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Sample records for inferior cerebellar artery

  1. [Aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery: case report].

    PubMed

    Adorno, Juan Oscar Alarcón; de Andrade, Guilherme Cabral

    2002-12-01

    The intracranial aneurysms of the posterior circulation have been reported between 5 and 10% of all cerebral aneurysms and the aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are considered rare, can cause cerebello pontine angle (CPA) syndrome with or without subarachnoid hemorrhage. Since 1948 few cases were described in the literature. We report on a 33 year-old female patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to sacular aneurysm of the left AICA. She was submitted to clipage of the aneurysm without complications.

  2. Acute bilateral cerebellar infarction in the territory of the medial branches of posterior inferior cerebellar arteries.

    PubMed

    Gurer, G; Sahin, G; Cekirge, S; Tan, E; Saribas, O

    2001-10-01

    The most frequent type of cerebellar infarcts involved the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and superior cerebellar artery territories but bilateral involvement of lateral or medial branches of PICA is extremely rare. In this report, we present a 55-year-old male who admitted to hospital with vomiting, nausea and dizziness. On examination left-sided hemiparesia and ataxic gait were detected. Infarct on bilateral medial branch of PICA artery territories was found out with cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique and 99% stenosis of the left vertebral artery was found out with digital subtraction arteriography. The patient was put on heparin treatment. After 3 weeks, his complaints and symptoms had disappeared except for mild gait ataxia.

  3. Aneurysm in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery variant: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Saad; Azeem, Abdul; Jiwani, Amyna; Javed, Gohar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There are variations in the anatomy of the vertebrobasilar system amongst which the Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery-Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery (AICA-PICA) variant is thought to have a prevalence of 20–24% (based on retrospective studies). Despite this, aneurysms of the AICA-PICA variant are rare. We present a case of an AICA-PICA aneurysm and discuss its presentation and management, along with a review of literature. Presentation of case We describe the case of a 35 year old female who presented with signs of meningismus. On the basis of radiological imaging it was initially misdiagnosed as a thrombosed arteriovenous malformation (AVM). The patient was eventually discharged with a plan of interval imaging and interventional radiology (if required). The patient presented again with similar signs and symptoms. Re-evaluation of imaging revealed an aneurysm of the AICA-PICA variant which was managed surgically. Discussion Aneurysms of the AICA-PICA variant are rare. The radiological features and surgical management represent a unique clinical entity and are discussed below. Conclusion The prevalence of the AICA-PICA variant might be high but aneurysms in this vessel are rare. The scant knowledge available on this subject makes it a diagnostic difficulty. PMID:27017276

  4. Ruptured partially thrombosed anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms: two case reports and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kanamori, Fumiaki; Kawabata, Teppei; Muraoka, Shinsuke; Kojima, Takao; Watanabe, Tadashi; Hatano, Norikazu; Seki, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aneurysms arising from the distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are very rare. When the parent artery is an AICA−posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) variant, occlusion of the artery, even distal to the meatal loop, leads to a significant area of cerebellar infarction. We report two cases of ruptured partially thrombosed distal AICA aneurysms. In both cases, the parent artery was an AICA−PICA variant. The aneurysms were clipped in one case and trapped following occipital artery (OA)−AICA anastomosis in another case. It is important to keep the OA as a donor artery for revascularization in the treatment of the AICA−PICA variant aneurysms, especially when the absence of intra-aneurysmal thrombus is not comfirmed preoperatively. PMID:28008208

  5. Retrograde Stent Placement for Coil Embolization of a Wide-Necked Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Hong Gee; Choi, Jin Woo; Cho, Joon; Moon, Won-Jin; Solander, Sten

    2012-01-01

    Wide-necked aneurysms of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) are infrequently encountered in cerebrovascular practice, and endovascular treatment is difficult or impossible even with the use of several neck remodeling techniques. We present the case of a patient with a wide-necked aneurysm of the PICA, which was treated by the retrograde stenting through the contralateral vertebral artery and vertebrobasilar junction with antegrade coil embolization. PMID:22778576

  6. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss as prodromal symptom of anterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction.

    PubMed

    Martines, Francesco; Dispenza, Francesco; Gagliardo, Cesare; Martines, Enrico; Bentivegna, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a clinical condition characterized by a sudden onset of unilateral or bilateral hearing loss. In recent years sudden deafness has been frequently described in association with anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) infarction generally presenting along with other brainstem and cerebellar signs such as ataxia, dysmetria and peripheral facial palsy. The authors report a rare clinical case of a 53-year-old man who suddenly developed hearing loss and tinnitus without any brainstem or cerebellar signs. Computed tomography of his brain was normal, and the audiological results localized the lesion causing deafness to the inner ear. Surprisingly, magnetic resonance imaging showed an ischemic infarct in the right AICA territory. This case represents the fifth in the literature to date but it confirms that AICA occlusion can cause sudden deafness even without brainstem or cerebellar signs. Therefore, we recommend submitting the patient for neuroimaging, as an emergency, in order to exclude infarction of the AICA territory. By doing this, it may be possible to limit the extent of the lesion by commencing early therapy.

  7. Vascular loops in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery, as identified by magnetic resonance imaging, and their relationship with otologic symptoms*

    PubMed Central

    de Abreu Junior, Luiz; Kuniyoshi, Cristina Hiromi; Wolosker, Angela Borri; Borri, Maria Lúcia; Antunes, Augusto; Ota, Vanessa Kiyomi Arashiro; Uchida, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Objective To use magnetic resonance imaging to identify vascular loops in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery and to evaluate their relationship with otologic symptoms. Materials and Methods We selected 33 adults with otologic complaints who underwent magnetic resonance imaging at our institution between June and November 2013. Three experienced independent observers evaluated the trajectory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery in relation to the internal auditory meatus and graded the anterior inferior cerebellar artery vascular loops according to the Chavda classification. Kappa and chi-square tests were used. Values of p < 0.05 were considered significant. Results The interobserver agreement was moderate. Comparing ears that presented vascular loops with those that did not, we found no association with tinnitus, hearing loss, or vertigo. Similarly, we found no association between the Chavda grade and any otological symptom. Conclusion Vascular loops do not appear to be associated with otoneurological manifestations. PMID:27818543

  8. Gravity-dependent nystagmus and inner-ear dysfunction suggest anterior and posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarct.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Aasef G; Miller, Benjamin R; Sundararajan, Sophia; Katirji, Bashar

    2014-04-01

    Cerebellar lesions may present with gravity-dependent nystagmus, where the direction and velocity of the drifts change with alterations in head position. Two patients had acute onset of hearing loss, vertigo, oscillopsia, nausea, and vomiting. Examination revealed gravity-dependent nystagmus, unilateral hypoactive vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), and hearing loss ipsilateral to the VOR hypofunction. Traditionally, the hypoactive VOR and hearing loss suggest inner-ear dysfunction. Vertigo, nausea, vomiting, and nystagmus may suggest peripheral or central vestibulopathy. The gravity-dependent modulation of nystagmus, however, localizes to the posterior cerebellar vermis. Magnetic resonance imaging in our patients revealed acute cerebellar infarct affecting posterior cerebellar vermis, in the vascular distribution of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). This lesion explains the gravity-dependent nystagmus, nausea, and vomiting. Acute onset of unilateral hearing loss and VOR hypofunction could be the manifestation of inner-ear ischemic injury secondary to the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) compromise. In cases of combined AICA and PICA infarction, the symptoms of peripheral vestibulopathy might masquerade the central vestibular syndrome and harbor a cerebellar stroke. However, the gravity-dependent nystagmus allows prompt identification of acute cerebellar infarct.

  9. Laceration of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery by suboccipital puncture of the cisterna magna: case report.

    PubMed

    Portela, Luiz Antonio Pezzi; Souza, Valéria; Pahl, Félix Hendrick; Cardoso, Alberto Cappel; Vellutini, Eduardo de Arnaldo Silva; Mutarelli, Eduardo Genaro; Machado, Luis dos Ramos; Livramento, José Antonio

    2004-09-01

    We report the case of a 27 year old man who presented to the emergency room of a hospital with headache, vomiting and an episode of loss of conciousness. A cranial CT scan was normal and the patient discharged. Ten hours later he came to the emergency room of our hospital with the same complaints. A technically difficult cisternal puncture in an anxious patient who moved during the needle introduction was done. The CSF sample showed 1600 intact red blood cells without other alterations. His headache worsened and after 6 hours he became drowsy, numb and exhibited decerebration signs. A new CT scan showed diffuse subarachnoid and intraventricular blood. An emergency angiogram demonstrated laceration of a left posterior-inferior cerebellar artery in its retrobulbar loop with a pseudoaneurysm. He was successfully treated by surgical clipping without injury. Sixteen days later he was discharged with a normal neurological exam.

  10. Spontaneous healing and complete disappearance of a ruptured posterior inferior cerebellar artery dissecting aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Su, Tsung-Ming; Cheng, Ching-Hsiao; Chen, Wu-Fu; Hsu, Shih-Wei

    2014-05-01

    A 7-month-old baby presented with a 4-day history of drowsiness and vomiting after a falling accident. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage, intraventricular hemorrhage, and variable stages of subdural hematoma in bilateral occipital and left temporal subdural spaces. A partially thrombosed aneurysm was noted in the right craniocervical junction. Ophthalmological examination revealed bilateral retinal petechial hemorrhages. Conventional cerebral angiography revealed a dissecting aneurysm in the right posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). Endovascular embolization was suggested, but the family refused. After conservative treatment, follow-up MRI revealed that the PICA aneurysm had remodeled and ultimately disappeared completely at the 10th month. This case illustrates the relatively plastic nature of intracranial aneurysms in pediatric patients. More studies are necessary to clarify the natural history of spontaneously thrombosed aneurysms to assist in their overall management.

  11. [Dissecting aneurysm of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery--a case report].

    PubMed

    Ueki, K; Teraoka, A; Yoshida, S; Hori, T

    1987-11-01

    The authors present a case of dissecting aneurysm of the right posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) in a 47-year-old female, who suffered from mild subarachnoid hemorrhage. Right vertebral angiogram showed typical "pearl and string" sign of the PICA, but we could not fully understand the condition until a surgical exposure revealed a purple sausage-like dissecting aneurysm of the PICA. The aneurysm was wrapped with muscle pieces. Postoperatively she developed Wallenberg's syndrome, but it subsided gradually. No specific disorder concerning the mural dissection was found in this patient, except for a history of mild hypertension. This case is unusual because it affected not an arterial trunk but a small branch and we could find only one other case reported in the literature. Other formerly reported cases were of arterial trunks. The intracranial dissecting aneurysm has been known as a rare cause of cerebral infarct in children and adolescents. Infants are also affected and referred to as "infantile hemiplegia". It mainly affects one of the trunk arteries and cause a severe ischemic stroke, and surgically treatable case is rare. But as the typical angiographic findings are commonly known the number of the reported cases is increasing at an accelerating rate, and some of them are being noted to need surgical treatment because they cause subarachnoid hemorrhage. We here emphasize that not only trunk arteries but also small branch arteries can develop mural dissection, leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage. Dissecting aneurysm of a smaller artery would be milder in symptom, and would give more chance for surgical intervention.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. [Dissecting aneurysm of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery--studied by serial angiography].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Y; Hayashi, S; Saitho, H; Teramoto, A

    2001-11-01

    We report the case of a 34-year-old male with cerebellar hemorrhagic infarction caused by a dissecting aneurysm of the left posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). The patient suffered from a headache and vomiting for two days and was transferred to our hospital with sudden deterioration of consciousness. On admission, he was semicomatose. A CT scan revealed hemorrhagic infarction in the left cerebellum and upward herniation. The emergency operation for posterior fossa decompression was performed. Postoperatively, his consciousness level improved promptly and he had no neurological deficits except for slight gait disturbance. The first vertebral angiography was performed on Day 27. It showed a sausage-like dissecting aneurysm of the left distal PICA. We planned conservative therapy with careful observation because of there being no indication for an operation. Serial angiography was performed and demonstrated the regression of the dissecting aneurysm on Day 258. Dissecting aneurysms of the distal PICA are rare and their natural history is not well understood. Conservative therapy for vertebrobasilar dissecting aneurysms has often been reported. We suggest that conservative therapy with serial angiography is the treatment of choice especially for ischemic-type dissecting aneurysms. We review 17 cases of dissecting aneurysm of the distal PICA in this study.

  13. Treatment of Ruptured Vertebral Artery Dissecting Aneurysms Distal to the Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery: Stenting or Trapping?

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Yi-Bin Zhao, Kai-Jun Wu, Yi-Na Zhou, Yu Li, Qiang Yang, Peng-Fei Huang, Qing-Hai Zhao, Wen-Yuan Xu, Yi Liu, Jian-Min

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThe treatment of ruptured vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms (VADAs) continues to be controversial. Our goal was to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and long-term outcomes of internal trapping and stent-assisted coiling (SAC) for ruptured VADAs distal to the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (supra-PICA VADAs), which is the most common subset.MethodsA retrospective review was conducted of 39 consecutive ruptured supra-PICA VADAs treated with internal trapping (n = 20) or with SAC (n = 19) at our institution. The clinical and angiographic data were retrospectively compared.ResultsThe immediate total occlusion rate of the VADAs was 80 % in the trapping group, which improved to 88.9 % at the follow-ups (45 months on average). Unwanted occlusions of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) were detected in three trapped cases. Incomplete obliteration of the VADA or unwanted occlusions of the PICA were detected primarily in the VADAs closest to the PICA. In the stenting group, the immediate total occlusion rate was 47.4 %, which improved to 100 % at the follow-ups (39 months on average). The immediate total occlusion rate of the VADAs was higher in the trapping group (p < 0.05), but the later total occlusion was slightly higher in the stenting group (p > 0.05).ConclusionsOur preliminary results showed that internal trapping and stent-assisted coiling are both technically feasible for treating ruptured supra-PICA VADAs. Although not statistically significant, procedural related complications occurred more frequently in the trapping group. When the VADAs are close to the PICA, we suggest that the lesions should be treated using SAC.

  14. Intracranial Aneurysms Associated with a Double Origin of the Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery

    PubMed Central

    Padovani Trivelato, F.; Salles Rezende, M.T.; Brito Santos, R.; Hilton Vieira Madeira, T.; Cardoso Campos, R.; Cordeiro Ulhûa, A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) frequently has a variable course and target territory. However, double origin PICA is a rare finding. Its significance is uncertain, but it has been associated with intracranial aneurysms localized at the PICA proper or at a distant site. The presence of this variation imposes specific challenges. We describe two cases of double origin PICA, one of them associated with an ipsilateral PICA aneurysm. The role of this finding was critically reviewed. A literature search identified 23 cases of double origin PICA, including both cases reported in this paper. Intracranial aneurysms were strongly associated with double origin PICA (71% in 21 detailed cases of double origin PICA). The current patient harboring a PICA aneurysm was successfully treated by endovascular trapping. In the setting of double origin PICA aneurysms, this variation beneficially affects the treatment choice once the two limbs enable the safe sacrifice of the channel involved, with preservation of blood flow through the other channel. PMID:22005699

  15. Therapeutic Progress in Treating Vertebral Dissecting Aneurysms Involving the Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Xu, Kan; Sun, Xiaofeng; Yu, Jinlu

    2016-01-01

    Among the variations of vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms (VDAs), VDAs involving the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA), especially ruptured and high-risk unruptured aneurysms, are the most difficult to treat. Because the PICA is an important structure, serious symptoms may occur after its occlusion. Retained PICAs are prone to re-bleeding because VDAs are difficult to completely occlude. There is therefore confusion regarding the appropriate treatment for VDAs involving the PICA. Here, we used the PubMed database to review recent research concerning VDAs that involve the PICA, and we found that treatments for VDAs involving the PICA include (i) endovascular treatment involving the reconstruction of blood vessels and blood flow, (ii) occluding the aneurysm using an internal coil trapping or an assisted bypass, (iii) inducing reversed blood flow by occluding the proximal VDA or forming an assisted bypass, or (iv) the reconstruction of blood flow via a craniotomy. Although the above methods effectively treat VDAs involving the PICA, each method is associated with both a high degree of risk and specific advantages and disadvantages. The core problem when treating VDAs involving the PICA is to retain the PICA while occluding the aneurysm. Therefore, the method is generally selected on a case-by-case basis according to the characteristics of the aneurysm. In this study, we summarize the various current methods that are used to treat VDAs involving the PICA and provide schematic diagrams as our conclusion. Because there is no special field of research concerning VDAs involving the PICA, these cases are hidden within many multiple-cases studies. Therefore, this study does not review all relevant documents and may have some limitations. Thus, we have focused on the mainstream treatments for VDAs that involve the PICA. PMID:27429591

  16. Ruptured aneurysm at the cortical segment of the distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery associated with hemodynamic stress after basilar artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Marutani, Akiko; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Park, Hun Soo; Tamura, Kentaro; Motoyama, Yasushi; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background: A distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) de novo aneurysm at the cortical segment after atherosclerotic basilar artery occlusion is extremely rare. Here, we report the case of a ruptured distal PICA de novo aneurysm 8 years after basilar artery occlusion. Case Description: A 75-year-old man experienced sudden disturbance of consciousness; computed tomography demonstrated cerebellar and subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured distal PICA aneurysm. Neck clipping of the aneurysm prevented re-rupture initially, and superficial temporal artery-superior cerebellar artery (STA-SCA) bypass was performed 3 months after admission. Postoperative angiography confirmed patency of the bypass, and the patient was discharged without any new neurological deficits. Conclusion: This report describes a case of de novo development of a saccular distal PICA aneurysm after atherosclerotic basilar artery occlusion. We believe that increased hemodynamic stress at the PICA might have contributed to the occurrence and rupture of the aneurysm. STA-SCA bypass, introduced in the territory of the cerebellar hemisphere, reduces hemodynamic stress, which would prevent the occurrence of de novo aneurysm and recurrent bleeding. PMID:28144485

  17. [Compression of the inferior cerebellar artery-induced compression of the medulla oblongata in Arnold-Chiari malformation as a cause of essential hypertension].

    PubMed

    Makhmudov, U V; Salalykin, V I; Shimanskiĭ, V N; Taniashin, S V; Sidorkin, D V

    2001-01-01

    Cerebrovascular abnormalities (primarily looping of cerebellar arteries) are almost without exception concurrent with the Arnold-Chiari syndrome and hydrocephalus. Persistent essential hypertension may be a manifestation of pathological vessel-brain contact. Customary microvascular decompression may lead to blood pressure stabilization in the postoperative period for a long time. The paper presents a clinical case of a 52-year female patient with the Arnold-Chiari syndrome who underwent microvascular decompression of the left posterior inferior cerebellar artery at the level of the medulla oblongata. Surgical treatment regressed preoperative cerebellar, bulbar, and truncal symptoms, lowered blood pressure from 190/100 to 120/80 mm Hg, and stabilized it at this level.

  18. Intracranial-to-intracranial bypass for posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms: options, technical challenges, and results in 35 patients.

    PubMed

    Abla, Adib A; McDougall, Cameron M; Breshears, Jonathan D; Lawton, Michael T

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Intracranial-to-intracranial (IC-IC) bypasses are alternatives to traditional extracranial-to-intracranial (EC-IC) bypasses to reanastomose parent arteries, reimplant efferent branches, revascularize branches with in situ donor arteries, and reconstruct bifurcations with interposition grafts that are entirely intracranial. These bypasses represent an evolution in bypass surgery from using scalp arteries and remote donor sites toward a more local and reconstructive approach. IC-IC bypass can be utilized preferentially when revascularization is needed in the management of complex aneurysms. Experiences using IC-IC bypass, as applied to posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) aneurysms in 35 patients, were reviewed. METHODS Patients with PICA aneurysms and vertebral artery (VA) aneurysms involving the PICA's origin were identified from a prospectively maintained database of the Vascular Neurosurgery Service, and patients who underwent bypass procedures for PICA revascularization were included. RESULTS During a 17-year period in which 129 PICA aneurysms in 125 patients were treated microsurgically, 35 IC-IC bypasses were performed as part of PICA aneurysm management, including in situ p3-p3 PICA-PICA bypass in 11 patients (31%), PICA reimplantation in 9 patients (26%), reanastomosis in 14 patients (40%), and 1 V3 VA-to-PICA bypass with an interposition graft (3%). All aneurysms were completely or nearly completely obliterated, 94% of bypasses were patent, 77% of patients were improved or unchanged after treatment, and good outcomes (modified Rankin Scale ≤ 2) were observed in 76% of patients. Two patients died expectantly. Ischemic complications were limited to 2 patients in whom the bypasses occluded, and permanent lower cranial nerve morbidity was limited to 3 patients and did not compromise independent function in any of the patients. CONCLUSIONS PICA aneurysms receive the application of IC-IC bypass better than any other aneurysm, with nearly one

  19. Development of anterior inferior cerebellar artery pseudoaneurysm after gamma knife surgery for vestibular schwannoma. A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Geraint; Hassan, Faizul; Bhatnagar, Priya; Mitchell, Patrick; Jayakrishnan, Vijayam; Forster, David; Mendelow, Alexander David

    2014-08-01

    Gamma knife surgery (GKS) is a well-established modality for controlling the progression of vestibular schwannomas. Adverse effects of this treatment are extremely rare but include cyst formation and malignant transformation. We report a case of anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) pseudoaneurysm development rupture presenting as a poor WFNS grade subarachnoid haemorrhage. This is only the fourth case of aneurysm development (AICA aneurysm) following GKS reported but due to its serious nature we believe this potential complication warrants awareness in those offering this treatment.

  20. Compression of the medulla oblongata and acute respiratory failure caused by rupture of a thrombosed large aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Kito, Akira; Maki, Hideki; Hattori, Kenichi; Tanahashi, Kuniaki

    2010-01-01

    A 65-year-old female presented with an extremely rare case of a ruptured thrombosed large aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) in which a local hematoma compressed the medulla oblongata and caused acute respiratory failure. She first presented with dizziness, general fatigue, and nausea 2 months before admission. She was hospitalized for intense general fatigue, nausea, and occipitalgia. Computed tomography and T(1)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed a heterogeneous lesion around the right cerebello-medullary cistern. Angiography revealed a fusiform aneurysm of the right AICA. Asphyxia occurred 4 days after admission and the patient underwent an emergency operation. No subarachnoid hematoma was present, but a hematoma around the ruptured portion markedly compressed the medulla oblongata. The medulla oblongata was adequately decompressed after subtotal removal of the aneurysm. The patient's respiratory status and consciousness level recovered after the operation.

  1. Glucose utilization in the inferior cerebellar vermis and ocular myoclonus.

    PubMed

    Yakushiji, Y; Otsubo, R; Hayashi, T; Fukuchi, K; Yamada, N; Hasegawa, Y; Minematsu, K

    2006-07-11

    In a patient with symptomatic ocular myoclonus, the authors observed the regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose use (rCMRGlu) before and after successful treatment with clonazepam. Even after the symptoms resolved, the rCMRGlu in the hypertrophic olive increased persistently, whereas that in the inferior cerebellar vermis contralateral to the hypertrophic olive decreased. The inferior cerebellar vermis, belonging to the vestibulocerebellar system, may be associated with the generation of symptomatic ocular myoclonus.

  2. Congenital rubella with agenesis of the inferior cerebellar vermis and total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage.

    PubMed

    Cluver, C; Meyer, R; Odendaal, H; Geerts, L

    2013-08-01

    Congenital rubella infection has been associated with a number of abnormalities including cardiac, central nervous system and placental complications. We present a case with multiple fetal abnormalities detected on prenatal ultrasound, and confirmed postnatally, that included a single umbilical artery, severe tricuspid regurgitation, micrognathia and agenesis of the inferior cerebellar vermis. Postnatal echocardiography additionally revealed unobstructed total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage (TAPVD) into the coronary sinus. Placental examination showed signs of placentitis, and polymerase chain reaction on neonatal serum was positive for rubella. Following a multidisciplinary team review, it was decided to provide only supportive care, and the infant died at 6 months of age owing to a respiratory tract infection. To our knowledge, TAPVD and agenesis of the inferior cerebellar vermis have not been reported previously in association with congenital rubella infection. This case illustrates how congenital infection may present in atypical ways and stresses the importance of considering congenital infection in the differential diagnosis of fetal anomalies when multiple features are present.

  3. Inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm associated with common hepatic artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Bracale, G; Porcellini, M; Bernardo, B; Selvetella, L; Renda, A

    1996-12-01

    A unique case of true inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm (IPDA) associated with occlusion of common hepatic artery is reported. Radiological and MRI findings are described. Because of high risk of visceral ischemia that contraindicated a percutaneous transluminal embolization, a successful tangential resection of aneurysm was performed.

  4. A case of cerebellar infarction caused by vertebral artery injury from a stab wound to the neck.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Je; Shim, Hyun Seok; Jeong, Jae Ho; Whang, Soo Hyun; Kim, Jin Pyeong; Jeon, Sea Young; Kwon, Oh Jin

    2007-09-01

    Vertebral artery injuries are the least common arterial injuries because of the deep location of the vessel in a bony canal. Injury of this vessel has not been associated with neurological deficits, and it is thought that many of these injuries are not recognized. The incidence of vertebral artery injury occurring after a penetration wound to the neck varies from 1.0% in gunshot wounds to 7.4% in stab wounds. However, even with vertebral artery injury in penetration wounds of the neck the association with cerebellar infarction is a rare occurrence. We describe a case of cerebellar infarction caused by vertebral artery injury from a stab wound that severed the vessel between the transverse processes of C3 and C4 with a hypoplastic contralateral vertebral artery. The patient ultimately suffered infarction of the cerebellum due to the lack of preservation of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery blood flow. Management is discussed and the medical literature is reviewed.

  5. [Surgery of AVM of the inferior medullary velum by the uvulotonsillar approach--advantage of moving of the cerebellar tonsil: technical case report].

    PubMed

    Shigeno, Taku; Kumai, Junichiro; Endo, Masaru; Hotta, Shinji

    2002-01-01

    An incidentally found arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the inferior medullary velum behind the medulla was removed by the lateral approach to the fourth ventricle originally described by Seeger in 1980. A wide posterior fossa craniotomy was performed to move the cerebellar tonsil laterally with C-1 laminectomy. The tela chroidea and inferior medullary velum, the two main sheets of tissue that form the lower half of the roof of the fourth ventricle can be exposed by gently displacing the tonsils laterally without splitting the vermis. Both the cerebellomedullary and uvulotonsillar spaces were exposed. Because the lateral cerebellomedullary cistern was also exposed, the moving of the cerebellar tonsil in a lateral direction was easy to do without injuring the cerebellar tissues. The nidus was located mainly in the extrapial plane that received feeding arteries from the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The nidus was removed in a dry field without bleeding. This report is the first report of surgical removal of unruptured AVM of the inferior medullary velum through the so-called telovelar or transcerebellomedullary fissure approach. We propose to call this approach the uvulotonsillar approach to emphasize the dissecting plane between the uvula and the tonsil.

  6. Spontaneous Recanalization of Superior Mesenteric Artery Occlusion Following Angioplasty and Stenting of Inferior Mesenteric Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Akpinar, Erhan Cil, Barbaros E.; Arat, Anil; Baykal, Atac; Karaman, Kerem; Balkanci, Ferhun

    2006-02-15

    An 84-year-old woman with a history of hypertension and coronary artery disease was admitted with a progressively worsening diffuse abdominal pain. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen and angiography revealed occlusion of the origin and proximal portion of superior mesenteric artery. Aortography also showed severe origin stenosis of inferior mesenteric artery and that the distal part of the superior mesenteric artery was supplied by a prominent marginal artery of Drummond. Patient was effectively treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting of the inferior mesenteric artery. Follow-up imaging studies demonstrated patency of the stent and spontaneous recanalization of superior mesenteric artery occlusion.

  7. Clipping of ipsilateral posterior communicating and superior cerebellar artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Welch, Babu G

    2015-01-01

    The case is a 55-year-old female who presented with dizziness as the chief complaint. She has a family history of two relatives with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Digital subtraction angiography revealed the presence of a left-sided posterior communicating artery aneurysm and an ipsilateral superior cerebellar artery (SCA) aneurysm. Due to the smaller nature of the SCA, a decision was made to proceed with surgical clipping of both lesions through a pterional approach. A narrated video with illustrations depicts the intraoperative management of these lesions with postoperative angiography results. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/HCHToSsXv-4 .

  8. Infantile intracranial aneurysm of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Del Santo, Molly Ann; Cordina, Steve Mario

    2016-03-03

    Intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant who presented with inconsolable crying, vomiting, and sunset eye sign. CT revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, with CT angiogram revealing a superior cerebellar artery aneurysm. An external ventricular drain was placed for acute management of hydrocephalus, with definitive treatment by endovascular technique with a total of six microcoils to embolize the aneurysm. Serial transcranial Dopplers revealed no subsequent vasospasm. Although aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare, once the diagnosis is established, early treatment results in better outcomes.

  9. Infantile intracranial aneurysm of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Del Santo, Molly Ann; Cordina, Steve Mario

    2016-02-29

    Intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant who presented with inconsolable crying, vomiting, and sunset eye sign. CT revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, with CT angiogram revealing a superior cerebellar artery aneurysm. An external ventricular drain was placed for acute management of hydrocephalus, with definitive treatment by endovascular technique with a total of six microcoils to embolize the aneurysm. Serial transcranial Dopplers revealed no subsequent vasospasm. Although aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare, once the diagnosis is established, early treatment results in better outcomes.

  10. Inferior epigastric artery: Surface anatomy, prevention and management of injury.

    PubMed

    Wong, Clare; Merkur, Harry

    2016-04-01

    The anatomical position of the inferior epigastric artery (IEA) subjects it to risk of injury during abdominal procedures that are close to the artery, such as laparoscopic trocar insertion, insertion of intra-abdominal drains, Tenckhoff(®) catheter (peritoneal dialysis catheter) and paracentesis. This article aims to raise the awareness of the anatomical variations of the course of the IEA in relation to abdominal landmarks in order to define a safer zone for laparoscopic ancillary trocar placement. Methods of managing the IEA injury as well as techniques to minimise the risk of injury to the IEA are reviewed and discussed.

  11. A Case of the Inferior Mesenteric Artery Arising from the Superior Mesenteric Artery in a Korean Woman

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung Jin; Ku, Min Jung; Cho, Sa Sun

    2011-01-01

    Anatomical variations of the inferior mesenteric artery are extremely uncommon, since the inferior mesenteric artery is regularly diverged at the level of the third lumbar vertebra. We found a rare case in which the inferior mesenteric artery arose from the superior mesenteric artery. The findings were made during a routine dissection of the cadaver of an 82-yr-old Korean woman. This is the tenth report on this anomaly, the second female and the first Korean. The superior mesenteric artery normally arising from abdominal aorta sent the inferior mesenteric artery as the second branch. The longitudinal anastomosis vessels between the superior mesenteric artery and inferior mesenteric artery survived to form the common mesenteric artery. This anatomical variation concerning the common mesenteric artery is of clinical importance, performing procedures containing the superior mesenteric artery. PMID:22022194

  12. Partial breast reconstruction with mini superficial inferior epigastric artery and mini deep inferior epigastric perforator flaps.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Aldona J; Eldor, Liron

    2010-08-01

    In this study, partial breast reconstruction was undertaken after breast conservation therapy using mini abdominal free flaps on both an immediate and delayed basis.Patient demographics, oncologic status, reconstructive data, and complications were collected from medical records.Twelve patients (age range 39-60) were included in this study with a mean follow-up time of 5 years. Ten mini superficial inferior epigastric artery flaps and 2 mini deep inferior epigastric perforator flaps were used (7 immediate and 5 delayed reconstructions). No flap lost, 1 minor abdominal wound dehiscence, and no local or distant recurrences were noted. Good to excellent results were reported by 91% of the women.In properly selected patients with high motivation toward breast conservation, tailored abdominal mini-free flaps can safely and satisfactorily be implemented for the reconstruction of partial mastectomy defects. Patients should be comprehensively educated on the potential future implications of using the abdominal donor site for partial breast reconstruction.

  13. Cerebellar inhibitory output shapes the temporal dynamics of its somatosensory inferior olivary input.

    PubMed

    Hogri, Roni; Segalis, Eyal; Mintz, Matti

    2014-08-01

    The cerebellum is necessary and sufficient for the acquisition and execution of adaptively timed conditioned motor responses following repeated paired presentations of a conditioned stimulus and an unconditioned stimulus. The underlying plasticity depends on the convergence of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli signals relayed to the cerebellum by the pontine nucleus and the inferior olive (IO), respectively. Adaptive timing of conditioned responses relies on the correctly predicted onset of the unconditioned stimulus, usually a noxious somatosensory stimulus. We addressed two questions: First, does the IO relay information regarding the duration of somatosensory stimuli to the cerebellum? Multiple-unit recordings from the IO of anesthetized rats that received periorbital airpuffs of various durations revealed that sustained somatosensory stimuli are invariably transformed into phasic IO outputs. The phasic response was followed by a post-peak depression in IO activity as compared to baseline, providing the cerebellum with a highly synchronous signal, time-locked to the stimulus' onset. Second, we sought to examine the involvement of olivocerebellar interactions in this signal transformation. Cerebello-olivary inhibition was interrupted using temporary pharmacological inactivation of cerebellar output nuclei, resulting in more sustained (i.e., less synchronous) IO responses to sustained somatosensory stimuli, in which the post-peak depression was substituted with elevated activity as compared to baseline. We discuss the possible roles of olivocerebellar negative-feedback loops and baseline cerebello-olivary inhibition levels in shaping the temporal dynamics of the IO's response to somatosensory stimuli and the consequences of this shaping for cerebellar plasticity and its ability to adapt to varying contexts.

  14. Aberrant origin of the inferior thyroid artery from the common carotid artery: a rare anatomical variation

    PubMed Central

    Ngo Nyeki, Adèle-Rose; Peloni, Giuseppe; Karenovics, Wolfram; Triponez, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a rare anatomical variant of the inferior thyroid artery (ITA) taking its origin directly from the common carotid artery (CCA) instead of the thyrocervical trunk (TCT). This anatomical feature exposes to risks of perioperative bleeding and nerve injuries when it is unrecognized by the surgeons. Knowledge of its existence may be helpful to reduce risks for the patient. PMID:28149813

  15. Use of the inferior epigastric artery to revascularize a lower pole renal artery in renal transplant.

    PubMed

    Young, J S; Rohr, M S

    1995-02-01

    The increasing use of living-related donors has increased the incidence wherein the transplant surgeon is required to use special vascular surgical techniques to transplant kidneys with anomalous arterial anatomy. One of the most commonly encountered arterial anomalies is the presence of a lower pole renal artery. In many cases, this artery can be anastomosed to the main renal artery, and the main renal artery can then be anastomosed into the recipient vessel. However, there are cases where the lower pole renal artery is too distant from the main renal artery to allow an anastomosis to be performed. The lower pole renal artery of the graft must be revascularized to avoid ischemic injury to the ureter. Thus, alternate methods for the revascularization of this vessel must be found. We describe the use of the recipient inferior epigastric artery as an arterial supply for the donor lower pole artery. In our case report, this method provided excellent flow to the lower kidney and was documented by later studies.

  16. [Conservative management of a ruptured inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm associated with celiac artery occlusion].

    PubMed

    Kidogawa, Hideo; Okamoto, Kohji; Yamayoshi, Takatomo; Noguchi, Junya

    2013-10-01

    A 45-year-old female presented at our hospital with a one-day history of upper abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed that the root of the celiac artery was obstructed and that a large hematoma was present in the retroperitoneum. The patient was diagnosed with retroperitoneal hemorrhage associated with the rupture of an inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm, which was caused by increased blood flow in the pancreaticoduodenal arterial arcade. Because the patient's general condition was stable, she was managed conservatively and discharged on achieving remission after a month. Follow-up CT revealed spontaneous resolution of the celiac artery obstruction and aneurysm. The celiac artery obstruction in this case was assumed to be caused by segmental arterial mediolysis.

  17. A case of atherosclerotic inferior mesenteric artery aneurysm secondary to high flow state.

    PubMed

    Troisi, Nicola; Esposito, Giovanni; Cefalì, Pietro; Setti, Marco

    2011-07-01

    Inferior mesenteric artery aneurysms are very rare and they are among the rarest of visceral artery aneurysms. Sometimes, the distribution of the blood flow due to chronic atherosclerotic occlusion of some arteries can establish an increased flow into a particular supplying district (high flow state). A high flow state in a stenotic inferior mesenteric artery in compensation for a mesenteric occlusive disease can produce a rare form of aneurysm. We report the case of an atherosclerotic inferior mesenteric aneurysm secondary to high flow state (association with occlusion of the celiac trunk and severe stenosis of the superior mesenteric artery), treated by open surgical approach.

  18. Chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma via the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery in patients with celiac artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, M; Higashihara, H; Ono, H; Koganemaru, F; Fujimitsu, R; Mizuma, Y; Nakamura, T; Sato, S; Kimura, S; Kodama, S

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-one patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accompanied by extensive celiac artery stenosis or obstruction were treated by chemoembolization via the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA). The tip of the catheter was placed in the arteries in front of the confluence with the proper hepatic artery in 12 patients (group A: the proximal portion of the IPDA in 10, and common hepatic artery in 2), and in the proper hepatic artery or branches of it (group B) in 9 using a coaxial catheter system. Transient hyperamylasemia was observed in 10 of the 12 patients in group A and in 3 of the 9 patients in group B after chemoembolization. Splenic infarction developed in 8 patients in group A and in none in group B. Intrapancreatic fluid collection was present in 2 patients in group A following chemoembolization. No fatal complications were encountered. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates of the 10 patients in group A treated by only chemoembolization were 90, 57, and 23%, respectively (mean survival 780 days). The 1- and 2-year survival rates of 9 patients in group B were 85.8 and 85.8% (mean 879 days), respectively. Considering the severity of complications and the survival rates in groups A and B, chemoembolization by superselective catheterization into the hepatic artery via the IPDA is the treatment of choice. However, chemoembolization from the arteries in front of the confluence with the proper hepatic artery seems to be acceptable in cases of hypervascular HCC which fail to be superselectively catheterized.

  19. Successful transcatheter arterial embolization of an inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm associated with celiac axis stenosis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toshihiko; Uenoyama, Shoichi; Isogai, Satoshi

    2004-05-01

    A case of inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA) aneurysm associated with celiac axis stenosis was successfully treated using only transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). A 57-year-old woman was urgently referred to our hospital with sudden abdominal pain; computed tomography revealed retroperitoneal hematoma due to bleeding from an aneurysm around the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). Selective angiography into the SMA showed an aneurysm derived from the IPDA posterior branch; the IPDA anterior branch was intact and contrast medium flowed into the common hepatic artery territory through the pancreatic arcade because of celiac axis stenosis. We subsequently performed TAE on the lesion. Arteriography after TAE showed that the aneurysm had disappeared and that the IPDA anterior branch was intact. She had no aneurysm recurrence for about two years after the treatment. We believe that TAE is effective even for a PDA aneurysm with celiac axis stenosis or occlusion. However, it is important to perform embolization precisely and over a long period.

  20. Bilateral Superior Cerebellar Artery Embolic Occlusion with a Fetal-Type Posterior Cerebral Artery Providing Collateral Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Taylor J.; Saporito, Rachael C.; Hope, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral infarction of the superior cerebellar arteries with sparing of the rest of the posterior circulation, particularly the posterior cerebral arteries, is an uncommon finding in neurological practice. Most commonly, the deficits of the superior cerebellar arteries and posterior cerebral arteries occur together due to the close proximity of their origins at the top of the basilar artery. A patient was transferred to the neurological intensive care unit with a history of recent-onset falls from standing, profound hypertension, dizziness, and headaches. The neurological exam revealed cerebellar signs, including dysmetria of the right upper extremity and a decreased level of consciousness. Computed tomography of the head and neck revealed decreased attenuation throughout most of the cerebellar hemispheres suggestive of ischemic injury with sparing of the rest of the brain. Further investigation with a computed tomography angiogram revealed a fetal-type posterior cerebral artery on the right side that was providing collateral circulation to the posterior brain. Due to this embryological anomaly, the patient was spared significant morbidity and mortality that would have likely occurred had the circulation been more typical of an adult male. PMID:28203181

  1. Bilateral Superior Cerebellar Artery Embolic Occlusion with a Fetal-Type Posterior Cerebral Artery Providing Collateral Circulation.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Taylor J; Saporito, Rachael C; Hope, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral infarction of the superior cerebellar arteries with sparing of the rest of the posterior circulation, particularly the posterior cerebral arteries, is an uncommon finding in neurological practice. Most commonly, the deficits of the superior cerebellar arteries and posterior cerebral arteries occur together due to the close proximity of their origins at the top of the basilar artery. A patient was transferred to the neurological intensive care unit with a history of recent-onset falls from standing, profound hypertension, dizziness, and headaches. The neurological exam revealed cerebellar signs, including dysmetria of the right upper extremity and a decreased level of consciousness. Computed tomography of the head and neck revealed decreased attenuation throughout most of the cerebellar hemispheres suggestive of ischemic injury with sparing of the rest of the brain. Further investigation with a computed tomography angiogram revealed a fetal-type posterior cerebral artery on the right side that was providing collateral circulation to the posterior brain. Due to this embryological anomaly, the patient was spared significant morbidity and mortality that would have likely occurred had the circulation been more typical of an adult male.

  2. Traumatic Inferior Gluteal Artery Pseudoaneurysm and Arteriovenous Fistula Managed with Emergency Transcatheter Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Keeling, A. N.; Naughton, P. A.; Leahy, A. L.; Lee, M. J.

    2008-07-15

    We present a case of blunt trauma to the buttock resulting in an inferior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm and arteriovenous fistula. The characteristic diagnostic features on CT angiography and digital subtraction angiography (DSA), along with the emergency percutaneous management of this traumatic vascular injury, are described. A review of the literature demonstrates inferior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare condition, while successful treatment with glue embolization is previously unreported.

  3. Pseudoaneurysm of the Inferior Epigastric Artery Successfully Treated by Ultrasound-guided Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Takase, Kei Kazama, Takuro; Abe, Kayoko; Chiba, Yoshihiro; Saito, Haruo; Takahashi, Shoki

    2004-09-15

    An 82-year-old woman underwent right hemicolectomy by median laparotomy. Two weeks later, a pulsatile mass was found at the left side of the surgical wound, which was diagnosed as pseudoaneurysm of the inferior epigastric artery by color Doppler US and CT. The pseudoaneurysm was successfully treated by US-guided compression of the neck of the aneurysm for 30 minutes. US-guided compression should be considered the treatment of choice for postsurgical pseudoaneurysm of the inferior epigastric artery.

  4. Acute Anterior Myocardial Infarction Accompanied by Acute Inferior Myocardial Infarction: A Very Rare Coronary Artery Anomaly.

    PubMed

    Alsancak, Y; Sezenöz, B; Duran, M; Unlu, S; Turkoglu, S; Yalcın, R

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery anomalies are rare and mostly silent in clinical practice. First manifestation of this congenital abnormality can be devastating as syncope, acute coronary syndrome, and sudden cardiac death. Herein we report a case with coronary artery anomaly complicated with ST segment myocardial infarction in both inferior and anterior walls simultaneously diagnosed during primary percutaneous coronary intervention.

  5. Embolization in a Patient with Ruptured Anterior Inferior Pancreaticoduodenal Arterial Aneurysm with Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Hiroyuki; Sato, Yozo; Banno, Tatsuo; Arakawa, Toshinao; Hara, Masaki

    2002-08-15

    In median arcuate ligament syndrome, the root of the celiac artery is compressed and narrowed by the median arcuate ligament of the diaphragm during expiration, causing abdominal angina.Aneurysm may be formed in arteries of the pancreas and duodenum due toa chronic increase in blood flow from the superior mesenteric artery into the celiac arterial region. We report a patient saved by embolization with coils of ruptured aneurysm that developed with markedly dilated anterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery due to median arcuate ligament syndrome.

  6. Aberrant Left Inferior Bronchial Artery Originating from the Left Gastric Artery in a Patient with Acute Massive Hemoptysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Sen Sun, Xi-Wen Yu, Dong Jie, Bing

    2013-10-15

    Massive hemoptysis is a life-threatening condition, and the major source of bleeding in this condition is the bronchial circulation. Bronchial artery embolization is a safe and effective treatment for controlling hemoptysis. However, the sites of origin of the bronchial arteries (BAs) have numerous anatomical variations, which can result in a technical challenge to identify a bleeding artery. We present a rare case of a left inferior BA that originated from the left gastric artery in a patient with recurrent massive hemoptysis caused by bronchiectasis. The aberrant BA was embolized, and hemoptysis has been controlled for 8 months.

  7. Arterial supply to the bleeding diverticulum in the ascending duodenum treated by transcatheter arterial embolization- a duodenal artery branched from the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery.

    PubMed

    Sanda, Hiroki H; Kawai, Nobuyuki N; Sato, Morio M; Tanaka, Fumihiro F; Nakata, Kouhei K; Minamiguchi, Hiroki H; Nakai, Motoki M; Sonomura, Tetsuo T

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of endoscopically unmanageable hemorrhagic diverticulum in the ascending duodenum. The ventral and dorsal walls of the ascending duodenum were supplied from the first jejunal artery (1JA) and inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA), respectively. The hemorrhage mainly occurred from IPDA. The abruptly branching of IPDA from superior mesenteric artery enabled successful catheterization of the IPDA with an angled microcatheter. Hemostasis was obtained by embolization using n-butyl cyanoacrylate. Gastroendoscopy depicted a duodenal hemi-circumferential ulcer. No symptoms related to hemorrhage were found at the last follow-up at 12 months.

  8. Bilateral Pedicled Superficial Inferior Epigastric Artery Flap in the Treatment of Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Don; Saber, Sepideh; Patel, Ketan; Carey, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The authors present a new technique in surgically treating hidradenitis suppurativa (HS), a debilitating skin condition. In HS, surgical treatment is often the best option because of the high recurrence rates despite extensive medical treatment. A commonly successful surgical method is using skin flaps after excision of the affected area. A superficial inferior epigastric artery flap is demonstrated here as a new alternative approach to treating a case of extensive HS of the groin. By using the pedicled superficial inferior epigastric artery flap for groin reconstruction, inguinal HS can be widely excised and reconstructed with minimal donor-site morbidity and a good aesthetic outcome. PMID:27622101

  9. Traumatic Inferior Gluteal Artery Aneurysm Managed with Emergency Transcatheter Thrombin Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Juszkat, Robert; Zielinski, Maciej; Wykretowicz, Mateusz; Piekarek, Alina; Majewski, Waclaw

    2010-06-15

    Pseudoaneurysms of the inferior gluteal artery (IGA) are rare and are often caused by trauma. Treatment options vary and include surgery, ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection, and endovascular procedures such as stent-graft placement, coil embolization, and glue injection. We report a 70-year-old male who presented to the hospital after a road accident with a posttraumatic pseudoaneurysm that was treated by endovascular thrombin embolization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of inferior gluteal artery false aneurysm treated by this method.

  10. Detection of crossed cerebellar diaschisis in hyperacute ischemic stroke using arterial spin-labeled MR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Koung Mi; Sohn, Chul-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Arterial spin-labeling (ASL) was recently introduced as a noninvasive method to evaluate cerebral hemodynamics. The purposes of this study were to assess the ability of ASL imaging to detect crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) in patients with their first unilateral supratentorial hyperacute stroke and to identify imaging or clinical factors significantly associated with CCD. Materials and methods We reviewed 204 consecutive patients who underwent MRI less than 8 hours after the onset of stroke symptoms. The inclusion criteria were supratentorial abnormality in diffusion-weighted images in the absence of a cerebellar or brain stem lesion, bilateral supratentorial infarction, subacute or chronic infarction, and MR angiography showing vertebrobasilar system disease. For qualitative analysis, asymmetric cerebellar hypoperfusion in ASL images was categorized into 3 grades. Quantitative analysis was performed to calculate the asymmetric index (AI). The patients’ demographic and clinical features and outcomes were recorded. Univariate and multivariate analyses were also performed. Results A total of 32 patients met the inclusion criteria, and 24 (75%) presented CCD. Univariate analyses revealed more frequent arterial occlusions, higher diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) lesion volumes and higher initial NIHSS and mRS scores in the CCD-positive group compared with the CCD-negative group (all p < .05). The presence of arterial occlusion and the initial mRS scores were related with the AI (all p < .05). Multivariate analyses revealed that arterial occlusion and the initial mRS scores were significantly associated with CCD and AI. Conclusion ASL imaging could detect CCD in 75% of patients with hyperacute infarction. We found that CCD was more prevalent in patients with arterial occlusion, larger ischemic brain volumes, and higher initial NIHSS and mRS scores. In particular, vessel occlusion and initial mRS score appeared to be significantly related

  11. [Experience of coronary artery bypass grafting with inferior epigastric artery (IEA) and pathological examination of the IEA].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, S; Kawaue, Y

    1995-01-01

    From January to March 1994, coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) using the inferior epigastric artery (IEA) were performed in 10 patients. The stumps of the IEAs were examined pathologically. 1. Intimal thickening of the IEA was scarcely noted. 2. Internal elastic lamina of the IEA showed good development equivalent to the internal thoracic artery (ITA). 3. Tunica media of the IEA was poor in elastic fibers and rich in smooth muscle cells compared with the ITA. 4. The thickness of intima + media was 150-360 microns, suggesting its low risk of ischemic necrosis in case of free grafting. These results suggested the IEA to be a good graft material applicable for CABG.

  12. Cerebellar infarction resulting from vertebral artery occlusion associated with a Jefferson fracture.

    PubMed

    Muratsu, Hirotsugu; Doita, Minoru; Yanagi, Toshihide; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Nishida, Kotaro; Tomioka, Masao; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2005-06-01

    Neurologic deficit secondary to a Jefferson fracture is rare, as the fracture fragments tend to spread outward. To the authors' knowledge, only five cases of vertebral artery injury associated with C1 fracture have been reported. A 75-year-old man with diffuse spinal hyperostosis hit the top of his head and sustained a Jefferson fracture. The patient presented with vertigo and slurred speech. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated cerebellar infarction, and MR angiography (MRA) showed bilateral vertebral artery occlusion associated with a Jefferson fracture. The patient was placed in a halo vest for a total of 11 weeks and treated with anticoagulant therapy. Vertigo gradually improved, and the patient was able to walk with a cane. Previously slurred speech was completely resolved. This case demonstrates that a Jefferson fracture can cause vertebral artery occlusion, resulting in cerebellar infarction. The clinician should be aware of the possibility and implications of vertebral artery injuries, especially if a fracture involving the foramen transversarium with displacement is documented or if there is a neurologic deficit above the level of injury. Advances in noninvasive imaging such as MRA will facilitate accurate evaluation of these potentially life-threatening vascular injuries.

  13. [Clinical outcome of the coronary arterial bypass graft with inferior epigastric artery as a composite graft].

    PubMed

    Ayabe, T; Fukushima, Y; Yoshioka, M; Onizuka, T

    2003-08-01

    Based on a good long-patency of the internal thoracic arteries (ITA) in coronary arterial bypass graft (CABG), the postoperative early patency of the inferior epigastric artery (IEA) was evaluated by means of the proximal anastomosed types as a composite graft. Among patients performed with CABG during October in 1998 to June, 2000, 39 cases with the IEA composite graft were studied for this clinical outcome (31 males and 8 females, the averaged age was 66.4 +/- 8.0 year old). The preoperative diagnosis were done as acute myocardial infarction (4), old myocardial infarction with angina pectoris (8), effort angina (12), and unstable angina (15). The coronary disease was left main trunk disease (8), 3 vessels (22), and 2 vessels (9). The operation was performed with cold blood-cardioplegia (20 degrees C, blood-GIK liquor used) on cardiopulmonary bypass with a single atrial and aortic cannulation. The averaged extracorporeal circulation time and the aortic clamping one were done for 169 and 131 min, respectively. The bypass number was double (n = 5), triple (n = 10), quadruple (n = 16), and quintuple (n = 8). Total bypass number was 150 (the averaged bypass number was 3.7 +/- 0.9), and total anastomosal number was 145. The postoperative early-patency of IEA was 94.9% (37/39). The proximal sites of IEA were anastomozed to ITA with I-shaped end-to-end (n = 15), to ITA with Y-shaped end-to-side (n = 5), and to SVG with Y-shaped end-to-side (n = 19). Compared with the postoperative early-patency of I-shaped anastomosis to ITA and that of Y-shaped one to ITA or SVG, there was no significance among these cases (100%, 15/15 versus 91.7%, 22/24, p = 0.6738), however, that of Y-shaped one to ITA was significantly better than that of Y-shaped one to SVG (60%, 3/5 versus 100%, 19/19, p = 0.0488). It should be available for spreading of the anastomotic objective vessels that the IEA as a composite graft was used with the proximal site anastomozed to ITA by I-shaped end-to-end and

  14. Disappearance of myocardial bridging of the left anterior descending coronary artery after inferior myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Yıldız, Bekir Serhat; Esin, Fatma; Alihanoğlu, Yusuf Izzettin; Kılıç, Ismail Doğu; Evrengül, Harun

    2014-06-01

    Myocardial bridging (MB) is defined as the intramural course of a major epicardial coronary artery, and is mostly confined to the left ventricle and the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). MB is a common congenital abnormality of a coronary artery, and is usually thought to be a benign anatomical variant. Although rare, previous studies have reported that patients with MB may suffer from myocardial ischemia, myocardial infarction (MI), arrhythmias, and even sudden death. Therefore, the diagnosis and treatment of MB are both important. Since MB is congenital, its disappearance is unlikely. We here report a very rare case of disappearance of MB after inferior MI.

  15. Origin of a common trunk for the inferior phrenic arteries from the right renal artery: a new anatomic vascular variant with clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Topaz, On; Topaz, Allyne; Polkampally, Pritam R; Damiano, Thomas; King, Christopher A

    2010-01-01

    The inferior phrenic arteries constitute a pair of important vessels, supplying multiple organs including the diaphragm, adrenal glands, esophagus, stomach, liver, inferior vena cava, and retroperitoneum. The vast majority (80-90%) of inferior phrenic arteries originate as separate vessels with near equal frequency from either the abdominal aorta or the celiac trunk. Infrequently, the right and left inferior phrenic arteries can arise in the form of a common trunk from the aorta or from the celiac trunk. We herein present three patients with a new anatomic vascular variant: a common trunk of the inferior phrenic arteries arising from the right renal artery. In one case, the left inferior phrenic branch of the common trunk provided collaterals connecting with a supra-diaphragmatic branch of the left internal mammary artery and in another with the lateral wall of the pericardium. Angiographic identification of a common trunk for the inferior phrenic arteries arising from the right renal artery is important for proper diagnosis and clinical management. The presence of this unique vascular variant can impact revascularization of the renal arteries.

  16. Inferior Phrenic Arteries and Their Branches, Their Anatomy and Possible Clinical Importance: An Experimental Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Gürses, İlke Ali; Gayretli, Özcan; Kale, Ayşin; Öztürk, Adnan; Usta, Ahmet; Şahinoğlu, Kayıhan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization is a common treatment for patients with inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma. If the carcinoma is advanced or the main arterial supply, the hepatic artery, is occluded, extrahepatic collateral arteries may develop. Both, right and left inferior phrenic arteries (RIPA and LIPA) are the most frequent and important among these collaterals. However, the topographic anatomy of these arteries has not been described in detail in anatomy textbooks, atlases and most previous reports. Aims: To investigate the anatomy and branching patterns of RIPA and LIPA on cadavers and compare our results with the literature. Study Design: Descriptive study. Methods: We bilaterally dissected 24 male and 2 female cadavers aged between 49 and 88 years for this study. Results: The RIPA and LIPA originated as a common trunk in 5 cadavers. The RIPA originated from the abdominal aorta in 13 sides, the renal artery in 2 sides, the coeliac trunk in 1 side and the left gastric artery in 1 side. The LIPA originated from the abdominal aorta in 9 sides and the coeliac trunk in 6 sides. In 6 cadavers, the ascending and posterior branches of the LIPA had different sources of origin. Conclusion: As both the RIPA and LIPA represent the half of all extrahepatic arterial collaterals to hepatocellular carcinomas, their anatomy gains importance not only for anatomists but interventional radiologists as well. PMID:26167344

  17. The Anterior Branch of the Left Inferior Phrenic Artery Arising from the Right Inferior Phrenic Artery: An Angiographic and CT Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hieda, Masashi Toyota, Naoyuki; Kakizawa, Hideaki; Ishikawa, Masaki; Horiguchi, Jun; Ito, Katsuhide

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively analyze the frequency and anatomical pattern of the anterior branch of the left inferior phrenic artery (LIPA) arising from the right inferior phrenic artery (RIPA). Angiography of the RIPA for patients (n = 140) with hepatic malignancy was retrospectively reviewed. The frequency at which the anterior branch of the LIPA arose from the RIPA was 14.3% (20 of 140 patients [pts]). Among the three branches that may arise from the RIPA in these cases (the anterior branch of the LIPA and the anterior and posterior branches of the RIPA), the anterior branch of the LIPA was the first branch of the RIPA in 9 of 20 pts (45%), and the posterior branch of the RIPA in 11 of 20 pts (55%). The anterior branch of the LIPA ran along the ventral side of the esophagus or stomach and supplied the esophagogastric region and dome of the left diaphragm in all cases. In conclusion, the anterior branch of the LIPA arises from the RIPA at a comparatively high frequency. In embolization of the RIPA, to effectively treat and avoid possible complications, interventionalists should be aware of this potential variant anatomy.

  18. Multiple aneurysms of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery: a rare complication of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Klonaris, Chris; Psathas, Emmanouil; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Lioudaki, Stella; Chatziioannou, Achilleas; Karatzas, Theodore

    2013-01-01

    Inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA) aneurysms are uncommon, representing nearly 2% of all visceral aneurysms, and sporadically associated with celiac artery stenosis. Multiple IPDA aneurysms have been rarely reported. We report a case of a 53-year-old female patient with a history of prior pancreatitis, who presented with two IPDA aneurysms combined with median arcuate ligament-syndrome-like stenosis of the celiac trunk. The patient was treated successfully with coil embolization under local anesthesia. The procedure is described and illustrated in detail and the advantages and technical considerations of such an approach are also being discussed.

  19. Multiple Aneurysms of the Inferior Pancreaticoduodenal Artery: A Rare Complication of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Klonaris, Chris; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Lioudaki, Stella; Chatziioannou, Achilleas; Karatzas, Theodore

    2013-01-01

    Inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA) aneurysms are uncommon, representing nearly 2% of all visceral aneurysms, and sporadically associated with celiac artery stenosis. Multiple IPDA aneurysms have been rarely reported. We report a case of a 53-year-old female patient with a history of prior pancreatitis, who presented with two IPDA aneurysms combined with median arcuate ligament-syndrome-like stenosis of the celiac trunk. The patient was treated successfully with coil embolization under local anesthesia. The procedure is described and illustrated in detail and the advantages and technical considerations of such an approach are also being discussed. PMID:23509663

  20. Inferior Lateral Genicular Artery Injury during Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lamo-Espinosa, J. M.; Llombart Blanco, R.; Valentí, J. R.

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of inferior lateral genicular artery (ILG) injury during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery with lateral partial meniscectomy. This is a rare arthroscopy complication. A review of the literature has been made with the aim to define the anatomy of ILG across the lateral articular line and the risk of lesion during knee arthroscopy. We propose embolization as a good treatment option for this type of injuries. PMID:22957293

  1. FoxP2 expression in the cerebellum and inferior olive: development of the transverse stripe-shaped expression pattern in the mouse cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hirofumi; Sugihara, Izumi

    2012-02-15

    Many molecules are expressed heterogeneously in subpopulations of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) and inferior olive (IO) neurons during development or in adulthood. These expression patterns are often organized in longitudinal stripes in the cerebellar cortex, which may be related to functional compartmentalization. FoxP2, a transcription factor, is expressed in PCs and IO neurons, but the details of its expression pattern remain unclear. Here we examined FoxP2 expression patterns systematically by immunostaining serial sections of the hindbrain from embryonic day 14.5 to adulthood in mice. FoxP2 was highly expressed in virtually all PCs at and before postnatal day 6 (P6), except for those in the flocculus and small parts of the nodulus (vermal lobule X), where FoxP2 expression was moderate or absent. After P6, FoxP2 expression gradually diminished in PCs in some areas. In adults, FoxP2 was expressed, less intensely than in earlier stages, in subsets of PCs that were mostly arranged transversely along the folial apices. In contrast, FoxP2 was expressed intensely in most IO neurons during development and in adulthood. FoxP2 was also expressed in a small population of neurons in the cerebellar nuclei. FoxP2 expression in adult rats and chicks was generally comparable to that in adult mice, suggesting evolutionary conservation of the expression pattern. Thus, the FoxP2 expression pattern reflects new transverse compartmentalization in the adult cerebellar cortex, although its functional significance remains unclear.

  2. Significance of inferior wall ischemia in non-dominant right coronary artery anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ali Osama; Abela, Oliver; Devabhaktuni, Subodh; Malik, Arhama Aftab; Allenback, Gayle; Ahsan, Chowdhury H; Malhotra, Sanjay; Diep, Jimmy

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the relationship of inferior wall ischemia on myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with non-dominant right coronary artery anatomy. METHODS This was a retrospective observational analysis of consecutive patients who presented to the emergency department with primary complaint of chest pain. Only patients who underwent single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) were included. Patients who showed a reversible defect on SPECT MPI and had coronary angiography during the same hospitalization was analyzed. Patients with prior history of coronary artery disease (CAD) including history of percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery bypass graft surgerys were excluded. True positive and false positive results were identified on the basis of hemodynamically significant CAD on coronary angiography, in the same territory as identified on SPECT MPI. Coronary artery dominance was determined on coronary angiography. Patients were divided into group 1 and group 2. Group 1 included patients with non-dominant right coronary artery (RCA) (left dominant and codominant). Group 2 included patients with dominant RCA anatomy. Demographics, baseline characteristics and positive predictive value (PPV) were analyzed for the two groups. RESULTS The mean age of the study cohort was 57.6 years. Sixty-one point seven percent of the patients were males. The prevalence of self-reported diabetes mellitus, hypertension and dyslipidemia was 36%, 71.9% and 53.9% respectively. A comparison of baseline characteristics between the two groups showed that patients with a non-dominant RCA were more likely to be men. For inferior wall ischemia on SPECT MPI, patients in study group 2 had a significantly higher PPV, 32/42 (76.1%), compared to patients in group 1, in which only 3 out of the 29 patients (10.3%) had true positive results (P value < 0.001 Z test). The difference remained statistically significant even when only patients

  3. Pseudoaneurysm of the inferior epigastric artery: a rare complication of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Nichols-Totten, Kysha; Pollema, Travis; Moncure, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the inferior epigastric artery (IEA) is a recognized complication of surgery; however, it is a very rare clinical occurrence. The anatomic position of the IEA subjects patients to possible IEA injury during abdominal wall procedures that are close to the artery, such as insertions of drains, Tenckhoff catheters, laparoscopic trocars, or paracentesis. Treatment options include open surgery, percutaneous coil embolization, embolization with N-butyl cyanoacrylate, sonographic-guided thrombin injection, or sonographic-guided compression. We report the first case of a pseudoaneurysm arising from the IEA after a laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. To our knowledge, 17 IEA pseudoaneurysms have been reported, only 3 of which were spontaneous. The pseudoaneurysm in our patient was successfully treated by percutaneous injection of thrombin by interventional radiology.

  4. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis after stroke identified noninvasively with cerebral blood flow-weighted arterial spin labeling MRI

    PubMed Central

    Strother, Megan K.; Buckingham, Cari; Faraco, Carlos C.; Arteaga, Daniel; Lu, Pengcheng; Xu, Yaomin; Donahue, Manus J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) is most commonly investigated using hemodynamic PET and SPECT imaging. However, noninvasive MRI offers advantages of improved spatial resolution, allowing hemodynamic changes to be compared directly with structural findings and without concerns related to ionizing radiation exposure. The aim of this study was to evaluate relationships between CCD identified from cerebral blood flow (CBF)-weighted arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI with cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR)-weighted blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) MRI, Wallerian degeneration, clinical motor impairment, and corticospinal tract involvement. Methods Subjects (n=74) enrolled in an ongoing observational stroke trial underwent CBF-weighted ASL and hypercapnic CVR-weighted BOLD MRI. Hemispheric asymmetry indices for basal cerebellar CBF, cerebellar CVR, and cerebral peduncular area were compared between subjects with unilateral supratentorial infarcts (n=18) and control subjects without infarcts (n=16). CCD required (1) supratentorial infarct and (2) asymmetric cerebellar CBF (>95% confidence interval relative to controls). Results In CCD subjects (n=9), CVR (p=0.04) and cerebral peduncular area (p < 0.01) were significantly asymmetric compared to controls. Compared to infarct subjects not meeting CCD criteria (n=9), CCD subjects had no difference in corticospinal tract location for infarct (p=1.0) or motor impairment (p=0.08). Conclusions CCD correlated with cerebellar CVR asymmetry and Wallerian degeneration. These findings suggest that noninvasive MRI may be a useful alternative to PET or SPECT to study structural correlates and clinical consequences of CCD following supratentorial stroke. PMID:26724658

  5. Fast convergence of learning requires plasticity between inferior olive and deep cerebellar nuclei in a manipulation task: a closed-loop robotic simulation

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Niceto R.; Garrido, Jesús A.; Carrillo, Richard R.; D'Angelo, Egidio; Ros, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is known to play a critical role in learning relevant patterns of activity for adaptive motor control, but the underlying network mechanisms are only partly understood. The classical long-term synaptic plasticity between parallel fibers (PFs) and Purkinje cells (PCs), which is driven by the inferior olive (IO), can only account for limited aspects of learning. Recently, the role of additional forms of plasticity in the granular layer, molecular layer and deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) has been considered. In particular, learning at DCN synapses allows for generalization, but convergence to a stable state requires hundreds of repetitions. In this paper we have explored the putative role of the IO-DCN connection by endowing it with adaptable weights and exploring its implications in a closed-loop robotic manipulation task. Our results show that IO-DCN plasticity accelerates convergence of learning by up to two orders of magnitude without conflicting with the generalization properties conferred by DCN plasticity. Thus, this model suggests that multiple distributed learning mechanisms provide a key for explaining the complex properties of procedural learning and open up new experimental questions for synaptic plasticity in the cerebellar network. PMID:25177290

  6. MDCT Anatomic Assessment of Right Inferior Phrenic Artery Origin Related to Potential Supply to Hepatocellular Carcinoma and its Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, Antonio Tsetis, Dimitrios; Montineri, Arturo; Puleo, Stefano; Massa Saluzzo, Cesare; Runza, Giuseppe; Coppolino, Francesco; Ettorre, Giovanni Carlo; Patti, Maria Teresa

    2008-03-15

    Purpose. To prospectively assess the anatomic variation of the right inferior phrenic artery (RIPA) origin with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scans in relation to the technical and angiographic findings during transcatheter arterial embolization of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods. Two hundred patients with hepatocellular carcinomas were examined with 16-section CT during the arterial phase. The anatomy of the inferior phrenic arteries was recorded, with particular reference to their origin. All patients with subcapsular HCC located at segments VII and VIII underwent arteriography of the RIPA with subsequent embolization if neoplastic supply was detected. Results. The RIPA origin was detected in all cases (sensitivity 100%), while the left inferior phrenic artery origin was detected in 187 cases (sensitivity 93.5%). RIPAs originated from the aorta (49%), celiac trunk (41%), right renal artery (5.5%), left gastric artery (4%), and proper hepatic artery (0.5%), with 13 types of combinations with the left IPA. Twenty-nine patients showed subcapsular HCCs in segments VII and VIII and all but one underwent RIPA selective angiography, followed by embolization in 7 cases. Conclusion. MDCT assesses well the anatomy of RIPAs, which is fundamental for planning subsequent cannulation and embolization of extrahepatic RIPA supply to HCC.

  7. Surface anatomy of the inferior epigastric artery in relation to laparoscopic injury.

    PubMed

    Epstein, J; Arora, A; Ellis, H

    2004-07-01

    The inferior epigastric artery (IEA) is at risk of injury in laparoscopic surgery. Current descriptions of the course of the IEA do not provide surface landmarks useful to the surgeon. This study aimed to define surface relations and propose guidelines for safer trocar placement. The posterior surfaces of the anterior abdominal walls of 30 preserved cadavers were dissected. The surface anatomy of 60 IEAs and their branches were defined. At the level of the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS), the IEA is 38% +/- 18% (95% confidence interval [CI]) from the midline to the ASIS. At the mid-inguinal point the relation is 40% +/- 17% and at the umbilicus 40% +/- 22%. The pattern of branches is highly variable. Although giving guidelines for trocar insertion can be treacherous, we found the following to be of value: 1) the midline is avascular; 2) the main stem of the IEA will be avoided if trocars are inserted more than two-thirds of the distance along a horizontal line between the midline and the ASIS; and 3) IEA branches are least frequently found in the lowest part of the abdomen lateral to the artery.

  8. The inferior medial genicular artery and its vascularization of the pes anserinus superficialis: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Hirtler, Lena; Ederer, Manuel; Faber, Mike; Weninger, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background: A common method for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is it's replacement by a free avascular graft, using the gracilis and/or semitendinosus tendons. These grafts pass a vulnerable phase in the ligamentization-process during the 1st year after reconstruction. The aims of this study were first to evaluate the vascularization of the pes anserinus superficialis (PAS) by the inferior medial genicular artery (IMGA) and second to develop a pedunculated surgical technique for ACL reconstruction, to preserve a maximal amount of natural vascularization of the tendons inserting at the PAS. Materials and Methods: First, the vascularization of the PAS was assessed in 12 fresh-frozen lower extremities. The IMGA was identified at its origin at the popliteal artery and perfused with a methylene blue solution. Second, a pedunculated ACL reconstruction was performed in 5 fresh-frozen lower extremities under maintenance of the distal tendon insertion at PAS. Results: The PAS is a highly vascularized structure. Vessels originate from the IMGA, running along the three tendons of the PAS in the paratendinous tissue. Histologically intratendinous vessels exist; however, perfusion of the inserting tendons through intratendinous vessels was not proven macroscopically. The pedunculated grafts could be positioned and fixed successfully into the bone tunnels in all knees. Conclusion: Although intratendinous vascularization of the tendons of the PAS via the IMGA was not proven, this study indicates a new possibility of ACL reconstruction. The described operation technique can be conducive to shorten the vulnerable phase of the graft-ligamentization after ACL reconstruction. PMID:27904225

  9. [Study of cerebellar infarction with isolated vertigo].

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Ai; Enomoto, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Kimura, Yu; Koizuka, Izumi; Tsukuda, Mamoru

    2010-07-01

    Isolated vertigo is generally attributed to labyrinthine disease, but may also signal otherwise asymptomatic cerebellar infarction. Of 309 subjects admitted between April 2004 and March 2009 for the single symptom of acute vertigo initially thought to be labyrinthine, four were found to have cerebellar infarction of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery area (PICA). All were over 60 years old and had risk factors including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, arrhythmia, and/or hyperlipidemia. Two had trunk ataxia, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showing infarction within a few days. The other two could walk without apparent trunk ataxia, however, it took 4 to 7 days to find the infarction, mainly through neurological, neurootological, and MRI findings. Neurologically, astasia, dysbasia or trunk ataxia were important signs. Neurootologically, nystagmus and electronystagmographic testing involving eye tracking, saccade, and optokinetic patttens were useful.

  10. Right coronary artery dissection and aneurysm presented as acute inferior myocardial infarction from an automobile airbag trauma.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chunlai; Hu, Wuming; Zhu, Ning; Zhao, Xuyong; Xu, Jian; Ye, Shiyong; Xiang, Yijia; Lv, Linchun

    2015-10-01

    Coronary artery dissection and aneurysm culminating in acute myocardial infarction are rare after blunt chest trauma. We are reporting a case of a previously healthy 52-year-old man who presented with right inferior lobe contusion, pleural effusion, right interlobar fissure effusion, bone fracture of right fourth rib, and acute inferior wall myocardial infarction and who experienced blunt trauma in his right chest wall by an airbag deployment in a car accident. Coronary angiography showed an aneurysm in the middle of right coronary artery with 70% afferent narrowing just distal to the aneurysm with no visible atherosclerotic lesion. A 4.0×20 mm TEXUS Liberté stent in the lesion was deployed, and a good coronary flow was obtained without residual stenosis and the aneurysm vanished.

  11. Renal Artery Stump to Inferior Vena Cava Fistula: Unusual Clinical Presentation and Transcatheter Embolization with the Amplatzer Vascular Plug

    SciTech Connect

    Taneja, Manish; Lath, Narayan Soo, Tan Bien; Hiong, Tay Kiang; Htoo, Maung Myint; Richard, Lo; Fui, Alexander Chung Yaw

    2008-07-15

    Fistulous communication between the renal artery stump and inferior vena cava following nephrectomy is rare. We describe the case of a 52-year-old man with a fistula detected on investigation for hemolytic anemia in the postoperative period. The patient had had a nephrectomy performed 2 weeks prior to presentation for blunt abdominal trauma. The fistula was successfully occluded percutaneously using an Amplatzer vascular plug. The patient recovered completely and was discharged 2 weeks later.

  12. Variations in the Origin of Inferior Phrenic Arteries and Their Relationship to Celiac Axis Variations on CT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Aslaner, Ramazan; Sahin, Hilal; Toka, Onur

    2017-01-01

    Objective Knowing the origin of the inferior phrenic artery (IPA) is important prior to surgical interventions and interventional radiological procedures related to IPA. We aimed to identify variations in the origin of IPA and to investigate the relationship between the origin of IPA and celiac axis variations using computed tomography angiography (CTA). Materials and Methods The CTA images of 1000 patients (737 male and 263 female, the mean age 60, range 18–94 years) were reviewed in an analysis of IPA and celiac axis variations. The origin of IPA was divided into two groups, those originating as a common trunk and those originating independently without a truncus. The relationship between the origin of IPA and celiac axis variation was analyzed using Pearson's chi-square test. Results Both IPAs originated from a common trunk in 295 (29.5%) patients. From which the majority of the common trunk originated from the aorta. Contrastingly, the inferior phrenic arteries originated from different origins in 705 (70.5%) patients. The majority of the right inferior phrenic artery (RIPA) and the left inferior phrenic artery (LIPA) originated independently from the celiac axis. Variation in the celiac axis were detected in 110 (11%) patients. The origin of IPA was found to be significantly different in the presence of celiac axis variation. Conclusion The majority of IPA originated from the aorta in patients with a common IPA trunk, while the majority of RIPA and LIPA originating from the celiac axis in patients without a common IPA trunk. Thus, the origin of IPA may widely differ in the presence of celiac axis variation. PMID:28246513

  13. Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Inferior Vena Cava and Right Atrial Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, M. C. Chuang, V. P. Cheng, T. Lin, Z. H. Lin, Y. M.

    2008-07-15

    Advanced hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC) with invasion of venous systems usually indicates not only a poor prognosis but also a contraindication for transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). This study evaluated the feasibility of TACE for advanced HCC with inferior vena cava (IVC) and right atrium (RA) tumors and, also, to search for the ideal embolization particle size. Twenty-six patients who had HCC invasion into the IVC included five patients with coexistent RA tumors that were treated with TACE. The chemoembolization method was cisplatin, doxorubicin, and mitomycin C mixed with Lipiodol and Ivalon. The selection of Ivalon particles was divided into two groups based on their size: (A) >180 {mu}m, N = 9; and (B) 47-180 {mu}m, N = 17. The overall response rate was 53.8% (14/26). Based on the response to TACE, the median survival period of the entire group was 4.2 months (range, 1.5 to 76.7 months). The median survival period of the 14 responders was 13.5 months (1.5-76.7 months), and that of the 12 nonresponders, 3.3 months (2.1 to 24.3 months) (p < 0.002). Comparing the two Ivalon particle sizes, the response rate was 12.5% (1/9 patients) for group A and 76.5% for group B (13/17 patients) (p < 0.02). No serious complication was observed post-chemoembolization. In conclusion, TACE is a safe and effective treatment for advanced HCC with IVC and RA tumors, and small Ivalon particles (47-180 {mu}m) are superior to large ones (>180 {mu}m).

  14. Atherosclerotic inferior mesenteric artery stenosis resulting in large intestinal hypoperfusion: a paradigm shift in the diagnosis and management of symptomatic chronic mesenteric ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lotun, Kapildeo; Shetty, Ranjith; Topaz, On

    2012-11-01

    Symptomatic chronic mesenteric ischemia results from intestinal hypoperfusion and is classically thought to result from involvement of two or more mesenteric arteries. The celiac artery and superior mesenteric artery are most frequently implicated in this disease process, and their involvement usually results in symptoms of small intestinal ischemia. Symptomatic chronic mesenteric ischemia resulting predominantly from inferior mesenteric artery involvement has largely been overlooked but does gives rise to its own, unique clinical presentation with symptoms resulting from large intestinal ischemia. We present four patients with atherosclerotic inferior mesenteric artery stenosis with symptomatic chronic mesenteric ischemia that have unique clinical presentations consistent with large intestinal ischemia that resolved following percutaneous endovascular treatment of the inferior mesenteric artery stenosis. These cases represent a novel approach to the diagnosis and management of this disease process and may warrant a further subclassification of chronic mesenteric ischemia into chronic small intestinal ischemia and chronic large intestinal ischemia.

  15. [Case of cerebellar and spinal cord infarction presenting with acute brachial diplegia due to right vertebral artery occlusion].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takayuki; Santa, Yo; Akutagawa, Noriko; Nagano, Sukehisa; Yoshimura, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was admitted for evaluation of sudden onset of dizziness, bilateral shoulder pain, and brachial diplegia. Neurological examination revealed severe bilateral weakness of the triceps brachii, wrist flexor, and wrist extensor muscles. There was no paresis of the lower limbs. His gait was ataxic. Pinprick and temperature sensations were diminished at the bilateral C6-C8 dermatomes. Vibration and position senses were intact. An MRI of the head revealed a right cerebellar infarction and occlusion of the right vertebral artery. An MRI of the cervical spine on T₂ weighted imaging (T₂WI) showed cord compression at the C3/4-C5/6 level secondary to spondylotic degeneration without any intramedullary signal changes of the cord. On the following day, however, high-signal lesions on T₂WI appeared in the C5-C6 spinal cord, suggesting cord infarction. Unilateral vertebral artery occlusion does not usually result in cervical cord infarction because of anastomosis of arteries. Because of the long-term mechanical compression in our case, it was likely that cervical cord ischemia was present before the onset of symptoms. On the basis of chronic cord compression, our case suggests that occlusion of a unilateral vertebral artery could cause cervical cord infarction.

  16. Angioplasty and stenting for severe vertebral artery orifice stenosis: effects on cerebellar function remodeling verified by blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Li, Zhiwei; Xie, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Vertebral artery orifice stenting may improve blood supply of the posterior circulation of the brain to regions such as the cerebellum and brainstem. However, previous studies have mainly focused on recovery of cerebral blood flow and perfusion in the posterior circulation after interventional therapy. This study examined the effects of functional recovery of local brain tissue on cerebellar function remodeling using blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging before and after interventional therapy. A total of 40 Chinese patients with severe unilateral vertebral artery orifice stenosis were enrolled in this study. Patients were equally and randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. The control group received drug treatment only. The intervention group received vertebral artery orifice angioplasty and stenting + identical drug treatment to the control group. At 13 days after treatment, the Dizziness Handicap Inventory score was compared between the intervention and control groups. Cerebellar function remodeling was observed between the two groups using blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging. The improvement in dizziness handicap and cerebellar function was more obvious in the intervention group than in the control group. Interventional therapy for severe vertebral artery orifice stenosis may effectively promote cerebellar function remodeling and exert neuroprotective effects. PMID:25657727

  17. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) dilates cerebellar arteries through activation of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated (BK) and ATP-sensitive (K ATP) K (+) channels.

    PubMed

    Koide, Masayo; Syed, Arsalan U; Braas, Karen M; May, Victor; Wellman, George C

    2014-11-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a potent vasodilator of numerous vascular beds, including cerebral arteries. Although PACAP-induced cerebral artery dilation is suggested to be cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent, the downstream intracellular signaling pathways are still not fully understood. In this study, we examined the role of smooth muscle K(+) channels and hypothesized that PACAP-mediated increases in cAMP levels and protein kinase A (PKA) activity result in the coordinate activation of ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) and large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels for cerebral artery dilation. Using patch-clamp electrophysiology, we observed that PACAP enhanced whole-cell KATP channel activity and transient BK channel currents in freshly isolated rat cerebellar artery myocytes. The increased frequency of transient BK currents following PACAP treatment is indicative of increased intracellular Ca(2+) release events termed Ca(2+) sparks. Consistent with the electrophysiology data, the PACAP-induced vasodilations of cannulated cerebellar artery preparations were attenuated by approximately 50 % in the presence of glibenclamide (a KATP channel blocker) or paxilline (a BK channel blocker). Further, in the presence of both blockers, PACAP failed to cause vasodilation. In conclusion, our results indicate that PACAP causes cerebellar artery dilation through two mechanisms: (1) KATP channel activation and (2) enhanced BK channel activity, likely through increased Ca(2+) spark frequency.

  18. Celiac Artery Stenting in the Treatment of Intestinal Ischemia Due to the Sacrifice of the Dominant Inferior Mesenteric Artery During Endovascular Aortic Repair.

    PubMed

    Su, Zijie; Pan, Tianyue; Lian, Weishuai; Guo, Daqiao; Dong, Zhihui; Fu, Weiguo

    2016-08-01

    A 42-year-old man had intestinal ischemia 7 weeks after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair due to sacrifice of the inferior mesenteric artery, which had compensated for the intestinal blood supply because of the total occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and severe stenosis of the celiac artery (CA). He was diagnosed in the active phase of Takayasu arteritis, and an emergency endovascular treatment was performed. After the SMA failed to be recanalized, a stent was successfully placed into the CA; this choice was made based on the preexisting collaterals between them. The symptoms were relieved shortly after the operation. The Kirk arcade, the Barkow arcade, and the enlarged pancreaticoduodenal arcade were visualized on the follow-up computed tomography angiography. Based on this case, a short review of celiomesenteric and intermesenteric collateral circulations is presented.

  19. Arterial supply to the thyroid gland and the relationship between the recurrent laryngeal nerve and the inferior thyroid artery in human fetal cadavers.

    PubMed

    Ozgüner, G; Sulak, O

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the arterial supply to the thyroid gland and the relationship between the inferior thyroid artery (ITA) and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) in fetal cadavers using anatomical dissection. The anterior necks of 200 fetuses were dissected. The origins of the superior thyroid artery (STA) and the ITA and location of the ITA in relation to the entrance of the thyroid lobe were examined. The relationship between the ITA and the RLN was determined. The origins of the STA were classified as: external carotid artery, common carotid artery (CCA), and the thyrolingual trunk. The origins of the ITA were the thyrocervical trunk and the CCA. The ITA was absent on the left side in two cases. The relationship of the RLN to the ITA fell into seven different types. Type 1: the RLN lay posterior to the artery; right (42.5%), left (65%). Type 2: the RLN lay anterior to the artery; right (40.5%), left (22.5%). Type 3: the RLN lay parallel to the artery; right (11.5%), left (7%). Type 4: the RLN lay between the two branches of the artery; right (1%), left (3.5%). Type 5: The extralaryngeal branch of the RLN was detected before it crossed the ITA; right (4.5%), left (0%). Type 6: the ITA lay between the two branches of the RLN; right (0%), left (0.5%). Type 7: the branches of the RLN lay among the branches of the ITA; right (0%), left (0.5%). The results from this study would be useful in future thyroid surgeries.

  20. A Novel Strategy to Supercharge a Deep Inferior Epigastric Artery Perforator Flap after Port-a-Cath Removal

    PubMed Central

    Teven, Chad M.; Ooi, Adrian S.H.; Chang, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Autologous breast reconstruction using the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap has become increasingly popular because of its unique advantages. However, compared with some other forms of abdominal-based autologous reconstruction, DIEP flaps are associated with an increased risk of venous congestion. Many techniques—or lifeboats—have been introduced to diagnose and treat this potentially devastating complication. In this case report, we describe a novel strategy to augment venous drainage when venous congestion is encountered. A patient presented requesting autologous reconstruction and removal of a venous access catheter that had been used for chemotherapy administration. We performed left delayed breast reconstruction using a single-perforator DIEP flap from the right hemiabdomen. The superficial inferior epigastric vein to this flap was preserved. After removal of the Port-a-Cath from the left chest, we anastomosed the superficial inferior epigastric vein to the fibrous capsular sheath that had formed around the indwelling catheter to allow additional venous drainage. Flow through this conduit was confirmed using Doppler ultrasound. There were no flap-related complications, and the patient was discharged in good condition. Further research is warranted to characterize the indications and limitations of this novel lifeboat.

  1. [Pancreatoduodenectomy for invasive carcinoma of the head of the pancreas with ligation of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery performed first].

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Akihiko; Ishihara, Shin; Ito, Masahiro; Asano, Yukio; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Miyakawa, Shuichi

    2011-05-01

    The ideal surgical procedure for treating pancreatic cancer achieves radical excision in a minimally invasive manner and allows rapid transition to adjuvant chemotherapy. If the afferent artery to the pancreatic head is not ligated until the latter half of the surgery, congestion of the pancreaticoduodenal vein may occur, leading to phleborrhagia and increased intraoperative hemorrhage. Ligation of the afferent artery, i.e., the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA), in the first half of the surgery may prevent the occurrence of hemorrhage due to congestion. Early ligation of the IPDA is also useful in ensuring the success of radical dissection of the plexus around the superior mesenteric artery or the no. 14 lymph node. We have been performing pancreaticoduodenectomies with antecedent IPDA ligation since 2005 and have found that the percentage of R0 versus R1 and R2 has increased compared with that when standard pancreaticoduodenectomies were performed. Preemptive ligation of the IPDA early in pancreaticoduodenectomy for invasive pancreatic cancer is a useful method for reducing blood loss and achieving R0 resection in a thorough yet efficient manner.

  2. Endovascular embolization for the management of inferior alveolar artery bleeding after a third molar extraction: A case report.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Bernardo; Varazzani, Anea; Ferri, Anea; Menozzi, Roberto; Sesenna, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    Removal of third molars is a common surgical procedure with low complication rates. Localized alveolar osteitis, infection, bleeding, and paresthesia are the four most common postoperative complications of third molar extraction reported in the literature. Postoperative severe hemorrhages are rare and are usually related to inferior alveolar artery damage. Although most bleeding is usually managed effectively by local compression or packing of the socket, even life-threatening complications may occur. Endovascular embolization has been rarely reported as treatment for such a complication and represents an ideal solution, with a low complication rate and excellent control of bleeding. The authors report a case of potentially life-threatening hemorrhage continuing 4 days after extraction of the mandibular right third molar, resulting in significant anemia (Hb 6.6 g/dL) and treated successfully with endovascular embolization of the inferior alveolar artery. The authors consider it important for general practitioners to know this treatment and how to manage this rare complication in the correct way, saving time if satisfactory hemostasis cannot be reached with common procedures.

  3. Traumatic Neuroma at the Inferior Mesenteric Artery Stump after Rectal Cancer Surgery: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sung Mi; Lee, Jae Young; Byeon, Sun Ju

    2016-11-25

    Traumatic neuroma results from regeneration attempts of the proximal end of an injured or severed nerve, resulting in a non-neoplastic nodular lesion. The lower extremity after amputation is the most common site, followed by the head and neck. Traumatic neuromas occurring in the abdomen, however, are rare. In the abdominal region, traumatic neuromas occur in the cystic duct stump and the common bile ducts as well as around the celiac trunk. This study reports a case of a 59-year-old man who presented with a traumatic neuroma arising at the stump of the inferior mesenteric artery after rectal cancer surgery. Traumatic neuromas at the stump of the inferior mesenteric artery have not been previously reported. The lesion exhibited atypical imaging features, including a well-enhanced nodule, a significant interval growth in size and a mild increase in 18F-fluo-rodeoxyglucose uptake, resembling lymph node metastasis. This case report will help physicians understand the sites of occurrence and imaging features of traumatic neuromas in the abdomen.

  4. Inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm treated with coil packing and stent placement

    PubMed Central

    Ikoma, Akira; Nakai, Motoki; Sato, Morio; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Takami; Sanda, Hiroki; Nakata, Kouhei; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Sonomura, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    Two cases with a pancreaticoduodenal arterial aneurysm accompanied with superior mesenteric artery (SMA) stenosis were previously described and both were treated surgically. However, for interventional treatment, securing a sufficient blood supply to the SMA should be a priority of treatment. We present the case of a 71-year-old male with a 20 mm diameter pancreaticoduodenal arterial aneurysm accompanied by SMA stenosis at its origin. The guidewire traverse from SMA to the aneurysm was difficult because of the tight SMA stenosis; however, the guidewire traverse from the celiac artery was finally successful and was followed by balloon angioplasty using a pull-through technique, leading to stent placement. Thereafter, coil packing through the SMA achieved eradication of the aneurysm without bowel ischemia. At the last follow-up computed tomography 8 mo later, no recurrence of the aneurysm was confirmed. The pull-through technique was useful for angioplasty for tight SMA stenosis in this case. PMID:22937218

  5. Inferior Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Aneurysms Associated with Occlusive Lesions of the Celiac Axis: Diagnosis, Treatment Options, Outcomes, and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Flood, Karen Nicholson, Anthony A.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To describe the presentation, treatment, and outcomes for 14 patients with aneurysms of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal arteries associated with occlusive lesions of the celiac axis, and to review the literature for similar cases. Methods, Over a period of 12 years, 14 patients (10 women and 4 men) ranging in age from 26 to 50 (mean 46) years were demonstrated to have aneurysms of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery origin associated with stenosis or occlusion of the celiac axis. All patients were treated by a combination of surgery and interventional radiology. Results. Outcome data collected between 3 months and 4 years (mean 2 years) demonstrated that all aneurysms remained excluded, and all 14 patients were well. The 49 case reports in the literature confirm the findings of this cohort. Conclusion. In inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm resulting from celiac occlusive disease, endovascular treatment is best achieved by stenting the celiac axis and/or embolizing the aneurysm when necessary.

  6. Orexin-neuromodulated cerebellar circuit controls redistribution of arterial blood flows for defense behavior in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Nisimaru, Naoko; Mittal, Chetan; Shirai, Yoshinori; Sooksawate, Thongchai; Anandaraj, Prabu; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Nagao, Soichi; Arata, Akiko; Sakurai, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Miyuki; Ito, Masao

    2013-01-01

    We investigated a unique microzone of the cerebellum located in folium-p (fp) of rabbit flocculus. In fp, Purkinje cells were potently excited by stimulation of the hypothalamus or mesencephalic periaqueductal gray, which induced defense reactions. Using multiple neuroscience techniques, we determined that this excitation was mediated via beaded axons of orexinergic hypothalamic neurons passing collaterals through the mesencephalic periaqueductal gray. Axonal tracing studies using DiI and biotinylated dextran amine evidenced the projection of fp Purkinje cells to the ventrolateral corner of the ipsilateral parabrachial nucleus (PBN). Because, in defense reactions, arterial blood flow has been known to redistribute from visceral organs to active muscles, we hypothesized that, via PBN, fp adaptively controls arterial blood flow redistribution under orexin-mediated neuromodulation that could occur in defense behavior. This hypothesis was supported by our finding that climbing fiber signals to fp Purkinje cells were elicited by stimulation of the aortic nerve, a high arterial blood pressure, or a high potassium concentration in muscles, all implying errors in the control of arterial blood flow. We further examined the arterial blood flow redistribution elicited by electric foot shock stimuli in awake, behaving rabbits. We found that systemic administration of an orexin antagonist attenuated the redistribution and that lesioning of fp caused an imbalance in the redistribution between active muscles and visceral organs. Lesioning of fp also diminished foot shock-induced increases in the mean arterial blood pressure. These results collectively support the hypothesis that the fp microcomplex adaptively controls defense reactions under orexin-mediated neuromodulation. PMID:23912185

  7. Congenital subclavian steal syndrome with multiple cerebellar infarctions caused by an atypical circumflex retroesophageal right aortic arch with atretic aberrant left subclavian artery.

    PubMed

    Mamopoulos, Apostolos T; Luther, Bernd

    2014-09-01

    A right-sided aortic arch is a rare anomaly with an incidence of 0.1% worldwide and is usually associated with a mirror image of all supra-aortic branches or an aberrant left subclavian artery. The latter is often associated with a Kommerell diverticulum, although it can rarely be hypoplastic or atretic and lead to congenital subclavian steal. In most patients, the situation is well-tolerated. In this report, we present a case of subclavian steal syndrome with multiple cerebellar infarcts in a patient with an atypical right-sided aortic arch and an atretic aberrant left subclavian artery arising from a left-sided descending thoracic aorta.

  8. Correlations between pulmonary artery pressures and inferior vena cava collapsibility in critically ill surgical patients: An exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Stawicki, Stanislaw P.; Papadimos, Thomas J.; Bahner, David P.; Evans, David C.; Jones, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: As pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) use declines, search continues for reliable and readily accessible minimally invasive hemodynamic monitoring alternatives. Although the correlation between inferior vena cava collapsibility index (IVC-CI) and central venous pressures (CVP) has been described previously, little information exists regarding the relationship between IVC-CI and pulmonary artery pressures (PAPs). The goal of this study is to bridge this important knowledge gap. We hypothesized that there would be an inverse correlation between IVC-CI and PAPs. Methods: A post hoc analysis of prospectively collected hemodynamic data was performed, examining correlations between IVC-CI and PAPs in a convenience sample of adult Surgical Intensive Care Unit patients. Concurrent measurements of IVC-CI and pulmonary arterial systolic (PAS), pulmonary arterial diastolic (PAD), and pulmonary arterial mean (PAM) pressures were performed. IVC-CI was calculated as ([IVCmax − IVCmin]/IVCmax) × 100%. Vena cava measurements were obtained by ultrasound–credentialed providers. For the purpose of correlative analysis, PAP measurements (PAS, PAD, and PAM) were grouped by terciles while the IVC-CI spectrum was divided into thirds (<33, 33–65, ≥66). Results: Data from 34 patients (12 women, 22 men, with median age of 59.5 years) were analyzed. Median Acute Physiologic Assessment and Chronic Health Evaluation II score was 9. A total of 76 measurement pairs were recorded, with 57% (43/76) obtained in mechanically ventilated patients. Correlations between IVC-CI and PAS (rs = −0.334), PAD (rs = −0.305), and PAM (rs = −0.329) were poor. Correlations were higher between CVP and PAS (R2 = 0.61), PAD (R2 = 0.68), and PAM (R2 = 0.70). High IVC-CI values (≥66%) consistently correlated with measurements in the lowest PAP ranges. Across all PAP groups (PAS, PAD, and PAM), there were no differences between the mean measurement values for the lower and middle IVC

  9. Bilateral cerebellar and brain stem infarction resulting from vertebral artery injury following cervical trauma without radiographic damage of the spinal column: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mimata, Yoshikuni; Murakami, Hideki; Sato, Kotaro; Suzuki, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Vertebral artery injury can be a complication of cervical spine injury. Although most cases are asymptomatic, the rare case progresses to severe neurological impairment and fatal outcomes. We experienced a case of bilateral cerebellar and brain stem infarction with fatal outcome resulting from vertebral artery injury associated with cervical spine trauma. A 69-year-old male was admitted to our hospital because of tetraplegia after falling down the stairs and hitting his head on the floor. Marked bony damage of the cervical spine was not apparent on radiographs and CT scans, so the injury was initially considered to be a cervical cord injury without bony damage. However, an intensity change in the intervertebral disc at C5/C6, and a ventral epidural hematoma were observed on MRI. A CT angiogram of the neck showed the right vertebral artery was completely occluded at the C4 level of the spine. Forty-eight hours after injury, the patient lapsed into drowsy consciousness. The cranial CT scan showed a massive low-density area in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres and brain stem. Anticoagulation was initiated after a diagnosis of the right vertebral artery injury, but the patient developed bilateral cerebellar and brain stem infarction. The patient's brain herniation progressed and the patient died 52 h after injury. We considered that not only anticoagulation but also treatment for thrombosis would have been needed to prevent cranial embolism. We fully realize that early and appropriate treatment are essential to improve the treatment results, and constructing a medical system with a team of orthopedists, radiologists, and neurosurgeons is also very important.

  10. Failure of Fixation Suppression of Spontaneous Nystagmus in Cerebellar Infarction: Frequency, Pattern, and a Possible Structure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ah; Yi, Hyon-Ah; Lee, Hyung

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the frequency and pattern of failure of the fixation suppression (FFS) of spontaneous nystagmus (SN) in unilateral cerebellar infarction, and to identify the structure responsible for FFS, 29 patients with acute, mainly unilateral, isolated cerebellar infarction who had SN with a predominantly horizontal component were enrolled in this study. The ocular fixation index (OFI) was defined as the mean slow phase velocity (SPV) of the horizontal component of SN with fixation divided by the mean SPV of the horizontal component of SN without fixation. The OFI from age- and sex-matched patients with vestibular neuritis was calculated and used as the control data. The FFS of SN was only found in less than half (41 %, 12/29) of the patients. Approximately 65 % (n = 7) of the patients with isolated anterior inferior cerebellar artery territory cerebellar infarction showed FFS, whereas only a quarter (n = 3) of the patients with isolated posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) territory cerebellar infarction showed FFS. The proportion of gaze-evoked nystagmus (6/12 [50 %] vs. 2/17 [12 %], p = 0.04) and deficient gain of ipsilesional pursuit (10/12 [83 %] vs. 6/17 [35 %], p = 0.05) was more frequent in the FFS group than in the group without FFS. Lesion subtraction analysis in isolated PICA territory cerebellar infarction revealed that the nodulus was commonly damaged in patients with FFS, compared to that of patients without FFS. Our study shows that FFS of SN due to acute cerebellar infarction is less common than previously thought and the nodulus may be an important structure for the suppression of SN in humans.

  11. Extreme fenestration of the right vertebral artery: magnetic resonance angiographic demonstration.

    PubMed

    Uchino, A; Sawada, A; Takase, Y; Kudo, S

    2002-12-01

    The authors describe an extreme fenestration of the right vertebral artery. This anomaly was found incidentally in a female patient undergoing MR imaging and MR angiography evaluation for severe dizziness and headache. Magnetic resonance angiography showed that the right posterior inferior cerebellar artery originated possibly extracranially and anastomosed with the terminal portion of the right vertebral artery, indicating the presence of an extremely large fenestration. This, to our knowledge, is the first report of MR angiographic demonstration of this variation.

  12. Combined Use of an Anterolateral Thigh Flap and Superficial Inferior Epigastric Artery Flap for Reconstruction of an Extensive Abdominal Wall Defect

    PubMed Central

    Kagaya, Yu; Arikawa, Masaki; Kobayashi, Eisuke

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Reconstruction of large abdominal wall defects is challenging. We herein report the successful reconstruction of an extensive abdominal wall defect using a novel combination of flaps after sarcoma resection. A 74-year-old man presented with a dedifferentiated liposarcoma on his abdominal wall. He underwent excision of the tumor, which resulted in an extensive abdominal wall defect. The defect was reconstructed with a pedicled anterolateral thigh flap with an iliotibial tract and a pedicled superficial inferior epigastric artery flap. No skin graft was necessary. The wounds healed successfully, and no herniation occurred. The combination of an anterolateral thigh flap and a superficial inferior epigastric artery flap is a versatile option for reconstruction of extensive abdominal wall defects. PMID:27975026

  13. [Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome secondary to a cerebellar tumour].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Carral, J; Carreras-Sáez, I; García-Peñas, J J; Fournier-Del Castillo, C; Villalobos-Reales, J

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome is characterized by disturbances of executive function, impaired spatial cognition, linguistic difficulties, and personality change. The case of an 11 year old boy is presented, with behavior problems, learning difficulties and social interaction problems. In the physical examination he had poor visual contact, immature behavior, reduced expressive language and global motor disability with gait dyspraxia, with no defined cerebellar motor signs. In the neuropsychological evaluation he has a full scale overall intellectual quotient of 84, with signs of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. A tumour affecting inferior cerebellar vermis was observed in the magnetic resonance imaging, which had not significantly grown during 5 years of follow up. The cerebellum participates in controlling cognitive and affective functions. Cerebellar pathology must be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with cognitive or learning disorder with associated behavioral and emotional components.

  14. Clinical anatomy of the inferior epigastric artery with special relevance to invasive procedures of the anterior abdominal wall

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Praisy; Prithishkumar, Ivan James; Isaac, Bina

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Injury to the inferior epigastric artery (IEA) has been reported following lower abdominal wall surgical incisions, abdominal peritoneocentesis and trocar placements at laparoscopic port sites, resulting in the formation of abdominal wall haematomas that may expand considerably due to lack of tissue resistance. The aim of this study was to localise its course in relation to standard anatomic landmarks and suggest safe areas for performance of invasive procedures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty IEAs of 30 adult cadavers (male = 19; female = 11) were dissected and the course of the IEA noted in relation to the mid-inguinal point, anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) and umbilicus. RESULTS: The mean distance of the IEA from the midline was 4.45 ± 1.42 cm at the level of the mid-inguinal point, 4.10 ± 1.15 cm at the level of ASIS and 4.49 ± 1.15 cm at the level of umbilicus. There was an average of 3.3 branches per IEA with more branches arising from its lateral aspect. The IEA was situated within one-third (32%) of the distance between the midline and the sagittal plane through ASIS at all levels. CONCLUSION: To avoid injury to IEA, trocars can be safely inserted 5.5 cm [mean + 1 standard deviation (SD)] away from the midline (or) slightly more than one-third of the distance between the midline and a sagittal plane running through ASIS. These findings may be useful not only for laparoscopic procedures but also for image-guided biopsy, abdominal paracentesis, and placement of abdominal drains. PMID:27251822

  15. Spatial organization of visual messages of the rabbit's cerebellar flocculus. I. Typology of inferior olive neurons of the dorsal cap of Kooy.

    PubMed

    Leonard, C S; Simpson, J I; Graf, W

    1988-12-01

    1. Single-unit responses to large-field visual stimuli were recorded extracellularly from neurons in the dorsal cap of Kooy of the inferior olive in anesthetized, paralyzed rabbits. The visually modulated neurons in the dorsal cap responded optimally to slow rotation of random dot stimuli, which were produced using handheld patterns or a planetarium projector. 2. Neurons had either monocular or binocular receptive fields. For binocular receptive field neurons, monocular stimulation of one eye, called the dominant eye, elicited greater modulation than did stimulation of the other eye. Rotation about a particular axis, called the preferred axis, produced both maximal excitation and inhibition. On the basis of differences in preferred axis orientation and in eye dominance, three neuron classes called Vertical Axis, Anterior (45 degrees) Axis, and Posterior (135 degrees) Axis were distinguished. 3. Vertical Axis neurons were modulated exclusively from the eye contralateral to the inferior olive recording site. This cell type responded strongly to large-field visual stimuli rotating about the vertical axis. Excitation resulted from movement in the temporal to nasal direction, and inhibition occurred during movement in the nasal to temporal direction. 4. Two subclasses of Anterior (45 degrees) Axis neurons were distinguished according to whether the receptive field was monocular or binocular. For both subclasses, the dominant eye was ipsilateral. The receptive field organization of the dominant eye was bipartite as described in the previous paper (51) for neurons in the midbrain visual tegmental relay zone. Anterior (45 degrees) Axis neurons were maximally excited when the stimulus pattern moved upward and posterior above the horizon in the anterior quadrant of the ipsilateral visual field, from 0 degrees (nose) to approximately 45 degrees azimuth. From 45 to 180 degrees azimuth (occiput) and above the horizon, these neurons were excited by downward and posterior

  16. Stable fracture of the pubic rami: a rare cause of life-threatening bleeding from the inferior epigastric artery managed with transcatheter embolization.

    PubMed

    Loffroy, Romaric; Yeguiayan, Jean-Michel; Guiu, Boris; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre; Krausé, Denis

    2008-07-01

    Extraperitoneal bleeding from the inferior epigastric artery (IEA) and its branches is a rare complication of blunt pelvic trauma; however, it can result in life-threatening hemorrhage, even in cases of minimally displaced fractures of the pelvic ring. We report the case of a patient who had posttraumatic pelvic hematoma and cardiovascular collapse caused by avulsion of the right pubic branch of the IEA related to undisplaced fractures of the pubic rami. CT scanning followed by angiography showed leakage of contrast from the IEA. Transcatheter arterial embolization was performed to successfully control the hemorrhage. There have been very few previous reports of IEA injury related to stable fractures of the pubic rami successfully treated by transcatheter arterial embolization.

  17. [Cerebellar hypoplasias].

    PubMed

    Safronova, Marta Maia; Barbot, Clara; Resende Pereira, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Cerebellar hypoplasias are cerebellar malformations with small but completely formed cerebellum. They can be divided in focal and in diffuse or generalized. It is sometimes difficult to make distinction between cerebellar atrophy (progressive condition) and hipoplasia (not progressive condition). Focal hypoplasias are restricted to one cerebellar hemisphere or to the vermis. Diffuse hypoplasias refer to both cerebellar hemispheres and vermis. If there is associated IVth ventricle enlargement, hypoplasias occur in the context of Dandy-Walker complex, a continuum of posterior fossa cystic anomalies. A revision of cerebellar hypoplasias and associated pathology is done, illustrated with 22 cases tha include focal and diffuse cerebellar hypoplasias, Dandy-Walker malformations and its variant, persistent Blake's pouch cyst, megacisterna magna, PEHO síndrome (progressive encephalopathy with oedema, hipsarrhythmia and optic atrophy), Joubert syndrome, congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ia, pontocerebellar hipoplasias Barth type I and II, diffuse subcortical heterotopia. The imaging finding of structural cerebellar anomalies frequently leads to diagnostic incertainty as the anomalies are mostly unspecific, implying an extenuating analytical and genetic workup. Their knowledge and classification may be useful to decide the patient adjusted laboratorial workup.

  18. Side predilections of offending arteries in hemifacial spasm.

    PubMed

    Chung, Moonyoung; Han, Inbo; Chung, Sang-Sup; Huh, Ryoong

    2016-07-01

    The side predilections of various offending arteries in hemifacial spasm (HFS) have not been well studied. The relationship between clinical and radiological features of HFS and offending arteries were investigated in the present study. A retrospective analysis of 370 patients who underwent microvascular decompression for HFS was performed. The patients were divided into four groups based on the offending arteries, namely anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA), vertebral artery, and multiple offending arteries. Affected side, age at onset, presence of hypertension, and sigmoid sinus area and dominance were compared between groups. The mean age of patients with a left HFS was significantly greater than that of patients with a right HFS (P=0.009). The AICA affected primarily the right side and PICA and multiple offending arteries the left side (P<0.001). Side of sigmoid sinus dominance was significantly different among groups (P<0.001). The offending arteries in HFS may be related to these differences. AICA was associated with right-sided symptoms, younger age at onset, and presence of left dominant sigmoid sinus, while PICA was associated with left-sided symptoms, older age at onset, and smaller right sigmoid sinus area.

  19. In-vivo quantitative evaluation of perfusion zones and perfusion gradient in the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Cyr, Michel; Lakhiani, Chrisovalantis; Cheng, Angela; Mangum, Michael; Liang, Jinyang; Teotia, Sumeet; Livingston, Edward H.; Zuzak, Karel J.

    2013-03-01

    The selection of well-vascularized tissue during DIEP flap harvest remains controversial. While several studies have elucidated cross-midline perfusion, further characterization of perfusion to the ipsilateral hemiabdomen is necessary for minimizing rates of fat necrosis or partial fat necrosis in bilateral DIEP flaps. Eighteen patients (29 flaps) underwent DIEP flap harvest using a prospectively designed protocol. Perforators were marked and imaged with a novel system for quantitatively measuring tissue oxygenation, the Digital Light Hyperspectral Imager. Images were then analyzed to determine if perforator selection influenced ipsilateral flap perfusion. Flaps based on a single lateral row perforator (SLRP) were found to have a higher level of hemoglobin oxygenation in Zone I (mean %HbO2 = 76.1) compared to single medial row perforator (SMRP) flaps (%HbO2 = 71.6). Perfusion of Zone III relative to Zone I was similar between SLRP and SMRP flaps (97.4% vs. 97.9%, respectively). These differences were not statistically significant (p>0.05). Perfusion to the lateral edge of the flap was slightly greater for SLRP flaps compared SMRP flaps (92.1% vs. 89.5%, respectively). SMRP flaps had superior perfusion travelling inferiorly compared to SLRP flaps (88.8% vs. 83.9%, respectively). Overall, it was observed that flaps were better perfused in the lateral direction than inferiorly. Significant differences in perfusion gradients directed inferiorly or laterally were observed, and perforator selection influenced perfusion in the most distal or inferior aspects of the flap. This suggests broader clinical implications for flap design that merit further investigation.

  20. Patterns of spontaneous and head-shaking nystagmus in cerebellar infarction: imaging correlations.

    PubMed

    Huh, Young Eun; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-12-01

    Horizontal head-shaking may induce nystagmus in peripheral as well as central vestibular lesions. While the patterns and mechanism of head-shaking nystagmus are well established in peripheral vestibulopathy, they require further exploration in central vestibular disorders. To define the characteristics and mechanism of head-shaking nystagmus in central vestibulopathies, we investigated spontaneous nystagmus and head-shaking nystagmus in 72 patients with isolated cerebellar infarction. Spontaneous nystagmus was observed in 28 (39%) patients, and was mostly ipsilesional when observed in unilateral infarction (15/18, 83%). Head-shaking nystagmus developed in 37 (51%) patients, and the horizontal component of head-shaking nystagmus was uniformly ipsilesional when induced in patients with unilateral infarction. Perverted head-shaking nystagmus occurred in 23 (23/37, 62%) patients and was mostly downbeat (22/23, 96%). Lesion subtraction analyses revealed that damage to the uvula, nodulus and inferior tonsil was mostly responsible for generation of head-shaking nystagmus in patients with unilateral posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction. Ipsilesional head-shaking nystagmus in patients with unilateral cerebellar infarction may be explained by unilateral disruption of uvulonodular inhibition over the velocity storage. Perverted (downbeat) head-shaking nystagmus may be ascribed to impaired control over the spatial orientation of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex due to uvulonodular lesions or a build-up of vertical vestibular asymmetry favouring upward bias due to lesions involving the inferior tonsil.

  1. In vivo comparison of free coronary grafts using the inferior epigastric (IEA), the gastroepiploic (GEA) and the internal thoracic artery (ITA).

    PubMed

    Cremer, J; Liesmann, T; Wimmer-Greinecker, G; Abraham, C; Mügge, A; Haverich, A

    1994-01-01

    The validity of alternative arterial conduits for myocardial revascularization in comparison to internal thoracic artery (ITA) has not been sufficiently defined. Evaluation of the functional in vivo vascular properties of the different conduits may be appropriate to give a perspective on long-term graft qualities. The intraoperative function of single free grafts to the left anterior descending artery (LAD) was compared in inferior epigastric (IEA, n = 13), internal thoracic (ITA, n = 12) and gastroepiploic artery (GEA, n = 12) conduits. Graft flows were measured at four points of time, 1) in situ free flow after distal dissection (IEA: 42.2 ml/min, ITA: 68.8 ml/min, GEA: 61.1 ml/min), 2) free flow following proximal grafting to the aorta (IEA: 48.1 ml/min, ITA: 63.7 ml/min, GEA: 84.2 ml/min), 3) selective graft flow after distal attachment to the LAD (IEA: 52.6 ml/min, ITA: 77.5 ml/min, GEA: 102.8 ml/min), and 4) selective LAD graft flow following paraverine (Pap) stimulation (IEA: 98.4 ml/min, ITA: 128.0 ml/min, GEA: 142.9 ml/min). Endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxation was evaluated by examination of the intraluminal graft pressures at mechanically controlled constant flow rates. Following stimulation with substance P (SP), the change of intraluminal pressure (dp) was similar in IEA (dp: -20.0 mmHg) and GEA grafts (dp: -21.1 mmHg). Only ITA conduits were less reactive to SP (-9.7 mmHg). The response to acetylcholine (ACh) could only be assessed in ITA (dp: -16.0 mmHg) and IEA (dp: -10.7 mmHg) grafts. Gastroepiploic arteries did not react on ACh stimulation (dp: +0.4 mmHg).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Management of the accessory or replaced right hepatic artery (A/R RHA) during multiorgan retrieval when the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery shares a common origin with A/R RHA.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Li, J; Qi, H

    2013-01-01

    The accessory or replaced right hepatic artery (A/R RHA), which arises from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), represents a challenge to the surgeon during combined procurement of liver and whole pancreas allografts. We have herein described an angiographic investigation of this aberrant artery among 553 patients who underwent angiography of both the celiac axis and SMA trunks to measure the diameters of the arteries to be anastomosed as well as to clarify the locational relationship between the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA) and A/R RHA. Sixty-nine (12.5%) of 553 patients had an unambiguous site of the A/R RHA. In 6 patients the IPDA was not visible. We separated the remaining 63 patients into 2 groups: group A whose A/R RHA shared a common origin with IPDA, and group B whose A/R RHA had a noncommon origin with IPDA. Fifteen (23.8%) of these 63 patients had a common origin of IPDA and A/R RHA. The results showed that the diameters of A/R RHA and gastroduodenal artery (GDA) were matched in both groups whether or not the IPDA shared a common origin with A/R RHA. The similar vascular diameters between A/R RHA and GDA in these 2 groups simplified the anastomosis, but management of the A/R RHA with different locational relationships between the IPDA and A/R RHA remains a problem. We recommend a safe method to be applied to all donors with an A/R RHA regardless of the origin of the IPDA.

  3. Three-dimensional volume-rendered multidetector CT imaging of the posterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery: its anatomy and role in diagnosing extrapancreatic perineural invasion

    PubMed Central

    Giacomini, Craig; Brooke Jeffrey, R.; Willmann, Juergen K.; Olcott, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Extrapancreatic perineural spread in pancreatic adenocarcinoma contributes to poor outcomes, as it is known to be a major contributor to positive surgical margins and disease recurrence. However, current staging classifications have not yet taken extrapancreatic perineural spread into account. Four pathways of extrapancreatic perineural spread have been described that conveniently follow small defined arterial pathways. Small field of view three-dimensional (3D) volume-rendered multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) images allow visualization of small peripancreatic vessels and thus perineural invasion that may be associated with them. One such vessel, the posterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (PIPDA), serves as a surrogate for extrapancreatic perineural spread by pancreatic adenocarcinoma arising in the uncinate process. This pictorial review presents the normal and variant anatomy of the PIPDA with 3D volume-rendered MDCT imaging, and emphasizes its role as a vascular landmark for the diagnosis of extrapancreatic perineural invasion from uncinate adenocarcinomas. Familiarity with the anatomy of PIPDA will allow accurate detection of extrapancreatic perineural spread by pancreatic adenocarcinoma involving the uncinate process, and may potentially have important staging implications as neoadjuvant therapy improves. PMID:24434918

  4. Cerebellar Ataxia.

    PubMed

    Perlman

    2000-05-01

    There is nothing more discouraging than for a patient to be given a specific diagnosis, then to be told that there is nothing that can be done. Physicians are equally disheartened to see exponential progress being made in the understanding of the pathophysiology of a complex disorder but few direct benefits resulting for their patients. Over the past 5 years, molecular genetic research has completely revolutionized the way in which the progressive cerebellar ataxias are classified and diagnosed, but it has yet to produce effective gene-based, neuroprotective, or neurorestorative therapies. The treatment of cerebellar ataxia remains primarily a neurorehabilitation challenge, employing physical, occupational, speech, and swallowing therapy; adaptive equipment; driver safety training; and nutritional counseling. Modest additional gains are seen with the use of medications that can improve imbalance, incoordination, or dysarthria (amantadine, buspirone, acetazolamide); cerebellar tremor (clonazepam, propranolol); and cerebellar or central vestibular nystagmus (gabapentin, baclofen, clonazepam). Many of the progressive cerebellar syndromes have associated features involving other neurologic systems (eg, spasticity, dystonia or rigidity, resting or rubral tremor, chorea, motor unit weakness or fatigue, autonomic dysfunction, peripheral or posterior column sensory loss, neuropathic pain or cramping, double vision, vision and hearing loss, dementia, and bowel, bladder, and sexual dysfunction), which can impede the treatment of the ataxic symptoms or can worsen with the use of certain drugs. Treatment of the associated features themselves may in turn worsen the ataxia either directly (as side effects of medication) or indirectly (eg, relaxation of lower limb spasticity that was acting as a stabilizer for an ataxic gait). Secondary complications of progressive ataxia can include deconditioning or immobility, weight loss or gain, skin breakdown, recurrent pulmonary and

  5. Altered cerebellar feedback projections in Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Catani, Marco; Jones, Derek K; Daly, Eileen; Embiricos, Nitzia; Deeley, Quinton; Pugliese, Luca; Curran, Sarah; Robertson, Dene; Murphy, Declan G M

    2008-07-15

    It has been proposed that the biological basis of autism spectrum disorder includes cerebellar 'disconnection'. However, direct in vivo evidence in support of this is lacking. Here, the microstructural integrity of cerebellar white matter in adults with Asperger syndrome was studied using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance tractography. Fifteen adults with Asperger syndrome and 16 age-IQ-gender-matched healthy controls underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. For each subject, tract-specific measurements of mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were made within the inferior, middle, superior cerebellar peduncles and short intracerebellar fibres. No group differences were observed in mean diffusivity. However, people with Asperger syndrome had significantly lower fractional anisotropy in the short intracerebellar fibres (p<0.001) and right superior cerebellar (output) peduncle (p<0.001) compared to controls; but no difference in the input tracts. Severity of social impairment, as measured by the Autistic Diagnostic Interview, was negatively correlated with diffusion anisotropy in the fibres of the left superior cerebellar peduncle. These findings suggest a vulnerability of specific cerebellar neural pathways in people with Asperger syndrome. The localised abnormalities in the main cerebellar outflow pathway may prevent the cerebral cortex from receiving those cerebellar feedback inputs necessary for a successful adaptive social behaviour.

  6. Effect of edaravone on acute brainstem-cerebellar infarction with vertigo and sudden hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuta; Yabe, Takao; Okada, Kazunari; Nakamura, Yuka

    2014-06-01

    We report 2 cases with acute brainstem and brainstem-cerebellar infarction showed improvement of their signs and symptoms after administration of edaravone. Case 1, a 74-year-old woman who experienced sudden vertigo, also had dysarthria and left hemiplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an abnormal region in the right ventrolateral medulla oblongata. The patient's vertigo and hemiplegia improved completely after treatment. Case 2, a 50-year-old man who experienced sudden vertigo and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), developed dysarthria after admission. MRI revealed acute infarction in the right cerebellar hemisphere. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed dissection of the basilar artery and occlusion of the right anterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient's vertigo and hearing remarkably improved. We have described 2 patients whose early symptoms were vertigo and sudden SNHL, but who were later shown to have ischemic lesions of the central nervous system. Edaravone is neuroprotective drug with free radical-scavenging actions. Free radicals in the ear are responsible for ischemic damage. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger, may be useful in the treatment of vertigo and SNHL.

  7. Microsurgical management of aneurysms of the superior cerebellar artery - lessons learnt: An experience of 14 consecutive cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Prakash; Panikar, Dilip; Nair, Anup Parameshwaran; Sundar, Shyam; Ayiramuthu, Parasuraman; Thomas, Anoop

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This is a retrospective study from January 2002 to December 2012 analyzing the results of microsurgical clipping for aneurysms arising from the superior cerebellar artery (SCA). Materials and Methods: All patients with SCA were evaluated with computerized tomography angiography and/or digital subtraction angiography (DSA) prior to surgery. All patients in our series underwent microsurgical clipping and postoperative DSA to assess the extent of aneurysm occlusion. The Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) and the modified Rankin's scale (mRS) were used to grade their postoperative neurological status at discharge and 6 months, respectively. Results: Fourteen patients had SCA aneurysms (ruptured-9, unruptured-5). There were 10 females and 4 males with the mean age of 47.2 years (median - 46 years, range = 24–66 years). Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was seen in 11 patients. The mean duration of symptoms was 2.5 days (range = 1–7 days). The WFNS score at presentation was as follows: Grade 1 in 10 cases, II in 2 cases, III in 1 case and IV in 1 case. In the 9 cases with ruptured SCA aneurysm, average size of the ruptured aneurysms was 7.3 mm (range = 2.5–27 mm, median = 4.9 mm). The subtemporal approach was used in the first 7 cases. The extradural temporopolar (EDTP) approach was used in the last 5 cases. Complications include vasospasm (n = 6), third nerve palsy (n = 5) and hydrocephalus (n = 3). Two patients died following surgery. At mean follow-up 33.8 months (median - 25 months, range = 19–96 months), no patient had a rebleed. At discharge 9 (64%), had a GOS of 4 or 5 and 3 (21%) had a GOS of 3. At 6 months follow-up, 10/14 (71%) patients had mRS of 0–2, and 2 (14%) had mRS of 5. Conclusions: Aneurysms of the SCA are uncommon and tend to rupture even when the aneurysm size is small (<7 mm). They commonly present with SAH. The EDTP approach avoids complication caused by temporal lobe retraction and injury to the vein of Labbe. PMID:25767580

  8. Cerebellar blood flow in methylmercury poisoning (Minamata disease).

    PubMed

    Itoh, K; Korogi, Y; Tomiguchi, S; Takahashi, M; Okajima, T; Sato, H

    2001-04-01

    We looked at regional cerebellar blood flow in patients with Minamata disease (MD) using technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (99m-Tc-ECD). We carried out single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on 15 patients with MD (eight men, seven women, aged 51-78 years, mean 70.5 years) and 11 control subjects (eight men, three women, aged 62-80 years, mean 72.5 years). Regional blood flow was measured in the superior, middle, and inferior portions of the cerebellar hemispheres, and the frontal, temporal and occipital cerebral lobes. The degree of cerebellar atrophy was assessed on MRI. There were significant differences in regional blood flow in all parts of the cerebellum between patients and control, but no significant decrease was observed in the cerebrum. Blood flow was lower in the inferior cerebellum than in the other parts. Even in patients without cerebellar atrophy, flow was significantly decreased regional blood flow in the inferior part.

  9. Crossed Cerebellar Diaschisis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shuguang; Wang, Xiaopeng; Xu, Kai; Hu, Chunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) describes a depression of oxidative metabolism glucose and blood flow in the cerebellum secondary to a supratentorial lesion in the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. PET/MR has the potential to become a powerful tool for demonstrating and imaging intracranial lesions .We herein report 3 cases of CCD imaging using a tri-modality PET/CT–MR set-up for investigating the value of adding MRI rather than CT to PET in clinical routine. We describe 3 patients with CCD and neurological symptoms in conjunction with abnormal cerebral fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET/CT–MR) manifestations including arterial spin-labeling (ASL) and T2-weighted images. In all, 18FDG-PET/CT detected positive FDG uptake in supratentorial lesions, and hypometabolism with atrophy in the contralateral cerebellum. More than that, hybrid PET/MRI provided a more accurate anatomic localization and ASL indicated disruption of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway. Using pathology or long-term clinical follow-up to confirm the PET and ASL findings, the supratentorial lesions of the 3 patients were respectively diagnosed with cerebral infarction, recurrent glioma, and metastasis. The reports emphasize the significance of multimodality radiological examinations. Multimodality imaging contributes to proper diagnosis, management, and follow-up of supratentorial lesions with CCD. PMID:26765477

  10. A probabilistic atlas of the cerebellar white matter.

    PubMed

    van Baarsen, K M; Kleinnijenhuis, M; Jbabdi, S; Sotiropoulos, S N; Grotenhuis, J A; van Cappellen van Walsum, A M

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei and their connectivity are gaining attraction, due to the important role the cerebellum plays in cognition and motor control. Atlases of the cerebellar cortex and nuclei are used to locate regions of interest in clinical and neuroscience studies. However, the white matter that connects these relay stations is of at least similar functional importance. Damage to these cerebellar white matter tracts may lead to serious language, cognitive and emotional disturbances, although the pathophysiological mechanism behind it is still debated. Differences in white matter integrity between patients and controls might shed light on structure-function correlations. A probabilistic parcellation atlas of the cerebellar white matter would help these studies by facilitating automatic segmentation of the cerebellar peduncles, the localization of lesions and the comparison of white matter integrity between patients and controls. In this work a digital three-dimensional probabilistic atlas of the cerebellar white matter is presented, based on high quality 3T, 1.25mm resolution diffusion MRI data from 90 subjects participating in the Human Connectome Project. The white matter tracts were estimated using probabilistic tractography. Results over 90 subjects were symmetrical and trajectories of superior, middle and inferior cerebellar peduncles resembled the anatomy as known from anatomical studies. This atlas will contribute to a better understanding of cerebellar white matter architecture. It may eventually aid in defining structure-function correlations in patients with cerebellar disorders.

  11. The cerebellar serotoninergic system and its possible involvement in cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Trouillas, P

    1993-05-01

    A review concerning the characteristics of the cerebellar serotoninergic system is presented. In rat, cat and oppossum, the perikarya of origin are located in the brain stem raphe nuclei and in other brainstem structures. The projections to the cerebellar layers and deep nuclei include synaptic connections, but also non synaptic terminals, especially in a diffuse cortical plexus. Serotoninergic receptors have been described: 5-HT1B in the molecular layer and 5-HT2 in the inferior olive. Serotonin exerts neurophysiological effects on several target cells, directly or indirectly, presynaptically or postsynaptically. A modulatory effect on Purkinje cells is well documented. In thiamine deprived animals, a specific serotoninergic cerebellar syndrome includes a selective degeneration of the serotoninergic cerebellar system, an increase of the 5-HIAA cerebellar values and an exaggerated serotoninergic turnover. In human heredoataxias (Friedreich's ataxia and cerebellar cortical atrophy), serotoninergic disturbances have been observed in the CSF, including low 5-HIAA values and an increased serotoninergic turnover. Therapeutic results have been obtained with L-5-HTP, a precursor of serotonin, in several conditions presenting cerebellar ataxia. L-5-HTP resistance of olivopontocerebellar atrophies may be explained by the destruction of serotonin-sensitive target cells, especially Purkinje cells.

  12. Distinct critical cerebellar subregions for components of verbal working memory

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Freya E.; Grube, Manon; Von Kriegstein, Katharina; Kumar, Sukhbinder; English, Philip; Kelly, Thomas P.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Griffiths, Timothy D.

    2014-01-01

    A role for the cerebellum in cognition has been proposed based on studies suggesting a profile of cognitive deficits due to cerebellar stroke. Such studies are limited in the determination of the detailed organisation of cerebellar subregions that are critical for different aspects of cognition. In this study we examined the correlation between cognitive performance and cerebellar integrity in a specific degeneration of the cerebellar cortex: Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 6 (SCA6). The results demonstrate a critical relationship between verbal working memory and grey matter density in superior (bilateral lobules VI and crus I of lobule VII) and inferior (bilateral lobules VIIIa and VIIIb, and right lobule IX) parts of the cerebellum. We demonstrate that distinct cerebellar regions subserve different components of the prevalent psychological model for verbal working memory based on a phonological loop. The work confirms the involvement of the cerebellum in verbal working memory and defines specific subsystems for this within the cerebellum. PMID:22133495

  13. Modality specificity in the cerebro-cerebellar neurocircuitry during working memory.

    PubMed

    Ng, H B Tommy; Kao, K-L Cathy; Chan, Y C; Chew, Effie; Chuang, K H; Chen, S H Annabel

    2016-05-15

    Previous studies have suggested cerebro-cerebellar circuitry in working memory. The present fMRI study aims to distinguish differential cerebro-cerebellar activation patterns in verbal and visual working memory, and employs a quantitative analysis to deterimine lateralization of the activation patterns observed. Consistent with Chen and Desmond (2005a,b) predictions, verbal working memory activated a cerebro-cerebellar circuitry that comprised left-lateralized language-related brain regions including the inferior frontal and posterior parietal areas, and subcortically, right-lateralized superior (lobule VI) and inferior cerebellar (lobule VIIIA/VIIB) areas. In contrast, a distributed network of bilateral inferior frontal and inferior temporal areas, and bilateral superior (lobule VI) and inferior (lobule VIIB) cerebellar areas, was recruited during visual working memory. Results of the study verified that a distinct cross cerebro-cerebellar circuitry underlies verbal working memory. However, a neural circuitry involving specialized brain areas in bilateral neocortical and bilateral cerebellar hemispheres subserving visual working memory is observed. Findings are discussed in the light of current models of working memory and data from related neuroimaging studies.

  14. Treatment of Ruptured Vertebral Artery Dissecting Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Osamu; Ikawa, Fusao; Hidaka, Toshikazu; Kurokawa, Yasuharu; Yonezawa, Ushio

    2014-01-01

    Summary We evaluated the outcomes of endovascular or surgical treatment of ruptured vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms (VADAs), and investigated the relations between treatment complications and the development and location of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). We treated 14 patients (12 men, two women; mean age, 56.2 years) with ruptured VADAs between March 1999 and June 2012 at our hospital. Six and eight patients had Hunt and Hess grades 1-3 and 4-5, respectively. Twelve patients underwent internal endovascular trapping, one underwent proximal endovascular occlusion alone, and one underwent proximal endovascular occlusion in the acute stage and occipital artery (OA)-PICA anastomosis and surgical trapping in the chronic stage. The types of VADA based on their location relative to the ipsilateral PICA were distal, PICA-involved, and non-PICA in nine, two, and three patients, respectively. The types of PICA based on their development and location were bilateral anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA)-PICA, ipsilateral AICA-PICA, extradural, and intradural type in one, two, two, and nine patients, respectively. Two patients with high anatomical risk developed medullary infarction, but their midterm outcomes were better than in previous reports. The modified Rankin scale indicated grades 0-2, 3-5, and 6 in eight, three, and three patients, respectively. A good outcome is often obtained in the treatment of ruptured VADA using internal endovascular trapping, except in the PICA-involved type, even with high-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage. Treatment of the PICA-involved type is controversial. The anatomical location and development of PICA may be predicted by complications with postoperative medullary infarction. PMID:24976093

  15. Improvement of sudden bilateral hearing loss after vertebral artery stenting

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hwa; Roh, Kyung Jin; Suh, Sang Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Yul

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral deafness is a rare but possible symptom of vertebrobasilar ischemia. We report a case of sudden bilateral sensorineural hearing loss caused by bilateral vertebral artery (VA) occlusion which dramatically improved after stenting. A 54-year-old man was admitted with sudden onset of bilateral deafness, vertigo, and drowsy mental status. Brain diffusion-weighted MRI showed acute infarction involving both the posterior inferior cerebellar artery and left posterior cerebral artery territory. Cerebral angiography showed bilateral distal VA occlusion, and emergency intracranial stenting was performed in the left VA. After reperfusion therapy his symptoms gradually improved, including hearing impairment. Endovascular stenting may be helpful in a patient with sudden deafness caused by bilateral VA occlusion. PMID:25697296

  16. Cerebellar white matter pathways are associated with reading skills in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Travis, Katherine E; Leitner, Yael; Feldman, Heidi M; Ben-Shachar, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Reading is a critical life skill in the modern world. The neural basis of reading incorporates a distributed network of cortical areas and their white matter connections. The cerebellum has also been implicated in reading and reading disabilities. However, little is known about the contribution of cerebellar white matter pathways to major component skills of reading. We used diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) with tractography to identify the cerebellar peduncles in a group of 9- to 17-year-old children and adolescents born full term (FT, n = 19) or preterm (PT, n = 26). In this cohort, no significant differences were found between fractional anisotropy (FA) measures of the peduncles in the PT and FT groups. FA of the cerebellar peduncles correlated significantly with measures of decoding and reading comprehension in the combined sample of FT and PT subjects. Correlations were negative in the superior and inferior cerebellar peduncles and positive in the middle cerebellar peduncle. Additional analyses revealed that FT and PT groups demonstrated similar patterns of reading associations within the left superior cerebellar peduncle, middle cerebellar peduncle, and left inferior cerebellar peduncle. Partial correlation analyses showed that distinct sub-skills of reading were associated with FA in segments of different cerebellar peduncles. Overall, the present findings are the first to document associations of microstructure of the cerebellar peduncles and the component skills of reading.

  17. Controlateral cavernous syndrome, brainstem congestion and posterior fossa venous thrombosis with cerebellar hematoma related to a ruptured intracavernous carotid artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Aldea, Sorin; Guedin, Pierre; Roccatagliata, Luca; Boulin, Anne; Auliac, Stéphanie; Dupuy, Michel; Cerf, Charles; Gaillard, Stéphan; Rodesch, Georges

    2011-06-01

    Intracavernous carotid artery aneurysms (ICCAs) are rarely associated with life-threatening complications. We describe a 55-year-old woman who, after the rupture of an intracavernous carotid artery aneurysm, presented with a contralateral cavernous sinus syndrome and severe posterior fossa and spinal cord symptoms. Following parent artery occlusion, thrombosis of the posterior fossa and spinal cord veins caused a progressive worsening of the neurological status to a "locked-in" state. The patient fully recovered with anticoagulation therapy. Comprehension of the pathophysiological mechanism associated with the rupture of ICCA and early diagnosis of the related symptoms are essential in order to plan a correct treatment that includes the management of the aneurysm rupture and of possible complications related to venous thrombosis.

  18. Bioglue-Coated Teflon Sling Technique in Microvascular Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm Involving the Vertebral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong Ho; Park, Jae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Objective Microvascular decompression (MVD) for hemifacial spasm (HFS) involving the vertebral artery (VA) can be technically challenging. We investigated the therapeutic effects of a bioglue-coated Teflon sling technique on the VA during MVD in 42 cases. Methods A bioglue-coated Teflon sling was crafted by the surgeon and applied to patients in whom neurovascular compression was caused by the VA. The radiologic data, intra-operative findings with detailed introduction of the procedure, and the clinical outcomes of each patient were reviewed and analyzed. Results The 42 patients included in the analysis consisted of 22 females and 20 males, with an average follow-up duration of 76 months (range 24–132 months). Intraoperative investigation revealed that an artery other than the VA was responsible for the neurovascular compression in all cases : posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) in 23 patients (54.7%) and anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) in 11 patients (26.2%). All patients became symptom-free after MVD. Neither recurrence nor postoperative neurological deficit was noted during the 2-year follow-up, except in one patient who developed permanent deafness. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak occurred in three patients, and one required dural repair. Conclusion Transposition of the VA using a bioglue-coated Teflon sling is a safe and effective surgical technique for HFS involving the VA. A future prospective study to compare clinical outcomes between groups with and without use of this novel technique is required. PMID:27651870

  19. Distribution of cerebello-olivary degeneration in idiopathic late cortical cerebellar atrophy: clinicopathological study of four autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Ota, Satoru; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Anno, Midori; Niizato, Kazuhiro; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2008-02-01

    Late cortical cerebellar atrophy (LCCA) is a neurodegenerative disease which presents with slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia as a prominent symptom and is characterized neuropathologically by a limited main lesion to the cerebellar cortex and inferior olivary nucleus. To elucidate the features of lesions in the cerebellar cortex and inferior olivary nucleus, four autopsy cases suffering from idiopathic LCCA without other cortical cerebellar atrophies, such as alcoholic cerebellar degeneration, phenytoin intoxication, or hereditary cerebellar atrophy including spinocerebellar ataxia type 6, were examined. All affected patients had identical distinct features of cerebellar cortical lesions. In all four cases, the most obvious pathological finding throughout the cerebellum was loss of Purkinje cells, but the rarefaction of granular cell layers was observed only where loss of Purkinje cells was very severe, and thinning of the molecular layer was seen only where the rarefaction of granular cell layers was moderate to severe. Two patients presented with vermis dominant cerebellar cortical lesions, but the other two patients showed hemispheric dominant pathological changes. Neuronal loss of the inferior olivary nucleus was observed in the three autopsy cases. Two of the three cases had a prominent lesion in the dorsal part of the inferior olive and the cerebellar cortical lesion disclosed the vermis dominance, but the other patient, showing prominent neuronal loss in the ventral olivary nucleus, had a cerebellar hemisphere dominant lesion. The patient without neuronal loss in the inferior olivary nucleus had suffered from a shorter period of disease than the others and the rarefaction of granular cell layers and narrowing of the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex were mild. Therefore, it is obvious that there are two types of cerebellar cortex lesions in idiopathic LCCA; one is vermis dominant and the other is cerebellar hemispheric dominant. The lesion of the

  20. Early degeneration of the cerebellar cortex, particularly the granular cells.

    PubMed

    Bugiani, O; Berio, A; Di Stefano, A; Mangiante, G; Mancardi, G L; Leonardi, A

    1978-12-07

    An 8 month old infant, who died of severe gastroenteritis, presented a degeneration of the cerebellar cortex involving cells arising from the outer granular layer as well as Purkinje and Golgi II cells. Residual Purkinje cells showed vacuolar change of the cell body and dendritic abnormalities. Related lesions were atrophy of the inferior olives and degeneration of the mossy fibers.

  1. Asterixis as a Presentation of Cerebellar Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Gallelli, Luca; Di Benedetto, Olindo; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2012-01-01

    Asterixis is not yet considered a common neurological sign of cerebellum infarction, and the pathogenic mechanism for asterixis remains elusive. We report a 58-year-old male with moderate hypertension who presented to our emergency department for acute headache in both cervical and occipital regions of the left side. About 2 hours later the patient developed ipsilateral asterixis in the upper left limb; 3 days later the asterixis disappeared. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain disclosed cerebellar infarctions at the left superior cerebellar artery. In conclusion, we observed that a transitory asterixis associated with ipsilateral headache can be an initial clinical manifestation of ipsilateral cerebellar infarctions in the superior cerebellar artery area. PMID:23359270

  2. Microvascular Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm Associated with Vertebrobasilar Artery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Pyung; Choi, Seok Keun; Rhee, Bong Arm; Lim, Young Jin

    2008-01-01

    Objective Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is considered as a reversible pathophysiological condition mainly induced by continuous vascular compression of the facial nerve root exit zone (REZ) at the cerebellopontine angle. As an offending vessel, vertebrobasilar artery tends to compress much more heavily than others. The authors analyzed HFS caused by vertebrobasilar artery and described the relationships between microsurgical findings and clinical courses. Methods Out of 1,798 cases treated with microvascular decompression (MVD) from Jan. 1980 to Dec. 2004, the causative vessels were either vertebral artery or basilar artery in 87 patients. Seventy-nine patients were enrolled in this study. Preoperatively, computed tomography (CT) or brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with 3-dimentional short range MR technique was performed and CT was checked immediately or 2-3 days after anesthetic recovery. The authors retrospectively analyzed the clinical features, the compression patterns of the vessels at the time of surgery and treatment outcomes. Results There were 47 were male and 32 female patients. HFS developed on the left side in 52 cases and on the right side in 27. The mean age of onset was 52.3 years (range 19-60) and the mean duration of symptoms was 10.7 years. Many patients (39 cases; 49.1%) had past history of hypertension. HFS caused only by the vertebral artery was 8 cases although most of the other cases were caused by vertebral artery (VA) in combination with its branching arteries. Most frequently, the VA and the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) were the simultaneous causative blood vessels comprising 32 cases (40.5%), and in 27 cases (34.2%) the VA and the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) were the offenders. Facial symptoms disappeared in 61 cases (77.2%) immediately after the operation and 68 cases (86.1%) showed good outcome after 6 months. Surgical outcome just after the operation was poor in whom the perforators arose from the offending

  3. Abnormal cerebellar morphometry in abstinent adolescent marijuana users

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Krista Lisdahl; Nagel, Bonnie J.; Tapert, Susan F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Functional neuroimaging data from adults have, in general, found frontocerebellar dysfunction associated with acute and chronic marijuana (MJ) use (Loeber & Yurgelun-Todd, 1999). One structural neuroimaging study found reduced cerebellar vermis volume in young adult MJ users with a history of heavy polysubstance use (Aasly et al., 1993). The goal of this study was to characterize cerebellar volume in adolescent chronic MJ users following one month of monitored abstinence. Method Participants were MJ users (n=16) and controls (n=16) aged 16-18 years. Extensive exclusionary criteria included history of psychiatric or neurologic disorders. Drug use history, neuropsychological data, and structural brain scans were collected after 28 days of monitored abstinence. Trained research staff defined cerebellar volumes (including three cerebellar vermis lobes and both cerebellar hemispheres) on high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. Results Adolescent MJ users demonstrated significantly larger inferior posterior (lobules VIII-X) vermis volume (p<.009) than controls, above and beyond effects of lifetime alcohol and other drug use, gender, and intracranial volume. Larger vermis volumes were associated with poorer executive functioning (p’s<.05). Conclusions Following one month of abstinence, adolescent MJ users had significantly larger posterior cerebellar vermis volumes than non-using controls. These greater volumes are suggested to be pathological based on linkage to poorer executive functioning. Longitudinal studies are needed to examine typical cerebellar development during adolescence and the influence of marijuana use. PMID:20413277

  4. Study on the correlation of vertebral artery dominance, basilar artery curvature and posterior circulation infarction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Ya-Fang; Dong, Xiao-Feng; Feng, Hong-Xuan; Zhao, He-Qing; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-09-01

    Vertebral artery dominance (VAD), which is a common congenital variation of vertebral artery, may be associated with an increased risk of cerebral posterior circulation infarction (PCI). The aims of this study were to investigate the correlation of VAD with incidence and laterality of PCI, and oblige the correlation of VAD and basilar artery (BA) curvature. Incidence of separate territory infarction in posterior circulation and incidence of BA curvature were compared between 78 VAD patients and 68 controls. VA dominance, laterality of BA curvature and separate territory infarction, and their directional relationships were observed in VAD group. The incidence of BA curvature in VAD group was significantly higher than that in controls (P = 0.000). 89.7 % (35/39) of patients had an opposite directional relationship between dominant VA and BA curvature. The total incidence of PCI in VAD group was significantly higher than that in controls (P = 0.001). The incidences of posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and BA territory infarction were both significantly higher than those in controls [11.5 % (9/78) vs. 1.5 % (1/68), P = 0.016; 20.5 % (16/78) vs. 7.4 % (5/68), P = 0.024]. No differences were found in superior cerebellar artery and posterior cerebral artery territory infarction between two groups. 77.8 % (7/9) of PICA infarction were on the opposite side of dominant VA. 75.0 % (12/16) of BA infarction were on the side of dominant VA. The incidence of PCI in BA curvature patients was significantly higher than that in BA straight patients. The incidence of BA curvature is higher in VAD patients, and BA usually bends to the opposite side of dominant VA. The incidence of PCI is higher in VAD patients, especially in PICA infarction and BA infarction patients.

  5. Cerebellar Dysfunction in a Patient with HIV.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Ibarra, Fernando; Abdul, Waheed; Eivaz-Mohammadi, Sahar; Foscue, Christopher; Gongireddy, Srinivas; Syed, Amer

    2014-01-01

    A 50-year-old AIDS patient with a CD4 T-cell count of 114/mm(3) was admitted with cerebellar symptoms of left CN XI weakness, wide-based gait with left-sided dysmetria, abnormal heel-knee-shin test, and dysdiadochokinesia. MRI showed region of hyperintensity in the left inferior cerebellar hemisphere involving the cortex and underlying white matter. Serological tests for HSV1, HSV2, and syphilis were negative. Her CSF contained high protein content and a WBC of 71/mm(3), predominantly lymphocytes. The CSF was also negative for cryptococcal antigen and VDRL. CSF culture did not grow microbes. CSF PCR assay was negative for HSV1 and HSV2 but was positive for JC virus (1,276 copies). The most likely diagnosis is granule cell neuronopathy (GCN), which can only be definitively confirmed with biopsy and immunohistochemistry.

  6. Iatrogenic postoperative cerebellar cyst.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Robin; Moscovici, Samuel; Wygoda, Marc; Eliahou, Ruth; Spektor, Sergey

    2016-12-01

    Cerebellar cyst is a known but uncommon entity. It is congenital in most cases, or may develop after brain parenchyma injuries or interventions. To our knowledge, de novo cerebellar cyst after extra-axial tumor excision, has not been described in the literature. We present the first reported case of a de novo cerebellar cyst developing in a 70-year-old woman following retrosigmoid craniotomy for vestibular schwannoma excision, and discuss the possible causes. Following cyst fenestration, there was no clinical or radiological evidence of a residual cyst.

  7. Vertebral artery dissection after a chiropractor neck manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jeremy; Nugent, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    The differential diagnosis for ischemic central nervous system infarcts in young patients includes paradoxic emboli through cardiac shunts, vasculitis, and vascular trauma. We report a young woman who developed headache, vomiting, diplopia, dizziness, and ataxia following neck manipulation by her chiropractor. A computed tomography scan of the head revealed an infarct in the inferior half of the left cerebellar hemisphere and compression of the fourth ventricle causing moderate acute obstructive hydrocephalus. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed severe narrowing and low flow in the intracranial segment of the left distal vertebral artery. The patient was treated with mannitol and a ventriculostomy and had an excellent functional recovery. This report illustrates the potential hazards associated with neck trauma, including chiropractic manipulation. The vertebral arteries are at risk for aneurysm formation and/or dissection, which can cause acute stroke. PMID:25552813

  8. A simple bracing technique to correct kinking of arterial branches to avoid ischemic sequelae during neurovascular surgery

    PubMed Central

    Motoyama, Yasushi; Tanaka, Yoshitaka; Gurung, Pritam; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Park, Young-Soo; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background: During microscopic procedures for neurovascular disease, we sometimes encounter kinking of arterial branches resulting in ischemic sequelae. A simple and useful technique that involves inserting a small, ball-like prosthesis made of oxidized cellulose or shredded Teflon with fibrin glue that corrects the arterial branch kinking and avoids subsequent compromise is reported. Methods: Between January and December 2014, three patients developed arterial kinking during microscopic procedures, including two in the caudal loop of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery during microvascular decompression for glossopharyngeal neuralgia and one in a branch of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) during clipping for an unruptured MCA aneurysm. Blood flow insufficiency was confirmed by microvascular Doppler ultrasonography (MDU) and indocyanine green (ICG) videoangiography. The prosthesis, which was made of shredded Teflon in two cases and oxidized cellulose in one case, was inserted into the crotch of the kinked arteries to correct the kinking of the arteries and restore the proper vascular shape and normal blood flow. Results: The small, ball-shaped prosthesis corrected the kinked arteries and maintained the proper shape, which was confirmed by ICG videoangiography and MDU during the operation and three-dimensional computerized tomography angiography postoperatively. Postoperatively, the patients did not manifest any ischemic sequelae related to the kinked arteries. Conclusion: The insertion of prostheses with fibrin glue into the crotch of a kinked artery for repair is considered a simple and useful method for correcting a kinked artery that avoids ischemic sequelae. PMID:26862447

  9. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol, medications, and insecticides Bleeding into the cerebellum Multiple sclerosis Strokes of the cerebellum Vaccination ... swelling (inflammation) of the cerebellum (such as from multiple sclerosis) Cerebellar ataxia caused by a recent viral infection ...

  10. [Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias].

    PubMed

    Tranchant, Christine; Anheim, Mathieu

    2009-12-01

    Friedreich ataxia is the most frequent recessive cerebral ataxia d should always be researched first. Ataxia with isolated vitamin E deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia have a specific treatment. Associated neurological signs such polyneuroapthy, ophtalmologic or oculomotor signs, pyramidal signs, and cerebellar MRI can lead to the etiological diagnosis. Biological tests should be: vitamin E, cholesterol, alpha-fetoprotein levels, acanthocytes, than phytanic acid, cholestanol, lysosomal enzymes. Numerous autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia remain without etiology.

  11. Cerebellar Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2008-01-01

    Recent Advances The molecular control of cell type specification within the developing cerebellum as well as the genetic causes of the most common human developmental cerebellar disorders have long remained mysterious. Recent genetic lineage and loss-of-function data from mice have revealed unique and non-overlapping anatomical origins for GABAergic neurons from ventricular zone precursors and glutamatergic cell from rhombic lip precursors, mirroring distinct origins for these neurotransmitter-specific cell types in the cerebral cortex. Mouse studies elucidating the role of Ptf1a as a cerebellar ventricular zone GABerigic fate switch were actually preceded by the recognition that PTF1A mutations in humans cause cerebellar agenesis, a birth defect of the human cerebellum. Indeed, several genes for congenital human cerebellar malformations have recently been identified, including genes causing Joubert syndrome, Dandy-Walker malformation and Ponto-cerebellar hypoplasia. These studies have pointed to surprisingly complex roles for transcriptional regulation, mitochondrial function and neuronal cilia in patterning, homeostasis and cell proliferation during cerebellar development. Together mouse and human studies are synergistically advancing our understanding of the developmental mechanisms that generate the uniquely complex mature cerebellum. PMID:18513948

  12. Embolization of Ruptured Aneurysm Arising From Basilar Artery Fenestration Using Hydrocoils

    PubMed Central

    Chuan Zhi, Duan

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysms arising from the basilar artery fenestration are considered among the rare cerebrovascular diseases. Here, we report on a 44-year-old gentleman who presented with the sudden onset of severe headache complicated by several episodes of vomiting and an altered level of consciousness. A subarachnoid hemorrhage in the interpeduncle and ambient cisterns was detected by computed tomography of the head. During left vertebral arteriography, a basilar fenestration with a ruptured aneurysm just above the proximal end of vertebrobasilar junction was identified. The aneurysm was successfully occluded by means of endovascular treatment using Hydrosoft coils. In the 15-month follow-up angiography, 100% occlusion without recurrence and recanalization was observed. Bilateral anterior inferior cerebellar arteries and both channels of the basilar artery fenestration were entirely filled in follow-up angiograms. PMID:26488001

  13. 3D morphometric analysis of human fetal cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    Scott, Julia A; Hamzelou, Kia S; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Habas, Piotr A; Kim, Kio; Barkovich, A James; Glenn, Orit A; Studholme, Colin

    2012-09-01

    To date, growth of the human fetal cerebellum has been estimated primarily from linear measurements from ultrasound and 2D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we use 3D analytical methods to develop normative growth trajectories for the cerebellum in utero. We measured cerebellar volume, linear dimensions, and local surface curvature from 3D reconstructed MRI of the human fetal brain (N = 46). We found that cerebellar volume increased approximately 7-fold from 20 to 31 gestational weeks. The better fit of the exponential curve (R (2) = 0.96) compared to the linear curve (R (2) = 0.92) indicated acceleration in growth. Within-subject cerebellar and cerebral volumes were highly correlated (R (2) = 0.94), though the cerebellar percentage of total brain volume increased from approximately 2.4% to 3.7% (R (2) = 0.63). Right and left hemispheric volumes did not significantly differ. Transcerebellar diameter, vermal height, and vermal anterior to posterior diameter increased significantly at constant rates. From the local curvature analysis, we found that expansion along the inferior and superior aspects of the hemispheres resulted in decreased convexity, which is likely due to the physical constraints of the dura surrounding the cerebellum and the adjacent brainstem. The paired decrease in convexity along the inferior vermis and increased convexity of the medial hemisphere represents development of the paravermian fissure, which becomes more visible during this period. In this 3D morphometric analysis of the human fetal cerebellum, we have shown that cerebellar growth is accelerating at a greater pace than the cerebrum and described how cerebellar growth impacts the shape of the structure.

  14. 3D Morphometric Analysis of Human Fetal Cerebellar Development

    PubMed Central

    Hamzelou, Kia S.; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Habas, Piotr A.; Kim, Kio; Barkovich, A. James; Glenn, Orit A.; Studholme, Colin

    2012-01-01

    To date, growth of the human fetal cerebellum has been estimated primarily from linear measurements from ultrasound and 2D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we use 3D analytical methods to develop normative growth trajectories for the cerebellum in utero. We measured cerebellar volume, linear dimensions, and local surface curvature from 3D reconstructed MRI of the human fetal brain (N = 46). We found that cerebellar volume increased approximately 7-fold from 20 to 31 gestational weeks. The better fit of the exponential curve (R2 = 0.96) compared to the linear curve (R2 = 0.92) indicated acceleration in growth. Within-subject cerebellar and cerebral volumes were highly correlated (R2 = 0.94), though the cerebellar percentage of total brain volume increased from approximately 2.4% to 3.7% (R2 = 0.63). Right and left hemispheric volumes did not significantly differ. Transcerebellar diameter, vermal height, and vermal anterior to posterior diameter increased significantly at constant rates. From the local curvature analysis, we found that expansion along the inferior and superior aspects of the hemispheres resulted in decreased convexity, which is likely due to the physical constraints of the dura surrounding the cerebellum and the adjacent brainstem. The paired decrease in convexity along the inferior vermis and increased convexity of the medial hemisphere represents development of the paravermian fissure, which becomes more visible during this period. In this 3D morphometric analysis of the human fetal cerebellum, we have shown that cerebellar growth is accelerating at a greater pace than the cerebrum and described how cerebellar growth impacts the shape of the structure. PMID:22198870

  15. Modality specific cerebro-cerebellar activations in verbal working memory: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Kirschen, Matthew P; Chen, S H Annabel; Desmond, John E

    2010-01-01

    Verbal working memory (VWM) engages frontal and temporal/parietal circuits subserving the phonological loop, as well as, superior and inferior cerebellar regions which have projections from these neocortical areas. Different cerebro-cerebellar circuits may be engaged for integrating aurally- and visually-presented information for VWM. The present fMRI study investigated load (2, 4, or 6 letters) and modality (auditory and visual) dependent cerebro-cerebellar VWM activation using a Sternberg task. FMRI revealed modality-independent activations in left frontal (BA 6/9/44), insular, cingulate (BA 32), and bilateral inferior parietal/supramarginal (BA 40) regions, as well as in bilateral superior (HVI) and right inferior (HVIII) cerebellar regions. Visual presentation evoked prominent activations in right superior (HVI/CrusI) cerebellum, bilateral occipital (BA19) and left parietal (BA7/40) cortex while auditory presentation showed robust activations predominantly in bilateral temporal regions (BA21/22). In the cerebellum, we noted a visual to auditory emphasis of function progressing from superior to inferior and from lateral to medial regions. These results extend our previous findings of fMRI activation in cerebro-cerebellar networks during VWM, and demonstrate both modality dependent commonalities and differences in activations with increasing memory load.

  16. Total bolus extraction method improves arterial image quality in dynamic CTAs derived from whole-brain CTP data.

    PubMed

    Ghariq, Elyas; Mendrik, Adriënne M; Willems, Peter W A; Joemai, Raoul M S; Ghariq, Eidrees; Vonken, Evert-jan; van Osch, Matthias J P; van Walderveen, Marianne A A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purposes. The 320-detector row CT scanner enables visualization of whole-brain hemodynamic information (dynamic CT angiography (CTA) derived from CT perfusion scans). However, arterial image quality in dynamic CTA (dCTA) is inferior to arterial image quality in standard CTA. This study evaluates whether the arterial image quality can be improved by using a total bolus extraction (ToBE) method. Materials and Methods. DCTAs of 15 patients, who presented with signs of acute cerebral ischemia, were derived from 320-slice CT perfusion scans using both the standard subtraction method and the proposed ToBE method. Two neurointerventionalists blinded to the scan type scored the arterial image quality on a 5-point scale in the 4D dCTAs in consensus. Arteries were divided into four categories: (I) large extradural, (II) intradural (large, medium, and small), (III) communicating arteries, and (IV) cerebellar and ophthalmic arteries. Results. Quality of extradural and intradural arteries was significantly higher in the ToBE dCTAs than in the standard dCTAs (extradural P = 0.001, large intradural P < 0.001, medium intradural P < 0.001, and small intradural P < 0.001). Conclusion. The 4D dCTAs derived with the total bolus extraction (ToBE) method provide hemodynamic information combined with improved arterial image quality as compared to standard 4D dCTAs.

  17. Strong-Meter and Weak-Meter Rhythm Identification in Spina Bifida Meningomyelocele and Volumetric Parcellation of Rhythm-Relevant Cerebellar Regions

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Maureen; Hopyan, Talar; Juranek, Jenifer; Cirino, Paul T.; Hasan, Khader M.; Fletcher, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Children with spina bifida meningomyelocele (SBM) are impaired relative to controls in terms of discriminating strong-meter and weak-meter rhythms, so congenital cerebellar dysmorphologies that affect rhythmic movements also disrupt rhythm perception. Cerebellar parcellations in children with SBM showed an abnormal configuration of volume fractions in cerebellar regions important for rhythm function: a smaller inferior-posterior lobe, and larger anterior and superior-posterior lobes. PMID:19673758

  18. Fatal remote cerebellar hemorrhage after supratentorial unruptured aneurysm surgery in patient with previous cerebellar infarction

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Eun-Jeong; Park, Jung-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) is a rare complication of supratentorial and spinal surgeries, seldom requiring intervention but occasionally causing significant morbidity or even mortality. Although a number of theories have been proposed, the exact pathophysiology of RCH remains incompletely understood. Patient concerns: We present a 62-year-old patient with RCH encountered following surgical clipping of an unruptured middle cerebral artery bifurcation aneurysm in a patient with previous cerebellar infarction. Lessons: It is extremely rare, but sometimes, RCH can be life-threatening. It is necessary to check the patient's general condition, underlying diseases and medical history. And controlled drainage of the CSF seems to be most important. Arachnoidplasty may be a consideration and the position of the drain string might have to be carefully determined. PMID:28121936

  19. Genetics Home Reference: lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia (LCH) affects brain development, resulting in the brain ...

  20. Chiropractic Response to a Spontaneous Vertebral Artery Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Tarola, Gary; Phillips, Reed B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a case in which early detection and proper follow-up of spontaneous vertebral artery dissection led to satisfactory outcomes. Clinical Features A 34-year old white woman reported to a chiropractic clinic with a constant burning pain at the right side of her neck and shoulder with a limited ability to turn her head from side to side, periods of blurred vision, and muffled hearing. Dizziness, visual and auditory disturbances, and balance difficulty abated within 1 hour of onset and were not present at the time of evaluation. A pain drawing indicated burning pain in the suboccipital area, neck, and upper shoulder on the right and a pins and needles sensation on the dorsal surface of both forearms. Turning her head from side-to-side aggravated the pain, and the application of heat brought temporary relief. The Neck Disability Index score of 44 placed the patient’s pain in the most severe category. Intervention and Outcome The patient was not treated on the initial visit but was advised of the possibility of a vertebral artery or carotid artery dissection and was recommended to the emergency department for immediate evaluation. The patient declined but later was convinced by her chiropractor to present to the emergency department. A magnetic resonance angiogram of the neck and carotid arteries was performed showing that the left vertebral artery was hypoplastic and appeared to terminate at the left posterior inferior cerebellar artery. There was an abrupt moderately long segment of narrowing involving the right vertebral artery beginning near the junction of the V1 and V2 segments. The radiologist noted a concern regarding right vertebral artery dissection. Symptoms resolved and the patient was cleared of any medications but advised that if symptoms reoccurred she was to go for emergency care immediately. Conclusion Recognition and rapid response by the chiropractic physician provided the optimum outcome for

  1. Changes in cerebro-cerebellar interaction during response inhibition after performance improvement.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Satoshi; Jimura, Koji; Kunimatsu, Akira; Abe, Osamu; Ohtomo, Kuni; Miyashita, Yasushi; Konishi, Seiki

    2014-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that motor learning is supported by the cerebellum and the cerebro-cerebellar interaction. Response inhibition involves motor responses and the higher-order inhibition that controls the motor responses. In this functional MRI study, we measured the cerebro-cerebellar interaction during response inhibition in two separate days of task performance, and detected the changes in the interaction following performance improvement. Behaviorally, performance improved in the second day, compared to the first day. The psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) analysis revealed the interaction decrease from the right inferior frontal cortex (rIFC) to the cerebellum (lobule VII or VI). It was also revealed that the interaction increased from the same cerebellar region to the primary motor area. These results suggest the involvement of the cerebellum in response inhibition, and raise the possibility that the performance improvement was supported by the changes in the cerebro-cerebellar interaction.

  2. Childhood Cerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Brent L.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood presentations of ataxia, an impairment of balance and coordination caused by damage to or dysfunction of the cerebellum, can often be challenging to diagnose. Presentations tend to be clinically heterogeneous but key considerations may vary based on the child's age at onset, the course of illness, and subtle differences in phenotype. Systematic investigation is recommended for efficient diagnosis. In this review, we outline common etiologies and describe a comprehensive approach to the evaluation of both acquired and genetic cerebellar ataxia in children. PMID:22764177

  3. Cerebellar Zonal Patterning Relies on Purkinje Cell Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    White, Joshua J.; Arancillo, Marife; Stay, Trace L.; George-Jones, Nicholas A.; Levy, Sabrina L.; Heck, Detlef H.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar circuits are patterned into an array of topographic parasagittal domains called zones. The proper connectivity of zones is critical for motor coordination and motor learning, and in several neurological diseases cerebellar circuits degenerate in zonal patterns. Despite recent advances in understanding zone function, we still have a limited understanding of how zones are formed. Here, we focused our attention on Purkinje cells to gain a better understanding of their specific role in establishing zonal circuits. We used conditional mouse genetics to test the hypothesis that Purkinje cell neurotransmission is essential for refining prefunctional developmental zones into sharp functional zones. Our results show that inhibitory synaptic transmission in Purkinje cells is necessary for the precise patterning of Purkinje cell zones and the topographic targeting of mossy fiber afferents. As expected, blocking Purkinje cell neurotransmission caused ataxia. Using in vivo electrophysiology, we demonstrate that loss of Purkinje cell communication altered the firing rate and pattern of their target cerebellar nuclear neurons. Analysis of Purkinje cell complex spike firing revealed that feedback in the cerebellar nuclei to inferior olive to Purkinje cell loop is obstructed. Loss of Purkinje neurotransmission also caused ectopic zonal expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, which is only expressed in adult Purkinje cells when calcium is dysregulated and if excitability is altered. Our results suggest that Purkinje cell inhibitory neurotransmission establishes the functional circuitry of the cerebellum by patterning the molecular zones, fine-tuning afferent circuitry, and shaping neuronal activity. PMID:24920627

  4. Translational Approach to Behavioral Learning: Lessons from Cerebellar Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Cheron, Guy; Dan, Bernard; Márquez-Ruiz, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The role of cerebellar plasticity has been increasingly recognized in learning. The privileged relationship between the cerebellum and the inferior olive offers an ideal circuit for attempting to integrate the numerous evidences of neuronal plasticity into a translational perspective. The high learning capacity of the Purkinje cells specifically controlled by the climbing fiber represents a major element within the feed-forward and feedback loops of the cerebellar cortex. Reciprocally connected with the basal ganglia and multimodal cerebral domains, this cerebellar network may realize fundamental functions in a wide range of behaviors. This review will outline the current understanding of three main experimental paradigms largely used for revealing cerebellar functions in behavioral learning: (1) the vestibuloocular reflex and smooth pursuit control, (2) the eyeblink conditioning, and (3) the sensory envelope plasticity. For each of these experimental conditions, we have critically revisited the chain of causalities linking together neural circuits, neural signals, and plasticity mechanisms, giving preference to behaving or alert animal physiology. Namely, recent experimental approaches mixing neural units and local field potentials recordings have demonstrated a spike timing dependent plasticity by which the cerebellum remains at a strategic crossroad for deciphering fundamental and translational mechanisms from cellular to network levels. PMID:24319600

  5. Head impulse gain and saccade analysis in pontine-cerebellar stroke and vestibular neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Michael; Halmagyi, Gabor M.; Aw, Swee

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We sought to quantify and compare angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR) gain and compensatory saccade properties elicited by the head impulse test (HIT) in pontine-cerebellar stroke (PCS) and vestibular neuritis (VN). Methods: Horizontal HIT was recorded ≤7 days from vertigo onset with dual-search coils in 33 PCS involving the anterior inferior, posterior inferior, and superior cerebellar arteries (13 AICA, 17 PICA, 3 SCA) confirmed by MRI and 20 VN. We determined the aVOR gain and asymmetry, and compensatory overt saccade properties including amplitude asymmetry and cumulative amplitude (ipsilesional trials [I]; contralesional trials [C]). Results: The aVOR gain (normal: 0.96; asymmetry = 2%) was bilaterally reduced, greater in AICA (I = 0.39, C = 0.57; asymmetry = 20%) than in PICA/SCA strokes (I = 0.75, C = 0.74; asymmetry = 7%), in contrast to the unilateral deficit in VN (I = 0.22, C = 0.76; asymmetry = 54%). Cumulative amplitude (normal: 1.1°) was smaller in AICA (I = 4.2°, C = 3.0°) and PICA/SCA strokes (I = 2.1°, C = 3.0°) compared with VN (I = 8.5°, C = 1.3°). Amplitude asymmetry in AICA and PICA/SCA strokes was comparable, but favored the contralesional side in PICA/SCA strokes and the ipsilesional side in VN. Saccade asymmetry <61% was found in 97% of PCS and none of VN. Gain asymmetry <40% was found in 94% of PCS and 10% of VN. Conclusion: HIT gains and compensatory saccades differ between PCS and VN. VN was characterized by unilateral gain deficits with asymmetric large saccades, AICA stroke by more symmetric bilateral gain reduction with smaller saccades, and PICA stroke by contralesional gain bias with the smallest saccades. Saccade and gain asymmetry should be investigated further in future diagnostic accuracy studies. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that aVOR testing accurately distinguishes patients with PCS from VN (sensitivity 94%–97%, specificity 90%–100%). PMID:25253747

  6. Inferior vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Hyo Jung

    2012-08-01

    Vestibular neuritis (VN) mostly involves the superior portion of the vestibular nerve and labyrinth. This study aimed to describe the clinical features of VN involving the inferior vestibular labyrinth and its afferents only. Of the 703 patients with a diagnosis of VN or labyrinthitis at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from 2004 to 2010, we retrospectively recruited 9 patients (6 women, age range 15-75) with a diagnosis of isolated inferior VN. Diagnosis of isolated inferior VN was based on torsional downbeating spontaneous nystagmus, abnormal head-impulse test (HIT) for the posterior semicircular canal (PC), and abnormal cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) in the presence of normally functioning horizontal and anterior semicircular canals, as determined by normal HIT and bithermal caloric tests. All patients presented with acute vertigo with nausea, vomiting, and imbalance. Three patients also had tinnitus and hearing loss in the involved side. The rotation axis of torsional downbeating spontaneous nystagmus was best aligned with that of the involved PC. HIT was also positive only for the involved PC. Cervical VEMP was abnormal in seven patients, and ocular VEMP was normal in all four patients tested. Ocular torsion and subjective visual vertical tests were mostly within the normal range. Since isolated inferior VN lacks the typical findings of much more prevalent superior VN, it may be mistaken for a central vestibular disorder. Recognition of this rare disorder may help avoid unnecessary workups in patients with acute vestibulopathy.

  7. Nitrergic nerves derived from the pterygopalatine ganglion innervate arteries irrigating the cerebrum but not the cerebellum and brain stem in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ayajiki, Kazuhide; Kobuchi, Shuhei; Tawa, Masashi; Okamura, Tomio

    2012-01-01

    The functional roles of the nitrergic nerves innervating the monkey cerebral artery were evaluated in a tension-response study examining isolated arteries in vitro and cerebral angiography in vivo. Nicotine produced relaxation of arteries by stimulation of nerve terminals innervating isolated monkey arteries irrigating the cerebrum, cerebellum and brain stem. Relaxation of arteries induced by nicotine was abolished by treatment with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, and was restored by addition of L-arginine. Cerebral angiography showed that electrical stimulation of the unilateral greater petrosal nerve, which connects to the pterygopalatine ganglion via the parasympathetic ganglion synapse, produced vasodilatation of the anterior, middle and posterior cerebral arteries in the stimulated side. However, stimulation failed to produce vasodilatation of the superior and anterior-inferior cerebellar arteries and the basilar artery in anesthetized monkeys. Therefore, nitrergic nerves derived from the pterygopalatine ganglion appear to regulate cerebral vasomotor function. In contrast, circulation in the cerebellum and brain stem might be regulated by nitrergic nerves originating not from the pterygopalatine ganglion, but rather from an unknown ganglion (or ganglia).

  8. Basilar impression as a possible cause of cerebellar stroke: case report.

    PubMed

    Roje-Bedeković, Marina; Vargek-Solter, Vesna; Bedek, Darko; Demarin, Vida

    2011-12-01

    A case is reported of a 72-year-old woman who presented with severe vertigo, vomit, and mild neck and occipital pain. She had a medical history of hypertension, angina pectoris, cholelithiasis, gastric ulcer, pyelonephritis and periodical mild dizziness. Neuroimaging revealed right vertebral artery occlusion, right cerebellar stroke and basilar impression. The therapeutic approach chosen in our patient was conservative, with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and neck collar. Although our patient's prior risk factors for stroke supported a diagnosis of vertebrobasilar stroke, it is possible that the vertebral artery occlusion was the result of changes in the atlantoaxial anatomy and that cerebellar infarction was secondary to craniocervical anomaly. Although the presence of vertebral artery occlusion, cerebellar stroke and basilar impression in our patient may have been coincidental, we suggest that patients with basilar impression and craniocervical anomalies in general may be at an increased risk of vertebrobasilar vascular disease and vertebrobasilar stroke.

  9. The effects of inferior olive lesion on strychnine seizure

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.C.; Chung, E.Y.; Van Woert, M.H. )

    1990-10-01

    Bilateral inferior olive lesions, produced by systemic administration of the neurotoxin 3-acetylpyridine (3AP) produce a proconvulsant state specific for strychnine-induced seizures and myoclonus. We have proposed that these phenomena are mediated through increased excitation of cerebellar Purkinje cells, through activation of glutamate receptors, in response to climbing fiber deafferentation. An increase in quisqualic acid (QA)-displaceable ({sup 3}H)AMPA ((RS)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid) binding in cerebella from inferior olive-lesioned rats was observed, but no difference in ({sup 3}H)AMPA binding displaced by glutamate, kainic acid (KA) or glutamate diethylester (GDEE) was seen. The excitatory amino acid antagonists GDEE and MK-801 ((+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo(a,d)cyclo-hepten-5,10 imine) were tested as anticonvulsants for strychnine-induced seizures in 3AP inferior olive-lesioned and control rats. Neither drug effected seizures in control rats, however, both GDEE and MK-801 produced a leftward shift in the strychnine-seizure dose-response curve in 3AP inferior olive-lesioned rats. GDEE also inhibited strychnine-induced myoclonus in the lesioned group, while MK-801 had no effect on myoclonus. The decreased threshold for strychnine-induced seizures and myoclonus in the 3AP-inferior olive-lesioned rats may be due to an increase in glutamate receptors as suggested by the ({sup 3}H)AMPA binding data.

  10. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Palau, Francesc; Espinós, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) are a heterogeneous group of rare neurological disorders involving both central and peripheral nervous system, and in some case other systems and organs, and characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of cerebellum and spinal cord, autosomal recessive inheritance and, in most cases, early onset occurring before the age of 20 years. This group encompasses a large number of rare diseases, the most frequent in Caucasian population being Friedreich ataxia (estimated prevalence 2–4/100,000), ataxia-telangiectasia (1–2.5/100,000) and early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (1/100,000). Other forms ARCA are much less common. Based on clinicogenetic criteria, five main types ARCA can be distinguished: congenital ataxias (developmental disorder), ataxias associated with metabolic disorders, ataxias with a DNA repair defect, degenerative ataxias, and ataxia associated with other features. These diseases are due to mutations in specific genes, some of which have been identified, such as frataxin in Friedreich ataxia, α-tocopherol transfer protein in ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED), aprataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA1), and senataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by ancillary tests such as neuroimaging (magnetic resonance imaging, scanning), electrophysiological examination, and mutation analysis when the causative gene is identified. Correct clinical and genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counseling and prognosis and, in some instances, pharmacological treatment. Due to autosomal recessive inheritance, previous familial history of affected individuals is unlikely. For most ARCA there is no specific drug treatment except for coenzyme Q10 deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia. PMID:17112370

  11. Ischemia as a potential etiologic factor in idiopathic unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss: Analysis of posterior circulation arteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chulho; Sohn, Jong-Hee; Jang, Min Uk; Hong, Sung-Kwang; Lee, Joong-Seob; Kim, Hyung-Jong; Choi, Hui-Chul; Lee, Jun Ho

    2016-01-01

    The association between idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL) and the radiologic characteristics of the vertebrobasilar artery is unclear. We hypothesized that the degree and direction of vertebrobasilar artery curvature in the posterior circulation contribute to the occurrence of ISSNHL. We consecutively enrolled patients diagnosed with unilateral ISSNHL in two tertiary hospitals. Magnetic resonance images were performed in all patients to exclude specific causes of ISSNHL, such as vestibular schwannoma, chronic mastoiditis, and anterior inferior cerebellar artery infarct. We measured the following parameters of posterior circulation: vertebral and basilar artery diameter, the degree of basilar artery curvature (modified smoker criteria), and vertebral artery dominance. Pure tone audiometries were performed at admission and again 1 week and 3 months later. A total of 121 ISSNHL patients (mean age, 46.0 ± 17.3 years; 48.8% male) were included in these analyses. The proportion of patients with the left side hearing loss was larger than the proportion with the right side hearing loss (left, 57.9%; right, 42.1%). The majority of patients were characterized by a left dominant vertebral artery and right-sided basilar artery curvature. The direction of the basilar artery curvature was significantly associated with hearing loss lateralization (p = 0.036). Age and sex matched multivariable analyses revealed the absence of diabetes and right-sided basilar artery curvature as significant predictors for left sided hearing loss. There was no statistical difference between atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk score (high versus low) and hearing outcomes at 3 months. In ISSNHL, the laterality of hearing loss was inversely associated with the direction of basilar artery curvature. Our results, therefore, indicate the importance of vascular assessment when evaluating ISSNHL.

  12. Endovascular Treatment of Huge Dissecting Aneurysms Involving the Basilar Artery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, X.; Mu, S.; Lv, M.; Li, L.; Wu, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Dissecting aneurysms involving the basilar artery (BA) are lesions with significant morbidity and mortality. Their management is controversial and often difficult. There is no generally approved strategy. Two cases of huge dissections involving the BA presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage in one case and mass effect in both cases. The dissection of case 1 involved the upper two thirds of the BA distal to the anterior inferior cerebellar arteries (AICA). Another dissection of case 2 involved the bilateral vertebral arteries (VA) distal to bilateral PICA and extended to upper third of the BA. After making a basket with coils inside the pseudoaneursym, proximal dissection was totally occluded in case 1. Dissection on the bilateral VA distal to the bilateral PICA and proximal BA was occluded in case 2 with a small residual dissection on the left VA. Case 1 had an excellent recovery with a durable image and clinical result. But recanalization and regrowth occurred in case 2, which might have originated from the residual dissection on the left VA, induced acute mass effect and sudden coma six weeks after the initial treatment. The residual and regrown dissection had to be occluded in a second intervention. The patient died two days later. BA occlusion is safe and efficient for dissections involving the BA as in our case and the literature. Proximal occlusion might be enough for huge and long lesions like ours. It seems that completely dense packing of proximal dissection is the key point to prevent recanalization. PMID:20566106

  13. Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (ctDCS): A Novel Approach to Understanding Cerebellar Function in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Argyropoulos, Georgios P; Bastian, Amy; Cortes, Mar; Davis, Nicholas J; Edwards, Dylan J; Ferrucci, Roberta; Fregni, Felipe; Galea, Joseph M; Hamada, Masahi; Manto, Mario; Miall, R Chris; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Pope, Paul A; Priori, Alberto; Rothwell, John; Tomlinson, S Paul; Celnik, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    The cerebellum is critical for both motor and cognitive control. Dysfunction of the cerebellum is a component of multiple neurological disorders. In recent years, interventions have been developed that aim to excite or inhibit the activity and function of the human cerebellum. Transcranial direct current stimulation of the cerebellum (ctDCS) promises to be a powerful tool for the modulation of cerebellar excitability. This technique has gained popularity in recent years as it can be used to investigate human cerebellar function, is easily delivered, is well tolerated, and has not shown serious adverse effects. Importantly, the ability of ctDCS to modify behavior makes it an interesting approach with a potential therapeutic role for neurological patients. Through both electrical and non-electrical effects (vascular, metabolic) ctDCS is thought to modify the activity of the cerebellum and alter the output from cerebellar nuclei. Physiological studies have shown a polarity-specific effect on the modulation of cerebellar-motor cortex connectivity, likely via cerebellar-thalamocortical pathways. Modeling studies that have assessed commonly used electrode montages have shown that the ctDCS-generated electric field reaches the human cerebellum with little diffusion to neighboring structures. The posterior and inferior parts of the cerebellum (i.e., lobules VI-VIII) seem particularly susceptible to modulation by ctDCS. Numerous studies have shown to date that ctDCS can modulate motor learning, and affect cognitive and emotional processes. Importantly, this intervention has a good safety profile; similar to when applied over cerebral areas. Thus, investigations have begun exploring ctDCS as a viable intervention for patients with neurological conditions.

  14. Redistribution of crossed cerebellar diaschisis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.M.; Park, C.H.; Intenzo, C.M.; Bell, R.

    1989-04-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis refers to a functional decrease in blood flow to the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the infarcted or ischemic cerebral hemisphere. This phenomenon can be depicted using PET as well as using SPECT. This condition, seen on early I-123 IMP brain scans, can show redistribution on the three hour delayed scan, presumably due to normal non-specific amine receptor sites of the affected cerebellum. One such case is reported.

  15. Speech prosody in cerebellar ataxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Maureen

    The present study sought an acoustic signature for the speech disturbance recognized in cerebellar degeneration. Magnetic resonance imaging was used for a radiological rating of cerebellar involvement in six cerebellar ataxic dysarthric speakers. Acoustic measures of the [pap] syllables in contrastive prosodic conditions and of normal vs. brain-damaged patients were used to further our understanding both of the speech degeneration that accompanies cerebellar pathology and of speech motor control and movement in general. Pair-wise comparisons of the prosodic conditions within the normal group showed statistically significant differences for four prosodic contrasts. For three of the four contrasts analyzed, the normal speakers showed both longer durations and higher formant and fundamental frequency values in the more prominent first condition of the contrast. The acoustic measures of the normal prosodic contrast values were then used as a model to measure the degree of speech deterioration for individual cerebellar subjects. This estimate of speech deterioration as determined by individual differences between cerebellar and normal subjects' acoustic values of the four prosodic contrasts was used in correlation analyses with MRI ratings. Moderate correlations between speech deterioration and cerebellar atrophy were found in the measures of syllable duration and f0. A strong negative correlation was found for F1. Moreover, the normal model presented by these acoustic data allows for a description of the flexibility of task- oriented behavior in normal speech motor control. These data challenge spatio-temporal theory which explains movement as an artifact of time wherein longer durations predict more extreme movements and give further evidence for gestural internal dynamics of movement in which time emerges from articulatory events rather than dictating those events. This model provides a sensitive index of cerebellar pathology with quantitative acoustic

  16. Spontaneous vertebral artery dissection with multiple supratentorial and infratentorial acute infarcts in the posterior circulation Case report

    PubMed Central

    Cristea, I; Popa, C

    2016-01-01

    The article represents a case of a young patient with atypical clinical and paraclinical presentation of vertebral artery dissection by multiple cerebral infarcts, localized at the supratentorial and infratentorial levels in the posterior circulation. A case of a 21-year-old man, without a history of trauma in the cervical area or at the cranial level, without recent chiropractic maneuvers or practicing a sport, which required rapid, extreme, rotational movements of the neck, was examined. He presented to the emergency room with nausea, numbness of the left limbs, dysarthria, and incoordination of walking, with multiple objective signs at the neurological examination, which revealed right vertebral artery subacute dissection after the paraclinical investigations. The case was particular due to the atypical debut symptomatology, through the installation of the clinical picture in stages, during 4 hours and by multiple infarcts through the artery-to-artery embolic mechanism in the posterior cerebral territory. Abbreviations: PICA = posterior inferior cerebellar artery, CT = computed tomography, MRI = magnetic resonance imaging, angio MRI = mangnetic resonance angiography, FLAIR = fluid attenuated inversion recovery, FS = fat suppression, ADC = apparent diffusion coefficient, DWI = diffusion weighted imaging, T1/ T2 = T1/ T2 weighted image-basic pulse sequences in MRI, VA = vertebral artery, 3D-TOF = 3D Time of Flight PMID:27974938

  17. Spontaneous vertebral artery dissection with multiple supratentorial and infratentorial acute infarcts in the posterior circulation Case report.

    PubMed

    I, Cristea; C, Popa

    2016-01-01

    The article represents a case of a young patient with atypical clinical and paraclinical presentation of vertebral artery dissection by multiple cerebral infarcts, localized at the supratentorial and infratentorial levels in the posterior circulation. A case of a 21-year-old man, without a history of trauma in the cervical area or at the cranial level, without recent chiropractic maneuvers or practicing a sport, which required rapid, extreme, rotational movements of the neck, was examined. He presented to the emergency room with nausea, numbness of the left limbs, dysarthria, and incoordination of walking, with multiple objective signs at the neurological examination, which revealed right vertebral artery subacute dissection after the paraclinical investigations. The case was particular due to the atypical debut symptomatology, through the installation of the clinical picture in stages, during 4 hours and by multiple infarcts through the artery-to-artery embolic mechanism in the posterior cerebral territory. Abbreviations: PICA = posterior inferior cerebellar artery, CT = computed tomography, MRI = magnetic resonance imaging, angio MRI = mangnetic resonance angiography, FLAIR = fluid attenuated inversion recovery, FS = fat suppression, ADC = apparent diffusion coefficient, DWI = diffusion weighted imaging, T1/ T2 = T1/ T2 weighted image-basic pulse sequences in MRI, VA = vertebral artery, 3D-TOF = 3D Time of Flight.

  18. Progressive limb ataxia following inferior olive lesions

    PubMed Central

    Horn, K M; Deep, A; Gibson, A R

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar climbing fibres originate in the inferior olive (IO). Temporary IO inactivation produces movement deficits. Does permanent inactivation produce similar deficits and, if so, do they recover? The excitotoxin, kainic acid, was injected into the rostral IO of three cats. Behaviour was measured during reaching and locomotion. Two cats were injected during the reaching task. Within minutes, grasping became difficult and the trajectories of the reaches showed higher arcing than normally seen. During locomotion, both cats showed head and trunk deviation to the injected side, walking paths curved to the injected side, and the paws were lifted higher than normal. Limbs contralateral to the injections became rigid. Within 1 day, posture had normalized, locomotion was unsteady and high lifting of the paws had reversed to a tendency to drag the dorsum of the paws. Passive body movement produced vestibular signs. Over a few days, locomotion normalized and vestibular signs disappeared. Reach trajectories were normal but grasping deficits persisted. Over the first week, the amplitude of limb lift during reaching and locomotion began to increase. The increase continued over time and, after several months, limb movements became severely ataxic. The effects followed the somatotopy of the rostral IO: a loss of cells in medial rostral IO only affected the forelimb, whereas a loss of cells in medial and lateral IO affected both forelimb and hindlimb. Deficits produced by IO lesions involve multiple mechanisms; some recover rapidly, some appear stable, and some worsen over time. The nature of the progressive deficit suggests a gradual loss of Purkinje cell inhibition on cerebellar nuclear cells. PMID:23027819

  19. Isolated inferior mesenteric portal hypertension with giant inferior mesenteric vein and anomalous inferior mesenteric vein insertion

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, G. Raghavendra; Billa, Srikar; Bhandari, Pavaneel; Hussain, Aijaz

    2013-01-01

    Extrahepatic portal hypertension is not an uncommon disease in childhood, but isolated inferior mesenteric portal varices and lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleed have not been reported till date. A 4-year-old girl presented with lower GI bleed. Surgical exploration revealed extrahepatic portal vein obstruction with giant inferior mesenteric vein and colonic varices. Inferior mesenteric vein was joining the superior mesenteric vein. The child was treated successfully with inferior mesenteric – inferior vena caval anastomosis. The child was relieved of GI bleed during the follow-up. PMID:23798814

  20. Clinical findings of intracranial vertebral artery disease using magnetic resonance angiography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu-Han; Chen, Clayton Chi-Chang; Chang, Ming-Hong

    2004-09-01

    The vertebral artery lesion has a variety of clinical characteristics. We sought to clarify the clinical patterns and the location of the intracranial vertebral artery (ICVA) diseases according to analyses of images obtained using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). We studied vascular lesions, risk factors, symptoms, signs, and outcomes in 35 patients with ICVA disease (3 had bilateral occlusion; 9, unilateral occlusion; 6, bilateral stenosis; and 17, unilateral stenosis). The most common site of unilateral and bilateral lesions was the distal ICVA after the origin of posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). We found accompanying basilar artery disease in 28.6% of patients with unilateral and bilateral ICVA disease. The majority of the ICVA lesions were associated with internal carotid arteries disease (48.8%). The common vascular risk factors were hypertension (71%), diabetes mellitus (34%), hyperlipidemia (31%), smoking (29%), and coronary artery disease (23%). Eighteen patients (51.4%) had transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) only, 10 patients (28.6%) had TIAs before stroke, and 5 patients (14.3%) had strokes without TIAs. Most patients (80%) with TIAs, with or without stroke, had multiple episodes. Vertigo or dizziness, ataxia, limbs weakness and abnormal gait were the common symptoms and signs. At 6 months follow-up, 66.7% patients had no symptoms or only slight symptoms that caused no disability. Our data showed (1) the usual location of ICVA disease (occlusion or severe stenosis) was distal to PICA, especially near the vertebrobasilar junction; (2) the risk factors were hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, smoking, and coronary artery disease; (3) patients with ICVA disease had a high frequency of accompanying internal carotid, middle cerebral, or basilar artery disease; (4) vertigo or dizziness, and ataxia were the common symptoms and signs; (5) TIA was the most common clinical pattern; (6) the outcome was favorable, except in cases with

  1. Flavoprotein imaging in the cerebellar cortex in vivo: cellular and metabolic basis and insights into cerebellar function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wangcai; Chen, Gang; Ebner, Timothy J.

    2009-02-01

    Flavoprotein autofluorescence is an activity dependent intrinsic signal. Flavoproteins are involved in the electron transport chain and change their fluorescence according to the cellular redox state. We have been using flavoprotein autofluorescence in the cerebellum to examine properties of cerebellar circuits. Studies have also focused on understanding the cellular and metabolic origins of this intrinsic optical signal. Parallel fiber stimulation evokes a beamlike response intersected by bands of decreased fluorescence. The beam response is biphasic, with an early fluorescence increase (light phase) followed by a slower decrease (dark phase). We show this signal originates from flavoproteins as determined by its wavelength selectivity and sensitivity to blockers of the electron transport chain. Selectively blocking glutamate receptors abolished the on-beam light phase with the dark phase remaining intact. This demonstrates that the light phase is due to postsynaptic neuronal activation and suggests the dark phase is primarily due to glial activation. The bands of reduced fluorescence intersecting the beam are primarily neuronal in origin, mediated by GABAergic transmission, and due to the inhibitory action of molecular layer interneurons on Purkinje cells and the interneurons themselves. This parasagittally organized molecular layer inhibition differentially modulates the spatial pattern of cerebellar cortical activity. Flavoprotein imaging also reveals the functional architectures underlying the responses to inferior olive and peripheral whisker pad stimulation. Therefore, flavoprotein autofluorescence imaging is providing new insights into cerebellar cortical function and neurometabolic coupling.

  2. Alcohol Withdrawal and Cerebellar Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jung, Marianna E

    2015-08-01

    Cerebellar disorders trigger the symptoms of movement problems, imbalance, incoordination, and frequent fall. Cerebellar disorders are shown in various CNS illnesses including a drinking disorder called alcoholism. Alcoholism is manifested as an inability to control drinking in spite of adverse consequences. Human and animal studies have shown that cerebellar symptoms persist even after complete abstinence from drinking. In particular, the abrupt termination (ethanol withdrawal) of long-term excessive ethanol consumption has shown to provoke a variety of neuronal and mitochondrial damage to the cerebellum. Upon ethanol withdrawal, excitatory neurotransmitter molecules such as glutamate are overly released in brain areas including cerebellum. This is particularly relevant to the cerebellar neuronal network as glutamate signals are projected to Purkinje neurons through granular cells that are the most populated neuronal type in CNS. This excitatory neuronal signal may be elevated by ethanol withdrawal stress, which promotes an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) level and a decrease in a Ca(2+)-binding protein, both of which result in the excessive entry of Ca(2+) to the mitochondria. Subsequently, mitochondria undergo a prolonged opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore and the overproduction of harmful free radicals, impeding adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-generating function. This in turn provokes the leakage of mitochondrial molecule cytochrome c to the cytosol, which triggers a cascade of adverse cytosol reactions. Upstream to this pathway, cerebellum under the condition of ethanol withdrawal has shown aberrant gene modifications through altered DNA methylation, histone acetylation, or microRNA expression. Interplay between these events and molecules may result in functional damage to cerebellar mitochondria and consequent neuronal degeneration, thereby contributing to motoric deficit. Mitochondria-targeting research may help develop a powerful new

  3. Decreased cerebellar blood flow in postinfectious acute cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Nagamitsu, S.; Matsuishi, T.; Ishibashi, M.; Yamashita, Y.; Nishimi, T.; Ichikawa, K.; Yamanishi, K.; Kato, H.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The aim of the present study was to evaluate the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with postinfectious acute cerebellar ataxia using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).
METHODS—Five children with postinfectious acute cerebellar ataxia and five control subjects were examined. The distribution of rCBF was measured by SPECT imaging after intravenous administration of 123I-IMP (111 MBq). The rCBF ratio—defined as the ratio of rCBF in the region of interest (ROI) to that in the occipital cortex—was calculated for each cortical and subcortical ROI. The mean rCBF ratio of each region was then compared between the ataxic and control subjects. These patients and all control subjects were also evaluated using MRI.
RESULTS—The rCBF ratio was significantly lower in the cerebellum of the ataxic patients than in the cerebellum of the control subjects (p<0.05). No abnormal cerebellar morphology and no abnormal signal intensities were found on MRI.
CONCLUSION—123I-IMP SPECT clearly demonstrated the decreased rCBF in the cerebellum of all patients with postinfectious acute cerebellar ataxia.

 PMID:10369834

  4. A rare case report of subscapular artery.

    PubMed

    Khaki, Amir Afshin; Shoja, M A Mohagjel; Khaki, Arash

    2011-01-01

    Axillary artery is one of the most important arteries of the upper limb, which is a continua- tion of the subclavian artery. It begins at the lateral border of the first rib and ends at the inferior border of the teres major where it becomes the brachial artery. Axillary artery has six important branches included: 1) Superior thoracic artery 2) Thoracoacromial artery 3) Lateral thoracic artery 4) Subscapular artery 5) Posterior circumflex humeral artery 6) Anterior circumflex humeral artery. Subscapular artery arises from the third part of axillary artery normally and then divides into cir- cumflex scapular artery that extremely enters the triangular space. The other branch of subscapular artery, the thoracodorsal artery, accompanies thracodorsal nerve to lateral border of scapula and supplies and innervates that region. In this case the subscapular artery was absent in both sides and instead of that the circumflex scapular artery was directly derived from axillary artery and the thoracodorsal artery is separated from circumflex scapular artery as a thin and short branch, too. It seemed that the lateral thoracic artery, which was thicker than its normal condition, supplied the muscles of the lateral part of scapula and the thoracodorsal muscle. Other branches of the axillary artery demonstrated without any abnormally. Since axillary artery has the highest rate of rapture and damage coming after the popliteal artery, knowing the variations is important and essential for surgeons, radiologist and anatomist.

  5. Orthostatic tremor: a cerebellar pathology?

    PubMed

    Gallea, Cécile; Popa, Traian; García-Lorenzo, Daniel; Valabregue, Romain; Legrand, André-Pierre; Apartis, Emmanuelle; Marais, Lea; Degos, Bertrand; Hubsch, Cecile; Fernández-Vidal, Sara; Bardinet, Eric; Roze, Emmanuel; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Meunier, Sabine; Vidailhet, Marie

    2016-08-01

    SEE MUTHURAMAN ET AL DOI101093/AWW164 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Primary orthostatic tremor is characterized by high frequency tremor affecting the legs and trunk during the standing position. Cerebellar defects were suggested in orthostatic tremor without direct evidence. We aimed to characterize the anatomo-functional defects of the cerebellar motor pathways in orthostatic tremor. We used multimodal neuroimaging to compare 17 patients with orthostatic tremor and 17 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers. Nine of the patients with orthostatic tremor underwent repetitive transcranial stimulation applied over the cerebellum during five consecutive days. We quantified the duration of standing position and tremor severity through electromyographic recordings. Compared to healthy volunteers, grey matter volume in patients with orthostatic tremor was (i) increased in the cerebellar vermis and correlated positively with the duration of the standing position; and (ii) increased in the supplementary motor area and decreased in the lateral cerebellum, which both correlated with the disease duration. Functional connectivity between the lateral cerebellum and the supplementary motor area was abnormally increased in patients with orthostatic tremor, and correlated positively with tremor severity. After repetitive transcranial stimulation, tremor severity and functional connectivity between the lateral cerebellum and the supplementary motor area were reduced. We provide an explanation for orthostatic tremor pathophysiology, and demonstrate the functional relevance of cerebello-thalamo-cortical connections in tremor related to cerebellar defects.

  6. Linking oscillations in cerebellar circuits

    PubMed Central

    Courtemanche, Richard; Robinson, Jennifer C.; Aponte, Daniel I.

    2013-01-01

    In many neuroscience fields, the study of local and global rhythmicity has been receiving increasing attention. These network influences could directly impact on how neuronal groups interact together, organizing for different contexts. The cerebellar cortex harbors a variety of such local circuit rhythms, from the rhythms in the cerebellar cortex per se, or those dictated from important afferents. We present here certain cerebellar oscillatory phenomena that have been recorded in rodents and primates. Those take place in a range of frequencies: from the more known oscillations in the 4–25 Hz band, such as the olivocerebellar oscillatory activity and the granule cell layer oscillations, to the more recently reported slow (<1 Hz oscillations), and the fast (>150 Hz) activity in the Purkinje cell layer. Many of these oscillations appear spontaneously in the circuits, and are modulated by behavioral imperatives. We review here how those oscillations are recorded, some of their modulatory mechanisms, and also identify some of the cerebellar nodes where they could interact. A particular emphasis has been placed on how these oscillations could be modulated by movement and certain neuropathological manifestations. Many of those oscillations could have a definite impact on the way information is processed in the cerebellum and how it interacts with other structures in a variety of contexts. PMID:23908606

  7. Speech Prosody in Cerebellar Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Maureen A.; Raphael, Lawrence J.; Harris, Katherine S.; Geibel, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy…

  8. Arterial hypertension with brachydactyly in a 15-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Litwin, Mieczysław; Jurkiewicz, Elzbieta; Nowak, Katarzyna; Kościesza, Andrzej; Grenda, Ryszard; Malczyk, Katarzyna; Kościesza, Iwona

    2003-08-01

    Autosomal dominant brachydactyly with hypertension is the only form of monogenic hypertension which is not sodium dependent. The disease is characterized by brachydactyly type E, short stature, arterial hypertension and aberrant loop of posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) causing neurovascular conflict. So far the syndrome was described in one family in Turkey and two in Canada. We report a case of a 15-year-old boy who was admitted because of arterial hypertension 160/100 mmHg. He complained also of attacks of bilateral numbness of hands with deterioration of visual field. Examination revealed short stature (156 cm) and bone deformities of hands and feet consistent with brachydactyly type E. Ophthalmoscopy showed mild narrowing of retinal arteries. Serum electrolytes, blood gases, and renal function were normal. Renin activity and aldosterone concentrations were raised, and 24-h urinary excretion of catecholamines and urinary steroid profile were in normal range. Renal Doppler ultrasound was normal, but renal scintigraphy suggested vascular changes in the left kidney. Echocardiographic examination, besides mild left ventricular hypertrophy, was normal. Magnetic resonance angiography (angio-MR) revealed bilateral abnormal PICA loops and neurovascular conflict. Spiral angiotomography of renal arteries revealed narrow additional left renal artery. Both nonconsanguineous parents and younger brother were healthy, with normal height, without bone deformities, and had normal intracranial vessels. Amlodipine and metoprolol were given, and blood pressure lowered to 143/87. Adding rilmenidine gave no effect and enalapril was then added. It led to further improvement in blood pressure control. To our knowledge, this is the first pediatric description of a sporadic form of autosomal dominant brachydactyly with hypertension with abnormalities of brain and renal arteries.

  9. Impaired Motor Learning in a Disorder of the Inferior Olive: Is the Cerebellum Confused?

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Aasef G; Wong, Aaron L; Optican, Lance M; Zee, David S

    2017-02-01

    An attractive hypothesis about how the brain learns to keep its motor commands accurate is centered on the idea that the cerebellar cortex associates error signals carried by climbing fibers with simultaneous activity in parallel fibers. Motor learning can be impaired if the error signals are not transmitted, are incorrect, or are misinterpreted by the cerebellar cortex. Learning might also be impaired if the brain is overwhelmed with a sustained barrage of meaningless information unrelated to simultaneously appearing error signals about incorrect performance. We test this concept in subjects with syndrome of oculopalatal tremor (OPT), a rare disease with spontaneous, irregular, roughly pendular oscillations of the eyes thought to reflect an abnormal, synchronous, spontaneous discharge to the cerebellum from the degenerating neurons in the inferior olive. We examined motor learning during a short-term, saccade adaptation paradigm in patients with OPT and found a unique pattern of disturbed adaptation, quite different from the abnormal adaption when the cerebellum is involved directly. Both fast (seconds) and slow (minutes) timescales of learning were impaired. We suggest that the spontaneous, continuous, synchronous output from the inferior olive prevents the cerebellum from receiving the error signals it needs for appropriate motor learning. The important message from this study is that impaired motor adaptation and resultant dysmetria is not the exclusive feature of cerebellar disorders, but it also highlights disorders of the inferior olive and its connections to the cerebellum.

  10. Diffusion Tensor Tractography of the Cerebellar Peduncles in Prematurely Born 7-Year-Old Children.

    PubMed

    Shany, Eilon; Inder, Terrie E; Goshen, Sharon; Lee, Iris; Neil, Jeffrey J; Smyser, Christopher D; Doyle, Lex W; Anderson, Peter J; Shimony, Joshua S

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to correlate neurodevelopmental outcome of preterm-born children and their perinatal clinical and imaging characteristics with diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of the three cerebellar peduncles at age 7. Included in this prospective longitudinal study were 140 preterm-born children (<30 weeks gestation) who underwent neurodevelopmental assessment (IQ, motor, language, working memory) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) at age 7 years. White matter tracts in the superior, middle, and inferior cerebellar peduncles were delineated using regions of interest drawn on T2-weighted images and fractional anisotropy (FA) maps. Diffusion measures (mean diffusivity (MD) and FA) and tract volumes were calculated. Linear regression was used to assess relationships with outcome. The severity of white matter injury in the neonatal period was associated with lower FA in the right superior cerebellar peduncle (SCP) and lower tract volumes of both SCPs and middle cerebellar peduncles (MCPs). In the MCP, higher IQ was associated with lower MD in the whole group and higher FA in right-handed children. In the SCP, lower motor scores were associated with higher MD and higher language scores were associated with higher FA. These associations remained significant in multivariable models. This study adds to the body of literature detailing the importance of cerebellar involvement in cognitive function related to reciprocal connections with supratentorial structures.

  11. Integration of Purkinje cell inhibition by cerebellar nucleo-olivary neurons.

    PubMed

    Najac, Marion; Raman, Indira M

    2015-01-14

    Neurons in the cerebellar cortex, cerebellar nuclei, and inferior olive (IO) form a trisynaptic loop critical for motor learning. IO neurons excite Purkinje cells via climbing fibers and depress their parallel fiber inputs. Purkinje cells inhibit diverse cells in the cerebellar nuclei, including small GABAergic nucleo-olivary neurons that project to the IO. To investigate how these neurons integrate synaptic signals from Purkinje cells, we retrogradely labeled nucleo-olivary cells in the contralateral interpositus and lateral nuclei with cholera toxin subunit B-Alexa Fluor 488 and recorded their electrophysiological properties in cerebellar slices from weanling mice. Nucleo-olivary cells fired action potentials over a relatively narrow dynamic range (maximal rate, ∼ 70 spikes/s), unlike large cells that project to premotor areas (maximal rate, ∼ 400 spikes/s). GABA(A) receptor-mediated IPSCs evoked by electrical or optogenetic stimulation of Purkinje cells were more than 10-fold slower in nucleo-olivary cells (decay time, ∼ 25 ms) than in large cells (∼ 2 ms), and repetitive stimulation at 20-150 Hz evoked greatly summating IPSCs. Nucleo-olivary firing rates varied inversely with IPSP frequency, and the timing of Purkinje IPSPs and nucleo-olivary spikes was uncorrelated. These attributes contrast with large cells, whose brief IPSCs and rapid firing rates can permit well timed postinhibitory spiking. Thus, the intrinsic and synaptic properties of these two projection neurons from the cerebellar nuclei tailor them for differential integration and transmission of their Purkinje cell input.

  12. Development of cerebellar connectivity in human fetal brains revealed by high angular resolution diffusion tractography.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Emi; Hayashi, Emiko; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Grant, P Ellen

    2014-08-01

    High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) tractography has provided insights into major white matter pathways and cortical development in the human fetal cerebrum. Our objective in this study was to further apply HARDI tracography to the developing human cerebellum ranging from fetal to adult stages, to outline in broad strokes the 3-dimensional development of white matter and local gray matter organization in the cerebellum. We imaged intact fixed fetal cerebellum specimens at 17 gestational weeks (W), 21W, 31W, 36W, and 38W along with an adult cerebellum for comparison. At the earliest gestational age studied (17W), coherent pathways that formed the superior, middle, and inferior cerebellar peduncles were already detected, but pathways between deep cerebellar nuclei and the cortex were not observed until after 38W. At 36-38W, we identified emerging regional specification of the middle cerebellar peduncle. In the cerebellar cortex, we observed disappearance of radial organization in the sagittal orientation during the studied developmental stages similar to our previous observations in developing cerebral cortex. In contrast, in the axial orientation, cerebellar cortical pathways emerged first sparsely (31W) and then with increased prominence at 36-38W with pathways detected both in the radial and tangential directions to the cortical surface. The cerebellar vermis first contained only pathways tangential to the long axes of folia (17-21W), but pathways parallel to the long axes of folia emerged between 21 and 31W. Our results show the potential for HARDI tractography to image developing human cerebellar connectivity.

  13. Duplicated middle cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Perez, Jesus; Machado, Calixto; Scherle, Claudio; Hierro, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Duplicated middle cerebral artery (DMCA) is an anomalous vessel arising from the internal carotid artery. The incidence DMCA is relatively law, and an association between this anomaly and cerebral aneurysms has been documented. There is a controversy whether DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is an important fact to consider in aneurysm surgery. We report the case of a 34-year-old black woman who suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage and the angiography a left DMCA, and an aneurysm in an inferior branch of the main MCA. The DMCA and the MCA had perforating arteries. The aneurysm was clipped without complications. The observation of perforating arteries in our patient confirms that the DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is very important to be considered in cerebral aneurysms surgery. Moreover, the DMCA may potentially serve as a collateral blood supply to the MCA territory in cases of MCA occlusion.

  14. Ovarian arteries with bilateral unusual courses.

    PubMed

    Sulak, Osman; Albay, Soner; Tagil, Suleyman M; Malas, Mehmet A

    2005-09-01

    Bilateral unusual coursed ovarian arteries were found in a 45-year-old female cadaver. The ovarian arteries arose from the abdominal aorta at a level inferior to the corpus of L1 vertebra bilaterally. The right ovarian artery was coursing behind the inferior vena cava. The left one was coursing between the left renal artery and vein upward to the level of the inferior part of the body of Th12 vertebra. At the level of Th12 vertebra, it turned caudally and proceeded downward between the anterior-inferior and posterior segmental renal veins. On both sides, ovarian arteries were on their normal routes below the L2 vertebra accompanying the ovarian veins. The variation determined by this study would reduce possible complications of nephrectomy operations that urologists, gynecologists and other related surgeons may encounter.

  15. Cochlear implantation following cerebellar surgery.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Shahad; Mawman, Deborah; Green, Kevin

    2011-08-01

    Cochlear implantation in patients with known central nervous system conditions can result in wide-ranging outcomes. The aim of this study is to report two cases of cochlear implantation outcomes in patients with acquired cerebellar ataxia following cerebellar surgery. The first is a female implanted with the Nucleus 24 implant in September 2000 and the second is a male implanted with a MED-EL Sonata Flexsoft electro-acoustic stimulation in July 2009. Programming these patients resulted in significant non-auditory stimulation which resulted in less than optimum map fittings. The patients did not gain any open set speech perception benefit although both of them gained an awareness of sound with the device. However, patient 2 elected to become a non-user because of the limited benefit.

  16. Nonsurgical cerebellar mutism (anarthria) in two children.

    PubMed

    Mewasingh, Leena D; Kadhim, Hazim; Christophe, Catherine; Christiaens, Florence J; Dan, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism (anarthria) is a well-described complication of posterior fossa tumor resection. It is accompanied by a characteristic behavior including irritability and autistic features. This syndrome is typically reversible within days to months. Underlying pathophysiology is unknown. We describe two children who presented with a similar clinical finding after nonsurgical cerebellar involvement, hemolytic-uremic syndrome in one and cerebellitis in the other. Postmortem pathologic findings in the first patient indicated cerebellar ischemic necrosis. Single-photon emission computed tomography in the second patient revealed diffuse cerebellar hypoperfusion with no supratentorial abnormalities, refuting a phenomenon of diaschisis between cerebellar and frontal connections. These findings confirm that this clinical syndrome may occur in a nonsurgical, nontraumatic context. They are consistent with recent integrative hypotheses explaining cerebellar anarthria.

  17. Intracranial arterial and arteriovenous malformations presenting with infarction. Lausanne Stroke Registry study.

    PubMed

    Herzig, R; Bogousslavsky, J; Maeder, P; Maeder-Ingvar, M; Reichhart, M; Urbano, L A; Leemann, B

    2005-02-01

    Cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are well-known sources of intracranial hemorrhage, but can also manifest as other clinical symptoms or remain clinically asymptomatic. The aim was to document and analyze cases of aneurysm or AVM with brain infarction. Survey on 4804 stroke patients treated at the Department of Neurology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland between 1978 and 2000 using the Lausanne Stroke Registry. Twenty patients presented with cerebral aneurysm and 21 with cerebral AVM. Hemorrhage was present in 100% of the AVM and in 75% of the aneurysm patients; in one (5%) of the remaining aneurysm patients, aneurysm and infarction were located in different territories. Infarction associated with Sylvian artery aneurysm was found in three (15%), vertebrobasilar ischemia because of fusiform left vertebral artery aneurysm in one (5%), and dural fistula draining to the distal transversal and left sigmoid sinus associated with a stroke in the territory of the left anterior inferior cerebellar artery in one patient. Ischemic stroke is infrequent, but important, complication in unruptured intracranial aneurysms and AVMs. The early recognition and therapy of these vascular malformations in selected patients can avoid a major neurological deficit or death caused by their rupture.

  18. Inferior ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction Associated with Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Koeth, Oliver; Zeymer, Uwe; Schiele, Rudolf; Zahn, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) is usually characterized by transient left ventricular apical ballooning. Due to the clinical symptoms which include chest pain, electrocardiographic changes, and elevated myocardial markers, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is frequently mimicking ST-elevation myocardial infarction in the absence of a significant coronary artery disease. Otherwise an acute occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery can produce a typical Takotsubo contraction pattern. ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is frequently associated with emotional stress, but to date no cases of STEMI triggering TCM have been reported. We describe a case of a female patient with inferior ST-elevation myocardial infarction complicated by TCM. PMID:20811565

  19. Genetics Home Reference: VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description VLDLR -associated cerebellar hypoplasia is an inherited condition that affects the development ...

  20. Development of the cerebellar afferent system in the shark Scyliorhinus canicula: insights into the basal organization of precerebellar nuclei in gnathostomes.

    PubMed

    Pose-Méndez, Sol; Candal, Eva; Adrio, Fátima; Rodríguez-Moldes, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is recognized as an evolutionary innovation of jawed vertebrates, whose most primitive group is represented by the chondrichthyans, or cartilaginous fishes. A comprehensive knowledge of cerebellar connections in these fishes might shed light on the basal organization of the cerebellar system. Although the organization of the precerebellar system is known in adults, developmental studies are essential for understanding the origin and evolution of precerebellar nuclei. In the present work we performed a developmental study of cerebellar connections in embryos and juveniles of an advanced shark species, Scyliorhinus canicula, by application of tract tracing in combination with immunohistochemical techniques. Main precerebellar cell populations were located in the diencephalon (pretectum and thalamus), mesencephalon (reticular formation and nucleus ruber), rhombencephalon (cerebellar nucleus, reticular formation, and inferior olive), and spinal cord (ventral horn). The order of arrival of cerebellar afferent projections throughout development revealed a common pattern with other jawed vertebrates, which was helpful for comparison of stages of cerebellar development. The neurochemical study of the inferior olive and other precerebellar nuclei revealed many shared features with other gnathostomes. Furthermore, because many precerebellar nuclei originate from rhombic lips, the first analysis of neuronal migrations from these lips was performed with markers of neuroblasts. The shared features of development and organization of precerebellar connections observed between sharks and amniotes suggest that their basic pattern was established early in gnathostome evolution.

  1. Different subregional metabolism patterns in patients with cerebellar ataxia by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Oh, Minyoung; Kim, Jae Seung; Oh, Jungsu S; Lee, Chong Sik; Chung, Sun Ju

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated cerebellar subregional metabolic alterations in patients with cerebellar ataxia, a representative disease involving the spinocerebellum. We retrospectively analyzed 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) images in 44 patients with multiple system atrophy of the cerebellar type (MSA-C), 9 patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) type 2, and 14 patients with SCA type 6 and compared with 15 patients with crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) and 89 normal controls. Cerebellar subregional metabolism was assessed using 13 cerebellar subregions (bilateral anterior lobes [ANT], superior/mid/inferior posterior lobes [SUPP/MIDP/INFP], dentate nucleus [DN], anterior vermis [ANTV], and superior/inferior posterior vermis [SUPV/INFV]) to determine FDG uptake ratios. MSA-C and SCA type 2 showed severely decreased metabolic ratios in all cerebellar subregions compared to normal controls (ANT, 0.58 ± 0.08 and 0.50 ± 0.06 vs. 0.82 ± 0.07, respectively, p < 0.001). SCA type 6 showed lower metabolic ratios in almost all cerebellar subregions (ANT, 0.57 ± 0.06, p < 0.001) except INFV. Anterior-posterior lobe ratio measurements revealed that SCA type 2 (Right, 0.81 ± 0.05 vs. 0.88 ± 0.04, p < 0.001; Left, 0.83 ± 0.05 vs. 0.88 ± 0.04, p = 0.003) and SCA type 6 (Right, 0.72 ± 0.05 vs. 0.88 ± 0.04, p < 0.001; Left, 0.72 ± 0.05 vs. 0.88 ± 0.04, p < 0.001) showed preferential hypometabolism in the anterior lobe compared to normal controls, which was not observed in CCD and MSA-C. Asymmetric indices were higher in CCD and MSA-C than in normal controls (p < 0.001), whereas such differences were not found in SCA types 2 and 6. In summary, quantitative analysis of cerebellar subregional metabolism ratios revealed preferential involvement of the anterior lobe, corresponding to the spinocerebellum, in patients with cerebellar ataxia, whereas patients with CCD and MSA-C exhibited more asymmetric hypometabolism in the posterior lobe.

  2. Different subregional metabolism patterns in patients with cerebellar ataxia by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Seung; Oh, Jungsu S.; Lee, Chong Sik; Chung, Sun Ju

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated cerebellar subregional metabolic alterations in patients with cerebellar ataxia, a representative disease involving the spinocerebellum. We retrospectively analyzed 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) images in 44 patients with multiple system atrophy of the cerebellar type (MSA-C), 9 patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) type 2, and 14 patients with SCA type 6 and compared with 15 patients with crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) and 89 normal controls. Cerebellar subregional metabolism was assessed using 13 cerebellar subregions (bilateral anterior lobes [ANT], superior/mid/inferior posterior lobes [SUPP/MIDP/INFP], dentate nucleus [DN], anterior vermis [ANTV], and superior/inferior posterior vermis [SUPV/INFV]) to determine FDG uptake ratios. MSA-C and SCA type 2 showed severely decreased metabolic ratios in all cerebellar subregions compared to normal controls (ANT, 0.58 ± 0.08 and 0.50 ± 0.06 vs. 0.82 ± 0.07, respectively, p < 0.001). SCA type 6 showed lower metabolic ratios in almost all cerebellar subregions (ANT, 0.57 ± 0.06, p < 0.001) except INFV. Anterior-posterior lobe ratio measurements revealed that SCA type 2 (Right, 0.81 ± 0.05 vs. 0.88 ± 0.04, p < 0.001; Left, 0.83 ± 0.05 vs. 0.88 ± 0.04, p = 0.003) and SCA type 6 (Right, 0.72 ± 0.05 vs. 0.88 ± 0.04, p < 0.001; Left, 0.72 ± 0.05 vs. 0.88 ± 0.04, p < 0.001) showed preferential hypometabolism in the anterior lobe compared to normal controls, which was not observed in CCD and MSA-C. Asymmetric indices were higher in CCD and MSA-C than in normal controls (p < 0.001), whereas such differences were not found in SCA types 2 and 6. In summary, quantitative analysis of cerebellar subregional metabolism ratios revealed preferential involvement of the anterior lobe, corresponding to the spinocerebellum, in patients with cerebellar ataxia, whereas patients with CCD and MSA-C exhibited more asymmetric hypometabolism in the posterior lobe. PMID:28319124

  3. Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (ctDCS)

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Argyropoulos, Georgios P.; Bastian, Amy; Cortes, Mar; Davis, Nicholas J.; Edwards, Dylan J.; Ferrucci, Roberta; Fregni, Felipe; Galea, Joseph M.; Hamada, Masahi; Manto, Mario; Miall, R. Chris; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Pope, Paul A.; Priori, Alberto; Rothwell, John; Tomlinson, S. Paul; Celnik, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellum is critical for both motor and cognitive control. Dysfunction of the cerebellum is a component of multiple neurological disorders. In recent years, interventions have been developed that aim to excite or inhibit the activity and function of the human cerebellum. Transcranial direct current stimulation of the cerebellum (ctDCS) promises to be a powerful tool for the modulation of cerebellar excitability. This technique has gained popularity in recent years as it can be used to investigate human cerebellar function, is easily delivered, is well tolerated, and has not shown serious adverse effects. Importantly, the ability of ctDCS to modify behavior makes it an interesting approach with a potential therapeutic role for neurological patients. Through both electrical and non-electrical effects (vascular, metabolic) ctDCS is thought to modify the activity of the cerebellum and alter the output from cerebellar nuclei. Physiological studies have shown a polarity-specific effect on the modulation of cerebellar–motor cortex connectivity, likely via cerebellar–thalamocortical pathways. Modeling studies that have assessed commonly used electrode montages have shown that the ctDCS-generated electric field reaches the human cerebellum with little diffusion to neighboring structures. The posterior and inferior parts of the cerebellum (i.e., lobules VI-VIII) seem particularly susceptible to modulation by ctDCS. Numerous studies have shown to date that ctDCS can modulate motor learning, and affect cognitive and emotional processes. Importantly, this intervention has a good safety profile; similar to when applied over cerebral areas. Thus, investigations have begun exploring ctDCS as a viable intervention for patients with neurological conditions. PMID:25406224

  4. Active integration of glutamatergic input to the inferior olive generates bidirectional postsynaptic potentials

    PubMed Central

    Garden, Derek L. F.; Rinaldi, Arianna

    2016-01-01

    Key points We establish experimental preparations for optogenetic investigation of glutamatergic input to the inferior olive.Neurones in the principal olivary nucleus receive monosynaptic extra‐somatic glutamatergic input from the neocortex.Glutamatergic inputs to neurones in the inferior olive generate bidirectional postsynaptic potentials (PSPs), with a fast excitatory component followed by a slower inhibitory component.Small conductance calcium‐activated potassium (SK) channels are required for the slow inhibitory component of glutamatergic PSPs and oppose temporal summation of inputs at intervals ≤ 20 ms.Active integration of synaptic input within the inferior olive may play a central role in control of olivo‐cerebellar climbing fibre signals. Abstract The inferior olive plays a critical role in motor coordination and learning by integrating diverse afferent signals to generate climbing fibre inputs to the cerebellar cortex. While it is well established that climbing fibre signals are important for motor coordination, the mechanisms by which neurones in the inferior olive integrate synaptic inputs and the roles of particular ion channels are unclear. Here, we test the hypothesis that neurones in the inferior olive actively integrate glutamatergic synaptic inputs. We demonstrate that optogenetically activated long‐range synaptic inputs to the inferior olive, including projections from the motor cortex, generate rapid excitatory potentials followed by slower inhibitory potentials. Synaptic projections from the motor cortex preferentially target the principal olivary nucleus. We show that inhibitory and excitatory components of the bidirectional synaptic potentials are dependent upon AMPA (GluA) receptors, are GABAA independent, and originate from the same presynaptic axons. Consistent with models that predict active integration of synaptic inputs by inferior olive neurones, we find that the inhibitory component is reduced by blocking large conductance

  5. Factors involved in the antinatriuretic effects of acute constriction of the thoracic and abdominal inferior vena cava.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the antinatriuretic effect of acute thoracic inferior vena cava (TIVC) constriction in the absence of alterations in renal perfusion pressure. A comparison is made of the effects of equivalent degrees of TIVC and abdominal inferior vena cava constriction on arterial pressure, renal hemodynamics, and electrolyte excretion.

  6. Learning of Sensory Sequences in Cerebellar Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frings, Markus; Boenisch, Raoul; Gerwig, Marcus; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Timmann, Dagmar

    2004-01-01

    A possible role of the cerebellum in detecting and recognizing event sequences has been proposed. The present study sought to determine whether patients with cerebellar lesions are impaired in the acquisition and discrimination of sequences of sensory stimuli of different modalities. A group of 26 cerebellar patients and 26 controls matched for…

  7. Acute cerebellar ataxia and infectious mononucleosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, N. K.; Ghose, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    A 28-year-old man, who presented with acute cerebellar ataxia, was found to have haematological features of infectious mononucleosis. There was serological evidence of recent infection with Epstein-Barr virus. It is speculated that cerebellar dysfunction results from virus-induced inflammatory changes within the central nervous system. PMID:6312442

  8. Consensus Paper: Management of Degenerative Cerebellar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ilg, W.; Bastian, A. J.; Boesch, S.; Burciu, R. G.; Celnik, P.; Claaßen, J.; Feil, K.; Kalla, R.; Miyai, I.; Nachbauer, W.; Schöls, L.; Strupp, M.; Synofzik, M.; Teufel, J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of motor symptoms of degenerative cerebellar ataxia remains difficult. Yet there are recent developments that are likely to lead to significant improvements in the future. Most desirable would be a causative treatment of the underlying cerebellar disease. This is currently available only for a very small subset of cerebellar ataxias with known metabolic dysfunction. However, increasing knowledge of the pathophysiology of hereditary ataxia should lead to an increasing number of medically sensible drug trials. In this paper, data from recent drug trials in patients with recessive and dominant cerebellar ataxias will be summarized. There is consensus that up to date, no medication has been proven effective. Aminopyridines and acetazolamide are the only exception, which are beneficial in patients with episodic ataxia type 2. Aminopyridines are also effective in a subset of patients presenting with downbeat nystagmus. As such, all authors agreed that the mainstays of treatment of degenerative cerebellar ataxia are currently physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy. For many years, well-controlled rehabilitation studies in patients with cerebellar ataxia were lacking. Data of recently published studies show that coordinative training improves motor function in both adult and juvenile patients with cerebellar degeneration. Given the well-known contribution of the cerebellum to motor learning, possible mechanisms underlying improvement will be outlined. There is consensus that evidence-based guidelines for the physiotherapy of degenerative cerebellar ataxia need to be developed. Future developments in physiotherapeutical interventions will be discussed including application of non-invasive brain stimulation. PMID:24222635

  9. Simulation of the Inferior Mirage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branca, Mario

    2010-09-01

    A mirage can occur when a continuous variation in the refractive index of the air causes light rays to follow a curved path. As a result, the image we see is displaced from the location of the object. If the image appears higher in the air than the object, it is called a "superior" mirage, while if it appears lower it is called an "inferior" mirage.2 The most common example of an inferior mirage is when, on a hot day, a stretch of dry road off in the distance appears to be wet (see Fig. 1). Many lab activities have been described that simulate the formation of superior mirages. In these demonstrations light beams curve downward as they pass through a nonuni-form fluid.3-6 Much less common are laboratory demonstrations of upward-curving light rays of the kind responsible for inferior mirages. This paper describes a simple version of such a demonstration.

  10. Metronidazole-Induced Cerebellar Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Sabat, Shyam; Thamburaj, Krishnamurthy

    2016-01-01

    Metronidazole is a very common antibacterial and antiprotozoal with wide usage across the globe, including the least developed countries. It is generally well-tolerated with a low incidence of serious side-effects. Neurological toxicity is fairly common with this drug, however majority of these are peripheral neuropathy with very few cases of central nervous toxicity reported. We report the imaging findings in two patients with cerebellar dysfunction after Metronidazole usage. Signal changes in the dentate and red nucleus were seen on magnetic resonance imaging in these patients. Most of the cases reported in literature reported similar findings, suggesting high predilection for the dentate nucleus in metronidazole induced encephalopathy. PMID:27127600

  11. A cerebellar model for predictive motor control tested in a brain-based device.

    PubMed

    McKinstry, Jeffrey L; Edelman, Gerald M; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2006-02-28

    The cerebellum is known to be critical for accurate adaptive control and motor learning. We propose here a mechanism by which the cerebellum may replace reflex control with predictive control. This mechanism is embedded in a learning rule (the delayed eligibility trace rule) in which synapses onto a Purkinje cell or onto a cell in the deep cerebellar nuclei become eligible for plasticity only after a fixed delay from the onset of suprathreshold presynaptic activity. To investigate the proposal that the cerebellum is a general-purpose predictive controller guided by a delayed eligibility trace rule, a computer model based on the anatomy and dynamics of the cerebellum was constructed. It contained components simulating cerebellar cortex and deep cerebellar nuclei, and it received input from a middle temporal visual area and the inferior olive. The model was incorporated in a real-world brain-based device (BBD) built on a Segway robotic platform that learned to traverse curved paths. The BBD learned which visual motion cues predicted impending collisions and used this experience to avoid path boundaries. During learning, the BBD adapted its velocity and turning rate to successfully traverse various curved paths. By examining neuronal activity and synaptic changes during this behavior, we found that the cerebellar circuit selectively responded to motion cues in specific receptive fields of simulated middle temporal visual areas. The system described here prompts several hypotheses about the relationship between perception and motor control and may be useful in the development of general-purpose motor learning systems for machines.

  12. Neuroprotective Role of Liver Growth Factor “LGF” in an Experimental Model of Cerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Calatrava-Ferreras, Lucía; Gonzalo-Gobernado, Rafael; Reimers, Diana; Herranz, Antonio S.; Jiménez-Escrig, Adriano; Díaz-Gil, Juan José; Casarejos, María José; Montero-Vega, María Teresa; Bazán, Eulalia

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias (CA) comprise a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by a lack of motor coordination. They are caused by disturbances in the cerebellum and its associated circuitries, so the major therapeutic goal is to correct cerebellar dysfunction. Neurotrophic factors enhance the survival and differentiation of selected types of neurons. Liver growth factor (LGF) is a hepatic mitogen that shows biological activity in neuroregenerative therapies. We investigate the potential therapeutic activity of LGF in the 3-acetylpiridine (3-AP) rat model of CA. This model of CA consists in the lesion of the inferior olive-induced by 3-AP (40 mg/kg). Ataxic rats were treated with 5 µg/rat LGF or vehicle during 3 weeks, analyzing: (a) motor coordination by using the rota-rod test; and (b) the immunohistochemical and biochemical evolution of several parameters related with the olivo-cerebellar function. Motor coordination improved in 3-AP-lesioned rats that received LGF treatment. LGF up-regulated NeuN and Bcl-2 protein levels in the brainstem, and increased calbindin expression and the number of neurons receiving calbindin-positive projections in the cerebellum. LGF also reduced extracellular glutamate and GABA concentrations and microglia activation in the cerebellum. In view of these results, we propose LGF as a potential therapeutic agent in cerebellar ataxias. PMID:25338046

  13. Cerebellar Stroke-manifesting as Mania

    PubMed Central

    Jagadesan, Venkatesan; Thiruvengadam, Kannapiran R.; Muralidharan, Rengarajalu

    2014-01-01

    Secondary mania resulting from cerebral Cortex are described commonly. But secondary mania produced by cerebellar lesions are relatively uncommon. This case report describes a patient who developed cerebellar stoke and manic features simultaneously. 28 years old male developed giddiness and projectile vomiting. Then he would lie down for about an hour only to find that he could not walk. He became quarrelsome. His Psycho motor activities and speech were increased. He was euphoric and was expressing grandiose ideas. Bender Gestalt Test showed signs of organicity. Score in Young mania relating scale was 32; productivity was low in Rorschach. Neurological examination revealed left cerebellar signs like ataxia and slurring of speech. Computed tomography of brain showed left cerebellar infarct. Relationship between Psychiatric manifestations and cerebellar lesion are discussed. PMID:25035567

  14. Inferior angle of the scapula as a vascularized bone graft: an anatomic study.

    PubMed

    Sundine, M J; Sharobaro, V I; Ljubic, I; Acland, R D; Tobin, G R

    2000-04-01

    In reconstructing patients with massive midface losses, the authors required a vascularized bone graft that could be used to reconstruct the palate and orbital floor, provide vertical maxillary support, and provide soft tissue. The inferior angle of the scapula appears to be a promising source of vascularized bone stock, and until now, there has been no clear description of its vascular anatomy. The purpose of this study was to define the vascular anatomy of the inferior angle of the scapula. Thirteen fresh cadavers were studied. The subscapular artery was injected with Microfil (Flow Tec, Carver, MA) at its origin. Two branches of the subscapular artery were found to converge on the angle of the scapula: the descending osseous branch of the circumflex scapular, and the transverse branch of the thoracodorsal. The descending osseous branch of the circumflex scapular artery supplied the inferior angle of the scapula in 100 percent of cases. The transverse branch of the thoracodorsal artery supplied it in 76 percent of cases. The descending osseous branch of the circumflex scapular artery is the principal artery supplying the inferior angle of the scapula.

  15. White matter integrity of cerebellar-cortical tracts in reading impaired children: A probabilistic tractography study

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Vindia G.; Juranek, Jenifer; Romanowska-Pawliczek, Anna; Stuebing, Karla; Williams, Victoria J.; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the white matter integrity of cerebellar-cortical pathways in individuals with dyslexia. Building on previous findings of decreased volume in the anterior lobe of the cerebellum, we utilized novel cerebellar segmentation procedures and probabilistic tractography to examine tracts that connect the anterior lobe of the cerebellum and cortical regions typically associated with reading: the temporoparietal (TP), occipitotemporal (OT), and inferior frontal (IF) regions. The sample included 29 reading impaired children and 27 typical readers. We found greater fractional anisotropy (FA) for the poor readers in tracts connecting the cerebellum with TP and IF regions relative to typical readers. In the OT region, FA was greater for the older poor readers, but smaller for the younger ones. This study provides evidence for discrete, regionally-bound functions of the cerebellum and suggests that projections from the anterior cerebellum appear to have a regulatory effect on cortical pathways important for reading. PMID:26307492

  16. Arnold-Chiari malformation type 1 complicated by sudden onset anterior spinal artery thrombosis, tetraparesis and respiratory arrest.

    PubMed

    Wani, Abdul Majid; Zayyani, Najah R; Al Miamini, Wail; Khoujah, Amer M; Alharbi, Zeyad; Diari, Mohd S

    2011-04-15

    Chiari in 1891 described a constellation of anomalies at the base of the brain inherited congenitally, the characteristic of which are (1) extension of a tongue of cerebellar tissue posterior to the medulla and cord that extends into the cervical spinal canal; (2) caudal displacement of the medulla and the inferior part of the fourth ventricle into the cervical canal; and (3) a frequent but not invariable association with syringomyelia or a spinal developmental abnormality. Chiari recognized four types of abnormalities. Presently, the term has come to be restricted to Chiari's types I and II, that is, to cerebellomedullary descent without and with a meningomyelocele, respectively. The association of Arnold-Chairi malformation and high cervical cord infarction is unusual. The most common syndrome, anterior spinal artery syndrome (ASAS), is caused by interruption of blood flow to the anterior spinal artery, producing ischaemia in the anterior two-thirds of the cord, with resulting neurologic deficits. Causes of ASAS include aortic disease, postsurgical, sepsis, hypotension and thromboembolic disorders. The authors present an interesting case of cervical cord infarction due to anterior spinal artery thrombosis in a patient of type 1 Arnold-Chiari malformation without any of the above predisposing factors.

  17. [Memory transfer in cerebellar motor learning].

    PubMed

    Nagao, Soichi

    2012-01-01

    Most of our motor skills are acquired through learning. Experiments of gain adaptation of ocular reflexes have consistently suggested that the memory of adaptation is initially formed in the cerebellar cortex, and is transferred to the cerebellar (vestibular) nuclei for consolidation to long-term memory after repetitions of training. We have recently developed a new system to evaluate the motor learning in human subjects using prism adaptation of hand reaching movement, by referring to the prism adaptation of dart throwing of Martin et al. (1996). In our system, the subject views the small target presented in the touch-panel screen, and touches it with his/her finger without direct visual feedback. After 15-30 trials of touching wearing prisms, an adaptation occurs in healthy subjects: they became able to touch the target correctly. Meanwhile, such an adaptation was impaired in patients of cerebellar disease. We have proposed a model of human prism adaptation that the memory of adaptation is initially encoded in the cerebellar cortex, and is later transferred to the cerebellar nuclei after repetitions of training. The memory in the cerebellar cortex may be formed and extinguished independently of the memory maintained in the cerebellar nuclei, and these two memories work cooperatively.

  18. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Large Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Aneurysm with Mechanically Detachable Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Toshiya Fujimoto, Yukinori; Jin, Myeong Jun; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2004-03-15

    Large aneurysms (5.5 and 3.6 cm in diameter) arising from the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery located just near the main superior mesenteric artery were incidentally diagnosed in two patients. Transcatheter arterial embolization, packing mechanically detachable coils and microcoils into the aneurysms, was performed while the inflated balloon catheter was placed near the neck of the aneurysms. The procedures were successfully performed and no aneurysmal rupture or bowel ischemia was noted during follow-up. Balloon-assisted transcatheter arterial embolization with mechanically detachable coils seems to be an effective and safe treatment for large inferior pancreaticoduodenal aneurysms.

  19. Cerebellar cortex development in the weaver condition presents regional and age-dependent abnormalities without differences in Purkinje cells neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Martí, Joaquín; Santa-Cruz, María C; Hervás, José P; Bayer, Shirley A; Villegas, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Ataxias are neurological disorders associated with the degeneration of Purkinje cells (PCs). Homozygous weaver mice (wv/wv) have been proposed as a model for hereditary cerebellar ataxia because they present motor abnormalities and PC loss. To ascertain the physiopathology of the weaver condition, the development of the cerebellar cortex lobes was examined at postnatal day (P): P8, P20 and P90. Three approaches were used: 1) quantitative determination of several cerebellar features; 2) qualitative evaluation of the developmental changes occurring in the cortical lobes; and 3) autoradiographic analyses of PC generation and placement. Our results revealed a reduction in the size of the wv/wv cerebellum as a whole, confirming previous results. However, as distinguished from these reports, we observed that quantified parameters contribute differently to the abnormal growth of the wv/wv cerebellar lobes. Qualitative analysis showed anomalies in wv/wv cerebellar cytoarchitecture, depending on the age and lobe analyzed. Such abnormalities included the presence of the external granular layer after P20 and, at P90, ectopic cells located in the molecular layer following several placement patterns. Finally, we obtained autoradiographic evidence that wild-type and wv/wv PCs presented similar neurogenetic timetables, as reported. However, the innovative character of this current work lies in the fact that the neurogenetic gradients of wv/wv PCs were not modified from P8 to P90. A tendency for the accumulation of late-formed PCs in the anterior and posterior lobes was found, whereas early-generated PCs were concentrated in the central and inferior lobes. These data suggested that wv/wv PCs may migrate properly to their final destinations. The extrapolation of our results to patients affected with cerebellar ataxias suggests that all cerebellar cortex lobes are affected with several age-dependent alterations in cytoarchitectonics. We also propose that PC loss may be regionally

  20. Sonic hedgehog patterning during cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Annarita; Cerrato, Valentina; Fucà, Elisa; Parmigiani, Elena; Buffo, Annalisa; Leto, Ketty

    2016-01-01

    The morphogenic factor sonic hedgehog (Shh) actively orchestrates many aspects of cerebellar development and maturation. During embryogenesis, Shh signaling is active in the ventricular germinal zone (VZ) and represents an essential signal for proliferation of VZ-derived progenitors. Later, Shh secreted by Purkinje cells sustains the amplification of postnatal neurogenic niches: the external granular layer and the prospective white matter, where excitatory granule cells and inhibitory interneurons are produced, respectively. Moreover, Shh signaling affects Bergmann glial differentiation and promotes cerebellar foliation during development. Here we review the most relevant functions of Shh during cerebellar ontogenesis, underlying its role in physiological and pathological conditions.

  1. Simultaneous occurrence of internal capsule infarct and cerebellar haemorrhage in a patient with hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Pande, Nikhil; Vivek, Ganapathiraman; Hande, Manjunath; Acharya, Vasudeva

    2014-01-09

    A 68-year-old woman with hypertension with no history of cerebrovascular events presented with a left-sided hemiplegia which had developed acutely 2 days ago. She was not on maintenance therapy with antiplatelets or anticoagulants. A CT scan showed acute ischaemic infarction of the right internal capsule and cerebellar haemorrhage. Cardiac evaluation was normal. Doppler ultrasonography of the extracranial carotid and vertebral arteries showed diffuse arteriosclerotic changes, but did not reveal any haemodynamic occlusion. The simultaneous development of dual strokes was considered to be an extension of the same arteriosclerotic process to the intracranial carotid and basilar arteries.

  2. [A case of brainstem and cerebellar infarctions related to basilar impression].

    PubMed

    Kasai, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Kenji; Tachibana, Shunji; Taniguchi, Takuya; Nakagawa, Masanori

    2004-03-01

    We report a 30-year-old man presenting with medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) syndrome after an afternoon nap. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a right medial pontine tegmental infarction and right cerebellar infarctions. This patient was complicated with basilar impression detected on cervical X-ray and MRI. Three-dimensional CT angiography disclosed that the odontoid process migrated into the posterior fossa, thrusting the bilateral vertebral arteries postero-laterally. The mechanical stress on the bilateral vertebral arteries may have caused infarctions in the territories of the posterior circulation of this patient with basilar impression.

  3. Cystic cerebellar astrocytomas in childhood.

    PubMed

    Griffin, T W; Beaufait, D; Blasko, J C

    1979-07-01

    Thirty-nine patients with low grade cystic cerebellar astrocytomas were treated at the University of Washington and Children's Orthopedic Hospital in Seattle, Washington, between 1955 and 1977; 29 were treated with partial or complete resection alone, and 10 received radiation therapy after various types of surgical procedures. With a mean follow-up time of 7 years, the survival rate for patients who had complete resections of their primary disease was 100%. The relapse-free survival rate was 82%. The relapse-free survival rate for patients treated primarily with partial resection alone was 36%. Postoperative irradiation after partial resection for both primary and recurrent disease resulted in a relapse-free survival rate of 83%. If complete tumor excision is not possible, postoperative radiation therapy is recommended following partial resection.

  4. Simulation of the Inferior Mirage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branca, Mario

    2010-01-01

    A mirage can occur when a continuous variation in the refractive index of the air causes light rays to follow a curved path. As a result, the image we see is displaced from the location of the object. If the image appears higher in the air than the object, it is called a "superior" mirage, while if it appears lower it is called an "inferior"…

  5. Consensus Paper: Radiological Biomarkers of Cerebellar Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Baldarçara, Leonardo; Currie, Stuart; Hadjivassiliou, M.; Hoggard, Nigel; Jack, Allison; Jackowski, Andrea P.; Mascalchi, Mario; Parazzini, Cecilia; Reetz, Kathrin; Righini, Andrea; Schulz, Jörg B.; Vella, Alessandra; Webb, Sara Jane; Habas, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary and sporadic cerebellar ataxias represent a vast and still growing group of diseases whose diagnosis and differentiation cannot only rely on clinical evaluation. Brain imaging including magnetic resonance (MR) and nuclear medicine techniques allows for characterization of structural and functional abnormalities underlying symptomatic ataxias. These methods thus constitute a potential source of radiological biomarkers, which could be used to identify these diseases and differentiate subgroups of them, and to assess their severity and their evolution. Such biomarkers mainly comprise qualitative and quantitative data obtained from MR including proton spectroscopy, diffusion imaging, tractography, voxel-based morphometry, functional imaging during task execution or in a resting state, and from SPETC and PET with several radiotracers. In the current article, we aim to illustrate briefly some applications of these neuroimaging tools to evaluation of cerebellar disorders such as inherited cerebellar ataxia, fetal developmental malformations, and immune-mediated cerebellar diseases and of neurodegenerative or early-developing diseases, such as dementia and autism in which cerebellar involvement is an emerging feature. Although these radiological biomarkers appear promising and helpful to better understand ataxia-related anatomical and physiological impairments, to date, very few of them have turned out to be specific for a given ataxia with atrophy of the cerebellar system being the main and the most usual alteration being observed. Consequently, much remains to be done to establish sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of available MR and nuclear medicine features as diagnostic, progression and surrogate biomarkers in clinical routine. PMID:25382714

  6. Molecular mechanisms governing competitive synaptic wiring in cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masahiko

    2008-03-01

    Cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) play a principal role in motor coordination and motor learning. To fulfill these functions, PCs receive and integrate two types of excitatory inputs, climbing fiber (CF) and parallel fiber (PF). CFs are projection axons from the inferior olive, and convey error signals to PCs. On the other hand, PFs are T-shaped axons of cerebellar granule cells, and convey sensory and motor information carried through the pontocerebellar and spinocerebellar mossy fiber pathways. The most remarkable feature of PC circuits is the highly territorial innervation by these two excitatory afferents. A single climbing CF powerfully and exclusively innervates proximal PC dendrites, whereas hundreds of thousands of PFs innervate distal PC dendrites. Recent studies using gene-manipulated mice have been elucidating that the PC circuitry is formed and maintained by molecular mechanisms that fuel homosynaptic competition among CFs and heterosynaptic competition between CFs and PFs. GluRdelta2 (a PC-specific glutamate receptor) and precerebellin or Cbln1 (a granule cell-derived secretory protein) cooperatively work for selective strengthening of PF-PC synapses, and prevent excessive distal extension of CFs that eventually causes multiple innervation at distal dendrites. In contrast, P/Q-type Ca2+ channels, which mediate Ca2+ influx upon CF activity, selectively strengthen the innervation by a single main CF, and expel PFs and other CFs from proximal dendrites that it innervates. Therefore, we now understand that owing to these mechanisms, territorial innervation by CFs and PFs is properly structured and mono-innervation by CFs is established. Several key issues for future study are also discussed.

  7. Role of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor-2 in the Cerebellar Cortex in Cardiovascular Modulation in Anaesthetized Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changzheng; Sun, Tingzhe; Zhou, Peiling; Zhu, Qingfeng; Zhang, Liefeng

    2016-04-01

    Our previous investigations have demonstrated that microinjection of acetylcholine (ACh) or muscarinic ACh receptor activation in the cerebellar cortex induces a systemic blood pressure depressor response. This study aimed to determine the role of muscarinic ACh receptor-2 (M2 receptor) in the cerebellar cortex in cardiovascular function regulation in rats. A nonselective muscarinic receptor agonist (oxotremorine M, OXO; 30 mM), a selective M2 receptor agonist (arecaidine but-2-ynyl ester tosylate, ABET; 3, 10, and 30 mM), 30 mM OXO mixed with a selective M2 receptor antagonist (methoctramine hydrate, MCT; 0.3, 1, and 3 mM), and normal saline (0.9 % NaCl) were separately microinjected (0.5 µl/5 s) into the cerebellar cortex (lobule VI) of anaesthetized rats. We measured the mean arterial pressure (MAP), maximum change in MAP, and reactive time (RT; the duration required for the blood pressure to return to basal levels), heart rate (HR) and the maximum change in HR during the RT in response to drug activation. The results demonstrated that ABET dose-dependently decreased MAP and HR, increased the maximum change in MAP and the maximum change in HR, and prolonged the RT. Furthermore, MCT dose-dependently blocked the OXO-mediated cardiovascular depressor response. This study provides the first evidence that M2 receptors in the cerebellar cortex are involved in cardiovascular regulation, the activation of which evokes significant depressor and bradycardic responses.

  8. Training-induced improvements in postural control are accompanied by alterations in cerebellar white matter in brain injured patients.

    PubMed

    Drijkoningen, David; Caeyenberghs, Karen; Leunissen, Inge; Vander Linden, Catharine; Leemans, Alexander; Sunaert, Stefan; Duysens, Jacques; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether balance control in young TBI patients can be promoted by an 8-week balance training program and whether this is associated with neuroplastic alterations in brain structure. The cerebellum and cerebellar peduncles were selected as regions of interest because of their importance in postural control as well as their vulnerability to brain injury. Young patients with moderate to severe TBI and typically developing (TD) subjects participated in balance training using PC-based portable balancers with storage of training data and real-time visual feedback. An additional control group of TD subjects did not attend balance training. Mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were determined with diffusion MRI scans and were acquired before, during (4 weeks) and at completion of training (8 weeks) together with balance assessments on the EquiTest® System (NeuroCom) which included the Sensory Organization Test, Rhythmic Weight Shift and Limits of Stability protocols. Following training, TBI patients showed significant improvements on all EquiTest protocols, as well as a significant increase in mean diffusivity in the inferior cerebellar peduncle. Moreover, in both training groups, diffusion metrics in the cerebellum and/or cerebellar peduncles at baseline were predictive of the amount of performance increase after training. Finally, amount of training-induced improvement on the Rhythmic Weight Shift test in TBI patients was positively correlated with amount of change in fractional anisotropy in the inferior cerebellar peduncle. This suggests that training-induced plastic changes in balance control are associated with alterations in the cerebellar white matter microstructure in TBI patients.

  9. Coronary Arteries

    MedlinePlus

    ... and animations for grades K-6. The Coronary Arteries Coronary Circulation The heart muscle, like every other ... into two main coronary blood vessels (also called arteries). These coronary arteries branch off into smaller arteries, ...

  10. Changes in the cerebellar and cerebro-cerebellar circuit in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Peng; An, Jie; Tan, Xin; Zeng, Ling-Li; Shen, Hui; Qiu, Shijun; Hu, Dewen

    2017-01-11

    Currently, 422 million adults suffer from diabetes worldwide, leading to tremendous disabilities and a great burden to families and society. Functional and structural MRIs have demonstrated that patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) exhibit abnormalities in brain regions in the cerebral cortex. However, the changes of cerebellar anatomical connections in diabetic patients remains unclear. In the current study, diffusion tensor imaging deterministic tractography and statistical analysis were employed to investigate abnormal cerebellar anatomical connections in diabetic patients. This is the first study to investigate the altered cerebellar anatomical connectivity in T2DM patients. Decreased anatomical connections were found in the cerebellar and cerebro-cerebellar circuits of T2DM patients, providing valuable new insights into the potential neuro-pathophysiology of diabetes-related motor and cognitive deficits.

  11. Inability to Process Negative Emotions in Cerebellar Damage: a Functional Transcranial Doppler Sonographic Study.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Michela; Troisi, Elio; Chiricozzi, Francesca R; Clausi, Silvia; Molinari, Marco; Leggio, Maria

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have implicated the cerebellum as part of a circuitry that is necessary to modulate higher order and behaviorally relevant information in emotional domains. However, little is known about the relationship between the cerebellum and emotional processing. This study examined cerebellar function specifically in the processing of negative emotions. Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography was performed to detect selective changes in middle cerebral artery flow velocity during emotional stimulation in patients affected by focal or degenerative cerebellar lesions and in matched healthy subjects. Changes in flow velocity during non-emotional (motor and cognitive tasks) and emotional (relaxing and negative stimuli) conditions were recorded. In the present study, we found that during negative emotional task, the hemodynamic pattern of the cerebellar patients was significantly different to that of controls. Indeed, whereas relaxing stimuli did not elicit an increase in mean flow velocity in any group, negative stimuli increased the mean flow velocity in the right compared with left middle cerebral artery only in the control group. The patterns by which mean flow velocity increased during the motor and cognitive tasks were similar within patients and controls. These findings support that the cerebellum is part of a network that gives meaning to external stimuli, and this particular involvement in processing negative emotional stimuli corroborates earlier phylogenetic hypotheses, for which the cerebellum is part of an older circuit in which negative emotions are crucial for survival and prepare the organism for rapid defense.

  12. INTERDEPENDENT SUPERIORITY AND INFERIORITY FEELINGS

    PubMed Central

    Ingham, Harrington V.

    1949-01-01

    It is postulated that in neurotic persons who have unrealistic feelings of superiority and inferiority the two are interdependent. This is a departure from the concept of previous observers that either one or the other is primary and its opposite is overcompensation. The author postulates considerable parallelism, with equal importance for each. He submits that the neurotic person forms two logic-resistant compartments for the two opposed self-estimates and that treatment which makes inroads of logic upon one compartment, simultaneously does so upon the other. Two examples are briefly reported. The neurotic benefits sought in exaggeration of capability are the same as those sought in insistence upon inferiority: Presumption of superiority at once bids for approbation and delivers the subject from the need to prove himself worthy of it in dreaded competition; exaggeration of incapability baits sympathy and makes competition unnecessary because failure is conceded. Some of the characteristics of abnormal self-estimates that distinguish them from normal are: Preoccupation with self, resistance to logical explanation of personality problems, inconsistency in reasons for beliefs in adequacy on the one hand and inadequacy on the other, unreality, rationalization of faults, and difficulty and vacillation in the selection of adequate goals. PMID:15390573

  13. Responses evoked in the cerebellar cortex by stimulation of the caudate nucleus in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Mary; Williams, T. D.

    1968-01-01

    1. Responses evoked in the cerebellar cortex following stimulation of caudate nucleus are described. 2. The evoked responses recorded from the surface of the cerebellar cortex were found to be of two types, one with a short (4-6 msec) latency and one with a longer (12-17 msec) latency. 3. The short latency response was maximal in the lobulus simplex, the longer latency response was maximal in paramedian lobule. 4. Following lesions in the inferior olive the longer latency response was absent. 5. Recordings from within the cerebellar cortex showed that the short latency response was uniformly distributed throughout the grey matter, the longer latency response was maximal in the region of the Purkinje cell bodies. 6. It was concluded that the short latency response was due to activation via the mossy fibres and the longer latency response to activation via the climbing fibres. 7. It was found that responses could be evoked in the cerebellum following stimulation of only the latero-ventral part of the caudate nucleus; stimulation of the rest of the nucleus caused no response in the cerebellum. This division of the caudate nucleus into two parts is similar to the subdivision of the caudate nucleus made by other workers using different criteria. PMID:5698279

  14. [A Case of Left Vertebral Artery Aneurysm Showing Evoked Potentials on Bilateral Electrode by the Left Vagus Nerve Stimulation to Electromyographic Tracheal Tube].

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Tatsuo; Uehara, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Toshinori; Shiraishi, Munehiro; Kinoshita, Yuki; Joyashiki, Takeshi; Enokida, Kengo

    2016-02-01

    Previously, we reported a case of brainstem cavernous hemangioma showing false positive responses to electromyographic tracheal tube (EMG tube). We concluded that the cause was spontaneous respiration accompanied by vocal cord movement. We report a case of left vertebral artery aneurysm showing evoked potentials on bilateral electrodes by the left vagus nerve stimulation to EMG tube. An 82-year-old woman underwent clipping of a left unruptured vertebral artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm. General anesthesia was induced with remifentanil, propofol and suxamethonium, and was maintained with oxygen, air, remifentanil and propofol. We monitored somatosensory evoked potentials, motor evoked potentials, and electromyogram of the vocal cord. When the manipulation reached brainstem and the instrument touched the left vagus nerve, evoked potentials appeared on bilateral electrodes. EMG tube is equipped with two electrodes on both sides. We concluded that the left vagus nerve stimulation generated evoked potentials of the left laryngeal muscles, and they were simultaneously detected as potential difference between two electrodes on both sides. EMG tube is used to identify the vagus nerve. However, it is necessary to bear in mind that each vagus nerve stimulation inevitably generates evoked potentials on bilateral electrodes.

  15. Cerebellar modules operate at different frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haibo; Lin, Zhanmin; Voges, Kai; Ju, Chiheng; Gao, Zhenyu; Bosman, Laurens WJ; Ruigrok, Tom JH; Hoebeek, Freek E

    2014-01-01

    Due to the uniform cyto-architecture of the cerebellar cortex, its overall physiological characteristics have traditionally been considered to be homogeneous. In this study, we show in awake mice at rest that spiking activity of Purkinje cells, the sole output cells of the cerebellar cortex, differs between cerebellar modules and correlates with their expression of the glycolytic enzyme aldolase C or zebrin. Simple spike and complex spike frequencies were significantly higher in Purkinje cells located in zebrin-negative than zebrin-positive modules. The difference in simple spike frequency persisted when the synaptic input to, but not intrinsic activity of, Purkinje cells was manipulated. Blocking TRPC3, the effector channel of a cascade of proteins that have zebrin-like distribution patterns, attenuated the simple spike frequency difference. Our results indicate that zebrin-discriminated cerebellar modules operate at different frequencies, which depend on activation of TRPC3, and that this property is relevant for all cerebellar functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02536.001 PMID:24843004

  16. Metabolic anatomy of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, N.E.; Posner, J.B.; Sidtis, J.J.; Moeller, J.R.; Strother, S.C.; Dhawan, V.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1988-06-01

    Eleven patients with acquired cerebellar degeneration (10 of whom had paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD)) were evaluated using neuropsychological tests and /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography to (1) quantify motor, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities; (2) determine if characteristic alterations in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlc) are associated with PCD; and (3) correlate behavioral and metabolic measures of disease severity. Eighteen volunteer subjects served as normal controls. Although some PCD neuropsychological test scores were abnormal, these results could not, in general, be dissociated from the effects of dysarthria and ataxia. rCMRGlc was reduced in patients with PCD (versus normal control subjects) in all regions except the brainstem. Analysis of patient and control rCMRGlc data using a mathematical model of regional metabolic interactions revealed two metabolic pattern descriptors, SSF1 and SSF2, which distinguished patients with PCD from normal control subjects; SSF2, which described a metabolic coupling between cerebellum, cuneus, and posterior temporal, lateral frontal, and paracentral cortex, correlated with quantitative indices of cerebellar dysfunction. Our inability to document substantial intellectual impairment in 7 of 10 patients with PCD contrasts with the 50% incidence of dementia in PCD reported by previous investigators. Widespread reductions in PCD rCMRGlc may result from the loss of cerebellar efferents to thalamus and forebrain structures, a reverse cerebellar diaschisis.

  17. Regionalization of the isthmic and cerebellar primordia.

    PubMed

    Narboux-Nême, Nicolas; Louvi, Angeliki; Alexandre, Paula; Wassef, Marion

    2005-01-01

    The complex migrations of neurons born in the dorsal neural tube of the isthmic and rhombomere l (rl) domains complicate the delineation of the cerebellar primordium. We show that Purkinje cells (P) are likely generated over a wide territory before gathering in the future cerebellar primordium under the developing external granular layer. Later expansion of the cerebellum over a restricted ependymal domain could rely on mutual interations between P cells and granule cell progenitors (GCP). P are attracted by GCP and in turn stimulate their proliferation, increasing the surface of the developing cortex. At later stages, regionalization of the developing and adult cerebellar cortex can be detected through regional variations in the distribution of several P cell markers. Whether and how the developmental and adult P subtypes are related is still unknown and it is unclear if they delineate the same sets of cerebellar subdivisions. We provide evidence that the early P regionalization is involved in intrinsic patterning of the cerebellar primordium, in particular it relate to the organization of the corticonuclear connection. We propose that the early P regionalization provides a scaffold to the mature P regionalization but that the development of functional afferent connections induces a period of P plasticity during which the early regional identity of P could be remodeled.

  18. Secondary orthostatic tremor in the setting of cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sarva, Harini; Severt, William Lawrence; Jacoby, Nuri; Pullman, Seth L; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel

    2016-05-01

    Orthostatic tremor (OT) and cerebellar ataxia are uncommon and difficult to treat. We present two patients with OT and cerebellar degeneration, one of whom had spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 and a good treatment response.

  19. Neurodevelopmental malformations of the cerebellar vermis in genetically engineered rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformati...

  20. Hybrid Coronary Artery Revascularization for Takayasu Arteritis with Major Visceral Collateral Circulation from the Left Internal Thoracic Artery

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Hyung Tae; Kim, Jeong-Won; Yoo, Jae Suk; Cho, Kwang Ree

    2017-01-01

    Coronary arterial involvement in Takayasu arteritis (TA) is not uncommon. Herein, we describe a case of TA with celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery occlusion combined with coronary artery disease. Bilateral huge internal thoracic arteries (ITAs) and the inferior mesenteric artery provided the major visceral collateral circulation. After percutaneous intervention to the right coronary artery, off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting for the left coronary territory was done using a right ITA graft and its large side branch because of its relatively minor contribution to the visceral collateral circulation. PMID:28382269

  1. Landmark based shape analysis for cerebellar ataxia classification and cerebellar atrophy pattern visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules.

  2. Landmark Based Shape Analysis for Cerebellar Ataxia Classification and Cerebellar Atrophy Pattern Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules. PMID:27303111

  3. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5820 Implanted cerebellar stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted cerebellar stimulator is a device used to...

  4. Shape recognition and inferior temporal neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, E L; Desimone, R; Albright, T D; Gross, C G

    1983-01-01

    Inferior temporal cortex plays an important role in shape recognition. To study the shape selectivity of single inferior temporal neurons, we recorded their responses to a set of shapes systematically varying in boundary curvature. Many inferior temporal neurons were selective for stimuli of specific boundary curvature and maintained this selectivity over changes in stimulus size or position. The method of describing boundary curvature was that of Fourier descriptors. PMID:6577453

  5. Autosomal-Recessive Congenital Cerebellar Ataxia Is Caused by Mutations in Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Guergueltcheva, Velina; Azmanov, Dimitar N.; Angelicheva, Dora; Smith, Katherine R.; Chamova, Teodora; Florez, Laura; Bynevelt, Michael; Nguyen, Thai; Cherninkova, Sylvia; Bojinova, Veneta; Kaprelyan, Ara; Angelova, Lyudmila; Morar, Bharti; Chandler, David; Kaneva, Radka; Bahlo, Melanie; Tournev, Ivailo; Kalaydjieva, Luba

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive congenital cerebellar ataxia was identified in Roma patients originating from a small subisolate with a known strong founder effect. Patients presented with global developmental delay, moderate to severe stance and gait ataxia, dysarthria, mild dysdiadochokinesia, dysmetria and tremors, intellectual deficit, and mild pyramidal signs. Brain imaging revealed progressive generalized cerebellar atrophy, and inferior vermian hypoplasia and/or a constitutionally small brain were observed in some patients. Exome sequencing, used for linkage analysis on extracted SNP genotypes and for mutation detection, identified two novel (i.e., not found in any database) variants located 7 bp apart within a unique 6q24 linkage region. Both mutations cosegregated with the disease in five affected families, in which all ten patients were homozygous. The mutated gene, GRM1, encodes metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1, which is highly expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells and plays an important role in cerebellar development and synaptic plasticity. The two mutations affect a gene region critical for alternative splicing and the generation of receptor isoforms; they are a 3 bp exon 8 deletion and an intron 8 splicing mutation (c.2652_2654del and c.2660+2T>G, respectively [RefSeq accession number NM_000838.3]). The functional impact of the deletion is unclear and is overshadowed by the splicing defect. Although ataxia lymphoblastoid cell lines expressed GRM1 at levels comparable to those of control cells, the aberrant transcripts skipped exon 8 or ended in intron 8 and encoded various species of nonfunctional receptors either lacking the transmembrane domain and containing abnormal intracellular tails or completely missing the tail. The study implicates mGluR1 in human hereditary ataxia. It also illustrates the potential of the Roma founder populations for mutation identification by exome sequencing. PMID:22901947

  6. Can secondary degeneration accelerate the formation of neurofibrillary tangles? A case of hemispheric infarction showing asymmetric degeneration of the substantia nigra, red nuclei, inferior olivary nuclei and dentate nuclei with concomitant changes of progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, R; Oda, M; Arai, N; Shin, T; Hayashi, M

    1999-02-01

    A case of hemispheric infarction involving the territory of the right middle cerebral artery and the thalamus showed conspicuous asymmetric degeneration in the substantia nigra, red nuclei, inferior olivary nuclei and dentate nuclei with concomitant changes of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). The right substantia nigra and red nucleus showed loss of neurons and proliferation of astrocytes. The right olivary nucleus was hypertrophic, while the neuronal loss and astrocytosis in the dentate nucleus were predominant on the contralateral side. Modified Gallyas-Braak staining revealed the extensive distribution of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), threads and intraglial argyrophilic structures in the globus pallidus, subthalamic nuclei, cerebral cortex and dentate nuclei, as well as in the affected brain stem nuclei, with a distinct predominance on the affected side. In this case, the one-sided predominance of the extended degeneration in these brain stem and cerebellar areas is considered, in addition to the PSP changes, to be due to secondary retrograde degeneration via the nigrostriatal and dentato-rubro-thalamic pathways following the hemispheric infarction, and to also be the result of disruption of the dentato-olivary fiber connections. In addition, because of the predominant distribution of NFTs on the more degenerated side, it is surmised that the formation of NFTs may be accelerated by secondary degeneration.

  7. Self-referential phase reset based on inferior olive oscillator dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kazantsev, V. B.; Nekorkin, V. I.; Makarenko, V. I.; Llinás, R.

    2004-01-01

    The olivo-cerebellar network is a key neuronal circuit that provides high-level motor control in the vertebrate CNS. Functionally, its network dynamics is organized around the oscillatory membrane potential properties of inferior olive (IO) neurons and their electrotonic connectivity. Because IO action potentials are generated at the peaks of the quasisinusoidal membrane potential oscillations, their temporal firing properties are defined by the IO rhythmicity. Excitatory inputs to these neurons can produce oscillatory phase shifts without modifying the amplitude or frequency of the oscillations, allowing well defined time-shift modulation of action potential generation. Moreover, the resulting phase is defined only by the amplitude and duration of the reset stimulus and is independent of the original oscillatory phase when the stimulus was delivered. This reset property, henceforth referred to as selfreferential phase reset, results in the generation of organized clusters of electrically coupled cells that oscillate in phase and are controlled by inhibitory feedback loops through the cerebellar nuclei and the cerebellar cortex. These clusters provide a dynamical representation of arbitrary motor intention patterns that are further mapped to the motor execution system. Being supplied with sensory inputs, the olivo-cerebellar network is capable of rearranging the clusters during the process of movement execution. Accordingly, the phase of the IO oscillators can be rapidly reset to a desired phase independently of the history of phase evolution. The goal of this article is to show how this selfreferential phase reset may be implemented into a motor control system by using a biologically based mathematical model. PMID:15604140

  8. The Cerebellar Mutism Syndrome and Its Relation to Cerebellar Cognitive Function and the Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Elizabeth M.; Walsh, Karin S.; Khademian, Zarir P.; Keating, Robert F.; Packer, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The postoperative cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS), consisting of diminished speech output, hypotonia, ataxia, and emotional lability, occurs after surgery in up to 25% of patients with medulloblastoma and occasionally after removal of other posterior fossa tumors. Although the mutism is transient, speech rarely normalizes and the syndrome is…

  9. Homozygous Deletion of the Very Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Causes Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Hypoplasia with Cerebral Gyral Simplification

    PubMed Central

    Boycott, Kym M.; Flavelle, Shauna; Bureau, Alexandre; Glass, Hannah C.; Fujiwara, T. Mary; Wirrell, Elaine; Davey, Krista; Chudley, Albert E.; Scott, James N.; McLeod, D. Ross; Parboosingh, Jillian S.

    2005-01-01

    An autosomal recessive syndrome of nonprogressive cerebellar ataxia and mental retardation is associated with inferior cerebellar hypoplasia and mild cerebral gyral simplification in the Hutterite population. An identity-by-descent mapping approach using eight patients from three interrelated Hutterite families localized the gene for this syndrome to chromosome region 9p24. Haplotype analysis identified familial and ancestral recombination events and refined the minimal region to a 2-Mb interval between markers D9S129 and D9S1871. A 199-kb homozygous deletion encompassing the entire very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) gene was present in all affected individuals. VLDLR is part of the reelin signaling pathway, which guides neuroblast migration in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. To our knowledge, this syndrome represents the first human lipoprotein receptor malformation syndrome and the second human disease associated with a reelin pathway defect. PMID:16080122

  10. Case report on vertebral artery dissection in mixed martial arts.

    PubMed

    Slowey, Michael; Maw, Graeme; Furyk, Jeremy

    2012-04-01

    A 41-year-old man presented to the ED with severe vertigo 2 days after a grappling injury while training in mixed martial arts. Imaging revealed a cerebellar infarct with complete occlusion of the right vertebral artery secondary to dissection. Management options are discussed as is the ongoing controversy regarding the safety of the sport.

  11. Arterial insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most common causes of arterial insufficiency is atherosclerosis or "hardening of the arteries." Fatty material (called ... Images Arteries of the brain Developmental process of atherosclerosis References Hansson GK, Hamsten A. Atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and ...

  12. Cerebellar Hypoplasia and Dysmorphia in Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    PubMed

    Toelle, Sandra P; Poretti, Andrea; Weber, Peter; Seute, Tatjana; Bromberg, Jacoline E C; Scheer, Ianina; Boltshauser, Eugen

    2015-12-01

    Unidentified bright objects (UBO) and tumors are well-known cerebellar abnormalities in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Literature reports on malformative cerebellar anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), however, are scant. We retrospectively studied the clinical and neuroimaging findings of 5 patients with NF1 (4 females, age 6 to 29 years at last follow-up) and cerebellar anomalies. Cerebellar symptoms on neurological examination were mild or even not evident whereas learning disabilities were more or less pronounced in four patients. Two patients had cerebellar hypoplasia (diffusely enlarged cerebellar interfoliar spaces) and three cerebellar dysmorphias involving mainly one cerebellar hemisphere. In NF1, malformative cerebellar anomalies are rare (estimated prevalence of about 1%), but most likely underestimated and easily overlooked, because physicians tend to focus on more prevalent, obvious, and well-known findings such as optic pathway gliomas, other tumors, and UBO. This kind of cerebellar anomaly in NF1 has most likely a malformative origin, but the exact pathogenesis is unknown. The individual clinical significance is difficult to determine. We suggest that cerebellar anomalies should be systematically evaluated in neuroimaging studies of NF1 patients.

  13. Inverse Stochastic Resonance in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

    PubMed Central

    Häusser, Michael; Gutkin, Boris S.; Roth, Arnd

    2016-01-01

    Purkinje neurons play an important role in cerebellar computation since their axons are the only projection from the cerebellar cortex to deeper cerebellar structures. They have complex internal dynamics, which allow them to fire spontaneously, display bistability, and also to be involved in network phenomena such as high frequency oscillations and travelling waves. Purkinje cells exhibit type II excitability, which can be revealed by a discontinuity in their f-I curves. We show that this excitability mechanism allows Purkinje cells to be efficiently inhibited by noise of a particular variance, a phenomenon known as inverse stochastic resonance (ISR). While ISR has been described in theoretical models of single neurons, here we provide the first experimental evidence for this effect. We find that an adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire model fitted to the basic Purkinje cell characteristics using a modified dynamic IV method displays ISR and bistability between the resting state and a repetitive activity limit cycle. ISR allows the Purkinje cell to operate in different functional regimes: the all-or-none toggle or the linear filter mode, depending on the variance of the synaptic input. We propose that synaptic noise allows Purkinje cells to quickly switch between these functional regimes. Using mutual information analysis, we demonstrate that ISR can lead to a locally optimal information transfer between the input and output spike train of the Purkinje cell. These results provide the first experimental evidence for ISR and suggest a functional role for ISR in cerebellar information processing. PMID:27541958

  14. Vergence Deficits in Patients with Cerebellar Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, T.; Sprenger, A.; Neumann, G.; Machner, B.; Gottschalk, S.; Rambold, H.; Helmchen, C.

    2009-01-01

    The cerebellum is part of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar circuit for conjugate eye movements. Recent animal data suggest an additional role of the cerebellum for the control of binocular alignment and disconjugate, i.e. vergence eye movements. The latter is separated into two different components: fast vergence (to step targets) and slow vergence…

  15. Improving cerebellar segmentation with statistical fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plassard, Andrew J.; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multiatlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non- Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution.

  16. Improving Cerebellar Segmentation with Statistical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Plassard, Andrew J.; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multi-atlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non-Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution. PMID:27127334

  17. Improving Cerebellar Segmentation with Statistical Fusion.

    PubMed

    Plassard, Andrew J; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L; Claassen, Daniel O; Landman, Bennett A

    2016-02-27

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multi-atlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non-Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution.

  18. Inferior vena caval masses identified by echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, J. P.; Asher, C. R.; Xu, Y.; Huang, V.; Griffin, B. P.; Stewart, W. J.; Novick, A. C.; Thomas, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    The most common cause of an inferior vena caval mass is renal cell carcinoma that extends through the lumen, occurring in 47 of 62 patients (85%). Detection of an inferior vena caval mass affects the surgical approach requiring cardiopulmonary bypass for resection when the mass extends to the heart.

  19. Acute cerebellar ataxia, acute cerebellitis, and opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Desai, Jay; Mitchell, Wendy G

    2012-11-01

    Acute cerebellar ataxia and acute cerebellitis represent a process characterized by parainfectious, postinfectious, or postvaccination cerebellar inflammation. There is considerable overlap between these entities. The mildest cases of acute cerebellar ataxia represent a benign condition that is characterized by acute truncal and gait ataxia, variably with appendicular ataxia, nystagmus, dysarthria, and hypotonia. It occurs mostly in young children, presents abruptly, and recovers over weeks. Neuroimaging is normal. Severe cases of cerebellitis represent the other end of the spectrum, presenting with acute cerebellar signs often overshadowed by alteration of consciousness, focal neurological deficits, raised intracranial pressure, hydrocephalus, and even herniation. Neuroimaging is abnormal and the prognosis is less favorable than in acute cerebellar ataxia. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis may be confused with acute cerebellitis when the clinical findings are predominantly cerebellar, but lesions on neuroimaging are usually widespread. Paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome is often initially misdiagnosed as acute cerebellar ataxia, but has very specific features, course, and etiopathogensis.

  20. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling.

    PubMed

    Zampetti, Benedetta; Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Boccardi, Edoardo; Loli, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Simultaneous bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of Cushing's syndrome. It is the most accurate procedure in the differential diagnosis of hypercortisolism of pituitary or ectopic origin, as compared with clinical, biochemical and imaging analyses, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88-100% and 67-100%, respectively. In the setting of hypercortisolemia, ACTH levels obtained from venous drainage of the pituitary are expected to be higher than the levels of peripheral blood, thus suggesting pituitary ACTH excess as the cause of hypercortisolism. Direct stimulation of the pituitary corticotroph with corticotrophin-releasing hormone enhances the sensitivity of the procedure. The procedure must be undertaken in the presence of hypercortisolemia, which suppresses both the basal and stimulated secretory activity of normal corticotrophic cells: ACTH measured in the sinus is, therefore, the result of the secretory activity of the tumor tissue. The poor accuracy in lateralization of BIPSS (positive predictive value of 50-70%) makes interpetrosal ACTH gradient alone not sufficient for the localization of the tumor. An accurate exploration of the gland is recommended if a tumor is not found in the predicted area. Despite the fact that BIPSS is an invasive procedure, the occurrence of adverse events is extremely rare, particularly if it is performed by experienced operators in referral centres.

  1. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling

    PubMed Central

    Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Boccardi, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of Cushing’s syndrome. It is the most accurate procedure in the differential diagnosis of hypercortisolism of pituitary or ectopic origin, as compared with clinical, biochemical and imaging analyses, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88–100% and 67–100%, respectively. In the setting of hypercortisolemia, ACTH levels obtained from venous drainage of the pituitary are expected to be higher than the levels of peripheral blood, thus suggesting pituitary ACTH excess as the cause of hypercortisolism. Direct stimulation of the pituitary corticotroph with corticotrophin-releasing hormone enhances the sensitivity of the procedure. The procedure must be undertaken in the presence of hypercortisolemia, which suppresses both the basal and stimulated secretory activity of normal corticotrophic cells: ACTH measured in the sinus is, therefore, the result of the secretory activity of the tumor tissue. The poor accuracy in lateralization of BIPSS (positive predictive value of 50–70%) makes interpetrosal ACTH gradient alone not sufficient for the localization of the tumor. An accurate exploration of the gland is recommended if a tumor is not found in the predicted area. Despite the fact that BIPSS is an invasive procedure, the occurrence of adverse events is extremely rare, particularly if it is performed by experienced operators in referral centres. PMID:27352844

  2. Prognostic significance of resting anterior thallium-201 defects in patients with inferior myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, R.S.; Taylor, G.J.; Watson, D.D.; Berger, B.C.; Crampton, R.S.; Martin, R.P.; Beller, G.A.

    1980-11-01

    To determine whether Tl-201 scintigraphy performed at rest during the late hospital phase of inferior myocardial infarction can predict subsequent coronary events, 25 patients with historical, enzymatic, and electrocardiographic criteria of transmural inferior infarction underwent serial imaging with computer quantification 7 to 35 days after admission. All 25 patients had inferior defects, and 13 (52%) also had anterior defects implying stenosis of the left anterior descending coronary artery. The patients were divided into those with inferior and anterior perfusion defects (Group 1) and those with inferior defects alone (Group 2). In Group 1, three patients had persistent defects in the anterior wall and ten had initial defects with redistribution. New or recurrent coronary events - which included new onset or progression of angina pectoris, sudden death, reinfarction, and congestive heart failure - were recorded over an average 7.2 months of followup (range 3 to 9 mo) for all patients. Ten of 13 (77%) patients in Group 1 had 17 coronary events and four of 12 (33%) patients in Group 2 had six coronary events (p < 0.02). Nine patients in Group 1 and three in Group 2 developed angina (p < 0.03). The apparently increased prevalence in Group 1 of sudden death (8% against 0%), reinfarction (8% against 0%), and congestive heart failure (46% against 25%) was not statistically significant. Thus resting T1-201 scintigraphy with computer quantification is a highly sensitive method to detect inferior myocardial infarction even in the late hospital phase. Moreover, it appears to identify those patients with inferior infarction at high risk for subsequent coronary events, presumably due to stenosis of the left anterior descending coronary artery.

  3. Improved segmentation of cerebellar structures in children

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Priya Lakshmi; Boonazier, Natalie; Warton, Christopher; Molteno, Christopher D; Joseph, Jesuchristopher; Jacobson, Joseph L; Jacobson, Sandra W; Zöllei, Lilla; Meintjes, Ernesta M

    2016-01-01

    Background Consistent localization of cerebellar cortex in a standard coordinate system is important for functional studies and detection of anatomical alterations in studies of morphometry. To date, no pediatric cerebellar atlas is available. New method The probabilistic Cape Town Pediatric Cerebellar Atlas (CAPCA18) was constructed in the age-appropriate National Institute of Health Pediatric Database asymmetric template space using manual tracings of 16 cerebellar compartments in 18 healthy children (9–13 years) from Cape Town, South Africa. The individual atlases of the training subjects were also used to implement multi atlas label fusion using multi atlas majority voting (MAMV) and multi atlas generative model (MAGM) approaches. Segmentation accuracy in 14 test subjects was compared for each method to ‘gold standard’ manual tracings. Results Spatial overlap between manual tracings and CAPCA18 automated segmentation was 73% or higher for all lobules in both hemispheres, except VIIb and X. Automated segmentation using MAGM yielded the best segmentation accuracy over all lobules (mean Dice Similarity Coefficient 0.76; range 0.55–0.91). Comparison with existing methods In all lobules, spatial overlap of CAPCA18 segmentations with manual tracings was similar or higher than those obtained with SUIT (spatially unbiased infra-tentorial template), providing additional evidence of the benefits of an age appropriate atlas. MAGM segmentation accuracy was comparable to values reported recently by Park et al. (2014) in adults (across all lobules mean DSC = 0.73, range 0.40–0.89). Conclusions CAPCA18 and the associated multi atlases of the training subjects yield improved segmentation of cerebellar structures in children. PMID:26743973

  4. Pulmonary Artery Intimal Sarcoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kriz, Joseph P; Munfakh, Nabil A; King, Gregory S; Carden, Juan O

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary artery intimal sarcomas are rare and lethal malignant tumors that typically affect larger vessels: the aorta, inferior vena cava, and pulmonary arteries. Since symptoms and imaging of pulmonary arterial intimal sarcomas mimic pulmonary thromboembolism, the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with chest pain, dyspnea, and filling defect within the pulmonary arteries should include intimal sarcoma. Often right ventricular failure is observed due to pulmonary hypertension caused by the obstructive effect of the tumor and concomitant chronic thromboembolism. We report the case of a 72-year-old African-American male with arterial intimal sarcoma of the left and right pulmonary artery with extension through the right artery into the bronchus and right lung.

  5. Pulmonary Artery Intimal Sarcoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kriz, Joseph P.; Munfakh, Nabil A.; King, Gregory S.; Carden, Juan O.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary artery intimal sarcomas are rare and lethal malignant tumors that typically affect larger vessels: the aorta, inferior vena cava, and pulmonary arteries. Since symptoms and imaging of pulmonary arterial intimal sarcomas mimic pulmonary thromboembolism, the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with chest pain, dyspnea, and filling defect within the pulmonary arteries should include intimal sarcoma. Often right ventricular failure is observed due to pulmonary hypertension caused by the obstructive effect of the tumor and concomitant chronic thromboembolism. We report the case of a 72-year-old African-American male with arterial intimal sarcoma of the left and right pulmonary artery with extension through the right artery into the bronchus and right lung. PMID:27239183

  6. Morphometry and Variability of the Brain Arterial Circle in Chinchilla (Chinchilla laniger, Molina).

    PubMed

    Kuchinka, Jacek

    2017-02-09

    Arterial circles of brains from 70 adult chinchillas were filled with synthetic latex. The arterial circle of the brain is formed as the result of vertebral arteries being merged into the basilar artery. Caudally, both vertebral arteries gave rise to the ventral spinal artery. The ventral spinal artery splits into tiny cerebellar vessels, the pontine and cochlear branches. Distally, the basilar artery ramified into two terminal branches that formed the arterial circle of brain, rostrally open in most cases (75%). The observed variability of the arterial circle of brain of chinchillas pertained to all elements of that circle. The greatest variability within the vessels of the circle of Willis in chinchillas was observed in 22 cases (31.4%) of internal ophthalmic arteries. In chinchillas, a trend toward slight variability within the arteries comprising the arterial circle of the brain was observed in 44 animals. This accounted for 62.8% of all cases. Only in three cases was the arterial circle of brain clearly symmetrical. At the same time, 23 animals (32.8%) revealed features of significant vascular variability within the brain base region. These consisted of disturbed geometry of the entire arterial circle, different levels of ramifications into individual arteries, as well as the number and diameter of arteries. No internal carotid arteries were observed in chinchillas apart from one atypical case in which the carotid artery extended unilaterally into the basilar artery. These investigations indicate on the significant variability of arterial circle in rodents. Anat Rec, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Segmentation of the Cerebellar Peduncles Using a Random Forest Classifier and a Multi-object Geometric Deformable Model: Application to Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chuyang; Yang, Zhen; Ying, Sarah H; Prince, Jerry L

    2015-07-01

    The cerebellar peduncles, comprising the superior cerebellar peduncles (SCPs), the middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP), and the inferior cerebellar peduncles (ICPs), are white matter tracts that connect the cerebellum to other parts of the central nervous system. Methods for automatic segmentation and quantification of the cerebellar peduncles are needed for objectively and efficiently studying their structure and function. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides key information to support this goal, but it remains challenging because the tensors change dramatically in the decussation of the SCPs (dSCP), the region where the SCPs cross. This paper presents an automatic method for segmenting the cerebellar peduncles, including the dSCP. The method uses volumetric segmentation concepts based on extracted DTI features. The dSCP and noncrossing portions of the peduncles are modeled as separate objects, and are initially classified using a random forest classifier together with the DTI features. To obtain geometrically correct results, a multi-object geometric deformable model is used to refine the random forest classification. The method was evaluated using a leave-one-out cross-validation on five control subjects and four patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). It was then used to evaluate group differences in the peduncles in a population of 32 controls and 11 SCA6 patients. In the SCA6 group, we have observed significant decreases in the volumes of the dSCP and the ICPs and significant increases in the mean diffusivity in the noncrossing SCPs, the MCP, and the ICPs. These results are consistent with a degeneration of the cerebellar peduncles in SCA6 patients.

  8. Precordial ST segment depression during acute inferior myocardial infarction: early thallium-201 scintigraphic evidence of adjacent posterolateral or inferoseptal involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, A.S.; Weiss, A.T.; Shah, P.K.; Maddahi, J.; Peter, T.; Ganz, W.; Swan, H.J.; Berman, D.S.

    1985-02-01

    To investigate the myocardial perfusion correlates of precordial ST segment depression during acute inferior myocardial infarction, a rest thallium-201 scintigram and a closely timed 12 lead electrocardiogram were obtained within 6 hours of the onset of infarction in 44 patients admitted with their first acute inferior myocardial infarction. Thirty-six patients demonstrated precordial ST segment depression (group 1) and eight did not (group 2). A perfusion defect involving the inferior wall was present in all 44 patients. Additional perfusion defects of the adjacent posterolateral wall (n . 20), the ventricular septum (n . 9) or both (n . 6) were present in 35 of 36 patients from group 1 compared with only 1 of 8 patients from group 2 (p less than 0.001). There was no significant difference in the frequency of multivessel coronary artery disease or disease of the left anterior descending artery between group 1 and group 2 or between patients with and those without a thallium-201 perfusion defect involving the ventricular septum. Thus, precordial ST segment depression during an acute inferior myocardial infarction is associated with thallium-201 scintigraphic evidence of more extensive involvement of the adjacent posterolateral or inferoseptal myocardial segments, which probably reflects the extent and pattern of distribution of the artery of infarction, rather than the presence of coexistent multivessel coronary artery disease or disease of the left anterior descending artery.

  9. [Ruptured pseudoaneurysm of the renal artery associated with segmental arterial mediolysis].

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Kosuke; Kikuchii, Mina; Kondo, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Yoji; Tsuchiya, Tomohiro; Masahiro, Nakano; Hidetoshi, Ehara; Deguchii, Takashi; Shinoda, Ikuo

    2008-07-01

    We present a 71-year-old woman with spontaneous perinephric hematoma due to a rupture of pseudoaneurysm of the right renal artery on the fourth day after radical cystectomy and bilateral ureterocutaneostomy for bladder cancer. This patient received steroid therapy for chronic rheumatoid arthritis for several years. The digital subtraction angiography of the right renal artery showed two pseudoaneurysms in the anterior inferior segmental branch and the posterior inferior segmental branch. Transarterial coil embolization of the right renal artery proximally and distally to the two aneurysms was performed without complications. Moreover, the additional angiography showed typical string-of-beads appearance and small aneurysms in abdominal visceral arteries, suggesting segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) as a possible etiology. Differential diagnoses of SAM are discussed.

  10. Inferior alveolar nerve block: Alternative technique

    PubMed Central

    Thangavelu, K.; Kannan, R.; Kumar, N. Senthil

    2012-01-01

    Background: Inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) is a technique of dental anesthesia, used to produce anesthesia of the mandibular teeth, gingivae of the mandible and lower lip. The conventional IANB is the most commonly used the nerve block technique for achieving local anesthesia for mandibular surgical procedures. In certain cases, however, this nerve block fails, even when performed by the most experienced clinician. Therefore, it would be advantageous to find an alternative simple technique. Aim and Objective: The objective of this study is to find an alternative inferior alveolar nerve block that has a higher success rate than other routine techniques. To this purpose, a simple painless inferior alveolar nerve block was designed to anesthetize the inferior alveolar nerve. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in Oral surgery department of Vinayaka Mission's dental college Salem from May 2009 to May 2011. Five hundred patients between the age of 20 years and 65 years who required extraction of teeth in mandible were included in the study. Out of 500 patients 270 were males and 230 were females. The effectiveness of the IANB was evaluated by using a sharp dental explorer in the regions innervated by the inferior alveolar, lingual, and buccal nerves after 3, 5, and 7 min, respectively. Conclusion: This study concludes that inferior alveolar nerve block is an appropriate alternative nerve block to anesthetize inferior alveolar nerve due to its several advantages. PMID:25885503

  11. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 4 (SCA4): Initial pathoanatomical study reveals widespread cerebellar and brainstem degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hellenbroich, Y; Gierga, K; Reusche, E; Schwinger, E; Deller, T; de Vos, R A I; Zühlke, C; Rüb, U

    2006-07-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 4 (SCA4), also known as 'hereditary ataxia with sensory neuropathy', represents a very rare, progressive and untreatable form of an autosomal dominant inherited cerebellar ataxia (ADCA). Due to a lack of autopsy cases, no neuropathological or clinicopathological studies had yet been performed in SCA4. In the present study, the first available cerebellar and brainstem tissue of a clinically diagnosed and genetically-confirmed German SCA4 patient was pathoanatomically studied using serial thick sections. During this systematic postmortem investigation, along with an obvious demyelinization of cerebellar and brainstem fiber tracts we observed widespread cerebellar and brainstem neurodegeneration with marked neuronal loss in the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area, central raphe and pontine nuclei, all auditory brainstem nuclei, in the abducens, principal trigeminal, spinal trigeminal, facial, superior vestibular, medial vestibular, interstitial vestibular, dorsal motor vagal, hypoglossal, and prepositus hypoglossal nuclei, as well as in the nucleus raphe interpositus, all dorsal column nuclei, and in the principal and medial subnuclei of the inferior olive. Severe neuronal loss was seen in the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum, in the cerebellar fastigial nucleus, in the red, trochlear, lateral vestibular, and lateral reticular nuclei, the reticulotegmental nucleus of the pons, and the nucleus of Roller. In addition, immunocytochemical analysis using the anti-polyglutamine antibody 1C2 failed to detect any polyglutamine-related immunoreactivity in the central nervous regions of this SCA4 patient studied. In view of the known functional role of affected nuclei and related fiber tracts, the present findings not only offer explanations for the well-known disease symptoms of SCA4 patients (i.e. ataxic symptoms, dysarthria and somatosensory deficits), but for the first time help to explain why diplopia, gaze-evoked nystagmus

  12. Structural cerebellar correlates of cognitive and motor dysfunctions in cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kansal, Kalyani; Yang, Zhen; Fishman, Ann M; Sair, Haris I; Ying, Sarah H; Jedynak, Bruno M; Prince, Jerry L; Onyike, Chiadi U

    2017-03-01

    See King et al. (doi:10.1093/aww348) for a scientific commentary on this article.Detailed mapping of clinical dysfunctions to the cerebellar lobules in disease populations is necessary to establish the functional significance of lobules implicated in cognitive and motor functions in normal subjects. This study constitutes the first quantitative examination of the lobular correlates of a broad range of cognitive and motor phenomena in cerebellar disease. We analysed cross-sectional data from 72 cases with cerebellar disease and 36 controls without cerebellar disease. Cerebellar lobule volumes were derived from a graph-cut based segmentation algorithm. Sparse partial least squares, a variable selection approach, was used to identify lobules associated with motor function, language, executive function, memory, verbal learning, perceptual organization and visuomotor coordination. Motor dysfunctions were chiefly associated with the anterior lobe and posterior lobule HVI. Confrontation naming, noun fluency, recognition, and perceptual organization did not have cerebellar associations. Verb and phonemic fluency, working memory, cognitive flexibility, immediate and delayed recall, verbal learning, and visuomotor coordination were variably associated with HVI, Crus I, Crus II, HVII B and/or HIX. Immediate and delayed recall also showed associations with the anterior lobe. These findings provide preliminary anatomical evidence for a functional topography of the cerebellum first defined in task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of normal subjects and support the hypotheses that (i) cerebellar efferents target frontal lobe neurons involved in forming action representations and new search strategies; (ii) there is greater involvement of the cerebellum when immediate recall tasks involve more complex verbal stimuli (e.g. longer words versus digits); and (iii) it is involved in spontaneous retrieval of long-term memory. More generally, they provide an anatomical

  13. A neural model of cerebellar learning for arm movement control: cortico-spino-cerebellar dynamics.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Vidal, J L; Grossberg, S; Bullock, D

    1997-01-01

    A neural network model of opponent cerebellar learning for arm movement control is proposed. The model illustrates how a central pattern generator in cortex and basal ganglia, a neuromuscular force controller in spinal cord, and an adaptive cerebellum cooperate to reduce motor variability during multijoint arm movements using mono- and bi-articular muscles. Cerebellar learning modifies velocity commands to produce phasic antagonist bursts at interpositus nucleus cells whose feed-forward action overcomes inherent limitations of spinal feedback control of tracking. Excitation of alpha motoneuron pools, combined with inhibition of their Renshaw cells by the cerebellum, facilitate movement initiation and optimal execution. Transcerebellar pathways are opened by learning through long-term depression (LTD) of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses in response to conjunctive stimulation of parallel fibers and climbing fiber discharges that signal muscle stretch errors. The cerebellar circuitry also learns to control opponent muscles pairs, allowing cocontraction and reciprocal inhibition of muscles. Learning is stable, exhibits load compensation properties, and generalizes better across movement speeds if motoneuron pools obey the size principle. The intermittency of climbing fiber discharges maintains stable learning. Long-term potentiation (LTP) in response to uncorrelated parallel fiber signals enables previously weakened synapses to recover. Loss of climbing fibers, in the presence of LTP, can erode normal opponent signal processing. Simulated lesions of the cerebellar network reproduce symptoms of cerebellar disease, including sluggish movement onsets, poor execution of multijoint plans, and abnormally prolonged endpoint oscillations.

  14. A toolbox to visually explore cerebellar shape changes in cerebellar disease and dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Yang, Zhen; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi U.; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    The cerebellum plays an important role in motor control and is also involved in cognitive processes. Cerebellar function is specialized by location, although the exact topographic functional relationship is not fully understood. The spinocerebellar ataxias are a group of neurodegenerative diseases that cause regional atrophy in the cerebellum, yielding distinct motor and cognitive problems. The ability to study the region-specific atrophy patterns can provide insight into the problem of relating cerebellar function to location. In an effort to study these structural change patterns, we developed a toolbox in MATLAB to provide researchers a unique way to visually explore the correlation between cerebellar lobule shape changes and function loss, with a rich set of visualization and analysis modules. In this paper, we outline the functions and highlight the utility of the toolbox. The toolbox takes as input landmark shape representations of subjects' cerebellar substructures. A principal component analysis is used for dimension reduction. Following this, a linear discriminant analysis and a regression analysis can be performed to find the discriminant direction associated with a specific disease type, or the regression line of a specific functional measure can be generated. The characteristic structural change pattern of a disease type or of a functional score is visualized by sampling points on the discriminant or regression line. The sampled points are used to reconstruct synthetic cerebellar lobule shapes. We showed a few case studies highlighting the utility of the toolbox and we compare the analysis results with the literature.

  15. Crossed Cerebellar Atrophy of the Lateral Cerebellar Nucleus in an Endothelin-1-Induced, Rodent Model of Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hugh H.; Cooperrider, Jessica L.; Park, Hyun-Joo; Wathen, Connor A.; Gale, John T.; Baker, Kenneth B.; Machado, Andre G.

    2017-01-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) is a functional deficit of the cerebellar hemisphere resulting from loss of afferent input consequent to a lesion of the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. It is manifested as a reduction of metabolism and blood flow and, depending on severity and duration, it can result in atrophy, a phenomenon known as crossed cerebellar atrophy (CCA). While CCA has been well-demonstrated in humans, it remains poorly characterized in animal models of stroke. In this study we evaluated the effects of cerebral cortical ischemia on contralateral cerebellar anatomy using an established rodent model of chronic stroke. The effects of cortical ischemia on the cerebellar hemispheres, vermis and deep nuclei were characterized. Intracortical microinjections of endothelin-1 (ET-1) were delivered to the motor cortex of Long Evans rats to induce ischemic stroke, with animals sacrificed 6 weeks later. Naive animals served as controls. Cerebral sections and cerebellar sections including the deep nuclei were prepared for analysis with Nissl staining. Cortical ischemia was associated with significant thickness reduction of the molecular layer at the Crus 1 and parafloccular lobule (PFL), but not in fourth cerebellar lobule (4Cb), as compared to the ipsilesional cerebellar hemisphere. A significant reduction in volume and cell density of the lateral cerebellar nucleus (LCN), the rodent correlate of the dentate nucleus, was also noted. The results highlight the relevance of corticopontocerebellar (CPC) projections for cerebellar metabolism and function, including its direct projections to the LCN. PMID:28261086

  16. Marijuana alters the human cerebellar clock.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Daniel S; Block, Robert I; Turner, Beth M; Koeppel, Julie; Magnotta, Vincent A; Ponto, Laura Boles; Watkins, G Leonard; Hichwa, Richard D; Andreasen, Nancy C

    2003-06-11

    The effects of marijuana on brain perfusion and internal timing were assessed using [15O] water PET in occasional and chronic users. Twelve volunteers who smoked marijuana recreationally about once weekly, and 12 volunteers who smoked daily for a number of years performed a self-paced counting task during PET imaging, before and after smoking marijuana and placebo cigarettes. Smoking marijuana increased rCBF in the ventral forebrain and cerebellar cortex in both groups, but resulted in significantly less frontal lobe activation in chronic users. Counting rate increased after smoking marijuana in both groups, as did a behavioral measure of self-paced tapping, and both increases correlated with rCBF in the cerebellum. Smoking marijuana appears to accelerate a cerebellar clock altering self-paced behaviors.

  17. Cerebellar secretin modulates eyeblink classical conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Jason R.; Robinson, Gain M.; Dean, Aaron M.; Schoenberg, Heidi E.; Williams, Michael R.; Morielli, Anthony D.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that intracerebellar infusion of the neuropeptide secretin enhances the acquisition phase of eyeblink conditioning (EBC). Here, we sought to test whether endogenous secretin also regulates EBC and to test whether the effect of exogenous and endogenous secretin is specific to acquisition. In Experiment 1, rats received intracerebellar infusions of the secretin receptor antagonist 5-27 secretin or vehicle into the lobulus simplex of cerebellar cortex immediately prior to sessions 1–3 of acquisition. Antagonist-infused rats showed a reduction in the percentage of eyeblink CRs compared with vehicle-infused rats. In Experiment 2, rats received intracerebellar infusions of secretin or vehicle immediately prior to sessions 1–2 of extinction. Secretin did not significantly affect extinction performance. In Experiment 3, rats received intracerebellar infusions of 5-27 secretin or vehicle immediately prior to sessions 1–2 of extinction. The secretin antagonist did not significantly affect extinction performance. Together, our current and previous results indicate that both exogenous and endogenous cerebellar secretin modulate acquisition, but not extinction, of EBC. We have previously shown that (1) secretin reduces surface expression of the voltage-gated potassium channel α-subunit Kv1.2 in cerebellar cortex and (2) intracerebellar infusions of a Kv1.2 blocker enhance EBC acquisition, much like secretin. Kv1.2 is almost exclusively expressed in cerebellar cortex at basket cell–Purkinje cell pinceaus and Purkinje cell dendrites; we propose that EBC-induced secretin release from PCs modulates EBC acquisition by reducing surface expression of Kv1.2 at one or both of these sites. PMID:25403455

  18. [Inferior vestibular neuritis: diagnosis using VEMP].

    PubMed

    Walther, L E; Repik, I

    2012-02-01

    Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) are a new method to establish the functional status of the otolith organs. The sacculocollic reflex of the cervical VEMP to air conduction (AC) reflects predominantly saccular function due to saccular afferents to the inferior vestibular nerve. We describe a case of inferior vestibular neuritis as a rare differential diagnosis of vestibular neuritis. Clinical signs were a normal caloric response, unilaterally absent AC cVEMPs and bilaterally preserved ocular VEMPs (AC oVEMPs).

  19. Albumin and Cr-EDTA uptake by systemic arteries, veins, and pulmonary artery of rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Lever, M.J.; Jay, M.T. )

    1990-07-01

    Experiments have been performed both in vivo and in vitro to measure the steady-state uptake of labeled albumin and Cr-ethylenediaminetetraacetate by various blood vessels of the rabbit: the ascending and descending portions of the thoracic aorta, the carotid artery, the pulmonary artery, and the inferior vena cava. The in vitro experiments indicated that the wall tissues of the pulmonary artery and the vena cava have much greater distribution volumes for albumin than do the systemic arteries. This may in part explain the differences in wall tissue concentrations in vivo and, in turn, the differences between vessels in their susceptibility to atherosclerosis.

  20. Autism and cerebellar dysfunction: Evidence from animal models.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Peter T

    2016-10-01

    Autism is a prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder whose origins are not well understood. Cerebellar involvement has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorders with increasing evidence from both clinical studies and animal models supporting an important role for cerebellar dysfunction in autism spectrum disorders. This article discusses the various cerebellar contributions to autism spectrum disorders. Both clinical and preclinical studies are discussed and future research directions highlighted.

  1. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Anila M; Stoodley, Catherine J

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. The emerging topography of sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective subregions in the cerebellum provides a new framework for interpreting the significance of regional cerebellar findings in ASD and their relationship to broader cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Further, recent research supports the idea that the integrity of cerebro-cerebellar loops might be important for early cortical development; disruptions in specific cerebro-cerebellar loops in ASD might impede the specialization of cortical regions involved in motor control, language, and social interaction, leading to impairments in these domains. Consistent with this concept, structural, and functional differences in sensorimotor regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor cerebro-cerebellar circuits are associated with deficits in motor control and increased repetitive and stereotyped behaviors in ASD. Further, communication and social impairments are associated with atypical activation and structure in cerebro-cerebellar loops underpinning language and social cognition. Finally, there is converging evidence from structural, functional, and connectivity neuroimaging studies that cerebellar right Crus I/II abnormalities are related to more severe ASD impairments in all domains. We propose that cerebellar abnormalities may disrupt optimization of both structure and function in specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits in ASD.

  2. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    D'Mello, Anila M.; Stoodley, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. The emerging topography of sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective subregions in the cerebellum provides a new framework for interpreting the significance of regional cerebellar findings in ASD and their relationship to broader cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Further, recent research supports the idea that the integrity of cerebro-cerebellar loops might be important for early cortical development; disruptions in specific cerebro-cerebellar loops in ASD might impede the specialization of cortical regions involved in motor control, language, and social interaction, leading to impairments in these domains. Consistent with this concept, structural, and functional differences in sensorimotor regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor cerebro-cerebellar circuits are associated with deficits in motor control and increased repetitive and stereotyped behaviors in ASD. Further, communication and social impairments are associated with atypical activation and structure in cerebro-cerebellar loops underpinning language and social cognition. Finally, there is converging evidence from structural, functional, and connectivity neuroimaging studies that cerebellar right Crus I/II abnormalities are related to more severe ASD impairments in all domains. We propose that cerebellar abnormalities may disrupt optimization of both structure and function in specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits in ASD. PMID:26594140

  3. Unusual case of left ventricular ballooning involving the inferior wall: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Tako – tsubo like syndrome (also named left ventricular apical ballooning) is an unusual cardiomyopathy with an high incidence in Japanese population of female sex, following an emotional stress. The clinical features (typical chest pain), and the electrocardiographic changes (negative T wave and persistent ST elevation in anterior leads), are suggestive of an acute myocardial infarction; nevertheless the coronary angiography show coronary arteries without lesions and the ventriculography show specific segmental dysfunction. In the literature there are many reports of typical left ventricular ballooning (apical); due to the rarity of the atypical localizations (such as mid, basal, anterior or inferior left ventricular wall) many authors think they are different physiopatologic entity. Case report We report a case of 50 – years old woman, with a family history of ischeamic cardiomyopathy but with no additional cardiovascular risk factors, who arrived to emergency department with a recent episode of chest pain (about 30 minutes) with electrocardiographic and echocardiographic features suggested of a inferior ST elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography showed coronary arteries without atherosclerotic lesions; ventriculography showed an inferior dysfunction. Conclusion This data can suggest for an atypical form (in term of clinical presentation and localization) of left ventricular ballooning involving the inferior wall (never described in the literature), not preceded by any emotional or physical stress. The follow – up performed by transthoracic echocardiography (2 months later) revealed a complete regression of wall motions abnormalities. PMID:19232097

  4. Feeding Artery of Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancers: Role of the Superior Thyroid Artery in Superselective Intraarterial Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Terayama, Noboru Sanada, Junichiro; Matsui, Osamu; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Kawashima, Hiroko; Yamashiro, Masashi; Takanaka, Tsuyoshi; Kumano, Tomoyasu; Yoshizaki, Tomokazu; Furukawa, Mitsuru

    2006-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of the superior thyroid artery in intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. Thirty-nine patients with laryngeal cancer and 29 patients with hypopharyngeal cancer underwent intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy. We performed a retrospective analysis of the feeding arteries confirmed by computed tomography during selective arteriography and compared the results with the extent of the tumors. In 14 of 39 laryngeal and 15 of 29 hypopharyngeal cancers, the tumor did not cross the midline (group 1). In the remaining 25 and 14 cancers, respectively, the tumor crossed the midline or located in the center (group 2). For 13 of 14 laryngeal and 7 of 15 hypopharyngeal cancers in group 1 and for 6 of 25 laryngeal cancers in group 2, the entire tumor was contrast enhanced by the ipsilateral superior thyroid and/or superior laryngeal artery. For 12 of 25 laryngeal and 1 of 14 hypopharyngeal cancers in group 2, the entire tumor was contrast enhanced by the bilateral superior thyroid artery. For the other patients, infusion via the other arterial branches such as the inferior thyroid and the lingual arteries were needed to achieve contrast enhancement of the entire tumor. Superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy for laryngeal cancer from the superior thyroid artery is appropriate, whereas that for hypopharyngeal cancer is less sufficient. To accomplish contrast enhancement of the entire tumor, additional intra-arterial infusion from other arteries such as the inferior thyroid artery is often necessary.

  5. Reappraisal of the inferior epigastric flap: a new neurovascular flap model in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hirigoyen, M B; Rhee, J S; Weisz, D J; Zhang, W X; Urken, M L; Weinberg, H

    1996-09-01

    An anatomic, histologic, and electrophysiologic study was carried out in order to determine the distribution and cutaneous sensory territory of the epigastric nerve in the rat. Results for nerve staining (Sihler's method) and electrophysiologic nerve mapping indicate that the neurosome of the epigastric nerve has a different autonomy than the vascular territory of the inferior epigastric artery. Based on these findings, an experimental model for neurovascular free-tissue transfer is proposed.

  6. Pitch discrimination in cerebellar patients: evidence for a sensory deficit.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Lawrence M; Petacchi, Augusto; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Bower, James M

    2009-12-15

    In the last two decades, a growing body of research showing cerebellar involvement in an increasing number of nonmotor tasks and systems has prompted an expansion of speculations concerning the function of the cerebellum. Here, we tested the predictions of a hypothesis positing cerebellar involvement in sensory data acquisition. Specifically, we examined the effect of global cerebellar degeneration on primary auditory sensory function by means of a pitch discrimination task. The just noticeable difference in pitch between two tones was measured in 15 healthy controls and in 15 high functioning patients afflicted with varying degrees of global cerebellar degeneration caused by hereditary, idiopathic, paraneoplastic, or postinfectious pancerebellitis. Participants also performed an auditory detection task assessing sustained attention, a test of verbal auditory working memory, and an audiometric test. Patient pitch discrimination thresholds were on average five and a half times those of controls and were proportional to the degree of cerebellar ataxia assessed independently. Patients and controls showed normal hearing thresholds and similar performance in control tasks in sustained attention and verbal auditory working memory. These results suggest there is an effect of cerebellar degeneration on primary auditory function. The findings are consistent with other recent demonstrations of cerebellar-related sensory impairments, and with robust cerebellar auditorily evoked activity, confirmed by quantitative meta-analysis, across a range of functional neuroimaging studies dissociated from attention, motor, affective, and cognitive variables. The data are interpreted in the context of a sensory hypothesis of cerebellar function.

  7. Endovascular Treatment of Vertebral Artery Dissecting Aneurysms That Cause Subarachnoid Hemorrhage : Consideration of Therapeutic Approaches Relevant to the Angioarchitecture

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seung Hoon; Lee, Seung Hwan; Koh, Jun Seok

    2015-01-01

    Objective Intracranial ruptured vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms (VADAns) are associated with high morbidity and mortality when left untreated due to the high likelihood of rebleeding. The present study aimed to establish an endovascular therapeutic strategy that focuses specifically on the angioarchitecture of ruptured VADAns. Methods Twenty-three patients with ruptured VADAn received endovascular treatment (EVT) over 7 years. The patient group included 14 women (60.9%) and 9 men (39.1%) between the ages of 39 and 72 years (mean age 54.2 years). Clinical data and radiologic findings were retrospectively analyzed. Results Four patients had aneurysms on the dominant vertebral artery. Fourteen (61%) aneurysms were located distal to the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). Six (26%) patients had an extracranial origin of the PICA on the ruptured VA, and 2 patients (9%) had bilateral VADAns. Eighteen patients (78%) were treated with internal coil trapping. Two patients (9%) required an adjunctive bypass procedure. Seven patients (30%) required stent-supported endovascular procedures. Two patients experienced intra-procedural rupture during EVT, one of which was associated with a focal medullary infarction. Two patients (9%) exhibited recanalization of the VADAn during follow-up, which required additional coiling. No recurrent hemorrhage was observed during the follow-up period. Conclusion EVT of ruptured VADAns based on angioarchitecture is a feasible and effective armamentarium to prevent fatal hemorrhage recurrence with an acceptable low risk of procedural complications. Clinical outcomes depend mainly on the pre-procedural clinical state of the patient. Radiologic follow-up is necessary to prevent hemorrhage recurrence after EVT. PMID:26539258

  8. A cerebellar neural network model for adaptative control of saccades implemented with MATLAB.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Campos, Francisco A; Enderle, John

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a neural network for the adaptative control of the saccadic system. The model shows the cerebellum plays an important role in the adaptive control of the saccadic gain. Using only eye position input through the granule cells, the cerebellum projects this signal to the other cerebellar structures and then to motor neurons responsible for the saccade. The generation of an adjustment signal occurs in the inferior olive as a result of the error sensory signal created by the open loop saccade system from propioceptive position inputs from the last eye movement generated by the network until the movement towards the target is completed. In addition, a memory component has been defined in the error system to achieve the adaptation. This neural network involves only the horizontal saccade component modeled with Matrix Laboratory language (MATLAB), in conjunction with the Simulink tool.

  9. Role of the olivo-cerebellar complex in motor learning and control

    PubMed Central

    Schweighofer, Nicolas; Lang, Eric J.; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2013-01-01

    How is the cerebellum capable of efficient motor learning and control despite very low firing of the inferior olive (IO) inputs, which are postulated to carry errors needed for learning and contribute to on-line motor control? IO neurons form the largest electrically coupled network in the adult human brain. Here, we discuss how intermediate coupling strengths can lead to chaotic resonance and increase information transmission of the error signal despite the very low IO firing rate. This increased information transmission can then lead to more efficient learning than with weak or strong coupling. In addition, we argue that a dynamic modulation of IO electrical coupling via the Purkinje cell-deep cerebellar neurons – IO triangle could speed up learning and improve on-line control. Initially strong coupling would allow transmission of large errors to multiple functionally related Purkinje cells, resulting in fast but coarse learning as well as significant effects on deep cerebellar nucleus and on-line motor control. In the late phase of learning decreased coupling would allow desynchronized IO firing, allowing high-fidelity transmission of error, resulting in slower but fine learning, and little on-line motor control effects. PMID:23754983

  10. Altered Cerebellar Circuitry following Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar function is critical for coordinating movement and motor learning. However, events occurring in the cerebellum following spinal cord injury (SCI) have not been investigated in detail. We provide evidence of SCI-induced cerebellar synaptic changes involving a loss of granule cell parallel fiber input to distal regions of the Purkinje cell dendritic tree. This is accompanied by an apparent increase in synaptic contacts to Purkinje cell proximal dendrites, presumably from climbing fibers originating in the inferior olive. We also observed an early stage injury-induced decrease in the levels of cerebellin-1, a synaptic organizing molecule that is critical for establishing and maintaining parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synaptic integrity. Interestingly, this transsynaptic reorganizational pattern is consistent with that reported during development and in certain transgenic mouse models. To our knowledge, such a reorganizational event has not been described in response to SCI in adult rats. Regardless, the novel results of this study are important for understanding SCI-induced synaptic changes in the cerebellum, which may prove critical for strategies focusing on promoting functional recovery. PMID:27504204

  11. CaV3.1 is a tremor rhythm pacemaker in the inferior olive

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Gyun; Park, Hye-Yeon; Lee, C. Justin; Choi, Soonwook; Jo, Seonmi; Choi, Hansol; Kim, Yang-Hann; Shin, Hee-Sup; Llinas, Rodolfo R.; Kim, Daesoo

    2010-01-01

    The rhythmic motor pathway activation by pacemaker neurons or circuits in the brain has been proposed as the mechanism for the timing of motor coordination, and the abnormal potentiation of this mechanism may lead to a pathological tremor. Here, we show that the potentiation of CaV3.1 T-type Ca2+ channels in the inferior olive contributes to the onset of the tremor in a pharmacological model of essential tremor. After administration of harmaline, 4- to 10-Hz synchronous neuronal activities arose from the IO and then propagated to cerebellar motor circuits in wild-type mice, but those rhythmic activities were absent in mice lacking CaV3.1 gene. Intracellular recordings in brain-stem slices revealed that the CaV3.1-deficient inferior olive neurons lacked the subthreshold oscillation of membrane potentials and failed to trigger 4- to 10-Hz rhythmic burst discharges in the presence of harmaline. In addition, the selective knockdown of CaV3.1 gene in the inferior olive by shRNA efficiently suppressed the harmaline-induced tremor in wild-type mice. A mathematical model constructed based on data obtained from patch-clamping experiments indicated that harmaline could efficiently potentiate CaV3.1 channels by changing voltage-dependent responsiveness in the hyperpolarizing direction. Thus, CaV3.1 is a molecular pacemaker substrate for intrinsic neuronal oscillations of inferior olive neurons, and the potentiation of this mechanism can be considered as a pathological cause of essential tremor. PMID:20498062

  12. Chaotic Resonance in Coupled Inferior Olive Neurons with the Llinás Approach Neuron Model.

    PubMed

    Nobukawa, Sou; Nishimura, Haruhiko

    2016-09-14

    It is well known that cerebellar motor control is fine-tuned by the learning process adjusted according to rich error signals from inferior olive (IO) neurons. Schweighofer and colleagues proposed that these signals can be produced by chaotic irregular firing in the IO neuron assembly; such chaotic resonance (CR) was replicated in their computer demonstration of a Hodgkin-Huxley (HH)-type compartment model. In this study, we examined the response of CR to a periodic signal in the IO neuron assembly comprising the Llinás approach IO neuron model. This system involves empirically observed dynamics of the IO membrane potential and is simpler than the HH-type compartment model. We then clarified its dependence on electrical coupling strength, input signal strength, and frequency. Furthermore, we compared the physiological validity for IO neurons such as low firing rate and sustaining subthreshold oscillation between CR and conventional stochastic resonance (SR) and examined the consistency with asynchronous firings indicated by the previous model-based studies in the cerebellar learning process. In addition, the signal response of CR and SR was investigated in a large neuron assembly. As the result, we confirmed that CR was consistent with the above IO neuron's characteristics, but it was not as easy for SR.

  13. Arterial Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... The arterial catheter allows accurate, second-to-second measurement of the blood pressure; repeated meas- urement is ... pressure must be lowered gradually in steps, and measurements with an arterial catheter help guide the treatment. ■ ...

  14. Clinical utility of a multigated modified anterior projection in the detection of left ventricular inferior and apical wall motion abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, J.F.; Bianco, J.A.; Kemper, A.J.; Tow, D.E.

    1982-04-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the left anterior oblique projection (LAO) multigated radionuclide ventriculogram (RVG) underestimates presence and extent of apical and inferior left ventricular (LV) wall motion abnormalities. We investigated, prospectively, the sensitivity and specificity of a modified anterior projection (MAP), which incorporates cephalad tilting. Thirty-three consecutive patients undergoing cardiac catheterization suspected to have coronary artery disease were studied with RVG, using both the MAP and LAO views. LAO views were analyzed using the ejection fraction image (REFI), and the regional ejection fraction (REF) of the inferoapical region. The MAP studies were analyzed using stroke volume image (SVI) to evaluate apical and inferior LV regions. Results were as follows: (Formula: see text), Both intraobserver and interobserver variabilities were comparable to those of conventional angiographic studies used in detection of apical and inferior asynergy. It is concluded that the multigated MAP offers additional information about abnormalities of the LV inferior and apical regions.

  15. Comparative anatomical studies on the thyroid and thymic arteries. VI. Diprotodont marsupials.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Masahiro

    2016-06-01

    The thyroid and thymic arteries in 44 specimens from 18 species belonging to the diprotodont marsupials were investigated. The results were compared with those of polyprotodont marsupials, suncuses, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, and man. The superior thyroid artery was constant in three superfamily groups. The inferior thyroid artery was extremely rare. The superior thymic artery arising from the thyrocervical trunk was observed in 1 phalangeroid and 2 macropodoids, and that arising from the vertebral artery occurred in 1 macropodoid. The middle thymic artery occurred in 1 phalangeroid, but was abundant in macropodoids. The inferior thymic artery was constant in koalas and phalangeroids, but was absent in half of the macropodoids. The thyroid ima, middle thymothyroid, and the supreme thymic arteries were absent in all diprotodonts. In addition to the usual thymus, diprotodonts have the superficial cervical thymus, which is only shared with guinea pigs. The superior superficial cervical thymic artery was absent in koalas and in half of the macropodoids, but was abundant in the phalangeroids. Conversely, the inferior superficial cervical thymic artery was constant in koalas and was dominant in the macropodoids. These results show that variations in the arterial patterns for both organs were much more prevalent in macropodoids than in phalangeroids, while the arterial patterns in koalas were characteristic. As a whole, the arteries for both organs were more complex in diprotodonts than in polyprotodonts or rats, but more simple than those in rabbits or man. The superior superficial cervical thymic arteries, which showed various patterns, were compared with those in guinea pigs.

  16. Successful third renal transplantation in a child with an occluded inferior vena cava: A novel technique to use the venous interposition between the transplant renal vein and the infrahepatic inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Masaki; Shishido, Seiichiro; Takahashi, Yusuke; Hamasaki, Yuko; Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Nihei, Hiroshi; Itabashi, Yoshihiro; Kawamura, Takeshi; Aikawa, Atsushi

    2017-03-19

    A girl aged 11 years and 3 months with occlusion of the inferior vena cava had experienced two renal transplant graft failures since birth. The third renal transplant from a live donor was carried out. Preoperative evaluation showed that the arteries from the right common to the right external iliac artery were absent, and the ilio-caval vein was occluded below the level of the renal vein. The donor's renal artery was anastomosed to the aorta. The donor's ovarian and large saphenous veins were used to extend the transplant renal vein to the recipient's patent inferior vena cava. The present report concludes that the extension of a short donor renal vein using other donor veins is a viable therapeutic option for pediatric patients with vascular occlusions.

  17. Lateralization Technique and Inferior Alveolar Nerve Transposition

    PubMed Central

    Sanches, Marco Antonio; Ramalho, Gabriel Cardoso; Manzi, Marcello Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Bone resorption of the posterior mandible can result in diminished bone edge and, therefore, the installation of implants in these regions becomes a challenge, especially in the presence of the mandibular canal and its contents, the inferior alveolar nerve. Several treatment alternatives are suggested: the use of short implants, guided bone regeneration, appositional bone grafting, distraction osteogenesis, inclined implants tangential to the mandibular canal, and the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve. The aim was to elucidate the success rate of implants in the lateralization technique and in inferior alveolar nerve transposition and to determine the most effective sensory test. We conclude that the success rate is linked to the possibility of installing implants with long bicortical anchor which favors primary stability and biomechanics. PMID:27433360

  18. An integrator circuit in cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Maex, Reinoud; Steuber, Volker

    2013-09-01

    The brain builds dynamic models of the body and the outside world to predict the consequences of actions and stimuli. A well-known example is the oculomotor integrator, which anticipates the position-dependent elasticity forces acting on the eye ball by mathematically integrating over time oculomotor velocity commands. Many models of neural integration have been proposed, based on feedback excitation, lateral inhibition or intrinsic neuronal nonlinearities. We report here that a computational model of the cerebellar cortex, a structure thought to implement dynamic models, reveals a hitherto unrecognized integrator circuit. In this model, comprising Purkinje cells, molecular layer interneurons and parallel fibres, Purkinje cells were able to generate responses lasting more than 10 s, to which both neuronal and network mechanisms contributed. Activation of the somatic fast sodium current by subthreshold voltage fluctuations was able to maintain pulse-evoked graded persistent activity, whereas lateral inhibition among Purkinje cells via recurrent axon collaterals further prolonged the responses to step and sine wave stimulation. The responses of Purkinje cells decayed with a time-constant whose value depended on their baseline spike rate, with integration vanishing at low (< 1 per s) and high rates (> 30 per s). The model predicts that the apparently fast circuit of the cerebellar cortex may control the timing of slow processes without having to rely on sensory feedback. Thus, the cerebellar cortex may contain an adaptive temporal integrator, with the sensitivity of integration to the baseline spike rate offering a potential mechanism of plasticity of the response time-constant.

  19. Neocortical networks entrain neuronal circuits in cerebellar cortex

    PubMed Central

    Roš, Hana; Sachdev, Robert N. S.; Yu, Yuguo; Šestan, Nenad; McCormick, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Activity in neocortex is often characterized by synchronized oscillations of neurons and networks, resulting in the generation of a local field potential and electroencephalogram. Do the neuronal networks of the cerebellum also generate synchronized oscillations and are they under the influence of those in the neocortex? Here we show that in the absence of any overt external stimulus, the cerebellar cortex generates a slow oscillation that is correlated with that of the neocortex. Disruption of the neocortical slow oscillation abolishes the cerebellar slow oscillation, whereas blocking cerebellar activity has no overt effect on the neocortex. We provide evidence that the cerebellar slow oscillation results in part from the activation of granule, Golgi, and Purkinje neurons. In particular, we show that granule and Golgi cells discharge trains of single spikes, and Purkinje cells generate complex spikes, during the Up state of the slow oscillation. Purkinje cell simple spiking is weakly related to the cerebellar and neocortical slow oscillation in a minority of cells. Our results indicate that the cerebellum generates rhythmic network activity that can be recorded as an LFP in the anesthetized animal, which is driven by synchronized oscillations of the neocortex. Furthermore, we show that correlations between neocortical and cerebellar LFPs persist in the awake animal, indicating that neocortical circuits modulate cerebellar neurons in a similar fashion in natural behavioral states. Thus, the projection neurons of the neocortex collectively exert a driving and modulatory influence on cerebellar network activity. PMID:19692605

  20. Acute cerebellar ataxia with human parvovirus B19 infection

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Y.; Ueno, T.; Komatsu, H.; Takada, H.; Nunoue, T.

    1999-01-01

    A 2 year old boy developed acute cerebellar ataxia in association with erythema infectiosum. During the disease, genomic DNA and antibodies against human parvovirus B19 were detected in serum but not in cerebrospinal fluid. Parvovirus B19 associated acute cerebellar ataxia might occur due to transient vascular reaction in the cerebellum during infection.

 PMID:10325764

  1. [Clinical study of two cases of traumatic cerebellar injury].

    PubMed

    Yokota, H; Nakazawa, S; Kobayashi, S; Taniguchi, Y; Yukihide, T

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of traumatic cerebellar injury complicated with a traumatic medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) syndrome or cerebellar mutism were reported, and the cause of these mechanisms was discussed: Case 1: A 9-year-old boy who struck his head in the occipital region during an automobile accident was operated on for a delayed traumatic intracerebellar hematoma. The operation improved the level of his consciousness but MLF syndrome was noticed. The mechanism of traumatic MLF syndrome was discussed in relation to vascular injury and to neurovascular friction. The outcome of the syndrome including our case, which recovered spontaneously, seemed to support the theory of neurovascular injury. Case 2: A 6-year-old boy who struck his head in the temporooccipital region during an automobile accident was admitted to our hospital without conciousness. On admission, contusion of the temporal lobe and left cerebellar hemisphere was demonstrated by a computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A mute state (cerebellar mutism) was recognized after his recovery of consciousness. The cause of the cerebellar mutism was thought to be an injury of the cerebellar vermis or left cerebellar hemisphere. The findings of CT scan and MRI in our case suggested that the cause of the cerebellar mutism was the contusion of these areas.

  2. Distinct Critical Cerebellar Subregions for Components of Verbal Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Freya E.; Grube, Manon; Von Kriegstein, Katharina; Kumar, Sukhbinder; English, Philip; Kelly, Thomas P.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Griffiths, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    A role for the cerebellum in cognition has been proposed based on studies suggesting a profile of cognitive deficits due to cerebellar stroke. Such studies are limited in the determination of the detailed organisation of cerebellar subregions that are critical for different aspects of cognition. In this study we examined the correlation between…

  3. Humor and laughter in patients with cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Frank, B; Propson, B; Göricke, S; Jacobi, H; Wild, B; Timmann, D

    2012-06-01

    Humor is a complex behavior which includes cognitive, affective and motor responses. Based on observations of affective changes in patients with cerebellar lesions, the cerebellum may support cerebral and brainstem areas involved in understanding and appreciation of humorous stimuli and expression of laughter. The aim of the present study was to examine if humor appreciation, perception of humorous stimuli, and the succeeding facial reaction differ between patients with cerebellar degeneration and healthy controls. Twenty-three adults with pure cerebellar degeneration were compared with 23 age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy control subjects. No significant difference in humor appreciation and perception of humorous stimuli could be found between groups using the 3 Witz-Dimensionen Test, a validated test asking for funniness and aversiveness of jokes and cartoons. Furthermore, while observing jokes, humorous cartoons, and video sketches, facial expressions of subjects were videotaped and afterwards analysed using the Facial Action Coding System. Using depression as a covariate, the number, and to a lesser degree, the duration of facial expressions during laughter were reduced in cerebellar patients compared to healthy controls. In sum, appreciation of humor appears to be largely preserved in patients with chronic cerebellar degeneration. Cerebellar circuits may contribute to the expression of laughter. Findings add to the literature that non-motor disorders in patients with chronic cerebellar disease are generally mild, but do not exclude that more marked disorders may show up in acute cerebellar disease and/or in more specific tests of humor appreciation.

  4. Inferior ST-Elevation Acute Myocardial Infarction or an Inferior-Lead Brugada-like Electrocardiogram Pattern Associated With the Use of Pregabalin and Quetiapine?

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Natale D; Ieva, Riccardo; Correale, Michele; Cuculo, Andrea; Santoro, Francesco; Guaricci, Andrea I; De Gennaro, Luisa; Gaglione, Antonio; Di Biase, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    The Brugada electrocardiogram pattern is characterized by coved-type ST-elevation (>2 mm) in the right precordial leads. We report the case of a 62-year-old man, with bipolar disorder, admitted to the emergency department because of dyspnea and chest discomfort. The patient was on treatment with pregabalin and quetiapine. Unexpectedly, electrocardiogram at admission showed diffuse ST-elevation, more evident in inferior leads, where a Brugada-like pattern was present. The patient underwent coronary angiography with a diagnosis of suspected acute coronary syndrome. Coronary angiography, however, showed mild coronary artery disease not requiring coronary angioplasty. Echocardiography did not reveal left ventricular dysfunction or pericardial effusion. Troponin levels remained normal over serial controls. Eventually, chest radiography showed lung opacities and consolidation suggestive for pneumonia. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first cases showing a transient Brugada-like electrocardiogram pattern in inferior leads, probably amplified by the administration of pregabalin and quetiapine.

  5. Inferior Vena Cava Filters for Recurrent Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Salil H.; Patel, Rima

    2007-01-01

    Inferior vena cava filters are often used as alternatives to anticoagulant therapy for the prevention of pulmonary embolism. Many of the clinical data that support the use of these devices stem from relatively limited retrospective studies. The dual purpose of this review is to examine the incidence of thrombotic complications associated with inferior vena cava filters and to discuss the role of anticoagulant therapy concurrent with filter placement. Device-associated morbidity and overall efficacy can be considered only in the context of rates of vena cava thrombosis, insertion-site thrombosis, recurrent deep venous thrombosis, and recurrent pulmonary embolism. PMID:17622366

  6. Preterm cerebellar growth impairment after postnatal exposure to glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Emily W. Y.; Chau, Vann; Ferriero, Donna M.; Barkovich, A. James; Poskitt, Kenneth J.; Studholme, Colin; Fok, Eric D.-Y.; Grunau, Ruth E.; Glidden, David V.; Miller, Steven P.

    2012-01-01

    With improving survival rates of preterm newborns, adverse cognitive outcomes are increasingly recognized. Adverse cognitive outcomes are associated with decreased cerebellar volumes, and modifiable risk factors for these adverse outcomes should be identified. Animal models demonstrate reduced preterm cerebellar growth after exposure to glucocorticoids. Preterm neonates were prospectively studied with serial MRI examinations near birth and again near term-equivalent age. Adjusting for associated clinical factors, antenatal bethamethasone was not associated with changes in cerebellar volume. Postnatal exposure to clinically routine doses of hydrocortisone or dexamethasone were associated with impaired cerebellar, but not cerebral, growth. Modifying postnatal risk factors for impaired cerebellar development, and particularly glucocorticoid exposure, may help to decrease risk for adverse neurological outcome after preterm birth. PMID:22013125

  7. The physiological basis of therapies for cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Manto, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias represent a group of heterogeneous disorders impacting on activities of daily living and quality of life. Various therapies have been proposed to improve symptoms in cerebellar ataxias. This review examines the physiological background of the various treatments currently administered worldwide. We analyze the mechanisms of action of drugs with a focus on aminopyridines and other antiataxic medications, of noninvasive cerebellar stimulation, and of motor rehabilitation. Considering the cerebellum as a controller, we propose the novel concept of ‘restorable stage’. Because of its unique anatomical architecture and its diffuse connectivity in particular with the cerebral cortex, keeping in mind the anatomophysiology of the cerebellar circuitry is a necessary step to understand the rationale of therapies of cerebellar ataxias and develop novel therapeutic tools. PMID:27582895

  8. Cerebellar vermis plays a causal role in visual motion discrimination.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Renzi, Chiara; Casali, Stefano; Silvanto, Juha; Vecchi, Tomaso; Papagno, Costanza; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-09-01

    Cerebellar patients have been found to show deficits in visual motion discrimination, suggesting that the cerebellum may play a role in visual sensory processing beyond mediating motor control. Here we show that triple-pulse online transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over cerebellar vermis but not over the cerebellar hemispheres significantly impaired motion discrimination. Critically, the interference caused by vermis TMS on motion discrimination did not depend on an indirect effect of TMS over nearby visual areas, as demonstrated by a control experiment in which TMS over V1 but not over cerebellar vermis significantly impaired orientation discrimination. These findings demonstrate the causal role of the cerebellar vermis in visual motion processing in neurologically normal participants.

  9. Cerebellar mass as a location of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Desideri, Ilaria; Canovetti, Silvia; Pesaresi, Ilaria; Caniglia, Michele; Ciancia, Eugenio; Bartolozzi, Carlo; Puglioli, Michele; Cosottini, Mirco

    2014-09-01

    A 22-year-old man with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was referred to our observation for headache, cervical pain and sopor. A computed tomography study revealed triventricular obstructive hydrocephalus due to a left cerebellar hyperdense mass impinging on the fourth ventricle. A magnetic resonance study demonstrated an area of hyperintensity on T2-weighted images, hypointensity on T1, restricted diffusivity and contrast enhancement involving the left hemispherical cerebellar cortex and the vermis and causing cerebellar herniation. After surgical excision of the lesion, histological examination revealed an infiltrate of lymphoblastic leukaemia with B cells. Leukaemic intracranial masses are rare. Our report describes a case presenting a cerebellar mass of leukaemic tissue characterized by high cellularity and low apparent diffusion coefficient value comparable to acute ischaemia. Therefore leukaemic intracranial mass has to be considered in the differential diagnosis of cerebellar masses.

  10. New evidence for the cerebellar involvement in personality traits

    PubMed Central

    Picerni, Eleonora; Petrosini, Laura; Piras, Fabrizio; Laricchiuta, Daniela; Cutuli, Debora; Chiapponi, Chiara; Fagioli, Sabrina; Girardi, Paolo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Following the recognition of its role in sensory-motor coordination and learning, the cerebellum has been involved in cognitive, emotional, and even personality domains. This study investigated the relationships between cerebellar macro- and micro-structural variations and temperamental traits measured by Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). High resolution T1-weighted, and Diffusion Tensor Images of 100 healthy subjects aged 18–59 years were acquired by 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance scanner. In multiple regression analyses, cerebellar Gray Matter (GM) or White Matter (WM) volumes, GM Mean Diffusivity (MD), and WM Fractional Anisotropy (FA) were used as dependent variables, TCI scores as regressors, gender, age, and education years as covariates. Novelty Seeking scores were associated positively with the cerebellar GM volumes and FA, and negatively with MD. No significant association between Harm Avoidance, Reward Dependence or Persistence scores and cerebellar structural measures was found. The present data put toward a cerebellar involvement in the management of novelty. PMID:24106465

  11. New evidence for the cerebellar involvement in personality traits.

    PubMed

    Picerni, Eleonora; Petrosini, Laura; Piras, Fabrizio; Laricchiuta, Daniela; Cutuli, Debora; Chiapponi, Chiara; Fagioli, Sabrina; Girardi, Paolo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Following the recognition of its role in sensory-motor coordination and learning, the cerebellum has been involved in cognitive, emotional, and even personality domains. This study investigated the relationships between cerebellar macro- and micro-structural variations and temperamental traits measured by Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). High resolution T1-weighted, and Diffusion Tensor Images of 100 healthy subjects aged 18-59 years were acquired by 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance scanner. In multiple regression analyses, cerebellar Gray Matter (GM) or White Matter (WM) volumes, GM Mean Diffusivity (MD), and WM Fractional Anisotropy (FA) were used as dependent variables, TCI scores as regressors, gender, age, and education years as covariates. Novelty Seeking scores were associated positively with the cerebellar GM volumes and FA, and negatively with MD. No significant association between Harm Avoidance, Reward Dependence or Persistence scores and cerebellar structural measures was found. The present data put toward a cerebellar involvement in the management of novelty.

  12. A left cerebellar pathway mediates language in prematurely-born young adults.

    PubMed

    Constable, R Todd; Vohr, Betty R; Scheinost, Dustin; Benjamin, Jennifer R; Fulbright, Robert K; Lacadie, Cheryl; Schneider, Karen C; Katz, Karol H; Zhang, Heping; Papademetris, Xenophon; Ment, Laura R

    2013-01-01

    Preterm (PT) subjects are at risk for developmental delay, and task-based studies suggest that developmental disorders may be due to alterations in neural connectivity. Since emerging data imply the importance of right cerebellar function for language acquisition in typical development, we hypothesized that PT subjects would have alternate areas of cerebellar connectivity, and that these areas would be responsible for differences in cognitive outcomes between PT subjects and term controls at age 20 years. Nineteen PT and 19 term control young adults were prospectively studied using resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) to create voxel-based contrast maps reflecting the functional connectivity of each tissue element in the grey matter through analysis of the intrinsic connectivity contrast degree (ICC-d). Left cerebellar ICC-d differences between subjects identified a region of interest that was used for subsequent seed-based connectivity analyses. Subjects underwent standardized language testing, and correlations with cognitive outcomes were assessed. There were no differences in gender, hand preference, maternal education, age at study, or Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT) scores. Functional connectivity (FcMRI) demonstrated increased tissue connectivity in the biventer, simple and quadrangular lobules of the L cerebellum (p<0.05) in PTs compared to term controls; seed-based analyses from these regions demonstrated alterations in connectivity from L cerebellum to both R and L inferior frontal gyri (IFG) in PTs compared to term controls. For PTs but not term controls, there were significant positive correlations between these connections and PPVT scores (R IFG: r=0.555, p=0.01; L IFG: r=0.454, p=0.05), as well as Verbal Comprehension Index (VCI) scores (R IFG: r=0.472, p=0.04). These data suggest the presence of a left cerebellar language circuit in PT subjects at young adulthood. These findings may represent either a delay in maturation or the engagement of

  13. Evaluating cerebellar functions using optogenetic transgenic mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, John P.; Turecek, Josef; Turner, Eric E.

    2013-03-01

    We employed a transgenic mouse having conditional expression of ChR2(H134R) in neurons of the inferior olive to facilitate understanding of the role of electrical coupling and oscillation in central nervous system function. Two-photon excitation of ChR2-expressing neurons using 64 laser beams restricted to single inferior olive cell bodies depolarized neurons and evoked voltage deflections in neighboring neurons demonstrating electrical coupling. Broader illumination of neuronal ensembles using blue light induced an optical clamp of endogenous electrical rhythms in the inferior olive of acutely-prepared brain slices, which when applied in vivo directly modulated the local field potential activity and induced tremor. The experiments demonstrate novel methods to optically manipulate electrically coupled potentials and rhythmogenesis within a neuronal ensemble. From a functional perspective, the experiments shed light on the cellular and circuitry mechanisms of essential tremor, a prevalent neurological condition, by indicating time- and frequencydependence of tremor upon varying rhythms of inferior olive stimulation. The experiments indicate analog control of a brain rhythm that may be used to enhance our understanding of the functional consequences of central rhythmogenesis.

  14. Mucosal perforators from the facial artery.

    PubMed

    Coronel-Banda, Mauricio E; Serra-Renom, Jose M; Lorente, Marian; Larrea-Terán, Wendy P

    2014-07-01

    The cutaneous perforators of the facial artery have been well described, but to our knowledge the oral mucosal perforators have not. We studied 10 facial arteries from 10 hemifaces in 5 cadavers. The arteries were injected with latex, and we studied all perforators that extended from the facial artery and headed directly to the oral mucosa. The diameter and length of the facial artery and its mucosal perforators were measured and compared. We found 52 oral mucosal perforators in the 10 facial arteries injected with latex. Their mean (SD) diameter was 0.5 (0.2) mm and the mean (SD) number/facial artery was 5.2 (1.1). Their mean (SD) length was 16.4 (5.3) mm. Most of those to the cheek were localised between the branching-off points of the inferior and superior labial arteries. The facial artery has perforators to the oral mucosa of the cheek, most of them between the points at which the labial arteries emerge.

  15. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  16. Aorto-gastroduodenal bypass grafting for an inferior pancreaticoduodenal aneurysm and celiac trunk thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Jens C; Johnston, Malcolm; Caruana, Mario F; Laws, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of a male patient diagnosed with a large inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA) aneurysm, associated with a fresh thrombotic occlusion of the celiac trunk. Given the risk of splanchnic ischaemia, radiologic embolisation of the aneurysm combined with celiac axis stenting was deemed unsafe. Management was therefore modified to elective revascularisation of the celiac axis prior to surgical resection of the aneurysm. A retropancreatic aorto-gastroduodenal artery bypass graft was performed prior to exposing and resecting the pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm. This ensured near uninterrupted retrograde supply to the celiac axis during the procedure. This is an effective, efficient and expeditious patient pathway for these rare and complex aneurysms complicated by celiac trunk involvement.

  17. Efferent pathways modulate hyperactivity in inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Mulders, Wilhelmina Henrica A M; Seluakumaran, Kumar; Robertson, Donald

    2010-07-14

    Animal models have demonstrated that mild hearing loss caused by acoustic trauma results in spontaneous hyperactivity in the central auditory pathways. This hyperactivity has been hypothesized to be involved in the generation of tinnitus, a phantom auditory sensation. We have recently shown that such hyperactivity, recorded in the inferior colliculus, is still dependent on cochlear neural output for some time after recovery (up to 6 weeks). We have now studied the capacity of an intrinsic efferent system, i.e., the olivocochlear system, to alter hyperactivity. This system is known to modulate cochlear neural output. Anesthetized guinea pigs were exposed to a loud sound and after 2 or 3 weeks of recovery, single-neuron recordings in inferior colliculus were made to confirm hyperactivity. Olivocochlear axons were electrically stimulated and effects on cochlear neural output and on highly spontaneous neurons in inferior colliculus were assessed. Olivocochlear stimulation suppressed spontaneous hyperactivity in the inferior colliculus. This result is in agreement with our earlier finding that hyperactivity can be modulated by altering cochlear neural output. Interestingly, the central suppression was generally much larger and longer lasting than reported previously for primary afferents. Blockade of the intracochlear effects of olivocochlear system activation eliminated some but not all of the effects observed on spontaneous activity, suggesting also a central component to the effects of stimulation. More research is needed to investigate whether these central effects of olivocochlear efferent stimulation are due to central intrinsic circuitry or to coactivation of central efferent collaterals to the cochlear nucleus.

  18. [A case of medial medullary infarction with persistent primitive hypoglossal artery].

    PubMed

    Jin, Kazutaka; Aihara, Naoto; Tsukamoto, Tetsuro

    2002-04-01

    A 66-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of vomiting, dizziness and vertigo. Neurological examination on admission revealed only upbeat nystagmus without cranial nerve symptoms, paresis, cerebellar signs or sensory disturbances. Magnetic resonance(MR) images demonstrated a new T 2 high intensity and T 1 iso-intensity signal lesion in the right upper medial medulla. This medial medullary infarction caused central vestibular dysfunction. MR angiography and digital subtraction angiography demonstrated a persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA) originating from the right internal carotid artery to the vertebrobasilar artery associated with the stenosis of the right internal carotid artery at the level of the cervical bifurcation. This is the first report of medullary infarction with persistent carotid-basilar anastomosis. We suspected this medullary infarction was caused by artery to artery embolism in the branch of the right vertebral artery through the PPHA distal originated from the stenosis of the right internal carotid artery.

  19. Anatomy of the medial femoral circumflex artery with respect to the vascularity of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Zlotorowicz, M; Szczodry, M; Czubak, J; Ciszek, B

    2011-11-01

    We performed a series of 16 anatomical dissections on Caucasian cadaver material to determine the surgical anatomy of the medial femoral circumflex artery (MFCA) and its anastomoses. These confirmed that the femoral head receives its blood supply primarily from the MFCA via a group of posterior superior nutrient arteries and the posterior inferior nutrient artery. In terms of anastomoses that may also contribute to the blood supply, the anastomosis with the inferior gluteal artery, via the piriformis branch, is the most important. These dissections provide a base of knowledge for further radiological studies on the vascularity of the normal femoral head and its vascularity after dislocation of the hip.

  20. [Anatomic study of the arteries and nervous plexus of the prostate and their clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Chen, X Q

    1989-06-01

    The arteries and nervous plexus of prostates were observed on 32 sides of male adult cadavers. 74.3% of prostatic arteries were derived from the inferior vesical arteries. The latters divided into branches at a site of 24 +/- 10 mm above 4(8) o'clock point of intervesico-prostatic sulcus. According to the anatomical results, the authors have put and used a new hemostatic method ligating the inferior vesical arteries prior to the section of the hyperplastic gland tissue in 18 cases. Bleeding volume in the operations was 80 ml average. The various color varied from red to clean was 90 minutes average after the operations.

  1. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization of Concurrent Spontaneous Hematomas of the Rectus Sheath and Psoas Muscle in Patients Undergoing Anticoagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, Antonio; Medina, Jose Garcia; Mundo, Elena; Medina, Vicente Garcia; Leal, Rafael

    2004-11-15

    We report a case of concurrent rectus sheath and psoas hematomas in a patient undergoing anticoagulant therapy, treated by transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) of inferior epigastric and lumbar arteries. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated signs of active bleeding in two hematomas of the anterior and posterior abdominal walls. Transfemoral arteriogram confirmed the extravasation of contrast from the right inferior epigastric artery (RIEA). Indirect signs of bleeding were also found in a right lumbar artery (RLA). We successfully performed TAE of the feeding arteries. There have been few reports in the literature of such spontaneous hemorrhages in patients undergoing anticoagulation, successfully treated by TAE.

  2. The Arteries of the Brain in Hare (Lepus europaeus Pallas, 1778).

    PubMed

    Brudnicki, Witold; Kirkiłło-Stacewicz, Krzysztof; Skoczylas, Benedykt; Nowicki, Włodzimierz; Jabłoński, Ryszard; Brudnicki, Adam; Wach, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Research into course and variability of brain arteries in hare were performed on 38 adult hares of both sexes (males 23 and females 15). The arteries were filled with a synthetic latex at a constant pressure introduced with a medical syringe to the left ventricle. The source of blood supply to the brain was internal carotid arteries, whose branches formed an arterial circle of the brain, vertebral arteries, and basilar artery as the result of its anastomosis. Variability focused on a method of departure of middle cerebral arteries, which were multiple vessels in 39.5% of cases and rostral cerebellar arteries. Caudal communicating arteries in hare comprised bilateral anastomosis of internal carotid arteries and final branches of the basilar artery. It stabilized the steady flow of blood to all parts of the brain. Caudal cerebral arteries comprised final branches of the basilar artery. The largest capacity of all the arteries of the brain was observed in the main trunk of the basilar artery. The capacity of these vessels was 4.53 mm(3) on average. The factor of capacity of cerebral arteries in relation to weight of the brain reaches a high value in hare.

  3. Cerebellar dentate nuclei lesions alter prefrontal cortex dendritic spine morphology.

    PubMed

    Bauer, David J; Peterson, Todd C; Swain, Rodney A

    2014-01-28

    Anatomical tracing studies in primates have revealed neural tracts from the cerebellar dentate nuclei to prefrontal cortex, implicating a cerebellar role in nonmotor processes. Experiments in rats examining the functional role of this cerebellothalamocortical pathway have demonstrated the development of visuospatial and motivational deficits following lesions of the dentate nuclei, in the absence of motor impairment. These behavioral deficits possibly occur due to structural modifications of the cerebral cortex secondary to loss of cerebellar input. The current study characterized morphological alterations in prefrontal cortex important for visuospatial and motivational processes following bilateral cerebellar dentate nuclei lesions. Rats received either bilateral electrolytic cerebellar dentate nuclei lesions or sham surgery followed by a 30-day recovery. Randomly selected Golgi-impregnated neurons in prefrontal cortex were examined for analysis. Measures of branch length and spine density revealed no differences between lesioned and sham rats in either apical or basilar arbors; however, the proportion of immature to mature spines significantly decreased in lesioned rats as compared to sham controls, with reductions of 33% in the basilar arbor and 28% in the apical arbor. Although expected pruning of branches and spines did not occur, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that cerebellar lesions influence prefrontal morphology and support the possibility that functional deficits following cerebellar dentate nuclei lesions are related to prefrontal morphological alteration.

  4. Pleural and Pulmonary Staining at Inferior Phrenic Arteriography Mimicking a Tumor Staining of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Deok Hee; Hwang, Jae Cheol; Lim, Soo Mee; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Sung, Kyu-Bo; Song, Ho-Young

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To describe the findings of pleural and pulmonary staining of the inferior phrenic artery, which can be confused with tumor staining during transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) of hepatoma.Methods: Fifteen patients who showed pleural and pulmonary staining without relationship to hepatic masses at inferior phrenic arteriography were enrolled. The staining was noted at initial TACE (n = 8), at successive TACE (n = 5), and after hepatic surgery (n = 2). The angiographic pattern, the presence of pleural change on computed tomography (CT), and clinical history were evaluated.Results: Draining pulmonary veins were seen in all cases. The lower margin of the staining corresponded to the lower margin of the pleura in 10 patients. CT showed pleural and/or pulmonary abnormalities in all cases. After embolization of the inferior phrenic artery, the accumulation of iodized oil in the lung was noted.Conclusion: Understanding the CT and angiographic findings of pleural and pulmonary staining during TACE may help differentiate benign staining from tumor staining.

  5. Brachioradial arteries with anastomotic arteries connecting to brachial arteries bilaterally.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tong; Qiuhong, Dan; Haipeng, Cai

    2010-01-01

    We present a patient with a failed radial coronary angioplasty as a result of bilateral brachioradial arteries, the radial arteries anomalously originating from the axillary arteries. We review the literature concerning abnormal origins of the radial artery and propose the left ulnar artery as optimal access of choice in cases with a right brachioradial artery of relatively small size in its proximal part.

  6. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting with cerebellar ataxia and cortical blindness.

    PubMed

    Ben Sassi, Samia; Mizouni, Habiba; Nabli, Fatma; Kallel, Lamia; Kefi, Mounir; Hentati, Fayçal

    2010-01-01

    Venous infarction in the cerebellum has been reported only rarely, probably because of the abundant venous collateral drainage in this region. Bilateral occipital infarction is a rare cause of visual loss in cerebral venous thrombosis. We describe a 50-year-old woman with a history of ulcerative colitis who developed acute cerebellar ataxia and cortical blindness. She had bilateral cerebellar and occipital lesions related to sigmoid venous thrombosis and achieved complete recovery with anticoagulation therapy. Cerebral venous thrombosis should be considered in cases of simultaneous cerebellar and occipital vascular lesions.

  7. Cerebellar Mutism Following Closed Head Injury in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Kariyattil, Rajeev; Rahim, Mohamed I. A.; Muthukuttiparambil, Unnikrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism is a rare occurrence following paediatric trauma. Although it is quite common after posterior fossa surgery in children, this phenomenon has rarely been reported following other insults, such as trauma, and its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. We report a seven-year-old child who presented to the casualty department of Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in May 2013 with a traumatic right cerebellar contusion. The child presented with clinical features of cerebellar mutism but underwent a rapid and spontaneous recovery. The possible mechanism of this occurrence is discussed. PMID:25685374

  8. Lissencephaly with brainstem and cerebellar hypoplasia and congenital cataracts.

    PubMed

    Abumansour, Iman S; Wrogemann, Jens; Chudley, Albert E; Chodirker, Bernard N; Salman, Michael S

    2014-06-01

    Classical lissencephaly may be associated with cerebellar hypoplasia and when significant cerebellar abnormalities occur, defects in proteins encoded by TUBA1A, RELN, and very-low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) genes have been reported. We present a neonate with a severe neurologic phenotype associated with hypotonia, oropharyngeal incoordination that required a gastric tube for feeding, intractable epilepsy, and congenital cataracts. Her brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed classical lissencephaly, ventriculomegaly, absent corpus callosum, globular and vertical hippocampi, and severe cerebellar and brainstem hypoplasia. She died at 6 weeks of age. No specific molecular diagnosis was made. This likely represents a previously undescribed genetic lissencephaly syndrome.

  9. Complete heart block in late presentation of inferior STEMI successfully treated with percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Liang, Michael; Chin, John; Pasupati, Sanjeevan

    2011-09-01

    A 55-year-old female presented with 4-day history of fatigue and exertional shortness of breath. A late presentation inferior ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) was diagnosed based on ST elevation in the inferior leads of electrocardiography and elevated cardiac troponin T (TnT). She developed complete heart block 1 day after admission to the hospital and remained hemodynamically stable. She was taken to the catheterization laboratory for a temporary pacing wire insertion. Coronary angiogram at the same time showed an occluded right coronary artery at the mid-section. The lesion was successfully opened. Within 24 hours, the patient's heart rhythm returned to sinus with first-degree atrioventricular block (AVB), thus avoiding the need for a permanent pacemaker. Current guidelines recommend medical management for late presentation hemodynamically stable STEMI of more than 72 H onset. Current ACC/AHA/HRS Pacemaker Guidelines recommend reperfusion strategy for acute presentation inferior STEMI associated with AVB. However, no clear strategy exists in the case of late presentation inferior STEMI with advanced AVB. Our case report suggests that late coronary intervention could be a management strategy in such a scenario in order to avoid a permanent pacemaker.

  10. The arcuate nucleus of the C57BL/6J mouse hindbrain is a displaced part of the inferior olive.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu Hong; Watson, Charles

    2012-01-01

    The arcuate nucleus is a prominent cell group in the human hindbrain, characterized by its position on the pial surface of the pyramid. It is considered to be a precerebellar nucleus and has been implicated in the pathology of several disorders of respiration. An arcuate nucleus has not been convincingly demonstrated in other mammals, but we have found a similarly positioned nucleus in the C57BL/6J mouse. The mouse arcuate nucleus consists of a variable group of neurons lying on the pial surface of the pyramid. The nucleus is continuous with the ventrolateral part of the principal nucleus of the inferior olive and both groups are calbindin positive. At first we thought that this mouse nucleus was homologous with the human arcuate nucleus, but we have discovered that the neurons of the human nucleus are calbindin negative, and are therefore not olivary in nature. We have compared the mouse arcuate neurons with those of the inferior olive in terms of molecular markers and cerebellar projection. The neurons of the arcuate nucleus and of the inferior olive share three major characteristics: they both contain neurons utilizing glutamate, serotonin or acetylcholine as neurotransmitters; they both project to the contralateral cerebellum, and they both express a number of genes not present in the major mossy fiber issuing precerebellar nuclei. Most importantly, both cell groups express calbindin in an area of the ventral hindbrain almost completely devoid of calbindin-positive cells. We conclude that the neurons of the hindbrain mouse arcuate nucleus are a displaced part of the inferior olive, possibly separated by the caudal growth of the pyramidal tract during development. The arcuate nucleus reported in the C57BL/6J mouse can therefore be regarded as a subgroup of the rostral inferior olive, closely allied with the ventral tier of the principal nucleus.

  11. Chronic THC intake modifies fundamental cerebellar functions

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Nephi

    2013-01-01

    Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal bioactive component in the Cannabis plant, is truly a captivating drug. Acute and chronic THC intake produces a spectrum of biological effects ranging from transient psychotropic effects to prolonged medicinal benefits, many of which have been fostered for centuries by our society. In the July 2013 issue of the JCI, Cutando et al. combined mouse genetics with classic mouse behavioral analysis to deepen our understanding of the physiological consequence of subchronic THC intake on eyeblink reflexes, a fundamental neuronal adaptive response, revealing that this regimen leads to downregulation of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (referred to as CB1 in the Cutando et al. article) in cerebellar stress fibers and the activation of microglia, raising provocative new questions about the safety profile of regimented THC intake. PMID:23863631

  12. Classically conditioned postural reflex in cerebellar patients.

    PubMed

    Kolb, F P; Lachauer, S; Maschke, M; Timmann, D

    2004-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to compare postural responses to repetitive platform-evoked perturbations in cerebellar patients with those of healthy subjects using a classical conditioning paradigm. The perturbations consisted of tilting of the platform (unconditioned stimulus: US) at random time intervals, preceded by an auditory signal that represented the conditioning stimulus (CS). Physiological reactions were recorded biomechanically by measuring the vertical ground forces, yielding the center of vertical pressure (CVP), and electrophysiologically by EMG measurements of the main muscle groups of both legs. The recording session consisted of a control section with US-alone trials, a testing section with paired stimuli and a brief final section with US-alone trials. Healthy control subjects were divided into those establishing conditioned responses (CR) in all muscles tested (strategy I) and those with CR in the gastrocnemius muscles only (strategy II), suggesting an associative motor-related process is involved. Patients with a diffuse, non-localized disease were almost unable to establish CR. This was also true for a patient with a focal surgical lesion with no CR on the affected side but who, simultaneously, showed an essentially normal CR incidence on the intact side. During US-alone trials healthy controls exhibited a remarkable decay of the UR amplitude due to a non-associative motor-related process such as habituation. The decay was most prominent in the paired trials section. In contrast, patients showed no significant differences in the UR amplitude throughout the entire recording session. Analysis of the CVP supported the electrophysiological findings, showing CR in the controls only. The differences between the responses of control subjects and those of the cerebellar patients imply strongly that the cerebellum is involved critically in controlling associative and non-associative motor-related processes.

  13. Leiomyosarcoma arising from the inferior mesenteric vein

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Gennaro; Sarno, Gerardo; Barbaro, Brunella; Nuzzo, Gennaro

    2009-01-01

    Leyomiosarcomas arising from the portal/mesenteric venous system are very rare tumours, and only a few cases have been reported in the global literature. As the other leyomiosarcomas of vascular origin, they are associated with a poor prognosis. The present report describes the case of a 66-year-old woman with a leyomiosarcoma of the inferior mesenteric vein, unexpectedly found during a CT scan performed for another indication. A brief review of the literature is also given. The patient underwent radical surgical excision and enjoys a good health, without radiological signs of recurrence, 24 months after surgery. In this case, an early incidental diagnosis determined an early treatment and, probably, a favourable prognosis. This is the second case of leyomiosarcoma of the inferior mesenteric vein reported in the literature. PMID:21686492

  14. Spinocerebellar ataxias types 2 and 3: degeneration of the pre-cerebellar nuclei isolates the three phylogenetically defined regions of the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Rüb, U; Gierga, K; Brunt, E R; de Vos, R A I; Bauer, M; Schöls, L; Bürk, K; Auburger, G; Bohl, J; Schultz, C; Vuksic, M; Burbach, G J; Braak, H; Deller, T

    2005-11-01

    The pre-cerebellar nuclei act as a gate for the entire neocortical, brainstem and spinal cord afferent input destined for the cerebellum. Since no pathoanatomical studies of these nuclei had yet been performed in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) or type 3 (SCA3), we carried out a detailed postmortem study of the pre-cerebellar nuclei in six SCA2 and seven SCA3 patients in order to further characterize the extent of brainstem degeneration in these ataxic disorders. By means of unconventionally thick serial sections through the brainstem stained for lipofuscin pigment and Nissl material, we could show that all of the pre-cerebellar nuclei (red, pontine, arcuate, prepositus hypoglossal, superior vestibular, lateral vestibular, medial vestibular, interstitial vestibular, spinal vestibular, vermiform, lateral reticular, external cuneate, subventricular, paramedian reticular, intercalate, interfascicular hypoglossal, and conterminal nuclei, pontobulbar body, reticulotegmental nucleus of the pons, inferior olive, and nucleus of Roller) are among the targets of both of the degenerative processes underlying SCA2 and SCA3. These novel findings are in contrast to the current neuropathological literature, which assumes that only a subset of pre-cerebellar nuclei in SCA2 and SCA3 may undergo neurodegeneration. Widespread damage to the pre-cerebellar nuclei separates all three phylogenetically and functionally defined regions of the cerebellum, impairs their physiological functions and thus explains the occurrence of gait, stance, limb and truncal ataxia, dysarthria, truncal and postural instability with disequilibrium, impairments of the vestibulo-ocular reaction and optokinetic nystagmus, slowed and saccadic smooth pursuits, dysmetrical horizontal saccades, and gaze-evoked nystagmus during SCA2 and SCA3.

  15. Case report: Rapid improvement of crossed cerebellar diaschisis after intravascular laser irradiation of blood in a case of stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wan-Hua; Lin, Shiou-Ping; Chang, Shin-Tsu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) is a poor prognostic factor after stroke because without immediate cerebral reperfusion no further improvements in the patient's condition can be achieved. We investigated the clinical effects of intravascular laser irradiation therapy (ILIB) on CCD and evaluated the therapeutic effect in the sub-acute post-stroke stage. Patient concerns: The 77-year-old male with cerebral infarction in the territory of the right anterior cerebral artery only underwent conservative treatment including hydration and aspirin in the acute post-stroke stage. Diagnosis: He was diagnosed as stroke based on the clinical presentations and imaging findings. Intervention: Once the patient was in stable condition, he underwent a daily hour-long ILIB (He-Ne laser) for ten consecutive days during the sub-acute post-stroke stage. Outcomes: We used single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) before and after intravascular laser irradiation to detect changes in cerebral and cerebellar perfusion. Then, we compared the two images. CCD was detected using the first SPECT. After intervention by ILIB, the second SPECT showed greater perfusion in the affected cerebellar hemisphere. Lessons: We found that ILIB helped eliminate CCD, which was previously shown to be an untreatable condition using any intervention during the sub-acute post-stroke stage. Stroke patients could therefore greatly benefit from ILIB. PMID:28079797

  16. Leiomyosarcoma of the Inferior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Sadri, Ben Abid; Amine, Attaoui Mohamed; Zeineb, Mzoughi; Nizar, Miloudi; Lassad, Gharbi; Khalfallah, Mohamed Tahar

    2013-01-01

    Vascular leiomyosarcoma (LMS) are unique. The inferior vena cava (IVC) is the most affected organ (about 38% cases). We report the observation of a 50-year old woman who consulted for right upper quadrant pain. Imaging studies revealed a retroperitoneal mass that mimic a LMS of the IVC. The patient was operated. A resection of the IVC along with the tumor was performed without reconstruction. The management of LMS is surgical and depends upon the location and tumor characteristics. PMID:24765501

  17. Arterial calcifications

    PubMed Central

    Rennenberg, Roger J M W; Schurgers, Leon J; Kroon, Abraham A; Stehouwer, Coen D A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Arterial calcifications as found with various imaging techniques, like plain X-ray, computed tomography or ultrasound are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The prevalence of arterial calcification increases with age and is stimulated by several common cardiovascular risk factors. In this review, the clinical importance of arterial calcification and the currently known proteins involved are discussed. Arterial calcification is the result of a complex interplay between stimulating (bone morphogenetic protein type 2 [BMP-2], RANKL) and inhibitory (matrix Gla protein, BMP-7, osteoprotegerin, fetuin-A, osteopontin) proteins. Vascular calcification is especially prevalent and related to adverse outcome in patients with renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. We address the special circumstances and mechanisms in these patient groups. Treatment and prevention of arterial calcification is possible by the use of specific drugs. However, it remains to be proven that reduction of vascular calcification in itself leads to a reduced cardiovascular risk. PMID:20716128

  18. Memory impairment following right cerebellar infarction: a case study.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Fumiko Kusunoki; Tsutsumiuchi, Michiko; Maeda, Meiko Hashimoto; Uesaka, Yoshikazu; Takeda, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    We reported a patient with a right cerebellar infarction who showed anterograde amnesia. Cognitive dysfunction caused by cerebellar lesions was called cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome, and deactivation of the contralateral prefrontal cortex function due to disconnections of cerebello-cerebral fiber tracts have been hypothesized as mechanism underlying the syndrome. The episodic memory impairment, however, could not be supported by the same mechanism because the prefrontal lesions cannot cause amnesia syndrome. The feature of the impairment of our patient was similar to that of diencephalic amnesia, and a single photon emission computed tomography study showed a relative hypoperfusion in the right cerebellar hemisphere and left anterior thalamus. We considered that the memory deficit was caused by the dysfunction of the thalamus, which is a relay center of the cerebello-cerebral connectivity network.

  19. Past, Present and Future Therapeutics for Cerebellar Ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Marmolino, D; Manto, M

    2010-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias are a group of disabling neurological disorders. Patients exhibit a cerebellar syndrome and can also present with extra-cerebellar deficits, namely pigmentary retinopathy, extrapyramidal movement disorders, pyramidal signs, cortical symptoms (seizures, cognitive impairment/behavioural symptoms), and peripheral neuropathy. Recently, deficits in cognitive operations have been unraveled. Cerebellar ataxias are heterogeneous both at the phenotypic and genotypic point of view. Therapeutical trials performed during these last 4 decades have failed in most cases, in particular because drugs were not targeting a deleterious pathway, but were given to counteract putative defects in neurotransmission. The identification of the causative mutations of many hereditary ataxias, the development of relevant animal models and the recent identifications of the molecular mechanisms underlying ataxias are impacting on the development of new drugs. We provide an overview of the pharmacological treatments currently used in the clinical practice and we discuss the drugs under development. PMID:20808545

  20. Hypocupremia: A Possible Association with Late Cortical Cerebellar Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Shivam Om; Machado, Duarte G.

    2014-01-01

    Background We report a patient, diagnosed with late cortical cerebellar atrophy, who had persistent low serum copper levels. Case report A 48-year-old male developed progressive difficulty with balance, frequent falls, and dysarthric speech, which worsened over a short time span. He had an extensive ataxia work-up, which was unremarkable except for persistent low serum copper levels despite adequate supplementation. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed marked cerebellar atrophy. The patient experienced progressive worsening of symptoms, which did not improve with either oral or parenteral copper supplementation. Discussion To our knowledge, ours is the first case report of late cortical cerebellar atrophy in the setting of low serum copper levels. The current report should trigger further research in mechanisms leading to copper deficiency and its possible role in cerebellar disease. PMID:25247109

  1. Anomalous Cerebellar Anatomy in Chinese Children with Dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Chen, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Bi, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellar deficit hypothesis for developmental dyslexia claims that cerebellar dysfunction causes the failures in the acquisition of visuomotor skills and automatic reading and writing skills. In people with dyslexia in the alphabetic languages, the abnormal activation and structure of the right or bilateral cerebellar lobes have been identified. Using a typical implicit motor learning task, however, one neuroimaging study demonstrated the left cerebellar dysfunction in Chinese children with dyslexia. In the present study, using voxel-based morphometry, we found decreased gray matter volume in the left cerebellum in Chinese children with dyslexia relative to age-matched controls. The positive correlation between reading performance and regional gray matter volume suggests that the abnormal structure in the left cerebellum is responsible for reading disability in Chinese children with dyslexia. PMID:27047403

  2. Malignant cerebellar peduncle lesions - rapid progression and poor outcome

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Navneet; Kapoor, Ankur; Savardekar, Amey; Radotra, B. D.; Chatterjee, Debjyoti; Gupta, Sunil K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tumors arising from cerebellar peduncle are extremely rare and behave aggressively. The inclusion of these into either cerebellar or brainstem gliomas is contentious. Case Description: We performed clinicopathological review of three patients treated at our institute and surveyed the literature for previous such reported cases. Mean duration of symptoms in our patients was 2 weeks. Subtotal tumor resection was performed in two patients while the third underwent stereotactic biopsy followed by chemoradiotherapy. Histopathology revealed glioblastoma in initial two patients and medulloblastoma Grade IV in the third. The two patients who underwent surgical excision succumbed to the illness within 2 days and a month, respectively. Conclusion: Malignant cerebellar peduncular lesions have poor overall survival despite surgical debulking. It is not confirmed whether these tumors should be considered as cerebellar lesions or brainstem gliomas due to aggressive clinical behavior, and so the ideal line of management is not yet known. PMID:27057396

  3. Non-inferiority trials: are they inferior? A systematic review of reporting in major medical journals

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Tim P; Fielding, Katherine; Carpenter, James R; Phillips, Patrick P J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the adequacy of reporting of non-inferiority trials alongside the consistency and utility of current recommended analyses and guidelines. Design Review of randomised clinical trials that used a non-inferiority design published between January 2010 and May 2015 in medical journals that had an impact factor >10 (JAMA Internal Medicine, Archives Internal Medicine, PLOS Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, BMJ, JAMA, Lancet and New England Journal of Medicine). Data sources Ovid (MEDLINE). Methods We searched for non-inferiority trials and assessed the following: choice of non-inferiority margin and justification of margin; power and significance level for sample size; patient population used and how this was defined; any missing data methods used and assumptions declared and any sensitivity analyses used. Results A total of 168 trial publications were included. Most trials concluded non-inferiority (132; 79%). The non-inferiority margin was reported for 98% (164), but less than half reported any justification for the margin (77; 46%). While most chose two different analyses (91; 54%) the most common being intention-to-treat (ITT) or modified ITT and per-protocol, a large number of articles only chose to conduct and report one analysis (65; 39%), most commonly the ITT analysis. There was lack of clarity or inconsistency between the type I error rate and corresponding CIs for 73 (43%) articles. Missing data were rarely considered with (99; 59%) not declaring whether imputation techniques were used. Conclusions Reporting and conduct of non-inferiority trials is inconsistent and does not follow the recommendations in available statistical guidelines, which are not wholly consistent themselves. Authors should clearly describe the methods used and provide clear descriptions of and justifications for their design and primary analysis. Failure to do this risks misleading conclusions being drawn, with consequent effects on clinical practice. PMID:27855102

  4. Non-invasive cerebellar stimulation--a consensus paper.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, G; Argyropoulos, G P; Boehringer, A; Celnik, P; Edwards, M J; Ferrucci, R; Galea, J M; Groiss, S J; Hiraoka, K; Kassavetis, P; Lesage, E; Manto, M; Miall, R C; Priori, A; Sadnicka, A; Ugawa, Y; Ziemann, U

    2014-02-01

    The field of neurostimulation of the cerebellum either with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS; single pulse or repetitive (rTMS)) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS; anodal or cathodal) is gaining popularity in the scientific community, in particular because these stimulation techniques are non-invasive and provide novel information on cerebellar functions. There is a consensus amongst the panel of experts that both TMS and tDCS can effectively influence cerebellar functions, not only in the motor domain, with effects on visually guided tracking tasks, motor surround inhibition, motor adaptation and learning, but also for the cognitive and affective operations handled by the cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Verbal working memory, semantic associations and predictive language processing are amongst these operations. Both TMS and tDCS modulate the connectivity between the cerebellum and the primary motor cortex, tuning cerebellar excitability. Cerebellar TMS is an effective and valuable method to evaluate the cerebello-thalamo-cortical loop functions and for the study of the pathophysiology of ataxia. In most circumstances, DCS induces a polarity-dependent site-specific modulation of cerebellar activity. Paired associative stimulation of the cerebello-dentato-thalamo-M1 pathway can induce bidirectional long-term spike-timing-dependent plasticity-like changes of corticospinal excitability. However, the panel of experts considers that several important issues still remain unresolved and require further research. In particular, the role of TMS in promoting cerebellar plasticity is not established. Moreover, the exact positioning of electrode stimulation and the duration of the after effects of tDCS remain unclear. Future studies are required to better define how DCS over particular regions of the cerebellum affects individual cerebellar symptoms, given the topographical organization of cerebellar symptoms. The long-term neural consequences of non

  5. A Previously Unreported Arterial Variant of the Suboccipital Region Based on Cadaveric Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Fisahn, Christian; Burgess, Brittni; Iwanaga, Joe; Alonso, Fernando; Chapman, Jens R.; Oskouian, Rod J.; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Several arterial variants have been reported to occur around the posterior arch of the atlas. Understanding the various anomalies and diagnosing them preoperatively can dramatically reduce the risk of surgical insult during neurosurgical procedures. Herein we report a case of an arterial variant found just below the posterior arch of C1. Case Report During the routine dissection of the suboccipital region via a posterior approach, an unusual bulge was identified just inferior to the inferior capitis oblique muscle. With further dissection, the structure was identified as a tortuous internal carotid artery. Conclusion Arterial variants around the posterior arch of C1 are surgically significant and can result in catastrophic injuries if unappreciated. Most of these variants will be related to the vertebral artery. To our knowledge, an arterial variant of the internal carotid artery in this location, as reported herein, has not been previously reported. PMID:28299248

  6. Descending aorta-external iliac artery bypass for middle aortic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yuki; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Sugimoto, Tsutomu; Asami, Fuyuki; Nagasawa, Ayako; Shiraiwa, Satoru; Nakamura, Norihito; Yoshii, Shinpei

    2014-11-01

    We encountered a surgical case of middle aortic syndrome (MAS) in a 56-year-old man who had resistant hypertension. Computed tomography showed severe stenosis of the abdominal aorta from below the superior mesenteric artery to above the inferior mesenteric artery. Although bilateral renal artery stenosis was confirmed, renal function was within normal limits. A 10-mm vascular prosthetic graft was used to perform a descending aorta to left external iliac artery bypass. His hypertension was well controlled without medication. This extra-anatomic bypass may be a simple and useful approach for treating MAS if it is not necessary to reconstruct the renal artery or visceral artery.

  7. Isolated cerebellar toxoplasmosis as a complication of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Pott, H; Castelo, A

    2013-01-01

    Isolated cerebellar mass lesion is an uncommon presentation of toxoplasmosis. The authors report one rare case in a 50-year-old HIV-infected male patient who presented with clipped speech, gait ataxia and incoordination. The cerebellar toxoplasmosis was suspected based on imaging findings, despite the atypical location. This case highlights the need for a high index of clinical suspicion among HIV-infected patients with neurological manifestations and suspicious neuroimaging findings.

  8. Primary cerebellopontine progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy diagnosed premortem by cerebellar biopsy.

    PubMed

    Jones, H R; Hedley-Whyte, E T; Freidberg, S R; Kelleher, J E; Krolikowski, J

    1982-02-01

    A subacute progressive cerebellar brainstem syndrome developed in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus in remission. Cerebellar biopsy documented the diagnosis of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Data from this patient and 10 others in the literature emphasize the need to consider this diagnosis when ataxia develops in any patient with underlying malignancy, chronic infection, or other disease that involves immunological incompetence. Although the ataxic form of PML is not of nosological relevance, early diagnosis may eventually have therapeutic importance.

  9. Neurochondrin is a neuronal target antigen in autoimmune cerebellar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Miske, Ramona; Gross, Catharina C.; Scharf, Madeleine; Golombeck, Kristin S.; Hartwig, Marvin; Bhatia, Urvashi; Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Andreas; Bönte, Kathrin; Strippel, Christine; Schöls, Ludger; Synofzik, Matthis; Lohmann, Hubertus; Dettmann, Inga Madeleine; Deppe, Michael; Mindorf, Swantje; Warnecke, Tobias; Denno, Yvonne; Teegen, Bianca; Probst, Christian; Brakopp, Stefanie; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Wiendl, Heinz; Stöcker, Winfried; Meuth, Sven G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To report on a novel neuronal target antigen in 3 patients with autoimmune cerebellar degeneration. Methods: Three patients with subacute to chronic cerebellar ataxia and controls underwent detailed clinical and neuropsychological assessment together with quantitative high-resolution structural MRI. Sera and CSF were subjected to comprehensive autoantibody screening by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and immunoblot. Immunoprecipitation with lysates of hippocampus and cerebellum combined with mass spectrometric analysis was used to identify the autoantigen, which was verified by recombinant expression in HEK293 cells and use in several immunoassays. Multiparameter flow cytometry was performed on peripheral blood and CSF, and peripheral blood was subjected to T-cell receptor spectratyping. Results: Patients presented with a subacute to chronic cerebellar and brainstem syndrome. MRI was consistent with cortical and cerebellar gray matter atrophy associated with subsequent neuroaxonal degeneration. IFA screening revealed strong immunoglobulin G1 reactivity in sera and CSF with hippocampal and cerebellar molecular and granular layers, but not with a panel of 30 recombinantly expressed established neural autoantigens. Neurochondrin was subsequently identified as the target antigen, verified by IFA and immunoblot with HEK293 cells expressing human neurochondrin as well as the ability of recombinant neurochondrin to neutralize the autoantibodies' tissue reaction. Immune phenotyping revealed intrathecal accumulation and activation of B and T cells during the acute but not chronic phase of the disease. T-cell receptor spectratyping suggested an antigen-specific T-cell response accompanying the formation of antineurochondrin autoantibodies. No such neurochondrin reactivity was found in control cohorts of various neural autoantibody-associated neurologic syndromes, relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, cerebellar type of multiple system atrophy, hereditary

  10. Histological comparison of the candidate arteries for bypass grafting of the posterior interventricular artery.

    PubMed

    Appleson, Tova; Hill, Robert V

    2012-09-01

    This study evaluated five vessels as potential candidates for coronary artery bypass grafting at the posterior interventricular artery (PIVA) blockage site. We used light microscopy and digital image analysis of H&E and Van Gieson's-stained slides to investigate luminal diameter, arterial wall thickness, and relative muscularity and elasticity of candidate vessels. Results from our sample indicate that the inferior epigastric artery (IEA) may be the preferred graft to the PIVA based on overall similarities in these measurements. Other arteries provided a favorable match based on a single measurement, but the IEA agreed most consistently with the PIVA. When choosing a vessel to bypass blockage at the PIVA, cardiothoracic surgeons should be aware of the many favorable features of the IEA.

  11. Computation of inverse functions in a model of cerebellar and reflex pathways allows to control a mobile mechanical segment.

    PubMed

    Ebadzadeh, M; Tondu, B; Darlot, C

    2005-01-01

    The command and control of limb movements by the cerebellar and reflex pathways are modeled by means of a circuit whose structure is deduced from functional constraints. One constraint is that fast limb movements must be accurate although they cannot be continuously controlled in closed loop by use of sensory signals. Thus, the pathways which process the motor orders must contain approximate inverse functions of the bio-mechanical functions of the limb and of the muscles. This can be achieved by means of parallel feedback loops, whose pattern turns out to be comparable to the anatomy of the cerebellar pathways. They contain neural networks able to anticipate the motor consequences of the motor orders, modeled by artificial neural networks whose connectivity is similar to that of the cerebellar cortex. These networks learn the direct biomechanical functions of the limbs and muscles by means of a supervised learning process. Teaching signals calculated from motor errors are sent to the learning sites, as, in the cerebellum, complex spikes issued from the inferior olive are conveyed to the Purkinje cells by climbing fibers. Learning rules are deduced by a differential calculation, as classical gradient rules, and they account for the long term depression which takes place in the dendritic arborizations of the Purkinje cells. Another constraint is that reflexes must not impede voluntary movements while remaining at any instant ready to oppose perturbations. Therefore, efferent copies of the motor orders are sent to the interneurones of the reflexes, where they cancel the sensory-motor consequences of the voluntary movements. After learning, the model is able to drive accurately, both in velocity and position, angular movements of a rod actuated by two pneumatic McKibben muscles. Reflexes comparable to the myotatic and tendinous reflexes, and stabilizing reactions comparable to the cerebellar sensory-motor reactions, reduce efficiently the effects of perturbing torques

  12. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Peripheral artery disease (PAD) refers to ... is peripheral artery disease treated? What is peripheral artery disease (PAD)? Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, refers ...

  13. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... bowel - mesenteric; Dead gut - mesenteric; Atherosclerosis - mesenteric artery; Hardening of the arteries - mesenteric artery ... the aorta, the main artery from the heart. Hardening of the arteries occurs when fat, cholesterol, and ...

  14. Proprioceptive Localization Deficits in People With Cerebellar Damage.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Heidi M; Therrien, Amanda S; Bastian, Amy J

    2017-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that an important function of the cerebellum is predicting the state of the body during movement. Yet, the extent of cerebellar involvement in perception of limb state (i.e., proprioception, specifically limb position sense) has yet to be determined. Here, we investigated whether patients with cerebellar damage have deficits when trying to locate their hand in space (i.e., proprioceptive localization), which is highly important for everyday movements. By comparing performance during passive robot-controlled and active self-made multi-joint movements, we were able to determine that some cerebellar patients show improved precision during active movement (i.e., active benefit), comparable to controls, whereas other patients have reduced active benefit. Importantly, the differences in patient performance are not explained by patient diagnosis or clinical ratings of impairment. Furthermore, a subsequent experiment confirmed that active deficits in proprioceptive localization occur during both single-joint and multi-joint movements. As such, it is unlikely that localization deficits can be explained by the multi-joint coordination deficits occurring after cerebellar damage. Our results suggest that cerebellar damage may cause varied impairments to different elements of proprioceptive sense. It follows that proprioceptive localization should be adequately accounted for in clinical testing and rehabilitation of people with cerebellar damage.

  15. Transplantation and Stem Cell Therapy for Cerebellar Degenerations.

    PubMed

    Cendelin, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell-based and regenerative therapy may become a hopeful treatment for neurodegenerative diseases including hereditary cerebellar degenerations. Neurotransplantation therapy mainly aims to substitute lost cells, but potential effects might include various mechanisms including nonspecific trophic effects and stimulation of endogenous regenerative processes and neural plasticity. Nevertheless, currently, there remain serious limitations. There is a wide spectrum of human hereditary cerebellar degenerations as well as numerous cerebellar mutant mouse strains that serve as models for the development of effective therapy. By now, transplantation has been shown to ameliorate cerebellar function, e.g. in Purkinje cell degeneration mice, Lurcher mutant mice and mouse models of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and type 2 and Niemann-Pick disease type C. Despite the lack of direct comparative studies, it appears that there might be differences in graft development and functioning between various types of cerebellar degeneration. Investigation of the relation of graft development to specific morphological, microvascular or biochemical features of the diseased host tissue in various cerebellar degenerations may help to identify factors determining the fate of grafted cells and potential of their functional integration.

  16. Neurodevelopmental Malformations of the Cerebellar Vermis in Genetically Engineered Rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Raddy L; Van Dine, Sarah E; Gilbert, Mary E; Leheste, Joerg R; Torres, German

    2015-12-01

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformations are almost exclusively found along the primary fissure and are indicative of deficits of neuronal migration during cerebellar development. In the present report, we test the prediction that genetically engineered rats on Sprague-Dawley or Long-Evans backgrounds will also exhibit the same cerebellar malformations. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that three different transgenic lines on two different backgrounds had cerebellar malformations. Heterotopia in transgenic rats had identical cytoarchitecture as that observed in wild-type rats including altered morphology of Bergmann glia. In light of the possibility that heterotopia could affect results from behavioral studies, these data suggest that histological analyses be performed in studies of cerebellar function or development when using genetically engineered rats on these backgrounds in order to have more careful interpretation of experimental findings.

  17. Clumsiness and disturbed cerebellar development: insights from animal experiments.

    PubMed

    Gramsbergen, Albert

    2003-01-01

    Cerebellar functioning has been implied in the fine adjustments of muscle tone, in the coordination and the feed-forward control of movements and posture, as well as in the establishment and performance of motor skills. The cerebellar cortex in mammals develops late in neuro-ontogeny and an extrapolation from experimental results indicates that in the human the proliferation of the granule cells and the development of circuitry in the cerebellar cortex starts only in the last trimester of pregnancy and lasts until beyond the first birthday. This late development makes the cerebellar development particularly vulnerable to situations like an insufficient supply of nutrients, which may follow placental dysfunction, or to side effects of pharmacological treatments like the administration of corticosteroids in the postnatal period. We studied whether such situations might also lead to motor impairments. In rats, the effects of undernutrition during the brain growth spurt were investigated as well as those of corticosteroids administered in a period that is analogous to the 7th to 8th month of pregnancy in the human. Both these interferences affect cerebellar development and our results in rats indicate that they also lead to retardations in the emergence of certain reflexes, as well as to longer lasting motor impairments during locomotion. Extrapolation of these results strongly suggests that a disturbed cerebellar development should be considered as an important etiological factor in clumsiness in human children.

  18. Voltage-gated calcium channel autoimmune cerebellar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    McKasson, Marilyn; Clawson, Susan A.; Hill, Kenneth E.; Wood, Blair; Carlson, Noel; Bromberg, Mark; Greenlee, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe response to treatment in a patient with autoantibodies against voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) who presented with autoimmune cerebellar degeneration and subsequently developed Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), and to study the effect of the patient's autoantibodies on Purkinje cells in rat cerebellar slice cultures. Methods: Case report and study of rat cerebellar slice cultures incubated with patient VGCC autoantibodies. Results: A 53-year-old man developed progressive incoordination with ataxic speech. Laboratory evaluation revealed VGCC autoantibodies without other antineuronal autoantibodies. Whole-body PET scans 6 and 12 months after presentation detected no malignancy. The patient improved significantly with IV immunoglobulin G (IgG), prednisone, and mycophenolate mofetil, but worsened after IV IgG was halted secondary to aseptic meningitis. He subsequently developed weakness with electrodiagnostic evidence of LEMS. The patient's IgG bound to Purkinje cells in rat cerebellar slice cultures, followed by neuronal death. Reactivity of the patient's autoantibodies with VGCCs was confirmed by blocking studies with defined VGCC antibodies. Conclusions: Autoimmune cerebellar degeneration associated with VGCC autoantibodies may precede onset of LEMS and may improve with immunosuppressive treatment. Binding of anti-VGCC antibodies to Purkinje cells in cerebellar slice cultures may be followed by cell death. Patients with anti-VGCC autoantibodies may be at risk of irreversible neurologic injury over time, and treatment should be initiated early. PMID:27088118

  19. Altered cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients ON and OFF L-DOPA medication

    PubMed Central

    Festini, Sara B.; Bernard, Jessica A.; Kwak, Youngbin; Peltier, Scott; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Müller, Martijn L. T. M.; Dayalu, Praveen; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2015-01-01

    Although nigrostriatal changes are most commonly affiliated with Parkinson's disease, the role of the cerebellum in Parkinson's has become increasingly apparent. The present study used lobule-based cerebellar resting state functional connectivity to (1) compare cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients both ON and OFF L-DOPA medication and controls, and to (2) relate variations in cerebellar connectivity to behavioral performance. Results indicated that, when contrasted to the control group, Parkinson's patients OFF medication had increased levels of cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity, whereas Parkinson's patients ON medication had decreased levels of cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity. Moreover, analyses relating levels of cerebellar connectivity to behavioral measures demonstrated that, within each group, increased levels of connectivity were most often associated with improved cognitive and motor performance, but there were several instances where increased connectivity was related to poorer performance. Overall, the present study found medication-variant cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients, further demonstrating cerebellar changes associated with Parkinson's disease and the moderating effects of medication. PMID:25954184

  20. An Internal Model Architecture for Novelty Detection: Implications for Cerebellar and Collicular Roles in Sensory Processing

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Sean R.; Porrill, John; Pearson, Martin J.; Pipe, Anthony G.; Prescott, Tony J.; Dean, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum is thought to implement internal models for sensory prediction, but details of the underlying circuitry are currently obscure. We therefore investigated a specific example of internal-model based sensory prediction, namely detection of whisker contacts during whisking. Inputs from the vibrissae in rats can be affected by signals generated by whisker movement, a phenomenon also observable in whisking robots. Robot novelty-detection can be improved by adaptive noise-cancellation, in which an adaptive filter learns a forward model of the whisker plant that allows the sensory effects of whisking to be predicted and thus subtracted from the noisy sensory input. However, the forward model only uses information from an efference copy of the whisking commands. Here we show that the addition of sensory information from the whiskers allows the adaptive filter to learn a more complex internal model that performs more robustly than the forward model, particularly when the whisking-induced interference has a periodic structure. We then propose a neural equivalent of the circuitry required for adaptive novelty-detection in the robot, in which the role of the adaptive filter is carried out by the cerebellum, with the comparison of its output (an estimate of the self-induced interference) and the original vibrissal signal occurring in the superior colliculus, a structure noted for its central role in novelty detection. This proposal makes a specific prediction concerning the whisker-related functions of a region in cerebellar cortical zone A2 that in rats receives climbing fibre input from the superior colliculus (via the inferior olive). This region has not been observed in non-whisking animals such as cats and primates, and its functional role in vibrissal processing has hitherto remained mysterious. Further investigation of this system may throw light on how cerebellar-based internal models could be used in broader sensory, motor and cognitive contexts. PMID

  1. Post-operative pediatric cerebellar mutism syndrome and its association with hypertrophic olivary degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, Michaela; Kumar, Ram; Lewis, Emma; Harave, Srikrishna; Windridge, David; Ong, Chan; Pizer, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Background The dentato-thalamo-cortical (DTC) pathway is recognized as the anatomical substrate for postoperative pediatric cerebellar mutism (POPCMS), a well-recognized complication affecting up to 31% of children undergoing posterior fossa brain tumour resection. The proximal structures of the DTC pathway also form a segment of the Guillain and Mollaret triangle, a neural network which when disrupted causes hypertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD) of the inferior olivary nucleus (ION). We hypothesize that there is an association between the occurrence of POPCMS and HOD and aim to evaluate this on MR imaging using qualitative and quantitative analysis of the ION in children with and without POPCMS. Methods In this retrospective study we qualitatively analysed the follow up MR imaging in 48 children who underwent posterior fossa tumour resection for presence of HOD. Quantitative analysis of the ION was possible in 28 children and was performed using semi-automated segmentation followed by feature extraction and feature selection techniques and relevance of the features to POPCMS were evaluated. The diagnosis of POPCMS was made independently based on clinical and nursing assessment notes. Results There was significant association between POPCMS and bilateral HOD (P=0.002) but not unilateral HOD. Quantitative analysis showed that hyperintensity in the left ION was the most relevant feature in children with POPCMS. Conclusions Bilateral HOD can serve as a reliable radiological indicator in establishing the diagnosis of POPCMS particularly in equivocal cases. The strong association of signal change due to HOD in the left ION suggests that injury to the right proximal efferent cerebellar pathway plays an important role in the causation of POPCMS. PMID:27942473

  2. Cerebellar-Motor Dysfunction in Schizophrenia and Psychosis-Risk: The Importance of Regional Cerebellar Analysis Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Jessica A.; Mittal, Vijay A.

    2014-01-01

    Motor abnormalities in individuals with schizophrenia and those at-risk for psychosis are well documented. An accumulating body of work has also highlighted motor abnormalities related to cerebellar dysfunction in schizophrenia including eye-blink conditioning, timing, postural control, and motor learning. We have also recently found evidence for motor dysfunction in individuals at ultra high-risk for psychosis (1–3). This is particularly relevant as the cerebellum is thought to be central to the cognitive dysmetria model of schizophrenia, and these overt motor signs may point to more general cerebellar dysfunction in the etiology of psychotic disorders. While studies have provided evidence indicative of motor cerebellar dysfunction in at-risk populations and in schizophrenia, findings with respect to the cerebellum have been mixed. One factor potentially contributing to these mixed results is the whole-structure approach taken when investigating the cerebellum. In non-human primates, there are distinct closed-loop circuits between the cerebellum, thalamus, and brain with motor and non-motor cortical regions. Recent human neuroimaging has supported this finding and indicates that there is a cerebellar functional topography (4), and this information is being missed with whole-structure approaches. Here, we review cerebellar-motor dysfunction in individuals with schizophrenia and those at-risk for psychosis. We also discuss cerebellar abnormalities in psychosis, and the cerebellar functional topography. Because of the segregated functional regions of the cerebellum, we propose that it is important to look at the structure regionally in order to better understand its role in motor dysfunction in these populations. This is analogous to approaches taken with the basal ganglia, where each region is considered separately. Such an approach is necessary to better understand cerebellar pathophysiology on a macro-structural level with respect to the pathogenesis of

  3. The inferior olive is essential for long-term maintenance of a simple motor skill.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang Yang; Wang, Yu; Chen, Yi; Chen, Lu; Wolpaw, Jonathan R

    2016-10-01

    The inferior olive (IO) is essential for operant down-conditioning of the rat soleus H-reflex, a simple motor skill. To evaluate the role of the IO in long-term maintenance of this skill, the H-reflex was down-conditioned over 50 days, the IO was chemically ablated, and down-conditioning continued for up to 102 more days. H-reflex size just before IO ablation averaged 62(±2 SE)% of its initial value (P < 0.001 vs. initial). After IO ablation, H-reflex size rose to 75-80% over ∼10 days, remained there for ∼30 days, rose over 10 days to above its initial value, and averaged 140(±14)% for the final 10 days of study (P < 0.01 vs. initial). This two-stage loss of down-conditioning maintenance correlated with IO neuronal loss (r = 0.75, P < 0.01) and was similar to the loss of down-conditioning that follows ablation of the cerebellar output nuclei dentate and interpositus. In control (i.e., unconditioned) rats, IO ablation has no long-term effect on H-reflex size. These results indicate that the IO is essential for long-term maintenance of a down-conditioned H-reflex. With previous data, they support the hypothesis that IO and cortical inputs to cerebellum combine to produce cerebellar plasticity that produces sensorimotor cortex plasticity that produces spinal cord plasticity that produces the smaller H-reflex. H-reflex down-conditioning appears to depend on a hierarchy of plasticity that may be guided by the IO and begin in the cerebellum. Similar hierarchies may underlie other motor learning.

  4. Spontaneous cluster activity in the inferior olivary nucleus in brainstem slices from postnatal mice.

    PubMed

    Rekling, Jens C; Jensen, Kristian H R; Jahnsen, Henrik

    2012-04-01

    A distinctive property of the cerebellar system is olivocerebellar modules, where synchronized electrical activity in neurons in the inferior olivary nucleus (IO) evokes organized activity in the cerebellar cortex. However, the exact function of these modules, and how they are developed, is still largely unknown. Here we show that the IO in in vitro slices from postnatal mice spontaneously generates clusters of neurons with synchronous Ca(2+) transients. Neurons in the principal olive (PO), and the vestibular-related dorsomedial cell column (dmcc), showed an age-dependent increase in spontaneous calcium transients. The spatiotemporal activity pattern was occasionally organized in clusters of co-active neighbouring neurons,with regular (16 min-1) and irregular (2-3 min(-1)) repeating cluster activity in the dmcc and PO, respectively. IO clusters had a diameter of 100-170 μm, lasted~1 s, and increased in occurrence from postnatal day P5.5 to P12.5, followed by a sharp drop to near zero at P15.5. IO clusters were overlapping, and comprised nearly identical neurons at some time points, and a varied subset of neurons at others. Some neurons had hub-like properties, being co-active with many other neighbours, and some were co-active with separate clusters at different times. The coherence between calcium transients in IO neurons decreased with Euclidean distance between the cells reaching low values at 100-200 μm distances. Intracellular recordings from IO neurons during cluster formation revealed the presence of spikelet-like potentials, suggesting that electrical coupling between neighbouring IO neurons may serve as a synchronizing mechanism. In conclusion, the IO shows spontaneous cluster activity under in vitro conditions, coinciding with a critical postnatal period in olivocerebellar development. We propose that these clusters may be forerunners of the ensembles of IO neurons shown to be co-active in adult animals spontaneously and during motor acts.

  5. Disruption of cerebellar microzonal organization in GluD2 (GluRδ2) knockout mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, Miki; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Sakimura, Kenji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kitamura, Kazuo; Kano, Masanobu

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar cortex has an elaborate rostrocaudal organization comprised of numerous microzones. Purkinje cells (PCs) in the same microzone show synchronous activity of complex spikes (CSs) evoked by excitatory inputs from climbing fibers (CFs) that arise from neurons in the inferior olive (IO). The synchronous CS activity is considered to depend on electrical coupling among IO neurons and anatomical organization of the olivo-cerebellar projection. To determine how the CF–PC wiring contributes to the formation of microzone, we examined the synchronous CS activities between neighboring PCs in the glutamate receptor δ2 knockout (GluD2 KO) mouse in which exuberant surplus CFs make ectopic innervations onto distal dendrites of PCs. We performed in vivo two-photon calcium imaging for PC populations to detect CF inputs. Neighboring PCs in GluD2 KO mice showed higher synchrony of calcium transients than those in wild-type (control) mice. Moreover, the synchrony in GluD2 KO mice hardly declined with mediolateral separation between PCs up to ~200 μm, which was in marked contrast to the falloff of the synchrony in control mice. The enhanced synchrony was only partially affected by the blockade of gap junctional coupling. On the other hand, transverse CF collaterals in GluD2 KO mice extended beyond the border of microzone and formed locally clustered ectopic synapses onto dendrites of neighboring PCs. Furthermore, PCs in GluD2 KO mice exhibited clustered firing (Cf), the characteristic CF response that was not found in PCs of wild-type mice. Importantly, Cf was often associated with localized calcium transients in distal dendrites of PCs, which are likely to contribute to the enhanced synchrony of calcium signals in GluD2 KO mice. Thus, our results indicate that CF signals in GluD2 KO mice propagate across multiple microzones, and that proper formation of longitudinal olivo-cerebellar projection is essential for the spatiotemporal organization of CS activity in the

  6. Decompression of inferior alveolar nerve: case report.

    PubMed

    Marques, Tiago Miguel Santos; Gomes, Joana Marques

    2011-01-01

    Paresthesia as a result of mechanical trauma is one of the most frequent sensory disturbances of the inferior alveolar nerve. This case report describes surgical treatment for paresthesia caused by a compressive phenomenon within the mandibular canal. The cause of the compression, a broken instrument left in the patient's mouth during previous endodontic therapy, was identified during routine radiography and computed tomography. Once the foreign object was removed by surgery, the paresthesia resolved quickly. This case highlights the potential for an iatrogenic mechanical cause of paresthesia.

  7. Cytoarchitectonic mapping of the human brain cerebellar nuclei in stereotaxic space and delineation of their co-activation patterns.

    PubMed

    Tellmann, Stefanie; Bludau, Sebastian; Eickhoff, Simon; Mohlberg, Hartmut; Minnerop, Martina; Amunts, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellar nuclei are involved in several brain functions, including the modulation of motor and cognitive performance. To differentiate their participation in these functions, and to analyze their changes in neurodegenerative and other diseases as revealed by neuroimaging, stereotaxic maps are necessary. These maps reflect the complex spatial structure of cerebellar nuclei with adequate spatial resolution and detail. Here we report on the cytoarchitecture of the dentate, interposed (emboliform and globose) and fastigial nuclei, and introduce 3D probability maps in stereotaxic MNI-Colin27 space as a prerequisite for subsequent meta-analysis of their functional involvement. Histological sections of 10 human post mortem brains were therefore examined. Differences in cell density were measured and used to distinguish a dorsal from a ventral part of the dentate nucleus. Probabilistic maps were calculated, which indicate the position and extent of the nuclei in 3D-space, while considering their intersubject variability. The maps of the interposed and the dentate nuclei differed with respect to their interaction patterns and functions based on meta-analytic connectivity modeling and quantitative functional decoding, respectively. For the dentate nucleus, significant (p < 0.05) co-activations were observed with thalamus, supplementary motor area (SMA), putamen, BA 44 of Broca's region, areas of superior and inferior parietal cortex, and the superior frontal gyrus (SFG). In contrast, the interposed nucleus showed more limited co-activations with SMA, area 44, putamen, and SFG. Thus, the new stereotaxic maps contribute to analyze structure and function of the cerebellum. These maps can be used for anatomically reliable and precise identification of degenerative alteration in MRI-data of patients who suffer from various cerebellar diseases.

  8. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia deafness and narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Melberg, A; Hetta, J; Dahl, N; Nennesmo, I; Bengtsson, M; Wibom, R; Grant, C; Gustavson, K H; Lundberg, P O

    1995-12-01

    A new autosomal dominant syndrome in a Swedish pedigree is described. Five patients were affected with cerebellar ataxia and sensorineural deafness. Four of these patients had symptoms of narcolepsy. Optic atrophy, other neurological abnormalities and psychiatric symptoms developed with increasing disease duration. Three patients had non-neurological disease in addition, including diabetes mellitus in two and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in one. Autopsy with neuropathological examination was performed in one case. Molecular studies focused on the short arm of chromosome 6, including the HLA DR2 locus associated with narcolepsy and the (CAG)n repeat at the spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) locus. Biochemical investigation of muscle biopsy of one case indicated mitochondrial dysfunction with selective decrease in ATP production for substrates that normally give the highest rates. The activity of glutamate dehydrogenase was reduced, indicating a low mitochondrial density. We postulate an autosomal dominant genetic factor responsible for this syndrome. Linkage was excluded to HLA DR2, and a normal sized SCA1 repeat was observed. We conclude that a locus predisposing to ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy exists outside this region of chromosome 6.

  9. Imaging calcium waves in cerebellar Bergmann glia.

    PubMed

    Beierlein, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This protocol describes methods for recording synaptically evoked Ca(2+) waves from individual Bergmann glia (BG) in slices of cerebellar cortex. Unlike protoplasmic, star-shaped astrocytes, whose thin processes pose a serious challenge to stable Ca(2+) measurements, BG are large radial cells, with several main processes that run over distances of several hundred micrometers toward the pia and ensheathe thousands of parallel fiber (PF) synapses. Stimulation of PF synapses with brief bursts can trigger long-lasting Ca(2+) responses in BG processes, which can be reliably recorded using a cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. This protocol was developed to enable measurements of Ca(2+) waves in individual BG loaded with a high-affinity Ca(2+) indicator such as Fura-2 for up to 2 h. Because BG recorded in slices rarely display spontaneous (i.e., tetrodotoxin [TTX]-sensitive) or intrinsic Ca(2+) transients, Ca(2+) waves can be evoked repeatedly and reliably, which permits quantitative studies using pharmacological tools. Fluorescence measurements obtained using CCD technology offer a straightforward means of characterizing the mechanisms and potential functional consequences of widespread and long-lasting, store-mediated Ca(2+) increases in astrocytes.

  10. Understanding and modulating motor learning with Cerebellar stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Celnik, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques are a powerful approach to investigate the physiology and function of the central nervous system. Recent years have seen numerous investigations delivering transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the cerebellum to determine its role in motor, cognitive and emotional behaviours. Early studies have shown that it is possible to assess cerebellar-motor cortex (CB-M1) connectivity using a paired-pulse TMS paradigm called cerebellar inhibition (CBI), and indirectly infer the state of cerebellar excitability. Thus, it has been shown that CBI changes proportionally to the magnitude of locomotor learning and in association with reaching adaption tasks. In addition, CBI has been used to demonstrate at a physiological level the effects of applying TMS or tDCS to modulate, up or down, the excitability of cerebellar-M1 connectivity. These studies became the fundamental substrate to newer investigations showing that we can affect motor, cognitive and emotional behaviour when TMS or tDCS targeting the cerebellum is delivered in the context of performance. Furthermore, newer investigations are starting to report the effects of cerebellar non-invasive stimulation to treat symptoms associated with neurological conditions such as stroke and dystonia. Altogether, non-invasive cerebellar stimulation can potentially become a game changer for the management of conditions that affect the cerebellum given the scarcity of current effective therapeutic options. In this brief manuscript, some of the current evidence demonstrating the effects of cerebellar stimulation to modulate motor behaviour and its use to assess physiological processes underlying motor learning are presented. PMID:25283180

  11. Effect of Valsartan on Cerebellar Adrenomedullin System Dysregulation During Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Figueira, Leticia; Israel, Anita

    2017-02-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) and its receptors components, calcitonin-receptor-like receptor (CRLR), and receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP1, RAMP2, and RAMP3) are expressed in cerebellum. Cerebellar AM, AM binding sites and receptor components are altered during hypertension, suggesting a role for cerebellar AM in blood pressure regulation. Thus, we assessed the effect of valsartan, on AM and its receptor components expression in the cerebellar vermis of Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. Additionally, we evaluated AM action on superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) production in cerebellar vermis. Animals were treated with valsartan or vehicle for 11 days. Rats were sacrificed by decapitation; cerebellar vermis was dissected; and AM, CRLR, RAMP1, RAMP2, and RAMP3 expression was quantified by Western blot analysis. CAT, SOD, and GPx activity was determined spectrophotometrically and blood pressure by non-invasive plethysmography. We demonstrate that AM and RAMP2 expression was lower in cerebellum of SHR rats, while CRLR, RAMP1, and RAMP3 expression was higher than those of WKY rats. AM reduced cerebellar CAT, SOD, GPx activities, and TBARS production in WKY rats, but not in SHR rats. Valsartan reduced blood pressure and reversed the altered expression of AM and its receptors components, as well the loss of AM capacity to reduce antioxidant enzyme activity and TBARS production in SHR rats. These findings demonstrate that valsartan is able to reverse the dysregulation of cerebellar adrenomedullinergic system; and they suggest that altered AM system in the cerebellum could represent the primary abnormality leading to hypertension.

  12. A Cerebellar Neuroprosthetic System: Computational Architecture and in vivo Test

    PubMed Central

    Herreros, Ivan; Giovannucci, Andrea; Taub, Aryeh H.; Hogri, Roni; Magal, Ari; Bamford, Sim; Prueckl, Robert; Verschure, Paul F. M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Emulating the input–output functions performed by a brain structure opens the possibility for developing neuroprosthetic systems that replace damaged neuronal circuits. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by replacing the cerebellar circuit responsible for the acquisition and extinction of motor memories. Specifically, we show that a rat can undergo acquisition, retention, and extinction of the eye-blink reflex even though the biological circuit responsible for this task has been chemically inactivated via anesthesia. This is achieved by first developing a computational model of the cerebellar microcircuit involved in the acquisition of conditioned reflexes and training it with synthetic data generated based on physiological recordings. Secondly, the cerebellar model is interfaced with the brain of an anesthetized rat, connecting the model’s inputs and outputs to afferent and efferent cerebellar structures. As a result, we show that the anesthetized rat, equipped with our neuroprosthetic system, can be classically conditioned to the acquisition of an eye-blink response. However, non-stationarities in the recorded biological signals limit the performance of the cerebellar model. Thus, we introduce an updated cerebellar model and validate it with physiological recordings showing that learning becomes stable and reliable. The resulting system represents an important step toward replacing lost functions of the central nervous system via neuroprosthetics, obtained by integrating a synthetic circuit with the afferent and efferent pathways of a damaged brain region. These results also embody an early example of science-based medicine, where on the one hand the neuroprosthetic system directly validates a theory of cerebellar learning that informed the design of the system, and on the other one it takes a step toward the development of neuro-prostheses that could recover lost learning functions in animals and, in the longer term, humans. PMID:25152887

  13. Endovascular Treatment of Lower Limb Penetrating Arterial Traumas

    SciTech Connect

    Mavili, Ertugrul Donmez, Halil; Ozcan, Nevzat; Akcali, Yigit

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous arterial embolization in patients with penetrating peripheral arterial trauma. Materials and Methods: Twelve patients with penetrating peripheral arterial trauma were treated with percutaneous arterial embolization between 2002 and 2007. All injuries were secondary to penetrating stab wounds. Active bleeding (eight patients), recurrent bleeding episodes (one patient), persistent pain and mass (one patient), leg edema, claudication, swelling (one patient), local hyperemia, and pain (one patient) were the presenting symptoms. Microcatheter systems were used for catheterization. We used n-butyl cyanoacrylate mixture as the embolizing agent in all patients. Results: On angiograms the inferior gluteal artery (one patient), internal pudendal artery (one patient), perforating branch of the profundal femoral artery (six patients), superficial femoral artery (one patient), peroneal artery (two patients), and anterior tibial artery (one patient) were found to be injured. In all patients, the source of arterial bleeding could be reached, and a safe embolization was achieved. Nontarget embolization due to backflow of n-butyl cyanoacrylate mixture was detected in two patients and inguinal hematoma at the puncture site occurred in one patient. Conclusions: We conclude that embolization-particularly n-butyl cyanoacrylate embolization-is technically feasible in patients with penetrating peripheral arterial trauma.

  14. Distributed Cerebellar Motor Learning: A Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity Model.

    PubMed

    Luque, Niceto R; Garrido, Jesús A; Naveros, Francisco; Carrillo, Richard R; D'Angelo, Egidio; Ros, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Deep cerebellar nuclei neurons receive both inhibitory (GABAergic) synaptic currents from Purkinje cells (within the cerebellar cortex) and excitatory (glutamatergic) synaptic currents from mossy fibers. Those two deep cerebellar nucleus inputs are thought to be also adaptive, embedding interesting properties in the framework of accurate movements. We show that distributed spike-timing-dependent plasticity mechanisms (STDP) located at different cerebellar sites (parallel fibers to Purkinje cells, mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus cells, and Purkinje cells to deep cerebellar nucleus cells) in close-loop simulations provide an explanation for the complex learning properties of the cerebellum in motor learning. Concretely, we propose a new mechanistic cerebellar spiking model. In this new model, deep cerebellar nuclei embed a dual functionality: deep cerebellar nuclei acting as a gain adaptation mechanism and as a facilitator for the slow memory consolidation at mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus synapses. Equipping the cerebellum with excitatory (e-STDP) and inhibitory (i-STDP) mechanisms at deep cerebellar nuclei afferents allows the accommodation of synaptic memories that were formed at parallel fibers to Purkinje cells synapses and then transferred to mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus synapses. These adaptive mechanisms also contribute to modulate the deep-cerebellar-nucleus-output firing rate (output gain modulation toward optimizing its working range).

  15. Distributed Cerebellar Motor Learning: A Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity Model

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Niceto R.; Garrido, Jesús A.; Naveros, Francisco; Carrillo, Richard R.; D'Angelo, Egidio; Ros, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Deep cerebellar nuclei neurons receive both inhibitory (GABAergic) synaptic currents from Purkinje cells (within the cerebellar cortex) and excitatory (glutamatergic) synaptic currents from mossy fibers. Those two deep cerebellar nucleus inputs are thought to be also adaptive, embedding interesting properties in the framework of accurate movements. We show that distributed spike-timing-dependent plasticity mechanisms (STDP) located at different cerebellar sites (parallel fibers to Purkinje cells, mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus cells, and Purkinje cells to deep cerebellar nucleus cells) in close-loop simulations provide an explanation for the complex learning properties of the cerebellum in motor learning. Concretely, we propose a new mechanistic cerebellar spiking model. In this new model, deep cerebellar nuclei embed a dual functionality: deep cerebellar nuclei acting as a gain adaptation mechanism and as a facilitator for the slow memory consolidation at mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus synapses. Equipping the cerebellum with excitatory (e-STDP) and inhibitory (i-STDP) mechanisms at deep cerebellar nuclei afferents allows the accommodation of synaptic memories that were formed at parallel fibers to Purkinje cells synapses and then transferred to mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus synapses. These adaptive mechanisms also contribute to modulate the deep-cerebellar-nucleus-output firing rate (output gain modulation toward optimizing its working range). PMID:26973504

  16. Differences in cortico-striatal-cerebellar activation during working memory in syndromal and nonsyndromal children with prenatal alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Diwadkar, Vaibhav A; Meintjes, Ernesta M; Goradia, Dhruman; Dodge, Neil C; Warton, Christopher; Molteno, Christopher D; Jacobson, Sandra W; Jacobson, Joseph L

    2013-08-01

    Although children with heavy prenatal alcohol exposure may exhibit the distinctive facial dysmorphology seen in full or partial fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS/PFAS), many lack that dysmorphology. This study examined the functional organization of working memory in the brain in three groups of children-those meeting diagnostic criteria for FAS or PFAS, heavily exposed (HE) nonsyndromal children, and healthy controls. A verbal n-back task (1-back and 0-back) was administered to 47 children (17 with FAS/PFAS, 13 HE, and 17 controls) during fMRI. Intra-group one-sample t-tests were used to identify activity regions of interest central to verbal working memory including the dorsal prefrontal cortex (dPFC), inferior frontal gyrus, caudate/putamen, parietal cortex, and cerebellar Crus I/lobule VI and lobule VIIB-IX. Whereas groups did not differ in task sensitivity, fMRI analyses suggested different patterns of sub-network recruitment across groups. Controls primarily recruited left inferior frontal gyrus (Broca's area). By contrast, HE primarily recruited an extensive set of fronto-striatal regions, including left dPFC and left caudate, and the FAS/PFAS group relied primarily on two cerebellar subregions and parietal cortex. This study is, to our knowledge, the first to demonstrate differential recruitment of critical brain regions that subserve basic function in children with different fetal alcohol spectrum disorders compared to controls. The distinct activation patterns seen in the two exposed groups may be related to substantial differences in alcohol dose/occasion to which these groups were exposed in utero.

  17. Involvement of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic systems in thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced rat cerebellar cGMP formation.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, T; Hashimoto, T; Nagai, Y

    1996-12-05

    The increase in cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) caused by subcutaneous injection of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) tartrate was observed in a region-specific manner in the rat cerebellum. TRH tartrate (TRH-T) (2.8, 7.0 and 17 mg/kg as free TRH, s.c.) produced dose-dependent increases in cGMP levels markedly in the cerebellar superior and inferior vermis, and a smaller but still significant increase in the cerebellar hemispheres and brainstem but no significant increases in other brain regions. The TRH-induced increase in the cGMP level in the cerebellum was suppressed by pretreatment with muscimol, THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3(2H)-one) or MK-801 (dizocilpine maleate) and partially suppressed by atropine but was not suppressed by chlordiazepoxide, oxazepam, phentolamine, propranolol, cyproheptadine, haloperidol, baclofen or DNQX (6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione), suggesting the possible involvement of GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)(A)-ergic, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamatergic and cholinergic systems. These results suggest that excitatory amino acids may be involved in the cGMP formation caused by TRH in the cerebellar areas, and that cGMP formation is inhibited by enhancement of GABAA receptor function.

  18. Synchronous Aberrant Cerebellar and Opercular Development in Fetuses and Neonates with Congenital Heart Disease: Correlation with Early Communicative Neurodevelopmental Outcomes, Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wong, A.; Chavez, T.; O'Neil, S.; Votava-Smith, J.; Miller, D.; delCastillo, S.; Panigrahy, A.; Paquette, L.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) demonstrate multidomain cognitive delays. Cingulo-opercular and cerebellar brain networks are critical to language functions. This is a description of our initial experience aiming to identify an anatomic correlate for CHD patients with expressive language delays. Fetal CHD patients, prospectively enrolled, underwent serial fetal (1.5T), postnatal pre- and postoperative (3T) MRI. Non-CHD patients were enrolled retrospectively from the same epoch. Comparable fetal and neonatal T2 contrast was used for manual linear cross-sectional measurement. Multivariable analysis was used for adjustments and curve fitting. Neurodevelopment was assessed with Battelle Developmental Inventory, 2nd ed. between 9 and 36 months of age. This interim analysis included patients from our longitudinal CHD study who had fetal, postnatal imaging and neurodevelopmental data—yielding a total of 62 mothers (11 CHD fetuses and 51 non-CHD fetuses). Altered brain trajectories were seen in selected cerebellar and opercular measurements in CHD patients compared with the non-CHD group. Smaller inferior cerebellar vermis measurements were associated with multiple communication-related abnormalities. Altered early structural development of the cerebellum and operculum is present in patients with CHD, which correlates with specific neurodevelopmental abnormalities. PMID:28210520

  19. Cerebellar cortex and cerebellar nuclei are concomitantly activated during eyeblink conditioning: a 7T fMRI study in humans.

    PubMed

    Thürling, Markus; Kahl, Fabian; Maderwald, Stefan; Stefanescu, Roxana M; Schlamann, Marc; Boele, Henk-Jan; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Diedrichsen, Jörn; Ladd, Mark E; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K E; Timmann, Dagmar

    2015-01-21

    There are controversies whether learning of conditioned eyeblink responses primarily takes place within the cerebellar cortex, the interposed nuclei, or both. It has also been suggested that the cerebellar cortex may be important during early stages of learning, and that there is a shift to the cerebellar nuclei during later stages. As yet, human studies have provided little to resolve this question. In the present study, we established a setup that allows ultra-high-field 7T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the cerebellar cortex and interposed cerebellar nuclei simultaneously during delay eyeblink conditioning in humans. Event-related fMRI signals increased concomitantly in the cerebellar cortex and nuclei during early acquisition of conditioned eyeblink responses in 20 healthy human subjects. ANOVAs with repeated-measures showed significant effects of time across five blocks of 20 conditioning trials in the cortex and nuclei (p < 0.05, permutation corrected). Activations were most pronounced in, but not limited to, lobules VI and interposed nuclei. Increased activations were most prominent at the first time the maximum number of conditioned responses was achieved. Our data are consistent with a simultaneous and synergistic two-site model of learning during acquisition of classically conditioned eyeblinks. Because increased MRI signal reflects synaptic activity, concomitantly increased signals in the cerebellar nuclei and cortex are consistent with findings of learning related potentiation at the mossy fiber to nuclear cell synapse and mossy fiber to granule cell synapse. Activity related to the expression of conditioned responses, however, cannot be excluded.

  20. Intimal sarcoma of the superficial femoral artery with osteosarcomatous differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ebaugh, James L; Yuan, Minsheng; Hu, Jeffery; Chen, Ahchean; Raffetto, Joseph D

    2011-05-01

    Sarcomas of the large vessels usually present centrally in the aorta, pulmonary artery, and inferior vena cava. Peripheral arterial sarcomas are exceptionally rare. They have been reported in the iliac and common or profunda femoral arteries, and are frequently undifferentiated. In this study, we describe a differentiated intimal sarcoma of the superficial femoral artery with abundant osteosarcoma within the specimen. Before knowing the diagnosis, treatment was for a presumed pseudoaneurysm using excision and bypass. Postoperatively, the patient received palliative radiation therapy. The tumor's location and histopathology are unique. A differentiated intimal sarcoma has never been reported in the superficial femoral artery, and it represents the second peripheral arterial intimal sarcoma reported with osteosarcomatous differentiation.

  1. Cerebellar pressor response in the dog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dormer, K. J.; Stone, H. L.

    1976-01-01

    A fastigial pressor response has been elicited in the anesthetized mongrel dog. Stimulation within the rostral portions of this nucleus results in mean arterial pressure rises up to 150 mmHg above control. A proportional tachycardia is simultaneously evoked which may rapidly attain heart rates of 190 beats/min above control levels. Peak tachycardias immediately subside and often the heart rate declines below control values during stimulation while arterial pressure remains elevated. When either the carotid sinuses were isolated by ligation or a bilateral vagotomy was performed, the fastigial tachycardia was sustained. The response could still be attained when submaximal doses of alpha-chloralose anesthesia or high levels of barbiturates (30-40 mg/kg) were given. Both portions of the response result from widespread sympathetic activation; however, buffering of the response through the baroreceptor reflexes is only demonstrated in the cardiac segment of the response.

  2. Thalamic, brainstem, and cerebellar glucose metabolism in the hemiplegic monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoyama, I.; Dauth, G.W.; Gilman, S.; Frey, K.A.; Penney, J.B. Jr.

    1988-12-01

    Unilateral ablation of cerebral cortical areas 4 and 6 of Brodmann in the macaque monkey results in a contralateral hemiplegia that resolves partially with time. During the phase of dense hemiplegia, local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (1CMRG1c) is decreased significantly in most of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation, and there are slight contralateral decreases. The lCMRGlc is reduced bilaterally in most of the brainstem nuclei and bilaterally in the deep cerebellar nuclei, but only in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. During the phase of partial motor recovery, lCMRGlc is incompletely restored in many of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation and completely restored in the contralateral nuclei. In the brainstem and deep cerebellar nuclei, poor to moderate recovery occurs bilaterally. Moderate recovery occurs in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. The findings demonstrate that a unilateral cerebral cortical lesion strongly affects lCMRGlc in the thalamus ipsilaterally and in the cerebellar cortex contralaterally, but in the brainstem bilaterally. Partial recovery of lCMRGlc accompanies the progressive motor recovery. The structures affected include those with direct, and also those with indirect, connections to the areas ablated.

  3. Cerebellar network plasticity: from genes to fast oscillation.

    PubMed

    Cheron, G; Servais, L; Dan, B

    2008-04-22

    The role of the cerebellum has been increasingly recognized not only in motor control but in sensory, cognitive and emotional learning and regulation. Purkinje cells, being the sole output from the cerebellar cortex, occupy an integrative position in this network. Plasticity at this level is known to critically involve calcium signaling. In the last few years, electrophysiological study of genetically engineered mice has demonstrated the topical role of several genes encoding calcium-binding proteins (calretinin, calbindin, parvalbumin). Specific inactivation of these genes results in the emergence of a fast network oscillation (ca. 160 Hz) throughout the cerebellar cortex in alert animals, associated with ataxia. This oscillation is produced by synchronization of Purkinje cells along the parallel fiber beam. It behaves as an electrophysiological arrest rhythm, being blocked by sensorimotor stimulation. Pharmacological manipulations showed that the oscillation is blocked by GABA(A) and NMDA antagonists as well as gap junction blockers. This cerebellar network oscillation has also been documented in mouse models of human conditions with complex developmental cerebellar dysfunction, such as Angelman syndrome and fetal alcohol syndrome. Recent evidence suggests a relationship between fast oscillation and cerebellar long term depression (LTD). This may have major implications for future therapeutic targeting.

  4. Motor learning of mice lacking cerebellar Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Porras-García, M. Elena; Ruiz, Rocío; Pérez-Villegas, Eva M.; Armengol, José Á.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a key role in the acquisition and execution of motor tasks whose physiological foundations were postulated on Purkinje cells' long-term depression (LTD). Numerous research efforts have been focused on understanding the cerebellum as a site of learning and/or memory storage. However, the controversy on which part of the cerebellum participates in motor learning, and how the process takes place, remains unsolved. In fact, it has been suggested that cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, and/or their combination with some brain structures other than the cerebellum are responsible for motor learning. Different experimental approaches have been used to tackle this question (cerebellar lesions, pharmacological agonist and/or antagonist of cerebellar neurotransmitters, virus tract tracings, etc.). One of these approaches is the study of spontaneous mutations affecting the cerebellar cortex and depriving it of its main input–output organizer (i.e., the Purkinje cell). In this review, we discuss the results obtained in our laboratory in motor learning of both Lurcher (Lc/+) and tambaleante (tbl/tbl) mice as models of Purkinje-cell-devoid cerebellum. PMID:23630472

  5. Motor learning of mice lacking cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Porras-García, M Elena; Ruiz, Rocío; Pérez-Villegas, Eva M; Armengol, José Á

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a key role in the acquisition and execution of motor tasks whose physiological foundations were postulated on Purkinje cells' long-term depression (LTD). Numerous research efforts have been focused on understanding the cerebellum as a site of learning and/or memory storage. However, the controversy on which part of the cerebellum participates in motor learning, and how the process takes place, remains unsolved. In fact, it has been suggested that cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, and/or their combination with some brain structures other than the cerebellum are responsible for motor learning. Different experimental approaches have been used to tackle this question (cerebellar lesions, pharmacological agonist and/or antagonist of cerebellar neurotransmitters, virus tract tracings, etc.). One of these approaches is the study of spontaneous mutations affecting the cerebellar cortex and depriving it of its main input-output organizer (i.e., the Purkinje cell). In this review, we discuss the results obtained in our laboratory in motor learning of both Lurcher (Lc/+) and tambaleante (tbl/tbl) mice as models of Purkinje-cell-devoid cerebellum.

  6. Modeling the Generation of Output by the Cerebellar Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Steuber, Volker; Jaeger, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Functional aspects of network integration in the cerebellar cortex have been studied experimentally and modeled in much detail ever since the early work by theoreticians such as Marr, Albus and Braitenberg more than 40 years ago. In contrast, much less is known about cerebellar processing at the output stage, namely in the cerebellar nuclei (CN). Here, input from Purkinje cells converges to control CN neuron spiking via GABAergic inhibition, before the output from the CN reaches cerebellar targets such as the brainstem and the motor thalamus. In this article we review modeling studies that address how the CN may integrate cerebellar cortical inputs, and what kind of signals may be transmitted. Specific hypotheses in the literature contrast rate coding and temporal coding of information in the spiking output from the CN. One popular hypothesis states that postinhibitory rebound spiking may be an important mechanism by which Purkinje cell inhibition is turned into CN output spiking, but this hypothesis remains controversial. Rate coding clearly does take place, but in what way it may be augmented by temporal codes remains to be more clearly established. Several candidate mechanisms distinct from rebound spiking are discussed, such as the significance of spike time correlations between Purkinje cell pools to determine CN spike timing, irregularity of Purkinje cell spiking as a determinant of CN firing rate, and shared brief pauses between Purkinje cell pools that may trigger individual CN spikes precisely. PMID:23200193

  7. Upregulation of cortico-cerebellar functional connectivity after motor learning.

    PubMed

    Mehrkanoon, Saeid; Boonstra, Tjeerd W; Breakspear, Michael; Hinder, Mark; Summers, Jeffery J

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between the cerebellum and primary motor cortex are crucial for the acquisition of new motor skills. Recent neuroimaging studies indicate that learning motor skills is associated with subsequent modulation of resting-state functional connectivity in the cerebellar and cerebral cortices. The neuronal processes underlying the motor-learning-induced plasticity are not well understood. Here, we investigate changes in functional connectivity in source-reconstructed electroencephalography (EEG) following the performance of a single session of a dynamic force task in twenty young adults. Source activity was reconstructed in 112 regions of interest (ROIs) and the functional connectivity between all ROIs was estimated using the imaginary part of coherence. Significant changes in resting-state connectivity were assessed using partial least squares (PLS). We found that subjects adapted their motor performance during the training session and showed improved accuracy but with slower movement times. A number of connections were significantly upregulated after motor training, principally involving connections within the cerebellum and between the cerebellum and motor cortex. Increased connectivity was confined to specific frequency ranges in the mu- and beta-bands. Post hoc analysis of the phase spectra of these cerebellar and cortico-cerebellar connections revealed an increased phase lag between motor cortical and cerebellar activity following motor practice. These findings show a reorganization of intrinsic cortico-cerebellar connectivity related to motor adaptation and demonstrate the potential of EEG connectivity analysis in source space to reveal the neuronal processes that underpin neural plasticity.

  8. Spontaneous arterial hemorrhage as a complication of dengue

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shoma Vinay; Jacob, Gijoe George; Raju, Nithin Abraham; Ancheri, Sneha Ann

    2016-01-01

    Bleeding complications of dengue hemorrhagic fever such as epistaxis, gum bleeding, gastrointestinal bleeding, hypermenorrhea, hematuria, and thrombocytopenia have been documented. A 49-year-old female presented with complaints of intermittent high-grade fever for the past 4 days, lower abdominal pain and altered sensorium for 1 day. Laboratory investigations revealed severe anemia, mild thrombocytopenia, hypofibrinogenemia, and positive dengue serology. Emergency ultrasound examination of the abdomen revealed a possible rapidly expanding hematoma from the inferior epigastric artery and suggested urgent computed tomography (CT) angiogram for confirmation of the same. CT angiogram was confirmatory, and patient underwent emergency embolization of the right inferior epigastric artery. We report the first case of inferior epigastric hemorrhage and rectus sheath hematoma as a consequence of dengue. PMID:27275081

  9. Presynaptic Calcium Signalling in Cerebellar Mossy Fibres

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Louiza B.; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive fast Na+ spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers. Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none TTX-sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than 1 s affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could be modulated locally, suggesting that cerebellar glomeruli may be dynamically sub-compartmentalized due to ongoing inhibition mediated by Golgi cells. This could provide a fine-grained control of mossy fibre-granule cell information transfer and synaptic plasticity within a mossy fibre rosette. PMID:20162034

  10. Behavioral effects of neonatal lesions on the cerebellar system.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Robert; Strazielle, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    Several rodent models with spontaneous mutations causing cerebellar pathology are impaired in motor functions during the neonatal period, including Grid2(Lc), Rora(sg), Dab1(scm), Girk2(Wv), Lmx1a(dr-sst), Myo5a(dn), Inpp4a(wbl), and Cacna1a(rol) mice as well as shaker and dystonic rats. Deficits are also evident in murine null mutants such as Zic1, Fgfr1/FgFr2, and Xpa/Ercc8. Behavioral deficits are time-dependent following X-irradiated- or aspiration-induced lesions of the cerebellum in rats. In addition, motor functions are deficient after lesions in cerebellar-related pathways. As in animal subjects, sensorimotor disturbances have been described in children with cerebellar lesions. These results underline the importance of the cerebellum and its connections in the development of motor functions.

  11. Excitatory Cerebellar Nucleocortical Circuit Provides Internal Amplification during Associative Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhenyu; Proietti-Onori, Martina; Lin, Zhanmin; ten Brinke, Michiel M.; Boele, Henk-Jan; Potters, Jan-Willem; Ruigrok, Tom J.H.; Hoebeek, Freek E.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Closed-loop circuitries between cortical and subcortical regions can facilitate precision of output patterns, but the role of such networks in the cerebellum remains to be elucidated. Here, we characterize the role of internal feedback from the cerebellar nuclei to the cerebellar cortex in classical eyeblink conditioning. We find that excitatory output neurons in the interposed nucleus provide efference-copy signals via mossy fibers to the cerebellar cortical zones that belong to the same module, triggering monosynaptic responses in granule and Golgi cells and indirectly inhibiting Purkinje cells. Upon conditioning, the local density of nucleocortical mossy fiber terminals significantly increases. Optogenetic activation and inhibition of nucleocortical fibers in conditioned animals increases and decreases the amplitude of learned eyeblink responses, respectively. Our data show that the excitatory nucleocortical closed-loop circuitry of the cerebellum relays a corollary discharge of premotor signals and suggests an amplifying role of this circuitry in controlling associative motor learning. PMID:26844836

  12. Preterm cerebellar growth impairment after postnatal exposure to glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Tam, Emily W Y; Chau, Vann; Ferriero, Donna M; Barkovich, A James; Poskitt, Kenneth J; Studholme, Colin; Fok, Eric D-Y; Grunau, Ruth E; Glidden, David V; Miller, Steven P

    2011-10-19

    As survival rates of preterm newborns improve as a result of better medical management, these children increasingly show impaired cognition. These adverse cognitive outcomes are associated with decreases in the volume of the cerebellum. Because animals exhibit reduced preterm cerebellar growth after perinatal exposure to glucocorticoids, we sought to determine whether glucocorticoid exposure and other modifiable factors increased the risk for these adverse outcomes in human neonates. We studied 172 preterm neonatal infants from two medical centers, the University of British Columbia and the University of California, San Francisco, by performing serial magnetic resonance imaging examinations near birth and again near term-equivalent age. After we adjusted for associated clinical factors, antenatal betamethasone was not associated with changes in cerebellar volume. Postnatal exposure to clinically routine doses of hydrocortisone or dexamethasone was associated with impaired cerebellar, but not cerebral, growth. Alterations in treatment after preterm birth, particularly glucocorticoid exposure, may help to decrease risk for adverse neurological outcome after preterm birth.

  13. Cerebellar Development and Autism Spectrum Disorder in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, Maria; Sahin, Mustafa

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 50% of patients with the genetic disease tuberous sclerosis complex present with autism spectrum disorder. Although a number of studies have investigated the link between autism and tuberous sclerosis complex, the etiology of autism spectrum disorder in these patients remains unclear. Abnormal cerebellar function during critical phases of development could disrupt functional processes in the brain, leading to development of autistic features. Accordingly, the authors review the potential role of cerebellar dysfunction in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorder in tuberous sclerosis complex. The authors also introduce conditional knockout mouse models of Tsc1 and Tsc2 that link cerebellar circuitry to the development of autistic-like features. Taken together, these preclinical and clinical investigations indicate the cerebellum has a profound regulatory role during development of social communication and repetitive behaviors.

  14. A composite neurobehavioral test to evaluate acute functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    McBride, Devin W; Nowrangi, Derek; Kaur, Harpreet; Wu, Guangyong; Huang, Lei; Lekic, Tim; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2017-01-01

    Cerebellar haemorrhage accounts for 5-10% of all intracerebral haemorrhages and leads to severe, long-lasting functional deficits. Currently, there is limited research on this stroke subtype, which may be due to the lack of a suitable composite neuroscoring system specific for cerebellar injury in rodents. The purpose of this study is to develop a comprehensive composite neuroscore test for cerebellar injury using a rat model of cerebellar haemorrhage. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham surgery or cerebellar haemorrhage. Twenty-four hours post-injury, neurological behaviour was evaluated using 17 cost-effective and easy-to-perform tests, and a composite neuroscore was developed. The composite neuroscore was then used to assess functional recovery over seven days after cerebellar haemorrhage. Differences in the composite neuroscore deficits for the mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage models were observed for up to five days post-ictus. Until now, a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was not available for rodent studies. Herein, using mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage rat models a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was developed and used to assess functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage. This composite neuroscore may also be useful for other cerebellar injury models.

  15. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting? Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is ... bypass multiple coronary arteries during one surgery. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Figure A shows the location of ...

  16. Differential cerebellar and cortical involvement according to various attentional load: role of educational level.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Melissa C; Dilharreguy, Bixente; Allard, Michele; Deloire, Mathilde S A; Petry, Klaus G; Brochet, Bruno

    2009-04-01

    Recent imaging studies have evidenced various cerebral patterns dependent on educational level during cognitive tasks in neurodegenerative diseases. Determining relationships between educational status and cerebral activation during cognitive demands in physiological conditions may help to better understand the role of education on cognitive efficacy and functional reorganisation in pathological conditions. We proposed to analyse by functional MRI (fMRI) the relationship between educational status and cerebral activation during various attentional requests in healthy young adults. Twenty healthy young adults completed four successive conditions of a Go/No-go test of increasing complexity under fMRI. An effect of education was observed on attentional performances. Both in-scanner response times and cerebral activation increased during the Go/No-go paradigm. Healthy subjects with higher education exhibited higher activity in cerebellum and lower activity in medial prefrontal and inferior parietal regions compared with the healthy subjects with lower educational levels while performing the conditions of Go/No-go task. Our data evidence the influence of education on automatized strategies in healthy adults by modulating a functional balance of activation between cerebral cortex and cerebellar regions during attentional processes.

  17. Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Pseudoaneurysm Caused by Segmental Arterial Mediolysis: A Case Report of Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman underwent surgical resection of a posterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal arterial aneurysm in the subacute phase of acute aortic dissection (AAD). Concomitantly, a distal pancreatectomy was also required. The aneurysm was approximately 20 mm in diameter. Surgical resection of the aneurysm was performed because endovascular treatment was considered to be technically difficult due to dissecting lesions that had remained at the abdominal aorta. Histopathological findings suggested this aneurysm to be a pseudoaneurysm, which had arisen as a result of segmental arterial mediolysis. Approximately 1 year after surgery, no recurrence of the aneurysms was detected. PMID:23825502

  18. Pancreaticoduodenal artery pseudoaneurysm caused by segmental arterial mediolysis: a case report of surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Ushijima, Tomoki; Izumo, Akihiko; Matsumoto, Takashi; Taniguchi, Kenichiro; Uchida, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman underwent surgical resection of a posterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal arterial aneurysm in the subacute phase of acute aortic dissection (AAD). Concomitantly, a distal pancreatectomy was also required. The aneurysm was approximately 20 mm in diameter. Surgical resection of the aneurysm was performed because endovascular treatment was considered to be technically difficult due to dissecting lesions that had remained at the abdominal aorta. Histopathological findings suggested this aneurysm to be a pseudoaneurysm, which had arisen as a result of segmental arterial mediolysis. Approximately 1 year after surgery, no recurrence of the aneurysms was detected.

  19. Cerebellar cysts in children: a pattern recognition approach.

    PubMed

    Boltshauser, Eugen; Scheer, Ianina; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Cerebellar cysts may be seen in selected genetic disorders and acquired anomalies. Here, we review our experience, excluding cystic tumors and parasitic cysts. The pathogenesis is heterogeneous: Cysts may involve/represent normal structures (e.g., Virchow-Robin spaces), be "destructive" (such as in some types of pontocerebellar hypoplasias), "malformative" (such as in some forms of congenital muscular dystrophies and GPR56-related migration disorders), or "disruptive" (such as in some cerebellar dysplasias). The provided checklist may be useful in deciding targeted diagnostic workup.

  20. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration as a marker of endometrial cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Lie, Geoffrey; Morley, Thomas; Chowdhury, Muhammad

    2016-05-18

    An 84-year-old woman developed a cerebellar syndrome having undergone a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for endometrial cancer 1 year previously. She was found to be anti-Yo antibody positive and was diagnosed with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD). A subsequent positron emission tomography scan and lymph node biopsy identified recurrence of her endometrial cancer. This case illustrates how PCD can be an indicator of cancer recurrence, underlines the significance of PCD as a prompt to search for underlying malignancy, and highlights the difficulties PCD poses to the clinician in terms of diagnosis and management.

  1. [Type I Chiari malformation associated with cerebellar atrophy. Case report].

    PubMed

    Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; Calderón-Miranda, Willem Guillermo; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Lee-Aguirre, Ángel; Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Chiari malformation is characterized by caudal displacement of the cerebellar tonsils that penetrate into the spinal canal through the foramen magnum, achieving reach the atlas or axis. trunk and any drop of the fourth ventricle is observed. Typically is seen in young adults. In some cases scoliosis and Syringomyelic cavities may occur. The authors present (as far as they know) the first case in the literature with long term follow-up, of a caucasian woman with an unusual form of cerebellar atrophy and Chiari Type I malformation, suffering from weakness in his upper and lower extremities with rapidly progression. The patient was successfully treated with suboccipital decompression and C1 laminectomy.

  2. Symptomatic cerebellar hemorrhage from recurrent hemangioblastoma during delivery. Case report.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shigeto; Takeda, Naoya; Komura, Eiji

    2010-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman suffered cerebellar hemorrhage during the delivery of her first child. She had undergone surgical removal of a symptomatic cerebellar hemangioblastoma 6 years previously. Neuroradiological examinations indicated recurrent hemangioblastoma, confirmed by histological examination of the surgical specimen. She was discharged with no neurological deficit. Hemangioblastomas are benign tumors that are curable with surgical removal, but can grow during pregnancy. Women of reproductive age who have been treated for hemangioblastoma need careful long-term follow up, even if they show no signs of lesion recurrence.

  3. [Anatomical and clinical correlations in the cerebellar eredodegeneration].

    PubMed

    Pea, Umberto; de Luca, Francesco; Nicola, Massimiliano; Galli, Luigi

    2003-06-01

    Spinocerebellar hereditary degeneration makes up a heterogeneous group of diseases headed by Strumpell-Lorrain syndrome and Friedreich's disease. They are a heterogeneous group characterized by spasticity and paraplegia and related to demyelinization of the pyramidal tract and of the posterior cordons. During a 4-year period, we studied 14 patients (42-61 years old) suffering cerebellar eredodegeneration (hereditary ataxia). The aim of our work was to correlate anatomopathological findings with clinical signs. The important role played by the cerebellum in vesicosphincterial coordination was shown; in particular severe alteration of the ponto-cerebellar bundles could be cause of the abnormal behaviour of the detrusor.

  4. Inside the Thompson laboratory during the "cerebellar years" and the continuing cerebellar story.

    PubMed

    Lavond, D G; Wikgren, J; Nokia, M S

    2011-02-01

    This paper is based on the talk by one of the authors (DL) given at the symposium for the retirement of RF Thompson (RF Thompson: A bridge between 20th and 21st century neuroscience). We first make some informal observations of the historical times and research conditions in the Thompson laboratory when the cerebellum was found to play a critical role in eye lid classical conditioning, the "cerebellar years". These conditions influenced our collaborative international program on the phenomenon known as "transfer of training" or "savings". Our research shows that the appearance of "savings" is an artifact of the order of testing, and depends upon the functioning of the contralateral interpositus nucleus (IPN) in a way that is complementary to the role of the IPN in normal eyelid classical conditioning.

  5. Arterial embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... for embolization (especially to the brain) is mitral stenosis . Endocarditis (infection of the inside of the heart) can also cause arterial emboli. A common source for an embolus is from areas of hardening (atherosclerosis) in the aorta and other large blood vessels. These clots can ...

  6. Oscillatory activity, phase differences, and phase resetting in the inferior olivary nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lefler, Yaara; Torben-Nielsen, Benjamin; Yarom, Yosef

    2013-01-01

    The generation of temporal patterns is one of the most fascinating functions of the brain. Unlike the response to external stimuli temporal patterns are generated within the system and recalled for a specific use. To generate temporal patterns one needs a timing machine, a "master clock" that determines the temporal framework within which temporal patterns can be generated and implemented. Here we present the concept that in this putative "master clock" phase and frequency interact to generate temporal patterns. We define the requirements for a neuronal "master clock" to be both reliable and versatile. We introduce this concept within the inferior olive nucleus which at least by some scientists is regarded as the source of timing for cerebellar function. We review the basic properties of the subthreshold oscillation recorded from olivary neurons, analyze the phase relationships between neurons and demonstrate that the phase and onset of oscillation is tightly controlled by synaptic input. These properties endowed the olivary nucleus with the ability to act as a "master clock."

  7. Dyslexic Children Show Atypical Cerebellar Activation and Cerebro-Cerebellar Functional Connectivity in Orthographic and Phonological Processing.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaoxia; Li, Le; Zhang, Manli; Yang, Xiujie; Tian, Mengyu; Xie, Weiyi; Lu, Yao; Liu, Li; Bélanger, Nathalie N; Meng, Xiangzhi; Ding, Guosheng

    2017-04-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have found atypical cerebellar activation in individuals with dyslexia in either motor-related tasks or language tasks. However, studies investigating atypical cerebellar activation in individuals with dyslexia have mostly used tasks tapping phonological processing. A question that is yet unanswered is whether the cerebellum in individuals with dyslexia functions properly during orthographic processing of words, as growing evidence shows that the cerebellum is also involved in visual and spatial processing. Here, we investigated cerebellar activation and cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity during word processing in dyslexic readers and typically developing readers using tasks that tap orthographic and phonological codes. In children with dyslexia, we observed an abnormally higher engagement of the bilateral cerebellum for the orthographic task, which was negatively correlated with literacy measures. The greater the reading impairment was for young dyslexic readers, the stronger the cerebellar activation was. This suggests a compensatory role of the cerebellum in reading for children with dyslexia. In addition, a tendency for higher cerebellar activation in dyslexic readers was found in the phonological task. Moreover, the functional connectivity was stronger for dyslexic readers relative to typically developing readers between the lobule VI of the right cerebellum and the left fusiform gyrus during the orthographic task and between the lobule VI of the left cerebellum and the left supramarginal gyrus during the phonological task. This pattern of results suggests that the cerebellum compensates for reading impairment through the connections with specific brain regions responsible for the ongoing reading task. These findings enhance our understanding of the cerebellum's involvement in reading and reading impairment.

  8. Contribution of Somatic and Dendritic SK Channels in the Firing Rate of Deep Cerebellar Nuclei: Implication in Cerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Samira; Abbasi, Ataollah; Sarbaz, Yashar; Shahabi, Parviz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Loss of inhibitory output from Purkinje cells leads to hyperexcitability of the Deep Cerebellar Nuclei (DCN), which results in cerebellar ataxia. Also, inhibition of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channel increases firing rate of DCN, which could cause cerebellar ataxia. Therefore, SK channel activators can be effective in reducing the symptoms of this disease, and used for the treatment of cerebellar ataxia. In this regard, we hypothesized that blockade of SK channels in different compartments of DCN would increase firing rate with different value. The location of these channels has different effects on increasing firing rate. Methods: In this study, multi-compartment computational model of DCN was used. This computational stimulation allowed us to study the changes in the firing activity of DCN neuron without concerns about interfering parameters in the experiment. Results: The simulation results demonstrated that blockade of somatic and dendritic SK channel increased the firing rate of DCN. In addition, after hyperpolarization (AHP) amplitude increased with blocking SK channel, and its regularity and resting potential changed. However, action potentials amplitude and duration had no significant changes. The simulation results illustrated a more significant contribution of SK channels on the dendritic tree to the DCN firing rate. SK channels in the proximal dendrites have more impact on firing rate compared to distal dendrites. Discussion: Therefore, inhibition of SK channel in DCN can cause cerebellar ataxia, and SK channel openers can have a therapeutic effect on cerebellar ataxia. In addition, the location of SK channels could be important in therapeutic goals. Dendritic SK channels can be a more effective target compared to somatic SK channels. PMID:27303600

  9. Postural Ataxia in Cerebellar Downbeat Nystagmus: Its Relation to Visual, Proprioceptive and Vestibular Signals and Cerebellar Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Helmchen, Christoph; Kirchhoff, Jan-Birger; Göttlich, Martin; Sprenger, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Background The cerebellum integrates proprioceptive, vestibular and visual signals for postural control. Cerebellar patients with downbeat nystagmus (DBN) complain of unsteadiness of stance and gait as well as blurred vision and oscillopsia. Objectives The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential role of visual input, gaze eccentricity, vestibular and proprioceptive input on the postural stability in a large cohort of cerebellar patients with DBN, in comparison to healthy age-matched control subjects. Methods Oculomotor (nystagmus, smooth pursuit eye movements) and postural (postural sway speed) parameters were recorded and related to each other and volumetric changes of the cerebellum (voxel-based morphometry, SPM). Results Twenty-seven patients showed larger postural instability in all experimental conditions. Postural sway increased with nystagmus in the eyes closed condition but not with the eyes open. Romberg’s ratio remained stable and was not different from healthy controls. Postural sway did not change with gaze position or graviceptive input. It increased with attenuated proprioceptive input and on tandem stance in both groups but Romberg’s ratio also did not differ. Cerebellar atrophy (vermal lobule VI, VIII) correlated with the severity of impaired smooth pursuit eye movements of DBN patients. Conclusions Postural ataxia of cerebellar patients with DBN cannot be explained by impaired visual feedback. Despite oscillopsia visual feedback control on cerebellar postural control seems to be preserved as postural sway was strongest on visual deprivation. The increase in postural ataxia is neither related to modulations of single components characterizing nystagmus nor to deprivation of single sensory (visual, proprioceptive) inputs usually stabilizing stance. Re-weighting of multisensory signals and/or inappropriate cerebellar motor commands might account for this postural ataxia. PMID:28056109

  10. Whole-Cell Properties of Cerebellar Nuclei Neurons In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Canto, Cathrin B; Witter, Laurens; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar nuclei neurons integrate sensorimotor information and form the final output of the cerebellum, projecting to premotor brainstem targets. This implies that, in contrast to specialized neurons and interneurons in cortical regions, neurons within the nuclei encode and integrate complex information that is most likely reflected in a large variation of intrinsic membrane properties and integrative capacities of individual neurons. Yet, whether this large variation in properties is reflected in a heterogeneous physiological cell population of cerebellar nuclei neurons with well or poorly defined cell types remains to be determined. Indeed, the cell electrophysiological properties of cerebellar nuclei neurons have been identified in vitro in young rodents, but whether these properties are similar to the in vivo adult situation has not been shown. In this comprehensive study we present and compare the in vivo properties of 144 cerebellar nuclei neurons in adult ketamine-xylazine anesthetized mice. We found regularly firing (N = 88) and spontaneously bursting (N = 56) neurons. Membrane-resistance, capacitance, spike half-width and firing frequency all widely varied as a continuum, ranging from 9.63 to 3352.1 MΩ, from 6.7 to 772.57 pF, from 0.178 to 1.98 ms, and from 0 to 176.6 Hz, respectively. At the same time, several of these parameters were correlated with each other. Capacitance decreased with membrane resistance (R2 = 0.12, P<0.001), intensity of rebound spiking increased with membrane resistance (for 100 ms duration R2 = 0.1503, P = 0.0011), membrane resistance decreased with membrane time constant (R2 = 0.045, P = 0.031) and increased with spike half-width (R2 = 0.023, P<0.001), while capacitance increased with firing frequency (R2 = 0.29, P<0.001). However, classes of neuron subtypes could not be identified using merely k-clustering of their intrinsic firing properties and/or integrative properties following activation of their Purkinje cell input

  11. Whole-Cell Properties of Cerebellar Nuclei Neurons In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar nuclei neurons integrate sensorimotor information and form the final output of the cerebellum, projecting to premotor brainstem targets. This implies that, in contrast to specialized neurons and interneurons in cortical regions, neurons within the nuclei encode and integrate complex information that is most likely reflected in a large variation of intrinsic membrane properties and integrative capacities of individual neurons. Yet, whether this large variation in properties is reflected in a heterogeneous physiological cell population of cerebellar nuclei neurons with well or poorly defined cell types remains to be determined. Indeed, the cell electrophysiological properties of cerebellar nuclei neurons have been identified in vitro in young rodents, but whether these properties are similar to the in vivo adult situation has not been shown. In this comprehensive study we present and compare the in vivo properties of 144 cerebellar nuclei neurons in adult ketamine-xylazine anesthetized mice. We found regularly firing (N = 88) and spontaneously bursting (N = 56) neurons. Membrane-resistance, capacitance, spike half-width and firing frequency all widely varied as a continuum, ranging from 9.63 to 3352.1 MΩ, from 6.7 to 772.57 pF, from 0.178 to 1.98 ms, and from 0 to 176.6 Hz, respectively. At the same time, several of these parameters were correlated with each other. Capacitance decreased with membrane resistance (R2 = 0.12, P<0.001), intensity of rebound spiking increased with membrane resistance (for 100 ms duration R2 = 0.1503, P = 0.0011), membrane resistance decreased with membrane time constant (R2 = 0.045, P = 0.031) and increased with spike half-width (R2 = 0.023, P<0.001), while capacitance increased with firing frequency (R2 = 0.29, P<0.001). However, classes of neuron subtypes could not be identified using merely k-clustering of their intrinsic firing properties and/or integrative properties following activation of their Purkinje cell input

  12. A rare type of single coronary artery with right coronary artery originating from the left circumflex artery in a child

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Min; Lee, Ok Jeong; Kang, I-Seok; Huh, June; Kim, Geena

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a single coronary artery is a rare congenital anomaly; such patients often present with severe myocardial ischemia. We experienced the case of a 13-year-old girl with the right coronary artery originating from the left circumflex artery. She visited our Emergency Department owing to severe chest pain; her cardiac enzyme levels were elevated, but her initial electrocardiogram (ECG) was normal. Echocardiography showed normal anatomy and normal regional wall motion. When she presented with recurrent chest pain on admission, the ECG showed significant ST-segment elevation in the left precordial leads and inferior leads with ST-segment depression in aVR lead, suggesting myocardial ischemia, and her cardiac enzyme levels were also elevated. We performed coronary angiography that showed a single right coronary artery originating from the left circumflex artery without stenosis. We confirmed the presence of a single coronary artery using coronary computed tomography. In addition, the treadmill test that was performed showed normal results. She was discharged from the hospital without any medications but with a recommendation of a regular follow-up. PMID:25729398

  13. INFERIOR OLIVE OSCILLATION AS THE TEMPORAL BASIS FOR MOTRICITY AND OSCILLATORY RESET AS THE BASIS FOR MOTOR ERROR CORRECTION

    PubMed Central

    LLINÁS, R. R.

    2010-01-01

    The cerebellum can be viewed as supporting two distinct aspects of motor execution related to a) motor coordination and the sequence that imparts such movement temporal coherence and b) the reorganization of ongoing movement when a motor execution error occurs. The former has been referred to as “motor time binding” as it requires that the large numbers of motoneurons involved be precisely activated from a temporal perspective. By contrast, motor error correction requires the abrupt reorganization of ongoing motor sequences, on occasion sufficiently important to rescue the animal or person from potentially lethal situations. The olivo-cerebellar system plays an important role in both categories of motor control. In particular, the morphology and electrophysiology of inferior olivary neurons have been selected by evolution to execute a rather unique oscillatory pacemaking function, one required for temporal sequencing and a unique oscillatory phase resetting dynamic for error correction. Thus, inferior olivary (IO) neurons are electrically coupled through gap junctions, generating synchronous subthreshold oscillations of their membrane potential at a frequency of 1–10 Hz and are capable of fast and reliable phase resetting. Here I propose to address the role of the olivocerebellar system in the context of motor timing and reset. PMID:19393291

  14. Heterogeneous Expression of T-type Ca2+ Channels Defines Different Neuronal Populations in the Inferior Olive of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bazzigaluppi, Paolo; de Jeu, Marcel T. G.

    2016-01-01

    The neurons in the inferior olive express subthreshold oscillations in their membrane potential. This oscillatory activity is known to drive synchronous activity in the cerebellar cortex and plays a role in motor learning and motor timing. In the past years, it was commonly thought that olivary neurons belonged to a unique population of oscillating units and that oscillation properties were exclusively dependent on network settings and/or synaptic inputs. The origin of olivary oscillations is now known to be a local phenomenon and is generated by a combination of conductances. In the present work, we show the existence of at least two neuronal populations that can be distinguished on the basis of the presence or absence of low-voltage activated Ca2+ channels. The expression of this channel determines the oscillatory behavior of olivary neurons. Furthermore, the number of cells that express this channel is different between sub nuclei of the inferior olive. These findings clearly indicate the functional variability within and between olivary sub nuclei. PMID:27540355

  15. Fatal Vertebral Artery Injury in Penetrating Cervical Spine Trauma.

    PubMed

    Tannoury, Chadi; Degiacomo, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Study Design. This case illustrates complications to a vertebral artery injury (VAI) resulting from penetrating cervical spine trauma. Objectives. To discuss the management of both VAI and cervical spine trauma after penetrating gunshot wound to the neck. Summary of Background Data. Vertebral artery injury following cervical spine trauma is infrequent, and a unilateral VAI often occurs without neurologic sequela. Nevertheless, devastating complications of stroke and death do occur. Methods. A gunshot wound to the neck resulted in a C6 vertebral body fracture and C5-C7 transverse foramina fractures. Neck CT angiogram identified a left vertebral artery occlusion. A cerebral angiography confirmed occlusion of the left extracranial vertebral artery and patency of the remaining cerebrovascular system. Following anterior cervical corpectomy and stabilization, brainstem infarction occurred and resulted in death. Results. A fatal outcome resulted from vertebral artery thrombus propagation with occlusion of the basilar artery triggering basilar ischemia and subsequent brainstem and cerebellar infarction. Conclusions. Vertebral artery injury secondary to cervical spine trauma can lead to potentially devastating neurologic sequela. Early surgical stabilization, along with anticoagulation therapy, contributes towards managing the combination of injuries. Unfortunately, despite efforts, a poor outcome is sometimes inevitable when cervical spine trauma is coupled with a VAI.

  16. Fatal Vertebral Artery Injury in Penetrating Cervical Spine Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Tannoury, Chadi; Degiacomo, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Study Design. This case illustrates complications to a vertebral artery injury (VAI) resulting from penetrating cervical spine trauma. Objectives. To discuss the management of both VAI and cervical spine trauma after penetrating gunshot wound to the neck. Summary of Background Data. Vertebral artery injury following cervical spine trauma is infrequent, and a unilateral VAI often occurs without neurologic sequela. Nevertheless, devastating complications of stroke and death do occur. Methods. A gunshot wound to the neck resulted in a C6 vertebral body fracture and C5–C7 transverse foramina fractures. Neck CT angiogram identified a left vertebral artery occlusion. A cerebral angiography confirmed occlusion of the left extracranial vertebral artery and patency of the remaining cerebrovascular system. Following anterior cervical corpectomy and stabilization, brainstem infarction occurred and resulted in death. Results. A fatal outcome resulted from vertebral artery thrombus propagation with occlusion of the basilar artery triggering basilar ischemia and subsequent brainstem and cerebellar infarction. Conclusions. Vertebral artery injury secondary to cervical spine trauma can lead to potentially devastating neurologic sequela. Early surgical stabilization, along with anticoagulation therapy, contributes towards managing the combination of injuries. Unfortunately, despite efforts, a poor outcome is sometimes inevitable when cervical spine trauma is coupled with a VAI. PMID:26640731

  17. Uses of the Inferior Oblique Muscle in Strabismus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stager, David; Dao, Lori M.; Felius, Joost

    2015-01-01

    Inferior oblique muscle weakening is typically performed for overaction of the muscle. In this article, we review inferior oblique muscle anatomy, different weakening procedures, and recent surgical techniques that take advantage of the muscle's unique anatomy for the treatment of additional indications such as excyclotorsion and hypertropia in primary gaze. PMID:26180466

  18. [Intraabdominal metastasis of cerebellar medulloblastoma through ventriculoperitoneal shunt].

    PubMed

    Carrasco Torrents, R; Sancho, M A; Juliá, V; Montaner, A; Costa, J M; Morales, L

    2001-01-01

    We present a 6-year-old girl with cerebellar medulloblastoma causing obstructive hydrocephalus that was treated by ventriculoperitoneal shunting. The patient subsequently underwent surgical excision of the tumor followed by adjuvant craniospinal radiotherapy. Nine months after shunting, multiple intraabdominal metastatic lesions were found. Although the risk is low, ventriculoperitoneal shunting may facilitate the spread of malignant cells.

  19. Cerebro-cerebellar interactions underlying temporal information processing.

    PubMed

    Aso, Kenji; Hanakawa, Takashi; Aso, Toshihiko; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    2010-12-01

    The neural basis of temporal information processing remains unclear, but it is proposed that the cerebellum plays an important role through its internal clock or feed-forward computation functions. In this study, fMRI was used to investigate the brain networks engaged in perceptual and motor aspects of subsecond temporal processing without accompanying coprocessing of spatial information. Direct comparison between perceptual and motor aspects of time processing was made with a categorical-design analysis. The right lateral cerebellum (lobule VI) was active during a time discrimination task, whereas the left cerebellar lobule VI was activated during a timed movement generation task. These findings were consistent with the idea that the cerebellum contributed to subsecond time processing in both perceptual and motor aspects. The feed-forward computational theory of the cerebellum predicted increased cerebro-cerebellar interactions during time information processing. In fact, a psychophysiological interaction analysis identified the supplementary motor and dorsal premotor areas, which had a significant functional connectivity with the right cerebellar region during a time discrimination task and with the left lateral cerebellum during a timed movement generation task. The involvement of cerebro-cerebellar interactions may provide supportive evidence that temporal information processing relies on the simulation of timing information through feed-forward computation in the cerebellum.

  20. Cerebellar Damage Produces Selective Deficits in Verbal Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravizza, Susan M.; Mccormick, Cristin A.; Schlerf, John E.; Justus, Timothy; Ivry, Richard B.; Fiez, Julie A.

    2006-01-01

    The cerebellum is often active in imaging studies of verbal working memory, consistent with a putative role in articulatory rehearsal. While patients with cerebellar damage occasionally exhibit a mild impairment on standard neuropsychological tests of working memory, these tests are not diagnostic for exploring these processes in detail. The…

  1. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with cerebellar stroke.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Martínez, A; Arpa, J

    1997-01-01

    Conduction time of the central motor pathways (CMCT) by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was performed within the first two weeks in 7 patients with isolated hemicerebellar lesions after stroke. Cerebellar infarcts were small (< 2 cm in diameter) in 5 patients and no brainstem structure was involved in CT studies. The threshold (3 cases) and CMCT (4 cases) were abnormal or asymmetric by stimulation of the motor cortex contralateral to the impaired hemicerebellum. The follow-up study in 2 patients revealed electrophysiological improvement closely related to clinical cerebellar recovery rate. CMCT was significantly longer by cortex stimulation contralateral to the impaired hemicerebellum than by ipsilateral stimulation. Prolonged CMCT was significantly correlated with the rated severity of cerebellar signs. Increased threshold may be due to depressed facilitating action of the deep cerebellar nuclei on contralateral motor cortex. Abnormal CMCT might result in reduced size and increased dispersion of the efferent volleys. Recovery of electrophysiological results could represent in part true potentially reversible functional deficit. Whichever the pathophysiological mechanisms involved, our results demonstrate that the cerebellum dysfunction plays a role in the abnormalities of CMCT elicited by TMS.

  2. The Contribution of Brainstem and Cerebellar Pathways to Auditory Recognition

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, Neil M.; Wilson, Sarah J.

    2017-01-01

    The cerebellum has been known to play an important role in motor functions for many years. More recently its role has been expanded to include a range of cognitive and sensory-motor processes, and substantial neuroimaging and clinical evidence now points to cerebellar involvement in most auditory processing tasks. In particular, an increase in the size of the cerebellum over recent human evolution has been attributed in part to the development of speech. Despite this, the auditory cognition literature has largely overlooked afferent auditory connections to the cerebellum that have been implicated in acoustically conditioned reflexes in animals, and could subserve speech and other auditory processing in humans. This review expands our understanding of auditory processing by incorporating cerebellar pathways into the anatomy and functions of the human auditory system. We reason that plasticity in the cerebellar pathways underpins implicit learning of spectrotemporal information necessary for sound and speech recognition. Once learnt, this information automatically recognizes incoming auditory signals and predicts likely subsequent information based on previous experience. Since sound recognition processes involving the brainstem and cerebellum initiate early in auditory processing, learnt information stored in cerebellar memory templates could then support a range of auditory processing functions such as streaming, habituation, the integration of auditory feature information such as pitch, and the recognition of vocal communications. PMID:28373850

  3. Cortical networks of procedural learning: evidence from cerebellar damage.

    PubMed

    Torriero, Sara; Oliveri, Massimiliano; Koch, Giacomo; Lo Gerfo, Emanuele; Salerno, Silvia; Petrosini, Laura; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2007-03-25

    The lateral cerebellum plays a critical role in procedural learning that goes beyond the strict motor control functions attributed to it. Patients with cerebellar damage show marked impairment in the acquisition of procedures, as revealed by their performance on the serial reaction time task (SRTT). Here we present the case of a patient affected by ischemic damage involving the left cerebellum who showed a selective deficit in procedural learning while performing the SRTT with the left hand. The deficit recovered when the cortical excitability of an extensive network involving both cerebellar hemispheres and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) was decreased by low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Although inhibition of the right DLPFC or a control fronto-parietal region did not modify the patient's performance, inhibition of the right (unaffected) cerebellum and the left DLPFC markedly improved task performance. These findings could be explained by the modulation of a set of inhibitory and excitatory connections between the lateral cerebellum and the contralateral prefrontal area induced by rTMS. The presence of left cerebellar damage is likely associated with a reduced excitatory drive from sub-cortical left cerebellar nuclei towards the right DLPFC, causing reduced excitability of the right DLPFC and, conversely, unbalanced activation of the left DLPFC. Inhibition of the left DLPFC would reduce the unbalancing of cortical activation, thus explaining the observed selective recovery of procedural memory.

  4. Caytaxin Deficiency Disrupts Signaling Pathways in Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianfeng; Gong, Suzhen; LeDoux, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    The genetically dystonic (dt) rat, an autosomal recessive model of generalized dystonia, harbors an insertional mutation in Atcay. As a result, dt rats are deficient in Atcay transcript and the neuronally-restricted protein caytaxin. Previous electrophysiological and biochemical studies have defined olivocerebellar pathways, particularly the climbing fiber projection to Purkinje cells, as a site of significant functional abnormality in dt rats. In normal rats, Atcay transcript is abundantly expressed in the granular and Purkinje cell layers of cerebellar cortex. To better understand the consequences of caytaxin deficiency in cerebellar cortex, differential gene expression was examined in dt rats and their normal littermates. Data from oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (QRT-PCR) identified phosphatidylinositol signaling pathways, calcium homeostasis, and extracellular matrix interactions as domains of cellular dysfunction in dt rats. In dt rats, genes encoding the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRH-R1, Crhr1) and calcium-transporting plasma membrane ATPase 4 (PMCA4, Atp2b4) showed the greatest up-regulation with QRT-PCR. Immunocytochemical experiments demonstrated that CRH-R1, CRH, and PMCA4 were up-regulated in cerebellar cortex of mutant rats. Along with previous electrophysiological and pharmacological studies, our data indicate that caytaxin plays a critical role in the molecular response of Purkinje cells to climbing fiber input. Caytaxin may also contribute to maturational events in cerebellar cortex. PMID:17092653

  5. Caytaxin deficiency disrupts signaling pathways in cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J; Gong, S; Ledoux, M S

    2007-01-19

    The genetically dystonic (dt) rat, an autosomal recessive model of generalized dystonia, harbors an insertional mutation in Atcay. As a result, dt rats are deficient in Atcay transcript and the neuronally-restricted protein caytaxin. Previous electrophysiological and biochemical studies have defined olivocerebellar pathways, particularly the climbing fiber projection to Purkinje cells, as sites of significant functional abnormality in dt rats. In normal rats, Atcay transcript is abundantly expressed in the granular and Purkinje cell layers of cerebellar cortex. To better understand the consequences of caytaxin deficiency in cerebellar cortex, differential gene expression was examined in dt rats and their normal littermates. Data from oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR (QRT-PCR) identified phosphatidylinositol signaling pathways, calcium homeostasis, and extracellular matrix interactions as domains of cellular dysfunction in dt rats. In dt rats, genes encoding the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRH-R1, Crhr1) and plasma membrane calcium-dependent ATPase 4 (PMCA4, Atp2b4) showed the greatest up-regulation with QRT-PCR. Immunocytochemical experiments demonstrated that CRH-R1, CRH, and PMCA4 were up-regulated in cerebellar cortex of mutant rats. Along with previous electrophysiological and pharmacological studies, our data indicate that caytaxin plays a critical role in the molecular response of Purkinje cells to climbing fiber input. Caytaxin may also contribute to maturational events in cerebellar cortex.

  6. Speech and Language Findings Associated with Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paslawski, Teresa; Duffy, Joseph R.; Vernino, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) is an autoimmune disease that can be associated with cancer of the breast, lung, and ovary. The clinical presentation of PCD commonly includes ataxia, visual disturbances, and dysarthria. The speech disturbances associated with PCD have not been well characterized, despite general acceptance that…

  7. Cerebellar rTMS disrupts predictive language processing

    PubMed Central

    Lesage, Elise; Morgan, Blaire E.; Olson, Andrew C.; Meyer, Antje S.; Miall, R. Chris

    2012-01-01

    Summary The human cerebellum plays an important role in language, amongst other cognitive and motor functions [1], but a unifying theoretical framework about cerebellar language function is lacking. In an established model of motor control, the cerebellum is seen as a predictive machine, making short-term estimations about the outcome of motor commands. This allows for flexible control, on-line correction, and coordination of movements [2]. The homogeneous cytoarchitecture of the cerebellar cortex suggests that similar computations occur throughout the structure, operating on different input signals and with different output targets [3]. Several authors have therefore argued that this ‘motor’ model may extend to cerebellar nonmotor functions [3–5], and that the cerebellum may support prediction in language processing [6]. However, this hypothesis has never been directly tested. Here, we used the ‘Visual World’ paradigm [7], where on-line processing of spoken sentence content can be assessed by recording the latencies of listeners' eye movements towards objects mentioned. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) was used to disrupt function in the right cerebellum, a region implicated in language [8]. After cerebellar rTMS, listeners showed delayed eye fixations to target objects predicted by sentence content, while there was no effect on eye fixations in sentences without predictable content. The prediction deficit was absent in two control groups. Our findings support the hypothesis that computational operations performed by the cerebellum may support prediction during both motor control and language processing. PMID:23017990

  8. Bilateral cerebellar activation in unilaterally challenged essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Broersma, Marja; van der Stouwe, Anna M M; Buijink, Arthur W G; de Jong, Bauke M; Groot, Paul F C; Speelman, Johannes D; Tijssen, Marina A J; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Maurits, Natasha M

    2016-01-01

    •We added EMG as an index of tremor intensity to fMRI to study essential tremor.•Block- and tremor-related activations during a unilateral motor task were separated.•Block-related activations were found in the classical motor network.•Tremor-related activations were found in bilateral cerebellar lobules V, VI and VIII.

  9. Arachnodactyly, aminoaciduria, congenital cataracts, cerebellar ataxia, and delayed developmental milestones

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskar, P. A.; Jagannathan, K.; Valmikinathan, K.

    1974-01-01

    Two male cousins are reported with arachnodactyly, selective aminoaciduria, congenital cataracts, cerebellar ataxia, and delayed developmental milestones, and a distant female relative with similar abnormalities. The syndrome is thought to be previously undescribed, though it has resemblances to Marinesco-Sjögren and Marfan's syndromes. Images PMID:4448994

  10. The Contribution of Brainstem and Cerebellar Pathways to Auditory Recognition.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Neil M; Wilson, Sarah J

    2017-01-01

    The cerebellum has been known to play an important role in motor functions for many years. More recently its role has been expanded to include a range of cognitive and sensory-motor processes, and substantial neuroimaging and clinical evidence now points to cerebellar involvement in most auditory processing tasks. In particular, an increase in the size of the cerebellum over recent human evolution has been attributed in part to the development of speech. Despite this, the auditory cognition literature has largely overlooked afferent auditory connections to the cerebellum that have been implicated in acoustically conditioned reflexes in animals, and could subserve speech and other auditory processing in humans. This review expands our understanding of auditory processing by incorporating cerebellar pathways into the anatomy and functions of the human auditory system. We reason that plasticity in the cerebellar pathways underpins implicit learning of spectrotemporal information necessary for sound and speech recognition. Once learnt, this information automatically recognizes incoming auditory signals and predicts likely subsequent information based on previous experience. Since sound recognition processes involving the brainstem and cerebellum initiate early in auditory processing, learnt information stored in cerebellar memory templates could then support a range of auditory processing functions such as streaming, habituation, the integration of auditory feature information such as pitch, and the recognition of vocal communications.

  11. Hippocampo-cerebellar theta band phase synchrony in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wikgren, J; Nokia, M S; Penttonen, M

    2010-02-17

    Hippocampal functioning, in the form of theta band oscillation, has been shown to modulate and predict cerebellar learning of which rabbit eyeblink conditioning is perhaps the most well-known example. The contribution of hippocampal neural activity to cerebellar learning is only possible if there is a functional connection between the two structures. Here, in the context of trace eyeblink conditioning, we show (1) that, in addition to the hippocampus, prominent theta oscillation also occurs in the cerebellum, and (2) that cerebellar theta oscillation is synchronized with that in the hippocampus. Further, the degree of phase synchrony (PS) increased both as a response to the conditioning stimuli and as a function of the relative power of hippocampal theta oscillation. However, the degree of PS did not change as a function of either training or learning nor did it predict learning rate as the hippocampal theta ratio did. Nevertheless, theta band synchronization might reflect the formation of transient neural assemblies between the hippocampus and the cerebellum. These findings help us understand how hippocampal function can affect eyeblink conditioning, during which the critical plasticity occurs in the cerebellum. Future studies should examine cerebellar unit activity in relation to hippocampal theta oscillations in order to discover the detailed mechanisms of theta-paced neural activity.

  12. Verb Generation in Children and Adolescents with Acute Cerebellar Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, B.; Schoch, B.; Hein-Kropp, C.; Dimitrova, A.; Hovel, M.; Ziegler, W.; Gizewski, E. R.; Timmann, D.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine verb generation in a larger group of children and adolescents with acute focal lesions of the cerebellum. Nine children and adolescents with cerebellar tumours participated. Subjects were tested a few days after tumour surgery. For comparison, a subgroup was tested also 1 or 2 days before surgery. None…

  13. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section 882.5820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5820...

  14. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section 882.5820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5820...

  15. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section 882.5820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5820...

  16. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Children with Cerebellar Malformations: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolduc, Marie-Eve; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Cerebellar malformations are increasingly diagnosed in the fetal period. Consequently, their consideration requires stressful and often critical decisions from both clinicians and families. This has resulted in an emergent need to understand better the impact of these early life lesions on child development. We performed a comprehensive literature…

  17. Predicting and correcting ataxia using a model of cerebellar function

    PubMed Central

    Bhanpuri, Nasir H.; Okamura, Allison M.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar damage results in uncoordinated, variable and dysmetric movements known as ataxia. Here we show that we can reliably model single-joint reaching trajectories of patients (n = 10), reproduce patient-like deficits in the behaviour of controls (n = 11), and apply patient-specific compensations that improve reaching accuracy (P < 0.02). Our approach was motivated by the theory that the cerebellum is essential for updating and/or storing an internal dynamic model that relates motor commands to changes in body state (e.g. arm position and velocity). We hypothesized that cerebellar damage causes a mismatch between the brain’s modelled dynamics and the actual body dynamics, resulting in ataxia. We used both behavioural and computational approaches to demonstrate that specific cerebellar patient deficits result from biased internal models. Our results strongly support the idea that an intact cerebellum is critical for maintaining accurate internal models of dynamics. Importantly, we demonstrate how subject-specific compensation can improve movement in cerebellar patients, who are notoriously unresponsive to treatment. PMID:24812203

  18. Is a Cerebellar Deficit the Underlying Cause of Reading Disabilities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irannejad, Shahrzad; Savage, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether children with dyslexia differed in their performance on reading, phonological, rapid naming, motor, and cerebellar-related tasks and automaticity measures compared to reading age (RA)-matched and chronological age (CA)-matched control groups. Participants were 51 children attending mainstream English elementary…

  19. Early Cerebellar Network Shifting in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    PubMed

    Falcon, M I; Gomez, C M; Chen, E E; Shereen, A; Solodkin, A

    2016-07-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 6 (SCA6), an autosomal dominant degenerative disease, is characterized by diplopia, gait ataxia, and incoordination due to severe progressive degeneration of Purkinje cells in the vestibulo- and spinocerebellum. Ocular motor deficits are common, including difficulty fixating on moving objects, nystagmus and disruption of smooth pursuit movements. In presymptomatic SCA6, there are alterations in saccades and smooth-pursuit movements. We sought to assess functional and structural changes in cerebellar connectivity associated with a visual task, hypothesizing that gradual changes would parallel disease progression. We acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging data during a passive smooth-pursuit task in 14 SCA6 patients, representing a range of disease duration and severity, and performed a cross-sectional comparison of cerebellar networks compared with healthy controls. We identified a shift in activation from vermis in presymptomatic individuals to lateral cerebellum in moderate-to-severe cases. Concomitantly, effective connectivity between regions of cerebral cortex and cerebellum was at its highest in moderate cases, and disappeared in severe cases. Finally, we noted structural differences in the cerebral and cerebellar peduncles. These unique results, spanning both functional and structural domains, highlight widespread changes in SCA6 and compensatory mechanisms associated with cerebellar physiology that could be utilized in developing new therapies.

  20. Complications of inferior vena cava filters

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, Simer; Chamarthy, Murthy R.

    2016-01-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placement is a relatively low risk alternative for prophylaxis against pulmonary embolism in patients with pelvic or lower extremity deep venous thrombosis who are not suitable for anticoagulation. There is an increasing trend in the number of IVC filter implantation procedures performed every year. There are many device types in the market and in the early 2000s, the introduction of retrievable filters brought an additional subset of complications to consider. Modern filter designs have led to decreased morbidity and mortality, however, a thorough understanding of the limitations and complications of IVC filters is necessary to weight the risks and benefits of placing IVC filters. In this review, the complications associated with IVC filters are divided into procedure related, post-procedure, and retrieval complications. Differences amongst the device types and retrievable filters are described, though this is limited by a significant lack of prospective studies. Additionally, the clinical presentation as well as prevention and treatment strategies are outlined with each complication type. PMID:28123983

  1. [A case of cardiac myxoma presenting with multiple cerebellar hemorrhages and elevation of interleukin-6 in the cerebrospinal fluid].

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Hiroshi; Murakami, Yasuo; Sengoku, Renpei; Sato, Hironori; Inoue, Kiyoharu

    2004-10-01

    We report a 25-year old man with cardiac myxoma presenting with multiple cerebellar hemorrhages and elevation of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The patient was first admitted to our hospital because of cerebral infarctions at the age of 23. After systemic exploration he was diagnosed as cardiac myxoma. In this patient, the serum level of IL-6 was elevated. The cardiac myxoma was resected and the serum IL-6 level returned to normal. His neurological symptoms improved almost to normal and he was discharged. The patient had been well for two years until he developed headache at the age of 25. Brain MRI revealed multiple cerebellar hemorrhages that overlaid old infarctions. The hemorrhages enlarged in a three months period and his headache became worse, and then he was admitted again. The IL-6 value was normal in serum at that time, but it was elevated in the CSF. The CSF IgG index was also elevated. Cerebral angiograms showed no abnormal vessel in the infratentorium, while multiple fusiform aneurysms were found in both middle cerebral arteries. A transesophageal echocardiography revealed no recurrence of cardiac myxoma. Craniotomy was performed and intracerebellar hematomas were removed. Histopathological examination showed only old and recent bleedings; no metastatic myxoma tissue was found. Although no myxoma tissue was found in biopsy specimen, it seemed reasonable that an elevated level of IL-6 in the CSF was due to metastasized intracranial myxoma, which caused cerebellar embolism, and then invaded the vessel walls and continued to grow. In reviewing the literature we have found no reported case of cardiac myxoma with analysis of IL-6 value in the CSF. We speculate that the level of IL-6 in the CSF might be a good marker for the neurological manifestations of cardiac myxoma.

  2. Adaptive Robotic Control Driven by a Versatile Spiking Cerebellar Network

    PubMed Central

    Casellato, Claudia; Antonietti, Alberto; Garrido, Jesus A.; Carrillo, Richard R.; Luque, Niceto R.; Ros, Eduardo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is involved in a large number of different neural processes, especially in associative learning and in fine motor control. To develop a comprehensive theory of sensorimotor learning and control, it is crucial to determine the neural basis of coding and plasticity embedded into the cerebellar neural circuit and how they are translated into behavioral outcomes in learning paradigms. Learning has to be inferred from the interaction of an embodied system with its real environment, and the same cerebellar principles derived from cell physiology have to be able to drive a variety of tasks of different nature, calling for complex timing and movement patterns. We have coupled a realistic cerebellar spiking neural network (SNN) with a real robot and challenged it in multiple diverse sensorimotor tasks. Encoding and decoding strategies based on neuronal firing rates were applied. Adaptive motor control protocols with acquisition and extinction phases have been designed and tested, including an associative Pavlovian task (Eye blinking classical conditioning), a vestibulo-ocular task and a perturbed arm reaching task operating in closed-loop. The SNN processed in real-time mossy fiber inputs as arbitrary contextual signals, irrespective of whether they conveyed a tone, a vestibular stimulus or the position of a limb. A bidirectional long-term plasticity rule implemented at parallel fibers-Purkinje cell synapses modulated the output activity in the deep cerebellar nuclei. In all tasks, the neurorobot learned to adjust timing and gain of the motor responses by tuning its output discharge. It succeeded in reproducing how human biological systems acquire, extinguish and express knowledge of a noisy and changing world. By varying stimuli and perturbations patterns, real-time control robustness and generalizability were validated. The implicit spiking dynamics of the cerebellar model fulfill timing, prediction and learning functions. PMID:25390365

  3. GDNF-induced cerebellar toxicity: A brief review.

    PubMed

    Luz, Matthias; Mohr, Erich; Fibiger, H Christian

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant-methionyl human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is known for its neurorestorative and neuroprotective effects in rodent and primate models of Parkinson's disease (PD). When administered locally into the putamen of Parkinsonian subjects, early clinical studies showed its potential promise as a disease-modifying agent. However, the development of GDNF for the treatment of PD has been significantly clouded by findings of cerebellar toxicity after continuous intraputamenal high-dose administration in a 6-month treatment/3-month recovery toxicology study in rhesus monkeys. Specifically, multifocal cerebellar Purkinje cell loss affecting 1-21% of the cerebellar cortex was observed in 4 of 15 (26.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.5-52.4%) animals treated at the highest dose level tested (3000μg/month). No cerebellar toxicity was observed at lower doses (450 and 900μg/month) in the same study, or at similar or higher doses (up to 10,000μg/month) in subchronic or chronic toxicology studies testing intermittent intracerebroventricular administration. While seemingly associated with the use of GDNF, the pathogenesis of the cerebellar lesions has not been fully understood to date. This review integrates available information to evaluate potential pathogenic mechanisms and provide a consolidated assessment of the findings. While other explanations are considered, the existing evidence is most consistent with the hypothesis that leakage of GDNF into cerebrospinal fluid during chronic infusions into the putamen down-regulates GDNF receptors on Purkinje cells, and that subsequent acute withdrawal of GDNF generates the observed lesions. The implications of these findings for clinical studies with GDNF are discussed.

  4. Long lasting cerebellar alterations after perinatal asphyxia in rats.

    PubMed

    Campanille, Verónica; Saraceno, G Ezequiel; Rivière, Stéphanie; Logica, Tamara; Kölliker, Rodolfo; Capani, Francisco; Castilla, Rocío

    2015-07-01

    The developing brain may be particularly vulnerable to injury before, at and after birth. Among possible insults, hypoxia suffered as a consequence of perinatal asphyxia (PA) exhibits the highest incidence levels and the cerebellar circuitry appears to be particularly susceptible, as the cellular makeup and the quantity of inputs change quickly during days and weeks following birth. In this work, we have used a murine model to induce severe global PA in rats at the time of birth. Short-term cerebellar alterations within this PA model have been previously reported but whether such alterations remain in adulthood has not been conclusively determined yet. For this reason, and given the crucial cerebellar role in determining connectivity patterns in the brain, the aim of our work is to unveil long-term cerebellum histomorphology following a PA insult. Morphological and cytological neuronal changes and glial reaction in the cerebellar cortex were analyzed at postnatal 120 (P120) following injury performed at birth. As compared to control, PA animals exhibited: (1) an increase in molecular and granular thickness, both presenting lower cellular density; (2) a disarrayed Purkinje cell layer presenting a higher number of anomalous calbindin-stained cells. (3) focal swelling and marked fragmentation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) in Purkinje cell dendrites and, (4) an increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in Bergmann cells and the granular layer. In conclusion, we demonstrate that PA produces long-term damage in cellular histomorphology in rat cerebellar cortex which could be involved in the pathogenesis of cognitive deficits observed in both animals and humans.

  5. Patterns of regional cerebellar atrophy in genetic frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Bocchetta, Martina; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Cash, David M.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Warren, Jason D.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder with a strong genetic component. The cerebellum has not traditionally been felt to be involved in FTD but recent research has suggested a potential role. Methods We investigated the volumetry of the cerebellum and its subregions in a cohort of 44 patients with genetic FTD (20 MAPT, 7 GRN, and 17 C9orf72 mutation carriers) compared with 18 cognitively normal controls. All groups were matched for age and gender. On volumetric T1-weighted magnetic resonance brain images we used an atlas propagation and label fusion strategy of the Diedrichsen cerebellar atlas to automatically extract subregions including the cerebellar lobules, the vermis and the deep nuclei. Results The global cerebellar volume was significantly smaller in C9orf72 carriers (mean (SD): 99989 (8939) mm3) compared with controls (108136 (7407) mm3). However, no significant differences were seen in the MAPT and GRN carriers compared with controls (104191 (6491) mm3 and 107883 (6205) mm3 respectively). Investigating the individual subregions, C9orf72 carriers had a significantly lower volume than controls in lobule VIIa-Crus I (15% smaller, p < 0.0005), whilst MAPT mutation carriers had a significantly lower vermal volume (10% smaller, p = 0.001) than controls. All cerebellar subregion volumes were preserved in GRN carriers compared with controls. Conclusion There appears to be a differential pattern of cerebellar atrophy in the major genetic forms of FTD, being relatively spared in GRN, localized to the lobule VIIa-Crus I in the superior-posterior region of the cerebellum in C9orf72, the area connected via the thalamus to the prefrontal cortex and involved in cognitive function, and localized to the vermis in MAPT, the ‘limbic cerebellum’ involved in emotional processing. PMID:26977398

  6. Ultrastructural pathology of human peritumoural oedematous cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Castejón, O J

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar cortical biopsies of the peritumoural region of seven patients with cerebellar haemangioma, mesencephalic meningioma, cerebellopontine astrocytoma, cerebellopontine meningioma, and medulloblastoma of cerebellar vermis were examined by means of conventional transmission electron microscopy. Granule cells showed oedematous cytoplasm and mitochondria. Swollen Golgi cells exhibited lipofuscin granules and intranuclear inclusions. Both neuron cell types displayed swollen dendritic digits synapsing with afferent mossy fibre endings. Degenerated myelinated axons corresponding to afferent mossy and climbing fibres and efferent Purkinje cell axons were observed at the granular layer. Dense and clear ischaemic Purkinje cells established degenerated synapses with swollen parallel fibre synaptic varicosities. Degenerated Purkinje cell recurrent axonal collaterals were found at the molecular layer. Swollen and clear Bergmann glial cell cytoplasm was observed closely applied to the oedematous clear and dark Purkinje cell body, dendritic trunk, secondary and tertiary dendritic branches. Swollen climbing fibre endings featured by numerous microtubules and neurofilaments, and a decreased number of synaptic vesicles were observed making degenerated axo-spinodendritic synapses with clear and swollen dendritic spines from Purkinje, Golgi, basket and stellate cell dendrites. Swollen stellate neurons showed oedematous mitochondria. Lipofuscin-rich astrocytes and reactive phagocytic astrocytes were observed. The latter appeared engulfing haematogenous proteinaceous oedema fluid. All cerebellar neurons showed stress endoplasmic reticulum dysfunction featured by focal dilated cisterns and detachment of associated ribosomes. Myelin sheath degeneration was related with oligodendrocyte degenerating hydropic changes. The peritumoural ischaemic cerebellar nerve and glial cell abnormalities were related with neurobehavioral changes, tremor, nystagmus, dismetry and gait disturbance

  7. Neuroimaging Evidence of Cerebellar Involvement in Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rapkin, Andrea J.; Berman, Steven M.; Mandelkern, Mark A.; Silverman, Daniel H. S.; Morgan, Melinda; London, Edythe D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a debilitating cyclic disorder that is characterized by affective symptoms, including irritability, depression, and anxiety which arise in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and resolve soon after the onset of menses. Despite a prevalence of up to 8% in women of reproductive age, few studies have investigated the brain mechanisms that underlie this disorder. Methods We used positron emission tomography with [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose and self-report questionnaires to assess cerebral glucose metabolism and mood in 12 women with PMDD and 12 healthy comparison subjects in the follicular and late luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. The primary biological endpoint was incorporated regional cerebral radioactivity (scaled to the global mean) as an index of glucose metabolism. Relationships between regional brain activity and mood ratings were assessed. Blood samples were taken before each session for assay of plasma estradiol and progesterone concentrations. Results There were no group differences in hormone levels in either the follicular or late luteal phase, but the groups differed in the effect of menstrual phase on cerebellar activity. Women with PMDD, but not comparison subjects, showed an increase in cerebellar activity (particularly in the right cerebellar vermis) from the follicular phase to the late luteal phase (p = 0.003). In the PMDD group, this increase in cerebellar activity was correlated with worsening of mood (p = 0.018). Conclusions These findings suggest that the midline cerebellar nuclei, which have been implicated in other mood disorders, also contribute to negative mood in PMDD. PMID:21092938

  8. Coronary artery occlusion after arterial switch operation in an asymptomatic 15-year-old boy

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Ashish P; Cyran, Stephen E; Ettinger, Steven M; Pauliks, Linda B

    2016-01-01

    A 15-year-old boy with transposition of the great arteries (TGA) and neonatal arterial switch operation (ASO) presented with complete occlusion of the left main coronary artery (LMCA). Intra-operatively, an intramural left coronary artery was identified. Therefore, since age 7 years he had a series of screening exercise stress tests. At 13 years old, he had 3 to 4 mm ST segment depression in the infero-lateral leads without symptoms. This progressed to 4.2 mm inferior ST segment depression at 15 years old with normal stress echocardiogram. Sestamibi myocardial perfusion scan and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was inconclusive. Therefore, a coronary angiogram was obtained which showed complete occlusion of the LMCA with ample collateralization from the right coronary artery system. This was later confirmed on a computed tomogram (CT) angiogram, obtained in preparation of coronary artery bypass grafting. The case illustrates the difficulty of detecting coronary artery stenosis and occlusion in young patients with rich collateralization. Coronary CT angiogram and conventional angiography were the best imaging modalities to detect coronary anomalies in this adolescent with surgically corrected TGA. Screening CT angiography may be warranted for TGA patients, particularly for those with known coronary anomalies. PMID:27574609

  9. Crossed Cerebellar Diaschisis: Three Case Reports Imaging Using a Tri-Modality PET/CT-MR System.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuguang; Wang, Xiaopeng; Xu, Kai; Hu, Chunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) describes a depression of oxidative metabolism glucose and blood flow in the cerebellum secondary to a supratentorial lesion in the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. PET/MR has the potential to become a powerful tool for demonstrating and imaging intracranial lesions .We herein report 3 cases of CCD imaging using a tri-modality PET/CT-MR set-up for investigating the value of adding MRI rather than CT to PET in clinical routine.We describe 3 patients with CCD and neurological symptoms in conjunction with abnormal cerebral fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET/CT-MR) manifestations including arterial spin-labeling (ASL) and T2-weighted images. In all, 18FDG-PET/CT detected positive FDG uptake in supratentorial lesions, and hypometabolism with atrophy in the contralateral cerebellum. More than that, hybrid PET/MRI provided a more accurate anatomic localization and ASL indicated disruption of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway.Using pathology or long-term clinical follow-up to confirm the PET and ASL findings, the supratentorial lesions of the 3 patients were respectively diagnosed with cerebral infarction, recurrent glioma, and metastasis.The reports emphasize the significance of multimodality radiological examinations. Multimodality imaging contributes to proper diagnosis, management, and follow-up of supratentorial lesions with CCD.

  10. Development of cerebellar neurons and glias revealed by in utero electroporation: Golgi-like labeling of cerebellar neurons and glias.

    PubMed

    Kita, Yoshiaki; Kawakami, Koichi; Takahashi, Yoshiko; Murakami, Fujio

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar cortical functions rely on precisely arranged cytoarchitectures composed of several distinct types of neurons and glias. Studies have indicated that cerebellar excitatory and inhibitory neurons have distinct spatial origins, the upper rhombic lip (uRL) and ventricular zone (VZ), respectively, and that different types of neurons have different birthdates. However, the spatiotemporal relationship between uRL/VZ progenitors and their final phenotype remains poorly understood due to technical limitations. To address this issue, we performed in utero electroporation (IUE) of fluorescent protein plasmids using mouse embryos to label uRL/VZ progenitors at specific developmental stages, and observed labeled cells at maturity. To overcome any potential dilution of the plasmids caused by progenitor division, we also utilized constructs that enable permanent labeling of cells. Cerebellar neurons and glias were labeled in a Golgi-like manner enabling ready identification of labeled cells. Five types of cerebellar neurons, namely Purkinje, Golgi, Lugaro and unipolar brush cells, large-diameter deep nuclei (DN) neurons, and DN astrocytes were labeled by conventional plasmids, whereas plasmids that enable permanent labeling additionally labeled stellate, basket, and granule cells as well as three types of glias. IUE allows us to label uRL/VZ progenitors at different developmental stages. We found that the five types of neurons and DN astrocytes were labeled in an IUE stage-dependent manner, while stellate, basket, granule cells and three types of glias were labeled regardless of the IUE stage. Thus, the results indicate the IUE is an efficient method to track the development of cerebellar cells from uRL/VZ progenitors facing the ventricular lumen. They also indicate that while the generation of the five types of neurons by uRL/VZ progenitors is regulated in a time-dependent manner, the progenitor pool retains multipotency throughout embryonic development.

  11. [Combined resection of liver and inferior vena cava].

    PubMed

    Sherba, A E; Efimov, D Iu; Rummo, O O

    2014-01-01

    It was analyzed the results of treatment of 8 patients. Combined resection of liver and inferior vena cava was done in all cases. All resections of inferior vena cava were performed in combination with right-sided hemihepatectomy. Circular resection of inferior vena cava was done in 6 cases, tangential-in 2 cases. Allograft of donor inferior vena cava was used in 3 cases for reconstruction of inferior vena cava. Average duration of combined resection of liver and inferior vena cava was 675±189 min, average hemorrhage - 1800±1402 ml. The need for transfusion of packed red blood cells was 270±723 ml, the need for transfusion of fresh frozen plasma was 1105±636 ml. Post-resection liver failure according to criteria ISGLS developed in 3 patients (37.5%). Biliary complications such as biliary fistula and inconsistency of hepatico-jejunal anastomosis developed in 2 patients (25%). Hospital mortality was 12.5%. It is considered that resection of liver with inferior vena cava demands an experience in hepatobiliary surgery and/or liver transplantation. Surgeon must be ready to use total vascular isolation, hypothermic preservation and veno-venous bypass grafting. It allows to dilate an opportunity of resection liver surgery.

  12. The resistance of some rat cerebral arteries to the vasorelaxant effect of cromakalim and other K+ channel openers.

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, G. A.; Stork, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    1. Cromakalim (0.01-30 microM) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 0.01-100 microM) were tested for their ability to relax a number of pre-contracted small arteries (approximate diameter 200-700 microM at 100 mmHg) from the rat, rabbit and guinea-pig. 2. In the rat, SNP (0.01-100 microM) caused near maximal relaxation in all vessels studied including the middle cerebral, anterior cerebellar, basilar, mesenteric and renal arteries. Cromakalim (0.01-30 microM) relaxed pre-contracted mesenteric and renal arteries but was only a weak relaxant of all the rat cerebral arteries with the exception of the basilar artery. Similar experiments using mesenteric and cerebral vessels from the rabbit and guinea-pig showed cromakalim could relax pre-contracted vessels in a concentration-dependent manner. 3. Two other K+ channel openers, nicorandil and pinacidil, were also tested for their ability to relax rat cerebral arteries. Nicorandil (0.01-100 microM) was ineffective in the rat anterior cerebellar artery at concentrations up to 100 microM. Pinacidil (0.01-100 microM) caused significant vasorelaxation, although high concentrations were required (greater than 10 microM) and the response was insensitive to the effects of glibenclamide (3 microM). 4. Electrophysiological experiments with the rat anterior cerebellar artery showed that cromakalim (up to 30 microM) failed to influence the resting membrane potential of impaled single smooth muscle cells. 5. The results showed that some rat small cerebral arteries were resistant to the effects of K+ channel openers including cromakalim, pinacidil and nicorandil. This is peculiar to this vascular tree since the same vessels from other species do not exhibit the same behaviour.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1534504

  13. Spatial selectivity in the temporoparietal junction, inferior frontal sulcus, and inferior parietal lobule

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kathleen A.; Chu, Carlton; Dickinson, Annelise; Pye, Brandon; Weller, J. Patrick; Ungerleider, Leslie G.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial selectivity, as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activity patterns that vary consistently with the location of visual stimuli, has been documented in many human brain regions, notably the occipital visual cortex and the frontal and parietal regions that are active during endogenous, goal-directed attention. We hypothesized that spatial selectivity also exists in regions that are active during exogenous, stimulus-driven attention. To test this hypothesis, we acquired fMRI data while subjects maintained passive fixation. At jittered time intervals, a briefly presented wedge-shaped array of rapidly expanding circles appeared at one of three contralateral or one of three ipsilateral locations. Positive fMRI activations were identified in multiple brain regions commonly associated with exogenous attention, including the temporoparietal junction, the inferior parietal lobule, and the inferior frontal sulcus. These activations were not organized as a map across the cortical surface. However, multivoxel pattern analysis of the fMRI activity correctly classified every pair of stimulus locations, demonstrating that patterns of fMRI activity were correlated with spatial location. These observations held for both contralateral and ipsilateral stimulus pairs as well as for stimuli of different textures (radial checkerboard) and shapes (squares and rings). Permutation testing verified that the obtained accuracies were not due to systematic biases and demonstrated that the findings were statistically significant. PMID:26382006

  14. Venous Cannula Positioning in Arterial Deoxygenation During Veno‐Arterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation—A Simulation Study and Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lindfors, Mattias; Frenckner, Björn; Sartipy, Ulrik; Bjällmark, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA‐ECMO) is indicated in reversible life‐threatening circulatory failure with or without respiratory failure. Arterial desaturation in the upper body is frequently seen in patients with peripheral arterial cannulation and severe respiratory failure. The importance of venous cannula positioning was explored in a computer simulation model and a clinical case was described. A closed‐loop real‐time simulation model has been developed including vascular segments, the heart with valves and pericardium. ECMO was simulated with a fixed flow pump and a selection of clinically relevant venous cannulation sites. A clinical case with no tidal volumes due to pneumonia and an arterial saturation of below 60% in the right hand despite VA‐ECMO flow of 4 L/min was described. The case was compared with simulation data. Changing the venous cannulation site from the inferior to the superior caval vein increased arterial saturation in the right arm from below 60% to above 80% in the patient and from 64 to 81% in the simulation model without changing ECMO flow. The patient survived, was extubated and showed no signs of hypoxic damage. We conclude that venous drainage from the superior caval vein improves upper body arterial saturation during veno‐arterial ECMO as compared with drainage solely from the inferior caval vein in patients with respiratory failure. The results from the simulation model are in agreement with the clinical scenario. PMID:27086941

  15. Venous Cannula Positioning in Arterial Deoxygenation During Veno-Arterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation-A Simulation Study and Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lindfors, Mattias; Frenckner, Björn; Sartipy, Ulrik; Bjällmark, Anna; Broomé, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) is indicated in reversible life-threatening circulatory failure with or without respiratory failure. Arterial desaturation in the upper body is frequently seen in patients with peripheral arterial cannulation and severe respiratory failure. The importance of venous cannula positioning was explored in a computer simulation model and a clinical case was described. A closed-loop real-time simulation model has been developed including vascular segments, the heart with valves and pericardium. ECMO was simulated with a fixed flow pump and a selection of clinically relevant venous cannulation sites. A clinical case with no tidal volumes due to pneumonia and an arterial saturation of below 60% in the right hand despite VA-ECMO flow of 4 L/min was described. The case was compared with simulation data. Changing the venous cannulation site from the inferior to the superior caval vein increased arterial saturation in the right arm from below 60% to above 80% in the patient and from 64 to 81% in the simulation model without changing ECMO flow. The patient survived, was extubated and showed no signs of hypoxic damage. We conclude that venous drainage from the superior caval vein improves upper body arterial saturation during veno-arterial ECMO as compared with drainage solely from the inferior caval vein in patients with respiratory failure. The results from the simulation model are in agreement with the clinical scenario.

  16. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow, usually because of atherosclerosis. ... one of the causes of stroke. Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms, but there are ...

  17. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection

    MedlinePlus

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Spontaneous coronary artery dissection — sometimes referred to as SCAD — is an ... the blood vessels in the heart. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) can slow or block blood flow ...

  18. Coronary artery fistula

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital heart defect - coronary artery fistula; Birth defect heart - coronary artery fistula ... A coronary artery fistula is often congenital, meaning that it is present at birth. It generally occurs when one of the ...

  19. Endovascular Treatment of Totally Occluded Superior Mesenteric Artery by Retrograde Crossing via the Villemin Arcade

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Seitun, Sara; Bovio, Giulio; Fornaro, Rosario

    2013-06-15

    Chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) is a rare disorder that is commonly caused by progressive atherosclerotic stenosis or occlusion of one or more mesenteric arteries. Endovascular treatment for symptomatic CMI represents a viable option, especially in high-operative risk patients. We report a case of acute symptomatic CMI with chronic totally occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) associated with significant stenosis of celiac trunk (CT) and inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) that underwent endovascular treatment of all the three mesenteric arteries: stenting of CT and IMA stenosis, and recanalization of the SMA occlusion by retrograde crossing via the Villemin arcade.

  20. [Pulmonary artery sarcoma mimicking a Hughes Stovin syndrome. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Erlij, Daniel; Michalland, Susana; Neira, Óscar; Fernández, Cristina; Wolff, Verónica

    2014-11-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma is an uncommon entity with high mortality. Its clinical presentation is usually indistinguishable from pulmonary embolism, which leads to a significant delay in diagnosis. Hughes-Stovin syndrome is characterized by venous thrombosis and aneurysms of the pulmonary or bronchial artery. We report a 59 year-old female with a history of recurrent pulmonary embolism. In the last thromboembolic episode a pulmonary artery aneurysm was found on a CT scan. The patient was operated performing a left inferior lobectomy. The patient died five days after surgery and the pathological examination of the surgical piece revealed a pulmonary artery sarcoma.

  1. Cerebellar deficits and hyperactivity in mice lacking Smad4.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong-Xing; Zhao, Mingrui; Li, Dan; Shimazu, Kazuhiro; Sakata, Kazuko; Deng, Chu-Xia; Lu, Bai

    2003-10-24

    Smad4 is a central mediator of TGF-beta signals, which are known to play essential roles in many biological processes. Using a Cre-loxP approach to overcome early embryonic lethality, we have studied functions of TGF-beta/Smad4 signals in the central nervous system (CNS). No obvious deficits were detected in mice carrying the targeted disruption of Smad4 in the CNS. The overall morphology of the hippocampus appeared normal. There was no change in the proliferation of neuronal precursor cells, nor in several forms of synaptic plasticity. In contrast, deletion of Smad4 resulted in a marked decrease in the number of cerebellar Purkinje cells and parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Accompanied by the abnormality in the cerebellum, mutant mice also exhibited significantly increased vertical activity. Thus, our study reveals an unexpected role for Smad4 in cerebellar development and in the control of motor function.

  2. Short latency cerebellar modulation of the basal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Christopher H.; Fremont, Rachel; Arteaga-Bracho, Eduardo E.; Khodakhah, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    The graceful, purposeful motion of our body is an engineering feat which remains unparalleled in robotic devices using advanced artificial intelligence. Much of the information required for complex movements is generated by the cerebellum and the basal ganglia in conjunction with the cortex. Cerebellum and basal ganglia have been thought to communicate with each other only through slow multi-synaptic cortical loops, begging the question as to how they coordinate their outputs in real time. Here we show in mice that the cerebellum rapidly modulates the activity of the striatum via a disynaptic pathway. Under physiological conditions this short latency pathway is capable of facilitating optimal motor control by allowing the basal ganglia to incorporate time-sensitive cerebellar information and by guiding the sign of cortico-striatal plasticity. Conversely, under pathological condition this pathway relays aberrant cerebellar activity to the basal ganglia to cause dystonia. PMID:25402853

  3. Short latency cerebellar modulation of the basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Christopher H; Fremont, Rachel; Arteaga-Bracho, Eduardo E; Khodakhah, Kamran

    2014-12-01

    The graceful, purposeful motion of our body is an engineering feat that remains unparalleled in robotic devices using advanced artificial intelligence. Much of the information required for complex movements is generated by the cerebellum and the basal ganglia in conjunction with the cortex. Cerebellum and basal ganglia have been thought to communicate with each other only through slow, multi-synaptic cortical loops, begging the question as to how they coordinate their outputs in real time. We found that the cerebellum rapidly modulates the activity of the striatum via a disynaptic pathway in mice. Under physiological conditions, this short latency pathway was capable of facilitating optimal motor control by allowing the basal ganglia to incorporate time-sensitive cerebellar information and by guiding the sign of cortico-striatal plasticity. Conversely, under pathological condition, this pathway relayed aberrant cerebellar activity to the basal ganglia to cause dystonia.

  4. Palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, M. Narendra; Gowrishankar; Ramesh, S.

    2016-01-01

    A new-born male presented within 12 h of birth with respiratory distress. On examination and workup, he had palatoglossal fusion, cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. A 2.5 Fr endotracheal tube was inserted into the pharynx through nostril as a nasopharyngeal stent, following which his respiratory distress improved. Once child was optimised, then feeding was started by nasogastric tube and feeds were tolerated well. Elective tracheostomy and gastrostomy were done, followed by release of adhesions between the tongue and palate at a later stage. Review of literature suggests that palatoglossal fusion is uncommon and presents as an emergency. Mostly, these oral synechiae are associated with digital and/or cardiac anomaly. Other disorders associated with intra-oral synechiae include congenital alveolar synechiae, van der Woude syndrome, popliteal pterygium syndrome and oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome. The authors report a hitherto undescribed association of palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. PMID:27274132

  5. Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome presented as severe borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Pesic, Danilo; Peljto, Amir; Lukic, Biljana; Milovanovic, Maja; Svetozarevic, Snezana; Lecic Tosevski, Dusica

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of findings confirm the significance of cerebellum in affecting regulation and early learning. Most consistent findings refer to association of congenital vermis anomalies with deficits in nonmotor functions of cerebellum. In this paper we presented a young woman who was treated since sixteen years of age for polysubstance abuse, affective instability, and self-harming who was later diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. Since the neurological and neuropsychological reports pointed to signs of cerebellar dysfunction and dysexecutive syndrome, we performed magnetic resonance imaging of brain which demonstrated partially developed vermis and rhombencephalosynapsis. These findings match the description of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome and show an overlap with clinical manifestations of borderline personality disorder.

  6. Motor training compensates for cerebellar dysfunctions caused by oligodendrocyte ablation

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Ludovic; Usiello, Alessandro; Erbs, Eric; Mathis, Carole; Borrelli, Emiliana

    2004-01-01

    The role played by oligodendrocytes (OLs), the myelinating cells of the CNS, during brain development has not been fully explored. We have addressed this question by inducing a temporal and reversible ablation of OLs on postnatal CNS development. OL ablation in newborn mice leads to a profound alteration in the structure of the cerebellar cortex, which can be progressively rescued by newly generated cells, leading to a delayed myelination. Nevertheless, the temporal shift of the OL proliferation and myelinating program cannot completely compensate for developmental defects, resulting in impaired motor functions in the adult. Strikingly, we show that, despite these abnormalities, epigenetic factors, such as motor training, are able to fully rescue cerebellar-directed motor skills. PMID:14694200

  7. Correlation between vestibular habituation and postural recovery in cerebellar patients.

    PubMed

    Suarez, H; Caffa, C; Macadar, O

    1992-01-01

    Vestibular habituation was studied in normal subjects and in patients with cerebellar disease using a stimulation paradigm proposed in this paper. Six caloric stimuli were repeated daily in the same ear during six days and electronystagmographic responses at the beginning and the end of that period were compared. The normal behaviour was a clear reduction of the response across time. Two groups of cerebellar patients were identified by their ability to recover from positional imbalance after treatment. Compensated patients responded to repeated caloric stimulation in the same way as normal subjects. Conversely, uncompensated patients increased their response after the stimulation paradigm. The role played by the cerebellum in vestibular plasticity is discussed together with the observed correlation between vestibular habituation and the ability for postural recovery to occur.

  8. Cardiac Perforation by Migrated Fractured Strut of Inferior Vena Cava Filter Mimicking Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Piercecchi, Chris W; Vasquez, Julio C; Kaplan, Stephen J; Hoffman, Jordan; Puskas, John D; DeLaRosa, Jacob

    2017-02-01

    We present a rare late complication after inferior vena cava filter (IVC) placement. A 52-year-old woman with an IVC presented with sudden onset of chest pain. Cardiac catheterisation and echocardiography revealed an embolised IVC filter strut penetrating the right ventricle. Endovascular retrieval was considered but deemed unsafe due to proximity to the right coronary artery and concern for migration to pulmonary circulation. Urgent removal of the strut was performed via sternotomy. The postoperative course was uneventful. Two weeks later, she was asymptomatic. Minimally invasive approaches have been described for retrieval of intact IVC filters that have migrated to the right heart but not for embolised filter fragments. We recommend traditional sternotomy as the preferred method of retrieval as it limits the likelihood of further migration or trauma.

  9. Development of the human infrahepatic inferior caval and azygos venous systems

    PubMed Central

    Hikspoors, Jill P J M; Soffers, Jelly H M; Mekonen, Hayelom K; Cornillie, Pieter; Köhler, S Eleonore; Lamers, Wouter H

    2015-01-01

    Differences in opinion regarding the development of the infrahepatic inferior caval and azygos venous systems in mammals centre on the contributions of ‘caudal cardinal’, ‘subcardinal’, ‘supracardinal’, ‘medial and lateral sympathetic line’ and ‘sacrocardinal’ veins. The disagreements appear to arise from the use of topographical position rather than developmental origin as criterion to define separate venous systems. We reinvestigated the issue in a closely spaced series of human embryos between 4 and 10 weeks of development. Structures were visualized with the Amira® reconstruction and Cinema4D® remodelling software. The vertebral level and neighbouring structures were used as topographic landmarks. The main results were that the caudal cardinal veins extended caudally from the common cardinal vein between CS11 and CS15, followed by the development of the subcardinal veins as a plexus sprouting ventrally from the caudal cardinal veins. The caudal cardinal veins adapted their course from lateral to medial relative to the laterally expanding lungs, adrenal glands, definitive kidneys, sympathetic trunk and umbilical arteries between CS15 and CS18, and then became interrupted in the part overlaying the regressing mesonephroi (Th12-L3). The caudal part of the left caudal cardinal vein then also regressed. The infrarenal part of the inferior caval vein originated from the right caudal cardinal vein, while the renal part originated from subcardinal veins. The azygos veins developed from the remaining cranial part of the caudal cardinal veins. Our data show that all parts of the inferior caval and azygos venous systems developed directly from the caudal cardinal veins or from a plexus sprouting from these veins. PMID:25496171

  10. Hardening of the arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Atherosclerosis; Arteriosclerosis; Plaque buildup - arteries; Hyperlipidemia - atherosclerosis; Cholesterol - atherosclerosis ... cause of heart attack and stroke. High blood cholesterol levels can cause hardening of the arteries at ...

  11. Evidence for distinct cognitive deficits after focal cerebellar lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gottwald, B; Wilde, B; Mihajlovic, Z; Mehdorn, H

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: Anatomical evidence and lesion studies, as well as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, indicate that the cerebellum contributes to higher cognitive functions. Cerebellar posterior lateral regions seem to be relevant for cognition, while vermal lesions seem to be associated with changes in affect. However, the results remain controversial. Deficits of patients are sometimes still attributed to motor impairment. Methods: We present data from a detailed neuropsychological examination of 21 patients with cerebellar lesions due to tumour or haematoma, and 21 controls matched for age, sex, and years of education. Results: Patients showed deficits in executive function, and in attentional processes such as working memory and divided attention. Further analysis revealed that patients with right-sided lesions were in general more impaired than those with left-sided lesions. Conclusions: Those hypotheses that suggest that lesions of the right cerebellar hemisphere lead to verbal deficits, while those of the left lead to non-verbal deficits, have in part been confirmed. The generally greater impairment of those patients with a right-sided lesion has been interpreted as resulting from the connection of the right cerebellum to the left cerebral hemisphere, which is dominant for language functions and crucial for right hand movements. Motor impairment was correlated with less than half of the cognitive measures, with no stronger tendency for correlation with cognitive tests that require motor responses discernible. The results are discussed on the basis of an assumption that the cerebellum has a predicting and preparing function, indicating that cerebellar lesions lead to a "dysmetria of thought." PMID:15489381

  12. Familial Aggregation of the Cerebellar Signs in Familial Essential Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Elan D.; Hernandez, Nora; Chen, Karen P.; Naranjo, Kelly V.; Park, Jemin; Clark, Lorraine N.; Ottman, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Background Although the hallmark feature of essential tremor (ET) is kinetic tremor, patients may exhibit additional motor features (e.g., intention tremor and mild gait ataxia) that are markers of an underlying abnormality of cerebellar function. ET is also a highly familial disorder, but we do not know whether the presence and expression of cerebellar signs are similar across family members. There are simply no published data. The alternative possibility is that these features are not heritable. We tested the specific hypothesis that the presence of cerebellar signs (i.e., intention tremor, tandem gait difficulty) ran in ET families. Methods ET probands and relatives enrolled in a genetic study at Yale and Columbia universities underwent a detailed videotaped neurological examination. Results There were 187 enrollees (59 probands, 128 affected relatives). In a bivariate logistic regression model, the presence of intention tremor in the proband was not a predictor of the presence of intention tremor in the relatives (odds ratio [OR] = 0.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.28–1.27, p = 0.18). In a similar model, the presence of greater tandem gait difficulty (i.e., a tandem gait score in the upper quartile) in the proband was not a predictor of the presence of such difficulty in the relatives (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 0.41–3.66, p = 0.73). Discussion The presence of cerebellar signs did not aggregate in families with ET. In the current dataset, these did not seem to be disease features that were heritable. PMID:28176975

  13. Typhoid fever presenting as acute cerebellar ataxia and severe thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Cheong, B M K

    2008-03-01

    Typhoid fever being a systemic infection can present in a multitude of ways, involving various systems. Here we describe a case of typhoid fever presenting with acute cerebellar ataxia and marked thrombocytopenia. This atypical presentation is not common in typhoid fever and can lead to misdiagnosis as well as a delay in the initiation of appropriate therapy. Prompt clinical improvement and the return of platelet counts to normal were noted after the patient was started on IV Ceftriaxone.

  14. Bilateral cerebellar activation in unilaterally challenged essential tremor

    PubMed Central

    Broersma, Marja; van der Stouwe, Anna M.M.; Buijink, Arthur W.G.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Groot, Paul F.C.; Speelman, Johannes D.; Tijssen, Marina A.J.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Maurits, Natasha M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Essential tremor (ET) is one of the most common hyperkinetic movement disorders. Previous research into the pathophysiology of ET suggested underlying cerebellar abnormalities. Objective In this study, we added electromyography as an index of tremor intensity to functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (EMG-fMRI) to study a group of ET patients selected according to strict criteria to achieve maximal homogeneity. With this approach we expected to improve upon the localization of the bilateral cerebellar abnormalities found in earlier fMRI studies. Methods We included 21 propranolol sensitive patients, who were not using other tremor medication, with a definite diagnosis of ET defined by the Tremor Investigation Group. Simultaneous EMG-fMRI recordings were performed while patients were off tremor medication. Patients performed unilateral right hand and arm extension, inducing tremor, alternated with relaxation (rest). Twenty-one healthy, age- and sex-matched participants mimicked tremor during right arm extension. EMG power variability at the individual tremor frequency as a measure of tremor intensity variability was used as a regressor, mathematically independent of the block regressor, in the general linear model used for fMRI analysis, to find specific tremor-related activations. Results Block-related activations were found in the classical upper-limb motor network, both for ET patients and healthy participants in motor, premotor and supplementary motor areas. In ET patients, we found tremor-related activations bilaterally in the cerebellum: in left lobules V, VI, VIIb and IX and in right lobules V, VI, VIIIa and b, and in the brainstem. In healthy controls we found simulated tremor-related activations in right cerebellar lobule V. Conclusions Our results expand on previous findings of bilateral cerebellar involvement in ET. We have identified specific areas in the bilateral somatomotor regions of the cerebellum: lobules V, VI and VIII. PMID:26909321

  15. Sensitivity of cerebellar glutathione system to neonatal ionizing radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Di Toro, C G; Di Toro, P A; Zieher, L M; Guelman, L R

    2007-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are relevant components of living organisms that, besides their role in the regulation of different important physiological functions, when present in excess are capable to affect cell oxidative status, leading to damage of cellular molecules and disturbance of normal cell function. ROS accumulation has been associated with a variety of conditions such as neurodegenerative diseases and ionizing radiation exposure. Cell ability to counteract ROS overproduction depends on the capacity of the endogenous antioxidant defenses--which includes the glutathione (GSH) system--to cope with. Since developing central nervous system (CNS) is especially sensitive to ROS-induced damage, the aim of the present work was to evaluate ROS, reduced GSH and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels in the cerebellum at different developmental ages after irradiation, in order to test if any changes were induced on these key oxidative stress-related cellular markers that might explain the high cerebellar vulnerability to radiation-induced injury. Since intracellular levels of GSH are maintained by glutathione reductase (GSHr), this enzymatic activity was also evaluated. Newborn Wistar rats were irradiated in their cephalic ends and the different parameters were measured, from 1h to 90 days post-irradiation. Results showed that an early transient increase in ROS levels followed by a decrease in cerebellar weight at 3-5 days post-irradiation were induced. An increase in cerebellar GSH levels was induced at 30 days after irradiation, together with a decrease in GSHr activity. These results support the hypothesis that ROS may represent a marker of damage prior to radiation-induced cell death. In contrast, it would be suggested that GSH system might play a role in the compensatory mechanisms triggered to counteract radiation-induced cerebellar damage.

  16. Endogenous cerebellar neurogenesis in adult mice with progressive ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Csaba, Zsolt; Peineau, Stéphane; Srivastava, Rupali; Rasika, Sowmyalakshmi; Mani, Shyamala; Gressens, Pierre; El Ghouzzi, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Objective Transplanting exogenous neuronal progenitors to replace damaged neurons in the adult brain following injury or neurodegenerative disorders and achieve functional amelioration is a realistic goal. However, studies so far have rarely taken into consideration the preexisting inflammation triggered by the disease process that could hamper the effectiveness of transplanted cells. Here, we examined the fate and long-term consequences of human cerebellar granule neuron precursors (GNP) transplanted into the cerebellum of Harlequin mice, an adult model of progressive cerebellar degeneration with early-onset microgliosis. Methods Human embryonic stem cell-derived progenitors expressing Atoh1, a transcription factor key to GNP specification, were generated in vitro and stereotaxically transplanted into the cerebellum of preataxic Harlequin mice. The histological and functional impact of these transplants was followed using immunolabeling and Rotarod analysis. Results Although transplanted GNPs did not survive beyond a few weeks, they triggered the proliferation of endogenous nestin-positive precursors in the leptomeninges that crossed the molecular layer and differentiated into mature neurons. These phenomena were accompanied by the preservation of the granule and Purkinje cell layers and delayed ataxic changes. In vitro neurosphere generation confirmed the enhanced neurogenic potential of the cerebellar leptomeninges of Harlequin mice transplanted with exogenous GNPs. Interpretation The cerebellar leptomeninges of adult mice contain an endogenous neurogenic niche that can be stimulated to yield mature neurons from an as-yet unidentified population of progenitors. The transplantation of human GNPs not only stimulates this neurogenesis, but, despite the potentially hostile environment, leads to neuroprotection and functional amelioration. PMID:25574472

  17. [Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava: role of imaging].

    PubMed

    Manfredi, R; Cotroneo, A R; Pirronti, T; Macis, G; Marano, P

    1995-10-01

    In recent years, clinics and radiology of congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava have increased in importance in planning abdominal surgery, liver or kidney transplantation, or new interventional or diagnostic procedures such as the positioning of inferior vena cava filters to prevent pulmonary embolism, varicocel sclerotherapy and renal venous sampling. In the past, the radiologic assessment of these rare anomalies was performed only with angiography, which remains the most accurate diagnostic method. Today, besides angiography, less invasive examinations can be performed, e.g., US, CT and MRI, with MRA. In the last two years, 5 patients with inferior vena cava anomalies were examined: 3 had double inferior vena cava and 2 azygos continuation. All of them were submitted to US, CT, MRI and MRA and 3 patients underwent also angiography, two of them with double puncture. US can suggest the diagnosis but may be limited by technical factors and in the assessment of the whole inferior vena cava. Enhanced CT can depict anomaly extent, but uses contrast agents and ionizing radiations. Angiography better depicts craniocaudal spread and collateral networks but is an invasive procedure and sometimes needs a double puncture (double inferior vena cava). MRI, with MRA, yields the same information as the other modalities, but without contrast agents or ionizing radiations. The development of velocity encoded sequences will probably make this technique the method of choice in the study of inferior vena cava anomalies. Our study was aimed at reviewing the embryo-genesis of inferior vena cava anomalies and to assess the relative importance of different diagnostic procedures in the diagnosis and staging of these anomalies.

  18. Auditory scene analysis following unilateral inferior colliculus infarct.

    PubMed

    Champoux, François; Paiement, Philippe; Vannasing, Phetsamone; Mercier, Claude; Gagné, Jean-Pierre; Lepore, Franco; Lassonde, Maryse

    2007-11-19

    Event-related potentials in the form of mismatch negativity were recorded to investigate auditory scene analysis capabilities in a person with a very circumscribed haemorrhagic lesion at the level of the right inferior colliculus. The results provide the first objective evidence that processing at the level of the inferior colliculus plays an important role in human auditory frequency discrimination. Moreover, the electrophysiological data suggest that following this unilateral lesion, the auditory pathways fail to reorganize efficiently.

  19. Successfull management of a life threatening cerebellar haemorrhage following spine surgery - a case report -.

    PubMed

    Pallud, Johan; Belaïd, Hayat; Aldea, Sorin

    2009-06-01

    Cerebellar haemorrhages are rare life-threatening complications following spine surgery that present challenges for their diagnostic and their therapeutic management. Their patho-physiology remains unclear.We report a case of a life-threatening cerebellar haemorrhage secondary to an occult dural tear following a planned L5-S1 laminectomy. The patient was treated with emergent external ventriculostomy following by a posterior fossa decompressive craniectomy. Cerebellar haemorrhages have to be suspected systematically when unexpected neurological signs occur after spine surgery since their rapid management lead to favourable outcomes. The present imaging findings allow us proposing that cerebellar haemorrhages result primarily from superior cerebellar venous stretching and tearing, and that cerebellar infarction and swelling occur secondarily.

  20. Maternal Postsecondary Education Associated With Improved Cerebellar Growth After Preterm Birth.

    PubMed

    Stiver, Mikaela L; Kamino, Daphne; Guo, Ting; Thompson, Angela; Duerden, Emma G; Taylor, Margot J; Tam, Emily W Y

    2015-10-01

    The preterm cerebellum is vulnerable to impaired development impacting long-term outcome. Preterm newborns (<32 weeks) underwent serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. The association between parental education and cerebellar volume at each time point was assessed, adjusting for age at scan. In 26 infants, cerebellar volumes at term (P = .001), but not birth (P = .4), were associated with 2-year volumes. For 1 cm(3) smaller cerebellar volume (4% total volume) at term, the cerebellum was 3.18 cm(3) smaller (3% total volume) by 2 years. Maternal postsecondary education was not associated with cerebellar volume at term (P = .16). Maternal postsecondary education was a significant confounder in the relationship between term and 2-year cerebellar volumes (P = .016), with higher education associated with improved volumes by 2 years. Although preterm birth has been found to be associated with smaller cerebellar volumes at term, maternal postsecondary education is associated with improved growth detectable by 2 years.

  1. Cerebellar cortical degeneration with selective granule cell loss in Bavarian mountain dogs.

    PubMed

    Flegel, T; Matiasek, K; Henke, D; Grevel, V

    2007-08-01

    Three Bavarian mountain dogs aged between 18 and 20 months, not related to each other, were presented with chronic signs of cerebellar dysfunction. On sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging brain images, the tentative diagnosis of cerebellar hypoplasia was established based on an enlarged cerebrospinal fluid space around the cerebellum and an increased cerebrospinal fluid signal between the folia. Post-mortem examination was performed in one dog and did show an overall reduction of cerebellar size. On histopathologic examination, a selective loss of cerebellar granule cells with sparing of Purkinje cells was evident. Therefore, the Bavarian mountain dog is a breed where cerebellar cortical degeneration caused by the rather exceptional selective granule cell loss can be seen as cause of chronic, slowly progressive cerebellar dysfunction starting at an age of several months.

  2. Variant Branching Pattern of Superior Thyroid Artery and Its Clinical Relevance: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Motwani, Rohini

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid surgeries are most common neck surgeries; hence thorough knowledge of the blood supply of this gland to the surgeons is of immense importance to prevent any alarming haemorrhage. We report a rare unilateral branching pattern of superior thyroid artery (STA) on right side during routine dissection on an adult male cadaver in the Department of Anatomy, A.I.I.M.S, New Delhi. Left superior thyroid artery was normal. The common trunk (CT) arose from anterior surface of right external carotid artery (ECA) just above the bifurcation of common carotid artery (CCA) soon dividing into five branches i.e., infrahyoid, superior laryngeal, superior thyroid, cricothyroid and sternocleidomastoid artery. This variant branching pattern of STA is very rare. The inferior thyroid arteries did not show any unusual distribution. Knowledge of such arterial variations related to the thyroid gland is immensely helpful to the surgeons to avoid damage of the vital organs in this region. PMID:26266110

  3. Controversies in the neurosurgical management of cerebellar hemorrhage and infarction.

    PubMed

    Amar, Arun Paul

    2012-04-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for the management of hemorrhagic and ischemic cerebellar stroke are sparse, and most available data come from Class III studies. As a result, opinions and practices regarding the nature and role of neurosurgical intervention vary widely. A comprehensive literature review was conducted to adjudicate several contentious issues, such as the difference in the management of cerebellar hemorrhage versus infarction, criteria for imaging to exclude an underlying structural lesion, the value of MRI for patient selection, the role of external ventricular drainage, the indications for operative management, the timing of surgical intervention, and various options of surgical technique, among others. Treatment algorithms proposed in several different studies are compared and contrasted. This analysis is concluded by a summary of the recommendations from the American Stroke Association, which advises that patients with cerebellar hemorrhage who experience neurological deterioration or who have brainstem compression and/or hydrocephalus due to ventricular obstruction should undergo surgical evacuation of the hemorrhage as soon as possible, and that initial treatment of such patients with ventricular drainage alone rather than surgical removal of the hemorrhage is not recommended.

  4. The Changeable Nervous System: Studies On Neuroplasticity In Cerebellar Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Seil, Fredrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Circuit reorganization after injury was studied in a cerebellar culture model. When cerebellar cultures derived from newborn mice were exposed at explantation to a preparation of cytosine arabinoside that destroyed granule cells and oligodendrocytes and compromised astrocytes, Purkinje cells surviving in greater than usual numbers were unensheathed by astrocytic processes and received twice the control number of inhibitory axosomatic synapses. Purkinje cell axon collaterals sprouted and many of their terminals formed heterotypical synapses with other Purkinje cell dendritic spines. The resulting circuit reorganization preserved inhibition in the cerebellar cortex. Following this reorganization, replacement of the missing granule cells and glia was followed by a restitution of the normal circuitry. Most of these developmental and reconstructive changes were not dependent on neuronal activity, the major exception being inhibitory synaptogenesis. The full complement of inhibitory synapses did not develop in the absence of neuronal activity, which could be mitigated by application of exogenous TrkB receptor ligands. Inhibitory synaptogenesis could also be promoted by activity-induced release of endogenous TrkB receptor ligands or by antibody activation of the TrkB receptor. PMID:24933693

  5. Evidence for Cerebellar Contributions to Adaptive Plasticity in Speech Perception.

    PubMed

    Guediche, Sara; Holt, Lori L; Laurent, Patryk; Lim, Sung-Joo; Fiez, Julie A

    2015-07-01

    Human speech perception rapidly adapts to maintain comprehension under adverse listening conditions. For example, with exposure listeners can adapt to heavily accented speech produced by a non-native speaker. Outside the domain of speech perception, adaptive changes in sensory and motor processing have been attributed to cerebellar functions. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging study investigates whether adaptation in speech perception also involves the cerebellum. Acoustic stimuli were distorted using a vocoding plus spectral-shift manipulation and presented in a word recognition task. Regions in the cerebellum that showed differences before versus after adaptation were identified, and the relationship between activity during adaptation and subsequent behavioral improvements was examined. These analyses implicated the right Crus I region of the cerebellum in adaptive changes in speech perception. A functional correlation analysis with the right Crus I as a seed region probed for cerebral cortical regions with covarying hemodynamic responses during the adaptation period. The results provided evidence of a functional network between the cerebellum and language-related regions in the temporal and parietal lobes of the cerebral cortex. Consistent with known cerebellar contributions to sensorimotor adaptation, cerebro-cerebellar interactions may support supervised learning mechanisms that rely on sensory prediction error signals in speech perception.

  6. Behavior modification after inactivation of cerebellar dentate nuclei.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Todd C; Villatoro, Lee; Arneson, Tom; Ahuja, Brittany; Voss, Stephanie; Swain, Rodney A

    2012-08-01

    Effort-based decision making occurs when subjects are given a choice between a reward available at a high response cost and a reward available at a low response cost and is altered in individuals with disorders such as autism or particular patterns of brain injury. The current study explored the relationship between effort-based decision making and reinforcement characteristics in the T maze. This was done using both normal animals and animals with bilateral inactivation of the cerebellar dentate nuclei. Rats chose between alternatives in which one arm contained high-density reinforcement (HR) and the other arm contained low-density reinforcement (LR). During training, the HR arm was obstructed and the point at which the animal no longer worked for reinforcement (breaking point) was determined. The cerebellar dentate nuclei were then transiently inactivated and once again breaking points were assessed. The results indicated that inactivation of the dentate nucleus disrupted effort-based decision making. Additionally, altering both the palatability and the magnitude of the reinforcement were assessed in an attempt to reestablish the original preinactivation breaking point. It was hypothesized that an increase in the strength or magnitude of the reinforcement would promote an increase in the breaking point of the animal even when the cerebellum was inactivated. The results indicated that with both strategies animals effectively reestablished original breaking points. The results of this study will inform the current literature regarding the modification of behavior after brain injury and further the understanding of the behavioral deficits associated with cerebellar dysfunction.

  7. Monoaminergic modulation of GABAergic transmission onto cerebellar globular cells.

    PubMed

    Hirono, Moritoshi; Nagao, Soichi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Konishi, Shiro

    2017-03-11

    Cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) project their axon collaterals to underneath of the PC layer and make GABAergic synaptic contacts with globular cells, a subgroup of Lugaro cells. GABAergic transmission derived from the PC axon collaterals is so powerful that it could inhibit globular cells and regulate their firing patterns. However, the physiological properties and implications of the GABAergic synapses on globular cells remain unknown. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from globular cells in the mouse cerebellum, we examined the monoaminergic modulation of GABAergic inputs to these cells. Application of either serotonin (5-HT) or noradrenaline (NA) excited globular cells, thereby leading to their firing. The 5-HT- and NA-induced firing was temporally confined and attenuated by GABAergic transmission, although 5-HT and NA exerted an inhibitory effect on the release of GABA from presynaptic terminals of PC axon collaterals. Agonists for 5-HT1B receptors and α2-adrenoceptors mimicked the 5-HT- and NA-induced suppression of GABAergic activity. Through their differential modulatory actions on the cerebellar inhibitory neural circuits, 5-HT facilitated PC firing, whereas NA suppressed it. These results indicate that 5-HT and NA regulate the membrane excitability of globular cells and PCs through their differential modulation of not only the membrane potential but also GABAergic synaptic circuits. Monoaminergic modulation of the neural connections between globular cells and PCs could play a role in cerebellar motor coordination.

  8. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration with anti-Yo antibodies - a review.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Anand; Opal, Puneet

    2016-08-01

    The ataxic syndrome associated with Anti-Yo antibody, or Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody type 1 (PCA1), is the most common variant of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD). The typical presentation involves the subacute development of pancerebellar deficits with a clinical plateau within 6 months. The vast majority of cases have been reported in women with pelvic or breast tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain is often normal in the early stages, with cerebellar atrophy seen later. The underlying mechanism is believed to be an immunological reaction to cerebellar degeneration-related protein 2 (CDR2), a protein usually found in the cerebellum that is ectopically produced by tumor cells. Although both B- and T-cell abnormalities are seen, there is debate about the relative importance of the autoantibodies and cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the neuronal loss. Cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities, primarily elevated protein, lymphocytic pleocytosis, and oligoclonal bands, are common in the early stages. The low prevalence of this condition has not allowed for large-scale randomized controlled trials. Immunotherapies, such as steroids, intravenous immune globulins, and plasma exchange, have been extensively used in managing this condition, with limited success. Although some reports indicate benefit from antitumor therapies like surgery and chemotherapy, this has not been consistently observed. The prognosis for anti-Yo PCD is almost uniformly poor, with most patients left bedridden. Further studies are required to clarify the pathophysiology and provide evidence-based treatment options.

  9. Sustained Reduction of Cerebellar Activity in Experimental Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Rijkers, Kim; Moers-Hornikx, Véronique M. P.; Hemmes, Roelof J.; Aalbers, Marlien W.; Temel, Yasin; Vles, Johan S. H.; Hoogland, Govert

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence suggests a role for the cerebellum in seizure control, while no data are available on cerebellar activity between seizures. We hypothesized that interictal regional activity of the deep cerebellar nuclei is reduced in epilepsy and tested this in an animal model by using ΔFosB and cytochrome oxidase (COX) (immuno)histochemistry. The expression of these two markers of neuronal activity was analysed in the dentate nucleus (DN), interpositus nucleus (IN), and fastigial nucleus (FN) of the cerebellum of fully amygdala kindled rats that were sacrificed 48 hours after their last seizure. The DN and FN of kindled rats exhibited 25 to 29% less ΔFosB immunopositive cells than their respective counterpart in sham controls (P < 0.05). COX expression in the DN and FN of kindled animals was reduced by 32 to 33% compared to respective control values (P < 0.05). These results indicate that an epileptogenic state is characterized by decreased activity of deep cerebellar nuclei, especially the DN and FN. Possible consequences may include a decreased activation of the thalamus, contributing to further seizure spread. Restoration of FN activity by low frequency electrical stimulation is suggested as a possible treatment option in chronic epilepsy. PMID:26417599

  10. Junctophilin-mediated channel crosstalk essential for cerebellar synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kakizawa, Sho; Kishimoto, Yasushi; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Furutani, Kazuharu; Shimizu, Hidemi; Fukaya, Masahiro; Nishi, Miyuki; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Atsushi; Kondo, Hisatake; Kano, Masanobu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Iino, Masamitsu; Takeshima, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Functional crosstalk between cell-surface and intracellular ion channels plays important roles in excitable cells and is structurally supported by junctophilins (JPs) in muscle cells. Here, we report a novel form of channel crosstalk in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). The generation of slow afterhyperpolarization (sAHP) following complex spikes in PCs required ryanodine receptor (RyR)-mediated Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release and the subsequent opening of small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels in somatodendritic regions. Despite the normal expression levels of these channels, sAHP was abolished in PCs from mutant mice lacking neural JP subtypes (JP-DKO), and this defect was restored by exogenously expressing JPs or enhancing SK channel activation. The stimulation paradigm for inducing long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber–PC synapses adversely established long-term potentiation in the JP-DKO cerebellum, primarily due to the sAHP deficiency. Furthermore, JP-DKO mice exhibited impairments of motor coordination and learning, although normal cerebellar histology was retained. Therefore, JPs support the Ca2+-mediated communication between voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, RyRs and SK channels, which modulates the excitability of PCs and is fundamental to cerebellar LTD and motor functions. PMID:17347645

  11. Inpatient Rehabilitation Performance of Patients with Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jack B.; Raj, Vishwa S.; Asher, Arash; Lee, Jay; Guo, Ying; Konzen, Benedict S.; Bruera, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the functional improvement of rehabilitation inpatients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Design Retrospective Review Setting Three tertiary referral based hospitals. Interventions Medical records were retrospectively analyzed for demographic, laboratory, medical and functional data. Main Outcome Measure Functional Independence Measure (FIM) Participants Cancer rehabilitation inpatients admitted to three different cancer centers with a diagnosis of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (n=7). Results All 7 patients were white females. Median age was 62. Primary cancers included ovarian carcinoma (2), small cell lung cancer (2), uterine carcinoma (2), and invasive ductal breast carcinoma. Mean admission total FIM score was 61.0 (SD=23.97). Mean discharge total FIM score was 73.6 (SD=29.35). The mean change in total FIM score was 12.6 (p=.0018). The mean length of rehabilitation stay was 17.1 days. The mean total FIM efficiency was 0.73. 5/7 (71%) patients were discharged home. 1/7 (14%) was discharged to a nursing home. 1/7 (14%) transferred to the primary acute care service. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate the functional performance of a group of rehabilitation inpatients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Despite the poor neurologic prognosis associated with this syndrome, these patients made significant functional improvements on inpatient rehabilitation. When appropriate, inpatient rehabilitation should be considered. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed. PMID:25051460

  12. Inferior ectopic pupil and typical ocular coloboma in RCS rats.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Naho; Ozaki, Kiyokazu; Narama, Isao; Matsuura, Tetsuro

    2011-08-01

    Ocular coloboma is sometimes accompanied by corectopia in humans and therefore ectopic pupil may indicate ocular coloboma in experimental animals. The RCS strain of rats has a low incidence of microphthalmia. We found that inferior ectopic pupil is associated exclusively with small-sized eyes in this strain. The objective of the current study was to evaluate whether inferior ectopic pupil is associated with iridal coloboma and other types of ocular coloboma in RCS rats. Both eyes of RCS rats were examined clinically, and those with inferior ectopic pupils underwent morphologic and morphometric examinations. In a prenatal study, coronal serial sections of eyeballs from fetuses at gestational day 16.5 were examined by using light microscopy. Ectopic pupils in RCS rats were found exclusively in an inferior position, where the iris was shortened. Fundic examination revealed severe chorioretinal coloboma in all cases of inferior ectopic pupil. The morphologic characteristics closely resembled those of chorioretinal coloboma in humans. Histopathologic examination of primordia showed incomplete closure of the optic fissure in 4 eyeballs of RCS fetuses. Neither F(1) rats nor N(2) (progeny of RCS × BN matings) displayed any ocular anomalies, including ectopic pupils. The RCS strain is a suitable model for human ocular coloboma, and inferior ectopic pupil appears to be a strong indicator of ocular coloboma.

  13. Anterior transposition of the inferior oblique muscle as the initial treatment of a snapped inferior rectus muscle.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Aquino, B I; Riemann, C D; Lewis, H; Traboulsi, E I

    2001-02-01

    Snapping or tearing of an extraocular muscle refers to its rupture across its width, usually at the junction between muscle and tendon several millimeters behind the insertion. Tearing occurs during strabismus or retinal reattachment surgery, or after trauma. If the proximal end of the muscle cannot be located, transposition procedures are necessary to achieve ocular realignment. These surgical procedures carry the risk of anterior segment ischemia, especially in the elderly. Anterior transposition of the inferior oblique muscle has been used for the treatment of inferior oblique overaction, especially in the presence of a dissociated vertical deviation, and in patients with fourth nerve palsy. We transposed the inferior oblique muscle insertion in a 73-year-old woman with a snapped inferior rectus muscle.

  14. Differential Effects of Intraventricular Hemorrhage and White Matter Injury on Preterm Cerebellar Growth

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Emily W.Y.; Miller, Steven P.; Studholme, Colin; Chau, Vann; Glidden, David; Poskitt, Kenneth J.; Ferriero, Donna M.; Barkovich, A. James

    2010-01-01

    Objective To hypothesize that detailed examination of early cerebellar volumes over time would distinguish differences in cerebellar growth associated with intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and white matter injury (WMI) in preterm infants. Study design Preterm newborns at the University of California San Francisco (n=57) and the University of British Columbia (n=115) were studied using serial MRI scans near birth and again at near term-equivalent age. Interactive semi-automated tools were used to determine volumes of the cerebellar hemispheres. Results Adjusting for supratentorial brain injury, cerebellar hemorrhage, and study site, cerebellar volume increased 1.7cm3/week postmenstrual age (95% CI 1.6–1.7, P<0.001). More severe supratentorial IVH was associated with slower growth of cerebellar volumes (P<0.001). Volumes by 40 weeks were 1.4 cm3 lower in premature infants with grade 1–2 IVH and 5.4 cm3 lower with grade 3–4 IVH. The same magnitude of decrease was found between ipsilateral and contralateral IVH. No association was found with severity of WMI (P=0.3). Conclusions Early effects of decreased cerebellar volume associated with supratentorial IVH in either hemisphere may be a result of concurrent cerebellar injury or direct effects of subarachnoid blood on cerebellar development. PMID:20961562

  15. Contribution of tonic vibration reflex to the evaluation and diagnosis of cerebellar disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Abbruzzese, G; Abbruzzese, M; Ratto, S; Favale, E

    1982-01-01

    Biceps brachii tonic vibration reflexes were elicited in patients with either focal or diffuse cerebellar damage and spino-cerebellar degenerations. As compared to normal controls, tonic vibration reflex amplitude was reduced in cerebellar patients, particularly in cases with unilateral hemispheric lesion, who exhibited a clear cut tonic vibration reflex asymmetry even when clinical symptoms were mild. These reflexes were absent or very weak in patients with spino-cerebellar degenerations. Muscle vibration induced in most of the patients an enhancement of mild or latent clinical symptoms such as intention tremor, difficulty in muscle relaxation or motor incoordination. PMID:7119815

  16. Medical management of cerebellar abscess: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Turner, Ryan C; Dodson, Sean C; Rosen, Charles L

    2011-01-01

    A large abscess of the posterior fossa often warrants surgical intervention. We report a case of a 50-year-old male presenting with a cerebellar abscess measuring 2.8 cm x 1.6 cm located in the left cerebellar hemisphere at the level of the middle cerebellar peduncle that was treated conservatively and successfully with antibiotics. Therapeutic management options are discussed in regards to this case specifically as well as a review of the literature. This case illustrates the successful medical management of a cerebellar abscess of otogenic origin in an adult, a unique result in terms of abscess size and age of the patient.

  17. JC virus variant associated with cerebellar atrophy in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Roux, Damien; Bouldouyre, Marie-Anne; Mercier-Delarue, Séverine; Seilhean, Danielle; Zagdanski, Anne-Marie; Delaugerre, Constance; Simon, François; Molina, Jean-Michel; Legoff, Jerôme

    2011-06-01

    The human polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) is the agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). It has also recently been involved in cerebellar atrophy. Factors involved in this entity are elusive. We present a case of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patient with PML and cerebellar atrophy. In addition to a compartmentalization of JCV strains between urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and cerebellum, specific rearrangements in the JCV regulatory region were observed in the cerebellum, resulting in alterations of transcription factor binding sites. Our data underline the importance of searching for JCV in HIV-infected patients with cerebellar disorders and suggest that mutations in the regulatory region may be involved in cerebellar degeneration.

  18. Comparative anatomical studies on the cerebellar nuclei of the pangolins.

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Y

    1983-01-01

    The configurations and volumes of the cerebellar nuclei of left and right 10 sides of 5 cases of the pangolins (Manis pentadactyla) were examined with sagittal myelin sheath and toluidine blue stained serial sections and reconstruction models based upon these serial sections respectively. The cerebellar nuclei of the pangolins, same as in other mammals can be divided into four nuclei, nucleus medialis (M), nucleus interpositus posterior (P), nucleus interpositus anterior (A) and nucleus lateralis (L). In all cases from medially to laterally, M, P, A and L appear in order and disappear M, A, P and L in order respectively. The volume of each nucleus in the total volume of the cerebellar nuclei is: M; 5.3-7.9% P; 27.1-31.2% A; 17.6-22.9% L; 42.4-46.2% In right and left each cerebellar nuclei significant difference is not recognized as p is less than 0.05. The posterior protuberance of the nucleus medialis protrudes remarkably in 4 cases of No. 1, No. 2, No. 3 and No. 4 but in only 1 case of No. 5 it protrudes slightly. In nucleus interpositus posterior the ventrolateral protuberance protrudes slightly in 4 cases of No. 1, No. 3, No. 4 and No. 5 but in only 1 case of No. 2 it protrudes remarkably. The anterior protuberance protrudes remarkably in all cases and the superior protuberance protrudes remarkably in 3 cases of No. 2, No. 3 and No. 4 but in 2 cases of No. 1 and No. 5 it protrudes slightly. In sulci, sulcus b and sulcus a' are distinct in all cases and sulcus a, sulcus c, sulcus b' and sulcus c' are considerably remarkable. In the toluidine blue stained serial sections, the nucleus medialis is composed of close small nerve cells, nucleus interpositus posterior is composed of the diffuse medium-sized nerve cells, nucleus interpositus anterior is composed of the close medium-sized nerve cells and nucleus lateralis is composed of the diffuse large nerve cells. In projection pictures of each subnuclei to the cerebellar cortex in each directions in the dorsal view

  19. Specific cerebellar activation during Braille reading in blind subjects.

    PubMed

    Gizewski, Elke R; Timmann, Dagmar; Forsting, Michael

    2004-07-01

    The traditional view that the cerebellum is involved only in the control of movements has been changed recently. It has been suggested that the human cerebellum is involved in cognition and language. Likewise, besides cortical activity in sensorimotor and visual areas, an increased global activation of the cerebellum has been revealed during Braille reading in blind subjects. Our purpose was to investigate whether there is cerebellar activation during Braille reading by blind subjects other than sensorimotor activation related to finger movements. Early blind and normal sighted subjects were studied with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during Braille reading, tactile discrimination of nonsense dots, dots forming symbols, and finger tapping. The experiments were done in block design. Echo planar imaging sequences were carried out on a 1.5-T MR scanner. All blind individuals reading Braille showed robust activation of the posterior and lateral aspects of cerebellar hemispheral lobules Crus I bilaterally but more predominately on the right side. Additionally, activation was present in the medial cerebellum within lobules IV, V, and VIIIA, predominantly on the right. Discriminating nonsense dots did not reveal any activation of Crus I, but did reveal activation within the medial part of lobules IV, V, and VIIIA, predominately on the right. Analysis of sighted subjects during reading of printed text revealed activation of the posterolateral cerebellar hemisphere in Crus I bilaterally, predominantly on the right. Tactile analysis of dots representing symbols revealed an activation in lobules IV and VIII and in right Crus II but not in Crus I. In conclusion, parts of cerebellar activation during Braille reading in blind subjects (i.e., within lobules IV, V, and VIII) overlap with the known hand representation within the cerebellum and are likely related to the sensorimotor part of the task. Cerebellar activation during Braille reading within bilateral Crus I

  20. Postinfectious Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome in a 41-Year-Old Patient-Visualizing Hyperactivation in Deep Cerebellar Nuclei by Cerebral [(18) F]-FDG- PET.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mona; Levin, Johannes; Schöberl, Florian; Rominger, Axel

    2015-01-01

    A 41-year-old woman presented with acute onset headache, vertigo, nausea, and gait disorder, initially interpreted as a common cold. Within 2 weeks, she developed a severe opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome with truncal ataxia. Cerebrospinal fluid examination and serological findings suggested a recent infection with Coxsackie B3 virus. [(18) F]-FDG-PET proved to be the only imaging tool to identify the underlying pathology depicting hyperactivation in the vestibulo- and spinocerebellum as well as hyperactivation of the ocular muscles. At the clinical follow-up 4 months later, the patient's symptoms were considerably improved with only intermittent low-frequency opsoclonus. Corresponding PET findings were able to depict the response to therapy in the ocular muscles and the inferior vermis, whereas the deep cerebellar nuclei were still hyperactivated, however, to a lesser extent. This finding highlights the usefulness of functional/metabolic brain imaging to study the pathophysiology of this type of disorder.

  1. Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Supplied by a Lumbar Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Han Myun; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Woo, Sungmin; Son, Kyu Ri; Cho, Seong Whi; Chung, Jin Wook

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo describe the radiologic findings and imaging response of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) supplied by the lumbar artery.MethodsBetween April 2004 and December 2012, we encountered HCC supplied by a lumbar artery in 21 patients. Two investigators retrospectively reviewed clinical and radiological findings of HCC supplied by the lumbar artery using computed tomography (CT) scans and digital subtraction angiograms.ResultsPatients had received 1–27 sessions of previous chemoembolization procedures (mean 7.7 sessions, median 4 sessions). Mean tumor size was 5.3 cm. The locations of HCC supplied by lumbar artery were the bare area (n = 14, 67 %) and segment VI (n = 7, 33 %). Tumor-feeding arteries arose from the main lumbar artery (n = 7), proximal anterior division (n = 4), and distal anterior division (n = 14). In 20 patients, selective chemoembolization through the tumor-feeding arteries of the lumbar artery was achieved. In 1 patient, nonselective embolization at the main lumbar artery was performed. There was no complication such as skin necrosis or paralysis. On the first follow-up enhanced CT scan, target tumors fed by the lumbar artery showed complete response (n = 6), partial response (n = 4), stable disease (n = 3), and progressive disease (n = 8), but overall tumor response was partial response (n = 1) and progressive disease (n = 20).ConclusionWhen HCC is located in the inferior tip or bare area of the liver, a lumbar artery may supply the tumor. Although selective chemoembolization via the tumor-feeding vessel of the lumbar artery can be achieved in most cases, overall tumor response is commonly unfavorable.

  2. Arterialized venous free flap for reconstruction of burned face.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Martín; Butrón, Patricia; Chávez-Muñoz, Claudia; Ramos-Sánchez, Iván; Barajas-Olivas, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a forearm arterialized venous free flap (23 cm x 14 cm) was used in a 25-year-old male with facial burns sequels to reconstruct both cheeks, chin, lips, nose, columnella, nasal tip, and nostrils. It was arterialized by the facial artery to an afferent vein anastomosis. The venous flow was drained by four efferent vein to vein anastomoses. Although it developed small inferior marginal necrosis in the lower lip, the rest of the flap survived with good quality of the skin in both texture and color, with self-delimitation of the different esthetics units of the center of the face such as the nasogenian folds, nostrils, and upper lip filtrum, without the need of additional thinning surgical procedures. From all of the above, the arterialized venous free flap is an alternative reconstructive option for the treatment of burn sequels especially those that include the centrofacial region.

  3. Impaired sprouting and axonal atrophy in cerebellar climbing fibres following in vivo silencing of the growth-associated protein GAP-43.

    PubMed

    Grasselli, Giorgio; Mandolesi, Georgia; Strata, Piergiorgio; Cesare, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The adult mammalian central nervous system has a limited ability to establish new connections and to recover from traumatic or degenerative events. The olivo-cerebellar network represents an excellent model to investigate neuroprotection and repair in the brain during adulthood, due to its high plasticity and ordered synaptic organization. To shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in these events, we focused on the growth-associated protein GAP-43 (also known as B-50 or neuromodulin). During development, this protein plays a crucial role in growth and in branch formation of neurites, while in the adult it is only expressed in a few brain regions, including the inferior olive (IO) where climbing fibres (CFs) originate. Following axotomy GAP-43 is usually up-regulated in association with regeneration. Here we describe an in vivo lentiviral-mediated gene silencing approach, used for the first time in the olivo-cerebellar system, to efficiently and specifically downregulate GAP-43 in rodents CFs. We show that lack of GAP-43 causes an atrophy of the CF in non-traumatic conditions, consisting in a decrease of its length, branching and number of synaptic boutons. We also investigated CF regenerative ability by inducing a subtotal lesion of the IO. Noteworthy, surviving CFs lacking GAP-43 were largely unable to sprout on surrounding Purkinje cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that GAP-43 is essential both to maintain CFs structure in non-traumatic condition and to promote sprouting after partial lesion of the IO.

  4. MRI Assessment of Uterine Artery Patency and Fibroid Infarction Rates 6 Months after Uterine Artery Embolization with Nonspherical Polyvinyl Alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Raj Gonsalves, Michael; Vlahos, Ioannis; Manyonda, Issac; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: We have observed significant rates of uterine artery patency after uterine artery embolization (UAE) with nonspherical polyvinyl alcohol (nsPVA) on 6 month follow-up MR scanning. The study aim was to quantitatively assess uterine artery patency after UAE with nsPVA and to assess the effect of continued uterine artery patency on outcomes. Methods: A single centre, retrospective study of 50 patients undergoing bilateral UAE for uterine leiomyomata was undertaken. Pelvic MRI was performed before and 6 months after UAE. All embolizations were performed with nsPVA. Outcome measures included uterine artery patency, uterine and dominant fibroid volume, dominant fibroid percentage infarction, presence of ovarian arterial collaterals, and symptom scores assessed by the Uterine Fibroid Symptom and Quality of Life questionnaire (UFS-QOL). Results: Magnetic resonance angiographic evidence of uterine artery recanalization was demonstrated in 90 % of the patients (64 % bilateral, 26 % unilateral) at 6 months. Eighty percent of all dominant fibroids demonstrated >90 % infarction. The mean percentage reduction in dominant fibroid volume was 35 %. No significant difference was identified between nonpatent, unilateral, and bilateral recanalization of the uterine arteries with regard to percentage dominant fibroid infarction or dominant fibroid volume reduction. The presence of bilaterally or unilaterally patent uterine arteries was not associated with inferior clinical outcomes (symptom score or UFS-QOL scores) at 6 months. Conclusion: The high rates of uterine artery patency challenge the current paradigm that nsPVA is a permanent embolic agent and that permanent uterine artery occlusion is necessary to optimally treat uterine fibroids. Despite high rates of uterine artery recanalization in this cohort, satisfactory fibroid infarction rates and UFS-QOL scores were achieved.

  5. Carotid artery anatomy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    There are four carotid arteries, two on each side of the neck: right and left internal carotid arteries, and right and left external carotid arteries. The carotid arteries deliver oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the head and brain.

  6. Idiopathic Isolated Cilioretinal Artery Occlusion Treated with Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Aktaş, Serdar; Uyar, Osman Murat; Özer, Erol; Aktaş, Hatice; Eltutar, Kadir

    2016-01-01

    Cilioretinal artery occlusion (CLRAO) is a rare event which has been reported in association with various systemic diseases. We report a case of idiopathic isolated CLRAO treated successfully with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy. A 26-year-old man presented with sudden, painless vision loss and an inferior hemivisual field defect in the left eye. Fundus fluorescein angiography revealed an occluded cilioretinal artery. After 2 weeks of HBO therapy, visual acuity improved from 20/200 to 20/20. The visual field defect improved. PMID:28058169

  7. Vapor resistant arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor); Dussinger, Peter M. (Inventor); Buchko, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A vapor block resistant liquid artery structure for heat pipes. A solid tube artery with openings is encased in the sintered material of a heat pipe wick. The openings are limited to that side of the artery which is most remote from the heat source. The liquid in the artery can thus exit the artery through the openings and wet the sintered sheath, but vapor generated at the heat source is unlikely to move around the solid wall of the artery and reverse its direction in order to penetrate the artery through the openings. An alternate embodiment uses finer pore size wick material to resist vapor entry.

  8. Computed tomography of cerebral infarction along the distribution of the basal perforating arteries. Part 1. Striate arterial group

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.; Goto, K.; Fukasawa, H.; Kawata, Y.; Uemura, K.; Suzuki, K.

    1985-04-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) manifestations of cerebral infarction along the distribution of the basal perforating arteries were reviewed in correlation with cerebral angiography. Infarcts in the territories of perforators were demonstrated individually based on knowledge of their three dimensional distribution as demonstrated by microangiography of cadavers. In Part I of the study, the areas supplied by the medial (MSA) and lateral striate arteries (LSA) were examined. Infarction along the branches of the MSA usually involved the antero-inferior portion of the corpus striatum, immediately posterolateral to the most inferior part of the frontal horn of the lateral ventricle. Infarcts along the branches of the LSA abutted the territory of the MSA posteriorly and superiorly and involved the posterolateral region of the corpus striatum. Clinical and neuroradiological correlations are discussed.

  9. Arterial vascularization of the pineal gland in the fetus of Zavot-bred cattle.

    PubMed

    Aslan, K; Ozcan, S; Aksoy, G; Kurtul, I; Dursun, N

    2003-04-01

    This study aimed at revealing arterial vascularization of the pineal gland of the Zavot-bred foetus. Twenty foetuses, regardless of their sex, at the age of 2-7 months were used. Coloured-latex was injected by way of both the right and left common carotid arteries. Then, dissection was performed and vessels nourishing the pineal gland were documented. The pineal gland is vascularized by a number of 2-5 central rami. A small vessel arising from each of the central rami in two foetuses (10%) was shown anastomosing with a branch of the cranial cerebral artery, which advances in cranio-caudal direction in the callosal groove. Hence, anastomoses were