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Sample records for inferior glenohumeral ligament

  1. Capsular tear in line with the inferior glenohumeral ligament: a cause of anterior glenohumeral instability in 2 patients.

    PubMed

    Rothberg, David L; Burks, Robert T

    2009-08-01

    Anterior glenohumeral instability typically involves lesions associated with the inferior glenohumeral ligament complex. Multiple lesions have been described in this setting, including Bankart, humeral avulsion of the inferior glenohumeral ligament complex, and mid-substance capsular tears. These lesions are indicative of the high-force traumatic nature of anterior shoulder dislocation. Two cases of recurrent anterior shoulder instability are presented with a capsular tear perpendicular to the usual orientation and not consistent to the amount of force involved in a dislocation. Arthroscopy revealed a capsular defect from the glenoid to the humeral head in the anterior inferior glenohumeral ligamentous complex in both. This lesion is an unusual circumstance, providing another pathology to include in the differential diagnosis of anterior glenohumeral instability.

  2. Arthroscopic autograft reconstruction of the inferior glenohumeral ligament: Exploration of technical feasibility in cadaveric shoulder specimens.

    PubMed

    Bouaicha, Samy; Moor, Beat K

    2013-01-01

    Failure of primary arthroscopic Bankart repair in anterior-inferior glenohumeral instability is low, but in some cases revision surgery is required. Revision procedures show good to excellent results but typically are done open and do not respect the anatomical functionality of the joint capsule. The purpose of this cadaveric study was to explore the feasibility of a completely arthroscopic anatomical reconstruction of the inferior glenohumeral ligament using a hamstring autograft.

  3. Stress and strain in the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament during a simulated clinical examination.

    PubMed

    Debski, Richard E; Weiss, Jeffrey A; Newman, William J; Moore, Susan M; McMahon, Patrick J

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this research was to predict, with a finite-element model, the stress and strain fields in the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (AB-IGHL) during application of an anterior load with the humerus abducted. The stress and strain in the AB-IGHL were determined during a simulated simple translation test of a single intact shoulder. A 6-degree-of-freedom magnetic tracking system was used to measure the kinematics of the humerus with respect to the scapula. A clinician applied an anterior load to the humerus until a manual maximum was achieved at 60 degrees of glenohumeral abduction and 0 degrees of flexion/extension and external rotation. For the computational analysis, the experimentally measured joint kinematics were used to prescribe the motion of the humerus with respect to the scapula, whereas the material properties of the AB-IGHL were based on published experimental data. The geometry of the AB-IGHL, humerus, and scapula was acquired by use of a volumetric computed tomography scan, which was used to define the reference configuration of the AB-IGHL. Strains reached 12% along the inferior edge and 15% near the scapular insertion site at the position of maximum anterior translation. During this motion, the AB-IGHL wrapped around the humerus and transferred load to the bone via contact. Predicted values for von Mises stress in the ligament reached 4.3 MPa at the point of contact with the humeral head and 6.4 MPa near the scapular insertion site. A comparison of these results to the literature suggests that the computational approach provided reasonable predictions of fiber strain in the AB-IGHL when specimen-specific geometry and kinematics with average material properties were used. The complex stress and strain distribution throughout the AB-IGHL suggests that the continuous nature of the glenohumeral capsule should be considered in biomechanical analyses. In the future, this combined experimental and computational approach will

  4. Identification and management of chronic shoulder pain in the presence of an MRA-confirmed humeral avulsion of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (HAGL) lesion

    PubMed Central

    Karmali, Arif; McLeod, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To present the assessment and conservative management of chronic shoulder pain in the presence of a humeral avulsion of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (HAGL) lesion in an active individual. Clinical Features: A 47 year-old female office-worker with constant, deep, right shoulder pain with occasional clicking and catching claimed to have “tore something” in her right shoulder five years ago while performing reverse bicep curls. A physical exam led to differential diagnoses of a Superior Labrum Anterior to Posterior (SLAP) lesion, Bankart lesion, and bicipital tendinopathy. A Magnetic Resonance Arthrogram revealed a HAGL lesion. Intervention and Outcome: A conservative chiropractic treatment plan in addition to physical therapy was initiated. The patient reported 75% improvement in symptoms after 4 treatments over a four-week duration. Summary: This case demonstrates the successful implementation of a conservative plan of management suggesting that the treatment provided to this patient should be considered and attempted prior to arthroscopic surgery. PMID:27385837

  5. Arthroscopic repair of a humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament lesion.

    PubMed

    Kon, Yoshiaki; Shiozaki, Hiroyuki; Sugaya, Hiroyuki

    2005-05-01

    We describe 3 cases of an all-arthroscopic technique for repair of a humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament (HAGL) lesion and the postoperative clinical outcomes. From a technical perspective, the most critical part of the surgeries was the anchor insertion at an optimal position on the humerus in order to achieve proper tension of the glenohumeral ligament. The arm-free beach-chair position, which facilitates maximum internal rotation, use of a 70 degrees angled arthroscope, and an anterior-inferior trans-subscapularis tendon portal were considered key factors to accomplish this procedure.

  6. A rare anatomic variant of the superior glenohumeral ligament.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, R L; Itoi, E; Watanabe, W; Yamada, S; Nagasawa, H; Shimizu, T; Wakabayashi, I; Sato, K

    2001-01-01

    The attachment of the superior glenohumeral ligament (SGHL) to the upper pole of the glenoid is variable and 3 types have been described. We report an anatomic variant of SGHL attachment to the upper pole of the glenoid that has not heretofore been reported in the literature. In this case, the SGHL overrode the biceps origin, continued to the superior labrum posteriorly, and had no attachment to the middle glenohumeral ligament or the anterior labrum. This variant was detected during routine arthroscopic examination undertaken before surgery on a rotator cuff tear.

  7. Glenoid avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments as a cause of recurrent anterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Eugene M; Siparsky, Patrick N

    2010-09-01

    Although the Bankart lesion is accepted as the primary pathology responsible for recurrent shoulder instability, recognition of other soft-tissue lesions has improved the surgical treatment for this common problem. Whereas humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments has been acknowledged as a cause of anterior shoulder instability, we have not found any reported cases of glenoid avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments. We describe 3 cases of recurrent anterior shoulder instability due to glenoid avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments. The avulsed ligaments were repaired to the labrum and glenoid, restoring the glenohumeral ligament-labral complex.

  8. Posterior humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament (PHAGL) in anterior shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Vedova, Franco Della; Ibáñez, Maximiliano; Alvarez, Victoria; Lépore, Salvador; Sulzle, Vanina Ojeda; Galan, Hernán; Slullitel, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bankart lesion is the anterior glenohumeral instability most common associated injury. Tears at glenohumeral ligaments can be intra substance or at humeral insertion, this location may be the cause of instability. Posterior humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament (PHAGL) can be an isolated or associated cause of instability and it is usually related to the posterior glenohumeral instability. The aim of this article is to report the clinical assessment and postoperative outcomes of 6 patients with PHAGL with anterior shoulder instability. Materials and Methods: We evaluated six patients with PHAGL due to anterior glenohumeral instability arthroscopically repaired. All 6 patients developed the lesion after a sports-related trauma. Sixty six per cent of patients had associated intra-articular shoulder pathologies. The diagnosis with MRI arthrogram (with gadolinium) was performed preoperatively in 50% of patients. Postoperative evaluation was made with Rowe, ASES and WOSI scores. Results: All patients returned to their previous sports level. One patient had a recurrence. Postoperative scores results are WOSI: 13.13%, Rowe 83.33 and ASES 95.83. Discussion: Humeral avulsions of glenohumeral ligaments represent 25% of capsulolabral injuries. PHAGL injury was initially described as a cause of posterior instability, but according to two other series, our study shows that this lesion may also cause anterior instability. It is critical to have a high index of suspicion and make a correct arthroscopic examination to diagnose this injury, because arthroscopic repair of PHAGL has good postoperative outcomes.

  9. Arthroscopic Bone Graft Procedure for Anterior Inferior Glenohumeral Instability

    PubMed Central

    Taverna, Ettore; D'Ambrosi, Riccardo; Perfetti, Carlo; Garavaglia, Guido

    2014-01-01

    There are many described surgical techniques for the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability. Numerous authors have performed anterior bone block procedures with good results for the treatment of anterior shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss. The benefits of using arthroscopic procedures for surgical stabilization of the shoulder include smaller incisions with less soft-tissue dissection, better visualization of the joint, better repair accessibility, and the best possible outcome for external rotation. We describe an arthroscopic anteroinferior shoulder stabilization technique with an iliac crest tricortical bone graft and capsulolabral reconstruction. It is an all-arthroscopic technique with the advantage of not using fixation devices, such as screws, but instead using special buttons to fix the bone graft. The steps of the operation are as follows: precise placement of a specific posterior glenoid guide that allows the accurate positioning of the bone graft on the anterior glenoid neck; fixation of the graft flush with the anterior glenoid rim using specific buttons under arthroscopic control; and finally, subsequent capsular, labral, and ligament reconstruction on the glenoid rim using suture anchors and leaving the graft as an extra-articular structure. PMID:25685669

  10. Traumatic shoulder dislocation with combined bankart lesion and humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament in a professional basketball player: three-year follow-up of surgical stabilization.

    PubMed

    Shah, Aakash A; Selesnick, F Harlan

    2010-10-01

    Traumatic anterior shoulder instability has been well documented to have associated lesions such as a Bankart tear, humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament (HAGL), Hill-Sachs lesion, fracture, and nerve injury. To our knowledge, the combined Bankart and HAGL injury in a single acute anterior shoulder dislocation has not yet been reported. We describe a traumatic first-time anterior-inferior shoulder dislocation in a professional basketball player with a combined Bankart and HAGL lesion. The patient underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair followed by open repair of the HAGL lesion with an open capsular shift reconstruction. At 3 years' follow-up, the patient had returned to an elite level of play, with an excellent outcome.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in glenohumeral instability

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Manisha; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2011-01-01

    The glenohumeral joint is the most commonly dislocated joint of the body and anterior instability is the most common type of shoulder instability. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and more recently, MR arthrography, have become the essential investigation modalities of glenohumeral instability, especially for pre-procedure evaluation before arthroscopic surgery. Injuries associated with glenohumeral instability are variable, and can involve the bones, the labor-ligamentous components, or the rotator cuff. Anterior instability is associated with injuries of the anterior labrum and the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament, in the form of Bankart lesion and its variants; whereas posterior instability is associated with reverse Bankart and reverse Hill-Sachs lesion. Multidirectional instability often has no labral pathology on imaging but shows specific osseous changes such as increased chondrolabral retroversion. This article reviews the relevant anatomy in brief, the MR imaging technique and the arthrographic technique, and describes the MR findings in each type of instability as well as common imaging pitfalls. PMID:22007285

  12. The isolated inferior glenohumeral labrum injury, anterior to posterior (the ILAP): A case series

    PubMed Central

    Irion, Val; Cheah, Michael; Jones, Grant L.; Bishop, Julie Y.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We describe the presentation, exam findings, surgical repair techniques, and short-term outcomes in a series of patients with isolated inferior labral tears. Materials and Methods : A retrospective chart review was performed at a large academic medical center. Isolated inferior labral tears were defined as between the 4 o'clock and 8 o'clock position of the glenoid as determined by direct arthroscopic visualization. Tears that were smaller were also included but were required to cross the 6 o'clock point, having anterior and posterior components. Patients were excluded if they had any other pathology or treatment of the shoulder. 1-year follow-up was required. Results: Of the 17 patients who met inclusion criteria for review, 12 were available for a minimum 1-year follow-up. Average total follow-up for patients to complete the phone interview/Oxford Shoulder Instability Score (OSIS) was an average of 37.7 months (range: 16-79 months). Postoperatively, all reported symptom improvement or resolution since surgery. The mean preoperative pain on a scale of 0-10 was 6.3 (range: 0-10). Mean postoperative pain on a scale of 0-10 was 2.25 (range: 0-5). Eleven of 12 patients (91.7%) had returned to the level of activity desired. The mean OSIS was 41.4 (median: 43; range: 27-47). Eleven of 12 patients (91.7%) had good or excellent scores. Ten of 12 patients (83.3%) had a feeling of stability in the shoulder. All 12 patients reached were satisfied with the procedure and would undergo surgery again in a similar situation. Conclusions: We have presented our series of patients with isolated inferior labral injury, and have shown that when surgically treated, outcomes of this uncommon injury are good to excellent and a full return to sports can be expected. PMID:25709240

  13. Anatomy of the capsulolabral complex and rotator interval related to glenohumeral instability.

    PubMed

    Itoigawa, Yoshiaki; Itoi, Eiji

    2016-02-01

    The glenohumeral joint with instability is a common diagnosis that often requires surgery. The aim of this review was to present an overview of the anatomy of the glenohumeral joint with emphasis on instability based on the current literature and to describe the detailed anatomy and anatomical variants of the glenohumeral joint associated with anterior and posterior shoulder instability. A review was performed using PubMed/MEDLINE using key words: Search terms were "glenohumeral", "shoulder instability", "cadaver", "rotator interval", "anatomy", and "anatomical study". During the last decade, the interest in both arthroscopic repair techniques and surgical anatomy of the glenohumeral ligament (superior, middle, and inferior), labrum, and rotator interval has increased. Understanding of the rotator interval and attachment of the inferior glenohumeral ligament on the glenoid or humeral head have evolved significantly. The knowledge of the detailed anatomy and anatomical variations is essential for the surgeon in order to understand the pathology, make a correct diagnosis of instability, and select proper treatment options. Proper understanding of anatomical variants can help us avoid misdiagnosis. Level of evidence V.

  14. Successful Nonoperative Management of HAGL (Humeral Avulsion of Glenohumeral Ligament) Lesion With Concurrent Axillary Nerve Injury in an Active-Duty US Navy SEAL.

    PubMed

    Ernat, Justin J; Bottoni, Craig R; Rowles, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    Humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament (HAGL) is a lesion that has been recognized as a cause of recurrent shoulder instability. To our knowledge there are no reports of successful return to full function in young, competitive athletes or return to manual labor following nonoperative management of a HAGL lesion. A 26-year-old Navy SEAL was diagnosed with a HAGL injury, and associated traction injury of the axillary nerve as well as a partial tear of the rotator cuff. Operative intervention was recommended; however, due to issues with training and with inability to properly rehab with the axillary nerve injury, surgical plans were delayed. Interestingly, the patient demonstrated both clinical and radiographic magnetic resonance imaging healing of his lesion over an 18-month period. At 18 months the patient had returned to full active duty without pain or instability as a Navy SEAL. PMID:27552458

  15. Posterior capsular fibrosis in professional baseball pitchers: case series of MR arthrographic findings in six patients with glenohumeral internal rotational deficit.

    PubMed

    Tehranzadeh, Arash D; Fronek, Jan; Resnick, Donald

    2007-01-01

    In the high-performance athlete, acquired thickening of the posterior joint capsule is a proposed etiology for glenohumeral internal rotational deficit (GIRD). The purpose of this study was to present our MR arthrographic imaging observations of posterior capsular thickening in professional baseball players who present with reduced throwing velocity related to pain and clinical findings of internal rotational deficit of the glenohumeral joint. Our observations of MR imaging features in patients with clinical and arthroscopic manifestations of GIRD lesions include articular surface partial thickness tears of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons, superoposterior subluxation of the humeral head and SLAP tears of the labrum. Although no empiric standard currently exists for the axial dimension thickness of the shoulder capsule, we have observed a thickened appearance of the posterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament in these patients.

  16. Anatomy of the inferior extensor retinaculum and its role in lateral ankle ligament reconstruction: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Dalmau-Pastor, M; Yasui, Y; Calder, J D; Karlsson, J; Kerkhoffs, G M M J; Kennedy, J G

    2016-04-01

    The inferior extensor retinaculum (IER) is an aponeurotic structure, which is in continuation with the anterior part of the sural fascia. The IER has often been used to augment the reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments, for instance in the Broström-Gould procedure, with good outcomes reported. However, its anatomy has not been described in detail and only a few studies are available on this structure. The presence of a non-constant oblique supero-lateral band appears to be important. This structure defines whether the augmentation of the lateral ankle ligaments reconstruction is performed using true IER or only the anterior part of the sural fascia. It is concluded that the use of this structure will have an impact on the resulting ankle stability.

  17. Comparison of Periodontal Ligament Injection and Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block in Mandibular Primary Molars Pulpotomy: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Haghgoo, Roza; Taleghani, Ferial

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inferior alveolar nerve block is a common technique for anesthesia of the primary mandibular molars. A number of disadvantages have been shown to be associated with this technique. Periodontal ligament (PDL) injection could be considered as an alternative to inferior alveolar nerve block. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of PDL injection in the anesthesia of primary molar pulpotomy with mandibular block. Methods: This study was performed using a sequential double-blind randomized trial design. 80 children aged 3-7 years old who required pulpotomy in symmetrical mandibular primary molars were selected. The teeth of these children were anesthetized with periodontal injection on one side of the mandible and block on the other. Pulpotomy was performed on each patient during the same appointment. Signs of discomfort, including hand and body tension and eye movement, the verbal complaint and crying (SEM scale), were evaluated by a dental assistant who was blinded to the treatment allocation of the patients. Finally, the data were analyzed using the exact Fisher test and Pearson Chi-squared exact test. Results: Success rate was 88/75 and 91/25 in the PDL injection and nerve block groups, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the two techniques (P = 0.250). Conclusion: Results showed that PDL injection can be used as an alternative to nerve block in pulpotomy of the mandibular primary molars. PMID:26028895

  18. The periodontal ligament (PDL) injection: an alternative to inferior alveolar nerve block.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F

    1982-02-01

    The periodontal ligament (PDL) injection for mandibular anesthesia in isolated regions was evaluated, using both a conventional syringe and two devices designed for this procedure. A high success rate was achieved, with a low incidence of adverse reaction and highly favorable comment from both patients and administrators. Duration of pulpal anesthesia following the technique described proved adequate for most dental procedures. The newer devices appear to have some advantage over the conventional syringe technique. However, the PDL injection technique can readily be used with any conventional syringe. Further study is recommended to determine the response of periodontal and pulpal tissues.

  19. Glenohumeral Synovial Chondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Robert

    2016-09-01

    A 20-year-old, right hand-dominant man reported to physical therapy with a history of deep anterior left shoulder pain. Radiographs, which were obtained after physical therapy was initiated, and subsequent magnetic resonance imaging showed the presence of numerous radio-opaque loose bodies that followed bone signal characteristics dispersed throughout the glenohumeral joint, leading to a diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):809. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0414.

  20. Glenohumeral Joint Injections

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Christopher; Dhawan, Aman; Harwood, Daniel; Gochanour, Eric; Romeo, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Context: Intra-articular injections into the glenohumeral joint are commonly performed by musculoskeletal providers, including orthopaedic surgeons, family medicine physicians, rheumatologists, and physician assistants. Despite their frequent use, there is little guidance for injectable treatments to the glenohumeral joint for conditions such as osteoarthritis, adhesive capsulitis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Evidence Acquisition: We performed a comprehensive review of the available literature on glenohumeral injections to help clarify the current evidence-based practice and identify deficits in our understanding. We searched MEDLINE (1948 to December 2011 [week 1]) and EMBASE (1980 to 2011 [week 49]) using various permutations of intra-articular injections AND (corticosteroid OR hyaluronic acid) and (adhesive capsulitis OR arthritis). Results: We identified 1 and 7 studies that investigated intra-articular corticosteroid injections for the treatment of osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis, respectively. Two and 3 studies investigated the use of hyaluronic acid in osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis, respectively. One study compared corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid injections in the treatment of osteoarthritis, and another discussed adhesive capsulitis. Conclusion: Based on existing studies and their level of evidence, there is only expert opinion to guide corticosteroid injection for osteoarthritis as well as hyaluronic acid injection for osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis. PMID:24427384

  1. Glenohumeral Synovial Chondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Robert

    2016-09-01

    A 20-year-old, right hand-dominant man reported to physical therapy with a history of deep anterior left shoulder pain. Radiographs, which were obtained after physical therapy was initiated, and subsequent magnetic resonance imaging showed the presence of numerous radio-opaque loose bodies that followed bone signal characteristics dispersed throughout the glenohumeral joint, leading to a diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):809. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0414. PMID:27581180

  2. Comparison of 3-Dimensional Shoulder Complex Kinematics in Individuals With and Without Shoulder Pain, Part 2: Glenohumeral Joint

    PubMed Central

    LAWRENCE, REBEKAH L.; BRAMAN, JONATHAN P.; STAKER, JUSTIN L.; LAPRADE, ROBERT F.; LUDEWIG, PAULA M.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional. OBJECTIVES To compare differences in glenohumeral joint angular motion and linear translations between symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals during shoulder motion performed in 3 planes of humerothoracic elevation. BACKGROUND Numerous clinical theories have linked abnormal glenohumeral kinematics, including decreased glenohumeral external rotation and increased superior translation, to individuals with shoulder pain and impingement diagnoses. However, relatively few studies have investigated glenohumeral joint angular motion and linear translations in this population. METHODS Transcortical bone pins were inserted into the scapula and humerus of 12 a symptomatic and 10 symptomatic participants for direct bone-fixed tracking using electromagnetic sensors. Glenohumeral joint angular positions and linear translations were calculated during active shoulder flexion, abduction, and scapular plane abduction. RESULTS Differences between groups in angular positions were limited to glenohumeral elevation, coinciding with a reduction in scapulothoracic upward rotation. Symptomatic participants demonstrated 1.4 mm more anterior glenohumeral translation between 90° and 120° of shoulder flexion and an average of 1 mm more inferior glenohumeral translation throughout shoulder abduction. CONCLUSION Differences in glenohumeral kinematics exist between symptomatic and a symptomatic individuals. The clinical implications of these differences are not yet understood, and more research is needed to understand the relationship between abnormal kinematics, shoulder pain, and pathoanatomy. PMID:25103132

  3. Surgical treatment of a concurrent type 5 acromioclavicular joint dislocation and a failed anterior glenohumeral joint stabilization.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Abbas; Lawrence, Christopher; Tytherleigh-Strong, Graham

    2016-10-01

    Traumatic glenohumeral joint dislocation and acromioclavicular joint subluxations tend to occur in young active males. Use of the coracoid process either as a transfer in recurrent instability or in suspensory reconstructions of the coracoclavicular ligaments have gained popularity. However this requires careful consideration in the event of concomitant injuries if they both require surgery. PMID:27660658

  4. Surgical treatment of a concurrent type 5 acromioclavicular joint dislocation and a failed anterior glenohumeral joint stabilization.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Abbas; Lawrence, Christopher; Tytherleigh-Strong, Graham

    2016-10-01

    Traumatic glenohumeral joint dislocation and acromioclavicular joint subluxations tend to occur in young active males. Use of the coracoid process either as a transfer in recurrent instability or in suspensory reconstructions of the coracoclavicular ligaments have gained popularity. However this requires careful consideration in the event of concomitant injuries if they both require surgery.

  5. The influence of implant articular thickness and glenohumeral conformity on stability of an all-metal glenoid component.

    PubMed

    Bicknell, Ryan T; Liew, Allan S L; Danter, Matthew R; Patterson, Stuart D; King, Graham J W; Chess, David G; Johnson, James A

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of implant thickness and glenohumeral conformity on fixation of an all-metal glenoid component. A stainless steel glenoid component was designed and implanted in 10 cadaveric scapulae. A testing apparatus capable of producing a loading vector at various angles, magnitudes, and directions was used. The independent variables included 6 directions and 3 angles of joint load, 3 implant thicknesses, and 4 glenohumeral conformities. Implant micromotion relative to bone was measured by use of 4 displacement transducers at the superior, inferior, anterior, and posterior sites. The components displayed a consistent response to loading of ipsilateral compression and contralateral distraction. Stability decreased as the load application angle increased (P < .05). A decrease in the implant thickness and glenohumeral conformity resulted in increased implant stability (P < .05). Decreasing implant thickness and glenohumeral conformity reduce the eccentric component of loading and may improve the durability of glenoid implants.

  6. Differences in glenohumeral translations calculated with three methods: Comparison of relative positions and contact point.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Keisuke; Kenmoku, Tomonori; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Sugaya, Hiroyuki; Banks, Scott A

    2016-06-14

    Several published articles have reported 3-dimensional glenohumeral kinematics using model-image registration techniques. However, different methods to compute the translations were used in these articles. The purpose of this study was to compare glenohumeral translations calculated with three different methods. Fifteen healthy males with a mean age of 31 years (range, 27-36 years old) were enrolled in this study. Fluoroscopic images during scapular plane elevation were recorded at 30 frames per second for the right shoulder in each subject, and CT-derived models of the humerus and the scapula were matched with the silhouette of the bones in the fluoroscopic images using model-image registration techniques. Glenohumeral translations were computed with three methods: relative position of the origins of the humeral and scapular models, contact points of the two models, and relative positions based upon the calculated glenohumeral center of rotation (CoR). In the supero-inferior direction, translations calculated with the three methods were roughly parallel, with the maximum difference of 1.6mm (P<0.001). In the antero-posterior direction, translations with the origins and CoR were parallel; however, translations computed with the origins and contact point describe arcs that differ by almost 2mm at low humeral elevation angles and converge at higher degrees of humeral elevation (P<0.001). Glenohumeral translations calculated using three methods showed statistically significant differences that may be important when comparing detailed results of different studies. However, these relatively small differences are likely subclinical, so that all three methods can reasonably be used for description of glenohumeral translations. PMID:27083061

  7. ULTRASOUND MEASUREMENTS AND OBJECTIVE FORCES OF GLENOHUMERAL TRANSLATIONS DURING SHOULDER ACCESSORY PASSIVE MOTION TESTING IN HEALTHY INDIVIDUALS

    PubMed Central

    Worst, Haley; Decarreau, Ryan; Davies, George

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical examination of caspuloligamentous structures of the glenohumeral joint has historically been subjective in nature, as demonstrated by limited intra-rater and inter-rater reproducibility. Musculoskeletal diagnostic ultrasound was utilized to develop a clinically objective measurement technique for glenohumeral inferior and posterolateral translation. Purpose The purpose of this study was to measure the accessory passive force required to achieve end range glenohumeral posterolateral and inferior accessory translation, as well as, to quantify the amount of translation of the glenohumeral joint caused by the applied force. Study Design Cross-sectional descriptive correlational study Methods Twenty-five asymptomatic subjects between the ages of 18 and 30 were recruited via convenience sampling. Posterolateral and inferior shoulder accessory passive translation was assessed and measured using a GE LOGIQe ultrasound, while concurrently using a hand held dynamometer to quantify the passive force applied during assessment. Normative values for force and translation were described as means and standard deviations. Results Mean values for posterolateral translation were 6.5 +/− 4.0 mm on the right shoulder and 6.3 +/− 3.5 mm on the left with an associated mean force of 127.1 +/− 55.6 N and 114.4 +/− 50.7 N, respectively. Mean values for inferior translation were 4.8 +/− 1.7 mm on the right shoulder and 5.4 +/− 1.8 mm on the left with an associated mean force of 84.5 +/− 30.5 N and 76.1 +/− 30.1 N, respectively. There was a significant association between inferior translation and inferior force (r = .51). No significant association was found between posterolateral translation and posterolateral force. Significant differences were found between dominant and non-dominant shoulders for posterolateral translation, posterolateral force to produce translation, and inferior translation values

  8. GLENOHUMERAL MOTION DEFICITS: FRIEND OR FOE?

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, Kevin E.; Davies, George; Ellenbecker, Todd; Reinold, Mike

    2013-01-01

    In most shoulder conditions a loss of glenohumeral motion results in shoulder performance impairments. However, in the overhead athlete loss of glenohumeral internal rotation, termed glenohumeral internal rotation deficiency (GIRD), is a normal phenomenon that should be expected. Without a loss of glenohumeral internal rotation the overhead athlete will not have the requisite glenohumeral external rotation needed to throw a baseball at nearly 100 miles per hour, or serve a tennis ball at velocities of 120 miles per hour or more. Not all GIRD is pathologic. The authors of this manuscript have defined two types of GIRD; one that is normal and one that is pathologic. Anatomical GIRD (aGIRD) is one that is normal in overhead athletes and is characterized by a loss of internal rotation of less than 18°‐20° with symmetrical total rotational motion (TROM) bilaterally. Pathologic GIRD (pGIRD) is when there is a loss of glenohumeral internal rotation greater than 18°‐20° with a corresponding loss of TROM greater than 5° when compared bilaterally. A more problematic motion restriction may be that of a loss of TROM in the glenohumeral joint. Recent evidence supports that a loss of TROM is predictive of future injury to the shoulder in professional athletes. Additionally, external rotation deficiency (ERD), the difference between external rotation (ER) of the throwing shoulder and the non‐throwing shoulder of less than 5°, may be another predictor of future shoulder injury and disability. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:24175137

  9. The use of ultrasound in the assessment of the glenoid labrum of the glenohumeral joint. Part I: Ultrasound anatomy and examination technique.

    PubMed

    Krzyżanowski, Wojciech

    2012-06-01

    The glenohumeral joint is a spherical articulation with a remarkable range of motion in several planes and decreased stability. The maintenance of joint stability is influenced by the functioning of specific muscle groups in the shoulder region, a complex system of ligaments reinforcing the joint capsule, and the labrum which augments the glenoid fossa. Lesions of the aforementioned structures require accurate diagnosis prior to a decision for operative treatment. Ultrasound is one of the imaging methods that has been widely used in the assessment of various shoulder pathologies. In the author opinion, this imaging modality may also be applied for the evaluation of labral tears. Being attached along the glenoid rim, the labrum forms a collar deepening the glenoid fossa thus increasing area of its contact with the head of the humerus. To better describe the location of lesions, the glenoid labrum is usually divided into certain zones. Most of them may be visualized sonographically. The US examination of the posterior labrum can be performed during evaluation of the infraspinatus and teres minor muscles. The anterior labrum along with capsulolabral complex is seen at the glenoid edge under the subscapularis tendon. Sonographic examination of the inferior labrum is best performed using axillar approach. The superior labrum is only partially available for US examination. A crucial part of the sonographic assessment of the labrum is the dynamic examination during rotation of the upper extremity. The paper presents normal sonographic anatomy of the glenoid labrum and technique of the examination.

  10. Early glenohumeral arthritis in the competing athlete.

    PubMed

    Reineck, John R; Krishnan, Sumant G; Burkhead, W Z

    2008-10-01

    Early glenohumeral degeneration is, at best, a difficult condition for the competing athlete. This is especially true of athletes who participate in overhead sports of baseball, tennis, swimming, and volleyball. However, competitors in football, basketball, and soccer may also find themselves saddled with severe posttraumatic, post-reconstruction, or primary cartilage loss in their shoulders. Unfortunately, this may lead to impeded performance, and, ultimately, derailed careers.

  11. In Vivo Measurement of Glenohumeral Joint Contact Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bey, Michael J.; Kline, Stephanie K.; Zauel, Roger; Kolowich, Patricia A.; Lock, Terrence R.

    2009-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe a technique for measuring in-vivo glenohumeral joint contact patterns during dynamic activities and to demonstrate application of this technique. The experimental technique calculated joint contact patterns by combining CT-based 3D bone models with joint motion data that were accurately measured from biplane x-ray images. Joint contact patterns were calculated for the repaired and contralateral shoulders of 20 patients who had undergone rotator cuff repair. Significant differences in joint contact patterns were detected due to abduction angle and shoulder condition (i.e., repaired versus contralateral). Abduction angle had a significant effect on the superior/inferior contact center position, with the average joint contact center of the repaired shoulder 12.1% higher on the glenoid than the contralateral shoulder. This technique provides clinically relevant information by calculating in-vivo joint contact patterns during dynamic conditions and overcomes many limitations associated with conventional techniques for quantifying joint mechanics.

  12. Synovial Lipomatosis of the Glenohumeral Joint

    PubMed Central

    Safran, Ori

    2016-01-01

    Synovial lipomatosis (also known as lipoma arborescens) is a rare and benign lesion affecting synovium-lined cavities. It is characterized by hyperplasia of mature fat tissue in the subsynovial layer. Although the most commonly affected site is the knee joint, rarely additional locations such as tendon sheath and other joints are involved. We present a case of synovial lipomatosis of the glenohumeral joint in a 44-year-old man. The clinical data radiological studies and histopathologic results are described, as well as a review of the current literature. PMID:27563476

  13. Synovial Lipomatosis of the Glenohumeral Joint.

    PubMed

    Beyth, Shaul; Safran, Ori

    2016-01-01

    Synovial lipomatosis (also known as lipoma arborescens) is a rare and benign lesion affecting synovium-lined cavities. It is characterized by hyperplasia of mature fat tissue in the subsynovial layer. Although the most commonly affected site is the knee joint, rarely additional locations such as tendon sheath and other joints are involved. We present a case of synovial lipomatosis of the glenohumeral joint in a 44-year-old man. The clinical data radiological studies and histopathologic results are described, as well as a review of the current literature.

  14. Rotator Cuff Tear Consequent to Glenohumeral Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Gilotra, Mohit N; Christian, Matthew W; Lovering, Richard M

    2016-08-01

    The patient was a 21-year-old collegiate running back who was tackled during a football game and sustained a posterior glenohumeral dislocation. He was referred to an orthopaedist and presented 3 weeks after the injury, and, following examination, further imaging was ordered by the orthopaedist due to rotator cuff weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a complete tear of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus, as well as a posterior Bankart lesion, a subscapularis tear, and a dislocation of the biceps long head tendon into the reverse Hill-Sachs lesion. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):708. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0413. PMID:27477475

  15. Functional tissue engineering of ligament healing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Ligaments and tendons are dense connective tissues that are important in transmitting forces and facilitate joint articulation in the musculoskeletal system. Their injury frequency is high especially for those that are functional important, like the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL) of the knee as well as the glenohumeral ligaments and the rotator cuff tendons of the shoulder. Because the healing responses are different in these ligaments and tendons after injury, the consequences and treatments are tissue- and site-specific. In this review, we will elaborate on the injuries of the knee ligaments as well as using functional tissue engineering (FTE) approaches to improve their healing. Specifically, the ACL of knee has limited capability to heal, and results of non-surgical management of its midsubstance rupture have been poor. Consequently, surgical reconstruction of the ACL is regularly performed to gain knee stability. However, the long-term results are not satisfactory besides the numerous complications accompanied with the surgeries. With the rapid development of FTE, there is a renewed interest in revisiting ACL healing. Approaches such as using growth factors, stem cells and scaffolds have been widely investigated. In this article, the biology of normal and healing ligaments is first reviewed, followed by a discussion on the issues related to the treatment of ACL injuries. Afterwards, current promising FTE methods are presented for the treatment of ligament injuries, including the use of growth factors, gene delivery, and cell therapy with a particular emphasis on the use of ECM bioscaffolds. The challenging areas are listed in the future direction that suggests where collection of energy could be placed in order to restore the injured ligaments and tendons structurally and functionally. PMID:20492676

  16. Pitching Speed and Glenohumeral Adaptation in High School Pitchers.

    PubMed

    Keller, Robert A; Marshall, Nathan E; Mehran, Nima; Moutzouros, Vasilios

    2015-08-01

    Glenohumeral internal rotational deficit and increased glenohumeral external rotation are common findings in baseball pitchers. To the authors' knowledge, no study has focused on the adaptation of glenohumeral internal rotational deficit and increased glenohumeral external rotation in relation to pitching speed. This study evaluated changes in range of motion in the throwing shoulder in high school pitchers to determine whether changes in internal and external rotation directly correlate with pitch velocity. The shoulders of 22 high school varsity pitchers were evaluated. Standard goniometric technique was used to measure passive external and internal glenohumeral range of motion in both arms. Measurements were evaluated for statistically significant differences in range of motion. Demographic features, including height, weight, and age, were assessed. Fifteen consecutive in-game pitch speeds were recorded, and the fastest pitch was used for evaluation. Pitch speeds were correlated to the player's glenohumeral internal rotational deficit, increased glenohumeral external rotation, and physical demographics. Average age was 16.9 years. Average external rotation of the throwing arm was significantly greater than that of the nonthrowing arm (143.00° vs 130.32°, P=.005). Average internal rotation of the throwing arm was significantly less than that of the nonthrowing arm (49.50° vs 65.90°, P=.006). Both shoulders had similar total arc of motion (throwing shoulder, 192.54; nonthrowing shoulder, 196.23; P=.822). Average maximum velocity was 77.7 mph (maximum, 88 mph; minimum, 66 mph). Maximum pitch velocity did not correlate with changes in glenohumeral internal rotational deficit (P=.683) or increased glenohumeral external rotation (P=.241). There was also no evidence of correlation between pitch velocity and player age, height, weight, or dominant hand. The stress of pitching creates adaptations to the throwing shoulder, even in young athletes. There appears to be

  17. Pitching Speed and Glenohumeral Adaptation in High School Pitchers.

    PubMed

    Keller, Robert A; Marshall, Nathan E; Mehran, Nima; Moutzouros, Vasilios

    2015-08-01

    Glenohumeral internal rotational deficit and increased glenohumeral external rotation are common findings in baseball pitchers. To the authors' knowledge, no study has focused on the adaptation of glenohumeral internal rotational deficit and increased glenohumeral external rotation in relation to pitching speed. This study evaluated changes in range of motion in the throwing shoulder in high school pitchers to determine whether changes in internal and external rotation directly correlate with pitch velocity. The shoulders of 22 high school varsity pitchers were evaluated. Standard goniometric technique was used to measure passive external and internal glenohumeral range of motion in both arms. Measurements were evaluated for statistically significant differences in range of motion. Demographic features, including height, weight, and age, were assessed. Fifteen consecutive in-game pitch speeds were recorded, and the fastest pitch was used for evaluation. Pitch speeds were correlated to the player's glenohumeral internal rotational deficit, increased glenohumeral external rotation, and physical demographics. Average age was 16.9 years. Average external rotation of the throwing arm was significantly greater than that of the nonthrowing arm (143.00° vs 130.32°, P=.005). Average internal rotation of the throwing arm was significantly less than that of the nonthrowing arm (49.50° vs 65.90°, P=.006). Both shoulders had similar total arc of motion (throwing shoulder, 192.54; nonthrowing shoulder, 196.23; P=.822). Average maximum velocity was 77.7 mph (maximum, 88 mph; minimum, 66 mph). Maximum pitch velocity did not correlate with changes in glenohumeral internal rotational deficit (P=.683) or increased glenohumeral external rotation (P=.241). There was also no evidence of correlation between pitch velocity and player age, height, weight, or dominant hand. The stress of pitching creates adaptations to the throwing shoulder, even in young athletes. There appears to be

  18. A new shoulder model with a biologically inspired glenohumeral joint.

    PubMed

    Quental, C; Folgado, J; Ambrósio, J; Monteiro, J

    2016-09-01

    Kinematically unconstrained biomechanical models of the glenohumeral (GH) joint are needed to study the GH joint function, especially the mechanisms of joint stability. The purpose of this study is to develop a large-scale multibody model of the upper limb that simulates the 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) of the GH joint and to propose a novel inverse dynamics procedure that allows the evaluation of not only the muscle and joint reaction forces of the upper limb but also the GH joint translations. The biomechanical model developed is composed of 7 rigid bodies, constrained by 6 anatomical joints, and acted upon by 21 muscles. The GH joint is described as a spherical joint with clearance. Assuming that the GH joint translates according to the muscle load distribution, the redundant muscle load sharing problem is formulated considering as design variables the 3 translational coordinates associated with the GH joint translations, the joint reaction forces associated with the remaining kinematic constraints, and the muscle activations. For the abduction motion in the frontal plane analysed, the muscle and joint reaction forces estimated by the new biomechanical model proposed are similar to those estimated by a model in which the GH joint is modeled as an ideal spherical joint. Even though this result supports the assumption of an ideal GH joint to study the muscle load sharing problem, only a 6 DOF model of the GH joint, as the one proposed here, provides information regarding the joint translations. In this study, the biomechanical model developed predicts an initial upward and posterior migration of the humeral head, followed by an inferior and anterior movement, which is in good agreement with the literature. PMID:27381499

  19. Nonoperative and postoperative rehabilitation for glenohumeral instability.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Kevin E; Macrina, Leonard C

    2013-10-01

    The glenohumeral joint is an inherently unstable joint that relies on the interaction of the dynamic and static stabilizers to maintain stability. Disruption of this interplay or poor development of any of these factors may result in instability, pain, and a loss of function. Rehabilitation will vary based on the type of instability present and the key principles described. Whether a course of nonoperative rehabilitation is followed or the patient presents postoperatively, a comprehensive program designed to establish full ROM and balance capsular mobility, in addition to maximizing muscular strength, endurance, proprioception, dynamic stability, and neuromuscular control is essential. A functional approach to rehabilitation using movement patterns and sport-specific positions along with an interval sport program will allow a gradual return to athletics. The focus of the program should minimize the risk of recurrence and ensure that the patient can safely return to functional activities.

  20. COMPREHENSIVE POST‐ARTHROSCOPIC MANAGEMENT OF A MIDDLE‐AGED ADULT WITH GLENOHUMERAL OSTEOARTHRITIS: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Thomas; Millett, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive Arthroscopic Management (CAM) is a new glenohumeral debridement procedure developed as a joint preserving alternative to total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). The procedure consists of several arthroscopic components including: A. scar tissue and chondral debridement, B. synovectomy, C. inferior humeral osteoplasty, D. capsular release, E. axillary nerve decompression, and F. tenodesis of the long head of the biceps. In this case, an active, middle age patient who failed physical therapy treatment and corticosteroid injections was evaluated and diagnosed with glenohumeral osteoarthritis. Anterior‐ posterior (AP) and axillary radiographs showed grade IV changes of the articular cartilage, confirming the diagnosis. The patient was not an ideal candidate for TSA because of her age, activity level, and concern for implant survival; therefore surgical intervention was performed using the CAM procedure. After the surgery, the patient demonstrated increased joint space as shown using radiographic imaging. The patient underwent intensive postoperative rehabilitation with a heavy emphasis on joint range of motion (ROM) and capsular mobility. By eight weeks she achieved 85% active ROM compared to her uninvolved shoulder, and a 55% improvement on the Pennsylvania Shoulder Score. Radiographic imaging provided an understanding of the severity of the arthritic changes present in this patient, identified the limited potential of continued conservative management, and showed structural changes that may be correlated with improved function following the surgical intervention. For patients less than 55 years of age diagnosed with severe glenohumeral osteoarthritis, the CAM procedure and intensive, motion focused therapy presents a promising treatment combination. Level of Evidence: IIIb PMID:23439911

  1. Superior labrum anterior to posterior tears and glenohumeral instability.

    PubMed

    Virk, Mandeep S; Arciero, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Cadaver experiments and clinical studies suggest that the superior labrum-biceps complex plays a role in glenohumeral stability. Superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears can be present in acute and recurrent glenohumeral dislocations and contribute to glenohumeral instability. Isolated SLAP tears can cause instability, especially in throwing athletes. Diagnosing a SLAP tear on the basis of the clinical examination alone is difficult because of nonspecific history and physical examination findings and the presence of coexisting intra-articular lesions. Magnetic resonance arthrography is the imaging study of choice for diagnosing SLAP tears; however, arthroscopy remains the gold standard for diagnosis. Arthroscopy is the preferred technique for the repair of a type II SLAP tear and its variant types (V through X) in acute glenohumeral dislocations and instability in younger populations. Clinical outcome studies report a low recurrence of glenohumeral instability after the arthroscopic repair of a SLAP tear in addition to a Bankart repair. Long-term follow-up studies and further advances in arthroscopic fixation techniques will allow a better understanding and improvement in outcomes in patients with SLAP tears associated with glenohumeral instability. PMID:23395054

  2. Treatment of glenohumeral instability in rugby players.

    PubMed

    Funk, Lennard

    2016-02-01

    Rugby is a high-impact collision sport, with impact forces. Shoulder injuries are common and result in the longest time off sport for any joint injury in rugby. The most common injuries are to the glenohumeral joint with varying degrees of instability. The degree of instability can guide management. The three main types of instability presentations are: (1) frank dislocation, (2) subluxations and (3) subclinical instability with pain and clicking. Understanding the exact mechanism of injury can guide diagnosis with classical patterns of structural injuries. The standard clinical examination in a large, muscular athlete may be normal, so specific tests and techniques are needed to unearth signs of pathology. Taking these factors into consideration, along with the imaging, allows a treatment strategy. However, patient and sport factors need to be also considered, particularly the time of the season and stage of sporting career. Surgery to repair the structural damage should include all lesions found. In chronic, recurrent dislocations with major structural lesions, reconstruction procedures such as the Latarjet procedure yields better outcomes. Rehabilitation should be safe, goal-driven and athlete-specific. Return to sport is dependent on a number of factors, driven by the healing process, sport requirements and extrinsic pressures. Level of evidence V. PMID:26786164

  3. Transverse ligament of the knee in humans.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, Wojciech; Jakubowicz, Marian; Pytel, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to trace the histological structure of the transverse ligament of the knee and its relation to the inferior lateral genicular artery. Investigations were carried out on 20 lower limbs (10 males, and 10 females) from the Department of Anatomy. It was found that close to the attachment of the transverse ligament to the menisci, bundles of fibres pass in vertical, oblique and horizontal directions, occupying a wide area on the anterior margin of the menisci. These fibres intermingle with bundles of the fibrocartilage of the menisci. In the area of the lateral attachment the inferior lateral genicular artery passes anteriorly to the transverse ligament, giving off numerous branches to the ligament. The medial part of the transverse ligament presents a thick rounded structure, surrounded by loose connective tissue. The fibres are arranged irregularly in bundles running horizontally on a tortuous course and with single spindle-like cells with darkly stained nuclei. The cells are not found at the ends of the ligament. Numerous blood vessels are observed between the bundles of fibres and on the periphery of the ligament.

  4. Differential expression of extracellular matrix genes in glenohumeral capsule of shoulder instability patients.

    PubMed

    Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Cohen, Carina; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Smith, Marília Cardoso; Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moises

    2016-07-01

    Anterior shoulder instability is a common orthopedic problem. After a traumatic shoulder dislocation, patients present a plastic deformation of the capsule. The shoulder instability biology remains poorly understood. We evaluated the expression of genes that encode the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), fibronectin 1 (FN1), tenascin C (TNC) and tenascin XB (TNXB) in the glenohumeral capsule of anterior shoulder instability patients and controls. Moreover, we investigated the associations between gene expression and clinical parameters. The gene expression was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in the antero-inferior (macroscopically injured region), antero-superior and posterior regions of the capsule of 29 patients with shoulder instability and 8 controls. COMP expression was reduced and FN1 and TNC expression was increased in the antero-inferior capsule region of cases compared to controls (p < 0.05). TNC expression was increased in the posterior capsule portion of shoulder instability patients (p = 0.022). COMP expression was reduced in the antero-inferior region compared to the posterior region of shoulder instability patients (p = 0.007). In the antero-inferior region, FN1 expression was increased in the capsule of patients with more than one year of symptoms (p = 0.003) and with recurrent dislocations (p = 0.004) compared with controls. FN1 and TNXB expression was correlated with the duration of symptoms in the posterior region (p < 0.05). Thus, COMP, FN1, TNC and TNXB expression was altered across the capsule of shoulder instability patients. Dislocation episodes modify FN1, TNC and TNXB expression in the injured tissue. COMP altered expression may be associated with capsule integrity after shoulder dislocation, particularly in the macroscopically injured portion.

  5. Bristow-Latarjet Technique: Still a Very Successful Surgery for Anterior Glenohumeral Instability - A Forty Year One Clinic Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ruci, Vilson; Duni, Artid; Cake, Alfred; Ruci, Dorina; Ruci, Julian

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the functional outcomes of the Bristow-Latarjet procedure in patients with recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Personal clinical records of 42 patients with 45 operated shoulders were reviewed retrospectively. Patient age at time of first dislocation, injury mechanism, and number of recurring dislocations before surgery were recorded. The overall function and stability of the shoulder was evaluated. RESULTS: Thirty five (78%) of the scapulohumeral humeral instabilities were caused by trauma. The mean number of recurring dislocations was 9 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0–18); one patient had had 17 recurrences. Mean follow-up 46 months (95% CI, 16-88). No dislocation happened postoperatively. Four patients have fibrous union (9%). Only two had clinical sign of pain and discomfort. One of them was reoperated for screw removal with very good post-operative result. The overall functional outcome was good, with a mean Rowe score of 88 points (95% CI, 78–100). Scores of 27 (64%) of the patients were excellent, 9 (22%) were good, 4 (9.5%) were fair, and 2 (4.5%) were poor. CONCLUSION: The Bristow-Latarjet procedure is a very good surgical treatment for recurrent anterior-inferior instability of the glenohumeral joint. It must not be used for multidirectional instability or psychogenic habitual dislocations. PMID:27275242

  6. Anatomic Variant of Liver, Gall Bladder and Inferior Vena Cava.

    PubMed

    Sontakke, Yogesh Ashok; Gladwin, V; Chand, Parkash

    2016-07-01

    The morphology and relations of liver, gall bladder and inferior vena cava are cardinal. Their anatomical variations may be a reason for the adverse surgical outcome. During routine anatomy dissection of an abdomen, we noticed a variant liver, gall bladder and inferior vena cava in a 63-year-old male cadaver. In the specimen, a retrohepatic segment of inferior vena cava was found to be intrahepatic. On dissection, it was observed that inferior vena cava was covered entirely by a liver tissue on its dorsal aspect. In the same specimen, the gall bladder had undulated inferior surface. On dissection of the gall bladder, numerous mucosal folds were present in the interior. A band of fibrous tissue was found, which was extending from the right side of the gall bladder to the falciform ligament. Hence, preoperative scanning of congenital variations of the liver, gall bladder and inferior vena cava may be compassionate in planning safe surgeries and interventional abdominal procedures. PMID:27630832

  7. Anatomic Variant of Liver, Gall Bladder and Inferior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Gladwin, V.; Chand, Parkash

    2016-01-01

    The morphology and relations of liver, gall bladder and inferior vena cava are cardinal. Their anatomical variations may be a reason for the adverse surgical outcome. During routine anatomy dissection of an abdomen, we noticed a variant liver, gall bladder and inferior vena cava in a 63-year-old male cadaver. In the specimen, a retrohepatic segment of inferior vena cava was found to be intrahepatic. On dissection, it was observed that inferior vena cava was covered entirely by a liver tissue on its dorsal aspect. In the same specimen, the gall bladder had undulated inferior surface. On dissection of the gall bladder, numerous mucosal folds were present in the interior. A band of fibrous tissue was found, which was extending from the right side of the gall bladder to the falciform ligament. Hence, preoperative scanning of congenital variations of the liver, gall bladder and inferior vena cava may be compassionate in planning safe surgeries and interventional abdominal procedures. PMID:27630832

  8. The Comprehensive Arthroscopic Management Procedure for Treatment of Glenohumeral Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mook, William R.; Petri, Maximilian; Greenspoon, Joshua A.; Millett, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Younger, high-demand patients who are less suitable for joint replacement procedures are often affected by advanced glenohumeral osteoarthritis. There are several alternatives to total joint arthroplasty for the treatment of these patients. However, the outcomes of these procedures are less predictable and have limited durability. The comprehensive arthroscopic management procedure, which includes a combination of arthroscopic glenohumeral debridement, chondroplasty, synovectomy, loose body removal, humeral osteoplasty with excision of the goat's beard osteophyte, capsular releases, subacromial and subcoracoid decompressions, axillary nerve decompression, and biceps tenodesis, has been shown to reduce pain, improve function, and provide a predictable short-term joint-preserving option for patients with advanced glenohumeral osteoarthritis. A unique feature of the comprehensive arthroscopic management procedure is the indirect and direct decompression of the axillary nerve, which may explain the difference in outcomes with this technique compared with other approaches. Furthermore, the technique is technically demanding and associated with several notable pitfalls that are preventable when using the meticulous surgical technique detailed in this article and accompanying video. PMID:26697301

  9. Glenohumeral internal rotation deficit: pathogenesis and response to acute throwing.

    PubMed

    Kibler, W Ben; Sciascia, Aaron; Thomas, Stephen J

    2012-03-01

    Overhand throwing places high loads and stresses on the joints and tissues of the shoulder and arm. As a result, throwing athletes regularly demonstrate altered shoulder internal and external ranges of motion where internal rotation (IR) is decreased and external rotation is increased in the dominant arm when compared with the nondominant arm. This alteration can exist as a result of alterations to the bones (humeral retroversion), capsule (posterior thickening), or muscle (passive stiffness known as thixotropy). When the amount of IR or total arc of motion difference reaches a certain threshold (typically 20 or more degrees of IR or 8 degrees total arc difference), it is known as glenohumeral internal rotation deficit or total arc of motion deficit. Glenohumeral internal rotation deficit and total arc of motion deficit can cause alterations in biomechanics such as scapular "wind-up" or alteration of glenohumeral joint kinematics, which can in turn lead to clinical findings of impingement and labral pathology. This study will review the causes of motion alteration, effects of altered motion on the throwing motion, provide definitions for the various types of rotation deficits, and how to evaluate and treat rotational deficits.

  10. Scapular Resting Position and Gleno-Humeral Movement Dysfunction in Asymptomatic Racquet Players: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Shimpi, Apurv P.; Bhakti, Shah; Roshni, Karnik; Rairikar, Savita A.; Shyam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Racquet sports, especially lawn tennis and badminton have been gaining popularity in Asian countries like India. With this increase in popularity, the injury rate in the sport has also increased. Objectives: The study will help detect the presence of gleno-humeral movement dysfunction and scapular resting position abnormality in asymptomatic racquet players, thus providing basis for screening the players and allow the clinician to determine if the asymmetry is a normal adaptation in the player or an abnormal change associated with injury. Materials and Methods: 46 asymptomatic professional players were divided into a study group of 23 players (16 tennis and 7 badminton) and control group of 23 football players. Assessment of passive gleno-humeral range of motion and distance of spine and inferior angle of scapula from corresponding spinous process were measured bilaterally and between groups. Results: There was statistically significant reduction in range of internal rotation (62.17 ± 8.09), extension (39.78 ± 4.12) and an increase in the external rotation (106.95 ± 7.49) of dominant compared to non-dominant arm of racquet players and a statistically significant decrease in internal rotation (78.69 ± 10.24), extension (44.78 ± 3.19), adduction (37.39 ± 6.54) and an increase in external rotation (102.6 ± 5.19) of dominant arm of racquet players compared to football players. Study also showed statistically significant increase in the spino-scapular distance at the level of inferior angle of scapula (10.23 ± 1.43) on dominant side compared to non-dominant. Conclusions: The dominant side scapula of asymptomatic racquet players showed increased external rotation and elevation as compared to the non-dominant side. Also, reduced shoulder internal rotation, extension and adduction and gain in shoulder external rotation was observed on the dominant side of racquet players when compared to the control group. PMID:26715968

  11. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Jeffrey; Bedi, Asheesh; Altchek, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common surgical procedures, with more than 200,000 ACL tears occurring annually. Although primary ACL reconstruction is a successful operation, success rates still range from 75% to 97%. Consequently, several thousand revision ACL reconstructions are performed annually and are unfortunately associated with inferior clinical outcomes when compared with primary reconstructions. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from peer-reviewed literature through a search of the PubMed database (1988-2013) as well as from textbook chapters and surgical technique papers. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The clinical outcomes after revision ACL reconstruction are largely based on level IV case series. Much of the existing literature is heterogenous with regard to patient populations, primary and revision surgical techniques, concomitant ligamentous injuries, and additional procedures performed at the time of the revision, which limits generalizability. Nevertheless, there is a general consensus that the outcomes for revision ACL reconstruction are inferior to primary reconstruction. Conclusion: Excellent results can be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability but are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction. A staged approach with autograft reconstruction is recommended in any circumstance in which a single-stage approach results in suboptimal graft selection, tunnel position, graft fixation, or biological milieu for tendon-bone healing. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): Good results may still be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability, but results are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction: Level B. PMID:25364483

  12. GLENOHUMERAL INSTABILITY AND GLENOID BONE LOSS IN A THROWING ATHLETE

    PubMed Central

    Mair, Scott; Lattermann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This case presents the challenges of management associated with a young throwing athlete presenting with a history of bilateral anterior shoulder instability. This athlete had multiple surgical interventions over a three‐year period. The imaging modalities provided partial elucidation (at best) of the true picture of the pathology. This case report outlines the decision making process utilized to provide individualized care to a young throwing athlete with bilateral glenohumeral joint instability, recurrent dislocations, and resultant glenoid bone loss. Level of Evidence: 5 (Single Case report) PMID:23593558

  13. Bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma

    PubMed Central

    Sahemey, R.; Warfield, A.T.; Ahmed, S.

    2016-01-01

    Osteomas are the most common benign osteoclastic tumours of the paranasal sinuses. However, nasal cavity and turbinate osteomas are extremely rare. Only nine middle turbinate, three inferior turbinate and one inferior turbinate osteoma cases have been reported to date. The present case report describes the management and follow-up of symptomatic bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma. A 60-year-old female presented with symptoms of bilateral nasal obstruction and right-sided epiphora. Radiological investigation found hypertrophic bony changes involving both inferior turbinates. The patient was managed successfully by endoscopic inferior turbinectomies in order to achieve a patent airway, with no further recurrence of tumour after 3 months postoperatively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma. We describe a safe and minimally invasive method of tumour resection, which has a better cosmetic outcome compared with other approaches. PMID:27534890

  14. Bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma.

    PubMed

    Sahemey, R; Warfield, A T; Ahmed, S

    2016-01-01

    Osteomas are the most common benign osteoclastic tumours of the paranasal sinuses. However, nasal cavity and turbinate osteomas are extremely rare. Only nine middle turbinate, three inferior turbinate and one inferior turbinate osteoma cases have been reported to date. The present case report describes the management and follow-up of symptomatic bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma.A 60-year-old female presented with symptoms of bilateral nasal obstruction and right-sided epiphora. Radiological investigation found hypertrophic bony changes involving both inferior turbinates. The patient was managed successfully by endoscopic inferior turbinectomies in order to achieve a patent airway, with no further recurrence of tumour after 3 months postoperatively.To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma. We describe a safe and minimally invasive method of tumour resection, which has a better cosmetic outcome compared with other approaches. PMID:27534890

  15. TREATMENT OF TRAUMATIC GLENOHUMERAL DISLOCATION: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Wajnsztejn, André; Sugawara Tamaoki, Marcel Jun; Netto, Nicola Archetti; Belotti, João Carlos; Matsumoto, Marcelo Hide; Faloppa, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate Brazilian orthopedists' opinions regarding the main aspects of the treatment of glenohumeral traumatic dislocation and compare these to literature's current concepts. Methods: Two hundred questionnaires containing 13 items were randomly distributed to orthopedists who were attending a Brazilian orthopedics congress; 158 were filled, in correctly and were considered in this study. Results: The preferred maneuver was traction-countertraction (60.8%). Among the respondents, 68.4% stated that glenohumeral dislocation reduction was achieved in the first attempt in 90% of the cases. The first attempt of reduction occurred mainly in the Emergency room (96.5%). Seventy-nine individuals (50%) reported that they do not use any analgesic prior to reduction. The majority of the participants immobilize their patients after the reduction (98.1%). 75.4% of them keep their patients immobilized from 2 to 3 weeks. Conclusion: Generally, Brazilian orthopaedists perform tractioncountertraction maneuvers, achieving reduction in the first attempt in more than 90% of the cases in the Emergency room. No previous analgesic agent is used prior to reduction. Immobilization of the patient is made with a Velpeau dressing or a sling for 2 to 3 weeks. PMID:27004185

  16. The Association of Scapular Kinematics and Glenohumeral Joint Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    LUDEWIG, PAULA M.; REYNOLDS, JONATHAN F.

    2009-01-01

    SYNOPSIS There is a growing body of literature associating abnormal scapular positions and motions, and, to a lesser degree, clavicular kinematics with a variety of shoulder pathologies. The purpose of this manuscript is to (1) review the normal kinematics of the scapula and clavicle during arm elevation, (2) review the evidence for abnormal scapular and clavicular kinematics in glenohumeral joint pathologies, (3) review potential biomechanical implications and mechanisms of these kinematic alterations, and (4) relate these biomechanical factors to considerations in the patient management process for these disorders. There is evidence of scapular kinematic alterations associated with shoulder impingement, rotator cuff tendinopathy, rotator cuff tears, glenohumeral instability, adhesive capsulitis, and stiff shoulders. There is also evidence for altered muscle activation in these patient populations, particularly, reduced serratus anterior and increased upper trapezius activation. Scapular kinematic alterations similar to those found in patient populations have been identified in subjects with a short rest length of the pectoralis minor, tight soft-tissue structures in the posterior shoulder region, excessive thoracic kyphosis, or with flexed thoracic postures. This suggests that attention to these factors is warranted in the clinical evaluation and treatment of these patients. The available evidence in clinical trials supports the use of therapeutic exercise in rehabilitating these patients, while further gains in effectiveness should continue to be pursued. PMID:19194022

  17. Lower body predictors of glenohumeral compressive force in high school baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Keeley, David W; Oliver, Gretchen D; Dougherty, Christopher P; Torry, Michael R

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand how lower body kinematics relate to peak glenohumeral compressive force and develop a regression model accounting for variability in peak glenohumeral compressive force. Data were collected for 34 pitchers. Average peak glenohumeral compressive force was 1.72% ± 33% body weight (1334.9 N ± 257.5). Correlation coefficients revealed 5 kinematic variables correlated to peak glenohumeral compressive force (P < .01, α = .025). Regression models indicated 78.5% of the variance in peak glenohumeral compressive force (R2 = .785, P < .01) was explained by stride length, lateral pelvis flexion at maximum external rotation, and axial pelvis rotation velocity at release. These results indicate peak glenohumeral compressive force increases with a combination of decreased stride length, increased pelvic tilt at maximum external rotation toward the throwing arm side, and increased pelvis axial rotation velocity at release. Thus, it may be possible to decrease peak glenohumeral compressive force by optimizing the movements of the lower body while pitching. Focus should be on both training and conditioning the lower extremity in an effort to increase stride length, increase pelvis tilt toward the glove hand side at maximum external rotation, and decrease pelvis axial rotation at release. PMID:25734579

  18. Lower body predictors of glenohumeral compressive force in high school baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Keeley, David W; Oliver, Gretchen D; Dougherty, Christopher P; Torry, Michael R

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand how lower body kinematics relate to peak glenohumeral compressive force and develop a regression model accounting for variability in peak glenohumeral compressive force. Data were collected for 34 pitchers. Average peak glenohumeral compressive force was 1.72% ± 33% body weight (1334.9 N ± 257.5). Correlation coefficients revealed 5 kinematic variables correlated to peak glenohumeral compressive force (P < .01, α = .025). Regression models indicated 78.5% of the variance in peak glenohumeral compressive force (R2 = .785, P < .01) was explained by stride length, lateral pelvis flexion at maximum external rotation, and axial pelvis rotation velocity at release. These results indicate peak glenohumeral compressive force increases with a combination of decreased stride length, increased pelvic tilt at maximum external rotation toward the throwing arm side, and increased pelvis axial rotation velocity at release. Thus, it may be possible to decrease peak glenohumeral compressive force by optimizing the movements of the lower body while pitching. Focus should be on both training and conditioning the lower extremity in an effort to increase stride length, increase pelvis tilt toward the glove hand side at maximum external rotation, and decrease pelvis axial rotation at release.

  19. Surgical options for the young patient with glenohumeral arthritis.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Jonathan D; Abboud, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Young patients with glenohumeral arthritis are an ongoing treatment challenge. They typically have high demands of their shoulders, require long-term durability due to their young age, and often have altered local anatomy, through their disease process (instability arthropathy, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, etc.) or from previous surgery (capsulorraphy arthropathy, chondrolysis, etc.). Workup to evaluate underlying causes of early arthritis, and to exclude infectious causes are necessary. When nonoperative management fails, arthroscopic debridement, hemiarthroplasty (isolated, with glenoid reaming, or with biological interposition), and total shoulder arthroplasty are treatment options available to the treating surgeon. Debridement or hemiarthroplasty can provide pain relief for a subset of patients, but results have not been reproducible across the literature and have not been durable over time. Total shoulder arthroplasty provides the most reliable pain relief, but long-term glenoid loosening and wear continue to lead to high revision rates in this patient population. PMID:26980987

  20. Non-Operative Rehabilitation for Traumatic and Atraumatic Glenohumeral Instability

    PubMed Central

    Macrina, Leonard C.; Reinold, Michael M.

    2006-01-01

    Glenohumeral joint instability is a common pathology encountered in the orthopaedic and sports medicine setting. A wide range of symptomatic shoulder instabilities exist ranging from subtle subluxations due to contributing congenital factors to dislocations as a result of a traumatic episode. Non-operative rehabilitation is utilized in patients diagnosed with shoulder instability to regain their previous functional activities through specific strengthening exercises, dynamic stabilization drills, neuromuscular training, proprioception drills, scapular muscle strengthening program and a gradual return to their desired activities. The specific rehabilitation program should be varied based on the type and degree of shoulder instability present and desired level of function. The purpose of this paper is to outline the specific principles associated with non-operative rehabilitation for each of the various types of shoulder instability and to discuss the specific rehabilitation program for each pathology type. PMID:21522197

  1. Surgical options for the young patient with glenohumeral arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Jonathan D.; Abboud, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Young patients with glenohumeral arthritis are an ongoing treatment challenge. They typically have high demands of their shoulders, require long-term durability due to their young age, and often have altered local anatomy, through their disease process (instability arthropathy, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, etc.) or from previous surgery (capsulorraphy arthropathy, chondrolysis, etc.). Workup to evaluate underlying causes of early arthritis, and to exclude infectious causes are necessary. When nonoperative management fails, arthroscopic debridement, hemiarthroplasty (isolated, with glenoid reaming, or with biological interposition), and total shoulder arthroplasty are treatment options available to the treating surgeon. Debridement or hemiarthroplasty can provide pain relief for a subset of patients, but results have not been reproducible across the literature and have not been durable over time. Total shoulder arthroplasty provides the most reliable pain relief, but long-term glenoid loosening and wear continue to lead to high revision rates in this patient population. PMID:26980987

  2. Perspectives on glenohumeral joint contractures and shoulder dysfunction in children with perinatal brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Gharbaoui, Idris S; Gogola, Gloria R; Aaron, Dorit H; Kozin, Scott H

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder joint deformities continue to be a challenging aspect of treating upper plexus lesions in children with perinatal brachial plexus palsy (PBPP). It is increasingly recognized that PBPP affects the glenohumeral joint specifically, and that abnormal scapulothoracic movements are a compensatory development. The pathophysiology and assessment of glenohumeral joint contractures, the progression of scapular dyskinesia and skeletal dysplasia, and current shoulder imaging techniques are reviewed. PMID:25835253

  3. Artificial Ligaments: Promise or Panacea?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubell, Adele

    1987-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration has approved a prosthetic ligament for limited use in persons with damaged anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). This article addresses ligament repair, ACL tears, current treatment, development of the Gore-Tex artificial ligament, other artificial ligaments in process, and arguments for and against their use.…

  4. Tendon and ligament imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, R J; O'Connor, P J; Grainger, A J

    2012-01-01

    MRI and ultrasound are now widely used for the assessment of tendon and ligament abnormalities. Healthy tendons and ligaments contain high levels of collagen with a structured orientation, which gives rise to their characteristic normal imaging appearances as well as causing particular imaging artefacts. Changes to ligaments and tendons as a result of disease and injury can be demonstrated using both ultrasound and MRI. These have been validated against surgical and histological findings. Novel imaging techniques are being developed that may improve the ability of MRI and ultrasound to assess tendon and ligament disease. PMID:22553301

  5. Creep behaviour and creep mechanisms of normal and healing ligaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Gail Marilyn

    Patients with knee ligament injuries often undergo ligament reconstructions to restore joint stability and, potentially, abate osteoarthritis. Careful literature review suggests that in 10% to 40% of these patients the graft tissue "stretches out". Some graft elongation is likely due to creep (increased elongation of tissue under repeated or sustained load). Quantifying creep behaviour and identifying creep mechanisms in both normal and healing ligaments is important for finding clinically relevant means to prevent creep. Ligament creep was accurately predicted using a novel yet simple structural model that incorporated both collagen fibre recruitment and fibre creep. Using the inverse stress relaxation function to model fibre creep in conjunction with fibre recruitment produced a superior prediction of ligament creep than that obtained from the inverse stress relaxation function alone. This implied mechanistic role of fibre recruitment during creep was supported using a new approach to quantify crimp patterns at stresses in the toe region (increasing stiffness) and linear region (constant stiffness) of the stress-strain curve. Ligament creep was relatively insensitive to increases in stress in the toe region; however, creep strain increased significantly when tested at the linear region stress. Concomitantly, fibre recruitment was evident at the toe region stresses; however, recruitment was limited at the linear region stress. Elevating the water content of normal ligament using phosphate buffered saline increased the creep response. Therefore, both water content and fibre recruitment are important mechanistic factors involved in creep of normal ligaments. Ligament scars had inferior creep behaviour compared to normal ligaments even after 14 weeks. In addition to inferior collagen properties affecting fibre recruitment and increased water content, increased glycosaminoglycan content and flaws in scar tissue were implicated as potential mechanisms of scar creep

  6. Optical Enhancement of Exoskeleton-Based Estimation of Glenohumeral Angles.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Camilo; Unzueta, Luis; de Los Reyes-Guzmán, Ana; Ruiz, Oscar E; Flórez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    In Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation (RAR) the accurate estimation of the patient limb joint angles is critical for assessing therapy efficacy. In RAR, the use of classic motion capture systems (MOCAPs) (e.g., optical and electromagnetic) to estimate the Glenohumeral (GH) joint angles is hindered by the exoskeleton body, which causes occlusions and magnetic disturbances. Moreover, the exoskeleton posture does not accurately reflect limb posture, as their kinematic models differ. To address the said limitations in posture estimation, we propose installing the cameras of an optical marker-based MOCAP in the rehabilitation exoskeleton. Then, the GH joint angles are estimated by combining the estimated marker poses and exoskeleton Forward Kinematics. Such hybrid system prevents problems related to marker occlusions, reduced camera detection volume, and imprecise joint angle estimation due to the kinematic mismatch of the patient and exoskeleton models. This paper presents the formulation, simulation, and accuracy quantification of the proposed method with simulated human movements. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the method accuracy to marker position estimation errors, due to system calibration errors and marker drifts, has been carried out. The results show that, even with significant errors in the marker position estimation, method accuracy is adequate for RAR. PMID:27403044

  7. Optical Enhancement of Exoskeleton-Based Estimation of Glenohumeral Angles

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Camilo; Unzueta, Luis; de los Reyes-Guzmán, Ana; Ruiz, Oscar E.; Flórez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    In Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation (RAR) the accurate estimation of the patient limb joint angles is critical for assessing therapy efficacy. In RAR, the use of classic motion capture systems (MOCAPs) (e.g., optical and electromagnetic) to estimate the Glenohumeral (GH) joint angles is hindered by the exoskeleton body, which causes occlusions and magnetic disturbances. Moreover, the exoskeleton posture does not accurately reflect limb posture, as their kinematic models differ. To address the said limitations in posture estimation, we propose installing the cameras of an optical marker-based MOCAP in the rehabilitation exoskeleton. Then, the GH joint angles are estimated by combining the estimated marker poses and exoskeleton Forward Kinematics. Such hybrid system prevents problems related to marker occlusions, reduced camera detection volume, and imprecise joint angle estimation due to the kinematic mismatch of the patient and exoskeleton models. This paper presents the formulation, simulation, and accuracy quantification of the proposed method with simulated human movements. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the method accuracy to marker position estimation errors, due to system calibration errors and marker drifts, has been carried out. The results show that, even with significant errors in the marker position estimation, method accuracy is adequate for RAR. PMID:27403044

  8. Optical Enhancement of Exoskeleton-Based Estimation of Glenohumeral Angles.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Camilo; Unzueta, Luis; de Los Reyes-Guzmán, Ana; Ruiz, Oscar E; Flórez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    In Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation (RAR) the accurate estimation of the patient limb joint angles is critical for assessing therapy efficacy. In RAR, the use of classic motion capture systems (MOCAPs) (e.g., optical and electromagnetic) to estimate the Glenohumeral (GH) joint angles is hindered by the exoskeleton body, which causes occlusions and magnetic disturbances. Moreover, the exoskeleton posture does not accurately reflect limb posture, as their kinematic models differ. To address the said limitations in posture estimation, we propose installing the cameras of an optical marker-based MOCAP in the rehabilitation exoskeleton. Then, the GH joint angles are estimated by combining the estimated marker poses and exoskeleton Forward Kinematics. Such hybrid system prevents problems related to marker occlusions, reduced camera detection volume, and imprecise joint angle estimation due to the kinematic mismatch of the patient and exoskeleton models. This paper presents the formulation, simulation, and accuracy quantification of the proposed method with simulated human movements. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the method accuracy to marker position estimation errors, due to system calibration errors and marker drifts, has been carried out. The results show that, even with significant errors in the marker position estimation, method accuracy is adequate for RAR.

  9. Osteochondral allograft transplantation for treatment of glenohumeral instability.

    PubMed

    Chapovsky, Felix; Kelly, John D

    2005-08-01

    The intimate contact between articular surfaces of the humeral head and glenoid labrum contribute to glenohumeral stability. When the articular surface area of these 2 surfaces is decreased, as with the presence of a bony Bankart lesion or an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, the shoulder is more prone to dislocation. Although osteochondral allograft transplantation has become widely popular for the treatment of osteochondral defects of the knee, it is less used for treating bony defects of the humeral head. We present a case in which a 16-year-old male athlete with multiple anterior shoulder dislocations underwent arthroscopic repair of a Bankart lesion. His arthroscopic repair ultimately failed and on subsequent magnetic resonance imaging he was found to have a large, engaging Hill-Sachs defect. He underwent arthroscopic osteochondral allograft transplantation to correct the humeral head bony deformity. As of the 1-year follow-up, the patient has had no recurrences and had returned to his normal level of activity.

  10. Does surgery for instability of the shoulder truly stabilize the glenohumeral joint?

    PubMed Central

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Denard, Patrick J.; Tirefort, Jérôme; Kolo, Frank C.; Chagué, Sylvain; Cunningham, Grégory; Charbonnier, Caecilia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite the fact that surgery is commonly used to treat glenohumeral instability, there is no evidence that such treatment effectively corrects glenohumeral translation. The purpose of this prospective clinical study was to analyze the effect of surgical stabilization on glenohumeral translation. Glenohumeral translation was assessed in 11 patients preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively following surgical stabilization for anterior shoulder instability. Translation was measured using optical motion capture and computed tomography. Preoperatively, anterior translation of the affected shoulder was bigger in comparison to the normal contralateral side. Differences were significant for flexion and abduction movements (P < 0.001). Postoperatively, no patients demonstrated apprehension and all functional scores were improved. Despite absence of apprehension, postoperative anterior translation for the surgically stabilized shoulders was not significantly different from the preoperative values. While surgical treatment for anterior instability limits the chance of dislocation, it does not seem to restore glenohumeral translation during functional range of motion. Such persistent microinstability may explain residual pain, apprehension, inability to return to activity and even emergence of dislocation arthropathy that is seen in some patients. Further research is necessary to better understand the causes, effects, and treatment of residual microinstability following surgical stabilization of the shoulder. PMID:27495043

  11. Osseous adaptation and range of motion at the glenohumeral joint in professional baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Crockett, Heber C; Gross, Lyndon B; Wilk, Kevin E; Schwartz, Martin L; Reed, Jamie; O'Mara, Jay; Reilly, Michael T; Dugas, Jeffery R; Meister, Keith; Lyman, Stephen; Andrews, James R

    2002-01-01

    The throwing shoulder in pitchers frequently exhibits a paradox of glenohumeral joint motion, in which excessive external rotation is present at the expense of decreased internal rotation. The object of this study was to determine the role of humeral head retroversion in relation to increased glenohumeral external rotation. Glenohumeral joint range of motion and laxity along with humeral head and glenoid version of the dominant versus nondominant shoulders were studied in 25 professional pitchers and 25 nonthrowing subjects. Each subject underwent a computed tomography scan to determine bilateral humeral head and glenoid version. The throwing group demonstrated a significant increase in the dominant shoulder versus the nondominant shoulder in humeral head retroversion, glenoid retroversion, external rotation at 90 degrees, and external rotation in the scapular plane. Internal rotation was decreased in the dominant shoulder. Total range of motion, anterior glenohumeral laxity, and posterior glenohumeral laxity were found to be equal bilaterally. The nonthrowing group demonstrated no significant difference in humeral head retroversion, glenoid retroversion, external rotation at 90 degrees or external rotation in the scapular plane between shoulders, and no difference in internal rotation at 90 degrees, total motion, or laxity. A comparison of the dominant shoulders of the two groups indicated that both external rotation at 90 degrees and humeral head retroversion were significantly greater in the throwing group.

  12. Linking wheelchair kinetics to glenohumeral joint demand during everyday accessibility activities.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Catherine S; Symonds, Andrew; Suzuki, Tatsuto; Gall, Angela; Smitham, Peter; Taylor, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate if push-rim kinetics could be used as markers of glenohumeral joint demand during manual wheelchair accessibility activities; demonstrating a method of biomechanical analysis that could be used away from the laboratory. Propulsion forces, trunk and upper limb kinematics and surface electromyography were recorded during four propulsion tasks (level, 2.5% cross slope, 6.5% incline and 12% incline). Kinetic and kinematic data were applied to an OpenSim musculoskeletal model of the trunk and upper limb, to enable calculation of glenohumeral joint contact force. Results demonstrated a positive correlation between propulsion forces and glenohumeral joint contact forces. Both propulsion forces and joint contact forces increased as the task became more challenging. Participants demonstrated increases in trunk flexion angle as the requirement for force application increased, significantly so in the 12% incline. There were significant increases in both resultant glenohumeral joint contact forces and peak and mean normalized muscle activity levels during the incline tasks. This study demonstrated the high demand placed on the glenohumeral joint during accessibility tasks, especially as the gradient of incline increases. A lightweight instrumented wheelchair wheel has potential to guide the user to minimize upper limb demand during daily activity.

  13. Ligament shortening: an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vangsness, C. Thomas; Mitchell, William; Saadat, Vahid; Nimni, Marcel

    1994-09-01

    Joint injury often involves a stretching or loosening of the supporting ligaments. This joint laxity can be increasingly deleterious over time and may lead to osteoarthritis. Decreasing joint laxity is a clinical goal of ligament reconstructions. No study has addressed the possibility of tightening ligaments by heat. This pilot study examined the mechanical and histological effects of the shrinkage of human ligaments.

  14. The Influence of Task Constraints on the Glenohumeral Horizontal Abduction Angle of the Overarm Throw of Novice Throwers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslin, Casey M.; Garner, John C.; Rudisill, Mary E.; Parish, Loraine E.; St. Onge, Paul M.; Campbell, Brian J.; Weimar, Wendi H.

    2009-01-01

    This study determines the effects of three baseballs and softballs of different masses (0.113 kg, 0.198 kg, 0.340 kg) and regulation diameters (22.86 and 30.48 cm, respectively) on the glenohumeral horizontal abduction angle of an overarm throw performed by young children who were novice throwers. Glenohumeral horizontal abduction angle was…

  15. Glenohumeral interposition of rotator cuff stumps: a rare complication of traumatic rotator cuff tear*

    PubMed Central

    Agnollitto, Paulo Moraes; Chu, Marcio Wen King; Lorenzato, Mario Muller; Zatiti, Salomão Chade Assan; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2016-01-01

    The present report describes a case where typical findings of traumatic glenohumeral interposition of rotator cuff stumps were surgically confirmed. This condition is a rare complication of shoulder trauma. Generally, it occurs in high-energy trauma, frequently in association with glenohumeral joint dislocation. Radiography demonstrated increased joint space, internal rotation of the humerus and coracoid process fracture. In addition to the mentioned findings, magnetic resonance imaging showed massive rotator cuff tear with interposition of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and subscapularis stumps within the glenohumeral joint. Surgical treatment was performed confirming the injury and the rotator cuff stumps interposition. It is important that radiologists and orthopedic surgeons become familiar with this entity which, because of its rarity, might be neglected in cases of shoulder trauma. PMID:26929462

  16. Does restriction of glenohumeral horizontal adduction reflect posterior capsule thickening of the throwing shoulder?

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, Tomonobu; Ishida, Tomoya; Samukawa, Mina; Saito, Hiroshi; Ezawa, Yuya; Hirokawa, Motoki; Kato, Takumi; Sugawara, Makoto; Tohyama, Harukazu; Yamanaka, Masanori

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] Glenohumeral posterior capsule tightness possibly relates to posterior capsule thickness (PCT). The purpose of the current study was to analyze the relationships between PCT and glenohumeral range of motion (ROM) in horizontal adduction (HAdd) and internal rotation (IR). [Subjects and Methods] This study recruited 39 healthy collegiate baseball players. We measured PCT by using ultrasonography and ROM of the glenohumeral joint of the throwing shoulder by using a digital inclinometer. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated between PCT and HAdd or IR ROM. [Results] There was no correlation between PCT and HAdd ROM, but PCT was significantly correlated with IR ROM. [Conclusion] This result indicates that posterior shoulder capsule tightness only relates to IR ROM, and that restricted HAdd ROM might reflect tightness of other tissue, such as the posterior deltoid.

  17. Changes to the mechanical properties of the glenohumeral capsule during anterior dislocation.

    PubMed

    Browe, Daniel P; Voycheck, Carrie A; McMahon, Patrick J; Debski, Richard E

    2014-01-22

    The glenohumeral joint is the most frequently dislocated major joint in the body, and instability due to permanent deformation of the glenohumeral capsule is a common pathology. The corresponding change in mechanical properties may have implications for the ideal location and extent of plication, which is a common clinical procedure used to repair the capsule. Therefore, the objective of this study was to quantify the mechanical properties of four regions of the glenohumeral capsule after anterior dislocation and compare the properties to the normal glenohumeral capsule. Six fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were dislocated in the anterior direction with the joint in the apprehension position using a robotic testing system. After dislocation, mechanical testing was performed on the injured glenohumeral capsule by loading the tissue samples in tension and shear. An inverse finite element optimization routine was used to simulate the experiments and obtain material coefficients for each tissue sample. Cauchy stress-stretch curves were then generated to represent the mechanical response of each tissue sample to theoretical loading conditions. Based on several comparisons (average of the material coefficients, average stress-stretch curve for each region, and coefficients representing the average curves) between the normal and injured tissue samples, the mechanical properties of the injured tissue samples from multiple regions were found to be lower than those of the normal tissue in tension but not in shear. This finding indicates that anterior dislocation primarily affects the tensile behavior of the glenohumeral capsule rather than the shear behavior, and this phenomenon could be caused by plastic deformation of the matrix, permanent collagen fiber rotation, and/or collagen fiber failure. These results suggest that plication and suturing may not be sufficient to return stability to the shoulder after dislocation in all individuals. Thus, surgeons may need to perform

  18. Endoscopic Intermetatarsal Ligament Decompression.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Morton neuroma is an entrapment of the intermetatarsal nerve by the deep intermetatarsal ligament. It is usually treated conservatively. Surgery is considered if there is recalcitrant pain that is resistant to conservative treatment. The surgical options include resection of the neuroma or decompression of the involved nerve. Decompression of the nerve by release of the intermetatarsal ligament can be performed by either an open or minimally invasive approach. We describe 2-portal endoscopic decompression of the intermetatarsal nerve. The ligament is released by a retrograde knife through the toe-web portal under arthroscopic guidance through the plantar portal.

  19. Endoscopic Intermetatarsal Ligament Decompression.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Morton neuroma is an entrapment of the intermetatarsal nerve by the deep intermetatarsal ligament. It is usually treated conservatively. Surgery is considered if there is recalcitrant pain that is resistant to conservative treatment. The surgical options include resection of the neuroma or decompression of the involved nerve. Decompression of the nerve by release of the intermetatarsal ligament can be performed by either an open or minimally invasive approach. We describe 2-portal endoscopic decompression of the intermetatarsal nerve. The ligament is released by a retrograde knife through the toe-web portal under arthroscopic guidance through the plantar portal. PMID:27284515

  20. Inferior alveolar nerve repositioning.

    PubMed

    Louis, P J

    2001-09-01

    Nerve repositioning is a viable alternative for patients with an atrophic edentulous posterior mandible. Patients, however, should be informed of the potential risks of neurosensory disturbance. Documentation of the patient's baseline neurosensory function should be performed with a two-point discrimination test or directional brush stroke test preoperatively and postoperatively. Recovery of nerve function should be expected in 3 to 6 months. The potential for mandibular fracture when combining nerve repositioning with implant placement also should be discussed with the patient. This can be avoided by minimizing the amount of buccal cortical plate removal during localization of the nerve and maintaining the integrity of the inferior cortex of the mandible. Additionally, avoid overseating the implant, thus avoiding stress along the inferior border of the mandible. The procedure does allow for the placement of longer implants, which should improve implant longevity. Patients undergoing this procedure have expressed overall satisfaction with the results. Nerve repositioning also can be used to preserve the inferior alveolar nerve during resection of benign tumors or cysts of the mandible. This procedure allows the surgeon to maintain nerve function in situations in which the nerve would otherwise have to be resected. PMID:11665379

  1. Incarcerated inferior lumbar (Petit's) hernia.

    PubMed

    Astarcioğlu, H; Sökmen, S; Atila, K; Karademir, S

    2003-09-01

    Petit's hernia is an uncommon abdominal wall defect in the inferior lumbar triangle. Colonic incarceration through the inferior lumbar triangle, which causes mechanical obstructive symptoms, necessitates particular diagnostic and management strategy. We present a rare case of inferior lumbar hernia, leading to mechanical bowel obstruction, successfully treated with prosthetic mesh reinforcement repair.

  2. Treatment of ligament laxity by electrothermal shrinkage or surgical plication: a morphologic and mechanical comparison.

    PubMed

    Hill, Adam M; Jones, Ioan T; Hansen, Ulrich; Suri, Amrita; Sandison, Ann; Moss, Jill; Wallace, Andrew L

    2007-01-01

    Capsular plication or thermal shrinkage can be used to enhance surgical joint stabilization. We compared mechanical or morphologic properties of the medial collateral ligament of the rabbit knee treated by either bipolar radiofrequency electrothermal shrinkage or surgical plication. After 12 weeks, the medial collateral ligaments were procured from treated and contralateral knees to undergo viscoelastic (creep) testing, quantitative transmission electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry. Creep strain in thermal (1.85% +/- 0.32%) and plicated (1.92% +/- 0.36%) ligaments was almost twice that of the control group (1.04% +/- 0.15%), although there was no difference between treatment modalities. The morphologic parameters of all 3 groups were significantly different (P < .001). The thermal ligaments demonstrated predominantly small fibrils, whereas the plicated group displayed an intermediate distribution of heterogeneous fibrils, suggesting a different pattern of remodeling. Viscoelastic properties are similar after thermal shrinkage or plication, though inferior to those of intact ligaments. PMID:17030129

  3. [Ligamentous knee injuries in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Drenck, T C; Akoto, R; Meenen, N M; Heitmann, M; Preiss, A; Frosch, K- H

    2016-07-01

    Due to an increase in sporting activities, the number of injuries of the immature knee is continuously increasing. These injuries necessitate a special approach regarding the particular anatomical situation with open growth plates. Three of the most commonly occurring injuries are rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament, patella dislocation and meniscus injuries. The clinical results for conservative treatment of ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament in the growth phase are inferior to operative treatment. Transepiphyseal reconstruction has been shown to be a safe treatment method and provides good clinical results. Therapy of patella instability in children has shown poor results and new surgical techniques have been introduced to perform an anatomical reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament as well as to improve distal alignment. Isolated injuries to the meniscus are rare and discoid meniscus is a special phenomenon occurring in infancy. Meniscus injuries should be treated with primary sutures rather than resection. A discoid meniscus should be resected with extreme caution and anatomically reconstructed. PMID:27385203

  4. Injuries of the posterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Moyer, R A; Marchetto, P A

    1993-04-01

    A review of the anatomy and biomechanics of the posterior cruciate ligament, and the systematic approach for the diagnosis and treatment of isolated posterior cruciate ligament injuries and posterior cruciate ligament insufficiency in combination with other ligamentous instabilities is discussed.

  5. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Patients with Generalized Joint Laxity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Kumar, Praveen

    2010-01-01

    Generalized joint laxity is a genetically determined component of overall joint flexibility. The incidence of joint laxity in the overall population is approximately 5% to 20%, and its prevalence is higher in females. Recently it was noticed that individuals with generalized joint laxity are not only prone to anterior cruciate ligament injuries but also have inferior results after a reconstruction. Therefore, an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients with generalized laxity should be undertaken with caution due to the higher expected failure rate from the complexity of problems associated with this condition. It is also necessary to identify the risk factors for the injury as well as for the post operative outcome in this population. A criterion that includes all the associated components is necessary for the proper screening of individuals for generalized joint laxity. Graft selection for an anterior cruciate reconstruction in patients with ligament laxity is a challenge. According to the senior author, a hamstring autograft is an inferior choice and a double bundle reconstruction with a quadriceps tendon-bone autograft yields better results than a single bundle bone-patella tendon-bone autograft. Future studies comparing the different grafts available might be needed to determine the preferred graft for this subset of patients. Improved results after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction can be achieved by proper planning and careful attention to each step beginning from the clinical examination to the postoperative rehabilitation. PMID:20808583

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients with generalized joint laxity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Kumar, Praveen; Kim, Sung-Hwan

    2010-09-01

    Generalized joint laxity is a genetically determined component of overall joint flexibility. The incidence of joint laxity in the overall population is approximately 5% to 20%, and its prevalence is higher in females. Recently it was noticed that individuals with generalized joint laxity are not only prone to anterior cruciate ligament injuries but also have inferior results after a reconstruction. Therefore, an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients with generalized laxity should be undertaken with caution due to the higher expected failure rate from the complexity of problems associated with this condition. It is also necessary to identify the risk factors for the injury as well as for the post operative outcome in this population. A criterion that includes all the associated components is necessary for the proper screening of individuals for generalized joint laxity. Graft selection for an anterior cruciate reconstruction in patients with ligament laxity is a challenge. According to the senior author, a hamstring autograft is an inferior choice and a double bundle reconstruction with a quadriceps tendon-bone autograft yields better results than a single bundle bone-patella tendon-bone autograft. Future studies comparing the different grafts available might be needed to determine the preferred graft for this subset of patients. Improved results after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction can be achieved by proper planning and careful attention to each step beginning from the clinical examination to the postoperative rehabilitation.

  7. Isolated inferior mesenteric portal hypertension with giant inferior mesenteric vein and anomalous inferior mesenteric vein insertion

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, G. Raghavendra; Billa, Srikar; Bhandari, Pavaneel; Hussain, Aijaz

    2013-01-01

    Extrahepatic portal hypertension is not an uncommon disease in childhood, but isolated inferior mesenteric portal varices and lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleed have not been reported till date. A 4-year-old girl presented with lower GI bleed. Surgical exploration revealed extrahepatic portal vein obstruction with giant inferior mesenteric vein and colonic varices. Inferior mesenteric vein was joining the superior mesenteric vein. The child was treated successfully with inferior mesenteric – inferior vena caval anastomosis. The child was relieved of GI bleed during the follow-up. PMID:23798814

  8. Glenohumeral joint motion after subscapularis tendon repair: an analysis of cadaver shoulder models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As for the surgical treatment of the rotator cuff tears, the subscapularis tendon tears have recently received much attention for the mini-open or arthroscopic repair. The results of surgical repair for the subscapularis tendon tear are satisfactory, but the range of external rotation is reported to be restricted after the repair. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the range of glenohumeral joint motion after repairs of various sizes of subscapularis tendon tears. Methods Using eight fresh frozen human cadaveric shoulders (mean age at death, 81.5 years), three sizes of subscapularis tendon tear (small, medium, and large) were made and then repaired. With the scapula fixed to the wooden jig, the end-range of glenohumeral motion was measured with passive movement applied through 1.0-Nm torque in the directions of scapular elevation, flexion, abduction, extension, horizontal abduction, and horizontal adduction. The passive end-ranges of external and internal rotation in various positions with rotational torque of 1.0 Nm were also measured. Differences in the ranges among the three type tears were analyzed. Results As tear size increased, range of glenohumeral motion in horizontal abduction after repair decreased gradually and was significantly decreased with the large size tear (P < 0.01). The end-range of external rotation decreased progressively with increasing tear size in every glenohumeral position. The prominent decrease in external rotation (around 40° reduction from intact shoulders) was observed in shoulders after repair of large size tear at 30° to 60° of scapular elevation and abduction. Conclusions As the size of the subscapularis tendon tear increased, the passive ranges of horizontal abduction and external rotation of the glenohumeral joint after repair decreased significantly. In shoulders with a subscapularis tendon tear, it is necessary to consider the reduction of external rotation depending on tear size. PMID:24885276

  9. Glenohumeral kinematics after soft tissue interposition graft and glenoid reaming: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Garbis, Nickolas G; Weber, Alexander E; Shewman, Elizabeth F; Cole, Brian J; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-01-01

    Background: The management of young patients with glenohumeral arthritis is controversial. Resurfacing of the glenoid with biologic interposition and reaming of the glenoid have been suggested as potential treatment options. The goal of this study was to determine the change in glenohumeral contact pressures in interposition arthroplasty, as well as glenoid reaming in an arthritis model. We hypothesized that interposition with meniscal allograft will lead to the best normalization of contact pressure throughout the glenohumeral range of motion. Materials and Methods: Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were tested in static positions of humeral abduction with a compressive load. Glenohumeral contact area, contact pressure, and peak force were determined sequentially for (1) intact glenoid (2) glenoid with cartilage removed (arthritis model) (3) placement of lateral meniscus allograft (4) placement of Achilles allograft (5) arthritis model with reamed glenoid. Results: The arthritis model demonstrated statistically higher peak pressures than intact glenoid and glenoid with interpositional allograft. Meniscal and Achilles allograft lowered mean contact pressure and increased contact area to a level equal to or more favorable than the control state. In contrast, the reamed glenoid did not show any statistical difference from the arthritis model for any of the recorded measures. Conclusion: Glenohumeral contact pressure is significantly improved with interposition of allograft at time zero compared to an arthritic state. Our findings suggest that concentric reaming did not differ from the arthritic model when compared to normal. These findings favor the use of allograft for interposition as a potential treatment option in patients with glenoid wear. PMID:27293292

  10. Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... often occur among active teens, especially athletes. A torn medial collateral ligament (MCL) — a ligament that helps ... the more serious injuries. Teens who have a torn MCL tend to play contact sports, like football ...

  11. ACUTE CHANGES IN PASSIVE GLENOHUMERAL ROTATION FOLLOWING TENNIS PLAY EXPOSURE IN ELITE FEMALE PLAYERS

    PubMed Central

    Kibler, W. Ben; Myers, Natalie L.; Smith, Belinda J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Alterations in glenohumeral (GH) rotation especially internal rotation and total range of motion have been associated with altered GH kinematics and susceptibility to injury. Researchers have evaluated long-term change in baseball and tennis players, and short-term changes in baseball players. However, acute (short-term) changes in GH rotation have not been evaluated in tennis players. Hypotheses/Purpose The purpose of this study was to quantify short-term glenohumeral rotational changes within a group of professional women's tennis players following competitive play. It was hypothesized that there would be acute alterations in passive glenohumeral internal rotation and total range of motion following episodes of tennis play. Study Design Cohort Study Methods Passive glenohumeral external rotation (GER), glenohumeral internal rotation (GIR), and total range of motion (TROM) were evaluated in a cohort of 79 professional adult female tennis players. Measurements were taken at three different time points (TP): baseline before match play (TP1), immediately after match play (TP2), and 24-hours after baseline (TP3). Results There was a statistically significant decrease in the mean GIR from TP1 (43 ± 11 °) to TP2 (39 ± 9 °) (p=0.002) and from TP1 to TP3 (38 ± 10 °) (p=0.001). All measures were at the level of minimal detectable change (MDC) (4 °) indicating clinical significance. There was a decrease in mean TROM from TP1 (146 ± 11 °) to TP2 (142 ± 12 °) (p=0.04), which was not above MDC (7 °). Subgroup analysis showed that 47% of the players demonstrated a decrease in GIR beyond MDC, and 37% demonstrated a decrease in TROM beyond MDC. GER remained unchanged across all time points (p>0.05). Conclusion Both GIR and TROM were reduced after acute exposure to tennis play. In a large subgroup of the cohort, the changes were clinically significant and approached values previously demonstrated to be associated with

  12. MR imaging of cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Naraghi, Ali; White, Lawrence M

    2014-11-01

    Cruciate ligament injuries, and in particular injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), are the most commonly reconstructed ligamentous injuries of the knee. As such, accurate preoperative diagnosis is essential in optimal management of patients with cruciate ligament injuries. This article reviews the anatomy and biomechanics of the ACL and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and describes the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging appearances of complete and partial tears. Normal postoperative appearances of ACL and PCL reconstructions as well as MR imaging features of postoperative complications will also be reviewed.

  13. The inferior epigastric artery arising from the internal iliac artery via a common trunk with the obturator artery.

    PubMed

    Won, Hyung-Sun; Won, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Chang-Seok; Han, Seung-Ho; Chung, In-Hyuk; Kim, Dong-Hoan

    2012-12-01

    We report a rare case of a left inferior epigastric artery arising from the internal iliac artery via a common trunk with the obturator artery in an 84-year-old female cadaver. A common trunk for the inferior epigastric and obturator arteries firstly originated from the left internal iliac artery, at 3.0 mm below the bifurcation of the left common iliac artery. This trunk ran straight between the left external iliac artery and left external iliac vein, and was finally divided into the left inferior epigastric and left obturator arteries just superior to the inguinal ligament. PMID:23301197

  14. Glenohumeral Joint Range of Motion in Elite Male Golfers: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Meria, Erik; Nee, Bob; Davidson, Greg

    2008-01-01

    Background Shoulder injuries account for up to 17% of all golf related musculoskeletal injuries. One cause may be the repetitive stresses applied to the lead shoulder during the backswing and follow-through phases, which may contribute to the frequency of these injuries. The “elite” golfer may be pre-disposed to developing a shoulder injury based upon the reported adaptations to the glenohumeral joint. Objective To examine and compare bilateral glenohumeral joint rotational range of motion in elite golfers using standard goniometric procedures. Methods Twenty-four “elite” male golfers were recruited for this study. Glenohumeral internal (IR) and external rotation (ER) passive range of motion was measured bilaterally at 90° of abduction using a standard universal goniometer. Paired t-tests were utilized to statistically compare the rotational range of motion patterns between the lead and the trailing shoulder. Results No statistical differences existed between each shoulder for mean IR or mean ER measures. This finding was consistent throughout different age groups. External rotation measurements were greater than IR measurements in both extremities. Discussion and Conclusion Unlike other sports requiring repetitive shoulder function, the “elite” golfers sampled in this pilot investigation did not demonstrate a unique passive range of motion pattern between the lead and trailing shoulders. Factors, including subjects' age, may have confounded the findings. Further studies are warranted utilizing cohorts of golfers with matching age and skill levels. Additional shoulder range of motion measures should be evaluated. PMID:21509130

  15. Glenohumeral joint reaction forces increase with critical shoulder angles representative of osteoarthritis-A biomechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Viehöfer, Arnd F; Snedeker, Jess G; Baumgartner, Daniel; Gerber, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the glenohumeral joint constitutes the most frequent indication for nontraumatic shoulder joint replacement. Recently, a small critical shoulder angle (CSA) was found to be associated with a high prevalence of OA. This study aims to verify the hypothesis that a small CSA leads to higher glenohumeral joint reaction forces during activities of daily living than a normal CSA. A shoulder simulator with simulated deltoid (DLT), supraspinatus (SSP), infraspinatus/teres minor (ISP/TM), and subscapularis (SSC) musculotendinous units was constructed. The DLT wrapping on the humerus was simulated using a pulley that could be horizontally adjusted to simulate the 28° CSA found in OA or the 33° CSA found in disease-free shoulders. Over a range of motion between 6° and 82° of thoracohumeral abduction joint forces were measured using a six-axis load cell. An OA-associated CSA yielded higher net joint reaction forces than a normal CSA over the entire range of motion. The maximum difference of 26.4 N (8.5%) was found at 55° of thoracohumeral abduction. Our model thus suggests that a CSA typical for OA predisposes the glenohumeral joint to higher joint reaction forces and could plausibly play a role in joint overloading and development of OA. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1047-1052, 2016. PMID:26638117

  16. GLENOHUMERAL ROTATIONAL RANGE OF MOTION DIFFERENCES BETWEEN FAST BOWLERS AND SPIN BOWLERS IN ELITE CRICKETERS

    PubMed Central

    SKN, Bhargava; Karuppannan, Selvamani

    2012-01-01

    Background: The shoulder, particularly the glenohumeral joint with its predominant reliance upon soft tissues for stability is prone to injury among the cricketers who bowl regularly. These shoulder injuries are more common in spin bowlers than fast bowlers. A decreased internal rotational difference and increased external rotational difference exist when comparing the dominant shoulder with non‐dominant shoulder between overarm cricketers and non‐throwing wicket keepers. Purpose: To compare the glenohumeral internal and external rotation range of motion differences between fast bowlers and spin bowlers. Methods: A cross‐sectional design was utilized for this study. Thirty‐five fast bowlers and 31 spin bowlers from an elite group were recruited based on the selection criteria. Glenohumeral passive internal and external rotational differences between dominant and non‐dominant shoulders were measured using a standardized mechanical inclinometer. Results: Independent t‐tests revealed a statistically significant difference for external rotational difference (p=0.005) between fast and spin bowlers and no such difference for internal rotational difference (p=0.549) between them at 0.05 level. Conclusion: External rotational difference is significantly different between fast bowlers and spin bowlers but not internal rotational difference. Level of Evidence: Level 4 PMID:23316421

  17. Modified Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure With Coracoid Exteriorization for Treatment of Anterior Glenohumeral Instability

    PubMed Central

    Ranne, Juha O.; Kainonen, Terho U.; Lehtinen, Janne T.; Heinonen, Olli J.

    2013-01-01

    The Latarjet procedure for treating anterior glenohumeral instability includes transfer of the coracoid and biceps tendon to the anterior glenoid. A modified method for the arthroscopic procedure was developed to facilitate the procedure and minimize the risk of injury to the brachial plexus. The detached coracoid was exteriorized through the anteroinferior portal for drilling and shaping. A Coracoid Drill Guide (Arthrex, Naples, FL) was used to help cut the coracoid to the desired size and make 2 drill holes in the coracoid for fixation to the glenoid. The Coracoid Transfer Instrument (Acierart, Masku, Finland) was designed to facilitate coracoid transfer and serve as a pin guide for fixation. Ten patients with severe anterior glenohumeral instability were treated with this technique. They had only mild to moderate postoperative pain. There were no postoperative infections or recurrent dislocations. The safety of this operation was similar to that of other operations on the coracoid process in the proximity of the brachial plexus. The modified arthroscopic Latarjet procedure may be applied successfully to the treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability, with good patient satisfaction and functional outcome. PMID:24400183

  18. Bioengineered anterior cruciate ligament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altman, Gregory (Inventor); Kaplan, David (Inventor); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana (Inventor); Martin, Ivan (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament ex vivo. The method comprises seeding pluripotent stem cells in a three dimensional matrix, anchoring the seeded matrix by attachment to two anchors, and culturing the cells within the matrix under conditions appropriate for cell growth and regeneration, while subjecting the matrix to one or more mechanical forces via movement of one or both of the attached anchors. Bone marrow stromal cells are preferably used as the pluripotent cells in the method. Suitable matrix materials are materials to which cells can adhere, such as a gel made from collagen type I. Suitable anchor materials are materials to which the matrix can attach, such as Goinopra coral and also demineralized bone. Optimally, the mechanical forces to which the matrix is subjected mimic mechanical stimuli experienced by an anterior cruciate ligament in vivo. This is accomplished by delivering the appropriate combination of tension, compression, torsion, and shear, to the matrix. The bioengineered ligament which is produced by this method is characterized by a cellular orientation and/or matrix crimp pattern in the direction of the applied mechanical forces, and also by the production of collagen type I, collagen type III, and fibronectin proteins along the axis of mechanical load produced by the mechanical forces. Optimally, the ligament produced has fiber bundles which are arranged into a helical organization. The method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament can be adapted to produce a wide range of tissue types ex vivo by adapting the anchor size and attachment sites to reflect the size of the specific type of tissue to be produced, and also adapting the specific combination of forces applied, to mimic the mechanical stimuli experienced in vivo by the specific type of tissue to be produced. The methods of the present invention can be further modified to incorporate other stimuli experienced in vivo by the

  19. Anatomy and histology of apical support: a literature review concerning cardinal and uterosacral ligaments.

    PubMed

    Ramanah, Rajeev; Berger, Mitchell B; Parratte, Bernard M; DeLancey, John O L

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this work was to collect and summarize relevant literature on the anatomy, histology, and imaging of apical support of the upper vagina and the uterus provided by the cardinal (CL) and uterosacral (USL) ligaments. A literature search in English, French, and German languages was carried out with the keywords apical support, cardinal ligament, transverse cervical ligament, Mackenrodt ligament, parametrium, paracervix, retinaculum uteri, web, uterosacral ligament, and sacrouterine ligament in the PubMed database. Other relevant journal and textbook articles were sought by retrieving references cited in previous PubMed articles. Fifty references were examined in peer-reviewed journals and textbooks. The USL extends from the S2 to the S4 vertebra region to the dorsal margin of the uterine cervix and/or to the upper third of the posterior vaginal wall. It has a superficial and deep component. Autonomous nerve fibers are a major constituent of the deep USL. CL is defined as a perivascular sheath with a proximal insertion around the origin of the internal iliac artery and a distal insertion on the cervix and/or vagina. It is divided into a cranial (vascular) and a caudal (neural) portions. Histologically, it contains mainly vessels, with no distinct band of connective tissue. Both the deep USL and the caudal CL are closely related to the inferior hypogastric plexus. USL and CL are visceral ligaments, with mesentery-like structures containing vessels, nerves, connective tissue, and adipose tissue.

  20. Posterior cruciate ligament of the knee (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is a powerful ligament extending from the top-rear surface of the tibia to the bottom-front surface of the femur. The ligament prevents the knee joint from posterior instability.

  1. Arthroscopic posterior-inferior capsular release in the treatment of overhead athletes.

    PubMed

    Codding, Jason; Dahm, Diane L; McCarty, L Pearce; May, Jedediah H; Tucker, Lanning H; Buss, Daniel D

    2015-05-01

    In this article, we present our technique for arthroscopic posterior-inferior capsular release and report the results of applying this technique in a population of athletes with symptomatic glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD) that was unresponsive to nonoperative treatment and was preventing them from returning to sport. Fifteen overhead athletes met the inclusion criteria. Two were lost to follow-up. Of the 13 remaining, 6 underwent isolated posterior-inferior capsular releases, and 7 had concomitant procedures. Before and after surgery, patients completed an activity questionnaire, which included the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) Standardized Shoulder Assessment Form. Passive internal rotation in the scapular plane was measured with a bubble goniometer. Mean age was 21 years (range, 16-33 years). Mean follow-up was 31.1 months (range, 24-59 months). Mean ASES score improved significantly (P<.01) from before surgery (71.5) to after surgery (86.9). Mean GIRD improved from 43.1° to 9.7° (P<.05). Three athletes (23%) did not return to their preoperative level of play; the other 10 (77%) returned to their same level of play or a higher level. Selective arthroscopic posterior-inferior capsular release may be a reasonable solution for overhead athletes with symptomatic GIRD unresponsive to conservative management.

  2. Incidental Anterior Cruciate Ligament Calcification: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hisami; Fischer, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The calcification of knee ligaments is a finding noted only in a handful of case reports. The finding of an anterior cruciate ligament calcification has been reported once in the literature. Comparable studies involving the posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and an ossicle within the anterior cruciate ligament are likewise discussed in reports of symptomatic patients. We report a case of incidentally discovered anterior cruciate ligament calcification. We discuss the likely etiology and clinical implications of this finding. PMID:27200163

  3. Incidental Anterior Cruciate Ligament Calcification: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hisami; Fischer, Hans

    2016-03-01

    The calcification of knee ligaments is a finding noted only in a handful of case reports. The finding of an anterior cruciate ligament calcification has been reported once in the literature. Comparable studies involving the posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and an ossicle within the anterior cruciate ligament are likewise discussed in reports of symptomatic patients. We report a case of incidentally discovered anterior cruciate ligament calcification. We discuss the likely etiology and clinical implications of this finding.

  4. Endoscopic Repair of the Superficial Deltoid Ligament and Spring Ligament.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-06-01

    The plantar calcaneonavicular ligament, also known as the spring ligament, is an important static stabilizer of the medial longitudinal foot arch. Compromise of this ligament is a primary causative factor of peritalar subluxation, and it should be repaired in addition to treatment of tibialis posterior tendon abnormalities. Open repair of the ligament requires extensive soft-tissue dissection. The development of the high distal portal for posterior tibial tendoscopy allows repair of the ligament endoscopically. This, together with endoscopically assisted reconstruction of the tibialis posterior tendon, allows complete endoscopic treatment of stage 2 posterior tibial tendon deficiency. The major structure at risk is the medial plantar nerve. This technique is technically demanding and should be reserved for experienced foot and ankle arthroscopists. PMID:27656387

  5. Hindlimb unloading alters ligament healing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provenzano, Paolo P.; Martinez, Daniel A.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Dwyer, Kelley W.; Turner, Joanne; Vailas, Arthur C.; Vanderby, Ray Jr

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that hindlimb unloading inhibits healing in fibrous connective tissue such as ligament. Male rats were assigned to 3- and 7-wk treatment groups with three subgroups each: sham control, ambulatory healing, and hindlimb-suspended healing. Ambulatory and suspended animals underwent surgical rupture of their medial collateral ligaments, whereas sham surgeries were performed on control animals. After 3 or 7 wk, mechanical and/or morphological properties were measured in ligament, muscle, and bone. During mechanical testing, most suspended ligaments failed in the scar region, indicating the greatest impairment was to ligament and not to bone-ligament insertion. Ligament testing revealed significant reductions in maximum force, ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and low-load properties in suspended animals. In addition, femoral mineral density, femoral strength, gastrocnemius mass, and tibialis anterior mass were significantly reduced. Microscopy revealed abnormal scar formation and cell distribution in suspended ligaments with extracellular matrix discontinuities and voids between misaligned, but well-formed, collagen fiber bundles. Hence, stress levels from ambulation appear unnecessary for formation of fiber bundles yet required for collagen to form structurally competent continuous fibers. Results support our hypothesis that hindlimb unloading impairs healing of fibrous connective tissue. In addition, this study provides compelling morphological evidence explaining the altered structure-function relationship in load-deprived healing connective tissue.

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament - updating article.

    PubMed

    Luzo, Marcus Vinicius Malheiros; Franciozi, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Rezende, Fernando Cury; Gracitelli, Guilherme Conforto; Debieux, Pedro; Cohen, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    This updating article on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has the aim of addressing some of the most interesting current topics in this field. Within this stratified approach, it contains the following sections: ACL remnant; anterolateral ligament and combined intra and extra-articular reconstruction; fixation devices; and ACL femoral tunnel creation techniques. PMID:27517015

  7. Anterior cruciate ligament - updating article.

    PubMed

    Luzo, Marcus Vinicius Malheiros; Franciozi, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Rezende, Fernando Cury; Gracitelli, Guilherme Conforto; Debieux, Pedro; Cohen, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    This updating article on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has the aim of addressing some of the most interesting current topics in this field. Within this stratified approach, it contains the following sections: ACL remnant; anterolateral ligament and combined intra and extra-articular reconstruction; fixation devices; and ACL femoral tunnel creation techniques.

  8. Influence of rotator cuff tears on glenohumeral stability during abduction tasks.

    PubMed

    Hölscher, Thomas; Weber, Tim; Lazarev, Igor; Englert, Carsten; Dendorfer, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    One of the main goals in reconstructing rotator cuff tears is the restoration of glenohumeral joint stability, which is subsequently of utmost importance in order to prevent degenerative damage such as superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) lesion, arthrosis, and malfunction. The goal of the current study was to facilitate musculoskeletal models in order to estimate glenohumeral instability introduced by muscle weakness due to cuff lesions. Inverse dynamics simulations were used to compute joint reaction forces for several static abduction tasks with different muscle weakness. Results were compared with the existing literature in order to ensure the model validity. Further arm positions taken from activities of daily living, requiring the rotator cuff muscles were modeled and their contribution to joint kinetics computed. Weakness of the superior rotator cuff muscles (supraspinatus; infraspinatus) leads to a deviation of the joint reaction force to the cranial dorsal rim of the glenoid. Massive rotator cuff defects showed higher potential for glenohumeral instability in contrast to single muscle ruptures. The teres minor muscle seems to substitute lost joint torque during several simulated muscle tears to maintain joint stability. Joint instability increases with cuff tear size. Weakness of the upper part of the rotator cuff leads to a joint reaction force closer to the upper glenoid rim. This indicates the comorbidity of cuff tears with SLAP lesions. The teres minor is crucial for maintaining joint stability in case of massive cuff defects and should be uprated in clinical decision-making. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1628-1635, 2016. PMID:26756861

  9. Simulation of the Inferior Mirage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branca, Mario

    2010-09-01

    A mirage can occur when a continuous variation in the refractive index of the air causes light rays to follow a curved path. As a result, the image we see is displaced from the location of the object. If the image appears higher in the air than the object, it is called a "superior" mirage, while if it appears lower it is called an "inferior" mirage.2 The most common example of an inferior mirage is when, on a hot day, a stretch of dry road off in the distance appears to be wet (see Fig. 1). Many lab activities have been described that simulate the formation of superior mirages. In these demonstrations light beams curve downward as they pass through a nonuni-form fluid.3-6 Much less common are laboratory demonstrations of upward-curving light rays of the kind responsible for inferior mirages. This paper describes a simple version of such a demonstration.

  10. Coracoclavicular Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi; Hsueh, Pei-ling; Chen, Yun-feng

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Operative intervention is recommended for complete acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation to restore AC stability, but the best operative technique is still controversial. Twelve fresh-frozen male cadaveric shoulders (average age, 62.8 ± 7.8 years) were equally divided into endobutton versus the modified Weaver-Dunn groups. Each potted scapula and clavicle was fixed in a custom made jig to allow translation and load to failure testing using a Zwick BZ2.5/TS1S material testing machine (Zwick/Roell Co, Germany). A systematic review of 21 studies evaluating reconstructive methods for coracoclavicular or AC joints using a cadaveric model was also performed. From our biomechanical study, after ligament reconstruction, the triple endobutton technique demonstrated superior, anterior, and posterior displacements similar to that of the intact state (P > 0.05). In the modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction group, however, there was significantly greater anterior (P < 0.001) and posterior (P = 0.003) translation after ligament reconstruction. In addition, there was no significant difference after reconstruction between failure load of the triple endobutton group and that of the intact state (686.88 vs 684.9 N, P > 0.05), whereas the failure load after the modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction was decreased compared with the intact state (171.64 vs 640.86 N, P < 0.001). From our systematic review of 21 studies, which involved comparison of the modified Weaver-Dunn technique with other methods, the majority showed that the modified Weaver-Dunn procedure had significantly (P < .05) greater laxity than other methods including the endobutton technique. The triple endobutton reconstruction proved superior to the modified Weaver-Dunn technique in restoration of AC joint stability and strength. Triple endobutton reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligament is superior to the modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction in controlling both superior and

  11. A Probabilistic Model of Glenohumeral External Rotation Strength for Healthy Normals and Rotator Cuff Tear Cases

    PubMed Central

    Langenderfer, Joseph E.; Carpenter, James E.; Johnson, Marjorie E.; An, Kai-nan; Hughes, Richard E.

    2006-01-01

    The reigning paradigm of musculoskeletal modeling is to construct deterministic models from parameters of an “average” subject and make predictions for muscle forces and joint torques with this model. This approach is limited because it does not perform well for outliers, and it does not model the effects of population parameter variability. The purpose of this study was to simulate variability in musculoskeletal parameters on glenohumeral external rotation strength in healthy normals, and in rotator cuff tear cases using a Monte Carlo model. The goal was to determine if variability in musculoskeletal parameters could quantifiably explain variability in glenohumeral external rotation strength. Multivariate Gamma distributions for musculoskeletal architecture and moment arm were constructed from empirical data. Gamma distributions of measured joint strength were constructed. Parameters were sampled from the distributions and input to the model to predict muscle forces and joint torques. The model predicted measured joint torques for healthy normals, subjects with supraspinatus tears, and subjects with infraspinatus–supraspinatus tears with small error. Muscle forces for the three conditions were predicted and compared. Variability in measured torques can be explained by differences in parameter variability. PMID:16474916

  12. A Case of Bilateral Anterior Gleno-Humeral Dislocation following First Time Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Wheelton, Andrew; Dowen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation following a seizure has recently been demonstrated as being more common than previously believed with 44 cases in the literature. This case is unique as it was caused by a first time seizure and there was no associated fracture of the humerus. Case Report: A previously fit and well 32 year old man presented to the Emergency Department following a convulsive episode. On initial assessment he was drowsy and the focus of investigation was the cause of the seizure, he was prepared for transfer to the medical ward. As he became more alert he complained of bilateral shoulder pain. Further clinical exam highlighted he had reduced range of movement in the shoulder joint bilaterally with a symmetrical clinical appearance of gleno-humeral dislocation. Radiographs confirmed bilateral anterior gleno-humeral dislocations which were reduced under sedation uneventfully. Conclusion: Post ictal patients can be difficult to assess when drowsy. Although not all seizures require musculoskeletal examination attending medical staff should remain vigilant to the possibility of injury following seizure to afford prompt diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27299040

  13. Imaging assessment of glenohumeral dysplasia secondary to brachial plexus birth palsy*

    PubMed Central

    Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaete; Dalto, Vitor Faeda; Crema, Michel Daoud; Waters, Peter M.; Gregio-Junior, Everaldo; Mazzer, Nilton; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess imaging parameters related to the morphology of the glenohumeral joint in children with unilateral brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP), in comparison with those obtained for healthy shoulders. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective search for cases of unilateral BPBP diagnosed at our facility. Only patients with a clinical diagnosis of unilateral BPBP were included, and the final study sample consisted of 10 consecutive patients who were assessed with cross-sectional imaging. The glenoid version, the translation of the humeral head, and the degrees of glenohumeral dysplasia were assessed. Results The mean diameter of the affected humeral heads was 1.93 cm, compared with 2.33 cm for those of the normal limbs. In two cases, there was no significant posterior displacement of the humeral head, five cases showed posterior subluxation of the humeral head, and the remaining three cases showed total luxation of the humeral head. The mean glenoid version angle of the affected limbs (90-α) was -9.6º, versus +1.6º for the normal, contralateral limbs. Conclusion The main deformities found in this study were BPBP-associated retroversion of the glenoid cavity, developmental delay of the humeral head, and posterior translation of the humeral head. PMID:27403013

  14. Electromyographic analysis of the glenohumeral muscles during a baseball rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Townsend, H; Jobe, F W; Pink, M; Perry, J

    1991-01-01

    Many exercises are used to strengthen the glenohumeral muscles, but there have been limited studies to evaluate the exercises. Thus, the purpose of this study was to decide how the muscles responsible for humeral motion can best be exercised in a rehabilitation program for the throwing athlete. Dynamic, fine wire, intramuscular electromyography was carried out in 15 normal male volunteers performing 17 shoulder exercises derived from a shoulder rehabilitation program used by professional baseball clubs. The four rotator cuff muscles were studied, as well as other positioners of the humerus, including the pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi, and three portions of the deltoid. The electromyographic activity was synchronized with cinematography and averaged over 30 degrees arcs of motion. An exercise was considered to be a significant challenge for a muscle if it generated at least 50% of its predetermined maximum contraction over three consecutive arcs (i.e., a 90 degrees range). Four exercises were consistently found to be among the most challenging exercises for every muscle. These shoulder exercises consisted of 1) elevation in the scapular plane with thumbs down, 2) flexion, 3) horizontal abduction with arms externally rotated, and 4) press-up. This study documents that the minimum for an effective and succinct rehabilitation protocol for the glenohumeral muscles would include these exercises.

  15. Glenohumeral relationships: subchondral mineralization patterns, thickness of cartilage, and radii of curvature.

    PubMed

    Zumstein, Valentin; Kraljević, Marko; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena

    2013-11-01

    Subchondral mineralization represents the loading history of a joint and can be measured in vivo using computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry. Different mineralization patterns in the glenohumeral joint have been explained by the principle of physiologic incongruence. We sought to support this explanation by measurement of mineralization, radii, and cartilage thickness in 18 fresh shoulder specimens. We found three mineralization patterns: bicentric, monocentric anterior, and monocentric central. Mean radii of the glenoids were 27.4 mm for bicentric glenoids, 27.3 mm for monocentric anterior, and 24.8 mm for monocentric central glenoids. Cartilage thickness measurement revealed the highest values in anterior parts; the thinnest cartilage was found centrally. Our findings support the principle of a physiologic incongruence in the glenohumeral joint. Bicentric mineralization patterns exist in joints consisting of more flat glenoids compared to the corresponding humeral head. Monocentric distribution with a central maximum was found in specimens with glenoids being more curved, indicating higher degrees of congruence, which might represent an early stage of degenerative disease. The obtained information might also be important for implant fixation in resurfacing procedures or to achieve the best possible fit of an osteochondral allograft in the repair of cartilage defects.

  16. Glenohumeral Rotational Range of Motion in Collegiate Overhead-Throwing Athletes During an Athletic Season

    PubMed Central

    Dwelly, Priscilla M.; Tripp, Brady L.; Tripp, Patricia A.; Eberman, Lindsey E.; Gorin, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Context: Repetitive throwing at high velocities leads to altered range of motion (ROM) in the dominant shoulder compared with the nondominant shoulder in overhead-throwing athletes. Loss of glenohumeral internal rotation (IR), or glenohumeral internal-rotation deficit (GIRD), is associated with shoulder injuries. Therefore, GIRD should be evaluated during the clinical examination of the thrower's shoulder. Objective: To assess glenohumeral ROM in competitive baseball and softball athletes at 3 intervals over the course of an athletic season in order to (1) examine changes in ROM over time and (2) monitor the prevalence of GIRD. Design: Observational, repeated-measures study. Setting: Collegiate athletic training room. Patients or Other Participants: Forty-eight healthy National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I or Division II athletes (age  =  19 ± 1 years, height  =  174 ± 14 cm, mass  =  77.8 ± 18.1 kg; 19 softball, 29 baseball players). Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured glenohumeral IR, external rotation (ER), total arc (ER + IR), and GIRD at 3 times: prefall, prespring, and postspring. We calculated GIRD in 2 ways: as the difference in IR between dominant and nondominant shoulders and as the percentage of the total arc. Results: In the dominant shoulder, ER increased during the season (F2,96  =  17.433, P < .001), but IR remained the same (F2,96  =  1.839, P  =  .17). The total arc in the dominant shoulder increased between time intervals (F2,96  =  14.030, P < .001); the mean difference between prefall and postspring measurements was 9.694° (P < .001), and the mean difference between prefall and postspring measurements was 10.990° (P < .001). In the nondominant shoulder, ER increased over the season (F2,96  =  23.395, P < .001), but IR did not change over the season (F2,96  =  0.087, P  =  .90). The total arc in the nondominant shoulder increased between prefall and prespring measurements

  17. Does Repair of a Hill-Sachs Defect Increase Stability at the Glenohumeral Joint?

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Neil K.; Jolly, John T.; Debski, Richard E.; Sekiya, Jon K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The effect of osteoallograft repair of a Hill-Sachs lesion and the effect of allograft fit on glenohumeral translations in response to applied force are poorly understood. Purpose: To compare the impact of a 25% Hill-Sachs lesion, a perfect osteoallograft repair (PAR) of a 25% Hill-Sachs lesion, and an “imperfect” osteoallograft repair (IAR) of a 25% Hill-Sachs lesion on glenohumeral translations in response to a compressive load and either an anterior or posterior load in 3 clinically relevant arm positions. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: A robotic/universal force-moment sensor testing system was used to apply joint compression (22 N) and an anterior or posterior load (44 N) to cadaveric shoulders (n = 9) with the skin and deltoid removed (intact) at 3 glenohumeral joint positions (abduction/external rotation): 0°/0°, 30°/30°, and 60°/60°. The 25% bony defect state, PAR state, and IAR state were created and the loading protocol was performed. Translational motion was measured in each position for each shoulder state. A nonparametric repeated-measures Friedman test with a Wilcoxon signed-rank post hoc test was performed to compare the biomechanical parameters (P < .05). Results: Compared with the defect shoulder, the PAR shoulder had significantly less anterior translation with an anterior load in the 0°/0° (15.3 ± 8.2 vs 16.6 ± 9.0 mm, P = .008) and 30°/30° (13.6 ± 7.1 vs 14.2 ± 7.0 mm, P = .021) positions. Compared with IAR, the PAR shoulder had significantly less anterior translation with an anterior load in the 0°/0° (15.3 ± 8.2 vs 16.6 ± 9.0 mm, P = .008) and 30°/30° (13.6 ± 7.1 vs 14.4 ± 7.1 mm, P = .011) positions, and the defect shoulder had significantly less anterior translation with an anterior load in the 30°/30° (14.2 ± 7.0 vs 14.4 ± 7.0 mm, P = .038) position. Conclusion: PAR resulted in the least translational motion at the glenohumeral joint. The defect shoulder had significantly less

  18. The effect of shoulder core exercises on isometric torque of glenohumeral joint movements in healthy young females

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam, Afsun Nodehi; Mohammadi, Roghayeh; Arab, Amir Massoud; Kazamnajad, Anoshirvan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strength improvement of the shoulder muscles is a major goal in rehabilitation or athletic conditioning programs. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of shoulder core exercises on the isometric torque of glenohumeral joint movements. METHODS: A total of 36 healthy females with no history of shoulder injury enrolled in this study. Subjects were randomly assigned into the control group (n = 18, 22 ± 2.19 years of age) or experimental group (n = 18, 21 ± 2.05 years of age). Subjects in experimental group performed shoulder core exercises, using progressive resistance training, three times a week for six weeks. Subjects in control group performed no exercise. The isometric torque of shoulder movements were measured with Dynatorq device in isolated test positions of glenohumeral muscles at the beginning and after six weeks in both groups. RESULTS: shoulder core exercise training led to an increase in maximal isometric torques of shoulder scaption at 0° and 90° arm elevation, external and internal rotation, horizontal adduction and extension movements (p < 0.001 in all instances). No significant difference was found between initial scores and scores after six weeks in the control group (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicated that shoulder core exercise training leads to an increase in peak torque for all glenohumeral movements that can be considered in glenohumeral muscles strengthening programs. PMID:22973363

  19. Evaluation and management of adult shoulder pain: a focus on rotator cuff disorders, acromioclavicular joint arthritis, and glenohumeral arthritis.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, April

    2014-07-01

    Shoulder pain is a common reason for a patient to see their primary care physician. This article focuses on the evaluation and management of 3 common shoulder disorders; rotator cuff disorders, acromioclavicular joint arthritis, and glenohumeral joint arthritis. The typical history and physical examination findings for each of these entities are highlighted, in addition to treatment options.

  20. Arthroscopic-Assisted Management of Unstable Distal-Third Clavicle Fractures: Conoid Ligament Reconstruction and Fracture Cerclage With Sutures

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, Luis Natera; Reiriz, Juan Sarasquete

    2015-01-01

    Surgical treatment is usually indicated for the management of Neer type IIB fractures of the distal third of the clavicle. These unstable injuries have shown a rate of nonunion that oscillates around 30% to 45% when managed conservatively, and surgical strategies often require a second operation for implant removal. We describe an arthroscopic-assisted technique for the treatment of Neer type IIB unstable distal-third clavicle fractures that overcomes the issues related to open surgery, metal hardware, and implant irritation. This technique increases the load to failure of the construct by means of adding a synthetic conoid ligament reconstruction with a nonrigid suspension device, and it allows the diagnosis and treatment of associated glenohumeral injuries. Our technique incorporates a fracture interfragmentary fixation with sutures, thus avoiding a second operation for implant removal. PMID:26870642

  1. Serotonin in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Laura M; Thompson, Ann M; Pollak, George D

    2002-06-01

    It has been recognized for some time that serotonin fibers originating in raphe nuclei are present in the inferior colliculi of all mammalian species studied. More recently, serotonin has been found to modulate the responses of single inferior colliculus neurons to many types of auditory stimuli, ranging from simple tone bursts to complex species-specific vocalizations. The effects of serotonin are often quite strong, and for some neurons are also highly specific. A dramatic illustration of this is that serotonin can change the selectivity of some neurons for sounds, including species-specific vocalizations. These results are discussed in light of several theories on the function of serotonin in the IC, and of outstanding issues that remain to be addressed. PMID:12117504

  2. Simulation of the Inferior Mirage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branca, Mario

    2010-01-01

    A mirage can occur when a continuous variation in the refractive index of the air causes light rays to follow a curved path. As a result, the image we see is displaced from the location of the object. If the image appears higher in the air than the object, it is called a "superior" mirage, while if it appears lower it is called an "inferior"…

  3. Reliability of a New Clinical Instrument for Measuring Internal and External Glenohumeral Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Lindenfeld, Thomas N.; Fleckenstein, Cassie M.; Levy, Martin S.; Grood, Edward S.; Frush, Todd J.; Parameswaran, A. Dushi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The shoulder plays a critical role in many overhead athletic activities. Several studies have shown alterations in shoulder range of motion (ROM) in the dominant shoulder of overhead athletes and correlation with significantly increased risk of injury to the shoulder and elbow. The purpose of this study was to measure isolated glenohumeral joint internal/external rotation (IR/ER) to determine inter- and intraobserver reliability of a new clinical device. Hypothesis: (1) Inter- and intraobserver reliability would exceed 90% for measures of glenohumeral joint IR, ER, and total arc of motion; (2) the dominant arm would exhibit significantly increased ER, significantly decreased IR, and no difference in total arc of motion compared with the nondominant shoulder; and (3) a significant difference exists in total arc between male and female patients. Study Design: Case series. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Methods: Thirty-seven subjects (mean age, 23 years; range, 13-54 years) were tested by 2 orthopaedic surgeons. A single test consisted of 1 arc of motion from neutral to external rotation to internal rotation and back to neutral within preset torque limits. Each examiner performed 3 tests on the dominant and nondominant shoulders. Each examiner completed 2 installations. Results: Testing reliability demonstrated that neither trial, installation, nor observer were significant sources of variation. The maximum standard deviation was 1.3° for total arc of motion and less than 2° for most other measurements. Dominant arm ER was significantly greater than nondominant arm ER (P = 0.02), and dominant arm IR was significantly less than nondominant arm IR (P = 0.00). Mean total rotation was 162°, with no significant differences in total rotation between dominant and nondominant arms (P = 0.34). Mean total arc of motion was 45° greater in female subjects. Differences in total arc of motion between male and female subjects was statistically significant (P < 0

  4. LARS Artificial Ligament Versus ABC Purely Polyester Ligament for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Iliadis, Dimitrios Ph.; Bourlos, Dimitrios N.; Mastrokalos, Dimitrios S.; Chronopoulos, Efstathios; Babis, George C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Graft choice for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is of critical importance. Various grafts have been used so far, with autografts long considered the optimal solution for the treatment of ACL-deficient knees. Limited data are available on the long-term survivorship of synthetic grafts. Purpose: To compare the functional outcome and survivorship of ACL reconstructions performed using the LARS (ligament augmentation and reconstruction system) ligament and the ABC (active biosynthetic composite) purely polyester ligament. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: The results of 72 patients who underwent primary arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with the LARS ligament and 31 cases with an ABC purely polyester ligament were reviewed. The mean follow-up periods for the LARS and ABC groups were 9.5 and 5.1 years, respectively. A survivorship analysis of the 2 synthetic grafts was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method with a log-rank test (Mantel-Cox, 95% CI). Lysholm, Tegner activity, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores as well as laxity measurements obtained using a KT-1000 arthrometer were recorded for all intact grafts, and a Mann-Whitney U test was used for comparison reasons. Results: The rupture rates for LARS and ABC grafts were 31% (95% CI, 20%-42%) and 42% (95% CI, 25%-59%), respectively. For intact grafts, the mean Lysholm score was good for both groups (90 for the LARS group and 89 for the ABC group), with the majority of patients returning to their preinjury level of activities, and the mean IKDC score was 90 for the LARS group and 86 for the ABC group. Conclusion: The rupture rates of both LARS and ABC grafts were both high. However, the LARS ligament provided significantly better survivorship compared with the ABC ligament at short- to midterm follow-up (95% CI). PMID:27453894

  5. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Daniel TP; Chan, Yue-Yan; Mok, Kam-Ming; Yung, Patrick SH; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms). Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms). The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative. Immobilization should not

  6. Computed and conventional arthrotomography of the glenohumeral joint: normal anatomy and clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, A.L.; Resnick, D.; Mink, J.H.; Berman, J.L.; Cone, R.O. III; Resnik, C.S.; Danzig, L.; Guerra, J. Jr.

    1984-12-01

    The glenohumeral joint was studied in 25 cadavers and 136 patients using computed arthrotomography (CAT) and conventional arthrotomography (AT) to assess shoulder instability. Cadaver shoulders were injected with air or latex, sectioned with a band saw, and normal articular anatomy outlined. CAT was performed in 81 patients and characterized the glenoid labrum as normal, abnormal, or detached. Hill-Sachs defects were seen in 20 out of 29 patients with anterior labral abnormalities, while bicipital tendon abnormalities were evident on CAT in 6. Of 55 patients who had AT, the status of the labrum was clarified in 13 of the 16 patients who had surgery or arthroscopy. Both methods can characterize the labrum; however, CAT is more comprehensive and appears ideal for both detection of Hill-Sachs defects and imaging the bicipital tendon. CAT requires less technical expertise and radiation than AT and is tolerated better by patients in pain.

  7. Loss of glenohumeral internal rotation in little league pitchers: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Nakamizo, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Yasuo; Nobuhara, Katsuya; Yamamoto, Tetsuji

    2008-01-01

    Glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD) is a significant shoulder problem for throwing athletes. GIRD, however, has not been reported in little league pitchers. The purpose of this study was to investigate GIRD in little leaguers. The range of motion of both shoulders was measured in 25 male little league pitchers. All pitchers underwent motion analyses of their pitching to evaluate shoulder kinematics. GIRD was found in 10 of the 25 pitchers. External rotation in the dominant arm in the GIRD group was not significantly different compared to the contralateral or dominant arm in the non-GIRD group. This biomechanical study showed that the GIRD group had increased external rotation while throwing compared to the non-GIRD group. These findings indicate that GIRD can occur prior to development of the increased external rotation in the dominant arm seen in adult throwers.

  8. Management of Humeral and Glenoid Bone Loss in Recurrent Glenohumeral Instability

    PubMed Central

    Rusen, Jamie; Leiter, Jeff; Chahal, Jaskarndip; MacDonald, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent shoulder instability and resultant glenoid and humeral head bone loss are not infrequently encountered in the population today, specifically in young, athletic patients. This review on the management of bone loss in recurrent glenohumeral instability discusses the relevant shoulder anatomy that provides stability to the shoulder joint, relevant history and physical examination findings pertinent to recurrent shoulder instability, and the proper radiological imaging choices in its workup. Operative treatments that can be used to treat both glenoid and humeral head bone loss are outlined. These include coracoid transfer procedures and allograft/autograft reconstruction at the glenoid, as well as humeral head disimpaction/humeroplasty, remplissage, humeral osseous allograft reconstruction, rotational osteotomy, partial humeral head arthroplasty, and hemiarthroplasty on the humeral side. Clinical outcomes studies reporting general results of these techniques are highlighted. PMID:25136461

  9. Muscular Activation During Plyometric Exercises in 90° of Glenohumeral Joint Abduction

    PubMed Central

    Ellenbecker, Todd S.; Sueyoshi, Tetsuro; Bailie, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Plyometric exercises are frequently used to increase posterior rotator cuff and periscapular muscle strength and simulate demands and positional stresses in overhead athletes. The purpose of this study was to provide descriptive data on posterior rotator cuff and scapular muscle activation during upper extremity plyometric exercises in 90° of glenohumeral joint abduction. Hypothesis: Levels of muscular activity in the posterior rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers will be high during plyometric shoulder exercises similar to previously reported electromyographic (EMG) levels of shoulder rehabilitation exercises. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Twenty healthy subjects were tested using surface EMG during the performance of 2 plyometric shoulder exercises: prone external rotation (PERP) and reverse catch external rotation (RCP) using a handheld medicine ball. Electrode application included the upper and lower trapezius (UT and LT, respectively), serratus anterior (SA), infraspinatus (IN), and the middle and posterior deltoid (MD and PD, respectively) muscles. A 10-second interval of repetitive plyometric exercise (PERP) and 3 repetitions of RCP were sampled. Peak and average normalized EMG data were generated. Results: Normalized peak and average IN activity ranged between 73% and 102% and between 28% and 52% during the plyometric exercises, respectively, with peak and average LT activity measured between 79% and 131% and between 31% and 61%. SA activity ranged between 76% and 86% for peak and between 35% and 37% for average activity. Muscular activity levels in the MD and PD ranged between 49% and 72% and between 12% and 33% for peak and average, respectively. Conclusion: Moderate to high levels of muscular activity were measured in the rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers during these plyometric exercises with the glenohumeral joint abducted 90°. PMID:25553216

  10. Treatment of medial collateral ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Ryan G; Bosco, Joseph A; Sherman, Orrin H

    2009-03-01

    The medial collateral ligament is the most frequently injured ligament of the knee. The anatomy and biomechanical role of this ligament and the associated posteromedial structures of the knee continue to be explored. Prophylactic knee bracing has shown promise in preventing injury to the medial collateral ligament, although perhaps at the cost of functional performance. Most isolated injuries are treated nonsurgically. Recent studies have investigated ligament-healing variables, including modalities such as ultrasound and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Concomitant damage to the anterior or posterior cruciate ligaments is a common indication to surgically address the high-grade medial collateral ligament injury. The optimal treatment of multiligamentous knee injuries continues to evolve, and controversy exists surrounding the role of medial collateral ligament repair/reconstruction, with data supporting both conservative and surgical management. PMID:19264708

  11. Inferior mirages: an improved model.

    PubMed

    Young, Andrew T

    2015-02-01

    A quantitative model of the inferior mirage is presented, based on a realistic temperature profile in the convective boundary layer, using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. The top of the inverted image is determined by the logarithmic part of the profile; the bottom is the apparent horizon, which depends on optical obstruction by roughness elements. These effects of surface roughness are included in the model, which is illustrated with a simulation. The vertical magnification varies throughout the mirage, becoming infinite at Minnaert's ill-named "vanishing line"-which makes green flashes apparent to the naked eye. PMID:25967823

  12. INTERDEPENDENT SUPERIORITY AND INFERIORITY FEELINGS

    PubMed Central

    Ingham, Harrington V.

    1949-01-01

    It is postulated that in neurotic persons who have unrealistic feelings of superiority and inferiority the two are interdependent. This is a departure from the concept of previous observers that either one or the other is primary and its opposite is overcompensation. The author postulates considerable parallelism, with equal importance for each. He submits that the neurotic person forms two logic-resistant compartments for the two opposed self-estimates and that treatment which makes inroads of logic upon one compartment, simultaneously does so upon the other. Two examples are briefly reported. The neurotic benefits sought in exaggeration of capability are the same as those sought in insistence upon inferiority: Presumption of superiority at once bids for approbation and delivers the subject from the need to prove himself worthy of it in dreaded competition; exaggeration of incapability baits sympathy and makes competition unnecessary because failure is conceded. Some of the characteristics of abnormal self-estimates that distinguish them from normal are: Preoccupation with self, resistance to logical explanation of personality problems, inconsistency in reasons for beliefs in adequacy on the one hand and inadequacy on the other, unreality, rationalization of faults, and difficulty and vacillation in the selection of adequate goals. PMID:15390573

  13. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with preservation of remnant bundle using hamstring autograft: technical note.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin Hwan; Lee, Yong Seuk; Ha, Hae Chan

    2009-08-01

    During an arthroscopic examination for an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, there is a relatively thick remnant ACL tibial stump attached to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) or rarely remained between the femur origin and the tibia insertion. We thought that preservation of the remnant ACL original bundle might promote graft healing or be helpful in preserving the proprioception and function to stabilize the knee. Therefore, we established a remnant preservation procedure without additional instruments during an ACL reconstruction using a bio-cross pin (RIGIDfix system: Mitek, Johnson & Johnson, USA) for the femoral tunnel fixation. The remnant ACL was sutured (usually three stitches) using a suture hook (Linvatec, Largo, FL), and both ends of the sutures were pulled to the far anteromedial (AM) portal. These sutures protected the remnant tissue during the ACL reconstruction because medial traction of these sutures can provide a wide view during the reconstruction. After the femoral and tibial tunnel formation, these sutures were pulled out to the inferior sleeve of the cross pin using a previously inserted wire loop via an inferior sleeve. After graft passage, a superior cross pin was first fixed and tibial fixation was then performed. Finally, inferior cross pin fixation was performed and ties were made at the entrance of the inferior cross pin. PMID:18299859

  14. Role of biomechanics in the understanding of normal, injured, and healing ligaments and tendons

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ho-Joong; Fisher, Matthew B; Woo, Savio L-Y

    2009-01-01

    Ligaments and tendons are soft connective tissues which serve essential roles for biomechanical function of the musculoskeletal system by stabilizing and guiding the motion of diarthrodial joints. Nevertheless, these tissues are frequently injured due to repetition and overuse as well as quick cutting motions that involve acceleration and deceleration. These injuries often upset this balance between mobility and stability of the joint which causes damage to other soft tissues manifested as pain and other morbidity, such as osteoarthritis. The healing of ligament and tendon injuries varies from tissue to tissue. Tendinopathies are ubiquitous and can take up to 12 months for the pain to subside before one could return to normal activity. A ruptured medial collateral ligament (MCL) can generally heal spontaneously; however, its remodeling process takes years and its biomechanical properties remain inferior when compared to the normal MCL. It is also known that a midsubstance anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear has limited healing capability, and reconstruction by soft tissue grafts has been regularly performed to regain knee function. However, long term follow-up studies have revealed that 20–25% of patients experience unsatisfactory results. Thus, a better understanding of the function of ligaments and tendons, together with knowledge on their healing potential, may help investigators to develop novel strategies to accelerate and improve the healing process of ligaments and tendons. With thousands of new papers published in the last ten years that involve biomechanics of ligaments and tendons, there is an increasing appreciation of this subject area. Such attention has positively impacted clinical practice. On the other hand, biomechanical data are complex in nature, and there is a danger of misinterpreting them. Thus, in these review, we will provide the readers with a brief overview of ligaments and tendons and refer them to appropriate methodologies used to

  15. THE EFFECTS OF A DAILY STRETCHING PROTOCOL ON PASSIVE GLENOHUMERAL INTERNAL ROTATION IN OVERHEAD THROWING COLLEGIATE ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Stephen Guffey, J.; Whitehead, Malcolm T.; Head, Penny

    2012-01-01

    Introduction/Purpose: Shoulder dysfunction and injury are common in throwing athletes. Loss of internal rotation has been correlated to shoulder pathologies. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a stretching protocol on passive internal rotation. The purpose of this study was assess the effects of a stretching protocol on passive internal rotation motion in the throwing shoulders of collegiate baseball players. Study Design: Pre-Post, intervention, using a within subjects comparison of a convenience sample. Methods: Glenohumeral internal rotation and external rotation of the throwing and non-throwing shoulders of NCAA Division I baseball players were measured using a universal goniometer. Determinations were made as to the degree of Glenohumeral Internal Rotation Deficit (GIRD) in the throwing shoulder. A daily (5 days per week), 12-week posterior capsule stretching program was administered. Post-stretching internal rotation and external rotation measures were again obtained. The coaches and athletic trainers of the included team monitored the players for shoulder injuries and innings of training/competition lost due to shoulder injuries during the 12 week intervention. Results: A significant increase in range of motion was found for dominant arm internal rotation (IR) and total range of motion (TOT) following the stretching program. No statistically significant improvement in range of motion was found for external rotation (ER), non-throwing arm internal rotation (NDIR), non-throwing arm external rotation (NDER), and non-throwing arm total motion (NDTOT). Conclusions: Implementation of a posterior capsule stretching program may be helpful to facilitate increased passive internal rotation range of motion at the glenohumeral joint. Further research should be performed using a control group not receiving the stretching program in order to more completely establish the impact of stretching on measures of passive glenohumeral range of motion. Level of

  16. Anterior cruciate ligament allograft transplantation for intraarticular ligamentous reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Goertzen, M; Dellmann, A; Gruber, J; Clahsen, H; Bürrig, K F

    1992-01-01

    A multiplicity of surgical operations have been developed in an attempt to achieve satisfactory function after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair. None of these procedures have been able to reproduce the fiber organization anatomy of attachment site, vascularity, or function of the ACL. Twenty-nine foxhounds received a deep-frozen bone-ACL-bone allograft and a ligament augmentation device (LAD). Biomechanical, microvascular, and histological changes were evaluated 3, 6, and 12 months following implantation. The maximum loads of the allograft/LADs were 34.3% (387.2 N) after 3 months, 49.3% (556.6 N) after 6 months, and 61.1% (698.8 N) after a year. The maximum load was 69.1% (780 N). In general, after 6 months the allografts showed normal collagen orientation. The allografts demonstrated no evidence of infection or immune reaction. No bone ingrowth into the LAD was observed. Polarized light microscopy and periodic acid-schiff staining showed that the new bone-ligament substance interface had intact fiber orientation at the area of the ligament insertion. Microvascular examination using the Spalteholtz technique revealed revascularization and the importance of an infrapatellar fat pad for the nourishment of ACL allografts.

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament allograft transplantation for intraarticular ligamentous reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Goertzen, M; Dellmann, A; Gruber, J; Clahsen, H; Bürrig, K F

    1992-01-01

    A multiplicity of surgical operations have been developed in an attempt to achieve satisfactory function after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair. None of these procedures have been able to reproduce the fiber organization anatomy of attachment site, vascularity, or function of the ACL. Twenty-nine foxhounds received a deep-frozen bone-ACL-bone allograft and a ligament augmentation device (LAD). Biomechanical, microvascular, and histological changes were evaluated 3, 6, and 12 months following implantation. The maximum loads of the allograft/LADs were 34.3% (387.2 N) after 3 months, 49.3% (556.6 N) after 6 months, and 61.1% (698.8 N) after a year. The maximum load was 69.1% (780 N). In general, after 6 months the allografts showed normal collagen orientation. The allografts demonstrated no evidence of infection or immune reaction. No bone ingrowth into the LAD was observed. Polarized light microscopy and periodic acid-schiff staining showed that the new bone-ligament substance interface had intact fiber orientation at the area of the ligament insertion. Microvascular examination using the Spalteholtz technique revealed revascularization and the importance of an infrapatellar fat pad for the nourishment of ACL allografts. PMID:1389780

  18. Immunohistochemical evaluation for outflow reconstruction using opened round ligament in living donor right posterior sector graft liver transplantation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sanada, Yukihiro; Sakuma, Yasunaru; Sasanuma, Hideki; Miki, Atsushi; Katano, Takumi; Hirata, Yuta; Okada, Noriki; Yamada, Naoya; Ihara, Yoshiyuki; Urahashi, Taizen; Sata, Naohiro; Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Mizuta, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing the opened round ligament as venous grafts during liver transplantation is useful but controversial, and there are no pathological analyses of this procedure. Herein, we describe the first reported case of a pathological analysis of an opened round ligament used as a venous patch graft in a living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). A 13-year-old female patient with biliary atresia underwent LDLT using a posterior segment graft from her mother. The graft had two hepatic veins (HVs), which included the right HV (RHV; 15 mm) and the inferior RHV (IRHV; 20 mm). The graft RHV and IRHV were formed into a single orifice using the donor’s opened round ligament (60 mm × 20 mm) as a patch graft during bench surgery; it was then anastomosed end-to-side with the recipient inferior vena cava. The recipient had no post-transplant complications involving the HVs, but she died of septic shock with persistent cholangitis and jaundice 86 d after LDLT. The HV anastomotic site had no stenosis or thrombus on autopsy. On pathology, there was adequate patency and continuity between the recipient’s HV and the donor’s opened round ligament. In addition, the stains for CD31 and CD34 on the inner membrane of the opened round ligament were positive. Hepatic venous reconstruction using the opened round ligament as a venous patch graft is effective in LDLT, as observed on pathology.

  19. Immunohistochemical evaluation for outflow reconstruction using opened round ligament in living donor right posterior sector graft liver transplantation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sanada, Yukihiro; Sakuma, Yasunaru; Sasanuma, Hideki; Miki, Atsushi; Katano, Takumi; Hirata, Yuta; Okada, Noriki; Yamada, Naoya; Ihara, Yoshiyuki; Urahashi, Taizen; Sata, Naohiro; Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Mizuta, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing the opened round ligament as venous grafts during liver transplantation is useful but controversial, and there are no pathological analyses of this procedure. Herein, we describe the first reported case of a pathological analysis of an opened round ligament used as a venous patch graft in a living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). A 13-year-old female patient with biliary atresia underwent LDLT using a posterior segment graft from her mother. The graft had two hepatic veins (HVs), which included the right HV (RHV; 15 mm) and the inferior RHV (IRHV; 20 mm). The graft RHV and IRHV were formed into a single orifice using the donor’s opened round ligament (60 mm × 20 mm) as a patch graft during bench surgery; it was then anastomosed end-to-side with the recipient inferior vena cava. The recipient had no post-transplant complications involving the HVs, but she died of septic shock with persistent cholangitis and jaundice 86 d after LDLT. The HV anastomotic site had no stenosis or thrombus on autopsy. On pathology, there was adequate patency and continuity between the recipient’s HV and the donor’s opened round ligament. In addition, the stains for CD31 and CD34 on the inner membrane of the opened round ligament were positive. Hepatic venous reconstruction using the opened round ligament as a venous patch graft is effective in LDLT, as observed on pathology. PMID:27678368

  20. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Bach, Bernard R.; Cohen, Mark S.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Cole, Brian J.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Nicholson, Gregory P.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) is a common surgery performed in professional, collegiate, and high school athletes. Purpose: To report patient demographics, surgical techniques, and outcomes of all UCLRs performed at a single institution from 2004 to 2014. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: All patients who underwent UCLR from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2014, at a single institution were identified. Charts were reviewed to determine patient age, sex, date of surgery, sport played, athletic level, surgical technique, graft type, and complications. Data were collected prospectively, and patients were contacted via phone calls to obtain the return-to-sport rate, Conway-Jobe score, Andrews-Timmerman score, and Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic (KJOC) Shoulder and Elbow score. Continuous variable data were reported as weighted means, and categorical variable data were reported as frequencies with percentages. Results: A total of 187 patients (188 elbows) underwent UCLR during the study period (92% male; mean age, 19.6 ± 4.7 years; 78.2% right elbows). There were 165 baseball players (87.8% of all patients), 155 of whom were pitchers (82.5% of all patients). Ninety-seven (51.6%) were college athletes, 68 (36.2%) high school athletes, and 7 (3.7%) professional athletes at the time of surgery. The docking technique was used in 110 (58.5%) patients while the double-docking technique was used in 78 (41.5%). An ipsilateral palmaris longus graft was used in 110 (58.5%) patients while a hamstring autograft was used in 48 (25.5%) patients. The ulnar nerve was subcutaneously transposed in 79 (42%) patients. Clinical follow-up data were available on 85 patients. Mean follow-up was 60 ± 30.8 months. Overall, 94.1% of patients were able to return to sport and had a Conway-Jobe score of good/excellent while 4.3% had a score of fair. The mean KJOC score was 90.4 ± 6.7 and mean Andrews-Timmerman score was 92.5 ± 7

  1. LIGAMENT-CONTROLLED EFFERVESCENT ATOMIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The operating principles and performance of a new type of spray nozzle are presented. This nozzle, termed a "ligament-controlled effervescent atomizer," was developed to allow consumer product manufacturers to replace volatile organic compound (VOC) solvents with water and hydroc...

  2. Arthroscopic debridement and biological resurfacing of the glenoid in glenohumeral arthritis.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Joe F; Bhatia, Deepak N; van Rooyen, Karin S; Du Toit, Donald F

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the intermediate-term results of an arthroscopic procedure to debride and resurface the arthritic glenoid, in a middle-aged population, using an acellular human dermal scaffold. Between 2003 and 2005, thirty-two consecutive patients underwent an arthroscopic debridement and biological glenoid resurfacing for glenohumeral arthritis. The diagnoses included primary osteoarthrosis (28 patients), arthritis after arthroscopic reconstruction for anterior instability (1 patient) and inflammatory arthritis (3 patients). All shoulders were assessed clinically using the Constant and Murley score, and results graded according to Neer's criteria. Statistical analysis was performed to determine significant parameters and associations. A significant improvement (P < 0.0001) in each parameter of the subjective evaluation component (severity of pain, limitation in daily living and recreational activities) of the Constant score was observed. The Constant and Murley score increased significantly (P < 0.0001) from a median of 40 points (range 26-63) pre-operatively to 64.5 (range 19-84) at the final assessment. Overall, the procedure was considered as "successful outcome" in 23 patients (72%) and as a "failure" in 9 patients (28%). According to Neer's criteria, the result was categorized as excellent in 9 (28%), satisfactory in 14 (44%) and unsatisfactory in 9 (28%). Within the unsatisfactory group, there were five conversions to prosthetic arthroplasty. A standard magnetic resonance imaging was performed on 22 patients in the successful outcome group; glenoid cartilage was identified in 12 (thick in 5, intermediate in 1, thin in 6) and could not be identified in 10 patients (complete/incomplete loss in 5, technical difficulties in 5). Overall, five complications included transient axillary nerve paresis, foreign-body reaction to biological material, inter-layer dissociation, mild chronic non-specific synovitis and post-traumatic contusion

  3. Glenohumeral internal rotation deficit in the asymptomatic professional pitcher and its relationship to humeral retroversion.

    PubMed

    Tokish, John M; Curtin, Michael S; Kim, Young-Kyu; Hawkins, Richard J; Torry, Michael R

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if glenohumeral internal rotation deficits (GIRD) exist in an asymptomatic population of professional pitchers, and to assess whether these changes are primarily a bony or soft tissue adaptation. Twenty three, active, asymptomatic professional (Major League Baseball) pitchers volunteered for the study. Clinical measures of glenohumeral ranges of motion, laxity, GIRD, as well as radiographic measures of humeral retroversion were taken by two independent orthopaedic surgeons. Data comparing side to side differences in range of motion, laxity, and humeral retroversion were analyzed for statistical significance using a paired t-test for continuous data and a Chi-squared test for ordinal data, with a significance set at 0.05. Evaluations of statistical correlations between different measurement parameters were accomplished using a Pearson product moment correlation. We hypothesized GIRD will be positively correlated with humeral retroversion (HR) in the pitching arm. All clinical and radiographic measures were made in the field, at spring training, by physicians of both private and institutional based sports medicine practices. For the entire group, significant differences were exhibited for HR, external rotation at 90° and internal rotation at 90°, for dominant vs. non-dominant arms. GIRD of greater than 25° was noted in 10/23 of pitchers. In this group, HR was significantly increased and correlated to GIRD. No such increase or correlation was noted for the non-GIRD group. GIRD is a common finding in asymptomatic professional pitchers, and is related to humeral retroversion. Thus internal rotation deficits should not be used as the sole screening tool to diagnose the disabled throwing shoulder. Key pointsGIRD is relatively common in asymptomatic baseball pitchers (35-43%).Large ranges (-45 to 5°) and a large standard deviation (±16°) were noted suggesting that GIRD is quite variable in this population.GIRD is a variable

  4. HIP AND GLENOHUMERAL PASSIVE RANGE OF MOTION IN COLLEGIATE SOFTBALL PLAYERS

    PubMed Central

    Plummer, Hillary; Brambeck, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Range of motion deficits at the hip and glenohumeral joint (GHJ) may contribute to the incidence of injury in softball players. With injury in softball players on the rise, softball related studies in the literature are important. The purpose of this study was to examine hip and GHJ passive range of motion (PROM) patterns in collegiate softball players. Hypothesis It was hypothesized that the position players would exhibit significantly different PROM patterns than pitchers. Additionally, position players would exhibit significantly different side-to-side differences in PROM for both the hip and GHJ compared to pitchers. Study Design Prospective cohort study. Methods Forty-nine collegiate softball players (19.63 ± 1.15 years; 170.88 ± 8.08 cm; 72.96 ± 19.41 kg) participated. Passive hip and GHJ internal (IR) and external rotation (ER) measures were assessed. Glenohumeral PROM was measured with the participants supine with the arm abducted to 90 °. The measurements were recorded when the scapula began to move or a firm capsular end-feel was achieved. The hip was positioned in 90 ° of flexion and passively rotated until a capsular end-feel was achieved. Total PROM was calculated by taking the sum of IR and ER for both the hip and GHJ. Results No significant side-to-side PROM differences were observed in pitchers, at the GHJ or hip joint. Position players throwing side hip IR was significantly greater than the non-throwing side hip (p = 0.002). The non-throwing side hip had significantly greater ER compared to the throwing side hip (p = 0.002). When examining side-to-side differences at the GHJ, IR was significantly greater in the non-throwing shoulder (p = 0.047). No significant differences in total range of motion of the hip and GHJ were observed. Conclusion In the current study, position players displayed side-to-side differences in hip and GHJ IR PROM while no statistically significant differences were

  5. Current concepts in the management of recurrent anterior gleno-humeral joint instability with bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Ramhamadany, Eamon; Modi, Chetan S

    2016-01-01

    The management of recurrent anterior gleno-humeral joint instability is challenging in the presence of bone loss. It is often seen in young athletic patients and dislocations related to epileptic seizures and may involve glenoid bone deficiency, humeral bone deficiency or combined bipolar lesions. It is critical to accurately identify and assess the amount and position of bone loss in order to select the most appropriate treatment and reduce the risk of recurrent instability after surgery. The current literature suggests that coracoid and iliac crest bone block transfers are reliable for treating glenoid defects. The treatment of humeral defects is more controversial, however, although good early results have been reported after arthroscopic Remplissage for small defects. Larger humeral defects may require complex reconstruction or partial resurfacing. There is currently very limited evidence to support treatment strategies when dealing with bipolar lesions. The aim of this review is to summarise the current evidence regarding the best imaging modalities and treatment strategies in managing this complex problem relating particularly to contact athletes and dislocations related to epileptic seizures. PMID:27335809

  6. Preliminary evaluation of a robotic apparatus for the analysis of passive glenohumeral joint kinematics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The shoulder has the greatest range of motion of any joint in the human body. This is due, in part, to the complex interplay between the glenohumeral (GH) joint and the scapulothoracic (ST) articulation. Currently, our ability to study shoulder kinematics is limited, because existing models isolate the GH joint and rely on manual manipulation to create motion, and have low reproducibility. Similarly, most established techniques track shoulder motion discontinuously with limited accuracy. Methods To overcome these problems, we have designed a novel system in which the shoulder girdle is studied intact, incorporating both GH and ST motions. In this system, highly reproducible trajectories are created using a robotic actuator to control the intact shoulder girdle. High-speed cameras are employed to track retroreflective bone markers continuously. Results We evaluated this automated system’s capacity to reproducibly capture GH translation in intact and pathologic shoulder conditions. A pair of shoulders (left and right) were tested during forward elevation at baseline, with a winged scapula, and after creation of a full thickness supraspinatus tear. Discussion The system detected differences in GH translations as small as 0.5 mm between different conditions. For each, three consecutive trials were performed and demonstrated high reproducibility and high precision. PMID:23883431

  7. Inferior vena caval masses identified by echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, J. P.; Asher, C. R.; Xu, Y.; Huang, V.; Griffin, B. P.; Stewart, W. J.; Novick, A. C.; Thomas, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    The most common cause of an inferior vena caval mass is renal cell carcinoma that extends through the lumen, occurring in 47 of 62 patients (85%). Detection of an inferior vena caval mass affects the surgical approach requiring cardiopulmonary bypass for resection when the mass extends to the heart.

  8. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling.

    PubMed

    Zampetti, Benedetta; Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Boccardi, Edoardo; Loli, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Simultaneous bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of Cushing's syndrome. It is the most accurate procedure in the differential diagnosis of hypercortisolism of pituitary or ectopic origin, as compared with clinical, biochemical and imaging analyses, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88-100% and 67-100%, respectively. In the setting of hypercortisolemia, ACTH levels obtained from venous drainage of the pituitary are expected to be higher than the levels of peripheral blood, thus suggesting pituitary ACTH excess as the cause of hypercortisolism. Direct stimulation of the pituitary corticotroph with corticotrophin-releasing hormone enhances the sensitivity of the procedure. The procedure must be undertaken in the presence of hypercortisolemia, which suppresses both the basal and stimulated secretory activity of normal corticotrophic cells: ACTH measured in the sinus is, therefore, the result of the secretory activity of the tumor tissue. The poor accuracy in lateralization of BIPSS (positive predictive value of 50-70%) makes interpetrosal ACTH gradient alone not sufficient for the localization of the tumor. An accurate exploration of the gland is recommended if a tumor is not found in the predicted area. Despite the fact that BIPSS is an invasive procedure, the occurrence of adverse events is extremely rare, particularly if it is performed by experienced operators in referral centres. PMID:27352844

  9. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling.

    PubMed

    Zampetti, Benedetta; Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Boccardi, Edoardo; Loli, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Simultaneous bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of Cushing's syndrome. It is the most accurate procedure in the differential diagnosis of hypercortisolism of pituitary or ectopic origin, as compared with clinical, biochemical and imaging analyses, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88-100% and 67-100%, respectively. In the setting of hypercortisolemia, ACTH levels obtained from venous drainage of the pituitary are expected to be higher than the levels of peripheral blood, thus suggesting pituitary ACTH excess as the cause of hypercortisolism. Direct stimulation of the pituitary corticotroph with corticotrophin-releasing hormone enhances the sensitivity of the procedure. The procedure must be undertaken in the presence of hypercortisolemia, which suppresses both the basal and stimulated secretory activity of normal corticotrophic cells: ACTH measured in the sinus is, therefore, the result of the secretory activity of the tumor tissue. The poor accuracy in lateralization of BIPSS (positive predictive value of 50-70%) makes interpetrosal ACTH gradient alone not sufficient for the localization of the tumor. An accurate exploration of the gland is recommended if a tumor is not found in the predicted area. Despite the fact that BIPSS is an invasive procedure, the occurrence of adverse events is extremely rare, particularly if it is performed by experienced operators in referral centres.

  10. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling

    PubMed Central

    Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Boccardi, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of Cushing’s syndrome. It is the most accurate procedure in the differential diagnosis of hypercortisolism of pituitary or ectopic origin, as compared with clinical, biochemical and imaging analyses, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88–100% and 67–100%, respectively. In the setting of hypercortisolemia, ACTH levels obtained from venous drainage of the pituitary are expected to be higher than the levels of peripheral blood, thus suggesting pituitary ACTH excess as the cause of hypercortisolism. Direct stimulation of the pituitary corticotroph with corticotrophin-releasing hormone enhances the sensitivity of the procedure. The procedure must be undertaken in the presence of hypercortisolemia, which suppresses both the basal and stimulated secretory activity of normal corticotrophic cells: ACTH measured in the sinus is, therefore, the result of the secretory activity of the tumor tissue. The poor accuracy in lateralization of BIPSS (positive predictive value of 50–70%) makes interpetrosal ACTH gradient alone not sufficient for the localization of the tumor. An accurate exploration of the gland is recommended if a tumor is not found in the predicted area. Despite the fact that BIPSS is an invasive procedure, the occurrence of adverse events is extremely rare, particularly if it is performed by experienced operators in referral centres. PMID:27352844

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament and medial collateral ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Bollier, Matthew; Smith, Patrick A

    2014-10-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL) injuries have evolved over the past 30 years. A detailed physical examination along with careful review of the magnetic resonance imaging and stress radiographs will guide decision making. Early ACL reconstruction and acute MCL repair are recommended when there is increased medial joint space opening with valgus stress in extension, a significant meniscotibial deep MCL injury (high-riding medial meniscus), or a displaced tibial-sided superficial MCL avulsion (stener lesion of the knee). Delayed ACL reconstruction to allow for MCL healing is advised when increased valgus laxity is present only at 30 degrees of flexion and not at 0 degree. However, at the time of ACL surgery, medial stability has to be re-assessed after the reconstruction is completed. In patients with neutral alignment in the chronic setting, graft reconstruction of both the ACL and MCL is recommended.

  12. Profile of collagen gene expression in the glenohumeral capsule of patients with traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moises

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the expression of the genes COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1 and COL5A1 in the glenohumeral capsule of patients with traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder. Methods Samples from the glenohumeral capsule of 18 patients with traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder were evaluated. Male patients with a positive grip test and a Bankart lesion seen on magnetic resonance imaging were included. All the patients had suffered more than one episode of shoulder dislocation. Samples were collected from the injured glenohumeral capsule (anteroinferior region) and from the macroscopically unaffected region (anterosuperior region) of each patient. The expression of collagen genes was evaluated using the polymerase chain reaction after reverse transcription with quantitative analysis (qRT-PCR). Results The expression of COL1A1, COL1A2 and COL3A1 did not differ between the two regions of the shoulder capsule. However, it was observed that the expression of COL5A1 was significantly lower in the anteroinferior region than in the anterosuperior region (median ± interquartile range: 0.057 ± 0.052 vs. 0.155 ± 0.398; p = 0.028) of the glenohumeral capsule. Conclusion The affected region of the glenohumeral capsule in patients with shoulder instability presented reduced expression of COL5A1. PMID:26229875

  13. Bioreactor Design for Tendon/Ligament Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Lin, Zhen; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B.; Wang, Allan; Xu, Jiake

    2013-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injury is a worldwide health problem, but the treatment options remain limited. Tendon and ligament engineering might provide an alternative tissue source for the surgical replacement of injured tendon. A bioreactor provides a controllable environment enabling the systematic study of specific biological, biochemical, and biomechanical requirements to design and manufacture engineered tendon/ligament tissue. Furthermore, the tendon/ligament bioreactor system can provide a suitable culture environment, which mimics the dynamics of the in vivo environment for tendon/ligament maturation. For clinical settings, bioreactors also have the advantages of less-contamination risk, high reproducibility of cell propagation by minimizing manual operation, and a consistent end product. In this review, we identify the key components, design preferences, and criteria that are required for the development of an ideal bioreactor for engineering tendons and ligaments. PMID:23072472

  14. Cyclic loading in knee ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Weisman, G; Pope, M H; Johnson, R J

    1980-01-01

    The effect of cyclic loading on knee ligaments was studied both in vivo and in vitro. The compliance of the medial collateral ligaments of athletes participating in hockey, basketball, soccer, and downhill skiing was determined by using a specially built machine. Tests were conducted before and after participation in the various sports. Most subjects tested showed an increased compliance after their respective sporting activities. This observation was confirmed in the laboratory by imparting cyclic loading to 10 people under controlled conditions. The in vitro studies were conducted on the medial collateral ligaments of rats. These were tested to determine the effect of cyclic loading on the strength and stiffness of the ligaments. Results show a clear relationship between decreased stiffness or softening and a reduction in strength of the ligament. The amount of softening was related to the cyclic stress in the ligament.

  15. [Colposuspension of the sacrospinal ligament].

    PubMed

    Neri Ruz, E S; Ruiz Moreno, J A; Cárdenas Salinas, J

    1998-10-01

    During a period of 15 years, at the Hospital Central Militar, 36 operations were done to fix the vaginal cupule to sacrocyatic ligament, as therapeutic or preventive surgery; most of the fixations were together with vaginal hysterectomy by genital prolapse; and six of them were as surgical therapy of vaginal cupule prolapse. Complications were in 2.8% (one case), recidive of cupule prolapse and in 2.8% pudendal vein lesion. Long term result has been excellent, with minimal morbidity.

  16. Unilateral aplasia of both cruciate ligaments

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Aplasia of both cruciate ligaments is a rare congenital disorder. A 28-year-old male presented with pain and the feeling of instability of his right knee after trauma. The provided MRI and previous arthroscopy reports did not indicate any abnormalities except cruciate ligament tears. He was referred to us for reconstruction of both cruciate ligaments. The patient again underwent arthroscopy which revealed a hypoplasia of the medial trochlea and an extremely narrow intercondylar notch. The tibia revealed a missing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) footprint and a single bump with a complete coverage with articular cartilage. There was no room for an ACL graft. A posterior cruciate ligament could not be identified. The procedure was ended since a ligament reconstruction did not appear reasonable. A significant notch plasty if not a partial resection of the condyles would have been necessary to implant a ligament graft. It is most likely that this would not lead to good knee stability. If the surgeon would have retrieved the contralateral hamstrings at the beginning of the planned ligament reconstruction a significant damage would have occurred to the patient. Even in seemingly clear diagnostic findings the arthroscopic surgeon should take this rare abdnormality into consideration and be familiar with the respective radiological findings. We refer the abnormal finding of only one tibial spine to as the "dromedar-sign" as opposed to the two (medial and a lateral) tibial spines in a normal knee. This may be used as a hint for aplasia of the cruciate ligaments. PMID:20184748

  17. Inferior alveolar nerve block: Alternative technique

    PubMed Central

    Thangavelu, K.; Kannan, R.; Kumar, N. Senthil

    2012-01-01

    Background: Inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) is a technique of dental anesthesia, used to produce anesthesia of the mandibular teeth, gingivae of the mandible and lower lip. The conventional IANB is the most commonly used the nerve block technique for achieving local anesthesia for mandibular surgical procedures. In certain cases, however, this nerve block fails, even when performed by the most experienced clinician. Therefore, it would be advantageous to find an alternative simple technique. Aim and Objective: The objective of this study is to find an alternative inferior alveolar nerve block that has a higher success rate than other routine techniques. To this purpose, a simple painless inferior alveolar nerve block was designed to anesthetize the inferior alveolar nerve. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in Oral surgery department of Vinayaka Mission's dental college Salem from May 2009 to May 2011. Five hundred patients between the age of 20 years and 65 years who required extraction of teeth in mandible were included in the study. Out of 500 patients 270 were males and 230 were females. The effectiveness of the IANB was evaluated by using a sharp dental explorer in the regions innervated by the inferior alveolar, lingual, and buccal nerves after 3, 5, and 7 min, respectively. Conclusion: This study concludes that inferior alveolar nerve block is an appropriate alternative nerve block to anesthetize inferior alveolar nerve due to its several advantages. PMID:25885503

  18. The Effects of Latarjet Reconstruction on Glenohumeral Instability in the Presence of Combined Bony Defects

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ronak Maneklal; Walia, Piyush; Gottschalk, Lionel; Jones, Morgan H.; Fening, Stephen D.; Miniaci, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Recurrent glenohumeral instability is often as a result of underlying bony defects in the glenoid and/or humeral head. Anterior glenoid augmentation with a bone block (i.e. Latarjet) has been recommended for glenoid bone loss in the face of recurrent instability. However, no study has investigated the effect of Latarjet augmentation in the setting of both glenoid and humeral head defects (Hill-Sachs Defects (HSD)). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stability achieved through a Latarjet procedure in the presence of combined bony defects. Methods: Eighteen fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens were tested at all combinations of glenohumeral abduction (ABD) angles of 20°, 40°, and 60° and three external rotation (ER) levels (0°, 40°, and 80°). Each experiment comprised of anterior dislocation by translating the glenoid under a 50N medial load applied on the humerus, simulating the static load of soft tissues. Translational distance and medial-lateral displacement of the humeral head, along with horizontal reaction forces were recorded for every trial. Specimens were tested in an intact condition (no defect), different combinations of defects, and with Latarjet augmentation. The Latarjet was performed for 20% and 30% glenoid defects by transferring the specimen's coracoid process anterior to the glenoid flush with the articulating surface. Four different humeral head defects were created of sizes 6%, 19%, 31%, and 44% of humeral diameter. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed with statistical significance set at p <0.05. Results: Results are summarized in Fig. 1. The vertical axis represents the normalized distance to dislocation with respect to the values of the intact joint. The horizontal axis represents the varying sizes and combinations of bony defects. At 20° ABD and 0°ER, increasing HSD size did not affect percentage of intact translation with a constant glenoid defect of 20% before and after Latarjet

  19. The Effects of Latarjet Reconstruction on Glenohumeral Instability in the Presence of Combined Bony Defects

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ronak M.; Walia, Piyush; Gottschalk, Lionel; Jones, Morgan H.; Fening, Stephen D.; Miniaci, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Recurrent glenohumeral instability is often a result of underlying bony defects in the glenoid and/or humeral head. Anterior glenoid augmentation with a bone block (i.e. Latarjet) has been recommended for glenoid bone loss in the face of recurrent instability. However, no study has investigated the effect of Latarjet augmentation in the setting of both glenoid and humeral head defects (Hill-Sachs Defects (HSD)). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stability achieved through a Latarjet procedure in the presence of combined bony defects. Our hypothesis was that Latarjet augmentation would increase shoulder stability for glenoid defects with small HSD, but have limited success in cases with large concomitant HSD. Methods: Eighteen fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens were tested at combinations of glenohumeral abduction (ABD) angles of 20°, 40°, and 60° and external rotation (ER) angles of 0°, 40°, and 80°. Each experiment applied a 50N medial load on the humerus to replicate the static load of soft tissues, and then simulated anterior dislocation by translating the glenoid in an anterior direction. Translational distance and medial-lateral displacement of the humeral head, along with horizontal reaction forces, were recorded for every trial. Specimens were tested in an intact condition (no defect), different combinations of defects, and with Latarjet augmentation. The Latarjet was performed for 20% and 30% glenoid defects by transferring the specimen’s coracoid process anterior to the glenoid flush with the articulating surface. Results: Results are summarized in Fig. 1. The vertical axis represents the normalized distance to dislocation with respect to the values of the intact joint. The horizontal axis represents the varying sizes and combinations of bony defects. Latarjet augmentation improved stability for every combination of bony defects. At 20° ABD, 0°ER, and 20% glenoid defect size, the percentage of intact translation did not

  20. Intra-articular infiltration therapy for patients with glenohumeral osteoarthritis: A systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Colen, Sascha; Geervliet, Pieter; Haverkamp, Daniël; Van Den Bekerom, Michel P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Conservative treatments are especially in patients with glenohumeral osteoarthritis (GH-OA) important, since shoulder arthroplasty has its limitations. In this systematic review, we will evaluate the current evidence regarding the efficacy of intra-articular (IA) infiltration treatment options in patients with GH-OA. Materials and Methods: The following databases are searched: Pubmed/Medline, Cochrane Clinical Trial Register, Embase and the WHO clinical trial register. All IA injection products used for the treatment of shoulder OA in humans are included. Results: A total of 8 studies could be included in this review. Hyaluronic acid (HA) showed effect sizes of 2.07, 2.02 and 2.11 at 6, 12 and 26 weeks follow-up, respectively. Placebo (1.60, 1.82 and 1.68) also showed stable effect sizes at the same time points. The efficacy of corticosteroids (CS) decreased rapidly at follow-up (1.08, 0.43 and 0.19). Although statistical significant, the maximum difference in effect sizes between HA and placebo was only 0.43 with absolute values between 2.0 and 6.4 on a 100-point visual analogue score for pain. Conclusion: IA treatment with HA has a good efficacy at follow-up compared to baseline. However, the difference in efficacy between HA and placebo never reaches the minimal clinically important difference at any of the follow-up points. We are not able to give clear recommendations for the use of IA CS injections in patients with GH-OA. In future research, we recommend focusing on sufficiently powered randomized trials to compare the efficacies of HA, CS, placebo and other IA treatment options in patients with GH-OA. PMID:25538430

  1. Anterior Glenohumeral Laxity and Stiffness After a Shoulder-Strengthening Program in Collegiate Cheerleaders

    PubMed Central

    Laudner, Kevin G; Metz, Betsy; Thomas, David Q

    2013-01-01

    Context Approximately 62% of all cheerleaders sustain some type of orthopaedic injury during their cheerleading careers. Furthermore, the occurrence of such injuries has led to inquiry regarding optimal prevention techniques. One possible cause of these injuries may be related to inadequate conditioning in cheerleaders. Objective To determine whether a strength and conditioning program produces quantifiable improvements in anterior glenohumeral (GH) laxity and stiffness. Design Descriptive laboratory study. Setting University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A sample of 41 collegiate cheerleaders (24 experimental and 17 control participants) volunteered. No participants had a recent history (in the past 6 months) of upper extremity injury or any history of upper extremity surgery. Intervention(s) The experimental group completed a 6-week strength and conditioning program between the pretest and posttest measurements; the control group did not perform any strength training between tests. Main Outcome Measure(s) We measured anterior GH laxity and stiffness with an instrumented arthrometer. We conducted a group × time analysis of variance with repeated measures on time (P < .05) to determine differences between groups. Results A significant interaction was demonstrated, with the control group having more anterior GH laxity at the posttest session than the strengthening group (P = .03, partial η2 = 0.11). However, no main effect for time (P = .92) or group (P = .97) was observed. In another significant interaction, the control group had less anterior GH stiffness at the posttest session than the strengthening group (P = .03, partial η2 = 0.12). Main effects for time (P = .02) and group (P = .004) were also significant. Conclusions Cheerleaders who participate in a shoulder-strengthening program developed less anterior GH laxity and more stiffness than cheerleaders in the control group. PMID:23672322

  2. Dynamic MR imaging and stress testing in glenohumeral instability: comparison with normal shoulders and clinical/surgical findings.

    PubMed

    Hodge, D K; Beaulieu, C F; Thabit, G H; Gold, G E; Bergman, A G; Butts, R K; Dillingham, M F; Herfkens, R J

    2001-05-01

    Our objectives were to test the hypotheses that: 1) during shoulder motion, glenohumeral alignment differs between asymptomatic shoulders and those with symptomatic instability; 2) during magnetic resonance (MR)-monitored physical exam or stress testing, glenohumeral alignment differs between asymptomatic shoulders and those with instability; and 3) glenohumeral translation during MR stress testing correlates with findings of shoulder instability by clinical exam and exam under anesthesia (EUA). Using an open-configuration 0.5 T MR imaging (MRI) system, we studied symptomatic shoulders in 11 subjects and compared them to their contralateral asymptomatic shoulders. Each shoulder was studied during abduction/adduction and internal/external rotation to determine the humeral head position on the glenoid. An examiner also performed the MR stress test on each shoulder by applying manual force on the humeral head during imaging. All shoulders were assigned an instability grade from the MR stress test, and this grade was correlated with: 1) clinical exam grade assigned during preoperative assessment by an orthopedic surgeon and 2) intraoperative instability grade by EUA immediately preceding arthroscopy. With dynamic abduction and internal/external rotation, the humeral head remained centered on the glenoid in 9 of 11 shoulders, but in two subjects there were dramatic demonstrations of subluxation. With stress testing, a trend toward more joint laxity was demonstrated in symptomatic than in asymptomatic joints (P = 0.11). MR grading of instability correlated directly with clinical grading in six cases and underestimated the degree of instability relative to clinical exam in the other cases. MR instability grading systematically underestimated instability compared with EUA in 7 of the 10 cases that underwent surgical repair. We concluded that dynamic MR evaluation of glenohumeral alignment did not demonstrate abnormalities in symptomatic shoulders in 8 of 10 patients

  3. Postoperative rehabilitation of the posterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Edson, Craig J; Fanelli, Gregory C; Beck, John D

    2010-12-01

    Diagnosis and management of posterior cruciate ligament injuries has evolved, and now the treatment often includes surgical intervention. The purpose of this paper is to define the current approach to postsurgical management after the posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, review conservative management, and discuss surgical outcomes using a specified program.

  4. Colorectal and uterine movement and tension of the inferior hypogastric plexus in cadavers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypotheses on somatovisceral dysfunction often assume interference by stretch or compression of the nerve supply to visceral structures. The purpose of this study is to examine the potential of pelvic visceral movement to create tension of the loose connective tissue that contains the fine branches of the inferior hypogastric nerve plexus. Methods Twenty eight embalmed human cadavers were examined. Pelvic visceral structures were displaced by very gentle 5 N unidirectional tension and the associated movement of the endopelvic fascia containing the inferior hypogastric plexus that this caused was measured. Results Most movement of the fascia containing the inferior hypogastric plexus was obtained by pulling the rectosigmoid junction or broad ligament of the uterus. The plexus did not cross any vertebral joints and the fascia containing it did not move on pulling the hypogastric nerve. Conclusions Uterine and rectosigmoid displacement produce most movement of the fascia containing the hypogastric nerve plexus, potentially resulting in nerve tension. In the living this might occur as a consequence of menstruation, pregnancy or constipation. This may be relevant to somatovisceral reflex theories of the effects of manual therapy on visceral conditions. PMID:22520735

  5. Assessing Posterior Shoulder Contracture: The Reliability and Validity of Measuring Glenohumeral Joint Horizontal Adduction

    PubMed Central

    Laudner, Kevin G; Stanek, Justin M; Meister, Keith

    2006-01-01

    Context: Increased contracture of the dominant posterior shoulder in throwing athletes has been associated with the development of altered shoulder rotational motion as well as several shoulder conditions. Clinicians must be able to accurately and reliably measure posterior shoulder contractures during the evaluation of such athletes in order to provide appropriate treatment. Objective: To evaluate the reliability and validity of assessing posterior shoulder contracture by measuring supine glenohumeral (GH) horizontal adduction. Design: Descriptive with repeated measures. Setting: The biomechanics laboratory at Illinois State University (Normal, IL) and the athletic training room in Surprise, AZ. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-four shoulders were tested in 12 subjects (age = 21.9 ± 4.3 years, height = 175.0 ± 10.0 cm, mass = 82.4 ± 19.1 kg) for determination of reliability, and 46 shoulders were tested in 23 professional baseball pitchers (age = 21.25 ± 1.66 years, height = 190.0 ± 5.0 cm, mass = 88.45 ± 6.99 kg) for determination of validity. Main Outcome Measure(s): We examined intratester and intertester reliability over 3 testing sessions by having 2 examiners measure GH horizontal adduction with the subject in a supine position with the scapula stabilized. To determine the validity and clinical usefulness of this measurement, we examined the relationship between GH horizontal adduction motion and internal shoulder rotational motion among a group of baseball pitchers. Results: Intraclass correlation coefficients were high for intratester (0.93, SEM = 1.64°) and intertester (0.91, SEM = 1.71°) measurements. This measurement was also shown to have a moderate to good relationship with lost internal shoulder rotational motion ( r = .72, P = .001) of the dominant arm among the baseball pitchers. Conclusions: Based on the results of this study, we found that measuring GH horizontal adduction with the subject supine and the scapula stabilized is a

  6. Functional organization of the left inferior precentral sulcus: dissociating the inferior frontal eye field and the inferior frontal junction.

    PubMed

    Derrfuss, J; Vogt, V L; Fiebach, C J; von Cramon, D Y; Tittgemeyer, M

    2012-02-15

    Two eye fields have been described in the human lateral frontal cortex: the frontal eye field (FEF) and the inferior frontal eye field (iFEF). The FEF has been extensively studied and has been found to lie at the ventral part of the superior precentral sulcus. Much less research, however, has focused on the iFEF. Recently, it was suggested that the iFEF is located at the dorsal part of the inferior precentral sulcus. A similar location was proposed for the inferior frontal junction area (IFJ), an area thought to be involved in cognitive control processes. The present study used fMRI to clarify the topographical and functional relationship of the iFEF and the IFJ in the left hemispheres of individual participants. The results show that both the iFEF and the IFJ are indeed located at the dorsal part of the inferior precentral sulcus. Nevertheless, the activations were spatially dissociable in every individual examined. The IFJ was located more towards the depth of the inferior precentral sulcus, close to the junction with the inferior frontal sulcus, whereas the iFEF assumed a more lateral, posterior and superior position. Furthermore, the results provided evidence for a functional double dissociation: the iFEF was activated only in a comparison of saccades vs. button presses, but not in a comparison of incongruent vs. congruent Stroop conditions, while the opposite pattern was found at the IFJ. These results provide evidence for a spatial and functional dissociation of two directly adjacent areas in the left posterior frontal lobe.

  7. Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi; de Leeuw, Peter A J; Malagelada, Francesc; Manzanares, M Cristina; Götzens, Víctor; van Dijk, C Niek

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the ankle ligaments is important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Ankle ligament injury is the most frequent cause of acute ankle pain. Chronic ankle pain often finds its cause in laxity of one of the ankle ligaments. In this pictorial essay, the ligaments around the ankle are grouped, depending on their anatomic orientation, and each of the ankle ligaments is discussed in detail.

  8. TREM-1, HMGB1 and RAGE in the Shoulder Tendon: Dual Mechanisms for Inflammation Based on the Coincidence of Glenohumeral Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Thankam, Finosh G.; Dilisio, Matthew F.; Dietz, Nicholas E.

    2016-01-01

    Rotator cuff injury (RCI) is a major musculoskeletal disorder in the adult population where inflammation and pain are major contributing factors. Coincidence of other clinical conditions like glenohumeral arthritis aggravates inflammation and delays the healing response. The mechanism and signaling factors underlying the sustenance of inflammation in the rotator cuff joint are largely unknown. The present article aims to elucidate the involvement of inflammatory molecule, TREM-1 (Triggering Receptors Expressed on Myeloid cells-1), and danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), including high mobility group protein 1 (HMGB-1) and RAGE (receptor for advanced glycation end products), in the setting of RCI with respect to the severity of glenohumeral arthritis. Biceps tendons (15 specimens) from the shoulder and blood (11 samples) from patients with glenohumeral arthritis (Group-1, n = 4) and without glenohumeral arthritis (Group-2, n = 11) after RCI surgery were obtained for the study. Molecular and morphological alterations between the groups were compared using histology, immunofluorescence, RT-PCR and flow cytometry. MRI and histomorphology assessment revealed severe inflammation in Group-1 patients while in Group-2 ECM disorganization was prominent without any hallmarks of inflammation. A significant increase in TREM-1 expression in circulating neutrophils and monocytes was observed. Elevated levels of TREM-1, HMGB-1 and RAGE in Group-1 patients along with CD68+ and CD16+ cells confirmed DAMP-mediated inflammation. Expression of TREM-1 in the tendon of Group-2 patients even in the absence of immune cells presented a new population of TREM-expressing cells that were confirmed by real-time PCR analysis and immunofluorescence. Expression of HMGB-1 and RAGE in the biceps tendon from the shoulder of patients without glenohumeral arthritis implied TREM-1-mediated inflammation without involving immune cells, whereas in patients with glenohumeral arthritis

  9. [Inferior alveolar nerve repositioning in implant surgery].

    PubMed

    Ardekian, L; Salnea, J; Abu el-Naaj, I; Gutmacher, T; Peled, M

    2001-04-01

    Severe resorption of the posterior mandible possesses one of the most difficult restorative challenges to the implant surgery today. This resorption may prevent the placement of dental implants without the potentially damage to the inferior alveolar nerve. To create the opportunity of insertion dental implants of adequately length in those cases, the technique of nerve repositioning has been advocated. The purpose of this article is to describe two cases of nerve repositioning combined with placement of dental implants. Both cases showed appropriate postoperative healing without damage to the inferior alveolar nerve. The inferior alveolar nerve repositioning technique seems to be an acceptable alternative to augmentation procedure prior to dental implants placement in cases exhibiting atrophic posterior mandibular ridges. PMID:11494807

  10. Lateralization Technique and Inferior Alveolar Nerve Transposition

    PubMed Central

    Sanches, Marco Antonio; Ramalho, Gabriel Cardoso; Manzi, Marcello Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Bone resorption of the posterior mandible can result in diminished bone edge and, therefore, the installation of implants in these regions becomes a challenge, especially in the presence of the mandibular canal and its contents, the inferior alveolar nerve. Several treatment alternatives are suggested: the use of short implants, guided bone regeneration, appositional bone grafting, distraction osteogenesis, inclined implants tangential to the mandibular canal, and the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve. The aim was to elucidate the success rate of implants in the lateralization technique and in inferior alveolar nerve transposition and to determine the most effective sensory test. We conclude that the success rate is linked to the possibility of installing implants with long bicortical anchor which favors primary stability and biomechanics. PMID:27433360

  11. Synthetic grafts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Rizzello, Giacomo; Berton, Alessandra; Fumo, Caterina; Maltese, Ludovica; Khan, Wasim S; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2013-11-01

    Several artificial biomaterials are available as ligament grafts. No ideal prosthesis mimicking natural human tissue have been found to date. The emerging field of tissue engineering holds the promise to use artificial ligaments as a viable alternative to the patellar or hamstring tendon autografts. Preliminary studies support the idea that these biomaterials have the ability to provide an alternative for autogenous grafts. However, no definitive conclusions have been found. Additionally, the incidence of postoperative complications varies within different studies. Prospective investigations are required to better understand the potential of artificial biomaterials as ligament grafts.

  12. Ligamentous laxity in secondary school athletes.

    PubMed

    Grana, W A; Moretz, J A

    1978-10-27

    An increase in ligamentous laxity has been said to predispose athletes to injury of the joint. To evaluate the usefulness of testing ligamentous laxity to predict a predisposition to injury in secondary school athletes, 166 male football players, 84 female basketball players, and 32 male basketball players were tested. The results were compared with those for 167 males and 223 females in high school but not involved in interscholastic sports. No correlation could be found between ligamentous laxity and the occurrence or type of injury.

  13. Anatomy of Inferior Mesenteric Artery in Fetuses.

    PubMed

    Nuzhat, Ayesha

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To analyze Inferior Mesenteric Artery in fetuses through its site of origin, length, diameter, and variation of its branches. Method. 100 fetuses were collected from various hospitals in Warangal at Kakatiya Medical College in Andhra Pradesh, India, and were divided into two groups, group I (second-trimester fetuses) and group II (third-trimester fetuses), followed by dissection. Result. (1) Site of Origin. In group I fetuses, origin of Inferior Mesenteric Artery was at third lumbar vertebra in 33 out of 34 fetuses (97.2%). In one fetus it was at first lumbar vertebra, 2.8%. In all group II fetuses, origin of Inferior Mesenteric Artery was at third lumbar vertebra. (2) Length. In group I fetuses it ranged between 18 and 30 mm, average being 24 mm except in one fetus where it was 48 mm. In group II fetuses the length ranged from 30 to 34 mm, average being 32 mm. (3) Diameter. In group I fetuses it ranged from 0.5 to 1 mm, and in group II fetuses it ranged from 1 to 2 mm, average being 1.5 mm. (4) Branches. Out of 34 fetuses of group I, 4 fetuses showed variation. In one fetus left colic artery was arising from abdominal aorta, 2.9%. In 3 fetuses, Inferior Mesenteric Artery was giving a branch to left kidney, 8.8%. Out of 66 fetuses in group II, 64 had normal branching. In one fetus left renal artery was arising from Inferior Mesenteric Artery, 1.5%, and in another fetus one accessory renal artery was arising from Inferior Mesenteric Artery and entering the lower pole of left kidney. Conclusion. Formation, course, and branching pattern of an artery depend on development and origin of organs to attain the actual adult position. PMID:27313956

  14. Braided nanofibrous scaffold for tendon and ligament tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Barber, John G; Handorf, Andrew M; Allee, Tyler J; Li, Wan-Ju

    2013-06-01

    Tendon and ligament (T/L) injuries present an important clinical challenge due to their intrinsically poor healing capacity. Natural healing typically leads to the formation of scar-like tissue possessing inferior mechanical properties. Therefore, tissue engineering has gained considerable attention as a promising alternative for T/L repair. In this study, we fabricated braided nanofibrous scaffolds (BNFSs) as a potential construct for T/L tissue engineering. Scaffolds were fabricated by braiding 3, 4, or 5 aligned bundles of electrospun poly(L-lactic acid) nanofibers, thus introducing an additional degree of flexibility to alter the mechanical properties of individual scaffolds. We observed that the Young's modulus, yield stress, and ultimate stress were all increased in the 3-bundle compared to the 4- and 5-bundle BNFSs. Interestingly, acellular BNFSs mimicked the normal tri-phasic mechanical behavior of native tendon and ligament (T/L) during loading. When cultured on the BNFSs, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) adhered, aligned parallel to the length of the nanofibers, and displayed a concomitant realignment of the actin cytoskeleton. In addition, the BNFSs supported hMSC proliferation and induced an upregulation in the expression of key pluripotency genes. When cultured on BNFSs in the presence of tenogenic growth factors and stimulated with cyclic tensile strain, hMSCs differentiated into the tenogenic lineage, evidenced most notably by the significant upregulation of Scleraxis gene expression. These results demonstrate that BNFSs provide a versatile scaffold capable of supporting both stem cell expansion and differentiation for T/L tissue engineering applications.

  15. Outcomes of Unilateral Inferior Oblique Myectomy Surgery in Inferior Oblique Overaction Due to Superior Oblique Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Yumuşak, Erhan; Yolcu, Ümit; Küçükevcilioğlu, Murat; Diner, Oktay; Mutlu, Fatih Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To present the outcomes of unilateral inferior oblique myectomy performed in patients with inferior oblique overaction due to superior oblique palsy. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven eyes of 27 patients that underwent inferior oblique myectomy surgery for superior oblique palsy between 2002 and 2008 were included. Inferior oblique overaction scores (between 0-4) at preoperative, early postoperative (within 1 week after surgery) and late postoperative (earliest 6 months) visits were reviewed. Results: There were 12 male and 15 female patients. Eighteen were operated on the right eye, and 9 were operated on the left eye. The mean age was 15.62±13.31 years, and the mean follow-up was 17±11.28 months (range, 6-60 months). Patients who had horizontal component and V-pattern deviation were excluded. Preoperative and early postoperative inferior oblique overaction scores were 2.55±0.75 and 0.14±0.36, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.01). This improvement was maintained up to the late postoperative period. Conclusion: Due to its promising short-term and long-term results, inferior oblique myectomy can be the first choice of surgery for inferior oblique overaction due to superior oblique palsy. PMID:27800253

  16. [Ankle braces prevent ligament injuries].

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Jon

    2002-09-01

    The Cochrane collaboration has performed a meta-analysis of all studies found on the prevention of ankle ligament injuries, frequent in sports like soccer, European handball and basketball. Interventions include the use of modified footwear and associated supports, training programmes and health education. Five randomized trials totalling 3,954 participants were included. With the exception of ankle disc training, all prophylactic interventions entailed the application of an external ankle support in the form of a semi-rigid orthosis, air-cast or high top shoes. The studies showed a significant reduction in the number of ankle sprains in individuals allocated to external ankle support. This reduction was greater for those with a previous history of ankle sprains.

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament repair - Series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... removed using a shaver or other instruments. Bone tunnels are made to place the new ligament (patellar ... used to secure the graft in the bone tunnels, although other methods of fixation are used depending ...

  18. Biomechanical Evaluation of Ligamentous Stabilizers of the Scaphoid and Lunate

    PubMed Central

    Short, Walter H.; Werner, Frederick W.; Green, Jason K.; Masaoka, Shunji

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of sectioning the scapholunate interosseous ligament, radioscaphocapitate ligament, and scaphotrapezial ligament on the kinematics of the scaphoid and lunate. Eight cadaver upper extremities were placed in a wrist joint simulator and moved in continuous cycles of flexion-extension and radial-ulnar deviation. Positional data of the scaphoid and lunate were obtained in the intact state, after the scapholunate ligament was cut; after the scapholunate and scaphotrapezial ligaments were cut; after the scapholunate, scaphotrapezial, and radioscaphocapitate ligaments were cut; and after all 3 ligaments were cut and the specimen was placed through an additional 1,000 cycles of flexion-extension. Cutting the scapholunate ligament caused changes in scaphoid and lunate motion during flexion-extension, but not radial-ulnar deviation. Additional sectioning of the scaphotrapezial ligament followed by the radioscaphocapitate ligament caused further kinematic changes in these carpal bones. One thousand cycles of motion after all 3 ligaments were sectioned caused additional kinematic changes in the scaphoid and lunate. The scapholunate ligament appears to be the primary stabilizer between the scaphoid and lunate. The radioscaphocapitate and scaphotrapezial ligaments are secondary restraints. Repetitive cyclic motion after ligament sectioning appears to have additional deleterious effects on carpal kinematics. PMID:12457349

  19. Rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Halling, A H; Howard, M E; Cawley, P W

    1993-04-01

    Rehabilitation of the anterior cruciate ligament absent or reconstructed knee is becoming a true artform. Accelerated, but controlled rehabilitation, is becoming more commonplace. Scientific-based data along with clinical experiences are the basis of the rehabilitation guidelines brought forth in this article. Anterior cruciate ligament strain and implications for exercise, continuous passive motion, proprioceptive exercise, and the role of knee bracing are all discussed in relation to the overall rehabilitation program.

  20. A combination of Latarjet and Remplissage for treatment of severe glenohumeral instability and bone loss. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ranne, Juha O.; Sarimo, Janne J.; Heinonen, Olli J.; Orava, Sakari Y.

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent glenohumeral instability is challenging to treat when large bony defects are present in the anterior glenoid and there is a large Hill–Sachs lesion. We present a case with extensive glenoid and humeral bone loss treated with open Latarjet procedure combined with posterior arthroscopic Remplissage. 3.5 years after surgery, there have been no dislocations or any subjective signs of instability. After half a year, the patient was able to return to work as an airline pilot. Constant score has improved from 33 to 74 and the Oxford instability score from 8 to 46. We find that in young patients with difficult instability combining the Latarjet and Remplissage is a good and replicable method. PMID:24403748

  1. A combination of Latarjet and Remplissage for treatment of severe glenohumeral instability and bone loss. A case report.

    PubMed

    Ranne, Juha O; Sarimo, Janne J; Heinonen, Olli J; Orava, Sakari Y

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent glenohumeral instability is challenging to treat when large bony defects are present in the anterior glenoid and there is a large Hill-Sachs lesion. We present a case with extensive glenoid and humeral bone loss treated with open Latarjet procedure combined with posterior arthroscopic Remplissage. 3.5 years after surgery, there have been no dislocations or any subjective signs of instability. After half a year, the patient was able to return to work as an airline pilot. Constant score has improved from 33 to 74 and the Oxford instability score from 8 to 46. We find that in young patients with difficult instability combining the Latarjet and Remplissage is a good and replicable method.

  2. The Cruciate Ligaments in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Parcells, Bertrand W; Tria, Alfred J

    2016-01-01

    The early knee replacements were hinge designs that ignored the ligaments of the knee and resurfaced the joint, allowing freedom of motion in a single plane. Advances in implant fixation paved the way for modern designs, including the posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that sacrifices both cruciate ligaments while substituting for the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and the cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA designs that sacrifice the anterior cruciate ligament but retain the PCL. The early bicruciate retaining (BCR) TKA designs suffered from loosening and early failures. Townley and Cartier designed BCR knees that had better clinical results but the surgical techniques were challenging.Kinematic studies suggest that normal motion relies on preservation of both cruciate ligaments. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty retains all knee ligaments and closely matches normal motion, while PS and CR TKA deviate further from normal. The 15% to 20% dissatisfaction rate with current TKA has renewed interest in the BCR design. Replication of normal knee kinematics and proprioception may address some of the dissatisfaction.

  3. Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Modulates Inflammation and Scarring after Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Connie S.; Leiferman, Ellen M.; Frisch, Kayt E.; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah E.; Brickson, Stacey L.; Murphy, William L.; Baer, Geoffrey S.; Vanderby, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Ligaments have limited regenerative potential and as a consequence, repair is protracted and results in a mechanically inferior tissue more scar-like than native ligament. We previously reported that a single injection of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) delivered at the time of injury, decreased the number of M2 macrophage-associated inflammatory cytokines. Based on these results, we hypothesized that IL-1Ra administered after injury and closer to peak inflammation (as would occur clinically), would more effectively decrease inflammation and thereby improve healing. Since IL-1Ra has a short half-life, we also investigated the effect of multiple injections. The objective of this study was to elucidate healing of a medial collateral ligament (MCL) with either a single IL-1Ra injection delivered one day after injury or with multiple injections of IL-1Ra on days 1, 2, 3, and 4. One day after MCL injury, rats received either single or multiple injections of IL-1Ra or PBS. Tissue was then collected at days 5 and 11. Both single and multiple IL-1Ra injections reduced inflammatory cytokines, but did not change mechanical behavior. A single injection of IL-1Ra also reduced the number of myofibroblasts and increased type I procollagen. Multiple IL-1Ra doses provided no additive response and, in fact, reduced the M2 macrophages. Based on these results, a single dose of IL-1Ra was better at reducing the MCL-derived inflammatory cytokines compared to multiple injections. The changes in type I procollagen and myofibroblasts further suggest a single injection of IL-1Ra enhanced repair of the ligament but not sufficiently to improve functional behavior. PMID:24649870

  4. Anatomic reconstruction of chronic coracoclavicular ligament tears: arthroscopic-assisted approach with nonrigid mechanical fixation and graft augmentation.

    PubMed

    Natera, Luis; Sarasquete Reiriz, Juan; Abat, Ferran

    2014-10-01

    It has recently been suggested that all coracoclavicular ligament tears could be considered for surgery because nonoperative management might result in irreversible changes in the scapular position that could lead to muscle kinematic alterations that would perturb the shoulder girdle function and result in pain. In this technical note we describe an anatomic technique for the treatment of chronic coracoclavicular ligament tears that overcomes the issues related to open surgery, metal hardware, the inferior resistance to secondary displacement of only grafting and nonanatomic techniques, and the saw effect and anterior loop translation that can be seen in systems that surround the base of the coracoid. Our technique incorporates the use of a tendon graft and a nonrigid mechanical stabilizer that protects the graft from stretching during the process of healing and integration into bone, guaranteeing the maintenance of a reduced acromioclavicular joint. PMID:25473611

  5. Anatomic Reconstruction of Chronic Coracoclavicular Ligament Tears: Arthroscopic-Assisted Approach With Nonrigid Mechanical Fixation and Graft Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Natera, Luis; Sarasquete Reiriz, Juan; Abat, Ferran

    2014-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that all coracoclavicular ligament tears could be considered for surgery because nonoperative management might result in irreversible changes in the scapular position that could lead to muscle kinematic alterations that would perturb the shoulder girdle function and result in pain. In this technical note we describe an anatomic technique for the treatment of chronic coracoclavicular ligament tears that overcomes the issues related to open surgery, metal hardware, the inferior resistance to secondary displacement of only grafting and nonanatomic techniques, and the saw effect and anterior loop translation that can be seen in systems that surround the base of the coracoid. Our technique incorporates the use of a tendon graft and a nonrigid mechanical stabilizer that protects the graft from stretching during the process of healing and integration into bone, guaranteeing the maintenance of a reduced acromioclavicular joint. PMID:25473611

  6. Multidirectional Instability Accompanying an Inferior Labral Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Kim, Sung-Jae

    2010-01-01

    Paralabral cyst of the shoulder joint can be observed in 2% to 4% of the general population, particularly in men during the third and fourth decade. On average, these cysts measure 10 mm to 20 mm in diameter and are located preferentially on the postero-superior aspect of the glenoid. The MRI has increased the frequency of the diagnosis of paralabral cysts of the shoulder joint. Paralabral cysts of the shoulder joint usually develop in the proximity of the labrum. The relationship between shoulder instability and labral tears is well known, however, the association of shoulder instability with a paralabral cyst is rare. Shoulder instability may cause labral injury or labral injury may cause shoulder instability, and then injured tear develops paralabral cyst. In our patient, the inferior paralabral cyst may be associated with inferior labral tears and instability MRI. PMID:20514270

  7. Advanced imaging of the scapholunate ligamentous complex.

    PubMed

    Shahabpour, Maryam; Staelens, Barbara; Van Overstraeten, Luc; De Maeseneer, Michel; Boulet, Cedric; De Mey, Johan; Scheerlinck, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    The scapholunate joint is one of the most involved in wrist injuries. Its stability depends on primary and secondary stabilisers forming together the scapholunate complex. This ligamentous complex is often evaluated by wrist arthroscopy. To avoid surgery as diagnostic procedure, optimization of MR imaging parameters as use of three-dimensional (3D) sequences with very thin slices and high spatial resolution, is needed to detect lesions of the intrinsic and extrinsic ligaments of the scapholunate complex. The paper reviews the literature on imaging of radial-sided carpal ligaments with advanced computed tomographic arthrography (CTA) and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) to evaluate the scapholunate complex. Anatomy and pathology of the ligamentous complex are described and illustrated with CTA, MRA and corresponding arthroscopy. Sprains, mid-substance tears, avulsions and fibrous infiltrations of carpal ligaments could be identified on CTA and MRA images using 3D fat-saturated PD and 3D DESS (dual echo with steady-state precession) sequences with 0.5-mm-thick slices. Imaging signs of scapholunate complex pathology include: discontinuity, nonvisualization, changes in signal intensity, contrast extravasation (MRA), contour irregularity and waviness and periligamentous infiltration by edema, granulation tissue or fibrosis. Based on this preliminary experience, we believe that 3 T MRA using 3D sequences with 0.5-mm-thick slices and multiplanar reconstructions is capable to evaluate the scapholunate complex and could help to reduce the number of diagnostic arthroscopies.

  8. Histological characteristics and ultrastructure of polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament after the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shao-Bin; Yang, Rong-Hua; Zuo, Zhong-Nan; Dong, Qi-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament were the remnant of LARS ligament used for repairing posterior cruciate ligament obtained from operation. We want to study histological characteristics and ultrastructure of polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament after the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament in rabbits. Therefore, we replaced the original ACL with polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament which was covering with the remnant of ACL in 9 rabbits (L-LARS group), while just only polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament were transplanted in 3 rabbits (LARS group) with the remnant of ACL. Compared with group LARS, inflammatory cell reaction and foreign body reaction were more significant in group L-LARS. Moreover, electron microscopy investigation showed the tissue near LARS fibers was highly cellular with a matrix of thin collagen fibrils (50-100 nm) in group L-LARS. These above findings suggest the polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament possess the high biocompatibility, which contributes to the polyethylene terephthalate LARS covered with recipient connective tissues. PMID:25356104

  9. Bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft versus LARS artificial ligament for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyun; Wen, Hong; Wang, Lide; Ge, Tichi

    2013-10-01

    The optimized graft for use in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is still in controversy. The bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft has been accepted as the gold standard for ACL reconstruction. However, donor site morbidities cannot be avoided after this treatment. The artificial ligament of ligament advanced reinforcement system (LARS) has been recommended for ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study is to compare the midterm outcome of ACL reconstruction using BPTB autografts or LARS ligaments. Between July 2004 and March 2006, the ACL reconstruction using BPTB autografts in 30 patients and LARS ligaments in 32 patients was performed. All patients were followed up for at least 4 years and evaluated using the Lysholm knee score, Tegner score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, and KT-1000 arthrometer test. There were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to the data of Lysholm scores, Tegner scores, IKDC scores, and KT-1000 arthrometer test at the latest follow-up. Our study demonstrates that the similarly good clinical results are obtained after ACL reconstruction using BPTB autografts or LARS ligaments at midterm follow-up. In addition to BPTB autografts, the LARS ligament may be a satisfactory treatment option for ACL rupture.

  10. Maxillary antral lavage using inferior meatal cannula anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Mochloulis, G; Hern, J D; Hollis, L J; Tolley, N S

    1996-08-01

    Antral puncture and lavage through the inferior meatus is a minor but common otolaryngological procedure, usually performed under local anaesthesia. We describe a new method of introducing local anaesthetic into the inferior meatus, via the use of a soft intravenous cannula connected to a syringe containing 10 per cent cocaine paste. We have called this new technique inferior meatal cannula anaesthesia (IMCA).

  11. Surgical treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injury in adults.

    PubMed

    Alazzawi, Sulaiman; Sukeik, Mohamed; Ibrahim, Mazin; Haddad, Fares S

    2016-04-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury is among the most common soft tissue injuries of the knee joint and reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament is the gold standard treatment for young active symptomatic patients. This review summarizes the surgical treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

  12. An in vivo comparison of the orientation of the transverse acetabular ligament and the acetabulum.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Andrew R; Perriman, Diana M; Bolton, Claire J; Smith, Paul N

    2014-03-01

    Aligning the acetabular component with the Transverse Acetabular Ligament (TAL) to ensure optimal anteversion has been reported to reduce dislocation rates. However, to our knowledge in vivo measurement of the TAL angle has not yet been reported in a large cohort of normal hips. CT scans of 218 normal hips were analyzed. The TAL and four acetabular rim anteversion angles were measured (superiorly to inferiorly) relative to the anterior pelvic plane. The mean TAL anteversion angle was 20.5° ± 7.0°, and the acetabular rim angles from superior to inferior were 11.0° ± 12.9°, 19.9° ± 8.8°, 20.9° ± 6.2° and 25.1° ± 6.2° respectively. Both the TAL and the acetabular rim were significantly more anteverted in females than in males. The TAL anteversion angle was comparable to the predominant orientation (central rim section) of the native acetabulum while the superior acetabulum was comparatively retroverted and the inferior was relatively more anteverted.

  13. Inferior sinus venosus defects: anatomic features and echocardiographic correlates.

    PubMed

    Plymale, Jennifer; Kolinski, Kellen; Frommelt, Peter; Bartz, Peter; Tweddell, James; Earing, Michael G

    2013-02-01

    Inferior sinus venosus defects (SVDs) are rare imperfections located in the inferior portion of the atrial septum, leading to an overriding inferior vena cava (IVC) and an interatrial connection. These defects have increased risk of anomalous pulmonary venous return (PAPVR) and often are confused with secundum atrial septal defects (ASDs) with inferior extension. The authors sought to review their experience with inferior SVDs and to establish at their institution an echocardiographic definition that differentiates inferior SVDs from secundum ASDs with inferior extension. The study identified 161 patients 1.5 to 32 years of age who had undergone repair of a secundum ASD with inferior extension or inferior SVD over the preceding 10 years. All surgical notes, preoperative transthoracic echocardiograms (TTEs), and preoperative transesophageal echocardiograms (TEEs) were reviewed. Based on the surgical notes, 147 patients were classified as having a secundum ASD (147/161, 91 %) and 14 patients (9 %) as having an inferior SVD. The study identified PAPVR in 7 % (1/14) of the patients with inferior SVDs and 3.5 % (5/14) of the patients with secundum ASDs. Surgical diagnosis and preoperative TTE correlated for 143 (89 %) of the 161 patients. Using a strict anatomic and echocardiographic definition with a blinded observer, the majority of the defects (14/18, 78 %) were reclassified correctly after review of their TTE images, and 100 % of the defects were correctly reclassified after TEE image review. Accurate diagnosis of inferior SVDs remains challenging. The data from this study demonstrate that use of a strict anatomic and echocardiographic definition (a defect that originates in the mouth of the IVC and continues into the inferoposterior border of the left atrium, leaving no residual atrial septal tissue at the inferior margin) allows for accurate differentiation between secundum ASDs with inferior extension and inferior SVDs. This differentiation is extremely important

  14. Avulsion fracture of the posterior cruciate ligament in an uncommon location associated with distal injury to the patellar ligament.

    PubMed

    E Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires; da Palma, Idemar Monteiro; Cobra, Hugo; de Paula Mozella, Alan; Vaques, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Avulsion fractures of the posterior cruciate ligament in unusual locations are rare injuries. We report the first case in the literature of an avulsion fracture of the posterior cruciate ligament associated with distal injury to the patellar ligament. The aim of this study was to present a novel case, the therapy used and the clinical follow-up.

  15. A Profile of Glenohumeral Internal and External Rotation Motion in the Uninjured High School Baseball Pitcher, Part I: Motion

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Wendy J.; Kaplan, Kevin M.; ElAttrache, Neal S.; Jobe, Frank W.; Morrey, Bernard F.; Kaufman, Kenton R.

    2011-01-01

    Context: The magnitude of motion that is normal for the throwing shoulder in uninjured baseball pitchers has not been established. Chronologic factors contributing to adaptations in motion present in the thrower's shoulder also have not been established. Objectives: To develop a normative profile of glenohumeral rotation motion in uninjured high school baseball pitchers and to evaluate the effect of chronologic characteristics on the development of adaptations in shoulder rotation motion. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Baseball playing field. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 210 uninjured male high school baseball pitchers (age = 16±1.1 years, height = 1.8 + 0.1 m, mass = 77.5±11.2 kg, pitching experience = 6±2.3 years). Intervention(s): Using standard goniometric techniques, we measured passive rotational glenohumeral range of motion bilaterally with participants in the supine position. Main Outcome Measure(s): Paired t tests were performed to identify differences in motion between limbs for the group. Analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey tests were conducted to identify differences in motion by age. Linear regressions were performed to determine the influence of chronologic factors on limb motion. Results: Rotation motion characteristics for the population were established. We found no difference between sides for external rotation (ER) at 0° of abduction (t209 = 0.658, P = .51), but we found side-to-side differences in ER (t209 = −13.012, P<.001) and internal rotation (t209 = 15.304, P<.001) at 90° of abduction. Age at the time of testing was a significant negative predictor of ER motion for the dominant shoulder (R2 = 0.019, P = .049) because less ER motion occurred at the dominant shoulder with advancing age. We found no differences in rotation motion in the dominant shoulder across ages (F4,205 range, 0.451–1.730, P>.05). Conclusions: This range-of-motion profile might be used to assist with the interpretation of normal and atypical

  16. Anterior cruciate ligament tunnel placement.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Brian R; Ramme, Austin J; Britton, Carla L; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this cadaveric study was to analyze variation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tunnel placement between surgeons and the influence of preferred surgical technique and surgeon experience level using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT). In this study, 12 surgeons drilled ACL tunnels on six cadaveric knees each. Surgeons were divided by experience level and preferred surgical technique (two-incision [TI], medial portal [MP], and transtibial [TT]). ACL tunnel aperture locations were analyzed using 3D CT scans and compared with radiographic ACL footprint criteria. The femoral tunnel location from front to back within the notch demonstrated a range of means of 16% with the TI tunnels the furthest back. A range of means of only 5% was found for femoral tunnel low to high positions by technique. The anterior to posterior tibial tunnel measure demonstrated wider variation than the medial to lateral position. The mean tibial tunnel location drilled by TT surgeons was more posterior than surgeons using the other techniques. Overall, 82% of femoral tunnels and 78% of tibial tunnels met all radiographic measurement criteria. Slight (1-7%) differences in mean tunnel placement on the femur and tibia were found between experienced and new surgeons. The location of the femoral tunnel aperture in the front to back plane relative to the notch roof and the anterior to posterior position on the tibia were the most variable measures. Surgeon experience level did not appear to significantly affect tunnel location. This study provides background information that may be beneficial when evaluating multisurgeon and multicenter collaborative ACL studies.

  17. Thumb Ligament Injuries in the Athlete.

    PubMed

    Owings, F Patterson; Calandruccio, James H; Mauck, Benjamin M

    2016-10-01

    Hand injuries account for up to 15% of sports injuries and are common in contact sports and in sports with a high risk of falling. Appropriate management requires knowledge of the type of injury, demands of the sport and position, competitive level of the athlete, future athletic demands and expectations, and the role of rehabilitation and protective splints for return to play. Management of the athlete requires aggressive and expedient diagnostic intervention and treatment. This article describes ligamentous injuries to the thumb, including thumb carpometacarpal dislocations, thumb metacarpophalangeal dislocations, collateral ligament injuries and interphalangeal dislocations, their evaluation, treatment and outcomes. PMID:27637666

  18. Biomechanical Comparison of the Latarjet Procedure with and without Capsular Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, Matthew T.; Payne, William B.; McGarry, Michelle H.; Tibone, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine if capsular repair used in conjunction with the Latarjet procedure results in significant alterations in glenohumeral rotational range of motion and translation. Methods Glenohumeral rotational range of motion and translation were measured in eight cadaveric shoulders in 90° of abduction in both the scapular and coronal planes under the following four conditions: intact glenoid, 20% bony Bankart lesion, modified Latarjet without capsular repair, and modified Latarjet with capsular repair. Results Creation of a 20% bony Bankart lesion led to significant increases in anterior and inferior glenohumeral translation and rotational range of motion (p < 0.005). The Latarjet procedure restored anterior and inferior stability compared to the bony Bankart condition. It also led to significant increases in glenohumeral internal and external rotational range of motion relative to both the intact and bony Bankart conditions (p < 0.05). The capsular repair from the coracoacromial ligament stump to the native capsule did not significantly affect translations relative to the Latarjet condition; however it did cause a significant decrease in external rotation in both the scapular and coronal planes (p < 0.005). Conclusions The Latarjet procedure is effective in restoring anteroinferior glenohumeral stability. The addition of a capsular repair does not result in significant added stability; however, it does appear to have the effect of restricting glenohumeral external rotational range of motion relative to the Latarjet procedure performed without capsular repair. PMID:26929804

  19. Inferior alveolar and lingual nerve imaging.

    PubMed

    Miloro, Michael; Kolokythas, Antonia

    2011-03-01

    At present, there are no objective testing modalities available for evaluation of iatrogenic injury to the terminal branches of the trigeminal nerve, making such clinical diagnosis and management complicated for the oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Several imaging modalities can assist in the preoperative risk assessment of the trigeminal nerve as related to commonly performed procedures in the vicinity of the nerve, mostly third molar surgery. This article provides a review of all available imaging modalities and their clinical application relative to preoperative injury risk assessment of the inferior alveolar nerve and lingual nerve, and postinjury and postsurgical repair recovery status.

  20. Cruciate ligament loading during common knee rehabilitation exercises.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Macleod, Toran D; Wilk, Kevin E; Paulos, Lonnie; Andrews, James R

    2012-09-01

    Cruciate ligament injuries are common and may lead to dysfunction if not rehabilitated. Understanding how to progress anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament loading, early after injury or reconstruction, helps clinicians prescribe rehabilitation exercises in a safe manner to enhance recovery. Commonly prescribed therapeutic exercises include both weight-bearing exercise and non-weight-bearing exercise. This review was written to summarize and provide an update on the available literature on cruciate ligament loading during commonly used therapeutic exercises. In general, weight-bearing exercise produces smaller loads on the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament compared with non-weight-bearing exercise. The anterior cruciate ligament is loaded less at higher knee angles (i.e. 50-100 degrees). Squatting and lunging with a more forward trunk tilt and moving the resistance pad proximally on the leg during the seated knee extension unloads the anterior cruciate ligament. The posterior cruciate ligament is less loaded at lower knee angles (i.e. 0-50 degrees), and may be progressed from level ground walking to a one-leg squat, lunges, wall squat, leg press, and the two-leg squat (from smallest to greatest). Exercise type and technique variation affect cruciate ligament loading, such that the clinician may prescribe therapeutic exercises to progress ligament loading safely, while ensuring optimal recovery of the musculoskeletal system.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell isolation and characterization from human spinal ligaments.

    PubMed

    Asari, Toru; Furukawa, Ken-Ichi; Tanaka, Sunao; Kudo, Hitoshi; Mizukami, Hiroki; Ono, Atsushi; Numasawa, Takuya; Kumagai, Gentaro; Motomura, Shigeru; Yagihashi, Soroku; Toh, Satoshi

    2012-01-27

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a fibroblast-like morphology, multilineage potential, long-term viability and capacity for self-renewal. While several articles describe isolating MSCs from various human tissues, there are no reports of isolating MSCs from human spinal ligaments, and their localization in situ. If MSCs are found in human spinal ligaments, they could be used to investigate hypertrophy or ossification of spinal ligaments. To isolate and characterize MSCs from human spinal ligaments, spinal ligaments were harvested aseptically from eight patients during surgery for lumbar spinal canal stenosis and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. After collagenase digestion, nucleated cells were seeded at an appropriate density to avoid colony-to-colony contact. Cells were cultured in osteogenic, adipogenic or chondrogenic media to evaluate their multilineage differentiation potential. Immunophenotypic analysis of cell surface markers was performed by flow cytometry. Spinal ligaments were processed for immunostaining using MSC-related antibodies. Cells from human spinal ligaments could be extensively expanded with limited senescence. They were able to differentiate into osteogenic, adipogenic or chondrogenic cells. Flow cytometry revealed that their phenotypic characteristics met the minimum criteria of MSCs. Immunohistochemistry revealed the localization of CD90-positive cells in the collagenous matrix of the ligament, and in adjacent small blood vessels. We isolated and expanded MSCs from human spinal ligaments and demonstrated localization of MSCs in spinal ligaments. These cells may play an indispensable role in elucidating the pathogenesis of numerous spinal diseases.

  2. Cruciate ligament loading during common knee rehabilitation exercises.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Macleod, Toran D; Wilk, Kevin E; Paulos, Lonnie; Andrews, James R

    2012-09-01

    Cruciate ligament injuries are common and may lead to dysfunction if not rehabilitated. Understanding how to progress anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament loading, early after injury or reconstruction, helps clinicians prescribe rehabilitation exercises in a safe manner to enhance recovery. Commonly prescribed therapeutic exercises include both weight-bearing exercise and non-weight-bearing exercise. This review was written to summarize and provide an update on the available literature on cruciate ligament loading during commonly used therapeutic exercises. In general, weight-bearing exercise produces smaller loads on the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament compared with non-weight-bearing exercise. The anterior cruciate ligament is loaded less at higher knee angles (i.e. 50-100 degrees). Squatting and lunging with a more forward trunk tilt and moving the resistance pad proximally on the leg during the seated knee extension unloads the anterior cruciate ligament. The posterior cruciate ligament is less loaded at lower knee angles (i.e. 0-50 degrees), and may be progressed from level ground walking to a one-leg squat, lunges, wall squat, leg press, and the two-leg squat (from smallest to greatest). Exercise type and technique variation affect cruciate ligament loading, such that the clinician may prescribe therapeutic exercises to progress ligament loading safely, while ensuring optimal recovery of the musculoskeletal system. PMID:23025167

  3. Reconstruction of the Scapholunate Ligament Using Capitohamate Bone-Ligament-Bone.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toshiyasu; Abe, Koji; Iwamoto, Takuji; Ochi, Kensuke; Sato, Kazuki

    2015-11-01

    Background The biomechanical properties of the capitohamate (CH) ligament are equivalent to those of the scapholunate (SL) interosseous ligament. We reconstructed the SL ligament using the CH bone-ligament-bone substitute for chronic injury of the SL ligament. Patients and Methods Beginning in 2008, 15 wrists of 14 patients with an average age of 38 years underwent this procedure with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Thirteen wrists had an SL joint gap more than 3 mm, and two had a complete SL ligament disruption with a severe dorsal intercalated segment instability (DISI) deformity. Kirschner wires (K-wires) were removed 8 weeks after the surgery, then active ROM exercise began. Pain (on visual analog scale [VAS]), wrist motion (angle), radiographic characteristics, such as SL gap (mm) and SL angle, and Modified Mayo Wrist Score (MMWS) were evaluated. Technique The SL joint was reduced by manipulation or with the use of joysticks, then temporary fixed with K-wires. A dorsal trough was then made between the scaphoid and the lunate. The proximal half of the CH ligament was harvested with attached bone from the capitate and hamate (CH bone-ligament-bone), inset into the SL trough, and fixed firmly with 1.2-mm diameter titanium screws in the scaphoid and lunate, respectively. Results The VAS improved from 77 preoperatively to 12 postoperatively. The average wrist extension/flexion was 74°/60°. There was no ossification of the reconstructed SL at the final follow-up. The SL gap improved from an average of 4.8 mm to an average of 2.1 mm, and the SL angle changed from 67° to 55°. The MMWS improved to 82 points postoperatively from a preoperative average of 47 with eight excellent, five good, and two fair results.

  4. Surgical Correction of Posttraumatic Scapulothoracic Bursitis, Rhomboid Major Muscle Injury, Ipsilateral Glenohumeral Instability, and Headaches Resulting from Circus Acrobatic Maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Skedros, John G; Langston, Tanner D; Phippen, Colton M

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 28-year-old transgender (male-to-female) patient that had a partial tear of the rhomboid major tendon, scapulothoracic bursitis, and glenohumeral instability on the same side. These conditions resulted from traumatic events during circus acrobatic maneuvers. Additional aspects of this case that make it unique include (1) the main traumatic event occurred during a flagpole exercise, where the patient's trunk was suspended horizontally while a vertical pole was grasped with both hands, (2) headaches were associated with the periscapular injury and they improved after scapulothoracic bursectomy and rhomboid tendon repair, (3) surgical correction was done during the same operation with an open anterior capsular-labral reconstruction, open scapulothoracic bursectomy without bone resection, and rhomboid tendon repair, (4) a postoperative complication of tearing of the serratus anterior and rhomboid muscle attachments with recurrent scapulothoracic pain occurred from patient noncompliance, and (5) the postoperative complication was surgically corrected and ultimately resulted in an excellent outcome at the one-year final follow-up. PMID:26273484

  5. Anatomical glenohumeral internal rotation deficit and symmetric rotational strength in male and female young beach volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Saccol, Michele Forgiarini; Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto Leão; de Souza, Vivian Lima

    2016-08-01

    Beach volleyball is a sport with a high demand of shoulder structures that may lead to adaptations in range of motion (ROM) and strength like in other overhead sports. Despite of these possible alterations, no study evaluated the shoulder adaptations in young beach volleyball athletes. The aim of this study was to compare the bilateral ROM and rotation strength in the shoulders of young beach volleyball players. Goniometric passive shoulder ROM of motion and isometric rotational strength were evaluated in 19 male and 14 female asymptomatic athletes. External and internal ROM, total rotation motion, glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD), external rotation and internal rotation strength, bilateral deficits and external rotation to internal rotation ratio were measured. The statistical analysis included paired Student's t-test and analysis of variance with repeated measures. Significantly lower dominant GIRD was found in both groups (p<0.05), but only 6 athletes presented pathological GIRD. For strength variables, no significant differences for external or internal rotation were evident. Young beach volleyball athletes present symmetric rotational strength and shoulder ROM rotational adaptations that can be considered as anatomical. These results indicate that young practitioners of beach volleyball are subject to moderate adaptations compared to those reported for other overhead sports.

  6. Surgical Correction of Posttraumatic Scapulothoracic Bursitis, Rhomboid Major Muscle Injury, Ipsilateral Glenohumeral Instability, and Headaches Resulting from Circus Acrobatic Maneuvers

    PubMed Central

    Skedros, John G.; Langston, Tanner D.; Phippen, Colton M.

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 28-year-old transgender (male-to-female) patient that had a partial tear of the rhomboid major tendon, scapulothoracic bursitis, and glenohumeral instability on the same side. These conditions resulted from traumatic events during circus acrobatic maneuvers. Additional aspects of this case that make it unique include (1) the main traumatic event occurred during a flagpole exercise, where the patient's trunk was suspended horizontally while a vertical pole was grasped with both hands, (2) headaches were associated with the periscapular injury and they improved after scapulothoracic bursectomy and rhomboid tendon repair, (3) surgical correction was done during the same operation with an open anterior capsular-labral reconstruction, open scapulothoracic bursectomy without bone resection, and rhomboid tendon repair, (4) a postoperative complication of tearing of the serratus anterior and rhomboid muscle attachments with recurrent scapulothoracic pain occurred from patient noncompliance, and (5) the postoperative complication was surgically corrected and ultimately resulted in an excellent outcome at the one-year final follow-up. PMID:26273484

  7. The effect of CT dose on glenohumeral joint congruency measurements using 3D reconstructed patient-specific bone models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalone, Emily A.; Fox, Anne-Marie V.; Kedgley, Angela E.; Jenkyn, Thomas R.; King, Graham J. W.; Athwal, George S.; Johnson, James A.; Peters, Terry M.

    2011-10-01

    The study of joint congruency at the glenohumeral joint of the shoulder using computed tomography (CT) and three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of joint surfaces is an area of significant clinical interest. However, ionizing radiation delivered to patients during CT examinations is much higher than other types of radiological imaging. The shoulder represents a significant challenge for this modality as it is adjacent to the thyroid gland and breast tissue. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal CT scanning techniques that would minimize radiation dose while accurately quantifying joint congruency of the shoulder. The results suggest that only one-tenth of the standard applied total current (mA) and a pitch ratio of 1.375:1 was necessary to produce joint congruency values consistent with that of the higher dose scans. Using the CT scanning techniques examined in this study, the effective dose applied to the shoulder to quantify joint congruency was reduced by 88.9% compared to standard clinical CT imaging techniques.

  8. Smart instrumentation for determination of ligament stiffness and ligament balance in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hasenkamp, W; Villard, J; Delaloye, J R; Arami, A; Bertsch, A; Jolles, B M; Aminian, K; Renaud, P

    2014-06-01

    Ligament balance is an important and subjective task performed during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) procedure. For this reason, it is desirable to develop instruments to quantitatively assess the soft-tissue balance since excessive imbalance can accelerate prosthesis wear and lead to early surgical revision. The instrumented distractor proposed in this study can assist surgeons on performing ligament balance by measuring the distraction gap and applied load. Also the device allows the determination of the ligament stiffness which can contribute a better understanding of the intrinsic mechanical behavior of the knee joint. Instrumentation of the device involved the use of hall-sensors for measuring the distractor displacement and strain gauges to transduce the force. The sensors were calibrated and tested to demonstrate their suitability for surgical use. Results show the distraction gap can be measured reliably with 0.1mm accuracy and the distractive loads could be assessed with an accuracy in the range of 4N. These characteristics are consistent with those have been proposed, in this work, for a device that could assist on performing ligament balance while permitting surgeons evaluation based on his experience. Preliminary results from in vitro tests were in accordance with expected stiffness values for medial collateral ligament (MCL) and lateral collateral ligament (LCL).

  9. Anterolateral Meniscofemoral Ligament of the Lateral Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Mo; Yeon, Kyu-Woong; Lee, Ki-Young

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical variations of the meniscus are a common anomaly that knee surgeons frequently encounter. However, anomalies of the anterior horn of the lateral meniscus (AHLM) are extremely rare. In this report, we present a newly discovered anomaly of the AHML: an anterolateral meniscofemoral ligament is described with clinical features and radiographic and arthroscopic findings.

  10. [Posterior longitudinal ligament ossification: case report].

    PubMed

    Tella, Oswaldo Inácio de; Herculano, Marco Antonio; Paiva Neto, Manoel Antonio; Faedo Neto, Atílio; Crosera, João Francisco

    2006-03-01

    Posterior longitudinal ligament ossification of cervical spine is a rare condition among caucasians. A 42 years old japanese patient with progressive walking difficulty was diagnosed with this pathology by CT scan and MRI and treated surgically by an anterior approach with arthrodesis. Pathophysiology, racial prevalence, clinical picture, radiological characteristics and surgical approaches options are revised.

  11. [Age, activity and strength of knee ligaments].

    PubMed

    Kasperczyk, W J; Rosocha, S; Bosch, U; Oestern, H J; Tscherne, H

    1991-07-01

    The cruciate ligaments of older persons are thought to have diminished biomechanical properties. On the other hand, joint immobilization also leads to similar functional losses in ligaments. It can be difficult to differentiate between these factors in older and immobile persons. The anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments of six younger (average age 30 years) and six older (average age 64.7 years) donors with similar levels of activity were subjected to biomechanical testing. Each sample had to meet the following conditions: appropriate age, no chronic vascular and cardiopulmonary disease found on autopsy, no signs of osteoarthrosis and no knee injuries. The material properties of maximum stress (e.g. ACL: young/old 24/21N/mm2), elastic modulus (e.g. ACL: young/old 144/129 MPa), and strain (e.g. ACL: young/old 25/28%), did not differ significantly (p less than 0.05). This indicates that older persons who are active do not necessarily show functional losses in the cruciate ligaments. Other data found in the literature can be ascribed to immobilization influences. In this data many of the older test persons had chronic vascular insufficiency, cardiopulmonary disease or malignancies.

  12. Isolated unilateral rupture of the alar ligament.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sui-To; Ernest, Kimberly; Fan, Grace; Zovickian, John; Pang, Dachling

    2014-05-01

    Only 6 cases of isolated unilateral rupture of the alar ligament have been previously reported. The authors report a new case and review the literature, morbid anatomy, and pathogenesis of this rare injury. The patient in their case, a 9-year-old girl, fell head first from a height of 5 feet off the ground. She presented with neck pain, a leftward head tilt, and severe limitation of right rotation, extension, and right lateral flexion of the neck. Plain radiographs and CT revealed no fracture but a shift of the dens toward the right lateral mass of C-1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed signal hyperintensity within the left dens-atlas space on both T1- and T2-weighted sequences and interruption of the expected dark signal representing the left alar ligament, suggestive of its rupture. After 12 weeks of immobilization in a Guilford brace, MRI showed lessened dens deviation, and the patient attained full and painless neck motion. Including the patient in this case, the 7 patients with this injury were between 5 and 21 years old, sustained the injury in traffic accidents or falls, presented with marked neck pain, and were treated with external immobilization. All patients had good clinical outcome. The mechanism of injury is hyperflexion with rotation. Isolated unilateral alar ligament rupture is a diagnosis made by excluding associated fracture, dislocation, or disruption of other major ligamentous structures in the craniovertebral junction. CT and MRI are essential in establishing the diagnosis. External immobilization is adequate treatment.

  13. Anterolateral Meniscofemoral Ligament of the Lateral Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Mo; Yeon, Kyu-Woong; Lee, Ki-Young

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical variations of the meniscus are a common anomaly that knee surgeons frequently encounter. However, anomalies of the anterior horn of the lateral meniscus (AHLM) are extremely rare. In this report, we present a newly discovered anomaly of the AHML: an anterolateral meniscofemoral ligament is described with clinical features and radiographic and arthroscopic findings. PMID:27595080

  14. Anterolateral Meniscofemoral Ligament of the Lateral Meniscus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Mo; Joo, Yong-Bum; Yeon, Kyu-Woong; Lee, Ki-Young

    2016-09-01

    Anatomical variations of the meniscus are a common anomaly that knee surgeons frequently encounter. However, anomalies of the anterior horn of the lateral meniscus (AHLM) are extremely rare. In this report, we present a newly discovered anomaly of the AHML: an anterolateral meniscofemoral ligament is described with clinical features and radiographic and arthroscopic findings.

  15. Causes of anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Ristić, Vladimir; Ninković, Srdan; Harhaji, Vladimir; Milankov, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    In order to prevent anterior cruciate ligament injuries it is necessary to define risk factors and to analyze the most frequent causes of injuries--that being the aim of this study. The study sample consisted of 451 surgically treated patients, including 400 sportsmen (65% of them being active and 35% recreational sportsmen), 29% female and 71% male; of whom 90% were younger than 35. Sports injuries, as the most frequent cause of anterior cruciate ligament injuries, were recorded in 88% of patients (non-contact ones in 78% and contact ones in 22%), injuries occurring in everyday activities in 11% and in traffic in 1%. Among sportsmen, reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament was most frequently performed in football players (48%), then in handball players (22%), basketball players (13%), volleyball players (8%), martial arts fighters (4%). However, the injury incidence was the highest among the active basketball players (1 injured among 91 active players). Type of footwear, warming up before the activity, genetic predisposition and everyday therapy did not have a significant influence on getting injured. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries happened three times more often during matches, in the middle and at the end of a match and training session (79%), at landing after the jump or when changing direction of movement (75%) without a contact with other competitors, on dry surfaces (79%), among not so well prepared sportsmen.

  16. The ligament augmentation device: an historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K; Maffulli, N

    1999-05-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is the most common ligament injury in the knee, and a significant number of patients may develop progressive instability and disability despite aggressive rehabilitation. Various materials have been used for its reconstruction. These include autografts, allografts, prosthetic ligaments, and synthetic augmentation of the biological tissue. The concept of ligament augmentation device (LAD) arose from the observation that biological grafts undergo a phase of degeneration and loss of strength before being incorporated. The LAD is meant to protect the biological graft during this vulnerable phase. However, it provokes an inflammatory reaction in the knee, and has been found to delay maturation of autogenous graft in humans. In experimental situations, the LAD has been found to share loads in a composite graft. It has also been found to be substantially stronger than the biological graft. However, in clinical situations no significant advantages have been observed with the use of LAD to augment patellar tendon or hamstring reconstruction of the chronic ACL-deficient knee or in the acute setting to augment repair of the torn ACL. There are very few reports of the use of LAD in reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament, and again these do not suggest any advantage in its use. Insertion of the LAD implies the introduction of a foreign material into the knee, has been associated with complications such as reactive synovitis and effusions, and may also be associated with an increased risk of infection. At present, there is no evidence that its routine use should be advocated in uncomplicated reconstructions of the ACL using biological grafts.

  17. The ligament augmentation device: an historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K; Maffulli, N

    1999-05-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is the most common ligament injury in the knee, and a significant number of patients may develop progressive instability and disability despite aggressive rehabilitation. Various materials have been used for its reconstruction. These include autografts, allografts, prosthetic ligaments, and synthetic augmentation of the biological tissue. The concept of ligament augmentation device (LAD) arose from the observation that biological grafts undergo a phase of degeneration and loss of strength before being incorporated. The LAD is meant to protect the biological graft during this vulnerable phase. However, it provokes an inflammatory reaction in the knee, and has been found to delay maturation of autogenous graft in humans. In experimental situations, the LAD has been found to share loads in a composite graft. It has also been found to be substantially stronger than the biological graft. However, in clinical situations no significant advantages have been observed with the use of LAD to augment patellar tendon or hamstring reconstruction of the chronic ACL-deficient knee or in the acute setting to augment repair of the torn ACL. There are very few reports of the use of LAD in reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament, and again these do not suggest any advantage in its use. Insertion of the LAD implies the introduction of a foreign material into the knee, has been associated with complications such as reactive synovitis and effusions, and may also be associated with an increased risk of infection. At present, there is no evidence that its routine use should be advocated in uncomplicated reconstructions of the ACL using biological grafts. PMID:10355719

  18. Distal Radius Attachments of the Radiocarpal Ligaments: An Anatomical Study

    PubMed Central

    Zumstein, M. A.; Hasan, A. P.; McGuire, D. T.; Eng, Kevin; Bain, Gregory Ian

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the anatomy of the ligaments of the distal radius aids in the surgical repair of ligamentous injuries and the prediction of intraarticular fracture patterns. Purposes (1) to measure the horizontal and vertical distances of the origins of the radiocarpal ligaments from the most ulnar corner of the sigmoid notch and the joint line, respectively; and (2) to express them as a percentile of the total width of the bony distal radius. Methods We dissected 8 cadaveric specimens and identified the dorsal radiocarpal, radioscaphocapitate, and the long and short radiolunate ligaments. Results The dorsal radiocarpal ligament attached from the 16th to the 52nd percentile of the radial width. The radioscaphocapitate ligament attached around the radial styloid from the 86th percentile volarly to the 87th percentile dorsally. The long radiolunate ligament attached from the 59th to the 85th percentile, and the short radiolunate ligament attached from the 14th to the 41st percentile. Discussion There was a positive correlation between the radial width and the horizontal distance of the ligaments from the sigmoid notch. These findings may aid individualized surgical repair or reconstruction adjusted to patient size and enable further standardized research on distal radial fractures and their relationship with radiocarpal ligaments. PMID:24436840

  19. Total laparoscopic retrieval of inferior vena cava filter

    PubMed Central

    Benrashid, Ehsan; Adkar, Shaunak Sanjay; Bennett, Kyla Megan; Zani, Sabino

    2015-01-01

    While there is some local variability in the use of inferior vena cava filters and there has been some evolution in the indications for filter placement over time, inferior vena cava filters remain a standard option for pulmonary embolism prophylaxis. Indications are clear in certain subpopulations of patients, particularly those with deep venous thrombosis and absolute contraindications to anticoagulation. There are, however, a variety of reported inferior vena cava filter complications in the short and long term, making retrieval of the filter desirable in most cases. Here, we present the case of a morbidly obese patient complaining of chronic abdominal pain after inferior vena cava filter placement and malposition of the filter with extensive protrusion outside the inferior vena cava. She underwent successful laparoscopic retrieval of her malpositioned inferior vena cava filters after failure of a conventional endovascular approach. PMID:27489697

  20. Iatrogenic Spinal Cord Injury during Removal of the Inferior Articular Process in the Presence of Ossification of the Ligamentum Flavum

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Shane M.; Hwang, Steven W.; Safain, Mina G.; Riesenburger, Ron I.

    2016-01-01

    Ossified ligamentum flavum (OLF) is a condition of heterotopic lamellar bone formation within the yellow ligament. Some patients with OLF can be asymptomatic. However, asymptomatic OLF may not be obvious on preoperative MRI and could increase the risk of iatrogenic injury during treatments for unrelated spinal conditions. This report describes a case of spinal cord injury caused by the indirect transmission of force from an osteotome to an asymptomatic OLF during the resection of a thoracic inferior articular process (IAP). To prevent this outcome, we urge careful review of CT imaging in the preoperative setting and advocate the use of a high-speed drill instead of an osteotome during bone removal in the setting of an adjacent area of OLF. PMID:26885431

  1. Mucoid Degeneration of Posterior Cruciate Ligament with Secondary Impingement of Anterior Cruciate Ligament: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joon Ho; Jangir, Rajat R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Mucoid degeneration of cruciate ligament is well known entity, but symptomatic lesions are rare. It is even rarer to find a symptomatic posterior cruciate ligament mucoid degeneration than anterior cruciate ligament. Case Report: A 65-years-old female presented to our hospital complaining of pain in right knee joint on terminal extension since 6 months. On clinical examination, there was a flexion deformity of 5 degree and a further flexion of 150 degree with mild pain exacerbated by extension. MRI of the right knee joint showed a diffusely thickened posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) with increased intra ligamentous signal intensity on T2-weighted images. The arthroscopic findings of grossly thickened PCL with a yellowish hue are characteristic and the PCL was filled with a yellowish substance. We excised the yellowish substance from the PCL as precisely as possible not to damage the remaining PCL fiber (Limited Debulking). We did notchplasty of lateral wall and roof to accommodate the Anterior Cruciate Ligament and avoid impingement. Conclusion: Posterior cruciate ligament may enlarge significantly and may push the Anterior Cruciate Ligament in the notch and may lead to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) impingement symptoms. Partial Debulking of Posterior Cruciate Ligament and notchplasty is effective treatment with immediate postoperative pain relief and good functional results. PMID:27299097

  2. Intra-articular glenohumeral injections of HYADD®4-G for the treatment of painful shoulder osteoarthritis: a prospective multicenter, open-label trial

    PubMed Central

    PORCELLINI, GIUSEPPE; MEROLLA, GIOVANNI; GIORDAN, NICOLA; PALADINI, PAOLO; BURINI, ANDREA; CESARI, EUGENIO; CASTAGNA, ALESSANDRO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose numerous experimental and clinical studies in osteoarthritis (OA) have demonstrated that intra-articular (IA) administration of hyaluronic acid can improve the altered rheological properties of the synovial fluid and exert protective and reparative effects on the joint structure. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and performance of HYADD®4-G (Hymovis®) in patients with glenohumeral joint OA. Methods forty-one patients with shoulder pain and limited shoulder function resulting from concentric glenohumeral joint OA were enrolled in a multicenter clinical trial. Patients received two HYADD®4-G injections administered one week apart. The main outcome measure was improvement in shoulder pain on movement at six months as assessed through a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS), range of motion (ROM) values, and Constant-Murley Shoulder Outcome Score (CS). Results two IA injections of HYADD®4-G (Hymovis®) significantly decreased pain and improved shoulder function for up to six months from the first injection. The VAS score decreased (from 66.1 mm to 37.7 mm at six months) and improvements were recorded in the total CS and in the ROM values ( rotation decreased from a mean value of 54.2° at baseline to 63.2° at six months and internal rotation from a mean value of 44.0° at baseline to 45.7° at 26 weeks). No serious adverse events occurred. Conclusions the study results demonstrated that two IA injections of HYADD®4-G (Hymovis®) may be a safe and effective treatment option for shoulder pain associated with glenohumeral OA and that the effects of the injections are still present for up to six months after the treatment. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:26889467

  3. Testing procedures for SLAP lesions of the shoulder involving contraction and torsion of biceps long head and glenohumeral glides.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sumeer; Watson, Lyn; Taylor, Nicholas F; Green, Rodney A; Hairodin, Zaki

    2011-11-01

    Testing procedures for SLAP lesions of the shoulder can combine resisted elbow flexion, forearm pronation and supination, and glenohumeral glides. These procedures reproduce symptoms by increasing biceps long head active tension or passive torsion, and by placing the shoulder in an unstable position. We compared activation of biceps long head and pain intensity, between supinated and pronated forearm positions, between different glides, and between individuals with and without shoulder impairment. A case control study. Twelve participants with suspected SLAP lesions and twelve with no history of shoulder injury volunteered. Electromyography measured muscle activity in biceps long head, normalised against maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Subjective pain intensity scores were recorded. Biceps long head activity was greater in forearm supination (mean 39% MVIC) than pronation (mean 24% MVIC), but pain was higher in pronation (mean 4.5/10) than supination (3.2/10). Biceps long head activity was greater when testing without a glide, but there was no difference in pain comparing the glide conditions. The impaired group experienced more pain (mean 3.9/10) than controls (mean 0.3/10) but there was no difference in shoulder muscle activity. No one combination of testing procedures appeared to be diagnostic of SLAP lesions in our sample. This study supports the theory that biceps long head acts as a stabiliser of the shoulder, and suggests that clinical testing procedures for SLAP lesions may need to inhibit biceps long head activity. The addition of glides to SLAP testing procedures did not affect the reproduction of pain.

  4. Reliability of Measurement of Glenohumeral Internal Rotation, External Rotation, and Total Arc of Motion in 3 Test Positions

    PubMed Central

    Kevern, Mark A.; Beecher, Michael; Rao, Smita

    2014-01-01

    Context: Athletes who participate in throwing and racket sports consistently demonstrate adaptive changes in glenohumeral-joint internal and external rotation in the dominant arm. Measurements of these motions have demonstrated excellent intrarater and poor interrater reliability. Objective: To determine intrarater reliability, interrater reliability, and standard error of measurement for shoulder internal rotation, external rotation, and total arc of motion using an inclinometer in 3 testing procedures in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I baseball and softball athletes. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Athletic department. Patients or Other Participants Thirty-eight players participated in the study. Shoulder internal rotation, external rotation, and total arc of motion were measured by 2 investigators in 3 test positions. The standard supine position was compared with a side-lying test position, as well as a supine test position without examiner overpressure. Results: Excellent intrarater reliability was noted for all 3 test positions and ranges of motion, with intraclass correlation coefficient values ranging from 0.93 to 0.99. Results for interrater reliability were less favorable. Reliability for internal rotation was highest in the side-lying position (0.68) and reliability for external rotation and total arc was highest in the supine-without-overpressure position (0.774 and 0.713, respectively). The supine-with-overpressure position yielded the lowest interrater reliability results in all positions. The side-lying position had the most consistent results, with very little variation among intraclass correlation coefficient values for the various test positions. Conclusions: The results of our study clearly indicate that the side-lying test procedure is of equal or greater value than the traditional supine-with-overpressure method. PMID:25188316

  5. Effect of exercise-based management on multidirectional instability of the glenohumeral joint: a pilot randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Warby, Sarah A; Ford, Jon J; Hahne, Andrew J; Watson, Lyn; Balster, Simon; Lenssen, Ross; Pizzari, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The most commonly recommended treatment for multidirectional instability (MDI) of the shoulder is exercise. Despite this recommendation, there is limited evidence to support the effectiveness of exercise. The aim of this paper is to describe a pilot randomised controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of 2 exercise programmes on outcomes of participants with MDI. Methods and analysis Consenting participants between 12 and 35 years, with non-traumatic MDI will be randomly allocated to participate in either the Rockwood Instability programme or the Watson MDI programme. Both programmes involve 1 consultation per week for 12 weeks with a physiotherapist to prescribe and progress a home exercise programme. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, 6, 12, 24 and 52 weeks. Primary outcome measures include the Melbourne Instability Shoulder Score and Western Ontario Shoulder Index. Secondary outcomes include scapular coordinates, scapular upward rotation angles, muscle strength, symptomatic onset, limiting factor and angle of limiting factor in abduction range, incidence of complete glenohumeral joint dislocation, global rating of change, satisfaction scores, the Orebro Musculoskeletal Pain Questionnaire, adverse events and compliance with the home exercise programme. Data will be analysed on intention-to-treat principles and a per protocol basis. Discussion This trial will evaluate whether there are differences in outcomes between the Rockwood and the Watson MDI programmes for participants with MDI. Ethics and dissemination Participant confidentiality will be maintained with publication of results. Ethics approval: Faculty of Health Sciences (FHEC12/201). Trial registration number ACTRN12613001240730; Pre-results. PMID:27619831

  6. Snow skiing combined anterior cruciate ligament/medial collateral ligament disruptions.

    PubMed

    Barber, F A

    1994-02-01

    Recent reports indicate that combined anterior cruciate ligament/medial collateral ligament (ACL/MCL) knee injuries are usually associated with a lateral meniscus tear. In our center, snow skiing is the athletic activity most frequently associated with this double-ligament injury complex. A sports-specific analysis was undertaken to evaluate the hypothesis that the snow skiing ligament injury is different from similar injuries caused by other athletic activities. Of a total of 64 acute arthroscopically confirmed tears of both the MCL and ACL, 23 were caused by snow skiing and 41 by nonskiing activities. There were fewer lateral meniscus tears in skiers (43%) when compared with the nonskiers (88%). Skiers also had fewer medial meniscus tears (13%) than did nonskiers (37%). No medial meniscus tears occurred in the absence of a lateral meniscus tear. Although 78% of the skiers were women, only 12% of the nonskiers were women. Skiers were older (average age 35 years) than the nonskiers (average age 28 years). The right knee was injured almost twice as frequently as the left. These data suggest that the double (ACL/MCL) ligament injury in skiers might be distinctly different from that in nonskiers.

  7. Double bundle posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: surgical technique and results.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Gregory C; Beck, John D; Edson, Craig J

    2010-12-01

    The keys to successful posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are to identify and treat all pathology, use strong graft material, accurately place tunnels in anatomic insertion sites, minimize graft bending, use a mechanical graft tensioning device, use primary and back-up graft fixation, and use the appropriate postoperative rehabilitation program. Adherence to these technical principles results in successful single and double-bundle arthroscopic transtibial tunnel posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction based upon stress radiography, arthrometer, knee ligament rating scales, and patient satisfaction measurements.

  8. Quantifying the Nonlinear, Anisotropic Material Response of Spinal Ligaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Daniel J.

    Spinal ligaments may be a significant source of chronic back pain, yet they are often disregarded by the clinical community due to a lack of information with regards to their material response, and innervation characteristics. The purpose of this dissertation was to characterize the material response of spinal ligaments and to review their innervation characteristics. Review of relevant literature revealed that all of the major spinal ligaments are innervated. They cause painful sensations when irritated and provide reflexive control of the deep spinal musculature. As such, including the neurologic implications of iatrogenic ligament damage in the evaluation of surgical procedures aimed at relieving back pain will likely result in more effective long-term solutions. The material response of spinal ligaments has not previously been fully quantified due to limitations associated with standard soft tissue testing techniques. The present work presents and validates a novel testing methodology capable of overcoming these limitations. In particular, the anisotropic, inhomogeneous material constitutive properties of the human supraspinous ligament are quantified and methods for determining the response of the other spinal ligaments are presented. In addition, a method for determining the anisotropic, inhomogeneous pre-strain distribution of the spinal ligaments is presented. The multi-axial pre-strain distributions of the human anterior longitudinal ligament, ligamentum flavum and supraspinous ligament were determined using this methodology. Results from this work clearly demonstrate that spinal ligaments are not uniaxial structures, and that finite element models which account for pre-strain and incorporate ligament's complex material properties may provide increased fidelity to the in vivo condition.

  9. Paediatric intrasubstance posterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Scott, Chloe E H; Murray, Alastair W

    2011-01-01

    The authors present the case of a 4-year-old boy who sustained an intrasubstance posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tear whist trampolining. He was managed non-operatively with return to full function by 8 months. A high index of suspicion is required when assessing paediatric hyperflexion/extension injuries at the knee as ligamentous injury may occur without osteochondral fracture and may be missed on routine radiographs. Early MRI can identify such injuries in addition to osteochondral avulsions which are often amenable to acute internal fixation. In the case of paediatric intrasubstance PCL tears, it appears that non-operative management yields a good functional outcome in the short term in the skeletally immature.

  10. Essentials of anterior cruciate ligament rupture management.

    PubMed

    Klinge, Stephen A; Sawyer, Gregory A; Hulstyn, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common knee injury and an understanding of current medical knowledge regarding its management is essential. Accurate and prompt diagnosis requires an awareness of injury mechanisms and risk factors, common symptoms and physical/radiologic findings. Early mobilization and physical therapy improves outcomes regardless of treatment modality. Many older patients regain sufficient stability and function after non-operative rehabilitation. Early ACL reconstruction is appropriate for younger patients and those who engage in activities requiring frequent pivoting and rapid direction changes. ACL surgery involves reconstruction of the torn ligament tissue with various replacement graft options, each with advantages and disadvantages. The guidance of a knowledgeable and experienced therapist is required throughout an intensive and prolonged rehabilitation course. Generally excellent outcomes and low complication rates are expected, but treatment does not prevent late osteoarthritis.

  11. Prevention of ligament injuries to the knee.

    PubMed

    Baker, B E

    1990-01-01

    Disruption of the ligamentous structures of the knee are commonly seen in competitive sports. Factors affecting the rate of injury include the sport, the participant, conditioning and technique, the level of competition, rules enforcement, the type of playing surface, and footwear. The role of prophylactic and functional bracing is controversial. Currently, prophylactic bracing has not been shown, conclusively, to be protective. Functional braces appear to have a capacity to provide some protective effect. PMID:2192897

  12. Prevention of anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Hewett, T E; Myer, G D; Ford, K R

    2001-12-01

    Numerous studies have found that female athletes who participate in jumping and pivoting sports are four to six times more likely to sustain a knee ligament injury, such as anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, than male athletes participating in the same sports [1-8]. A widening gender gap in the number of serious knee ligament injuries exists due to geometric growth in female athletic participation, coupled with the four- to sixfold higher injury rate. More than 50,000 serious knee injuries are projected to occur in female varsity intercollegiate and high school athletics each year [9, 10]. Most ACL injuries occur by noncontact mechanisms, often during landing from a jump or making a lateral pivot while running [2, 11]. Knee instability, due to ligament dominance (decreased medial-lateral neuromuscular control of the joint), quadriceps dominance (increased quadriceps recruitment and decreased hamstring recruitment and strength), and leg dominance (side-to-side differences in strength, flexibility, and coordination) are possible contributing factors to the increased incidence of knee injury in female athletes [5, 6]. In this review, dynamic neuromuscular analysis (DNA) training is defined, and a rationale is presented for correcting the neuromuscular imbalances that may result in dynamic knee instability during sports play. Dynamic neuromuscular training has been shown to increase knee stability and decrease knee injury rates in female athletes [5, 12.., 13.]. Preliminary research on athlete screening and injury prediction based on the three aforementioned imbalances also is presented with recommendations for developing screening protocols for the identification of high-risk athletes.

  13. Optimal management of ulnar collateral ligament injury in baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Hibberd, Elizabeth E; Brown, J Rodney; Hoffer, Joseph T

    2015-01-01

    The ulnar collateral ligament stabilizes the elbow joint from valgus stress associated with the throwing motion. During baseball pitching, this ligament is subjected to tremendous stress and injury if the force on the ulnar collateral ligament during pitching exceeds the physiological limits of the ligament. Injuries to the throwing elbow in baseball pitchers result in significant time loss and typically surgical intervention. The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of current information to sports medicine clinicians on injury epidemiology, injury mechanics, injury risk factors, injury prevention, surgical interventions, nonsurgical interventions, rehabilitation, and return to play outcomes in baseball pitchers of all levels. PMID:26635490

  14. Optimal management of ulnar collateral ligament injury in baseball pitchers

    PubMed Central

    Hibberd, Elizabeth E; Brown, J Rodney; Hoffer, Joseph T

    2015-01-01

    The ulnar collateral ligament stabilizes the elbow joint from valgus stress associated with the throwing motion. During baseball pitching, this ligament is subjected to tremendous stress and injury if the force on the ulnar collateral ligament during pitching exceeds the physiological limits of the ligament. Injuries to the throwing elbow in baseball pitchers result in significant time loss and typically surgical intervention. The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of current information to sports medicine clinicians on injury epidemiology, injury mechanics, injury risk factors, injury prevention, surgical interventions, nonsurgical interventions, rehabilitation, and return to play outcomes in baseball pitchers of all levels. PMID:26635490

  15. Thumb ulnar collateral and radial collateral ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Nicole S; Goldfarb, Charles A

    2015-01-01

    Thumb metacarpophalangeal ulnar and radial collateral ligament injuries occur frequently in the competitive athlete. Collateral ligament integrity is essential to joint stability, pinch strength, and pain-free motion. Acute rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament is due to a sudden radial deviation force on the abducted thumb and is referred to as skier's thumb. An ulnar-directed force causes injury to the radial collateral ligament. The degree of joint instability on clinical examination allows classification of these injuries and guides management. Surgical repair of acute, complete tears results in good outcomes and allows for return to sporting activity.

  16. Optimal management of ulnar collateral ligament injury in baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Hibberd, Elizabeth E; Brown, J Rodney; Hoffer, Joseph T

    2015-01-01

    The ulnar collateral ligament stabilizes the elbow joint from valgus stress associated with the throwing motion. During baseball pitching, this ligament is subjected to tremendous stress and injury if the force on the ulnar collateral ligament during pitching exceeds the physiological limits of the ligament. Injuries to the throwing elbow in baseball pitchers result in significant time loss and typically surgical intervention. The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of current information to sports medicine clinicians on injury epidemiology, injury mechanics, injury risk factors, injury prevention, surgical interventions, nonsurgical interventions, rehabilitation, and return to play outcomes in baseball pitchers of all levels.

  17. Imaging of meniscus and ligament injuries of the knee.

    PubMed

    Faruch-Bilfeld, M; Lapegue, F; Chiavassa, H; Sans, N

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has now an indisputable role for the diagnosis of meniscus and ligament injuries of the knee. Some technical advances have improved the diagnostic capabilities of magnetic resonance imaging so that diagnoses, which may change the therapeutic approach, such as a partial tear of the anterior cruciate ligament or confirmation of unstable meniscal injuries, are now made easier. This article describes the essential about magnetic resonance imaging technique and pathological results for the menisci, collateral ligaments and damage to the central pivot of the cruciate knee ligaments. PMID:27452631

  18. Minimally Invasive Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction in the Setting of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    PubMed

    Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Barbosa, Nuno Camelo; Tuteja, Sanesh; Daggett, Matt; Kajetanek, Charles; Thaunat, Mathieu

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence on the anatomy, function, and biomechanical properties of the anterolateral ligament has led to the recognition of the importance of this structure in the rotational control of the knee. This article describes a technique that allows for minimally invasive anterolateral ligament reconstruction as a complement to most techniques of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A gracilis tendon autograft is harvested and prepared in a double-strand, inverted V-shaped graft. The graft is percutaneously placed through a femoral stab incision, and each strand is then passed deep to the iliotibial band, emerging through each tibial stab incision. After the femoral-end loop graft is fixed, the tibial fixation of each strand is performed in full extension for optimal isometry. PMID:27274456

  19. Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee: Back to the Future in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; D’Amelio, Andrea; Pellegrino, Pietro; Rosso, Federica; Rossi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of the anterolateral stabilizing structures of the knee in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries has been recognized since many years, most of orthopedic surgeons do not take into consideration the anterolateral structures when performing an ACL reconstruction. Anatomic single or double bundle ACL reconstruction will improve knee stability, but a small subset of patients may experience some residual anteroposterior and rotational instability. For this reason, some researchers have turned again towards the anterolateral aspect of the knee and specifically the anterolateral ligament. The goal of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge regarding the anterolateral ligament of the knee, including anatomy, histology, biomechanics and imaging. In addition, the most common anterolateral reconstruction/tenodesis techniques are described together with their respective clinical outcomes. PMID:26330991

  20. Ligament Mediated Fragmentation of Viscoelastic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz, Bavand; Houze, Eric C.; Moore, John R.; Koerner, Michael R.; McKinley, Gareth H.

    2016-10-01

    The breakup and atomization of complex fluids can be markedly different than the analogous processes in a simple Newtonian fluid. Atomization of paint, combustion of fuels containing antimisting agents, as well as physiological processes such as sneezing are common examples in which the atomized liquid contains synthetic or biological macromolecules that result in viscoelastic fluid characteristics. Here, we investigate the ligament-mediated fragmentation dynamics of viscoelastic fluids in three different canonical flows. The size distributions measured in each viscoelastic fragmentation process show a systematic broadening from the Newtonian solvent. In each case, the droplet sizes are well described by Gamma distributions which correspond to a fragmentation-coalescence scenario. We use a prototypical axial step strain experiment together with high-speed video imaging to show that this broadening results from the pronounced change in the corrugated shape of viscoelastic ligaments as they separate from the liquid core. These corrugations saturate in amplitude and the measured distributions for viscoelastic liquids in each process are given by a universal probability density function, corresponding to a Gamma distribution with nmin=4 . The breadth of this size distribution for viscoelastic filaments is shown to be constrained by a geometrical limit which can not be exceeded in ligament-mediated fragmentation phenomena.

  1. A new snowboard injury caused by "FLOW" bindings: a complete deltoid ligament and anterior talofibular ankle ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Haverkamp, Daniel; Hoornenborg, Daniel; Maas, Mario; Kerkhoffs, Gino

    2014-05-01

    We present a case of a snowboard injury that caused a combination of a complete deltoid and anterior talofibular ligament rupture, without bony or syndesmotic injury. Initial surgical repair for both ligaments was performed. We describe the etiology of this injury to demonstrate the cause and existence of medial and lateral ankle ligament rupture without osseous and syndesmotic involvement and to create awareness of these types of injuries. PMID:24901589

  2. Combined Reconstruction of the Medial Patellofemoral Ligament With Quadricipital Tendon and the Medial Patellotibial Ligament With Patellar Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Hinckel, Betina Bremer; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2016-01-01

    Although the medial patellotibial ligament (MPTL) has been neglected regarding its function in patellar stability, recently, its importance in terminal extension and during flexion has been recognized. Indications for reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament combined with the MPTL are extension subluxation, flexion instability, children with anatomic risk factors for patellar instability, and knee hyperextension associated with generalized laxity. We describe a combined reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament with quadricipital tendon and reconstruction of the MPTL with patellar tendon autografts. PMID:27073782

  3. Reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and anterolateral ligament using interlinked hamstrings - technical note.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marcio de Castro; Zidan, Flavio Ferreira; Miduati, Francini Belluci; Fortuna, Caio Cesar; Mizutani, Bruno Moreira; Abdalla, Rene Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Recent anatomical and biomechanical studies on the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee have shown that this structure has an important function in relation to joint stability, especially when associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, the criteria for its reconstruction have not yet been fully established and the surgical techniques that have been described present variations regarding anatomical points and fixation materials. This study presents a reproducible technique for ALL and ACL reconstruction using hamstring tendons, in which three interference screws are used for fixation.

  4. Reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and anterolateral ligament using interlinked hamstrings - technical note.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marcio de Castro; Zidan, Flavio Ferreira; Miduati, Francini Belluci; Fortuna, Caio Cesar; Mizutani, Bruno Moreira; Abdalla, Rene Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Recent anatomical and biomechanical studies on the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee have shown that this structure has an important function in relation to joint stability, especially when associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, the criteria for its reconstruction have not yet been fully established and the surgical techniques that have been described present variations regarding anatomical points and fixation materials. This study presents a reproducible technique for ALL and ACL reconstruction using hamstring tendons, in which three interference screws are used for fixation. PMID:27517028

  5. Progressive limb ataxia following inferior olive lesions

    PubMed Central

    Horn, K M; Deep, A; Gibson, A R

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar climbing fibres originate in the inferior olive (IO). Temporary IO inactivation produces movement deficits. Does permanent inactivation produce similar deficits and, if so, do they recover? The excitotoxin, kainic acid, was injected into the rostral IO of three cats. Behaviour was measured during reaching and locomotion. Two cats were injected during the reaching task. Within minutes, grasping became difficult and the trajectories of the reaches showed higher arcing than normally seen. During locomotion, both cats showed head and trunk deviation to the injected side, walking paths curved to the injected side, and the paws were lifted higher than normal. Limbs contralateral to the injections became rigid. Within 1 day, posture had normalized, locomotion was unsteady and high lifting of the paws had reversed to a tendency to drag the dorsum of the paws. Passive body movement produced vestibular signs. Over a few days, locomotion normalized and vestibular signs disappeared. Reach trajectories were normal but grasping deficits persisted. Over the first week, the amplitude of limb lift during reaching and locomotion began to increase. The increase continued over time and, after several months, limb movements became severely ataxic. The effects followed the somatotopy of the rostral IO: a loss of cells in medial rostral IO only affected the forelimb, whereas a loss of cells in medial and lateral IO affected both forelimb and hindlimb. Deficits produced by IO lesions involve multiple mechanisms; some recover rapidly, some appear stable, and some worsen over time. The nature of the progressive deficit suggests a gradual loss of Purkinje cell inhibition on cerebellar nuclear cells. PMID:23027819

  6. Return to Play Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Morris, Ryan C; Hulstyn, Michael J; Fleming, Braden C; Owens, Brett D; Fadale, Paul D

    2016-10-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions are commonly performed in an attempt to return an athlete to sports activities. Accelerated rehabilitation has made recovery for surgery more predictable and shortened the timeline for return to play. Despite success with and advancements in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions, some athletes still fail to return to play. PMID:27543405

  7. Features extraction in anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments analysis.

    PubMed

    Zarychta, P

    2015-12-01

    The main aim of this research is finding the feature vectors of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PCL). These feature vectors have to clearly define the ligaments structure and make it easier to diagnose them. Extraction of feature vectors is obtained by analysis of both anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments. This procedure is performed after the extraction process of both ligaments. In the first stage in order to reduce the area of analysis a region of interest including cruciate ligaments (CL) is outlined in order to reduce the area of analysis. In this case, the fuzzy C-means algorithm with median modification helping to reduce blurred edges has been implemented. After finding the region of interest (ROI), the fuzzy connectedness procedure is performed. This procedure permits to extract the anterior and posterior cruciate ligament structures. In the last stage, on the basis of the extracted anterior and posterior cruciate ligament structures, 3-dimensional models of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligament are built and the feature vectors created. This methodology has been implemented in MATLAB and tested on clinical T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) slices of the knee joint. The 3D display is based on the Visualization Toolkit (VTK).

  8. Management of anterior cruciate ligament injury: pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Alazzawi, Sulaiman; Sukeik, Mohamed; Ibrahim, Mazin; Haddad, Fares S

    2016-04-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury, a common soft tissue injury of the knee joint, is increasing in incidence particularly in young active people. It causes instability of the knee that leads to meniscal tears, cartilage defects and early osteoarthritis. This review summarizes aspects of anterior cruciate ligament injury management.

  9. What does the transverse carpal ligament contribute to carpal stability?

    PubMed

    Vanhees, Matthias; Verstreken, Frederik; van Riet, Roger

    2015-02-01

    Background The transverse carpal ligament is well known for its involvement in carpal tunnel syndrome, and sectioning of this ligament remains the definite treatment for this pathology. Some authors believe that the transverse carpal ligament is an important stabilizer of the carpal arch, whereas others do not consider it to be significant. Several studies have been performed, both in vivo and in in vitro. Sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament does not seem to have any effect on the width of the carpal arch in the unloaded condition. However, patients will load the arch during their activities of daily living. Materials and Methods A cadaveric study was done with distraction of the carpal bones before and after sectioning the transverse carpal ligament. Results With the transverse carpal ligament intact, the carpal arch is mobile, with distraction leading up to 50% widening of the arch. Sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament resulted in a significant widening of the carpal arch by a further 30%. Conclusions Loading of the carpal arch after sectioning of the transeverse carapal ligament leads to a significant increase in intracarpal mobility. This will inevitably influence carpal kinematics in the patient and might be responsible for some complications after simple carpal tunnel releases, such as pillar pain, palmar tenderness, and loss of grip strength.

  10. Investigation of 3D glenohumeral displacements from 3D reconstruction using biplane X-ray images: Accuracy and reproducibility of the technique and preliminary analysis in rotator cuff tear patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Skalli, Wafa; Lagacé, Pierre-Yves; Billuart, Fabien; Ohl, Xavier; Cresson, Thierry; Bureau, Nathalie J; Rouleau, Dominique M; Roy, André; Tétreault, Patrice; Sauret, Christophe; de Guise, Jacques A; Hagemeister, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    Rotator cuff (RC) tears may be associated with increased glenohumeral instability; however, this instability is difficult to quantify using currently available diagnostic tools. Recently, the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and registration method of the scapula and humeral head, based on sequences of low-dose biplane X-ray images, has been proposed for glenohumeral displacement assessment. This research aimed to evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of this technique and to investigate its potential with a preliminary application comparing RC tear patients and asymptomatic volunteers. Accuracy was assessed using CT scan model registration on biplane X-ray images for five cadaveric shoulder specimens and showed differences ranging from 0.6 to 1.4mm depending on the direction of interest. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility was assessed through two operators who repeated the reconstruction of five subjects three times, allowing defining 95% confidence interval ranging from ±1.8 to ±3.6mm. Intraclass correlation coefficient varied between 0.84 and 0.98. Comparison between RC tear patients and asymptomatic volunteers showed differences of glenohumeral displacements, especially in the superoinferior direction when shoulder was abducted at 20° and 45°. This study thus assessed the accuracy of the low-dose 3D biplane X-ray reconstruction technique for glenohumeral displacement assessment and showed potential in biomechanical and clinical research.

  11. Characterization and role of the immune response during ligament healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Connie S.

    Scar formation of ligaments after rupture remains a great challenge. Ligament healing involves a complex, coordinated series of events that form a neo-ligament, which is more disorganized and fibrotic in character than the native tissue. The repair process may extend from months to years, and the injured ligament never fully recovers its original mechanical properties. With little intrinsic healing potential, ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are usually reconstructed. The "healed" tissues, however, do not regenerate native tissues or recapitulate their mechanical function. ACL grafts often lengthen (incidents range from 40-100%) and their strength can drop by ˜50% after remodeling. Reconstructed knees are often less stable and fail to restore normal joint kinematics. Our overall goal is to improve healing, making ligaments more regenerative. The first 2 studies characterized ligament healing in a spatial and temporal manner over 28 days. The experiments demonstrated creeping substitution and the potential role of the immune system to control the repair and/or regenerative process. From these studies, macrophages were identified as significant players during healing. Macrophages paralleled creeping substitution, were abundant within the healing ligament, and potentially played a destructive role via matrix phagocytosis. The role of macrophages during early ligament healing was then evaluated using liposome-encapsulated clodronate to inhibit phagocytosing macrophages. Clodronate attenuated the early infiltration of macrophages, resulting in delayed structural and functional healing. Macrophage re-infiltration into the wound resulted in continued ligament healing. These results suggested that early inhibition of phagocytosing macrophages is detrimental to ligament healing. The final experiment evaluated the effects of interleukin-4 on ligament healing. Interleukin-4 (IL-4) is reported to stimulate the Th2 lymphocyte/M2 macrophage pathway, reducing

  12. Spatial selectivity in the temporoparietal junction, inferior frontal sulcus, and inferior parietal lobule.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Kathleen A; Chu, Carlton; Dickinson, Annelise; Pye, Brandon; Weller, J Patrick; Ungerleider, Leslie G

    2015-01-01

    Spatial selectivity, as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activity patterns that vary consistently with the location of visual stimuli, has been documented in many human brain regions, notably the occipital visual cortex and the frontal and parietal regions that are active during endogenous, goal-directed attention. We hypothesized that spatial selectivity also exists in regions that are active during exogenous, stimulus-driven attention. To test this hypothesis, we acquired fMRI data while subjects maintained passive fixation. At jittered time intervals, a briefly presented wedge-shaped array of rapidly expanding circles appeared at one of three contralateral or one of three ipsilateral locations. Positive fMRI activations were identified in multiple brain regions commonly associated with exogenous attention, including the temporoparietal junction, the inferior parietal lobule, and the inferior frontal sulcus. These activations were not organized as a map across the cortical surface. However, multivoxel pattern analysis of the fMRI activity correctly classified every pair of stimulus locations, demonstrating that patterns of fMRI activity were correlated with spatial location. These observations held for both contralateral and ipsilateral stimulus pairs as well as for stimuli of different textures (radial checkerboard) and shapes (squares and rings). Permutation testing verified that the obtained accuracies were not due to systematic biases and demonstrated that the findings were statistically significant. PMID:26382006

  13. Spatial selectivity in the temporoparietal junction, inferior frontal sulcus, and inferior parietal lobule

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kathleen A.; Chu, Carlton; Dickinson, Annelise; Pye, Brandon; Weller, J. Patrick; Ungerleider, Leslie G.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial selectivity, as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activity patterns that vary consistently with the location of visual stimuli, has been documented in many human brain regions, notably the occipital visual cortex and the frontal and parietal regions that are active during endogenous, goal-directed attention. We hypothesized that spatial selectivity also exists in regions that are active during exogenous, stimulus-driven attention. To test this hypothesis, we acquired fMRI data while subjects maintained passive fixation. At jittered time intervals, a briefly presented wedge-shaped array of rapidly expanding circles appeared at one of three contralateral or one of three ipsilateral locations. Positive fMRI activations were identified in multiple brain regions commonly associated with exogenous attention, including the temporoparietal junction, the inferior parietal lobule, and the inferior frontal sulcus. These activations were not organized as a map across the cortical surface. However, multivoxel pattern analysis of the fMRI activity correctly classified every pair of stimulus locations, demonstrating that patterns of fMRI activity were correlated with spatial location. These observations held for both contralateral and ipsilateral stimulus pairs as well as for stimuli of different textures (radial checkerboard) and shapes (squares and rings). Permutation testing verified that the obtained accuracies were not due to systematic biases and demonstrated that the findings were statistically significant. PMID:26382006

  14. Variant Inferior Alveolar Nerves and Implications for Local Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Kevin T; Brokaw, Everett J; Bell, Andrea; Joy, Anita

    2016-01-01

    A sound knowledge of anatomical variations that could be encountered during surgical procedures is helpful in avoiding surgical complications. The current article details anomalous morphology of inferior alveolar nerves encountered during routine dissection of the craniofacial region in the Gross Anatomy laboratory. We also report variations of the lingual nerves, associated with the inferior alveolar nerves. The variations were documented and a thorough review of literature was carried out. We focus on the variations themselves, and the clinical implications that these variations present. Thorough understanding of variant anatomy of the lingual and inferior alveolar nerves may determine the success of procedural anesthesia, the etiology of pathologic processes, and the avoidance of surgical misadventure.

  15. Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction Technique: An Anatomic-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Menge, Travis J; Mitchell, Justin J; Dean, Chase S; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-06-01

    Restoration of anteroposterior laxity after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction has been predictable with traditional open and endoscopic techniques. However, anterolateral rotational stability has been difficult to achieve in a subset of patients, even with appropriate anatomic techniques. Therefore, differing techniques have attempted to address this rotational laxity by augmenting or reconstructing lateral-sided structures about the knee. In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in the anterolateral ligament as a potential contributor to residual anterolateral rotatory instability in anterior cruciate ligament-deficient patients. Numerous anatomic and biomechanical studies have been performed to further define the functional importance of the anterolateral ligament, highlighting the need for surgical techniques to address these injuries in the unstable knee. This article details our technique for an anatomic anterolateral ligament reconstruction using a semitendinosus tendon allograft. PMID:27656361

  16. Specialisation of extracellular matrix for function in tendons and ligaments

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Helen L.; Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Rumian, Adam P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Tendons and ligaments are similar structures in terms of their composition, organisation and mechanical properties. The distinction between them stems from their anatomical location; tendons form a link between muscle and bone while ligaments link bones to bones. A range of overlapping functions can be assigned to tendon and ligaments and each structure has specific mechanical properties which appear to be suited for particular in vivo function. The extracellular matrix in tendon and ligament varies in accordance with function, providing appropriate mechanical properties. The most useful framework in which to consider extracellular matrix differences therefore is that of function rather than anatomical location. In this review we discuss what is known about the relationship between functional requirements, structural properties from molecular to gross level, cellular gene expression and matrix turnover. The relevance of this information is considered by reviewing clinical aspects of tendon and ligament repair and reconstructive procedures. PMID:23885341

  17. All-inside anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Andrew J; Stuart, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    All-inside anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has undergone a series of modifications over the past 20 years. Current techniques offer the advantages of improved cosmesis, less postoperative pain, decreased bone removal, and gracilis preservation. Few all-inside ACL reconstruction outcome studies are available; therefore, additional research is necessary to compare the results to conventional techniques. The purpose of this article is to review the evolution of all-inside ACL reconstruction, the advantages and disadvantages, our preferred technique, and clinical experience to date.

  18. Troubleshooting OptEase inferior vena cava filter retrieval.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Masaya; Kobayashi, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    For treatment of deep vein thrombosis and prevention of pulmonary thromboembolism, a retrievable inferior vena cava filter is commonly utilized as an effective bridge to anticoagulation. However, we have experienced difficulties in retrieving inferior vena cava filters. Endovascular retrieval assisted by disposable biopsy forceps is an appropriate approach because it provides a less-invasive low-cost way to remove a migrated filter. We suggest this troubleshooting technique to deal with filter hook migration into the caval wall.

  19. Ulnar collateral ligament of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Safran, Marc; Ahmad, Christopher S; Elattrache, Neal S

    2005-11-01

    Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of the overhead athlete's elbow has led the medical community to understand that the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of the elbow is more commonly injured than originally thought. Injury can result in secondary symptoms and problems in other regions of the elbow. Sports requiring an overhead motion, such as throwing a ball, hitting a ball overhead, or serving a tennis ball, imparts a valgus stress on the elbow that is resisted by the UCL. Throwing sidearm or hitting a forehand in tennis, squash, or racquetball may also impart a valgus stress to the elbow. Repeated or excessive valgus stress places a force on the UCL that may result in injury to the ligament. Injury to the UCL may result in problems in other areas of the elbow, including the ulnar nerve, the flexor-pronator musculotendinous unit, the radiocapitellar joint and the posterior compartment of the elbow, in addition to being a cause of loose bodies within the elbow. This article reviews the anatomy, biomechanics, and pathophysiology of injury to the UCL and injuries to the other structures that result from UCL injury. Also reviewed are patient history, examination techniques, tests that help confirm the diagnosis of UCL injury, and treatment of the injured UCL.

  20. Subsequent Surgery after Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ding, David; Group, Mars

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Failure or reinjury after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction can lead to recurrent instability and concomitant intra-articular injuries. While revision ACL reconstruction (rACLR) can be performed to restore knee stability and improve patient activity level, outcomes after these surgeries are reported to be inferior to primary ACL reconstruction. Further reoperation after rACLR can have an even more profound effect on patient satisfaction and outcome. Yet, there is a current lack of information regarding the rate and risk factors for subsequent surgery after rACLR. Methods: 1205 patients who underwent rACLR were enrolled between 2006 and 2011, comprising the prospective cohort. Two-year questionnaire follow-up was obtained on 989 (82%), while telephone follow-up was obtained on 1112 (92%). If a patient reported having a subsequent surgery, operative reports detailing the subsequent procedure(s) were obtained and categoriezed. A repeated meaures ANOVA was used to reveal significatnt differences in patient reported outcomes. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to determine independent risk factors for reoperation. Results: One hundred and twenty-two patients (10.1%) underwent a total of 172 subsequent procedures on the ipsilateral knee at 2-year follow-up. Of the reoperation procedures, 26.7% were meniscus procedures (69% meniscectomy, 26% repair), 18.6% were subsequent rACLR, 17.4% were cartilage procedures (61% chondroplasty, 17% microfracture, and 13% mosaicplasty), 10% hardware removal, and 9.3% were procedures for arthrofibrosis such has lysis of adhesions and synovectomy. Patients who had reoperations had significantly lower IKDC, KOOS symptoms and pain scores, and WOMAC stiffness scores at two-year follow up. Multivariate analysis revealed that patients under 20 years old were 2.1 times more likely than patients aged 20-29 to have a reoperation. Use of allograft at the time of rACLR and staged revision (bone grafting of

  1. Pollical oblique ligament in humans and non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Shrewsbury, Marvin

    2003-04-01

    A morphological study of the oblique ligament in the thumb is presented. The ligament was consistently described in human specimens and compared with dissections of non-human primates from different species. The oblique ligament was found in some, but not all, specimens in each of the following species examined: chimpanzee, orangutan, gibbon, anubis baboon, hamadryas baboon, squirrel monkey, lemur and marmoset. A revised identity of the oblique ligament is proposed as a reinforced distal border of a fibro-osseous annular pollical flexor sheath and whose function is not independent of the flexor sheath. The constant presence and tendinous trait of the pollical oblique ligament in humans, when compared with non-human primates, supports the notion that the oblique ligament strengthens the pollical flexor sheath in humans for restraint of the flexor pollicis longus tendon during forceful precision pinching. A derivation of the pollical oblique ligament is considered as representing a vestigial radial limb of a flexor pollicis superficialis tendon in the thumb.

  2. Arthroscopically assisted combined anterior and posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, G C; Giannotti, B F; Edson, C J

    1996-02-01

    This article presents the minimum 2-year results (range, 24 to 48 months) of 20 arthroscopically assisted combined anterior cruciate ligament/posterior cruciate ligament (ACL/PCL) reconstructions, evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively using the Tegner, Lysholm, and Hospital for Special Surgery knee ligament rating scales, and the KT 1000 knee ligament arthrometer (Medmetric Corp, San Diego, CA). There were 16 men or boys, 4 women or girls; 9 right, 11 left; 10 acute, and 10 chronic knee injuries. Ligament injuries included 1 ACL/PCL tear, 2 ACL/PCL/medial collateral ligament (MCL)/posterior lateral corner tears. 7 ACL/PCL/MCL tears, and 10 ACL/PCL/posterior lateral corner tears. ACLs were reconstructed using autograft or allograft patellar tendons. PCLs were reconstructed using allograft Achilles tendon, or autograft patellar tendon. MCL tears were successfully treated with bracing. Posterior lateral instability was successfully treated with long head of the biceps femoris tendon tenodesis. Tegner, Lysholm, and Hospital for Special Surgery knee ligament rating scales significantly improved preoperatively to postoperatively (P = .0001). Corrected anterior KT 1000 measurements improved from preoperative to postoperative status (P = .0078).

  3. Mechanical properties of the human lumbar anterior longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Neumann, P; Keller, T S; Ekström, L; Perry, L; Hansson, T H; Spengler, D M

    1992-10-01

    A new technique incorporating a motion analysis system and a materials testing machine was used to investigate regional differences in the tensile mechanical properties of the lumbar spine anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL). Bone-ALL-bone specimens were prepared from young human cadaveric motion segments with no disc or bony pathology. Each specimen was distracted until failure at a constant crosshead displacement rate of 2.5 mm s-1 (approximately 1.0% strain per second). Strains were evaluated from digitized video recordings of markers attached to the ALL at 12 sites along its length and width, including the ligament substance and insertions. The 'overall' strain in the ligament was calculated from the outermost pairs of markers along the ligament length. The average tensile strength, the 'overall' tensile modulus and the 'overall' strain of the ALL at failure were 27.4 MPa (S.D. 5.9), 759 MPa (S.D. 336) and 4.95% (S.D. 1.51), respectively. Large and significant variations in the strains were present along the width and length of the ALL. Peak substance strains were over twofold greater than peak strains at the ligament insertion sites, whereas across the ligament width, peak strains in the outer portion of the ligament were over 40% greater than in the central region. Failure consistently occurred in the ligament mid-substance and ultimate strains at the ligament failure site averaged 12.1% (S.D. 2.3). These results indicate that the strains are highly nonuniform in the normal ALL.

  4. Real-Time Estimation of Glenohumeral Joint Rotation Center With Cable-Driven Arm Exoskeleton (CAREX)-A Cable-Based Arm Exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ying; Jin, Xin; Agrawal, Sunil K

    2014-02-01

    In the past few years, the authors have proposed several prototypes of a Cable-driven upper ARm EXoskeleton (CAREX) for arm rehabilitation. One of the assumptions of CAREX was that the glenohumeral joint rotation center (GH-c) remains stationary in the inertial frame during motion, which leads to inaccuracy in the kinematic model and may hamper training performance. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to estimate GH-c using measurements of shoulder joint angles and cable lengths. This helps in locating the GH-c center appropriately within the kinematic model. As a result, more accurate kinematic model can be used to improve the training of human users. An estimation algorithm is presented to compute the GH-c in real-time. The algorithm was implemented on the latest prototype of CAREX. Simulations and preliminary experimental results are presented to validate the proposed GH-c estimation method.

  5. Broad Ligament Pregnancy - Success Story of a Laparoscopically Managed Case.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Jayashree; Nair, Sobha S

    2016-07-01

    Abdominal pregnancies constitute 1% of ectopic pregnancies, among which broad ligament pregnancy is a rare form. The maternal mortality rate has been reported to be as high as 20%. The diagnosis is seldom established before surgery. Laparoscopic management of broad ligament ectopic pregnancy is the ideal form of treatment in appropriately selected patients. We present the case report of successful laparoscopic treatment of a 3x3.5cm broad ligament pregnancy. A search of literature shows that ours is the 6(th) case report of such a rare ectopic pregnancy managed endoscopically successfully. PMID:27630914

  6. Falciform ligament abscess after omphalitis: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Moon, Suk-Bae; Lee, Hae Won; Park, Kwi-Won; Jung, Sung-Eun

    2010-07-01

    A falciform ligament abscess is a rare type of intra-abdominal abscess. A 2-yr-old male, who had omphalitis two months previously, presented with a fever and right upper quadrant abdominal pain. The ultrasound and CT scan showed an abdominal wall abscess located anterior to the liver, which was refractory to conservative management with percutaneous drainage and antibiotics. On the third recurrence, surgical exploration was performed and revealed an abscess arising from the falciform ligament; the falciform ligament was excised. A follow up ultrasound confirmed complete resolution of the abscess with no further recurrence.

  7. Combined anterolateral ligament and anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction of the knee.

    PubMed

    Smith, James O; Yasen, Sam K; Lord, Breck; Wilson, Adrian J

    2015-11-01

    Although anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is established for the surgical treatment of anterolateral knee instability, there remains a significant cohort of patients who continue to experience post-operative instability. Recent advances in our understanding of the anatomic, biomechanical and radiological characteristics of the native anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee have led to a resurgent interest in reconstruction of this structure as part of the management of knee instability. This technical note describes our readily reproducible combined minimally invasive technique to reconstruct both the ACL and ALL anatomically using autologous semitendinosus and gracilis grafts. This method of ALL reconstruction can be easily integrated with all-inside ACL reconstruction, requiring minimal additional operative time, equipment and expertise. Level of evidence V.

  8. Ultrastructure of periprosthetic Dacron knee ligament tissue. Two cases of ruptured anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Salvi, M; Velluti, C; Misasi, M; Bartolozzi, P; Quacci, D; Dell'Orbo, C

    1991-04-01

    Light- and electron-microscopic investigations were performed on two failed Dacron ligaments that had been removed from 2 patients shortly after failure of the implant 2-3 years after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. Two different cell populations and matrices were correlated with closeness to the Dacron threads. Fibroblasts surrounded by connective tissue with collagen fibrils were located far from the Dacron threads. Roundish cells, appearing to be myofibroblasts surrounded by a more lax connective tissue and elastic fibers, were found close to the Dacron threads. The presence of myofibroblasts and the matrix differentiation could be attributed to the different mechanical forces acting on the Dacron and on the connective tissue because of their different coefficients of elasticity. The sparse occurrence of inflammatory cells in the synovial membrane and in the connective tissue surrounding the Dacron supports the biologic inertness of this artificial material. However, the repair tissue was not structured to resist tension stresses.

  9. Partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament. Progression to complete ligament deficiency.

    PubMed

    Noyes, F R; Mooar, L A; Moorman, C T; McGinniss, G H

    1989-11-01

    In a prospective seven-year study, we treated 32 patients with partial ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) verified by arthroscopy. Twelve knees (38%) progressed to complete ACL deficiency with positive pivot shift tests and increased anteroposterior translation on tests with the KT-1000 arthrometer. Patients with partial ACL tears frequently had limitation for strenuous sports, while those developing ACL deficiency had additional functional limitations involving recreational activities. Three factors were statistically significant in predicting which partial tears would develop complete ACL deficiency: the amount of ligament tearing--one-fourth tears infrequently progressed, one-half tears progressed in 50% and three-fourth tears in 86%; a subtle increase in initial anterior translation; and the occurrence of a subsequent re-injury with giving-way.

  10. Feasibility of utilizing the patellar ligament angle for assessing cranial cruciate ligament rupture in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-ha

    2014-01-01

    The patellar ligament angle (PLA) was assessed in 105 normal stifle joints of 79 dogs and 33 stifle joints of 26 dogs with a ruptured cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL). The PLA of stifles with complete CrCL rupture was significantly lower than that of normal stifles, particularly at a flexion angle of 60~80° in both plain and stress views. If the PLA was <90.55° on the stress view with a 60~80° flexion angle, the dog was diagnosed with a complete rupture of the CrCL with a sensitivity of 83.9% and specificity of 100%. In conclusion, measuring the PLA is a quantitative method for diagnosing complete CrCL rupture in canines. PMID:24962409

  11. Ligament-muscle reflex arc after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: electromyographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Biedert, R M; Zwick, E B

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a ligament-muscle reflex arc exists between the bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and the hamstring muscle group. We studied four patients, average age 34.2 years (range 32-36 years). The mean time between the ACL reconstruction and the study examination was 56.2 months (range 5-108 months). All patients underwent a second-look arthroscopy for meniscal injuries, cyclops lesions, or adhesions. Five patients with a normal ACL served as a control group before we performed an arthroscopic meniscectomy. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was measured using fine wire electrodes under two different testing conditions. No unequivocal EMG activity could be detected in the ACL-reconstructed knees when we pulled on the graft or in the controls. Three of four patients and all controls felt pain when we touched the graft or normal ACL or applied strain on it with the hook. In conclusion, the ACL autograft presents a noxious sensory innervation, the Lachman test maneuver stimulates a reflex arc with hamstrings activation, and an unequivocal ligament-muscle reflex arc from the graft to the hamstring muscle group could not be demonstrated. PMID:9833113

  12. Human periodontal ligament cell sheets can regenerate periodontal ligament tissue in an athymic rat model.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Masateru; Yamato, Masayuki; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Okano, Teruo; Ishikawa, Isao

    2005-01-01

    Conventional periodontal regeneration methods remain insufficient to attain complete and reliable clinical regeneration of periodontal tissues. We have developed a new method of cell transplantation using cell sheet engineering and have applied it to this problem. The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of human periodontal ligament (HPDL) cell sheets retrieved from culture on unique temperature-responsive culture dishes, and to examine whether these cell sheets can regenerate periodontal tissues. The HPDL cell sheets were examined histologically and biochemically, and also were transplanted into a mesial dehiscence model in athymic rats. HPDL cells were harvested from culture dishes as a contiguous cell sheet with abundant extracellular matrix and retained intact integrins that are susceptible to trypsin-EDTA treatment. In the animal study, periodontal ligament-like tissues that include an acellular cementum-like layer and fibrils anchoring into this layer were identified in all the athymic rats transplanted with HPDL cell sheets. This fibril anchoring highly resembles native periodontal ligament fibers; such regeneration was not observed in nontransplanted controls. These results suggest that this technique, based on the concept of cell sheet engineering, can be useful for periodontal tissue regeneration. PMID:15869425

  13. A basic review on the inferior alveolar nerve block techniques

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Hesham

    2014-01-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve block is the most common injection technique used in dentistry and many modifications of the conventional nerve block have been recently described in the literature. Selecting the best technique by the dentist or surgeon depends on many factors including the success rate and complications related to the selected technique. Dentists should be aware of the available current modifications of the inferior alveolar nerve block techniques in order to effectively choose between these modifications. Some operators may encounter difficulty in identifying the anatomical landmarks which are useful in applying the inferior alveolar nerve block and rely instead on assumptions as to where the needle should be positioned. Such assumptions can lead to failure and the failure rate of inferior alveolar nerve block has been reported to be 20-25% which is considered very high. In this basic review, the anatomical details of the inferior alveolar nerve will be given together with a description of its both conventional and modified blocking techniques; in addition, an overview of the complications which may result from the application of this important technique will be mentioned. PMID:25886095

  14. Inferior oblique muscle paresis as a sign of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Almog, Yehoshua; Ben-David, Merav; Nemet, Arie Y

    2016-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis may affect any of the six extra-ocular muscles, masquerading as any type of ocular motor pathology. The frequency of involvement of each muscle is not well established in the medical literature. This study was designed to determine whether a specific muscle or combination of muscles tends to be predominantly affected. This retrospective review included 30 patients with a clinical diagnosis of myasthenia gravis who had extra-ocular muscle involvement with diplopia at presentation. The diagnosis was confirmed by at least one of the following tests: Tensilon test, acetylcholine receptor antibodies, thymoma on chest CT scan, or suggestive electromyography. Frequency of involvement of each muscle in this cohort was inferior oblique 19 (63.3%), lateral rectus nine (30%), superior rectus four (13.3%), inferior rectus six (20%), medial rectus four (13.3%), and superior oblique three (10%). The inferior oblique was involved more often than any other muscle (p<0.01). Eighteen (60%) patients had ptosis, six (20%) of whom had bilateral ptosis. Diagnosing myasthenia gravis can be difficult, because the disease may mimic every pupil-sparing pattern of ocular misalignment. In addition diplopia caused by paresis of the inferior oblique muscle is rarely encountered (other than as a part of oculomotor nerve palsy). Hence, when a patient presents with vertical diplopia resulting from an isolated inferior oblique palsy, myasthenic etiology should be highly suspected.

  15. The effects of inferior olive lesion on strychnine seizure

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.C.; Chung, E.Y.; Van Woert, M.H. )

    1990-10-01

    Bilateral inferior olive lesions, produced by systemic administration of the neurotoxin 3-acetylpyridine (3AP) produce a proconvulsant state specific for strychnine-induced seizures and myoclonus. We have proposed that these phenomena are mediated through increased excitation of cerebellar Purkinje cells, through activation of glutamate receptors, in response to climbing fiber deafferentation. An increase in quisqualic acid (QA)-displaceable ({sup 3}H)AMPA ((RS)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid) binding in cerebella from inferior olive-lesioned rats was observed, but no difference in ({sup 3}H)AMPA binding displaced by glutamate, kainic acid (KA) or glutamate diethylester (GDEE) was seen. The excitatory amino acid antagonists GDEE and MK-801 ((+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo(a,d)cyclo-hepten-5,10 imine) were tested as anticonvulsants for strychnine-induced seizures in 3AP inferior olive-lesioned and control rats. Neither drug effected seizures in control rats, however, both GDEE and MK-801 produced a leftward shift in the strychnine-seizure dose-response curve in 3AP inferior olive-lesioned rats. GDEE also inhibited strychnine-induced myoclonus in the lesioned group, while MK-801 had no effect on myoclonus. The decreased threshold for strychnine-induced seizures and myoclonus in the 3AP-inferior olive-lesioned rats may be due to an increase in glutamate receptors as suggested by the ({sup 3}H)AMPA binding data.

  16. Unusual morphology of scapulae: incidence and dimensions of ossified ligaments and supraspinous bony tunnels for clinical consideration

    PubMed Central

    Kharay, Sonia Singh; Sharma, Anu; Singh, Poonam

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Knowledge of morphological variations of the suprascapular region is important in the management of entrapment neuropathy and interventional procedures. The objective of this study was to collect data on the morphological features and dimensions of ossified ligaments and unusual bony tunnels of scapulae from a North Indian population. METHODS A total of 268 adult human scapulae of unknown gender were obtained from the bone bank of the Department of Anatomy, Dayanand Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana, Punjab, India. The scapulae were evaluated for the incidence of ossified superior transverse scapular ligaments (STSLs), ossified inferior transverse scapular ligaments (ITSLs) and bony tunnels (i.e. the bony canal between the suprascapular notch and spinoglenoid notch), found along the course of the suprascapular nerve (SSN). The dimensions of these structures were measured and noted down. Ossified STSLs were classified based on their shape (i.e. fan- or band-shaped) and the dimensions of the ossified suprascapular openings (SSOs) were measured. RESULTS Ossified STSLs were present in 26 (9.7%) scapulae. Among the 26 scapulae, 16 (61.5%) were fan-shaped (mean area of SSO 16.6 mm2) and 10 (38.5%) were band-shaped (mean area of SSO 34.2 mm2). Bony tunnels were observed in 2 (0.75%) specimens, while an ossified ITSL was observed in 1 (0.37%) specimen. CONCLUSION The data obtained in the present study augments the reference literature for SSN decompression and the existing anatomical databases, especially those on Indian populations. This data is useful to clinicians, radiologists and orthopaedic surgeons. PMID:26831314

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament tears: reconstruction and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mary Atkinson; Smith, W Todd; Kosko, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are common knee injuries experienced by athletes and people with active lifestyles. It is important for members of the healthcare team to take an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis, surgical management, and postoperative rehabilitation of patients with an ACL-deficient knee. Mechanism of ACL injury and diagnostic testing is consistent throughout the literature. Patients frequently opt for ACL reconstruction, and many surgical techniques for ACL reconstruction are available with no clear consensus regarding superiority. Surgeon preference dictates the type of reconstruction and graft choice utilized. No standardized pre- and postoperative rehabilitation protocol exists. However, rehabilitation plays an important role in functional outcomes. A comprehensive rehabilitation program is needed pre- and postoperatively to produce positive patient outcomes.

  18. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-June

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that in the majority of patellar dislocation cases, the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is disrupted with a high recurrence rate especially in female patients. Although MPFL tear is not the primary cause of instability, MPFL reconstruction is effective for stabilizing the knee and may alone prevent lateral patellar dislocation. There is limited but growing evidence that MPFL reconstruction for patellofemoral instability leads to excellent functional outcomes. Growing awareness of the biomechanical contribution of the MPFL has led to an upsurge in the publication of techniques and trials dealing with reconstructive techniques, warranting a review that includes the most recent evidence. The aim of this article was to review and summarize the recent literatures concerning MPFL reconstruction and provide a comprehensive review of previous studies ranging from basic science to current surgical techniques and results. PMID:26389065

  19. Ligaments: a source of musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Solomonow, Moshe

    2009-04-01

    The mechanical and neurological properties of ligaments are reviewed and updated with recent development from the perspective which evaluates their role as a source of neuromusculoskeletal disorders resulting from exposure to sports and occupational activities. Creep, tension-relaxation, hysteresis, sensitivity to strain rate and strain/load frequency were shown to result not only in mechanical functional degradation but also in the development of sensory-motor disorders with short- and long-term implication on function and disability. The recently exposed relationships between collagen fibers, applied mechanical stimuli, tissue micro-damage, acute and chronic inflammation and neuromuscular disorders are delineated with special reference to sports and occupational stressors such as load duration, rest duration, work/rest ratio, number of repetitions of activity and velocity of movement. PMID:19329050

  20. Infections in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Stucken, Charlton; Garras, David N.; Shaner, Julie L.; Cohen, Steven B.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a safe, common, and effective method of restoring stability to the knee after injury, but evolving techniques of reconstruction carry inherent risk. Infection after ACL reconstruction, while rare, carries a high morbidity, potentially resulting in a poor clinical outcome. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from previously published peer-reviewed literature through a search of the entire PubMed database (up to December 2012) as well as from textbook chapters. Results: Treatment with culture-specific antibiotics and debridement with graft retention is recommended as initial treatment, but with persistent infection, consideration should be given to graft removal. Graft type likely has no effect on infection rates. Conclusion: The early diagnosis of infection and appropriate treatment are necessary to avoid the complications of articular cartilage damage and arthrofibrosis. PMID:24427432

  1. Posterior Cruciate Ligament: Focus on Conflicting Issues

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Seuk

    2013-01-01

    There is little consensus on how to optimally reconstruct the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and the natural history of injured PCL is also unclear. The graft material (autograft vs. allograft), the type of tibial fixation (tibial inlay vs. transtibial tunnel), the femoral tunnel position within the femoral footprint (isometric, central, or eccentric), and the number of bundles in the reconstruction (1 bundle vs. 2 bundles) are among the many decisions that a surgeon must make in a PCL reconstruction. In addition, there is a paucity of information on rehabilitation after reconstruction of the PCL and posterolateral structures. This article focused on the conflicting issues regarding the PCL, and the scientific rationales behind some critical points are discussed. PMID:24340144

  2. Posterior cruciate ligament: focus on conflicting issues.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Seuk; Jung, Young Bok

    2013-12-01

    There is little consensus on how to optimally reconstruct the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and the natural history of injured PCL is also unclear. The graft material (autograft vs. allograft), the type of tibial fixation (tibial inlay vs. transtibial tunnel), the femoral tunnel position within the femoral footprint (isometric, central, or eccentric), and the number of bundles in the reconstruction (1 bundle vs. 2 bundles) are among the many decisions that a surgeon must make in a PCL reconstruction. In addition, there is a paucity of information on rehabilitation after reconstruction of the PCL and posterolateral structures. This article focused on the conflicting issues regarding the PCL, and the scientific rationales behind some critical points are discussed.

  3. Surgical Dissection of the Anterolateral Ligament.

    PubMed

    Daggett, Matthew; Busch, Kyle; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand

    2016-02-01

    Recent investigations into the structure and function of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) have resulted in renewed interest in the role of the lateral extra-articular structures in rotational control of the knee. With increased focus on the ALL, debate about the anatomic characteristics, the functional role in knee stability, and even the existence of this lateral structure has ensued. This article describes our dissection method for the ALL. Through careful dissection and precise elevation of the iliotibial band, the ALL can be clearly identified as a distinct structure with an attachment near the lateral epicondyle on the femur and an insertion in a fan-like fashion onto the tibia, between the Gerdy tubercle and the fibular head. This investigation provides the surgeon with anatomic landmarks to use during surgical reconstruction of the ALL. PMID:27274451

  4. Isolated fibular collateral ligament injuries in athletes.

    PubMed

    Sikka, Robby S; Dhami, Ranjodh; Dunlay, Ryan; Boyd, Joel L

    2015-03-01

    Isolated injuries to the fibular collateral ligament (FCL) are rare. Although recent data suggest that operative and nonoperative treatment can both result in good functional outcomes, limited data exist on return to play for nonoperative treatment of FCL injuries and the value of magnetic resonance imaging in predicting prognosis. In this article, we present a review of the current literature and present a focused review regarding the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of FCL injuries, as well as the senior authors experience and a cohort of National Football League players. Magnetic resonance imaging can be useful to predict the length of disability in isolated FCL injuries, and both operative and nonoperative management of isolated FCL injuries successfully resulted in return to play in all players in several series of elite athletes; however, nonoperative management may result in faster return to play. Evaluation of potential concomitant injury is imperative in treatment of FCL injuries.

  5. Individualized anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    van Eck, Carola F; Widhalm, Harrald; Murawski, Christopher; Fu, Freddie H

    2015-02-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are often seen in young participants in sports such as soccer, football, and basketball. Treatment options include conservative management as well as surgical intervention, with the goal of enabling the patient to return to cutting and pivoting sports and activities. Individualized anatomic ACL reconstruction is a surgical technique that tailors the procedure to the individual patient using preoperative measurements on plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative measurement to map the patients' native ACL anatomy in order to replicate it as closely as possible. Anatomic ACL reconstruction, therefore, is defined as reconstruction of the ACL to its native dimensions, collagen orientation, and insertion site. The surgical reconstruction is followed by a specific rehabilitation protocol that is designed to enable the patient to regain muscle strength and proprioception while facilitating healing of the reconstructed ACL prior to the patient's returning to sports activities.

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries: etiology and prevention.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Robert H; Silvers, Holly J; Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2010-03-01

    The relatively high risk of noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture among female athletes has been a major impetus for investigation into the etiology of this injury. A number of risk factors have been identified, both internal and external to the athlete, including neuromuscular, anatomical, hormonal, shoe-surface interaction, and environmental, such as weather. The anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors, often gender related, are the focus of most ACL injury prevention programs. Although studies have shown that biomechanic- centered prevention programs can reduce the risk of ACL injury, many questions remain unanswered. More research is needed to increase our understanding of the risk factors for ACL injury; how injury prevention programs work and can the clinical application of such programs be optimized. PMID:20160623

  7. Rupture of Posterior Cruciate Ligament: Diagnosis and Treatment Principles

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Shin Woo

    2011-01-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries associated with multiple ligament injuries can be easily diagnosed, but isolated PCL tears are less symptomatic, very difficult to diagnose, and frequently misdiagnosed. If a detailed investigation of the history of illness suggests a PCL injury, careful physical examinations including the posterior drawer test, dial test, varus and valgus test should be done especially if the patient complains of severe posterior knee pain in >90° of flexion. Vascular assessment and treatment should be done to avoid critical complications. An individualized treatment plan should be established after consideration of the type of tear, time after injury, associated collateral ligament injuries, bony alignment, and status of remnant. The rehabilitation should be carried out slower than that after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. PMID:22570824

  8. Rupture of posterior cruciate ligament: diagnosis and treatment principles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Beom Koo; Nam, Shin Woo

    2011-09-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries associated with multiple ligament injuries can be easily diagnosed, but isolated PCL tears are less symptomatic, very difficult to diagnose, and frequently misdiagnosed. If a detailed investigation of the history of illness suggests a PCL injury, careful physical examinations including the posterior drawer test, dial test, varus and valgus test should be done especially if the patient complains of severe posterior knee pain in >90° of flexion. Vascular assessment and treatment should be done to avoid critical complications. An individualized treatment plan should be established after consideration of the type of tear, time after injury, associated collateral ligament injuries, bony alignment, and status of remnant. The rehabilitation should be carried out slower than that after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  9. Digital infrared thermal imaging following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Barker, Lauren E; Markowski, Alycia M; Henneman, Kimberly

    2012-03-01

    This case describes the selective use of digital infrared thermal imaging for a 48-year-old woman who was being treated by a physical therapist following left anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with a semitendinosus autograft. PMID:22383168

  10. The clinical implications of the oblique retinacular ligament.

    PubMed

    Adkinson, Joshua M; Johnson, Shepard P; Chung, Kevin C

    2014-03-01

    The oblique retinacular ligament originates from the flexor tendon sheath, courses past the proximal interphalangeal joint, and merges with the lateral extensor tendon. There has been disagreement regarding the contribution of the oblique retinacular ligament to coordinated movements between the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints. Landsmeer postulated that it acts as a dynamic tenodesis that tightens with proximal interphalangeal joint extension, causing obligatory distal interphalangeal joint extension. However, studies have shown that the oblique retinacular ligament is variably present and often attenuated, which diminishes its presumed role in finger movement. Despite this, the concept of a checkrein linking interphalangeal joint motion heralded the development of effective and reproducible surgical interventions for swan-neck and mallet deformities. This article examines the controversy regarding the existence of the oblique retinacular ligament, its plausible functionality, and clinical implications in the practice of hand surgery. PMID:24559632

  11. [Secondary ligament instabilities in the area of the elbow joint].

    PubMed

    Wirth, C J

    1988-08-01

    Secondary capsular or ligamentous injuries around the elbow joint, which are generally a rare finding, can give rise to medial, lateral, anterior, and posterior instability. Medial instability is especially bothersome during sporting activities, such as javelin throwing and baseball, and requires tightening or replacement of the ulnar collateral ligament. On the lateral side it is particularly the subluxation of the head of the radius that makes surgical tightening of the annular ligament essential. Anterior instability, which would cause the joint to dislocate anteriorly, is extremely rare and does not lead to secondary problems. Posterolateral, chronically recurrent, dislocation of the elbow joint, however, is intolerable for the patient, and many operative stabilizing procedures have been performed, mostly in isolated patients, in attempts at correction. The current method of choice consists in tightening of the dorsoradial capsular pouch in combination with osseous refixation of the slack radial ligament.

  12. Tendon and ligament adaptation to exercise, immobilization, and remobilization.

    PubMed

    Wren, T A; Beaupré, G S; Carter, D R

    2000-01-01

    This study provides a theoretical and computational basis for understanding and predicting how tendons and ligaments adapt to exercise, immobilization, and remobilization. In a previous study, we introduced a model that described the growth and development of tendons and ligaments. In this study, we use the same model to predict changes in the cross-sectional area, modulus, and strength of tendons and ligaments due to increased or decreased loading. The model predictions are consistent with the results of experimental exercise and immobilization studies performed by other investigators. These results suggest that the same fundamental principles guide both development and adaptation. A basic understanding of these principles can contribute both to prevention of tendon and ligament injuries and to more effective rehabilitation when injury does occur.

  13. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee are immediately debilitating and can cause long-term consequences, including the early onset of osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 1 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unknown regarding anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors for injury to the ACL from the current peer-reviewed literature. Data Sources: Studies were identified from MEDLINE (1951–March 2011) using the MeSH terms anterior cruciate ligament, knee injury, and risk factors. The bibliographies of relevant articles and reviews were cross-referenced to complete the search. Study Selection: Prognostic studies that utilized the case-control and prospective cohort study designs to evaluate risk factors for ACL injury were included in this review. Results: A total of 50 case-control and prospective cohort articles were included in the review, and 30 of these studies focused on neuromuscular and anatomic risk factors. Conclusions: Several anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors are associated with increased risk of suffering ACL injury—such as female sex and specific measures of bony geometry of the knee joint, including decreased intercondylar femoral notch size, decreased depth of concavity of the medial tibial plateau, increased slope of the tibial plateaus, and increased anterior-posterior knee laxity. These risk factors most likely act in combination to influence the risk of ACL injury; however, multivariate risk models that consider all the aforementioned risk factors in combination have not been established to explore this interaction. PMID:23016072

  14. Resorbable polymer fibers for ligament augmentation.

    PubMed

    Dürselen, L; Dauner, M; Hierlemann, H; Planck, H; Claes, L E; Ignatius, A

    2001-01-01

    Resorbable augmentation devices for cruciate ligament surgery have been developed to temporarily protect healing tendon grafts or sutured ligaments against high tensile loads during the postoperative healing period. Materials available at present [e.g., polydioxanone (PDS)] show a half-life tensile strength of only 4-6 weeks, whereas the process of revitalization and recovering of the transplanted tendon graft can take up to 12 months. Therefore, a device that provides gradually decreasing mechanical properties with a half-time strength of at least 6 months would be desirable. In order to obtain a suitable material, we investigated the degradation kinetics of a variety of different resorbable fibers made of poly(L-lactide) and poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide). The fiber materials differed in processing and treatment parameters like thermal posttreatment, irradiation, and fiber diameter. The fibers were degraded in vitro and were tested for mechanical properties and molecular weight at various time points up to 72 weeks. The half-time strength of the materials ranged between 5 and 64 weeks, depending on their treatment parameters. In contrast, the stiffness did not decrease adequately. However, an augmentation stiffness that does not change much versus time could not provide a gradual increase in graft load, which is important to stimulate the orientation of the collagenous tissue. Therefore, design of an augmentation construct braided out of more than one quickly degrading fiber materials is suggested. After the breakdown of the faster-degrading fiber components the stiffness would automatically decrease by the diminution of the load-carrying fiber volume. PMID:11745519

  15. The 5-Strand Hamstring Graft in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Rushyuan Jay; Ganley, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in the pediatric and adolescent population has been increasing in recent years. Autograft hamstring graft is favored in this population, but these patients often have smaller hamstring tendons that yield smaller final graft constructs. These smaller grafts are associated with an increased need for revision surgery. We describe a technique for obtaining a larger-diameter anterior cruciate ligament graft construct from autologous hamstring graft without allograft supplementation. PMID:25473619

  16. [Chondroblastoma in the anterior cruciate ligament origo: a case report].

    PubMed

    Aydin, Hafız; Turhan, Ahmet Uğur; Karataş, Metin; Onay, Atilgan; Yildiz, Kadriye

    2012-01-01

    Chondroblastoma is a rarely seen cartilage originated tumor. It is mostly localized in the epiphysis of long bones. In this article, we present an 18-year-old male case in whom the tumor was located in the right distal femoral lateral condyle and destroyed anterior cruciate ligament origo. The tumor was curetted and the cavity was filled with cement. Anterior cruciate ligament resection was mandatory for this treatment. The patient had no complaint in the postoperative period.

  17. Ulnar collateral ligament injuries in the throwing athlete.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Jeremy R; Andrews, James R

    2014-05-01

    Repetitive valgus forces on the throwing elbow place significant stress on that joint. This stress can cause structural damage and injury to the ulnar collateral ligament. Many acute injuries of the throwing elbow are caused by repetitive chronic wear. Although much work has been done on injury prevention in youth who are pitchers, overuse injury in throwing sports constitutes an epidemic. Failing nonsurgical management, ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction is a viable option to return the throwing athlete to competition. PMID:24788447

  18. Ulnar collateral ligament injuries in the throwing athlete.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Jeremy R; Andrews, James R

    2014-05-01

    Repetitive valgus forces on the throwing elbow place significant stress on that joint. This stress can cause structural damage and injury to the ulnar collateral ligament. Many acute injuries of the throwing elbow are caused by repetitive chronic wear. Although much work has been done on injury prevention in youth who are pitchers, overuse injury in throwing sports constitutes an epidemic. Failing nonsurgical management, ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction is a viable option to return the throwing athlete to competition.

  19. [Chondroblastoma in the anterior cruciate ligament origo: a case report].

    PubMed

    Aydin, Hafız; Turhan, Ahmet Uğur; Karataş, Metin; Onay, Atilgan; Yildiz, Kadriye

    2012-01-01

    Chondroblastoma is a rarely seen cartilage originated tumor. It is mostly localized in the epiphysis of long bones. In this article, we present an 18-year-old male case in whom the tumor was located in the right distal femoral lateral condyle and destroyed anterior cruciate ligament origo. The tumor was curetted and the cavity was filled with cement. Anterior cruciate ligament resection was mandatory for this treatment. The patient had no complaint in the postoperative period. PMID:22765492

  20. Traumatic neuroma of the inferior alveolar nerve: a case report.

    PubMed

    Arribas-García, Ignacio; Alcalá-Galiano, Andrea; Gutiérrez, Ramón; Montalvo-Moreno, Juan José

    2008-03-01

    Traumatic neuromas are rare entities which characteristically arise subsequently to surgery and are usually accompanied by pain, typically neuralgic. We present an unusual case of an intraosseous traumatic neuroma of the inferior alveolar nerve following tooth extraction. A 56-year-old man consulted for paresthesias and hyperesthesia in the left mandibular region following extraction of the left mandibular third molar (#38). The panoramic radiograph revealed a radiolucent lesion in the inferior alveolar nerve canal, and CT demonstrated the existence of a mass within the canal, producing widening of the same. Nerve-sparing excisional biopsy was performed. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry were consistent with traumatic neuroma of the left inferior alveolar nerve. After 3 years of follow-up, the patient is asymptomatic and there are no signs of recurrence.

  1. Variant Inferior Alveolar Nerves and Implications for Local Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Kevin T; Brokaw, Everett J; Bell, Andrea; Joy, Anita

    2016-01-01

    A sound knowledge of anatomical variations that could be encountered during surgical procedures is helpful in avoiding surgical complications. The current article details anomalous morphology of inferior alveolar nerves encountered during routine dissection of the craniofacial region in the Gross Anatomy laboratory. We also report variations of the lingual nerves, associated with the inferior alveolar nerves. The variations were documented and a thorough review of literature was carried out. We focus on the variations themselves, and the clinical implications that these variations present. Thorough understanding of variant anatomy of the lingual and inferior alveolar nerves may determine the success of procedural anesthesia, the etiology of pathologic processes, and the avoidance of surgical misadventure. PMID:27269666

  2. Inferior oblique recession in thyroid-related orbitopathy.

    PubMed

    Salchow, Daniel J

    2015-06-01

    Thyroid-related orbitopathy is a form of orbital inflammation associated with thyroid dysfunction, developing in many patients with Graves disease. Fibrosis of the inferior rectus muscle can lead to restricted elevation and vertical ocular misalignment, which may be improved by recessing this muscle. In some patients, vertical misalignment persists after surgical weakening of one or more vertical rectus muscles. In this case series, unilateral inferior oblique recession as a secondary procedure after inferior rectus recession reduced hypertropia in primary gaze from 9(Δ) ± 3(Δ) to 1.3(Δ) ± 1.5(Δ) (mean ± standard deviation) and largest hypertropia in side gaze from 18.3 ± 2.1(Δ) to 3.3(Δ) ± 1.5(Δ). Postoperatively, all 3 patients were diplopia free in primary and downgaze. PMID:26059675

  3. Cervical ligamentous instability in a canine in vivo model.

    PubMed

    Whitehill, R; Moran, D J; Fechner, R E; Ruch, W W; Drucker, S; Hooper, W E; McCoig, J A

    1987-12-01

    A canine in vivo model of midcervical ligamentous instability was developed by dividing the anterior longitudinal ligament, anulus fibrosus, and all posterior ligamentous structures including the ligamentum flavum. The natural history of healing in the model, the effect on its healing by an adjacent one-level arthrodesis, and the effect of a one-level arthrodesis on normal adjacent ligamentous structures were studied radiographically, mechanically, and histologically. The authors determined that healing takes place primarily by anterior scar formation in their instability model but not to a degree sufficient to recreate normal mechanical stability. After three months, healing in the model was not affected by an adjacent arthrodesis; however, acutely, instability apparently was increased as three animals became quadriplegic between the second and fourth postoperative days. Arthrodesis did not affect adjacent normal ligamentous structures, during this period. Incomplete healing in the authors' model supports those who advocate arthrodesis as the treatment of choice for destabilizing cervical ligamentous injury. The authors previously reported the case of a patient who sustained bilateral facet dislocations adjacent to an arthrodesed segment and questioned whether this resulted from a stress-concentrating effect. This study indicates that this could well have been the case acutely. Thus, inadvertent exclusion of an unstable segment from an arthrodesis has potentially catastrophic results. Finally, the authors also have previously questioned whether arthrodesis of a midcervical segment could lead to instability of adjacent normal segments. This project does not support such a concern, at least for the three postoperative months of study. PMID:3441821

  4. Cable-Augmented, Quad Ligament Tenodesis Scapholunate Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bain, Gregory I; Watts, Adam C; McLean, James; Lee, Yu C; Eng, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    Maintaining reduction of the scapholunate interval after reconstruction can be difficult. The authors performed scapholunate reconstruction using tensionable suture anchors in 8 patients. The anchors provide a fixed cable that both fixes the graft, and reduces the scapholunate diastasis and maintains reduction. The flexor carpi radialis tendon graft stabilizes not only the volar scaphotrapezial ligament, and dorsal scapholunate ligament, but also the dorsal intercarpal and dorsal radiocarpal ligament. The Berger flap is closed using an ulnar advancement capsulodesis that further reinforces the dorsal intercarpal and dorsal radiocarpal ligament. The mean pain score improved from 5.8 to 2.1. Mean extension was 56° (91% of contralateral side), flexion 44° (70% of contralateral side), and grip strength was 41kg (95% of the contralateral side). The mean scapholunate angle was 71°, radiolunate angle 16° and scapholunate interval 3.0 mm. The cable augmented, quad ligament scapholunate ligament reconstruction offers theoretical advantages but long term follow up is required.

  5. [VARIANT ANATOMY OF SPLENIC LIGAMENTS AND ARTERIES PASSING THROUGH THEM].

    PubMed

    Gaivoronskiy, I V; Kotiv, B N; Alekseyev, V S; Nichiporuk, G I

    2015-01-01

    The research was performed on 15 non embalmed bodies and 32 abdominal complexes of adult individuals. The comparative study of variant anatomy of splenic ligaments and architectonics of arteries passing through them was carried out to substantiate the mobilization of splenopancreatic complex. Anatomical and angiographic restudied were carried out using preparation, morphometry, injection of gastric, pancreatic and splenic vascular bed with red lead suspension. It was established that the form and sizes of splenic ligaments and their interrelation with the branches of the splenic artery were variable. The minimal and maximal sizes of gastrolienal, phrenicosplenic and splenocolic ligaments differed 2-3 times. In most cases, spleen was fixed in abdominal cavity by many short ligaments. It was shown that architectonics and topography of main branches of spleen artery were determined by morphometric characteristics of the spleen proper and its ligaments. The knowledge of splenic ligament variant anatomy allows a new perspective to approach to substantiate different methods of the mobilization of spleno-pancreatic complex during surgical operations on organs of the upper part of the peritoneal cavity and organ-preserving surgery of the spleen.

  6. Arthroscopically assisted anatomical coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction using tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yon-Sik; Seo, Young-Jin; Noh, Kyu-Cheol; Patro, Bishu Prasad; Kim, Do-Young

    2011-07-01

    We describe a method of arthroscopically assisted, mini-open, anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligament. This method restores both components of the native ligament with the aim of achieving maximum stability with minimal disruption of the normal anatomy. Using the same principles of ligament reconstruction that are employed in other joints, transosseous tunnels are created following the native footprints of the conoid and trapezoid ligaments and an autologous graft is fixed using a PEEK screw. Adequate healing of the ligament occurs within the bone, to prevent stress risers with an appropriate working length. This procedure is unique, as it replaces the torn ligament with a natural substitute, in the appropriate location, through a minimally invasive procedure. This technique would be suitable for treatment of patients with either grade III or V acute acromioclavicular dislocations. Clinical outcomes for the first 13 consecutive patients treated with this procedure are reported, revealing excellent satisfaction rates with a Constant score of 96.6 at final follow-up.

  7. The sacrotuberous and the sacrospinous ligament--a virtual reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hammer, N; Steinke, H; Slowik, V; Josten, C; Stadler, J; Böhme, J; Spanel-Borowski, K

    2009-10-01

    Little is known about the morphometric properties of the sacrotuberous ligament (ST) and the sacrospinous ligament (SS). The influence of ligaments on pelvic stability and the extent of reconstruction in case of instability are controversially discussed. The ST and the SS of 55 human subjects fixed in alcohol solution and of four fresh cadavers were measured. Both ligaments were defined as geometric figures. The ST was a contorted bifrustum, while the SS was a contorted frustum, both with elliptic planes. In all cases investigated, the ST and the SS fibres were twisted. For men, the ST and the SS had a mean length of 64 and 38 mm. For women, lengths of 70 and 46 mm were measured in the ST and the SS. The ST length, height and cross-sectional area showed gender-specific differences at statistically significant level. The ST and the SS volumes correlated closely, regardless of gender or side. Measurements of fresh ligaments of four unfixed cadavers showed similar results. The data obtained were then used to generate computer-based three-dimensional models of both ligaments, using the Catia software. Conclusively, the virtually generated ST and SS are suitable models to be included in pelvic fracture simulation, using the finite element method.

  8. [PARTICULAR QUALITIES OF DIAGNOSTIC ACUTE LATERAL ANKLE LIGAMENT INJURIES].

    PubMed

    Krasnoperov, S N; Shishka, I V; Golovaha, M L

    2015-01-01

    Delayed diagnosis of acute lateral ankle ligaments injury and subsequent inadequate treatment leads to the development of chronic instability and rapid progression of degenerative processes in the joint. The aim of our work was to improve treatment results by developing an diagnostic algorithm and treatment strategy of acute lateral ankle ligament injuries. The study included 48 patients with history of acute inversion ankle injury mechanism. Diagnostic protocol included clinical and radiological examination during 48 hours and after 7-10 days after injury. According to the high rate of inaccurate clinical diagnosis in the first 48 hours of the injury a short course of conservative treatment for 7-10 days is needed with follow-up and controlling clinical and radiographic instability tests. Clinical symptoms of ankle inversion injury showed that the combination of local tenderness in the projection of damaged ligaments, the presence of severe periarticular hematoma in the lateral department and positive anterior drawer and talar tilt tests in 7-10 days after the injury in 87% of cases shows the presence of ligament rupture. An algorithm for diagnosis of acute lateral ankle ligament injury was developed, which allowed us to determine differential indications for surgical repair of the ligaments and conservative treatment of these patients.

  9. Pleomorphic adenoma originates from inferior nasal turbinate causing epiphora.

    PubMed

    Erol, Bekir; Selçuk, Ömer Tarik; Gürses, Cemil; Osma, Üstün; Köroğlu, Mert; Süren, Dinç

    2013-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma is the most common benign tumor of the salivary glands. A 62-year-old female patient presented with epiphora and was suffering from breathing difficulties. With the diagnostic nasal endoscopy, a mass, originating from right inferior nasal turbinate and filling the entire nasal cavity, was seen. Originating from the inferior nasal turbinate is a very rare entity. Paranasal sinus computed tomography and magnetic resonance images revealed a mass that fills and expands the right nasal cavity. Mass was hypoechoic in B-mode ultrasonography and hypovascular in color Doppler ultrasonography, and rate of tissue stiffness was high in sonoelastography. These were helpful for the diagnosis.

  10. Suprarenal symplastic leiomyoma of the inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Kepenekci, Ilknur; Demirkan, Arda; Sözener, Ulas; Cakmak, Atil; Demirer, Seher; Alaçayir, Iskender; Ekinci, Cemil

    2009-01-01

    We report on a case of a leiomyoma in the inferior vena cava that appeared in the image to be located in the adrenal gland. En bloc excision of the tumor with the right adrenal gland and the involved segment of the vena cava was carried out. Histopathological work-up of the tumor revealed smooth muscle fibers and marked nuclear pleomorphism consistent with symplastic leiomyoma. This case report presents a distinct histological variant of the rarely seen primary smooth muscle tumor of the inferior vena cava.

  11. Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament surgery: results of autogenous patellar tendon graft versus the Leeds-Keio synthetic graft five year follow-up of a prospective randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ghalayini, S R A; Helm, A T; Bonshahi, A Y; Lavender, A; Johnson, D S; Smith, R B

    2010-10-01

    We conducted a prospective, randomised controlled trial comparing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using middle third patellar tendon graft (PT) to synthetic Leeds-Keio (LK) ligament. The patients were randomised (26 PT, 24 LK). Subjective knee function was classified (Lysholm, Tegner activity, IKDC scores), laxity was measured (Lachman test, Stryker laxometer), and functional ability was assessed (one-hop test). There were no significant differences between Lysholm or IKDC scores at any stage by 5 years. Significant differences were found between the groups at 2 years for Tegner activity scores, laxity and one-hop testing. By 5 years there were no significant differences. Clinical equivalence was demonstrated between the two groups for the Lysholm score and one-hop test but not for the Tegner activity score at 5 years. The use of the LK ligament has been largely abandoned due to reports of its insufficiency. Our results demonstrate that it is not as inferior as one might expect. We conclude that the results of LK ligament ACL reconstruction are as acceptable as those using PT. It may provide an additional means of reconstruction where no suitable alternative is present.

  12. Combined Intra- and Extra-articular Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament: The Reconstruction of the Knee Anterolateral Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2015-01-01

    We present a new technique for the combined intra- and extra-articular reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. Intra-articular reconstruction is performed in an outside-in manner according to the precepts of the anatomic femoral tunnel technique. Extra-articular reconstruction is performed with the gracilis tendon while respecting the anatomic parameters of the origin and insertion points and the path described for the knee anterolateral ligament. PMID:26258037

  13. Morphology of the transverse ligament of the atlas and the alar ligaments in the silver fox (Vulpes vulpes var)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent new anatomical and histological features of craniocervical junction in dogs and cats were described providing evidence of differences between the carnivore species. No information on these structures in foxes exists. Results Two parts of the alar ligaments were found. A longer one aroused from dens of axis to the internal (medial) surface of the occipital condyles and was called apical part. A shorter part originated from the entire length of the lateral edge of the dens of axis and terminated on the internal wall of the vertebral foramen of atlas and thus was called the lateral part. The transverse ligament of the atlas was widened in the mid region, above the dens of axis, and thickened at enthesis. Periosteal fibrocartilage was detected in the transverse ligament of the atlas at the enthesis, and sesamoid fibrocartilage was present on periphery in the middle of the ligament. Conclusions The craniocervical junction in foxes differs in part from other carnivores such as dogs and cats but resembles that of mesaticephalic dogs. The sesamoid and periosteal fibrocartilage supports the transverse ligament of the atlas whereas the alar ligaments have no cartilage. PMID:23557095

  14. Traumatic longitudinal splitting of the inferior rectus muscle

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Jessica; Demer, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Orbital floor fractures and associated injuries can cause strabismus. We present the case of a 34-year-old man with incomitant strabismus following orbital reconstruction after a high-impact baseball injury. Multipositional, high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed extensive longitudinal splitting of the inferior rectus muscle by an orbital floor implant that separated its orbital and global layers. PMID:21463958

  15. Corticofugal regulation of auditory sensitivity in the bat inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Jen, P H; Chen, Q C; Sun, X D

    1998-12-01

    Under free-field stimulation conditions, corticofugal regulation of auditory sensitivity of neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, was studied by blocking activities of auditory cortical neurons with Lidocaine or by electrical stimulation in auditory cortical neuron recording sites. The corticocollicular pathway regulated the number of impulses, the auditory spatial response areas and the frequency-tuning curves of inferior colliculus neurons through facilitation or inhibition. Corticofugal regulation was most effective at low sound intensity and was dependent upon the time interval between acoustic and electrical stimuli. At optimal inter-stimulus intervals, inferior colliculus neurons had the smallest number of impulses and the longest response latency during corticofugal inhibition. The opposite effects were observed during corticofugal facilitation. Corticofugal inhibitory latency was longer than corticofugal facilitatory latency. Iontophoretic application of gamma-aminobutyric acid and bicuculline to inferior colliculus recording sites produced effects similar to what were observed during corticofugal inhibition and facilitation. We suggest that corticofugal regulation of central auditory sensitivity can provide an animal with a mechanism to regulate acoustic signal processing in the ascending auditory pathway.

  16. A periodic network of neurochemical modules in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Chernock, Michelle L; Larue, David T; Winer, Jeffery A

    2004-02-01

    A new organization has been found in shell nuclei of rat inferior colliculus. Chemically specific modules with a periodic distribution fill about half of layer 2 of external cortex and dorsal cortex. Modules contain clusters of small glutamic acid decarboxylase-positive neurons and large boutons at higher density than in other inferior colliculus subdivisions. The modules are also present in tissue stained for parvalbumin, cytochrome oxidase, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase, and acetylcholinesterase. Six to seven bilaterally symmetrical modules extend from the caudal extremity of the external cortex of the inferior colliculus to its rostral pole. Modules are from approximately 800 to 2200 microm long and have areas between 5000 and 40,000 microm2. Modules alternate with immunonegative regions. Similar modules are found in inbred and outbred strains of rat, and in both males and females. They are absent in mouse, squirrel, cat, bat, macaque monkey, and barn owl. Modules are immunonegative for glycine, calbindin, serotonin, and choline acetyltransferase. The auditory cortex and ipsi- and contralateral inferior colliculi project to the external cortex. Somatic sensory influences from the dorsal column nuclei and spinal trigeminal nucleus are the primary ascending sensory input to the external cortex; ascending auditory input to layer 2 is sparse. If the immunopositive modular neurons receive this input, the external cortex could participate in spatial orientation and somatic motor control through its intrinsic and extrinsic projections. PMID:14759566

  17. Inferior Colliculus Lesions Impair Eyeblink Conditioning in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, John H.; Halverson, Hunter E.; Hubbard, Erin M.

    2007-01-01

    The neural plasticity necessary for acquisition and retention of eyeblink conditioning has been localized to the cerebellum. However, the sources of sensory input to the cerebellum that are necessary for establishing learning-related plasticity have not been identified completely. The inferior colliculus may be a source of sensory input to the…

  18. Traumatic longitudinal splitting of the inferior rectus muscle.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Jessica; Demer, Joseph L

    2011-04-01

    Orbital floor fractures and associated injuries can cause strabismus. We present the case of a 34-year-old man with incomitant strabismus after orbital reconstruction following a high-impact baseball injury. Multipositional, high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging revealed extensive longitudinal splitting of the inferior rectus muscle by an orbital floor implant that separated its orbital and global layers.

  19. Asymptomatic Lumbar Vertebral Erosion from Inferior Vena Cava Filter Perforation

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Wayne Hieb, Robert A.; Olson, Eric; Carrera, Guillermo F.

    2007-06-15

    In 2002, a 24-year-old female trauma patient underwent prophylactic inferior vena cava filter placement. Recurrent bouts of renal stones prompted serial CT imaging in 2004. In this brief report, we describe erosion and ossification of the L3 vertebral body by a Greenfield filter strut.

  20. Traumatic longitudinal splitting of the inferior rectus muscle.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Jessica; Demer, Joseph L

    2011-04-01

    Orbital floor fractures and associated injuries can cause strabismus. We present the case of a 34-year-old man with incomitant strabismus after orbital reconstruction following a high-impact baseball injury. Multipositional, high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging revealed extensive longitudinal splitting of the inferior rectus muscle by an orbital floor implant that separated its orbital and global layers. PMID:21463958

  1. Evaluation of Knee Ligament Mechanics Using Computational Models.

    PubMed

    Guess, Trent M; Razu, Swithin; Jahandar, Hamidreza

    2016-02-01

    The steady maturation of computational biomechanics is providing the musculoskeletal health community with exciting avenues for enhancing orthopedic practice and rehabilitation. Computational knee models deliver tools that may improve the efficiency and outcomes of orthopedic research and methods through analysis of virtual surgeries and devices. They also provide insight into the interaction of knee structures and can predict what cannot be directly measured such as loading on our cartilage and ligaments during movement. This project created subject-specific computational knee models of two young adult females using magnetic resonance imaging-derived knee geometries and passive leg motion measured by a motion capture system. The knee models produced passive ligament lengthening patterns similar to experimental measurements available in the literature. The models also predicted cruciate ligament forces during passive flexion with and without applying anterior-posterior tibia forces that were similar to experimental measurements available in the literature. The biomechanics of the posterior oblique ligament (POL) and the anterior cruciate ligament bundles during combined tibia internal-external rotation torque and anterior-posterior forces through deep flexion were then examined. The study showed that the central arm of the POL: (1) produces a maximum constraining force when the knee is at full extension, (2) constrains internal tibial rotation at extension, and (3) constrains posterior tibial translation at extension. The POL reinforces the constraint of the anterior cruciate ligament to internal rotation at extension and provides constraint for posterior tibial translation at extension, a position where the posterior cruciate ligament provides minimal posterior translation constraint.

  2. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction; the Rush Experience

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Bach, Bernard R.; Cohen, Mark S.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Cole, Brian J.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Nicholson, Gregory P.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Background: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) is now a common surgery performed in both professional, as well as high level athletes Purpose: To report the patient demographics, surgical techniques, and outcomes of all UCLR performed at a single institution from 2004-2014 Hypothesis: UCLR will be performed mostly in male pitchers and will have a complication rate of less than 5%. Methods: Methods: The surgical database of one institution was searched from January 1st 2004-December 31st 2014 for the current procedural terminology (CPT) code 24346 “Reconstruction medial collateral ligament, elbow, with tendon graft (includes harvesting of graft)”. Charts were reviewed to determine patient age, gender, date of surgery, sport played, athletic level, surgical technique, graft type, and complications were recorded. Patients were contacted via phone calls to obtain the return to sport rate, Conway-Jobe score, Timmerman & Andrews score, and Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic (KJOC) Shoulder and Elbow score. Results: Results: One hundred eighty-nine patients underwent UCLR during the study period (92% male, average age 19.6 +/- 4.9 years, 77.8% were right elbows). There were 166 baseball players (87.8% of all patients), 156 of which were pitchers (82.5% of all patients). Ninety-eight (51.6%) were college athletes, 62 (36%) were high school athletes, and 25 (13.2%) were professional athletes at the time of surgery. The docking technique was used in 111 (58.7%) patients while the double docking technique was used in 78 (41.3%). An ipsilateral palmaris longus graft was used in 111 (58.7%) of patients while a hamstring autograft was used in 48 (25.4%) patients. The ulnar nerve was subcutaneously transposed in 79 (41.8%) patients. Overall 95.7% of patients were able to return to sport and had a Conway-Jobe score of good/excellent while 4.3% had a score of fair. The average KJOC score was 94.7 +/- 5.7 and average Timmerman-Andrews score was 93.7 +/- 7

  3. Surgical outcomes of superior versus inferior glaucoma drainage device implantation

    PubMed Central

    Martino, Amy Z.; Iverson, Shawn; Feuer, William J.; Greenfield, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare the safety and intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering efficacy of initial glaucoma drainage device (GDD) implantation performed at the superior versus inferior limbus. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted to identify glaucoma patients that had undergone initial Baerveldt GDD surgery at the inferior limbus for uncontrolled IOP. All eyes had a minimum of 6 months of postoperative follow-up. These eyes were frequency matched to eyes with initial Baerveldt GDD implantation performed at the superior limbus to within 5 years of age and 6 months of follow-up. Baseline demographic and clinical information, as well as preoperative and postoperative IOP, visual acuity, and number of anti-glaucoma medications were extracted. Failure was defined as IOP > 21 mmHg or not reduced by 20% below baseline on two consecutive follow-up visits after 3 months, IOP ≤ 5 mmHg on two consecutive follow-up visits after 3 months, reoperation for glaucoma, or loss of light perception vision. Statistical methods consisted of Student's t-tests, chi-squared test, and Kaplan-Meier time to failure analysis. Results Fifty eyes (17 inferior, 33 superior) of 43 patients were enrolled. Mean postoperative follow-up in both groups were similar (mean 26.2 ± 15.2 for inferior and 23.9 ± 10.43 months for superior, p=0.54). Prior trabeculectomy had been performed in 8/17 (47%) and 11/33 (33%) eyes (p=0.34) with inferior and superior implants, respectively. Mean preoperative IOP (mmHg) in the superior group (26 ± 11) was significantly higher (p=0.02) than in the inferior group (21 ± 7). Success rates were similar (p>0.05) between the inferior and superior GDD groups during the study period, with 64.7% and 75.8% classified as successful at 1-year of follow-up and 43.1% and 65.7% at 2-years of follow-up, respectively. There was no difference in cumulative proportions of eyes failing between the groups (p=0.20, log-rank test). Mean postoperative IOP and number of anti

  4. Medial collateral ligament autografts have increased creep response for at least two years and early immobilization makes this worse.

    PubMed

    Thornton, G M; Boorman, R S; Shrive, N G; Frank, C B

    2002-03-01

    Recent evidence has shown that 10-40% of knee joints reconstructed with soft-tissue autografts have a recurrence of abnormal joint laxity over time. One possible explanation is the "stretching out" (or unrecovered creep) of the graft tissue. To test in vitro creep and creep recovery of fresh anatomic ligament autografts in an extra-articular environment, 16 rabbits underwent an orthotopic medial collateral ligament (MCL) autograft procedure to one hindlimb. Three subgroups of animals had either unrestricted cage activity for 1 year (n = 5) or 2 years (n = 5) or pin-immobilization for the first 6 weeks followed by cage activity for the remainder of 1 year (n = 6). Following laxity measurements, to test their creep response, isolated MCL grafts were cyclically and then statically creep tested in vitro at 4.1 MPa, allowed to recover at zero load for 20 min, and finally elongated to failure. Due to differences in cross-sectional area between the grafts and normal MCLs, two normal control groups were tested: stress-matched tested at 4.1 MPa (16.2 N; n = 7) and force-matched tested at 29.1 N (7.1 MPa; n = 6). Ligament grafts had normal laxity but significantly increased creep and decreased creep recovery compared to normal MCLs after I and 2 years of healing (p < 0.0004). Graft failure stress was also significantly less than normal (p < 0.0001). Immobilized grafts had significantly greater creep compared to non-immobilized grafts at 1 year of healing (p < 0.05). These results support previous observations concerning material inferiority of fresh anatomic rabbit MCL autografts, but add the concept that such grafts also have increased potential to creep with either slower or incomplete recovery when subjected to low stresses in vitro. Joint and ligament laxities in situ were normal in this model, however, suggesting either that in vivo MCL graft stresses are lower than those used here in vitro or that these tissues have other mechanisms by which they can recover their

  5. The Relationship Between Humeral Retrotorsion and Shoulder Range of Motion in Baseball Players With an Ulnar Collateral Ligament Tear

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bobby Jean S.; Garrison, J. Craig; Conway, John E.; Pollard, Kalyssa; Aryal, Subhash

    2016-01-01

    Background: Humeral retrotorsion has been investigated in relation to shoulder range of motion (ROM) in healthy baseball players. Currently, there is limited information on the osseous anatomy and development of ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) tears. Purpose: To determine the relationship between humeral retrotorsion and shoulder ROM in baseball players with a UCL tear. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Fifty-four baseball players (mean age, 18.5 ± 2.0 years) with a UCL tear volunteered for this study. Participants were measured bilaterally for shoulder internal (IR) and external rotation (ER) ROM and humeral retrotorsion. Differences between sides (involved to uninvolved) were used to calculate the glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD), external rotation ROM difference (ERDiff), total rotational motion difference (TRM), and humeral retrotorsion difference (HTDiff). A multivariate regression analysis was performed with GIRD, ERDiff, and TRM regressing on HTDiff. Univariate analysis was performed to further evaluate the effect of the predictors on each outcome separately. To control for the effect of age, weight, duration of symptoms, and years of experience, the variables were included as covariates. An a priori level was set at P < .05. Results: There was a statistically significant relationship between the GIRD, ERDiff, and TRM results compared with HTDiff (P = .003). Independent analysis revealed a statistically significant relationship between GIRD and HTDiff (P = .004) and between ERDiff and HTDiff (P = .003) but no significant relationship between TRM and HTDiff (P = .999). After adjusting for age, weight, duration of symptoms, years of experience, dominant arm, and position, a significant relationship was found between GIRD and HTDiff (P = .05) and between ERDiff and HTDiff (P = .01). No significant relationship was found between TRM and HTDiff (P = .54). Adjusted univariate regression analysis determined that

  6. Principles of postoperative anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Saka, Tolga

    2014-09-18

    It is known that anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction needs to be combined with detailed postoperative rehabilitation in order for patients to return to their pre-injury activity levels, and that the rehabilitation process is as important as the reconstruction surgery. Literature studies focus on how early in the postoperative ACL rehabilitation period rehabilitation modalities can be initiated. Despite the sheer number of studies on this topic, postoperative ACL rehabilitation protocols have not been standardized yet. Could common, "ossified" knowledge or modalities really prove themselves in the literature? Could questions such as "is postoperative brace use really necessary?", "what are the benefits of early restoration of the range of motion (ROM)?", "to what extent is neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) effective in the protection from muscular atrophy?", "how early can proprioception training and open chain exercises begin?", "should strengthening training start in the immediate postoperative period?" be answered for sure? My aim is to review postoperative brace use, early ROM restoration, NMES, proprioception, open/closed chain exercises and early strengthening, which are common modalities in the very comprehensive theme of postoperative ACL rehabilitation, on the basis of several studies (Level of Evidence 1 and 2) and to present the commonly accepted ways they are presently used. Moreover, I have presented the objectives of postoperative ACL rehabilitation in tables and recent miscellaneous studies in the last chapter of the paper.

  7. [Rehabilitation after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Smékal, D; Kalina, R; Urban, J

    2006-12-01

    Rehabilitation is an important part of therapy in patients who have had arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A well-designed rehabilitation program avoids potential graft damage and speeds up patients' return to their full function level. The course of rehabilitation depends on the type of surgery, mode of fixation and possible co-existing injury to the knee's soft tissues. The rehabilitation program presented here is based on the present-day knowledge of neurophysiological and biomechanical principles and is divided into five phases. In the pre-operative phase (I), the main objective is to prepare patients for surgery in terms of maximum muscle strength and range of motion. It also includes providing full information on the procedure. In the early post-operative phase (II) we are concerned with pain alleviation and reduction of knee edema. After suture removal we begin with soft techniques for the patella and post-operative physical therapy to reduce scarring. In the next post-operative phase (III) patients are able to walk with their full weight on the extremity operated on, and we continue doing exercises that improve flexor/extensor co-contraction. In this phase we also begin with exercises improving the patient's proprioceptive and sensorimotor functions. In the late post-operative phase (IV) we go on with exercises promoting proprioception of both lower extremities with the aim of increasing muscle control of the knee joints. In the convalescent phase (V) patients gradually return to their sports activities.

  8. Principles of postoperative anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Saka, Tolga

    2014-09-18

    It is known that anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction needs to be combined with detailed postoperative rehabilitation in order for patients to return to their pre-injury activity levels, and that the rehabilitation process is as important as the reconstruction surgery. Literature studies focus on how early in the postoperative ACL rehabilitation period rehabilitation modalities can be initiated. Despite the sheer number of studies on this topic, postoperative ACL rehabilitation protocols have not been standardized yet. Could common, "ossified" knowledge or modalities really prove themselves in the literature? Could questions such as "is postoperative brace use really necessary?", "what are the benefits of early restoration of the range of motion (ROM)?", "to what extent is neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) effective in the protection from muscular atrophy?", "how early can proprioception training and open chain exercises begin?", "should strengthening training start in the immediate postoperative period?" be answered for sure? My aim is to review postoperative brace use, early ROM restoration, NMES, proprioception, open/closed chain exercises and early strengthening, which are common modalities in the very comprehensive theme of postoperative ACL rehabilitation, on the basis of several studies (Level of Evidence 1 and 2) and to present the commonly accepted ways they are presently used. Moreover, I have presented the objectives of postoperative ACL rehabilitation in tables and recent miscellaneous studies in the last chapter of the paper. PMID:25232521

  9. Principles of postoperative anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Saka, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    It is known that anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction needs to be combined with detailed postoperative rehabilitation in order for patients to return to their pre-injury activity levels, and that the rehabilitation process is as important as the reconstruction surgery. Literature studies focus on how early in the postoperative ACL rehabilitation period rehabilitation modalities can be initiated. Despite the sheer number of studies on this topic, postoperative ACL rehabilitation protocols have not been standardized yet. Could common, “ossified” knowledge or modalities really prove themselves in the literature? Could questions such as “is postoperative brace use really necessary?”, “what are the benefits of early restoration of the range of motion (ROM)?”, “to what extent is neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) effective in the protection from muscular atrophy?”, “how early can proprioception training and open chain exercises begin?”, “should strengthening training start in the immediate postoperative period?” be answered for sure? My aim is to review postoperative brace use, early ROM restoration, NMES, proprioception, open/closed chain exercises and early strengthening, which are common modalities in the very comprehensive theme of postoperative ACL rehabilitation, on the basis of several studies (Level of Evidence 1 and 2) and to present the commonly accepted ways they are presently used. Moreover, I have presented the objectives of postoperative ACL rehabilitation in tables and recent miscellaneous studies in the last chapter of the paper. PMID:25232521

  10. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction: Fixation Technique Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Russo, Franco; Doan, Joshua; Chase, Derek C; Farnsworth, Christine L; Pennock, Andrew T

    2016-05-01

    Introduction The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is the primary soft-tissue stabilizer of the patella and it is often reconstructed in patients with recurrent patella instability. This biomechanical analysis evaluates the integrity of four methods of MPFL reconstruction subjected to cyclic loading using a porcine model. Methods Four techniques of MPFL reconstruction were analyzed using a 4 mm flexor tendon graft, all with two points of patellar fixation to best recreate the native MPFL anatomy. The four techniques were: (1) interference screw technique, (2) suture anchor technique, (3) converging tunnel technique, and (4) two bone tunnel technique. Maximum load, yield load, and stiffness of the graft fixation/bone complex were analyzed, and statistics were performed with SPSS and significance set at a p-value of < 0.05. Results The converging tunnel technique demonstrated the highest maximum load and yield load, significantly higher than the interference screw or suture anchor groups (p = 0.007). In addition, the converging tunnel technique demonstrated the greatest stiffness with significantly greater stiffness than the two bone tunnel techniques (p = 0.016). Conclusion The combination of strength and stiffness, the avoidance of patella implants, and the creation of a single transosseous tunnel make the converging tunnel technique a desirable technique for MPFL reconstructions. PMID:26190788

  11. Graft impingement in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Iriuchishima, Takanori; Shirakura, Kenji; Fu, Freddie H

    2013-03-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft impingement is one of the most troubling complications in ACL reconstruction. In the previous strategy of isometric "non-anatomical" ACL reconstruction, posterior tibial tunnel placement and notchplasty were recommended to avoid graft impingement. Recently, the strategy of ACL reconstruction is shifting towards "anatomical" reconstruction. In anatomical ACL reconstruction, the potential risk of graft impingement is higher than in non-anatomical reconstruction because the tibial tunnel is placed at a more anterior portion on the tibia. However, there have been few studies reporting on graft impingement in anatomical ACL reconstruction. This study will provide a review of graft impingement status in both non-anatomical and the more recent anatomical ACL reconstruction techniques. In conclusion, with the accurate creation of bone tunnels within ACL native footprint, the graft impingement might not happen in anatomical ACL reconstruction. For the clinical relevance, to prevent graft impingement, surgeons should pay attention of creating correct anatomical tunnels when they perform ACL reconstruction. Level of evidence IV.

  12. Injury to ulnar collateral ligament of thumb.

    PubMed

    Madan, Simerjit Singh; Pai, Dinker R; Kaur, Avneet; Dixit, Ruchita

    2014-02-01

    Injury of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of thumb can be incapacitating if untreated or not treated properly. This injury is notorious for frequently being missed by inexperienced health care personnel in emergency departments. It has frequently been described in skiers, but also occurs in other sports such as rugby, soccer, handball, basketball, volleyball and even after a handshake. The UCL of the thumb acts as a primary restraint to valgus stress and is injured if hyperabduction and hyperextension forces are applied to the first metacarpophalangeal joint. The diagnosis is best established clinically, though MRI is the imaging modality of choice. Many treatment options exist, surgical treatment being offered depending on various factors, including timing of presentation (acute or chronic), grade (severity of injury), displacement (Stener lesion), location of tear (mid-substance or peripheral), associated or concomitant surrounding tissue injury (bone, volar plate, etc.), and patient-related factors (occupational demands, etc.). This review aims to identify the optimal diagnostic techniques and management options for UCL injury available thus far.

  13. Broad Ligament Hernia-Associated Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    López-Loredo, A.; León, J. F. García

    2007-01-01

    Background and Objective: We present the case of a female patient 29 years of age with antecedents of laparoscopic laser ablation for endometriosis, laparoscopic appendectomy, and umbilical hernioplasty. Methods: The patient was admitted to the hospital's emergency room for abdominal pain in the epigastrium, transfixing, irradiating to both upper quadrants and to the lumbar region, accompanied by nausea and gastrobiliary vomiting. Lipase determination was 170 mg/dL. Other laboratory findings were normal. Plain abdominal films on the patient's admission were normal, and computed tomography (CT) showed data compatible with acute pancreatitis. Without improvement during the patient's hospital stay, pain and vomiting increased in intensity and frequency. Results: New abdominal x-rays revealed dilatation of small bowel loops. Management was begun for intestinal obstruction, with intravenous hydration and placement of a nasogastric tube without a good response. At 48 hours, a diagnostic laparoscopy was performed, revealing a 3-cm internal hernia in the left broad ligament in which a 20-cm segment of terminal ileum was encased. We performed liberation of the ileal segment and closed the hernial orifice by using the laparoscopic approach. Conclusion: The patient's evolution was excellent. PMID:17651574

  14. Mechanoresponsive Properties of the Periodontal Ligament.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Liu, B; Cha, J Y; Yuan, G; Kelly, M; Singh, G; Hyman, S; Brunski, J B; Li, J; Helms, J A

    2016-04-01

    The periodontal ligament (PDL) functions as an enthesis, a connective tissue attachment that dissipates strains created by mechanical loading. Entheses are mechanoresponsive structures that rapidly adapt to changes in their mechanical loading; here we asked which features of the PDL are sensitive to such in vivo loading. We evaluated the PDL in 4 physiologically relevant mechanical environments, focusing on mitotic activity, cell density, collagen content, osteogenic protein expression, and organization of the tissue. In addition to examining PDLs that supported teeth under masticatory loading and eruptive forces, 2 additional mechanical conditions were created and analyzed: hypoloading and experimental tooth movement. Collectively, these data revealed that the adult PDL is a remarkably quiescent tissue and that only when it is subjected to increased loads--such as those associated with mastication, eruption, and orthodontic tooth movement-does the tissue increase its rate of cell proliferation and collagen production. These data have relevance in clinical scenarios where PDL acclimatization can be exploited to optimize tooth movement. PMID:26767771

  15. Failure of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Samitier, Gonzalo; Marcano, Alejandro I; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Cugat, Ramon; Farmer, Kevin W; Moser, Michael W

    2015-10-01

    The present review classifies and describes the multifactorial causes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery failure, concentrating on preventing and resolving such situations. The article particularly focuses on those causes that require ACL revision due to recurrent instability, without neglecting those that affect function or produce persistent pain. Although primary ACL reconstruction has satisfactory outcome rates as high as 97%, it is important to identify the causes of failure, because satisfactory outcomes in revision surgery can drop to as much as 76%. It is often possible to identify a primary or secondary cause of ACL surgery failure; even the most meticulous planning can give rise to unexpected findings during the intervention. The adopted protocol should therefore be sufficiently flexible to adapt to the course of surgery. Preoperative patient counseling is essential. The surgeon should limit the patient's expectations for the outcome by explaining the complexity of this kind of procedure. With adequate preoperative planning, close attention to details and realistic patient expectations, ACL revision surgery may offer beneficial and satisfactory results for the patient. PMID:26550585

  16. Gait patterns after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bulgheroni, P; Bulgheroni, M V; Andrini, L; Guffanti, P; Giughello, A

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the changes in select gait parameters following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The study was performed on 15 subjects who underwent ACL reconstruction by the bone-patellar tendon-bone technique. Gait analysis was performed using the Elite three-dimensional (3D) optoelectronic system (BTS), a Kistler force platform and the Telemg telemetric electromyograph (BTS). Kinematic data were recorded for the principal lower limb joints (hip, knee and ankle). The examined muscles include vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris and semitendinosus. The results obtained from the operated subjects were compared with those of 10 untreated subjects and 5 subjects without ACL damage. In the operated subjects the knee joint angular values regained a normal flexion pattern for the injured limb during the stance phase. The analysis of joint moments shows: (a) sagittal plane: recovery of the knee flexion moment at loading response and during preswing; (b) frontal plane: recovery of the normal patterns for both hip and knee adduction-abduction moments during the entire stance phase. The examination of ground reaction forces reveals the recovery of frontal component features. The EMG traces show the normal biphasic pattern for the operated subjects as compared to the untreated subjects. The results suggest that the gait parameters shift towards normal value patterns.

  17. Failure of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Samitier, Gonzalo; Marcano, Alejandro I.; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Cugat, Ramon; Farmer, Kevin W; Moser, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The present review classifies and describes the multifactorial causes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery failure, concentrating on preventing and resolving such situations. The article particularly focuses on those causes that require ACL revision due to recurrent instability, without neglecting those that affect function or produce persistent pain. Although primary ACL reconstruction has satisfactory outcome rates as high as 97%, it is important to identify the causes of failure, because satisfactory outcomes in revision surgery can drop to as much as 76%. It is often possible to identify a primary or secondary cause of ACL surgery failure; even the most meticulous planning can give rise to unexpected findings during the intervention. The adopted protocol should therefore be sufficiently flexible to adapt to the course of surgery. Preoperative patient counseling is essential. The surgeon should limit the patient’s expectations for the outcome by explaining the complexity of this kind of procedure. With adequate preoperative planning, close attention to details and realistic patient expectations, ACL revision surgery may offer beneficial and satisfactory results for the patient. PMID:26550585

  18. Medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction in patellar instability

    PubMed Central

    Krishna Kumar, MS; Renganathan, Sankarram; Joseph, Clement J; Easwar, TR; Rajan, David V

    2014-01-01

    Background: Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is one of the major static medial stabilising structures of the patella. MPFL is most often damaged in patients with patellar instability. Reconstruction of MPFL is becoming a common surgical procedure in treating patellar instability. We hypothesised that MPFL reconstruction was adequate to treat patients with patellar instability if the tibial tubercle and the centre of the trochlear groove (TT-TG) value was less than 20 mm and without a dysplastic trochlea. Materials and Methods: 30 patients matching our inclusion criteria and operated between April 2009 and May 2011 were included in the study. MPFL reconstruction was performed using gracilis tendon fixed with endobutton on the patellar side and bio absorbable interference screw or staple on the femoral side. Patients were followed up with subjective criteria, Kujala score and Lysholm score. Results: The mean duration of followup was 25 months (range 14-38 months). The mean preoperative Kujala score was 47.5 and Lysholm score was 44.7. The mean postoperative Kujala score was 87 and Lysholm score was 88.06. None of the patients had redislocation. Conclusion: MPFL reconstruction using gracilis tendon gives excellent results in patients with patellar instability with no redislocations. Some patients may have persistence of apprehension. PMID:25298558

  19. Ex Vivo Growth of Bioengineered Ligaments and Other Tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altman, Gregory; Kaplan, David L.; Martin, Ivan; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2005-01-01

    A method of growing bioengineered tissues for use in surgical replacement of damaged anterior cruciate ligaments has been invented. An anterior cruciate ligament is one of two ligaments (the other being the posterior cruciate ligament) that cross in the middle of a knee joint and act to prevent the bones in the knee from sliding forward and backward relative to each other. Anterior cruciate ligaments are frequently torn in sports injuries and traffic accidents, resulting in pain and severe limitations on mobility. By making it possible to grow replacement anterior cruciate ligaments that structurally and functionally resemble natural ones more closely than do totally synthetic replacements, the method could create new opportunities for full or nearly full restoration of functionality in injured knees. The method is also adaptable to the growth of bioengineered replacements for other ligaments (e.g., other knee ligaments as well as those in the hands, wrists, and elbows) and to the production of tissues other than ligaments, including cartilage, bones, muscles, and blood vessels. The method is based on the finding that the histomorphological properties of a bioengineered tissue grown in vitro from pluripotent cells within a matrix are affected by the direct application of mechanical force to the matrix during growth generation. This finding provides important new insights into the relationships among mechanical stress, biochemical and cell-immobilization methods, and cell differentiation, and is applicable to the production of the variety of tissues mentioned above. Moreover, this finding can be generalized to nonmechanical (e.g., chemical and electromagnetic) stimuli that are experienced in vivo by tissues of interest and, hence, the method can be modified to incorporate such stimuli in the ex vivo growth of replacements for the various tissues mentioned above. In this method, a three-dimensional matrix made of a suitable material is seeded with pluripotent stem

  20. Round ligament lipoma mimicking acute appendicitis in a 24-week pregnant female: a case report.

    PubMed

    Miller, T J; Paulk, D G

    2013-04-01

    An exhaustive search of the literature using the Pub Med database revealed no reports of round ligament lipomas mimicking acute appendicitis in pregnant patients. There are relatively few articles on round ligament lipomas and even less on round ligament lipomas during pregnancy. This case report is on a 27-year-old 24-week pregnant female who presented with signs and symptoms similar to acute appendicitis who in fact had a large right pelvic round ligament lipoma that was causing her pain.

  1. Bone tunnel enlargement on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, Adriano Barros de Aguiar; Duarte, Aires; Severino, Nilson Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the presence of tibial bone tunnel enlargement after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using quadruple graft of the flexor tendons and correlate the functional results in their presence. Methods: The studied lasted six months and included 25 patients, with ages ranging from 18 to 43 years old. Assessment was based on radiographs taken immediately postoperatively and at the third and sixth month of follow up in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Reconstruction of ligaments was performed with tendon grafts of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscle fixated in the femur with transverse metal screw and in the tibia with interference screws. Patients were evaluated objectively by tests ligament, graded from zero to four crosses and subjectively by the Lysholm method preoperative and after sixth month follow up. Results: Significant increase in the tunnels diameters were observed, 20.56% for radiographs in the anteroposterior view, 26.48% in profile view and 23.22% in computed tomography. Descriptive statistics showed significant improvement in subjective and objective clinical parameters. Conclusions: The bone tunnel enlargement is a phenomenon found in the first months after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament and it has no implications on clinical outcomes in the short term. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Study. PMID:25328430

  2. Artificial phrenoesophageal ligament. An experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Sader, A A; Dantas, R O; Campos, A D; Evora, P R B

    2016-01-01

    This report deals with the preparation of a 'true' artificial phrenoesophageal ligament aimed at restoring effective anchoring of the esophagus to the diaphragm, keeping the esophagogastric sphincter in the abdomen. A total of 24 mongrel dogs were assigned to four groups: (i) Group I (n = 4): the esophageal diaphragm hiatus left wide open; (ii) Group II (n = 8): the anterolateral esophagus walls were attached to the diaphragm by the artificial ligament and the esophageal hiatus was left wide opened; (iii) Group III (n = 5): in addition to the use of the artificial ligament, the esophageal hiatus was narrowed with two retroesophageal stitches; (iv) Group IV (n = 7): the only procedure was the esophageal hiatus narrowing with two retroesophageal stitches. The phrenoesophagogastric connections were released, sparing the vagus nerves. Five animals of groups III and IV, which did not develop hiatal hernia, were submitted to esophageal manometry immediately before and 15 days after surgery. In group I, all animals developed huge sliding hiatal hernias. In group II, two dogs (25%) had a paraesophageal hernia between the two parts of the artificial ligament. In group III, neither sliding hiatal hernia nor paraesophageal hernia occurred. In group IV, two animals (28.6%) developed sliding esophageal hiatus hernia. Regarding esophageal manometry, postoperative significant difference between groups III and IV (P = 0.008) was observed. Thus, the artificial phrenoesophageal ligament maintained the esophagus firmly attached to the diaphragm in all animals and the esophagogastric sphincter pressure was significantly higher in this group. PMID:25604516

  3. Quasi-linear viscoelastic characterization of human hip ligaments.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Andrew R; McNally, Craig; Smith, Byron; Duma, Stefan M

    2007-01-01

    The object of this study was to develop a quasi-linear viscoelastic model for the iliofemoral and ischiofemoral hip ligaments. In order to accomplish this, a total of 56 axial tension tests were performed on 8 bone-ligament-bone specimens prepared from 4 fresh frozen male cadavers. Each specimen went through a battery of 7 tests including a series of step-and-hold tests and load-and-unload ramp tests. The bone-ligament-bone specimens were situated so that the load from a servo-hydraulic Material Testing System would be applied on the long axis of each ligament. The reduced relaxation data was fit to a two exponential damping function while the instantaneous elastic response was fit to a power-law function. These two constituents were then combined to create a single constitutive equation for each ligament. The quasi-linear viscoelastic model presented in this study can be used to improve the biofidelity of computational models of the human hip. PMID:17487102

  4. Reduction of artifacts in computer simulation of breast Cooper's ligaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrajac, David D.; Kuperavage, Adam; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Bakic, Predrag R.

    2016-03-01

    Anthropomorphic software breast phantoms have been introduced as a tool for quantitative validation of breast imaging systems. Efficacy of the validation results depends on the realism of phantom images. The recursive partitioning algorithm based upon the octree simulation has been demonstrated as versatile and capable of efficiently generating large number of phantoms to support virtual clinical trials of breast imaging. Previously, we have observed specific artifacts, (here labeled "dents") on the boundaries of simulated Cooper's ligaments. In this work, we have demonstrated that these "dents" result from the approximate determination of the closest simulated ligament to an examined subvolume (i.e., octree node) of the phantom. We propose a modification of the algorithm that determines the closest ligament by considering a pre-specified number of neighboring ligaments selected based upon the functions that govern the shape of ligaments simulated in the subvolume. We have qualitatively and quantitatively demonstrated that the modified algorithm can lead to elimination or reduction of dent artifacts in software phantoms. In a proof-of concept example, we simulated a 450 ml phantom with 333 compartments at 100 micrometer resolution. After the proposed modification, we corrected 148,105 dents, with an average size of 5.27 voxels (5.27nl). We have also qualitatively analyzed the corresponding improvement in the appearance of simulated mammographic images. The proposed algorithm leads to reduction of linear and star-like artifacts in simulated phantom projections, which can be attributed to dents. Analysis of a larger number of phantoms is ongoing.

  5. Psychological Aspects of Recovery Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Christino, Melissa A; Fantry, Amanda J; Vopat, Bryan G

    2015-08-01

    Recovery following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is an arduous process that requires a significant mental and physical commitment to rehabilitation. Orthopaedic research in recent years has focused on optimizing anterior cruciate ligament surgical techniques; however, despite stable anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions, many athletes still never achieve their preinjury ability or even return to sport. Psychological factors associated with patient perceptions and functional outcomes following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are important to acknowledge and understand. Issues related to emotional disturbance, motivation, self-esteem, locus of control, and self-efficacy can have profound effects on patients' compliance, athletic identity, and readiness to return to sport. The psychological aspects of recovery play a critical role in functional outcomes, and a better understanding of these concepts is essential to optimize the treatment of patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, particularly those who plan to return to sport. Identifying at-risk patients, encouraging a multidisciplinary approach to patient care, and providing early referral to a sports psychologist may improve patient outcomes and increase return-to-play rates among athletes.

  6. Decellularized Periodontal Ligament Cell Sheets with Recellularization Potential

    PubMed Central

    Farag, A.; Vaquette, C.; Theodoropoulos, C.; Hamlet, S.M.; Hutmacher, D.W.; Ivanovski, S.

    2014-01-01

    The periodontal ligament is the key tissue facilitating periodontal regeneration. This study aimed to fabricate decellularized human periodontal ligament cell sheets for subsequent periodontal tissue engineering applications. The decellularization protocol involved the transfer of intact human periodontal ligament cell sheets onto melt electrospun polycaprolactone membranes and subsequent bi-directional perfusion with NH4OH/Triton X-100 and DNase solutions. The protocol was shown to remove 92% of DNA content. The structural integrity of the decellularized cell sheets was confirmed by a collagen quantification assay, immunostaining of human collagen type I and fibronectin, and scanning electron microscopy. ELISA was used to demonstrate the presence of residual basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in the decellularized cell sheet constructs. The decellularized cell sheets were shown to have the ability to support recellularization by allogenic human periodontal ligament cells. This study describes the fabrication of decellularized periodontal ligament cell sheets that retain an intact extracellular matrix and resident growth factors and can support repopulation by allogenic cells. The decellularized hPDL cell sheet concept has the potential to be utilized in future “off-the-shelf” periodontal tissue engineering strategies. PMID:25270757

  7. Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome in a patient with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sturiale, Alessandro; Alemanno, Giovanni; Giudici, Francesco; Addasi, Rami; Bellucci, Francesco; Tonelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome is a rare condition characterized by postprandial abdominal pain, bowel function disorder and weight loss. We report the first case to our knowledge of Crohn's disease and Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome. PRESENTATION OF CASE The patient was a 33 year-old female with a previous diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Acute postprandial abdominal pain affected the patient every day; she was, therefore, referred to US-Doppler and magnetic resonance angiography of the abdominal vessels and received a diagnosis of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome. Consequently, the patient was surgically treated, releasing the vascular compression. After the operation, she reported a complete relief from postprandial pain which was one of her major concerns. Subocclusive symptoms occurred after six months due to the inflammatory reactivation of the terminal ileitis. DISCUSSION The diagnosis of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome is mainly based on the exclusion of other intestinal disorders but it should be always confirmed using noninvasive tests such as US-Doppler, angio-CT or magnetic resonance angiography. CONCLUSION This case demonstrates that the Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome could be the major cause of symptoms, even in presence of other abdominal disorders. PMID:23500743

  8. Artificial phrenoesophageal ligament. An experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Sader, A A; Dantas, R O; Campos, A D; Evora, P R B

    2016-01-01

    This report deals with the preparation of a 'true' artificial phrenoesophageal ligament aimed at restoring effective anchoring of the esophagus to the diaphragm, keeping the esophagogastric sphincter in the abdomen. A total of 24 mongrel dogs were assigned to four groups: (i) Group I (n = 4): the esophageal diaphragm hiatus left wide open; (ii) Group II (n = 8): the anterolateral esophagus walls were attached to the diaphragm by the artificial ligament and the esophageal hiatus was left wide opened; (iii) Group III (n = 5): in addition to the use of the artificial ligament, the esophageal hiatus was narrowed with two retroesophageal stitches; (iv) Group IV (n = 7): the only procedure was the esophageal hiatus narrowing with two retroesophageal stitches. The phrenoesophagogastric connections were released, sparing the vagus nerves. Five animals of groups III and IV, which did not develop hiatal hernia, were submitted to esophageal manometry immediately before and 15 days after surgery. In group I, all animals developed huge sliding hiatal hernias. In group II, two dogs (25%) had a paraesophageal hernia between the two parts of the artificial ligament. In group III, neither sliding hiatal hernia nor paraesophageal hernia occurred. In group IV, two animals (28.6%) developed sliding esophageal hiatus hernia. Regarding esophageal manometry, postoperative significant difference between groups III and IV (P = 0.008) was observed. Thus, the artificial phrenoesophageal ligament maintained the esophagus firmly attached to the diaphragm in all animals and the esophagogastric sphincter pressure was significantly higher in this group.

  9. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. Findings: The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Interpretation: Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27347334

  10. Lateral collateral ligament deficiency of the elbow joint: A modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Munsur; Cil, Akin; Bogener, James W; Stylianou, Antonis P

    2016-09-01

    A computational model capable of predicting the effects of lateral collateral ligament deficiency of the elbow joint would be a valuable tool for surgical planning and prediction of the long-term consequences of ligament deficiency. The purpose of this study was to simulate lateral collateral ligament deficiency during passive flexion using a computational multibody elbow joint model and investigate the effects of ligament insufficiency on the kinematics, ligament loads, and articular contact characteristics (area, pressure). The elbow was placed initially at approximately 20° of flexion and a 345 mm vertical downward motion profile was applied over 40 s to the humerus head. The vertical displacement induced flexion from the initial position to a maximum flexion angle of 135°. The study included simulations for intact, radial collateral ligament deficient, lateral ulnar collateral ligament deficient, and combined radial and lateral ulnar collateral ligament deficient elbow. For each condition, relative bone kinematics, contact pressure, contact area, and intact ligament forces were predicted. Intact and isolated radial collateral ligament deficient elbow simulations were almost identical for all observed outcomes. Minor differences in kinematics, contact area and pressure were observed for the isolated lateral ulnar collateral ligament deficient elbow compared to the intact elbow, but no elbow dislocation was detected. However, sectioning both ligaments together induced substantial differences in kinematics, contact area, and contact pressure, and caused complete dislocation of the elbow joint. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1645-1655, 2016.

  11. A Comparison of Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligament Laxity Between Female and Male Basketball Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weesner, Carol L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament laxity of 90 uninjured male and female high school players were measured. No significant differences were found, indicating that the greater female injury rate may be due to inadequate conditioning, not greater knee ligament laxity. (Author/MT)

  12. Dynamic sonography with valgus stress to assess elbow ulnar collateral ligament injury in baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Arthur A; Winter, Thomas C; Best, Thomas M; Bernhardt, David T

    2002-11-01

    Sonography is a valuable method for imaging superficial tendons and ligaments. The ability to obtain comparison images easily with dynamic stress allows assessment of ligament and tendon integrity. We studied the medial elbow joints of two baseball pitchers using MR imaging and dynamic sonography. Both sonography and MR imaging identified the ulnar collateral ligament tears. Dynamic sonography uniquely demonstrated the medial joint instability.

  13. On the scaling behavior of hardness with ligament diameter of nanoporous-Au: Constrained motion of dislocations along the ligaments

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanath, R. N.; Polaki, S. R.; Rajaraman, R.; Abhaya, S.; Chirayath, V. A.; Amarendra, G.; Sundar, C. S.

    2014-06-09

    The scaling behavior of hardness with ligament diameter and vacancy defect concentration in nanoporous Au (np-Au) has been investigated using a combination of Vickers Hardness, Scanning electron microscopy, and positron lifetime measurements. It is shown that for np-Au, the hardness scales with the ligament diameter with an exponent of −0.3, that is, at variance with the conventional Hall-Petch exponent of −0.5 for bulk systems, as seen in the controlled experiments on cold worked Au with varying grain size. The hardness of np-Au correlates with the vacancy concentration C{sub V} within the ligaments, as estimated from positron lifetime experiments, and scales as C{sub V}{sup 1/2}, pointing to the interaction of dislocations with vacancies. The distinctive Hall-Petch exponent of −0.3 seen for np-Au, with ligament diameters in the range of 5–150 nm, is rationalized by invoking the constrained motion of dislocations along the ligaments.

  14. “8 Plate”: An Alternative Device to Fix Highly Recurrent Traumatic Anterior Gleno-Humeral Instability in Patients with Severe Impairment of the Anterior Capsule

    PubMed Central

    Tudisco, C; Bisicchia, S; Savarese, E; Ippolito, E

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is still debate about the best treatment option for highly recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation in patients with severe impairment of the anterior capsule and/or recurrence after either arthroscopic or open capsulorrhaphy. Materials and Methods: The clinical and radiological findings of 7 patients treated with an open capsulorrhaphy stabilized with an “8 plate” for a highly recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation with severe impairment of the anterior capsule and a large Bankart lesion were retrospectively reviewed. Follow-up evaluation included VAS for pain, Constant-Murley, Simple Shoulder Test, ASES, UCLA, Quick DASH, Rowe, Walsch-Duplay scores, as well as X-rays of the operated shoulder. Results: At follow-up none of the patients reported subsequent dislocations. Range of motion of the shoulder was complete in all cases, but one. Results of the functional scoring systems were satisfactory. X-rays showed no osteolysis and good position of the plate. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature about an open capsular tensioning and Bankart lesion repair performed with an “8 plate”. We believe that this is a reliable and effective procedure to address traumatic anterior re-dislocation of the gleno-humeral joint when the capsule is extensively torn and frayed or in revision cases. Moreover the “8 plate” is ideal to be applied in such a narrow space on the slant surface of the scapular neck close to the glenoid rim. PMID:25621080

  15. Dorsal intercarpal ligament capsulodesis for predynamic and dynamic scapholunate instability.

    PubMed

    Luchetti, R; Zorli, I Papini; Atzei, A; Fairplay, T

    2010-01-01

    We treated a prospective series of 18 patients (nine men and nine women) with a mean age of 35 years (range 15 to 57), with chronic predynamic or dynamic scapholunate instability by a dorsal intercarpal ligament capsulodesis using the modified Mayo technique. All the patients were assessed by the modified Mayo wrist score and DASH questionnaire. Wrist arthroscopy was done in all patients before open surgery in order to grade the scapholunate instability and correlate the findings with the radiographic and MRI results. At an average follow-up of 45 months (range 34 to 60) pain significantly diminished (P < 0.05) with improvement in the grip strength (P < 0.005) in all 18 cases. Wrist motion remained almost the same. The mean Mayo wrist score improved from 62 to 84 (P < 0.005).We recommend dorsal capsulodesis by using the dorsal intercarpal ligament flap for the treatment of scapholunate dissociation, when the ligament is still repairable.

  16. Tibial inlay posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: surgical technique and results.

    PubMed

    McAllister, David R; Hussain, Suleman M

    2010-12-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries occur much less frequently than other ligament injuries of the knee such as anterior cruciate ligament injuries. There is general agreement for nonoperative treatment for lower grade injuries such as type I PCL injuries. However, for more severe injuries which may require surgery, there is no consensus on an optimal reconstruction method. Multiple arthroscopic and open techniques exist to reconstruct the PCL. Limited clinical outcomes data reveals good short-term clinical results with different reconstruction options. Biomechanical data has helped further the understanding regarding the performance of different reconstructions. This article will present a surgical technique for single bundle tibial inlay reconstruction of the PCL along with the objective biomechanical data that supports this reconstruction.

  17. Stress radiography in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament deficiency.

    PubMed

    Garcés, G L; Perdomo, E; Guerra, A; Cabrera-Bonilla, R

    1995-01-01

    A prospective study was carried out to test the sensitivity and specificity of stress radiography in detecting anterior cruciate ligament deficiency in both knees of 116 patients using the Telos device. In 47 of these a total or partial rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament was diagnosed by arthroscopy, while the ligament was intact in the remaining 69 patients. The mean difference in radiological translation between the injured and the normal knee was greater than 5 mm (p < 0.001) in those with anterior cruciate deficiency, and less than 3 mm in the others. A differential displacement of up to 3 mm was considered normal. The sensitivity of the method was less than 67% and the specificity was 100%. Clinical diagnosis had a sensitivity of 70.2% and a specificity of 98.5%. Our findings suggest that, although a differential translation of more than 3 mm can be diagnostic, smaller differences do not rule out anterior cruciate deficiency.

  18. Current Rehabilitation Concepts for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Surgery in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Malempati, Chaitu; Jurjans, John; Noehren, Brian; Ireland, Mary L; Johnson, Darren L

    2015-11-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament is the most commonly disrupted ligament in the knee in high-performance athletes. Most recently, advancements in surgical technique and graft fixation have enabled athletes to participate in early postoperative rehabilitation, focusing on range of motion and progressing to patellar mobilization, strengthening, and neuromuscular control. Several rehabilitation protocols exist with variations in specific exercises, progression through phases, and key components. The ultimate goal of rehabilitation is to return the athlete to preinjury performance level, including motion and strength, without injuring or elongating the graft. Each athlete is unique; thus, safe return to play should be individualized rather than follow a particular postoperative month or time line. This article provides an overview of the application and the scientific basis for formulating a rehabilitation protocol prior to and following anterior cruciate ligament surgery.

  19. Compartment syndrome with mononeuropathies after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kindle, Brett J; Murthy, Naveen; Stolp, Kathryn

    2015-05-01

    Compartment syndrome rarely follows anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. However, when it does, it may result in mononeuropathies that are amenable to neurolysis. The authors of this study present an 18-yr-old woman who sustained a right anterior cruciate ligament tear and underwent uneventful anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using femoral and popliteal nerve blocks. Postoperatively, she developed compartment syndrome requiring emergent fasciotomies. At 11 wks after fasciotomy, results of electrophysiologic tests showed evidence of severe fibular and tibial neuropathies. Magnetic resonance images showed extensive tricompartmental myonecrosis. Fibular and tibial neurolysis as well as decompression were performed, followed by intensive outpatient rehabilitation. At the 6-mo follow-up, she reported resolution of pain as well as significant improvement in sensation, strength, and function. Early recognition and intervention are crucial to prevent serious neurologic damage. Excessive tourniquet pressure and anesthetic nerve blocks may have been responsible.

  20. Interfascicular reconstruction of the peroneal nerve after knee ligament injury.

    PubMed

    McMahon, M S; Craig, S M

    1994-06-01

    Peroneal palsy is the most common lower extremity nerve injury. Although most studies emphasize particularly poor prognosis after traction injuries to the peroneal nerve, interfascicular nerve grafting has emerged as a promising technique. We describe the case of a 20-year-old man who sustained a traction injury to the peroneal nerve (0/5 foot dorsiflexion and eversion) concomitant with tears of the anterior cruciate and lateral collateral ligaments. Interfascicular sural nerve grafting (10-14 cm in length) was performed 7 months after injury and 6 months after ligament reconstruction. The patient recovered motor strength (4+/5) in both anterior and lateral compartments by 2 years' postsurgery. The results obtained indicate that interfascicular nerve grafting is a valuable technique for reconstruction of the disrupted peroneal nerve; it provides sufficient benefit to justify the time, expense, and effort involved. An aggressive approach is thus recommended in patients with peroneal nerve disruption in the setting of multiple knee ligament injuries.

  1. Inferior turbinate osteoma as a cause of unilateral nose obstruction.

    PubMed

    Grabovac, Stjepan; Hadzibegović, Ana Danić; Markesić, Josip

    2012-11-01

    Osteomas are benign, slow growing bone tumors often seen in paranasal sinuses, mostly in the frontal sinus, whereas they are rare in the nasal cavity. Inferior turbinate osteoma is extremely rare and our case is the third reported in the literature to date. Symptoms vary depending on the location, size and spreading and nasal obstruction is the most common symptom. Treatment of osteomas is surgical and is reserved only for rapidly growing osteomas with symptoms of infection or compression. Although endoscopic surgery is preferred modality, external approach with lateral rhinotomy should be considered with larger osteomas especially those that involve the ethmoid labyrinth. In cases like ours, when large osteoma is localized on the inferior nasal turbinate, sublabial incision through the vestibulum is very suitable approach because it provides wide access and good visibility and leaves no visible scar.

  2. Deep Vein Thrombosis Provoked by Inferior Vena Cava Agenesis.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Raad A; Saadaldin, Mazin; Kumar, Binay; Bachuwa, Ghassan

    2015-01-01

    Inferior vena cava agenesis (IVCA) is a rare congenital anomaly that can be asymptomatic or present with vague, nonspecific symptoms, such as abdominal or lower back pain, or deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Here, we present a 55-year-old male who came with painless swelling and redness of his left lower limb. On examination, swelling and redness were noted extending from the left foot to the upper thigh; it was also warm compared to his right lower limb. Venous Doppler ultrasound was done which showed DVT extending up to the common femoral vein. Subsequently, computed-tomography (CT) of the chest and abdomen was done to exclude malignancy or venous flow obstruction; it revealed congenital absence (agenesis) of the infrarenal inferior vena cava (IVC). PMID:26788400

  3. Pheochromocytoma with inferior vena cava thrombosis: An unusual association

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil K.; Kota, Siva K.; Jammula, Sruti; Meher, Lalit K.; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2012-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas have been described in association with vascular abnormalities like renal artery stenosis. A 48-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with the complaints of headache, sweating, anxiety, dizziness, nausea, vomiting and hypertension. For last several days, he was having a dull aching abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed the presence of a left adrenal pheochromocytoma. An inferior vena cava (IVC) venogram via the right jugular vein demonstrated occlusion of the IVC inferior to the right atrium. Surgical removal of pheochromocytoma was done, followed by anticoagulant treatment for IVC thrombosis, initially with subcutaneous low molecular weight heparin, and then with oral warfarin, resulting in restoration of patency. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of pheochromocytoma in IVC thrombosis has not been reported so far from India. Possible mechanisms of such an involvement are discussed. PMID:22629039

  4. Penetrating injuries of the abdominal inferior vena cava.

    PubMed Central

    Degiannis, E.; Velmahos, G. C.; Levy, R. D.; Souter, I.; Benn, C. A.; Saadia, R.

    1996-01-01

    This is a retrospective study of 74 patients with penetrating injuries of the abdominal inferior vena cava; the cause of injury was gunshot in 91% and stabbing in 9%. Of the patients, 77% underwent lateral venorrhaphy, 5% underwent infrarenal ligation of the inferior vena cava (IVC), and 18% died perioperatively before any caval repair could be carried out. There was an overall perioperative mortality of 39%. Persistent shock, the site of the venous injury, particularly in the retrohepatic position, and the number of associated vascular injuries were directly related to mortality. Irrespective of the improvements in resuscitation and the various operative methods available, penetrating trauma of the abdominal IVC remains a life-threatening injury. PMID:8943628

  5. Atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia ablation and inferior vena cava agenesis.

    PubMed

    Galand, Vincent; Pavin, Dominique; Behar, Nathalie; Mabo, Philippe; Martins, Raphaël P

    2016-10-01

    Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are rare and very often diagnosed in asymptomatic patients during computed tomography performed for other purposes. These anomalies can have significant clinical implications, for example if electrophysiology procedures are needed. Diagnostic and ablation procedures are difficult since catheter manipulation and positioning are more complex. We present here a case of successful atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia ablation in a patient with unexpected IVC agenesis, using an azygos route. PMID:27633734

  6. Leiomyosarcoma of the inferior vena cava: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nascif, Rafael Lemos; Antón, Ana Graziela Santana; Fernandes, Gabriel Lacerda; Dantas, George Caldas; Gomes, Vinícius de Araújo; Natal, Marcelo Ricardo Canuto

    2014-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 48 year-old female patient with moderate abdominal pain and bulging in the abdomen. Physical examination demonstrated the presence of a palpable abdominal mass. Computed tomography showed a heterogeneously enhancing retroperitoneal mass in close contact with the inferior vena cava. En bloc resection of the mass and of the attached vena cava segment was performed. Histological analysis revealed leiomyosarcoma.

  7. [Aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery: case report].

    PubMed

    Adorno, Juan Oscar Alarcón; de Andrade, Guilherme Cabral

    2002-12-01

    The intracranial aneurysms of the posterior circulation have been reported between 5 and 10% of all cerebral aneurysms and the aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are considered rare, can cause cerebello pontine angle (CPA) syndrome with or without subarachnoid hemorrhage. Since 1948 few cases were described in the literature. We report on a 33 year-old female patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to sacular aneurysm of the left AICA. She was submitted to clipage of the aneurysm without complications.

  8. Truncal ataxia from infarction involving the inferior olivary nucleus.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyun; Ryoo, Sookyung; Moon, So Young; Seo, Sand Won; Na, Duk L

    2012-08-01

    Truncal ataxia in medullary infarction may be caused by involvement of the lateral part of the medulla; however, truncal ataxia in infarction involving the inferior olivary nucleus (ION) has received comparatively little attention. We report a patient with truncal ataxia due to medial medullary infarction located in the ION. A lesion in the ION could produce a contralateral truncal ataxia due to increased inhibitory input to the contralesional vestibular nucleus from the contralesional flocculus.

  9. [One case of pleomorphic adenoma originates from inferior nasal turbinate].

    PubMed

    Hao, Fang; Xu, Xuehai

    2014-10-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma (PA) is the most common benign tumor of the salivary glands. Originating from the nasal cavity is very rare. This paper reports one case of pleomorphic adenoma of the inferior nasal turbinate to analyze the clinic characteristic of this disease. Although these tumors are rarely seen in everyday practice, one should consider this possibility as an uncommon aetiology when confronted with an intranasal mass.

  10. Rehabilitation concerns following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Frndak, P A; Berasi, C C

    1991-11-01

    Rehabilitation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is a subject of controversy in the orthopaedic and rehabilitation literature. With an increasing number of these operations currently being performed and with the advent of arthroscopically assisted ACL reconstruction over the past several years, particular rehabilitation needs and problems have been identified in association with these patients. Various authors have stressed one or a combination of a few basic themes which outline the basic rehabilitation concerns following ACL reconstruction. The most fundamental concern is the need to initiate motion very soon after surgery. Prolonged postoperative immobilisation is known to cause serious complications after ACL reconstruction which can be avoided by early motion. Positions or activities which may apply excessive stress to a newly reconstructed ACL must also be considered. The amount of protection required by the graft will vary depending upon the type of graft used and the quality of fixation obtained intraoperatively. Most authors agree that nonweightbearing, active resistive quadriceps exercises should be avoided for an extended period, while closed chain exercises may be initiated much earlier. Strength recovery is obviously important for the quadriceps postoperatively, but maximal strength returns of all of the muscles about the knee must be pursued. Hamstring strength is of particular concern as this may provide an active support to the reconstructed ACL. Sensory loss in the knee after ACL disruption should also be addressed during rehabilitation, prior to a patient's return to full athletic activity. Progressive neuromuscular re-education exercises which rely on sensory input from intact pericapsular structures are encouraged. A final concern is the role of bracing after ACL reconstruction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1763251

  11. Biomechanical Evaluation of Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Duchman, Kyle R; DeVries, Nicole A; McCarthy, Mark A; Kuiper, Justin J; Grosland, Nicole M; Bollier, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Background The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is the most frequently injured soft tissue structure following acute lateral patellar dislocation. MPFL reconstruction has become a popular option to restore patellar stability following lateral patellar dislocation due to the high incidence of recurrent instability following conservative management. Anatomic reconstruction of the MPFL minimizes graft length changes during full knee range of motion and restores patellar stability. Materials & Methods Four fresh frozen cadaver specimens underwent biomechanical testing in a materials testing machine. With the knee fixed in 30° of flexion, the patella was translated laterally a distance of 10 mm and continuous force-displace- ment data was collected with the intact MPFL and again following a newly described MPFL reconstruction technique. Lateral force-displacement and stiffness data were calculated, allowing comparison between the intact and reconstructed MPFL. Results The average lateral restraining force provided by the intact MPFL was 10.6 ± 5.7, 36.6 ± 2.7, and 69.0 ± 5.9 N while the lateral restraining force following MPFL reconstruction was 0.4 ± 4.3, 50.3 ± 16.3, and 110.2 ± 17.5 N at 1, 5, and 10 mm of lateral displacement, respectively. Conclusion Anatomic MPFL reconstruction displays similar lateral restraining force compared to the intact MPFL at low levels of lateral displacement. At higher levels of displacement, the reconstructed MPFL provides increased lateral restraining force compared to the intact MPFL, improving patellar stability in pathologic knees. PMID:24027463

  12. Inferior hip dislocation after falling from height: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Ali Çağrı; Çabuk, Haluk; Büyükkurt, Cem Dinçay; Dedeoğlu, Süleyman Semih; İmren, Yunus; Gürbüz, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Traumatic inferior hip dislocation is the least common of all hip dislocations. Adult inferior hip dislocations usually occur after high-energy trauma, very few cases are reported without fracture. Presentation of case A 26-year-old female was brought to the emergency department with severe pain in the left hip, impaired posture and restricted movement following a fall from 15 m height. The hip joint was fixed in 90° flexion, 15° abduction, and 20° external rotation. No neurovascular impairment was determined. On radiologic examination, a left ischial type inferior hip dislocation was detected. Hemorrhagic shock which developed due to acute blood loss to thoracic and abdominal cavity and patient died at third hour after she was brought to the hospital. Discussion Traumatic hip dislocations have high morbidity and mortality rates due to multiple organ damage, primarily of the extremities, chest and abdomen. In the treatment of traumatic hip dislocation, closed reduction is recommended through muscle relaxation under general anesthesia or sedation. This procedure should be applied before any intervention for concomitant extremity injuries. A detailed evaluation on emergency presentation, a multi-disciplinary approach and early diagnosis with the rapid application of imaging methods could be life-saving for such patients. PMID:27058153

  13. Gaining Surgical Access for Repositioning the Inferior Alveolar Neurovascular Bundle

    PubMed Central

    Al-Siweedi, Saif Yousif Abdullah; Nambiar, P.; Shanmuhasuntharam, P.; Ngeow, W. C.

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at determining anatomical landmarks that can be used to gain access to the inferior alveolar neurovascular (IAN) bundle. Scanned CBCT (i-CAT machine) data of sixty patients and reconstructions performed using the SimPlant dental implant software were reviewed. Outcome variables were the linear distances of the mandibular canal to the inferior border and the buccal cortex of the mandible, measured immediately at the mental foramen (D1) and at 10, 20, 30, and 40 mm (D2–D5) distal to it. Predictor variables were age, ethnicity, and gender of subjects. Apicobasal assessment of the canal reveals that it is curving downward towards the inferior mandibular border until 20 mm (D3) distal to the mental foramen where it then curves upwards, making an elliptic-arc curve. The mandibular canal also forms a buccolingually oriented elliptic arc in relation to the buccal cortex. Variations due to age, ethnicity, and gender were evident and this study provides an accurate anatomic zone for gaining surgical access to the IAN bundle. The findings indicate that the buccal cortex-IAN distance was greatest at D3. Therefore, sites between D2 and D5 can be used as favorable landmarks to access the IAN bundle with the least complications to the patient. PMID:24892077

  14. Combination-sensitive neurons in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Mittmann, D H; Wenstrup, J J

    1995-10-01

    We examined whether neurons in the inferior colliculus of the mustached bat (Pteronotus parnellii) are combination sensitive, responding to both low- and high-frequency components of the bat's sonar signal. These neurons, previously reported in the thalamus and cortex, analyze sonar target features including distance. Of 82 single units and 36 multiple units from the 58-112 kHz representations of the inferior colliculus, most (86%) displayed sensitivity to low-frequency sounds that was tuned in the range of the fundamental biosonar component (24-31 kHz). All histologically localized units were in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC). There were two major types of combination-sensitive influences. Many neurons were facilitated by low-frequency sounds and selective for particular delays between the low- and high-frequency components. In other neurons, the low-frequency signal was inhibitory if presented simultaneously or a few milliseconds prior to the high-frequency signal. The results indicate that mechanisms creating specialized frequency comparisons and delay sensitivity in combination-sensitive neurons operate at the ICC or below. Since combination sensitivity or multipeaked tuning curves occur in the auditory systems of many species, ICC neurons in these animals may also respond to species-specific frequency combinations.

  15. [Inferior vertical nystagmus: is magnetic resonance imaging mandatory?].

    PubMed

    Esteban-Sánchez, Jonathan; Rueda-Marcos, Almudena; Sanz-Fernández, Ricardo; Martín-Sanz, Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    Introduccion. La aparicion de un nistagmo vertical inferior clasicamente obliga a descartar una patologia vascular o de la union craneocervical mediante resonancia magnetica (RM). Estudios recientes demuestran una baja rentabilidad de esta prueba, ya que sugieren que este signo oculomotor puede tener una causa vestibular periferica, sobre todo cuando el paciente presenta un vertigo posicional paroxistico benigno (VPPB) del canal semicircular superior. Objetivo. Comprobar la rentabilidad de la RM en una poblacion de pacientes con nistagmo de posicion vertical inferior. Pacientes y metodos. Estudio retrospectivo de 42 pacientes consecutivos a los que se les realizo una historia clinica, exploracion fisica, y pruebas vestibulares caloricas y rotatorias. A todos ellos se les practico una RM craneal y cervical. Resultados. El 52% de los pacientes con nistagmo de posicion vertical inferior presentaba una clinica y exploracion fisica compatibles con VPPB del canal semicircular superior. La RM fue normal en un 67%, un 26% mostraba datos de espondilopatia y un 5% de microangiopatia cerebral no relacionados con la clinica del paciente. La prevalencia de malformacion de Arnold-Chiari de tipo I fue de un 9% en la poblacion estudiada, sin que nadie tuviera un antecedente reciente de VPPB. Los resultados obtenidos en las pruebas complementarias vestibulares no aportaron informacion adicional para llegar a un diagnostico etiologico. Conclusion. En los pacientes con un VPPB, la RM craneal y las pruebas vestibulares tienen una baja rentabilidad diagnostica, y se debe evaluar la necesidad real de esta prueba con el contexto clinico.

  16. Acute finger injuries: part I. Tendons and ligaments.

    PubMed

    Leggit, Jeffrey C; Meko, Christian J

    2006-03-01

    Improper diagnosis and treatment of finger injuries can cause deformity and dysfunction over time. A basic understanding of the complex anatomy of the finger and of common tendon and ligament injury mechanisms can help physicians properly diagnose and treat finger injuries. Evaluation includes a general musculoskeletal examination as well as radiography (oblique, anteroposterior, and true lateral views). Splinting and taping are effective treatments for tendon and ligament injuries. Treatment should restrict the motion of injured structures while allowing uninjured joints to remain mobile. Although family physicians are usually the first to evaluate patients with finger injuries, it is important to recognize when a referral is needed to ensure optimal outcomes.

  17. Rate-dependent extensional "dynamic ligaments" using shear thickening fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenno, Paul T.; Wetzel, Eric D.

    2014-04-01

    A novel "dynamic ligament" smart material that exhibits a strongly rate-dependent response in extension is developed and characterized. The devices, based on elastomeric polymers and shear thickening fluids, exhibit low resistance to extension at rates below 10 mm/s, but when stretched at 100 mm/s or higher resist with up to 7 × higher force. A link between the shear thickening fluid's rheology and the dynamic ligament's tensile performance is presented to explain the rate-dependent response. Future recommendations for improving device performance are presented, along with a host of different potential application areas including safety equipment, adaptive braces, sporting goods, and military equipment.

  18. Return to Play Following Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cain, Edward Lyle; McGonigle, Owen

    2016-10-01

    Ulnar collateral ligament injury in the overhead athlete typically presents as activity-related pain with loss of velocity and control. Treatment options range from nonoperative rehabilitation to ligament reconstruction. Surgical reconstruction is frequently required to allow the athlete to return to competition and many surgical techniques have been described. The rehabilitation process to return back to overhead athletics, in particular pitching, is prolonged and requires progression through multiple phases. Despite this, surgical treatment has been shown by multiple investigators to be successful at returning athletes to their previous level of competition.

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of injuries to the posterolateral ligament complex.

    PubMed

    Rue, John-Paul; Kilcoyne, Kelly; Dickens, Jonathan; Kluk, Matthew

    2011-09-01

    Posterolateral corner (PLC) injuries are an often unrecognized and disabling injury that frequently accompanies other ligamentous disruptions. The spectrum of injury severity and heterogeneity of treatment options have made comparison of outcomes difficult. Several clinical studies and reviews have focused on the outcomes and treatment algorithms of knee dislocations or multiligamentous knee injuries. There is, however, a paucity of data in the literature analyzing the clinical outcomes and treatment recommendations of isolated PLC injuries or PLC injuries in combination with a single cruciate ligament tear. Furthermore, to our knowledge there is no review that analyzes the different repair or reconstructive techniques and assesses the clinical outcomes of these techniques.

  20. Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Structure, Injuries and Regenerative Treatments.

    PubMed

    Negahi Shirazi, Ali; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Khademhosseini, Ali; Dehghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most vulnerable ligaments of the knee. ACL impairment results in episodic instability, chondral and meniscal injury and early osteoarthritis. The poor self-healing capacity of ACL makes surgical treatment inevitable. Current ACL reconstructions include a substitution of torn ACL via biological grafts such as autograft, allograft. This review provides an insight of ACL structure, orientation and properties followed by comparing the performance of various constructs that have been used for ACL replacement. New approaches, undertaken to induce ACL regeneration and fabricate biomimetic scaffolds, are also discussed. PMID:26545750

  1. Delayed diagnosis of isolated alar ligament rupture: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Robin A; Marzi, Ingo; Vogl, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Ligament disruptions at the craniovertebral junction are typically associated with atlantoaxial rotatory dislocation during upper cervical spine injuries and require external orthoses or surgical stabilization. Only in few patients isolated ruptures of the alar ligament have been reported. Here we present a further case, in which the diagnosis was initially obscured by a misleading clinical symptomatology but finally established six month following the trauma, demonstrating the value of contrast-enhanced high resolution 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in identifying this particular lesion. PMID:26516433

  2. Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Structure, Injuries and Regenerative Treatments.

    PubMed

    Negahi Shirazi, Ali; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Khademhosseini, Ali; Dehghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most vulnerable ligaments of the knee. ACL impairment results in episodic instability, chondral and meniscal injury and early osteoarthritis. The poor self-healing capacity of ACL makes surgical treatment inevitable. Current ACL reconstructions include a substitution of torn ACL via biological grafts such as autograft, allograft. This review provides an insight of ACL structure, orientation and properties followed by comparing the performance of various constructs that have been used for ACL replacement. New approaches, undertaken to induce ACL regeneration and fabricate biomimetic scaffolds, are also discussed.

  3. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Williams, John; Hutt, Jonathan; Rickman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This report details the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in an 18-year-old man with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). The reduced mechanical properties of the tissue in EDS can pose a challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. In this case, we describe the use of a hamstring autograft combined with a Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS). There was a good radiographical, clinical, and functional outcome after two years. This technique gave a successful outcome in the reconstruction of the ACL in a patient with EDS and therefore may help surgeons faced with the same clinical scenario. PMID:26221555

  4. Pathologic conditions of the ligaments and tendons of the knee.

    PubMed

    El-Dieb, Adam; Yu, Joseph S; Huang, Guo-Shu; Farooki, Shella

    2002-09-01

    Excellent spatial resolution and unparalleled contrast resolution have allowed MRI to emerge as the dominant imaging modality for diagnosis of ligament and tendon pathology of the knee joint This article presents several important mechanisms of injury associated with tendon and ligament disruptions. When present, the pattern of bone contusions may reveal the vector of force. When one is aware of the mechanism of injury, it is possible to analyze systematically the structures of the knee and maximize the detection of pathology. Recognition of a knee dislocation pattern is important because the diagnosis may be unsuspected, and the clinician may have to be alerted to the possibility of vascular and neural injury.

  5. Snapping annular ligament of the elbow joint in the throwing arms of young brothers.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Okamura, Kenji; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2003-10-01

    We examined young brothers with symptomatic snapping elbow in the throwing arm. Arthroscopic examination confirmed the mechanism of snapping, in which loose and protruded annular ligament-like tissue covered the volar half of the radial head in elbow extension and uncovered the radial head in deep elbow flexion. Arthroscopic resection of the annular ligament-like tissue was performed in one brother. Histologic examination of the removed tissue showed degenerated ligament tissue. Excision of loose annular ligament abolished snapping. Contralateral elbows of the brothers also showed similar asymptomatic snapping. Researchers suggest that a hereditary factor contributing to loose annular ligament and repetitive microtrauma from throwing is the cause of symptoms.

  6. Mandibular osteotomies after drawing out the inferior alveolar nerve along the canal.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hoon; Kim, Byung-Gun

    2003-01-01

    In some cases, the inferior alveolar nerve runs through a lower course than usual. In such cases, osteotomy of the mandible can injure the inferior alveolar nerves. In other instances, the course of the mandibular osteotomy can meet that of the inferior alveolar nerve. In these cases, a useful method may be excavating the canal and drawing the nerve out through it. With this technique, we can make the osteotomy as initially planned with minimal damage to the inferior alveolar nerve. PMID:14629066

  7. Degenerative changes of the cranial cruciate ligament harvested from dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture

    PubMed Central

    ICHINOHE, Tom; KANNO, Nobuo; HARADA, Yasuji; YOGO, Takuya; TAGAWA, Masahiro; SOETA, Satoshi; AMASAKI, Hajime; HARA, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture is characterized histologically by degenerating extracellular matrix (ECM) and chondroid metaplasia. Here, we describe the progression of chondroid metaplasia and the changes in the expression of ECM components in canine CCL rupture (CCLR). CCLs from 26 stifle joints with CCLR (CCLR group) and normal CCLs from 12 young beagles (control group) were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for expression of type I (COLI), type II (COLII), type III collagen (COLIII) and Sry-type HMG box 9 (SOX9). Cell density and morphology of CCLs were quantified using hematoxylin–eosin staining. The percentage of round cells was higher in the CCLR group than in controls. COLI-positive areas were seen extensively in the connecting fibers, but weakly represented in the cytoplasm of normal CCLs. In the CCLR group, there were fewer COLI-positive areas, but many COLI-positive cells. The percentages of COLII-, COLIII- and SOX9-positive cells were higher in the CCLR group than in controls. The number of spindle cells with perinuclear halo was high in the CCLR group, and most of these cells were SOX9-positive. Deposition of COLI, the main ECM component of ligaments, decreased with increased COLIII expression in degenerated CCL tissue, which shows that the deposition of the ECM is changed in CCLR. On the contrary, expression of SOX9 increased, which may contribute to the synthesis of cartilage matrix. The expression of COLII and SOX9 in ligamentocytes showed that these cells tend to differentiate into chondrocytes. PMID:25716871

  8. The effects of transection of the anterior cruciate ligament on healing of the medial collateral ligament. A biomechanical study of the knee in dogs.

    PubMed

    Woo, S L; Young, E P; Ohland, K J; Marcin, J P; Horibe, S; Lin, H C

    1990-03-01

    The effect of concurrent injury to the anterior cruciate ligament on the healing of injuries of the medial collateral ligament was studied in dogs. In Group I, isolated transection of the medial collateral ligament was performed; in Group II, transection of the medial collateral ligament with partial transection of the anterior cruciate ligament; and in Group III, complete transection of both the medial collateral ligament and the anterior cruciate ligament. The three groups of animals were examined six and twelve weeks postoperatively with respect to varus-valgus rotation of the knee and tensile properties of the femur-medial collateral ligament-tibia complex. The varus-valgus rotation of the knee was found to be the largest in Group-III specimens at all time-periods and was 3.5 times greater than the control values at twelve weeks. Group-I and Group-II specimens also showed large varus-valgus rotations at time zero, but the rotations returned to the control values by twelve weeks. For the structural properties of the femur-medial collateral ligament-tibia complex, the values for ultimate load for Groups I and II reached the control values by twelve weeks, while that for Group III remained at only 80 per cent of the control value. Both energy absorbed at failure and linear stiffness for all three groups were less than those for the controls at six weeks, and only linear stiffness returned to the control values by twelve weeks. For the mechanical (material) properties of the healed ligament substance, the values for modulus and tensile strength were markedly lower than the control values for all groups at six weeks. By twelve weeks, the tensile strength of Group-I specimens had increased to 52 per cent of the control value, while those of Groups II and III were only 45 and 14 per cent, respectively. Our results demonstrate that healing of the transected medial collateral ligament is adversely affected by concomitant transection of the anterior cruciate ligament

  9. Biomechanical Evaluation of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Quadriceps Versus Achilles Tendon Bone Block Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Brian; Haro, Marc S.; Bogunovic, Ljiljana; Collins, Michael J.; Arns, Thomas A.; Trella, Katie J.; Shewman, Elizabeth F.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Long-term studies of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction suggest that normal stability is not restored in the majority of patients. The Achilles tendon allograft is frequently utilized, although recently, the quadriceps tendon has been introduced as an alternative option due to its size and high patellar bone density. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical strength of PCL reconstructions using a quadriceps versus an Achilles allograft. The hypothesis was that quadriceps bone block allograft has comparable mechanical properties to those of Achilles bone block allograft. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-nine fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: (1) intact PCL, (2) PCL reconstruction with Achilles tendon allograft, or (3) PCL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon allograft. After reconstruction, all supporting capsular and ligamentous tissues were removed. Posterior tibial translation was measured at neutral and 20° external rotation. Each specimen underwent a preload, 2 cyclic loading protocols of 500 cycles, then load to failure. Results: Construct creep deformation was significantly lower in the intact group compared with both Achilles and quadriceps allograft (P = .008). The intact specimens reached the greatest ultimate load compared with both reconstructions (1974 ± 752 N, P = .0001). The difference in ultimate load for quadriceps versus Achilles allograft was significant (P = .048), with the quadriceps group having greater maximum force during failure testing. No significant differences were noted between quadriceps versus Achilles allograft for differences in crosshead excursion during cyclic testing (peak-valley [P-V] extension stretch), creep deformation, or stiffness. Construct stiffness measured during the failure test was greatest in the intact group (117 ± 9 N/mm, P = .0001) compared with the Achilles (43 ± 11 N/mm) and quadriceps (43

  10. Putative proprioceptive function of the pelvic ligaments: biomechanical and histological studies.

    PubMed

    Varga, Endre; Dudas, Bertalan; Tile, Marvin

    2008-08-01

    The sacrospinous (SS) and sacrotuberous (ST) ligaments of the pelvic ring are known as mechanical stabilisers of the pelvic girdle, primarily against rotational forces in the sagittal and horizontal planes. Earlier studies, however, raised the possibility that ST/SS ligaments possess significant proprioceptive function, while the mechanical role of these ligaments in maintaining the structural integrity of the pelvis is of less importance. The aim of this study is to determine whether the function of these ligaments is strictly to provide mechanical stability or if they have any additional functional properties, i.e., proprioception. In order to reveal the function of the SS/ST ligaments, biomechanical studies of cadaver pelvis were used along with the histological analysis of the ligaments. Following measurements to determine the accurate mechanical role of the pelvic ligaments, the strength of these ligaments was significantly less than we earlier expected. For this reason other functions of the SS/ST ligaments were considered, including the proprioceptive role. Indeed, histological studies revealed ramifying nerve terminals in the SS/ST ligaments. These terminals may represent the morphological substrate of the proprioceptive function associated with the ligaments. Our studies revealed that SS/ST ligaments might have a significant proprioceptive function providing information of the position of the pelvis. Consequently, the mechanical role of the ligaments in maintaining the structural integrity of the pelvis may be significantly less than previously assumed. Understanding the function of the SS/ST ligaments is crucial for providing more precise guidelines for patient management with injuries to the posterior pelvic region.

  11. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction of the Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Chalmers, Peter N.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) is a common procedure in both professional and high-level athletes. Purpose: To determine the effect of technique and level of play with UCLR on return to sport (RTS). Hypothesis: When comparing different surgical techniques or preoperative level of sports participation, there is no difference in rate of RTS after UCLR. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review was registered with PROSPERO and performed following PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines using 3 publicly available free databases. Therapeutic clinical outcome investigations reporting UCLR outcomes with level of evidence 1 through 4 were eligible for inclusion. All study, subject, and surgical technique demographics were analyzed and compared between continents and countries. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and 2-proportion 2-sample z-test calculators with α = .05 were used to compare RTS between level of play and technique. Results: Twenty studies (2019 patients/elbows; mean age, 22.13 ± 4 years; 97% male; mean follow-up, 39.9 ± 16.2 months) were included. The majority of patients were baseball players (94.5%), specifically pitchers (80%). The most common level of play was collegiate (44.6%). Palmaris longus (71.2%) and the American Sports Medicine Institute (ASMI) technique (65.6%) were the most common graft choice and surgical technique, respectively. There was a pooled 86.2% RTS rate, and 90% of players scored excellent/good on the Conway-Jobe scale. RTS rates were higher among collegiate athletes (95.5%) than either high school (89.4%, P = .023) or professional athletes (86.4%, P < .0001). RTS rates were higher for the docking technique (97.0%, P = .001) and the ASMI technique (93.3%, P = .0034) than the Jobe technique (66.7%). Conclusion: UCLR is performed most commonly in collegiate athletes. Collegiate athletes have the highest RTS rate

  12. Clinical Outcomes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tibor, Lisa M.; Long, Joy L.; Schilling, Peter L.; Lilly, Ryan J.; Carpenter, James E.; Miller, Bruce S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Clinical outcomes of autograft and allograft anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions are mixed, with some reports of excellent to good outcomes and other reports of early graft failure or significant donor site morbidity. Objective: To determine if there is a difference in functional outcomes, failure rates, and stability between autograft and allograft ACL reconstructions. Data Sources: Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Evidence Based Medicine Reviews Collection), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Web of Science, CINAHL, and SPORTDiscus were searched for articles on ACL reconstruction. Abstracts from annual meetings of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, and Arthroscopy Association of North America were searched for relevant studies. Study Selection: Inclusion criteria for studies were as follows: primary unilateral ACL injuries, mean patient age less than 41 years, and follow-up for at least 24 months postreconstruction. Exclusion criteria for studies included the following: skeletally immature patients, multiligament injuries, and publication dates before 1990. Data Extraction: Joint stability measures included Lachman test, pivot-shift test, KT-1000 arthrometer assessment, and frequency of graft failures. Functional outcome measures included Tegner activity scores, Cincinnati knee scores, Lysholm scores, and IKDC (International Knee Documentation Committee) total scores. Results: More than 5000 studies were identified. After full text review of 576 studies, 56 were included, of which only 1 directly compared autograft and allograft reconstruction. Allograft ACL reconstructions were more lax when assessed by the KT-1000 arthrometer. For all other outcome measures, there was no statistically significant difference between autograft and allograft ACL reconstruction. For all outcome measures, there was strong evidence of statistical heterogeneity between

  13. Suture Bridge Fixation Technique for Posterior Cruciate Ligament Avulsion Fracture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Won; Yang, Dae Suk; Lee, Gyu Sang; Choy, Won Sik

    2015-12-01

    We presented a surgical technique including a suture bridge technique with relatively small incision for the reduction and fixation of posterior ligament avulsion fractures. A suture anchor was used to hold the avulsed fragment and a knotless anchor was used to continuously compress the bony fragment into the fracture site, thereby maintaining reduction during healing.

  14. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Patients with Generalized Joint Laxity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Chang, Ji-Hoon

    2008-01-01

    Generalized joint laxity has been considered a risk factor causing late failure of reconstructed anterior cruciate ligaments, although it is unknown whether that is the case for reconstructed posterior cruciate ligaments. We hypothesized patients with generalized joint laxity, compared with those without laxity, would have similar postoperative knee stability, range of motion, and functional scores after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The Beighton and Horan criteria were used to determine generalized joint laxity. We enrolled 24 patients with generalized joint laxity (Group L) and 29 patients without any positive findings of joint laxity (Group N) matched by gender and age. The average side-by-side differences of posterior tibial translation were 4.72 mm in Group L and 3.63 mm in Group N. We observed no differences in posterior tibial translation with differing graft materials or combined procedures. In Group L the International Knee Documentation Committee score was normal in 12.5% and nearly normal in 45.8% whereas in Group N, 24.1% were normal and 55.2% nearly normal. Patients with generalized joint laxity showed more posterior laxity than patients without joint laxity. Generalized joint laxity therefore appears to be a risk factor associated with posterior laxity after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Level of Evidence: Level III, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18843524

  15. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Elaine Y. L.; Boutlis, Craig S.; Chen, Darren B.; Liu, Eunice Y.-T.

    2015-01-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis. PMID:26041900

  16. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair.

    PubMed

    Yong, Elaine X L; Cheong, Elaine Y L; Boutlis, Craig S; Chen, Darren B; Liu, Eunice Y-T; McKew, Genevieve L

    2015-08-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis.

  17. Repair and reconstruction of the lateral ulnar collateral ligament.

    PubMed

    Bonnaig, Nicholas S; Throckmorton, Thomas Quin

    2015-01-01

    Lateral ulnar collateral ligament repair and reconstruction are techniques used to treat posterolateral rotatory instability of the elbow. The choice to perform repair versus reconstruction is typically dependent on the chronicity of the injury and the quality of tissue available at the time of surgery.

  18. [Method of surgical treatment of stenosing ligamentitis of fingers].

    PubMed

    Dzatseeva, D V; Titarenko, I V

    2008-01-01

    The authors present results of surgical treatment of patients with stenosing ligamentitis of fingers using different methods. A new method of operative treatment is described. The strategy of decision on this method is grounded, its practicability and results of treatment. PMID:18411674

  19. Anatomy and histology of the transverse humeral ligament.

    PubMed

    Snow, Brian J; Narvy, Steven J; Omid, Reza; Atkinson, Roscoe D; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2013-10-01

    The classic literature describes the transverse humeral ligament (THL) as a distinct anatomic structure with a role in biceps tendon stability; however, recent literature suggests that it is not a distinct anatomic structure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gross and microscopic anatomy of the THL, including a specific investigation of the histology of this ligament. Thirty frozen, embalmed cadaveric specimens were dissected to determine the gross anatomy of the THL. Seven specimens were evaluated histologically for the presence of mechanoreceptors and free nerve endings. Two tissue layers were identified in the area described as the THL. In the deep layer, fibers of the subscapularis tendon were found to span the bicipital groove with contributions from the coracohumeral ligament and the supraspinatus tendon. Superficial to this layer was a fibrous fascial covering consisting of distinct bands of tissue. Neurohistology staining revealed the presence of free nerve endings but no mechanoreceptors. This study's findings demonstrate that the THL is a distinct structure continuous with the rotator cuff tendons and the coracohumeral ligament. The finding of free nerve endings in the THL suggests a potential role as a shoulder pain generator.

  20. FEMORAL INSERTION OF THE POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: AN ANATOMICAL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Leite Cury, Ricardo; Severino, Nilson Roberto; Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix; Aihara, Tatsuo; Neto, Leopoldo Viana Batista; Goarayeb, Dedley Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify objective parameters to guide correct location of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) in the femur. Methods: The PCLs of 20 human cadavers were resected. The following portions were measured: distance from the most distal portion of the PCL, close to the roof, to the most anterior edge of the cartilage (AB); distance from the most proximal portion of the PCL, close to the roof, to the most anterior cartilage (AC); distance between the two parts of the ligament close to the roof (BC); distance from the distal edge in its posterior portion, to the more posterior joint edge (DE); distance from the distal edge of the ligament in its posterior portion, to the intercondylar roof (DF); and finally, the format of the ligament insertion and area of coverage on the femoral condyle. Results: The PCL has the shape of a quarter ellipse, with an average area of 153.5mm2. The mean distances found were: AB of 2.1mm, AC of 10.7mm, BC of 8.6mm DE of 12.4mm and DF of 16.8mm. Conclusions: The edge close to the roof of the anterolateral bundle is closer to the joint cartilage (2.1mm) than the posteromedial bundle is, which is 12.4mm from the edge proximal to the cartilage. These references should assist in better and more accurate positioning of femoral tunnels in PCL reconstruction. PMID:27027059

  1. Postoperative Imaging of the Knee: Meniscus, Cartilage, and Ligaments.

    PubMed

    Walz, Daniel M

    2016-09-01

    This article reviews the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging appearance of frequently performed surgical procedures of the meniscus, articular cartilage, and ligaments. Imaging algorithms and protocols are discussed with particular attention to MR imaging techniques. Attention is paid to surgical procedures and the expected postoperative appearance as well to commonly identified recurrent and residual disorders and surgical complications. PMID:27545429

  2. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair.

    PubMed

    Yong, Elaine X L; Cheong, Elaine Y L; Boutlis, Craig S; Chen, Darren B; Liu, Eunice Y-T; McKew, Genevieve L

    2015-08-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis. PMID:26041900

  3. Editorial Commentary: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Auto or Allo?

    PubMed

    Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-01-01

    Considerable controversy exists regarding appropriate graft choice for patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Allografts pretreated with high-dose irradiation should be avoided. Otherwise, multiple factors should be considered to individualize patient decision making, including patient age and activity level, graft type, and fixation type. PMID:26743418

  4. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction in a Below-Knee Amputee

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Sherif; Elfons Tawafig, Marian; Miles, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Patellar instability is a common finding in patients with below-knee amputation and yet management options are not commonly described in the literature. We describe the first reported case of a medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction using allograft in a patient with a below-knee amputation. Clinical outcome at two-year follow-up remains very good. PMID:26579321

  5. Results of the surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Zelić, Zoran; Jovanović, Savo; Wertheimer, Vjekoslav; Sarić, Gordan; Biuk, Egon; Gulan, Gordan

    2012-03-01

    Results of the surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), using as a graft fourfold hamstring tendons (gracilis and semitendinosus) and middle third of the patellar ligament, were compared. In all patients that were participating in this study clinical examination and magnetic resonance showed ACL rupture, and apart from the choice of the graft, surgical technique was identical. We evaluated 112 patients with implemented patellar ligament graft and fourfold hamstring tendons graft six months after the procedure. Both groups were similar according to age, sex, activity level, knee instability level and rehabilitation program. The results showed that there was no significant difference between groups regarding Lysholm Knee score, IKDC 2000 score, activity level, musculature hypotrophy, and knee joint stability 6 months after the surgery. Anterior knee pain incidence is significantly higher in the group with patellar ligament graft (44% vs. 21%). Both groups had a significant musculature hypotrophy of the upper leg of the knee joint that was surgically treated, six months after the procedure. Both grafts showed good subjective and objective results.

  6. Genetic basis of cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) in dogs.

    PubMed

    Baird, Arabella Elizabeth Gardiner; Carter, Stuart D; Innes, John F; Ollier, William E; Short, Andrea D

    2014-08-01

    Cranial Cruciate Ligament rupture (CCLR) is one of the most common forms of lameness in dogs and is analogous to rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament in humans, for which it can serve as a model. As there is a strong breed-related predisposition to CCLR in dogs, a study was undertaken to consider putative genetic components in susceptible dog breeds. A candidate gene, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping approach using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (Sequenom Ltd) was designed to investigate several CCLR-susceptible dog breeds and identify CCLR-associated genes/gene regions that may confer susceptibility or resistance. A meta-analysis was performed using the breed case/control candidate gene data to identify SNP associations that were common to the whole cohort of susceptible dogs. We identified SNPs in key genes involved in ligament strength, stability and extracellular matrix formation (COL5A1, COL5A2, COL1A1, COL3A1, COL11A1, COL24A1, FBN1, LOX, LTBP2) which were significantly associated with CCLR susceptibility across the dog breeds used in this study. These SNPs could have an involvement in CCLR due to a detrimental effect on ligament structure and strength. This is the first published candidate gene study that has revealed significant genetic associations with canine CCLR. PMID:24684544

  7. Editorial Commentary: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Auto or Allo?

    PubMed

    Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-01-01

    Considerable controversy exists regarding appropriate graft choice for patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Allografts pretreated with high-dose irradiation should be avoided. Otherwise, multiple factors should be considered to individualize patient decision making, including patient age and activity level, graft type, and fixation type.

  8. Rehabilitation after anatomical ankle ligament repair or reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Christopher J; Tourné, Yves; Zellers, Jennifer; Terrier, Romain; Toschi, Pascal; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare

    2016-04-01

    The selection, implementation of and adherence to a post-operative regimen are all essential in order to achieve the best outcomes after ankle ligament surgery. The purpose of this paper is to present a best-evidence approach to this, with grounding in basic science and a consensus opinion from the members of the ESSKA-AFAS Ankle Instability Group. Basic science and clinical evidence surrounding tissue healing after surgical repair or reconstruction of the ligaments as well as around the re-establishment of sensorimotor control are reviewed. A consensus opinion based on this evidence as to the recommended rehabilitation protocol after ankle ligament surgery was then obtained from the members of the ESSKA-AFAS Ankle Instability Group. Rehabilitation recommendations are presented for the initial post-operative period, the early recovery phase and a goal-orientated late rehabilitation and return-to-sport phase. This paper presents practical, evidenced-based guidelines for rehabilitation and return to activity after lateral ankle ligament surgery.

  9. Anatomic Reconstruction Technique for a Plantar Calcaneonavicular (Spring) Ligament Tear.

    PubMed

    Palmanovich, Ezequiel; Shabat, Shay; Brin, Yaron S; Feldman, Viktor; Kish, Benny; Nyska, Meir

    2015-01-01

    Acquired flatfoot deformity in adults is usually due to partial or complete tearing of the posterior tibial tendon, with secondary failure of other structures such as the plantar calcaneonavicular (spring) ligament (SL), which maintain the medial longitudinal arch. In flexible cases, the tibialis posterior can be replaced with the flexor digitorum longus. It is common practice to suture the SL directly in the case of a tear; however, if the tear is complete, suturing directly to the ligament alone will not be possible. Reconstruction of the ligament is needed; however, no validated methods are available to reconstruct this ligament. The operative technique of SL reconstruction described in this report as a part of acquired flatfoot deformity reconstruction consists of augmenting remnants of the spring from the navicularis to the sustentaculum tali and suspending it to the medial malleolus using 2-mm-wide, long-chain polyethylene suture tape. This technique results in the firm anatomic reconstruction of the SL, in addition to "classic" medial arch reconstruction. We recommend SL reconstruction for medial arch reconstruction when the SL is torn. PMID:26253476

  10. Ligament reconstruction and tendon interposition for thumb basal arthritis.

    PubMed

    Elfar, John C; Burton, Richard I

    2013-02-01

    Arthritis at the base of the thumb is common and debilitating. Arthroplasty has evolved over 3 decades to become a highly refined surgical procedure, with excellent results. This article summarizes the history, method, and expected results of basal joint arthroplasty, and the authors describe their method of ligament reconstruction and tendon interposition for thumb basal arthritis.

  11. A Finite Element Analysis of Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    DeVries Watson, Nicole A.; Duchman, Kyle R.; Bollier, Matthew J.; Grosland, Nicole M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The medial patellofemoral ligament is the primary soft-tissue restraint to lateral patella translation. Medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction has become a viable surgical option to provide patellar stability in patients with recurrent instability. The primary goal of this study was to determine the effect of medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction on the lateral force-displacement behavior of the patella using finite element analyses. Methods A finite element model of the knee was created using cadaveric image data. Experimental testing was performed to validate the computational model. After validation, the model was modified to study the effect of various medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction insertion sites, allowing comparison of patellofemoral contact force and pressure. Results For the intact anatomic model, the lateral restraining force was 80.0 N with a corresponding patellar contact area of 54.97 mm2. For the anatomic reconstructed medial patellofemoral ligament model, the lateral restraining force increased to 148.9 N with a contact area of 71.78 mm2. This compared favorably to the corresponding experimental study. The force required to laterally displace the patella increased when the femoral insertion site was moved anteriorly or distally. The lateral restraining force decreased when the femoral insertion site moved proximally and the patellar insertion site moved either proximal or distal by 5 mm. Conclusion The line of action was altered with insertion site position, which in turn changed the amount of force it took to displace the patella laterally. Considering the model constraints, an anterior femoral attachment may over constrain the patella and increase cartilage wear due to increase contact area and restraining force. Clinical Relevance A malpositioned femoral tunnel in MPFL reconstruction could increase restraining forces and PF contact pressure, thus it is suggested to use intra-operative fluoroscopy to confirm

  12. Anesthetic technique for inferior alveolar nerve block: a new approach

    PubMed Central

    PALTI, Dafna Geller; de ALMEIDA, Cristiane Machado; RODRIGUES, Antonio de Castro; ANDREO, Jesus Carlos; LIMA, José Eduardo Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Background Effective pain control in Dentistry may be achieved by local anesthetic techniques. The success of the anesthetic technique in mandibular structures depends on the proximity of the needle tip to the mandibular foramen at the moment of anesthetic injection into the pterygomandibular region. Two techniques are available to reach the inferior alveolar nerve where it enters the mandibular canal, namely indirect and direct; these techniques differ in the number of movements required. Data demonstrate that the indirect technique is considered ineffective in 15% of cases and the direct technique in 1329% of cases. Objective Objective: The aim of this study was to describe an alternative technique for inferior alveolar nerve block using several anatomical points for reference, simplifying the procedure and enabling greater success and a more rapid learning curve. Materials and Methods A total of 193 mandibles (146 with permanent dentition and 47 with primary dentition) from dry skulls were used to establish a relationship between the teeth and the mandibular foramen. By using two wires, the first passing through the mesiobuccal groove and middle point of the mesial slope of the distolingual cusp of the primary second molar or permanent first molar (right side), and the second following the oclusal plane (left side), a line can be achieved whose projection coincides with the left mandibular foramen. Results The obtained data showed correlation in 82.88% of cases using the permanent first molar, and in 93.62% of cases using the primary second molar. Conclusion This method is potentially effective for inferior alveolar nerve block, especially in Pediatric Dentistry. PMID:21437463

  13. Determining the non-inferiority margin for patient reported outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gerlinger, Christoph; Schmelter, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    One of the cornerstones of any non-inferiority trial is the choice of the non-inferiority margin delta. This threshold of clinical relevance is very difficult to determine, and in practice, delta is often "negotiated" between the sponsor of the trial and the regulatory agencies. However, for patient reported, or more precisely patient observed outcomes, the patients' minimal clinically important difference (MCID) can be determined empirically by relating the treatment effect, for example, a change on a 100-mm visual analogue scale, to the patient's satisfaction with the change. This MCID can then be used to define delta. We used an anchor-based approach with non-parametric discriminant analysis and ROC analysis and a distribution-based approach with Norman's half standard deviation rule to determine delta in three examples endometriosis-related pelvic pain measured on a 100-mm visual analogue scale, facial acne measured by lesion counts, and hot flush counts. For each of these examples, all three methods yielded quite similar results. In two of the cases, the empirically derived MCIDs were smaller or similar of deltas used before in non-inferiority trials, and in the third case, the empirically derived MCID was used to derive a responder definition that was accepted by the FDA. In conclusion, for patient-observed endpoints, the delta can be derived empirically. In our view, this is a better approach than that of asking the clinician for a "nice round number" for delta, such as 10, 50%, π, e, or i. PMID:21932298

  14. Bruxism elicited by inferior alveolar nerve injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Melis, Marcello; Coiana, Carlo; Secci, Simona

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this case report is to describe the history of a patient who received an injury to the right inferior alveolar nerve after placement of a dental implant, with bruxism noted afterward. The symptoms were managed by the use of an occlusal appliance worn at night and occasionally during the day, associated with increased awareness of parafunction during the day to reduce muscle pain and fatigue. Paresthesia of the teeth, gingiva, and lower lip persisted but were reduced during appliance use. PMID:22254232

  15. Evidence of mirror neurons in human inferior frontal gyrus.

    PubMed

    Kilner, James M; Neal, Alice; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Friston, Karl J; Frith, Chris D

    2009-08-12

    There is much current debate about the existence of mirror neurons in humans. To identify mirror neurons in the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) of humans, we used a repetition suppression paradigm while measuring neural activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Subjects either executed or observed a series of actions. Here we show that in the IFG, responses were suppressed both when an executed action was followed by the same rather than a different observed action and when an observed action was followed by the same rather than a different executed action. This pattern of responses is consistent with that predicted by mirror neurons and is evidence of mirror neurons in the human IFG.

  16. Inferior Vena Cava Duplication: Incidental Case in a Young Woman.

    PubMed

    Coco, Danilo; Cecchini, Sara; Leanza, Silvana; Viola, Massimo; Ricci, Stefano; Campagnacci, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    A case of a double inferior vena cava (IVC) with retroaortic left renal vein, azygos continuation of the IVC, and presence of the hepatic portion of the IVC drained into the right renal vein is reported and the embryologic, clinical, and radiological significance is discussed. The diagnosis is suggested by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), which reveals the aberrant vascular structures. Awareness of different congenital anomalies of IVC is necessary for radiologists to avoid diagnostic pitfalls and they should be remembered because they can influence several surgical interventions and endovascular procedures. PMID:27217964

  17. Leiomyosarcoma of the Inferior Vena Cava With Kidney Invasion.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Katherine; Attalla, Kyrollis; Husain, Fatima; Tsao, Che-Kai; Badani, Ketan K; Sfakianos, John P

    2016-11-01

    Primary leiomyosarcomas of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are rare tumors associated with poor prognosis, and surgical resection with the goal of obtaining negative margins is the gold standard for initial treatment. Tumor characteristics of both extraluminal extension into renal parenchyma and intraluminal extension of the subdiaphragmatic IVC are even less common. The prognosis of vascular leiomyosarcomas is determined by the location and the size of the tumor, as these factors determine the risk of local recurrence and metastasis. We present a case of a 30-year old female incidentally found to have a 14 cm right renal mass and IVC thrombus. PMID:27679758

  18. Laparoscopic management of inferior lumbar hernia (Petit triangle hernia).

    PubMed

    Ipek, T; Eyuboglu, E; Aydingoz, O

    2005-05-01

    Lumbar hernias are rare defects in the posterolateral abdominal wall that may be congenital or acquired. We present a case of laparoscopic approach to repair an acquired inferior triangle (Petit) lumbar hernia in a woman by using polytetrafluoroethylene mesh. The size of the hernia was 8 x 10 cm. The length of her hospital stay was 2 days. The patient resumed normal activities in less than 2 weeks. The main advantage of this approach is excellent operative visualization, thus avoiding injury to structures near the hernia during repair. Patients benefit from a minimally invasive approach with less pain, shortened hospital course, less analgesic requirements, better cosmetic result, and minimal life-style interference.

  19. Pleomorphic adenoma originated from the inferior nasal turbinate.

    PubMed

    Unlu, H Halis; Celik, Onur; Demir, M Akif; Eskiizmir, Gorkem

    2003-12-01

    Although pleomorphic adenoma is the most common benign neoplasm of the salivary glands, it has also been reported to be present in the neck, ear, mediastinum, external nose and nasal cavity. Intranasal localization of this lesion is very rare and mainly originates from the nasal septum. From wherever the lesion originates, the main treatment modality should be surgical. We presented a very rare case of intranasal pleomorphic adenoma originated from the inferior nasal turbinate. Due to the expansile nature of the lesion, a midfacial degloving approach was preferred.

  20. Left Inferior Vena Cava and Right Retroaortic Renal Vein

    PubMed Central

    Nania, Alberto; Capilli, Fabio; Longo, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, incidental anatomical variants are frequent findings, due to the widespread diffusion of cross-sectional imaging. This case report illustrates a fairly uncommon anatomical variant, that is, the copresence of left inferior vena cava and retroaortic right renal vein reported in a 46-year-old lady, undergoing a staging CT for breast cancer. Although the patient was asymptomatic, the authors highlight potential risks related to the above-mentioned condition and the importance of correct identification and diagnosis of the findings. PMID:26955497

  1. Arthroscopic dorsal capsulo-ligamentous repair in the treatment of chronic scapho-lunate ligament tears.

    PubMed

    Wahegaonkar, Abhijeet L; Mathoulin, Christophe L

    2013-05-01

    Introduction Scapholunate ligament injuries usually result due to a fall on the outstretched hand leading to scapholunate instability. The natural history of untreated scapholunate instability remains controversial and usually results in late arthritic changes- the so-called "SLAC" wrist. The advent of wrist arthroscopy helps in early diagnosis and treatment of these serious injuries. In selected cases with reducible scapholunate instability (Garcia-Elias stages 2, 3 and 4) we propose a new "all arthroscopic dorsal capsulo- ligamentous repair" with the added advantage of early rehabilitation and prevention of post-operative stiffness. Material and Methods We report the results of our series of 57 consecutive patients suffering from chronic wrist pain refractory to conservative measures. All patients underwent a thorough clinical examination in addition to a standard set of radiographs and MRI exam; and they were treated by an all-arthroscopic dorsal capsulo-ligamentous repair under loco-regional anesthesia on an ambulatory basis. All patients were available for follow-up at regular intervals during the post-operative period. At follow-up, the wrist ROM in all directions, the grip strength, DASH questionnaire and pain relief based on the VAS were recorded for both- the operated and contra-lateral sides. Results There were 34 males & 23 females with a mean age of 38.72 ± 11.33 years (range 17-63 years). The dominant side was involved in 52 cases. The mean time since injury was 9.42 ± 6.33 months (range 3-24 months) and the mean follow-up was 30.74 ± 7.05 months (range 18-43 months). The mean range of motion improved in all directions. The mean difference between the post- and pre-operative extension was 14.03° (SEM = 1.27°; p < 0.001); while the mean difference between the post-and pre-operative flexion was 11.14° (SEM = 1.3°; p < 0.0001) with flexion and radial deviation reaching 84.3% and 95.72% respectively of the

  2. Spatial Change of Cruciate Ligaments in Rat Embryo Knee Joint by Three-Dimensional Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangkai; Aoyama, Tomoki; Takaishi, Ryota; Higuchi, Shinya; Yamada, Shigehito; Kuroki, Hiroshi; Takakuwa, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the spatial developmental changes of rat cruciate ligaments by three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction using episcopic fluorescence image capture (EFIC). Cruciate ligaments of Wister rat embryos between embryonic day (E) 16 and E20 were analyzed. Samples were sectioned and visualized using EFIC. 3D reconstructions were generated using Amira software. The length of the cruciate ligaments, distances between attachment points to femur and tibia, angles of the cruciate ligaments and the cross angle of the cruciate ligaments were measured. The shape of cruciate ligaments was clearly visible at E17. The lengths of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) increased gradually from E17 to E19 and drastically at E20. Distances between attachment points to the femur and tibia gradually increased. The ACL angle and PCL angle gradually decreased. The cross angle of the cruciate ligaments changed in three planes. The primordium of the 3D structure of rat cruciate ligaments was constructed from the early stage, with the completion of the development of the structures occurring just before birth.

  3. Intercondylar notch size and anterior cruciate ligament injuries in athletes. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Souryal, T O; Freeman, T R

    1993-01-01

    Published reports agree that there is a strong association between intercondylar notch stenosis and anterior cruciate ligament injuries. In a previously published retrospective study on bilateral anterior cruciate ligament injuries and associated intercondylar notch stenosis, we formulated the notch width index to measure and compare intercondylar notch width. The purpose of this prospective study was to establish a normal range for the notch width index and to correlate intercondylar notch size and anterior cruciate ligament injuries. We gathered data on 902 high school athletes, including range of motion, thigh girth, ligament stability and intercondylar notch width using the notch width index. The population was then followed prospectively and anterior cruciate ligament injuries were recorded and correlated with notch width index in a blind manner. Two-year results showed that the overall anterior cruciate ligament injury rate was 3%. The normal intercondylar notch ratio was 0.231 +/- 0.044. Intercondylar notch width index for men was larger than that for women. Athletes sustaining noncontact anterior cruciate ligament tears have statistically significant intercondylar notch stenosis (notch width index, 0.189). Ten of 14 athletes with noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries had a notch width index that was at least 1 SD below the mean. Athletes with contact anterior cruciate ligament injuries had a mean of 0.233. We conclude that athletes with a stenotic intercondylar notch are at significantly greater risk for sustaining noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury.

  4. [Anterior cruciate ligament-plasty using the "U-dos" technique].

    PubMed

    Morales-Trevizo, C; Paz-García, M; Leal-Berumen, I; Leal-Contreras, C; Berumen-Nafarrate, E

    2013-01-01

    The knee is a compound diarthrodial joint, vulnerable to serious injuries such as ligament injuries of: medial collateral ligament, lateral collateral ligament, anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament, as cruciate ligaments limit rotation movement in the joint. The purpose of our study was to create a new technique to treat injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament, which is composed of two bundles--anteromedial and posterolateral--trying to achieve an anatomical reconstruction that allows for a normal biomechanical recovery. This technique reduces the use of fixation material and costs. The diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament injuries was made with the pivot shift test. There are currently two repair methods for anterior cruciate ligament injuries: single bundle or double bundle repair; none of these techniques is considered as the gold standard, as their results are very similar. This paper describes a technique used for the treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injuries, known as "U-dos", and its clinical results. Cross-sectional, observational study that enrolled 20 patients with total anterior cruciate ligament injuries who underwent anterior cruciate ligament plasty using the "U-dos" technique between June 2009 and June 2010. The technique requires the use of bone bank allograft, in this case of the anterior tibial ligament. Patients were assessed using the Lysholm scale and the pivot shift test. Our results show that all the pivot shift tests were negative and assessments according to the Lysholm scale were from normal to excellent in 95% of cases (19/20). Only one failure was reported, with avulsion of the graft attachment which required a surgical intervention.

  5. Measurement of normal patellar ligament and anterior cruciate ligament by MRI and data analysis

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HONGPO; HUA, CAIHONG; CUI, HONGKAI; LI, YUXIA; QIN, HAIXIA; HAN, DONGMING; YUE, JUNYAN; LIANG, CHANGHUA; YANG, RUIMIN

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain geometric data of in vivo patellar ligament (PL) and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) by MRI and to analyze the correlation of the two with body weight, height and gender. A total of 157 cases with normal sagittal images of bilateral PL and ACL were enrolled. The PL and ACL lengths in the images were measured using the Radworks 5.1 application. The intraclass correlation coefficient for the data measured independently by three doctors was 0.997–1.000. In individuals aged 15–24 years, the values of PL and ACL length and the PL to ACL ratio were 43.95±4.25 mm, 38.45±4.62 mm and 1.15±1.09 in males and 42.03±0.94 mm, 36.00±1.06 mm and 1.18±0.1 in females, respectively. In individuals aged 25–64 years, the values in males were 40.99±4.45 mm, 36.06±3.74 mm and 1.14±0.09 and in females were 39.84±0.64 mm, 36.50±0.81 mm and 1.11±0.02, respectively. In individuals aged ≥65 years, the values in males were 41.43±3.08 mm, 36.62±3.44 mm and 1.15±0.09 and in females were 38.94±0.79 mm, 34.36±0.85 mm and 1.13±0.07, respectively. There was a significant difference between PL and ACL length on the same side (P<0.01). The data obtained was stable and repeatable. The present study established a database of PL and ACL length and the ratio of the two measured by MRI. PMID:23407754

  6. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Autologous Hamstring

    PubMed Central

    Grawe, Brian M.; Williams, Phillip N.; Burge, Alissa; Voigt, Marcia; Altchek, David W.; Hannafin, Jo A.; Allen, Answorth A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent clinical investigations have identified inadequate autograft hamstring graft diameter (<8 mm) to be predictive of failure after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Purpose/Hypothesis: The objective of this study was to determine the utility of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) variables of the hamstring tendons for the prediction of graft diameter at the time of surgery. The hypothesis was that cross-sectional area (CSA) of the hamstring tendon measured on MRI could accurately predict graft diameter, and threshold measurements could be established to predict graft diameter at the time of surgery. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A total of 84 consecutive skeletally mature patients prospectively enrolled in our ACL reconstruction patient registry were identified for study purposes. Patients were included if they underwent an MRI of the affected knee at our institution prior to ACL reconstruction with hamstring (HT) autograft. Graft preparation was performed via a standard quadrupled hamstring technique after harvesting both the gracilis and semitendinosus (4-GST). The smallest diameter end of the HT autograft was then utilized for measurement analysis. Total CSA was calculated for both hamstring tendons using the “region of interest tool” on the corresponding proton density–weighted axial image of the knee at the widest condylar dimension. Three independent reviewers measured the MRI scans so that intra- and interrater reliability of the measurements could be determined. A trend analysis was then undertaken to establish correlations between the MRI CSA and graft diameter. Predictive analysis was then performed to establish threshold MRI measurement values for specific graft diameters and determine whether any patient-specific factors would affect graft diameter (age, sex, and body mass index). Results: Mean patient age at the time of surgery was 36 years (range, 11

  7. Correlation of anthropometric measurements, strength, anterior cruciate ligament size, and intercondylar notch characteristics to sex differences in anterior cruciate ligament tear rates.

    PubMed

    Anderson, A F; Dome, D C; Gautam, S; Awh, M H; Rennirt, G W

    2001-01-01

    We performed a prospective study based on the hypothesis that physiologic differences exist between men and women in strength after adjustments for body weight; that the size of the anterior cruciate ligament is proportionate to the strength of its antagonists, the quadriceps muscles; and that women have a relatively small anterior cruciate ligament, thus predisposing them to a disproportionate number of anterior cruciate ligament injuries. One hundred matched high school basketball players, 50 male and 50 female, were evaluated with anthropometric measurements, body fat analysis, muscle strength evaluation, and magnetic resonance imaging measurements of the intercondylar notch and cross-sectional area of the anterior cruciate ligament at the outlet. The male players were taller and heavier than their female counterparts, although they had 11% less body fat. Male players had statistically greater quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength than female players, even when adjustments were made for body weight. With adjustments for body weight, the size of the anterior cruciate ligament in girls was found to be statistically smaller than in boys. There was no statistically significant difference in the notch width index between the sexes. The study data support our hypothesis that sex differences in anterior cruciate ligament tear rates are caused primarily by several interrelated intrinsic factors. Most importantly, stiffness and muscular strength increase stress on the anterior cruciate ligament in female athletes. The anterior cruciate ligament, when adjustments have been made for body weight, is smaller in female athletes, and therefore, probably does not compensate for the lack of stiffness and strength.

  8. Ectopic supernumerary tooth on the inferior nasal concha.

    PubMed

    Ray, Bappaditya; Singh, Lav Kumar; Das, Chandan Jyoti; Roy, T S

    2006-01-01

    Variations regarding the location of an ectopic tooth in the human nasal cavity, although rare, are documented in the literature, but presence of an ectopic tooth on the inferior nasal concha (INC) has not been reported. We observed an anomalous tooth projecting from the posterior margin of the right INC in two adult female skulls. A small quadrangular tooth projected beyond the posterior margin of the hard palate in one of the skulls and a medium sized conical tooth was observed in the other skull. The affected INC in both skulls were located more inferiorly compared to the opposite side and were in close approximation with the hard palate. No similar findings were noted on the contralateral side nor were there any associated congenital or iatrogenic deformity. The phylogenetic, ontogenetic, and clinical importance of this variant is described. Knowledge of such an anomaly is of paramount importance to otorhinolaryngologists, reconstructive and dental surgeons, and radiologists for identification of such rarities encountered during invasive or non-invasive procedures. PMID:16283635

  9. Tendon and Ligament Regeneration and Repair: Clinical Relevance and Developmental Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Tuan, Rocky S.

    2014-01-01

    Tendon and ligament (T/L) are dense connective tissues connecting bone to muscle and bone to bone, respectively. Similar to other musculoskeletal tissues, T/L arise from the somitic mesoderm, but they are derived from a recently discovered somitic compartment, the syndetome. The adjacent sclerotome and myotome provide inductive signals to the interposing syndetome, thereby upregulating the expression of the transcription factor Scleraxis, which in turn leads to further tenogenic and ligamentogenic differentiation. These advances in the understanding of T/L development have been sought to provide a knowledge base for improving the healing of T/L injuries, a common clinical challenge due to the intrinsically poor natural healing response. Specifically, the three most common tendon injuries involve tearing of the rotator cuff of the shoulder, the flexor tendon of the hand, and the Achilles tendon. At present, injuries to these tissues are treated by surgical repair and/or conservative approaches, including biophysical modalities such as physical rehabilitation and cryotherapy. Unfortunately, the healing tissue forms fibrovascular scar and possesses inferior mechanical and biochemical properties as compared to native T/L. Therefore, tissue engineers have sought to improve upon the natural healing response by augmenting the injured tissue with cells, scaffolds, bioactive agents, and mechanical stimulation. These strategies show promise, both in vitro and in vivo, for improving T/L healing. However, several challenges remain in restoring full T/L function following injury, including uncertainties over the optimal combination of these biological agents as well how to best deliver tissue engineered elements to the injury site. A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in T/L development and natural healing, coupled with the capability of producing complex biomaterials to deliver multiple growth factors with high spatiotemporal resolution and specificity

  10. Anterior cruciate ligament injury after more than 20 years: I. Physical activity level and knee function.

    PubMed

    Tengman, E; Brax Olofsson, L; Nilsson, K G; Tegner, Y; Lundgren, L; Häger, C K

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about physical activity level and knee function including jump capacity and fear of movement/reinjury more than 20 years after injury of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Seventy persons with unilateral ACL injury participated (23 ± 2 years post-injury): 33 treated with physiotherapy in combination with surgical reconstruction (ACLR ), and 37 treated with physiotherapy alone (ACLPT ). These were compared with 33 age- and gender-matched controls. Assessment included knee-specific and general physical activity level [Tegner activity scale, International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ)], knee function [Lysholm score, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)], jump capacity (one-leg hop, vertical jump, side hops), and fear of movement/reinjury [Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK)]. Outcomes were related to degree of osteoarthritis (OA). ACL-injured had lower Lysholm, KOOS, and Tegner scores than controls (P < 0.001), while IPAQ score was similar. ACL-injured demonstrated inferior jump capacity in injured compared with noninjured leg (6-25%, P < 0.001-P = 0.010 in the different jumps), while noninjured leg had equal jump capacity as controls. ACL groups scored 33 ± 7 and 32 ± 7 of 68 on TSK. Lower scores on Lysholm and KOOS symptom were seen for persons with moderate-to-high OA than for no-or-low OA, while there were no differences for physical activity and jump capacity. Regardless of treatment, there are still negative knee-related effects of ACL injury more than 20 years later.

  11. Manual therapy of the mandibular accessory ligaments for the management of temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Cuccia, Antonino Marco; Caradonna, Carola; Caradonna, Domenico

    2011-02-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders are characterized by chronic or acute musculoskeletal or myofascial pain with dysfunction of the masticatory system. Treatment modalities include occlusal splints, patient education, activity modification, muscle and joint exercises, myofascial therapy, acupuncture, and manipulative therapy. In the physiology of the temporomandibular joint, accessory ligaments limit the movement of the mandible. A thorough knowledge of the anatomy of accessory ligaments is necessary for good clinical management of temporomandibular joint disorders. Although general principles regarding the anatomy of the ligaments are relatively clear, very little substantiated information on the dimension, orientation, and function of the ligaments has been published, to the authors' knowledge. The authors review the literature concerning the accessory ligaments of the temporomandibular joint and describe treatment options, including manual techniques for mobilizing the accessory ligaments. PMID:21357496

  12. Influence of thermofixation on artificial ACL ligament dimensional and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Abdessalem, S.; Jedda, H.; Skhiri, S.; Karray, S.; Dahmen, J.; Boughamoura, H.

    2005-11-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the major articular ligamentous structure of the knee, it functions as a joint stabilizer. When ruptured, the natural ACL ligament can be replaced by a textile synthetic ligament such as a braid, knitted cord, or woven cord. Theses structures are composed of biocompatible materials such as polyester or Gore-Tex filaments. The success of an ACL replacement is widely linked to its mechanical and dimensional properties such as tensile strength, dimensional stability and resistance to abrasion. We introduced an additional treatment in the manufacturing of textile ACL ligaments based on the thermofixation of the textile structure by using textile industry stabilization techniques. Boiling water, saturated vapor and dry heat have been tested to stabilize a braided ligament made of Dacron polyester. The application of these three techniques led to shrinkage and an increase of breaking strength of the textile structure.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Craniovertebral Junction Ligaments: Normal Anatomy and Traumatic Injury.

    PubMed

    Nidecker, Anna E; Shen, Peter Y

    2016-10-01

    The superb stability and flexibility of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ) are enabled by the ligaments that connect the occipital bone and the C1 and C2 vertebral bodies. Radiographically, these ligaments are best assessed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has excellent soft tissue contrast, but typically poor spatial resolution. With the advent of advanced MRI techniques, including volumetric sequences, high spatial resolution and contrast resolution can both be attained, allowing for detailed analysis of the ligaments, particularly in trauma settings. We have instituted a cervical spine trauma protocol which utilizes a high resolution (1-mm voxel) volumetric proton density sequence to detect injuries to the ligaments of the CVJ in all trauma patients who receive a cervical spine MRI in our emergency room. In this article, we review techniques for imaging the ligaments at the CVJ, the normal imaging anatomy and the function of the CVJ ligaments, and their appearance in cases of traumatic injury. PMID:27648395

  14. Aneurysm in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery variant: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Saad; Azeem, Abdul; Jiwani, Amyna; Javed, Gohar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There are variations in the anatomy of the vertebrobasilar system amongst which the Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery-Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery (AICA-PICA) variant is thought to have a prevalence of 20–24% (based on retrospective studies). Despite this, aneurysms of the AICA-PICA variant are rare. We present a case of an AICA-PICA aneurysm and discuss its presentation and management, along with a review of literature. Presentation of case We describe the case of a 35 year old female who presented with signs of meningismus. On the basis of radiological imaging it was initially misdiagnosed as a thrombosed arteriovenous malformation (AVM). The patient was eventually discharged with a plan of interval imaging and interventional radiology (if required). The patient presented again with similar signs and symptoms. Re-evaluation of imaging revealed an aneurysm of the AICA-PICA variant which was managed surgically. Discussion Aneurysms of the AICA-PICA variant are rare. The radiological features and surgical management represent a unique clinical entity and are discussed below. Conclusion The prevalence of the AICA-PICA variant might be high but aneurysms in this vessel are rare. The scant knowledge available on this subject makes it a diagnostic difficulty. PMID:27017276

  15. Pregnancy affects cellular activity, but not tissue mechanical properties, in the healing rabbit medial collateral ligament.

    PubMed

    Hart, D A; Reno, C; Frank, C B; Shrive, N G

    2000-05-01

    Recently, evidence has been accumulating that ligament and joint laxity is altered in women and rabbits during pregnancy. Furthermore, many female adolescents injure ligaments through participation in athletics and other activities. Therefore, to determine whether pregnancy has different effects on the injured and uninjured medial collateral ligament of the rabbit knee, we investigated cellular changes (mRNA levels) and alterations in tissue properties (biomechanics) accompanying pregnancy in animals with the medial collateral ligament injured during adolescence and bred for their primigravid pregnancy as young adults. Assessment of mRNA levels for matrix molecules, matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, growth factors and sex hormone receptors, inflammatory cytokines, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2 by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that pregnancy had different impacts on scar and uninjured tissue for six of 15 genes assessed. A pregnancy-associated increase in laxity of the medial collateral ligament was observed for rabbits in the uninjured primigravida group; however, no increase was observed for injured rabbits during pregnancy. The injured ligament was already significantly more lax than the normal counterpart, and pregnancy did not lead to additional laxity or prevent the normal decline in laxity as the scar matured in nonpregnant animals. These results indicate that the impact of pregnancy on laxity and cell activity of the medial collateral ligament is dependent on whether the ligament is uninjured or injured. Pregnancy had no significant effect on structural (stiffness and failure load), material (stress at failure and Young's modulus), or viscoelastic (cyclic and static relaxation) properties of tissue from uninjured or injured medial collateral ligament. Therefore, the properties of the healing ligament were not adversely affected during pregnancy in this

  16. MEDIAL PATELLOFEMORAL LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION TO TREAT RECURRENT PATELLAR DISLOCATION

    PubMed Central

    Gonçaives, Matheus Braga Jacques; Júnior, Lúcio Honório de Carvalho; Soares, Luiz Fernando Machado; Gonçaives, Tiago Jacques; dos Santos, Rogério Luciano; Pereira, Marcelo Lobo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present a new technique for reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) in patients with recurrent patellar dislocation and to evaluate the clinical findings from this. Methods: Between January 2007 and January 2008, 23 patients underwent reconstruction of the MPFL with a free graft from the semitendinosus tendon. After a minimum of 24 months of follow-up, 22 patients were evaluated using the Kujala and Lysholm clinical protocols. Results: The mean follow up was 26.2 months. According to the Lysholm protocol, the patients had a mean score of 53.72 points preoperatively and 93.36 points postoperatively (p = 0.000006). According to the Kujala protocol, the mean score was 59.81 points preoperatively and 83.54 points postoperatively (p = 0.002173). Conclusion: Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the proposed technique showed excellent results over the short term, when evaluated by means of clinical protocols. PMID:27027005

  17. Repair of rectus femoris rupture with LARS ligament.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Clare; Yarlagadda, Rathan; Keenan, Jonathan

    2012-03-20

    The rectus femoris muscle is the most frequently involved quadriceps muscle in strain pathologies. The majority of quadriceps muscle belly injuries can be successfully treated conservatively and even significant tears in the less active and older population, non-operative management is a reasonable option. The authors report the delayed presentation of a 17-year-old male who sustained an injury to his rectus femoris muscle belly while playing football. This young patient did not recover the functional outcome required to get back to running and participating in sport despite 15 months of physiotherapy and non-operative management. Operative treatment using the ligament augmentation and reconstruction system ligament to augment Kessler repair allowed immediate full passive flexion of the knee and an early graduated physiotherapy programme. Our patient was able to return to running and his previous level of sport without any restrictions.

  18. The median arcuate ligament syndrome: a mimicker of mesenteric vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Kay, Johnson C; Arroyo, Ramon A

    2013-08-01

    The median arcuate ligament syndrome is an uncommon condition characterized by the triad of postprandial abdominal pain, unintentional weight loss, and an epigastric bruit. This condition is diagnostically challenging and patients often undergo extensive laboratory, radiographic, and invasive evaluations before it is identified. Physicians should consider this syndrome in the differential diagnoses of chronic abdominal pain and mesenteric vasculitis. Once diagnosed, treatment is generally surgical with known predictors of favorable and unfavorable outcomes. Surgical candidates should be selected carefully. We describe the cases of two young active duty patients diagnosed with median arcuate ligament syndrome after suffering from chronic abdominal pain. Both were referred to our rheumatology department to evaluate for mesenteric vasculitis. Each had a different therapeutic outcome.

  19. In Vitro Periodontal Ligament Cell Viability in Different Storage Media.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Meenakshi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the viability of periodontal ligament cells of avulsed teeth in three different storage media. Forty-five mature premolars extracted for orthodontic therapeutic purposes were randomly and equally divided into three groups according to the storage medium: milk (control), rice water and egg white. After placing extracted teeth for 30 min in storage media, the scrapings of the periodontal ligament (PDL) were collected in Falcon tubes containing collagenase in 2.5 mL of phosphate buffer saline and were incubated for 30 min and centrifuged for 5 min at 800 rpm. Cell viability was analyzed by Trypan blue exclusion. Rice water had a significantly higher number of viable cells compared to egg white and milk. There was no statistically significant difference between egg white and milk. Rice water may be able to maintain PDL cell viability of avulsed teeth better than egg white or milk. PMID:27652702

  20. Tenomodulin Expression in the Periodontal Ligament Enhances Cellular Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Komiyama, Yuske; Ohba, Shinsuke; Shimohata, Nobuyuki; Nakajima, Keiji; Hojo, Hironori; Yano, Fumiko; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Docheva, Denitsa; Shukunami, Chisa; Hiraki, Yuji; Chung, Ung-il

    2013-01-01

    Tenomodulin (Tnmd) is a type II transmembrane protein characteristically expressed in dense connective tissues such as tendons and ligaments. Its expression in the periodontal ligament (PDL) has also been demonstrated, though the timing and function remain unclear. We investigated the expression of Tnmd during murine tooth eruption and explored its biological functions in vitro. Tnmd expression was related to the time of eruption when occlusal force was transferred to the teeth and surrounding tissues. Tnmd overexpression enhanced cell adhesion in NIH3T3 and human PDL cells. In addition, Tnmd-knockout fibroblasts showed decreased cell adhesion. In the extracellular portions of Tnmd, the BRICHOS domain or CS region was found to be responsible for Tnmd-mediated enhancement of cell adhesion. These results suggest that Tnmd acts on the maturation or maintenance of the PDL by positively regulating cell adhesion via its BRICHOS domain. PMID:23593173

  1. The anatomic coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction: surgical technique and indications.

    PubMed

    Carofino, Brad C; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2010-03-01

    The anatomic coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction (ACCR) is a surgical procedure to address acriomioclavicular joint instability. The coracoclavicular ligaments are reconstructed using a semitendinosus allograft passed beneath the coracoid and through bone tunnels in the clavicle. The graft is secured with interference screw fixation, and the acromioclavicular joint is retained. Here we describe the authors' surgical technique, indications, and rehabilitation protocol. Also, a preliminary case series of seventeen patients is presented. Patients demonstrated significant improvement in pain levels and function. The mean ASES score increased from 52 preoperatively to 92. The Constant Murley rose from 66.6 to 94.7. There were three failures in this series, and two required revision surgery. PMID:20188267

  2. [Evolutionary aspect of spinal ligaments in the human fetus].

    PubMed

    Bourges, M; Vanneuville, G

    1994-06-01

    Preliminary histological observations concerning interspinal ligament, at level T1 T2 and far the 14th, 24th and 37th post-ovulatory (P.O.) weeks, are presented here. In an histological, then biological context, these observation take place into an evolutive study of the muscular and ligamentous material of the human fetus spine. The paraffin included biopsy sections were examined after being colored with Mallory blue and picro-indigo-carmin chlorhydric orcein. After 14 weeks P.O., an heterogeneous structure appears with muscular, mixt and fibrous fascicules in a polygonal cellulo-fibrous network. After 24 weeks P.O., the structure is entirely fibrous, in a long, plexiform web. The evolution become more acute after 37 weeks P.O. After chlorhydric orcein coloration, no elastic fibers were observed in the collagen network, during the first two stages of observation cholorhydric orcein coloration, however, revealed a small quantity of them, 37 weeks after ovulation.

  3. Controversies in Knee Rehabilitation: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Failla, Mathew J.; Arundale, Amelia J.H.; Logerstedt, David S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Controversy in management of athletes exists after anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction. Consensus criteria for evaluating successful outcomes following ACL injury include no re-injury or recurrent giving way, no joint effusion, quadriceps strength symmetry, restored activity level and function, and returning to pre-injury sports. Using these criterions, we will review the success rates of current management strategies after ACL injury and provide recommendations for the counseling of athletes after ACL injury. PMID:25818715

  4. Tibial cyst formation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zabala, Ibon López; Solsona, Sergi Sastre

    2014-10-01

    The patient was a 31-year-old man who had undergone anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction of the right knee 2 years prior using a hamstring autograft, with tibial fixation achieved using a bioabsorbable interference screw. Evaluation of the region by radiography revealed widening of the tibial tunnel, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed cystic formation in the tibial tunnel and the fragmentation of the bioabsorbable interference screw. PMID:25098192

  5. Trial analysis of swine's periodontal ligament with Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegotto, G. F.; Grabarski, L.; Kalinowski, H. J.; Simões, J. A.

    2009-10-01

    In this work it is reported the measurement of the differential strain between the dental and bone tissues under effect of an applied load. Slices of swine mandible, containing the premolar tooth, are cut and measured in fresh condition. The strain is measured using fibre Bragg grating sensors glued to both tissues. In the measured range the results show a linear behaviour and confirm the importance of the periodontal ligament in the load transfer mechanism.

  6. Impact of Ulnar Collateral Ligament Tear on Posteromedial Elbow Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Anand, Prashanth; Parks, Brent G; Hassan, Sheref E; Osbahr, Daryl C

    2015-07-01

    Ulnar collateral ligament insufficiency has been shown to result in changes in contact pressure and contact area in the posteromedial elbow. This study used new digital technology to assess the effect of a complete ulnar collateral ligament tear on ulnohumeral contact area, contact pressure, and valgus laxity throughout the throwing motion. Nine elbow cadaveric specimens were tested at 90° and 30° of elbow flexion to simulate the late cocking/early acceleration and deceleration phases of throwing, respectively. A digital sensor was placed in the posteromedial elbow. Each specimen was tested with valgus torque of 2.5 Nm with the anterior band of the ulnar collateral ligament intact and transected. A camera-based motion analysis system was used to measure valgus inclination of the forearm with the applied torque. At 90° of elbow flexion, mean contact area decreased significantly (107.9 mm(2) intact vs 84.9 mm(2) transected, P=.05) and average maximum contact pressure increased significantly (457.6 kPa intact vs 548.6 kPa transected, P<.001). At 30° of elbow flexion, mean contact area decreased significantly (83.9 mm(2) intact vs 65.8 mm(2) transected, P=.01) and average maximum contact pressure increased nonsignificantly (365.9 kPa intact vs 450.7 kPa transected, P=.08). Valgus laxity increased significantly at elbow flexion of 90° (1.1° intact vs 3.3° transected, P=.01) and 30° (1.0° intact vs 1.7° transected, P=.05). Ulnar collateral ligament insufficiency was associated with significant changes in contact area, contact pressure, and valgus laxity during both relative flexion (late cocking/early acceleration phase) and relative extension (deceleration phase) moments during the throwing motion arc.

  7. Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with quadriceps tendon autograft.

    PubMed

    Rabuck, Stephen J; Musahl, Volker; Fu, Freddie H; West, Robin V

    2013-01-01

    A multitude of graft options exist including both allograft and autograft sources for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. With recent concerns regarding the early graft failure and cost-effectiveness of allograft sources, more attention has been directed toward autograft options. However, autograft harvest has been associated with specific morbidity that can result in suboptimal outcomes. The quadriceps tendon is an excellent biomechanical and biologic option.

  8. Popliteal artery injury during posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cenni, Marcos Henrique Frauendorf; do Nascimento, Bruno Fajardo; Carneiro, Guilherme Galvão Barreto; de Andrade, Rodrigo Cristiano; Pinheiro Júnior, Lúcio Flávio Biondi; Nicolai, Oscar Pinheiro

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a case of popliteal artery injury during arthroscopic reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament. The evolution of the injury is described and comments are made regarding the anatomy of this artery and potential risks of this surgical technique. This study had the aims of alerting the medical community, especially knee surgeons, regarding a severe surgical complication and discussing the ways of preventing it.

  9. Anterior cruciate ligament injury in indoor ball games.

    PubMed

    Ebstrup, J F; Bojsen-Møller, F

    2000-04-01

    Three videorecorded incidents of knee injuries inflicted during indoor ball games are reported. Injuries and especially anterior cruciate ligament ruptures seemed to be triggered in varus loaded knees by femural external rotation, or in valgus loaded knees by femural internal rotation with the pivot shifted to the lateral femurotibial compartment. The observations suggest that it may be to the players' advantage to be trained in not letting their knees sag medially or laterally during side-stepping or sudden changes in speed.

  10. Controversies in knee rehabilitation: anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Failla, Mathew J; Arundale, Amelia J H; Logerstedt, David S; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-04-01

    Controversy in management of athletes exists after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstruction. Consensus criteria for evaluating successful outcomes following ACL injury include no reinjury or recurrent giving way, no joint effusion, quadriceps strength symmetry, restored activity level and function, and returning to preinjury sports. Using these criteria, the success rates of current management strategies after ACL injury are reviewed and recommendations are provided for the counseling of athletes after ACL injury.

  11. Diagnosis and management of ulnar collateral ligament injuries in throwers.

    PubMed

    Freehill, Michael T; Safran, Marc R

    2011-01-01

    Although ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injuries are reported most commonly in baseball players (especially in pitchers), these also have been observed in other throwing sports including water polo, javelin throw, tennis, and volleyball. This article reviews the functional anatomy and biomechanics of the UCL with associated pathophysiology of UCL injuries of the elbow of the athlete participating in overhead throwing. Evaluation, including pertinent principles in history, physical examination, and imaging modalities, is discussed, along with the management options.

  12. Diagnosis and management of ulnar collateral ligament injuries in throwers.

    PubMed

    Freehill, Michael T; Safran, Marc R

    2011-01-01

    Although ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injuries are reported most commonly in baseball players (especially in pitchers), these also have been observed in other throwing sports including water polo, javelin throw, tennis, and volleyball. This article reviews the functional anatomy and biomechanics of the UCL with associated pathophysiology of UCL injuries of the elbow of the athlete participating in overhead throwing. Evaluation, including pertinent principles in history, physical examination, and imaging modalities, is discussed, along with the management options. PMID:23531973

  13. Basketball knee injuries and the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Emerson, R J

    1993-04-01

    Basketball arguably may present the greatest risk for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury because it is well known that ACL injuries may occur with external or internal rotation of the tibia with or without hyperextension. All of these mechanical phenomena occur repetitively in a running, jumping, and cutting sport such as basketball. This article discusses the diagnosis and mechanism of injury as well as treatment of ACL injury.

  14. ['Non-inferiority' trials. Tips for the critical reader. Research methodology 3].

    PubMed

    Soonawala, Darius; Dekkers, Olaf M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of non-inferiority trials is to show that a new treatment is not less effective than standard treatment, in other words 'non-inferior'. The non-inferiority margin should be determined before a study commences. This margin determines the maximal magnitude of difference in effectiveness permissible if it is to be concluded that a new treatment is not less effective than the standard treatment. There is usually a good reason for a non-inferiority design. For example, because the new treatment is easier to use, provides better cost-effectiveness or has fewer side effects. The reader of a non-inferiority trial should consider a number of aspects critically: (a) the reason for use of this study design, (b) the assumed benefit of the new treatment, (c) the rationale for the choice of non-inferiority margin and (d) the choice of the standard therapy with which the new treatment is compared.

  15. Posttransplant Complex Inferior Venacava Balloon Dilatation After Hepatic Vein Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Kohli, Vikas; Wadhawan, Manav; Gupta, Subhash; Roy, Vipul

    2010-02-15

    Orthotopic and living related liver transplantation is an established mode of treatment of end-stage liver disease. One of the major causes of postoperative complications is vascular anastomotic stenosis. One such set of such complications relates to hepatic vein, inferior vena cava (IVC), or portal vein stenosis, with a reported incidence of 1-3%. The incidence of vascular complications is reported to be higher in living donor versus cadaveric liver transplants. We encountered a patient with hepatic venous outflow tract obstruction, where the hepatic vein had been previously stented, but the patient continued to have symptoms due to additional IVC obstruction. The patient required double-balloon dilatation of the IVC simultaneously from the internal jugular vein and IVC.

  16. Infrahepatic inferior vena cava agenesis with bilateral renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Skeik, Nedaa; Wickstrom, Kelly K; Schumacher, Clark W; Sullivan, Timothy M

    2013-10-01

    Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are rare and are estimated to be present in 0.07-8.7% of the general population. IVC agenesis (IVCA) is found in approximately 5% of cases of unprovoked lower extremity deep vein thrombosis in patients <30 years of age. Renal vein thrombosis (RVT) is an extremely rare and unusual presentation of IVCA. We report a unique case of a 23-year-old previously healthy man presenting with infrahepatic IVCA-induced bilateral RVT with azygos and hemiazygos continuation. To our knowledge, this is the third reported case in the literature of IVCA-induced RVT and the first to affect the bilateral renal veins in the absence of any other thrombogenic risk factors or any lower extremity venous complications. We also present a literature review of IVCA-induced vein thrombosis and highlight the lack of literature to manage this condition.

  17. Inhibition and the right inferior frontal cortex: one decade on.

    PubMed

    Aron, Adam R; Robbins, Trevor W; Poldrack, Russell A

    2014-04-01

    In our TICS Review in 2004, we proposed that a sector of the right inferior frontal cortex (rIFC) in humans is critical for inhibiting response tendencies. Here we survey new evidence, discuss ongoing controversies, and provide an updated theory. We propose that the rIFC (along with one or more fronto-basal-ganglia networks) is best characterized as a brake. This brake can be turned on in different modes (totally, to outright suppress a response; or partially, to pause), and in different contexts (externally, by stop or salient signals; or internally, by goals). We affirm inhibition as a central component of executive control that relies upon the rIFC and associated networks, and explain why rIFC disruption could generally underpin response control disorders.

  18. Does the left inferior parietal lobule contribute to multiplication facts?

    PubMed

    van Harskamp, Natasja J; Rudge, Peter; Cipolotti, Lisa

    2005-12-01

    We report a single case, who presents with a selective and severe impairment for multiplication and division facts. His ability to retrieve subtraction and addition facts was entirely normal. His brain lesion affected the left superior temporal and to lesser extent in the left middle temporal gyri and the left precentral gyrus extending inferiorly to the pars opercularis of the left frontal lobe. Interestingly, the left supramarginal and angular gyri (SMG/AG) were spared. This finding realised a double dissociation with a previously reported patient, who despite lesions in the SMG/AG did not have a multiplication impairment (van Harskamp et al., 2002). The previously suggested crucial role of the SMG/AG in the retrieval of simple multiplication facts is therefore poorly supported (Cohen et al., 2000; Lee, 2000). PMID:16350657

  19. Anesthetic Efficacy of Bupivacaine Solutions in Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block

    PubMed Central

    Volpato, Maria Cristina; Ranali, José; Ramacciato, Juliana Cama; de Oliveira, Patrícia Cristine; Ambrosano, Glaúcia Maria Bovi; Groppo, Francisco Carlos

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 2 bupivacaine solutions. Twenty-two volunteers randomly received in a crossover, double-blinded manner 2 inferior alveolar nerve blocks with 1.8 mL of racemic bupivacaine and a mixture of 75% levobupivacaine and 25% dextrobupivacaine, both 0.5% and with 1 : 200,000 epinephrine. Before and after the injection, the first mandibular pre-molar was evaluated every 2 minutes until no response to the maximal output (80 reading) of the pulp tester and then again every 20 minutes. Data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon paired test and the paired t test. No differences were found between the solutions for onset and duration of pulpal anesthesia and duration of soft tissue anesthesia (P > .05). It was concluded that the solutions have similar anesthetic efficacy. PMID:16596912

  20. Auditory recognition memory is inferior to visual recognition memory

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Michael A.; Horowitz, Todd S.; Wolfe, Jeremy M.

    2009-01-01

    Visual memory for scenes is surprisingly robust. We wished to examine whether an analogous ability exists in the auditory domain. Participants listened to a variety of sound clips and were tested on their ability to distinguish old from new clips. Stimuli ranged from complex auditory scenes (e.g., talking in a pool hall) to isolated auditory objects (e.g., a dog barking) to music. In some conditions, additional information was provided to help participants with encoding. In every situation, however, auditory memory proved to be systematically inferior to visual memory. This suggests that there exists either a fundamental difference between auditory and visual stimuli, or, more plausibly, an asymmetry between auditory and visual processing. PMID:19307569

  1. Scorpion envenomation-induced acute thrombotic inferior myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Baykan, Ahmet Oytun; Gür, Mustafa; Acele, Armağan; Şeker, Taner; Çaylı, Murat

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of a serious cardiac emergency following scorpion envenomation has rarely been reported and, when so, mostly presented as non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, cardiogenic shock, or myocarditis. Possible mechanisms include imbalance in blood pressure and coronary vasospasm caused by the combination of sympathetic excitation, scorpion venom-induced release of catecholamines, and the direct effect of the toxin on the myocardium. We report a case of a 55-year-old man who presented with acute inferior wall myocardial infarction (MI) within 2 h of being stung by a scorpion. Coronary angiogram revealed total thrombotic occlusion of the left circumflex artery, which was treated successfully with glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor, thrombus aspiration, antivenom serum, and supportive therapy. Therefore, life-threatening MI can complicate the clinical course during some types of scorpion envenomation and should be managed as an acute coronary syndrome. PMID:26875137

  2. Evidence of Mirror Neurons in Human Inferior Frontal Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Kilner, James M.; Neal, Alice; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Friston, Karl J.; Frith, Chris D.

    2009-01-01

    There is much current debate about the existence of mirror neurons in humans. To identify mirror neurons in the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) of humans we employed a repetition suppression paradigm while measuring neural activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Subjects either executed or observed a series of actions. Here we show that in the IFG, responses were suppressed both when an executed action was followed by the same rather than a different observed action and when an observed action was followed by the same rather than a different executed action. This pattern of responses is consistent with that predicted by mirror neurons and is evidence of mirror neurons in the human IFG. PMID:19675249

  3. Indications, Management, and Complications of Temporary Inferior Vena Cava Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Linsenmaier, Ulrich; Rieger, Johannes; Schenk, Franz; Rock, Clemens; Mangel, Eugen; Pfeifer, Klaus Juergen

    1998-11-15

    Purpose: We describe the results of a preliminary prospective study using different recently developed temporary and retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filters. Methods: Fifty temporary IVC filters (Guenther, Guenther Tulip, Antheor) were inserted in 47 patients when the required period of protection against pulmonary embolism (PE) was estimated to be less than 2 weeks. The indications were documented deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and temporary contraindications for anticoagulation, a high risk for PE, and PE despite DVT prophylaxis. Results: Filters were removed 1-12 days after placement and nine (18%) had captured thrombi. Complications were one PE during and after removal of a filter, two minor filter migrations, and one IVC thrombosis. Conclusion: Temporary filters are effective in trapping clots and protecting against PE, and the complication rate does not exceed that of permanent filters. They are an alternative when protection from PE is required temporarily, and should be considered in patients with a normal life expectancy.

  4. The Epidural Ligaments (of Hofmann): A Comprehensive Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Tardieu, Gabrielle G; Loukas, Marios; Moisi, Marc; Chapman, Jens; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2016-01-01

    The epidural space contains the internal vertebral venous plexus, adipose, and other connective tissues. In the anatomical literature, there are nonspecific descriptions of varying fibrous connective tissue bands in the epidural space, mainly mentioned in the lumbar region, that tether the dural sac to the posterior longitudinal ligament, the vertebral canal, and the ligamentum flavum. These ligaments have been termed as Hofmann’s ligaments. This review expands on the anatomy and function of Hofmann’s ligaments, increasing the awareness of their presence and serves as an impetus for further study of their histology, innervation, and function.  PMID:27752405

  5. Sensitivity of rat inferior colliculus neurons to frequency distributions.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Björn; Parthasarathy, Aravindakshan; Han, Emily X; Obleser, Jonas; Bartlett, Edward L

    2015-11-01

    Stimulus-specific adaptation refers to a neural response reduction to a repeated stimulus that does not generalize to other stimuli. However, stimulus-specific adaptation appears to be influenced by additional factors. For example, the statistical distribution of tone frequencies has recently been shown to dynamically alter stimulus-specific adaptation in human auditory cortex. The present study investigated whether statistical stimulus distributions also affect stimulus-specific adaptation at an earlier stage of the auditory hierarchy. Neural spiking activity and local field potentials were recorded from inferior colliculus neurons of rats while tones were presented in oddball sequences that formed two different statistical contexts. Each sequence consisted of a repeatedly presented tone (standard) and three rare deviants of different magnitudes (small, moderate, large spectral change). The critical manipulation was the relative probability with which large spectral changes occurred. In one context the probability was high (relative to all deviants), while it was low in the other context. We observed larger responses for deviants compared with standards, confirming previous reports of increased response adaptation for frequently presented tones. Importantly, the statistical context in which tones were presented strongly modulated stimulus-specific adaptation. Physically and probabilistically identical stimuli (moderate deviants) in the two statistical contexts elicited different response magnitudes consistent with neural gain changes and thus neural sensitivity adjustments induced by the spectral range of a stimulus distribution. The data show that already at the level of the inferior colliculus stimulus-specific adaptation is dynamically altered by the statistical context in which stimuli occur. PMID:26354316

  6. Posterosuperior and anterosuperior impingement of the shoulder in overhead athletes—evolving concepts

    PubMed Central

    Kirchhoff, Chlodwig

    2010-01-01

    During throwing motion the athlete puts enormous stress on both the dynamic and the static stabilisers of the shoulder. Repetitive forces cause adaptive soft tissue and bone changes that initially improve performance but ultimately may lead to shoulder pathologies. Although a broad range of theories have been suggested for the pathophysiology of internal impingement, the reasons are obviously multifactorial. This review aims to critically analyse the current literature and to summarise clinically important information. The cardinal lesions of internal impingement, articular-sided rotator cuff tears and posterosuperior labral lesions, have been shown to occur in association with a number of other findings, most importantly glenohumeral internal rotation deficit and SICK scapula syndrome, but also with posterior humeral head lesions, posterior glenoid bony injury and, rarely, with Bankart and inferior glenohumeral ligament lesions. Extensive biomechanical and clinical research is necessary before a complete understanding and reconciliation of the varying theories of the pathomechanisms of injury can be developed. PMID:20490792

  7. Posterosuperior and anterosuperior impingement of the shoulder in overhead athletes-evolving concepts.

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Imhoff, Andreas B

    2010-10-01

    During throwing motion the athlete puts enormous stress on both the dynamic and the static stabilisers of the shoulder. Repetitive forces cause adaptive soft tissue and bone changes that initially improve performance but ultimately may lead to shoulder pathologies. Although a broad range of theories have been suggested for the pathophysiology of internal impingement, the reasons are obviously multifactorial. This review aims to critically analyse the current literature and to summarise clinically important information. The cardinal lesions of internal impingement, articular-sided rotator cuff tears and posterosuperior labral lesions, have been shown to occur in association with a number of other findings, most importantly glenohumeral internal rotation deficit and SICK scapula syndrome, but also with posterior humeral head lesions, posterior glenoid bony injury and, rarely, with Bankart and inferior glenohumeral ligament lesions. Extensive biomechanical and clinical research is necessary before a complete understanding and reconciliation of the varying theories of the pathomechanisms of injury can be developed.

  8. Effect of Ligament Morphology on Electrical Conductivity of Porous Silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuruzi, Abu Samah; Mazulianawati, Majid Siti

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the effect of ligament morphology on electrical conductivity of open cell porous silver (Ag). Porous Ag was formed when silver nanoparticles in an organic phase were annealed at 150°C for durations ranging from 1 to 5 min. Electrical conductivity of porous Ag was about 20% of bulk value after 5 min annealing. Porous Ag was modeled as a collection of Kelvin cell (truncated octahedrons) structures comprised of conjoined conical ligaments and spherical vertices. An analytical expression for electrical conductivity was obtained. Electrical conductivity normal to hexagonal faces of the unit cell was computed. Our model indicates contribution of grain boundary to electrical resistance increases significantly after the first minute of annealing and plateaus thereafter. Using experimental electrical conductivity data as an input, the model suggests that the ratio, n, of surfaces of one half of a conjoined cone ligament is between 0.7 and 1.0. Average deviation from experimentally determined relative electrical conductivity, Δσ r, was minimal when n = 0.9.

  9. Extracellular matrix content of ruptured anterior cruciate ligament tissue.

    PubMed

    Young, Kate; Samiric, Tom; Feller, Julian; Cook, Jill

    2011-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligaments (ACLs) can rupture with simple movements, suggesting that structural changes in the ligament may reduce the loading capacity of the ligament. We aimed to investigate if proteoglycan and collagen levels were different between ruptured and non-ruptured ACLs. We also compared changes in ruptured tissue over time. During arthroscopic knee reconstruction surgery 24 ruptured ACLs were collected from participants (10 females; 14 males; mean age 24 years). Four non-ruptured ACLs were obtained from participants undergoing total knee replacement surgery (one female, three males; mean age 66 years). Western blot analysis was used to characterise core proteins of aggrecan, versican, decorin and biglycan and glycosaminoglycan assays were also conducted. Collagen levels were measured by hydroxyproline (OHPr) assays. Significantly lower levels of collagen, were found in ruptured ACL compared to non-ruptured ACL (p=0.004). Lower levels of both small and large proteoglycans were found in ruptured than non-ruptured ACLs. No correlation was found between time since rupture and proteoglycan or collagen levels. Ruptured ACLs had less collagen and proteoglycans than non-ruptured ACLs. These changes indicate either extracellular matrix protein levels were reduced prior to rupture or levels decreased immediately after rupture. It is possible that the composition and structure of ACLs that rupture are different to normal ACLs, potentially reducing the tissue's ability to withstand loading. An enhanced understanding of the aetiology of ACL injury could help identify individuals who may be predisposed to rupture.

  10. Nonoperative Management of Craniocervical Ligamentous Distraction Injury: Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Nathan B.; Molinari, Christine; Molinari, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Literature review and case report. Objective Review the existing literature and report the successful nonoperative management of a two-level craniocervical ligamentous distraction injury. Methods A PubMed and Medline review revealed only three limited reports involving the nonoperative management of patients with craniocervical distraction injury. This article reviews the existing literature and reports the case of a 27-year-old man who was involved in a motorcycle accident and sustained multiple systemic injuries and ligamentous distraction injuries to both occipitocervical joints and both C1–C2 joints. The patient's traumatic brain injury and bilateral pulmonary contusions precluded safe operative management of the two-level craniocervical distraction injury. Therefore, the patient was placed in a halo immobilization device. Results The literature remains unclear as to the specific indications for nonoperative management of ligamentous craniocervical injuries. Nonoperative management was associated with poor outcomes in the majority of reported patients. We report a patient who was managed for 6 months in a halo device. Posttreatment computed tomography and flexion–extension radiographs demonstrated stable occipitocervical and C1–C2 joints bilaterally. The patient reported minimal neck pain and had excellent functional outcome with a Neck Disability Index score of 2 points at 41 months postoperatively. He returned to preinjury level of employment without restriction. Conclusions Further study is needed to determine which craniocervical injuries may be managed successfully with nonoperative measures. PMID:26682101

  11. Ring-shaped lateral meniscus with hypoplasic anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Cátia; Castro, Ricardo; Cadilha, Rui; Raposo, Frederico; Melão, Lina

    2015-12-01

    Knee joint lesions can be solitary or occur concomitantly with other lower limb abnormalities. Ring-shaped lateral meniscus (RSM) and hypoplasic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are two rare malformations. The therapeutic management of such abnormalities is not consensual, and highly depends on clinical symptomatology. We report a case of a 25-year-old girl with progressive knee pain whose MRI demonstrated a continuous segment of lateral meniscus situated along the medial aspect of the lateral compartment, continuous with the otherwise normal-appearing lateral meniscus, compatible with an RSM. This anatomic variant can be mistaken by a displaced meniscal fragment, like a bucket-handle tear, a central tear of a discoid meniscus, or incomplete discoid meniscus, as previously reported. Her MRI examination also showed a thinned ACL with anomalous lateral course. This abnormality may be mistaken for an ACL rupture and/or a meniscofemoral ligament with agenesis of ACL. Multiple images in different planes as well as following the course of meniscal and ligaments are critical clues to avoid misdiagnosis. As a result, the diagnosis of an RSM along with hypoplasic ACL with abnormal attachment was assumed based on MRI and confirmed during arthroscopy. The patient was treated conservatively with clinical outcome improvement.

  12. Effectiveness of interference screw fixation in ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Carl W

    2008-07-01

    Ulnar collateral ligament disruptions of the elbow are increasingly common for athletes involved in overhead sports. One newer reconstructive technique combines the use of a biotenodesis screw for ulnar fixation with the docking procedure for humeral fixation referred to as the DANE procedure. Biomechanical evaluations have determined that the combined procedure has properties similar to previous methods, but few comparative clinical studies have been performed. The current study compares the DANE procedure to a traditional method of ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction with a medium range follow-up. Twelve ulnar collateral ligament reconstructions were observed for a minimum of 21 months. Six reconstructions were performed using bone tunnels on the ulna. The other 6 used a biotenodesis interference screw on the ulna. Both groups used the docking procedure on the humerus. Identical rehabilitation phases were followed by both groups. Attention was paid not only to the time to return to play and the level able to be returned to but also to interoperative differences, including tourniquet time. We concluded that the DANE reconstruction is an appropriate and effective method. Results are similar to those achieved with a traditional reconstructive method. The study also demonstrates that tourniquet time and, therefore, operative time is less for the DANE procedure.

  13. [Augmented anterior cruciate ligament replacement with the Kennedy-LAD (ligament augmentation device)--long term outcome].

    PubMed

    Riel, K A

    1998-01-01

    The ligament augmentation device (Kennedy-LAD) is used to protect tendon grafts during the posttransplantation decrease in strength in anterior cruciate ligament (acl) reconstructions. The augmentation with the LAD is based on the concept of load sharing. Since 1983 we used the LAD in acl-reconstructions in 856 patients. In 63 cases we had to treat complications like infection (8), recurrent effusions (21), arthrofibrosis (34). The overall results are good with respect to stability, regain of strength and sports activity. In 73 cases resurgery was necessary because of synovitis (7), LAD-rupture due to re-injury (9), fatigue-rupture of the LAD (22), meniscal tears (35), 2.7 +/- 2.3 years (range: 2 months to 10 years) after LAD implantation. Modern techniques in acl reconstruction lead to comparable results without synthetic augmentation. Therefore, we now recommend the use of a LAD only in cases of repeated acl replacement with week tendon grafts, to avoid an allograft.

  14. Repair of a torn medial meniscus with an anteromedial meniscofemoral ligament in an anterior cruciate ligament-injured knee.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Masayuki; Miyama, Takahide; Nagayama, Yoshihiro; Shino, Konsei

    2011-05-01

    We report a rare case of longitudinal tear of the anterior segment of the medial meniscus in association with the anteromedial meniscofemoral ligament (AMMFL) in an anterior cruciate ligament-injured knee. The tear was repaired, and the anterior horn was transferred to the tibia using the pull-out technique after excising the AMMFL. Repeat arthroscopy performed 7 months postoperatively revealed that the medial meniscus had completely healed and the anterior horn was firmly fixed to the tibia. Two years after the surgery, the patient could play basketball without any symptom. A posteroanterior flexion weight-bearing radiograph did not show any narrowing of the medial joint space. Considering the excellent healing observed in this case, preservation of the meniscus should be considered despite an association between a torn meniscus and an anomalous insertion.

  15. The incidence of secondary pathology after anterior cruciate ligament rupture in 5086 patients requiring ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sri-Ram, K; Salmon, L J; Pinczewski, L A; Roe, J P

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed 5086 patients with a mean age of 30 years (9 to 69) undergoing primary reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in order to determine the incidence of secondary pathology with respect to the time between injury and reconstruction. There was an increasing incidence of medial meniscal tears and chondral damage, but not lateral meniscal tears, with increasing intervals before surgery. The chances of requiring medial meniscal surgery was increased by a factor of two if ACL reconstruction was delayed more than five months, and increased by a factor of six if surgery was delayed by > 12 months. The effect of delaying surgery on medial meniscal injury was also pronounced in the patients aged < 17 years, where a delay of five to 12 months doubled the odds of medial meniscal surgery (odds ratio (OR) 2.0, p = 0.001) and a delay of > 12 months quadrupled the odds (OR 4.3, p = 0.001). Increasing age was associated with a greater odds of chondral damage (OR 4.6, p = 0.001) and medial meniscal injury (OR 2.9, p = 0.001), but not lateral meniscal injury. The gender split (3251 men, 1835 women) revealed that males had a greater incidence of both lateral (34% (n = 1114) vs 20% (n = 364), p = 0.001) and medial meniscal tears (28% (n = 924) vs 25% (n = 457), p = 0.006), but not chondral damage (35% (n = 1152) vs 36% (n = 665), p = 0.565). We conclude that ideally, and particularly in younger patients, ACL reconstruction should not be delayed more than five months from injury.

  16. The patella ligament insertion angle influences quadriceps usage during walking of anterior cruciate ligament deficient patients.

    PubMed

    Shin, Choongsoo S; Chaudhari, Ajit M; Dyrby, Chris O; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2007-12-01

    Following ACL injury a reduction in the peak knee flexion moment during walking (thought to be created by a decrease of quadriceps contraction) has been described as an adaptation to reduce anterior tibial translation (ATT) relative to the femur. However, the amount of ATT caused by quadriceps contraction is influenced by the patellar ligament insertion angle (PLIA). The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that quadriceps usage during walking correlates to individual anatomical variations in the extensor mechanism as defined by PLIA. PLIA and gait were measured for ACL-deficient knees, using subjects' contralateral knees as controls. In ACL-deficient knees, PLIA was negatively correlated (R2 = 0.59) to peak knee flexion moment (balanced by net quadriceps moment), while no correlation was found in contralateral knees. Reduction in peak flexion moment in ACL-deficient knees compared to their contralateral knees was distinctive in subjects with large PLIA, possibly to avoid excessive ATT. These results suggest that subject-specific anatomic variability of knee extensor mechanism may account for the individual variability previously observed in adaptation to a quadriceps reduction strategy following ACL injury. The average (+/-1 SD) PLIA of ACL-deficient knees (21.1 +/- 3.4 degrees) was less than the average PLIA of contralateral knees (23.9 +/- 3.1 degrees). This altered equilibrium position of the tibiofemoral joint associated with reduced PLIA and adaptations of gait patterns following ACL injury may be associated with degenerative changes in the articular cartilage. In the future, individually tailored treatment and rehabilitation considering individuals' specific extensor anatomy may improve clinical outcomes.

  17. Definition of the To Be Named Ligament and Vertebrodural Ligament and Their Possible Effects on the Circulation of CSF

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Nan; Yuan, Xiao-Ying; Li, Yun-Fei; Chi, Yan-Yan; Gao, Hai-Bin; Zhao, Xin; Sharkey, John

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have been conducted specifically on the dense connective tissue located in the posterior medial part of the cervical epidural space. This study was undertaken to examine the presence of this connection between the cervical dura mater and the posterior wall of spinal canal at the level of C1–C2. 30 head-neck specimens of Chinese adults were used. Gross dissection was performed on the suboccipital regions of the 20 specimens. Having been treated with the P45 plastination method, 10 specimens were sliced (9 sagittal and 1 horizontal sections). As a result, a dense fibrous band was identified in the nuchal ligament of 29 specimens (except for one horizontal section case). This fascial structure arose from the tissue of the posterior border of the nuchal ligament and then projected anteriorly and superiorly to enter the atlantoaxial interspace. It was termed as to be named ligament (TBNL). In all 30 specimens the existence of a fibrous connection was found between the posterior aspect of the cervical dura mater and the posterior wall of the spinal canal at the level of the atlas to the axis. This fibrous connection was identified as vertebrodural ligament (VDL). The VDL was mainly subdivided into three parts, and five variations of VDL were identified. These two structures, TBNL and VDL, firmly link the posterior aspect of cervical dura mater to the rear of the atlas-axis and the nuchal region. According to these findings, the authors speculated that the movements of the head and neck are likely to affect the shape of the cervical dural sleeve via the TBNL and VDL. It is hypothesized that the muscles directly associated with the cervical dural sleeve, in the suboccipital region, may work as a pump providing an important force required to move the CSF in the spinal canal. PMID:25084162

  18. Definition of the to be named ligament and vertebrodural ligament and their possible effects on the circulation of CSF.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Nan; Yuan, Xiao-Ying; Li, Yun-Fei; Chi, Yan-Yan; Gao, Hai-Bin; Zhao, Xin; Yu, Sheng-Bo; Sui, Hong-Jin; Sharkey, John

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have been conducted specifically on the dense connective tissue located in the posterior medial part of the cervical epidural space. This study was undertaken to examine the presence of this connection between the cervical dura mater and the posterior wall of spinal canal at the level of C1-C2. 30 head-neck specimens of Chinese adults were used. Gross dissection was performed on the suboccipital regions of the 20 specimens. Having been treated with the P45 plastination method, 10 specimens were sliced (9 sagittal and 1 horizontal sections). As a result, a dense fibrous band was identified in the nuchal ligament of 29 specimens (except for one horizontal section case). This fascial structure arose from the tissue of the posterior border of the nuchal ligament and then projected anteriorly and superiorly to enter the atlantoaxial interspace. It was termed as to be named ligament (TBNL). In all 30 specimens the existence of a fibrous connection was found between the posterior aspect of the cervical dura mater and the posterior wall of the spinal canal at the level of the atlas to the axis. This fibrous connection was identified as vertebrodural ligament (VDL). The VDL was mainly subdivided into three parts, and five variations of VDL were identified. These two structures, TBNL and VDL, firmly link the posterior aspect of cervical dura mater to the rear of the atlas-axis and the nuchal region. According to these findings, the authors speculated that the movements of the head and neck are likely to affect the shape of the cervical dural sleeve via the TBNL and VDL. It is hypothesized that the muscles directly associated with the cervical dural sleeve, in the suboccipital region, may work as a pump providing an important force required to move the CSF in the spinal canal.

  19. Stem cell therapy: a promising biological strategy for tendon-bone healing after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zi-Chen; Wang, Shan-Zheng; Zhang, Xue-Jun; Lu, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Tendon-bone healing after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a complex process, impacting significantly on patients' prognosis. Natural tendon-bone healing usually results in fibrous scar tissue, which is of inferior quality compared to native attachment. In addition, the early formed fibrous attachment after surgery is often not reliable to support functional rehabilitation, which may lead to graft failure or unsatisfied function of the knee joint. Thus, strategies to promote tendon-bone healing are crucial for prompt and satisfactory functional recovery. Recently, a variety of biological approaches, including active substances, gene transfer, tissue engineering and stem cells, have been proposed and applied to enhance tendon-bone healing. Among these, stem cell therapy has been shown to have promising prospects and draws increasing attention. From commonly investigated bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bMSCs) to emerging ACL-derived CD34+ stem cells, multiple stem cell types have been proven to be effective in accelerating tendon-bone healing. This review describes the current understanding of tendon-bone healing and summarizes the current status of related stem cell therapy. Future limitations and perspectives are also discussed.

  20. Editorial Commentary: Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction--Do Not Abandon the C-Arm Quite Yet.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Timothy J

    2016-03-01

    Accurate tibial tunnel placement using the arthroscopically-assisted anatomic fovea landmark technique in transtibial posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is possible without the use of fluoroscopic imaging. However, until a prospective, randomized controlled trial comparing the C-arm and anatomic fovea landmark techniques is completed, abandonment of the C-arm in posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction cannot be recommended.

  1. Severely calcified leiomyoma of broad ligament in a postmenopausal woman: Report of a rare case

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Subrata; Mondal, Sajeeb; Mondal, Palash Kr; Raychaudhuri, Gargi; Pradhan, Rajashree; Banerjee, Suparna

    2016-01-01

    Calcified broad ligament leiomyoma is a rare benign lesion in postmenopausal age group. It causes diagnostic confusion with solid calcified adnexal mass and large bladder calculi at the pelvic region. Clinical and radiological diagnoses were confirmed by histopathology of the hysterectomy specimen. We hereby present a case of heavily calcified broad ligament fibroid in a postmenopausal woman. PMID:27721644

  2. Quadriceps muscle contraction protects the anterior cruciate ligament during anterior tibial translation.

    PubMed

    Aune, A K; Cawley, P W; Ekeland, A

    1997-01-01

    The proposed skiing injury mechanism that suggests a quadriceps muscle contraction can contribute to anterior cruciate ligament rupture was biomechanically investigated. The effect of quadriceps muscle force on a knee specimen loaded to anterior cruciate ligament failure during anterior tibial translation was studied in a human cadaveric model. In both knees from six donors, average age 41 years (range, 31 to 65), the joint capsule and ligaments, except the anterior cruciate ligament, were cut. The quadriceps tendon, patella, patellar tendon, and menisci were left intact. One knee from each pair was randomly selected to undergo destructive testing of the anterior cruciate ligament by anterior tibial translation at a displacement rate of 30 mm/sec with a simultaneously applied 889 N quadriceps muscle force. The knee flexion during testing was 30 degrees. As a control, the contralateral knee was loaded correspondingly, but only 5 N of quadriceps muscle force was applied. The ultimate load for the knee to anterior cruciate ligament failure when tested with 889 N quadriceps muscle force was 22% +/- 18% higher than that of knees tested with 5 N of force. The linear stiffness increased by 43% +/- 30%. These results did not support the speculation that a quadriceps muscle contraction contributes to anterior cruciate ligament failure. In this model, the quadriceps muscle force protected the anterior cruciate ligament from injury during anterior tibial translation.

  3. Response of individual thoracolumbar spine ligaments under high-rate deformation.

    PubMed

    Iwaskiw, Alexander S; Armiger, Robert S; Ott, Kyle A; Wickwire, Alexis C M; Merkle, Andrew C

    2012-01-01

    Under-Body Blast (UBB) has emerged as the predominant threat to ground vehicles and Warfighter survivability. The force transference from the vehicle structure to the human body has resulted in serious injuries, with the thoracolumbar spine frequently damaged. Computational models of the human body are being generated to model human response and develop injury mitigation strategies. To effectively model the spine mechanics, the thoracolumbar ligaments, which serve varying roles in contributing to spine stability, must be characterized at relevant strains and strain rates. Adaptation of cervical spine testing methods has allowed for testing of isolated spinal ligaments including the Anterior Longitudinal Ligament (ALL), Posterior Longitudinal Ligament (PLL), and Ligamentum Flavum (LF). A high-rate servo-hydraulic test machine was used to execute a tensile test protocol for 24 complexes with loading rates ranging from 240 - 2800 mm/s and displacements of 25%, 50%, 75%, 100%, and 300% of the measured ligament length. Non-contact strain field measurements were recorded to produce a three dimensional strain field of the ligament surface. In order to provide the ligament data in a form which can be incorporated in the human computational models, analytical methods for modeling the ligament response are being investigated. Ultimately, this model will be optimized to be utilized in computational models of the lumbar spine. PMID:22846283

  4. An update on the constitutive relation of ligament tissues with the effects of collagen types.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chao; Hao, Zhixiu; Tong, Lingying; Lin, Jianhao; Li, Zhichang; Wen, Shizhu

    2015-10-01

    The musculoskeletal ligament is a kind of multiscale composite material with collagen fibers embedded in a ground matrix. As the major constituent in ligaments to bear external loads, collagens are composed mainly of two collagen contents with different mechanical properties, i.e., types I and III collagen. The constitutive relation of ligaments plays a critical role in the stability and normal function of human joints. However, collagen types have not been distinguished in the previous constitutive relations. In this paper a constitutive relation for ligament tissues was modified based on the previous constitutive relation by considering the effects of collagen types. Both the collagen contents and the mechanical properties of sixteen ligament specimens from four cadaveric human knee joints were measured for determining their material coefficients in the constitutive relation. The mechanical behaviors of ligaments were obtained from both the uniaxial tensile and simple shear tests. A linear regression between joint kinematic results from in vitro and in silico experiments was made to validate the accuracy of this constitutive relation. The high correlation coefficient (R(2)=0.93) and significance (P<0.0001) of the regression equation revealed that this modified constitutive relation of ligaments was accurate to be used in studying joint biomechanics. Another finite element analysis with collagen contents changing demonstrated that the effect of variations in collagen ratios on both joint kinematics and ligament biomechanics could be simulated by this constitutive relation.

  5. [Application of silk-based tissue engineering scaffold for tendon / ligament regeneration].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yejun; Le, Huihui; Jin, Zhangchu; Chen, Xiao; Yin, Zi; Shen, Weiliang; Ouyang, Hongwei

    2016-03-01

    Tendon/ligament injury is one of the most common impairments in sports medicine. The traditional treatments of damaged tissue repair are unsatisfactory, especially for athletes, due to lack of donor and immune rejection. The strategy of tissue engineering may break through these limitations, and bring new hopes to tendon/ligament repair, even regeneration. Silk is a kind of natural biomaterials, which has good biocompatibility, wide range of mechanical properties and tunable physical structures; so it could be applied as tendon/ligament tissue engineering scaffolds. The silk-based scaffold has robust mechanical properties; combined with other biological ingredients, it could increase the surface area, promote more cell adhesion and improve the biocompatibility. The potential clinical application of silk-based scaffold has been confirmed by in vivo studies on tendon/ligament repairing, such as anterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament, achilles tendon and rotator cuff. To develop novel biomechanically stable and host integrated tissue engineered tendon/ligament needs more further micro and macro studies, combined with product development and clinical application, which will give new hope to patients with tendon/ligament injury.

  6. [Anatomical study of Cooper's ligament. Value in the surgical cure of urinary incontinence in women].

    PubMed

    Perdu, M; Darai, E; Goffinet, F; Madelenat, P

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the study was to measure Cooper's ligament thickness in the middle and at 1, 2, 3, 4 cm and to find the best place to fix the stitches of colposuspension. This study was performed on fresh cadavers. Sixteen Cooper's ligaments were studied (8 women, mean age 78 +/- 6 years). The length, the width and thickness of Cooper's ligament at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 cm from the middle were measured. The limits of Cooper's ligament are indefinite. This ligament is significantly thicker (p < 0.01) in the middle and at 4 cm from the middle (2.2 +/- 0.4 mm) than 1 cm (1.4 +/- 0.5), 2 cm (1.4 +/- 0.5 mm) and at 3 cm (1.9 +/- 0.3 mm) from the middle. Cooper's ligament is used to fix the stitches for colposuspension derived from Burch colposuspension (non-incision percutaneous colposuspension to Cooper's ligament, laparoscopic colposuspension...) and sometime help to fix meshes in frondes procedures and the vagina in the Bologna procedure. This study showed the best point to fix the stitches (by its thickness) for colposuspension on this ligament at 4 cm from the middle (the fixation at the origin exposing to periostitis).

  7. An Unusual Case of Paraganglioma of the Broad Ligament Presenting as Cystic Mass

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Maithili Mandar; Joshi, Avinash; Naphade, Pushpalata

    2016-01-01

    In clinical practice, broad ligament (BL) tumors are seldom encountered. Paraganglioma of the BL is exceedingly rare entity. Here we present an unusual case of broad ligament paraganglioma, presenting as a cystic mass, in a 50-year-old postmenopausal female. A high degree of suspicion along with detailed immunohistopathological work-up is needed for arriving at an accurate diagnosis.

  8. Functional regeneration of ligament-bone interface using a triphasic silk-based graft.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongguo; Fan, Jiabing; Sun, Liguo; Liu, Xincheng; Cheng, Pengzhen; Fan, Hongbin

    2016-11-01

    The biodegradable silk-based scaffold with unique mechanical property and biocompatibility represents a favorable ligamentous graft for tissue-engineering anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. However, the low efficiency of ligament-bone interface restoration barriers the isotropic silk graft to common ACL therapeutics. To enhance the regeneration of the silk-mediated interface, we developed a specialized stratification approach implementing a sequential modification on isotropic silk to constitute a triphasic silk-based graft in which three regions respectively referring to ligament, cartilage and bone layers of interface were divided, followed by respective biomaterial coating. Furthermore, three types of cells including bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), chondrocytes and osteoblasts were respectively seeded on the ligament, cartilage and bone region of the triphasic silk graft, and the cell/scaffold complex was rolled up as a multilayered graft mimicking the stratified structure of native ligament-bone interface. In vitro, the trilineage cells loaded on the triphasic silk scaffold revealed a high proliferative capacity as well as enhanced differentiation ability into their corresponding cell lineage. 24 weeks postoperatively after the construct was implanted to repair the ACL defect in rabbit model, the silk-based ligamentous graft exhibited the enhancement of osseointegration detected by a robust pullout force and formation of three-layered structure along with conspicuously corresponding matrix deposition via micro-CT and histological analysis. These findings potentially broaden the application of silk-based ligamentous graft for ACL reconstruction and further large animal study. PMID:27566867

  9. 75 FR 9228 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Non-Inferiority Clinical Trials; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... ``Non- Inferiority Clinical Trials.'' This draft guidance provides sponsors and review staff in the... announcing the availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Non-Inferiority Clinical Trials... clinical trials. It does not create or confer any rights for or on any person and does not operate to...

  10. Dynamic Analysis of Gene Expression in Rice Superior and Inferior Grains by RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongzheng; Peng, Ting; Zhao, Yafan; Du, Yanxiu; Zhang, Jing; Li, Junzhou; Xin, Zeyu; Zhao, Quanzhi

    2015-01-01

    Poor grain filling of inferior grains located on lower secondary panicle branch causes great drop in rice yield and quality. Dynamic gene expression patterns between superior and inferior grains were examined from the view of the whole transcriptome by using RNA-Seq method. In total, 19,442 genes were detected during rice grain development. Genes involved in starch synthesis, grain storage and grain development were interrogated in particular in superior and inferior grains. Of the genes involved in sucrose to starch transformation process, most were expressed at lower level in inferior grains at early filling stage compared to that of superior grains. But at late filling stage, the expression of those genes was higher in inferior grains and lower in superior grains. The same trends were observed in the expression of grain storage protein genes. While, evidence that genes involved in cell cycle showed higher expression in inferior grains during whole period of grain filling indicated that cell proliferation was active till the late filling stage. In conclusion, delayed expression of most starch synthesis genes in inferior grains and low capacity of sink organ might be two important factors causing low filling rate of inferior grain at early filling stage, and shortage of carbohydrate supply was a limiting factor at late filling stage.

  11. Does the Left Inferior Longitudinal Fasciculus Play a Role in Language? A Brain Stimulation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandonnet, Emmanuel; Nouet, Aurelien; Gatignol, Peggy; Capelle, Laurent; Duffau, Hugues

    2007-01-01

    Although advances in diffusion tensor imaging have enabled us to better study the anatomy of the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), its function remains poorly understood. Recently, it was suggested that the subcortical network subserving the language semantics could be constituted, in parallel with the inferior occipitofrontal fasciculus, by…

  12. Generalizing Screen Inferiority--Does the Medium, Screen versus Paper, Affect Performance Even with Brief Tasks?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidi, Yael; Ophir, Yael; Ackerman, Rakefet

    2016-01-01

    Screen inferiority in performance and metacognitive processes has been repeatedly found with text learning. Common explanations for screen inferiority relate to technological and physiological disadvantages associated with extensive reading on screen. However, recent studies point to lesser recruitment of mental effort on screen than on paper.…

  13. Deep venous thrombosis in a young woman with hypoplastic inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Lavens, Matthias; Moors, Boudewijn; Thomis, Sarah

    2014-05-01

    We present a 33-year-old woman with deep venous thrombosis of the left iliac vein and the left lower limb. A computed tomography scan of her abdomen revealed a hypoplastic inferior vena cava and agenesis of the right kidney. Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava are uncommon and are sometimes an unrecognized cause of deep venous thrombosis.

  14. Tinnitus-Related Changes in the Inferior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Joel I.; Coomber, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Tinnitus is highly complex, diverse, and difficult to treat, in part due to the fact that the underlying causes and mechanisms remain elusive. Tinnitus is generated within the auditory brain; however, consolidating our understanding of tinnitus pathophysiology is difficult due to the diversity of reported effects and the variety of implicated brain nuclei. Here, we focus on the inferior colliculus (IC), a midbrain structure that integrates the vast majority of ascending auditory information and projects via the thalamus to the auditory cortex. The IC is also a point of convergence for corticofugal input and input originating outside the auditory pathway. We review the evidence, from both studies with human subjects and from animal models, for the contribution the IC makes to tinnitus. Changes in the IC, caused by either noise exposure or drug administration, involve fundamental, heterogeneous alterations in the balance of excitation and inhibition. However, differences between hearing loss-induced pathology and tinnitus-related pathology are not well understood. Moreover, variability in tinnitus induction methodology has a significant impact on subsequent neural and behavioral changes, which could explain some of the seemingly contradictory data. Nonetheless, the IC is likely involved in the generation and persistence of tinnitus perception. PMID:25870582

  15. Encoding of Stimulus Probability in Macaque Inferior Temporal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Bell, Andrew H; Summerfield, Christopher; Morin, Elyse L; Malecek, Nicholas J; Ungerleider, Leslie G

    2016-09-12

    Optimal perceptual decisions require sensory signals to be combined with prior information about stimulus probability. Although several theories propose that probabilistic information about stimulus occurrence is encoded in sensory cortex, evidence from neuronal recordings has not yet fully supported this view. We recorded activity from single neurons in inferior temporal cortex (IT) while monkeys performed a task that involved discriminating degraded images of faces and fruit. The relative probability of the cue being a face versus a fruit was manipulated by a latent variable that was not revealed to the monkeys and that changed unpredictably over the course of each recording session. In addition to responding to stimulus identity (face or fruit), population responses in IT encoded the long-term stimulus probability of whether a face or a fruit stimulus was more likely to occur. Face-responsive neurons showed reduced firing rates to expected faces, an effect consistent with "expectation suppression," but expected stimuli were decoded from multivariate population signals with greater accuracy. These findings support "predictive coding" theories, whereby neural signals in the mammalian visual system actively encode and update predictions about the local sensory environment.

  16. Dopaminergic Input to the Inferior Colliculus in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nevue, Alexander A; Elde, Cameron J; Perkel, David J; Portfors, Christine V

    2015-01-01

    The response of sensory neurons to stimuli can be modulated by a variety of factors including attention, emotion, behavioral context, and disorders involving neuromodulatory systems. For example, patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have disordered speech processing, suggesting that dopamine alters normal representation of these salient sounds. Understanding the mechanisms by which dopamine modulates auditory processing is thus an important goal. The principal auditory midbrain nucleus, the inferior colliculus (IC), is a likely location for dopaminergic modulation of auditory processing because it contains dopamine receptors and nerve terminals immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. However, the sources of dopaminergic input to the IC are unknown. In this study, we iontophoretically injected a retrograde tracer into the IC of mice and then stained the tissue for TH. We also immunostained for dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), an enzyme critical for the conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine, to differentiate between dopaminergic and noradrenergic inputs. Retrogradely labeled neurons that were positive for TH were seen bilaterally, with strong ipsilateral dominance, in the subparafascicular thalamic nucleus (SPF). All retrogradely labeled neurons that we observed in other brain regions were TH-negative. Projections from the SPF were confirmed using an anterograde tracer, revealing TH-positive and DBH-negative anterogradely labeled fibers and terminals in the IC. While the functional role of this dopaminergic input to the IC is not yet known, it provides a potential mechanism for context dependent modulation of auditory processing. PMID:26834578

  17. Right inferior longitudinal fasciculus lesions disrupt visual-emotional integration.

    PubMed

    Fischer, David B; Perez, David L; Prasad, Sashank; Rigolo, Laura; O'Donnell, Lauren; Acar, Diler; Meadows, Mary-Ellen; Baslet, Gaston; Boes, Aaron D; Golby, Alexandra J; Dworetzky, Barbara A

    2016-06-01

    The mechanism by which the brain integrates visual and emotional information remains incompletely understood, and can be studied through focal lesions that selectively disrupt this process. To date, three reported cases of visual hypoemotionality, a vision-specific form of derealization, have resulted from lesions of the temporo-occipital junction. We present a fourth case of this rare phenomenon, and investigate the role of the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) in the underlying pathophysiology. A 50-year-old right-handed male was found to have a right medial temporal lobe tumor following new-onset seizures. Interstitial laser ablation of the lesion was complicated by a right temporo-parieto-occipital intraparenchymal hemorrhage. The patient subsequently experienced emotional estrangement from visual stimuli. A lesion overlap analysis was conducted to assess involvement of the ILF by this patient's lesion and those of the three previously described cases, and diffusion tensor imaging was acquired in our case to further investigate ILF disruption. All four lesions specifically overlapped with the expected trajectory of the right ILF, and diminished structural integrity of the right ILF was observed in our case. These findings implicate the ILF in visual hypoemotionality, suggesting that the ILF is critical for integrating visual information with its emotional content. PMID:26940563

  18. Serotonin shifts first-spike latencies of inferior colliculus neurons.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Laura M; Pollak, George D

    2005-08-24

    Many studies of neuromodulators have focused on changes in the magnitudes of neural responses, but fewer studies have examined neuromodulator effects on response latency. Across sensory systems, response latency is important for encoding not only the temporal structure but also the identity of stimuli. In the auditory system, latency is a fundamental response property that varies with many features of sound, including intensity, frequency, and duration. To determine the extent of neuromodulatory regulation of latency within the inferior colliculus (IC), a midbrain auditory nexus, the effects of iontophoretically applied serotonin on first-spike latencies were characterized in the IC of the Mexican free-tailed bat. Serotonin significantly altered the first-spike latencies in response to tones in 24% of IC neurons, usually increasing, but sometimes decreasing, latency. Serotonin-evoked changes in latency and spike count were not always correlated but sometimes occurred independently within individual neurons. Furthermore, in some neurons, the size of serotonin-evoked latency shifts depended on the frequency or intensity of the stimulus, as reported previously for serotonin-evoked changes in spike count. These results support the general conclusion that changes in latency are an important part of the neuromodulatory repertoire of serotonin within the auditory system and show that serotonin can change latency either in conjunction with broad changes in other aspects of neuronal excitability or in highly specific ways. PMID:16120790

  19. Compression of the Inferior Vena Cava in Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cina, Alessandro; Zamparelli, Roberto; Venturino, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. We investigated whether (a) the inferior vena cava (IVC) is compressed in bowel obstruction and (b) some tracts are more compressed than others. Methods. Two groups of abdominal computed tomography (CT) examinations were collected retrospectively. Group O (N = 69) scans were positive for bowel obstruction, group C (N = 50) scans were negative for diseases. IVC anteroposterior and lateral diameters (APD, LAD) were assessed at seven levels. Results. In group C, IVC section had an elliptic shape (APD/LAD: .76 ± .14), the area of which increased gradually from 1.9 (confluence of the iliac veins) to 3.1 cm2/m2 of BSA (confluence of the hepatic veins) with a significant narrowing in the hepatic section. In group O, bowel obstruction caused a compression of IVC (APD/LAD: .54 ± .17). Along its course, IVC section area increased from 1.3 to 2.5 cm2/m2. At ROC curve analysis, an APD/LAD ratio lower than 0.63 above the confluence of the iliac veins discriminated between O and C groups with sensitivity of 74% and specificity of 96%. Conclusions. Bowel obstruction caused a compression of IVC, which involved its entire course except for the terminal section. APD/LAD ratio may be useful to monitor the degree of compression. PMID:24151603

  20. Advanced Techniques for Removal of Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Iliescu, Bogdan; Haskal, Ziv J.

    2012-08-15

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters have proven valuable for the prevention of primary or recurrent pulmonary embolism in selected patients with or at high risk for venous thromboembolic disease. Their use has become commonplace, and the numbers implanted increase annually. During the last 3 years, in the United States, the percentage of annually placed optional filters, i.e., filters than can remain as permanent filters or potentially be retrieved, has consistently exceeded that of permanent filters. In parallel, the complications of long- or short-term filtration have become increasingly evident to physicians, regulatory agencies, and the public. Most filter removals are uneventful, with a high degree of success. When routine filter-retrieval techniques prove unsuccessful, progressively more advanced tools and skill sets must be used to enhance filter-retrieval success. These techniques should be used with caution to avoid damage to the filter or cava during IVC retrieval. This review describes the complex techniques for filter retrieval, including use of additional snares, guidewires, angioplasty balloons, and mechanical and thermal approaches as well as illustrates their specific application.