treatable or correctable causes. This differential diagnosis includes both acute and chronic disappointment reactions, the prodrome of an acute psychotic episode, neuroleptic induced akinesia and akathisia, the possibility of direct neuroleptic-induced depression, negative symptoms of schizophrenia, and the possible co-occurrence of an independent depressive diathesis. The potential beneficial roles of 'atypical' antipsychotic agents, including both clozapine and more novel agents, and adjunctive treatment with other psychopharmacological medications are considered, and the important roles of psychosocial factors and interventions are recognized.

  6. Bullying, cyberbullying, and suicide.

    PubMed

    Hinduja, Sameer; Patchin, Justin W

    2010-01-01

    Empirical studies and some high-profile anecdotal cases have demonstrated a link between suicidal ideation and experiences with bullying victimization or offending. The current study examines the extent to which a nontraditional form of peer aggression--cyberbullying--is also related to suicidal ideation among adolescents. In 2007, a random sample of 1,963 middle-schoolers from one of the largest school districts in the United States completed a survey of Internet use and experiences. Youth who experienced traditional bullying or cyberbullying, as either an offender or a victim, had more suicidal thoughts and were more likely to attempt suicide than those who had not experienced such forms of peer aggression. Also, victimization was more strongly related to suicidal thoughts and behaviors than offending. The findings provide further evidence that adolescent peer aggression must be taken seriously both at school and at home, and suggest that a suicide prevention and intervention component is essential within comprehensive bullying response programs implemented in schools.

  7. Repeated suicide attempts.

    PubMed

    Mynatt, S

    2000-12-01

    Attempted suicide is an act associated with childhood sexual abuse, depression, bipolar illness, substance abuse, and other diagnoses, as documented in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) (American Psychiatric Association [APA], 1994). Three women, who attended a group to decrease their depression and increase their self-esteem and who had histories of multiple suicide attempts, agreed to participate in interviews designed to determine the common factors associated with their suicide attempts and to examine the assertion that their suicide attempts were an addiction, similar to their addictions to alcohol and drugs. The common factors found were depression, substance use disorders with early abuse and risky behaviors, history of sexual abuse, faulty relationships, alteration of mood with a suicide plan, and distorted and illogical thinking and motivation. The similarities to addiction also were described. Based on the complexity of factors that emerged and the addictive nature of the suicide attempts, treatment for similar patients needs to be multidimensional and ongoing to allow sufficient time to monitor progress and address the numerous factors involved.

  8. Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and Interpersonal Violence in Suicide Attempters.

    PubMed

    Sahlin, Hanna; Moberg, Tomas; Hirvikoski, Tatja; Jokinen, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    The current study compared characteristics of suicidal behavior and interpersonal violence in suicide attempters with and without a history of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). A total of 100 suicide attempters were assessed with Karolinska Interpersonal Violence Scale (KIVS) and Karolinska Suicide History Interview concerning interpersonal violence and NSSI. There was a high degree of comorbid NSSI in suicide attempters (44%). Suicide attempters with NSSI-history reported more interpersonal violence as adults and more severe suicidal behavior compared to suicide attempters without NSSI. Comorbid NSSI was related to severity of suicidal behavior in a gender specific manner. Comorbid NSSI in suicide attempters may increase suicide and violence risk.

  9. Associations between risk behaviors and suicidal ideation and suicide attempts: do racial/ethnic variations in associations account for increased risk of suicidal behaviors among Hispanic/Latina 9th- to 12th-grade female students?

    PubMed

    Eaton, Danice K; Foti, Kathryn; Brener, Nancy D; Crosby, Alex E; Flores, Glenn; Kann, Laura

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify factors that may account for the disproportionately high prevalence of suicidal behaviors among Hispanic/Latina youth by examining whether associations of health risk behaviors with suicidal ideation and suicide attempts vary by race/ethnicity among female students. Data from the school-based 2007 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey were analyzed. Analyses were conducted among female students in grades 9 through 12 and included 21 risk behaviors related to unintentional injuries and violence; tobacco use; alcohol and other drug use; sexual behaviors that contribute to unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, including human immunodeficiency virus; physical activity; obesity and weight control; and perceived health status. With the exception of physical activity behaviors and obesity, all risk behaviors examined were associated with suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. Associations of risk behaviors with suicidal ideation varied by race/ethnicity for 5 of 21 behaviors, and for 0 of 21 behaviors for suicide attempts. Stratified analyses provided little insight into factors that may account for the higher prevalence of suicidal behaviors among Hispanic/Latina female students. These results suggest that the increased risk of suicidal behaviors among Hispanic/Latina female students cannot be accounted for by differential associations with these selected risk behaviors. Other factors, such as family characteristics, acculturation, and the socio-cultural environment, should be examined in future research.

  10. Suicide in ancient Greece.

    PubMed

    Laios, K; Tsoukalas, G; Kontaxaki, M-I; Karamanou, M; Androutsos, G

    2014-01-01

    The theme of suicide appears several times in ancient Greek literature. However, each such reference acquires special significance depending on the field from which it originates. Most of the information found in mythology, but the suicide in a mythological tale, although in terms of motivation and mental situation of heroes may be in imitation of similar incidents of real life, in fact is linked with the principles of the ancient Greek religion. In ancient drama and mainly in tragedies suicide conduces to the tragic hypostasis of the heroes and to the evolution of the plot and also is a tool in order to be presented the ideas of poets for the relations of the gods, the relation among gods and men and the relation among the men. In ancient Greek philosophy there were the deniers of suicide, who were more concerned about the impact of suicide on society and also these who accepted it, recognizing the right of the individual to put an end to his life, in order to avoid personal misfortunes. Real suicides will be found mostly from historical sources, but most of them concern leading figures of the ancient world. Closer to the problem of suicide in the everyday life of antiquity are ancient Greek medicines, who studied the phenomenon more general without references to specific incidents. Doctors did not approve in principal the suicide and dealt with it as insane behavior in the development of the mental diseases, of melancholia and mania. They considered that the discrepancy of humors in the organ of logic in the human body will cause malfunction, which will lead to the absurdity and consequently to suicide, either due to excessive concentration of black bile in melancholia or due to yellow bile in mania. They believed that greater risk to commit suicide had women, young people and the elderly. As therapy they used the drugs of their time with the intention to induce calm and repression in the ill person, therefore they mainly used mandragora. In general, we would say

  11. BCG vaccination enhances resistance to M. tuberculosis infection in guinea pigs fed a low casein diet.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Isamu; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Mizuno, Satoru

    2007-03-01

    In order to examine the relationship between malnutrition and tuberculosis development in vivo, a malnourished guinea pig model fed with a low casein (5%) diet was developed. After being fed with the low casein diet, the guinea pigs were infected with Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis Kurono strain by aerosol infection, and seven weeks later were subjected to histopathologic examination, colony-forming unit (CFU) assay, fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis and real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for interferon (IFN)-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-12 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA. Another group of guinea pigs were vaccinated subcutaneously with 10(6) CFU BCG Tokyo for three weeks and then similarly infected by aerosol. Eighty-eight% (7/8) of the malnourished guinea pigs succumbed to mycobacterial infection within 85 days after infection, while the malnourished guinea pigs vaccinated with BCG Tokyo survived. CFU assay showed that lung and splenic CFUs were higher in the low casein diet-fed groups than in the control diet (20% casein)-fed groups, although both groups had significantly lower CFUs after vaccination with BCG Tokyo (p<0.01). Examination of lung histopathology revealed that pulmonary granulomas were large and disorganized in the groups fed the low casein diet. The number of visible lesions on the surfaces of the fixed lungs in guinea pigs fed control diet+BCG and low casein diet+BCG was low significantly. Pan T-, CD4-, CD8- and Mac antigen-positive cells were also recognized in the infected lung tissues of low casein-fed guinea pigs and Pan T-, CD4- and Mac antigen-positive cells increased after vaccination with BCG Tokyo. Expression of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-12 and iNOS mRNA was also recognized in the infected lung tissues of low casein-fed guinea pigs and IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha mRNA expression was enhanced with BCG vaccination. These results indicate that

  12. Enhanced levels of scrapie responsive gene mRNA in BSE-infected mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Dandoy-Dron, F; Benboudjema, L; Guillo, F; Jaegly, A; Jasmin, C; Dormont, D; Tovey, M G; Dron, M

    2000-03-10

    The expression of the mRNA of nine scrapie responsive genes was analyzed in the brains of FVB/N mice infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). The RNA transcripts of eight genes were overexpressed to a comparable extent in both BSE-infected and scrapie-infected mice, indicating a common series of pathogenic events in the two transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). In contrast, the serine proteinase inhibitor spi 2, an analogue of the human alpha-1 antichymotrypsin gene, was overexpressed to a greater extent in the brains of scrapie-infected animals than in animals infected with BSE, reflecting either an agent specific or a mouse strain specific response. The levels of spi 2 mRNA were increased during the course of scrapie prior to the onset of clinical signs of the disease and the increase reached 11 to 45 fold relative to uninfected controls in terminally ill mice. Spi 2, in common with four of the other scrapie responsive genes studied, is known to be associated with pro-inflammatory processes. These observations underline the importance of cell reactivity in TSE. In addition, scrg2 mRNA the level of which is enhanced in TSE-infected mouse brain, was identified as a previously unrecognized long transcript of the murine aldolase C gene. However, the level of the principal aldolase C mRNA is unaffected in TSE. The increased representation of the longer transcript in the late stage of the disease may reflect changes in mRNA processing and/or stability in reactive astrocytes or in damaged Purkinje cells.

  13. G6PD Deficiency Does Not Enhance Susceptibility for Acquiring Helicobacter pylori Infection in Sardinian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dore, Maria Pina; Marras, Giuseppina; Rocchi, Chiara; Soro, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background Subjects with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency may be more susceptible to infections due to impaired leukocyte bactericidal activity. The disorder is common in the Mediterranean area. The aim of this study was to investigate whether G6PD deficiency may be a risk factor for acquiring H. pylori infection. Methods We performed a retrospective study. Data from clinical records of 6565 patients (2278 men and 4287 women, median age 51, range 7‒94) who underwent upper endoscopy between 2002 and 2014 were collected. H. pylori status, assessed by histology plus rapid urease test or 13C-urea breath test, and G6PD status were also reported. A multiple logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between G6PD deficiency and H. pylori infection. Results Enzyme deficiency was detected in 12% (789/6565) of the entire cohort, and more specifically in 8.3% of men and in 14.0% of women. Overall, the proportion of patients positive for H. pylori was 50.6% and 51.5% among G6PD deficient and non-deficient patients (χ² = 0.271; p = 0.315). Moreover, among G6PD-deficient and normal patients the frequency of previous H. pylori infection was similar. After adjustment for age and gender the risk for acquiring H. pylori infection was similar in G6PD-deficient and normal patients. Only age was a strong statistically significant risk predictor. Conclusions These results demonstrate for the first time that G6PD deficiency does not enhance patients’ susceptibility to acquire H. pylori infection in Sardinia. PMID:27467818

  14. Sialoadhesin Expressed on IFN-Induced Monocytes Binds HIV-1 and Enhances Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Rempel, Hans; Calosing, Cyrus; Sun, Bing; Pulliam, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Background HIV-1 infection dysregulates the immune system and alters gene expression in circulating monocytes. Differential gene expression analysis of CD14+ monocytes from subjects infected with HIV-1 revealed increased expression of sialoadhesin (Sn, CD169, Siglec 1), a cell adhesion molecule first described in a subset of macrophages activated in chronic inflammatory diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed sialoadhesin expression on CD14+ monocytes by flow cytometry and found significantly higher expression in subjects with elevated viral loads compared to subjects with undetectable viral loads. In cultured CD14+ monocytes isolated from healthy individuals, sialoadhesin expression was induced by interferon-α and interferon-γ but not tumor necrosis factor-α. Using a stringent binding assay, sialoadhesin-expressing monocytes adsorbed HIV-1 through interaction with the sialic acid residues on the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120. Furthermore, monocytes expressing sialoadhesin facilitated HIV-1 trans infection of permissive cells, which occurred in the absence of monocyte self-infection. Conclusions/Significance Increased sialoadhesin expression on CD14+ monocytes occurred in response to HIV-1 infection with maximum expression associated with high viral load. We show that interferons induce sialoadhesin in primary CD14+ monocytes, which is consistent with an antiviral response during viremia. Our findings suggest that circulating sialoadhesin-expressing monocytes are capable of binding HIV-1 and effectively delivering virus to target cells thereby enhancing the distribution of HIV-1. Sialoadhesin could disseminate HIV-1 to viral reservoirs during monocyte immunosurveillance or migration to sites of inflammation and then facilitate HIV-1 infection of permissive cells. PMID:18414664

  15. Homicide Followed by Suicide: A Comparison with Homicide and Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liem, Marieke; Nieuwbeerta, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Homicide-suicides are a rare yet very serious form of lethal violence which mainly occurs in partnerships and families. The extent to which homicide-suicide can be understood as being primarily a homicide or a suicide event, or rather a category of its own is examined. In total, 103 homicide-suicides were compared to 3,203 homicides and 17,751…

  16. Pipecolic acid enhances resistance to bacterial infection and primes salicylic acid and nicotine accumulation in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Vogel-Adghough, Drissia; Stahl, Elia; Návarová, Hana; Zeier, Juergen

    2013-11-01

    Distinct amino acid metabolic pathways constitute integral parts of the plant immune system. We have recently identified pipecolic acid (Pip), a lysine-derived non-protein amino acid, as a critical regulator of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and basal immunity to bacterial infection in Arabidopsis thaliana. In Arabidopsis, Pip acts as an endogenous mediator of defense amplification and priming. For instance, Pip conditions plants for effective biosynthesis of the phenolic defense signal salicylic acid (SA), accumulation of the phytoalexin camalexin, and expression of defense-related genes. Here, we show that tobacco plants respond to leaf infection by the compatible bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci (Pstb) with a significant accumulation of several amino acids, including Lys, branched-chain, aromatic, and amide group amino acids. Moreover, Pstb strongly triggers, alongside the biosynthesis of SA and increases in the defensive alkaloid nicotine, the production of the Lys catabolites Pip and α-aminoadipic acid. Exogenous application of Pip to tobacco plants provides significant protection to infection by adapted Pstb or by non-adapted, hypersensitive cell death-inducing P. syringae pv maculicola. Pip thereby primes tobacco for rapid and strong accumulation of SA and nicotine following bacterial infection. Thus, our study indicates that the role of Pip as an amplifier of immune responses is conserved between members of the rosid and asterid groups of eudicot plants and suggests a broad practical applicability for Pip as a natural enhancer of plant disease resistance.

  17. Strategies to enhance immune function in hematopoietic transplantation recipients who have fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Safdar, A

    2006-09-01

    The challenges in the treatment of systemic fungal infections after HSCT include: (1) changing epidemiology as less drug-susceptible saprophytic fungi are increasingly associated with human disease; (2) the difficulty of early and correct diagnosis, even with the new generation of enzymatic immunoassays; (3) the inability to reduce or eliminate predisposing factors, especially severe immune suppression in most transplant patients with these infections and (4) the uncertain role of antifungal drug combinations and risk of drug antagonism complicating effective empiric-pre-emptive therapy. Current, developing and future immune enhancement strategies including recombinant granulocyte- and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), adjuvant pro-inflammatory cytokine therapy during mobilized donor granulocyte transfusions, therapeutic potential of pentraxin, adaptive immune transfer and dendritic cell fungal vaccines. Improved understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of fungal infections and of the complexity of host antifungal immune responses has provided the critical information to readdress existing treatment paradigms and further evaluate the role of GM-CSF and IFN-gamma early in the course of therapy against life-threatening fungal infections in high-risk patients following stem cell transplantation.

  18. Flavone enhances dengue virus type-2 (NGC strain) infectivity and replication in vero cells.

    PubMed

    Zandi, Keivan; Lani, Rafidah; Wong, Pooi-Fong; Teoh, Boon-Teong; Sam, Sing-Sin; Johari, Jefree; Mustafa, Mohd Rais; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2012-02-28

    This study investigates the effects of 2-phenyl-1-benzopyran-4-one (flavone) on DENV-2 infectivity in Vero cells. Virus adsorption and attachment and intracellular virus replication were investigated using a foci forming unit assay (FFUA) and quantitative RT-PCR, respectively. Addition of flavone (100 μg/mL) significantly increased the number of DENV-2 foci by 35.66% ± 1.52 and 49.66% ± 2.51 when added during and after virus adsorption to the Vero cells, respectively. The average foci size after 4 days of infection increased by 33% ± 2.11 and 89% ± 2.13. The DENV-2 specific RNA copy number in the flavone-treated infected cells increased by 6.41- and 23.1-fold when compared to the mock-treated infected cells. Flavone (100 μg/mL) did not promote or inhibit Vero cell proliferation. The CC₅₀ value of flavone against Vero cells was 446 µg/mL. These results suggest that flavone might enhance dengue virus replication by acting antagonistically towards flavonoids known to inhibit dengue virus replication.

  19. Enhanced cytomegalovirus infection in human trabecular meshwork cells and its implication in glaucoma pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin A; Kim, Ju-Eun; Noh, Seung-Jun; Kyoung Kim, Eun; Park, Chan Kee; Paik, Soon-Young

    2017-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is one of the infectious causes of hypertensive anterior uveitis, which is characterized by recurrent episodes of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and mild anterior uveitis. Despite the potentially vision-threatening complications of this disease, the underlying mechanisms remain largely undefined. We aimed to investigate whether human trabecular meshwork (TM) cells, the key cell type that regulates IOP, could support CMV replication, as well as demonstrate the relevant pathological changes in TM. When human TM cells were infected with CMV AD169, immediate early antigens were detected 1 day post-infection (dpi); cytopathic changes including rounding, a ballooned appearance with disorganization, and a decreased number of stress fibers were noted in TM cells. The marked increase in viral DNA accumulation was observed most notably at 5 and 7 dpi, suggesting that the active viral infection in human TM cells could be the key mechanism underlying the elevation of IOP in anterior viral uveitis. Notably, CMV infection enhanced the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, an upstream molecule that increases the resistance of the outflow pathway in human TM cells. The increase of TGF-β1 was countervailed by additional treatment with corticosteroids. Our results provide a pathogenic mechanism for IOP elevation in viral anterior uveitis. PMID:28240260

  20. Contribution of Imitative Suicide to the Suicide Rate in Prisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Nigel; Keane, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Suicide rates in prisons are high. Our aim was to investigate the contribution of imitative suicide to the prison suicide rate. We used Knox tests for space-time clustering in a case register of natural and self-inflicted deaths in prisons in England and Wales and model simulations to estimate the effect size. We found significant space-time…

  1. Suicide in Peacekeepers: Risk Factors for Suicide versus Accidental Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoresen, Siri; Mehlum, Lars

    2006-01-01

    To investigate risk factors for suicide in veterans of peacekeeping, 43 suicides and 41 fatal accidents in Norwegian peacekeepers (1978 to 1995) were compared in a psychological autopsy study. Mental health problems were the most important risk factor for suicide. Both living alone and the break-up of a love relationship contributed uniquely to…

  2. DST non-suppression predicts suicide after attempted suicide.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, Jussi; Carlborg, Andreas; Mårtensson, Björn; Forslund, Kaj; Nordström, Anna-Lena; Nordström, Peter

    2007-04-15

    Most prospective studies of HPA axis have found that non-suppressors in the dexamethasone suppression test (DST) are more likely to commit suicide during the follow-up. Attempted suicide is a strong clinical predictor of suicide. The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of DST for suicide in a group of depressed inpatients with and without an index suicide attempt. Historical cohort of 382 psychiatric inpatients with mood disorder admitted to the department of Psychiatry at the Karolinska University Hospital between 1980 and 2000 were submitted to the DST and followed up for causes of death. During the follow-up (mean 18 years), 36 suicides (9.4%) occurred, 20 of these were non-suppressors and 16 were suppressors. There was no statistically significant difference in suicide risk between the suppressors and non-suppressors for the sample as a whole. An index suicide attempt predicted suicide. In suicide attempters with mood disorder, the non-suppressor status was significantly associated with suicide indicating that HPA axis hyperactivity is a risk factor for suicide in this group. The dexamethasone suppression test may be a useful predictor within this population.

  3. A Brief Intervention to Reduce Suicide Risk in Military Service Members and Veterans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    to the general population. There are limited evidence-based suicide prevention interventions that have been developed for military personnel and...veteran populations in three ways by: (1) evaluating suicide risk using a structured assessment measure; (2) enhancing suicide-related coping strategies ...Institutional Review Board Processes The PIs and SAFEMIL project team members participated in face-to-face, phone, and/or email communication to determine the

  4. Dyadic Death: Murder-Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Alan L.

    1979-01-01

    Results indicated a lower incidence for homocide-suicides than reported previously and several distinguishing characteristics of murderers who subsequently commit suicide. Presented at the 10th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Suicidology, May 1977, Boston. (Author)

  5. NIMH Answers Questions about Suicide

    MedlinePlus

    ... thoughts and behaviors are: Depression, anxiety, and other mental disorders Substance abuse disorder Chronic pain Prior suicide attempt Family history of suicide Family violence, including physical or sexual abuse Firearms in the ...

  6. Suicide bereavement and complicated grief.

    PubMed

    Tal Young, Ilanit; Iglewicz, Alana; Glorioso, Danielle; Lanouette, Nicole; Seay, Kathryn; Ilapakurti, Manjusha; Zisook, Sidney

    2012-06-01

    Losing a loved to suicide is one is one of life's most painful experiences. The feelings of loss, sadness, and loneliness experienced after any death of a loved one are often magnified in suicide survivors by feelings of quilt, confusion, rejection, shame, anger, and the effects of stigma and trauma. Furthermore, survivors of suicide loss are at higher risk of developing major depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and suicidal behaviors, as well as a prolonged form of grief called complicated grief. Added to the burden is the substantial stigma, which can keep survivors away from much needed support and healing resources. Thus, survivors may require unique supportive measures and targeted treatment to cope with their loss. After a brief description of the epidemiology and circumstances of suicide, we review the current state of research on suicide bereavement, complicated grief in suicide survivors, and grief treatment for survivors of suicide.

  7. Suicide bereavement and complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Tal Young, Ilanit; Iglewicz, Alana; Glorioso, Danielle; Lanouette, Nicole; Seay, Kathryn; Ilapakurti, Manjusha; Zisook, Sidney

    2012-01-01

    Losing a loved to suicide is one is one of life's most painful experiences. The feelings of loss, sadness, and loneliness experienced after any death of a loved one are often magnified in suicide survivors by feelings of quilt, confusion, rejection, shame, anger, and the effects of stigma and trauma. Furthermore, survivors of suicide loss are at higher risk of developing major depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and suicidal behaviors, as well as a prolonged form of grief called complicated grief. Added to the burden is the substantial stigma, which can keep survivors away from much needed support and healing resources. Thus, survivors may require unique supportive measures and targeted treatment to cope with their loss. After a brief description of the epidemiology and circumstances of suicide, we review the current state of research on suicide bereavement, complicated grief in suicide survivors, and grief treatment for survivors of suicide. PMID:22754290

  8. Dietary Curcuma longa enhances resistance against Eimeria maxima and Eimeria tenella infections in chickens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk Kyung; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Lee, Sung Hyen; Jang, Seung I; Lillehoj, Erik P; Bravo, David

    2013-10-01

    The effects of dietary supplementation with an organic extract of Curcuma longa on systemic and local immune responses to experimental Eimeria maxima and Eimeria tenella infections were evaluated in commercial broiler chickens. Dietary supplementation with C. longa enhanced coccidiosis resistance as demonstrated by increased BW gains, reduced fecal oocyst shedding, and decreased gut lesions compared with infected birds fed a nonsupplemented control diet. The chickens fed C. longa-supplemented diet showed enhanced systemic humoral immunity, as assessed by greater levels of serum antibodies to an Eimeria microneme protein, MIC2, and enhanced cellular immunity, as measured by concanavalin A-induced spleen cell proliferation, compared with controls. At the intestinal level, genome-wide gene expression profiling by microarray hybridization identified 601 differentially expressed transcripts (287 upregulated, 314 downregulated) in gut lymphocytes of C. longa-fed chickens compared with nonsupplemented controls. Based on the known functions of the corresponding mammalian genes, the C. longa-induced intestinal transcriptome was mostly associated with genes mediating anti-inflammatory effects. Taken together, these results suggest that dietary C. longa could be used to attenuate Eimeria-induced, inflammation-mediated gut damage in commercial poultry production.

  9. Enhanced binding of antibodies generated during chronic HIV infection to mucus component MUC16

    PubMed Central

    Bastian, Arangassery Rosemary; Fahrbach, Kelly; Smith, Archer; Mahan, Alison; Karim, Marcus; Licht, Anna; Zvonar, Ivan; Tedesco, Jacquelynn; Anderson, Meegan; Chapel, Anais; Suscovich, Todd; Malaspina, David; Streeck, Hendrik; Walker, Bruce D.; Kim, Arthur; Lauer, Georg; Altfeld, Marcus; Pillai, Shiv; Szleifer, Igal; Kelleher, Neil L.; Kiser, Patrick F.; Hope, Thomas J.; Alter, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Transmission of HIV across mucosal barriers accounts for the majority of HIV infections worldwide. Thus, efforts aimed at enhancing protective immunity at these sites are a top priority, including increasing virus-specific antibodies (Abs) and antiviral activity at mucosal sites. Mucin proteins, including the largest cell-associated mucin, MUC16, help form mucus to provide a physical barrier to incoming pathogens. Here we describe a natural interaction between Abs and MUC16 that is enhanced in specific disease settings such as chronic HIV infection. Binding to MUC16 was independent of IgG subclass, but strongly associated with shorter Ab glycan profiles, with agalactosylated (G0) Abs demonstrating the highest binding to MUC16. Binding of Abs to epithelial cells was diminished following MUC16-knockdown, and the MUC16 N-linked glycans were critical for binding. Further, agalactosylated VRC01 captured HIV more efficiently in MUC16. These data point to a novel opportunity to enrich Abs at mucosal sites by targeting Abs to MUC16 through changes in Fc-glycosylation, potentially blocking viral movement and sequestering the virus far from the epithelial border. Thus, next-generation vaccines or monoclonal therapeutics may enhance protective immunity by tuning Ab glycosylation to promote the enrichment of Abs at mucosal barriers. PMID:26960182

  10. Dietary Bifidobacterium lactis (HN019) enhances resistance to oral Salmonella typhimurium infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Shu, Q; Lin, H; Rutherfurd, K J; Fenwick, S G; Prasad, J; Gopal, P K; Gill, H S

    2000-01-01

    The ability of a newly identified probiotic lactic acid bacterial strain, Bifidobacterium lactis (HN019), to confer protection against Salmonella typhimurium was investigated in BALB/c mice. Feeding mice with B. lactis conferred a significant degree of protection against single or multiple oral challenge with virulent S. typhimurium, in comparison to control mice that did not receive B. lactis. Protection included a ten-fold increase in survival rate, significantly higher post-challenge food intake and weight gain, and reduced pathogen translocation to visceral tissues (spleen and liver). Furthermore, the degree of pathogen translocation showed a significant inverse correlation with splenic lymphocyte proliferative responses to mitogens, blood and peritoneal cell phagocytic activity and intestinal mucosal anti-S. typhimurium antibody titers in infected mice; all of these immune parameters were enhanced in mice fed B. lactis. Together, these results suggest that dietary B. lactis can provide a significant degree of protection against Salmonella infection by enhancing various parameters of immune function that are relevant to the immunological control of salmonellosis. Thus dietary supplementation with B. lactis provides a unique opportunity for developing immune-enhancing probiotic dairy food products with proven health benefits.

  11. Increased CRP levels may be a trait marker of suicidal attempt.

    PubMed

    Courtet, Ph; Jaussent, I; Genty, C; Dupuy, A M; Guillaume, S; Ducasse, D; Olié, E

    2015-10-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of death worldwide. Identifying biomarkers will help enhance our understanding of suicidal pathophysiology and improve its prevention. Therefore, we investigated CRP levels in 600 depressed inpatients: 520 patients had a lifetime history of suicide attempts and 80 patients did not have any history of suicide attempts. For all patients, we assessed socio-demographic features, lifetime Axis I DSM-IV diagnoses, depression intensity, suicidal ideation, characteristics of suicidal history, and history of childhood trauma. The day following admission, fasting blood tests yielded samples collected for the measurement of high sensitivity hs-CRP. CRP levels were associated with a history of suicide attempts. The risk of suicide attempts increased with higher levels of CRP in a dose-response way before and after adjustments for age, gender, chronic diseases, addiction and anxiety comorbidities, antidepressants use, smoking status and sexual abuse. Noteworthy, the association between CRP levels and history of suicide attempts remained significant after having excluded patients with chronic diseases. There was no significant difference in CRP levels between patients who attempted suicide more or less than a week before plasma sampling, and no significant difference in CRP levels was evidenced between high vs low suicidal ideation. In conclusion, this is the first study suggesting that CRP may be a trait marker for suicidal vulnerability by associating CRP levels and a lifetime history of suicide attempts in depressed inpatients. Therefore, determining the inflammatory marker profile of individuals exhibiting suicidal behaviors could be relevant for anticipating behaviors and refining new therapeutic opportunities.

  12. Dengue virus sero-cross-reactivity drives antibody-dependent enhancement of infection with zika virus

    PubMed Central

    Dejnirattisai, Wanwisa; Supasa, Piyada; Wongwiwat, Wiyada; Rouvinski, Alexander; Barba-Spaeth, Giovanna; Duangchinda, Thaneeya; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Cao-Lormeau, Van-Mai; Malasit, Prida; Rey, Felix A; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Screaton, Gavin R

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) was discovered in 1947 and was thought to lead to relatively mild disease. The recent explosive outbreak of ZIKV in South America has led to widespread concern with reports of neurological sequelae ranging from Guillain Barré syndrome to microcephaly. ZIKV infection has occurred in areas previously exposed to dengue, a flavivirus closely related to ZIKV. Here we investigate the serological crossreaction between the two viruses. Dengue immune plasma substantially crossreacted with ZIKV and could drive antibody-dependent enhancement of ZIKV infection. Using a panel of human anti-dengue monoclonal antibodies we showed that most antibodies reacting to dengue envelope protein also reacted to ZIKV. Antibodies to linear epitopes including the immunodominant fusion loop epitope while able to bind ZIKV could not neutralize the virus but instead promoted ADE. These data indicate that dengue immunity may drive higher ZIKV replication and have clear implications for disease pathogenesis and future ZIKV and dengue vaccine programs. PMID:27339099

  13. Enhanced virulence of Histoplasma capsulatum through transfer and surface incorporation of glycans from Cryptococcus neoformans during co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Radames J. B.; Liedke, Susie Coutinho; de S. Araújo, Glauber R.; Martinez, Luis R.; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Frases, Susana; Peralta, Jose Mauro; Casadevall, Arturo; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Guimaraes, Allan J.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) and Histoplasma capsulatum (Hc) co-exist in the environment and occasionally co-infect individuals, which can lead to severe disease/lethal outcomes. We investigated specific interactions between Cn-Hc to determine the impact of synchronous infection in virulence and disease. Co-infected mice had significantly higher mortality than infection with either species or acapsular Cn-Hc. Coating of Hc with cryptococcal glycans (Cn-gly) resulted in higher pulmonary fungal burden in co-infected animals relative to control. Co-cultivation or addition of Cn-gly resulted in enhanced pellicle formation with a hybrid polysaccharide matrix with higher reactivity to GXM mAbs. Transfer and incorporation of Cn polysaccharide onto Hc surface was time and temperature dependent. Cn-gly transfer altered the zeta potential of Hc and was associated with increased resistance to phagocytosis and killing by macrophages. Mice infected with Hc and subsequently injected with purified Cn-gly died significantly more rapidly than Hc alone infected, establishing the precedent that virulence factors from one fungus can enhance the virulence of unrelated species. These findings suggest a new mechanism of microbial interaction involving the transfer of virulence traits that translates into enhanced lethality during mixed fungal infections and highlights the importance of studying heterogeneous microbial populations in the setting of infection. PMID:26908077

  14. Enhanced virulence of Histoplasma capsulatum through transfer and surface incorporation of glycans from Cryptococcus neoformans during co-infection.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Radames J B; Liedke, Susie Coutinho; de S Araújo, Glauber R; Martinez, Luis R; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Frases, Susana; Peralta, Jose Mauro; Casadevall, Arturo; Rodrigues, Marcio L; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Guimaraes, Allan J

    2016-02-24

    Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) and Histoplasma capsulatum (Hc) co-exist in the environment and occasionally co-infect individuals, which can lead to severe disease/lethal outcomes. We investigated specific interactions between Cn-Hc to determine the impact of synchronous infection in virulence and disease. Co-infected mice had significantly higher mortality than infection with either species or acapsular Cn-Hc. Coating of Hc with cryptococcal glycans (Cn-gly) resulted in higher pulmonary fungal burden in co-infected animals relative to control. Co-cultivation or addition of Cn-gly resulted in enhanced pellicle formation with a hybrid polysaccharide matrix with higher reactivity to GXM mAbs. Transfer and incorporation of Cn polysaccharide onto Hc surface was time and temperature dependent. Cn-gly transfer altered the zeta potential of Hc and was associated with increased resistance to phagocytosis and killing by macrophages. Mice infected with Hc and subsequently injected with purified Cn-gly died significantly more rapidly than Hc alone infected, establishing the precedent that virulence factors from one fungus can enhance the virulence of unrelated species. These findings suggest a new mechanism of microbial interaction involving the transfer of virulence traits that translates into enhanced lethality during mixed fungal infections and highlights the importance of studying heterogeneous microbial populations in the setting of infection.

  15. Perspective: Physician education: a promising strategy to prevent adolescent suicide.

    PubMed

    Taliaferro, Lindsay A; Borowsky, Iris Wagman

    2011-03-01

    Many young people who present to primary care providers (PCPs) have high levels of emotional distress and/or suicidal ideation. Therefore, PCPs are in an ideal position to recognize and respond to early symptoms and distress signals that accompany suicide warning signs, yet they underrecognize mood disorders and suicidality among youth. Medical school and residency programs typically provide inadequate training on pediatric mental health and adolescent suicide prevention. Thus, PCPs lack complete knowledge of risk factors and feel unprepared to handle mental health problems among youth. In this article, the authors provide an overview of the epidemiology of adolescent suicide and describe risk factors, protective factors, and warning signs. They propose that physician education represents a promising strategy to prevent adolescent suicide, and they establish the need for improved educational opportunities that would provide PCPs with the necessary skills and supports to identify and respond to psychosocial concerns that may increase suicide risk among youth. They recommend strategies, methods, and content areas for addressing educational gaps, as well as organizational approaches to support enhanced physician education. They also suggest areas for future research.

  16. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level.

    PubMed

    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Finkenstaedt, Felix W; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-03-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient's environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P < 0.001) independently from mechanical ventilation and preserved sensory function by multiple regression analysis. We present evidence that spinal cord injury directly causes increased risk for bacterial infection in mice as well as in patients. Besides obvious motor and sensory paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS ('immune paralysis'), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner.

  17. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level

    PubMed Central

    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A.; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J.; Finkenstaedt, Felix W.; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient’s environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P < 0.001) independently from mechanical ventilation and preserved sensory function by multiple regression analysis. We present evidence that spinal cord injury directly causes increased risk for bacterial infection in mice as well as in patients. Besides obvious motor and sensory paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS (‘immune paralysis’), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner. PMID:26754788

  18. [Suicide in Spain today].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Pérez, Isabel; Olry de Labry-Lima, Antonio

    2006-03-01

    Spain presents one of the lowest suicide rates (8.7 per 100,000) but, as well as Ireland, it has also experienced one of the highest rate increases both within Europe and within the world. In our country, it can be observed an increase in the suicide rates from 1975 to 1994, being this increase greater in men than in women. It can also be noted that there was a stabilisation in the following years. Social factors, specially those which have to deal with gender roles and changes in these roles, are the most common explanations. Another possible explanation for the observed increase in mortality due to suicide among young men could be the AIDS epidemic and intravenous drug addiction, that was observed in Spain during the eighties and nineties. Furthermore, we are witnessing an epidemic related to violence against children and women. Literature strongly suggests that child abuse (psychological and sexual) is associated with increased suicide risk in adolescent or adult life. Women experience violence from their intimate partners and have a greater risk of suffering from chronic pain, diverse somatisations, greater substance use like drugs and alcohol, depression and suicide attempt. The association between work precariousness and suicide seems to be due to economic and social and family support factors, which can lead to greater vulnerability to mental health problems. These factors are of great relevance, since Spain presents one of the highest unemployment and temporary employment rates in the European Union. It seems reasonable that, due to the individualism that characterises the contemporary society, its demands and the new role of women in the work market that cause, among others, a greater difficulty in combining work and family life, are factors that could explain the lack of decrease in suicide rates.

  19. Rational Suicide among the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphry, Derek

    1992-01-01

    Contends that old age, in and of itself, should never need to be a cause for self-destruction. Further argues that suicide and assisted suicide carried out in the face of terminal illness causing unbearable suffering should be ethically and legally acceptable. Outlines a perspective on rational suicide among the elderly. (Author/NB)

  20. The Ethics of Assisted Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Jay

    1994-01-01

    From social work perspective, considers ethics of assisted suicide. Discusses traditional social work value of client self-determination and identifies tensions in this ideal and conflicts with value of client well-being. Finds assisted suicide unethical, arguing that studies have shown judgment of most suicidal people to be impaired as result of…

  1. Suicidal Behavior in Hospitalized Schizophrenics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, Ashoka Jahnavi; Kumar, Nirmal

    1988-01-01

    Compared 131 hospitalized schizophrenics who had attempted suicide within past year to 70 hospitalized schizophrenics who had not attempted suicide, using the Present State Examination depressive symptoms. Found that schizophrenics who had attempted suicide had significantly higher number of symptoms indicative of a depressive disorder. (Author/NB)

  2. Nursing Postvention for Suicide Survivors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantino, Rose Eva Bana

    Survivors of suicide are invaded by an unhealthy complex of disturbing emotions resulting in depression, psychological distress, grief, social isolation, and even suicide. This study examined the bereavement patterns of widows whose husbands had died from various causes including cancer, heart disease, and suicide. Subjects (N=117) were randomly…

  3. Suicide in the Israeli Army.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Gideon; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examined suicide in combat and noncombat Israeli units by duration of service and by preservice psychiatric, medical, and motivational data from 1974-85. Suicide population among combat and noncombat soldiers did not differ from nonsuicide population along induction criteria variables. Results suggest suicide may have been response to conditions…

  4. Suicide and Occupation: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedeian, Arthur G.

    1982-01-01

    Examined the literature dealing with the relation of occupation to suicide for three occupational categories: health care providers, managerial and professional persons, and military and paramilitary personnel. Presents evidence relating to group differences in suicidal behavior. Considers theories explaining variations in incidence of suicide.…

  5. Suicidal Behavior among Early Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gover, F. Jill

    There is a great deal of concern about teenage suicide. This study obtained a prevalence rate of suicidal behaviors among non-psychiatric early adolescents (ages 11-16) and investigated personal and family variables that may characterize the young teenagers who report varying degrees of suicidal behavior. A self-report questionnaire was…

  6. Teenage Suicide: A Critical Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NJEA Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Suicide and attempted suicide among teenagers has risen dramatically since 1960, especially among girls. Three theories of the causes of suicide (emotional crises, brain chemistry and nonexpression of grief) are discussed. Depression and other first stage warning signals, and the nature of second stage "cries for help," are considered. (CM)

  7. Youth Suicide: An Intervention Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, James L.

    1987-01-01

    Suggests school and university intervention strategies for preventing suicides among youths, proposed following a series of teenage suicides in Minnesota: closer liaison and backup for the school counselor, peer counseling services, in-school support groups, faculty in-service on suicide, curricular introduction to coping skills and identification…

  8. Recent Biologic Studies on Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Alex

    1994-01-01

    Reviews studies on suicidal behavior in depressed patients, including study showing that depressed patients who had attempted suicide had significantly reduced CSF concentrations of dopamine metabolite homovanillic acid (HVA) and significantly lower urinary outputs of HVA than patients who had not attempted suicide. Considers role of diminished…

  9. Cognitive Aspects of Suicidal Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedrosian, Richard C.; Beck, Aaron T.

    1979-01-01

    Hopelessness seems to account for the bulk of the relationship between depression and suicidal intent. The Scale for Suicide Ideation seems to show promise as a predictive instrument, as a dependent variable in research on treatment efficacy, and as a tool for clinical assessment of suicide potential. (Author)

  10. The Interpersonal Theory of Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Orden, Kimberly A.; Witte, Tracy K.; Cukrowicz, Kelly C.; Braithwaite, Scott R.; Selby, Edward A.; Joiner, Thomas E., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Suicidal behavior is a major problem worldwide and, at the same time, has received relatively little empirical attention. This relative lack of empirical attention may be due in part to a relative absence of theory development regarding suicidal behavior. The current article presents the interpersonal theory of suicidal behavior. We propose that…

  11. Suicidal Adolescents: Factors in Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gispert, Maria; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Examined factors (family structure, functioning in school, suicidal risk, depression, and stressful life events) related to suicide attempts in 82 adolescents. Suicide risk correlated with current stress, while depression correlated with life-long and current stress. Results indicated most were depressed, angry, and experienced family disruption,…

  12. Suicide Postvention: Crisis or Opportunity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Bonnie Frank; Brooks, Allan

    1990-01-01

    Describes program of suicide postvention which provides assistance to the survivors of a suicide. The clinical process of school-based postvention (as developed by Youth Suicide Prevention Services in the Department of Psychiatry at Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is presented. Includes case presentation of postvention…

  13. Body Modification and Suicidal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicinbothem, Julie; Gonsalves, Sonia; Lester, David

    2006-01-01

    In a large sample of individuals who belong to a website for body modification, having body modifications (e.g., piercings, tattoos, scarification and surgical procedures) was associated with a higher incidence of prior suicidality (i.e., suicidal ideation and attempted suicide). However, controls for self-reported depression weakened the strength…

  14. Suicide Prevention for LGBT Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, R. Bradley; Oxendine, Symphony; Taub, Deborah J.; Robertson, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Extensive media coverage of the suicide deaths of several gay and lesbian youth has highlighted lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth as a population at-risk for suicide. In addition, it has caused colleges and universities to address mental health and suicide behavior among this very diverse college population. One issue that…

  15. Suicide Attempts among Drug Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrsi, Rachel; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The relationship between substance abuse and suicide is indicated by high rate of attempted suicide among alcoholics and drug abusers, as well as increased likelihood of repeated attempts in these populations. This study reports on psychological characteristics of male drug suicide attempters who are in treatment for their addiction problem.…

  16. Attempted Suicide among Iranian Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheikholeslami, Homayoun; Kani, Camellia; Ziaee, Amir

    2008-01-01

    Predictors of suicide attempts in Iran, to distinguish any similarities and differences of these predictors between suicide attempts in Iran and other developed and developing countries and to investigate the relation between general psychiatric symptoms and repetition of suicidal attempts were assessed. The validated Farsi version of the General…

  17. About Teen Suicide (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... informed and take action to help a troubled teenager. About Teen Suicide The reasons behind a teen's suicide or attempted ... Some bereaved family members become part of the suicide prevention network that helps parents, teenagers, and schools learn how to help prevent future ...

  18. Suicidal Behavior and Marital Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Alan L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents two cases chosen to draw attention to marital and developmental dynamics of suicidal behavior. Both case vignettes are based on individual interviews with suicidal persons and their spouses during the suicidal person's psychiatric hospitalization, and both include observations of the marital interaction. Case vignettes are followed by…

  19. Suicide in the Medically Ill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Douglas; Kleespies, Phillip

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between medical illness and suicide seems to be multi-faceted. While medical illness is not the sole determinant of suicide, certain illnesses, such as HIV/AIDS and brain cancers, do appear to elevate the risk of suicide. Possible effective prevention efforts include education of primary care providers, and improved medication…

  20. Exploring the Phenomenology of Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pompili, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    Phenomenology studies conscious experience as experienced from the subjective or first-person point of view. This paper was developed with the aim of shedding light on the phenomenology of suicide; that is, to focus on suicide as a phenomenon affecting a unique individual with unique motives for the suicidal act. To explore this topic, the author…

  1. The Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality (CAMS): an evolving evidence-based clinical approach to suicidal risk.

    PubMed

    Jobes, David A

    2012-12-01

    The Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality (CAMS) is an evidence-based clinical intervention that has significantly evolved over 25 years of clinical research. CAMS is best understood as a therapeutic framework that emphasizes a unique collaborative assessment and treatment planning process between the suicidal patient and clinician. This process is designed to enhance the therapeutic alliance and increase treatment motivation in the suicidal patient. Central to the CAMS approach is the use of the Suicide Status Form (SSF), which is a multipurpose clinical assessment, treatment planning, tracking, and outcome tool. The original development of CAMS was largely rooted in SSF-based quantitative and qualitative assessment of suicidal risk. As this line of research progressed, CAMS emerged as a problem-focused clinical intervention that is designed to target and treat suicidal "drivers" and ultimately eliminate suicidal coping. To date, CAMS (and the clinical use of the SSF) has been supported by six published correlational studies and one randomized clinical trial (RCT). Currently, two well-powered RCTs are under way, and various new CAMS-related projects are also being pursued. The clinical and empirical evolution of CAMS-how it was developed and what are the next steps for this clinical approach-are described here.

  2. Overexpression of potato miR482e enhanced plant sensitivity to Verticillium dahliae infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Mu, Xiaoying; Liu, Chao; Cai, Jinghui; Shi, Ke; Zhu, Wenjiao; Yang, Qing

    2015-12-01

    Verticillium wilt of potato is caused by the fungus pathogen Verticillium dahliae. Present sRNA sequencing data revealed that miR482 was in response to V. dahliae infection, but the function in potato is elusive. Here, we characterized potato miR482 family and its putative role resistance to Verticillium wilt. Members of the potato miR482 superfamily are variable in sequence, but all variants target a class of disease-resistance proteins with nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) motifs. When potato plantlets were infected with V. dahliae, the expression level of miR482e was downregulated, and that of several NBS-LRR targets of miR482e were upregulated. Transgenic potato plantlets overexpressing miR482e showed hypersensitivity to V. dahliae infection. Using sRNA and degradome datasets, we validated that miR482e targets mRNAs of NBS-LRR disease-resistance proteins and triggers the production of trans-acting (ta)-siRNAs, most of which target mRNAs of defense-related proteins. Thus, the hypersensitivity of transgenic potato could be explained by enhanced miR482e and miR482e-derived ta-siRNA-mediated silencing on NBS-LRR-disease-resistance proteins. It is speculated that a miR482-mediated silencing cascade mechanism is involved in regulating potato resistance against V. dahliae infection and could be a counter defense action of plant in response to pathogen infection.

  3. Secondary infection as a risk factor for dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome: an historical perspective and role of antibody-dependent enhancement of infection.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Maria G; Alvarez, Mayling; Halstead, Scott B

    2013-07-01

    Today, dengue viruses are the most prevalent arthropod-borne viruses in the world. Since the 1960s, numerous reports have identified a second heterologous dengue virus (DENV) infection as a principal risk factor for severe dengue disease (dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome, DHF/DSS). Modifiers of dengue disease response include the specific sequence of two DENV infections, the interval between infections, and contributions from the human host, such as age, ethnicity, chronic illnesses and genetic background. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of dengue virus infection has been proposed as the early mechanism underlying DHF/DSS. Dengue cross-reactive antibodies raised following a first dengue infection combine with a second infecting virus to form infectious immune complexes that enter Fc-receptor-bearing cells. This results in an increased number of infected cells and increased viral output per cell. At the late illness stage, high levels of cytokines, possibly the result of T cell elimination of infected cells, result in vascular permeability, leading to shock and death. This review is focused on the etiological role of secondary infections (SI) and mechanisms of ADE.

  4. Hume on suicide.

    PubMed

    Frey, R G

    1999-08-01

    Anyone interested in the morality of suicide reads David Hume's essay on the subject even today. There are numerous reasons for this, but the central one is that it sets up the starting point for contemporary debate about the morality of suicide, namely, the debate about whether some condition of life could present one with a morally acceptable reason for autonomously deciding to end one's life. We shall only be able to have this debate if we think that at least some acts of suicide can be moral, and we shall only be able to think this if we give up the blanket condemnation of suicide that theology has put in place. I look at this strategy of argument in the context of the wider eighteenth-century attempt to develop a non-theologically based ethic. The result in Hume's case is a very modern tract on suicide, with voluntariness and autonomy to the fore and with reflection on the condition of one's life and one's desire to carry on living a life in that condition the motivating circumstance.

  5. Gaps in Crisis Mental Health: Suicide and Homicide-Suicide.

    PubMed

    Carretta, Carrie M; Burgess, Ann W; Welner, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Gaps in crises of mental health emerge from poor distinction between the qualities of people who suicide and those who murder and then kill themselves. The role, if any, that substance use has in such lethal violence is an example of such a lack of distinction. In this study, a sample of medical examiner investigative and toxicology reports from Los Angeles and Orange counties in California were available for analysis for 432 suicide cases and 193 homicide-suicide cases. This informed clearer toxicological and pharmacological distinction of suicide from homicide-suicide. Blood alcohol levels were higher in persons committing suicide than in homicide-suicide perpetrators (p=.004). Homicide-suicide perpetrators had almost twice the level of stimulants in their system than people who suicide (p=.022) but did not have comparatively elevated levels of drugs or alcohol. Predictors of suicide included the following: substance abuse history, high number of drugs in system, death inside a house, and legal impairment by alcohol. Predictors of homicide-suicide included gunshot as the cause of death, female gender, domestic conflict, children living in the home, and prior arrest for substance abuse.

  6. An Integrative Suicide Prevention Program for Visitor Charcoal Burning Suicide and Suicide Pact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Paul W. C.; Liu, Patricia M. Y.; Chan, Wincy S. C.; Law, Y. W.; Law, Steven C. K.; Fu, King-Wa; Li, Hana S. H.; Tso, M. K.; Beautrais, Annette L.; Yip, Paul S. F.

    2009-01-01

    An integrative suicide prevention program was implemented to tackle an outbreak of visitor charcoal burning suicides in Cheung Chau, an island in Hong Kong, in 2002. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the program. The numbers of visitor suicides reduced from 37 deaths in the 51 months prior to program implementation to 6 deaths in the 42…

  7. Approach to adolescent suicide prevention

    PubMed Central

    Kostenuik, Marcia; Ratnapalan, Mohana

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To provide family physicians with an approach to suicide prevention in youth. SOURCES OF INFORMATION A literature review was performed using Ovid MEDLINE with the key words suicide, attempted suicide, and evaluation studies or program evaluation, adolescent. MAIN MESSAGE Youth suicide might be prevented by earlier recognition and treatment of mental illness. Family physicians can and should screen for mental illness in youth; there are many diagnostic and treatment resources available to assist with this. CONCLUSION Earlier detection and treatment of mental illness are the most important ways family physicians can reduce morbidity and mortality for youth who are contemplating suicide. PMID:20705879

  8. Flavivirus NS1 protein in infected host sera enhances viral acquisition by mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianying; Liu, Yang; Nie, Kaixiao; Du, Senyan; Qiu, Jingjun; Pang, Xiaojing; Wang, Penghua; Cheng, Gong

    2016-01-01

    Summary The arbovirus life cycle involves viral transfer between a vertebrate host and an arthropod vector, and acquisition of virus from an infected mammalian host by a vector is an essential step in this process. Here, we report that flavivirus nonstructural protein-1 (NS1), which is abundantly secreted into the serum of an infected host, plays a critical role in flavivirus acquisition by mosquitoes. The presence of dengue virus (DENV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) NS1s in the blood of infected interferon alpha and gamma receptor-deficient mice (AG6) facilitated virus acquisition by their native mosquito vectors because the protein enabled the virus to overcome the immune barrier of the mosquito midgut. Active immunization of AG6 mice with a modified DENV NS1 reduced DENV acquisition by mosquitoes and protected mice against a lethal DENV challenge, suggesting that immunization with NS1 could reduce the number of virus-carrying mosquitoes as well as the incidence of flaviviral diseases. Our study demonstrates that flaviviruses utilize NS1 proteins produced during their vertebrate phases to enhance their acquisition by vectors, which might be a result of flavivirus evolution to adapt to multiple host environments. PMID:27562253

  9. Treponemal infection specifically enhances node T-cell regulation of macrophage activity.

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, D R; Bagasra, O; Jacobs, R F

    1986-01-01

    Hamsters experimentally inoculated in the inguinal region with Treponema pallidum subsp. endemicum develop considerable pathology at that site. We examined the cell populations from these inguinal lymph nodes to determine their intercellular responses to infection. In vitro, syphilitic-node T cells markedly suppressed C3b receptor-mediated ingestion (C3bMI) in syphilitic macrophages derived from sites both proximal and distal to the inoculation. This activity was more pronounced when node T cells rather than peritoneal T cells were used. When treponemal preparations or live treponemes were added to the coculture system, the suppression was specifically enhanced, whereas the addition of heterologous agents did not promote this effect. Syphilitic macrophages from either compartment cultured alone showed no significant inhibition of C3bMI. In parallel studies on syphilitic macrophages, we observed that the expression of Ia quickly became elevated and was sustained throughout the infection. Moreover, in vitro culturing of the syphilitic-node T cells with these macrophages did not alter this function. These observations suggest that the syphilitic node contains a subpopulation of T cells that can selectively suppress macrophage C3bMI activity and concurrently regulate their cellular response to treponemal infection. PMID:3531014

  10. Self-generation enhances verbal recall in individuals infected with HIV.

    PubMed

    Weber, Erica; Woods, Steven Paul; Kellogg, Emily; Grant, Igor; Basso, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of HIV-associated episodic memory impairment and its adverse functional impact, there are no empirically validated cognitive rehabilitation strategies for HIV-infected persons. The present study examined the self-generation approach, which is theorized to enhance new learning by elaborating and deepening encoding. Participants included 54 HIV-infected and 46 seronegative individuals, who learned paired word associates in both self-generated and didactic encoding experimental conditions. Results revealed main effects of HIV serostatus and encoding condition, but no interaction. Planned comparisons showed that both groups recalled significantly more words learned in the self-generation condition, and that HIV+ individuals recalled fewer words overall compared to their seronegative counterparts at delayed recall. Importantly, HIV+ participants with clinical memory impairment evidenced similar benefits of self-generation compared to unimpaired HIV+ subjects. Self-generation strategies may improve verbal recall in individuals with HIV infection and may, therefore, be an appropriate and potentially effective cognitive rehabilitation tool in this population.

  11. Thyroid Hormone Enhances Nitric Oxide-Mediated Bacterial Clearance and Promotes Survival after Meningococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Altenbacher, Georg; Hagner, Matthias; Berglund, Pernilla; Gao, Yumin; Lu, Ting; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Sjölinder, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Euthyroid sick syndrome characterized by reduced levels of thyroid hormones (THs) is observed in patients with meningococcal shock. It has been found that the level of THs reflects disease severity and is predictive for mortality. The present study was conducted to investigate the impact of THs on host defense during meningococcal infection. We found that supplementation of thyroxine to mice infected with Neisseria meningitidis enhanced bacterial clearance, attenuated the inflammatory responses and promoted survival. In vitro studies with macrophages revealed that THs enhanced bacteria-cell interaction and intracellular killing of meningococci by stimulating inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNos)-mediated NO production. TH treatment did not activate expression of TH receptors in macrophages. Instead, the observed TH-directed actions were mediated through nongenomic pathways involving the protein kinases PI3K and ERK1/2 and initiated at the membrane receptor integrin αvβ3. Inhibition of nongenomic TH signaling prevented iNos induction, NO production and subsequent intracellular bacterial killing by macrophages. These data demonstrate a beneficial role of THs in macrophage-mediated N. meningitidis clearance. TH replacement might be a novel option to control meningococcal septicemia. PMID:22844479

  12. Suicide bomber detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Naomi; Callejero, Carlos; Fiore, Franco; Gómez, Ignacio; Gonzalo, Ramón; Enríquez de Luna, Álvaro; Ederra, Iñigo; Palacios, Inés

    2009-05-01

    The chance of suicide bomber attacks against troops in the Theatre of Operations is currently quite high. Most of the time checkpoints and compound gates are not equipped with the appropriate equipment to screen for potential suicide bombers. The ultimate solution would be to be able to perform stand-off screening under various weather conditions whilst avoiding contact between Force Protection personnel and potential suicide bombers. Radiation in the millimeterwave and the lower Terahertz range, having the useful property of being able to penetrate clothing in addition to fog and rain, makes it a clear candidate for imaging in this situation. A study has been made simulating real case scenarios to test practical detection performance and stand-off distances at a range of frequencies in this band, the results of which will be presented.

  13. Suicides among Family Members of Elderly Suicide Victims: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waern, Margda

    2005-01-01

    This exploratory study compares elderly suicides with (n = 13) and without (n = 72) family member suicide. Previous episodes of suicidal behavior were more common among suicides who lost first-degree relatives by suicide (100% vs. 65%, p = 0.009). Six persons had lost an offspring by suicide prior to their own deaths. Substance use disorder was…

  14. Murine retroviral neurovirulence correlates with an enhanced ability ofvirus to infect selectively, replicate in, and activate resident microglial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Baszler, T. V.; Zachary, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    To determine the biologic basis of ts1 MoMuLV neurovirulence in vivo, newborn CFW/D mice were inoculated with neurovirulent ts1 MoMuLV and nonneurovirulent wt MoMuLV and the temporal response to virus infection in the central nervous system (CNS), spleen, and thymus was studied comparatively. Experimental procedures included single and double labeling in situ immunohistochemistry with selective morphometric analyses, and steady state immunoblotting of viral proteins. Cellular targets for virus infection were identical for both ts1 and wt MoMuLV and consisted sequentially of 1) splenic megakaryocytes, 2) splenic and thymic lymphocytes, 3) CNS capillary endothelial cells, and 4) CNS pericytes and microglia. Resident microglial cells served as the major reservor and amplifier of virus infection in the CNS of ts1 MoMuLV-infected mice; a similar but much less significant role was played by microglia in wt MoMuLV-infected mice. The genesis and progression of severe spongiform lesions in ts1 MoMuLV-infected mice were both temporally and spatially correlated with amplified virus infection of microglia, and hyperplasia and hypertrophy of both virus-infected and nonvirus-infected microglial cells. Direct virus infection of neurons was never observed. The development of clinical neurologic disease and spongiform lesions in ts1 MoMuLV-infected mice correlated with the accumulation of both viral gag and env gene products in the CNS; there was no selective accumulation of env precursor polyprotein Pr80env. When compared to wt MoMuLV-infected mice, the neurovirulence of ts1 MoMuLV-infected mice occurred by an enhanced ability to replicate in the CNS and to infect and activate more microglia, rather than by a fundamental change in cellular tropism or topography of virus infection. Images Figure 5 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 p666-a Figure 8 PMID:2000941

  15. Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    standing, diagnosis, and treatment of musculoskeletal infections. Key Words: musculoskeletal infection, biofilm , bacteria, biomaterial (J Orthop Trauma...form a biofilm , or slime layer.1 The recurrence of infections is often the result of microbial biofilm formation on the implant, enabling the persistence...Klebsiella pneumoniae). Staphylococcus species is by far the most studied pathogen in musculoskeletal infections and can produce a multilayered biofilm

  16. Enhancement of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Infection by Seminal Plasma and Semen Amyloids Implicates a New Target for the Prevention of HSV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Lilith; Ortiz, Tatiana; Tang, Qiyi

    2015-01-01

    Human herpesviruses cause different infectious diseases, resulting in world-wide health problems. Sexual transmission is a major route for the spread of both herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and -2. Semen plays an important role in carrying the viral particle that invades the vaginal or rectal mucosa and, thereby, initiates viral replication. Previously, we demonstrated that the amyloid fibrils semenogelin (SEM) and semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI), and seminal plasma (SP) augment cytomegalovirus infection (Tang et al., J. Virol 2013). Whether SEM or SEVI amyloids or SP could also enhance other herpesvirus infections has not been examined. In this study, we found that the two amyloids as well as SP strongly enhance both HSV-1 and -2 infections in cell culture. Along with SP, SEM and SEVI amyloids enhanced viral entry and increased infection rates by more than 10-fold, as assessed by flow cytometry assay and fluorescence microscopy. Viral replication was increased by about 50- to 100-fold. Moreover, viral growth curve assays showed that SEM and SEVI amyloids, as well as SP, sped up the kinetics of HSV replication such that the virus reached its replicative peak more quickly. The interactions of SEM, SEVI, and SP with HSVs are direct. Furthermore, we discovered that the enhancing effects of SP, SEM, and SEVI can be significantly reduced by heparin, a sulfated polysaccharide with an anionic charge. It is probable that heparin abrogates said enhancing effects by interfering with the interaction of the viral particle and the amyloids, which interaction results in the binding of the viral particles and both SEM and SEVI. PMID:25903833

  17. Understanding suicide in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Zanni, Guido R; Wick, Jeannette Y

    2010-02-01

    One suicide occurs every 16 minutes. Intentionally killing oneself is distinctly human; other species don't commit suicide. Suicide is an exceedingly complex phenomenon stemming from intolerable stress and the inability to cope. Elders tend to plan their suicides well, choose means of killing themselves that are more violent than younger people do, and are less likely to survive the attempt than others. Numerous factors increase risk for elder suicide: recent bereavement, pain, chronic illness, hopelessness, and despair. Identifying and treating depression early is essential to avoid tragedy. Regardless, many elders are treated with anxiolytics and analgesics in lieu of antidepressants, and some medications may increase suicide risk. Consultant pharmacists need to be aware that suicide is a serious concern for elders. When depression seems to be worsening in an elder, aggressive action is needed.

  18. [On the unpredictability of suicide].

    PubMed

    Biondi, Massimo; Iannitelli, Angela; Ferracuti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Suicide has become one of the main reasons of professional liability proceedings for psychiatrists. It is a widespread belief that suicide is a systematic expression of mental illness and that, as for many diseases is preventable by appropriate means. There is a lack of research data that can enable the identification of clinically useful variables to identify suicide risk, even in people who have already made a suicide attempt. Unfortunately, these convictions have led and lead to judgments of professional responsibility for psychiatrists that are not based on scientific data, but on social needs related to feelings of frustration and helplessness that develop after a suicide and by the urge to compensate in some way the family of suicide victim. Suicide is too complex a phenomenon to be reported to a causality beyond any reasonable certainty as instead required by the criminal law, neither can be faced with a progressive patients loss of freedom of our patients.

  19. [Phenomenological exploration of suicidal ideation].

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, D

    1994-01-01

    Death fuels the idea of suicide with a strong emotional charge that often turns suicidal tendencies and suicide into one and the same. The idea of suicide, at times linked with depression and personality disorders, is nonetheless full of a meaning which deserves further research. Suicide can appear as a solution to a problem which the idea of suicide helps to identify and resolve. When it is a conscious realization, the idea of suicide can lead the patient to consult. As a danger signal, it allows to determine whether the individual's defense mechanism functions. Also, it attracts attention to a situation, reveals a form of repressed self-hate and even helps in passing from one life state to another, as in transition rituals described by anthropology.

  20. Detecting the Suicide Risk

    PubMed Central

    Cipywnyk, D.

    1974-01-01

    An undeniable fact of life is the potential risk of suicide. It is an ubiquitous phenomenon and touches every family practice at some time. Evidence indicates that the physician is in the forefront of recognition and management of this alarming and distressing problem. It behooves him to be familiar with high risk indicators and criteria of intervention. Not thinking about it will not prevent it. His own anxiety and denial should not prove an obstacle in the recognition and effective disposition of patients manifesting suicidal symptoms. PMID:20469130

  1. Suicide in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Tonkin, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    The recent trend in suicide mortality has made it the second-most-common cause of death in adolescence. The recognition of depressed adolescents, especially males, is made difficult by their low utilization of health services and by the variety of modes of presentation. The family physician's ability to play an effective role in helping the depressed adolescent and preventing the occurrence of suicide depends on the establishment of rapport, obtaining a detailed history, and being prepared to offer continuity of care. In most depressed adolescents there is limited need for hospitalization, medication or psychiatric treatment. PMID:21267225

  2. The Heavy Metal Subculture and Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stack, Steven; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Assessed relationship between heavy metal music and suicide with data on heavy metal magazine subscriptions and youth suicide in 50 states. Found that, controlling for other predictors of suicide, greater strength of metal subculture, higher youth suicide rate, suggests that music perhaps nurtures suicidal tendencies already present in subculture.…

  3. Religiousness and Non-Hopeless Suicide Ideation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Randy H.

    2008-01-01

    Individuals who think about suicide but do not feel suicidally hopeless tend to be less religious and can therefore entertain thoughts of suicide unabated by religiousness. Religiousness, suicide ideation, and hopelessness were surveyed among 279 Idaho college students, 37 (13%) of whom were non-hopeless suicide ideators. A total of only 21 (7%)…

  4. Synergism between rhinovirus infection and oxidant pollutant exposure enhances airway epithelial cell cytokine production.

    PubMed Central

    Spannhake, E William; Reddy, Sekhar P M; Jacoby, David B; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Saatian, Bahman; Tian, Jingyan

    2002-01-01

    Of the several factors believed to exacerbate asthmatic symptoms, air pollution and viral infections are considered to be particularly important. Although evidence indicates that each of these respiratory insults individually can increase asthma severity in susceptible individuals, we know little about the extent to which exposure to environmental oxidant pollutants can influence the course of respiratory viral infection and its associated inflammation. To investigate the interaction of these two stimuli within their common epithelial cell targets in the upper and lower respiratory tracks, we infected primary human nasal epithelial cells and cells of the BEAS-2B line grown at the air-liquid interface with human rhinovirus type 16 (RV16) and exposed them to NO2 (2.0 ppm) or O3 (0.2 ppm) for 3 hr. Independently, RV16, NO2, and O3 rapidly increased release of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-8 through oxidant-dependent mechanisms. The combined effect of RV16 and oxidant ranged from 42% to 250% greater than additive for NO2 and from 41% to 67% for O3. We abrogated these effects by treating the cells with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. Surface expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) underwent additive enhancement in response to combined stimulation. These data indicate that oxidant pollutants can amplify the generation of proinflammatory cytokines by RV16-infected cells and suggest that virus-induced inflammation in upper and lower airways may be exacerbated by concurrent exposure to ambient levels of oxidants commonly encountered the indoor and outdoor environments. PMID:12117643

  5. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer enhances host resistance against pseudomonas aeruginosa infection through MAPK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongwei; Chen, Lu; Wang, Chunxia; Chen, Jianshe; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Hu, Yue; Niu, Xiaobin; Pei, Dongxu; He, Zhiqiang; Bi, Yongyi

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the role of extra-cellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) in the drug resistance of the pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). The BALB/c mice were transfected with PA, then the mice were infected with the siRNA of EMMPRIN to silence the EMMPRIN gene. The EMMPRIN mRNA and protein were detected by using RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. In order to examine the function of EMMPRIN in drug resistance of PA, the BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were treated with EMMPRIN siRNA. The cytokines, EMMPRIN and MMP9 were examined by the RP-PCR and ELISA, respectively, undergoing the silence of EMMPRIN siRNA. Moreover, the western blot assay was also used to test the phosphorylated MAPK in the murine macrophages after silenced by the EMMPRIN siRNA. The EMMPRIN was activated, with lipopolysaccharide stimulation and treated with the MAPK inhibitor, to evaluate whether the MAPK participates in the EMMPRIN-triggered drug resistance. The results indicated that the EMMPRIN expression was elevated in the infected BALB/c at 3 or 5 days post-infection. Silence of EMMPRIN Enhanced the Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in PA keratitis. Silence of EMMPRIN significantly up-regulated Th1-type cytokines IFN-γ, IL-12, and IL-18, but down-regulated Th2-type cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10. MMP9 was increased in the cells with rEMMPRIN treatment. EMMPRIN inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokine production via a MAPK signaling pathway. In conclusion, EMMPRIN promotes host resistance against pseudomonas aeruginosa infection via MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:28078032

  6. Topical CpG Oligodeoxynucleotide Adjuvant Enhances the Adaptive Immune Response against Influenza A Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wing Ki; Plumb, Adam William; Lai, Jacqueline Cheuk-Yan; Abraham, Ninan; Dutz, Jan Peter

    2016-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines generate humoral immunity, targeting highly variable epitopes and thus fail to achieve long-term protection. T cells recognize and respond to several highly conserved epitopes across influenza serotypes. A strategy of raising strong cytotoxic T cell memory responses to epitopes conserved across serotypes would provide cross serotype protection, eliminating the need for annual vaccination. We explored the adjuvant potential of epicutaneous (ec) and subcutaneous (sc) delivery of CpG oligodeoxynucleotide in conjunction with sc protein immunization to improve protection against influenza A virus (IAV) infections using a mouse model. We found enhanced long-term protection with epicutaneous CpG ODN (ecCpG) compared to subcutaneous CpG ODN (scCpG) as demonstrated by reduced viral titers in the lungs. This correlated with increased antigen-specific CD8 T cells in the airways and the lungs. The memory T cell response after immunization with ecCpG adjuvant was comparable to memory response by priming with IAV infection in the lungs. In addition, ecCpG was more efficient than scCpG in inducing the generation of IFN-γ producing CD4 T cells. The adjuvant effect of ecCpG was accompanied with its ability to modulate tissue-homing molecules on T cells that may direct them to the site of infection. Together, this work provides evidence for using ecCpG to induce strong antibody and memory T cell responses to confer protection against IAV infection. PMID:27524984

  7. Annexin 2-mediated enhancement of cytomegalovirus infection opposes inhibition by annexin 1 or annexin 5.

    PubMed

    Derry, Mélanie C; Sutherland, Michael R; Restall, Christina M; Waisman, David M; Pryzdial, Edward L G

    2007-01-01

    Biochemical studies have suggested that annexin 2 (A2) may participate in cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. In the current work, effects of A2 monomer (p36) and heterotetramer (A2t; p36(2)p11(2)) were investigated. Demonstrating a role for endogenous A2, the four stages of infection that were followed were each inhibited by anti-p36 or anti-p11 at 37 degrees C. Immuno-inhibition was attenuated when the virus and cells were pre-incubated at 4 degrees C to coordinate virus entry initiated afterwards at 37 degrees C, reconciling controversy in the literature. As an explanation, CMV-induced phosphorylation of p36 was prevented by the 4 degrees C treatment. Supporting these immuno-inhibition data, purified A2t or p11 increased CMV infectious-progeny generation and CMV gene expression. A specific role for A2t was indicated by purified p36 having no effect. Unlike other steps, primary plaque formation was not enhanced by purified A2t or p11, possibly because of undetectable phosphorylation. As annexins 1 (A1) and 5 (A5) interact with A2, their effect on CMV was also tested. Both purified proteins inhibited CMV infection. In each experiment, the concentration of A1 required for half-maximal inhibition was five- to 10-fold lower than that of A5. Addition of A2 opposed A1- or A5-mediated inhibition of CMV, as did certain A2-specific antibodies that had no effect in the absence of added A1 or A5. Transfection of the p36-deficient cell line HepG2 increased CMV infection and was required for inhibition by the other annexins. These data suggest that CMV exploits A2t at physiological temperature to oppose the protection of cells conferred by A1 or A5.

  8. Family history of suicide and interpersonal functioning in suicide attempters.

    PubMed

    Rajalin, Mia; Hirvikoski, Tatja; Salander Renberg, Ellinor; Åsberg, Marie; Jokinen, Jussi

    2017-01-01

    Difficulties in interpersonal relationships are associated with a wide range of psychiatric diagnoses and have been reported as a trigger for suicidal behavior, too. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between interpersonal problems and family history of suicide in suicide attempters and to describe relevant patterns of interpersonal problems in this patient group. The study involves 181 patients having their clinical follow-up after a suicide attempt. Family history of suicide was assessed by using the Karolinska Self Harm History Interview or retrieved in patient records. The Inventory of Interpersonal Problems was used to assess personal style in an interpersonal context. Suicide attempters with a family history of suicide had significantly more often an intrusive personal style. The results remained significant after adjustment for personality disorder. The specific interpersonal patterns associated with family history of suicide may interfere with the ability to create stable, long-lasting relationships. In regards to treatment, these personal qualities could cause difficulties in the alliance with health care personnel and make it harder for suicide attempters to accept or benefit from treatment. Attention to suicide attempters' interpersonal problems is of importance to lower their distress.

  9. Copycat Suicide Induced by Entertainment Celebrity Suicides in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Soo Ah; Sung, Ji Min; Park, Jin Young

    2016-01-01

    Objective Throughout the past several years, there have been a number of entertainment celebrity suicides in South Korea. The aim of this study was to investigate the clustering of suicides following celebrities' suicides in South Korea from 2005 to 2008, particularly according to certain characteristics. Methods Seven celebrity suicides were examined and defined using the Korean Integrated Newspaper Database System (KINDS) and from these, we considered four affected periods occurring 28 days after each celebrity's suicide. A Poisson time-series autoregression model was used to estimate the relative risk of the total suicide number for each affected period from 2005 to 2008. Logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate whether there were specific increases in the numbers of suicides in subgroups matching each celebrity. Results There were significant increases in the risk of suicide during the affected periods. Remarkable increases were found in the subgroups matching each celebrity, especially in the group in which all factors (sex, age, and method) were similar. Conclusion This study provides confirmation that a significant copycat effect was induced by these celebrities' suicides, especially among people who identified more with the celebrities. This implies that countermeasures for upright media coverage of celebrity suicides should be discussed and practiced properly in South Korea. PMID:26766949

  10. Infection of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells by ANDES Hantavirus enhances pro-inflammatory state, the secretion of active MMP-9 and indirectly enhances endothelial permeability

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Andes virus (ANDV), a rodent-borne Hantavirus, is the major etiological agent of Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in South America, which is mainly characterized by a vascular leakage with high rate of fatal outcomes for infected patients. Currently, neither specific therapy nor vaccines are available against this pathogen. ANDV infects both dendritic and epithelial cells, but in despite that the severity of the disease directly correlates with the viral RNA load, considerable evidence suggests that immune mechanisms rather than direct viral cytopathology are responsible for plasma leakage in HCPS. Here, we assessed the possible effect of soluble factors, induced in viral-activated DCs, on endothelial permeability. Activated immune cells, including DC, secrete gelatinolytic matrix metalloproteases (gMMP-2 and -9) that modulate the vascular permeability for their trafficking. Methods A clinical ANDES isolate was used to infect DC derived from primary PBMC. Maturation and pro-inflammatory phenotypes of ANDES-infected DC were assessed by studying the expression of receptors, cytokines and active gMMP-9, as well as some of their functional status. The ANDES-infected DC supernatants were assessed for their capacity to enhance a monolayer endothelial permeability using primary human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). Results Here, we show that in vitro primary DCs infected by a clinical isolate of ANDV shed virus RNA and proteins, suggesting a competent viral replication in these cells. Moreover, this infection induces an enhanced expression of soluble pro-inflammatory factors, including TNF-α and the active gMMP-9, as well as a decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10 and TGF-β. These viral activated cells are less sensitive to apoptosis. Moreover, supernatants from ANDV-infected DCs were able to indirectly enhance the permeability of a monolayer of primary HUVEC. Conclusions Primary human DCs, that are primarily

  11. Cytokine-enhanced vaccine and suicide gene therapy as surgery adjuvant treatments for spontaneous canine melanoma: 9 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Finocchiaro, L M E; Glikin, G C

    2012-12-01

    We present here the updated results after 9 years of the beginning of a trial on canine patients with malignant melanoma. This surgery adjuvant approach combined local suicide gene therapy with a subcutaneous vaccine composed by tumor cells extracts and xenogeneic cells producing human interleukin-2 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Toxicity was absent or minimal in all patients (0≤VCOG-CTCAE grade≤1). With respect to surgery-treated controls (ST), the complete surgery (CS) arm of this combined treatment (CT) significantly increased the fraction of local disease-free patients from 13 to 81% and distant metastases free from 32 to 84%. Even though less effective than the CS arm, the partial surgery (PS) arm of this CT was significantly better controlling the disease than only surgery (14% while PS-ST: 0%, P<0.01 and CS-ST: 5%, P<0.05). In addition, CT produced a significant sevenfold (CS) and threefold (PS) increase in overall survival. The CS-CT arm significantly improved both CS-ST metastasis-free- and melanoma overall survival from 99 days (respective ranges: 11-563 and 10-568) to >2848 days (81-2848 and 35-2848). Thus, more of 50% of our CT patients died of melanoma unrelated causes, transforming a lethal disease into a chronic one. Finally, surgery adjuvant CT delayed or prevented post-surgical recurrence and distant metastasis, significantly improved disease-free and overall survival maintaining the quality of life. Long-term safety and efficacy of this treatment are supported by the high number of CT patients (283) and extensive follow-up (>9 years). The successful clinical outcome encourages the further translation of similar approaches to human gene therapy trials.

  12. Suicide gene approach using a dual-expression lentiviral vector to enhance the safety of ex vivo gene therapy for bone repair.

    PubMed

    Alaee, F; Sugiyama, O; Virk, M S; Tang, H; Drissi, H; Lichtler, A C; Lieberman, J R

    2014-02-01

    'Ex vivo' gene therapy using viral vectors to overexpress BMP-2 is shown to heal critical-sized bone defects in experimental animals. To increase its safety, we constructed a dual-expression lentiviral vector to overexpress BMP-2 or luciferase and an HSV1-tk analog, Δtk (LV-Δtk-T2A-BMP-2/Luc). We hypothesized that administering ganciclovir (GCV) will eliminate the transduced cells at the site of implantation. The vector-induced expression of BMP-2 and luciferase in a mouse stromal cell line (W-20-17 cells) and mouse bone marrow cells (MBMCs) was reduced by 50% compared with the single-gene vector. W-20-17 cells were more sensitive to GCV compared with MBMCs (90-95% cell death at 12 days with GCV at 1 μg ml(-1) in MBMCs vs 90-95% cell death at 5 days by 0.1 μg ml(-1) of GCV in W-20-17 cells). Implantation of LV-Δtk-T2A-BMP-2 transduced MBMCs healed a 2 mm femoral defect at 4 weeks. Early GCV treatment (days 0-14) postoperatively blocked bone formation confirming a biologic response. Delayed GCV treatment starting at day 14 for 2 or 4 weeks reduced the luciferase signal from LV-Δtk-T2A-Luc-transduced MBMCs, but the signal was not completely eliminated. These data suggest that this suicide gene strategy has potential for clinical use in the future, but will need to be optimized for increased efficiency.

  13. Psychotherapy for Suicidal Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David

    1994-01-01

    Reviews various systems of psychotherapy for suitability for suicidal clients. Discusses psychoanalysis, cognitive therapy, primal therapy, transactional analysis, Gestalt therapy, reality therapy, person-centered therapy, existential analysis, and Jungian analysis in light of available treatment options. Includes 36 citations. (Author/CRR)

  14. Suicide with hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Sams, Ralph Newton; Carver, H Wayne; Catanese, Charles; Gilson, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    This presentation will address the recent rise of suicide deaths resulting from the asphyxiation by hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas.Hydrogen sulfide poisoning has been an infrequently encountered cause of death in medical examiner practice. Most H2S deaths that have been reported occurred in association with industrial exposure.More recently, H2S has been seen in the commission of suicide, particularly in Japan. Scattered reports of this phenomenon have also appeared in the United States.We have recently observed 2 intentional asphyxial deaths in association with H2S. In both cases, the decedents committed suicide in their automobiles. They generated H2S by combining a sulfide-containing tree spray with toilet bowl cleaner (with an active ingredient of hydrogen chloride acid). Both death scenes prompted hazardous materials team responses because of notes attached to the victims' car windows indicating the presence of toxic gas. Autopsy findings included discoloration of lividity and an accentuation of the gray matter of the brain. Toxicology testing confirmed H2S exposure with the demonstration of high levels of thiosulfate in blood.In summary, suicide with H2S appears to be increasing in the United States.

  15. Electroconvulsive Therapy and Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanney, Bryan L.

    1986-01-01

    When the effectiveness and mortality-morbidity of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) are compared with those of drug therapies, it appears that ECT is an effective and preferred treatment strategy. It remains underutilized as a modality of suicide prevention. Addresses controversies that presently limit the use of this treatment. (Author/ABB)

  16. Suicide in serial killers.

    PubMed

    Lester, David; White, John

    2010-02-01

    In a sample of 248 killers of two victims in America from 1900 to 2005, obtained from an encyclopedia of serial killers by Newton (2006), those completing suicide did not differ in sex, race, or the motive for the killing from those who were arrested.

  17. Stigmatization and Suicide Bereavement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feigelman, William; Gorman, Bernard S.; Jordan, John R.

    2009-01-01

    With survey data collected primarily from peer support group participants, the authors compared stigmatization responses of 462 parents losing children to suicide with 54 other traumatic death survivors and 24 child natural death survivors. Parents who encountered harmful responses and strained relations with family members and non-kin reported…

  18. Eimeria bovis infection enhances adhesion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to and their transmigration through an infected bovine endothelial cell monolayer in vitro.

    PubMed

    Taubert, Anja; Zahner, Horst; Hermosilla, Carlos

    2007-08-01

    The first schizogony of Eimeria bovis takes place in lymphatic endothelial cells of the ileum, resulting in the formation of macroschizonts within 2-3 weeks. In this study, we analyse early cellular immune responses to infected host cells on the basis of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) adhesion on and transmigration through infected bovine umbilical vein endothelial cell (BUVEC) monolayers. Adhesion of PBMC was upregulated by an E. bovis infection. Most marked effects were observed 1 day p.i.; thereafter, PBMC adhesion declined reaching control levels from day 8 p.i. onward. CD8(+) T cells adhered more frequently to infected BUVEC (42%) than CD4(+) T cells (25%). About one third of attached PBMC were represented by gammadelta-TCR(+) T cells. Adhesion of T cells was not restricted to parasitised host cells, but occurred almost equally on non-infected BUVEC within the same monolayer. Furthermore, we found moderately enhanced levels of PBMC transmigration through infected BUVEC monolayers, in particular on day 2 p.i. The data presented here suggest that E. bovis infection of BUVEC induces endothelial cell-derived proinflammatory reactions, which appear suitable for the initiation of both adaptive and innate immune responses.

  19. Suicidal Behavior and Alcohol Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Pompili, Maurizio; Serafini, Gianluca; Innamorati, Marco; Dominici, Giovanni; Ferracuti, Stefano; Kotzalidis, Giorgio D.; Serra, Giulia; Girardi, Paolo; Janiri, Luigi; Tatarelli, Roberto; Sher, Leo; Lester, David

    2010-01-01

    Suicide is an escalating public health problem, and alcohol use has consistently been implicated in the precipitation of suicidal behavior. Alcohol abuse may lead to suicidality through disinhibition, impulsiveness and impaired judgment, but it may also be used as a means to ease the distress associated with committing an act of suicide. We reviewed evidence of the relationship between alcohol use and suicide through a search of MedLine and PsychInfo electronic databases. Multiple genetically-related intermediate phenotypes might influence the relationship between alcohol and suicide. Psychiatric disorders, including psychosis, mood disorders and anxiety disorders, as well as susceptibility to stress, might increase the risk of suicidal behavior, but may also have reciprocal influences with alcohol drinking patterns. Increased suicide risk may be heralded by social withdrawal, breakdown of social bonds, and social marginalization, which are common outcomes of untreated alcohol abuse and dependence. People with alcohol dependence or depression should be screened for other psychiatric symptoms and for suicidality. Programs for suicide prevention must take into account drinking habits and should reinforce healthy behavioral patterns. PMID:20617037

  20. Suicide in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Richa, Sami; Fahed, Mario; Khoury, Elias; Mishara, Brian

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on suicide in patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) as well as risk factors and comorbidities of persons with ASD who have attempted suicide. Research was conducted by searching PubMed and Psychinfo for articles. Suicide in ASD is largely understudied. Although suicide is common in clinical samples, we have little knowledge of suicide in persons with ASD in the general population. Comorbidity, particularly with depression and other affective disorders or schizoid disorders and psychotic symptoms, is often reported, so it is difficult to determine if suicidality is associated with ASD or the comorbid disorder. Clinical samples suggest that suicide occurs more frequently in high functioning autism. Physical and sexual abuse, bullying, and changes in routine are precipitating events associated with suicide risk. Persons with ASD present risk factors inherent to their diagnosis (deficit in expression of feelings and thoughts), along with risk factors pertaining to the general population (abuse, depression, anxiety, etc.). The inability of persons with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) to express emotions and thoughts makes the diagnosis of suicidal ideation difficult and demands important adjustments to traditional psychotherapeutic interventions. More research is needed to determine the incidence of suicidal behaviors in persons with ASD, to identify risk and protective factors, as well as to assess the effectiveness of prevention strategies and interventions.

  1. A Suicide Prevention Program for HIV-Positive Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Seana; Rothberg, Joseph M.

    Research has shown that suicide risk is elevated in the patient who has tested positive for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Studies within the Army have found that the three most turbulent periods for the soldier with HIV infection are: (1) at the time of notification of diagnosis; (2) when the family and peer group learn of the diagnosis; and…

  2. Suicide: Issues of Prevention, Intervention, and Facilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Franklyn L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the concept of suicide intervention which allows for the possibility of death facilitation as well as prevention. A proposed suicide intervention model is contrasted with the goals and methods of existing suicide prevention and crisis counseling services. (JAC)

  3. Family history of suicide and high motor impulsivity distinguish suicide attempters from suicide ideators among college students.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Guang; Chen, Shen; Xu, Zhi-Ming; Shen, Zhi-Hua; Wang, Yi-Quan; He, Xiao-Yan; Cao, Ri-Fang; Roberts, David L; Shi, Jian-Fei; Wang, Yi-Qiang

    2017-02-08

    Suicide in college students has become an important public health issue in China. The aim of this study was to identify the differences between suicide attempters and suicide ideators based on a cross-sectional survey. Our results indicate that although female gender, positive screening for psychiatric illness, positive family history of suicide, elevated overall impulsivity, and elevated motor impulsivity were correlated with suicidal ideation, only positive family history of suicide and high motor impulsivity could differentiate suicide attempters from suicidal ideators. Future research with a longitudinal and prospective study design should be conducted to confirm these findings.

  4. Novel Anti-infective Activities of Chitosan Immobilized Titanium Surface with Enhanced Osteogenic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Niranjan; Luo, Jie; Tang, Ruogu; Sun, Yuyu; Deng, Ying

    2014-01-01

    We have covalently immobilized chitosan onto a titanium (Ti) surface to manage implant-related infection and poor osseointegration, two of the major complications of orthopedic implants. The Ti surface was first treated with sulfuric acid (SA) and then covalently grafted with chitosan. Surface roughness, contact angle and surface zeta potential of the samples were markedly increased by the sulfuric acid treatment and the subsequent chitosan immobilization. The chitosan-immobilized Ti (SA-CS-Ti) showed two novel antimicrobial roles: it a) prevented the invasion and internalization of bacteria into the osteoblast-like cells, and b) significantly increased the susceptibility of adherent bacteria to antibiotics. In addition, the sulfuric acid-treated Ti (SA-Ti) and SA-CS-Ti led to significantly increased (P<0.05) osteoblast-like cell attachment, enhanced cell proliferation, and better osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of osteoblast-like cells. PMID:25033432

  5. Enhancement of the neonate's nonspecific immunity to Klebsiella infection by muramyl dipeptide, a synthetic immunoadjuvant.

    PubMed Central

    Parant, M; Parant, F; Chedid, L

    1978-01-01

    N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (muramyl dipeptide) and certain derivatives that are structural analogs of part of the bacterial peptidoglycan monomer have been shown to be adjuvant active and to enhance the nonspecific immunity of adult mice infected by Klebsiella pneumoniae. In the present study muramyl dipeptide and two other synthetic analogs were found to be active in newborn mice. This activity could be demonstrated after administration by subcutaneous or even by oral route. In contrast to what was observed after treatment by lipopolysaccharide, 8-day-old mice were definitively protected against bacterial challenge by these glycopeptides. Therefore such molecules could have a great value in view of studying and correcting the neonate's unresponsiveness. PMID:356054

  6. Tracking Pertussis and Evaluating Control Measures through Enhanced Pertussis Surveillance, Emerging Infections Program, United States

    PubMed Central

    Baumbach, Joan; Cieslak, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Despite high coverage with pertussis-containing vaccines, pertussis remains endemic to the United States. There have been increases in reported cases in recent years, punctuated by striking epidemics and shifting epidemiology, both of which raise questions about current policies regarding its prevention and control. Limited data on pertussis reported through the National Notifiable Disease Surveillance System have proved insufficient to answer these questions. To address shortcomings of national pertussis data, the Emerging Infections Program at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention launched Enhanced Pertussis Surveillance (EPS), which is characterized by systematic case ascertainment, augmented data collection, and collection of Bordetella pertussis isolates. Data collected through EPS have been instrumental in understanding the rapidly evolving epidemiology and molecular epidemiology of pertussis and have contributed essential information regarding pertussis vaccines. EPS also serves as a platform for conducting critical and timely evaluations of pertussis prevention and control strategies, including targeting of vaccinations and antimicrobial prophylaxis. PMID:26291475

  7. Tracking Pertussis and Evaluating Control Measures through Enhanced Pertussis Surveillance, Emerging Infections Program, United States.

    PubMed

    Skoff, Tami H; Baumbach, Joan; Cieslak, Paul R

    2015-09-01

    Despite high coverage with pertussis-containing vaccines, pertussis remains endemic to the United States. There have been increases in reported cases in recent years, punctuated by striking epidemics and shifting epidemiology, both of which raise questions about current policies regarding its prevention and control. Limited data on pertussis reported through the National Notifiable Disease Surveillance System have proved insufficient to answer these questions. To address shortcomings of national pertussis data, the Emerging Infections Program at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention launched Enhanced Pertussis Surveillance (EPS), which is characterized by systematic case ascertainment, augmented data collection, and collection of Bordetella pertussis isolates. Data collected through EPS have been instrumental in understanding the rapidly evolving epidemiology and molecular epidemiology of pertussis and have contributed essential information regarding pertussis vaccines. EPS also serves as a platform for conducting critical and timely evaluations of pertussis prevention and control strategies, including targeting of vaccinations and antimicrobial prophylaxis.

  8. Novel anti-infective activities of chitosan immobilized titanium surface with enhanced osteogenic properties.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Niranjan; Luo, Jie; Tang, Ruogu; Sun, Yuyu; Deng, Ying

    2014-10-01

    We have covalently immobilized chitosan onto a titanium (Ti) surface to manage implant-related infection and poor osseointegration, two of the major complications of orthopedic implants. The Ti surface was first treated with sulfuric acid (SA) and then covalently grafted with chitosan. Surface roughness, contact angle and surface zeta potential of the samples were markedly increased by the sulfuric acid treatment and the subsequent chitosan immobilization. The chitosan-immobilized Ti (SA-CS-Ti) showed two novel antimicrobial roles: it (a) prevented the invasion and internalization of bacteria into the osteoblast-like cells, and (b) significantly increased the susceptibility of adherent bacteria to antibiotics. In addition, the sulfuric acid-treated Ti (SA-Ti) and SA-CS-Ti led to significantly increased (P<0.05) osteoblast-like cell attachment, enhanced cell proliferation, and better osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of osteoblast-like cells.

  9. Comprehensive mapping infection-enhancing epitopes of dengue pr protein using polyclonal antibody against prM.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yayan; Guo, Xiaolan; Yan, Huijun; Fang, Danyun; Zeng, Gucheng; Zhou, Junmei; Jiang, Lifang

    2015-07-01

    Dengue vaccine development is considered a global public health priority, but the antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) issues have critically restricted vaccine development. Recent findings have demonstrated that pre-membrane (prM) protein was involved in dengue virus (DENV) infection enhancement. Although the importance of prM antibodies have been well characterized, only a few epitopes in DENV prM protein have ever been identified. In this study, we screened five potential linear epitopes located at positions pr1 (1-16aa), pr3 (13-28aa), pr4 (19-34aa), pr9 (49-64aa), and pr10 (55-70aa) in pr protein using peptide scanning and comprehensive bioinformatics analysis. Then, we found that only pr4 (19-34aa) could elicit high-titer antibodies in Balb/c mice, and this epitope could react with sera from DENV2-infected patients, suggesting that specific antibodies against epitope peptide pr4 were elicited in both DENV-infected mice and human. In addition, our data demonstrated that anti-pr4 sera showed limited neutralizing activity but significant ADE activity toward standard DENV serotypes and imDENV. Hence, it seems responsible to hypothesize that anti-pr4 serum was infection-enhancing antibody and pr4 was infection-enhancing epitope. In conclusion, we characterized a novel infection-enhancing epitope on dengue pr protein, a finding that may provide new insight into the pathogenesis of DENV infection and contribute to dengue vaccine design.

  10. Complete urinary tract infection (UTI) diagnosis and antibiogram using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjigeorgiou, Katerina; Kastanos, Evdokia; Kyriakides, Alexandros; Pitris, Costas

    2012-03-01

    There are three stages to a complete UTI diagnosis: (1) identification of a urine sample as positive/negative for an infection, (2) identification of the responsible bacterium, (3) antibiogram to determine the antibiotic to which the bacteria are most sensitive to. Using conventional methods, all three stages require bacterial cultures in order to provide results. This long delay in diagnosis causes a rise in ineffective treatments, chronic infections, health care costs and antibiotic resistance. In this work, SERS is used to identify a sample as positive/negative for a UTI as well as to obtain an antibiogram against different antibiotics. SERS spectra of serial dilutions of E. coli bacteria mixed with silver nanoparticles, showed a linear correlation between spectral intensity and concentration. For antibiotic sensitivity testing, SERS spectra of three species of gram negative bacteria were collected four hours after exposure to the antibiotics ciprofloxacin and amoxicillin. Spectral analysis revealed clear separation between bacterial samples exposed to antibiotics to which they were sensitive and samples exposed to antibiotics to which they were resistant. With the enhancement provided by SERS, the technique can be applied directly to urine samples leading to the development of a new, rapid method for UTI diagnosis and antibiogram.

  11. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy as a point-of-care diagnostic for infection in wound effluent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghebremedhin, Meron; Yesupriya, Shubha; Crane, Nicole J.

    2016-03-01

    In military medicine, one of the challenges in dealing with large combat-related injuries is the prevalence of bacterial infection, including multidrug resistant organisms. This can prolong the wound healing process and lead to wound dehiscence. Current methods of identifying bacterial infection rely on culturing microbes from patient material and performing biochemical tests, which together can take 2-3 days to complete. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is a powerful vibrational spectroscopy technique that allows for highly sensitive structural detection of analytes adsorbed onto specially prepared metal surfaces. In the past, we have been able to discriminate between bacterial isolates grown on solid culture media using standard Raman spectroscopic methods. Here, SERS is utilized to assess the presence of bacteria in wound effluent samples taken directly from patients. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt for the application of SERS directly to wound effluent. The utilization of SERS as a point-of-care diagnostic tool would enable physicians to determine course of treatment and drug administration in a matter of hours.

  12. Enhanced Direct Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Self-Antigen Presentation Induced by Chlamydia Infection.

    PubMed

    Cram, Erik D; Simmons, Ryan S; Palmer, Amy L; Hildebrand, William H; Rockey, Daniel D; Dolan, Brian P

    2015-11-23

    The direct major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation pathway ensures intracellular peptides are displayed at the cellular surface for recognition of infected or transformed cells by CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Chlamydia spp. are obligate intracellular bacteria and, as such, should be targeted by CD8(+) T cells. It is likely that Chlamydia spp. have evolved mechanisms to avoid the CD8(+) killer T cell responses by interfering with MHC class I antigen presentation. Using a model system of self-peptide presentation which allows for posttranslational control of the model protein's stability, we tested the ability of various Chlamydia species to alter direct MHC class I antigen presentation. Infection of the JY lymphoblastoid cell line limited the accumulation of a model host protein and increased presentation of the model-protein-derived peptides. Enhanced self-peptide presentation was detected only when presentation was restricted to defective ribosomal products, or DRiPs, and total MHC class I levels remained unaltered. Skewed antigen presentation was dependent on a bacterial synthesized component, as evidenced by reversal of the observed phenotype upon preventing bacterial transcription, translation, and the inhibition of bacterial lipooligosaccharide synthesis. These data suggest that Chlamydia spp. have evolved to alter the host antigen presentation machinery to favor presentation of defective and rapidly degraded forms of self-antigen, possibly as a mechanism to diminish the presentation of peptides derived from bacterial proteins.

  13. Enhanced Direct Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Self-Antigen Presentation Induced by Chlamydia Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cram, Erik D.; Simmons, Ryan S.; Palmer, Amy L.; Hildebrand, William H.; Rockey, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    The direct major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation pathway ensures intracellular peptides are displayed at the cellular surface for recognition of infected or transformed cells by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Chlamydia spp. are obligate intracellular bacteria and, as such, should be targeted by CD8+ T cells. It is likely that Chlamydia spp. have evolved mechanisms to avoid the CD8+ killer T cell responses by interfering with MHC class I antigen presentation. Using a model system of self-peptide presentation which allows for posttranslational control of the model protein's stability, we tested the ability of various Chlamydia species to alter direct MHC class I antigen presentation. Infection of the JY lymphoblastoid cell line limited the accumulation of a model host protein and increased presentation of the model-protein-derived peptides. Enhanced self-peptide presentation was detected only when presentation was restricted to defective ribosomal products, or DRiPs, and total MHC class I levels remained unaltered. Skewed antigen presentation was dependent on a bacterial synthesized component, as evidenced by reversal of the observed phenotype upon preventing bacterial transcription, translation, and the inhibition of bacterial lipooligosaccharide synthesis. These data suggest that Chlamydia spp. have evolved to alter the host antigen presentation machinery to favor presentation of defective and rapidly degraded forms of self-antigen, possibly as a mechanism to diminish the presentation of peptides derived from bacterial proteins. PMID:26597986

  14. Effectiveness of short-term, enhanced, infection control support in improving compliance with infection control guidelines and practice in nursing homes: a cluster randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Gopal Rao, G; Jeanes, A; Russell, H; Wilson, D; Atere-Roberts, E; O'Sullivan, D; Donaldson, N

    2009-10-01

    In this prospective cluster randomized controlled trial we evaluated the impact of short-term provision of enhanced infection control support on infection control practice in nursing homes in South London. Twelve nursing homes were recruited, six each in intervention (300 residents) and control (265 residents) groups. Baseline observations of hand hygiene facilities, environmental cleanliness and safe disposal of clinical waste showed poor compliance in both groups. Post-intervention observations showed improvement in both groups. There was no statistical difference between the two groups in the compliance for hand hygiene facilities (P=0.69); environmental cleanliness (P=0.43) and safe disposal of clinical waste (P=0.96). In both groups, greatest improvement was in compliance with safe disposal of clinical waste and the least improvement was in hand hygiene facilities. Since infection control practice improved in intervention and control groups, we could not demonstrate that provision of short-term, enhanced, infection control support in nursing homes had a significant impact in infection control practice.

  15. National Pathways for Suicide Prevention and Health Services Research

    PubMed Central

    Ahmedani, Brian K.; Vannoy, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Context In 2012, the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention (Action Alliance)'s Research Prioritization Task Force (RPTF) released a series of Aspirational Goals (AGs) to decrease suicide deaths and attempts. The RPTF asked experts to summarize what was known about particular AGs, and to propose research pathways that would help reach them. This manuscript describes what is known about the benefits of access to health care (AG8) and continuity of care (AG9) for individuals at risk for suicide. Research pathways are proposed to address limitations in current knowledge, particularly in U.S. healthcare-based research. Evidence acquisition Using a three-step process, the expert panel reviewed available literature from electronic databases. For two AGs, the experts summarized the current state of knowledge, determined breakthroughs needed to advance the field, and developed a series of research pathways to achieve prevention goals. Evidence synthesis Several components of healthcare provision have been found to be associated with reduced suicide ideation, and in some cases mitigated suicide deaths. Randomized trials are needed to provide more definitive evidence. Breakthroughs that support more comprehensive patient data collection (e.g., real-time surveillance, death record linkage, patient registries) would facilitate the steps needed to establish research infrastructure so that various interventions could be tested efficiently within various systems of care. Short-term research should examine strategies within the current healthcare systems, and long-term research should investigate models that redesign the health system to prioritize suicide prevention. Conclusions Evidence exists to support optimism regarding future suicide prevention, but knowledge is limited. Future research is needed on U.S. healthcare services and system enhancements to determine which of these approaches can provide empirical evidence for reducing suicide. PMID:25145743

  16. Interleukin 18 coexpression during respiratory syncytial virus infection results in enhanced disease mediated by natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Harker, James A; Godlee, Alexandra; Wahlsten, Jennifer L; Lee, Debbie C P; Thorne, Lucy G; Sawant, Devika; Tregoning, John S; Caspi, Rachel R; Bukreyev, Alexander; Collins, Peter L; Openshaw, Peter J M

    2010-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes bronchiolitis, the main cause of infantile hospitalization. Immunity against reinfection is poor, and there is great interest in boosting vaccine responses using live vectors expressing host cytokines. We therefore constructed a recombinant RSV expressing murine interleukin 18 (RSV/IL-18), a cytokine capable of inducing strong antiviral immune responses. In vitro RSV/IL-18 replicated at wild-type levels and produced soluble IL-18. In naïve BALB/c mice, RSV/IL-18 infection significantly increased both IL-18 mRNA and protein and attenuated the peak viral load 3-fold. Despite a reduced viral load, RSV/IL-18 infection caused a biphasic weight loss at days 2 and 6 postinfection that was not seen in wild-type infection. Day 2 disease was associated with enhanced pulmonary natural killer (NK) cell numbers and activity and was prevented by NK cell depletion during infection; day 6 disease was correlated with CD8 T-cell recruitment and was enhanced by NK cell depletion. IL-18 expression during priming also enhanced RSV-specific antibody responses and T-cell responses on secondary RSV infection. Therefore, while IL-18 boosted antiviral immunity and reduced the viral load, its coexpression worsened disease. This is the first recombinant RSV with this property, and these are the first studies to demonstrate that NK cells can induce pathology during pulmonary viral infections.

  17. Attitudes toward suicide: the effect of suicide death in the family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Jia, Cun-Xian

    There have been few reports on the effect of suicide death on family members' attitudes toward suicide. In order to estimate the extent to which suicide death affects attitudes toward suicide among family members of suicides, data of 264 informants from a case-control psychological autopsy study were analyzed. The results showed that there were no significant differences in attitudes toward suicide, measured by the General Social Survey's (GSS) four questions, between informants of suicides and informants of living controls, between family members of suicides and family members of living controls, or between family members of suicides and non-family members of suicides. Our findings did not support the hypothesis that suicide death affects the attitudes toward suicide in suicides' family members. However, some factors were found to be related to the pro-suicide attitudes measured by the four questions included in the GSS.

  18. A community's response to suicide through public art: stakeholder perspectives from the Finding the Light Within project.

    PubMed

    Mohatt, Nathaniel V; Singer, Jonathan B; Evans, Arthur C; Matlin, Samantha L; Golden, Jane; Harris, Cathy; Burns, James; Siciliano, Catherine; Kiernan, Guy; Pelleritti, Margaret; Tebes, Jacob Kraemer

    2013-09-01

    Suicide is a preventable public health problem and a leading cause of death in the United States. Despite recognized need for community-based strategies for suicide prevention, most suicide prevention programs focus on individual-level change. This article presents seven first person accounts of Finding the Light Within, a community mobilization initiative to reduce the stigma associated with suicide through public arts participation that took place in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from 2011 through 2012. The stigma associated with suicide is a major challenge to suicide prevention, erecting social barriers to effective prevention and treatment and enhancing risk factors for people struggling with suicidal ideation and recovery after losing a loved one to suicide. This project engaged a large and diverse audience and built a new community around suicide prevention through participatory public art, including community design and production of a large public mural about suicide, storytelling and art workshops, and a storytelling website. We present this project as a model for how arts participation can address suicide on multiple fronts-from raising awareness and reducing stigma, to promoting community recovery, to providing healing for people and communities in need.

  19. A Community’s Response to Suicide Through Public Art: Stakeholder Perspectives from the Finding the Light Within Project

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Jonathan B.; Evans, Arthur C.; Matlin, Samantha L.; Golden, Jane; Harris, Cathy; Burns, James; Siciliano, Catherine; Kiernan, Guy; Pelleritti, Margaret; Tebes, Jacob Kraemer

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is a preventable public health problem and a leading cause of death in the United States. Despite recognized need for community-based strategies for suicide prevention, most suicide prevention programs focus on individual-level change. This article presents seven first person accounts of Finding the Light Within, a community mobilization initiative to reduce the stigma associated with suicide through public arts participation that took place in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from 2011 through 2012. The stigma associated with suicide is a major challenge to suicide prevention, erecting social barriers to effective prevention and treatment and enhancing risk factors for people struggling with suicidal ideation and recovery after losing a loved one to suicide. This project engaged a large and diverse audience and built a new community around suicide prevention through participatory public art, including community design and production of a large public mural about suicide, storytelling and art workshops, and a storytelling website. We present this project as a model for how arts participation can address suicide on multiple fronts—from raising awareness and reducing stigma, to promoting community recovery, to providing healing for people and communities in need. PMID:23743604

  20. Rates and risk factors for suicide, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts in chronic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jana E; Hermann, Bruce P; Barry, John J; Gilliam, Frank G; Kanner, Andres M; Meador, Kimford J

    2003-10-01

    Studies of causes of death among people with epilepsy suggest that the lifetime prevalence rate of suicide is elevated. Although not all of the studies have reported an increased risk for suicide, the collective data yield an average rate of approximately 12% among people with epilepsy, compared with 1.1-1.2% in the general population. The increased risk for suicide appears to affect children and adolescents as well as adults. Rates of suicide attempts have also been reported to be elevated among people with epilepsy. A suicide attempt is a significant risk factor for completed suicide. Certain psychiatric disorders, including primary mood disorders, also increase the risk for suicide. Among people with epilepsy, psychiatric comorbidity is common, and rates of mood disorders, particularly major depression, have consistently been reported to be elevated. Other potential risk factors are family issues, physical health, personality, life stress, previous suicidal behavior, and access to firearms. Assessing severity of risk helps to determine the appropriate level of intervention. The suicidality module of the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview is a practical tool to help quantify current suicide risk.

  1. Passive transfer of interferon-γ over-expressing macrophages enhances resistance of SCID mice to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Pasula, Rajamouli; Martin, William J; Kesavalu, Banu Rekha; Abdalla, Maher Y; Britigan, Bradley E

    2017-02-23

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) is associated with increased deaths worldwide. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) play a critical role in host defense against infection with this pathogen. In this work we tested the hypothesis that passive transfer of normal AMs, IFN-γ activated AMs, or macrophages transduced to over-express IFN-γ into the lungs of immunosuppressed SCID mice, where resident macrophages are present but not functional, would enhance alveolar immunity and increase clearance of pulmonary M.tb infection. Accordingly, SCID mice were infected with M.tb intratracheally (I.T.), following which they received either control macrophages or macrophages overexpressing IFN-γ (J774A.1). The extent of M.tb infection was assessed at 30days post-M.tb infection. SCID mice administered macrophages over-expressing IFN-γ showed a significant decrease in M.tb burden and increased survival compared to J774A.1 control macrophages or untreated mice. This was further associated with a significant increase in IFN-γ and TNF-α mRNA and protein expression, as well as NF-κB (p65) mRNA, in the lungs. The increase in IFN-γ and TNF-α lung levels was inversely proportional to the number of M.tb organisms recovered. These results provide evidence that administration of macrophages overexpressing IFN-γ inhibit M.tb growth in vivo and may enhance host defense against M.tb infection.

  2. [Temporal dimensions of suicide: hypothesis].

    PubMed

    Carbonell-Camós, Eliseu

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author examines the temporal dimensions of suicide by taking into account the multiple existing approaches-circadian physiology, psychiatric or sociological epidemiology of suicide-however promoting a socio-anthropological perspective. From this perspective, suicide is examined as a social phenomenon inscribed in time. By beginning with a concern that is characteristic of anthropology of time, knowingly the relation between time of nature and time of society, the author addresses a key issue of the study of suicide already elaborated by Durkheim, in the relation between change that is a basic expression of the passage of time and suicide. After presenting different scientific contributions on the subject, the author proposes an hypothesis allowing integration of the influence of time related to natural phenomenon (cosmobiological rhythms) and the relation of time to social phenomenon (politico-economic rhythms) in relation with suicide and this, according to Gabennesch's theory of "failed promises."

  3. Suicide, guns, and public policy.

    PubMed

    Lewiecki, E Michael; Miller, Sara A

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is a serious public health concern that is responsible for almost 1 million deaths each year worldwide. It is commonly an impulsive act by a vulnerable individual. The impulsivity of suicide provides opportunities to reduce the risk of suicide by restricting access to lethal means. In the United States, firearms, particularly handguns, are the most common means of suicide. Despite strong empirical evidence that restriction of access to firearms reduces suicides, access to firearms in the United States is generally subject to few restrictions. Implementation and evaluation of measures such as waiting periods and permit requirements that restrict access to handguns should be a top priority for reducing deaths from impulsive suicide in the United States.

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Is Enhanced by Vector Saliva through Immunosuppressant Mechanisms Mediated by Lysophosphatidylcholine▿

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Rafael D.; Carneiro, Alan Brito; Bafica, André; Gazos-Lopes, Felipe; Takiya, Christina M.; Souto-Padron, Thaís; Vieira, Danielle P.; Ferreira-Pereira, Antônio; Almeida, Igor C.; Figueiredo, Rodrigo T.; Porto, Bárbara N.; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Graça-Souza, Aurélio V.; Lopes, Angela H. C. S.; Atella, Geórgia C.; Silva-Neto, Mário A. C.

    2008-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, is transmitted by bug feces deposited on human skin during a blood meal. However, parasite infection occurs through the wound produced by insect mouthparts. Saliva of the Triatominae bug Rhodnius prolixus is a source of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). Here, we tested the role of both triatomine saliva and LPC on parasite transmission. We show that vector saliva is a powerful inducer of cell chemotaxis. A massive number of inflammatory cells were found at the sites where LPC or saliva was inoculated into the skin of mice. LPC is a known chemoattractant for monocytes, but neutrophil recruitment induced by saliva is LPC independent. The preincubation of peritoneal macrophages with saliva or LPC increased fivefold the association of T. cruzi with these cells. Moreover, saliva and LPC block nitric oxide production by T. cruzi-exposed macrophages. The injection of saliva or LPC into mouse skin in the presence of the parasite induces an up-to-sixfold increase in blood parasitemia. Together, our data suggest that saliva of the Triatominae enhances T. cruzi transmission and that some of its biological effects are attributed to LPC. This is a demonstration that a vector-derived lysophospholipid may act as an enhancing factor of Chagas disease. PMID:18794282

  5. [Suicide - ethical and juridical aspects].

    PubMed

    Hoff, Paul

    2015-10-01

    This paper discusses the phenomenon of suicidality with regard to patient autonomy on the one hand and the obligation of medical professionals to provide support and treatment on the other hand. The continuation of a broad debate on these issues within the whole of society is mandatory also in the future. Suicide and assisted suicide are topics with high relevance for medicine in general and for psychiatry in particular. They can, however, not be handled by medical specialists alone.

  6. Suicides and the lunar cycle.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-García, J M; Tusell, F

    1997-02-01

    The existence of lunar influence on the frequency of suicide is tested by means of a permutation test. A total of 897 suicide deaths reported by the Anatomical Forensic Institute of Madrid were analyzed by a permutation test, a direct application of Fisher's ideas. Noteworthy in this study are the testing method used and the accuracy of timing of the deaths. Both factors provide firm ground for our conclusion: there appears to be no relationship between lunar phases and suicide.

  7. Reframing Suicide in the Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Scott 8 Parameters Theoretical Approaches to Suicide Durkheim on Suicide Suicide is simultaneously an individual and a social act. Many of us...of sociology was struggling with its substantive and scientific identity. Durkheim sought to set the record straight. If society was nothing more...their temporal regularities and covariation with “causal” variables.11 This enabled Durkheim to draw upon reams of statistical data in presenting and

  8. Suicide prevention in military organizations.

    PubMed

    Zamorski, Mark A

    2011-04-01

    Suicide is an important public health problem in the demographic group that forms the bulk of military populations, namely young and middle-aged men. Suicide in the military also has special significance: certain aspects of military service can lead to serious mental disorders that increase the risk of suicidal behaviour. Moreover, military organizations have control over a broad range of factors (notably the direct delivery of mental health care) that could mitigate suicide risk. This article will review the literature on suicide risk in military organizations to answer the important question: Are military personnel at increased risk for suicide? Next, Mann et al.'s (2005) model for specific suicide preventive interventions in civilian settings will be reviewed and then expanded, with an emphasis on identifying special opportunities for suicide prevention in military organizations, including: 1) organizational interventions to mitigate work stress; 2) selection, resilience training, and risk factor reduction; 3) interventions to overcome barriers to care; and 4) systematic quality improvement efforts in mental health care. Finally, the evidence behind comprehensive suicide prevention programmes will be reviewed, with a special focus on the US Air Force's benchmark programme.

  9. [Suicidality: procedure in emergency cases].

    PubMed

    Flüchter, P; Müller, V; Pajonk, F-G B

    2012-09-01

    Emergency physicians (EP), paramedics and the staff of the emergency room play an increasingly important role in the medical and psychological emergency treatment of patients after suicide attempts, as well as in the crisis intervention of persons with acute suicidal tendencies. This article aims to give an overview of the prevalence rates, methods of suicide or attempted suicide and the problems faced by EPs when treating these patients. In addition, concepts are presented which allow an adequate risk assessment of suicidality and the options for primary crisis intervention. Paramedics and intensive care clinicians are increasingly confronted with this complex process with social, personal and medical aspects. In order to treat people in suicidal crises and/or after a suicide attempt and to provide a safe and optimal care for this often heterogeneous group of patients, clear guidelines are a prerequisite. The first assessment of the acute danger of suicide is of particular importance due to the resulting consequences and a clear approach is demonstrated for dealing with suicidal people. Furthermore, the legal principles are presented.

  10. Holiday Suicides: Fact or Myth?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Violence Data LGB Suicidal Thoughts & Experiences Data LGB Youth Report School Violence Featured Topic: Opportunities for Action Featured Topic: Bullying Research Featured Topic: Prevent Gang Membership Featured Topic: ...

  11. Nonhuman TRIM5 Variants Enhance Recognition of HIV-1-Infected Cells by CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Moyano, Esther; Ruiz, Alba; Kløverpris, Henrik N.; Rodriguez-Plata, Maria T.; Peña, Ruth; Blondeau, Caroline; Selwood, David L.; Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Moris, Arnaud; Clotet, Bonaventura; Goulder, Philip; Towers, Greg J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tripartite motif-containing protein 5 (TRIM5) restricts human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in a species-specific manner by uncoating viral particles while activating early innate responses. Although the contribution of TRIM5 proteins to cellular immunity has not yet been studied, their interactions with the incoming viral capsid and the cellular proteasome led us to hypothesize a role for them. Here, we investigate whether the expression of two nonhuman TRIM5 orthologs, rhesus TRIM5α (RhT5) and TRIM-cyclophilin A (TCyp), both of which are potent restrictors of HIV-1, could enhance immune recognition of infected cells by CD8+ T cells. We illustrate how TRIM5 restriction improves CD8+ T-cell-mediated HIV-1 inhibition. Moreover, when TRIM5 activity was blocked by the nonimmunosuppressive analog of cyclosporine (CsA), sarcosine-3(4-methylbenzoate)–CsA (SmBz-CsA), we found a significant reduction in CD107a/MIP-1β expression in HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells. This finding underscores the direct link between TRIM5 restriction and activation of CD8+ T-cell responses. Interestingly, cells expressing RhT5 induced stronger CD8+ T-cell responses through the specific recognition of the HIV-1 capsid by the immune system. The underlying mechanism of this process may involve TRIM5-specific capsid recruitment to cellular proteasomes and increase peptide availability for loading and presentation of HLA class I antigens. In summary, we identified a novel function for nonhuman TRIM5 variants in cellular immunity. We hypothesize that TRIM5 can couple innate viral sensing and CD8+ T-cell activation to increase species barriers against retrovirus infection. IMPORTANCE New therapeutics to tackle HIV-1 infection should aim to combine rapid innate viral sensing and cellular immune recognition. Such strategies could prevent seeding of the viral reservoir and the immune damage that occurs during acute infection. The nonhuman TRIM5 variants, rhesus TRIM5α (RhT5) and TRIM

  12. Epigenetics and Suicidal Behavior Research Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Turecki, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Suicide and suicidal behaviors are complex, heterogeneous phenomena that are thought to result from the interactions among distal factors increasing predisposition and proximal factors acting as precipitants. Epigenetic factors are likely to act both distally and proximally. Aspirational Goal 1 aims to find clear targets for suicide and suicidal behavior intervention through greater understanding of the interplay among the biological, psychological, and social risk and protective factors associated with suicide. This paper discusses Aspirational Goal 1, focusing on the research pathway related to epigenetics, suicide, and suicidal behaviors. Current knowledge on epigenetics factors associated with suicide and suicidal behaviors is reviewed and avenues for future research are discussed. Epigenetic factors are a promising area of further investigation in the understanding of suicide and suicidal behaviors and may hold clues to identifying targets or avenues for intervention. PMID:25145732

  13. Inhibition of Bim enhances replication of varicella-zoster virus and delays plaque formation in virus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueqiao; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2014-01-01

    Programmed cell death (apoptosis) is an important host defense mechanism against intracellular pathogens, such as viruses. Accordingly, viruses have evolved multiple mechanisms to modulate apoptosis to enhance replication. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) induces apoptosis in human fibroblasts and melanoma cells. We found that VZV triggered the phosphorylation of the proapoptotic proteins Bim and BAD but had little or no effect on other Bcl-2 family members. Since phosphorylation of Bim and BAD reduces their proapoptotic activity, this may prevent or delay apoptosis in VZV-infected cells. Phosphorylation of Bim but not BAD in VZV-infected cells was dependent on activation of the MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Cells knocked down for Bim showed delayed VZV plaque formation, resulting in longer survival of VZV-infected cells and increased replication of virus, compared with wild-type cells infected with virus. Conversely, overexpression of Bim resulted in earlier plaque formation, smaller plaques, reduced virus replication, and increased caspase 3 activity. Inhibition of caspase activity in VZV-infected cells overexpressing Bim restored levels of virus production similar to those seen with virus-infected wild-type cells. Previously we showed that VZV ORF12 activates ERK and inhibits apoptosis in virus-infected cells. Here we found that VZV ORF12 contributes to Bim and BAD phosphorylation. In summary, VZV triggers Bim phosphorylation; reduction of Bim levels results in longer survival of VZV-infected cells and increased VZV replication.

  14. OASL1 deficiency promotes antiviral protection against genital herpes simplex virus type 2 infection by enhancing type I interferon production.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Eun; Lee, Myeong Sup; Kim, Young-Joon; Lee, Heung Kyu

    2016-01-11

    Type I interferon (IFN) interferes with virus replication, promotes antiviral responses, and controls innate and adaptive immune responses to certain viruses. Recently, we reported that 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase-like 1 (OASL1) negatively regulates type I IFN production by inhibiting the translation of the type I IFN-regulating master transcription factor, IRF7. Notably, while OASL1-deficient mice induce robust production of type I IFN and are resistant to systemic viral infection, the effects of OASL1 during localized viral infection has not been studied. To this end, we investigated the role of OASL1 during mucosal HSV-2 infection of the genital tract. Oasl1(-/-) mice exhibited better survival rates than wild type (WT) mice following intravaginal HSV-2 infection, and suppressed virus replication more efficiently despite comparable recruitment of effector immune cells. Moreover, Ly6C(high) monocytes, and not pDCs or other cell types, displayed enhanced production of type I IFNs in Oasl1(-/-) mice in response to HSV-2 infection. Furthermore, cytotoxic T cell responses including IFN-γ production were accelerated in Oasl1(-/-) mice after mucosal HSV-2 infection. Collectively, these results demonstrate that OASL1 deficiency promotes antiviral immunity against local mucosal viral infection and suggest that OASL1 could be a therapeutic target for treatment of HSV-2 infection of the genital mucosa.

  15. Immunodominant SARS Coronavirus Epitopes in Humans Elicited both Enhancing and Neutralizing Effects on Infection in Non-human Primates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qidi; Zhang, Lianfeng; Kuwahara, Kazuhiko; Li, Li; Liu, Zijie; Li, Taisheng; Zhu, Hua; Liu, Jiangning; Xu, Yanfeng; Xie, Jing; Morioka, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Qin, Chuan; Liu, Gang

    2016-05-13

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is caused by a coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and has the potential to threaten global public health and socioeconomic stability. Evidence of antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of SARS-CoV infection in vitro and in non-human primates clouds the prospects for a safe vaccine. Using antibodies from SARS patients, we identified and characterized SARS-CoV B-cell peptide epitopes with disparate functions. In rhesus macaques, the spike glycoprotein peptides S471-503, S604-625, and S1164-1191 elicited antibodies that efficiently prevented infection in non-human primates. In contrast, peptide S597-603 induced antibodies that enhanced infection both in vitro and in non-human primates by using an epitope sequence-dependent (ESD) mechanism. This peptide exhibited a high level of serological reactivity (64%), which resulted from the additive responses of two tandem epitopes (S597-603 and S604-625) and a long-term human B-cell memory response with antisera from convalescent SARS patients. Thus, peptide-based vaccines against SARS-CoV could be engineered to avoid ADE via elimination of the S597-603 epitope. We provide herein an alternative strategy to prepare a safe and effective vaccine for ADE of viral infection by identifying and eliminating epitope sequence-dependent enhancement of viral infection.

  16. Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... 23(4):251-69. Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) guideline. Back to Top Administration ... : Hospital Scope | Glossary | References | Site Map | Credits Freedom of ...

  17. Suicide Bombers in CONUS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-07

    the first successful suicide bombings in U.S. mass transit systems and shopping malls , the military response will probably resemble that after 9/11...detonation SLPD/UPI 16-Feb-02 PFLP Karnei Shomron West Bank Mall 3 29 N Belt bomb 4 Outdoor food court CSS/ICT 17-Feb-02 Fatah Hadera Israel...in Lebanon, Hezbollah provided them with military, religious and operational training in addition to food and shelter. Thus, when the HAMAS and PIJ

  18. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Annual Report YR3 Gutierrez, P. M. (in press). Suicide Risk among Lesbian, Gay , Bisexual, and Transgender Military Personnel and Veterans: What...eating in heterosexual and gay college students. Body Image, 8, 232-236. 16. Smith, A., Li, N., & Joiner, T. (2011). The pursuit of success: Can...individuals by variation in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene . Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 20, 794-806. 20. Pettit, J

  19. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    21 ( DASS - 21 ): Further examination of dimensions, scale reliability, and correlates. Journal of Clinical Psychology. York, J., Lamis, D. A...Consortium will warehouse knowledge about suicidal behavior in general (e.g., from civilian and international sources as well as from military sources), so...reports (months 15, 18, 21 , 24) • The 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th quarter reports were prepared and distributed on time. Task 10. Continue to refine

  20. Enhancing Resident Safety by Preventing Healthcare-Associated Infection: A National Initiative to Reduce Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Mody, Lona; Meddings, Jennifer; Edson, Barbara S.; McNamara, Sara E.; Trautner, Barbara W.; Stone, Nimalie D.; Krein, Sarah L.; Saint, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Preventing healthcare-associated infection (HAI) is a key contributor to enhancing resident safety in nursing homes. In 2013, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services approved a plan to enhance resident safety by reducing HAIs in nursing homes, with particular emphasis on reducing indwelling catheter use and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI). Lessons learned from a recent multimodal Targeted Infection Prevention program in a group of nursing homes as well as a national initiative to prevent CAUTI in over 950 acute care hospitals called “On the CUSP: STOP CAUTI” will now be implemented in nearly 500 nursing homes in all 50 states through a project funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). This “AHRQ Safety Program in Long-Term Care: HAIs/CAUTI” will emphasize professional development in catheter utilization, catheter care and maintenance, and antimicrobial stewardship as well as promoting patient safety culture, team building, and leadership engagement. We anticipate that an approach integrating technical and socio-adaptive principles will serve as a model for future initiatives to reduce other infections, multidrug resistant organisms, and noninfectious adverse events among nursing home residents. PMID:25814630

  1. Suicidal ideation and distress in family members bereaved by suicide in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sara; Campos, Rui C; Tavares, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    The present study assessed the impact of suicide and distress on suicidal ideation in a sample of 93 Portuguese family members bereaved by suicide. A control community sample of 102 adults also participated. After controlling for educational level, those bereaved by the suicide of a family member were found to have higher levels of suicidal ideation. Forty-two percent of family members had Suicide Ideation Questionnaire scores at or above the cutoff point. General distress, depression, anxiety, and hostility related to suicidal ideation, whereas time since suicide also interacted with general distress and depression in predicting suicidal ideation.

  2. Local blockade of epithelial PDL-1 in the airways enhances T cell function and viral clearance during influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    McNally, Beth; Ye, Fang; Willette, Meredith; Flaño, Emilio

    2013-12-01

    In order to maintain the gas exchange function of the lung following influenza virus infection, a delicate orchestration of positive and negative regulatory pathways must be maintained to attain viral eradication while minimizing local inflammation. The programmed death receptor 1 ligand/programmed death receptor 1 (PDL-1/PD-1) pathway plays an important immunoregulatory role, particularly in the context of T cell function. Here, we have shown that influenza virus infection of primary airway epithelial cells strongly enhances PDL-1 expression and does so in an alpha interferon receptor (IFNAR) signaling-dependent manner. PD-1 is expressed primarily on effector T cells in the lung, compared to effector memory and central memory cells, and shortly after influenza virus infection, an increased number of PD-1(+) T cells are recruited to the airways. Using in vitro cocultures of airway epithelial cells and T cells and in vivo models of influenza virus infection, we have demonstrated that blockade of airway epithelial PDL-1 improves CD8 T cell function, defined by increased production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and granzyme B and expression of CD107ab. Furthermore, PDL-1 blockade in the airways served to accelerate influenza virus clearance and enhance infection recovery. Our findings suggest that local manipulation of the PDL-1/PD-1 axis in the airways may represent a therapeutic alternative during acute influenza virus infection.

  3. Hamlet's Suicide Soliloquy: A Case Study in Suicide Ideology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Andrew P.

    This paper presents a secondary-level teaching technique that can be used in an integrated English and health education curriculum. The exercise provides students and teachers with a case study of a suicidal person for the purpose of teaching the warning signs of suicide, appropriate questioning, and referral skills. The case study uses Hamlet's…

  4. An enhanced DNA fingerprinting service to investigate potential Clostridium difficile infection case clusters sharing the same PCR ribotype.

    PubMed

    Fawley, Warren N; Wilcox, Mark H

    2011-12-01

    Of 53 potential Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) case clusters/outbreaks, affecting 2 to 41 patients in 27 institutions, 19% comprised unrelated isolates and 34% had highly related and distinct isolates as shown by multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis, despite sharing a common ribotype. These findings emphasize the value of enhanced fingerprinting to confirm or refute suspected CDI case clusters.

  5. Oxygenated drinking water enhances immune activity in broiler chicks and increases survivability against Salmonella Gallinarum in experimentally infected broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bock-Gie; Lee, Jin-A; Nam, Kyoung-Woo; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2012-03-01

    It has been suggested that drinking oxygenated water may improve oxygen availability, which may increase vitality and improving immune activity. The present study evaluated the immune enhancing effects of oxygenated drinking water in broiler chicks and demonstrated the protective efficacy of oxygenated drinking water against Salmonella Gallinarum in experimentally infected broiler chicks. Continuous drinking of oxygenated water markedly increased serum lysozyme activity, peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation and the CD4(+)/CD8(+) splenocyte ratio in broiler chicks. In the chicks experimentally infected with S. Gallinarum, oxygenated drinking water alleviated symptoms and increased survival. These findings suggest that oxygenated drinking water enhances immune activity in broiler chicks, and increases survivability against S. Gallinarum in experimentally infected broiler chicks.

  6. MiR1918 enhances tomato sensitivity to Phytophthora infestans infection

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Yushi; Cui, Jun; Wang, Weichen; Meng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Late blight of tomato is caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans. In our previous work, we identified and characterized a miR1918 in P. infestans (pi-miR1918), and showed that its sequence is similar to the sequence of tomato miR1918 (sly-miR1918). In this study, we used Arabidopsis thaliana pre-miR159a as a backbone to synthesize pi-miR1918 via PCR and mutagenesis. The artificial pi-miR1918 was used to investigate the role of miR1918 in tomato-P. infestans interaction. Trangenic tomato plants that overexpressed the artificial pi-miR1918 displayed more serious disease symptoms than wild-type tomato plants after infection with P. infestans, as shown by increased number of necrotic cells, lesion sizes and number of sporangia per leaf. The target genes of pi-miR1918 and sly-miR1918 were also predicted for tomato and P. infestans, respectively. qPCR analysis of these targets also performed during tomato-P. infestans interaction. The expression of target gene, RING finger were negatively correlated with miR1918 in the all Lines of transgenic tomato plants. In addition, we used the 5′ RACE to determine the cleavage site of miR1918 to RING finger. These results suggested that miR1918 might be involved in the silencing of target genes, thereby enhancing the susceptibility of tomato to P. infestans infection. PMID:27779242

  7. MiR1918 enhances tomato sensitivity to Phytophthora infestans infection.

    PubMed

    Luan, Yushi; Cui, Jun; Wang, Weichen; Meng, Jun

    2016-10-25

    Late blight of tomato is caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans. In our previous work, we identified and characterized a miR1918 in P. infestans (pi-miR1918), and showed that its sequence is similar to the sequence of tomato miR1918 (sly-miR1918). In this study, we used Arabidopsis thaliana pre-miR159a as a backbone to synthesize pi-miR1918 via PCR and mutagenesis. The artificial pi-miR1918 was used to investigate the role of miR1918 in tomato-P. infestans interaction. Trangenic tomato plants that overexpressed the artificial pi-miR1918 displayed more serious disease symptoms than wild-type tomato plants after infection with P. infestans, as shown by increased number of necrotic cells, lesion sizes and number of sporangia per leaf. The target genes of pi-miR1918 and sly-miR1918 were also predicted for tomato and P. infestans, respectively. qPCR analysis of these targets also performed during tomato-P. infestans interaction. The expression of target gene, RING finger were negatively correlated with miR1918 in the all Lines of transgenic tomato plants. In addition, we used the 5' RACE to determine the cleavage site of miR1918 to RING finger. These results suggested that miR1918 might be involved in the silencing of target genes, thereby enhancing the susceptibility of tomato to P. infestans infection.

  8. Suicide Method Runs in Families: A Birth Certificate Cohort Study of Adolescent Suicide in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Tsung-Hsueh; Chang, Wan-Ting; Lin, Jin-Jia; Li, Chung-Yi

    2011-01-01

    Suicide method used by adolescents was examined to determine if it was the same as that employed by their suicidal parents. Six hundred eighty adolescents completed suicide between 1997 and 2007, of whom 12 had parents who had previously died by suicide. The suicide method used by these adolescents was compared with that employed by their suicidal…

  9. Pathways for Preparation: Locating Suicide Education in Preparing Professionals for Encounters with Suicidal Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranahan, Patti

    2013-01-01

    Current suicide prevention strategies often include suicide education based on the premise that education can lead to recognition of those at risk of suicide and others who are prepared can respond and potentially save lives. As suicide is a leading cause of death for young people, it is relevant to explore how suicide education is made available…

  10. Restrictions in Means for Suicide: An Effective Tool in Preventing Suicide: The Danish Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordentoft, Merete; Qin, Ping; Helweg-Larsen, Karin

    2007-01-01

    Restriction of means for suicide is an important part of suicide preventive strategies in different countries. The effect on method-specific suicide rate and overall suicide rate of restrictions on availability of carbon monoxide, barbiturates, and dextropropoxyphene was examined. From 1970 to 2000, overall suicide mortality and method-specific…

  11. Toxoplasmosis Titers and past Suicide Attempts Among Older Adolescents Initiating SSRI Treatment.

    PubMed

    Coryell, William; Yolken, Robert; Butcher, Brandon; Burns, Trudy; Dindo, Lilian; Schlechte, Janet; Calarge, Chadi

    2016-01-01

    Latent infection with toxoplasmosis is a prevalent condition that has been linked in animal studies to high-risk behaviors, and in humans, to suicide and suicide attempts. This analysis investigated a relationship between suicide attempt history and toxoplasmosis titers in a group of older adolescents who had recently begun treatment with an SSRI. Of 108 participants, 17 (15.7 %) had a lifetime history of at least one suicide attempt. All were given structured and unstructured diagnostic interviews and provided blood samples. Two individuals (11.9%) with a past suicide attempt, and two (2.1%) without this history, had toxoplasmosis titers ≥ 10 IU/ml (p = 0.166). Those with a past suicide attempt had mean toxoplasmosis titers that were significantly different (p = 0.018) from those of patients who lacked this history. An ROC analysis suggested a lower optimal threshold for distinguishing patients with and without suicide attempts (3.6 IU/ml) than that customarily used to identify seropositivity. Toxoplasmosis titers may quantify a proneness to suicidal behavior in younger individuals being treated with antidepressants.

  12. Interventions to reduce suicides at suicide hotspots: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background ‘Suicide hotspots’ include tall structures (for example, bridges and cliffs), railway tracks, and isolated locations (for example, rural car parks) which offer direct means for suicide or seclusion that prevents intervention. Methods We searched Medline for studies that could inform the following question: ‘What interventions are available to reduce suicides at hotspots, and are they effective?’ Results There are four main approaches: (a) restricting access to means (through installation of physical barriers); (b) encouraging help-seeking (by placement of signs and telephones); (c) increasing the likelihood of intervention by a third party (through surveillance and staff training); and (d) encouraging responsible media reporting of suicide (through guidelines for journalists). There is relatively strong evidence that reducing access to means can avert suicides at hotspots without substitution effects. The evidence is weaker for the other approaches, although they show promise. Conclusions More well-designed intervention studies are needed to strengthen this evidence base. PMID:23496989

  13. Lectin-Dependent Enhancement of Ebola Virus Infection via Soluble and Transmembrane C-type Lectin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lear, Calli; Chen, Li; Yantosca, L. Michael; Scully, Corinne; Sarraju, Ashish; Sokolovska, Anna; Zariffard, M. Reza; Eisen, Damon P.; Mungall, Bruce A.; Kotton, Darrell N.; Omari, Amel; Huang, I-Chueh; Farzan, Michael; Takahashi, Kazue; Stuart, Lynda; Stahl, Gregory L.; Ezekowitz, Alan B.; Spear, Gregory T.; Olinger, Gene G.; Schmidt, Emmett V.; Michelow, Ian C.

    2013-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key soluble effector of the innate immune system that recognizes pathogen-specific surface glycans. Surprisingly, low-producing MBL genetic variants that may predispose children and immunocompromised individuals to infectious diseases are more common than would be expected in human populations. Since certain immune defense molecules, such as immunoglobulins, can be exploited by invasive pathogens, we hypothesized that MBL might also enhance infections in some circumstances. Consequently, the low and intermediate MBL levels commonly found in human populations might be the result of balancing selection. Using model infection systems with pseudotyped and authentic glycosylated viruses, we demonstrated that MBL indeed enhances infection of Ebola, Hendra, Nipah and West Nile viruses in low complement conditions. Mechanistic studies with Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviruses confirmed that MBL binds to N-linked glycan epitopes on viral surfaces in a specific manner via the MBL carbohydrate recognition domain, which is necessary for enhanced infection. MBL mediates lipid-raft-dependent macropinocytosis of EBOV via a pathway that appears to require less actin or early endosomal processing compared with the filovirus canonical endocytic pathway. Using a validated RNA interference screen, we identified C1QBP (gC1qR) as a candidate surface receptor that mediates MBL-dependent enhancement of EBOV infection. We also identified dectin-2 (CLEC6A) as a potentially novel candidate attachment factor for EBOV. Our findings support the concept of an innate immune haplotype that represents critical interactions between MBL and complement component C4 genes and that may modify susceptibility or resistance to certain glycosylated pathogens. Therefore, higher levels of native or exogenous MBL could be deleterious in the setting of relative hypocomplementemia which can occur genetically or because of immunodepletion during active

  14. Involvement of CD16 in antibody-dependent enhancement of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Gu, Weihong; Guo, Longjun; Yu, Haidong; Niu, Junwei; Huang, Mingming; Luo, Xiaolei; Li, Ren; Tian, Zhijun; Feng, Li; Wang, Yue

    2015-07-01

    The immunological effect of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome disease virus (PRRSV) vaccines is thought to be influenced by a variety of host factors, in which antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection is one crucial factor. Here, we assessed the mechanism of ADE of PRRSV infection. First, we found that subneutralizing serum could induce ADE of PRRSV infection in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs). Quantitative PCR, Western blotting and flow cytometry revealed that CD16 is the most abundant Fcγ receptor (FcγR) expressed on the surface of PAMs; thus, the role of CD16 in ADE of PRRSV infection was examined in PAMs. By using functional blocking antibodies, we demonstrated that CD16 is involved in enhanced virus production in PRRSV-antibody immune complex-infected PAMs. Because PAMs co-express different FcγR isoforms, we evaluated the effects of CD16 in FcγR-non-bearing cells by transfection. Using these engineered cells, we found that CD16 could specifically bind to the PRRSV-antibody immune complex and subsequently mediate internalization of the virus, resulting in the generation of progeny virus. We also showed that efficient expression of CD16 required association of the FcR γ-chain. Together, our findings provide significant new insights into PRRSV infection, which can be enhanced by CD16-mediated PRRSV-antibody immune complexes. This CD16-mediated ADE may induce a shift in PRRSV tropism towards CD16-expressing cells, distributing virus to more organs during virus infection.

  15. Suicide in Guyana: Nurses' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Maureen; Groh, Carla; Gash, Jean

    Guyana, an English-speaking country on the north coast of South America, has the highest suicide rate in the world. Nurses are an integral part of the healthcare team working with patients experiencing psychological distress and are uniquely qualified to add to the discourse on factors contributing to the high suicide rate in Guyana. The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes and experiences of nurses and nurse assistants in Guyana related to suicide. Nine registered nurses and nurse assistants who worked at a private hospital in Georgetown, Guyana, were recruited to participate in a focus group. The focus group lasted approximately 70 minutes and was recorded. The audio recordings were later transcribed word for word. Four themes emerged from the data: family issues as they relate to the high suicide rate, suicide attempts as a cry for help, lack of support, and coping mechanisms used by nurses when caring for victims of attempted suicide. Nurses are uniquely positioned to intervene with families in crisis, whether it be suicide, suicide attempts, or the underlying factors of family dysfunction, child maltreatment, poverty, or alcoholism. Establishing forensic nursing as a specialty in Guyana would validate this important role through education and certification of nurses.

  16. Rx for the Suicide Epidemic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stupple, Donna-Marie

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the gradual rise in teenage suicides since the 1950s, and offers some pointers for using writing (with "Romeo and Juliet" as source literature) as a basis for group discussion. Adds that suicide is a theme and a reality that can be addressed in the English classroom. (NKA)

  17. Surrogate Endpoints in Suicide Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wortzel, Hal S.; Gutierrez, Peter M.; Homaifar, Beeta Y.; Breshears, Ryan E.; Harwood, Jeri E.

    2010-01-01

    Surrogate endpoints frequently substitute for rare outcomes in research. The ability to learn about completed suicides by investigating more readily available and proximate outcomes, such as suicide attempts, has obvious appeal. However, concerns with surrogates from the statistical science perspective exist, and mounting evidence from…

  18. Adolescent Suicide: An Educator's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Brenda H.

    Intended for use as part of an inservice program, this guide was designed to provide insight into adolescent suicide and to serve as a reference tool. It begins with an overview of suicide, citing society's desensitization to death, rapid changes in society, success codes, and the disappearance of the extended family as factors in the increase of…

  19. Predictors of Police Suicide Ideation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Violanti, John M.

    2004-01-01

    Further inquiry into processes that lead to suicide in the police occupation is necessary. Suicide ideation in police officers and possible correlates associated with such ideation is explored in this paper. The focus was on psychologically traumatic police work experiences, the development of posttraumatic stress (PTSD) in officers, and the…

  20. Toward a Biosignature for Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Oquendo, Maria A.; Sullivan, Gregory M.; Sudol, Katherin; Baca-Garcia, Enrique; Stanley, Barbara H.; Sublette, M. Elizabeth; Mann, J. John

    2015-01-01

    Objective Suicide, a major cause of death worldwide, has distinct biological underpinnings. The authors review and synthesize the research literature on biomarkers of suicide, with the aim of using the findings of these studies to develop a coherent model for the biological diathesis for suicide. Method The authors examined studies covering a large range of neurobiological systems implicated in suicide. They provide succinct descriptions of each system to provide a context for interpreting the meaning of findings in suicide. Results Several lines of evidence implicate dysregulation in stress response systems, especially the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, as a diathesis for suicide. Additional findings related to neuroinflammatory indices, glutamatergic function, and neuronal plasticity at the cellular and circuitry level may reflect downstream effects of such dysregulation. Whether serotonergic abnormalities observed in individuals who have died by suicide are independent of stress response abnormalities is an unresolved question. Conclusions The most compelling biomarkers for suicide are linked to altered stress responses and their downstream effects, and to abnormalities in the serotonergic system. Studying these systems in parallel and in the same populations may elucidate the role of each and their interplay, possibly leading to identification of new treatment targets and biological predictors. PMID:25263730

  1. Latina Teen Suicide and Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Andrea J.; Wiggs, Christine Bracamonte; Valencia, Celina; Bauman, Sheri

    2013-01-01

    Latina adolescents experience depression and suicidal ideations in a disproportionate manner compared to their non-Latina counterparts. We investigate suicide and depressive symptoms among a state-wide sample (N = 650) of adolescent Latina girls with a focus on bullying as a predictor. Bullying rates are higher than previous studies have found for…

  2. Suicidality in Bipolar I Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Sheri L.; McMurrich, Stephanie L.; Yates, Marisa

    2005-01-01

    People with bipolar disorder are at high suicide risk. The literature suggests that suicidality is predicted by higher symptom severity and less use of pharmacological agents, but few studies have examined the joint contributions of these variables. The present study examines the conjoint contribution of symptom severity and pharmacological…

  3. Meriwether Lewis: Was it Suicide?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westefeld, John S.; Less, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    Even 200 years following the conclusion of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, questions remain about whether Meriwether Lewis' death was a suicide. The purpose of this article is to consider this issue by examining historical evidence from a psychological perspective. A risk factor model for suicide assessment (Sanchez, 2001) is employed to evaluate…

  4. On the Neuropsychology of Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D.

    1989-01-01

    Three neuropsychological case studies of individuals with learning disabilities support the possibility that nonverbal learning disability is associated with greater emotional dysfunction and the potential for suicide. Further research to resolve some concerns about this possible predisposition to suicidal behavior is recommended. (MSE)

  5. Alpha-tocopherol transfer protein gene inhibition enhances the acquired immune response during malaria infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Herbas, Maria Shirley; Natama, Magloire Hamtandi; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Immune response to malaria infection is complex and seems to be regulated by innate and adaptive immune response as well as environmental factors such as host genetics and nutritional status. Previously, we have reported that α-tocopherol transfer protein knockout (α-ttp(Δ)) mice, showing low concentrations of α-tocopherol in circulation, infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 survived significantly longer as compared with the wild-type mice. In addition, Plasmodium yoelii XL-17, a lethal strain, showed non-lethal virulence in α-ttp(Δ) mice. Thus, we hypothesized that the ability of the α-ttp(Δ) mice to control P. yoelli XL-17 proliferation may allow them to build an efficient immune response against murine malaria infection. On 15 days after infection with P. yoelli XL-17, α-ttp(Δ) mice were challenged to infection with P. berghei NK65. Results indicated that α-ttp(Δ) mice infected with P. yoelli XL-17 built a protective immunity against P. berghei NK65 associated to extremely low levels of parasitemia, a controlled inflammatory response, and a robust antibody response. Moreover, the importance of α-tocopherol for parasite proliferation was remarkable. The results suggest that inhibition of α-tocopherol transfer protein activity is effective for the enhancement of acquired immunity in murine malaria infection.

  6. Suicide and the Military Justice System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lande, Raymond G.

    1992-01-01

    Notes that U.S. military policies emphasize humanitarian approach to issue of suicide, yet military law may view suicidal behavior as deviant and may prosecute suicide attempters. Cites convictions of soldiers for attempted and assisted suicides. Reviews recent court decisions and suggests revisions in military law. (Author/NB)

  7. Preventing the Spread of Suicide among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, William

    1985-01-01

    Communities across the country are having to deal with teenage suicide--a tragedy because it is preventable in many situations. Characteristics of a suicidal person are discussed. Recommendations for intervening with students after the suicide death of a peer in order to help prevent subsequent suicide deaths are made. (RM)

  8. Prison Suicides in Austria, 1975-1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fruehwald, Stefan; Frottier, Patrick; Eher, Reinhard; Gutierrez, Karin; Ritter, Kristina

    2000-01-01

    Examines the prison suicide phenomenon by evaluating all suicides occurring in Austrian prisons between 1975 and 1997 (N=220). Results reveal suicide rates for prisoners on remand and mentally ill prisoners are 8 times higher than that of the general population. Recommends that psychologists concentrate on the suicide prevention of high-risk…

  9. Can Suicide Be a Good Death?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David

    2006-01-01

    The issue of whether suicide can be a good death was separated into two different questions: (1) can suicide be an appropriate death, and (2) can suicide be a rational death? Several definitions of an "appropriate" death were proposed, and suicide was seen as potentially appropriate. Similarly, several criteria for rationality were proposed and…

  10. A Comparison of 15 Theories of Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David

    1994-01-01

    Studied lives of suicidal individuals by operationalizing each of 15 theories of suicide with 10 statements and rating these 150 statements as present or absent in lives of 30 famous suicides for whom biographies were available. Theory of Aaron Beck was found to be most applicable to suicidal lives and that of Freud was least applicable.…

  11. Suicidality and Psychosis: Beyond Depression and Hopelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warman, Debbie M.; Forman, Evan M.; Henriques, Gregg R.; Brown, Gregory K.; Beck, Aaron T.

    2004-01-01

    The present study examined recent suicide attempters with and without psychotic disorders in order to understand factors that contribute to suicide ideation during and following the suicide attempt. Patients with psychotic disorders endorsed higher levels of suicide ideation than patients without psychotic disorders. Even when depression,…

  12. African American College Women's Suicide Buffers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion, Michelle S.; Range, Lillian M.

    2003-01-01

    To examine the relationships buffers may have with suicide ideation, 300 African American female college students completed measures of suicide ideation and buffers. Three variables accounted for a significant and unique portion of the variance in suicide ideation: family support, a view that suicide is unacceptable, and a collaborative religious…

  13. Impaired Decision Making in Adolescent Suicide Attempters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridge, Jeffrey A.; McBee-Strayer, Sandra M.; Cannon, Elizabeth A.; Sheftall, Arielle H.; Reynolds, Brady; Campo, John V.; Pajer, Kathleen A.; Barbe, Remy P.; Brent, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Decision-making deficits have been linked to suicidal behavior in adults. However, it remains unclear whether impaired decision making plays a role in the etiopathogenesis of youth suicidal behavior. The purpose of this study was to examine decision-making processes in adolescent suicide attempters and never-suicidal comparison…

  14. Grief Experiences and Expectance of Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojtkowiak, Joanna; Wild, Verena; Egger, Jos

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is generally viewed as an unexpected cause of death. However, some suicides might be expected to a certain extent, which needs to be further studied. The relationships between expecting suicide, feeling understanding for the suicide, and later grief experiences were explored. In total, 142 bereaved participants completed the Grief…

  15. Suicide and Its Prevention on College Campuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyes, Lee

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is a significant issue facing higher education institutions. Many campuses are involved in a variety of procedures, programs, and initiatives that seek to reduce or prevent suicide and the impact of suicide-related behavior. This article offers examples of campus prevention efforts, important resources on suicide prevention for college…

  16. Female Suicide Rates in Ghizer, Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Murad M.; Ahmed, Aziz; Khan, Sultan R.

    2009-01-01

    Suicide is an understudied subject in Pakistan. There are many social, legal, and religious sanctions against it. National rates of suicides are not known. We calculated suicide rates of women in the Ghizer District of the remote Northern Areas of Pakistan. During years 2000 to 2004, 49 women committed suicide. Taking average mean population for…

  17. DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES ENHANCE INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTIVITY BY INCREASING VIRUS ATTACHMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite vaccination and antiviral therapies, influenza infections continue to cause large scale morbidity and mortality every year. Several factors, such as age and nutritional status can affect the incidence and severity of influenza infections. Moreover, exposure to air polluta...

  18. Can We Really Prevent Suicide?

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz-Lifshitz, Maya; Zalsman, Gil; Giner, Lucas; Oquendo, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Every year, suicide is among the top 20 leading causes of death globally for all ages. Unfortunately, suicide is difficult to prevent, in large part because the prevalence of risk factors is high among the general population. In this review, clinical and psychological risk factors are examined and methods for suicide prevention are discussed. Prevention strategies found to be effective in suicide prevention include means restriction, responsible media coverage, and general public education, as well identification methods such as screening, gatekeeper training, and primary care physician education. Although the treatment for preventing suicide is difficult, follow-up that includes pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, or both may be useful. However, prevention methods cannot be restricted to the individual. Community, social, and policy interventions will also be essential. PMID:22996297

  19. Heroin inhibits HIV-restriction miRNAs and enhances HIV infection of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Ma, Tong-Cui; Li, Jie-Liang; Zhou, Yu; Geller, Ellen B.; Adler, Martin W.; Peng, Jin-Song; Zhou, Wang; Zhou, Dun-Jin; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Although opioids have been extensively studied for their impact on the immune system, limited information is available about the specific actions of opioids on intracellular antiviral innate immunity against HIV infection. Thus, we investigated whether heroin, one of the most abused drugs, inhibits the expression of intracellular HIV restriction microRNA (miRNA) and facilitates HIV replication in macrophages. Heroin treatment of macrophages enhanced HIV replication, which was associated with the downregulation of several HIV restriction miRNAs. These heroin-mediated actions on the miRNAs and HIV could be antagonized by naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist. Furthermore, the in vitro negative impact of heroin on HIV-associated miRNAs was confirmed by the in vivo observation that heroin addicts had significantly lower levels of macrophage-derived HIV restriction miRNAs than those in the control subjects. These in vitro and in vivo findings indicate that heroin use compromises intracellular anti-HIV innate immunity, providing a favorable microenvironment for HIV survival in the target cells. PMID:26583016

  20. Experimental virotherapy of chemoresistant pancreatic carcinoma using infectivity-enhanced fiber-mosaic oncolytic adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Kaliberov, Sergey A.; Kaliberova, Lyudmila N.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.; Curiel, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a significant clinical problem and novel therapeutic approaches are desperately needed. Recent advances in conditionally replicative adenovirus-based (CRAd) oncolytic virus design allow the application of CRAd vectors as a therapeutic strategy to efficiently target and eradicate chemoresistant pancreatic cancer cells thereby improving the efficacy of pancreatic cancer treatment. The goal of this study was to construct and validate the efficacy of an infectivity-enhanced, liver-untargeted, tumor-specific CRAd vector. A panel of CRAds has been derived which embody the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 promoter for conditional replication, two fiber complex mosaicism for targeting expansion, and hexon hypervariable region 7 (HVR7) modification for liver untargeting. We evaluated CRAds for cancer virotherapy using a human pancreatic tumor xenograft model. Employment of the fiber mosaic approach improved CRAd replication in pancreatic tumor xenografts. Substitution of the HVR7 of the Ad5 hexon for Ad serotype 3 hexon resulted in decreased liver tropism of systemically administrated CRAd. Obtained data demonstrated that employment of complex mosaicism increased efficacy of the combination of oncolytic virotherapy with chemotherapy in a human pancreatic tumor xenograft model. PMID:24903014

  1. Infection by gymnophallid metacercariae enhances predation mortality of SW Atlantic stout razor clam Tagelus plebeius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addino, Mariana; Lomovasky, Betina J.; Cremonte, Florencia; Iribarne, Oscar

    2010-02-01

    Parasite life cycles are frequently completed in different hosts, thus the parasites have its life cycle overlapped to natural trophic webs. The family Gymnophallidae (Class: Trematoda; Subclass: Digenea) includes digenetic parasites whose larval stages occur on bivalves and may affect bivalve predation by the final host of these parasites. In this work we evaluated: (a) if individuals of the razor clam Tagelus plebeius with higher parasite intensity suffer higher predation by the oystercatcher Haematopus palliatus and, (b) if there is any effect of parasite intensity on burrowing and escape behaviours of these razor clams which may enhance exposure to predators. Field experiments (oystercatcher exclusion vs. open access) showed that clams with higher parasite intensity support higher predation by oystercatchers, which suggests a higher consumption of more parasitized clams and thus, a more successful reproduction of parasites linked to the intensity of infection. However, clam burrowing and escape behaviours did not show differences related to different parasite intensity, suggesting that the commonly believed mechanisms are not responsible in this case.

  2. Cultural influences on suicide in Japan.

    PubMed

    Russell, Roxanne; Metraux, Daniel; Tohen, Mauricio

    2017-01-01

    Following the economic crash of the late 1990s, the suicide rate in Japan increased to a rate of over 30 000 people per year and has been one of the highest in the world. Cultural factors have influenced this high suicide rate, such as a tradition of honorable suicide as well as permissive attitudes towards suicide that remain in modern times. Additionally, the economic downturn, particularly the trend of unemployment in middle-aged men, also played a significant role in the high suicide rate. The suicide rate has started to decrease in recent years perhaps in part due to suicide prevention measures undertaken by the government.

  3. Religion and Suicide Risk: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Ryan E; Oquendo, Maria A; Stanley, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Although religion is reported to be protective against suicide, the empirical evidence is inconsistent. Research is complicated by the fact that there are many dimensions to religion (affiliation, participation, doctrine) and suicide (ideation, attempt, completion). We systematically reviewed the literature on religion and suicide over the last 10 years (89 articles) with a goal of identifying what specific dimensions of religion are associated with specific aspects of suicide. We found that religious affiliation does not necessarily protect against suicidal ideation, but does protect against suicide attempts. Whether religious affiliation protects against suicide attempts may depend on the culture-specific implications of affiliating with a particular religion, since minority religious groups can feel socially isolated. After adjusting for social support measures, religious service attendance is not especially protective against suicidal ideation, but does protect against suicide attempts, and possibly protects against suicide. Future qualitative studies might further clarify these associations.

  4. Military and civilian media coverage of suicide.

    PubMed

    Edwards-Stewart, Amanda; Kinn, Julie T; June, Jennifer D; Fullerton, Nicole R

    2011-01-01

    Military suicide has increased over the past decade and reports of Service Member and Veteran suicides receive media attention. Some methods of reporting suicide appear to cause a "media contagion" effect, potentially increasing suicide. This effect is explored in relation to media reports of both military and civilian suicides. To reduce possible contagion, recommendations for media reporting of suicides were adapted by the Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC). We assessed 240 military and civilian newspaper reports of suicide from 15 different sources for compliance with the SPRC guidelines. Nearly all reviewed articles violated at least one guideline. Results highlighted military news articles regarding Service Members included more pejorative language and discussion of failed psychological treatment. Conversely, civilian articles romanticized the victim and provided more details regarding the suicide. Further exploration of military suicide reporting bias is discussed as a need in future research.

  5. Exposure to pairs of Aeromonas strains enhances virulence in the Caenorhabditis elegans infection model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aeromonad virulence remains poorly understood, and is difficult to predict from strain characteristics. In addition, infections are often polymicrobial (i.e., are mixed infections), and 5 -10% of such infections include two distinct aeromonads, which has an unknown impact on virulence. In this work,...

  6. A new in vitro model using small intestinal epithelial cells to enhance infection of Cryptosporidium parvum

    EPA Science Inventory

    To better understand and study the infection of the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, a more sensitive in vitro assay is required. In vivo, this parasite infects the epithelial cells of the microvilli layer in the small intestine. While cell infection models using colon,...

  7. Enhancement of the Musca domestica hytrosavirus infection with orally delivered reducing agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    House flies (Musca domestica L.) throughout the world are infected with the salivary gland hypertrophy virus MdSGHV (Hytrosaviridae). Although the primary route of infection is thought to be via ingestion, flies that are old enough to feed normally are resistant to infection per os, suggesting that ...

  8. Dietary aluminosilicate supplement enhances immune activity in mice and reinforces clearance of porcine circovirus type 2 in experimentally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bock-Gie; Toan, Nguyen Tat; Cho, Sun-Ju; Ko, Jae-hyung; Jung, Yeon-Kwon; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2010-07-14

    Aluminosilicate is the major component of clay minerals such as zeolite, bentonite and clinoptilolite. The minerals possess a number of beneficial activities, especially in regulating the immune system. The aims of the present study were to evaluate immune enhancing effects of dietary aluminosilicate supplement (DAS) in mice, and to demonstrate clearance effects of DAS against porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in experimentally infected pigs as an initial step towards the development of an antibiotic substitute for use in pigs. Relative messenger RNA expression levels of interferon-gamma, interleukin-4 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, phagocytic activities of polymorphonuclear leucocytes, serum antibody production level and spleen B cell ratio were significantly increased in the DAS groups of mice compared with the control group (each feeding group had three replications with 5 mice each). The results indicated that general immune activity including cellular and humoral immunity could be enhanced by DAS in mice. In experimentally PCV2-infected pigs, the load of viral genome in nasal swab, serum and lung of the DAS group of pigs was significantly decreased compared with the control group at 28 days post-infection (each group three pigs). Corresponding histopathological analyses demonstrated that pigs in the DAS group displayed mild and less severe abnormal changes compared with the control group, indicating that DAS reinforces clearance of PCV2 in experimentally infected pigs. This may relate to general immune enhancing effects of DAS in mice. Therefore DAS will help the health of animal, especially in swine.

  9. Ricin-B-lectin enhances microsporidia Nosema bombycis infection in BmN cells from silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Li, Mingqian; Cai, Shunfeng; He, Xinyi; Shao, Yongqi; Lu, Xingmeng

    2016-11-01

    Nosema bombycis is an obligate intracellular parasitic fungus that utilizes a distinctive mechanism to infect Bombyx mori Spore germination can be used for host cell invasion; however, the detailed mechanism remains to be elucidated. The ricin-B-lectin (RBL) gene is significantly differentially regulated after N. bombycis spore germination, and NbRBL might play roles in spore germination and infection. In this study, the biological function of NbRBL was examined. Protein sequence analysis showed that NbRBL is a secreted protein that attaches to carbohydrates. The relative expression level of the NbRBL gene was low during the first 30 h post-infection (hpi) in BmN cells, and high expression was detected from 42 hpi. Gene cloning, prokaryotic expression, and antibody preparation for NbRBL were performed. NbRBL was detected in total and secreted proteins using western blot analysis. Subcellular localization analysis showed that NbRBL is an intracellular protein. Spore adherence and infection assays showed that NbRBL could enhance spore adhesion to BmN cells; the proliferative activities of BmN cells incubated with anti-NbRBL were higher than those in negative control groups after N. bombycis infection; and the treatment groups showed less damage from spore invasion. We therefore, propose that NbRBL is released during spore germination, enhances spore adhesion to BmN cells, and contributes to spore invasion.

  10. Infection,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-16

    inapparent infection. A refeeding program may thus become complicated by the sudden appearance of a life-threatening infectious illness (3). (3) The...Beisel, W. R. 23 Unusually low serum concentrations of inorganic phosphate have been reported in patients with gram-negative sepsis and in Reye’s syndrome ...infection should be corrected by a well-managed program of convalescent-period refeeding . This aspect of nutritional support is too often ignored. On the

  11. Induction of suicidal erythrocyte death by nelfinavir.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, Rosi; Waibel, Sabrina; Lang, Florian

    2015-05-08

    The HIV protease inhibitor, nelfinavir, primarily used for the treatment of HIV infections, has later been shown to be effective in various infectious diseases including malaria. Nelfinavir may trigger mitochondria-independent cell death. Erythrocytes may undergo eryptosis, a mitochondria-independent suicidal cell death characterized by cell shrinkage and phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include oxidative stress and increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i). During malaria, accelerated death of infected erythrocytes may decrease parasitemia and thus favorably influence the clinical course of the disease. In the present study, phosphatidylserine abundance at the cell surface was estimated from annexin V binding, cell volume from forward scatter, reactive oxidant species (ROS) from 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) fluorescence, and [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence. A 48 h treatment of human erythrocytes with nelfinavir significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells (≥5µg/mL), significantly decreased forward scatter (≥2.5µg/mL), significantly increased ROS abundance (10 µg/mL), and significantly increased [Ca2+]i (≥5 µg/mL). The up-regulation of annexin-V-binding following nelfinavir treatment was significantly blunted, but not abolished by either addition of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (1 mM) or removal of extracellular Ca2+. In conclusion, exposure of erythrocytes to nelfinavir induces oxidative stress and Ca2+ entry, thus leading to suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by erythrocyte shrinkage and erythrocyte membrane scrambling.

  12. The development of pharmacokinetically enhanced amoxicillin/clavulanate for the management of respiratory tract infections in adults.

    PubMed

    File, Thomas M

    2007-12-01

    Rising levels of resistance amongst the major respiratory pathogens have compromised empiric antimicrobial therapy. This, coupled with a recent lack in availability of novel classes of antibacterials, has led to a need for new approaches to combat community respiratory tract infections. Bacteriological and clinical efficacy in two trials involving patients with acute bacterial sinusitis and six trials of patients with community-acquired pneumonia has shown that the development of a pharmacokinetically enhanced formulation of amoxicillin/clavulanate (Augmentin SR, available as Augmentin XR in the USA) has allowed amoxicillin/clavulanate to retain its place in the treatment of respiratory tract infections today.

  13. Enhanced clearance of HIV-1-infected cells by broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ching-Lan; Murakowski, Dariusz K; Bournazos, Stylianos; Schoofs, Till; Sarkar, Debolina; Halper-Stromberg, Ariel; Horwitz, Joshua A; Nogueira, Lilian; Golijanin, Jovana; Gazumyan, Anna; Ravetch, Jeffrey V; Caskey, Marina; Chakraborty, Arup K; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-05-20

    Antiretroviral drugs and antibodies limit HIV-1 infection by interfering with the viral life cycle. In addition, antibodies also have the potential to guide host immune effector cells to kill HIV-1-infected cells. Examination of the kinetics of HIV-1 suppression in infected individuals by passively administered 3BNC117, a broadly neutralizing antibody, suggested that the effects of the antibody are not limited to free viral clearance and blocking new infection but also include acceleration of infected cell clearance. Consistent with these observations, we find that broadly neutralizing antibodies can target CD4(+) T cells infected with patient viruses and can decrease their in vivo half-lives by a mechanism that requires Fcγ receptor engagement in a humanized mouse model. The results indicate that passive immunotherapy can accelerate elimination of HIV-1-infected cells.

  14. Cell-to-cell contact of human monocytes with infected arterial smooth-muscle cells enhances growth of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Puolakkainen, Mirja; Campbell, Lee Ann; Lin, Tsun-Mei; Richards, Theresa; Patton, Dorothy L; Kuo, Cho-Chou

    2003-02-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae can infect arterial cells. It has been shown that coculture of human monocytes (U937) and endothelial cells promotes infection of C. pneumoniae in endothelial cells and that the enhancement was mediated by a soluble factor (insulin-like growth factor 2) secreted by monocytes. In this study, it is shown that coculture of monocytes with C. pneumoniae enhances infection of C. pneumoniae in arterial smooth-muscle cells 5.3-fold at a monocyte-to-smooth-muscle cell ratio of 5. However, unlike endothelial cells, no enhancement was observed if monocytes were placed in cell culture inserts or if conditioned medium from monocyte cultures was used, which suggests that cell-to-cell contact is critical. The addition of mannose 6-phosphate or octyl glucoside, a nonionic detergent containing a sugar group, to cocultures inhibited the enhancement. These findings suggest that the monocyte-smooth-muscle cell interaction may be mediated by mannose 6-phosphate receptors present on monocytes.

  15. Assisted suicide and euthanasia.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Agnes

    2013-01-01

    Several countries have adopted laws that regulate physician assistance in dying. Such assistance may consist of providing a patient with a prescription of lethal medication that is self-administered by the patient, which is usually referred to as (physician) assistance in suicide, or of administering lethal medication to a patient, which is referred to as euthanasia. The main aim of regulating physician assistance in dying is to bring these practices into the open and to provide physicians with legal certainty. A key condition in all jurisdictions that have regulated either assistance in suicide or euthanasia is that physicians are only allowed to engage in these acts upon the explicit and voluntary request of the patient. All systems that allow physician assistance in dying have also in some way included the notion that physician assistance in dying is only accepted when it is the only means to address severe suffering from an incurable medical condition. Arguments against the legal regulation of physician assistance in dying include principled arguments, such as the wrongness of hastening death, and arguments that emphasize the negative consequences of allowing physician assistance in dying, such as a devaluation of the lives of older people, or people with chronic disease or disabilities. Opinion polls show that some form of accepting and regulating euthanasia and physician assistance in suicide is increasingly supported by the general population in most western countries. Studies in countries where physician assistance in dying is regulated suggest that practices have remained rather stable in most jurisdictions and that physicians adhere to the legal criteria in the vast majority of cases.

  16. Military suicide coverage: AP news wire & suicide guidelines.

    PubMed

    Schuman, Donna; Praetorius, Regina T; Barnes, Donelle M; Arana, Allyson A

    2016-10-01

    The authors evaluated how well Associated Press News Wire stories adhered to the Recommendations for Reporting on Suicide™ during 2012, a peak year of military suicide. They included individual suicide stories (N = 167) from randomly selected days. They also evaluated differences in the military versus civilian coverage. Military and civilian stories typically had about five negative practices, and less than one positive practice, with military stories significantly more likely to miss valuable opportunities to promote help-seeking. The findings, combined with previous evidence, suggest the need for the development of specific military suicide reporting guidelines.

  17. [Suicidal buflomedil intoxication].

    PubMed

    Babel, Bernward; Tatschner, Thomas; Patzelt, Dieter

    2004-01-01

    A suicidal intoxication of a young woman following an overdose of buflomedil is reported. She died in a hospital 17 hours after ingestion. In various body fluids the following buflomedil concentrations were determined: heart blood 24.5 microg/ml, liquor 21.3 microg/ml, bile 39.1 mg/ml and urine 138.6 mg/ml. Additionally the results of autopsy and histology are presented. Anemia of the internal organs was conspicuous; this finding is attributed to the vasodilating effect of buflomedil on the peripheral vessels.

  18. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant enhance neonatal resistance to systemic Escherichia coli K1 infection by accelerating development of intestinal defense

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaolong; Zeng, Qing; Puthiyakunnon, Santhosh; Zeng, Zhijie; Yang, Weijun; Qiu, Jiawen; Du, Lei; Boddu, Swapna; Wu, Tongwei; Cai, Danxian; Huang, Sheng-He; Cao, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG culture supernatant (LCS) has a preventive effect against gut-derived systemic neonatal Escherichia coli (E. coli) K1 infection. The preventive effects were evaluated in human colonic carcinoma cell line Caco-2 and neonatal rat models. Our in vitro results showed that LCS could block adhesion, invasion and translocation of E. coli K1 to Caco-2 monolayer via up-regulating mucin production and maintaining intestinal integrity. In vivo experiments revealed that pre-treatment with LCS significantly decrease susceptibility of neonatal rats to oral E. coli K1 infection as reflected by reduced bacterial intestinal colonization, translocation, dissemination and systemic infections. Further, we found that LCS treated neonatal rats have higher intestinal expressions of Ki67, MUC2, ZO-1, IgA, mucin and lower barrier permeability than those in untreated rats. These results indicated that LCS could enhance neonatal resistance to systemic E. coli K1 infection via promoting maturation of neonatal intestinal defense. In conclusions, our findings suggested that LCS has a prophylactic effect against systemic E. coli K1 infection in neonates. Future studies aimed at identifying the specific active ingredients in LCS will be helpful in developing effective pharmacological strategies for preventing neonatal E. coli K1 infection. PMID:28262688

  19. Enhancement of infectivity and persistence in vivo by HBZ, a natural antisense coded protein of HTLV-1.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Joshua; Yamamoto, Brenda; Li, Min; Phipps, Andrew J; Younis, Ihab; Lairmore, Michael D; Green, Patrick L

    2006-05-15

    Natural antisense viral transcripts have been recognized in retroviruses, including human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), HIV-1, and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and have been postulated to encode proteins important for the infection cycle and/or pathogenesis of the virus. The antisense strand of the HTLV-1 genome encodes HBZ, a novel nuclear basic region leucine zipper (b-ZIP) protein that in overexpression assays down-regulates Tax oncoprotein-induced viral transcription. Herein, we investigated the contribution of HBZ to HTLV-1-mediated immortalization of primary T lymphocytes in vitro and HTLV-1 infection in a rabbit animal model. HTLV-1 HBZ mutant viruses were generated and evaluated for viral gene expression, protein production, and immortalization capacity. Biologic properties of HBZ mutant viruses in vitro were indistinguishable from wild-type HTLV-1, providing the first direct evidence that HBZ is dispensable for viral replication and cellular immortalization. Rabbits inoculated with irradiated cells expressing HTLV-1 HBZ mutant viruses became persistently infected. However, these rabbits displayed a decreased antibody response to viral gene products and reduced proviral copies in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as compared with wild-type HTLV-1-infected animals. Our findings indicated that HBZ was not required for in vitro cellular immortalization, but enhanced infectivity and persistence in inoculated rabbits. This study demonstrates that retroviruses use negative-strand-encoded proteins in the establishment of chronic viral infections.

  20. Immunosuppressive prednisolone enhances early cholangiocarcinoma in Syrian hamsters with liver fluke infection and administration of N-nitrosodimethylamine.

    PubMed

    Juasook, Amornrat; Boonmars, Thidarut; Wu, Zhiliang; Loilome, Watcharin; Veteewuthacharn, Kulathida; Namwat, Nissana; Sudsarn, Pakkayanee; Wonkchalee, Orasa; Sriraj, Pranee; Aukkanimart, Ratchadawan

    2013-01-01

    Chronic infection with Opisthorchis viverrini for many years has been associated with the development of hepatobiliary diseases including cholangiocarcinoma. It is well known that inflammation is a key component of the tumor microenvironment, and that chronic inflammation plays an important role in tumorigenesis. Therefore, in this study cholangiocarcinogenesis was induced in Syrian hamsters in order to observe the cancer-related inflammation. The Syrian hamsters were divided into 5 groups: uninfected controls; normal Syrian hamsters infected with O. viverrini (OV); immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters infected with O. viverrini (OVis); normal Syrian hamsters infected with O. viverrini and administered N-nitrosodimethylamine (CCA); and immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters infected with O. viverrini and administered N-nitrosodimethylamine (CCAis). Syrian hamster livers were later observed for gross pathology and histopathological changes; COX2 was analyzed by immunohistochemical staining. We found a decreased number of inflammatory cells surrounding the hepatic bile duct in the OVis group, but not in the OV and CCAis groups. However, in the CCAis group (with suppressed immunity) early appearance and greater severity of cholangiocarcinoma were observed; gross pathological examination revealed many cancer nodularities on the liver surface, and histopathological studies showed the presence of cancer cells, findings which correlated with the predominant expression of COX2. The present study suggests that host immune responses are intended to ameliorate pathology, and they are also crucially associated with pathogenesis in O. viverrini infection; the unbalancing of host immunity may enhance cancer-related inflammation.

  1. Lack of Association between Toxocara Exposure and Suicide Attempts in Psychiatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Toxocara may affect the central nervous system. A high seroprevalence of Toxocara infection has been reported in psychiatric patients. To the best of our knowledge, there is no previous report about an association of Toxocara infection with suicide attempts. Therefore, we sought to determine whether Toxocara exposure is associated with suicide attempts in psychiatric patients. We studied 282 psychiatric outpatients (156 with suicide attempts and 126 without suicide attempts). Sera of patients were analyzed for the presence of anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies by using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay. One of the 156 (0.6%) suicide attempters and 1 (0.8%) of the 126 controls were positive for anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies (OR = 0.80; 95% CI: 0.04–13.02; P = 1.00). Toxocara seropositivity was significantly higher (P = 0.01) in male patients with consumption of raw dried goat meat than male patients without this consumption. Results suggest that Toxocara exposure is not associated with suicide attempts in psychiatric outpatients in Durango City, Mexico. However, further studies with larger samples sizes to confirm our results should be conducted. Too few patients were seropositive to assess further associations of Toxocara exposure with sociodemographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics of the psychiatric patients. PMID:26483971

  2. [Suicidal and personality characteristics of women married to men with alcohol dependence and suicidal activity].

    PubMed

    Merinov, A V; Shustov, D I

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the suicidal activity in men with alcohol dependence on suicidal indexes, personal-codependency and psychological specifics of their wives has been studied. It has been found that women married to suicidal men with alcohol dependence significantly more frequently demonstrate suicidal activity (a phenomenon of suicidal matrimonial comorbidity) compared to wives of "non-suicidal" men. They also reveal non-suicidal behavioral patterns more frequently and prosuicidal predictors are quite common in them. This contingent of women has high suicidal potential that needs special attention during the therapeutic work.

  3. The additive effect on suicidality of family history of suicidal behavior and early traumatic experiences.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Castroman, J; Guillaume, S; Olié, E; Jaussent, I; Baca-García, E; Courtet, P

    2015-01-01

    Family history of suicidal behavior and personal history of childhood abuse are reported risk factors for suicide attempts and suicide completion. We aim to quantify the additive effect of family history of suicidal behavior and different subtypes of childhood abuse on suicidal behavior. We examined a sample of 496 suicide attempters, comparing individuals with family history of suicidal behavior and personal history of childhood (physical or sexual) abuse, individuals with family history of suicidal behavior only, individuals with history of early traumatic experiences only, and individuals with none of these two risk factors with regards to suicidal features. An additive effect was found for the age at the first attempt in suicide attempters with both family history of suicidal behavior and either physical or sexual abuse. No significant interactions were found between family history of suicidal behavior and childhood trauma in relation to any characteristics of suicidal behavior. Subjects presenting family history of suicidal behavior and childhood abuse attempt suicide earlier in life than subjects with just one or none of them, particularly if they were sexually abused. Other suicidality indexes were only partially or not associated with this combination of risk factors. A careful assessment of patients with both family history of suicidal behavior and childhood abuse could help to prevent future suicide attempts, particularly in young people.

  4. The interpersonal nature of suicide: a qualitative investigation of suicide notes.

    PubMed

    Sanger, Sandra; Veach, Patricia McCarthy

    2008-01-01

    Prior investigations of suicide notes typically focus on verifying psychological theories about suicide motives. Fewer concern the interpersonal nature of suicide. This research investigated broad interpersonal themes related to suicide as revealed through suicide notes. This study was a qualitative investigation of suicide notes written by 138 individuals who completed suicide. Grounded theory analysis revealed seven interpersonal themes: 1) instructions; 2) positive relationships; 3) explanations; 4) relationship reconciliation/maintenance; 5) concern for others; 6) negative relationships; and 7) acknowledging end of relationship. These themes suggest that suicidal individuals consider positive and negative aspects of relationships in their notes, and they attempt to maintain and reconcile relationships even in the face of death.

  5. Suicides and suicide attempts in the U.S. Military, 2008-2010.

    PubMed

    Bush, Nigel E; Reger, Mark A; Luxton, David D; Skopp, Nancy A; Kinn, Julie; Smolenski, Derek; Gahm, Gregory A

    2013-06-01

    The Department of Defense Suicide Event Report Program collects extensive information on suicides and suicide attempts from the U.S. Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy. Data are compiled on demographics, suicide event details, behavioral health treatment history, military history, and information about other potential risk factors such as psychosocial stressors that were present at the time of the event. The ultimate goal of this standardized suicide surveillance program is to assist suicide prevention in the U.S. military. Descriptive data are presented on 816 suicides and 1,514 suicide attempts reported through the program between 2008 and 2010.

  6. The Interpersonal Theory of Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Van Orden, Kimberly A.; Witte, Tracy K.; Cukrowicz, Kelly C.; Braithwaite, Scott; Selby, Edward A.; Joiner, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Suicidal behavior is a major problem worldwide and at the same time has received relatively little empirical attention. This relative lack of empirical attention may be due in part to a relative absence of theory development regarding suicidal behavior. The current paper presents the Interpersonal Theory of Suicidal Behavior. We propose that the most dangerous form of suicidal desire is caused by the simultaneous presence of two interpersonal constructs—thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness (and hopelessness about these states)—and further, that the capability to engage in suicidal behavior is separate from the desire to engage in suicidal behavior. According to the theory, the capability for suicidal behavior emerges, via habituation and opponent processes, in response to repeated exposure to physically painful and/or fear-inducing experiences. In the current paper, the theory’s hypotheses are more precisely delineated than in previous presentations (Joiner, 2005), with the aim of inviting scientific inquiry and potential falsification of the theory’s hypotheses. PMID:20438238

  7. A series of complex suicide.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Serafettin; Dogan, Kamil Hakan; Erkol, Zerrin; Deniz, Idris

    2009-06-01

    This article presents 16 complex suicide cases. Complex suicide is defined as the use of more than one method to induce death. Of the victims, 10 were men and the ages ranged from 19 to 70 years. Eight victims left a suicide note. It was observed that 13 victims realized the suicidal act in the house and 5 victims had previous suicidal attempts. It was determined that 10 victims had psychiatric disorders, one of them had alcohol dependence. Six victims were housewives, 4 victims were unemployed, followed by one each victim of student, worker, farmer, tradesman, prayer leader, and animal husbandry lines of business. Ten victims were married; 3 victims were single; and 3 victims were divorced. On investigating the methods of suicide, it was seen that 9 victims preferred sharp instrument usage; 5 victims insecticide ingestion; 4 victims each firearms, medicine overdose; 3 victims each hanging, falling from a height; 2 victims self-strangulation; and 1 victim each drowning, liquefied petroleum gas and natural gas inhalation together, fungicide ingestion, rodenticide ingestion. It was determined that 2 victims used 3 methods and the other 14 victims 2 methods in company, to realize the suicide. In this article, the data obtained from our study was discussed by comparing similar data.

  8. Fasting and acquired capability for suicide: a test of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide in an undergraduate sample.

    PubMed

    Zuromski, Kelly L; Witte, Tracy K

    2015-03-30

    Though some preliminary research within the framework of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide (IPTS; Joiner, 2005) has postulated that restrictive eating may contribute to increased risk for suicide through its effect on the acquired capability for suicide (ACS; i.e., increased fearlessness about death and heightened physical pain tolerance), existing studies have not conducted direct tests of this relationship. To enhance understanding of this relationship, we compared undergraduates who endorsed one form of restrictive eating, fasting, (n = 99) to controls endorsing no forms of eating pathology over the lifetime (n = 94). We hypothesized that the fasting group would have higher ACS and higher likelihood of suicide attempt history. Contrary to hypotheses, no differences emerged between groups on ACS, and frequency of fasting within the fasting group was not significantly associated with ACS. Consistent with hypotheses, the fasting group was more likely to have suicide attempt history. Though results were not entirely consistent with hypotheses, the current study represents the first attempt at isolating and examining one form of restrictive eating (i.e., fasting) within the context of the IPTS. Results suggest that, in isolation, fasting may not be directly contributing to increases in ACS.

  9. Lack of cross-protection against Mycoplasma haemofelis infection and signs of enhancement in "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis"-recovered cats.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Julia; Novacco, Marilisa; Willi, Barbara; Riond, Barbara; Meli, Marina L; Boretti, Felicitas S; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2015-09-24

    "Mycoplasma haemofelis" and "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis" are feline hemoplasmas that induce hemolytic anemia. Protection from homologous re-challenge was recently demonstrated in cats recovered from primary infection. Here, we determined if cats recovered from "Cand. M. turicensis" infection were protected against infections with the more pathogenic M. haemofelis. Ten specified pathogen-free cats were exposed to M. haemofelis. Five of the ten cats had recovered from "Cand. M. turicensis" bacteremia (group A), and five cats were naïve controls (group B). No cross-protection was observed. By contrast, the "Cand. M. turicensis"-recovered cats displayed faster M. haemofelis infection onset (earlier PCR-positive and anemic) than the controls. No "Cand. M. turicensis" was detected in any cat. M. haemofelis shedding was observed in saliva, feces and urine. In both groups, evidence of a Th1 response was observed (high IFN-γ, low IL-4), but IL-10 levels were also high. In group A, total, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells increased within days after M. haemofelis exposure. At times of maximal bacteremia, macrocytic hypochromic anemia, neutropenia, monocytosis and a decrease in leukocyte, eosinophil, and lymphocyte counts and subsets thereof (B- and T-cells, CD4+, CD8+ and CD4+CD25+ cells) were particularly significant in group A. Moreover, an increase in protein concentrations, hypoalbuminemia and a polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia were observed. Five of ten M. haemofelis-infected cats subsequently cleared bacteremia without antibiotic treatment. In conclusion, the study suggests that a previous hemoplasma infection, even when the cat has ostensibly recovered, may influence subsequent infections, lead to an enhancement phenomenon and other differences in infection kinetics.

  10. Enhanced viral clearance and reduced leukocyte infiltration in experimental herpes encephalitis after intranasal infection of CXCR3-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, J; Hafezi, W; Dockhorn, A; Lorentzen, Eva U; Krauthausen, M; Getts, Daniel R; Müller, M; Kühn, Joachim E; King, Nicholas J C

    2017-01-23

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) encephalitis (HSE) is the most common fatal sporadic encephalitis in developed countries. There is evidence from HSE animal models that not only direct virus-mediated damage caused but also the host's immune response contributes to the high mortality of the disease. Chemokines modulate and orchestrate this immune response. Previous experimental studies in HSE models identified the chemokine receptor CXCR3 and its ligands as molecules with a high impact on the course of HSE in mouse models. In this study, the role of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 was evaluated after intranasal infection with the encephalitogenic HSV-1 strain 17 syn(+) using CXCR3-deficient mice (CXCR3(-/-)) and wild-type controls. We demonstrated a neurotropic viral spread into the CNS of after intranasal infection. Although viral load and histological distribution of infected neurons were independent from CXCR3 signaling early after infection, CXCR3-deficient mice cleared HSV-1 more efficiently 14 days after infection. Furthermore, CXCR3 deficiency led to a decreased weight loss in mice after HSV-1 infection. T cell infiltration and microglial activation was prominently reduced by inhibition of CXCR3 signaling. Quantitative PCR of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines confirmed the reduced neuroinflammatory response in CXCR3-deficient mice during HSE. Our results demonstrate that the recruitment of peripheral immune cells into the CNS, induction of neuroinflammation, and consecutive weight loss during herpes encephalitis is modulated by CXCR3 signaling. Interruption of the CXCR3 pathway ameliorates the detrimental host immune response and in turn, leads paradoxically to an enhanced viral clearance after intranasal infection. Our data gives further insight into the role of CXCR3 during HSE after intranasal infection.

  11. Respiratory syncytial virus infection enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth through dysregulation of nutritional immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hendricks, Matthew R.; Lashua, Lauren P.; Fischer, Douglas K.; Flitter, Becca A.; Eichinger, Katherine M.; Durbin, Joan E.; Sarkar, Saumendra N.; Coyne, Carolyn B.; Empey, Kerry M.; Bomberger, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical observations link respiratory virus infection and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in chronic lung disease, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The development of P. aeruginosa into highly antibiotic-resistant biofilm communities promotes airway colonization and accounts for disease progression in patients. Although clinical studies show a strong correlation between CF patients’ acquisition of chronic P. aeruginosa infections and respiratory virus infection, little is known about the mechanism by which chronic P. aeruginosa infections are initiated in the host. Using a coculture model to study the formation of bacterial biofilm formation associated with the airway epithelium, we show that respiratory viral infections and the induction of antiviral interferons promote robust secondary P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. We report that the induction of antiviral IFN signaling in response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection induces bacterial biofilm formation through a mechanism of dysregulated iron homeostasis of the airway epithelium. Moreover, increased apical release of the host iron-binding protein transferrin during RSV infection promotes P. aeruginosa biofilm development in vitro and in vivo. Thus, nutritional immunity pathways that are disrupted during respiratory viral infection create an environment that favors secondary bacterial infection and may provide previously unidentified targets to combat bacterial biofilm formation. PMID:26729873

  12. Respiratory syncytial virus infection enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth through dysregulation of nutritional immunity.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Matthew R; Lashua, Lauren P; Fischer, Douglas K; Flitter, Becca A; Eichinger, Katherine M; Durbin, Joan E; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Coyne, Carolyn B; Empey, Kerry M; Bomberger, Jennifer M

    2016-02-09

    Clinical observations link respiratory virus infection and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in chronic lung disease, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The development of P. aeruginosa into highly antibiotic-resistant biofilm communities promotes airway colonization and accounts for disease progression in patients. Although clinical studies show a strong correlation between CF patients' acquisition of chronic P. aeruginosa infections and respiratory virus infection, little is known about the mechanism by which chronic P. aeruginosa infections are initiated in the host. Using a coculture model to study the formation of bacterial biofilm formation associated with the airway epithelium, we show that respiratory viral infections and the induction of antiviral interferons promote robust secondary P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. We report that the induction of antiviral IFN signaling in response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection induces bacterial biofilm formation through a mechanism of dysregulated iron homeostasis of the airway epithelium. Moreover, increased apical release of the host iron-binding protein transferrin during RSV infection promotes P. aeruginosa biofilm development in vitro and in vivo. Thus, nutritional immunity pathways that are disrupted during respiratory viral infection create an environment that favors secondary bacterial infection and may provide previously unidentified targets to combat bacterial biofilm formation.

  13. [Suicide and malpractice].

    PubMed

    Catanesi, Roberto; Carabellese, Felice

    2011-01-01

    Some recent statements on the subject of psychiatrists' responsibility for suicide committed by patients have provoked lively discussions about the welfare duties of public psychiatric services, causing a widespread climate of alarm among medical institutions. The discussion is primarily about the extent of the psychiatrist's "posizione della garanzia", in particular the duty of protection and surveillance in relation to the risk of self-destructive behavior, referring to convictions not only in TSO cases but also in cases of voluntary hospitalization and valid consensus on treatment. The subject of suicide inevitably reminds us of the predictability of self-destructive behavior and, above all, of its prevention. The authors compare data from scientific literature on this subject - the organizational model of territorial psychiatry - with the principles ordered by the convictions, in particular the request for "ulterior and more rigorous protective rules", thus highlighting their complicated synthesis. In the authors' opinion, a possible literal interpretation of the legal indications would risk a profound change in the quality of the relationship between psychiatrist and patient. The authors, striving to adopt the psychiatrists' point of view, want to finally provide some operational advice with the objective to delimit good practice according to a medico-legal view.

  14. Dissociation of the CD4 downregulation and viral infectivity enhancement functions of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef.

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, M A; Warmerdam, M T; Atchison, R E; Miller, M D; Greene, W C

    1995-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the nef gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 augments rather than inhibits viral replication in both cell culture and in vivo models. In addition, nef alters various normal cellular processes, including the display of CD4 on the cell surface. However, it remains unknown whether the enhancement of infectivity and the downregulation of CD4 represent linked or independent biologic properties of this single protein. In the present studies, mutational analyses were performed to define structure-function relationships within the Nef protein that mediate these effects. To assess the functional consequences of these mutations, sensitive and reliable assays were developed to quantitate the viral infectivity enhancement and CD4 downregulation functions of Nef. The results indicate that membrane-targeting sequences at the N terminus of Nef are important for both functions of Nef, while certain other conserved regions are dispensable for both functions. A conserved proline-X-X repeat segment in the central core of the protein, which is reminiscent of an SH3-binding domain, is critical for the enhancement of infectivity function but is dispensable for CD4 downregulation. However, the downregulation of CD4 by Nef appears to involve a two-step process requiring the initial dissociation of p56lck from CD4 to permit engagement of the endocytic apparatus by CD4. Together, these findings demonstrate that the infectivity enhancement and CD4 downregulation activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef can be dissociated. Thus, these processes may be independent of one another in the viral replication cycle. PMID:7769669

  15. Depressed suicide attempters with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Ramberg, Maria; Stanley, Barbara; Ystgaard, Mette; Mehlum, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder and major depressive disorder are well-established risk factors for suicidal behavior. This study compared depressed suicide attempters with and without comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder with respect to additional diagnoses, global functioning, depressive symptoms, substance abuse, history of traumatic exposure, and suicidal behavior. Adult patients consecutively admitted to a general hospital after a suicide attempt were interviewed and assessed for DSM-IV diagnosis and clinical correlates. Sixty-four patients (71%) were diagnosed with depression; of them, 21 patients (32%) had posttraumatic stress disorder. There were no group differences in social adjustment, depressive symptoms, or suicidal intent. However, the group with comorbid depression and posttraumatic stress disorder had more additional Axis I diagnoses, a higher degree of childhood trauma exposure, and more often reported previous suicide attempts, non-suicidal self-harm, and vengeful suicidal motives. These findings underline the clinical importance of diagnosis and treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder in suicide attempters.

  16. Media influence on attitudes toward suicide.

    PubMed

    Biblarz, A; Brown, R M; Biblarz, D N; Pilgrim, M; Baldree, B F

    1991-01-01

    This experiment investigated the effects of viewing films on suicide and violence on attitudes toward suicide. Non-suicidal university students were assigned to one of three groups: One group was shown a film about suicide, a second saw a film about violence, and the third saw a neutral film. Perceptions of the appropriateness of suicide and level of emotional arousal were measured by a questionnaire administered before and after the films were shown. Both the suicide and violent film groups showed increases in arousal scores after viewing the films. The results suggest that arousal became linked to cognitions specific to film content as a result of viewing the films dealing with suicide and violence. Other findings suggest that, for the suicide and violent film groups, perceived relations with parents were important predictors of film-induced changes in attitudes toward suicide.

  17. Why not Commercial Assistance for Suicide? On the Question of Argumentative Coherence of Endorsing Assisted Suicide.

    PubMed

    Kipke, Roland

    2015-09-01

    Most people who endorse physician-assisted suicide are against commercially assisted suicide - a suicide assisted by professional non-medical providers against payment. The article questions if this position - endorsement of physician-assisted suicide on the one hand and rejection of commercially assisted suicide on the other hand - is a coherent ethical position. To this end the article first discusses some obvious advantages of commercially assisted suicide and then scrutinizes six types of argument about whether they can justify the rejection of commercially assisted suicide while simultaneously endorsing physician-assisted suicide. The conclusion is that they cannot provide this justification and that the mentioned position is not coherent. People who endorse physician-assisted suicide have to endorse commercially assisted suicide as well, or they have to revise their endorsement of physician-assisted suicide.

  18. Suicidal Behavior in Relatives or Associates Moderates the Strength of Common Risk Factors for Suicide.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yongsheng; Phillips, Michael R; Duberstein, Paul; Zhan, Weihai

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence and odds ratios of different suicide risk factors were compared in three pairs of decedents: 80 suicides and 25 injury decedents with blood relatives with suicidal behavior history (biologically exposed); 259 suicides and 126 injury decedents with unrelated acquaintances with suicidal behavior history (socially exposed); and 471 suicides and 523 injury decedents with neither relatives nor acquaintances with suicidal behavior history (unexposed). Negative life events and high psychological stress were more common in socially exposed suicides than in other suicides. The adjusted odds ratios of most established suicide risk factors were higher in unexposed decedents than in biologically or socially exposed decedents, suggesting that the predictive value of established risk factors wanes in individuals who have been exposed to suicidal behavior in family or friends.

  19. Community Responses to a Suicidal Crisis: Implications for Suicide Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Gregory Luke; Rivera, Hector; Xu, Hongzhi; Rincon, Edward; Beautrais, Annette L.

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional, random-digit-dial survey to evaluate public responses to a hypothetical question: "If someone you knew was suicidal, what would you do first?" Younger people were more likely to call a suicide hotline, and less likely to go to an emergency room (ER) or call 911; immigrants (in the U.S. less than 15 years) were more…

  20. Suicide fantasy as a life-sustaining recourse.

    PubMed

    Maltsberger, John T; Ronningstam, Elsa; Weinberg, Igor; Schechter, Mark; Goldblatt, Mark J

    2010-01-01

    The suicide literature tends to lump all suicidal ideation together, thereby implying that it is all functionally equivalent. However obvious the claim that suicidal ideation is usually a prelude to suicidal action, some suicidal daydreaming tends to inhibit suicidal action. How are we to distinguish between those daydreams that augur an impending attempt from those that help patients calm down?

  1. Suicide method runs in families: a birth certificate cohort study of adolescent suicide in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tsung-Hsueh; Chang, Wan-Ting; Lin, Jin-Jia; Li, Chung-Yi

    2011-12-01

    Suicide method used by adolescents was examined to determine if it was the same as that employed by their suicidal parents. Six hundred eighty adolescents completed suicide between 1997 and 2007, of whom 12 had parents who had previously died by suicide. The suicide method used by these adolescents was compared with that employed by their suicidal parent and that of a matched peer control adolescent with no exposure to parental suicide and living in the same area. In 10 of the 12 suicidal parent-adolescent dyads, the same suicide method was employed by parent and adolescent. Of seven adolescents whose age at parental suicide was 15 years or above, six used the same suicide method as their suicidal parent had. On the contrary, of 12 exposure-nonexposure suicidal adolescent dyads, the same method was used in only four. Adolescents exposed to parental suicide are more likely to use the suicide method employed by their suicidal parents than the method used by adolescent peers with no exposure to parental suicide.

  2. Mysore study: A study of suicide notes

    PubMed Central

    Namratha, P.; Kishor, M.; Sathyanarayana Rao, T. S.; Raman, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Suicide is one of the leading causes of preventable deaths. Recent data suggest South India as one of the regions with highest suicide rates in the world. In 2013, 134,799 people committed suicide in India according to the statistics released by the National Crime Records Bureau. Suicide note is one of the most important sources to understand suicide, which may be beneficial in suicide prevention. Studies on suicidal notes from this part of the world are sparse. Objective: The aim was to study the themes in suicide notes that might be useful in prevention strategies. Materials and Methods: A descriptive study of all suicide notes of those individuals who committed suicide between 2010 and 2013 available with Police Department, Mysore district was obtained and analyzed. Results: A total of 22 suicide note were available. A majority of suicide note was in age group of 16–40 years (86%) and most were men (59%). All suicide notes were handwritten, the majority (70%) in regional language Kannada. Length of notes varied from just few words to few pages. Contents of suicide notes included apology/shame/guilt (80%), love for those left behind (55%) and instruction regarding practical affairs (23%). Most have blamed none for the act (50%). 23% mentioned that they are committing suicide to prove their innocence. 32% mentioned a last wish. Conclusion: The majority of suicidal note contained “guilt” which is a strong indicator of possible depression in deceased. Creating awareness about suicide among public and ensuring access to professionals trained in suicide prevention is need of the hour in this part of the world. PMID:26816426

  3. Suicidal ideation and attempted suicide in elderly people - subjective experiences.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Denise Machado Duran; Sousa, Amandia Braga Lima; Grubits, Sonia

    2015-06-01

    We discuss the subjective experiences of elderly people who show suicidal ideation and/or attempts at suicide, based on their own reports. We understand the concept of 'subjective' as referring to intra-psychic experience resulting from social, economic, relationship or biographical conditions. Although the subject is sparsely covered in the literature, it is important, because it is in the field of subjectivity that ideations of, and attempts at, suicide develop and occur until they become a concrete act. Empirical data were collected through semi-structured interviews focusing on: social characterization, portrayal and mode of life, previous mental state, atmosphere of the attempt, effects on the health of the elderly person and family. Based on the analysis of the meanings that emerge, five empirical categories were generated: (1) subject's feeling of being in a non-place; (2) absence of acceptance of losses; (3) suffering due to ingratitude of family members; (4) feeling of uselessness of, and in, life; (5) re-signification of the situations that generate suicide-related conduct. The results point to a fundamental need to incorporate knowledge about the subjective processes into programs for prevention of suicide among the elderly who have ideation of, or attempts at, suicide.

  4. EXPOSURE TO DIESEL EXHAUST ENHANCES THE SEVERITY OF AN ONGOING INFLUENZA INFECTION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous studies have shown that air pollutants including diesel exhaust (DE), alter host defense responses to decrease resistance to respiratory infection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of DE exposure on the severity of an ongoing influenza infection in ...

  5. Dietary Curcuma longa enhances resistance against Eimeria maxima and Eimeria tenella infections in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of dietary supplementation with an organic extract of Curcuma longa on systemic and local immune responses to experimental Eimeria maxima and E. tenella infections were evaluated in commercial broiler chickens. Infected chickens given the C. longa-containing diet had increased body weig...

  6. Cytocompatibility with osteogenic cells and enhanced in vivo anti-infection potential of quaternized chitosan-loaded titania nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Ao, Haiyong; Wang, Yugang; Lin, Wentao; Yang, Shengbing; Zhang, Shuhong; Yu, Zhifeng; Tang, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    Infection is one of the major causes of failure of orthopedic implants. Our previous study demonstrated that nanotube modification of the implant surface, together with nanotubes loaded with quaternized chitosan (hydroxypropyltrimethyl ammonium chloride chitosan, HACC), could effectively inhibit bacterial adherence and biofilm formation in vitro. Therefore, the aim of this study was to further investigate the in vitro cytocompatibility with osteogenic cells and the in vivo anti-infection activity of titanium implants with HACC-loaded nanotubes (NT-H). The titanium implant (Ti), nanotubes without polymer loading (NT), and nanotubes loaded with chitosan (NT-C) were fabricated and served as controls. Firstly, we evaluated the cytocompatibility of these specimens with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vitro. The observation of cell attachment, proliferation, spreading, and viability in vitro showed that NT-H has improved osteogenic activity compared with Ti and NT-C. A prophylaxis rat model with implantation in the femoral medullary cavity and inoculation with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was established and evaluated by radiographical, microbiological, and histopathological assessments. Our in vivo study demonstrated that NT-H coatings exhibited significant anti-infection capability compared with the Ti and NT-C groups. In conclusion, HACC-loaded nanotubes fabricated on a titanium substrate show good compatibility with osteogenic cells and enhanced anti-infection ability in vivo, providing a good foundation for clinical application to combat orthopedic implant-associated infections. PMID:27672479

  7. A multidisciplinary approach to therapeutic risk management of the suicidal patient

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Cynthia L; Lusk, Jaimie L

    2015-01-01

    As health care trends toward a system of care approach, providers from various disciplines strive to collaborate to provide optimal care for their patients. While a multidisciplinary approach to suicide risk assessment and management has been identified as important for reducing suicidality, standardized clinical guidelines for such an approach do not yet exist. In this article, the authors propose the adoption of the therapeutic risk management of the suicidal patient (TRMSP) to improve suicide risk assessment and management within multidisciplinary systems of care. The TRMSP, which has been fully articulated in previous articles, involves augmenting clinical risk assessment with structured instruments, stratifying risk in terms of both severity and temporality, and developing and documenting a safety plan. Augmenting clinical risk assessments with reliable and valid structured instruments serves several functions, including ensuring important aspects of suicide are addressed, establishing a baseline for suicidal thoughts and behaviors, facilitating interprofessional communication, and mitigating risk. Similarly, a two-dimensional risk stratification qualifying suicide risk in terms of both severity and temporality can enhance communication across providers and settings and improve understanding of acute crises in the context of chronic risk. Finally, safety planning interventions allow providers and patients to collaboratively create a personally meaningful plan for managing a suicidal crisis that can be continually modified across time with multiple providers in different care settings. In a busy care environment, the TRMSP can provide concrete guidance on conducting clinically and medicolegally sound suicide risk assessment and management. This collaborative and comprehensive process would potentially improve care of patients with suicidality, optimize clinical resources, decrease unnecessary and costly admissions, and mitigate medicolegal risk. The TRMSP may

  8. Peripheral viral infection induced microglial sensome genes and enhanced microglial cell activity in the hippocampus of neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Ji, Peng; Schachtschneider, Kyle M; Schook, Lawrence B; Walker, Frederick R; Johnson, Rodney W

    2016-05-01

    Although poorly understood, early-life infection is predicted to affect brain microglial cells, making them hypersensitive to subsequent stimuli. To investigate this, we assessed gene expression in hippocampal tissue obtained from a previously published study reporting increased microglial cell activity and reduced hippocampal-dependent learning in neonatal piglets infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), a virus that induces interstitial pneumonia. Infection altered expression of 455 genes, of which 334 were up-regulated and 121 were down-regulated. Functional annotation revealed that immune function genes were enriched among the up-regulated differentially expressed genes (DEGs), whereas calcium binding and synaptic vesicle genes were enriched among the down-regulated DEGs. Twenty-six genes encoding part of the microglia sensory apparatus (i.e., the sensome) were up-regulated (e.g., IL1R1, TLR2, and TLR4), whereas 15 genes associated with the synaptosome and synaptic receptors (e.g., NPTX2, GABRA2, and SLC5A7) were down-regulated. As the sensome may foretell microglia reactivity, we next inoculated piglets with culture medium or PRRSV at PD 7 and assessed hippocampal microglia morphology and function at PD 28 when signs of infection were waning. Consistent with amplification of the sensome, microglia from PRRSV piglets had enhanced responsiveness to chemoattractants, increased phagocytic activity, and secreted more TNFα in response to lipopolysaccharide and Poly I:C. Immunohistochemical staining indicated PRRSV infection increased microglia soma length and length-to-width ratio. Bipolar rod-like microglia not evident in hippocampus of control piglets, were present in infected piglets. Collectively, this study suggests early-life infection alters the microglia sensome as well as microglial cell morphology and function.

  9. A small hairpin RNA targeting myeloid cell leukemia-1 enhances apoptosis in host macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei-yu; Zhang, Yu-qing; Wang, Xin-min; Wang, Chan; Wang, Xiao-fang; Wu, Jiang-dong; Wu, Fang; Zhang, Wan-jiang; Zhang, Le

    2016-04-01

    Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) plays an important role in various cell survival pathways. Some studies indicated that the expression of Mcl-1 was upregulated in host cells during infection with the virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain, H37Rv. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of inhibiting Mcl-1 expression both in vivo and in vitro on apoptosis of host macrophages infected with M. tuberculosis using a small hairpin (sh)RNA. Mcl-1 expression was detected by the real time-polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. Flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy were used to measure host macrophage apoptosis. We found elevated Mcl-1 levels in host macrophages infected with M. tuberculosis H37Rv. The expression of Mcl-1 was downregulated efficiently in H37Rv-infected host macrophages using shRNA. Knockdown of Mcl-1 enhanced the extent of apoptosis in H37Rv-infected host macrophages significantly. The increased apoptosis correlated with a decrease in M. tuberculosis colony forming units recovered from H37Rv-infected cells that were treated with Mcl-1-shRNA. Reducing Mcl-1 accumulation by shRNA also reduced accumulation of the anti-apoptotic gene, Bcl-2, and increased expression of the pro-apoptotic gene, Bax, in H37Rv-infected host macrophages. Our results showed that specific knockdown of Mcl-1 expression increased apoptosis of host macrophages significantly and decreased the intracellular survival of a virulent strain of M. tuberculosis. These data indicate that interference with Mcl-1 expression may provide a new avenue for tuberculosis therapy.

  10. Suicide Facts at a Glance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Based on data about suicides in 16 National Violent Death Reporting System states in 2010, 33.4% ... Johnson LL, McDaniel DD, Gladden M. Surveillance for Violent Deaths– National Violent Death Reporting System, 16 states, ...

  11. About Teen Suicide (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... relationships and a need for independence that often conflicts with the rules and expectations set by others. ... loved one, a divorce , or a major family conflict. Teens who are thinking about suicide might: talk ...

  12. Altruistic suicide: a few reflections.

    PubMed

    Leenaars, Antoon A

    2004-01-01

    In the last few centuries, science has become arithmetic, tabular, taxonomic, to explain living creatures, chemical elements and even diseases of the mind. Emile Durkheim attempted to do the same with his enduring volume, Suicide: A Study of Sociology, first published in 1897. Durkheim showed that suicide could be divided into an order: egoistic, altruistic, anomic and fatalistic-here, we focus on the question, who is the altruistic suicide? Durkheim's additional question is raised: When is a motive praiseworthy and when not-when to be called altruistic or heroic, and when terrorist? Further study is warranted-and thus, this opening editorial to an array of studies on the topic, from antiquity to the Christian martyrs into this century, to the act of Sati in India, to the suicide bomber in the Moslem world.

  13. Suicide Awareness Voices of Education

    MedlinePlus

    ... Involved Shop SAVE Suicide can be prevented and SAVE is here to help. Learn More For Survivors ... SAVE Partners with Film, “Extra Innings” Read More SAVE About Us Disclaimer, Terms, & Privacy Policy Sign up ...

  14. End of Life: Suicide Grief

    MedlinePlus

    ... missing clues about suicidal intentions. Guilt. You might replay "what if" and "if only" scenarios in your ... find peace and healing, while still honoring the memory of your loved one. References Young IT, et ...

  15. The psychology of suicide terrorism.

    PubMed

    Post, Jerrold M; Ali, Farhana; Henderson, Schuyler W; Shanfield, Steven; Victoroff, Jeff; Weine, Stevan

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews current understandings of the psychology of suicide terrorism for psychiatrists and other mental health professionals to help them better understand this terrifying phenomenon. After discussing key concepts and definitions, the paper reviews both group and individual models for explaining the development of suicide terrorists, with an emphasis on "collective identity." Stressing the importance of social psychology, it emphasizes the "normality" and absence of individual psychopathology of the suicide bombers. It will discuss the broad range of terrorisms, but will particularly emphasize terrorism associated with militant Islam. The article emphasizes that comprehending suicide terrorism requires a multidisciplinary approach that includes anthropological, economic, historical, and political factors as well as psychological ones. The paper concludes with a discussion of implications for research, policy, and prevention, reviewing the manner in which social psychiatric knowledge and understandings applied to this phenomenon in an interdisciplinary framework can assist in developing approaches to counter this deadly strategy.

  16. Reflections on jokes and cartoons about suicide.

    PubMed

    Lester, David

    2012-08-01

    This article is intended to engage others in a dialogue about the role and meaning of jokes about suicide. Types of jokes involving suicide are examined to distinguish the different types of humor involved. A sample of 118 recent political cartoons in an online website was downloaded, of which 73 concerned suicide bombers. Examples of suicide cartons and jokes involving disparagement, incongruity, repression, and ridiculousness are provided. Although in some contexts, such as suicidal terrorism, these themes may be appropriate, a few cartons and jokes that addressed ordinary suicidal individuals were often hostile.

  17. The heavy metal subculture and suicide.

    PubMed

    Stack, S; Gundlach, J; Reeves, J L

    1994-01-01

    The impact of the heavy metal music subculture on suicide has been the subject of much public debate but little scholarly research. The present paper assesses this relationship with data on heavy metal magazine subscriptions and youth suicide in the 50 states. We find that, controlling for other predictors of suicide, the greater the strength of the metal subculture, the higher the youth suicide rate. The music perhaps nurtures suicidal tendencies already present in the subculture. The model explains 51% of the variance in youth suicide.

  18. Suicide Prevention Strategies for Improving Population Health.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Holly C; Wyman, Peter A

    2016-04-01

    Suicide is a public health problem that accounts for more than 1 million deaths annually worldwide. This article addresses evidence-based and promising youth suicide prevention approaches at the primary, secondary, and tertiary levels. Coordinated, developmentally timed, evidence-based suicide prevention approaches at all intervention levels are likely to reduce youth suicide. For most youth who die by suicide, there are opportunities for intervention before imminent risk develops. Current research in suicide prevention points to the value of investing in "upstream" universal interventions that build skills and resilience as well as policies that enable access to care and protection from lethal means.

  19. Extended suicide with a pet.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    The combination of the killing of a pet and a suicide is a perplexing scenario that is largely unexplored in the literature. Many forensic psychiatrists and psychologists may be unaccustomed to considering the significance of the killing of a pet. The subject is important, however, because many people regard their pets as members of their family. A case is presented of a woman who killed her pet dog and herself by carbon monoxide poisoning. The purpose of this article is to provide an initial exploration of the topic of extended suicide with a pet. Forensic mental health evaluations may have a role in understanding the etiology of this event and in opining as to the culpability of individuals who attempt to or successfully kill a pet and then commit suicide. Because the scientific literature is lacking, there is a need to understand this act from a variety of perspectives. First, a social and anthropological perspective will be presented that summarizes the history of the practice of killing of one's pet, with a focus on the ancient Egyptians. A clinical context will examine what relationship animals have to mental illness. A vast body of existing scientific data showing the relevance of human attachment to pets suggests that conclusions from the phenomena of homicide-suicide and filicide-suicide are applicable to extended suicide with a pet. Finally, recommendations will be proposed for both clinical and forensic psychiatrists faced with similar cases.

  20. Suicidal adolescents: factors in evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gispert, M; Wheeler, K; Marsh, L; Davis, M S

    1985-01-01

    Suicide attempts among adolescents are occurring more frequently and their evaluation is a difficult task. The factors related to suicide attempts in eighty-two adolescents, ages 12 to 18 were examined. They had been admitted to the adolescent unit of a large, urban general hospital for evaluation of self-destructive behavior. A systematic review of the patients' charts was performed to gather information about family structure, functioning in school, suicidal risk, degree of depression, and stressful life events. Although most were moderately depressed, a significant proportion denied having tried to harm themselves. While some repressed their anger, the majority expressed anger openly, tended to feel sad and to carry out premeditated as well as more serious suicide attempts. Most had experienced family disruption, and nearly half were functioning poorly in school. Suicide risk correlated only with current stress, while depression correlated with life-long as well as current stress. Results suggest that identification of the suicide attempt and the contributory factors, especially the degree of overt anger and depression, are crucial in deciding appropriate interventions, providing adequate treatment, and avoiding recurrence.