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Sample records for inferior vena cava

  1. Inferior vena cava filters.

    PubMed

    Duffett, L; Carrier, M

    2017-01-01

    Use of inferior vena cava (IVC) filters has increased dramatically in recent decades, despite a lack of evidence that their use has impacted venous thromboembolism (VTE)-related mortality. This increased use appears to be primarily driven by the insertion of retrievable filters for prophylactic indications. A growing body of evidence, however, suggests that IVC filters are frequently associated with clinically important adverse events, prompting a closer look at their role. We sought to narratively review the current evidence on the efficacy and safety of IVC filter placements. Inferior vena cava filters remain the only treatment option for patients with an acute (within 2-4 weeks) proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism and an absolute contraindication to anticoagulation. In such patients, anticoagulation should be resumed and IVC filters removed as soon as the contraindication has passed. For all other indications, there is insufficient evidence to support the use of IVC filters and high-quality trials are required. In patients where an IVC filter remains, regular follow-up to reassess removal and screen for filter-related complications should occur. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  2. Inferior Vena Cava Filters for Recurrent Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Salil H.; Patel, Rima

    2007-01-01

    Inferior vena cava filters are often used as alternatives to anticoagulant therapy for the prevention of pulmonary embolism. Many of the clinical data that support the use of these devices stem from relatively limited retrospective studies. The dual purpose of this review is to examine the incidence of thrombotic complications associated with inferior vena cava filters and to discuss the role of anticoagulant therapy concurrent with filter placement. Device-associated morbidity and overall efficacy can be considered only in the context of rates of vena cava thrombosis, insertion-site thrombosis, recurrent deep venous thrombosis, and recurrent pulmonary embolism. PMID:17622366

  3. Robotic inferior vena cava surgery.

    PubMed

    Davila, Victor J; Velazco, Cristine S; Stone, William M; Fowl, Richard J; Abdul-Muhsin, Haidar M; Castle, Erik P; Money, Samuel R

    2017-03-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) surgery is uncommon and has traditionally been performed through open surgical approaches. Renal cell carcinoma with IVC extension generally requires vena cavotomy and reconstruction. Open removal of malpositioned IVC filters (IVCF) is occasionally required after endovascular retrieval attempts have failed. As our experience with robotic surgery has advanced, we have applied this technology to surgery of the IVC. We reviewed our institution's experience with robotic surgical procedures involving the IVC to determine its safety and efficacy. All patients undergoing robotic surgery that included cavotomy and repair from 2011 to 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Data were obtained detailing preoperative demographics, operative details, and postoperative morbidity and mortality. Ten patients (6 men) underwent robotic vena caval procedures at our institution. Seven patients underwent robotic nephrectomy with removal of IVC tumor thrombus and retroperitoneal lymph node dissection. Three patients underwent robotic explantation of an IVCF after multiple endovascular attempts at removal had failed. The patients with renal cell carcinoma were a mean age of was 65.4 years (range, 55-74 years). Six patients had right-sided malignancy. All patients had T3b lesions at time of diagnosis. Mean tumor length extension into the IVC was 5 cm (range, 1-8 cm). All patients underwent robotic radical nephrectomy, with caval tumor thrombus removal and retroperitoneal lymph node dissection. The average operative time for patients undergoing surgery for renal cell carcinoma was 273 minutes (range, 137-382 minutes). Average intraoperative blood loss was 428 mL (range, 150-1200 mL). The patients with IVCF removal were a mean age of 33 years (range, 24-41 years). Average time from IVCF placement until robotic removal was 35.5 months (range, 4.3-57.3 months). Before robotic IVCF removal, a minimum of two endovascular retrievals were attempted. Average operative time

  4. Filtering through the data on retrievable inferior vena cava filters.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Ido; Drachman, Douglas E

    2015-10-01

    Technical success rates with implantation and retrieval of retrievable inferior vena cava filters are high Inferior vena cava filters are being used for a wide range of indications Systems should be put in place to ensure prompt and effective retrieval of inferior vena cava filters once these are no longer needed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Leiomyosarcoma of the Inferior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Sadri, Ben Abid; Amine, Attaoui Mohamed; Zeineb, Mzoughi; Nizar, Miloudi; Lassad, Gharbi; Khalfallah, Mohamed Tahar

    2013-01-01

    Vascular leiomyosarcoma (LMS) are unique. The inferior vena cava (IVC) is the most affected organ (about 38% cases). We report the observation of a 50-year old woman who consulted for right upper quadrant pain. Imaging studies revealed a retroperitoneal mass that mimic a LMS of the IVC. The patient was operated. A resection of the IVC along with the tumor was performed without reconstruction. The management of LMS is surgical and depends upon the location and tumor characteristics. PMID:24765501

  6. Anatomic Variant of Liver, Gall Bladder and Inferior Vena Cava.

    PubMed

    Sontakke, Yogesh Ashok; Gladwin, V; Chand, Parkash

    2016-07-01

    The morphology and relations of liver, gall bladder and inferior vena cava are cardinal. Their anatomical variations may be a reason for the adverse surgical outcome. During routine anatomy dissection of an abdomen, we noticed a variant liver, gall bladder and inferior vena cava in a 63-year-old male cadaver. In the specimen, a retrohepatic segment of inferior vena cava was found to be intrahepatic. On dissection, it was observed that inferior vena cava was covered entirely by a liver tissue on its dorsal aspect. In the same specimen, the gall bladder had undulated inferior surface. On dissection of the gall bladder, numerous mucosal folds were present in the interior. A band of fibrous tissue was found, which was extending from the right side of the gall bladder to the falciform ligament. Hence, preoperative scanning of congenital variations of the liver, gall bladder and inferior vena cava may be compassionate in planning safe surgeries and interventional abdominal procedures.

  7. Inferior vena cava filters: indications and management.

    PubMed

    Sing, Ronald F; Fischer, Peter E

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine recent studies concerning the use of inferior vena cava (IVC) filters. In the past 18 months, the American College of Chest Physicians released the 9th edition of their guideline for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism. There have also been a number of studies reviewing the use of IVC filters in select populations for the prophylactic prevention of pulmonary embolism. Trauma continues to be the leading indication for prophylactic filters in a number of series, but further studies have demonstrated some benefit of prophylactic filters in the bariatric and spine surgery populations. The IVC filter complication rate remains low; however, so does the retrieval rate for potentially removable filters. These retrieval rates are increased with use of dedicated patient tracking mechanisms. Finally, there have been a number of technology updates in the hardware itself, focusing on strut design. Despite little change in the society guidelines, the use of vena cava filters (VCFs) continues to rise. Overall, the use of IVC filters, especially in prophylactic situations, will remain controversial until randomized, controlled trials are performed within each specific patient population.

  8. [Combined resection of liver and inferior vena cava].

    PubMed

    Sherba, A E; Efimov, D Iu; Rummo, O O

    2014-01-01

    It was analyzed the results of treatment of 8 patients. Combined resection of liver and inferior vena cava was done in all cases. All resections of inferior vena cava were performed in combination with right-sided hemihepatectomy. Circular resection of inferior vena cava was done in 6 cases, tangential-in 2 cases. Allograft of donor inferior vena cava was used in 3 cases for reconstruction of inferior vena cava. Average duration of combined resection of liver and inferior vena cava was 675±189 min, average hemorrhage - 1800±1402 ml. The need for transfusion of packed red blood cells was 270±723 ml, the need for transfusion of fresh frozen plasma was 1105±636 ml. Post-resection liver failure according to criteria ISGLS developed in 3 patients (37.5%). Biliary complications such as biliary fistula and inconsistency of hepatico-jejunal anastomosis developed in 2 patients (25%). Hospital mortality was 12.5%. It is considered that resection of liver with inferior vena cava demands an experience in hepatobiliary surgery and/or liver transplantation. Surgeon must be ready to use total vascular isolation, hypothermic preservation and veno-venous bypass grafting. It allows to dilate an opportunity of resection liver surgery.

  9. Reporting the impact of inferior vena cava perforation by filters.

    PubMed

    Wood, Emily A; Malgor, Rafael D; Gasparis, Antonios P; Labropoulos, Nicos

    2014-08-01

    Perforation of the inferior vena cava by filters struts is a known complication. The goal of our review is to assess the impact of inferior vena cava perforation by filters based on an open, voluntary national database. We reviewed 3311 adverse events of inferior vena cava filters reported in Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database from January 2000 to June 2011. Outcomes of interest were incidence of inferior vena cava perforation, type of filter, clinical presentation, and management of the perforation, including retrievability rates. Three hundred ninety-one (12%) cases of inferior vena cava perforation were reported. The annual distribution of inferior vena cava perforation was 35 cases (9%), varying from seven (2%) to 70 (18%). A three-fold increment in the number of adverse events related to inferior vena cava filters has been noted since 2004. Wall perforation as an incidental finding was the most common presentation (N = 268, 69%). Surrounding organ involvement was found in 117 cases (30%), with the aorta being the most common in 43 cases (37%), followed by small bowel in 36 (31%). Filters were retrieved in 97 patients (83%) regardless of wall perforation. Twenty-five (26%) cases required an open procedure to remove the filter. Neither major bleeding requiring further intervention nor mortality was reported. Inferior vena cava perforation by filters remains stable over the studied years despite increasing numbers of adverse events reported. The majority of filters involved in a perforation were retrievable. Filter retrieval, regardless of inferior vena cava wall perforation, is feasible and must be attempted whenever possible in order to avoid complications. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  10. [Surgery of inferior vena cava-associated urological tumor lesions].

    PubMed

    Weber, M; Meyer, F; Liehr, U B; Halloul, Z

    2013-10-01

    Tumor lesions of the inferior vena cava are extremely challenging with regard to adequate therapeutic management also in advanced malignant urological tumor lesions which can be caused by malignant adhesion, impression and tumor infiltration from the surrounding tissue. This can be the case with metastases from a seminoma or testicular carcinoma (differential diagnosis: primary vena cava leiomyosarcoma), tumor-associated growth into and within the inferior vena cava originating from renal cell carcinoma or carcinoma of the pararenal gland. The aim of this overview was to summarize current clinical and operative experiences in the treatment of inferior vena cava-associated urological tumor lesions, perioperative management, individual-specific and finding-adapted surgical technique and possible outcome, including prognostic considerations from clinical daily practice and representative data found in the literature. The primary aim of the surgical approach is to achieve R0 resection with reconstruction of the inferior vena cava lumen providing a reasonable risk-benefit ratio, which comprises i) complete resection and substitution of the inferior vena cava by a prosthesis along the previous extent of tumor growth, ii) partial resection of the vena cava wall with subsequent patch-plasty or tangential resection with primary suture or iii) removal of the vena cava thrombus after cavotomy. Particular attention should be paid to tumor thrombi reaching the right atrium which need to be extracted after sternotomy and atriotomy using an extracorporeal circulation (cardiac surgeon). For surgical planning, subdivision of the inferior vena cava into three segments, infracardiac, infrahepatic and infrarenal third, has been proven and tested. The current development status and advances in surgical approaches as well as advances in medical technology allow the successful approach to such advanced stage urological tumor manifestations. A deciding factor is the abdominal and

  11. Practical points on transvenous insertion of inferior vena cava filters.

    PubMed

    Novelline, R A

    1980-01-01

    During the transvenous insertion of Kimray-Greenfield (KG) and Mobin-Uddin (MU) inferior vena cava filters at the Massachusetts General Hospital, several problems have been encountered and successfully resolved. The author offers suggestions for dealing with small or spastic internal jugular veins, prominent eustachian valves (valves of the inferior vena cava), congenital variations in the inferior vena cava, inferior vena cava thrombi, and filters that have been placed too low or too high. In addition, methods are described for directing the KG filter with gravity, identifying the lowest renal vein with a selective catheter, inserting the KG filter from a femoral venous route, assuring proper seating of an MU filter, and confirming filter position following placement.

  12. Rhythmic pulsations in inferior vena cava in pericardial constriction.

    PubMed

    Mittal, S R

    2016-09-01

    A case of pericardial constriction with rhythmic, nonrespiratory pulsations in inferior vena cava is presented. Hepatic vein flow showed wave form classical of pericardial constriction. Backward transmission of changes in right atrial pressure resulted in rhythmic, nonrespiratory pulsations in inferior vena cava. This echocardiographic finding could help in diagnosis of pericardial constriction. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava: role of imaging].

    PubMed

    Manfredi, R; Cotroneo, A R; Pirronti, T; Macis, G; Marano, P

    1995-10-01

    In recent years, clinics and radiology of congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava have increased in importance in planning abdominal surgery, liver or kidney transplantation, or new interventional or diagnostic procedures such as the positioning of inferior vena cava filters to prevent pulmonary embolism, varicocel sclerotherapy and renal venous sampling. In the past, the radiologic assessment of these rare anomalies was performed only with angiography, which remains the most accurate diagnostic method. Today, besides angiography, less invasive examinations can be performed, e.g., US, CT and MRI, with MRA. In the last two years, 5 patients with inferior vena cava anomalies were examined: 3 had double inferior vena cava and 2 azygos continuation. All of them were submitted to US, CT, MRI and MRA and 3 patients underwent also angiography, two of them with double puncture. US can suggest the diagnosis but may be limited by technical factors and in the assessment of the whole inferior vena cava. Enhanced CT can depict anomaly extent, but uses contrast agents and ionizing radiations. Angiography better depicts craniocaudal spread and collateral networks but is an invasive procedure and sometimes needs a double puncture (double inferior vena cava). MRI, with MRA, yields the same information as the other modalities, but without contrast agents or ionizing radiations. The development of velocity encoded sequences will probably make this technique the method of choice in the study of inferior vena cava anomalies. Our study was aimed at reviewing the embryo-genesis of inferior vena cava anomalies and to assess the relative importance of different diagnostic procedures in the diagnosis and staging of these anomalies.

  14. Complications of inferior vena cava filters

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, Simer; Chamarthy, Murthy R.

    2016-01-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placement is a relatively low risk alternative for prophylaxis against pulmonary embolism in patients with pelvic or lower extremity deep venous thrombosis who are not suitable for anticoagulation. There is an increasing trend in the number of IVC filter implantation procedures performed every year. There are many device types in the market and in the early 2000s, the introduction of retrievable filters brought an additional subset of complications to consider. Modern filter designs have led to decreased morbidity and mortality, however, a thorough understanding of the limitations and complications of IVC filters is necessary to weight the risks and benefits of placing IVC filters. In this review, the complications associated with IVC filters are divided into procedure related, post-procedure, and retrieval complications. Differences amongst the device types and retrievable filters are described, though this is limited by a significant lack of prospective studies. Additionally, the clinical presentation as well as prevention and treatment strategies are outlined with each complication type. PMID:28123983

  15. Leiomyosarcoma of the inferior vena cava: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nascif, Rafael Lemos; Antón, Ana Graziela Santana; Fernandes, Gabriel Lacerda; Dantas, George Caldas; Gomes, Vinícius de Araújo; Natal, Marcelo Ricardo Canuto

    2014-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 48 year-old female patient with moderate abdominal pain and bulging in the abdomen. Physical examination demonstrated the presence of a palpable abdominal mass. Computed tomography showed a heterogeneously enhancing retroperitoneal mass in close contact with the inferior vena cava. En bloc resection of the mass and of the attached vena cava segment was performed. Histological analysis revealed leiomyosarcoma.

  16. Inferior vena cava leiomyosarcoma: vascular reconstruction is not always mandatory

    PubMed Central

    Slimane, Maher; Yahia, Nada Belhaj; Bouaziz, Hanene; Bouzaine, Hatem; Benhassouna, Jamel; Dhieb, Tarek Ben; Hechiche, Monia; Gammoudi, Amor; Rahal, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Leiomyosarcoma (LMS) of inferior vena cava is a rare and aggressive tumor, arising from the smooth muscle cells in the vessel wall. A large complete surgical resection is the essential treatment. The need of vascular reconstruction is not always mandatory. It’s above all to understand the place of the reconstruction with artificial vascular patch prosthetics of vena cave after a large resection of the tumor. We rapport two cases of LMS of inferior vena cava in two women who underwent successful large resection of tumor and lower segment of inferior vena cava. In first case, reconstruction of the inferior vena cava was not performed because of the development of venous collaterals derivation. In the second case reconstruction was done using Dacron interposition graft. The necessity of a large resection in management of primary leiomyosarcoma of vena cave makes sometimes unavoidable the sacrifice of a portion of the vena. Indeed, a better comprehension of the development of venous derivation may render unnecessary the reconstruction. PMID:28154642

  17. Symptomatic duodenal perforation by inferior vena cava filter.

    PubMed

    Baptista Sincos, Anna Pw; Sincos, Igor R; Labropoulos, Nicos; Donegá, Bruno C; Klepacz, Andrea; Aun, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Duodenal perforation by an inferior vena cava filter is rare and life threatening. Our objective is to find out number of occurrences and compare diagnosis and treatments. Method The reference list of Malgor's review in 2012 was considered as well as all new articles with eligible features. Search was conducted on specific databases: MEDLINE, Web of Sciences, and Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde. Results Most of the patients presented with upper abdominal pain and the use of radiologic studies was crucial for diagnosis. The most common treatment was laparotomy with filter or strut removal plus duodenum repair. However, clinical conditions of patients must be considered and the endovascular technique with endograft deployment into inferior vena cava may be an alternative. Conclusion Duodenal perforation by an inferior vena cava filter is uncommon and in high-risk surgical patients endovascular repair must be considered.

  18. Anatomy of the ostia venae hepaticae and the retrohepatic segment of the inferior vena cava.

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, A M; Teixeira, G G; Ortale, J R

    1996-01-01

    In 30 normal adult livers the retrohepatic segment of inferior vena cava had a length of 6.7 cm and was totally encircled by liver substance in 30% of cases. Altogether 442 ostia venae hepaticae were found, averaging 14.7 per liver and classified as large, medium, small and minimum. The localisation of the openings was studied according to the division of the wall of the retrohepatic segment of the inferior vena cava into 16 areas. PMID:8655416

  19. Asymptomatic Lumbar Vertebral Erosion from Inferior Vena Cava Filter Perforation

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Wayne Hieb, Robert A.; Olson, Eric; Carrera, Guillermo F.

    2007-06-15

    In 2002, a 24-year-old female trauma patient underwent prophylactic inferior vena cava filter placement. Recurrent bouts of renal stones prompted serial CT imaging in 2004. In this brief report, we describe erosion and ossification of the L3 vertebral body by a Greenfield filter strut.

  20. Laceration of the inferior vena cava of angiographic demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Sclafani, S.J.A.; Gordon, D.H.; Mitchell, W.

    1983-08-01

    Laceration of the inferior vena cava (IVC) often presents as an acute surgical emergency requiring immediate operative intervention. We show that when the patient's clinical condition permits, angiography may delineate the site of caval laceration and active hemorrhage, and identify associated arterial injuries. Contrast extravasation from the IVC also is reported for the first time.

  1. The Role of Inferior Vena Cava Filters in Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Pandhi, Mithil B; Desai, Kush R; Ryu, Robert K; Lewandowski, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    Cancer induces a hypercoagulable state and renders patients susceptible to venous thromboembolism. While anticoagulation remains the mainstay of treatment, many of these patients require placement of an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter, often due to a contraindication to or failure of anticoagulation. In this article, the available data on IVC filter usage in cancer patients will be reviewed.

  2. The Role of Inferior Vena Cava Filters in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pandhi, Mithil B.; Desai, Kush R.; Ryu, Robert K.; Lewandowski, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer induces a hypercoagulable state and renders patients susceptible to venous thromboembolism. While anticoagulation remains the mainstay of treatment, many of these patients require placement of an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter, often due to a contraindication to or failure of anticoagulation. In this article, the available data on IVC filter usage in cancer patients will be reviewed. PMID:27247473

  3. Asymptomatic lumbar vertebral erosion from inferior vena cava filter perforation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wayne; Hieb, Robert A; Olson, Eric; Carrera, Guillermo F

    2007-01-01

    In 2002, a 24-year-old female trauma patient underwent prophylactic inferior vena cava filter placement. Recurrent bouts of renal stones prompted serial CT imaging in 2004. In this brief report, we describe erosion and ossification of the L3 vertebral body by a Greenfield filter strut.

  4. Prosthetic replacement of the infrahepatic inferior vena cava for leiomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; Calio', Francesco G; D'Urso, Antonio; Giacobbi, Daniela; Papaspyropoulos, Vassilios; Ceccanei, Gianluca

    2006-09-01

    Resection of the infrahepatic inferior vena cava associated with prosthetic graft replacement for caval leiomyosarcoma is an acceptable procedure to obtain prolonged and good-quality survival. A consecutive sample clinical study with a mean follow-up of 40 months. The surgical department of an academic tertiary center and an affiliated secondary care center. Eleven patients, with a mean age of 51 years, who have primary leiomyosarcoma of the infrahepatic inferior vena cava. All of the patients underwent radical resection of the tumor en bloc with the affected segment of the vena cava. Reconstruction consisted of 10 cavocaval polytetrafluoroethylene grafts and 1 cavobiliac graft. An associated right nephrectomy was performed in 2 cases. The left renal vein was reimplanted in the graft in 3 cases. Cumulative disease-specific survival, disease-free survival, and graft patency rates expressed by standard life-table analysis. No patients died in the postoperative period. The cumulative (SE) disease-specific survival rate was 53% (21%) at 5 years. The cumulative (SE) disease-free survival rate was 44% (19%) at 5 years. The cumulative (SE) graft patency rate was 67% (22%) at 5 years. Radical resection followed by prosthetic graft reconstruction is a valuable method for treating primary leiomyosarcoma of the infrahepatic inferior vena cava.

  5. Management of the Thrombosed Filter-Bearing Inferior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Sildiroglu, Onur; Ozer, Harun; Turba, Ulku Cenk

    2012-01-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filter thrombosis is a complex problem. Thrombus within an IVC filter may range from an asymptomatic small thrombus to critical IVC occlusion that affects both lower extremities. The published experience of IVC thrombosis management in relation to filters is either anecdotal or limited to a small group of patients; however, endovascular treatment methods appear to be safe and effective in patients with IVC thrombosis. This review focuses on filter-related IVC thrombosis and its endovascular management. PMID:23449290

  6. Liver cirrhosis in hepatic vena cava syndrome (or membranous obstruction of inferior vena cava)

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Santosh Man

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic vena cava syndrome (HVCS) also known as membranous obstruction of inferior vena cava reported mainly from Asia and Africa is an important cause of hepatic venous outflow obstruction (HVOO) that is complicated by high incidence of liver cirrhosis (LC) and moderate to high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In the past the disease was considered congenital and was included under Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS). HVCS is a chronic disease common in developing countries, the onset of which is related to poor hygienic living condition. The initial lesion in the disease is a bacterial infection induced localized thrombophlebitis in hepatic portion of inferior vena cava at the site where hepatic veins open which on resolution transforms into stenosis, membrane or thick obstruction, and is followed by development of cavo-caval collateral anastomosis. The disease is characterized by long asymptomatic period and recurrent acute exacerbations (AE) precipitated by clinical or subclinical bacterial infection. AE is managed with prolonged oral antibiotic. Development of LC and HCC in HVCS is related to the severity and frequency of AEs and not to the duration of the disease or the type or severity of the caval obstruction. HVOO that develops during severe acute stage or AE is a pre-cirrhotic condition. Primary BCS on the other hand is a rare disease related to prothrombotic disorders reported mainly among Caucasians that clinically manifest as acute, subacute disease or as fulminant hepatic failure; and is managed with life-long anticoagulation, porto-systemic shunt/endovascular angioplasty and stent or liver transplantation. As epidemiology, etiology and natural history of HVCS are different from classical BCS, it is here, recognized as a separate disease entity, a third primary cause of HVOO after sinusoidal obstruction syndrome and BCS. Understanding of the natural history has made early diagnosis of HVCS possible. This paper describes epidemiology, natural

  7. CT fluoroscopic guided insertion of inferior vena cava filters.

    PubMed

    Ignotus, P; Wetton, C; Berry, J

    2006-03-01

    The value and use of inferior vena cava (IVC) filters is well documented and has been growing since the first reported filter placement in 1973 and the first percutaneous insertion in 1982. Access routes now include both jugular veins, both ante-cubital veins and both femoral veins. However, all insertions require some form of imaging, usually fluoroscopy, to identify the location of the filter with respect to the IVC and the renal veins. We describe two cases where the patients' weight was significantly greater than the weight limit of the angiography table, necessitating insertion under CT fluoroscopic guidance.

  8. Tips and tricks for stenting the inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Bjarnason, Haraldur

    2013-03-01

    Chronic occlusion of the Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) can go unnoticed because of the remarkable compensatory mechanism of the human body. On the other hand, IVC occlusion can have a significant and debilitating effect on an individual's ability to live a normal lifestyle and be an active and productive member of society. With the introduction of endovascular technology, new treatment options have opened for patients with this condition. This article describes the technical aspects of IVC recanalization and briefly discusses follow-up care and limited reports on outcomes from the procedure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters for Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Win, Lei Lei

    2013-01-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are used as an alternative to anticoagulants for prevention of fatal pulmonary embolism (PE) in venous thromboembolic disorders. Retrievable IVC filters have become an increasingly attractive option due to the long-term risks of permanent filter placement. These devices are shown to be technically feasible in insertion and retrieval percutaneously while providing protection from PE. Nevertheless, there are complications and failed retrievals with these retrievable filters. The aim of the paper is to review the retrievable filters and their efficacy, safety, and retrievability. PMID:24967292

  10. Anatomic and Technical Considerations: Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement.

    PubMed

    Doe, Christopher; Ryu, Robert K

    2016-06-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters play an important role in preventing pulmonary embolism in patients with deep venous thrombosis. When preparing for IVC filter placement, there are several important anatomic and technical considerations. The IVC has complex embryologic origins, and normal variants are relatively common which may necessitate a change in technique or approach. When performing the procedure, the choice in imaging modality for deployment, location of deployment, and route of access must be considered. The pediatric and pregnant populations present unique situations that require special consideration and close examination of indications and contraindications.

  11. Anatomic and Technical Considerations: Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement

    PubMed Central

    Doe, Christopher; Ryu, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters play an important role in preventing pulmonary embolism in patients with deep venous thrombosis. When preparing for IVC filter placement, there are several important anatomic and technical considerations. The IVC has complex embryologic origins, and normal variants are relatively common which may necessitate a change in technique or approach. When performing the procedure, the choice in imaging modality for deployment, location of deployment, and route of access must be considered. The pediatric and pregnant populations present unique situations that require special consideration and close examination of indications and contraindications. PMID:27247476

  12. A Novel Technique for Inferior Vena Cava Filter Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Edward William Rowe, Luke Michael Morgan; Brookes, Jocelyn; Raja, Jowad; Hague, Julian

    2013-05-02

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are used to protect against pulmonary embolism in high-risk patients. Whilst the insertion of retrievable IVC filters is gaining popularity, a proportion of such devices cannot be removed using standard techniques. We describe a novel approach for IVC filter removal that involves snaring the filter superiorly along with the use of flexible forceps or laser devices to dissect the filter struts from the caval wall. This technique has used to successfully treat three patients without complications in whom standard techniques failed.

  13. Duplicate inferior vena cava filters: more is not always better.

    PubMed

    Katyal, Anup; Javed, Muhammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Duplication of the inferior vena cava (IVC) has been reported in literature. This achieves clinical significance in the setting of lower extremity venous thromboembolism with a contraindication for anticoagulation. We describe a case of lower extremity deep vein thrombosis with duplicate IVC. Anticoagulation was contraindicated in this case leading to successful treatment with double IVC filters. We conducted a PubMed search for all current English language published literature, where filters were placed in the presence of duplicate IVC. We suggest that patients with deep vein thrombosis should have an accurate assessment of venous anatomy before IVC filter placement. Duplication of IVC, although rare, should be considered as this has management implications.

  14. [LGM inferior vena cava filters--observation of 79 patients].

    PubMed

    Hajduk, B; Tomkowski, W; Fijałkowska, A; Oniszh, K; Małek, G; Wawrzyńska, L; Radomyski, A; Filipecki, S; Torbicki, A

    2000-11-01

    The aim of the study was to assess effectiveness and safety of the LGM inferior vena cava (IVC) filters in patients with venous thromboembolic disease. In the Department of Internal Medicine of Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases in Warsaw 79 LGM IVC filters have been inserted since 1993. Indications for filters placement were as follows: recurrent pulmonary embolism (pe) despite anticoagulation--17 patients (pts), severe bleeding complications of thrombolytic or anticoagulant therapy--11 pts, contraindications for thrombolytic and/or anticoagulant treatment--5 pts, massive pe--14 pts, chronic thromboembolic-major vessel pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH)--30 pts, extensive deep vein thrombosis of lower limbs or vena cava inferior in patients with urgent indications for surgery--24 pts. Each filter placement was preceded by cavography. The diagnostic procedures (mainly ultrasonography) were performed after 3-6 and 12 months in the first year then once yearly during follow-up period. Oral anticoagulants (OA) or low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) were instituted in the majority of patients. 58 patients are still alive, 21 patients died. Only two non-fatal episodes of recurrent pe were documented. Other complications were rare and insignificant. We have not observed excess rate of recurrent deep venous thrombosis nor thrombosis at the filter site. The LGM IVC filters are effective and safe in such selectively chosen group of patients.

  15. Using inferior vena cava filters to prevent pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Chung, John; Owen, Richard J.T.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the evidence for using inferior vena cava (IVC) filters to prevent pulmonary embolism (PE) in high-risk patients. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE Ovid MEDLINE was searched from 1966 to 2006 for all English-language papers on IVC filters. Evidence was graded according to the 3-level classification system. Most evidence found was level II. MAIN MESSAGE Inferior vena cava filters are used to prevent PE in patients with contraindications to, complications of, or failure of anticoagulation therapy and patients with extensive free-floating thrombi or residual thrombi following massive PE. Current evidence indicates that IVC filters are largely effective; breakthrough PE occurs in only 0% to 6.2% of cases. Contraindications to implantation of IVC filters include lack of venous access, caval occlusion, uncorrectable coagulopathy, and sepsis. Complications include misplacement or embolization of the filter, vascular injury or thrombosis, pneumothorax, and air emboli. Recurrent PE, IVC thrombosis, filter migration, filter fracture, or penetration of the caval wall sometimes occur with long-term use. CONCLUSION When used appropriately, IVC filters are a safe and effective method of preventing PE. Using retrievable filters might reduce long-term complications. PMID:18208955

  16. Pheochromocytoma with inferior vena cava thrombosis: An unusual association.

    PubMed

    Kota, Sunil K; Kota, Siva K; Jammula, Sruti; Meher, Lalit K; Modi, Kirtikumar D

    2012-04-01

    Pheochromocytomas have been described in association with vascular abnormalities like renal artery stenosis. A 48-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with the complaints of headache, sweating, anxiety, dizziness, nausea, vomiting and hypertension. For last several days, he was having a dull aching abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed the presence of a left adrenal pheochromocytoma. An inferior vena cava (IVC) venogram via the right jugular vein demonstrated occlusion of the IVC inferior to the right atrium. Surgical removal of pheochromocytoma was done, followed by anticoagulant treatment for IVC thrombosis, initially with subcutaneous low molecular weight heparin, and then with oral warfarin, resulting in restoration of patency. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of pheochromocytoma in IVC thrombosis has not been reported so far from India. Possible mechanisms of such an involvement are discussed.

  17. Computed Tomography-Guided Central Venous Catheter Placement in a Patient with Superior Vena Cava and Inferior Vena Cava Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rivero, Maria A.; Shaw, Dennis W.W.; Schaller, Robert T. Jr.

    1999-01-15

    An 18-year-old man with a gastrointestinal hypomotility syndrome required lifelong parenteral nutrition. Both the superior and inferior vena cava were occluded. Computed tomography guidance was used to place a long-term central venous catheter via a large tributary to the azygos vein.

  18. The curious case of the disappearing IVC: a case report and review of the aetiology of inferior vena cava agenesis.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Michael; Robson, Nicola

    2014-04-01

    We report the case of a previously well 18-year-old male who presented to the Emergency Department with lower limb pain. An ultrasound demonstrated extensive left sided deep vein thrombosis and computed tomography demonstrated inferior vena cava agenesis, leading to the diagnosis of inferior vena cava agenesis associated deep vein thrombosis. The aetiology of inferior vena cava agenesis is explored in depth.

  19. Interruption of the inferior vena cava with azygos termination associated with congenital absence of portal vein.

    PubMed

    Le Borgne, J; Paineau, J; Hamy, A; Dupas, B; Lerat, F; Raoul, S; Hamel, A; Robert, R; Armstrong, O; Rogez, J M

    2000-01-01

    The authors report an exceptional and well-documented case of interruption of the retrohepatic segment of the inferior vena cava with an "azygos continuation", combined with absence of the portal vein. The only known combination of congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava and the portal vein was that of an "azygos continuation" and a preduodenal portal vein. The double interruption, portal and inferior caval, may be associated with a disturbance of preferential flows induced by the left umbilical thrust. According to hemodynamic theory, the left umbilical flow is the determining factor in organogenesis of the portal vein and the retrohepatic segment of the inferior vena cava.

  20. Inferior Vena Cava Filter Erosion Causing Symptomatic Obstructive Hydronephrosis

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Nathan; Duchene, David

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Transcaval inferior vena cava (IVC) filter penetration involving the urinary tract is rare, but has been previously reported. We herein present unique management of symptomatic hydronephrosis secondary to erosion of an IVC filter limb into the lumen of the proximal right ureter. Case Presentation: A 59-year-old woman presented with abdominal and right flank pain in October 2015 and was found to have right hydronephrosis, apparently secondary to obstruction from erosion of an IVC filter limb into the proximal right ureter. This was effectively managed with percutaneous, endovascular, and endourologic procedures, without the need for a major invasive surgical procedure. Conclusion: Endovascular removal of the IVC filter was performed safely in this case and can be considered when the urinary tract is involved in filter erosion. PMID:27579443

  1. Catheter directed interventions for inferior vena cava thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Warhit, Michael; Matsunaga, Felipe; Cynamon, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis, although similar in many aspects to deep venous thrombosis (DVT), has distinct clinical implications, treatments and roles for endovascular management. Etiologies of IVC thrombosis vary from congenital malformations of the IVC to acquired, where indwelling IVC filters have been implicated as a leading cause. With an increasing incidence of IVC thrombosis throughout the United States, clinicians need to be educated on the clinical signs and diagnostic tools available to aid in the diagnosis as well as available treatment options. Untreated IVC thrombus can result in serious morbidity and mortality, both in the acute phase with symptoms related to venous outflow occlusion and embolism, and in the long-term, sequelae of post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) related to chronic venous occlusion. This manuscript will discuss the clinical presentation of IVC thrombosis, diagnostic and treatment options, as well as the role of endovascular management. PMID:28123981

  2. Retrieval of Inferior Vena Cava Filters: Technical Considerations.

    PubMed

    Laws, James L; Lewandowski, Robert J; Ryu, Robert K; Desai, Kush R

    2016-06-01

    Placement of retrievable inferior vena cava filters has seen rapid growth since their introduction into clinical practice. When retrieved, these devices offer the notional benefit of temporary protection from pulmonary embolism related to lower extremity deep venous thrombosis, and mitigation of filter-related deep venous thrombosis. When promptly removed after the indication for mechanical prophylaxis is no longer present, standard endovascular retrieval techniques are frequently successful. However, the majority of these devices are left in place for extended periods of time, which has been associated with greater device-related complications when left in situ, and failure of standard techniques when retrieval is attempted. The development of advanced retrieval techniques has had a positive impact on retrieval of these embedded devices. In this article, technical considerations in the retrieval of such devices, with an emphasis on advanced techniques to facilitate retrieval of embedded devices, are discussed.

  3. Preservation of the recipient inferior vena cava in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, F; Herrera, J; Mora, N P; Nuño, J; Turrión, V S; Vicente, E; Ardaiz, J

    1994-01-01

    Twenty piggy-back (PB) liver transplantations (LT) were compared with 20 LT performed by the standard technique in order to evaluate whether or not the theoretical haemodynamic advantages of the preservation of the inferior vena cava (IVC) have any impact on the final results of the LT. Statistically significant differences were observed in the duration of the hepatectomy, which was longer for PB LT (192 min vs. 146 min), and in the duration of the anhepatic phase, which was shorter in that group (52 min vs. 76 min). There were no differences in the duration of the complete surgical procedure, consumption of blood products, incidence of postoperative acute renal failure, number of reoperations or survival.

  4. Indications, Management, and Complications of Temporary Inferior Vena Cava Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Linsenmaier, Ulrich; Rieger, Johannes; Schenk, Franz; Rock, Clemens; Mangel, Eugen; Pfeifer, Klaus Juergen

    1998-11-15

    Purpose: We describe the results of a preliminary prospective study using different recently developed temporary and retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filters. Methods: Fifty temporary IVC filters (Guenther, Guenther Tulip, Antheor) were inserted in 47 patients when the required period of protection against pulmonary embolism (PE) was estimated to be less than 2 weeks. The indications were documented deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and temporary contraindications for anticoagulation, a high risk for PE, and PE despite DVT prophylaxis. Results: Filters were removed 1-12 days after placement and nine (18%) had captured thrombi. Complications were one PE during and after removal of a filter, two minor filter migrations, and one IVC thrombosis. Conclusion: Temporary filters are effective in trapping clots and protecting against PE, and the complication rate does not exceed that of permanent filters. They are an alternative when protection from PE is required temporarily, and should be considered in patients with a normal life expectancy.

  5. [Congenital absence of the inferior vena cava as a risk factor for pulmonar thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Castro, F J; Pérez, C; Narváez, F J; Gacía, A; Biosca, M; Vilaseca, J; Vives, J; Argiles, J M

    2003-06-01

    The absence of the inferior vena cava is a rare congenital anomaly. Currently its diagnosis is based on non-invasive imaging techniques (computerised axial tomagraphy and nuclear magnetic resonance). In most cases, it constitutes a casual finding upon practising these image tests unrelated to this congenital anomaly. In the symptomatic patients, the complaints associated are secondary to venous insufficiency and/or deep vein thrombosis. Recently the congenital absence of inferior vena cava has been described as a risk factor of deep vein thrombosis in young patients. We present a case of congenital absence of inferior vena cava that was admitted in our hospital because of pulmonary thromboembolism.

  6. [Massive inferior vena cava thrombosis in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic hepatorenal disease].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Gil, F; Costero, O; Pobes, A

    2002-01-01

    We report a 68-year-old man with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, who developed multiple venous thromboses (inferior vena cava, left renal vein and iliofemoral veins) caused by local compression of the intrahepatic inferior vena cava by hepatic cysts. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of inferior vena cava thrombosis caused by hepatic cysts compression. Doppler ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging were effective in documenting the venous thromboses and the underlying lesions non-invasively. Long-term anticoagulation was an efficient and safe treatment.

  7. Advanced Techniques for Removal of Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Iliescu, Bogdan; Haskal, Ziv J.

    2012-08-15

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters have proven valuable for the prevention of primary or recurrent pulmonary embolism in selected patients with or at high risk for venous thromboembolic disease. Their use has become commonplace, and the numbers implanted increase annually. During the last 3 years, in the United States, the percentage of annually placed optional filters, i.e., filters than can remain as permanent filters or potentially be retrieved, has consistently exceeded that of permanent filters. In parallel, the complications of long- or short-term filtration have become increasingly evident to physicians, regulatory agencies, and the public. Most filter removals are uneventful, with a high degree of success. When routine filter-retrieval techniques prove unsuccessful, progressively more advanced tools and skill sets must be used to enhance filter-retrieval success. These techniques should be used with caution to avoid damage to the filter or cava during IVC retrieval. This review describes the complex techniques for filter retrieval, including use of additional snares, guidewires, angioplasty balloons, and mechanical and thermal approaches as well as illustrates their specific application.

  8. Inferior vena cava filter penetration following Whipple surgical procedure causing ureteral injury

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Aal, Ahmed Kamel; Ezzeldin, Islam B.; Moustafa, Amr Soliman; Ertel, Nathan; Oser, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an indwelling inferior vena cava filter that penetrated the IVC wall after Whipple’s pancreatico-duodenectomy procedure performed in a patient with ampullary carcinoma, resulting in right ureteral injury and obstruction with subsequent hydroureter and hydronephrosis. This was incidentally discovered on a computed tomography scan performed as routine follow up to evaluate the results of the surgery. We retrieved the inferior vena cava filter and placed a nephrostomy catheter to relieve the ureteral obstruction. Our case highlights the importance of careful inferior vena cava manipulation during abdominal surgery in the presence of an inferior vena cava filter, and the option of temporary removal of the filter to be placed again after surgery in order to avoid this complication, unless protection is required against clot migration during the surgical procedure. PMID:27200175

  9. Inferior vena cava thrombosis as a cause of haemolysis in a patient on ECMO.

    PubMed

    Wills, Samantha; Forrest, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Haemolysis, thrombosis and haemorrhage are well-documented complications of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. This case report outlines an unusual case of haemolysis, thought secondary to a large mobile thrombus in the inferior vena cava.

  10. Inferior Vena Cava Filter Migration to the Right Ventricle Causing Nonsustained Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Matthew N.; Khazi Syed, Rashad H.; Katz, Morgan J.; Moscona, John C.; Nijjar, Vikram S.; Bisharat, Mohannad B.

    2013-01-01

    Inferior vena cava filters are commonly used to prevent pulmonary embolism in patients who manifest deep vein thrombosis and recurrent pulmonary embolism despite anticoagulation, or in patients with contraindications to anticoagulation. We report the case of a 69-year-old man with a structurally normal heart who experienced migration of an inferior vena cava filter to the right ventricle, which caused the abrupt onset of recurrent episodes of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia unresponsive to intravenous antiarrhythmic medication. Cardiac imaging revealed the location of the filter within the right ventricle, and the device was removed, with subsequent resolution of the arrhythmia. We anticipate that the incidence of inferior vena cava filter migration might increase in the future because of recent changes in device construction. The sudden appearance of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in a patient with an inferior vena cava filter might indicate the occurrence of this potentially life-threatening sequela and should lead to emergent cardiac imaging. PMID:23914030

  11. Leiomyosarcoma of the inferior vena cava: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Alberto; Vigna, Silvia; Dal Pozzo, Aldo; Balduino, Maurizio; Sartori, Carlo Augusto

    2009-01-01

    Leiomyosarcoma of the inferior vena cava is a particularly rare tumour, originating from the smooth muscle of the vessel wall. The authors describe the case of a female patient admitted with a picture of anorexia and weight loss, accompanied by epi- and mesogastric pain. Preoperative examinations revealed the presence of a mass of considerable size originating from the inferior vena cava. The patient was submitted to surgery consisting in removal of the mass and of part of the wall of the vena cava. A review of the literature confirms the rarity of this tumour and demonstrates that optimal anatomical knowledge is absolutely indispensable for the management of this pathology.

  12. Relief of membranous obstruction of the inferior vena cava in a 5-year-old child.

    PubMed

    Amodeo, A; Di Donato, R; Dessanti, A; Caccia, G; Zaltron, D; Alberti, D; Callea, F; Marcelletti, C

    1986-12-01

    Membranous obstruction of the inferior vena cava is a rare congenital anomaly that may present clinical features of Budd-Chiari syndrome caused by chronic obstruction of the hepatic drainage. We report membranous obstruction of the inferior vena cava in a 5-year-old boy. Surgical repair was prompted by signs and symptoms of hepatic venous obstruction. To our knowledge, this is the youngest patient successfully operated on for this anomaly.

  13. Preduodenal portal vein and anomalous continuation of inferior vena cava: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Y; Nishimura, K; Kawakami, S; Kimura, I; Nakano, Y; Konishi, J

    1991-01-01

    Four cases of a rare congenital anomaly, preduodenal portal vein (PPV), are presented. Preduodenal portal vein is known to be frequently associated with other anomalies including intestinal malrotation, situs inversus, biliary atresia, and pancreatic, splenic, and cardiac anomalies. Of our four cases, three had azygos or hemiazygos continuation of the inferior vena cava and other anomalies. We want to call attention to association of azygos or hemiazygos continuation of inferior vena cava with PPV.

  14. Renal Vein and Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis: A Rare Extrasplanchnic Complication of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Choksi, Dhaval; Chaubal, Alisha; Pipaliya, Nirav; Ingle, Meghraj; Sawant, Prabha

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disorder often associated with various complications. Approximately one fourth of patients with acute pancreatitis develop vascular complications, of which venous thrombosis forms a major group. Extrasplanchnic venous thrombosis is less common, and simultaneous renal vein and inferior vena cava thrombosis is reported only twice. We report a case of alcohol-related acute pancreatitis complicated by simultaneous renal vein and inferior vena cava thrombosis. PMID:28008405

  15. Inferior Vena Cava Torsion and Stenosis Complicated by Compressive Pericaval Regional Ascites following Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gilroy, Richard; Johnson, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) stenosis and torsion are well-described rare complications following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). We present a case of inferior vena cava intermittent torsion and stenosis complicated by compressive regional ascites. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second case of post-OLT regional ascites related compressive IVC stenosis reported and the first reported case of torsion complicated by regional ascites compression. PMID:24386585

  16. Inferior vena cava occlusion secondary to an inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, Tomoya; Tabuchi, Noriyuki; Makita, Satoru

    2007-02-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAAs) represent 3% to 10% of all AAAs. However, inferior vena cava occlusion secondary to an IAAA is rarely reported. We report a case of inferior vena cava occlusion secondary to an IAAA presenting deep venous thrombosis. As it is crucial to avoid pulmonary embolism and excessive blood loss during an operation, we pre-operatively implanted a venous filter and minimized intra-operative dissection that allowed successful operative repair.

  17. Indications, complications and outcomes of inferior vena cava filters: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Wassef, Andrew; Lim, Wendy; Wu, Cynthia

    2017-05-01

    Inferior vena cava filters are used to prevent embolization of a lower extremity deep vein thrombosis when the risk of pulmonary embolism is thought to be high. However, evidence is lacking for their benefit and guidelines differ on the recommended indications for filter insertion. The study aim was to determine the reasons for inferior vena cava filter placement and subsequent complication rate. A retrospective cohort of patients receiving inferior vena cava filters in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada from 2007 to 2011. Main outcome was the indication of inferior vena cava filter insertion. Other measures include baseline demographic and medical history of patients, clinical outcomes and filter retrieval rates. 464 patients received inferior vena cava filters. An acute deep vein thrombosis with a contraindication to anticoagulation was the indication for 206 (44.4%) filter insertions. No contraindication to anticoagulation could be identified in 20.7% of filter placements. 30.6% were placed in those with active cancer, in which mortality was significantly higher. Only 38.9% of retrievable filters were successfully retrieved. Inferior vena cava filters were placed frequently in patients with weak or no guideline-supported indications for filter placement and in up to 20% of patients with no contraindication to anticoagulation. The high rates of cancer and the high mortality rate of the cohort raise the possibility that some filters are placed inappropriately in end of life settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Preliminary experience with Option inferior vena cava filter.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Shams I; Elmi, Azadeh; Hedgire, Sandeep; Yeddula, Kalpana; Ganguli, Suvranu; Walker, T Gregory; Salazar, Gloria M; Wicky, Stephan; Kalva, Sanjeeva P

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of Option inferior vena cava (IVC) filter during placement and short-term follow-up. A total of 165 patients (mean age: 60-years) who received Option IVC filter from June 2009 to July 2011 were included. In all, 42 patients presented with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), 26 with pulmonary embolism (PE), and 17 with both. All outcomes were examined until April 30, 2012. The filters were successfully deployed in 161patients. During follow-up (mean, 9.5 ± 0.68months), 10 patients were diagnosed with post-filter PE and 13 patients with DVT. There were no instances of fatal PE. Follow-up abdominal computed tomography was available in 60 patients and demonstrated filter-related problems in 8 patients (2: penetration of filter legs, 5: asymptomatic nonocclusive thrombus, and 1: caval occlusion). There were no instances of filter migration or fracture. In total, 27 filters were successfully retrieved after a mean of 5.27 ± 0.76 months. The Option filter was effective and safe during implantation and short-term follow-up and associated with high technical success at retrieval.

  19. Inferior vena cava filters: what radiologists need to know.

    PubMed

    Harvey, J J; Hopkins, J; McCafferty, I J; Jones, R G

    2013-07-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are a controversial mechanical adjunct in the prevention of pulmonary embolism, the most serious result of venous thromboembolism. Despite modern IVC filters being in clinical use for more than 45 years, there is still uncertainty amongst many radiologists about the indications for IVC filter placement and their removal, particularly the more recent prophylactic use in patients without confirmed deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE). Recently published guidelines on filter use from the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) and other professional bodies are discussed. The vast majority of IVC filters in the UK are inserted by interventional radiologists, so radiologists may be the first point of contact for information requested by other clinicians. The increasing use of filters means that radiologists will encounter filters increasingly often during abdominal cross-sectional imaging. Awareness of common filter-related complications, such as tilting, thrombosis, and caval perforation, is useful to reassure or alert other clinicians. The potential role of filters in upper extremity DVT and requirement for concomitant anticoagulation is discussed. Copyright © 2013 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. G2 inferior vena cava filter: retrievability and safety.

    PubMed

    Charles, Hearns W; Black, Michelle; Kovacs, Sandor; Gohari, Arash; Arampulikan, Joseph; McCann, Jeffrey W; Clark, Timothy W I; Bashar, Mona; Steiger, David

    2009-08-01

    To assess the retrievability of the G2 inferior vena cava (IVC) filter and factors influencing the safety and technical success of retrieval. From October 2006 through June 2008, G2 IVC filters were placed in 140 consecutive patients who needed prophylaxis against pulmonary embolism (PE). General indications for filter placement included history of thromboembolic disease (n = 98) and high risk for PE (n = 42); specific indications included contraindication to anticoagulation (n = 120), prophylaxis in addition to anticoagulation (n = 16), and failure of anticoagulation (n = 4). Filter dwell time, technical success of filter retrieval, and complications related to placement or retrieval were retrospectively evaluated in patients who underwent filter removal. Twenty-seven attempts at G2 filter removal were made in 26 patients (12 men; age range, 24-88 years; mean age, 55.4 y) after a mean period of 122 days (range, 11-260 d). Data were collected retrospectively with institutional review board approval. Filter removal was successful in all 27 attempts (100%). Tilting of the filter (> or =15 degrees ) occurred in five cases (18.5%), with probable filter incorporation into the right lateral wall of the IVC in one. Other complications of retrieval such as filter thrombosis, significant filter migration, filter fracture, and caval occlusion were not observed. G2 IVC filter retrieval has a high technical success rate and a low complication rate. Technical success appears to be unaffected by the dwell time within the reported range.

  1. Compression of the Inferior Vena Cava in Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cina, Alessandro; Zamparelli, Roberto; Venturino, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. We investigated whether (a) the inferior vena cava (IVC) is compressed in bowel obstruction and (b) some tracts are more compressed than others. Methods. Two groups of abdominal computed tomography (CT) examinations were collected retrospectively. Group O (N = 69) scans were positive for bowel obstruction, group C (N = 50) scans were negative for diseases. IVC anteroposterior and lateral diameters (APD, LAD) were assessed at seven levels. Results. In group C, IVC section had an elliptic shape (APD/LAD: .76 ± .14), the area of which increased gradually from 1.9 (confluence of the iliac veins) to 3.1 cm2/m2 of BSA (confluence of the hepatic veins) with a significant narrowing in the hepatic section. In group O, bowel obstruction caused a compression of IVC (APD/LAD: .54 ± .17). Along its course, IVC section area increased from 1.3 to 2.5 cm2/m2. At ROC curve analysis, an APD/LAD ratio lower than 0.63 above the confluence of the iliac veins discriminated between O and C groups with sensitivity of 74% and specificity of 96%. Conclusions. Bowel obstruction caused a compression of IVC, which involved its entire course except for the terminal section. APD/LAD ratio may be useful to monitor the degree of compression. PMID:24151603

  2. Supra Hepatic Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis–Surgical Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Ramamurthy, Anand; Gopashetty, Mahesh; Vijayshankar, Cuddalore Sadasivam; Khakhar, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is a chronic affliction characterized by numerous liver and kidney cysts. There is a gradual but progressive renal and liver impairment which may require combined liver-kidney transplantation. Compression of the retrohepatic Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) by an enlarged polycystic liver may impede clear visualization on pre-operative imaging and miss an underlying thrombosis or obliteration. This may result in an intra-operative surprise. Management can be challenging requiring modification of conventional surgical approach. We present our experience of a 67-year-old patient who underwent combined liver-kidney deceased donor transplantation for decompensated chronic liver disease with chronic kidney disease due to ADPKD. She was diagnosed with ADPKD for 16 year, with progressive deterioration in kidney function over the last 6 year and liver decompensation following knee replacement surgery requiring regular renal replacement therapy. We report this case to highlight the peri-operative challenges and their management along with a review of published literature on this uncommon occurrence. PMID:28208936

  3. [RADICAL LAPAROSCOPIC NEPHRECTOMY WITH INFERIOR VENA CAVA THROMBECTOMY].

    PubMed

    Perlin, D V; Aleksandrov, I V; Zipunnikov, V P; Ljaljuev, A M

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic radical nephrectomy has proven itself as the "gold standard" treatment of renal cell carcinoma. Inferior vena cava (IVC) tumor thrombus is a complicating factor that occurs in 5% to 10% of patients with renal cell carcinoma. In world literature, there are only anecdotal reports on using laparoscopic approach for IVC thrombectomy in patients with renal cell carcinoma. Herein we report our experience of laparoscopic radical nephrectomy and thrombectomy of the level II tumor thrombus in the IVC. Two patients (79-year-old female and 48-year-old male) underwent radical nephrectomy with thrombectomy from IVC for renal cell carcinoma T3bNxM0 complicated by the formation of a tumor thrombus in the IVC. To do this, IVC was isolated, the right gonadal and lumbar veins were ligated and transected. The IVC and the left renal vein blood flow were controlled with a plastic clip and Satinski clamp. After thrombectomy and resection of the IVC, the wall the defect was sutured with continuous Prolene suture. Laparoscopic radical nephrectomy with thrombectomy without conversion to open surgery was successfully carried out in both patients. During 6-18 months follow-up no local recurrence or distant metastasis were observed. Laparoscopic radical nephrectomy with thrombectomy for renal cell carcinoma complicated with tumor thrombus level II is a safe and reproducible method, which can be applied to a specific population of patients.

  4. Robotic-Assisted Inferior Vena Cava Filter Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Owji, Shahin; Lu, Tony; Loh, Thomas M; Schwein, Adeline; Lumsden, Alan B; Bismuth, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Although anticoagulation remains the mainstay of therapy for patients with venous thromboembolism, guidelines recommend the use of inferior vena cava (IVC) filters in those who fail anticoagulation or have contraindications to its use. Short-term use of filters has proven effective in reducing the rate of pulmonary embolism. However, their extended use is associated with a variety of complications such as thrombosis, filter migration, or caval perforation, thus making a case for timely filter retrieval. This is the case of a 68-year-old female with a history of chronic oral anticoagulation use for multiple deep venous thrombi (DVT) and pulmonary emboli (PE) who required cervical and thoracic spinal intervention for spondylosis and foramina stenosis. Given her increased risk of recurrent DVT and PE perioperatively, we elected to place a Cook Celect(™) IVC filter (Cook Medical, Bloomington, IN) after oral anticoagulation was stopped for the procedure. Her treatment course was prolonged due to wound-healing complications. We elected to use the Magellan Robotic Catheter System (Hansen Medical, Mountain View, CA) for filter retrieval when she presented 6 months later with caval perforation from the filter struts. With its ease of use, superior mechanical stability, and maneuverability, robot-assisted IVC filter retrieval may be a safer and more reliable substitute for traditional navigation techniques when presented with challenging filter retrievals.

  5. Inferior vena cava filter migration: updated review and case presentation.

    PubMed

    Janjua, Muhammad; Omran, Fatema M; Kastoon, Tony; Alshami, Mahmood; Abbas, Amr E

    2009-11-01

    We report a case of inferior vena cava filter migration to the right ventricle resulting in ventricular tachycardia and elevated troponin. The patient was taken to the cardiac catheterization laboratory and under fluoroscopy the filter was found to be in the right ventricle. Later in the day the filter was removed surgically with the aid of cardiopulmonary bypass. This case, as well as the other 27 reported cases of filter migration, were reviewed. It was noticed that newer retrievable filters made of nitinol, phynox and elgioly have a significantly higher percentage of filter migration into the right ventricle as compared to the old stainless steel and titanium-based Greenfield filters. Similarly, there were also higher percentages of complications and mortality associated with the newer retrievable filters migrating to the right ventricle. Filter migration to the right ventricle as opposed to the right atrium increased over the past 10 years, which has resulted in more serious symptoms, ventricular arrhythmias, deaths and higher rates of surgical removal.

  6. The curious case of the disappearing IVC: A case report and review of the aetiology of Inferior Vena Cava Agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Paddock, Michael; Robson, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a previously well 18-year-old male who presented to the Emergency Department with lower limb pain. An ultrasound demonstrated extensive left sided deep vein thrombosis and computed tomography demonstrated inferior vena cava agenesis, leading to the diagnosis of inferior vena cava agenesis associated deep vein thrombosis. The aetiology of inferior vena cava agenesis is explored in depth. PMID:24967034

  7. Inferior vena cava aneurysm in an infant presenting with a renal mass.

    PubMed

    Unzueta-Roch, José L; García-Abós, Miriam; Sirvent-Cerdá, Sara; de Prada, Inmaculada; Martínez de Azagra, Amelia; Ollero, Jose M; Madero-López, Luis

    2014-10-01

    Aneurysm of the inferior vena cava is a rare finding in the pediatric population. We report the case of a 5-month-old infant presenting with anemia, hypertension, and dehydration in the emergency room. A renal mass was found with ultrasound and MRI and a renal tumor was first considered. Histopathologic review of the surgical specimen led to the diagnosis of aneurysmal dilatation of the vena cava.

  8. Temporary Inferior Vena Cava Filters: How Do We Move Forward?

    PubMed

    Arous, Edward J; Messina, Louis M

    2016-05-01

    Despite their widespread use, the indications for the selective use of temporary inferior vena cava (IVC) filters remains uncertain with few trials supporting their use. Additionally, the risks of long-term temporary IVC filter insertion are being increasingly discussed amongst the mainstream media and through multiple class action lawsuits. Retrievable IVC filters were specifically designed to have a less secure implantation in order to facilitate retrieval. However, multiple reports have demonstrated significant filter-related complications, most commonly related to duration of implantation. Furthermore, the risk is not isolated to one manufacturer alone. The incidence of filter-related complications is linearly related to its duration of time on the market. Currently, the FDA recommends that IVC filters be removed within 25-54 days of their implantation. Unfortunately, little evidence exists to show that this recommendation is followed routinely. Recently, the PRESERVE Trial (NCT02381509) was initiated as a multicenter non-randomized open label study to determine the safety and effectiveness of commercially available IVC filters (both temporary and permanent) in individuals who require mechanical prophylaxis against pulmonary embolism. Until such evidence is developed, temporary IVC filters should be implanted based on best available evidence and routinely removed within the guidelines of the FDA of 25-54 days. A fair question at this point is whether the design features themselves that are required to manufacture a low profile removable IVC filter can achieve effective prophylaxis against pulmonary embolism at a low rate of short and long-term complications.

  9. Inferior vena cava filter retrievals, standard and novel techniques

    PubMed Central

    Walker, T. Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The placement of an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter is a well-established management strategy for patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) disease in whom anticoagulant therapy is either contraindicated or has failed. IVC filters may also be placed for VTE prophylaxis in certain circumstances. There has been a tremendous growth in placement of retrievable IVC filters in the past decade yet the majority of the devices are not removed. Unretrieved IVC filters have several well-known complications that increase in frequency as the filter dwell time increases. These complications include caval wall penetration, filter fracture or migration, caval thrombosis and an increased risk for lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Difficulty is sometimes encountered when attempting to retrieve indwelling filters, mainly because of either abnormal filter positioning or endothelization of filter components that are in contact with the IVC wall, thereby causing the filter to become embedded. The length of time that a filter remains indwelling also impacts the retrieval rate, as increased dwell times are associated with more difficult retrievals. Several techniques for difficult retrievals have been described in the medical literature. These techniques range from modifications of standard retrieval techniques to much more complex interventions. Complications related to complex retrievals are more common than those associated with standard retrieval techniques. The risks of complex filter retrievals should be compared with those of life-long anticoagulation associated with an unretrieved filter, and should be individualized. This article summarizes current techniques for IVC filter retrieval from a clinical point of view, with an emphasis on advanced retrieval techniques. PMID:28123984

  10. Indications and appropriateness of inferior vena cava filter placement.

    PubMed

    Patel, Gaurav; Panikkath, Ragesh; Fenire, Mahmoud; Gadwala, Swetha; Nugent, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    Several professional societies have published guidelines for the placement of inferior vena cava (IVC) filters. The authors wanted to determine how frequently patients in their hospital had IVC filters placed based on current indications and to compare guidelines published by the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) and the Society of Interventional Radiologists (SIR). The authors performed a structured review of the medical records of 180 patients identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes who had IVC filter placement at their hospital between July 1, 2007, and June 30, 2012. Indications for placement were based on current recommendations from the ACCP and SIR. These patients had a mean age of 62.4 ± 15.7 years and included 96 men and 84 women. One hundred forty patients had a history of deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary emboli or both. One hundred seven patients had permanent filters inserted, 34 had retrievable filters inserted and 39 had an unknown type of filter inserted. Forty-one patients (22.7%) had no definite indication for IVC filter insertion based on SIR guidelines, and 72 (40%) had no definite indication based on ACCP guidelines. There was a good agreement between the ACCP guidelines and the SIR guidelines when indications were categorized. Only one retrievable filter was removed. Twenty to forty percent of the patients with IVC filter insertions in their hospital had no definite indication documented in the medical record. A performance improvement activity to evaluate the use of IVC filters, such as a dedicated clinic, may be useful.

  11. Adjunctive Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement for Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, V. M.; Lee-Llacer, J.; Williams, J.; Ubaissi, H.; Gutierrez, G.

    2010-08-15

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are sometimes placed as an adjunct to full anticoagulation in patients with significant pulmonary embolism (PE). We aimed to determine the prevalence of adjunctive IVC filter placement in individuals diagnosed with PE, as well as the effect of adjunctive filter placement on mortality in patients with right heart strain associated with PE. This was a retrospective study of patients with acute PE treated with full anticoagulation admitted to a single academic medical center. Information abstracted from patient charts included presence or absence of right heart strain and of deep-vein thrombosis, and whether or not an IVC filter was placed. The endpoint was in-hospital mortality. Over 2.75 years, we found that 248 patients were diagnosed with acute PE, with an in-hospital mortality rate of 4.4%. The prevalence of adjunctive IVC filter placement was 13.3% (33 of 248), and the prevalence of documented right heart strain was 27.0% (67 of 248). In-hospital mortality was 10.2% in the non-filter-treated group (5 of 49), whereas there were no deaths in the filter-treated group (0 of 18); however, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.37). Both the presence of deep-vein thrombosis and of right heart strain increased the likelihood that an adjunctive IVC filter was placed (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.001, respectively). At our institution, patients were treated with IVC filters in addition to anticoagulation in 13.3% of cases of acute PE. Prospective studies or large clinical registries should be conducted to clarify whether this practice improves outcomes.

  12. Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters: Factors that Affect Retrieval Success

    SciTech Connect

    Geisbuesch, Philipp Benenati, James F.; Pena, Constantino S.; Couvillon, Joseph; Powell, Alex; Gandhi, Ripal; Samuels, Shaun; Uthoff, Heiko

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To report and analyze the indications, procedural success, and complications of retrievable inferior vena cava filters (rIVCF) placement and to identify parameters that influence retrieval attempt and failure. Methods: Between January 2005 and December 2010, a total of 200 patients (80 men, median age 67 years, range 11-95 years) received a rIVCF with the clinical possibility that it could be removed. All patients with rIVCF were prospectively entered into a database and followed until retrieval or a decision not to retrieve the filter was made. A retrospective analysis of this database was performed. Results: Sixty-one percent of patients had an accepted indication for filter placement; 39% of patients had a relative indication. There was a tendency toward a higher retrieval rate in patients with relative indications (40% vs. 55%, P = 0.076). Filter placement was technically successful in all patients, with no procedure-related mortality. The retrieval rate was 53%. Patient age of >80 years (odds ratio [OR] 0.056, P > 0.0001) and presence of malignancy (OR 0.303, P = 0.003) was associated with a significantly reduced probability for attempted retrieval. Retrieval failure occurred in 7% (6 of 91) of all retrieval attempts. A time interval of > 90 days between implantation and attempted retrieval was associated with retrieval failure (OR 19.8, P = 0.009). Conclusions: Patient age >80 years and a history of malignancy are predictors of a reduced probability for retrieval attempt. The rate of retrieval failure is low and seems to be associated with a time interval of >90 days between filter placement and retrieval.

  13. Long term complications of inferior vena cava thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hausler, M; Hubner, D; Delhaas, T; Muhler, E

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To evaluate the long term outcome after paediatric inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis.
METHODS—A combined retrospective and prospective study on infants and children with IVC thrombosis treated at Aachen and Maastricht University Hospitals between 1980 and 1999.
RESULTS—Forty patients were enrolled, including four with preceding cardiac catheterisation, 18 with central venous saphenous lines, and an additional eight with umbilical venous catheters. Six patients died within three months of diagnosis; one patient was lost to follow up. Twelve of the remaining 33 patients had suffered from limited IVC thrombosis; during follow up (for up to nine years) none showed persisting caval obstruction (successful thrombolysis, n = 2; spontaneous recanalisation, n = 10). The remaining 21 patients presented with extensive IVC thrombosis. During follow up (for up to 18 years) complete restitution was found in only four cases (one thrombolysis, two surgery, one spontaneous recanalisation). Persisting iliac and/or caval venous obstruction occurred in 17patients, including six with thrombolysis. Varicose veins were found in 12, and post-thrombotic syndrome in seven of these cases. According to Kaplan-Meier analysis, 30% of patients with persisting venous disease will develop post-thrombotic syndrome within 10years of the thrombotic event.
CONCLUSIONS—Infants and children with extensive IVC thrombosis are at high risk for persisting venous disease and serious long term complications. Prospective trials are urgently needed to establish effective treatment strategies and to improve long term prognosis. Central venous catheters, contributing to IVC thrombosis in the majority of cases reported here, should be inserted only if essential.

 PMID:11517106

  14. A Critical Review of Available Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Jennifer P; Kaufman, John A

    2016-06-01

    Inferior vena cava filters have been placed in patients for decades for protection against pulmonary embolism. The widespread use of filters has dramatically increased owing at least in part to the approval of retrievable vena cava filters. Retrievable filters have the potential to protect against pulmonary embolism and then be retrieved once no longer needed to avoid potential long-term complications. There are several retrievable vena cava filters available for use. This article discusses the different filter designs as well as the published data on these available filters. When selecting a filter for use, it is important to consider the potential short-term complications and the filters' window for retrieval. Understanding potential long-term complications is also critical, as these devices are approved for permanent placement and many filters are not retrieved. Finally, this article will address research into new designs that may be the future of vena cava filtration.

  15. A Critical Review of Available Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Jennifer P.; Kaufman, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Inferior vena cava filters have been placed in patients for decades for protection against pulmonary embolism. The widespread use of filters has dramatically increased owing at least in part to the approval of retrievable vena cava filters. Retrievable filters have the potential to protect against pulmonary embolism and then be retrieved once no longer needed to avoid potential long-term complications. There are several retrievable vena cava filters available for use. This article discusses the different filter designs as well as the published data on these available filters. When selecting a filter for use, it is important to consider the potential short-term complications and the filters' window for retrieval. Understanding potential long-term complications is also critical, as these devices are approved for permanent placement and many filters are not retrieved. Finally, this article will address research into new designs that may be the future of vena cava filtration. PMID:27247475

  16. Successful Percutaneous Retrieval of an Inferior Vena Cava Filter Migrating to the Right Ventricle in a Bariatric Patient

    SciTech Connect

    Veerapong, Jula; Wahlgren, Carl Magnus; Jolly, Neeraj; Bassiouny, Hisham

    2008-07-15

    The use of an inferior vena cava filter has an important role in the management of patients who are at high risk for development of pulmonary embolism. Migration is a rare but known complication of inferior vena cava filter placement. We herein describe a case of a prophylactic retrievable vena cava filter migrating to the right ventricle in a bariatric patient. The filter was retrieved percutaneously by transjugular approach and the patient did well postoperatively. A review of the current literature is given.

  17. Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement during Pregnancy: An Adjuvant Option When Medical Therapy Fails

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Fátima; Torres, Rita; Borges, Augusta

    2013-01-01

    The authors present a case of a 27-year-old multiparous woman, with multiple thrombophilia, whose pregnancy was complicated with deep venous thrombosis requiring placement of a vena cava filter. At 15th week of gestation, following an acute deep venous thrombosis of the right inferior limb, anticoagulant therapy with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) was instituted without improvement in her clinical status. Subsequently, at 18 weeks of pregnancy, LMWH was switched to warfarin. At 30th week of gestation, the maintenance of high thrombotic risk was the premise for placement of an inferior vena cava filter for prophylaxis of pulmonary embolism during childbirth and postpartum. There were no complications and a vaginal delivery was accomplished at 37 weeks of gestation. Venal placement of inferior vena cava filters is an attractive option as prophylaxis for pulmonary embolism during pregnancy. PMID:23781361

  18. Clinical Sequelae of Thrombus in an Inferior Vena Cava Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Yeddula, Kalpana; Wicky, Stephan; Kalva, Sanjeeva P.

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the long-term clinical sequelae of inferior vena cava (IVC) filter thrombus and the effect of anticoagulation on filter thrombus. Of 1,718 patients who had IVC filters placed during 2001-2008, 598 (34.8%) had follow-up abdominal CT. Filter thrombus was seen in 111 of the 598 (18.6%). There were 44 men (39.6%). The mean age at filter placement was 64 years. The medical diseases included cancer in 64, trauma in 15, stroke in 12, and others in 20. The frequency of filter thrombus on CT and asymptomatic filter thrombus on CT was calculated. The frequency of pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients with filter thrombus was calculated. The frequency of thrombus progression or regression (on CT, available in 56) was calculated. The effect of anticoagulation on filter thrombus regression/progression was evaluated using the Fisher exact test by comparing the group of patients who received anticoagulants versus those who did not. A P-value of <0.05 was considered significant. The overall frequency of filter thrombus was 18.6%. Total occlusion of the IVC filter was seen in 12 of 598 (2%). The filter thrombus was asymptomatic in 110 (18.3%). Filter thrombus was detected after a median of 35 days (range, 0-2082) following filter placement. Thrombus extended above the filter in 4 (3.6%); IVC thrombus below the filter was seen in 35(31.5%). Thrombus in the filter occluded <25% of the filter volume in 58 (52.3%), 25-50% in 21 (18.9%), and 50-75% in 20 (18%). Total IVC occlusion was seen in 12 (10.8%). Eighty-three patients received anticoagulation. Sixteen patients developed symptoms of PE. PE was confirmed on CT in 3 of 15 (2.7%). On follow-up, filter thrombus regressed completely in 19 (33.9%) after a median of 6 months. Filter thrombus decreased in size in 13 (23.2%) and it progressed without IVC occlusion in 7 (12.6%). In one (1.7%), filter thrombus progressed to IVC occlusion. Filter thrombus remained stable in 16 (28.6%). There was no

  19. Risk factors of nonretrieval of retrievable inferior vena cava filters.

    PubMed

    Siracuse, Jeffrey J; Al Bazroon, Ahmed; Gill, Heather L; Meltzer, Andrew J; Schneider, Darren B; Parrack, Inkyong; Jones, Douglas W; Connolly, Peter H

    2015-02-01

    Optimal use of retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filters is an important health care issue, and despite an exponential rise in the use of retrievable IVC filters, national trends suggest that most of these filters are not removed. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors associated with nonretrieval of retrievable IVC filters at our institution. A retrospective institutional review of all patients undergoing IVC filter placement from June 2010 to June 2012 was performed. A number of patient parameters were studied, including relevant demographics, indication for filter placement, clinical history, related hospitalization, and whether filter retrieval was performed. Patient parameters were compared by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. There were 605 retrievable IVC filters placed over a 24-month period by vascular surgery, intervention radiology, and interventional cardiology. The follow-up retrieval rate was 25%. By indication, 272 (45%), 53 (9%), and 280 (46%) filters were placed for absolute, relative, and prophylactic indications, respectively. Independent predictors for nonretrieval by multivariate analysis were age >80 years (hazard ratio [HR], 5.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7-20; P < 0.001), acute bleed (HR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.4-5; P < 0.001), current malignancy (HR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.3-3.3; P = 0.011), postfilter anticoagulation (HR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.28-0.9; P = 0.017), and history of pulmonary embolism and/or venous thromboembolism (HR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.28-0.35; P < 0.001). Filter placement team and indication were not identified as independent predictors of nonretrieval of IVC filters. Patient variables identified by univariate and multivariate analyses as risk for nonretrieval of retrievable IVC filters have several implications: first, some of these patients may represent a group of patients with a low life expectancy or unresolvable underlying condition in which filter retrieval has diminishing returns and may

  20. Outcome of inferior vena cava and noncaval venous leiomyosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; Pizzardi, Giulia; Calio', Francesco; Pacilè, Maria Antonietta; Masci, Federica; Vietri, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    Leiomyosarcoma (LMS) is a rare tumor arising from the smooth muscle cells of arteries and veins. LMS may affect both the inferior vena cava (IVC) and non-IVC veins. Because of its rarity, the experience with the outcome of the disease originating from the IVC compared with that with non-IVC offspring is overall limited. In this study, we compared the clinical features and outcomes after operative resection of IVC and non-IVC LMS to detect possible significant differences that could affect treatment and prognosis. Twenty-seven patients undergoing operative resection of a venous LMS at a single tertiary care center and one secondary care hospital were reviewed retrospectively and divided into 2 groups: IVC-LMS (Group A, n = 18) and non-IVC LMS (Group B, n = 9). As primary end points, postoperative mortality and morbidity, disease-specific survival and, if applicable, patency of venous reconstruction were considered. Bivariate differences were compared with the χ(2) test. Disease-specific survival was expressed by a life-table analysis and compared using the log-rank test. No postoperative mortality was observed in either group. Postoperative morbidity was 28% in group A and 11% in group B (P = .33). The mean duration of follow-up was 60 months (range, 13-140). Disease-specific survival was 60% in group A and 75% in group B at 3 years (P = .48), and it was 54% in group A and 62% in group B at 5 years (P = .63). Seven grafts were occluded in group A (39%) and 1of 3 were occluded in group B (33%) (P = .85). IVC and non-IVC LMS exhibit similar outcomes in terms of postoperative course and survival. Operative resection associated with vascular reconstruction, if applicable, eventually followed by radiation and chemotherapy may be curative and is associated with good functional results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Factors involved in the antinatriuretic effects of acute constriction of the thoracic and abdominal inferior vena cava.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the antinatriuretic effect of acute thoracic inferior vena cava (TIVC) constriction in the absence of alterations in renal perfusion pressure. A comparison is made of the effects of equivalent degrees of TIVC and abdominal inferior vena cava constriction on arterial pressure, renal hemodynamics, and electrolyte excretion.

  2. Polytetrafluoroethylene expanded prosthesis as replacement of the inferior vena cava in renal cell carcinoma with caval thrombus.

    PubMed

    Benkirane, Ahmed; Khodari, Muhieddine; Yakoubi, Rachid; Lambert, Marc; Koussa, Mohamad; Ghoneim, Tarek; Haulon, Stephan; Villers, Arnauld; Lemaitre, Laurent; Zini, Laurent

    2014-05-01

    To assess the outcomes of inferior vena cava replacement with polytetrafluoroethylene expanded prosthesis in patients with renal cell carcinoma and caval thrombosis. All patients who underwent radical nephrectomy with inferior vena cava replacement by polytetrafluoroethylene expanded prosthesis for renal cancer associated with inferior vena cava thrombosis and a suspicion of inferior vena cava wall invasion from January 2000 to June 2011 were considered for this study. Demographic data, postoperative course, graft patency and survival data were evaluated. A total of 26 patients (median age 59.5 years, range 19.9-85.6 years) were included in the analysis. The median tumor diameter was 10 cm (range 5-14 cm). Histological invasion of the wall of the inferior vena cava was found in 16 (61.5%) cases. The median follow up was 28 months (range 1-136). A graft thrombosis occurred in five (19.2%) patients within the first year. Four of these patients died before the end of the second year. Patency of the inferior vena cava graft at 6 and 12 months was 88% and 79%, respectively. Overall survival probability at 3 years was 64%. Prosthetic replacement of the inferior vena cava can be carried out when invasion of the wall of the inferior vena cava is suspected. The postoperative complication rate in this subset of high-risk patients undergoing radical nephrectomy seems acceptable, and the patency of the prostheses is good in most of the cases. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  3. Hepatic Veins and Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis in a Child Treated by Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, Francisco Cesar Santos, Aline Cristine Barbosa; Tannuri, Uenis; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2010-06-15

    We report the case of a 9-year-old boy with portal hypertension, due to Budd-Chiari syndrome, and retrohepatic inferior vena cava thrombosis, submitted to a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) by connecting the suprahepatic segment of the inferior vena cava directly to the portal vein. After 3 months, the withdrawal of anticoagulants promoted the thrombosis of the TIPS. At TIPS revision, thrombosis of the TIPS and the main portal vein and clots at the splenic and the superior mesenteric veins were found. Successful angiography treatment was performed by thrombolysis and balloon angioplasty of a severe stenosis at the distal edge of the stent.

  4. [Radical surgical resection of leiomyosarcoma of the inferior vena cava with intracardial tumour growth].

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Christian Ross; Larsen, Peter Nørgaard; Arendrup, Henrik C; Rasmussen, Allan

    2005-11-07

    Sarcoma of the inferior vena cava (IVC) is a rare clinical entity. Surgical treatment of IVC is associated with improved survival. This case report describes a 42-year-old woman with biopsy-proven leiomyosarcoma of the inferior vena cava with intracardial tumour growth. The primary tumour was only 1 x 1 cm in the wall of the vena cava while the intracaval tumour was 12 cm long with a diameter of 5 cm and 1.5 cm in the right atrium. Using venovenous bypass with circulatory support, the tumour was excised in toto and the caval vein closed with a pericardial patch. The patient was discharged in good condition after 19 days.

  5. Acute Traumatic Renal Artery to Inferior Vena Cava Fistula Treated with a Covered Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, J.; Kossman, T.; Lyon, S.

    2006-12-15

    A 34-year-old man presented within hours of suffering a penetrating stab wound and was diagnosed with a right renal artery to inferior vena cava fistula. Initial attempts at excluding the fistula with a balloon were unsuccessful. He was subsequently treated with a covered stent inserted into the right renal artery which successfully excluded the fistula.

  6. Retrieval of Cement Embolus from Inferior Vena Cava After Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Athreya, S.; Mathias, N.; Rogers, P.; Edwards, R.

    2009-07-15

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty is an accepted treatment for painful vertebral compression fractures caused by osteoporosis and malignant disease. Venous leakage of cement and pulmonary cement embolism have been reported complications. We describe a paravertebral venous cement leak resulting in the deposition of a cement cast in the inferior vena cava and successful retrieval of the cement embolus.

  7. Extraction of a defibrillator lead through an inferior vena cava filter.

    PubMed

    Henrikson, Charles A; Brinker, Jeffrey A

    2004-11-01

    We report an extraction of a chronic, previously cut and abandoned, active-fixation implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead through an inferior vena cava filter. A long workstation sheath that crossed the filter was used, allowing the lead and all hardware to be withdrawn through a single opening in the filter.

  8. Inferior vena cava filter removal after prolonged dwell time of 2310 days.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ankit H; Lichliter, Andrew; Cura, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Inferior vena cava filters are commonly placed for a variety of indications, often when anticoagulation is contraindicated. Although technical success is high and complication rates low, there are complications that are important to be aware of. We present the case of a 29-year-old woman with a prolonged filter dwell time resulting in complications.

  9. Inferior vena cava filter removal after prolonged dwell time of 2310 days

    PubMed Central

    Lichliter, Andrew; Cura, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Inferior vena cava filters are commonly placed for a variety of indications, often when anticoagulation is contraindicated. Although technical success is high and complication rates low, there are complications that are important to be aware of. We present the case of a 29-year-old woman with a prolonged filter dwell time resulting in complications. PMID:27365875

  10. Calcified thrombus of the inferior vena cava in transposition of the great vessels.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, G; D'Souza, V J; Glass, T A; Sumner, T E; Formanek, A G

    1986-01-01

    Calcified thrombus of the inferior vena cava (IVC) in children is an entity usually not associated with significant complications. The possibility of pulmonary embolism from the soft thrombus, however, has been suggested but never reported. We give an account of a child with transposition of the great vessels who suffered embolization from a calcified thrombus in the IVC that entered the systemic circulation.

  11. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome with gastrointestinal bleeding, splenic hemangiomas and left inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Kai; Wang, Fang-Yu; Zhu, Ren-Min; Liu, Jiong

    2010-03-28

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a congenital vascular anomaly characterized by a triad of varicose veins, cutaneous capillary malformation, and hypertrophy of bone and (or) soft tissue. Gastrointestinal vascular malformations in Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome may present with gastrointestinal bleeding. The majority of patients with splenic hemangiomatosis and/or left inferior vena cava are asymptomatic. We herein report a case admitted to the gastroenterology clinic with life-threatening hematochezia and symptomatic iron deficiency anemia. Due to the asymptomatic mild intermittent hematochezia, splenic hemangiomas and left inferior vena cava, the patient did not seek any help for gastrointestinal bleeding until his admittance to our department for evaluation of massive gastrointestinal bleeding. He was referred to angiography because of his serious pathogenetic condition and inefficiency of medical therapy. The method showed that hemostasis was successfully achieved in the hemorrhage site by embolism of corresponding vessels. Further endoscopy revealed vascular malformations starting from the stomach to the descending colon. On the other hand, computed tomography revealed splenic hemangiomas and left inferior vena cava. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome case presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding, splenic hemangiomas and left inferior vena cava. The literature on the evaluation and management of this case is reviewed.

  12. Bird's Nest Filter Causing Symptomatic Hydronephrosis Following Transmural Penetration of the Inferior Vena Cava

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, C.S. Manhire, A.R.; Rose, D.H.; Bishop, M.C.

    2004-01-15

    We report a case of symptomatic hydronephrosis caused by transcaval penetration of a Bird's Nest filter. Perforation of the wall of the inferior vena cava (IVC) following insertion of a caval filter is a well-recognized complication. Whilst two cases of hydronephrosis have been described with Greenfield filters, no case involving a Bird's Nest filter has been reported previously.

  13. Liver transplantation in a patient with developmental interruption of the inferior vena cava with azygos substitution.

    PubMed

    Zinser, M J; Hanto, D W

    2012-06-01

    Infrahepatic interruption of the inferior vena cava (IVC) with azygos or hemiazygos substitution has been reported frequently in children with biliary atresia where this venous abnormality is associated with other venous abnormalities such as preduodenal portal vein or congenital heart disease. It is important to recognize this anomaly pretransplant because the hepatic vein may drain directly into the right atrium rather than into the suprahepatic vena cava. We describe herein the first report of an orthotopic deceased donor liver transplant in an adult patient with an interrupted IVC and azygos continuation. We also review the embryological development of the IVC and the vascular anomalies that can occur.

  14. Heart block and cardiac embolization of fractured inferior vena cava filter

    PubMed Central

    Abudayyeh, Islam; Takruri, Yessar; Weiner, Justin B

    2016-01-01

    Objective: A 66-year-old man underwent a placement of an inferior vena cava filter before a gastric surgery 9 years prior, presented to the emergency room with a complete atrioventricular block. Chest x-ray and transthoracic echocardiogram showed struts migrating to right ventricle with tricuspid regurgitation. Cardiothoracic surgery was consulted and declined an open surgical intervention due to the location of the embolized fragments and the patient’s overall condition. It was also felt that the fragments had migrated chronically and were adhered to the cardiac structures. Methods: The patient underwent a dual-chamber permanent pacemaker implantation. Post-implant fluoroscopy showed no displacement of the inferior vena cava filter struts due to the pacemaker leads indicating that the filter fracture had likely been a chronic process. Results: This case highlights a rare combination of complications related to inferior vena cava filter fractures and the importance of assessing for such fractures in chronic placements. Inferior vena cava filter placement for a duration greater than 1 month can be associated with filter fractures and strut migration which may lead to, although rare, serious or fatal complications such as complete atrioventricular conduction system disruption and valvular damage including significant tricuspid regurgitation. Conclusions: Assessing for inferior vena cava filter fractures in chronic filter placement is important to avoid such complications. When possible, retrieval of the filter should be considered in all patients outside the acute setting in order to avoid filter-related complications. Filter retrieval rates remain low even when a retrievable filter is in place and the patient no longer has a contraindication to anticoagulation. PMID:28228959

  15. [Leiomyosarcoma of the inferior vena cava. Case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    López-Ruiz, José Antonio; Tallón-Aguilar, Luis; Marenco-de la Cuadra, Beatriz; López-Pérez, José; Oliva-Mompeán, Fernando; Padillo-Ruiz, Javier

    Large vessel sarcomas are rare tumours. Leiomyosarcoma of the inferior vena cava is the most common. About 300 cases have been reported in the literature. They tend to be large, and not develop metastasis. The prognosis of these tumours is poor. An 81 year-old woman who complained of pain in the right flank, with no other symptoms. Abdominal computed tomography showed a large retroperitoneal mass, which affected the inferior vena cava, with signs of thrombosis inside. It also encompassed the right renal vein and the right kidney. Excision of the tumour was performed in block, performing an autologous saphenous vein bypass between left the renal vein and proximal segment of inferior vena cava. Leiomyosarcomas of the inferior vena cava are classified according to their relationship with adjacent structures. The clinical signs and symptoms are generally non-specific. Diagnosis is made using computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, and biopsy of the retroperitoneal mass. Surgery is the only treatment capable of providing prolonged survival. The surgical management is determined by: the level of involvement, the extension, and the presence or absence of collateral veins. The role of adjuvant therapy is controversial. Inferior vena cava leiomyosarcomas remain a challenge for surgeons. At present, radical resection with negative margins, offers the highest survival rate. The best results are obtained with a multidisciplinary approach by experienced teams in the management of these tumours. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. Implantation of Inferior Vena Cava Interposition Graft in Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Ung; Yi, Tai; Tara, Shuhei; Lee, Avione Y.; Hibino, Narutoshi; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Breuer, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable scaffolds seeded with bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs) are often used for reconstructive surgery to treat congenital cardiac anomalies. The long-term clinical results showed excellent patency rates, however, with significant incidence of stenosis. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of vascular neotissue formation and prevent stenosis development in tissue engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs), we developed a mouse model of the graft with approximately 1 mm internal diameter. First, the TEVGs were assembled from biodegradable tubular scaffolds fabricated from a polyglycolic acid nonwoven felt mesh coated with ε-caprolactone and L-lactide copolymer. The scaffolds were then placed in a lyophilizer, vacuumed for 24 hr, and stored in a desiccator until cell seeding. Second, bone marrow was collected from donor mice and mononuclear cells were isolated by density gradient centrifugation. Third, approximately one million cells were seeded on a scaffold and incubated O/N. Finally, the seeded scaffolds were then implanted as infrarenal vena cava interposition grafts in C57BL/6 mice. The implanted grafts demonstrated excellent patency (>90%) without evidence of thromboembolic complications or aneurysmal formation. This murine model will aid us in understanding and quantifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms of neotissue formation in the TEVG. PMID:24961688

  17. Piggyback liver transplant techniques in the surgical management of urological tumors with inferior vena cava tumor thrombus.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhi-gang; Xue, Chong; Li, Han-zhong; Wang, Hui-jun; Xie, Yi; Liu, Guan-hua

    2009-09-20

    An important characteristic of renal cell carcinomas and adrenal tumors is that these tumors may expand into the renal vein and inferior vena cava, and transform into tumor thrombi. This study was to evaluate the use of piggyback liver transplant techniques for surgical management of urological tumors with inferior vena cava tumor thrombus. Nineteen patients with renal cell carcinomas or adrenal tumors with inferior vena cava tumor thrombus were treated from November 1995 to April 2008. Their ages ranged from 29 years to 76 years (mean 54 years). The extent of tumor thrombus was infrahepatic (level I) in 2, retrohepatic (level II) in 7, suprahepatic (level III) in 6, and intra-atrial (level IV) in 4 patients. We used cardiopulmonary bypass with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest to remove the thrombi in 3 cases of level IV and in 2 cases of level III. In all level II, 4 level III, and 2 level IV cases, we used piggyback liver transplant techniques to mobilize the liver off of the inferior vena cava and to separate the inferior vena cava from the posterior abdominal wall. Mean operative time was 5.1 hours, mean estimated blood loss was 2289 ml and mean blood transfusion was 12.84 U. One patient with adrenal cortical carcinoma and level IV thrombus died in the immediate postoperative period. Three patients were lost to follow up, and the other 15 survivors were followed from 5 months to 56 months. Eight of these 15 patients died due to metastasis; however 7 were still alive at the last follow-up. An aggressive surgical approach is the only hope for curing patients diagnosed with urological tumors combined with inferior vena cava tumor thrombus. The use of piggyback liver transplant techniques to mobilize the liver off of the inferior vena cava provides excellent exposure of the inferior vena cava. Patients with a level II or level III inferior vena cava thrombus may be treated without using cardiopulmonary bypass.

  18. Treatment of Superior Vena Cava (SVC) Syndrome and Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) Thrombosis in a Patient with Colorectal Cancer: Combination of SVC Stenting and IVC Filter Placement to Palliate Symptoms and Pave the Way for Port Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Sauter, Alexander; Triller, Juergen; Schmidt, Felix; Kickuth, Ralph

    2008-07-15

    Thrombosis of the inferior vena cava is a life-threatening complication in cancer patients leading to pulmonary embolism. These patients can also be affected by superior vena cava syndrome causing dyspnea followed by trunk or extremity swelling. We report the case of a 61-year-old female suffering from an extended colorectal tumor who became affected by both of the mentioned complications. Due to thrombus formation within the right vena jugularis interna, thrombosis of the inferior vena cava, and superior vena cava syndrome, a combined interventional procedure via a left jugular access with stenting of the superior vena cava and filter placement into the inferior vena cava was performed As a consequence, relief of the patient's symptoms, prevention of pulmonary embolism, and paving of the way for further venous chemotherapy were achieved.

  19. Dysgenesis of the inferior vena cava associated with deep venous thrombosis and a partial Protein C deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tribe, Howard; Borgstein, Rudi

    2013-01-01

    Dysgenesis of the inferior vena cava is rare but it is being increasingly diagnosed by cross-sectional imaging techniques. Patients are usually asymptomatic with abnormalities detected incidentally. An 11 year old boy presented with a 10 day history of fever, vomiting and abdominal pain, which progressed to his back and lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging, computerised tomography and Doppler ultrasonography showed the absence of a suprarenal inferior vena cava with bilateral superficial femoral vein thrombi extending cranially to the end of the aberrant inferior vena cava. Haematological testing revealed a partial Protein C deficiency. The presenting clinical picture in this case is unique within the English literature and highlights that deep venous thrombosis associated with inferior vena cava dysgenesis may not present with typical symptoms in children. Early use of advanced imaging modalities would expedite diagnosis and subsequent treatment. PMID:24421930

  20. Giant biatrial myxoma nearly obstructing the orifice of the inferior vena cava

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac myxomas are the most common type of benign cardiac tumors and most of them occur in the left atrium but the biatrial myxoma is uncommon. We present a rare case of giant biatrial myxoma nearly obstructing the orifice of the inferior vena cava. A 58-year old woman presented with exertional dyspnea and intermittent chest discomfort. The non-pedunculated tumor involved most of the interatrial septum and extended from the orifice of the inferior vena cava to the displaced mitral annulus and the lower left pulmonary vein. The resected specimen weighed 76 gram and measured 80 × 40 × 30 mm. She did not complain of dyspnea or show any sign of recurrence by echocardiography during the 2-year follow-up period. PMID:23758983

  1. Duplication of Inferior Vena Cava with Associated Anomalies: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shaha, Pramod; Sahoo, Kulamani; Kothari, Nupoor; Garg, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Duplication of inferior vena cava is an uncommon abnormality and is important in daily today practice for vascular surgeons, radiologist and urologist especially during retroperitoneal surgeries and treatment of thromboembolic disease. Radiologically, Duplicated IVC can be mistaken for lymphadenopathy or left pyeloureteric dilatation. Crossed fused kidney with a single ureter defy the embryological theory of ureteric bud crossing the opposite side and induce nephron formation associated anomaly of Duplication of inferior vena cava and malrotation of gut are not reported in a same patient. On meticulous search of literature no such combination of abnormalities has been reported. In this case report we bring forward this rare type of combination of three congenital malformations that is Duplication of IVC, crossed fused kidney and malrotation of gut. PMID:27134964

  2. Importance of cholescintigraphy and inferior vena cava flow studies in the differential diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Botha, U.; Pilloy, W.; Strydom, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    In order to assess the usefulness of inferior vena cava flow studies and cholescintigraphy complementary to the routine static liver scintigraphy in the differential diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we studied 37 patients with a proven diagnosis of HCC and 11 patients with a liver abcess or cyst. The procedure followed was (1) a {sup 99m}Tc-colloid flow study of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and iliac veins followed by static liver imaging and (2) cholescintigraphy using a dynamic acquisition mode to determine the perfusion as well as the concentration/excretion of the liver and pathological area. The hepatic perfusion index (HPI) was calculated by the slope method of Sarper et al.: Radiology 141:179-184 (1981) and the area method of Biersack et al. The results were compared with data previously collected in patients without liver disease (control) and other liver pathologies.

  3. Inferior vena cava filters in pulmonary embolism: A historic controversy.

    PubMed

    Jerjes-Sanchez, Carlos; Rodriguez, David; Navarrete, Aline; Parra-Cantu, Carolina; Joya-Harrison, Jorge; Vazquez, Eduardo; Ramirez-Rivera, Alicia

    Rationale for non-routine use of inferior venous cava filters (IVCF) in pulmonary embolism (PE) patients. Thrombosis mechanisms involved with IVCF placement and removal, the blood-contacting medical device inducing clotting, and the inorganic polyphosphate in the contact activation pathway were analyzed. In addition, we analyzed clinical evidence from randomized trials, including patients with and without cancer. Furthermore, we estimated the absolute risk reduction (ARR), the relative risk reduction (RRR), and the number needed to treat (NNT) based on the results of each study using a frequency table. Finally, we analyzed the outcome of our PE patients that were submitted to thrombolysis with short and long term follow-up. IVCF induces thrombosis by several mechanisms including placement and removal, rapid protein adsorption, and simultaneous surface-induced activation via the contact activation pathway. Also, inorganic polyphosphate has an important role as a procoagulant, reversing the effect of anticoagulants. Randomized control trials included 904 cancer and non-cancer PE patients. In terms of ARR, RRR, and NNT, there is no evidence for routine use of IVCF. In 290 patients with proved PE, extensive thrombotic burden and right ventricular dysfunction under thrombolysis and oral anticoagulation, we observed a favorable outcome in a short- and long-term follow-up; additionally, IVCF was only used in 5% of these patients. Considering the complex mechanisms of thrombosis related with IVCF, the evidence from randomized control trials and ARR, RRR, and NNT obtained from venous thromboembolism patients with and without cancer, non-routine use of IVCF is recommended. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  4. A case of renal cell carcinoma with an extensive inferior vena cava thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alfreijat, Majd

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most prevalent primary renal malignant neoplasm in adults. Most of the cases are usually found incidentally. It is commonly associated with venous thrombosis. We demonstrate a case of a RCC which was associated with an extensive thrombus that reached the upper part of the inferior vena cava (IVC). We also perform a brief literature review about the association between RCC and IVC thrombosis. PMID:27802848

  5. Inferior Vena Cava and Renal Vein Thrombosis Associated with Thymic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Paraschiv, Marina; Sorohan, Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    Thymic tumors are rare mediastinal tumors that can present with a wide variety of symptoms. They can cause distant manifestations and are frequently associated with paraneoplastic syndromes. In our case, we describe the evolution of a 68-year-old male whose first manifestation was thrombosis of the inferior vena cava and renal veins. Thrombosis of large abdominal veins is rare, especially without being associated with any other comorbidity or risk factors. PMID:28163719

  6. Complications in right-sided paraaortic lymphadenectomy: ventral tributaries of the inferior vena cava

    PubMed Central

    Turyna, Radovan; Kachlik, David; Kucera, Eduard; Kujal, Petr; Feyereisl, Jaroslav; Baca, Vaclav

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the distribution and structure of ventral tributaries leading into the inferior vena cava where right-sided paraaortic lymphadenectomy is performed. The study examined 21 retroperitoneal specimens by graphic reconstruction, statistical evaluation, and histological examination of ventral tributaries (VTs). Seventy VTs were identified. The average number per specimen was 3.33. There were 20, 40, and 40% of VTs found in Levels I, II, and III, respectively. During the preparation, we observed an unusual arrangement of the IVC wall, into which VTs were led through a preformed sleeve-like channel and anchored near the lumen. This finding is a key mechanism that explains the ease with which VTs are extracted during surgery. Knowledge of the distribution and histological structure of VTs allows proper orientation of the retroperitoneal area of the front wall of inferior vena cava, which is essential for uncomplicated right-sided paraaortic lymphadenectomy. The histological structure of the VT ostium within the wall of the inferior vena cava explains why injury is easy during the procedure. PMID:23692119

  7. Creating a Fontan fenestration in a child with dextrocardia and interrupted inferior vena cava

    PubMed Central

    Charlagorla, Pradeepkumar; Breinholt, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Plastic bronchitis is a rare life-threatening complication of the Fontan operation. Transcatheter Fontan fenestration can ameliorate symptoms by decompressing elevated venous pressures. Transcatheter creation of a fenestration can be technically challenging in cases with complex venous anatomy. We report a case of a 5-year-old boy with heterotaxy, dextrocardia with unbalanced atrioventricular canal (AVC), atrial and visceral situs inversus, left-sided superior vena cava (SVC), and left-sided interrupted inferior vena cava (IVC) with azygos continuation. With few modifications to the equipment, a successful Fontan fenestration with stent implantation was performed via transjugular approach. At 2-year follow-up, his symptoms of plastic bronchitis improved significantly. PMID:27212858

  8. Entrapment of Guide Wire in an Inferior Vena Cava Filter: A Technique for Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Aal, Ahmed Kamel Saddekni, Souheil; Hamed, Maysoon Farouk; Fitzpatrick, Farley

    2013-04-15

    Entrapment of a central venous catheter (CVC) guide wire in an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter is a rare, but reported complication during CVC placement. With the increasing use of vena cava filters (VCFs), this number will most likely continue to grow. The consequences of this complication can be serious, as continued traction upon the guide wire may result in filter dislodgement and migration, filter fracture, or injury to the IVC. We describe a case in which a J-tipped guide wire introduced through a left subclavian access without fluoroscopic guidance during CVC placement was entrapped at the apex of an IVC filter. We describe a technique that we used successfully in removing the entrapped wire through the left subclavian access site. We also present simple useful recommendations to prevent this complication.

  9. Dual-pump support in the inferior and superior vena cavae of a patient-specific fontan physiology.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Amy L; Lopez-Isaza, Sergio; Moskowitz, William

    2013-06-01

    The implementation of simultaneous mechanical cavopulmonary assistance having blood pumps located in both of the vena cavae is investigated as an approach to treating patients with an ailing Fontan physiology. Identical intravascular blood pumps are employed to model the hemodynamic support of a patient-specific Fontan. Pressure flow characteristics, energy gain calculations, and blood damage analyses are assessed for each model. The performance of the dual-support scenario is compared to conditions of mechanical support in the inferior vena cava only and to a nonsupported cavopulmonary circuit. The blood pump in the superior vena cava generates pressures ranging from 1 to 22 mm Hg for flow rates of 1-4 L/min at operating speeds of 1250-2500 rpm. The blood pump in the inferior vena cava produces pressures at levels approximately 20% lower. The blood pumps positively augment the hydraulic energy in the total cavopulmonary connection circuit as a function of flow rate and rotational speed. Scalar stress levels and fluid residence times are at acceptable levels. Damage indices for the dual-support case, however, are elevated slightly above 3.5%. These results suggest that concurrent, mechanical assistance of the inferior vena cava and superior vena cava in Fontan patients has the potential to be beneficial, but additional studies are needed to further explore this approach.

  10. Inferior Vena Cava Filters in Elderly Patients with Stable Acute Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Stein, Paul D; Matta, Fadi; Hughes, Mary J

    2017-03-01

    Patients aged >60 years with pulmonary embolism who were stable and did not require thrombolytic therapy were shown to have a somewhat lower in-hospital all-cause mortality with vena cava filters. In this investigation we further assess mortality with filters in stable elderly patients. In-hospital all-cause mortality according to use of inferior vena cava filters was assessed from the National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample, 2003-2012, in: 1) All patients with pulmonary embolism; 2) All with pulmonary embolism who had none of the comorbid conditions listed in the Charlson Comorbidity Index; 3) Patients with a primary (first-listed) diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, and 4) Patients with a primary diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and none of the comorbid conditions listed in the Charlson Comorbidity Index. From 2003-2012, 2,621,575 stable patients with pulmonary embolism were hospitalized in the US. Patients aged >80 years showed lower mortality with vena cava filters (all pulmonary embolism, 6.1% vs 10.5%; all pulmonary embolism with no comorbid conditions, 3.3% vs 6.3%; primary pulmonary embolism, 4.1% vs 5.7%; primary pulmonary embolism with no comorbid conditions, 2.1% vs 3.7%; all P <.0001). In the all-patient category, patients aged 71-80 years showed somewhat lower mortality with filters, 6.3% vs 7.4% (P <.0001), and those without comorbid conditions, 2.5% vs 2.8% (P = .04). Those aged 71-80 years with primary pulmonary embolism, irrespective of comorbid conditions, did not show lower mortality with filters. At present, in the absence of a randomized controlled trial, it seems prudent to consider a vena cava filter in very elderly (aged >80 years) stable patients with acute pulmonary embolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Inferior vena cava pseudoaneurysm after penetrating injury of the abdomen: a case report.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Beltran, Alvaro; Cubillos, Diego

    2009-09-01

    Reports of inferior vena cava (IVC) pseudoaneurysms are always associated with arteriovenous fistulae and arterial injuries. This seems to be the first case report of an isolated IVC pseudoaneurysm in a 40-year-old man who suffered a penetrating abdominal injury 4 weeks before being referred to our hospital. Jaundice was the finding that leads to the identification of this aneurysm and its later successful surgical treatment. This is a nonreported lesion in the published literature about IVC injuries, in which the endovascular therapy is recently included.

  12. Duplication of the inferior vena cava: anatomy, embryology and classification proposal.

    PubMed

    Natsis, Konstantinos; Apostolidis, Stylianos; Noussios, George; Papathanasiou, Efthymia; Kyriazidou, Aggela; Vyzas, Vasilios

    2010-03-01

    A case of a duplicated inferior vena cava (IVC) along with other anatomical vessel variations in a 72-year-old male cadaver is presented. The anomalous vessels involved, besides the IVC, were the left testicular vein and artery, the left suprarenal artery and a superior accessory left renal artery. Based on the gross appearance of the preaortic anastomotic trunk between the left and right IVC as well as on the underlying embryological features, a classification is proposed: incomplete bilateral duplication of the IVC and complete bilateral duplication of the IVC. The latter can be further divided into three types: major, minor and asymmetric.

  13. Lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm caused by a Gunther Tulip inferior vena cava filter.

    PubMed

    Skeik, Nedaa; McEachen, James C; Stockland, Andrew H; Wennberg, Paul W; Shepherd, Roger F J; Shields, Raymond C; Andrews, James C

    2011-11-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are widely used to decrease the risk of pulmonary embolism in patients with contraindications to anticoagulation. Complications include local hematoma, access site deep venous thrombosis (DVT), filter migration and embolization, leg penetration through the IVC wall, IVC occlusion, and filter fracture with embolization. Other rare complications include leg penetration into adjacent organs including duodenum and ureter. Lumbar artery pseudoaneurysms are rare and may be spontaneous, iatrogenic, or traumatic. To date, there have been 3 case reports of lumbar artery pseudoaneurysms caused by IVC filters. We present an additional case of a lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm caused by a Gunther Tulip IVC filter treated successfully with selective embolization.

  14. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome with hemimegalencephaly, retroperitoneal lymphangioma and double inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Vurucu, S; Battal, B; Kocaoglu, M; Akin, R

    2009-05-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a rare disorder characterised by congenital vascular hamartomas, limb hypertrophy, lymphangiomas and atresia of lymph vessels with non-pitting oedema. A 6-year-old girl with KTS was referred to our hospital for evaluation of intractable seizures. In addition to findings consistent with KTS, we also found hemimegalencephaly, retroperitoneal lymphangioma and double inferior vena cava. All of these associations in the same patient with KTS are unique in the English literature. We report on the multidedector CT and MRI features of such an unusual case.

  15. The use of retrievable inferior vena cava filters in pregnancy: Another successful case report, but are we actually making a difference?

    PubMed

    Du Plessis, Lodewyk E; Mol, Ben W; Svigos, John M

    2016-09-01

    Pregnant women with venous thromboembolism are traditionally managed with anticoagulation, but inferior vena cava filters are an alternative. We balanced risks and benefits of an inferior vena cava filter in a decision analysis. We constructed a decision model to compare in pregnant women with VTE the outcome of (1) inferior vena cava filter and anticoagulant treatment versus (2) anticoagulant treatment only. Assuming a 63% risk reduction from an inferior vena cava filter (baseline mortality rate of venous thromboembolism of 0.5%), 318 women would need to be treated with inferior vena cava filters to prevent one venous thromboembolism related maternal death. Sensitivity analyses indicated that at a mortality rate of 0.5% the risk reduction from inferior vena cava filters needed to be 80%, while at a mortality rate of 2% a risk reduction of 20% would justify inferior vena cava filters. In view of their potential morbidity, inferior vena cava filters should be restricted to pregnant woman at strongly increased risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism.

  16. Primary Leiomyosarcoma in the Inferior Vena Cava Extended to the Right Atrium: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Shuichi; Takahashi, Hideaki; Kanzaki, Yumiko; Fujisaka, Tomohiro; Takeda, Yoshihiro; Ozawa, Hideki; Kuwabara, Hiroko; Katsumata, Takahiro; Ishizaka, Nobukazu

    2016-01-01

    A 38-year-old woman had developed an abdominal distention, lower extremity edema, and dyspnea. Imaging examination revealed a large mass in the right atrium which was connected to lesions within the inferior vena cava. Although complete resection of the mass was not possible, partial surgical tumor resection was performed to avoid pulmonary embolization and circulatory collapse. Leiomyosarcoma was diagnosed histologically, and chemotherapy (doxorubicin) followed by radiotherapy was started. By reviewing papers published in the past 10 years that included 322 patients, we also discuss the clinical presentations and prognosis of leiomyosarcoma in the inferior vena cava. PMID:27920691

  17. New approach of assessing hypovolemic shock class 1 during acute emergencies: Ultrasonographic inferior vena cava and abdominal aorta diameter ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Rashidi; Kunji, Mohamad Iqhbal; Hj Abd Kareem, Meera Mohaideen; Halim, Shamimi A.

    2013-09-01

    In a patient with hypovolemic shock class 1, the vital signs and biochemical properties are almost normal. The alteration of hemodynamic parameters and biochemical values occurs mainly in advanced hypovolemia state (neuroendocrine response). The availability of ultrasound machine at healthcare centers makes the measurement of vascular calibre feasible and possible. Inspiration and expiration inferior vena cava diameter changes predict hypovolemic shock class 1 but in acute emergencies this method is impractical. The purpose of this study is to develop a new approach in identifying hypovolemic shock at early phase by measuring the inferior vena cava and aorta diameter ratio using bedside ultrasound machine.

  18. Compression of the Inferior Vena Cava by the Right Iliac Artery: A Rare Variant of May-Thurner Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Fretz, V.; Binkert, C. A.

    2010-10-15

    May-Thurner syndrome is known as compression of the left common iliac vein by the right common iliac artery. We describe a case of an atypical compression of the inferior vena cava by the right common iliac artery secondary to a high aortic bifurcation. Despite an extensive collateral network, there was a significant venous gradient between the iliac veins and the inferior vena cava above the compression. After stenting the venous pressure gradient disappeared. Follow-up 4 months later revealed a good clinical response with a patent stent.

  19. [Intraluminal dilation of inferior vena cava stenosis after repair of the scimitar syndrome in an adult patient].

    PubMed

    Benito Bartolomé, Fernando; González García, Ana; Oliver Ruiz, José M

    2002-02-01

    A 39 year-old woman diagnosed with anomalous drainage of middle and lower right pulmonary veins to the inferior vena cava was corrected surgically by means of baffle with patch up to the left atrium. Early after the operation the patient related intolerance to small efforts and an episode of syncope. The cardiac catheterization demonstrated the presence of a severe stenosis in the inferior vena cava, in its union with the right atrium, that was successfully treated by means of intraluminal percutaneous dilation with a catheter of Inoue. After the procedure the gradient decreased and she improved tolerance to effort, which persisted 10 months later.

  20. Effectiveness of Inferior Vena Cava Filters without Anticoagulation Therapy for Prophylaxis of Recurrent Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Zektser, Miri; Bartal, Carmi; Zeller, Lior; Nevzorov, Roman; Jotkowitz, Alan; Stavi, Vered; Romanyuk, Vitaly; Chudakov, Gregory; Barski, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    Objective The optimal treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is anticoagulation therapy. Inferior vena cava filter (IVC) placement is another option for the prevention of pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients with deep vein thrombosis. This is used mostly in patients with a contraindication to anticoagulant therapy. The purpose of the present study was to compare the two options. Methods A retrospective cohort study of two groups of patients with DVT: patients who received an IVC filter and did not receive anticoagulation due to contraindications; and patients with DVT and similar burden of comorbidity treated with anticoagulation without IVC insertion. To adjust for a potential misbalance in baseline characteristics between the two groups, we performed matching for age, gender, and Charlson’s index, which is used to compute the burden of comorbid conditions. The primary outcome was an occurrence of a PE. Results We studied 1,742 patients hospitalized with the diagnosis of DVT in our hospital;93 patients from this population received IVC filters. Charlson’s score index was significantly higher in the IVC filter group compared with the anticoagulation group. After matching of the groups of patients according to Charlson’s score index there were no significant differences in primary outcomes. Conclusion Inferior vena cava filter without anticoagulation may be an alternative option for prevention of PE in patients with contraindications to anticoagulant therapy. PMID:27487310

  1. Inferior vena cava filter insertion and retrieval patterns in a tertiary referral centre in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Kok, H K; Salati, U; O'Brien, C; Govender, P; Torreggiani, W C; Browne, R

    2015-06-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are widely used in clinical practice to prevent large, clinically significant pulmonary emboli. Modern filters are designed to be retrievable within a specific time window; however, many become lost to follow-up. To examine the insertion and retrieval patterns of IVC filters in a tertiary referral teaching hospital in Ireland. A retrospective review of all IVC filter insertions and retrievals was performed in a tertiary referral university teaching hospital which incorporates the national referral centre for pelvic and acetabular trauma, over a 22-month period. Fifty-seven patients underwent IVC filter insertion with 100% technical success. The most common indication was prophylaxis in patients at high risk of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary emboli (64.9%), followed by patients with contra-indication to anticoagulation (24.6%) and breakthrough thromboembolic events despite anticoagulation (10.5%). IVC filter retrievals were attempted in 48.9% of patients with a success rate of 86.9%. The mean dwell time for retrieved IVC filters was 159.4 days. Inferior vena cava filter insertion and retrieval patterns in our centre were comparable to trends reported internationally with scope for improvement in terms of filter retrieval rates and minimising filter dwell time. Particular vigilance is required in younger patients where the indication for filter insertion was prophylactic.

  2. Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser Syndrome Associated with Severe Inferior Vena Cava Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, John; Kolp, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Precis. The postoperative course of a neovagina creation procedure in a young woman with Meyer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome was complicated, despite prophylaxis, by extensive pelvic deep venous thrombosis secondary to unsuspected severe inferior vena cava stenosis. Background. Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome is characterized by congenital vaginal agenesis and an absent or rudimentary uterus in genotypical females. Malformations of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are not commonly associated with MRKH syndrome. We report a case of a patient with MRKH syndrome with severe IVC stenosis that was diagnosed when the patient presented with extensive pelvic deep venous thrombosis (DVT) during the postoperative course of a neovagina creation. Case. A 19-year-old female underwent a McIndoe procedure. Despite DVT prophylaxis, extensive pelvic DVT of the femoral vein was diagnosed on postoperative day 7. Therapeutic anticoagulation was initiated, and pharmacological and mechanical thrombolysis were performed. During these procedures, a hypoplastic IVC was noted. Conclusion. MRKH syndrome can be associated with IVC malformations, which constitute an anatomical risk factor for postoperative DVT. PMID:25136466

  3. CT of inferior vena cava filters: normal presentations and potential complications.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Nicholas A; Katz, Douglas S; Ganson, George; Eng, Kaitlin; Hon, Man

    2015-12-01

    With massive pulmonary embolism (PE) being the first or second leading cause of unexpected death in adults, protection against PE is critical in appropriately selected patients. The use of inferior vena cava (IVC) filters has increased over the years, paralleling the increased detection of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and PE by improved and more available imaging techniques. The use of IVC filters has become very common as an alternative and/or as a supplement to anticoagulation, and these filters are often seen on routine abdominal CT, including in the emergency setting; therefore, knowledge of the normal spectrum of findings of IVC filters by the radiologist on CT is critical. Additionally, CT can be used specifically to identify complications related to IVC filters, and CT may alternatively demonstrate IVC filter-related problems which are not specifically anticipated clinically. With multiple available IVC filters on the US market, and even more available outside of the USA, it is important for the emergency and the general radiologist to recognize the different models and various appearances and positioning on CT, as well as their potential complications. These complications may be related to venous access, but also include thrombosis related to the filter, filter migration and penetration, and problems associated with filter deployment. With the increasing number of inferior vena cava filters placed and their duration within patients increasing over time, it is critical for emergency and other radiologists to be aware of these findings on CT.

  4. The law of unintended consequences: current design challenges in inferior vena cava filters.

    PubMed

    Magnowski, Audrey; Brown, Matthew; Schramm, Kristofer; Lindquist, Jonathan; Rochon, Paul J; Johnson, D Thor; Kondo, Kimi L; Desai, Kush; Lewandowski, Robert J; Ryu, Robert K

    2017-09-12

    Venous thromboembolic disease (VTD) encompassing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) is a commonly encountered condition with potentially fatal sequelae. When unable to be adequately anticoagulated, patients require a mechanical means to prevent PE. This review discusses the history of inferior vena cava interruption and the development of inferior vena cava filters (IVCF). Areas covered: Milestone innovations in the mechanical treatment of VTD, their successes and shortcomings are discussed. The unforeseen complications that have occurred with implantation of IVCF have a profound impact on the present utilization of retrievable filters. Particular attention is dedicated to the evidence for safe and effective use of IVCF and the challenges presented to further improvement of these technologies. Expert commentary: While evidence suggests that IVCF are effective in preventing PE, the recent 'de-volution' from permanent to retrievable design has unleashed an epidemic device-related complications. Retrievable filter design is reliant on a 'Goldilocks' premise: make the device stable (so it doesn't migrate), but not too stable (so you can still retrieve it). Efforts must be aimed at optimizing utilization using decision support tools, meticulous follow up after deployment, and conversion from retrievable to permanent devices if the patient requires lifelong mechanical prophylaxis.

  5. Mayer-rokitansky-kuster-hauser syndrome associated with severe inferior vena cava stenosis.

    PubMed

    Londra, Laura; Tobler, Kyle; Wu, John; Kolp, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Precis. The postoperative course of a neovagina creation procedure in a young woman with Meyer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome was complicated, despite prophylaxis, by extensive pelvic deep venous thrombosis secondary to unsuspected severe inferior vena cava stenosis. Background. Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome is characterized by congenital vaginal agenesis and an absent or rudimentary uterus in genotypical females. Malformations of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are not commonly associated with MRKH syndrome. We report a case of a patient with MRKH syndrome with severe IVC stenosis that was diagnosed when the patient presented with extensive pelvic deep venous thrombosis (DVT) during the postoperative course of a neovagina creation. Case. A 19-year-old female underwent a McIndoe procedure. Despite DVT prophylaxis, extensive pelvic DVT of the femoral vein was diagnosed on postoperative day 7. Therapeutic anticoagulation was initiated, and pharmacological and mechanical thrombolysis were performed. During these procedures, a hypoplastic IVC was noted. Conclusion. MRKH syndrome can be associated with IVC malformations, which constitute an anatomical risk factor for postoperative DVT.

  6. Squamous cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis with stones and inferior vena cava infiltration. Case report.

    PubMed

    Di Battista, L; Stio, F; Guarino, S; Galani, A; Maturo, A; Dimko, M; Mancini, M; Gallo, P

    2012-05-01

    We report a rare case of a 50 year old man with renal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) who first came to our attention with renal colic and fever not responding to antibiotic or analgesic treatment. He had a long history of kidney stones, but had not undergone any imaging in the last 5 years. Physical examination revealed tenderness and a palpable mass in the right flank and lumbar region. A whole body CT scan was performed, revealing an 11 cm mass in the right kidney infiltrating the inferior vena cava. There were areas of calcification within the mass and multiple stones within the renal pelvis. The tumor was considered unsuitable for resection according to radiological and clinical criteria. The mass was biopsied percutaneously under CT guidance and histological examination revealed squamous cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis. The patient was treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and embolization of the renal artery. He died one month after diagnosis. To our knowledge this is the second reported case in the world of renal SCC infiltrating the inferior vena cava and with kidney stones.

  7. Development of a fluid resuscitation protocol using inferior vena cava and lung ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher W C; Kory, Pierre D; Arntfield, Robert T

    2016-02-01

    Appropriate fluid resuscitation has been a major focus of critical care medicine since its inception. Currently, the most accurate method to guide fluid administration decisions uses "dynamic" measures that estimate the change in cardiac output that would occur in response to a fluid bolus. Unfortunately, their use remains limited due to required technical expertise, costly equipment, or applicability in only a subset of patients. Alternatively, point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has become widely used as a tool to help clinicians prescribe fluid therapy. Common POCUS applications that serve as guides to fluid administration rely on assessments of the inferior vena cava to estimate preload and lung ultrasound to identify the early presence of extravascular lung water and avoid fluid overresuscitation. Although application of these POCUS measures has multiple limitations that are commonly misunderstood, current evidence suggests that they can be used in combination to sort patients among 3 fluid management categories: (1) fluid resuscitate, (2) fluid test, and (3) fluid restrict. This article reviews the pertinent literature describing the use of inferior vena cava and lung ultrasound for fluid responsiveness and presents an evidence-informed algorithm using these measures to guide fluid resuscitation decisions in the critically ill. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Electrophysiology and innervation of the smooth muscle of dog inferior vena cava.

    PubMed Central

    Mekata, F; Nagatsu, I

    1982-01-01

    1. Electrical properties of outer and inner muscles of three portions of dog inferior vena cava and their catecholaminergic innervation were investigated by microelectrode recording and an immunohistochemical technique. 2. There was no difference in the electrical properties of outer and inner muscles of the supradiaphragmatic (portion a) or the infrarenal (portion c) segments which had a quiescent membrane potential, delayed rectification, strong outward going rectification and no action potential. 3. In the longitudinal muscle which made up most of the segment (portion b) between the liver and renal veins, some of the outermost cells fired slow discharges and others action potentials in response to depolarizing current, but no cells from the innermost layer of longitudinal muscle of this portion did so. 4. All smooth muscle portions of the inferior vena cava showed a current spread in the direction of the long axis of the cell. Mean values of space constant of portions a, b and c were 2.25, 1.15 and 0.99 mm, respectively. 5. Noradrenergic nerve terminals were widely distributed in the longitudinal muscle layer of portion b and the circular muscle layer of portion c. Few nerve terminals were seen in any part of portion a. 6. The results suggest that a tendency to repetitive electrical activity was associated with outer smooth muscle aligned longitudinally, though a low space constant may have been associated with noradrenergic innervation. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PMID:6133946

  9. Pancreatic and multiorgan resection with inferior vena cava reconstruction for retroperitoneal leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, John A; Fakhre, G Peter; Dougherty, Marjorie K; Nakhleh, Raouf E; Maples, William J; Nguyen, Justin H

    2009-01-01

    Background Inferior vena cava (IVC) leiomyosarcoma is a rare tumor of smooth muscle origin. It is often large by the time of diagnosis and may involve adjacent organs. A margin-free resection may be curative, but the resection must involve the tumor en bloc with the affected segment of vena cava and locally involved organs. IVC resection often requires vascular reconstruction, which can be done with prosthetic graft. Case presentation We describe a 39-year-old man with an IVC leiomyosarcoma that involved the adrenal gland, distal pancreas, and blood supply to the spleen and left kidney. Tumor excision involved en bloc resection of all involved organs with reimplantation of the right renal vein and reconstruction of the IVC with a polytetrafluoroethylene graft. The patient recovered without renal insufficiency, graft infection, or other complications. Follow-up abdominal imaging at 1 year showed a patent IVC graft and no locally recurrent tumor. Prosthetic graft provides a sufficient diameter and length for replacement conduit in extensive resection of IVC leiomyosarcoma. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first case of resection of an IVC sarcoma with prosthetic graft reconstruction in combination with pancreatic resection. Aggressive surgical resection including vascular reconstruction is warranted for select IVC tumors to achieve a potentially curative outcome. PMID:19126222

  10. Azygos Vein Dialysis Catheter Placement Using the Translumbar Approach in a Patient with Inferior Vena Cava Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Jaber, Mohammad R.; Thomson, Matthew J.; Smith, Douglas C.

    2008-07-15

    We describe percutaneous, translumbar placement of a 14-Fr dialysis catheter into an ascending lumbar vein to achieve tip position in an enlarged azygos vein. The patient had thrombosis of all traditional vascular sites, as well as the inferior vena cava. This catheter functioned well for 7 months before fatal catheter-related infection developed.

  11. Excessive venous bleeding in a patient with acetabular pelvic fracture secondary to inferior vena cava filter occlusion.

    PubMed

    Nahas, Sam; Yeoh, Clarence; Velayudham, Senthil

    2012-11-30

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters can be used to prevent pulmonary embolism in cases where anticoagulation is contraindicated. Filter obstruction remains one of the major complications after its insertion. This is the rare case demonstrating excessive venous bleeding during attempted open reduction internal fixation of an acetabular fracture secondary to subcomplete IVC filter thrombosis day 1 postinsertion of the device.

  12. An unusual case: a giant paraesophageal hiatal hernia with intrathoracic spleen, preduodenal portal vein, malrotation, and left inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Başaklar, A Can; Sönmez, Kaan; Karabulut, Ramazan; Türkyilmaz, Zafer; Moralioğlu, Serdar

    2007-12-01

    A giant paraesophageal hiatal hernia with preduodenal portal vein, nonrotating gut, intrathoracic spleen, and left inferior vena cava has not been reported to date. This set of complex anomalies can have significant clinical implications. Awareness of these anomalies is essential to avoid further complications.

  13. Use of a retrievable inferior vena cava filter in term pregnancy: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Milford, William; Chadha, Yogesh; Lust, Karin

    2009-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in obstetrics. Management with anticoagulation can be problematic, especially peripartum. We report the successful placement and retrieval of an inferior vena cava filter as prophylaxis for peripartum pulmonary embolism in a woman with a large, proximal, deep venous thrombosis at term.

  14. Computational Modeling of Blood Flow in the TrapEase Inferior Vena Cava Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, M A; Henshaw, W D; Wang, S L

    2008-02-04

    To evaluate the flow hemodynamics of the TrapEase vena cava filter using three dimensional computational fluid dynamics, including simulated thrombi of multiple shapes, sizes, and trapping positions. The study was performed to identify potential areas of recirculation and stagnation and areas in which trapped thrombi may influence intrafilter thrombosis. Computer models of the TrapEase filter, thrombi (volumes ranging from 0.25mL to 2mL, 3 different shapes), and a 23mm diameter cava were constructed. The hemodynamics of steady-state flow at Reynolds number 600 was examined for the unoccluded and partially occluded filter. Axial velocity contours and wall shear stresses were computed. Flow in the unoccluded TrapEase filter experienced minimal disruption, except near the superior and inferior tips where low velocity flow was observed. For spherical thrombi in the superior trapping position, stagnant and recirculating flow was observed downstream of the thrombus; the volume of stagnant flow and the peak wall shear stress increased monotonically with thrombus volume. For inferiorly trapped spherical thrombi, marked disruption to the flow was observed along the cava wall ipsilateral to the thrombus and in the interior of the filter. Spherically shaped thrombus produced a lower peak wall shear stress than conically shaped thrombus and a larger peak stress than ellipsoidal thrombus. We have designed and constructed a computer model of the flow hemodynamics of the TrapEase IVC filter with varying shapes, sizes, and positions of thrombi. The computer model offers several advantages over in vitro techniques including: improved resolution, ease of evaluating different thrombus sizes and shapes, and easy adaptation for new filter designs and flow parameters. Results from the model also support a previously reported finding from photochromic experiments that suggest the inferior trapping position of the TrapEase IVC filter leads to an intra-filter region of recirculating

  15. Inferior Vena Cava Filters for Primary Prophylaxis: When Are They Indicated?

    PubMed Central

    Wehrenberg-Klee, Eric; Stavropoulos, S. William

    2012-01-01

    Over the past several years there has been a rapid increase in the number of inferior vena cava (IVC) filters placed for primary thromboprophylaxis. Increased use has occurred in settings where other methods of thromboprophylaxis are viewed to be inadequate, technically challenging, or that place patients at an unacceptably high bleeding risk. These clinical services include trauma, bariatric surgery, neurosurgery, cancer, intensive care unit populations, and patients with a relative contraindication to anticoagulation. We review the studies to date addressing filter placement for these indications. Although preliminary data are promising, the patient populations most likely to benefit from prophylactic IVC filter placement have not been well defined, and randomized studies demonstrating efficacy have not been conducted. Moving forward, it will be critical to accomplish these two tasks if IVC filters are to continue to have a role in primary thromboprophylaxis. PMID:23450194

  16. Inferior Vena Cava Filtration in the Management of Venous Thromboembolism: Filtering the Data

    PubMed Central

    Molvar, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality. This is especially true for hospitalized patients. Pulmonary embolism (PE) is the leading preventable cause of in-hospital mortality. The preferred method of both treatment and prophylaxis for VTE is anticoagulation. However, in a subset of patients, anticoagulation therapy is contraindicated or ineffective, and these patients often receive an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. The sole purpose of an IVC filter is prevention of clinically significant PE. IVC filter usage has increased every year, most recently due to the availability of retrievable devices and a relaxation of thresholds for placement. Much of this recent growth has occurred in the trauma patient population given the high potential for VTE and frequent contraindication to anticoagulation. Retrievable filters, which strive to offer the benefits of permanent filters without time-sensitive complications, come with a new set of challenges including methods for filter follow-up and retrieval. PMID:23997414

  17. Migration of the Günther Tulip inferior vena cava filter to the chest.

    PubMed

    Galhotra, Sanjay; Amesur, Nikhil B; Zajko, Albert B; Simmons, Richard L

    2007-12-01

    The authors describe two cases in which Günther Tulip inferior vena cava filters migrated to the chest, necessitating open-heart surgery for retrieval. In the first case, a 52-year-old man was transferred to their hospital from an outside facility after the filter migrated to the main pulmonary artery during attempted filter placement. In the second case, a 72-year-old man, a Günther Tulip filter was found to have migrated to the tricuspid valve after cardiopulmonary arrest and subsequent resuscitation, including emergent central venous line placement. The authors present the relevant details of both cases, discuss possible preventive strategies, and review the available literature about migration of the Günther Tulip filter.

  18. Cardiac Perforation by Migrated Fractured Strut of Inferior Vena Cava Filter Mimicking Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Piercecchi, Chris W; Vasquez, Julio C; Kaplan, Stephen J; Hoffman, Jordan; Puskas, John D; DeLaRosa, Jacob

    2017-02-01

    We present a rare late complication after inferior vena cava filter (IVC) placement. A 52-year-old woman with an IVC presented with sudden onset of chest pain. Cardiac catheterisation and echocardiography revealed an embolised IVC filter strut penetrating the right ventricle. Endovascular retrieval was considered but deemed unsafe due to proximity to the right coronary artery and concern for migration to pulmonary circulation. Urgent removal of the strut was performed via sternotomy. The postoperative course was uneventful. Two weeks later, she was asymptomatic. Minimally invasive approaches have been described for retrieval of intact IVC filters that have migrated to the right heart but not for embolised filter fragments. We recommend traditional sternotomy as the preferred method of retrieval as it limits the likelihood of further migration or trauma.

  19. A Dedicated Inferior Vena Cava Filter Service Line: How to Optimize Your Practice.

    PubMed

    Karp, Jennifer K; Desai, Kush R; Salem, Riad; Ryu, Robert K; Lewandowski, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    Despite the increased placement of retrievable inferior vena cava filters (rIVCFs), efforts to remove these devices are not commensurate. The majority of rIVCFs are left in place beyond their indicated usage, and often are retained permanently. With a growing understanding of the clinical issues associated with these devices, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has prompted clinicians to remove rIVCF when they are no longer indicated. However, major obstacles exist to filter retrieval, chief among them being poor clinical follow-up. The establishment of a dedicated IVC filter service line, or clinic, has been shown to improve filter retrieval rates. Usage of particular devices, specifically permanent versus retrievable filters, is enhanced by prospective physician consultation. In this article, the rationale behind a dedicated IVC filter service line is presented as well as described the structure and activities of the authors' IVC filter clinic; supporting data will also be provided when appropriate.

  20. A Dedicated Inferior Vena Cava Filter Service Line: How to Optimize Your Practice

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Jennifer K.; Desai, Kush R.; Salem, Riad; Ryu, Robert K.; Lewandowski, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increased placement of retrievable inferior vena cava filters (rIVCFs), efforts to remove these devices are not commensurate. The majority of rIVCFs are left in place beyond their indicated usage, and often are retained permanently. With a growing understanding of the clinical issues associated with these devices, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has prompted clinicians to remove rIVCF when they are no longer indicated. However, major obstacles exist to filter retrieval, chief among them being poor clinical follow-up. The establishment of a dedicated IVC filter service line, or clinic, has been shown to improve filter retrieval rates. Usage of particular devices, specifically permanent versus retrievable filters, is enhanced by prospective physician consultation. In this article, the rationale behind a dedicated IVC filter service line is presented as well as described the structure and activities of the authors' IVC filter clinic; supporting data will also be provided when appropriate. PMID:27247479

  1. Liver transplantation with preservation of the inferior vena cava in case of symptomatic adult polycystic disease.

    PubMed

    Lerut, Jan; Ciccarelli, Olga; Rutgers, Matthieu; Orlando, Giuseppe; Mathijs, Jules; Danse, Etienne; Goffin, Eric; Gigot, Jean-François; Goffette, Pierre

    2005-05-01

    Adult polycystic liver disease (APLD) is a rare disorder of the liver parenchyma, the treatment of which is still controversial. Conservative surgery may have a significant morbidity and is often ineffective in the long run. Liver replacement may be indicated in case of incapacitating hepatomegaly. Patients (one male, five females) undergoing liver transplantation for symptomatic APLD is presented in this study. The particular nature of this series is the fact that successful transplantation was performed in all cases with preservation of the recipient's inferior vena cava and without use of veno-venous bypass despite massive hepatomegaly and previous extensive liver surgery (in three cases). There was minimal morbidity and no mortality. All patients have excellent quality of life with a median follow-up of 41 months (range: 12-58) as testified by a median Karnofsky score of 90% (range: 80-100%).

  2. Left-Sided Inferior Vena Cava Encountered During Organ Retrieval Surgery: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Rajabnejad, Y.; Aliakbarian, M.; Rajabnejad, A.; Motie, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Left-sided inferior vena cava (IVC) is the second most common anatomical anomaly of the IVC after duplication. Herein, we present two cases of left-sided IVC, diagnosed during organ retrieval procedure. In a young brain-dead man, a single left-sided IVC was observed; it originated from iliac confluence in the left side of the aorta and extended throughout the abdomen. There was no retrohepatic IVC in the patient; hepatic veins drained directly into the right atrium. The second case was a brain-dead young woman with a left-sided IVC originated from iliac confluence to the kidney level; then, the IVC crossed anterior to the abdominal aorta to join a normally positioned retrohepatic IVC. In cases of retroperitoneal surgeries, IVC anomalies should be considered during preoperative imaging studies, because they may be misdiagnosed as para-aortic lymphadenopathy, tumor or dilated gonadal vein that may result in iatrogenic damage during surgery. PMID:28078062

  3. Superior Vena Cava Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Trainini, Jorge Carlos; Auricchio, Renato; Del Bagno, Horacio Augusto; Federico, Vicente; Acrich, Mario Willie; Osorio, Julio Nestor

    1983-01-01

    A case of superior vena cava obstruction due to carcinoma of unknown origin is reported. A superior vena cava bypass with polytetrafluoroethylene was performed by suturing the prosthesis to the left innominate vein and the right atrium, respectively. Long-term satisfactory results were achieved. Images PMID:15227139

  4. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy in a case of congenital duplication of the inferior vena cava. Case report.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Giuseppe; Calò, Pietro Giorgio; Piras, Stefano; Pisano, Umberto; Nicolosi, Angelo

    2013-07-25

    L’eventualità di un’emorragia intraoperatoria è la complicanza più temuta nel corso di una surrenectomia laparoscopica. Tale rischio diventa ancora più importante nel caso in cui siano presenti anomalie anatomiche rappresentate da duplicità della Vena Cava Inferiore (VCI) e da anomali confluenze delle vene surrenali. Tale riscontro, osservato nel caso descritto, ha fornito lo spunto per uno studio sull’incidenza di dette anomalie e sulle metodiche utili a prevenire la complicanza emorragica. Una donna di 39 anni è giunta alla nostra osservazione a causa di una neoformazione non funzionante del surrene destro andata incontro ad un lento ma progressivo accrescimento volumetrico. Tale neoformazione era stata riconosciuta a distanza di tempo nel corso di controlli clinici e strumentali praticati per una Poliposi Familiare del Colon, sottoposta in altra sede a Proctocolectomia Restorativa circa 8 anni prima. Già in quell’epoca era stata documentata una duplicità congenita della VCI associata ad altre anomalie vascolari e viscerali. Nel corso della surrenectomia laparoscopica, dopo aver clippato e sezionato la vena surrenalica alla sua confluenza cavale, è stata riconosciuta una seconda vena con sbocco nella vena renale destra; anch’essa trattata in modo analogo e con esito favorevole. La presenza di una duplice VCI, pur essendo un reperto piuttosto raro, è divenuta di più frequente riscontro con la diffusione di tecniche di diagnostica per immagini sempre più elaborate, in particolare l’AngioTC. La presenza di tali anomalie può rendere problematiche alcune manovre di radiologia interventistica quali il posizionamento di un filtro cavale o il cateterismo selettivo di una vena surrenalica. È però in ambito chirurgico che la duplicità della VCI può causare i maggiori inconvenienti, rappresentati da un possibile danno vascolare. La maggior parte degli Autori ritiene in proposito indispensabile un valido studio per immagini preoperatorio quale

  5. Modeling Flow Past a TrapEase Inferior Vena Cava Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Michael; Henshaw, William; Wang, Stephen

    2008-11-01

    This study uses three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics to evaluate the efficacy of the TrapEase inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. Hemodynamics of the unoccluded and partially occluded filter are examined, and the clinical implications are assessed. The IVC, which is the primary vein that drains the legs, is modeled as a straight pipe, and a geometrically accurate model of the filter is constructed using computer aided design. Blood is modeled as a homogeneous, incompressible, Newtonian fluid, and the method of overset grids is used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations. Results are corroborated with in-vitro studies. Flow around the unoccluded filter demonstrates minimal disruption, but spherical clots in the downstream trapping position lead to regions of stagnant and recirculating flow that may promote further clotting. The volume of stagnant flow and the peak wall shear stress increase with clot volume. For clots trapped in the upstream trapping position, flow is disrupted along the cava wall downstream of the clot and within the filter. The shape and location of trapped clots also effect the peak wall shear stress and may impact the efficacy of the filter.

  6. Radiographic Findings of Distressed Venous Stents and Inferior Vena Cava Filters: Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Chick, Jeffrey Forris Beecham; Abramowitz, Steven D; Osher, Matthew L; Khaja, Minhaj S; Cooper, Kyle J; Saad, Wael E; Williams, David M

    2017-08-31

    The objective of our study was to describe an association between the radiographic appearance of distressed intravascular implants and venous stenosis or occlusion and to determine the success of reparative endovascular procedures. Seventy-eight patients with distressed stents or inferior vena cava (IVC) filters characterized by pursing (short-axis contracture), straightening, longitudinal contraction (long-axis contracture), or fracture were identified from retrospective review of a venous registry for the period from February 2004 to October 2016. Patients originally presented with superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome (n = 25), arm swelling (n = 16), iliocaval thrombosis (n = 21), and lower extremity deep venous thrombosis (n = 16), and stents were initially placed in 65 and filters in 13. Implants were located in the IVC (n = 24), subclavian vein (n = 16), brachiocephalic vein (n = 15), common iliac vein (n = 10), multiple veins (n = 4), axillary vein (n = 4), common femoral vein (n = 3), SVC (n = 1), and internal jugular vein (n = 1). Implants included Wallstents in 63 patients; Smart stents in two patients; and Celect Platinum, Denali, Greenfield, and Trapease IVC filters in two, three, two, and six patients, respectively. Venographic indication, distress type, time from initial normal placement to identification of distress, venographic finding (patent, mild stenosis, high-grade stenosis, or occlusion), treatment, revascularization outcome, and complications were recorded. The mean time to distress was 23 months. Fifty-two (67%) patients underwent venography for symptoms and 26 (33%) for surveillance. Forty-five (58%) implants were pursed; 19 (24%), straightened; nine (12%), contracted; and five (6%), fractured. Venography depicted 48 (62%) high-grade stenoses, 19 (24%) complete occlusions, and six (8%) mild stenoses. Of the 73 patients who underwent an intervention, 29 (40%) underwent angioplasty, 15 (21%) underwent angioplasty and stenting, 15 (21%) underwent

  7. Successful third renal transplantation in a child with an occluded inferior vena cava: A novel technique to use the venous interposition between the transplant renal vein and the infrahepatic inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Masaki; Shishido, Seiichiro; Takahashi, Yusuke; Hamasaki, Yuko; Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Nihei, Hiroshi; Itabashi, Yoshihiro; Kawamura, Takeshi; Aikawa, Atsushi

    2017-03-19

    A girl aged 11 years and 3 months with occlusion of the inferior vena cava had experienced two renal transplant graft failures since birth. The third renal transplant from a live donor was carried out. Preoperative evaluation showed that the arteries from the right common to the right external iliac artery were absent, and the ilio-caval vein was occluded below the level of the renal vein. The donor's renal artery was anastomosed to the aorta. The donor's ovarian and large saphenous veins were used to extend the transplant renal vein to the recipient's patent inferior vena cava. The present report concludes that the extension of a short donor renal vein using other donor veins is a viable therapeutic option for pediatric patients with vascular occlusions.

  8. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Associated with Graves' Disease Presenting As Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis with Bilateral Lower Limb DVT.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ankur

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 60-year-old lady who presented with bilateral lower limb swelling and a thyroid swelling with clinical features consistent with thyrotoxicosis. Investigations revealed the presence of a thrombus in bilateral external, internal iliac veins, and inferior vena cava extending up to its infrahepatic part. Hormone profile and radioiodine uptake scan confirmed the diagnosis of Graves' disease. Further workup revealed the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (confirmed after a repeat test at 12 weeks). The patient was treated with antithyroid drugs and anticoagulants. The patient improved with normalization of thyroid function and partial recanalization of the infrahepatic part of inferior vena cava. Hyperthyroidism has been implicated as a potential hypercoagulable state; however, the association of Graves' disease with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is limited to isolated case reports. This case highlights a new mechanism underlying hypercoagulability associated with Graves' disease.

  9. Renal transplantation with venous drainage through the superior mesenteric vein in cases of thrombosis of the inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Aguirrezabalaga, Javier; Novas, Serafín; Veiga, Francisco; Chantada, Venancio; Rey, Ignacio; Gonzalez, Marcelino; Gomez, Manuel

    2002-08-15

    Renal transplantation usually is performed by placing the graft in the iliac fossa, anastomosing the renal vein to the iliac vein or, when this is not possible, to the vena cava. When vascular complications occur, particularly on the venous side, the position of the graft may have to be changed. This report describes orthotopic renal grafts and positioning of the organ with anastomosis to the splenic vessels. Venous drainage was established directly into the mesenteric-portal territory, with two cases to the portal vein and one to the inferior mesenteric vein. A new technique for the venous drainage of the renal graft is shown. We have used this model in two cases of infrarenal inferior vena cava thrombosis. The kidney was located in a retroperitoneal position, with venous drainage to the superior mesenteric vein through an orifice in the posterior peritoneum.

  10. Bard Denali inferior vena cava filter fracture and embolization resulting in cardiac tamponade: a device failure analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuo, William T; Robertson, Scott W

    2015-01-01

    A 46-year-old woman underwent inferior vena cava filter placement before bariatric surgery and returned within 6 months for routine removal. She complained of a 1-week history of severe chest pain, and during retrieval, two fractured filter components were identified including one arm in the right ventricle. The filter body and one fragment were successfully retrieved, but the fragment in the right ventricle was refractory to percutaneous retrieval. During open-heart surgery, the fragment was found traversing through the ventricular wall resulting in cardiac tamponade. Electron microscopic fragment analysis revealed high-cycle metal fatigue indicating the filter design failed to withstand this patient's natural inferior vena cava biomechanical motions. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Application of contrast-enhanced ultrasound before inferior vena cava filter recovery.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ji-Ping; Li, Wei-Qin; Wang, Zhen-Feng; Guo, Bian-Lian

    2017-10-01

    This study aims to investigate the clinical value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) before temporary inferior vena cava filter (IVCF) recovery in patients with deep venous thrombosis, in order to provide ultrasound signs for the recovery of IVCF in clinical practice. The CEU manifestations of patients with deep vein thrombosis before temporary IVCF recovery were retrospectively analyzed. With the manifestations of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) or results of the surgical recovery of IVCF as the standard, the detection rate of a thrombus in IVCF was compared between conventional ultrasound and CEU, and the role of CEU in detecting complications of IVCF was analyzed. In the 103 patients with IVCF, conventional ultrasound and CEU did not reveal any filter displacement and deformation, as well as infection. In 86 patients, filters were successfully recovered under DSA. In one patient, the filter was removed surgically. In 16 patients, recovery failed or was given up, and inferior vena cava (IVC) angiography was performed. The recovery rate of IVCF was 84.5%. Among all cases, thrombi were found within the filters or around the filter in 23 patients. The detection rate of thrombi was 47.8% (11/23) by conventional ultrasound and 82.6% (19/23) by CEU, and the difference between these two methods was statistically significant (P<0.05). CEU drew a misdiagnosis of thrombus within the filter in one patient, and the diagnosis was not confirmed after the recovery of the filter. The diagnostic coincidence rate of CEU for thrombus in the IVCF was 95.1%, and the positive predictive value was 95%. In another case, the foot of the IVCF pierced out of the wall of the IVC into the intestinal wall; and this was confirmed by DSA. Hence, recovery was given up. Thrombosis is the main complication after IVCF placement. CEU revealed typical manifestations of thrombi in the IVC, and has overcome the shortcoming of color Doppler ultrasound such as angular dependence. Its detection

  12. Renal Artery Stump to Inferior Vena Cava Fistula: Unusual Clinical Presentation and Transcatheter Embolization with the Amplatzer Vascular Plug

    SciTech Connect

    Taneja, Manish; Lath, Narayan Soo, Tan Bien; Hiong, Tay Kiang; Htoo, Maung Myint; Richard, Lo; Fui, Alexander Chung Yaw

    2008-07-15

    Fistulous communication between the renal artery stump and inferior vena cava following nephrectomy is rare. We describe the case of a 52-year-old man with a fistula detected on investigation for hemolytic anemia in the postoperative period. The patient had had a nephrectomy performed 2 weeks prior to presentation for blunt abdominal trauma. The fistula was successfully occluded percutaneously using an Amplatzer vascular plug. The patient recovered completely and was discharged 2 weeks later.

  13. Blocking of the Hepatic Vein Outflow by Neointima Covering a Wallstent Across a Membranous Stenosis of the Inferior Vena Cava

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Usha; Garg, Pramod K.; Agarwal, Rajeev; Gupta, S. Dutta; Prasad, G. A.; Kaul, Upendra; Tandon, Rakesh K.

    1999-11-15

    A 31-year-old man presented with idiopathic membranous obstruction of the suprahepatic inferior vena cava (IVC) and was treated by balloon dilation and placement of a Wallstent. The patient improved markedly. However, he developed obstruction of the hepatic vein outflow secondary to neointima formation over the stent that covered the hepatic vein ostia. The patient died of liver failure and septicemia. We believe that this is the first report of such a serious complication.

  14. Defining Prolonged Dwell Time: When Are Advanced Inferior Vena Cava Filter Retrieval Techniques Necessary? An Analysis in 762 Procedures.

    PubMed

    Desai, Kush R; Laws, James L; Salem, Riad; Mouli, Samdeep K; Errea, Martin F; Karp, Jennifer K; Yang, Yihe; Ryu, Robert K; Lewandowski, Robert J

    2017-06-01

    Despite growth in placement of retrievable inferior vena cava filters, retrieval rates remain low. Filters with extended implantation times present a challenge to retrieval, where standard techniques often fail. The development of advanced retrieval techniques has positively impacted retrieval of retrievable inferior vena cava filters with prolonged dwell times; however, there is no precise definition of the time point when advanced techniques become necessary. We aim to define prolonged retrievable inferior vena cava filters dwell time by determining the inflection point when the risk of standard retrieval technique failure increases significantly, necessitating advanced retrieval techniques to maintain overall technical success of retrieval. From January 2009 to April 2015, 762 retrieval procedures were identified from a prospectively acquired database. We assessed patient age/sex, filter dwell time, procedural technical success, the use of advanced techniques, and procedure-related adverse events. Overall retrieval success rate was 98% (n=745). When standard retrieval techniques failed, advanced techniques were used; this was necessary 18% of the time (n=138). Logistic regression identified that dwell time was the only risk factor for failure of standard retrieval technique (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.10; P<0.001). Spline function regression analysis demonstrated that if dwell time exceeded 7 months, the risk of standard technique failure was 40.9%. Adverse events occurred at a rate of 2% (n=18; 15 minor and 3 major). The necessity of advanced techniques to maintain technical success of retrieval increases with dwell time. Patients with retrievable inferior vena cava filters in place beyond 7 months may benefit from referral to centers with expertise in advanced filter retrieval. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Comparison of complication rates associated with permanent and retrievable inferior vena cava filters: a review of the MAUDE database.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, Jessica M; Lewandowski, Robert J; Vogelzang, Robert L; Ryu, Robert K

    2014-08-01

    To compare the safety of permanent and retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filters by reviewing the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database. The MAUDE database was reviewed from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2012. Product class search criteria were "filter, intravascular, cardiovascular." Type of device used and specific adverse events (AEs) were recorded. For the period January 2009-December 2012, 1,606 reported AEs involving 1,057 IVC filters were identified in the MAUDE database . Of reported AEs, 1,394 (86.8%) involved retrievable inferior vena cava filters (rIVCFs), and 212 (13.2%) involved permanent inferior vena cava filters (pIVCFs) (P < .0001). Reported AEs included fracture, migration, limb embolization, tilt, IVC penetration, venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism, IVC thrombus, and malfunctions during placement. Each specific AE was reported with significantly higher frequency in rIVCFs compared with pIVCFs. The most common reported complication with rIVCFs was fracture, whereas the most commonly reported complications with pIVCFs were placement malfunctions. For rIVCFs, the most commonly reported AE varied depending on filter brand. The MAUDE database reveals that complications occur with significantly higher frequency with rIVCFs compared with pIVCFs. This finding suggests that the self-reported complication rate with rIVCFs is significantly higher than the self-reported complication rate with pIVCFs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Prognostic Benefit of Surgical Management of Renal Cell Carcinoma Invading the Inferior Vena Cava.

    PubMed

    Mastoraki, Aikaterini; Mastoraki, Sotiria; Tsikala-Vafea, Maria; Papanikolaou, Ioannis S; Lazaris, Andreas; Smyrniotis, Vassilios; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos

    2017-03-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 3 % of adult malignancies and 90-95 % of neoplasms arising from the kidney. One of the unique features of RCC is the tumor thrombus formation that migrates into the venous system including renal vein (RV) and inferior vena cava (IVC). Only 10 % of patients with RCC present with the classic triad of flank pain, hematuria and defined mass, while 25-30 % of affected patients are asymptomatic. Signs of para-neoplastic syndrome such as hypercalcemia, hypertension, anemia, cachexia and increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) are often apparent. Extension of tumor thrombus into the venous system is depicted by radiological examinations, such as contrast enhanced Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and vena cavography. The level of the thrombus is mostly determined according to the Mayo classification. Despite recent research on the therapeutic strategies against advanced RCC, surgical resection appears the only potentially curative approach. Aggressive surgical management including nephrectomy with thrombectomy is currently the standard therapeutic approach for RCC patients with tumor thrombus extending to the RV or the IVC. Pre-surgical down-staging with the use of molecular targeted therapy has also been proposed. Alternative therapies, such as radio- and chemotherapy proved insufficient. The aim of this review is to evaluate the results of surgical treatment for RCC invading IVC with special reference to the extent of its histological spread. Review of recent world literature was accomplished to provide an update on the current concepts of surgical management of the disease.

  17. The bedside insertion of inferior vena cava filters using ultrasound guidance.

    PubMed

    Uppal, Baljeet; Flinn, William R; Benjamin, Marshall E

    2007-03-01

    Since the introduction of inferior vena cava (IVC) filters more than 30 years ago, there has been a steady improvement in the design, ease, and safety of the delivery systems. Today, all of the commonly used filters can be placed via a peripheral vein by using standard percutaneous Seldinger technique. However, this typically requires fluoroscopy, intravenous contrast agents, radiation exposure, and transport of the patient to the interventional or operating suite. In the multiply injured trauma or critically-ill intensive care unit patient, often requiring inotropic and ventilator support, transport to these facilities can be hazardous. In addition, these patients frequently have a combination of neurospinal and long bone injuries, which require skeletal immobilization, thus further complicating transportation. Advancing technology with portable duplex ultrasound and improved deep abdominal duplex imaging has allowed for routine diagnostic evaluation of the IVC, renal veins, and surrounding visceral structures. This degree of accuracy has allowed numerous centers to gain experience with ultrasonic imaging of the IVC and insertion site after a filter has been placed. A logical progression has evolved to the point in which, today, duplex ultrasound can be used to guide the insertion of IVC filters. The following describes, in detail, a technique for the percutaneous placement of an IVC filter at the bedside using only duplex ultrasound guidance. The article also briefly compares and contrasts this technique with an alternate technique using intravascular ultrasound. Vena caval interruption can be safely performed under ultrasound guidance in a monitored, intensive care unit environment. In selected intensive care unit or multiply injured trauma patients, this will reduce the risk, complexity and cost of transport for these critically ill patients. Duplex-guided IVC filter placement also reduces procedural costs compared to an operating room or interventional suite

  18. Inferior vena cava filters in cancer patients: to filter or not to filter

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Razeq, Hikmat; Mansour, Asem; Ismael, Yousef; Abdulelah, Hazem

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Cancer and its treatment are recognized risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE); active cancer accounts for almost 20% of all newly diagnosed VTE. Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are utilized to provide mechanical thromboprophylaxis to prevent pulmonary embolism (PE) or to avoid bleeding from systemic anticoagulation in high-risk situations. In this report, and utilizing a case study, we will address the appropriate utilization of such filters in cancer patients. Methods: The case of a 43-year-old female patient with rectal cancer, who developed deep vein thrombosis following a complicated medical course, will be presented. The patient was anticoagulated with a low molecular weight heparin, but a few months later and following an episode of bleeding, an IVC filter was planned. Using the PubMed database, articles published in English language addressing issues related to IVC filters in cancer patients were accessed and will be presented. Results: Many recent studies questioned the need to insert IVC filters in advanced-stage cancer patients, particularly those whose anticipated survival is short and prevention of PE may be of little clinical benefit and could be a poor utilization of resources. Conclusion: Systemic anticoagulation can be safely offered for the majority of cancer patients. When the risk of bleeding or pulmonary embolism is high, IVC filters can be utilized. However, placement of such filters should take into consideration the stage of disease and life expectancy of such patients. PMID:21479140

  19. Inferior vena cava filters in cancer patients: to filter or not to filter.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Razeq, Hikmat; Mansour, Asem; Ismael, Yousef; Abdulelah, Hazem

    2011-01-01

    Cancer and its treatment are recognized risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE); active cancer accounts for almost 20% of all newly diagnosed VTE. Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are utilized to provide mechanical thromboprophylaxis to prevent pulmonary embolism (PE) or to avoid bleeding from systemic anticoagulation in high-risk situations. In this report, and utilizing a case study, we will address the appropriate utilization of such filters in cancer patients. The case of a 43-year-old female patient with rectal cancer, who developed deep vein thrombosis following a complicated medical course, will be presented. The patient was anticoagulated with a low molecular weight heparin, but a few months later and following an episode of bleeding, an IVC filter was planned. Using the PubMed database, articles published in English language addressing issues related to IVC filters in cancer patients were accessed and will be presented. Many recent studies questioned the need to insert IVC filters in advanced-stage cancer patients, particularly those whose anticipated survival is short and prevention of PE may be of little clinical benefit and could be a poor utilization of resources. Systemic anticoagulation can be safely offered for the majority of cancer patients. When the risk of bleeding or pulmonary embolism is high, IVC filters can be utilized. However, placement of such filters should take into consideration the stage of disease and life expectancy of such patients.

  20. Central venous catheter placement in the inferior vena cava via the direct translumbar approach.

    PubMed

    Elduayen, B; Martínez-Cuesta, A; Vivas, I; Delgado, C; Pueyo, J C; Bilbao, J I

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical aspects and efficacy of placing tunneled central venous access catheters (CVA) in the inferior vena cava (IVC) via a direct translumbar approach. Between August 1994 and July 1998, 50 CVA (Hickman 13.5 F) were placed in the IVC via a direct translumbar approach in 46 patients (10 males, 36 females) with a mean age of 39.9 years (age range 10-87 years). The indications were chemotherapy administration plus leukoaphoresis (n = 39), bone marrow transplantation (n = 2) and hemodialysis (n = 5). The reasons for placing the CVA in the IVC were cosmetic (n = 34), supradiaphragmatic venous thrombosis (n = 8), previous catheter infection (n = 2), and non-functioning arteriovenous fistula (n = 2). There were no immediate complications. The mean period of time the CVA was in place was 3 months (15 days to 15 months), during which the function was excellent. The commonest late complication was infection (4 local, 6 bacteremia). Others included: pain (n = 2), ureteric fistula (n = 1), pericatheter fibrin sheath formation (n = 6) and catheter-tip impaction (n = 2). Two catheters were damaged due to postprocedural inappropriate manipulations and two others fell off due to incorrect fixation. Due to these complications, it was necessary to remove ten catheters, replace an additional four and reposition two. Direct translumbar catheterization of the IVC is a safe and effective way of placing a long-term CVA with a moderate complication rate.

  1. [Application of suprarenal inferior vena cava filter placement in patients with venous thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Huang, Qianxin; Zhang, Qingqiao; Xu, Hao; Zu, Maoheng; Gu, Yuming; Wei, Ning; Xu, Wei; Cui, Yanfeng

    2015-07-07

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of suprarenal inferior vena cava (IVC) filter implantation in patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE). Between May 2006 and December 2014, 28 patients with VTE underwent suprarenal IVC filter implantation, anticoagulant treatment and/or catheter-directed thrombolysis at the affiliated hospital of Xuzhou medical college. Follow up examination with color Doppler ultrasound was taken after treatment to eassess the patency of IVC. One filter was successfully implanted in suprarenal IVC in each patient intraoperatively. The filter was retrieved in 26 patients after indwelling of 5 to 17 (mean 11 ± 3) days. The filter was permanently indwelled in 2 patients. There were no complications of filter tilt and migration in all cases. Twenty eight patients were followed up for 2 to 104 (mean 34 ± 34) months. None of the 2 patients whose filters were permanently indwelled presented complications of recurrent pulmonary embolism and IVC occlusion due to the filter. Among 26 patients whose filters were retrieved, the IVC was patent. Suprarenal IVC filter placement is a safe and effective method in the treatment of VTE.

  2. Inferior vena cava collapsibility detects fluid responsiveness among spontaneously breathing critically-ill patients.

    PubMed

    Corl, Keith A; George, Naomi R; Romanoff, Justin; Levinson, Andrew T; Chheng, Darin B; Merchant, Roland C; Levy, Mitchell M; Napoli, Anthony M

    2017-05-12

    Measurement of inferior vena cava collapsibility (cIVC) by point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has been proposed as a viable, non-invasive means of assessing fluid responsiveness. We aimed to determine the ability of cIVC to identify patients who will respond to additional intravenous fluid (IVF) administration among spontaneously breathing critically-ill patients. Prospective observational trial of spontaneously breathing critically-ill patients. cIVC was obtained 3cm caudal from the right atrium and IVC junction using POCUS. Fluid responsiveness was defined as a≥10% increase in cardiac index following a 500ml IVF bolus; measured using bioreactance (NICOM™, Cheetah Medical). cIVC was compared with fluid responsiveness and a cIVC optimal value was identified. Of the 124 participants, 49% were fluid responders. cIVC was able to detect fluid responsiveness: AUC=0.84 [0.76, 0.91]. The optimum cutoff point for cIVC was identified as 25% (LR+ 4.56 [2.72, 7.66], LR- 0.16 [0.08, 0.31]). A cIVC of 25% produced a lower misclassification rate (16.1%) for determining fluid responsiveness than the previous suggested cutoff values of 40% (34.7%). IVC collapsibility, as measured by POCUS, performs well in distinguishing fluid responders from non-responders, and may be used to guide IVF resuscitation among spontaneously breathing critically-ill patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Disintegration of the 'waterfall phenomenon' in the inferior vena cava due to right heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kira, S; Dambara, T; Mieno, T; Tamaki, S; Natori, H

    1996-03-01

    The concept of the waterfall phenomenon in Zone 2 in the pulmonary vasculature is well known from West's lung model. It is believed that the flow through this zone is determined by the pressure difference between the pulmonary artery and alveoli, and the left atrial pressure is not transmissible to the alveolar capillaries. However, it is impossible to see whether alveolar capillaries are really displaying the waterfall phenomenon or not. In this review, the interrelation between the flow and geometry of the alveolar capillaries in the waterfall phenomenon is analyzed based on physiological studies using a model system and isolated lung lobe experiments. Further, extending the concept to the analysis of ventilatory changes of the inferior vena cava (IVC) configuration, it is ascertained that the waterfall phenomenon normally occurs in the IVC during inspiration just before it enters the thorax and the waterfall phenomenon in the IVC disintegrates with elevation of the central venous pressure. Because these configurations of the IVC in normal and abnormal conditions are visible with ultrasonography, the technique is very useful as a noninvasive approach to diagnose right heart failure.

  4. Retrieval of TRAPEASE and OPTEASE Inferior Vena Cava Filters with Extended Dwell Times.

    PubMed

    Scher, Daniel; Venbrux, Anthony; Okapal, Kevin; Gabriel, Gaby; Dufour, Robert; Chun, Albert; Sarin, Shawn; Akman, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    To demonstrate that OPTEASE and TRAPEASE filters can be removed after dwell times greater than 60 days. A retrospective review was performed of patients who underwent an attempted removal of a TRAPEASE or OPTEASE filter with a greater than 60-day dwell time between 2009 and 2015 at a single institution. Eleven patients within that time span were identified, and 10 were included in the review. One patient was excluded from the study because the date of filter placement was unknown. All filters were successfully retrieved. The average dwell time for removed TRAPEASE filters was 1,273 days (range, 129-3,582 d), with a median of 492 days (n = 5). The average dwell time for OPTEASE filters was 977 days (range, 123-2,584 d), with a median of 661 days (n = 5). The average dwell time of all filters was 1,125 days (range, 123-3,582 d), with a median of 577 days (n = 10). All patients exhibited inferior vena cava (IVC) stenosis after filter retrieval. An IVC pseudoaneurysm was present following retrieval in one case and resolved. In one case, a fractured filter strut was left completely embedded in the caval wall. Two patients reported unilateral leg swelling on clinical follow-up, and the remainder reported no leg swelling or tightness. Initial experience suggests that TRAPEASE and OPTEASE filters can be removed after extended dwell times. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Systematic review of the use of retrievable inferior vena cava filters.

    PubMed

    Angel, Luis F; Tapson, Victor; Galgon, Richard E; Restrepo, Marcos I; Kaufman, John

    2011-11-01

    To review the available literature on retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filters to examine the effectiveness and risks of these devices. Investigators searched MEDLINE for clinical trials evaluating retrievable filters and reviewed the complications reported to the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Eligibility criteria were met by 37 studies comprising 6,834 patients. All of the trials had limitations, and no studies were randomized. There were 11 prospective clinical trials; the rest were retrospective studies. Despite the limitations of the evidence, the IVC filters seemed to be effective in preventing pulmonary embolism (PE); the rate of PE after IVC placement was 1.7%. The mean retrieval rate was 34%. Most of the filters became permanent devices. Multiple complications associated with the use of IVC filters were described in the reviewed literature or were reported to the MAUDE database; most of these were associated with long-term use (> 30 days). At the present time, the objective comparison data of different filter designs do not support superiority of any particular design. In high-risk patients for whom anticoagulation is not feasible, retrievable IVC filters seem to be effective in preventing PE. Long-term complications are a serious concern with the use of these filters. The evidence of the effectiveness and the risks was limited by the small number of prospective studies. Copyright © 2011 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A computational method for predicting inferior vena cava filter performance on a patient-specific basis.

    PubMed

    Aycock, Kenneth I; Campbell, Robert L; Manning, Keefe B; Sastry, Shankar P; Shontz, Suzanne M; Lynch, Frank C; Craven, Brent A

    2014-08-01

    A computational methodology for simulating virtual inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placement and IVC hemodynamics was developed and demonstrated in two patient-specific IVC geometries: a left-sided IVC and an IVC with a retroaortic left renal vein. An inverse analysis was performed to obtain the approximate in vivo stress state for each patient vein using nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA). Contact modeling was then used to simulate IVC filter placement. Contact area, contact normal force, and maximum vein displacements were higher in the retroaortic IVC than in the left-sided IVC (144 mm(2), 0.47 N, and 1.49 mm versus 68 mm(2), 0.22 N, and 1.01 mm, respectively). Hemodynamics were simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), with four cases for each patient-specific vein: (1) IVC only, (2) IVC with a placed filter, (3) IVC with a placed filter and model embolus, all at resting flow conditions, and (4) IVC with a placed filter and model embolus at exercise flow conditions. Significant hemodynamic differences were observed between the two patient IVCs, with the development of a right-sided jet, larger flow recirculation regions, and lower maximum flow velocities in the left-sided IVC. These results support further investigation of IVC filter placement and hemodynamics on a patient-specific basis.

  7. Factors associated with failed retrieval of the Günther Tulip inferior vena cava filter.

    PubMed

    Marquess, Joel S; Burke, Charles T; Beecham, Ashley H; Dixon, Robert G; Stavas, Joseph M; Sag, Alan A; Koch, Gary G; Mauro, Matthew A

    2008-09-01

    To identify potential factors associated with failed retrieval of the Günther Tulip inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. A retrospective review was performed of patients who underwent placement of the Günther Tulip filter with at least one attempt at filter retrieval over a 3-year period. Patient demographics, filter dwell time, filter angulation, and filter leg protrusion were analyzed. A total of 188 patients were included in the study. Primary retrieval success was achieved in 166 patients (88.3%), for an overall retrieval success rate of 94.2%. The overall mean dwell time was 63 days, whereas the mean dwell time in cases of retrieval failure was 95.4 days. A total of seven filters were in place for longer than 6 months, four of which were successfully retrieved. The degree of filter tilt was not found to be significantly related to retrieval success (P = .36), even though filter angulation was commonly cited as a reason for retrieval failure. On venography, 90.9% of filters that could not be retrieved showed leg protrusion beyond the lumen of the IVC. Finally, increasing patient age also correlated with retrieval failure (P = .01). Prolonged dwell time and increasing patient age are associated with failed filter retrieval. However, even filters in place for extended periods can be safely removed.

  8. Retrievable Gunther Tulip inferior vena cava filter: experience in 317 patients.

    PubMed

    Given, M F; McDonald, B C; Brookfield, P; Niggemeyer, L; Kossmann, T; Varma, D K; Thomson, K R; Lyon, S M

    2008-10-01

    The aim of our study was to assess our experience with the retrievable Gunther Tulip (GT) inferior vena cava (IVC) filter, with regard to its insertion, efficacy, ease of placement and retrieval, and associated complications. Between November 2001 and October 2005, 322 GT filters were placed in 317 patients. Insertion indications included the following: pulmonary embolus (PE) prophylaxis in trauma patients (n = 232), PE prophylaxis in perioperative patients (n = 27), PE prophylaxis in moribund intensive care unit patients (n = 22), recent PE (n = 48), extensive deep venous thrombosis (n = 66), contraindication to anticoagulation (n = 63), anticoagulation complication (n = 8) and deep venous thrombosis with failed anticoagulation (n = 8). Some patients had more than one indication for caval filter placement. Two hundred and five attempted retrievals have been carried out, with 15 failures. Our successful retrieval rate is 92%. Nineteen filters were originally inserted permanently. There have been three minor complications associated with insertion and five with retrieval. The mean time from filter insertion to attempted retrieval was 76.95 days. The ideal filter implantation time gives the patient the benefit of PE protection, while avoiding the long-term risks associated with caval filters. Although GT retrieval times have lengthened considerably, our data suggest that this is at the expense of successful retrieval rates.

  9. The Guenther temporary inferior vena cava filter for short-term protection against pulmonary embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Vos, Louwerens D.; Tielbeek, Alexander V.; Bom, Ernst P.; Gooszen, Harm C.; Vroegindeweij, Dammis

    1997-03-15

    Purpose. To evaluate clinically the Guenther temporary inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. Methods. Eleven IVC filters were placed in 10 patients. Indications for filter placement were surgical pulmonary embolectomy in seven patients, pulmonary embolism in two patients, and free-floating iliofemoral thrombus in one patient. Eight filters were inserted from the right femoral approach, three filters from the left. Follow-up was by plain abdominal radiographs, cavography, and duplex ultrasound (US). Eight patients received systemic heparinization. Follow-up, during 4-60 months after filter removal was by clinical assessment, and imaging of the lungs was performed when pulmonary embolism (PE) was suspected. Patients received anticoagulation therapy for at least 6 months. Results. Ten filters were removed without complications 7-14 days (mean 10 days) after placement. One restless patient pulled the filter back into the common femoral vein, and a permanent filter was placed. In two patients a permanent filter was placed prior to removal. One patient developed sepsis, and one an infection at the insertion site. Clinically no recurrent PE developed with the filter in place or during removal. One patient had recurrent PE 7 months after filter removal. Conclusion. The Guenther temporary IVC filter can be safely placed for short-term protection against PE. The use of this filter is not appropriate in agitated or immunocompromised patients.

  10. Echocardiographic Characterization of the Inferior Vena Cava in Trained and Untrained Females.

    PubMed

    Hedman, Kristofer; Nylander, Eva; Henriksson, Jan; Bjarnegård, Niclas; Brudin, Lars; Tamás, Éva

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the long- and short-axis dimensions, shape and collapsibility of the inferior vena cava in 46 trained and 48 untrained females (mean age: 21 ± 2 y). Echocardiography in the subcostal view revealed a larger expiratory long-axis diameter (mean: 24 ± 3 vs. 20 ± 3 mm, p < 0.001) and short-axis area (mean: 5.5 ± 1.5 vs. 4.7 ± 1.4 cm(2), p = 0.014) in trained females. IVC shape (the ratio of short-axis major to minor diameters) and the relative decrease in IVC dimension with inspiration were similar for the two groups. The IVC long-axis diameter reflected short-axis minor diameter and was correlated to maximal oxygen uptake (r = 0.52, p < 0.01). In summary, the results indicate that trained females have a larger IVC similar in shape and respiratory decrease in dimensions to that of untrained females. The long-axis diameter corresponded closely to short-axis minor diameter and, thus, underestimates maximal IVC diameter.

  11. Congenital Vitelline Band Causing Intestinal Obstruction in an Adult with a Double Inferior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Pussepitiya, Kumari; Samarasinghe, Bandula; Wickramasinghe, Nuwan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Vitelline artery remnants are rare causes of intra-abdominal bands leading to bowel obstruction. These bands may be associated with Meckel's diverticulum. Double inferior vena cava (IVC) is a rare presentation and is usually identified incidentally. Case Presentation. A sixty-year-old male presented with progressive vomiting for five days and he was clinically diagnosed with intestinal obstruction. Plain X-ray abdomen showed evidence of small bowel obstruction. CT scan of the abdomen revealed dilated small bowel loops with a small outpouching in the distal ileum with a band like structure attached to it. In the CT, left sided patent IVC draining into the left renal vein was identified. Left external iliac vein was in continuity with the left IVC. Left internal iliac vein was draining into the right IVC. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a Meckel's diverticulum with a band identified as the vitelline remnant attached to its apex and inserting at the anterior abdominal wall near the umbilicus. Discussion. Meckel's diverticulum with vitelline bands, although rare, should be borne in mind in adult patients with intestinal obstruction. Identification of this anomaly can be difficult in imaging studies. Presence of double IVC should be mentioned in the imaging findings to prevent possible catastrophic complications during surgery. PMID:27843667

  12. Evidence-Based Evaluation of Inferior Vena Cava Filter Complications Based on Filter Type

    PubMed Central

    Deso, Steven E.; Idakoji, Ibrahim A.; Kuo, William T.

    2016-01-01

    Many inferior vena cava (IVC) filter types, along with their specific risks and complications, are not recognized. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the various FDA-approved IVC filter types to determine device-specific risks, as a way to help identify patients who may benefit from ongoing follow-up versus prompt filter retrieval. An evidence-based electronic search (FDA Premarket Notification, MEDLINE, FDA MAUDE) was performed to identify all IVC filter types and device-specific complications from 1980 to 2014. Twenty-three IVC filter types (14 retrievable, 9 permanent) were identified. The devices were categorized as follows: conical (n = 14), conical with umbrella (n = 1), conical with cylindrical element (n = 2), biconical with cylindrical element (n = 2), helical (n = 1), spiral (n = 1), and complex (n = 1). Purely conical filters were associated with the highest reported risks of penetration (90–100%). Filters with cylindrical or umbrella elements were associated with the highest reported risk of IVC thrombosis (30–50%). Conical Bard filters were associated with the highest reported risks of fracture (40%). The various FDA-approved IVC filter types were evaluated for device-specific complications based on best current evidence. This information can be used to guide and optimize clinical management in patients with indwelling IVC filters. PMID:27247477

  13. Inferior Vena Cava Repair Using Serosal Patch of Small Bowel: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Hodjati, Hossein; Hoseinzadeh, Ahmad; Mousavi, Seyed Masoud; Dehghani Nazhavi, Seifollah; Kumar, Viginda; Sehhatpour, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and results of using serosal patch of small bowel for repair and replacement of inferior vena cava (IVC) after resection of a part of infra-renal IVC in an animal model, as it may be encountered in extensive tumors of retroperitoneal and trauma patients. Methods: Five healthy sheep of both sexes were prepared. After general anesthesia and laparotomy, a defect with 1 cm width and 4cm length was made on anterior aspect of infra-renal IVC, and then an adjacent loop of small bowel was brought and sutured continuously to cover the defect of IVC as a patch graft. The observation period was two months. Results: Three of five IVCs were macroscopically patent without stenosis and thrombosis. Pathologic assay revealed complete endothelialization of serosal surface of the patch of small bowel loop. One of IVCs was completely occluded in gross evaluation and fibrous formation in pathologist review. The sheep had no sign of venous hypertension and edema of limbs. One sheep died at the night of first operation due to internal bleeding.   Conclusion: Serosal patch of small bowel is an accessible and feasible alternative in repair and reconstruction of IVC especially when there is restriction for use of prosthetic material in a contaminated space of abdomen. PMID:28246620

  14. Umbilical venous pressure and Doppler flow pattern of inferior vena cava in the fetus.

    PubMed

    Okamura, K; Murotsuki, J; Kobayashi, M; Yano, M; Tanigawara, S; Uehara, S; Yajima, A

    1994-07-01

    Umbilical venous blood pressure (UVP) was measured at fetal blood sampling using cordocentesis in 113 fetuses. Among these, both inferior vena cava (IVC) Doppler flow pattern, when the preload index was set as a parameter of reversed flow, and UVP were measured in 50 fetuses. We evaluated whether direct measurement of UVP, representing fetal central venous pressure, could be replaced by an assessment of reversed IVC blood flow. Normal mean UVP was 4.89 +/- 3.22 mm Hg, whereas no correlation was observed between UVP and gestational week. When the extent of reversed blood flow from the right atrium to the IVC was expressed as a preload index (PLI), there was a significant correlation between the index and UVP (r = 0.463; P < 0.001). When the abnormal range of PLI was set at 0.45, the sensitivity of an estimate of abnormal UVP (more than 1.5 SD plus the mean) was 0.54 and the specificity was 0.89. Measurement of UVP is necessary for the prediction of fetal cardiac function. PLI can be substituted for the UVP measurement. However, PLI should be supplemented with other parameters for an accurate fetal cardiac function evaluation.

  15. The Importance of Hemorheology and Patient Anatomy on the Hemodynamics in the Inferior Vena Cava.

    PubMed

    Aycock, Kenneth I; Campbell, Robert L; Lynch, Frank C; Manning, Keefe B; Craven, Brent A

    2016-12-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters have been used for nearly half a century to prevent pulmonary embolism in at-risk patients. However, complications with IVC filters remain common. In this study, we investigate the importance of considering the hemorheological and morphological effects on IVC hemodynamics by simulating Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood flow in three IVC models with varying levels of geometric idealization. Partial occlusion by an IVC filter and a thrombus is also considered. More than 99% of the infrarenal IVC volume is found to contain flow in the nonlinear region of the shear rate-viscosity curve for blood (less than 100 s(-1)) in the unoccluded IVCs. Newtonian simulations performed using the asymptotic viscosity for blood over-predict the non-Newtonian Reynolds numbers by more than a factor of two and under-predict the mean wall shear stress (WSS) by 28-54%. Agreement with the non-Newtonian simulations is better using a characteristic viscosity, but local WSS errors are still large (up to 50%) in the partially occluded cases. Secondary flow patterns in the IVC also depend on the viscosity model and IVC morphological complexity. Non-Newtonian simulations required only a marginal increase in computational expense compared with the Newtonian simulations. We recommend that future studies of IVC hemodynamics consider the effects of hemorheology and IVC morphology when accurate predictions of WSS and secondary flow features are desired.

  16. Assessment of Snared-Loop Technique When Standard Retrieval of Inferior Vena Cava Filters Fails

    SciTech Connect

    Doody, Orla Noe, Geertje; Given, Mark F.; Foley, Peter T.; Lyon, Stuart M.

    2009-01-15

    Purpose To identify the success and complications related to a variant technique used to retrieve inferior vena cava filters when simple snare approach has failed. Methods A retrospective review of all Cook Guenther Tulip filters and Cook Celect filters retrieved between July 2006 and February 2008 was performed. During this period, 130 filter retrievals were attempted. In 33 cases, the standard retrieval technique failed. Retrieval was subsequently attempted with our modified retrieval technique. Results The retrieval was successful in 23 cases (mean dwell time, 171.84 days; range, 5-505 days) and unsuccessful in 10 cases (mean dwell time, 162.2 days; range, 94-360 days). Our filter retrievability rates increased from 74.6% with the standard retrieval method to 92.3% when the snared-loop technique was used. Unsuccessful retrieval was due to significant endothelialization (n = 9) and caval penetration by the filter (n = 1). A single complication occurred in the group, in a patient developing pulmonary emboli after attempted retrieval. Conclusion The technique we describe increased the retrievability of the two filters studied. Hook endothelialization is the main factor resulting in failed retrieval and continues to be a limitation with these filters.

  17. Histology of Tissue Adherent to OptEase Inferior Vena Cava Filters Regarding Indwelling Time

    SciTech Connect

    Rimon, Uri Volkov, Alexander; Garniek, Alexander; Golan, Gil; Bensaid, Paul; Khaitovich, Boris; Abu-Salah, Kamel; Zissin, Rivka; Simon, Daniel; Konen, Eli

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the histology of tissues found on retrieved filters with regard to indwelling time. Between February 2006 and January 2007, 28 Optease inferior vena cava filters (Cordis Europa, Roden, The Netherlands) were retrieved from 27 patients. Twenty-two filters were inserted prophylactically for trauma patients and six for patients with venous thromboembolism. Cavography was performed both before and after filter removal to evaluate the presence of thrombi or wall damage. Filters were retrieved with the snare and sheath method. All material adherents to the filters were examined histologically.The mean indwelling time of the filters was 24.9 days (range, 6-69 days). Red tissue fragments were seen on all the filters, consistent microscopically with clots and fibrin. On five filters (18%; mean indwelling time, 45.4 days) white tissue consistent with vascular intima was found. All postprocedure cavographies were normal. We conclude that most material adherent to the retrieved filters is thrombi, while vascular intima can be found in the minority of filters with a longer indwelling time.

  18. Improving the Tracking and Removal of Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters

    PubMed Central

    Goei, Anthony D.; Josephs, Shellie C.; Kinney, Thomas B.; Ray, Charles E.; Sacks, David

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic and prophylactic inferior vena cava (IVC) filters should be placed based on currently accepted indications to prevent a fatal pulmonary embolism (PE). The protective effect of filters is offset by the potential for lower extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT), caval thrombosis, and possible otherwise unnecessary life-long anticoagulation (AC). The duration of treatment for most DVTs or PEs is 3 to 6 months of AC/filter. Filters should be retrieved when duration of treatment for a DVT/PE has been met, the risk of a PE is no longer high, and/or there is no longer a contraindication to AC. An effective system that leads to improving the retrieval rate of filters must include education of the patient, a tracking system to minimize patient lost to follow-up, and dedicated personnel to oversee the process. If these goals are accomplished, interventionalists can help decrease the incidence of a fatal PE during the high-risk period, and also decrease the risk of a DVT or the use of otherwise unnecessary life-long AC in subsequent years. Currently, there is much room for improvement in the frequency that IVCF patients are systematically followed and filters are retrieved. The principles discussed in this report will be helpful in this process. PMID:22379282

  19. Management of Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of the Kidney with Inferior Vena Cava Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sahil; Majumder, Kaustav; Chahal, Anurag; Saini, Ashish K.; Gupta, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) are an aggressive group of small round cell tumors usually arising in the nervous system and affecting children. They have a tendency for local invasion, distant spread and formation of tumor thrombi. The kidney is a rare primary location for these tumors. Outcomes are frequently poor due to late diagnosis (Wilms tumor is a more common tumor in this population) and early spread. Immunohistochemistry is invaluable in making the diagnosis of PNET. We report a case of a primary renal PNET with extensive tumor thrombus into the inferior vena cava, and lung metastasis in a pediatric patient, and its successful management. Our 14-year-old patient with renal PNET was managed with radical nephrectomy, thrombectomy and chemotherapy and remains disease free to date. The diagnosis of renal PNETs should be considered in young adult patients who present with aggressive renal masses at initial presentations. Despite its aggressive nature, good outcomes can be achieved by a multimodality therapeutic strategy. PMID:26989372

  20. Clinical Outcome after Intrahepatic Venous Stent Placement for Malignant Inferior Vena Cava Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Brountzos, Elias N.; Binkert, Christoph A.; Panagiotou, Irene E.; Petersen, Bryan D.; Timmermans, Hans; Lakin, Paul C.

    2004-03-15

    We evaluated the clinical outcome of malignant inferior vena cava (IVC) syndrome after intrahepatic IVC stent placement by retrospective analysis of 50 consecutive patients (25 men, 25 women, age 32-83 years) with malignant IVC syndrome who were treated with intrahepatic stent placement. Gianturco-Rosch-Z (GRZ) stents (n = 45), and Wallstents (n = 5) were inserted. Clinical outcome was assessed from patients' records using a score based on leg swelling, scrotal/vulvar edema, ascites and anasarca before and after stent placement, as well as at last follow-up visit before death. Clinical follow-up was supplemented by duplex sonography in 36 patients. Inferior venocavography was performed in 5 patients prior to re- intervention. Follow-up time ranged from 1 to 932 days (mean 62 days). Mean pressure gradient in the IVC was reduced from 14 {+-} 4.1 mmHg before to 2.9 {+-} 3.2 mmHg after stent placement (p < 0.001). Four patients had stent occlusion, 2 of whom were successfully re-stented. Primary and secondary patency was 59% and 100%, respectively at 540 days. Immediate clinical data were available in 44 patients: 38 improved; 6 did not respond. Last follow-up visit data were available in 36 patients: 24 showed persistent symptom relief till death. All symptom scores were significantly improved after stent placement (p < 0.001) and with the exception of ascites, remained significantly improved (p < 0.05) until the last follow-up. Increased serum bilirubin was a common characteristic of clinical failures and recurrences. Intrahepatic IVC stent placement resulted in significant symptomatic relief in patients with malignant IVC syndrome. Palliation was effective even in patients with a very short life expectancy.

  1. [Indications of the different routes of inferior vena cava for inserting the clip of Adams De Weese (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Inglesakis, J A; Migliori, G

    1980-09-01

    Partial occlusion of inferior vena cava with clip of Adams De Weese is now currently performed in cavo-iliac thrombosis. The authors recall technical modalities for inserting clip and they try to bring to light the indications of each modality according to following parameters: upper level thrombosis, state of abdominal cavity, general condition of the patient and researched result: temporary or definitive artial oclusion, with or without associated thrombectomy. In localizations under renal veins, a definitive partial occlusion is indicated by sub-mesocolic way, eventually retro-peritoneal way in case of poor risk; it is a fact that associated thrombectomy will be realized easily, only by transmesenteric and submesocolic way. In localizations above renal veins, the authors think that transpericardiac way which allow temporary occlusion and thrombectomy of retro-hepatic part of vena cava is indicated.

  2. Excimer laser-assisted removal of embedded inferior vena cava filters: a single-center prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kuo, William T; Odegaard, Justin I; Rosenberg, Jarrett K; Hofmann, Lawrence V

    2013-10-01

    Although chronically implanted inferior vena cava filters may result in filter-related morbidity, there is currently no routine option for removing such filters when they become firmly embedded along the vena cava endothelium. During a 3-year period, 100 consecutive patients were prospectively enrolled in a single-center study. There were 42 men and 58 women (mean age, 46 years; limits, 18-76 years). Retrieval indications included filter-related acute inferior vena cava thrombosis, chronic inferior vena cava occlusion, and pain from retroperitoneal or bowel penetration. Filter retrieval was also performed to prevent risks from prolonged implantation and to potentially eliminate the need for lifelong anticoagulation. After standard methods failed, photothermal tissue ablation was attempted with a laser sheath powered by a 308-nm xenon chloride excimer laser. Applied forces were recorded with a digital tension meter before and during laser activation. Laser-assisted retrieval was successful in 98.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 93.0%-99.8%) with mean implantation of 855 days (limits, 37-6663 days; >18 years). The following filter types were encountered in this study: Günther-Tulip (n=34), Celect (n=12), Option (n=17), Optease (n=20, 1 failure), TrapEase (n=6, 1 failure), Simon-Nitinol (n=1), 12F Stainless Steel Greenfield (n=4), and Titanium Greenfield (n=6). The average force during failed standard retrievals was 7.2 versus 4.6 pounds during laser-assisted retrievals (P<0.0001). The major complication rate was 3.0% (95% CI, 0.6%-8.5%), the minor complication rate was 7.0% (95% CI, 0.3%-13.9%), and there were 4 adverse events (2 coagulopathic hemorrhages, 1 renal infarction, and 1 cholecystitis; 4.0%; 95% CI, 1.1%-9.9%) at mean follow-up of 500 days (limits, 84-1079 days). Scar tissue ablation was histologically confirmed in 96.0% (95% CI, 89.9%-98.9%). Successful retrieval allowed cessation of anticoagulation in 30 of 30 (100%) patients and alleviated morbidity

  3. Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Inferior Vena Cava and Right Atrial Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, M. C. Chuang, V. P. Cheng, T. Lin, Z. H. Lin, Y. M.

    2008-07-15

    Advanced hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC) with invasion of venous systems usually indicates not only a poor prognosis but also a contraindication for transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). This study evaluated the feasibility of TACE for advanced HCC with inferior vena cava (IVC) and right atrium (RA) tumors and, also, to search for the ideal embolization particle size. Twenty-six patients who had HCC invasion into the IVC included five patients with coexistent RA tumors that were treated with TACE. The chemoembolization method was cisplatin, doxorubicin, and mitomycin C mixed with Lipiodol and Ivalon. The selection of Ivalon particles was divided into two groups based on their size: (A) >180 {mu}m, N = 9; and (B) 47-180 {mu}m, N = 17. The overall response rate was 53.8% (14/26). Based on the response to TACE, the median survival period of the entire group was 4.2 months (range, 1.5 to 76.7 months). The median survival period of the 14 responders was 13.5 months (1.5-76.7 months), and that of the 12 nonresponders, 3.3 months (2.1 to 24.3 months) (p < 0.002). Comparing the two Ivalon particle sizes, the response rate was 12.5% (1/9 patients) for group A and 76.5% for group B (13/17 patients) (p < 0.02). No serious complication was observed post-chemoembolization. In conclusion, TACE is a safe and effective treatment for advanced HCC with IVC and RA tumors, and small Ivalon particles (47-180 {mu}m) are superior to large ones (>180 {mu}m).

  4. A systematic review of symptomatic duodenal perforation by inferior vena cava filters.

    PubMed

    Malgor, Rafael D; Labropoulos, Nicos

    2012-03-01

    A systematic review of the literature on symptomatic duodenal perforation caused by inferior vena cava (IVC) filters. Three databases, PubMed MEDLINE, Web of Sciences, and Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS), reference lists of review articles and conference proceedings were searched. All articles containing data on clinical presentation, diagnostic strategy, and available treatment of symptomatic duodenal perforation caused by an IVC filter were included regardless of design, language, size, or length of follow-up. Seventy-two articles were selected for full-text screening, being 21 case reports were selected. The median age was 46 years old (range, 21-83 years old). Abdominal pain was reported in 11 patients and gastrointestinal bleed in 5 patients. The indications for IVC filter placement in this cohort of patients were contraindication of anticoagulation and recurrent pulmonary embolism (PE) despite therapeutic levels in 8 and 5 patients, respectively. Three different imaging modalities were obtained in 9 patients (43%) before confirming the diagnosis. All but 1 patient underwent open approach through laparotomy with or without removal of the filter. No PEs or deaths were reported and only 1 patient had a severe clinical complication of IVC and bilateral iliac vein thrombosis with massive lower extremities edema. Duodenal perforation caused by IVC filters is a rare complication that frequently requires extensive workup. Excellent outcomes with low complication rate have been reported in cases where an open procedure was performed with either extraction of the filter or removal of the offending struts. Copyright © 2012 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Patency and Clinical Outcome After Stent Placement for Chronic Obstruction of the Inferior Vena Cava.

    PubMed

    Grøtta, O; Enden, T; Sandbæk, G; Gjerdalen, G F; Slagsvold, C-E; Bay, D; Kløw, N-E; Rosales, A

    2017-08-07

    The objective was to assess the technical success, patency, and clinical outcome after stent placement for chronic obstruction of the inferior vena cava (IVC). A retrospective analysis was carried out of patients with chronic IVC obstruction verified with computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance venography, accepted for stent placement at the Norwegian National Unit for Reconstructive Deep Venous Surgery from March 2010 to September 2015. Clinical status was categorized according to the CEAP classification and symptom severity was assessed using venous clinical severity score (VCSS). Stent patency was evaluated by colour duplex ultrasound. Large -diameter Wallstents were placed in the IVC and concurrent iliac and femoral obstructions via right internal jugular and femoral vein access. Sixteen patients presented with symptoms of chronic venous disease. Four patients had symptoms assumed to be related to a reduced cardiac preload. Twelve patients had IVC occlusion and eight had stenosis. Median follow-up was 25 months (range 3-70 months). Stent placement in the IVC was successful in 19 of 20 patients. Primary patency after 24 months was 67% and secondary patency 83%. Fifteen of 19 patients had open stents at final follow-up. Re-interventions were performed in four patients and included catheter directed thrombolysis in all and adjunctive stenting in three. Thirteen of 19 patients (68%) reported a sustained and significant clinical improvement. Mean VCSS improved from 8.5 (range 3-25) at baseline to 7 (range 2-23) at final follow-up (p = .007). There were no peri-procedural or long-term complications. The endovascular approach with stent placement for chronic IVC obstruction is a safe treatment option that should be offered to patients who otherwise have little opportunity for sustained clinical improvement. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Inferior Vena Cava Filters to Prevent Pulmonary Embolism: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bikdeli, Behnood; Chatterjee, Saurav; Desai, Nihar R; Kirtane, Ajay J; Desai, Mayur M; Bracken, Michael B; Spencer, Frederick A; Monreal, Manuel; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2017-09-26

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are widely used for prevention of pulmonary embolism (PE). However, uncertainty persists about their efficacy and safety. The authors conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the published reports on the efficacy and safety of IVC filters. The authors searched PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ClinicalTrials.gov through October 3, 2016, for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or prospective controlled observational studies of IVC filters versus none in patients at risk of PE. Inverse variance fixed-effects models with odds ratio (OR) as the effect measure were used for primary analyses. Main outcomes included subsequent PE, PE-related mortality, all-cause mortality, and subsequent deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The authors' search retrieved 1,986 studies, of which 11 met criteria for inclusion (6 RCTs and 5 prospective observational studies). Quality of evidence for RCTs was low to moderate. Overall, patients receiving IVC filters had lower risk for subsequent PE (OR: 0.50; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.33 to 0.75); increased risk for DVT (OR: 1.70; 95% CI: 1.17 to 2.48); nonsignificantly lower PE-related mortality (OR: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.25 to 1.05); and no change in all-cause mortality (OR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.70 to 1.19). Limiting the results to RCTs showed similar results. Findings were substantively similar across a wide range of sensitivity analyses. Very few prospective controlled studies, with limited quality of evidence, exist regarding the efficacy and safety of IVC filters. Overall, filters appear to reduce the risk of subsequent PE, increase the risk for DVT, and have no significant effect on overall mortality. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Catheter-directed thrombolysis combined with manual aspiration thrombectomy for acute inferior vena cava filter thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen D; Li, Cheng L; Qian, Ai M; Zhang, Ye Q; Li, Xiao Q

    2016-12-01

    The occurrence of inferior vena cava (IVC) filter thrombosis has been reported, however, the optimal treatment of IVC thrombosis has not been established yet. The aim of this study was to assess the results of catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) combined with aspiration thrombectomy (AT) in the treatment for IVC filter thrombosis. A total of 35 consecutive patients received endovascular treatment with CDT alone or CDT with AT for IVC filter thrombosis at Second Affiliated Hospital of Suzhou University from May 2009 to May 2014 were included in this study. The procedure, complications and clinical outcome between these two groups were retrospectively reviewed. The mean age of patients was 44.7±15.8 years (range: 17-74 years). The patients were consisted of 21 males and 14 females. CDT alone and CDT with AT were performed in 16 and 19 patients, respectively. The mean procedural time in the group receiving CDT alone group was longer than in the group receiving CDT with AT (99.5±51.4 vs. 64.9±35.9 hours, P<0.05) and the dose of urokinase used during the procedure was significantly lower in the CDT + AT group (2.1±1.1 vs. 1.5±0.6 million IU, P<0.05). Besides, total number of complications in the CDT + AT group was smaller than in the group treated with CDT alone (9 vs. 4 cases, P<0.05). Our results confirmed that CDT with AT was a safe and effective method in the treatment of acute IVC filter thrombosis. Compared with CDT alone, it was better performing thanks to a shorter thrombolysis time and a lower urokinase dose required. In addition, it may decrease the occurrence of complications.

  8. Inferior vena cava filter retrieval: effectiveness and complications of routine and advanced techniques.

    PubMed

    Al-Hakim, Ramsey; Kee, Stephen T; Olinger, Kristen; Lee, Edward W; Moriarty, John M; McWilliams, Justin P

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the success and safety of routine versus advanced inferior vena cava (IVC) filter retrieval techniques. A retrospective review was performed of patients who underwent IVC filter placement and/or a retrieval attempt over a 10-year period. Retrieval technique(s), preretrieval computed tomography, preretrieval venography, and clinical/imaging follow-up for 30 days after retrieval were analyzed. Mean filter dwell time was 134 days (range, 0-2,475 d). Filter retrieval was attempted 231 times in 217 patients (39% female, 61% male; mean age, 50.7 y), with success rates of 73.2% (169 of 231) and 94.7% (54 of 57) for routine and advanced filter retrieval techniques, respectively. The overall filter retrieval complication rate was 1.7% (four of 231); complications in four patients (with multiple complications in some cases) included IVC dissection, IVC intussusception, IVC thrombus/stenosis, filter fracture with embedded strut, IVC injury with hemorrhage, and vascular injury from complicated venous access. The rate of complications associated with filter retrievals that required advanced technique was significantly higher than seen with routine technique (5.3% vs 0.4%; P < .05). Longer dwell time, more transverse tilt, and presence of an embedded hook were associated with significantly increased rates of failed retrieval via routine technique (P < .05). IVC filters can be retrieved with a high overall success rate (98.2%) and a low complication rate (1.7%) by using advanced techniques when the routine approach has failed; however, the use of advanced techniques is associated with a significantly higher complication rate. Copyright © 2014 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Multicenter Cohort Study of Inferior Vena Cava Filter Use in Children.

    PubMed

    Blevins, Erin M; Glanz, Karen; Huang, Yuan-Shung V; Raffini, Leslie; Shinohara, Russell T; Witmer, Char

    2015-12-01

    To describe inferior vena cava (IVC) filter use in pediatric patients admitted to U.S. children's hospitals and to determine factors associated with prophylactic placement. This retrospective multicenter cohort study utilized data from the Pediatric Health Information Systems (PHIS) administrative database, with 44 participating children's hospitals. Subjects included for analysis were less than 21 years of age, admitted to a PHIS hospital between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2012 and had a procedure code for IVC filter placement. ICD-9-CM discharge codes were used to identify subjects with a venous thromboembolism (VTE). Pharmaceutical billing codes were used to identify anticoagulation use. During this 9-year-study period, 276 subjects met the inclusion criteria. The median age of subjects was 15 years (range 1 month-20 years). Subjects had an ICD-9-CM code for VTE 76% of the time and were started on anticoagulation after IVC filter placement 77% of the time. The mean number of IVC filters placed per year was 6 per 100,000 admissions (SD-1.4), which was constant throughout the study period (P = 0.12). The median number of filters placed by center was 4.5 (range 0-32). In multivariate analysis, subjects undergoing orthopedic surgery were more likely to have prophylactic placement of an IVC filter (OR 4.5; 95%CI 1.8-11). IVC filter placement in pediatric patients remains a rare event and is most common in adolescents. Unlike in adults, pediatric IVC filter placement does not appear to be increasing over time and is predominantly used in the setting of a venous thrombotic event. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Incidence and management of inferior vena cava filter thrombus detected at time of filter retrieval.

    PubMed

    Teo, Terence K B; Angle, John F; Shipp, John I; Bluett, Michael K; Gilliland, Charles A; Turba, Ulku C; Matsumoto, Alan H

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate inferior vena cava (IVC) venograms (ie, cavograms) before filter retrieval to determine the incidence and volume of filter thrombus relative to filter dwell time and evaluate subsequent changes in thrombus volume with additional anticoagulation. IVC filter retrieval attempts between December 2002 and June 2010 were retrospectively reviewed to determine the incidence of filter thrombus and estimate thrombus volume on a preretrieval cavogram. Correlation between filter dwell times (assessed at 30-d intervals) and incidence and volume of thrombus was assessed. Follow-up images and management of filters with thrombus that were not initially removed were analyzed. A total of 463 retrieval attempts were performed in 440 patients, with a mean filter dwell time of 95 days ± 145 (SD; range, 0-1,762 d). Thirty (6.5%) had filter thrombus on initial cavograms, with a mean thrombus volume of 2.8 cm(3) ± 7.3 (range, 0.04-40.02 cm(3)). Incidence rate and estimated thrombus volume were highest in the 0-30-day dwell interval (8.0% and 6.3 cm(3), respectively) and decreased at subsequent time intervals. On linear regression analysis, incidence of filter thrombus was inversely related to dwell time (P < .05; correlation coefficient, -0.86). Seven patients with thrombus underwent additional anticoagulation for a mean of 48 days ± 25 (range, 14-90 d); thrombus resolved completely in five (71%) and partially in one (14%), and increased in one (14%). The incidence of filter thrombus at the time of filter retrieval appears to decrease with dwell time. If thrombus is detected, an additional period of anticoagulation is likely to reduce the thrombus burden and facilitate later retrieval. Copyright © 2011 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ten-year experience of retrievable inferior vena cava filters in a tertiary referral center

    PubMed Central

    Tse, George; Cleveland, Trevor; Goode, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE A significant proportion of patients undergoing surgery have an increased incidence of acute pulmonary embolus (PE). We analyzed all patients who had a retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placed preoperatively for PE prophylaxis and investigated the long-term outcomes of the patients who did not have their filter removed. METHODS Patients who underwent retrievable IVC filter insertion and attempted removal were identified from the radiology information systems database in a large tertiary referral university teaching hospital. Results of all clinical investigations (including computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography, and plain radiography) while the IVC filters were in situ were reviewed. RESULTS In total, 393 retrievable IVC filters were inserted, 254 with the indication of preoperative thromboembolic prophylaxis. Recurrent PE was reported in five patients (1.9%) despite the IVC filter. Of the 254 retrievable filters inserted prior to surgery, an attempt at retrieval was made in 168 filters (66.1%). Successful retrieval at the first attempt occurred in 143 cases (85.1%), while 25 cases failed or were aborted (14.9%). No attempt at retrieval was made in 86 (33.9%) patients and a significant proportion of these patients had undergone cancer surgery (P < 0.0107). In those patients where there was no attempt at retrieval, there was an association between cancer surgery and a shorter absolute survival time (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION The majority of attempted filter retrievals were successful, and a proportion of nonretrieved IVC filters are accounted for in patients who underwent cancer surgery and ultimately died with the filter in situ. A departmental protocol is recommended to ensure the filter is removed where appropriate and possible. PMID:28093377

  12. Management of Fractured Inferior Vena Cava Filters: Outcomes by Fragment Location.

    PubMed

    Trerotola, Scott O; Stavropoulos, S William

    2017-09-01

    Purpose To inform the management of fractured inferior vena cava filters on the basis of results from a tertiary referral center specializing in complex filter retrieval. Materials and Methods This study had institutional review board approval and was HIPAA compliant. Retrospective analysis of all patients with fractured filters and/or filter fragments evaluated for removal in a complex filter removal program was performed. Removal was attempted when fragments were intravascular or immediately extravascular by using primarily endobronchial forceps for caval fragments and snares for cardiac and pulmonary fragments. Data collected included success rate and complications of filter and fragment removal, symptoms relating to the filter or fragment, techniques used for removal, and follow-up of retained fragments. Results Sixty-five patients (12 men, 53 women) of a total of 222 patients referred for complex retrieval had fractured filters. Of these patients, two had undergone filter removal elsewhere and had retained fragments. All 63 filters were removed successfully with forceps (n = 61), a cone (n = 1), or a snare (n = 1). There were 116 separate filter fragments; removal was attempted for 78 fragments. Removal was successful for 63 (81%) of 78 fragments and varied by location. All extravascular fragments except one were retained. In all, 63 (54%) of 116 fragments were removed percutaneously, rendering 34 (54%) of 63 patients fragment free. Five minor (7.7% [five of 65]) and four major (6.2% [four of 65]) complications occurred. Conclusion Intravascular filter fragments can be removed safely with success rates that vary according to location. Because extravascular fragments are not readily accessible for removal, many patients are not rendered fragment free. (©) RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  13. Venous thrombotic, thromboembolic, and mechanical complications after retrievable inferior vena cava filters for major trauma.

    PubMed

    Ho, K M; Tan, J A; Burrell, M; Rao, S; Misur, P

    2015-01-01

    The ideal thromboprophylaxis in patients at risk of bleeding is uncertain. This retrospective cohort study assessed the risk factors for complications after using retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filters for primary or secondary thromboembolism prophylaxis in patients after major trauma. Using data from radiology, trauma and death registries, the incidence of and risk factors for subsequent deep venous thrombosis (DVT), venous thromboembolism (VTE), and mechanical complications related to retrievable IVC filters in patients, admitted between 2007 and 2012, were assessed in a single trauma centre. Of the 2940 major trauma patients admitted during the study period, a retrievable IVC filter was used in 223 patients (7.6%). Thirty-six patients (16%) developed DVT or VTE subsequent to placement of IVC filters (median 20 days, interquartile range 9-33), including 27 with lower limb (DVT), 8 upper limb DVT, and 4 pulmonary embolism. A high Injury Severity Score, tibial/fibular fractures, and a delay in initiating pharmacological thromboprophylaxis after insertion of the filters (14 vs 7 days, P=0.001) were significant risk factors. Thirty patients were lost to follow-up (13%) and their filters were not retrieved. Mechanical complications-including filters adherent to the wall of IVC (4.9%), IVC thrombus (4.0%), and displaced or tilted filters (2.2%)-were common when the filters were left in situ for >50 days. A delay in initiating pharmacological thromboprophylaxis or filter removal were associated with an increased risk of subsequent DVT, VTE, and mechanical complications of retrievable IVC filters in patients after major trauma. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Improving the retrieval rate of inferior vena cava filters with a multidisciplinary team approach

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Elica; Farber, Alik; Eslami, Mohammad H.; Siracuse, Jeffrey J.; Rybin, Denis V.; Sarosiek, Shayna; Sloan, J. Mark; Kalish, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    Objective The option to retrieve inferior vena cava (IVC) filters has resulted in an increase in the utilization of these devices as stopgap measures in patients with relative contraindications to anticoagulation. These retrievable IVC filters, however, are often not retrieved and become permanent. Recent data from our institution confirmed a historically low retrieval rate. Therefore, we hypothesized that the implementation of a new IVC filter retrieval protocol would increase the retrieval rate of appropriate IVC filters at our institution. Methods All consecutive patients who underwent an IVC filter placement at our institution between September 2003 and July 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. In August 2012, a multidisciplinary task force was established, and a new IVC filter retrieval protocol was implemented. Prospective data were collected using a centralized interdepartmental IVC filter registry for all consecutive patients who underwent an IVC filter placement between August 2012 and September 2014. Patients were chronologically categorized into preimplementation (PRE) and postimplementation (POST) groups. Comparisons of outcome measures, including the retrieval rate of IVC filters along with rates of retrieval attempt and technical failure, were made between the two groups. Results In the PRE and POST groups, a total of 720 and 74 retrievable IVC filters were implanted, respectively. In the POST group, 40 of 74 filters (54%) were successfully retrieved compared with 82 of 720 filters (11%) in the PRE group (P < .001). Furthermore, a greater number of IVC filter retrievals were attempted in the POST group than in the PRE group (66% vs 14%; P < .001). No significant difference was observed between the PRE and POST groups for technical failure (17% vs 18%; P = .9). Conclusions The retrieval rate of retrievable IVC filters at our institution was significantly increased with the implementation of a new IVC filter retrieval protocol with a multidisciplinary

  15. Indications, applications, and outcomes of inferior vena cava filters for venous thromboembolism in Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yugo; Unoki, Takashi; Takagi, Daisuke; Hamatani, Yasuhiro; Ishii, Mitsuru; Iguchi, Moritake; Ogawa, Hisashi; Masunaga, Nobutoyo; Wada, Hiromichi; Hasegawa, Koji; Abe, Mitsuru; Akao, Masaharu

    2016-07-01

    A recent multicenter registry study of venous thromboembolism (VTE) patients in Japan demonstrated a high prevalence of inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placement. However, data regarding indications, applications, and outcomes of IVC filters in Japanese patients are quite limited. This study was an observational, single-center, retrospective cohort study of all consecutive patients with acute VTE treated between March 2006 and February 2014. Data extracted included patient demographics, indications, applications, and complications of IVC filters, as well as VTE recurrence and death. A total of 257 consecutive patients were analyzed. Seventy-eight patients (30 %) received IVC filters. The proportions of IVC filter placement were 26 % for deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) alone, 10 % for pulmonary embolism (PE) alone, and 46 % for both DVT and PE. There was no significant difference in patient demographics between the IVC filter group and no-IVC filter group. Stated indications for filter placement were 24 cases (30 %) of DVT in intrapelvic veins, 16 cases (20 %) of DVT in proximal veins, and 11 cases (14 %) of contraindication to anticoagulant therapy. In the IVC filter group, cases of class I indication (guidelines: JCS 75:1258-1281, 2009) numbered only 6 (8 %). Many of the retrievable IVC filters were not removed and placed permanently and the retrieval rate was 42 %. We found complications of IVC filters in 8 cases (10 %). IVC filter placement was significantly associated with a better survival rate and a higher incidence of DVT recurrence during a mean observation period of 541 days. Our research suggests the frequent use of IVC filters for VTE treatment, combined with a low retrieval rate. Most of the stated indications of IVC filter placement for VTE in Japanese patients were cases of DVT in intrapelvic veins or proximal veins, not cases of contraindication to anticoagulant therapy.

  16. Ten-year experience of retrievable inferior vena cava filters in a tertiary referral center.

    PubMed

    Tse, George; Cleveland, Trevor; Goode, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    A significant proportion of patients undergoing surgery have an increased incidence of acute pulmonary embolus (PE). We analyzed all patients who had a retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placed preoperatively for PE prophylaxis and investigated the long-term outcomes of the patients who did not have their filter removed. Patients who underwent retrievable IVC filter insertion and attempted removal were identified from the radiology information systems database in a large tertiary referral university teaching hospital. Results of all clinical investigations (including computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography, and plain radiography) while the IVC filters were in situ were reviewed. In total, 393 retrievable IVC filters were inserted, 254 with the indication of preoperative thromboembolic prophylaxis. Recurrent PE was reported in five patients (1.9%) despite the IVC filter. Of the 254 retrievable filters inserted prior to surgery, an attempt at retrieval was made in 168 filters (66.1%). Successful retrieval at the first attempt occurred in 143 cases (85.1%), while 25 cases failed or were aborted (14.9%). No attempt at retrieval was made in 86 (33.9%) patients and a significant proportion of these patients had undergone cancer surgery (P < 0.0107). In those patients where there was no attempt at retrieval, there was an association between cancer surgery and a shorter absolute survival time (P < 0.0001). The majority of attempted filter retrievals were successful, and a proportion of nonretrieved IVC filters are accounted for in patients who underwent cancer surgery and ultimately died with the filter in situ. A departmental protocol is recommended to ensure the filter is removed where appropriate and possible.

  17. Caval Penetration by Inferior Vena Cava Filters: A Systematic Literature Review of Clinical Significance and Management.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhongzhi; Wu, Alex; Tam, Mathew; Spain, James; McKinney, J Mark; Wang, Weiping

    2015-09-08

    Limited penetration into the caval wall is an important securing mechanism for inferior vena cava (IVC) filters; however, caval penetration can also cause unintentional complications. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence, severity, clinical consequences, and management of filter penetration across a range of commercially available IVC filters. The MEDLINE database was searched for all studies (1970-2014) related to IVC filters. A total of 88 clinical studies and 112 case reports qualified for analysis; these studies included 9002 patients and 15 types of IVC filters. Overall, penetration was reported in 19% of patients (1699 of 9002), and 19% of those penetrations (322 of 1699) showed evidence of organ/structure involvement. Among patients with penetration, 8% were symptomatic, 45% were asymptomatic, and 47% had unknown symptomatology. The most frequently reported symptom was pain (77%, 108 of 140). Major complications were reported in 83 patients (5%). These complications required interventions including surgical removal of the IVC filter (n=63), endovascular stent placement or embolization (n=11), endovascular retrieval of the permanent filter (n=4), and percutaneous nephrostomy or ureteral stent placement (n=3). Complications led to death in 2 patients. A total of 87% of patients (127 of 146) underwent premature filter retrieval or interventions for underlying symptoms or penetration-related complications. Caval penetration is a frequent but clinically underrecognized complication of IVC filter placement. Symptomatic patients accounted for nearly 1/10th of all penetrations; most of these cases had organ/structure involvement. Interventions with endovascular retrieval and surgery were required in most of these symptomatic patients. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Cost-benefit analysis of establishing an inferior vena cava filter clinic

    PubMed Central

    Dowell, Joshua D.; Shah, Summit H.; Cooper, Kyle J.; Yıldız, Vedat; Pan, Xueliang

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE Adverse events associated with retrievable inferior vena cava filters (IVCFs) have generated an increased interest in improving IVCF retrieval rates to improve patient safety and quality care. This study aims to demonstrate the cost-benefit of implementing an IVCF clinic to improve patient care in an institution in the United States. METHODS An IVCF clinic was established at a single institution in September 2012 and for ten months referring physicians were contacted to facilitate retrieval when appropriate. Additionally, a retrospective review was conducted on filter placements over the eight preclinic months. Cost-benefit analysis was conducted by creating a model, which incorporated the average cost and reimbursement for permanent and retrievable IVCFs. RESULTS A total of 190 IVCFs (152 retrievable IVCFs and 38 permanent IVCFs) were implanted during the IVCF clinic period. Twenty-nine percent of the retrievable IVCFs were successfully retrieved compared to 10 of 119 retrievable IVCFs placed during the preclinic period (8.4%). Cost-benefit analysis, using the average of the institution’s six most common reimbursement schedules, demonstrated an average net financial loss per permanent or retrievable IVCF not removed. However, a net financial gain was realized for each retrievable IVCF removed. The additional hospital cost to maintain the IVCF clinic was offset by removing an additional 3.1 IVCFs per year. CONCLUSION An IVCF clinic significantly increases retrieval rates, promotes patient safety, and is economically feasible. Given the adverse event profile of retrievable IVCFs, strategic efforts such as these ultimately can improve quality care for patients with in-dwelling IVCFs. PMID:27833068

  19. The effect of supine versus upright patient positioning on inferior vena cava metrics.

    PubMed

    Panebianco, Nova L; Shofer, Frances; Cheng, Alfred; Fischer, Jonathan; Cody, Kenneth; Dean, Anthony J

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound of the inferior vena cava (IVC) is a noninvasive and rapidly obtainable method of intravascular volume assessment; however not all patients can lie supine for this procedure. In this study we assess whether patient positioning affects IVC diameter metrics. This was a prospective convenience sample of patients in an in-patient dialysis unit at an urban tertiary care center. IVC metrics taken in the supine patient, and then at 45o semi-upright position, pre and post dialysis. Measurements were taken in M-mode in longitudinal plane roughly 2 cm below the level of the diaphragm. IVC-maximum and IVC-minimum diameter measurements were used to determine the IVC collapse index (IVC Max - IVC Min)/IVC Max). Statistics such as means, frequencies and percentages, intraclass correlation coefficient and Bland Altman summary statistics were calculated. Forty-five patients were enrolled. Average age was 57 years, 69% were male, 73% were African American, 82% had hypertension, 42% had diabetes. There was good to excellent agreement between supine and upright IVC measurements. Both the IVC minimum and maximum measurements had similar coefficient correlation (ri) measurements (0.917 and 0.890 respectively), whereas agreement in the collapse index was lower (ri = 0.813). Bland Altman analysis demonstrated excellent agreement and small 95% limits of agreement (±6 mm) with minimal mean bias for both the minimum and maximum measurements. IVC metrics do not change significantly based on patient position. For those patients who are unable to lay completely supine, a semi-upright measurement of the IVC for volume status may be an accurate alternative. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Circulating microRNA profile in patients with membranous obstruction of the inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gui-Xiang; Su, Yong; Li, Ying; Zhang, Ya-Feng; Xu, Li-Chun; Zu, Mao-Heng; Huang, Shui-Ping; Zhang, Jin-Peng; Lu, Zhao-Jun

    2016-03-01

    Membranous obstruction of the inferior vena cava (MOVC) is a common type of Budd-Chiari syndrome. However, the pathogenesis of MOVC has not been fully elucidated. Recent studies demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) are involved in multiple diseases. To the best of our knowledge, specific changes in the expression of miRNAs in MOVC patients have not been previously assessed. The present study used a microarray analysis, followed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) validation, with the aim to access the miRNA expression levels in the plasma of 34 MOVC patients, compared with those in healthy controls. The results revealed a total of 16 differentially expressed miRNAs in MOVC patients. Subsequently, RT-qPCR analysis verified the statistically consistent expression of 5 selected miRNAs (miR-125a-5p, miR-133b, miR-423-5p, miR-1228-5p and miR-1266), in line with the results of the microarray analysis. These 5 miRNAs, which were described as crucial regulators in numerous biological processes and vascular diseases, may play an important role in the pathogenesis of MOVC. Bioinformatics analysis of target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs revealed that these predicted targets were significantly enriched and involved in several key signaling pathways important for MOVC, including the ErbB, Wnt, MAPK and VEGF signaling pathway. In conclusion, miRNAs may involve in multiple signaling pathways contributing to the pathological processes of MOVC. The present study offers an intriguing new perspective on the involvement of miRNAs in MOVC; however, the precise underlying mechanisms require further validation.

  1. Prophylactic and therapeutic inferior vena cava filters to prevent pulmonary emboli in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Arthur M; Tyburski, James G; Wilson, Robert F; Steffes, Christopher

    2002-05-01

    Insertion of inferior vena cava filters (IVCFs) can prophylactically reduce pulmonary embolism (PE) in trauma patients. Retrospective review. Urban, level I trauma center. Two hundred blunt trauma patients undergoing IVCF placement. In 122 patients who had already been diagnosed as having deep vein thrombosis (DVT) (112 patients) and/or PE (22 patients), the insertion of the IVCF was considered "therapeutic." In 78 patients who had no evidence of DVT or PE but who were considered to be at high risk for a PE, the IVCF was considered "prophylactic." Incidence of PE and related mortality and morbidity in therapeutic vs prophylactic IVCFs. The number of prophylactic IVCFs inserted increased significantly from only 4% (3/68 cases) from 1991 through 1996, up to 57% (75/132 cases) from 1997 to June 2001. Although the mean +/- SD age (51 +/- 20 years vs 41 +/- 15 years; P<.001) was higher in the therapeutic group, there was no difference in the mean +/- SD Injury Severity Scores (20 +/- 12 vs 21 +/- 11). Therapeutic filters were placed much later after injury (mean +/- SD time, 11 +/- 7 vs 3 +/- 2 days; P<.001). The mortality rate was 11% (13/122 patients) in patients having a therapeutic IVCF, as compared with only 3% (2/78 patients) in those placed prophylactically (P =.07). None of the patients who had placement of a prophylactic IVCF developed subsequent PE. The incidence of PE decreased in all blunt trauma patients from 0.29% before 1997 to 0.15% after January 1, 1997, when 57% of the IVCF inserted were prophylactic (P =.06). Prophylactic IVCFs should be inserted within 48 hours of injury in specific trauma patients at high risk for PE and with contraindications to anticoagulation.

  2. Inferior vena cava collapsibility to guide fluid removal in slow continuous ultrafiltration: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Guiotto, Giovanna; Masarone, Mario; Paladino, Fiorella; Ruggiero, Enrico; Scott, Sean; Verde, Sossio; Schiraldi, Fernando

    2010-04-01

    To investigate whether ultrasound determination of the inferior vena cava diameter (IVCD) and its collapsibility index (IVCCI) could be used to optimize the fluid removal rate while avoiding hypotension during slow continuous ultrafiltration (SCUF). Twenty-four consecutive patients [13 men and 11 women, mean age 72 +/- 5 years; New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classes III-IV] with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) and diuretic resistance were admitted to our 16-bed medical ICU. Blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), blood samples for hematocrit, creatinine, sodium, potassium, and arterial BGA plus lactate were obtained at baseline and than every 2 h from the beginning of SCUF. IVCD, assessed by M-mode subcostal echocardiography during spontaneous breathing, was evaluated before SCUF, at 12 h, and just after the cessation of the procedure. The IVCCI was calculated as follows: [(IVCD(max) - IVCD(min))/IVCD(max)] x 100. Mean UF time was 20.3 +/- 4.6 h with a mean volume of 287.6 +/- 96.2 ml h(-1) and a total ultrafiltrate production of 5,780.8 +/- 1,994.6 ml. No significant difference in MAP, HR, RR, and IVCD before and after UF was found. IVCCI increased significantly after UF (P < 0.001). Hypotension was observed only in those patients (2/24) who reached an IVCCI >30%. In all the other patients, a significant increase in IVCCI was obtained without any hemodynamic instability. IVC ultrasound is a rapid, simple, and non-invasive means for bedside monitoring of intravascular volume during SCUF and may guide fluid removal velocity.

  3. Improving inferior vena cava filter retrieval rates with the define, measure, analyze, improve, control methodology.

    PubMed

    Sutphin, Patrick D; Reis, Stephen P; McKune, Angie; Ravanzo, Maria; Kalva, Sanjeeva P; Pillai, Anil K

    2015-04-01

    To design a sustainable process to improve optional inferior vena cava (IVC) filter retrieval rates based on the Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control (DMAIC) methodology of the Six Sigma process improvement paradigm. DMAIC, an acronym for Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control, was employed to design and implement a quality improvement project to increase IVC filter retrieval rates at a tertiary academic hospital. Retrievable IVC filters were placed in 139 patients over a 2-year period. The baseline IVC filter retrieval rate (n = 51) was reviewed through a retrospective analysis, and two strategies were devised to improve the filter retrieval rate: (a) mailing of letters to clinicians and patients for patients who had filters placed within 8 months of implementation of the project (n = 43) and (b) a prospective automated scheduling of a clinic visit at 4 weeks after filter placement for all new patients (n = 45). The effectiveness of these strategies was assessed by measuring the filter retrieval rates and estimated increase in revenue to interventional radiology. IVC filter retrieval rates increased from a baseline of 8% to 40% with the mailing of letters and to 52% with the automated scheduling of a clinic visit 4 weeks after IVC filter placement. The estimated revenue per 100 IVC filters placed increased from $2,249 to $10,518 with the mailing of letters and to $17,022 with the automated scheduling of a clinic visit. Using the DMAIC methodology, a simple and sustainable quality improvement intervention was devised that markedly improved IVC filter retrieval rates in eligible patients. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Sonographic inferior vena cava measurements to assess hydration status in college football players during preseason camp.

    PubMed

    Waterbrook, Anna L; Shah, Amish; Jannicky, Elisabeth; Stolz, Uwe; Cohen, Randy P; Gross, Austin; Adhikari, Srikar

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether sonographic measurement of the inferior vena cava (IVC) in college football players during preseason camp is a reliable way to detect and monitor dehydration. Our primary hypothesis was that IVC diameter measurements, the postpractice caval index, and expiratory diameter were significantly related to percent weight loss after a preseason football practice. A prospective cohort sample of Division I intercollegiate football players in preseason training camp was recruited before practice. All football players on the active roster who were at least 18 years of age were eligible to participate in the study. Sonographic IVC measurements were obtained in the long axis using either the subcostal or subxiphoid approach during inspiration and expiration both before and after an approximately 3-hour practice with moderate to high levels of exertion at high ambient temperatures. Player weights were recorded in the locker room before and after practice. A total of 27 prepractice and postpractice sonographic measurements were obtained. The postpractice expiratory IVC diameter was significantly related to percent weight loss after practice (R(2) = 0.153; P = .042), with the IVC diameter being significantly inversely correlated with percent weight loss; the regression coefficient was -1.07 (95% confidence interval, -2.09 to -0.04). There was no statistically significant relationship between percent weight loss and the postpractice caval index; the regression coefficient was 0.245 (95% confidence interval, -0.10 to 0.59; R(2) = 0.078; P = .16). The postpractice expiratory IVC diameter was significantly related to percent weight loss after practice, whereas the caval index was not found to correlate with weight loss. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  5. Ultrasound measurement of inferior vena cava collapse predicts propofol-induced hypotension.

    PubMed

    Au, Arthur K; Steinberg, Dean; Thom, Christopher; Shirazi, Maziar; Papanagnou, Dimitrios; Ku, Bon S; Fields, J Matthew

    2016-06-01

    Hypotension is a common side effect of propofol, but there are no reliable methods to determine which patients are at risk for significant propofol-induced hypotension (PIH). Ultrasound has been used to estimate volume status by visualization of inferior vena cava (IVC) collapse. This study explores whether IVC assessment by ultrasound can assist in predicting which patients may experience significant hypotension. This was a prospective observational study conducted in the operating suite of an urban community hospital. A convenience sample of consenting adults planned to receive propofol for induction of anesthesia during scheduled surgical procedures were enrolled. Bedside ultrasound was used to measure maximum (IVCmax) and minimum (IVCmin) IVC diameters. IVC-CI was calculated as [(IVCmax-IVCmin)/IVCmax × 100%]. The primary outcome was significant hypotension defined as systolic blood pressure (BP) below 90mmHg and/or administration of a vasopressor to increase BP during surgery. The study sample comprised 40 patients who met inclusion criteria. Mean age was 55years, (95%CI, 49-60) with 53% female. 55% of patients had significant hypotension after propofol administration. 76% of patients with IVC-CI≥50% had significant hypotension compared to 39% with IVC-CI<50%, P=.02. IVC-CI≥50% had a specificity of 77.27% (95%CI, 64.29%-90.26%) and sensitivity of 66.67% (95%CI, 52.06%-81.28%) in predicting PIH. The odds ratio for PIH in patients with IVC-CI≥50% was 6.9 (95%CI, 1.7-27.5). Patients with IVC-CI≥50% were more likely to develop significant hypotension from propofol. IVC ultrasound may be a useful tool to predict which patients are at increased risk for PIH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Inferior vena cava injuries: a case series and review of the South African experience.

    PubMed

    van Rooyen, P L; Karusseit, V O L; Mokoena, T

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating injury may involve the major vessels in the abdomen. Injury to the abdominal inferior vena cava (IVC) is uncommon and is usually caused by gunshot wounds. Mortality from IVC injuries is high and has changed little over time. The aim of the study was to report a series of IVC injuries from an urban trauma unit and to compare this with reports from similar institutions. A retrospective review of penetrating abdominal injuries at Kalafong Hospital from 1993 to 2010 was performed. All cases of injury to the IVC were retrieved and the following data recorded: patient demographics, incident history, origin of referral, description of the IVC injury, associated injuries, operative management, hospital stay and outcome. The results were compared to those from similar institutions. Twenty-seven patients with IVC injuries were treated. All were caused by gunshot wounds, and all had associated intra-abdominal injuries. The majority (56%) of injuries were infrarenal. The injury was managed most commonly by venorrhaphy and, when successful, all the patients survived. A third of patients with infrarenal injuries died, some after exploration of a stable peri-caval haematoma. Ten of the patients died (37%), half of them during surgery. These results are similar to those from similar institutions from earlier time periods. This report concurs with other studies. IVC injury carries a high mortality rate and that this has not improved over several decades. Less aggressive management of some stable patients or stable injuries is proposed by the authors for possible improvement of the mortality rate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Safety and Effectiveness of the Denali Inferior Vena Cava Filter: Intermediate Follow-Up Results.

    PubMed

    Reis, Stephen P; Kovoor, Jerry; Sutphin, Patrick D; Toomay, Seth; Trimmer, Clayton; Pillai, Anil; Reddick, Mark; Kalva, Sanjeeva P

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the clinical safety and effectiveness of the Denali (Bard, Tempe, Arizona) retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. In this retrospective study, authors reviewed the data of Denali IVC filters placed at their institution between 2013 and 2015. The clinical presentation, indications, and procedure-related complications during placement and retrieval were evaluated. The frequency of post filter pulmonary embolism (PE) and filter-related complications was assessed. Denali filters were placed in 87 patients (47 males; mean age: 56 years). Twenty patients presented with PE, 45 with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), and 21 with both PE and DVT, 1 filter was placed prophylactically before surgery. Indications for filter placement included contraindications to anticoagulation (AC; n = 80), failure of AC (n = 4), and complications of AC (n = 3). No patients had PE on follow-up imaging after filter placement. Retrieval was attempted in 31 patients after a mean period of 125 days (range: 34-324 days). The filter was successfully removed in 31 (100%) patients. Follow-up imaging, available in 71 (82%) patients (range: 2-538 days), demonstrated penetration of 15 legs in 5 patients, caval thrombus in 3, 1 resulting in caval occlusion, <15° filter tilt in 5, and no leg fractures or crossed legs. The Denali filter is safe during deployment and readily retrievable. The overall safety following deployment is similar to those reported in the literature, and the incidence of filter fractures and migration appears to be less than the previous generation of Bard devices. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Inferior vena cava diameter in acute decompensated heart failure as predictor of all-cause mortality.

    PubMed

    Jobs, Alexander; Brünjes, Kerstin; Katalinic, Alexander; Babaev, Valentin; Desch, Steffen; Reppel, Michael; Thiele, Holger

    2017-07-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) diameter can be used to approximate right atrial pressure in patients admitted for acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). Recent studies linked IVC dilation to an increased risk of early re-admission and short-term mortality. Moreover, renal insufficiency (RI) is an established risk factor for mortality in ADHF and is associated with congestion. We hypothesized that the IVC diameter is a marker of all-cause mortality but its prognostic impact may be influenced by kidney function. We analyzed data of 1101 patients admitted for ADHF with available echocardiography of the IVC by chart review and death registry linkage. Patients were dichotomized according to a cut-off value of 21 mm. Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify mortality predictors. A dilated IVC was detected in 474 (43.1%) patients. Overall, 400 (36.3%) patients died within 3 years. All-cause mortality was significantly higher in patients with dilated IVC [hazard ratio 1.45 (confidence interval 1.21-1.74); p < 0.001]. However, a dilated IVC was only associated with all-cause mortality in patients with RI function [hazard ratio 1.60 (confidence interval 1.26-2.03); p < 0.001] but not in patients with a preserved kidney function [hazard ratio 1.04 (confidence interval 0.72-1.50); P = 0.84]. IVC diameter was identified as an independent predictor for all-cause mortality in a Cox proportional hazards model with a significant interaction between IVC diameter and baseline kidney function. In conclusion, IVC dilation is a marker of high mortality risk in patients admitted for ADHF. However, this observation was confined to patients with RI.

  9. Outcomes Associated With Inferior Vena Cava Filters Among Patients With Thromboembolic Recurrence During Anticoagulant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mellado, Meritxell; Pijoan, José I; Jiménez, David; Muriel, Alfonso; Aujesky, Drahomir; Bertoletti, Laurent; Decousus, Herve; Barrios, Deisy; Clará, Albert; Yusen, Roger D; Monreal, Manuel

    2016-12-12

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of inferior vena cava (IVC) filter use among patients who develop recurrent symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) on anticoagulant therapy. There is a lack of efficacy evidence of IVC filter therapy in patients with VTE recurrence on anticoagulant therapy. In this cohort study of patients with acute VTE identified from the RIETE (Registro Informatizado de la Enfermedad Tromboembólica) registry, the associations between IVC filter placement for VTE recurrence in the first 3 months of anticoagulant therapy and the outcomes of all-cause mortality, pulmonary embolism (PE)-related mortality, second recurrent VTE, and major bleeding rates through 30 days after diagnosis of recurrence were assessed. Among 17 patients treated with filters and 49 matched patients treated without filters for VTE recurrence that presented as deep vein thrombosis, propensity score-matched groups showed no significant differences in death for filter insertion compared with no insertion (17.7% vs. 12.2%; p = 0.56). Among 48 patients treated with filters and 91 matched patients treated without filters for VTE recurrence that presented as PE, propensity score-matched groups showed a significant decrease in all-cause death for filter insertion compared with no insertion (2.1% vs. 25.3%; p = 0.02). The PE-related mortality rate was not significantly lower for filter insertion than no insertion (2.1% vs. 17.6%; p = 0.08), though the point estimates markedly differed. Among patients with VTE recurrence during the first 3 months of anticoagulant therapy, IVC filter insertion was not associated with a survival benefit in patients who recurred with deep vein thrombosis, although it was associated with a lower risk for all-cause death in patients who recurred with PE. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Occult Amoebic Liver Abscess as Cause of Extensive Inferior Vena Cava and Hepatic Vein Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Leslie; Burute, Nishigandha; Haider, Ehsan; Serrano, Pablo E; O'Shea, Timothy; Siegal, Deborah

    2017-07-03

    The most common extraintestinal complication of Entamoeba histolytica is amoebic liver abscess (ALA). Hepatic vein and inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis are rare but well-documented complications of ALA, typically attributed to mechanical compression and inflammation associated with a large abscess. We present a case of a previously healthy 43-year-old Canadian man presenting with constitutional symptoms and right upper quadrant abdominal pain. He was found to have thrombophlebitis of the IVC, accessory right hepatic vein, and bilateral iliac veins. Extensive investigations for thrombophilia were negative. Magnetic resonance imaging of the liver demonstrated a 3.2-cm focal area of parenchymal abnormality that was reported as presumptive hepatocellular carcinoma, and a 1.9-cm lesion in the caudate lobe with diffusion restriction and peripheral rim enhancement. Despite multiple biopsy attempts, a histopathological diagnosis was not achieved. Abdominal pain and fever 4 months later prompted repeat ultrasound demonstrating a 10.4- × 12.0-cm rim-enhancing fluid attenuation lesion felt to represent a liver abscess. Thick dark "chocolate brown" drainage from the lesion and positive serology for E. histolytica confirmed the diagnosis of ALA acquired from a previous trip to Cuba. The patient was started on treatment with metronidazole and paromomycin and repeat abdominal ultrasound demonstrated resolution of the abscess. This case is the first to demonstrate extensive IVC thrombosis secondary to a relatively small occult ALA and emphasizes the thrombogenic potential of ALA. Amoebic infection should be considered as a rare cause of IVC thrombosis in the correct clinical context.

  11. Factors affecting Cook Gunther Tulip and Cook Celect inferior vena cava filter retrieval success.

    PubMed

    Glocker, Roan J; Novak, Zdenek; Matthews, Thomas C; Patterson, Mark A; Jordan, William D; Pearce, Benjamin J; Passman, Marc A

    2014-01-01

    Success rates vary for the retrieval of inferior vena cava filters (IVCFs). The optimal retrieval time and factors influencing retrieval success remain unproven. This study aims to determine optimal time and evaluate factors related to successful IVCF retrieval. An institutional prospectively maintained database was reviewed for all IVCF retrieval attempts from 2006 to 2012. Patient demographics, comorbidities, indications for procedure, placement technique, IVCF type, presence of angulation, and time to retrieval were evaluated with respect to success or failure of retrieval. Statistical analyses (t-test, χ(2), correlations, and Kaplan-Meier plots) were performed comparing successful and unsuccessful retrievals. Of 121 attempted IVCF retrievals, 92 (76%) were successful and 29 (24%) were unsuccessful. There were no significant differences between the successful and unsuccessful attempts in terms of patient demographics, comorbidities, indications for procedure, placement technique, or IVCF type, which included 93 Celect (77%) and 28 Gunther Tulip (23%). Time since IVCF placement was significantly different (P = .025) between the successful and unsuccessful retrieval groups (medians were 105 [7-368] and 162 [43-379] days, respectively). Time since IVCF placement greater than 117 days correlated significantly with unsuccessful IVCF retrieval (R = 0.218; P = .017; odds ratio, 2.88; P = .02). Angulation greater than 20 degrees on anteroposterior radiograph was noted in seven of 29 (24%) unsuccessful retrievals compared with seven of 92 (8%) successful retrievals and was significant (P = .012). Cook Gunther Tulip and Celect IVCF retrieval is most likely to be successful within 3 to 4 months of placement. Unsuccessful retrieval attempts are more likely to occur when IVCF position is angulated. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Correlation Between Inferior Vena Cava Diameter Measured by Ultrasonography and Central Venous Pressure.

    PubMed

    Vaish, Hans; Kumar, Virendra; Anand, Rama; Chhapola, Viswas; Kanwal, Sandeep Kumar

    2017-09-04

    To find a correlation between inferior vena cava (IVC) diameters, IVC compressibility index (CI) and central venous pressure (CVP). Prospective observational study was done at pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) of Kalawati Saran Children's Hospital (KSCH). Fifty children aged 5-18 y, presenting with shock were enrolled for the study. IVC diameters, CI and relevant clinical data were noted at enrollment, 30 min, 1 h, 6 h, and 12 h. Central line was placed at the time of admission. Of 50 children enrolled, 28 were boys, with a mean age of 11 y. More than 80% of cases were diagnosed as septic shock. Mean maximum and minimum IVC diameter of 8.3 ± 2 mm and 3.7 ± 1.7 mm, respectively CI 58.2 ± 7% and CVP of 5.4 ± 1.5 cm of H2O was observed at admission. CVP and IVC diameters showed a serial improvement with treatment; CI showed a serial decrease with treatment. Heart rate (HR) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) also showed a serial improvement at 12 h (p < 0.05). CVP showed a positive correlation with IVC diameter (r +0.312; p < 0.05), and a negative correlation with CI (r -0.343; p < 0.05). Effective fluid resuscitation improves IVC diameters with a decrease in CI. IVC diameter has a positive correlation to CVP and CI has a negative correlation to CVP.

  13. A double J stent misplaced in the inferior vena cava during Boari flap repair

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Pankaj N.; Oswal, Ajay T.; Wagaskar, Vinayak G.

    2016-01-01

    A 30-year-old lady underwent a Boari flap repair for post-hysterectomy mid-ureteric stricture. The upper end of the double J stent inserted during the procedure was misplaced in the supra-renal inferior venal cava. Cystoscopic stent removal could be performed uneventfully, while the stricture was managed by endoureterotomy. PMID:26941499

  14. Mechanical Thrombectomy in Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis After Caval Filter Placement: A Report of Three Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Poon, W.L.; Luk, S.H.; Yam, K.Y.; Lee, Anselm C.W.

    2002-10-15

    Inferior vena caval (IVC) filter thrombosis inpatients with contraindications to anticoagulant therapy is a difficult and challenging clinical problem. We report our experience in treating three such patients using a mechanical thrombectomy device, which resulted in rapid symptomatic relief until anticoagulant therapy could be safely introduced.

  15. Congenital anomaly of the inferior vena cava and factor V Leiden mutation predisposing to deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Lamparello, Brooke M; Erickson, Cameron R; Kulthia, Arun; Virparia, Vasudev; Thet, Zeyar

    2014-01-01

    A previously healthy 21-year-old man presented with back pain, bilateral extremity pain, and right lower extremity weakness, paresthesias, and swelling. Sonographic examination revealed diffuse deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the femoral and popliteal venous system. CT imaging revealed hypoplasia of the hepatic inferior vena cava (IVC) segment with formation of multiple varices and collateral veins around the kidneys. Hematologic workup also discovered a factor V Leiden mutation, further predisposing the patient to DVT. The rare, often overlooked occurrence of attenuated IVC, especially in the setting of hypercoagulable state, can predispose patients to significant thrombosis.

  16. Congenital anomaly of the inferior vena cava and factor V Leiden mutation predisposing to deep vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Lamparello, Brooke M; Erickson, Cameron R; Kulthia, Arun; Virparia, Vasudev; Thet, Zeyar

    2014-01-01

    A previously healthy 21-year-old man presented with back pain, bilateral extremity pain, and right lower extremity weakness, paresthesias, and swelling. Sonographic examination revealed diffuse deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the femoral and popliteal venous system. CT imaging revealed hypoplasia of the hepatic inferior vena cava (IVC) segment with formation of multiple varices and collateral veins around the kidneys. Hematologic workup also discovered a factor V Leiden mutation, further predisposing the patient to DVT. The rare, often overlooked occurrence of attenuated IVC, especially in the setting of hypercoagulable state, can predispose patients to significant thrombosis. PMID:25395858

  17. Use of a Trellis Device for Endovascular Treatment of Venous Thrombosis Involving a Duplicated Inferior Vena Cava

    SciTech Connect

    Saettele, Megan R.; Morelli, John N.; Chesis, Paul; Wible, Brandt C.

    2013-12-15

    Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are increasingly recognized with CT and venography techniques. Although many patients with IVC anomalies are asymptomatic, recent studies have suggested an association with venous thromboembolism. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman with extensive venous clot involving the infrarenal segment of a duplicated left IVC who underwent pharmacomechanical thrombectomy and tissue plasminogen activator catheter-directed thrombolysis with complete deep venous thrombosis resolution. To our knowledge this is the first reported case in the English literature of the use of a Trellis thrombectomy catheter in the setting of duplicated IVC.

  18. Use of rigid bronchoscopic forceps in the difficult retrieval of the Günther Tulip inferior vena cava filter.

    PubMed

    Burke, Charles T; Dixon, Robert G; Stavas, Joseph M

    2007-10-01

    Retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filters may, over time, become incorporated into the wall of the IVC, making subsequent removal difficult. The authors present a case in which a Günther Tulip filter was placed prophylactically before gastric bypass surgery. The retrieval hook of the filter became incorporated into the wall of the IVC, preventing the filter from being snared. Eventually, the filter was freed from the wall of the IVC and successfully removed by using rigid bronchoscopy forceps; however, the filter was damaged in the process.

  19. [Low back pain secondary to lumbar epidural venous plexus dilatation due to compression of the inferior vena cava].

    PubMed

    Juan, L Jiménez; Argüelles, C Ferreiro; Gallardo, J M Fernández

    2008-01-01

    We present the case of a patient presenting at the emergency department with subacute low back pain radiating to both lower limbs in whom ultrasonography and abdominal computed tomography diagnosed a retroperitoneal adenopathic mass compressing the inferior vena cava. Magnetid resonance imagin of the lumbar spine showed the retroperitoneal mass and also showed dilatation and tortuosity of the vessels of the lumbar epidural venous plexus, which was considered responsible for the radiating low back pain. Histological study defined the retroperitoneal mass as follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The dilatation of the lumbar epidural venous plexus can cause lumbar and radicular pain.

  20. Percutaneous Extraction of Embolized Intracardiac Inferior Vena Cava Filter Struts Using Fused Intracardiac Ultrasound and Electroanatomic Mapping.

    PubMed

    Hannawa, Kevin K; Good, Eric D; Haft, Jonathan W; Williams, David M

    2015-09-01

    This report describes the percutaneous extraction of embolized intracardiac inferior vena cava (IVC) filter struts using fluoroscopy and fused intracardiac echocardiography and three-dimensional electroanatomic mapping. Six patients with indwelling IVC filters placed at outside institutions 5 months to 14 years previously presented with cross-sectional imaging of the chest demonstrating fractured IVC filter struts embolized to the myocardial free wall (four patients) or interventricular septum (two patients). All embolized filter struts were successfully retrieved, and open heart surgery was avoided. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nickel hypersensitivity in patients with inferior vena cava filters: case report and literature and MAUDE database review.

    PubMed

    Morshedi, Maud M; Kinney, Thomas B

    2014-08-01

    Placement of a prophylactic retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter was requested in a 73-year-old woman with nickel hypersensitivity resulting in a clinical dilemma. Given that all retrievable filters contain nickel, the published literature and the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database were reviewed; no documented case of IVC filter placement in a patient with nickel hypersensitivity or reported hypersensitivity reaction in a patient after IVC filter placement could be identified. This article presents the uneventful course of the case described and a review of the literature and recommendations on use of nickel-containing devices in patients with nickel hypersensitivity. Copyright © 2014 SIR. All rights reserved.

  2. Gross haematuria associated with penetration of an inferior vena cava filter into the right renal collecting system

    PubMed Central

    Cusano, Antonio; Rosenberg, David; Haddock, Peter; Meraney, Anoop

    2015-01-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are a viable alternative for patients with venous thromboembolic disease for whom standard anticoagulation therapy is contraindicated. Rare complications associated with their use, however, include misplacement and IVC penetration. We report a case of a 63-year-old woman who developed gross haematuria following IVC filter penetration into both the right renal collecting system and renal pelvis, for which open caval removal and reconstruction was required. This is an unusual case of IVC filter penetration causing symptomatic haematuria and requiring surgical intervention. PMID:25750222

  3. Idiopathic Thrombosis of the Inferior Vena Cava and Bilateral Femoral Veins in an Otherwise Healthy Male Soldier

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Sarah; Kerns, Tamie; Londeree, William; Ching, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Thrombosis of the inferior vena cava is less common than deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremities, particularly in the absence of an obvious congenital caval abnormality or hypercoagulable state. We present a case of IVC thrombosis in an otherwise healthy and active 28-year-old male soldier secondary to dehydration and venous webbing. IVC thrombosis is an uncommon and underrecognized condition; in this case, the patient's caval thrombosis was initially mistaken for acute back strain. Prompt recognition is necessary to minimize long-term sequelae. PMID:24187556

  4. Deep venous thrombosis and inferior vena cava agenesis causing double crush sciatic neuropathy in Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Kara, Murat; Ozçakar, Levent; Eken, Güneş; Ozen, Gülsen; Kiraz, Sedat

    2008-12-01

    We report here the case of a 18-year-old young man with Behçet's disease who had suffered deep venous thrombosis of the right femoral and popliteal veins. Consequently, right sciatic nerve injury, drop foot and tightness of the achilles tendon also ensued. The clinical scenario was further challenged by demonstration of the agenetic inferior vena cava and epidural vein dilatations compressing the lumbar nerve roots. To the best notice of the authors, this is the first patient encompassing all these complications in the literature concerning Behçet's disease.

  5. Gross haematuria associated with penetration of an inferior vena cava filter into the right renal collecting system.

    PubMed

    Cusano, Antonio; Rosenberg, David; Haddock, Peter; Meraney, Anoop

    2015-03-06

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are a viable alternative for patients with venous thromboembolic disease for whom standard anticoagulation therapy is contraindicated. Rare complications associated with their use, however, include misplacement and IVC penetration. We report a case of a 63-year-old woman who developed gross haematuria following IVC filter penetration into both the right renal collecting system and renal pelvis, for which open caval removal and reconstruction was required. This is an unusual case of IVC filter penetration causing symptomatic haematuria and requiring surgical intervention.

  6. British Society of Interventional Radiology (BSIR) Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) Filter Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Uberoi, Raman Tapping, Charles Ross; Chalmers, Nicholas; Allgar, Victoria

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The British Society of Interventional Radiology (BSIR) Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) Filter Registry was produced to provide an audit of current United Kingdom (UK) practice regarding placement and retrieval of IVC filters to address concerns regarding their safety. Methods: The IVC filter registry is a web-based registry, launched by the BSIR on behalf of its membership in October 2007. This report is based on prospectively collected data from October 2007 to March 2011. This report contains analysis of data on 1,434 IVC filter placements and 400 attempted retrievals performed at 68 UK centers. Data collected included patient demographics, insertion and retrieval data, and patient follow-up. Results: IVC filter use in the majority of patients in the UK follows accepted CIRSE guidelines. Filter placement is usually a low-risk procedure, with a low major complication rate (<0.5 %). Cook Gunther Tulip (560 filters: 39 %) and Celect (359 filters: 25 %) filters constituted the majority of IVC filters inserted, with Bard G2, Recovery filters, Cordis Trapease, and OptEase constituting most of the remainder (445 filters: 31 %). More than 96 % of IVC filters deployed as intended. Operator inexperience (<25 procedure) was significantly associated with complications (p < 0.001). Of the IVC filters initially intended for temporary placement, retrieval was attempted in 78 %. Of these retrieval was technically successful in 83 %. Successful retrieval was significantly reduced for implants left in situ for >9 weeks versus those with a shorter dwell time. New lower limb deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and/or IVC thrombosis was reported in 88 patients following filter placement, there was no significant difference of incidence between filter types. Conclusions: This registry report provides interventional radiologists and clinicians with an improved understanding of the technical aspects of IVC filter placement to help improve practice, and the potential consequences of IVC filter

  7. Inferior vena cava filter placement during thrombolysis for acute iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Avgerinos, Efthymios D; Hager, Eric S; Jeyabalan, Geetha; Marone, Luke; Makaroun, Michel S; Chaer, Rabih A

    2014-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the need for inferior vena cava (IVC) filters and to identify anatomic and patient-specific risk factors associated with embolization in patients undergoing thrombolysis for acute iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Consecutive patients who underwent catheter-directed thrombolysis or pharmacomechanical thrombolysis (PMT) for iliofemoral DVT from May 2007 to March 2012 were identified from a prospectively maintained database. Patients were categorized in two groups, depending on the status of IVC filtration during the lysis procedures: patients with an IVC filter protection (group A) and patients without an IVC filter protection (group B). The primary outcome was perioperative clinically significant pulmonary embolism (PE) or intraprocedural IVC filter clot capture. Eighty patients (mean age, 50 ± 16 years; 39 women) with symptoms averaging 12 ± 10 days were treated. A perioperative IVC filter was placed in 32 patients, and nine patients had an indwelling patent filter (group A, n = 41). Twenty patients received no filter, and 19 patients had an indwelling thrombosed filter (group B, n = 39). There were no clinically significant PE in either group. In group A, nine patients (22%) had documented embolic clot within the filter nest. The clot volume was deemed clinically significant in only two patients (5%). Factors related to embolization included female gender (odds ratio [OR], 5.833; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.038-32.797; P = .032) and preoperative clinical PE (OR, 5.6; 95% CI, 1.043-30.081; P = .054). A trend for increased embolization was seen with a higher average number of DVT risk factors (1.44 vs 1; P = .065) and when PMT was used as a single treatment (OR, 4.32; 95% CI, 0.851-21.929; P = .087). IVC filters during thrombolysis should be used selectively in patients with preoperative clinical PE, in women and potentially in patients with multiple risk factors for DVT, or when stand

  8. Improving the retrieval rate of inferior vena cava filters with a multidisciplinary team approach.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Elica; Farber, Alik; Eslami, Mohammad H; Siracuse, Jeffrey J; Rybin, Denis V; Sarosiek, Shayna; Sloan, J Mark; Kalish, Jeffrey

    2016-07-01

    The option to retrieve inferior vena cava (IVC) filters has resulted in an increase in the utilization of these devices as stopgap measures in patients with relative contraindications to anticoagulation. These retrievable IVC filters, however, are often not retrieved and become permanent. Recent data from our institution confirmed a historically low retrieval rate. Therefore, we hypothesized that the implementation of a new IVC filter retrieval protocol would increase the retrieval rate of appropriate IVC filters at our institution. All consecutive patients who underwent an IVC filter placement at our institution between September 2003 and July 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. In August 2012, a multidisciplinary task force was established, and a new IVC filter retrieval protocol was implemented. Prospective data were collected using a centralized interdepartmental IVC filter registry for all consecutive patients who underwent an IVC filter placement between August 2012 and September 2014. Patients were chronologically categorized into preimplementation (PRE) and postimplementation (POST) groups. Comparisons of outcome measures, including the retrieval rate of IVC filters along with rates of retrieval attempt and technical failure, were made between the two groups. In the PRE and POST groups, a total of 720 and 74 retrievable IVC filters were implanted, respectively. In the POST group, 40 of 74 filters (54%) were successfully retrieved compared with 82 of 720 filters (11%) in the PRE group (P < .001). Furthermore, a greater number of IVC filter retrievals were attempted in the POST group than in the PRE group (66% vs 14%; P < .001). No significant difference was observed between the PRE and POST groups for technical failure (17% vs 18%; P = .9). The retrieval rate of retrievable IVC filters at our institution was significantly increased with the implementation of a new IVC filter retrieval protocol with a multidisciplinary team approach. This improved

  9. Endovascular intervention for deep venous thrombosis in patients with inferior vena cava filters.

    PubMed

    Karageorgiou, John; Fowler, Kathryn; Vedantham, Suresh; Saad, Nael

    2016-10-01

    Patients with inferior vena cava (IVC) filter-associated deep venous thrombosis (DVT) are a challenging subset of patients for endovascular intervention. Given the lack of available data pertaining to this clinical scenario, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the authors' experience with the use of endovascular treatment for DVT in patients with IVC filters. Primary aims included assessing the technical and clinical success, complications, and clinical patency in these patients. This was a retrospective single-center review of adult patients with IVC filters undergoing endovascular treatment of DVT between 1/2005 and 4/2014. Patient electronic medical records were reviewed for demographic data, anticoagulation status, symptoms, symptomatic extremities, extent of thrombosis, therapies received, technical and clinical success, and complications. Query yielded 82 patients (mean 53 years, range 18-96; 66% male), all of whom were included in our analysis. The majority of patients presented with lower extremity pain and swelling, with extensive clot burden despite the use of anticoagulant medication. Treatment elements utilized included pharmacologic lysis in 92%, mechanical thrombectomy in 77%, angioplasty in 63% and stent placement in 50% of patients. Interventions were technically successful in restoring flow in 87% of patients, and clinically successful in improving presenting symptoms in 79% of patients. By SIR criteria, 24% of patients experienced complications (categorized as 10% minor and 14% major). There were two deaths from intracranial hemorrhage. The probability of thrombosis-free survival at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months was 0.85 (CI 0.74-0.93), 0.81 (CI 0.69-0.89), 0.74 (CI 0.62-0.83), 0.70 (CI 0.57-0.8) and 0.70 (CI 0.57-0.8), respectively. Endovascular interventions are usually effective in relieving symptoms in patients with DVT and pre-existing IVC filters. However, these outcomes are achieved with significant complication rates that may exceed those

  10. Risks and benefits of prophylactic inferior vena cava filters in patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Birkmeyer, Nancy J; Finks, Jonathan F; English, Wayne J; Carlin, Arthur M; Hawasli, Abdelkader A; Genaw, Jeffrey A; Wood, Michael H; Share, David A; Birkmeyer, John D

    2013-04-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration recently issued a warning about adverse events in patients receiving inferior vena cava (IVC) filters. To assess relationships between IVC filter insertion and complications while controlling for differences in baseline patient characteristics and medical venous thromboembolism prophylaxis. Propensity-matched cohort study. The prospective, statewide, clinical registry of the Michigan Bariatric Surgery Collaborative. Bariatric surgery patients (n=35,477) from 32 hospitals during the years 2006 through 2012. Prophylactic IVC filter insertion. Outcomes included the occurrence of complications (pulmonary embolism, deep vein thrombosis, and overall combined rates of complications by severity) within 30 days of bariatric surgery. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics among the 1,077 patients with IVC filters and in 1,077 matched control patients. Patients receiving IVC filters had higher rates of pulmonary embolism (0.84% vs 0.46%; odds ratio [OR], 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.6-6.5; P=0.232), deep vein thrombosis (1.2% vs 0.37%; OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.1-10.1; P=0.039), venous thromboembolism (1.9% vs 0.74%; OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.1-6.3, P=0.027), serious complications (5.8% vs 3.8%; OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.0-2.4; P=0.031), permanently disabling complications (1.2% vs 0.37%; OR, 4.3; 95% CI, 1.2-15.6; P=0.028), and death (0.7% vs 0.09%; OR, 7.0; 95% CI, 0.9-57.3; P=0.068). Of the 7 deaths among patients with IVC filters, 4 were attributable to pulmonary embolism and 2 to IVC thrombosis/occlusion. We have identified no benefits and significant risks to the use of prophylactic IVC filters among bariatric surgery patients and believe that their use should be discouraged. Copyright © 2013 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  11. Inferior vena cava filters and postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing bariatric surgery: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kaw, Roop; Pasupuleti, Vinay; Wayne Overby, D; Deshpande, Abhishek; Coleman, Craig I; Ioannidis, John P A; Hernandez, Adrian V

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary embolism(PE)accounts for almost 40% of perioperative deaths after bariatric surgery.Placement of prophylactic inferior vena cava(IVC) filter before bariatric surgery to improve outcomes has shown varied results. We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate post- operative outcomes associated with the preoperative placement of IVC filters in these patients. Methods: A systematic review was conducted by three investigators independently in PubMed, EMBASE, the Web of Science and Scopus until February 28,2013.Our search was restricted to studies in adult patients undergoing bariatric surgery with and without IVC filters. Primary outcomes were postoperative deep vein thrombosis(DVT),pulmonary embolism (PE),and postoperative mortality. Meta-analysis used random effects models to account for heterogeneity,and Sidik- Jonkman method to account for scarcity of outcomes and studies. Associations are shown as Relative Risks(RR) and 95% Confidence Intervals(CI). Results: Seven observational studies were identified (n=102,767), with weighted average inci- dences of DVT(0.9%),PE(1.6%),and mortality(1.0%)for a follow-up ranging from 3 weeks to 3 months. Use of IVC filters was associated with an approximately 3-fold higher risk of DVT and death that was nominally significant for the former outcome, but not the latter (RR2.81,95%CI 1.33-5.97, p=0.007; and RR 3.27,95%CI0.78-13.64, p=0.1, respectively);there was no difference in the risk of PE(RR1.02,95%CI0.31-3.77,p=0.9). Moderate to high heterogeneity of effects was noted across studies. Conclusions: Placement of IVC filter before bariatric surgery Is associated with higher risk of postoperative DVT and mortality. A similar risk of PE inpatients with and without IVC filter placement cannot exclude a benefit, given the potential large imbalance in risk at baseline.Ran- domized trials are needed before IVC placement can be recommended. (SurgObesRelatDis 2015;11:268-269.) r 2015 American Society for Metabolic and

  12. Factors impacting follow-up care after placement of temporary inferior vena cava filters.

    PubMed

    Gyang, Elsie; Zayed, Mohamed; Harris, E John; Lee, Jason T; Dalman, Ronald L; Mell, Matthew W

    2013-08-01

    Rates of inferior vena cava (IVC) filter retrieval have remained suboptimal, in part because of poor follow-up. The goal of our study was to determine demographic and clinical factors predictive of IVC filter follow-up care in a university hospital setting. We reviewed 250 consecutive patients who received an IVC filter placement with the intention of subsequent retrieval between March 2009 and October 2010. Patient demographics, clinical factors, and physician specialty were evaluated. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify variables predicting follow-up care. In our cohort, 60.7% of patients received follow-up care; of those, 93% had IVC filter retrieval. Major indications for IVC filter placement were prophylaxis for high risk surgery (53%) and venous thromboembolic event with contraindication and/or failure of anticoagulation (39%). Follow-up care was less likely for patients discharged to acute rehabilitation or skilled nursing facilities (P < .0001), those with central nervous system pathology (eg, cerebral hemorrhage or spinal fracture; P < .0001), and for those who did not receive an IVC filter placement by a vascular surgeon (P < .0001). In a multivariate analysis, discharge home (odds ratio [OR], 4.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.99-8.2; P < .0001), central nervous system pathology (OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.22-0.95; P = .04), and IVC filter placement by the vascular surgery service (OR, 4.7; 95% CI, 2.3-9.6; P < .0001) remained independent predictors of follow-up care. Trauma status and distance of residence did not significantly impact likelihood of patient follow-up. Service-dependent practice paradigms play a critical role in patient follow-up and IVC filter retrieval rates. Nevertheless, specific patient populations are more prone to having poorer rates of follow-up. Such trends should be factored into institutional quality control goals and patient-centered care. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by

  13. Clinical utility of flat inferior vena cava by axial tomography in severely injured elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Milia, David Joseph; Dua, Anahita; Paul, Jasmeet Singh; Tolat, Parag; Brasel, Karen J

    2013-12-01

    Flat inferior vena cava (IVC) has been associated with shock and mortality in young trauma patients (age < 55 years). Because of the greater possibility of nonhypovolemic shock in the elderly, we hypothesized that there would be no correlation between IVC ratio and the presence of shock. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all severely injured (Injury Severity Score [ISS] ≥ 15), blunt trauma patients 55 years or older from April 2006 to April 2011. Only patients undergoing axial imaging of the IVC within 1 hour of arrival were considered. Anteroposterior and transverse diameter of the IVC were measured 2.5 mm above the renal veins. Transverse-to-anteroposterior IVC ratios of 2, 3, and 4 were analyzed. Hemodynamic (heart rate, blood pressure, systolic blood pressure, shock index, and adjusted shock index [ASI]) and laboratory (hemoglobin, HCO, base excess) markers of shock were reviewed. Correlation among shock markers, IVC ratio, and death was analyzed using multivariate logistic regression. Relationship between shock and IVC ratio was analyzed using logistic regression and χ where appropriate. A total of 308 patients met the inclusion criteria during the study period. The IVC ratio was greater than 2, greater than 3, and greater than 4 in 180, 85, and 46 patients, respectively. The IVC ratio (analyzed continuously) correlated with mortality (p < 0.05). Ratios of greater than 3 and greater than 4 predicted a 2.0 and 2.2 times mortality increase (95% confidence interval, 1.00-5.00 and 1.00-4.95, respectively). IVC ratio did not correlate with shock (ASI > 50) for any of the ratios studied. As in previous studies with younger injured patients, a flat IVC is predictive of increased mortality risk in the elderly. Presence of a shock state, as defined by ASI, is not correlated with a flat IVC. Moreover, almost one third of patients presenting in shock had a round IVC. This is consistent with our hypothesis that shock in the elderly trauma population may be

  14. Physiologic Effect of Stent Therapy for Inferior Vena Cava Obstruction Due to Malignant Liver Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Kishi, Kazushi Sonomura, Tetsuo; Fujimoto, Hisashi; Kimura, Masashi; Yamada, Katsuya; Sato, Morio; Juri, Masanobu

    2006-02-15

    Purpose. To understand systemic the influence of stent therapy for inferior vena cava (IVC) obstruction due to advanced liver tumor. Methods. Seven patients with symptomatic IVC obstruction due to advanced primary (n 4) or secondary (n = 3) liver tumor were subjected to stent therapy. Enrollment criteria included high IVC pressure over 15 mmHg and the presence of edema and ascites. Z-stents were deployed using coaxial sheath technique via femoral venous puncture. Physiologic and hematobiochemical parameters were analyzed. Results. All procedures were successful, and the stents remained patent until patient death. Promptly after stent placement, the IVC flow recovered, and the venous blood pressure in the IVC below the obstruction level showed a significant decrease from 20.8 {+-} 1.2 mmHg (mean {+-} SE) to 10.7 {+-} 0.7 mmHg (p < 0.01). Transient mild increase of right atrial pressure was observed in 1 patient. During the following week prominent diuresis was observed in all patients. Mean urine output volume in the 3 days before the stent therapy was 0.81 {+-} 0.09 l/day compared with 2.1 {+-} 0.2 l/day (p < 0.01) in the 3 days after. The edema and ascites decreased in all patients. The caval pressure change correlated well (r > 0.6) with the urine volume increase, and with the decreased volume of edema and ascites. The urine volume increase correlated well with the decrement of edema, but not with that of ascites. Improvements for various durations in the levels of blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase, fibrinogen, and platelet count were found (p < 0.05). These hematobiochemical changes were well correlated with each other and with the decrement of ascites. Two patients showed a low blood sodium level of 128.5 mEq/l after intensive natriuresis, and one of them died on day 21 with hepatic failure, which was interpreted as maladaptation aggravation. The mean survival time was 94.1 {+-} 34.1 days (mean {+-} SD), ranging from 21 to 140 days

  15. Inferior vena cava filter placement in the gynecologic oncology patient: A 15-year institutional experience.

    PubMed

    Dewdney, Summer B; Benn, Teri; Rimel, B J; Gao, Feng; Saad, Nael; Vedantham, Suresh; Mutch, David G; Zighelboim, Israel

    2011-05-01

    Venous thrombosis is a frequent complication of gynecologic cancer. Data regarding the use of inferior vena cava (IVC) filters in this population is limited. The aim of this study was to review our experience with gynecologic oncology patients who received an IVC filter, specifically to evaluate indications for filter placement and survival outcomes. This was a retrospective, single-institution study of patients who had an IVC filter placed after a histologically confirmed gynecologic malignancy. Patients were identified from a prospectively collected interventional radiology (IR) database. Clinicopathologic characteristics, procedure details, and outcome data were obtained from outpatient and inpatient medical records. Survival after IVC filter placement was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier product limit method and compared by log-rank test. A total of 128 patients were identified and 103 were found to be eligible for analysis. Most patients had ovarian cancer (52%), followed by cervical cancer (25%) and endometrial cancer (21%). Two-thirds had advanced stage disease (III/IV). The procedure complication rate was 2%. Median survival after IVC filter placement was 7.8months (95% CI, 4.1-13.6). The most common indication for IVC filter placement was contraindication to anticoagulation secondary to hemorrhage (44%), followed by perioperative indications (30%) and failed anticoagulation (14%). There was no difference in survival by IVC filter placement indication (p=0.18). The majority of the IVC filters placed were permanent (90.5%) and in an infrarenal position (95.8%). There was no difference in survival according to specific thromboembolic event (DVT vs. PE vs. both). Patients able to receive anticoagulation after IVC filter placement had improved survival (HR 0.45, 95%CI 0.45-0.27, p=0.003). We present the largest series of gynecologic oncology patients treated with IVC filters. Long-term survival after IVC filter placement is uncommon. Patients who receive

  16. Use of Retrievable Compared to Permanent Inferior Vena Cava Filters: A Single-Institution Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Thuong G. Van Chien, Andy S.; Funaki, Brian S.; Lorenz, Jonathan; Piano, Giancarlo; Shen, Maxine; Leef, Jeffrey

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to review the use, safety, and efficacy of retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filters in their first 5 years of availability at our institution. Comparison was made with permanent filters placed in the same period. A retrospective review of IVC filter implantations was performed from September, 1999, to September, 2004, in our department. These included both retrievable and permanent filters. The Recovery nitinol and Guenther tulip filters were used as retrievable filters. The frequency of retrievable filter used was calculated. Clinical data and technical data related to filter placement were reviewed. Outcomes, including pulmonary embolism, complications associated with placement, retrieval, or indwelling, were calculated. During the study period, 604 IVC filters were placed. Of these, 97 retrievable filters (16%) were placed in 96 patients. There were 53 Recovery filter and 44 Tulip filter insertions. Subjects were 59 women and 37 men; the mean age was 52 years, with a range of from 18 to 97 years. The placement of retrievable filters increased from 2% in year 1 to 32% in year 5 of the study period. The total implantation time for the permanent group was 145,450 days, with an average of 288 days (range, 33-1811 days). For the retrievable group, the total implantation time was 21,671 days, with an average of 226 days (range, 2-1217 days). Of 29 patients who returned for filter retrieval, the filter was successfully removed in 28. There were 14 of 14 successful Tulip filter retrievals and 14 of 15 successful Recovery filter retrievals. In one patient, after an indwelling period of 39 days, a Recovery nitinol filter could not be removed secondary to a large clot burden within the filter. For the filters that were removed, the mean dwell time was 50 days for the Tulip type and 20 days for the Recovery type. Over the follow-up period there was an overall PE incidence of 1.4% for the permanent group and 1% for the retrieval group. In

  17. Use of retrievable compared to permanent inferior vena cava filters: a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Van Ha, Thuong G; Chien, Andy S; Funaki, Brian S; Lorenz, Jonathan; Piano, Giancarlo; Shen, Maxine; Leef, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the use, safety, and efficacy of retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filters in their first 5 years of availability at our institution. Comparison was made with permanent filters placed in the same period. A retrospective review of IVC filter implantations was performed from September, 1999, to September, 2004, in our department. These included both retrievable and permanent filters. The Recovery nitinol and Günther tulip filters were used as retrievable filters. The frequency of retrievable filter used was calculated. Clinical data and technical data related to filter placement were reviewed. Outcomes, including pulmonary embolism, complications associated with placement, retrieval, or indwelling, were calculated. During the study period, 604 IVC filters were placed. Of these, 97 retrievable filters (16%) were placed in 96 patients. There were 53 Recovery filter and 44 Tulip filter insertions. Subjects were 59 women and 37 men; the mean age was 52 years, with a range of from 18 to 97 years. The placement of retrievable filters increased from 2% in year 1 to 32% in year 5 of the study period. The total implantation time for the permanent group was 145,450 days, with an average of 288 days (range, 33-1811 days). For the retrievable group, the total implantation time was 21,671 days, with an average of 226 days (range, 2-1217 days). Of 29 patients who returned for filter retrieval, the filter was successfully removed in 28. There were 14 of 14 successful Tulip filter retrievals and 14 of 15 successful Recovery filter retrievals. In one patient, after an indwelling period of 39 days, a Recovery nitinol filter could not be removed secondary to a large clot burden within the filter. For the filters that were removed, the mean dwell time was 50 days for the Tulip type and 20 days for the Recovery type. Over the follow-up period there was an overall PE incidence of 1.4% for the permanent group and 1% for the retrieval group. In

  18. Guenther Tulip Filter Retrieval from a Left-sided Inferior Vena Cava

    SciTech Connect

    Brountzos, Elias N.; Kaufman, John A. Lakin, Paul L.

    2004-01-15

    Optional (retrievable) inferior cava filters (IVC) may have advantages over permanent filters in a certain subset of patients, especially in view of recent concerns about the long-term thrombotic complications of the latter. Retrieval of the Guenther Tulip Filter (GTF), an optional filter, has been reported in a total of 76 patients. We present the first description of GTF retrieval from a left-sided IVC using the right internal jugular approach.

  19. Risk of inferior vena cava compression syndrome during fetal MRI in the supine position - a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Kienzl, Daniela; Berger-Kulemann, Vanessa; Kasprian, Gregor; Brugger, Peter C; Weber, Michael; Bettelheim, Dieter; Pusch, Franz; Prayer, Daniela

    2014-05-01

    Inferior vena cava compression syndrome (VCCS) is a serious complication of supine fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations, particularly during late gestation. This morphologic study correlated the occurrence of VCCS with the grade of inferior vena cava (IVC) compression. There were 56 fetal MRI in the supine position [median gestational weeks (GW) 27+4] and 16 fetal MRI in the lateral position (median GW 30+6) retrospectively analyzed. The grade of maternal IVC compression was determined by the maximal anterior-posterior diameter (DAP) at the level of L4/L5. Fetal head position and right-sided uterus volume were analyzed. Clinical VCCS-related symptoms during fetal MRI were assessed. A noncompressed IVC was present in 1.8% (n=1) and a DAP of 5 to <10 mm in 33.3% (n=19) and 1 to <5 mm in 64.9% (n=36). The DAP was independent of fetal head position (P=0.99) and showed no significant correlation with gestational age (r=0.33). IVC compression increased with right-sided uterus volume (r=-0.328; P=0.014). There was a significant difference in DAP in the lateral position compared with the supine position (P<0.001). Clinical assessment revealed no symptoms of VCCS in any woman. The presented data support the concept of physiologic compensation for significantly reduced venous backflow in the supine position during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy.

  20. Biaxial mechanical properties of the inferior vena cava in C57BL/6 and CB-17 SCID/bg mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y U; Naito, Y; Kurobe, H; Breuer, C K; Humphrey, J D

    2013-09-03

    Multiple murine models have proven useful in studying the natural history of neovessel development in the tissue engineering of vascular grafts. Nevertheless, to better understand longitudinal changes in the biomechanics of such neovessels, we must first quantify native tissue structure and properties. In this paper, we present the first biaxial mechanical data for, and nonlinear constitutive modeling of, &QJ;the inferior vena cava from two models used in tissue engineering: wild-type C57BL/6 and immunodeficient CB-17 SCID/bg mice. Results show that inferior vena cava from the latter are significantly stiffer in the circumferential direction, both materially (as assessed by a stored energy function) and structurally (as assessed by the compliance), despite a lower intramural content of fibrillar collagen and similar wall thickness. Quantifying the natural history of neovessel development in different hosts could lead to increased insight into the mechanisms by which cells fashion and maintain extracellular matrix in order to match best the host stiffness while ensuring sufficient vascular integrity.

  1. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement through transcaval aortic access in a patient with duplicated inferior vena cava and poor iliofemoral anatomy.

    PubMed

    Fanari, Zaher; Al-Akchar, Mohammad; Mahmaljy, Hadi; Goel, Sachin; Goswami, Nilesh J

    2017-07-01

    Transthoracic (transapical and transaortic) access is inferior compared with femoral artery access. Percutaneous transcaval aortic access is a reasonable alternative approach that is being used in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with poor iliofemoral anatomy. Duplicated Inferior vena cava (DIVC) is an uncommon abnormality. We report the case of 76-year-old lady with history of severe peripheral vascular disease, morbid obesity, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and duplicated IVC that had severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. The patient had diffuse bilateral iliac disease precluding the arterial access required for TAVR. Other comorbidities made transthoracic access less desirable. We report the first successful Transcaval TAVR in a patient with DIVC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Extensive Thrombosis of the Inferior Vena Cava and Left Renal Vein in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Kdous, Moez; Khlifi, Oussema; Brahem, Marwene; Khrouf, Mohamed; Amari, Sarah; Ferchiou, Monia; Zhioua, Fethi

    2015-01-01

    Antenatal renal vein thrombosis is a rarely described diagnostic finding, with variable consequences on kidney function. We present the case of an affected fetus, born at 35-week gestation, with intrauterine oligohydramnios and two small kidneys. A renal ultrasound carried out after birth confirmed the presence of prenatal abnormalities. Renal vein thrombosis was not diagnosed at the time. The baby died 20 days later of kidney failure, metabolic acidosis, and polypnea with severe hypotrophy. Autopsy revealed atrophied kidneys and adrenal glands. The vena cava had thrombosis occupying most of its length. The right renal vein was normal, while the left renal vein was threadlike and not permeable. Histologically, there was necrosis of the left adrenal gland with asymmetrical bilateral renal impairment and signs of ischemic and hemorrhagic lesions. A review of thrombophilia was carried out and a heterozygous mutation in Factor V was found in both the mother and the child. PMID:26124971

  3. Endovascular treatment of stenosis between hepatic vein and inferior vena cava following liver transplantation in a child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; Borges, Marcus Vinicius; Pinto, Ricardo Augusto de Paula; Oliva, José Luiz; Andrade, Wagner de Castro; Maksoud, João Gilberto

    2004-12-01

    The liver transplantation technique advances have allowed the endovascular treatment of stenosis between hepatic vein and inferior vena cava, and this has become an established and widely acceptable method for the treatment of patients with end-stage liver disease. However, in spite of the advances in the surgical technique of liver transplantation there is relatively still a high incidence of postoperative complications, especially those related to vascular complications. One technical variant of orthotopic liver transplantation is the piggyback technique with conservation of the recipient vena cava, which is anastomosed to the graft hepatic veins. As a consequence of the increased number of liver transplants in children, there is a higher demand for endovascular treatment of vascular stenosis, such as those at the level of the hepatic veins. This leads to more consistent experience of endovascular treatment of the surgical vascular complications following liver transplantation. This article describes the case of a child submitted to liver transplantation with reduced graft (left lateral segment) who presented stenosis of the anastomosis between the hepatic vein and IVC 6 months later which was successfully treated by PTA.

  4. Inferior vena cava reconstruction for leiomyosarcoma of Zone I-III requiring complete hepatectomy and bilateral nephrectomy with autotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Hoylan T; Kim, Peter T W; Anthony, Tiffany L; Hamman, Baron L; Goldstein, Robert M; Testa, Giuliano

    2015-10-01

    The inferior vena cava (IVC) is the most common site of leiomyosarcomas arising from a vascular origin. Leiomyosarcomas of the IVC are categorized by anatomical location. Zone I refers to the infrarenal portion of the IVC, Zone II from the hepatic veins to the renal veins, and Zone III from the right atrium to the hepatic veins. This is a rare presentation of a Zone I-III leiomyosarcoma. Fifty-two-years-old female with a medical history significant only for HTN was admitted to the hospital with bilateral lower extremity edema and dyspnea. Two-dimensional echo demonstrated a right atrial thrombus, extending into the IVC. On subsequent CT and MRI, a 15 cm mass was noted that began in the right atrium and extended into the IVC, with continuation below the renal veins to above the level of the confluence of the common iliac veins. The patient underwent a complete resection of the mass, replacement of the IVC with Dacron graft, total hepatectomy and bilateral nephrectomy, with liver and kidney autotransplantation. Pathology was consistent with a high grade spindle cell sarcoma of vena cava origin. Patient was readmitted approximately 4 weeks postoperatively to begin adjuvant chemotherapy. This case represents a zone I-III IVC leiomyosarcoma treated with surgical R0 resection. This included a hepatectomy, bilateral nephrectomy, and hepatic and left renal autotransplantation. These complex tumors should be treated with surgical resection, and require a multidisciplinary approach.

  5. Experimental investigation of the effects of inserting a bovine venous valve in the inferior vena cava of Fontan circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhanakrishnan, Arvind; Johnson, Jacob; Kotz, Monica; Tang, Elaine; Khiabani, Reza; Yoganathan, Ajit; Maher, Kevin

    2012-11-01

    The Fontan procedure is a palliative surgery performed on patients with single ventricle (SV) congenital heart defects. The SV is used for systemic circulation and the venous return from the inferior vena cava (IVC) and superior vena cava (SVC) is routed to the pulmonary arteries (PA), resulting in a total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC). Hepatic venous hypertension is commonly manifested in the Fontan circulation, leading to long-term complications including liver congestion and cirrhosis. Respiratory intrathoracic pressure changes affect the venous return from the IVC to the PA. Using a physical model of an idealized TCPC, we examine placement of a unidirectional bovine venous valve within the IVC as a method of alleviating hepatic venous hypertension. A piston pump is used to provide pulsatility in the internal flow through the TCPC, while intrathoracic pressure fluctuations are imposed on the external walls of the model using a pair of linear actuators. When implanted in the extrathoracic position, the hepatic venous pressure is lowered from baseline condition. The effects of changing caval flow distribution and intrathoracic pressure on TCPC hemodynamics will be examined.

  6. Primary Gianturco stent placement for inferior vena cava abnormalities following liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Weeks, S M; Gerber, D A; Jaques, P F; Sandhu, J; Johnson, M W; Fair, J H; Mauro, M A

    2000-02-01

    To determine the efficacy of primary Gianturco stent placement for patients with inferior vena caval (IVC) abnormalities following liver transplantation. From August 1996 through March 1999, nine adult patients developed significant IVC abnormalities following liver transplantation. Patients were referred for vena cavography on the basis of abnormal clinical findings, laboratory values, liver biopsy results, Doppler findings, or a combination. Those patients demonstrating a significant caval or hepatic venous gradient were treated with primary Gianturco stent placement. Patients were followed clinically (nine patients), with duplex ultrasound (nine patients), vena cavography (four patients), and biopsy (seven patients). Original pressure gradients ranged from 3 to 14 mm Hg, with a mean of 9 mm Hg. Gradients were reduced to 3 mm Hg or less in all nine patients; presenting signs and symptoms either resolved or improved in eight of nine patients. The ninth patient required repeated transplantation 2 days later. A second patient died 433 days after stent placement of recurrent hepatitis C. Another initially improved following caval stent placement, but underwent repeated transplantation 7 days later due to hepatic necrosis from hepatic arterial thrombosis. Follow-up for the remaining six patients has averaged 491 days, with no clinical, venographic, or ultrasound evidence for recurrent caval stenosis. Intermediate term results suggest that primary Gianturco stent placement for IVC stenosis, compression, or torsion resulting after liver transplantation is safe and effective.

  7. Interruption of the inferior vena cava with azygos/hemiazygos continuation accompanied by distinct renal vein anomalies: MRA and CT assessment.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, E; Gulcu, A; Sal, S; Obuz, F

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of interruption of the inferior vena cava with azygos/hemiazygos continuation and additional variations of the renal veins, an uncommon developmental anomaly. Magnetic resonance angiography and computed tomography, in association with clinical awareness, can be used to diagnose this entity.

  8. Cavo-atrial bypass with a polytetrafluoroethylene graft for the treatment of a complete, traumatic transection of the suprahepatic inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Prevot, Flavien; Berna, Pascal; Badoux, Louise; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2017-02-01

    In the event of injury to the vena cava, the surgeon's goal is to control the bleeding and then repair the vascular damage. Given the wide range of lesions observed, the repair step has not been standardized. There are a few case reports of simple venoplasty or cavocaval bypass with a polytetrafluoroethylene graft. The present report introduces another treatment option for total avulsion of the suprahepatic inferior vena cava when a lack of remnant venous tissue below the heart prevents direct repair: cavo-atrial bypass with a polytetrafluoroethylene graft. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  9. CT-Guided Percutaneous Fine-Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Inferior Vena Cava Wall: A Posterior Coaxial Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Kos, Sebastian Bilecen, Deniz; Baumhoer, Daniel; Guillaume, Nicolas; Jacob, Augustinus L.

    2010-02-15

    A 72-year-old man was referred to our department with an incidentally diagnosed bronchogenic carcinoma of the right upper lobe. Positron emission tomography (PET) combined with computed tomography (PET-CT) revealed an unexpected hot spot in the ventral wall of the infrarenal segment of the inferior vena cava (IVC). Diagnostic biopsy of this lesion was performed under CT guidance with semiautomated 20G fine-needle aspiration (FNA) through a 19G coaxial needle. Cytology revealed few carcinoma cells, which led to the remarkable diagnosis of a distant metastasis to the IVC wall. Both the immediate postinterventional CT control and the further surveillance period of the patient were unremarkable; in particular, no signs of bleeding complications were detected. We conclude that coaxial FNA of an IVC wall lesion is technically feasible and may even help diagnose distant metastasis.

  10. Displacement of the inferior vena cava as a factor limiting catheter performance in long-term hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Fabbian, F; Malacarne, F; Russo, G; Galeotti, R; Gresta, E; Cantelli, S; Catizone, L

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of a lady affected by autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease who had been on hemodialyis for 24 years. She has exhausted all options for arterious-venous fistula. The presence of an acquired anatomical abnormality was an obstacle in order to get appropriate blood flow from standard tunnelled femoral catheters. The enlarged right kidney was pushing the inferior vena cava to the left side of the abdomen, and the abnormality was demonstrated by phlebography. Only after placing a cuffed catheter 53 cm long in her left femoral vein we could dialyze efficiently. Venography is mandatory before placing a cuffed catheter especially in uremic patients with long history of access failure, because it saves costs.

  11. Undifferentiated Intimal Sarcoma of the Inferior Vena Cava with Extension to the Right Atrium and Renal Vasculature.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Aasim M; Alsahhar, Jamil; Podduturi, Varsha; Schussler, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Primary sarcomas of the great vessels (aorta, pulmonary artery, and inferior vena cava (IVC)) are exceedingly rare. We report a rare case of an undifferentiated intimal sarcoma of the IVC with extension to the right atrium, adrenal, and renal veins. The patient underwent extensive resection, reconstruction of the IVC, and subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy. Patient has tolerated chemotherapy and, at 17 months after resection, the patient remains free of tumor recurrence. Undifferentiated intimal sarcomas remain a rare entity with only five cases of venous undifferentiated intimal sarcomas reported in the literature, two of which occurred in the IVC. Intimal sarcomas tend to carry a poor prognosis with the limited literature available on treatment approaches. Our objective is to highlight this rare entity and possible treatment approach which we utilized. Primary sarcomas of IVC need to be included as part of a complete differential diagnosis in patients with atrial masses or recurrent pulmonary emboli.

  12. Undifferentiated Intimal Sarcoma of the Inferior Vena Cava with Extension to the Right Atrium and Renal Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Aasim M.; Alsahhar, Jamil; Podduturi, Varsha; Schussler, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Primary sarcomas of the great vessels (aorta, pulmonary artery, and inferior vena cava (IVC)) are exceedingly rare. We report a rare case of an undifferentiated intimal sarcoma of the IVC with extension to the right atrium, adrenal, and renal veins. The patient underwent extensive resection, reconstruction of the IVC, and subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy. Patient has tolerated chemotherapy and, at 17 months after resection, the patient remains free of tumor recurrence. Undifferentiated intimal sarcomas remain a rare entity with only five cases of venous undifferentiated intimal sarcomas reported in the literature, two of which occurred in the IVC. Intimal sarcomas tend to carry a poor prognosis with the limited literature available on treatment approaches. Our objective is to highlight this rare entity and possible treatment approach which we utilized. Primary sarcomas of IVC need to be included as part of a complete differential diagnosis in patients with atrial masses or recurrent pulmonary emboli. PMID:26106489

  13. Streptococcus constellatus Causing Septic Thrombophlebitis of the Right Ovarian Vein with Extension into the Inferior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Haidar, Abdallah; Haddad, Amy; Naqvi, Amir; Onyesoh, Ngozi U.; Malik, Rushdah; Williams, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Streptococcus constellatus collectively with Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus intermedius constitute the Streptococcus anginosus (formerly Streptococcus milleri) group. Though they are commonly associated with abscesses, bacteremia with subsequent septic thrombophlebitis is extremely rare, and resulting mortality is infrequent. Case Presentation. We report a case of a previously healthy 60-year-old African American female who presented with Streptococcus constellatus bacteremia associated with septic thrombophlebitis to the right ovarian vein extending into the inferior vena cava. She was urgently treated with antibiotics and anticoagulation. Conclusion. Septic thrombophlebitis has a clinical presentation that is often misleading. Therefore, a high clinical index of suspicion and the use of appropriate imaging modalities (computed tomography) are essential in recognizing and confirming this diagnosis. Prompt treatment is warranted. Surgical thrombectomies have been successfully replaced by a combination of antibiotics and anticoagulation therapy. PMID:26171262

  14. Streptococcus constellatus Causing Septic Thrombophlebitis of the Right Ovarian Vein with Extension into the Inferior Vena Cava.

    PubMed

    Haidar, Abdallah; Haddad, Amy; Naqvi, Amir; Onyesoh, Ngozi U; Malik, Rushdah; Williams, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Streptococcus constellatus collectively with Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus intermedius constitute the Streptococcus anginosus (formerly Streptococcus milleri) group. Though they are commonly associated with abscesses, bacteremia with subsequent septic thrombophlebitis is extremely rare, and resulting mortality is infrequent. Case Presentation. We report a case of a previously healthy 60-year-old African American female who presented with Streptococcus constellatus bacteremia associated with septic thrombophlebitis to the right ovarian vein extending into the inferior vena cava. She was urgently treated with antibiotics and anticoagulation. Conclusion. Septic thrombophlebitis has a clinical presentation that is often misleading. Therefore, a high clinical index of suspicion and the use of appropriate imaging modalities (computed tomography) are essential in recognizing and confirming this diagnosis. Prompt treatment is warranted. Surgical thrombectomies have been successfully replaced by a combination of antibiotics and anticoagulation therapy.

  15. Retrievable inferior vena cava filters can be placed and removed with a high degree of success: Initial experience.

    PubMed

    Cohoon, Kevin P; McBride, Joseph; Friese, Jeremy L; McPhail, Ian R

    2015-10-01

    Evaluate the success rate of retrievable inferior vena cava filter (IVC) removal in a tertiary care practice. Retrievable IVC filters became readily available in the United States following Food and Drug Administration approval in 2003, and their use has increased dramatically. They represent an attractive option for patients with contraindications to anticoagulation who may only need short-term protection against pulmonary embolism. All patients who had undergone placement of a retrievable IVC filter at Mayo Clinic between 2003 and 2005 were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate our initial experience with retrievable inferior vena cava filters at a large tertiary care center. During a three-year-period of time, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN placed 892 IVC filters of which 460 were retrievable. Of the 460 retrievable filters placed (249 Günther Tulip®, 207 Recovery®, and 4 OptEase®), retrieval was attempted in 223 (48.5%). Of 223 initial attempts, 196 (87.9%) were initially successful and 27 (12.1%) were unsuccessful. Of the 27 unsuccessful initial retrieval attempts, 23 (85.2%) were because of the presence of significant thrombus within the filter and 4 (14.8%) were because of tilting and strut perforation. Of the 23 filters containing significant thrombus, 9 (39.1%) were later retrieved after a period of anticoagulation and resolution of the thrombus. Retrievable IVC filters can be removed with a high degree of success. Approximately one in ten retrievable IVC filter removal attempts may fail initially, usually because of significant thrombus within the filter. This does not preclude possible removal at a later date. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. An Experimental Study to Determine the Role of Inferior Vena Cava Filter in Preventing Bone Cement Implantation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wangang; Zheng, Qiangsun; Li, Bingling; Shi, Xiaoqin; Xiang, Dingcheng; Wang, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inferior vena cava filters (IVCF) are frequently used for preventing pulmonary embolism (PE) following deep venous thromboembolism. Objectives: The present study was designed to investigate whether IVCF could prevent or impede the occurrence of bone cement implantation syndrome (BCIS), since PE is considered as the central mechanism of BCIS. Materials and Methods: Fifteen sheep were divided into three groups: bone cement free (BCF) group, cement implantation (CI) group and IVCF group. In all the groups, an osteotomy proximal to the greater trochanter of left femur was carried out. In BCF group, the femoral canal was not reamed out or packed with any bone cement. In CI and IVCF groups, the left femoral canals were packed with bone cement, to simulate the cementing procedures carried out in hip replacement. An OptEase® filter was placed and released in inferior vena cava, prior to packing cement in the femoral canal in IVCF group, while the IVCF was not released in the CI group. The BCF group was considered as control. Results: Systolic blood pressure (SBP), saturation of oxygen (SaO2) and partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) declined significantly 10 min after the bone cement packing, in CI group, compared to those in BCF group. This was accompanied by a rise in the arterial pH. However, IVCF prevented those changes in the CI group. On ultrasonography, there were dotted echoes in right atrium in the CI group, after bone cement packing, while such echoes were hardly seen in the IVCF group. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that IVCF could prevent BCIS effectively, and, as a corollary, suggests that PE represents the leading cause of the constellation of BCIS symptoms. PMID:26557267

  17. On determining the characteristics of a Greenfield Inferior Vena Cava Filter using CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Tirumani; Hu, Howard; Patel, Aalpen

    2004-11-01

    In those patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) or those at a high risk for DVT, and who have contraindications to or are unresponsive to anticoagulation therapy, vena cava filters are often used to prevent recurrent pulmonary emboli. Ideally, the filter should be efficacious while being non-thrombogenic and non-impeding to the blood flow. In reality, the filter has to establish a balance between clot capture efficiency and flow impedance before and after clot capture. The development and use of numerical tools to study the characteristics of filters and its application to the case of a Greenfield filter has been presented here. A detailed model resolving the flow field around the filter to a fine detail is described. The thrombogenecity of the filter in un-occluded flows is determined by analyzing plots of shear stresses and velocity fields. To evaluate a filter's clot capturing efficacy, a Thin Wire Model (TWM) has been developed and used in conjunction with a moving finite element scheme to study the probability of clot capturing for the Greenfield filter.

  18. Supra hepatic inferior vena cava and right atrial thrombosis following a traffic car crash.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Karim, Hosein; Haghi, Marjan

    2016-07-01

    We present a case of nephrotic syndrome associated with right atrial and supra hepatic vein part of inferior vena caval thrombosis. This patient presented with dyspena, lower extremity edema and back pain after a vehicle accident and blunt trauma to the abdomen. Trauma should be considered not only as a thrombophilic pre-disposition, but also as a predisposing factor to IVC endothelium injury and thrombosis formation. Echocardiography revealed supra hepatic vein IVC thrombosis floating to the right atrium. A C-T scan with contrast also showed pulmonary artery emboli to the left upper lobe. With open heart surgery, the right atrial and IVC clot were extracted and the main left and right pulmonary arteries were evaluated for possible clot lodging. The patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery and thrombosis has not reoccurred with periodical follow-up examinations. © 2016 KUMS, All rights reserved.

  19. Limitations of using synthetic blood clots for measuring in vitro clot capture efficiency of inferior vena cava filters.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Ronald A; Herbertson, Luke H; Sarkar Das, Srilekha; Malinauskas, Richard A; Pritchard, William F; Grossman, Laurence W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was first to evaluate the clot capture efficiency and capture location of six currently-marketed vena cava filters in a physiological venous flow loop, using synthetic polyacrylamide hydrogel clots, which were intended to simulate actual blood clots. After observing a measured anomaly for one of the test filters, we redirected the focus of the study to identify the cause of poor clot capture performance for large synthetic hydrogel clots. We hypothesized that the uncharacteristic low clot capture efficiency observed when testing the outlying filter can be attributed to the inadvertent use of dense, stiff synthetic hydrogel clots, and not as a result of the filter design or filter orientation. To study this issue, sheep blood clots and polyacrylamide (PA) synthetic clots were injected into a mock venous flow loop containing a clinical inferior vena cava (IVC) filter, and their captures were observed. Testing was performed with clots of various diameters (3.2, 4.8, and 6.4 mm), length-to-diameter ratios (1:1, 3:1, 10:1), and stiffness. By adjusting the chemical formulation, PA clots were fabricated to be soft, moderately stiff, or stiff with elastic moduli of 805 ± 2, 1696 ± 10 and 3295 ± 37 Pa, respectively. In comparison, the elastic moduli for freshly prepared sheep blood clots were 1690 ± 360 Pa. The outlying filter had a design that was characterized by peripheral gaps (up to 14 mm) between its wire struts. While a low clot capture rate was observed using large, stiff synthetic clots, the filter effectively captured similarly sized sheep blood clots and soft PA clots. Because the stiffer synthetic clots remained straight when approaching the filter in the IVC model flow loop, they were more likely to pass between the peripheral filter struts, while the softer, physiological clots tended to fold and were captured by the filter. These experiments demonstrated that if synthetic clots are used as a surrogate for animal or human blood

  20. Caval penetration by retrievable inferior vena cava filters: a retrospective comparison of Option and Günther Tulip filters.

    PubMed

    Olorunsola, Olufoladare G; Kohi, Maureen P; Fidelman, Nicholas; Westphalen, Antonio C; Kolli, Pallav K; Taylor, Andrew G; Gordon, Roy L; LaBerge, Jeanne M; Kerlan, Robert K

    2013-04-01

    To compare the frequency of vena caval penetration by the struts of the Option and Günther Tulip cone filters on postplacement computed tomography (CT) imaging. All patients who had an Option or Günther Tulip inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placed between January 2010 and May 2012 were identified retrospectively from medical records. Of the 208 IVC filters placed, the positions of 58 devices (21 Option filters, 37 Günther Tulip filters [GTFs]) were documented on follow-up CT examinations obtained for reasons unrelated to filter placement. In cases when multiple CT studies were obtained after placement, each study was reviewed, for a total of 80 examinations. Images were assessed for evidence of caval wall penetration by filter components, noting the number of penetrating struts and any effect on pericaval tissues. Penetration of at least one strut was observed in 17% of all filters imaged by CT between 1 and 447 days following placement. Although there was no significant difference in the overall prevalence of penetration when comparing the Option filter and GTF (Option, 10%; GTF, 22%), only GTFs showed time-dependent penetration, with penetration becoming more likely after prolonged indwelling times. No patient had damage to pericaval tissues or documented symptoms attributed to penetration. Although the Günther Tulip and Option filters exhibit caval penetration at CT imaging, only the GTF exhibits progressive penetration over time. Copyright © 2013 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The high-risk polytrauma patient and inferior vena cava filter use.

    PubMed

    Berber, Onur; Vasireddy, Aswin; Nzeako, Obi; Tavakkolizadeh, Adel

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact on practice of vena cava filter insertion guidelines (Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma: practice management guidelines). The study was performed at a level 1 trauma centre with data from the 'Trauma Audit and Research Network' cross-referenced to hospital data. A total of 1138 specific 'high-risk' major trauma patients were identified over a 6-year period. The mean age was 46 years (18-102) and the male to female ratio was 3.3:1. The average Injury Severity Score was 23.6 (4-75). The overall DVT rate was 2.6% and the PE rate was 1.8%. A retrievable IVC filter was inserted in 42 cases (3.8%). The filter retrieval rate was 23.8% at a mean of 68.5days (4-107). Only one complication was reported of a breakthrough PE despite filter. Applying the EAST guidelines to this cohort would have suggested filter insertion in 279 (24.6%) cases. The kappa concordance value between observed practice and the 'EAST filter group' was 0.103 (poor). The PE rate in the 'EAST filter group' was 2.2% vs 1.6% in the 'no filter group' (p=0.601, no statistical difference) and the observed odds ratio was 0.814 (95% CI 0.413, 1.602). The EAST guidelines are useful but may be overestimating the need for filter insertion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fulminant Buddchiari syndrome caused by renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor with inferior vena cava thrombus extending to atrium.

    PubMed

    Mete, Uttam K; Singh, Dig Vijay; Bhattacharya, Anish; Kakkar, Nandita

    2015-01-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) of the kidney are rare, the diagnosis usually being made at histopathology. A young female presented with a massive right renal mass with features of hepatic dysfunction. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed a large tumor of right kidney with tumor thrombus extending from inferior vena cava (IVC) to right atrium with features suggesting Buddchiari syndrome (BCS). Needle biopsy of mass showed a round cell neoplasm and positive staining for neuron specific enolase and minimum inhibitory concentration-2 on immunohistochemistry. She was managed with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy, surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case of renal PNET with inferior IVC tumor thrombus extending to right atrium with BCS. We suggest that renal PNET should be kept in mind as a differential diagnosis in young adults presenting with a large kidney mass extending to IVC that shows evidence of necrosis on imaging, which may be associated with BCS as in index case.

  3. Iodine-125 Seeds Strand for Treatment of Tumor Thrombus in Inferior Vena Cava: An Experimental Study in a Rabbit Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wen Yan, Zhiping Luo, Jianjun Fang, Zhuting Wu, Linlin Liu, QingXin Qu, Xudong Liu, Lingxiao Wang, Jianhua

    2013-10-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to establish an animal model of implanted inferior vena cava tumor thrombus (IVCTT) and to evaluate the effect of linear iodine-125 seeds strand in treating implanted IVCTT. Methods: Tumor cell line VX{sub 2} was inoculated subcutaneously into New Zealand rabbit to develop the parent tumor. The tumor strip was inoculated into inferior vena cava (IVC) to establish the IVCTT model. The IVCTT was confirmed by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) after 2 weeks. Twelve rabbits with IVCTT were randomly divided into two groups. Treatment group (group T; n = 6) underwent Iodine-125 seeds brachytherapy, and the control group (group C; n = 6) underwent blank seeds strand. The blood laboratory examination (including blood routine examination, hepatic and renal function), body weight, survival time, and IVCTT volume by MDCT were monitored. All rabbits were dissected postmortem, and the therapeutic effects were evaluated on the basis of histopathology. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen index (PI) and apoptosis index (AI) of IVCTT were compared between two groups. T test, Wilcoxon rank test, and Kaplan-Meier survival curve analysis were used. Results: The success rate of establishing IVCTT was 100 %. The body weight loss and cachexia of rabbits in group C appeared earlier than in group T. Body weight in the third week, the mean survival time, PI, AI in groups T and C were 2.23 {+-} 0.12 kg, 57.83 {+-} 8.68 days, (16.73 {+-} 5.18 %), (29.47 {+-} 7.18 %), and 2.03 {+-} 0.13 kg, 43.67 {+-} 5.28 days, (63.01 {+-} 2.01 %), (6.02 {+-} 2.93 %), respectively. There were statistically significant differences between group T and group C (P < 0.05). The IVCTT volume of group T was remarkably smaller than that of group C. Conclusions: Injecting and suspensory fixing VX2 tumor strip into IVC is a reliable method to establish IVCTT animal model. The linear Iodine-125 seeds strand brachytherapy was a safe and effective method for treating IVCTT

  4. An uncommon and insidious presentation of renal cell carcinoma with tumor extending into the inferior vena cava and right atrium: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hou Tee; Chong, Jen Lim; Othman, Norliza; Vendargon, Simon; Omar, Shamsuddin

    2016-05-03

    Renal cell carcinoma is a potentially lethal cancer with aggressive behavior and it tends to metastasize. Renal cell carcinoma involves the inferior vena cava in approximately 15% of cases and it rarely extends into the right atrium. A majority of renal cell carcinoma are detected as incidental findings on imaging studies obtained for unrelated reasons. At presentation, nearly 25% of patients either have distant metastases or significant local-regional disease with no symptoms that can be attributed to renal cell carcinoma. A 64-year-old Indian male with a past history of coronary artery bypass graft surgery, congestive heart failure, and diabetes mellitus complained of worsening shortness of breath for 2 weeks. Incidentally, a transthoracic echocardiography showed a "thumb-like" mass in his right atrium extending into his right ventricle through the tricuspid valve with each systole. Abdomen magnetic resonance imaging revealed a heterogenous lobulated mass in the upper and mid-pole of his right kidney with a tumor extending into his inferior vena cava and right atrium, consistent with our diagnosis of advanced renal cell carcinoma which was later confirmed by surgical excision and histology. Radical right nephrectomy, lymph nodes clearance, inferior vena cava cavatomy, and complete tumor thrombectomy were performed successfully. Perioperatively, he did not require cardiopulmonary bypass or deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. He had no recurrence during the follow-up period for more than 2 years after surgery. Advanced extension of renal cell carcinoma can occur with no apparent symptoms and be detected incidentally. In rare circumstances, atypical presentation of renal cell carcinoma should be considered in a patient presenting with right atrial mass detected by echocardiography. Renal cell carcinoma with inferior vena cava and right atrium extension is a complex surgical challenge, but excellent results can be obtained with proper patient selection, meticulous

  5. Unintentional embolization of a guide wire in the inferior vena cava during central venous catheter insertion successfully retrieved percutaneously 9 months later.

    PubMed

    Trabattoni, Daniela; Andreini, Daniele; Bartorelli, Antonio L

    2014-01-01

    Central venous catheters are routinely positioned for hemodynamic monitoring and fluid administration in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, and many well-known complications associated with this manoeuver have been described. Metalic guide wire embolization is a rare complication potentially associated with nonmechanical and mechanical adverse events. The case we report is peculiar as an almost fully endothelialized guide wire was successfully retrieved 9 months after its unintentional embolization in the inferior vena cava.

  6. Factors associated with reduced radiation exposure, cost, and technical difficulty of inferior vena cava filter placement and retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Neill, Matthew; Charles, Hearns W.; Pflager, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We sought to delineate factors of inferior vena cava filter placement associated with increased radiation and cost and difficult subsequent retrieval. In total, 299 procedures from August 2013 to December 2014, 252 in a fluoroscopy suite (FS) and 47 in the operating room (OR), were reviewed for radiation exposure, fluoroscopy time, filter type, and angulation. The number of retrieval devices and fluoroscopy time needed for retrieval were assessed. Multiple linear regression assessed the impact of filter type, procedure location, and patient and procedural variables on radiation dose, fluoroscopy time, and filter angulation. Logistic regression assessed the impact of filter angulation, type, and filtration duration on retrieval difficulty. Access site and filter type had no impact on radiation exposure. However, placement in the OR, compared to the FS, entailed more radiation (156.3 vs 71.4 mGy; P = 0.001), fluoroscopy time (6.1 vs 2.8 min; P < 0.001), and filter angulation (4.8° vs 2.6°; P < 0.001). Angulation was primarily dependent on filter type (P = 0.02), with VenaTech and Denali filters associated with decreased angulation (2.2°, 2.4°) and Option filters associated with greater angulation (4.2°). Filter angulation, but not filter type or filtration duration, predicted cases requiring >1 retrieval device (P < 0.001) and >30 min fluoroscopy time (P = 0.02). Cost savings for placement in the FS vs OR were estimated at $444.50 per case. In conclusion, increased radiation and cost were associated with placement in the OR. Filter angulation independently predicted difficult filter retrieval; angulation was determined by filter type. Performing filter placement in the FS using specific filters may reduce radiation and cost while enabling future retrieval. PMID:28127123

  7. Factors associated with reduced radiation exposure, cost, and technical difficulty of inferior vena cava filter placement and retrieval.

    PubMed

    Neill, Matthew; Charles, Hearns W; Pflager, Daniel; Deipolyi, Amy R

    2017-01-01

    We sought to delineate factors of inferior vena cava filter placement associated with increased radiation and cost and difficult subsequent retrieval. In total, 299 procedures from August 2013 to December 2014, 252 in a fluoroscopy suite (FS) and 47 in the operating room (OR), were reviewed for radiation exposure, fluoroscopy time, filter type, and angulation. The number of retrieval devices and fluoroscopy time needed for retrieval were assessed. Multiple linear regression assessed the impact of filter type, procedure location, and patient and procedural variables on radiation dose, fluoroscopy time, and filter angulation. Logistic regression assessed the impact of filter angulation, type, and filtration duration on retrieval difficulty. Access site and filter type had no impact on radiation exposure. However, placement in the OR, compared to the FS, entailed more radiation (156.3 vs 71.4 mGy; P = 0.001), fluoroscopy time (6.1 vs 2.8 min; P < 0.001), and filter angulation (4.8° vs 2.6°; P < 0.001). Angulation was primarily dependent on filter type (P = 0.02), with VenaTech and Denali filters associated with decreased angulation (2.2°, 2.4°) and Option filters associated with greater angulation (4.2°). Filter angulation, but not filter type or filtration duration, predicted cases requiring >1 retrieval device (P < 0.001) and >30 min fluoroscopy time (P = 0.02). Cost savings for placement in the FS vs OR were estimated at $444.50 per case. In conclusion, increased radiation and cost were associated with placement in the OR. Filter angulation independently predicted difficult filter retrieval; angulation was determined by filter type. Performing filter placement in the FS using specific filters may reduce radiation and cost while enabling future retrieval.

  8. Endovascular treatment of ruptured abdominal aneurysm into the inferior vena cava in patient after stent graft placement.

    PubMed

    Juszkat, Robert; Pukacki, Fryderyk; Zarzecka, Anna; Kulesza, Jerzy; Majewski, Wacław

    2009-07-01

    We report the case of a patient who underwent endovascular repair and then reintervention as a result of the presence of a persistent endoleak complicated by an aortocaval fistula. A 76-year-old patient with a history of endovascular treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysm 2 years earlier had a palpable abdominal mass, high-output cardiac failure, and renal failure. A computed tomographic scan and angiography revealed bending of the right iliac limb, a type I endoleak, and rupture of the aneurysm into the inferior vena cava with aortocaval fistula formation. An iliac extension was positioned in the right external iliac artery. The procedure was finished successfully. Control angiography showed normal flow within the endoprosthesis, and both iliac arteries were without signs of endoleakage and aortocaval fistula. Ectatic common iliac artery may lead to a late distal attachment site endoleak. The application of a stent graft in cases of secondary aortocaval fistula after stent graft repair is a good option, particularly in emergency cases.

  9. Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aneurysm into the Inferior Vena Cava in Patient After Stent Graft Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Juszkat, Robert; Pukacki, Fryderyk; Zarzecka, Anna; Kulesza, Jerzy; Majewski, Waclaw

    2009-07-15

    We report the case of a patient who underwent endovascular repair and then reintervention as a result of the presence of a persistent endoleak complicated by an aortocaval fistula. A 76-year-old patient with a history of endovascular treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysm 2 years earlier had a palpable abdominal mass, high-output cardiac failure, and renal failure. A computed tomographic scan and angiography revealed bending of the right iliac limb, a type I endoleak, and rupture of the aneurysm into the inferior vena cava with aortocaval fistula formation. An iliac extension was positioned in the right external iliac artery. The procedure was finished successfully. Control angiography showed normal flow within the endoprosthesis, and both iliac arteries were without signs of endoleakage and aortocaval fistula. Ectatic common iliac artery may lead to a late distal attachment site endoleak. The application of a stent graft in cases of secondary aortocaval fistula after stent graft repair is a good option, particularly in emergency cases.

  10. Pharmacomechanical thrombolysis in the management of acute inferior vena cava filter occlusion using the Trellis-8 device.

    PubMed

    Branco, Bernardino C; Montero-Baker, Miguel F; Espinoza, Eduardo; Gamero, Maite; Zea, Rodrigo; Labropoulos, Nicos; Leon, Luis R

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the performance and safety of the Trellis-8 system, a pharmacomechanical thrombolysis infusion catheter, and adjunctive therapies in the treatment of symptomatic inferior vena cava (IVC) filter-related acute thrombotic occlusion. Eight consecutive patients (6 men; mean age 57.4 years, range 34-78 years) with acute thrombotic occlusion of the IVC in the presence of an IVC filter underwent percutaneous venous thrombectomy using the Trellis-8 thrombectomy system and adjunctive techniques between January 2009 and November 2013. Demographics, clinical data, procedures, and outcomes were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had clinical signs of lower extremity venous hypertension on presentation. The median time between IVC filter placement and occlusion was 25 months. Patients were followed for the development of thromboembolic complications to the last clinic visit or until they died. The procedure was technically successful in 6 patients, whereas it could not be performed in 2 due to failure to cross the occlusion. The median follow-up period was 7.8 months, at which time all patients undergoing successful Trellis-8 thrombectomy had relief of symptoms without thromboembolic or bleeding complications. In this limited performance and safety evaluation, the Trellis-8 thrombectomy system combined with adjunctive therapies, such as mechanical thrombectomy and balloon angioplasty, was effective in 75% of patients with IVC filter-related acute caval occlusion. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Retrieval of Tip-embedded Inferior Vena Cava Filters by Using the Endobronchial Forceps Technique: Experience at a Single Institution.

    PubMed

    Stavropoulos, S William; Ge, Benjamin H; Mondschein, Jeffrey I; Shlansky-Goldberg, Richard D; Sudheendra, Deepak; Trerotola, Scott O

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the use of endobronchial forceps to retrieve tip-embedded inferior vena cava (IVC) filters. This institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant retrospective study included 114 patients who presented with tip-embedded IVC filters for removal from January 2005 to April 2014. The included patients consisted of 77 women and 37 men with a mean age of 43 years (range, 18-79 years). Filters were identified as tip embedded by using rotational venography. Rigid bronchoscopy forceps were used to dissect the tip or hook of the filter from the wall of the IVC. The filter was then removed through the sheath by using the endobronchial forceps. Statistical analysis entailed calculating percentages, ranges, and means. The endobronchial forceps technique was used to successfully retrieve 109 of 114 (96%) tip-embedded IVC filters on an intention-to-treat basis. Five failures occurred in four patients in whom the technique was attempted but failed and one patient in whom retrieval was not attempted. Filters were in place for a mean of 465 days (range, 31-2976 days). The filters in this study included 10 Recovery, 33 G2, eight G2X, 11 Eclipse, one OptEase, six Option, 13 Günther Tulip, one ALN, and 31 Celect filters. Three minor complications and one major complication occurred, with no permanent sequelae. The endobronchial forceps technique can be safely used to remove tip-embedded IVC filters. © RSNA, 2014.

  12. Primary Renal Rhabdomyosarcoma in an Adolescent With Tumor Thrombosis in the Inferior Vena Cava and Right Atrium

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Ching; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Westphalen, Antonio; Chang, Han; Chiang, I-Ping; Chen, Cheng-Hong; Wu, Hsi-Chin; Lin, Chien-Heng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although the second peak of the age distribution of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is at adolescence, renal RMS is extremely rare at this age group. This tumor is indistinguishable from other renal tumors based on clinical and imaging findings, and the diagnosis relies on histology and immunohistochemical staining. We report a unique case of adolescent renal RMS associated with tumor thrombus extending into the inferior vena cava (IVC) and right atrium. An 18-year-old female adolescent presented with shortness of breath and palpitations, associated with right flank discomfort, and hematuria. A pleomorphic-type renal RMS with Budd–Chiari syndrome and arrhythmia induced by IVC and RA thrombosis was diagnosed. Despite complete tumor resection, the patient developed multiple lung metastases a month after surgery. Chemotherapy was recommended, but the patient declined. She died within a year of the initial operation. Adolescent renal RMS is rare and associated with poor outcome. Early aggressive multimodal therapy seems to be appropriate, in particular, in the presence of tumor thrombosis. PMID:27227946

  13. Mesenteric-portal axis thrombosis and deep venous thrombosis in a patient with inferior vena cava agenesis.

    PubMed

    Lluis Pons, Laia; Chahri Vizcarro, Nadia; Llaverias Borrell, Silvia; Miquel Abbad, Carlos

    2017-06-01

    Splenoportal axis thrombosis not associated with cirrhosis or neoplasms has a prevalence lower than 5 per 10,000 people. An etiologic factor responsible for portal thrombosis is finally identified in most cases, usually systemic thrombogenic factors or predisposing local factors. However, despite a detailed study of all etiologic factors, up to 30% of cases are eventually considered as idiopathic in origin. We report the case of a 41-year-old patient who presented with abdominal pain and lower extremity edema. The patient was diagnosed with portal and mesenteric-portal confluence thrombosis, bilateral deep venous thrombosis and right lumbar vein thrombosis based on an abdominal CT scan. This was associated with a likely congenital inferior vena cava agenesis. This malformation is present in approximately 5% of patients with deep vein thrombosis even though it represents a rare cause of portal thrombosis. The fact that several thromboses developed simultaneously makes this a unique and isolated case in the current literature as no similar cases have been reported thus far.

  14. Social and Demographic Factors Influencing Inferior Vena Cava Filter Retrieval at a Single Institution in the United States.

    PubMed

    Smith, S Christian; Shanks, Candace; Guy, Gregory; Yang, Xiangyu; Dowell, Joshua D

    2015-10-01

    Retrievable inferior vena cava filters (IVCFs) are associated with long-term adverse events that have increased interest in improving filter retrieval rates. Determining the influential patient social and demographic factors affecting IVCF retrieval is important to personalize patient management strategies and attain optimal patient care. Seven-hundred and sixty-two patients were retrospectively studied who had a filter placed at our institution between January 2011 and November 2013. Age, gender, race, cancer history, distance to residence from retrieval institution, and insurance status were identified for each patient, and those receiving retrievable IVCFs were further evaluated for retrieval rate and time to retrieval. Of the 762 filters placed, 133 were permanent filters. Of the 629 retrievable filters placed, 406 met the inclusion criteria and were eligible for retrieval. Results revealed patients with Medicare were less likely to have their filters retrieved (p = 0.031). Older age was also associated with a lower likelihood of retrieval (p < 0.001) as was living further from the medical center (p = 0.027). Patients who were white and had Medicare were more likely than similarly insured black patients to have their filters retrieved (p = 0.024). The retrieval rate of IVCFs was most influenced by insurance status, distance from the medical center, and age. Race was statistically significant only when combined with insurance status. The results of this study suggest that these patient groups may need closer follow-up in order to obtain optimal IVCF retrieval rates.

  15. Failed Retrieval of an Inferior Vena Cava Filter During Pregnancy Because of Filter Tilt: Report of Two Cases

    SciTech Connect

    McConville, R. M. Kennedy, P. T.; Collins, A. J.; Ellis, P. K.

    2009-01-15

    Thromboembolic disease during pregnancy is an important cause of obstetric morbidity and mortality. Pregnant patients with venous thromboembolism are usually managed by conventional anticoagulation. However, this must be discontinued during vaginal or caesarian delivery to avoid haemorrhage and to reduce the risk of possible epidural haematoma. Retrievable inferior vena cava filters (IVCFs) offer protection against pulmonary embolism during this high-risk period, when anticoagulation is discontinued, while avoiding potential long-term sequelae of a permanent IVCF. Here we report two patients who presented in the third trimester of pregnancy with floating ileofemoral deep vein thrombosis. Both patients were initially treated with standard anticoagulation; however, shortly before delivery both patients had a retrievable IVCF placed in a suprarenal position. In both patients, retrieval failed at 28 days after insertion because of filter tilt. The timing and mechanism of filter tilt remains uncertain. We believe that a number of factors could have been involved, including change in the anatomic configuration with lateral displacement of the IVCF as a result of the gravid uterus as well as forceful uterine contractions during labour, which modified the shape and diameter of the IVC. We showed that failure to retrieve the IVCF has had considerable implications for the two young patients regarding long-term anticoagulation and have highlighted the need for further clinical trials regarding the safe use of retrievable IVCFs during pregnancy.

  16. Semi-automated tracking and continuous monitoring of inferior vena cava diameter in simulated and experimental ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Mesin, Luca; Pasquero, Paolo; Albani, Stefano; Porta, Massimo; Roatta, Silvestro

    2015-03-01

    Assessment of respirophasic fluctuations in the diameter of the inferior vena cava (IVC) is detrimentally affected by its concomitant displacements. This study was aimed at presenting and validating a method to compensate for IVC movement artifacts while continuously measuring IVC diameter in an automated fashion (with minimal interaction with the user) from a longitudinal B-mode ultrasound clip. Performance was tested on both experimental ultrasound clips collected from four healthy patients and simulations, implementing rigid IVC displacements and pulsation. Compared with traditional M-mode measurements, the new approach systematically reduced errors in caval index assessment (range over maximum diameter value) to an extent depending on individual vessel geometry, IVC movement and choice of the M-line (the line along which the diameter is computed). In experimental recordings, this approach identified both the cardiac and respiratory components of IVC movement and pulsatility and evidenced the spatial dependence of IVC pulsatility. IVC tracking appears to be a promising approach to reduce movement artifacts and to improve the reliability of IVC diameter monitoring.

  17. Renal cell carcinoma with inferior vena cava involvement: Prognostic effect of tumor thrombus consistency on cancer specific survival.

    PubMed

    Mager, Rene; Daneshmand, Siamak; Evans, Christopher P; Palou, Joan; Martínez-Salamanca, Juan I; Master, Viraj A; McKiernan, James M; Libertino, John A; Haferkamp, Axel; Haferkamp, Axel; Capitanio, Umberto; Carballido, Joaquín A; Chantada, Venancio; Chromecki, Thomas; Ciancio, Gaetano; Daneshmand, Siamak; Evans, Christopher P; Gontero, Paolo; González, Javier; Hohenfellner, Markus; Huang, William C; Koppie, Theresa M; Libertino, John A; Espinós, Estefanía Linares; Lorentz, Adam; Martínez-Salamanca, Juan I; Master, Viraj A; McKiernan, James M; Montorsi, Francesco; Novara, Giacomo; O'Malley, Padraic; Pahernik, Sascha; Palou, Joan; Moreno, José Luis Pontones; Pruthi, Raj S; Faba, Oscar Rodriguez; Russo, Paul; Scherr, Douglas S; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Spahn, Martin; Terrone, Carlo; Tilki, Derya; Vázquez-Martul, Dario; Donoso, Cesar Vera; Vergho, Daniel; Wallen, Eric M; Zigeuner, Richard

    2016-11-01

    Renal cell carcinoma forming a venous tumor thrombus (VTT) in the inferior vena cava (IVC) has a poor prognosis. Recent investigations have been focused on prognostic markers of survival. Thrombus consistency (TC) has been proposed to be of significant value but yet there are conflicting data. The aim of this study is to test the effect of IVC VTT consistency on cancer specific survival (CSS) in a multi-institutional cohort. The records of 413 patients collected by the International Renal Cell Carcinoma-Venous Thrombus Consortium were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent radical nephrectomy and tumor thrombectomy. Kaplan-Meier estimate and Cox regression analyses investigated the impact of TC on CSS in addition to established clinicopathological predictors. VTT was solid in 225 patients and friable in 188 patients. Median CSS was 50 months in solid and 45 months in friable VTT. TC showed no significant association with metastatic spread, pT stage, perinephric fat invasion, and higher Fuhrman grade. Survival analysis and Cox regression rejected TC as prognostic marker for CSS. In the largest cohort published so far, TC seems not to be independently associated with survival in RCC patients and should therefore not be included in risk stratification models. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;114:764-768. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Thirty-year experience with surgical interruption of the inferior vena cava for prevention of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, M C; Wirthlin, L S; Donaldson, G A

    1980-01-01

    Case records of 237 patients treated by inferior vena cava (IVC) ligation (154), suture plication (27) or clip application (56) were reviewed. Indications for surgery included failure of anticoagulation or femoral vein ligation to control embolism and threat of potentially massive, septic or paradoxical emboli. Overall hospital mortality was 15% and recent operative mortality was 2%. The incidence of early postoperative leg swelling was 36% and late venous sequellae occurred in 50% of the follow-up group of 140 cases followed an average of 44.3 months. Morbidity secondary to IVC interruption was decreased by use of the prosthetic lip, but clip application was still associated with early leg swelling in 21% and late mild swelling in 24%. The incidence of proven or suspected recurrent emboli was 7.6% with no significant variation by type of IVC procedure, and recurrent emboli were fatal in 2.5%. Refinement of indications, operative methods and perioperative care for IVC interruption procedures over the years has substantially improved the surgical approach to prevention of life-threatening pulmonary embolism. PMID:7362302

  19. Inferior vena cava tumor thrombus that directly infiltrated from paracaval lymph node metastases in a patient with recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we present the case of a patient with recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who had paracaval lymph node (LN) metastases with an inferior vena cava (IVC) tumor thrombus after a hepatectomy. A 65-year-old man with chronic hepatitis B virus infection received an extended anterior segmentectomy because of two hepatic tumors, located in segments 7 and 8. Histological examination of both resected specimens showed mostly moderately differentiated HCC with some poorly differentiated areas, and liver cirrhosis (A2/F4). Because the patient had an elevated α-fetoprotein serum level, abdominal computed tomography (CT) was performed. Abdominal CT revealed a 9-mm-diameter recurrent tumor in hepatic segment 3 and paracaval LN metastases with an IVC tumor thrombus at 8 months after the first operation. The patient received transcatheter arterial chemoembolization as treatment for the intrahepatic recurrence, following resection of the paracaval LN metastases and removal of the IVC tumor thrombus. In this case, the paracaval LN metastases had directly infiltrated the IVC via the lumbar veins, resulting in an IVC tumor thrombus, which usually develops from an intrahepatic tumor via the hepatic vein. The development of an IVC tumor thrombus with HCC recurrence, as in this case, is very rare, and based on a PubMed search, we believe this report may be the first to describe this condition. PMID:23915104

  20. Topographic anatomy of the fetal inferior vena cava, coronary sinus, and pulmonary veins: Variations in Chiari's network.

    PubMed

    Naito, Michiko; Yu, Hee Chul; Kim, Ji Hyun; Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Murakami, Gen; Cho, Baik Hwan

    2015-07-01

    To understand anomalies in Chiari's network better, we assessed the topographical anatomy of the fetal inferior vena cava (IVC), coronary sinus, and atria. We examined sagittal serial paraffin sections of 15 human fetuses of crown-rump length 24-36 mm, corresponding to a gestational age of 8 weeks. Although their outflow tract morphologies were similar, these 15 specimens could be classified into two groups. In eight specimens, the left common cardinal vein reached the body wall, whereas in the other seven the vein was obliterated near the left pulmonary vein. Irrespective of the group in which the specimen was included, the anteroposterior arrangement of the coronary sinus, the sinus septum (septum), and the right sinus valve (right valve) could be classified into three types: the right valve-septum-coronary sinus arrangement in seven specimens; the right valve-coronary sinus-septum arrangement in five; and the coronary sinus-right valve-septum arrangement in three. Depending on differences in topographical anatomy, the sinus septum separated the coronary sinus opening from either the right or the left atrium. Likewise, the coronary sinus opening was either adjacent to or distant from the IVC terminal. Rather than the counter-side position of the right valve being at the IVC terminal, the left sinus valve protruded leftward, forming an incomplete interatrial septum. Fetal variations seemed to be closely connected with individual variations and a high frequency of Chiari's network anomalies in adults.

  1. Suction against resistance: a new breathing technique to significantly improve the blood flow ratio of the superior and inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Gutzeit, Andreas; Roos, Justus E; Hergan, Klaus; von Weymarn, Constantin; Wälti, Stephan; Reischauer, Carolin; Froehlich, Johannes M

    2014-12-01

    Optimal contrast within the pulmonary artery is achieved by the maximum amount of contrast-enhanced blood flowing through the superior vena cava (SVC), while minimum amounts of non-contrasted blood should originate from the inferior vena cava (IVC). This study aims to clarify whether "suction against resistance" might optimise this ratio. Phase-contrast pulse sequences on a 1.5T MRI magnet were used for flow quantification (mean flow (mL/s), stroke volume (Vol) in the SVC and IVC in volunteers. Different breathing manoeuvers were analysed repeatedly: free breathing; inspiration; expiration; suction against resistance, and Valsalva. To standardise breathing commands, volunteers performed suction and Valsalva manoeuvers with an MR-compatible manometer. Suction against resistance was associated with a significant drop of the IVC/SVC flow quotient (1.63 [range 1.3-2.0] p < 0.05 at -10 mmHg and 1.48 [1.1-1.9] p < 0.01 at -20 mmHg) corresponding to increased blood flow from SVC and diminished flow originating from the IVC. The remaining breathing commands (free breathing 2.2; inspiration 2.4; expiration 2.4; Valsalva 10 mmHg 2.3; Valsalva 20 mmHg 2.6; and Valsalva 30 mmHg 2.2) showed no differences (p > 0.05). Suction against resistance caused a significant drop in the IVC/SVC quotient. Theoretically, this breathing manoeuver might significantly improve the enhancement characteristics of CT angiography. Suction provokes reduction in blood flow in the inferior vena cava. Ratio between the inferior and superior vena cava blood flow diminished during suction. Manometer used during breathing standardises MR phase-contrast blood flow measurements.

  2. Correlations between pulmonary artery pressures and inferior vena cava collapsibility in critically ill surgical patients: An exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Stawicki, Stanislaw P.; Papadimos, Thomas J.; Bahner, David P.; Evans, David C.; Jones, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: As pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) use declines, search continues for reliable and readily accessible minimally invasive hemodynamic monitoring alternatives. Although the correlation between inferior vena cava collapsibility index (IVC-CI) and central venous pressures (CVP) has been described previously, little information exists regarding the relationship between IVC-CI and pulmonary artery pressures (PAPs). The goal of this study is to bridge this important knowledge gap. We hypothesized that there would be an inverse correlation between IVC-CI and PAPs. Methods: A post hoc analysis of prospectively collected hemodynamic data was performed, examining correlations between IVC-CI and PAPs in a convenience sample of adult Surgical Intensive Care Unit patients. Concurrent measurements of IVC-CI and pulmonary arterial systolic (PAS), pulmonary arterial diastolic (PAD), and pulmonary arterial mean (PAM) pressures were performed. IVC-CI was calculated as ([IVCmax − IVCmin]/IVCmax) × 100%. Vena cava measurements were obtained by ultrasound–credentialed providers. For the purpose of correlative analysis, PAP measurements (PAS, PAD, and PAM) were grouped by terciles while the IVC-CI spectrum was divided into thirds (<33, 33–65, ≥66). Results: Data from 34 patients (12 women, 22 men, with median age of 59.5 years) were analyzed. Median Acute Physiologic Assessment and Chronic Health Evaluation II score was 9. A total of 76 measurement pairs were recorded, with 57% (43/76) obtained in mechanically ventilated patients. Correlations between IVC-CI and PAS (rs = −0.334), PAD (rs = −0.305), and PAM (rs = −0.329) were poor. Correlations were higher between CVP and PAS (R2 = 0.61), PAD (R2 = 0.68), and PAM (R2 = 0.70). High IVC-CI values (≥66%) consistently correlated with measurements in the lowest PAP ranges. Across all PAP groups (PAS, PAD, and PAM), there were no differences between the mean measurement values for the lower and middle IVC

  3. Inferior Vena Cava Compression as a Novel Maneuver to Detect Patent Foramen Ovale: A Transesophageal Echocardiographic Study.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Eiji; Murata, Tomoyuki; Goto, Eri; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Sasaki, Takehito; Minami, Kentaro; Nakamura, Kohki; Kumagai, Koji; Naito, Shigeto; Kario, Kazuomi; Oshima, Shigeru

    2017-03-01

    The Valsalva maneuver, the most sensitive test for patent foramen ovale (PFO) detection, is difficult during transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), especially after sedation. The aim of this study was to compare PFO detection effectiveness between inferior vena cava (IVC) compression and the Valsalva maneuver. A total of 293 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation undergoing TEE before initial atrial fibrillation ablation were prospectively enrolled. Agitated saline was injected in 290 patients under three conditions: Valsalva maneuver under conscious sedation, at rest, and IVC compression under deep sedation. Three patients with newly diagnosed atrial septal defects on TEE were excluded. The IVC compression maneuver consisted of manual compression 5 cm to the right of the epigastric region and depressed the abdominal wall by 5 cm for 30 sec and compression release immediately before right atrial opacification with microbubbles by agitated intravenous saline. The overall PFO detection rate was better with IVC compression (57 PFOs [19.7%]) than at rest (15 patients [5.2%]) (P < .0001) or with the Valsalva maneuver (37 patients [12.8%]) (P = .024). There were no significant differences in PFO detection between IVC compression and the Valsalva maneuver (IVC compression, 43 patients [22.5%]; Valsalva maneuver, 35 patients [18.3%]; P = .31), even in patients who could perform the Valsalva maneuver effectively (n = 191). IVC compression is feasible and effective for detecting PFO and is not inferior to the Valsalva maneuver. In particular, IVC compression could be an alternative diagnostic method for PFO using TEE when the Valsalva maneuver cannot be performed under deep sedation. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of Physician Education and a Dedicated Inferior Vena Cava Filter Tracking System on Inferior Vena Cava Filter Use and Retrieval Rates Across a Large US Health Care Region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Stephen L; Cha, Hsien-Hwa A; Lin, James R; Francis, Bolanos; Elizabeth, Wakley; Martin, Porras; Rajan, Sudhir

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of physician familiarity with current evidence and guidelines on inferior vena cava (IVC) filter use and the availability of IVC filter tracking infrastructure on retrieval rates. Fourteen continuing medical education-approved in-hospital grand rounds covering evidence-based review of the literature on IVC filter efficacy, patient-centered outcomes, guidelines for IVC filter indications, and complications were performed across a large United States (US) health care region serving more than 3.5 million members. A computer-based IVC filter tracking system was deployed simultaneously. IVC filter use, rates of attempted retrieval, and fulfillment of guidelines for IVC filter indications were retrospectively evaluated at each facility for 12 months before intervention (n = 427) and for 12 months after intervention (n = 347). After education, IVC filter use decreased 18.7%, with a member enrollment-adjusted decrease of 22.2%, despite an increasing IVC filter use trend for 4 years. Reduction in IVC filter use at each facility strongly correlated with physician attendance at grand rounds (r = -0.69; P = .007). Rates of attempted retrieval increased from 38.9% to 54.0% (P = .0006), with similar rates of successful retrieval (82.3% before education and 85.8% after education on first attempt). Improvement in IVC filter retrieval attempts correlated with physician attendance at grand rounds (r = 0.51; P = .051). IVC filter dwell times at first retrieval attempt were similar (10.2 wk before and 10.8 wk after). Physician education dramatically reduced IVC filter use across a large US health care region, and represents a learning opportunity for physicians who request and place them. Education and a novel tracking system improved rates of retrieval for IVC filter devices. Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Kaolin-based hemostatic dressing improves hemorrhage control from a penetrating inferior vena cava injury in coagulopathic swine.

    PubMed

    Koko, Kiavash R; McCauley, Brian M; Gaughan, John P; Nolan, Ryan S; Fromer, Marc W; Hagaman, Ashleigh L R; Choron, Rachel L; Brown, Spencer A; Hazelton, Joshua P

    2017-07-01

    Retrohepatic inferior vena cava (RIVC) injuries are often lethal due to challenges in obtaining hemorrhage control. We hypothesized that packing with a new kaolin-based hemostatic dressing (Control+; Z-Medica, Wallingford, CT) would improve hemorrhage control from a penetrating RIVC injury compared with packing with standard laparotomy sponges alone. Twelve male Yorkshire pigs received a 25% exchange transfusion of blood for refrigerated normal saline to induce a hypothermic coagulopathy. A laparotomy was performed and a standardized 1.5 cm injury to the RIVC was created which was followed by temporary abdominal closure and a period of uncontrolled hemorrhage. When the mean arterial pressure reached 70% of baseline, demonstrating hemorrhagic shock, the abdomen was re-entered, and the injury was treated with perihepatic packing using standard laparotomy sponges (L; n = 6) or a new kaolin-based hemostatic dressing (K; n = 6). Animals were then resuscitated for 6 hours with crystalloid solution. The two groups were compared using the Wilcoxon rank sum test and Fisher exact test. A p value of 0.05 or less was considered statistically significant. There was no difference in the animal's temperature, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, cardiac output, and blood loss at baseline or before packing was performed (all p > 0.05). In the laparotomy sponge group, five of six pigs survived the entire study period, whereas all six pigs treated with kaolin-based D2 hemostatic dressings survived. Importantly, there was significantly less blood loss after packing with the new hemostatic kaolin-based dressing compared with packing with laparotomy sponge (651 ± 180 mL vs. 1073 ± 342 mL; p ≤ 0.05). These results demonstrate that the use of this new hemostatic kaolin-based dressing improved hemorrhage control and significantly decreased blood loss in this penetrating RIVC model. This is basic science research based on a large animal model, level V.

  6. Comparative evaluation of central venous pressure and sonographic inferior vena cava variability in assessing fluid responsiveness in septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Manjri; Sen, Jyotsna; Goyal, Sandeep; Chaudhry, Dhruva

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Fluid infusion, the most critical step in the resuscitation of patients with septic shock, needs preferably continuous invasive hemodynamic monitoring. The study was planned to evaluate the efficacy of ultrasonographically measured inferior vena cava collapsibility index (IVC CI) in comparison to central venous pressure (CVP) in predicting fluid responsiveness in septic shock. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six patients of septic shock requiring ventilatory support (invasive/noninvasive) were included. Patients with congestive heart failure, raised intra-abdominal pressure, and poor echo window were excluded from the study. They were randomly divided into two groups based on mode of fluid resuscitation – Group I (CVP) and Group II (IVC CI). Primary end-points were mean arterial pressure (MAP) of ≥65 mmHg and CVP >12 mmHg or IVC CI <20% in Groups I and II, respectively. Patients were followed till achievement of end-points or maximum of 6 h. Outcome variables (pulse rate, MAP, urine output, pH, base deficit, and ScvO2 ) were serially measured till the end of the study. Survival at 2 and 4 weeks was used as secondary end-point. Results: Primary end-point was reached in 31 patients (15 in Group I and 16 in Group II). Fluid infusion, by either method, had increased CVP and decreased IVC CI with resultant negative correlation between them (Pearson correlation coefficient –0.626). There was no significant difference in the amount of fluid infused and time to reach end-point in two groups. Comparison in outcome variables at baseline and end-point showed no significant difference including mortality. Conclusion: CVP and IVC CI are negatively correlated with fluid resuscitation, and both methods can be used for resuscitation, with IVC CI being noninferior to CVP. PMID:28149028

  7. Bundling of Reimbursement for Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement Resulted in Significantly Decreased Utilization between 2012 and 2014.

    PubMed

    Glocker, Roan J; TerBush, Matthew J; Hill, Elaine L; Guido, Joseph J; Doyle, Adam; Ellis, Jennifer L; Raman, Kathleen; Morrow, Gary R; Stoner, Michael C

    2017-01-01

    On January 1, 2012, reimbursement for inferior vena cava filters (IVCFs) became bundled by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. This resulted in ICVF placement (CPT code 37191) now yielding 4.71 relative value units (RVUs), a decrease from 15.6 RVUs for placement and associated procedures (CPT codes 37620, 36010, 75825-26, 75940-26). Our hypothesis was that IVCF utilization would decrease in response to this change as other procedures had done once they had become bundled. Including data from 2010 to 2011 (before bundling) and 2012 to 2014 (after bundling), we utilized 5% inpatient, outpatient, and carrier files of Medicare limited data sets and analyzed IVCF utilization before and after bundling across specialty types, controlling for total diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) (ICD-9 codes 453.xx and 415.xx, respectively) and placement location. In 2010 and 2011, the rates/10,000 DVT/PE diagnoses were 918 and 1,052, respectively (average 985). In 2012, 2013, and 2014, rates were 987, 877, and 605, respectively (average 823). Comparing each year individually, there is a significant difference (P < 0.0001) with 2012, 2013, and 2014 having lower rates of ICVF utilization. Comparing averages in the 2010-2011 and 2012-2014 groups, there is also a significant decrease in utilization after bundling (P < 0.0001). Following the bundling of reimbursement for IVCF placement, procedural utilization decreased significantly. More data from subsequent years will be needed to show if this decrease utilization continues to persist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Is the Collapsibillity Index of the Inferior Vena Cava an Accurate Predictor for the Early Detection of Intravascular Volume Change?

    PubMed

    Gui, Jianjun; Yang, Zhengfei; Ou, Bing; Xu, Anding; Yang, Fan; Chen, Qiaozhu; Jiang, Longyuan; Tang, Wanchun

    2017-06-27

    The ultrasonographic evaluation of inferior vena cava (IVC) parameters, particularly the collapsibility index (CI), has been widely used in the assessment of the fluid responsiveness (FR) of critically ill patients, but the results are conflicting. In this study, we aimed to investigate the early change in CI after increased intravascular volume (IVV) induced by passive leg raising (PLR). A total of 145 healthy volunteers over 18 years old were enrolled between September and December in 2015. Before and 2 min after PLR, the maximum and minimum IVC diameter (maxIVC and minIVC) were measured by color Doppler ultrasonography, and the difference in CI (ΔCI) was calculated. The heart rate (HR) and noninvasive mean arterial pressure (MAP) were also monitored. We found that there was a significant increase in the mean maxIVC and minIVC values and a reduction in CI. Nevertheless, no significant differences in HR or MAP were observed before or 2 min after PLR. The baseline CI had no relationship with individual characteristics and a multiple linear regression analysis of the ΔCI and individual characteristics showed that age, baseline CI, and BMI were independent variables for ΔCI. In conclusion, IVC-CI measured by ultrasound is useful for the detection of early IVV change induced by 2 min PLR. However, its ability to detect the increased IVV value is influenced by age, BMI, and baseline CI. Moreover, only 50.3% of the subjects had an IVC-CI reduction of more than 10%, making IVC-CI of little value for clinical applications, due to its poor sensitivity.

  9. Respiratory Collapse of the Inferior Vena Cava Reflects Volume Shift and Subsequent Fluid Refill in Acute Heart Failure Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Asahi, Tomohiro; Nakata, Marohito; Higa, Namio; Manita, Mamoru; Tabata, Kazuhiko; Shimabukuro, Michio

    2016-04-25

    Fluid redistribution rather than fluid accumulation plays an important role in the development of acute heart failure (HF) syndrome. Patients with fluid redistribution develop acute HF without prominent volume overload. We investigated volume status by measuring the diameter of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and examining variations in hemoglobin and hematocrit. Seventy-four consecutive patients admitted for acute HF syndrome were analyzed. Blood tests and measurement of IVC diameter after stabilization of respiratory distress were performed on admission and were repeated after 24 h. IVC collapsibility index (IVC-CI) was calculated as (maximum IVC-minimum IVC)/maximum IVC. According to the initial IVC-CI, the patients were divided into the collapse group (IVC-CI ≥0.5: n=34) and the non-collapse group (IVC-CI <0.5: n=40). Initial blood pressure was higher in the collapse group (P<0.001). Although 24-h urine volume did not differ between the groups, hemoglobin (P<0.001) and hematocrit (P<0.001) decreased significantly in the collapse group but not in the non-collapse group after 24 h. Furthermore, IVC-CI significantly decreased in the collapse group after 24 h (P=0.003). In acute HF syndrome, IVC-CI ≥0.5 on admission suggests a volume shift from the central vein into the pulmonary vasculature. Fluid refill occurs within 24 h after admission. This observation could be helpful in selecting strategies for diuretic use. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1171-1177).

  10. Social and Demographic Factors Influencing Inferior Vena Cava Filter Retrieval at a Single Institution in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S. Christian Shanks, Candace Guy, Gregory Yang, Xiangyu Dowell, Joshua D.

    2015-10-15

    PurposeRetrievable inferior vena cava filters (IVCFs) are associated with long-term adverse events that have increased interest in improving filter retrieval rates. Determining the influential patient social and demographic factors affecting IVCF retrieval is important to personalize patient management strategies and attain optimal patient care.Materials and MethodsSeven-hundred and sixty-two patients were retrospectively studied who had a filter placed at our institution between January 2011 and November 2013. Age, gender, race, cancer history, distance to residence from retrieval institution, and insurance status were identified for each patient, and those receiving retrievable IVCFs were further evaluated for retrieval rate and time to retrieval.ResultsOf the 762 filters placed, 133 were permanent filters. Of the 629 retrievable filters placed, 406 met the inclusion criteria and were eligible for retrieval. Results revealed patients with Medicare were less likely to have their filters retrieved (p = 0.031). Older age was also associated with a lower likelihood of retrieval (p < 0.001) as was living further from the medical center (p = 0.027). Patients who were white and had Medicare were more likely than similarly insured black patients to have their filters retrieved (p = 0.024).ConclusionsThe retrieval rate of IVCFs was most influenced by insurance status, distance from the medical center, and age. Race was statistically significant only when combined with insurance status. The results of this study suggest that these patient groups may need closer follow-up in order to obtain optimal IVCF retrieval rates.

  11. Does Respiratory Variation in Inferior Vena Cava Diameter Predict Fluid Responsiveness: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Long, Elliot; Oakley, Ed; Duke, Trevor; Babl, Franz E

    2017-05-01

    The aim of fluid resuscitation is to increase stroke volume, yet this effect is observed in only 50% of patients. Prediction of fluid responsiveness may allow fluid resuscitation to be administered to those most likely to benefit. The aim of this study was to systematically review the test characteristics of respiratory variation in inferior vena cava (IVC) diameter as a predictor of fluid responsiveness in patients with acute circulatory failure. Electronic searches combined with reference review of identified studies. Prospective observational studies of all patient groups and ages that used a recognized reference standard, stratified participants into fluid responders and fluid non-responders, and used summary statistics to describe their results were selected for inclusion. Study design, size, setting, patient population, use of mechanical ventilation and tidal volume, definition of fluid responsiveness, fluid challenge strategy, and summary statistics were abstracted. Quality assessment was performed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 (QUADAS-2) domains. Seventeen studies involving 533 patients were included, in whom 253 (47%) were fluid responders. The pooled sensitivity and specificity for a positive IVC ultrasound as a predictor of fluid responsiveness were 0.63 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.56-0.69) and 0.73 (95% CI: 0.67-0.78), respectively, with a pooled area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.79 (standard error 0.05). In subgroup analysis, respiratory variation in IVC diameter was a better predictor of fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients. Respiratory variation in IVC diameter has limited ability to predict fluid responsiveness, particularly in spontaneously ventilating patients. A negative test cannot be used to rule out fluid responsiveness. Clinical context should be taken into account when using IVC ultrasound to help make treatment decisions.

  12. Effect of position and weight force on inferior vena cava diameter--implications for arrest-related death.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jeffrey D; Dawes, Donald M; Moore, Johanna C; Caroon, Liberty V; Miner, James R

    2011-10-10

    The physiology of many sudden, unexpected arrest-related deaths (ARDs) proximate to restraint has not been elucidated. A sudden decrease in central venous return during restraint procedures could be physiologically detrimental. The impact of body position and applied weight force on central venous return has not been previously studied. In this study, we use ultrasound to measure the size of the inferior vena cava (IVC) as a surrogate of central venous return in the standing position, prone position, and with weight force applied to the thorax in the prone position. This was a prospective, observational study of volunteer human subjects. The IVC was visualized from the abdomen in both the longitudinal and transverse section in the standing and prone positions without weight force applied, and with 100 lbs (45 kg) and 147 lbs (67 kg) of weight force on the upper back in the prone position. Maximum and minimum measurements were determined in each section to account for possible respiratory variation of the IVC. The IVC significantly decreased in size with each successive change: from standing to prone, from prone to prone with 100 lbs (45 kg) weight compression, from prone with 100 lbs (45 kg) weight compression to prone with 147 lbs (67 kg) weight compression (p < 0.0001). The vital sign measurements had no statistical change. The physiology involved in many sudden, unexpected ARDs has not been elucidated. However, in our study, we found a significant decrease in IVC diameter with weight force compression to the upper thorax when the subject was in the prone position. This may have implications for the tactics of restraint to aid in the prevention of sudden, unexpected ARD cases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Retrospective Review of 516 Implantations of Option Inferior Vena Cava Filters at a Single Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Brian; An, Tianzhi; Moon, Eunice; King, Russell; Wang, Weiping

    2016-03-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the safety, efficacy, and retrievability of Option inferior vena cava (IVC) filters. All patients (N = 516; 247 women; mean age, 67.1 y ± 15.1; range, 19.5-101.6 y) who received an Option filter between August 2009 and March 2015 at a single health care system were analyzed. The study duration was 68 months, with median clinical follow-up of 7.1 months (range, 1 d to 61.8 mo). During follow-up, 73 of 83 patients (88.0%) underwent successful filter retrieval, 153 died (including three after successful retrieval), and 293 remained alive with filters in situ. Seventeen cases of breakthrough pulmonary embolism (PE) occurred (3.4%). Among 323 patients with direct filter imaging, there were two cases of tilt > 15°, one case of filter deformity, 16 cases of intracaval migration > 2 cm, and no cases of filter fracture. There were six cases of caval occlusion, nine cases of thrombus trapped inside the filter, and 57 cases of limb penetration on computed tomography scans or radiographs of the IVC. Retrieval failures were attributed to filter tilt or tip embedment in the caval wall (n = 4), complete IVC thrombosis (n = 3), thrombus inside the filter (n = 2), or inability to disengage filter legs (n = 1). Recurrent deep vein thrombosis occurred in 34 patients, including 32 with filters in situ and two whose filters had been removed. Most Option filters were left in situ for permanent indications. Rates of successful retrieval, device-related complications, and breakthrough PE were similar to those associated with other retrievable filters. Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prophylactic inferior vena cava filters prevent pulmonary embolisms in high-risk patients undergoing major spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Dazley, Justin M; Wain, Reese; Vellinga, Ryan M; Cohen, Benjamin; Agulnick, Marc A

    2012-06-01

    Clinical case series. To show the efficacy of prophylactic inferior vena cava (IVC) filters in preventing venous thromboembolic event (VTE) in high-risk patients undergoing major spinal surgery. Patients undergoing major spinal surgery are at increased risk for VTEs. Recent studies have shown IVC filters are effective in preventing clinically significant pulmonary embolism (PE), but have not documented the frequency of all emboli prevented. Patients undergoing major spinal surgery from 2006 to 2009, having IVC filters placed for VTE prophylaxis, were reviewed. Patients with 2 or more risk factors for VTE were included and their perioperative courses were reviewed for PE and device-related complications. Cavograms obtained at the time of attempted filter retrieval identified intercepted emboli. The rates of intercepted emboli and clinical PEs were compared with those of similar populations undergoing similar procedures. Approximately 17% of patients had entrapped thrombus present at attempted filter retrieval. An additional 17% of filters were unable to be retrieved due to change in position within the IVC. No patients experienced symptomatic PE. One patient developed a deep vein thrombus requiring pharmacologic treatment and another patient developed superficial phlebitis. There were no complications related to IVC filter use. These findings show that the decreased rate of PE observed in this and other series is likely because of the use of IVC filters, rather than sampling bias inherent when studying a relatively rare problem. The safety of IVC filters in this population is also confirmed. The observed rate of clinical PE is consistent with other published series. Emboli intercepted by filters may more accurately estimate clinically significant emboli prevented. Therefore, cavograms may prove to be a valuable method of assessing the efficacy of these devices in future studies.

  15. Techniques used for difficult retrievals of the Günther Tulip inferior vena cava filter: experience in 32 patients.

    PubMed

    Van Ha, Thuong G; Vinokur, Olga; Lorenz, Jonathan; Regalado, Sidney; Zangan, Steven; Piano, Giancarlo; Funaki, Brian

    2009-01-01

    To retrospectively review experience with difficult retrievals of Günther Tulip filters (GTFs) in which various techniques were used. From December 2004 to December 2006, 32 patients were referred to a single radiology department for GTF retrieval (25 women and seven men; mean age, 40 years; range, 21-60 y). All patients were evaluated, and 22 of these patients had undergone unsuccessful filter retrieval attempts elsewhere. In the remaining patients, significant tilt of the filter (n = 8) or difficult internal jugular vein access (n = 2) discouraged retrieval attempts. There were a total of 38 filters. Twenty-five patients had a filter in the infrarenal inferior vena cava (IVC). Among the remaining seven patients, six had bilateral iliac filters and one had a left iliac filter. Retrievals were performed via conventional technique-ie, by snaring the hook of the filter without additional maneuvers-or other techniques. Thirty-seven of 38 filters were successfully removed, for a success rate of 97%. Successful retrievals were performed with conventional (n = 4), catheter twist (n = 3), modified snare (n = 15), loop snare (n = 14), and balloon dilation (n = 1) techniques. The average dwell time for filters successfully removed was 58 days (range, 22-258 d). One failure occurred in a patient who had undergone unsuccessful retrieval previously. The hook of the filter and a displaced secondary strut, which had migrated superiorly, were incorporated into the IVC wall in this case. Additional maneuvers were useful in these difficult retrievals of GTFs that might not otherwise be retrievable with the conventional method.

  16. Can Pre-Retrieval Computed Tomography Predict the Difficult Removal of an Implementing an Inferior Vena Cava Filter?

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Shinho; Park, Keun-Myoung; Jeon, Yong Sun; Cho, Soon Gu; Hong, Kee Chun; Shin, Woo Young; Choe, Yun-Mee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Implementing an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter is a relatively safe procedure but potential negative long-term effects. The complications for filter retrieval have been noted. We examined filter characteristics on pre-retrieval computed tomography (CT) that were associated with complicated retrieval (CR) of IVC filters. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of IVC filter retrievals between January 2008 and June 2014 was performed to identify patients who had undergone a pre-retrieval CT for IVC filter retrieval. CR was defined as the use of nonstandard techniques, procedural time over 30 min, filter fractures, filter tip incorporation into the IVC wall, and retrieval failure. Pre-retrieval CT images were evaluated for tilt angle in the mediolateral and anteroposterior directions, tip embedding into the IVC wall, degree of filter strut perforation, and distance of the filter tip from the nearest renal vein. Results: Of seventy-six patients, twenty-four patients (31.6%) with CRs and 56 patients (73.7%) with non-CR were evaluated for pre-retrieval CT. For IVC filter retrieval with a dwelling time of over 45 days, a tilt of over 15 degrees, the appearance of tip embedding and grade 2 perforation were associated with CR on multivariate analysis. However, for IVC filter retrievals with a dwelling time of less than 45 days, there were no factors associated with CR. Conclusion: Pre-retrieval CTs may be more effective for IVC filters with a dwelling time of over 45 days. Therefore, a pre-retrieval CT may be helpful in predicting CR of IVC filters with long dwelling times. PMID:28042557

  17. The flatness index of inferior vena cava is useful in predicting hypovolemic shock in severe multiple-injury patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Lian-yang; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Wei-guo

    2013-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) signs of hypovolemic shock have been reported previously. Whether these signs can be used to clinically predict hypovolemic shock remains unclear. To investigate the predictive value of CT signs for hypovolemic shock in severe multiple-injury patients. The clinical and multi-slice spiral CT (MSCT) data from 63 severe multiple-injury patients admitted to our trauma center from January 2008 to December 2011 were reviewed. The caliber of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and abdominal aorta, and mean CT value of the abdominal organs in both the early and the delayed phases were measured. The patients were divided into two groups, a shock group (n = 34) and a stable group (n = 29), based on the occurrence of hypovolemic shock within 24 h after the CT scan. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was performed to assess the predictive accuracy of these signs for hypovolemic shock. The shock group, compared to the stable group, had a higher Injury Severity Score (30 ± 8 vs. 22 ± 6, respectively, p < 0.001), shock index (1.17 ± 0.37 vs. 0.96 ± 0.33, respectively, p = 0.019), and lactate level (3.27 ± 0.69 mmol/L vs. 2.56 ± 0.89 mmol/L, respectively, p = 0.001). Among all the CT signs, the flatness index of IVC had the largest area under the curve (0.833) in ROC analysis, with sensitivity of 73.5% and specificity of 86.2%, higher than traditional indices and other CT signs. The optimal diagnostic cutoff value for the flatness index of IVC was 3.02. MSCT can provide useful information for predicting hyovolemic shock in severe multiple-injury patients. An IVC flatness index > 3.02 suggests the presence of hypovolemic shock in severe multiple-injury patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cardiovascular CT in the diagnosis of pericardial constriction: predictive value of inferior vena cava cross-sectional area.

    PubMed

    Hanneman, Kate; Thavendiranathan, Paaladinesh; Nguyen, Elsie T; Moshonov, Hadas; Paul, Narinder S; Wintersperger, Bernd J; Crean, Andrew M

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of pericardial constriction remains challenging. We sought to evaluate the predictive value of cardiovascular CT-based measurements of inferior vena cava (IVC) parameters in the diagnosis of pericardial constriction. Forty-two consecutive patients referred for assessment of pericardial constriction by 64-slice CT were evaluated. The diagnosis of pericardial constriction was confirmed by clinical history, echocardiography, cardiac catheterization, intraoperative findings, histopathology, or a combination. Diameter and cross-sectional area of the suprahepatic IVC and cross-sectional area of the aorta were measured on a single-axial CT image at the level of the esophageal hiatus. Maximum pericardial thickness was measured. Logistic regression and receiver operating curve analyses were performed. Twenty-two patients had pericardial constriction. Mean age of the 42 patients was 57.1 ± 16.4 years, 57.1% were men. IVC diameter, IVC area, the ratio of IVC to aortic area, and pericardial thickness were all significantly greater in patients with constriction than in patients without (P < .05 for all). IVC-to-aortic area ratio had the highest odds ratio (51; 95% CI, 2.8-922) for the prediction of constriction and remained a significant predictor in multivariable analysis. In nested models, IVC-to-aortic area ratio had incremental value over pericardial thickness for the diagnosis of constriction. IVC-to-aortic area ratio discriminated between patients with and without constriction with an area under the curve of 0.88 on receiver operating curve analysis, with a value ≥ 1.6 having a sensitivity and specificity of 95% and 76%, respectively. Interobserver agreement for IVC-to-aortic area ratio was excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.98). Assessment of IVC-to-aortic area ratio on CT aids with the diagnosis of pericardial constriction and has independent and incremental value over pericardial thickness alone. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by

  19. Efficacy and Safety of Endovascular Intervention for the Management of Primary Entire-Inferior Vena Cava Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qingqiao Huang, Qianxin Shen, Bin Sun, Jingmin Wang, Xiaolong Liu, Hongtao

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to investigate the safety and efficacy of endovascular intervention for the treatment of primary entire-inferior vena cava (IVC) occlusion.MethodsEndovascular interventions were performed in six patients for the treatment of primary entire-IVC occlusion. IVC and hepatic venography were performed via the jugular and femoral veins. Balloon angioplasty was used to revascularize the hepatic vein and IVC and a stent was placed in the IVC to maintain patency. Postoperative color Doppler ultrasonography was performed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months, and then annually, to monitor the patency of the hepatic vein and IVC.ResultsThe IVC and one or two hepatic veins were successfully revascularized in five patients. Revascularization was successful in the right and left hepatic veins in one patient; however, IVC patency could not be established in this patient. Eleven Z-type, self-expanding stents were placed into the IVCs of five patients (three stents in two patients, two stents in two patients, and one stent in one patient). There were no instances of postoperative bleeding or mortality. Follow-up was conducted for 18–90 months (42.8 ± 26.5 months). None of the five patients suffered restenosis of the IVC or hepatic veins. However, there was one of the six cases of right hepatic vein restenosis at 18 months postprocedure that was revascularized after a second balloon dilatation.ConclusionsEndovascular intervention is safe and efficacious for the treatment of primary entire-IVC occlusion.

  20. Efficacy of Lower-Extremity Venous Thrombolysis in the Setting of Congenital Absence or Atresia of the Inferior Vena Cava

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguli, Suvranu Kalva, Sanjeeva; Oklu, Rahmi; Walker, T. Gregory; Datta, Neil; Grabowski, Eric F.; Wicky, Stephan

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: A rare but described risk factor for deep venous thrombosis (DVT), predominately in the young, is congenital agenesis or atresia of the inferior vena cava (IVC). The optimal management for DVT in this subset of patients is unknown. We evaluated the efficacy of pharmacomechanical catheter-directed thrombolysis (PCDT) followed by systemic anticoagulation in the treatment of acute lower-extremity DVT in the setting of congenital IVC agenesis or atresia. Materials and Methods: Between November of 2005 and May of 2010, six patients (three women [average age 21 years]) were referred to our department with acute lower-extremity DVT and subsequently found to have IVC agenesis or atresia on magnetic resonance imaging. A standardized technique for PCDT (the Angiojet Rheolytic Thrombectomy System followed by the EKOS Microsonic Accelerated Thrombolysis System) was used for all subjects. Successful thrombolysis was followed by systemic heparinization with transition to Coumadin or low molecular-weight heparin and compression stockings. Subjects were followed-up at 1, 3, and then every 6 months after the procedure with clinical assessment and bilateral lower-extremity venous ultrasound. Results: All PCDT procedures were technically successful. No venous stenting or angioplasty was performed. The average thrombolysis time was 28.6 h (range 12-72). Two patients experienced heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, and one patient developed a self-limited knee hemarthrosis, No patients were lost to follow-up. The average length of follow-up was 25.8 {+-} 20.2 months (range 3.8-54.8). No incidence of recurrent DVT was identified. There were no manifestations of postthrombotic syndrome. Conclusions: PCDT followed by systemic anticoagulation and the use of compression stockings appears to be safe and effective in relatively long-term follow-up treatment of patients who present with acute DVT and IVC agenesis or atresia.

  1. Analysis of the Final DENALI Trial Data: A Prospective, Multicenter Study of the Denali Inferior Vena Cava Filter.

    PubMed

    Stavropoulos, S William; Chen, James X; Sing, Ronald F; Elmasri, Fakhir; Silver, Mitchell J; Powell, Alex; Lynch, Frank C; Abdel Aal, Ahmed Kamel; Lansky, Alexandra; Muhs, Bart E

    2016-10-01

    To report the final 2-year data on the efficacy and safety of a nitinol retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter for protection against pulmonary embolism (PE). This was a prospective multicenter trial of 200 patients with temporary indications for caval filtration who underwent implantation of the Denali IVC filter. After filter placement, all patients were followed for 2 years after placement or 30 days after filter retrieval. The primary endpoints were technical success of filter implantation in the intended location and clinical success of filter placement and retrieval. Secondary endpoints were incidence of clinically symptomatic recurrent PE, new or propagating deep vein thrombosis (DVT), and filter-related complications including migration, fracture, penetration, and tilt. Filter placement was technically successful in 199 patients (99.5%). Filters were clinically successful in 190 patients (95%). The rate of PE was 3% (n = 6), with 5 patients having a small subsegmental PE and 1 having a lobar PE. New or worsening DVT was noted in 26 patients (13%). Filter retrieval was attempted 125 times in 124 patients and was technically successful in 121 patients (97.6%). The mean filter dwell time at retrieval was 200.8 days (range, 5-736 d). There were no instances of filter fracture, migration, or tilt greater than 15° at the time of filter retrieval or during follow-up. The Denali IVC filter exhibited high success rates for filter placement and retrieval while maintaining a low complication rate in this clinical trial. Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The DENALI Trial: an interim analysis of a prospective, multicenter study of the Denali retrievable inferior vena cava filter.

    PubMed

    Stavropoulos, S William; Sing, Ronald F; Elmasri, Fakhir; Silver, Mitchell J; Powell, Alex; Lynch, Frank C; Aal, Ahmed Kamel Abdel; Lansky, Alexandra J; Settlage, Richard A; Muhs, Bart E

    2014-10-01

    To assess safety and effectiveness of a nitinol retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter in patients who require caval interruption to protect against pulmonary embolism (PE). Two hundred patients with temporary indications for an IVC filter were enrolled in this prospective, multicenter clinical study. Patients undergoing filter implantation were to be followed for 2 years or for 30 days after filter retrieval. At the time of the present interim report, all 200 patients had been enrolled in the study, and 160 had undergone a retrieval attempt or been followed to 6 months with their filter in place. Primary study endpoints included technical and clinical success of filter placement and retrieval. Patients were also evaluated for recurrent PE, new or worsening deep vein thrombosis, and filter migration, fracture, penetration, and tilt. Clinical success of placement was achieved in 94.5% of patients (172 of 182), with a one-sided lower limit of the 95% confidence interval of 90.1%. Technical success rate of filter placement was 99.5%. Technical success rate of retrieval was 97.3%; 108 filters were retrieved in 111 attempts. In two cases, the filter apex could not be engaged with a snare, and one device was engaged but could not be removed. Filter retrievals occurred at a mean indwell time of 165 days (range, 5-632 d). There were no instances of filter fracture, migration, or tilt greater than 15° at the time of retrieval or 6-month follow-up. In this interim report, the nitinol retrievable IVC filter provided protection against pulmonary embolism, and the device could be retrieved with a low rate of complications. Copyright © 2014 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Antithrombotic Agents on the Patency of PTFE-Covered Stents in the Inferior Vena Cava: An Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Makutani, Shiro; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Uchida, Hideo; Maeda, Munehiro; Konishi, Noboru; Hiasa, Yoshio; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Kimura, Yukio

    1999-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of antithrombotic agents in the prevention of stenosis of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered stents in the venous system. Methods: Spiral Z stents covered with PTFE (PTFE-covered stents) were placed in the inferior vena cava (IVC) of 34 dogs. Nineteen dogs, used as a control group, were sacrificed at 2, 4, and 12 weeks. Fifteen dogs, previously given antithrombotic agents [cilostazol (n= 5), warfarin potassium (n= 5), cilostazol plus warfarin potassium (n= 5)] were sacrificed at 4 weeks, and then examined angiographically and histopathologically. The effect of the antithrombotic agents was compared between groups. Results: The patency rate of the antithrombotic agent group was 93% (14/15), which was higher than the control group rate of 63% (12/19). The mean stenosis rate of the patent stent at both ends and at the midportion was lower at 4 weeks in the antithrombotic agent group than in the control group. In particular, the mean stenosis rate in the cilostazol plus warfarin potassium group was significantly lower than the control group (Tukey's test, p < 0.05). The mean neointimal thickness of the patent stent at both ends and at the midportion was thinner at 4 weeks in the antithrombotic agent group than in the control group. In particular, the thickness of the neointima in the cilostazol plus warfarin potassium group was significantly decreased when compared with the control group (Tukey's test p < 0.05). At 4 weeks, endothelialization in the antithrombotic agent group tended to be almost identical to that in the control group. Conclusion: The present study suggests that administration of an antithrombotic agent is an effective way of preventing the stenosis induced by a neointimal thickening of PTFE-covered stents in the venous system.

  4. [Prognostic value of measuring the diameter and inspiratory collapse of the inferior vena cava in acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Josa-Laorden, C; Giménez-López, I; Rubio-Gracia, J; Ruiz-Laiglesia, F; Garcés-Horna, V; Pérez-Calvo, J I

    2016-05-01

    To assess the utility of measuring the diameter and collapse of the inferior vena cava (IVC) in acute heart failure (AHF), its relationship with the prognosis and serum biomarkers of congestion. An observational prospective study was conducted that included 85 patients with AHF, classifying them into 4 groups according to IVC diameter (≤ or >20mm) and inspiratory collapse (< or ≥50%) at admission. The endpoints were mortality due to HF and the combined event of mortality and readmission for HF at 180 days. Some 24.7% of the patients had an undilated IVC and ≥50% collapse (group 1); 20% had an undilated IVC and <50% collapse (group 2), 5.9% had a dilated IVC and ≥50% collapse (group 3); and 49.4% had a dilated IVC and <50% collapse (group 4). The lack of inspiratory collapse but not IVC dilation was related to higher concentrations of urea (P=.007), creatinine (P=.004), uric acid (P=.008), NT-proBNP (P=.009) and CA125 (P=.005). Survival free of the combined event at 180 days was lower in those patients with no IVC collapse. Dilation and the absence of the inspiratory collapse of the IVC are common in the context of AHF. The lack of inspiratory collapse of the IVC during the decompensation phase identifies a subgroup of patients with poorer prognosis at 6 months. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  5. Peculiarities of Blood Flow Changes in Venae Cavae during Experimental Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Evlakhov, V I; Poyassov, I Z; Shaidakov, E V

    2016-10-01

    The model of acute pulmonary embolism in rabbits demonstrated reduced pulmonary blood flow, cardiac output, left atrial pressure, and blood flow in venae cavae against the background of elevated left pulmonary artery pressure and increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Simultaneously, the blood flow in the superior vena cava decreased to a lesser extent than that in the inferior vena cava, which was a characteristic feature of the model of pulmonary pathology. In contrast, when histamine was infused into the left jugular vein to equally elevate pressure in pulmonary artery as in the above model, the blood flow in the superior vena cava decreased to a greater extent than that in inferior vena cava. During stenosis of inferior vena cava that decreased the cardiac output to the level observed during modeled pulmonary embolism, the blood flows in both venae cavae dropped equally.

  6. Surgical treatment of renal cell carcinoma: Can morphological features of inferior vena cava tumor thrombus on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging be a prognostic factor?

    PubMed

    Choi, Don Kyoung; Jeon, Hwang Gyun; Jeong, Chang Wook; Kwak, Cheol; Song, Cheryn; Chung, Jinsoo; Hong, Sung Kyu; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Seo, Seong Il

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of morphological features of inferior vena cava thrombus on the overall survival and cancer-specific survival (cancer-specific survival of patients with renal cell carcinoma). We retrospectively analyzed the records of 156 renal cell carcinoma patients with inferior vena cava thrombus who underwent radical nephrectomy and thrombectomy from 1998 to 2013 at five tertiary centers. Inferior vena cava thrombi were classified as spherical (type I) and spiculated (type II) according to morphological features on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Multivariate cox regression models were used to quantify the impact of prognostic factors on overall survival and cancer-specific survival. Type I was found in 29 patients (18.6%), and type II in 127 patients (81.4%). Median follow up was 38.2 months (interquartile range 12-57). Demographic characteristics were not significantly different, except for the cranial thrombus height (P = 0.003). On multivariate analysis, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score, clinical tumor size, distant metastasis, histologic subtype, thrombus morphology and remnant venous thrombus significantly affected overall survival in pNany Many patients (all P < 0.05). Among the pNO /X MO patients, clinical tumor size, histologic subtype, thrombus morphology and remnant venous thrombus significantly affected overall survival (all P < 0.05). In terms of cancer-specific survival, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score, clinical tumor size, distant metastasis, histologic subtype and thrombus morphology significantly affected cancer-specific survival in pNany Many patients (all P < 0.05). In patients with pNO /X MO , body mass index, clinical tumor size, histological subtype, thrombus morphology and remnant venous thrombus significantly affected cancer-specific survival (all P < 0.05). Clinical tumor size, histological subtype, and thrombus morphology are independent predictors of overall survival

  7. Peripartum Primary Prophylaxis Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement in a Patient with Stage IV B-Cell Lymphoma Presenting with a Pathologic Femur Fracture.

    PubMed

    Sherer, David M; Dalloul, Mudar; Behar, Henry James; Salame, Ghadir; Holland, Roy; Zinn, Harry; Abulafia, Ovadia

    2015-10-01

    Background Pulmonary embolus (PE) remains a leading etiology of maternal mortality in the developed world. Increasing utilization of retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placement currently includes pregnant patients. Case A 22-year-old woman at 27 weeks' gestation was diagnosed with Stage IV high-grade malignant B cell lymphoma following pathologic femur fracture. Significant risk factors for PE led to placement of primary prophylaxis IVC filter before cesarean delivery, open reduction and internal fixation of the fractured femur, and chemotherapy. Conclusion This case supports that primary prophylaxis placement of IVC filters in highly selected pregnant patients may assist in decreasing PE-associated maternal mortality.

  8. Cadaveric liver transplantation in biliary atresia splenic malformation syndrome with the absence of retrohepatic inferior vena cava, preduodenal portal vein, and intestinal malrotation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sen-Oran, E; Yankol, Y; Tuzun, B; Kocak, B; Kanmaz, T; Acarli, K; Kalayoglu, M

    2008-01-01

    A 9-month-old female infant with biliary atresia underwent cadaveric liver transplantation due to progressive cholestatic hepatitis following a Kasai operation. She had biliary atresia splenic malformation syndrome (BASM) composed of an absent retrohepatic inferior vena cava with an azygous connection, preduodenal portal vein, polysplenia, and intestinal malrotation. A portal vein thrombosis developed on the 4th postoperative day requiring immediate treatment by thrombectomy. The patient is well with normal liver function at 3 months follow-up. Although BASM may render the transplantation more difficult, the presence of BASM is no longer a contraindication to liver transplantation.

  9. Role of bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) in the diagnosis of Cushing’s disease in a patient with double superior vena cava

    PubMed Central

    Tashi, Sonam; Ng, Keng Sin

    2015-01-01

    Cushing’s syndrome is known to have a wide spectrum of clinical presentation with debilitating consequences and morbidity if not diagnosed and treated in time. Sometimes the diagnosis of Cushing’s syndrome can be challenging to the endocrinologist, especially when the usual battery of biochemical tests and advanced cross-sectional imaging is negative or inconclusive. We described a case in which the use of bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) was conclusive albeit being technically challenging (due to a rare incidental finding of double superior vena cava) and invasive in nature. PMID:26629301

  10. Identifying diversion of inferior vena cava after repair of atrial septal defect.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi Wei; Lee, Wei Chieh; Chua, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    Inadvertent IVC diversion into left atrium is a rare morbidity following ASD repair. Reported risk factors included a large secundum, or low-lying ASD, or inferior sinus venosus defect, and anomalous pulmonary connection into the RA. In our case, transesophageal echocardiogram showed abnormal connection of IVC to LA, but could not be identified owing to limited window. Cardiac CT could offer better anatomic clarification. On contrast transesophageal echocardiogram with agitated saline injected via right femoral vein, an abnormal right-to-left shunt was demonstrated by transit of microbubbles from IVC into LA, while majority of rest entered into the RA. Therefore, we confirm the IVC diversion into LA. Detection of such unusual condition is a challenge due to the fact that special echocardiographic windows are often needed.

  11. Long-term survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma with inferior vena cava tumor thrombus treated with sorafenib combined with transarterial chemoembolization: report of two cases and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Heng-Jun; Xu, Li; Zhang, Yao-Jun; Chen, Min-Shan

    2014-01-01

    The prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with tumor thrombus formation in the main vasculature is extremely poor. Sorafenib combined with transarterial chemoembolization is a novel treatment approach for advanced HCC. In this study, we report two HCC patients with inferior vena cava tumor thrombus who underwent the combination treatment. The overall survival times for these two patients were 44 months and 35 months, respectively. Our report suggests that sorafenib combined with transarterial chemoembolization may be a viable choice for patients with advanced HCC even with inferior vena cava tumor thrombus. Further studies are required to verify the efficacy and safety of this combination therapy for patients with advanced HCC with inferior vena cava tumor thrombus. PMID:24325788

  12. The effectiveness of prophylactic inferior vena cava filters in trauma patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Haut, Elliott R; Garcia, Luis J; Shihab, Hasan M; Brotman, Daniel J; Stevens, Kent A; Sharma, Ritu; Chelladurai, Yohalakshmi; Akande, Tokunbo O; Shermock, Kenneth M; Kebede, Sosena; Segal, Jodi B; Singh, Sonal

    2014-02-01

    Trauma is known to be one of the strongest risk factors for pulmonary embolism (PE). Current guidelines recommend low-molecular-weight heparin therapy for prevention of PE, but trauma places some patients at risk of excess bleeding. Experts are divided on the role of prophylactic inferior vena cava (IVC) filters to prevent PE. To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis examining the comparative effectiveness of prophylactic IVC filters in trauma patients, particularly in preventing PE, fatal PE, and mortality. We searched the following databases for primary studies: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, CINAHL, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, clinicaltrial.gov, and the Cochrane Library (all through July 31, 2012). We developed a search strategy using medical subject headings terms and text words of key articles that we identified a priori. We reviewed the references of all included articles, relevant review articles, and related systematic reviews to identify articles the database searches might have missed. We reviewed titles followed by abstracts to identify randomized clinical trials or observational studies with comparison groups reporting on the effectiveness and/or safety of IVC filters for prevention of venous thromboembolism in trauma patients. Two investigators independently reviewed abstracts and abstracted data. For studies amenable to pooling with meta-analysis, we pooled using the random-effects model to analyze the relative risks. We graded the quantity, quality, and consistency of the evidence by adapting an evidence-grading scheme recommended by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Eight controlled studies compared the effectiveness of no IVC filter vs IVC filter on PE, fatal PE, deep vein thrombosis, and/or mortality in trauma patients. Evidence showed a consistent reduction of PE (relative risk, 0.20 [95% CI, 0.06-0.70]; I(2)=0%) and fatal PE (0.09 [0.01-0.81]; I(2)=0%) with IVC filter placement, without any statistical heterogeneity

  13. Impact of Body Size on Inferior Vena Cava Parameters for Estimating Right Atrial Pressure: A Need for Standardization?

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Tatsunori; Ohtani, Tomohito; Nakatani, Satoshi; Hayashi, Kenichi; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Komuro, Issei; Sakata, Yasushi

    2015-12-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) diameter and its respiratory change, as determined using echocardiography, are commonly used to assess right atrial pressure (RAP). Despite the widespread use of the IVC approach for RAP assessment, the relations among body surface area (BSA), IVC diameter, and respirophasic change remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of BSA on IVC parameters for predicting elevated RAP. Ninety consecutive patients undergoing right-heart catheterization or central venous catheter insertion were prospectively included. To investigate the impact of BSA on IVC parameters, patients were divided into higher and lower BSA groups by comparing individual BSA measurements with the median value. Optimal cutoff points of IVC parameters for detecting RAP of ≥ 10 mm Hg were defined using receiver operating characteristic curves. The median RAP and BSA were 8 mm Hg (range, 1-25 mm Hg) and 1.61 m(2) (range, 1.23-2.22 m(2)), respectively. In all patients, the optimal cutoff point for maximal IVC diameter (IVCDmax) and IVC collapsibility for the detection of RAP ≥ 10 mm Hg were 20 mm and 49.0%, respectively. The optimal cutoff point of IVCDmax for predicting RAP of ≥ 10 mm Hg was significantly larger in patients with higher BSAs than in those with lower BSAs (21 vs 17 mm, P = .0342). No differences in collapsibility indices were detected between the two groups. IVCDmax was larger in men (19 ± 5 vs 17 ± 5 mm in women, P = .0347) and weakly correlated with BSA (r = 0.35, P = .0007), whereas no relation was found between IVCDmax and age. However, the partial correlation coefficient of the entire cohort demonstrated that only BSA was still associated with IVCDmax after adjusting for age and gender (partial correlation coefficient = 0.32, P = .0020). Body size, measured as BSA, is important to consider when IVC diameter is used to assess RAP. The optimal cutoff point of IVCDmax was 21 mm for patients with larger BSAs and 17 mm for those

  14. Incidence and Outcomes of Inferior Vena Cava Filter Thrombus during Catheter-directed Thrombolysis for Proximal Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jianguang; Tu, Jianfei; Jia, Zhongzhi; Chen, Jiezhong; Cao, Haitao; Meng, Qingli; Fuller, Tyler A; Tian, Feng

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the incidence and outcomes of inferior vena cava (IVC) filter thrombus during catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) for acute proximal deep venous thrombosis (DVT). From October 2006 to June 2015, patients diagnosed with acute proximal DVT and received CDT after a retrievable IVC filter was placed were included. The incidence, treatment, and outcomes of IVC filter thrombus during CDT were recorded and analyzed. A total of 189 patients (91 women, 98 men; mean age, 57.6 ± 9.8 years; range, 24-85 years) were included in this study. Among the 189 cases, the DVTs involved popliteal iliofemoral veins in 54 patients, iliofemoral veins in 113 patients, and iliac veins in 22 patients, of which 18 patients had thrombus extended into the IVC. Of the 189 patients, a total of 8 (4.2%, 8 of 189) patients were identified with IVC filter thrombus during CDT. The IVC filter thrombus was detected on a median of 2 days (range, 2-4 days) of CDT therapy, including small-size (n = 6) and large-size (n = 2) filter thrombus. Of the 8 patients, CDTs were performed with a mean 7.6 ± 1.1 days (range, 6-11 days) after the presence of symptoms for the treatment of proximal DVT, and all the IVC filter thrombi were lysed during CDT for the proximal DVT. All the IVC filters were removed successfully with a mean of 12.8 ± 0.93 days from placement. There were no procedure- or thrombolysis-related major complications, and no symptomatic pulmonary embolism breakthrough was seen in any of the patients after the filter placement. IVC filter thrombus during CDT for the acute proximal DVT is uncommon, and all of them did not need any additional treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Temporary inferior vena cava filter indications, retrieval rates, and follow-up management at a multicenter tertiary care institution.

    PubMed

    Tao, Mary Jiayi; Montbriand, Janice M; Eisenberg, Naomi; Sniderman, Kenneth W; Roche-Nagle, Graham

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the practice pattern of inferior vena cava (IVC) filters and to determine factors predictive of filter retrievals at a multicenter, tertiary care institution. A retrospective review of all IVC filter procedures performed between January 2001 and July 2013 was conducted. Data collected included demographics, venous thromboembolism risk factors, medical comorbidities, insertional and retrieval characteristics, referring services, complications, discharge, and follow-up management. During the study period, 1123 IVC filter procedures were performed; 69% (n = 810) were insertions and 31% (n = 313) were retrievals. Of the patients receiving filters, the average age was 61.4 years, and 53.3% were male. Overall, 408 filters (51.5%) were placed with absolute indications, 214 (27.0%) for relative indications, 138 (17.4%) prophylactically, and 32 (4.0%) for reasons outside the established guidelines. Of the 663 retrievable filters, successful removal rate was 41.6% (n = 276); the mean time to first retrieval attempt was 76.4 days (standard deviation = 110.5). Documentation of the filter was present in 342 (43.1%) discharge summaries, and outlined instructions for filter management were seen in 129 (16.3%) cases. Significant predictors of filter removal were thrombosis follow-up (odds ratio [OR], 6.7; P < .01) and the ordering service as filters ordered by medical specialties were less likely to be retrieved than filters ordered by surgical specialties (OR, 0.53; P = .04). Compared with discharge summaries without filter management instructions, those with plans had higher filter retrieval rates (OR, 3.74; P < .00). Filter-related complications was observed in 57 patients. Given the established complications relating to long indwelling times and recent Food and Drug Administration guidelines, a multidisciplinary and systematic follow-up protocol needs to be implemented to optimize filter retrieval rates and to ensure exemplary

  16. Association Between Inferior Vena Cava Filter Insertion in Trauma Patients and In-Hospital and Overall Mortality.

    PubMed

    Sarosiek, Shayna; Rybin, Denis; Weinberg, Janice; Burke, Peter A; Kasotakis, George; Sloan, J Mark

    2017-01-01

    Trauma patients admitted to the hospital are at increased risk of bleeding and thrombosis. The use of inferior vena cava (IVC) filters in this population has been increasing, despite a lack of high-quality evidence to demonstrate their efficacy. To determine if IVC filter insertion in trauma patients affects overall mortality. This retrospective cohort study used stratified 3:1 propensity matching to select a control population similar to patients who underwent IVC filter insertion at Boston Medical Center (a level I trauma center at Boston University School of Medicine) between August 1, 2003, and December 31, 2012. Among patients with an IVC filter and matched controls, age, sex, race/ethnicity, and Injury Severity Score were entered into a multivariable logistic regression model to calculate a propensity score. Matching was stratified by the date of injury. Multivariable logistic regression was used to compare hospital mortality across both groups, adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, Injury Severity Score, and brain injury severity using the head and neck Abbreviated Injury Score. To determine any significant difference in mortality, patient characteristics and mortality data from the National Death Index were analyzed in all patients and in those who survived 24, 48, and 72 hours after injury, as well as at hospital discharge. Among 451 trauma patients with an IVC filter and 1343 matched controls without an IVC filter, the mean (SD) age was 47.4 (21.5) years. The median Injury Severity Score overall was 24 (range, 1-75). Based on a mean follow-up of 3.8 years (range, 0-9.4 years), there was no significant difference in overall mortality or cause of mortality in patients with vs without an IVC filter who survived more than 24 hours from the time of injury, independent of the presence or absence of deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism at the time of IVC filter placement. Additional analyses at shorter intervals of 6 months and 1 year after discharge

  17. Mid- and long-term outcome of patients with permanent inferior vena cava filters: a single center review.

    PubMed

    Chow, Felix Che-Lok; Chan, Yiu-Che; Cheung, Grace Chung-Yan; Cheng, Stephen Wing-Keung

    2015-07-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are used to prevent pulmonary embolism (PE), especially in patients with active contraindication to systemic anticoagulation. The aim of this study is to examine the outcomes of patients who received permanent IVC filters at our institution. This is a single-center retrospective observational study with review of a prospectively collected database for patients who had permanent IVC filters. Patient demographics, indications of filter placement, postprocedure clinical outcome and complications, as well as use of anticoagulant therapy were documented. Chi-squared test was used to test for statistically significant differences (IBM SPSS version 21; IBM Corp., Armonk, NY), while survival was calculated using Kaplan-Meier survival curves analysis. Between February 1998 and December 2013, a total of 109 patients with a median age of 65 (47 men, range 19-97) years had IVC filters inserted at our institution. All of them had documented venous thromboembolism (VTE) before filter placement: 99 (90.8%) had lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT) (including 34 iliac, 65 infrainguinal), 9 (8.3%) had massive PE without evidence of lower limb DVT, and 1 (0.9%) had isolated IVC thrombosis. Forty-seven (43.1%) patients had PE before filter insertion. There were 2 serious procedure-related complications: one access site thrombosis and one right ventricular perforation. With a mean follow-up of 36 ± 33 months, no patient had further symptomatic PE or paradoxical embolism. There were a total of 54 (49.5%) deaths, with a 30-day mortality of 8.3%; none of them was device or procedure related. Among the 92 patients followed up, 27 (29.3%) had further VTE-either DVT in the index or the contralateral lower limb (20 patients, 21.7%), or thrombus inside the filter or the IVC (14 patients, 15.2%). Forty-one (44.6%) patients reported post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) symptoms. Anticoagulant therapy was given to 39 (42.4%) and 55 (59.8%) patients in the

  18. Technical and financial feasibility of an inferior vena cava filter retrieval program at a level one trauma center.

    PubMed

    Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Leake, Samuel S; Sola, Cristina N; Sandhu, Harleen K; Albarado, Rondel; Holcomb, John B; Miller, Charles C; Safi, Hazim J; Azizzadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Considering new guidelines for retrievable inferior vena cava filters (IVCFs), we examine our initial experience after establishing a comprehensive filter removal program in our level 1 trauma center. We evaluated the technical and financial feasibility of this program and barriers to IVCF retrieval, including insurance status and costs, in trauma patients. Trauma patients receiving IVCFs from May 2011 to 2013 were consented and prospectively enrolled in the study program. Retrieval rates were assessed for the years before study initiation. Primary outcome was IVCF retrieval. Hospital financial data for retrieval were examined and univariate analysis performed. Hospital cost-to-charge and payment-to-charge ratios were assessed. Before study initiation from April 2009 to 2011, 66 IVCFs were placed in trauma patients with only 2 retrievals in 2 years. During the study period, 247 trauma patients had IVCF placement of which 111 (45%) were enrolled. The main reason for nonenrollment was lack of referral by the implanting team. Retrieval was attempted in 100 outpatients with success in 85 (85%). Patients enrolled in the program were more likely to have their filters removed (73% vs. 18%; odds ratio, 12.6; 95% confidence interval, 6.6-24.3; P < 0.001). Mean time from placement to attempt was 6.2 ± 4.0 months (range, 0.5-31.8). Of the total attempts, 29% were nonresource patients, 11% had Medicaid, and 60% had commercial insurance including Medicare patients. Chances of successful retrieval were higher if performed later during the study (P = 0.03). Successful retrieval was not related to insurance status (P = not significant). The mean total hospital charges related to retrieval were $4,493 (range, $2,510-$9,106). Successful retrieval contributed to lower total charges (P < 0.01). Factors contributing to higher total charges were retrieval attempt later in study period (P = 0.01) and commercial insurance status (P = 0.04). The rate of IVCF placement in trauma patients

  19. Important surgical considerations in the management of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with inferior vena cava (IVC) tumour thrombus.

    PubMed

    Lawindy, Samuel M; Kurian, Tony; Kim, Timothy; Mangar, Devanand; Armstrong, Paul A; Alsina, Angel E; Sheffield, Cedric; Sexton, Wade J; Spiess, Philippe E

    2012-10-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Historically, the surgical management of renal tumours with intravascular tumour thrombus has been associated with high morbidity and mortality. In addition, few cases are treated, and typically at tertiary care referral centres, hence little is known and published about the ideal surgical management of such complex cases. The present comprehensive review details how a multidisciplinary surgical approach to renal tumours with intravascular tumour thrombus can optimise patient outcomes. Similarly, we have developed a treatment algorithm in this review that can be used in the surgical planning of such cases. To detail the perioperative and technical considerations essential to the surgical management of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with inferior vena cava (IVC) tumour thrombus, as historically patients with RCC and IVC tumour thrombus have had an adverse clinical outcome. • Recent surgical and perioperative advances have for the most part optimized the clinical outcome of such patients. A comprehensive review of the scientific literature was conducted using MEDLINE from 1990 to present using as the keywords 'renal cell carcinoma' and 'IVC tumor thrombus'. • In all, 62 manuscripts were reviewed, 58 of which were in English. Of these, 25 peer-reviewed articles were deemed of scientific merit and were assessed in detail as part of this comprehensive review. • These articles consist of medium to large (≥25 patients) peer-reviewed studies containing contemporary data pertaining to the surgical management of RCC and IVC tumour thrombus. • Many of these studies highlight important surgical techniques and considerations in the management of such patients and report on their respective clinical outcomes. Careful preoperative planning is essential to optimising the outcomes within this patient cohort. High quality and detailed preoperative imaging studies help delineate the proximal extension of the IVC tumour

  20. Comparison of Inferior Vena Cava Filters Placed at the Bedside via Intravenous Ultrasound Guidance Versus Fluoroscopic Guidance.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, Suvranu; Hawkins, Beau M; Abtahian, Farhad; Abu-Fadel, Mazen S; Walker, Thomas G; MacKay, Cheryl; Jaff, Michael R; Weinberg, Ido

    2017-02-01

    IVCFs are usually placed under fluoroscopic guidance in dedicated angiography suites. Bedside placement of inferior vena cava filters (IVCF) is possible in patients not suitable for transportation, but data regarding their use are limited. The objective of this study is to compare utilization, procedural outcomes, complications, and long-term patient outcomes associated with bedside placement of IVCFs using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and fluoroscopic placement of IVCF. All patients receiving IVCF between January 2009 and December 2011 at a tertiary care institution were retrospectively identified. Data regarding patient characteristics, IVCF indications, complications, and outcomes were collected, and comparisons were made between patients receiving fluoroscopic-guided and IVUS-guided bedside IVCF. There were 117 bedside and 571 fluoroscopic-guided IVCF placed during this period. Patients receiving bedside IVCF were younger (50.8 vs. 60.7 years, P < 0.001), less often had malignancy (22.2% vs. 42.6%, P < 0.001), and received prophylactic filters more commonly (59.9% vs. 29.9%, P < 0.001). Placement-related complications occurred in 4.3% and 0.6%, respectively (bedside IVCF: 4 malpositions, 1 severe tilt; fluoroscopic-guided IVCF: 1 malposition, 1 severe tilt, P = 0.01). Indwelling IVCF-related complications occurred equally during median follow-up of 463 and 488 days, respectively (deep vein thrombosis: 13.7% vs. 13.3%, P = 0.92; pulmonary embolism: 5.1% vs. 4.0%, P = 0.61; filter thrombosis: 3.4% vs. 3.9%, P = 0.82). Time to indwelling complication was similar between groups (74 vs. 127 days, P = 0.29). Bedside placement of IVUS-guided IVCF is safe, but with higher procedural complications when compared with fluoroscopic placement. Long-term indwelling complications are similar between IVCF placed via bedside IVUS guidance and fluoroscopic approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of guidelines for insertion of inferior vena cava filters in high-risk trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Spangler, Emily L; Dillavou, Ellen D; Smith, Kenneth J

    2010-12-01

    Inferior vena cava filters (IVCFs) can prevent pulmonary embolism (PE); however, indications for use vary. The Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma (EAST) 2002 guidelines suggest prophylactic IVCF use in high-risk patients, but the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) 2008 guidelines do not. This analysis compares cost-effectiveness of prophylactic vs therapeutic retrievable IVCF placement in high-risk trauma patients. Markov modeling was used to determine incremental cost-effectiveness of these guidelines in dollars per quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) during hospitalization and long-term follow-up. Our population was 46-year-old trauma patients at high risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) by EAST criteria to whom either the EAST (prophylactic IVCF) or ACCP (no prophylactic IVCF) guidelines were applied. The analysis assumed the societal perspective over a lifetime. For base case and sensitivity analyses, probabilities and utilities were obtained from published literature and costs calculated from Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services fee schedules, the Healthcare Cost & Utilization Project database, and Red Book wholesale drug prices for 2007. For data unavailable from the literature, similarities to other populations were used to make assumptions. In base case analysis, prophylactic IVCFs were more costly ($37,700 vs $37,300) and less effective (by 0.139 QALYs) than therapeutic IVCFs. In sensitivity analysis, the EAST strategy of prophylactic filter placement would become the preferred strategy in individuals never having a filter, with either an annual probability of VTE of ≥ 9.6% (base case, 5.9%), or a very high annual probability of anticoagulation complications of ≥ 24.3% (base case, 2.5%). The EAST strategy would also be favored if the annual probability of venous insufficiency was <7.69% (base case, 13.9%) after filter removal or <1.90% with a retained filter (base case, 14.1%). In initial hospitalization only, EAST guidelines

  2. The 6-F nitinol TrapEase inferior vena cava filter: results of a prospective multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, H; Perreault, P; Otal, P; Stockx, L; Golzarian, J; Oliva, V; Reynaud, P; Raat, F; Szatmari, F; Santoro, G; Emanuelli, G; Nonent, M; Hoogeveen, Y

    2001-03-01

    The authors report the first results of a new 6-F symmetrically designed permanent nitinol inferior vena cava (IVC) filter, the Cordis TrapEase, evaluated in a multicenter prospective study with 6-months of follow-up. A total of 65 patients (29 men, 36 women) who ranged in age from 37 to 96 years (mean age, 68 years) and who were at high risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) were enrolled in 12 centers in Europe and Canada. The study was approved by the institutional review boards at all centers. Study objectives were to evaluate filter effectiveness, filter stability, and caval occlusion. Indications for filter placement were deep vein thrombosis with recurrent thromboembolism and/or free-floating thrombus with contraindication to anticoagulation in 37 patients, and complications in achieving adequate anticoagulation in 28 patients. Follow-up included clinical examination, plain film, Doppler ultrasound, CT scan, and nuclear medicine. The analysis of the data revealed a technical success of 95.4% (three filter-system related implantations not at the intended site, no events of filter tilting) and a clinical success of 100% at 6 months (no cases of symptomatic PE), the study primary endpoint. There were no cases (0%) of filter migration, insertion site thrombosis, filter fracture, or vessel wall perforation. During the study period, there were two cases of filter thrombosis: one case of early symptomatic thrombosis that was successfully treated in the hospital, and one case of nonsymptomatic filter thrombosis detected at 1-month follow-up, with spontaneous recanalization at 3 months. In the latter patient, some residual thrombus was still detected at 6 months. Of the study population of 65 patients, there were 23 deaths. These deaths were not related to the device or the implantation procedure but to the underlying disease process. This study demonstrates the new nitinol permanent IVC filter to be a safe and an effective device, with a low overall complication rate, for

  3. A South Indian Cadaveric Study About the Relationship of Hepatic Segment of Inferior Vena Cava with the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Surendran, Sudarshan; Nelluri, Venu Madhav; Kumar, Naveen; Aithal, Ashwini P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) is the largest vein of the body. It runs vertically upwards in the abdomen, behind the liver. Its course is very constant in relation to liver. However, the amount of liver parenchyma related to it can vary from person to person. The data regarding its course and relations may be very useful to radiologists and surgeons during surgical treatment procedures for Budd-Chiari syndrome, liver carcinoma, liver transplant, venous cannulations and many other clinical procedures. Aim Aim of this study was to document the incidence of straight and curved course of IVC in relation to liver and also to note the pattern in which the liver tissue was related to the IVC. Materials and Methods In the current study, 95 adult cadaveric livers were observed; specifically to study the course/direction of the hepatic segment of IVC in relation to the liver. The extent of liver tissue related to various aspects of IVC was also studied. The course of the IVC was classified as straight and curved; and the relationship of liver parenchyma to the IVC was classified into 6 categories. The data was expressed as percentage incidence. Results In 78.94% cases, the IVC had a straight course in relation to the liver; whereas in 21.06% cases, it had a left sided curve (concavity of the curve towards the caudate lobe) in its course. In 6.31% cases, IVC travelled in a tunnel, being encircled by the liver parenchyma all around; in 36.84% cases, it was covered by liver parenchyma on front and sides so that only posterior surface of IVC was visible; in 3.15% cases it was covered by liver tissue on front, sides and also partly on posterior aspect; in 50.52% of cases, its anterior surface, sides and left edge of the posterior surface was covered by liver tissue; and in 3.15% cases it was covered only from the front by the liver tissue. Conclusion The data being reported here might be useful for surgeons while planning and executing various hepatic surgeries and also

  4. Primitive neuroectodermal tumour of kidney with thrombosis of the inferior vena cava and good responsive to surgical and medical treatment: description of a case and revision of literature.

    PubMed

    Giliberto, Giovanni L; Di Franco, Carmelo A; Rovereto, Bruno

    2017-03-15

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) of kidney is a rare cancer typical of young adults with few cases described in the literature. We report a case of renal PNET in a 31-year-old man who presented to our department with a computed tomographic (CT)-scan revealing a large renal mass of 20 cm, massive thrombosis of the inferior vena cava (IVC). The patient underwent radical nephrectomy with contextual retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy and resection of IVC needing Dacron prosthesis substitution. Definitive histopathological examination showed PNET of kidney infiltrating ipsilateral adrenal gland, massive cava thrombosis with infiltration of vena cava wall and one lymph nodal metastasis. Postoperative PET-scan showed metastatic lesions in bilateral adrenal glands and pancreas. The patient received chemotherapy, and currently, he is in follow-up after 26 months from first diagnosis without any sign of recurrence of disease. Kidney PNET usually is associated with poor prognosis, so, it needs an early identification and differentiation from other similar small cells tumours in order to obtain a good response to the treatments.

  5. Gunther Tulip Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement During Treatment for Deep Venous Thrombosis of the Lower Extremity

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Takuji Kato, Takeharu; Iida, Shigeharu; Hirota, Tatsuya; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Gunther tulip retrievable vena cava filter (GTF) implantation to prevent pulmonary embolism during intravenously administered thrombolytic and anticoagulation therapy and interventional radiological therapy for occlusive or nonocclusive deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the lower extremity. Methods. We evaluated placement of 55 GTFs in 42 patients with lower extremity DVT who had undergone various treatments including those utilizing techniques of interventional radiology. Results. Worsening of pulmonary embolism in patients with existing pulmonary embolism or in those without pulmonary embolism at the time of GTF insertion was avoided in all patients. All attempts at implantation of the GTF were safely accomplished. Perforation and migration experienced by one patient was the only complication. Mean period of treatment for DVT under protection from pulmonary embolism by the GTF was 12.7 {+-} 8.3 days (mean {+-} SD, range 4-37 days). We attempted retrieval of GTFs in 18 patients in whom the venous thrombus had disappeared after therapy, and retrieval in one of these 18 cases failed. GTFs were left in the vena cava in 24 patients for permanent use when the DVT was refractory to treatment. Conclusion. The ability of the GTF to protect against pulmonary embolism during treatment of DVT was demonstrated. Safety in both placement and retrieval was clarified. Because replacement with a permanent filter was not required, use of the GTF was convenient when further protection from complicated pulmonary embolism was necessary.

  6. Inferior vena cava/aorta diameter index in the assessment of the body fluid status – a comparative study of measurements performed by experienced and inexperienced examiners in a group of young adults

    PubMed Central

    Januszkiewicz, Emilia; Szmygel, Łukasz; Kosiak, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of the body fluid status is one the most challenging tasks in clinical practice. Although there are many methods to assess the body fluid status of patients, none of them is fully satisfactory in contemporary medical sciences. In the article below, we compare the results of measurements performed by experienced and inexperienced examiners based on the inferior vena cava/aorta diameter index in a sonographic hydration assessment. The study enrolled 50 young students at the age of 19–26 (the median age was 22.95) including 27 women and 23 men. The volunteers were examined in the supine position with GE Logiq 7 system and a convex transducer with the frequency of 2–5 MHz. The measurements were performed in the longitudinal and transverse planes by two inexperienced examiners – the authors of this paper, following a four-hour training conducted by an experienced sonographer. The longitudinal values of the inferior vena cava/aorta diameter index obtained in this study were similar to those found in the literature. The reference value for the inferior vena cava/aorta index determined by Kosiak et al., which constituted 1.2 ± 2 SD, for SD = 0.17, was similar to the values obtained by the authors of this paper which equaled 1.2286 ± 2 SD, for SD = 0.2. The article presented below proves that measuring the inferior vena cava/aorta diameter index is not a complex examination and it may be performed by physicians with no sonographic experience. Furthermore, the paper demonstrates that the inferior vena cava/aorta diameter index measured in the transverse plane is similar to the inferior vena cava/aorta diameter index determined in the longitudinal plane. Thus, both measurements may be used interchangeably to assess the hydration status of patients. PMID:26675322

  7. Inferior vena cava/aorta diameter index in the assessment of the body fluid status - a comparative study of measurements performed by experienced and inexperienced examiners in a group of young adults.

    PubMed

    Durajska, Kaja; Januszkiewicz, Emilia; Szmygel, Łukasz; Kosiak, Wojciech

    2014-09-01

    The assessment of the body fluid status is one the most challenging tasks in clinical practice. Although there are many methods to assess the body fluid status of patients, none of them is fully satisfactory in contemporary medical sciences. In the article below, we compare the results of measurements performed by experienced and inexperienced examiners based on the inferior vena cava/aorta diameter index in a sonographic hydration assessment. The study enrolled 50 young students at the age of 19-26 (the median age was 22.95) including 27 women and 23 men. The volunteers were examined in the supine position with GE Logiq 7 system and a convex transducer with the frequency of 2-5 MHz. The measurements were performed in the longitudinal and transverse planes by two inexperienced examiners - the authors of this paper, following a four-hour training conducted by an experienced sonographer. The longitudinal values of the inferior vena cava/aorta diameter index obtained in this study were similar to those found in the literature. The reference value for the inferior vena cava/aorta index determined by Kosiak et al., which constituted 1.2 ± 2 SD, for SD = 0.17, was similar to the values obtained by the authors of this paper which equaled 1.2286 ± 2 SD, for SD = 0.2. The article presented below proves that measuring the inferior vena cava/aorta diameter index is not a complex examination and it may be performed by physicians with no sonographic experience. Furthermore, the paper demonstrates that the inferior vena cava/aorta diameter index measured in the transverse plane is similar to the inferior vena cava/aorta diameter index determined in the longitudinal plane. Thus, both measurements may be used interchangeably to assess the hydration status of patients.

  8. Use of a dual lumen cannula for venovenous extra corporeal membrane oxygenation in a patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome and a previously inserted inferior vena cava filter: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Palizas Jr., Fernando; García, Christian Casabella; Norese, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is used in refractory hypoxemia in many clinical settings. Thoracic trauma patients usually develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. Due to high risk of bleeding, thrombotic complications present in this context are particularly difficult to manage and usually require insertion of an inferior vena cava filter to prevent embolism from the distal veins to the pulmonary circulation. Here, we present a case of a thoracic trauma patient with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome requiring venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation via a right internal jugular double lumen cannula due to a previously inserted inferior vena cava filter caused by distal bilateral calf muscle vein deep vein thrombosis. PMID:27096680

  9. [An inflammatory aortic aneurysm ruptured into the retroperitoneum and an extensive communication of the aneurysm with the vena cava inferior].

    PubMed

    Tovar Martín, E; Acea Nebril, B; Díaz Pardeiro, P

    1993-01-01

    Aortocaval fistula is a rare complication of abdominal aortic aneurysms that occurs with a frequency of 1% of operative cases or less. In this report we present a case of aortocaval fistula associated with ruptured and inflammatory aortic aneurysm that became apparent after evacuation of the thrombus. The inferior cava was ligated. We discuss the clinical syndrome and the management of patients with aortocaval fistula secondary to an abdominal aortic aneurysm and the results of surgical repair.

  10. “En bloc” caudate lobe and inferior vena cava resection following cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for peritoneal and liver metastasis of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Velázquez, Patricia; Moosmann, Nicolas; Töpel, Ingolf; Piso, Pompiliu

    2016-01-01

    There are diverse protocols to manage patients with recurrent disease after primary cytoreductive surgery (CRS) with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) for peritoneal carcinomatosis. We describe a case of metachronous liver metastasis after CRS and HIPEC for colorectal cancer, successfully treated with a selective metastectomy and partial graft of the inferior vena cava. A 35-year-old female presented with a large tumour in the cecum and consequent colonic stenosis. After an emergency right colectomy, the patient received adjuvant chemotherapy. One year later she was diagnosed with peritoneal carcinomatosis, and it was decided to carry out a CRS/HIPEC. After 2 years of total remission, an isolated metachronous liver metastasis was detected by magnetic resonance imaging surveillance. The patient underwent a third procedure including a caudate lobe and partial inferior vena cava resection with a prosthetic graft interposition, achieving an R0 situation. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 17 after the liver resection. At 18-mo follow-up after the liver resection the patient remained free of recurrence. In selected patients, the option of re-operation due to recurrent disease should be discussed. Even liver resection of a metachronous metastasis and an extended vascular resection are acceptable after CRS/HIPEC and can be considered as a potential treatment option to remove all macroscopic lesions. PMID:28028374

  11. Comparison between respiratory changes in the inferior vena cava diameter and pulse pressure variation to predict fluid responsiveness in postoperative patients.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Olivia Haun; Freitas, Flávio Geraldo Rezende de; Ladeira, Renata Teixeira; Fischer, Claudio Henrique; Bafi, Antônio Tonete; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes; Machado, Flávia Ribeiro

    2016-08-01

    The objective of our study was to assess the reliability of the distensibility index of the inferior vena cava (dIVC) as a predictor of fluid responsiveness in postoperative, mechanically ventilated patients and compare its accuracy with that of the pulse pressure variation (PPV) measurement. We included postoperative mechanically ventilated and sedated patients who underwent volume expansion with 500mL of crystalloids over 15minutes. A response to fluid infusion was defined as a 15% increase in the left ventricular outflow tract velocity time integral according to transthoracic echocardiography. The inferior vena cava diameters were recorded by a subcostal view using the M-mode and the PPV by automatic calculation. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated for the baseline dIVC and PPV. Twenty patients were included. The area under the ROC curve for dIVC was 0.84 (95% confidence interval, 0.63-1.0), and the best cutoff value was 16% (sensitivity, 67%; specificity, 100%). The area under the ROC curve for PPV was 0.92 (95% confidence interval, 0.76-1.0), and the best cutoff was 12.4% (sensitivity, 89%; specificity, 100%). A noninferiority test showed that dIVC cannot replace PPV to predict fluid responsiveness (P=.28). The individual PPV discriminative properties for predicting fluid responsiveness in postoperative patients seemed superior to those of dIVC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Intra-arterial CT angiography visualization of arterial supply to inferior vena cava tumor thrombus prior to radioembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Roche, Glen; Teo, Terence K B; Tan, Andrew E H; Irani, Farah G

    2012-01-01

    Unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma has a high frequency of vascular invasion and arterial parasitization. Trans-arterial radioembolization using yttrium-90 (Y90) microspheres is a possible treatment option. Paramount to its success is the meticulous angiographic interrogation of tumor feeding arteries and extra-hepatic supply. We describe a patient with tumor invasion of the inferior vena cava with arterial supply from the right inferior phrenic artery, which was exquisitely visualized using intra-arterial computed tomographic angiography (IACTA) during the planning technetium-99m macro aggregated albumin phase. This technique was useful in planning which artery to administer Y90 microspheres into for maximal brachytherapy. Although patient outcome was poor due to significant arterio-portal shunting, we believe that IACTA is a useful adjunct to conventional digital subtraction angiography in planning radioembolization therapy.

  13. Endothelium-Dependent Nitric Oxide and Hyperpolarization-Mediated Venous Relaxation Pathways in Rat Inferior Vena cava

    PubMed Central

    Raffetto, Joseph D.; Yu, Peng; Reslan, Ossama M.; Xia, Yin; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The vascular endothelium plays a major role in the control of arterial tone; however, its role in venous tissues is less clear. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of endothelium in the control of venous function, and the relaxation pathways involved. Methods Circular segments of inferior vena cava (IVC) from male Sprague-Dawley rats were suspended between two wires and isometric contraction to phenylephrine (Phe, 10−5M) and 96 mM KCl was measured. Acetylcholine (Ach, 10−10 to 10−5M) was added and the percentage venous relaxation was measured. To determine the role of nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin (PGI2), vein relaxation was measured in the presence of the NOS inhibitor L-NAME (3X10−4 M) and the COX inhibitor indomethacin (10−5 M). To measure the role of hyperpolarization, vein relaxation was measured in the presence of K+ channel activator cromakalim (10−11 to 10−6 M), and the nonselective K+ channel blocker tetraethylammonium (TEA, 10−3 M). To test for the contribution of a specific K+ channel, the effects of K+ channel blockers: glibenclamide (ATP-sensitive KATP, 10−5M), 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, voltage-dependent Kv, 10−3M), apamin (small conductance Ca2+-dependent SKCa, 10−7M), and iberiotoxin (large conductance Ca2+-dependent BKCa, 10−8M), on Ach-induced relaxation were tested. Results Ach caused concentration-dependent relaxation of Phe contraction (max 49.9±4.9%). Removal of endothelium abolished Ach-induced relaxation. IVC treatment with L-NAME partially reduced Ach relaxation (32.8±4.9%). In IVC treated with L-NAME plus indomethacin significant Ach-induced relaxation (33.6±3.2%) could still be observed, suggesting a role of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). In IVC treated with L-NAME, indomethacin and TEA, Ach relaxation was abolished, supporting a role of EDHF. In veins stimulated with high KCl, Ach caused relaxation (max 59.5±3.5%) that was abolished in the presence of L

  14. Thrombosis of the Inferior Vena Cava after Endovascular Aortic Repair in a Patient with May-Thurner Syndrome: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Dahi, Firouza; Gkremoutis, Asimakis; Harth, Marc; Schmitz-Rixen, Thomas; Keese, Michael

    2017-02-03

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis is a rare complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). A 70-year-old male patient of Italian origin presented with a 9.3 × 8.4 cm infrarenal AAA, which was treated by endovascular aortic repair (EVAR). He reported a history of ulcerative colitis and was on prednisolone 80 mg daily. Seven weeks postoperatively the patient was readmitted with a deep vein thrombosis including both iliac veins and IVC, and bilateral pulmonary embolism. Venous thrombectomy and decompression of the IVC were performed by partial resection of the aneurysm sac. A covered stent was intraoperatively placed in the left common iliac vein to treat compression of the left iliac vein (May-Thurner Syndrome). Enoxaparin (2 × 0.8 mg) and antiplatelet agent with aspirin were administered, as well as intermittent compression therapy to the left leg. This case report describes vena cava thrombosis as a rare complication after EVAR in a patient with May-Thurner syndrome.

  15. Use of steerable delivery catheter to successfully deliver a Ceraflex septal occluder to close an atrial septal defect in a child with interrupted inferior vena cava with azygos continuation.

    PubMed

    Yücel, İlker K; Ballı, Şevket; Küçük, Mehmet; Çelebi, Ahmet

    2016-04-01

    The closure of a secundum atrial septal defect through the jugular vein in a child with interrupted inferior vena cava with azygos continuation by steerable delivery catheter is described in the present report. The steerable catheter can be used to correct the perpendicular position of the device over the margins of the defect, and is particularly useful in cases of large defects.

  16. Suprarenal inferior vena cava filter placement prior to transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) of a renal cell carcinoma with large renal vein tumor thrombus: Prevention of pulmonary tumor emboli after TAE

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, Shozo; Matsumoto, Shinnichi; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Koshino, Tukasa; Sako, Masao; Kono, Michio

    1997-03-15

    To prevent embolization of necrotic renal vein tumor after transcatheter embolization of a left renal cell carcinoma, we placed a suprarenal Bird's nest inferior vena cava filter. The patient tolerated the procedure well and had extensive tumor infarction including the tumor thrombus on 6-month follow-up computed tomography.

  17. Usefulness of ultrasonographic measurement of the diameter of the inferior vena cava to predict responsiveness to intravascular fluid administration in patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo-Armenta, Juan M.; Guevara-García, Humberto; Barragán-Dessavre, Mireya; García-Guillén, Francisco J.; Sánchez-Hurtado, Luis A.; Córdova-Sánchez, Bertha; Bautista-Ocampo, Andoreni R.; Herrera-Gómez, Angel; Meneses-García, Abelardo

    2016-01-01

    We conducted an observational, longitudinal prospective study in which we measured the diameters of the inferior vena cava (IVC) of 47 patients using ultrasonography. The aim of our study was to assess the state of blood volume and to determine the percentage of patients who responded to intravascular volume expansion. Only 17 patients (36%) responded to fluid management. A higher number of responding patients had cardiovascular failure compared with nonresponders (82% vs. 50%, P = 0.03). Among the patients with cardiovascular failure, the probability of finding responders was 4.6 times higher than that of not finding responders (odds ratio, 4.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.10–19.6; P = 0.04). No significant difference was observed in the mortality rate between the two groups (11% vs. 23%, P = 0.46). In conclusion, responding to intravascular volume expansion had no impact on patient survival in the intensive care unit. PMID:27695165

  18. [Spinal cord infarction following radical nephrectomy using extracorporeal circulation for renal cell carcinoma with tumor thrombus in the inferior vena cava and right atrium: a case report].

    PubMed

    Sumino, Yasuhiro; Sato, Fuminori; Mimata, Hiromitsu

    2010-07-01

    A 51 year-old man admitted to our hospital for macroscopic hematuria and right abdominal mass. CT demonstrated a large hypervascular mass and tumor thrombus in the inferior vena cava and right atrium. We diagnosed right renal cancer (stage III), and he underwent radical nephrectomy and resection of tumor thrombus with extracorporeal circulation. Operative time was 9 hours. Time for extracorporeal circulation was 119 minutes, and it took 60 minutes for intraoperative balloon occlusion of descending aorta in order to arrest hemorrhage. Pathological diagnosis was clear cell carcinoma of the kidney (pT3c, N0, M0). Four days after surgery, paraplegia was evident, and a diagnosis of spinal cord infarction was made based on neurologic examination and MRI findings. In cases with such a surgery requiring extracorporeal circulation, preoperative meeting with cardiologists and anesthetists is indispensable in order to fully understand the possible complications. Especially, to keep a careful watch and prepare for spinal cord ischemia is mandatory.

  19. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis of Acute Deep Vein Thrombosis in the Lower Extremity of a Child with Interrupted Inferior Vena Cava

    SciTech Connect

    Oguzkurt, Levent Ozkan, Ugur; Tercan, Fahri; Koc, Zafer

    2007-04-15

    We present the case of a 14-year-old girl who developed acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in her right lower extremity. Laboratory testing revealed protein S deficiency, and the patient's father also had this abnormality with a history of lower extremity DVT. Manual thromboaspiration followed by catheter-directed thrombolysis resulted in total clearance of all thrombi. Computed tomography and later venography revealed an interrupted inferior vena cava. Catheter-directed thrombolysis is an established treatment for adults with acute DVT. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first to describe catheter-directed thrombolysis in a pediatric patient with lower extremity DVT. Our results suggest that catheter-directed thrombolysis is safe and effective for use in selected older children and adolescents with acute DVT in the lower extremity.

  20. 21 CFR 870.3260 - Vena cava clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vena cava clip. 870.3260 Section 870.3260 Food and... CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3260 Vena cava clip. (a) Identification. A vena cava clip is an implanted extravascular device designed to occlude partially the vena cava for...

  1. 21 CFR 870.3260 - Vena cava clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vena cava clip. 870.3260 Section 870.3260 Food and... CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3260 Vena cava clip. (a) Identification. A vena cava clip is an implanted extravascular device designed to occlude partially the vena cava for...

  2. Retrieval of gunther tulip vena cava filter with thrombosed hook and a leg incorporated into the vena cava wall.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, Takuji; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2009-01-01

    A Gunther tulip vena cava filter was implanted in a patient with pulmonary embolism from deep venous thrombosis. The filter became unnecessary after therapy. However, retrieval by the standard method employing a vascular sheath placed via the transjugular approach in combination with a snare device was impossible. A thrombus occupying the apical hook made it difficult to snare the hook, also one filter leg was incorporated into the inferior vena cava wall. Therefore we modified an existing method to withdraw the filter. As the first step, the filter cone was snared using the snare-over-guide wire loop technique, and the cephalad site of the filter was introduced into the sheath. Then, a 12-French sheath was advanced from the femoral vein and, using a pusher, the distal legs of the filter were pushed, which resulted the filter leg that was incorporated into the inferior vena cava wall became detached. Finally the filter was successfully retrieved.

  3. Retrieval of Gunther Tulip Vena Cava Filter with Thrombosed Hook and a Leg Incorporated into the Vena Cava Wall

    PubMed Central

    Yamagami, Takuji; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2009-01-01

    A Gunther tulip vena cava filter was implanted in a patient with pulmonary embolism from deep venous thrombosis. The filter became unnecessary after therapy. However, retrieval by the standard method employing a vascular sheath placed via the transjugular approach in combination with a snare device was impossible. A thrombus occupying the apical hook made it difficult to snare the hook, also one filter leg was incorporated into the inferior vena cava wall. Therefore we modified an existing method to withdraw the filter. As the first step, the filter cone was snared using the snare-over-guide wire loop technique, and the cephalad site of the filter was introduced into the sheath. Then, a 12-French sheath was advanced from the femoral vein and, using a pusher, the distal legs of the filter were pushed, which resulted the filter leg that was incorporated into the inferior vena cava wall became detached. Finally the filter was successfully retrieved. PMID:23555355

  4. Evaluation of volume overload by bioelectrical impedance analysis, NT-proBNP and inferior vena cava diameter in patients with stage 3&4 and 5 chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Zülfükar; Yildirim, Yaşar; Oto, Ferhat; Aydin, Fatma Yilmaz; Aydin, Emre; Kadiroglu, Ali Kemal; Yilmaz, Mehmet Emin

    2014-05-01

    Determination of fluid overload is important in chronic kidney disease. Early diagnosis and treatment of volume overload may decrease morbidity and mortality. We aimed to determine body composition by using bioelectrical impedance analysis, and studying other clinical characteristics, inferior vena cava diameter, and N-terminal pro-B natriuretic peptide associated with hydration status in chronic kidney disease Stages 3&4 and 5 in patients not undergoing dialysis. We examined 62 patients with Stages 3&4 and 68 patients with Stage 5 chronic kidney disease. Plasma NT-proBNP was measured and analyzed after log transformation. Inferior vena cave diameter was measured with echocardiography and indexed for body surface area. Hydration status was assessed using multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis. Overhydration was defined as overhydration/extracellular water >0.15. Overhydration was more frequent in Stage 5 than in Stages 3&4 patients. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, inferior vena cava index, and log NT-proBNP were higher in overhydrated compared to non-overhydrated patients. A significant positive correlation existed between overhydration/extracellular water and log NT-proBNP, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and inferior vena cava index. In multiple linear regression analysis, the variables associated with hydration status were male sex, extracellular water/total body water, and extracellular water/intracellular water (greater overhydration), while serum albumin levels had a negative association with overhydration. Overhydration is more prevalent in Stage 5 chronic kidney disease patients than in Stages 3&4 patients. Bioelectrical impedance analysis, inferior vena cava diameter, and NT-proBNP analysis in chronic kidney disease are useful methods to determine the volume overload.

  5. Individualized Computer-Based Surgical Planning Addressing Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations in Single-Ventricle Patients with Interrupted Inferior Vena Cava and Azygous Continuation

    PubMed Central

    de Zélicourt, Diane A.; Haggerty, Christopher M.; Sundareswaran, Kartik S.; Whited, Brian S.; Rossignac, Jarek R.; Kanter, Kirk R.; Gaynor, J. William; Spray, Thomas L.; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Fogel, Mark A.; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Single-ventricle patients with interrupted inferior vena cava (IVC) can develop pulmonary arterio-venous malformations due to abnormal hepatic flow distribution (HFD). However, preoperatively determining the hepatic baffle design that optimizes HFD is far from trivial. In this study, we combine virtual surgery and numerical simulations to identify potential surgical strategies for patients with interrupted IVC. METHODS Five patients with interrupted IVC and severe PAVMs were enrolled. Their in vivo anatomies were reconstructed from MRI (n=4) and CT (n=1), and alternate virtual-surgery options (intra/extra-cardiac, Y-grafts, hepato-to-azygous and azygous-to-hepatic shunts) were generated for each. HFD was assessed for all options using a fully validated computational flow solver. RESULTS For patients with a single superior vena cava (SVC, n=3), intra/extra-cardiac connections proved dangerous, as even a small left or right offset led to a highly preferential HFD to the associated lung. Best results were obtained with either a Y-graft spanning the Kawashima to split the flow, or hepato-to-azygous shunts to promote mixing. For patients with bilateral SVCs (n=2), results depended on the balance between the left and right superior inflows. When those were equal, connecting the hepatic baffle between the SVCs performed well, but other options should be pursued otherwise. CONCLUSION This study demonstrates how virtual-surgery environments can benefit the clinical community, especially for rare and complex cases such as single-ventricle patients with interrupted IVC. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the optimal baffle design to the superior inflows underscores the need to characterize both pre-operative anatomy and flows to identify the best suited option. PMID:21334010

  6. In Vivo Evaluation of the Effects of Gravitational Force (+Gz) on Over-the-Wire Stainless Steel Greenfield Inferior VenaCava Filter in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, P.M. Soares, G.M.; Dick, E.J.; Harroff, H.H.

    2003-08-15

    This study was done to determine the effect of exposure to gravitational force (acceleration stress) on invivo over-the-wire stainless steel Greenfield inferior vena cavafilters. Fifteen pigs underwent venous cut down and placement of a stainless steel Greenfield filter. A 4-week observation period simulated realistic convalescence and allowed sufficient time for epithelialization. Ten pigs were exposed to acceleration stress in a centrifuge (3G run for 15 sec followed by rest until return to baseline heart rate, then a 9G run for 15 sec), with inertial loading in ahead-to-tail direction (+Gz). Fluoroscopy during acceleration stress allowed assessment for filter migration. Five pigs were not exposed to acceleration stress. AP and lateral abdominal radiographs were obtained at post-filter placement, convalescence, and centrifuge exposure to determine the position and integrity of the filter. All 15 IVCs were resected and evaluated for gross or histological injury to the vessel wall. IVC filter placement was technically successful in all 15 pigs.Radiographic measurements were limited secondary to differences in pig positioning. Fluoroscopy showed no filter migration. All filters were securely attached to the vena cava by the hooks without gross evidence of perforation or hemorrhage. There were varying degrees of fibroplasia involving the hooks and tip of the filters in both the control and experimental groups. Histologically, there was evidence of prior hemorrhage at the level of the hooks, which was similar between the control and experimental groups. It is concluded that Greenfield filter position and vena caval integrity at the implantation site is unaffected by high acceleration stress.

  7. Vena Cava ınvasion by Adrenal Leiomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Oztürk, Hakan

    2014-05-13

    Primary adrenal mesenchymal tumors are extremely rare. These tumors are hard to diagnose, and similar to certain adrenal tumors, as they do not produce hormones, and they can only manifest themselves when the tumor reaches an advanced size. These tumors are generally detected incidentally. This study reports a rare case of primary leiomyosarcoma of the right adrenal gland with vena cava invasion, in a 70-year-old woman who presented with right flank pain. Computerized tomography showed an adrenal mass with a diameter of 78 mm, which exerted pressure on the vena cava inferior. The invasive part was excised by using adrenalectomy and cavatomy. Tumor invasion was determined on the wall of the vena cava. Histopathological examination on 10× magnification showed 8-10 mitotic events. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the cells were SMA (+), desmin (+), cytokeratin (-), and Bcl-2 (-). The Ki67 proliferation index was 70%. Widespread metastasis developed six months after the adrenalectomy.

  8. Cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy during cardiopulmonary bypass predicts superior vena cava oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Ginther, Richard; Sebastian, Vinod A; Huang, Rong; Leonard, Steven R; Gorney, Ronald; Guleserian, Kristine J; Forbess, Joseph M

    2011-08-01

    Cerebral and flank near-infrared spectroscopy are used to monitor tissue oxygenation during cardiopulmonary bypass in pediatric patients. We sought to validate these noninvasive measurements as predictors of oxygen saturation in the superior and inferior venae cavae during cardiopulmonary bypass. Eight patients underwent elective repair of congenital heart defects with bicaval cannulation. Ultrasonic flow probes and oximetric catheters were placed in the superior and inferior venae cavae limbs of the perfusion circuit. Cerebral and flank near-infrared spectroscopy and 12 additional variables were recorded each minute on cardiopulmonary bypass. Relationships between these variables and superior and inferior venae cavae oxygen saturation were analyzed by linear mixed modeling. The regression of superior vena cava oxygen saturation by current cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy and 1-minute lag cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy, which are equivalent to the regression of the superior vena cava saturation by the current cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy and the 1-minute change in cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy, were used to assess cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy as a trend monitor. The mean number of observation time points per patient was 86 (median 72, range 34-194) for 690 total observations. The root mean square percentage error was 6.39% for the prediction model of superior vena cava saturation by single-factor cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy. The root mean square percentage error was 10.8% for the prediction model of inferior vena cava saturation by single-factor flank near-infrared spectroscopy. Cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy accurately predicts superior vena cava oxygen saturation and changes in superior vena cava oxygen saturation on cardiopulmonary bypass. The relationship between flank near-infrared spectroscopy and inferior vena cava saturation is not as strong. Copyright © 2011. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  9. Urologic Oncologic SurveyRobotic level III inferior vena cava tumor thrombectomy: Initial series. Gill IS, Metcalfe C, Abreu A, Duddalwar V, Chopra S, Cunningham M, Thangathurai D, Ukimura O, Satkunasivam R, Hung A, Papalia R, Aron M, Desai M, Gallucci M. J Urol. 2015 Oct;194(4):929-938. [Epub 2015 Apr 6]. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2015.03.119.

    PubMed

    Meng, Max

    2017-05-01

    Level III inferior vena cava tumor thrombectomy for renal cancer is one of the most challenging open urologic surgeries. We present the initial series of completely intracorporeal robotic level III inferior vena cava tumor thrombectomy. Nine patients underwent robotic level III inferior vena cava thrombectomy and 7 patients underwent level II thrombectomy. The entire operation (high intrahepatic inferior vena cava control, caval exclusion, tumor thrombectomy, inferior vena cava repair, radical nephrectomy, and retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy) was performed exclusively robotically. To minimize the chances of intraoperative inferior vena cava thrombus embolization, an "inferior vena cava-first, kidney-last" robotic technique was developed. Data were accrued prospectively. All 16 robotic procedures were successful, without open conversion or mortality. For level III cases (9), median primary kidney (right 6, left 3) cancer size was 8.5cm (range: 5.3-10.8) and inferior vena cava thrombus length was 5.7cm (range: 4-7). Median operative time was 4.9 hours (range: 4.5-6.3), estimated blood loss was 375ml (range: 200-7,000), and hospital stay was 4.5 days. All surgical margins were negative. There were no intraoperative complications and 1 postoperative complication (Clavien 3b). At a median 7 months of follow-up (range: 1-18) all patients are alive. Compared to level II thrombi the level III cohort trended toward greater inferior vena cava thrombus length (3.3 vs 5.7cm), operative time (4.5 vs 4.9h) and blood loss (290 vs 375ml). With appropriate patient selection, surgical planning and robotic experience, completely intracorporeal robotic level III inferior vena cava thrombectomy is feasible and can be performed efficiently. Larger experience, longer follow-up and comparison with open surgery are needed to confirm these initial outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Can Nephrologists Use Ultrasound to Evaluate the Inferior Vena Cava? A Cross-Sectional Study of the Agreement between a Nephrologist and a Cardiologist

    PubMed Central

    Muniz Pazeli, José; Fagundes Vidigal, Daniel; Cestari Grossi, Tarcísio; Silva Fernandes, Natália Maria; Colugnati, Fernando; Baumgratz de Paula, Rogério; Sanders-Pinheiro, Hélady

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The costs and the need for a specialist impair the implementation of ultrasonography for evaluating the inferior vena cava (IVC) to assess the volemic status in hemodialysis patients. We investigated whether a nephrologist with limited ultrasound training can accurately assess the IVC in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Methods A cardiologist and a nephrologist consecutively measured the indexed IVC expiratory diameter (VCDi) and the IVC collapsibility index (IVCCI) of 52 patients during hemodialysis sessions. In protocol I, the nephrologist used a regular ultrasound system (RUS) and the cardiologist used a cardiovascular ultrasound equipment; in protocol II, the machines were interchanged. Pearson and kappa coefficients and the interexaminer agreement by the Bland-Altman method were calculated. Results The VCDi measurements showed a strong correlation in both protocols (r = 0.88 and 0.84 in protocols I and II, respectively). The volemic classifications were excellent in protocol I (kappa = 0.82 and 0.93 by VCDi and IVCCI, respectively) and substantial in protocol II (kappa = 0.77 and 0.75 by VCDi and IVCCI, respectively). The interexaminer agreement on the VCDi measurements was very good in both protocols. Conclusions Ultrasound evaluation of the IVC can be performed by nephrologists using an RUS to assess the volemic status in hemodialysis patients. PMID:24926312

  11. Asymptomatic inferior vena cava abnormalities in three children with end-stage renal disease: risk factors and screening guidelines for pretransplant diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S E; Hickman, R O; Tapper, D; Shaw, D W; Fouser, L S; McDonald, R A

    2000-02-01

    We report two children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) found to have inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis at the time of renal transplantation. The children suffered from renal diseases that included congenital hepatic fibrosis and portal hypertension as part of their pathophysiology. Neither child had evidence of hypercoaguability or clinical symptoms of IVC thrombosis. Prior to transplantation, the renal replacement therapy consisted primarily of peritoneal dialysis. During their hospital courses, these children had central venous catheters placed for temporary hemodialysis, episodes of peritonitis and numerous abdominal surgeries. The medical literature to date has not identified a link between IVC thrombosis and portal hypertension, nor has an association between the patients' primary renal disease and IVC thrombosis been found. We also report the finding of asymptomatic IVC narrowing in a third patient with obstructive uropathy, colonic dysmotility and numerous abdominal surgeries. IVC narrowing was diagnosed by CT scan during his pretransplant evaluation. In this paper, we consider similarities between these three patients that may have predisposed each of them to asymptomatic IVC pathology, including large-bore central venous access as young children and/or recurrent scarring abdominal processes. A discussion regarding appropriate screening of the 'high-risk patient' for IVC pathology prior to kidney transplantation and surgical options for children with this rare complication are presented.

  12. An approach to the intra-thoracic inferior vena cava through the abdominal cavity preparing for total hepatic vascular exclusion by sagittal diaphragmotomy.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Shugo; Yagihara, Masahiro; Tanemura, Akihiro; Kuriyama, Naohisa; Azumi, Yoshinori; Kishiwada, Masashi; Ohsawa, Ichiro; Usui, Masanobu; Sakurai, Hiroyuki; Tabata, Masami; Miyabe, Masayuki; Isaji, Shuji

    2013-09-01

    For resection of advanced liver tumors with tumor thrombus/invasion extending into the intra-thoracic inferior vena cava (IVC) above the diaphragm as well as huge liver tumors located at the root of hepatic vein, an appropriate approach to the intra-thoracic IVC through the abdominal cavity is the key to control the intraoperative massive bleeding. The pericardium and diaphragm are separated by using fingers without injury of the pericardium. From just below the xiphoid process to the IVC, the diaphragm is vertically dissected without cutting the pericardium and doing median sternotomy. Then the intra-thoracic IVC is exposed easily and encircled with an umbilical tape. This technique was applied in four patients (hepatocellular carcinoma: n = 3, cholangiocellular carcinoma: n = 1). The mean patient's age was 69 (59-81) year old, and three were male. The median duration of surgery and blood loss was 490 min and 3600 mL, respectively. The median peaked aspartate aminotransferase and total bilirubin was 428 IU/mL and 2.75 mg/dL, respectively. The median duration of hospital stay was 22 days. This approach to intra-thoracic IVC through the abdominal cavity is very beneficial and helpful for many liver surgeons.

  13. Volume overload and its risk factors in South African chronic kidney disease patients: an appraisal of bioimpedance spectroscopy and inferior vena cava measurements.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Muzamil Olamide; Duarte, Raquel; Dix-Peek, Therese; Vachiat, Ahmed; Dickens, Caroline; Grinter, Sacha; Naidoo, Sagren; Manga, Pravin; Naicker, Saraladevi

    2016-07-01

    Fluid retention occurs early in chronic kidney disease (CKD) resulting in increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to assess volume and nutritional status among South African CKD participants and determine the relationship between malnutrition, inflammation, atherosclerosis, and volume overload using a body composition monitor (BCM). We also evaluated the usefulness of BCM measurement in assessing volume overload. 160 participants comprising hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, stage 3 CKD patients, and healthy controls (40 in each group) were studied. A BCM was used to assess fluid and nutritional status. Cardiac dimension measurements, and inferior vena cava diameter (IVCD) and carotid intima media thickness were assessed by echocardiography and ultrasonography, respectively. Serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured as markers of inflammation. Fluid overload and malnutrition were present in 68% and 63% of studied patients, respectively. Using physical examination findings as the reference measurements for volume overload, the area under the concentration curves for BCM and IVCD measurements were 0.866 (sensitivity 82%, specificity 74%, p < 0.001) and 0.727 (sensitivity 57%, specificity 70%, p < 0.001), respectively. Lean tissue index, inflammation, and atherosclerosis were associated with volume overload. Volume overload and malnutrition were common across the spectrum of South African CKD cohorts; volume overload was associated with malnutrition, inflammation, and atherosclerosis. Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) is a useful and sensitive tool for the assessment of fluid status in clinically euvolumic nondialytic CKD patients.

  14. Venous Congestive Myelopathy due to Chronic Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis Treated with Endovascular Stenting: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Diego Z.; Hughes, Joshua D.; Liebo, Greta B.; Bendel, Emily C.; Bjarnason, Haraldur; Klaas, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Impaired inferior vena cava (IVC) outflow can lead to collateralization of blood to the valveless epidural venous plexus, causing epidural venous engorgement and venous congestion. Herein we describe a case of chronic IVC thrombosis presenting as venous congestive myelopathy treated with angioplasty and endovascular stenting. The pathophysiological mechanisms of cord injury are hypothesized, and IVC stenting application is evaluated. Methods Case report and review of the literature. Results IVC outflow obstruction has only rarely been associated with neurologic dysfunction, with reports of lumbosacral nerve root compression in the cases of IVC agenesis, compression, or occlusion. Although endovascular angioplasty with stenting is emerging as a leading treatment option for chronic IVC thrombosis, its use to treat neurologic complications is limited to one case report for intractable sciatica. Our case is the first description of IVC thrombosis presenting with venous congestive myelopathy, and treated successfully with IVC stenting. Conclusion Venous congestive myelopathy should be seen as a broader clinical condition, including not only typical dural arteriovenous fistulas, but also disorders of venous outflow. Therefore, identifying a rare, but potentially treatable, etiology is important to avoid permanent neurologic deficits. IVC stenting is proposed as a novel and effective treatment approach. PMID:25825633

  15. Clinical and histopathological effects of presurgical treatment with sunitinib for renal cell carcinoma with inferior vena cava tumor thrombus at a single institution.

    PubMed

    Ujike, Takeshi; Uemura, Motohide; Kawashima, Atsunari; Nagahara, Akira; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Nonomura, Norio

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the clinical and histopathological effects of presurgical treatment with sunitinib on inferior vena cava (IVC) tumor thrombus. Between 2010 and 2014, we treated seven patients with renal cell carcinoma and IVC tumor thrombus presurgically with sunitinib. We retrospectively evaluated primitive tumor size, the level of tumor thrombus according to Novick's classification, its distance above the renal vein, thrombus diameter at its widest segment, and histopathological change after sunitinib treatment. Three patients were diagnosed histologically. Percutaneous biopsy of the renal mass before sunitinib treatment was performed in two patients. One patient was diagnosed after sunitinib treatment following nephrectomy. The primitive tumors shrank upon sunitinib therapy in four cases; however, although the caval thrombus was downstaged (from level II to I) in one patient, the level of caval thrombus did not change in five patients and increased in one patient (from level III to IV). We evaluated the histopathological effects in two patients. In one patient, the IVC tumor thrombus was mostly replaced with necrotic tissue, but its thrombus level was not downstaged. In the other patient, the IVC tumor thrombus was downstaged, but tumor thrombus was not replaced with necrotic tissue and viable tumor cells remained. Presurgical treatment with sunitinib for renal cell carcinoma with IVC tumor thrombus appears to have limited effect on IVC tumor thrombus, in contrast to its effects on primitive tumor shrinkage. In the absence of evidence of presurgical benefits from prospective studies, this treatment may not be systematically advisable.

  16. [Anesthetic management of a patient with aortocaval fistula caused by rupture of a huge abdominal aortic aneurysm into the inferior vena cava].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Motonari; Kawashima, Akira; Kuremoto, Yoshito; Tanada, Kazuko

    2013-12-01

    Aortocaval fistula is a rare complication of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. We report anesthetic management of a patient with aortocaval fistula caused by rupture of a huge abdominal aortic aneurysm into the inferior vena cava. A 51-year-old man who had complained of low back pain and general fatigue was referred to our hospital because of his liver damage. Aortocaval fistula due to rupture of a huge abdominal aortic aneurysm was diagnosed from physical examination, enhanced computed tomography and color Doppler ultrasonography. Anesthesia was induced with propofol and rocuronium, and was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. After induction of anesthesia, the central venous pressure and cardiac index showed remarkably high values because of arteriovenous shunt. When the aneurysm was incised after the clamping of the abdominal aorta, massive venous bleeding occurred from the fistula and caused severe hypotension. Blood pressure recovered by digital compression of the bleeding point and the use of an autotransfusion device. After the repair of the aortocaval fistula, the hemodynamics became stable. The patient had a high output but a good cardiac function in preoperative examination. Therefore anesthesia was managed successfully without worsening high-output heart failure.

  17. Assessment of the safety and efficacy of bedside ultrasound guidance for inferior vena cava filter placement in critically ill intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Zhou, Hong; Chen, ChangYu; Cui, Chi; Liu, XiPin; Liu, Qinwen; Ye, Ming; Wang, Jing

    2015-04-01

    Inferior vena cava filters (IVCFs) have been used clinically for approximately 45 y, but only a few studies of these devices have involved intensive care unit (ICU) patients who were critically ill and had multiple-organ dysfunction or were otherwise too unstable for transport. The purpose of this research was to assess the tolerability and efficacy of bedside ultrasound-guided IVCF placement in ICU patients. A retrospective analysis of both bedside ultrasound-guided and X-ray-guided ICVF placement was performed from November of 2011 to August of 2013. The total success rate for ultrasound-guided IVCF placement was 93.4%, which included a 96.0% success rate in 25 ICU patients with an average age of 69.46 y. Six-month follow-up studies revealed no significant differences in long-term complications between the ultrasound- and X-ray-guided groups. IVCFs may be safely implanted under ultrasound guidance in a monitored ICU environment. Our conclusion is that patients should be fasting and should receive an enema and that pre-operative surface marking and dynamic monitoring should be employed. Further research is needed to develop specific ultrasound guidelines.

  18. MR angiography versus color Doppler sonography in the evaluation of renal vessels and the inferior vena cava in abdominal masses of pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Pfluger, T; Czekalla, R; Hundt, C; Schubert, M; Graubner, U; Leinsinger, G; Scheck, R; Hahn, K

    1999-07-01

    Involvement of renal vessels and the inferior vena cava (IVC) plays a decisive role during operative planning for removal of abdominal masses in pediatric patients. Advantages and limitations of MR angiography and color Doppler sonography for determining these factors were evaluated. MR angiography and color Doppler sonography were performed preoperatively in 42 neonates, infants, and children with abdominal masses and were compared with spin-echo MR imaging and with surgical findings. Variables evaluated were anatomic variants, vessel displacement, patency of vessels, collateral circulation, and intravascular tumor extension. Quality of vessel visualization was assessed in vessels not affected by tumor. In 88% of unaffected renal vessels, the entire vessel course could be visualized on MR angiography compared with 58% on color Doppler sonography and 43% on spin-echo MR imaging. In four of nine cases, color Doppler sonography revealed an accessory renal artery, whereas MR angiography revealed these variants in seven of nine cases. MR angiography showed 79% and color Doppler sonography 66% of displaced vessels. Unlike MR angiography, color Doppler sonography did not reveal five stenotic renal veins because they could not be completely imaged. In two cases, however, MR angiography falsely indicated an occlusion of the IVC, whereas color Doppler sonography showed residual flow. Anatomic variants, vessel displacement, collateral circulation, and neoplastic vessel infiltration were revealed more accurately by MR angiography than by color Doppler sonography. In cases in which patency of the IVC is unclear on MR angiography, color Doppler sonography should also be performed.

  19. Incidence of inferior vena cava thrombosis detected by transthoracic echocardiography in the immediate postoperative period after adult cardiac and general surgery.

    PubMed

    Saranteas, T; Kostopanagiotou, G; Tzoufi, M; Drachtidi, K; Knox, G M; Panou, F

    2013-11-01

    Venous thromboembolism is an important complication after general and cardiac surgery. Using transthoracic echocardiography, this study assessed the incidence of inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis among a total of 395 and 289 cardiac surgical and major surgical patients in the immediate postoperative period after cardiac and major surgery, respectively. All transthoracic echocardiography was performed by a specialist intensivist within 24 hours after surgery with special emphasis on using the subcostal view in the supine position to visualise the IVC. Of the 395 cardiac surgical patients studied, the IVC was successfully visualised using the subcostal view in 315 patients (79.8%) and eight of these patients (2.5%) had a partially obstructive thrombosis in the IVC. In 250 out of 289 (85%) general surgical patients, the IVC was also clearly visualised, but only one patient (0.4%) had an IVC thrombosis (2.5 vs 0.4%, P <0.05). In summary, visualisation of the IVC was feasible in most patients in the immediate postoperative period after both adult cardiac and major surgery. IVC thrombosis appeared to be more common after adult cardiac surgery than general surgery. A large prospective cohort study is needed to define the risk factors for IVC thrombus and whether early thromboprophylaxis can reduce the incidence of IVC thrombus after adult cardiac surgery.

  20. Successful removal of a Gunther tulip vena cava filter with wall-embedded hook and migration during a retrieval attempt.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, Takuji; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2013-01-01

    Retrieval of a Gunther tulip vena cava filter implanted in a patient with inferior vena cava and right common iliac vein thrombosis was attempted by the standard method. Because the filter was tilted, the hook became attached to the vena cava wall and could not be snared. During attempts at removal by an alternative method, the filter migrated toward the right atrium. However, it was finally successfully removed.

  1. Successful removal of a Gunther tulip vena cava filter with wall-embedded hook and migration during a retrieval attempt

    PubMed Central

    Yamagami, Takuji; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2013-01-01

    Retrieval of a Gunther tulip vena cava filter implanted in a patient with inferior vena cava and right common iliac vein thrombosis was attempted by the standard method. Because the filter was tilted, the hook became attached to the vena cava wall and could not be snared. During attempts at removal by an alternative method, the filter migrated toward the right atrium. However, it was finally successfully removed. PMID:23986855

  2. Risk Factors for Hepatic Venous Outflow Obstruction in Piggyback Liver Transplantation: The Role of Recipient's Pattern of Hepatic Veins Drainage into the Inferior Vena Cava.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qifa; Zeng, Cheng; Wang, Yanfeng; Fang, Zhehong; Hu, Xiaoyan; Xiong, Yan; Li, Ling

    2017-05-19

    BACKGROUND The recipient's pattern of hepatic veins (HVs) drainage into the inferior vena cava (IVC) (drainage pattern, for short) may influence outflow reconstruction and thus hepatic venous outflow obstruction (HVOO) in piggyback liver transplantation (PBLT). However, no previous study has investigated this association. MATERIAL AND METHODS A retrospective analysis of 202 PBLT (2000-2016) was conducted. Based on drainage patterns, the patients were divided into Group A (common trunk of left and middle HVs), Group B (common trunk of right and middle HVs), and Group C (common trunk of 3 HVs). Patients' demographic and surgical data were compared within the 3 groups, and risk factors for HVOO were tested using a multiple logistic regression model. RESULTS A chi-square test revealed a significantly higher HVOO incidence in Group 1 compared with the other groups (23.5% vs. 9.6% vs. 7.1%, p=0.047). The demographics and surgical data except angleÐAOB between the reconstructed outflow and IVC in cross-section of 3D image (∠AOB), ratio of the length of reconstructed outflow and ∠AOB (LRO/∠AOB ratio), and types of HV ligation did not differ significantly within the 3 groups. ∠AOB and LRO/∠AOB ratio were used to assess the level of anastomosis twisting and compression, respectively. Among the 3 groups, the largest ∠AOB and highest LRO/∠AOB ratio were observed in Group A and B, respectively. In addition, multivariate analysis indicated that the ÐAOB (OR=1.016, 95%CI: 1.006-1.027) and LRO/ÐAOB ratio (OR=2.254, 95% CI: 1.041-5.519) were risk factors for HVOO. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrated that drainage patterns were associated with HVOO. The best choice for outflow reconstruction is Group C. The patients in Group A and B were likely to develop HVOO due to anastomosis twisting and compression, respectively.

  3. Endovascular Iliocaval Stent Reconstruction for Inferior Vena Cava Filter-Associated Iliocaval Thrombosis: Approach, Technical Success, Safety, and Two-Year Outcomes in 120 Patients.

    PubMed

    Chick, Jeffrey Forris Beecham; Jo, Alexandria; Meadows, J Matthew; Abramowitz, Steven D; Khaja, Minhaj S; Cooper, Kyle J; Williams, David M

    2017-07-01

    To report technical success, outcomes, and patency of iliocaval stent reconstruction for inferior vena cava (IVC) filter-bearing iliocaval thrombosis. A total of 120 patients with 123 IVC filters and symptomatic iliocaval thrombosis underwent stent reconstruction. Mean patient age was 55 years (range, 19-88 y). Filters included 70 (57%) retrievable and 53 (43%) permanent filters. Symptoms included lower extremity swelling or pain (n = 93), ulcers (n = 8), phlegmasia (n = 7), back pain (n = 5), shortness of breath (n = 4), worsening renal function (n = 2), and stenosis identified during translumbar catheter placement (n = 1). Clinical success was defined as decrease in clinical, etiology, anatomy, and pathophysiology (CEAP) score of at least 1; resolution of presenting symptoms; or normalization of renal function in patients with juxtarenal or suprarenal thrombosis on presentation. Technical aspects of reconstruction, technical success, complications, 6-month clinical response, and 6-, 12-, and 24-month primary, primary-assisted, and secondary stent patency rates were recorded. Stent reconstruction was technically successful in all 120 patients, 63 of whom (53%) underwent thrombolysis. Thirty filters (24%) were retrieved, and 93 (76%) were excluded with stent placement across the indwelling filter. Six minor and 2 major complications occurred. Clinical success was achieved in 115 patients (96%) at 6 months. Six-, 12-, and 24-month primary iliocaval stent patency rates were 96.4%, 94.8%, and 87.2%, respectively. Twenty-four month primary-assisted and secondary patency rates were 90.3% and 94.2%, respectively. Iliocaval stent reconstruction is an effective treatment for filter-associated thrombosis with 100% technical success and 96% clinical success at 6 months. Technical and clinical outcomes in patients who underwent filter retrieval versus filter exclusion were similar. Copyright © 2017 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inferior vena cava filter insertion through the popliteal vein: enabling the percutaneous endovenous intervention of deep vein thrombosis with a single venous access approach in a single session

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoung Ook; Kim, Jae Kyu; Park, Jin Gyoon; Yim, Nam Yeol; Kang, Yang Jun; Jung, Hye Doo

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the efficiency of placing an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter through the same popliteal vein access site used for percutaneous endovenous intervention in patients with extensive lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. METHODS This retrospective study included 21 patients who underwent IVC filter insertion through the popliteal vein over a three-year period. Patient medical records were reviewed for the location of the deep vein thrombosis, result of filter removal, and total number of endovascular procedures needed for filter insertion and recanalization of the lower extremity venous system. Follow-up lower extremity computed tomography (CT) venography was also reviewed in each patient to assess the degree of filter tilt in the IVC. RESULTS All patients had extensive lower extremity deep vein thrombosis involving the iliac vein and/or femoral vein. Seventeen patients showed deep vein thrombosis of the calf veins. In all patients, IVC filter insertion and the recanalization procedure were performed during a single procedure through the single popliteal vein access site. In the 17 patients undergoing follow-up CT, the mean tilt angle of the filter was 7.14°±4.48° in the coronal plane and 8.77°±5.49° in the sagittal plane. Filter retrieval was successful in 16 of 17 patients (94.1%) in whom filter retrieval was attempted. CONCLUSION Transpopliteal IVC filter insertion is an efficient technique that results in low rates of significant filter tilt and enables a single session procedure using a single venous access site for filter insertion and percutaneous endovenous intervention. PMID:27559713

  5. Clinical outcomes and causes of death in Japanese patients with long-term inferior vena cava filter implants and deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Yumiko; Okamoto, Mitsunori; Hashimoto, Masaki; Fukuda, Yukihiro; Uchimura, Yuko; Iwamoto, Akimichi; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Iwasaki, Toshitaka; Kinoshita, Hiroki; Ueda, Hironori; Kihara, Yasuki

    2014-10-01

    We assessed the causes of death and efficacy of permanent inferior vena cava (IVC) filters for preventing new pulmonary embolisms (PE) in Japanese deep vein thrombosis (DVT) patients with or without PE. We studied the clinical outcomes during the follow-up period of 1 day to 9 years (median: 18 months; mean: 28 months) in 66 of 72 consecutive patients (44 with acute PE, 27 with intrapelvic DVT, and 1 with floating femoral vein thrombosis). Fifty of 66 patients received anticoagulant therapy after the filter placement. Five patients died within 1 month (median 9 days) after the filter placement: three from recurrence of PE, one from cancer, and one from sepsis. Two of the three patients with recurrence of PE had preexisting intracardiac thrombi in the right atrium or main pulmonary artery before filter implantation. Ten patients died from the underlying disease (cancer: 7; brain hemorrhage: 1; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: 1; pneumonia: 1) over 1 month after the filter placement (median follow-up period: 21 months). No new symptomatic PE recurrence was observed over 1 month after the filter placement. The 61 patients with long-term follow-up had no deterioration of DVT, and all the 31 patients who underwent multi-slice computed tomography showed no PE recurrence or filter thrombus occlusion, fracture, or migration. Underlying diseases and preexisting intracardiac thrombi may be the determining factors for the prognosis of DVT patients. Permanent IVC filters with anticoagulant therapy may be effective for preventing death from new PE in Japanese DVT patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Evaluation of nonpermanent inferior vena cava filter placement in patients with deep venous thrombosis after lower extremity fracture: A single-center retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ye; Zhao, Jun; Mei, Jiacai; Shao, Mingzhe; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Haisheng

    2016-09-01

    To investigate nonpermanent inferior vena cava (IVC) filter in the prevention of perioperative pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients of lower extremity and/or pelvic bone fracture with deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Lower extremity or pelvic bone fracture patients with lower extremity DVT hospitalized in our hospital from January 2003 to October 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Data was analyzed for age, gender, position of fracture, position of proximal of thrombosis, indications of placement, complications, retrieval rate, and rate of entrapped filter clot. Patients who underwent IVC filter placement were selected as the filter group. The patients who did not perform IVC filter placement after 2008 and the cases between January 2003 and December 2007 were selected as control group 1 and control group 2, respectively. The incidence of perioperative symptomatic PE and mortality were analyzed. A total of 2763 cases complicated with DVT underwent orthopedic surgery between January 2003 and October 2014. 823 nonpermanent filters were inserted. All filters were successfully deployed with no major complications. After a mean 14.2 days indwelling time, all of temporary filters were removed. Retrieval was attempted in 556 patients with retrievable filters and was successful in 545 (98%); mean indwelling time was 16.3 days. The total retrieval rate was 90%. The incidence of PE in the filter group was significantly lower compared with the two control groups. Among the patients who received chemical anticoagulant therapy, the incidence of PE in filter group, control group 1 and control group 2 were 0.14%, 1.60% and 2.10%, respectively. The incidence of PE in filter group was also significant lower compared with control groups. Nonpermanent IVC filter placement seems like to be a safe and effective method for preventing perioperative symptomatic and fatal PE in bone fracture patients with DVT in the present retrospective study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Inferior vena cava filter insertion through the popliteal vein: enabling the percutaneous endovenous intervention of deep vein thrombosis with a single venous access approach in a single session.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung Ook; Kim, Jae Kyu; Park, Jin Gyoon; Yim, Nam Yeol; Kang, Yang Jun; Jung, Hye Doo

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the efficiency of placing an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter through the same popliteal vein access site used for percutaneous endovenous intervention in patients with extensive lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. This retrospective study included 21 patients who underwent IVC filter insertion through the popliteal vein over a three-year period. Patient medical records were reviewed for the location of the deep vein thrombosis, result of filter removal, and total number of endovascular procedures needed for filter insertion and recanalization of the lower extremity venous system. Follow-up lower extremity computed tomography (CT) venography was also reviewed in each patient to assess the degree of filter tilt in the IVC. All patients had extensive lower extremity deep vein thrombosis involving the iliac vein and/or femoral vein. Seventeen patients showed deep vein thrombosis of the calf veins. In all patients, IVC filter insertion and the recanalization procedure were performed during a single procedure through the single popliteal vein access site. In the 17 patients undergoing follow-up CT, the mean tilt angle of the filter was 7.14°±4.48° in the coronal plane and 8.77°±5.49° in the sagittal plane. Filter retrieval was successful in 16 of 17 patients (94.1%) in whom filter retrieval was attempted. Transpopliteal IVC filter insertion is an efficient technique that results in low rates of significant filter tilt and enables a single session procedure using a single venous access site for filter insertion and percutaneous endovenous intervention.

  8. Creation of an iOS and Android Mobile Application for Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) Filters: A Powerful Tool to Optimize Care of Patients with IVC Filters

    PubMed Central

    Deso, Steven E.; Idakoji, Ibrahim A.; Muelly, Michael C.; Kuo, William T.

    2016-01-01

    Owing to a myriad of inferior vena cava (IVC) filter types and their potential complications, rapid and correct identification may be challenging when encountered on routine imaging. The authors aimed to develop an interactive mobile application that allows recognition of all IVC filters and related complications, to optimize the care of patients with indwelling IVC filters. The FDA Premarket Notification Database was queried from 1980 to 2014 to identify all IVC filter types in the United States. An electronic search was then performed on MEDLINE and the FDA MAUDE database to identify all reported complications associated with each device. High-resolution photos were taken of each filter type and corresponding computed tomographic and fluoroscopic images were obtained from an institutional review board–approved IVC filter registry. A wireframe and storyboard were created, and software was developed using HTML5/CSS compliant code. The software was deployed using PhoneGap (Adobe, San Jose, CA), and the prototype was tested and refined. Twenty-three IVC filter types were identified for inclusion. Safety data from FDA MAUDE and 72 relevant peer-reviewed studies were acquired, and complication rates for each filter type were highlighted in the application. Digital photos, fluoroscopic images, and CT DICOM files were seamlessly incorporated. All data were succinctly organized electronically, and the software was successfully deployed into Android (Google, Mountain View, CA) and iOS (Apple, Cupertino, CA) platforms. A powerful electronic mobile application was successfully created to allow rapid identification of all IVC filter types and related complications. This application may be used to optimize the care of patients with IVC filters. PMID:27247483

  9. Creation of an iOS and Android Mobile Application for Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) Filters: A Powerful Tool to Optimize Care of Patients with IVC Filters.

    PubMed

    Deso, Steven E; Idakoji, Ibrahim A; Muelly, Michael C; Kuo, William T

    2016-06-01

    Owing to a myriad of inferior vena cava (IVC) filter types and their potential complications, rapid and correct identification may be challenging when encountered on routine imaging. The authors aimed to develop an interactive mobile application that allows recognition of all IVC filters and related complications, to optimize the care of patients with indwelling IVC filters. The FDA Premarket Notification Database was queried from 1980 to 2014 to identify all IVC filter types in the United States. An electronic search was then performed on MEDLINE and the FDA MAUDE database to identify all reported complications associated with each device. High-resolution photos were taken of each filter type and corresponding computed tomographic and fluoroscopic images were obtained from an institutional review board-approved IVC filter registry. A wireframe and storyboard were created, and software was developed using HTML5/CSS compliant code. The software was deployed using PhoneGap (Adobe, San Jose, CA), and the prototype was tested and refined. Twenty-three IVC filter types were identified for inclusion. Safety data from FDA MAUDE and 72 relevant peer-reviewed studies were acquired, and complication rates for each filter type were highlighted in the application. Digital photos, fluoroscopic images, and CT DICOM files were seamlessly incorporated. All data were succinctly organized electronically, and the software was successfully deployed into Android (Google, Mountain View, CA) and iOS (Apple, Cupertino, CA) platforms. A powerful electronic mobile application was successfully created to allow rapid identification of all IVC filter types and related complications. This application may be used to optimize the care of patients with IVC filters.

  10. Indications, complications, and management of inferior vena cava filters: the experience in 952 patients at an academic hospital with a level I trauma center.

    PubMed

    Sarosiek, Shayna; Crowther, Mark; Sloan, J Mark

    2013-04-08

    Retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filters were designed to provide temporary protection from pulmonary embolism, sparing patients from long-term complications of permanent filters. However, many retrievable IVC filters are left in place indefinitely. To review the medical records of patients with IVC filters to determine patient demographics and date of and indication for IVC filter placement, as well as complications, follow-up data, date of IVC filter retrieval, and use of anticoagulant therapy. A retrospective review of IVC filter use between August 1, 2003, and February 28, 2011, was conducted at Boston Medical Center, a tertiary referral center with the largest trauma center in New England. In total, 978 patients. Twenty six patients were excluded from the study because of incomplete medical records. Placement of retrievable IVC filter. In total, 952 medical records were included in the analysis. Of 679 retrievable IVC filters that were placed, 58 (8.5%) were successfully removed. Unsuccessful retrieval attempts were made in 13 patients (18.3% of attempts). Seventy-four venous thrombotic events (7.8% of 952 patients included in the study) occurred after IVC filter placement, including 25 pulmonary emboli, all of which occurred with the IVC filter in place. Forty-eight percent of venous thrombotic events were in patients without venous thromboembolism at the time of IVC filter placement, and 89.4% occurred in patients not receiving anticoagulants. Many IVC filters placed after trauma were inserted when the highest bleeding risk had subsided, and anticoagulant therapy may have been appropriate. While many of these filters were placed because of a perceived contraindication to anticoagulants, 237 patients (24.9%) were discharged on a regimen of anticoagulant therapy. Our research suggests that the use of IVC filters for prophylaxis and treatment of venous thrombotic events, combined with a low retrieval rate and inconsistent use of anticoagulant therapy

  11. Outcome of Resection and Chemotherapy versus Chemotherapy Alone for Retroperitoneal Recurrence of Testicular Cancer Involving the Inferior Vena Cava: A Retrospective Cohort Study of 22 Consecutive Patients.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; Calio, Francesco G; Angelici, Alberto M; Pizzardi, Giulia; Pasqua, Rocco; Masci, Federica; Vietri, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    Optimal treatment strategy for retroperitoneal recurrence of testicular cancer involving the inferior vena cava (IVC) is uncertain. The purpose of this study was to validate the hypothesis that surgical resection, en-bloc with the involved segment of IVC and its subsequent reconstruction followed by chemotherapy, would yield better oncologic results than chemotherapy alone. Two consecutive series of patients with retroperitoneal recurrence of testicular cancer involving the IVC, treated with surgical resection plus chemotherapy (group A, n=14) or chemotherapy alone (group B, n=8) were retrospectively reviewed. The mean duration of follow-up was was 65 months (range=8-184). Operative mortality and morbidity in group A, response to chemotherapy in group B, disease-specific survival and quality adjusted life-years (QALY) for both groups, were primary end-points of the study. Postoperative mortality and morbidity (group A) were, respectively, nil and 14%. In group B, two patients (25%) fully responded to chemotherapy and remained free from disease progression. Disease-specific survival at 3 and 5 years was 81% and 54% in group A and 36% in group B both at 3 and 5 years, respectively (p=0.02). QALY was 3.92 in group A and 0.77 for both 3 and 5 years in group B, respectively, (p=0.031). En bloc resection of retroperitoneal recurrence of testicular tumors invading the IVC, followed by chemotherapy, allows a better survival rate compared to chemotherapy alone. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  12. Use of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Based Measurements of Inferior Vena Cava Cross-Sectional Area in the Diagnosis of Pericardial Constriction.

    PubMed

    Hanneman, Kate; Thavendiranathan, Paaladinesh; Nguyen, Elsie T; Moshonov, Hadas; Wald, Rachel; Connelly, Kim A; Paul, Narinder S; Wintersperger, Bernd J; Crean, Andrew M

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the value of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based measurements of inferior vena cava (IVC) cross-sectional area in the diagnosis of pericardial constriction. Patients who had undergone cardiac MRI for evaluation of clinically suspected pericardial constriction were identified retrospectively. The diagnosis of pericardial constriction was established by clinical history, echocardiography, cardiac catheterization, intraoperative findings, and/or histopathology. Cross-sectional areas of the suprahepatic IVC and descending aorta were measured on a single axial steady-state free-precession (SSFP) image at the level of the esophageal hiatus in end-systole. Logistic regression and receiver-operating curve (ROC) analyses were performed. Thirty-six patients were included; 50% (n = 18) had pericardial constriction. Mean age was 53.9 ± 15.3 years, and 72% (n = 26) were male. IVC area, ratio of IVC to aortic area, pericardial thickness, and presence of respirophasic septal shift were all significantly different between patients with constriction and those without (P < .001 for all). IVC to aortic area ratio had the highest odds ratio for the prediction of constriction (1070, 95% confidence interval [8.0-143051], P = .005). ROC analysis illustrated that IVC to aortic area ratio discriminated between those with and without constriction with an area under the curve of 0.96 (95% confidence interval [0.91-1.00]). In patients referred for cardiac MRI assessment of suspected pericardial constriction, measurement of suprahepatic IVC cross-sectional area may be useful in confirming the diagnosis of constriction when used in combination with other imaging findings, including pericardial thickness and respirophasic septal shift. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Renal cell carcinoma and tumour thrombus in the inferior vena cava: clinical outcome of 98 consecutive patients and the prognostic value of preoperative parameters.

    PubMed

    Niedworok, Christian; Dörrenhaus, Bettina; Vom Dorp, Frank; Piotrowski, Jarowit Adam; Tschirdewahn, Stephan; Szarvas, Tibor; Rübben, Herbert; Schenck, Marcus

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the outcome of patients after nephrectomy and removal of tumour thrombus and to assess the prognostic value of preoperative parameters. Ninety-eight patients who were surgically treated between 2002 and 2011 were included. Patients' charts were reviewed, and patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and concomitant tumour thrombus in the renal vein (RV) were compared with those with extended inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombus. Wilcoxon rank-sum test, Kaplan-Meier analysis and uni- and multivariate Cox regression analysis were used for statistical evaluation. Follow-up was 36 months (20-122 months), and 5-year disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival were 68.4 and 54.1 %, respectively. Patients with extended thrombus (levels 2-4) had higher intraoperative transfusion rates of concentrated red cells (CRC) and fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) compared with patients with thrombus confined to the RV (CRC: 5.8 vs. 1.5, p < 0.0001; FFP: 2.3 vs. 0.4, p = 0.0032). Surgery time (190 vs. 107 min, p < 0.0001), duration of hospitalisation (16 vs. 11 days, p = 0.0269), serum phosphate (3.64 vs. 3.29 mmol/l, p = 0.0369) and CRP levels (6.7 vs. 4.4 mg/dl, p = 0.0194) as well as aPTT were increased (33.7 vs. 29.6 s, p = 0.0059) in extended thrombus disease. In multivariate analysis, the presence of distant metastasis (p = 0.03) and lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.001), high platelet counts (p = 0.001) and high serum potassium levels (p = 0.032) proved to be independent prognostic factors. The surgical treatment of RCC with tumour thrombus in the RV or IVC has favourable results. Extended thrombus disease requires multidisciplinary approach. High serum potassium levels and platelet counts are associated with reduced DSS.

  14. The use of biological grafts for reconstruction of the inferior vena cava is a safe and valid alternative: results in 32 patients in a single institution

    PubMed Central

    Pulitanó, Carlo; Crawford, Michael; Ho, Phong; Gallagher, James; Joseph, David; Stephen, Michael; Sandroussi, Charbel

    2013-01-01

    Background Resection and reconstruction of the inferior vena cava (IVC) is occasionally required in the surgical treatment of intra-abdominal tumours. IVC reconstruction can be performed with biological or synthetic graft material, with most centres preferring synthetic grafts. In spite of the potential advantages of biological grafts in terms of handling characteristics, and safety, very limited data are available about their use in patients requiring an IVC resection. Methods Medical records of 32 patients who underwent an IVC resection and reconstruction from 1990 and 2011 with autogenous peritoneo-fascial (N = 22) and bovine pericardial (N = 10) grafts were reviewed. Results A tangential resection with patch repair was performed in 10 patients, whereas in the remaining 22 it was necessary to resect and replace a segment or all of the retrohepatic IVC. A concomitant liver resection was performed in 14 patients, nephrectomy in 10 and pancreaticoduodenectomy in 2 patients. There were no acute or late complications related to graft thrombosis or infection. Three patients died as a consequence of multi-organ failure. Overall survival at 1 and 5 years was 78% and 48%, respectively. Conclusions The preferential use of synthetic grafts in IVC replacement is not evidence based. Selection of an appropriate prosthetic graft for IVC reconstruction should be based on the safety and its handling features. The use of biological grafts for IVC repair is a valid alternative to current synthetic materials and may in fact be superior in terms of biocompatability, ease of handling, reduced rate of infection and improved long-term patency without permanent anticoagulation. PMID:23458108

  15. Use of ultrasound measurement of the inferior vena cava diameter as an objective tool in the assessment of children with clinical dehydration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Kim, Yunie; Santucci, Karen A

    2007-10-01

    Bedside ultrasonography (US) measurement of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and aorta (Ao) may be useful in objectively assessing children with dehydration. The objectives of this study were 1) to compare the IVC and Ao diameters (IVC/Ao) ratio of dehydrated children with controls and 2) to compare the IVC/Ao ratio before and after intravenous (i.v.) rehydration in children with dehydration. This prospective observational study was performed in an urban pediatric emergency department. Children between 6 months and 16 years of age with clinical evidence of dehydration were enrolled. Bedside US measurements of the IVC and Ao were taken before and immediately after i.v. fluids were administered. An age-, gender-, and weight-matched control without dehydration was enrolled for each subject. The IVC/Ao ratios of subjects and controls were compared using Wilcoxon signed rank test, as were the ratios before and after i.v. hydration for each subject. Thirty-six pairs of subjects and matched controls were enrolled. The IVC/Ao ratios in the subjects were lower as compared with controls (mean of 0.75 vs. 1.01), with a mean difference of 0.26 (95% confidence interval = 0.18 to 0.35). In subjects, the IVC/Ao ratios were significantly lower before i.v. hydration (mean of 0.75 vs. 1.09), with a mean difference of 0.34 (95% confidence interval = 0.29 to 0.39). As measured by bedside US measurement, the IVC/Ao ratio is lower in children clinically assessed to be dehydrated. Furthermore, it increases with administration of i.v. fluid boluses.

  16. Establishment of an inferior vena cava filter database and interventional radiology led follow-up - retrieval rates and patients lost to follow-up.

    PubMed

    Klinken, Sven; Humphries, Charlotte; Ferguson, John

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the rates of inferior vena cava (IVC) filter retrieval and the number of patient's lost to follow-up, before and after the establishment of an IVC filter database and interventional radiology (inserting physician) led follow-up. On the 1st of June 2012, an electronic interventional radiology database was established at our Institution. In addition, the interventional radiology team took responsibility for follow-up of IVC filters. Data were prospectively collected from the database for all patients who had an IVC filter inserted between the 1st June 2012 and the 31st May 2014. Data on patients who had an IVC filter inserted between the 1st of June 2009 to the 31st of May 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographics, insertion indications, filter types, retrieval status, documented retrieval decisions, time in situ, trackable events and complications were obtained in the pre-database (n = 136) and post-database (n = 118) cohorts. Attempted IVC filter retrieval rates were improved from 52.9% to 72.9% (P = 0.001) following the establishment of the database. The number of patients with no documented decision (lost to follow-up) regarding their IVC filter reduced from 31 of 136 (23%) to 0 of 118 patients (P = < 0.001). There was a non-significant reduction in IVC filter dwell time in the post-database group (113 as compared to 137 days, P = 0.129). Following the establishment of an IVC filter database and interventional radiology led follow-up, we demonstrate a significant improvement in the attempted retrieval rates of IVC filters and the number of patient's lost to follow-up. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  17. Complications of Celect, Günther tulip, and Greenfield inferior vena cava filters on CT follow-up: a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    McLoney, Eric D; Krishnasamy, Venkatesh P; Castle, Jordan C; Yang, Xiangyu; Guy, Gregory

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate and compare the rates of complications on follow-up computed tomography (CT) studies of patients with Celect, Günther Tulip, and Greenfield inferior vena cava (IVC) filters. Retrospective review of CT studies obtained 0-1,987 days after infrarenal placement of an IVC filter identified 255 Celect, 160 Tulip, and 50 Greenfield filters. Follow-up CT studies were independently evaluated by two observers for IVC perforation, contact with adjacent organs, and filter fracture. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify factors associated with higher rates of IVC perforation, including age, IVC diameter, sex, and history of malignancy. IVC perforation was observed in 126 of 255 Celect filters (49%) with a mean follow-up of 277 days, 69 of 160 Tulip filters (43%) with a mean follow-up of 437 days, and one of 50 Greenfield filters (2%) with a mean follow-up of 286 days. A significantly higher IVC perforation rate was observed in women (45.5%) compared with men (30.8%; P = .002) and in patients with a history of malignancy (43.7%) compared with patients with no history of malignancy (29.9%; P < .001). Filter fracture was rare, observed in two of 255 Celect filters (0.8%), one of 160 Tulip filters (0.6%), and none of 50 Greenfield filters. No significant difference was observed in IVC perforation rate between Celect and Tulip filters. Greenfield filters had a significantly lower rate of IVC perforation than Celect and Tulip filters. Higher IVC perforation rates were observed in women and patients with a history of malignancy. © SIR, 2013.

  18. Platelets, glycoprotein Ib-IX, and von Willebrand factor are required for FeCl3-induced occlusive thrombus formation in the inferior vena cava of mice

    PubMed Central

    Joglekar, M.; Ware, Jerry; Xu, Jin; Fitzgerald, Malinda E. C.; Gartner, T. Kent

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a leading cause of death from cardiovascular disease. Despite the importance of the glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX/von Willebrand factor (vWF) axis in arterial thrombosis, its requirement in venous, not venule thrombosis in response to endothelial injury (not stenosis or stasis) is uncharacterized. GPIbα-vWF participation in FeCl3-induced thrombus formation was evaluated in the inferior vena cava (IVC). Stable, occlusive thrombus formation in response to FeCl3-induced injury of the IVC was studied. FeCl3 (20% FeCl3, 10 minutes)-induced occlusive thrombosis required platelets as confirmed by a lack of occlusion in thrombocytopenic mice, and stable occlusion in control animals. No IVC occlusion was observed using GPIbα-deficient animals, a model of the human Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSS). Transgenic IL-4R/GPIbα mice (lack murine GPIbα, but express the extracellular domain of the human interleukin (IL)-4 receptor fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of human GPIbα), were studied to determine if the absence of IVC occlusion in the BSS mouse was caused by GPIbα extracellular domain deficiency rather than platelet BSS phenotype associated abnormalities. As with GPIbα knock-out (KO) mice, no occlusion was observed in the IVC of IL-4R/GPIbα mice. The IVC of vWF-deficient mice also failed to occlude in response to FeCl3 treatment. The chimeric protein GPIbα(2V)-Fc prevented occlusion, demonstrating that GPIbα-vWF A1 domain interaction is required for FeCl3-induced stable thrombus formation in the IVC. Therefore, FeCl3-induced stable, occlusive thrombus formation in the IVC is platelet, GPIbα-vWF interaction-dependent despite the large diameter and low venous flow rate in the IVC. PMID:22720736

  19. Superior Vena Cava Obstruction Complicated by Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis: A Novel Endovascular Approach.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Mohamed; Patel, Neeral; Moser, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Superior vena cava obstruction (SVCO) and associated thrombus formation can occur in patients with upper mediastinal or right apical masses. While stenting is useful in relieving obstruction, it can facilitate the passage of upper extremity deep vein thrombus to the pulmonary arterial tree, resulting in a potentially fatal pulmonary embolism (PE). We present a case that illustrates a novel technique, which protects the patient from PE while also relieving the SVCO. This involves placing an inferior vena cava filter in an inverted position within a superior vena cava (SVC) stent to capture emboli. This procedure offers a potentially lifesaving endovascular therapeutic option to patients who would otherwise be deemed unsuitable for SVC stenting.

  20. Greenfield filter fixation in large venae cavae.

    PubMed

    Savin, M A; Shlansky-Goldberg, R D

    1998-01-01

    It is generally thought that the Greenfield filter should not be placed in inferior venae cavae (IVCs) that are larger than 28 mm in diameter because of its base diameter. However, the newer versions have larger base diameters. The purpose of this study was to evaluate fixation of the three currently available Greenfield filters in large IVCs. Filter fixation was tested in an ex vivo perfusion system with a 34-mm-diameter equine IVC. Greenfield filters with base diameters of 30 mm (original 24-F version [24-F GF]), 38 mm (percutaneous titanium [TGF]), and 32 mm (percutaneous stainless steel [SGF]) were deployed. Increasing force was then applied in a cephalic direction and the resultant movement was measured. In a 34-mm-diameter IVC, the TGF and SGF demonstrated significantly less movement than did the 24-F GF (P < .001). None of the TGFs or SGFs moved above the renal veins with a 480-g pull. Three of the seven 24-F GFs moved above the renal veins at 30 g. No significant difference in fixation was demonstrated between the TGF and the SGF (P = .6). In a 34-mm-diameter IVC, fixation of the TGF and SGF was significantly better than the 24-F GF. The TGF and SGF may not be subject to the same 28-mm-diameter IVC size limitation as the 24-F GF.

  1. Retrievable Filter Update: The Denali Vena Cava Filter.

    PubMed

    Hahn, David

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a gradual evolution of the retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter, as the indications for caval filtration have expanded since the first such filters came into use. However, the particular design of retrievable or optional filters has introduced a subset of both symptomatic and asymptomatic device failures that have prompted a reassessment in the approach to patient selection as well as a new lexicon of technical considerations when considering retrieval. The Denali Vena Cava Filter (Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc., Tempe, AZ) represents one of the latest filters to come to market that specifically addresses the various issues of its predecessors. While the body of published experience with this filter is still relatively sparse, the incidence of filter tilt, strut perforation, strut fracture, and filter migration appears acceptably low and the filters remain relatively easy to retrieve even after long dwell times.

  2. Retrievable Filter Update: The Denali Vena Cava Filter

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, David

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a gradual evolution of the retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter, as the indications for caval filtration have expanded since the first such filters came into use. However, the particular design of retrievable or optional filters has introduced a subset of both symptomatic and asymptomatic device failures that have prompted a reassessment in the approach to patient selection as well as a new lexicon of technical considerations when considering retrieval. The Denali Vena Cava Filter (Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc., Tempe, AZ) represents one of the latest filters to come to market that specifically addresses the various issues of its predecessors. While the body of published experience with this filter is still relatively sparse, the incidence of filter tilt, strut perforation, strut fracture, and filter migration appears acceptably low and the filters remain relatively easy to retrieve even after long dwell times. PMID:26622101

  3. Modeling Flow Past a Tilted Vena Cava Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, M A; Wang, S L

    2009-06-29

    Inferior vena cava filters are medical devices used to prevent pulmonary embolism (PE) from deep vein thrombosis. In particular, retrievable filters are well-suited for patients who are unresponsive to anticoagulation therapy and whose risk of PE decreased with time. The goal of this work is to use computational fluid dynamics to evaluate the flow past an unoccluded and partially occluded Celect inferior vena cava filter. In particular, the hemodynamic response to thrombus volume and filter tilt is examined, and the results are compared with flow conditions that are known to be thrombogenic. A computer model of the filter inside a model vena cava is constructed using high resolution digital photographs and methods of computer aided design. The models are parameterized using the Overture software framework, and a collection of overlapping grids is constructed to discretize the flow domain. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved, and the characteristics of the flow (i.e., velocity contours and wall shear stresses) are computed. The volume of stagnant and recirculating flow increases with thrombus volume. In addition, as the filter increases tilt, the cava wall adjacent to the tilted filter is subjected to low velocity flow that gives rise to regions of low wall shear stress. The results demonstrate the ease of IVC filter modeling with the Overture software framework. Flow conditions caused by the tilted Celect filter may elevate the risk of intrafilter thrombosis and facilitate vascular remodeling. This latter condition also increases the risk of penetration and potential incorporation of the hook of the filter into the vena caval wall, thereby complicating filter retrieval. Consequently, severe tilt at the time of filter deployment may warrant early clinical intervention.

  4. Factors Associated with Advanced Inferior Vena Cava Filter Removals: A Single-Center Retrospective Study of 203 Patients Over 7 Years

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, Joshua D. Wagner, Daniel Elliott, Eric; Yildiz, Vedat O. Pan, Xueliang

    2016-02-15

    PurposeTo identify factors associated with advanced inferior vena cava filter (IVCF) retrieval to raise awareness on technical considerations, retrieval efficiency, and patient safety.Materials and MethodsA single-center retrospective review was performed of 203 consecutive retrievable IVC filters placed between 2007 and 2014. Attempted retrievals were classified as advanced if the routine “snare and sheath” technique was initially unsuccessful after multiple attempts, or an alternate endovascular maneuver or access site was utilized. Patient and filter characteristics were recorded.Results203 attempted retrievals were reviewed (48.7 % male, 51.2 % female, mean age 52.7 years, mean dwell time 109 days). Advanced retrievals were observed in 20 patients (9.8 %) (15 females, 5 males). Fluoroscopy time (p ≤ 0.01, 34.3 ± 21.1 and 5.3 ± 4.5 min for advanced retrievals and routine retrievals respectively, same below), gender (p = 0.031), and retrieval tilt angle (p ≤ 0.01, 5.7 ± 5.10° vs. 11.9 ± 11.03°) were associated with advanced retrievals. Females were 3.16 times more likely to have an advanced retrieval performed than males with a significantly higher tilt angle in those with advanced retrieval. History of cancer (p = 0.502), dwell time (p = 0.916), retrieval caval diameter (p = 0.053), placement caval diameter (p = 0.365), filter type (p = 0.710), strut perforation (p = 0.506), placement tilt angle (p = 0.311), and age (p = 0.558) were not found significantly associated with advanced retrievals.ConclusionsWomen are at increased risk for advanced filter retrieval secondary to a significant change in filter tilt over time compared to men, independent of filter type or competing demographic or filter risks, likely placing them at increased risk for higher procedural fluoroscopy times.

  5. Factors Associated with Advanced Inferior Vena Cava Filter Removals: A Single-Center Retrospective Study of 203 Patients Over 7 Years.

    PubMed

    Dowell, Joshua D; Wagner, Daniel; Elliott, Eric; Yildiz, Vedat O; Pan, Xueliang

    2016-02-01

    To identify factors associated with advanced inferior vena cava filter (IVCF) retrieval to raise awareness on technical considerations, retrieval efficiency, and patient safety. A single-center retrospective review was performed of 203 consecutive retrievable IVC filters placed between 2007 and 2014. Attempted retrievals were classified as advanced if the routine "snare and sheath" technique was initially unsuccessful after multiple attempts, or an alternate endovascular maneuver or access site was utilized. Patient and filter characteristics were recorded. 203 attempted retrievals were reviewed (48.7 % male, 51.2 % female, mean age 52.7 years, mean dwell time 109 days). Advanced retrievals were observed in 20 patients (9.8 %) (15 females, 5 males). Fluoroscopy time (p ≤ 0.01, 34.3 ± 21.1 and 5.3 ± 4.5 min for advanced retrievals and routine retrievals respectively, same below), gender (p = 0.031), and retrieval tilt angle (p ≤ 0.01, 5.7 ± 5.10° vs. 11.9 ± 11.03°) were associated with advanced retrievals. Females were 3.16 times more likely to have an advanced retrieval performed than males with a significantly higher tilt angle in those with advanced retrieval. History of cancer (p = 0.502), dwell time (p = 0.916), retrieval caval diameter (p = 0.053), placement caval diameter (p = 0.365), filter type (p = 0.710), strut perforation (p = 0.506), placement tilt angle (p = 0.311), and age (p = 0.558) were not found significantly associated with advanced retrievals. Women are at increased risk for advanced filter retrieval secondary to a significant change in filter tilt over time compared to men, independent of filter type or competing demographic or filter risks, likely placing them at increased risk for higher procedural fluoroscopy times.

  6. A comparison of treatment combinations with and without radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein and/or inferior vena cava tumor thrombus

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Zhaochong . E-mail: zczeng@zshospital.net; Fan Jia; Tang Zhaoyou; Zhou Jian; Qin Lunxiu; Wang Jianhua; Sun Huichuan; Wang Binliang; Zhang Jianying; Jiang Guoliang; Wang Yuqi

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential role of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in the treatment of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who have portal vein (PV) and/or inferior vena cava (IVC) tumor thrombi. Methods and materials: One hundred fifty-eight patients with HCC who had PV and/or IVC tumor thrombus were reviewed and analyzed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analysis. Forty-four patients with HCC who received local limited EBRT (in addition to other treatment modalities) were classified as the EBRT group. The total radiation dose was 36-60 Gy (median, 50 Gy) and was focused on the tumor thrombi. One hundred fourteen patients with HCC who did not receive EBRT were selected from hospitalized patients with HCC who had PV and/or IVC thrombi during the same period; these were classified as the non-EBRT group, and their intrahepatic tumors were treated with transarterial chemoembolization or resection, on the basis of the patients' status. Parameters observed included survival rates and the tumor thrombus response to EBRT as seen on CT scan or MRI. Results: Of the 44 patients who received EBRT, 15 (34.1%) showed complete disappearance of tumor thrombi, 5 (11.4%) were in partial remission, 23 (52.3%) were stable in their tumor thrombi, and 1 (2.3%) showed disease progression at the end of the study period. The median survival was 8 months, and the 1-year survival rate was 34.8% in the EBRT group. In the non-EBRT group, the median survival and 1-year survival rates were 4 months and 11.4%, respectively. In stepwise multivariate analysis, EBRT showed a strongly protective value (relative risk = 0.324, p < 0.001). Survival was not related to intrahepatic tumor status in the non-EBRT patients. However, in the EBRT group, poorer prognosis was significantly related to intrahepatic multifocal or diffusion lesions, and the most common reason for death was liver failure caused by uncontrolled intrahepatic disease. Conclusion: Although EBRT is palliative in

  7. Long-term Outcomes of Percutaneous Venoplasty and Gianturco Stent Placement to Treat Obstruction of the Inferior Vena Cava Complicating Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Jonathan M. Beek, Darren van; Funaki, Brian; Ha, Thuong G. Van; Zangan, Stephen; Navuluri, Rakesh; Leef, Jeffery A.

    2013-05-11

    PurposeEvaluation of long-term outcomes of venoplasty and Gianturco stents to treat inferior vena cava (IVC) obstruction after liver transplantation.MethodsWe retrospectively analyzed records from 33 consecutive adult patients referred with the intent to treat suspected IVC obstruction after liver transplantation. Treatment was performed for occlusion or stenosis with a gradient exceeding 3 mmHg. The primary treatment was venoplasty and, if refractory, Gianturco stent placement. Recurrence prompted repeat venoplasty or stent placement.ResultsOf the 33 patients, 25 (aged 46.9 ± 12.2 years) required treatment at a mean of 2.3 years (14 days to 20.3 years) after transplantation. For technically successful cases, primary treatment was venoplasty alone (14) or with stent placement (10). Technical success was 96 % (24 of 25) reflecting failure to cross one occlusion. Clinical success was 88 % (22 of 25) reflecting the technical failure and two that died of unrelated complications within 5 weeks. Cumulative primary patencies were 57.1 % at 6 months (n = 21) and 51.4 % at 1 (n = 10), 3 (n = 7), 5 (n = 6), and 7 (n = 5) years. Cumulative primary assisted patency was 95.2 % at 6 months (n = 21) and at 1 (n = 15), 3 (n = 9), 5 (n = 8), and 7 (n = 8) years. The 17 patients stented for refractory (n = 10) or recurrent (n = 7) stenosis had cumulative primary and primary assisted patencies of 86.0 and 100 %, respectively, from 6 months (n = 14) to 7 years (n = 3). No major complications occurred; one fractured stent was observed after 11.6 years.ConclusionFor IVC obstruction following liver transplantation, excellent long-term outcomes can be achieved by venoplasty and Gianturco stent placement.

  8. Usefulness of Serial Measurements of Inferior Vena Cava Diameter by Vscan(TM) to Identify Patients With Heart Failure at High Risk of Hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Khandwalla, Raj M; Birkeland, Kade T; Zimmer, Raymond; Henry, Timothy D; Nazarian, Roland; Sudan, Madhuri; Mirocha, James; Cha, Jeena; Kedan, Ilan

    2017-05-15

    Estimation of volume status is integral to heart failure (HF) management. Measurement of inferior vena cava (IVC) diameter (IVCd) by ultrasound provides a noninvasive estimate of right atrial pressures. The GE Vscan is a handheld ultrasound (HHU) device that allows for point-of-care measurements to assess volume status. We hypothesize that IVCd measurements using HHU can predict the risk of HF admission. We retrospectively analyzed a cohort of patients with HF treated in an ambulatory care setting over 17 months. Serial measurements of IVCd were obtained using HHU in the supine position from the subcostal window. Log-binomial regression models were used to compare IVCd measurements between patients with and without HF admissions and to estimate the association between IVCd and risk of HF admission. Of the 355 patients with systolic (38%) and diastolic HF (62%) who were analyzed, 45% were women with a mean age of 73 years at the time of the first IVCd measurement. Overall, 3,488 measurements were obtained, and 32.4% of patients were hospitalized during follow-up. Patients with at least 1 hospital admission had a greater mean IVCd than those who were not admitted (2.0 vs 1.8 cm, p <0.01). In our analysis, every 0.5-cm increase in the mean IVCd was associated with a 38% increase in risk of HF admission (risk ratio [RR] 1.38, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.62, p <0.01). The risk of HF admission was also significantly increased in patients with IVCd 2.0 to 2.49 cm (RR 1.79, 95% CI 1.27 to 2.52, p <0.01) and ≥2.5 cm (RR 2.39, 95% CI 1.55 to 3.67, p <0.01), compared with patients with an IVCd < 2.0 cm. Increasing IVCd as measured by HHU at the point-of-care is associated with an increased risk of HF admission and may provide clinically useful information at the point-of-care to guide HF management. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical and radiographic predictors of the need for inferior vena cava resection during nephrectomy for patients with renal cell carcinoma and caval tumour thrombus.

    PubMed

    Psutka, Sarah P; Boorjian, Stephen A; Thompson, Robert H; Schmit, Grant D; Schmitz, John J; Bower, Thomas C; Stewart, Suzanne B; Lohse, Christine M; Cheville, John C; Leibovich, Bradley C

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the clinical and radiographic predictors of the need for partial or circumferential resection of the inferior vena cava (IVC) requiring complex vascular reconstruction during venous tumour thrombectomy for renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Data were collected on 172 patients with RCC and IVC (levels I-IV) venous tumour thrombus who underwent radical nephrectomy with tumour thrombectomy at the Mayo Clinic between 2000 and 2010. Preoperative imaging was re-reviewed by one of two radiologists blinded to details of the patient's surgical procedure. Univariable and multivariable associations of clinical and radiographic features with IVC resection were evaluated by logistic regression. A secondary analysis was used to assess the ability of the model to predict histological invasion of the IVC by the tumour thrombus. Of the 172 patients, 38 (22%) underwent IVC resection procedures during nephrectomy. Optimum radiographic thresholds were determined to predict the need for IVC resection based on preoperative imaging included a renal vein diameter at the renal vein ostium (RVo) of 15.5 mm, maximum anterior-posterior (AP) diameter of the IVC of 34.0 mm and AP and coronal diameters of the IVC at the RVo of 24 and 19 mm, respectively. On multivariable analysis, the presence of a right-sided tumour (odds ratio 3.3; P = 0.017), an AP diameter of the IVC at the RVo of ≥24.0 mm (odds ratio 4.4; P = 0.017), and radiographic identification of complete occlusion of the IVC at the RVo (odds ratio 4.9; P < 0.001) were associated with a significantly increased risk of IVC resection. The c-index for the model was 0.81. We present a multivariable model of the radiographic features associated with the need for IVC resection during tumour thrombectomy. Pending external validation, this model may be used for preoperative planning, patient counselling and planned involvement of vascular surgical colleagues in anticipation of the need for complex vascular repair. © 2015 The Authors

  10. Outcome of operation in patients with adrenocortical cancer invading the inferior vena cava--a European Society of Endocrine Surgeons (ESES) survey.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Radu; Iacobone, Maurizio; Makay, Ozer; Moreno, Pablo; Frilling, Andrea; Kraimps, Jean-Louis; Soriano, Arturo; Villar del Moral, Jesús; Barczynski, Marcin; Durán, Manuel C; Sadler, Gregory P; Niederle, Bruno; Dralle, Henning; Harrison, Barney; Carnaille, Bruno

    2012-02-01

    Most patients with adrenocortical cancer (ACC) continue to present with advanced disease. Invasion into the inferior vena cava (IVC) defines stage III disease and the management of such patients raises additional difficulties. A multicentre survey was organized by emailing a standardized proforma to members of the European Society of Endocrine Surgery (ESES). Anonymised retrospective clinical data were collected. Replies were received from 18 centres in nine countries. ACC with IVC invasion was encountered in 38 patients (18F:20M, age 15-84 years, median 54 years). There were 16 nonfunctioning tumours and 22 functioning tumours predominantly right-sided (26R:12L) and measuring 18-255 mm (median 115 mm). Fourteen patients had metastatic disease at presentation. Tumour thrombus extended in the prehepatic IVC (n = 21), subdiaphragmatic IVC (n = 6) or into the SVC/right atrium (n = 3). Open adrenalectomy was associated with resection of surrounding viscera in 24 patients (nephrectomy n = 16, liver resection n = 14, splenectomy n = 3, Whipple procedure n = 2). IVC was controlled locally (n = 27), at suprahepatic levels (n = 6) or necessitated cardiac bypass (n = 5). Complete resection (R0, n = 20) was achieved in the majority of patients, with a minority having microscopic persistent disease (R1, n = 7) or macroscopic residual disease (R2, n = 4). Perioperative 30-day mortality was 13% (n = 5). Postoperative Mitotane was used in 23 patients and chemotherapy in eight patients. Twenty-five patients died 2-61 months after their operation (median 5 months). Currently, 13 patients are alive at 2-58 months (median 16 months) with known metastatic disease (n = 7) or with no signs of distant disease (n = 6). This dataset is limited by the lack of a denominator as it remains unknown how many other patients with ACC presenting with IVC invasion did not undergo surgery. The relatively low perioperative

  11. Rare case of primary inferior vena cava leiomyosarcoma on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan: Differentiation from nontumor thrombus in a background of procoagulant state.

    PubMed

    Singh, Natasha; Shivdasani, Divya; Karangutkar, Sanket

    2014-10-01

    We report a rare case of leiomyosarcoma of the inferior vena cava (IVC) in which F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan provided vital evidence, which led to its diagnosis, in a background of procoagulant state of the patient, where previous ultrasound-Doppler and echocardiography studies were nonspecific and revealed bilateral lower limb deep vein thrombosis with thrombus in IVC. The whole body F-18 FDG PET-CT scan was done in view of no significant improvement in clinical status of the patient over few months in spite of appropriate medical management. FDG PET-CT scan revealed high grade uptake in a large mass lesion occupying the right atrium, extending superiorly into terminal superior vena cava, inferiorly into dilated IVC and probably into hepatic veins. CT guided biopsy of this F-18 FDG avid mass was consistent with the diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma, which however was not amenable to surgery at this stage. F-18 FDG PET-CT accurately differentiated tumor mass from bland thrombus and further had a significant impact on the management, since aggressive surgery combined with adjuvant therapy offers the best outcome for patients with leiomyosarcoma of the IVC.

  12. 21 CFR 870.3260 - Vena cava clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vena cava clip. 870.3260 Section 870.3260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3260 Vena cava clip. (a) Identification. A...

  13. 21 CFR 870.3260 - Vena cava clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vena cava clip. 870.3260 Section 870.3260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3260 Vena cava clip. (a) Identification. A...

  14. 21 CFR 870.3260 - Vena cava clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vena cava clip. 870.3260 Section 870.3260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3260 Vena cava clip. (a) Identification. A...

  15. In Vitro Studies of Temporary Vena Cava Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Lorch, Heike; Zwaan, Martin; Kulke, Christian; Weiss, Hans-Dieter

    1998-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clot trapping capacity of different temporary vena cava filters in a vena cava model. Methods: A vena cava flow model was built using PVC tubing, a hemodialysis membrane and a pulsatile pump. Blood was imitated by a Dextran 40 solution. Five different temporary vena cava filters and two prototypes were tested using human thrombi. The mechanism of clot capture was observed. Results: Decreasing rank order according to decreasing percentage of clots captured for the 21-mm diameter vena cava model was Cook (C) > Angiocor (A) > Cordis (CD) > Antheor (TF-6) > DIL for thrombi with a diameter of 3 mm and A > C > CD > TF-6 > DIL for 5-mm thrombi. In a cava with diameter of 28 mm, decreasing rank order was C > CD = A > TF-6 > DIL and C > CD = A > DIL > TF-6 for 3- and 5-mm thrombi, respectively. Two new prototypes, the TF-8 and TF-10 filters, achieved better results than the TF-6 filter and were in most conditions comparable to the A and CD filters. In most cases, thrombi were trapped between filter and cava wall. Conclusion: The vena cava flow model demonstrates significant differences in rates of clot capture (range 22%-98%) depending on cava diameter, thrombus size, and filter type.

  16. [Prothrombin fragment 1+2 (F1+2), thrombin-antithrombin III complex(TAT) and thrombophilia parameters in orally anticoagulated patients with inferior vena cava filters].

    PubMed

    Halbmayer, W M; Haushofer, A; Toth, E

    1993-01-01

    Prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2) and thrombin-antithrombin-III-complex (TAT) levels were compared in 31 orally anticoagulated patients with inferior vena caval filters and a control group of 31 orally anticoagulated patients without caval filters and the incidence of markers of thrombophilia (deficiency of antithrombin-III, protein C, protein S and factor XII, presence of lupus anticoagulants) was determined. 8 of 31 patients (26%) from the group of caval filter carriers showed markers of thrombophilia (3 protein S deficiencies, 1 protein C deficiency, 2 factor XII deficiencies and 2 patients with lupus anticoagulants). In all orally anticoagulated patients a significant interdependence (p < 0.05) between F1 + 2- and TAT-levels and intensity (INR) of the oral anticoagulation could be observed. Comparison of F1 + 2- and TAT-levels of caval filter carriers and controls revealed no significant difference which leads to the conclusion that inferior vena caval filters do not induce detectable systemic activation of prothrombin under adequate oral anticoagulation therapy.

  17. Late endovascular removal of Günther-Tulip inferior vena cava filter and stent reconstruction of chronic post-thrombotic iliocaval obstruction after 4753 days of filter dwell time: a case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Mehul Harshad; Narayanan, Govindarajan

    2016-12-01

    Chronic post-thrombotic obstruction of the inferior vena cava (IVC) or iliocaval junction is an uncommon complication of long indwelling IVC filter. When such an obstruction is symptomatic, endovascular treatment options include stent placement with or without filter retrieval. Filter retrieval becomes increasingly difficult with longer dwell times. We present a case of symptomatic post-thrombotic obstruction of the iliocaval junction related to Günther-Tulip IVC filter (Cook Medical Inc, Bloomington, IN) with dwell time of 4753 days, treated successfully with endovascular filter removal and stent reconstruction. Filter retrieval and stent reconstruction may be a treatment option in symptomatic patients with filter-related chronic IVC or iliocaval junction obstruction, even after prolonged dwell time.

  18. Inferior vena caval masses identified by echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, J. P.; Asher, C. R.; Xu, Y.; Huang, V.; Griffin, B. P.; Stewart, W. J.; Novick, A. C.; Thomas, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    The most common cause of an inferior vena caval mass is renal cell carcinoma that extends through the lumen, occurring in 47 of 62 patients (85%). Detection of an inferior vena caval mass affects the surgical approach requiring cardiopulmonary bypass for resection when the mass extends to the heart.

  19. Inferior vena caval masses identified by echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, J. P.; Asher, C. R.; Xu, Y.; Huang, V.; Griffin, B. P.; Stewart, W. J.; Novick, A. C.; Thomas, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    The most common cause of an inferior vena caval mass is renal cell carcinoma that extends through the lumen, occurring in 47 of 62 patients (85%). Detection of an inferior vena caval mass affects the surgical approach requiring cardiopulmonary bypass for resection when the mass extends to the heart.

  20. Successful Iliac Vein and Inferior Vena Cava Stenting Ameliorates Venous Claudication and Improves Venous Outflow, Calf Muscle Pump Function, and Clinical Status in Post-Thrombotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Delis, Konstantinos T.; Bjarnason, Haraldur; Wennberg, Paul W.; Rooke, Thom W.; Gloviczki, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Stent therapy has been proposed as an effective treatment of chronic iliofemoral (I-F) and inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of technically successful stenting in consecutive patients with advanced CVD (CEAP3–6 ± venous claudication) for chronic obliteration of the I-F (±IVC) trunks, on the venous hemodynamics of the limb, the walking capacity, and the clinical status of CVD. These patients had previously failed to improve with conservative treatment entailing compression and/or wound care for at least 12 months. Methods: The presence of venous claudication was assessed by ≥3 independent examiners. The CEAP clinical classification was used to determine the severity of CVD. Outflow obstruction [Outflow Fraction at 1- and 4-second (OF1 and OF4) in %], venous reflux [Venous Filling Index (VFI) in mL/100 mL/s], calf muscle pump function [Ejection Fraction (EF) in %] and hypertension [Residual Venous Fraction (RVF) in %], were examined before and after successful venous stenting in 16 patients (23 limbs), 6 females, 10 males, median age 42 years; range, 31–77 yearas, left/right limbs 14/9, using strain gauge plethysmography; 7/16 of these had thrombosis extending to the IVC. Contralateral limbs to those stented without prior I-F ± IVC thrombosis, nor infrainguinal clots on duplex, were used as control limbs (n = 9). Excluded were patients with stent occlusion or stenoses, peripheral arterial disease (ABI <1.0), symptomatic cardiac disease, unrelated causes of walking impairment, and malignancy. Preinterventional data (≤30 days) were compared with those after endovascular therapy (8.4 months; interquartile range [IQR], 3–11.8 months). Nonparametric analysis was applied. Results: Compared with the control group, limbs with I-F ± IVC thrombosis before stenting had reduced venous outflow (OF4) and calf muscle pump function (EF), worse CEAP clinical class, and increased RVF (all, P < 0

  1. Development and evaluation of a new biodegradable vena cava filter in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fuxian; Li, Hailei; Liang, Gangzhu; Zhang, Huan

    2017-01-01

    Preliminary testing of a new biodegradable inferior vena cava filter in a canine model. The biodegradable filter consisted of two parts, a filter cone and a stent. The filter cone was constructed of six polyglycolic acid polymer strands anchored to a handmade absorbable stent. Central inferior vena cava fixation was accomplished by the absorbable stent, which was made of polycaprolactone. Device insertion was performed through a 9F sheath under ultrasound guidance on 10 adult beagles. The filters were operatively retrieved at 6 weeks after implantation. The inferior venae cavae were subsequently analyzed grossly and using light microscopy. None of the 10 beagles had abnormal vital signs. All of the 10 filters migrated cephalad approximately <2 cm and remained below the renal vein ostia. One specimen had evidence of incorporated residual strands within the caval wall on gross examination. The caval wall became thickened at the level of filter placement without significant lumen narrowing. There was no evidence of pulmonary embolism caused by degradation products of the absorbable strands. Biodegradable inferior vena cava filters are feasible and potentially could be used in specific patients who are at temporary high risk of venous thromboembolism. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  2. LGM vena cava filter: objective evaluation of early results.

    PubMed

    Murphy, T P; Dorfman, G S; Yedlicka, J W; McCowan, T C; Vogelzang, R L; Hunter, D W; Carver, D K; Pinsk, R; Castaneda-Zuniga, W; Ferris, E J

    1991-02-01

    One hundred one LG-Medical (LGM) vena cava filters were placed in 97 patients at four institutions. Placement was a complete technical success in 90% (91 of 101). In 6% of attempts, LGM filter insertion was complicated by incomplete opening of the filter. Pulmonary embolism after filter placement was not definitely demonstrated in any patient. The probability of inferior vena cava patency was 92% at 6 months after filter insertion. Thrombosis at the insertion site was seen in eight of 35 patients (23%) evaluated with duplex ultrasound or venography. Thrombus was observed in 37% of filters at follow-up examination, with cephalic extension of thrombus above the filter in 20% of all patients examined. Filter migration (greater than 1 cm) was seen in 12%; significant angulation was observed in only one patient (2%). In vitro experimentation demonstrated that incomplete opening of the LGM filter during placement can be avoided, in part, by brisk retraction of the insertion cannula. The low-profile introducer system of the LGM filter allows increased alternatives in selecting the site for filter insertion. The low-profile system also makes outpatient filter placement a possibility. No significant difference in the prevalence of thrombosis at the insertion site following LGM filter insertion was noted compared with previous results reported for percutaneous transfemoral placement of the Greenfield filter. The nonopaque sheath does not permit careful localization prior to filter deposition. Modification of the LGM filter to include a radiopaque sheath is suggested.

  3. [Duplication of the superior vena cava and other malformations discovered at insertion of a port-a-cath].

    PubMed

    Hammerer, V; Jeung, M; Mennecier, B; Demian, M; Pauli, G; Quoix, E

    2005-09-01

    We report a clinical case of a persistent left superior vena cava discovered in a 50-year-old female patient when a port-a-cath was inserted. This already seldom malformation was associated with an arteria lusoria and polysplenia with left inferior vena cava with hemiazygos continuation, right-sided stomach, short pancreas, preduodenal portal vein and intestinal malrotation, but without any cardiac abnormalities.

  4. Coronary artery bypass and superior vena cava syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, T V; Masrani, K; Thomas, J L

    1999-01-01

    Superior vena cava syndrome is the obstruction of the superior vena cava or its main tributaries by benign or malignant lesions. The syndrome causes edema and engorgement of the vessels on the face, neck, and arms, nonproductive cough, and dyspnea. We discuss the case of a 48-year-old obese diabetic woman who was admitted with unstable angina. She had previously been diagnosed with superior vena cava syndrome. Urgent coronary artery bypass grafting was necessary Although thousands of coronary artery bypasses are performed every year, there are not many reports on patients with superior vena cava syndrome who successfully undergo cardiopulmonary bypass and coronary artery grafting with an internal mammary artery as the conduit. The results of the case and alternative recommended methods are discussed. Images PMID:10653258

  5. Coronary artery bypass and superior vena cava syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thomas, T V; Masrani, K; Thomas, J L

    1999-01-01

    Superior vena cava syndrome is the obstruction of the superior vena cava or its main tributaries by benign or malignant lesions. The syndrome causes edema and engorgement of the vessels on the face, neck, and arms, nonproductive cough, and dyspnea. We discuss the case of a 48-year-old obese diabetic woman who was admitted with unstable angina. She had previously been diagnosed with superior vena cava syndrome. Urgent coronary artery bypass grafting was necessary Although thousands of coronary artery bypasses are performed every year, there are not many reports on patients with superior vena cava syndrome who successfully undergo cardiopulmonary bypass and coronary artery grafting with an internal mammary artery as the conduit. The results of the case and alternative recommended methods are discussed.

  6. Role of cardiac output and the autonomic nervous system in the antinatriuretic response to acute constriction of the thoracic superior vena cava.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.; Ufferman, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the differential characteristics of hepatic congestion and decreased cardiac output in terms of potential afferent stimuli in the antinatriuretic effect of acute thoracic inferior vena cava (TIVC) constriction. An attempt is made to see if the autonomic nervous system is involved in the antinatriuretic effect of acute TIVC or thoracic superior vena cava constriction.

  7. Role of cardiac output and the autonomic nervous system in the antinatriuretic response to acute constriction of the thoracic superior vena cava.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.; Ufferman, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the differential characteristics of hepatic congestion and decreased cardiac output in terms of potential afferent stimuli in the antinatriuretic effect of acute thoracic inferior vena cava (TIVC) constriction. An attempt is made to see if the autonomic nervous system is involved in the antinatriuretic effect of acute TIVC or thoracic superior vena cava constriction.

  8. Temporary vena cava filter placement for pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Backus, Charles L; Heniford, B Todd; Sing, Ronald F

    2002-10-01

    Current clinical trials are under way to determine the safety and efficacy of temporary inferior vena cava filters for use in patients who need but have contraindications to anticoagulation medications for a short time (<10 days). To date, no data on these types of filters have been published. The authors describe a 20-year-old male trauma patient in whom a pulmonary embolism developed early in his hospital course and who was appropriately placed on anticoagulation therapy. Surgical intervention, however, was necessary to repair complex facial fractures sustained in a motorcycle collision. A filtering infusion catheter was placed until anticoagulation therapy could be resumed. The patient tolerated the surgery without further embolism and has recovered without difficulty.

  9. Hepatic vein, hepatic parenchymal, and inferior vena caval mechanoreceptors with phrenic afferents.

    PubMed

    Kostreva, D R; Pontus, S P

    1993-07-01

    Dogs were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium and placed on positive-pressure ventilation. The right phrenic nerve and/or its C5 branch were prepared for afferent recording. The hepatic veins, hepatic parenchyma, diaphragm, and inferior vena cava were studied for mechanoreceptors using light pressure and stroking as the stimuli. Mechanosensitive areas were found in the hepatic veins, hepatic parenchyma of the right medial lobe, and inferior vena cava. The hepatic vein and inferior vena caval receptors are located in the same 1- to 2-cm region as the sphincters that are found in these vessels. This study presents the first experimental evidence for the existence of hepatic vein receptors, hepatic parenchymal receptors, and inferior vena caval mechanoreceptors with phrenic afferents in the dog. These sensory areas of the circulation may be involved in the neural control of venous return as well as mediating changes in intrahepatic and portal venous blood pressure during normal respiration.

  10. Design Optimization of Vena Cava Filters: An application to dual filtration devices

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, M A; Wang, S L; Diachin, D P

    2009-12-03

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a significant medical problem that results in over 300,000 fatalities per year. A common preventative treatment for PE is the insertion of a metallic filter into the inferior vena cava that traps thrombi before they reach the lungs. The goal of this work is to use methods of mathematical modeling and design optimization to determine the configuration of trapped thrombi that minimizes the hemodynamic disruption. The resulting configuration has implications for constructing an optimally designed vena cava filter. Computational fluid dynamics is coupled with a nonlinear optimization algorithm to determine the optimal configuration of trapped model thrombus in the inferior vena cava. The location and shape of the thrombus are parameterized, and an objective function, based on wall shear stresses, determines the worthiness of a given configuration. The methods are fully automated and demonstrate the capabilities of a design optimization framework that is broadly applicable. Changes to thrombus location and shape alter the velocity contours and wall shear stress profiles significantly. For vena cava filters that trap two thrombi simultaneously, the undesirable flow dynamics past one thrombus can be mitigated by leveraging the flow past the other thrombus. Streamlining the shape of thrombus trapped along the cava wall reduces the disruption to the flow, but increases the area exposed to abnormal wall shear stress. Computer-based design optimization is a useful tool for developing vena cava filters. Characterizing and parameterizing the design requirements and constraints is essential for constructing devices that address clinical complications. In addition, formulating a well-defined objective function that quantifies clinical risks and benefits is needed for designing devices that are clinically viable.

  11. Design optimization of vena cava filters: an application to dual filtration devices.

    PubMed

    Singer, Michael A; Wang, Stephen L; Diachin, Darin P

    2010-10-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a significant medical problem that results in over 300,000 fatalities per year. A common preventative treatment for PE is the insertion of a metallic filter into the inferior vena cava that traps thrombi before they reach the lungs. The goal of this work is to use methods of mathematical modeling and design optimization to determine the configuration of trapped thrombi that minimizes the hemodynamic disruption. The resulting configuration has implications for constructing an optimally designed vena cava filter. Computational fluid dynamics is coupled with a nonlinear optimization algorithm to determine the optimal configuration of a trapped model thrombus in the inferior vena cava. The location and shape of the thrombus are parametrized, and an objective function, based on wall shear stresses, determines the worthiness of a given configuration. The methods are fully automated and demonstrate the capabilities of a design optimization framework that is broadly applicable. Changes to thrombus location and shape alter the velocity contours and wall shear stress profiles significantly. For vena cava filters that trap two thrombi simultaneously, the undesirable flow dynamics past one thrombus can be mitigated by leveraging the flow past the other thrombus. Streamlining the shape of the thrombus trapped along the cava wall reduces the disruption to the flow but increases the area exposed to low wall shear stress. Computer-based design optimization is a useful tool for developing vena cava filters. Characterizing and parametrizing the design requirements and constraints is essential for constructing devices that address clinical complications. In addition, formulating a well-defined objective function that quantifies clinical risks and benefits is needed for designing devices that are clinically viable.

  12. Endovascular treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm with aortocaval fistula based on aortic and inferior vena cava stent-graft placement.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Pierre Galvagni; Cunha, Josué Rafael Ferreira; Lima, Guilherme Baumgardt Barbosa; Franklin, Rafael Narciso; Bortoluzzi, Cristiano Torres; Galego, Gilberto do Nascimento

    2014-11-01

    A ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA), complicated by an aortocaval fistula (ACF), is usually associated with high morbidity and mortality during open operative repair. We report a case of endovascular treatment of an RAAA with ACF. After accessing both common femoral arteries, a bifurcated aortic stent graft was placed. Subsequently, we accessed the fistula from the right femoral vein and a cava vein angiography showed a persistent massive flow from the cava to the excluded aneurysm sac. We proceeded by covering the fistula with an Excluder aortic stent-graft cuff to prevent pressurization of the aneurysm sac and secondary endoleaks. This procedure is feasible and may reduce the chances of posterior endoleaks.

  13. Long-term retrieval of modified Günther Tulip vena cava Filters: an animal study.

    PubMed

    Buecker, Arno; Behrendt, Florian F; Knüchel, Ruth; Kinzel, Sylvia; Mølgaard-Nielsen, Arne; Neuerburg, Joerg; Günther, Rolf W

    2007-10-01

    We modified the Günther Tulip Filter to allow long-term retrieval and tested this modified filter design in an animal experiment. Fourteen modified Günther Tulip Filters (Celect filter) were inserted percutaneously into the inferior venae cavae of 7 domestic adult sheep (2 filters per animal). Before removal, 3 months after filter placement, cavography was performed and the filters were removed. Subsequently, cavography was obtained to check for any signs of bleeding. All venae cavae were prepared, removed, and macroscopically examined for bleeding. Filter placement was easy and successfully performed in all cases. No thrombi were detected inside the filters. All cases showed some narrowing of the vena cava at the level, where the filter legs were connected with the vessel wall. Neither cavograms after filter removal nor macroscopic examinations of the perivascular vena cava tissue showed any significant bleeding. The modified Günther Tulip Filter allowed for successful and uncomplicated filter removal up to 3 months after placement.

  14. [Superior vena cava thrombosis in a patient on hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Saval, N; Pou, M; López Pedret, J; Burrell, M; Cases, A

    2004-01-01

    We present a patient with end-stage renal disease on maintenace hemodialysis through a permanent catheter (Permcath) on the right subclavian vein. One month after the catheter placement the patient exhibited a superior vena cava syndrome due to a pericatheter thrombosis. The patient was initially managed with anticoagulation with early clinical improvement. Nevertheless, the reappearance of the symptoms forced the removal of the catheter and percutaneous angioplasty of the superior vena cava. After those measures and anticoagulation with coumarin the patient remains stable with complete clinical resolution and angiographical improvement.

  15. Percutaneous Stent Placement as Treatment of Renal Vein Obstruction Due to Inferior Vena Caval Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Stecker, Michael S. Casciani, Thomas; Kwo, Paul Y.

    2006-02-15

    A patient who had undergone his third orthotopic liver transplantation nearly 9 years prior to presentation developed worsening hepatic and renal function, as well as severe bilateral lower extremity edema. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated vena caval thrombosis from the suprahepatic venous anastomosis to the infrarenal inferior vena cava, obstructing the renal veins. This was treated by percutaneous placement of metallic stents from the renal veins to the right atrium. At 16 months clinical follow-up, the patient continues to do well.

  16. Aortocaval Tunnel to the Superior Vena Cava: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Rezvanieh; Rastkar, Bahman; Afrasiabi, Abbas; Pourafkari, Leili

    2011-01-01

    A 20-year old female with a rare anomaly of aortocaval tunnel to superior vena cava is presented. Rare cases of congenital communications between aorta and right sided of the heart has been reported previously. The patient underwent surgical repair and had uneventful recovery. PMID:24250957

  17. Efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis/inferior vena cava tumor thrombosis: evaluation by comparison with conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Yoshiro; Yoshida, Kenji; Nishimura, Hideki; Ejima, Yasuo; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Uezono, Haruka; Ishihara, Takeaki; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Fukumoto, Takumi; Ku, Yonson; Yamaguchi, Masato; Sugimoto, Koji; Sasaki, Ryohei

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Forty-three patients with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT)/inferior vena cava tumor thrombosis (IVCTT) treated with SBRT (27 with CyberKnife (CK) and 16 with TrueBeam (TB)) from April 2013 to December 2014, and 54 treated with 3DCRT from June 2008 to March 2013 were evaluated. Dosimetric parameters, response to radiotherapy (RT) and survival outcomes were compared in total SBRT vs. 3DCRT, CK vs. 3DCRT and TB vs. 3DCRT, respectively. The median biologically effective dose 10 (BED10) values in total SBRT, CK, TB and 3DCRT were 73.4 Gy10, 75.0 Gy10, 60.5 Gy10 and 58.5 Gy10, respectively (P < 0.001 in total SBRT vs. 3DCRT, P < 0.001 in CK vs. 3DCRT, P = 0.004 in TB vs. 3DCRT). The tumor response rates were 67%, 70%, 62% and 46%, respectively (P = 0.04, P = 0.04, P = 0.25). The 1-year overall survival rates were 49.3%, 56.7%, 38.1% and 29.3%, respectively (P = 0.02, P = 0.02, P = 0.30), and the 1-year local progression rates were 20.4%, 21.9%, 18.8% and 43.6%, respectively (P = 0.01, P = 0.04, P = 0.10). The use of SBRT made it possible to achieve a higher BED10 compared with the use of 3DCRT. Improvements in local control and survival were achieved in the CK group and the total SBRT group. Our results suggest that SBRT may have the potential to be the standard RT technique for the treatment of PVTT/IVCTT. PMID:27053259

  18. Evaluation of a Device Combining an Inferior Vena Cava Filter and a Central Venous Catheter for Preventing Pulmonary Embolism Among Critically Ill Trauma Patients.

    PubMed

    Tapson, Victor F; Hazelton, Joshua P; Myers, John; Robertson, Claudia; Gilani, Ramyar; Dunn, Julie A; Bukur, Marko; Croce, Martin A; Peick, Ann; West, Sonlee; Lottenberg, Lawrence; Doucet, Jay; Miller, Preston R; Crookes, Bruce; Gandhi, Rajesh R; Croft, Chasen A; Manasia, Anthony; Hoey, Brian A; Lieberman, Howard; Guillamondegui, Oscar D; Novack, Victor; Piazza, Gregory; Goldhaber, Samuel Z

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate efficacy and safety of a novel device that combines an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter and central venous catheter (CVC) for prevention of pulmonary embolism (PE) in critically ill patients. In a multicenter, prospective, single-arm clinical trial, the device was inserted at the bedside without fluoroscopy and subsequently retrieved before transfer from the intensive care unit (ICU). The primary efficacy endpoint was freedom from clinically significant PE or fatal PE 72 hours after device removal or discharge, whichever occurred first. Secondary endpoints were incidence of acute proximal deep venous thrombosis (DVT), catheter-related thrombosis, catheter-related bloodstream infections, major bleeding events, and clinically significant thrombus (occupying > 25% of volume of filter) detected by cavography before retrieval. The device was placed in 163 critically ill patients with contraindications to anticoagulation; 151 (93%) were critically ill trauma patients, 129 (85%) had head or spine trauma, and 102 (79%) had intracranial bleeding. The primary efficacy endpoint was achieved for all 163 (100%) patients (95% confidence interval [CI], 97.8%-100%, P < .01). Diagnosis of new or worsening acute proximal DVT was time dependent with 11 (7%) occurring during the first 7 days. There were no (0%) catheter-related bloodstream infections. There were 5 (3.1%) major bleeding events. Significant thrombus in the IVC filter occurred in 14 (8.6%) patients. Prophylactic anticoagulation was not initiated for a mean of 5.5 days ± 4.3 after ICU admission. This novel device prevented clinically significant and fatal PE among critically ill trauma patients with low risk of complications. Copyright © 2017 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Perioperative and Oncologic Outcomes of Nephrectomy and Caval Thrombectomy Using Extracorporeal Circulation and Deep Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest for Renal Cell Carcinoma Invading the Supradiaphragmatic Inferior Vena Cava and/or Right Atrium.

    PubMed

    Nini, Alessandro; Capitanio, Umberto; Larcher, Alessandro; Dell'Oglio, Paolo; Dehò, Federico; Suardi, Nazareno; Muttin, Fabio; Carenzi, Cristina; Freschi, Massimo; Lucianò, Roberta; La Croce, Giovanni; Briganti, Alberto; Colombo, Renzo; Salonia, Andrea; Castiglioni, Alessandro; Rigatti, Patrizio; Montorsi, Francesco; Bertini, Roberto

    2017-09-13

    Radical nephrectomy (RN) and caval thrombectomy (CT) for renal cell carcinoma, with extracorporeal circulation (ECC) and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) is a challenging surgical approach. To assess peri-operative and oncologic outcomes of renal cell carcinoma patients treated with RN and CT, using ECC and DHCA. We retrospectively evaluated 46 patients who underwent RN and CT using ECC and DHCA. After retroperitoneal nodal dissection and RN, a cardiopulmonary bypass was placed and DHCA achieved. A combined approach through the abdomen and the thorax was described. Perioperative and long-term survival outcomes were reported. Median operative time and length of hospital stay were 545min and 22 d. Overall, 33 patients (72%) did not require any additional interventional or surgical treatment. Thirty-day and 90-d mortality were 11% (5/46) and 15% (7/46). The 1-yr, 2-yr, and 3-yr cancer specific mortality (CSM)-free survival rates were 77%, 62%, and 56%, respectively. After stratification, according to metastatic status at diagnosis, CSM-free survival rates were significantly lower for cM1 patients compared with cM0 patients (1-yr 46% vs 93%, 2-yr 23% vs 81%, 3-yr 23% vs 73%, p<0.01). Our study is limited by its retrospective and uncomparative nature. RN with CT using ECC and DHCA is a challenging procedure which requires a dedicated multidisciplinary working team to minimise complications and maximise patients' outcomes. Patients with kidney cancer and a thrombus within the inferior vena cava, which reaches above the diaphragm, can be treated with surgery. However, this kind of surgical treatment is challenging and requires a dedicated multidisciplinary team in order to accomplish the task. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Predicting Fluid Responsiveness Using Bedside Ultrasound Measurements of the Inferior Vena Cava and Physician Gestalt in the Emergency Department of an Urban Public Hospital in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Sawe, Hendry Robert; Haeffele, Cathryn; Mfinanga, Juma A; Mwafongo, Victor G; Reynolds, Teri A

    Bedside inferior vena cava (IVC) ultrasound has been proposed as a non-invasive measure of volume status. We compared ultrasound measurements of the caval index (CI) and physician gestalt to predict blood pressure response in patients requiring intravenous fluid resuscitation. This was a prospective study of adult emergency department patients requiring fluid resuscitation. A structured data sheet was used to record serial vital signs and the treating clinician's impression of patient volume status and cause of hypotension. Bedside ultrasound CI measurements were performed at baseline and after each 500mL of fluid. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to characterize the relationship between CI and Physician gestalt, and the change in mean arterial pressure (MAP). We enrolled 364 patients, 52% male, mean age 36 years. Indications for fluid resuscitation were haemorrhage (54%), dehydration (30%), and sepsis (17%). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis found optimal CI cut-off values of 45%, 52% and 53% to predict a MAP rise of 5, 8 and 10 mmHg per litre of fluid, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of CI of 50% for predicting a 10mmHg increase in MAP per litre were 88% (95%CI 81-93%) and 73% (95%CI 67-79%), respectively, area under the curve (AUC) = 0.85 (0.81-0.89). The sensitivity and specificity of physician gestalt estimate of volume depletion severity were 68% (95%CI 60-75%) and 86% (95%CI 80-90%), respectively, AUC = 0.83 (95% CI: 0.79-0.87). Those with a baseline CI ≥ 50% (51% of patients) had a 2.8-fold greater fluid responsiveness than those with a baseline CI<50% (p<0.0001). Ultrasound measurement of the CI can predict blood pressure response among patients requiring intravenous fluid resuscitation and may be useful in early identification of patients who will benefit most from volume resuscitation, and those who will likely require other interventions.

  1. Safety and efficacy of vena cava filters in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Giannoudis, Peter V; Pountos, Ippokratis; Pape, Hans Christoph; Patel, Jai V

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE), due to its sudden onset, notoriously difficult diagnosis, unpredictable nature and often fatal outcome, remains one of the most feared complications in surgical practice. Trauma patients with multisystem injuries, extremity or pelvic fractures and head or spinal cord injuries often pose a significant dilemma for the surgeon because of the inability to use conventional measures such as anticoagulation therapy and compression devices. On the other hand, the incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is high among trauma patients and the attendant risk of PE is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Inferior vena cava (IVC) interruption by placement of diverse filtering devices has evolved over the past three decades. With the use of these devices, the risk of PE has been reduced dramatically. However, variable rates of complications are reported from their use. In this study, we review all the available data on IVC filter placement in trauma patients and we discuss the potential complications of IVC filters in order to understand better the risk/benefit ratio of their use.

  2. Safety and Efficacy of the Gunther Tulip Retrievable Vena Cava Filter: Midterm Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffer, Eric K. Mueller, Rebecca J.; Luciano, Marcus R.; Lee, Nicole N.; Michaels, Anne T.; Gemery, John M.

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo evaluate of the medium-term integrity, efficacy, and complication rate associated with the Gunther Tulip vena cava filter.MethodsA retrospective study was performed of 369 consecutive patients who had infrarenal Gunther Tulip inferior vena cava filters placed over a 5-year period. The mean patient age was 61.8 years, and 59 % were men. Venous thromboembolic disease and a contraindication to or complication of anticoagulation were the indications for filter placement in 86 % of patients; 14 % were placed for prophylaxis in patients with a mean of 2.3 risk factors. Follow-up was obtained by review of medical and radiologic records.ResultsMean clinical follow-up was 780 days. New or recurrent pulmonary embolus occurred in 12 patients (3.3 %). New or recurrent deep-vein thrombosis occurred in 53 patients (14.4 %). There were no symptomatic fractures, migrations, or caval perforations. Imaging follow-up in 287 patients (77.8 %) at a mean of 731 days revealed a single (0.3 %) asymptomatic fracture, migration greater than 2 cm in 36 patients (12.5 %), and no case of embolization. Of 122 patients with CT scans, asymptomatic perforations were identified in 53 patients (43.4 %) at a mean 757 days.ConclusionThe Gunther Tulip filter was safe and effective at 2-year follow-up. Complication rates were similar to those reported for permanent inferior vena cava filters.

  3. Safety and efficacy of the Gunther Tulip retrievable vena cava filter: midterm outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Eric K; Mueller, Rebecca J; Luciano, Marcus R; Lee, Nicole N; Michaels, Anne T; Gemery, John M

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate of the medium-term integrity, efficacy, and complication rate associated with the Gunther Tulip vena cava filter. A retrospective study was performed of 369 consecutive patients who had infrarenal Gunther Tulip inferior vena cava filters placed over a 5-year period. The mean patient age was 61.8 years, and 59% were men. Venous thromboembolic disease and a contraindication to or complication of anticoagulation were the indications for filter placement in 86% of patients; 14% were placed for prophylaxis in patients with a mean of 2.3 risk factors. Follow-up was obtained by review of medical and radiologic records. Mean clinical follow-up was 780 days. New or recurrent pulmonary embolus occurred in 12 patients (3.3%). New or recurrent deep-vein thrombosis occurred in 53 patients (14.4%). There were no symptomatic fractures, migrations, or caval perforations. Imaging follow-up in 287 patients (77.8%) at a mean of 731 days revealed a single (0.3%) asymptomatic fracture, migration greater than 2 cm in 36 patients (12.5%), and no case of embolization. Of 122 patients with CT scans, asymptomatic perforations were identified in 53 patients (43.4%) at a mean 757 days. The Gunther Tulip filter was safe and effective at 2-year follow-up. Complication rates were similar to those reported for permanent inferior vena cava filters.

  4. An uncommon course of the right superior vena cava in a patient with heterotaxy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chenu, Caroline; Fouilloux, Virginie; Kreitmann, Bernard; Metras, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of an infant with congenital heart disease which includes a partial atrioventricular canal defect with the absence of the atrial septum (common atrium) and an extremely uncommon course of the right-sided superior vena cava (SVC) including an intra-atrial segment coursing intramurally along the right posterolateral atrial wall, with an intracardiac orifice situated low within the right side of the atrium, close to the atrial orifice of the right hepatic veins. This feature of the anatomy was discovered intraoperatively at the time of surgical repair. Systemic venous anatomy also included interrupted inferior vena cava (IVC) with azygos continuation to a left-sided SVC draining directly into the left side of the atrium. The successful surgical procedure included tunneling of the left-sided SVC to the right side of the common atrium and atrial septation with a patch.

  5. Side-to-side cavocavostomy with an endovascular stapler: Rescue technique for severe hepatic vein and/or inferior vena cava outflow obstruction after liver transplantation using the piggyback technique.

    PubMed

    Quintini, Cristiano; Miller, Charles M; Hashimoto, Koji; Philip, Ding; Uso, Teresa Diago; Aucejo, Federico; Kelly, Dympna; Winans, Charles; Eghtesad, Bijan; Vogt, David; Fung, John

    2009-01-01

    Venous outflow obstruction is a rare but potentially lethal complication after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) with the "piggyback" technique. Therapeutic options include angioplasty with or without stent placement, surgical reconstruction of the venous anastomosis, and retransplantation. Surgical options are technically very challenging and the outcomes discouraging. We describe here two cases of venous outflow obstruction in recipients of piggyback liver grafts, one involving both the vena cava and hepatic veins and the other affecting only hepatic vein outflow. Both patients were treated successfully with side-to-side cavo-cavostomy using an endovascular (endo-GIA) stapler. This novel technique is fast and effective in resolving the outflow obstruction. Copyright 2008 AASLD.

  6. Superior vena cava syndrome caused by embolisation of liquid Onyx.

    PubMed

    Crusio, Robbert; Ramachandran, Kishan; Ramachandran, Kavan; Kupfer, Yizhak; Tessler, Sidney

    2011-02-14

    Superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) is usually caused by a malignancy or the presence of an intravascular device in a central vein. A 74-year-old male with a history of a superior vena cava (SVC) stent underwent embolisation of a brain arterio-venous malformation through the right meningeal artery with liquid Onyx. Two weeks later he presented with acute respiratory failure, upper airway obstruction, plethora, varices of the chest wall and stridor. He was intubated and placed on mechanical ventilatory support. Chest imaging revealed a linear structure in the SVC, extending to the right atrium. Interventional radiology removed the material, which was determined to be liquid Onyx. Venous pressures of the right internal jugular vein decreased after removal of the material. The symptoms resolved and patient was successfully extubated. This is the first reported case of SVCS caused by liquid Onyx.

  7. Superior vena cava syndrome caused by embolisation of liquid Onyx

    PubMed Central

    Crusio, Robbert; Ramachandran, Kishan; Ramachandran, Kavan; Kupfer, Yizhak; Tessler, Sidney

    2011-01-01

    Superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) is usually caused by a malignancy or the presence of an intravascular device in a central vein. A 74-year-old male with a history of a superior vena cava (SVC) stent underwent embolisation of a brain arterio-venous malformation through the right meningeal artery with liquid Onyx. Two weeks later he presented with acute respiratory failure, upper airway obstruction, plethora, varices of the chest wall and stridor. He was intubated and placed on mechanical ventilatory support. Chest imaging revealed a linear structure in the SVC, extending to the right atrium. Interventional radiology removed the material, which was determined to be liquid Onyx. Venous pressures of the right internal jugular vein decreased after removal of the material. The symptoms resolved and patient was successfully extubated. This is the first reported case of SVCS caused by liquid Onyx. PMID:22707372

  8. Vena cava filter behavior and endovascular response: an experimental in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Arend; Hoogeveen, Yvonne; Elstrodt, Jan M; Tiebosch, Anton T M G

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the behavior and endovascular response of a new nitinol permanent vena cava filter, the TrapEase. Percutaneous implantation of the filter was performed in six goats, with inferior vena cava (IVC) diameter close to that of man. Radiologic data concerning the IVC, filter diameter, patency and stability were collected. At 2, 4, 20 and 26 weeks post-implantation, histopathologic analysis of the IVC wall was performed at the site of filter distension, and distal and proximal to the filter. All filters remained patent. There was no migration and no signs of biological incompatibility. Signs of neointimalization were seen at 2 weeks, with well-developed neointima at 4 weeks. No acute vessel wall perforation was detected by cavography at implantation. During follow-up histologic analysis at 26 weeks, perforation of some of the small fixation barbs was seen, causing minimal damage to the vessel wall and adjacent organ tissue without impairing organ function. These events were well tolerated, probably due to the gradual nature of the penetration of fixation barbs allowing reactive fibrous tissue development. At 26 weeks the parallel filter struts were well covered with neointima and did not perforate the vessel wall. There were no complications associated with the filter implantation. The TrapEase vena cava filter was well tolerated and is suitable for incorporation into the IVC wall of healthy animals without any apparent deleterious reaction due to biological incompatibility.

  9. Predicting Fluid Responsiveness Using Bedside Ultrasound Measurements of the Inferior Vena Cava and Physician Gestalt in the Emergency Department of an Urban Public Hospital in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Haeffele, Cathryn; Mfinanga, Juma A.; Mwafongo, Victor G.; Reynolds, Teri A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Bedside inferior vena cava (IVC) ultrasound has been proposed as a non-invasive measure of volume status. We compared ultrasound measurements of the caval index (CI) and physician gestalt to predict blood pressure response in patients requiring intravenous fluid resuscitation. Methods This was a prospective study of adult emergency department patients requiring fluid resuscitation. A structured data sheet was used to record serial vital signs and the treating clinician’s impression of patient volume status and cause of hypotension. Bedside ultrasound CI measurements were performed at baseline and after each 500mL of fluid. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to characterize the relationship between CI and Physician gestalt, and the change in mean arterial pressure (MAP). Results We enrolled 364 patients, 52% male, mean age 36 years. Indications for fluid resuscitation were haemorrhage (54%), dehydration (30%), and sepsis (17%). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis found optimal CI cut-off values of 45%, 52% and 53% to predict a MAP rise of 5, 8 and 10 mmHg per litre of fluid, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of CI of 50% for predicting a 10mmHg increase in MAP per litre were 88% (95%CI 81–93%) and 73% (95%CI 67–79%), respectively, area under the curve (AUC) = 0.85 (0.81–0.89). The sensitivity and specificity of physician gestalt estimate of volume depletion severity were 68% (95%CI 60–75%) and 86% (95%CI 80–90%), respectively, AUC = 0.83 (95% CI: 0.79–0.87). Those with a baseline CI ≥ 50% (51% of patients) had a 2.8-fold greater fluid responsiveness than those with a baseline CI<50% (p<0.0001). Conclusion Ultrasound measurement of the CI can predict blood pressure response among patients requiring intravenous fluid resuscitation and may be useful in early identification of patients who will benefit most from volume resuscitation, and those who will likely require other

  10. Hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy using 5-fluorouracil and systemic interferon-α for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma in combination with or without three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to venous tumor thrombosis in hepatic vein or inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Eisuke; Aikata, Hiroshi; Miyaki, Daisuke; Nagaoki, Yuko; Katamura, Yoshio; Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Takaki, Shintaro; Hiramatsu, Akira; Waki, Koji; Takahashi, Shoichi; Kimura, Tomoki; Kenjo, Masahiro; Nagata, Yasushi; Ishikawa, Masaki; Kakizawa, Hideaki; Awai, Kazuo; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2012-05-01

      We investigated the efficacy of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) using 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and systemic interferon (IFN)-α (HAIC-5-FU/IFN) for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with venous tumor thrombosis (VTT) in the hepatic vein trunk (Vv2) or inferior vena cava (Vv3).   Thirty-three patients with HCC/Vv2/3 underwent HAIC with 5-FU (500 mg/body weight/day, into hepatic artery on days 1-5 on the first and second weeks) and IFN-α (recombinant IFN-α-2b 3 000 000 U or natural IFN-α 5 000 000 U, intramuscularly on days 1, 3 and 5 of each week). Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) was used in combination with HAIC-5-FU/IFN in 14 of 33 patients to reduce VTT.   The median survival time (MST) was 7.9 months, and 1- and 2-year survival rates were 30% and 20%, respectively. Evaluation of intrahepatic response after two cycles of HAIC-5-FU/IFN showed complete response (CR) in three (9%) and partial response (PR) in seven (21%), with an objective response rate of 30%. Multivariate analysis identified reduction of VTT (P = 0.0006), size of largest tumor (P = 0.013) and intrahepatic response CR/PR (P = 0.030) as determinants of survival. CR/PR correlated significantly with tumor liver occupying rate (P = 0.016) and hepatitis C virus Ab (P = 0.010). Reduction of VTT correlated significantly with radiotherapy (P = 0.021) and platelet count (P = 0.015). Radiotherapy-related reduction in VTT significantly improved survival of 16 patients with Vv3 and non-CR/PR response of HAIC-5-FU/IFN (P = 0.028).   As for advanced HCC with VTT of Vv2/3, HAIC-5-FU/IFN responsive patients could obtain favorable survival. Despite ineffective HAIC-5-FU/IFN, the combination with effective radiotherapy to VTT might improve patients' prognosis. © 2011 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  11. Iatrogenic migration of VenaTech LP IVC filter to superior vena cava secondary to guidewire entrapment: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Almestady, Rajaa; Spain, James; Bayona-Molano, Maria Del Pilar; Wang, Weiping

    2013-01-01

    Modern inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are generally safe devices for preventing pulmonary embolus, with fewer complications compared to earlier techniques of caval interruption. Despite continuing improvement in filter designs and insertion methods, complications still occur. The IVC filter complications resulting from iatrogenic causes are rare and include but are not limited to misplacement, filter tilting, incomplete deployment, and filter migration. We recently experienced a problem in which the Vena Tech LP filter (B. Braun, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania) migrated to the superior vena cava (SVC) immediately after successful deployment of the filter in the infrarenal venacava. The root cause analysis of this case revealed that the complication was related to blind pullout of the J-tipped guidewire following deployment of the filter in the IVC. This report highlights the potential risks of using a wire while an IVC filter is in place.

  12. Retrievable Vena Cava Filters in Major Trauma Patients: Prevalence of Thrombus Within the Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Mahrer, Arie; Zippel, Douglas; Garniek, Alexander; Golan, Gil; Bensaid, Paul; Simon, Daniel; Rimon, Uri

    2008-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to report the prevalence of thrombus within a retrievable vena cava filter inserted prophylactically in major trauma patients referred for filter extraction. Between November 2002 and August 2005, 80 retrievable inferior vena cava filters (68 Optease and 12 Gunther-Tulip) were inserted into critically injured trauma patients (mean injury severity score 33.5). The filters were inserted within 1 to 6 (mean 2) days of injury. Thirty-seven patients were referred for filter removal (32 with Optease and 5 with Gunther-Tulip). The indwelling time was 7 to 22 (mean 13) days. All patients underwent inferior vena cavography prior to filter removal. There were no insertion-related complications and all filters were successfully deployed. Forty-three (54%) of the 80 patients were not referred for filter removal, as these patients continued to have contraindications to anticoagulation. Thirty-seven patients (46%) were referred for filter removal. In eight of them (22%) a large thrombus was seen within the filters and they were left in place, all with the Optease device. The other 29 filters (36%) were removed uneventfully.We conclude that the relatively high prevalence of intrafilter thrombi with the Optease filter may be explained by either spontaneous thrombus formation or captured emboli.

  13. Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement and Removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the leg or pelvis, a condition called deep vein thrombosis (DVT), occasionally break up and large ... It does not address the cause of the deep vein thrombosis or coagulation. Your referring physician will ...

  14. Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement and Removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... breathing, shortness of breath or even death. Until recently, IVC filters were available only as permanently implanted ... are trauma victims. who are immobile. who have recently had surgery or delivered a baby. IVC filters ...

  15. Superior vena cava syndrome with retropharyngeal edema as a complication of ventriculoatrial shunt

    PubMed Central

    Al-Natour, Mohammed S; Entezami, Pouya; Nazzal, Munier M S; Casabianca, Andrew B; Assaly, Ragheb; Riley, Kalen; Gaudin, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Thirty-seven-year old female with hydrocephalus managed by a ventriculoatrial (VA) shunt presented with upper body edema, dysphagia, and headache. Imaging demonstrated thrombosis of the superior vena cava (SVC). Direct catheter thrombolysis led to resolution of thrombus burden. Superior vena cava thrombosis is a rare consequence of VA shunting and must be managed emergently. PMID:26509004

  16. Paradoxical emboli from left superior vena cava causing recurrent brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Ch'ng, J K; Soon, J L; Lim, C H

    2012-01-01

    Persistent left superior vena cava is a rare but well-recognised condition. We describe a case of persistent left superior vena cava draining directly into the left atrium, with a fixed anatomical right-to-left shunt and paradoxical embolic events causing recurrent brain abscess. Surgical ligation was curative.

  17. The RETRIEVE trial: safety and effectiveness of the retrievable crux vena cava filter.

    PubMed

    Smouse, H Bob; Mendes, Robert; Bosiers, Marc; Van Ha, Thuong G; Crabtree, Tami

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the Crux vena cava filter in patients at risk for pulmonary embolism (PE). The Crux Biomedical Evaluation of the Crux Inferior Vena Cava Filter System trial was an international prospective, multicenter, single-arm clinical trial in 125 patients implanted with the Crux filter between June 2010 and June 2011. Follow-up was 180 days after filter placement and 30 days after filter retrieval. The primary objective was to determine whether the clinical success rate was at least 80%. Clinical success was defined as technical success of deployment and freedom from definite PE, filter migration, and device-related adverse events requiring intervention. The clinical success rate was 96.0% (120 of 125), with a one-sided lower limit of the 95% confidence interval of 91.8%. The rate of technical success was 98.4% (123 of 125). There were three cases of definite PE (2.4%), two cases of deployment failure, and no cases of device migration, embolization, fracture, or tilting. Investigators observed nine cases of thrombus (all nonocclusive) in or near the filter (six during retrieval evaluation vena cavography, two during computed tomography [CT] scans for PE symptoms, and one during CT for cancer management) and 13 cases of deep vein thrombosis. Device retrieval was attempted at a mean of 84.6 days±57.6 (range, 6-190 d) after implantation and was successful for 98.1% of patients (53 of 54). All deaths (n = 14) were determined to be unrelated to the filter or PE. The Crux vena cava filter performed safely, with high rates of clinical, technical, and retrieval success. Copyright © 2013 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Vena cava filters: a synopsis of complications and related topics.

    PubMed

    Stawicki, S P; Sims, C A; Sharma, R; Weger, N S; Truitt, M; Cipolla, J; Schrag, S P; Lorenzo, M; El Chaar, M; Torigian, D A; Kim, P K; Sarani, B

    2008-01-01

    Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism constitute common preventable causes of morbidity and mortality. The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) continues to increase. Standard anticoagulation therapy may reduce the risk of fatal PE by 75% and that of recurrent VTE by over 90%. For patients who are not candidates for anticoagulation, a vena cava filter (VCF) may be beneficial. Despite a good overall safety record, significant complications related to VCF are occasionally seen. This review discusses both procedural and non-procedural complications associated with VCF placement and use. We will also discuss VCF use in the settings of pregnancy, malignancy, and the clinical need for more than one filter.

  19. Implantation of VVI pacemaker in a patient with dextrocardia, persistent left superior vena cava, and sick sinus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Gongliang; Yang, Lili; Wu, Jinyi; Sun, Liqun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Dextrocardia, or right-lying heart, is an uncommon congenital heart disease in which the apex of the heart is located on the right side of chest. Persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVA) is a rare venous anomaly that is often associated with the abnormalities of cardiac transduction system. A case with combination of dextrocardia, persistent left superior vena cava, and sick sinus syndrome has not been reported. Methods: We used different techniques including cardiac color Doppler echocardiography, 24-hour Holter monitoring, and abdominal ultrasound to make a diagnosis and treated the patient by implanting a VVI pacemaker. Results: A 50-year-old woman was admitted with a syncope. Angiography of the right atrium and superior vena cava, echocardiography, electrocardiography, and abdominal ultrasound revealed the presence of the combination of mirror image dextrocardia, PLSVA, and sick sinus syndrome. The complex structural anomalies presented great technical challenges for interventional treatments. After thorough examination and understanding of the structural anatomy and anomalies of the superior and inferior vena cava and cardiac chambers, we successfully treated this patient by implanting a VVI pacemaker. Conclusion: Physicians must be aware of the complexity of the morphological and anatomical structures of dextrocardia accompanying PLSVC. Given that the diagnosis of situs inversus was performed at a relatively advanced age, it is therefore important to make such a correct diagnosis followed by appropriate therapeutic intervention. PMID:28151908

  20. Thrombectomy and surgical reconstruction for extensive iliocaval thrombosis in a patient with agenesis of the retrohepatic vena cava and atresia of the left renal vein.

    PubMed

    La Spada, Michele; Stilo, Francesco; Carella, Giuseppe; Salomone, Ignazio; Benedetto, Filippo; De Caridi, Giovanni; Spinelli, Francesco

    2011-08-01

    In 80% of the patients presenting with deep-venous thrombosis (DVT), a risk factor can be identified. An absent or hypoplastic infrarenal vena cava is a rare risk factor for DVT in young adults. In these cases, the prevalence of congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC) is estimated at 0.5% of the general population, up to 5% in young people. The association with coagulopathy increases the risk of DVT. We report a case of a young man who presented with a massive caval and iliofemoral-popliteal thrombosis in presence of the agenesis of retrohepatic inferior vena cava and atresia of the left renal vein. Open thrombectomy and caval reconstruction with a polytetrafluoroethylene graft were performed. Surgical option with vein reconstruction was preferred to prevent new episodes of thrombosis and the risk of acute renal failure.

  1. Early and Late Retrieval of the ALN Removable Vena Cava Filter: Results from a Multicenter Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pellerin, O.; Barral, F. G.; Lions, C.; Novelli, L.; Beregi, J. P.; Sapoval, M.

    2008-09-15

    Retrieval of removable inferior vena cava (IVC) filters in selected patients is widely practiced. The purpose of this multicenter study was to evaluate the feasibility and results of percutaneous removal of the ALN removable filter in a large patient cohort. Between November 2003 and June 2006, 123 consecutive patients were referred for percutaneous extraction of the ALN filter at three centers. The ALN filter is a removable filter that can be implanted through a femoral/jugular vein approach and extracted by the jugular vein approach. Filter removal was attempted after an implantation period of 93 {+-} 15 days (range, 6-722 days) through the right internal jugular vein approach using the dedicated extraction kit after control inferior vena cavography. Following filter removal, vena cavograms were obtained in all patients. Successful extraction was achieved in all but one case. Among these successful retrievals, additional manipulation using a femoral approach was needed when the apex of the filter was close to the IVC wall in two patients. No immediate IVC complications were observed according to the postimplantation cavography. Neither technical nor clinical differences between early and late filter retrieval were noticed. Our data confirm the safety of ALN filter retrieval up to 722 days after implantation. In infrequent cases, additional endovenous filter manipulation is needed to facilitate extraction.

  2. PORCINE VENA CAVA AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO BOVINE PERICARDIUM IN BIOPROSTHETIC PERCUTANEOUS HEART VALVES

    PubMed Central

    Munnelly, Amy; Cochrane, Leonard; Leong, Joshua; Vyavahare, Naren

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous heart valves are revolutionizing valve replacement surgery by offering a less invasive treatment option for high-risk patient populations who have previously been denied the traditional open chest procedure. Percutaneous valves need to be crimped to accommodate a small-diameter catheter during deployment, and they must then open to the size of heart valve. Thus the material used must be strong and possess elastic recoil for this application. Most percutaneous valves utilize bovine pericardium as a material of choice. One possible method to reduce the device delivery diameter is to utilize a thin, highly elastic tissue. Here we investigated porcine vena cava as an alternative to bovine pericardium for percutaneous valve application. We compared the structural, mechanical, and in vivo properties of porcine vena cava to those of bovine pericardium. While the extracellular matrix fibers of pericardium are randomly oriented, the vena cava contains highly aligned collagen and elastin fibers that impart strength to the vessel in the circumferential direction and elasticity in the longitudinal direction. Moreover, the vena cava contains a greater proportion of elastin, whereas the pericardium matrix is mainly composed of collagen. Due to its high elastin content, the vena cava is significantly less stiff than the pericardium, even after crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. Furthermore, the vena cava’s mechanical compliance is preserved after compression under forces similar to those exerted by a stent, whereas pericardium is significantly stiffened by this process. Bovine pericardium also showed surface cracks observed by scanning electron microscopy after crimping that were not seen in vena cava tissue. Additionally, the vena cava exhibited reduced calcification (46.64 ± 8.15 μg Ca/mg tissue) as compared to the pericardium (86.79 ± 10.34 μg/mg). These results suggest that the vena cava may enhance leaflet flexibility, tissue resilience, and tissue

  3. Mediastinal seminoma presenting with superior vena cava syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wanous, Amanda; McPhail, Ian R; Quevedo, J Fernando; Sandhu, Nicole P

    2017-06-08

    We present a rare cause of superior vena cava syndrome (SVC) in a previously healthy male aged 31 years. Malignancy was suspected due to unintentional weight loss and childhood exposure to radioactive fallout from a nuclear facility accident. A very large anterior mediastinal mass was identified and demonstrated to be an extragonadal seminoma. Extragonadal germ cell tumours are rare tumours with a high potential for cardiovascular, pulmonary and vascular sequelae. Studies have documented an increased risk of developing seminoma in patients with radioactive exposure. Chemotherapy was initiated, during which the patient experienced progressive and new symptoms, found to be due to extensive thromboembolic disease, which responded well to anticoagulation. Seventy-two months after completing chemotherapy, without need for surgical management, he remains free of the disease. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. [Persistent left superior vena cava. Implications in central venous catheterisation].

    PubMed

    Lacuey Lecumberri, G; Ureña, M; Martínez Basterra, J; Basterra, N

    2009-01-01

    The placement of central catheters through the subclavian and jugular venous path can be complicated by the cannulation of an artery or an aberrant venous path. The most frequent anomaly of the embryological development of the caval vein is the persistence of the left superior vena cava (LSVC). The implantation of catheters in the LSVC can be suspected by its anomalous route in thorax radiography. Gasometry and the pressure curve of the vessel make it possible to rule out an arterial catheterisation. Diagnostic confirmation is obtained through angiography, echocardiography, computerised tomography or cardiac resonance. The doctor who regularly implants central venous catheters must be familiar with the anatomy of the venous system and its variants and anomalies, since their presence might influence the handling of the patient.

  5. Intrapericardial haematic cyst. A rare form of left superior vena cava atresia.

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, A; Martinez, P; Del Campo, A

    1984-01-01

    A 21 month old infant was found to have an intrapericardial haematic cyst at operation. This rare entity may be explained by a pouch-like dilatation of an atretic left superior vena cava. Images PMID:6380550

  6. Evaluation of superior vena cava syndrome by axial CT and CT phlebography

    SciTech Connect

    Moncada, R.; Cardella, R.; Demos, T.C.; Churchill, R.J.; Cardoso, M.; Love, L.; Reynes, C.J.

    1984-10-01

    Transverse axial computed tomography (CT) has been combined with CT digital phlebography to study nine patients with superior vena cava syndrome. Six were due to malignancy, two were secondary to benign disease, and one was a paraneoplastic manifestation. This combined CT approach successfully identified the abnormal morphology of the superior vena cava, demonstrating external compression, encasement, or intraluminal thrombus in all patients and the collateral venous channels in eight. This technique is a rapid, informative, and cost-effective method for the workup of superior vena cava syndrome. The CT digital phlebogram, however, is not successful in regularly and optimally opacifying the normal superior vena cava because of the limited amount of contrast material, dilution effect of the nonopacified incoming flow from the jugular and azygos veins, and the lack of image enhancement from the CT digital scanograms.

  7. Atresia of the superior vena cava causing cyanosis and increasing head circumference in an infant.

    PubMed

    Lytrivi, Irene D; Avramidis, Dimosthenis; Sfyridis, Panagiotis; Kirvassilis, George; Sarris, George; Papagiannis, John

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of congenital atresia of the superior vena cava (SVC) with stenotic anastomoses between systemic and pulmonary veins, resulting in cyanosis and symptoms consistent with SVC syndrome in an infant.

  8. Coexistence of pulmonary embolism, aortic dissection, and persistent left superior vena cava in the same patient.

    PubMed

    Elmali, Muzaffer; Gulel, Okan; Bahcivan, Muzaffer

    2008-11-01

    We report a patient with pulmonary embolism, dissection in the descending and abdominal aorta, and persistent left superior vena cava. To our knowledge, coexistence of these three clinical entities has never been described before in the same patient.

  9. Isolated Right Superior Vena Cava Drainage into the Left Atrium Diagnosed Noninvasively in the Peripartum Period

    PubMed Central

    Baggett, Charles; Skeen, Shawn J.; Gantt, D. Scott; Trotter, Bradley R.; Birkemeier, Krista L.

    2009-01-01

    Isolated right superior vena cava drainage into the left atrium is an extremely rare cardiac anomaly, especially in the absence of other cardiac abnormalities. Only 28 of 5,127 reported consecutive congenital cardiac cases involved superior vena cava drainage into the left atrium, and all were associated with other cardiac anomalies. Of 19 reported cases of right superior vena cava drainage into the left atrium, most patients have been children who were experiencing mild hypoxemia and cyanosis. Herein, we describe the case of a 34-year-old woman who presented with asymptomatic hypoxemia in the peripartum period. She was diagnosed to have isolated drainage of the right superior vena cava into the left atrium. To the best of our knowledge, this is the 1st reported instance of such diagnosis by use of noninvasive imaging only, without cardiac catheterization. We also review the medical literature that pertains to our patient's anomaly. PMID:20069093

  10. Superior vena cava syndrome as a complication of DDD pacemaker implantation.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Y; Matsuno, Y; Izumi, S; Murakami, R; Tanaka, K; Morioka, S; Moriyama, K

    1990-04-01

    A 75-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of swelling of the face and neck 6 months after implantation of a two-chamber pacemaker. Digital subtraction angiography showed total occlusion of the superior vena cava vein and well-developed collateral channels. After thrombolytic therapy, facial swelling disappeared. Digital subtraction angiography performed after thrombolytic therapy revealed a recanalization of the superior vena cava.

  11. Persistent left superior vena cava remnant causing cyanosis in a post-Fontan patient.

    PubMed

    Baslaim, Ghassan; Hussain, Arif

    2013-05-01

    We report the successful surgical closure of a persistent left superior vena cava remnant draining into the pulmonary venous circulation causing cyanosis in a post-Fontan patient who had previously undergone Damus-Kaye-Stansel and bidirectional superior cavopulmonary connection followed by a transcatheter coil occlusion of his persistent left superior vena cava. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cardiac musculature of the cranial vena cava in the common tree shrew (Tupaia glis).

    PubMed

    Endo, H; Maeda, S; Kimura, J; Yamada, J; Rerkamnuaychoke, W; Chungsamarnyart, N; Tanigawa, M; Kurohmaru, M; Hayashi, Y; Nishida, T

    1995-10-01

    Cardiac musculature of the cranial vena cava in the common tree shrew (Tupaia glis) was examined by light and transmission electron microscopy. The common tree shrew has well developed cardiac myocyte layers in the tunica media of the cranial vena cava, extending from the right atrium to the root of the subclavian vein. Because the common tree shrew belongs to a primitive group of mammals, the occurrence of cardiac musculature in the cranial vena cava may be a common feature in lower mammals. The development of this musculature indicates that active contraction of the cranial vena cava wall occurs in this species. Electron micrographs showed the typical ultrastructure of myocytes and nerve endings. These observations suggest that this musculature may serve as a regulatory pump for the return of venous blood to the right atrium and as a blood reservoir system under conditions of rapid heart rate. Additionally, the presence of atrial natriuretic polypeptide (ANP) was also demonstrated in the myocytes of the vena cava immunohistochemically. These findings show that the cardiac endocrine organ for ANP develops even in the principal veins including the cranial vena cava.

  13. Recurrent intravenous leiomyosarcoma of the uterus in the retrohepatic vena cava

    PubMed Central

    Mckenna, Logan R.; Jones, Edward L.; Jones, Teresa S.; Nydam, Trevor; Gajdos, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    Although intravenous extension of uterine leiomyosarcomas has been described, extension into the inferior vena cava (IVC) and right atrium, so-called ‘intravenous leiomyosarcomatosis (IVLS)’, is rare. To our knowledge only a few cases have been described in the literature. We describe a case of recurrent uterine leiomyosarcoma to the retrohepatic IVC. The patient was initially treated with total abdominal hysterectomy. Follow-up computed tomography a year later showed an extensive intravascular and intracardiac soft tissue mass treated with tumor extraction using cardiac bypass. Five years later she presented to our institution with a new retrohepatic caval mass treated with surgical resection and caval grafting. IVLS is a rare disease that is best treated with surgical resection even in the recurrent setting. The role of adjuvant therapy remains unclear. PMID:25204766

  14. Stenting of the superior vena cava and left brachiocephalic vein with preserving the central venous catheter in situ.

    PubMed

    Isfort, Peter; Penzkofer, Tobias; Goerg, Fabian; Mahnken, Andreas H

    2011-01-01

    Stenting of the central veins is well established for treating localized venous stenosis. The techniques regarding catheter preservation for central venous catheters in the superior vena cava have been described. We describe here a method for stent implantation in the superior vena cava and the left brachiocephalic vein, and principally via a single jugular venous puncture, while saving a left sided jugular central venous catheter in a patient suffering from central venous stenosis of the superior vena cava and the left brachiocephalic vein.

  15. Endovascular treatment with primary stenting of inferior cava vein torsion following orthotopic liver transplantation with modified piggyback technique.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Carlo; Andorno, Enzo; Guastavino, Andrea; Rossi, Umberto G; Seitun, Sara; Bovio, Giulio; Valente, Umberto

    2014-03-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate primary stenting in patients with inferior vena cava torsion after orthotopic liver transplantation performed with modified piggyback technique. From November 2003 to October 2010, six patients developed clinical, laboratory and imaging findings suggestive of caval stenosis, after a mean period of 21 days from an orthotopic liver transplantation performed with modified piggyback technique. Vena cavography showed stenosis due to torsion of the inferior vena cava at the anastomoses and a significant caval venous pressure gradient. All patients were treated with primary stenting followed by in-stent angioplasty in three cases. In all patients, the stents were successfully positioned at the caval anastomosis and the venous gradient pressure fell from a mean value of 10 to 2 mmHg. Signs and symptoms resolved in all six patients. One patient died 3 months after stent placement due to biliary complications. No evidence of recurrence or complications was noted during the follow-up (mean 49 months). Primary stenting of inferior vena cava stenosis due to torsion of the anastomoses in patients receiving orthotopic liver transplantation with modified piggyback technique is a safe, effective and durable treatment.

  16. Evaluation of Retrievability of the Gunther Tulip Vena Cava Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Takuji Kato, Takeharu; Hirota, Tatsuya; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility and safety of withdrawal of a Gunther tulip retrievable vena cava filter (GTF). Methods. Between June 2001 and December 2005, at our institution 86 GTFs were implanted for temporary caval filtration in 59 patients (37 women, 22 men; mean age 59.3 years, range 18-87 years). For GTFs retrieved thereafter, we retrospectively reviewed the following parameters: rate of success in retrieval, degree of trapped thrombus in the filter, and complications during retrieval. Results. Worsening of or new development of pulmonary embolism after filter implantation did not occur in any patient. Of the 86 GTFs implanted, retrieval of 80 was attempted. Among those 80 filters, 77 (96%) were successfully retrieved (with the standard method, n = 72; with the modified method, n = 5) without any complication. The period of implantation of the retrieved filters was 13.4 {+-} 4.2 days. In the 5 filters that were filled to a height of {>=} 1/4 with trapped thrombus, retrieval was performed after attempts were made to decrease trapped thrombi. In addition, a temporary filter or another GTF was temporarily placed at the cephalad level of the GTF during this removal procedure. Conclusion. GTFs can be retrieved in the majority of cases. Even when encountering situations in which the filter could not be removed using the standard method, withdrawal was possible in a high frequency of cases through various trials using modified methods.

  17. Multicenter Trial of the VenaTech Convertible Vena Cava Filter.

    PubMed

    Hohenwalter, Eric J; Stone, James R; O'Moore, Paul V; Smith, Steven J; Selby, J Bayne; Lewandowski, Robert J; Samuels, Shaun; Kiproff, Paul M; Trost, David W; Madoff, David C; Handel, Jeremy; Gandras, Eric J; Vlahos, Athanasios; Rilling, William S

    2017-08-16

    To demonstrate rates of successful filter conversion and 6-month major device-related adverse events in subjects with converted caval filters. An investigational device exemption multicenter, prospective, single-arm study was performed at 11 sites enrolling 149 patients. The VenaTech Convertible Vena Cava Filter (B. Braun Interventional Systems, Inc, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania) was implanted in 149 patients with venous thromboembolism and contraindication to or failure of anticoagulation (n = 119), with high-risk trauma (n = 14), and for surgical prophylaxis (n = 16). When the patient was no longer at risk for pulmonary embolism as determined by clinical assessment, an attempt at filter conversion was made. Follow-up of converted patients (n = 93) was conducted at 30 days, 3 months, and 6 months after conversion. Patients who did not undergo a conversion attempt (n = 53) had follow-up at 6 months after implant. All implants were successful. One 7-day migration to the right atrium required surgical removal. Technical success rate for filter conversion was 92.7% (89/96). Mean time from placement to conversion was 130.7 days (range, 15-391 d). No major conversion-related events were reported. The mean conversion procedure time was 30.7 minutes (range, 7-135 min). There were 89 converted and 32 unconverted patients who completed 6-month follow-up with no delayed complications. The VenaTech Convertible filter has a high conversion rate and low 6-month device-related adverse event rate. Further studies are necessary to determine long-term safety and efficacy in both converted and unconverted patients. Copyright © 2017 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Porcine vena cava as an alternative to bovine pericardium in bioprosthetic percutaneous heart valves.

    PubMed

    Munnelly, Amy E; Cochrane, Leonard; Leong, Joshua; Vyavahare, Naren R

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous heart valves are revolutionizing valve replacement surgery by offering a less invasive treatment option for high-risk patient populations who have previously been denied the traditional open chest procedure. Percutaneous valves need to be crimped to accommodate a small-diameter catheter during deployment, and they must then open to the size of heart valve. Thus the material used must be strong and possess elastic recoil for this application. Most percutaneous valves utilize bovine pericardium as a material of choice. One possible method to reduce the device delivery diameter is to utilize a thin, highly elastic tissue. Here we investigated porcine vena cava as an alternative to bovine pericardium for percutaneous valve application. We compared the structural, mechanical, and in vivo properties of porcine vena cava to those of bovine pericardium. While the extracellular matrix fibers of pericardium are randomly oriented, the vena cava contains highly aligned collagen and elastin fibers that impart strength to the vessel in the circumferential direction and elasticity in the longitudinal direction. Moreover, the vena cava contains a greater proportion of elastin, whereas the pericardium matrix is mainly composed of collagen. Due to its high elastin content, the vena cava is significantly less stiff than the pericardium, even after crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. Furthermore, the vena cava's mechanical compliance is preserved after compression under forces similar to those exerted by a stent, whereas pericardium is significantly stiffened by this process. Bovine pericardium also showed surface cracks observed by scanning electron microscopy after crimping that were not seen in vena cava tissue. Additionally, the vena cava exhibited reduced calcification (46.64 ± 8.15 μg Ca/mg tissue) as compared to the pericardium (86.79 ± 10.34 μg/mg). These results suggest that the vena cava may provide enhanced leaflet flexibility, tissue resilience, and tissue

  19. Percutaneous Intervention of a Persistent Left Superior Vena Cava Draining Into Left Pulmonary Vein and Coarctation of the Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Bugami, Saad Al; Althobaiti, Mohammed; Momenah, Tarek; Alrahimi, Jamilah; Kashkari, Wael Al

    2016-01-01

    We describe a 54-year-old male with history of type II DM, hypertension and dyslipidemia during admission for bronchopneumonia discovered to have coarctation of the aorta and a persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) draining into the left atrium through the left superior pulmonary vein. The latter was thought to contribute to a transient ischemic attack and an episode of chest pain resulting in ST-segment elevation in the inferior leads. He was treated with coarctation stenting and percutaneous exclusion of the PLSVC with a vascular plug. PMID:28197285

  20. Evaluation of an active vena cava filter for MR imaging in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Nils A; Immel, Erwin; Donker, Hank C W; Melzer, Andreas; Ocklenburg, Christina; Guenther, Rolf W; Buecker, Arno; Krombach, Gabriele A; Spuentrup, Elmar

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided placement of an active vena cava filter (AVCF) in a swine model, the effectiveness of the system in filtering thrombi, and the detection of thrombi with MR imaging. This study was approved by the government committee on animal investigations. An AVCF tuned to the Larmor frequency of a 1.5-T MR unit was placed in the inferior vena cava (IVC) of seven pigs under real-time MR imaging guidance. Steady-state free precession sequences with four different flip angles (90°, 40°, 25°, and 15°), T1-weighted turbo spin-echo sequences with two flip angles (90° and 15°), and black-blood proton-density-weighted sequences with a flip angle of 90° were performed before and after filter placement. In six cases, extracorporeally produced thrombi were injected through the femoral access to test filter function. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were assessed before and after filter deployment and compared by using the signed-rank test. All AVCFs were successfully deployed. Significant differences (P < .05) in the SNR and CNR of the IVC were found before and after AVCF placement and between sequences with different flip angles. Intravenous thrombi were caught in all cases and clearly depicted with MR imaging. On black-blood proton-density-weighted images, high-signal-intensity thrombi inside the filter were clearly detectable without any overlaying artifacts. MR imaging-guided deployment and monitoring of an AVCF is feasible. The AVCF enhances the SNR and CNR, resulting in clear depiction of thrombi inside the filter without the need for contrast material. Design modifications for improved intracaval fixation and retrieval of the prototype AVCF will be required. © RSNA, 2010.

  1. [A case of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm with associated inferior vena caval and bilateral ureteral obstruction].

    PubMed

    Hirose, Y; Hayashida, K; Ishida, Y; Hamada, S; Takahashi, N; Takamiya, M; Ando, M; Nishimura, T

    1994-09-01

    One year ago, a 48-year-old man complained of dyspnea, and was diagnosed as mitral valve regurgitation and aortic dissection. He underwent mitral valve replacement and aortic arch grafting. He was also pointed out to have an inflammatory aortic aneurysm (IAAA) in the infrarenal abdominal aorta, but did not undergo surgery. At this admission, he had lumbago and low grade fever probably due to deterioration of the IAAA. On the preoperative radionuclide studies, inferior vena caval obstruction and bilateral ureteral obstruction or severe stenosis were demonstrated by 99mTc-MAA venography and 123I-OIH renogram, respectively. 67Ga scan showed faint abnormal accumulation at the IAAA. He underwent surgery. IAAA had a thick wall in white and hard fibrotic tissue adhered closely to duodenum, jejunum, inferior vena cava and bilateral ureters. After surgery, his renal function was improved. In this case, radionuclide studies were useful for detecting the inferior vena caval obstruction, assessing renal function and inflammatory activity.

  2. [Usefulness of vena cava filters from clinicians view].

    PubMed

    Mayer, Otto; Poklopová, Zdenka

    2015-09-01

    The indication for vena cava filters (VCF) in treatment of venous thromboembolism is still controversial. The presented overview should support the practical decisions. Beside of large volume of observational date there is only one study - PREPIC 1 - fulfilling requirements of prospective randomized design. During 8 years of follow up, pulmonary embolism (PE) was less frequent in the group with VCF than in the group without VCF, but at the cost of more frequent deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Other, but observational studies, showed similar results. Since last 10 years retrievable VCF are available. PREPIC 2 study was settled to prove, if use of retrievable VCF and their early removal will decrease the frequency of late complications observed in PREPIC 1. The results are available as conference abstract only, but it was presented that recurrence of DVT and PE was less frequent in group without IVC than with inserted VCF. Evaluation of impact of VCF insertion on mortality from RIETE registry showed only a trend which was in favour of VCF. On the other hand, a protective effect of VCF was demonstrated in hemodynamically unstable patients with PE (cardiogenic shock, massive embolism) with or without thrombolytic therapy evaluating cases from US NIS registry. Metaanalysis of studies in patients with polytrauma showed VCF protection mainly in patients where anticoagulation was contraindicated. Data gained from literature are discussed with existing guidelines. 2014 Recommendations of European Cardiologic Society is thatVC filters may be used when there are absolute contraindications to anticoagulation and a high risk of VTE recurrence. The routine use of IVC filters in patients with PE is not recommended.

  3. Persistent left superior vena cava in cardiac congenital surgery.

    PubMed

    Giuliani-Poncini, Cristina; Perez, Marie-Hélène; Cotting, Jacques; Hurni, Michel; Sekarski, Nicole; Pfammatter, Jean-Pierre; Di Bernardo, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Persistent left superior vena cava (LSVC) is a relatively frequent finding in congenital cardiac malformation. The scope of the study was to analyze the timing of diagnosis of persistent LSVC, the timing of diagnosis of associated anomalies of the coronary sinus, and the global impact on morbidity and mortality of persistent LSVC in children with congenital heart disease after cardiac surgery. Retrospective analysis of a cohort of children after cardiac surgery on bypass for congenital heart disease. Three hundred seventy-one patients were included in the study, and their median age was 2.75 years (IQR 0.65-6.63). Forty-seven children had persistent LSVC (12.7 %), and persistent LSVC was identified on echocardiography before surgery in 39 patients (83 %). In three patients (6.4 %) with persistent LSVC, significant inflow obstruction of the left ventricle developed after surgery leading to low output syndrome or secondary pulmonary hypertension. In eight patients (17 %), persistent LSVC was associated with a partially or completely unroofed coronary sinus and in two cases (4 %) with coronary sinus ostial atresia. Duration of mechanical ventilation was significantly shorter in the control group (1.2 vs. 3.0 days, p = 0.04), whereas length of stay in intensive care did not differ. Mortality was also significantly lower in the control group (2.5 vs. 10.6 %, p = 0.004). The results of study show that persistent LSVC in association with congenital cardiac malformation increases the risk of mortality in children with cardiac surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass. Recognition of a persistent LSVC and its associated anomalies is mandatory to avoid complications during or after cardiac surgery.

  4. Vena cava filter retrieval in therapeutically anticoagulated patients.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, Thomas M; Christmas, A Britton; Taylor, Dennis A; Heniford, B Todd; Sing, Ronald F

    2008-12-01

    Vena cava filters (VCFs) are indicated in patients with active venous thromboembolism and are a contraindication to therapeutic anticoagulation. When patients can be anticoagulated, VCFs can be removed; however, patients often have anticoagulation discontinued during the retrieval procedure, leaving them at risk for pulmonary embolism (PE). The authors evaluated their experience with retrieving VCFs in therapeutically anticoagulated patients. Data from a prospectively collected database of patients with VCFs placed between January 2005 and September 2007 were reviewed. The retrievals in therapeutically anticoagulated patients (international normalized ratio, 2.0-3.4) were performed using a strict protocol, including preretrieval and postretrieval cavograms. All retrievals were performed in the operating room, and patients were discharged home the same day and examined within 7 to 14 days. Descriptive statistics including means and counts were calculated. One hundred thirteen VCF removals occurred during the study period; 62 were attempted on anticoagulated patients (42 male and 20 female patients; mean age, 36.5 years). Thirty-five patients (56%) had VCFs placed for prophylaxis, 22 (35%) had deep venous thromboses or PEs but had contraindications to anticoagulation, and 5 (8%) were on anticoagulation, which was discontinued perioperatively for major surgical operations. The mean time the filters were in place was 153.7 days (range, 22-684 days). No extravasation was seen on postretrieval cavography. Eight of 62 removal attempts in anticoagulated patients were unsuccessful. One patient had a postoperative pneumothorax that was successfully managed without intervention. There were no operative bleeding complications, and no hematomas or contusions were seen at follow-up. The retrieval of VCFs in therapeutically anticoagulated patients can be performed without complication. Given the perioperative risk for PE, anticoagulation should not be discontinued for VCF

  5. Percutaneous replacement of a right jugular dialysis catheter via a stenosed superior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Lau, K Y; Chan, J K W; Wong, W W C; Lo, S H K

    2006-06-01

    A female patient with end-stage renal failure, who was maintained on haemodialysis via multiple central dialysis catheters, developed chronic occlusion of the left brachiocephalic vein. Subsequently, the right jugular dual lumen PermCath became dysfunctional because of marked superior vena cava stenosis. Angioplasty of the superior vena cava stenosis was performed but failed to restore adequate catheter function. The patient was referred for possible salvage of her central venous access and re-insertion of a new PermCath. During surgery, the right jugular PermCath was removed, the superior vena cava was stented to establish venous patency, and a new PermCath was re-inserted via the existing right jugular puncture site. The technique helps reduce cost and time, and avoids another jugular puncture. In addition, this procedure saves a central venous access which is important in patients on long-term haemodialysis.

  6. Persistent Left Superior Vena Cava Draining into the Coronary Sinus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kurtoglu, Ertugrul; Cakin, Ozlem; Akcay, Selahaddin; Akturk, Erdal; Korkmaz, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) is a congenital anomaly of the thoracic venous system resulting from the abnormal persistence of an embryological vessel that normally regresses during early fetal life. This anomaly is often discovered incidentally during surgery, cardiovascular imaging or invasive cardiovascular procedures. In most cases, a PLSVC drains into the right atrium through the coronary sinus. In the remainder of cases, it enters directly or through the pulmonary veins into the left atrium. A dilated coronary sinus on echocardiography should always raise the suspicion of a PLSVC as it has important clinical implications. The diagnosis should be confirmed by saline contrast echocardiography. We report a patient with persistent left superior vena cava with an enlarged coronary sinus and normal right superior vena cava.

  7. [Histogenesis and structural organization of the walls of rat venae cavae and pulmonary veins].

    PubMed

    Iamshchikov, N V; Krugliakov, P P; Koshev, V I; Petrov, E S; Rudenko, E Iu; Iamshchikova, E N

    2004-01-01

    Using light and electron microscopic methods, the histogenesis and structural organization of the walls of rat venae cavae and pulmonary veins were studied in prenatal and postnatal periods of development. The special attention was paid to the appearance of the striated myocytes in the walls of these vessels during the process of ontogenesis. The time of initial divergent development of myoblastic differon was established, the stages of differentiation of striated myoblasts and the peculiarities of intercellular junctions were characterized, as well as the innervation and vascularization of the walls of venae cavae and pulmonary veins.

  8. Imaging of the vena cava in the intensive care unit prior to vena cava filter insertion: carbon dioxide as an alternative to iodinated contrast.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, Thomas M; Christmas, A Britton; Jacobs, David G; Heniford, B Todd; Sing, Ronald F

    2008-02-01

    This study evaluates the safety and effectiveness of carbon dioxide (CO2) as a contrast agent in patients in the intensive care unit undergoing vena cava filter (VCF) insertion. We prospectively evaluated patients in the intensive care unit undergoing bedside VCF insertion using CO2 cavagraphy. Blood pressure, pulse rate, mixed venous oxygen saturation, and intracranial pressure were monitored before, during, and after the CO2 injection. Fifty patients in the intensive care unit (mean age 48.2 +/- 16.5 years) were included in the study. Five patients had decreases in blood pressure, which resolved without intervention. Two patients required iodinated contrast as a result of inadequate CO2 imaging. All patients had successful insertion of VCF. The use of CO2 as a contrast agent is a safe and highly effective alternative for vena cava imaging and can be considered the first-line contrast agent for all critically ill patients requiring VCF placement.

  9. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Creation in Budd-Chiari Syndrome: Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Direct Simultaneous Puncture of the Portal Vein and Vena Cava

    SciTech Connect

    Boyvat, Fatih Aytekin, Cueneyt; Harman, Ali; Ozin, Yasemin

    2006-10-15

    Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) is an uncommon disorder that can be life-threatening, depending on the degree of hepatic venous outflow obstruction. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) provides decompression of the congested liver but the hepatic vein obstruction makes the procedure more difficult. We describe a modified method that involved a single percutaneous puncture of the portal vein and inferior vena cava simultaneously for TIPS creation in a patient with BCS.

  10. Thrombosis of the cranial vena cava in a cow with bronchopneumonia and traumatic reticuloperitonitis

    PubMed Central

    Gerspach, Christian; Wirz, Mirjam; Schweizer-Knubben, Gabriela; Braun, Ueli

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the clinical findings, surgical and medical management, and necropsy of a 6-year-old cow with thrombosis of the cranial vena cava and thrombo-embolic pneumonia following traumatic reticuloperitonitis. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by necropsy. PMID:22547845

  11. Cranial vena cava syndrome secondary to cryptococcal mediastinal granuloma in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Letendre, Jo-Annie; Boysen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    The successful management of cranial vena cava syndrome with suspected secondary chylothorax due to mediastinal cryptococcal granuloma in a 4-year-old male domestic shorthair cat is described. Treatment included long-term antifungal medication, short-term corticosteroids, intermittent thoracocentesis, rutin, octreotide, and enalapril. PMID:25829555

  12. Cardiac Metastasis from Invasive Thymoma Via the Superior Vena Cava: Cardiac MRI Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Dursun, Memduh Sarvar, Sadik; Cekrezi, Bledi; Kaba, Erkan; Bakir, Baris; Toker, Alper

    2008-07-15

    Cardiac tumors are rare, and metastatic deposits are more common than primary cardiac tumors. We present cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 50-year-old woman with invasive thymoma. Cardiac MRI revealed a heterogeneous, lobulated anterior mediastinal mass invading the superior vena cava and extending to the right atrium. In cine images there was no invasion to the right atrial wall.

  13. Vena cava filter placement using a cutdown of the superficial epigastric vein.

    PubMed

    Danikas, D; Theodorou, S J V; Ginalis, E M; Stratoulias, C; Singh, R; Constantinopoulos, G

    2002-01-01

    Percutaneous placement of vena cava filters through the femoral vein has been associated with insertion site venous thrombosis. Reported incidence varies from 2% to 41%. In the majority of placements, sequential dilators are used to create the venotomy and subcutaneous tract. This technique disrupts all layers of the vein wall. The injured area may extend as far proximal as the dilator or sheath is placed. The authors present their experience with placement of vena cava filters using a cutdown of the superficial epigastric vein. During a 5-year period, 2