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Sample records for inflamed colonic mucosa

  1. Gene expression alterations in inflamed and unaffected colon mucosa from patients with mild inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lili; Ma, Lili; Lian, Jingjing; Yang, Jiayin; Chen, Shiyao

    2016-03-01

    An endoscopic examination is currently the most reliable method for monitoring disease activity in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, endoscopic evaluations are unable to detect mucosal inflammation at the earliest stages. The present study aimed to evaluate the molecular profiles of inflamed and unaffected colon mucosa from patients with mild Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), in order to identify a more sensitive method for monitoring mucosal impairment. Patients were recruited and colon biopsies from the inflamed and the normal‑appearing mucosa of patients with mild IBD were obtained by colonoscopy. Gene expression analysis was performed using microarrays, after which Gene Ontology and clustering were performed using bioinformatics. In addition, the levels of inflammatory cytokines were analyzed by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. A total of 620 genes in the inflamed and 210 genes in the unaffected colon mucosa with at least a 3‑fold change, as compared with healthy controls, were detected in patients with mild CD, and 339 genes in the inflamed and 483 genes in the unaffected colon mucosa were detected in patients with mild UC. Heat mapping demonstrated a similarity in the gene alteration patterns, and altered transcripts overlapped, between the inflamed and unaffected colon mucosa. Interferon‑γ and interleukin‑17 mRNA levels were comparably elevated in the inflamed and unaffected colon mucosa from patients with IBD. Marked gene expression alterations were detected in the inflamed and unaffected colon mucosa from patients with mild IBD, and these showed marked similarity and overlap between the two groups. The results of the present study suggested that inflammation was not limited to the endoscopic lesions and that gene expression profiling may be considered a sensitive tool for monitoring mucosal inflammation, predicting relapses and optimizing therapeutic strategies for patients with

  2. ToF-SIMS and principal component analysis of lipids and amino acids from inflamed and dysplastic human colonic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Urbini, Marco; Petito, Valentina; de Notaristefani, Francesco; Scaldaferri, Franco; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Tortora, Luca

    2017-08-03

    Here, time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and multivariate analysis were combined to study the role of ulcerative colitis (UC), a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), in the colon cancer progression. ToF-SIMS was used to obtain mass spectra and chemical maps from the mucosal surface of human normal (NC), inflamed (IC), and dysplastic (DC) colon tissues. Chemical mapping with a lateral resolution of ≈ 1 μm allowed to evaluate zonation of fatty acids and amino acids as well as the morphological condition of the intestinal glands. High mass resolution ToF-SIMS spectra showed chemical differences in lipid and amino acid composition as a function of pathological state. In positive ion mode, mono- (MAG), di- (DAG), and triacylglycerol (TAG) signals were detected in NC tissues, while in IC and DC tissues, the only cholesterol was present as lipid class representative. Signals from fatty acids, collected in negative ion mode, were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA). PCA showed a strict correlation between IC and DC samples, due to an increase of stearic, arachidonic, and linoleic acid. In the same way, differences in the amino acid composition were highlighted through multivariate analysis. PCA revealed that glutamic acid, leucine/isoleucine, and valine fragments are related to IC tissues. On the other hand, tyrosine, methionine, and tryptophan peaks contributed highly to the separation of DC tissues. Finally, a classification of NC, IC, and DC patients was also achieved through hierarchical cluster analysis of amino acid fragments. In this case, human colonic inflammation showed a stronger relationship with normal than dysplastic condition. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. Epstein-Barr Virus Infection is Common in Inflamed Gastrointestinal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Julie L.; Shen, You-Jun; Morgan, Douglas R.; Thorne, Leigh B.; Kenney, Shannon C.; Dominguez, Ricardo L.; Gulley, Margaret L.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is present in the malignant epithelial cells of 10% of all gastric adenocarcinomas, however localization of the virus in normal gastrointestinal mucosa is largely unexplored. In the current study, we measured EBV DNA and localized viral gene products in gastritis specimens (n=89), normal gastric and colonic mucosa (n=14), Crohn’s disease (n=9), and ulcerative colitis (n=11) tissues. Methods A battery of sensitive and specific quantitative polymerase chain reactions targeted six disparate regions of the EBV genome: BamH1W, EBNA1, LMP1, LMP2, BZLF1, and EBER1. EBV infection was localized by EBV-encoded RNA (EBER) in situ hybridization and by immunohistochemical stains for viral latent proteins LMP1 and LMP2 and for viral lytic proteins BMRF1 and BZLF1. B lymphocytes were identified using CD20 immunostains. Results EBV DNA was essentially undetectable in normal gastric mucosa but was present in 46% of gastritis lesions, 44% of normal colonic mucosa, 55% of Crohn’s disease, and 64% of ulcerative colitis samples. Levels of EBV DNA exceeded what would be expected based on the numbers of B lymphocytes in inflamed tissues, suggesting that EBV is preferentially localized to inflammatory gastrointestinal lesions. Histochemical staining revealed EBER expression in lymphoid cells of some PCR-positive lesions. The viral lytic viral proteins, BMRF1 and BZLF1, were expressed in lymphoid cells of two ulcerative colitis tissues, both of which had relatively high viral loads by quantitative PCR. Conclusion EBV-infected lymphocytes are frequently present in inflamed gastric and colonic mucosa. Active viral replication in some lesions raises the possibility of virus-related perpetuation of gastrointestinal inflammation. PMID:22410851

  4. A novel protocol allowing oral delivery of a protein complement inhibitor that subsequently targets to inflamed colon mucosa and ameliorates murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Elvington, M; Blichmann, P; Qiao, F; Scheiber, M; Wadsworth, C; Luzinov, I; Lucero, J; Vertegel, A; Tomlinson, S

    2014-01-01

    While there is evidence of a pathogenic role for complement in inflammatory bowel disease, there is also evidence for a protective role that relates to host defence and protection from endotoxaemia. There is thus concern regarding the use of systemic complement inhibition as a therapeutic strategy. Local delivery of a complement inhibitor to the colon by oral administration would ameliorate such concerns, but while formulations exist for oral delivery of low molecular weight drugs to the colon, they have not been used successfully for oral delivery of proteins. We describe a novel pellet formulation consisting of cross-linked dextran coated with an acrylic co-polymer that protects the complement inhibitor CR2-Crry from destruction in the gastrointestinal tract. CR2-Crry containing pellets administered by gavage, were characterized using a therapeutic protocol in a mouse model of dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Oral treatment of established colitis over a 5-day period significantly reduced mucosal inflammation and injury, with similar therapeutic benefit whether or not the proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, was co-administered. Reduction in injury was associated with the targeting of CR2-Crry to the mucosal surface and reduced local complement activation. Treatment had no effect on systemic complement activity. This novel method for oral delivery of a targeted protein complement inhibitor will reduce systemic effects, thereby decreasing the risk of opportunistic infection, as well as lowering the required dose and treatment cost and improving patient compliance. Furthermore, the novel delivery system described here may provide similar benefits for administration of other protein-based drugs, such as anti-tumour necrosis factor-α antibodies. PMID:24730624

  5. Karyometry of the colonic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Alberts, David S; Einspahr, Janine G; Krouse, Robert S; Prasad, Anil; Ranger-Moore, James; Hamilton, Peter; Ismail, Ayaaz; Lance, Peter; Goldschmid, Steven; Hess, Lisa M; Yozwiak, Michael; Bartels, Hubert G; Bartels, Peter H

    2007-12-01

    The study summarizes results of karyometric measurements in epithelial cells of the colorectal mucosa to document evidence of a field effect of preneoplastic development among patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma or adenoma. Karyometric analyses were done on high-resolution images of histologic sections from 48 patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas and 44 patients with adenomas and on images from matching normal-appearing mucosa directly adjacent to such lesions, at a 1-cm and 10-cm distance from the lesions or from the rectal mucosa of adenoma patients, as well as from 24 healthy normal controls with no family history of colonic disease. The nuclei recorded in the histologically normal-appearing mucosa of patients with either colorectal adenoma or adenocarcinoma exhibited differences in karyometric features in comparison with nuclei recorded in rectal mucosa from patients who were free of a colonic lesion. These differences were expressed to the same extent in tissue adjacent to the lesions and in normal-appearing tissue as distant as the rectum. The nuclear chromatin pattern may serve as an integrating biomarker for a preneoplastic development. The field effect might provide an end point in chemopreventive intervention trials.

  6. Oxidative stress disrupts purinergic neuromuscular transmission in the inflamed colon

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jane A; Durnin, Leonie; Sharkey, Keith A; Mutafova-Yambolieva, Violeta N; Mawe, Gary M

    2013-01-01

    Colitis, induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) in guinea pig, leads to decreased purinergic neuromuscular transmission resulting in a reduction in inhibitory junction potentials (IJPs) in colonic circular muscle. We explored possible mechanisms responsible for this inflammation-induced neurotransmitter plasticity. Previous studies have suggested that the deficit in inflamed tissue involves decreased ATP release. We therefore hypothesized that decreased purinergic transmission results from inflammation-induced free radical damage to mitochondria, leading to decreased purine synthesis and release. Stimulus-induced release of purines was measured using high-performance liquid chromatography, and quantities of all purines measured were significantly reduced in the inflamed colons as compared to controls. To test whether decreased mitochondrial function affects the IJP, colonic muscularis preparations were treated with the mitochondrial ATP synthase inhibitors oligomycin or dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, which resulted in a significant reduction of IJP amplitude. Induction of oxidative stress in vitro, by addition of H2O2 to the preparation, also significantly reduced IJP amplitude. Purinergic neuromuscular transmission was significantly restored in TNBS-inflamed guinea pigs, and in dextran sodium sulfate-inflamed mice, treated with a free radical scavenger. Furthermore, propulsive motility in the distal colons of guinea pigs with TNBS colitis was improved by in vivo treatment with the free radical scavenger. We conclude that oxidative stress contributes to the reduction in purinergic neuromuscular transmission measured in animal models of colitis, and that these changes can be prevented by treatment with a free radical scavenger, resulting in improved motility. PMID:23732648

  7. Differences in cellular glycoconjugates of quiescent, inflamed, and neoplastic colonic epithelium in colitis and cancer-prone tamarins.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R.; King, N.; Alroy, J.

    1988-01-01

    In the preceding paper the authors demonstrated that the lectin staining patterns of normal colonic epithelium obtained from colitis and carcinoma-prone cotton top tamarins (CTTs), Saguinus oedipus, a New World primate, differs from colitis- and carcinoma-resistant primate species. In this study they determined the usefulness of cytochemical features in inflamed epithelium as indicators for malignant change. They compared the lectin staining pattern in inflamed mucosa and adjacent mucosa with colonic carcinoma from 8 CTTs with that of 9 clinically healthy CTTs with no histologic evidence of colitis. Deparaffinized sections were labeled with ten biotinylated lectins and stained by the avidin-biotin peroxidase complex method. Numerous significant differences were demonstrated in the lectin staining pattern between normal epithelium and colonic carcinoma; fewer between normal and chronic inflamed epithelium. However, between chronic inflamed epithelium and colonic carcinoma significant staining differences were observed with only two lectins, peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I). These findings suggest that there is a progression in alteration of lectin staining pattern from normal epithelium, via chronic colitis, to colonic carcinoma. Furthermore, the differences between chronic colitis and colonic carcinoma are expressed only with those lectins that are associated with malignant transformation of human colonic epithelium. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3132858

  8. Enhanced transferrin receptor expression by proinflammatory cytokines in enterocytes as a means for local delivery of drugs to inflamed gut mucosa.

    PubMed

    Harel, Efrat; Rubinstein, Abraham; Nissan, Aviram; Khazanov, Elena; Nadler Milbauer, Mirela; Barenholz, Yechezkel; Tirosh, Boaz

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic intervention in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) is often associated with adverse effects related to drug distribution into non-diseased tissues, a situation which attracts a rational design of a targeted treatment confined to the inflamed mucosa. Upon activation of immune cells, transferrin receptor (TfR) expression increases at their surface. Because TfR is expressed in all cell types we hypothesized that its cell surface levels are regulated also in enterocytes. We, therefore, compared TfR expression in healthy and inflamed human colonic mucosa, as well as healthy and inflamed colonic mucosa of the DNBS-induced rat model. TfR expression was elevated in the colonic mucosa of IBD patients in both the basolateral and apical membranes of the enterocytes. Increased TfR expression was also observed in colonocytes of the induced colitis rats. To explore the underlying mechanism CaCo-2 cells were treated with various proinflammatory cytokines, which increased both TfR expression and transferrin cellular uptake in a mechanism that did not involve hyper proliferation. These findings were then exploited for the design of targetable carrier towards inflamed regions of the colon. Anti-TfR antibodies were conjugated to nano-liposomes. As expected, iron-starved Caco-2 cells internalized anti-TfR immunoliposomes better than controls. Ex vivo binding studies to inflamed mucosa showed that the anti-TfR immunoliposomes accumulated significantly better in the mucosa of DNBS-induced rats than the accumulation of non-specific immunoliposomes. It is concluded that targeting mucosal inflammation can be accomplished by nano-liposomes decorated with anti-TfR due to inflammation-dependent, apical, elevated expression of the receptor.

  9. Intestinal metaplasia of the stomach and esophagus: an immunohistochemical study of 60 cases including comparison with normal and inflamed intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Chlumská, Alena; Mukenšnabl, Petr; Mareček, Petr; Zámečník, Michal

    2014-07-01

    Recently, a new classification of intestinal metaplasia (IM) using immunohistochemical mucin markers was proposed. Two following types of IM were defined: (1) a mixed gastric and intestinal type also called incomplete IM; (2) a purely intestinal type, also called complete IM. We present a series of 30 cases of gastric IM and 30 cases of IM of the esophagus, using this new classification. In all gastric cases, IM developed in the mucus-neck region in the form of incomplete IM. Toward the mucosa surface, it matured gradually into complete IM. This maturation showed a gradual reduction of both foveolar mucin MUC5AC and pyloric gland mucin MUC6. In two of 30 cases, IM was of the incomplete hyperproliferative type. In one case, focal high-grade adenomatous dysplasia was found in the incomplete IM. In the esophageal cases, IM was found in inflamed cardiac-type mucosa, and it was usually of the incomplete type, with almost diffuse positivity for MUC5AC and with rare positivity of MUC6. The goblet cells and some cylindrical cells expressed intestinal mucin MUC2. The proliferation was higher than in the complete IM, and in one case, focal low grade adenomatous dysplasia was found. In addition, we examined the expression of mucins in normal and inflamed intestinal mucosa. These cases included 50 duodenal biopsies, 50 biopsies from the ileum, and 50 biopsies from the colon. The inflamed cases included celiac disease, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis. Some goblet cells of the normal intestinal mucosa expressed both MUC2 and MUC5AC. More numerous MUC5AC+ goblet cells were found in the inflamed intestinal mucosa. In the duodenal and small intestinal mucosa, even the MUC6 positivity of a few goblet or cylindrical cells was found. In sum, our results indicate that incomplete IM is an initial step of the metaplastic process. It can mature into complete IM, or alternatively, it can develop dysplasia or adenocarcinoma. In addition, we found that gastric-type mucins are also

  10. Self assembled hyaluronic acid nanoparticles as a potential carrier for targeting the inflamed intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Vafaei, Seyed Yaser; Esmaeili, Motahareh; Amini, Mohsen; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Ostad, Seyed Naser; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2016-06-25

    To develop a nanoparticulate drug carrier for targeting of the inflamed intestinal mucosa, amphiphilic hyaluronic acid (HA) conjugates were synthesized, which could form self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous solution and budesonide (BDS) was loaded into the HANPs. Their particle sizes were in the range of 177 to 293nm with negative surface charge. The model of inflammatory CACO-2 cells was utilized to investigate the therapeutic potential of budesonide loaded HA nanocarriers. The highest expression of CD44 receptors was found on inflamed Caco-2 cells, as determined by flow cytometry. FITC-labeled HANPs revealed greater uptake in inflamed CACO-2 cells compared to untreated CACO-2 and CD44-negative cell lines, NIH3T3. BDS loaded HANPs displayed almost no toxicity indicating HANPs are excellent biocompatible nano-carriers. BDS loaded HANPs demonstrated higher anti-inflammatory effect on IL-8 and TNF-α secretion in inflamed cell model compared to the same dose of free drug. These results revealed the promising potential of HA nanoparticles as a targeted drug delivery system for IBD treatment.

  11. Probiotics modulate inflammatory cytokine secretion from inflamed mucosa in active ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Bai, A-P; Ouyang, Q; Xiao, X-R; Li, S-F

    2006-03-01

    Enteric microflora of ulcerative colitis patients becomes aberrant. The abnormal interaction between microflora and intestinal mucosal immune system leads the mucosal inflammation. Probiotic administration may recover the commensal microflora and normalise the host-microbial interaction. In this experiment, we cocultured colonic biopsies from active ulcerative colitis patients with bifidobacterium to investigate the modulation effect of probiotics on inflamed colonic tissues and its possible mechanism. Colonic biopsies from active ulcerative colitis were cocultured for 24 h with Bifidobacterium longum. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-8 in supernatants were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, the biopsies were fixed using paraffin and the expression of NF-kappaB P65 of tissues was studied using immunohistochemical staining. The concentrations of TNF-alpha and IL-8 in supernatants of tissues cocultured with probiotics were lower than those cultured alone. The number of lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) with nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) P65 positive in cocultured tissues was also decreased. When cocultured with inflamed tissues of active ulcerative colitis, probiotics could inhibit NF-kappaB activation in LPMC and down-regulate inflammatory cytokine secretion from inflamed tissues of active ulcerative colitis.

  12. Platelet activating factor: release from colonic mucosa in patients with ulcerative colitis and its effect on colonic secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Wardle, T D; Hall, L; Turnberg, L A

    1996-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators have been implicated in the pathophysiology of ulcerative colitis. They may stimulate intestinal secretion and contribute to the production of diarrhoea. Platelet activating factor (PAF) may be responsible for a high proportion of this secretory response. Biopsy specimens from inflamed and quiescent mucosa of patients with ulcerative colitis and normal human colonic mucosa were cultured or co-cultured. The release of PAF, prostaglandin E2, and leukotriene D4 into the culture medium was measured and the ability of this culture medium, from inflamed and normal tissues, to influence secretion in rat colonic mucosa was assessed. PAF was liberated by inflamed tissue. Its release from quiescent but not normal tissue was stimulated by medium in which inflamed mucosal biopsy tissues had been cultured and by exogenous bradykinin and 5-hydroxytryptamine, but not by histamine. PAF stimulated eicosanoid production. The rise in short circuit current produced in vitro by inflamed tissue culture medium was inhibited by the PAF receptor antagonist (CV 6209) (46%) (32.4 (2.9) v 17.5 (1.19) muA.cm-2, p < 0.005) and further by combined cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibition (indomethacin plus ICI 207968) (58%) (32.4 (2.9) v 13.6 (1.9) muA.cm-2, p < 0.005). Mepacrine and hydrocortisone attenuated considerably the electrical response evoked by medium from inflamed mucosa to a similar extent (32.4 (2.9) v 6.3 (1.2) v 5.1 (0.9) muA.cm-2, p < 0.001). These data suggest that PAF accounted for 46% of the culture medium secretory effect. Thus, any attempt to block its release in patients with ulcerative colitis may have only a partial effect on their symptoms. PMID:8675086

  13. Immunohistochemical changes in morphologically involved and uninvolved colonic mucosa of patients with idiopathic proctitis.

    PubMed Central

    Das, K M; Erber, W F; Rubinstein, A

    1977-01-01

    Alterations in secretory component, IgA, IgG, and IgM were studied by immunofluorescent techniques in mucosal biopsy specimens obtained at colonoscopy from inflamed and grossly uninvolved colonic mucosa from 12 patients with idiopathic proctitis. Parotid-salivary secretory component and IgA and serum immunoglobulins were also investigated. Decreased secretory IgA was observed in the epithelium of all grossly involved rectal mucosa and in 40% of proximal normal mucosa. Salivary secretory IgA was not diminished. These observations suggest that a local immune defect may be pathogenetically related to idiopathic proctitis. Images PMID:320226

  14. Recovery time for inflamed middle ear mucosa in chronic otitis media.

    PubMed

    Pakır, Onur; Dinç, Aykut Erdem; Damar, Murat; Akyıldız, İlker; Eliçora, Sultan Şevik; Erdem, Duygu

    2016-01-01

    The present study shows that 2-3 weeks after medical treatment the status of middle ear mucosa in draining ears is similar to that of dry ears for at least 3 months. To measure the time required for an inflamed middle ear mucosa to return into optimal state after appropriate medical treatment in chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). To assess optimal timing for elective surgical treatment of draining ears in uncomplicated CSOM. In this prospective study, the Eustachian tube (ET) mucociliary clearance time (MCT) was used as the method to demonstrate the status of middle ear mucosa. In group 1 (28 patients) ET-MCT was measured in ears that were free of drainage for at least 3 months. In Group 2 (21 patients), ET-MCT was measured in draining ears, who responded to 10-14 days medical treatment, at presentation, after 10 days and 1 month. The ET-MCT was 8.63 ± 1.32 min in group 1 and 28.96 ± 8.19 min in group 2 at presentation; and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.001). The ET-MCT was 14.76 ± 5.11 min after 10 days and 9.31 ± 2.33 min after 1 month in group 2. The ET-MCT was indifferent between groups 1 and 2 after 1 month (p = 0.235).

  15. Modeling the transcriptome of genital tract epithelial cells and macrophages in healthy mucosa versus mucosa inflamed by Chlamydia muridarum infection

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Raymond M.; Kerr, Micah S.

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis urogenital serovars are intracellular bacteria that parasitize human reproductive tract epithelium. As the principal cell type supporting bacterial replication, epithelial cells are central to Chlamydia immunobiology initially as sentries and innate defenders, and subsequently as collaborators in adaptive immunity-mediated bacterial clearance. In asymptomatic individuals who do not seek medical care a decisive struggle between C. trachomatis and host defenses occurs at the epithelial interface. For this study, we modeled the immunobiology of epithelial cells and macrophages lining healthy genital mucosa and inflamed/infected mucosa during the transition from innate to adaptive immunity. Upper reproductive tract epithelial cell line responses were compared to bone marrow-derived macrophages utilizing gene expression microarray technology. Those comparisons showed minor differences in the intrinsic innate defenses of macrophages and epithelial cells. Major lineage-specific differences in immunobiology relate to epithelial collaboration with adaptive immunity including an epithelial requirement for inflammatory cytokines to express MHC class II molecules, and a paucity and imbalance between costimulatory and coinhibitory ligands on epithelial cells that potentially limits sterilizing immunity (replication termination) to Chlamydia-specific T cells activated with limited or unconventional second signals. PMID:26519447

  16. Aberrant Gene Expression Profile of Unaffected Colon Mucosa from Patients with Unifocal Colon Polyp

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Jingjing; Ma, Lili; Yang, Jiayin; Xu, Lili

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate gene expression profiles in unaffected colon mucosa and polyp tissue from patients with unifocal colon polyp to investigate the potential mucosa impairment in normal-appearing colon mucosa from these patients. Material/Methods Colon polyp patients were prospectively recruited. We obtained colon biopsies from the normal-appearing sites and polyp tissue through colonoscopy. Gene expression analysis was performed using microarrays. Gene ontology and clustering were evaluated by bioinformatics. Results We detected a total of 711 genes (274 up-regulated and 437 down-regulated) in polyp tissue and 256 genes (170 up-regulated and 86 down-regulated) in normal-appearing colon mucosa, with at least a 3-fold of change compared to healthy controls. Heatmapping of the gene expression showed similar gene alteration patterns between unaffected colon mucosa and polyp tissue. Gene ontology analyses confirmed the overlapped molecular functions and pathways of altered gene expression between unaffected colon mucosa and polyp tissue from patients with unifocal colon polyp. The most significantly altered genes in normal-appearing tissues in polyp patients include immune response, external side of plasma membrane, nucleus, and cellular response to zinc ion. Conclusions Significant gene expression alterations exist in unaffected colon mucosa from patients with unifocal colon polyp. Unaffected colon mucosa and polyp tissue share great similarity and overlapping of altered gene expression profiles, indicating the potential possibility of recurrence of colon polyps due to underlying molecular abnormalities of colon mucosa in these patients. PMID:26675397

  17. Cannabidiol and Palmitoylethanolamide are anti-inflammatory in the acutely inflamed human colon.

    PubMed

    Couch, Daniel G; Tasker, Chris; Theophilidou, Elena; Lund, Jonathan N; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E

    2017-09-27

    Objective: We sought to quantify the anti-inflammatory effects of two cannabinoid drugs: cannabidiol (CBD) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), in cultured cell lines and compared this effect with experimentally inflamed explant human colonic tissue.  These effects were explored in acutely and chronically inflamed colon, using inflammatory bowel disease and appendicitis explants. Design: Caco-2 cells and human colonic explants collected from elective bowel cancer, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or acute appendicitis resections, and were treated with the following drug treatments: vehicle, an inflammatory protocol of IFNγ and TNFα (10 ng/ml), inflammation and PEA (10µM), inflammation and CBD (10µM), & PEA or CBD alone.  PEA, CBD or vehicle were added simultaneously with IFNγ. Nine intracellular signalling phosphoproteins were determined by multiplex.  Inflammatory cytokine secretion was determined using ELISA.  Receptor mechanisms were investigated using antagonists for CB1, CB2, PPARα, PPARγ, TRPV1 and GPR55. Results:   IFNγ and TNFα treatment increased phosphoprotein and cytokine levels in Caco-2 cultures and colonic explants.  Phosphoprotein levels were significantly reduced by PEA or CBD in Caco-2 cultures and colonic explants.  CBD and PEA prevented increases in cytokine production in explant colon, but not in Caco-2 cells. CBD effects were blocked by the CB2antagonist AM630 and TRPV1 antagonist SB366791.  PEA effects were blocked by the PPARα antagonist GW6471.  PEA and CBD were anti-inflammatory in IBD and appendicitis explants. Conclusion: PEA and CBD are anti-inflammatory in the human colon.  This effect is not seen in cultured epithelial cells. Appropriately sized clinical trials should assess their efficacy. ©2017 The Author(s).

  18. Validation of methylation biomarkers that distinguish normal colon mucosa of cancer patients from normal colon mucosa of patients without cancer.

    PubMed

    Cesaroni, Matteo; Powell, Jasmine; Sapienza, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    We have validated differences in DNA methylation levels of candidate genes previously reported to discriminate between normal colon mucosa of patients with colon cancer and normal colon mucosa of individuals without cancer. Here, we report that CpG sites in 16 of the 30 candidate genes selected show significant differences in mean methylation level in normal colon mucosa of 24 patients with cancer and 24 controls. A support vector machine trained on these data and data for an additional 66 CpGs yielded an 18-gene signature, composed of ten of the validated candidate genes plus eight additional candidates. This model exhibited 96% sensitivity and 100% specificity in a 40-sample training set and classified all eight samples in the test set correctly. Moreover, we found a moderate-strong correlation (Pearson coefficients r = 0.253-0.722) between methylation levels in colon mucosa and methylation levels in peripheral blood for seven of the 18 genes in the support vector model. These seven genes, alone, classified 44 of the 48 patients in the validation set correctly and five CpGs selected from only two of the seven genes classified 41 of the 48 patients in the discovery set correctly. These results suggest that methylation biomarkers may be developed that will, at minimum, serve as useful objective and quantitative diagnostic complements to colonoscopy as a cancer-screening tool. These data also suggest that it may be possible to monitor biomarker methylation levels in tissues collected much less invasively than by colonoscopy.

  19. Validation of methylation biomarkers that distinguish normal colon mucosa from cancer patients from normal colon mucosa of patients without cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cesaroni, Matteo; Powell, Jasmine; Sapienza, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    We have validated differences in DNA methylation levels of candidate genes previously reported to discriminate between normal colon mucosa of colon cancer patients and normal colon mucosa of individuals without cancer. Here, we report that CpG sites in 16 of the 30 candidate genes selected show significant differences in mean methylation level in normal colon mucosa of 24 cancer patients and 24 controls. A support vector machine trained on these data and data for an additional 66 CpGs yielded an 18-gene signature, composed of 10 of the validated candidate genes plus eight additional candidates. This model exhibited 96% sensitivity and 100% specificity in a 40-sample training set and classified all eight samples in the test set correctly. Moreover, we found a moderate-strong correlation (Pearson coefficients r=0.253-0.722) between methylation levels in colon mucosa and methylation levels in peripheral blood for seven of the 18 genes in the support vector model. These seven genes, alone, classified 44 of the 48 patients in the validation set correctly and five CpGs selected from only two of the seven genes classified 41 of the 48 patients in the discovery set correctly. These results suggest that methylation biomarkers may be developed that will, at minimum, serve as useful objective and quantitative diagnostic complements to colonoscopy as a cancer-screening tool. These data also suggest that it may be possible to monitor biomarker methylation levels in tissues collected much less invasively than by colonoscopy. PMID:24806665

  20. Phagocytes in cell suspensions of human colon mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Beeken, W; Northwood, I; Beliveau, C; Gump, D

    1987-01-01

    Because little is known of the phagocytes of the human colon we enumerated these cells in mucosal suspensions and studied their phagocytic activity. Phagocyte rich suspensions were made by EDTA collagenase dissociation followed by elutriation centrifugation. Phagocytosis was evaluated by measuring cellular radioactivity after incubation of phagocytes with 3H-adenine labelled E coli ON2 and checked microscopically. Dissociation of normal mucosa from colorectal neoplasms yielded means of 1.9 X 10(6) eosinophils, 1.4 X 10(6) macrophages and 2 X 10(5) neutrophils per gram of mucosa. Visually normal mucosa of inflammatory states yielded 2.2 X 10(6) eosinophils, 2.3 X 10(6) macrophages and 7 X 10(5) neutrophils per gram of mucosa. Phagocyte rich suspensions of normal mucosa from tumour patients phagocytosed 21.8% of a pool of opsonised tritiated E coli ON2 and by microscopy 100% of mucosal neutrophils ingested bacteria, 83% of eosinophils were phagocytic, and 53% of macrophages contained bacteria. These results suggest that in the human colonic mucosa, the eosinophil is more abundant than the macrophage and the per cent of those cells exhibiting phagocytosis is intermediate between that of the macrophage and the neutrophil. Thus these three types of cells are actively phagocytic and share the potential for a major role in host defence against invasive enteric bacteria. PMID:3666566

  1. Epigenetic maturation in colonic mucosa continues beyond infancy in mice.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Monozygotic twin and other epidemiologic studies indicate that epigenetic processes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases that commonly affect the colonic mucosa. The peak onset of these disorders in young adulthood, suggests that epigenetic changes normally o...

  2. Proteome analysis of the macroscopically affected colonic mucosa of Crohn’s disease and intestinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rukmangadachar, Lokesh A.; Makharia, Govind K.; Mishra, Asha; Das, Prasenjit; Hariprasad, Gururao; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Ahuja, Vineet; Acharya, Subrat K.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation between intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and Crohn’s disease (CD) is challenging in geographical regions where both these diseases are prevalent. There is a need of biomarkers for differentiation between these two disorders. Colonic biopsies from inflamed mucosa of treatment-naive patients with ITB, CD and controls were used for analysis. Protein extracted from biopsies was digested with trypsin and resulting peptides were labeled with iTRAQ reagents. The peptides were subsequently analyzed using LC-MS/MS for identification and quantification. Gene ontology annotation for proteins was analyzed in PANTHER. Validation experiments were done for six differentially expressed proteins using immunohistochemistry. 533 proteins were identified and 241 proteins were quantified from 5 sets of iTRAQ experiments. While 63 were differentially expressed in colonic mucosa of patients with CD and ITB in at least one set of iTRAQ experiment, 11 proteins were differentially expressed in more than one set of experiments. Six proteins used for validation using immunohistochemistry in a larger cohort of patients; none of them however was differentially expressed in patients with ITB and CD. There are differentially expressed proteins in tissue proteome of CD and ITB. Further experiments are required using a larger cohort of homogeneous tissue samples. PMID:26988818

  3. Host lysozyme-mediated lysis of Lactococcus lactis facilitates delivery of colitis-attenuating superoxide dismutase to inflamed colons.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Sonia A; Veiga, Patrick; Fenn, Kathrin; Michaud, Monia; Kim, Jason H; Gallini, Carey Ann; Glickman, Jonathan N; Quéré, Gaëlle; Garault, Peggy; Béal, Chloé; Derrien, Muriel; Courtin, Pascal; Kulakauskas, Saulius; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan; Garrett, Wendy S

    2015-06-23

    Beneficial microbes that target molecules and pathways, such as oxidative stress, which can negatively affect both host and microbiota, may hold promise as an inflammatory bowel disease therapy. Prior work showed that a five-strain fermented milk product (FMP) improved colitis in T-bet(-/-) Rag2(-/-) mice. By varying the number of strains used in the FMP, we found that Lactococcus lactis I-1631 was sufficient to ameliorate colitis. Using comparative genomic analyses, we identified genes unique to L. lactis I-1631 involved in oxygen respiration. Respiration of oxygen results in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Also, ROS are produced at high levels during intestinal inflammation and cause tissue damage. L. lactis I-1631 possesses genes encoding enzymes that detoxify ROS, such as superoxide dismutase (SodA). Thus, we hypothesized that lactococcal SodA played a role in attenuating colitis. Inactivation of the sodA gene abolished L. lactis I-1631's beneficial effect in the T-bet(-/-) Rag2(-/-) model. Similar effects were obtained in two additional colonic inflammation models, Il10(-/-) mice and dextran sulfate sodium-treated mice. Efforts to understand how a lipophobic superoxide anion (O2 (-)) can be detoxified by cytoplasmic lactoccocal SodA led to the finding that host antimicrobial-mediated lysis is a prerequisite for SodA release and SodA's extracytoplasmic O2 (-) scavenging. L. lactis I-1631 may represent a promising vehicle to deliver antioxidant, colitis-attenuating SodA to the inflamed intestinal mucosa, and host antimicrobials may play a critical role in mediating SodA's bioaccessibility.

  4. Host lysozyme-mediated lysis of Lactococcus lactis facilitates delivery of colitis-attenuating superoxide dismutase to inflamed colons

    PubMed Central

    Ballal, Sonia A.; Veiga, Patrick; Fenn, Kathrin; Michaud, Monia; Kim, Jason H.; Gallini, Carey Ann; Glickman, Jonathan N.; Quéré, Gaëlle; Garault, Peggy; Béal, Chloé; Derrien, Muriel; Courtin, Pascal; Kulakauskas, Saulius; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan; Garrett, Wendy S.

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial microbes that target molecules and pathways, such as oxidative stress, which can negatively affect both host and microbiota, may hold promise as an inflammatory bowel disease therapy. Prior work showed that a five-strain fermented milk product (FMP) improved colitis in T-bet−/− Rag2−/− mice. By varying the number of strains used in the FMP, we found that Lactococcus lactis I-1631 was sufficient to ameliorate colitis. Using comparative genomic analyses, we identified genes unique to L. lactis I-1631 involved in oxygen respiration. Respiration of oxygen results in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Also, ROS are produced at high levels during intestinal inflammation and cause tissue damage. L. lactis I-1631 possesses genes encoding enzymes that detoxify ROS, such as superoxide dismutase (SodA). Thus, we hypothesized that lactococcal SodA played a role in attenuating colitis. Inactivation of the sodA gene abolished L. lactis I-1631’s beneficial effect in the T-bet−/− Rag2−/− model. Similar effects were obtained in two additional colonic inflammation models, Il10−/− mice and dextran sulfate sodium-treated mice. Efforts to understand how a lipophobic superoxide anion (O2−) can be detoxified by cytoplasmic lactoccocal SodA led to the finding that host antimicrobial-mediated lysis is a prerequisite for SodA release and SodA’s extracytoplasmic O2− scavenging. L. lactis I-1631 may represent a promising vehicle to deliver antioxidant, colitis-attenuating SodA to the inflamed intestinal mucosa, and host antimicrobials may play a critical role in mediating SodA’s bioaccessibility. PMID:26056274

  5. Intraperitoneal but Not Intravenous Cryopreserved Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Home to the Inflamed Colon and Ameliorate Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Castelo-Branco, Morgana T. L.; Soares, Igor D. P.; Lopes, Daiana V.; Buongusto, Fernanda; Martinusso, Cesonia A.; do Rosario, Alyson; Souza, Sergio A. L.; Gutfilen, Bianca; Fonseca, Lea Mirian B.; Elia, Celeste; Madi, Kalil; Schanaider, Alberto; Rossi, Maria Isabel D.; Souza, Heitor S. P.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were shown to have immunomodulatory activity and have been applied for treating immune-mediated disorders. We compared the homing and therapeutic action of cryopreserved subcutaneous adipose tissue (AT-MSCs) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in rats with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)–induced colitis. Methods After colonoscopic detection of inflammation AT-MSCs or BM-MSCs were injected intraperitoneally. Colonoscopic and histologic scores were obtained. Density of collagen fibres and apoptotic rates were evaluated. Cytokine levels were measured in supernatants of colon explants. For cell migration studies MSCs and skin fibroblasts were labelled with Tc-99m or CM-DiI and injected intraperitonealy or intravenously. Results Intraperitoneal injection of AT-MSCs or BM-MSCs reduced the endoscopic and histopathologic severity of colitis, the collagen deposition, and the epithelial apoptosis. Levels of TNF-α and interleukin-1β decreased, while VEGF and TGF-β did not change following cell-therapy. Scintigraphy showed that MSCs migrated towards the inflamed colon and the uptake increased from 0.5 to 24 h. Tc-99m-MSCs injected intravenously distributed into various organs, but not the colon. Cm-DiI-positive MSCs were detected throughout the colon wall 72 h after inoculation, predominantly in the submucosa and muscular layer of inflamed areas. Conclusions Intraperitoneally injected cryopreserved MSCs home to and engraft into the inflamed colon and ameliorate TNBS-colitis. PMID:22432015

  6. A 3D co-culture of three human cell lines to model the inflamed intestinal mucosa for safety testing of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Susewind, Julia; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane; Repnik, Urska; Collnot, Eva-Maria; Schneider-Daum, Nicole; Griffiths, Gareth Wyn; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Oral exposure to nanomaterials is a current concern, asking for innovative biological test systems to assess their safety, especially also in conditions of inflammatory disorders. Aim of this study was to develop a 3D intestinal model, consisting of Caco-2 cells and two human immune cell lines, suitable to assess nanomaterial toxicity, in either healthy or diseased conditions. Human macrophages (THP-1) and human dendritic cells (MUTZ-3) were embedded in a collagen scaffold and seeded on the apical side of transwell inserts. Caco-2 cells were seeded on top of this layer, forming a 3D model of the intestinal mucosa. Toxicity of engineered nanoparticles (NM101 TiO2, NM300 Ag, Au) was evaluated in non-inflamed and inflamed co-cultures, and also compared to non-inflamed Caco-2 monocultures. Inflammation was elicited by IL-1β, and interactions with engineered NPs were addressed by different endpoints. The 3D co-culture showed well preserved ultrastructure and significant barrier properties. Ag NPs were found to be more toxic than TiO2 or Au NPs. But once inflamed with IL-1β, the co-cultures released higher amounts of IL-8 compared to Caco-2 monocultures. However, the cytotoxicity of Ag NPs was higher in Caco-2 monocultures than in 3D co-cultures. The naturally higher IL-8 production in the co-cultures was enhanced even further by the Ag NPs. This study shows that it is possible to mimic inflamed conditions in a 3D co-culture model of the intestinal mucosa. The fact that it is based on three easily available human cell lines makes this model valuable to study the safety of nanomaterials in the context of inflammation.

  7. Adherence of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites to rat and human colonic mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Ravdin, J I; John, J E; Johnston, L I; Innes, D J; Guerrant, R L

    1985-01-01

    We studied the adherence of [3H]thymidine-labeled axenic Entamoeba histolytica (strain HM1-IMSS) to in vitro preparations of rat and human colonic mucosa. Studies were performed with fixed or unfixed rat colonic mucosa, unfixed rat mucosa exposed to trypsin, unfixed rat submucosa, and fixed human colonic mucosa. Twenty percent of the amebae adhered to fixed rat colonic mucosa; adherence was specifically inhibited by N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc), galactose, and asialofetuin. The adherence of amebae to fixed human colonic mucosa was also GalNAc inhibitable. Greater adherence was found with unfixed rat colonic mucosa (40.9%) and was not GalNAc inhibitable unless the tissue was first exposed to trypsin. However, GalNAc did inhibit the adherence of amebae to unfixed rat submucosa. Glutaraldehyde fixation of amebae inactivates known amebic adhesion proteins; there was a markedly decreased adherence of fixed amebae to trypsin-exposed mucosa or fixed rat colonic mucosa. However, fixed or viable amebae had equal levels of adherence to unfixed rat colonic mucosa, suggesting the presence of a host adhesion protein that binds to receptors on amebae. Human (10%) and rabbit (5%) immune sera reduced the adherence of viable amebae to fixed rat colonic mucosa. We concluded that the GalNAc-inhibitable adhesion protein on the surface of E. histolytica trophozoites mediated adherence to fixed rat mucosa, fixed human colonic mucosa, trypsin-exposed unfixed rat mucosa, and unfixed rat submucosa. The surface of unfixed rat colonic mucosa contained a glutaraldehyde- and trypsin-sensitive host adhesion protein, perhaps in the overlying mucus blanket, which bound viable or fixed E. histolytica trophozoites. Images PMID:2580787

  8. Quantification of pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor in colonic carcinoma and normal adjacent colonic mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Bohe, H; Bohe, M; Jönsson, P; Lindström, C; Ohlsson, K

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To measure the content of immunoreactive human pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (irPSTI) in colonic carcinoma and adjacent normal colonic mucosa. METHODS: From a stable hybridoma cell line producing monoclonal antibodies specific for human PSTI, a specific enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for human PSTI was developed. In a precipitation assay system these antibodies bound human PSTI in a dose-dependent manner. The specimens were obtained from resectional surgery. RESULTS: The content of irPSTI was 19.9 micrograms/g protein (0.55 micrograms/g tissue wet weight) in colonic carcinoma. In adjacent normal colonic mucosa 43.6 micrograms/g protein (1.12 micrograms/g tissue wet weight) was shown. CONCLUSIONS: The enzymatic degradation of surrounding tissue necessary for tumour cell invasion could be facilitated by this relative deficit of the inhibitor in infiltrative carcinoma. PMID:1479031

  9. Autonomic Neurotransmitters Modulate Immunoglobulin A Secretion in Porcine Colonic Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Lisa D.; Xie, Yonghong; Lyte, Mark; Vulchanova, Lucy; Brown, David R.

    2007-01-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) plays a crucial role in mucosal surface defense. We tested the hypothesis that colonic sIgA secretion is under enteric neural control. Immunohistochemistry of the porcine distal colonic mucosa revealed presumptive cholinergic and adrenergic nerve fibers apposed to secretory component (SC)-positive crypt epithelial cells and neighboring IgA+ plasmacytes. The cholinomimetic drug carbamylcholine elicited rapid, atropine-sensitive IgA secretion into the luminal fluid bathing mucosal explants mounted in Ussing chambers. The adrenergic receptor agonist norepinephrine also increased IgA secretion, an action inhibited by phentolamine. These effects were independent of agonist-induced anion secretion. In Western blots of luminal fluid, both agonists increased the density of protein bands co-immunoreactive for IgA and SC. Mucosal exposure to enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli did not affect IgA secretion, and carbamylcholine treatment did not affect mucosal adherence of this enteropathogen. Acetylcholine and norepinephrine, acting respectively through muscarinic cholinergic and alpha-adrenergic receptors in the colonic mucosa, stimulate sIgA secretion and may enhance mucosal defense in vivo. PMID:17320195

  10. Colonic mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma identified by chromoendoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Sang-Wook; Lee, Seung-Hwa; Lee, Duck-Joo; Kim, Kwang-Min; Kang, Joon-Koo; Kim, Do-Wan; Lee, Jeong-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Colonic mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas are a rare occurrence and the definitive treatment has not been established. Solitary or multiple, elevated or polypoid lesions are the usual appearances of MALT lymphoma in the large intestine and sometimes the surface may reveal abnormal vascularity. Herein, we report a case of MALT lymphoma and review the relevant literature. Upon colonoscopy, a suspected pathologic lesion was observed in the proximal transverse colon. The lesion could be distinguished more prominently after using narrow-band imaging mode and indigo carmine-dye spraying chromoendoscopy. Histopathologic examination of this biopsy specimen revealed lymphoepithelial lesions with diffuse proliferation of atypical lymphoid cells effacing the glandular architecture and centrocyte-like cells infiltrating the lamina propria. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that tumor cells were positive for CD20 and Bcl-2e, and negative for CD10, CD23, and Bcl-6. According to Ann-Arbor staging system, the patient had stage IIE. A partial colectomy with dissection of the paracolic lymph nodes was performed. Until now, there is no recurrence of lymphoma at follow-up. PMID:25561821

  11. Epigenetic differences in normal colon mucosa of cancer patients suggests altered dietary metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Silviera, Matthew L.; Smith, Brian P.; Powell, Jasmine; Sapienza, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    We have compared DNA methylation in normal colon mucosa between colon cancer patients and patients without cancer. We identified significant differences in methylation between the two groups at 114 – 874 genes. The majority of the differences are in pathways involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids and amino acids. We also compared transcript levels of genes in the insulin-signaling pathway. We found that the mucosa of cancer patients had significantly higher transcript levels of several hormones regulating glucose metabolism and significantly lower transcript levels of a glycolytic enzyme and a key regulator of glucose and lipid homeostasis. The se differences suggest that the normal colon mucosa of cancer patients metabolizes dietary components differently than the colon mucosa of controls. Because the differences identified are present in morphologically normal tissue, they may be diagnostic of colon cancer and/or prognostic of colon cancer susceptibility. PMID:22300984

  12. Identification of Restricted Subsets of Mature microRNA Abnormally Expressed in Inactive Colonic Mucosa of Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guichard, Cécile; Pedruzzi, Eric; Cazals-Hatem, Dominique; Richard, Christophe; Aparicio, Thomas; Daniel, Fanny; Soulé, Jean-Claude; Moreau, Richard; Bouhnik, Yoram; Laburthe, Marc; Groyer, André; Ogier-Denis, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Background Ulcerative Colitis (UC) and Crohn's Disease (CD) are two chronic Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD) affecting the intestinal mucosa. Current understanding of IBD pathogenesis points out the interplay of genetic events and environmental cues in the dysregulated immune response. We hypothesized that dysregulated microRNA (miRNA) expression may contribute to IBD pathogenesis. miRNAs are small, non-coding RNAs which prevent protein synthesis through translational suppression or mRNAs degradation, and regulate several physiological processes. Methodology/Findings Expression of mature miRNAs was studied by Q-PCR in inactive colonic mucosa of patients with UC (8), CD (8) and expressed relative to that observed in healthy controls (10). Only miRNAs with highly altered expression (>5 or <0.2 -fold relative to control) were considered when Q-PCR data were analyzed. Two subsets of 14 (UC) and 23 (CD) miRNAs with highly altered expression (5.2->100 -fold and 0.05–0.19 -fold for over- and under- expression, respectively; 0.001colonic mucosa, 8 being commonly dysregulated in non-inflamed UC and CD (mir-26a,-29a,-29b,-30c,-126*,-127-3p,-196a,-324-3p). Several miRNA genes with dysregulated expression co-localize with acknowledged IBD-susceptibility loci while others, (eg. clustered on 14q32.31), map on chromosomal regions not previously recognized as IBD-susceptibility loci. In addition, in silico clustering analysis identified 5 miRNAs (mir-26a,-29b,-126*,-127-3p,-324-3p) that share coordinated dysregulation of expression both in quiescent and in inflamed colonic mucosa of IBD patients. Six miRNAs displayed significantly distinct alteration of expression in non-inflamed colonic biopsies of UC and CD patients (mir-196b,-199a-3p,-199b-5p,-320a,-150,-223). Conclusions/Significance Our study supports miRNAs as crucial players in the onset and/or relapse of inflammation from quiescent mucosal tissues in IBD patients. It allows

  13. Histochemical Detection of Collagen Fibers by Sirius Red/Fast Green Is More Sensitive than van Gieson or Sirius Red Alone in Normal and Inflamed Rat Colon

    PubMed Central

    Antonioli, Luca; Pellegrini, Carolina; Blandizzi, Corrado; Dolfi, Amelio; Bernardini, Nunzia

    2015-01-01

    Collagen detection in histological sections and its quantitative estimation by computer-aided image analysis represent important procedures to assess tissue localization and distribution of connective fibers. Different histochemical approaches have been proposed to detect and quantify collagen deposition in paraffin slices with different degrees of satisfaction. The present study was performed to compare the qualitative and quantitative efficiency of three histochemical methods available for collagen staining in paraffin sections of colon. van Gieson, Sirius Red and Sirius Red/Fast Green stainings were carried out for collagen detection and quantitative estimation by morphometric image analysis in colonic specimens from normal rats or animals with 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (DNBS) induced colitis. Haematoxylin/eosin staining was carried out to assess tissue morphology and histopathological lesions. Among the three investigated methods, Sirius Red/Fast Green staining allowed to best highlight well-defined red-stained collagen fibers and to obtain the highest quantitative results by morphometric image analysis in both normal and inflamed colon. Collagen fibers, which stood out against the green-stained non-collagen components, could be clearly appreciated, even in their thinner networks, within all layers of normal or inflamed colonic wall. The present study provides evidence that, as compared with Sirius Red alone or van Gieson staining, the Sirius Red/Fast Green method is the most sensitive, in terms of both qualitative and quantitative evaluation of collagen fibers, in paraffin sections of both normal and inflamed colon. PMID:26673752

  14. Detection of elements and trace elements in endoscopy biopsies of colonic mucosa in normal and high risks colon cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buoso, M. C.; Fazinic, S.; Galassini, S.; Lecis, P. E.; Moschini, G.; Makarewicz, M.; Naccarato, R.; Ogris, R.; Shao, H. R.; Sturniolo, G. C.; Valkovic, V.

    1991-05-01

    In the present study efforts are made to obtain a correlation between the trace element (TE) levels in patients and the presence of digestive cancer. The aim of the study is to detect selenium (Se), zinc (Zn) and other TE concentrations in different segments of colonic mucosa and to find out if there is any difference between the normal and pathological colonic mucosa. The concentration data (averages, standard deviations and ranges) obtained by neutron activation analysis and proton induced X-ray emission are presented and the data distribution is analyzed.

  15. Multiphoton morpho-functional imaging of healthy colon mucosa, adenomatous polyp and adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cicchi, Riccardo; Sturiale, Alessandro; Nesi, Gabriella; Kapsokalyvas, Dimitrios; Alemanno, Giovanni; Tonelli, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2013-01-01

    Two-photon spectral resolved imaging was used to image fresh human biopsies of colon tissue and to characterize healthy colon mucosa, adenomatous polyp and adenocarcinoma by means of a morpho-functional analysis. Morphological examination, performed using endogenous tissue fluorescence, discriminated adenomatous and adenocarcinoma tissues from normal mucosa in terms of cellular asymmetry and nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio. Good agreement was found between multiphoton images and histological examination performed on the same samples. Further characterization, performed by means of spectral-resolved analysis of NADH and FAD fluorescence, demonstrated an altered metabolic activity in both adenomatous and adenocarcinoma tissues compared to healthy mucosa. This morpho-functional approach may represent a powerful method to be used in combination with endoscopy for in vivo optical diagnosis of colon cancer and may be extended to other tissues. PMID:23847743

  16. Effects of flunixin meglumine on the recovery of ischaemic equine colonic mucosa in vitro.

    PubMed

    Morton, A J; Grosche, A; Matyjaszek, S A; Polyak, M M R; Freeman, D E

    2011-08-01

    The effects of prostaglandins and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on repair of equine intestinal mucosa are important since most horses with gastrointestinal diseases are routinely treated with NSAIDs, such as flunixin meglumine (FM), and these drugs can be toxic to equine gastrointestinal mucosa. Flunixin meglumine would not affect recovery of equine colonic mucosa in vitro, 18 h after a reversible ischaemic injury. In 14 anaesthetised horses, a segment of pelvic flexure was subjected to 2 h of ischaemia and the horses were allowed to recover for 18 h. Seven horses received normal saline and 7 received FM, 1.1 mg/kg bwt i.v., at the end of ischaemia and 12 h later. Colonic mucosa was harvested during a second anaesthesia, 18 h after recovery from ischaemia and then horses were subjected to euthanasia. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and transepithelial flux of tritiated mannitol were used to measure mucosal permeability during 4 h of incubation in Ussing chambers, with the following in vitro treatments: 1) no addition, 2) FM 14 µmol/l as powder, 3) FM 14 µmol/l in injectable form and 4) diluent for injectable FM. Histomorphological changes were assessed by light microscopy. There were no significant differences in any of the measurements between saline and FM treated horses. The mucosal height of the ischaemic FM tissues incubated in diluent was significantly decreased compared to the nonischaemic tissues. Flunixin meglumine did not adversely affect barrier integrity in ischaemic equine colonic mucosa. © 2011 EVJ Ltd.

  17. Hypermethylation of ITGA4, TFPI2 and VIMENTIN promoters is increased in inflamed colon tissue: putative risk markers for colitis-associated cancer.

    PubMed

    Gerecke, Christian; Scholtka, Bettina; Löwenstein, Yvonne; Fait, Isabel; Gottschalk, Uwe; Rogoll, Dorothee; Melcher, Ralph; Kleuser, Burkhard

    2015-12-01

    Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes is involved in early transforming events and has a high impact on colorectal carcinogenesis. Likewise, colon cancers that derive from chronically inflamed bowel diseases frequently exhibit epigenetic changes. But there is little data about epigenetic aberrations causing colorectal cancer in chronically inflamed tissue. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the aberrant gain of methylation in the gene promoters of VIM, TFPI2 and ITGA4 as putative early markers in the development from inflamed tissue via precancerous lesions toward colorectal cancer. Initial screening of different cancer cell lines by using methylation-specific PCR revealed a putative colon cancer-specific methylation pattern. Additionally, a demethylation assay was performed to investigate the methylation-dependent gene silencing of ITGA4. The candidate markers were analyzed in colonic tissue specimens from patients with colorectal cancer (n = 15), adenomas (n = 76), serrated lesions (n = 13), chronic inflammation (n = 10) and normal mucosal samples (n = 9). A high methylation frequency of VIM (55.6 %) was observed in normal colon tissue, whereas ITGA4 and TFPI2 were completely unmethylated in controls. A significant gain of methylation frequency with progression of disease as well as an age-dependent effect was detectable for TFPI2. ITGA4 methylation frequency was high in precancerous and cancerous tissues as well as in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The already established methylation marker VIM does not permit a specific and sensitive discrimination of healthy and neoplastic tissue. The methylation markers ITGA4 and TFPI2 seem to be suitable risk markers for inflammation-associated colon cancer.

  18. Effects of flunixin meglumine on recovery of colonic mucosa from ischemia in horses.

    PubMed

    Matyjaszek, Sarah A; Morton, Alison J; Freeman, David E; Grosche, Astrid; Polyak, Maximilian M R; Kuck, Hilken

    2009-02-01

    To examine the effects of flunixin meglumine (FM) on recovery of colonic mucosa from experimentally induced ischemia in horses. 14 research horses. Ischemia was induced in the colons of anesthetized horses for 2 hours. Afterward, horses received saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (12 mL, IV, q 12 h; n = 7) or FM (1.1 mg/kg, IV, q 12 h; 7) and were allowed to recover for 18 hours after termination of the ischemic event. Postoperative pain scores were recorded every 4 hours throughout the recovery period. At the end of the recovery period, horses were anesthetized, and ischemic and nonischemic segments of colonic mucosa were harvested for histologic evaluation, western blot analysis, and in vitro assessment of transepithelial electric resistance (TER) and transmucosal flux of tritium-labeled (3H-) mannitol. Horses were then euthanatized. Flunixin meglumine significantly lowered pain scores at the first postoperative recording. There were no significant differences between treatment with saline solution and FM in any of the measurements for TER, 3H-mannitol flux, histomorphometric variables, neutrophil infiltration (detected via calprotectin immunostaining), and expressions of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2. After both treatments, TER declined significantly in nonischemic tissues in vitro, whereas it increased significantly in ischemic-injured tissues. Flunixin meglumine did not affect recovery of equine colonic mucosa from ischemic injury, and continued use in horses with colonic ischemia is therefore justified.

  19. Advanced precancerous lesions (APL) in the colonic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Naini, Bita V; Odze, Robert D

    2013-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Most colorectal cancers are preventable. Surveillance colonoscopy is used to detect and remove precancerous lesions. Although the majority of precancerous lesions develop sporadically, some have an inherited component. In this review, we summarize the clinical, pathologic, and molecular features of advanced precancerous lesions of the colon. The most common and clinically important intestinal polyposis syndromes, and their genetics, are also discussed. Finally, current recommendations regarding the treatment and surveillance of precancerous lesions, both in the sporadic and in inherited setting, are reviewed.

  20. Oxidation of hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol to thiosulfate by rat tissues: a specialized function of the colonic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Furne, J; Springfield, J; Koenig, T; DeMaster, E; Levitt, M D

    2001-07-15

    Colonic bacteria release large quantities of the highly toxic thiols hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) and methanethiol (CH(3)SH). These gases rapidly permeate the colonic mucosa, and tissue damage would be expected if the mucosa could not detoxify these compounds rapidly. We previously showed that rat cecal mucosa metabolizes these thiols via conversion to thiosulfate. The purpose of the present study in rats was to determine if this conversion of thiols to thiosulfate is (a) a generalized function of many tissues, or (b) a specialized function of the colonic mucosa. The tissues studied were mucosa from the cecum, right colon, mid-colon, ileum, and stomach; liver; muscle; erythrocytes; and plasma. The metabolic rate was determined by incubating homogenates of the various tissues with H(2)(35)S and CH(3)(35)SH and measuring the rate of incorporation of (35)S into thiosulfate and sulfate. The detoxification activity of H(2)S (expressed as nmol/mg per min) that resulted in thiosulfate production was at least eight times greater for cecal and right colonic mucosa than for the non-colonic tissues. Thiosulfate production from CH(3)SH was at least five times more rapid for cecal and right colonic mucosa than for the non-colonic tissues. We conclude that colonic mucosa possesses a specialized detoxification system that allows this tissue to rapidly metabolize H(2)S and CH(3)SH to thiosulfate. Presumably, this highly developed system protects the colon from what otherwise might be injurious concentrations of H(2)S and CH(3)SH. Defects in this detoxification pathway possibly could play a role in the pathogenesis of various forms of colitis.

  1. Global gene expression analysis of the mouse colonic mucosa treated with azoxymethane and dextran sodium sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Rikako; Miyamoto, Shingo; Yasui, Yumiko; Sugie, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Takuji

    2007-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is well known to be a risk factor for colon cancer. Previously we established a novel mouse model of inflammation-related colon carcinogenesis, which is useful to examine the involvement of inflammation in colon carcinogenesis. To shed light on the alterations in global gene expression in the background of inflammation-related colon cancer and gain further insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying inflammation-related colon carcinogenesis, we conducted a comprehensive DNA microarray analysis using our model. Methods Male ICR mice were given a single ip injection of azoxymethane (AOM, 10 mg/kg body weight), followed by the addition of 2% (w/v) dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) to their drinking water for 7 days, starting 1 week after the AOM injection. We performed DNA microarray analysis (Affymetrix GeneChip) on non-tumorous mucosa obtained from mice that received AOM/DSS, AOM alone, and DSS alone, and untreated mice at wks 5 and 10. Results Markedly up-regulated genes in the colonic mucosa given AOM/DSS at wk 5 or 10 included Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (Wif1, 48.5-fold increase at wk 5 and 5.7-fold increase at wk 10) and plasminogen activator, tissue (Plat, 48.5-fold increase at wk 5), myelocytomatosis oncogene (Myc, 3.0-fold increase at wk 5), and phospholipase A2, group IIA (platelets, synovial fluid) (Plscr2, 8.0-fold increase at wk 10). The notable down-regulated genes in the colonic mucosa of mice treated with AOM/DSS were the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor binding protein (Pparbp, 0.06-fold decrease at wk 10) and the transforming growth factor, beta 3 (Tgfb3, 0.14-fold decrease at wk 10). The inflammation-related gene, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (Pparγ 0.38-fold decrease at wk 5), was also down-regulated in the colonic mucosa of mice that received AOM/DSS. Conclusion This is the first report describing global gene expression analysis of an AOM/DSS-induced mouse colon carcinogenesis model, and

  2. The short-circuited everted sac of rat colon mucosa.

    PubMed

    Goerg, K J; Wanitschke, R; Soergel, K H; Wood, C M; Nell, G

    1981-01-01

    A short-circuited preparation of everted rat colon sacs is described. The serosal current electrode is a AgAgCl wire. A cylindrical agar bridge or AgAgCl electrode may be employed on the mucosal side. Effects of Ag+ ions liberated from the electrodes on ion transport could not be demonstrated. Fluid and sodium are absorbed ad bicarbonate secreted. Potassium and chloride movements are not significantly different form zero. The preparation remains stable for at least 2 h. Sodium absorption is diminished by 50% and bicarbonate secretion abolished in the absence of glucose. In principle, similar ion transport properties were found as in Ussing-chamber preparations. The advantage of the everted sac is the capability of measuring net transport of fluid and electrolytes simultaneously and directly because of the large surface/inner volume ratio of the sac.

  3. Innervation of the muscularis mucosae of canine proximal colon.

    PubMed Central

    Angel, F; Go, V L; Szurszewski, J H

    1984-01-01

    The innervation of the muscularis mucosae of the canine large intestine was studied in vitro using superfusion and radioimmunological techniques. In the majority of preparations, electrical field stimulation (10 V, 200 microseconds, 10 Hz) elicited a biphasic neurogenic response which consisted of a contraction followed, after cessation of the stimulus, by relaxation. Electrical field stimulation released VIP-, substance P- and bombesin-like immunoreactivity. Release of these peptides and the biphasic response to nerve stimulation were blocked by tetrodotoxin and a 'calcium-free' solution. Several observations suggest that neuronally released substance P (or a closely related peptide) mediated the contraction by a direct action on the muscle. The contraction caused by substance P was tetrodotoxin insensitive. Desensitization to substance P abolished the excitatory response to nerve stimulation. The contraction elicited by nerve stimulation was blocked by substance P antiserum. Several observations suggest that bombesin or a closely related peptide caused contraction of the muscle by releasing substance P from intramural neurones. Bombesin caused an increase in substance P-like immunoreactivity in the superfusate which was blocked by tetrodotoxin, as was the contraction; substance P antibodies blocked the contractile response to bombesin. In addition, while the excitatory response to electrical nerve stimulation was blocked by substance P antiserum, there was still an increase in bombesin-like immunoreactivity in the superfusate. The data also suggest that VIP or a closely related peptide might have mediated the relaxation by a direct action on the muscle. The inhibitory response to nerve stimulation was mimicked by VIP and abolished by VIP antiserum. PMID:6210358

  4. Melatonin inhibits tachykinin NK₂ receptor-triggered 5-HT release from guinea pig isolated colonic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Shu-ichi; Tohei, Atsushi; Ikeda, Masashi

    2011-03-01

    Melatonin is involved in the regulation of colonic motility, and sensation, but little is known about the influence of melatonin on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release from colonic mucosa. A tachykinin NK₂ receptor-selective agonist, [β-Ala⁸]-neurokinin A(4-10) [βAla-NKA-(4-10)] can induce 5-HT release from guinea pig colonic mucosa via NK₂ receptors on the mucosal layer. The present study was designed to determine the influence of melatonin on 5-HT release from guinea pig colonic mucosa, evoked by the NK₂ receptor agonist, βAla-NKA-(4-10). The effect of melatonin was investigated on the outflow of 5-HT and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) from muscle layer-free mucosal preparations of guinea pig colon, using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Melatonin caused a sustained decline in the βAla-NKA-(4-10)-evoked 5-HT outflow from the muscle layer-free mucosal preparations, but failed to affect its metabolite 5-HIAA outflow. The specific MT₃ receptor agonist, 5-methoxycarbonylamino-N-acetyltryptamine mimicked the inhibitory effect of melatonin on βAla-NKA-(4-10)-evoked 5-HT outflow. A MT₃ receptor antagonist prazosin shifted the concentration-response curve of melatonin to the right in a concentration-dependent manner and depressed the maximum effect, but neither a combined MT₁/MT₂ receptor antagonist luzindole, nor a MT₂ receptor antagonist N-pentanoyl-2-benzyltryptamine modified the concentration-response curve to melatonin. Melatonin inhibits NK₂ receptor-triggered 5-HT release from guinea pig colonic mucosa by acting at a MT₃ melatonin receptor located directly on the mucosal layer, without affecting 5-HT degradation processes. Possible contributions of MT₁/MT₂ melatonin receptors to the inhibitory effect of melatonin appear to be negligible. Melatonin may act as a modulator of excess 5-HT release from colonic mucosa. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The

  5. LINE-1 hypomethylation in normal colon mucosa is associated with poor survival in Chinese patients with sporadic colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuchen; Li, Yiwei; Nie, Jia; Li, Dawei; Peng, Junjie; Lian, Peng; Li, Bin; Cai, Guoxiang; Li, Xinxiang; Cai, Sanjun

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and epigenetic pathways are not independent in colorectal cancer (CRC) carcinogenesis. We aimed to determine the influence of various molecular features on Chinese patients' colon cancer-specific survival (CCSS). Various genetic and epigenetic modifications were detected in paired tumor and normal mucosa tissue samples. The prognostic variables regarding patient CCSS were determined. Overall, 127 patients, including 83 males and 44 females, completed a median follow-up of 65 (3–85) months. A mean LINE-1 methylation rate of 64.62% (range, 9.45–86.93) was observed. Hypermethylation at the hMLH1 gene promoter was detected in 26 (20.47%) patients. KRAS was mutated in 52 (40.94%) patients. Sixteen (12.60%) patients were confirmed as microsatellite instability (MSI)-High, and 76 (59.84%) were found to have loss of heterozygosity at 18q. The LINE-1 methylation level, MSI status, perineural invasion and distant metastases were confirmed as independent prognostic factors for patient CCSS. A stratified survival analysis further revealed that certain subgroups of patients with LINE-1 hypomethylation had significantly worse survival (all p < 0.05). Our data revealed that both genetic and epigenetic abnormalities can concurrently exist during colonic tumorigenesis. As a global epigenetic change, LINE-1 hypomethylation in normal colon mucosa might be associated with a worse outcome in certain Chinese patients with colon cancer. PMID:26172297

  6. Forskolin induced chloride secretion across the isolated mucosa of rat colon descendens.

    PubMed

    Bridges, R J; Rummel, W; Simon, B

    1983-08-01

    The effects of forskolin, a diterpene reported to stimulate adenylate cyclase, on electrolyte transport across the isolated colonic mucosa of rat colon descendens were investigated. Forskolin, over a concentration range of 10(-7)-10(-5) M, dose-dependently increased short circuit current (Isc) and transmural potential difference (Vms). The nearly 2-fold increase in Isc and Vms caused by forskolin was accompanied by a small increase in transmural conductance (Gt). The effects of forskolin were rapid and completely reversible without any loss in tissue sensitivity. Forskolin (5 X 10(-6) M) inhibited the absorption of Na+ and reversed Cl- absorption to secretion. These effects were due to an inhibition of the mucosal-to-serosal fluxes of Na+ and Cl-. Ion substitution experiments revealed that the effects of forskolin were both Na+ and Cl- dependent and these ions were required in the serosal solution. Furosemide (10(-4) M) as well as scilliroside (10(-4) M) reversed and prevented the increase in Isc caused by forskolin. Adenylate cyclase activity in homogenates of colonic mucosa was increased 3-fold by forskolin. These results with rat colon are compared with those reported for rabbit colon and ileum and the mechanism of cyclic-AMP induced Cl- secretion in these epithelia is discussed.

  7. High-resolution imaging of colonic mucosa using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruikang K.; Elder, James B.; Smith, Victoria

    2001-05-01

    We report further the capability of OCT to delineate the microstructures beneath the colonic tissue surface, and to discriminate the normal tissues form the diseased ones. The OCT system operating at central wavelength at 820 nm was used which has measured axial resolution of 12 microns in free space and transversal resolution at 16 microns. The tissue specimens were obtained form the patient in the theater, who diagnosed as bearing colonic cancer and underwent conventional operations in the Hospital, and imaged with the OCT within 0.5-1 hour of removal. More than 10 patients were studied. The result of this study indicates that the important clinical layers and features with depth down to 1~2.0 mm of the colonic mucosa could be clearly delineated with the OCT imaging, and their thickness correlates well with the histology. The OCT images are also able to differentiate the normal colonic mucosa from the diseased ones. In conclusion, OCT is capable of high- resolution in situ imaging of colonic microstructures, without the need for excisional biopsy.

  8. Targeting the delivery of systemically administered haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells to the inflamed colon using hydrogen peroxide and platelet microparticle pre-treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Yemm, Adrian; Adams, David; Kalia, Neena

    2015-11-01

    Haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSC) therapy may be promising for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disorders (IBDs). However, clinical success remains poor, partly explained by limited HSC recruitment following systemic delivery. The mechanisms governing HSC adhesion within inflamed colon, and whether this event can be enhanced, are not known. An immortalised HSC-like line (HPC7) was pre-treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), activated platelet releasate enriched supernatant (PES) or platelet microparticles (PMPs). Subsequent adhesion was monitored using adhesion assays or in vivo ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) and colitis injured mouse colon intravitally. Integrin clustering was determined confocally and cell morphology using scanning electron microscopy. Both injuries resulted in increased HPC7 adhesion within colonic mucosal microcirculation. H2O2 and PES significantly enhanced adhesion in vitro and in the colitis, but not IR injured, colon. PMPs had no effect on adhesion. PES and PMPs induced clustering of integrins on the HPC7 surface, but did not alter their expression. Adhesion to the colon is modulated by injury but only in colitis injury can this recruitment be enhanced. The enhanced adhesion induced by PES is likely through integrin distribution changes on the HPC7 surface. Improving local HSC presence in injured colon may result in better therapeutic efficacy for treatment of IBD. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. An exploration of the microrheological environment around the distal ileal villi and proximal colonic mucosa of the possum (Trichosurus vulpecula)

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Y. F.; Williams, M. A. K.; Lentle, R. G.; Janssen, P. W. M.; Mansel, B. W.; Keen, S. A. J.; Chambers, P.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple particle-tracking techniques were used to quantify the thermally driven motion of ensembles of naked polystyrene (0.5 µm diameter) microbeads in order to determine the microrheological characteristics around the gut mucosa. The microbeads were introduced into living ex vivo preparations of the wall of the terminal ileum and proximal colon of the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula). The fluid environment surrounding both the ileal villi and colonic mucosa was heterogeneous; probably comprising discrete viscoelastic regions suspended in a continuous Newtonian fluid of viscosity close to water. Neither the viscosity of the continuous phase, the elastic modulus (G’) nor the sizes of viscoelastic regions varied significantly between areas within 20 µm and areas more than 20 µm from the villous mucosa nor from the tip to the sides of the villous mucosa. The viscosity of the continuous phase at distances further than 20 µm from the colonic mucosa was greater than that at the same distance from the ileal villous mucosa. Furthermore, the estimated sizes of viscoelastic regions were significantly greater in the colon than in the ileum. These findings validate the sensitivity of the method and call into question previous hypotheses that a contiguous layer of mucus envelops all intestinal mucosa and restricts diffusive mass transfer. Our findings suggest that, in the terminal ileum and colon at least, mixing and mass transfer are governed by more complex dynamics than were previously assumed, perhaps with gel filtration by viscoelastic regions that are suspended in a Newtonian fluid. PMID:23389898

  10. The underlying cellular mechanism in the effect of tetramethylpyrazine on the anion secretion of colonic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen-Chao; Duan, Dong-Xiao; Wang, Zhi-Ju; Tang, Ning; Yan, Ming; Zhang, Gui-Hong; Xing, Ying

    2005-12-01

    The present study investigated the underlying cellular mechanism in the effect of ligustrazine (tetramethylpyrazine, TMP) on the anion secretion of colonic mucosa in rats using a short-circuit current (I(sc)) technique in conjunction with "tool drugs." (i) After a pretreatment of the tissues by bathing the bilateral surface with Cl(-)-free Krebs-Henseleit (K-H) solution for over an hour, a basolateral application of 1 mmol/l TMP produced an increase in I(sc), and the total charges transported for 30 min were about 8.7 +/- 1.4 mC/cm(2); an apical pretreatment of DPC and a basolateral addition of acetazolamide decreased the TMP-induced I(sc) by about 60% (P < 0.01) and 45% (P < 0.05), respectively; a basolateral application of 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS), the inhibitor of Na(+)-HCO(3)(-) cotransporter (NBC), did not alter the TMP-induced I(sc). (ii) After the bilateral surface of mucosa was bathed with HCO(3)(-)-free K-H solution for over an hour, a basolateral application of 1 mmol/l TMP produced an increase in I(sc), and the total charges transported in 30 min were about 8.3 +/- 1.9 mC/cm(2); an apical pretreatment of DPC (1 mmol/l), the inhibitor of Cl(-) channels, decreased the TMP-induced Isc by about 84% (P < 0.01). The basolateral presence of bumetanide (0.1 mmol/l), the inhibitor of Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC), significantly reduced the TMP-evoked I(sc) by about 86% (P < 0.01). In conclusion, (i) ligustrazine could promote colonic mucosa secretion Cl(-) via apical Cl(-) channels and basolateral NKCC; (ii) ligustrazine could promote colonic mucosa secretion HCO(3)(-) via apical Cl(-) channels and the basolateral diffusion of CO(2).

  11. [Expression of proliferation and apoptosis markers in neoplasms of colon mucosa after cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Galitskiĭ, M V; Khomeriki, S G; Nikiforov, P A

    2009-01-01

    The cholecystectomy results in change of cholic acids flow into intestine. Permanent type of the bile flow provokes the increase of proliferation of colic epithelial cells and increases the risk for development of right-sided colorectal tumors. Meanwhile morphological features of colorectal tumors at the patients with cholecystectomy are still remaining to be clarified. The goal of the study was to investigate immunohistochemical markers of proliferation and apoptosis in colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas at the patients with cholecystectomy. Fifty patients (40 with retained function of gallbladder and 10 patients with cholecystectomy) histologically diagnosed as proximal colon adenoma or adenocarcinoma were included into the study. Colonoscopic biopsies have been taken from the lesion in cancer patients, and colonoscopic polypectomy has been performed for adenomas. In addition, biopsies have been taken from the adjacent healthy colon mucosa at least 5 cm from the lesion in each patient. 83 tumors and 49 samples of mucosa were immunostained with monoclonal mouse anti-human p53 protein (Dako) and monoclonal mouse anti-human Ki-67 antigen (Novocastra). The index of Ki-67 expression in healthy colon mucosa at the patients with cholecystectomy was 37,5 +/- 1,8% (p < 0,05) as compared to 31,36 +/- 1,9 at the patients without cholecystectomy. No significant difference was detected in the comparison of Ki-67 expression levels between the healthy mucosa and adenomas at the patients with cholecystectomy 43,4 +/- 3,45 (p > 0,05), but more prominent increase was revealed in adenocarcinomas 64,33 +/- 7,67% (p < 0,01). Protein p53 expression in healthy mucosa at the patients with a cholecystectomy was at the same level as at the patients without cholecystectomy (37%). At the patients without cholecystectomy the frequency of revealing p53 in adenomas does not vary, compared with healthy mucosa, however in adenocarcinomas p53 was not revealed at none case. As a contrast, in

  12. Morphological and morphometric measurements in colorectal mucosa of subjects at increased risk for colonic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Richter, A; Yang, K; Richter, F; Lynch, H T; Lipkin, M

    1993-10-15

    Measurements of intermediate biomarkers have recently increased, attempting to provide useful information about cancer risk. We report morphological findings in rectal mucosal biopsies from patients at low risk and at high risk for colorectal cancer. Rectal biopsies were analyzed from fourteen Seventh-Day Adventist (SDA) subjects at low risk and from twenty-seven members of families with hereditary nonpolyposis colonic cancer (HNPCC) at higher risk. The following measurements were made on rectal crypts: length of crypts, numbers of cells, diameter of the surface, middle and base of the crypts and infiltration of inflammatory cells into the lamina propria. Findings indicated morphological differences in normal-appearing rectal mucosa of individuals in the HNPCC group compared with SDA subjects (P < 0.05). They included shorter crypts with fewer epithelial cells and increased cellular infiltration in the mucosa of HNPCC subjects compared with SDA subjects, suggesting minimal inflammation, and an early stage of crypt atrophy in the rectal mucosa of subjects at higher risk for colonic neoplasia.

  13. HLA-A, -B, -C expression in colon carcinoma mimics that of the normal colonic mucosa and is prognostically relevant.

    PubMed

    Benevolo, Maria; Mottolese, Marcella; Piperno, Giulia; Sperduti, Isabella; Cione, Antonio; Sibilio, Leonardo; Martayan, Aline; Donnorso, Raffaele Perrone; Cosimelli, Maurizio; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2007-01-01

    Whether human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, -B, -C expression has any predictive value on the prognosis of human malignancies remains controversial. Herein, monoclonal antibodies with preferential reactivity for HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C (HCA2, HC10, and L31) were used to stain an archival collection of 291 formalin-fixed/paraffin-embedded tissues, comprising neoplastic lesions from stages II and III colon carcinoma patients (n=165), and the uninvolved, morphologically normal mucosae from a subset (n=126) of these patients. Marked staining variability was detected not only in the tumors as in previous studies, but also in the normal paired mucosae. HLA-A, -B, -C expression was similar in approximately two thirds of the available 126 normal/neoplastic pairs, confirming in vivo our previous observation that most tumor cells mimic the HLA phenotypes of their normal counterparts. Both up and down-regulation occurred in the remaining third of the pairs, but did not coincide with high and low expression, respectively, conventionally evaluated on the tumor lesion only. Remarkably, a "paired" evaluation, but not high or low expression in the tumor, was predictive of the clinical outcome. Deviations from the expression in the normal paired mucosa (both increases and decreases) of HCA2-reactive class I molecules (possibly HLA-A), and down-regulation of L31-reactive class I molecules (possibly HLA-C), particularly in tumors from stage II patients, correlated with poor 5-year overall and disease-free survival, hazard risk ranging from 2 to 6, approximately. Thus, a paired immunohistochemical comparison reveals a novel immune evasion strategy that may impact on the prognosis of colon carcinoma.

  14. The relationship of Candida colonization of the oral and vaginal mucosae of mothers and oral mucosae of their newborns at birth.

    PubMed

    Al-Rusan, Rund M; Darwazeh, Azmi M G; Lataifeh, Isam M

    2017-04-01

    Vaginal Candida colonization is common during pregnancy. Vaginal Candida may transmit vertically to the mouth of newborns during labor. The aim of this study was to assess and compare oral Candida colonization between vaginally born newborns and cesarean-born newborns and to investigate the association of the mother's vaginal and oral Candida colonization and the newborn's oral colonization at the time of delivery. Culture swabs were collected from the oral and vaginal mucosae of 100 pregnant women and from the oral mucosa of their 100 full-term newborns. Fifty (50%) of the mothers gave birth vaginally and the other 50 (50%) by cesarean section. The prevalence of oral and vaginal Candida in pregnant mothers was 49% and 40%, respectively. Oral Candida colonization in newborns was 7%. Oral Candida was isolated from 5 of 50 (10%) in the vaginally born group and from 2 of 50 (4%) in the cesarean-born group (P = .44). In vaginally born group, oral Candida was isolated from 5 of 20 (25%) in those born to mothers with vaginal colonization of Candida, and 0 of 30 (0.0%) in mothers without vaginal colonization of Candida (P = .007). The mother's vaginal Candida may constitute an important source of oral Candida in the newborns, particularly in those delivered vaginally. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Zinc sulphate attenuates chloride secretion in human colonic mucosae in vitro.

    PubMed

    Medani, Mekki; Bzik, Victoria A; Rogers, Ailin; Collins, Danielle; Kennelly, Rory; Winter, Des C; Brayden, David J; Baird, Alan W

    2012-12-05

    Zinc's usefulness in the treatment of diarrhoea is well established as an addition to oral rehydration. Mechanisms of action of zinc have been explored in intestinal epithelia from rodents and in cell lines. The aim was to examine how zinc alters ion transport and signal transduction in human colon in vitro. Voltage clamped colonic sheets obtained at the time of surgical resection were used to quantify ion transport responses to established secretagogues. Nystatin permeabilisation was used to study basolaterally-sited ion channels. Direct actions of zinc were determined using preparations of colonic crypts isolated from human mucosal sheets. Electrophysiological measurements revealed zinc to be an inhibitor of electrogenic ion transport stimulated by forskolin, PGE(2), histamine and carbachol in isolated human colonic epithelium. Basolateral addition of zinc sulphate had no direct effect on the epithelium. To further outline the mechanism of action, levels of secondary intracellular messengers (3', 5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate; cAMP) were determined in isolated colonic crypts, and were found to be reduced by zinc sulphate. Finally, indirect evidence from nystatin-permeabilised mucosae further suggested that zinc inhibits basolateral K(+) channels, which are critical for transepithelial Cl(-) secretion linked to water flux. Anti-secretory, and therefore anti-diarrhoeal, actions of exogenous zinc are due, at least in part, to direct basolateral epithelial K(+) channel inhibition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of glucose and hyperosmolality on the electrical characteristics of dog colon mucosa in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Gazitúa, S

    1981-01-01

    1. A method has been developed to maintain the electrical characteristics of dog colon mucosa stable over prolonged periods in vivo. This was achieved by paying special attention to the constancy of the volume of the organ and its intraluminal pressure during perfusion. 2. Intraluminal glucose elicits an increase in transmural potential and short-circuit current; this has been attributed to the presence of a Na-glucose co-transport process in this tissue. 3. Na replacement by K in the perfusate caused an increase in the transmural potential, whereas mannitol substitution evoked an inversion. These observations are probably the result of diffusion potentials. In the mannitol solution, glucose effectively abolished the negative transmural potential, whereas in the K solution, the effect of the sugar was smaller than in the control. 4. Perfusion of a hyperosmotic solution containing mannitol resulted in the development of streaming potentials across the mucosa. Their magnitude was reduced by addition of 2,4-dinitrophenol or by removal of Na from the perfusate. They were counteracted by replacement of mannitol by glucose. The streaming potentials showed no sign of saturability, reflecting a pronounced hydraulic conductivity of the epithelium. 5. The rapidity of onset of the potential response to glucose was enhanced by increasing the perfusion rate, but the response to hyperosmolality was unaffected. 6. Streaming potentials, diffusion potentials and glucose-evoked potentials are generally considered to be features of the small intestinal mucosa; their existence in the dog colon indicates that this epithelium has more in common with small gut than with the majority of mammalian colons. PMID:7320926

  17. [C. pylori colonization of the mucosa in patients with chronic ulcerative and non-ulcerative gastropathies].

    PubMed

    Loschiavo, F; Ventura-Spagnolo, T; Broccio, G

    1990-05-01

    C. pyloridis colonization was investigated in a selected group of 58 patients with upper gastrointestinal disorders submitted to endoscopy and biopsy. The following results were registered. C. pyloridis was isolated in 14 out of 18 cases of active chronic gastritis, in 15 out of 24 cases of non active chronic gastritis, and 7 out of 8 cases of antral ulceration. A negative finding was registered in 8 patients whose gastric mucosa was normal. Therefore, the Authors consider as valid the etiopathogenetic correlation between C. pyloridis and ulcerative or non-ulcerative chronic gastric diseases, suggested by others.

  18. Exposure to a social stressor disrupts the community structure of the colonic mucosa-associated microbiota

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The microbiota of the mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract consists of diverse populations of commensal bacteria that interact with host physiological function. Dysregulating these populations, through exogenous means such as antibiotics or dietary changes, can have adverse consequences on the health of the host. Studies from laboratories such as ours have demonstrated that exposure to psychological stressors disrupts the population profile of intestinal microbiota. To date, such studies have primarily focused on prolonged stressors (repeated across several days) and have assessed fecal bacterial populations. It is not known whether shorter stressors can also impact the microbiota, and whether colonic mucosa-associated populations can also be affected. The mucosa-associated microbiota exist in close proximity to elements of the host immune system and the two are tightly interrelated. Therefore, alterations in these populations should be emphasized. Additionally, stressors can induce differential responses in anxiety-like behavior and corticosterone outputs in variant strains of mice. Thus, whether stressor exposure can have contrasting effects on the colonic microbiota in inbred C57BL/6 mice and outbred CD-1 mice was also examined. Results In the present study, we used high throughput pyrosequencing to assess the effects of a single 2-hour exposure to a social stressor, called social disruption (SDR), on colonic mucosa-associated microbial profiles of C57BL/6 mice. The data indicate that exposure to the stressor significantly changed the community profile and significantly reduced the relative proportions of two genera and one family of highly abundant intestinal bacteria, including the genus Lactobacillus. This finding was confirmed using a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) technique. The use of qPCR also identified mouse strain-specific differences in bacterial abundances. L. reuteri, an immunomodulatory species, was decreased in

  19. Grain-rich diets altered the colonic fermentation and mucosa-associated bacterial communities and induced mucosal injuries in goats

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Huimin; Liu, Junhua; Feng, Panfei; Zhu, Weiyun; Mao, Shengyong

    2016-01-01

    Remarkably little information is available about the impact of high-grain (HG) feeding on colonic mucosa-associated bacteria and mucosal morphology. In the present study, 12 male goats were randomly assigned to either a hay diet (n = 6) or an HG diet (65% grain; n = 6) to characterise the changes in the composition of the bacterial community in colonic mucosa and the mucosal morphology of the colon. The results showed that HG feeding decreased the colonic pH and increased the concentrations of total short chain fatty acids and lipopolysaccharides in colonic digesta. The principal coordinate analysis results showed that the HG diet altered the colonic mucosal bacterial communities, with an increase in the abundance of genus Blautia and a decrease in the abundance of genera Bacillus, Enterococcus, and Lactococcus. The HG-fed goats showed sloughing of the surface layer epithelium, intercellular tight junction erosion, cell mitochondrial damage, and upregulation of the relative mRNA expression of IL-2 and IFN-γ in colonic mucosa. Collectively, our data indicate that HG feeding induced changes in colonic mucosal morphology and cytokines expression that might be caused by excessive fermentation and dramatic shifts in the bacterial populations in the colon. PMID:26841945

  20. Oxygen consumption and chloride secretion in rat distal colon isolated mucosa.

    PubMed

    Saraví, Fernando D; Saldeña, Teobaldo A; Carrera, Cristian A; Ibañez, Jorge E; Cincunegui, Liliana M; Carra, Graciela E

    2003-09-01

    The aerobic metabolic cost of chloride secretion was studied in rat distal colon isolated mucosa under several conditions by simultaneous measurement of short-circuit current and oxygen consumption under conditions that preserve vectorial ion transport. A low-chloride solution and the presence of bumetanide plus diphenylamine-2-carboxylate reduced short-circuit current by 75% and oxygen consumption by 25%. Ouabain decreased short-circuit current by 93% and oxygen consumption by 32%. Serotonin increased both variables by 59% and 33%, respectively. Bumetanide and diphenylamine-2-carboxylate reduced but did not abolish the effect of serotonin on short-circuit current and oxygen consumption. Changes in short-circuit current and oxygen consumption were linearly correlated under all conditions tested. It is concluded that, in the unstimulated rat distal colon epithelium, chloride secretion accounts for about 75% of ouabain-sensitive short-circuit current and oxygen consumption. Stimulated chloride secretion may demand over 40% of total oxygen consumption.

  1. Expression of apical junction complex proteins in colorectal mucosa of miniature dachshunds with inflammatory colorectal polyps

    PubMed Central

    YOKOYAMA, Nozomu; OHTA, Hiroshi; KAGAWA, Yumiko; LEELA-ARPORN, Rommaneeya; DERMLIM, Angkhana; NISA, Khoirun; MORITA, Tomoya; OSUGA, Tatsuyuki; SASAKI, Noboru; MORISHITA, Keitaro; NAKAMURA, Kensuke; TAKIGUCHI, Mitsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    We examine the expression of tight junction and adherence junction proteins in the colorectal mucosa of miniature dachshunds (MDs) with inflammatory colorectal polyps (ICRPs). Colorectal mucosa samples were endoscopically obtained from 8 MDs with ICRPs and 8 control dogs for immunoblotting. Paraffin-embedded tissues of surgically resected inflamed lesions from another 5 MDs with ICRPs and full-thickness colorectal specimens from 5 healthy beagles were obtained for immunohistochemistry. The expression patterns of claudin-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -7 and -8, E-cadherin and β-catenin were analyzed in the non-inflamed mucosa and inflamed mucosa of ICRPs and colorectal mucosa of control dogs by immunoblotting. The localization of these proteins in the inflamed lesions was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The expressions of each of claudin, E-cadherin and β-catenin were not significantly different between control dogs and non-inflamed colonic mucosa from MDs with ICRPs. In contrast, only E-cadherin and β-catenin were detected in the inflamed lesions of MDs with ICRPs. By immunohistochemistry, claudin-2, -3, -4, -5 and -7, E-cadherin and β-catenin were expressed in the colorectal epithelium within the inflamed mucosa, but not in granulation tissue. Distributions of claudin-2, -3, -4, -5, and -7, E-cadherin and β-catenin in the colonic epithelium were not different between MDs with ICRPs and control dogs. These results indicated that no significant alteration was detected in several tight junction or adherence junction proteins expression in the colorectal epithelium of ICRPs. PMID:28090006

  2. Accuracy of automatic detection of small-bowel mucosa by second-generation colon capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Adler, Samuel; Hassan, Cesare; Metzger, Yoav; Sompolinsky, Yishai; Spada, Cristiano

    2012-12-01

    Colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) is a noninvasive technique for the detection of colorectal lesions. However, for CCE to be offered as an out-of-clinic procedure, the system needs to automatically alert the patient when to ingest the laxative (booster). We tested the reliability of the automatic detection of the small-bowel (SB) mucosa and the subsequent alert for booster ingestion by the Data Recorder 3 (DR3) of the second-generation CCE (CCE-2). Retrospective analysis. Data from 120 consecutive cases of CCE-2 were analyzed for proper DR3 automatic detection of the capsule entering the SB to prompt the patient to ingest the laxative booster. Accuracy of the DR3 for detecting the SB mucosa. The DR3 correctly identified the proper time for ingestion of the laxative (booster) in 118 of 120 cases, corresponding to a sensitivity of 98.3% (95% CI, 97%-100%). The median time difference between DR3 automatic SB detection to the observed entrance of the capsule into the SB was 3 minutes 30 seconds (interquartile range 2 minutes 35 seconds to 5 minutes 57 seconds). Retrospective analysis. The 98.3% sensitivity of the DR3 for automatic identification of the SB mucosa and subsequent alert for the first laxative (booster) ingestion paves the way for CCE-2 to be offered as an out-of-clinic procedure. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Chromosome division figures reveal genomic instability in tumorigenesis of human colon mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Steinbeck, R. G.

    1998-01-01

    A variety of chromosomal gains and losses has been detected with comparative genomic hybridization during tumorigenesis in the colon mucosa. The aim of this investigation was to corroborate increasing genomic instability and to elucidate those lesions in which the record from comparative genomic hybridization has remained unexpectedly negative. Replicate paraffin-embedded samples were investigated in detail using image microphotometry. Crucial to the recent approach was the fact that the histological compartments were exactly matched and that the single-cell measurements were highly accurate (CV at 0.05). Feulgen DNA was quantified in interphase nuclei and chromosome division figures, which were found in all cases of high-grade dysplasia and, with increased frequency, of colon carcinoma. The genomic imbalance in chromosome division figures was quantified by the sensitive 4.5 c exceeding rate (where c is the haploid genome equivalent), which was also positive in cases with a negative record from comparative genomic hybridization. The DNA content of chromosome division figures was measured with a mean 4.5 c exceeding rate of 25.8 +/- 4.4% standard error in 12 cases of high-grade dysplasia and of 62.1 +/- 7.1% in colon carcinoma (16 cases). The chromosome division figures were considered to be the first morphological manifestation of genomic instability attending precancerous conditions in the colon. Telophase-like chromosome division figures with unequal amounts of DNA in their hemispheres revealed gross somatic mutations before clonal selection. Images Figure 4 PMID:9569034

  4. [Bioinformatic analysis of adenoma-normal mucosa SSH library of colon].

    PubMed

    Lü, Bing-Jian; Cui, Jing; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Hao; Luo, Min-Jie; Zhu, Yi-Min; Lai, Mao-De

    2006-04-01

    We established a colonic adenoma-normal mucosa suppressive subtraction hybridization (SSH) library in 1999. In this study, we wanted to explore the expression profile of all candidate genes in this library. We developed an EST pipeline which contained two in-house software packages, nucleic acid analytical software and GetUni. The nucleic acid analytical software, an integrator of the universal bioinformatics tools including phred, phd2fasta, cross_match, repeatmasker and blast2.0, can blast sequences of differential clones with the downloaded non-redundant nucleotide (NR) database. GetUni can cluster these NR sequences into Unigene via matching with the downloaded Homo Sapiens UniGene database. Sixty-two candidate genes in A-N library were obtained via the high throughput automatic gene expression bioinformatics pipeline. Gene Ontology online analysis revealed that ribosome genes and immunity-regulating genes were the two most common categories in the KEGG or Biocarta Pathway. We also detected the expression of 2 genes with highest hits, Reg4 and FAM46A, by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Both genes were up-regulated in 10 or 9 out of 10 adenomas in comparison with the paired normal mucosa, respectively. The candidate genes in A-N library would be of great significance in disclosing the molecular mechanism underlying in colonic adenoma initiation and progression.

  5. Expression Profiles of miRNA Subsets Distinguish Human Colorectal Carcinoma and Normal Colonic Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Pellatt, Daniel F; Stevens, John R; Wolff, Roger K; Mullany, Lila E; Herrick, Jennifer S; Samowitz, Wade; Slattery, Martha L

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-protein-coding RNA molecules that are commonly dysregulated in colorectal tumors. The objective of this study was to identify smaller subsets of highly predictive miRNAs. METHODS: Data come from population-based studies of colorectal cancer conducted in Utah and the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program. Tissue samples were available for 1,953 individuals, of which 1,894 had carcinoma tissue and 1,599 had normal mucosa available for statistical analysis. Agilent Human miRNA Microarray V.19.0 was used to generate miRNA expression profiles; validation of expression levels was carried out using quantitative PCR. We used random forest analysis and verified findings with logistic modeling in separate data sets. Important microRNAs are identified and bioinformatics tools are used to identify target genes and related biological pathways. RESULTS: We identified 16 miRNAs for colon and 17 miRNAs for rectal carcinoma that appear to differentiate between carcinoma and normal mucosa; of these, 12 were important for both colon and rectal cancer, hsa-miR-663b, hsa-miR-4539, hsa-miR-17-5p, hsa-miR-20a-5p, hsa-miR-21-5p, hsa-miR-4506, hsa-miR-92a-3p, hsa-miR-93-5p, hsa-miR-145-5p, hsa-miR-3651, hsa-miR-378a-3p, and hsa-miR-378i. Estimated misclassification rates were low at 4.83% and 2.5% among colon and rectal observations, respectively. Among independent observations, logistic modeling reinforced the importance of these miRNAs, finding the primary principal components of their variation statistically significant (P<0.001 among both colon and rectal observations) and again producing low misclassification rates. Repeating our analysis without those miRNAs initially identified as important identified other important miRNAs; however, misclassification rates increased and distinctions between remaining miRNAs in terms of classification importance were reduced. CONCLUSIONS: Our data support the hypothesis that while many miRNAs are

  6. Uropathogenic E. coli Exploit CEA to Promote Colonization of the Urogenital Tract Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Muenzner, Petra; Kengmo Tchoupa, Arnaud; Klauser, Benedikt; Brunner, Thomas; Putze, Johannes; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Hauck, Christof R.

    2016-01-01

    Attachment to the host mucosa is a key step in bacterial pathogenesis. On the apical surface of epithelial cells, members of the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family are abundant glycoproteins involved in cell-cell adhesion and modulation of cell signaling. Interestingly, several gram-negative bacterial pathogens target these receptors by specialized adhesins. The prototype of a CEACAM-binding pathogen, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, utilizes colony opacity associated (Opa) proteins to engage CEA, as well as the CEA-related cell adhesion molecules CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 on human epithelial cells. By heterologous expression of neisserial Opa proteins in non-pathogenic E. coli we find that the Opa protein-CEA interaction is sufficient to alter gene expression, to increase integrin activity and to promote matrix adhesion of infected cervical carcinoma cells and immortalized vaginal epithelial cells in vitro. These CEA-triggered events translate in suppression of exfoliation and improved colonization of the urogenital tract by Opa protein-expressing E. coli in CEA-transgenic compared to wildtype mice. Interestingly, uropathogenic E. coli expressing an unrelated CEACAM-binding protein of the Afa/Dr adhesin family recapitulate the in vitro and in vivo phenotype. In contrast, an isogenic strain lacking the CEACAM-binding adhesin shows reduced colonization and does not suppress epithelial exfoliation. These results demonstrate that engagement of human CEACAMs by distinct bacterial adhesins is sufficient to blunt exfoliation and to promote host infection. Our findings provide novel insight into mucosal colonization by a common UPEC pathotype and help to explain why human CEACAMs are a preferred epithelial target structure for diverse gram-negative bacteria to establish a foothold on the human mucosa. PMID:27171273

  7. A comparison of linaclotide and lubiprostone dosing regimens on ion transport responses in human colonic mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sang Bum; Marchelletta, Ronald R; Penrose, Harrison; Docherty, Michael J; McCole, Declan F

    2015-01-01

    Linaclotide, a synthetic guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C) agonist, and the prostone analog, Lubiprostone, are approved to manage chronic idiopathic constipation and constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. Lubiprostone also protects intestinal mucosal barrier function in ischemia. GC-C signaling regulates local fluid balance and other components of intestinal mucosal homeostasis including epithelial barrier function. The aim of this study was to compare if select dosing regimens differentially affect linaclotide and lubiprostone modulation of ion transport and barrier properties of normal human colonic mucosa. Normal sigmoid colon biopsies from healthy subjects were mounted in Ussing chambers. Tissues were treated with linaclotide, lubiprostone, or vehicle to determine effects on short-circuit current (Isc). Subsequent Isc responses to the cAMP agonist, forskolin, and the calcium agonist, carbachol, were also measured to assess if either drug caused desensitization. Barrier properties were assessed by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance. Isc responses to linaclotide and lubiprostone were significantly higher than vehicle control when administered bilaterally or to the mucosal side only. Single versus cumulative concentrations of linaclotide showed differences in efficacy while cumulative but not single dosing caused desensitization to forskolin. Lubiprostone reduced forskolin responses under all conditions. Linaclotide and lubiprostone exerted a positive effect on TER that was dependent on the dosing regimen. Linaclotide and lubiprostone increase ion transport responses across normal human colon but linaclotide displays increased sensitivity to the dosing regimen used. These findings may have implications for dosing protocols of these agents in patients with constipation. PMID:26038704

  8. A comparison of linaclotide and lubiprostone dosing regimens on ion transport responses in human colonic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sang Bum; Marchelletta, Ronald R; Penrose, Harrison; Docherty, Michael J; McCole, Declan F

    2015-03-01

    Linaclotide, a synthetic guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C) agonist, and the prostone analog, Lubiprostone, are approved to manage chronic idiopathic constipation and constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. Lubiprostone also protects intestinal mucosal barrier function in ischemia. GC-C signaling regulates local fluid balance and other components of intestinal mucosal homeostasis including epithelial barrier function. The aim of this study was to compare if select dosing regimens differentially affect linaclotide and lubiprostone modulation of ion transport and barrier properties of normal human colonic mucosa. Normal sigmoid colon biopsies from healthy subjects were mounted in Ussing chambers. Tissues were treated with linaclotide, lubiprostone, or vehicle to determine effects on short-circuit current (I sc). Subsequent I sc responses to the cAMP agonist, forskolin, and the calcium agonist, carbachol, were also measured to assess if either drug caused desensitization. Barrier properties were assessed by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance. I sc responses to linaclotide and lubiprostone were significantly higher than vehicle control when administered bilaterally or to the mucosal side only. Single versus cumulative concentrations of linaclotide showed differences in efficacy while cumulative but not single dosing caused desensitization to forskolin. Lubiprostone reduced forskolin responses under all conditions. Linaclotide and lubiprostone exerted a positive effect on TER that was dependent on the dosing regimen. Linaclotide and lubiprostone increase ion transport responses across normal human colon but linaclotide displays increased sensitivity to the dosing regimen used. These findings may have implications for dosing protocols of these agents in patients with constipation.

  9. Ileal and colonic fatty acid profiles in patients with active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bühner, S; Nagel, E; Körber, J; Vogelsang, H; Linn, T; Pichlmayr, R

    1994-01-01

    In patients with active Crohn's disease and in a control group the fatty acid profiles in the whole lipid fraction of ileal and colonic mucosal biopsy specimens were determined by capillary gas chromatography. The biopsy specimens in Crohn's disease patients were taken from the inflamed terminal ileum as well as from the inflamed and macroscopically normal colon. Compared with controls the fatty acid distribution in the inflamed ileal mucosa was significantly characterised by (a) a decrease of 18:2 n6 and 18:3 n3 accompanied by a substantial increase of the highly polyunsaturated fatty acids 20:4 n6, 22:4 n6, and 22:6 n3 and (b) a higher unsaturation index of total fatty acids compared with controls. These changes were similar in the inflamed colon. Additionally, both the inflamed and the macroscopically normal colonic mucosa showed an increase of saturated (18:0) and a decrease of monounsaturated fatty acids (18:1 n9). Fatty acid profiles of ileum and colon showed side variations in controls, but not in the Crohn's disease group. These data suggest that in Crohn's disease changes in the distribution of polyunsaturated fatty acids seem to be the general feature of inflamed mucosa in small and large intestine. Results further suggest that colonic fatty acid metabolism in Crohn's disease is altered by degrees, showing changes in saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids as an additional, primary event. PMID:7959199

  10. Regional Specialisation of T Cell Subsets and Apoptosis in the Human Gut Mucosa: Differences Between Ileum and Colon in Healthy Intestine and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Anna; Fernández-Bañares, Fernando; Pedrosa, Elisabet; Salas, Antonio; Loras, Carme; Rosinach, Mercè; Aceituno, Montserrat; Andújar, Xavier; Forné, Montserrat; Zabana, Yamile; Esteve, Maria

    2016-09-01

    There is very limited information regarding region-specific immunological response in human intestine. We aimed to determine differences in immune compartmentalisation between ileum and colon in healthy and inflamed mucosa. T cell profile and its apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry, Th1, Th17, Treg [CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+)], double positive [DP, CD3(+)CD4(+)CD8(+)] and double negative T cells [DN, CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-)], immunohistochemistry [FOXP3, caspase-3], and real-time polymerase chain reaction [PCR] [IFN-γ, IL-17-A, and FOXP3] on biopsies from different regions of healthy intestine and of intestine in inflammatory bowel diseases. Healthy colon showed higher percentages of Treg, Th17, and DN, and lower numbers of DP T cells compared with ileum [p < 0.05]. Some but not all region-specific differences were lost in inflammatory conditions. Disease-specific patterns were found: a Th1/Th17 pattern and a Th17 pattern in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis respectively, whereas a reduction in Th1/Th17 was found in microscopic colitis. In colonic Crohn's disease and microscopic colitis, DN T cells had a pattern inverse to that of Th1/Th17 (increase in microscopic colitis [p < 0.05] and decrease in Crohn's disease [p < 0.005]). Higher levels of lymphocyte apoptosis were found in healthy colon compared with the ileal counterparts [p = 0.001]. All forms of colonic inflammation presented a dramatic decrease in apoptosis compared with healthy colon. By contrast ileal Crohn's disease showed higher levels of cleaved-Caspase(+) CD3(+) cells. Immunological differences exist in healthy gastrointestinal tract. Inflammatory processes overwhelm some location-specific differences, whereas others are maintained. Care has to be taken when analysing immune response in intestinal inflammation, as location-specific differences may be relevant. Copyright © 2016 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  11. Expression of Beclin1 in the colonic mucosa tissues of patients with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiaoqian; Yang, Bin; Liu, Xingshan; Yang, Huixiang; Liu, Xishuang

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the expression of Beclin1 in the colonic mucosa tissue of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), which acts as a regulator of autophagy and might play a part in the disease progression potentially. A total of 112 patients were selected from September 2013 to November 2014, and their colonic mucosal tissues were collected as the subject of study. Among them, 75 cases were diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC), 37 cases were diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IRS) during the same time, which was set as the control group. The mucosal tissues were processed with ELISA and IHCA to measure the expression level of Beclin1, and correlation analysis was performed to demonstrate its role in the disease progression. The expression level pf Beclin1 was significantly higher in the UC patients compared with the control group (P<0.05). Meanwhile, it’s positively correlated with the severity of disease, the endoscopic classification and the pathologic staging results, which has statistical significance (P<0.05). Beclin1 was expressed at a higher level in UC patients, and correlated with the severity of the disease, indicating the abnormal regulation of autophagy in the disease progression. PMID:26885041

  12. Novel xylan-controlled delivery of therapeutic proteins to inflamed colon by the human anaerobic commensal bacterium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Growth factors such as keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) are important immunoregulatory and epithelial growth factors. They are also potential therapeutic proteins for inflammatory bowel disease. However, owing to protein instability in the upper gastrointestinal tract, it is difficult to achieve therapeutic levels of these proteins in the injured colon when given orally. Furthermore, the short half-life necessitates repeated dosage with large amounts of the growth factor, which may have dangerous side effects, hence the importance of temporal and spatial control of growth factor delivery. Methods The human commensal gut bacterium, Bacteroides ovatus, was genetically engineered to produce human KGF-2 or TGF-β 1 (BO-KGF or BO-TGF) in a regulated manner in response to the dietary polysaccharide, xylan. The successful application of BO-KGF or BO-TGF in the prevention of dextran sodium sulphate induced murine colitis is presented here. Results This novel drug delivery system had a significant prophylactic effect, limiting the development of intestinal inflammation both clinically and histopathologically. The ability to regulate heterologous protein production by B ovatus using xylan is both unique and an important safety feature of this drug delivery system. Conclusions The use of genetically engineered B ovatus for the controlled and localised delivery of epithelial growth promoting and immunomodulatory proteins has potential clinical applications for the treatment of various diseases targeting the colon. PMID:23676805

  13. Histamine and chondroitin sulfate E proteoglycan released by cultured human colonic mucosa: indication for possible presence of E mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eliakim, R.; Gilead, L.; Ligumsky, M; Okon, E.; Rachmilewitz, D.; Razin, E.

    1986-01-01

    An association between the release of histamine and chondroitin sulfate E proteoglycan (PG) was demonstrates in human colonic mucosa (HCM). Colonic biopsy samples incorporated (/sup 35/S)sulfate into PG, which was partially released into the culture medium during the incubation period. Ascending thin-layer chromatography of the released /sup 35/S-labeled PG after its digestion by chondroitin ABC lyase (chondroitinase, EC 4.2.2.4) followed by autoradiography yielded three products that migrated in the position of monosulfated disaccharides of N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfate and N-acetylgalactosoamine 6-sulfate and of an oversulfated disaccharide possessing N-acetylgalatosamine 4,6-disulfate. Cultured colonic mucosa released 23.6 +/- 3.7ng of histamine per mg of wet tissue without any special trigger. Comparison by linear regression analysis of the release of histamine and chondroitin (/sup 35/S)sulfate E PG revealed a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.7. Histological examination of the colonic biopsies revealed the presence of many mast cells in various degrees of degranulation in the mucosa and submucosa. The above correlation, the observation that most of the mast cells showed various degrees of degranulation, and the lack of heparin synthesis as opposed to the synthesis and immunological release of chondroitin sulfate E strongly suggest that the E mast cell exists in the human colon.

  14. Relationship Between Microbiota of the Colonic Mucosa vs Feces and Symptoms, Colonic Transit, and Methane Production in Female Patients With Chronic Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Gopanandan; Chen, Jun; Chen, Xianfeng; Chia, Nicholas; O'Connor, Helen M.; Wolf, Patricia G.; Gaskins, H. Rex; Bharucha, Adil E.

    2015-01-01

    colonic transit, the profile of the microbiota in the colonic mucosa could discriminate patients with constipation from healthy individuals. The profile of the fecal microbiota was associated with colonic transit and methane production (measured in breath), but not constipation. PMID:26460205

  15. Relationship Between Microbiota of the Colonic Mucosa vs Feces and Symptoms, Colonic Transit, and Methane Production in Female Patients With Chronic Constipation.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Gopanandan; Chen, Jun; Chen, Xianfeng; Chia, Nicholas; O'Connor, Helen M; Wolf, Patricia G; Gaskins, H Rex; Bharucha, Adil E

    2016-02-01

    the colonic mucosa could discriminate patients with constipation from healthy individuals. The profile of the fecal microbiota was associated with colonic transit and methane production (measured in breath), but not constipation. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Altered Interactions between the Gut Microbiome and Colonic Mucosa Precede Polyposis in APCMin/+ Mice.

    PubMed

    Son, Joshua S; Khair, Shanawaj; Pettet, Donald W; Ouyang, Nengtai; Tian, Xinyu; Zhang, Yuanhao; Zhu, Wei; Mackenzie, Gerardo G; Robertson, Charles E; Ir, Diana; Frank, Daniel N; Rigas, Basil; Li, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Mutation of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene), an early event in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, is present in 70-80% of sporadic human colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. To test the hypothesis that mutation of the APC gene alters microbial interactions with host intestinal mucosa prior to the development of polyposis, culture-independent methods (targeted qPCR assays and Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene V1V2 hypervariable region) were used to compare the intestinal microbial composition of 30 six-week old C57BL/6 APCMin/+ and 30 congenic wild type (WT) mice. The results demonstrate that similar to 12-14 week old APCMin/+ mice with intestinal neoplasia, 6 week old APCMin/+ mice with no detectable neoplasia, exhibit an increased relative abundance of Bacteroidetes spp in the colon. Parallel mouse RNA sequence analysis, conducted on a subset of proximal colonic RNA samples (6 APCMin/+, 6 WT) revealed 130 differentially expressed genes (DEGs, fold change ≥ 2, FDR <0.05). Hierarchical clustering of the DEGs was carried out by using 1-r dissimilarity measurement, where r stands for the Pearson correlation, and Ward minimum variance linkage, in order to reduce the number of input variables. When the cluster centroids (medians) were included along with APC genotype as input variables in a negative binomial (NB) regression model, four of seven mouse gene clusters, in addition to APC genotype, were significantly associated with the increased relative abundance of Bacteroidetes spp. Three of the four clusters include several downregulated genes encoding immunoglobulin variable regions and non-protein coding RNAs. These results support the concept that mutation of the APC gene alters colonic-microbial interactions prior to polyposis. It remains to be determined whether interventions directed at ameliorating dysbiosis in APCMin/+mice, such as through probiotics, prebiotics or antibiotics, could reduce tumor formation.

  17. IGF-1 Gene Expression in Rat Colonic Mucosa After Different Exercise Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Buehlmeyer, Katja; Doering, Frank; Daniel, Hannelore; Petridou, Anatoli; Mougios, Vassilis; Schulz, Thorsten; Michna, Horst

    2007-01-01

    The evidence is increasing for a close link between the insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system and colon cancer prevention by physical exercise. To reveal exercise-induced alterations in colon mucosa, gene expression of IGF-1 and related genes and serum IGF-1 were investigated. Twenty male Wistar rats performed a 12 week voluntary exercise program. Nine rats served as the control group. Gene expression of IGF-1, IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and IGF-binding protein 3 (IGF-BP3) were quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Circulating IGF-1 was analyzed exercise volume-dependent. Based on 3 distinguished groups with low (L-EX, <2629 m·night-1), medium (M-EX, 3003-7458 m·night-1) and high exercise volume (H-EX, >8314 m·night-1), we observed lower serum IGF-1 levels (P < 0.05) in all exercise groups as compared to the control group and IGF-1 levels declined proportional to the increase in exercise volume. A significant (p < 0.05) positive correlation was found between IGF-1 concentration and body mass (r = 0.50) and a significant negative correlation exists between body mass and exercise volume (r = -0.50). Significant differences in colonic mRNA levels of IGF-1, IGF-1R and IGF-BP3 could not be observed. Based on our data we propose that the exercise as well as the body mass reduction leads to a decrease in circulating IGF-1 and this might represent a prime link to colon cancer prevention. Key pointsThere were significantly lower serum IGF-1 levels in all exercise groups as compared to the control group.GF-1 levels declined proportional to the increase in exercise volume.A significant positive correlation was found between IGF-1 concentration and body mass and a significant negative correlation was found between body mass and exercise volume.Significant differences in colonic mRNA levels of IGF-1, IGF-1R and IGF-BP3 could not be observed. PMID:24149475

  18. Contribution of the Collagen-Binding Proteins of Streptococcus mutans to Bacterial Colonization of Inflamed Dental Pulp.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Ryota; Ogaya, Yuko; Nakano, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a major pathogen of dental caries. Collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) (approximately 120 kDa), termed Cnm and Cbm, are regarded as important cell surface antigens related to the adherence of S. mutans to collagenous tissue. Furthermore, CBP-positive S. mutans strains are associated with various systemic diseases involving bacteremia, such as infective endocarditis. Endodontic infection is considered to be an important cause of bacteremia, but little is known regarding the presence of S. mutans in dental pulp tissue. In the present study, the distribution and virulence of S. mutans in dental pulp tissues were investigated by focusing on CBPs. Adhesion and invasion properties of various S. mutans strains were analyzed using human dental pulp fibroblasts (HDPFs). CBP-positive strains had a significantly higher rate of adhesion to HDPFs compared with CBP-defective isogenic mutant strains (P<0.001). In addition, CBP-positive strains induced HDPF proliferation, which is a possible mechanism related to development of hyperplastic pulpitis. The distribution of S. mutans strains isolated from infected root canal specimens was then analyzed by PCR. We found that approximately 50% of the root canal specimens were positive for S. mutans. Approximately 20% of these strains were Cnm-positive, while no Cbm-positive strains were isolated. The Cnm-positive strains isolated from the specimens showed adhesion to HDPFs. Our results suggest that CBP-positive S. mutans strains exhibit high colonization in dental pulp. This could be a possible virulence factor for various systemic diseases.

  19. Contribution of the Collagen-Binding Proteins of Streptococcus mutans to Bacterial Colonization of Inflamed Dental Pulp

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Ryota; Ogaya, Yuko; Nakano, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a major pathogen of dental caries. Collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) (approximately 120 kDa), termed Cnm and Cbm, are regarded as important cell surface antigens related to the adherence of S. mutans to collagenous tissue. Furthermore, CBP-positive S. mutans strains are associated with various systemic diseases involving bacteremia, such as infective endocarditis. Endodontic infection is considered to be an important cause of bacteremia, but little is known regarding the presence of S. mutans in dental pulp tissue. In the present study, the distribution and virulence of S. mutans in dental pulp tissues were investigated by focusing on CBPs. Adhesion and invasion properties of various S. mutans strains were analyzed using human dental pulp fibroblasts (HDPFs). CBP-positive strains had a significantly higher rate of adhesion to HDPFs compared with CBP-defective isogenic mutant strains (P<0.001). In addition, CBP-positive strains induced HDPF proliferation, which is a possible mechanism related to development of hyperplastic pulpitis. The distribution of S. mutans strains isolated from infected root canal specimens was then analyzed by PCR. We found that approximately 50% of the root canal specimens were positive for S. mutans. Approximately 20% of these strains were Cnm-positive, while no Cbm-positive strains were isolated. The Cnm-positive strains isolated from the specimens showed adhesion to HDPFs. Our results suggest that CBP-positive S. mutans strains exhibit high colonization in dental pulp. This could be a possible virulence factor for various systemic diseases. PMID:27442266

  20. In vitro effects of reactive oxygen metabolites, with and without flunixin meglumine, on equine colonic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Olivia J; Freeman, David E; Wallig, Matthew A; Clarkson, Robert B

    2007-03-01

    To determine effects of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs), with and without flunixin meglumine, on equine right ventral colon (RVC) in vitro. 18 healthy horses and ponies. In 3 groups of 6 animals each, short-circuit current and conductance were measured in RVC mucosa in Ussing chambers. The 3 groups received physiologic saline (0.9% NaCl) solution, IV, 10 minutes before euthanasia and tissue incubation in Krebs-Ringer-bicarbonate (KRB) solution; flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg, IV) 10 minutes before euthanasia and tissue incubation in KRB solution; or physiologic saline solution, IV, 10 minutes before euthanasia and incubation in KRB solution with 2.7 x 10(5)M flunixin meglumine. Incubation conditions included control (no addition) and ROM systems, including addition of 1 mM xanthine and 80 mU of xanthine oxidase (to produce the superoxide radical), 1 mM H(2)O(2), and 1 mM H(2)O(2) and 0.5 mM ferrous sulfate (to produce the hydroxyl radical). All ROMs that were added or generated significantly increased the short-circuit current except in tissues coincubated with flunixin meglumine, and they induced mild epithelial vacuolation and apoptosis, but did not disrupt the epithelium nor change conductance, lactate dehydrogenase release, or [(3)H]mannitol flux. Responses to ROMs could be attributed to increased chloride secretion and inhibited neutral NaCl absorption in equine RVC, possibly by stimulating prostaglandin production. The ROMs examined under conditions of this study could play a role in prostaglandin-mediated colonic secretion in horses with enterocolitis without causing direct mucosal injury.

  1. Spectroscopic Microvascular Blood Detection from the Endoscopically Normal Colonic Mucosa: Biomarker for Neoplasia Risk

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Hemant K.; Gomes, Andrew; Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Goldberg, Michael J; Rogers, Jeremy; Ruderman, Sarah; L, Young Kim; Kromine, Alex; Brand, Randall E.; Jameel, Mohammed; Vakil, Parmede; Hasabou, Nahla; Backman, Vadim

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims We have previously utilized a novel biomedical optics technology, four-dimensional elastically-scattered light fingerprinting, to demonstrate that in experimental colon carcinogenesis, the predysplastic epithelial microvascular blood content is markedly elevated. In order to assess the potential clinical translatability of this putative field effect marker, we characterized the early increase in blood supply (EIBS) in humans in vivo. Methods We developed a novel endoscopically-compatible polarization-gated spectroscopic probe that was capable of measuring oxygenated (Ohb) and deoxygenated (Dhb) hemoglobin specifically in the mucosal microcirculation through polarization-gating. Microvascular blood content was measured in 222 patients from the endoscopically-normal cecum, midtransverse colon and rectum. If polyp was present, readings were taken from the polyp tissue along with the normal mucosa 10 cm and 30 cm proximal and distal to the lesion. Results Tissue phantom studies demonstrated that the probe had outstanding accuracy for hemoglobin determination (r2=0.99). Augmentation of microvasculature blood content was most pronounced within the most superficial (~100µm) layer and dissipated in deeper layers (i.e. submucosa). EIBS was detectable within 30 cm from lesion and the magnitude mirrored adenoma proximity. This occurred for both OHb and DHb, with the effect size being slightly greater for DHb. EIBS correlated with adenoma size and was not engendered by non-neoplastic (hyperplastic) polyps. Conclusions We provide, herein, the first demonstration that in vivo microvascular blood content can be measured and provides an accurate marker of field carcinogenesis. This technological/biological advance has numerous potential applications in CRC screening such as improved polyp detection and risk-stratification. PMID:18722372

  2. Melatonin inhibits tachykinin NK2 receptor-triggered 5-HT release from guinea pig isolated colonic mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Shu-ichi; Tohei, Atsushi; Ikeda, Masashi

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Melatonin is involved in the regulation of colonic motility, and sensation, but little is known about the influence of melatonin on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release from colonic mucosa. A tachykinin NK2 receptor-selective agonist, [β-Ala8]-neurokinin A4-10[βAla-NKA-(4-10)] can induce 5-HT release from guinea pig colonic mucosa via NK2 receptors on the mucosal layer. The present study was designed to determine the influence of melatonin on 5-HT release from guinea pig colonic mucosa, evoked by the NK2 receptor agonist, βAla-NKA-(4-10). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effect of melatonin was investigated on the outflow of 5-HT and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) from muscle layer-free mucosal preparations of guinea pig colon, using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. KEY RESULTS Melatonin caused a sustained decline in the βAla-NKA-(4-10)-evoked 5-HT outflow from the muscle layer-free mucosal preparations, but failed to affect its metabolite 5-HIAA outflow. The specific MT3 receptor agonist, 5-methoxycarbonylamino-N-acetyltryptamine mimicked the inhibitory effect of melatonin on βAla-NKA-(4-10)-evoked 5-HT outflow. A MT3 receptor antagonist prazosin shifted the concentration-response curve of melatonin to the right in a concentration-dependent manner and depressed the maximum effect, but neither a combined MT1/MT2 receptor antagonist luzindole, nor a MT2 receptor antagonist N-pentanoyl-2-benzyltryptamine modified the concentration–response curve to melatonin. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Melatonin inhibits NK2 receptor-triggered 5-HT release from guinea pig colonic mucosa by acting at a MT3 melatonin receptor located directly on the mucosal layer, without affecting 5-HT degradation processes. Possible contributions of MT1/MT2 melatonin receptors to the inhibitory effect of melatonin appear to be negligible. Melatonin may act as a modulator of excess 5-HT release from colonic mucosa. PMID

  3. Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma of the Sigmoid Colon Discovered on Routine Screening Colonoscopy in Patient with Hepatitis C and Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    PubMed

    Bhuta, Rajiv; Bromberg, Michael; Bains, Ashish; Schey, Ron

    2016-08-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is predominantly found in the stomach. Rarely, it is found in the proximal colon and even less so in the sigmoid colon. We present a rare case of primary sigmoid colon MALT lymphoma in a patient with concomitant Helicobacter pylori and hepatitis C infection. We also review current imaging, staging, and therapeutic modalities. To our knowledge, this is the first sigmoid colon MALT lymphoma reported in the United States.

  4. Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma of the Sigmoid Colon Discovered on Routine Screening Colonoscopy in Patient with Hepatitis C and Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bhuta, Rajiv; Bromberg, Michael; Bains, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is predominantly found in the stomach. Rarely, it is found in the proximal colon and even less so in the sigmoid colon. We present a rare case of primary sigmoid colon MALT lymphoma in a patient with concomitant Helicobacter pylori and hepatitis C infection. We also review current imaging, staging, and therapeutic modalities. To our knowledge, this is the first sigmoid colon MALT lymphoma reported in the United States. PMID:27807552

  5. Comparative study of the optical properties of colon mucosa and colon precancerous polyps between 400 and 1000 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Sónia; Gueiral, Nuno; Nogueira, Elisabete; Henrique, Rui; Oliveira, Luís.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2017-03-01

    Optical properties of biological tissues are unique and may be used for tissue identification, tissue discrimination or even to identify pathologies. Early stage colorectal cancer evolves from adenomatous polyps that arise in the inner layer of the colorectal tube - the mucosa. The identification of different optical properties between healthy and pathological colorectal tissues might be used to identify different tissue components and to develop an early stage diagnosis method using optical technologies. Since most of the biomedical optics techniques use light within the visible and near infrared wavelength ranges, we used the inverse adding-doubling method to make a fast estimation of the optical properties of colorectal mucosa and early stage adenocarcinoma between 400 and 1000 nm. The estimated wavelength dependencies have provided information about higher lipid content in healthy mucosa and higher blood content in pathological tissue. Such data has also indicated that the wavelength dependence of the scattering coefficient for healthy mucosa is dominated by Rayleigh scattering and for pathological mucosa it is dominated by Mie scattering. Such difference indicates smaller scatterer size in healthy mucosa tissue. Such information can now be used to develop new diagnosis or treatment methods for early cancer detection or removal. One possibility is to use optical clearing technique to improve tissue transparency and create localized and temporary tissue dehydration for image contrast improvement during diagnosis or polyp laser removal. Such techniques can now be developed based on the different results that we have found for healthy and pathological colorectal mucosa.

  6. An Assessment of Database-Validated microRNA Target Genes in Normal Colonic Mucosa: Implications for Pathway Analysis.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Herrick, Jennifer S; Stevens, John R; Wolff, Roger K; Mullany, Lila E

    2017-01-01

    Determination of functional pathways regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs), while an essential step in developing therapeutics, is challenging. Some miRNAs have been studied extensively; others have limited information. In this study, we focus on 254 miRNAs previously identified as being associated with colorectal cancer and their database-identified validated target genes. We use RNA-Seq data to evaluate messenger RNA (mRNA) expression for 157 subjects who also had miRNA expression data. In the replication phase of the study, we replicated associations between 254 miRNAs associated with colorectal cancer and mRNA expression of database-identified target genes in normal colonic mucosa. In the discovery phase of the study, we evaluated expression of 18 miR-NAs (those with 20 or fewer database-identified target genes along with miR-21-5p, miR-215-5p, and miR-124-3p which have more than 500 database-identified target genes) with expression of 17 434 mRNAs to identify new targets in colon tissue. Seed region matches between miRNA and newly identified targeted mRNA were used to help determine direct miRNA-mRNA associations. From the replication of the 121 miRNAs that had at least 1 database-identified target gene using mRNA expression methods, 97.9% were expressed in normal colonic mucosa. Of the 8622 target miRNA-mRNA associations identified in the database, 2658 (30.2%) were associated with gene expression in normal colonic mucosa after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Of the 133 miRNAs with database-identified target genes by non-mRNA expression methods, 97.2% were expressed in normal colonic mucosa. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, 2416 miRNA-mRNA associations remained significant (19.8%). Results from the discovery phase based on detailed examination of 18 miRNAs identified more than 80 000 miRNA-mRNA associations that had not previously linked to the miRNA. Of these miRNA-mRNA associations, 15.6% and 14.8% had seed matches for CRCh38 and CRCh37

  7. In vitro studies on the colonization of bovine colonic mucosa by Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC).

    PubMed Central

    Cobbold, R. N.; Desmarchelier, P. M.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated host-related factors that influence intestinal colonization by Shiga-toxigenic E. coli (STEC). A quantitative colonization assay was developed to comparatively measure attachment of STEC to bovine colonic tissues maintained in vitro. No differences were determined in colonization susceptibility between tissues derived from weaning calves and adult cattle, or for tissues from cattle fed grain and forage-based rations. Substrate conditions designed to represent various intra-enteric environments were tested for their effect on STEC/mucosal interaction. Under conditions corresponding to a well-fed ruminant (high volatile fatty acid and lactate concentrations, low pH), significantly less STEC colonized the mucosal surface of colonic biopsies. These results may help explain why fasted, poorly or intermittently fed cattle and pre-ruminant calves excrete STEC to a greater degree. Studies on the ecology of STEC within the ruminant gut help identify mechanisms to reduce their threat to public health. PMID:14979594

  8. Exposure to meat-derived carcinogens and bulky DNA adduct levels in normal-appearing colon mucosa.

    PubMed

    Ho, Vikki; Brunetti, Vanessa; Peacock, Sarah; Massey, Thomas E; Godschalk, Roger W L; van Schooten, Frederik J; Ashbury, Janet E; Vanner, Stephen J; King, Will D

    2017-09-01

    Meat consumption is a risk factor for colorectal cancer. This research investigated the relationship between meat-derived carcinogen exposure and bulky DNA adduct levels, a biomarker of DNA damage, in colon mucosa. Least squares regression was used to examine the relationship between meat-derived carcinogen exposure (PhIP and meat mutagenicity) and bulky DNA adduct levels in normal-appearing colon tissue measured using (32)P-postlabelling among 202 patients undergoing a screening colonoscopy. Gene-diet interactions between carcinogen exposure and genetic factors relevant to biotransformation and DNA repair were also examined. Genotyping was conducting using the MassARRAY(®) iPLEX(®) Gold SNP Genotyping assay. PhIP and higher meat mutagenicity exposures were not associated with levels of bulky DNA adducts in colon mucosa. The XPC polymorphism (rs2228001) was found to associate with bulky DNA adduct levels, whereby genotypes conferring lower DNA repair activity were associated with higher DNA adduct levels than the normal activity genotype. Among individuals with genotypes associated with lower DNA repair (XPD, rs13181 and rs1799179) or detoxification activity (GSTP1, rs1695), higher PhIP or meat mutagenicity exposures were associated with higher DNA adduct levels. Significant interactions between the XPC polymorphism (rs2228000) and both dietary PhIP and meat mutagenicity on DNA adduct levels was observed, but associations were inconsistent with the a priori hypothesized direction of effect. Exposure to meat-derived carcinogens may be associated with increased DNA damage occurring directly in the colon among genetically susceptible individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Saccharomyces boulardii Protease Inhibits the Effects of Clostridium difficile Toxins A and B in Human Colonic Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Riegler, Martin F.; Valenick, Leyla; LaMont, J. Thomas; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    1999-01-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii is a nonpathogenic yeast used in the treatment of Clostridium difficile diarrhea and colitis. We have reported that S. boulardii inhibits C. difficile toxin A enteritis in rats by releasing a 54-kDa protease which digests the toxin A molecule and its brush border membrane (BBM) receptor (I. Castagliuolo, J. T. LaMont, S. T. Nikulasson, and C. Pothoulakis, Infect. Immun. 64:5225–5232, 1996). The aim of this study was to further evaluate the role of S. boulardii protease in preventing C. difficile toxin A enteritis in rat ileum and determine whether it protects human colonic mucosa from C. difficile toxins. A polyclonal rabbit antiserum raised against purified S. boulardii serine protease inhibited by 73% the proteolytic activity present in S. boulardii conditioned medium in vitro. The anti-protease immunoglobulin G (IgG) prevented the action of S. boulardii on toxin A-induced intestinal secretion and mucosal permeability to [3H]mannitol in rat ileal loops, while control rabbit IgG had no effect. The anti-protease IgG also prevented the effects of S. boulardii protease on digestion of toxins A and B and on binding of [3H]toxin A and [3H]toxin B to purified human colonic BBM. Purified S. boulardii protease reversed toxin A- and toxin B-induced inhibition of protein synthesis in human colonic (HT-29) cells. Furthermore, toxin A- and B-induced drops in transepithelial resistance in human colonic mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers were reversed by 60 and 68%, respectively, by preexposing the toxins to S. boulardii protease. We conclude that the protective effects of S. boulardii on C. difficile-induced inflammatory diarrhea in humans are due, at least in part, to proteolytic digestion of toxin A and B molecules by a secreted protease. PMID:9864230

  10. Numerical ecology validates a biogeographical distribution and gender-based effect on mucosa-associated bacteria along the human colon

    PubMed Central

    de Cárcer, Daniel Aguirre; Cuív, Páraic Ó; Wang, Tingting; Kang, Seungha; Worthley, Daniel; Whitehall, Vicki; Gordon, Iain; McSweeney, Chris; Leggett, Barbara; Morrison, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We applied constrained ordination numerical ecology methods to data produced with a human intestinal tract-specific phylogenetic microarray (the Aus-HIT Chip) to examine the microbial diversity associated with matched biopsy tissue samples taken from the caecum, transverse colon, sigmoid colon and rectum of 10 healthy patients. Consistent with previous studies, the profiles revealed a marked intersubject variability; however, the numerical ecology methods of analysis allowed the subtraction of the subject effect from the data and revealed, for the first time, evidence of a longitudinal gradient for specific microbes along the colorectum. In particular, probes targeting Streptococcus and Enterococcus spp. produced strongest signals with caecal and transverse colon samples, with a gradual decline through to the rectum. Conversely, the analyses suggest that several members of the Enterobacteriaceae increase in relative abundance towards the rectum. These collective differences were substantiated by the multivariate analysis of quantitative PCR data. We were also able to identify differences in the microarray profiles, especially for the streptococci and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, on the basis of gender. The results derived by these multivariate analyses are biologically intuitive and suggest that the biogeography of the colonic mucosa can be monitored for changes through cross-sectional and/or inception cohort studies. PMID:21124491

  11. Spectral Slope from the Endoscopically-Normal Mucosa Predicts Concurrent Colonic Neoplasia: A Pilot Ex-Vivo Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Hemant K.; Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Kim, Young L.; Goldberg, Michael J.; Muldoon, Joseph P.; Liu, Yang; Brand, Randall E.; Hall, Curtis; Hasabou, Nahla; Jameel, Mohammed; Backman, Vadim

    2008-01-01

    Purpose We previously reported that analysis of histologically normal intestinal epithelium for spectral slope, a marker for aberrations in nanoscale tissue architecture, had outstanding accuracy in identifying field carcinogenesis in preclinical colorectal cancer models. In this study, we assessed the translatability of spectral slope analysis to human colorectal cancer screening. Methods Subjects (n=127) undergoing colonoscopy had spectral slope determined from two endoscopically normal midtransverse colonic biopsies using four dimensional elastic light-scattering fingerprinting and correlated with clinical findings. Results Four dimensional elastic light-scattering fingerprinting analysis showed the submicron particles size progressively shifted towards larger sizes in subjects with harboring neoplasia. There was a corresponding decrease in spectral slope values from the endoscopically normal mucosa in subjects harboring adenomas (n=41) and advanced adenomas (n=10), compared to neoplasia-free subjects (p<0.00001). These factors did not appear to be confounded by either age or adenoma location. For detecting advanced adenomas, spectral slope had a negative and positive predictive value of 95 percent and 50 percent respectively. Conclusions We demonstrate, for the first time, that spectral slope in “normal” mucosa accurately risk-stratify patients for colonic neoplasia. This proof of concept study serves to underscore the promise of four-dimensional elastic light-scattering fingerprinting analysis for colorectal cancer screening. PMID:18536963

  12. Muc2 Protects against Lethal Infectious Colitis by Disassociating Pathogenic and Commensal Bacteria from the Colonic Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bergstrom, Kirk S. B.; Kissoon-Singh, Vanessa; Gibson, Deanna L.; Ma, Caixia; Montero, Marinieve; Sham, Ho Pan; Ryz, Natasha; Huang, Tina; Velcich, Anna; Finlay, B. Brett; Chadee, Kris; Vallance, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Despite recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of attaching and effacing (A/E) Escherichia coli infections, the mechanisms by which the host defends against these microbes are unclear. The goal of this study was to determine the role of goblet cell-derived Muc2, the major intestinal secretory mucin and primary component of the mucus layer, in host protection against A/E pathogens. To assess the role of Muc2 during A/E bacterial infections, we inoculated Muc2 deficient (Muc2−/−) mice with Citrobacter rodentium, a murine A/E pathogen related to diarrheagenic A/E E. coli. Unlike wildtype (WT) mice, infected Muc2−/− mice exhibited rapid weight loss and suffered up to 90% mortality. Stool plating demonstrated 10–100 fold greater C. rodentium burdens in Muc2−/− vs. WT mice, most of which were found to be loosely adherent to the colonic mucosa. Histology of Muc2−/− mice revealed ulceration in the colon amid focal bacterial microcolonies. Metabolic labeling of secreted mucins in the large intestine demonstrated that mucin secretion was markedly increased in WT mice during infection compared to uninfected controls, suggesting that the host uses increased mucin release to flush pathogens from the mucosal surface. Muc2 also impacted host-commensal interactions during infection, as FISH analysis revealed C. rodentium microcolonies contained numerous commensal microbes, which was not observed in WT mice. Orally administered FITC-Dextran and FISH staining showed significantly worsened intestinal barrier disruption in Muc2−/− vs. WT mice, with overt pathogen and commensal translocation into the Muc2−/− colonic mucosa. Interestingly, commensal depletion enhanced C. rodentium colonization of Muc2−/− mice, although colonic pathology was not significantly altered. In conclusion, Muc2 production is critical for host protection during A/E bacterial infections, by limiting overall pathogen and commensal numbers associated with the colonic

  13. Integrated datasets characterize metabolic interactions between mouse’s colonic mucosa, colonic-cecal contents and feces

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The pattern of metabolites produced by the gut microbiome comprises a phenotype indicative of the means by which that microbiome affects the gut. We characterized that phenotype by conducting metabolomic analyses of the colonic-cecal contents, comparing that to the metabolite patterns of feces and c...

  14. Corticotropin releasing hormone in colonic mucosa in patients with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kawahito, Y; Sano, H; Mukai, S; Asai, K; Kimura, S; Yamamura, Y; Kato, H; Chrousos, G P; Wilder, R L; Kondo, M

    1995-01-01

    Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) is a key hormone in integrated response to stress, acting as the major regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Recently, local production of CRH has been detected in normal human colonic enterochromaffin cells. CRH is locally secreted in granulomatous and arthritic tissues in rats and humans, where it seems to act as a local proinflammatory agent. To find out if CRH is present in colonic tissues of patients with ulcerative colitis, this study examined the expression of this peptide in the large bowel of patients with ulcerative colitis. Colonic tissues of patients with ulcerative colitis obtained by endoscopic biopsy were immunostained with anti-CRH antibody. CRH messenger (m) RNA was also examined in biopsy specimens of ulcerative colitis by the reverse transcribed polymerase chain reaction method and by in situ hybridisation. Considerably enhanced expression of immunoreactive CRH was found in mucosal inflammatory cells. Intense staining with anti-CRH antibody was also shown in mucosal macrophages. CRH mRNA was expressed in mucosal epithelial cells. The expression of immunoreactive CRH in colonic mucosal epithelial cells of ulcerative colitis slightly increased, but not significantly, compared with normal colonic mucosal epithelial cells. These results suggest that CRH may play a part in the modulation of intestinal immune and inflammatory system, and as a modulator in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4A Figure 4B-4C Figure 5 PMID:7489943

  15. Diagnosis of a submucosal mass at the staple line after sigmoid colon cancer resection by endoscopic cutting-mucosa biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Mitsuaki; Koinuma, Koji; Lefor, Alan K; Horie, Hisanaga; Ito, Homare; Sata, Naohiro; Hayashi, Yoshikazu; Sunada, Keijiro; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old man underwent laparoscopic sigmoid colon resection for cancer and surveillance colonoscopy was performed annually thereafter. Five years after the resection, a submucosal mass was found at the anastomotic staple line, 15 cm from the anal verge. Computed tomography scan and endoscopic ultrasound were not consistent with tumor recurrence. Endoscopic mucosa biopsy was performed to obtain a definitive diagnosis. Mucosal incision over the lesion with the cutting needle knife technique revealed a creamy white material, which was completely removed. Histologic examination showed fibrotic tissue without caseous necrosis or tumor cells. No bacteria, including mycobacterium, were found on culture. The patient remains free of recurrence at five years since the resection. Endoscopic biopsy with a cutting mucosal incision is an important technique for evaluation of submucosal lesions after rectal resection. PMID:27114752

  16. Dietary selenomethionine increases exon-specific DNA methylation of the p53 gene in rat liver and colon mucosa.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Yan, Lin; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Uthus, Eric O

    2011-08-01

    The regulation of site-specific DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes has been considered as a leading mechanism by which certain nutrients exert their anticancer property. This study was to investigate whether selenium (Se) affects the methylation of globe genomic DNA and the exon-specific p53 gene. Three groups of rats (n = 6-7/group) were fed the AIN-93G basal diet supplemented with 0 [Se deficient (D)], 0.15 [Se adequate (A)], or 4 mg [Se supranutritional (S)] (Se as l-selenomethionine)/kg diet for 104 d, respectively. Rats fed the A or S diet had greater plasma and liver glutathione peroxidase activity, liver thioredoxin reductase activity, and plasma homocysteine concentration than those fed the D diet. However, compared with the A diet, rats fed the S diet did not further increase these Se-dependent enzyme activities or homocysteine concentration. In contrast, Se concentrations in kidney, liver, gastrocnemius muscle, and plasma were increased in a Se-dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, rats fed the S diet had significantly less global liver genomic DNA methylation than those fed the D diet. However, the S diet significantly increased the methylation of the p53 gene (exons 5-8) but not the β-actin gene (exons 2-3) DNA in liver and colon mucosa compared with those fed the D diet. Taken together, long-term Se consumption not only affects selenoprotein enzyme activities, homocysteine, tissue Se concentrations, and global genomic DNA methylation but also increases exon-specific DNA methylation of the p53 gene in a Se-dose-dependent manner in rat liver and colon mucosa.

  17. Short-term oxycodone treatment does not affect electrogenic ion transport in isolated mucosa from the human rectosigmoid colon.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Matias; Brock, Christina; Poulsen, Jakob Lykke; Bindslev, Niels; Hansen, Mark Berner; Louring Christrup, Lona; Drewes, A M

    2016-01-01

    Opioid therapy is associated with altered secretion and motility of the gut. The relative contribution of decreased secretion to the development of opioid-induced constipation remains unknown. Twenty-five healthy males were treated with oxycodone for 5 d in a placebo-controlled, randomised cross-over design. Gastrointestinal adverse effects were assessed with validated questionnaires (bowel function index and gastrointestinal symptom rating scale). Rectosigmoid mucosal biopsies were taken at baseline and on day 5 during both treatments and mounted in Ussing chambers. Electrogenic ion transport parameters (short circuit current (SCC) and slope conductance) were measured after addition of secretagogues (prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) (6 μm), theophylline (400 μm)), and an inhibitor (ouabain (200 μm)). Additionally, morphine (50 μm) was added to investigate the direct opioid effect on colonic mucosa. Questionnaires showed pronounced bowel symptoms, including constipation during oxycodone treatment (eight-fold increase in bowel function index score from day 1 to day 5 (p < 0.001) while no significant change occurred during placebo treatment (p = 0.47). Basal SCC and slope conductance did not differ between treatments (all p > 0.05) and application with PGE2, theophylline, and ouabain yielded comparable results on all examinations (all p > 0.05). Morphine application consistently did not evoke a change in ion transport. Compared to placebo, epithelial electrogenic ion transport is not altered in mucosal biopsies from the rectosigmoid colon following 5-d oxycodone treatment. The secretory mechanisms in isolated mucosa appear to play a negligible role in the development of opioid-induced constipation.

  18. [THE INFLUENCE OF NANODISPERSE CERIUM DIOXIDE ON ONTOGENETIC CHANGES OF ANTIOXIDANT SYSTEM IN THE MUCOSA OF THE STOMACH AND COLON IN RATS].

    PubMed

    Iefimenko, O Yu; Savchenko, I O; Falalyeyeva, T M; Beregova, T V; Zholobak, N M; Shcherbakov, O B; Malyukin, Yu V; Spivak, M Ya

    2015-01-01

    It was established that with age the content of lipid peroxidation products increased in the mucosa of the stomach: Diene conjugates by 30%, products which react to thiobarbituric acid by 285% and Schif bases by 181%. Nanodisperse cerium dioxide (NCD) reduced the content of lipid peroxidation in the gastric mucosa in old rats: Diene conjugates by 43 %, products which react to thiobarbituric acid by 51% and Schif bases by 44% relative to the control group of rats given age. Similarly, it was established that the content of Diene conjugates increased by 40%, products which react to thiobarbituric acid by 114% and Schif bases by 132% in the mucosa of the colon of old rats. NDC significant reduced the content of products which react to thiobarbituric acid by 69% and Schyf basics by 132%. In the stomach superoxide dismutase (by 43%) and catalase activity (by 24%) decreases with age, while in the colon superoxide dismutase activity increases (by 43%). In the colon NCD significant decreased superoxide dismutase (by 34%) and catalase activity (by 21%) relative to controls. Thus, the NDC restores lipid peroxidation in the gastric mucosa and colon, in which develops oxidative stress with age.

  19. Nucleoside-nucleotide free diet protects rat colonic mucosa from damage induced by trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Adjei, A A; Morioka, T; Ameho, C K; Yamauchi, K; Kulkarni, A D; Al-Mansouri, H M; Kawajiri, A; Yamamoto, S

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Growing evidence suggests that intestinal recovery from injury induced by radiation, endotoxin, and protein deficiency is improved by the ingestion of nucleosides and nucleotides. AIM: This study examined the effect of dietary nucleosides and nucleotides supplementation on trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid induced colonic damage in experimental colitis. METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats were randomised into two groups and fed nucleic acid free 20% casein diet (control) or this diet supplemented with 0.5% nucleoside-nucleotide mixture for four weeks. On the second week, colonic inflammation was induced in rats by intracolonic administration of 0.25 ml of 50% ethanol containing 25 mg of trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid. Additionally, other sets of rats were treated with 0.25 ml of 50% ethanol, 25 mg of trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid in 0.25 ml saline, or 0.25 ml of 0.9% saline. RESULTS: After two weeks, colon weight, macroscopic and microscopic damage scores, were significantly greater (p < 0.05) in the nucleoside-nucleotide supplemented group compared with the non-supplemented control groups. The same variables seen in the trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-ethanol group fed nucleoside-nucleotide free diet were greater (p < 0.05) than in the rest of the groups fed nucleoside-nucleotide free diet and treated with ethanol, trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid in saline, or saline. Histologically, segmental ulceration and inflammation associated with significantly increased infiltration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes, macrophages, lymphocytes, fibroblasts were observed in the supplemented group compared with the controls. In the nucleoside-nucleotide supplemented group the epithelial damage, mucosal erosion, oedema, and coagulative necrosis of the muscularis propria was more extensive in comparison to the non-supplemented control groups. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that dietary nucleosides and nucleotides may aggravate colonic damage and inflammation in chemically

  20. Nucleoside-nucleotide free diet protects rat colonic mucosa from damage induced by trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid.

    PubMed

    Adjei, A A; Morioka, T; Ameho, C K; Yamauchi, K; Kulkarni, A D; Al-Mansouri, H M; Kawajiri, A; Yamamoto, S

    1996-09-01

    Growing evidence suggests that intestinal recovery from injury induced by radiation, endotoxin, and protein deficiency is improved by the ingestion of nucleosides and nucleotides. This study examined the effect of dietary nucleosides and nucleotides supplementation on trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid induced colonic damage in experimental colitis. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomised into two groups and fed nucleic acid free 20% casein diet (control) or this diet supplemented with 0.5% nucleoside-nucleotide mixture for four weeks. On the second week, colonic inflammation was induced in rats by intracolonic administration of 0.25 ml of 50% ethanol containing 25 mg of trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid. Additionally, other sets of rats were treated with 0.25 ml of 50% ethanol, 25 mg of trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid in 0.25 ml saline, or 0.25 ml of 0.9% saline. After two weeks, colon weight, macroscopic and microscopic damage scores, were significantly greater (p < 0.05) in the nucleoside-nucleotide supplemented group compared with the non-supplemented control groups. The same variables seen in the trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-ethanol group fed nucleoside-nucleotide free diet were greater (p < 0.05) than in the rest of the groups fed nucleoside-nucleotide free diet and treated with ethanol, trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid in saline, or saline. Histologically, segmental ulceration and inflammation associated with significantly increased infiltration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes, macrophages, lymphocytes, fibroblasts were observed in the supplemented group compared with the controls. In the nucleoside-nucleotide supplemented group the epithelial damage, mucosal erosion, oedema, and coagulative necrosis of the muscularis propria was more extensive in comparison to the non-supplemented control groups. This study suggests that dietary nucleosides and nucleotides may aggravate colonic damage and inflammation in chemically induced experimental colitis in rats; and that

  1. Activation of nuclear factor κB in colonic mucosa from patients with collagenous and ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, L; Jørgensen, V L; Perner, A; Hansen, A; Eugen-Olsen, J; Rask-Madsen, J

    2005-01-01

    Background and aims: Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is greatly upregulated in the colonic mucosa of patients with collagenous and ulcerative colitis. As the transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NFκB) is a major inducer of iNOS gene expression, we compared activation and transcriptional activity of NFκB in colonic mucosal biopsies from these patients. Patients: Eight patients with collagenous colitis, six with relapsing ulcerative colitis, and eight with uninflamed bowel were studied. Methods: NFκB DNA binding activity was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and inhibitor of NFκB (IκB) kinase (IKK) activity by immunocomplex kinase assay. In vivo recruitment of NFκB to the iNOS promoter was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis and transcriptional activity by NFκB gene expression profiling arrays. Cells showing NFκB activation were identified by immunohistochemistry. Results: In collagenous and ulcerative colitis, as opposed to uninflamed bowel, IKKβ activity and strong NFκB DNA binding gave rise to activation of identical NFκB subunits and recruitment of transcriptionally active p65 to the iNOS promoter. In collagenous colitis, activated NFκB was observed only in epithelial cells while up to 10% of lamina propria macrophages showed activation in ulcerative colitis. Conclusions: In collagenous and ulcerative colitis, colonic mucosal NFκB is activated and recruited to the iNOS promoter in vivo via an IKKβ mediated pathway. As collagenous colitis is not associated with tissue injury, these data challenge the prevailing view that activation of NFκB per se mediates tissue injury. Our results suggest that downstream inflammatory reactions leading to tissue damage originate in lamina propria immune cells, as increased NFκB activity in collagenous colitis was localised solely in epithelial cells, but present also in macrophages in ulcerative colitis. PMID:15753535

  2. Reduction in diversity of the colonic mucosa associated bacterial microflora in patients with active inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Ott, S J; Musfeldt, M; Wenderoth, D F; Hampe, J; Brant, O; Fölsch, U R; Timmis, K N; Schreiber, S

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: The intestinal bacterial microflora plays an important role in the aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). As most of the colonic bacteria cannot be identified by culture techniques, genomic technology can be used for analysis of the composition of the microflora. Patients and methods: The mucosa associated colonic microflora of 57 patients with active inflammatory bowel disease and 46 controls was investigated using 16S rDNA based single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) fingerprint, cloning experiments, and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Full length sequencing of 1019 clones from 16S rDNA libraries (n = 3) revealed an overall bacterial diversity of 83 non-redundant sequences—among them, only 49 known bacterial species. Molecular epidemiology of the composition of the colonic microflora was investigated by SSCP. Diversity of the microflora in Crohn’s disease was reduced to 50% compared with controls (21.7 v 50.4; p<0.0001) and to 30% in ulcerative colitis (17.2 v 50.4; p<0.0001). The reduction in diversity in inflammatory bowel disease was due to loss of normal anaerobic bacteria such as Bacteroides species, Eubacterium species, and Lactobacillus species, as revealed by direct sequencing of variable bands and confirmed by real time PCR. Bacterial diversity in the Crohn’s group showed no association with CARD15/NOD2 status. Conclusions: Mucosal inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease is associated with loss of normal anaerobic bacteria. This effect is independent of NOD2/CARD15 status of patients. PMID:15082587

  3. Lectin binding patterns in normal and neoplastic colonic mucosa. A study of Dolichos biflorus agglutinin, peanut agglutinin, and wheat germ agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Campo, E; Condom, E; Palacín, A; Quesada, E; Cardesa, A

    1988-11-01

    The cellular distribution of the carbohydrates labeled by Dolichos bifluorus agglutinin (DBA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) were studied in 21 normal colonic mucosae, 17 transitional mucosae, 9 nonneoplastic polyps (NNP), 27 adenomas, and 25 colorectal carcinomas. In normal mucosa DBA bound selectively to mucin of the goblet cells in the upper colonic crypt and to apical cytoplasm of the superficial columnar cells with a strong linear pattern. PNA binding was present only in the supranuclear portion (Golgi area) of the cells. WGA showed a strong reactivity in the goblet-cell mucin and in the supranuclear portion and apical cytoplasm of columnar cells. Transitional mucosa (TM) showed a decrease in DBA binding to goblet-cell mucin, which was replaced by an increase in PNA reactivity. The DBA linear pattern in the apical cytoplasm of columnar cells was unmodified, however. Changes similar to those of TM were observed in juvenile and Peutz-Jeghers polyps. Adenomas showed a progressive loss of DBA reactivity and an increase in PNA positivity related to the degree of dysplasia. This change was more evident in the linear pattern of apical cytoplasm. Only 32% of the carcinomas reacted with DBA and those were mucinous and well-differentiated adenocarcinomas. WGA was positive in all carcinomas with a different pattern than in normal mucosa. These findings suggest that the different lectin-binding patterns in normal and neoplastic colonic mucosa are related to the degree of cellular differentiation. In the process of malignant transformation the carbohydrate distribution undergoes progressive changes through the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. These changes are related to the degree of dysplasia in adenomas and to the degree of differentiation in carcinomas.

  4. Interaction of Lactobacillus fermentum BGHI14 with Rat Colonic Mucosa: Implications for Colitis Induction

    PubMed Central

    Lukic, Jovanka; Strahinic, Ivana; Milenkovic, Marina; Golic, Natasa; Kojic, Milan; Topisirovic, Ljubisa

    2013-01-01

    The present study was carried out to test the colonic mucosal response of rats to oral supplementation with Lactobacillus fermentum BGHI14 and to correlate the tissue reaction to trinitrobenzenesulfonate (TNBS)-induced colitis with mucosal barrier alterations caused by bacterial ingestion. An immune cell-mediated reaction of healthy colonic tissue was noticed after bacterial feeding. After prolonged bacterial treatment, the observed reaction had retreated to normality, but the mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) remained elevated. These data point to the chronic low-grade inflammation that could be caused by long-term probiotic consumption. Although no detrimental effects of bacterial pretreatment were noticed in colitic rats, at least in the acute state of disease, the results obtained in our study point to the necessity of reassessment of existing data on the safety of probiotic preparations. Additionally, probiotic effects in experimental colitis models might depend on time coordination of disease induction with treatment duration. PMID:23851097

  5. Miniaturized camera system for an endoscopic capsule for examination of the colonic mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wippermann, Frank; Müller, Martin; Wäny, Martin; Voltz, Stephan

    2014-09-01

    Todaýs standard procedure for the examination of the colon uses a digital endoscope located at the tip of a tube encasing wires for camera read out, fibers for illumination, and mechanical structures for steering and navigation. On the other hand, there are swallowable capsules incorporating a miniaturized camera which are more cost effective, disposable, and less unpleasant for the patient during examination but cannot be navigated along the path through the colon. We report on the development of a miniaturized endoscopic camera as part of a completely wireless capsule which can be safely and accurately navigated and controlled from the outside using an electromagnet. The endoscope is based on a global shutter CMOS-imager with 640x640 pixels and a pixel size of 3.6μm featuring through silicon vias. Hence, the required electronic connectivity is done at its back side using a ball grid array enabling smallest lateral dimensions. The layout of the f/5-objective with 100° diagonal field of view aims for low production cost and employs polymeric lenses produced by injection molding. Due to the need of at least one-time autoclaving, high temperature resistant polymers were selected. Optical and mechanical design considerations are given along with experimental data obtained from realized demonstrators.

  6. Xylan-regulated Delivery of Human Keratinocyte Growth Factor-2 to the Inflamed Colon by the Human Anaerobic Commensal Bacterium Bacteroides ovatus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The use of genetically modified bacteria to deliver biologically active molecules directly to the gut has become an increasingly attractive area of investigation. The challenge of regulation of production of the therapeutic molecule and colonization of the bowel led us to investigate Bacteroides ov...

  7. Biased JH usage in plasma cell immunoglobulin gene sequences from colonic mucosa in ulcerative colitis but not in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Dunn-Walters, D; Boursier, L; Hackett, M; Spencer, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory disease of the colonic and rectal mucosa. Autoantibodies have been observed in ulcerative colitis which may have a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Evidence also suggests that there is an hereditary predisposition towards the disease, although no individual genes have been identified. 
AIMS—This is a pilot study of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes (IgH) in ulcerative colitis to determine whether they have any particular genetic characteristics which may lead to a better understanding of the disease aetiology. 
SUBJECTS—Colonic or rectal tissue was obtained from five children with ulcerative colitis. Tissue was also obtained from five children with Crohn's disease and five children who did not have inflammatory bowel disease as controls. 
METHODS—B cells and IgD+ B cells were identified by immunohistochemistry on frozen sections. Areas of lamina propria containing plasma cells, and areas of IgD+ B cells were microdissected. The immunoglobulin genes were PCR amplified, cloned, and sequenced. Sequences were analysed for content of somatic mutations and composition of heavy chain. 
RESULTS—An increase in the use of JH6 and DXP'1, and a decrease in the use of JH4, gene segments in immunoglobulin genes from lamina propria plasma cells, and from virgin IgD+ B cells, was found in patients with ulcerative colitis. These biases were not present in the control groups. 
CONCLUSIONS—There is a fundamental difference in the immunoglobulin genes from patients with ulcerative colitis. Whether this is caused by a difference in content of immunoglobulin gene segments in the germline or a difference in the recombination mechanism is not known. 

 Keywords: ulcerative colitis; immunoglobulin heavy chain gene; joining region; diversity region; repertoire; Crohn's disease PMID:10026325

  8. Expression of epithelial cell-derived cytokine genes in the duodenal and colonic mucosae of dogs with chronic enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    OSADA, Hironari; OGAWA, Misato; HASEGAWA, Ayana; NAGAI, Makoto; SHIRAI, Junsuke; SASAKI, Kazuaki; SHIMODA, Minoru; ITOH, Hiroshi; KONDO, Hirotaka; OHMORI, Keitaro

    2016-01-01

    It remains unclear whether epithelial cell-derived cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-25, IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), contribute to development of canine chronic enteropathy (CE), which includes antibiotic-responsive enteropathy (ARE), food-responsive enteropathy (FRE) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the present study, we examined mRNA expression of il-25, il-33 and tslp in the duodenal and colonic mucosae of dogs with ARE, FRE and IBD. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that mRNA expression of il-33 was significantly lower in the duodenum in dogs with FRE than in healthy dogs. The results suggest that epithelial cell-derived cytokines may not be an inducer of Th2-type immunity in the gut of dogs with CE, and decreased expression of IL-33 may be involved in induction of FRE. Further studies are required to clarify roles of epithelial cell-derived cytokines, especially IL-33, in the pathogenesis of canine CE. PMID:28049868

  9. Expression of epithelial cell-derived cytokine genes in the duodenal and colonic mucosae of dogs with chronic enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Osada, Hironari; Ogawa, Misato; Hasegawa, Ayana; Nagai, Makoto; Shirai, Junsuke; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Shimoda, Minoru; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kondo, Hirotaka; Ohmori, Keitaro

    2017-02-28

    It remains unclear whether epithelial cell-derived cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-25, IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), contribute to development of canine chronic enteropathy (CE), which includes antibiotic-responsive enteropathy (ARE), food-responsive enteropathy (FRE) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the present study, we examined mRNA expression of il-25, il-33 and tslp in the duodenal and colonic mucosae of dogs with ARE, FRE and IBD. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that mRNA expression of il-33 was significantly lower in the duodenum in dogs with FRE than in healthy dogs. The results suggest that epithelial cell-derived cytokines may not be an inducer of Th2-type immunity in the gut of dogs with CE, and decreased expression of IL-33 may be involved in induction of FRE. Further studies are required to clarify roles of epithelial cell-derived cytokines, especially IL-33, in the pathogenesis of canine CE.

  10. Hsp60 and Hsp10 increase in colon mucosa of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Rodolico, Vito; Tomasello, Giovanni; Zerilli, Monica; Martorana, Anna; Pitruzzella, Alessandro; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; David, Sabrina; Zummo, Giovanni; Damiani, Provvidenza; Accomando, Salvatore; Conway de Macario, Everly; Macario, Alberto J. L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine in colon mucosa of Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) in relapse: a) the levels of the chaperonins Hsp60 and Hsp10; b) the quantity of inflammatory cells; and c) if the levels of chaperonins parallel those of inflammation cells. Twenty cases of CD and UC and twenty normal controls (NC) were studied using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Immunohistochemically, Hsp60 and Hsp10 were increased in both inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) compared to NC. These results were confirmed by Western blotting. Hsp60 and Hsp10 occurred in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells in CD and UC but not in NC. Hsp60 and Hsp10 co-localised to epithelial cells of mucosal glands but not always in connective tissue cells of lamina propria, where only Hsp60 or, less often, Hsp10 was found. Cells typical of inflammation were significantly more abundant in CD and UC than in NC. Since chaperonins are key factors in the activation of the immune system leading to inflammation, we propose that they play a central role in the pathogenesis of the two diseases, which, consequently, ought to be studied as chaperonopathies. PMID:20390473

  11. Transient and Prolonged Response of Chicken Cecum Mucosa to Colonization with Different Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Volf, Jiri; Polansky, Ondrej; Varmuzova, Karolina; Gerzova, Lenka; Sekelova, Zuzana; Faldynova, Marcela; Babak, Vladimir; Medvecky, Matej; Smith, Adrian L.; Kaspers, Bernd; Velge, Philippe; Rychlik, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    In this study we determined protein and gene expression in the caeca of newly hatched chickens inoculated with cecal contents sourced from hens of different ages. Over 250 proteins exhibited modified expression levels in response to microbiota inoculation. The most significant inductions were observed for ISG12-2, OASL, ES1, LYG2, DMBT1-L, CDD, ANGPTL6, B2M, CUZD1, IgM and Ig lambda chain. Of these, ISG12-2, ES1 and both immunoglobulins were expressed at lower levels in germ-free chickens compared to conventional chickens. In contrast, CELA2A, BRT-2, ALDH1A1, ADH1C, AKR1B1L, HEXB, ALDH2, ALDOB, CALB1 and TTR were expressed at lower levels following inoculation of microbiota. When chicks were given microbiota preparations from different age donors, the recipients mounted differential responses to the inoculation which also differed from the response profile in naturally colonised birds. For example, B2M, CUZD1 and CELA2A responded differently to the inoculation with microbiota of 4- or 40-week-old hens. The increased or decreased gene expression could be recorded 6 weeks after the inoculation of newly hatched chickens. To characterise the proteins that may directly interact with the microbiota we characterised chicken proteins that co-purified with the microbiota and identified a range of host proteins including CDD, ANGPTL6, DMBT1-L, MEP1A and Ig lambda. We propose that induction of ISG12-2 results in reduced apoptosis of host cells exposed to the colonizing commensal microbiota and that CDD, ANGPTL6, DMBT1-L, MEP1A and Ig lambda reduce contact of luminal microbiota with the gut epithelium thereby reducing the inflammatory response. PMID:27685470

  12. Mucosa-associated bacteria in the human gastrointestinal tract are uniformly distributed along the colon and differ from the community recovered from feces.

    PubMed

    Zoetendal, Erwin G; von Wright, Atte; Vilpponen-Salmela, Terttu; Ben-Amor, Kaouther; Akkermans, Antoon D L; de Vos, Willem M

    2002-07-01

    The human gastrointestinal (GI) tract harbors a complex community of bacterial cells in the mucosa, lumen, and feces. Since most attention has been focused on bacteria present in feces, knowledge about the mucosa-associated bacterial communities in different parts of the colon is limited. In this study, the bacterial communities in feces and biopsy samples from the ascending, transverse, and descending colons of 10 individuals were analyzed by using a 16S rRNA approach. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that 10(5) to 10(6) bacteria were present in the biopsy samples. To visualize the diversity of the predominant and the Lactobacillus group community, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was performed. DGGE analysis and similarity index comparisons demonstrated that the predominant mucosa-associated bacterial community was host specific and uniformly distributed along the colon but significantly different from the fecal community (P < 0.01). The Lactobacillus group-specific profiles were less complex than the profiles reflecting the predominant community. For 6 of the 10 individuals the community of Lactobacillus-like bacteria in the biopsy samples was similar to that in the feces. Amplicons having 99% sequence similarity to the 16S ribosomal DNA of Lactobacillus gasseri were detected in the biopsy samples of nine individuals. No significant differences were observed between healthy and diseased individuals. The observed host-specific DGGE profiles of the mucosa-associated bacterial community in the colon support the hypothesis that host-related factors are involved in the determination of the GI tract microbial community.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy induces glucocorticoid synthesis in colonic mucosa and suppresses radiation-activated T cells: new insights into MSC immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Bessout, R; Sémont, A; Demarquay, C; Charcosset, A; Benderitter, M; Mathieu, N

    2014-05-01

    Non-neoplastic tissues around an abdomino-pelvic tumor can be damaged by the radiotherapy protocol, leading to chronic gastrointestinal complications that affect the quality of life with substantial mortality. Stem cell-based approaches using immunosuppressive bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising cell therapy tools. In a rat model of radiation proctitis, we evidenced that a single MSC injection reduces colonic mucosa damages induced by ionizing radiation with improvement of the re-epithelization process for up to 21 days. Immune cell infiltrate and inflammatory molecule expressions in the colonic mucosa were investigated. We report that MSC therapy specifically reduces T-cell infiltration and proliferation, and increases apoptosis of radiation-activated T cells. We assessed the underlying molecular mechanisms and found that interleukin-10 and regulatory T lymphocytes are not involved in the immunosuppressive process in this model. However, an increased level of corticosterone secretion and HSD11b1 (11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1)-steroidogenic enzyme expression was detected in colonic mucosa 21 days after MSC treatment. Moreover, blocking the glucocorticoid (GC) receptor using the RU486 molecule statistically enhances the allogenic lymphocyte proliferation inhibited by MSCs in vitro and abrogates the mucosal protection induced by MSC treatment in vivo. Using the irradiation model, we found evidence for a new MSC immunosuppressive mechanism involving GCs.

  14. Expression of pim-1 in tumors, tumor stroma and tumor-adjacent mucosa co-determines the prognosis of colon cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yong-hai; Li, Jian-jun; Xie, Fang-wei; Chen, Jian-fang; Yu, Ying-hao; Ouyang, Xue-nong; Liang, Hou-jie

    2013-01-01

    Provirus integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus (pim-1) is a proto-oncogene that is linked to the development and progression of several cancers. In this study, we evaluated pim-1 expression in tumors, tumor stroma and tumor-adjacent mucosa together as an independent prognostic factor for colon cancer patients. The study included 343 colon cancer patients. Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect pim-1. Multivariate cox regression for disease-free survival (DFS) were used to identify independent prognostic factors. Analytic hierarchy process (AHP) was used to calculate the weight of pim-1 in tumors, tumor stroma and tumor-adjacent mucosa in order to obtain a Pim-1 total score (PTS) for recurrence and survival. Kaplan-Meier DFS curves and OS curves for patients with different pim-1 expression levels were compared using the log-rank test. In this study, four independent prognostic factors were identified for colon cancer patients: pim-1 expression in tumors, tumor stroma, tumor-adjacent mucosa, as well as tumor stage. It has been established that clinical stage is an important prognostic factor for colon cancer patients. However, PTS can identify the patients who are likely to recur not only in the whole radical excision group but also within each stage of this group. Based on the results of this study we can conclude that the PTS combined with clinical staging system may be a better predictor of colon cancer patients' prognosis than using the clinical stage system alone. ClinicalTrials.gov Number: ChiCTR-PRCH-12002842.

  15. Expression of pim-1 in Tumors, Tumor Stroma and Tumor-Adjacent Mucosa Co-Determines the Prognosis of Colon Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-fang; Yu, Ying-hao; Ouyang, Xue-nong; Liang, Hou-jie

    2013-01-01

    Provirus integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus (pim-1) is a proto-oncogene that is linked to the development and progression of several cancers. In this study, we evaluated pim-1 expression in tumors, tumor stroma and tumor-adjacent mucosa together as an independent prognostic factor for colon cancer patients. The study included 343 colon cancer patients. Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect pim-1. Multivariate cox regression for disease-free survival (DFS) were used to identify independent prognostic factors. Analytic hierarchy process (AHP) was used to calculate the weight of pim-1 in tumors, tumor stroma and tumor-adjacent mucosa in order to obtain a Pim-1 total score (PTS) for recurrence and survival. Kaplan–Meier DFS curves and OS curves for patients with different pim-1 expression levels were compared using the log-rank test. In this study, four independent prognostic factors were identified for colon cancer patients: pim-1 expression in tumors, tumor stroma, tumor-adjacent mucosa, as well as tumor stage. It has been established that clinical stage is an important prognostic factor for colon cancer patients. However, PTS can identify the patients who are likely to recur not only in the whole radical excision group but also within each stage of this group. Based on the results of this study we can conclude that the PTS combined with clinical staging system may be a better predictor of colon cancer patients’ prognosis than using the clinical stage system alone. Clinical Trials Gov. Number: ChiCTR-PRCH-12002842 PMID:24116137

  16. An in vitro model to evaluate the impact of the soluble factors from the colonic mucosa of collagenous colitis patients on T cells: enhanced production of IL-17A and IL-10 from peripheral CD4⁺ T cells.

    PubMed

    Kumawat, Ashok Kumar; Nyhlin, Nils; Wickbom, Anna; Tysk, Curt; Bohr, Johan; Hultgren, Olof; Hörnquist, Elisabeth Hultgren

    2014-01-01

    Soluble factors from intestinal mucosal cells contribute to immune homeostasis in the gut. We have established an in vitro model to investigate the regulatory role of soluble factors from inflamed intestinal mucosa of collagenous colitis (CC) patients in the differentiation of T cells. Peripheral blood CD4(+) T cells from healthy donors were polyclonally activated in the presence of conditioned medium (CM) generated from denuded biopsies (DNB) or isolated lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) from mucosal biopsies from CC patients compared to noninflamed controls, to determine proliferation and secretion of cytokines involved in T-cell differentiation. Compared to controls, we observed significantly increased production of the proinflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, IL-17A, IL-6, and IL-1β and the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 in the presence of CC-DNB-CM. The most pronounced effect of CC-LPMC-CM on peripheral CD4(+) T cells was a trend towards increased production of IL-17A and IL-10. A trend towards reduced inhibition of T-cell proliferation was noted in the presence of CC-DNB-CM. In conclusion, our in vitro model reveals implications of soluble factors from CC colonic mucosa on peripheral T cells, enhancing their production of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines.

  17. [Effects of shugan jianpi recipe on the ion transport of diarrhea predominant irritable bowel syndrome rat colon mucosa induced by 5-HT].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng-Sheng; Wang, Zheng-Fang; Guo, Qian-Kun

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the mechanism of Shugan Jianpi Recipe (SJR) on the ion transportation of diarrhea predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) colon mucosa induced by 5-HT. Totally 36 male SD rats were randomly divided into three groups, i. e., the normal group, the model group, and the SJR group, 12 in each group. IBS-D Rat model was induced by intracolonic instillation of acetic acid and restraint stress. After successful modeling, normal saline was given to rats in the normal group and the model group, while SJR was given to those in the SJR group by gastrogavage for 14 days. The short circuit current (lsc) technology was used to measure 5-HT induced lsc changes of the colon mucosa under the actions of drugs and specific blocking agents. There was no difference in basal current (BC), the potential difference (PD), and transmembrane resistance (TR) of the distal colon among the 3 groups (all P > 0.05). The 5-HT induced short circuit current change (delta lsc) was lower in the model group than in the normal group (P < 0.05), and it was higher in the SJR group than in the model group (P < 0.05). When 4,4'-diisothiocyanato-stilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS, 500 micromol/L), an Ca(+)-dependent Cl- channel blocker, was added from the epiphragm of the colonic mucosa, the 5-HT induced delta lsc was lower in the model group than in the normal group (P < 0.05), and it was higher in the SJR group than in the model group (P < 0.05). When Na+ was substituted in the epiphragm solution (Na+ free) or amiloride (100 micromol/L) was added from the epiphragm of the colonic mucosa, an epithelial Na+ channel blocker, the 5-HT induced delta lsc was lower in the model group than in the normal group (P < 0.05), and it was higher in the SJR group than in the model group (P < 0.05). SJR could affect the transmembrane electrolyte transportation of IBS-D rat induced by 5-HT through regulating the secretion of Cl- and HCO3-. The effects might be achieved by the coordination of apical Cl

  18. Inhibition of water absorption and selective damage to human colonic mucosa induced by Shiga toxin-2 are enhanced by Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Adriana; Gerhardt, Elizabeth; García, Hugo; Amigo, Natalia; Cataldi, Angel; Zotta, Elsa; Ibarra, Cristina

    2015-05-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains are responsible for a variety of clinical syndromes including bloody and non-bloody diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Although multiple serotypes of STEC have been isolated from hemorrhagic colitis cases, E. coli O157:H7 is by far the most prevalent serotype associated with HUS. Shiga toxin is the major virulence factor of E. coli O157:H7 and is responsible for the more severe symptoms of the infection. However, the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of diarrhea mediated by Stx2 are not well known. In this study, we have determined the effects of E. coli O157:H7 strain 125/99 wild type (wt) on the human colonic mucosa mounted in an Ussing chamber. In response to 125/99wt, an inhibition of water absorption across human colonic mucosa was observed. Histological sections showed severe necrosis with detachment of the surface epithelium, mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate and loss of goblet cells after 1h of incubation with 125/99wt. These alterations were not observed with the isogenic mutant strain lacking stx2 or with the filter-sterilized culture supernatant from the 125/99wt strain. These results indicate that the cell damages in human colon are induced by Stx2, and that Stx2 production is increased by the interaction with bacterial cells. Identification of host cell-derived factors responsible for increasing Stx2 can lead to new strategies for modulating STEC infections.

  19. The multiple forms and kinetic properties of the N-acetyl-beta-D-hexosaminidases from colonic tumours and mucosa of rats treated with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine.

    PubMed Central

    Mian, N; Herries, D G; Cowen, D M; Batte, E A

    1979-01-01

    The separation and purification of the N-acetyl-beta-D-hexosaminidase activities from tumours induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine in the rat colon and from colonic mucosa of tumour-bearing animals are reported. Mucosa contained N-acetylhexosaminidases A and B, as well as a third form whose properties with regard to electrophoretic mobility and thermostability lay between those of A and B. Tumours contained only N-acetylhexosaminidase A and B activities. Each form possessed both N-acetylglucosaminidase (EC 3.2.1.30) and N-acetylgalactosaminidase (EC 3.2.1.53) activities, which could not be separated by a variety of techniques. The alteration of the ratio of the two specific activities in each form during purification, together with differences in the kinetic inhibition constants and behaviour during inactivation by various reagents or a temperature of 50 degrees C, supported the belief that each form contains the two enzyme activities, glucosaminidase and galactosaminidase, at separate active sites. This model is in contrast with that reported for these activities from a number of other sources. A variety of treatments reported to cause the conversion of form A into a form resembling B failed to produce such an effect on the rat colonic hexosaminidases. PMID:34391

  20. Genetic variants in the TGFβ-signaling pathway influence expression of miRNAs in colon and rectal normal mucosa and tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Trivellas, Andromahi; Pellatt, Andrew J; Mullany, Lila E; Stevens, John R; Wolff, Roger K; Herrick, Jennifer S

    2017-01-05

    The TGF-β signaling pathway is involved in regulation of cell growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. We test the hypothesis that genetic variation in the TGF-β signaling pathway alters miRNA expression.We use data from 1188 colorectal cancer cases to evaluate associations between 80 SNPs in 21 genes.Seven variants eIF4E rs12498533, NFκB1 rs230510, TGFB1 rs4803455, TGFBR1 rs1571590 and rs6478974, SMAD3 rs3743343, and RUNX1 rs8134179 were associated with expression level of miRNAs in normal colorectal mucosa. RUNX2 rs12333172 and BMPR1B rs13134042 were associated with miRNAs in normal colon mucosa; eIF4EBP3 rs250425, SMAD3 rs12904944, SMAD7 rs3736242, and PTEN rs532678 were associated with miRNA expression in normal rectal mucosa. Evaluation of the differential expression between carcinoma and normal mucosa showed that SMAD3 rs12708491 and rs2414937, NFκB1 rs230510 and rs3821958, and RUNX3 rs6672420 were associated with several miRNAs for colorectal carcinoma. Evaluation of site-specific differential miRNA expression showed that BMPR1B rs2120834, BMPR2 rs2228545, and eIF4EBP3 rs250425 were associated with differential miRNA expression in colon tissue and SMAD3 rs12901071, rs1498506, and rs2414937, BMPR2 rs2228545, and RUNX2 rs2819854, altered differential miRNA expression in rectal tissue.These data support the importance of the TGF-β signaling pathway to the carcinogenic process, possibly through their influence on miRNA expression levels.

  1. 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) can reduce levels of oxidative DNA damage in cells of colonic mucosa with and without fecal stream.

    PubMed

    Caltabiano, Caroline; Máximo, Felipe Rodrigues; Spadari, Ana Paula Pimentel; da Conceição Miranda, Daniel Duarte; Serra, Marcia Milena Pivatto; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2011-04-01

    No studies have evaluated the effectiveness of 5-ASA against oxidative DNA damage in experimental models of diversion colitis. To evaluate the effects of 5-ASA against oxidative DNA damage in an experimental model of diversion colitis. Twenty-six Wistar rats were divided into two groups corresponding to sacrifice at 2 or 4 weeks after fecal diversion of the left colon by means of proximal colostomy and distal mucosa fistula. Each group was divided into two subgroups according to intervention in excluded colon performed with 0.9% saline solution or 5-ASA. Level of oxidative DNA damage was determined by comet assay in cells obtained from segments with and without fecal stream before and after H2O2 challenge. For statistical analysis, was used one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), adopting a 5% significance level (P<0.05). Levels of DNA damage were always higher in colon segments without fecal stream, regardless of the intervention solution employed. DNA damage in colon segments with and without fecal stream in animals irrigated with 5-ASA was lower when compared with those treated with saline solution, regardless of time of irrigation. These levels remained lower after intervention with 5-ASA, even after H2O2 challenge. Enema with 5-ASA reduces oxidative DNA damage in epithelial cells of colon segments without fecal stream, even after H2O2 challenge, confirming the effects of 5-ASA against DNA damage by oxygen free radicals.

  2. Expression of the Bitter Taste Receptor, T2R38, in Enteroendocrine Cells of the Colonic Mucosa of Overweight/Obese vs. Lean Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, Rocco; Huynh, Jennifer; Mazzoni, Maurizio; Gupta, Arpana; Bonora, Elena; Clavenzani, Paolo; Chang, Lin; Mayer, Emeran A.; De Giorgio, Roberto; Sternini, Catia

    2016-01-01

    Bitter taste receptors (T2Rs) are expressed in the mammalian gastrointestinal mucosa. In the mouse colon, T2R138 is localized to enteroendocrine cells and is upregulated by long-term high fat diet that induces obesity. The aims of this study were to test whether T2R38 expression is altered in overweight/obese (OW/OB) compared to normal weight (NW) subjects and characterize the cell types expressing T2R38, the human counterpart of mouse T2R138, in human colon. Colonic mucosal biopsies were obtained during colonoscopy from 35 healthy subjects (20 OW/OB and 15 NW) and processed for quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry using antibodies to T2R38, chromogranin A (CgA), glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1), cholecystokinin (CCK), or peptide YY (PYY). T2R38 mRNA levels in the colonic mucosa of OW/OB were increased (> 2 fold) compared to NW subjects but did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.06). However, the number of T2R38 immunoreactive (IR) cells was significantly increased in OW/OB vs. NW subjects (P = 0.01) and was significantly correlated with BMI values (r = 0.7557; P = 0.001). In both OW/OB and NW individuals, all T2R38-IR cells contained CgA-IR supporting they are enteroendocrine. In both groups, T2R38-IR colocalized with CCK-, GLP1- or PYY-IR. The overall CgA-IR cell population was comparable in OW/OB and NW individuals. This study shows that T2R38 is expressed in distinct populations of enteroendocrine cells in the human colonic mucosa and supports T2R38 upregulation in OW/OB subjects. T2R38 might mediate host functional responses to increased energy balance and intraluminal changes occurring in obesity, which could involve peptide release from enteroendocrine cells. PMID:26866366

  3. MicroRNA profiles in colorectal carcinomas, adenomas and normal colonic mucosa: variations in miRNA expression and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Herrick, Jennifer S; Pellatt, Daniel F; Stevens, John R; Mullany, Lila E; Wolff, Erica; Hoffman, Michael D; Samowitz, Wade S; Wolff, Roger K

    2016-03-01

    MiRNAs are small, non-protein-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression either by post-transcriptionally suppressing mRNA translation or by mRNA degradation. We examine differentially expressed miRNAs in colorectal carcinomas, adenomas and normal colonic mucosa. Data come from population-based studies of colorectal cancer conducted in Utah and the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program. A total of 1893 carcinoma/normal-paired samples and 290 adenoma tissue samples were run on the Agilent Human miRNA Microarray V19.0 which contained 2006 miRNAs. We tested for significant differences in miRNA expression between paired carcinoma/adenoma/normal colonic tissue samples. Fewer than 600 miRNAs were expressed in >80% of people for colonic tissue; of these 86.5% were statistically differentially expressed between carcinoma and normal colonic mucosa using a false discovery rate of 0.05. Roughly half of these differentially expressed miRNAs showed a progression in levels of expression from normal to adenoma to carcinoma tissue. Other miRNAs appeared to be altered at the normal to adenoma stage, while others were only altered at the adenoma to carcinoma stage or only at the normal to carcinoma stage. Evaluation of the Agilent platform showed a high degree of repeatability (r = 0.98) and reasonable agreement with the NanoString platform. Our data suggest that miRNAs are highly dysregulated in colorectal tissue among individuals with colorectal cancer; the pattern of disruption varies by miRNA as tissue progresses from normal to adenoma to carcinoma.

  4. Apoptosis in the intestinal mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease: evidence of altered expression of FasL and perforin cytotoxic pathways.

    PubMed

    Souza, Heitor S P; Tortori, Claudio J A; Castelo-Branco, Morgana T L; Carvalho, Ana Teresa P; Margallo, Victor S; Delgado, Carlos F S; Dines, Ilana; Elia, Celeste C S

    2005-05-01

    Abnormal apoptosis may result in the persistence of activated intestinal T-cells in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We investigated apoptosis in distinct mucosal compartments, and the expression of Fas/Fas ligand and perforin in the inflamed and non-inflamed intestinal mucosa of patients with IBD. Colon specimens from 15 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and inflamed and non-inflamed mucosa from 15 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) were analysed for densities and distribution of apoptotic cells determined by the terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUDP-biotin nick-end labelling (TUNEL) method. Fas, FasL, and perforin-expressing cells were assessed by immunoperoxidase, and with anti-CD3, anti-CD20 and anti-CD68, by double immunofluorescence with confocal microscopy. Quantitative analysis was performed using a computer-assisted image analyser. Colonic lamina propria (LP) and epithelium from patients with UC showed higher rates of apoptosis than controls, but no difference was shown regarding patients with CD. In LP, co-expression of Fas was reduced with T-cells in inflamed CD mucosa, and with macrophages in all patients with IBD. No difference was found in the expression of Fas on B-cells. Rates of FasL-expressing cells in LP were higher in IBD than in controls, with no correlation with the rates of apoptosis. Rates of perforin-expressing cells in LP were greater in UC than in controls, and correlated to the rates of apoptosis. No difference was shown regarding the inflamed and non-inflamed CD mucosa. Rates of FasL and perforin-expressing intra-epithelial lymphocytes showed no difference among groups. Increased expression of FasL in IBD colonic LP not parallelled by Fas on T-cells and macrophages may indicate a reduced susceptibility to the Fas/FasL-mediated apoptosis of lymphoid cells. Expression of perforin is correlated to the tissue damage, and may represent the enhancement of a distinct cytotoxic pathway in UC.

  5. Administration of different Lactobacillus strains in fermented oatmeal soup: in vivo colonization of human intestinal mucosa and effect on the indigenous flora.

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, M L; Molin, G; Jeppsson, B; Nobaek, S; Ahrné, S; Bengmark, S

    1993-01-01

    In vivo colonization by different Lactobacillus strains on human intestinal mucosa of healthy volunteers was studied together with the effect of Lactobacillus administration on different groups of indigenous bacteria. A total of 19 test strains were administered in fermented oatmeal soup containing 5 x 10(6) CFU of each strain per ml by using a dose of 100 ml of soup per day for 10 days. Biopsies were taken from both the upper jejunum and the rectum 1 day before administration was started and 1 and 11 days after administration was terminated. The administration significantly increased the Lactobacillus counts on the jejunum mucosa, and high levels remained 11 days after administration was terminated. The levels of streptococci increased by 10- to 100-fold in two persons, and the levels of sulfite-reducing clostridia in the jejunum decreased by 10- to 100-fold in three of the volunteers 1 day after administration was terminated. In recta, the anaerobic bacterium counts and the gram-negative anaerobic bacterium counts decreased significantly by the end of administration. Furthermore, a decrease in the number of members of the Enterobacteriaceae by 1,000-fold was observed on the rectal mucosa of two persons. Randomly picked Lactobacillus isolates were identified phenotypically by API 50CH tests and genotypically by the plasmid profiles of strains and by restriction endonuclease analysis of chromosomal DNAs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:8439146

  6. Epithelial and Mesenchymal Cells in the Bovine Colonic Mucosa Differ in Their Responsiveness to Escherichia coli Shiga Toxin 1

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cells in the depth of the crypts in the bovine colon express CD77 molecules that potentially act as receptors for Shiga toxins (Stx). The implication of this finding for the intestinal colonization 25 of cattle with human pathogenic Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) remains undefined. We used f...

  7. Interactions between bacteria and the gut mucosa: Do enteric neurotransmitters acting on the mucosal epithelium influence intestinal colonization or infection?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The intestinal epithelium is a critical barrier between the internal and external milieux of the mammalian host. Epithelial interactions between these two host environments have been shown to be modulated by several different, cross-communicating cell types residing in the gut mucosa. These includ...

  8. Interactions between bacteria and the gut mucosa: Do enteric neurotransmitters acting on the mucosal epithelium influence intestinal colonization or infection?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The intestinal epithelium is a critical barrier between the internal and external milieux of the mammalian host. Epithelial interactions between these two host environments have been shown to be modulated by several different, cross-communicating cell types residing in the gut mucosa. These include ...

  9. Impact of Eating Probiotic Yogurt on Colonization by Candida Species of the Oral and Vaginal Mucosa in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Women

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Haihong; Wang, Cuiwei; Hamilton, Pilar R.; Blackmon, Mandy L.; Chen, Hui; Calderone, Richard A.; Li, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    Background Candidiasis in HIV/AIDS patients continues to be a public health problem. Antifungal therapies are not always effective and may result in complications, such as the development of drug-resistant strains of Candida species. Objectives This study evaluated the impact of probiotic consumption on Candida colonization of the oral and vaginal mucosa. Patients/Methods A pilot study was conducted in 24 women (17 HIV-infected, 7 HIV-uninfected) from the Women's Interagency HIV Study. The women underwent a 60-day initiation period with no probiotic consumption, followed by two 15-day consumption periods, with a different probiotic yogurt (DanActive™ or YoPlus™ yogurt) during each interval. There was a 30-day washout period between the two yogurt consumption periods. Oral and vaginal culture swabs were collected on days 0, 60, 74, and 120. Candida was detected by inoculating each swab in both Sabouraud's dextrose agar with or without chloramphenicol and CHROMagar. Results Less fungal colonization among women was observed when the women consumed probiotic yogurts (54 % of the women had vaginal fungal colonization during the non-probiotic yogurt consumption period, 29 % during the DanActive™ period, and 38 % during YoPlus™ yogurt consumption period), and HIV-infected women had significantly lower vaginal fungal colonization after they consumed DanActive™ yogurt compared to the nonintervention periods (54 vs 29 %, p = 0.03). Conclusions These data are promising, but as expected in a small pilot study, there were some significant changes but also some areas where colonization was not changed. This type of conflicting data is supportive of the need for a larger trial to further elucidate the role of probiotic yogurts in fungal growth in HIV-infected women. PMID:23925786

  10. Effects of sucralfate and sulglycotide treatment on active gastritis and Helicobacter pylori colonization of the gastric mucosa in non-ulcer dyspepsia patients.

    PubMed

    Barbara, L; Biasco, G; Capurso, L; Dobrilla, G; Lalli, A; Paganelli, G M; Pallone, F; Torsoli, A

    1990-09-01

    We conducted a double-blind randomized treatment study on patients affects by non-ulcer dyspepsia in whom multiple biopsy specimens showed active gastritis. Patients were given either 3 g/day of sucralfate (n = 39) or 600 mg/day of sulglycotide (n = 50) for 6 wk, a glycopeptide isolated from pig duodenum constituents. Endoscopy was carried out at baseline and at the end of treatment. We took biopsies from the gastric body (twice) and antrum (six times) at each endoscopy in order to determine grade and extent of gastritis and Helicobacter pylori colonization. Both treatments induced a marked regression of active gastritis (sucralfate group: p less than 0.05 and p less than 0.0001, respectively, in body and in antrum; sulglycotide group: p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.001, respectively). Conversely, Helicobacter pylori colonization remained unchanged at the end of the treatments. At baseline, a close relationship was found between grade of active inflammation in each biopsy and Helicobacter pylori density. After therapy, the association was lost in each treatment group. These results suggest that there can be a remission of active gastritis in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia even without changes in Helicobacter pylori colonization. This result can be achieved by enhancing the protective properties of the gastric mucosa.

  11. Computer-aided detection of colonic polyps with level set-based adaptive convolution in volumetric mucosa to advance CT colonography toward a screening modality

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongbin; Duan, Chaijie; Pickhardt, Perry; Wang, Su; Liang, Zhengrong

    2009-01-01

    As a promising second reader of computed tomographic colonography (CTC) screening, the computer-aided detection (CAD) of colonic polyps has earned fast growing research interest. In this paper, we present a CAD scheme to automatically detect colonic polyps in CTC images. First, a thick colon wall representation, ie, a volumetric mucosa (VM) with several voxels wide in general, was segmented from CTC images by a partial-volume image segmentation algorithm. Based on the VM, we employed a level set-based adaptive convolution method for calculating the first- and second-order spatial derivatives more accurately to start the geometric analysis. Furthermore, to emphasize the correspondence among different layers in the VM, we introduced a middle-layer enhanced integration along the image gradient direction inside the VM to improve the operation of extracting the geometric information, like the principal curvatures. Initial polyp candidates (IPCs) were then determined by thresholding the geometric measurements. Based on IPCs, several features were extracted for each IPC, and fed into a support vector machine to reduce false positives (FPs). The final detections were displayed in a commercial system to provide second opinions for radiologists. The CAD scheme was applied to 26 patient CTC studies with 32 confirmed polyps by both optical and virtual colonoscopies. Compared to our previous work, all the polyps can be detected successfully with less FPs. At the 100% by polyp sensitivity, the new method yielded 3.5 FPs/dataset. PMID:20428331

  12. A lyophilized red grape pomace containing proanthocyanidin-rich dietary fiber induces genetic and metabolic alterations in colon mucosa of female C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Lizarraga, Daneida; Vinardell, M Pilar; Noé, Véronique; van Delft, Joost H; Alcarraz-Vizán, Gema; van Breda, Simone G; Staal, Yvonne; Günther, Ulrich L; Carrigan, John B; Reed, Michelle A; Ciudad, Carlos J; Torres, Josep L; Cascante, Marta

    2011-09-01

    Diet plays a decisive role in promoting or preventing colon cancer. However, the specific effects of some nutrients remain unclear. The capacity of fruit and vegetables to prevent cancer has been associated with their fiber and antioxidant composition. We investigated whether consumption of a lyophilized red grape pomace containing proanthocyanidin-rich dietary fiber (grape antioxidant dietary fiber, GADF) by female C57BL/6J mice would affect the serum metabolic profile or colon mucosa gene expression using NMR techniques and DNA microarray, respectively. The mice were randomly assigned to 2 groups that for 2 wk consumed a standard rodent diet and were gavaged with 100 mg/kg body weight GADF suspended in water or an equivalent volume of plain tap water (10 mL/kg body weight). The amount of fiber supplemented was calculated to equal the current recommended daily levels of fiber consumption for humans. The inclusion of dietary GADF induced alterations in the expression of tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes as well as the modulation of genes from pathways, including lipid biosynthesis, energy metabolism, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Overexpression of enzymes pertaining to the xenobiotic detoxifying system and endogenous antioxidant cell defenses was also observed. In summary, the genetic and metabolic profiles induced by GADF were consistent with the preventive effects of fiber and polyphenols. On the basis of these observations, we propose that GADF may contribute to reducing the risk of colon cancer.

  13. Immunostimulatory oligonucleotides inhibit colonic proinflammatory cytokine production in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Rachmilewitz, Daniel; Karmeli, Fanny; Shteingart, Shimon; Lee, Jongdae; Takabayashi, Kenji; Raz, Eyal

    2006-05-01

    We previously showed that Toll-like receptor-9 (TLR-9) ligands ameliorate experimental colitis. In this study, we evaluated the effect of TLR-9 ligands on the generation of proinflammatory cytokines by human colonic mucosa. Colonoscopic biopsies were obtained from patients with active ulcerative colitis (UC) and from normal subjects. The tissue was organ cultured for 24 hours in the presence or absence of different types of immunostimulatory (ISS) (CpG)-oligonucleotides (ODNs). Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) levels in the medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In active UC, hTNF-alpha and hIL-lbeta generation by inflamed colonic mucosa is 7- and 3-fold higher, respectively, than their generation by normal mucosa. Class B CpG ODNs inhibited colonic TNF-alpha and IL-1beta generation by 50%, whereas class A or C ODNs had a partial or no effect, respectively. A novel class of ODNs that is based on multiple TCG repeats was as effective as class B ODNs. This inhibition resulted from the transcriptional suppression of IL-1beta that occurred within the first 2 hours after ISS-ODN incubation. The addition of chloroquine abolished the inhibitory effects of ISS-ODNs on colonic TNF-alpha and IL-1beta generation. Only certain classes of ISS-ODNs inhibit the enhanced TNF-alpha and IL-1beta generated ex vivo by inflamed colonic mucosa of patients with UC. The effect of ISS-ODNs is mediated by triggering of TLR-9. These results suggest a potential therapeutic value for ISS-ODNs in UC.

  14. Methylation of MGMT and ADAMTS14 in normal colon mucosa: biomarkers of a field defect for cancerization preferentially targeting elder African-Americans

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Sergio; Dai, Yuichi; Yamashita, Kentaro; Horiuchi, Shina; Dai, Tomoko; Matsunaga, Akihiro; Sánchez-Muñoz, Rosa; Bilbao-Sieyro, Cristina; Díaz-Chico, Juan Carlos; Chernov, Andrei V.; Strongin, Alex Y.; Perucho, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Somatic hypermethylation of the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene (MGMT) was previously associated with G > A transition mutations in KRAS and TP53 in colorectal cancer (CRC). We tested the association of MGMT methylation with G > A mutations in KRAS and TP53 in 261 CRCs. Sixteen cases, with and without MGMT hypermethylation, were further analyzed by exome sequencing. No significant association of MGMT methylation with G > A mutations in KRAS, TP53 or in the whole exome was found (p > 0.5 in all comparisons). The result was validated by in silico comparison with 302 CRCs from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) consortium dataset. Transcriptional silencing associated with hypermethylation and stratified into monoallelic and biallelic. We also found a significant clustering (p = 0.001) of aberrant hypermethylation of MGMT and the matrix metalloproteinase gene ADAMTS14 in normal colonic mucosa of CRC patients. This suggested the existence of an epigenetic field defect for cancerization disrupting the methylation patterns of several loci, including MGMT or ADAMTS14, that may lead to predictive biomarkers for CRC. Methylation of these loci in normal mucosa was more frequent in elder (p = 0.001) patients, and particularly in African Americans (p = 1 × 10−5), thus providing a possible mechanistic link between somatic epigenetic alterations and CRC racial disparities in North America. PMID:25638164

  15. Fungal Dysbiosis in Mucosa-associated Microbiota of Crohn’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Giuseppina; Lamas, Bruno; Richard, Mathias L.; Brandi, Giovanni; da Costa, Gregory; Hoffmann, Thomas W.; Di Simone, Massimo Pierluigi; Calabrese, Carlo; Poggioli, Gilberto; Langella, Philippe; Campieri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Gut microbiota is involved in many physiological functions and its imbalance is associated with several diseases, particularly with inflammatory bowel diseases. Mucosa-associated microbiota could have a key role in induction of host immunity and in inflammatory process. Although the role of fungi has been suggested in inflammatory disease pathogenesis, the fungal microbiota has not yet been deeply explored. Here we analysed the bacterial and fungal composition of the mucosa-associated microbiota of Crohn’s disease patients and healthy subjects. Methods: Our prospective, observational study evaluated bacterial and fungal composition of mucosa-associated microbiota of 23 Crohn’s disease patients [16 in flare, 7 in remission] and 10 healthy subjects, using 16S [MiSeq] and ITS2 [pyrosequencing] sequencing, respectively. Global fungal load was assessed by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results: Bacterial microbiota in Crohn’s disease patients was characterised by a restriction in biodiversity. with an increase of Proteobacteria and Fusobacteria. Global fungus load was significantly increased in Crohn’s disease flare compared with healthy subjects [p < 0.05]. In both groups, the colonic mucosa-associated fungal microbiota was dominated by Basidiomycota and Ascomycota phyla. Cystofilobasidiaceae family and Candida glabrata species were overrepresented in Crohn’s disease. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Filobasidium uniguttulatum species were associated with non-inflamed mucosa, whereas Xylariales order was associated with inflamed mucosa. Conclusions: Our study confirms the alteration of the bacterial microbiota and is the first demonstration of the existence of an altered fungal microbiota in Crohn’s disease patients, suggesting that fungi may play a role in pathogenesis. PMID:26574491

  16. Investigation of 5-HT3 receptor-triggered serotonin release from guinea-pig isolated colonic mucosa: a role of PYY-containing endocrine cell.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Shu-Ichi; Kojima, Ken; Fujita, Tomoe

    2017-03-15

    The effect of a 5-HT3 receptor-selective agonist SR57227A was investigated on the outflow of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) from isolated muscle layer-free mucosal preparations of guinea-pig colon. The mucosal preparations were incubated in vitro and the outflow of 5-HT from these preparations was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. SR57227A (100μM) produced a tetrodotoxin-resistant and sustained increase in the outflow of 5-HT from the mucosal preparations. The SR57227A-evoked sustained 5-HT outflow was completely inhibited by the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ramosetron (1μM). The neuropeptide Y1 receptor antagonist BIBO3304 (100nM) partially inhibited the SR57227A-evoked sustained 5-HT outflow, but the Y2 receptor antagonist BIIE0246 (1μM) or the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39) (1μM), showed a minimal effect on the SR57227A-evoked sustained 5-HT outflow. In the presence of BIBO3304 (100nM) and exendin-(9-39) (1μM), SR57227A (100μM) failed to produce a sustained increase in the outflow of 5-HT. The Y1 receptor agonist [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-neuropeptide Y (10nM), but not GLP-1-(7-36) amide (100nM), produced a sustained increase in the outflow of 5-HT. We found that 5-HT3 receptor-triggered 5-HT release from guinea-pig colonic mucosa is mediated by the activation of 5-HT3 receptors located at endocrine cells (enterochromaffin cells and peptide YY (PYY)-containing endocrine cells). The activation of both Y1 and GLP-1 receptors appears to be required for the maintenance of 5-HT3 receptor-triggered 5-HT release. It is therefore considered that 5-HT3 receptors located at colonic mucosa play a crucial role in paracrine signaling between enterochromaffin cells and PYY-containing endocrine cells.

  17. The Helicobacter pylori chemotaxis receptor TlpB (HP0103) is required for pH taxis and for colonization of the gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Croxen, Matthew A; Sisson, Gary; Melano, Roberto; Hoffman, Paul S

    2006-04-01

    The location of Helicobacter pylori in the gastric mucosa of mammals is defined by natural pH gradients within the gastric mucus, which are more alkaline proximal to the mucosal epithelial cells and more acidic toward the lumen. We have used a microscope slide-based pH gradient assay and video data collection system to document pH-tactic behavior. In response to hydrochloric acid (HCl), H. pylori changes its swimming pattern from straight-line random swimming to arcing or circular patterns that move the motile population away from the strong acid. Bacteria in more-alkaline regions did not swim toward the acid, suggesting the pH taxis is a form of negative chemotaxis. To identify the chemoreceptor(s) responsible for the transduction of pH-tactic signals, a vector-free allelic replacement strategy was used to construct mutations in each of the four annotated chemoreceptor genes (tlpA, tlpB, tlpC, and tlpD) in H. pylori strain SS1 and a motile variant of strain KE26695. All deletion mutants were motile and displayed normal chemotaxis in brucella soft agar, but only tlpB mutants were defective for pH taxis. tlpD mutants exhibited more tumbling and arcing swimming, while tlpC mutants were hypermotile and responsive to acid. While tlpA, tlpC, and tlpD mutants colonized mice to near wild-type levels, tlpB mutants were defective for colonization of highly permissive C57BL/6 interleukin-12 (IL-12) (p40-/-)-deficient mice. Complementation of the tlpB mutant (tlpB expressed from the rdxA locus) restored pH taxis and infectivity for mice. pH taxis, like motility and urease activity, is essential for colonization and persistence in the gastric mucosa, and thus TlpB function might represent a novel target in the development of therapeutics that blind tactic behavior.

  18. Bicarbonate secretion and non-Na component of the short-circuit current in the isolated colonic mucosa of Bufo arenarum

    PubMed Central

    Carlisky, N. J.; Lew, V. L.

    1970-01-01

    1. In the isolated colonic mucosa of Bufo arenarum, under special circumstances, there is a variable fraction of the short-circuit current (0-38%) that is unaccounted for by either the Na or the Cl and bicarbonate transmembrane net fluxes. 2. The hypothesis that a special kind of bicarbonate transport may account for the non-Na component of the short-circuit current was investigated. According to this, bicarbonate ions formed within the membrane await transport towards the mucosal solution within a compartment that does not undergo isotopic exchange with the serosal bathing solution. This kind of transport may be detected by a lowering of mucosal specific activity of bicarbonate but would not be revealed by the classic method of comparing the difference between the unidirectional fluxes with the short-circuit current. 3. The specific activity of bicarbonate was determined in the inside solution (initially bicarbonate-free) of ten normal and four everted colonic sacs incubated in an external medium (reservoir) containing a constant specific activity of bicarbonate. Comparison between membrane-to-internal solution bicarbonate flux and non-Na component of the short-circuit current was carried out in two different ways: (a) by measuring the remaining short-circuit current in Na-free medium and (b) by determining simultaneously the Na net flux. 4. Whatever the value of the short-circuit current and its non-Na component, there is no reduction of the specific activity of the bicarbonate appearing in the inside solution of the everted colonic sacs. 5. In the normal sacs there is a reduction of the specific activity of bicarbonate which accounts for a membrane-to-mucosa bicarbonate flux which parallels the variations of the non-Na component of the short-circuit current although quantitatively representing only 68-87% of it. 6. There is no systematic decrease in the rate of reduction of the mucosal specific activity of bicarbonate in successive experimental flux periods

  19. Transporter function and cyclic AMP turnover in normal colonic mucosa from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Kleberg, Karen; Jensen, Gerda Majgaard; Christensen, Dan Ploug; Lundh, Morten; Grunnet, Lars Groth; Knuhtsen, Svend; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Hansen, Mark Berner; Bindslev, Niels

    2012-06-26

    The pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia is still unresolved but has been associated with alterations in epithelial clearance of xenobiotics and metabolic waste products. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize the transport of cyclic nucleotides in colonic biopsies from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia. Cyclic nucleotides were used as model substrates shared by some OATP- and ABC-transporters, which in part are responsible for clearance of metabolites and xenobiotics from the colonic epithelium. On colonic biopsies from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia, molecular transport was electrophysiologically registered in Ussing-chamber set-ups, mRNA level of selected transporters was quantified by rt-PCR, and subcellular location of transporters was determined by immunohistochemistry. Of four cyclic nucleotides, dibuturyl-cAMP induced the largest short circuit current in both patient groups. The induced short circuit current was significantly lower in neoplasia-patients (p = 0.024). The observed altered transport of dibuturyl-cAMP in neoplasia-patients could not be directly translated to an observed increased mRNA expression of OATP4A1 and OATP2B1 in neoplasia patients. All other examined transporters were expressed to similar extents in both patient groups. OATP1C1, OATP4A1, OATP4C1 seem to be involved in the excretory system of human colon. ABCC4 is likely to be involved from an endoplasmic-Golgi complex and basolateral location in goblet cells. ABCC5 might be directly involved in the turnover of intracellular cAMP at the basolateral membrane of columnar epithelial cells, while OATP2B1 is indirectly related to the excretory system. Colorectal neoplasia is associated with lower transport or sensitivity to cyclic nucleotides and increased expression of OATP2B1 and OATP4A1 transporters, known to transport PGE(2).

  20. Transporter function and cyclic AMP turnover in normal colonic mucosa from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia is still unresolved but has been associated with alterations in epithelial clearance of xenobiotics and metabolic waste products. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize the transport of cyclic nucleotides in colonic biopsies from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia. Methods Cyclic nucleotides were used as model substrates shared by some OATP- and ABC-transporters, which in part are responsible for clearance of metabolites and xenobiotics from the colonic epithelium. On colonic biopsies from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia, molecular transport was electrophysiologically registered in Ussing-chamber set-ups, mRNA level of selected transporters was quantified by rt-PCR, and subcellular location of transporters was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results Of four cyclic nucleotides, dibuturyl-cAMP induced the largest short circuit current in both patient groups. The induced short circuit current was significantly lower in neoplasia-patients (p = 0.024). The observed altered transport of dibuturyl-cAMP in neoplasia-patients could not be directly translated to an observed increased mRNA expression of OATP4A1 and OATP2B1 in neoplasia patients. All other examined transporters were expressed to similar extents in both patient groups. Conclusions OATP1C1, OATP4A1, OATP4C1 seem to be involved in the excretory system of human colon. ABCC4 is likely to be involved from an endoplasmic-Golgi complex and basolateral location in goblet cells. ABCC5 might be directly involved in the turnover of intracellular cAMP at the basolateral membrane of columnar epithelial cells, while OATP2B1 is indirectly related to the excretory system. Colorectal neoplasia is associated with lower transport or sensitivity to cyclic nucleotides and increased expression of OATP2B1 and OATP4A1 transporters, known to transport PGE2. PMID:22734885

  1. Microscopical examination of the localisation patterns of two novel rhodamine derivatives in normal and neoplastic colonic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Atlamazoglou, V; Yova, D; Kavantzas, N; Loukas, S

    2001-01-01

    Tissue characterisation by fluorescence imaging, using exogenous fluorophores, is a promising method for cancer detection. Histochemical alterations in the composition of mucins, when neoplastic transformations occur, could be exploited to derive more selective fluoroprobes indicative of early malignant transformation. The aim of this work was to develop and examine tumour selective fluoroprobes for colon cancer diagnosis, as well as to determine the morphological components where selective dye accumulation has occurred. Two novel fluoroprobes: rhodamine B-L-leucine amide and rhodamine B-phenylboronic acid were synthesised and examined together with Mayer's mucicarmine, alexa 350-wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and tetramethyl rhodamine-concanavalin A (ConA). Fluorescence microscopy studies were performed with deparaffinised human colon sections, using an epifluorescence microscope equipped with a colour CCD camera. The intense accumulation of the novel fluoroprobes was localised in the amorphous material in the lumen of neoplastic crypts. To gain insight into the localisation patterns, mucicarmine, alexa 350-WGA and tetramethyl rhodamine-ConA were used. Alexa 350-WGA reacted primarily with mucin secreted in the malignant crypt lumen suggesting that this material is rich in sialic acid and N-acetylglucosaminyl residues. These derivatives clearly and consistently distinguished non-neoplastic from neoplastic human colon tissue sections. The intense accumulation at the altered mucins indicates that they could be used as fluoroprobes of biochemical alterations for carcinoma detection.

  2. Expression of VLA-alpha 2, VLA-alpha 6, and VLA-beta 1 chains in normal mucosa and adenomas of the colon, and in colon carcinomas and their liver metastases.

    PubMed Central

    Koretz, K.; Schlag, P.; Boumsell, L.; Möller, P.

    1991-01-01

    'Very late antigen' (VLA) proteins are members of the integrin superfamily with cell-surface receptor function and are involved in the cell-cell matrix interaction. They are heterodimers with a common beta 1 chain and different alpha chains counted through VLA-1 to VLA-6. The VLA-2 complex (alpha 2/beta 1) was found to act as collagen receptor on platelets and the VLA-6 complex (alpha 6/beta 1) as laminin receptor. Using monoclonal antibodies and an indirect immunoperoxidase method, we investigated the expression of VLA-alpha 2, VLA-alpha 6, and VLA-beta 1 chains in 20 normal colonic mucosa samples, in 20 colonic adenomas, and in 96 carcinomas together with 10 accompanying liver metastases. All three proteins were expressed throughout the colonic epithelium, except for VLA-alpha 2, which was present in the cryptic gland but was absent on the mucosal surface in some cases. In general, adenomas were strongly positive for the VLA proteins but 3 of 20 cases showed focal VLA-alpha 2-negative areas. The carcinomas revealed considerable heterogeneity of VLA-alpha 2 expression; ie, 59 tumors were completely positive, 35 tumors revealed a focal loss of antigen, and 2 cases were negative. This reduced antigen expression was statistically associated with Dukes' stage C/D (P = 0.003). VLA-alpha 6 was expressed throughout in all tumors. VLA-beta 1 was found extensively expressed in 77 carcinomas, partially expressed in 17 carcinomas, and was absent in 2 carcinomas. As compared to their primary tumors, liver metastases showed roughly corresponding patterns of antigen expression. The down regulation/loss of VLA proteins in a subset of epithelial colon tumors might cause a disturbed cell-cell/cell-matrix interaction that might augment the invasive property of their cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2000944

  3. Immunohistochemical study of lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate and epithelial HLA-DR expression in the rectal and colonic mucosae of children with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Arató, A; Savilahti, E; Tainio, V M; Klemola, T

    1989-02-01

    Lymphocyte subpopulations, plasma cells in the lamina propria, and the expression of HLA-DR antigens on the epithelium of the rectal and colonic mucosae were studied in eight children with ulcerative colitis and 12 control subjects using a panel of monoclonal antisera and the peroxidase technique before any treatment and 3 months later (four patients). The numbers of intraepithelial lymphocytes were similar in specimens from patients and controls. The majority of these cells (on average, 73% in the patients and 84% in the controls) were mature CD3+ T cells; among them, CD8+ suppressor-cytotoxic cells were preponderant. In both untreated and treated patients, the numbers of mature T cells in the rectal mucosae were supranormal (1,870 +/- 205 cells/mm2, p less than 0.01 and 1,537 +/- 214 cells/mm2, p less than 0.05, respectively; controls, 1,105 +/- 214 cells/mm2). In rectal specimens from untreated patients, the number of helper T (CD4+) cells was increased (1,094 +/- 74 versus 801 +/- 74 cells/mm2, p less than 0.05); the same specimens had more B-1-positive (CD20+) B cells and pre-B cells (122 +/- 21 versus 71 +/- 17 cells/mm2, p less than 0.05). The number of IgG-containing cells was significantly greater than in the controls (1,058 +/- 263 versus 359 +/- 64 cells/mm2, p less than 0.01), and the commonest isotype in the plasma cells of patients was IgG. The number of IgE-containing cells was also significantly elevated (230 +/- 40 versus 95 +/- 16 cells/mm2, p less than 0.01). The numbers of IgA- and IgM-containing cells were similar in patients and controls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Dietary Protein and Amino Acid Supplementation in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Course: What Impact on the Colonic Mucosa?

    PubMed

    Vidal-Lletjós, Sandra; Beaumont, Martin; Tomé, Daniel; Benamouzig, Robert; Blachier, François; Lan, Annaïg

    2017-03-21

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), after disease onset, typically progress in two cyclically repeated phases, namely inflammatory flare and remission, with possible nutritional status impairment. Some evidence, either from epidemiological, clinical, and experimental studies indicate that the quantity and the quality of dietary protein consumption and amino acid supplementation may differently influence the IBD course according to the disease phases. For instance, although the dietary protein needs for mucosal healing after an inflammatory episode remain undetermined, there is evidence that amino acids derived from dietary proteins display beneficial effects on this process, serving as building blocks for macromolecule synthesis in the wounded mucosal area, energy substrates, and/or precursors of bioactive metabolites. However, an excessive amount of dietary proteins may result in an increased intestinal production of potentially deleterious bacterial metabolites. This could possibly affect epithelial repair as several of these bacterial metabolites are known to inhibit colonic epithelial cell respiration, cell proliferation, and/or to affect barrier function. In this review, we present the available evidence about the impact of the amount of dietary proteins and supplementary amino acids on IBD onset and progression, with a focus on the effects reported in the colon.

  5. Dietary Protein and Amino Acid Supplementation in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Course: What Impact on the Colonic Mucosa?

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Lletjós, Sandra; Beaumont, Martin; Tomé, Daniel; Benamouzig, Robert; Blachier, François; Lan, Annaïg

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), after disease onset, typically progress in two cyclically repeated phases, namely inflammatory flare and remission, with possible nutritional status impairment. Some evidence, either from epidemiological, clinical, and experimental studies indicate that the quantity and the quality of dietary protein consumption and amino acid supplementation may differently influence the IBD course according to the disease phases. For instance, although the dietary protein needs for mucosal healing after an inflammatory episode remain undetermined, there is evidence that amino acids derived from dietary proteins display beneficial effects on this process, serving as building blocks for macromolecule synthesis in the wounded mucosal area, energy substrates, and/or precursors of bioactive metabolites. However, an excessive amount of dietary proteins may result in an increased intestinal production of potentially deleterious bacterial metabolites. This could possibly affect epithelial repair as several of these bacterial metabolites are known to inhibit colonic epithelial cell respiration, cell proliferation, and/or to affect barrier function. In this review, we present the available evidence about the impact of the amount of dietary proteins and supplementary amino acids on IBD onset and progression, with a focus on the effects reported in the colon. PMID:28335546

  6. [Molecular Mechanisms for Adhesion and Colonization of Human Gastric Mucosa by Helicobacter pylori and its Clinical Implications].

    PubMed

    Coelho, Elisabete; Magalhães, Ana; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Reis, Celso A

    2016-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is very prevalent worldwide and is associated with the progression of the gastric carcinogenesis cascade, being one of the main risk factors for the development of gastric carcinoma. Several factors are determinant for the infection and for the development of gastric disease, including environmental factors, host genetic factors and virulence factors of the bacteria. In this review, we present an overview of the current knowledge on the determinants of the infection and on the recently described molecular mechanisms of Helicobacter pylori adhesion to the gastric mucosa, as well as its possible future therapeutic application. The adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to the gastric epithelium is critical for gastric pathogenesis, allowing bacterial access to nutrients and the action of bacterial virulence factors, promoting recurrence of the infection and the progression of the gastric carcinogenesis pathway. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection is the best preventive strategy available against gastric cancer, mainly if it is achieved before the development of pre-neoplastic lesions. The increase in antibiotics resistance, together with the eradication failures in some patients, has promoted the development of alternative treatments. The new therapeutic strategies, focused on the molecular mechanism of Helicobacter pylori adhesion, are very promising; however, future studies are needed to evaluate its in vivo efficiency and toxicity.

  7. Colonic mucosa-associated microbiota is influenced by an interaction of Crohn disease and FUT2 (Secretor) genotype.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Philipp; Rehman, Ateequr; Künzel, Sven; Häsler, Robert; Ott, Stephan J; Schreiber, Stefan; Rosenstiel, Philip; Franke, Andre; Baines, John F

    2011-11-22

    The FUT2 (Secretor) gene is responsible for the presence of ABO histo-blood group antigens on the gastrointestinal mucosa and in bodily secretions. Individuals lacking a functional copy of FUT2 are known as "nonsecretors" and display an array of differences in susceptibility to infection and disease, including Crohn disease. To determine whether variation in resident microbial communities with respect to FUT2 genotype is a potential factor contributing to susceptibility, we performed 454-based community profiling of the intestinal microbiota in a panel of healthy subjects and Crohn disease patients and determined their genotype for the primary nonsecretor allele in Caucasian populations, W143X (G428A). Consistent with previous studies, we observe significant deviations in the microbial communities of individuals with Crohn disease. Furthermore, the FUT2 genotype explains substantial differences in community composition, diversity, and structure, and we identified several bacterial species displaying disease-by-genotype associations. These findings indicate that alterations in resident microbial communities may in part explain the variety of host susceptibilities surrounding nonsecretor status and that FUT2 is an important genetic factor influencing host-microbial diversity.

  8. Actions of Angeli's salt, a nitroxyl (HNO) donor, on ion transport across mucosa-submucosa preparations from rat distal colon.

    PubMed

    Pouokam, Ervice; Bell, Anna; Diener, Martin

    2013-09-05

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether nitroxyl (HNO), a redox variant of the radical gasotransmitter nitric oxide (NO) with therapeutically promising properties, affects colonic ion transport. Changes in short-circuit current (Isc) induced by the HNO donor Angeli's salt were recorded in Ussing chambers. Cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration was measured with fura-2. The nitroxyl donor induced a concentration-dependent increase in Isc across rat distal colon which was due to a stimulation of chloride secretion. The secretion induced by Angeli's salt (5×10(-4)mol/l) was not altered by the NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1H-imidazolyl-1-oxy-3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO), but was abolished by the HNO scavenger l-cysteine. The response was not dependent on the activity of soluble guanylate cyclase or enteric neurons, but was inhibited by indomethacin. Experiments with apically permeabilized epithelia revealed the activation of basolateral K(+) channels and a stimulation of the current carried by the basolateral Na(+)-K(+)-pump by Angeli's salt. The secretion induced by Angeli's salt was reduced in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). A prominent increase in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration was evoked by Angeli's salt predominantly in subepithelial cells within the submucosa, which had the same dependence on extracellular Ca(2+) as the Angeli's salt-induced Cl(-) secretion. Consequently, Angeli's salt induces a soluble guanylate cyclase-independent, Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion via activation of the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and of basolateral K(+) channels. Cyclooxygenase metabolites produced within the submucosa seem to be involved in this response.

  9. Enhanced colonic nitric oxide generation and nitric oxide synthase activity in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Rachmilewitz, D; Stamler, J S; Bachwich, D; Karmeli, F; Ackerman, Z; Podolsky, D K

    1995-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that nitric oxide (NO.), the product of nitric oxide synthase in inflammatory cells, may play a part in tissue injury and inflammation through its oxidative metabolism. In this study the colonic generation of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and nitric oxide synthase activity was determined in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Colonic biopsy specimens were obtained from inflammatory bowel disease patients and from normal controls. Mucosal explants were cultured in vitro for 24 hours and NOx generation was determined. Nitric oxide synthase activity was monitored by the conversion of [3H]-L-arginine to citrulline. Median NOx generation by inflamed colonic mucosa of patients with active ulcerative colitis and Crohn's colitis was 4.2- and 8.1-fold respectively higher than that by normal human colonic mucosa. In ulcerative colitis and Crohn's colitis nitric oxide synthase activity was 10.0- and 3.8-fold respectively higher than in normal subjects. Colonic NOx generation is significantly decreased by methylprednisolone and ketotifen. The decrease in NOx generation by cultured colonic mucosa induced by methylprednisolone suggests that NO synthase activity is induced during the culture and the steroid effect may contribute to its therapeutic effect. Enhanced colonic NOx generation by stimulated nitric oxide synthase activity in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease may contribute to tissue injury. PMID:7541008

  10. Cytokine changes in colonic mucosa associated with Blastocystis spp. subtypes 1 and 3 in diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yakoob, Javed; Abbas, Zaigham; Usman, Muhammad Waqas; Sultana, Aisha; Islam, Muhammad; Awan, Safia; Ahmad, Zubair; Hamid, Saeed; Jafri, Wasim

    2014-06-01

    We determined cytokines (e.g. interleukin-8, 10, 12 and TNF-α) expression by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and in rectal mucosa in diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (D-IBS) with Blastocystis spp. Eighty patients with D-IBS and Blastocystis spp. infection were classified as 'cases' and 80 with D-IBS without Blastocystis spp. infection were classified as 'control'. Cases were subdivided into D-IBS and Blastocystis sp. defined type 1 (subtype-specific primer SB83) and type 3 (SB227). Stool microscopy and culture were performed. Rectal biopsies were obtained for histology and cytokines by real-time PCR for mRNA expression of cytokines. PBMCs IL-8 was similar in different groups but in type 1, IL-8mRNA was increased compared with type 3 (P = 0·001) and control (P = 0·001). In type 1, IL-10 by PBMCs had a low mean value (14·5±1·6) compared with (16·7±1·5) type 3 and (16±2·3) in controls (P<0·001 and P<0·001, respectively). In Blastocystis sp. type 1, low IL-10 was associated with lymphocyte and plasma cell infiltration (P = 0·015 and P = 0·002, respectively). In Blastocystis sp. type 1 and type 3, IL-12 was associated with goblet cell depletion 23 (85%) (P<0·001) and 8 (29%) (P = 0·037), respectively. In Blastocystis sp. type 1, low IL-10 was associated with a proinflammatory response characterized by IL-8.

  11. Pilot Clinical Study of the Effects of Ginger Root Extract on Eicosanoids in Colonic Mucosa of Subjects at Increased Risk for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zick, Suzanna M.; Turgeon, D. Kim; Ren, Jianwei; Ruffin, Mack T.; Wright, Benjamin D.; Sen, Ananda; Djuric, Zora; Brenner, Dean E.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a significant cause of mortality. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX) and thus prostaglandin E2, are promising CRC preventives, but have significant toxicities. Ginger has been shown to inhibit COX, to decrease the incidence and multiplicity of adenomas, and decrease PGE2 concentrations in subjects at normal risk for CRC. This study was conducted to determine the effects of 2.0 g/d of ginger given orally on the levels of PGE2, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 13-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids, and 5-, 12-, & 15-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid, in the colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for CRC. We randomized 20 subjects to 2.0 g/d ginger or placebo for 28 d. At baseline and Day 28, a flexible sigmoidoscopy was used to obtain colon biopsies. A liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method was used to determine eicosanoid levels in the biopsies, and levels were expressed per amount of protein or free arachidonic acid (AA). There was a significant decrease in AA between baseline and Day 28 (P = 0.05) and significant increase in LTB4 (P = 0.04) when normalized to protein, in subjects treated with ginger versus placebo. No other changes in eicosanoids were observed. There was no difference between the groups in total adverse events (AE; P = 0.06). Ginger lacks the ability to decrease eicosanoid levels in people at increased risk for CRC. Ginger did appear to be both tolerable and safe; and could have chemopreventive effects through other mechanisms. Further investigation should focus on other markers of CRC risk in those at increased CRC risk. PMID:24760534

  12. Pilot clinical study of the effects of ginger root extract on eicosanoids in colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zick, Suzanna M; Turgeon, D Kim; Ren, Jianwei; Ruffin, Mack T; Wright, Benjamin D; Sen, Ananda; Djuric, Zora; Brenner, Dean E

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a significant cause of mortality. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX) and thus prostaglandin E2, are promising CRC preventives, but have significant toxicities. Ginger has been shown to inhibit COX, to decrease the incidence and multiplicity of adenomas, and decrease PGE2 concentrations in subjects at normal risk for CRC. This study was conducted to determine the effects of 2.0 g/d of ginger given orally on the levels of PGE2, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 13-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids, and 5-, 12-, & 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, in the colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for CRC. We randomized 20 subjects to 2.0 g/d ginger or placebo for 28 d. At baseline and Day 28, a flexible sigmoidoscopy was used to obtain colon biopsies. A liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method was used to determine eicosanoid levels in the biopsies, and levels were expressed per amount of protein or free arachidonic acid (AA). There was a significant decrease in AA between baseline and Day 28 (P = 0.05) and significant increase in LTB4 (P = 0.04) when normalized to protein, in subjects treated with ginger versus placebo. No other changes in eicosanoids were observed. There was no difference between the groups in total adverse events (AE; P = 0.06). Ginger lacks the ability to decrease eicosanoid levels in people at increased risk for CRC. Ginger did appear to be both tolerable and safe; and could have chemopreventive effects through other mechanisms. Further investigation should focus on other markers of CRC risk in those at increased CRC risk. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Phase II study of the Effects of Ginger Root Extract on Eicosanoids in Colon Mucosa in People at Normal Risk for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zick, Suzanna M.; Turgeon, D. Kim; Vareed, Shaiju K; Ruffin, Mack T.; Litzinger, Amie J.; Wright, Benjamin D; Alrawi, Sara; Normolle, Daniel P.; Djuric, Zora; Brenner, Dean E.

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX) indicate that up-regulation of inflammatory eicosanoids produced by COX, and in particular prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), are early events in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Ginger has demonstrated down regulation of COX in vitro and decreased incidence/ multiplicity of adenomas in rats. This study was conducted to determine if 2.0 g/day of ginger could decrease the levels of PGE2, 13-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids (13-HODE), and 5-, 12-, & 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-, 12-, & 15-HETE), in the colon mucosa of healthy volunteers. To investigate this aim we randomized 30 subjects to 2.0 g/day ginger or placebo for 28 days. Flexible sigmoidoscopy at baseline and day 28 was used to obtain colon biopsies. A liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method was used to determine eicosanoid levels in the biopsies, and levels were expressed per protein or per free arachidonic acid. There were no significant differences in mean percent change between baseline and day 28 for any of the eicosanoids, when normalized to protein. There was a significant decrease in mean percent change in PGE2 (p=0.05) and 5-HETE (p=0.04), and a trend toward significant decreases in 12-HETE (p=0.09) and 15-HETE (p=0.06) normalized to free arachidonic acid. There was no difference between the groups in terms of total adverse events (AE) (p=0.55). Based on these results, it appears that Ginger has the potential to decrease eicosanoid levels, perhaps by inhibiting their synthesis from arachidonic acid. Ginger also appeared to be tolerable and safe. Further investigation in people at high risk for CRC seems warranted. PMID:21990307

  14. Vegetables affect the expression of genes involved in anticarcinogenic processes in the colonic mucosa of C57BL/6 female mice.

    PubMed

    van Breda, Simone G J; van Agen, Ebienus; van Sanden, Suzy; Burzykowski, Tomasz; Kienhuis, Anne S; Kleinjans, Jos C S; van Delft, Joost H M

    2005-08-01

    There is abundant epidemiological evidence that vegetable consumption decreases colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. However, the molecular targets in the genome are mostly unknown. The present study investigated the effects of vegetable consumption on gene expression in the colon mucosa of female C57Bl/6 mice using cDNA microarray technology. Mice were fed one of 8 diets: a control diet containing no vegetables (diet 1); a diet containing 100 g/kg (diet 2, 10% dose), 200 g/kg (diet 3, 20% dose), or 400 g/kg (diet 4, 40% dose) of a vegetable mixture; or a diet containing 70 g/kg of cauliflower (diet 5, 7% dose), 73 g/kg of carrots (diet 6, 7.3% dose), 226 g/kg of peas (diet 7, 22.6% dose); or 31 g/kg of onions (diet 8, 3.1% dose). The vegetable mixture used in diets 2 to 4 consisted of the 4 individual vegetables used in diets 5 to 8: cauliflower (30% wet wt), carrots (30% wet wt), peas (30% wet wt), and onions (10% wet wt). To assess gene expression changes, colonic mucosal cells were collected after the mice were killed. Total RNA was isolated and microarray technology was used to measure the expression levels of 602 genes simultaneously. For 39 genes, significant dose-dependent effects were found, although in general the relations were not linear. For 15 genes, the altered expression could indeed explain reduced cancer risk at various stages of CRC development. Eleven genes were modulated by the vegetable mixture as well as by one or more of the individual vegetables. For 7 of the genes, the modulation by the mixture was due to the effect of a particular vegetable. These genes are of particular interest because they were consistently affected and could be involved in the prevention of CRC by vegetable consumption.

  15. Identification of dominant bacteria in feces and colonic mucosa from healthy Spanish adults by culturing and by 16S rDNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Susana; Suárez, Adolfo; Mayo, Baltasar

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this work was to examine by culturing the changes in the total and indicator populations of the feces of two individuals over 1 year and to identify the dominant microbial components of a single sample of feces from each donor. Populations and dominant bacteria from a sample of colonic mucosa from a further individual were also assessed. The culture results were then compared to those obtained with the same samples by 16S rDNA cloning and sequencing. High interindividual variation in representative microbial populations of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) was revealed by both the culture and the culture-independent techniques. Species belonging to Clostridium clusters (XIVa, IV, and XVIII) predominated in both the fecal and the mucosal samples (except in the mucose cultured isolates), members of Clostridium coccoides cluster XIVa being the most numerous microorganisms. Species of gamma-proteobacteria (Escherichia coli and Shigella spp.), bifidobacteria, and actinobacteria appeared in lower numbers than those of clostridia. From the mucosal cultured sample, only facultative anaerobes and bifidobacteria were recovered, suggesting destruction of the anaerobe population during processing. In accordance with this, the microbial diversity revealed by 16S rDNA sequence analysis was greater than that revealed by culturing. Despite large interindividual differences, distinct human communities may have group-associated GIT microbiota characteristics, such as the low number of Bacteroides seen in the subjects in this study.

  16. Transcriptome and proteome profiling of colon mucosa from quercetin fed F344 rats point to tumor preventive mechanisms, increased mitochondrial fatty acid degradation and decreased glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Dihal, Ashwin A; van der Woude, Hester; Hendriksen, Peter J M; Charif, Halima; Dekker, Lennard J; Ijsselstijn, Linda; de Boer, Vincent C J; Alink, Gerrit M; Burgers, Peter C; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Woutersen, Ruud A; Stierum, Rob H

    2008-01-01

    Quercetin has been shown to act as an anticarcinogen in experimental colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of the present study was to characterize transcriptome and proteome changes occurring in the distal colon mucosa of rats supplemented with 10 g quercetin/kg diet for 11 wk. Transcriptome data analyzed with Gene Set Enrichment Analysis showed that quercetin significantly downregulated the potentially oncogenic mitogen-activated protein kinase (Mapk) pathway. In addition, quercetin enhanced expression of tumor suppressor genes, including Pten, Tp53, and Msh2, and of cell cycle inhibitors, including Mutyh. Furthermore, dietary quercetin enhanced genes involved in phase I and II metabolism, including Fmo5, Ephx1, Ephx2, and Gpx2. Quercetin increased PPARalpha target genes, and concomitantly enhanced expression of genes involved in mitochondrial fatty acid (FA) degradation. Proteomics performed in the same samples revealed 33 affected proteins, of which four glycolysis enzymes and three heat shock proteins were decreased. A proteome-transcriptome comparison showed a low correlation, but both pointed out toward altered energy metabolism. In conclusion, transcriptomics combined with proteomics showed that dietary quercetin evoked changes contrary to those found in colorectal carcinogenesis. These tumor-protective mechanisms were associated with a shift in energy production pathways, pointing at decreased cytoplasmic glycolysis and toward increased mitochondrial FA degradation.

  17. Cell associated urokinase activity and colonic epithelial cells in health and disease.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, P R; van de Pol, E; Doe, W F

    1991-01-01

    It is not known if urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is associated with normal colonic epithelial cells. The aims of this study were to determine if normal colonic epithelial cells have uPA activity and whether this is concentrated at the cell membrane. In addition, the contribution of colonic epithelial cell associated uPA activity to disease related pertubations of mucosal uPA activity were examined. A highly enriched population of colonic epithelial cells was isolated from resected colon or biopsy specimens by an enzymatic technique. uPA activity was measured in cell homogenates by a specific and sensitive colorimetric method and expressed relative to cellular DNA. In two experiments subcellular fractionation of colonic epithelial cells was performed by nitrogen cavitation followed by ultracentrifugation over a linear sucrose gradient. The fractions collected were analysed for uPA and organelle-specific enzyme activities. Normal colonic epithelial cells have cell associated uPA activity (mean (SEM) 5.6 (1.1) IU/mg, n = 18). This colocalised with fractions enriched for leucine-beta-naphthylamidase and 5'-nucleotidase, markers of plasma membrane. uPA activities in epithelial cells from cancerous colons (9.8 (3.1) n = 7) or from mucosa affected by inflammatory bowel disease (3.8 (0.7) n = 15) were not significantly different from normal (paired t test), while that in epithelial cells from greatly inflamed mucosa was similar to that from autologous normal or mildly inflamed areas (4.4 (1.2) v 5.9 (3.6), n = 9). Thus normal colonic epithelial cells have cell associated uPA activity which is concentrated on the plasma membranes, suggesting the presence of uPA receptors. Increased mucosal levels of uPA previously reported in patients with inflammatory bowel disease are not due to increased colonic epithelial cell associated uPA. PMID:1650741

  18. Comparison of the Luminal and Mucosa-Associated Microbiota in the Colon of Pigs with and without Swine Dysentery.

    PubMed

    Burrough, Eric R; Arruda, Bailey L; Plummer, Paul J

    2017-01-01

    Colonic contents and mucosal scrapings from pigs inoculated with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae or Brachyspira hampsonii were collected at necropsy and classified as either positive (n = 29) or negative (n = 7) for swine dysentery (SD) based upon lesions and positive culture from the source pig. The microbiota in each sample was analyzed by bacterial census taking (16S rRNA gene sequencing). Procrustes analysis revealed similar clustering by disease classification with a relatively high M2 value (0.44) suggesting differences in the microbiota between mucosal and luminal samples from the same pig. In both sample types, differences in richness and beta diversity were observed between disease statuses (P ≤ 0.014). The relative abundance of Brachyspirales, Campylobacterales, Desulfovibrionales, and Enterobacteriales was higher in pigs with dysentery for both mucosal scrapings and luminal samples while Clostridiales, Erysipelotrichales, and Fusobacteriales were significantly more abundant in the luminal contents only. For inoculated pigs that did not develop dysentery, Burkholderiales were more abundant in both sample types, Bacteroidales and Synergistales were more abundant in mucosal scrapings, and Lactobacillales and Bifidobacteriales were more abundant in luminal contents when compared with diseased pigs. Linear discriminant analysis of effect size revealed Brachyspira, Campylobacter, Mogibacterium, and multiple Desulfovibrio spp. as differential features in mucosal scrapings from pigs with dysentery while Lactobacillus and a Bifidobacterium spp. were differential in pigs without disease. These differential features were not observed in luminal samples. In summary, microbial profiles in both sample types differ significantly between disease states; however, evaluation of the mucosal microbiome specifically may be of higher value in elucidating bacterial mechanisms underlying development of SD.

  19. Bacterial colonization or infection in chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Pandak, Nenad; Pajić-Penavić, Ivana; Sekelj, Alen; Tomić-Paradžik, Maja; Cabraja, Ivica; Miklaušić, Božana

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was the determination of bacteria present in maxillary and ethmoid cavities in patients with chronic sinusitis and to correlate these findings with bacteria simultaneously present in their nasopharynx. The purpose of this correlation was to establish the role of bacteria found in chronically inflamed sinuses and to evaluate if the bacteria present colonized or infected sinus mucosa. Nasopharyngeal and sinus swabs of 65 patients that underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery were cultivated and at the same time the presence of leukocytes were determined in each swab. The most frequently found bacteria in nasopharynx were Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus spp., Streptococcus viridans and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Maxillary or ethmoidal sinus swabs yielded bacterial growth in 47 (72.31%) patients. The most frequently found bacteria in sinuses were Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella spp. and Streptococci (pneumoniae, viridans and spp.). The insignificant number of leukocytes was present in each sinus and nasopharyngeal swab. Every published microbiology study of chronic sinusitis proved that sinus mucosa were colonized with bacteria and not infected, yet antibiotic therapy was discussed making no difference between infection and colonization. Chronic sinusitis should be considered a chronic inflammatory condition rather than bacterial infection, so routine antibiotic therapy should be avoided. Empiric antibiotic therapy should be prescribed only in cases when the acute exacerbation of chronic sinusitis occurs and the antibiotics prescribed should aim the usual bacteria causing acute sinusitis. In case of therapy failure, antibiotics should be changed having in mind that under certain circumstances any bacteria colonizing sinus mucosa can cause acute exacerbation of chronic sinusitis.

  20. All-Trans Retinoic Acid Modulates TLR4/NF-κB Signaling Pathway Targeting TNF-α and Nitric Oxide Synthase 2 Expression in Colonic Mucosa during Ulcerative Colitis and Colitis Associated Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rafa, Hayet; Benkhelifa, Sarra; AitYounes, Sonia; Saoula, Houria; Belhadef, Said; Belkhelfa, Mourad; Boukercha, Aziza; Toumi, Ryma; Soufli, Imene; de Launoit, Yvan; Mahfouf, Hassen; Nakmouche, M'hamed

    2017-01-01

    Colitis associated cancer (CAC) is the colorectal cancer (CRC) subtype that is associated with bowel disease such as ulcerative colitis (UC). The data on role of NF-κB signaling in development and progression of CAC were derived from preclinical studies, whereas data from human are rare. The aim of this work was to study the contribution of NF-κB pathway during UC and CAC, as well as the immunomodulatory effect of all-trans retinoic acid (AtRA). We analyzed the expression of NOS2, TNF-α, TLR4, and NF-κB, in colonic mucosa. We also studied NO/TNF-α modulation by LPS in colonic mucosa pretreated with AtRA. A marked increase in TLR4, NF-κB, TNF-α, and NOS2 expression was reported in colonic mucosa. The relationship between LPS/TLR4 and TNF-α/NO production, as well as the role of NF-κB signaling, was confirmed by ex vivo experiments and the role of LPS/TLR4 in NOS2/TNF-α induction through NF-κB pathway was suggested. AtRA downregulates NOS2 and TNF-α expression. Collectively, our study indicates that AtRA modulates in situ LPS/TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway targeting NOS2 and TNF-α expression. Therefore, we suggest that AtRA has a potential value in new strategies to improve the current therapy, as well as in the clinical prevention of CAC development and progression. PMID:28408791

  1. Differential effects of α4β7 and GPR15 on homing of effector and regulatory T cells from patients with UC to the inflamed gut in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Anika; Zundler, Sebastian; Atreya, Raja; Rath, Timo; Voskens, Caroline; Hirschmann, Simon; López-Posadas, Rocío; Watson, Alastair; Becker, Christoph; Schuler, Gerold; Neufert, Clemens; Atreya, Imke; Neurath, Markus F

    2016-10-01

    Gut homing of lymphocytes via adhesion molecules has recently emerged as new target for therapy in IBDs. We aimed to analyse the in vivo homing of effector (Teff) and regulatory (Treg) T cells to the inflamed gut via α4β7 and G protein receptor GPR15. We assessed the expression of homing receptors on T cells in peripheral blood and inflamed mucosa. We studied the migration pattern and homing of Teff and Treg cells to the inflamed gut using intravital confocal microscopy and FACS in a humanised mouse model in dextran sodium sulfate-treated NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid-Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ) mice. Expression of GPR15 and α4β7 was significantly increased on Treg rather than Teff cells in peripheral blood of patients with UC as compared with Crohn's disease and controls. In vivo analysis in a humanised mouse model showed augmented gut homing of UC Treg cells as compared with controls. Moreover, suppression of UC (but not control) Teff and Treg cell homing was noted upon treatment with the α4β7 antibody vedolizumab. In contrast, siRNA blockade of GPR15 had only effects on homing of Teff cells but did not affect Treg homing in UC. Clinical vedolizumab treatment was associated with marked expansion of UC Treg cells in peripheral blood. α4β7 rather than GPR15 is crucial for increased colonic homing of UC Treg cells in vivo, while both receptors control UC Teff cell homing. Vedolizumab treatment impairs homing of UC Treg cells leading to their accumulation in peripheral blood with subsequent suppression of systemic Teff cell expansion. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Differential effects of α4β7 and GPR15 on homing of effector and regulatory T cells from patients with UC to the inflamed gut in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Anika; Zundler, Sebastian; Atreya, Raja; Rath, Timo; Voskens, Caroline; Hirschmann, Simon; López-Posadas, Rocío; Watson, Alastair; Becker, Christoph; Schuler, Gerold; Neufert, Clemens; Atreya, Imke; Neurath, Markus F

    2016-01-01

    Objective Gut homing of lymphocytes via adhesion molecules has recently emerged as new target for therapy in IBDs. We aimed to analyse the in vivo homing of effector (Teff) and regulatory (Treg) T cells to the inflamed gut via α4β7 and G protein receptor GPR15. Design We assessed the expression of homing receptors on T cells in peripheral blood and inflamed mucosa. We studied the migration pattern and homing of Teff and Treg cells to the inflamed gut using intravital confocal microscopy and FACS in a humanised mouse model in dextran sodium sulfate-treated NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid-Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ) mice. Results Expression of GPR15 and α4β7 was significantly increased on Treg rather than Teff cells in peripheral blood of patients with UC as compared with Crohn’s disease and controls. In vivo analysis in a humanised mouse model showed augmented gut homing of UC Treg cells as compared with controls. Moreover, suppression of UC (but not control) Teff and Treg cell homing was noted upon treatment with the α4β7 antibody vedolizumab. In contrast, siRNA blockade of GPR15 had only effects on homing of Teff cells but did not affect Treg homing in UC. Clinical vedolizumab treatment was associated with marked expansion of UC Treg cells in peripheral blood. Conclusions α4β7 rather than GPR15 is crucial for increased colonic homing of UC Treg cells in vivo, while both receptors control UC Teff cell homing. Vedolizumab treatment impairs homing of UC Treg cells leading to their accumulation in peripheral blood with subsequent suppression of systemic Teff cell expansion. PMID:26209553

  3. A role of hydrogen peroxide producing commensal bacteria present in colon of adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease in perpetuation of the inflammatory process.

    PubMed

    Strus, M; Gosiewski, T; Fyderek, K; Wedrychowicz, A; Kowalska-Duplaga, K; Kochan, P; Adamski, P; Heczko, P B

    2009-12-01

    Bacteria in the gut play a central role in the initiation and progress of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This study was prepared to elucidate the role in the inflammatory process of the bacterial species which are able to produce hydrogen peroxide, present in samples taken from colon lesions in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease. Fifty eight adolescents were enrolled into the study from January 2004 to October 2006 in Cracow, Poland. Biopsies and stool samples were collected. Bacteriological examinations and measurements of hydrogen peroxide production by enterococci, streptococci and lactobacilli were performed. For the first time it has been shown here that HP producing bacteria may contribute to increased amounts of hydrogen peroxide in the inflamed mucosa of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis patients. Moreover, we have been able to demonstrate an increase of total populations of aerobic bacteria but not anaerobes in the studied samples of mucosa of adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease which is an indirect evidence of higher oxygen tension present in inflamed tissues in IBD. We have also been able to demonstrate the direct relationship between presence of blood in stools of IBD adolescents and increased populations of Enterobacteriaceae but not streptococci in samples of colon mucosa. It is, therefore, possible that different products of Enterobacteriaceae and especially their lipopolysaccharides may also contribute to perpetuation of the chronic colon inflammation.

  4. Compared with Raw Bovine Meat, Boiling but Not Grilling, Barbecuing, or Roasting Decreases Protein Digestibility without Any Major Consequences for Intestinal Mucosa in Rats, although the Daily Ingestion of Bovine Meat Induces Histologic Modifications in the Colon.

    PubMed

    Oberli, Marion; Lan, Annaïg; Khodorova, Nadezda; Santé-Lhoutellier, Véronique; Walker, Francine; Piedcoq, Julien; Davila, Anne-Marie; Blachier, François; Tomé, Daniel; Fromentin, Gilles; Gaudichon, Claire

    2016-08-01

    Cooking may impair meat protein digestibility. When undigested proteins are fermented by the colon microbiota, they can generate compounds that potentially are harmful to the mucosa. This study addressed the effects of typical cooking processes and the amount of bovine meat intake on the quantity of undigested proteins entering the colon, as well as their effects on the intestinal mucosa. Male Wistar rats (n = 88) aged 8 wk were fed 11 different diets containing protein as 20% of energy. In 10 diets, bovine meat proteins represented 5% [low-meat diet (LMD)] or 15% [high-meat diet (HMD)] of energy, with the rest as total milk proteins. Meat was raw or cooked according to 4 processes (boiled, barbecued, grilled, or roasted). A meat-free diet contained only milk proteins. After 3 wk, rats ingested a (15)N-labeled meat meal and were killed 6 h later after receiving a (13)C-valine injection. Meat protein digestibility was determined from (15)N enrichments in intestinal contents. Cecal short- and branched-chain fatty acids and hydrogen sulfide were measured. Intestinal tissues were used for the assessment of protein synthesis rates, inflammation, and histopathology. Meat protein digestibility was lower in rats fed boiled meat (94.5% ± 0.281%) than in the other 4 groups (97.5% ± 0.0581%, P < 0.001). Cecal and colonic bacterial metabolites, inflammation indicators, and protein synthesis rates were not affected by cooking processes. The meat protein amount had a significant effect on cecal protein synthesis rates (LMD > HMD) and on myeloperoxidase activity in the proximal colon (HMD > LMD), but not on other outcomes. The ingestion of bovine meat, whatever the cooking process and the intake amount, resulted in discrete histologic modifications of the colon (epithelium abrasion, excessive mucus secretion, and inflammation). Boiling bovine meat at a high temperature (100°C) for a long time (3 h) moderately lowered protein digestibility compared with raw meat and other

  5. Periodontal inflamed surface area: quantifying inflammatory burden.

    PubMed

    Nesse, Willem; Abbas, Frank; van der Ploeg, Ids; Spijkervet, Frederik Karst Lucien; Dijkstra, Pieter Ubele; Vissink, Arjan

    2008-08-01

    Currently, a large variety of classifications is used for periodontitis as a risk factor for other diseases. None of these classifications quantifies the amount of inflamed periodontal tissue, while this information is needed to assess the inflammatory burden posed by periodontitis. To develop a classification of periodontitis that quantifies the amount of inflamed periodontal tissue, which can be easily and broadly applied. A literature search was conducted to look for a classification of periodontitis that quantified the amount of inflamed periodontal tissue. A classification that quantified the root surface area affected by attachment loss was found. This classification did not quantify the surface area of inflamed periodontal tissue, however. Therefore, an Excel spreadsheet was developed in which the periodontal inflamed surface area (PISA) is calculated using clinical Attachment Level (CAL), recessions and bleeding on probing (BOP). The PISA reflects the surface area of bleeding pocket epithelium in square millimetres. The surface area of bleeding pocket epithelium quantifies the amount of inflamed periodontal tissue. A freely downloadable spreadsheet is available to calculate the PISA. PISA quantifies the inflammatory burden posed by periodontitis and can be easily and broadly applied.

  6. The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor-suppressor gene is down-regulated by selenium deficiency in Caco-2 cells and rat colon mucosa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To test the hypothesis that selenium affects DNA methylation and hence gene regulation we employed a methylation array (Panomics) in the human colonic epithelial Caco-2 cell model. The array profiles DNA methylation from promoter regions of 82 human genes. After conditioning cells to repeatedly redu...

  7. Partially hydrolyzed guar gum affects the expression of genes involved in host defense functions and cholesterol absorption in colonic mucosa of db/db male mice

    PubMed Central

    Yasukawa, Zenta; Naito, Yuji; Takagi, Tomohisa; Mizushima, Katsura; Tokunaga, Makoto; Ishihara, Noriyuki; R. Juneja, Lekh; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2012-01-01

    Biomedical evidence in the last 20 years has shown that the consumption of partially hydrolyzed guar gum may influence lipid and/or carbohydrate metabolism at many levels. Since intestine represents the first interface to interact with dietary partially hydrolyzed guar gum in vivo, we evaluated gene expression profiles in small intestinal mucosa of db/db mice fed with partially hydrolyzed guar gum in an effort to delineate its effect on the small intestine. DNA microarray and real-time PCR analyses were performed to evaluate the gene expression profiles in mice small intestinal mucosa. Among the 28,853 transcripts represented on the GeneChip® microarray, no more than 20 genes exhibited up- or down-regulation by 1.5-fold or more after four weeks following partially hydrolyzed guar gum consumption. No adverse effects were apparent. We detected up- or down-regulation of some genes known to be involved in host defense functions and cholesterol absorption. PMID:22798710

  8. Archaea prevalence in inflamed pulp tissues

    PubMed Central

    Efenberger, Magdalena; Agier, Justyna; Pawłowska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Archaea have been detected in several ecological niches of the human body such as the large intestine, skin, vagina as well as the oral cavity. At present, archaea are recognized as nonpathogenic microorganisms. However, some data indicate that they may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of several diseases, including intestinal diseases as well as oral diseases: periodontitis, peri-implantitis and endodontitis. In this study, on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, we examined whether archaea might be present in inflamed pulp tissues and contribute to the development of endodontic infection. In comparison, we also determined selected bacterial species associated with endodontitis. We detected archaea in 85% of infected endodontic samples. In addition, Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola were present in inflamed pulp tissue samples and Treponema denticola occurred with the highest frequency (70%). Further analysis revealed the presence of methanogenic archaea in analyzed samples. Direct sequencing of archaeal 16S rRNA gene PCR products indicated the occurrence of methanogenic archaea in inflamed pulp tissues; phylogenetically most similar were Methanobrevibacter oralis and Methanobrevibacter smithii. Therefore, our results show that methanogenic archaea are present in inflamed pulp tissues and may participate in the development of endodontic infection. PMID:26557034

  9. [Influence of moxibustion with different duration on colonic epithelial structure, serum inflammatory cytokines, and intestinal mucosa inflammatory cell signal transduction pathways].

    PubMed

    Ma, Tie-Ming; Han, Yang; Ma, Xian-De; Zeng, Xiao-Xia; Ge, Wei

    2014-02-01

    [ To observe the effect of moxibustion at different duration on colonic mucosal morphological chan-ObjectiveTo observe the effect of moxibustion at different duration on colonic mucosal morphological changes, serum and colonic cytokine levels in ulcerative colitis (UC) rats, so as to provide experimental evidence for clinical treat-ges, serum and colonic cytokine levels in ulcerative colitis (UC) rats, so as to provide experimental evidence for clinical treatment of UC. SD rats were randomly divided into blank control, UC model, 3 cones-moxibustion (3-cones-M), 6-SD rats were randomly divided into blank control, UC model, 3 cones-moxibustion (3-cones-M), 6-cones-M and 9-cones-M groups, with 6 rats in each group. UC model was established by intra-rectal injection of mixture solution ofcones-M and 9-cones-M groups, with 6 rats in each group. UC model was established by intra-rectal injection of mixture solution of 5% trinitro-benzene-sulfonic acid (TNBS, 100 mg/kg) and 50% alcohol (1 1) under anesthesia and oral administration of 5%5% trinitro-benzene-sulfonic acid (TNBS, 100 mg/kg) and 50% alcohol (1 : 1) under anesthesia and oral administration of 5% dextran sodium sulfate. Moxibustion (ignited moxa cones) was applied to "Tianshu" (ST 25) and "Daheng" (SP 15), once daily indextran sodium sulfate. Moxibustion (ignited moxa cones) was applied to "Tianshu" (ST 25) and "Daheng" (SP 15), once daily in the first 7 days, and once every other day in the subsequent 14 days. Serum IL-8 and IL- 10 contents were assayed by ELISA andthe first 7 days, and once every other day in the subsequent 14 days. Serum IL-8 and IL-10 contents were assayed by ELISA and colonic toll-like receptor 9 (TLR-9) and nuclear factor-icB p 65 (NE-KB p 65) protein expression levels detected by Western blot.colonic toll-like receptor 9 (TLR-9) and nuclear factor-mB p 65 (NF-mB p 65) protein expression levels detected by Western blot. The colonic mucosal structure was observed by light microscope after

  10. Dextran-5-(4-ethoxycarbonylphenylazo)salicylic acid ester, a polymeric colon-specific prodrug releasing 5-aminosalicylic acid and benzocaine, ameliorates TNBS-induced rat colitis.

    PubMed

    Nam, Joon; Kim, Wooseong; Lee, Sunyoung; Jeong, Seongkeun; Yoo, Jin-Wook; Kim, Min-Soo; Jung, Yunjin

    2016-01-01

    Local anesthetics have beneficial effects on colitis. Dextran-5-(4-ethoxycarbonylphenylazo)salicylic acid ester (Dex-5-ESA), designed as a polymeric colon-specific prodrug liberating 5-ASA and benzocaine in the large intestine, was prepared and its therapeutic activity against colitis was evaluated using a TNBS-induced rat colitis model. Dex-5-ESA liberated 5-ASA and benzocaine in the cecal contents while (bio)chemically stable in the small intestinal contents and mucosa. Oral administration of Dex-5-ESA (equivalent to 10 mg 5-ASA/kg, twice a day) alleviated colonic injury and reduced MPO activity in the inflamed colon. In parallel, pro-inflammatory mediators, COX-2, iNOS and CINC-3, elevated by TNBS-induced colitis, were substantially diminished in the inflamed colon. Dex-5-ESA was much more effective for the treatment of colitis than 5-(4-ethoxycarbonylphenylazo)salicylic acid (5-ESA) that may not deliver benzocaine to the large intestine. Our data suggest that Dex-5-ESA is a polymeric colon-specific prodrug, liberating 5-ASA and benzocaine in the target site (large intestine), probably exerting anti-colitic effects by combined action of 5-ASA and benzocaine.

  11. Effect of ginger root on cyclooxygenase-1 and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase expression in colonic mucosa of humans at normal and increased risk of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yan; Turgeon, D. Kim; Wright, Benjamin D.; Sidahmed, Elkhansa; Ruffin, Mack T.; Brenner, Dean E.; Sen, Ananda; Zick, Suzanna M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Elevated tissue levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), produced by cyclooxygenase (COX) are an early event in colorectal cancer (CRC). Data suggest the efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAIDs) drugs, which inhibit COX activity, as cancer preventives; however, side effects of NSAIDs indicate unacceptable limitations. Ginger has been reported to have anti-inflammatory activities with significant CRC preventive potential. We investigated if consumption of 2.0 g ginger daily regulated the level of two key enzymes, which control PGE2 production, COX-1 and NAD+- dependent 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH). Methods Thirty participants at normal and twenty participants at increased risk of CRC were randomized and given 2.0 g/day ginger or placebo for 28 days. Flexible sigmoidoscopy was used to obtain colon biopsies at baseline and end of the study. Tissue level of COX-1 and 15-PGDH were assessed using Western Blotting. Results After ginger consumption participants at increased risk of CRC, had significantly reduced colonic COX-1 protein level (23.8%± 41) compared to the placebo group (18.9%± 52; p=0.03). Protein levels of 15-PGDH in the colon were unchanged. In normal risk for CRC participants, neither protein levels of COX-1 nor 15-PGDH in the colon were altered by ginger consumption. Conclusion Ginger significantly lowered COX-1 protein expression in increased risk participants, but not in normal risk participants at normal for CRC. Ginger did not alter 15-PGDH protein expression in either increased or normal risk participants. Further investigation, in larger studies with a longer ginger intervention is needed to examine the ability of ginger to impact tissue level of prostaglandin. PMID:23222413

  12. Effect of ginger root on cyclooxygenase-1 and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase expression in colonic mucosa of humans at normal and increased risk for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Turgeon, Danielle K; Wright, Benjamin D; Sidahmed, Elkhansa; Ruffin, Mack T; Brenner, Dean E; Sen, Ananda; Zick, Suzanna M

    2013-09-01

    Elevated tissue levels of prostaglandin E2, produced by cyclooxygenase (COX), are an early event in colorectal cancer (CRC). Data suggest the efficacy of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as cancer preventives, in the inhibition of COX activity; however, side effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory pose unacceptable limitations. Ginger has been reported to have anti-inflammatory activities with significant CRC preventive potential. We investigated whether consumption of 2.0 g ginger daily regulated the level of two key enzymes that control prostaglandin E2 production, COX-1 and NAD(+)-dependent 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH). Thirty participants at normal and 20 participants at increased risk for CRC were randomized and given 2.0 g/day ginger or placebo for 28 days. Flexible sigmoidoscopy was used to obtain colon biopsies at baseline and the end of the study. Tissue levels of COX-1 and 15-PGDH were assessed using western blotting. After ginger consumption, participants at increased risk for CRC had a significantly reduced colonic COX-1 protein level (23.8±41%) compared with the placebo group (18.9±52%; P=0.03). Protein levels of 15-PGDH in the colon were unchanged. In participants who were at normal risk for CRC, neither protein levels of COX-1 nor 15-PGDH in the colon were altered by ginger consumption. Ginger significantly lowered COX-1 protein expression in participants at increased risk for CRC but not in those at normal risk for CRC. Ginger did not alter 15-PGDH protein expression in either increased or normal-risk participants. Further investigation, in larger studies with a longer ginger intervention, is needed to examine the ability of ginger to impact tissue levels of prostaglandin.

  13. For Inflamed Pancreas, Eating Right Away May Be Best Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165624.html For Inflamed Pancreas, Eating Right Away May Be Best Medicine Contrary ... people hospitalized for pancreatitis. This is when the pancreas becomes inflamed, causing pain and swelling in the ...

  14. S1P₁ localizes to the colonic vasculature in ulcerative colitis and maintains blood vessel integrity.

    PubMed

    Montrose, David C; Scherl, Ellen J; Bosworth, Brian P; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Jung, Bongnam; Dannenberg, Andrew J; Hla, Timothy

    2013-03-01

    Signaling through sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor₁ (S1P₁) promotes blood vessel barrier function. Degradation of S1P₁ results in increased vascular permeability in the lung and may explain side effects associated with administration of FTY720, a functional antagonist of the S1P₁ receptor that is currently used to treat multiple sclerosis. Ulcerative colitis (UC) is characterized by an increased density of abnormal vessels. The expression or role of S1P₁ in blood vessels in the colon has not been investigated. In the present study, we show that S1P₁ is overexpressed in the colonic mucosa of UC patients. This increase in S1P₁ levels reflects increased vascular density in the inflamed mucosa. Genetic deletion of S1pr1 in mice increases colonic vascular permeability under basal conditions and increases bleeding in experimental colitis. In contrast, neither FTY720 nor AUY954, two S1P receptor-targeting agents, increases bleeding in experimental colitis. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that S1P₁ is critical to maintaining colonic vascular integrity and may play a role in UC pathogenesis.

  15. The Helicobacter heilmannii hofE and hofF Genes are Essential for Colonization of the Gastric Mucosa and Play a Role in IL-1β-Induced Gastric MUC13 Expression.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liu; Mirko, Rossi; Sara, Lindén; Medea, Padra; Caroline, Blaecher; Eva, Bauwens; Myrthe, Joosten; Bram, Flahou; Wim, Van den Broeck; Richard, Ducatelle; Freddy, Haesebrouck; Annemieke, Smet

    2016-12-01

    Helicobacter heilmannii is a zoonotic bacterium associated with gastric disease in humans. We recently showed that H. heilmannii binds to human gastric mucins and epithelial cells and highlighted a potential role for the murine Muc13 mucin in gastric Helicobacter colonization. The aims of this study were to investigate the role of the H. heilmannii hof gene locus encoding HofH/F/E/G/C/D in adhesion to the gastric mucosa and induction of increased gastric Muc13 expression. Bacterial hof gene and host gene expression experiments, Helicobacter binding assays and experimental infection studies in mice were performed. H. pylori and its ΔhofF mutant were included for comparison. Helicobacter heilmannii strains lacking HofE or HofF showed a clear decrease in binding to gastric mucins and epithelial cells as well as a lower gastric colonization level in the stomach of Balb/c mice at 4 and 9 weeks post-infection compared to the H. heilmannii wildtype strain. Interestingly, H. heilmannii ΔhofE and ΔhofF and H. pylori ΔhofF did not induce an increased expression of MUC13 in human gastric epithelial cells and of Muc13 in the stomach of mice. Finally, we demonstrated that IL-1β is induced in the stomach as a response to Helicobacter colonization which on its turn is involved in the expression of MUC13/Muc13 in the gastric epithelium. These novel results in Helicobacter research identified H. heilmannii HofE and HofF as adhesins and suggest an important role of H. heilmannii HofE and HofF and H. pylori HofF in IL-1β-induced gastric MUC13/Muc13 expression. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Prosecretory effect of loperamide in ileal and colonic mucosae of mice displaying high or low swim stress-induced analgesia associated with high and low endogenous opioid system activity.

    PubMed

    Wasilewski, A; Misicka, A; Sacharczuk, M; Fichna, J

    2017-07-26

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel habit. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of loperamide hydrochloride (LOP) and naloxone hydrochloride (NLX), an opioid agonist and antagonist, respectively, on electrolyte equilibrium in ileal and colonic mucosae and to estimate the possible influence of divergent activity of the endogenous opioid system (EOS) on IBS therapy. Two mouse lines bidirectionally selected for high (HA) and low (LA) swim stress-induced analgesia associated with high and low EOS activity were used in this study. To assess the effect of LOP and NLX on HA/LA lines in vivo, we used the castor oil-induced diarrhea model. Changes in electrolyte equilibrium were determined on the basis of short-circuit current (ΔIsc ) in isolated mouse ileum and colon exposed to LOP and NLX and stimulated by forskolin (FSK), veratridine (VER), and bethanechol (BET). In vivo, we found that LOP significantly prolonged time to appearance of diarrhea in HA and LA lines. In vitro, LOP and NLX increased ΔIsc in FSK- and VER-stimulated colonic tissue, respectively, in HA line. In the ileum, LOP increased ΔIsc in FSK- and VER-stimulated tissue and decreased ΔIsc in BET-stimulated tissues in HA line. Individual differences in EOS activity may play a crucial role in the response to the IBS-D therapy, thus some patients may be at an increased risk of side effects such as constipation or diarrhea. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Effects of a grape-supplemented diet on proliferation and Wnt signaling in the colonic mucosa are greatest for those over age 50 and with high arginine consumption.

    PubMed

    Holcombe, Randall F; Martinez, Micaela; Planutis, Kestutis; Planutiene, Marina

    2015-06-19

    A diet rich in fruits and vegetables, and a grape-derived compound, resveratrol, have been linked to a reduced incidence of colon cancer. In vitro and in vivo, resveratrol suppresses Wnt signaling, a pathway constitutively activated in over 85 % of colon cancers.Thirty participants were placed on a low resveratrol diet and subsequently allocated to one of three groups ingesting 1/3-to-1 lb (0.15-0.45 kg) of grapes per day for 2 weeks. Dietary information was collected via 24-h recall. Colon biopsies for biomarker analysis were obtained pre- and post-grape and evaluated for the expression of Wnt pathway target genes and for markers of proliferation by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry.Participants lost an average of 2 · 6 lb (1.2 kg, p = 0 · 0018) during the period of grape ingestion. The expression of CyclinD1 (p < 0 · 01), AXIN2, CD133 (p = 0 · 02) and Ki67 (p = 0 · 002) were all reduced after grape ingestion. Individuals over 50 years of age and those with high dietary arginine consumption had increased basal expression of CyclinD1, AXIN2, cMYC and CD133 (p value range 0 · 04 to <0 · 001) that, following grape ingestion, were reduced to levels seen in younger participants.The reduction in Wnt signaling and mucosal proliferation seen following short-term ingestion of 1/3-1 lb (0.15-0.45 kg) of grapes per day may reduce the risk of mutational events that can facilitate colon carcinogenesis. The potential benefit is most marked for high-risk older individuals and individuals whose diet is high in arginine intake. Dietary grape supplementation may play a role in colon cancer prevention for high-risk individuals.

  18. Confocal laser endomicroscopy and narrow-band imaging-aided endoscopy for in vivo imaging of colitis and colon cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Waldner, Maximilian J; Wirtz, Stefan; Neufert, Clemens; Becker, Christoph; Neurath, Markus F

    2011-09-01

    New endoscopic techniques such as narrow-band imaging (NBI) and confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) have improved the in vivo diagnosis of human gastrointestinal diseases in the colon. Whereas NBI may facilitate the identification of neoplastic lesions, CLE permits real-time histology of the inflamed or neoplastic colonic mucosa through the use of fluorescent dyes. These techniques have been recently adopted for use during ongoing endoscopy in mice. This protocol, which can be completed in 2 h, provides a detailed description of NBI and CLE in the mouse colon. In contrast to other techniques, this approach does not require laparotomy, and it allows direct CLE analysis of lesions identified by NBI. Mice exposed to models of colitis or colorectal cancer are anesthetized and examined with a miniaturized NBI endoscope, which provides an increased contrast of the vasculature. Upon identification of suspicious areas by NBI and the administration of fluorescent dyes, a confocal laser probe can be directed to the area of interest through the endoscope and confocal images can be obtained. Through the use of various fluorescent dyes, different aspects of the mucosa can be assessed. In addition, fluorescence-labeled antibodies can be used for molecular imaging of mice in vivo. Mouse NBI endoscopy and CLE represent reliable and fast high-quality techniques for the endoscopic characterization and molecular imaging of the mucosa in colitis and colon cancer.

  19. Passage from normal mucosa to adenoma and colon cancer: alteration of normal sCD30 mechanisms regulating TH1/TH2 cell functions.

    PubMed

    Contasta, Ida; Berghella, Anna Maria; Pellegrini, Patrizia; Adorno, Domenico

    2003-08-01

    The pathogenesis of cancer is currently under intensive investigation to identify reliable prognostic indices for the early detection of disease. Adenomas have been identified as precursors of colorectal cancer and tumor establishment, and disease progression has been found to reflect a malfunction of the immune system. On the basis of the role of the CD30 molecule in the regulation of TH1/TH2 functions and our previous results, strongly suggesting the validity of serum TH1/TH2 cytokines in the study of tumor progression, we studied network interaction between the production of soluble (s) CD30/sBCl2 in whole blood culture [in basic conditions and after PHA, LPS, and anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) stimulation] and levels of TH1/TH2 cytokines (IL2, IFN gamma, IL12, IL4, IL5, IL10). Peripheral blood from a group of healthy subjects, as well as from patients with adenoma and colorectal cancer was used. Our objective was to gain a better insight into the role of the CD30 molecule in the passage from normal mucosa to adenoma and tumor and identify specific disease markers. Our results suggest that the decrease in CD30 expression and the abnormal increase in Bcl2 expression, observed in the peripheral cells of both adenoma and tumor groups determine an imbalance between TH1/TH2 functions. Consequently, changes in sCD30/sBcl2 culture production and TH1/TH2 cytokine serum levels may be reliable markers for tumor progression. In fact, our overall data show that a decrease of sCD30 levels in basic and PHA conditions and an increase of IFN gamma, IL4, IL5, and IL12 serum levels and sBcl2 in all activation condition are indicative of the passage from normal mucosa to adenoma; whilst a decrease of sBcl2 level in basic, LPS and anti-CD3 conditions and of IL2, IFN gamma serum levels, together with an increase of IL5 are indicative of the passage from adenoma to tumor.

  20. Effects of Ginger Supplementation on Cell Cycle Biomarkers in the Normal-Appearing Colonic Mucosa of Patients at Increased Risk for Colorectal Cancer: Results from a Pilot, Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Citronberg, Jessica; Bostick, Roberd; Ahearn, Thomas; Turgeon, D. Kim; Ruffin, Mack T.; Djuric, Zora; Sen, Ananda; Brenner, Dean E.; Zick, Suzanna M.

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the effects of ginger on apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation in the normal-appearing colonic mucosa, we randomized 20 people at increased risk for colorectal cancer to 2.0 g of ginger or placebo daily for 28 days in a pilot trial. Overall expression and distributions of Bax, Bcl-2, p21, hTERT and MIB-1 (Ki-67) in colorectal crypts in rectal mucosa biopsies were measured using automated immunohistochemistry and quantitative image analysis. Relative to placebo, Bax expression in the ginger group decreased 15.6% (p = 0.78) in the whole crypts, 6.6% (p = 0.95) in the upper 40% (differentiation zone) of crypts, and 21.7% (p = 0.67) in the lower 60% (proliferative zone) of crypts; however, there was a 19% increase (p = 0.14) in Bax expression in the upper 40% relative to the whole crypt. While p21 and Bcl-2 expression remained relatively unchanged, hTERT expression in the whole crypts decreased by 41.2% (p = 0.05); the estimated treatment effect on hTERT expression was larger in the upper 40% of crypts (−47.9%; p = 0.04). In the ginger group, MIB-1 expression decreased in the whole crypts, upper 40% of crypts, and lower 60% of crypts by 16.9% (p = 0.39), 46.8% (p = 0.39), and 15.3% (p = 0.41), respectively. These pilot study results suggest that ginger may reduce proliferation in the normal-appearing colorectal epithelium and increase apoptosis and differentiation relative to proliferation—especially in the differentiation zone of the crypts, and support a larger study to further investigate these results. PMID:23303903

  1. Effects of ginger supplementation on cell-cycle biomarkers in the normal-appearing colonic mucosa of patients at increased risk for colorectal cancer: results from a pilot, randomized, and controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Citronberg, Jessica; Bostick, Roberd; Ahearn, Thomas; Turgeon, D Kim; Ruffin, Mack T; Djuric, Zora; Sen, Ananda; Brenner, Dean E; Zick, Suzanna M

    2013-04-01

    To estimate the effects of ginger on apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation in the normal-appearing colonic mucosa, we randomized 20 people at increased risk for colorectal cancer to 2.0 g of ginger or placebo daily for 28 days in a pilot trial. Overall expression and distributions of Bax, Bcl-2, p21, hTERT, and MIB-1 (Ki-67) in colorectal crypts in rectal mucosa biopsies were measured using automated immunohistochemistry and quantitative image analysis. Relative to placebo, Bax expression in the ginger group decreased 15.6% (P = 0.78) in the whole crypts, 6.6% (P = 0.95) in the upper 40% (differentiation zone) of crypts, and 21.7% (P = 0.67) in the lower 60% (proliferative zone) of crypts; however, there was a 19% increase (P = 0.14) in Bax expression in the upper 40% relative to the whole crypt. While p21 and Bcl-2 expression remained relatively unchanged, hTERT expression in the whole crypts decreased by 41.2% (P = 0.05); the estimated treatment effect on hTERT expression was larger in the upper 40% of crypts (-47.9%; P = 0.04). In the ginger group, MIB-1 expression decreased in the whole crypts, upper 40% of crypts, and lower 60% of crypts by 16.9% (P = 0.39), 46.8% (P = 0.39), and 15.3% (P = 0.41), respectively. These pilot study results suggest that ginger may reduce proliferation in the normal-appearing colorectal epithelium and increase apoptosis and differentiation relative to proliferation--especially in the differentiation zone of the crypts and support a larger study to further investigate these results.

  2. Gene Expression Profile of Colon Mucosa after Cytotoxic Insult in wt and Apc-Mutated Pirc Rats: Possible Relation to Resistance to Apoptosis during Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Luceri, Cristina; Lodovici, Maura; Crucitta, Stefania; Caderni, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Apc-mutated Pirc rats, spontaneously developing intestinal tumours, are resistant to 1,2-dimethylhydrazine- (DMH-) induced colon apoptosis. To understand this phenomenon, we analyzed the expression of genotoxic stress-related genes Mgmt, Gsta1, and Gstp1 in the colon of wt and Pirc rats in basal conditions and 24 h after DMH; plasmatic oxidant/antioxidant status was also evaluated. After DMH, Mgmt expression was increased in both genotypes but significantly only in wt rats; Gsta1 expression was significantly increased in both genotypes. Gstp1 expression did not vary after DMH but was lower in Pirc rats. Moreover, for each genotype, we studied by microarray technique whole gene expression profile after DMH. By unsupervised cluster analysis, 28 genes were differentially modulated between the two genotypes. Among them were interferon-induced genes Irf7, Oas1a, Oasl2, and Isg15 and the transcription factor Taf6l, overexpressed in DMH-treated wt rats and unchanged in Pirc rats. RT-PCR confirmed their overexpression in DMH-treated wt rats and showed a slighter variation in DMH-treated Pirc rats. Taken together, despite a blunted induction of Irf7, Oas1a, and Mgmt, defective apoptosis in Pirc rats 24 h after DMH is not mirrored by major differences in gene expression compared with wt rats. PMID:27840820

  3. Gene Expression Profile of Colon Mucosa after Cytotoxic Insult in wt and Apc-Mutated Pirc Rats: Possible Relation to Resistance to Apoptosis during Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Femia, Angelo Pietro; Luceri, Cristina; Lodovici, Maura; Crucitta, Stefania; Caderni, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Apc-mutated Pirc rats, spontaneously developing intestinal tumours, are resistant to 1,2-dimethylhydrazine- (DMH-) induced colon apoptosis. To understand this phenomenon, we analyzed the expression of genotoxic stress-related genes Mgmt, Gsta1, and Gstp1 in the colon of wt and Pirc rats in basal conditions and 24 h after DMH; plasmatic oxidant/antioxidant status was also evaluated. After DMH, Mgmt expression was increased in both genotypes but significantly only in wt rats; Gsta1 expression was significantly increased in both genotypes. Gstp1 expression did not vary after DMH but was lower in Pirc rats. Moreover, for each genotype, we studied by microarray technique whole gene expression profile after DMH. By unsupervised cluster analysis, 28 genes were differentially modulated between the two genotypes. Among them were interferon-induced genes Irf7, Oas1a, Oasl2, and Isg15 and the transcription factor Taf6l, overexpressed in DMH-treated wt rats and unchanged in Pirc rats. RT-PCR confirmed their overexpression in DMH-treated wt rats and showed a slighter variation in DMH-treated Pirc rats. Taken together, despite a blunted induction of Irf7, Oas1a, and Mgmt, defective apoptosis in Pirc rats 24 h after DMH is not mirrored by major differences in gene expression compared with wt rats.

  4. Biomimetic proteolipid vesicles for targeting inflamed tissues

    PubMed Central

    Molinaro, R.; Corbo, C.; Martinez, J. O.; Taraballi, F.; Evangelopoulos, M.; Minardi, S.; Yazdi, I.K.; Zhao, P.; De Rosa, E.; Sherman, M.; De Vita, A.; Furman, N.E. Toledano; Wang, X.; Parodi, A.; Tasciotti, E.

    2016-01-01

    A multitude of micro- and nanoparticles have been developed to improve the delivery of systemically administered pharmaceuticals, which are subject to a number of biological barriers that limit their optimal biodistribution. Bioinspired drug-delivery carriers formulated by bottom-up or top-down strategies have emerged as an alternative approach to evade the mononuclear phagocytic system and facilitate the transport across the endothelial vessel wall. Here, we describe a method that leverages the advantages of bottom-up and top-down strategies to incorporate proteins derived from the leukocyte plasma membrane into lipid nanoparticles. The resulting proteolipid vesicles - which we refer to as leukosomes - retained the versatility and physicochemical properties typical of liposomal formulations, preferentially targeted inflamed vasculature, enabled the selective and effective delivery of dexamethasone to inflamed tissues, and reduced phlogosis in a localized model of inflammation. PMID:27213956

  5. Biomimetic proteolipid vesicles for targeting inflamed tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinaro, R.; Corbo, C.; Martinez, J. O.; Taraballi, F.; Evangelopoulos, M.; Minardi, S.; Yazdi, I. K.; Zhao, P.; De Rosa, E.; Sherman, M. B.; de Vita, A.; Toledano Furman, N. E.; Wang, X.; Parodi, A.; Tasciotti, E.

    2016-09-01

    A multitude of micro- and nanoparticles have been developed to improve the delivery of systemically administered pharmaceuticals, which are subject to a number of biological barriers that limit their optimal biodistribution. Bioinspired drug-delivery carriers formulated by bottom-up or top-down strategies have emerged as an alternative approach to evade the mononuclear phagocytic system and facilitate transport across the endothelial vessel wall. Here, we describe a method that leverages the advantages of bottom-up and top-down strategies to incorporate proteins derived from the leukocyte plasma membrane into lipid nanoparticles. The resulting proteolipid vesicles--which we refer to as leukosomes--retained the versatility and physicochemical properties typical of liposomal formulations, preferentially targeted inflamed vasculature, enabled the selective and effective delivery of dexamethasone to inflamed tissues, and reduced phlogosis in a localized model of inflammation.

  6. Tip-alpha (hp0596 gene product) is a highly immunogenic Helicobacter pylori protein involved in colonization of mouse gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Godlewska, Renata; Pawlowski, Marcin; Dzwonek, Artur; Mikula, Michal; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Drela, Nadzieja; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elzbieta K

    2008-03-01

    A product of the Helicobacter pylori hp0596 gene (Tip-alpha) is a highly immunogenic homodimeric protein, unique for this bacterium. Cell fractionation experiments indicate that Tip-alpha is anchored to the inner membrane. In contrast, the three-dimensional model of the protein suggests that Tip-alpha is soluble or, at least, largely exposed to the solvent. hp0596 gene knockout resulted in a significant decrease in the level of H. pylori colonization as measured by real-time PCR assay. In addition, the Tip-alpha recombinant protein was determined to stimulate macrophage to produce IL-1alpha and TNF-alpha. Both results imply that Tip-alpha is rather loosely connected to the inner membrane and potentially released during infection.

  7. Inhibition of Water Absorption and Selective Damage to Human Colonic Mucosa Are Induced by Subtilase Cytotoxin Produced by Escherichia coli O113:H21

    PubMed Central

    Gerhardt, Elizabeth; Masso, Mariana; Paton, Adrienne W.; Paton, James C.; Zotta, Elsa

    2013-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 (STEC) is by far the most prevalent serotype associated with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) although many non-O157 STEC strains have been also isolated from patients with HUS. The main virulence factor of STEC is the Shiga toxin type 2 (Stx2) present in O157 and non-O157 strains. Recently, another toxin, named subtilase cytotoxin (SubAB), has been isolated from several non-O157 strains and may contribute to the pathogenesis of HUS. Here, we have demonstrated that an O113:H21 STEC strain expressing SubAB and Stx2 inhibits normal water absorption across human colon and causes damage to the surface epithelium, necrosis, mononuclear inflammatory infiltration, edema, and marked mucin depletion. This damage was less marked, but nevertheless significant, when purified SubAB or E. coli O113:H21 expressing only SubAB was assayed. This is the first study showing that SubAB may directly participate in the mechanisms of diarrhea in children infected with non-O157 STEC strains. PMID:23732168

  8. Zinc sequestration by the neutrophil protein calprotectin enhances Salmonella growth in the inflamed gut.

    PubMed

    Liu, Janet Z; Jellbauer, Stefan; Poe, Adam J; Ton, Vivian; Pesciaroli, Michele; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E; Restrepo, Nicole A; Hosking, Martin P; Edwards, Robert A; Battistoni, Andrea; Pasquali, Paolo; Lane, Thomas E; Chazin, Walter J; Vogl, Thomas; Roth, Johannes; Skaar, Eric P; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2012-03-15

    Neutrophils are innate immune cells that counter pathogens by many mechanisms, including release of antimicrobial proteins such as calprotectin to inhibit bacterial growth. Calprotectin sequesters essential micronutrient metals such as zinc, thereby limiting their availability to microbes, a process termed nutritional immunity. We find that while calprotectin is induced by neutrophils during infection with the gut pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium, calprotectin-mediated metal sequestration does not inhibit S. Typhimurium proliferation. Remarkably, S. Typhimurium overcomes calprotectin-mediated zinc chelation by expressing a high affinity zinc transporter (ZnuABC). A S. Typhimurium znuA mutant impaired for growth in the inflamed gut was rescued in the absence of calprotectin. ZnuABC was also required to promote the growth of S. Typhimurium over that of competing commensal bacteria. Thus, our findings indicate that Salmonella thrives in the inflamed gut by overcoming the zinc sequestration of calprotectin and highlight the importance of zinc acquisition in bacterial intestinal colonization.

  9. Lymphatic vessels in inflamed human dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, C; Piacentini, C; Menghini, P

    1990-01-01

    Investigation has been performed on both the light and electron microscopic characteristics of the lymphatic vessels present in the dental pulp of human teeth which have been affected by serious carious lesions. These conditions provoke a severe inflammatory response resulting in structural and functional modifications of the tissue; increase of the tissue pressure is followed by the need for a more intensive lymphatic drainage. In the inflamed pulps, dilated lymphatic vessels with distended walls and "open junctions" between endothelial cells are detectable. On the other hand they lack certain endothelial structures which characterize the morphology of these vessels under normal conditions. In the pulpal regions affected by fibrotic proliferation shrunken vessels with irregular profiles are present. From these observations it is possible to obtain other information on the mechanisms regulating the lymphatic drainage in different structural and functional conditions of the interstitium.

  10. Spatial organization of bacterial flora in normal and inflamed intestine: A fluorescence in situ hybridization study in mice

    PubMed Central

    Swidsinski, Alexander; Loening-Baucke, Vera; Lochs, Herbert; Hale, Laura P.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of intestinal flora in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: The spatial organization of intestinal flora was investigated in normal mice and in two models of murine colitis using fluorescence in situ hybridization. RESULTS: The murine small intestine was nearly bacteria-free. The normal colonic flora was organized in three distinct compartments (crypt, interlaced, and fecal), each with different bacterial compositions. Crypt bacteria were present in the cecum and proximal colon. The fecal compartment was composed of homogeneously mixed bacterial groups that directly contacted the colonic wall in the cecum but were separated from the proximal colonic wall by a dense interlaced layer. Beginning in the middle colon, a mucus gap of growing thickness physically separated all intestinal bacteria from contact with the epithelium. Colonic inflammation was accompanied with a depletion of bacteria within the fecal compartment, a reduced surface area in which feces had direct contact with the colonic wall, increased thickness and spread of the mucus gap, and massive increases of bacterial concentrations in the crypt and interlaced compartments. Adhesive and infiltrative bacteria were observed in inflamed colon only, with dominant Bacteroides species. CONCLUSION: The proximal and distal colons are functionally different organs with respect to the intestinal flora, representing a bioreactor and a segregation device. The highly organized structure of the colonic flora, its specific arrangement in different colonic segments, and its specialized response to inflammatory stimuli indicate that the intestinal flora is an innate part of host immunity that is under complex control. PMID:15754393

  11. Nicotine suppresses acute colitis and colonic tumorigenesis associated with chronic colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shusaku; Hamada, Takayuki; Zaidi, Syed Faisal; Oshiro, Momoe; Lee, Jaemin; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Ishii, Yoko; Sasahara, Masakiyo; Kadowaki, Makoto

    2014-11-15

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that frequently progresses to colon cancer. The tumor-promoting effect of inflammation is now widely recognized and understood. Recent studies have revealed that treatment with nicotine ameliorates colitis in humans and experimental murine models, whereas the effect of nicotine on colitis-associated colonic tumorigenesis remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the effect of nicotine on the development of acute colitis and colitis-associated cancer (CAC). The acute colitis model was induced by treatment with 3% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) for 7 days, whereas the CAC model was induced by a combination of azoxymethane and repeated DSS treatment. Nicotine and a selective agonist of the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR) reduced the severity of DSS-induced acute colonic inflammation. In addition, the suppressive effect of nicotine on acute colitis was attenuated by an antagonist of α7-nAChR. Furthermore, nicotine inhibited the IL-6 production of CD4 T cells in the DSS-induced inflamed colonic mucosa. We found that nicotine significantly reduced the number and size of colonic tumors in mice with CAC. Nicotine markedly inhibited the elevation of TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA as well as phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) 3 expression in the colons of the tumor model mice. These results demonstrate that nicotine suppresses acute colitis and colitis-associated tumorigenesis, and this effect may be associated with the activation of α7-nAChR. Furthermore, it is presumed that nicotine downregulates the expression of inflammatory mediators such as IL-6/Stat3 and TNF-α, thereby reducing the colonic tumorigenesis associated with chronic colitis.

  12. Effective anaesthesia of the acutely inflamed pulp: part 1. The acutely inflamed pulp.

    PubMed

    Virdee, S S; Seymour, D; Bhakta, S

    2015-10-23

    Achieving profound pulpal anaesthesia in a mandibular molar diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis can be argued to be the most testing of dental anaesthetic challenges. This can be attributed to the technical complexities of conventional techniques and the presence of pulp pathosis. Reasons for why the latter influences the ability to attain pulpal anaesthesia is not yet fully understood, but its frequent occurrence is well documented. In light of overcoming this it has become common practice to prescribe antibiotics, refer onto secondary care or to even commence treatment without appropriately anaesthetising the tooth. Therefore, this two part series aims to help practitioners attain clinically acceptable pulpal anaesthesia in the most testing of scenarios; the acutely inflamed mandibular molar. They should then be able to apply these same principles to other teeth presenting with similar symptoms. This section outlines the clinical presentation and pathophysiology associated with an acutely inflamed pulp, defines what it is to attain pulpal anaesthesia and critically analyses theories as to why these teeth are up to eight times more difficult to anaesthetise than their healthy counterparts.

  13. Rectal mucosa in cows' milk allergy.

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, N; Yadav, M; Boey, C G

    1989-01-01

    Eleven infants who were suspected clinically of having cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy were fed with a protein hydrolysate formula for six to eight weeks, after which they had jejunal and rectal biopsies taken before and 24 hours after challenge with cows' milk protein. When challenged six infants (group 1) developed clinical symptoms and five did not (group 2). In group 1 the lesions developed in both the jejunal mucosa (four infants at 24 hours and one at three days), and the rectal mucosa, and the injury was associated with depletion of alkaline phosphatase activity. Infants in group 2 were normal. It seems that rectal injury that develops as a direct consequence of oral challenge with the protein in reactive infants may be used as one of the measurements to confirm the diagnosis of cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy. Moreover, ingestion of such food proteins may injure the distal colonic mucosa without affecting the proximal small gut in some infants. PMID:2817945

  14. [Solcoseryl--dental adherent paste in the treatment of acute radiation-induced inflammation of oral mucosa, gingivae and tongue].

    PubMed

    Kryst, L; Kowalik, S; Bartkowski, S; Henning, G

    1990-07-01

    On the basis of a study carried out in three teaching departments of maxillofacial surgery the effect was analysed of Solcoseryl dental adherent paste and Linomag in the treatment of acute radiation-induced stomatitis. Both drugs were effective but Solcoseryl was superior to the other drug since it accelerated healing by about 50% and formed a protecting dressing on the inflamed mucosa.

  15. Serpin B1 protects colonic epithelial cell via blockage of neutrophil elastase activity and its expression is enhanced in patients with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Naito, Yuji; Takagi, Tomohisa; Mizushima, Katsura; Hirai, Yasuko; Hayashi, Natsuko; Harusato, Akihito; Inoue, Ken; Fukumoto, Kohei; Yamada, Shinya; Handa, Osamu; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Yagi, Nobuaki; Kokura, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2012-05-15

    Serpin B1 is a monocyte neutrophil elastase (NE) inhibitor and is one of the most efficient inhibitors of NE. In the present study, we investigated the role of serpin B1 in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis by using clinical samples and an experimental model. The colonic expression of serpin B1 was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blot analysis, and immunohistological studies in both normal and inflamed mucosa from patients with ulcerative colitis. Serpin B1 mRNA expression was determined by real-time PCR in the mouse dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis model. Young adult mouse colonic epithelial (YAMC) cells were used to determine the role of serpin B1. Serpin B1 gene transfected YAMC cells were treated with H(2)O(2) to measure cell viability. The expression of NE was determined in YAMC cells treated with H(2)O(2). NE-silenced YAMC cells were also treated with H(2)O(2) and then measured for viability. Upregulated expression of serpin B1 in colonic mucosa was confirmed from patients with active ulcerative colitis. Immunohistochemical studies showed that serpin B1 expression was localized not only in inflammatory infiltration cells but also in epithelial cells. Serpin B1 mRNA expression was also increased in colonic mucosa of mouse DSS-induced colitis. Serpin B1-transfected YAMC cells were resistant against the treatment of H(2)O(2). H(2)O(2) treatment significantly induced NE in YAMC cells, and NE-silenced YAMC cells were also resistant against the treatment of H(2)O(2). These results suggest that serpin B1 may be a novel marker of active ulcerative colitis and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease.

  16. Characterisation of colonic dysplasia-like epithelial atypia in murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Randall-Demllo, Sarron; Fernando, Ruchira; Brain, Terry; Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh; Cook, Anthony L; Guven, Nuri; Kunde, Dale; Spring, Kevin; Eri, Rajaraman

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine if exacerbation of pre-existing chronic colitis in Winnie (Muc2 mutant) mice induces colonic dysplasia. METHODS Winnie mice and C57BL6 as a genotype control, were administered 1% w/v dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) orally, followed by drinking water alone in week-long cycles for a total of three cycles. After the third cycle, mice were killed and colonic tissue collected for histological and immunohistochemical evaluation. Inflammation and severity of dysplasia in the colonic mucosa were assessed in H&E sections of the colon. Epithelial cell proliferation was assessed using Ki67 and aberrant β-catenin signalling assessed with enzyme-based immunohistochemistry. Extracted RNA from colonic segments was used for the analysis of gene expression using real-time quantitative PCR. Finally, the distribution of Cxcl5 was visualised using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS Compared to controls, Winnie mice exposed to three cycles of DSS displayed inflammation mostly confined to the distal-mid colon with extensive mucosal hyperplasia and regenerative atypia resembling epithelial dysplasia. Dysplasia-like changes were observed in 100% of Winnie mice exposed to DSS, with 55% of these animals displaying changes similar to high-grade dysplasia, whereas high-grade changes were absent in wild-type mice. Occasional penetration of the muscularis mucosae by atypical crypts was observed in 27% of Winnie mice after DSS. Atypical crypts however displayed no evidence of oncogenic nuclear β-catenin accumulation, regardless of histological severity. Expression of Cav1, Trp53 was differentially regulated in the distal colon of Winnie relative to wild-type mice. Expression of Myc and Ccl5 was increased by DSS treatment in Winnie only. Furthermore, increased Ccl5 expression correlated with increased complexity in abnormal crypts. While no overall difference in Cxcl5 mucosal expression was observed between treatment groups, epithelial Cxcl5 protein appeared to be diminished in the

  17. Characterisation of colonic dysplasia-like epithelial atypia in murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Randall-Demllo, Sarron; Fernando, Ruchira; Brain, Terry; Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh; Cook, Anthony L; Guven, Nuri; Kunde, Dale; Spring, Kevin; Eri, Rajaraman

    2016-10-07

    To determine if exacerbation of pre-existing chronic colitis in Winnie (Muc2 mutant) mice induces colonic dysplasia. Winnie mice and C57BL6 as a genotype control, were administered 1% w/v dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) orally, followed by drinking water alone in week-long cycles for a total of three cycles. After the third cycle, mice were killed and colonic tissue collected for histological and immunohistochemical evaluation. Inflammation and severity of dysplasia in the colonic mucosa were assessed in H&E sections of the colon. Epithelial cell proliferation was assessed using Ki67 and aberrant β-catenin signalling assessed with enzyme-based immunohistochemistry. Extracted RNA from colonic segments was used for the analysis of gene expression using real-time quantitative PCR. Finally, the distribution of Cxcl5 was visualised using immunohistochemistry. Compared to controls, Winnie mice exposed to three cycles of DSS displayed inflammation mostly confined to the distal-mid colon with extensive mucosal hyperplasia and regenerative atypia resembling epithelial dysplasia. Dysplasia-like changes were observed in 100% of Winnie mice exposed to DSS, with 55% of these animals displaying changes similar to high-grade dysplasia, whereas high-grade changes were absent in wild-type mice. Occasional penetration of the muscularis mucosae by atypical crypts was observed in 27% of Winnie mice after DSS. Atypical crypts however displayed no evidence of oncogenic nuclear β-catenin accumulation, regardless of histological severity. Expression of Cav1, Trp53 was differentially regulated in the distal colon of Winnie relative to wild-type mice. Expression of Myc and Ccl5 was increased by DSS treatment in Winnie only. Furthermore, increased Ccl5 expression correlated with increased complexity in abnormal crypts. While no overall difference in Cxcl5 mucosal expression was observed between treatment groups, epithelial Cxcl5 protein appeared to be diminished in the atypical epithelium

  18. Adhesion of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli to pediatric intestinal mucosa in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, S; Candy, D C; Phillips, A D

    1996-01-01

    Organ cultures of small- and large-intestinal mucosa from children were used to examine the interactions of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) with human intestine. Mucosae from patients aged between 3 and 190 months were cultured with five EAEC strains isolated from infants with diarrhea in the United Kingdom and with two well-described prototype EAEC strains, 17-2 and 221. The prototype strains adhered to jejunal, ileal, and colonic mucosae. The wild-type strains also adhered to this tissue but showed a variable pattern of adhesion: two adhered to all intestinal levels, one adhered to jejunum and ileum, one adhered to ileum only, and one adhered to ileum and colon. Adherence was in an aggregative or stacked-brick pattern, resembling that seen on HEp-2 cells. Electron microscopy of infected small intestinal mucosa revealed bacteria in association with a thick mucus layer above an intact enterocyte brush border, which contained extruded cell fragments. This mucus layer was not present on controls. EAEC adherence to colonic mucosa was associated with cytotoxic effects including microvillous vesiculation (but without evidence of an attaching/effacing lesion), enlarged crypt openings, the presence of intercrypt crevices, and increased epithelial cell extrusion. These results demonstrate that in vitro organ culture of intestinal mucosa from children can be used to investigate EAEC pathogenesis in childhood directly. EAEC strains appear able to colonize many regions of the gastrointestinal tract, without overt changes to small intestinal mucosa but with cytotoxic effects on colonic mucosa. PMID:8890236

  19. Substance P induces CCN1 expression via histone deacetylase activity in human colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Koon, Hon Wai; Shih, David Q; Hing, Tressia C; Chen, Jeremy; Ho, Samantha; Zhao, Dezheng; Targan, Stephan R; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    2011-11-01

    We have shown that substance P (SP) and its neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) regulate intestinal angiogenesis by increasing expression of protein CYR61 (the cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61, or CCN1) in colonic epithelial cells. However, the mechanism involved in SP-induced CCN1 expression has not been studied, and the outcome of increased CCN1 expression in the development of colitis is not fully understood. Because histone deacetylase (HDAC) modulates transcription of several genes involved in inflammation, we investigated participation of HDAC in SP-induced CCN1 expression in human colonic epithelial NCM460 cells overexpressing NK-1R (NCM460-NK-1R) and in primary colonocytes. SP increased HDAC activity with deacetylation and dephosphorylation of nucleosome protein histone H3 in NCM460-NK-1R and/or primary colonocytes. Histone deacetylation and dephosphorylation was observed in colonic mucosa from irritable bowel disease patients. Similarly, colonic mucosal tissues from mice exposed to dextran sulfate sodium showed histone H3 deacetylation and dephosphorylation and increased HDAC activity that was reversed by the NK-1R antagonist CJ-12255. SP-induced increased CCN1 expression in NCM460-NK-1R cells was abolished by pharmacological HDAC inhibition. HDAC overexpression activated basal and SP-induced CCN1 promoter activity. Intracolonic CCN1 overexpression significantly ameliorated dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis, with reduction of proinflammatory cytokine expression in mice. Thus, SP-mediated CCN1 expression in the inflamed human and mouse colon involves increased HDAC activity. Our results strongly suggest that increased CCN1 expression may be involved in mucosal healing during colitis.

  20. Deterioration of Mechanical Properties of Discs in Chronically Inflamed TMJ

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X.D.; Cui, S.J.; Liu, Y.; Luo, Q.; Du, R.J.; Kou, X.X.; Zhang, J.N.; Zhou, Y.H.; Gan, Y.H.

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) discs frequently undergo degenerative changes in arthritis. However, the biomechanical properties of pathogenic discs remain to be explored. In this study, we evaluated the effects of chronic inflammation on the biomechanical properties of TMJ discs in rats. Chronic inflammation of TMJs was induced by double intra-articular injections of complete Freund’s adjuvant for 5 weeks, and biomechanical properties and ultrastructure of the discs were examined by mechanical testing, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The instantaneous compressive moduli of the anterior and posterior bands of discs in inflamed TMJs were decreased significantly compared with those in the control group. The instantaneous tensile moduli of the discs of inflamed TMJs also showed significant decreases in both the anterior-posterior and mesial-lateral directions. The relaxation moduli of the discs of inflamed TMJs showed nearly the same tendency as the instantaneous moduli. The surfaces of the discs of inflamed TMJs became rough and porous due to the loss of the superficial gel-like stratum, with many collagen fibers exposed and degradation of the sub-superficial collagen fibrils. Our results suggested that chronic inflammation of TMJ could lead to deterioration of mechanical properties and alteration of disc ultrastructure, which might contribute to TMJ disc displacement. PMID:25266714

  1. N-Succinyl-chitosan systems for 5-aminosalicylic acid colon delivery: in vivo study with TNBS-induced colitis model in rats.

    PubMed

    Mura, C; Nácher, A; Merino, V; Merino-Sanjuan, M; Carda, C; Ruiz, A; Manconi, M; Loy, G; Fadda, A M; Diez-Sales, O

    2011-09-15

    5-Aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) loaded N-Succinyl-chitosan (SucCH) microparticle and freeze-dried system were prepared as potential delivery systems to the colon. Physicochemical characterization and in vitro release and swelling studies were previously assessed and showed that the two formulations appeared to be good candidates to deliver the drug to the colon. In this work the effectiveness of these two systems in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease was evaluated. In vitro mucoadhesive studies showed excellent mucoadhesive properties of both the systems to the inflamed colonic mucosa. Experimental colitis was induced by rectal instillation of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) into male Wistar rats. Colon/body weight ratio, clinical activity score system, myeloperoxidase activity and histological evaluation were determined as inflammatory indices. The two formulations were compared with drug suspension and SucCH suspension. The results showed that the loading of 5-ASA into SucCH polymer markedly improved efficacy in the healing of induced colitis in rats.

  2. Colon Polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... or family history of colon polyps or colon cancer. Colon polyps often don't cause symptoms. It's important ... removed safely and completely. The best prevention for colon cancer is regular screening for polyps. Colon polyps care ...

  3. Inflamed leukocyte-mimetic nanoparticles for molecular imaging of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyue; Wong, Richard; Khalidov, Ildar; Wang, Andrew Y; Leelawattanachai, Jeerapond; Wang, Yi; Jin, Moonsoo M

    2011-10-01

    Dysregulated host inflammatory response causes many diseases, including cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and sepsis. Sensitive detection of the site of inflammation will, therefore, produce a wide-ranging impact on disease diagnosis and treatment. We hypothesized that nanoprobes designed to mimic the molecular interactions occurring between inflamed leukocytes and endothelium may possess selectivity toward diverse host inflammatory responses. To incorporate inflammation-sensitive molecular interactions, super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were conjugated with integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 I domain, engineered to mimic activated leukocytes in physiology. Whole body optical and magnetic resonance imaging in vivo revealed that leukocyte-mimetic nanoparticles localized preferentially to the vasculature within and in the invasive front of the tumor, as well as to the site of acute inflammation. This study explored in vivo detection of tumor-associated vasculature with systemically injected inflammation-specific nanoparticles, presenting a possibility of tumor detection by inflamed tumor microenvironment.

  4. Inflammation and Exercise (INFLAME): study rationale, design, and methods

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Angela; Mikus, Catherine; Rodarte, Ruben Q.; Distefano, Brandy; Priest, Elisa L.; Sinclair, Erin; Earnest, Conrad P.; Blair, Steven N.; Church, Timothy S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The INFLAME study is designed to determine the effect of exercise training on elevated high-sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (CRP) concentrations in initially sedentary women and men. Methods INFLAME will recruit 170 healthy, sedentary women and men with elevated CRP (≥2.0 mg/L) to be randomized to either an exercise group or non-exercise control group. Exercising individuals will participate in four months of supervised aerobic exercise with a total energy expenditure of 16 kcal • kg−1 • week−1 (KKW). Exercise intensity will be 60–80% of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max). Outcome The primary outcome will be change in plasma CRP concentration. Secondary outcomes include visceral adiposity, the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, and heart rate variability (HRV) in order to examine potential biological mechanisms whereby exercise might affect CRP concentrations. Summary INFLAME will help us understand the effects of moderate to vigorous exercise on CRP concentrations in sedentary individuals. To our knowledge this will be the largest training study specifically designed to examine the effect of exercise on CRP concentrations. This study has the potential to influence therapeutic applications since CRP measurement is becoming an important clinical measurement in Coronary Heart Disease risk assessment. This study will also contribute to the limited body of literature examining the effect of exercise on the variables of visceral adiposity, cytokines, and heart rate variability. PMID:18024231

  5. In colon cancer, normal colon tissue and blood cells have altered telomere lengths.

    PubMed

    Valls-Bautista, Cristina; Piñol-Felis, Carme; Reñé-Espinet, Josep M; Buenestado-García, Juan; Viñas-Salas, Joan

    2015-06-01

    Telomere length (TL) shortened occurs in colorectal carcinogenetic process. Our objective is to determine if it is only a local fact or there are alterations in normal colon cells and in other body cells. TL of tumoral and normal mucosa and leukocytes of 40 patients operated of colorectal cancer (CRC) and 40 control patients with normal colonoscopy were measured by Southern-blot. Groups were matched by the same localization as tumors, sex, and age. In CRC patients, TRFL (Telomere Repeat Factor Length) leukocytes mean was 8.84 kpb, normal colonic mucosa 7.97 kpb, and tumoral mucosa 7.33 kpb (P < 0.001). In the 40 normal control patients, mean TRFL of colonic mucosa was 7.76 kpb, while in blood cells was 7.01 kpb (P < 0.001). We observed an inverse correlation between leukocytes TRFL and age (r(2)  = 0.17, P = 0.008). Mucosa TRFL correlates significantly with patient's age (r(2)  = 0.138, P = 0.018). TRFL of controls colonic mucosa correlates with TRFL of their blood cells (r(2)  = 0.354, P < 0.001). Normal colonic mucosa and leukocytes in CCR patients presents telomere altered in respect to normal patients. Telomere length in normal leukocytes could be an initial marker for colorectal cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Biomechanics of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of prosthodontic treatment has been well recognized, and the need is continuously increasing with the ageing population. While the oral mucosa plays a critical role in the treatment outcome, the associated biomechanics is not yet fully understood. Using the literature available, this paper provides a critical review on four aspects of mucosal biomechanics, including static, dynamic, volumetric and interactive responses, which are interpreted by its elasticity, viscosity/permeability, apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient, respectively. Both empirical studies and numerical models are analysed and compared to gain anatomical and physiological insights. Furthermore, the clinical applications of such biomechanical knowledge on the mucosa are explored to address some critical concerns, including stimuli for tissue remodelling (interstitial hydrostatic pressure), pressure–pain thresholds, tissue displaceability and residual bone resorption. Through this review, the state of the art in mucosal biomechanics and their clinical implications are discussed for future research interests, including clinical applications, computational modelling, design optimization and prosthetic fabrication. PMID:26224566

  7. HIF1α deficiency reduces inflammation in a mouse model of proximal colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mladenova, Dessislava N.; Dahlstrom, Jane E.; Tran, Phuong N.; Benthani, Fahad; Bean, Elaine G.; Ng, Irvin; Pangon, Laurent; Currey, Nicola; Kohonen-Corish, Maija R. J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) is a transcription factor that regulates the adaptation of cells to hypoxic microenvironments, for example inside solid tumours. Stabilisation of HIF1α can also occur in normoxic conditions in inflamed tissue or as a result of inactivating mutations in negative regulators of HIF1α. Aberrant overexpression of HIF1α in many different cancers has led to intensive efforts to develop HIF1α-targeted therapies. However, the role of HIF1α is still poorly understood in chronic inflammation that predisposes the colon to carcinogenesis. We have previously reported that the transcription of HIF1α is upregulated and that the protein is stabilised in inflammatory lesions that are caused by the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) sulindac in the mouse proximal colon. Here, we exploited this side effect of long-term sulindac administration to analyse the role of HIF1α in colon inflammation using mice with a Villin-Cre-induced deletion of Hif1α exon 2 in the intestinal epithelium (Hif1αΔIEC). We also analysed the effect of sulindac sulfide on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) pathway in vitro in colon cancer cells. Most sulindac-treated mice developed visible lesions, resembling the appearance of flat adenomas in the human colon, surrounded by macroscopically normal mucosa. Hif1αΔIEC mice still developed lesions but they were smaller than in the Hif1α-floxed siblings (Hif1αF/F). Microscopically, Hif1αΔIEC mice had significantly less severe colon inflammation than Hif1αF/F mice. Molecular analysis showed reduced MIF expression and increased E-cadherin mRNA expression in the colon of sulindac-treated Hif1αΔIEC mice. However, immunohistochemistry analysis revealed a defect of E-cadherin protein expression in sulindac-treated Hif1αΔIEC mice. Sulindac sulfide treatment in vitro upregulated Hif1α, c-JUN and IL8 expression through the AHR pathway. Taken together, HIF1α expression augments inflammation in the

  8. Proteome Analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis Gut Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Ellingsen, Torkell; Glerup, Henning; Bonderup, Ole Kristian; Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing; Meyer, Michael Kruse; Bøgsted, Martin; Christiansen, Gunna; Birkelund, Svend; Andersen, Vibeke; Stensballe, Allan

    2017-01-06

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory joint disease leading to cartilage damage and ultimately impaired joint function. To gain new insight into the systemic immune manifestations of RA, we characterized the colon mucosa proteome from 11 RA-patients and 10 healthy controls. The biopsies were extracted by colonoscopy and analyzed by label-free quantitative proteomics, enabling the quantitation of 5366 proteins. The abundance of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) was statistically significantly increased in RA-patient biopsies compared with controls and correlated with the administered dosage of methotrexate (MTX), the most frequently prescribed immunosuppressive drug for RA. Additionally, our data suggest that treatment with Leflunomide, a common alternative to MTX, increases DHFR. The findings were supported by immunohistochemistry with confocal microscopy, which furthermore demonstrated that DHFR was located in the cytosol of the intestinal epithelial and interstitial cells. Finally, we identified 223 citrullinated peptides from 121 proteins. Three of the peptides were unique to RA. The list of citrullinated proteins was enriched in extracellular and membrane proteins and included known targets of anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs). Our findings support that the colon mucosa could trigger the production of ACPAs, which could contribute to the onset of RA. The MS data have been deposited to ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD001608 and PXD003082.

  9. Colonic Polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colonic polyps grow in the large intestine, or colon. Most polyps are not dangerous. However, some polyps ... member with polyps Have a family history of colon cancer Most colon polyps do not cause symptoms. ...

  10. Optical reconstruction of murine colorectal mucosa at cellular resolution

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cambrian Y.; Dubé, Philip E.; Girish, Nandini; Reddy, Ajay T.

    2015-01-01

    The mucosal layer of the colon is a unique and dynamic site where host cells interface with one another and the microbiome, with major implications for physiology and disease. However, the cellular mechanisms mediating colonic regeneration, inflammation, dysplasia, and dysbiosis remain undercharacterized, partly because the use of thin tissue sections in many studies removes important volumetric context. To address these challenges in visualization, we have developed the deep mucosal imaging (DMI) method to reconstruct continuous extended volumes of mouse colorectal mucosa at cellular resolution. Use of ScaleA2 and SeeDB clearing agents enabled full visualization of the colonic crypt, the fundamental unit of adult colon. Confocal imaging of large colorectal expanses revealed epithelial structures involved in repair, inflammation, tumorigenesis, and stem cell function, in fluorescent protein-labeled, immunostained, paraffin-embedded, or human biopsy samples. We provide freely available software to reconstruct and explore on computers with standard memory allocations the large DMI datasets containing in toto representations of distal colonic mucosal volume. Extended-volume imaging of colonic mucosa through the novel, extensible, and readily adopted DMI approach will expedite mechanistic investigations of intestinal physiology and pathophysiology at intracrypt to multicrypt length scales. PMID:25721303

  11. Detoxification of hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol in the cecal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Levitt, M D; Furne, J; Springfield, J; Suarez, F; DeMaster, E

    1999-10-01

    Colonic bacteria liberate large quantities of the highly toxic gases hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) and methanethiol (CH(3)SH). The colonic mucosa presumably has an efficient means of detoxifying these compounds, which is thought to occur through methylation of H(2)S to CH(3)SH and CH(3)SH to dimethylsulfide (CH(3)SCH(3)). We investigated this detoxification pathway by incubating rat cecal mucosal homogenates with gas containing H(2)S, CH(3)SH, or CH(3)SCH(3). Neither CH(3)SH nor CH(3)SCH(3) was produced during H(2)S catabolism, whereas catabolism of CH(3)SH liberated H(2)S but not CH(3)SCH(3). Thus, H(2)S and CH(3)SH are not detoxified by methylation to CH(3)SCH(3). Rather, CH(3)SH is demethylated to H(2)S, and H(2)S is converted to nonvolatile metabolites. HPLC analysis of the homogenate showed the metabolite to be primarily thiosulfate. Analysis of cecal venous blood obtained after intracecal instillation of H(2)(35)S revealed that virtually all absorbed H(2)S had been oxidized to thiosulfate. The oxidation rate of H(2)S by colonic mucosa was 10,000 times greater than the reported methylation rate. Conversion to thiosulfate appears to be the mechanism whereby the cecal mucosa protects itself from the injurious effects of H(2)S and CH(3)SH, and defects in this detoxification possibly could play a role in colonic diseases such as ulcerative colitis.

  12. Colon Cryptogenesis: Asymmetric Budding

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chin Wee; Hirokawa, Yumiko; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Smith, David W.; Burgess, Antony W.

    2013-01-01

    The process of crypt formation and the roles of Wnt and cell-cell adhesion signaling in cryptogenesis are not well described; but are important to the understanding of both normal and cancer colon crypt biology. A quantitative 3D-microscopy and image analysis technique is used to study the frequency, morphology and molecular topography associated with crypt formation. Measurements along the colon reveal the details of crypt formation and some key underlying biochemical signals regulating normal colon biology. Our measurements revealed an asymmetrical crypt budding process, contrary to the previously reported symmetrical fission of crypts. 3D immunofluorescence analyses reveals heterogeneity in the subcellular distribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin in distinct crypt populations. This heterogeneity was also found in asymmetrical budding crypts. Singular crypt formation (i.e. no multiple new crypts forming from one parent crypt) were observed in crypts isolated from the normal colon mucosa, suggestive of a singular constraint mechanism to prevent aberrant crypt production. The technique presented improves our understanding of cryptogenesis and suggests that excess colon crypt formation occurs when Wnt signaling is perturbed (e.g. by truncation of adenomatous polyposis coli, APC protein) in most colon cancers. PMID:24205248

  13. Hyalinosis cutis et mucosae.

    PubMed

    Vago, Bernadette; Hausser, Ingrid; Hennies, Hans Christian; Enk, Alexander; Jappe, Uta

    2007-05-01

    Hyalinosis cutis et mucosae is a rare autosomal recessive disorder which is characterized by deposition of hyaline material around the basement membrane of the skin and mucous membranes. Typical clinical symptoms are hoarseness, infiltration of the mucous membranes and papular verrucous skin changes. Mutations within the extracellular matrix protein gene (ECM-1) are the underlying defect. We report on a 24-year-old man, who had first been seen in our department at the age of seven and had undergone the necessary diagnostic procedures and who revisited 17 years later with hoarseness and extensive verrucous skin changes at elbows and knees which were removed by excision. A new mutation of the ECM1 gene was identified.

  14. Imaging Nanotherapeutics in Inflamed Vasculature by Intravital Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenjia

    2016-01-01

    Intravital microscopy (IVM) is the application of light microscopy to real time study biology of live animal tissues in intact and physiological conditions with the high spatial and temporal resolution. Advances in imaging systems, genetic animal models and imaging probes, IVM has offered quantitative and dynamic insight into cell biology, immunology, neurobiology and cancer. In this review, we will focus on the targeting of nanotherapeutics to inflamed vasculature. We will introduce the basic concept and principle of IVM and demonstrate that IVM is a powerful tool used to quantitatively determine the molecular mechanisms of interactions between nanotherapeutics and neutrophils or endothelium in living mice. In the future, it is needed to develop new imaging systems and novel imaging contrast agents to better understand molecular mechanisms of tissue processing of nanotherapeutics in vivo. PMID:27877245

  15. Non-cell autonomous effects of targeting inducible PGE2 synthesis during inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Masako; Perret, Christine; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J; Rosenberg, Daniel W

    2015-04-01

    Microsomal PGE2 synthase-1 (mPGES-1), the terminal enzyme in the formation of inducible PGE2, represents a potential target for cancer chemoprevention. We have previously shown that genetic abrogation of mPGES-1 significantly suppresses tumorigenesis in two preclinical models of intestinal cancer. In this study, we examined the role of mPGES-1 during colon tumorigenesis in the presence of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced inflammatory microenvironment. Using Apc (Δ14/+) in which the mPGES-1 gene is either wild-type (D14:WT) or deleted (D14:KO), we report that mPGES-1 deficiency enhances sensitivity to acute mucosal injury. As a result of the increased epithelial damage, protection against adenoma formation is unexpectedly compromised in the D14:KO mice. Examining the DSS-induced acute injury, cryptal structures are formed within inflamed areas of colonic mucosa of both genotypes that display the hallmarks of early neoplasia. When acute epithelial injury is balanced by titration of DSS exposures, however, these small cryptal lesions progress rapidly to adenomas in the D14:WT mice. Given that mPGES-1 is highly expressed within the intestinal stroma under the inflammatory conditions of DSS-induced ulceration, we propose a complex and dual role for inducible PGE2 synthesis within the colonic mucosa. Our data suggest that inducible PGE2 is critical for the maintenance of an intact colonic epithelial barrier, while promoting epithelial regeneration. This function is exploited during neoplastic transformation in Apc (Δ14/+) mice as PGE2 contributes to the growth and expansion of the early initiated cryptal structures. Taken together, inducible PGE2 plays a complex role in inflammation-associated cancers that requires further analysis. Inducible PGE2 production by mPGES-1 is critical for the colonic mucosal homeostasis. This function is exploited in the presence of the neoplastic transformation in Apc (Δ14/+) mice as PGE2 contributes to the growth and expansion of

  16. Non-cell autonomous effects of targeting inducible PGE2 synthesis during inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Masako; Perret, Christine; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J.; Rosenberg, Daniel W.

    2015-01-01

    Microsomal PGE2 synthase-1 (mPGES-1), the terminal enzyme in the formation of inducible PGE2, represents a potential target for cancer chemoprevention. We have previously shown that genetic abrogation of mPGES-1 significantly suppresses tumorigenesis in two preclinical models of intestinal cancer. In this study, we examined the role of mPGES-1 during colon tumorigenesis in the presence of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced inflammatory microenvironment. Using Apc Δ14/+ in which the mPGES-1 gene is either wild-type (D14:WT) or deleted (D14:KO), we report that mPGES-1 deficiency enhances sensitivity to acute mucosal injury. As a result of the increased epithelial damage, protection against adenoma formation is unexpectedly compromised in the D14:KO mice. Examining the DSS-induced acute injury, cryptal structures are formed within inflamed areas of colonic mucosa of both genotypes that display the hallmarks of early neoplasia. When acute epithelial injury is balanced by titration of DSS exposures, however, these small cryptal lesions progress rapidly to adenomas in the D14:WT mice. Given that mPGES-1 is highly expressed within the intestinal stroma under the inflammatory conditions of DSS-induced ulceration, we propose a complex and dual role for inducible PGE2 synthesis within the colonic mucosa. Our data suggest that inducible PGE2 is critical for the maintenance of an intact colonic epithelial barrier, while promoting epithelial regeneration. This function is exploited during neoplastic transformation in Apc Δ14/+ mice as PGE2 contributes to the growth and expansion of the early initiated cryptal structures. Taken together, inducible PGE2 plays a complex role in inflammation-associated cancers that requires further analysis. Inducible PGE2 production by mPGES-1 is critical for the colonic mucosal homeostasis. This function is exploited in the presence of the neoplastic transformation in Apc Δ14/+ mice as PGE2 contributes to the growth and expansion of the

  17. Related IgA1 and IgG producing cells in blood and diseased mucosa in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Thoree, V C; Golby, S J C; Boursier, L; Hackett, M; Dunn-Walters, D K; Sanderson, J D; Spencer, J

    2002-01-01

    Background: Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease in which the colonic mucosa is infiltrated with plasma cells producing IgG autoantibodies. It is not known whether this represents a local mucosal response which has switched to IgG or a peripheral response which may have been initiated by peripheral antigen which homed to the colonic mucosa. The clonal distribution of IgG secreting cells and isotype switched variants in UC is not known. Aims: To investigate the clonal distribution of mucosal IgG in UC and to search for related IgG and IgA secreting cells in normal and diseased mucosa and blood in UC. To investigate characteristics which may discriminate between the mucosal and peripheral repertoire in the normal mucosa and in UC. Patients: Blood and normal and diseased mucosa from two patients with UC were studied. Methods: Immunoglobulin gene analysis and clone specific polymerase chain reaction were used to study the clonal distribution and characteristics of IgG and related IgA in the mucosa and blood of patients with UC. Results: The IgG response in the mucosa of UC patients included widespread clones of cells that were present in both the diseased mucosa and blood but that were scarce in normal mucosa. Clonally related IgA class switch variants, all IgA1, were detected but also only in the diseased mucosa and blood. This suggests that these clones home preferentially to the diseased mucosa. We showed that JH1 usage was characteristic of the peripheral repertoire, and that examples of JH1 usage were observed in mucosal IgG in UC. Conclusions: Overall, these data are consistent with a model of UC in which a peripheral response is expressed and expanded in the colonic mucosa. PMID:12077090

  18. Scientific Results from the FIRST Instrument Deployment to Cerro Toco, Chile and from the Flight of the INFLAME Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Cageao, Richard P.; Johnson, David G.

    2011-01-01

    Results from the FIRST and INFLAME infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometers are presented. These are comprehensive measurements of the far-IR spectrum (FIRST) and the net infrared fluxes within the atmosphere (INFLAME).

  19. Schlafen 3, a novel gene, regulates colonic mucosal growth during aging.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhaumik B; Yu, Yingjie; Du, Jianhua; Rishi, Arun K; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Tarca, Adi L; Wali, Anil; Majumdar, Adhip P N

    2009-04-01

    Although aging is associated with increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis in the colonic mucosa of Fischer 344 rats, the regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. Gene expression profiling (Illumina platform) was carried out in freshly isolated colonic mucosal cells from young (4-6 mo old) and aged (22-24 mo old) Fischer 344 rats. Sixty-six genes were differentially expressed in the colonic mucosa between young and old animals (P<0.05). In particular, the expression of schlafen 3, a negative regulator of proliferation, was decreased by 8- to 10-fold in the colonic mucosa of aged rats. Administration of wortmannin, which inhibited colonic mucosal proliferation in the colonic mucosa of aged rats, stimulated the expression of schlafen 3, indicating a growth regulatory role of this gene. To further determine the growth regulatory properties of schlafen 3 gene, schlafen 3 cDNA was transfected in colon cancer HCT-116 cells. This resulted in a 30-40% inhibition of cellular growth, accompanied by decreased expression of PCNA and cyclin D1 and reduced phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. In conclusion, our present study demonstrates that several genes involved in proliferation and apoptosis are differentially expressed in the colonic mucosa of young and aged rats. Schlafen 3, a novel negative regulator of growth, which is markedly downregulated in the colonic mucosa of the aged, may play a role in regulating colonic mucosal growth during aging.

  20. Schlafen 3, a novel gene, regulates colonic mucosal growth during aging

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Bhaumik B.; Yu, Yingjie; Du, Jianhua; Rishi, Arun K.; Sarkar, Fazlul H.; Tarca, Adi L.; Wali, Anil; Majumdar, Adhip P. N.

    2009-01-01

    Although aging is associated with increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis in the colonic mucosa of Fischer 344 rats, the regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. Gene expression profiling (Illumina platform) was carried out in freshly isolated colonic mucosal cells from young (4–6 mo old) and aged (22–24 mo old) Fischer 344 rats. Sixty-six genes were differentially expressed in the colonic mucosa between young and old animals (P < 0.05). In particular, the expression of schlafen 3, a negative regulator of proliferation, was decreased by 8- to 10-fold in the colonic mucosa of aged rats. Administration of wortmannin, which inhibited colonic mucosal proliferation in the colonic mucosa of aged rats, stimulated the expression of schlafen 3, indicating a growth regulatory role of this gene. To further determine the growth regulatory properties of schlafen 3 gene, schlafen 3 cDNA was transfected in colon cancer HCT-116 cells. This resulted in a 30–40% inhibition of cellular growth, accompanied by decreased expression of PCNA and cyclin D1 and reduced phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. In conclusion, our present study demonstrates that several genes involved in proliferation and apoptosis are differentially expressed in the colonic mucosa of young and aged rats. Schlafen 3, a novel negative regulator of growth, which is markedly downregulated in the colonic mucosa of the aged, may play a role in regulating colonic mucosal growth during aging. PMID:19228883

  1. Angiodysplasias of the colon.

    PubMed Central

    Pounder, D J; Rowland, R; Pieterse, A S; Freeman, R; Hunter, R

    1982-01-01

    We studied 14 large bowel resections from patients with a provisional clinical diagnosis of a bleeding vascular lesion of the colon. For the purpose of this study we developed a barium-gelatine vascular injection technique. Six of the 14 cases were proven to be angiodysplasias with an identifiable mucosal vascular ectasia. The pathological findings in these six cases are described. We conclude that angiodysplasia represent a significant cause of lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage in the elderly. It is our opinion that only the mucosa vascular ectasia seen in these cases is histologically diagnostic and that sub-mucosal venous ectasia, while characteristic of angiodysplasia, is non-specific. the differential diagnostic features which will allow the histological distinction of angiodysplasia from other vascular lesions of the colon are discussed. Images PMID:6980903

  2. Blocking Lymphocyte Localization to the Gastrointestinal Mucosa as a Therapeutic Strategy for IBD

    PubMed Central

    Villablanca, Eduardo J.; Cassani, Barbara; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Mora, J. Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    Lymphocyte migration (homing) to specific tissues has an important role during protective and pathological immune responses, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Lymphocytes use integrin α4β7 and the chemokine receptor CCR9 to localize to the gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa; their respective ligands, MAdCAM-1 and CCL25, are displayed on endothelial cells in intestinal post-capillary venules. Whereas GI-homing receptors are required for lymphocyte migration to the intestine in the non-inflamed steady state, their role during inflammation is a matter of debate. Reagents designed to block interactions between these receptors and their ligands have had variable degrees of success in animal models of IBD and patients. We discuss the mechanisms involved in lymphocyte localization to the intestinal mucosa and how they can be applied to therapy for IBD. PMID:21530744

  3. Laparoscopy as a Diagnostic and Definitive Therapeutic Tool in Cases of Inflamed Simple Lymphatic Cysts of the Mesentery

    PubMed Central

    Abdelaal, Abdelrahman; Sulieman, Ibnouf; Aftab, Zia; Ahmed, Ayman; Al-Mudares, Saif; Al Tarakji, Mohannad; Almuzrakchi, Ahmad; Di Carlo, Isidoro

    2015-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare benign abdominal tumors. These cysts, especially those of lymphatic origin, very rarely become inflamed. The diagnosis of inflamed lymphatic cysts of the mesentery may be difficult. We herein report two cases of inflamed simple lymphatic cysts of the mesentery definitively diagnosed and excised by laparoscopy. PMID:26064760

  4. Laparoscopy as a Diagnostic and Definitive Therapeutic Tool in Cases of Inflamed Simple Lymphatic Cysts of the Mesentery.

    PubMed

    Abdelaal, Abdelrahman; Sulieman, Ibnouf; Aftab, Zia; Ahmed, Ayman; Al-Mudares, Saif; Al Tarakji, Mohannad; Almuzrakchi, Ahmad; Toro, Adriana; Di Carlo, Isidoro

    2015-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare benign abdominal tumors. These cysts, especially those of lymphatic origin, very rarely become inflamed. The diagnosis of inflamed lymphatic cysts of the mesentery may be difficult. We herein report two cases of inflamed simple lymphatic cysts of the mesentery definitively diagnosed and excised by laparoscopy.

  5. Effects of nicotine on an in vitro reconstituted model oral mucosa in terms of cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Muhammad Nauman; Hanif, Sajid; Zia, Majid; Qayyum, Zahur

    2011-01-01

    The extensive use of tobacco and its associated problematic health issues have been a concern to mankind. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that approximately one-third of the global population aged 15 years or older are smokers and each smoker consumes an average of 15 cigarettes daily. The objective of this study was to establish the effect of nicotine on an in vitro reconstituted oral mucosa model, the effect of treatment with this compound was measured in terms of cytokine production. Observational laboratory based study design was used to carry out the experiment. The reconstituted human epithelium model used in the study was prepared and supplied by Skin Ethic Laboratories, Nice, France. The effect of nicotine on epithelial cytokine production was assessed using commercially available assay kits (R&D systems). This was done using the enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay. In this study there was evidence that after 5 minutes treatment on un-inflamed mucosa with nicotine at 10 mm concentration GM-CSF release decreased, and also after 24 hours treatment with nicotine at 10mM concentration GM-CSF release increased. TNF-alpha increased release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-8, and also GM-CSF from the model mucosa after 24 hours, but had no effect on the release of IL-1alpha, IL-6, IL-8, and GM-CSF after 5 minutes and 24 hours respectively. In conclusion at all the concentrations used in this experiment, nicotine had no effect on the TNF-alpha stimulated tissue and un-inflamed mucosa and had no significant effect on cytokine release including IL-1alpha, IL-6, IL-8, and GM-CSF after 5 minutes and 24 hours respectively.

  6. Colon-targeted delivery of piceatannol enhances anti-colitic effects of the natural product: potential molecular mechanisms for therapeutic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Yum, Soohwan; Jeong, Seongkeun; Lee, Sunyoung; Nam, Joon; Kim, Wooseong; Yoo, Jin-Wook; Kim, Min-Soo; Lee, Bok Luel; Jung, Yunjin

    2015-01-01

    Piceatannol (PCT), an anti-colitic natural product, undergoes extensive Phase II hepatic metabolism, resulting in very low bioavailability. We investigated whether colon-targeted delivery of PCT could enhance anti-colitic effects and how therapeutic enhancement occurred at the molecular level. Molecular effects of PCT were examined in human colon carcinoma cells and inflamed colons. The anti-colitic effects of PCT in a colon-targeted capsule (colon-targeted PCT) were compared with PCT in a gelatin capsule (conventional PCT) in a trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced rat colitis model. Colon-targeted PCT elicited greatly enhanced recovery of the colonic inflammation. In HCT116 cells, PCT inhibited nuclear factor kappaB while activating anti-colitic transcription factors, nuclear factor-erythroid 2 (NF-E2) p45-related factor 2, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1. Colon-targeted PCT, but not conventional PCT, modulated production of the target gene products of the transcription factors in the inflamed colonic tissues. Rectal administration of PCT, which simulates the therapeutic action of colon-targeted PCT, also ameliorated rat colitis and reproduced the molecular effects in the inflamed colonic tissues. Colon-targeted delivery increased therapeutic efficacy of PCT against colitis, likely resulting from multitargeted effects exerted by colon-targeted PCT. The drug delivery technique may be useful for therapeutic optimization of anti-colitic lead compounds including natural products.

  7. Adjuvant alternative treatment with chemical peeling and subsequent iontophoresis for postinflammatory hyperpigmentation, erosion with inflamed red papules and non-inflamed atrophic scars in acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Ichiro; Oiso, Naoki; Kawada, Akira

    2017-04-01

    The standard management of acne vulgaris in Japan includes a combination of topical treatment with benzoyl peroxide (BPO) and BPO/clindamycin (CLDM), topical adapalene and systemic antimicrobials. However, the treatment of therapy-resistant complications such as postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH), erosions with inflamed red papules and atrophic scars has not been established. We performed chemical peeling with glycolic acid and iontophoresis with ascorbyl 2-phosphate 6-palmitate and DL-α-tocopherol phosphate for the treatment of PIH, erosions with inflamed red papules and non-inflamed atrophic scars in 31 patients with acne vulgaris (mild to severe severity), and evaluated the efficacy and safety of these interventions. In most of cases, there was remarkable improvement in PIH and erosions with inflamed red papules after treatment. There was also some improvement in non-inflamed atrophic scars without erythema. Mild redness and irritation was observed in four cases as adverse reactions. Early initial treatment of PIH and erosions with red papules by chemical peeling and iontophoresis is an effective and safe method to prevent the formation of atrophic scars in patients with acne vulgaris. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  8. Inflamed urachal cyst containing calculi in an adult.

    PubMed

    Milotic, Franko; Fuckar, Zeljko; Gazdik, Miljen; Cicvaric, Tedi; Milotic, Irena; Zauhar, Gordana

    2002-05-01

    The urachus is an embryonic structure that persists after birth in some individuals and can cause various problems. We report a case of an inflamed urachal cyst filled with a thick yellow fluid and several calculi in a woman with a 1-month history of dysuria. Physical examination revealed a fist-sized tumor located infraumbically in the midline. The patient's erythrocyte sedimentation rate was elevated; the results of all other routine laboratory studies were normal. Sonography showed a regularly shaped, ovoid, hypoechoic cystic area in the abdominal wall measuring 8 x 4 x 3 cm and containing several hyperechoic masses associated with acoustic shadowing. The wall of the cyst was inhomogeneous, and a thin hypoechoic linear tract linked the superior aspect of the mass to the umbilicus. The results of excretory urography, voiding cystography, and cystoscopy excluded an abnormality of the urinary system. A urachal cyst was diagnosed, and the mass was surgically removed. The surgical specimen was sent for histopathologic analysis, which confirmed the diagnosis.

  9. Localization of the lipopolysaccharide recognition complex in the human healthy and inflamed premature and adult gut.

    PubMed

    Wolfs, Tim G A M; Derikx, Joep P M; Hodin, Caroline M I M; Vanderlocht, Joris; Driessen, Ann; de Bruïne, Adriaan P; Bevins, Charles L; Lasitschka, Felix; Gassler, Nikolaus; van Gemert, Wim G; Buurman, Wim A

    2010-01-01

    Microbiota in the intestinal lumen provide an abundant source of potentially detrimental antigens, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a potent immunostimulatory product of Gram-negative bacteria recognized by the host via TLR-4 and MD-2. An aberrant immune response to LPS or other bacterial antigens has been linked to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). We investigated which cells express MD-2 in the normal and inflamed ileum from neonates and adults by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, MD-2 and TLR4 mRNA expression in normal adult ileum was studied by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on cells isolated by laser capture microdissection. Premature infants did not show MD-2 expression either in epithelial cells or in the lamina propria. Similarly, MD-2 was absent in epithelial cells and lamina propria inflammatory cells in preterm infants with NEC. MD-2 protein in the healthy term neonatal and adult ileum was predominantly expressed by Paneth cells and some resident inflammatory cells in the lamina propria. MD-2 and TLR-4 mRNA expression was restricted to crypt cells. Also in IBD, Paneth cells were still the sole MD-2-expressing epithelial cells, whereas inflammatory cells (mainly plasma cells) were responsible for the vast majority of the MD-2 expression. The absence of MD-2 in the immature neonatal gut suggests impaired LPS sensing, which could predispose neonates to NEC upon microbial colonization of the immature intestine. The apparent expression of MD-2 by Paneth cells supports the critical concept that these cells respond to luminal bacterial products in order to maintain homeostasis with the intestinal microbiota in vivo.

  10. Acute necrotizing enterocolitis of preterm piglets is characterized by dysbiosis of ileal mucosa-associated bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Azcarate-Peril, M Andrea; Foster, Derek M; Cadenas, Maria B; Stone, Maria R; Jacobi, Sheila K; Stauffer, Stephen H; Pease, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Investigation of bacteria involved in pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is limited by infant fragility, analysis restricted to feces, use of culture-based methods and lack of clinically-relevant animal models. This study used a unique preterm piglet model to characterize spontaneous differences in microbiome composition of NEC-predisposed regions of gut. Preterm piglets (n = 23) were cesarean-delivered and nurtured for 30 h over which time 52% developed NEC. Bacterial DNA from ileal content, ileal mucosa and colonic mucosa were PCR amplified, subjected to terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis and targeted 16s rDNA qPCR. Preterm ileal mucosa was specifically bereft in diversity of bacteria compared to ileal content and colonic mucosa. Preterm ileum was restricted to representation by only Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi. In piglets with NEC, ileal mucosa was uniquely characterized by increases in number of Firmicutes and diversity of phyla to include Actinobacteria and uncultured bacteria. Five specific TRFLP profiles, corresponding in closest identity to Clostridium butyricum, C. neonatale, C. proteolyticum, Streptomyces spp. and Leptolyngbya spp., were significantly more prevalent or observed only among samples from piglets with NEC. Total numbers of Clostridium spp. and C. butyricum were significantly greater in samples of NEC ileal mucosa but not ileal content or colonic mucosa. These results provide strong support for ileal mucosa as a focus for investigation of specific dysbiosis associated with NEC and suggest a significant role for Clostridium spp., and members of the Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria in the pathogenesis of NEC in preterm piglets. PMID:21983069

  11. The Proteome of Ulcerative Colitis in Colon Biopsies from Adults - Optimized Sample Preparation and Comparison with Healthy Controls.

    PubMed

    Schniers, Armin; Anderssen, Endre; Fenton, Christopher Graham; Goll, Rasmus; Pasing, Yvonne; Paulssen, Ruth Hracky; Florholmen, Jon; Hansen, Terkel

    2017-08-30

    The purpose of the study was to optimize the sample preparation and to further use an improved sample preparation to identify proteome differences between inflamed ulcerative colitis tissue from untreated adults and healthy controls. To optimize the sample preparation, we studied the effect of adding different detergents to a urea containing lysis buffer for a Lys-C/trypsin tandem digestion. With the optimized method, we prepared clinical samples from six ulcerative colitis patients and six healthy controls and analysed them by LC-MS/MS. We examined the acquired data to identify differences between the states. We improved the protein extraction and protein identification number by utilizing a urea and sodium deoxycholate containing buffer. Comparing ulcerative colitis and healthy tissue, we found 168 of 2366 identified proteins differently abundant. Inflammatory proteins are higher abundant in ulcerative colitis, proteins related to anion-transport and mucus production are lower abundant. A high proportion of S100 proteins is differently abundant, notably with both up-regulated and down-regulated proteins. The optimized sample preparation method will improve future proteomic studies on colon mucosa. The observed protein abundance changes and their enrichment in various groups improve our understanding of ulcerative colitis on protein level. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Ectopic expression of SIGIRR in the colon ameliorates colitis in mice by downregulating TLR4/NF-κB overactivation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinlin; Chen, Yanxia; Liu, Dongsheng; Liu, Wei; Hu, Sijun; Zhou, Nanjin; Xie, Yong

    2017-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by uncontrolled immune responses in inflamed mucosa, especially the TLR (Toll-like receptor) signaling pathway. Single Ig domain containing IL-1 receptor-related molecule (SIGIRR), a negative regulator of the TLR signaling pathway, whether had a therapeutic effect in a mouse model of IBD, and the underlying mechanism has not been investigated. Coacervation was used to prepare chitosan/pUNO-SIGIRR nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were administered to mice with colitis using enteroclysis. The disease activity index (DAI) and hematoxylin and eosin staining (HE) staining were used to evaluate the therapeutic effects of the SIGIRR nanoparticles. Immunohistochemistry was performed to elucidate the underlying mechanism driving these effects. Chitosan/pUNO-SIGIRR nanoparticles were successfully constructed and were spherical, with a mean diameter of less than 100nm, and the plasmid encapsulating efficiency was 99.9%. The chitosan/pUNO-SIGIRR nanoparticles attenuated colonic tissue inflammation through the inhibition of TLR4/NF-κB overactivation by downregulating TLR4, MyD88 and NF-κB p65 expression in a mouse model of colitis. The novel chitosan/pUNO-SIGIRR nanoparticles had a therapeutic effect on IBD in a mouse model through the inhibition of TLR4/NF-κB overactivation. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Vermilion Reconstruction with Genital Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Müller-Richter, Urs D A; Weyandt, Gerhard H; Woeckel, Achim; Kübler, Alexander C

    2016-05-01

    Functional and aesthetical reconstruction, especially of the upper lip after ablative tumor surgery, can be very challenging. The skin of the lip might be sufficiently reconstructed by transpositional flaps from the nasolabial or facial area. Large defects of the lip mucosa, including the vestibule, are even more challenging due to the fact that flaps from the inner lining of the oral cavity often lead to functional impairments. We present a case of multiple vermilion and skin resections of the upper lip. At the last step, we had to resect even the whole vermilion mucosa, including parts of the oral mucosa of the vestibule, leaving a bare orbicularis oris muscle. To reconstruct the mucosal layer, we used a mucosal graft from the labia minora and placed it on the compromised lip and the former transpositional flaps for the reconstructed skin of the upper lip with very good functional and aesthetic results.

  14. Vermilion Reconstruction with Genital Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Weyandt, Gerhard H.; Woeckel, Achim; Kübler, Alexander C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Functional and aesthetical reconstruction, especially of the upper lip after ablative tumor surgery, can be very challenging. The skin of the lip might be sufficiently reconstructed by transpositional flaps from the nasolabial or facial area. Large defects of the lip mucosa, including the vestibule, are even more challenging due to the fact that flaps from the inner lining of the oral cavity often lead to functional impairments. We present a case of multiple vermilion and skin resections of the upper lip. At the last step, we had to resect even the whole vermilion mucosa, including parts of the oral mucosa of the vestibule, leaving a bare orbicularis oris muscle. To reconstruct the mucosal layer, we used a mucosal graft from the labia minora and placed it on the compromised lip and the former transpositional flaps for the reconstructed skin of the upper lip with very good functional and aesthetic results. PMID:27579226

  15. Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Chronically Inflamed Periapical Granulomas

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Kosuke; Takeichi, Osamu; Hatori, Keisuke; Imai, Kenichi; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Ogiso, Bunnai

    2015-01-01

    Periapical granulomas are lesions around the apex of a tooth caused by a polymicrobial infection. Treatment with antibacterial agents is normally performed to eliminate bacteria from root canals; however, loss of the supporting alveolar bone is typically observed, and tooth extraction is often selected if root canal treatment does not work well. Therefore, bacteria and other microorganisms could be involved in this disease. To understand the pathogenesis of periapical granulomas more precisely, we focused on the association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) using surgically removed periapical granulomas (n = 32). EBV DNA was detected in 25 of 32 periapical granulomas (78.1%) by real-time PCR, and the median number of EBV DNA copies was approximately 8,688.01/μg total DNA. In contrast, EBV DNA was not detected in healthy gingival tissues (n = 10); the difference was statistically significant according to the Mann-Whitney U test (p = 0.0001). Paraffin sections were also analyzed by in situ hybridization to detect EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER)-expressing cells. EBER was detected in the cytoplasm and nuclei of B cells and plasma cells in six of nine periapical granulomas, but not in healthy gingival tissues. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis for latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1) of EBV using serial tissue sections showed that LMP-1-expressing cells were localized to the same areas as EBER-expressing cells. These data suggest that B cells and plasma cells in inflamed granulomas are a major source of EBV infection, and that EBV could play a pivotal role in controlling immune cell responses in periapical granulomas. PMID:25884725

  16. Immune/Inflammatory Response and Hypocontractility of Rabbit Colonic Smooth Muscle After TNBS-Induced Colitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonggang; Li, Fang; Wang, Hong; Yin, Chaoran; Huang, JieAn; Mahavadi, Sunila; Murthy, Karnam S; Hu, Wenhui

    2016-07-01

    The contractility of colonic smooth muscle is dysregulated due to immune/inflammatory responses in inflammatory bowel diseases. Inflammation in vitro induces up-regulation of regulator of G-protein signaling 4 (RGS4) expression in colonic smooth muscle cells. To characterize the immune/inflammatory responses and RGS4 expression pattern in colonic smooth muscle after induction of colitis. Colitis was induced in rabbits by intrarectal instillation of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Innate/adaptive immune response RT-qPCR array was performed using colonic circular muscle strips. At 1-9 weeks after colonic intramuscular microinjection of lentivirus, the distal and proximal colons were collected, and muscle strips and dispersed muscle cells were prepared from circular muscle layer. Expression levels of RGS4 and NFκB signaling components were determined by Western blot analysis. The biological consequences of RGS4 knockdown were assessed by measurement of muscle contraction and phospholipase C (PLC)-β activity in response to acetylcholine (ACh). Contraction in response to ACh was significantly inhibited in the inflamed colonic circular smooth muscle cells. RGS4, IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, CCL3, CD1D, and ITGB2 were significantly up-regulated, while IL-18, CXCR4, CD86, and C3 were significantly down-regulated in the inflamed muscle strips. RGS4 protein expression in the inflamed smooth muscles was dramatically increased. RGS4 stable knockdown in vivo augmented ACh-stimulated PLC-β activity and contraction in colonic smooth muscle cells. Inflamed smooth muscle exhibits up-regulation of IL-1-related signaling components, Th1 cytokines and RGS4, and inhibition of contraction. Stable knockdown of endogenous RGS4 in colonic smooth muscle increases PLC-β activity and contractile responses.

  17. Monochloramine induces reorganization of nuclear speckles and phosphorylation of SRp30 in human colonic epithelial cells: role of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ya-Qin; Lu, Yu; Tan, Xiao-Di

    2003-11-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells are constantly stimulated by reactive oxidant metabolites (ROMs) in inflamed mucosa. Monochloramine (NH2Cl), a cell-permeant ROM, is particularly relevant to the pathogenesis of inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. Nuclear speckles, a unique nuclear subcompartment, accumulate a family of proteins, namely, serine- and arginine-rich (SR) proteins. They play important roles in regulation of pre-mRNA splicing. Currently, little is known about the link between inflammatory stimulation and the pre-mRNA splicing process, although gene expression is changed in inflamed tissues. The present study was designed to investigate whether stimulation of human colonic epithelial cells (HT-29 and Caco-2 cell lines) with NH2Cl affects nuclear speckles and their components. By indirect immunofluorescence, nuclear speckles have been shown to undergo rapid aggregation after NH2Cl stimulation. By utilizing Western blotting, SRp30 (a subset of SR proteins) in intestinal epithelial cells was found to be phosphorylated after NH2Cl treatment, whereas other SR proteins were not responsive to NH2Cl stimulation. The cytotoxic effect of NH2Cl was excluded by both negative lactate dehydrogenase assay and propidium iodide staining. Therefore, NH2Cl-induced morphological changes on nuclear speckles and phosphorylated SRp30 do not result from intestinal epithelial injury. Furthermore, the effect of NH2Cl on nuclear speckles and SRp30 was blocked by bisindolylmaleimide I, a selective PKC inhibitor. Together, the available data suggest that stimulation of intestinal epithelial cells with NH2Cl results in a consequent change on pre-mRNA splicing machinery via a distinctive signal pathway involving activation of PKC. This effect may contribute to oxidant-induced pathophysiological changes in the gastrointestinal tract.

  18. Chemopreventive effects of nobiletin and its colonic metabolites on colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xian; Song, Mingyue; Wang, Minqi; Zheng, Jinkai; Gao, Zili; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Guodong; Xiao, Hang

    2015-01-01

    Scope Nobiletin (NBT) is a major citrus flavonoid with various health benefits. Herein, we investigated the colon cancer chemopreventive effects of NBT and its colonic metabolites in a colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis mouse model as well as in human colon cancer cell models. Methods and results In azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-treated mice, oral administration of NBT effectively decreased both incidence and multiplicity of colonic tumors. NBT showed significant anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects in the mouse colon. HPLC analysis revealed that oral administration of NBT resulted in high levels of metabolites, i.e. 3′-demethylnobiletin (M1), 4′-demethylnobiletin (M2), and 3′, 4′-didemethylnobiletin (M3) in the colonic mucosa. In contrast, the colonic level of NBT was about 20-fold lower than the total colonic level of three metabolites. Cell culture studies demonstrated that the colonic metabolites of NBT significantly inhibited the growth of human colon cancer cells, caused cell cycle arrest, induced apoptosis, and profoundly modulated signaling proteins related with cell proliferation and cell death. All of these effects were much stronger than those produced by NBT alone. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that oral administration of NBT significantly inhibited colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis in mice, and this chemopreventive effect was strongly associated with its colonic metabolites. PMID:26445322

  19. Aldehyde dehydrogenases of the rat colon: comparison with other tissues of the alimentary tract and the liver.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, T; Salaspuro, M

    1996-05-01

    Intracolonic bacteria have previously been shown to produce substantial amounts of acetaldehyde during ethanol oxidation, and it has been suggested that this acetaldehyde might be associated with alcohol-related colonic disorders, as well as other alcohol-induced organ injuries. The capacity of colonic mucosa to remove this bacterial acetaldehyde by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) is, however, poorly known. We therefore measured ALDH activities and determined ALDH isoenzyme profiles from different subcellular fractions of rat colonic mucosa. For comparison, hepatic, gastric, and small intestinal samples were studied similarly. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activities were also measured from all of these tissues. Rat colonic mucosa was found to possess detectable amounts of ALDH activity with both micromolar and millimolar acetaldehyde concentrations and in all subcellular fractions. The ALDH activities of colonic mucosa were, however, generally low when compared with the liver and stomach, and they also tended to be lower than in small intestine. Mitochondrial low K(m) ALDH2 and cytosolic ALDH with low K(m) for acetaldehyde were expressed in the colonic mucosa, whereas some cytosolic high K(m) isoenzymes found in the small intestine and stomach were not detectable in colonic samples. Cytosolic ADH activity corresponded well to ALDH activity in different tissues: in colonic mucosa, it was approximately 6 times lower than in the liver and about one-half of gastric ADH activity. ALDH activity of the colonic mucosa should, thus, be sufficient for the removal of acetaldehyde produced by colonic mucosal ADH during ethanol oxidation. It may, however, be insufficient for the removal of the acetaldehyde produced by intracolonic bacteria. This may lead to the accumulation of acetaldehyde in the colon and colonic mucosa after ingestion of ethanol that might, at least after chronic heavy alcohol consumption, contribute to the development of alcohol-related colonic morbidity

  20. Antimicrobial compounds of porcine mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotenkova, E. A.; Lukinova, E. A.; Fedulova, L. V.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate porcine oral cavity mucosa (OCM), nasal cavity mucosa (NCM), rectal mucosa (RM) and tongue mucosa (TM) as sources of antimicrobial compounds. Ultrafiltrates with MW >30 kDa, MW 5-30 kDa and MW <5 kDa were obtained. All ultrafiltrates had antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Proteus vulgaris. NCM ultrafiltrates revealed the highest antibacterial activity in respect to negative control: for the fraction with MW >30 kDa, the zone of microbial growth inhibition was 7.5 mm, for the MW<5 kDa fraction, it was 7 mm, and for MW 5-30 kDa fraction, it was 4.5 mm. No significant differences were found in high molecular weight proteomic profile, while qualitative and quantitative differences were observed in the medium and low molecular weight areas, especially in OCM and NCM. HPLC showed 221 tissue-specific peptides in OCM, 156 in NCM, 225 in RM, but only 5 in TM. The results observed confirmed porcine mucous tissues as a good source of antimicrobial compounds, which could be an actual alternative for reduction of microbial spoilage of foods.

  1. Physical stress and bacterial colonization

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial surface colonizers are subject to a variety of physical stresses. During the colonization of human epithelia such as on the skin or the intestinal mucosa, bacteria mainly have to withstand the mechanical stress of being removed by fluid flow, scraping, or epithelial turnover. To that end, they express a series of molecules to establish firm attachment to the epithelial surface, such as fibrillar protrusions (pili) and surface-anchored proteins that bind to human matrix proteins. In addition, some bacteria – in particular gut and urinary tract pathogens – use internalization by epithelial cells and other methods such as directed inhibition of epithelial turnover to ascertain continued association with the epithelial layer. Furthermore, many bacteria produce multi-layered agglomerations called biofilms with a sticky extracellular matrix, providing additional protection from removal. This review will give an overview over the mechanisms human bacterial colonizers have to withstand physical stresses with a focus on bacterial adhesion. PMID:25212723

  2. Carvacrol exhibits anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects against 1, 2-dimethyl hydrazine plus dextran sodium sulfate induced inflammation associated carcinogenicity in the colon of Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Arigesavan, Kaninathan; Sudhandiran, Ganapasam

    2015-05-29

    Chronic inflammation is one of the remarkable etiologic factors for various human ailments including cancer. The well known hypothesis is that persistent inflammation in colon can increase the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, a pharmacological evaluation of carvacrol, a phenolic monoterpene constituent of essential oils produced from aromatic plant Oreganum vulgarea sp. on colitis associated colon cancer (CACC) induced by 1,2 Dimethylhydrazine (DMH) and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in male Fischer 344 rat model was studied. F344 rats were given three subcutaneous injections of DMH (40 mg/kg body wt) in the first week and were given free access to drinking water containing 1% DSS for the next one week followed by 7-14 days of water as three cycles. Carvacrol was administrated before and after tumor induction at a concentration of 50 mg/kg body weight (o.p). Carvacrol treated groups promotes the endogenous antioxidant system and suppress the inflammation in DMH/DSS induced animals. An increased antioxidant status and restoration of histological lesions in the inflamed colonic mucosa was observed in carvacrol treated rats. This effect was confirmed biochemically by reducing free-radical accumulation and suppressing expression of pro-inflammatory mediators. In this study, Carvacrol significantly increased the anti-oxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) glutathione (GSH) levels and reduced lipid peroxides (LPO), myeloperoxidase (MPO) and nitric oxide (NO) as compared to DMH/DSS induced rats. These dramatic changes facilitate the suppression of pro-inflammatory mediators such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) in CACC induced rats. Taken together, these findings suggest that Carvacrol may play a beneficial role in DMH/DSS induced experimental rat model and serve as an excellent dietary antioxidant as well as anti-inflammatory agent. It may represent novel therapeutic interventions

  3. In vivo signal-transduction pathways to stimulate phasic contractions in normal and inflamed ileum.

    PubMed

    Sarna, S K

    1998-04-01

    We investigated the in vivo signal-transduction pathways to stimulate phasic contractions in normal and inflamed ileum by close intra-arterial infusions of test substances. Methacholine stimulated phasic contractions dose dependently. This response was suppressed during inflammation. Verapamil inhibited the response to methacholine dose dependently in both normal and inflamed ileum. Neomycin inhibited the response partially in normal ileum and almost completely in inflamed ileum. H-7 and chelerythrine partially inhibited the methacholine response in normal ileum but had no significant effect in inflamed ileum. Ryanodine stimulated phasic contractions that were blocked by TTX, hexamethonium, atropine, or ruthenium red. Ruthenium red, however, had no significant effect on the contractile response to methacholine. 1) Ca2+ influx through the L-type channels may be the primary source of Ca2+ to stimulate in vivo phasic contractions. 2) Phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis enhances the stimulation of in vivo phasic contractions in the normal ileum. In the inflamed ileum, phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis may be essential to stimulate phasic contractions. 3) Inflammation may downregulate the protein kinase C pathway. 4) Ryanodine stimulates phasic contractions by the release of ACh.

  4. Taste of Milk from Inflamed Breasts of Breastfeeding Mothers with Mastitis Evaluated Using a Taste Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Michiko; Shinohara, Hitomi; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Kumagai, Masanori; Muto, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: The refusal of infants to suckle from a breast that is inflamed with mastitis suggests that the taste of the milk has changed. However, the taste of milk from a breast with mastitis has never been empirically determined. The present study compares the taste of milk from breastfeeding mothers with or without mastitis and identifies specific changes in the taste of milk from mothers with mastitis. Subjects and Methods: The intensity of four basic tastes (sourness, saltiness, bitterness, and umami) of breastmilk from 24 healthy mothers at 3–5 days and at 2–3, 4–5, and 8–10 weeks postpartum and from 14 mothers with mastitis was determined objectively using a taste sensor. The intensity of each basic taste and the concentrations of main taste substances in milk were compared between the inflamed breasts and the normal breasts of control mothers or the contralateral asymptomatic breast of mothers with unilateral mastitis. Results: The transition from colostrum to mature milk was accompanied by changes in the taste of the milk, such as decreased saltiness and umami and increased bitterness and sourness. Umami and saltiness increased in milk from inflamed breasts. Contents of sodium, glutamate, and guanosine monophosphate increased in milk from inflamed breasts. Conclusions: Tastes that were specifically associated with inflamed breasts appeared to include an increase in umami and saltiness, which might have resulted from an increased content in factors associated with umami and sodium. PMID:24350703

  5. Taste of milk from inflamed breasts of breastfeeding mothers with mastitis evaluated using a taste sensor.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Michiko; Shinohara, Hitomi; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Kumagai, Masanori; Muto, Hajime; Kodama, Hideya

    2014-03-01

    The refusal of infants to suckle from a breast that is inflamed with mastitis suggests that the taste of the milk has changed. However, the taste of milk from a breast with mastitis has never been empirically determined. The present study compares the taste of milk from breastfeeding mothers with or without mastitis and identifies specific changes in the taste of milk from mothers with mastitis. The intensity of four basic tastes (sourness, saltiness, bitterness, and umami) of breastmilk from 24 healthy mothers at 3-5 days and at 2-3, 4-5, and 8-10 weeks postpartum and from 14 mothers with mastitis was determined objectively using a taste sensor. The intensity of each basic taste and the concentrations of main taste substances in milk were compared between the inflamed breasts and the normal breasts of control mothers or the contralateral asymptomatic breast of mothers with unilateral mastitis. The transition from colostrum to mature milk was accompanied by changes in the taste of the milk, such as decreased saltiness and umami and increased bitterness and sourness. Umami and saltiness increased in milk from inflamed breasts. Contents of sodium, glutamate, and guanosine monophosphate increased in milk from inflamed breasts. Tastes that were specifically associated with inflamed breasts appeared to include an increase in umami and saltiness, which might have resulted from an increased content in factors associated with umami and sodium.

  6. Osteolipoma of the buccal mucosa.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Alvimar-Lima; de Castro, Eni-Vaz-Franco-Lima; Felipini, Renata-Callestini; Ribeiro, Ana-Carolina-Prado; Soubhia, Ana-Maria-Pires

    2010-03-01

    Lipomas are benign mesenchymal neoplasms of soft tissue that can be found in any part of the human body. Conversely, their presence in the oral mucosa is rather uncommon, with approximately 4% of the cases occurring in the oral cavity. In such cases, they are likely to have originated from mature adipose tissue and to be among several described histological variants of lipomas, which are identified according to the predominant type of tissue. There is a rare lipoma, known as an osteolipoma or an ossifying lipoma; however, little has been written this type of lipoma characterized by a classical lipoma with areas of osseous metaplasia. Considering the few cases of oral osteolipomas previously described in the English-related literature and the consequent risk of misdiagnosis and overtreatment, this paper describes an extreme case of an osteolipoma affecting the buccal mucosa of an adult patient. This paper focuses particularly on the pathogenesis of this lesion and the discussion of a correct diagnosis.

  7. The STING pathway and the T cell-inflamed tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Seng-Ryong; Corrales, Leticia; Gajewski, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    A major subset of patients with advanced solid tumors shows a spontaneous T cell-inflamed tumor microenvironment, which has prognostic import and is associated with clinical response to immunotherapies. As such, understanding the mechanisms governing the generation of spontaneous T cell responses in only a subset of patients is critical for advancing immunotherapeutic approaches further. Here, we discuss characteristics of T cell-inflamed versus non-inflamed tumors, including a type I IFN signature associated with T cell priming against tumor antigens. We review recent findings that have pointed towards the STING pathway of cytosolic DNA sensing as an important innate immune sensing mechanism driving type I IFN production in the tumor context. Knowledge of this pathway is guiding the further development of novel immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:25758021

  8. Stimulation of proliferation in the colorectal mucosa by gastrin precursors is blocked by desferrioxamine.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, Audrey; Lachal, Shamilah; Bramante, Gianni; Kovac, Suzana; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S

    2010-07-01

    Precursors of the peptide hormone gastrin stimulate proliferation in the colorectal mucosa and promote the development of colorectal carcinoma. Gastrins bind two ferric ions selectively and with high affinity, and the biological activity of glycine-extended gastrin (Ggly) in vitro is dependent on the presence of ferric ions. The aim of the present study was to determine whether or not iron is required for biological activity of progastrin and Ggly in vivo. Rats that had undergone a colostomy were infused with Ggly, and proliferation was measured in the defunctioned rectal mucosa. Proliferation was also measured in the colonic mucosa of hGAS and MTI-Ggly mice, which, by definition, overexpress progastrin and Ggly, respectively. The requirement for iron was assessed by thrice-weekly injection of the chelating agent desferrioxamine (DFO). The proliferation index in the defunctioned rectal mucosa was significantly increased in the Ggly-infused rats, and the increase was significantly reduced after treatment with DFO. Treatment with DFO significantly reduced the crypt height and proliferation index in the colonic mucosa of hGAS and MTI-Ggly mice but had no effect on the same variables in wild-type mice. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that the biological activity of progastrin and Ggly in vivo is dependent on the presence of ferric ions and further suggest that chelating agents may block the stimulatory effects of gastrin precursors in the development of colorectal carcinoma.

  9. Novel urease-negative Helicobacter sp. 'H. enhydrae sp. nov.' isolated from inflamed gastric tissue of southern sea otters.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zeli; Batac, Francesca; Mannion, Anthony; Miller, Melissa A; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Ho, Calvin; Manning, Sean; Paster, Bruce J; Fox, James G

    2017-02-08

    A total of 31 sea otters Enhydra lutris nereis found dead or moribund (and then euthanized) were necropsied in California, USA. Stomach biopsies were collected and transected with equal portions frozen or placed in formalin and analyzed histologically and screened for Helicobacter spp. in gastric tissue. Helicobacter spp. were isolated from 9 sea otters (29%); 58% (18 of 31) animals were positive for helicobacter by PCR. The Helicobacter sp. was catalase- and oxidase-positive and urease-negative. By electron microscopy, the Helicobacter sp. had lateral and polar sheathed flagella and had a slightly curved rod morphology. 16S and 23S rRNA sequence analyses of all 'H. enhydrae' isolates had similar sequences, which clustered as a novel Helicobacter sp. closely related to H. mustelae (96-97%). The genome sequence of isolate MIT 01-6242 was assembled into a single ~1.6 Mb long contig with a 40.8% G+C content. The annotated genome contained 1699 protein-coding sequences and 43 RNAs, including 65 genes homologous to known Helicobacter spp. and Campylobacter spp. virulence factors. Histological changes in the gastric tissues extended from mild cystic degeneration of gastric glands to severe mucosal erosions and ulcers. Silver stains of infected tissues demonstrated slightly curved bacterial rods at the periphery of the gastric ulcers and on the epithelial surface of glands. The underlying mucosa and submucosa were infiltrated by low numbers of neutrophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes, with occasional lymphoid aggregates and well-defined lymphoid follicles. This is the second novel Helicobacter sp., which we have named 'H. enhydrae', isolated from inflamed stomachs of mustelids, the first being H. mustelae from a ferret.

  10. Taste sensing in the colon.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Izumi; Karaki, Shin-ichiro; Kuwahara, Atsukazu

    2014-01-01

    The colonic lumen is continually exposed to many compounds, including beneficial and harmful compounds that are produced by colonic microflora. The intestinal epithelia form a barrier between the internal and luminal (external) environments. Chemical receptors that sense the luminal environment are thought to play important roles as sensors and as modulators of epithelial cell functions. The recent molecular identification of various membrane receptor proteins has revealed the sensory role of intestinal epithelial cells. Nutrient sensing by these receptors in the small intestine is implicated in nutrient absorption and metabolism. However, little is known about the physiological roles of chemosensors in the large intestine. Since 1980s, researchers have examined the effects of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), the primary products of commensal bacteria, on gut motility, secretion, and incretin release, for example. In this decade, the SCFA receptor genes and their expression were identified in the mammalian colon. Furthermore, many other chemical receptors, including taste and olfactory receptors have been found in colonic epithelial cells. These findings indicate that the large intestinal epithelia express chemosensors that detect the luminal contents, particularly bacterial metabolites, and induce the host defense systems and the modulation of systemic metabolism via incretin release. In this review, we describe the local effects of chemical stimuli on the lumen associated with the expression pattern of sensory receptors. We propose that sensory receptors expressed in the colonic mucosa play important roles in luminal chemosensing to maintain homeostasis.

  11. A comparison of Helicobacter pylori and non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter spp. Binding to canine gastric mucosa with defined gastric glycophenotype.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Irina; Freitas, Daniela P; Magalhães, Ana; Faria, Fátima; Lopes, Célia; Faustino, Augusto M; Smet, Annemieke; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Reis, Celso A; Gärtner, Fátima

    2014-08-01

    The gastric mucosa of dogs is often colonized by non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters (NHPH), while H. pylori is the predominant gastric Helicobacter species in humans. The colonization of the human gastric mucosa by H. pylori is highly dependent on the recognition of host glycan receptors. Our goal was to define the canine gastric mucosa glycophenotype and to evaluate the capacity of different gastric Helicobacter species to adhere to the canine gastric mucosa. The glycosylation profile in body and antral compartments of the canine gastric mucosa, with focus on the expression of histo-blood group antigens was evaluated. The in vitro binding capacity of FITC-labeled H. pylori and NHPH to the canine gastric mucosa was assessed in cases representative of the canine glycosylation pattern. The canine gastric mucosa lacks expression of type 1 Lewis antigens and presents a broad expression of type 2 structures and A antigen, both in the surface and glandular epithelium. Regarding the canine antral mucosa, H. heilmannii s.s. presented the highest adhesion score whereas in the body region the SabA-positive H. pylori strain was the strain that adhered more. The canine gastric mucosa showed a glycosylation profile different from the human gastric mucosa suggesting that alternative glycan receptors may be involved in Helicobacter spp. binding. Helicobacter pylori and NHPH strains differ in their ability to adhere to canine gastric mucosa. Among the NHPH, H. heilmannii s.s. presented the highest adhesion capacity in agreement with its reported colonization of the canine stomach. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Infrared spectroscopic characteristics of normal and malignant colonic epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupnik, Eduardo; Jackson, Michael; Bird, Ranjana P.; Smith, Ian C. P.; Mantsch, Henry H.

    1998-04-01

    IR spectroscopy is being widely used to study the biochemical changes associated with cancer. In particular, based upon the hypothesis that biochemical changes associated with cancer precede morphological manifestations of the disease, IR spectroscopy is being evaluated as a potential early diagnostic and prognostic tool. In the current study, IR spectroscopy was applied to the study of colon tissue from rats treated with the specific colon carcinogen azoxymethane, to determine whether tumor induction was associated with identifiable spectroscopic changes in the colon. Characteristic spectra were found for each layer of the colon. Spectra of normal-appearing mucosa and tumors form treated animals then compared to spectra of control mucosa. Differences between tumors and control mucosa were apparent, indicating changes in cellular biochemistry associated with tumor development. In particular, differences in absorptions attributed to nucleic acids were seen, indicating alterations in the structure of cellular DNA in malignant and carcinogen treated tissues. Interestingly, spectra of carcinogen treated rates exhibit characteristics intermediate between those of normal mucosa and tumors. Application of multivariate analysis allowed non-subjective classification of the spectra into three distinct classes with and accuracy of 86.7 percent. The separate classification of control and treated mucosa suggests that IR spectroscopy, when combined with the appropriate classifier, can indeed detect biochemical changes in tissue before physical manifestation of the disease process.

  13. Structural environment built by AKAP12+ colon mesenchymal cells drives M2 macrophages during inflammation recovery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun-Mo; Lee, Hye Shin; Seo, Ji Hae; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Gelman, Irwin H.; Lo, Eng H.; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages exhibit phenotypic plasticity, as they have the ability to switch their functional phenotypes during inflammation and recovery. Simultaneously, the mechanical environment actively changes. However, how these dynamic alterations affect the macrophage phenotype is unknown. Here, we observed that the extracellular matrix (ECM) constructed by AKAP12+ colon mesenchymal cells (CMCs) generated M2 macrophages by regulating their shape during recovery. Notably, rounded macrophages were present in the linear and loose ECM of inflamed colons and polarized to the M1 phenotype. In contrast, ramified macrophages emerged in the contracted ECM of recovering colons and mainly expressed M2 macrophage markers. These contracted structures were not observed in the inflamed colons of AKAP12 knockout (KO) mice. Consequently, the proportion of M2 macrophages in inflamed colons was lower in AKAP12 KO mice than in WT mice. In addition, clinical symptoms and histological damage were more severe in AKAP12 KO mice than in WT mice. In experimentally remodeled collagen gels, WT CMCs drove the formation of a more compacted structure than AKAP12 KO CMCs, which promoted the polarization of macrophages toward an M2 phenotype. These results demonstrated that tissue contraction during recovery provides macrophages with the physical cues that drive M2 polarization. PMID:28205544

  14. Structural environment built by AKAP12+ colon mesenchymal cells drives M2 macrophages during inflammation recovery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun-Mo; Lee, Hye Shin; Seo, Ji Hae; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Gelman, Irwin H; Lo, Eng H; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2017-02-16

    Macrophages exhibit phenotypic plasticity, as they have the ability to switch their functional phenotypes during inflammation and recovery. Simultaneously, the mechanical environment actively changes. However, how these dynamic alterations affect the macrophage phenotype is unknown. Here, we observed that the extracellular matrix (ECM) constructed by AKAP12+ colon mesenchymal cells (CMCs) generated M2 macrophages by regulating their shape during recovery. Notably, rounded macrophages were present in the linear and loose ECM of inflamed colons and polarized to the M1 phenotype. In contrast, ramified macrophages emerged in the contracted ECM of recovering colons and mainly expressed M2 macrophage markers. These contracted structures were not observed in the inflamed colons of AKAP12 knockout (KO) mice. Consequently, the proportion of M2 macrophages in inflamed colons was lower in AKAP12 KO mice than in WT mice. In addition, clinical symptoms and histological damage were more severe in AKAP12 KO mice than in WT mice. In experimentally remodeled collagen gels, WT CMCs drove the formation of a more compacted structure than AKAP12 KO CMCs, which promoted the polarization of macrophages toward an M2 phenotype. These results demonstrated that tissue contraction during recovery provides macrophages with the physical cues that drive M2 polarization.

  15. [Infections of the oral mucosa].

    PubMed

    Reibel, Jesper; Kragelund, Camilla

    2010-11-01

    The most common infections of the oral mucosa are those caused by Candida albicans and herpes simplex virus (HSV). Candidosis occurs as pseudomembraneous, erythematous and hyperplastic types with varying symptoms from no to a burning sensation. Treatment most importantly includes elimination of any predisposing factors such as smoking, sub-optimal denture hygiene and hyposalivation. A primary HSV infection results in a life-long latent infection recurring in some infected persons either intraorally or on the lip. If treatment is indicated, topical or systemic aciclovir and related drugs can be used.

  16. Metastatic Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Massagué, Joan; Obenauf, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of death from cancer. To colonize distant organs, circulating cancer cells must overcome many obstacles through mechanisms that we are starting to understand. Infiltrating distant tissue, evading immune defences, adapting to supportive niches, surviving as latent tumour-initiating seeds, and eventually breaking out to replace the host tissue, are key steps for metastatic colonization. These obstacles make metastasis a highly inefficient process, but once metastases are established current treatments frequently fail to provide durable responses. A better understanding of the mechanistic determinants of metastatic colonization is needed to better prevent and treat metastatic cancer. PMID:26791720

  17. Hypoxia inducible factors are dispensable for myeloid cell migration into the inflamed mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Peter J.; Liyanage, Sidath E.; Cristante, Enrico; Sampson, Robert D.; Dick, Andrew D.; Ali, Robin R.; Bainbridge, James W.

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) are ubiquitously expressed transcription factors important for cell homeostasis during dynamic oxygen levels. Myeloid specific HIFs are crucial for aspects of myeloid cell function, including their ability to migrate into inflamed tissues during autoimmune disease. This contrasts with the concept that accumulation of myeloid cells at ischemic and hypoxic sites results from a lack of chemotactic responsiveness. Here we seek to address the role of HIFs in myeloid trafficking during inflammation in a mouse model of human uveitis. We show using mice with myeloid-specific Cre-deletion of HIFs that myeloid HIFs are dispensable for leukocyte migration into the inflamed eye. Myeloid-specific deletion of Hif1a, Epas1, or both together, had no impact on the number of myeloid cells migrating into the eye. Additionally, stabilization of HIF pathways via deletion of Vhl in myeloid cells had no impact on myeloid trafficking into the inflamed eye. Finally, we chemically induce hypoxemia via hemolytic anemia resulting in HIF stabilization within circulating leukocytes to demonstrate the dispensable role of HIFs in myeloid cell migration into the inflamed eye. These data suggest, contrary to previous reports, that HIF pathways in myeloid cells during inflammation and hypoxia are dispensable for myeloid cell tissue trafficking. PMID:28112274

  18. Expression of corticotropin-releasing factor in inflamed tissue is required for intrinsic peripheral opioid analgesia.

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, M; Mousa, S A; Zhang, Q; Carter, L; Stein, C

    1996-01-01

    Immune cell-derived opioid peptides can activate opioid receptors on peripheral sensory nerves to inhibit inflammatory pain. The intrinsic mechanisms triggering this neuroimmune interaction are unknown. This study investigates the involvement of endogenous corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1). A specific stress paradigm, cold water swim (CWS), produces potent opioid receptor-specific antinociception in inflamed paws of rats. This effect is dose-dependently attenuated by intraplantar but not by intravenous alpha-helical CRF. IL-1 receptor antagonist is ineffective. Similarly, local injection of antiserum against CRF, but not to IL-1, dose-dependently reverses this effect. Intravenous anti-CRF is only inhibitory at 10(4)-fold higher concentrations and intravenous CRF does not produce analgesia. Pretreatment of inflamed paws with an 18-mer 3'-3'-end inverted CRF-antisense oligodeoxynucleotide abolishes CWS-induced antinociception. The same treatment significantly reduces the amount of CRF extracted from inflamed paws and the number of CRF-immunostained cells without affecting gross inflammatory signs. A mismatch oligodeoxynucleotide alters neither the CWS effect nor CRF immunoreactivity. These findings identify locally expressed CRF as the predominant agent to trigger opioid release within inflamed tissue. Endogenous IL-1, circulating CRF or antiinflammatory effects, are not involved. Thus, an intact immune system plays an essential role in pain control, which is important for the understanding of pain in immunosuppressed patients with cancer or AIDS. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8650225

  19. Mechanical small bowel obstruction due to an inflamed appendix wrapping around the last loop of ileum.

    PubMed

    Assenza, M; Ricci, G; Bartolucci, P; Modini, C

    2005-01-01

    Acute apendicitis rarely presents with a clinical picture of mechanical small-bowel obstruction. The Authors report a case of this inusual clinical occurrence, arised like a complication of a common disease, characterized by a chronically inflamed appendix (mucocele) wrapping around the last loop of ileum that produced volvolus and strangulation. The few similar cases reported in the literature are moreover reviewed.

  20. Primary Afferent Neurons Express Functional Delta Opioid Receptors in Inflamed Skin

    PubMed Central

    Brederson, Jill-Desiree; Honda, Christopher N.

    2015-01-01

    Peripherally-restricted opiate compounds attenuate hyperalgesia in experimental models of inflammatory pain, but have little discernable effect on nociceptive behavior in normal animals. This suggests that activation of opioid receptors on peripheral sensory axons contributes to decreased afferent activity after injury. Previously, we reported that direct application of morphine to cutaneous receptive fields decreased mechanical and heat-evoked responses in a population of C-fiber nociceptors in inflamed skin. Consistent with reported behavioral studies, direct application of morphine had no effect on fiber activity in control skin. The aim of the present study was to determine whether mechanical responsiveness of nociceptors innervating inflamed skin was attenuated by direct activation of delta opioid receptors (DOR) on peripheral terminals. An ex vivo preparation of rat plantar skin and tibial nerve was used to examine effects of a selective DOR agonist, deltorphin II, on responsiveness of single fibers innervating inflamed skin. Electrical recordings were made eighteen hours after injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant into the hindpaw. Deltorphin II produced an inhibition of the mechanical responsiveness of single fibers innervating inflamed skin; an effect blocked by the DOR-selective antagonist, naltrindole. The population of units responsive to deltorphin II was identified as consisting of C fiber mechanical nociceptors. PMID:25911583

  1. Primary afferent neurons express functional delta opioid receptors in inflamed skin.

    PubMed

    Brederson, Jill-Desiree; Honda, Christopher N

    2015-07-21

    Peripherally-restricted opiate compounds attenuate hyperalgesia in experimental models of inflammatory pain, but have little discernable effect on nociceptive behavior in normal animals. This suggests that activation of opioid receptors on peripheral sensory axons contributes to decreased afferent activity after injury. Previously, we reported that direct application of morphine to cutaneous receptive fields decreased mechanical and heat-evoked responses in a population of C-fiber nociceptors in inflamed skin. Consistent with reported behavioral studies, direct application of morphine had no effect on fiber activity in control skin. The aim of the present study was to determine whether mechanical responsiveness of nociceptors innervating inflamed skin was attenuated by direct activation of delta opioid receptors (DORs) on peripheral terminals. An ex vivo preparation of rat plantar skin and tibial nerve was used to examine effects of a selective DOR agonist, deltorphin II, on responsiveness of single fibers innervating inflamed skin. Electrical recordings were made eighteen hours after injection of complete Freund's adjuvant into the hindpaw. Deltorphin II produced an inhibition of the mechanical responsiveness of single fibers innervating inflamed skin; an effect blocked by the DOR-selective antagonist, naltrindole. The population of units responsive to deltorphin II was identified as consisting of C fiber mechanical nociceptors.

  2. Use of buccal mucosa in hypospadias repair.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Diaz, Omar; Castellan, Miguel; Gosalbez, Rafael

    2013-08-01

    Hypospadias is an embryological disorder that results in an abnormal ventral positioning of the urethral meatus. Among multiple surgical techniques described to correct this anomaly, the use of buccal mucosa grafts has gained popularity among pediatric urologists, pediatric surgeons and plastic surgeons. Buccal mucosa grafts have shown favorable histological changes that result in an excellent scaffold for urethral reconstructive surgery. This review describes the evolution of the use of buccal mucosa grafts in hypospadias repair.

  3. Foreign Body in Jugal Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Thiago Luís Infanger; Pauna, Henrique Furlan; Hazboun, Igor Moreira; Dal Rio, Ana Cristina; Correa, Maria Elvira Pizzigatti; Nicola, Ester Maria Danielli

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Foreign body in the oral cavity may be asymptomatic for long time and only sometimes it can lead to a typical granulomatous foreign body reaction. Some patients may complain of oral pain and present signs of inflammation with purulent discharge. A granuloma is a distinct, compact microscopic structure composed of epithelioid-shaped macrophages typically surrounded by a rim of lymphocytes and filled with fibroblasts and collagen. Nowadays, the increase of cosmetic invasive procedures such as injection of prosthetic materials in lips and cheeks may lead to unusual forms of inflammatory granulomas. Objectives Describe an unusual presentation of a foreign body reaction in the buccal mucosa due to previous injection of cosmetic agent. Resumed Report A 74-year-old woman was referred to the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery to investigate the presence of multiple painless, bilateral nodules in the buccal mucosa, with progressive growth observed during the previous 2 months. The histologic results showed a foreign body inflammatory reaction. Conclusion Oral granulomatosis lesions represent a challenging diagnosis for clinicians and a biopsy may be necessary. Patients may feel ashamed to report previous aesthetic procedures, and the clinicians must have a proactive approach.

  4. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... THERAPY Targeted treatment zeroes in on specific targets (molecules) in cancer cells. These targets play a role ... colon cancer. Some studies have reported that NSAIDs (aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib) may help reduce the ...

  5. Gene Expression Changes in the Colon Epithelium Are Similar to Those of Intact Colon during Late Inflammation in Interleukin-10 Gene Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Anna E.; Peters, Jason S.; McNabb, Warren C.; Barnett, Matthew P. G.; Anderson, Rachel C.; Park, Zaneta; Zhu, Shuotun; Maclean, Paul; Young, Wayne; Reynolds, Gordon W.; Roy, Nicole C.

    2013-01-01

    In addition to their role in absorption and secretion, epithelial cells play an important role in the protection of the colon mucosa from the resident microbiota and are important for the maintenance of homeostasis. Microarray analysis of intact colon samples is widely used to gain an overview of the cellular pathways and processes that are active in the colon during inflammation. Laser microdissection of colon epithelial cells allows a more targeted analysis of molecular pathways in the mucosa, preceding and during inflammation, with potentially increased sensitivity to changes in specific cell populations. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular changes that occur in early and late inflammation stages in colon epithelium of a mouse model of inflammatory bowel diseases. Microarray analysis of intact colon samples and microdissected colon epithelial cell samples from interleukin-10 gene deficient and control mice at 6 and 12 weeks of age was undertaken. Results of gene set enrichment analysis showed that more immune-related pathways were identified between interleukin-10 gene deficient and control mice at 6 weeks of age in epithelial cells than intact colon. This suggests that targeting epithelial cells could increase sensitivity for detecting immune changes that occur early in the inflammatory process. However, in the later stages of inflammation, microarray analyses of intact colon and epithelium both provide a similar overview of gene expression changes in the colon mucosa at the pathway level. PMID:23700416

  6. Adhesion and Invasion of Gastric Mucosa Epithelial Cells by Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Wang, Qi-long; Cheng, Dan-dan; Xu, Wen-ting; Lu, Nong-hua

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the main pathogenic bacterium involved in chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer and a class 1 carcinogen in gastric cancer. Current research focuses on the pathogenicity of H. pylori and the mechanism by which it colonizes the gastric mucosa. An increasing number of in vivo and in vitro studies demonstrate that H. pylori can invade and proliferate in epithelial cells, suggesting that this process might play an important role in disease induction, immune escape and chronic infection. Therefore, to explore the process and mechanism of adhesion and invasion of gastric mucosa epithelial cells by H. pylori is particularly important. This review examines the relevant studies and describes evidence regarding the adhesion to and invasion of gastric mucosa epithelial cells by H. pylori. PMID:27921009

  7. Expression of Melatonin Synthesizing Enzymes in Helicobacter pylori Infected Gastric Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Chojnacki, Cezary; Popławski, Tomasz; Reiter, Russel J.; Klupinska, Grazyna

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonization of gastric mucosa causes pain of unknown etiology in about 15–20% of infected subjects. The aim of the present work was to determine the level of expression of enzymes involved in the synthesis of melatonin in gastric mucosa of asymptomatic and symptomatic H. pylori infected patients. To diagnose H. pylori infection, histological analysis and the urea breath test (UBT C13) were performed. The levels of mRNA expression of arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) and acetylserotonin methyltransferase (ASMT) were estimated in gastric mucosa with RT-PCR. The level of AA-NAT expression and AMST was decreased in H. pylori infected patients and was increased after H. pylori eradication. We conclude that decreased expression of melatonin synthesizing enzymes, AA-NAT and ASMT, in patients with symptomatic H. pylori infection returns to normal level after H. pylori eradication. PMID:23936850

  8. Vibrio cholerae Represses Polysaccharide Synthesis To Promote Motility in Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenyu; Wang, Yuning; Liu, Shengyan; Sheng, Ying; Rueggeberg, Karl-Gustav; Wang, Hui; Li, Jie; Gu, Frank X.; Zhong, Zengtao; Kan, Biao

    2015-01-01

    The viscoelastic mucus layer of gastrointestinal tracts is a host defense barrier that a successful enteric pathogen, such as Vibrio cholerae, must circumvent. V. cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, is able to penetrate the mucosa and colonize the epithelial surface of the small intestine. In this study, we found that mucin, the major component of mucus, promoted V. cholerae movement on semisolid medium and in liquid medium. A genome-wide screen revealed that Vibrio polysaccharide (VPS) production was inversely correlated with mucin-enhanced motility. Mucin adhesion assays indicated that VPS bound to mucin. Moreover, we found that vps expression was reduced upon exposure to mucin. In an infant mouse colonization model, mutants that overexpressed VPS colonized less effectively than wild-type strains in more distal intestinal regions. These results suggest that V. cholerae is able to sense mucosal signals and modulate vps expression accordingly so as to promote fast motion in mucus, thus allowing for rapid spread throughout the intestines. PMID:25561707

  9. Quantitative Proteomics of Intestinal Mucosa From Male Mice Lacking Intestinal Epithelial Insulin Receptors.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Stina Rikke; Schoof, Erwin M; Wheeler, Sarah E; Hvid, Henning; Ahnfelt-Rønne, Jonas; Hansen, Bo Falck; Nishimura, Erica; Olsen, Grith Skytte; Kislinger, Thomas; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2017-08-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine whether loss of the insulin receptor alters the molecular landscape of the intestinal mucosa, using intestinal-epithelial insulin receptor knockout (IE-irKO) mice and both genetic (IRfl/fl and Villin-cre) controls. Quantitative proteomic analysis by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry was applied to jejunal and colonic mucosa from mice fed a normal chow diet and mice fed a Western diet (WD). Jejunal mucosa from IE-irKO mice demonstrated alterations in all intestinal cell lineages: Paneth, goblet, absorptive, and enteroendocrine cells. Only goblet and absorptive cells were affected in the colon. Also, a marked effect of WD consumption was found on the gut proteome. A substantial reduction was detected in Paneth cell proteins with antimicrobial activity, including lysozyme C-1, angiogenin-4, cryptdin-related sequence 1C-3 and -2, α-defensin 17, and intelectin-1a. The key protein expressed by goblet cells, mucin-2, was also reduced in the IE-irKO mice. Proteins involved in lipid metabolism, including aldose reductase-related protein 1, 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase, apolipoprotein A-II, and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isozyme 4, were increased in the mucosa of WD-fed IE-irKO mice compared with controls. In contrast, expression of the nutrient-responsive gut hormones, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and neurotensin, was reduced in the jejunal mucosa of IE-irKO mice, and the expression of proteins of the P-type adenosine triphosphatases and the solute carrier-transporter family was reduced in the colon of WD-fed IE-irKO mice. In conclusion, IE-irKO mice display a distinct molecular phenotype, suggesting a biological role of insulin and its receptor in determining differentiated cell specificity in the intestinal epithelium. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  10. [A solitary ganglioneuroma occurring in the sigmoid colon].

    PubMed

    Rabjerg, Maj; Kolodziejczyk, Adam

    2012-09-24

    We report a case of a rare solitary ganglioneuroma occurring in the sigmoid colon of a 70-year-old woman. She experienced sudden onset of abdominal pain and loss of old blood from the gastrointestinal tract. A colonoscopy disclosed a pedunculate polyp in the sigmoid colon 20 cm from the anus, and a histopathologic examination revealed a polypoid mucosa with abundant ganglionic cells and nerve fibres.

  11. Aberrant DNA methylation occurs in colon neoplasms arising in the azoxymethane colon cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Borinstein, Scott C.; Conerly, Melissa; Dzieciatkowski, Slavomir; Biswas, Swati; Washington, M. Kay; Trobridge, Patty; Henikoff, Steve; Grady, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Mouse models of intestinal tumors have advanced our understanding of the role of gene mutations in colorectal malignancy. However, the utility of these systems for studying the role of epigenetic alterations in intestinal neoplasms remains to be defined. Consequently, we assessed the role of aberrant DNA methylation in the azoxymethane (AOM) rodent model of colon cancer. AOM induced tumors display global DNA hypomethylation, which is similar to human colorectal cancer. We next assessed the methylation status of a panel of candidate genes previously shown to be aberrantly methylated in human cancer or in mouse models of malignant neoplasms. This analysis revealed different patterns of DNA methylation that were gene specific. Zik1 and Gja9 demonstrated cancer-specific aberrant DNA methylation, whereas, Cdkn2a/p16, Igfbp3, Mgmt, Id4, and Cxcr4 were methylated in both the AOM tumors and normal colon mucosa. No aberrant methylation of Dapk1 or Mlt1 was detected in the neoplasms, but normal colon mucosa samples displayed methylation of these genes. Finally, p19Arf, Tslc1, Hltf, and Mlh1 were unmethylated in both the AOM tumors and normal colon mucosa. Thus, aberrant DNA methylation does occur in AOM tumors, although the frequency of aberrantly methylated genes appears to be less common than in human colorectal cancer. Additional studies are necessary to further characterize the patterns of aberrantly methylated genes in AOM tumors. PMID:19777566

  12. Warty dyskeratoma of the oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Laskaris, G; Sklavounou, A

    1985-10-01

    A case of oral warty dyskeratoma is presented and the literature is reviewed in brief. While warty dyskeratoma of the oral mucosa is rare, it appears to exhibit a variability of clinical appearance and to have a special predilection for keratinised mucosae exposed to friction and mechanical stress.

  13. Heterotopic Gastric Mucosa in the Umbilicus

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Young Soo; Jeong, Se Yeong; Son, Sang Wook; Kim, Il-Hwan

    2010-01-01

    Heterotopia refers to the finding of normal tissue in foreign sites, entirely separate from the main organ. Heterotopic gastric mucosa has been observed throughout the alimentary tract, everywhere from the oral cavity to the rectum. However, occurrences in the umbilicus are an extremely rare and peculiar phenomena. We report the case of heterotopic gastric mucosa in the umbilicus. PMID:20548921

  14. Antispasmodic effects of myrrh due to calcium antagonistic effects in inflamed rat small intestinal preparations.

    PubMed

    Vissiennon, Cica; Goos, Karl-Heinz; Goos, Ole; Nieber, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Myrrh is the oleo-gum resin of mainly Commiphora molmol and as a powdered substance, one compound in the traditional medicinal product Myrrhinil-Intest®, which has been used for the treatment of unspecific, inflammatory intestinal disorders. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antispasmodic effect of myrrh under healthy and inflamed conditions, and to evaluate a calcium-antagonistic effect as a possible mode of action. Therefore, an ethanolic myrrh extract was tested for its effects on muscle tone and acetylcholine-induced contractions in untreated and inflamed rat ileum/jejunum preparations. Inflammation was experimentally induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (10 mM, 30 min). Additionally, the effect of the calcium channel agonist Bay K8644 in the presence of varying myrrh extract concentrations was examined. Myrrh extract (0.99 mg/mL) suppressed the acetylcholine-induced contraction down to 25.8 % in untreated and 15.2 % in inflamed preparations. Myrrh extract (0.15; 0.25 and 0.35 mg/mL) induced a concentration-dependent rightward shift of the Bay K8644 concentration-response curve in untreated and inflamed preparations with a significant EC50 shift. Schild analysis resulted in a pA2 value of 0.93 for untreated preparations. Increasing myrrh extract concentrations induced a concentration-dependent decrease of the agonistic maximum effect in untreated and inflamed preparations down to 15.8 % and 25.8 %, respectively, for the highest concentration leading to a pD2 value of 0.58. Myrrh extract reduced intestinal muscle tone and acetylcholine-induced contraction of untreated and inflamed ileum/jejunum preparations based on dual calcium antagonism characterized by a right shift of the agonistic dose-response curve and a depression of the maximum effect. The resulting reduction of intestinal motility and spasmolytic effects provide a rationale for the symptom treatment of intestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome

  15. Laser Treatment of Oral Mucosa Tattoo

    PubMed Central

    Gojkov-Vukelic, Mirjana; Hadzic, Sanja; Pasic, Enes

    2011-01-01

    The most common oral solitary pigmented lesion is the dental amalgam tattoo. It occurs as a result of colouring of the tissue by alien pigment which was administered intra or subepidermaly either intentionally or accidentally. The most common material used for the colouring of the oral mucosa is amalgam from amalgam fillings and metal particles from prosthetic restorations which are absorbed accidentally. The oral mucosa tattoos are most often found in the area of the marginal gingiva or the buccal mucosa. The metal particles may accidentally reach the area of the oral mucosa during various dentistry interventions. The therapy most often involves surgical intervention with excisional biopsy while in the recent period the low power laser therapy has provided exceptional results. The aim of the paper was to present the successful removal of the oral mucosa tattoo in a single visit. PMID:23408182

  16. Laser treatment of oral mucosa tattoo.

    PubMed

    Gojkov-Vukelic, Mirjana; Hadzic, Sanja; Pasic, Enes

    2011-12-01

    The most common oral solitary pigmented lesion is the dental amalgam tattoo. It occurs as a result of colouring of the tissue by alien pigment which was administered intra or subepidermaly either intentionally or accidentally. The most common material used for the colouring of the oral mucosa is amalgam from amalgam fillings and metal particles from prosthetic restorations which are absorbed accidentally. The oral mucosa tattoos are most often found in the area of the marginal gingiva or the buccal mucosa. The metal particles may accidentally reach the area of the oral mucosa during various dentistry interventions. The therapy most often involves surgical intervention with excisional biopsy while in the recent period the low power laser therapy has provided exceptional results. The aim of the paper was to present the successful removal of the oral mucosa tattoo in a single visit.

  17. Role of TRPV1 in high-threshold rat colonic splanchnic afferents is revealed by inflammation.

    PubMed

    Phillis, Benjamin D; Martin, Chris M; Kang, Daiwu; Larsson, Håkan; Lindström, Erik A; Martinez, Vicente; Blackshaw, L Ashley

    2009-08-07

    The vanilloid-1 receptor TRPV1 is known to play a role in extrinsic gastrointestinal afferent function. We investigated the role of TRPV1 in mechanosensitivity in afferents from normal and inflamed tissue. Colonic mechanosensitivity was determined in an in vitro rat colon preparation by recording from attached splanchnic nerves. Recordings were made from serosal/mesenteric afferents responding only at high thresholds to graded mechanical stimulation with von Frey probes. Colonic inflammation was induced by adding 5% dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) to the drinking water for 5 days, and was confirmed by histopathology. The selective TRPV1 antagonist, SB-750364 (10(-8) to 10(-6)M), was tested on mechanosensory stimulus response functions of afferents from normal and inflamed preparations (N=7 each). Mechanosensory responses had thresholds of 1-2g, and maximal responses were observed at 12 g. The stimulus response function was not affected by DSS-induced colitis. SB-750364 had no effect on stimulus response functions in normal preparations, but reduced (up to 60%) in a concentration-dependent manner those in inflammation (2-way ANOVA, p<0.05). Moreover, in inflamed tissue, spontaneous afferent activity showed a dose-dependent trend toward reduction with SB-750364. We conclude that mechanosensitivity of high-threshold serosal colonic splanchnic afferents to graded stimuli is unaffected during DSS colitis. However, there is a positive influence of TRPV1 in mechanosensitivity in inflammation, suggesting up-regulation of excitatory TRPV1-mediated mechanisms.

  18. Role of visceral fat in colonic inflammation: from Crohn's disease to diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Paeschke, Anna; Erben, Ulrike; Kredel, Lea I; Kühl, Anja A; Siegmund, Britta

    2017-01-01

    The composition of activated adipose tissue with adipocytes secreting a broad spectrum of immune-modulatory adipokines next to adipose tissue-derived stromal cells and professional immune effector cells in the visceral fat creates a complex network of inflammatory processes shaping local immune responses in the adjacent inflamed intestinal mucosa. In Crohn's disease a particular phenomenon called 'creeping fat' can be observed. Here the hyperplastic mesenteric fat tissue not only grows around inflamed small intestinal segments but also furthermore affects the regulation of the mucosal immune system. Diverticular disease is highly prevalent in the western world but the knowledge about its immunopathology remains incomplete. Interestingly, adipose tissue also frequently covers the basolateral site of inflamed diverticula, hence locally reflecting the phenomenon seen in Crohn's disease. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge in which measures this intraabdominal fat participates in the regulation of intestinal inflammation with a particular focus on differences and possible parallels in Crohn's disease and diverticulitis. The available data allow for suggesting that each inflamed diverticula mechanistically reflects Crohn's disease on a miniature scale.

  19. Detection of interleukin-8 in exudates from normal and inflamed human dental pulp tissues.

    PubMed

    Guo, X; Niu, Z; Xiao, M; Yue, L; Lu, H

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of IL-8 in exudates clinically obtained from normal and inflamed human dental pulp tissues so as to reveal the possible relationship between IL-8 and pulpitis. Samples of 2 microliters of pulpal exudate from each normal or clinically diagnosed as acute or chronic pulpitis teeth was obtained by filter paper strips and IL-8 level was measured by ELISA method. No IL-8 was detected in the samples from normal pulp, but significant amount of IL-8 appeared in inflamed pulp tissues, and the level of IL-8 in exudates of acute stage of pulpitis was higher than that of chronic stage (P < 0.01). This study demonstrates that IL-8 is produced and accumulated in pulp inflammation and may play a role in the occurrence and development of human pulpitis.

  20. Effects of alcohol on the morphological and structural changes in oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lin; Wang, Lili

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the morphological and structural changes of oral mucosa under the influence of alcohol. Methods: Sixty male and female specimens (42 males and 18 females) who died of chronic alcoholism were selected in this study. The specimens (5-7 mm) were sliced by the morphological-histological detection method, and stained by the HE and Spielmeyer (myelin staining) protocols respectively. Then five immune peroxidase chemical reaction tests were performed. Results: 10% of the tissue sections had epithelial hyperplasia points with hyperkeratosis and acanthosis. 90% of the sections had epithelial atrophy points with different degrees of damage, and had moderate infiltration of lymphocytes-macrophages in the basal oral mucosa simultaneously. For the tissue sections of patients who died of cardiovascular diseases with a history of alcoholism, about a half showed that extensive necrotic points were observed in different parts of oral mucosa, accompanied by a secondary infection. Approximately 15% of the sections had more dense and homogeneous necrotic tissues with microbial colonization, and the necrotic focus of 5% of the sections was located above the epithelial tissue, which was not distinctively different from other tissues. 48% of the sections were subjected to small nerve bundles with jeopardized deep oral mucosa, accompanied by necrosis of neuron axon and its myelin membrane. Conclusion: The findings of this study show that drinking alcohol over an extended time may lead to carcinogenic changes in oral mucosa. PMID:24353685

  1. Investigation of computer-aided colonic crypt pattern analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xin; Pan, Yinsheng; Sivak, Michael V., Jr.; Olowe, Kayode; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2007-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Approximately 50% of these deaths could be prevented by earlier detection through screening. Magnification chromoendoscopy is a technique which utilizes tissue stains applied to the gastrointestinal mucosa and high-magnification endoscopy to better visualize and characterize lesions. Prior studies have shown that shapes of colonic crypts change with disease and show characteristic patterns. Current methods for assessing colonic crypt patterns are somewhat subjective and not standardized. Computerized algorithms could be used to standardize colonic crypt pattern assessment. We have imaged resected colonic mucosa in vitro (N = 70) using methylene blue dye and a surgical microscope to approximately simulate in vivo imaging with magnification chromoendoscopy. We have developed a method of computerized processing to analyze the crypt patterns in the images. The quantitative image analysis consists of three steps. First, the crypts within the region of interest of colonic tissue are semi-automatically segmented using watershed morphological processing. Second, crypt size and shape parameters are extracted from the segmented crypts. Third, each sample is assigned to a category according to the Kudo criteria. The computerized classification is validated by comparison with human classification using the Kudo classification criteria. The computerized colonic crypt pattern analysis algorithm will enable a study of in vivo magnification chromoendoscopy of colonic crypt pattern correlated with risk of colorectal cancer. This study will assess the feasibility of screening and surveillance of the colon using magnification chromoendoscopy.

  2. Melanosis coli in patients with colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Biernacka-Wawrzonek, Dorota; Stępka, Michał; Tomaszewska, Alicja; Ehrmann-Jóśko, Agnieszka; Chojnowska, Natalia; Muszyński, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Melanosis coli is a benign lesion affecting the mucosa of the large intestine. There is a relationship between the presence of melanosis and anthraquinone laxative use. Melanosis coli is also observed in patients with colon cancer, but there is doubt whether these two conditions are related. Aim To analyze the correlation between melanosis and colon cancer. Material and methods We analyzed retrospectively 436 patients undergoing colon cancer surgery. There were 246 women and 190 men. Patients were divided into three age groups: under 50 years, between 51 and 65 years, and over 66 years. We analyzed sections of the cancer and intestinal mucosa from the tumor’s proximal (2–5 cm) and distal (8–10 cm) zone. Results Melanosis coli was present in 52 patients, which represents 11.9% of patients with colon cancer. More often it was present in women. The most common location of melanosis and colon cancer was the terminal part of the large intestine. In patients below 50 years of age in both sexes melanosis coli did not occur. In men, melanosis was more common in the age group over 66 years. Intensity of pigmentation was higher in the tumor’s distal zone. Conclusions The incidence of melanosis coli increases with age, similar to that of colon cancer. Melanosis was not present inside tumors, in almost half of the cases it was not present in the proximal zone, and the degree of pigmentation increased in distal zone. The cause-effect relationship between melanosis coli and colon cancer remains uncertain. PMID:28337232

  3. Neutralization of endogenous NGF prevents the sensitization of nociceptors supplying inflamed skin.

    PubMed

    Koltzenburg, M; Bennett, D L; Shelton, D L; McMahon, S B

    1999-05-01

    Evidence suggests that nerve growth factor (NGF) is an important mediator in inflammatory pain states: NGF levels increase in inflamed tissue, and neutralization of endogenous NGF prevents the hyperalgesia which normally develops during inflammation of the skin. Here we asked whether NGF contributes to sensitization of primary afferent nociceptors, which are an important component of pain and hyperalgesia in inflamed tissue. An in vitro skin nerve preparation of the rat was used to directly record the receptive properties of thin myelinated (Adelta) and unmyelinated (C) nociceptors innervating normal hairy skin, carrageenan-inflamed skin and carrageenan-inflamed skin where endogenous NGF had been neutralized by application of a trkA-IgG (tyrosine kinase Aimmunoglobulin G) fusion molecule. Following carrageenan inflammation, there was a marked increase in the proportion of nociceptors which displayed ongoing activity (50% of nociceptors developed spontaneous activity compared to 4% of nociceptors innervating normal uninflamed skin), and this was reflected in a significant increase in the average ongoing discharge activity. Spontaneously active fibres were sensitized to heat and displayed a more than twofold increase in their discharge to a standard noxious heat stimulus. Furthermore, the number of nociceptors responding to the algesic mediator bradykinin increased significantly from 28% to 58%. By contrast, the mechanical threshold of nociceptive afferents did not change during inflammation. When the NGF-neutralizing molecule trkA-IgG was coadministered with carrageenan at the onset of the inflammation, primary afferent nociceptors did not sensitize and displayed essentially normal response properties, although the inflammation as evidenced by tissue oedema developed normally. We therefore conclude that NGF is a crucial component for the sensitization of primary afferent nociceptors associated with tissue inflammation.

  4. A time-dependent degeneration manner of condyle in rat CFA-induced inflamed TMJ.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liqin; Guo, Huilin; Li, Cheng; Xu, Jie; Fang, Wei; Long, Xing

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation is a potential risk factor of osteoarthritis (OA) but the detailed degenerative changes in the inflamed TMJ remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated the changes of condylar cartilage and subchondral bone in rat inflamed TMJ induced by Freund's complete adjuvant (CFA). Articular cavity was injected with CFA and the TMJ samples were collected 1, 2, 3, and 4-week post-injection. Hematoxylin & Eosin (H&E) staining, toluidine blue (TB) staining, Safranin O (S.O) staining, Masson trichrome staining and micro-CT were used to assess TMJ degeneration during inflammation. Osteoclast and osteoblast activities were analyzed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining and osteocalcin (OCN) immunohistochemistry staining respectively. The expression of receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in condylar cartilage and subchondral bone was also evaluated through immunohistochemistry and RANKL/OPG ratio was evaluated. Reduced cartilage thickness, decreased number of chondrocytes, and down-regulated proteoglycan expression were observed in the condylar cartilage in the inflamed TMJ. Enhanced osteoclast activity, and expanded bone marrow cavity were reached the peak in the 2-week after CFA-injection. Meanwhile the RANKL/OPG ratio in the cartilage and subchondral bone also increased in the 2-week CFA-injection. Immature, unmineralized new bones with irregular trabecular bone structure, atypical condylar shape, up-regulated OCN expression, and decreased bone mineral density (BMD) were found in the inflamed TMJ. The time-dependent degeneration manner of TMJ cartilage and subchondral bone was found in CFA-induced arthritis rat model. The degeneration in the TMJ with inflammation might be a risk factor and should be concerned.

  5. Genomic Landscape of Colorectal Mucosa and Adenomas in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Borras, Ester; San Lucas, F. Anthony; Chang, Kyle; Zhou, Ruoji; Masand, Gita; Fowler, Jerry; Mork, Maureen E.; You, Y. Nancy; Taggart, Melissa W.; McAllister, Florencia; Jones, David A.; Davies, Gareth E.; Edelmann, Winfried; Ehli, Erik A.; Lynch, Patrick M.; Hawk, Ernest T.; Capella, Gabriel; Scheet, Paul; Vilar, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The molecular basis of the adenoma to carcinoma transition has been deduced using comparative analysis of genetic alterations observed through the sequential steps of intestinal carcinogenesis. However, comprehensive genomic analyses of adenomas and at-risk mucosa are still lacking. Therefore, our aim was to characterize the genomic landscape of colonic at-risk mucosa and adenomas. Experimental Design We analyzed the mutation profile and copy number changes of 25 adenomas and adjacent mucosa from 12 familial adenomatous polyposis patients using whole-exome sequencing and validated allelic imbalances in 37 adenomas using SNP arrays. We assessed for evidence of clonality and performed estimations on the proportions of driver and passenger mutations using a systems biology approach. Results Adenomas had lower mutational rates than did colorectal cancers and showed recurrent alterations in known cancer-driver genes (APC, KRAS, FBXW7, TCF7L2) and allelic imbalances in chromosomes 5, 7 and 13. Moreover, 80% of adenomas had somatic alterations in WNT pathway genes. Adenomas displayed evidence of multiclonality similar to stage I carcinomas. Strong correlations between mutational rate and patient age were observed in at-risk mucosa and adenomas. Our data indicate that at least 23% of somatic mutations are present in at-risk mucosa prior to adenoma initiation. Conclusions The genomic profiles of at-risk mucosa and adenomas illustrate the evolution from normal tissue to carcinoma via greater resolution of molecular changes at the inflection point of premalignant lesions. Furthermore, substantial genomic variation exists in at-risk mucosa before adenoma formation, and deregulation of the WNT pathway is required to foster carcinogenesis. PMID:27221540

  6. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    2002-12-01

    NASA interest in colonization encompasses space tourism; space exploration; space bases in orbit, at L1, on the Moon, or on Mars; in-situ resource utilization; and planetary terraforming. Activities progressed during 2002 in areas such as Mars colonies, hoppers, and biomass; space elevators and construction; and in-situ consumables.

  7. An unusual radiological presentation of mucinous adenocarcinoma of the colon

    PubMed Central

    Swann, Joanna; Kaczynski, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of an elderly patient presenting with the left iliac fossa mass. The provisional diagnosis included an inflammatory diverticular mass or sigmoid colon cancer. Interestingly, computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis demonstrated the left incarcerated Spigelian hernia containing an inflamed loop of the colon with signs of an early strangulation. However, at operation, a mucinous tumor was found involving the descending and upper sigmoid colon. The tumor eroded through the anterior abdominal wall, which was excised “en bloc.” In the presented case, CT findings suggestive of a benign etiology were misleading. This potentially could have had significant consequences if the patient was treated conservatively. This case highlights that clinical history and examination remain the core components of a safe surgical practice. Clinical judgment cannot be substituted even by the best quality imaging. Therefore, we feel that it is important to share our experience of the successful management of the presented case. PMID:28250979

  8. Helicobacter pylori protein oxidation influences the colonization process.

    PubMed

    Godlewska, Renata; Dzwonek, Artur; Mikuła, Michał; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Pawłowski, Marcin; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elzbieta K

    2006-08-01

    Dsb proteins control the formation and rearrangement of disulfide bonds during the folding of membrane and exported proteins. Here we examined the role of DsbI protein in Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis and demonstrated that a dsbI mutant impaired in disulfide bond formation revealed a greatly reduced ability to colonize mice gastric mucosa.

  9. No tolerance to peripheral morphine analgesia in presence of opioid expression in inflamed synovia.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, C; Pflüger, M; Yassouridis, A; Hoelzl, J; Lehrberger, K; Welte, C; Hassan, A H

    1996-01-01

    Pain treatment with centrally acting opiates is limited by tolerance. Tolerance is a decreasing effect of a drug with prolonged administration of that drug or of a related (e.g., endogenous) compound acting at the same receptor. This is often associated with a downregulation of receptors. In peripheral inflamed tissue, both locally expressed opioid peptides and morphine can produce powerful analgesia mediated by similar populations of opioid receptors. We hypothesized that the chronic presence of endogenous opioids in inflamed joints might convey downregulation of peripheral opioid receptors and tolerance to the analgesic effects of intraarticular morphine. We assessed these effects after arthroscopic surgery in patients with and without histologically verified synovial cellular infiltration, and we examined synovial opioid peptides and opioid receptors by immunocytochemistry and autoradiography, respectively. We found that, despite an abundance of opioid-containing cells in pronounced synovitis, morphine is at least as effective as in patients without such cellular infiltrations, and there is no major downregulation of peripheral opioid receptors. Thus, opioids expressed in inflamed tissue do not produce tolerance to peripheral morphine analgesia. Tolerance may be less pronounced for peripherally than for centrally acting opioids, which provides a promising perspective for the treatment of chronic pain in arthritis and other inflammatory conditions. PMID:8698872

  10. MicroRNA expression in inflamed and noninflamed gingival tissues from Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yorimasa; Matsui, Sari; Kato, Ayako; Zhou, Liming; Nakayama, Yohei; Takai, Hideki

    2014-12-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by specific bacteria and viruses. Local, systemic, and environmental factors affect the rate of disease progression. Immune responses to bacterial products, and the subsequent production of inflammatory cytokines, are crucial in the destruction of periodontal tissue. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small RNAs that control various cell processes by negatively regulating protein-coding genes. In this study, we compared miRNA expression in inflamed and noninflamed gingival tissues from Japanese dental patients. Total RNAs were isolated from inflamed and noninflamed gingival tissues. miRNA expression profiles were examined by an miRNA microarray, and the data were analyzed by GeneSpring GX, Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, and the TargetScan databases. Observed miRNA expression levels in inflamed gingiva were confirmed by real-time PCR. The three most overexpressed (by >2.72-fold) miRNAs were hsa-miR-150, hsa-miR-223, and hsa-miR-200b, and the three most underexpressed (by <0.39-fold) miRNAs were hsa-miR-379, hsa-miR-199a-5p, and hsa-miR-214. In IPA analysis, hsa-miR-150, hsa-miR-223, and hsa-miR-200b were associated with inflammatory disease, organismal injury, abnormalities, urological disease, and cancer. The present findings suggest that miRNAs are associated with chronic periodontitis lesions in Japanese.

  11. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase as a marker in colon carcinogenesis: analysis of the prostaglandin pathway in human colonic tissue

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dong-Hoon; Ryu, Yeon-Mi; Lee, Sun-Mi; Jeong, Jin-Yong; Yoon, Soon Man; Ye, Byong Duk; Byeon, Jeong-Sik; Yang, Suk-Kyun

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGEs-1) regulate prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) expression and are involved in colon carcinogenesis. We investigated the expression of PGE2 and its regulating genes in sporadic human colon tumors and matched normal tissues. Methods Twenty colonic adenomas and 27 colonic adenocarcinomas were evaluated. COX-2 and 15-PGDH expression was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The expression of PGE2 and mPGEs-1 was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting, respectively. Results The expression of COX-2, mPGEs-1, and PGE2 did not differ between the adenomas and matched distant normal tissues. 15-PGDH expression was lower in adenomas than in the matched normal colonic tissues (P<0.001). In adenocarcinomas, mPGEs-1 and PGE2 expression was significantly higher (P<0.001 and P=0.020, respectively), and COX-2 expression did not differ from that in normal tissues (P=0.207). 15-PGDH expression was significantly lower in the normal colonic mucosa from adenocarcinoma patients than in the normal mucosa from adenoma patients (P=0.018). Conclusions Early inactivation of 15-PGDH, followed by activation of COX-2 and mPGEs-1, contributes to PGE2 production, leading to colon carcinogenesis. 15-PGDH might be a novel candidate marker for early detection of field defects in colon carcinogenesis. PMID:28239316

  12. Metabolomics and metabolic pathway networks from human colorectal cancers, adjacent mucosa, and stool.

    PubMed

    Brown, Dustin G; Rao, Sangeeta; Weir, Tiffany L; O'Malia, Joanne; Bazan, Marlon; Brown, Regina J; Ryan, Elizabeth P

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancers (CRC) are associated with perturbations in cellular amino acids, nucleotides, pentose-phosphate pathway carbohydrates, and glycolytic, gluconeogenic, and tricarboxylic acid intermediates. A non-targeted global metabolome approach was utilized for exploring human CRC, adjacent mucosa, and stool. In this pilot study, we identified metabolite profile differences between CRC and adjacent mucosa from patients undergoing colonic resection. Metabolic pathway analyses further revealed relationships between complex networks of metabolites. Seventeen CRC patients participated in this pilot study and provided CRC, adjacent mucosa ~10 cm proximal to the tumor, and stool. Metabolomes were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). All of the library standard identifications were confirmed and further analyzed via MetaboLync(TM) for metabolic network interactions. There were a total of 728 distinct metabolites identified from colonic tissue and stool matrices. Nineteen metabolites significantly distinguished CRC from adjacent mucosa in our patient-matched cohort. Glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate demonstrated 0.64-fold and 0.75-fold lower expression in CRC compared to mucosa, respectively, whereas isobar: betaine aldehyde, N-methyldiethanolamine, and adenylosuccinate had 2.68-fold and 1.88-fold higher relative abundance in CRC. Eleven of the 19 metabolites had not previously been reported for CRC relevance. Metabolic pathway analysis revealed significant perturbations of short-chain fatty acid metabolism, fructose, mannose, and galactose metabolism, and glycolytic, gluconeogenic, and pyruvate metabolism. In comparison to the 500 stool metabolites identified from human CRC patients, only 215 of those stool metabolites were also detected in tissue. This CRC and stool metabolome investigation identified novel metabolites that may serve as key small molecules in

  13. Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC) Exacerbates Colonic Inflammatory Symptoms in Dextran Sodium Sulphate-Induced Murine Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Yoke-Leng; Klopcic, Borut; Lloyd, Frances; Forrest, Cynthia; Greene, Wayne; Lawrance, Ian C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC) is expressed during tissue repair and regulates cellular proliferation, migration and cytokine expression. The aim was to determine if SPARC modifies intestinal inflammation. Methods Wild-type (WT) and SPARC-null (KO) mice received 3% dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) for 7 days. Inflammation was assessed endoscopically, clinically and histologically. IL-1β, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17A, IL-12/IL23p40, TNF-α, IFN-γ, RANTES, MCP-1, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MIG and TGF-β1 levels were measured by ELISA and cytometric bead array. Inflammatory cells were characterised by CD68, Ly6G, F4/80 and CD11b immunofluorescence staining and regulatory T cells from spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes were assessed by flow cytometry. Results KO mice had less weight loss and diarrhoea with less endoscopic and histological inflammation than WT animals. By day 35, all (n = 13) KO animals completely resolved the inflammation compared to 7 of 14 WT mice (p<0.01). Compared to WTs, KO animals at day 7 had less IL1β (p = 0.025) and MIG (p = 0.031) with higher TGFβ1 (p = 0.017) expression and a greater percentage of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in the spleen and draining lymph nodes of KO animals (p<0.01). KO mice also had fewer CD68+ and F4/80+ macrophages, Ly6G+ neutrophils and CD11b+ cells infiltrating the inflamed colon. Conclusions Compared to WT, SPARC KO mice had less inflammation with fewer inflammatory cells and more regulatory T cells. Together, with increased TGF-β1 levels, this could aid in the more rapid resolution of inflammation and restoration of the intestinal mucosa suggesting that the presence of SPARC increases intestinal inflammation. PMID:24204877

  14. Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Yardimci, Gurkan; Kutlubay, Zekayi; Engin, Burhan; Tuzun, Yalcin

    2014-01-01

    Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa, known as potentially malignant disorders in recent years, are consists of a group of diseases, which should be diagnosed in the early stage. Oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, and oral erythroplakia are the most common oral mucosal diseases that have a very high malignant transformation rate. Oral lichen planus is one of the potentially malignant disorders that may be seen in six different subtypes including papular, reticular, plaque-like, atrophic, erosive, and bullous type, clinically. Atrophic and erosive subtypes have the greater increased malignant transformation risk compared to another subtypes. Although there are various etiological studies, the etiology of almost all these diseases is not fully understood. Geographically, etiologic factors may vary. The most frequently reported possible factors are tobacco use, alcohol drinking, chewing of betel quid containing areca nut, and solar rays. Early diagnosis is very important and can be lifesaving, because in late stages, they may be progressed to severe dysplasia and even carcinoma in situ and/or squamous cell carcinoma. For most diseases, treatment results are not satisfactory in spite of miscellaneous therapies. While at the forefront of surgical intervention, topical and systemic treatment alternatives such as corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and retinoids are widely used. PMID:25516862

  15. Characterization of colonic dendritic cells in normal and colitic mice.

    PubMed

    Cruickshank, Sheena M; English, Nicholas R; Felsburg, Peter J; Carding, Simon R

    2005-10-28

    Recent studies demonstrating the direct involvement of dendritic cells (DC) in the activation of pathogenic T cells in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease identify DC as important antigen presenting cells in the colon. However, very little is known about the properties of colonic DC. Using immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy and flow cytometry we have characterized and compared colonic DC in the colon of healthy animals and interleukin-2-deficient (IL2(-/-)) mice that develop colitis. In the healthy colon, DC resided within the lamina propria and in close association with the basement membrane of colonic villi. Type 1 myeloid (CD11c(+), CD11b(+), B220(-), CD8alpha(-)) DC made up the largest (40-45%) population and all DC expressed low levels of CD80, CD86, and CD40, and had high endocytic activity consistent with an immature phenotype. In colitic IL2(-/-) mice, colonic DC numbers increased four- to five-fold and were localized within the epithelial layer and within aggregates of T and B cells. They were also many more DC in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). The majority (>85%) of DC in the colon and MLN of IL2(-/-) mice were type 1 myeloid, and expressed high levels of MHC class II, CD80, CD86, CD40, DEC 205, and CCR5 molecules and were of low endocytic activity consistent with mature DC. These findings demonstrate striking changes in the number, distribution and phenotype of DC in the inflamed colon. Their intimate association with lymphocytes in the colon and draining lymph nodes suggest that they may contribute directly to the ongoing inflammation in the colon.

  16. Characterization of colonic dendritic cells in normal and colitic mice

    PubMed Central

    Cruickshank, Sheena M; English, Nicholas R; Felsburg, Peter J; Carding, Simon R

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Recent studies demonstrating the direct involvement of dendritic cells (DC) in the activation of pathogenic T cells in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease identify DC as important antigen presenting cells in the colon. However, very little is known about the properties of colonic DC. METHODS: Using immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy and flow cytometry we have characterized and compared colonic DC in the colon of healthy animals and interleukin-2-deficient (IL2-/-) mice that develop colitis. RESULTS: In the healthy colon, DC resided within the lamina propria and in close association with the basement membrane of colonic villi. Type 1 myeloid (CD11c+, CD11b+, B220-, CD8α-) DC made up the largest (40-45%) population and all DC expressed low levels of CD80, CD86, and CD40, and had high endocytic activity consistent with an immature phenotype. In colitic IL2-/- mice, colonic DC numbers increased four- to five-fold and were localized within the epithelial layer and within aggregates of T and B cells. They were also many more DC in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). The majority (>85%) of DC in the colon and MLN of IL2-/- mice were type 1 myeloid, and expressed high levels of MHC class II, CD80, CD86, CD40, DEC 205, and CCR5 molecules and were of low endocytic activity consistent with mature DC. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate striking changes in the number, distribution and phenotype of DC in the inflamed colon. Their intimate association with lymphocytes in the colon and draining lymph nodes suggest that they may contribute directly to the ongoing inflammation in the colon. PMID:16419163

  17. Colonic transit time is related to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the gut.

    PubMed

    Roager, Henrik M; Hansen, Lea B S; Bahl, Martin I; Frandsen, Henrik L; Carvalho, Vera; Gøbel, Rikke J; Dalgaard, Marlene D; Plichta, Damian R; Sparholt, Morten H; Vestergaard, Henrik; Hansen, Torben; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Nielsen, H Bjørn; Pedersen, Oluf; Lauritzen, Lotte; Kristensen, Mette; Gupta, Ramneek; Licht, Tine R

    2016-06-27

    Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism and its importance for host health, although a firm stool consistency, a proxy for a long colonic transit time, has recently been positively associated with gut microbial richness. Here, we show that colonic transit time in humans, assessed using radio-opaque markers, is associated with overall gut microbial composition, diversity and metabolism. We find that a long colonic transit time associates with high microbial richness and is accompanied by a shift in colonic metabolism from carbohydrate fermentation to protein catabolism as reflected by higher urinary levels of potentially deleterious protein-derived metabolites. Additionally, shorter colonic transit time correlates with metabolites possibly reflecting increased renewal of the colonic mucosa. Together, this suggests that a high gut microbial richness does not per se imply a healthy gut microbial ecosystem and points at colonic transit time as a highly important factor to consider in microbiome and metabolomics studies.

  18. Colonic mucus, smoking and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Pullan, R D

    1996-03-01

    Human colonic mucosal protection is not fully understood but may in part rely on a layer of mucus gel adherent to the mucosa. Ulcerative colitis may occur if mucosal protection breaks down. Two studies are presented, both of which relate to the aetiology of ulcerative colitis. First, a layer of adherent mucus gel was demonstrated by a simple, reliable method. Measurements of mucus layer thickness were made in freshly resected colonic specimens and shown to increase from a mean of 107 microns on the right colon to 155 microns in the rectum. In ulcerative colitis the layer is significantly thinner or absent, whereas in Crohn's disease the colonic mucus layer is significantly thicker. Second, the relationship between smoking and colitis is explored by a double-blind, randomised and placebo-controlled trial of transdermal nicotine in active disease. Significant clinical benefit was seen, indicating nicotine may be both useful therapeutically and the component of tobacco smoke that acts to protect against colitis. Since smoking and nicotine have actions on mucosae and mucus in other organs, it is argued that there is a mucus deficiency in ulcerative colitis that smoking acts to reverse.

  19. [Phenotypic analysis of Th cells in colon and peripheral blood in patients with irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu; Tong, Jing-Jing; Pan, Qi; Wang, Wen-Feng; Zou, Kai-Fang; Qian, Wei; Hou, Xiao-Hua

    2009-08-11

    OBJECTIVE; To analyze the change of Th1/Th2/Th17 in colonic mucosa and peripheral blood in diarrhea-predominant IBS (D-IBS) to uncover the underlying mechanism for the activation of mucosal immune system. Colonic biopsy specimens and peripheral blood were obtained from patients with D-IBS (n = 27) and controls (n = 16). Two different groups were classified on the basis of histological assessment of biopsy specimens from D-IBS patients. One group (14 of 27) had normal conventional histology (IBS), while another group (13 of 27) had nonspecific microscopic inflammation (IBS-A). Flow cytometric detection of intracellular IFN-gamma/IL-4/IL-17 cytokine production was employed to investigate Th1, Th2 and Th17 cells in colonic lamina propria and peripheral blood. Western blot was used to determine the expressions of IL-12, IL-4 and IL-17 in colonic mucosa. The levels of IL-12, IL-4 and IL-17 in peripheral blood were detected by ELISA. In colonic mucosa, the proportion of Th17 increased in IBS-A group as compared with controls [3.60 (4.05) vs 1.25 (3.70), P = 0.045], but not in IBS group. No difference could be observed in the frequencies of Th1 and Th2 in colonic mucosa and peripheral blood. The levels of IL-12, IL4 and IL-17 in IBS and IBS-A showed no difference in either colonic mucosa or peripheral blood. Subgroup of D-IBS showed abnormal conventional histology, implicating the activation of mucosal immune system in pathogenesis. The shift of Th1/Th2/Th17 balance in colonic mucosa showed the enhanced Th17 activity.

  20. [Regeneration of the gastric and intestinal mucosas].

    PubMed

    Castrup, H J

    1979-05-10

    The physiological cell renewal of gastrointestinal mucosa is regulated in man as in animal through certain mechanisms with measurable kinetic data. Pathologic mucosal alterations, metabolic disorders, pharmacological agents etc. clearly affect the regenerative processes of the gastrointestinal epithelium. Gastrin and pentagastrin stimulate the growth not only of the parietal cells, but also of the superficial epithelium of the gastric mucosa, whereas secretin does not change cell growth. Glucocorticoid steroids inhibit epithelial regeneration in all parts of the gastrointestinal tract. 5-fluorouracil has a similar effect but acts at a different site in the regeneration cycle. Epithelial cell proliferation of the gastric and intestinal mucosa is likewise inhibited in an uremic condition. In inflammatory changes in the human gastric mucosa epithelial cell hyperproliferation relative to the severity of gastritis and anomalous proliferation within regions of dysplasia can be demonstrated. Foveolary hyperplasia in Ménétrier's disease occurs on the basis of excessive hyperproliferation with displacement of regeneration zones.

  1. Normal keratinized mucosa transplants in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Holmstrup, P; Dabelsteen, E; Reibel, J; Harder, F

    1981-01-01

    Two types of normal keratinized mucosa were transplanted to subcutaneous sites of nude mice of two different strains. 24 intact specimens of clinically normal human palatal mucosa were transplanted to nude mice of the strain nu/nu NC. The transplants were recovered after 42 d with a recovery rate of 96%. Moreover, 22 intact specimens of normal rat forestomach mucosa were transplanted to nude mice of the strain nu/nu BALB/c/BOM. These transplants were recovered after 21 d with a recovery rate of 63%. The histologic features of the transplants were essentially the same as those of the original tissues. However, epithelial outgrowths from the transplants differed with respect to the pattern of keratinization. The outgrowths of human palatal mucosa transplants were essentially unkeratinized, while the outgrowths of the rat forestomach transplants showed continued keratinization.

  2. [Morphological changes of the colon in patients with irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wierzbicka-Tutka, Iga; Ciećko-Michalska, Irena; Jabłoński, Konrad; Adamek, Dariusz; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disease belonging to the group of chronic functional gastrointestinal disorders. Variety of symptoms and lack of macroscopic and structural pathologies in colon, make IBS a challenge both in diagnosis and in medication. According to the last reports, the role of chronic minimal inflammation in colon mucosa is becoming more relevant. The aim of this study was to verify the microscopic and macroscopic changes in colon mucosa in patients with IBS. A retrospective study of microscopic changes and macroscopic lesions in colon, due to endoscopy biopsies in the group of 89 patients diagnosed with IBS in an average age of 47 years. Mild inflammation of colonic mucosa in lamina propria was observed in 92% patients, 34% presented other inflammatory cells. No statistical relationship between macroscopic lesions (in 44% cases) and lymphatic infiltration was observed. Low grade inflammation of lamina propria in colon was observed among patients with IBS. Beside the edema of the lamina propria, no correlation between macroscopic and microscopic changes was found. Despite the fact that IBS is a functional disorder, in many patients occur morphological changes in colon mucosa. Further studies are necessary.

  3. Autofluorescence spectroscopy of oral mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, S. K.; Uppal, A.; Gupta, P. K.

    1998-06-01

    We report the results of an in-vitro study on autofluorescence from pathologically characterized normal and malignant squamous tissues from the oral cavity. The study involved biopsy samples from 47 patients with oral cancer of which 11 patients had cancer of tongue, 17 of buccal mucosa and 19 of alveolus. The results of excitation and emission spectroscopy at several wavelengths (280 nm less than or equal to (lambda) exless than or equal to 460 nm; 340 nm less than or equal to (lambda) em less than or equal to 520 nm) showed that at (lambda) ex equals 337 nm and 400 nm the mean value for the spectrally integrated fluorescence intensity [(Sigma) (lambda ) IF((lambda) )] from the normal tissue sites was about a factor of 2 larger than that from the malignant tissue sites. At other excitation wavelengths the difference in (Sigma) (lambda ) IF((lambda) ) was not statistically significant. Similarly, for (lambda) em equals 390 nm and 460 nm, the intensity of the 340 nm band of the excitation spectra from normal tissues was observed to be a factor of 2 larger than that from malignant tissues. Analysis of these results suggests that NADH concentration is higher in normal oral tissues compared to the malignant. This contrasts with our earlier observation of an reduced NADH concentration in normal sites of breast tissues vis a vis malignant sites. For the 337 nm excited emission spectra a 10-variable MVLR score (using (Sigma) (lambda ) IF((lambda) ) and normalized intensities at nine wavelengths as input parameters) provided a sensitivity and specificity of 95.7% and 93.1% over the sample size investigated.

  4. Angiopoietin-like 4 Mediates Colonic Inflammation by Regulating Chemokine Transcript Stability via Tristetraprolin

    PubMed Central

    Phua, Terri; Sng, Ming Keat; Tan, Eddie Han Pin; Chee, Dickson Shao Liang; Li, Yinliang; Wee, Jonathan Wei Kiat; Teo, Ziqiang; Chan, Jeremy Soon Kiat; Lim, Maegan Miang Kee; Tan, Chek Kun; Zhu, Pengcheng; Arulampalam, Velmurugesan; Tan, Nguan Soon

    2017-01-01

    Many gastrointestinal diseases exhibit a protracted and aggravated inflammatory response that can lead to hypercytokinaemia, culminating in extensive tissue damage. Recently, angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) has been implicated in many inflammation-associated diseases. However, how ANGPTL4 regulates colonic inflammation remains unclear. Herein, we show that ANGPTL4 deficiency in mice (ANGPTL4−/−) exacerbated colonic inflammation induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) or stearic acid. Microbiota was similar between the two genotypes prior DSS challenge. A microarray gene expression profile of the colon from DSS-treated ANGPTL4−/− mice was enriched for genes involved in leukocyte migration and infiltration, and showed a close association to inflamed ulcerative colitis (UC), whereas the profile from ANGPTL4+/+ littermates resembled that of non-inflamed UC biopsies. Bone marrow transplantation demonstrates the intrinsic role of colonic ANGPTL4 in regulating leukocyte infiltration during DSS-induced inflammation. Using immortalized human colon epithelial cells, we revealed that the ANGPTL4-mediated upregulation of tristetraprolin expression operates through CREB and NF-κB transcription factors, which in turn, regulates the stability of chemokines. Together, our findings suggest that ANGPTL4 protects against acute colonic inflammation and that its absence exacerbates the severity of inflammation. Our findings emphasize the importance of ANGPTL4 as a novel target for therapy in regulating and attenuating inflammation. PMID:28287161

  5. Angiopoietin-like 4 Mediates Colonic Inflammation by Regulating Chemokine Transcript Stability via Tristetraprolin.

    PubMed

    Phua, Terri; Sng, Ming Keat; Tan, Eddie Han Pin; Chee, Dickson Shao Liang; Li, Yinliang; Wee, Jonathan Wei Kiat; Teo, Ziqiang; Chan, Jeremy Soon Kiat; Lim, Maegan Miang Kee; Tan, Chek Kun; Zhu, Pengcheng; Arulampalam, Velmurugesan; Tan, Nguan Soon

    2017-03-13

    Many gastrointestinal diseases exhibit a protracted and aggravated inflammatory response that can lead to hypercytokinaemia, culminating in extensive tissue damage. Recently, angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) has been implicated in many inflammation-associated diseases. However, how ANGPTL4 regulates colonic inflammation remains unclear. Herein, we show that ANGPTL4 deficiency in mice (ANGPTL4(-/-)) exacerbated colonic inflammation induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) or stearic acid. Microbiota was similar between the two genotypes prior DSS challenge. A microarray gene expression profile of the colon from DSS-treated ANGPTL4(-/-) mice was enriched for genes involved in leukocyte migration and infiltration, and showed a close association to inflamed ulcerative colitis (UC), whereas the profile from ANGPTL4(+/+) littermates resembled that of non-inflamed UC biopsies. Bone marrow transplantation demonstrates the intrinsic role of colonic ANGPTL4 in regulating leukocyte infiltration during DSS-induced inflammation. Using immortalized human colon epithelial cells, we revealed that the ANGPTL4-mediated upregulation of tristetraprolin expression operates through CREB and NF-κB transcription factors, which in turn, regulates the stability of chemokines. Together, our findings suggest that ANGPTL4 protects against acute colonic inflammation and that its absence exacerbates the severity of inflammation. Our findings emphasize the importance of ANGPTL4 as a novel target for therapy in regulating and attenuating inflammation.

  6. Expression of pIgR in the tracheal mucosa of SHIV/SIV-infected rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong; Wang, Feng-Jie; Yu, Lei; Yao, Wen-Rong; Cui, Yan-Fang; Yang, Gui-Bo

    2017-01-01

    Polymeric immunoglobulin receptors (pIgR) are key participants in the formation and secretion of secretory IgA (S-IgA), which is critical for the prevention of microbial infection and colonization in the respiratory system. Although increased respiratory colonization and infections are common in HIV/AIDS, little is known about the expression of pIgR in the airway mucosa of these patients. To address this, the expression levels of pIgR in the tracheal mucosa and lungs of SHIV/SIV-infected rhesus macaques were examined by real-time RTPCR and confocal microscopy. We found that the levels of both PIGR mRNA and pIgR immunoreactivity were lower in the tracheal mucosa of SHIV/SIV-infected rhesus macaques than that in non-infected rhesus macaques, and the difference in pIgR immunoreactivity was statistically significant. IL-17A, which enhances pIgR expression, was also changed in the same direction as that of pIgR. In contrast to changes in the tracheal mucosa, pIgR and IL-17A levels were higher in the lungs of infected rhesus macaques. These results indicated abnormal pIgR expression in SHIV/SIV, and by extension HIV infections, which might partially result from IL-17A alterations and might contribute to the increased microbial colonization and infection related to pulmonary complications in HIV/AIDS. PMID:28271669

  7. Expression of endothelial adhesion molecules in the alveolar ridge mucosa, gingiva and periimplant mucosa.

    PubMed

    Zitzmann, N U; Berglundh, T; Marinello, C P; Lindhe, J

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells in the alveolar ridge mucosa, the gingiva and the periimplant mucosa in humans. Twelve partially edentulous subjects were included in the study. In each subject, one soft tissue biopsy was harvested from the edentulous alveolar ridge mucosa, one from a tooth site and one from an implant site. After 3 weeks of undisturbed plaque accumulation, an additional biopsy was obtained from one tooth and one implant site in each subject. The tissue samples were snap frozen and prepared for immunohistochemical analysis. In the alveolar ridge mucosa, smaller proportions of endothelial cells expressing ICAM-1, ELAM-1 and VCAM-1 were observed than in the gingiva. ELAM-1-positive cells occurred in lower numbers than in periimplant mucosa. After 21 days of plaque accumulation, ELAM-1 was increased in tooth sites, but decreased in periimplant mucosa. The results of the present study indicated that the proportions of activated endothelial cells and the extravasation of leukocytes is larger in gingiva and periimplant mucosa than in alveolar ridge mucosa. This might be due to the less permeable keratinized epithelial layer in the edentulous ridge mucosa, which offers proper protection against microbial pathogens. The greater expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules during experimental gingivitis, compared to periimplant mucositis, may reflect its longer history of repeated antigenic assaults.

  8. Localization of tumor-associated glycoprotein DF3 in normal, inflammatory, and neoplastic lesions of the colon.

    PubMed

    Andrews, C W; Jessup, J M; Goldman, H; Hayes, D F; Kufe, D W; O'Hara, C J; Steele, G D

    1993-12-01

    The expression of DF3 was assessed by a monoclonal antibody in normal, inflammatory, and neoplastic conditions in the large bowel. Using immunohistochemistry, expression was examined in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsy and resection samples of 19 normal colonic mucosal specimens, 49 inflammatory lesions, 34 adenomas, and 38 primary colonic adenocarcinomas. In addition, Western blots of normal colonic mucosa and adenocarcinoma were examined. DF3 expression was detected in 84% of the adenocarcinomas with coarse membrane staining, intense positivity of luminal secretions, and focal cytoplasmic and intracytoplasmic vacuole staining. Nine of 32 areas of transitional mucosa revealed reactivity along apical membranes in crypt cells. Five adenomas containing carcinoma revealed DF3 positivity in the malignant areas only, whereas the remaining 29 were negative. Staining was membrane, luminal, and intracytoplasmic. Two examples of active ulcerative colitis revealed focal reactivity along the apical membrane of crypt cells. No other areas of staining were noted, including 12 cases containing dysplasia. Four of 10 other inflammatory lesions also revealed similar membrane reactivity in crypt cells. Normal colonic mucosa was nonreactive. Examples of normal colonic mucosa were negative for DF3 by Western blot analysis, whereas two carcinoma samples that reacted immunohistochemically were positive. DF3 is not detectable in normal colonic tissues. It is expressed focally and predominantly along the apical membrane of crypt cells in some inflammatory lesions and in the transitional mucosa of primary adenocarcinomas. Most adenocarcinomas of the colon and adenomas with foci of invasive carcinoma demonstrate reactivity in the cytoplasm and luminal secretions.

  9. Glycoconjugate with Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I-binding sites in normal mucosa, adenoma, and carcinoma of the human large bowel.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, S; Nakamura, T; Tanaka, S; Sato, E

    1982-10-01

    Cancerous lesions and nonneoplastic mucosa of surgically extirpated specimens from 94 patients with colorectal carcinoma (of the right colon, 31 patients; of the left colon, 29 patients; and of the rectum, 34 patients) and endoscopically polypectomized specimens from 18 patients with rectal adenoma were examined with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated or horse-radish peroxidase-conjugated Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) specific to a certain terminal alpha-L-fucosyl residue in glycoconjugates. Of the 31 patients with right colon cancers, 22 showed positive UEA-I binding in the neoplastic cell apexes, apical luminal borders, and luminal secretions. The adjacent nonneoplastic mucosa of all 31 patients, however, demonstrated positive UEA-I binding in the goblet cell mucus. UEA-I binding was positive for 23 of the 29 left colon cancers and for 28 of the 34 rectal cancers, although UEA-I binding was not revealed in the adjacent nonneoplastic mucosa for most of the cases. Of the 18 rectal adenomas, 12 specimens showed positive UEA-I binding in the apical secretions of their adenoma cells. Marked regional differences of UEA-I binding in the nonneoplastic mucosae indicated that the constituents of glycoprotein with UEA-I binding sites in goblet cell mucus differed significantly between the human right and left large bowels. Positive UEA-I binding in many rectal cancerous and adenomatous lesions suggested that a neoplastic glycoprotein with alpha-L-fucosyl residue was produced or that the terminal carbohydrate structure of glycoprotein present in the nonneoplastic mucosa was altered to bind easily with UEA-I after the neoplastic transformation had occurred. A possible relation of this UEA-I binding to blood group H(O) substance is discussed.

  10. Neuropilin-1 in Human Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Alexander A.; Fan, Fan; Liu, Wen Biao; Ahmad, Syed A.; Stoeltzing, Oliver; Reinmuth, Niels; Bielenberg, Diane; Bucana, Corazon D.; Klagsbrun, Michael; Ellis, Lee M.

    2004-01-01

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP-1), a recently identified co-receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor, is expressed by several nongastrointestinal tumor types and enhances prostate cancer angiogenesis and growth in preclinical models. We investigated the expression and regulation of NRP-1 and the effect of NRP-1 overexpression on angiogenesis and growth of human colon adenocarcinoma by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. NRP-1 was expressed in 20 of 20 human colon adenocarcinoma specimens but not in the adjacent nonmalignant colonic mucosa. By reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis, NRP-1 mRNA was expressed in seven of seven colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. Subcutaneous xenografts of stably transfected KM12SM/LM2 human colon cancer cells overexpressing NRP-1 led to increased tumor growth and angiogenesis in nude mice. In in vitro assays, conditioned medium from NRP-1-transfected cell lines led to an increase in endothelial cell migration, but did not affect endothelial cell growth. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) led to induction of NRP-1 in human colon adenocarcinoma cells and selective blockade of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) decreased constitutive and EGF-induced NRP-1 expression. Blockade of the Erk 1/2 and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways also led to a decrease in constitutive and EGF-induced NRP-1 expression. These findings demonstrate the ubiquitous expression of NRP-1 in human colon cancer and suggest that NRP-1 may contribute to colon cancer angiogenesis and growth. This study also suggests that EGF and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways play an important role in NRP-1 regulation in colon cancer cells. PMID:15161648

  11. Autofluorescence ratio imaging of human colonic adenomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaizumi, Katsuichi; Harada, Yoshinori; Wakabayashi, Naoki; Yamaoka, Yoshihisa; Dai, Ping; Tanaka, Hideo; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2011-02-01

    Recently autofluorescence imaging (AFI) endoscopy, visualizing tissue fluorescence in combination with reflected light, has been adopted as a technique for detecting neoplasms in the colon and other organs. However, autofluorescence colonoscopy is not infallible, and improvement of the detection method can be expected to enhance the performance. Colonic mucosa contains metabolism-related fluorophores, such as reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, which may be useful for visualizing neoplasia in autofluorescence endoscopy. We examined sliced cross-sections of endoscopically resected tubular adenomas under a microscope. Fluorescence images acquired at 365-nm excitation (F365ex) and 405-nm excitation (F405ex), and reflectance images acquired at 550 nm (R550) were obtained. Fluorescence ratio (F365ex/F405ex) images and reflectance/fluorescence ratio (R550/F405ex) images were calculated from the acquired images. The fluorescence ratio images could distinguish adenomatous mucosa from normal mucosa more clearly than the reflectance/fluorescence ratio images. The results showed that the autofluorescence ratio imaging is a potential technique for increasing the diagnostic power of autofluorescence endoscopy.

  12. Enhanced endoscopic detection of early colon cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandar, Gowra; Trowers, Eugene A.

    1999-06-01

    Enhanced endoscopic detection of small flat adenomas is becoming increasingly important as they have a reported 14 percent incidence of dysplasia when compared with 5% incidence in polypod adenomas of the same size. These lesions even when invasive do not show up against the translucent surrounding mucosa making endoscopic detection difficult. Dye spraying with indigo carmine makes their morphology clear, with well-circumscribed borders. Dye spraying and magnifying endoscopes can be used to observe pit patterns on the surface of the bowel. Combining dye spraying and high-resolution video endoscopy demonstrates well the colorectal epithelial surface. Scanning immersion video endoscopy visualizes the epithelial surface of the colorectal mucosa by high-resolution endoscopy after filling the lumen with water. Endoscopic ultrasound can be used to see if the lesion is intramucosal or not and assess the depth of invasion if malignancy is presented. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy has the potential to detect colonic dysplasia in vivo. Combining such technologies with conventional colonoscopy can help in the surveillance of large areas of colonic mucosa for the presence of dysplasia. Guided biopsy can replace random biopsy based on information provided at the time of colonoscopic examination.

  13. T Cell Interstitial Migration: Motility Cues from the Inflamed Tissue for Micro- and Macro-Positioning.

    PubMed

    Gaylo, Alison; Schrock, Dillon C; Fernandes, Ninoshka R J; Fowell, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    Effector T cells exit the inflamed vasculature into an environment shaped by tissue-specific structural configurations and inflammation-imposed extrinsic modifications. Once within interstitial spaces of non-lymphoid tissues, T cells migrate in an apparent random, non-directional, fashion. Efficient T cell scanning of the tissue environment is essential for successful location of infected target cells or encounter with antigen-presenting cells that activate the T cell's antimicrobial effector functions. The mechanisms of interstitial T cell motility and the environmental cues that may promote or hinder efficient tissue scanning are poorly understood. The extracellular matrix (ECM) appears to play an important scaffolding role in guidance of T cell migration and likely provides a platform for the display of chemotactic factors that may help to direct the positioning of T cells. Here, we discuss how intravital imaging has provided insight into the motility patterns and cellular machinery that facilitates T cell interstitial migration and the critical environmental factors that may optimize the efficiency of effector T cell scanning of the inflamed tissue. Specifically, we highlight the local micro-positioning cues T cells encounter as they migrate within inflamed tissues, from surrounding ECM and signaling molecules, as well as a requirement for appropriate long-range macro-positioning within distinct tissue compartments or at discrete foci of infection or tissue damage. The central nervous system (CNS) responds to injury and infection by extensively remodeling the ECM and with the de novo generation of a fibroblastic reticular network that likely influences T cell motility. We examine how inflammation-induced changes to the CNS landscape may regulate T cell tissue exploration and modulate function.

  14. T Cell Interstitial Migration: Motility Cues from the Inflamed Tissue for Micro- and Macro-Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Gaylo, Alison; Schrock, Dillon C.; Fernandes, Ninoshka R. J.; Fowell, Deborah J.

    2016-01-01

    Effector T cells exit the inflamed vasculature into an environment shaped by tissue-specific structural configurations and inflammation-imposed extrinsic modifications. Once within interstitial spaces of non-lymphoid tissues, T cells migrate in an apparent random, non-directional, fashion. Efficient T cell scanning of the tissue environment is essential for successful location of infected target cells or encounter with antigen-presenting cells that activate the T cell’s antimicrobial effector functions. The mechanisms of interstitial T cell motility and the environmental cues that may promote or hinder efficient tissue scanning are poorly understood. The extracellular matrix (ECM) appears to play an important scaffolding role in guidance of T cell migration and likely provides a platform for the display of chemotactic factors that may help to direct the positioning of T cells. Here, we discuss how intravital imaging has provided insight into the motility patterns and cellular machinery that facilitates T cell interstitial migration and the critical environmental factors that may optimize the efficiency of effector T cell scanning of the inflamed tissue. Specifically, we highlight the local micro-positioning cues T cells encounter as they migrate within inflamed tissues, from surrounding ECM and signaling molecules, as well as a requirement for appropriate long-range macro-positioning within distinct tissue compartments or at discrete foci of infection or tissue damage. The central nervous system (CNS) responds to injury and infection by extensively remodeling the ECM and with the de novo generation of a fibroblastic reticular network that likely influences T cell motility. We examine how inflammation-induced changes to the CNS landscape may regulate T cell tissue exploration and modulate function. PMID:27790220

  15. Helicobacter pylori colonization critically depends on postprandial gastric conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bücker, Roland; Azevedo-Vethacke, Marina; Groll, Claudia; Garten, Désirée; Josenhans, Christine; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Schreiber, Sören

    2012-01-01

    The risk of Helicobacter pylori infection is highest in childhood, but the colonization process of the stomach mucosa is poorly understood. We used anesthetized Mongolian gerbils to study the initial stages of H. pylori colonization. Prandial and postprandial gastric conditions characteristic of humans of different ages were simulated. The fraction of bacteria that reached the deep mucus layer varied strongly with the modelled postprandial conditions. Colonization success was weak with fast gastric reacidification typical of adults. The efficiency of deep mucus entry was also low with a slow pH decrease as seen in pH profiles simulating the situation in babies. Initial colonization was most efficient under conditions simulating the postprandial reacidification and pepsin activation profiles in young children. In conclusion, initial H. pylori colonization depends on age-related gastric physiology, providing evidence from an in vivo infection model that suggests an explanation why the bacterium is predominantly acquired in early childhood. PMID:23251780

  16. Receptive properties of myelinated primary afferents innervating the inflamed urinary bladder of the cat.

    PubMed

    Häbler, H J; Jänig, W; Koltzenburg, M

    1993-02-01

    1. The present study has investigated the receptive properties of myelinated mechanoreceptive primary afferents innervating the inflamed urinary bladder of the cat. In 15 experiments, 20 units were recorded from the dorsal and 3 from the ventral root S2. Before inflammation the afferents had no resting activity and responded consistently to increases of intravesical pressure evoked by isotonic distension or isovolumetric contractions. All units were studied before and after the onset of an acute inflammation induced by intraluminal injection of mustard (1-2.5%) or turpentine oil (50%), which are known to induce an acute cystitis. 2. Eleven out of 14 units tested with mustard oil and 5/9 units tested with turpentine oil were activated at short latency. The response could not be explained by a concomitant increase of intraluminal pressure resulting from the intravesical injection of the irritant. This suggests that a large proportion of mechanosensitive afferents has an additional chemosensitivity. 3. After removal of the irritants and with empty bladder, all afferent units exhibited irregular ongoing activity with intermittent high-frequency bursts. Such ongoing activity was entirely absent in myelinated afferents supplying the noninflamed bladder. The median rate of ongoing activity was significantly higher after mustard oil (1.65 imp/s) than after turpentine oil treatment (0.05 imp/s) 1 h after chemical stimulation. Post-hoc analysis revealed that afferents that developed high levels of ongoing activity had steeper stimulus response functions to changes of intravesical pressure before inflammation. 4. The stimulus-response function of vesical afferents changed characteristically in the inflamed bladder. Within 30 min of mustard oil treatment, the responses of some units to bladder filling was transiently enhanced, but later the units desensitized to this stimulus. However, there was no significant change of the stimulus-response function of six afferents studied

  17. Characterization and significance of ACE2 and Mas receptor in human colon adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Stella; Zennaro, Cristina; Palmisano, Silvia; Velkoska, Elena; Sabato, Nicoletta; Toffoli, Barbara; Giacomel, Greta; Buri, Luigi; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Bellini, Giuseppe; Burrell, Louise M; De Manzini, Nicolò; Fabris, Bruno

    2012-03-01

    A new arm of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been recently characterized; this includes angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)2 and angiotensin (Ang)1-7, a heptapeptide acting through the Mas receptor (MasR). Recent studies show that Ang1-7 has an antiproliferative action on lung adenocarcinoma cells. The aim of this study was to characterize RAS expression in human colon adenocarcinoma and to investigate whether Ang1-7 exerts an antiproliferative effect on human colon adenocarcinoma cells. Gene, protein expression and enzymatic activity of the main components of the RAS were determined on non-neoplastic colon mucosa as well as on the tumor mass and the mucosa taken 5 cm distant from it, both collected from patients with colon adenocarcinoma. Two different human colon cancer cell lines were treated with AngII and Ang1-7. The novel finding of this study was that MasR was significantly upregulated in colon adenocarcinoma compared with non-neoplastic colon mucosa, which showed little or no expression of it. ACE gene expression and enzymatic activity were also increased in the tumors. However, AngII and Ang1-7 did not have any pro-/antiproliferative effects in the cell lines studied. The data suggest that upregulation of the MasR could be used as a diagnostic marker of colon adenocarcinoma.

  18. Human papillomavirus DNA in oral squamous cell carcinomas and normal oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kansky, A A; Poljak, M; Seme, K; Kocjan, B J; Gale, N; Luzar, B; Golouh, R

    2003-01-01

    To elucidate the putative etiologic role of human papillomaviruses (HPV) in oral carcinogenesis, a comparative study was carried out on 62 tissue specimens of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and on 62 specimens of histologically normal oral mucosa obtained from the individuals who matched the subjects with OSCC in age, gender, localization of obtained tissue specimens, drinking and smoking habits. Internal control amplification showed that amplifiable DNA was recovered from 59/62 and 61/62 tissue samples of OSCC and normal oral mucosa, respectively. The amplification with two different HPV L1 and one HPV E6 consensus primer sets showed the presence of the HPV DNA genotypes 16, 33, 58 in 5/59 (8.4%) OSCC specimens and HPV genotypes 11, 16, 31, 68 in 4/61 (6.6%) tissue samples of normal oral mucosa tested. In the study in which a comparative examination of the presence of HPV DNA was for the first time performed on the tissue samples of the patients with OSCC and the age- and gender-matched control subjects there was no significant difference in the prevalence of HPV DNA among both study groups. Our results suggest that occasional findings of HPV DNA in OSCC tissue specimens may be the result of an incidental HPV colonization of oral mucosa, rather than of viral infection, and that HPVs play a limited role in the etiopathogenesis of the majority of OSCC.

  19. Innate immunity components and cytokines in gastric mucosa in children with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Michalkiewicz, Jacek; Helmin-Basa, Anna; Grzywa, Renata; Czerwionka-Szaflarska, Mieczyslawa; Szaflarska-Poplawska, Anna; Mierzwa, Grazyna; Marszalek, Andrzej; Bodnar, Magdalena; Nowak, Magdalena; Dzierzanowska-Fangrat, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE. To investigate the expression of innate immunity components and cytokines in the gastric mucosa among H. pylori infected and uninfected children. Materials and Methods. Biopsies of the antral gastric mucosa from children with dyspeptic symptoms were evaluated. Gene expressions of innate immunity receptors and cytokines were measured by quantitative real-time PCR. The protein expression of selected molecules was tested by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS. H. pylori infection did not lead to a significant upregulation of MyD88, TLR2, TLR4, CD14, TREM1, and TREM2 mRNA expression but instead resulted in high mRNA expression of IL-6, IL-10, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and CD163. H. pylori cagA(+) infection was associated with higher IL-6 and IL-10 mRNA expression, as compared to cagA(-) strains. H. pylori infected children showed increased IFN-γ and TNF-α protein levels. IFN-γ mRNA expression correlated with both H. pylori density of colonization and lymphocytic infiltration in the gastric mucosa, whereas TNF-α protein expression correlated with bacterial density. CONCLUSION. H. pylori infection in children was characterized by (a) Th1 expression profile, (b) lack of mRNA overexpression of natural immunity receptors, and (c) strong anti-inflammatory activities in the gastric mucosa, possibly resulting from increased activity of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. This may explain the mildly inflammatory gastric inflammation often observed among H. pylori infected children.

  20. Chronic ethanol feeding promotes azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium-induced colonic tumorigenesis potentially by enhancing mucosal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pradeep K; Chaudhry, Kamaljit K; Mir, Hina; Gangwar, Ruchika; Yadav, Nikki; Manda, Bhargavi; Meena, Avtar S; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-03-07

    Alcohol consumption is one of the major risk factors for colorectal cancer. However, the mechanism involved in this effect of alcohol is unknown. We evaluated the effect of chronic ethanol feeding on azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS)-induced carcinogenesis in mouse colon. Inflammation in colonic mucosa was assessed at a precancerous stage by evaluating mucosal infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages, and analysis of cytokine and chemokine gene expression. Chronic ethanol feeding significantly increased the number and size of polyps in colon of AOM/DSS treated mice. Confocal microscopic and immunoblot analyses showed a significant elevation of phospho-Smad, VEGF and HIF1α in the colonic mucosa. RT-PCR analysis at a precancerous stage indicated that ethanol significantly increases the expression of cytokines IL-1α, IL-6 and TNFα, and the chemokines CCL5/RANTES, CXCL9/MIG and CXCL10/IP-10 in the colonic mucosa of AOM/DSS treated mice. Confocal microscopy showed that ethanol feeding induces a dramatic elevation of myeloperoxidase, Gr1 and CD68-positive cells in the colonic mucosa of AOM/DSS-treated mice. Ethanol feeding enhanced AOM/DSS-induced suppression of tight junction protein expression and elevated cell proliferation marker, Ki-67 in the colonic epithelium. This study demonstrates that chronic ethanol feeding promotes colonic tumorigenesis potentially by enhancing inflammation and elevation of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines.

  1. Leukocyte-inspired biodegradable particles that selectively and avidly adhere to inflamed endothelium in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhalkar, Harshad S.; Dalal, Milind K.; Salem, Aliasger K.; Ansari, Ramin; Fu, Jie; Kiani, Mohammad F.; Kurjiaka, David T.; Hanes, Justin; Shakesheff, Kevin M.; Goetz, Douglas J.

    2003-12-01

    We exploited leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion chemistry to generate biodegradable particles that exhibit highly selective accumulation on inflamed endothelium in vitro and in vivo. Leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesive particles exhibit up to 15-fold higher adhesion to inflamed endothelium, relative to noninflamed endothelium, under in vitro flow conditions similar to that present in blood vessels, a 6-fold higher adhesion to cytokine inflamed endothelium relative to non-cytokine-treated endothelium in vivo, and a 10-fold enhancement in adhesion to trauma-induced inflamed endothelium in vivo due to the addition of a targeting ligand. The leukocyte-inspired particles have adhesion efficiencies similar to that of leukocytes and were shown to target each of the major inducible endothelial cell adhesion molecules (E-selectin, P-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1) that are up-regulated at sites of pathological inflammation. The potential for targeted drug delivery to inflamed endothelium has significant implications for the improved treatment of an array of pathologies, including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and cancer.

  2. Monocyte-mediated delivery of polymeric backpacks to inflamed tissues: a generalized strategy to deliver drugs to treat inflammation.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Aaron C; Gilbert, Jonathan B; Kumar, Sunny; Gupta, Vivek; Cohen, Robert E; Rubner, Michael F; Mitragotri, Samir

    2015-02-10

    Targeted delivery of drugs and imaging agents to inflamed tissues, as in the cases of cancer, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and arthritis, represents one of the major challenges in drug delivery. Monocytes possess a unique ability to target and penetrate into sites of inflammation. Here, we describe a broad approach to take advantage of the natural ability of monocytes to target and deliver flat polymeric particles ("Cellular Backpacks") to inflamed tissues. Cellular backpacks attach strongly to the surface of monocytes but do not undergo phagocytosis due to backpack's size, disk-like shape and flexibility. Following attachment of backpacks, monocytes retain important cellular functions including transmigration through an endothelial monolayer and differentiation into macrophages. In two separate in vivo inflammation models, backpack-laden monocytes exhibit increased targeting to inflamed tissues. Cellular backpacks, and their abilities to attach to monocytes without impairing monocyte functions and 'hitchhike' to a variety of inflamed tissues, offer a new platform for both cell-mediated therapies and broad targeting of inflamed tissues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic contributions to colonic hydrogen sulfide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Flannigan, Kyle L; McCoy, Kathy D; Wallace, John L

    2011-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is an important modulator of many aspects of digestive function, both in health and disease. Colonic tissue H(2)S synthesis increases markedly during injury and inflammation and appears to contribute to resolution. Some of the bacteria residing in the colon can also produce H(2)S. The extent to which bacterial H(2)S synthesis contributes to what is measured as colonic H(2)S synthesis is not clear. Using conventional and germ-free mice, we have delineated the eukaryotic vs. prokaryotic contributions to colonic H(2)S synthesis, both in healthy and colitic mice. Colonic tissue H(2)S production is entirely dependent on the presence of the cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (vitamin B(6)), while bacterial H(2)S synthesis appears to occur independent of this cofactor. As expected, approximately one-half of the H(2)S produced by feces is derived from eukaryotic cells. While colonic H(2)S synthesis is markedly increased when the tissue is inflamed, and, in proportion to the extent of inflammation, fecal H(2)S synthesis does not change and tissue granulocytes do not appear to be the source of the elevated H(2)S production. Rats fed a B vitamin-deficient diet for 6 wk exhibited significantly diminished colonic H(2)S synthesis, but fecal H(2)S synthesis was not different from that of rats on the control diet. Our results demonstrate that H(2)S production by colonic bacteria does not contribute significantly to what is measured as colonic tissue H(2)S production, using the acetate trapping assay system employed in this study.

  4. [Nasal mucosa in patients with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Müller, Maciej; Betlejewski, Stanisław

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common endocrinologic disease all over the world. 150 million people suffer from this disease, in Poland about 2 million. The disease on the basis of the onset and pathophysiology may be divided into type I and type II. Pathophysiologic changes include diabetic microangiopathy, macroangiopathy and neuropathy. The most common presentations in head and neck are otitis externa, hypoacusis, vertigo, disequilibrium, xerostomia, dysphagia, fungal and recurrent infections. The changes in nasal mucosa are not very well known. Only few papers concerned the problem. The main complaints of patients regarding the nose are xeromycteria, hyposmia and various degree of decreased patency of the nose. Chronic atrophic rhinitis, septal perforation, ulceration of nasal mucosa, alar necrosis, symptoms of staphylococcal or fungal infection can be found during otolaryngologic examination. The treatment in this group of patients should consist of systemic therapy of diabetes mellitus and on the other hand focal therapy with the use of a solution to moisten the nasal mucosa.

  5. Reduction of sensory responses to passive movements of inflamed knee joints by hylan, a hyaluronan derivative.

    PubMed

    Pozo, M A; Balazs, E A; Belmonte, C

    1997-08-01

    Hyaluronan (sodium hyaluronate) is a glycosaminoglycan that is present in all joint tissues. Painful arthritic joints have been characterized by hyaluronan of reduced elastoviscosity. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether hyaluronan has an influence on joint nociceptor sensitivity and whether restoration of elastoviscosity would decrease nerve responses from nociceptive afferent fibers in arthritic joints. Nerve impulse activity was recorded from nociceptive afferent fibers of the medial articular nerve in anesthetized cats. An acute experimental arthritis was produced by intra-articular injection of kaolin and carrageenan. This caused, within 3 h, the development of ongoing nerve activity and enhancement of nerve impulse responses to passive movements in the normal range of the joint. Intra-articular injection of an elastoviscous solution of hylan, a hyaluronan derivative, significantly reduced both the ongoing activity and the movement-evoked responses in 1-2 h. This effect was not obtained when a nonelastoviscous solution of hylan was injected into the inflamed joint. The results indicate that intra-articularly injected elastoviscous solutions of hylan reduced nociceptive activity in inflamed joints through an elastoviscous, rheological effect on nociceptive afferent fibers through the intercellular matrix in which these fibers are embedded.

  6. Uropod elongation is a common final step in leukocyte extravasation through inflamed vessels

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Young-Min; Sumagin, Ronen; Sarangi, Pranita P.; Lomakina, Elena; Overstreet, Michael G.; Baker, Christina M.; Fowell, Deborah J.; Waugh, Richard E.; Sarelius, Ingrid H.

    2012-01-01

    The efficient trafficking of immune cells into peripheral nonlymphoid tissues is key to enact their protective functions. Despite considerable advances in our understanding of cell migration in secondary lymphoid organs, real-time leukocyte recruitment into inflamed tissues is not well characterized. The conventional multistep paradigm of leukocyte extravasation depends on CD18 integrin–mediated events such as rapid arrest and crawling on the surface of the endothelium and transmigration through the endothelial layer. Using enhanced three-dimensional detection of fluorescent CD18 fusion proteins in a newly developed knockin mouse, we report that extravasating leukocytes (neutrophils, monocytes, and T cells) show delayed uropod detachment and become extremely elongated before complete transmigration across the endothelium. Additionally, these cells deposit CD18+ microparticles at the subendothelial layer before retracting the stretched uropod. Experiments with knockout mice and blocking antibodies reveal that the uropod elongation and microparticle formation are the result of LFA-1–mediated adhesion and VLA-3–mediated cell migration through the vascular basement membrane. These findings suggest that uropod elongation is a final step in the leukocyte extravasation cascade, which may be important for precise regulation of leukocyte recruitment into inflamed tissues. PMID:22711877

  7. Expression of the Somatostatin Receptor Subtype 4 in Intact and Inflamed Pulmonary Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Varecza, Zoltán; Elekes, Krisztián; László, Terézia; Perkecz, Anikó; Pintér, Erika; Sándor, Zoltán; Szolcsányi, János; Keszthelyi, Dániel; Szabó, Árpád; Sándor, Katalin; Molnár, Tamás F.; Szántó, Zalán; Pongrácz, Judit E.; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2009-01-01

    Somatostatin released from capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves of the lung during endotoxin-induced murine pneumonitis inhibits inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, presumably via somatostatin receptor subtype 4 (sst4). The goal of the present study was to identify sst4 receptors in mouse and human lungs and to reveal its inflammation-induced alterations with real-time quantitative PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. In non-inflamed mouse and human lungs, mRNA expression and immunolocalization of sst4 are very similar. They are present on bronchial epithelial, vascular endothelial, and smooth-muscle cells. The sst4 receptor protein in the mouse lung significantly increases 24 hr after intranasal endotoxin administration as well as in response to 3 months of whole-body cigarette smoke exposure, owing to the infiltrating sst4-positivite mononuclear cells and neutrophils. In the chronically inflamed human lung, the large number of activated macrophages markedly elevate sst4 mRNA levels, although there is no change in acute purulent pneumonia, in which granulocytes accumulate. Despite mouse granulocytes, human neutrophils do not show sst4 immunopositivity. We provide the first evidence for the expression, localization, and inflammation-induced alterations of sst4 receptors in murine and human lungs. Inasmuch as tissue distribution of this receptor is highly similar, extrapolation of murine experimental results to human conditions might be possible. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:1127–1137, 2009) PMID:19687471

  8. The immunomodulatory properties of periodontal ligament stem cells isolated from inflamed periodontal granulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenghua; Wang, Xinwen; Tan, Jun; Wang, Tao; Wang, Qintao

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is currently the main cause of tooth loss and as yet there is no appropriate method for establishing a functional and predictable periodontal regeneration. Tissue engineering involving seed cells provides a new prospect for periodontal regeneration. While periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) are a good choice for seed cells, it is not always possible to obtain the patients' own PDLSCs. We and others have found a type of stromal cells from inflamed periodontal granulation. These cells displayed similar differentiation properties to PDLSCs. Inflammation has a profound influence on the immunomodulatory properties of mesenchymal stem cells, which may affect therapeutic outcome. In this study, we assessed the immunomodulatory characteristics of these inflamed human (ih)PDLSCs. Along with the similarity in cell surface marker expressions, they also displayed immunomodulatory properties comparable to those in healthy human (hh)PDLSCs. Both hhPDLSCs and ihPDLSCs can suppress the proliferation and secretion of IFN-γ in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by indirect soluble mediators and direct cell-cell contact. Albeit with some quantitative variances, the gene expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthases, indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase, cyclooxygenase-2, TNF-α-induced protein 6 and IL-10 in ihPDLSCs displayed similar patterns as those in hhPDLSCs. Taken together, our results suggest that ihPDLSCs can provide a promising alternative to hhPDLSCs in terms of evident similarities in immunomodulatory properties as well as their easier accessibility and availability.

  9. Imaging CD4+ T cell interstitial migration in the inflamed dermis

    PubMed Central

    Gaylo, Alison; Overstreet, Michael G.; Fowell, Deborah J.

    2017-01-01

    The ability of CD4+ T cells to carry out effector functions is dependent upon the rapid and efficient migration of these cells in inflamed peripheral tissues through an as-yet undefined mechanism. The application of multiphoton microscopy to the study of the immune system provides a tool to measure the dynamics of immune responses within intact tissues. Here we present a protocol for non-invasive intravital multiphoton imaging of CD4+ T cells in the inflamed mouse ear dermis. Use of a custom imaging platform and a venous catheter allows for the visualization of CD4+ T cell dynamics in the dermal interstitium, with the ability to interrogate these cells in real-time via the addition of blocking antibodies to key molecular components involved in motility. This system provides advantages over both in vitro models and surgically invasive imaging procedures. Understanding the pathways used by CD4+ T cells for motility may ultimately provide insight into the basic function of CD4+ T cells as well as the pathogenesis of both autoimmune diseases and pathology from chronic infections. PMID:27078264

  10. Treatment of non-inflamed obstructive meibomian gland dysfunction by an infrared warm compression device

    PubMed Central

    Goto, E; Monden, Y; Takano, Y; Mori, A; Shimmura, S; Shimazaki, J; Tsubota, K

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To test the short term efficacy and safety of an infrared warm compression device (IWCD, Eye Hot, Cept Co, Tokyo, Japan) as treatment for non-inflamed meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). Methods: 37 subjects with non-inflamed obstructive MGD, with and without aqueous tear deficiency (ATD) dry eye, participated in a prospective non-comparative interventional case series. Symptom scores, face scores, tear evaporation rates, fluorescein and rose bengal vital staining, tear break up time (BUT), Schirmer test, meibomian gland obstruction, and meibography were compared before and after 2 weeks of therapy. Results: In a total of 37 cases, total subjective symptom scores and subjective face scores improved significantly, from 12.3 (SD 5.9) to 8.4 (6.1), and from 7.0 (1.7) to 5.3 (2.0) (both p <0.0001). The results for tear evaporation rates during forced blinking (p = 0.002), fluorescein staining (p = 0.03), rose bengal staining (p = 0.03), BUT (p <0.0001), and meibomian gland orifice obstruction score (p <0.0001) had also improved significantly at the end of the 2 week period of infrared thermotherapy. No complaints and/or complications of the IWCD were reported. Conclusion: The IWCD was effective and safe for the treatment of MGD. Improved tear stability associated with release of meibum is a possible mechanism of this treatment. PMID:12446375

  11. Colon cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - colon cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on colon cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/index Colon Cancer Alliance -- www.ccalliance.org National ...

  12. Parenteral nutrition supplemented with short-chain fatty acids: effect on the small-bowel mucosa in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Koruda, M J; Rolandelli, R H; Bliss, D Z; Hastings, J; Rombeau, J L; Settle, R G

    1990-04-01

    When enteral nutrition is excluded from animals maintained solely with total parenteral nutrition (TPN), atrophy of the intestinal mucosa is observed. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are produced in the colon by the fermentation of dietary carbohydrates and fiber polysaccharides and have been shown to stimulate mucosal-cell mitotic activity in the intestine. This study compared the effects of an intravenous and an intracecal infusion of SCFAs on the small-bowel mucosa. Rats received standard TPN, TPN with SCFAs (sodium acetate, propionate, and butyrate), TPN with an intracecal infusion of SCFAs, or rat food. After 7 d jejunal and ileal mucosal weights, DNA, RNA, and protein were determined. Standard TPN produced significant atrophy of the jejunal and ileal mucosa. Both the intracecal and intravenous infusion of SCFAs significantly reduced the mucosal atrophy associated with TPN. The intravenous and intracolonic infusion of SCFAs were equally effective in inhibiting small-bowel mucosal atrophy.

  13. Morphological characteristics of the intestinal mucosa in the Afghan pika (Ochotona rufescens rufescens).

    PubMed

    Kurohmaru, M; Hayakawa, T; Seki, M; Zyo, K

    1984-10-01

    The intestinal mucosa of the pika was examined with the naked eyes, a light microscope and a scanning electron microscope and was compared with that of the rabbit. The duodenal mucosa of the rabbit showed wavy folds different from so-called villi, while that of the pika exhibited leaf-like or columnar villi. In addition to the specific ileocecal lymphoid apparatuses, the pika had the peculiar region between the cecum and the proximal colon. That region called "the constricted portion" possessed characteristic net-arranged folds and well-developed muscular layers. At the lateral surface of these folds, small villus-like protrusions projected into the lumen in large numbers. The spiral fold ran around the mucosal surface of the rabbit cecum, whereas numerous slender protrusions, cecal digitations, projected into the lumen of the pika cecum. Although the colon of the pika showed a similar external figure to that of the rabbit, some differences were obviously found in histological structures. The first segment of the pika proximal colon with three teniae possessed several protrusions and well-developed mucous glands, while that of the rabbit had neither protrusions nor mucous glands. The second segment of the pika proximal colon with one tenia was covered with numerous villus-like protrusions, while that of the rabbit was composed of wart-like protrusions. The tubular mucous glands were observed in the lamina propria of the pika as well as the rabbit. The distal colon of the pika showed a flat mucosal surface and possessed tubular mucous glands as observed in the rabbit.

  14. Effect of Inulin on Proteome Changes Induced by Pathogenic Lipopolysaccharide in Human Colon.

    PubMed

    Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Altomare, Annamaria; Barera, Simone; Locato, Vittoria; Cocca, Silvia; Franchin, Cinzia; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Vannini, Candida; Grossi, Sarah; Campomenosi, Paola; Pasqualetti, Valentina; Bracale, Marcella; Alloni, Rossana; De Gara, Laura; Cicala, Michele

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the protective role of inulin against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress was evaluated on human colonic mucosa using a proteomic approach. Human colonic mucosa and submucosa were sealed between two chambers, with the luminal side facing upwards and overlaid with Krebs (control), LPS or LPS+ inulin IQ solution. The solutions on the submucosal side (undernatants) were collected following 30 min of mucosal exposure. iTRAQ based analysis was used to analyze the total soluble proteomes from human colonic mucosa and submucosa treated with different undernatants. Human colonic muscle strips were exposed to the undernatants to evaluate the response to acetylcholine. Inulin exposure was able to counteract, in human colonic mucosa, the LPS-dependent alteration of some proteins involved in the intestinal contraction (myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), myosin regulatory subunit (MYL)), to reduce the up-regulation of two proteins involved in the radical-mediated oxidative stress (the DNA-apurinic or apyrimidinic site) lyase) APEX1 and the T-complex protein 1 subunit eta (CCT7) and to entail a higher level of some detoxification enzymes (the metallothionein-2 MT2A, the glutathione-S-transferase K GSTk, and two UDP- glucuronosyltransferases UGT2B4, UGT2B17). Inulin exposure was also able to prevent the LPS-dependent intestinal muscle strips contraction impairment and the mucosa glutathione level alterations. Exposure of colonic mucosa to inulin seems to prevent LPS-induced alteration in expression of some key proteins, which promote intestinal motility and inflammation, reducing the radical-mediated oxidative stress.

  15. Neo-angiogenesis and the premalignant micro-circulatory augmentation of early colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Ashish K; Crawford, Susan E; Radosevich, Andrew; Wali, Ramesh K; Stypula, Yolanda; Kunte, Dhananjay P; Mutyal, Nikhil; Ruderman, Sarah; Gomes, Andrew; Cornwell, Mona L; De La Cruz, Mart; Brasky, Jeffrey; Gibson, Tina P; Backman, Vadim; Roy, Hemant K

    2011-07-28

    Spectroscopic techniques have demonstrated that in the microscopically normal mucosa, there is an increase in mucosal micro-circulation in patients harboring neoplasia elsewhere in the colon (i.e. marker of field carcinogenesis). However, the physiological and molecular basis of this early increase in blood supply (EIBS) has not been elucidated. We, therefore, investigated the microvessel density (MVD) and angiogenic gene expression in the premalignant colonic mucosa from the well-validated azoxymethane (AOM)-treated rat experimental model of colon carcinogenesis. Fisher 344 rats were treated with AOM (15 mg/kg i.p.) or saline and euthanized 14 weeks later (a time-point that precedes carcinoma development). Colon sections were studied for MVD via immunohistochemical assessment for CD31 and location was compared with optical assessment of mucosal hemoglobin with low-coherence enhanced backscattering spectroscopy (LEBS). Finally, we performed a pilot real-time PCR angiogenesis microarray (84 genes) from the microscopically normal colonic mucosa of AOM and age-matched saline treated rats. AOM treatment increased MVD in both the mucosa and submucosa of the rats (125% increase in mucosa; p<0.007, and 96% increase in submucosa; p<0.02) but the increase was most pronounced at the cryptal base consistent with the LEBS data showing maximal hemoglobin augmentation at 200-225 μm depth. Microarray analysis showed striking dysregulation of angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors. We demonstrate, for the first time, that neo-angiogenesis occurs in the microscopically normal colonic mucosa and was accentuated at the bottom of the crypt. This finding has potential implications as a biomarker for risk-stratification and target for chemoprevention. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Neo-Angiogenesis and the Premalignant Micro-Circulatory Augmentation of Early Colon Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Ashish K.; Crawford, Susan E.; Radosevich, Andrew; Wali, Ramesh K.; Stypula, Yolanda; Kunte, Dhananjay P.; Mutyal, Nikhil; Ruderman, Sarah; Gomes, Andrew; Cornwell, Mona L; De La Cruz, Mart; Brasky, Jeffrey; Gibson, Tina; Backman, Vadim; Roy, Hemant K.

    2013-01-01

    Spectroscopic techniques have demonstrated that in the microscopically normal mucosa, there is an increase in mucosal micro-circulation in patients harboring neoplasia elsewhere in the colon (i.e. marker of field carcinogenesis). However, the physiological and molecular basis of this early increase in blood supply (EIBS) has not been elucidated. We, therefore, investigated the microvessel density (MVD) and angiogenic gene expression in the premalignant colonic mucosa from the well-validated azoxymethane (AOM)-treated rat experimental model of colon carcinogenesis. Fisher 344 rats were treated with AOM (15 mg/kg i.p.) or saline and euthanized 14 weeks later (a time-point that precedes carcinoma development). Colon sections were studied for MVD via immunohistochemical assessment for CD31 and location was compared with optical assessment of mucosal hemoglobin with low-coherence enhanced backscattering spectroscopy (LEBS). Finally, we performed a pilot real-time PCR angiogenesis microarray (84 genes) from the microscopically normal colonic mucosa of AOM and age-matched saline treated rats. AOM treatment increased MVD in both the mucosa and submucosa of the rats (125% increase in mucosa; p<0.007, and 96% increase in submucosa; p<0.02) but the increase was most pronounced at the cryptal base consistent with the LEBS data showing maximal hemoglobin augmentation at 200-225μm depth. Microarray analysis showed striking dysregulation of angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors. We demonstrate, for the first time, that neo-angiogenesis occurs in the microscopically normal colonic mucosa and was accentuated at the bottom of the crypt. This finding has potential implications as a biomarker for risk-stratification and target for chemoprevention. PMID:21493000

  17. Effect of Inulin on Proteome Changes Induced by Pathogenic Lipopolysaccharide in Human Colon

    PubMed Central

    Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Barera, Simone; Locato, Vittoria; Cocca, Silvia; Franchin, Cinzia; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Vannini, Candida; Grossi, Sarah; Campomenosi, Paola; Pasqualetti, Valentina; Bracale, Marcella; Alloni, Rossana; De Gara, Laura; Cicala, Michele

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the protective role of inulin against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress was evaluated on human colonic mucosa using a proteomic approach. Human colonic mucosa and submucosa were sealed between two chambers, with the luminal side facing upwards and overlaid with Krebs (control), LPS or LPS+ inulin IQ solution. The solutions on the submucosal side (undernatants) were collected following 30 min of mucosal exposure. iTRAQ based analysis was used to analyze the total soluble proteomes from human colonic mucosa and submucosa treated with different undernatants. Human colonic muscle strips were exposed to the undernatants to evaluate the response to acetylcholine. Inulin exposure was able to counteract, in human colonic mucosa, the LPS-dependent alteration of some proteins involved in the intestinal contraction (myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), myosin regulatory subunit (MYL)), to reduce the up-regulation of two proteins involved in the radical-mediated oxidative stress (the DNA-apurinic or apyrimidinic site) lyase) APEX1 and the T-complex protein 1 subunit eta (CCT7) and to entail a higher level of some detoxification enzymes (the metallothionein-2 MT2A, the glutathione–S-transferase K GSTk, and two UDP- glucuronosyltransferases UGT2B4, UGT2B17). Inulin exposure was also able to prevent the LPS-dependent intestinal muscle strips contraction impairment and the mucosa glutathione level alterations. Exposure of colonic mucosa to inulin seems to prevent LPS-induced alteration in expression of some key proteins, which promote intestinal motility and inflammation, reducing the radical-mediated oxidative stress. PMID:28068390

  18. Characteristics of adherence of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli to human and animal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, T; Endo, S; Yokota, T; Echeverria, P

    1991-01-01

    An Escherichia coli strain (serotype O127a:H2) that had been isolated from a child with diarrhea in Thailand and that was negative for the virulence factors of the four categories of diarrheagenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic, enteropathogenic, enteroinvasive, and enterohemorrhagic) and that showed an aggregative pattern of adherence to HeLa cells was investigated for adherence to native or Formalin-fixed human and animal mucosa. The hemagglutinating activity and adherence ability of the bacteria were resistant to D-mannose and were strictly regulated by environmental conditions. Genetic data supported the close relation between the hemagglutinating activity and adherence ability. In accordance with the adherence pattern on tissue-cultured cells, the bacteria adhered to human and animal mucosa, as evidenced by a direct gold-labeling analysis. In human intestines, Formalin-fixed mucous coatings, epithelial cells of colonic mucosa, epithelial cells of ileal single lymphoid follicles and Peyer's patches, and the absorptive cells of jejunal or ileal villi provided adherence targets. Adherence to M cells in the Peyer's patch-associated epithelium was also confirmed. The adherence levels to native jejunal or ileal human villi were low, as was the case with the corresponding Formalin-fixed villi. In human urinary tract, the superficial epithelial cells of both native and Formalin-fixed ureter provided striking adherence targets. In animal (porcine and rabbit) small intestines, the bacteria adhered to the native villi to a lesser extent than to the Formalin-fixed villi. The adherence levels were compared with those of enterotoxigenic E. coli with colonization factor antigen (CFA)/I pili or CFA/II pili. The data suggested unique mucosa adherence characteristics of the enteroaggregative E. coli strain. The possibility of the adherence ability as a virulence factor was discussed. Images PMID:1680107

  19. Differential expression of CCL19 by DC-Lamp+ mature dendritic cells in human lymph node versus chronically inflamed skin.

    PubMed

    Katou, Fuminori; Ohtani, Haruo; Nakayama, Takashi; Nagura, Hiroshi; Yoshie, Osamu; Motegi, Katsutoshi

    2003-01-01

    De novo formation of lymphoid tissue is one of the characteristic features of chronic inflammation. The formation of T cell-mature dendritic cell (DC) clusters has been previously demonstrated in chronically inflamed skin infected with Candida albicans. A functional similarity was also found between chronic inflammation and the T-cell zone of lymph nodes (LNs), since a substantial fraction of phenotypically mature DCs in both tissues expressed CCL22 (macrophage-derived chemokine; MDC) and were closely surrounded by memory-type T cells expressing its receptor, CCR4. To analyse the nature of T cell-mature DC interactions further in chronically inflamed skin and LNs, the present study focuses on another chemokine system, namely CCL19 (EBI1 ligand chemokine; ELC), CCL21 (secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine; SLC) and their shared receptor, CCR7. RT-PCR analysis revealed expression of CCL19, CCL21, and CCR7 at high levels in LNs and at low levels in inflamed skin. Using immunohistochemistry, the majority of DC-Lamp(+) mature DCs in the T-cell area of LNs expressed CCL19 and were surrounded by CCR7(+) naïve-type lymphocytes, while CCL21 was expressed in reticular stromal cells and vascular endothelial cells. Very few mature DCs in LNs were found to express CCR7. In contrast, the majority of DC-Lamp(+) mature DCs in inflamed skin were totally negative for CCL19 and were surrounded by CCR7(-) memory-type T cells. Furthermore, CCL21 expression in the inflamed skin was detected in dermal lymphatic endothelial cells and rare CCR7(+) mature DCs were mostly seen within the lymphatic vessels. In normal skin, on the other hand, no cells immunoreactive for CCL19, CCL21, or CCR7 were found. The present study thus reveals a striking difference in the function of mature DCs between LNs and chronically inflamed skin. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Colon distention induces persistent visceral hypersensitivity by mechanotranscription of pain mediators in colonic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, You-Min; Fu, Yu; Wu, Chester C; Xu, Guang-Yin; Huang, Li-Yen; Shi, Xuan-Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal pain and distention are major complaints in irritable bowel syndrome. Abdominal distention is mainly attributed to intraluminal retention of gas or solid contents, which may cause mechanical stress to the gut wall. Visceral hypersensitivity (VHS) may account for abdominal pain. We sought to determine whether tonic colon distention causes persistent VHS and if so whether mechanical stress-induced expression (mechanotranscription) of pain mediators in colonic smooth muscle cells (SMCs) plays a role in VHS. Human colonic SMCs were isolated and stretched in vitro to investigate whether mechanical stress upregulates expression of the pain mediator cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Rat colon was distended with a 5-cm-long balloon, and gene expression of COX-2, visceromotor response (VMR), and sensory neuron excitability were determined. Static stretch of colonic SMCs induced marked expression of COX-2 mRNA and protein in a force- and time-dependent manner. Subnoxious tonic distention of the distal colon at ∼30-40 mmHg for 20 or 40 min induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in colonic smooth muscle, but not in the mucosa layer. Lumen distention also increased VMR in a force- and time-dependent manner. The increase of VMR persisted for at least 3 days. Patch-clamp experiments showed that the excitability of colon projecting sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia was markedly augmented, 24 h after lumen distention. Administration of COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 partially but significantly attenuated distention-induced VHS. In conclusion, tonic lumen distention upregulates expression of COX-2 in colonic SMC, and COX-2 contributes to persistent VHS. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Effects of immunostimulation with OK432, coenzyme Q10, or levamisole on dimethylhydrazine-induced colonic carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Yamamoto, J; Iwata, Y; Matsumoto, K; Iriyama, K

    1986-03-01

    Effects of immunostimulation with OK432, Coenzyme Q10 (Co-Q10), or levamisole on dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colonic carcinogenesis were investigated in 45 Donryu-rats. The manipulation with one of these immunopotentiators did not prevent DMH-induced colonic carcinogenesis in these rats. However, the number of tumors was significantly reduced and the incidence of invasive carcinomas decreased by immunostimulation. The treatment also reduced the number of lesions with epithelial dysplasia within the flat colonic mucosa.

  2. Distribution of fibronectin in the rectal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Scott, D L; Morris, C J; Blake, A E; Low-Beer, T S; Walton, K W

    1981-07-01

    Fibronectin is a glycoprotein of high molecular weight present in tissues, plasma, and tissue fluids. Its distribution in the rectal mucosa was studied by immunofluorescent and immunoperoxidase techniques using a monospecific antiserum. Immunofluorescent reactivity for fibronectin was present in the normal rectal mucosa of control subjects in epithelial cells, on basement membranes, and as a loose cribriform network of extracellular reactivity in the lamina propria that codistributed with histochemically demonstrable reticulin. Fibronectin was demonstrated immunoelectromicroscopically on collagen fibres, on smooth muscle cells and within and between columnar epithelial cells. In the rectal mucosa of patients with colitis with marked inflammatory changes, fibronectin appeared thickened and more prominent when present on basement membranes and as sparse strands between inflammatory cells infiltrating the lamina propria. In patients with longstanding colitis and less inflammatory cell infiltration there was a diffuse increase in fibronectin which was densely and uniformly present throughout the lamina propria. Fibronectin is a structural component of the rectal mucosa and changes in its distribution may form an important part of the local reaction to inflammatory bowel disease.

  3. Bioengineered vocal fold mucosa for voice restoration.

    PubMed

    Ling, Changying; Li, Qiyao; Brown, Matthew E; Kishimoto, Yo; Toya, Yutaka; Devine, Erin E; Choi, Kyeong-Ok; Nishimoto, Kohei; Norman, Ian G; Tsegyal, Tenzin; Jiang, Jack J; Burlingham, William J; Gunasekaran, Sundaram; Smith, Lloyd M; Frey, Brian L; Welham, Nathan V

    2015-11-18

    Patients with voice impairment caused by advanced vocal fold (VF) fibrosis or tissue loss have few treatment options. A transplantable, bioengineered VF mucosa would address the individual and societal costs of voice-related communication loss. Such a tissue must be biomechanically capable of aerodynamic-to-acoustic energy transfer and high-frequency vibration and physiologically capable of maintaining a barrier against the airway lumen. We isolated primary human VF fibroblasts and epithelial cells and cocultured them under organotypic conditions. The resulting engineered mucosae showed morphologic features of native tissue, proteome-level evidence of mucosal morphogenesis and emerging extracellular matrix complexity, and rudimentary barrier function in vitro. When grafted into canine larynges ex vivo, the mucosae generated vibratory behavior and acoustic output that were indistinguishable from those of native VF tissue. When grafted into humanized mice in vivo, the mucosae survived and were well tolerated by the human adaptive immune system. This tissue engineering approach has the potential to restore voice function in patients with otherwise untreatable VF mucosal disease.

  4. PSF3 marks malignant colon cancer and has a role in cancer cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagahama, Yumi; Ueno, Masaya; Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Mori, Masaki; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2010-02-05

    PSF3 (partner of Sld five 3) is a member of the tetrameric complex termed GINS, composed of SLD5, PSF1, PSF2, and PSF3, and well-conserved evolutionarily. Previous studies suggested that some GINS complex members are upregulated in cancer, but PSF3 expression in colon carcinoma has not been investigated. Here, we established a mouse anti-PSF3 antibody, and examined PSF3 expression in human colon carcinoma cell lines and colon carcinoma specimens. We found that PSF3 is expressed in the crypt region in normal colonic mucosa and that many PSF3-positive cells co-expressed Ki-67. This suggests that PSF3-positivity of normal mucosa is associated with cell proliferation. Expression of the PSF3 protein was greater in carcinoma compared with the adjacent normal mucosa, and even stronger in high-grade malignancies, suggesting that it may be associated with colon cancer progression. PSF3 gene knock-down in human colon carcinoma cell lines resulted in growth inhibition characterized by delayed S-phase progression. These results suggest that PSF3 is a potential biomarker for diagnosis of progression in colon cancer and could be a new target for cancer therapy.

  5. [Incidence of cholelithiasis in patients with cancer of the colon and adenomatous polyp].

    PubMed

    Paniagua Estévez, M; González Calleja, I; González Lazo, N; Jimenéz Mesa, G; Hernández Miranda, W

    1992-01-01

    Recent international publications remark the association about carcinoma of the colon and cholelithiasis. These two entities with similar geographical distribution can be seen frequently in the modern western societies, being the cause as aetiological factors the low content in dietetics fiber. Different studies about the carcinoma of the colon and cholelithiasis pathogenesis had lead the possibility that the abnormal degradation of bile acids for the colonic bacterias, could be responsible of each one of these illness. The exposition of colonic mucosa to products of degradation of bile acids, specially secondary bile acids, may play a role in the etiopathogenic of colon carcinoma. It was analysed 135 patients with colon carcinoma or adenomatosis polyps, 42 with cholelithiasis or cholecystectomized for the same cause (31.1%), although in the control group, only 2(5%) had cholelithiasis. The female predominated the group of colon carcinoma and cholelithiasis, as well as cholecystectomized for that cause. The most frequent associated pathology was the diverticulosis.

  6. Optical detection of (pre-)malignant lesions of the oral mucosa: autofluorescence characteristics of healthy mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Veld, Diana C. G.; Witjes, Max; Roodenburg, Jan L.; Star, Willem M.; Sterenborg, Hericus J. C. M.

    2001-10-01

    Previous clinical results demonstrate the potential of in vivo autofluorescence spectroscopy for early detection of (pre-)malignant lesions of the oral mucosa. For reliable diagnosis, it is necessary to study autofluorescence spectra of healthy mucosa first. We measured excitation-emission maps in healthy subjects and subjects with a history of cancer in the head -neck region. Our results show that different anatomical locations produce distinct autofluorescence spectra. Influences of, among others, smoking and drinking habits require further investigation.

  7. Inactivation of synovial fluid alpha 1-antitrypsin by exercise of the inflamed rheumatoid joint.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Farrell, A J; Blake, D R; Chidwick, K; Winyard, P G

    1993-04-26

    alpha 1-Antitrypsin (alpha 1AT) is known to be oxidised by reactive oxygen species both in vitro and in vivo, leading to its inactivation. We report here that synovial fluid (SF) alpha 1AT is inactivated during exercise of the knee-joints of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Sequential SF sampling from exercised RA patients showed a marked decrease in the mean activity of alpha 1AT after exercise with no change in the molecular forms of alpha 1AT. No such inactivation was found in the control (continuously resting) RA patients. We suggest that oxidation may contribute to alpha 1AT inactivation as a consequence of 'hypoxic-reperfusion' injury after exercise of the inflamed joint.

  8. Transcriptional profiling of stroma from inflamed and resting lymph nodes defines immunological hallmarks.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Deepali; Fletcher, Anne L; Astarita, Jillian; Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika; Tayalia, Prakriti; Gonzalez, Santiago F; Elpek, Kutlu G; Chang, Sook Kyung; Knoblich, Konstantin; Hemler, Martin E; Brenner, Michael B; Carroll, Michael C; Mooney, David J; Turley, Shannon J

    2012-04-01

    Lymph node stromal cells (LNSCs) closely regulate immunity and self-tolerance, yet key aspects of their biology remain poorly elucidated. Here, comparative transcriptomic analyses of mouse LNSC subsets demonstrated the expression of important immune mediators, growth factors and previously unknown structural components. Pairwise analyses of ligands and cognate receptors across hematopoietic and stromal subsets suggested a complex web of crosstalk. Fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) showed enrichment for higher expression of genes relevant to cytokine signaling, relative to their expression in skin and thymic fibroblasts. LNSCs from inflamed lymph nodes upregulated expression of genes encoding chemokines and molecules involved in the acute-phase response and the antigen-processing and antigen-presentation machinery. Poorly studied podoplanin (gp38)-negative CD31(-) LNSCs showed similarities to FRCs but lacked expression of interleukin 7 (IL-7) and were identified as myofibroblastic pericytes that expressed integrin α(7). Together our data comprehensively describe the transcriptional characteristics of LNSC subsets.

  9. Inducible galectins are expressed in the inflamed pharynx of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Vizzini, Aiti; Parrinello, Daniela; Sanfratello, Maria Antonietta; Salerno, Giuseppina; Cammarata, Matteo; Parrinello, Nicolò

    2012-01-01

    Although ascidians belong to a key group in chordate phylogenesis, amino acid sequences of Ciona intestinalis galectin-CRDs (CiLgals-a and -b) have been retained too divergent from vertebrate galectins. In the present paper, to contribute in disclosing Bi-CRD galectin evolution a novel attempt was carried out on CiLgals-a and -b CRDs phylogenetic analysis, and their involvement in ascidian inflammatory responses was shown. CiLgals resulted aligned with Bi-CRD galectins from vertebrates (Xenopus tropicalis, Gallus gallus, Mus musculus, Homo sapiens), cephalochordates (Branchiostoma floridae), echinoderms (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) and a mono-CRD galectin from the ascidian Clavelina picta. The CiLgals-a N-terminal and C-terminal CRDs contain the signature sequence involved in carbohydrate binding, whereas the CiLgals-b C-CRD presents only three out of seven key aminoacids and it could not be suitable as sugar binding motif. Sequence similarity between clusters suggests an evolutionary model based on CRD domain gene duplication and sequence diversification. In particular CiLgals-b N-CRD and C-CRD were similar to each other and both grouped with the ascidian C. picta mono-CRD. Homology modeling process shows a CiLgals molecular structure superimposed to chicken and mouse galectins. The CiLgals-a and CiLgals-b genes were upregulated by LPS inoculation suggesting that they are inducible and expressed in the inflamed pharynx as revealed by real-time PCR analysis. Finally, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical assays showed their localization in the inflamed tissues, while immunoblotting analysis indicated that CiLgals can form oligomers.

  10. Transendothelial migration of effector T cells across inflamed endothelial barriers does not require heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Stoler-Barak, Liat; Barzilai, Sagi; Zauberman, Ayelet; Alon, Ronen

    2014-06-01

    Leukocyte diapedesis is a chemotactic multistep process that requires optimal chemoattractant presentation by the endothelial barrier. Recent studies have described a critical role for heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (HSGAGs) in the presentation and functions of chemokines essential for lymphocyte interactions with the lymph node vasculature. We wished to test whether HS expression by a prototypic endothelial cell type, i.e. human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), is critical for their ability to support neutrophil and lymphocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration (TEM) under shear flow. We found that HUVECs deposit HS GAGs mainly at their basolateral compartments in both their resting and inflamed states. We next inactivated the key enzyme involved in HS biosynthesis, exostosin-1 (Ext1). Silencing Ext1 resulted in a complete loss of HS biosynthesis; nonetheless, TNF-α and IL-1β stimulation of key adhesion molecules and inflammatory chemokines necessary for neutrophil or lymphocyte adhesion and TEM remained intact. Ext1 silencing reduced neutrophil arrest and markedly impaired TEM, consistent with a role of basolateral HS GAGs in directing neutrophil crossing of inflamed endothelial barriers. Strikingly, however, the TEM of effector T cells across identically Ext1-silenced HUVECs remained normal. Importantly, the biosynthesis of the main promigratory chemokines for effector T cells and neutrophils, respectively, CCL2 and CXCL1, and their vesicle distributions were also Ext1 independent. These results suggest that transmigrating neutrophils must respond to chemokines transiently presented by apical and basolateral endothelial HS GAGs. In contrast, effector T cells can integrate chemotactic TEM signals directly from intra-endothelial chemokine stores rather than from externally deposited chemokines.

  11. Visfatin as a Novel Mediator Released by Inflamed Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Romacho, Tania; Villalobos, Laura A.; Cercas, Elena; Carraro, Raffaele; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F.; Peiró, Concepción

    2013-01-01

    Background Visfatin is a multifaceted adipokine whose circulating levels are enhanced in different metabolic diseases. Extracellular visfatin can exert various deleterious effects on vascular cells, including inflammation and proliferation. Limited evidence exists, however, on the capacity of human vascular cells to synthesize and release visfatin by themselves, under basal or pro-inflammatory conditions. Methods and Results Intracellular visfatin was detected by Western blot in non-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). However, exposing HUVEC for 18 h to a series of pro-inflammatory stimulus, such as interleukin (IL)-1β (1 to 10 ng/mL), tumor necrosis factor-α (1 to 10 ng/mL) or angiotensin II (10 pmol/L to 1 μmol/L) markedly enhanced intracellular visfatin content. Using IL-1β (10 ng/mL; 18 h), it was determined that the increase in intracellular visfatin, which was paralleled by enhanced visfatin mRNA levels, relied on a signalling mechanism involving both nuclear factor-κB and poly (ADP ribose) polymerase-1 activation. Moreover, IL-1β modified the sub-cellular localization of visfatin; while in non-stimulated HUVEC immunoreactive visfatin predominantly showed an intra-nuclear granular pattern, in IL-1β-inflamed cells an extra-nuclear filamentous staining, co-localising with F-actin fibers and suggesting a secretory pattern, was mainly found. Indeed, IL-1β promoted visfatin secretion, as determined by both ELISA and immunocytochemistry. Conclusions Human endothelial cells synthesize and release visfatin, particularly in response to inflammation. We suggest that the inflamed endothelium can be a source of visfatin, which arises as a local inflammatory mediator and a potential therapeutic target to interfere with vascular inflammation. PMID:24130902

  12. Tracking the Spatial and Functional Gradient of Monocyte-To-Macrophage Differentiation in Inflamed Lung.

    PubMed

    Sen, Debasish; Jones, Stephen M; Oswald, Erin M; Pinkard, Henry; Corbin, Kaitlin; Krummel, Matthew F

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived cells such as monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), and macrophages are at the heart of the immune effector function in an inflammatory response. But because of the lack of an efficient imaging system to trace these cells live during their migration and maturation in their native environment at sub-cellular resolution, our knowledge is limited to data available from specific time-points analyzed by flow cytometry, histology, genomics and other immunological methods. Here, we have developed a ratiometric imaging method for measuring monocyte maturation in inflamed mouse lungs in situ using real-time using 2-photon imaging and complementary methods. We visualized that while undifferentiated monocytes were predominantly found only in the vasculature, a semi-differentiated monocyte/macrophage population could enter the tissue and resembled more mature and differentiated populations by morphology and surface phenotype. As these cells entered and differentiated, they were already selectively localized near inflamed airways and their entry was associated with changes in motility and morphology. We were able to visualize these during the act of differentiation, a process that can be demonstrated in this way to be faster on a per-cell basis under inflammatory conditions. Finally, our in situ analyses demonstrated increases, in the differentiating cells, for both antigen uptake and the ability to mediate interactions with T cells. This work, while largely confirming proposed models for in situ differentiation, provides important in situ data on the coordinated site-specific recruitment and differentiation of these cells and helps elaborate the predominance of immune pathology at the airways. Our novel imaging technology to trace immunogenic cell maturation in situ will complement existing information available on in situ differentiation deduced from other immunological methods, and assist better understanding of the spatio-temporal cellular behavior during an

  13. Tracking the Spatial and Functional Gradient of Monocyte-To-Macrophage Differentiation in Inflamed Lung

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Debasish; Jones, Stephen M.; Oswald, Erin M.; Pinkard, Henry; Corbin, Kaitlin

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived cells such as monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), and macrophages are at the heart of the immune effector function in an inflammatory response. But because of the lack of an efficient imaging system to trace these cells live during their migration and maturation in their native environment at sub-cellular resolution, our knowledge is limited to data available from specific time-points analyzed by flow cytometry, histology, genomics and other immunological methods. Here, we have developed a ratiometric imaging method for measuring monocyte maturation in inflamed mouse lungs in situ using real-time using 2-photon imaging and complementary methods. We visualized that while undifferentiated monocytes were predominantly found only in the vasculature, a semi-differentiated monocyte/macrophage population could enter the tissue and resembled more mature and differentiated populations by morphology and surface phenotype. As these cells entered and differentiated, they were already selectively localized near inflamed airways and their entry was associated with changes in motility and morphology. We were able to visualize these during the act of differentiation, a process that can be demonstrated in this way to be faster on a per-cell basis under inflammatory conditions. Finally, our in situ analyses demonstrated increases, in the differentiating cells, for both antigen uptake and the ability to mediate interactions with T cells. This work, while largely confirming proposed models for in situ differentiation, provides important in situ data on the coordinated site-specific recruitment and differentiation of these cells and helps elaborate the predominance of immune pathology at the airways. Our novel imaging technology to trace immunogenic cell maturation in situ will complement existing information available on in situ differentiation deduced from other immunological methods, and assist better understanding of the spatio-temporal cellular behavior during an

  14. The melanocortin MC1 receptor agonist BMS-470539 inhibits leucocyte trafficking in the inflamed vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, G; Voisin, M-B; Carlson, K; Getting, SJ; Nourshargh, S; Perretti, M

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Over three decades of research evaluating the biology of melanocortin (MC) hormones and synthetic peptides, activation of the MC type 1 (MC1) receptor has been identified as a viable target for the development of novel anti-inflammatory therapeutic agents. Here, we have tested a recently described selective agonist of MC1 receptors, BMS-470539, on leucocyte/post-capillary venule interactions in murine microvascular beds. Experimental approach: Intravital microscopy of two murine microcirculations were utilized, applying two distinct modes of promoting inflammation. The specificity of the effects of BMS-470539 was assessed using mice bearing mutant inactive MC1 receptors (the recessive yellow e/e colony). Key results: BMS-470539, given before an ischaemia–reperfusion protocol, inhibited cell adhesion and emigration with no effect on cell rolling, as assessed 90 min into the reperfusion phase. These properties were paralleled by inhibition of tissue expression of both CXCL1 and CCL2. Confocal investigations of inflamed post-capillary venules revealed immunostaining for MC1 receptors on adherent and emigrated leucocytes. Congruently, the anti-inflammatory properties of BMS-470539 were lost in mesenteries of mice bearing the inactive mutant MC1 receptors. Therapeutic administration of BMS-470539 stopped cell emigration, but did not affect cell adhesion in the cremasteric microcirculation inflamed by superfusion with platelet-activating factor. Conclusions and implications: Activation of MC1 receptors inhibited leucocyte adhesion and emigration. Development of new chemical entities directed at MC1 receptors could be a viable approach in the development of novel anti-inflammatory therapeutic agents with potential application to post-ischaemic conditions. PMID:20331604

  15. Educating Normal Breast Mucosa to Prevent Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    1 Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0059 TITLE: Educating normal breast mucosa to prevent breast cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Keith L Knutson...SUBTITLE Educating Normal Breast Mucosa to Prevent Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0059 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0059 5c...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Breast cancer develops from breast mucosa and breast mucosa has intact immune system to

  16. Molecular Genotyping of Anisakis Larvae in Middle Eastern Japan and Endoscopic Evidence for Preferential Penetration of Normal over Atrophic Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Toshio; Akao, Nobuaki; Seki, Takenori; Kumagai, Takashi; Ishikawa, Hirofumi; Ohta, Nobuo; Hirata, Nobuto; Nakaji, So; Yamauchi, Kenji; Hirai, Mitsuru; Shiratori, Toshiyasu; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Fujii, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Eiji; Naito, Mikio; Saitoh, Shin-ichi; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Shibata, Nobumitsu; Shimo, Masamune; Tokiwa, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Background Anisakiasis is a parasitic disease caused primarily by Anisakis spp. larvae in Asia and in Western countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the genotype of Anisakis larvae endoscopically removed from Middle Eastern Japanese patients and to determine whether mucosal atrophy affects the risk of penetration in gastric anisakiasis. Methods In this study, 57 larvae collected from 44 patients with anisakiasis (42 gastric and 2 colonic anisakiasis) were analyzed retrospectively. Genotyping was confirmed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of ITS regions and by sequencing the mitochondrial small subunit (SSU) region. In the cases of gastric anisakiasis, correlation analyses were conducted between the frequency of larval penetration in normal/atrophic area and the manifestation of clinical symptoms. Results Nearly all larvae were A. simplex seusu stricto (s.s.) (99%), and one larva displayed a hybrid genotype. The A. simplex larvae penetrated normal mucosa more frequently than atrophic area (p = 0.005). Finally, patients with normal mucosa infection were more likely to exhibit clinical symptoms than those with atrophic mucosa infection (odds ratio, 6.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.52–31.8). Conclusions In Japan, A. simplex s.s. is the main etiological agent of human anisakiasis and tends to penetrate normal gastric mucosa. Careful endoscopic examination of normal gastric mucosa, particularly in the greater curvature of the stomach will improve the detection of Anisakis larvae. PMID:24586583

  17. Molecular genotyping of anisakis larvae in Middle Eastern Japan and endoscopic evidence for preferential penetration of normal over atrophic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Arai, Toshio; Akao, Nobuaki; Seki, Takenori; Kumagai, Takashi; Ishikawa, Hirofumi; Ohta, Nobuo; Hirata, Nobuto; Nakaji, So; Yamauchi, Kenji; Hirai, Mitsuru; Shiratori, Toshiyasu; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Fujii, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Eiji; Naito, Mikio; Saitoh, Shin-ichi; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Shibata, Nobumitsu; Shimo, Masamune; Tokiwa, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Anisakiasis is a parasitic disease caused primarily by Anisakis spp. larvae in Asia and in Western countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the genotype of Anisakis larvae endoscopically removed from Middle Eastern Japanese patients and to determine whether mucosal atrophy affects the risk of penetration in gastric anisakiasis. In this study, 57 larvae collected from 44 patients with anisakiasis (42 gastric and 2 colonic anisakiasis) were analyzed retrospectively. Genotyping was confirmed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of ITS regions and by sequencing the mitochondrial small subunit (SSU) region. In the cases of gastric anisakiasis, correlation analyses were conducted between the frequency of larval penetration in normal/atrophic area and the manifestation of clinical symptoms. Nearly all larvae were A. simplex seusu stricto (s.s.) (99%), and one larva displayed a hybrid genotype. The A. simplex larvae penetrated normal mucosa more frequently than atrophic area (p = 0.005). Finally, patients with normal mucosa infection were more likely to exhibit clinical symptoms than those with atrophic mucosa infection (odds ratio, 6.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.52-31.8). In Japan, A. simplex s.s. is the main etiological agent of human anisakiasis and tends to penetrate normal gastric mucosa. Careful endoscopic examination of normal gastric mucosa, particularly in the greater curvature of the stomach will improve the detection of Anisakis larvae.

  18. LIN28B Promotes Colon Cancer Migration and Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Minghui; Wu, Gang; Hou, Xiaolin; Hou, Nengyi; Liang, Liqin; Jia, Guiqing; Shuai, Ping; Luo, Bin; Wang, Kang; Li, Guoxin

    2014-01-01

    LIN28B is involved in “stemness” and tumourigenesis by negatively regulating the maturation of let-7 microRNA family members. In this study, we showed that LIN28B expression promotes migration and recurrence of colon cancer. Immunohistochemistry and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reactions were performed to detect LIN28B expression in colon cancer tissue microarrays, paraffin-embedded surgical resected tissues and cancer cells. Loss-of-function, migration and proliferation analyses were performed to delineate the potential roles of LIN28B in colon cancer. LIN28B was upregulated in colon cancer tissue compared to normal mucosa, and its overexpression correlated with reduced patient survival and increased tumour recurrence. LIN28B suppression inhibited the migration of SW480 colon cancer cells and facilitated the cytotoxicity induced by oxaliplatin in SW480 and HCT116 colon cancer cells. In conclusion, LIN28B overexpression contributes to colon tumourigenesis, and LIN28B may serve as a diagnostic tool and therapeutic target for colon cancer. PMID:25360631

  19. Expression of high mobility group box 1 in inflamed dental pulp and its chemotactic effect on dental pulp cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xufang; Jiang, Hongwei; Gong, Qimei; Fan, Chen; Huang, Yihua; Ling, Junqi

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • HMGB1 translocated from nucleus to cytoplasm during dental pulp inflammation. • HMGB1and its receptor RAGE were up-regulated in hDPCs under LPS stimulation. • HMGB1 enhanced hDPCs migration and induces cytoskeleton reorganization. • HMGB1 may play a critical role in dental pulp repair during inflamed state. - Abstract: High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a chromatin protein which can be released extracellularly, eliciting a pro-inflammatory response and promoting tissue repair process. This study aimed to examine the expression and distribution of HMGB1 and its receptor RAGE in inflamed dental pulp tissues, and to assess its effects on proliferation, migration and cytoskeleton of cultured human dental pulp cells (DPCs). Our data demonstrated that cytoplasmic expression of HMGB1 was observed in inflamed pulp tissues, while HMGB1 expression was confined in the nuclei in healthy dental pulp. The mRNA expression of HMGB1 and RAGE were significantly increased in inflamed pulps. In in vitro cultured DPCs, expression of HMGB1 in both protein and mRNA level was up-regulated after treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exogenous HMGB1 enhanced DPCs migration in a dose-dependent manner and induced the reorganization of f-actin in DPCs. Our results suggests that HMGB1 are not only involved in the process of dental pulp inflammation, but also play an important role in the recruitment of dental pulp stem cells, promoting pulp repair and regeneration.

  20. Cutting Edge: Origins, Recruitment, and Regulation of CD11c(+) Cells in Inflamed Islets of Autoimmune Diabetes Mice.

    PubMed

    Klementowicz, Joanna E; Mahne, Ashley E; Spence, Allyson; Nguyen, Vinh; Satpathy, Ansuman T; Murphy, Kenneth M; Tang, Qizhi

    2017-07-01

    In NOD mice, CD11c(+) cells increase greatly with islet inflammation and contribute to autoimmune destruction of pancreatic β cells. In this study, we investigated their origin and mechanism of recruitment. CD11c(+) cells in inflamed islets resembled classical dendritic cells based on their transcriptional profile. However, the majority of these cells were not from the Zbtb46-dependent dendritic-cell lineage. Instead, monocyte precursors could give rise to CD11c(+) cells in inflamed islets. Chemokines Ccl5 and Ccl8 were persistently elevated in inflamed islets and the influx of CD11c(+) cells was partially dependent on their receptor Ccr5. Treatment with islet Ag-specific regulatory T cells led to a marked decrease of Ccl5 and Ccl8, and a reduction of monocyte recruitment. These results implicate a monocytic origin of CD11c(+) cells in inflamed islets and suggest that therapeutic regulatory T cells directly or indirectly regulate their influx by altering the chemotactic milieu in the islets. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  1. Nasal Bacterial Colonization in Pediatric Epistaxis: The Role of Topical Antibacterial Treatment.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Mukadder; Çetinkol, Yeliz; Korkmaz, Hakan; Batmaz, Timur

    2016-03-01

    Epistaxis is a common problem in childhood. It has been shown that children with recurrent epistaxis are more likely to have nasal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus. It has been suggested that low-grade inflammation, crusting and increased vascularity due to bacterial colonization contributes to the development of epistaxis in children. This study aimed to investigate the nasal colonization and treatment outcome in pediatric epistaxis patients. Retrospective cross-sectional study. Charts of the pediatric patients referred to our university hospital otolaryngology outpatient clinics for the evaluation of epistaxis were reviewed. The patients whose nasal cultures had been taken at the first clinical visit comprised the study group. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common bacteria grown. The presence of crusting and hypervascularity was not dependent on the type of bacterial growth and there was no relation between hypervascularity and crusting of the nasal mucosa. Thirty-six patients were evaluated for the outcome analysis. Resolution of bleeding was not dependent on nasal colonization; in patients with colonization, there was no difference between topical antibacterial and non-antibacterial treatments. Despite the high colonization rates, topical antibacterial treatment was not found superior to non-antibacterial treatment. Our study does not support the belief that bacterial colonization results in hypervascularity of the septal mucosa causing epistaxis since no relation was found between nasal colonization, hypervascularity and crusting. The role of bacterial colonization in pediatric epistaxis need to be further investigated and treatment protocols must be determined accordingly.

  2. Nasal Bacterial Colonization in Pediatric Epistaxis: The Role of Topical Antibacterial Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Mukadder; Çetinkol, Yeliz; Korkmaz, Hakan; Batmaz, Timur

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epistaxis is a common problem in childhood. It has been shown that children with recurrent epistaxis are more likely to have nasal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus. It has been suggested that low-grade inflammation, crusting and increased vascularity due to bacterial colonization contributes to the development of epistaxis in children. Aims: This study aimed to investigate the nasal colonization and treatment outcome in pediatric epistaxis patients. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: Charts of the pediatric patients referred to our university hospital otolaryngology outpatient clinics for the evaluation of epistaxis were reviewed. The patients whose nasal cultures had been taken at the first clinical visit comprised the study group. Results: Staphylococcus aureus was the most common bacteria grown. The presence of crusting and hypervascularity was not dependent on the type of bacterial growth and there was no relation between hypervascularity and crusting of the nasal mucosa. Thirty-six patients were evaluated for the outcome analysis. Resolution of bleeding was not dependent on nasal colonization; in patients with colonization, there was no difference between topical antibacterial and non-antibacterial treatments. Conclusion: Despite the high colonization rates, topical antibacterial treatment was not found superior to non-antibacterial treatment. Our study does not support the belief that bacterial colonization results in hypervascularity of the septal mucosa causing epistaxis since no relation was found between nasal colonization, hypervascularity and crusting. The role of bacterial colonization in pediatric epistaxis need to be further investigated and treatment protocols must be determined accordingly. PMID:27403392

  3. Picornavirus-Induced Airway Mucosa Immune Profile in Asymptomatic Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Wolsk, Helene M.; Følsgaard, Nilofar V.; Birch, Sune; Brix, Susanne; Hansel, Trevor T.; Johnston, Sebastian L.; Kebadze, Tatiana; Chawes, Bo L.; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Bisgaard, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Background. Bacterial airway colonization is known to alter the airway mucosa immune response in neonates whereas the impact of viruses is unknown. The objective was therefore to examine the effect of respiratory viruses on the immune signature in the airways of asymptomatic neonates. Methods. Nasal aspirates from 571 asymptomatic 1-month-old neonates from the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood 2010 birth cohort were investigated for respiratory viruses. Simultaneously, unstimulated airway mucosal lining fluid was obtained and quantified for levels of 20 immune mediators related to type 1, type 2, type 17, and regulatory immune paths. The association between immune mediator levels and viruses was tested by conventional statistics and partial least square discriminant analysis. Results. Picornaviruses were detected in 58 neonates (10.2%) and other viruses in 10 (1.8%). A general up-regulation of immune mediators was found in the neonates with picornavirus (P < .0001; partial least square discriminant analysis). The association was pronounced for type 1– and type 2–related markers and was unaffected by comprehensive confounder adjustment. Detection of picornavirus and bacteria was associated with an additive general up-regulating effect. Conclusions. Asymptomatic presence of picornavirus in the neonatal airway is a potent activator of the topical immune response. This is relevant to understanding the immune potentiating effect of early life exposure to viruses. PMID:26655299

  4. Analysis of Mucosa-Associated Microbiota in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kehan; Jiang, Bo

    2017-09-14

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to compare the microbiota community structure, assess differences in intestinal bacterial types, and identify metagenomic biomarkers for disparate stages of colorectal cancer formation. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 160 individuals were recruited: 61 cases with non-tumor colon were regarded as the normal group, 47 cases with histology-substantiated colorectal adenomas were regarded as the adenoma group, and 52 cases with invasive adenocarcinomas were regarded as the cancer group. Biopsy on the mucosa was performed on each subject. USEARCH was used to process the sequences data and generate OTUs. Gut mucosal microbiota from healthy controls, adenoma patients, and carcinoma patients were analyzed. RESULTS Principal coordinate analysis of unweighted and weighted UniFrac distance showed a separation in composition of microbiota in the 3 groups. Bacteria with potential tumorigenesis, like Bacteroides fragilis and Fusobacterium, were more common in the carcinoma group, while some SCFA (short chain fatty acids) - producing microbes were enriched in the normal group. The commensal Escherichia were more abundant in adenoma patients. CONCLUSIONS Our study provides insights into possible function of gut microbiota in diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer. Some bacteria, such as Butyricicoccus, E. coli, and Fusobacterium, can be used as potential biomarkers for normal, adenoma, and cancer groups, respectively.

  5. Multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy used to discriminate human colon cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Javier; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Bianchi, Mariana; de Thomaz, André A.; Baratti, Mariana O.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; Casco, Víctor H.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2013-02-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most diffused cancers in the Western World, ranking third worldwide in frequency of incidence after lung and breast cancers. Even if it is curable when detected and treated early, a more accurate premature diagnosis would be a suitable aim for both cancer prognostic and treatment. Combined multimodal nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopies, such as two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), second-harmonic generation (SHG), third harmonic generation (THG), and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) can be used to detect morphological and metabolic changes associated with stroma and epithelial transformation in colon cancer disease. NLO microscopes provide complementary information about tissue microstructure, showing distinctive patterns between normal and malignant human colonic mucosa. Using a set of scoring methods significant differences both in the content, distribution and organization of stroma collagen fibrils, and lifetime components of NADH and FAD cofactors of human colon mucosa biopsies were found. Our results provide a framework for using NLO techniques as a clinical diagnostic tool for human colon cancer, and also suggest that the SHG and FLIM metrics could be applied to other intestinal disorders, which are characterized by abnormal cell proliferation and collagen assembly.

  6. Endoscopic Resection of Asymptomatic, Colonic, Polypoid Arteriovenous Malformations: Two Case Reports and a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han-Hee; Kwon, Hyuk-Min; Gil, Sanghyun; Kim, Young-Shin; Cho, Minjung; Seo, Kyung-Jin; Chae, Hiun-Suk; Cho, Young-Seok

    2017-01-01

    A colonic arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a significant vascular lesion of the gastrointestinal tract and a common cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. AVMs are usually identified endoscopically as bright red, flat lesions. AVMs with a polypoid appearance are extremely rare in the large intestine. We present two cases of colonic polypoid AVM, which were detected incidentally during screening colonoscopy. Both the patients had no history of gastrointestinal bleeding such as melena or hematochezia. Colonoscopy revealed pedunculated polyps overlaid by hyperemic mucosa in the ascending colon and proximal sigmoid colon. Microscopic examination showed aberrant vessels with thickened, hypertrophic walls in the mucosa and the submucosa, and arteries were directly connected to veins without capillary beds. These features were compatible with a diagnosis of AVM with a polypoid appearance. No immediate or delayed bleeding was noted after polypectomy. PMID:28139503

  7. Tryptophan autofluorescence imaging of neoplasms of the human colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Bhaskar; Renkoski, Timothy; Graves, Logan R.; Rial, Nathaniel S.; Tsikitis, Vassiliki Liana; Nfonsom, Valentine; Pugh, Judith; Tiwari, Piyush; Gavini, Hemanth; Utzinger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Detection of flat neoplasia is a major challenge in colorectal cancer screening, as missed lesions can lead to the development of an unexpected `incident' cancer prior to the subsequent endoscopy. The use of a tryptophan-related autofluorescence has been reported to be increased in murine intestinal dysplasia. The emission spectra of cells isolated from human adenocarcinoma and normal mucosa of the colon were studied and showed markedly greater emission intensity from cancerous cells compared to cells obtained from the surrounding normal mucosa. A proto-type multispectral imaging system optimized for ultraviolet macroscopic imaging of tissue was used to obtain autofluorescence images of surgical specimens of colonic neoplasms and normal mucosa after resection. Fluorescence images did not display the expected greater emission from the tumor as compared to the normal mucosa, most probably due to increased optical absorption and scattering in the tumors. Increased fluorescence intensity in neoplasms was observed however, once fluorescence images were corrected using reflectance images. Tryptophan fluorescence alone may be useful in differentiating normal and cancerous cells, while in tissues its autofluorescence image divided by green reflectance may be useful in displaying neoplasms.

  8. The contribution of activated peripheral kappa opioid receptors (kORs) in the inflamed knee joint to anti-nociception.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sun Wook; Park, Eui Ho; Suh, Hye Rim; Ko, Duk Hwan; Kim, Yang In; Han, Hee Chul

    2016-10-01

    The systemic administration of opioids can be used for their strong analgesic effect. However, extensive activation of opioid receptors (ORs) beyond the targeted tissue can cause dysphoria, pruritus, and constipation. Therefore, selective activation of peripheral ORs present in the afferent fibers of the targeted tissue can be considered a superior strategy in opioid analgesia to avoid potential adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of peripheral kappa opioid receptors (kORs) in arthritic pain for the possible use of peripheral ORs as a target in anti-nociceptive therapy. We administered U50488 or nor-BNI/DIPPA, a selective agonist or antagonist of kOR, respectively into arthritic rat knee joints induced using 1% carrageenan. After the injection of U50488 or U50488 with nor-BNI or DIPPA into the inflamed knee joint, we evaluated nociceptive behavior as indicated by reduced weight-bearing on the ipsilateral limbs of the rat and recorded the activity of mechanosensitive afferents (MSA). In the inflamed knee joint, the intra-articular application of 1μM, 10nM, or 0.1nM U50488 resulted in a significant reduction in nociceptive behavior. In addition, 1μM and 10nM U50488 decreased MSA activity. However, in a non-inflamed knee joint, 1μM U50488 had no effect on MSA activity. Additionally, intra-articular pretreatment with 20μM nor-BNI or 10μM DIPPA significantly blocked the inhibitory effects of 1μM U50488 on nociceptive behavior and MSA activity in the inflamed knee joint. These results implicate that peripheral kORs can contribute to anti-nociceptive processing in an inflamed knee joint. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Oral Neurothekeoma of the Right Buccal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Chilagondanahalli, Nandini L.; Bundele, Manish M.; Kanagalingam, Jeevendra

    2016-01-01

    Oral neurothekeoma or nerve sheath myxoma is a rare benign oral tumour of nerve sheath origin. Historically, this tumour has been subclassified as myxoid (classic), mixed, or the cellular type, depending on the amount of myxoid stroma and cellularity. We present a case of oral neurothekeoma (mixed type) of the buccal mucosa. The tumour was completely excised. No recurrence was detected in the last 3 years after local excision. PMID:27672465

  10. [Optimizing biopsies of the oral mucosa].

    PubMed

    Raybaud, H; Voha, C; Cardot-Leccia, N; Monteil, R A

    2012-11-01

    We had for aim to describe and illustrate the artefacts observed in biopsies of the oral mucosa, as well as the impact of sending non-representative histological material to a laboratory. This article was based on an international literature review, as well as on our experience. We analysed the problems raised, for the pathologists and the histology lab-technicians, by these artefacts as well as their impact on the pathology report patient management. We suggest simple solutions.

  11. Rare tumors of esophageal squamous mucosa.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Monika; Swanson, Paul E

    2016-10-01

    In spite of increasing incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in the last few decades, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) still remains the dominant subtype of esophageal cancer worldwide. Apart from conventional SCC, some rare unconventional tumors of esophageal squamous mucosa are also well known. This study provides an introduction to these and presents a brief review of the literature, including the diagnostic and prognostic importance of each variant.

  12. Dopamine receptors in human gastrointestinal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, D.E.; Mason, G.A.; Walker, C.H.; Valenzuela, J.E.

    1987-12-21

    Dopamine is a putative enteric neurotransmitter that has been implicated in exocrine secretory and motility functions of the gastrointestinal tract of several mammalian species including man. This study was designed to determine the presence of dopamine binding sites in human gastric and duodenal mucosa and to describe certain biochemical characteristics of these enteric receptor sites. The binding assay was performed in triplicate with tissue homogenates obtained from healthy volunteers of both sexes using /sup 3/H-dopamine as a ligand. The extent of nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of a 100-fold excess of unlabeled dopamine. Scatchard analysis performed with increasing concentrations of /sup 3/H-dopamine (20-500 nM) revealed a single class of saturable dopamine binding sites in gastric and duodenal mucosa. The results of this report demonstrate the presence of specific dopamine receptors in human gastric and duodenal mucosa. These biochemical data suggest that molecular abnormalities of these receptor sites may be operative in the pathogenesis of important gastrointestinal disorders. 33 references, 2 figures.

  13. Age and the architecture of oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Abu Eid, Rasha; Sawair, Faleh; Landini, Gabriel; Saku, Takashi

    2012-06-01

    Age changes affect the oral mucosa (the protective lining of the oral cavity), but few of these have been studied objectively. The aim of this study was to quantitatively analyse a number of morphometric parameters of the ageing oral mucosa. The fractal dimension of the epithelial connective tissue interface (ECTI) was estimated in 42 samples of normal buccal mucosa to correlate any changes in their irregularity to the age of the individuals. Morphometric parameters extracted from theoretical cell areas computed programatically were also analysed. Results showed no significant change in ECTI complexity associated with age; however, there was indication that epithelial cells tended to become larger and flatter with age. Interestingly, while some parameters did not show significant differences case wise, cluster analysis showed that the data clustered the cases into three main age groups: one representing the first two decades of life, another group represents adult life (21-50 years) and the last group representing the ageing population (50-90 years).

  14. [Bullous autoimmune diseases of the oral mucosa].

    PubMed

    Vaillant, L

    1999-10-01

    Autoimmune bullous diseases (AIBD) are characterized by autoantibodies targeted against adhesion molecules, impairing their formation. According to localization criteria, pemphigus (intraepidermal blister and desmosomal involvement) and pemphigoid (subepidermal blister and dermoepidermal junction involvement) can be distinguished. In two-thirds of the cases, pemphigus vulgaris begins with oral lesions (mainly the buccal mucosa and palate, rarely the gingiva). Skin lesions are usual. Excepting paraneoplastic pemphigus (a recently individualized entity), oral lesions are uncommon in other types of pemphigus. Cicatricial pemphigoid mainly involves oral mucosa, frequently other mucous membranes, and rarely the skin. Gingival involvement is frequent. In case of desquamative gingivitis, the clip sign gives the diagnosis of cicatricial pemphigoid. Ocular involvement is frequent and causes blindness. Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita and IgA linear dermatosis are rare. Bullous pemphigoid and bullous lupus rarely involve the oral mucosa. Diagnosis of AIBD requires a biopsy within the mucosal membrane lesion for pathology examination and another biopsy in a lesion-free area for direct immunofluorescence detection of antibody fixation. Immunoelectron microscopy or immunoblast transfer may be needed for positive diagnosis. Corticosteroids are used to treat pemphigus and dapsone is used for cicatricial pemphigoid. Immunosuppressive therapy is rarely needed.

  15. Active electrolyte transport in mammalian buccal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Orlando, R.C.; Tobey, N.A.; Schreiner, V.J.; Readling, R.D. )

    1988-09-01

    The transmural electrical potential difference (PD) was measured in vivo across the buccal mucosa of humans and experimental animals. Mean PD was {minus}31 {plus minus} 2 mV in humans, {minus}34 {plus minus} 2 mV in dogs, {minus}39 {plus minus} 2 mV in rabbits, and {minus}18 {plus minus} 1 mV in hamsters. The mechanisms responsible for this PD were explored in Ussing chambers using dog buccal mucosa. Fluxes of ({sup 14}C)mannitol, a marker of paracellular permeability, varied directly with tissue conductance. The net fluxes of {sup 22}Na and {sup 36}Cl were +0.21 {plus minus} 0.05 and {minus}0.04 {plus minus} 0.02 {mu}eq/h{center dot}cm{sup 2}, respectively, but only the Na{sup +} flux differed significantly from zero. I{sub sc} was reduced by luminal amiloride, serosal ouabain, or by reducing luminal Na{sup +} below 20 mM. This indicated that the I{sub sc} was determined primarily by active Na{sup +} absorption and that Na{sup +} traverses the apical membrane at least partly through amiloride-sensitive channels and exists across the basolateral membrane through Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase activity. The authors conclude that buccal mucosa is capable of active electrolyte transport and that this capacity contributes to generation of the buccal PD in vivo.

  16. The differences in colonic mucosal microbiota between normal individual and colon cancer patients by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Huipeng, Wang; Lifeng, Gong; Chuang, Ge; Jiaying, Zhao; Yuankun, Cai

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the differences in the intestinal composition between normal individuals and colon cancer patients. To establish the criteria for screening a normal individual for colon cancer, human colonic biopsies were obtained at routine colonoscopy. For patients with colon cancer, samples were obtained from cancerous regions. For normal individuals, colonic biopsies were taken from 3 sites of large intestine (descending, transverse, and ascending colon). Thereafter, a comparison of the microbiota structure by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was carried out. At last, bacterial species were identified by sequencing special bands from DGGE gels and comparing data with sequence databases. With PCR-DGGE, we have discovered that the diversity and richness of the bacterial community from colon cancer patient's colonic mucosa were lower than that of the normal individual's sample. Then, a special DGGE band was found in the colon cancer patients. After sequencing, we confirmed that it had a high level of similarity with bacteroides. Colon cancers are closely related with the alteration of intestinal flora such as the reduction of biodiversity and richness of the bacterial community. Furthermore, the increase in proportion of bacteroides may be directly associated with colon cancer.

  17. MULTIPHOTON IMAGING CAN BE USED FOR MICROSCOPIC EXAMINATION OF INTACT HUMAN GASTROINTESTINAL MUCOSA EX VIVO

    PubMed Central

    Rogart, Jason N.; Nagata, Jun; Loeser, Caroline S.; Roorda, Robert D.; Aslanian, Harry; Robert, Marie E.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Background & Aims The ability to observe cellular and subcellular detail during routine endoscopy is a major goal in the development of new endoscopic imaging techniques. Multiphoton microscopy, which relies on nonlinear infared optical processes, has the potential to identify cellular details by excitation of endogenous fluorescent molecules. We examined the feasibility of using multiphoton microscopy to characterize mucosal histology in the human gastrointestinal tract. Methods A multiphoton microscope was used to determine the optimal excitation wavelength for examination of gastrointestinal mucosa. Fresh, unfixed, and unstained biopsy specimens obtained during routine endoscopy in human subjects were then examined by confocal microscopy and multiphoton microscopy. Multiphoton images also were compared to standard H&E images obtained from paired biopsy specimens. A prototype miniaturized multiphoton probe was used to examine intact rat colon. Results Peak multiphoton autofluorescence intensity was detected in mucosa excited at 735 nm. Multiphoton microscopic examination of unstained biopsy specimens revealed improved cellular detail relative to either unstained or stained specimens examined by confocal imaging. Resolution of structures such as epithelial nuclei, goblet cells, and interstitial fibers and cells was comparable to what was obtained using standard H&E histology. Similar findings were observed when using a prototype miniaturized multiphoton probe. Conclusions Multiphoton microscopy can be used to examine gastrointestinal mucosa at the cellular level, without the need for fluorescent dyes. The construction of a multiphoton endomicroscope could therefore provide a practical means of performing “virtual biopsies” during the course of routine endoscopy, with advantages over currently available endomicroscopy technologies. PMID:18065276

  18. Benign colonic metaplasia at a previous stoma site in a patient without adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Prouty, Megan; Patrawala, Samit; Vogt, Adam; Kelleher, Michael; Lee, Michael; Parker, Douglas C

    2016-03-01

    There are few reported cases of cutaneous intestinal metaplasia or primary adenocarcinoma arising at the ileostomy site following panproctocolectomy. These complications have been seen almost exclusively in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, benign intraepidermal colonic mucosa at a reversed ileostomy site in a patient without familial adenomatous polyposis or IBD has not been documented. We report a case of a 51-year-old female with a history of colonic adenocarcinoma who presented with pruritic, erythematous, scaly plaques on the right lower abdomen, present since reversal of her ileostomy in 2007. Skin biopsy revealed benign foci of colonic epithelium with no evidence of adenomatous change. Benign intraepidermal colonic mucosa was diagnosed based on histopathologic findings and immunohistochemistry. To our knowledge, this is the first case of intraepidermal benign colonic metaplasia forming in a patient following ostomy reversal. The case emphasizes the importance of patient education and physical examination of the stoma or stoma remnants for detection of unusual or changing lesions due to the risk for malignant transformation. It also demonstrates that benign colonic mucosa should be considered in the differential diagnosis when evaluating lesions near ileostomy sites, regardless of whether the patient has a history of familial adenomatous polyposis or IBD.

  19. Antibiotics conspicuously affect community profiles and richness, but not the density of bacterial cells associated with mucosa in the large and small intestines of mice.

    PubMed

    Puhl, Nathan J; Uwiera, Richard R E; Yanke, L Jay; Selinger, L Brent; Inglis, G Douglas

    2012-02-01

    The influence of three antibiotics (bacitracin, enrofloxacin, and neomycin sulfate) on the mucosa-associated enteric microbiota and the intestines of mice was examined. Antibiotics caused conspicuous enlargement of ceca and an increase in overall length of the intestine. However, there were no pathologic changes associated with increased cecal size or length of the intestine. Conspicuous reductions in the richness of mucosa-associated bacteria and changes to community profiles within the small (duodenum, proximal jejunum, middle jejunum, distal jejunum, and ileum) and large (cecum, ascending colon, and descending colon) intestine occurred in mice administered antibiotics. Communities in antibiotic-treated mice were dominated by a limited number of Clostridium-like (i.e. clostridial cluster XIVa) and Bacteroides species. The richness of mucosa-associated communities within the small and large intestine increased during the 14-day recovery period. However, community profiles within the large intestine did not return to baseline (i.e. relative to the control). Although antibiotic administration greatly reduced bacterial richness, densities of mucosa-associated bacteria were not reduced correspondingly. These data showed that the antibiotics, bacitracin, enrofloxacin, and neomycin sulfate, administered for 21 days to mice did not sterilize the intestine, but did impart a tremendous and prolonged impact on mucosa-associated bacterial communities throughout the small and large intestine.

  20. Colon-targeted oral drug delivery systems: design trends and approaches.

    PubMed

    Amidon, Seth; Brown, Jack E; Dave, Vivek S

    2015-08-01

    Colon-specific drug delivery systems (CDDS) are desirable for the treatment of a range of local diseases such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic pancreatitis, and colonic cancer. In addition, the colon can be a potential site for the systemic absorption of several drugs to treat non-colonic conditions. Drugs such as proteins and peptides that are known to degrade in the extreme gastric pH, if delivered to the colon intact, can be systemically absorbed by colonic mucosa. In order to achieve effective therapeutic outcomes, it is imperative that the designed delivery system specifically targets the drugs into the colon. Several formulation approaches have been explored in the development colon-targeted drug delivery systems. These approaches involve the use of formulation components that interact with one or more aspects of gastrointestinal (GI) physiology, such as the difference in the pH along the GI tract, the presence of colonic microflora, and enzymes, to achieve colon targeting. This article highlights the factors influencing colon-specific drug delivery and colonic bioavailability, and the limitations associated with CDDS. Further, the review provides a systematic discussion of various conventional, as well as relatively newer formulation approaches/technologies currently being utilized for the development of CDDS.

  1. Red meat and colon cancer: dietary haem, but not fat, has cytotoxic and hyperproliferative effects on rat colonic epithelium.

    PubMed

    Sesink, A L; Termont, D S; Kleibeuker, J H; Van Der Meer, R

    2000-10-01

    High intake of red meat is associated with an increased risk of colon cancer. It has been suggested that fat from red meat is responsible, because high fat intake increases the concentration of cytotoxic lipids in the colon. Experimental studies have not unequivocally supported such a role for fat, however. Recently, we showed that dietary haem, which is abundant in red meat, increased colonic cytotoxicity and epithelial proliferation. In this study, we wanted to clarify whether dietary fat affects colon cancer risk by itself or by modulating the detrimental effects of haem on the colonic epithelium. Rats were fed control or haem-supplemented diets with 10%, 25% or 40% of the energy derived from fat for 14 days. Faeces were collected for biochemical analyses. Colonic cytotoxicity was determined from the degree of lysis of erythrocytes by faecal water. Colonic epithelial proliferation was measured in vivo using [(3)H]thymidine incorporation. Increasing the fat content of the control diets stimulated faecal disposal of both fatty acids and bile acids. It also increased the concentration of fatty acids, but not that of bile acids, in faecal water in control rats. The cytolytic activity of faecal water and colonic epithelial proliferation were unaffected. Dietary haem increased faecal cation content and cytolytic activity of faecal water at all fat levels, suggesting that the colonic mucosa was exposed to high amounts of luminal irritants. This effect was smaller in rats on the low-fat diet. Dietary haem also increased colonic epithelial proliferation at all fat levels. The haem-induced effects were independent of fatty acids or bile acids in the faecal water. In western societies, 30-40% of ingested energy is supplied by dietary fat, so our results suggest that the association between consumption of red meat and risk of colon cancer is mainly due to its haem content, and is largely independent of dietary fat content.

  2. Effects of curdlan and gellan gum on the surface structure of intestinal mucosa in rats.

    PubMed

    Tetsuguchi, M; Nomura, S; Katayama, M; Sugawa-Katayama, Y

    1997-10-01

    The effects of curdlan and gellan gum on the gastrointestinal function were studied, and the morphological structure of the intestinal mucosal surface was observed by scanning electron microscopy of rats fed curdlan and gellan gum diets for four weeks. The rats fed the curdlan diet showed a significant increase in the weight of the cecum and its contents and a decrease in fecal weight as compared to the rats fed a cellulose diet. On the other hand, the rats fed the gellan gum diet showed a weight loss in cecal contents and weight gain in colonic contents. The transit time of the gastrointestinal tract was extended by curdlan supplementation whereas it was shortened by gellan gum supplementation. The surface structures of the ileal and cecal mucosa were markedly abnormal in the rats fed the curdlan diet: the microvilli were tightly packed and had fallen out at places. In the gellan gum-fed rats, the tops of the ileal and cecal microvilli adhered to one another and were covered with their contents. There was no difference in the surface structure of colonic mucosa among the cellulose, curdlan and gellan gum diet groups.

  3. The features of mucosa-associated microbiota in primary sclerosing cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Joana; Bao, Xiuliang; Goel, Aparna; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Pekow, Joel; Jabri, Bana; Williams, Kelli; Castillo, Anabella; Odin, Joseph; Meckel, Katherine; Fasihuddin, Farah; Peter, Inga; Itzkowitz, Steven; Hu, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about the role of the microbiome in primary sclerosing cholangitis. Aim Our goal was to explore the mucosa-associated microbiota in PSC patients across different locations in the gut, and to compare it with IBD-only patients and healthy controls. Methods Biopsies from the terminal ileum, right colon, and left colon were collected from patients and healthy controls undergoing colonoscopy. Microbiota profiling using bacterial 16S rRNA sequencing was performed on all biopsies. Results Forty-four patients were recruited: 20 with PSC (19 with PSC-IBD and one with PSC-only), 15 with IBD-only, and 9 healthy controls. The overall microbiome profile was similar throughout different locations in the gut. No differences in the global microbiome profile were found. However, we observed significant PSC-associated enrichment in Barnesiellaceae at the family level, and in Blautia and an unidentified Barnesiellaceae at the genus level. At the operational taxa unit (OTU) level, most shifts in PSC were observed in Clostridiales and Bacteroidales orders, with approximately 86% of shifts occurring within the former order. Conclusion The overall microbiota profile was similar across multiple locations in the gut from the same individual regardless of disease status. In this study, the mucosa associated-microbiota of PSC patients was characterized by enrichment of Blautia and Barnesiellaceae and by major shifts in OTUs within Clostridiales order. PMID:26857969

  4. Demonstration of Helicobacter pylori-like organisms in the gastric mucosa of captive exotic carnivores.

    PubMed

    Jakob, W; Stolte, M; Valentin, A; Schröder, H D

    1997-01-01

    Samples of gastric tissue from the cardiac, fundic and pyloric region of 30 carnivores comprising 12 tigers (Panthera tigris), 10 lions (Panthera leo), three pumas (Felis concolor), two leopards (Panthera pardus), one serval (Felis serval), one wolf (Canis lupus) and one hyena (Crocuta crocuta) kept at German zoological gardens were subjected to histopathological and immunohistochemical examination. Selected tissue specimens of 12 animals were examined also by electron microscopy. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of Helicobacter-like organisms in carnivores and to record infection rates, degree of colonization and associated histopathological changes. Three morphologically different types of spiral-shaped bacteria were demonstrated. A Helicobacter pylori-like organism (HPLO) was found in 42% of the tigers and 90% of the lions examined. Large Helicobacter-like organisms (HLOs) were identified in three pumas, one serval, one hyena and in three lions (in the latter, in coexistence with HPLOs). A third organism with a spiral periplasmic fibril (Helicobacter felis-like) was demonstrated in a wolf. The most striking histopathological finding associated with HPLO and HLO colonization was the formation of lymphoid follicles in the mucosa. Additional lymphoplasmacytic and neutrophilic infiltrates in the gastric mucosa were found in a number of tigers and lions infected with HPLOs, but none in the other carnivores infected with HLOs. From these results it is concluded that gastric bacteria similar or identical with H. pylori may also be an important cause of chronic gastritis in tigers and lions.

  5. Serum vitamin D and colonic vitamin D receptor in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Delgado, Yamilka; Isidro, Raymond A; Torres, Esther A; González, Alexandra; Cruz, Myrella L; Isidro, Angel A; González-Keelan, Carmen I; Medero, Priscilla; Appleyard, Caroline B

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine serum vitamin D levels and colonic vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and non-IBD patients and correlate these with histopathology. METHODS: Puerto Rican IBD (n = 10) and non-IBD (n = 10) patients ≥ 21 years old scheduled for colonoscopy were recruited. Each patient completed a questionnaire and provided a serum sample and a colonic biopsy of normal-appearing mucosa. For IBD patients, an additional biopsy was collected from visually diseased mucosa. Serum vitamin D levels were measured by ultra-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Hematoxylin and eosin stained tissue sections from colonic biopsies were classified histologically as normal or colitis (active/inactive), and scored for the degree of inflammation present (0-3, inactive/absent to severe). Tissue sections from colonic biopsies were also stained by immunohistochemistry for VDR, for which representative diagnostic areas were photographed and scored for staining intensity using a 4-point scale. RESULTS: The IBD cohort was significantly younger (40.40 ± 5.27, P < 0.05) than the non-IBD cohort (56.70 ± 1.64) with a higher prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (40% vs 20%, respectively) and insufficiency (70% vs 50%, respectively). Histologic inflammation was significantly higher in visually diseased mucosa from IBD patients (1.95 ± 0.25) than in normal-appearing mucosa from control patients (0.25 ± 0.08, P < 0.01) and from IBD patients (0.65 ± 0.36, P < 0.05) and correlated inversely with VDR expression in visually diseased colonic tissue from IBD patients (r = -0.44, P < 0.05) and from IBD patients with Crohn’s disease (r = -0.69, P < 0.05), but not in normal-appearing colonic tissue from control patients or IBD patients. Control and IBD patient serum vitamin D levels correlated positively with VDR expression in normal colon from control and IBD patients (r = 0.38, P < 0.05) and with patient age (r = 0.54, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION

  6. Nitrotyrosylation of Ca2+ channels prevents c-Src kinase regulation of colonic smooth muscle contractility in experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Ross, Gracious R; Kang, Minho; Shirwany, Najeeb; Malykhina, Anna P; Drozd, Mary; Akbarali, Hamid I

    2007-09-01

    Basal levels of c-Src kinase are known to regulate smooth muscle Ca(2+) channels. Colonic inflammation results in attenuated Ca(2+) currents and muscle contraction. Here, we examined the regulation of calcium influx-dependent contractility by c-Src kinase in experimental colitis. Ca(2+)-influx induced contractions were measured by isometric tension recordings of mouse colonic longitudinal muscle strips depolarized by high K(+). The E(max) to CaCl(2) was significantly less in inflamed tissues (38.4 +/- 7.6%) than controls, indicative of reduced Ca(2+) influx. PP2 [4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine], a selective Src kinase inhibitor, significantly reduced the contractile amplitude and shifted the pD(2) from 3.88 to 2.44 in controls, whereas it was ineffective in inflamed tissues (3.66 versus 3.43). After pretreatment with a SIN-1 (3-morpholinosydnonimine)/peroxynitrite combination, the maximal contraction to CaCl(2) was reduced by 46 +/- 7% in controls but unaffected in inflamed tissues (13 +/- 11%). Peroxynitrite also prevented the inhibitory effect of PP2 in control tissues. In colonic single smooth muscle cells, PP2 inhibited Ca(2+) currents by 84.1 +/- 3.9% in normal but only 36.2 +/- 13% in inflamed tissues. Neither the Ca(2+) channel Ca(v)1.2b, gene expression, nor the c-Src kinase activity was altered by inflammation. Western blot analysis showed no change in the Ca(2+) channel protein expression but increased nitrotyrosylated-Ca(2+) channel proteins during inflammation. These data suggest that post-translational modification of Ca(2+) channels during inflammation, possibly nitrotyrosylation, prevents c-Src kinase regulation resulting in decreased Ca(2+) influx.

  7. KAI1 gene expression in colonic carcinoma and its clinical significances

    PubMed Central

    Wu, De-Hua; Liu, Li; Chen, Long-Hua; Ding, Yan-Qing

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate KAI1 gene expression in the progression of human colonic carcinoma and its clinical significances. METHODS: KAI1 expression was detected by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry in the 4 established cell lines of colorectal carcinoma with different metastatic potentials, and in 80 specimens of colonic carcinoma, 21 colonic carcinoma specimens with lymphatic metastasis and 20 controls of normal colonic mucosa. RESULTS: The expressions of KAI1 in HT29 and SW480 cell lines were higher than those in LoVo and SW620. The expression of KAI1 gene was significantly higher in colorectal carcinoma compared with normal colonic mucosa and lymphatic metastasis (χ2 = 46.838, P < 0.01). The expression of KAI1 gene had no relationship with histological grade. The KAI1 expressions in Dukes A and B carcinoma were higher at both mRNA and protein levels compared to Dukes C carcinoma (χ2 = 16.061, P < 0.05). The expression of KAI1 in colonic carcinoma specimens with lymphatic metastasis was almost lost. The results of in situ hybridization were in concordance with immunohistochemistry. CONCLUSION: KAI1 is highly related to the metastasis of colonic carcinoma and may be a useful indicator of metastasis in colonic carcinoma. PMID:15259074

  8. Learning about Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Top of page Is there a test for hereditary colon cancer? Gene testing can identify individuals who ... Top of page Current NHGRI Clinical Research on Hereditary Colon Cancer Currently, NHGRI is not conducting clinical ...

  9. Stages of Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... for information about colorectal cancer in children. Health history affects the risk of developing colon cancer. Anything ... colorectal cancer include the following: Having a family history of colon or rectal cancer in a first- ...

  10. Taenia taeniaeformis: colonic hyperplasia in heavily infected rats.

    PubMed

    Lagapa, Jose Trinipil; Oku, Yuzaburo; Kamiya, Masao

    2008-12-01

    Only one study previously mentioned the involvement of colon during Taenia taeniaeformis larvae infection in rats with inconsistent occurrence of lesions. Present study aimed to determine the consistency of histopathologic changes in colonic epithelia, and the proliferation of mucosal cells through BrdU and PCNA immunohistochemistry. Results demonstrated that crypt hyperplasia of the colon was found in all infected rats, although variable in degree even in a single tissue section. Cystic cavities were frequently seen in severely hyperplastic mucosa. Proliferative zone lengths were significantly increased and PCNA positive cells were observed throughout the colonic crypt lengths at 9 but not at 6 weeks post infection. Cell proliferation involving the major types of cells in the epithelial colon was also increased in infected rats at 9 weeks post infection, with labeling indices significantly greater than the control rats throughout the BrdU time course labeling. Findings suggested that massive increases in epithelial cells and depth of colonic crypts were due to a remarkable increase in cell proliferation. The study concluded that enteropathy in the colon during T. taeniaeformis infection could be consistently observed in heavily infected rats.

  11. Mucosal vaccination promotes clearance of Streptococcus agalactiae vaginal colonization.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jacqueline A; Lewis, Emma L; Byland, Leah M; Bonakdar, Maryam; Randis, Tara M; Ratner, Adam J

    2017-03-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in infants, and colonization of the maternal genital tract is the primary risk factor for newborn infection. Despite the importance of mucosal colonization in GBS pathogenesis, relevant host and bacterial factors are incompletely understood. We investigated the role of humoral immunity in clearance of vaginal colonization in vivo. B-cell-deficient mice or those lacking neonatal Fc-receptor, a mediator of IgG transport to the vaginal mucosa, exhibit prolonged GBS vaginal colonization compared to wild type animals. Intranasal but not intramuscular immunization induced systemic and mucosal immune responses and decreased GBS colonization duration without altering initial colonization density. Vaccine-induced clearance of GBS was serotype-specific, suggesting a role for anti-capsule antibodies in protection. Our results support a role for humoral immunity in GBS eradication from the female genital tract and suggest that mucosal vaccination may prime colonization clearance. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Modelling and validation of spectral reflectance for the colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidovic-Rowe, Dzena; Claridge, Ela

    2005-03-01

    The spectral reflectance of the colon is known to be affected by malignant and pre-malignant changes in the tissue. As part of long-term research on the derivation of diagnostically important parameters characterizing colon histology, we have investigated the effects of the normal histological variability on the remitted spectra. This paper presents a detailed optical model of the normal colon comprising mucosa, submucosa and the smooth muscle layer. Each layer is characterized by five variable histological parameters: the volume fraction of blood, the haemoglobin saturation, the size of the scattering particles, including collagen, the volume fraction of the scattering particles and the layer thickness, and three optical parameters: the anisotropy factor, the refractive index of the medium and the refractive index of the scattering particles. The paper specifies the parameter ranges corresponding to normal colon tissue, including some previously unpublished ones. Diffuse reflectance spectra were modelled using the Monte Carlo method. Validation of the model-generated spectra against measured spectra demonstrated that good correspondence was achieved between the two. The analysis of the effect of the individual histological parameters on the behaviour of the spectra has shown that the spectral variability originates mainly from changes in the mucosa. However, the submucosa and the muscle layer must be included in the model as they have a significant constant effect on the spectral reflectance above 600 nm. The nature of variations in the spectra also suggests that it may be possible to carry out model inversion and to recover parameters characterizing the colon from multi-spectral images. A preliminary study, in which the mucosal blood and collagen parameters were modified to reflect histopathological changes associated with colon cancer, has shown that the spectra predicted by our model resemble measured spectral reflectance of adenocarcinomas. This suggests that

  13. Products of the colonic microbiota mediate the effects of diet on colon cancer risk.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Stephen J D; Ou, Junhai; Aufreiter, Susanne; O'Connor, Deborah; Sharma, Sumit; Sepulveda, Jorge; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Shibata, Katsumi; Mawhinney, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    It is estimated that most colon cancers can be attributed to dietary causes. We have hypothesized that diet influences the health of the colonic mucosa through interaction with the microbiota and that it is the milieu interior that regulates mucosal proliferation and therefore cancer risk. To validate this further, we compared colonic contents from healthy 50- to 65-y-old people from populations with high and low risk, specifically low risk Native Africans (cancer incidence <1:100,000; n = 17), high risk African Americans (risk 65:100,000; n = 17), and Caucasian Americans (risk 50:100,000; n = 18). Americans typically consume a high-animal protein and -fat diet, whereas Africans consume a staple diet of maize meal, rich in resistant starch and low in animal products. Following overnight fasting, rapid colonic evacuation was performed with 2 L polyethylene glycol. Total colonic evacuants were analyzed for SCFA, vitamins, nitrogen, and minerals. Total SCFA and butyrate were significantly higher in Native Africans than in both American groups. Colonic folate and biotin content, measured by Lactobacillus rhamnoses and Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 8014 bioassay, respectively, exceeded normal daily dietary intakes. Compared with Africans, calcium and iron contents were significantly higher in Caucasian Americans and zinc content was significantly higher in African Americans, but nitrogen content did not differ among the 3 groups. In conclusion, the results support our hypothesis that the microbiota mediates the effect diet has on colon cancer risk by their generation of butyrate, folate, and biotin, molecules known to play a key role in the regulation of epithelial proliferation.

  14. Morphological study of the regeneration mechanism of acetic acid-injured colon crypts in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cheng, L; Araki, K; Furuya, Y; Matsuoka, T; Mashima, K; Kobayashi, M; Matsuura, K

    2000-01-01

    The regeneration mechanism of injured rat colonic mucosa with 1% acetic acid was certified in this study. The injured colons were studied periodically on experimental days 1, 3, 5, 7, 15, and 20 with light and scanning electron microscopy. Specimens were examined in paraffin sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin; crypts were isolated with the HCl digestion method; and three-dimensional stromal collagen tissue was prepared with the NaOH cell maceration method. Damage to the mucosal and submucosal layers peaked between the 1st and 3rd days with edema, regeneration, necrosis, and inflammation. The edema and inflammation subsided, and mucosal atrophy and crypt reduction remained at around 1 week. At 2 weeks the mucosa became thick, and crypts showed many branches in their lower two-thirds; and by 3 weeks the mucosa had recovered to almost normal. The ratio of number of crypts at the base and surface was almost 1.5 on the 15th day and 1.0 on the 20th day, suggesting that each branch progresses upward to create an independent crypt. We believe that the fission mechanism plays an important role in crypt repair after acetic acid injury of the colonic mucosa. As the proliferative zone of the colonic crypt is localized at the crypt base, fission of the crypt starting at the base and progressing up to the surface is the most reasonable and efficient mechanism for repair by increasing the number of crypts.

  15. Collecting and paramuscular venules in glandular mucosa of rat stomach.

    PubMed

    Moskalewski, Stanislaw; Biernacka-Wawrzonek, Dorota; Klimkiewicz, Justyna; Zdun, Rafal

    2002-03-01

    Blood from the rat gastric mucosa is drained by collecting venules running from the subepithelial layer towards the lamina muscularis mucosae. Details of their structure were studied in translucent, flat strips of the glandular stomach, in thick sections of glandular mucosa cleared in mineral oil and in semi-thin plastic sections. The number and dimensions of collecting venule outlets revealed in flat strips of gastric mucosa increased after administration of atropine and papaverine and intravital ligation of the portal vein in comparison with that of intact animals or animals with intravitally ligated portal vein but without administration of relaxing agents. In hyperemic mucosa short venules running parallel to the lamina muscularis mucosae (paramuscular venules) and draining collecting venules were distinctly visible. Saccular outlets equipped with triangular protrusions usually intervened between these vessels, probably directing blood flow. Collecting venules were straight, curved, extended or two-armed. Furthermore, numerous collecting venules contained circumscribed dilatations (sacculi) connected with the lumen of the collecting venule. Connection of paramuscular and submucosal veins occurred within the muscularis mucosae. Thus, contraction of the muscularis mucosae might control the outflow of venous blood from the gastric mucosa. Conceivably, alternate contraction and relaxation of muscularis mucosae could cause expansion and collapse of collecting venules which, in turn, would facilitate the movement of glandular content to the surface of the stomach and/or movement of interstitial fluid between cells.

  16. T cells out of control--impaired immune regulation in the inflamed joint.

    PubMed

    Wehrens, Ellen J; Prakken, Berent J; van Wijk, Femke

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of FOXP3+ regulatory T (T(REG)) cells over 15 years ago, intensive research has focused on their presence, phenotype and function in autoimmune disease. Whether deficiencies in T(REG) cells underlie autoimmune pathology and whether, or how, therapeutic approaches based on these cells might be successful is still the subject of debate. The potential role of T(REG)-cell extrinsic factors, such as proinflammatory cytokines and resistance of effector T cells to suppression, as the cause of regulatory defects in chronic autoimmune inflammation is an intensive area of research. It is now clear that, at the site of inflammation, antigen presenting cells (APCs) and proinflammatory cytokines drive effector T cell skewing and plasticity, and that these T cells can become unresponsive to regulation. In addition, expansion and function of T(REG) cells is affected by the inflammatory environment; indeed, new data suggest that, in certain conditions, T(REG) cells promote inflammation. This Review summarizes the latest findings on changes in effector T cell homeostasis in autoimmune disease and focuses on how mechanisms that normally regulate these cells are affected in the inflamed joints of patients with arthritis. These findings have important clinical implications and will affect the development of new therapeutic strategies for autoimmune arthritis.

  17. Phenotype of Antigen Unexperienced TH Cells in the Inflamed Central Nervous System in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Franck, Sophia; Paterka, Magdalena; Birkenstock, Jerome; Zipp, Frauke; Siffrin, Volker; Witsch, Esther

    2016-11-10

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, disseminated inflammation of the central nervous system which is thought to be driven by autoimmune T cells. Genetic association studies in multiple sclerosis and a large number of studies in the animal model of the disease support a role for effector/memory T helper cells. However, the mechanisms underlying relapses, remission and chronic progression in multiple sclerosis or the animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, are not clear. In particular, there is only scarce information on the role of central nervous system-invading naive T helper cells in these processes. By applying two-photon laser scanning microscopy we could show in vivo that antigen unexperienced T helper cells migrated into the deep parenchyma of the inflamed central nervous system in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, independent of their antigen specificity. Using flow cytometric analyses of central nervous system-derived lymphocytes we found that only antigen-specific, formerly naive T helper cells became activated during inflammation of the central nervous system encountering their corresponding antigen.

  18. From morphology to biochemical state - intravital multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of inflamed human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Getova, Valentina; Niemeyer, Verena; Zens, Katharina; Unnerstall, Tim R.; Feger, Julia S.; Fallah, Mohammad A.; Metze, Dieter; Ständer, Sonja; Luger, Thomas A.; Koenig, Karsten; Mess, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-03-01

    The application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. In the present study, we combined multiphoton-based intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM) within the scope of a clinical trial of atopic dermatitis with the aim of providing personalised data on the aetiopathology of inflammation in a non-invasive manner at patients’ bedsides. These ‘optical biopsies’ generated via MPT were morphologically analysed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Two independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed an even distribution in healthy skin and a perinuclear accumulation in inflamed skin. Moreover, using MPT-FLIM, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. In conclusion, the change in the distribution of mitochondria upon inflammation and the verification of an altered cellular metabolism facilitate a better understanding of inflammatory skin diseases and may permit early diagnosis and therapy.

  19. Orf virus IL-10 reduces monocyte, dendritic cell and mast cell recruitment to inflamed skin.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Jared R; Lateef, Zabeen; Fleming, Stephen B; Mercer, Andrew A; Wise, Lyn M

    2016-02-02

    Orf virus (ORFV) is a zoonotic parapoxvirus that causes pustular dermatitis of sheep, and occasionally humans. Despite causing sustained infections, ORFV induces only a transient increase in pro-inflammatory signalling and the trafficking of innate immune cells within the skin seems to be impaired. An explanation for this tempered response to ORFV infection may lie in its expression of a homolog of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin (IL)-10. Using a murine model in which inflammation was induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide, we examined the effects of the ORFV-IL-10 protein on immune cell trafficking to and from the skin. ORFV-IL-10 limited the recruitment of blood-derived Gr-1(int)/CD11b(int) monocytes, CD11c(+ve)/MHC-II(+ve) dendritic cells and c-kit(+ve)/FcεR1(+ve) mature mast cells into inflamed skin. ORFV-IL-10 also suppressed the activation of CD11c(+ve)/MHC-II(+ve) dendritic cells within the skin, reducing their trafficking to the draining lymph node. These findings suggest that expression of IL-10 by ORFV may contribute to the impaired trafficking of innate immune cells within infected skin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Indocyanine green enables near-infrared fluorescence imaging of lipid-rich, inflamed atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Botnaru, Ion; Aikawa, Elena; Calfon, Marcella A; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Folco, Eduardo J; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Weissleder, Ralph; Libby, Peter; Jaffer, Farouc A

    2011-05-25

    New high-resolution molecular and structural imaging strategies are needed to visualize high-risk plaques that are likely to cause acute myocardial infarction, because current diagnostic methods do not reliably identify at-risk subjects. Although molecular imaging agents are available for low-resolution detection of atherosclerosis in large arteries, a lack of imaging agents coupled to high-resolution modalities has limited molecular imaging of atherosclerosis in the smaller coronary arteries. Here, we have demonstrated that indocyanine green (ICG), a Food and Drug Administration-approved near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF)-emitting compound, targets atheromas within 20 min of injection and provides sufficient signal enhancement for in vivo detection of lipid-rich, inflamed, coronary-sized plaques in atherosclerotic rabbits. In vivo NIRF sensing was achieved with an intravascular wire in the aorta, a vessel of comparable caliber to human coronary arteries. Ex vivo fluorescence reflectance imaging showed high plaque target-to-background ratios in atheroma-bearing rabbits injected with ICG compared to atheroma-bearing rabbits injected with saline. In vitro studies using human macrophages established that ICG preferentially targets lipid-loaded macrophages. In an early clinical study of human atheroma specimens from four patients, we found that ICG colocalized with plaque macrophages and lipids. The atheroma-targeting capability of ICG has the potential to accelerate the clinical development of NIRF molecular imaging of high-risk plaques in humans.

  1. Higher rates of pressure decrease in inflamed compared with noninflamed middle ears.

    PubMed

    Alper, C M; Doyle, W J; Seroky, J T

    1999-07-01

    Recent clinical trials have renewed interest in middle ear inflation as a treatment for otitis media with effusion. However, air inflation in human beings with significant negative middle ear pressures was shown to be followed by a rapid pressure decrease to approach the preinflation values. In this experiment, the middle ears of anesthetized rhesus monkeys with unilateral inflammation were inflated at different times with air or N2, and pressures were recorded by tympanometry until they had stabilized or the animal had recovered from anesthesia. The results for air inflations reproduced those reported for human beings with negative pressures. Similarly, after N2 inflation a significantly greater rate of pressure decrease and significantly lesser terminal pressures were observed for inflamed ears when compared with the contralateral control ears. However, the rate of pressure decrease and the magnitude of the pressure drop were dampened by sequential N2 inflations. These observations have clinical implications with respect to the efficacy of inflation as a treatment for otitis media with effusion.

  2. Specific Transfection of Inflamed Brain by Macrophages: A New Therapeutic Strategy for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Haney, Matthew J.; Zhao, Yuling; Harrison, Emily B.; Mahajan, Vivek; Ahmed, Shaheen; He, Zhijian; Suresh, Poornima; Hingtgen, Shawn D.; Klyachko, Natalia L.; Mosley, R. Lee; Gendelman, Howard E.; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Batrakova, Elena V.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to precisely upregulate genes in inflamed brain holds great therapeutic promise. Here we report a novel class of vectors, genetically modified macrophages that carry reporter and therapeutic genes to neural cells. Systemic administration of macrophages transfected ex vivo with a plasmid DNA (pDNA) encoding a potent antioxidant enzyme, catalase, produced month-long expression levels of catalase in the brain resulting in three-fold reductions in inflammation and complete neuroprotection in mouse models of Parkinson's disease (PD). This resulted in significant improvements in motor functions in PD mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that transfected macrophages secreted extracellular vesicles, exosomes, packed with catalase genetic material, pDNA and mRNA, active catalase, and NF-κb, a transcription factor involved in the encoded gene expression. Exosomes efficiently transfer their contents to contiguous neurons resulting in de novo protein synthesis in target cells. Thus, genetically modified macrophages serve as a highly efficient system for reproduction, packaging, and targeted gene and drug delivery to treat inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23620794

  3. Mouth and Genital Ulcers with Inflamed Cartilage Syndrome: Case Report and Review of the Published Work

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Yuka; Nakai, Noriaki; Kida, Takashi; Kawahito, Yutaka; Katoh, Norito

    2016-01-01

    Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC) syndrome are disease that fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of Behcet's disease (BD) and relapsing polychondritis (RP). We report a 22-year-old Japanese woman presented with MAGIC syndrome and we described the clinicopathological characteristics of MAGIC syndrome based on a review of published cases from July 1985 to December 2015. In our case, the patient with oral aphthae, erythema nodosum, acne-like eruptions, uveitis, and polyarthritis fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of incomplete form of BD. The patient with uveitis, polyarthritis, and histological confirmation of chondritis also fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of RP. The patient was successfully treated with oral colchicine followed by prednisolone. The symptoms of MAGIC syndrome gradually disappeared, and the prednisolone dosage was gradually decreased and stopped. She has been in remission without active medication for a further 8 months. In the previous reports, some authors suggested that MAGIC syndrome was not a disease entity and might be RP occurring secondary to BD, another association of an autoimmune disease, or vasculitis with RP. However, the pathogenic association between MAGIC syndrome, BD, and RP is still unclear, and the number of reported cases of MAGIC syndrome is insufficient to establish a clear explanation. Therefore, further accumulation of data and careful observation of the clinical course are required to improve the understanding of MAGIC syndrome. PMID:27293269

  4. Mouth and Genital Ulcers with Inflamed Cartilage Syndrome: Case Report and Review of the Published Work.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuka; Nakai, Noriaki; Kida, Takashi; Kawahito, Yutaka; Katoh, Norito

    2016-01-01

    Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC) syndrome are disease that fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of Behcet's disease (BD) and relapsing polychondritis (RP). We report a 22-year-old Japanese woman presented with MAGIC syndrome and we described the clinicopathological characteristics of MAGIC syndrome based on a review of published cases from July 1985 to December 2015. In our case, the patient with oral aphthae, erythema nodosum, acne-like eruptions, uveitis, and polyarthritis fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of incomplete form of BD. The patient with uveitis, polyarthritis, and histological confirmation of chondritis also fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of RP. The patient was successfully treated with oral colchicine followed by prednisolone. The symptoms of MAGIC syndrome gradually disappeared, and the prednisolone dosage was gradually decreased and stopped. She has been in remission without active medication for a further 8 months. In the previous reports, some authors suggested that MAGIC syndrome was not a disease entity and might be RP occurring secondary to BD, another association of an autoimmune disease, or vasculitis with RP. However, the pathogenic association between MAGIC syndrome, BD, and RP is still unclear, and the number of reported cases of MAGIC syndrome is insufficient to establish a clear explanation. Therefore, further accumulation of data and careful observation of the clinical course are required to improve the understanding of MAGIC syndrome.

  5. Effects of exercise on synovium and cartilage from normal and inflamed knees.

    PubMed

    Shay, A K; Bliven, M L; Scampoli, D N; Otterness, I G; Milici, A J

    1995-01-01

    The effect of running activity on normal and inflamed knees was determined by light microscopic (LM) and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations on hamster articular cartilage. Animals were split into two groups; one housed in standard cages and one given free access to running wheels. Twenty-one days prior to analysis, half of each group was given an intra-articular injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to cause an inflammation, the other half were uninjected. No remarkable changes were observed by LM in either the control running or nonrunning groups. In contrast, cartilage proteoglycan depletion, and pannus and synovial hyperplasia were equally observed in both groups of LPS-injected animals. SEM observations on the patellae from control animals found them to be free from damage to the articular cartilage. The joints of both the LPS nonrunning and running animals contained synovial hypertrophy with villus projection from the synovial lining. However, only the LPS-injected running hamsters had cartilage fraying over large areas of the articular surface, as well as areas in which the villus projections had been flattened. These results demonstrated that mechanical stress applied to a proteoglycan-depleted cartilage enhances the breakdown of the collagen matrix as judged by fibrillation, and may aggravate the inflammation by crushing the swollen synovial lining where it encroaches on the joint space.

  6. Comparative analysis of Salmonella genomes identifies a metabolic network for escalating growth in the inflamed gut.

    PubMed

    Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-03-18

    The Salmonella genus comprises a group of pathogens associated with illnesses ranging from gastroenteritis to typhoid fever. We performed an in silico analysis of comparatively reannotated Salmonella genomes to identify genomic signatures indicative of disease potential. By removing numerous annotation inconsistencies and inaccuracies, the process of reannotation identified a network of 469 genes involved in central anaerobic metabolism, which was intact in genomes of gastrointestinal pathogens but degrading in genomes of extraintestinal pathogens. This large network contained pathways that enable gastrointestinal pathogens to utilize inflammation-derived nutrients as well as many of the biochemical reactions used for the enrichment and biochemical discrimination of Salmonella serovars. Thus, comparative genome analysis identifies a metabolic network that provides clues about the strategies for nutrient acquisition and utilization that are characteristic of gastrointestinal pathogens. IMPORTANCE While some Salmonella serovars cause infections that remain localized to the gut, others disseminate throughout the body. Here, we compared Salmonella genomes to identify characteristics that distinguish gastrointestinal from extraintestinal pathogens. We identified a large metabolic network that is functional in gastrointestinal pathogens but decaying in extraintestinal pathogens. While taxonomists have used traits from this network empirically for many decades for the enrichment and biochemical discrimination of Salmonella serovars, our findings suggest that it is part of a "business plan" for growth in the inflamed gastrointestinal tract. By identifying a large metabolic network characteristic of Salmonella serovars associated with gastroenteritis, our in silico analysis provides a blueprint for potential strategies to utilize inflammation-derived nutrients and edge out competing gut microbes.

  7. Lymphatic endothelium forms integrin-engaging 3D structures during DC transit across inflamed lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Teijeira, Alvaro; Garasa, Saray; Peláez, Rafael; Azpilikueta, Arantza; Ochoa, Carmen; Marré, Diego; Rodrigues, Magda; Alfaro, Carlos; Aubá, Cristina; Valitutti, Salvatore; Melero, Ignacio; Rouzaut, Ana

    2013-09-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) transmigration across the lymphatic endothelium is critical for the initiation and sustenance of immune responses. Under noninflammatory conditions, DC transit across the lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) has been shown to be integrin independent. In contrast, there is increasing evidence for the participation of integrins and their ligands in DC transit across lymphatic endothelium under inflammation. In this sense, we describe the formation of ICAM-1 (CD54)-enriched three-dimensional structures on LEC/DC contacts, as these DCs adhere to inflamed skin lymphatic vessels and transmigrate into them. In vitro imaging revealed that under inflammation ICAM-1 accumulated on microvilli projections surrounding 60% of adhered DCs. In contrast, these structures were scarcely formed in noninflammatory conditions. Furthermore, ICAM-1-enriched microvilli were important in promoting DC transendothelial migration and DC crawling over the LEC surface. Microvilli formation was dependent on the presence of β-integrins on the DC side and on integrin conformational affinity to ligand. Finally, we observed that LEC microvilli structures appeared in close vicinity of CCL21 depots and that their assembly was partially inhibited by CCL21-neutralizing antibodies. Therefore, under inflammatory conditions, integrin ligands form three-dimensional membrane projections around DCs. These structures offer docking sites for DC transit from the tissue toward the lymphatic vessel lumen.

  8. Assessing the colonic microbiome, hydrogenogenic and hydrogenotrophic genes, transit and breath methane in constipation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, P G; Parthasarathy, G; Chen, J; O'Connor, H M; Chia, N; Bharucha, A E; Gaskins, H R

    2017-10-01

    Differences in the gut microbiota and breath methane production have been observed in chronic constipation, but the relationship between colonic microbiota, transit, and breath tests remains unclear. In 25 healthy and 25 constipated females we evaluated the sigmoid colonic mucosal and fecal microbiota using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, abundance of hydrogenogenic FeFe (FeFe-hydA) and hydrogenotrophic (methyl coenzyme M reductase A [mrcA] and dissimilatory sulfite reductase A [dsrA]) genes with real-time qPCR assays, breath hydrogen and methane levels after oral lactulose, and colonic transit with scintigraphy. Breath hydrogen and methane were not correlated with constipation, slow colon transit, or with abundance of corresponding genes. After adjusting for colonic transit, the abundance of FeFehydA, dsrA, and mcrA were greater (P<.005) in colonic mucosa, but not stool, of constipated patients. The abundance of the selected functional gene targets also correlated with that of selected taxa. The colonic mucosal abundance of FeFe-hydA, but not mcrA, correlated positively (P<.05) with breath methane production, slow colonic transit, and overall microbiome composition. In the colonic mucosa and feces, the abundance of hydrogenogenic and hydrogenotrophic genes were positively correlated (P<.05). Breath methane production was not associated with constipation or colonic transit. Corroborating our earlier findings with 16S rRNA genes, colonic mucosal but not fecal hydrogenogenic and hydrogenotrophic genes were more abundant in constipated vs. healthy subjects independent of colonic transit. Breath gases do not directly reflect the abundance of target genes contributing to their production. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Alterations of the Ileal and Colonic Mucosal Microbiota in Canine Chronic Enteropathies

    PubMed Central

    Cassmann, Eric; White, Robin; Atherly, Todd; Wang, Chong; Sun, Yaxuan; Khoda, Samir; Mosher, Curtis; Ackermann, Mark; Jergens, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background The intestinal microbiota is increasingly linked to the pathogenesis of chronic enteropathies (CE) in dogs. While imbalances in duodenal and fecal microbial communities have been associated with mucosal inflammation, relatively little is known about alterations in mucosal bacteria seen with CE involving the ileum and colon. Aim To investigate the composition and spatial organization of mucosal microbiota in dogs with CE and controls. Methods Tissue sections from endoscopic biopsies of the ileum and colon from 19 dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), 6 dogs with granulomatous colitis (GC), 12 dogs with intestinal neoplasia, and 15 controls were studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on a quantifiable basis. Results The ileal and colonic mucosa of healthy dogs and dogs with CE is predominantly colonized by bacteria localized to free and adherent mucus compartments. CE dogs harbored more (P < 0.05) mucosal bacteria belonging to the Clostridium-coccoides/Eubacterium rectale group, Bacteroides, Enterobacteriaceae, and Escherichia coli versus controls. Within the CE group, IBD dogs had increased (P < 0.05) Enterobacteriaceae and E. coli bacteria attached onto surface epithelia or invading within the intestinal mucosa. Bacterial invasion with E. coli was observed in the ileal and colonic mucosa of dogs with GC (P < 0.05). Dogs with intestinal neoplasia had increased (P < 0.05) adherent (total bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, E. coli) and invasive (Enterobacteriaceae, E. coli, and Bacteroides) bacteria in biopsy specimens. Increased numbers of total bacteria adherent to the colonic mucosa were associated with clinical disease severity in IBD dogs (P < 0.05). Conclusion Pathogenic events in canine CE are associated with different populations of the ileal and colonic mucosal microbiota. PMID:26840462

  10. Immunoexpression of the COX-2, p53, and caspase-3 proteins in colorectal adenoma and non-neoplastic mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Renan Brito; Pires, Andréa Rodrigues Cordovil; Soares, Thélia Maria Santos; Rodrigues, Simone Rabello de Souza; Campos, Mariane Antonieta Menino; Toloi, Giovanna Canato; Waisberg, Jaques

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze the immunoexpression of the COX-2, p53, and caspase-3 proteins in colorectal adenomas and non-neoplastic mucosa. Methods: 72 individuals were subjected to colonoscopy, which provided 50 samples of adenomas and 45 samples of non-neoplastic colorectal mucosa. The tissue samples were obtained via the tissue microarray technique and subjected to immunohistochemical analysis using primary anti-p53, anti-COX-2, and anti-caspase-3 antibodies. The positivity and intensity of the immunoreaction were classified. The analyzed variables were as follows: site of the adenomas in the colon, degree of dysplasia, size, and score of positivity and intensity of immunoexpression of the p-53, caspase-3, and COX-2 proteins. Results: The immunoexpression of mutated protein p53 was positive in 30 (60%) adenoma samples and negative in 20 (40%) adenoma samples. The immunoexpression of mutated protein p53 was negative in 39 (86.6%) samples and positive in 6 (13.3%) samples of the non-neoplastic colorectal mucosa (p<0.0001). Significant differences were seen between both the largest size (p=0.006) and the highest degree of dysplasia (p<0.0001) of the adenomas and the intensity of immunoexpression of mutated protein p53. The positivity and intensity of immunoexpression of COX-2 (p=0.14) and caspase-3 (p=0.23) showed no significant differences between the adenomas and the non-neoplastic colorectal mucosa. Conclusion: Mutated protein p53 was hyperexpressed in the adenomas compared with the non-neoplastic mucosa. Greater size and greater degree of dysplasia in the adenomas were associated with higher expression of mutated protein p53. The immunoexpression of COX-2 and caspase-3 in the adenomas did not exhibit a correlation with the anatomical-pathological features of the tumors and did not differ from the corresponding expression levels in the non-neoplastic mucosa. PMID:24488384

  11. [THE MYCOBIOTA OF TUNICA MUCOSA OF MOUTH AND SURFACE OF REMOVABLE ACRYLIC LAMINAR DENTAL PROSTHESES UNDER ORTHOPEDIC REHABILITATION].

    PubMed

    Chesnokov, V A; Chesnokova, M G; Stafeiev, A A; Mironov, A Yu

    2016-02-01

    The analysis was carried out to detect mycobiota of tunica mucosa of mouth and surface of dental prostheses under orthopedic rehabilitation using removable acrylic laminar dental prostheses. The inoculation of biosamples received from examined patients permitted to isolate Candida albicans. The C. albicans from tunica mucosa of mouth of patients before prosthetics inoculated in low concentration making up 0.33±0.23 CFU/ml in comparison with concentration of 1.92±0.53 CFU/ml after prosthetics. The highest content of C. albicans was marked in biosample from surface of dental prostheses in comparison with biotope of tunica mucosa of mouth of patients. The concentration of microbiota from surface of dental prostheses signicantly surpassed the same on tunica mucosa of mouth of patients prior prosthetics. In patients with removable acrylic laminar dental prostheses under orthopedic rehabilitation various spectrum of representatives of microbiota was detected From biosamples from surface of dentalprostheses of patients the most frequently were inoculated such representatives of gram-positive microbiota as S. aureus, Micrococcus spp., S.haemolyticus, and of gram-negative microbiota Klebsiella pneumonae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The cultural analysis of biosamples from patients with removable acrylic laminar dental prostheses detected Candida albicans on tunica mucosa of mouth before and after prosthetics as well as on surfaces of prostheses. The highest concentration of C.albicans is established in case of colonization of removable acrylic laminar dental prostheses. The received data testifies possible involvement of fungi capable of expressed potential ofpathogenicity, in development and maintenance of inflammatory process of tunica mucosa of mouth under orthopedic rehabilitation using removable acrylic laminar dental prostheses.

  12. Differential responsiveness to contractile agents of isolated smooth muscle cells from human colons as a function of age and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Boyer, J C; Guitton, C; Pignodel, C; Cuq, P; Moussu, P; Pouderoux, P; Christen, M O; Balmes, J L; Bali, J P

    1997-11-01

    To study the involvement of age and inflammation in motor colonic activity in man, contractile responses to CCK, carbachol, and KCl of isolated colonic smooth muscle cells (SMC) from normal and inflamed human colons were evaluated; the incidence of sex and smoking on contraction was also analyzed. Contractile responses to the three agonists were significantly lower in tissues with a low degree of inflammation than in tissues with high level of inflammation or normal tissues. This reduction in cell responsiveness appears to be nonspecific and nonreceptor mediated. A positive correlation of the contractile responses to the three stimulants with the age of patients was observed. In contrast, no association was found between sex, smoking, and cell contraction. In conclusion, contractions of SMC due to CCK, carbachol, and KCl were significantly modified during life; inflammation of the colon led to a loss of SMC responsiveness.

  13. Immunohistochemical expression of metallothionein in normal human colorectal mucosa, in adenomas and in adenocarcinomas and their associated metastases.

    PubMed

    Giuffrè, G; Barresi, G; Sturniolo, G C; Sarnelli, R; D'Incà, R; Tuccari, G

    1996-10-01

    The immunohistochemical distribution pattern of metallothionein, a low molecular weight protein with strong affinity for divalent heavy metal ions, has been investigated in normal and neoplastic conditions of the large bowel. Utilizing a monoclonal mouse antibody the following formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded surgical or biopsy samples were studied: tubulo-villous adenomas (8 cases); adenocarcinomas with various degree of differentiation (85), nine of which were mucinous-type; synchronous tubular or tubulo-villous adenomas separate from carcinomas (30); transitional mucosa (45); metastases in lymph nodes (43); and distant metastases (45). Twenty biopsies from the right and left colon of 10 patients affected by irritable bowel syndrome were also analyzed. Normal colonic mucosa as well as transitional mucosa showed metallothionein immunopositivity in enterocytes at the luminal surface and crypts. Evident nuclear and cytoplasmic staining was encountered in tubulo-villous adenomas; the same reactivity was noted in the basal glandular component of colorectal carcinomas-synchronous adenomas, while less intense staining was noted in the apical villous portions. A variable metallothionein immunostaining was observed in adenocarcinomas (62.3%), in lymph node (55.8%) and distant hepatic (17.2%) and omental (43.8%) metastases, although it was not always concordant with that reported in the corresponding primary tumour. Whether the metallothionein positivity observed in normal and neoplastic cells is the result of expression of a stable form of the protein or an accumulation in the nucleus and cytoplasm remains to be clarified.

  14. Novel diet-related mouse model of colon cancer parallels human colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Anil R; Prasad, Shilpa; Nguyen, Huy; Facista, Alexander; Lewis, Cristy; Zaitlin, Beryl; Bernstein, Harris; Bernstein, Carol

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the close parallels between our novel diet-related mouse model of colon cancer and human colon cancer. METHODS: Twenty-two wild-type female mice (ages 6-8 wk) were fed the standard control diet (AIN-93G) and an additional 22 female mice (ages 6-8 wk) were fed the control diet supplemented with 0.2% deoxycholic acid [diet + deoxycholic acid (DOC)] for 10 mo. Tumors occurred in the colons of mice fed diet + DOC and showed progression to colon cancer [adenocarcinoma (AC)]. This progression is through the stages of tubular adenoma (TA), TA with high grade dysplasia or adenoma with sessile serrated morphology, intramucosal AC, AC stage T1, and AC stage T2. The mouse tumors were compared to human tumors at the same stages by histopathological analysis. Sections of the small and large intestines of mice and humans were evaluated for glandular architecture, cellular and nuclear morphology including cellular orientation, cellular and nuclear atypia, pleomorphism, mitotic activity, frequency of goblet cells, crypt architecture, ulceration, penetration of crypts through the muscularis mucosa and presence of malignant crypts in the muscularis propria. In addition, preserved colonic tissues from genetically similar male mice, obtained from a prior experiment, were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The male mice had been fed the control diet or diet + DOC. Four molecular markers were evaluated: 8-OH-dG, DNA repair protein ERCC1, autophagy protein beclin-1 and the nuclear location of beta-catenin in the stem cell region of crypts. Also, male mice fed diet + DOC plus 0.007% chlorogenic acid (diet + DOC + CGA) were evaluated for ERCC1, beclin-1 and nuclear location of beta-catenin. RESULTS: Humans with high levels of diet-related DOC in their colons are at a substantially increased risk of developing colon cancer. The mice fed diet + DOC had levels of DOC in their colons comparable to that of humans on a high fat diet. The 22 mice without added DOC in their diet

  15. [T-L mucosa to mucosa pancreatojejunal anastomosis for pancreatic reconstruction following a duodenopancreatectomy].

    PubMed

    Targarona, J; Garatea, R; Rosas, J; Romero, C; Rosamedina, J; Lora, A; Montoya, E

    2006-01-01

    The pancreatojejunal anastomosis is considered the weak spot when carrying out a duodenopancreatectomy, because it causes most of the complications following a Whipple surgery. Here we present a series of cases using a single technique for performing this anastomosis. During the period between October 2002 and August 2005, 49 duodenopancreatectomies were performed at the 3AII Department of the National Hospital Edgardo Rebagliati Martins - H.N.E.R.M., in 31 of these cases a lateral mucosa to mucosa pancreatojejunal anastomosis was carried out by the same surgeon. The most frequent complication was infection of the operating wound followed by pancreatic fistula and intra-abdominal hemorrhage and the overall morbidity was 29%. Pancreatic fistula developed in 13% of the cases; however, no patient required additional treatment and the fistula closed maximum twenty days after the surgery. On average, patients resumed oral food intake after 6 days and remained hospitalized for 16 days. Mortality was 3%, because a patient developed a pseudo-aneurism of the hepatic artery, which ruptured 17 days after the operation. The mucosa to mucosa pancreatojejunal anastomosis is a safe technique with a low index of pancreatic fistula and mortality.

  16. Colon-targeted cell-permeable NFκB inhibitory peptide is orally active against experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungchae; Yum, Soohwan; Yoo, Hyun-Jung; Kang, Sookjin; Yoon, Jeong-Hyun; Min, Dosik; Kim, Young Mi; Jung, Yunjin

    2012-05-07

    For the purpose of development of orally active peptide therapeutics targeting NFκB for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), two major barriers in oral delivery of therapeutic peptides, metabolic lability and tissue impermeability, were circumvented by introduction of a colon-targeted delivery system and cell permeable peptides (CPP) to NFκB inhibitory peptides (NIP). Suppression of NFκB activation was compared following treatment with various CPP conjugated NIPs (CPP-NIP). The most potent CPP-NIP was loaded in a capsule coated with a colon specific polymer, which was administered orally to colitic rats. The anti-inflammatory activity of the colon-targeted CPP-NIP was evaluated by measuring inflammatory indices in the inflamed colonic tissue. For confirmation of the local action of the CPP-NIP, the same experiment was done after rectal administration. Tissue permeability of the CPP-NIP was examined microscopically and spectrophotometrically using FITC-labeled CPP-NIP (CPP-NIP-FITC). NEMO binding domain peptide (NBD, TALDWSWLQTE) fused with a cell permeable peptide CTP (YGRRARRRARR), CTP-NBD, was most potent in inhibiting NFκB activity in cells. Colon-targeted CTP-NBD, but not colon-targeted NBD and CTP-NBD in an enteric capsule, ameliorated the colonic injury, which was in parallel with decrease in MPO activity and the levels of inflammatory mediators. Intracolonic treatment with CTP-NBD alleviated rat colitis and improved all the inflammatory indicators. CTP-NBD-FITC was detected at much greater level in the inflamed tissue than was NBD-FITC. Taken together, introduction of cell permeability and colon targetability to NIP may be a feasible strategy for an orally active peptide therapy for treatment of IBD.

  17. Catecholamine secretion and adrenal nerve activity in response to movements of normal and inflamed knee joints in cats.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, A; Sato, Y; Schmidt, R F

    1986-01-01

    The effects of articular stimulation on adrenal catecholamine secretion and adrenal sympathetic nerve activity were studied using halothane anaesthetized cats. Various natural passive movements were applied to the normal and inflamed knee joints. Rhythmic flexions and extensions as well as rhythmic inward and outward rotation of normal knee joints within their physiological range of motion did not change nerve activity or the secretion of adrenal catecholamines. Static outward rotation in the normal working range was also ineffective. However, as soon as this static rotation was extended into the noxious range, significant increases in both of these variables were elicited. In the acutely inflamed knee joint, various passive movements produced increases in both adrenal sympathetic and catecholamine secretion. Especially noteworthy was the finding that movements of the inflamed knee joint that were within the normal range of motion produced increases in all variables. Articularly induced increases in adrenal sympathetic nerve activity were diminished by severing various hind-limb somatic afferent nerves and abolished by complete denervation of the knee joint. Additionally, section of the adrenal sympathetic nerves eliminated the catecholamine secretion response. From these data it was concluded that the responses observed in these experiments were reflexes having an afferent limb in hind-limb nerves and an efferent limb in the adrenal sympathetic nerves. A contribution of supraspinal structures was suggested for the reflex responses of sympatho-adrenal medullary function evoked by knee joint stimulations, since spinal transection at the C2 level completely abolished the responses. PMID:3795070

  18. Inactivation of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Reduces Bile Acid/Farnesoid X Receptor Expression through Fxr gene CpG Methylation in Mouse Colon Tumors and Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Selmin, Ornella I; Fang, Changming; Lyon, Adam M; Doetschman, Tom C; Thompson, Patricia A; Martinez, Jesse D; Smith, Jeffrey W; Lance, Peter M; Romagnolo, Donato F

    2016-02-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates bile acid (BA) metabolism and possesses tumor suppressor functions. FXR expression is reduced in colorectal tumors of subjects carrying inactivated adenomatous polyposis coli (APC). Identifying the mechanisms responsible for this reduction may offer new molecular targets for colon cancer prevention. We investigated how APC inactivation influences the regulation of FXR expression in colonic mucosal cells. We hypothesized that APC inactivation would epigenetically repress nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group H, member 4 (FXR gene name) expression through increased CpG methylation. Normal proximal colonic mucosa and normal-appearing adjacent colonic mucosa and colon tumors were collected from wild-type C57BL/6J and Apc-deficient (Apc(Min) (/+)) male mice, respectively. The expression of Fxr, ileal bile acid-binding protein (Ibabp), small heterodimer partner (Shp), and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. In both normal and adjacent colonic mucosa and colon tumors, we measured CpG methylation of Fxr in bisulfonated genomic DNA. In vitro, we measured the impact of APC inactivation and deoxycholic acid (DCA) treatment on FXR expression in human colon cancer HCT-116 cells transfected with silencing RNA for APC and HT-29 cells carrying inactivated APC. In Apc(Min) (/+) mice, constitutive CpG methylation of the Fxrα3/4 promoter was linked to reduced (60-90%) baseline Fxr, Ibabp, and Shp and increased Cox-2 expression in apparently normal adjacent mucosa and colon tumors. Apc knockdown in HCT-116 cells increased cellular myelocytomatosis (c-MYC) and lowered (∼50%) FXR expression, which was further reduced (∼80%) by DCA. In human HCT-116 but not HT-29 colon cancer cells, DCA induced FXR expression and lowered CpG methylation of FXR. We conclude that the loss of APC function favors the silencing of FXR expression through CpG hypermethylation in mouse colonic mucosa and human colon cells

  19. A Grading Score for Colon Preservation Injury in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Bresler, A; Ionac, M; Oltean, M

    2016-03-01

    Colon transplantation is rarely performed because of the fear for an advanced ischemic injury that may favor septic complications. Systematic studies on colon preservation are missing. The score used to evaluate the preservation injury of the colon is adapted from that used for the small intestine, despite histological and biological differences between the two organs. We studied sequentially the tissue changes in the rat colon during prolonged cold storage (CS) in histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK) solution and designed a grading score specific for the colon. Large bowels of Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 9) were perfused in situ with HTK and stored at 4°C for 6 hours, 12 hours, 18 hours, and 24 hours. Samples from the proximal colon were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and alcian blue. Tight junction protein zonulla occludens (ZO)-1 was also studied. Minimal subepithelial edema (hallmark of small intestinal preservation injury) was observed throughout the 24 hours of CS. The two major changes observed during the colonic CS were progressive submucosal edema and the depletion of Goblet cells (GC). The submucosal edema was absent at 6 hours, started after 12 hours, and become significant (over 50% of the circumference) after 18 hours of CS. Depletion of GC started in the luminal half of the crypts between 12 and 18 hours of CS, and all samples revealed significant GC depletion only after 24 hours. The overall appearance of the mucosa was little affected under the CS, and ZO-1 expression was frequently maintained throughout the first 18 hours. The colon is more resilient to cold ischemia than the small bowel and maintains its histological epithelial features longer than the small intestine. On the basis of these serial observations, we suggest the following grading score: grade 0: normal mucosa, repleted GC, mucosa adhering to the muscular layer; grade 1: limited submucosal edema, repleted GC; grade 2: limited submucosal edema, GC depletion in the luminal half of

  20. Intestinal paragonimiasis with colonic ulcer and hematochezia in an elderly Taiwanese woman.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chung-Te; Chen, Yen-Cheng; Chen, Tso-Hsiao; Barghouth, Ursula; Fan, Chia-Kwung

    2012-12-01

    A 94-year-old female with end-stage renal disease presents with fever, fatigue, and hematochezia. She had previously resided in Hunan Province, China, and Myanmar, and she immigrated to Taiwan 30 years ago. Colonoscopy revealed a colonic ulcer. Biopsy of the colonic ulcer showed ulceration of the colonic mucosa, and many Paragonimus westermani-like eggs were noted. Serum IgG antibody levels showed strong reactivity with P. westermani excretory-secretory antigens by ELISA. Intestinal paragonimiasis was thus diagnosed according to the morphology of the eggs and serologic finding. After treatment with praziquantel, hematochezia resolved. The present case illustrates the extreme manifestations encountered in severe intestinal paragonimiasis.

  1. Quantitative biomarkers of colonic dysplasia based on intrinsic second-harmonic generation signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Wu, Guizhu; Chen, Jianxin; Xie, Shusen

    2011-12-01

    Most colorectal cancers arise from dysplastic lesions, such as adenomatous polyps, and these lesions are difficult to be detected by the current endoscopic screening approaches. Here, we present the use of an intrinsic second-harmonic generation (SHG) signal as a novel means to differentiate between normal and dysplastic human colonic tissues. We find that the SHG signal can quantitatively identify collagen change associated with colonic dysplasia that is indiscernible by conventional pathologic techniques. By comparing normal with dysplastic mucosa, there were significant differences in collagen density and collagen fiber direction, providing substantial potential to become quantitative intrinsic biomarkers for in vivo clinical diagnosis of colonic dysplasia.

  2. Portal hypertensive gastric mucosa: an endoscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Papazian, A; Braillon, A; Dupas, J L; Sevenet, F; Capron, J P

    1986-01-01

    The endoscopic features of the gastric mucosa in patients with cirrhosis have not been systematically investigated. In these patients, we observed an endoscopic aspect, consisting of multiple small erythematous areas, outlined by a subtle yellowish network (resembling a mosaic), mainly located in the proximal part of the stomach. We tested the value of this sign by comparing two groups: 100 patients with portal hypertension due to cirrhosis, and 300 control patients without signs of liver disease or portal hypertension. This endoscopic pattern was observed in 94 of the patients with cirrhosis, whereas oesophageal varices were seen in 78 only. In contrast, only one patient of the control group had this aspect. Moreover, this sign was also found in seven of eight patients with non cirrhotic portal hypertension, but was seen neither in 100 patients with chronic alcoholism but without liver disease, nor in 10 cirrhotic patients with end-to-side portacaval shunts. These endoscopic changes might be because of mucosal and/or submucosal oedema and congestion highlighting the normal areae gastricae pattern and related to raised portal pressure. We conclude that the mosaic pattern of the gastric mucosa is a sensible and specific sign for diagnosis of portal hypertension, whatever the cause. Images Figure PMID:3781334

  3. Primary esophageal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiang; Zhang, Chun; Fang, San’gao; Zhong, Peng; Zhu, Xiangfeng; Lin, Li; Xiao, Hualiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is a low grade malignant B cell lymphoma which occurs mainly in the organs having mucosal layer. Though gastrointestinal tract is the most commonly involved extranodal site, primary esophageal MALT lymphoma is very rare with less than 20 cases reported in literature. Patient concerns: A 75-year-old man was referred to our hospital for evaluation of dysphagia. Endoscopy revealed a submucosal tumor located in the middle and lower third of esophagus. CT chest and endoscopic ultrasound revealed a 15.5 × 5.9 × 4.0 cm well circumscribed submucosa esophageal tumor. Test for serum antibody against H. pylori was negative. Due to the large tumor size, patient underwent surgical resection. Histological examination showed a submucosal tumor consisting of multiple nodules of varying sizes with intact covering squamous epithelium. The nodules were mainly composed of diffusely and monoclonal proliferating centrocyte-like or monocyte-like cells. Follicular colonizations were observed without lymphoepithelial lesions. The tumor cells were diffusely positive for CD20, PAX-5, Bcl-2 and follicular dendritic cells were positive for CD21, CD23. Monoclonal gene rearrangement was positive for immunoglobulin heavy chain gene, Kappa light chain gene and Lambda light chain gene. Diagnoses: Based on these findings, final diagnosis of esophageal MALT lymphoma was made. Outcomes: At 8 month follow up, no recurrence or metastases was detected. Lessons: Esophageal MALT lymphoma is a rare disease with definitive diagnosis possible only after histopathological examination. It carries good prognosis due to low malignant potential. PMID:28353588

  4. Induction of colonic regulatory T cells by indigenous Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Atarashi, Koji; Tanoue, Takeshi; Shima, Tatsuichiro; Imaoka, Akemi; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Momose, Yoshika; Cheng, Genhong; Yamasaki, Sho; Saito, Takashi; Ohba, Yusuke; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Hori, Shohei; Ivanov, Ivaylo I; Umesaki, Yoshinori; Itoh, Kikuji; Honda, Kenya

    2011-01-21

    CD4(+) T regulatory cells (T(regs)), which express the Foxp3 transcription factor, play a critical role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis. Here, we show that in mice, T(regs) were most abundant in the colonic mucosa. The spore-forming component of indigenous intestinal microbiota, particularly clusters IV and XIVa of the genus Clostridium, promoted T(reg) cell accumulation. Colonization of mice by a defined mix of Clostridium strains provided an environment rich in transforming growth factor-β and affected Foxp3(+) T(reg) number and function in the colon. Oral inoculation of Clostridium during the early life of conventionally reared mice resulted in resistance to colitis and systemic immunoglobulin E responses in adult mice, suggesting a new therapeutic approach to autoimmunity and allergy.

  5. Dietary fibre and colon cancer: epidemiologic and experimental evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, B S

    1980-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have identified two dietary factors, a relatively high intake of fat and a relatively low intake of fibre, that are associated with colon cancer in humans. However, a recent study has shown a low risk of large bowel cancer in a rural Finnish population with a high dietary intake of fat, but also a high intake of fibre. Observations in humans and studies in animals have indicated that dietary fibre may protect against colon carcinogenesis by binding bile acids in the intestinal tract, by a direct effect on the colonic mucosa and by an indirect effect on the metabolism of carcinogens. The strength of protection varies with the type of fibre. PMID:6254626

  6. Mucoadhesion dependence of pharmaceutical polymers on mucosa characteristics.

    PubMed

    Accili, Daniela; Menghi, Giovanna; Bonacucina, Giulia; Martino, Piera Di; Palmieri, Giovanni F

    2004-07-01

    Well known mucoadhesive polymers such as Carbopol 974P and Pharmacoat 606 and three different mucosas (sublingual, oesophageal and duodenal bovine) were used to verify how the mucoadhesive properties of materials may depend on the mucosa characteristics and if a polymer may reveal more mucoadhesive than another and vice versa by changing the type of interacting mucosa. So, tablets of Carbopol 974P and Pharmacoat 606 were prepared and their mucoadhesion on the three mucosas was set in terms of maximum load and work of detachment, using a texture analyzer. At the same time, mucosas were characterized by immunohistochemical techniques and lectin histochemistry. Results obtained from the Tensile test analyses show that the adhesive power of the two polymers is different in the three mucosas. Particularly, in the sublingual mucosa, Carbopol was more mucoadhesive than Pharmacoat. On the contrary, Pharmacoat was more mucoadhesive than Carbopol in duodenal mucosa. The significantly different behavior of polymers was correlated with the desquamation layer thickness and the differential sialic acid and fucose exposition in the targeted mucosas.

  7. Ultrastructural evaluation of mesenchymal stem cells from inflamed periodontium in different in vitro conditions.

    PubMed

    Zaganescu, Raluca; Barbu Tudoran, Lucian; Pall, Emoke; Florea, Adrian; Roman, Alexandra; Soanca, Andrada; Mihaela Mihu, Carmen

    2015-09-01

    This research aimed to observe the behavior of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from periodontal granulation tissue (gt) when manipulated ex vivo to induce three-dimensional (3D) spheroid (aggregates) formation as well as when seeded on two bone scaffolds of animal origin. Periodontal gt was chosen as a MSC source because of its availability, considering that it is eliminated as a waste material during conventional surgical therapies. 3D aggregates of cells were generated; they were grown for 3 and 7 days, respectively, and then prepared for transmission electron microscopic analysis. The two biomaterials were seeded for 72 h with gtMSCs and prepared for scanning electronic microscopic observation. The ultrastructural analysis of 3D spheroids remarked some differences between the inner and the outer cell layers, with a certain commitment observed at the inner cells. Both scaffolds showed a relatively smooth surface at low magnification. Macro- and micropores having a scarce distribution were observed on both bone substitutes. gtMSCs grew with relative difficulty on the biomaterials. After 72 h of proliferation, gtMSCs scarcely covered the surface of bovine bone scaffolds, demonstrating fibroblast-like or star-like shapes with elongated filiform extensions. Our results add other data on the possible usefulness of gtMSC and could question the current paradigm regarding the complete removal of chronically inflamed gts from the defects during periodontal surgeries. Until optimal protocols for ex vivo manipulation of MSCs are available for clinical settings, it is advisable to use biocompatible bone substitutes that allow the development of progenitor cells. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The chemokine CX3CL1 promotes trafficking of dendritic cells through inflamed lymphatics

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Louise A.; Jackson, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Tissue inflammation is characterised by increased trafficking of antigen-loaded dendritic cells (DCs) from the periphery via afferent lymphatics to draining lymph nodes, with a resulting stimulation of ongoing immune responses. Transmigration across lymphatic endothelium constitutes the first step in this process and is known to involve the chemokine CCL21 and its receptor CCR7. However, the precise details of DC transit remain obscure and it is likely that additional chemokine-receptor pairs have roles in lymphatic vessel entry. Here, we report that the transmembrane chemokine CX3CL1 (fractalkine) is induced in inflamed lymphatic endothelium, both in vitro in TNF-α-treated human dermal lymphatic endothelial cells (HDLECs) and in vivo in a mouse model of skin hypersensitivity. However, unlike blood endothelial cells, which express predominantly transmembrane CX3CL1 as a leukocyte adhesion molecule, HDLECs shed virtually all CX3CL1 at their basolateral surface through matrix metalloproteinases. We show for the first time that both recombinant soluble CX3CL1 and endogenous secreted CX3CL1 promote basolateral-to-luminal migration of DCs across HDLEC monolayers in vitro. Furthermore, we show in vivo that neutralising antibodies against CX3CL1 dramatically reduce allergen-induced trafficking of cutaneous DCs to draining lymph nodes as assessed by FITC skin painting in mice. Finally, we show that deletion of the CX3CL1 receptor in Cx3cr1−/− DCs results in markedly delayed lymphatic trafficking in vivo and impaired translymphatic migration in vitro, thus establishing a previously unrecognised role for this atypical chemokine in regulating DC trafficking through the lymphatics. PMID:24006262

  9. Chronically inflamed human tissues are infiltrated by highly differentiated Th17 lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Pène, Jérôme; Chevalier, Sylvie; Preisser, Laurence; Vénéreau, Emilie; Guilleux, Marie-Hélène; Ghannam, Soufiane; Molès, Jean-Pierre; Danger, Yannic; Ravon, Elisa; Lesaux, Sabine; Yssel, Hans; Gascan, Hugues

    2008-06-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are characterized by local tissue injury caused by immunocompetent cells, in particular CD4(+) T lymphocytes, that are involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders via the production of distinctive sets of cytokines. Here, we have characterized single CD4(+) T cells that infiltrate inflamed tissue taken from patients with psoriasis, Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, or allergic asthma. Results from a cytokine production and gene profile analysis identified a population of in vivo differentiatedretinoid-related orphan receptor gamma-expressing T cells, producing high levels of IL-17, that can represent up to 30% of infiltrating T lymphocytes. Activated Th17 cells produced IL-26, TNF-alpha, lymphotoxin-beta, and IL-22. IL-17 and IL-22 concentrations secreted by tissue infiltrating Th17 cells could reach up to 100 nM and were inversely correlated with the production of Th1- and Th2-associated cytokines. In addition, tissue-infiltrating Th17 cells are also characterized by high cell surface expression of CCR6, a chemokine receptor that was not expressed by Th1 and Th2 cells, isolated from the same lesions, and by the production of CCL20/MIP3alpha, a CCR6 ligand, associated with tissue infiltration. Culture supernatants of activated Th17 cells, isolated from psoriatic lesions, induced the expression of gene products associated with inflammation and abnormal keratinocyte differentiation in an IL-17 and IL-22-dependent manner. These results show that tissue-infiltrating Th17 cells contribute to human chronic inflammatory disease via the production of several inflammatory cytokines and the creation of an environment contributing to their migration and sequestration at sites of inflammation.

  10. Fetuin-A downregulates adiponectin through Wnt-PPARγ pathway in lipid induced inflamed adipocyte.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Soumik; Chattopadhyay, Mrittika; Mukherjee, Sandip; Dasgupta, Suman; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Bhattacharya, Samir

    2017-01-01

    Adiponectin secreted from adipocytes is an anti-diabetic and anti-atherogenic adipokine. Adiponectin level is known to fall significantly in obesity induced type 2 diabetes which worsen insulin sensitivity because of aberrant lipid management. However, underlying mechanism of adiponectin decrease in obese diabetic condition is yet unclear. We report here that lowering of plasma adiponectin coincided with the higher Fetuin A (FetA) level in high fat diet (HFD) induced obese diabetic mice. Knock down of FetA gene (FetA(KD)) elevated adiponectin level markedly in HFD mice, while reinforcement of FetA into FetA(KD)HFD mice reduced its level again. These results indicate FetA's involvement in the lowering of adiponectin level in obesity induced diabetic mice. Our findings to understand how FetA could affect adiponectin decrease demonstrated that FetA could enhance Wnt3a expression in the adipocyte of HFD mice. FetA addition to 3T3L1 adipocyte incubation elevated Wnt3a expression in a dose dependent manner. Overexpression of Wnt3a by FetA inhibited PPARγ and adiponectin. FetA failed to reduce PPARγ and adiponectin in Wnt3a gene knocked down 3T3L1` adipocytes. All these suggest that FetA mediate its inhibitory effect on adiponectin through Wnt3a-PPARγ pathway. Inhibition of adiponectin expression through FetA and Wnt3a significantly compromised with the activation of AMPK and its downstream signalling molecules which adversely affected lipid management causing loss of insulin sensitivity. Downregulation of adiponectin in inflamed adipocyte by FetA through the mediation of Wnt3a and PPARγ is a new report.

  11. Hemichannels in the neurovascular unit and white matter under normal and inflamed conditions.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Juan A; Figueroa, Xavier F; Sánchez, Helmuth A; Contreras-Duarte, Susana; Velarde, Victoria; Sáez, Juan C

    2011-05-01

    In the normal brain, cellular types that compose the neurovascular unit, including neurons, astrocytes and endothelial cells express pannexins and connexins, which are protein subunits of two families that form plasma membrane channels. Most available evidence in mammals indicated that endogenously expressed pannexins only form hemichannels, and connexins form both gap junction channels and hemichannels. While gap junction channels connect the cytoplasm of contacting cells and coordinate electrical and metabolic activities, hemichannels communicate intra- and extracellular compartments and serve as diffusional pathways for ions and small molecules. Here, evidence supporting the functional role of hemichannels in the neurovascular unit and white matter under physiological and pathological conditions are reviewed. A sub-threshold acute pathological threatening condition (e.g., stroke and brain infection) leads to glial cell activation, which maintains an active defense and restores the normal function of the neurovascular unit. However, if the stimulus is deleterious, microglia and the endothelium become overactivated, both releasing bioactive molecules (e.g., glutamate, cytokines, prostaglandins and ATP) that increase the activity of astroglial hemichannels, reducing the astrocyte neuroprotective functions, and further reducing neuronal cell viability. Moreover, ATP is known to contribute to myelin degeneration of axons. Consequently, hemichannels might play a relevant role in the excitotoxic response of oligodendrocytes observed in ischemia and encephalomyelitis. Regulated changes in hemichannel permeability in healthy brain cells can have positive consequences in terms of paracrine/autocrine signaling, whereas persistent changes in cells affected by neurological disorders can be detrimental. Therefore, blocking hemichannels expressed by glial cells and/or neurons of the inflamed central nervous system might prevent neurovascular unit dysfunction and

  12. Patrolling monocytes promote intravascular neutrophil activation and glomerular injury in the acutely inflamed glomerulus

    PubMed Central

    Finsterbusch, Michaela; Hall, Pam; Li, Anqi; Devi, Sapna; Westhorpe, Clare L. V.; Kitching, A. Richard

    2016-01-01

    Nonclassical monocytes undergo intravascular patrolling in blood vessels, positioning them ideally to coordinate responses to inflammatory stimuli. Under some circumstances, the actions of monocytes have been shown to involve promotion of neutrophil recruitment. However, the mechanisms whereby patrolling monocytes control the actions of neutrophils in the circulation are unclear. Here, we examined the contributions of monocytes to antibody- and neutrophil-dependent inflammation in a model of in situ immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. Multiphoton and spinning disk confocal intravital microscopy revealed that monocytes patrol both uninflamed and inflamed glomeruli using β2 and α4 integrins and CX3CR1. Monocyte depletion reduced glomerular injury, demonstrating that these cells promote inappropriate inflammation in this setting. Monocyte depletion also resulted in reductions in neutrophil recruitment and dwell time in glomerular capillaries and in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by neutrophils, suggesting a role for cross-talk between monocytes and neutrophils in induction of glomerulonephritis. Consistent with this hypothesis, patrolling monocytes and neutrophils underwent prolonged interactions in glomerular capillaries, with the duration of these interactions increasing during inflammation. Moreover, neutrophils that interacted with monocytes showed increased retention and a greater propensity for ROS generation in the glomerulus. Also, renal patrolling monocytes, but not neutrophils, produced TNF during inflammation, and TNF inhibition reduced neutrophil dwell time and ROS production, as well as renal injury. These findings show that monocytes and neutrophils undergo interactions within the glomerular microvasculature. Moreover, evidence indicates that, in response to an inflammatory stimulus, these interactions allow monocytes to promote neutrophil recruitment and activation within the glomerular microvasculature, leading to neutrophil

  13. Stem/progenitor cells from inflamed human dental pulp retain tissue regeneration potential

    PubMed Central

    Alongi, Dominick J; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Song, Yingjie; Fouad, Ashraf F; Romberg, Elaine E; Shi, Songtao; Tuan, Rocky S; Huang, George T-J

    2011-01-01

    Background Potent stem/progenitor cells have been isolated from normal human dental pulps termed dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). However, it is unknown whether these cells exist in inflamed pulps (IPs). Aims To determine whether DPSCs can be identified and isolated from IPs; and if they can be successfully cultured, whether they retain tissue regeneration potential in vivo. Materials & methods DPSCs from freshly collected normal pulps (NPs) and IPs were characterized in vitro and their tissue regeneration potential tested using an in vivo study model. Results The immunohistochemical analysis showed that IPs expressed higher levels of mesenchymal stem cell markers STRO-1, CD90, CD105 and CD146 compared with NPs (p < 0.05). Flow cytometry analysis showed that DPSCs from both NPs and IPs expressed moderate to high levels of CD146, stage-specific embryonic antigen-4, CD73 and CD166. Total population doubling of DPSCs-IPs (44.6 ± 2.9) was lower than that of DPSCs-NPs (58.9 ± 2.5) (p < 0.05), and DPSCs-IPs appeared to have a decreased osteo/dentinogenic potential compared with DPSCs-NPs based on the mineral deposition in cultures. Nonetheless, DPSCs-IPs formed pulp/dentin complexes similar to DPSCs-NPs when transplanted into immunocompromised mice. Conclusion DPSCs-IPs can be isolated and their mesenchymal stem cell marker profiles are similar to those from NPs. Although some stem cell properties of DPSCs-IPs were altered, cells from some samples remained potent in tissue regeneration in vivo. PMID:20465527

  14. Vascular Deposition Patterns for Nanoparticles in an Inflamed Patient-Specific Arterial Tree

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Shaolie S.; Hughes, Thomas J.R.; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation, a precursor to many diseases including cancer and atherosclerosis, induces differential surface expression of specific vascular molecules. Blood-borne nanoparticles (NPs), loaded with therapeutic and imaging agents, can recognize and use these molecules as vascular docking sites. Here, a computational model is developed within the Isogeometric Analysis framework to understand and predict the vascular deposition of NPs within an inflamed arterial tree. The NPs have a diameter ranging from 0.1 to 2.0 μm and are decorated with antibodies directed toward three endothelial adhesion molecules, namely intravascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and E-selectin, whose surface density depends on the local wall shear stress. Results indicate VCAM-1 targeted NPs adhere more, with ICAM-1 directed NPs adhering least efficiently, resulting in approximately an order-of-magnitude lower average particle surface density. ICAM-1 and E-selectin directed 0.5 μm NPs are distributed more uniformly (heterogeneity index ≈ 0.9 and 1.0, respectively) over the bifurcating vascular branches compared to their VCAM-1 counterparts (heterogeneity index ≈ 1.4). When the NPs are coated with antibodies for VCAM-1 and E-selectin in equal proportions, a more uniform vascular distribution is achieved compared with VCAM-1-only targeted particles, thus demonstrating the advantage of NP multivalency in vascular targeting. Furthermore, the larger NPs (2 μm) adhere more (≈ 200%) in the lower branches compared to the upper branch. This computational framework provides insights into how size, ligand type, density, and multivalency can be manipulated to enhance NP vascular adhesion in an individual patient. PMID:23942910

  15. Pimecrolimus permeates less than tacrolimus through normal, inflamed, or corticosteroid