Science.gov

Sample records for inflammation resembling inflammatory

  1. Feline epidermal nevi resembling human inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masafumi; Kariya, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Munetaka; Itoh, Miyuki; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Nishifuji, Koji; Kamiie, Junichi; Shirota, Kinji

    2012-10-01

    Multiple, pigmented, verrucous, cutaneous lesions in a 2-year-old female cat were pathologically examined. The lesions were linearly arranged on the right side of the body, and had developed along with moderate pruritus since infancy. Histologically, prominent exophytic, papillomatous outgrowths of the epidermis and acanthosis with intense ortho and parakeratotic hyperkeratosis were characteristic of the lesions. Dermal inflammation with mononuclear cells, neutrophils, and eosinophils was also noted. Inclusion bodies, cellular degeneration, and intranuclear viral particles suggesting papillomavirus infection in the keratinocytes were not observed. Papillomavirus antigen and DNA were not detected in the lesions by immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction, respectively. In accordance with these clinical and histopathological features, the cutaneous lesions of the present cat were diagnosed as epidermal nevi, which were consistent with human inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevi.

  2. Aberrant Mucin Assembly in Mice Causes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Spontaneous Inflammation Resembling Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Price, Gareth R; Tauro, Sharyn B; Taupin, Douglas; Thornton, David J; Png, Chin Wen; Crockford, Tanya L; Cornall, Richard J; Adams, Rachel; Kato, Masato; Nelms, Keats A; Hong, Nancy A; Florin, Timothy H. J; Goodnow, Christopher C; McGuckin, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Background MUC2 mucin produced by intestinal goblet cells is the major component of the intestinal mucus barrier. The inflammatory bowel disease ulcerative colitis is characterized by depleted goblet cells and a reduced mucus layer, but the aetiology remains obscure. In this study we used random mutagenesis to produce two murine models of inflammatory bowel disease, characterised the basis and nature of the inflammation in these mice, and compared the pathology with human ulcerative colitis. Methods and Findings By murine N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis we identified two distinct noncomplementing missense mutations in Muc2 causing an ulcerative colitis-like phenotype. 100% of mice of both strains developed mild spontaneous distal intestinal inflammation by 6 wk (histological colitis scores versus wild-type mice, p < 0.01) and chronic diarrhoea. Monitoring over 300 mice of each strain demonstrated that 25% and 40% of each strain, respectively, developed severe clinical signs of colitis by age 1 y. Mutant mice showed aberrant Muc2 biosynthesis, less stored mucin in goblet cells, a diminished mucus barrier, and increased susceptibility to colitis induced by a luminal toxin. Enhanced local production of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-γ was seen in the distal colon, and intestinal permeability increased 2-fold. The number of leukocytes within mesenteric lymph nodes increased 5-fold and leukocytes cultured in vitro produced more Th1 and Th2 cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-13). This pathology was accompanied by accumulation of the Muc2 precursor and ultrastructural and biochemical evidence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in goblet cells, activation of the unfolded protein response, and altered intestinal expression of genes involved in ER stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and wound repair. Expression of mutated Muc2 oligomerisation domains in vitro demonstrated that aberrant Muc2 oligomerisation underlies the ER stress. In human ulcerative colitis we demonstrate similar

  3. Extracutaneous neutrophilic inflammation in a dog with lesions resembling Sweet's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Charles S; May, Elizabeth R; Myers, Ronald K; Hostetter, Jesse M

    2009-06-01

    A 7-year-old-spayed female standard poodle dog presented to the Iowa State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital with an 8-day history of lethargy, left hind limb lameness, ptyalism and peripheral lymphadenomegaly. On physical examination, the dog was lethargic, febrile (40.5 degrees C) and had multifocal to coalescing erythematous papular to pustular eruptions on the skin of all four limbs, periocularly and on the ventral and lateral thorax and abdomen. Histopathological findings from skin biopsies of the papules revealed a severe diffuse neutrophilic dermatitis with sub- and intra-epithelial pustules. Four days after being admitted the dog died from cardiac and respiratory failure. At necropsy, in addition to the multifocal to coalescing erythematous papules, the skin contained scattered pustules. Additionally, the subcutaneous tissue surrounding the right stifle was diffusely oedematous, and the peripheral and visceral lymph nodes were enlarged. The predominant histologic lesion was neutrophilic inflammation, in the absence of detectable bacteria in the skin, heart, lungs, oesophagus and left tarsus. In the absence of neoplasia or bacteraemia, a syndrome similar to Sweet's Syndrome should be considered as a differential diagnosis in dogs with cutaneous and extracutaneous neutrophilic infiltrates.

  4. Oral Inflammatory Diseases and Systemic Inflammation: Role of the Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Hasturk, Hatice; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex reaction to injurious agents and includes vascular responses, migration, and activation of leukocytes. Inflammation starts with an acute reaction, which evolves into a chronic phase if allowed to persist unresolved. Acute inflammation is a rapid process characterized by fluid exudation and emigration of leukocytes, primarily neutrophils, whereas chronic inflammation extends over a longer time and is associated with lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, blood vessel proliferation, and fibrosis. Inflammation is terminated when the invader is eliminated, and the secreted mediators are removed; however, many factors modify the course and morphologic appearance as well as the termination pattern and duration of inflammation. Chronic inflammatory illnesses such as diabetes, arthritis, and heart disease are now seen as problems that might have an impact on the periodontium. Reciprocal effects of periodontal diseases are potential factors modifying severity in the progression of systemic inflammatory diseases. Macrophages are key cells for the inflammatory processes as regulators directing inflammation to chronic pathological changes or resolution with no damage or scar tissue formation. As such, macrophages are involved in a remarkably diverse array of homeostatic processes of vital importance to the host. In addition to their critical role in immunity, macrophages are also widely recognized as ubiquitous mediators of cellular turnover and maintenance of extracellular matrix homeostasis. In this review, our objective is to identify macrophage-mediated events central to the inflammatory basis of chronic diseases, with an emphasis on how control of macrophage function can be used to prevent or treat harmful outcomes linked to uncontrolled inflammation. PMID:22623923

  5. Acute paretic syndrome in juvenile White Leghorn chickens resembles late stages of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies in humans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sudden limb paresis is a common problem in White Leghorn flocks, affecting about 1% of the chicken population before achievement of sexual maturity. Previously, a similar clinical syndrome has been reported as being caused by inflammatory demyelination of peripheral nerve fibres. Here, we investigated in detail the immunopathology of this paretic syndrome and its possible resemblance to human neuropathies. Methods Neurologically affected chickens and control animals from one single flock underwent clinical and neuropathological examination. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) alterations were characterised using standard morphological techniques, including nerve fibre teasing and transmission electron microscopy. Infiltrating cells were phenotyped immunohistologically and quantified by flow cytometry. The cytokine expression pattern was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). These investigations were accomplished by MHC genotyping and a PCR screen for Marek's disease virus (MDV). Results Spontaneous paresis of White Leghorns is caused by cell-mediated, inflammatory demyelination affecting multiple cranial and spinal nerves and nerve roots with a proximodistal tapering. Clinical manifestation coincides with the employment of humoral immune mechanisms, enrolling plasma cell recruitment, deposition of myelin-bound IgG and antibody-dependent macrophageal myelin-stripping. Disease development was significantly linked to a 539 bp microsatellite in MHC locus LEI0258. An aetiological role for MDV was excluded. Conclusions The paretic phase of avian inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuritis immunobiologically resembles the late-acute disease stages of human acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and is characterised by a Th1-to-Th2 shift. PMID:20109187

  6. Guinea-pig interpubic joint (symphysis pubica) relaxation at parturition: Underlying cellular processes that resemble an inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Horacio A; Ortega, Hugo H; Ramos, Jorge G; Muñoz-de-Toro, Mónica; Luque, Enrique H

    2003-01-01

    Background At term, cervical ripening in coordination with uterine contractions becomes a prerequisite for a normal vaginal delivery. Currently, cervical ripening is considered to occur independently from uterine contractions. Many evidences suggest that cervical ripening resembles an inflammatory process. Comparatively little attention has been paid to the increased flexibility of the pelvic symphysis that occurs in many species to enable safe delivery. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the guinea-pig interpubic joint relaxation process observed during late pregnancy and parturition resembles an inflammatory process. Methods Samples of pubic symphysis were taken from pregnant guinea-pigs sacrificed along gestation, parturition and postpartum. Serial sections of paraffin-embedded tissues were used to measure the interpubic distance on digitalized images, stained with Giemsa to quantify leukocyte infiltration and to describe the vascular area changes, or studied by the picrosirius-polarization method to evaluate collagen remodeling. P4 and E2 serum levels were measured by a sequential immunometric assay. Results Data showed that the pubic relaxation is associated with an increase in collagen remodeling. In addition, a positive correlation between E2 serum levels and the increase in the interpubic distance was found. On the other hand, a leukocyte infiltration in the interpubic tissue around parturition was described, with the presence of almost all inflammatory cells types. At the same time, histological images show an increase in vascular area (angiogenesis). Eosinophils reached their highest level immediately before parturition; whereas for the neutrophilic and mononuclear infiltration higher values were recorded one day after parturition. Correlation analysis showed that eosinophils and mononuclear cells were positively correlated with E2 levels, but only eosinophilic infiltration was associated with collagen remodeling. Additionally, we observed

  7. The role of inflammation in inflammatory breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Tamer M; Kogawa, Takahiro; Reuben, James M; Ueno, Naoto T

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive form of breast cancer. Despite extensive study, whether inflammation contributes to the tumorigenicity or aggressiveness of IBC remains largely unknown. In this chapter, we will review the potential role played by inflammation in IBC based on the results of in vitro, in vivo, and patient studies. Current evidence suggests that several major inflammatory signaling pathways are constitutively active in IBC and breast cancer. Among them, the NF-κB, COX-2, and JAK/STAT signaling systems seem to play a major role in the tumorigenesis of IBC. Inflammatory molecules such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and gamma interferon have been shown to contribute to malignant transformation in preclinical studies of IBC, while transforming growth factor-β, interleukins 8 and 1β, as well as TNF-α appear to play a role in proliferation, survival, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, invasion, and metastasis. In this chapter, we also describe work thus far involving inhibitors of inflammation in the development of prevention and treatment strategies for IBC.

  8. The inflammation highway: metabolism accelerates inflammatory traffic in obesity.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Amy R; Milner, J Justin; Makowski, Liza

    2012-09-01

    As humans evolved, perhaps the two strongest selection determinants of survival were a robust immune response able to clear bacterial, viral, and parasitic infection and an ability to efficiently store nutrients to survive times when food sources were scarce. These traits are not mutually exclusive. It is now apparent that critical proteins necessary for regulating energy metabolism, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, Toll-like receptors, and fatty acid-binding proteins, also act as links between nutrient metabolism and inflammatory pathway activation in immune cells. Obesity in humans is a symptom of energy imbalance: the scale has been tipped such that energy intake exceeds energy output and may be a result, in part, of evolutionary selection toward a phenotype characterized by efficient energy storage. As discussed in this review, obesity is a state of low-grade, chronic inflammation that promotes the development of insulin resistance and diabetes. Ironically, the formation of systemic and/or local, tissue-specific insulin resistance upon inflammatory cell activation may actually be a protective mechanism that co-evolved to repartition energy sources within the body during times of stress during infection. However, the point has been reached where a once beneficial adaptive trait has become detrimental to the health of the individual and an immense public health and economic burden. This article reviews the complex relationship between obesity, insulin resistance/diabetes, and inflammation, and although the liver, brain, pancreas, muscle, and other tissues are relevant, we focus specifically on how the obese adipose microenvironment can promote immune cell influx and sustain damaging inflammation that can lead to the onset of insulin resistance and diabetes. Finally, we address how substrate metabolism may regulate the immune response and discuss how fuel uptake and metabolism may be a targetable approach to limit or abrogate obesity

  9. Relationship between methylation and colonic inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Lobatón, Triana; Azuara, Daniel; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Loayza, Carolina; Sanjuan, Xavier; de Oca, Javier; Fernández-Robles, Ana; Guardiola, Jordi; Capellá, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between the methylation status in the SLIT2 and TGFB2 promoters and colonic inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease patients. METHODS: We evaluated the methylation status of 2 genes (SLIT2 and TGFB2) in 226 biopsies taken from 62 colonoscopies of 38 patients (29 ulcerative colitis and 9 Crohn’s colitis) using methylation-specific melting curve analysis. The relationships between methylation status and clinical, biological, endoscopic and histological activities were evaluated. Twenty-three of the 38 patients had a second colonoscopy and were included in a longitudinal analysis. Numerical results were given as the means ± SD of the sample and range, except when specified. Student t analysis, U Mann Whitney and ANOVA factor were used to compare the means. Qualitative results were based on the χ2 test. RESULTS: SLIT2 methylation was more frequent in samples with endoscopic activity than with endoscopic remission (55% vs 18%, P < 0.001). SLIT2 methylation was also higher in samples with acute inflammation (56.5%) than in samples with chronic (24%) or absent inflammation (15%) (P < 0.001). For TGFB2 methylation, the correlation was only significant with endoscopic activity. Methylation was higher in the distal colon for both genes (P < 0.001 for SLIT2 and P = 0.022 for TGFB2). In the multivariate analysis, only inflammation status (and not disease duration or extension) was independently associated with SLIT2 methylation [OR = 6.6 (95%CI: 1.65-27.36), P = 0.009]. In the longitudinal analysis, the maintenance of endoscopic remission was protective for methylation. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic and histological inflammation are predictive for SLIT2 methylation. PMID:25132780

  10. Prolactin promotes cartilage survival and attenuates inflammation in inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Adán, Norma; Guzmán-Morales, Jessica; Ledesma-Colunga, Maria G.; Perales-Canales, Sonia I.; Quintanar-Stéphano, Andrés; López-Barrera, Fernando; Méndez, Isabel; Moreno-Carranza, Bibiana; Triebel, Jakob; Binart, Nadine; Martínez de la Escalera, Gonzalo; Thebault, Stéphanie; Clapp, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the only cells in cartilage, and their death by apoptosis contributes to cartilage loss in inflammatory joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A putative therapeutic intervention for RA is the inhibition of apoptosis-mediated cartilage degradation. The hormone prolactin (PRL) frequently increases in the circulation of patients with RA, but the role of hyperprolactinemia in disease activity is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that PRL inhibits the apoptosis of cultured chondrocytes in response to a mixture of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ) by preventing the induction of p53 and decreasing the BAX/BCL-2 ratio through a NO-independent, JAK2/STAT3–dependent pathway. Local treatment with PRL or increasing PRL circulating levels also prevented chondrocyte apoptosis evoked by injecting cytokines into the knee joints of rats, whereas the proapoptotic effect of cytokines was enhanced in PRL receptor–null (Prlr–/–) mice. Moreover, eliciting hyperprolactinemia in rats before or after inducing the adjuvant model of inflammatory arthritis reduced chondrocyte apoptosis, proinflammatory cytokine expression, pannus formation, bone erosion, joint swelling, and pain. These results reveal the protective effect of PRL against inflammation-induced chondrocyte apoptosis and the therapeutic potential of hyperprolactinemia to reduce permanent joint damage and inflammation in RA. PMID:23908112

  11. Mapping inflammation onto mood: Inflammatory mediators of anhedonia.

    PubMed

    Swardfager, Walter; Rosenblat, Joshua D; Benlamri, Meriem; McIntyre, Roger S

    2016-05-01

    Evidence supports inflammatory involvement in mood and cognitive symptoms across psychiatric, neurological and medical disorders; however, inflammation is not a sensitive or specific characteristic of these diagnoses. The National Institute of Mental Health Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) ask for a shift away from symptom-based diagnoses toward a transdiagnostic neurobiological focus in the study of brain illnesses. The RDoC matrix may provide a useful framework for integrating the effects of inflammation on brain function. Based on preclinical and clinical findings, relevant relationships span negative and positive valence systems, cognitive systems, systems for social processes and arousal/regulatory systems. As an exemplar, we consider the psychopathological domain of anhedonia, conceptualizing the relevance of inflammation (e.g., cellular immunity) and downstream processes (e.g., indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activation and oxidative inactivation of tetrahydrobiopterin) across RDoC units of analysis (e.g., catecholamine neurotransmitter molecules, nucleus accumbens medium spiny neuronal cells, dopaminergic mesolimbic and mesocortical reward circuits, animal paradigms, etc.). We discuss implications across illnesses affecting the brain, including infection, major depressive disorder, stroke, Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes.

  12. Resolving an inflammatory concept: The importance of inflammation and resolution in tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dakin, Stephanie G.; Dudhia, Jayesh; Smith, Roger K.W.

    2014-01-01

    Injuries to the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in equine athletes, but the healing response is poorly understood. One important drive for the healing of connective tissues is the inflammatory cascade, but the role of inflammation in tendinopathy has been contentious in the literature. This article reviews the processes involved in the healing of tendon injuries in natural disease and experimental models. The importance of inflammatory processes known to be active in tendon disease is discussed with particular focus on recent findings related specifically to the horse. Whilst inflammation is necessary for debridement after injury, persistent inflammation is thought to drive fibrosis, a perceived adverse consequence of tendon healing. Therefore the ability to resolve inflammation by the resident cell populations in tendons at an appropriate time would be crucial for successful outcome. This review summarises new evidence for the importance of resolution of inflammation after tendon injury. Given that many anti-inflammatory drugs suppress both inflammatory and resolving components of the inflammatory response, prolonged use of these drugs may be contraindicated as a therapeutic approach. We propose that these findings have profound implications not only for current treatment strategies but also for the possibility of developing novel therapeutic approaches involving modulation of the inflammatory process. PMID:24556326

  13. Is Alzheimer's Disease Autoimmune Inflammation of the Brain That Can be Treated With Nasal Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs?

    PubMed

    Lehrer, Steven; Rheinstein, Peter H

    2015-05-01

    The Alzheimer's Association recently reported that a woman's estimated lifetime risk of developing Alzheimer's at age 65 is 1 in 6, compared to nearly 1 in 11 for a man (ie, female to male ratio 1.8). Based on female to male ratio, Alzheimer's disease could well be an autoimmune disorder. Like Alzheimer's, multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune inflammation of the central nervous system, has a female to male ratio of 2.3. Also based on female to male ratio, Alzheimer's resembles the autoimmune inflammatory disease rheumatoid arthritis, which has a female to male ratio of 2.7. The reasons for the female preponderance in autoimmune disease are unclear, but nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely and successfully employed to treat autoimmune anti-inflammatory disease and dramatically relieve symptoms. Moreover, oral NSAIDs consistently reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease, although they have been totally ineffective as a treatment in multiple failed clinical trials. A basis for this failure might well be that the brain dose after oral administration is too small and not sufficiently early in the pathogenesis of the disorder. But NSAID brain dose could be significantly increased by delivering the NSAIDs intranasally.

  14. Nonbilayer Phospholipid Arrangements Are Toll-Like Receptor-2/6 and TLR-4 Agonists and Trigger Inflammation in a Mouse Model Resembling Human Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Tescucano, Alonso; Astudillo, Horacio; Reséndiz, Albany; Landa, Carla; España, Luis; Serafín-López, Jeanet; Estrada-García, Iris; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; Wong, Carlos; Baeza, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is characterized by dysregulated activation of T and B cells and autoantibodies to nuclear antigens and, in some cases, lipid antigens. Liposomes with nonbilayer phospholipid arrangements induce a disease resembling human lupus in mice, including IgM and IgG antibodies against nonbilayer phospholipid arrangements. As the effect of these liposomes on the innate immune response is unknown and innate immune system activation is necessary for efficient antibody formation, we evaluated the effect of these liposomes on Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, cytokine production, proinflammatory gene expression, and T, NKT, dendritic, and B cells. Liposomes induce TLR-4- and, to a lesser extent, TLR-2/TLR-6-dependent signaling in TLR-expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages. Mice with the lupus-like disease had increased serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, C3a and C5a; they also had more TLR-4-expressing splenocytes, a higher expression of genes associated with TRIF-dependent TLR-4-signaling and complement activation, and a lower expression of apoptosis-related genes, compared to healthy mice. The percentage of NKT and the percentage and activation of dendritic and B2 cells were also increased. Thus, TLR-4 and TLR-2/TLR-6 activation by nonbilayer phospholipid arrangements triggers an inflammatory response that could contribute to autoantibody production and the generation of a lupus-like disease in mice. PMID:26568960

  15. Nonbilayer Phospholipid Arrangements Are Toll-Like Receptor-2/6 and TLR-4 Agonists and Trigger Inflammation in a Mouse Model Resembling Human Lupus.

    PubMed

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Tescucano, Alonso; Astudillo, Horacio; Reséndiz, Albany; Landa, Carla; España, Luis; Serafín-López, Jeanet; Estrada-García, Iris; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; Wong, Carlos; Baeza, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is characterized by dysregulated activation of T and B cells and autoantibodies to nuclear antigens and, in some cases, lipid antigens. Liposomes with nonbilayer phospholipid arrangements induce a disease resembling human lupus in mice, including IgM and IgG antibodies against nonbilayer phospholipid arrangements. As the effect of these liposomes on the innate immune response is unknown and innate immune system activation is necessary for efficient antibody formation, we evaluated the effect of these liposomes on Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, cytokine production, proinflammatory gene expression, and T, NKT, dendritic, and B cells. Liposomes induce TLR-4- and, to a lesser extent, TLR-2/TLR-6-dependent signaling in TLR-expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages. Mice with the lupus-like disease had increased serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, C3a and C5a; they also had more TLR-4-expressing splenocytes, a higher expression of genes associated with TRIF-dependent TLR-4-signaling and complement activation, and a lower expression of apoptosis-related genes, compared to healthy mice. The percentage of NKT and the percentage and activation of dendritic and B2 cells were also increased. Thus, TLR-4 and TLR-2/TLR-6 activation by nonbilayer phospholipid arrangements triggers an inflammatory response that could contribute to autoantibody production and the generation of a lupus-like disease in mice.

  16. Resolving inflammation: dual anti-inflammatory and pro-resolution lipid mediators

    PubMed Central

    Serhan, Charles N.; Chiang, Nan; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Preface Active resolution of acute inflammation is a previously unrecognized interface between innate and adaptive immunity. Once thought to be a passive process, the resolution of inflammation is now shown to involve active biochemical programmes that enable inflamed tissues to return to homeostasis. This Review presents newly uncovered cellular and molecular mechanisms for the resolution of inflammation, revealing key roles for eicosanoids, such as lipoxins, and new families of endogenous chemical mediators, termed resolvins and protectins. These mediators carry antiinflammatory and pro-resolution properties with leukocytes, protect organs and stimulate mucosal antimicrobial defence and clearance. Together, they control local inflammatory responses at multiple levels to stimulate resolution. PMID:18437155

  17. The role of the intestinal microvasculature in inflammatory bowel disease: studies with a modified Caco-2 model including endothelial cells resembling the intestinal barrier in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Jennifer Y; Hermanns, Maria Iris; Cavelius, Christian; Kraegeloh, Annette; Jung, Thomas; Danzebrink, Rolf; Unger, Ronald E; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2016-01-01

    The microvascular endothelium of the gut barrier plays a crucial role during inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease. We have modified a commonly used intestinal cell model based on the Caco-2 cells by adding microvascular endothelial cells (ISO-HAS-1). Transwell filters were used with intestinal barrier-forming Caco-2 cells on top and the ISO-HAS-1 on the bottom of the filter. The goal was to determine whether this coculture mimics the in vivo situation more closely, and whether the model is suitable to evaluate interactions of, for example, prospective nanosized drug vehicles or contrast agents with this coculture in a physiological and inflamed state as it would occur in inflammatory bowel disease. We monitored the inflammatory responsiveness of the cells (release of IL-8, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and soluble E-selectin) after exposure to inflammatory stimuli (lipopolysaccharide, TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β) and a nanoparticle (Ba/Gd: coprecipitated BaSO4 and Gd(OH)3), generally used as contrast agents. The barrier integrity of the coculture was evaluated via the determination of transepithelial electrical resistance and the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of NaFITC. The behavior of the coculture Caco-1/ISO-HAS-1 was compared to the respective monocultures Caco-2 and ISO-HAS-1. Based on transepithelial electrical resistance, the epithelial barrier integrity of the coculture remained stable during incubation with all stimuli, whereas the Papp decreased after exposure to the cytokine mixture (TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β, and Ba/Gd). Both the endothelial and epithelial monocultures showed a high inflammatory response in both the upper and lower transwell-compartments. However, in the coculture, inflammatory mediators were only detected on the epithelial side and not on the endothelial side. Thus in the coculture, based on the Papp, the epithelial barrier appears to prevent a potential inflammatory overreaction in the underlying endothelial cells

  18. The role of the intestinal microvasculature in inflammatory bowel disease: studies with a modified Caco-2 model including endothelial cells resembling the intestinal barrier in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Jennifer Y; Hermanns, Maria Iris; Cavelius, Christian; Kraegeloh, Annette; Jung, Thomas; Danzebrink, Rolf; Unger, Ronald E; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    The microvascular endothelium of the gut barrier plays a crucial role during inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease. We have modified a commonly used intestinal cell model based on the Caco-2 cells by adding microvascular endothelial cells (ISO-HAS-1). Transwell filters were used with intestinal barrier-forming Caco-2 cells on top and the ISO-HAS-1 on the bottom of the filter. The goal was to determine whether this coculture mimics the in vivo situation more closely, and whether the model is suitable to evaluate interactions of, for example, prospective nanosized drug vehicles or contrast agents with this coculture in a physiological and inflamed state as it would occur in inflammatory bowel disease. We monitored the inflammatory responsiveness of the cells (release of IL-8, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and soluble E-selectin) after exposure to inflammatory stimuli (lipopolysaccharide, TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β) and a nanoparticle (Ba/Gd: coprecipitated BaSO4 and Gd(OH)3), generally used as contrast agents. The barrier integrity of the coculture was evaluated via the determination of transepithelial electrical resistance and the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of NaFITC. The behavior of the coculture Caco-1/ISO-HAS-1 was compared to the respective monocultures Caco-2 and ISO-HAS-1. Based on transepithelial electrical resistance, the epithelial barrier integrity of the coculture remained stable during incubation with all stimuli, whereas the Papp decreased after exposure to the cytokine mixture (TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β, and Ba/Gd). Both the endothelial and epithelial monocultures showed a high inflammatory response in both the upper and lower transwell-compartments. However, in the coculture, inflammatory mediators were only detected on the epithelial side and not on the endothelial side. Thus in the coculture, based on the Papp, the epithelial barrier appears to prevent a potential inflammatory overreaction in the underlying endothelial cells

  19. Thioredoxin Ameliorates Cutaneous Inflammation by Regulating the Epithelial Production and Release of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hai; Matsuo, Yoshiyuki; Fukunaga, Atsushi; Ono, Ryusuke; Nishigori, Chikako; Yodoi, Junji

    2013-01-01

    Human thioredoxin-1 (TRX) is a 12-kDa protein with redox-active dithiol in the active site -Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys-. It has been demonstrated that systemic administration and transgenic overexpression of TRX ameliorate inflammation in various animal models, but its anti-inflammatory mechanism is not well characterized. We investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of topically applied recombinant human TRX (rhTRX) in a murine irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) induced by croton oil. Topically applied rhTRX was distributed only in the skin tissues under both non-inflammatory and inflammatory conditions, and significantly suppressed the inflammatory response by inhibiting the production of cytokines and chemokines, such as TNF-α, Il-1β, IL-6, CXCL-1, and MCP-1. In an in vitro study, rhTRX also significantly inhibited the formation of cytokines and chemokines produced by keratinocytes after exposure to croton oil and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. These results indicate that TRX prevents skin inflammation via the inhibition of local formation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. As a promising new approach, local application of TRX may be useful for the treatment of various skin and mucosal inflammatory disorders. PMID:24058364

  20. Chemokine Receptor Ccr6 Deficiency Alters Hepatic Inflammatory Cell Recruitment and Promotes Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Blaya, Delia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Coll, Mar; Millán, Cristina; Altamirano, José; Arroyo, Vicente; Caballería, Joan; Bataller, Ramón; Ginès, Pere; Sancho-Bru, Pau

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases are characterized by a sustained inflammatory response in which chemokines and chemokine-receptors orchestrate inflammatory cell recruitment. In this study we investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR6 in acute and chronic liver injury. In the absence of liver injury Ccr6-/- mice presented a higher number of hepatic macrophages and increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and M1 markers Tnf-α, Il6 and Mcp1. Inflammation and cell recruitment were increased after carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury in Ccr6-/- mice. Moreover, chronic liver injury by carbon tetrachloride in Ccr6-/- mice was associated with enhanced inflammation and fibrosis, altered macrophage recruitment, enhanced CD4+ cells and a reduction in Th17 (CD4+IL17+) and mature dendritic (MHCII+CD11c+) cells recruitment. Clodronate depletion of macrophages in Ccr6-/- mice resulted in a reduction of hepatic pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic markers in the absence and after liver injury. Finally, increased CCR6 hepatic expression in patients with alcoholic hepatitis was found to correlate with liver expression of CCL20 and severity of liver disease. In conclusion, CCR6 deficiency affects hepatic inflammatory cell recruitment resulting in the promotion of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:26691857

  1. Chemokine Receptor Ccr6 Deficiency Alters Hepatic Inflammatory Cell Recruitment and Promotes Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Affò, Silvia; Rodrigo-Torres, Daniel; Blaya, Delia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Coll, Mar; Millán, Cristina; Altamirano, José; Arroyo, Vicente; Caballería, Joan; Bataller, Ramón; Ginès, Pere; Sancho-Bru, Pau

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases are characterized by a sustained inflammatory response in which chemokines and chemokine-receptors orchestrate inflammatory cell recruitment. In this study we investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR6 in acute and chronic liver injury. In the absence of liver injury Ccr6-/- mice presented a higher number of hepatic macrophages and increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and M1 markers Tnf-α, Il6 and Mcp1. Inflammation and cell recruitment were increased after carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury in Ccr6-/- mice. Moreover, chronic liver injury by carbon tetrachloride in Ccr6-/- mice was associated with enhanced inflammation and fibrosis, altered macrophage recruitment, enhanced CD4+ cells and a reduction in Th17 (CD4+IL17+) and mature dendritic (MHCII+CD11c+) cells recruitment. Clodronate depletion of macrophages in Ccr6-/- mice resulted in a reduction of hepatic pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic markers in the absence and after liver injury. Finally, increased CCR6 hepatic expression in patients with alcoholic hepatitis was found to correlate with liver expression of CCL20 and severity of liver disease. In conclusion, CCR6 deficiency affects hepatic inflammatory cell recruitment resulting in the promotion of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis.

  2. Inflammatory Mechanisms Associated with Prostatic Inflammation and Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    St. Sauver, Jennifer L.; Jacobsen, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation is a common finding in histologic prostate specimens obtained from aging men, and accumulating data suggest that inflammation may play an important role in the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and the development and progression of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Inflammatory processes may contribute to prostatic enlargement directly through stimulation of prostate growth, or, alternatively, through decreasing prostatic apoptosis. Additionally, inflammatory processes may impact other components of the urogenital tract, such as the bladder, and contribute to the LUTS that may be experienced both in the presence and in the absence of prostate enlargement. Current research therefore offers clues about converging inflammatory pathways which may be targeted to improve treatment of BPH and/or LUTS as well as identifying potential targets for prevention of these syndromes. PMID:19809538

  3. Impact of physical activity on inflammation: effects on cardiovascular disease risk and other inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cicero, Arrigo

    2012-01-01

    Since the 19th century, many studies have enlightened the role of inflammation in atherosclerosis, changing our perception of “vessel plaque due to oxidized lipoproteins”, similar to a “rusted pipe”, towards a disease with involvement of many cell types and cytokines with more complex mechanisms. Although “physical activity” and “physical exercise” are two terms with some differences in meaning, compared to sedentary lifestyle, active people have lower cardiovascular risk and lower inflammatory markers. Activities of skeletal muscle reveal “myokines” which have roles in both the immune system and adipose tissue metabolism. In vitro and ex-vivo studies have shown beneficial effects of exercise on inflammation markers. Meanwhile in clinical studies, some conflicting results suggested that type of activity, exercise duration, body composition, gender, race and age may modulate anti-inflammatory effects of physical exercise. Medical data on patients with inflammatory diseases have shown beneficial effects of exercise on disease activity scores, patient well-being and inflammatory markers. Although the most beneficial type of activity and the most relevant patient group for anti-inflammatory benefits are still not clear, studies in elderly and adult people generally support anti-inflammatory effects of physical activity and moderate exercise could be advised to patients with cardiovascular risk such as patients with metabolic syndrome. PMID:23185187

  4. Autophagy, inflammation and innate immunity in inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, Cristina; Galbardi, Barbara; Kapetis, Dimos; Vattemi, Gaetano; Guglielmi, Valeria; Tonin, Paola; Salerno, Franco; Morandi, Lucia; Tomelleri, Giuliano; Mantegazza, Renato; Bernasconi, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy has a large range of physiological functions and its dysregulation contributes to several human disorders, including autoinflammatory/autoimmune diseases such as inflammatory myopathies (IIMs). In order to better understand the pathogenetic mechanisms of these muscular disorders, we sought to define the role of autophagic processes and their relation with the innate immune system in the three main subtypes of IIM, specifically sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM), polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). We found that although the mRNA transcript levels of the autophagy-related genes BECN1, ATG5 and FBXO32 were similar in IIM and controls, autophagy activation in all IIM subgroups was suggested by immunoblotting results and confirmed by immunofluorescence. TLR4 and TLR3, two potent inducers of autophagy, were highly increased in IIM, with TLR4 transcripts significantly more expressed in PM and DM than in JDM, sIBM and controls, and TLR3 transcripts highly up-regulated in all IIM subgroups compared to controls. Co-localization between autophagic marker, LC3, and TLR4 and TLR3 was observed not only in sIBM but also in PM, DM and JDM muscle tissues. Furthermore, a highly association with the autophagic processes was observed in all IIM subgroups also for some TLR4 ligands, endogenous and bacterial HSP60, other than the high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). These findings indicate that autophagic processes are active not only in sIBM but also in PM, DM and JDM, probably in response to an exogenous or endogenous 'danger signal'. However, autophagic activation and regulation, and also interaction with the innate immune system, differ in each type of IIM. Better understanding of these differences may lead to new therapies for the different IIM types.

  5. Anti-inflammatory modulation of chronic airway inflammation in the murine house dust mite model.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Kristina; Hincks, Jennifer S; Walsh, Roddy; Wetterstrand, E M Caroline; Fidock, Mark D; Sreckovic, Sasha; Lamb, David J; Douglas, Garry J; Yeadon, Michael; Perros-Huguet, Christelle; Evans, Steven M

    2008-08-01

    Asthma affects 300 million people worldwide and continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Disease relevant animal models of asthma are required for benchmarking of novel therapeutic mechanisms in comparison to established clinical approaches. We demonstrate that chronic exposure of mice to house dust mite (HDM) extract results in allergic airway inflammation, that can be significantly attenuated by therapeutic intervention with phosphodiesterase 4 inhibition and corticosteroid treatment. Female BALB/c mice were administered intranasally with HDM (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus) extract daily for five weeks, and therapeutic intervention with anti-inflammatory treatment (dexamethasone 1 mg/kg subcutaneous once daily, prednisolone 10mg/kg orally twice daily, fluticasone 3, 10 and 30 microg intranasally twice daily, roflumilast 10 mg/kg orally twice daily and intranasally 10 and 30 microg twice daily) was initiated after three weeks of exposure. Chronic HDM extract exposure resulted in significant airway inflammation, demonstrated by bronchoalveolar lavage cell infiltration and lung tissue inflammatory gene expression by TaqMan low density array. Chronic steroid treatment significantly inhibited these parameters. In addition, roflumilast caused a significant reduction in airway inflammatory cell infiltration. We have demonstrated that chronic HDM-induced allergic inflammation can be significantly ameliorated by steroid treatment, and that phosphodiesterase 4 inhibition modulates inflammatory cell infiltration. Therefore, the murine HDM model may be a useful tool for evaluating new targets for the treatment of asthma.

  6. Acacia ferruginea inhibits inflammation by regulating inflammatory iNOS and COX-2.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, Kunnathur Murugesan; Guruvayoorappan, Chandrasekaran

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a local defensive reaction of a host to cellular injury or infection. Prolonged inflammation can contribute to pathogenesis of many disorders. Identification of naturally occurring phytoconstituents that can suppress inflammatory mediators can lead to the discovery of anti-inflammatory therapeutics. Acacia ferruginea is used traditionally to treat numerous ailments including hemorrhage, irritable bowel syndrome and leprosy. The present study evaluated the anti-inflammatory activity of A. ferruginea extract against acute (carrageenan) and chronic (formaldehyde) inflammation in Balb/c mice. Pre-treatment with A. ferruginea extract (10 mg/kg BW) for 5 consecutive days via intraperitonial (IP) administration significantly inhibited subsequent induction of paw edema in both models; the effects were comparable to that of the standard drug indomethacin. The results also showed the A. ferruginea extract significantly inhibited nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and iNOS expression (as measured in serum), diminished inflammation in - and neutrophil infiltration to - the paw tissues and led to a reduction in the number of COX-2(+) immunoreative cells (as evidenced by histologic and immunohistochemical analyses) in the paws relative to those in paws of mice that received the irritants only. Further, in vitro studies showed the extract could significantly scavenge free radicals generated as in DPPH and NO radical generating assays. Taken together, the results showed that A. ferruginea extract imparted potent anti-oxidant and -inflammatory effects, in part by maintaining oxidative homeostasis, inhibiting NO synthesis and suppressing iNOS and COX-2 expression and so could potentially be exploited as a potential plant-based medication against inflammatory disorders.

  7. The biochemical origin of pain: the origin of all pain is inflammation and the inflammatory response. Part 2 of 3 - inflammatory profile of pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Omoigui, Sota

    2007-01-01

    Every pain syndrome has an inflammatory profile consisting of the inflammatory mediators that are present in the pain syndrome. The inflammatory profile may have variations from one person to another and may have variations in the same person at different times. The key to treatment of Pain Syndromes is an understanding of their inflammatory profile. Pain syndromes may be treated medically or surgically. The goal should be inhibition or suppression of production of the inflammatory mediators and inhibition, suppression or modulation of neuronal afferent and efferent (motor) transmission. A successful outcome is one that results in less inflammation and thus less pain. We hereby briefly describe the inflammatory profile for several pain syndromes including arthritis, back pain, neck pain, fibromyalgia, interstitial cystitis, migraine, neuropathic pain, complex regional pain syndrome/reflex sympathetic dystrophy (CRPS/RSD), bursitis, shoulder pain and vulvodynia. These profiles are derived from basic science and clinical research performed in the past by numerous investigators and serve as a foundation to be built upon by other researchers and will be updated in the future by new technologies such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Our unifying theory or law of pain states: the origin of all pain is inflammation and the inflammatory response. The biochemical mediators of inflammation include cytokines, neuropeptides, growth factors and neurotransmitters. Irrespective of the type of pain whether it is acute or chronic pain, peripheral or central pain, nociceptive or neuropathic pain, the underlying origin is inflammation and the inflammatory response. Activation of pain receptors, transmission and modulation of pain signals, neuro plasticity and central sensitization are all one continuum of inflammation and the inflammatory response. Irrespective of the characteristic of the pain, whether it is sharp, dull, aching, burning, stabbing, numbing or tingling, all pain

  8. Anti-inflammatory effect of Ulmus davidiana Planch (Ulmaceae) on collagen-induced inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Song, In-Kwang; Kim, Kap-Sung; Suh, Seok-Jong; Kim, Myung-Sunny; Kwon, Dae Young; Kim, Sun-Lim; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2007-01-01

    Ulmus davidiana Planch (Ulmaceae) extract (UD) has long been known to have anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. UD has been also known to have protective effects on damaged tissue, inflammation and bone among other functions. Effects of UD on inflammatory and immune responses and its mechanisms in collagen-induced inflammation (CII) rat were studied. Hind paw volumes of rats were measured by volume meter; lymphocyte proliferation, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α level was determined by 3-(4,5-2dimethylthiazal-2yl)2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide assay. Antibodies to collagen type II (BC-II) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. There was a marked secondary inflammatory response in CII model, which accompanied with the decrease of body weight and the weight of immune organs simultaneously. The administration of UD (20, 80, 150mg/kg, intragastrically×10 days) inhibited the inflammatory response and restored body weight and the weight of immune organs of CII rats. Lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2 production of CII rats increases, together with IL-1 and TNF-α in peritoneal macrophages and synoviocytes. The administration of UD (20, 80, 150mg/kg, 10 days) reduced above changes significantly. UD had no effect on the concentration of antibodies to BC-II. From the results, it was concluded that UD possesses anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory activities and has a therapeutic effect on CII rats.

  9. Anti-inflammatory effect of selenium nanoparticles on the inflammation induced in irradiated rats.

    PubMed

    El-Ghazaly, M A; Fadel, N; Rashed, E; El-Batal, A; Kenawy, S A

    2017-02-01

    Selenium (Se) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties, but its bioavailability and toxicity are considerable limiting factors. The present study aimed to investigate the possible anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of selenium nanoparticles (Nano-Se) on inflammation induced in irradiated rats. Paw volume and nociceptive threshold were measured in carrageenan-induced paw edema and hyperalgesia model. Leukocytic count, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBAR), and total nitrate/nitrite (NOx) were estimated in the exudate collected from 6 day old air pouch model. Irradiated rats were exposed to 6 Gy gamma (γ)-irradiation. Nano-Se were administered orally in a dose of 2.55 mg/kg once before carrageenan injection in the first model and twice in the second model. The paw volume but not the nociceptive response produced by carrageenan in irradiated rats was higher than that induced in non-irradiated rats. Nano-Se were effective in reducing the paw volume in non-irradiated and irradiated rats but it did not alter the nociceptive threshold. The inflammation induced in irradiated rats increased all the estimated parameters in the exudate whereas; Nano-Se decreased their elevation in non-irradiated and irradiated rats. Nano-Se possess a potential anti-inflammatory activity on inflammation induced in irradiated rats.

  10. FoxO1 regulates allergic asthmatic inflammation through regulating polarization of the macrophage inflammatory phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sangwoon; Lee, Tae Jin; Reader, Brenda F.; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Yong Gyu; Park, Gye Young; Karpurapu, Manjula; Ballinger, Megan N.; Qian, Feng; Rusu, Luiza; Chung, Hae Young; Unterman, Terry G.; Croce, Carlo M.; Christman, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory monocyte and tissue macrophages influence the initiation, progression, and resolution of type 2 immune responses, and alveolar macrophages are the most prevalent immune-effector cells in the lung. While we were characterizing the M1- or M2-like macrophages in type 2 allergic inflammation, we discovered that FoxO1 is highly expressed in alternatively activated macrophages. Although several studies have been focused on the fundamental role of FoxOs in hematopoietic and immune cells, the exact role that FoxO1 plays in allergic asthmatic inflammation in activated macrophages has not been investigated. Growing evidences indicate that FoxO1 acts as an upstream regulator of IRF4 and could have a role in a specific inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Therefore, we hypothesized that IRF4 expression regulated by FoxO1 in alveolar macrophages is required for established type 2 immune mediates allergic lung inflammation. Our data indicate that targeted deletion of FoxO1 using FoxO1-selective inhibitor AS1842856 and genetic ablation of FoxO1 in macrophages significantly decreases IRF4 and various M2 macrophage-associated genes, suggesting a mechanism that involves FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in alveolar macrophages that works to polarize macrophages toward established type 2 immune responses. In response to the challenge of DRA (dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillus) allergens, macrophage specific FoxO1 overexpression is associated with an accentuation of asthmatic lung inflammation, whereas pharmacologic inhibition of FoxO1 by AS1842856 attenuates the development of asthmatic lung inflammation. Thus, our study identifies a role for FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in the development of alternatively activated alveolar macrophages that contribute to type 2 allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27007158

  11. FoxO1 regulates allergic asthmatic inflammation through regulating polarization of the macrophage inflammatory phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sangwoon; Lee, Tae Jin; Reader, Brenda F; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Yong Gyu; Park, Gye Young; Karpurapu, Manjula; Ballinger, Megan N; Qian, Feng; Rusu, Luiza; Chung, Hae Young; Unterman, Terry G; Croce, Carlo M; Christman, John W

    2016-04-05

    Inflammatory monocyte and tissue macrophages influence the initiation, progression, and resolution of type 2 immune responses, and alveolar macrophages are the most prevalent immune-effector cells in the lung. While we were characterizing the M1- or M2-like macrophages in type 2 allergic inflammation, we discovered that FoxO1 is highly expressed in alternatively activated macrophages. Although several studies have been focused on the fundamental role of FoxOs in hematopoietic and immune cells, the exact role that FoxO1 plays in allergic asthmatic inflammation in activated macrophages has not been investigated. Growing evidences indicate that FoxO1 acts as an upstream regulator of IRF4 and could have a role in a specific inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Therefore, we hypothesized that IRF4 expression regulated by FoxO1 in alveolar macrophages is required for established type 2 immune mediates allergic lung inflammation. Our data indicate that targeted deletion of FoxO1 using FoxO1-selective inhibitor AS1842856 and genetic ablation of FoxO1 in macrophages significantly decreases IRF4 and various M2 macrophage-associated genes, suggesting a mechanism that involves FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in alveolar macrophages that works to polarize macrophages toward established type 2 immune responses. In response to the challenge of DRA (dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillus) allergens, macrophage specific FoxO1 overexpression is associated with an accentuation of asthmatic lung inflammation, whereas pharmacologic inhibition of FoxO1 by AS1842856 attenuates the development of asthmatic lung inflammation. Thus, our study identifies a role for FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in the development of alternatively activated alveolar macrophages that contribute to type 2 allergic airway inflammation.

  12. Progression of perianeurysmal inflammation after endovascular aneurysm repair for inflammatory abdominal aortic and bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Igari, Kimihiro; Kudo, Toshifumi; Uchiyama, Hidetoshi; Toyofuku, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoshinori

    2015-02-01

    The use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) to treat inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAAs) has been reported, and this procedure appears to be preferable to open surgical repair because of intraoperative difficulties related to inflammation. We herein report a case of IAAA and bilateral inflammatory common iliac artery aneurysms that was successfully treated with bifurcated stent grafting. The perianeurysmal inflammation worsened postoperatively, requiring the placement of a ureteric stent. EVAR is feasible in cases of inflammatory aneurysms; however, the potential for an inflammatory response should be taken into account when considering the application of EVAR in patients with IAAA.

  13. IL-32: A Novel Pluripotent Inflammatory Interleukin, towards Gastric Inflammation, Gastric Cancer, and Chronic Rhino Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A vast variety of nonstructural proteins have been studied for their key roles and involvement in a number of biological phenomenona. Interleukin-32 is a novel cytokine whose presence has been confirmed in most of the mammals except rodents. The IL-32 gene was identified on human chromosome 16 p13.3. The gene has eight exons and nine splice variants, namely, IL-32α, IL-32β, IL-32γ, IL-32δ, IL-32ε, IL-32ζ, IL-32η, IL-32θ, and IL-32s. It was found to induce the expression of various inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β as well as macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and has been reported previously to be involved in the pathogenesis and progression of a number of inflammatory disorders, namely, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), gastric inflammation and cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In the current review, we have highlighted the involvement of IL-32 in gastric cancer, gastric inflammation, and chronic rhinosinusitis. We have also tried to explore various mechanisms suspected to induce the expression of this extraordinary cytokine as well as various mechanisms of action employed by IL-32 during the mediation and progression of the above said problems. PMID:27143819

  14. The role of chronic inflammation in the development of gastrointestinal cancers: reviewing cancer prevention with natural anti-inflammatory intervention.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho-Jae; Park, Jong-Min; Han, Young Min; Gil, Hong Kwon; Kim, Jinhyung; Chang, Ji Young; Jeong, Migyeong; Go, Eun-Jin; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators alter the local environment of tumors, known as the tumor microenvironment. Mechanistically, chronic inflammation induces DNA damage, but understanding this hazard may help in the search for new chemopreventive agents for gastrointestinal (GI) cancer which attenuate inflammation. In the clinic, GI cancer still remains a major cause of cancer-associated mortality, chemoprevention with anti-inflammatory agents is thought to be a realistic approach to reduce GI cancer. Proton pump inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies targeting tumor necrosis factor-alpha, anti-sense targeted smad7 and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents have been investigated for their potential to prevent inflammation-based GI cancer. Besides these, a wide variety of natural products have also shown potential for the prevention of GI cancer. In this review, the authors will provide insights to explain the mechanistic connection between inflammation and GI cancer, as well as describe a feasible cancer prevention strategy based on anti-inflammatory treatments.

  15. MODEL OF COLONIC INFLAMMATION: IMMUNE MODULATORY MECHANISMS IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Wendelsdorf, Katherine; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Hontecillas, Raquel; Eubank, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is an immunoinflammatory illness of the gut initiated by an immune response to bacteria in the microflora. The resulting immunopathogenesis leads to lesions in epithelial lining of the colon through which bacteria may infiltrate the tissue causing recurring bouts of diarrhea, rectal bleeding, and mal-nutrition. In healthy individuals such immunopathogenesis is avoided by the presence of regulatory cells that inhibit the inflammatory pathway. Highly relevant to the search for treatment strategies is the identification of components of the inflammatory pathway that allow regulatory mechanisms to be overridden and immunopathogenesis to proceed. In vitro techniques have identified cellular interactions involved in inflammation-regulation crosstalk. However, tracing immunological mechanisms discovered at the cellular level confidently back to an in vivo context of multiple, simultaneous interactions has met limited success. To explore the impact of specific interactions, we have constructed a system of 29 ordinary differential equations representing different phenotypes of T-cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, and epithelial cells as they move and interact with bacteria in the lumen, lamina propria, and lymphoid tissue of the colon. Simulations revealed the positive inflammatory feedback loop formed by inflammatory M1 macrophage activation of T-cells as a driving force underlying the immunopathology of IBD. Furthermore, strategies that remove M1 from the site of infection, by either i) increasing its potential to switch to a regulatory M2 phenotype or ii) increasing the rate of reversion (for M1 and M2 alike) to a resting state, cease immunopathogenesis even as bacteria are eliminated by other inflammatory cells. Based on these results, we identify macrophages and their mechanisms of plasticity as key targets for mucosal inflammation intervention strategies. In addition, we propose that the primary mechanism behind the association of

  16. Eicosapentaenoic acid attenuates cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation by inhibiting ROS-sensitive inflammatory signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meng-Han; Lin, An-Hsuan; Lu, Shing-Hwa; Peng, Ruo-Yun; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Kou, Yu Ru

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking causes chronic lung inflammation that is mainly regulated by redox-sensitive pathways. Our previous studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoke (CS) activates reactive oxygen species (ROS)-sensitive mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling resulting in induction of lung inflammation. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a major type of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is present in significant amounts in marine-based fish and fish oil. EPA has been shown to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in vitro and in vivo. However, whether EPA has similar beneficial effects against CS-induced lung inflammation remains unclear. Using a murine model, we show that subchronic CS exposure for 4 weeks caused pulmonary inflammatory infiltration (total cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), 11.0-fold increase), increased lung vascular permeability (protein level in BALF, 3.1-fold increase), elevated levels of chemokines (11.4–38.2-fold increase) and malondialdehyde (an oxidative stress biomarker; 2.0-fold increase) in the lungs, as well as lung inflammation; all of these CS-induced events were suppressed by daily supplementation with EPA. Using human bronchial epithelial cells, we further show that CS extract (CSE) sequentially activated NADPH oxidase (NADPH oxidase activity, 1.9-fold increase), increased intracellular levels of ROS (3.0-fold increase), activated both MAPKs and NF-κB, and induced interleukin-8 (IL-8; 8.2-fold increase); all these CSE-induced events were inhibited by pretreatment with EPA. Our findings suggest a novel role for EPA in alleviating the oxidative stress and lung inflammation induced by subchronic CS exposure in vivo and in suppressing the CSE-induced IL-8 in vitro via its antioxidant function and by inhibiting MAPKs/NF-κB signaling. PMID:25452730

  17. Tissue heme oxygenase-1 exerts anti-inflammatory effects on LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Konrad, F M; Knausberg, U; Höne, R; Ngamsri, K-C; Reutershan, J

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been shown to display anti-inflammatory properties in models of acute pulmonary inflammation. For the first time, we investigated the role of leukocytic HO-1 using a model of HO-1(flox/flox) mice lacking leukocytic HO-1 that were subjected to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute pulmonary inflammation. Immunohistology and flow cytometry demonstrated that activation of HO-1 using hemin decreased migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) to the lung interstitium and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in the wild-type and, surprisingly, also in HO-1(flox/flox) mice, emphasizing the anti-inflammatory potential of nonmyeloid HO-1. Nevertheless, hemin reduced the CXCL1, CXCL2/3, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), and interleukin 6 (IL6) levels in both animal strains. Microvascular permeability was attenuated by hemin in wild-type and HO-1(flox/flox) mice, indicating a crucial role of non-myeloid HO-1 in endothelial integrity. The determination of the activity of HO-1 in mouse lungs revealed no compensatory increase in the HO-1(flox/flox) mice. Topical administration of hemin via inhalation reduced the dose required to attenuate PMN migration and microvascular permeability by a factor of 40, emphasizing its clinical potential. In addition, HO-1 stimulation was protective against pulmonary inflammation when initiated after the inflammatory stimulus. In conclusion, nonmyeloid HO-1 is crucial for the anti-inflammatory effect of this enzyme on PMN migration to different compartments of the lung and on microvascular permeability.

  18. Accelerated resolution of inflammation underlies sex differences in inflammatory responses in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Krishnaraj S.; Kapil, Vikas; Velmurugan, Shanti; Khambata, Rayomand S.; Siddique, Umme; Khan, Saima; Van Eijl, Sven; Bansal, Jascharanpreet; Pitrola, Kavi; Shaw, Christopher; D’Acquisto, Fulvio; Colas, Romain A.; Marelli-Berg, Federica

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Cardiovascular disease occurs at lower incidence in premenopausal females compared with age-matched males. This variation may be linked to sex differences in inflammation. We prospectively investigated whether inflammation and components of the inflammatory response are altered in females compared with males. METHODS. We performed 2 clinical studies in healthy volunteers. In 12 men and 12 women, we assessed systemic inflammatory markers and vascular function using brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD). In a further 8 volunteers of each sex, we assessed FMD response to glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) at baseline and at 8 hours and 32 hours after typhoid vaccine. In a separate study in 16 men and 16 women, we measured inflammatory exudate mediators and cellular recruitment in cantharidin-induced skin blisters at 24 and 72 hours. RESULTS. Typhoid vaccine induced mild systemic inflammation at 8 hours, reflected by increased white cell count in both sexes. Although neutrophil numbers at baseline and 8 hours were greater in females, the neutrophils were less activated. Systemic inflammation caused a decrease in FMD in males, but an increase in females, at 8 hours. In contrast, GTN response was not altered in either sex after vaccine. At 24 hours, cantharidin formed blisters of similar volume in both sexes; however, at 72 hours, blisters had only resolved in females. Monocyte and leukocyte counts were reduced, and the activation state of all major leukocytes was lower, in blisters of females. This was associated with enhanced levels of the resolving lipids, particularly D-resolvin. CONCLUSIONS. Our findings suggest that female sex protects against systemic inflammation-induced endothelial dysfunction. This effect is likely due to accelerated resolution of inflammation compared with males, specifically via neutrophils, mediated by an elevation of the D-resolvin pathway. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01582321 and NRES: City Road and Hampstead Ethics

  19. Lack of anti-inflammatory effect of botulinum toxin type A in experimental models of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bach-Rojecky, Lidija; Dominis, Mara; Lacković, Zdravko

    2008-10-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) has a long-lasting antinociceptive activity and less clear effect on inflammation. It was proposed that these two effects share the same mechanism--the inhibition of neurotransmitter exocytosis from peripheral nerve endings. However, till now possible anti-inflammatory action of BTX-A did not evoke much attention. In the present paper, we investigate possible anti-inflammatory action of the toxin in carrageenan and capsaicin models of inflammation in rats. BTX-A (5 and 10 U/kg) was injected into the plantar surface of the rat right hind-paw pad 5 days before the injection of the carrageenan (1%) or capsaicin (0.1%) at the same site. Carrageenan-induced paw oedema and capsaicin-induced protein extravasation were measured. Control, inflamed and BTX-A pretreated inflamed paws were photographed and histopathological analysis (haematoxylin & eosin) was performed. Pretreatment with BTX-A had no effect on the size of carrageenan-induced paw oedema, measured as paw volume and weight or capsaicin-induced plasma extravasations, measured by Evans blue as a marker of protein leakage. Neither macroscopic nor microscopic analysis showed a significant difference between BTX-A pretreated and control inflamed tissue. Results show dissociation between the effect of BTX-A on pain and inflammation thus questioning the validity of the suggested assumption about the common peripheral mechanism of action.

  20. CD38 Is Expressed on Inflammatory Cells of the Intestine and Promotes Intestinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Michael; Schumacher, Valéa; Lischke, Timo; Lücke, Karsten; Meyer-Schwesinger, Catherine; Velden, Joachim; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme CD38 is expressed on a variety of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells and is involved in diverse processes such as generation of calcium-mobilizing metabolites, cell activation, and chemotaxis. Here, we show that under homeostatic conditions CD38 is highly expressed on immune cells of the colon mucosa of C57BL/6 mice. Myeloid cells recruited to this tissue upon inflammation also express enhanced levels of CD38. To determine the role of CD38 in intestinal inflammation, we applied the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis model. Whereas wild-type mice developed severe colitis, CD38-/- mice had only mild disease following DSS-treatment. Histologic examination of the colon mucosa revealed pronounced inflammatory damage with dense infiltrates containing numerous granulocytes and macrophages in wild-type animals, while these findings were significantly attenuated in CD38-/- mice. Despite attenuated histological findings, the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines was only marginally lower in the colons of CD38-/- mice as compared to wild-type mice. In conclusion, our results identify a function for CD38 in the control of inflammatory processes in the colon. PMID:25938500

  1. Antioxidant modulation of skin inflammation: preventing inflammatory progression by inhibiting neutrophil influx

    PubMed Central

    McGilvray, Ian D.; Rotstein, Ori D.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that antioxidants might affect local inflammation by impairing inflammatory cell influx. Design A laboratory study using a Swiss–Webster mouse model of local inflammation. Setting A university-affiliated hospital. Methods Intradermal injection of 30 μg of S. minnesota endotoxin (LPS) to Swiss–Webster mice initiates a local inflammatory reaction characterized by an early rise in vascular permeability and a later influx of neutrophils. Animals were pretreated intraperitoneally with either pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, 2 mmol/kg), which inhibits free radical generation, or dimethylthiourea (DMTU, 450 mg/kg), a free radical scavenger. Main outcome measures Histologic findings of tissue samples taken at sites of injection; local changes in tissue vascular permeability (PI) determined by iodine-125 albumin injection before sacrifice; neutrophil accumulation quantified by tissue myeloperoxidase levels; tissue levels of the endothelial adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule-1 protein (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 protein (VCAM-1) assessed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot, respectively. Results Neither antioxidant had a significant effect on the early increase in PI, but both decreased the late rise in PI and reduced neutrophil influx. Both ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were upregulated in response to LPS; however, only the increase in VCAM-1 was attenuated by antioxidant pretreatment. Conclusion These data suggest that antioxidants disrupt the propagation phase of an inflammatory response, possibly by altering neutrophil migration. PMID:10223071

  2. Dietary inflammatory index is related to asthma risk, lung function and systemic inflammation in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Lisa G; Shivappa, Nitin; Berthon, Bronwyn S; Gibson, Peter G; Hebert, James R

    2014-01-01

    Background Asthma prevalence has increased in recent years and evidence suggests that diet may be a contributing factor. Increased use of processed foods has led to a decrease in diet quality, which may be creating a pro-inflammatory environment, thereby leading to the development and/or progression of various chronic inflammatory diseases and conditions. Recently, the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) has been developed and validated to assess the inflammatory potential of individual diets. Objective This study aimed to examine the DII in subjects with asthma compared to healthy controls and to relate the DII to asthma risk, lung function and systemic inflammation. Methods Subjects with asthma (n=99) and healthy controls (n=61) were recruited. Blood was collected and spirometry was performed. The DII was calculated from food frequency questionnaires administered to study subjects. Results The mean DII score for the asthmatics was higher than the DII score for healthy controls (−1.40 versus −1.86, p=0.04), indicating their diets were more pro-inflammatory. For every 1 unit increase in DII score the odds of having asthma increased by 70% (OR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.03, 2.14; p=0.040). FEV1 was significantly associated with DII score (β=−3.44, 95% CI: −6.50,−0.39; p=0.020), indicating that for every 1 unit increase in DII score, FEV1 decreased by 3.44 times. Furthermore, plasma IL-6 concentrations were positively associated with DII score (β=0.13, 95% CI: 0.05, 0.21;p=0.002). Conclusion and clinical relevance As assessed using the DII score, the usual diet consumed by asthmatics in this study was pro-inflammatory relative to the diet consumed by the healthy controls. The DII score was associated with increased systemic inflammation and lower lung function. Hence, consumption of pro-inflammatory foods may contribute to worse asthma status and targeting an improvement in DII in asthmatics, as an indicator of suitable dietary intake, might be a useful strategy for

  3. Markers of inflammation, activation of blood platelets and coagulation disorders in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Matowicka-Karna, Joanna

    2016-04-13

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. It is a group of chronic disorders characterized by inflammation of the gastrointestinal track with unknown etiology. Currently applied biomarkers include CRP, ESR, pANCA, ASCA, and fecal calprotectin. The etiopathogenesis of IBD is multifactorial. In patients with IBD in inflamed alimentary tract mucosa the number of recruited monocytes and activated macrophages which are source of cytokines. In IBD, the exacerbation is accompanied by thrombocytosis. Platelets play a crucial role in the hemostasis and inflammatory response. Selectins, which regulates the hemostasis and inflammatory response, stimulates the secretion of many inflammatory mediators such as β-thromboglobuline, CD40L, fibrinogen, IL-1β, platelet factor-4. In the course of IBD the following changes are observed: an increase in the number of platelets (reactive thrombocytosis), PDW and PCT, reduction in MPV, increased production and excretion of granular content products (P-selectin, GP53, β-TG, PF-4, vWF, fibrinolytic inhibitors).

  4. Coconut water of different maturity stages ameliorates inflammatory processes in model of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Sadia Saleem; Najam, Rahila

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Coconut water is a natural beverage that is a part of daily diet of many people. This study was designed to explore the anti-inflammatory activity of coconut water of different maturation stages (young and mature) with rat paw edema model of inflammation using plethysmometer. Methodology: For this study, albino rats were selected and divided into four equal groups (10 rats in each group). Group 1 was set as control and administered distilled water 1 ml orally; Groups 2 and 3 were treated with young and mature coconut water, respectively, at 4 ml/100 g dose orally. Group 4 was treated with the standard drug (ibuprofen) at 400 mg/70 kg. 0.1 ml of 1% w/v acetic acid was administered in the subplantar tissue of rat paw 30 min after oral treatments of groups. Plethysmometer was used to measure rat paw edema. Results: Results revealed that both coconut water possess significant anti-inflammatory activity (P < 0.001). In comparison to control, percent inhibition by young coconut water was 20.22%, 35.13%, 42.52%, and 36% at 1, 2, 3, and 4 h of acetic acid administration, respectively. However, maximum percent inhibition (42.52%) was observed in the second phase of the inflammatory process. On the other hand, percent inhibition by mature coconut water was 18.80%, 25.94%, 24.13%, and 18.66% at 1, 2, 3, and 4 h of acetic acid administration, respectively. However, maximum percent inhibition (25.94%) was observed in the first phase of the inflammatory process. Conclusions: This study strongly suggests the use of young coconut water for potent anti-inflammatory effect and mature coconut water for moderate anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:27366350

  5. Molecular mechanisms of inflammation. Anti-inflammatory benefits of virgin olive oil and the phenolic compound oleocanthal.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Lisa; Russell, Aaron; Keast, Russell

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a critical factor in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory disease states including cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, degenerative joint diseases and neurodegenerative diseases. Chronic inflammatory states are poorly understood, however it is known that dietary habits can evoke or attenuate inflammatory responses. Popular methods to deal with inflammation and its associated symptoms involve the use of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, however the use of these drugs are associated with severe side effects. Therefore, investigations concerned with natural methods of inflammatory control are warranted. A traditional Mediterranean diet has been shown to confer some protection against the pathology of chronic diseases through the attenuation of pro-inflammatory mediators and this has been partially attributed to the high intake of virgin olive oil accompanying this dietary regime. Virgin olive oil contains numerous phenolic compounds that exert potent anti-inflammatory actions. Of interest to this paper is the recently discovered phenolic compound oleocanthal. Oleocanthal is contained in virgin olive oil and possesses similar anti-inflammatory properties to ibuprofen. This pharmacological similarity has provoked interest in oleocanthal and the few studies conducted thus far have verified its anti-inflammatory and potential therapeutic actions. A review of the health benefits of the Mediterranean diet and anti-inflammatory properties of virgin olive oil is presented with the additional emphasis on the pharmacological and anti-inflammatory properties of the phenolic compound oleocanthal.

  6. Monogenic diseases associated with intestinal inflammation: implications for the understanding of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, Holm H

    2013-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), encompassing Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, has multifactorial aetiology with complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Over 150 genetic loci are associated with IBD. The genetic contribution of the majority of those loci towards explained heritability is low. Recent studies have reported an increasing spectrum of human monogenic diseases that can present with IBD-like intestinal inflammation. A substantial proportion of patients with those genetic defects present with very early onset of intestinal inflammation. The 40 monogenic defects with IBD-like pathology selected in this review can be grouped into defects in intestinal epithelial barrier and stress response, immunodeficiencies affecting granulocyte and phagocyte activity, hyper- and autoinflammatory disorders as well as defects with disturbed T and B lymphocyte selection and activation. In addition, there are defects in immune regulation affecting regulatory T cell activity and interleukin (IL)-10 signalling. Related to the variable penetrance of the IBD-like phenotype, there is a likely role for modifier genes and gene-environment interactions. Treatment options in this heterogeneous group of disorders range from anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive therapy to blockade of tumour necrosis factor α and IL-1β, surgery, haematopoietic stem cell transplantation or gene therapy. Understanding of prototypic monogenic 'orphan' diseases cannot only provide treatment options for the affected patients but also inform on immunological mechanisms and complement the functional understanding of the pathogenesis of IBD.

  7. Monocyte-derived inflammatory Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells mediate psoriasis-like inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Tej Pratap; Zhang, Howard H.; Borek, Izabela; Wolf, Peter; Hedrick, Michael N.; Singh, Satya P.; Kelsall, Brian L.; Clausen, Bjorn E.; Farber, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis but the roles for specific DC subsets are not well defined. Here we show that DCs are required for psoriasis-like changes in mouse skin induced by the local injection of IL-23. However, Flt3L-dependent DCs and resident Langerhans cells are dispensable for the inflammation. In epidermis and dermis, the critical DCs are TNF-producing and IL-1β-producing monocyte-derived DCs, including a population of inflammatory Langerhans cells. Depleting Ly6Chi blood monocytes reduces DC accumulation and the skin changes induced either by injecting IL-23 or by application of the TLR7 agonist imiquimod. Moreover, we find that IL-23-induced inflammation requires expression of CCR6 by DCs or their precursors, and that CCR6 mediates monocyte trafficking into inflamed skin. Collectively, our results imply that monocyte-derived cells are critical contributors to psoriasis through production of inflammatory cytokines that augment the activation of skin T cells. PMID:27982014

  8. Anti-inflammatory activity of Ajmodadi Churna extract against acute inflammation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ram, H. N. Aswatha; Sriwastava, Neeraj K.; Makhija, Inder K.; Shreedhara, C. S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Ayurvedic polyherbal formulations are widely prescribed for a wide range of inflammatory conditions, yet, despite widespread use, there has been no systematic documentation of their safety and efficacy. Objective: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of aqueous extracts of Ajmodadi churna (AJM) in rats. Materials and Methods: Carrageenan-induced hind paw edema and air pouch inflammation models were used for the study. Results: The extracts showed significant antiinflammatory activity, reducing paw edema volume by 0.417 ± 0.097 and 0.379 ± 0.049, respectively. In the carrageenan-induced air pouch model, AJM reduced total leukocyte count by 73.09 ± 7.13 and 62.17 ± 10.53, granulocyte count by 69.48 ± 5.44 and 63.33 ± 4.13, and myeloperoxidase activity by 14.84 ± 0.91 and 18.44 ± 3.18, respectively, compared to controls. Discussion and Conclusion: AJM significantly reduced paw edema, during the second phase of edema development. In the carrageenan-induced air pouch model, AJM inhibited cellular infiltration into the air pouch fluid. We conclude that AJM is an effective candidate for prevention or treatment of acute inflammation PMID:22529678

  9. An inflammation-targeting hydrogel for local drug delivery in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sufeng; Ermann, Joerg; Succi, Marc D.; Zhou, Allen; Hamilton, Matthew J.; Cao, Bonnie; Korzenik, Joshua R.; Glickman, Jonathan N.; Vemula, Praveen K.; Glimcher, Laurie H.; Traverso, Giovanni; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinical need for new, more effective treatments for chronic and debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Targeting drugs selectively to the inflamed intestine may improve therapeutic outcomes and minimize systemic toxicity. We report the development of an inflammation-targeting hydrogel (IT-hydrogel) that acts as a drug delivery system to the inflamed colon. Hydrogel microfibers were generated from ascorbyl palmitate, an amphiphile that is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. IT-hydrogel microfibers loaded with the anti-inflammatory corticosteroid dexamethasone (Dex) were stable, released drug only upon enzymatic digestion, and demonstrated preferential adhesion to inflamed epithelial surfaces in vitro and in two mouse colitis models in vivo. Dex-loaded IT-hydrogel enemas, but not free Dex enemas, administered every other day to mice with colitis resulted in a significant reduction in inflammation and were associated with lower Dex peak serum concentrations and, thus, less systemic drug exposure. Ex vivo analysis of colon tissue samples from patients with ulcerative colitis demonstrated that IT-hydrogel microfibers adhered preferentially to mucosa from inflamed lesions compared with histologically normal sites. The IT-hydrogel drug delivery platform represents a promising approach for targeted enema-based therapies in patients with colonic IBD. PMID:26268315

  10. An inflammation-targeting hydrogel for local drug delivery in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sufeng; Ermann, Joerg; Succi, Marc D; Zhou, Allen; Hamilton, Matthew J; Cao, Bonnie; Korzenik, Joshua R; Glickman, Jonathan N; Vemula, Praveen K; Glimcher, Laurie H; Traverso, Giovanni; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2015-08-12

    There is a clinical need for new, more effective treatments for chronic and debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Targeting drugs selectively to the inflamed intestine may improve therapeutic outcomes and minimize systemic toxicity. We report the development of an inflammation-targeting hydrogel (IT-hydrogel) that acts as a drug delivery system to the inflamed colon. Hydrogel microfibers were generated from ascorbyl palmitate, an amphiphile that is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. IT-hydrogel microfibers loaded with the anti-inflammatory corticosteroid dexamethasone (Dex) were stable, released drug only upon enzymatic digestion, and demonstrated preferential adhesion to inflamed epithelial surfaces in vitro and in two mouse colitis models in vivo. Dex-loaded IT-hydrogel enemas, but not free Dex enemas, administered every other day to mice with colitis resulted in a significant reduction in inflammation and were associated with lower Dex peak serum concentrations and, thus, less systemic drug exposure. Ex vivo analysis of colon tissue samples from patients with ulcerative colitis demonstrated that IT-hydrogel microfibers adhered preferentially to mucosa from inflamed lesions compared with histologically normal sites. The IT-hydrogel drug delivery platform represents a promising approach for targeted enema-based therapies in patients with colonic IBD.

  11. Bioelectrical Stimulation for the Reduction of Inflammation in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Ryan; Taylor, Ian; Lahr, Christopher; Abell, Thomas L.; Espinoza, Ingrid; Gupta, Nitin K.; Gomez, Christian R.

    2015-01-01

    Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are the primary inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) affecting the gastrointestinal tract. The current therapy aims at decreasing inflammation and reducing symptoms. This typically requires immune suppression by steroids, thiopurines, methotrexate, or tumor necrosis factor inhibitors. Patients may be unreceptive to medical therapy, and some may discontinue the treatment due to adverse effects. Noninvasive, transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is currently used as a treatment for depression and epilepsy, and it is being investigated for the treatment of conditions such as multiple sclerosis, migraines, and Alzheimer’s disease. Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of splenic and vagus nerve functions in the inflammatory process through the production of certain cytokines. We hypothesize that using transcutaneous VNS via the auricular afferent branch could achieve a selective anti-inflammatory effect on the intestinal wall. This review examines the possibility of using vagal stimulators as a therapy for IBD. This could open the door to novel treatments for numerous vagally mediated diseases characterized by poor responses to current therapies. PMID:26692766

  12. Metabolic syndrome, inflammation and atherosclerosis - the role of adipokines in health and in systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Santos, Maria José; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) events are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. It has been hypothesized that, in addition to the traditional CV risk factors, inflammation is a major contributor to atherogenesis. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) stands for a cluster of risk factors associated with insulin resistance and increased abdominal fat. Inflammation and MetS are intimately linked. Inflammatory biomarkers are frequently elevated in people with MetS and, conversely, the prevalence of MetS is higher in patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, such as Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Inflammatory cytokines impair insulin sensitivity and can induce an adverse lipoprotein profile as seen in MetS. Furthermore, the presence of MetS correlates with increased subclinical atherosclerosis, major adverse CV events and death, making an important contribution to the CV burden in inflammatory diseases. Adipose tissue has recently emerged as an active organ that produces and secretes numerous mediators - adipokines - particularly relevant in energy homeostasis, inflammation, immune regulation and angiogenesis. These mediators arise as a potential link between MetS, inflammation and atherogenesis. Understanding the complex regulation and function of adipokines in health and disease is a priority since it may lead to new preventive and therapeutic interventions aiming to decrease CV risk.

  13. Adipocytokine orosomucoid integrates inflammatory and metabolic signals to preserve energy homeostasis by resolving immoderate inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Sok; Choi, Jin Woo; Hwang, Injae; Lee, Joo Won; Lee, Jae Ho; Kim, A Young; Huh, Jin Young; Koh, Young Jun; Koh, Gou Young; Son, Hee Jung; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Hotta, Kikuko; Alfadda, Assim A; Kim, Jae Bum

    2010-07-16

    Orosomucoid (ORM), also called alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, is an abundant plasma protein that is an immunomodulator induced by stressful conditions such as infections. In this study, we reveal that Orm is induced selectively in the adipose tissue of obese mice to suppress excess inflammation that otherwise disturbs energy homeostasis. Adipose Orm levels were elevated by metabolic signals, including insulin, high glucose, and free fatty acid, as well as by the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha, which is found in increased levels in the adipose tissue of morbid obese subjects. In both adipocytes and macrophages, ORM suppressed proinflammatory gene expression and pathways such as NF-kappaB and mitogen-activated protein kinase signalings and reactive oxygen species generation. Concomitantly, ORM relieved hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance as well as tumor necrosis factor-alpha-mediated lipolysis in adipocytes. Accordingly, ORM improved glucose and insulin tolerance in obese and diabetic db/db mice. Taken together, our results suggest that ORM integrates inflammatory and metabolic signals to modulate immune responses to protect adipose tissue from excessive inflammation and thereby from metabolic dysfunction.

  14. DNA methylation profile of genes involved in inflammation and autoimmunity in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Karatzas, Pantelis S; Mantzaris, Gerassimos J; Safioleas, Michael; Gazouli, Maria

    2014-12-01

    The contribution of epigenetic alterations to disease pathogenesis is emerging as a research priority. In this study, we aimed to seek DNA methylation changes in peripheral blood and tissue biopsies from patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The promoter methylation status of genes involved in inflammation and autoimmunity was profiled using the Human Inflammatory Response and Autoimmunity EpiTect Methyl II Signature PCR Array profiles. Methylation was considered to be hypermethylated if >20% according to the instructions of the manufacturer. The microarrays were validated with Quantitative Real-time PCR. Regarding Crohn disease (CD) no gene appeared hypermethylated compared to healthy controls. In ulcerative colitis (UC) 5 genes (CXCL14, CXCL5, GATA3, IL17C, and IL4R) were hypermethylated compared to healthy controls. Some of the examined genes show different methylation patterns between CD and UC. Concerning tissue samples we found that all hypermethylated genes appear the same methylation pattern and confirmed a moderate-strong correlation between methylation levels in colon biopsies and peripheral blood (Pearson coefficients r=0.089-0.779, and r=0.023-0.353, respectively). The epigenetic changes observed in this study indicate that CD and UC exhibit specific DNA methylation signatures with potential clinical applications in IBD non-invasive diagnosis and prognosis.

  15. BZ-26, a novel GW9662 derivate, attenuated inflammation by inhibiting the differentiation and activation of inflammatory macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bei, Yuncheng; Chen, Jiajia; Zhou, Feifei; Huang, Yahong; Jiang, Nan; Tan, Renxiang; Shen, Pingping

    2016-12-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) is considered to be an important transcriptional factor in regulation of macrophages differentiation and activation. We have synthesized a series of novel structural molecules based on GW9662's structure (named BZ-24, BZ-25 and BZ-26), and interaction activity was calculated by computational docking. BZ-26 had shown stronger interaction with PPARγ and had higher transcriptional inhibitory activity of PPARγ with lower dosage compared with GW9662. BZ-26 was proved to inhibit inflammatory macrophage differentiation. LPS-induced acute inflammation mouse model was applied to demonstrate its anti-inflammatory activity. And the results showed that BZ-26 administration attenuated plasma tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) secretion, which are vital cytokines in acute inflammation. The anti-inflammatory activity was examined in THP-1 cell line, and TNF-α, IL-6 and MCP-1, were significantly inhibited. The results of Western blot and luciferase reporter assay indicated that BZ-26 not only inhibited NF-κB transcriptional activity, but also abolished LPS-induce nuclear translocation of P65. We also test BZ-26 action in tumor-bearing chronic inflammation mouse model, and BZ-26 was able to alter macrophages phenotype, resulting in antitumor effect. All our data revealed that BZ-26 modulated LPS-induced acute inflammation via inhibiting inflammatory macrophages differentiation and activation, potentially via inhibition of NF-κB signal pathway.

  16. Docosahexaenoic Acid, Inflammation, and Bacterial Dysbiosis in Relation to Periodontal Disease, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, and the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tabbaa, Maria; Golubic, Mladen; Roizen, Michael F.; Bernstein, Adam M.

    2013-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, has been used to treat a range of different conditions, including periodontal disease (PD) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). That DHA helps with these oral and gastrointestinal diseases in which inflammation and bacterial dysbiosis play key roles, raises the question of whether DHA may assist in the prevention or treatment of other inflammatory conditions, such as the metabolic syndrome, which have also been linked with inflammation and alterations in normal host microbial populations. Here we review established and investigated associations between DHA, PD, and IBD. We conclude that by beneficially altering cytokine production and macrophage recruitment, the composition of intestinal microbiota and intestinal integrity, lipopolysaccharide- and adipose-induced inflammation, and insulin signaling, DHA may be a key tool in the prevention of metabolic syndrome. PMID:23966110

  17. Critical role of CD11b+ macrophages and VEGF in inflammatory lymphangiogenesis, antigen clearance, and inflammation resolution.

    PubMed

    Kataru, Raghu P; Jung, Keehoon; Jang, Cholsoon; Yang, Hanseul; Schwendener, Reto A; Baik, Jung Eun; Han, Seung Hyun; Alitalo, Kari; Koh, Gou Young

    2009-05-28

    Using a bacterial pathogen-induced acute inflammation model in the skin, we defined the roles of local lymphatic vessels and draining lymph nodes (DLNs) in antigen clearance and inflammation resolution. At the peak day of inflammation, robust expansion of lymphatic vessels and profound infiltration of CD11b+/Gr-1+ macrophages into the inflamed skin and DLN were observed. Moreover, lymph flow and inflammatory cell migration from the inflamed skin to DLNs were enhanced. Concomitantly, the expression of lymphangiogenic growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C), VEGF-D, and VEGF-A were significantly up-regulated in the inflamed skin, DLNs, and particularly in enriched CD11b+ macrophages from the DLNs. Depletion of macrophages, or blockade of VEGF-C/D or VEGF-A, largely attenuated these phenomena, and produced notably delayed antigen clearance and inflammation resolution. Conversely, keratin 14 (K14)-VEGF-C transgenic mice, which have dense and enlarged lymphatic vessels in the skin dermis, exhibited accelerated migration of inflammatory cells from the inflamed skin to the DLNs and faster antigen clearance and inflammation resolution. Taken together, these results indicate that VEGF-C, -D, and -A derived from the CD11b+/Gr-1+ macrophages and local inflamed tissues play a critical role in promoting antigen clearance and inflammation resolution.

  18. The beneficial role of anti-inflammatory dietary ingredients in attenuating markers of chronic low-grade inflammation in aging.

    PubMed

    Panickar, Kiran S; Jewell, Dennis E

    2015-08-01

    Aging in humans is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation (systemic), and this condition is sometimes referred to as "inflammaging". In general, canines also age similarly to humans, and such aging is associated with a decline in mobility, joint problems, weakened muscles and bones, reduced lean body mass, cancer, increased dermatological problems, decline in cognitive ability, reduced energy, decreased immune function, decreased renal function, and urinary incontinence. Each of these conditions is also associated with an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines. An inflammatory state characterized by an increase in pro-inflammatory markers including but not restricted to tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, IL-1β, and C-reactive protein (CRP) is believed to contribute to or worsen a general decline in biological mechanisms responsible for physical function with aging. Nutritional management of inflammation in aging dogs is important in maintaining health. In particular, natural botanicals have bioactive components that appear to have robust anti-inflammatory effects and, when included in the diet, may contribute to a reduction in inflammation. While there are scientific data to support the anti-inflammatory effects and the efficacy of such bioactive molecules from botanicals, the clinical data are limited and more studies are needed to validate the efficacy of these ingredients. This review will summarize the role of dietary ingredients in reducing inflammatory molecules as well as review the evidence available to support the role of diet and nutrition in reducing chronic low-grade systemic inflammation in animal and human studies with a special reference to canines, where possible.

  19. Systemic inflammation alters the inflammatory response in experimental lipopolysaccharide-induced meningitis

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, T; Østergaard, C; Vaxelaire, J; Zak, O

    2007-01-01

    Experiments to evaluate the effect of the level and duration of endotoxaemia on the meningeal inflammatory response were performed in order to determine if systemic inflammation alters meningitis. Rabbits received either saline or Escherichia coli O111:B4 lipopolysacharide (LPS) intravenously at various doses (1, 3 or 10 µg) and times (−8, −2 or 0 h) before an intracisternal injection of 20 ng LPS. An intracisternal LPS injection together with saline intravenously produced a peak cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tumour necrosis factor (TNF) level (95 ± 26 ng/ml) at 2 h and peak leucocyte level (5413 ± 764 cells/µl) at 4 h post-injection. Blood leucocytes were slightly elevated (12 000 ± 500/µl at 0 h; 16 900 ± 280/µl at 8 h) but plasma TNF was always undetectable (< 0·05 ng/ml). Conversely, intravenous injection of 3 or 10 µg LPS 2 h prior to intracisternal LPS injection impaired pleocytosis (peak < 220 cells/µl) and delayed (∼4 h) and reduced peak CSF TNF levels (3 µg LPS 5·0 ± 1·2 ng/ml; 10 µg LPS 6·9 ± 1·9; P < 0·05). Intravenous administration of 1 µg LPS was less inhibitory to CSF inflammation, but delayed onset (peak 1100 ± 60 leucocytes/µl CSF at 8 h; 6·3 ± 0·3 ng TNF/ml CSF at 4 h; both P < 0·05). Neutropenia nadirs were dependent on LPS dose (1 µg, 4500 ± 1700; 3 µg, 1900 ± 60; 10 µg, 1100 ± 100 all at 4 h post-intravenous dose). Peak plasma TNF levels were not dose-dependent (> 8 ng/ml), but plasma TNF was always detectable (> 0·2 ng/ml at 10 h post-intravenous dose). Intravenous LPS administration at 0 h also blocked pleocytosis, but the inhibitory effect was lost when administration at −8 h. In conclusion, the degree and duration of endotoxaemia affect the meningeal inflammatory response to LPS in experimental meningitis. PMID:17177970

  20. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) restrains intestinal inflammation by rendering leukocytes hyporesponsive and balancing colitogenic inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Alves, Vanessa Beatriz Freitas; Basso, Paulo José; Nardini, Viviani; Silva, Angélica; Chica, Javier Emílio Lazo; Cardoso, Cristina Ribeiro de Barros

    2016-09-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a hormone that plays an important role in the modulation of inflammatory responses. However, the precise mechanisms that link the actions of this androgen with protection or susceptibility to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) remain uknown. Here we showed that low dose DHEA inhibited proliferation of spleen cells and IFN-у production. The hormone was not toxic to myeloid lineage cells, although it caused necrosis of spleen cells at the intermediate and highest doses in vitro (50 and 100μM). The treatment of C57BL/6 mice with DHEA during colitis induction by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) led to a reduction in weight loss and clinical signs of disease. There were decreased peripheral blood monocytes on day 6 of DSS exposure and treatment, besides increase in circulating neutrophils in the tissue repair phase. DHEA also led to reduced lamina propria cellularity and restoration of normal colon length. These results were accompanied by decreased expression of IL-6 and TGF-β mRNA, while IL-13 was augmented in the colon on day 6, which was probably related to attenuation of inflammation. There was retention of CD4(+) cells in the spleen after use of DHEA, along with augmented frequency of CD4(+)IL-4(+) cells, decreased CD4(+)IFN-ɣ(+) in spleen and constrained CD4(+)IL-17(+) population in the mesenteric lymph nodes. Moreover, splenocytes of mice treated with DHEA became hyporesponsive, as observed by reduced proliferation after re-stimulation ex-vivo. In conclusion, DHEA modifyies leukocyte activity and balances the exacerbated immune responses which drive local and systemic damages in IBD.

  1. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory actions of robenacoxib in acute joint inflammation in dog.

    PubMed

    Schmid, V B; Spreng, D E; Seewald, W; Jung, M; Lees, P; King, J N

    2010-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to establish dose-response and blood concentration-response relationships for robenacoxib, a novel nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug with selectivity for inhibition of the cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 isoenzyme, in a canine model of synovitis. Acute synovitis of the stifle joint was induced by intra-articular injection of sodium urate crystals. Robenacoxib (0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg/kg), placebo and meloxicam (0.2 mg/kg) were administered subcutaneously (s.c.) 3 h after the urate crystals. Pharmacodynamic endpoints included data from forceplate analyses, clinical orthopaedic examinations and time course of inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2 in ex vivo whole blood assays. Blood was collected for pharmacokinetics. Robenacoxib produced dose-related improvement in weight-bearing, pain and swelling as assessed objectively by forceplate analysis (estimated ED(50) was 1.23 mg/kg for z peak force) and subjectively by clinical orthopaedic assessments. The analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of robenacoxib were significantly superior to placebo (0.25-4 mg/kg robenacoxib) and were non-inferior to meloxicam (0.5-4 mg/kg robenacoxib). All dosages of robenacoxib produced significant dose-related inhibition of COX-2 (estimated ED(50) was 0.52 mg/kg) but no inhibition of COX-1. At a dosage of 1-2 mg/kg administered s.c., robenacoxib should be at least as effective as 0.2 mg/kg of meloxicam in suppressing acute joint pain and inflammation in dogs.

  2. Evolutionary medicine and bone loss in chronic inflammatory diseases – a theory of inflammation-related osteopenia

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Rainer H.; Cutolo, Maurizio; Pacifici, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective Bone loss is typical in chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, ankylosing spondylitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel diseases, pemphigus vulgaris, and others. It is also typical in transplantation-related inflammation and during the process of aging. While we recognized that bone loss is tightly linked to immune system activation or inflammaging in the form of acute, chronic active, or chronic smoldering inflammation, bone loss is typically discussed to be an “accident of inflammation”. Methods Extensive literature search in PubMed central. Results Using elements of evolutionary medicine, energy regulation, and neuroendocrine regulation of homeostasis and immune function, we work out that bone waste is an adaptive, evolutionarily positively selected program that is absolutely necessary during acute inflammation. However, when acute inflammation enters a chronic state due to the inability to terminate inflammation (e.g., in autoimmunity or in continuous immunity against microbes), the acute program of bone loss is a misguided adaptive program. Conclusions The article highlights the complexity of interwoven pathways of osteopenia. PMID:26044543

  3. Crucial role of the protein C pathway in governing microvascular inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Scaldaferri, Franco; Sans, Miquel; Vetrano, Stefania; Graziani, Cristina; De Cristofaro, Raimondo; Gerlitz, Bruce; Repici, Alessandro; Arena, Vincenzo; Malesci, Alberto; Panes, Julian; Grinnell, Brian W.; Danese, Silvio

    2007-01-01

    Endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) and thrombomodulin (TM) are expressed at high levels in the resting microvasculature and convert protein C (PC) into its activated form, which is a potent anticoagulant and antiinflammatory molecule. Here we provide evidence that in Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), the 2 major forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), there was loss of expression of endothelial EPCR and TM, which in turns caused impairment of PC activation by the inflamed mucosal microvasculature. In isolated human intestinal endothelial cells, administration of recombinant activated PC had a potent antiinflammatory effect, as demonstrated by downregulated cytokine-dependent cell adhesion molecule expression and chemokine production as well as inhibited leukocyte adhesion. In vivo, administration of activated PC was therapeutically effective in ameliorating experimental colitis as evidenced by reduced weight loss, disease activity index, and histological colitis scores as well as inhibited leukocyte adhesion to the inflamed intestinal vessels. The results suggest that the PC pathway represents a new system crucially involved in governing intestinal homeostasis mediated by the mucosal microvasculature. Restoring the PC pathway may represent a new therapeutic approach to suppress intestinal inflammation in IBD. PMID:17557119

  4. The anti-inflammatory effect of alloferon on UVB-induced skin inflammation through the down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yejin; Lee, Seung Koo; Bae, Seyeon; Kim, Hyemin; Park, Yunseong; Chu, Nag Kyun; Kim, Stephanie G; Kim, Hang-Rae; Hwang, Young-Il; Kang, Jae Seung; Lee, Wang Jae

    2013-01-01

    UVB irradiation can induce biological changes in the skin, modulate immune responses and activate inflammatory reactions leading to skin damage. Alloferon, which is isolated from the blood of an experimentally infected insect, the blow fly Calliphora vicina, is known for its anti-viral and anti-tumor activities in mice model. However, the effect of alloferon against UVB irradiation and its specific mechanism are still unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of alloferon on UVB-induced cutaneous inflammation in a human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT. RPA and ELISA data showed that alloferon decreased the production of UVB-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-18, both on the mRNA and protein level. Western blot analysis was done to determine if alloferon regulates the MAPK signaling pathway since the MAPK signaling pathway is activated by numerous inflammatory mediators and environmental stresses including UVB irradiation. Alloferon inhibited the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) induced by UVB irradiation. Furthermore, the topical application of alloferon on the UVB exposed skin of hairless mice showed that alloferon treatment significantly inhibited an increase in epithelial thickness in chronic UVB-irradiated mouse skin. These findings suggest that alloferon has significant anti-inflammatory effects not only on UVB-induced inflammation in the human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT, but also on mouse skin.

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects of formoterol and ipratropium bromide against acute cadmium-induced pulmonary inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenhui; Fievez, Laurence; Cheu, Esteban; Bureau, Fabrice; Rong, Weifang; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Yong; Advenier, Charles; Gustin, Pascal

    2010-02-25

    In this study, the anti-inflammatory properties of formoterol and ipratropium bromide, alone or in combination, were investigated in a rat model of acute pulmonary inflammation induced by cadmium inhalation. Airway resistance and inflammatory responses, including matrix metalloproteinease-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinease-9 (MMP-9) activities, were evaluated. Compared to values obtained in rats exposed to cadmium, pretreatment by bronchodilators administered alone significantly prevented the cadmium-induced increase of airway resistance. Formoterol elicited a significant decrease in total cell number, neutrophil and macrophage counts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, whereas ipratropium bromide reduced neutrophil numbers. The two compounds administered alone significantly attenuated the lung lesions associated with parenchyma inflammatory cell influx and congestion observed in the cadmium group. The increased MMP-9 activity was significantly attenuated. Although only formoterol induced a decrease protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, both compounds inhibited the pulmonary edema by reducing wet-to-dry weight ratio which returned to values similar to those recorded in the sham group. All the effects of formoterol on the cadmium-induced inflammatory responses were reversed by propranolol. Similar anti-inflammatory effects were obtained in rats pretreated with ilomastat which showed a significant reduction on inflammatory cell infiltration and MMP-9 activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Neither synergistic nor additive effects were obtained when the two bronchodilators were administered in combination. In conclusion, formoterol and ipratropium bromide partially protect the lungs against the inflammation by reducing neutrophilic infiltration. This protective effect is associated with reduced MMP-9 activity known to play an important pro-inflammatory role in acute inflammatory process.

  6. Tle1 tumor suppressor negatively regulates inflammation in vivo and modulates NF-κB inflammatory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Selvi; Saez, Borja; Mukhopadhyay, Subhankar; Ding, Daching; Ahmed, Alwiya M.; Chen, Xi; Pucci, Ferdinando; Yamin, Rae’e; Wang, Jianfeng; Pittet, Mikael J.; Kelleher, Cassandra M.; Scadden, David T.; Sweetser, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Tle1 (transducin-like enhancer of split 1) is a corepressor that interacts with a variety of DNA-binding transcription factors and has been implicated in many cellular functions; however, physiological studies are limited. Tle1-deficient (Tle1Δ/Δ) mice, although grossly normal at birth, exhibit skin defects, lung hypoplasia, severe runting, poor body condition, and early mortality. Tle1Δ/Δ mice display a chronic inflammatory phenotype with increased expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the skin, lung, and intestine and increased circulatory IL-6 and G-CSF, along with a hematopoietic shift toward granulocyte macrophage progenitor and myeloid cells. Tle1Δ/Δ macrophages produce increased inflammatory cytokines in response to Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists and lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and Tle1Δ/Δ mice display an enhanced inflammatory response to ear skin 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment. Loss of Tle1 not only results in increased phosphorylation and activation of proinflammatory NF-κB but also results in decreased Hes1 (hairy and enhancer of split-1), a negative regulator of inflammation in macrophages. Furthermore, Tle1Δ/Δ mice exhibit accelerated growth of B6-F10 melanoma xenografts. Our work provides the first in vivo evidence, to our knowledge, that TLE1 is a major counterregulator of inflammation with potential roles in a variety of inflammatory diseases and in cancer progression. PMID:26831087

  7. Fetal Inflammatory Response in Women with Proteomic Biomarkers Characteristic of Intra-Amniotic Inflammation and Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Buhimschi, Catalin S.; Dulay, Antonette T.; Abdel-Razeq, Sonya; Zhao, Guomao; Lee, Sarah; Hodgson, Eric J.; Bhandari, Vineet; Buhimschi, Irina A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between presence of amniotic fluid (AF) biomarkers characteristic of inflammation (defensins 2 and 1, calgranulins C and A) and fetal inflammatory status at birth. Design Prospective observational cohort. Setting Tertiary referral University hospital Population 132 consecutive mothers (gestational age, median [interquartile range]: 29.6 [24.1-33.6] weeks), who had a clinically indicated amniocentesis to rule-out infection and their newborns. Methods Intra-amniotic inflammation was diagnosed by mass spectrometry SELDI-TOF. The AF proteomic fingerprint [Mass Restricted (MR) score] ranges from 0-4 (none to all biomarkers present). The intensity of intra-amniotic inflammation was graded based on the number of proteomic biomarkers: MR score 0: “no” inflammation; MR score 1-2: “minimal” inflammation; MR score 3-4: “severe” inflammation. At birth, cord blood was obtained for all cases. Severity of histological chorioamnionitis (HCA) and early onset neonatal sepsis (EONS) was based on established histological and hematological criteria. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were measured by sensitive immunoassays. The cord blood-to-AF IL-6 ratio was used as an indicator of the differential inflammatory response in the fetal versus the AF compartment. Main Outcome Measures to relate proteomic biomarkers of intra-amniotic infection to cord blood IL-6 and to use the latter as the primary marker of fetal inflammatory response. Results Women with intra-amniotic inflammation delivered at an earlier gestational age (ANOVA, P<0.001) and had higher AF IL-6 levels (P<0.001). At birth, neonates of women with “severe” intra-amniotic inflammation had higher cord blood IL-6 levels (P=0.002) and a higher frequency of EONS (P=0.002). EONS was characterized by significantly elevated cord blood IL-6 levels (P<0.001). Out of the 39 neonates delivered by mothers with “minimal” intra-amniotic inflammation, 15 (39%) had umbilical cord blood IL-6

  8. Anti-inflammatory activity of aqueous fruit pulp extract of Hunteria umbellata K. Schum in acute and chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Igbe, Ighodaro; Ching, Fidelis P; Eromon, Aigbe

    2010-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of the aqueous fruit pulp extract of Hunteria umbellata K. Schum (Apocynaceae) was evaluated using the carrageenan- and dextran-induced rat paw edema, xylene-induced ear edema and formalin-induced arthritis inflammation tests. Oral administration of the extract produced significant (p < 0.05) antiedematogenic effect with a dose of 500 mg/kg throughout the period of the experiment in the dextran induced paw edema and at the 3 h in the carrageenan model. The extract (250 and 500 mg/kg) exhibited a dose-related and significant (p < 0.01) inhibition of xylene induced ear edema and the effect was similar to that produced by dexamethasone (1 mg/kg). In the chronic inflammation (formalin induced arthritis) the extract did not show any significant anti-inflammatory activity. Oral acute toxicity assays did not show any mortality at 15 g/kg of the plant extract. The results indicate that the aqueous extract of H. umbellata possesses acute inflammatory activity which may be mediated by either inhibition or by blocking the release of prostaglandins and histamine, thus supporting the usage of the plant in traditional medicine treatment of inflammation.

  9. Role of the endothelial-derived endogenous anti-inflammatory factor Del-1 in inflammation-mediated adrenal gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kanczkowski, Waldemar; Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Grossklaus, Sylvia; Sprott, David; Bornstein, Stefan R; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2013-03-01

    Inflammation in the course of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) or sepsis often results in dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis; however, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. The adrenal gland is highly vascularized; thus, we hypothesized that endothelial dysfunction may actively participate in inflammation-related adrenal insufficiency. To address this hypothesis, we used the properties of developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1), which is an endothelial-derived anti-inflammatory factor that antagonizes integrin-dependent leukocyte adhesion. Here we identified that Del-1 is expressed in the adrenal gland and that its expression was down-regulated upon SIRS induction by systemic lipopolysaccharide administration. Furthermore, we observed increased leukocyte accumulation, inflammation, and higher apoptosis in the adrenal glands of Del-1-deficient mice as compared with wild-type mice. Strikingly, Del-1 deficiency was also associated with reduced corticosterone and ACTH levels 24 hours after lipopolysaccharide administration. Together, these data suggest that Del-1 may act as a gatekeeper of adrenal gland inflammation and may regulate the integrity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis stress response, thereby modulating adrenal (dys)function in the course of SIRS.

  10. Lutein derived fragments exhibit higher antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties than lutein in lipopolysaccharide induced inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Nidhi, Bhatiwada; Sharavana, Gurunathan; Ramaprasad, Talahalli R; Vallikannan, Baskaran

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, we appraise the anti-inflammatory efficacy of lutein oxidative degradation derivatives mediated through UV-irradiation over lutein in counteracting the inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rats (n = 5 per group). UV-irradiated lutein fragments were identified as anhydrolutein (B, C40H54O), 2,6,6-trimethylcyclohexa-1,4-dienylium (M1, C9H13), (2E,4E,6E,8E)-9-(4-hydroxy-2,6,6-trimethylcyclohex-1-1en-1-yl)-3,7-dimethylnona-2,4,6,8-tetraen-1-ylium (M2, C20H29O), 4-[(1E,3E,5E,7E)-3,7,-dimethyldeca-1,3,5,7-tetraen-1-yl]-3,5,5-methylcyclohex-3-en-1-ol (M3, C21H30O) and zeaxanthin (M4, C40H56O) and its isomers as 13'-Z zeaxanthin, 13'-Z lutein, all-trans zeaxanthin, and 9-Z lutein. Induction of inflammation by LPS significantly increased the production of nitrites (3.3 fold in the serum and 2.6 fold in the liver), prostaglandin E2 (26 fold in the serum), and pro-inflammatory cytokines like tumor necrosis factor-α (6.6 fold in the serum), and interleukin-6 (4.8 fold in the serum). Oxidative derivatives of lutein, especially M1, M2 and M3, ameliorated acute inflammation in rats by inhibiting the production of nitrites, malondialdehyde (MDA), PGE2, TNF-α, and IL-6 cytokines more efficiently than lutein in rats. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of derivatives might be related to the decrease of inflammatory cytokines and the increase of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S transferase, glutathione reductase), which would result in the reduction of iNOS, COX-2 and MDA and subsequently inflammatory responses.

  11. Arctigenin, a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan, inhibits type I-IV allergic inflammation and pro-inflammatory enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yun; Kim, Chang Jong

    2010-06-01

    We previously reported that arctigenin, a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan isolated from Forsythia koreana, exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and analgesic effects in animal models. In addition, arctigenin inhibited eosinophil peroxidase and activated myeloperoxidase in inflamed tissues. In this study, we tested the effects of arctigenin on type I-IV allergic inflammation and pro-inflammatory enzymes in vitro and in vivo. Arctigenin significantly inhibited the heterologous passive cutaneous anaphylaxis induced by ovalbumin in mice at 15 mg/kg, p.o., and compound 48/80-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells at 10 microM. Arctigenin (15 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly inhibited reversed cutaneous anaphylaxis. Further, arctigenin (15 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly inhibited the Arthus reaction to sheep's red blood cells, decreasing the hemolysis titer, the hemagglutination titer, and the plaque-forming cell number for SRBCs. In addition, arctigenin significantly inhibited delayed type hypersensitivity at 15 mg/kg, p.o. and the formation of rosette-forming cells at 45 mg/kg, p.o. Contact dermatitis induced by picrylchloride and dinitrofluorobenzene was significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited by surface treatment with arctigenin (0.3 mg/ear). Furthermore, arctigenin dose-dependently inhibited pro-inflammatory enzymes, such as cyclooxygenase-1 and 2, 5-lipoxygenase, phospholipase A2, and phosphodiesterase. Our results show that arctigenin significantly inhibited B- and T-cell mediated allergic inflammation as well as pro-inflammatory enzymes.

  12. Glucocorticoids limit acute lung inflammation in concert with inflammatory stimuli by induction of SphK1

    PubMed Central

    Vettorazzi, Sabine; Bode, Constantin; Dejager, Lien; Frappart, Lucien; Shelest, Ekaterina; Klaßen, Carina; Tasdogan, Alpaslan; Reichardt, Holger M.; Libert, Claude; Schneider, Marion; Weih, Falk; Henriette Uhlenhaut, N.; David, Jean-Pierre; Gräler, Markus; Kleiman, Anna; Tuckermann, Jan P.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a severe inflammatory disease for which no specific treatment exists. As glucocorticoids have potent immunosuppressive effects, their application in ALI is currently being tested in clinical trials. However, the benefits of this type of regimen remain unclear. Here we identify a mechanism of glucocorticoid action that challenges the long-standing dogma of cytokine repression by the glucocorticoid receptor. Contrarily, synergistic gene induction of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) by glucocorticoids and pro-inflammatory stimuli via the glucocorticoid receptor in macrophages increases circulating sphingosine 1-phosphate levels, which proves essential for the inhibition of inflammation. Chemical or genetic inhibition of SphK1 abrogates the therapeutic effects of glucocorticoids. Inflammatory p38 MAPK- and mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1 (MSK1)-dependent pathways cooperate with glucocorticoids to upregulate SphK1 expression. Our findings support a critical role for SphK1 induction in the suppression of lung inflammation by glucocorticoids, and therefore provide rationales for effective anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:26183376

  13. The role and pathophysiological relevance of membrane transporter PepT1 in intestinal inflammation and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Sarah A; Ayyadurai, Saravanan; Charania, Moiz A; Laroui, Hamed; Yan, Yutao; Merlin, Didier

    2012-03-01

    Intestinal inflammation is characterized by epithelial disruption, leading to loss of barrier function and the recruitment of immune cells, including neutrophils. Although the mechanisms are not yet completely understood, interactions between environmental and immunological factors are thought to be critical in the initiation and progression of intestinal inflammation. In recent years, it has become apparent that the di/tripeptide transporter PepT1 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of such inflammation. In healthy individuals, PepT1 is primarily expressed in the small intestine and transports di/tripeptides for metabolic purposes. However, during chronic inflammation such as that associated with inflammatory bowel disease, PepT1 expression is upregulated in the colon, wherein the protein is normally expressed either minimally or not at all. Several recent studies have shown that PepT1 binds to and transports various bacterial di/tripeptides into colon cells, leading to activation of downstream proinflammatory responses via peptide interactions with innate immune receptors. In the present review, we examine the relationship between colonic PepT1-mediated peptide transport in the colon and activation of innate immune responses during disease. It is important to understand the mechanisms of PepT1 action during chronic intestinal inflammation to develop future therapies addressing inappropriate immune activation in the colon.

  14. Anti-inflammatory activity of Justicia prostrata gamble in acute and sub-acute models of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sanmugapriya, E; Shanmugasundaram, P; Venkataraman, S

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the aqueous (AQJP) and alcoholic (ALJP) extracts of the whole plant of Justicia prostrata Gamble (Acanthaceae) were screened for their acute and subacute anti-inflammatory activities using carrageenan-induced acute inflammation and cotton-pellet-induced granuloma (subacute inflammation), respectively, in rats. In the carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema model, both extracts were found to exhibit maximum reduction in paw volume at the first hour in a dose-dependent manner. At the dose of 500 mg/kg p.o., both extracts AQJP and ALJP showed maximum inhibition (51.39% and 62.5%, respectively) in rat paw oedema volume at the first hour of carrageenan-induced acute inflammation. In the cotton pellet granuloma assay, AQJP and ALJP at the dose of 500 mg/kg p.o. suppressed the transudative, exudative and proliferative phases of chronic inflammation. These extracts were able to (i) reduce the lipid peroxide content of exudates and liver and (ii) normalize the increased activity of acid and alkaline phosphatases in serum and liver of cotton pellet granulomatous rats. Preliminary phytochemical screening revealed the presence of lignans, triterpenes and phenolic compounds in ALJP, whereas phenolic compounds and glycosides in AQJP. The anti-inflammatory properties of these extracts may possibly be due to the presence of phenolic compounds. The anti-inflammatory effects produced by the extracts at the dose of 500 mg/kg, p.o. was comparable with the reference drug diclofenac sodium (5 mg/kg p.o.).

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of eugenol on lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory reaction in acute lung injury via regulating inflammation and redox status.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xianfeng; Liu, Yuanyuan; Lu, Yingxun; Ma, Chunhua

    2015-05-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) represents a clinical syndrome that results from complex responses of the lung to a multitude of direct and indirect insults. This study aims to evaluate the possible mechanisms responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of eugenol (EUL) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory reaction in ALI. ALI was induced in mice by intratracheal instillation of LPS (0.5 mg/kg), and EUL (5, and 10 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 1h prior to LPS administration. After 6h, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue were collected. The findings suggest that the protective mechanism of EUL may be attributed partly to decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines through the regulating inflammation and redox status. The results support that use of EUL is beneficial in the treatment of ALI.

  16. p-Hydroxyacetophenone suppresses nuclear factor-κB-related inflammation in nociceptive and inflammatory animal models.

    PubMed

    Ching-Wen, Chang; Yun-Chieh, Chen; Yu-Chin, Lin; Wen-Huang, Peng

    2017-04-01

    p-Hydroxyacetophenone (HAP) is a crucial chemical compound present in plants of the genus Artemisia, which are used in traditional therapies for treating jaundice, hepatitis, and inflammatory diseases. Nevertheless, the bioactivity of HAP remains to be identified in order to prove its importance in the plants of genus Artemisia. This study investigated the antioxidative, antinociceptive, and anti-inflammatory effects of HAP, and probed its possible molecular mechanisms. Our results revealed that HAP (80 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) in vivo reduced the acetic acid-induced writhing response and formalin-induced licking time. Moreover, in the λ-carrageenan-induced acute-inflammatory paw edema model in mice, HAP significantly improved hind paw swelling and neutrophil infiltration. In a homogenized paw tissue examination, HAP attenuated pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6. Simultaneously, HAP also inhibited the production of nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase-2, and nitric oxide (NO). Another examination revealed that HAP exerted anti-inflammatory activity by decreasing malondialdehyde levels in the edematous paw through increasing the activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase in the liver. These findings may be beneficial in understanding the therapeutic effects of some plants of the genus Artemisia in the pretreatment of inflammation-associated diseases.

  17. 1,25(OH)2D3 Deficiency Induces Colon Inflammation via Secretion of Senescence-Associated Inflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Chunchun; Shen, Ming; Sun, Weiwei; Miao, Dengshun; Yuan, Xiaoqin

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies showed that 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D[1,25(OH)2D3] insufficiency appears to be associated with aging and colon cancer while underlying biological mechanisms remain largely unknown. Inflammatory bowel disease is one of the risk factors for colon cancer. In this study, we investigated whether 1,25(OH)2D3 deficiency has an impact on the colon of 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1α-hydroxylase knockout [Cyp27b1−/−] mice fed on a rescue diet (high calcium, phosphate, and lactose) from weaning to 10 months of age. We found that 1,25(OH)2D3 deficient mice displayed significant colon inflammation phenotypes including shortened colon length, thinned and disordered mucosal structure, and inflammatory cell infiltration. DNA damage, cellular senescence and the production of senescence-associated inflammatory cytokines were also increased significantly in the colon of Cyp27b1−/−mice. Furthermore, the levels of ROS in the colon were increased significantly, whereas the expression levels of antioxidative genes were down-regulated dramatically in the colon of Cyp27b1−/−mice. Taken together, our results demonstrated that 1,25(OH)2D3 deficiency could induce colon inflammation, which may result from increased oxidative stress and DNA damage, subsequently, induced cell senescence and overproduction of senescence-associated secretory factors. Therefore, our findings suggest that 1,25(OH)2D3 may play an important role in preventing the development and progression of colon inflammation and colon cancer. PMID:26790152

  18. Neutrophilia and an Anti-Inflammatory Drug as Markers of Inflammation in Delayed Muscle Soreness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lucille L.; And Others

    This study reexamined the concept that delayed muscle soreness (DMS) is a form of inflammatory pain. This was accomplished by having 32 male volunteers perform exercise known to induce DMS and then assess the total and differential white blood cell changes. In addition, an anti-inflammatory drug, idomethacin, was administered to determine whether…

  19. Protective role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors in chronic intestinal inflammation: TNFR1 ablation boosts systemic inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Han, Gencheng; Chen, Yu; Wang, Ke; Liu, Guijun; Wang, Renxi; Xiao, He; Li, Xinying; Hou, Chunmei; Shen, Beifen; Guo, Renfeng; Li, Yan; Chen, Guojiang

    2013-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) acts as a key factor for the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), whose function is known to be mediated by TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) or TNFR2. However, the precise role of the two receptors in IBD remains poorly understood. Herein, chronic colitis was established by oral administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in TNFR1 or TNFR2-/- mice. Unexpectedly, TNFR1 or TNFR2 deficiency led to exacerbation of signs of colitis compared with wild-type (WT) counterparts. Of note, TNFR1 ablation rendered significantly increased mortality compared with TNFR2 and WT mice after DSS. Aggravated pathology of colitis in TNFR1-/- or TNFR2-/- mice correlated with elevated colonic expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Importantly, ablation of TNFR1 or TNFR2 increased apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells, which might be due to the heightened ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and increased expression of caspase-8. Intriguingly, despite comparable intensity of intestinal inflammation in TNFR-deficient mice after DSS, systemic inflammatory response (including splenomegaly and myeloid expansion) was augmented dramatically in TNFR1-/- mice, instead of TNFR2-/- mice. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF) was identified as a key mediator in this process, as neutralization of GMCSF dampened peripheral inflammatory reaction and reduced mortality in TNFR1-/- mice. These data suggest that signaling via TNFR1 or TNFR2 has a protective role in chronic intestinal inflammation, and that lacking TNFR1 augments systemic inflammatory response in GMCSF-dependent manner.

  20. New Echocardiographic Findings Correlate with Intramyocardial Inflammation in Endomyocardial Biopsies of Patients with Acute Myocarditis and Inflammatory Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Escher, Felicitas; Kasner, Mario; Kühl, Uwe; Heymer, Johannes; Wilkenshoff, Ursula; Tschöpe, Carsten; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background. The diagnosis of acute myocarditis (AMC) and inflammatory cardiomyopathy (DCMi) can be difficult. Speckle tracking echocardiography with accurate assessments of regional contractility could have an outstanding importance for the diagnosis. Methods and Results. N = 25 patients with clinically diagnosed AMC who underwent endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) were studied prospectively. Speckle tracking imaging was examined at the beginning and during a mean follow-up period of 6.2 months. In the acute phase patients had markedly decreased left ventricular (LV) systolic function (mean LV ejection fraction (LVEF) 40.4 ± 10.3%). At follow-up in n = 8 patients, inflammation persists, correlating with a significantly reduced fractional shortening (FS, 21.5 ± 6.0%) in contrast to those without inflammation in EMB (FS 32.1 ± 7.1%, P < 0.05). All AMC patients showed a reduction in global systolic longitudinal strain (LS, −8.36 ± −3.47%) and strain rate (LSR, 0.53 ± 0.29 1/s). At follow-up, LS and LRS were significantly lower in patients with inflammation, in contrast to patients without inflammation (−9.4 ± 1.4 versus −16.8 ± 2.0%, P < 0.0001; 0.78 ± 0.4 versus 1.3 ± 0.3 1/s). LSR and LS correlate significantly with lymphocytic infiltrates (for CD3 r = 0.7, P < 0.0001, and LFA-1 r = 0.8, P < 0.0001). Conclusion. Speckle tracking echocardiography is a useful adjunctive assisting tool for evaluation over the course of intramyocardial inflammation in patients with AMC and DCMi. PMID:23576857

  1. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of salbutamol on acute and chronic models of inflammation in rats: involvement of an antioxidant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Uzkeser, Hulya; Cadirci, Elif; Halici, Zekai; Odabasoglu, Fehmi; Polat, Beyzagul; Yuksel, Tugba Nurcan; Ozaltin, Seda; Atalay, Fadime

    2012-01-01

    The possible role of β-2 adrenergic receptors in modulation of inflammatory and nociceptive conditions suggests that the β-2 adrenergic receptor agonist, salbutamol, may have beneficial anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. Therefore, in this study, we induced inflammatory and nociceptive responses with carrageenan-induced paw edema or cotton-pellet-induced granuloma models, both of which result in oxidative stress. We hypothesized that salbutamol would prevent inflammatory and nociceptive responses by stimulating β-2 adrenergic receptors and the prevention of generation of ROS during the acute inflammation process in rats. Both doses of salbutamol used in the study (1 and 2 mg/kg) effectively blocked the acute inflammation and inflammatory nociception induced by carrageenan. In the cotton-pellet-induced granuloma test, both doses of salbutamol also significantly decreased the weight of granuloma tissue on the cotton pellets when compared to the control. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of salbutamol were found to be comparable with those of indomethacin. Salbutamol decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and lipid peroxidation (LPO) level and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and level of glutathione (GSH) during the acute phase of inflammation. In conclusion, salbutamol can decrease acute and chronic inflammation, possibly through the stimulation of β-2 adrenergic receptors. This anti-inflammatory effect may be of significance in asthma treatment, where inflammation also takes part in the etiopathology. This study reveals that salbutamol has significant antioxidative effects, which at least partially explain its anti-inflammatory capabilities. These findings presented here may also shed light on the roles of β-2 adrenergic receptors in inflammatory and hyperalgesic conditions.

  2. Treatment with oral bromelain decreases colonic inflammation in the IL-10-deficient murine model of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Hale, Laura P; Greer, Paula K; Trinh, Chau T; Gottfried, Marcia R

    2005-08-01

    Bromelain is a mixture of proteinases derived from pineapple stem that is marketed in health food stores as a "digestive aid". Orally administered bromelain was anecdotally reported to induce clinical and endoscopic remission of ulcerative colitis in two patients whose disease was refractory to multi-agent conventional medical therapy. However, the potential efficacy of bromelain in colitis has not yet been tested rigorously in either animals or humans. In this study, the clinical and histologic severity of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) was determined in IL-10-/- mice treated orally with bromelain in vivo. Daily treatment with oral bromelain beginning at age 5 weeks decreased the incidence and severity of spontaneous colitis in C57BL/6 IL-10-/- mice. Bromelain also significantly decreased the clinical and histologic severity of colonic inflammation when administered to piroxicam-exposed IL-10-/- mice with established colitis. Proteolytically active bromelain was required for anti-inflammatory effects in vivo. Adverse effects of dermatitis, hair loss, and weight loss due to mucositis were rare, dose related, and were not seen in wild-type mice treated orally with up to 1000 mg bromelain/kg/day for 18 weeks. Although the exact mechanisms by which exogenous proteinases affect bowel inflammation have not yet been determined, the results justify additional studies of this complementary biologically based approach to treatment of IBD.

  3. Targeting sites of inflammation: intercellular adhesion molecule-1 as a target for novel inflammatory therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery to sites of inflammation will provide effective, precise, and safe therapeutic interventions for treatment of diverse disease conditions, by limiting toxic side effects and/or increasing drug action. Disease-site targeting is believed to play a major role in the enhanced efficacy observed for a variety of drugs when formulated inside lipid vesicles. This article will focus on the factors and mechanisms involved in drug targeting to sites of inflammation and the importance of cell adhesion molecules, in particular intercellular adhesion molecule-1, in this process. PMID:24109453

  4. Anti-inflammatory Effect of Picrorhiza kurroa in Experimental Models of Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rohit; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar; Singh, Surender; Raj, Arun

    2016-11-01

    Picrorhiza kurroa is an important medicinal plant in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. The root and rhizome of this plant are used for the treatment of various liver and inflammatory conditions. In the present study, we sought to investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of P. kurroa rhizome extract against carrageenan-induced paw edema and cotton pellet implantation-induced granuloma formation in rats. In addition, its immunomodulatory activity was evaluated in Complete Freund's Adjuvant-induced stimulation of a peritoneal macrophage model and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. Pretreatment with P. kurroa rhizome extract inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema and cotton pellet-induced granuloma formation in a dose-dependent manner. This was associated with reduced levels of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6) accompanied with increased anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) in the serum and peritoneal macrophages. Additionally, P. kurroa rhizome extract inhibited inflammatory TNF-receptor 1 and cyclooxygenase-2 in Complete Freund's Adjuvant-induced activated peritoneal macrophages. Furthermore, P. kurroa rhizome extract treatment significantly inhibited iNOS and suppressed the activation of NF-κB through inhibition of its phosphorylation and by blocking the activation of IκB kinase alpha in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. Taken together, these results suggest that P. kurroa has anti-inflammatory activity that is mediated through the suppression of macrophage-derived cytokine and mediators via suppression of NF-κB signaling.

  5. Physical activity, by enhancing parasympathetic tone and activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, is a therapeutic strategy to restrain chronic inflammation and prevent many chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Heidi L; DiCarlo, Stephen E

    2013-05-01

    Chronic diseases are the leading cause of death in the world and chronic inflammation is a key contributor to many chronic diseases. Accordingly, interventions that reduce inflammation may be effective in treating multiple adverse chronic conditions. In this context, physical activity is documented to reduce systemic low-grade inflammation and is acknowledged as an anti-inflammatory intervention. Furthermore, physically active individuals are at a lower risk of developing chronic diseases. However the mechanisms mediating this anti-inflammatory phenotype and range of health benefits are unknown. We hypothesize that the "cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway" (CAP) mediates the anti-inflammatory phenotype and range of health benefits associated with physical activity. The CAP is an endogenous, physiological mechanism by which acetylcholine from the vagus nerve, interacts with the innate immune system to modulate and restrain the inflammatory cascade. Importantly, higher levels of physical activity are associated with enhanced parasympathetic (vagal) tone and lower levels of C-reactive protein, a marker of low-grade inflammation. Accordingly, physical activity, by enhancing parasympathetic tone and activating the CAP, may be a therapeutic strategy to restrain chronic inflammation and prevent many chronic diseases.

  6. Micronutrient-gene interactions related to inflammatory/immune response and antioxidant activity in ageing and inflammation. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mocchegiani, Eugenio; Costarelli, Laura; Giacconi, Robertina; Malavolta, Marco; Basso, Andrea; Piacenza, Francesco; Ostan, Rita; Cevenini, Elisa; Gonos, Efstathios S; Monti, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Recent longitudinal studies in dietary daily intake in human centenarians have shown that a satisfactory content of some micronutrients within the cells maintain several immune functions, a low grade of inflammation and preserve antioxidant activity. Micronutrients (zinc, copper, selenium) play a pivotal role in maintaining and reinforcing the performances of the immune and antioxidant systems as well as in affecting the complex network of the genes (nutrigenomic) with anti- and pro-inflammatory tasks. Genes of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and some key regulators of trace elements homeostasis, such as Metallothioneins (MT), are involved in the susceptibility to major geriatric disease/disorders. Moreover, the genetic inter-individual variability may affect the nutrients' absorption (nutrigenetic) with altered effects on inflammatory/immune response and antioxidant activity. The interaction between genetic factors and micronutrients (nutrigenomic and nutrigenetic approaches) may influence ageing and longevity because the micronutrients may become also toxic. This review reports the micronutrient-gene interactions in ageing and their impact on the healthy state with a focus on the method of protein-metal speciation analysis. The association between micronutrient-gene interactions and the protein-metal speciation analysis can give a complete picture for a personalized nutrient supplementation or chelation in order to reach healthy ageing and longevity.

  7. Fermented Brown Rice and Rice Bran with Aspergillus oryzae (FBRA) Prevents Inflammation-Related Carcinogenesis in Mice, through Inhibition of Inflammatory Cell Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Onuma, Kunishige; Kanda, Yusuke; Suzuki Ikeda, Saori; Sakaki, Ryuta; Nonomura, Takuya; Kobayashi, Masanobu; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Shikanai, Masataka; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Okada, Futoshi

    2015-01-01

    We have established an inflammation-related carcinogenesis model in mouse, in which regressive QR-32 cells subcutaneously co-implanted with a foreign body—gelatin sponge—convert themselves into lethal tumors due to massive infiltration of inflammatory cells into the sponge. Animals were fed with a diet containing 5% or 10% fermented brown rice and rice bran with Aspergillus oryzae (FBRA). In 5% and 10% FBRA diet groups, tumor incidences were lower (35% and 20%, respectively) than in the non-treated group (70%). We found that FBRA reduced the number of inflammatory cells infiltrating into the sponge. FBRA administration did not cause myelosuppression, which indicated that the anti-inflammatory effects of FBRA took place at the inflammatory lesion. FBRA did not have antitumor effects on the implanted QRsP-11 tumor cells, which is a tumorigenic cell line established from a tumor arisen after co-implantation of QR-32 cells with sponge. FBRA did not reduce formation of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanine adducts, a marker of oxidative DNA damage in the inflammatory lesion; however, it reduced expression of inflammation-related genes such as TNF-α, Mac-1, CCL3 and CXCL2. These results suggest that FBRA will be an effective chemopreventive agent against inflammation-related carcinogenesis that acts by inhibiting inflammatory cell infiltration into inflammatory lesions. PMID:26670250

  8. Topoisomerase 1 inhibition suppresses inflammatory genes and protects from death by inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rialdi, Alex; Campisi, Laura; Zhao, Nan; Lagda, Arvin Cesar; Pietzsch, Colette; Ho, Jessica Sook Yuin; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Fenouil, Romain; Chen, Xiaoting; Edwards, Megan; Metreveli, Giorgi; Jordan, Stefan; Peralta, Zuleyma; Munoz-Fontela, Cesar; Bouvier, Nicole; Merad, Miriam; Jin, Jian; Weirauch, Matthew; Heinz, Sven; Benner, Chris; van Bakel, Harm; Basler, Christopher; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Bukreyev, Alexander; Marazzi, Ivan

    2016-05-27

    The host innate immune response is the first line of defense against pathogens and is orchestrated by the concerted expression of genes induced by microbial stimuli. Deregulated expression of these genes is linked to the initiation and progression of diseases associated with exacerbated inflammation. We identified topoisomerase 1 (Top1) as a positive regulator of RNA polymerase II transcriptional activity at pathogen-induced genes. Depletion or chemical inhibition of Top1 suppresses the host response against influenza and Ebola viruses as well as bacterial products. Therapeutic pharmacological inhibition of Top1 protected mice from death in experimental models of lethal inflammation. Our results indicate that Top1 inhibition could be used as therapy against life-threatening infections characterized by an acutely exacerbated immune response.

  9. Analysis of local chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate combined with systemic inflammation improves prognostication in stage II colon cancer independent of standard clinicopathologic criteria.

    PubMed

    Turner, Natalie; Wong, Hui-Li; Templeton, Arnoud; Tripathy, Sagarika; Whiti Rogers, Te; Croxford, Matthew; Jones, Ian; Sinnathamby, Mathuranthakan; Desai, Jayesh; Tie, Jeanne; Bae, Susie; Christie, Michael; Gibbs, Peter; Tran, Ben

    2016-02-01

    In Stage II colon cancer, multiple independent studies have shown that a dense intratumoural immune infiltrate (local inflammation) is associated with improved outcomes, while systemic inflammation, measured by various markers, has been associated with poorer outcomes. However, previous studies have not considered the interaction between local and systemic inflammation, nor have they assessed the type of inflammatory response compared with standard clinicopathologic criteria. In order to evaluate the potential clinical utility of inflammatory markers in Stage II colon cancer, we examined local and systemic inflammation in a consecutive series of patients with resected Stage II colon cancer between 2000 and 2010 who were identified from a prospective clinical database. Increased intratumoural chronic inflammatory cell (CIC) density, as assessed by pathologist review of hematoxylin and eosin stained slides, was used to represent local inflammation. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) >5, as calculated from pre-operative full blood counts, was used to represent systemic inflammation. In 396 eligible patients identified, there was a non-significant inverse relationship between local and systemic inflammation. Increased CIC density was significantly associated with improved overall (HR 0.45, p = 0.001) and recurrence-free survival (HR 0.37, p = 0.003). High NLR was significantly associated with poorer overall survival (HR 2.56, p < 0.001). The combination of these markers further stratified prognosis independent of standard high-risk criteria, with a dominant systemic inflammatory response (low CIC/high NLR) associated with the worst outcome (5-year overall survival 55.8%). With further validation this simple, inexpensive combined inflammatory biomarker might assist in patient selection for adjuvant chemotherapy in Stage II colon cancer.

  10. Altered autophagic flux enhances inflammatory responses during inflammation-induced preterm labor

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Varkha; Jaiswal, Mukesh K.; Mallers, Timothy; Katara, Gajendra K.; Gilman-Sachs, Alice; Beaman, Kenneth D.; Hirsch, Emmet

    2015-01-01

    Cellular organelles and proteins are degraded and recycled through autophagy, a process during which vesicles known as autophagosomes fuse with lysosomes. Altered autophagy occurs in various diseases, but its role in preterm labor (PTL) is unknown. We investigated the role of autophagic flux in two mouse models of PTL compared to controls: 1) inflammation-induced PTL (IPTL), induced by toll-like receptor agonists; and 2) non-inflammation (hormonally)-induced PTL (NIPTL). We demonstrate that the autophagy related genes Atg4c and Atg7 (involved in the lipidation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) B-I to the autophagosome-associated form, LC3B-II) decrease significantly in uterus and placenta during IPTL but not NIPTL. Autophagic flux is altered in IPTL, as shown by the accumulation of LC3B paralogues and diminishment of lysosome associated membrane protein (LAMP)-1, LAMP-2 and the a2 isoform of V-ATPase (a2V, an enzyme involved in lysosome acidification). These alterations in autophagy are associated with increased activation of NF-κB and proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines in both uterus and placenta. Similar changes are seen in macrophages exposed to TLR ligands and are enhanced with blockade of a2V. These novel findings represent the first evidence of an association between altered autophagic flux and hyper-inflammation and labor in IPTL. PMID:25797357

  11. Oxidized low density lipoprotein suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in microglia: Oxidative stress acts through control of inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ohn Soon; Lee, Chang Seok; Joe, Eun-hye; Jou, Ilo . E-mail: jouilo@ajou.ac.kr

    2006-03-31

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) is readily oxidized under certain conditions, resulting in the formation of oxidized LDL (oxLDL). Despite numerous in vitro reports that reveal the pathogenic role of oxidative stress, anti-oxidative strategies have underperformed in the clinic. In this study, we examine the role of oxLDL in brain inflammatory responses using cultured rat brain microglia. We demonstrate that oxLDL inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in these cells. It also decreases LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and production of nitric oxide, and reduces LPS-induced secretion of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Oxysterols, known components of oxLDL and endogenous agonists of liver X receptor, can simulate the inhibitory effects of oxLDL in LPS-activated microglia. In addition, their inhibitory effects were mimicked by liver X receptor (LXR) agonists and potentiated by a retinoid X receptor agonist, suggesting these molecules heterodimerize to function as oxysterol receptors. Taken together, our results demonstrate that oxLDL inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory responses in brain microglia and that these inhibitory effects are mediated by oxysterols and, at least in part, by the nuclear receptor LXR. Our results suggest an additional mechanism of action for oxidative stress that acts indirectly via modulation of inflammatory responses. Although further studies are needed, these results answer in part the question of why anti-oxidative strategies have not been successful in clinical situations. Moreover, as brain inflammation participates in the initiation and progression of several neurodegenerative disorders, the present data provide information that should prove a useful guide for designing therapeutic strategies to combat oxidative brain diseases.

  12. Reflex control of inflammation by the splanchnic anti-inflammatory pathway is sustained and independent of anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Davide; Yao, Song T; Mancera, Julian; McKinley, Michael J; McAllen, Robin M

    2014-11-01

    Following an immune challenge, there is two-way communication between the nervous and immune systems. It is proposed that a neural reflex--the inflammatory reflex--regulates the plasma levels of the key proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α, and that its efferent pathway is in the splanchnic sympathetic nerves. The evidence for this reflex is based on experiments on anesthetized animals, but anesthesia itself suppresses inflammation, confounding interpretation. Here, we show that previous section of the splanchnic nerves strongly enhances the levels of plasma TNF-α in conscious rats 90 min after they received intravenous LPS (60 μg/kg). The same reflex mechanism, therefore, applies in conscious as in anesthetized animals. In anesthetized rats, we then determined the longer-term effects of splanchnic nerve section on responses to LPS (60 μg/kg iv). We confirmed that prior splanchnic nerve section enhanced the early (90 min) peak in plasma TNF-α and found that it reduced the 90-min peak of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10; both subsequently fell to low levels in all animals. Splanchnic nerve section also enhanced the delayed rise in two key proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and interferon γ. That enhancement was undiminished after 6 h, when other measured cytokines had subsided. Finally, LPS treatment caused hypotensive shock in rats with cut splanchnic nerves but not in sham-operated animals. These findings demonstrate that reflex activation of the splanchnic anti-inflammatory pathway has a powerful and sustained restraining influence on inflammatory processes.

  13. Cytokine profile in PFAPA syndrome suggests continuous inflammation and reduced anti-inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Stojanov, Silvia; Hoffmann, Florian; Kéry, Anja; Renner, Ellen D; Hartl, Dominik; Lohse, Peter; Huss, Kristina; Fraunberger, Peter; Malley, James D; Zellerer, Stephanie; Albert, Michael H; Belohradsky, Bernd H

    2006-06-01

    PFAPA syndrome is characterized by periodic episodes of high fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and/or cervical adenitis. It is of unknown etiology and manifests usually before 5 years of age. We determined serum and intracellular cytokine levels in six PFAPA patients (4 males, 2 females, mean age 8 years (+/- 1.2 SEM), range 4-13) during the symptom-free period as well as 6-12 hours and 18-24 hours after fever onset. Values were compared to age-matched, healthy controls. Febrile PFAPA attacks led to a significant increase in IL-6 and IFN-gamma serum concentrations compared to symptom-free periods and to controls, with IL-1beta, TNF-alpha and IL-12p70 levels being significantly higher than in controls. Lymphocytic IFN-gamma and CD8+ IL-2 production was consistently significantly elevated compared to healthy children. During the asymptomatic period, serum concentrations of IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha and IL-12p70 were significantly increased compared to controls. Intracellular TNF-alpha synthesis was not elevated at any time point. Soluble TNFRp55 levels were even lower in between febrile episodes, reaching values comparable to controls during attacks, whereas soluble TNFRp75 levels increased during attacks compared to healthy children. Anti-inflammatory IL-4 in serum was at all times lower in PFAPA patients compared to controls with no difference in levels of intracellular IL-4 and IL-10 or serum IL-10. The observed increase of pro-inflammatory mediators, even between febrile attacks, suggests a dysregulation of the immune response in PFAPA syndrome, with continuous pro-inflammatory cytokine activation and a reduced anti-inflammatory response.

  14. The spice for joint inflammation: anti-inflammatory role of curcumin in treating osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Kok-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease of the joint affecting aging populations worldwide. It has an underlying inflammatory cause, which contributes to the loss of chondrocytes, leading to diminished cartilage layer at the affected joints. Compounds with anti-inflammatory properties are potential treatment agents for osteoarthritis. Curcumin derived from Curcuma species is an anti-inflammatory compound as such. This review aims to summarize the antiosteoarthritic effects of curcumin derived from clinical and preclinical studies. Many clinical trials have been conducted to determine the effectiveness of curcumin in osteoarthritic patients. Extracts of Curcuma species, curcuminoids and enhanced curcumin, were used in these studies. Patients with osteoarthritis showed improvement in pain, physical function, and quality of life after taking curcumin. They also reported reduced concomitant usage of analgesics and side effects during treatment. In vitro studies demonstrated that curcumin could prevent the apoptosis of chondrocytes, suppress the release of proteoglycans and metal metalloproteases and expression of cyclooxygenase, prostaglandin E-2, and inflammatory cytokines in chondrocytes. These were achieved by blocking the activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) system in the chondrocytes, by preventing the activation of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor, alpha, phosphorylation, and translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB complexes into the nucleus. In conclusion, curcumin is a potential candidate for the treatment of osteoarthritis. More well-planned randomized control trials and enhanced curcumin formulation are required to justify the use of curcumin in treating osteoarthritis. PMID:27703331

  15. Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Pentaherbs Formula, Berberine, Gallic Acid and Chlorogenic Acid in Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Miranda S M; Jiao, Delong; Chan, Ben C L; Hon, Kam-Lun; Leung, Ping C; Lau, Clara B S; Wong, Eric C W; Cheng, Ling; Chan, Carmen K M; Lam, Christopher W K; Wong, Chun K

    2016-04-20

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common allergic skin disease, characterized by dryness, itchiness, thickening and inflammation of the skin. Infiltration of eosinophils into the dermal layer and presence of edema are typical characteristics in the skin biopsy of AD patients. Previous in vitro and clinical studies showed that the Pentaherbs formula (PHF) consisting of five traditional Chinese herbal medicines, Flos Lonicerae, Herba Menthae, Cortex Phellodendri, Cortex Moutan and Rhizoma Atractylodis at w/w ratio of 2:1:2:2:2 exhibited therapeutic potential in treating AD. In this study, an in vivo murine model with oxazolone (OXA)-mediated dermatitis was used to elucidate the efficacy of PHF. Active ingredients of PHF water extract were also identified and quantified, and their in vitro anti-inflammatory activities on pruritogenic cytokine IL-31- and alarmin IL-33-activated human eosinophils and dermal fibroblasts were evaluated. Ear swelling, epidermis thickening and eosinophils infiltration in epidermal and dermal layers, and the release of serum IL-12 of the murine OXA-mediated dermatitis were significantly reduced upon oral or topical treatment with PHF (all p < 0.05). Gallic acid, chlorogenic acid and berberine contents (w/w) in PHF were found to be 0.479%, 1.201% and 0.022%, respectively. Gallic acid and chlorogenic acid could suppress the release of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 and chemokine CCL7 and CXCL8, respectively, in IL-31- and IL-33-treated eosinophils-dermal fibroblasts co-culture; while berberine could suppress the release of IL-6, CXCL8, CCL2 and CCL7 in the eosinophil culture and eosinophils-dermal fibroblasts co-culture (all p < 0.05). These findings suggest that PHF can ameliorate allergic inflammation and attenuate the activation of eosinophils.

  16. Local anesthetic failure associated with inflammation: verification of the acidosis mechanism and the hypothetic participation of inflammatory peroxynitrite

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Takahiro; Tsuchiya, Hironori; Mizogami, Maki; Takakura, Ko

    2008-01-01

    The presence of inflammation decreases local anesthetic efficacy, especially in dental anesthesia. Although inflammatory acidosis is most frequently cited as the cause of such clinical phenomena, this has not been experimentally proved. We verified the acidosis mechanism by studying the drug and membrane lipid interaction under acidic conditions together with proposing an alternative hypothesis. Liposomes and nerve cell model membranes consisting of phospholipids and cholesterol were treated at different pH with lidocaine, prilocaine and bupivacaine (0.05%–0.2%, w/v). Their membrane-interactive potencies were compared by the induced-changes in membrane fluidity. Local anesthetics fluidized phosphatidylcholine membranes with the potency being significantly lower at pH 6.4 than at pH 7.4 (p < 0.01), supporting the acidosis theory. However, they greatly fluidized nerve cell model membranes even at pH 6.4 corresponding to inflamed tissues, challenging the conventional mechanism. Local anesthetics acted on phosphatidylserine liposomes, as well as nerve cell model membranes, at pH 6.4 with almost the same potency as that at pH 7.4, but not on phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin liposomes. Since the positively charged anesthetic molecules are able to interact with nerve cell membranes by ion-paring with anionic components like phosphatidylserine, tissue acidosis is not essentially responsible for the local anesthetic failure associated with inflammation. The effects of local anesthetics on nerve cell model membranes were inhibited by treating with peroxynitrite (50 μM), suggesting that inflammatory cells producing peroxynitrite may affect local anesthesia. PMID:22096346

  17. Metabolic inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease: crosstalk between adipose tissue and bowel.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Pedro; Magro, Fernando; Martel, Fátima

    2015-02-01

    Epidemiological studies show that both the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the proportion of people with obesity and/or obesity-associated metabolic syndrome increased markedly in developed countries during the past half century. Obesity is also associated with the development of more active IBD and requirement for hospitalization and with a decrease in the time span between diagnosis and surgery. Patients with IBD, especially Crohn's disease, present fat-wrapping or "creeping fat," which corresponds to ectopic adipose tissue extending from the mesenteric attachment and covering the majority of the small and large intestinal surface. Mesenteric adipose tissue in patients with IBD presents several morphological and functional alterations, e.g., it is more infiltrated with immune cells such as macrophages and T cells. All these lines of evidence clearly show an association between obesity, adipose tissue, and functional bowel disorders. In this review, we will show that the mesenteric adipose tissue and creeping fat are not innocent by standers but actively contribute to the intestinal and systemic inflammatory responses in patients with IBD. More specifically, we will review evidence showing that adipose tissue in IBD is associated with major alterations in the secretion of cytokines and adipokines involved in inflammatory process, in adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells and adipogenesis, and in the interaction between adipose tissue and other intestinal components (immune, lymphatic, neuroendocrine, and intestinal epithelial systems). Collectively, these studies underline the importance of adipose tissue for the identification of novel therapeutic approaches for IBD.

  18. Polyphenol metabolites from colonic microbiota exert anti-inflammatory activity on different inflammation models.

    PubMed

    Larrosa, Mar; Luceri, Cristina; Vivoli, Elisa; Pagliuca, Chiara; Lodovici, Maura; Moneti, Gloriano; Dolara, Piero

    2009-08-01

    The polyphenols in fruits and vegetables may be partly responsible for the health-promoting effects attributed to fruit and vegetable intake. Although their properties have been relatively well studied, the activity of their metabolites, produced after ingestion, has been poorly investigated. Thus, the aim of this work was to study the potential anti-inflammatory effect of 18 polyphenol metabolites, derived from colon microbiota. They were screened by measuring prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production by CCD-18 colon fibroblast cells stimulated with IL-1beta. Metabolites that inhibited more than 50% PGE(2) production were hydrocaffeic (HCAF), dihydroxyphenyl acetic (dOHPA), and hydroferulic acid (HFER), that subsequently were tested with the writhing and paw pressure test in rodents where all three compounds showed an anti-inflammatory effect. The effect of HCAF administered orally (50 mg/kg) was also tested in the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis model. Weight loss and fecal water content were more pronounced in DSS rats than in DSS-HCAF treated rats. HCAF treatment diminished the expression of the cytokines IL-1beta, IL-8, and TNF-alpha, reduced malonyldialdehyde (MDA) levels and oxidative DNA damage (measured as 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine levels) in distal colon mucosa. These results indicate that HCAF, dOHPA, and HFER have anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in vivo.

  19. OPN‐a induces muscle inflammation by increasing recruitment and activation of pro‐inflammatory macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Many, Gina M.; Yokosaki, Yasuyuki; Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Nghiem, Peter P.; Bello, Luca; Dadgar, Sherry; Yin, Ying; Damsker, Jesse M.; Cohen, Heather B.; Kornegay, Joe N.; Bamman, Marcas M.; Mosser, David M.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2016-01-01

    New Findings What is the central question of this study? What is the functional relevance of OPN isoform expression in muscle pathology? What is the main finding and its importance? The full‐length human OPN‐a isoform is the most pro‐inflammatory isoform in the muscle microenvironment, acting on macrophages and myoblasts in an RGD‐integrin‐dependent manner. OPN‐a upregulates expression of tenascin‐C (TNC), a known Toll‐like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist. Blocking TLR4 signalling inhibits the pro‐inflammatory effects of OPN‐a, suggesting that a potential mechanism of OPN action is by promoting TNC–TLR4 signalling. Although osteopontin (OPN) is an important mediator of muscle remodelling in health and disease, functional differences in human spliced OPN variants in the muscle microenvironment have not been characterized. We thus sought to define the pro‐inflammatory activities of human OPN isoforms (OPN‐a, OPN‐b and OPN‐c) on cells present in regenerating muscle. OPN transcripts were quantified in normal and dystrophic human and dog muscle. Human macrophages and myoblasts were stimulated with recombinant human OPN protein isoforms, and cytokine mRNA and protein induction was assayed. OPN isoforms were greatly increased in dystrophic human (OPN‐a > OPN‐b > OPN‐c) and dog muscle (OPN‐a = OPN‐c). In healthy human muscle, mechanical loading also upregulated OPN‐a expression (eightfold; P < 0.01), but did not significantly upregulate OPN‐c expression (twofold; P > 0.05). In vitro, OPN‐a displayed the most pronounced pro‐inflammatory activity among isoforms, acting on both macrophages and myoblasts. In vitro and in vivo data revealed that OPN‐a upregulated tenascin‐C (TNC), a known Toll‐like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist. Inhibition of TLR4 signalling attenuated OPN‐mediated macrophage cytokine production. In summary, OPN‐a is the most abundant and functionally active human spliced isoform in the skeletal muscle

  20. Association Between Genetic Variation in FOXO3 and Reductions in Inflammation and Disease Activity in Inflammatory Polyarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Viatte, Sebastien; Lee, James C.; Fu, Bo; Espéli, Marion; Lunt, Mark; De Wolf, Jack N. E.; Wheeler, Lily; Reynolds, John A.; Castelino, Madhura; Symmons, Deborah P. M.; Lyons, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Genetic variation in FOXO3 (tagged by rs12212067) has been associated with a milder course of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and shown to limit monocyte‐driven inflammation through a transforming growth factor β1–dependent pathway. This genetic association, however, has not been consistently observed in other RA cohorts. We sought to clarify the contribution of FOXO3 to prognosis in RA by combining detailed analysis of nonradiographic disease severity measures with an in vivo model of arthritis. Methods Collagen‐induced arthritis, the most commonly used mouse model of RA, was used to assess how Foxo3 contributes to arthritis severity. Using clinical, serologic, and biochemical methods, the arthritis that developed in mice carrying a loss‐of‐function mutation in Foxo3 was compared with that which occurred in littermate controls. The association of rs12212067 with nonradiographic measures of RA severity, including the C‐reactive protein level, the swollen joint count, the tender joint count, the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints, and the Health Assessment Questionnaire score, were modeled longitudinally in a large prospective cohort of patients with early RA. Results Loss of Foxo3 function resulted in more severe arthritis in vivo (both clinically and histologically) and was associated with higher titers of anticollagen antibodies and interleukin‐6 in the blood. Similarly, rs12212067 (a single‐nucleotide polymorphism that increases FOXO3 transcription) was associated with reduced inflammation, both biochemically and clinically, and with lower RA activity scores. Conclusion Consistent with its known role in restraining inflammatory responses, FOXO3 limits the severity of in vivo arthritis and, through genetic variation that increases its transcription, is associated with reduced inflammation and disease activity in RA patients, effects that result in less radiographic damage. PMID:27214848

  1. Macrophage phagocytosis of neutrophils at inflammatory/infectious foci: a cooperative mechanism in the control of infection and infectious inflammation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Manuel T

    2011-05-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils possess overlapping and complementary features associated to their common origin and subsequent specialization during myelopoiesis. That specialization results in macrophage lineage being limited in antimicrobial capacity and cytotoxicity comparatively with the neutrophil lineage. These and other features of mature macrophages and neutrophils, like different lifespan and tissue localization, promote their particular lifestyles and prompt a functional partnership for cooperation in the protective antimicrobial host defense. This partnership includes reciprocal recruitment to infected sites, cooperative effector antimicrobial activities, and pro-resolving anti-inflammatory effects. One modality of the cooperative effector antimicrobial activities involves the phagocytosis by the macrophage of apoptosing neutrophils and of nonapoptosing neutrophils expressing "eat-me" signals. This cooperative interaction results in the enhancement of the comparatively limited macrophage antimicrobial capacity by the acquisition and use of potent neutrophil microbicidal molecules. Here, data are reviewed that suggest that this is a process actively engaging the two professional phagocytes. Phagocytosis of neutrophils by macrophages at inflammatory/infectious foci accumulates two effects beneficial to the protective host immune response: help in the control of the infection and prevention of neutrophil autolysis, effects that converge to accelerate the resolution of the infection-associated inflammation.

  2. Upregulation of skeletal muscle inflammatory genes links inflammation with insulin resistance in women with the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Poelkens, Fleur; Lammers, Gerwen; Pardoel, Elisabeth M; Tack, Cees J; Hopman, Maria T E

    2013-10-01

    The metabolic syndrome, a combination of interrelated metabolic risk factors, is associated with insulin resistance and promotes the development of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes mellitus. There is a close link between inflammation and metabolic disease, but the responsible mechanisms remain elusive. The aim of this study was to identify differentially expressed genes in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle tissue of women with the metabolic syndrome compared with healthy control women. Women with the metabolic syndrome (n = 19) and healthy control women (n = 20) were extensively phenotyped, insulin sensitivity was measured using a hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp, and a skeletal muscle biopsy was obtained. Gene expression levels were compared between the two groups by microarrays. The upregulated genes in skeletal muscle of the women with the metabolic syndrome were primarily enriched for inflammatory response-associated genes. The three most significantly upregulated of this group, interleukin 6 receptor (IL6R), histone deacetylase 9 (HDAC9) and CD97 molecule (CD97), were significantly correlated with insulin resistance. Taken together, these findings suggest an important role for a number of inflammatory-related genes in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance.

  3. 99th Dahlem conference on infection, inflammation and chronic inflammatory disorders: lifestyle changes affecting the host-environment interface.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, S; Kaufmann, S H E

    2010-04-01

    In industrialized nations and high-income regions of the world, the decline of infectious diseases is paralleled by an increase in allergic, autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases (AACID). Changes in lifestyle in westernized societies, which impact individually and collectively on intestinal microbiota, may - at least in part - account for the AACID pandemic. Many disease genes that contribute to AACID encode pattern recognition and signalling molecules in barrier-associated cells. Interactions between gene products and environmental factors depend highly upon the host's state of maturation, the composition of the skin and gut microflora, and exposure to pollutants, antibiotics and nutrients. Inflammatory stress responses, if regulated appropriately, ensure immunity, health and relative longevity; when they are dysregulated, they can no longer be terminated appropriately and thus precipitate AACID. The 99th Dahlem Conference brought together experts of various disciplines (genetics, evolution biology, molecular biology, structural biology, cell biology, immunology, microbiology, nutrition science, epidemiology and clinical medicine) to discuss the multi-faceted relationships between infection, immunity and inflammation in barrier organs and the development of AACID. In Clinical and Experimental Immunology we are presenting a compilation of background papers that formed the basis of discussions. Controversial viewpoints and gaps in current knowledge were examined and new concepts for prevention and treatment of CID were formulated.

  4. Down-regulation of PPARα in the spinal cord contributes to augmented peripheral inflammation and inflammatory hyperalgesia in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Zhang, Q; Zhao, L; Li, D; Fu, Z; Liang, L

    2014-10-10

    Obesity is associated with augmented peripheral inflammation and pain sensitivity in response to inflammatory stimulation, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Emerging evidence has shown that activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) in the central nervous system controls peripheral inflammation and pain. We hypothesized that obesity might down-regulate PPARα in the spinal cord, leading to enhanced peripheral inflammation and inflammatory hyperalgesia. Sprague-Dawley rats fed a high-fat diet (HF) for 12weeks developed metabolic disorder and displayed significantly decreased spinal PPARα expression and activity. Interestingly, intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of the PPARα activator palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) in HF-fed rats for 2weeks normalized spinal PPARα expression and activity without altering metabolic parameters. HF-fed rats were more sensitive to stimulation of the inflamed paw, and exhibited more severe paw edema following carrageenan injection, whereas HF-fed rats receiving ICV PEA had similar pain sensitivity and paw edema to LF-fed rats. No difference in the expression of inflammatory mediators or nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity was observed at baseline among groups. Carrageenan induced decreased PPARα expression and activity, increased spinal cord inflammatory mediator expression and NF-κB activity in both LF-and HF-fed rats. However, the increase was more pronounced in HF-fed rats and corrected by PEA. Intrathecal injection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) against PPARα in HF-fed rats completely abolished PEA effects on peripheral pain sensitivity and paw edema. These findings suggest that diet-induced obesity causes down-regulation of spinal PPARα, which facilitates the susceptibility to peripheral inflammatory challenge by increasing inflammatory response in the spinal cord, contributing to augmented peripheral inflammation and inflammatory hyperalgesia in obesity.

  5. Adoptive Transfer of Dendritic Cells Expressing Fas Ligand Modulates Intestinal Inflammation in a Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Edelmarie Rivera; Isidro, Raymond A; Cruz, Myrella L; Marty, Harry; Appleyard, Caroline B

    2016-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic relapsing inflammatory conditions of unknown cause and likely result from the loss of immunological tolerance, which leads to over-activation of the gut immune system. Gut macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are essential for maintaining tolerance, but can also contribute to the inflammatory response in conditions such as IBD. Current therapies for IBD are limited by high costs and unwanted toxicities and side effects. The possibility of reducing intestinal inflammation with DCs genetically engineered to over-express the apoptosis-inducing FasL (FasL-DCs) has not yet been explored. Objective Investigate the immunomodulatory effect of administering FasL-DCs in the rat trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) model of acute colitis. Methods Expression of FasL on DCs isolated from the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) of normal and TNBS-colitis rats was determined by flow cytometry. Primary rat bone marrow DCs were transfected with rat FasL plasmid (FasL-DCs) or empty vector (EV-DCs). The effect of these DCs on T cell IFNγ secretion and apoptosis was determined by ELISPOT and flow cytometry for Annexin V, respectively. Rats received FasL-DCs or EV-DCs intraperitoneally 96 and 48 hours prior to colitis induction with TNBS. Colonic T cell and neutrophil infiltration was determined by immunohistochemistry for CD3 and myeloperoxidase activity assay, respectively. Macrophage number and phenotype was measured by double immunofluorescence for CD68 and inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase. Results MLN dendritic cells from normal rats expressed more FasL than those from colitic rats. Compared to EV-DCs, FasL-DCs reduced T cell IFNγ secretion and increased T cell apoptosis in vitro. Adoptive transfer of FasL-DCs decreased macroscopic and microscopic damage scores and reduced colonic T cells, neutrophils, and proinflammatory macrophages when compared to EV-DC adoptive transfer. Conclusion FasL-DCs are effective at treating colonic

  6. Anti-inflammatory effect of cinnamaldehyde in Helicobacter pylori induced gastric inflammation.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Jibran Sualeh; Zaidi, Syed Faisal; Shaharyar, Saeeda; Refaat, Alaa; Usmanghani, Khan; Saiki, Ikuo; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    Cinnamomum cassia is widely employed for gastrointestinal complaints such as dyspepsia, flatulence, diarrhea, and vomiting. Studies report cinnamaldehyde (CM) as a major active constituent of cinnamon. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of CM on Helicobacter (H.) pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells in order to validate cinnamon traditional use in gastrointestinal (GI)-related disorders. AGS/MKN-45 cells and H. pylori (193C) were employed for co-culture experiments. Anti-H. pylori cytotoxic and anti-adhesion activity of CM were determined. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, real time polymerase chain reaction analysis and immunoblotting were used to measure the effect on interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion/expression. The effect on activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) was determined by immunoblot analysis. The non-cytotoxic CM (≤125 µM) was also non-bactericidal at the given time, suggesting the effect in H. pylori/cell co-culture system was not due to alteration in H. pylori viability or the toxicity to the cells. Also, CM did not show any anti-adhesion effect against H. pylori/cell co-culture. However, pre-incubation of the cells with CM significantly inhibited the IL-8 secretion/expression from H. pylori-infected cells (p<0.01). In addition, CM suppressed H. pylori-induced NF-κB activation and prevented degradation of inhibitor (I)-κB This study provides evidence that the anti-inflammatory effect of C. cassia on H. pylori-infected gastric cells is due to blockage of the NF-κB pathway by cinnamaldehyde. This agent can be considered as a potential candidate for in vivo and clinical studies against various H. pylori related gastric pathogenic processes.

  7. Hypothesis: Disseminated Intravascular Inflammation as the Inflammatory Counterpart to Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Brian S.; Bull, Maureen H.

    1994-08-01

    We have identified a leukocyte activation syndrome that is occasionally associated with the transfusion of intraoperatively recovered erythrocytes. This syndrome appears to result from intravascular damage caused by leukocytes activated during the erythrocyte salvage process. We hypothesize that this syndrome is part of a larger disease grouping: disseminated intravascular inflammation (DII). DII is the analog of the coagulation disorder disseminated intravascular coagulation. In disseminated intravascular coagulation, the organ damage results from uncontrolled activation of the clotting pathway; in DII the damage is caused by leukocytes that have become activated by direct contact with bacteria or in rare instances-such as erythrocyte salvage-in the absence of bacteria and bacterial products. Recent studies of the hazards associated with intraoperative blood salvage indicate that activation of leukocytes can be achieved by exposure to activated platelets alone. If such activated leukocytes are reinfused along with the washed erythrocytes, widespread organ damage may result. The lung is the organ most severely affected by activated leukocytes. Adult respiratory distress syndrome is one outcome. It is likely that DII is a presently unrecognized pathophysiological process that complicates a variety of primary disease states and increases their lethality.

  8. The Anti-inflammatory Effect of the CXCR4 Antagonist-N15P Peptide and Its Modulation on Inflammation-Associated Mediators in LPS-Induced PBMC.

    PubMed

    Mo, Xue-mei; Sun, Han-xiao

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation was the important pathological process of many disease developments, but current therapeutic means for inflammatory diseases are not satisfactory. Chemokines and their receptors represent valuable targets for anti-inflammatory drug discovery. The N15P polypeptide (sequence: LGASWHRPDKCCLGY) is independently developed by our research group, it is a new CXCR4 antagonist drug derived from viral macrophage inflammatory protein-II (vMIP-II). This study aims to clarify the anti-inflammatory potency of N15P polypeptide on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in vitro. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of N15P polypeptide by the LPS-induced peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) model and measured the level of inflammatory factors (tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-6, IL-8, nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), MyD88, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and Akt). The messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions of inflammatory factors were analyzed by real-time PCR (RT-PCR) microarray analysis, and the production of inflammatory factors was measured further by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot. The results showed that the expression of inflammatory factors (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, NF-κB, COX-2, TLR4, MyD88, PI3K, and Akt) was downregulated by N15P peptide, suggesting that N15P peptide has a strong inhibitory effect on the inflammatory responses induced by LPS.

  9. Evaluation of the Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Locally Delivered Vitamin C in the Treatment of Persistent Gingival Inflammation: Clinical and Histopathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Aziz, Manar A.; Abdel Rahman, Ahmed R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role and efficiency of the locally injected vitamin C in the treatment of persistent gingival inflammation. Design. Twenty adult patients with persistent chronic gingival inflammation were included in this study. The same dose of sterile vitamin C was injected in gingival tissues after the completion of phase I therapy. Gingival biopsies were taken after total resolution of inflammation. The specimens were examined histologically, using H&E stain. Results. Clinical evaluation revealed great improvement of the injected sites with recall visits. Histopathological results revealed marked decrease in inflammatory cells and epithelial thickness and a higher number of newly formed subbasal capillaries. Conclusions. Vitamin C is an effective adjunctive treatment in reducing various degrees of chronic gingival inflammation. PMID:28050280

  10. The proinflammatory function of lymphocytes in non-immune inflammation: effect of steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed Central

    Leme, J. G.; Bechara, G. H.; Sudo, L. S.

    1977-01-01

    Leucopenia rendered rats unresponsive to various inflammatory stimuli. The intensity of the inflammatory response in such animals was restored by i.v. administration of suspensions of lymphocytes, but not of granulocytes. This restorative effect was blocked by both steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Utilizing carrageenin to induce inflammatory responses in the rat's paw, the effect of these drugs on lymphocytes was observed in two circumstances. First, following incubation of the cells with the drugs in concentrations not exceeding the peak plasma levels estimated for these substances in man or laboratory animals; the effect of the drugs seemed selective, since anti-histamine and anti-serotonin agents, as well as amethopterin, were devoid of action. Second, when lymphocytes were collected from rats previously treated with the various anti-inflammatory agents, injected 6-hourly during periods of 18 and 36 h, respectively, for steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory substances. The total amounts given were lower than those required to produce consistent anti-inflammatory effects in normal animals, when the drug was given as a single dose before injection of the irritant. It is concluded that the pro-inflammatory function of lymphocytes in non-immune inflammation can be blocked by steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:607989

  11. Inflammation Mediated Metastasis: Immune Induced Epithelial-To-Mesenchymal Transition in Inflammatory Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Evan N; Gao, Hui; Anfossi, Simone; Mego, Michal; Reddy, Neelima G; Debeb, Bisrat; Giordano, Antonio; Tin, Sanda; Wu, Qiong; Garza, Raul J; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Mani, Sendurai A; Croix, Denise A; Ueno, Naoto T; Woodward, Wendy A; Luthra, Raja; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Reuben, James M

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most insidious form of locally advanced breast cancer; about a third of patients have distant metastasis at initial staging. Emerging evidence suggests that host factors in the tumor microenvironment may interact with underlying IBC cells to make them aggressive. It is unknown whether immune cells associated to the IBC microenvironment play a role in this scenario to transiently promote epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in these cells. We hypothesized that soluble factors secreted by activated immune cells can induce an EMT in IBC and thus promote metastasis. In a pilot study of 16 breast cancer patients, TNF-α production by peripheral blood T cells was correlated with the detection of circulating tumor cells expressing EMT markers. In a variety of IBC model cell lines, soluble factors from activated T cells induced expression of EMT-related genes, including FN1, VIM, TGM2, ZEB1. Interestingly, although IBC cells exhibited increased invasion and migration following exposure to immune factors, the expression of E-cadherin (CDH1), a cell adhesion molecule, increased uniquely in IBC cell lines but not in non-IBC cell lines. A combination of TNF-α, IL-6, and TGF-β was able to recapitulate EMT induction in IBC, and conditioned media preloaded with neutralizing antibodies against these factors exhibited decreased EMT. These data suggest that release of cytokines by activated immune cells may contribute to the aggressiveness of IBC and highlight these factors as potential target mediators of immune-IBC interaction.

  12. Anti-inflammatory effects of orally ingested lactoferrin and glycine in different zymosan-induced inflammation models: evidence for synergistic activity.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Anita; Leenders, Inge; van der Kraan, Peter M; Garssen, Johan

    2007-12-15

    There is a growing awareness of the interaction of food constituents with the immune system. The present study aims to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of two of these nutritional components (glycine and bovine-lactoferrin (b-LF)) using two different mouse models. In a zymosan-induced ear-skin inflammation model both components decreased the inflammatory response locally (ear swelling and inflammatory cytokine concentration in the ears) and systemically (number of TNF-alpha producing spleen cells). Glycine effects (20, 50 or 100 mg/mouse/day) were concentration dependent. B-LF (0.1 or 1 mg/mouse/day) inhibited the inflammatory response although higher doses (5 and 25 mg/mouse/day) were not effective. A combination of b-LF 0.1 mg/mouse/day and glycine 20 or 50 mg/mouse/day counteracted the zymosan-induced ear swelling synergistically and enhanced the decrease in the number of TNF-alpha producing spleen cells of the individual components. In a zymosan-induced acute arthritis model glycine (50 mg/mouse/day) inhibited joint swelling, inflammatory cell infiltration and cartilage proteoglycan depletion. A b-LF dose of 5 mg/mouse/day reduced the zymosan-induced joint swelling without modulating inflammatory cell infiltration and cartilage proteoglycan depletion. The present study indicates that the anti-inflammatory effects of glycine are independent of the used models. B-LF displays a reversed concentration dependency and the activity is model dependent. A combination of glycine and lactoferrin demonstrated a synergistic anti-inflammatory effect on zymosan-induced skin inflammation and an enhanced decrease in the number of TNF-alpha producing spleen cells compared to the effect of the single components. Therefore, this nutritional concept might be a new option for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases.

  13. Anti-inflammatory effect of rosmarinic acid and an extract of Rosmarinus officinalis in rat models of local and systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Joao; Eduardo-Figueira, Maria; Barateiro, Andreia; Fernandes, Adelaide; Brites, Dora; Bronze, Rosario; Duarte, Catarina M M; Serra, Ana Teresa; Pinto, Rui; Freitas, Marisa; Fernandes, Eduarda; Silva-Lima, Beatriz; Mota-Filipe, Helder; Sepodes, Bruno

    2015-05-01

    Rosmarinic acid is a polyphenolic compound and main constituent of Rosmarinus officinalis and has been shown to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. We aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory properties of rosmarinic acid and of an extract of R. officinalis in local inflammation (carrageenin-induced paw oedema model in the rat), and further evaluate the protective effect of rosmarinic acid in rat models of systemic inflammation: liver ischaemia-reperfusion (I/R) and thermal injury models. In the local inflammation model, rosmarinic acid was administered at 10, 25 and 50 mg/kg (p.o.), and the extract was administered at 10 and 25 mg/kg (equivalent doses to rosmarinic acid groups) to male Wistar rats. Administration of rosmarinic acid and extract at the dose of 25 mg/kg reduced paw oedema at 6 hr by over 60%, exhibiting a dose-response effect, suggesting that rosmarinic was the main contributor to the anti-inflammatory effect. In the liver I/R model, rosmarinic acid was administered at 25 mg/kg (i.v.) 30 min. prior to the induction of ischaemia and led to the significant reduction in the serum concentration of transaminases (AST and ALT) and LDH. In the thermal injury model, rosmarinic acid was administered at 25 mg/kg (i.v.) 5 min. prior to the induction of injury and significantly reduced multi-organ dysfunction markers (liver, kidney, lung) by modulating NF-κB and metalloproteinase-9. For the first time, the anti-inflammatory potential of rosmarinic acid has been identified, as it causes a substantial reduction in inflammation, and we speculate that it might be useful in the pharmacological modulation of injuries associated to inflammation.

  14. Does Facial Resemblance Enhance Cooperation?

    PubMed Central

    Giang, Trang; Bell, Raoul; Buchner, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Facial self-resemblance has been proposed to serve as a kinship cue that facilitates cooperation between kin. In the present study, facial resemblance was manipulated by morphing stimulus faces with the participants' own faces or control faces (resulting in self-resemblant or other-resemblant composite faces). A norming study showed that the perceived degree of kinship was higher for the participants and the self-resemblant composite faces than for actual first-degree relatives. Effects of facial self-resemblance on trust and cooperation were tested in a paradigm that has proven to be sensitive to facial trustworthiness, facial likability, and facial expression. First, participants played a cooperation game in which the composite faces were shown. Then, likability ratings were assessed. In a source memory test, participants were required to identify old and new faces, and were asked to remember whether the faces belonged to cooperators or cheaters in the cooperation game. Old-new recognition was enhanced for self-resemblant faces in comparison to other-resemblant faces. However, facial self-resemblance had no effects on the degree of cooperation in the cooperation game, on the emotional evaluation of the faces as reflected in the likability judgments, and on the expectation that a face belonged to a cooperator rather than to a cheater. Therefore, the present results are clearly inconsistent with the assumption of an evolved kin recognition module built into the human face recognition system. PMID:23094095

  15. Cryptococcal meningitis accompanying lymphocytic inflammation predominantly in cerebral deep white matter: a possible manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Hiroya; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Kobayashi, Zen; Inaba, Akira; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2014-02-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is rarely complicated by immune-mediated leukoencephalopathy, but the precise pathomechanism is uncertain. A 72-year-old Japanese man treated with prednisolone for Sweet disease developed a subacute progression of meningitis, which was considered as neuro-Sweet disease. A treatment by methylprednisolone rapidly improved CSF findings with a remarkable decrease in lymphocyte numbers in the blood, but the patient's consciousness still worsened after the cessation of the treatment. The patient developed cryptococcal meningitis and MRI showed abnormal intensities predominantly in the cerebral deep white matter along with the recovery of lymphocyte numbers in the blood, which resulted in death. A postmortem examination of the brain revealed degenerative lesions, especially at the cerebral white matter and cortex adjacent to the leptomeninges abundantly infiltrated by Cryptococcus neoformans. In the affected cerebral deep white matter, perivascular infiltration of lymphocytes was prominent in coexistence with reactive astrocytes and vascular proliferation, but these findings were not observed in the subcortical and cortical lesions. Cryptococcus neoformans was not present within the brain parenchyma. This is the first report of a case suggesting that cryptococcal meningitis can accompany lymphocytic inflammation predominantly in cerebral deep white matter as a possible manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

  16. miRNAs as new molecular insights into inflammatory bowel disease: Crucial regulators in autoimmunity and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic relapsing inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, and includes two major phenotypes: ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. The pathogenesis of IBD is not fully understood as of yet. It is believed that IBD results from complicated interactions between environmental factors, genetic predisposition, and immune disorders. miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that can regulate gene expression by targeting the 3′-untranslated region of specific mRNAs for degradation or translational inhibition. miRNAs are considered to play crucial regulatory roles in many biologic processes, such as immune cellular differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis, and maintenance of immune homeostasis. Recently, aberrant expression of miRNAs was revealed to play an important role in autoimmune diseases, including IBD. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of how miRNAs regulate autoimmunity and inflammation by affecting the differentiation, maturation, and function of various immune cells. In particular, we focus on describing specific miRNA expression profiles in tissues and peripheral blood that may be associated with the pathogenesis of IBD. In addition, we summarize the opportunities for utilizing miRNAs as new biomarkers and as potential therapeutic targets in IBD. PMID:26900285

  17. Promoting inflammatory lymphangiogenesis by vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) aggravated intestinal inflammation in mice with experimental acute colitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X.L.; Zhao, J.; Qin, L.; Qiao, M.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis are thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, it is not understood if inflammatory lymphangiogenesis is a pathological consequence or a productive attempt to resolve the inflammation. This study investigated the effect of lymphangiogenesis on intestinal inflammation by overexpressing a lymphangiogenesis factor, vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C), in a mouse model of acute colitis. Forty eight-week-old female C57BL/6 mice were treated with recombinant adenovirus overexpressing VEGF-C or with recombinant VEGF-C156S protein. Acute colitis was then established by exposing the mice to 5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) for 7 days. Mice were evaluated for disease activity index (DAI), colonic inflammatory changes, colon edema, microvessel density, lymphatic vessel density (LVD), and VEGFR-3mRNA expression in colon tissue. When acute colitis was induced in mice overexpressing VEGF-C, there was a significant increase in colonic epithelial damage, inflammatory edema, microvessel density, and neutrophil infiltration compared to control mice. These mice also exhibited increased lymphatic vessel density (73.0±3.9 vs 38.2±1.9, P<0.001) and lymphatic vessel size (1974.6±104.3 vs 1639.0±91.5, P<0.001) compared to control mice. Additionally, the expression of VEGFR-3 mRNA was significantly upregulated in VEGF-C156S mice compared to DSS-treated mice after induction of colitis (42.0±1.4 vs 3.5±0.4, P<0.001). Stimulation of lymphangiogenesis by VEGF-C during acute colitis promoted inflammatory lymphangiogenesis in the colon and aggravated intestinal inflammation. Inflammatory lymphangiogenesis may have pleiotropic effects at different stages of IBD. PMID:27074165

  18. Potential anti-inflammatory effects of maraviroc in HIV-positive patients: a pilot study of inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and coagulation markers.

    PubMed

    Francisci, Daniela; Falcinelli, Emanuela; Baroncelli, Silvia; Petito, Eleonora; Cecchini, Enisia; Weimer, Liliana Elena; Floridia, Marco; Gresele, Paolo; Baldelli, Franco

    2014-06-01

    Persistent immune activation and chronic inflammation significantly contribute to non-AIDS morbidity in HIV-infected patients. The HIV inhibitor maraviroc (MVC) targets the cellular chemokine CCR5 HIV co-receptor, which is involved in important inflammatory pathways. MVC could have significant anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerotic effects, also reducing immune activation. We designed a pilot study to determine which plasma biomarkers of inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and hypercoagulability were modified by MVC in 2 groups of 10 patients starting MVC-free or MVC-containing regimens. Ten age- and gender-matched healthy controls were also included. We found higher levels of all inflammatory biomarkers in HIV-infected patients compared to healthy controls. Both groups showed decreasing levels of interleukin (IL)-17, IL-10, and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1a following the achievement of viral suppression. Vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 levels were decreased in the MVC group and increased in the MVC-free group. In conclusion, some inflammatory biomarkers tend to decrease with the salvage regimen; MVC was not associated with a better impact on these measured markers.

  19. Modulation of Intestinal Inflammation by Yeasts and Cell Wall Extracts: Strain Dependence and Unexpected Anti-Inflammatory Role of Glucan Fractions

    PubMed Central

    Jawhara, Samir; Habib, Khalid; Maggiotto, François; Pignede, Georges; Vandekerckove, Pascal; Maes, Emmanuel; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Fontaine, Thierry; Guerardel, Yann; Poulain, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Yeasts and their glycan components can have a beneficial or adverse effect on intestinal inflammation. Previous research has shown that the presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii (Sb) reduces intestinal inflammation and colonization by Candida albicans. The aim of this study was to identify dietary yeasts, which have comparable effects to the anti-C. albicans and anti-inflammatory properties of Sb and to assess the capabilities of yeast cell wall components to modulate intestinal inflammation. Mice received a single oral challenge of C. albicans and were then given 1.5% dextran-sulphate-sodium (DSS) for 2 weeks followed by a 3-day restitution period. S. cerevisiae strains (Sb, Sc1 to Sc4), as well as mannoprotein (MP) and β-glucan crude fractions prepared from Sc2 and highly purified β-glucans prepared from C. albicans were used in this curative model, starting 3 days after C. albicans challenge. Mice were assessed for the clinical, histological and inflammatory responses related to DSS administration. Strain Sc1-1 gave the same level of protection against C. albicans as Sb when assessed by mortality, clinical scores, colonization levels, reduction of TNFα and increase in IL-10 transcription. When Sc1-1 was compared with the other S. cerevisiae strains, the preparation process had a strong influence on biological activity. Interestingly, some S. cerevisiae strains dramatically increased mortality and clinical scores. Strain Sc4 and MP fraction favoured C. albicans colonization and inflammation, whereas β-glucan fraction was protective against both. Surprisingly, purified β-glucans from C. albicans had the same protective effect. Thus, some yeasts appear to be strong modulators of intestinal inflammation. These effects are dependent on the strain, species, preparation process and cell wall fraction. It was striking that β-glucan fractions or pure β-glucans from C. albicans displayed the most potent anti-inflammatory effect in the DSS model. PMID

  20. Dietary antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake modifies the effect of cadmium exposure on markers of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Colacino, Justin A.; Arthur, Anna E.; Ferguson, Kelly K.; Rozek, Laura S.

    2014-05-01

    Chronic cadmium exposure may cause disease through induction of systemic oxidative stress and inflammation. Factors that mitigate cadmium toxicity and could serve as interventions in exposed populations have not been well characterized. We used data from the 2003–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to quantify diet's role in modifying associations between cadmium exposure and oxidative stress and inflammation. We created a composite antioxidant and anti-inflammatory diet score (ADS) by ranking participants by quintile of intake across a panel of 19 nutrients. We identified associations and effect modification between ADS, urinary cadmium, and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation by multiple linear regression. An interquartile range increase in urinary cadmium was associated with a 47.5%, 8.8%, and 3.7% increase in C-reactive protein (CRP), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), respectively. An interquartile range increase in ADS was associated with an 7.4%, 3.3%, 5.2%, and 2.5% decrease in CRP, GGT, ALP, and total white blood cell count respectively, and a 3.0% increase in serum bilirubin. ADS significantly attenuated the association between cadmium exposure, CRP and ALP. Dietary interventions may provide a route to reduce the impact of cadmium toxicity on the population level. - Highlights: • Cadmium may cause chronic disease through oxidative stress or inflammation. • We developed a score to quantify dietary antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake. • Cadmium was associated with markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. • Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake mitigated the effects of cadmium exposure. • Dietary interventions may be effective against chronic cadmium toxicity.

  1. The Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Spray-Dried Plasma Is Mediated by a Reduction in Mucosal Lymphocyte Activation and Infiltration in a Mouse Model of Intestinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Bosque, Anna; Miró, Lluïsa; Amat, Concepció; Polo, Javier; Moretó, Miquel

    2016-01-01

    Spray-dried preparations from porcine and bovine plasma can alleviate mucosal inflammation in experimental models and improve symptoms in patients with enteropathy. In rodents, dietary supplementation with porcine spray-dried plasma (SDP) attenuates intestinal inflammation and improves the epithelial barrier function during intestinal inflammation induced by Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (SEB). The aim of this study was to discern the molecular mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of SDP. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed with 8% SDP or control diet (based on milk proteins) for two weeks, from weaning until day 33. On day 32, the mice were given a SEB dose (i.p., 25 µg/mouse) or vehicle. SEB administration increased cell recruitment to mesenteric lymph nodes and the percentage of activated Th lymphocytes and SDP prevented these effects). SDP supplementation increased the expression of interleukin 10 (IL-10) or transforming growth factor- β (TGF-β) compared to the SEB group. The SEB challenge increased six-fold the expression of mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule 1 (MAdCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1); and these effects were attenuated by SDP supplementation. SEB also augmented NF-κB phosphorylation, an effect that was prevented by dietary SDP. Our results indicate that the anti-inflammatory effects of SDP involve the regulation of transcription factors and adhesion molecules that reduce intestinal cell infiltration and the degree of the inflammatory response. PMID:27782068

  2. The effects of grounding (earthing) on inflammation, the immune response, wound healing, and prevention and treatment of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oschman, James L; Chevalier, Gaétan; Brown, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Multi-disciplinary research has revealed that electrically conductive contact of the human body with the surface of the Earth (grounding or earthing) produces intriguing effects on physiology and health. Such effects relate to inflammation, immune responses, wound healing, and prevention and treatment of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this report is two-fold: to 1) inform researchers about what appears to be a new perspective to the study of inflammation, and 2) alert researchers that the length of time and degree (resistance to ground) of grounding of experimental animals is an important but usually overlooked factor that can influence outcomes of studies of inflammation, wound healing, and tumorigenesis. Specifically, grounding an organism produces measurable differences in the concentrations of white blood cells, cytokines, and other molecules involved in the inflammatory response. We present several hypotheses to explain observed effects, based on current research results and our understanding of the electronic aspects of cell and tissue physiology, cell biology, biophysics, and biochemistry. An experimental injury to muscles, known as delayed onset muscle soreness, has been used to monitor the immune response under grounded versus ungrounded conditions. Grounding reduces pain and alters the numbers of circulating neutrophils and lymphocytes, and also affects various circulating chemical factors related to inflammation. PMID:25848315

  3. PI3K inhibitors LY294002 and IC87114 reduce inflammation in carrageenan-induced paw oedema and down-regulate inflammatory gene expression in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Eräsalo, Heikki; Laavola, Mirka; Hämäläinen, Mari; Leppänen, Tiina; Nieminen, Riina; Moilanen, Eeva

    2015-01-01

    PI3K/Akt pathway is a well-characterized pathway controlling cellular processes such as proliferation, migration and survival, and its role in cancer is vastly studied. There is also evidence to suggest the involvement of this pathway in the regulation of inflammatory responses. In this study, an attempt was made to investigate the role of PI3Ks in acute inflammation in vivo using pharmacological inhibitors against PI3Ks in the carrageenan-induced paw oedema model. A non-selective PI3K inhibitor LY294002 and a PI3Kδ-selective inhibitor IC87114 were used. Both of these inhibitors reduced inflammatory oedema upon carrageenan challenge in the mouse paw. To explain this result, the effects of the two inhibitors on inflammatory gene expression were investigated in activated macrophages. LY294002 and IC87114 prevented Akt phosphorylation as expected and down-regulated the expression of inflammatory factors IL-6, MCP-1,TNFα and iNOS. These findings suggest that PI3K inhibitors could be used to attenuate inflammatory responses and that the mechanism of action behind this effect is the down-regulation of inflammatory gene expression.

  4. Anti-inflammatory activity of four solvent fractions of ethanol extract of Mentha spicata L. investigated on acute and chronic inflammation induced rats.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, P; Priya, N Gayatri; Subathra, M; Ramesh, A

    2008-07-01

    Anti-inflammatory effects of four solvent fractions of ethanol extract of Mentha spicata were evaluated in acute and chronic inflammation induced in Wistar albino rats. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) and some antioxidants produced during chronic inflammation were quantitated. Hexane (320mg/kg of body weight in 25% DMSO), chloroform (320mg/kg body weight in 25% DMSO), ethyl acetate (160mg/kg body weight in 25% DMSO), aqueous (320mg/kg of body weight in ddH(2)O) fractions, two negative control groups (25% DMSO and ddH(2)O) and two anti-inflammatory drugs (Diclofenac: 25mg/kg of body weight; Indomethacin: 10mg/kg of body weight both in ddH(2)O) were administered by oral intubations to the eight groups of rats consisting six animals, each. In acute study, 1% carrageenan was injected subcutaneously in the sub-plantar region of the right hind paw after 1h of administration of test doses. The increased paw edema was measured at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 24h intervals. In the chronic study, the oral administration was carried out for seven consecutive days. On eighth day, four sterile cotton pellets (50mg each) were implanted subcutaneously in the dorsal region of the rats. On the sixteenth day, the rats were sacrificed and the cotton pellets with granulomatous tissue were dissected out and weighed (fresh and dry). Both in chronic and acute inflammation, ethyl acetate (EAF) and aqueous fraction (AF) were effective. EAF is comparable with the positive standards in chronic inflammation. The results indicate that EAF's anti-inflammatory activity is largely due to its ability to modulate in vivo antioxidants.

  5. Potentiation of indomethacin-induced anti-inflammatory response by pioglitazone in carrageenan-induced acute inflammation in rats: Role of PPARγ receptors.

    PubMed

    Houshmand, Gholamreza; Mansouri, Mohammad Taghi; Naghizadeh, Bahareh; Hemmati, Ali Asghar; Hashemitabar, Mahmoud

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the interaction between anti-inflammatory effects of pioglitazone (peroxysome proliferator activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) agonist, PGL), and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, IND) and to evaluate the possible underlying mechanisms. Paw edema induced by carrageenan was used to induce inflammation. Different doses of IND (0.3-10mg/kg) and PGL (1-20mg/kg) alone or in combination were administered intraperitoneally to rats. Paw tissue levels of PPARγ, COX-2, and prostaglandin E2 and serum levels of TNF-α and IL-10 were also estimated. Doses of IND and PGL showed a statistically significant anti-inflammatory effect. Combination of a non-effective dose of IND (0.3mg/kg) with increasing doses of PGL (1-10mg/kg) resulted in potentiated anti-inflammation and vise versa. IND, PGL and the combination were able to reduce the COX-2, PGE2 contents and TNF-α level. Moreover, all these treatments caused elevation in PPARγ levels and IL-10 levels. However, when the rats were pre-treated with GW-9662 (a selective PPARγ antagonist), all the anti-inflammation and alterations in the biochemical factors were antagonized. These results showed that PGL markedly enhanced the anti-inflammatory activity of IND and this effect mediated partly at least, through PPARγ. Possible mechanisms of the interaction were that PGL stimulates the PPARγ and inhibits COX-2 by those cytokines that trigger the PPARγ and also inhibit COX-2. This study suggests that combination therapy with pioglitazone and indomethacin may provide an alternative for the clinical control of inflammation especially in patients with diabetes.

  6. TRPV1, TRPA1, and TRPM8 channels in inflammation, energy redirection, and water retention: role in chronic inflammatory diseases with an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Straub, Rainer H

    2014-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are accompanied by a systemic response of the body, necessary to redirect energy-rich fuels to the activated immune system and to induce volume expansion. The systemic response is switched on by two major pathways: (a) circulating cytokines enter the brain, and (b) signals via sensory nerve fibers are transmitted to the brain. Concerning item b, sensory nerve terminals are equipped with a multitude of receptors that sense temperature, inflammation, osmolality, and pain. Thus, they can be important to inform the brain about peripheral inflammation. Central to these sensory modalities are transient receptor potential channels (TRP channels) on sensory nerve endings. For example, TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) can be activated by heat, inflammatory factors (e.g., protons, bradykinin, anandamide), hyperosmolality, pungent irritants, and others. TRP channels are multimodal switches that transmit peripheral signals to the brain, thereby inducing a systemic response. It is demonstrated how and why these TRP channels (TRPV1, TRP ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1), and TRP melastatin type 8 (TRPM8)) are important to start up a systemic response of energy expenditure, energy allocation, and water retention and how this is linked to a continuously activated immune system in chronic inflammatory diseases.

  7. TRPV1 and TRPA1 in cutaneous neurogenic and chronic inflammation: pro-inflammatory response induced by their activation and their sensitization.

    PubMed

    Gouin, Olivier; L'Herondelle, Killian; Lebonvallet, Nicolas; Le Gall-Ianotto, Christelle; Sakka, Mehdi; Buhé, Virginie; Plée-Gautier, Emmanuelle; Carré, Jean-Luc; Lefeuvre, Luc; Misery, Laurent; Le Garrec, Raphaele

    2017-03-31

    Cutaneous neurogenic inflammation (CNI) is inflammation that is induced (or enhanced) in the skin by the release of neuropeptides from sensory nerve endings. Clinical manifestations are mainly sensory and vascular disorders such as pruritus and erythema. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and ankyrin 1 (TRPV1 and TRPA1, respectively) are non-selective cation channels known to specifically participate in pain and CNI. Both TRPV1 and TRPA1 are co-expressed in a large subset of sensory nerves, where they integrate numerous noxious stimuli. It is now clear that the expression of both channels also extends far beyond the sensory nerves in the skin, occuring also in keratinocytes, mast cells, dendritic cells, and endothelial cells. In these non-neuronal cells, TRPV1 and TRPA1 also act as nociceptive sensors and potentiate the inflammatory process. This review discusses the role of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in the modulation of inflammatory genes that leads to or maintains CNI in sensory neurons and non-neuronal skin cells. In addition, this review provides a summary of current research on the intracellular sensitization pathways of both TRP channels by other endogenous inflammatory mediators that promote the self-maintenance of CNI.

  8. A novel mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease links mammalian target of rapamycin-dependent hyperproliferation of colonic epithelium to inflammation-associated tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lin; Zhou, Jin-Feng; Sellers, Rani S; Li, Jiu-Feng; Nguyen, Andrew V; Wang, Yubao; Orlofsky, Amos; Liu, Qiang; Hume, David A; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Augenlicht, Leonard; Lin, Elaine Y

    2010-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a high-risk condition for human colorectal cancer. However, our mechanistic understanding of the link between inflammation and tumorigenesis in the colon is limited. Here we established a novel mouse model of colitis-associated cancer by genetically inactivating signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) in macrophages, with partial deletion in other myeloid and lymphoid cells. Inflammation developed in the colon of mutant mice spontaneously, and tumor lesions, including invasive carcinoma, arose in the inflamed region of the intestine with a frequency similar to that observed in human IBD patients. The development of both inflammation and tumors in the mutant mice required the presence of microflora. Indeed, inflammation was associated with disruption of colonic homeostasis, fulminant epithelial/tumor cell proliferation, and activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-Stat3 pathway in epithelial and tumor cells. The activation of this pathway was essential for both the excess proliferation of epithelial/tumor cells and the disruption of colonic homeostasis in the mutant mice. Notably, a similar abnormal up-regulation of mTOR-Stat3 signaling was consistently observed in the colonic epithelial cells of human IBD patients with active disease. These studies demonstrate a novel mouse model of IBD-colorectal cancer progression in which disrupted immune regulation, mTOR-Stat3 signaling, and epithelial hyperproliferation are integrated and simultaneously linked to the development of malignancy.

  9. A Novel Mouse Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Links Mammalian Target of Rapamycin-Dependent Hyperproliferation of Colonic Epithelium to Inflammation-Associated Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lin; Zhou, Jin-Feng; Sellers, Rani S.; Li, Jiu-Feng; Nguyen, Andrew V.; Wang, Yubao; Orlofsky, Amos; Liu, Qiang; Hume, David A.; Pollard, Jeffrey W.; Augenlicht, Leonard; Lin, Elaine Y.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a high-risk condition for human colorectal cancer. However, our mechanistic understanding of the link between inflammation and tumorigenesis in the colon is limited. Here we established a novel mouse model of colitis-associated cancer by genetically inactivating signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) in macrophages, with partial deletion in other myeloid and lymphoid cells. Inflammation developed in the colon of mutant mice spontaneously, and tumor lesions, including invasive carcinoma, arose in the inflamed region of the intestine with a frequency similar to that observed in human IBD patients. The development of both inflammation and tumors in the mutant mice required the presence of microflora. Indeed, inflammation was associated with disruption of colonic homeostasis, fulminant epithelial/tumor cell proliferation, and activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-Stat3 pathway in epithelial and tumor cells. The activation of this pathway was essential for both the excess proliferation of epithelial/tumor cells and the disruption of colonic homeostasis in the mutant mice. Notably, a similar abnormal up-regulation of mTOR-Stat3 signaling was consistently observed in the colonic epithelial cells of human IBD patients with active disease. These studies demonstrate a novel mouse model of IBD-colorectal cancer progression in which disrupted immune regulation, mTOR-Stat3 signaling, and epithelial hyperproliferation are integrated and simultaneously linked to the development of malignancy. PMID:20042677

  10. Children's Explanations of Family Resemblances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horobin, Karen D.

    Four studies investigated children's explanations for family resemblance and species-typical characteristics, under different conditions of biological parentage and rearing environment. Participating were 226 children between 3 and 11 years. Children Children were presented with a number of different tasks, some involving people and some domestic…

  11. Anti-inflammatory Potentials of Excretory/Secretory (ES) and Somatic Products of Marshallagia marshalli on Allergic Airway Inflammation in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    SHIRVAN, Sima PARANDE; BORJI, Hassan; MOVASSAGHI, Ahmadreza; KHAKZAD, Mohammadreza; FARZIN, Hamidreza; MALEKI, Mohsen; HAGHPARAST, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inverse relationship between helminths infection and immune-mediated diseases has inspired researchers to investigate therapeutic potential of helminths in allergic asthma. Helminth unique ability to induce immunoregulatory responses has already been documented in several experimental studies. This study was designed to investigate whether excretory/secretory (ES) and somatic products of Marshallagia marshalli modulate the development of ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in a mouse model. Methods: This study was carried out at the laboratories of Immunology and Parasitology of Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran during spring and summer 2015. Allergic airway inflammation was induced in mice by intraperitoneal (IP) injection with ovalbumin (OVA). The effects of ES and somatic products of M. marshalli were analyzed by inflammatory cell infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), pathological changes and IgE response. Results: Treatment with ES and somatic products of M. marshalli decreased cellular infiltration into BALF when they were administered during sensitization with allergen. Pathological changes were decreased in helminth-treated group, as demonstrated by reduced inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell hyperplasia, epithelial lesion and smooth muscle hypertrophy. However, no significant differences were observed in IgE serum levels, cytokines and eosinophil counts between different groups. Conclusion: This study provides new insights into anti-inflammatory effects of ES and somatic products of M. marshalli, during the development of non-eosinophilic model of asthma. Further study is necessary to characterize immunomodulatory molecules derived from M. marshalli as a candidate for the treatment of airway inflammation. PMID:28127363

  12. [Role of anti-inflammatory drugs in the treatment of acute coronary syndromes. From athero-inflammation to athero-thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Altman, Raúl; Scazziota, Alejandra

    2003-01-01

    Coronary thrombosis is the most important cause of morbidity and mortality and the most severe manifestation of atherosclerosis. Knowledge of the pathophysiology of atheroma formation and the causes of atheroma accidents have allowed the development of new therapeutic measures for reducing thrombotic events after a coronary episode. Treating the thrombosis after plaque rupture is useful, but a late measure once coronary flow is disturbed. Therefore, treatment at an earlier stage, which we call athero-inflammation, a central event in atheroma progression leading to atherothrombosis, seems wise. There is evidence of an inflammatory component in the pathogenesis of atheroma rupture in acute coronary events. Earlier studies of anti-inflammatory medication have not demonstrated a reduction in thrombotic complications after an acute coronary episode. However, there are pathophysiological arguments and clinical findings that suggest that it would be advisable to include anti-inflammatory medications, especially those that inhibit preferentially COX-2, in the therapeutic arsenal for this pathology. We postulated that blocking athero-inflammation could prevent thrombosis. A pilot study was carried out in 120 patients with acute coronary syndrome without ST-segment elevation in which 60 patients were treated with meloxicam, a preferential COX-2 inhibitor. All patients received heparin and aspirin. During the stay in the coronary care unit, as well as after 90 days, meloxicam lowered composite outcomes (myocardial infarction, death and revascularization procedures) compared with the control group. These results and available pathophysiological and clinical evidence support the hypothesis of potential benefits of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with preferential inhibitory activity on COX-2 in patients with acute coronary syndromes. More trials are needed to confirm their preventive effect.

  13. Differential anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects of dexamethasone and N-acetylcysteine in endotoxin-induced lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rocksén, D; Lilliehöök, B; Larsson, R; Johansson, T; Bucht, A

    2000-01-01

    Inhalation of bacterial endotoxin induces an acute inflammation in the lower respiratory tract. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effects of the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and the glucocorticoid dexamethasone were investigated in mice exposed to aerosolized endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide (LPS)). Powerful reduction of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was obtained by a single i.p. injection of dexamethasone (10 mg/kg), whereas treatment with NAC only resulted in reduction of neutrophils when administered at a high dose (500 mg/kg). Measurement of cytokine and chemokine expression in lung tissue revealed a significant decrease of tumour necrosis factor-alpha, IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p40, and MIP-1α mRNA when mice where treated with dexamethasone but not when treated with NAC. Analysis of oxidative burst demonstrated a remarkable reduction of oxygen radicals in BALF neutrophils after treatment with dexamethasone, whereas the effect of NAC was not significantly different from that in untreated animals. In conclusion, dexamethasone exerted both anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects in acute airway inflammation, probably by blocking early events in the inflammatory cascade. In contrast, treatment with NAC resulted in a weak reduction of the inflammatory response but no inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines or reduction of oxidative burst in neutrophils. These results demonstrate dramatic differences in efficiency and also indicate that the two drugs have different actions. Combined treatment with NAC and dexamethasone revealed an additive action but no synergy was observed. PMID:11091282

  14. The function of tumour necrosis factor and receptors in models of multi-organ inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kollias, G.; Douni, E.; Kassiotis, G.; Kontoyiannis, D.

    1999-01-01

    There is now good evidence to demonstrate that aberrations in tumour necrosis factor (TNF) production in vivo may be either pathogenic or protective and several plausible mechanisms may explain these contrasting activities. According to the classic pro-inflammatory scenario, failure to regulate the production of TNF at a site of immunological injury may lead to chronic activation of innate immune cells and to chronic inflammatory responses, which may consequently lead to organ specific inflammatory pathology and tissue damage. However, more cryptic functions of this molecule may be considered to play a significant part in the development of TNF mediated pathologies. Direct interference of TNF with the differentiation, proliferation or death of specific pathogenic cell targets may be an alternative mechanism for disease initiation or progression. In addition to these activities, there is now considerable evidence to suggest that TNF may also directly promote or down regulate the adaptive immune response. A more complete understanding of the temporal and spatial context of TNF/TNF receptor (TNF-R) function and of the molecular and cellular pathways leading to the development of TNF/TNF-R mediated pathologies is necessary to fully comprehend relevant mechanisms of disease induction and progression in humans. In this paper, the potential pathogenic mechanisms exerted by TNF and receptors in models of multi-organ inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and inflammatory bowel disease are discussed. Elucidating the nature and level of contribution of these mechanisms in chronic inflammation and autoimmunity may lead to better regulatory and therapeutic applications.

 PMID:10577971

  15. Lunasin attenuates obesity-related inflammation in RAW264.7 cells and 3T3-L1 adipocytes by inhibiting inflammatory cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Mei-Jia; Wang, Chih-Hsuan

    2017-01-01

    Obesity has become a major threat to public health and is accompanied by chronic low-grade inflammation, which leads to various pathological developments. Lunasin, a natural seed peptide, exhibits several biological activities, such as anti-carcinogenesis, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant activities. However, the mechanism of action of lunasin in obesity-related inflammation has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to explore whether lunasin could reduce the inflammation induced by obesity-related mediators in RAW264.7 cells and 3T3-L1 adipocytes and whether it could attenuate the crosstalk between the two cell lines. RAW264.7 cells were cultured in leptin-containing medium, adipocyte-conditioned medium (Ad-CM), or co-cultured with 3T3-L1 cells to mimic the physiology of obesity. The data showed that the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) was inhibited by lunasin after leptin activation of RAW264.7 cells. In addition, lunasin decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and IL-1β secretions in the Ad-CM model. Cytokine MCP-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and IL-1β secretions were significantly decreased by leptin or Ad-CM plus lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Subsequently, the co-culture of the two cells refined the direct relation between them, resulting in apparently increased MCP-1, and decreased IL-6 levels after lunasin treatment. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, lunasin also exhibited anti-inflammatory property by inhibiting MCP-1, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and leptin productions stimulated by (TNF)-α, lipopolysaccharide, or RAW264.7 cell-conditioned medium. This result revealed that lunasin acts as a potential anti-inflammatory agent not only in macrophages but also in adipocytes, disrupting the crosstalk between these two cells. Therefore, this study suggests the intake of lunasin from diet or as a supplement, for auxiliary prevention or therapy in obesity-related inflammatory applications. PMID

  16. Lymphocyte 'homing' and chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Motohiro

    2015-07-01

    Chronic inflammation is a response to prolonged exposure to injurious stimuli that harm and destroy tissues and promote lymphocyte infiltration into inflamed sites. Following progressive accumulation of lymphocytes, the histology of inflamed tissue begins to resemble that of peripheral lymphoid organs, which can be referred to as lymphoid neogenesis or formation of tertiary lymphoid tissues. Lymphocyte recruitment to inflamed tissues is also reminiscent of lymphocyte homing to peripheral lymphoid organs. In the latter, under physiological conditions, homing receptors expressed on lymphocytes adhere to vascular addressin expressed on high endothelial venules (HEVs), initiating a lymphocyte migration process composed of sequential adhesive interactions. Intriguingly, in chronic inflammation, HEV-like vessels are induced de novo, despite the fact that the inflamed site is not originally lymphoid tissue, and these vessels contribute to lymphocyte recruitment in a manner similar to physiological lymphocyte homing. In this review, we first describe physiological lymphocyte homing mechanisms focusing on vascular addressins. We then describe HEV-like vessel-mediated pathogenesis seen in various chronic inflammatory disorders such as Helicobacter pylori gastritis, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), autoimmune pancreatitis and sclerosing sialadenitis, as well as chronic inflammatory cell neoplasm MALT lymphoma, with reference to our work and that of others.

  17. Depletion of macrophages in CD11b diphtheria toxin receptor mice induces brain inflammation and enhances inflammatory signaling during traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Frieler, Ryan A; Nadimpalli, Sameera; Boland, Lauren K; Xie, Angela; Kooistra, Laura J; Song, Jianrui; Chung, Yutein; Cho, Kae W; Lumeng, Carey N; Wang, Michael M; Mortensen, Richard M

    2015-10-22

    Immune cells have important roles during disease and are known to contribute to secondary, inflammation-induced injury after traumatic brain injury. To delineate the functional role of macrophages during traumatic brain injury, we depleted macrophages using transgenic CD11b-DTR mice and subjected them to controlled cortical impact. We found that macrophage depletion had no effect on lesion size assessed by T2-weighted MRI scans 28 days after injury. Macrophage depletion resulted in a robust increase in proinflammatory gene expression in both the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres after controlled cortical impact. Interestingly, this sizeable increase in inflammation did not affect lesion development. We also showed that macrophage depletion resulted in increased proinflammatory gene expression in the brain and kidney in the absence of injury. These data demonstrate that depletion of macrophages in CD11b-DTR mice can significantly modulate the inflammatory response during brain injury without affecting lesion formation. These data also reveal a potentially confounding inflammatory effect in CD11b-DTR mice that must be considered when interpreting the effects of macrophage depletion in disease models.

  18. Anti-inflammatory and anti-granuloma activity of Berberis aristata DC. in experimental models of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rohit; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar; Singh, Surender

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Berberis aristata (Berberidaceae) is an important medicinal plant used in traditional system of medicine for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory disorders. The aim of the present study is to scientifically validate the traditional use of BA in the treatment of inflammatory disorders. Materials and Methods: Anti-inflammatory and anti-granuloma activity of BA hydroalcoholic extract (BAHE) were evaluated in experimental models, viz., carrageenan-induced paw edema, cotton pellet-induced granuloma formation, and complete Freund's adjuvant-induced stimulation of peritoneal macrophages in rats. Expression of inflammatory mediators, viz., tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, TNF-R1, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was carried out in serum and peritoneal macrophages to derive the plausible mechanism of BAHE in activated peritoneal macrophages. Results: Pretreatment with BAHE produced a dose-dependent reduction (P < 0.01) in carrageenan-induced paw edema and cotton pellet-induced granuloma model. BAHE treatment produced significant (P < 0.01) reduction in serum inflammatory cytokine levels as compared to control. Protein expression of pro-inflammatory markers, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-R1, and COX-2, was found to be reduced in stimulated macrophages whereas anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, was upregulated in peritoneal macrophages. Conclusion: The result of the present study thus demonstrates the anti-inflammatory and anti-granuloma activity of BAHE which may be attributed to its inhibitory activity on macrophage-derived cytokine and mediators. PMID:27114638

  19. Immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effect of p-coumaric acid, a common dietary polyphenol on experimental inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Pragasam, Samuel Joshua; Venkatesan, Vijayalakshmi; Rasool, MahaboobKhan

    2013-02-01

    In this study, p-coumaric acid was evaluated for its immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties in vivo. The immunomodulatory effect of p-coumaric acid (100 mg/kg body weight) was assessed by evaluating its effect on cell-mediated immune responses (delayed type hypersensitivity reaction), serum immunoglobulin levels, and macrophage phagocytic index in rats. The anti-inflammatory effects of p-coumaric acid (100 mg/kg body weight) were investigated by examining its effect on expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) in synovial tissue by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and circulating immune complexes in serum of adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. The increased cell-mediated immune responses and macrophage phagocytic index observed in control rats were significantly reduced (p < 0.05) upon treatment with p-coumaric acid implying its immunosuppressive property, whereas serum immunoglobulin levels were found to be increased in p-coumaric acid treated control rats. p-coumaric acid also showed significant (p < 0.05) anti-inflammatory effects in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats by effecting a decrease in the expression of inflammatory mediator TNF-α and circulating immune complexes. Indomethacin was used as a reference drug for anti-inflammatory studies. Thus, our results show that p-coumaric acid could be considered a potential immunosuppressive agent in treating autoimmune inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Anti-inflammatory effects of essential oils extracted from Chamaecyparis obtusa on murine models of inflammation and RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Yujin; Yoo, Seung-Ah; Kim, Wan-Uk; Cho, Chul-Soo; Woo, Jong-Min; Yoon, Chong-Hyeon

    2016-04-01

    Antimicrobial, antifungal and anti-inflammatory effects of essential oils extracted from Chamaecyparis obtusa (EOCO) have previously been reported. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory effects of EOCO were investigated in two murine models of inflammation: Carrageenan-induced paw edema and thioglycollate-induced peritonitis, and in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. The expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines were analyzed by ELISA, the expression of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were determined by western blotting, and nitrite concentration was measured using Griess reagent. In mice with carrageenan-induced edema, paw thickness and the expression levels of interleukin (IL)‑1β and IL-6 in paw homogenates were significantly decreased in the EOCO (5 and 10 mg/kg) group, as compared with the control group. In mice with thioglycollate-induced peritonitis, treatment with EOCO (5 and 10 mg/kg) reduced the number of total cells and suppressed tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF‑α), IL‑1β and IL‑6 levels in peritoneal fluid. In addition, EOCO reduced nitric oxide, TNF‑α and IL‑6 production, and suppressed iNOS and COX‑2 expression in LPS‑stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. These results suggest that EOCO may exert anti‑inflammatory effects in vivo and in vitro, and that these effects may be associated with the inhibition of inflammatory mediators. Therefore, EOCO may be considered an effective therapeutic agent for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  1. AMPA/kainate glutamate receptors contribute to inflammation, degeneration and pain related behaviour in inflammatory stages of arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Cleo S; Williams, Anwen S; Gilbert, Sophie J; Harvey, Ann K; Evans, Bronwen A; Mason, Deborah J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Synovial fluid glutamate concentrations increase in arthritis. Activation of kainate (KA) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptors (GluRs) increase interleukin-6 (IL-6) release and cause arthritic pain, respectively. We hypothesised that AMPA and KA GluRs are expressed in human arthritis, and that intra-articular NBQX (AMPA/KA GluR antagonist) prevents pain and pathology in antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Methods GluR immunohistochemistry was related to synovial inflammation and degradation in osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A single intra-articular NBQX injection was given at induction, and knee swelling and gait of AIA and AIA+NBQX rats compared over 21 days, before imaging, RT-qPCR, histology and immunohistochemistry of joints. Effects of NBQX on human primary osteoblast (HOB) activity were determined. Results AMPAR2 and KA1 immunolocalised to remodelling bone, cartilage and synovial cells in human OA and RA, and rat AIA. All arthritic tissues showed degradation and synovial inflammation. NBQX reduced GluR abundance, knee swelling (p<0.001, days 1–21), gait abnormalities (days 1–2), end-stage joint destruction (p<0.001), synovial inflammation (p<0.001), and messenger RNA expression of meniscal IL-6 (p<0.05) and whole joint cathepsin K (p<0.01). X-ray and MRI revealed fewer cartilage and bone erosions, and less inflammation after NBQX treatment. NBQX reduced HOB number and prevented mineralisation. Conclusions AMPA/KA GluRs are expressed in human OA and RA, and in AIA, where a single intra-articular injection of NBQX reduced swelling by 33%, and inflammation and degeneration scores by 34% and 27%, respectively, exceeding the efficacy of approved drugs in the same model. AMPA/KA GluR antagonists represent a potential treatment for arthritis. PMID:24130267

  2. The Biochemical Origin of Pain – Proposing a new law of Pain: The origin of all Pain is Inflammation and the Inflammatory Response PART 1 of 3 – A unifying law of pain

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We are proposing a unifying theory or law of pain, which states: The origin of all pain is inflammation and the inflammatory response. The biochemical mediators of inflammation include cytokines, neuropeptides, growth factors and neurotransmitters. Irrespective of the type of pain whether it is acute or chronic pain, peripheral or central pain, nociceptive or neuropathic pain, the underlying origin is inflammation and the inflammatory response. Activation of pain receptors, transmission and modulation of pain signals, neuro plasticity and central sensitization are all one continuum of inflammation and the inflammatory response. Irrespective of the characteristic of the pain, whether it is sharp, dull, aching, burning, stabbing, numbing or tingling, all pain arise from inflammation and the inflammatory response. We are proposing a re-classification and treatment of pain syndromes based upon their inflammatory profile. Treatment of pain syndromes should be based on these principles: Determination of the inflammatory profile of the pain syndromeInhibition or suppression of production of the appropriate inflammatory mediators e.g. with inflammatory mediator blockers or surgical intervention where appropriateInhibition or suppression of neuronal afferent and efferent (motor) transmission e.g. with anti-seizure drugs or local anesthetic blocksModulation of neuronal transmission e.g. with opioid medication At the L.A. Pain Clinic, we have successfully treated a variety of pain syndromes by utilizing these principles. This theory of the biochemical origin of pain is compatible with, inclusive of, and unifies existing theories and knowledge of the mechanism of pain including the gate control theory, and theories of pre-emptive analgesia, windup and central sensitization. PMID:17240081

  3. The biochemical origin of pain--proposing a new law of pain: the origin of all pain is inflammation and the inflammatory response. Part 1 of 3--a unifying law of pain.

    PubMed

    Omoigui, Sota

    2007-01-01

    We are proposing a unifying theory or law of pain, which states: the origin of all pain is inflammation and the inflammatory response. The biochemical mediators of inflammation include cytokines, neuropeptides, growth factors and neurotransmitters. Irrespective of the type of pain whether it is acute or chronic pain, peripheral or central pain, nociceptive or neuropathic pain, the underlying origin is inflammation and the inflammatory response. Activation of pain receptors, transmission and modulation of pain signals, neuro plasticity and central sensitization are all one continuum of inflammation and the inflammatory response. Irrespective of the characteristic of the pain, whether it is sharp, dull, aching, burning, stabbing, numbing or tingling, all pain arise from inflammation and the inflammatory response. We are proposing a re-classification and treatment of pain syndromes based upon their inflammatory profile. Treatment of pain syndromes should be based on these principles: 1. Determination of the inflammatory profile of the pain syndrome; 2. Inhibition or suppression of production of the appropriate inflammatory mediators, e.g. with inflammatory mediator blockers or surgical intervention where appropriate; 3. Inhibition or suppression of neuronal afferent and efferent (motor) transmission, e.g. with anti-seizure drugs or local anesthetic blocks; 4. Modulation of neuronal transmission, e.g. with opioid medication. At the L.A. Pain Clinic, we have successfully treated a variety of pain syndromes by utilizing these principles. This theory of the biochemical origin of pain is compatible with, inclusive of, and unifies existing theories and knowledge of the mechanism of pain including the gate control theory, and theories of pre-emptive analgesia, windup and central sensitization.

  4. Molecular modeling of lectin-like protein from Acacia farnesiana reveals a possible anti-inflammatory mechanism in Carrageenan-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Abrantes, Vanessa Erika Ferreira; Matias da Rocha, Bruno Anderson; Batista da Nóbrega, Raphael; Silva-Filho, José Caetano; Teixeira, Claudener Souza; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Gadelha, Carlos Alberto de Almeida; Ferreira, Sergio Henrique; Figueiredo, Jozi Godoy; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Delatorre, Plinio

    2013-01-01

    Acacia farnesiana lectin-like protein (AFAL) is a chitin-binding protein and has been classified as phytohaemagglutinin from Phaseolus vulgaris (PHA). Legume lectins are examples for structural studies, and this family of proteins shows a remarkable conservation in primary, secondary, and tertiary structures. Lectins have ability to reduce the effects of inflammation caused by phlogistic agents, such as carrageenan (CGN). This paper explains the anti-inflammatory activity of AFAL through structural comparison with anti-inflammatory legume lectins. The AFAL model was obtained by molecular modeling and molecular docking with glycan and carrageenan were performed to explain the AFAL structural behavior and biological activity. Pisum sativum lectin was the best template for molecular modeling. The AFAL structure model is folded as a β sandwich. The model differs from template in loop regions, number of β strands and carbohydrate-binding site. Carrageenan and glycan bind to different sites on AFAL. The ability of AFAL binding to carrageenan can be explained by absence of the sixth β -strand (posterior β sheets) and two β strands in frontal region. AFAL can inhibit pathway inflammatory process by carrageenan injection by connecting to it and preventing its entry into the cell and triggers the reaction.

  5. Molecular Modeling of Lectin-Like Protein from Acacia farnesiana Reveals a Possible Anti-Inflammatory Mechanism in Carrageenan-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Abrantes, Vanessa Erika Ferreira; Matias da Rocha, Bruno Anderson; Batista da Nóbrega, Raphael; Silva-Filho, José Caetano; Teixeira, Claudener Souza; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Gadelha, Carlos Alberto de Almeida; Ferreira, Sergio Henrique; Figueiredo, Jozi Godoy; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Delatorre, Plinio

    2013-01-01

    Acacia farnesiana lectin-like protein (AFAL) is a chitin-binding protein and has been classified as phytohaemagglutinin from Phaseolus vulgaris (PHA). Legume lectins are examples for structural studies, and this family of proteins shows a remarkable conservation in primary, secondary, and tertiary structures. Lectins have ability to reduce the effects of inflammation caused by phlogistic agents, such as carrageenan (CGN). This paper explains the anti-inflammatory activity of AFAL through structural comparison with anti-inflammatory legume lectins. The AFAL model was obtained by molecular modeling and molecular docking with glycan and carrageenan were performed to explain the AFAL structural behavior and biological activity. Pisum sativum lectin was the best template for molecular modeling. The AFAL structure model is folded as a β sandwich. The model differs from template in loop regions, number of β strands and carbohydrate-binding site. Carrageenan and glycan bind to different sites on AFAL. The ability of AFAL binding to carrageenan can be explained by absence of the sixth β-strand (posterior β sheets) and two β strands in frontal region. AFAL can inhibit pathway inflammatory process by carrageenan injection by connecting to it and preventing its entry into the cell and triggers the reaction. PMID:24490151

  6. The Study of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Oil-Based Dill (Anethum graveolens L.) Extract Used Topically in Formalin-Induced Inflammation Male Rat Paw.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Mohsen; Mojab, Faraz; Khodadoost, Mahmood; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Davati, Ali; Choopani, Rasol; Hasheminejad, Abbas; Bararpoor, Zahra; Shariatpanahi, Shamsa; Emtiazy, Majid

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is one of the symptoms of many common and harmful diseases. As it is incurable through chemical drugs, the study on this ailment using new methods and drugs seems necessary. In addition, the adverse effects of the present anti-inflammatory drugs like NSAIDS and Glucocorticoid appeared in the long time use make such study more demanded. Accordingly, in this study we examined the effects of aerial organs' extract and seed of a plant commonly used in Iranian traditional medicine named Dill on the inflammation caused by plantar injection of formalin in rats and compared them with Diclofenac-gel. One of the methods used for the inflammation assessment is injecting formalin in the rat paw and then measuring the paw volume by the new plethysmometer (weighing method). The assessment is done at a specific time on day for 8 days and then recorded. This study includes 3 groups of 6 male rats: Formalin, Dill-Oil and Diclofenac-gel groups. The Dill-Oil group received 2 g of Dill-Oil, containing 100 mg Dill-extract and the Diclofenac group received 2 g gel containing, 20 mg Diclofenac Na. Data were analyzed with SPSS 17 using ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, and Repeated-Measures. The average paw volumes changes in these groups after Formalin-induced inflammation on 1st day, were 0.31 (standard error (SEM) = 0.02), 0.30 (SEM = 0.01) and 0.32 (SEM = 0.05) respectively, with no significant difference. Regarding the peak of inflammation on the 2nd day, it was indicated that the average inflammations in Formalin, Dill-Oil and Diclofenac-gel groups were 0.44 (SEM = 0.03), 0.15 (SEM = 0.04) and 0.36 (SEM = 0.08), respectively. The paw volume changes in groups receiving Dill-oil and Diclofenac-gel, after the daily formalin injection in 8 days compared to the blank group, had a significant decrease (p < 0.001). The Dill group showed even more decrease in the paw volume compared to the Diclofenac one. The results of paw volume measurement analyzed by the Plethysmometer manifest that

  7. Association of terpinolene and diclofenac presents antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory synergistic effects in a model of chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, E.M.A.; Santos, W.C.; Sousa, B.P.; Lopes, E.M.; Piauilino, C.A.; Cunha, F.V.M.; Sousa, D.P.; Oliveira, F.A.; Almeida, F.R.C.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment of inflammatory pain is usually done by administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). These drugs present high efficacy, although side effects are common, especially gastrointestinal lesions. One of the pharmacological strategies to minimize such effects is the combination of drugs and natural products with synergistic analgesic effect. The monoterpene terpinolene (TPL) is a chemical constituent of essential oils present in many plant species, which have pharmacological activities, such as analgesic and anti-inflammatory. The association of ineffective doses of TPL and diclofenac (DCF) (3.125 and 1.25 mg/kg po, respectively) presented antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in the acute (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 h, after treatment) and chronic (10 days) inflammatory hyperalgesia induced by Freund's complete adjuvant (CFA) in the right hind paw of female Wistar rats (170-230 g, n=6-8). The mechanical hyperalgesia was assessed by the Randall Selitto paw pressure test, which determines the paw withdrawal thresholds. The development of edema was quantified by measuring the volume of the hind paw by plethismography. The TPL/DCF association reduced neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes in the histological analysis of the paw, following a standard staining protocol with hematoxylin and eosin and the counts were performed with the aid of optical microscopy after chronic oral administration of these drugs. Moreover, the TPL/DCF association did not induce macroscopic gastric lesions. A possible mechanism of action of the analgesic effect is the involvement of 5-HT2A serotonin receptors, because ketanserin completely reversed the antinociceptive effect of the TPL/DCF association. These results suggest that the TPL/DCF association had a synergistic anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect without causing apparent gastric injury, and that the serotonergic system may be involved in the antinociceptive effect of this association

  8. Association of terpinolene and diclofenac presents antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory synergistic effects in a model of chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Macedo, E M A; Santos, W C; Sousa, B P; Lopes, E M; Piauilino, C A; Cunha, F V M; Sousa, D P; Oliveira, F A; Almeida, F R C

    2016-06-20

    Pharmacological treatment of inflammatory pain is usually done by administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). These drugs present high efficacy, although side effects are common, especially gastrointestinal lesions. One of the pharmacological strategies to minimize such effects is the combination of drugs and natural products with synergistic analgesic effect. The monoterpene terpinolene (TPL) is a chemical constituent of essential oils present in many plant species, which have pharmacological activities, such as analgesic and anti-inflammatory. The association of ineffective doses of TPL and diclofenac (DCF) (3.125 and 1.25 mg/kg po, respectively) presented antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in the acute (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 h, after treatment) and chronic (10 days) inflammatory hyperalgesia induced by Freund's complete adjuvant (CFA) in the right hind paw of female Wistar rats (170-230 g, n=6-8). The mechanical hyperalgesia was assessed by the Randall Selitto paw pressure test, which determines the paw withdrawal thresholds. The development of edema was quantified by measuring the volume of the hind paw by plethismography. The TPL/DCF association reduced neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes in the histological analysis of the paw, following a standard staining protocol with hematoxylin and eosin and the counts were performed with the aid of optical microscopy after chronic oral administration of these drugs. Moreover, the TPL/DCF association did not induce macroscopic gastric lesions. A possible mechanism of action of the analgesic effect is the involvement of 5-HT2A serotonin receptors, because ketanserin completely reversed the antinociceptive effect of the TPL/DCF association. These results suggest that the TPL/DCF association had a synergistic anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect without causing apparent gastric injury, and that the serotonergic system may be involved in the antinociceptive effect of this association.

  9. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-Induced Recruitment of Inflammatory Mononuclear Cells Leads to Inflammation and Altered Brain Development in Murine Cytomegalovirus-Infected Newborn Mice.

    PubMed

    Seleme, Maria C; Kosmac, Kate; Jonjic, Stipan; Britt, William J

    2017-04-15

    mouse model that recapitulates characteristics of the brain infection described in human infants, we have shown that TNF-α plays a key role in brain inflammation, including recruitment of inflammatory mononuclear cells. Neutralization of TNF-α normalized neurodevelopmental abnormalities in infected mice, providing evidence that virus-induced inflammation is a major component of disease in the developing brain. These results suggest that interventions limiting inflammation associated with the infection could potentially improve the neurologic outcome of infants infected in utero with HCMV.

  10. Anti-inflammatory Activity of Berry Fruits in Mice Model of Inflammation is Based on Oxidative Stress Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Nardi, Geisson Marcos; Farias Januario, Adriana Graziele; Freire, Cassio Geremia; Megiolaro, Fernanda; Schneider, Kétlin; Perazzoli, Marlene Raimunda Andreola; Do Nascimento, Scheley Raap; Gon, Ana Cristina; Mariano, Luísa Nathália Bolda; Wagner, Glauber; Niero, Rivaldo; Locatelli, Claudriana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many fruits have been used as nutraceuticals because the presence of bioactive molecules that play biological activities. Objective: The present study was designed to compare the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of methanolic extracts of Lycium barbarum (GOJI), Vaccinium macrocarpon (CRAN) and Vaccinium myrtillus (BLUE). Materials and Methods: Mices were treated with extracts (50 and 200 mg/kg, p.o.), twice a day through 10 days. Phytochemical analysis was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Antioxidant activity was determine by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, reducing power, lipid peroxidation thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), reduced glutathione (GSH) and catalase (CAT) activity. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by paw edema followed by determination of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and TBARS. Results: High amount of phenolic compounds, including rutin, were identified in all berries extracts. However, quercetin was observed only in BLUE and CRAN. GOJI presents higher scavenging activity of DPPH radical and reducing power than BLUE and CRAN. The extracts improved antioxidant status in liver; BLUE showed the largest reduction (75.3%) in TBARS when compared to CRAN (70.7%) and GOJI (65.3%). Nonetheless, CAT activity was lower in BLUE group. However, hepatic concentrations of GSH were higher in animals treated with GOJI rather than CRAN and BLUE. Despite all fruits caused a remarkable reduction in paw edema and TBARS, only BLUE and CRAN were able to reduce MPO. Conclusion: These results suggest that quercetin, rutin, or other phenolic compound found in these berry fruits extracts could produce an anti-inflammatory response based on modulation of oxidative stress in paw edema model. SUMMARY Within fruits broadly consumed because of its nutraceuticals properties include, Lycium barbarum (Goji berry), Vaccinium myrtillus (Blueberry or Bilberry) and Vaccinium macrocarpon (Cranberry)The objectives of this

  11. Evidence of different mediators of central inflammation in dysfunctional and inflammatory pain — Interleukin-8 in fibromyalgia and interleukin-1 β in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kosek, Eva; Altawil, Reem; Kadetoff, Diana; Finn, Anja; Westman, Marie; Le Maître, Erwan; Andersson, Magnus; Jensen-Urstad, Mats; Lampa, Jon

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to relate central inflammation to autonomic activity (heart rate variability (HRV)) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and fibromyalgia (FM). RA patients had reduced parasympathetic activity and FM patients had increased sympathetic activity compared to healthy controls. Comparisons between RA and FM showed higher cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) interleukin (IL)-1β inversely correlated to parasympathetic activity in RA. The FM patients had higher concentrations of CSF IL-8, IL-1Ra, IL-4 and IL-10, but none of these cytokines correlated with HRV. In conclusion, we found different profiles of central cytokines, i.e., elevated IL-1β in inflammatory pain (RA) and elevated IL-8 in dysfunctional pain (FM). PMID:25773155

  12. 99th Dahlem conference on infection, inflammation and chronic inflammatory disorders: the normal gut microbiota in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Bäckhed, F

    2010-04-01

    Mammals are metagenomic, in that they are composed not only of their own genome but also those of all of their associated microbes (microbiome). Individual variations in the microbiome influence host health and may be implicated in disease aetiology. Therefore, it is not surprising that decreased microbial diversity is associated with both obesity and inflammatory bowel disease. Studies in germ-free mice have demonstrated that the gut microbiota is required for development of diet-induced obesity as well as inflammatory diseases. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) for how the gut microbiota causes metabolic diseases is only beginning to be clarified. Furthermore, emerging data suggest that the gut microbiota may predispose or protect against other important diseases such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

  13. ApoE deficiency promotes colon inflammation and enhances the inflammatory potential of oxidized-LDL and TNF-α in primary colon epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    El-Bahrawy, Ali H.; Tarhuni, Abdelmetalab; Kim, Hogyoung; Subramaniam, Venkat; Benslimane, Ilyes; Elmajeed, Zakaria Y. Abd; Okpechi, Samuel C.; Ghonim, Mohamed A.; Hemeida, Ramadan A.M.; Abo-yousef, Amira M.; El-Sherbiny, Gamal A.; Abdel-Raheem, Ihab T.; Kim, Jong; Naura, Amarjit S.; Boulares, A. Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Although deficiency in Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is linked to many diseases, its effect on colon homoeostasis remains unknown. ApoE appears to control inflammation by regulating nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). The present study was designed to examine whether ApoE deficiency affects factors of colon integrity in vivo and given the likelihood that ApoE deficiency increases oxidized lipids and TNF-α, the present study also examined whether such deficiency enhances the inflammatory potential of oxidized-LDL (oxLDL) and TNF-α in colon epithelial cells (CECs), in vitro. Here we show that ApoE deficiency is associated with chronic inflammation systemically and in colonic tissues as assessed by TNF-α levels. Increased colon TNF-α mRNA coincided with a substantial increase in cyclooxygenase (COX)-2. ApoE deficiency enhanced the potential of oxLDL and TNF-α to induce COX-2 expression as well as several other inflammatory factors in primary CECs. Interestingly, oxLDL enhanced TGF-β expression only in ApoE−/−, but not in wild-type, epithelial cells. ApoE deficiency appears to promote COX-2 expression enhancement through a mechanism that involves persistent NF-κB nuclear localization and PI3 and p38 MAP kinases but independently of Src. In mice, ApoE deficiency promoted a moderate increase in crypt length, which was associated with opposing effects of an increase in cell proliferation and apoptosis at the bottom and top of the crypt respectively. Our results support the notion that ApoE plays a central role in colon homoeostasis and that ApoE deficiency may constitute a risk factor for colon pathologies. PMID:27538678

  14. Oral anti-inflammatory activity of cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive constituent of cannabis, in acute carrageenan-induced inflammation in the rat paw.

    PubMed

    Costa, Barbara; Colleoni, Mariapia; Conti, Silvia; Parolaro, Daniela; Franke, Chiara; Trovato, Anna Elisa; Giagnoni, Gabriella

    2004-03-01

    Cannabidiol, the major non-psychoactive component of marijuana, has various pharmacological actions of clinical interest. It is reportedly effective as an anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic in murine collagen-induced arthritis. The present study examined the anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperalgesic effects of cannabidiol, administered orally (5-40 mg/kg) once a day for 3 days after the onset of acute inflammation induced by intraplantar injection of 0.1 ml carrageenan (1% w/v in saline) in the rat. At the end of the treatment prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was assayed in the plasma, and cyclooxygenase (COX) activity, production of nitric oxide (NO; nitrite/nitrate content), and of other oxygen-derived free radicals (malondialdehyde) in inflamed paw tissues. All these markers were significantly increased following carrageenan. Thermal hyperalgesia, induced by carrageenan and assessed by the plantar test, lasted 7 h. Cannabidiol had a time- and dose-dependent anti-hyperalgesic effect after a single injection. Edema following carrageenan peaked at 3 h and lasted 72 h; a single dose of cannabidiol reduced edema in a dose-dependent fashion and subsequent daily doses caused further time- and dose-related reductions. There were decreases in PGE2 plasma levels, tissue COX activity, production of oxygen-derived free radicals, and NO after three doses of cannabidiol. The effect on NO seemed to depend on a lower expression of the endothelial isoform of NO synthase. In conclusion, oral cannabidiol has a beneficial action on two symptoms of established inflammation: edema and hyperalgesia.

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of Tat-Annexin protein on ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sun Hwa; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Hye Ri; Woo, Su Jung; Kim, So Mi; Jo, Hyo Sang; Jeon, Seong Gyu; Cho, Sung-Woo; Park, Jong Hoon; Won, Moo Ho; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We construct a cell permeable Tat-ANX1 fusion protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined the protective effects of Tat-ANX1 protein on OVA-induced asthma in animal models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transduced Tat-ANX1 protein protects from the OVA-induced production of cytokines and eosinophils in BAL fluid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tat-ANX1 protein markedly reduced OVA-induced MAPK in lung tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tat-ANX1 protein could be useful as a therapeutic agent for lung disorders including asthma. -- Abstract: Chronic airway inflammation is a key feature of bronchial asthma. Annexin-1 (ANX1) is an anti-inflammatory protein that is an important modulator and plays a key role in inflammation. Although the precise action of ANX1 remains unclear, it has emerged as a potential drug target for inflammatory diseases such as asthma. To examine the protective effects of ANX1 protein on ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma in animal models, we used a cell-permeable Tat-ANX1 protein. Mice sensitized and challenged with OVA antigen had an increased amount of cytokines and eosinophils in their bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. However, administration of Tat-ANX1 protein before OVA challenge significantly decreased the levels of cytokines (interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and IL-13) and BAL fluid in lung tissues. Furthermore, OVA significantly increased the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in lung tissues, whereas Tat-ANX1 protein markedly reduced phosphorylation of MAPKs such as extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase, p38, and stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase. These results suggest that transduced Tat-ANX1 protein may be a potential protein therapeutic agent for the treatment of lung disorders including asthma.

  16. Suppression of Transglutaminase-2 is Involved in Anti-Inflammatory Actions of Glucosamine in 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-Acetate-Induced Skin Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun A; Lee, Hye Ja; Lee, Eun Ji; Kang, June Hee; Kim, You Lee; Kim, Hyun Ji; Oh, Seung Hyun; Choi, Changsun; Lee, Ho; Kim, Soo Youl

    2012-01-01

    Glucosamine (GS) is well known for the treatment of inflam-mation. However, the mechanism and efficacy of GS for skin inflammation are unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects and mechanism of GS in the mouse 12-O-tetradecanoyl 13-acetate (TPA)-induced ear edema model. TPA-induced ear edema was evoked in ICR or transglutaminase 2 (Tgase-2) (-/-) mice. GS was administered orally (10-100 mg/kg) or topically (0.5-2.0 w/v %) prior to TPA treatment. Orally administered GS at 10 mg/kg showed a 76 or 57% reduction in ear weight or myeloperoxidase, respectively, and a decreased expression of cyclooxy-genase-2 (COX-2), NF-κB and Tgase-2 in TPA-induced ear edema by western blot and immunohistochemistry. Role of Tgase-2 in TPA ear edema is examined using Tgase-2 (-/-) mice and TPA did not induce COX-2 expression in ear of Tgase-2 (-/-) mice. These observations suggested that Tgase-2 is involved in TPA-induced COX-2 expression in the inflamed ear of mice and anti-inflammatory effects of glucosamine is mediated through suppression of Tgase-2 in TPA ear edema. PMID:24009824

  17. Protective Effect of Bioactivity Guided Fractions of Ziziphus jujuba Mill. Root Bark against Hepatic Injury and Chronic Inflammation via Inhibiting Inflammatory Markers and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kandimalla, Raghuram; Dash, Suvakanta; Kalita, Sanjeeb; Choudhury, Bhaswati; Malampati, Sandeep; Kalita, Kasturi; Kalita, Bhupalee; Devi, Rajlakshmi; Kotoky, Jibon

    2016-01-01

    The tribal communities of North Eastern India rely on herbal medicine to cure various disease conditions. Ziziphus jujuba Mill. (Rhamnaceae) is one of such medicinal plants used for curing liver ailments, insomnia, anemia, diarrhea, diabetic complications, cancer, and loss of appetite. The present study was aimed to describe the protective ability of Z. jujuba root bark (ZJRB) against hepatic injury and chronic inflammation. Bioactivity guided fractionation of Z. jujuba methanol extract (ZJME) was performed using different solvents of increasing polarity viz. hexane (ZJHF), chloroform (ZJCF), ethyl acetate (ZJEAF), water (ZJWF), and residue (ZJMR). In vitro antioxidant results revealed that both ZJME and ZJWF possess strong antioxidant activity among all the fractions and mother extract tested. Further, ZJME and ZJWF showed significant protection against CCl4 intoxicated HepG2 cell lines by means of increased cell viability and decreased LDH levels compared to control group. ZJME at 200, 400 mg/kg and ZJWF at 50, 100 mg/kg inhibited the lipid peroxidation and significantly restored the liver function markers (AST, ALT, ALP, LDH, SOD, and CAT) and cytokine levels (TNF-α, Il-1β, and Il-10) in CCl4 induced acute liver damage in rats. All the results were comparable with standard drug silymarin which was further confirmed by histopathology analysis of liver. Similarly, inflammation and increase inflammatory cytokines levels of carrageenan induced paw edema in rats have been refurbished to normal levels on par with the standard drug indomethacin. ZJWF demonstrated potent response than ZJME in all the biological tests conducted. The results of the study signify the ability of ZJRB as good therapeutic agent for liver toxicity and chronic inflammation. PMID:27656145

  18. NS6180, a new KCa3.1 channel inhibitor prevents T-cell activation and inflammation in a rat model of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Strøbæk, D; Brown, DT; Jenkins, DP; Chen, Y-J; Coleman, N; Ando, Y; Chiu, P; Jørgensen, S; Demnitz, J; Wulff, H; Christophersen, P

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The KCa3.1 channel is a potential target for therapy of immune disease. We identified a compound from a new chemical class of KCa3.1 inhibitors and assessed in vitro and in vivo inhibition of immune responses. Experimental Approach We characterized the benzothiazinone NS6180 (4-[[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]methyl]-2H-1,4-benzothiazin-3(4H)-one) with respect to potency and molecular site of action on KCa3.1 channels, selectivity towards other targets, effects on T-cell activation as well as pharmacokinetics and inflammation control in colitis induced by 2,4-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid, a rat model of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Key Results NS6180 inhibited cloned human KCa3.1 channels (IC50 = 9 nM) via T250 and V275, the same amino acid residues conferring sensitivity to triarylmethanes such as like TRAM-34. NS6180 inhibited endogenously expressed KCa3.1 channels in human, mouse and rat erythrocytes, with similar potencies (15–20 nM). NS6180 suppressed rat and mouse splenocyte proliferation at submicrolar concentrations and potently inhibited IL-2 and IFN-γ production, while exerting smaller effects on IL-4 and TNF-α and no effect on IL-17 production. Antibody staining showed KCa3.1 channels in healthy colon and strong up-regulation in association with infiltrating immune cells after induction of colitis. Despite poor plasma exposure, NS6180 (3 and 10 mg·kg−1 b.i.d.) dampened colon inflammation and improved body weight gain as effectively as the standard IBD drug sulfasalazine (300 mg·kg−1 q.d.). Conclusions and Implications NS6180 represents a novel class of KCa3.1 channel inhibitors which inhibited experimental colitis, suggesting KCa3.1 channels as targets for pharmacological control of intestinal inflammation. PMID:22891655

  19. Suppression of molecular inflammatory pathways by Toll-like receptor 7, 8, and 9 antagonists in a model of IL-23-induced skin inflammation.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Arbeit, Robert; Jiang, Weiwen; Ortenzio, Francesca S; Sullivan, Tim; Krueger, James G

    2013-01-01

    Psoriasis is a complex inflammatory disease resulting from the activation of T helper (Th) 1 and Th17 cells. Recent evidence suggests that abnormal activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 7, 8 and 9 contributes to the initiation and maintenance of psoriasis. We have evaluated the effects of TLR antagonists on the gene expression profile in an IL-23-induced skin inflammation model in mice. Psoriasis-like skin lesions were induced in C57BL/6 mice by intradermal injection of IL-23 in the dorsum. Two TLR antagonists were compared: IMO-3100, an antagonist of TLRs 7 and 9, and IMO-8400, an antagonist of TLRs 7, 8 and 9, both of which previously have been shown to reduce epidermal hyperplasia in this model. Skin gene expression profiles of IL-23-induced inflammation were compared with or without TLR antagonist treatment. IL-23 injection resulted in alteration of 5100 gene probes (fold change ≥ 2, FDR < 0.05) including IL-17 pathways that are up-regulated in psoriasis vulgaris. Targeting TLRs 7, 8 and 9 with IMO-8400 resulted in modulation of more than 2300 mRNAs while targeting TLRs 7 and 9 with IMO-3100 resulted in modulation of more than 1900 mRNAs. Both agents strongly decreased IL-17A expression (>12-fold reduction), normalized IL-17 induced genes such as beta-defensin and CXCL1, and normalized aberrant expression of keratin 16 (indicating epidermal hyperplasia). These results suggest that IL-23-driven inflammation in mouse skin may be dependent on signaling mediated by TLRs 7, 8, and 9 and that these receptors represent novel therapeutic targets in psoriasis vulgaris and other diseases with similar pathophysiology.

  20. The Role of Chlamydia trachomatis Polymorphic Membrane Proteins in Inflammation and Sequelae among Women with Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Brandie D.; Darville, Toni; Tan, Chun; Bavoil, Patrik M.; Ness, Roberta B.; Haggerty, Catherine L.

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis polymorphic membrane proteins (Pmps) may increase genital tract inflammation and play a role in virulence. Antibody levels for PmpA, PmpD, and PmpI, measured in densitometric units, were assessed among a pilot sample of 40 C. trachomatis-infected women with mild-to-moderate clinical PID. Women who expressed antibodies to PmpA were less likely to achieve pregnancy (40.0% versus 85.7%; P = 0.042) and less likely to have a live birth (0.0% versus 80.0%; P = 0.005) compared to women who did not express antibody to PmpA. Women who expressed antibodies to PmpI were more likely to have upper genital tract infection (61.5% versus 20.0%; P = 0.026). However, seropositivity to PmpI and PmpD did not modify the risk of reproductive sequelae or inflammation. Seropositivity to chlamydial PmpA may represent a biomarker of increased risk of sequelae secondary to infection with C. trachomatis. PMID:22028586

  1. The role of Chlamydia trachomatis polymorphic membrane proteins in inflammation and sequelae among women with pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Brandie D; Darville, Toni; Tan, Chun; Bavoil, Patrik M; Ness, Roberta B; Haggerty, Catherine L

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis polymorphic membrane proteins (Pmps) may increase genital tract inflammation and play a role in virulence. Antibody levels for PmpA, PmpD, and PmpI, measured in densitometric units, were assessed among a pilot sample of 40 C. trachomatis-infected women with mild-to-moderate clinical PID. Women who expressed antibodies to PmpA were less likely to achieve pregnancy (40.0% versus 85.7%; P = 0.042) and less likely to have a live birth (0.0% versus 80.0%; P = 0.005) compared to women who did not express antibody to PmpA. Women who expressed antibodies to PmpI were more likely to have upper genital tract infection (61.5% versus 20.0%; P = 0.026). However, seropositivity to PmpI and PmpD did not modify the risk of reproductive sequelae or inflammation. Seropositivity to chlamydial PmpA may represent a biomarker of increased risk of sequelae secondary to infection with C. trachomatis.

  2. Does Inflammation Mediate the Obesity and BPH Relationship? An Epidemiologic Analysis of Body Composition and Inflammatory Markers in Blood, Urine, and Prostate Tissue, and the Relationship with Prostate Enlargement and Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Fowke, Jay H.; Koyama, Tatsuki; Fadare, Oluwole; Clark, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    Background BPH is a common disease associated with age and obesity. However, the biological pathways between obesity and BPH are unknown. Our objective was to investigate biomarkers of systemic and prostate tissue inflammation as potential mediators of the obesity and BPH association. Methods Participants included 191 men without prostate cancer at prostate biopsy. Trained staff measured weight, height, waist and hip circumferences, and body composition by bioelectric impedance analysis. Systemic inflammation was estimated by serum IL-6, IL-1β, IL-8, and TNF-α; and by urinary prostaglandin E2 metabolite (PGE-M), F2-isoprostane (F2iP), and F2-isoprostane metabolite (F2iP-M) levels. Prostate tissue was scored for grade, aggressiveness, extent, and location of inflammatory regions, and also stained for CD3 and CD20 positive lymphocytes. Analyses investigated the association between multiple body composition scales, systemic inflammation, and prostate tissue inflammation against BPH outcomes, including prostate size at ultrasound and LUTS severity by the AUA-symptom index (AUA-SI). Results Prostate size was significantly associated with all obesity measures. For example, prostate volume was 5.5 to 9.0 mls larger comparing men in the 25th vs. 75th percentile of % body fat, fat mass (kg) or lean mass (kg). However, prostate size was not associated with proinflammatory cytokines, PGE-M, F2iP, F2iP-M, prostate tissue inflammation scores or immune cell infiltration. In contrast, the severity of prostate tissue inflammation was significantly associated with LUTS, such that there was a 7 point difference in AUA-SI between men with mild vs. severe inflammation (p = 0.004). Additionally, men with a greater waist-hip ratio (WHR) were significantly more likely to have severe prostate tissue inflammation (p = 0.02), and a high WHR was significantly associated with moderate/severe LUTS (OR = 2.56, p = 0.03) among those participants with prostate tissue inflammation. Conclusion

  3. S-Propargyl-Cysteine, a Novel Hydrogen Sulfide Donor, Inhibits Inflammatory Hepcidin and Relieves Anemia of Inflammation by Inhibiting IL-6/STAT3 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hong; Zhu, Yi Zhun

    2016-01-01

    Anemia of inflammation (AI) is clinically prevalent and greatly threatens public health. Traditional remedies have raised controversy during clinical practice, calling for alternative therapies. We have recently found that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) inhibits inflammatory hepcidin, the critical mediator of AI. However, due to the chemical property of H2S, there remains an urgent need for a stable H2S donor in AI treatment. Here we reported that S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC), a novel water-soluble H2S donor, suppressed hepatic hepcidin and corrected hypoferremia induced by lipopolysaccharide. The effects of SPRC were reversed by inhibition of cystathionine γ-lyase, one of the major endogenous H2S synthases. Moreover, SPRC reduced serum hepcidin, improved transferrin saturation, and maintained erythrocyte membrane integrity in a chronic mouse AI model. Consistently, splenomegaly was ameliorated and splenic iron accumulation relieved. Mechanism study indicated that serum IL-6 content and hepatic Il-6 mRNA were decreased by SPRC, in parallel with reduced hepatic JAK2/STAT3 activation. On the whole, our data reveal the inhibition of inflammatory hepcidin by SPRC, and suggest SPRC as a potential remedy against AI. PMID:27649298

  4. Beneficial effects of treatment with transglutaminase inhibitor cystamine on the severity of inflammation in a rat model of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Elli, Luca; Ciulla, Michele M; Busca, Giuseppe; Roncoroni, Leda; Maioli, Claudio; Ferrero, Stefano; Bardella, Maria Teresa; Bonura, Antonella; Paliotti, Roberta; Terrani, Claudia; Braidotti, Paola

    2011-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) represents a socially and clinically relevant disorder, characterized by intestinal chronic inflammation. Cystamine (CysN) is a multipotent molecule with healthy effects and, moreover, it is an inhibitor of transglutaminases (TGs), including the TG type 2 (TG2), an enzyme with pleiotropic functions, involved in different pathways of inflammation and central in the pathogenesis of some human disorders as the IBD. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of CysN in an IBD rat model. A total of 30 rats were divided into 4 groups: controls without treatment (CTR; n=7); receiving the 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid enema (TNBS group; n=8); treated with TNBS enema plus oral CysN (TNBS-CysN group; n=8); treated with CysN (CysN group; n=7). After killing, bowel inflammation was evaluated applying specific scores. TG activity, TG2 and isopeptide bond immunohistochemical expression, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were evaluated in the colonic tissue, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) serological levels (ELISA). TG2 was also evaluated on the luminal side of the colon by immunoautoradiography. Colonic samples from IBD patients were compared with animal results. TNBS-CysN group developed a less severe colitis compared with the TNBS group (macroscopic score 0.43±0.78 vs 3.28±0.95, microscopic score 6.62±12.01 vs 19.25±6.04, P<0.05, respectively) associated with a decrease of TG activity, TG2 and isopeptide bond immunohistochemical expression, TNF-α and IL-6 levels. No statistically significant differences were found between CysN and CTR groups. The colonic immunolocalization of TG2 was comparable in humans affected by IBD and TNBS-administered animals. This is the first demonstration that treatment with a CysN has an anti-inflammatory effect, reducing severity of colitis in a rat model. CysN could be tested as a possible treatment or co-treatment in IBD therapeutic trials.

  5. Dietary Enrichment with 20% Fish Oil Decreases Mucus Production and the Inflammatory Response in Mice with Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jean A.; Hartman, Jaye; Skinner, Monica M.; Schwindt, Adam R.; Fischer, Kay A.; Vorachek, William R.; Bobe, Gerd; Valentine, Beth A.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma has increased in recent decades, which may be related to higher dietary intake of (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and lower intake of (n-3) PUFA, e.g., those contained in fish oil. The objective of this study was to determine if dietary PUFA enrichment decreases mucus production or the inflammatory response associated with ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic lung inflammation. Mice (n = 10/group) were fed control, 20% fish oil, or 20% corn oil enriched diets for a total of 12 weeks. At 8 and 10 weeks, mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of saline (10 control-fed mice) or OVA (30 remaining mice). Once at 10 weeks and on 3 consecutive days during week 12, mice were challenged by nebulizing with saline or OVA. Mice were euthanized 24 hours after the last challenge and blood was collected for plasma FA analysis. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was collected to determine cell composition and Th2-type cytokine (IL-4, IL-13) concentrations. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) + mucus-producing cells and CD45+ inflammatory cell infiltrates in lung tissue were quantified using morphometric analysis. Relative abundance of mRNA for mucin (Muc4, Muc5ac, and Muc5b) and Th2-type cytokine (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) genes were compared with ß-actin by qPCR. Supplementation with either corn oil or fish oil effectively altered plasma FA profiles towards more (n-6) FA or (n-3) FA, respectively (P < 0.0001). Sensitization and challenge with OVA increased the proportion of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils, and decreased the proportion of macrophages and concentrations of IL-13 in BAL fluid; increased the percentage of PAS+ mucus-producing cells and CD45+ inflammatory cell infiltrates in lung tissue; and increased gene expression of mucins (Muc4, Muc5ac, and Muc5b) and Th2-type cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13) in lung tissue of control-fed mice. Dietary PUFA reversed the increase in PAS+ mucus-producing cells (P = 0.003). In addition, dietary

  6. Dietary Enrichment with 20% Fish Oil Decreases Mucus Production and the Inflammatory Response in Mice with Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Lung Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jean A; Hartman, Jaye; Skinner, Monica M; Schwindt, Adam R; Fischer, Kay A; Vorachek, William R; Bobe, Gerd; Valentine, Beth A

    The prevalence of asthma has increased in recent decades, which may be related to higher dietary intake of (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and lower intake of (n-3) PUFA, e.g., those contained in fish oil. The objective of this study was to determine if dietary PUFA enrichment decreases mucus production or the inflammatory response associated with ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic lung inflammation. Mice (n = 10/group) were fed control, 20% fish oil, or 20% corn oil enriched diets for a total of 12 weeks. At 8 and 10 weeks, mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of saline (10 control-fed mice) or OVA (30 remaining mice). Once at 10 weeks and on 3 consecutive days during week 12, mice were challenged by nebulizing with saline or OVA. Mice were euthanized 24 hours after the last challenge and blood was collected for plasma FA analysis. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was collected to determine cell composition and Th2-type cytokine (IL-4, IL-13) concentrations. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) + mucus-producing cells and CD45+ inflammatory cell infiltrates in lung tissue were quantified using morphometric analysis. Relative abundance of mRNA for mucin (Muc4, Muc5ac, and Muc5b) and Th2-type cytokine (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) genes were compared with ß-actin by qPCR. Supplementation with either corn oil or fish oil effectively altered plasma FA profiles towards more (n-6) FA or (n-3) FA, respectively (P < 0.0001). Sensitization and challenge with OVA increased the proportion of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils, and decreased the proportion of macrophages and concentrations of IL-13 in BAL fluid; increased the percentage of PAS+ mucus-producing cells and CD45+ inflammatory cell infiltrates in lung tissue; and increased gene expression of mucins (Muc4, Muc5ac, and Muc5b) and Th2-type cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13) in lung tissue of control-fed mice. Dietary PUFA reversed the increase in PAS+ mucus-producing cells (P = 0.003). In addition, dietary

  7. Defining the therapeutic time window for suppressing the inflammatory prostaglandin E2 signaling after status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yifeng; Kemper, Timothy; Qiu, Jiange; Jiang, Jianxiong

    2016-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a common feature in nearly all neurological and some psychiatric disorders. Resembling its extraneural counterpart, neuroinflammation can be both beneficial and detrimental depending on the responding molecules. The overall effect of inflammation on disease progression is highly dependent on the extent of inflammatory mediator production and the duration of inflammatory induction. The time-dependent aspect of inflammatory responses suggests that the therapeutic time window for quelling neuroinflammation might vary with molecular targets and injury types. Therefore, it is important to define the therapeutic time window for anti-inflammatory therapeutics, as contradicting or negative results might arise when different treatment regimens are utilized even in similar animal models. Herein, we discuss a few critical factors that can help define the therapeutic time window and optimize treatment paradigm for suppressing the cyclooxygenase-2/prostaglandin-mediated inflammation after status epilepticus. These determinants should also be relevant to other anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategies for the CNS diseases. PMID:26689339

  8. Anti-inflammatory and chondroprotective effects of nutraceuticals from Sasha's Blend in a cartilage explant model of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Wendy; Orth, Michael W; Karrow, Niel A; Maclusky, Neil J; Lindinger, Michael I

    2007-08-01

    New Zealand green lipped mussel (NZGLM), abalone (AB), and shark cartilage (SC) are extensively used for treatment of and/or as preventatives for arthritis, despite a relative paucity of scientific evidence for efficacy. This research integrated a simulated digestion protocol with ultrafiltration and cartilage explants to generate new information on the anti-inflammatory and chondroprotective properties of NZGLM, SC, and AB. Each nutraceutical was artificially digested using simulated gastric and intestinal fluids, and the crude digest was ultrafiltered (50 kDa). Each filtrate was applied individually to cartilage explants before the explants were stimulated with IL-1 to induce an acute inflammatory response. Media were collected daily for 48 h and analyzed for prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), glycosaminoglycan (GAG), and nitric oxide (NO), and cartilage tissue was differentially stained to determine the relative proportion of live and dead cells. SC and NZGLM significantly inhibited IL-1-induced PGE(2) synthesis and IL-1-induced GAG release, and AB was an effective inhibitor of IL-1-induced NO production. The three test nutraceuticals affect at least three major pathways involved in the catabolic cycle of arthritis and may prove important treatments and/or preventatives for the pain and degradation associated with this condition. The methodology and results describe a useful model for evaluating dietary nutraceuticals in vitro.

  9. Bioenergetic Dysfunction and Inflammation in Alzheimer’s Disease: A Possible Connection

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Heather M.; Carl, Steven M.; Greenlief, Alison C. S.; Festoff, Barry W.; Swerdlow, Russell H.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is observed in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) subject brains. Inflammation-relevant genes are increasingly implicated in AD genetic studies, and inflammatory cytokines to some extent even function as peripheral biomarkers. What underlies AD inflammation is unclear, but no “foreign” agent has been implicated. This suggests that internally produced damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMPs) molecules may drive inflammation in AD. A more complete characterization and understanding of AD-relevant DAMPs could advance our understanding of AD and suggest novel therapeutic strategies. In this review, we consider the possibility that mitochondria, intracellular organelles that resemble bacteria in many ways, trigger and maintain chronic inflammation in AD subjects. Data supporting the possible nexus between AD-associated bioenergetic dysfunction are discussed. PMID:25426068

  10. Keratoconus: an inflammatory disorder?

    PubMed

    Galvis, V; Sherwin, T; Tello, A; Merayo, J; Barrera, R; Acera, A

    2015-07-01

    Keratoconus has been classically defined as a progressive, non-inflammatory condition, which produces a thinning and steepening of the cornea. Its pathophysiological mechanisms have been investigated for a long time. Both genetic and environmental factors have been associated with the disease. Recent studies have shown a significant role of proteolytic enzymes, cytokines, and free radicals; therefore, although keratoconus does not meet all the classic criteria for an inflammatory disease, the lack of inflammation has been questioned. The majority of studies in the tears of patients with keratoconus have found increased levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. Eye rubbing, a proven risk factor for keratoconus, has been also shown recently to increase the tear levels of MMP-13, IL-6, and TNF-α. In the tear fluid of patients with ocular rosacea, IL-1α and MMP-9 have been reported to be significantly elevated, and cases of inferior corneal thinning, resembling keratoconus, have been reported. We performed a literature review of published biochemical changes in keratoconus that would support that this could be, at least in part, an inflammatory condition.

  11. Keratoconus: an inflammatory disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Galvis, V; Sherwin, T; Tello, A; Merayo, J; Barrera, R; Acera, A

    2015-01-01

    Keratoconus has been classically defined as a progressive, non-inflammatory condition, which produces a thinning and steepening of the cornea. Its pathophysiological mechanisms have been investigated for a long time. Both genetic and environmental factors have been associated with the disease. Recent studies have shown a significant role of proteolytic enzymes, cytokines, and free radicals; therefore, although keratoconus does not meet all the classic criteria for an inflammatory disease, the lack of inflammation has been questioned. The majority of studies in the tears of patients with keratoconus have found increased levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. Eye rubbing, a proven risk factor for keratoconus, has been also shown recently to increase the tear levels of MMP-13, IL-6, and TNF-α. In the tear fluid of patients with ocular rosacea, IL-1α and MMP-9 have been reported to be significantly elevated, and cases of inferior corneal thinning, resembling keratoconus, have been reported. We performed a literature review of published biochemical changes in keratoconus that would support that this could be, at least in part, an inflammatory condition. PMID:25931166

  12. Epidermal Nbn deletion causes premature hair loss and a phenotype resembling psoriasiform dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Philipp; Remus, Martina; Delacher, Michael; Grigaravicius, Paulius; Reuss, David E.; Frappart, Lucien; von Deimling, Andreas; Feuerer, Markus; Abdollahi, Amir; Frappart, Pierre-Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome is a disease caused by NBN mutations. Here, we report a novel function of Nbn in skin homeostasis. We found that Nbn deficiency in hair follicle (HF) progenitors promoted increased DNA damage signaling, stimulating p16Ink4a up-regulation, Trp53 stabilization and cytokines secretion leading to HF-growth arrest and hair loss. At later stages, the basal keratinocytes layer exhibited also enhanced DNA damage response but in contrast to the one in HF progenitor was not associated with pro-inflammatory cytokines expression, but rather increased proliferation, lack of differentiation and immune response resembling psoriasiform dermatitis. Simultaneous Nbn and Trp53 inactivation significantly exacerbated this phenotype, due to the lack of inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion by Trp53. Altogether, we demonstrated novel functions of Nbn in HF maintenance and prevention of skin inflammation and we provide a mechanistic explanation that links cell intrinsic DNA maintenance with large scale morphological tissue alterations. PMID:27050272

  13. Anti-inflammatory effects of low-dose radiotherapy in an experimental model of systemic inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Arenas, Meritxell; Gil, Felix B.A.; Gironella, Meritxell; Hernandez, Victor; Jorcano, Sandra; Biete, Albert; Pique, Josep M.; Panes, Julian . E-mail: jpanes@clinic.ub.es

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of low-dose radiotherapy (LD-RT) on the inflammatory response and to characterize the potential mechanisms underlying these effects. Methods and Materials: Mice were irradiated with 0.1, 0.3, 0.6 Gy, or sham radiation before lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in intestinal venules were assessed using intravital microscopy. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression was determined using radiolabeled antibodies 5 h after irradiation. Production of transforming growth factor-{beta}{sub 1} (TGF-{beta}{sub 1}) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and its in vivo functional relevance by immunoneutralization. Results: Compared with vehicle treated animals, LPS induced a marked increase in leukocyte adhesion (0.13 {+-} 0.59 vs. 5.89 {+-} 1.03, p < 0.0001) in intestinal venules. The number of adherent leukocytes was significantly reduced by the 3 doses of LD-RT tested; the highest inhibition was observed with 0.3 Gy (0.66 {+-} 1.96, p < 0.0001). LPS-induced ICAM-1 upregulation was not modified by LD-RT. Circulating levels of TGF-{beta}{sub 1} were significantly increased in response to LD-RT in controls and LPS challenged animals. Neutralization of TGF-{beta}{sub 1} partially restored LPS-induced adhesion (4.83 {+-} 1.41, p < 0.05). Conclusions: LD-RT has a significant anti-inflammatory effect, inhibiting leukocyte recruitment, which is maximal at 0.3 Gy. This effect results in part from increased TGF-{beta}{sub 1} production and is not related to modulation of ICAM-1 expression.

  14. miRNA-133a-UCP2 pathway regulates inflammatory bowel disease progress by influencing inflammation, oxidative stress and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xi; Chen, Dong; Zheng, Ruo-Heng; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Yi-Peng; Xiang, Zun

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of the miR-133a-UCP2 pathway in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and to explore the potential downstream mechanisms with respect to inflammation, oxidative stress and energy metabolism. METHODS C57BL/6 mice were fed dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) liquid for 7 consecutive days, followed by the administration of saline to the DSS group, UCP2 siRNA to the UCP2 group and a miR-133a mimic to the miR-133a group on days 8 and 11. Body weight, stool consistency and rectal bleeding were recorded daily, and these composed the disease activity index (DAI) score for the assessment of disease severity. After cervical dislocation was performed on day 14, the length of the colon in each mouse was measured, and colonic tissue was collected for further study, which included the following: haematoxylin and eosin staining, UCP2 and miR-133a detection by immunohistochemical staining, western blot and quantitative real-time PCR, measurement of apoptosis by TUNEL assay, and the assessment of inflammation (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and MCP1), oxidative stress (H2O2 and MDA) and metabolic parameters (ATP) by ELISA and colorimetric methods. RESULTS An animal model of IBD was successfully established, as shown by an increased DAI score, shortened colon length and specific pathologic changes, along with significantly increased UCP2 and decreased miR-133a levels. Compared with the DSS group, the severity of IBD was alleviated in the UCP2 and the miR-133a groups after successful UCP2 knockdown and miR-133a overexpression. The extent of apoptosis, as well as the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, MDA and ATP, were significantly increased in both the UCP2 and miR-133a groups compared with the DSS group. CONCLUSION The miR-133a-UCP2 pathway participates in IBD by altering downstream inflammation, oxidative stress and markers of energy metabolism, which provides novel clues and potential therapeutic targets for IBD. PMID:28104982

  15. Inflammation switches the differentiation program of Ly6Chi monocytes from antiinflammatory macrophages to inflammatory dendritic cells in the colon

    PubMed Central

    Rivollier, Aymeric; He, Jianping; Kole, Abhisake; Valatas, Vassilis

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MPs) are important for immunological homeostasis in the colon. We found that F4/80hiCX3CR1hi (CD11b+CD103−) cells account for 80% of mouse colonic lamina propria MHC-IIhi cells. Both CD11c+ and CD11c− cells within this population were identified as MPs based on multiple criteria, including an MP transcriptome revealed by microarray analysis. These MPs constitutively released high levels of IL-10 at least partially in response to the microbiota via an MyD88-independent mechanism. In contrast, cells expressing low to intermediate levels of F4/80 and CX3CR1 were identified as DCs based on phenotypic and functional analysis and comprise three separate CD11chi cell populations: CD103+CX3CR1−CD11b− DCs, CD103+CX3CR1−CD11b+ DCs, and CD103−CX3CR1intCD11b+ DCs. In noninflammatory conditions, Ly6Chi monocytes (MOs) differentiated primarily into CD11c+ but not CD11c− MPs. In contrast, during colitis, Ly6Chi MOs massively invaded the colon and differentiated into proinflammatory CD103−CX3CR1intCD11b+ DCs, which produced high levels of IL-12, IL-23, iNOS, and TNF. These findings demonstrate the dual capacity of Ly6Chi blood MOs to differentiate into either regulatory MPs or inflammatory DCs in the colon and that the balance of these immunologically antagonistic cell types is dictated by microenvironmental conditions. PMID:22231304

  16. Redox Proteomics of the Inflammatory Secretome Identifies a Common Set of Redoxins and Other Glutathionylated Proteins Released in Inflammation, Influenza Virus Infection and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Checconi, Paola; Salzano, Sonia; Bowler, Lucas; Mullen, Lisa; Mengozzi, Manuela; Hanschmann, Eva-Maria; Lillig, Christopher Horst; Sgarbanti, Rossella; Panella, Simona; Nencioni, Lucia; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Ghezzi, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Protein cysteines can form transient disulfides with glutathione (GSH), resulting in the production of glutathionylated proteins, and this process is regarded as a mechanism by which the redox state of the cell can regulate protein function. Most studies on redox regulation of immunity have focused on intracellular proteins. In this study we have used redox proteomics to identify those proteins released in glutathionylated form by macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) after pre-loading the cells with biotinylated GSH. Of the several proteins identified in the redox secretome, we have selected a number for validation. Proteomic analysis indicated that LPS stimulated the release of peroxiredoxin (PRDX) 1, PRDX2, vimentin (VIM), profilin1 (PFN1) and thioredoxin 1 (TXN1). For PRDX1 and TXN1, we were able to confirm that the released protein is glutathionylated. PRDX1, PRDX2 and TXN1 were also released by the human pulmonary epithelial cell line, A549, infected with influenza virus. The release of the proteins identified was inhibited by the anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid, dexamethasone (DEX), which also inhibited tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α release, and by thiol antioxidants (N-butanoyl GSH derivative, GSH-C4, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), which did not affect TNF-α production. The proteins identified could be useful as biomarkers of oxidative stress associated with inflammation, and further studies will be required to investigate if the extracellular forms of these proteins has immunoregulatory functions. PMID:25985305

  17. Vitamin D and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cannell, John J; Grant, William B; Holick, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Several studies found an inverse relationship between 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and markers of inflammation. A controversy exists as to whether vitamin D lowers inflammation or whether inflammation lowers 25(OH)D concentrations. Certainly 25(OH)D concentrations fall after major surgery. However, is this due to inflammation lowering 25(OH)D or is 25(OH)D being metabolically cleared by the body to quell inflammation. We searched the literature and found 39 randomized controlled trials (RCT) of vitamin D and markers of inflammation. Seventeen found significantly reduced inflammatory markers, 19 did not, one was mixed and one showed adverse results. With few exceptions, studies in normal subjects, obesity, type 2 diabetics, and stable cardiovascular disease did not find significant beneficial effects. However, we found that 6 out of 7 RCTS of vitamin D3 in highly inflammatory conditions (acute infantile congestive heart failure, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, cystic fibrosis, SLE, active TB and evolving myocardial infarction) found significant reductions. We found baseline and final 25(OH)D predicted RCTs with significant reduction in inflammatory markers. Vitamin D tends to modestly lower markers of inflammation in highly inflammatory conditions, when baseline 25(OH)D levels were low and when achieved 25(OH)D levels were higher. Future inquiries should: recruit subjects with low baseline 25(OH)D levels, subjects with elevated markers of inflammation, subjects with inflammatory conditions, achieve adequate final 25(OH)D levels, and use physiological doses of vitamin D. We attempted to identify all extant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of vitamin D that used inflammatory markers as primary or secondary endpoints. PMID:26413186

  18. Studies on the pathogenesis of acute inflammation. I. The inflammatory reaction to thermal injury as observed in the rabbit ear chamber.

    PubMed

    ALLISON, F; SMITH, M R; WOOD, W B

    1955-12-01

    A special adaptation of the rabbit ear chamber has been devised to study in vivo, under high magnification, the acute inflammatory reaction to thermal injury. Systematic observations of the cellular response have led to the following conclusions. 1. Contrary to the commonly accepted view, vasodilatation does not always precede the adherence of leucocytes to vascular endothelium. 2. The fact that leucocytes often adhere to one another as well as to the endothelium indicates that the increased adhesiveness characteristic of the early stages of inflammation is not limited to the surfaces of the endothelial cells. 3. The sharing of erythrocytes and platelets in this increased stickiness suggests that a "plasma factor" is involved. There is indirect but as yet inconclusive evidence that the plasma factor may concern the clotting mechanism of the blood. 4. The adherence of leucocytes to the endothelium is usually first noted on the side of the vessel closest to the site of injury. This previously undescribed phenomenon of "unilateral sticking" is in keeping with the concept that the vascular reaction is caused by products of cellular damage which diffuse to the vessel from the site of injury. 5. Leucocytes always become adherent to the endothelium before penetrating the vessel wall. They often migrate about for some time on the endothelial surface before undergoing diapedesis. 6. Although no definite stomata are at any time visible in the endothelium, penetrating leucocytes may leave behind temporary defects through which other leucocytes and even erythrocytes may pass. 7. The diapedesis of leucocytes appears to depend primarily upon cellular motility. It may occur in static vessels where there is presumably little if any hydrostatic pressure. 8. The diapedesis of erythrocytes, on the other hand, is a passive process depending upon intravascular pressure. Its occurrence is greatly exaggerated in areas in which intravascular pressure becomes elevated. Such elevations

  19. CLIPPERS: chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids. Review of an increasingly recognized entity within the spectrum of inflammatory central nervous system disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dudesek, A; Rimmele, F; Tesar, S; Kolbaske, S; Rommer, P S; Benecke, R; Zettl, U K

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) is a recently defined inflammatory central nervous system (CNS) disorder, prominently involving the brainstem and in particular the pons. The condition features a combination of clinical symptoms essentially referable to brainstem pathology and a characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance with punctate and curvilinear gadolinium enhancement ‘peppering’ the pons. The radiological distribution is focused in the pons and adjacent rhombencephalic structures such as the cerebellar peduncles, cerebellum, medulla and the midbrain. While the lesion burden with a perivascular pattern is typically most dense in these pontine and peripontine regions, enhancing lesions may additionally extend into the spinal cord and supratentorial structures such as the thalamus, basal ganglia, capsula interna, corpus callosum and the cerebral white matter. Another core feature is clinical and radiological responsiveness to glucocorticosteroid (GCS)-based immunosuppression. As withdrawal of GCS treatment results commonly in disease exacerbation, long-term immunosuppressive therapy appears to be mandatory for sustained improvement. Diagnosis of CLIPPERS is challenging, and requires careful exclusion of alternative diagnoses. A specific serum or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker for the disorder is currently not known. Pathogenesis of CLIPPERS remains poorly understood, and the nosological position of CLIPPERS has still to be established. Whether CLIPPERS represents an independent, actual new disorder or a syndrome that includes aetiologically heterogeneous diseases and/or their prestages remains a debated and not finally clarified issue. Clinicians and radiologists should be aware of this condition and its differential diagnoses, given that CLIPPERS constitutes a treatable condition and that patients may benefit from an early introduction of GCS ensued by long

  20. CLIPPERS: chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids. Review of an increasingly recognized entity within the spectrum of inflammatory central nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Dudesek, A; Rimmele, F; Tesar, S; Kolbaske, S; Rommer, P S; Benecke, R; Zettl, U K

    2014-03-01

    Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) is a recently defined inflammatory central nervous system (CNS) disorder, prominently involving the brainstem and in particular the pons. The condition features a combination of clinical symptoms essentially referable to brainstem pathology and a characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance with punctate and curvilinear gadolinium enhancement 'peppering' the pons. The radiological distribution is focused in the pons and adjacent rhombencephalic structures such as the cerebellar peduncles, cerebellum, medulla and the midbrain. While the lesion burden with a perivascular pattern is typically most dense in these pontine and peripontine regions, enhancing lesions may additionally extend into the spinal cord and supratentorial structures such as the thalamus, basal ganglia, capsula interna, corpus callosum and the cerebral white matter. Another core feature is clinical and radiological responsiveness to glucocorticosteroid (GCS)-based immunosuppression. As withdrawal of GCS treatment results commonly in disease exacerbation, long-term immunosuppressive therapy appears to be mandatory for sustained improvement. Diagnosis of CLIPPERS is challenging, and requires careful exclusion of alternative diagnoses. A specific serum or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker for the disorder is currently not known. Pathogenesis of CLIPPERS remains poorly understood, and the nosological position of CLIPPERS has still to be established. Whether CLIPPERS represents an independent, actual new disorder or a syndrome that includes aetiologically heterogeneous diseases and/or their prestages remains a debated and not finally clarified issue. Clinicians and radiologists should be aware of this condition and its differential diagnoses, given that CLIPPERS constitutes a treatable condition and that patients may benefit from an early introduction of GCS ensued by long

  1. Loss of epidermal Evi/Wls results in a phenotype resembling psoriasiform dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Iris; Gross, Julia; Baumann, Daniel; Korn, Claudia; Kerr, Grainne; Grigoryan, Tamara; Mauch, Cornelia; Birchmeier, Walter; Boutros, Michael

    2013-08-26

    Cells of the epidermis renew constantly from germinal layer stem cells. Although epithelial cell differentiation has been studied in great detail and the role of Wnt signaling in this process is well described, the contribution of epidermal Wnt secretion in epithelial cell homeostasis remains poorly understood. To analyze the role of Wnt proteins in this process, we created a conditional knockout allele of the Wnt cargo receptor Evi/Gpr177/Wntless and studied mice that lacked Evi expression in the epidermis. We found that K14-Cre, Evi-LOF mice lost their hair during the first hair cycle, showing a reddish skin with impaired skin barrier function. Expression profiling of mutant and wild-type skin revealed up-regulation of inflammation-associated genes. Furthermore, we found that Evi expression in psoriatic skin biopsies is down-regulated, suggesting that Evi-deficient mice developed skin lesions that resemble human psoriasis. Immune cell infiltration was detected in Evi-LOF skin. Interestingly, an age-dependent depletion of dendritic epidermal T cells (DETCs) and an infiltration of γδ(low) T cells in Evi mutant epidermis was observed. Collectively, the described inflammatory skin phenotype in Evi-deficient mice revealed an essential role of Wnt secretion in maintaining normal skin homeostasis by enabling a balanced epidermal-dermal cross talk, which affects immune cell recruitment and DETC survival.

  2. Morin, a dietary bioflavonol suppresses monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation in an animal model of acute gouty arthritis with reference to NLRP3 inflammasome, hypo-xanthine phospho-ribosyl transferase, and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekar, Chitra; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-09-05

    The anti-inflammatory effect of morin, a dietary bioflavanol was explored on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced inflammation in rats, an experimental model for acute gouty arthritis. Morin treatment (30mg/kg b.wt) significantly attenuated the ankle swelling and the levels of lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and articular elastase along with an increased anti-oxidant status (catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) in the joint homogenate of MSU crystal-induced rats. Histological assessment revealed that morin limited the diffusion of joint space, synovial hyperplasia, and inflammatory cell infiltrations. The mRNA expression of NLRP3 (nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3) inflammasome, caspase-1, pro-inflammatory cytokines, MCP-1, inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65 was found downregulated and HPRT (hypo-xanthine phospho-ribosyl transferase) mRNA expression was upregulated in morin treated MSU crystal-induced rats. In addition, morin treatment reduced the protein expression of NF-κB p65, p-NF-κB p65, iNOS, COX-2, and TNF-α. The results clearly demonstrated that morin exert a potent anti-inflammatory effect on MSU crystal-induced inflammation in rats.

  3. Carvacrol exhibits anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects against 1, 2-dimethyl hydrazine plus dextran sodium sulfate induced inflammation associated carcinogenicity in the colon of Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Arigesavan, Kaninathan; Sudhandiran, Ganapasam

    2015-05-29

    Chronic inflammation is one of the remarkable etiologic factors for various human ailments including cancer. The well known hypothesis is that persistent inflammation in colon can increase the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, a pharmacological evaluation of carvacrol, a phenolic monoterpene constituent of essential oils produced from aromatic plant Oreganum vulgarea sp. on colitis associated colon cancer (CACC) induced by 1,2 Dimethylhydrazine (DMH) and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in male Fischer 344 rat model was studied. F344 rats were given three subcutaneous injections of DMH (40 mg/kg body wt) in the first week and were given free access to drinking water containing 1% DSS for the next one week followed by 7-14 days of water as three cycles. Carvacrol was administrated before and after tumor induction at a concentration of 50 mg/kg body weight (o.p). Carvacrol treated groups promotes the endogenous antioxidant system and suppress the inflammation in DMH/DSS induced animals. An increased antioxidant status and restoration of histological lesions in the inflamed colonic mucosa was observed in carvacrol treated rats. This effect was confirmed biochemically by reducing free-radical accumulation and suppressing expression of pro-inflammatory mediators. In this study, Carvacrol significantly increased the anti-oxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) glutathione (GSH) levels and reduced lipid peroxides (LPO), myeloperoxidase (MPO) and nitric oxide (NO) as compared to DMH/DSS induced rats. These dramatic changes facilitate the suppression of pro-inflammatory mediators such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) in CACC induced rats. Taken together, these findings suggest that Carvacrol may play a beneficial role in DMH/DSS induced experimental rat model and serve as an excellent dietary antioxidant as well as anti-inflammatory agent. It may represent novel therapeutic interventions

  4. Pulmonary Remodeling in Equine Asthma: What Do We Know about Mediators of Inflammation in the Horse?

    PubMed Central

    Gehlen, Heidrun

    2016-01-01

    Equine inflammatory airway disease (IAD) and recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) represent a spectrum of chronic inflammatory disease of the airways in horses resembling human asthma in many aspects. Therefore, both are now described as severity grades of equine asthma. Increasing evidence in horses and humans suggests that local pulmonary inflammation is influenced by systemic inflammatory processes and the other way around. Inflammation, coagulation, and fibrinolysis as well as extracellular remodeling show close interactions. Cytology of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and tracheal wash is commonly used to evaluate the severity of local inflammation in the lung. Other mediators of inflammation, like interleukins involved in the chemotaxis of neutrophils, have been studied. Chronic obstructive pneumopathies lead to remodeling of bronchial walls and lung parenchyma, ultimately causing fibrosis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are discussed as the most important proteolytic enzymes during remodeling in human medicine and increasing evidence exists for the horse as well. A systemic involvement has been shown for severe equine asthma by increased acute phase proteins like serum amyloid A and haptoglobin in peripheral blood during exacerbation. Studies focusing on these and further possible inflammatory markers for chronic respiratory disease in the horse are discussed in this review of the literature. PMID:28053371

  5. 2-Chloroadenosine (2-CADO) treatment modulates the pro-inflammatory immune response to prevent acute lung inflammation in BALB/c mice suffering from Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Harjai, Kusum; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2010-06-01

    Acute lung inflammation (ALI) is a life-threatening pathology and can develop during the course of several clinical conditions such as pneumonia, acid aspiration or sepsis. Adenosine plays a significant role in controlling acute inflammation via binding to A(2A) receptors on inflammatory cells, i.e. neutrophils or macrophages. The present study was designed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of 2-chloroadenosine (2-CADO), alone or in combination with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC), in Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-induced acute lung infection in mice. Acute lung infection in mice was induced by directly instilling the selected dose (10(4) colony-forming units/mL) of bacteria intranasally. Histopathological examination of the lungs was performed to reveal neutrophil infiltration into the lung alveoli. In addition to the major pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and interleukin (IL)-1alpha, levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were also determined. Intranasal instillation of bacteria caused profound neutrophil infiltration into the lung alveoli as well as a significant increase in the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators (i.e. TNFalpha and IL-1alpha). However, intravenous administration of 2-CADO 10 microg/kg/day, alone or in combination with an antibiotic (i.e. AMC), significantly decreased neutrophil infiltration into the lung alveoli. A significant decrease in TNFalpha and IL-1alpha along with elevation of IL-10 levels in the lung homogenate of mice with acute lung infection was observed upon treatment with 2-CADO alone, with no significant decrease in bacterial counts. Moreover, in combination with AMC, 2-CADO exhibited its immunomodulatory action in acute lung infection and prevented ALI, whilst an antibacterial action was exhibited by AMC.

  6. The resolution of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Christopher D; Gilroy, Derek W; Serhan, Charles N; Stockinger, Brigitta; Tak, Paul P

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, Nature Reviews Immunology organized a conference that brought together scientists and clinicians from both academia and industry to discuss one of the most pressing questions in medicine--how do we turn off rampant, undesirable inflammation? There is a growing appreciation that, similarly to the initiation of inflammation, the resolution of inflammation is an intricate and active process. Can we therefore harness the mediators involved in resolution responses to treat patients with chronic inflammatory or autoimmune diseases? Here, we ask five of the speakers from the conference to share their thoughts on this emerging field.

  7. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection and inflammation of the uterus, ovaries, and other female reproductive organs. It causes scarring ... United States. Gonorrhea and chlamydia, two sexually transmitted diseases, are the most common causes of PID. Other ...

  8. Post-mating inflammatory responses of the uterus.

    PubMed

    Katila, T

    2012-08-01

    This review attempts to summarize the current knowledge on uterine inflammatory response after mating in horses, pigs and cattle. Post-mating endometritis has been extensively studied in horses as it has been considered to cause infertility. The inflammation is known to occur also in cattle, but it has not been investigated to a similar extent. There are a number of publications about mechanisms of post-mating uterine inflammation in pigs, which seem to resemble those in horses. The major focus of this review is the horse, but relevant literature is presented also on swine and cattle. Spermatozoa, seminal plasma and semen extenders play roles in the induction of inflammation. In addition, sperm numbers, concentration and viability, as well as the site of semen deposition may modulate the inflammatory response. Cytokines, polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) and mononuclear cells represent the uterine inflammatory response to mating. Inflammation is the first line of defence against invasion and eliminates excess spermatozoa and bacteria. Semen deposition elicits a massive PMN invasion, followed by phagocytosis of sperm aided by the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. Exposure of the female genital tract to semen is important also for endometrial receptivity and pre-implantation embryo development. Seminal plasma (SP) and inflammation elicit transient immune tolerance to antigens present in semen. SP contains immune-regulatory molecules that activate and control immune responses to antigens by stimulating expression of cytokines and growth factors and by initiating tissue remodelling. SP also regulates ovarian function. Effective elimination of excess sperm and inflammatory by-products and subsequent rapid return of the endometrium to the normal state is a prerequisite for pregnancy. Uterine backflow, driven by myometrial contractions and requiring a patent cervix, is an important physical tool in uterine drainage.

  9. Anti-inflammatory effects of hydrophilic and lipophilic statins with hyaluronic acid against LPS-induced inflammation in porcine articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Hung; Hsu, Yuan-Ming; Chen, Yu-Chun; Lin, Feng-Huei; Sadhasivam, Subramaniam; Loo, Siow-Tung; Savitha, Sivasubramanian

    2014-04-01

    The objective of the study is to understand the therapeutic effects of lipophilic (simvastatin) and hydrophilic statins (pravastatin) combined with/without hyaluronic acid for osteoarthritis by an in vitro LPS-induced inflammatory model of articular chondrocytes. HA in combination with different doses of simvastatin or pravastatin were used. Beside cytotoxicity, the influence of statins on NO production, pro-inflammatory cytokine, inflammatory mediators, and NF-κB p50 protein were analyzed. Finally, TUNEL assay was performed to detect DNA strand breakage. Two statins were less able to lower NF-κB activity when they were administrated along without HA. The gene expression demonstrates that simvastatin and pravastatin had the ability to decrease pro-inflammatory and inflammatory mediator levels. High dose simvastatin with or without HA down regulated inflammatory cytokines, but resulted in higher cytotoxicity. TUNEL assay confirms the regulatory effect of statins with or without HA over the apoptosis of chondrocytes, especially in hydrophilic statins. The significant down-regulation of inflammatory mediators suggests that intra-articular injection of HA in combination with statins might feasibly slow the progress of osteoarthritis. Administration of simvastatin or pravastatin with hyaluronic acid may produce beneficial effects for OA treatment, but with better results when hydrophilic statin was used.

  10. Angiopoietin-like 4 Mediates Colonic Inflammation by Regulating Chemokine Transcript Stability via Tristetraprolin

    PubMed Central

    Phua, Terri; Sng, Ming Keat; Tan, Eddie Han Pin; Chee, Dickson Shao Liang; Li, Yinliang; Wee, Jonathan Wei Kiat; Teo, Ziqiang; Chan, Jeremy Soon Kiat; Lim, Maegan Miang Kee; Tan, Chek Kun; Zhu, Pengcheng; Arulampalam, Velmurugesan; Tan, Nguan Soon

    2017-01-01

    Many gastrointestinal diseases exhibit a protracted and aggravated inflammatory response that can lead to hypercytokinaemia, culminating in extensive tissue damage. Recently, angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) has been implicated in many inflammation-associated diseases. However, how ANGPTL4 regulates colonic inflammation remains unclear. Herein, we show that ANGPTL4 deficiency in mice (ANGPTL4−/−) exacerbated colonic inflammation induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) or stearic acid. Microbiota was similar between the two genotypes prior DSS challenge. A microarray gene expression profile of the colon from DSS-treated ANGPTL4−/− mice was enriched for genes involved in leukocyte migration and infiltration, and showed a close association to inflamed ulcerative colitis (UC), whereas the profile from ANGPTL4+/+ littermates resembled that of non-inflamed UC biopsies. Bone marrow transplantation demonstrates the intrinsic role of colonic ANGPTL4 in regulating leukocyte infiltration during DSS-induced inflammation. Using immortalized human colon epithelial cells, we revealed that the ANGPTL4-mediated upregulation of tristetraprolin expression operates through CREB and NF-κB transcription factors, which in turn, regulates the stability of chemokines. Together, our findings suggest that ANGPTL4 protects against acute colonic inflammation and that its absence exacerbates the severity of inflammation. Our findings emphasize the importance of ANGPTL4 as a novel target for therapy in regulating and attenuating inflammation. PMID:28287161

  11. Angiopoietin-like 4 Mediates Colonic Inflammation by Regulating Chemokine Transcript Stability via Tristetraprolin.

    PubMed

    Phua, Terri; Sng, Ming Keat; Tan, Eddie Han Pin; Chee, Dickson Shao Liang; Li, Yinliang; Wee, Jonathan Wei Kiat; Teo, Ziqiang; Chan, Jeremy Soon Kiat; Lim, Maegan Miang Kee; Tan, Chek Kun; Zhu, Pengcheng; Arulampalam, Velmurugesan; Tan, Nguan Soon

    2017-03-13

    Many gastrointestinal diseases exhibit a protracted and aggravated inflammatory response that can lead to hypercytokinaemia, culminating in extensive tissue damage. Recently, angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) has been implicated in many inflammation-associated diseases. However, how ANGPTL4 regulates colonic inflammation remains unclear. Herein, we show that ANGPTL4 deficiency in mice (ANGPTL4(-/-)) exacerbated colonic inflammation induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) or stearic acid. Microbiota was similar between the two genotypes prior DSS challenge. A microarray gene expression profile of the colon from DSS-treated ANGPTL4(-/-) mice was enriched for genes involved in leukocyte migration and infiltration, and showed a close association to inflamed ulcerative colitis (UC), whereas the profile from ANGPTL4(+/+) littermates resembled that of non-inflamed UC biopsies. Bone marrow transplantation demonstrates the intrinsic role of colonic ANGPTL4 in regulating leukocyte infiltration during DSS-induced inflammation. Using immortalized human colon epithelial cells, we revealed that the ANGPTL4-mediated upregulation of tristetraprolin expression operates through CREB and NF-κB transcription factors, which in turn, regulates the stability of chemokines. Together, our findings suggest that ANGPTL4 protects against acute colonic inflammation and that its absence exacerbates the severity of inflammation. Our findings emphasize the importance of ANGPTL4 as a novel target for therapy in regulating and attenuating inflammation.

  12. Age-dependent effects of peripheral inflammation on the electrophysiological properties of neonatal rat dorsal horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Torsney, Carole; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the postnatal development of spinal cord neurophysiological mechanisms of inflammatory pain. The effect of hindpaw inflammation on the properties of neonatal spinal dorsal horn cells was investigated in urethane-anesthetized newborn rats using in vivo single-unit extracellular recordings. Responses to cutaneous mechanical and electrical A and C fiber stimulation were recorded at postnatal day (P) 3, 10, and 21 in pups that had received a unilateral intraplantar carageenan injection (1%, 1 microl/g body wt) 2-5 h earlier and compared with age-matched controls. At all three ages, carageenan inflammation increased A fiber evoked sensitization, spontaneous activity, and the suprathreshold response magnitude of dorsal horn cells. Receptive field size, which normally decreases with postnatal age, was unaffected by inflammation in P3 and P10 pups but significantly increased at P21 so that the size distribution closely resembled that in control P3 pups. Mechanical thresholds of individual dorsal horn neurons were not altered by carageenan inflammation at any age. The results show that some dorsal horn cell properties that are likely to underlie inflammatory hypersensitivity such as increased spontaneous activity and response magnitude are observed from the earliest postnatal age examined (P3). However inflammation induced expansion of mechanical receptive field size is not observed until at least the second postnatal week. These results have implications for the postnatal processing of inflammatory pain.

  13. Prostaglandins and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ricciotti, Emanuela; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2011-01-01

    Prostaglandins are lipid autacoids derived from arachidonic acid. They both sustain homeostatic functions and mediate pathogenic mechanisms, including the inflammatory response. They are generated from arachidonate by the action of cyclooxygenase (COX) isoenzymes and their biosynthesis is blocked by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including those selective for inhibition of COX-2. Despite the clinical efficacy of NSAIDs, prostaglandins may function in both the promotion and resolution of inflammation. This review summarizes insights into the mechanisms of prostaglandin generation and the roles of individual mediators and their receptors in modulating the inflammatory response. Prostaglandin biology has potential clinical relevance for atherosclerosis, the response to vascular injury and aortic aneurysm. PMID:21508345

  14. Potent anti-inflammatory activity of novel microtubule-modulating brominated noscapine analogs.

    PubMed

    Zughaier, Susu; Karna, Prasanthi; Stephens, David; Aneja, Ritu

    2010-02-11

    Noscapine, a plant-derived, non-toxic, over-the-counter antitussive alkaloid has tubulin-binding properties. Based upon the structural resemblance of noscapine to colchicine, a tubulin-binding anti-inflammatory drug, noscapine and its semi-synthetic brominated analogs were examined for in vitro anti-inflammatory activity. Brominated noscapine analogs were found to inhibit cytokine and chemokine release from macrophage cell lines but did not affect cell viability. Brominated noscapine analogs demonstrated anti-inflammatory properties in both TLR- and non-TLR induced in vitro innate immune pathway inflammation models, mimicking septic and sterile infection respectively. In addition, electron microscopy and immunoblotting data indicated that these analogs induced robust autophagy in human macrophages. This study is the first report to identify brominated noscapines as innate immune pathway anti-inflammatory molecules.

  15. [Connective tissue and inflammation].

    PubMed

    Jakab, Lajos

    2014-03-23

    The author summarizes the structure of the connective tissues, the increasing motion of the constituents, which determine the role in establishing the structure and function of that. The structure and function of the connective tissue are related to each other in the resting as well as inflammatory states. It is emphasized that cellular events in the connective tissue are part of the defence of the organism, the localisation of the damage and, if possible, the maintenance of restitutio ad integrum. The organism responds to damage with inflammation, the non specific immune response, as well as specific, adaptive immunity. These processes are located in the connective tissue. Sterile and pathogenic inflammation are relatively similar processes, but inevitable differences are present, too. Sialic acids and glycoproteins containing sialic acids have important roles, and the role of Siglecs is also highlighted. Also, similarities and differences in damages caused by pathogens and sterile agents are briefly summarized. In addition, the roles of adhesion molecules linked to each other, and the whole event of inflammatory processes are presented. When considering practical consequences it is stressed that the structure (building up) of the organism and the defending function of inflammation both have fundamental importance. Inflammation has a crucial role in maintaining the integrity and the unimpaired somato-psychological state of the organism. Thus, inflammation serves as a tool of organism identical with the natural immune response, inseparably connected with the specific, adaptive immune response. The main events of the inflammatory processes take place in the connective tissue.

  16. n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Mechanisms to Mitigate Inflammatory Paracrine Signaling in Obesity-Associated Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Monk, Jennifer M.; Turk, Harmony F.; Liddle, Danyelle M.; De Boer, Anna A.; Power, Krista A.; Ma, David W.L.; Robinson, Lindsay E.

    2014-01-01

    Globally, the prevalence of obesity is increasing which subsequently increases the risk of the development of obesity-related chronic diseases. Low-grade chronic inflammation and dysregulated adipose tissue inflammatory mediator/adipokine secretion are well-established in obesity, and these factors increase the risk of developing inflammation-associated cancer. Breast cancer is of particular interest given that increased inflammation within the subcutaneous mammary adipose tissue depot can alter the local tissue inflammatory microenvironment such that it resembles that of obese visceral adipose tissue. Therefore, in obese women with breast cancer, increased inflammatory mediators both locally and systemically can perpetuate inflammation-associated pro-carcinogenic signaling pathways, thereby increasing disease severity. Herein, we discuss some of these inflammation-associated pro-carcinogenic mechanisms of the combined obese breast cancer phenotype and offer evidence that dietary long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) may have utility in mitigating the severity of obesity-associated inflammation and breast cancer. PMID:25360510

  17. Tricin, flavonoid from Njavara reduces inflammatory responses in hPBMCs by modulating the p38MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways and prevents inflammation associated endothelial dysfunction in HUVECs.

    PubMed

    Shalini, V; Pushpan, Chithra K; G, Sindhu; A, Jayalekshmy; A, Helen

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies revealed the potent anti-inflammatory activity of tricin, the active component of Njavara rice bran. Here, we report the involvement of specific signaling pathways in the protective effect of tricin against LPS induced inflammation in hPBMCs and the role of tricin in modulating endothelial dysfunction in LPS induced HUVECs. Pretreatment with tricin (15μM) significantly inhibited the release of TNF-α and was comparable to the specific pathway blockers like ERK inhibitor (PD98059), JNK inhibitor (SP600125) and p38 inhibitor (SB203580), whereas an increased release of TNF-α was observed in PI3K/Akt inhibitor (LY294002) treated cells. Tricin alone and combination treatment of tricin and SB203580 showed more significant inhibition of activation of COX-2 and TNF-α than that of SB203580 alone treated group. Combination treatment of tricin and LY294002 showed increased activation of COX-2 and TNF-α, proved that PI3K activation is essential for the anti-inflammatory effect of tricin. Studies conducted on HUVECs revealed the protective effect of tricin against endothelial dysfunction associated with LPS induced inflammation by inhibiting the activation of proinflammatory mediators like TNF-α, IFN-γ, MCP 1 by modulating NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. ELISA and flow cytometric analysis again confirmed the protection of tricin against endothelial damage, especially from the decreased activation of cell adhesion molecules like ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-Selectin upon tricin treatment. This work establishes the mechanism behind the potent anti-inflammatory activity of the flavonoid tricin.

  18. Pulmonary inflammation induced by repeated inhalations of beta(1,3)-D-glucan and endotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Fogelmark, B.; Sjöstrand, M.; Rylander, R.

    1994-01-01

    In an animal model of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) guinea-pigs were exposed for 5 weeks to an aerosol of bacterial endotoxin, beta(1,3)-D-glucan (curdlan) or a combination. Exposure to endotoxin or curdlan showed only small changes in inflammatory cells in airways or the lung wall, histologically or in terms of enzyme secretion from alveolar macrophages. When the two agents were given together, a histology resembling HP was seen with alveolar infiltrates and early granulomas. Inflammatory cells in airways were increased and enzyme production of macrophages was changed, suggesting an effect of curdlan on the inflammatory regulating capacity of airway macrophages. The results suggest that interference with macrophage function and inflammation are important components in the development of HP. PMID:8199009

  19. Specific inhibition of ICAM-1 effectively reduces bladder inflammation in a rat model of severe non-bacterial cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang; He, Hongchao; Lu, Guoliang; Xu, Tianyuan; Qin, Liang; Wang, Xianjin; Jin, Xingwei; Liu, Boke; Zhao, Zhonghua; Shen, Zhoujun; Shao, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The development and progression of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is closely related to bladder inflammation. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) is associated with bladder inflammation in BPS/IC. We investigated the effect of specific inhibition of ICAM-1 using an anti-ICAM-1 antibody (AIA) on bladder inflammation in a rat model of severe non-bacterial cystitis (NBC) resembling BPS/IC by evaluating the bladder inflammation grade, mast cell infiltration and related cytokines and receptors. We also compared the effects of AIA with the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib and the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) inhibitor aprepitant. Our NBC model was established by intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide combined with intravesical protamine/lipopolysaccharide, which resulted in severe bladder inflammation and increased mast cell infiltration, similar to the pathological changes of BPS/IC. Inhibition of ICAM-1 by AIA significantly decreased the bladder inflammation grade and mast cell counts, which was accompanied by a reduction of purinergic receptors (P2X2/P2X3), prostaglandin E2, EP1/EP2 receptors, TNF-α, NK1R, and ICAM-1. Moreover, AIA showed superior effects to those of celecoxib and aprepitant treatment in improving the bladder inflammatory response. Our results suggest that ICAM-1 may play a critical role in bladder inflammation in severe NBC and may be used as a novel therapeutic target in non-bacterial bladder inflammation such as BPS/IC. PMID:27782122

  20. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Role of Oleic Acid-Triggered Lung Injury and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Silva, Adriana Ribeiro; Burth, Patrícia; Castro-Faria, Mauro Velho; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire

    2015-01-01

    Lung injury especially acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) can be triggered by diverse stimuli, including fatty acids and microbes. ARDS affects thousands of people worldwide each year, presenting high mortality rate and having an economic impact. One of the hallmarks of lung injury is edema formation with alveoli flooding. Animal models are used to study lung injury. Oleic acid-induced lung injury is a widely used model resembling the human disease. The oleic acid has been linked to metabolic and inflammatory diseases; here we focus on lung injury. Firstly, we briefly discuss ARDS and secondly we address the mechanisms by which oleic acid triggers lung injury and inflammation. PMID:26640323

  1. Nucleotide signalling during inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Idzko, Marco; Ferrari, Davide; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory conditions are associated with the extracellular release of nucleotides, particularly ATP. In the extracellular compartment, ATP predominantly functions as a signalling molecule through the activation of purinergic P2 receptors. Metabotropic P2Y receptors are G-protein-coupled, whereas ionotropic P2X receptors are ATP-gated ion channels. Here we discuss how signalling events through P2 receptors alter the outcomes of inflammatory or infectious diseases. Recent studies implicate a role for P2X/P2Ysignalling in mounting appropriate inflammatory responses critical for host defence against invading pathogens or tumours. Conversely, P2X/P2Y signalling can promote chronic inflammation during ischaemia and reperfusion injury, inflammatory bowel disease or acute and chronic diseases of the lungs. Although nucleotide signalling has been used clinically in patients before, research indicates an expanding field of opportunities for specifically targeting individual P2 receptors for the treatment of inflammatory or infectious diseases. PMID:24828189

  2. Evaluation of the Anti-Inflammatory, Antioxidant and Immunomodulatory Effects of the Organic Extract of the Red Sea Marine Sponge Xestospongia testudinaria against Carrageenan Induced Rat Paw Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    El-Shitany, Nagla A.; Abbas, Aymn T.; Abdel-dayem, Umama A.; Azhar, Esam I.; Ali, Soad S.; van Soest, Rob W. M.

    2015-01-01

    Marine sponges are found to be a rich source of bioactive compounds which show a wide range of biological activities including antiviral, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. This study aimed to investigate the possible anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and immunomodulator effects of the methanolic extract of the Red Sea marine sponge Xestospongia testudinaria. The chemical composition of the Xestospongia testudinaria methanolic extract was determined using Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis. DPPH (2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl) was measured to assess the antioxidant activity of the sponge extract. Carrageenan-induced rat hind paw edema was adopted in this study. Six groups of rats were used: group1: Control, group 2: Carrageenan, group 3: indomethacin (10 mg/kg), group 4–6: Xestospongia testudinaria methanolic extract (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg). Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory activity was performed by both calculating the percentage increase in paw weight and hisopathologically. Assessment of the antioxidant and immunomodulatory activity was performed. GC-MS analysis revealed that there were 41 different compounds present in the methanolic extract. Sponge extract exhibited antioxidant activity against DPPH free radicals. Xestospongia testudinaria methanolic extract (100 mg/kg) significantly decreased % increase in paw weight measured at 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after carrageenan injection. Histopathologically, the extract caused a marked decrease in the capillary congestion and inflammatory cells infiltrate. The extract decreased paw malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) and increased the reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) activity. It also decreased the inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1 β(IL-1β) and IL-6. The results of this study demonstrated the anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and immunomodulatory effects of the methanolic extract of the Red Sea

  3. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: When Natural Friends Turn into Enemies—The Importance of CpG Motifs of Bacterial DNA in Intestinal Homeostasis and Chronic Intestinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Obermeier, Florian; Hofmann, Claudia; Falk, Werner

    2010-01-01

    From numerous studies during the last years it became evident that bacteria and bacterial constituents play a decisive role both in the maintenance of intestinal immune homeostasis as well as in the development and perpetuation of chronic intestinal inflammation. In this review we focus on the role of bacterial DNA which is a potent immunomodulatory component of the bacterial flora. Bacterial DNA has been shown to be protective against experimental colitis. In contrast bacterial DNA essentially contributes to the perpetuation of an already established chronic intestinal inflammation in a Toll-like receptor (TLR)9-dependent manner. This dichotomic action may be explained by a different activation status of essential regulators of TLR signaling like Glycogen synthase kinase 3-β (GSK3-β) depending on the pre-activation status of the intestinal immune system. In this review we suggest that regulators of TLR signaling may be interesting therapeutic targets in IBD aiming at the restoration of intestinal immune homeostasis. PMID:21188217

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Anti-inflammatory Effects of a Kampo (Japanese Herbal) Medicine "Shoseiryuto (Xiao-Qing-Long-Tang)" on Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takayuki; Nakao, Marino; Shimizu, Yuliko; Kodera, Yoshio; Oh-Ishi, Masamichi; Maeda, Tadakazu; Yamada, Haruki

    2011-01-01

    Effects of a Kampo (Japanese herbal) medicine "shoseiryuto (SST, xiao-qing-long-tang in Chinese)", which has been used for the treatment of allergic bronchial asthma clinically, were examined on ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized allergic airway inflammation model (i.e., bronchial asthma) in a mouse. When SST was orally administered at 0.5 g kg(-1) day(-1) from day 1 to 6 after OVA inhalation, SST reduced the inflammation in lung tissue, the number of eosinophils and the OVA-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibody titer in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids at 7 days after the OVA inhalation. SST also reduced the airway hyperreactivity at 6 days after the OVA inhalation. Proteomic analysis with the agarose two-dimensional electrophoresis showed that the expression of spectrin α2 was reduced in the lung tissue of OVA-sensitized mice and SST recovered the expression. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses of lung tissue also confirmed this result. When prednisolone was orally administered at 3 mg kg(-1) day(-1) from day 1 to 6 after OVA inhalation, the inflammation in lung tissue, the number of eosinophils in BAL fluids and airway hyperreactivity were reduced in the OVA-sensitized mice. However, prednisolone did not reduce the OVA-specific IgE antibody titer in BAL fluids and did not recover the expression of spectrin α2 in lung tissue. These results suggest that at least a part of action mechanism of SST against OVA-sensitized allergic airway inflammation in a mouse model is different from that of prednisolone.

  5. Aging reverses the role of the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 channel in systemic inflammation from anti-inflammatory to proinflammatory.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Samuel P; Garami, Andras; Pakai, Eszter; Oliveira, Daniela L; Gavva, Narender R; Coimbra, Cândido C; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2012-01-15

    Studies in young rodents have shown that the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channel plays a suppressive role in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) by inhibiting production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α and possibly by other mechanisms. We asked whether the anti-inflammatory role of TRPV1 changes with age. First, we studied the effect of AMG517, a selective and potent TRPV1 antagonist, on aseptic, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced SIRS in young (12 wk) mice. In agreement with previous studies, AMG517 increased LPS-induced mortality in the young. We then studied the effects of TRPV1 antagonism (AMG517 or genetic deletion of TRPV1) on SIRS in middle-aged (43-44 wk) mice. Both types of TRPV1 antagonism delayed and decreased LPS-induced mortality, indicating a reversal of the anti-inflammatory role of TRPV1 with aging. In addition, deletion of TRPV1 decreased the serum TNFα response to LPS, suggesting that the suppressive control of TRPV1 on TNFα production is also reversed with aging. In contrast to aseptic SIRS, polymicrobial sepsis (induced by cecal ligation and puncture) caused accelerated mortality in aged TRPV1-deficient mice as compared with wild-type littermates. The recovery of TRPV1-deficient mice from hypothermia associated with the cecal ligation and puncture procedure was delayed. Hence, the reversal of the anti-inflammatory role of TRPV1 found in the aged and their decreased systemic inflammatory response are coupled with suppressed defense against microbial infection. These results caution that TRPV1 antagonists, widely viewed as new-generation painkillers, may decrease the resistance of older patients to infection and sepsis.

  6. Inflammatory biomarkers for AMD.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Chloe M; Wright, Alan F

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness worldwide, affecting an estimated 50 million individuals aged over 65 years.Environmental and genetic risk-factors implicate chronic inflammation in the etiology of AMD, contributing to the formation of drusen, retinal pigment epithelial cell dysfunction and photoreceptor cell death. Consistent with a role for chronic inflammation in AMD pathogenesis, several inflammatory mediators, including complement components, chemokines and cytokines, are elevated at both the local and systemic levels in AMD patients. These mediators have diverse roles in the alternative complement pathway, including recruitment of inflammatory cells, activation of the inflammasome, promotion of neovascularisation and in the resolution of inflammation. The utility of inflammatory biomarkers in assessing individual risk and progression of the disease is controversial. However, understanding the role of these inflammatory mediators in AMD onset, progression and response to treatment may increase our knowledge of disease pathogenesis and provide novel therapeutic options in the future.

  7. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis of Pug dogs associates with dog leukocyte antigen class II and resembles acute variant forms of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Greer, K A; Wong, A K; Liu, H; Famula, T R; Pedersen, N C; Ruhe, A; Wallace, M; Neff, M W

    2010-08-01

    Necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME) is a disorder of Pug Dogs that appears to have an immune etiology and high heritability based on population studies. The present study was undertaken to identify a genetic basis for the disease. A genome-wide association scan with single tandem repeat (STR) markers showed a single strong association near the dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) complex on CFA12. Fine resolution mapping with 27 STR markers on CFA12 further narrowed association to the region containing DLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and, -DQB1 genes. Sequencing confirmed that affected dogs were more likely to be homozygous for specific alleles at each locus and that these alleles were linked, forming a single high risk haplotype. The strong DLA class II association of NME in Pug Dogs resembles that of human multiple sclerosis (MS). Like MS, NME appears to have an autoimmune basis, involves genetic and nongenetic factors, has a relatively low incidence, is more frequent in females than males, and is associated with a vascularly orientated nonsuppurative inflammation. However, NME of Pug Dogs is more aggressive in disease course than classical human MS, appears to be relatively earlier in onset, and involves necrosis rather than demyelination as the central pathobiologic feature. Thus, Pug Dog encephalitis (PDE) shares clinical features with the less common acute variant forms of MS. Accordingly, NME of Pug Dogs may represent a naturally occurring canine model of certain idiopathic inflammatory disorders of the human central nervous system.

  8. Unsaturated lipid bodies as a hallmark of inflammation studied by Raman 2D and 3D microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czamara, K.; Majzner, K.; Selmi, A.; Baranska, M.; Ozaki, Y.; Kaczor, A.

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial HMEC-1 cells incubated with pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α for 6 and 24 hours were studied as a model of inflammation using Raman imaging. Striking changes in distribution, composition and concentration of cellular lipids were observed after exposure to TNF-α compared to the control. In particular, 3D Raman imaging revealed a significant increase in the amount of lipid entities formed under inflammation. Lipid bodies were randomly distributed in the cytoplasm and two types of droplets were assembled: more saturated one, in spectral characteristics resembling phosphatidylcholine and saturated cholesteryl esters, observed also in the control, and highly unsaturated one, containing also cholesterols, being a hallmark of inflamed cells. The statistical analysis showed that the number of lipid bodies was significantly dependent on the exposure time to TNF-α. Overall, observed formation of unsaturated lipid droplets can be directly correlated with the increase in production of prostacyclins - endogenous inflammation mediators.

  9. Unsaturated lipid bodies as a hallmark of inflammation studied by Raman 2D and 3D microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Czamara, K.; Majzner, K.; Selmi, A.; Baranska, M.; Ozaki, Y.; Kaczor, A.

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial HMEC-1 cells incubated with pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α for 6 and 24 hours were studied as a model of inflammation using Raman imaging. Striking changes in distribution, composition and concentration of cellular lipids were observed after exposure to TNF-α compared to the control. In particular, 3D Raman imaging revealed a significant increase in the amount of lipid entities formed under inflammation. Lipid bodies were randomly distributed in the cytoplasm and two types of droplets were assembled: more saturated one, in spectral characteristics resembling phosphatidylcholine and saturated cholesteryl esters, observed also in the control, and highly unsaturated one, containing also cholesterols, being a hallmark of inflamed cells. The statistical analysis showed that the number of lipid bodies was significantly dependent on the exposure time to TNF-α. Overall, observed formation of unsaturated lipid droplets can be directly correlated with the increase in production of prostacyclins - endogenous inflammation mediators. PMID:28098251

  10. The Macrophage Inflammatory Proteins MIP1α (CCL3) and MIP2α (CXCL2) in Implant-Associated Osteomyelitis: Linking Inflammation to Bone Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Dapunt, Ulrike; Maurer, Susanne; Giese, Thomas; Gaida, Matthias Martin; Hänsch, Gertrud Maria

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections of bones remain a serious complication of endoprosthetic surgery. These infections are difficult to treat, because many bacterial species form biofilms on implants, which are relatively resistant towards antibiotics. Bacterial biofilms elicit a progressive local inflammatory response, resulting in tissue damage and bone degradation. In the majority of patients, replacement of the prosthesis is required. To address the question of how the local inflammatory response is linked to bone degradation, tissue samples were taken during surgery and gene expression of the macrophage inflammatory proteins MIP1α (CCL3) and MIP2α (CXCL2) was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR. MIPs were expressed predominantly at osteolytic sites, in close correlation with CD14 which was used as marker for monocytes/macrophages. Colocalisation of MIPs with monocytic cells could be confirmed by histology. In vitro experiments revealed that, aside from monocytic cells, also osteoblasts were capable of MIP production when stimulated with bacteria; moreover, CCL3 induced the differentiation of monocytes to osteoclasts. In conclusion, the multifunctional chemokines CCL3 and CXCL2 are produced locally in response to bacterial infection of bones. In addition to their well described chemokine activity, these cytokines can induce generation of bone resorbing osteoclasts, thus providing a link between bacterial infection and osteolysis. PMID:24795505

  11. GASTRIN, INFLAMMATION, AND CARCINOGENESIS

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Celia; Hellmich, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Chronic infection of the gastric mucosa with Helicobacter pylori has long been recognized as a significant risk factor for gastric cancer, and indeed, this model represents the prototypical inflammation-associated cancer. In this review, we present the latest clinical and experimental evidence showing that gastrin peptides and their receptors (the cholecystokinin [CCK2] receptors) potentiate the progression of gastric cancer and other gastrointestinal malignancies in the presence of inflammation. Recent Findings We highlight the feed-forward mechanisms by which gastrin and CCK2 receptor expression are upregulated during inflammation and in GI cancers, summarize gastrin’s pro-inflammatory role by inducing the production cyclooxgenase-2 (COX-2) and interleukin-8 (IL-8), and relate evidence suggesting that gastrin and their receptors modulate the function of immune cells and fibroblasts following cellular stress, injury, repair, as well as during cancer progression. Summary We discuss trends for future studies directed toward the elucidation of gastrin peptides’ role in regulating inter-cellular molecular signaling mechanisms between local and circulating immune cells, fibroblasts, epithelial cells, and other cell-types in the microenvironments of inflammation-related cancers. Elucidation of the molecular and cellular pathways that relate inflammation with cancer may provide additional opportunities to develop complementary therapies that target the inflammatory microenvironment of the cancer. PMID:19907321

  12. Retroperitoneal inflammation

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001255.htm Retroperitoneal inflammation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Retroperitoneal inflammation is swelling that occurs in the retroperitoneal space. ...

  13. Quercetin, Inflammation and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao; Yao, Jiaying; Han, Chunyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Chaudhry, Maria Tabassum; Wang, Shengnan; Liu, Hongnan; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    In vitro and some animal models have shown that quercetin, a polyphenol derived from plants, has a wide range of biological actions including anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities; as well as attenuating lipid peroxidation, platelet aggregation and capillary permeability. This review focuses on the physicochemical properties, dietary sources, absorption, bioavailability and metabolism of quercetin, especially main effects of quercetin on inflammation and immune function. According to the results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, good perspectives have been opened for quercetin. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to better characterize the mechanisms of action underlying the beneficial effects of quercetin on inflammation and immunity. PMID:26999194

  14. Quercetin, Inflammation and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Yao, Jiaying; Han, Chunyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Chaudhry, Maria Tabassum; Wang, Shengnan; Liu, Hongnan; Yin, Yulong

    2016-03-15

    In vitro and some animal models have shown that quercetin, a polyphenol derived from plants, has a wide range of biological actions including anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities; as well as attenuating lipid peroxidation, platelet aggregation and capillary permeability. This review focuses on the physicochemical properties, dietary sources, absorption, bioavailability and metabolism of quercetin, especially main effects of quercetin on inflammation and immune function. According to the results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, good perspectives have been opened for quercetin. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to better characterize the mechanisms of action underlying the beneficial effects of quercetin on inflammation and immunity.

  15. Anemia of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2014-08-01

    Anemia of inflammation (AI, also called anemia of chronic disease) is a common, typically normocytic, normochromic anemia that is caused by an underlying inflammatory disease. It is diagnosed when serum iron concentrations are low despite adequate iron stores, as evidenced by serum ferritin that is not low. In the setting of inflammation, it may be difficult to differentiate AI from iron deficiency anemia, and the 2 conditions may coexist. Treatment should focus on the underlying disease. Recent advances in molecular understanding of AI are stimulating the development of new pathophysiologically targeted experimental therapies.

  16. Body elimination attitude family resemblance in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Al-Fayez, Ghenaim; Awadalla, Abdelwahid; Arikawa, Hiroko; Templer, Donald I; Hutton, Shane

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the family resemblance of attitude toward body elimination in Kuwaiti participants. This study was conceptualized in the context of the theories of moral development, importance of cleanliness in the Muslim religion, cross-cultural differences in personal hygiene practices, previous research reporting an association between family attitudes and body elimination attitude, and health implications. The 24-item Likert-type format Body Elimination Attitude Scale-Revised was administered to 277 Kuwaiti high school students and 437 of their parents. Females scored higher, indicating greater disgust, than the males. Moreover, sons' body elimination attitude correlated more strongly with fathers' attitude (r = .85) than with that of the mothers (r = .64). Daughters' attitude was similarly associated with the fathers' (r = .89) and the mothers' attitude (r = .86). The high correlations were discussed within the context of Kuwait having a collectivistic culture with authoritarian parenting style. The higher adolescent correlations, and in particular the boys' correlation with fathers than with mothers, was explained in terms of the more dominant role of the Muslim father in the family. Public health and future research implications were suggested. A theoretical formulation was advanced in which "ideal" body elimination attitude is relative rather than absolute, and is a function of one's life circumstances, one's occupation, one's culture and subculture, and the society that one lives in.

  17. Activation of mucosal mast cells promotes inflammation-related colon cancer development through recruiting and modulating inflammatory CD11b(+)Gr1(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lingzhi; Yi, Hong-Gan; Wu, Zhiyuan; Han, Wenxiao; Chen, Kun; Zang, Mengya; Wang, Dongmei; Zhao, Xinhua; Wang, Hongying; Qu, Chunfeng

    2015-08-10

    Mast cells (MCs) have been reported to be one of the important immunoregulatory cells in promoting the development of colitis-related colon cancer (CRC). It is not clear which MC subtypes play critical roles in CRC progression from colitis to cancer because mucosal mast cells (MMCs) are distinct from connective tissue mast cells (CTMCs) in maintaining intestinal barrier function under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. In the current study, we found that MMC numbers and the gene expressions of MMC-specific proteases increased significantly in an induced CRC murine model. The production of mast cell protease-1 (mMCP-1) after MMC activation not only resulted in the accumulation of CD11b(+)Gr1(+) inflammatory cells in the colon tissues but also modulated the activities of CD11b(+)Gr1(+) cells to support tumor cell growth and to inhibit T cell activation. Blocking the MMC activity in mice that had developed colitis-related epithelium dysplasia, CD11b(+)Gr1(+) infiltration was reduced and CRC development was inhibited. Our results suggest that MMC activation recruited and modulated the CD11b(+)Gr1(+) cells to promote CRC and that MMCs can be potential therapeutic targets for the prevention of CRC development.

  18. Identification of Novel Inflammatory Cytokines and Contribution of Keratinocyte-Derived Chemokine to Inflammation in Response to Vibrio vulnificus Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Fei; Wu, Jing; Wang, Ming-Yi; Chen, Ying-Jian; Cao, Yuan; Hu, Cheng-Jin

    2015-10-01

    Currently, only tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin family cytokines have been found to be elicited in Vibrio vulnificus (V. vulnificus)-infected animal models and humans. However, multiple other cytokines are also involved in the immune and inflammatory responses to foreign microorganism infection. Antibody array technology, unlike traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), is able to detect multiple cytokines at one time. Therefore, in this study, we examined the proinflammatory cytokine profile in the serum and liver homogenate samples of bacterial-infected mice using antibody array technology. We identified nine novel cytokines in response to V. vulnificus infection in mice. We found that keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) was the most elevated cytokine and demonstrated that KC played a very important role in the V. vulnificus infection-elicited inflammatory response in mice, as evidenced by the fact that the blocking of KC by anti-KC antibody reduced hepatic injury in vivo and that KC induced by V. vulnificus infection in AML-12 cells chemoattracted neutrophils. Our findings implicate that KC may serve as a novel diagnostic biomarker and a possible therapeutic target for V. vulnificus infection.

  19. Regulation of caspase 14 expression in keratinocytes by inflammatory cytokines--a possible link between reduced skin barrier function and inflammation?

    PubMed

    Hvid, Malene; Johansen, Claus; Deleuran, Bent; Kemp, Kaare; Deleuran, Mette; Vestergaard, Christian

    2011-08-01

    Caspase 14 is a unique member of the cysteinyl aspartate-specific proteinase family. Its expression is confined primarily to cornified epithelium such as the skin. Caspase 14 has been associated with the processing of filaggrin monomers and the development of natural moisturising factors of the skin, and thus, it could be speculated that caspase 14 dysregulation is implicated in the development of an impaired skin barrier function. We have investigated the regulation of caspase 14 transcription in cultured primary keratinocytes following stimulation with a number of factors present in inflamed skin, including T(H)1- and T(H)2-associated cytokines in addition to LPS and peptidoglycan. In particular, we found that T(H)2-associated cytokines reduced the caspase 14 mRNA level significantly. Furthermore, we found that the expression of caspase 14 was reduced in skin biopsies from patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), psoriasis and contact dermatitis, further supporting a role for this kinase in inflammatory skin conditions. Hence, the regulation of caspase 14 levels provides a possible link between impaired skin barrier function and inflammatory reactions in skin diseases such as AD and may offer an explanation to the skin barrier dysfunction in inflamed skin lesions.

  20. Eicosanoids in skin inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Eicosanoids play an integral part in homeostatic mechanisms related to skin health and structural integrity. They also mediate inflammatory events developed in response to environmental factors, such as exposure to ultraviolet radiation, and inflammatory and allergic disorders, including psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. This review article discusses biochemical aspects related to cutaneous eicosanoid metabolism, the contribution of these potent autacoids to skin inflammation and related conditions, and considers the importance of nutritional supplementation with bioactives such as omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and plant-derived antioxidants as means of addressing skin health issues.

  1. Grass carp TGF-β1 impairs IL-1β signaling in the inflammatory responses: Evidence for the potential of TGF-β1 to antagonize inflammation in fish.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinyan; Yang, Xiao; Wen, Chao; Gao, Yajun; Qin, Lei; Zhang, Shengnan; Zhang, Anying; Yang, Kun; Zhou, Hong

    2016-06-01

    results to our knowledge provide the first evidence for inducible TGF-β1 expression in inflammatory process, as well as the induction of inflammatory stimuli on IL-1β expression and signaling. In turn, TGF-β1 suppressed the proinflammatory process in vitro and in vivo presumably via interfering IL-1β expression and signaling in inflammatory response, highlighting the potential of TGF-β1 in the control of inflammation in fish.

  2. [Crohn's disease with the onset resembling systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, T; Nishinarita, S; Son, K; Tomita, Y; Yoshihiro; Matsukawa; Kitamura, N; Horie, T; Baba, M; Hiranuma, M

    1999-06-01

    We described a 37-year-old man with Crohn's disease (CD) resembling systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) at his disease onset. He was admitted to the municiple Akiru Hospital in October 1986 by fever, aphtous oral ulcerations, sore throat and polyarthralgia. Hematologic examination showed leukocytopenia, lymphocytopenia, positive tests for antinuclear antibody, anti-DNA antibody and LE cell phenomenon. He has had episodes of convulsion and conciousness loss of unknown etiology when he was 17 years old. The diagnosis of SLE was made, and oral medication of prednisolone was started. Several weeks later, most of symptoms and autoantibodies disappeared, although the oral aphtous ulcerations and leukocytopenia remained. In May 1987, he admitted to the other hospital because of bloody vomiting. Endoscopic examination showed the esophagial ulceration, and histology of biopsied-specimen was nonspecific esophagitis. The combination of prednisolone and oral cyclophosphamide or methotrexate was employed thereafter. However, the leukocytopenia, oral aphtous ulceration and esophagial ulceration continued in spite of these treatments. All the immunosuppressive treatment was stopped at March 1992. In October 1995, he admitted to our hospital because of body weight loss and continuous diarrhea with occasional bloody stool. Barium enema and endoscopic examination of the colon revealed the findings compatible with CD. The patient responded favorably to methylprednisolone pulse therapy followed by oral sulphasalazine. This case indicated that cases with inflammatory bowel diseases like CD could show similar clinical signs and symptoms to SLE, and in some cases of CD might satisfied the classification of criteria for SLE.

  3. Thermography in ocular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kawali, Ankush A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate ocular inflammatory and non-inflammatory conditions using commercially available thermal camera. Materials and Methods: A non-contact thermographic camera (FLIR P 620) was used to take thermal pictures of seven cases of ocular inflammation, two cases of non-inflammatory ocular pathology, and one healthy subject with mild refractive error only. Ocular inflammatory cases included five cases of scleritis, one case of postoperative anterior uveitis, and a case of meibomian gland dysfunction with keratitis (MGD-keratitis). Non-inflammatory conditions included a case of conjunctival benign reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (BRLH) and a case of central serous chorio-retinopathy. Thermal and non-thermal photographs were taken, and using analyzing software, the ocular surface temperature was calculated. Results: Patient with fresh episode of scleritis revealed high temperature. Eyes with MGD-keratitis depicted lower temperature in clinically more affected eye. Conjunctival BRLH showed a cold lesion on thermography at the site of involvement, in contrast to cases of scleritis with similar clinical presentation. Conclusion: Ocular thermal imaging is an underutilized diagnostic tool which can be used to distinguish inflammatory ocular conditions from non-inflammatory conditions. It can also be utilized in the evaluation of tear film in dry eye syndrome. Its applications should be further explored in uveitis and other ocular disorders. Dedicated “ocular thermographic” camera is today's need of the hour. PMID:24347863

  4. Hyaluronan, a Crucial Regulator of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Petrey, Aaron C.; de la Motte, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA), a major component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), plays a key role in regulating inflammation. Inflammation is associated with accumulation and turnover of HA polymers by multiple cell types. Increasingly through the years, HA has become recognized as an active participant in inflammatory, angiogenic, fibrotic, and cancer promoting processes. HA and its binding proteins regulate the expression of inflammatory genes, the recruitment of inflammatory cells, the release of inflammatory cytokines, and can attenuate the course of inflammation, providing protection against tissue damage. A growing body of evidence suggests the cell responses are HA molecular weight dependent. HA fragments generated by multiple mechanisms throughout the course of inflammatory pathologies, elicit cellular responses distinct from intact HA. This review focuses on the role of HA in the promotion and resolution of inflammation. PMID:24653726

  5. Evolution of Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Okin, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The association of inflammation with modern human diseases (e.g. obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer) remains an unsolved mystery of current biology and medicine. Inflammation is a protective response to noxious stimuli that unavoidably occurs at a cost to normal tissue function. This fundamental tradeoff between the cost and benefit of the inflammatory response has been optimized over evolutionary time for specific environmental conditions. Rapid change of the human environment due to niche construction outpaces genetic adaptation through natural selection, leading increasingly to a mismatch between the modern environment and selected traits. Consequently, multiple tradeoffs that affect human physiology are not optimized to the modern environment, leading to increased disease susceptibility. Here we examine the inflammatory response from an evolutionary perspective. We discuss unique aspects of the inflammatory response and its evolutionary history that can help explain the association between inflammation and modern human diseases. PMID:22975004

  6. Inflammation and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Terzić, Janos; Grivennikov, Sergei; Karin, Eliad; Karin, Michael

    2010-06-01

    The connection between inflammation and tumorigenesis is well-established and in the last decade has received a great deal of supporting evidence from genetic, pharmacological, and epidemiological data. Inflammatory bowel disease is an important risk factor for the development of colon cancer. Inflammation is also likely to be involved with other forms of sporadic as well as heritable colon cancer. The molecular mechanisms by which inflammation promotes cancer development are still being uncovered and could differ between colitis-associated and other forms of colorectal cancer. Recent work has elucidated the role of distinct immune cells, cytokines, and other immune mediators in virtually all steps of colon tumorigenesis, including initiation, promotion, progression, and metastasis. These mechanisms, as well as new approaches to prevention and therapy, are discussed in this review.

  7. Cancer-related inflammation.

    PubMed

    Candido, Juliana; Hagemann, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Solid tumors consist of neoplastic cells, non-malignant stromal cells, and migratory hematopoietic cells. Complex interactions between the cell types in this microenvironment regulate tumor growth, progression, metastasis, and angiogenesis. The cells and mediators of inflammation form a major part of the epithelial tumor microenvironment. In some cancers, inflammatory conditions precede development of malignancy; in others, oncogenic change drives a tumor-promoting inflammatory milieu. Whatever its origin, this "smoldering" inflammation aids proliferation and survival of malignant cells, stimulates angiogenesis and metastasis, subverts adaptive immunity, and alters response to hormones and chemotherapy. Cytokines are major mediators of communication between cells in the inflammatory tumor microenvironment. It is known that neoplastic cells often over-express proinflammatory mediators including proteases, eicosanoids, cytokines, and chemokines. Several cytokines such as macrophage migratory inhibitory factor (MIF), TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17, IL-12, IL-23, IL-10, and TGF-β have been linked with both experimental and human cancers and can either promote or inhibit tumor development. MIF is a major cytokine in many cancers and there is evidence that the cytokine is produced by both malignant cells and infiltrating leukocytes. In this article we will discuss the role of cancer-associated inflammation and the particular role of MIF in malignant disease.

  8. Ion channels in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Eisenhut, Michael; Wallace, Helen

    2011-04-01

    Most physical illness in vertebrates involves inflammation. Inflammation causes disease by fluid shifts across cell membranes and cell layers, changes in muscle function and generation of pain. These disease processes can be explained by changes in numbers or function of ion channels. Changes in ion channels have been detected in diarrhoeal illnesses, pyelonephritis, allergy, acute lung injury and systemic inflammatory response syndromes involving septic shock. The key role played by changes in ion transport is directly evident in inflammation-induced pain. Expression or function of all major categories of ion channels like sodium, chloride, calcium, potassium, transient receptor potential, purinergic receptor and acid-sensing ion channels can be influenced by cyto- and chemokines, prostaglandins, leukotrienes, histamine, ATP, reactive oxygen species and protons released in inflammation. Key pathways in this interaction are cyclic nucleotide, phosphoinositide and mitogen-activated protein kinase-mediated signalling, direct modification by reactive oxygen species like nitric oxide, ATP or protons and disruption of the cytoskeleton. Therapeutic interventions to modulate the adverse and overlapping effects of the numerous different inflammatory mediators on each ion transport system need to target adversely affected ion transport systems directly and locally.

  9. Markers of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Germolec, Dori R; Frawley, Rachel P; Evans, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex and necessary component of an organism's response to biological, chemical or physical stimuli. In the acute phase, cells of the immune system migrate to the site of injury in a carefully orchestrated sequence of events that is mediated by cytokines and acute phase proteins. Depending upon the degree of injury, this acute phase may be sufficient to resolve the damage and initiate healing. Persistent inflammation as a result of prolonged exposure to stimulus or an inappropriate reaction to self molecules can lead to the chronic phase, in which tissue damage and fibrosis can occur. Chronic inflammation is reported to contribute to numerous diseases including allergy, arthritis, asthma, atherosclerosis, autoimmune diseases, diabetes, and cancer, and to conditions of aging. Hematology and clinical chemistry data from standard toxicology studies can provide an initial indication of the presence and sometimes location of inflammation in the absence of specific data on the immune tissues. These data may suggest more specific immune function assays are necessary to determine the existence or mechanism(s) of -immunomodulation. Although changes in hematology dynamics, acute phase proteins, complement factors and cytokines are common to virtually all inflammatory conditions and can be measured by a variety of techniques, individual biomarkers have yet to be strongly associated with specific pathologic events. The specific profile in a given inflammatory condition is dependent upon species, mechanisms, severity, chronicity, and capacity of the immune system to respond and adapt.

  10. Parkinson's disease and systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Carina C; Tarelli, Rodolfo

    2011-02-22

    Peripheral inflammation triggers exacerbation in the central brain's ongoing damage in several neurodegenerative diseases. Systemic inflammatory stimulus induce a general response known as sickness behaviour, indicating that a peripheral stimulus can induce the synthesis of cytokines in the brain. In Parkinson's disease (PD), inflammation was mainly associated with microglia activation that can underlie the neurodegeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Peripheral inflammation can transform the "primed" microglia into an "active" state, which can trigger stronger responses dealing with neurodegenerative processes. Numerous evidences show that systemic inflammatory processes exacerbate ongoing neurodegeneration in PD patient and animal models. Anti-inflammatory treatment in PD patients exerts a neuroprotective effect. In the present paper, we analyse the effect of peripheral infections in the etiology and progression in PD patients and animal models, suggesting that these peripheral immune challenges can exacerbate the symptoms in the disease.

  11. Parkinson's Disease and Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Carina C.; Tarelli, Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral inflammation triggers exacerbation in the central brain's ongoing damage in several neurodegenerative diseases. Systemic inflammatory stimulus induce a general response known as sickness behaviour, indicating that a peripheral stimulus can induce the synthesis of cytokines in the brain. In Parkinson's disease (PD), inflammation was mainly associated with microglia activation that can underlie the neurodegeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Peripheral inflammation can transform the “primed” microglia into an “active” state, which can trigger stronger responses dealing with neurodegenerative processes. Numerous evidences show that systemic inflammatory processes exacerbate ongoing neurodegeneration in PD patient and animal models. Anti-inflammatory treatment in PD patients exerts a neuroprotective effect. In the present paper, we analyse the effect of peripheral infections in the etiology and progression in PD patients and animal models, suggesting that these peripheral immune challenges can exacerbate the symptoms in the disease. PMID:21403862

  12. Mitigation of inflammation with foods.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianli; Schauss, Alexander G

    2012-07-11

    Constant overproduction of pro-inflammatory molecules leads to chronic inflammation. Unlike acute inflammation, which is essential for healing, chronic inflammation can delay healing and, if left unchecked, contribute to a host of diseases. There is growing evidence that some dietary factors can play important roles in maintaining health and even reversing the progression of chronic diseases, with anti-inflammatory effects as important underlying mechanism. Such findings add to the body of evidence that certain dietary components, including polyphenols and other types of compounds, found in various dietary factors including fruits, berries, vegetables, nuts, whole grains, and foods of marine origin, can play an important role in attenuating and mitigating chronic pro-inflammatory processes associated with chronic diseases.

  13. 99th Dahlem Conference on Infection, Inflammation and Chronic Inflammatory Disorders: Immune therapies of type 1 diabetes: new opportunities based on the hygiene hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Chatenoud, L; You, S; Okada, H; Kuhn, C; Michaud, B; Bach, J-F

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes is a prototypic organ-specific autoimmune disease resulting from the selective destruction of insulin-secreting β cells within pancreatic islets of Langerhans by an immune-mediated inflammation involving autoreactive CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes which infiltrate pancreatic islets. Current treatment is substitutive, i.e. chronic use of exogenous insulin which, in spite of significant advances, is still associated with major constraints (multiple daily injections, risks of hypoglycaemia) and lack of effectiveness over the long term in preventing severe degenerative complications. Finding a cure for autoimmune diabetes by establishing effective immune-based therapies is a real medical health challenge, as the disease incidence increases steadily in industrialized countries. As the disease affects mainly children and young adults, any candidate immune therapy must therefore be safe and avoid a sustained depression of immune responses with the attendant problems of recurrent infection and drug toxicity. Thus, inducing or restoring immune tolerance to target autoantigens, controlling the pathogenic response while preserving the host reactivity to exogenous/unrelated antigens, appears to be the ideal approach. Our objective is to review the major progress accomplished over the last 20 years towards that aim. In addition, we would like to present another interesting possibility to access new preventive strategies based on the ‘hygiene hypothesis’, which proposes a causal link between the increasing incidence of autoimmune diseases, including diabetes, and the decrease of the infectious burden. The underlying rationale is to identify microbial-derived compounds mediating the protective activity of infections which could be developed therapeutically. PMID:20415859

  14. Inflammation in diabetic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Patricia M; Getino-Melián, María A; Domínguez-Pimentel, Virginia; Navarro-González, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus entails significant health problems worldwide. The pathogenesis of diabetes is multifactorial, resulting from interactions of both genetic and environmental factors that trigger a complex network of pathophysiological events, with metabolic and hemodynamic alterations. In this context, inflammation has emerged as a key pathophysiology mechanism. New pathogenic pathways will provide targets for prevention or future treatments. This review will focus on the implications of inflammation in diabetes mellitus, with special attention to inflammatory cytokines. PMID:25126391

  15. Calprotectin Is a Useful Tool in Distinguishing Coexisting Irritable Bowel-Like Symptoms from That of Occult Inflammation among Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Jelsness-Jørgensen, Lars-Petter; Bernklev, Tomm; Moum, Bjørn

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim. In the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), many symptoms are similar to the functional disorder irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A challenge is thus to distinguish symptoms of IBD from IBS. The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of calprotectin in IBS-positive IBD patients in remission. Methods. Remission was defined as a simple clinical colitis activity index (SCCAI) or simple crohn's disease activity index (SCDAI) score of less than three and less than four, respectively. The Rome II criteria were used to identify cases, and the calprotectin ELISA test was used to quantify calprotectin in stools. Results. The Rome II criteria were fulfilled in 24.6% of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, while the comparable number for Crohn's disease (CD) was 21.4%. There was a tendency for elevated fecal calprotectin levels in IBS-positive patients, regardless of diagnosis. However, these differences were only significant in CD. Conclusions. Calprotectin levels are elevated in subgroups of IBD patients that are in remission and have coexisting IBS-like symptoms. This study underscores the clinical usefulness of a noninvasive marker to distinguish patients in need of intensified followup from those that do not need further workup. PMID:23476638

  16. Surgical inflammation: a pathophysiological rainbow

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Jose-Ignacio; Aller, María-Angeles; Arias, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Tetrapyrrole molecules are distributed in virtually all living organisms on Earth. In mammals, tetrapyrrole end products are closely linked to oxygen metabolism. Since increasingly complex trophic functional systems for using oxygen are considered in the post-traumatic inflammatory response, it can be suggested that tetrapyrrole molecules and, particularly their derived pigments, play a key role in modulating inflammation. In this way, the diverse colorfulness that the inflammatory response triggers during its evolution would reflect the major pathophysiological importance of these pigments in each one of its phases. Therefore, the need of exploiting this color resource could be considered for both the diagnosis and treatment of the inflammation. PMID:19309494

  17. Oral inflammation in small animals.

    PubMed

    Lommer, Milinda J

    2013-05-01

    The oral cavity can be affected by a wide variety of disorders characterized by inflammation of the gingiva and/or oral mucosa. In dogs and cats, differential diagnoses for generalized oral inflammatory disorders include plaque-reactive mucositis, chronic gingivostomatitis, eosinophilic granuloma complex, pemphigus and pemphigoid disorders, erythema multiforme, and systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition, endodontic or periodontal abscesses, infectious conditions, reactive lesions, and neoplastic conditions may initially present with localized or generalized inflammation of the oral mucosa. Determination of the underlying cause of an oral inflammatory condition relies on a thorough history, complete physical and oral examination, and incisional biopsy and histopathologic examination of lesions.

  18. Inflammation in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Johnny; Kern, Timothy S.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes causes a number of metabolic and physiologic abnormalities in the retina, but which of these abnormalities contribute to recognized features of diabetic retinopathy (DR) is less clear. Many of the molecular and physiologic abnormalities that have been found to develop in the retina in diabetes are consistent with inflammation. Moreover, a number of anti-inflammatory therapies have been found to significantly inhibit development of different aspects of DR in animal models. Herein, we review the inflammatory mediators and their relationship to early and late DR, and discuss the potential of anti-inflammatory approaches to inhibit development of different stages of the retinopathy. We focus primarily on information derived from in vivo studies, supplementing with information from in vitro studies were important. PMID:21635964

  19. Models of inflammation: carrageenan air pouch.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Djane B; Vasko, Michael R; Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2012-03-01

    The subcutaneous air pouch is an in vivo model that can be used to study acute and chronic inflammation, the resolution of the inflammatory response, and the oxidative stress response. Injection of irritants into an air pouch in rats or mice induces an inflammatory response that can be quantified by the volume of exudate produced, the infiltration of cells, and the release of inflammatory mediators. The model presented in this unit has been extensively used to identify potential anti-inflammatory drugs.

  20. Endogenous Inhibitors of Kidney Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Trostel, Jessica; Garcia, Gabriela E.

    2015-01-01

    Although inflammation is the physiological response to pathogen invasion and tissue damage, it can also be responsible for significant tissue damage. Therefore, the inflammatory response must be carefully regulated to prevent critical inflammatory damage to vital organs. Typically, local endogenous regulatory mechanisms adjust the magnitude of the response such that the injurious condition is resolved and homeostasis is mantained. Humoral mechanisms that restrain or inhibit inflammation include glucocorticoid hormones, anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and soluble cytokine receptors; other mediators facilitate tissue healing, like lipoxins and resolvins. There is growing evidence that inflammation plays a critical role in the development and progression of heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, kidney diseases, sepsis, and several fibroproliferative disorders. Consequently, understanding the mechanisms that regulate inflammation may offer therapeutic targets for inhibiting the progression of several diseases. In this article, we review the significance of several novel endogenous anti-inflammatory mediators in the protection from kidney injury and the potential of these regulatory molecules as therapeutic targets for treatment of kidney inflammatory diseases. PMID:26779569

  1. Mechanisms Underlying Inflammation in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Christopher K.; Saijo, Kaoru; Winner, Beate; Marchetto, Maria Carolina; Gage, Fred H.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation is associated with many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and multiple sclerosis. In this Review, we discuss inducers, sensors, transducers, and effectors of neuroinflammation that contribute to neuronal dysfunction and death. Although inducers of inflammation may be generated in a disease-specific manner, there is evidence for a remarkable convergence in the mechanisms responsible for the sensing, transduction, and amplification of inflammatory processes that result in the production of neurotoxic mediators. A major unanswered question is whether pharmacological inhibition of inflammation pathways will be able to safely reverse or slow the course of disease. PMID:20303880

  2. Curcumin in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Shehzad, Adeeb; Rehman, Gauhar; Lee, Young Sup

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a yellow coloring agent extracted from turmeric is also used as a remedy for the treatment and prevention of inflammatory diseases. Acute and chronic inflammation is a major factor in the progression of obesity, type II diabetes, arthritis, pancreatitis, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and metabolic diseases, as well as certain types of cancer. Turmeric has a long history of use in Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. Recent studies on the efficacy and therapeutic applicability of turmeric have suggested that the active ingredient of tumeric is curcumin. Further, compelling evidence has shown that curcumin has the ability to inhibit inflammatory cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis through multiple molecular targets and mechanisms of action. Curcumin is safe, non-toxic, and mediates its anti-inflammatory effects through the down-regulation of inflammatory transcription factors, cytokines, redox status, protein kinases, and enzymes that all promote inflammation. In addition, curcumin induces apoptosis through mitochondrial and receptor-mediated pathways, as well as activation of caspase cascades. In the current study, the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin were evaluated relative to various chronic inflammatory diseases. Based on the available pharmacological data obtained from in vitro and in vivo research, as well as clinical trials, an opportunity exists to translate curcumin into clinics for the prevention of inflammatory diseases in the near future.

  3. Models of Inflammation: Carrageenan Air Pouch.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Djane B; Vasko, Michael R; Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2016-03-18

    The subcutaneous air pouch is an in vivo model that can be used to study the components of acute and chronic inflammation, the resolution of the inflammatory response, the oxidative stress response, and potential therapeutic targets for treating inflammation. Injection of irritants into an air pouch in rats or mice induces an inflammatory response that can be quantified by the volume of exudate produced, the infiltration of cells, and the release of inflammatory mediators. The model presented in this unit has been extensively used to identify potential anti-inflammatory drugs.

  4. Macrophages in Synovial Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Aisling; Fearon, Ursula; Veale, Douglas J.; Godson, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Synovial macrophages are one of the resident cell types in synovial tissue and while they remain relatively quiescent in the healthy joint, they become activated in the inflamed joint and, along with infiltrating monocytes/macrophages, regulate secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and enzymes involved in driving the inflammatory response and joint destruction. Synovial macrophages are positioned throughout the sub-lining layer and lining layer at the cartilage–pannus junction and mediate articular destruction. Sub-lining macrophages are now also considered as the most reliable biomarker for disease severity and response to therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There is a growing understanding of the molecular drivers of inflammation and an appreciation that the resolution of inflammation is an active process rather than a passive return to homeostasis, and this has implications for our understanding of the role of macrophages in inflammation. Macrophage phenotype determines the cytokine secretion profile and tissue destruction capabilities of these cells. Whereas inflammatory synovial macrophages have not yet been classified into one phenotype or another it is widely known that TNFα and IL-l, characteristically released by M1 macrophages, are abundant in RA while IL-10 activity, characteristic of M2 macrophages, is somewhat diminished. Here we will briefly review our current understanding of macrophages and macrophage polarization in RA as well as the elements implicated in controlling polarization, such as cytokines and transcription factors like NFκB, IRFs and NR4A, and pro-resolving factors, such as LXA4 and other lipid mediators which may promote a non-inflammatory, pro-resolving phenotype, and may represent a novel therapeutic paradigm. PMID:22566842

  5. [Auto-inflammatory syndromes].

    PubMed

    Grateau, Gilles

    2005-02-28

    Auto-inflammatory syndromes are a group of hereditary diseases characterised by intermittent bouts of clinical inflammation with focal organ involvement mainly: abdomen, musculoskeletal system and skin. The most frequent is familial Mediterranean fever, which affects patients of Mediterranean descent all over the world. Three other types have been recently clinically as well as genetically characterised. A thorough diagnosis is warranted, as clinical and therapeutic management is specific for each of these diseases, as underlied by a specific inflammatory pathway. This new group of diseases has already opened new avenues in our understanding of the inflammatory response.

  6. Inflammation and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wersinger, Christophe; Sidhu, Anita

    2002-09-01

    Numerous recent findings indicate the possible involvement of an immune mechanism in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration. The immune reaction could either act as a primary event, generating changes leading to cell death, or could be a secondary response to neuronal injury. In various neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Huntington's or Pick's disease, Down's syndrome, multiple sclerosis and the AIDS-dementia complex, the inflammatory pathomechanism is strongly supported by experimental and clinical studies. Such inflammatory mechanisms have also been postulated in Parkinson's disease (PD). This review summarizes some generalities about inflammation and immune reactions in the context of the brain, and provides clinical, epidemiological and experimental data showing that inflammation and immunity, or even auto-immunity, could be implicated in PD, either in its initial step or in its progression. Different experimental models useful for studying the role(s) of inflammation and (auto)immunity in the neurodegenerative process of the dopaminergic neurons in PD are examined. The major similarities and differences between PD and other neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  7. Purinergic receptors in ocular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Aranguez, Ana; Gasull, Xavier; Diebold, Yolanda; Pintor, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly "tuned," can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P(1),P(4)-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A), and P(1),P(5)-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A) are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)-5'-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101) have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases) can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation.

  8. Gut Microbiota and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hakansson, Asa; Molin, Goran

    2011-01-01

    Systemic and local inflammation in relation to the resident microbiota of the human gastro-intestinal (GI) tract and administration of probiotics are the main themes of the present review. The dominating taxa of the human GI tract and their potential for aggravating or suppressing inflammation are described. The review focuses on human trials with probiotics and does not include in vitro studies and animal experimental models. The applications of probiotics considered are systemic immune-modulation, the metabolic syndrome, liver injury, inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and radiation-induced enteritis. When the major genomic differences between different types of probiotics are taken into account, it is to be expected that the human body can respond differently to the different species and strains of probiotics. This fact is often neglected in discussions of the outcome of clinical trials with probiotics. PMID:22254115

  9. Infection, Inflammation, and Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, M.V.; Puleo, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Various strategies have been developed to promote bone regeneration in the craniofacial region. Most of these interventions utilize implantable materials or devices. Infections resulting from colonization of these implants may result in local tissue destruction in a manner analogous to periodontitis. This destruction is mediated via the expression of various inflammatory mediators and tissue-destructive enzymes. Given the well-documented association among microbial biofilms, inflammatory mediators, and tissue destruction, it seems reasonable to assume that inflammation may interfere with bone healing and regeneration. Paradoxically, recent evidence also suggests that the presence of certain pro-inflammatory mediators is actually required for bone healing. Bone injury (e.g., subsequent to a fracture or surgical intervention) is followed by a choreographed cascade of events, some of which are dependent upon the presence of pro-inflammatory mediators. If inflammation resolves promptly, then proper bone healing may occur. However, if inflammation persists (which might occur in the presence of an infected implant or graft material), then the continued inflammatory response may result in suboptimal bone formation. Thus, the effect of a given mediator is dependent upon the temporal context in which it is expressed. Better understanding of this temporal sequence may be used to optimize regenerative outcomes. PMID:21248364

  10. Inflammation in Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ruilong; Liang, Helena; Clarke, Elizabeth; Jackson, Christopher; Xue, Meilang

    2016-01-01

    Non-healing chronic wounds present a major biological, psychological, social, and financial burden on both individual patients and the broader health system. Pathologically extensive inflammation plays a major role in the disruption of the normal healing cascade. The causes of chronic wounds (venous, arterial, pressure, and diabetic ulcers) can be examined through a juxtaposition of normal healing and the rogue inflammatory response created by the common components within chronic wounds (ageing, hypoxia, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, and bacterial colonisation). Wound bed care through debridement, dressings, and antibiotics currently form the basic mode of treatment. Despite recent setbacks, pharmaceutical adjuncts form an interesting area of research. PMID:27973441

  11. Sleep Loss and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Norah S.; Meier-Ewert, Hans K.; Haack, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Controlled, experimental studies on the effects of acute sleep loss in humans have shown that mediators of inflammation are altered by sleep loss. Elevations in these mediators have been found to occur in healthy, rigorously screened individuals undergoing experimental vigils of more than 24 hours, and have also been seen in response to various durations of sleep restricted to between 25 and 50% of a normal 8 hour sleep amount. While these altered profiles represent small changes, such sub-clinical shifts in basal inflammatory cytokines are known to be associated with the future development of metabolic syndrome disease in healthy, asymptomatic individuals. Although the mechanism of this altered inflammatory status in humans undergoing experimental sleep loss is unknown, it is likely that autonomic activation and metabolic changes play key roles. PMID:21112025

  12. Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS): A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Soma Madhan; Lath, Rahul; Swain, Meenakshi; Ranjan, Alok

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) is a recently described inflammatory disease of central nervous system with distinct clinical and radiological features. The etiopathogenesis of this rare entity remains to be understood. The histopathological findings closely resemble chronic inflammatory diseases like sarcoidosis and malignancies like lymphoma. With advancements in serology, immunopathology and radiology CLIPPERS is identified as a distinct entity that differs considerably in its clinical presentation, immunopathology, radiological findings and response to steroids. We describe a case that presented to us with progressive quadriparesis and lower cranial nerve deficits whose radiological and pathological findings were consistent with CLIPPERS. The patient had a good outcome with long term immunosuppression.

  13. [Inflammation of the parathyroid glands].

    PubMed

    Ting, S; Synoracki, S; Sheu, S-Y; Schmid, K W

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation of the parathyroid glands is rare when compared to other endocrine organs. This leads to the use of descriptive terms as well as the lack of a generally accepted classification for inflammatory disorders of the parathyroid glands. This review article proposes that parathyroid inflammation be subdivided morphologically into (a) non-specific lymphocytic infiltration, which is more an expression of damage to small vessels, due to e. g. severe systemic inflammation or myocardial infarction, (b) autoimmunogenic lymphocytic parathyroiditis, (c) nonimmunogenic inflammation caused by granulomatous diseases or infections and (d) invasive sclerosing (peri) parathyroiditis. As only parathyroid glands removed due to hyperparathyroidism and normal parathyroid glands incidentally removed during thyroid surgery are seen almost exclusively in routine histopathology, virtually no information about the morphological correlate of hypoparathyroidism is available.

  14. Diabetes mellitus and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lontchi-Yimagou, Eric; Sobngwi, Eugene; Matsha, Tandi E; Kengne, Andre Pascal

    2013-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increasingly common worldwide. Related complications account for increased morbidity and mortality, and enormous healthcare spending. Knowledge of the pathophysiological derangements involved in the occurrence of diabetes and related complications is critical for successful prevention and control solutions. Epidemiologic studies have established an association between inflammatory biomarkers and the occurrence of T2DM and complications. Adipose tissue appears to be a major site of production of those inflammatory biomarkers, as a result of the cross-talk between adipose cells, macrophages, and other immune cells that infiltrate the expanding adipose tissue. The triggering mechanisms of the inflammation in T2DM are still ill-understood. Inflammatory response likely contributes to T2DM occurrence by causing insulin resistance, and is in turn intensified in the presence of hyperglycemia to promote long-term complications of diabetes. Targeting inflammatory pathways could possibly be a component of the strategies to prevent and control diabetes and related complications.

  15. Inflammation and epigenetic regulation in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Abu-Amer, Yousef; O'Keefe, Regis J.; McAlinden, Audrey

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) was once defined as a non-inflammatory arthropathy, but it is now well-recognized that there is a major inflammatory component to this disease. In addition to synovial cells, articular chondrocytes and other cells of diarthrodial joints are also known to express inflammatory mediators. It has been proposed that targeting inflammation pathways could be a promising strategy to treat OA. There have been many reports of cross-talk between inflammation and epigenetic factors in cartilage. Specifically, inflammatory mediators have been shown to regulate levels of enzymes that catalyze changes in DNA methylation and histone structure, as well as alter levels of non-coding RNAs. In addition, expression levels of a number of these epigenetic factors have been shown to be altered in OA, thereby suggesting potential interplay between inflammation and epigenetics in this disease. This review provides information on inflammatory pathways in arthritis and summarizes published research on how epigenetic regulators are affected by inflammation in chondrocytes. Furthermore, we discuss data showing how altered expression of some of these epigenetic factors can induce either catabolic or anti-catabolic effects in response to inflammatory signals. A better understanding of how inflammation affects epigenetic factors in OA may provide us with novel therapeutic strategies to treat this condition. PMID:27389927

  16. [Signaling mechanisms involved in resolution of inflammation].

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Villagrana, Rodolfo Daniel; Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto Rafael; Presno-Bernal, José Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a physiological process, which eliminates pathogens and induces repair of damaged tissue. This process is controlled by negative feedback mechanisms, but if the inflammation persists, it generates a deleterious autoimmune process or can to contribute with diseases such as obesity or cancer. The inflammation resolution involves mechanisms such as decrease of proliferation and maturation of immune cells, phagocytosis and apoptosis of immune cells, and decrease of proinflammatory mediators. Therefore, is relevant to study the physiological effects of specific receptors that participate in inflammation resolution and the design of specific agonists as conventional anti-inflammatory therapeutics, without dramatic collateral effects. In this review, we study some mechanisms associated with inflammation inhibition, particularly the transduction of receptors for ligands with anti-inflammatory effects and that are relevant for their potential therapeutic.

  17. Anti-Inflammatory Agents for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rayburn, Elizabeth R.; Ezell, Scharri J.; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation is closely linked to cancer, and many anti-cancer agents are also used to treat inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. Moreover, chronic inflammation increases the risk for various cancers, indicating that eliminating inflammation may represent a valid strategy for cancer prevention and therapy. This article explores the relationship between inflammation and cancer with an emphasis on epidemiological evidence, summarizes the current use of anti-inflammatory agents for cancer prevention and therapy, and describes the mechanisms underlying the anti-cancer effects of anti-inflammatory agents. Since monotherapy is generally insufficient for treating cancer, the combined use of anti-inflammatory agents and conventional cancer therapy is also a focal point in discussion. In addition, we also briefly describe future directions that should be explored for anti-cancer anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:20333321

  18. Inflammation and Human Ovarian Follicular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Boots, Christina E.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a biologic process that mediates tissue effects including vasodilation, hyperemia, edema, collagenolysis and cell proliferation through complex immunologic pathways. In regards to the ovary, inflammation has key physiologic roles in ovarian folliculogenesis and ovulation. On the other hand inflammatory processes are subject to underlying pathology and if pushed, pro-inflammatory conditions may have a negative impact on ovarian follicular dynamics. Obesity and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) serve as examples of conditions associated with chronic endogenous production of low-grade pro-inflammatory cytokines. Both conditions negatively impact ovarian folliculogenesis and ovulation. The pages that follow summarize the role of inflammation in normal ovarian follicular dynamics and evidence for its role in mediating the negative effects of obesity and PCOS on ovarian follicular dynamics. The review concludes with a summary supporting a role for lifestyle factors that favorably impact inflammatory process involved in obesity and PCOS to improve ovarian function. PMID:26132931

  19. Resolution of inflammation: a new therapeutic frontier.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, James N; Gilroy, Derek W

    2016-08-01

    Dysregulated inflammation is a central pathological process in diverse disease states. Traditionally, therapeutic approaches have sought to modulate the pro- or anti-inflammatory limbs of inflammation, with mixed success. However, insight into the pathways by which inflammation is resolved has highlighted novel opportunities to pharmacologically manipulate these processes - a strategy that might represent a complementary (and perhaps even superior) therapeutic approach. This Review discusses the state of the art in the biology of resolution of inflammation, highlighting the opportunities and challenges for translational research in this field.

  20. [Inflammatory process, histopathological aspects].

    PubMed

    Diébold, J

    1995-01-01

    Inflammation occurs only in conjunctive tissue and is the result of a close cooperation of various cells: blood platelets, endothelial cells, leucocytes, mast cells, fibroblasts. Successive phases can be recognized, the first is characterized by vascular phenomenons defining the acute phase. The second by cellular reactions defining the chronic or granulomatous phase. Various morphological patterns can be recognized in acute or chronic inflammation. In addition, hypersensitivity is responsible of peculiar morphology of the inflammatory response. After tissue necrosis, tissular debris should be eliminated by detersion. Then, a granulation tissue develops representing the first step of the healing, which will not be described here.

  1. Role of hypoxia-inducible factor 1{alpha} in modulating cobalt-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Saini, Yogesh; Kim, Kyung Y; Lewandowski, Ryan; Bramble, Lori A; Harkema, Jack R; Lapres, John J

    2010-02-01

    Hypoxia plays an important role in development, cellular homeostasis, and pathological conditions, such as cancer and stroke. There is also growing evidence that hypoxia is an important modulator of the inflammatory process. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are a family of proteins that regulate the cellular response to oxygen deficit, and loss of HIFs impairs inflammatory cell function. There is little known, however, about the role of epithelial-derived HIF signaling in modulating inflammation. Cobalt is capable of eliciting an allergic response and promoting HIF signaling. To characterize the inflammatory function of epithelial-derived HIF in response to inhaled cobalt, a conditional lung-specific HIF1alpha, the most ubiquitously expressed HIF, deletion mouse, was created. Control mice showed classic signs of metal-induced injury following cobalt exposure, including fibrosis and neutrophil infiltration. In contrast, HIF1alpha-deficient mice displayed a Th2 response that resembled asthma, including increased eosinophilic infiltration, mucus cell metaplasia, and chitinase-like protein expression. The results suggest that epithelial-derived HIF signaling has a critical role in establishing a tissue's inflammatory response, and compromised HIF1alpha signaling biases the tissue towards a Th2-mediated reaction.

  2. Obesity, Inflammation and Diet

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hansongyi; Lee, In Seok

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a state in which there is an over-accumulation of subcutaneous and/or abdominal adipose tissue. This adipose tissue is no longer considered inert and mainly devoted to storing energy; it is emerging as an active tissue in the regulation of physiological and pathological processes, including immunity and inflammation. Adipose tissue produces and releases a variety of adipokines (leptin, adiponectin, resistin, and visfatin), as well as pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin [IL]-4, IL-6, and others). Adipose tissue is also implicated in the development of chronic metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus or cardiovascular disease. Obesity is thus an underlying condition for inflammatory and metabolic diseases. Diet or dietary patterns play critical roles in obesity and other pathophysiological conditions. A healthy diet and some nutrients are generally considered beneficial; however, some dietary nutrients are still considered controversial. In this article, dietary factors that influence inflammation associated with obesity are discussed. PMID:24224147

  3. Anemia of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Roy, Cindy N

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation arising from various etiologies, including infection, autoimmune disorders, chronic diseases, and aging, can promote anemia. The anemia of inflammation (AI) is most often normocytic and normochromic and is usually mild. Characteristic changes in systemic iron handling, erythrocyte production, and erythrocyte life span all contribute to AI. The preferred treatment is directed at the underlying disease. However, when the inflammatory insult is intractable, or the cause has not been diagnosed, there are limited options for treatment of AI. Because anemia is a comorbid condition that is associated with poor outcomes in various chronic disease states, understanding its pathogenesis and developing new tools for its treatment should remain a priority. Hepcidin antimicrobial peptide has taken center stage in recent years as a potent modulator of iron availability. As the technology for quantitative hepcidin analysis improves, hepcidin's role in various disease states is also being revealed. Recent insights concerning the regulatory pathways that modify hepcidin expression have identified novel targets for drug development. As the field advances with such therapeutics, the analysis of the impact of normalized hemoglobin on disease outcomes will confirm whether anemia is a reversible independent contributor to the morbidity and mortality associated with inflammatory diseases.

  4. Bioactive Egg Components and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a normal acute response of the immune system to pathogens and tissue injury. However, chronic inflammation is known to play a significant role in the pathophysiology of numerous chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cancer. Thus, the impact of dietary factors on inflammation may provide key insight into mitigating chronic disease risk. Eggs are recognized as a functional food that contain a variety of bioactive compounds that can influence pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Interestingly, the effects of egg consumption on inflammation varies across different populations, including those that are classified as healthy, overweight, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetic. The following review will discuss the pro- and anti-inflammatory properties of egg components, with a focus on egg phospholipids, cholesterol, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, and bioactive proteins. The effects of egg consumption of inflammation across human populations will additionally be presented. Together, these findings have implications for population-specific dietary recommendations and chronic disease risk. PMID:26389951

  5. Intentions vs. resemblance: understanding pictures in typical development and autism.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Calum; Allen, Melissa L

    2014-04-01

    Research has debated whether children reflect on artists' intentions when comprehending pictures, or instead derive meaning entirely from resemblance. We explore these hypotheses by comparing how typically developing toddlers and low-functioning children with autism (a population impaired in intentional reasoning) interpret abstract pictures. In Experiment 1, both groups mapped familiar object names onto abstract pictures, however, they related the same representations to different 3-D referents. Toddlers linked abstract pictures with intended referents they did not resemble, while children with autism mapped picture-referent relations based on resemblance. Experiment 2 showed that toddlers do not rely upon linguistic cues to determine intended referential relations. Experiment 3 confirmed that the responding of children with autism was not due to perseveration or associative word learning, and also provided independent evidence of their intention-reading difficulties. We argue that typically developing children derive meaning from the social-communicative intentions underlying pictures when resemblance is an inadequate cue to meaning. By contrast, children with autism do not reflect on artists' intentions and simply relate pictures to whatever they happen to resemble.

  6. Vitamin D and inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kai; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2014-01-01

    Beyond its critical function in calcium homeostasis, vitamin D has recently been found to play an important role in the modulation of the immune/inflammation system via regulating the production of inflammatory cytokines and inhibiting the proliferation of proinflammatory cells, both of which are crucial for the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Several studies have associated lower vitamin D status with increased risk and unfavorable outcome of acute infections. Vitamin D supplementation bolsters clinical responses to acute infection. Moreover, chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular disease, asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, chronic kidney disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and others, tend to have lower vitamin D status, which may play a pleiotropic role in the pathogenesis of the diseases. In this article, we review recent epidemiological and interventional studies of vitamin D in various inflammatory diseases. The potential mechanisms of vitamin D in regulating immune/inflammatory responses in inflammatory diseases are also discussed. PMID:24971027

  7. The effect of maternal Inflammation on foetal programming of metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Ingvorsen, C; Brix, S; Ozanne, S E; Hellgren, L I

    2015-08-01

    Maternal obesity during pregnancy increases the child's risk of developing obesity and obesity-related diseases later in life. Key components in foetal programming of metabolic risk remain to be identified; however, chronic low-grade inflammation associated with obesity might be responsible for metabolic imprinting in the offspring. We have therefore surveyed the literature to evaluate the role of maternal obesity-induced inflammation in foetal programming of obesity and related diseases. The literature on this topic is limited, so this review also includes animal models where maternal inflammation is mimicked by single injections with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). An LPS challenge results in an immunological response that resembles the obesity-induced immune profile, although LPS injections provoke a stronger response than the subclinical obesity-associated response. Maternal LPS or cytokine exposures result in increased adiposity and impaired metabolic homeostasis in the offspring, similar to the phenotype observed after exposure to maternal obesity. The cytokine levels might be specifically important for the metabolic imprinting, as cytokines are both transferable from maternal to foetal circulation and have the capability to modulate placental nutrient transfer. However, the immune response associated with obesity is moderate and therefore potentially weakened by the pregnancy-driven immune modulation, dominated by anti-inflammatory Treg and Th2 cells. We know from other low-grade inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, that pregnancy can improve disease state. If pregnancy is also capable of suppressing the obesity-associated inflammation, the immunological markers might be less likely to affect metabolic programming in the developing foetus than otherwise implied.

  8. A hypothesis to explain accuracy of wasp resemblances.

    PubMed

    Boppré, Michael; Vane-Wright, Richard I; Wickler, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Mimicry is one of the oldest concepts in biology, but it still presents many puzzles and continues to be widely debated. Simulation of wasps with a yellow-black abdominal pattern by other insects (commonly called "wasp mimicry") is traditionally considered a case of resemblance of unprofitable by profitable prey causing educated predators to avoid models and mimics to the advantage of both (Figure 1a). However, as wasps themselves are predators of insects, wasp mimicry can also be seen as a case of resemblance to one's own potential antagonist. We here propose an additional hypothesis to Batesian and Müllerian mimicry (both typically involving selection by learning vertebrate predators; cf. Table 1) that reflects another possible scenario for the evolution of multifold and in particular very accurate resemblances to wasps: an innate, visual inhibition of aggression among look-alike wasps, based on their social organization and high abundance. We argue that wasp species resembling each other need not only be Müllerian mutualists and that other insects resembling wasps need not only be Batesian mimics, but an innate ability of wasps to recognize each other during hunting is the driver in the evolution of a distinct kind of masquerade, in which model, mimic, and selecting agent belong to one or several species (Figure  1b). Wasp mimics resemble wasps not (only) to be mistaken by educated predators but rather, or in addition, to escape attack from their wasp models. Within a given ecosystem, there will be selection pressures leading to masquerade driven by wasps and/or to mimicry driven by other predators that have to learn to avoid them. Different pressures by guilds of these two types of selective agents could explain the widely differing fidelity with respect to the models in assemblages of yellow jackets and yellow jacket look-alikes.

  9. Role of inflammation in the aging bones.

    PubMed

    Abdelmagid, Samir M; Barbe, Mary F; Safadi, Fayez F

    2015-02-15

    Chronic inflammation in aging is characterized by increased inflammatory cytokines, bone loss, decreased adaptation, and defective tissue repair in response to injury. Aging leads to inherent changes in mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation, resulting in impaired osteoblastogenesis. Also, the pro-inflammatory cytokines increase with aging, leading to enhanced myelopoiesis and osteoclastogenesis. Bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) play pivotal roles in osteoblast differentiation, the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), and subsequent bone repair. However, during aging, little is known about the role of macrophages in the differentiation and function of MSC and HSC. Aged mammals have higher circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines than young adults, supporting the hypothesis of increased inflammation with aging. This review will aid in the understanding of the potential role(s) of pro-inflammatory (M1) and anti-inflammatory (M2) macrophages in differentiation and function of osteoblasts and osteoclasts in relation to aging.

  10. Inflammation as a cause of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Saghazadeh, Amene; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-03-01

    Inflammatory markers are highly amenable to appraise and adjust and could already serve as a diagnostic indicator and also as a predictor of prognosis over the management of many health problems. Inflammation is implicated in venous thromboembolism (VTE). However there is still an intense curiosity about whether it is a cause or only a consequence of the thromboembolic process. The more likely scenario is that some inflammatory mediators contribute to the development of VTE, which per se induces an inflammatory reaction. Here we will review evidences supporting the role of inflammation as a cause of VTE. Genetic association studies have provided possible links between inflammation-related genetic variants, especially cytokines (e.g. IL-1, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-13), and VTE, leading to establish the fundamental role of genetic background in predisposition to VTE and variable inflammatory processes in individuals. Additionally, several inflammation-related conditions including aging, autoimmune disease, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, hormone replacement therapy, infectious diseases, metabolic diseases, overweight or obesity, pregnancy or postpartum, respiratory diseases, and trauma have been associated with an increased risk of VTE. At this moment, despite their theoretical potential, to achieve the implementation of the inflammation-related laboratory tests in practice is a long task and future studies with larger sample sizes are required to address whether the properties of the inflammatory process, particularly intensity and duration, are useful in determining the risk of VTE and following outcomes.

  11. Lacrimal gland inflammation is responsible for ocular pathology in TGF-beta 1 null mice.

    PubMed Central

    McCartney-Francis, N. L.; Mizel, D. E.; Frazier-Jessen, M.; Kulkarni, A. B.; McCarthy, J. B.; Wahl, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Mice homozygous for a nonfunctional transforming growth factor-beta 1 gene develop rampant inflammation in vital organs that contributes to a shortened life span. The presence of circulating anti-nuclear anti-bodies, immune deposits in tissues, leukocyte infiltration, and increased major histocompatibility complex antigen expression resembles an autoimmune-like syndrome. One of the overt symptoms that appears in these mice lacking transforming growth factor-beta 1 is the development of dry crusty eyes that close persistently as their health declines. Histologically, the eyes appear normal with little or no inflammation. However, inflammatory lesions, predominantly lymphocytic, develop in the lacrimal glands, disrupting their structure and function and severely limiting their ability to generate tears. This histopathology and aberrant function mimic that of Sjögren's syndrome, a human autoimmune disease characterized by dry eyes and dry mouth. Impeding the leukocyte infiltration into the glands with synthetic fibronectin peptides, which block adhesion, not only prevents the inflammatory pathology but also prevents the persistent eye closure characteristic of these mice. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9358754

  12. Immature myeloid-derived suppressor cells: A bridge between inflammation and cancer (Review).

    PubMed

    Musolino, Caterina; Allegra, Alessandro; Pioggia, Govanni; Gangemi, Sebastiano

    2017-02-01

    Chronic inflammation is considered to be one of the hallmarks of tumor initiation and progression. Changes occurring in the microenvironment of progressing tumors resemble the process of chronic inflammation, which begins with ischemia followed by interstitial and cellular edema, appearance of immune cells, growth of blood vessels and tissue repair, and development of inflammatory infiltrates. Moreover, long‑term production and accumulation of inflammatory factors lead to local and systemic immunosuppression associated with cancer progression. Of the several mechanisms described to explain this anergy, the accumulation of myeloid cells in the tumor, spleen, and peripheral blood of cancer patients has gained considerable interest. A population of suppressive CD11b+Gr-1+ cells has in fact been designated as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs are a unique category of the myeloid lineage, and they induce the prevention of the development of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in vitro, and the induction of antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell tolerance in vivo. Therapeutic approaches directed toward the manipulation of the MDSC population and their function may improve chemoimmune-enhancing therapy for advanced malignancies.

  13. Inflammation, Sanitation, and Consternation

    PubMed Central

    Raison, Charles L.; Lowry, Christopher A.; Rook, Graham A. W.

    2013-01-01

    Context Inflammation is increasingly recognized as contributing to the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder (MDD), even in individuals who are otherwise medically healthy. Most studies in search of sources for this increased inflammation have focused on factors such as psychosocial stress and obesity that are known to activate inflammatory processes and increase the risk for depression. However, MDD may be so prevalent in the modern world not just because proinflammatory factors are widespread, but also because we have lost contact with previously available sources of anti-inflammatory, immunoregulatory signaling. Objective To examine evidence that disruptions in co-evolved relationships with a variety of tolerogenic microorganisms that were previously ubiquitous in soil, food, and the gut, but that are largely missing from industrialized societies, may contribute to increasing rates of MDD in the modern world. Data Sources Relevant studies were identified using PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE. Study Selection Included were laboratory animal and human studies relevant to immune functioning, the hygiene hypothesis, and major depressive disorder identified via PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE searches. Data Extraction Studies were reviewed by all authors, and data considered to be potentially relevant to the contribution of hygiene-related immune variables to major depressive disorder were extracted. Data Synthesis Significant data suggest that a variety of microorganisms (frequently referred to as the “old friends”) were tasked by coevolutionary processes with training the human immune system to tolerate a wide array of nonthreatening but potentially proinflammatory stimuli. Lacking such immune training, vulnerable individuals in the modern world are at significantly increased risk of mounting inappropriate inflammatory attacks on harmless environmental antigens (leading to asthma), benign food contents and commensals in the gut (leading to inflammatory bowel disease), or

  14. Inflammatory pain hypersensitivity mediated by phenotypic switch in myelinated primary sensory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Simona; Doubell, Tim P.; Leslie, Tabi; Woolf, Clifford J.

    1996-11-01

    PAIN is normally evoked only by stimuli that are sufficiently intense to activate high-threshold Aδ and C sensory fibres, which relay the signal to the spinal cord. Peripheral inflammation leads to profoundly increased pain sensitivity: noxious stimuli generate a greater response and stimuli that are normally innocuous elicit pain. Inflammation increases the sensitivity of the peripheral terminals of Aδ and C fibres at the site of inflammation1. It also increases the excitability of spinal cord neurons2,3, which now amplify all sensory inputs including the normally innocuous tactile stimuli that are conveyed by low-threshold Aβ fibres. This central sensitization has been attributed to the enhanced activity of C fibres4, which increase the excitability of their postsynaptic targets by releasing glutamate and the neuropeptide substance P5-7. Here we show that inflammation results in Aβ fibres also acquiring the capacity to increase the excitability of spinal cord neurons. This is due to a phenotypic switch in a subpopulation of these fibres so that they, like C-fibres, now express substance P. Aβ fibres thus appear to contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity by switching their phenotype to one resembling pain fibres, thereby enhancing synaptic transmission in the spinal cord and exaggerating the central response to innocuous stimuli.

  15. Diabetes mellitus, exocrine pancreatic deficiency, hypertrichosis, hyperpigmentation, and chronic inflammation: confirmation of a syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Khalid; Padidela, Raja; Kapoor, Ritika R; James, Chela; Banerjee, Kausik; Harper, John; Wilson, Louise C; Hennekam, Raoul C M

    2009-05-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is characterized by dysregulation of the immune system leading to inflammation and selective destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Mild to moderate pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is found in patients with type 1 diabetes. Diabetes mellitus may also be part of a syndrome occasionally involving hair and skin abnormalities. We report our observations on two siblings with insulin-dependent diabetes, severe exocrine pancreatic deficiency, pigmented hypertrichotic skin patches with induration and chronic inflammation. The first sibling presented at the age of 9 months with hypertrichosis and hyperpigmentation, particularly on her back and legs and then developed diabetes mellitus at the age of 4 yr. The second sibling presented with exactly the same clinical features but at a later age of 12 yr. Both siblings had severe pancreatic exocrine deficiency with chronic persistent inflammation. Some of the clinical features in these siblings resemble those described by Prendiville et al. although our patients had additional features. The chronic inflammatory response in both siblings is highly suggestive of some form of immune dysregulation. The presence of consanguinity in the parents and similarity of clinical features in the siblings are suggestive of a novel autoimmune disorder, possibly secondary to autosomal recessive inheritance.

  16. ASL Nominal Constructions Involving Signs That Resemble Pronouns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan, Vivion Smith

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines six different types of noun phrases that commonly occur in American Sign Language. These noun phrases all include at least a head noun and one of four signs resembling a pronoun. Videos of natural ASL discourses are gathered, multiple instances of the six types of noun phrases are identified, and their meanings are…

  17. Differential grandparental investment - the impact of phenotypic resemblance.

    PubMed

    Schlee, Juliane; Kirchengast, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Differential grandparental investment is mainly explained as a result of paternity uncertainty. Phenotypic resemblance may be interpreted as an indicator of genetically relatedness. Consequently the present study focused on the impact of phenotypic resemblance on grandparental investment, i.e. solicitude, contact frequency and quality of relationship. 213 adults persons between the age 19 and 32 years (x = 25.5; SD = 3.4) were enrolled in the study. Data concerning grandparental investment during childhood were collected retrospectively using a 30 item questionnaire. Grandparental investment patterns differed significantly according grandparent category. In detail maternal grandmothers showed the highest contact frequency and the highest solicitude while - as to be expected - the paternal grandfather exhibited the lowest degree of investment. Grandparental investment was independent of grandparent category mainly influenced by residential distance. Phenotypic resemblance had an impact on grandparental investment independent of residential distance. This was first of all true of paternal grandfathers. An impact of phenotypic resemblance on grandparental investment patters can be assumed.

  18. Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Benzoyl Peroxide Resembling Impetigo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Changhyun; Craiglow, Brittany G; Watsky, Kalman L; Antaya, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    A 17-year-old boy presented with recurring severe dermatitis of the face of 5-months duration that resembled impetigo. He had been treated with several courses of antibiotics without improvement. Biopsy showed changes consistent with allergic contact dermatitis and patch testing later revealed sensitization to benzoyl peroxide, which the patient had been using for the treatment of acne vulgaris.

  19. Susceptibility to chronic inflammation: an update.

    PubMed

    Nasef, Noha Ahmed; Mehta, Sunali; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2017-03-01

    Chronic inflammation is defined by the persistence of inflammatory processes beyond their physiological function, resulting in tissue destruction. Chronic inflammation is implicated in the progression of many chronic diseases and plays a central role in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disease. As such, this review aims to collate some of the latest research in relation to genetic and environmental susceptibilities to chronic inflammation. In the genetic section, we discuss some of the updates in cytokine research and current treatments that are being developed. We also discuss newly identified canonical and non-canonical genes associated with chronic inflammation. In the environmental section, we highlight some of the latest updates and evidence in relation to the role that infection, diet and stress play in promoting inflammation. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the latest research to build on our current understanding of chronic inflammation. It highlights the complexity associated with chronic inflammation, as well as provides insights into potential new targets for therapies that could be used to treat chronic inflammation and consequently prevent disease progression.

  20. Pain related inflammation analysis using infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Mrinal Kanti; Bardhan, Shawli; Das, Kakali; Bhattacharjee, Debotosh; Nath, Satyabrata

    2016-05-01

    Medical Infrared Thermography (MIT) offers a potential non-invasive, non-contact and radiation free imaging modality for assessment of abnormal inflammation having pain in the human body. The assessment of inflammation mainly depends on the emission of heat from the skin surface. Arthritis is a disease of joint damage that generates inflammation in one or more anatomical joints of the body. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent appearing form of arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most threatening form of them. In this study, the inflammatory analysis has been performed on the infrared images of patients suffering from RA and OA. For the analysis, a dataset of 30 bilateral knee thermograms has been captured from the patient of RA and OA by following a thermogram acquisition standard. The thermograms are pre-processed, and areas of interest are extracted for further processing. The investigation of the spread of inflammation is performed along with the statistical analysis of the pre-processed thermograms. The objectives of the study include: i) Generation of a novel thermogram acquisition standard for inflammatory pain disease ii) Analysis of the spread of the inflammation related to RA and OA using K-means clustering. iii) First and second order statistical analysis of pre-processed thermograms. The conclusion reflects that, in most of the cases, RA oriented inflammation affects bilateral knees whereas inflammation related to OA present in the unilateral knee. Also due to the spread of inflammation in OA, contralateral asymmetries are detected through the statistical analysis.

  1. Sclerosing cholangitis in baboons (Papio spp) resembling primary sclerosing cholangitis of humans.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Gamboa, A M; Bearss, J J; Hubbard, G B; Porter, B F; Owston, M A; Dick, E J

    2012-05-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a chronic and progressive cholestatic liver disease that has been extensively documented in the human literature. Although it shares many features in common with chronic lymphocytic cholangitis in cats, primary sclerosing cholangitis has never been reported in a nonhuman primate. Primary sclerosing cholangitis is characterized by the presence of intrahepatic and/or extrahepatic inflammation and concentric fibrosis of bile ducts, eventually leading to cirrhosis and hepatic failure. The pathogenesis and cause remain unknown, but the disease likely involves a multifactorial mechanism with genetic- and immune-mediated components. The authors report 2 cases that histologically resemble the condition in humans; they consist of 2 adult male baboons with a clinical history of chronic elevated liver enzymes. In both cases, the liver was histologically characterized by thick bands of fibrosis and mild lymphoplasmacytic periportal cholangiohepatitis with concentric periductal fibrosis, resulting in atrophy and loss of bile ducts. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed positivity of hepatocytes to cytokeratin 7. Masson stain demonstrated marked biliary fibrosis. This is the first report that resembles sclerosing cholangitis in a nonhuman primate, and it suggests that the baboon may provide a useful animal model for this condition in humans.

  2. Monocyte trafficking in acute and chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Molly A; Platt, Andrew M; Potteaux, Stephane; Randolph, Gwendalyn J

    2011-10-01

    Environmental signals at the site of inflammation mediate rapid monocyte mobilization and dictate differentiation programs whereby these cells give rise to macrophages or dendritic cells. Monocytes participate in tissue healing, clearance of pathogens and dead cells, and initiation of adaptive immunity. However, recruited monocytes can also contribute to the pathogenesis of infection and chronic inflammatory disease, such as atherosclerosis. Here, we explore monocyte trafficking in the context of acute inflammation, relying predominantly on data from microbial infection models. These mechanisms will be compared to monocyte trafficking during chronic inflammation in experimental models of atherosclerosis. Recent developments suggest that monocyte trafficking shares common themes in diverse inflammatory diseases; however, important differences exist between monocyte migratory pathways in acute and chronic inflammation.

  3. Inflammatory signaling in Alzheimer disease and depression.

    PubMed

    Barber, Robert

    2011-08-01

    To help define the relationships among inflammation, Alzheimer disease, and depression, the Texas Alzheimer's Research Consortium analyzed an array of inflammatory biomarkers in a cohort of patients with Alzheimer disease and in controls. Inflammation severity was highly correlated with earlier age at onset of Alzheimer disease and was also associated with cognitive decline. The relationship between inflammation and depression was not as clear, and it varied with aspects of depression, gender, and the presence of Alzheimer disease.

  4. Resolution of Inflammation: What Controls Its Onset?

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Michelle A.; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; Pinho, Vanessa; Perretti, Mauro; Teixeira, Mauro M.

    2016-01-01

    An effective resolution program may be able to prevent the progression from non-resolving acute inflammation to persistent chronic inflammation. It has now become evident that coordinated resolution programs initiate shortly after inflammatory responses begin. In this context, several mechanisms provide the fine-tuning of inflammation and create a favorable environment for the resolution phase to take place and for homeostasis to return. In this review, we focus on the events required for an effective transition from the proinflammatory phase to the onset and establishment of resolution. We suggest that several mediators that promote the inflammatory phase of inflammation can simultaneously initiate a program for active resolution. Indeed, several events enact a decrease in the local chemokine concentration, a reduction which is essential to inhibit further infiltration of neutrophils into the tissue. Interestingly, although neutrophils are cells that characteristically participate in the active phase of inflammation, they also contribute to the onset of resolution. Further understanding of the molecular mechanisms that initiate resolution may be instrumental to develop pro-resolution strategies to treat complex chronic inflammatory diseases, in humans. The efforts to develop strategies based on resolution of inflammation have shaped a new area of pharmacology referred to as “resolution pharmacology.” PMID:27199985

  5. Resolution of Inflammation: What Controls Its Onset?

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Michelle A; Sousa, Lirlândia P; Pinho, Vanessa; Perretti, Mauro; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2016-01-01

    An effective resolution program may be able to prevent the progression from non-resolving acute inflammation to persistent chronic inflammation. It has now become evident that coordinated resolution programs initiate shortly after inflammatory responses begin. In this context, several mechanisms provide the fine-tuning of inflammation and create a favorable environment for the resolution phase to take place and for homeostasis to return. In this review, we focus on the events required for an effective transition from the proinflammatory phase to the onset and establishment of resolution. We suggest that several mediators that promote the inflammatory phase of inflammation can simultaneously initiate a program for active resolution. Indeed, several events enact a decrease in the local chemokine concentration, a reduction which is essential to inhibit further infiltration of neutrophils into the tissue. Interestingly, although neutrophils are cells that characteristically participate in the active phase of inflammation, they also contribute to the onset of resolution. Further understanding of the molecular mechanisms that initiate resolution may be instrumental to develop pro-resolution strategies to treat complex chronic inflammatory diseases, in humans. The efforts to develop strategies based on resolution of inflammation have shaped a new area of pharmacology referred to as "resolution pharmacology."

  6. Arteriovenous shunts resembling patent ductus arteriosus in dogs: 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yoko; Aoki, Takuma; Takano, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Ryokichi; Wakao, Yoshito

    2009-12-01

    Three dogs presented for the evaluation of cardiac murmurs were diagnosed with aberrant arteriovenous shunts. All cases demonstrated the following findings: 1) relatively soft continuous murmur loudest at the left heart base resembling patent ductus arteriosus (PDA); 2) shunt flow signals in the pulmonary artery on echocardiography; and 3) no PDA on selective angiography, but evidence of anomalous shunting vessels from thoracic aorta to pulmonary vasculature. An aberrant arteriovenous shunt should be considered when a continuous murmur of relatively small intensity is heard.

  7. [Inflammation and obesity (lipoinflammation)].

    PubMed

    Izaola, Olatz; de Luis, Daniel; Sajoux, Ignacio; Domingo, Joan Carles; Vidal, Montse

    2015-06-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease with multiple origins. It is a widespread global phenomenon carrying potentially serious complications which requires a multidisciplinary approach due to the significant clinical repercussions and elevated health costs associated with the disease. The most recent evidence indicates that it shares a common characteristic with other prevalent, difficult-to-treat pathologies: chronic, low-grade inflammation which perpetuates the disease and is associated with multiple complications. The current interest in lipoinflammation or chronic inflammation associated with obesity derives from an understanding of the alterations and remodelling that occurs in the adipose tissue, with the participation of multiple factors and elements throughout the process. Recent research highlights the importance of some of these molecules, called pro-resolving mediators, as possible therapeutic targets in the treatment of obesity. This article reviews the evidence published on the mechanisms that regulate the adipose tissue remodelling process and lipoinflammation both in obesity and in the mediators that are directly involved in the appearance and resolution of the inflammatory process.

  8. Pancreatic cancer, inflammation, and microbiome.

    PubMed

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Pushalkar, Smruti; Saxena, Deepak; Miller, George

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. No effective screening methods exist, and available treatment modalities do not effectively treat the disease. Inflammatory conditions such as pancreatitis represent a well-known risk factor for pancreatic cancer development. Yet only in the past 2 decades has pancreatic cancer been recognized as an inflammation-driven cancer, and the precise mechanisms underlying the pathogenic role of inflammation are beginning to be explored in detail. A substantial amount of preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that bacteria are likely to influence this process by activating immune receptors and perpetuating cancer-associated inflammation. The recent explosion of investigations of the human microbiome have highlighted how perturbations of commensal bacterial populations can promote inflammation and promote disease processes, including carcinogenesis. The elucidation of the interplay between inflammation and microbiome in the context of pancreatic carcinogenesis will provide novel targets for intervention to prevent and treat pancreatic cancer more efficiently. Further studies toward this direction are urgently needed.

  9. Inflammation and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Haruhiko; Barger, Steven; Barnum, Scott; Bradt, Bonnie; Bauer, Joachim; Cole, Greg M.; Cooper, Neil R.; Eikelenboom, Piet; Emmerling, Mark; Fiebich, Berndt L.; Finch, Caleb E.; Frautschy, Sally; Griffin, W.S.T.; Hampel, Harald; Hull, Michael; Landreth, Gary; Lue, Lih–Fen; Mrak, Robert; Mackenzie, Ian R.; McGeer, Patrick L.; O’Banion, M. Kerry; Pachter, Joel; Pasinetti, Guilio; Plata–Salaman, Carlos; Rogers, Joseph; Rydel, Russell; Shen, Yong; Streit, Wolfgang; Strohmeyer, Ronald; Tooyoma, Ikuo; Van Muiswinkel, Freek L.; Veerhuis, Robert; Walker, Douglas; Webster, Scott; Wegrzyniak, Beatrice; Wenk, Gary; Wyss–Coray, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation clearly occurs in pathologically vulnerable regions of the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain, and it does so with the full complexity of local peripheral inflammatory responses. In the periphery, degenerating tissue and the deposition of highly insoluble abnormal materials are classical stimulants of inflammation. Likewise, in the AD brain damaged neurons and neurites and highly insoluble amyloid β peptide deposits and neurofibrillary tangles provide obvious stimuli for inflammation. Because these stimuli are discrete, microlocalized, and present from early preclinical to terminal stages of AD, local upregulation of complement, cytokines, acute phase reactants, and other inflammatory mediators is also discrete, microlocalized, and chronic. Cumulated over many years, direct and bystander damage from AD inflammatory mechanisms is likely to significantly exacerbate the very pathogenic processes that gave rise to it. Thus, animal models and clinical studies, although still in their infancy, strongly suggest that AD inflammation significantly contributes to AD pathogenesis. By better understanding AD inflammatory and immunoregulatory processes, it should be possible to develop anti-inflammatory approaches that may not cure AD but will likely help slow the progression or delay the onset of this devastating disorder. PMID:10858586

  10. Pathogenesis of tendinopathies: inflammation or degeneration?

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Michele; Gravare-Silbernagel, Karin; Siljeholm, Carl; Di Iorio, Angelo; De Amicis, Daniele; Salini, Vincenzo; Werner, Suzanne; Paganelli, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    The intrinsic pathogenetic mechanisms of tendinopathies are largely unknown and whether inflammation or degeneration has the prominent role is still a matter of debate. Assuming that there is a continuum from physiology to pathology, overuse may be considered as the initial disease factor; in this context, microruptures of tendon fibers occur and several molecules are expressed, some of which promote the healing process, while others, including inflammatory cytokines, act as disease mediators. Neural in-growth that accompanies the neovessels explains the occurrence of pain and triggers neurogenic-mediated inflammation. It is conceivable that inflammation and degeneration are not mutually exclusive, but work together in the pathogenesis of tendinopathies. PMID:19591655

  11. Insight in modulation of inflammation in response to diclofenac intervention: a human intervention study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Chronic systemic low-grade inflammation in obese subjects is associated with health complications including cardiovascular diseases, insulin resistance and diabetes. Reducing inflammatory responses may reduce these risks. However, available markers of inflammatory status inadequately des...

  12. Protective role of interleukin-10 in Ozone-induced pulmonary inflammation**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The mechanisms underlying ozone (03)-induced pulmonary inflammation remain unclear. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that is known to inhibit inflammatory mediators. Objectives: We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying interleuken-10...

  13. Resolution of acute inflammation in the lung.

    PubMed

    Levy, Bruce D; Serhan, Charles N

    2014-01-01

    Acute inflammation in the lung is essential to health. So too is its resolution. In response to invading microbes, noxious stimuli, or tissue injury, an acute inflammatory response is mounted to protect the host. To limit inflammation and prevent collateral injury of healthy, uninvolved tissue, the lung orchestrates the formation of specialized proresolving mediators, specifically lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, and maresins. These immunoresolvents are agonists for resolution that interact with specific receptors on leukocytes and structural cells to blunt further inflammation and promote catabasis. This process appears to be defective in several common lung diseases that are characterized by excess or chronic inflammation. Here, we review the molecular and cellular effectors of resolution of acute inflammation in the lung.

  14. Resolution of Acute Inflammation In The Lung

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Bruce D.; Serhan, Charles N.

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation in the lung is essential to health. So too is its resolution. In response to invading microbes, noxious stimuli or tissue injury, an acute inflammatory response is mounted to protect the host. To limit inflammation and prevent collateral injury of healthy, uninvolved tissue, the lung orchestrates the formation of specialized pro-resolving mediators, specifically lipoxins, resolvins, protectins and maresins. These immunoresolvents are agonists for resolution that interact with specific receptors on leukocytes and structural cells to blunt further inflammation and promote catabasis. This process appears to be defective in several common lung diseases that are characterized by excess or chronic inflammation. Here, we review the molecular and cellular effectors of resolution of acute inflammation in the lung. PMID:24313723

  15. Mast cells and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Stassen, Michael; Hültner, Lothar; Müller, Christian; Schmitt, Edgar

    2002-01-01

    Mast cells have long been recognized as potent producers of a large panel of biologically highly active mediators such as biogenic amines, arachidonic acid metabolites, cytokines and chemokines, but most of their biological functions have been elusive and speculative. By taking advantage of mast cell-deficient mice, the role of mast cells in a variety of experimental settings can now be studied in detail and such approaches have dramatically altered and enlarged our knowledge about mast cell biology and function. Herein we will focus on the role of mast cells in inflammatory reactions of diverse origin, such as delayed type hypersensitivity, atopy, immune complex-mediated inflammation and innate immune responses. From the current standpoint, there is no doubt that the most outstanding and beneficial feature of mast cells is their recently discovered ability to induce a life-saving inflammatory response rapidly upon encountering microbes and microbial constituents. Nevertheless, the picture is also emerging that mast cells are deeply involved in the induction and maintenance of a variety of severe allergic and autoimmune diseases. However, a deeper understanding of their activation and immune-modulatory capacity might open a new window for the development of curative strategies.

  16. Targeting inflammation in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Welty, Francine K; Alfaddagh, Abdulhamied; Elajami, Tarec K

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is comprised of a cluster of closely related risk factors, including visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, hypertension, high triglyceride, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; all of which increase the risk for the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A chronic state of inflammation appears to be a central mechanism underlying the pathophysiology of insulin resistance and MetS. In this review, we summarize recent research which has provided insight into the mechanisms by which inflammation underlies the pathophysiology of the individual components of MetS including visceral adiposity, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. On the basis of these mechanisms, we summarize therapeutic modalities to target inflammation in the MetS and its individual components. Current therapeutic modalities can modulate the individual components of MetS and have a direct anti-inflammatory effect. Lifestyle modifications including exercise, weight loss, and diets high in fruits, vegetables, fiber, whole grains, and low-fat dairy and low in saturated fat and glucose are recommended as a first line therapy. The Mediterranean and dietary approaches to stop hypertension diets are especially beneficial and have been shown to prevent development of MetS. Moreover, the Mediterranean diet has been associated with reductions in total and cardiovascular mortality. Omega-3 fatty acids and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α agonists lower high levels of triglyceride; their role in targeting inflammation is reviewed. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and aldosterone blockers comprise pharmacologic therapies for hypertension but also target other aspects of MetS including inflammation. Statin drugs target many of the underlying inflammatory pathways involved in MetS.

  17. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Oct 12,2016 Understand the risks of ... inflammation causes cardiovascular disease, inflammation is common for heart disease and stroke patients and is thought to be ...

  18. The sterile inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Rock, Kenneth L; Latz, Eicke; Ontiveros, Fernando; Kono, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    The acute inflammatory response is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it plays a key role in initial host defense, particularly against many infections. On the other hand, its aim is imprecise, and as a consequence, when it is drawn into battle, it can cause collateral damage in tissues. In situations where the inciting stimulus is sterile, the cost-benefit ratio may be high; because of this, sterile inflammation underlies the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. Although there have been major advances in our understanding of how microbes trigger inflammation, much less has been learned about this process in sterile situations. This review focuses on a subset of the many sterile stimuli that can induce inflammation-specifically dead cells and a variety of irritant particles, including crystals, minerals, and protein aggregates. Although this subset of stimuli is structurally very diverse and might appear to be unrelated, there is accumulating evidence that the innate immune system may recognize them in similar ways and stimulate the sterile inflammatory response via common pathways. Here we review established and emerging data about these responses.

  19. Soy protein inhibits inflammation-induced VCAM-1 and inflammatory cytokine induction by inhibiting the NF-kappaB and AKT signaling pathway in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: Inflammation is a hallmark of many diseases, such as atherosclerosis, autoimmune diseases, obesity, and cancer. Isoflavone-free soy protein diet (SPI(-)) has been shown to reduce atherosclerotic lesions in a hyperlipidemic mouse model compared to casein (CAS)-fed mice, despite unchanged ser...

  20. Chronic Inflammation in Skin Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is linked to the development and progression of multiple cancers, including those of the lung, stomach, liver, colon, breast and skin. Inflammation not only drives the oncogenic transformation of epithelial cells under the stress of chronic infection and autoimmune diseases, but also promotes the growth, progression and metastatic spread of cancers. Tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells are comprised of a diverse population of myeloid and immune cell types, including monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, T and B cells, and others. Different myeloid and lymphoid cells within tumor microenvironment exert diverse, often contradicting, effects during skin cancer development and progression. The nature of tumor-immune interaction determines the rate of cancer progression and the outcome of cancer treatment. Inflammatory environment within skin tumor also inhibits naturally occurring anti-tumor immunity and limits the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. In this article we aim to give an overview on the mechanism by which inflammation interferes with the development and therapeutic intervention of cancers, especially those of the skin.

  1. Stromal cells in chronic inflammation and tertiary lymphoid organ formation.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Christopher D; Barone, Francesca; Nayar, Saba; Bénézech, Cecile; Caamaño, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is an unstable state. It either resolves or persists. Why inflammation persists and the factors that define tissue tropism remain obscure. Increasing evidence suggests that tissue-resident stromal cells not only provide positional memory but also actively regulate the differential accumulation of inflammatory cells within inflamed tissues. Furthermore, at many sites of chronic inflammation, structures that mimic secondary lymphoid tissues are observed, suggesting that chronic inflammation and lymphoid tissue formation share common activation programs. Similarly, blood and lymphatic endothelial cells contribute to tissue homeostasis and disease persistence in chronic inflammation. This review highlights our increasing understanding of the role of stromal cells in inflammation and summarizes the novel immunological role that stromal cells exert in the persistence of inflammatory diseases.

  2. Does Inflammation Mediate the Association Between Obesity and Insulin Resistance?

    PubMed

    Adabimohazab, Razieh; Garfinkel, Amanda; Milam, Emily C; Frosch, Olivia; Mangone, Alexander; Convit, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    In adult obesity, low-grade systemic inflammation is considered an important step in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance (IR). The association between obesity and inflammation is less well established in adolescents. Here, we ascertain the importance of inflammation in IR among obese adolescents by utilizing either random forest (RF) classification or mediation analysis approaches. The inflammation balance score, composed of eight pro- and anti-inflammatory makers, as well as most of the individual inflammatory markers differed significantly between lean and overweight/obese. In contrast, adiponectin was the only individual marker selected as a predictor of IR by RF, and the balance score only revealed a medium-to-low importance score. Neither adiponectin nor the inflammation balance score was found to mediate the relationship between obesity and IR. These findings do not support the premise that low-grade systemic inflammation is a key for the expression of IR in the human. Prospective longitudinal studies should confirm these findings.

  3. Inflammatory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Whitesell, Jackie

    2010-09-01

    Inflammatory neuropathies are acquired disorders of peripheral nerves and occasionally of the central nervous system that can affect individuals at any age. The course can be monophasic, relapsing, or progressive. Inflammatory neuropathies are classified as acute or chronic. The acute form reaches a nadir by 4 weeks and the chronic form over 8 weeks or greater. The most common example of an acute inflammatory neuropathy is acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP), which is part of the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). The most common chronic inflammatory neuropathy is chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculopathy (CIDP). Other chronic inflammatory neuropathies are multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and the Lewis-Sumner syndrome. The Fisher syndrome and Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis occur acutely and have clinical overlap with AIDP.

  4. IL-10 distinguishes a unique population of activated, effector-like CD8(+) T cells in murine acute liver inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rood, Julia E; Canna, Scott W; Weaver, Lehn K; Tobias, John W; Behrens, Edward M

    2017-04-01

    Immune-mediated liver injury is a central feature of hyperinflammatory diseases, such as hemophagocytic syndromes, yet the immunologic mechanisms underlying those processes are incompletely understood. In this study, we used the toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9)-mediated model of a hemophagocytic syndrome known as macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) to dissect the predominant immune cell populations infiltrating the liver during inflammation. We identified CD8(+) T cells that unexpectedly produce interleukin-10 (IL-10) in addition to interferon-γ (IFN-γ) as a major hepatic population induced by TLR9 stimulation. Despite their ability to produce this anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10(+) hepatic CD8(+) T cells in TLR9-MAS mice did not resemble CD8(+) T suppressor cells. Instead, the induction of these cells occurred independently of antigen stimulation and was partially dependent on IFN-γ. IL-10(+) hepatic CD8(+) T cells demonstrated an activated phenotype and high turnover rate, consistent with an effector-like identity. Transcriptional analysis of this population confirmed a gene signature of effector CD8(+) T cells yet suggested responsiveness to liver injury-associated growth factors. Together, these findings suggest that IL-10(+) CD8(+) T cells induced by systemic inflammation to infiltrate the liver have initiated an inflammatory, rather than regulatory, program and may thus have a pathogenic role in severe, acute hepatitis.

  5. Activation and Resolution of Periodontal Inflammation and Its Systemic Impact

    PubMed Central

    Hasturk, Hatice; Kantarci, Alpdogan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a highly organized event impacting upon organs, tissues and biological systems. Periodontal diseases are characterized by dysregulation or dysfunction of resolution pathways of inflammation resulting in a failure of healing and a dominant chronic, progressive, destructive and predominantly unresolved inflammation. The biological consequences of inflammatory processes may be independent of the etiological agents such as trauma, microbial organisms and stress. The impact of the inflammatory pathological process depends upon the affected tissues or organ system. Whilst mediators are similar, there is a tissue specificity for the inflammatory events. It is plausible that inflammatory processes in one organ could directly lead to pathologies in another organ or tissue. Communication between distant parts of the body and their inflammatory status is also mediated by common signaling mechanisms mediated via cells and soluble mediators. This review focuses on periodontal inflammation, its systemic associations and advances in therapeutic approaches based on mediators acting through orchestration of natural pathway to resolution of inflammation. We also discuss a new treatment concept where natural pathways of resolution of periodontal inflammation can be used to limit systemic inflammation and promote healing and regeneration. PMID:26252412

  6. Leukotrienes orchestrating allergic skin inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sadik, Christian D; Sezin, Tanya; Kim, Nancy D

    2013-11-01

    Leukotrienes constitute a group of lipid mediators, which may be subdivided into two groups, with leukotriene B4 on the one hand and cysteinyl leukotrienes on the other. Although leukotrienes are abundantly expressed in skin affected by diverse chronic inflammatory diseases, including atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid, their pathological roles in these diseases have remained elusive. Recent data now reveal that both leukotriene B4 and cysteinyl leukotrienes are indispensable in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis, with leukotriene B4 initiating the recruitment of inflammatory cells, particularly neutrophils and TH 2 cells into the skin, and cysteinyl leukotrienes later inducing characteristic structural alterations of chronically affected skin, specifically skin fibrosis and keratinocyte proliferation. Thus, these results reveal a sequential cooperation of LTB4 and cysteinyl leukotrienes to initiate and perpetuate allergic skin inflammation. These new insights highlight leukotrienes as promising therapeutic targets in allergic skin inflammation and should encourage more research into the role of leukotrienes in other inflammatory skin diseases.

  7. Extending disorder: essentialism, family resemblance and secondary sense.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Neil

    2013-05-01

    It is commonly thought that mental disorder is a valid concept only in so far as it is an extension of or continuous with the concept of physical disorder. A valid extension has to meet two criteria: determination and coherence. Essentialists meet these criteria through necessary and sufficient conditions for being a disorder. Two Wittgensteinian alternatives to essentialism are considered and assessed against the two criteria. These are the family resemblance approach and the secondary sense approach. Where the focus is solely on the characteristics or attributes of things, both these approaches seem to fail to meet the criteria for valid extension. However, this focus on attributes is mistaken. The criteria for valid extension are met in the case of family resemblance by the pattern of characteristics associated with a concept, and by the limits of intelligibility of applying a concept. Secondary sense, though it may have some claims to be a good account of the relation between physical and mental disorder, cannot claim to meet the two criteria of valid extension.

  8. Ritodrine-induced pustular eruptions distinctly resembling impetigo herpetiformis.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Yoshimitsu; Sato, Atsuki; Abe, Hiroko; Abe, Sumino; Kawai, Naoki; Takeshita, Toshiyuki

    2011-01-01

    A 27-year-old nulligravida woman without a history of dermatosis was hospitalized for threatened preterm labor at 29 weeks' gestation; therefore, continuous infusion of ritodrine hydrochloride was started. At 31 weeks' gestation, erythematous plaques appeared and spread over the body surface; therefore, a topical steroid preparation was applied. At 32 weeks' gestation, the eruptions developed into irregular annular areas of erythema with multiple pustules accompanied by severe itching, and oral prednisolone treatment was started. Bacterial cultures of the pustules were negative, and a crural cutaneous biopsy revealed Kogoj's spongiform pustules. Based on the clinicopathological findings, the most likely diagnosis was impetigo herpetiformis, which causes cutaneous symptoms closely resembling pustular psoriasis in pregnant females without a history of psoriasis. To rule out ritodrine-induced pustular eruptions, the ritodrine infusion was stopped and treatment with an MgSO(4) preparation was started at 33 weeks' 3 days' gestation; however, the uterine contractions could not be suppressed. Because of the patient's highly edematous, severely painful feet, a cesarean section was performed the same day. Within several days of delivery, the eruptions began to resolve, and no recurrence was observed after treatment with oral prednisolone was stopped 31 days after delivery. On the basis of a positive patch test for ritodrine, we diagnosed pustular drug eruptions caused by ritodrine hydrochloride. Although ritodrine-induced pathognomonic cutaneous eruptions are rare, we would like to emphasize that ritodrine can cause drug-induced pustular eruptions distinctly resembling life-threatening impetigo herpetiformis.

  9. The role of inflammation in epileptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vezzani, Annamaria; Friedman, Alon; Dingledine, Raymond J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary One compelling challenge in the therapy of epilepsy is to develop anti-epileptogenic drugs with an impact on the disease progression. The search for novel targets has focused recently on brain inflammation since this phenomenon appears to be an integral part of the diseased hyperexcitable brain tissue from which spontaneous and recurrent seizures originate. Although the contribution of specific proinflammatory pathways to the mechanism of ictogenesis in epileptic tissue has been demonstrated in experimental models, the role of these pathways in epileptogenesis is still under evaluation. We review the evidence conceptually supporting the involvement of brain inflammation and the associated blood-brain barrier damage in epileptogenesis, and describe the available pharmacological evidence where post-injury intervention with anti-inflammatory drugs has been attempted. Our review will focus on three main inflammatory pathways, namely the IL-1 receptor/Toll-like receptor signalling, COX-2 and the TGF-β signalling. The mechanisms underlying neuronal-glia network dysfunctions induced by brain inflammation are also discussed, highlighting novel neuromodulatory effects of classical inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and prostaglandins. The increase in knowledge about a role of inflammation in disease progression, may prompt the use of specific anti-inflammatory drugs for developing disease-modifying treatments. PMID:22521336

  10. Inflammatory Biomarkers in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Daghestani, Hikmat N.; Kraus, Virginia B.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteoarthritis (OA) is highly prevalent and a leading cause of disability worldwide. Despite the global burden of OA, diagnostic tests and treatments for the molecular or early subclinical stages are still not available for clinical use. In recent years, there has been a large shift in the understanding of OA as a “wear and tear” disease to an inflammatory disease. This has been demonstrated through various studies using MRI, ultrasound, histochemistry, and biomarkers. It would of great value to be able to readily identify subclinical and/or sub-acute inflammation, particularly in such a way as to be appropriate for a clinical setting. Here we review several types of biomarkers associated with OA in human studies that point to a role of inflammation in OA. PMID:26521734

  11. Proteomic Analysis of Anti-inflammatory Effects of a Kampo (Japanese Herbal) Medicine “Shoseiryuto (Xiao-Qing-Long-Tang)” on Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Takayuki; Nakao, Marino; Shimizu, Yuliko; Kodera, Yoshio; Oh-Ishi, Masamichi; Maeda, Tadakazu; Yamada, Haruki

    2011-01-01

    Effects of a Kampo (Japanese herbal) medicine “shoseiryuto (SST, xiao-qing-long-tang in Chinese)”, which has been used for the treatment of allergic bronchial asthma clinically, were examined on ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized allergic airway inflammation model (i.e., bronchial asthma) in a mouse. When SST was orally administered at 0.5 g kg−1 day−1 from day 1 to 6 after OVA inhalation, SST reduced the inflammation in lung tissue, the number of eosinophils and the OVA-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibody titer in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids at 7 days after the OVA inhalation. SST also reduced the airway hyperreactivity at 6 days after the OVA inhalation. Proteomic analysis with the agarose two-dimensional electrophoresis showed that the expression of spectrin α2 was reduced in the lung tissue of OVA-sensitized mice and SST recovered the expression. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses of lung tissue also confirmed this result. When prednisolone was orally administered at 3 mg kg−1 day−1 from day 1 to 6 after OVA inhalation, the inflammation in lung tissue, the number of eosinophils in BAL fluids and airway hyperreactivity were reduced in the OVA-sensitized mice. However, prednisolone did not reduce the OVA-specific IgE antibody titer in BAL fluids and did not recover the expression of spectrin α2 in lung tissue. These results suggest that at least a part of action mechanism of SST against OVA-sensitized allergic airway inflammation in a mouse model is different from that of prednisolone. PMID:19861507

  12. The impact of inflammation on respiratory plasticity.

    PubMed

    Hocker, Austin D; Stokes, Jennifer A; Powell, Frank L; Huxtable, Adrianne G

    2017-01-01

    Breathing is a vital homeostatic behavior and must be precisely regulated throughout life. Clinical conditions commonly associated with inflammation, undermine respiratory function may involve plasticity in respiratory control circuits to compensate and maintain adequate ventilation. Alternatively, other clinical conditions may evoke maladaptive plasticity. Yet, we have only recently begun to understand the effects of inflammation on respiratory plasticity. Here, we review some of common models used to investigate the effects of inflammation and discuss the impact of inflammation on nociception, chemosensory plasticity, medullary respiratory centers, motor plasticity in motor neurons and respiratory frequency, and adaptation to high altitude. We provide new data suggesting glial cells contribute to CNS inflammatory gene expression after 24h of sustained hypoxia and inflammation induced by 8h of intermittent hypoxia inhibits long-term facilitation of respiratory frequency. We also discuss how inflammation can have opposite effects on the capacity for plasticity, whereby it is necessary for increases in the hypoxic ventilatory response with sustained hypoxia, but inhibits phrenic long term facilitation after intermittent hypoxia. This review highlights gaps in our knowledge about the effects of inflammation on respiratory control (development, age, and sex differences). In summary, data to date suggest plasticity can be either adaptive or maladaptive and understanding how inflammation alters the respiratory system is crucial for development of better therapeutic interventions to promote breathing and for utilization of plasticity as a clinical treatment.

  13. Imaging techniques for myocardial inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, J.B.; Henkin, R.E.; Robinson, J.A.

    1986-03-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DC) represents a heterogeneous group of disorders which results in morbidity and mortality in young individuals. Recent evidence suggests that a subset of these patients have histologic evidence of myocarditis which is potentially treatable with immunosuppression. The identification of myocardial inflammation may therefore lead to development of therapeutic regimens designed to treat the cause rather than the effect of the myocardial disease. Ultimately, this may result in improvement in the abysmal prognosis of DC. The currently accepted technique for identification of active myocardial inflammation is endomyocardial biopsy. This technique is not perfect, however, since pathologic standards for the diagnosis of myocarditis have not been established. Furthermore, focal inflammation may give rise to sampling error. The inflammation-avid radioisotope gallium-67 citrate has been used as an adjunct to biopsy improving the yield of myocarditis from 7 percent to 36 percent. Serial imaging correlates well to biopsy results. Future studies are designed to study the applicability of lymphocyte labelling techniques to myocardial inflammatory disease.

  14. Monocyte-induced recovery of inflammation-associated hepatocellular dysfunction in a biochip-based human liver model

    PubMed Central

    Gröger, Marko; Rennert, Knut; Giszas, Benjamin; Weiß, Elisabeth; Dinger, Julia; Funke, Harald; Kiehntopf, Michael; Peters, Frank T.; Lupp, Amelie; Bauer, Michael; Claus, Ralf A.; Huber, Otmar; Mosig, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Liver dysfunction is an early event in sepsis-related multi-organ failure. We here report the establishment and characterization of a microfluidically supported in vitro organoid model of the human liver sinusoid. The liver organoid is composed of vascular and hepatocyte cell layers integrating non-parenchymal cells closely reflecting tissue architecture and enables physiological cross-communication in a bio-inspired fashion. Inflammation-associated liver dysfunction was mimicked by stimulation with various agonists of toll-like receptors. TLR-stimulation induced the release of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and diminished expression of endothelial VE-cadherin, hepatic MRP-2 transporter and apolipoprotein B (ApoB), resulting in an inflammation-related endothelial barrier disruption and hepatocellular dysfunction in the liver organoid. However, interaction of the liver organoid with human monocytes attenuated inflammation-related cell responses and restored MRP-2 transporter activity, ApoB expression and albumin/urea production. The cellular events observed in the liver organoid closely resembled pathophysiological responses in the well-established sepsis model of peritoneal contamination and infection (PCI) in mice and clinical observations in human sepsis. We therefore conclude that this human liver organoid model is a valuable tool to investigate sepsis-related liver dysfunction and subsequent immune cell-related tissue repair/remodeling processes. PMID:26902749

  15. Neurobiology of Inflammation-Associated Anorexia

    PubMed Central

    Gautron, Laurent; Layé, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    Compelling data demonstrate that inflammation-associated anorexia directly results from the action of pro-inflammatory factors, primarily cytokines and prostaglandins E2, on the nervous system. For instance, the aforementioned pro-inflammatory factors can stimulate the activity of peripheral sensory neurons, and induce their own de novo synthesis and release into the brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid. Ultimately, it results in the mobilization of a specific neural circuit that shuts down appetite. The present article describes the different cell groups and neurotransmitters involved in inflammation-associated anorexia and examines how they interact with neural systems regulating feeding such as the melanocortin system. A better understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying inflammation-associated anorexia will help to develop appetite stimulants for cancer and AIDS patients. PMID:20582290

  16. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun Ho; Jin, Guang Yu; Guo, Hui Shu; Piao, Hong Mei; Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao; Lin, Zhen Hua; Yan, Guang Hai

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  17. Infections, inflammation and epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Vezzani, Annamaria; Fujinami, Robert S.; White, H. Steve; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Blümcke, Ingmar; Sander, Josemir W.; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is the tendency to have unprovoked epileptic seizures. Anything causing structural or functional derangement of brain physiology may lead to seizures, and different conditions may express themselves solely by recurrent seizures and thus be labelled “epilepsy.” Worldwide, epilepsy is the most common serious neurological condition. The range of risk factors for the development of epilepsy varies with age and geographic location. Congenital, developmental and genetic conditions are mostly associated with the development of epilepsy in childhood, adolescence and early adulthood. Head trauma, infections of the central nervous system (CNS) and tumours may occur at any age and may lead to the development of epilepsy. Infections of the CNS are a major risk factor for epilepsy. The reported risk of unprovoked seizures in population-based cohorts of survivors of CNS infections from developed countries is between 6.8 and 8.3 %, and is much higher in resource-poor countries. In this review, the various viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic infectious diseases of the CNS which result in seizures and epilepsy are discussed. The pathogenesis of epilepsy due to brain infections, as well as the role of experimental models to study mechanisms of epileptogenesis induced by infectious agents, is reviewed. The sterile (non-infectious) inflammatory response that occurs following brain insults is also discussed, as well as its overlap with inflammation due to infections, and the potential role in epileptogenesis. Furthermore, autoimmune encephalitis as a cause of seizures is reviewed. Potential strategies to prevent epilepsy resulting from brain infections and non-infectious inflammation are also considered. PMID:26423537

  18. Cannabinoids, endocannabinoids, and related analogs in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Sumner H; Zurier, Robert B

    2009-03-01

    This review covers reports published in the last 5 years on the anti-inflammatory activities of all classes of cannabinoids, including phytocannabinoids such as tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, synthetic analogs such as ajulemic acid and nabilone, the endogenous cannabinoids anandamide and related compounds, namely, the elmiric acids, and finally, noncannabinoid components of Cannabis that show anti-inflammatory action. It is intended to be an update on the topic of the involvement of cannabinoids in the process of inflammation. A possible mechanism for these actions is suggested involving increased production of eicosanoids that promote the resolution of inflammation. This differentiates these cannabinoids from cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors that suppress the synthesis of eicosanoids that promote the induction of the inflammatory process.

  19. The reciprocal relationship between inflammation and coagulation.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Mauria

    2012-05-01

    Inflammation and coagulation constitute two host defense systems with complementary roles in eliminating invading pathogens, limiting tissue damage, and restoring homeostasis. Extensive cross talk exists between these 2 systems, whereby inflammation leads to activation of coagulation, and coagulation considerably affects inflammatory activity. Infection leads to the production of proinflammatory cytokines that, in turn, stimulate the production of tissue factor. Activation of the coagulation system and ensuing thrombin generation are dependent on the expression of tissue factor. Conversely, activated coagulation proteases may affect specific receptors on inflammatory cells and endothelial cells and thereby modulate the inflammatory response. Activation of coagulation with the simultaneous down-regulation of endothelial-bound anticoagulant mechanisms and endogenous fibrinolysis characterizes the pathophysiology of sepsis. The mechanisms by which these highly complex and codependent defense strategies are linked together both in health and disease is the focus of this review.

  20. Blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in aortic valve stenosis: links with inflammation and calcification.

    PubMed

    Natorska, J; Undas, A

    2015-08-01

    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) increasingly afflicts our aging population. However, the pathobiology of the disease is still poorly understood and there is no effective pharmacotherapy for treating those at risk for clinical progression. The progression of AS involves complex inflammatory and fibroproliferative processes that resemble to some extent atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence indicates that several coagulation proteins and its inhibitors, including tissue factor, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, prothrombin, factor XIII, von Willebrand factor, display increased expression within aortic stenotic valves, predominantly on macrophages and myofibroblasts around calcified areas. Systemic impaired fibrinolysis, along with increased plasma and valvular expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, has also been observed in patients with AS in association with the severity of the disease. There is an extensive cross-talk between inflammation and coagulation in stenotic valve tissue which contributes to the calcification and mineralisation of the aortic valve leaflets. This review summarises the available data on blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in AS with the emphasis on their interactions with inflammation and calcification.

  1. Mitochondrial lysates induce inflammation and Alzheimer's disease-relevant changes in microglial and neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Heather M; Carl, Steven M; Weber, Sam G; Ramanujan, Suruchi A; Festoff, Barry W; Linseman, Daniel A; Swerdlow, Russell H

    2015-01-01

    Neuroinflammation occurs in Alzheimer's disease (AD). While AD genetic studies implicate inflammation-relevant genes and fibrillar amyloid-β protein promotes inflammation, our understanding of AD neuroinflammation nevertheless remains incomplete. In this study we hypothesized damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecules arising from mitochondria, intracellular organelles that resemble bacteria, could contribute to AD neuroinflammation. To preliminarily test this possibility, we exposed neuronal and microglial cell lines to enriched mitochondrial lysates. BV2 microglial cells treated with mitochondrial lysates showed decreased TREM2 mRNA, increased TNFα mRNA, increased MMP-8 mRNA, increased IL-8 mRNA, redistribution of NFκB to the nucleus, and increased p38 MAPK phosphorylation. SH-SY5Y neuronal cells treated with mitochondrial lysates showed increased TNFα mRNA, increased NFκB protein, decreased IκBα protein, increased AβPP mRNA, and increased AβPP protein. Enriched mitochondrial lysates from SH-SY5Y cells lacking detectable mitochondrial DNA (ρ0 cells) failed to induce any of these changes, while mtDNA obtained directly from mitochondria (but not PCR-amplified mtDNA) increased BV2 cell TNFα mRNA. These results indicate at least one mitochondrial-derived DAMP molecule, mtDNA, can induce inflammatory changes in microglial and neuronal cell lines. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that a mitochondrial-derived DAMP molecule or molecules could contribute to AD neuroinflammation.

  2. Uterine Tumour Resembling Ovarian Sex Cord Tumour- A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Ilhan, Tolgay Tuyan; Gül, Ayhan; Ugurluoglu, Ceyhan; Çelik, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    Uterine Tumour Resembling Ovarian Sex-Cord Tumours (UTROSCTs) are an extremely rare type of uterine body tumours arising from the endometrial stroma. Epidemiology, aetiology, pathogenesis, management and natural history of UTROSCTs are still a question of debate, as there is little available data in the literature. Although rare, the possibility of UTROSCTs should be kept in mind, when a patient presents with abnormal bleeding and an enlarged uterus. UTROSCTs appear dirty white/cream-coloured, gelatinous, well-circumscribed mass with smooth surface on macroscopic examination. We present a rare case of endometrial stromal tumour with sex-cord-like differentiation which was successfully treated by hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. The clinical manifestations, pathologic characteristics, diagnosis and management of these tumours are reviewed here. PMID:28208949

  3. Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder resembling honeycomb in a child.

    PubMed

    Akçam, Mustafa; Buyukyavuz, Ilker; Ciriş, Metin; Eriş, Naim

    2008-09-01

    Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder is believed to be an uncommon pathologic condition of the gallbladder in childhood. Only three pediatric cases have been described in the literature up to now. Honeycomb gallbladder has been described in two adult patients; no patients have been reported in childhood until now. To the best of our knowledge, we report here the first case of adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder which resembled honeycomb, in a 9-year-old girl presented with recurrent abdominal pain. The diagnosis was made by ultrasound, and confirmed by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and finally cholecystectomy. In conclusion, ultrasound scanning performed more generally in children presenting with recurrent abdominal pain might lead to accurate diagnosis of adenomyomotosis of the gallbladder during childhood.

  4. Differentiated human stem cells resemble fetal, not adult, β cells.

    PubMed

    Hrvatin, Sinisa; O'Donnell, Charles W; Deng, Francis; Millman, Jeffrey R; Pagliuca, Felicia Walton; DiIorio, Philip; Rezania, Alireza; Gifford, David K; Melton, Douglas A

    2014-02-25

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have the potential to generate any human cell type, and one widely recognized goal is to make pancreatic β cells. To this end, comparisons between differentiated cell types produced in vitro and their in vivo counterparts are essential to validate hPSC-derived cells. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of sorted insulin-expressing (INS(+)) cells derived from three independent hPSC lines, human fetal pancreata, and adult human islets points to two major conclusions: (i) Different hPSC lines produce highly similar INS(+) cells and (ii) hPSC-derived INS(+) (hPSC-INS(+)) cells more closely resemble human fetal β cells than adult β cells. This study provides a direct comparison of transcriptional programs between pure hPSC-INS(+) cells and true β cells and provides a catalog of genes whose manipulation may convert hPSC-INS(+) cells into functional β cells.

  5. Imperfect Batesian mimicry and the conspicuousness costs of mimetic resemblance.

    PubMed

    Speed, Michael P; Ruxton, Graeme D

    2010-07-01

    We apply signal detection methodology to make predictions about the evolution of Batesian mimicry. Our approach is novel in three ways. First, we applied a deterministic evolutionary modeling system that allows a large number of alternative mimetic morphs to coexist and compete. Second, we considered that there may be natural boundaries to phenotypic expression. Finally, we allowed increasing conspicuousness to impose an increasing detection cost on mimics. In some instances, the model predicts widespread variation in mimetic forms at evolutionary stability. In other situations, rather than a polymorphism the model predicts dimorphisms in which some prey were maximally cryptic and had minimal resemblance to the model, whereas many others were more conspicuous than the model. The biological implications of these results, particularly for our understanding of imperfect mimicry, are discussed.

  6. Muscular dystrophy in a dog resembling human becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Baroncelli, A B; Abellonio, F; Pagano, T B; Esposito, I; Peirone, B; Papparella, S; Paciello, O

    2014-05-01

    A 3-year-old, male Labrador retriever dog was presented with clinical signs of progressive exercise intolerance, bilateral elbow extension, rigidity of the forelimbs, hindlimb flexion and kyphosis. Microscopical examination of muscle tissue showed marked variability in myofibre size, replacement of muscle with mature adipose tissue and degeneration/regeneration of muscle fibres, consistent with muscular dystrophy. Immunohistochemical examination for dystrophin showed markedly reduced labelling with monoclonal antibodies specific for the rod domain and the carboxy-terminal of dystrophin, while expression of β-sarcoglycan, γ-sarcoglycan and β-dystroglycan was normal. Immunoblotting revealed a truncated dystrophin protein of approximately 135 kDa. These findings supported a diagnosis of congenital canine muscular dystrophy resembling Becker muscular dystrophy in man.

  7. Peroxisomes, oxidative stress, and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Terlecky, Stanley R; Terlecky, Laura J; Giordano, Courtney R

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisomes are intracellular organelles mediating a wide variety of biosynthetic and biodegradative reactions. Included among these are the metabolism of hydrogen peroxide and other reactive species, molecules whose levels help define the oxidative state of cells. Loss of oxidative equilibrium in cells of tissues and organs potentiates inflammatory responses which can ultimately trigger human disease. The goal of this article is to review evidence for connections between peroxisome function, oxidative stress, and inflammation in the context of human health and degenerative disease. Dysregulated points in this nexus are identified and potential remedial approaches are presented. PMID:22649571

  8. Chemokines in cancer related inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Allavena, Paola; Germano, Giovanni; Marchesi, Federica; Mantovani, Alberto

    2011-03-10

    Chemokines are key players of the cancer-related inflammation. Chemokine ligands and receptors are downstream of genetic events that cause neoplastic transformation and are abundantly expressed in chronic inflammatory conditions which predispose to cancer. Components of the chemokine system affect multiple pathways of tumor progression including: leukocyte recruitment, neo-angiogenesis, tumor cell proliferation and survival, invasion and metastasis. Evidence in pre-clinical and clinical settings suggests that the chemokine system represents a valuable target for the development of innovative therapeutic strategies.

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis: model of systemic inflammation driving atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ku, Ivy A; Imboden, John B; Hsue, Priscilla Y; Ganz, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Similarities between the inflammatory pathways in atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are striking. Chronic systemic inflammation in RA patients leads to cardiovascular (CV) events beyond traditional cardiac risk factors. Clinicians typically focus on treating the joint manifestations of RA while neglecting to eliminate systemic inflammation, which leaves RA patients vulnerable to adverse CV events. In this review we provide an understanding of how systemic inflammation in RA accelerates atherosclerosis. This knowledge should guide therapeutic targets to minimize CV risk in RA, and may lead to insights into the inflammatory mechanisms of atherosclerosis in general.

  10. Inflammatory Response in Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kanak, Mazhar A.; Kunnathodi, Faisal; Lawrence, Michael C.; Levy, Marlon F.

    2014-01-01

    Islet cell transplantation is a promising beta cell replacement therapy for patients with brittle type 1 diabetes as well as refractory chronic pancreatitis. Despite the vast advancements made in this field, challenges still remain in achieving high frequency and long-term successful transplant outcomes. Here we review recent advances in understanding the role of inflammation in islet transplantation and development of strategies to prevent damage to islets from inflammation. The inflammatory response associated with islets has been recognized as the primary cause of early damage to islets and graft loss after transplantation. Details on cell signaling pathways in islets triggered by cytokines and harmful inflammatory events during pancreas procurement, pancreas preservation, islet isolation, and islet infusion are presented. Robust control of pre- and peritransplant islet inflammation could improve posttransplant islet survival and in turn enhance the benefits of islet cell transplantation for patients who are insulin dependent. We discuss several potent anti-inflammatory strategies that show promise for improving islet engraftment. Further understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in the inflammatory response will provide the basis for developing potent therapeutic strategies for enhancing the quality and success of islet transplantation. PMID:24883060

  11. Lipid Chaperones and Metabolic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Furuhashi, Masato; Ishimura, Shutaro; Ota, Hideki; Miura, Tetsuji

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, a large body of evidence has emerged demonstrating an integration of metabolic and immune response pathways. It is now clear that obesity and associated disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are associated with a metabolically driven, low-grade, chronic inflammatory state, referred to as “metaflammation.” Several inflammatory cytokines as well as lipids and metabolic stress pathways can activate metaflammation, which targets metabolically critical organs and tissues including adipocytes and macrophages to adversely affect systemic homeostasis. On the other hand, inside the cell, fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs), a family of lipid chaperones, as well as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and reactive oxygen species derived from mitochondria play significant roles in promotion of metabolically triggered inflammation. Here, we discuss the molecular and cellular basis of the roles of FABPs, especially FABP4 and FABP5, in metaflammation and related diseases including obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. PMID:22121495

  12. Inflammatory Myopathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms that include proximal muscle weakness and inflammation, edema (an abnormal collection of fluids within body tissues ... A low-sodium diet may help to counter edema and cardiovascular complications. Many individuals with dermatomyositis may ...

  13. Dietary supplementation of omega-3 fatty acid-containing fish oil suppresses F2-isoprostanes but enhances inflammatory cytokine response in a mouse model of ovalbumin-induced allergic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huiyong; Liu, Wei; Goleniewska, Kasia; Porter, Ned A; Morrow, Jason D; Peebles, R Stokes

    2009-09-01

    Epidemiological and clinical evidence has suggested that increased dietary intake of fish oil containing omega-3 fatty acids including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may be associated with a reduced risk of asthma. However, interventional studies on these effects have been equivocal and controversial. Free radical oxidation products of lipids and cyclooxygenases-derived prostaglandins are believed to play an important role in asthma, and fish oil supplementation may modulate the levels of these critical lipid mediators. We employed a murine model of allergic inflammation produced by sensitization to ovalbumin (OVA) to study the effects of fish oil supplementation on airway inflammation. Our studies demonstrated that omega-3 fatty acids were dose dependently incorporated into mouse lung tissue after dietary supplementation. We examined the oxidative stress status by measuring the levels of isoprostanes (IsoPs), the gold standard for oxidative stress in vivo. OVA challenge caused significant increase of F(2)-IsoPs in mouse lung, suggesting an elevated level of oxidative stress. Compared to the control group, fish oil supplementation led to a significant reduction of F(2)-IsoP (from arachidonic acid) with a concomitant increase of F(3)-IsoPs (from EPA) and F(4)-IsoPs (from DHA). Surprisingly, however, fish oil supplementation enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokine IL-5 and IL-13. Furthermore, fish oil supplementation suppressed the production of pulmonary protective PGE(2) in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) while the level of urinary metabolites of the PGE(2) was increased. Our data suggest that augmented lung inflammation after fish oil supplementation may be due to the reduction of PGE(2) production in the lung and these dichotomous results bring into question the role of fish oil supplementation in the treatment of asthma.

  14. Critical role of calpain in inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jingjing; Su, Lei; Liu, Zhifeng

    2016-01-01

    Calpains are a family of cysteine proteases, implicated in a wide range of cellular calcium-regulated functions. Evidence from previous studies using an inhibitor of calpain indicates that calpain activation is involved in the process of numerous inflammation-associated diseases. As a result of in-depth studies, calpains have been proposed to influence the process of inflammation via a variety of mechanisms. The aim of the present study is to provide an overview of recent reports regarding the role of calpain in the process of inflammation, including regulation of immune cell migration, modulation of the activation of inflammatory mediators, degradation of certain associated proteins and induction of cell apoptosis. Understanding these mechanisms may contribute to the investigation of novel therapeutic targets for inflammation-associated diseases. PMID:28101338

  15. Vitamin D in inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wöbke, Thea K.; Sorg, Bernd L.; Steinhilber, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Changes in vitamin D serum levels have been associated with inflammatory diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis (MS), atherosclerosis, or asthma. Genome- and transcriptome-wide studies indicate that vitamin D signaling modulates many inflammatory responses on several levels. This includes (i) the regulation of the expression of genes which generate pro-inflammatory mediators, such as cyclooxygenases or 5-lipoxygenase, (ii) the interference with transcription factors, such as NF-κB, which regulate the expression of inflammatory genes and (iii) the activation of signaling cascades, such as MAP kinases which mediate inflammatory responses. Vitamin D targets various tissues and cell types, a number of which belong to the immune system, such as monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs) as well as B- and T cells, leading to individual responses of each cell type. One hallmark of these specific vitamin D effects is the cell-type specific regulation of genes involved in the regulation of inflammatory processes and the interplay between vitamin D signaling and other signaling cascades involved in inflammation. An important task in the near future will be the elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms that are involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses by vitamin D on the molecular level by the use of techniques such as chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), ChIP-seq, and FAIRE-seq. PMID:25071589

  16. The evolution of inflammatory mediators

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, Andrew F.

    1996-01-01

    Invertebrates do not display the level of sophistication in immune reactivity characteristic of mammals and other ‘higher’ vertebrates. Their great number and diversity of forms, however, reflect their evolutionary success and hence they must have effective mechanisms of defence to deal with parasites and pathogens and altered self tissues. Inflammation appears to be an important first line defence in all invertebrates and vertebrates. This brief review deals with the inflammatory responses of invertebrates and fish concentrating on the cell types involved and the mediators of inflammation, in particular, eicosanoids, cytokines and adhesion molecules. PMID:18475690

  17. Role of Antioxidants and Natural Products in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Fard, Masoumeh Tangestani; Tan, Woan Sean; Gothai, Sivapragasam; Kumar, S. Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a comprehensive array of physiological response to a foreign organism, including human pathogens, dust particles, and viruses. Inflammations are mainly divided into acute and chronic inflammation depending on various inflammatory processes and cellular mechanisms. Recent investigations have clarified that inflammation is a major factor for the progression of various chronic diseases/disorders, including diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, eye disorders, arthritis, obesity, autoimmune diseases, and inflammatory bowel disease. Free radical productions from different biological and environmental sources are due to an imbalance of natural antioxidants which further leads to various inflammatory associated diseases. In this review article, we have outlined the inflammatory process and its cellular mechanisms involved in the progression of various chronic modern human diseases. In addition, we have discussed the role of free radicals-induced tissue damage, antioxidant defence, and molecular mechanisms in chronic inflammatory diseases/disorders. The systematic knowledge regarding the role of inflammation and its associated adverse effects can provide a clear understanding in the development of innovative therapeutic targets from natural sources that are intended for suppression of various chronic inflammations associated diseases. PMID:27803762

  18. Mast Cell Proteases and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hongyan; Korthuis, Ronald J.

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells are best known for their role in allergic reactions but are also now recognized for their important contributions to a number of disparate inflammatory conditions through the release of inflammatory mediators, serglycin and other proteoglycans, and proteases. Because these tissue resident inflammatory cells express proteases in such great abundance and their enzymatic activity results in cleavage of a multitude of proteins and peptides, which in turn modify tissue function, their substrate specificity, tissue distribution, and mode of action have become the subjects of great interest. Although mast cell protease-dependent proteolysis is critical to host defense against invading pathogens, regulation of these hydrolytic enzymes is essential to limiting self-induced damage as well. Indeed, dysregulated release of mast cell proteases is now recognized to contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory conditions including asthma, abdominal aortic aneurysm formation, vessel damage in atherosclerosis and hypertension, arthritis, and ischemia/reperfusion injury. Understanding how mast cell proteases contribute to inflammation will thus help unravel molecular mechanisms that underlie such immunologic disorders and will help identify new therapeutic targets for drug development. PMID:22125569

  19. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Aya M; Szakmary, Akos; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammation is strongly associated with approximately one-fifth of all human cancers. Arising from combinations of factors such as environmental exposures, diet, inherited gene polymorphisms, infections, or from dysfunctions of the immune response, chronic inflammation begins as an attempt of the body to remove injurious stimuli; however, over time, this results in continuous tissue destruction and promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis. Here, we focus on intestinal inflammation and its associated cancers, a group of diseases on the rise and affecting millions of people worldwide. Intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) and celiac disease. Long-standing intestinal inflammation is associated with colorectal cancer and small-bowel adenocarcinoma, as well as extraintestinal manifestations, including lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. This article highlights potential mechanisms of pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel diseases and celiac disease, as well as those involved in the progression to associated cancers, most of which have been identified from studies utilizing mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into chemically induced models; genetic models, which make up the bulk of the studied models; adoptive transfer models; and spontaneous models. Studies in these models have lead to the understanding that persistent antigen exposure in the intestinal lumen, in combination with loss of epithelial barrier function, and dysfunction and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses lead to chronic intestinal inflammation. Transcriptional changes in this environment leading to cell survival, hyperplasia, promotion of angiogenesis, persistent DNA damage, or insufficient repair of DNA damage due to an excess of proinflammatory mediators are then thought to lead to sustained malignant transformation. With

  20. Microbial deprivation, inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    von Hertzen, Leena C; Joensuu, H; Haahtela, T

    2011-06-01

    Dysregulated immune function is involved in the pathogenesis of many common human diseases. Living in urban, microbe-poor environment may have a profound influence on the immune function and eventually also on carcinogenesis. Unfortunately, few studies have thus far addressed the role of exposure to the environmental microbiota on the risk of cancer. Which mechanisms are broken in individuals prone to develop chronic inflammation in response to exposure that does not cause harm in others? Recent work in immunology has revealed that Th17 cells, a third subset of Th cells, and inflammatory cytokines, particularly IL-23, are closely linked with tumour-associated inflammation. Albeit the precise role of Th17 cells in cancer is still unclear and a matter of debate, accumulating evidence shows that Th17 cells are enriched in a wide range of human tumours, and that these tumour-derived Th17 cells may promote angiogenesis, tumour growth and inflammation. Regulatory T cells, in turn, appear to have counter-regulatory effects on Th17 cells and can inhibit their function. Thus, the regulatory network, induced and strengthened by continuous exposure to environmental microbiota, may play an important role in tumour immunobiology in preventing the establishment of chronic inflammation in its early phases. In addition, the discovery of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) system has brought micro-organisms to new light; continuous signalling via these TLRs and other receptors that sense microbial components is necessary for epithelial cell integrity, tissue repair, and recovery from injury. In this communication, we summarise the epidemiological data of living in environments with diverse microbial exposures and the risk of cancer, and discuss the related immunological mechanisms, focusing on the links between environmental microbiota, the Th17/IL-23 axis and cancer-associated inflammation.

  1. Oxidative Stress and Inflammation: What Polyphenols Can Do for Us?

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tarique; Yin, Yulong; Blachier, Francois; Tossou, Myrlene C. B.; Rahu, Najma

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is viewed as an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their elimination by protective mechanisms, which can lead to chronic inflammation. Oxidative stress can activate a variety of transcription factors, which lead to the differential expression of some genes involved in inflammatory pathways. The inflammation triggered by oxidative stress is the cause of many chronic diseases. Polyphenols have been proposed to be useful as adjuvant therapy for their potential anti-inflammatory effect, associated with antioxidant activity, and inhibition of enzymes involved in the production of eicosanoids. This review aims at exploring the properties of polyphenols in anti-inflammation and oxidation and the mechanisms of polyphenols inhibiting molecular signaling pathways which are activated by oxidative stress, as well as the possible roles of polyphenols in inflammation-mediated chronic disorders. Such data can be helpful for the development of future antioxidant therapeutics and new anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:27738491

  2. Diabetes tolerogenic vaccines targeting antigen-specific inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Shuang; Zhang, Huiyuan; Zhou, Xian; He, Yue; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Xie, Xiaoping; Li, Chaofan; He, Zhonghuai; Yu, Qingling; Zhong, Yiwei; Lowrie, Douglas B; Zheng, Guoxing; Wang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance controls the magnitude of inflammation, and balance between beneficial and harmful effects of inflammation is crucial for organ function and survival. Inadequate tolerance leads to various inflammatory diseases. Antigen specific tolerance is ideal for inflammation control as alternative anti-inflammatory interventions are non-specific and consequently increase the risk of infection and tumorigenesis. With inherent antigen specificity, tolerogenic vaccines are potentially ideal for control of inflammation. Although the concept of tolerogenic vaccines is still in its infancy, tolerogenic mucosal vaccines and specific immuno-therapies have long been proven effective in pioneering examples. Now a body of evidence supporting the concept of tolerogenic vaccines has also accumulated. Here we comment on recent successes of the tolerogenic vaccine concept, present new evidence with a type 1 diabetes vaccine as an example and draw conclusions on the advantages and potential for inflammatory disease control at the bedside. PMID:25622092

  3. Diabetes tolerogenic vaccines targeting antigen-specific inflammation.

    PubMed

    Geng, Shuang; Zhang, Huiyuan; Zhou, Xian; He, Yue; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Xie, Xiaoping; Li, Chaofan; He, Zhonghuai; Yu, Qingling; Zhong, Yiwei; Lowrie, Douglas B; Zheng, Guoxing; Wang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance controls the magnitude of inflammation, and balance between beneficial and harmful effects of inflammation is crucial for organ function and survival. Inadequate tolerance leads to various inflammatory diseases. Antigen specific tolerance is ideal for inflammation control as alternative anti-inflammatory interventions are non-specific and consequently increase the risk of infection and tumorigenesis. With inherent antigen specificity, tolerogenic vaccines are potentially ideal for control of inflammation. Although the concept of tolerogenic vaccines is still in its infancy, tolerogenic mucosal vaccines and specific immuno-therapies have long been proven effective in pioneering examples. Now a body of evidence supporting the concept of tolerogenic vaccines has also accumulated. Here we comment on recent successes of the tolerogenic vaccine concept, present new evidence with a type 1 diabetes vaccine as an example and draw conclusions on the advantages and potential for inflammatory disease control at the bedside.

  4. A Mouse Model of Diet-Induced Obesity Resembling Most Features of Human Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Della Vedova, Maria C.; Muñoz, Marcos D.; Santillan, Lucas D.; Plateo-Pignatari, Maria G.; Germanó, Maria J.; Rinaldi Tosi, Martín E.; Garcia, Silvina; Gomez, Nidia N.; Fornes, Miguel W.; Gomez Mejiba, Sandra E.; Ramirez, Dario C.

    2016-01-01

    Increased chicken-derived fat and fructose consumption in the human diet is paralleled by an increasing prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome (MS). Herein, we aimed at developing and characterizing a mouse model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) resembling most of the key features of the human MS. To accomplish this, we fed male C57BL/6J mice for 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks with either a low-fat diet (LFD) or a high-chicken-fat diet (HFD) and tap water with or without 10% fructose (F). This experimental design resulted in the following four experimental groups: LFD, LFD + F, HFD, and HFD + F. Over the feeding period, and on a weekly basis, the HFD + F group had more caloric intake and gained more weight than the other experimental groups. Compared to the other groups, and at the end of the feeding period, the HFD + F group had a higher adipogenic index, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting basal glycemia, insulin resistance, hypertension, and atherogenic index and showed steatohepatitis and systemic oxidative stress/inflammation. A mouse model of DIO that will allow us to study the effect of MS in different organs and systems has been developed and characterized. PMID:27980421

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Iridoids of Botanical Origin

    PubMed Central

    Viljoen, A; Mncwangi, N; Vermaak, I

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a manifestation of a wide range of disorders which include; arthritis, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, inflammatory bowel syndrome, physical injury and infection amongst many others. Common treatment modalities are usually non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, paracetamol, indomethacin and ibuprofen as well as corticosteroids such as prednisone. These however, may be associated with a host of side effects due to non-selectivity for cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes involved in inflammation and those with selectivity may be highly priced. Thus, there is a continuing search for safe and effective anti-inflammatory molecules from natural sources. Research has confirmed that iridoids exhibit promising anti-inflammatory activity which may be beneficial in the treatment of inflammation. Iridoids are secondary metabolites present in various plants, especially in species belonging to the Apocynaceae, Lamiaceae, Loganiaceae, Rubiaceae, Scrophulariaceae and Verbenaceae families. Many of these ethnobotanicals have an illustrious history of traditional use alluding to their use to treat inflammation. Although iridoids exhibit a wide range of pharmacological activities such as cardiovascular, hepatoprotection, hypoglycaemic, antimutagenic, antispasmodic, anti-tumour, antiviral, immunomodulation and purgative effects this review will acutely focus on their anti-inflammatory properties. The paper aims to present a summary for the most prominent iridoid-containing plants for which anti-inflammatory activity has been demonstrated in vitro and / or in vivo. PMID:22414102

  6. Causes of CNS inflammation and potential targets for anticonvulsants.

    PubMed

    Falip, Mercé; Salas-Puig, Xavier; Cara, Carlos

    2013-08-01

    Inflammation is one of the most important endogenous defence mechanisms in an organism. It has been suggested that inflammation plays an important role in the pathophysiology of a number of human epilepsies and convulsive disorders, and there is clinical and experimental evidence to suggest that inflammatory processes within the CNS may either contribute to or be a consequence of epileptogenesis. This review discusses evidence from human studies on the role of inflammation in epilepsy and highlights potential new targets in the inflammatory cascade for antiepileptic drugs. A number of mechanisms have been shown to be involved in CNS inflammatory reactions. These include an inflammatory response at the level of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), immune-mediated damage to the CNS, stress-induced release of inflammatory mediators and direct neuronal dysfunction or damage as a result of inflammatory reactions. Mediators of inflammation in the CNS include interleukin (IL)-1β, tumour necrosis factor-α, nuclear factor-κB and toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). IL-1β, BBB and high-mobility group box-1-TLR4 signalling appear to be the most promising targets for anticonvulsant agents directed at inflammation. Such agents may provide effective therapy for drug-resistant epilepsies in the future.

  7. Inflammation Effects on Motivation and Motor Activity: Role of Dopamine.

    PubMed

    Felger, Jennifer C; Treadway, Michael T

    2017-01-01

    Motivational and motor deficits are common in patients with depression and other psychiatric disorders, and are related to symptoms of anhedonia and motor retardation. These deficits in motivation and motor function are associated with alterations in corticostriatal neurocircuitry, which may reflect abnormalities in mesolimbic and mesostriatal dopamine (DA). One pathophysiologic pathway that may drive changes in DAergic corticostriatal circuitry is inflammation. Biomarkers of inflammation such as inflammatory cytokines and acute-phase proteins are reliably elevated in a significant proportion of psychiatric patients. A variety of inflammatory stimuli have been found to preferentially target basal ganglia function to lead to impaired motivation and motor activity. Findings have included inflammation-associated reductions in ventral striatal neural responses to reward anticipation, decreased DA and DA metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid, and decreased availability, and release of striatal DA, all of which correlated with symptoms of reduced motivation and/or motor retardation. Importantly, inflammation-associated symptoms are often difficult to treat, and evidence suggests that inflammation may decrease DA synthesis and availability, thus circumventing the efficacy of standard pharmacotherapies. This review will highlight the impact of administration of inflammatory stimuli on the brain in relation to motivation and motor function. Recent data demonstrating similar relationships between increased inflammation and altered DAergic corticostriatal circuitry and behavior in patients with major depressive disorder will also be presented. Finally, we will discuss the mechanisms by which inflammation affects DA neurotransmission and relevance to novel therapeutic strategies to treat reduced motivation and motor symptoms in patients with high inflammation.

  8. Mechanistic Differences Leading to Infectious and Sterile Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Behnia, Faranak; Sheller, Samantha; Menon, Ramkumar

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation is a physiologic component of pregnancy and parturition. Overwhelming intrauterine inflammatory load promotes quiescent feto-maternal tissues into a contractile phenotype. Like inflammation, oxidative stress is an inevitable component of both pregnancy and parturition. Pathologic activation of host innate immune response to adverse pregnancy conditions can lead to premature activation of inflammatory and oxidative stress. Inflammation and oxidative stress markers seen with both sterile and infectious inflammation are often similar; therefore, it is difficult to understand causality of conditions like spontaneous preterm birth. This review demonstrates potential mechanistic pathways of activation of sterile and infectious inflammation. We demonstrate the activation of two unique pathways of inflammation by factors that are well-documented proxies for oxidative stress (cigarette smoke extract) and infection (lipopolysaccharide). Sterile inflammation seen after exposure to an oxidative stress inducer is due to cellular elemental damage resulting in p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) induced cellular senescence. Infectious inflammation is through activation of transcription factor NF-κB and independent of oxidative stress-associated damages and p38 MAPK-induced senescence. Understanding the differences in the inflammatory pathway activation by various risk factors is important to design better screening, diagnostic and intervention strategies to reduce the risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  9. Roles for Inflammation and Regulatory T Cells in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erdman, Susan E.; Poutahidis, Theofilos

    2014-01-01

    Risk for developing cancer rises substantially as a result of poorly regulated inflammatory responses to pathogenic bacterial infections. Anti-inflammatory CD4+ regulatory cells (TREG) function to restore immune homeostasis during chronic inflammatory disorders. It seems logical that TREG cells would function to reduce risk of inflammation-associated cancer in the bowel by down-regulating inflammation. It is widely believed, however, that TREG function in cancer mainly to suppress protective anticancer inflammatory responses. Thus roles for inflammation, TREG cells, and gut bacteria in cancer are paradoxical and are the subject of controversy. Our accumulated data build upon the “hygiene hypothesis” model in which gastrointestinal (GI) infections lead to changes in TREG that reduce inflammation-associated diseases. Ability of TREG to inhibit or suppress cancer depends upon gut bacteria and IL-10, which serve to maintain immune balance and a protective anti-inflammatory TREG phenotype. However, under poorly regulated pro-inflammatory conditions, TREG fail to inhibit and may instead contribute to a T helper (Th)-17-driven procarcinogenic process, a cancer state that is reversible by down-regulation of inflammation and interleukin (IL)-6. Consequently, hygienic individuals with a weakened IL-10– and TREG–mediated inhibitory loop are highly susceptible to the carcinogenic consequences of elevated inflammation and show more frequent inflammation-associated cancers. Taken together, these data help explain the paradox of inflammation and TREG in cancer and indicate that targeted stimulation of TREG may promote health and significantly reduce risk of cancer. PMID:20019355

  10. Inflammation in prostate cancer progression and therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Timothy; Livas, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation contributes to the onset and progression of human cancer, via modifications in the tumor microenvironment by remodeling the extracellular matrix (ECM) and initiating epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). At the biological level, chronically inflamed cells release cytokines that are functionally dictating a constitutively active stroma, promoting tumor growth and metastasis. In prostate cancer, inflammation correlates with increased development of “risk factor” lesions or proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA). Chronic inflammation in benign prostate biopsy specimens can be associated with high-grade prostate tumors in adjacent areas. In this article, we discuss the current understanding of the incidence of inflammation in prostate cancer progression and the significance of the process in therapeutic targeting of specific inflammatory signaling pathways and critical effectors during tumor progression. Further understanding of the process of chronic inflammation in prostate tumor progression to metastasis will enable development and optimization of novel therapeutic modalities for the treatment of high-risk patients with advanced disease. PMID:26816843

  11. From Inflammation to Prostate Cancer: The Role of Inflammasomes

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation-associated studies entice specific attention due to inflammation's role in multiple stages of prostate cancer development. However, mechanistic regulation of inflammation inciting prostate cancer remains largely uncharacterized. A focused class of inflammatory regulators known as inflammasomes has recently gained attention in cancer development. Inflammasomes are a multiprotein complex that drives a cascade of proinflammatory cytokines regulating various cellular activities. Inflammasomes activation is linked with infection, stress, or danger signals, which are common events within the prostate gland. In this study, we review the potential of inflammasomes in understanding the role of inflammation in prostate cancer. PMID:27429614

  12. Auto-inflammatory fever syndromes.

    PubMed

    Padeh, Shai; Berkun, Yakov

    2007-08-01

    Human autoinflammatory diseases (except for PFAPA) are a heterogeneous group of genetically determined diseases characterized by seemingly unprovoked inflammation in the absence of autoimmune or infective causes (Table 2). The last decade has witnessed tremendous advances in the understanding of these disorders. These advances have allowed therapeutic interventions resulting in improvement in the short-term and long-term morbidity of all of these diseases. Future research into the molecular mechanisms underlying these inflammatory diseases should lead to a better understanding of inflammatory diseases in general and, it is hoped, to better and more targeted therapies.

  13. A neural network dynamics that resembles protein evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrán, Edgardo A.; Ferrara, Pascual

    1992-06-01

    We use neutral networks to classify proteins according to their sequence similarities. A network composed by 7 × 7 neurons, was trained with the Kohonen unsupervised learning algorithm using, as inputs, matrix patterns derived from the bipeptide composition of cytochrome c proteins belonging to 76 different species. As a result of the training, the network self-organized the activation of its neurons into topologically ordered maps, wherein phylogenetically related sequences were positioned close to each other. The evolution of the topological map during learning, in a representative computational experiment, roughly resembles the way in which one species evolves into several others. For instance, sequences corresponding to vertebrates, initially grouped together into one neuron, were placed in a contiguous zone of the final neural map, with sequences of fishes, amphibia, reptiles, birds and mammals associated to different neurons. Some apparent wrong classifications are due to the fact that some proteins have a greater degree of sequence identity than the one expected by phylogenetics. In the final neural map, each synaptic vector may be considered as the pattern corresponding to the ancestor of all the proteins that are attached to that neuron. Although it may be also tempting to link real time with learning epochs and to use this relationship to calibrate the molecular evolutionary clock, this is not correct because the evolutionary time schedule obtained with the neural network depends highly on the discrete way in which the winner neighborhood is decreased during learning.

  14. Hyperglycemia, tumorigenesis, and chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Chun; Yang, Wei-Chung Vivian

    2016-12-01

    Hyperglycemia is the most prominent sign that characterizes diabetes. Hyperglycemia favors malignant cell growth by providing energy to cancer cells. Clinical studies also showed an increased risk of diabetes being associated with different types of cancers. In addition, poorly regulated glucose metabolism in diabetic patients is often found with increased levels of chronic inflammatory markers, e.g., interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and emerging evidence has highlighted activation of the immune response in the progression and development of cancer cells. Therefore, uncontrolled proinflammatory responses could conceivably create a chronic inflammatory state, promoting a tumor-favorable microenvironment and potentially triggering immune overactivation and cancer growth. To further understand how hyperglycemia contributes to immune overactivation, the tumor microenvironment and the development of chronic inflammation-associated tumors may provide insights into tumor biology and immunology. This paper provides a brief introduction to hyperglycemia-associated diseases, followed by a comprehensive overview of the current findings of regulatory molecular mechanisms of glycosylation on proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix under hyperglycemic conditions. Then, the authors discuss the role of hyperglycemia in tumorigenesis (particularly in prostate, liver, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers), as well as the contribution of hyperglycemia to chronic inflammation. The authors end with a brief discussion on the future perspectives of hyperglycemia/tumorigenesis and potential applications of alternative/effective therapeutic strategies for hyperglycemia-associated cancers.

  15. Computational Modeling of Inflammation and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Mi, Qi; An, Gary; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    Objective Inflammation is both central to proper wound healing and a key driver of chronic tissue injury via a positive-feedback loop incited by incidental cell damage. We seek to derive actionable insights into the role of inflammation in wound healing in order to improve outcomes for individual patients. Approach To date, dynamic computational models have been used to study the time evolution of inflammation in wound healing. Emerging clinical data on histo-pathological and macroscopic images of evolving wounds, as well as noninvasive measures of blood flow, suggested the need for tissue-realistic, agent-based, and hybrid mechanistic computational simulations of inflammation and wound healing. Innovation We developed a computational modeling system, Simple Platform for Agent-based Representation of Knowledge, to facilitate the construction of tissue-realistic models. Results A hybrid equation–agent-based model (ABM) of pressure ulcer formation in both spinal cord-injured and -uninjured patients was used to identify control points that reduce stress caused by tissue ischemia/reperfusion. An ABM of arterial restenosis revealed new dynamics of cell migration during neointimal hyperplasia that match histological features, but contradict the currently prevailing mechanistic hypothesis. ABMs of vocal fold inflammation were used to predict inflammatory trajectories in individuals, possibly allowing for personalized treatment. Conclusions The intertwined inflammatory and wound healing responses can be modeled computationally to make predictions in individuals, simulate therapies, and gain mechanistic insights. PMID:24527362

  16. Impact of Inflammation on Male Reproductive Tract

    PubMed Central

    Azenabor, Alfred; Ekun, Ayodele Oloruntoba; Akinloye, Oluyemi

    2015-01-01

    Fertility in the male is dependent on the proper production of sperm cells. This process, called spermatogenesis is very complex and involves the synchronization of numerous factors. The presence of pro–inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF–α), interleukin–1 alpha (IL–1 α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL–1 β) cytokines in the male reproductive tract (testis, epididymis and sperm) may have certain physiological functions. However, when the levels of these cytokines are higher than normal, as seen in conditions of inflammation, they become very harmful to sperm production. Moreover, inflammation is also associated with oxidative stress and the latter is well known to impair sperm function. Epidemiological studies regarding male infertility have revealed that more and more infertile men suffer from acute or chronic inflammation of the genitourinary tract, which often occurs without any symptoms. The inflammatory reactions within the male genital tract are inevitably connected with oxidative stress. Oxidative stress, especially in sperm, is harmful because it damages sperm DNA and causes apoptosis in sperm. This article reviewed the suggested mechanisms and contribution of inflammation to male infertility. In addition, the review was further strengthened by discussing how inflammation affects both fertility and assisted reproductive technologies (ART). PMID:26913230

  17. Radiation, Inflammation, and Immune Responses in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Multhoff, Gabriele; Radons, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has emerged as one of the hallmarks of cancer. Inflammation also plays a pivotal role in modulating radiation responsiveness of tumors. As discussed in this review, ionizing radiation (IR) leads to activation of several transcription factors modulating the expression of numerous mediators in tumor cells and cells of the microenvironment promoting cancer development. Novel therapeutic approaches thus aim to interfere with the activity or expression of these factors, either in single-agent or combinatorial treatment or as supplements of the existing therapeutic concepts. Among them, NF-κB, STAT-3, and HIF-1 play a crucial role in radiation-induced inflammatory responses embedded in a complex inflammatory network. A great variety of classical or novel drugs including nutraceuticals such as plant phytochemicals have the capacity to interfere with the inflammatory network in cancer and are considered as putative radiosensitizers. Thus, targeting the inflammatory signaling pathways induced by IR offers the opportunity to improve the clinical outcome of radiation therapy by enhancing radiosensitivity and decreasing putative metabolic effects. Since inflammation and sex steroids also impact tumorigenesis, a therapeutic approach targeting glucocorticoid receptors and radiation-induced production of tumorigenic factors might be effective in sensitizing certain tumors to IR. PMID:22675673

  18. Kaempferol and inflammation: From chemistry to medicine.

    PubMed

    Devi, Kasi Pandima; Malar, Dicson Sheeja; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Sureda, Antoni; Xiao, Jianbo; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Daglia, Maria

    2015-09-01

    Inflammation is an important process of human healing response, wherein the tissues respond to injuries induced by many agents including pathogens. It is characterized by pain, redness and heat in the injured tissues. Chronic inflammation seems to be associated with different types of diseases such as arthritis, allergies, atherosclerosis, and even cancer. In recent years natural product based drugs are considered as the novel therapeutic strategy for prevention and treatment of inflammatory diseases. Among the different types of phyto-constituents present in natural products, flavonoids which occur in many vegetable foods and herbal medicines are considered as the most active constituent, which has the potency to ameliorate inflammation under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Kaempferol is a natural flavonol present in different plant species, which has been described to possess potent anti-inflammatory properties. Despite the voluminous literature on the anti-inflammatory effects of kaempferol, only very limited review articles has been published on this topic. Hence the present review is aimed to provide a critical overview on the anti-inflammatory effects and the mechanisms of action of kaempferol, based on the current scientific literature. In addition, emphasis is also given on the chemistry, natural sources, bioavailability and toxicity of kaempferol.

  19. Imiquimod Treatment Causes Systemic Disease in Mice Resembling Generalized Pustular Psoriasis in an IL-1 and IL-36 Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) is a severe form of psoriasis that can be caused by missense mutations in the interleukin-36 (IL-36) receptor antagonist. In addition to neutrophil rich skin inflammation, GPP patients typically also experience anorexia, fever, malaise, and pain. The imiquimod-induced skin inflammation mouse model has rapidly become a popular way to study plaque psoriasis, which typically does not involve symptoms of systemic disease. In this model, neutrophil recruitment to the skin is dependent upon the inflammatory mediators IL-1, via its receptor IL-1R1, and IL-36α. Unexpectedly, we observed that mice also exhibited signs of anorexia (weight loss and decreased food intake), general malaise (decreased activity and loss of interest in building nests), and pain (nose bulging and hunched posture). A scoring system allowing quantitative comparisons of test groups was developed. Female mice were found to develop more severe disease than male mice. Furthermore, mice deficient in both IL-1R1 and IL-36α are nearly disease-free, while mice lacking only one of these inflammatory mediators have less severe disease than wild type mice. Hence, the imiquimod-induced skin inflammation mouse model recapitulates not only plaque psoriasis, but also the more severe symptoms, that is, anorexia, malaise, and pain, seen in GPP. PMID:28057979

  20. Understanding migraine: Potential role of neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic inflammation, a well-defined pathophysiologial process is characterized by the release of potent vasoactive neuropeptides, predominantly calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and neurokinin A from activated peripheral nociceptive sensory nerve terminals (usually C and A delta-fibers). These peptides lead to a cascade of inflammatory tissue responses including arteriolar vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, and degranulation of mast cells in their peripheral target tissue. Neurogenic inflammatory processes have long been implicated as a possible mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of various human diseases of the nervous system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, urogenital tract, and skin. The recent development of several innovative experimental migraine models has provided evidence suggestive of the involvement of neuropeptides (SP, neurokinin A, and CGRP) in migraine headache. Antidromic stimulation of nociceptive fibers of the trigeminal nerve resulted in a neurogenic inflammatory response with marked increase in plasma protein extravasation from dural blood vessels by the release of various sensory neuropeptides. Several clinically effective abortive antimigraine medications, such as ergots and triptans, have been shown to attenuate the release of neuropeptide and neurogenic plasma protein extravasation. These findings provide support for the validity of using animal models to investigate mechanisms of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. These also further strengthen the notion of migraine being a neuroinflammatory disease. In the clinical context, there is a paucity of knowledge and awareness among physicians regarding the role of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. Improved understanding of the molecular biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology of neurogenic inflammation may provide the practitioner the context-specific feedback to identify the novel and most effective therapeutic approach to treatment

  1. Growth promotion in pigs by oxytetracycline coincides with down regulation of serum inflammatory parameters and of hibernation-associated protein HP-27.

    PubMed

    Soler, Laura; Miller, Ingrid; Hummel, Karin; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Jessen, Flemming; Escribano, Damian; Niewold, Theo

    2016-05-01

    The growth promoting effect of supplementing animal feed with antibiotics like tetracycline has traditionally been attributed to their antibiotic character. However, more evidence has been accumulated on their direct anti-inflammatory effect during the last two decades. Here we used a pig model to explore the systemic molecular effect of feed supplementation with sub therapeutic levels of oxytetracycline (OTC) by analysis of serum proteome changes. Results showed that OTC promoted growth, coinciding with a significant down regulation of different serum proteins related to inflammation, oxidation and lipid metabolism, confirming the anti-inflammatory mechanism of OTC. Interestingly, apart from the classic acute phase reactants also down regulation was seen of a hibernation associated plasma protein (HP-27), which is to our knowledge the first description in pigs. Although the exact function in non-hibernators is unclear, down regulation of HP-27 could be consistent with increased appetite, which is possibly linked to the anti-inflammatory action of OTC. Given that pigs are good models for human medicine due to their genetic and physiologic resemblance, the present results might also be used for rational intervention in human diseases in which inflammation plays an important role such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

  2. Reparative inflammation takes charge of tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Karin, Michael; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation underlies many chronic and degenerative diseases, but it also mitigates infections, clears damaged cells and initiates tissue repair. Many of the mechanisms that link inflammation to damage repair and regeneration in mammals are conserved in lower organisms, indicating that it is an evolutionarily important process. Recent insights have shed light on the cellular and molecular processes through which conventional inflammatory cytokines and Wnt factors control mammalian tissue repair and regeneration. This is particularly important for regeneration in the gastrointestinal system, especially for intestine and liver tissues in which aberrant and deregulated repair results in severe pathologies. PMID:26791721

  3. Chronic Brain Inflammation: The Neurochemical Basis for Drugs to Reduce Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Jarrott, Bevyn; Williams, Spencer J

    2016-03-01

    It is now recognised that the brain and the peripheral immune system have bidirectional communication in both health and neuronal diseases. Brain inflammation results after both acute injury and also with the appearance of mutated proteins or endogenous neurotoxic metabolites associated with slow neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and some psychiatric disorders. Microglia play a key role in brain inflammation by the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and with ageing, microglia exhibit 'priming' leading to increased basal release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines. Neurochemical targets to reduce or slow chronic brain inflammation include cyclooxygenase enzymes, Nrf2 transcription factor, angiotensin AT1 receptors and sigma-1 receptors. Development of more selective drugs to act at these targets is occurring but large scale clinical trials to validate the drugs will take significant time.

  4. Inflammatory aneurysms treated with EVAR.

    PubMed

    Stone, William M; Fankhauser, Grant T

    2012-12-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAA) are being treated more frequently by endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Some authors caution against treating IAAA by EVAR because retroperitoneal inflammation may not subside post-operatively. A recent experience of 69 IAAA treated by open and endovascular methods is presented with results supporting the use of EVAR for IAAA. Several other studies evaluating EVAR in the treatment of IAAA are discussed.

  5. FGF23 and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sharaf El Din, Usama A A; Salem, Mona M; Abdulazim, Dina O

    2017-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a recognized feature in chronic kidney disease (CKD). The role of systemic inflammation in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification was recently settled. FGF23 was recently accused as a direct stimulus of systemic inflammation. This finding explains the strong association of FGF23 to vascular calcification and increased mortality among CKD. PMID:28101453

  6. Ventricular Tachycardia and Resembling Acute Coronary Syndrome During Pheochromocytoma Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shi-jun; Wang, Tao; Wang, Lin; Pang, Zhan-qi; Ma, Ben; Li, Ya-wen; Yang, Jian; Dong, He

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pheochromocytomas are neuroendocrine tumors, and its cardiac involvement may include transient myocardial dysfunction, acute coronary syndrome (ACS), and even ventricular arrhythmias. A patient was referred for evaluation of stuttering chest pain, and his electrocardiogram showed T-wave inversion over leads V1 to V4. Coronary angiography showed 90% stenosis in the mid-left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), which was stented. Five days later, the patient had ventricular tachycardia, and severe hypertension, remarkable blood pressure fluctuation between 224/76 and 70/50 mm Hg. The patient felt abdominal pain and his abdominal ultrasound showed suspicious right adrenal gland tumor. Enhanced computed tomography of adrenal gland conformed that there was a tumor in right adrenal gland accompanied by an upset level of aldosterone. The tumor was removed by laparoscope, and the pathological examination showed pheochromocytoma. After the surgery, the blood pressure turned normal gradually. There was no T-wave inversion in lead V1-V4. Our case illustrates a rare pheochromocytoma presentation with a VT and resembling ACS. In our case, the serious stenosis in the mid of LAD could be explained by worsen the clinical course of myocardial ischemia or severe coronary vasospasm by the excessive amounts of catecholamines released from the tumor. Coronary vasospasm was possible because he had no classic coronary risk factors (e.g. family history and smoking habit, essential hypertension, hyperglycemia and abnormal serum lipoprotein, high body mass index). Thus, pheochromocytoma was missed until he revealed the association of his symptoms with abdominalgia. As phaeochromocytomas that present with cardiovascular complications can be fatal, it is necessary to screen for the disease when patients present with symptoms indicating catecholamine excess. PMID:27057898

  7. Gait analysis in a mouse model resembling Leigh disease.

    PubMed

    de Haas, Ria; Russel, Frans G; Smeitink, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Leigh disease (LD) is one of the clinical phenotypes of mitochondrial OXPHOS disorders and also known as sub-acute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy. The disease has an incidence of 1 in 77,000 live births. Symptoms typically begin early in life and prognosis for LD patients is poor. Currently, no clinically effective treatments are available. Suitable animal and cellular models are necessary for the understanding of the neuropathology and the development of successful new therapeutic strategies. In this study we used the Ndufs4 knockout (Ndufs4(-/-)) mouse, a model of mitochondrial complex I deficiency. Ndusf4(-/-) mice exhibit progressive neurodegeneration, which closely resemble the human LD phenotype. When dissecting behavioral abnormalities in animal models it is of great importance to apply translational tools that are clinically relevant. To distinguish gait abnormalities in patients, simple walking tests can be assessed, but in animals this is not easy. This study is the first to demonstrate automated CatWalk gait analysis in the Ndufs4(-/-) mouse model. Marked differences were noted between Ndufs4(-/-) and control mice in dynamic, static, coordination and support parameters. Variation of walking speed was significantly increased in Ndufs4(-/-) mice, suggesting hampered and uncoordinated gait. Furthermore, decreased regularity index, increased base of support and changes in support were noted in the Ndufs4(-/-) mice. Here, we report the ability of the CatWalk system to sensitively assess gait abnormalities in Ndufs4(-/-) mice. This objective gait analysis can be of great value for intervention and drug efficacy studies in animal models for mitochondrial disease.

  8. Familial resemblance for body composition measures: the HERITAGE Family Study.

    PubMed

    Rice, T; Daw, E W; Gagnon, J; Bouchard, C; Leon, A S; Skinner, J S; Wilmore, J H; Rao, D C

    1997-11-01

    A sex-specific familial correlation model was used to assess the heritable contributions to several measures of body composition in 86 sedentary white families participating in the HERITAGE Family Study. For this study, sedentary families were recruited, tested for a battery of measures, endurance exercise trained for 20 weeks, and remeasured. This sample is unique in that activity level was controlled for in these families at baseline measurement. In this report, three body composition variables measured at baseline were analyzed, two indexing adiposity (total subcutaneous fat based on eight skinfold measurements [SF8] and percent body fat measured by underwater weighing techniques [%BF]) and one assessing fat free mass ([FFM] derived from underwater weighing). The maximal heritabilities for SF8 (34%) and %BF (62%) were consistent with those reported in previous studies. There were no sex nor generation differences in the familial correlations, and the spouse correlation was significant, consistent with the hypothesis that the familial aggregation reflects genetic and familial environmental factors. However, the results for FFM were very different. The most parsimonious pattern of familial resemblance was consistent with mitochondrial inheritance (i.e., mother-offspring and sibling correlations were equal and were larger than those for spouse and father-offspring pairs). Under the mitochondrial hypothesis, 39% of the variance was accounted for by familial/genetic effects. However, under a nonmitochondrial hypothesis, which could not be ruled out, 65% of the FFM phenotypic variance was accounted for by familial/genetic factors. This high heritability level, as compared with results from previous studies, is consistent with the hypothesis that activity may constitute an important environmental determinant of FFM. These alternative hypotheses for FFM warrant further investigation using complex multilocus-multitrait segregation models, which allow for major genetic

  9. Obesity, inflammation and the immune system.

    PubMed

    de Heredia, Fátima Pérez; Gómez-Martínez, Sonia; Marcos, Ascensión

    2012-05-01

    Obesity shares with most chronic diseases the presence of an inflammatory component, which accounts for the development of metabolic disease and other associated health alterations. This inflammatory state is reflected in increased circulating levels of pro-inflammatory proteins, and it occurs not only in adults but also in adolescents and children. The chronic inflammatory response has its origin in the links existing between the adipose tissue and the immune system. Obesity, like other states of malnutrition, is known to impair the immune function, altering leucocyte counts as well as cell-mediated immune responses. In addition, evidence has arisen that an altered immune function contributes to the pathogenesis of obesity. This review attempts to briefly comment on the various plausible explanations that have been proposed for the phenomenon: (1) the obesity-associated increase in the production of leptin (pro-inflammatory) and the reduction in adiponectin (anti-inflammatory) seem to affect the activation of immune cells; (2) NEFA can induce inflammation through various mechanisms (such as modulation of adipokine production or activation of Toll-like receptors); (3) nutrient excess and adipocyte expansion trigger endoplasmic reticulum stress; and (4) hypoxia occurring in hypertrophied adipose tissue stimulates the expression of inflammatory genes and activates immune cells. Interestingly, data suggest a greater impact of visceral adipose tissue and central obesity, rather than total body fat, on the inflammatory process. In summary, there is a positive feedback loop between local inflammation in adipose tissue and altered immune response in obesity, both contributing to the development of related metabolic complications.

  10. The role of inflammation in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Norbert; Weidinger, Elif; Leitner, Bianka; Schwarz, Markus J.

    2015-01-01

    High levels of pro-inflammatory substances such as cytokines have been described in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of schizophrenia patients. Animal models of schizophrenia show that under certain conditions an immune disturbance during early life, such as an infection-triggered immune activation, might trigger lifelong increased immune reactivity. A large epidemiological study clearly demonstrated that severe infections and autoimmune disorders are risk factors for schizophrenia. Genetic studies have shown a strong signal for schizophrenia on chromosome 6p22.1, in a region related to the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) system and other immune functions. Another line of evidence demonstrates that chronic (dis)stress is associated with immune activation. The vulnerability-stress-inflammation model of schizophrenia includes the contribution of stress on the basis of increased genetic vulnerability for the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, because stress may increase pro-inflammatory cytokines and even contribute to a lasting pro-inflammatory state. Immune alterations influence the dopaminergic, serotonergic, noradrenergic, and glutamatergic neurotransmission. The activated immune system in turn activates the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) of the tryptophan/kynurenine metabolism which influences the serotonergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission via neuroactive metabolites such as kynurenic acid. The described loss of central nervous system volume and the activation of microglia, both of which have been clearly demonstrated in neuroimaging studies of schizophrenia patients, match the assumption of a (low level) inflammatory neurotoxic process. Further support for the inflammatory hypothesis comes from the therapeutic benefit of anti-inflammatory medication. Metaanalyses have shown an advantageous effect of cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors in early stages of schizophrenia. Moreover, intrinsic anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory effects of antipsychotic drugs

  11. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  12. Orbital inflammatory pseudotumors: etiology, differential diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Gabriela M

    2010-12-01

    Orbital inflammation is typically an idiopathic process that occasionally may be identified with a specific local or systemic disease as the causative agent. Orbital inflammatory pseudotumor (also known as idiopathic orbital inflammation syndrome, orbital pseudotumor, nonspecific orbital inflammation, and orbital inflammatory syndrome) is defined as an idiopathic tumor-like inflammation consisting of a pleomorphic cellular response and a fibrovascular tissue reaction. Various rheumatologic disorders are associated with orbital inflammation and must be ruled out in cases of orbital inflammatory pseudotumor, including Wegener's granulomatosis, giant cell arteritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, and rheumatoid arthritis. The mainstay of therapy is corticosteroid therapy, although there is an increasing trend toward use of antimetabolites, alkylating agents, cytotoxic agents, and other immunosuppressive agents.

  13. Systemic Inflammation and Early Atheroma Formation: Are They Related?

    PubMed Central

    Balanescu, Serban; Calmac, Lucian; Constantinescu, Dana; Marinescu, Mugur; Onut, Roxana; Dorobantu, Maria

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease started by endothelial injury and defined by arterial wall load with free and esterified cholesterol, followed by subintimal focal recruitment of circulating monocytes and T-lymphocytes that heals by fibrosis and calcification. Inflammation plays a crucial role in atherogenesis either by local cellular mechanisms or humoral consequences easily measurable in plasma. In most cases inflammation and endothelial dysfunction are triggered by cardiovascular risk factors: hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, smoking or diabetes. In other cases inflammation precedes atherosclerotic changes that occur in autoimmune diseases, as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In these diseases atherogenesis is mostly independent from conventional risk factors. Irrespective of its cause systemic inflammation is correlated with cardiovascular events, but currently there are controversial results regarding inflammatory markers and early atherosclerotic process. We designed a study to identify if the amplitude of inflammation expressed by multiple serum markers is correlated with the severity of the atherosclerotic process measured by coronary atheroma volume and carotid intima-media thickness. The selected inflammatory markers are associated with different pathogenic steps in atherogenesis: acute phase reactants (C-reactive protein); pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, interleukin-6 and -18); endothelium activation markers (soluble VCAM-1, ICAM-1); and specific factors (anticardiolipinic antibodies). We aim to enrol the two different patient subsets with early atherosclerosis: one with conventional risk factors and one with autoimmune diseases without traditional risk factors, in whom inflammation is part of the systemic disease progression. PMID:21977173

  14. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Gil, A

    2002-10-01

    Inflammation is overall a protective response, whose main goal is to liberate the human being of cellular lesions caused by micro-organisms, toxins, allergens, etc., as well as its consequences, and of death cells and necrotic tissues. Chronic inflammation, which is detrimental to tissues, is the basic pathogenic mechanism of hypersensitivity reactions against xenobiotics. Other frequent pathologies, for instance atherosclerosis, chronic hepatitis, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), liver cirrhosis, lung fibrosis, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis are also chronic inflammatory diseases. Chemical mediators of inflammation are derived from blood plasma or different cell-type activity. Biogenic amines, eicosanoids and cytokines are within the most important mediators of inflammatory processes. The different activities of eicosanoids derived from arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6) versus those derived from eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 n-3) are one of the most important mechanisms to explain why n-3, or omega-3, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) exhibit anti-inflammatory properties in many inflammatory diseases. Dietary supplements ranging 1-8 g per day of n-3 PUFA have been reportedly beneficial in the treatment of IBD, eczema, psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, recent experimental studies in rats with experimental ulcerative colitis, induced by intrarectal injection of trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid, have documented that treatment with n-3 long-chain PUFA reduces mucosal damage as assessed by biochemical and histological markers of inflammation. Moreover, the defence antioxidant system in this model is enhanced in treated animals, provided that the n-3 PUFA supply is adequately preserved from oxidation.

  15. Metabolic Inflammation-Differential Modulation by Dietary Constituents.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Claire L; Kennedy, Elaine B; Roche, Helen M

    2016-04-27

    Obesity arises from a sustained positive energy balance which triggers a pro-inflammatory response, a key contributor to metabolic diseases such as T2D. Recent studies, focused on the emerging area of metabolic-inflammation, highlight that specific metabolites can modulate the functional nature and inflammatory phenotype of immune cells. In obesity, expanding adipose tissue attracts immune cells, creating an inflammatory environment within this fatty acid storage organ. Resident immune cells undergo both a pro-inflammatory and metabolic switch in their function. Inflammatory mediators, such as TNF-α and IL-1β, are induced by saturated fatty acids and disrupt insulin signaling. Conversely, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids do not interrupt metabolism and inflammation to the same extent. AMPK links inflammation, metabolism and T2D, with roles to play in all and is influenced negatively by obesity. Lipid spillover results in hepatic lipotoxicity and steatosis. Also in skeletal muscle, excessive FFA can impede insulin's action and promote inflammation. Ectopic fat can also affect pancreatic β-cell function, thereby contributing to insulin resistance. Therapeutics, lifestyle changes, supplements and dietary manipulation are all possible avenues to combat metabolic inflammation and the subsequent insulin resistant state which will be explored in the current review.

  16. Metabolic Inflammation-Differential Modulation by Dietary Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Claire L.; Kennedy, Elaine B.; Roche, Helen M.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity arises from a sustained positive energy balance which triggers a pro-inflammatory response, a key contributor to metabolic diseases such as T2D. Recent studies, focused on the emerging area of metabolic-inflammation, highlight that specific metabolites can modulate the functional nature and inflammatory phenotype of immune cells. In obesity, expanding adipose tissue attracts immune cells, creating an inflammatory environment within this fatty acid storage organ. Resident immune cells undergo both a pro-inflammatory and metabolic switch in their function. Inflammatory mediators, such as TNF-α and IL-1β, are induced by saturated fatty acids and disrupt insulin signaling. Conversely, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids do not interrupt metabolism and inflammation to the same extent. AMPK links inflammation, metabolism and T2D, with roles to play in all and is influenced negatively by obesity. Lipid spillover results in hepatic lipotoxicity and steatosis. Also in skeletal muscle, excessive FFA can impede insulin’s action and promote inflammation. Ectopic fat can also affect pancreatic β-cell function, thereby contributing to insulin resistance. Therapeutics, lifestyle changes, supplements and dietary manipulation are all possible avenues to combat metabolic inflammation and the subsequent insulin resistant state which will be explored in the current review. PMID:27128935

  17. Endothelial Response to Glucocorticoids in Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zielińska, Karolina A.; Van Moortel, Laura; Opdenakker, Ghislain; De Bosscher, Karolien; Van den Steen, Philippe E.

    2016-01-01

    The endothelium plays a crucial role in inflammation. A balanced control of inflammation requires the action of glucocorticoids (GCs), steroidal hormones with potent cell-specific anti-inflammatory properties. Besides the classic anti-inflammatory effects of GCs on leukocytes, recent studies confirm that endothelial cells also represent an important target for GCs. GCs regulate different aspects of endothelial physiology including expression of adhesion molecules, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and maintenance of endothelial barrier integrity. However, the regulation of endothelial GC sensitivity remains incompletely understood. In this review, we specifically examine the endothelial response to GCs in various inflammatory diseases ranging from multiple sclerosis, stroke, sepsis, and vasculitis to atherosclerosis. Shedding more light on the cross talk between GCs and endothelium will help to improve existing therapeutic strategies and develop new therapies better tailored to the needs of patients. PMID:28018358

  18. Delayed puberty associated with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Ballinger, Anne B; Savage, Martin O; Sanderson, Ian R

    2003-02-01

    Delayed puberty frequently complicates the clinical course of young patients with inflammatory bowel disease, more often in Crohn's disease than ulcerative colitis. Undernutrition has been thought to be the main reason for delayed puberty in these patients. However, puberty may be delayed despite a normal nutritional status. Observations in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and in rats with experimental colitis suggest that inflammatory mediators may have a direct adverse influence, independent of undernutrition, on the onset and progression of puberty. Serum androgens are consistently reported to be reduced in patients with delayed puberty and inflammatory bowel disease. This reduction is not necessarily secondary to a reduction in gonadotrophins as serum concentrations of gonadotrophins have been reported to be normal or even increased in some studies. Management of delayed puberty involves calorie supplements to correct undernutrition and treatment of inflammation. Observations in boys with delayed puberty and controlled studies in experimental models of intestinal inflammation suggest that testosterone therapy can accelerate puberty.

  19. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Savarese, R P; Rosenfeld, J C; DeLaurentis, D A

    1986-05-01

    Between January 1976 and December 1982, 181 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated surgically, and in 13 patients the aneurysms were found to be inflammatory. Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA) share important characteristics with typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms. Diagnosis and surgical management of IAAA are distinctive which suggests that IAAA should be considered separately, as a varient of typical abdominal aortic aneurysms. IAAA occur predominantly in males. The presenting symptoms are often idiosyncratic and include severe abdominal or back pain, or both, and ureteral obstruction; the diagnosis of IAAA should be considered when these symptoms are present. Although grossly and microscopically, the perianeurysmal fibrosis resembles idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis, the two conditions can be differentiated. At the present time, ultrasonography and computed tomography appear to offer reliable means for diagnosing IAAA. The presence of IAAA, whether established preoperatively or discovered unexpectedly at operation, necessitate certain modifications in the surgical approach, in order to avoid injuring the duodenum and the venous structures. Most patients can be successfully treated by resection and graft replacement. Rupture of the aneurysm in IAAA appears to be less frequent than in typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  20. Tendons – time to revisit inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Jonathan D; Stride, Matthew; Scott, Alex

    2014-01-01

    It is currently widely accepted among clinicians that chronic tendinopathy is caused by a degenerative process devoid of inflammation. Current treatment strategies are focused on physical treatments, peritendinous or intratendinous injections of blood or blood products and interruption of painful stimuli. Results have been at best, moderately good and at worst a failure. The evidence for non-infammatory degenerative processes alone as the cause of tendinopathy is surprisingly weak. There is convincing evidence that the inflammatory response is a key component of chronic tendinopathy. Newer anti-inflammatory modalities may provide alternative potential opportunities in treating chronic tendinopathies and should be explored further. PMID:23476034

  1. Red cell DAMPs and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Rafaela; Silveira, Angélica A A; Conran, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Intravascular hemolysis, or the destruction of red blood cells in the circulation, can occur in numerous diseases, including the acquired hemolytic anemias, sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia, as well as during some transfusion reactions, preeclampsia and infections, such as those caused by malaria or Clostridium perfringens. Hemolysis results in the release of large quantities of red cell damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) into the circulation, which, if not neutralized by innate protective mechanisms, have the potential to activate multiple inflammatory pathways. One of the major red cell DAMPs, heme, is able to activate converging inflammatory pathways, such as toll-like receptor signaling, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and inflammasome formation, suggesting that this DAMP both activates and amplifies inflammation. Other potent DAMPs that may be released by the erythrocytes upon their rupture include heat shock proteins (Hsp), such as Hsp70, interleukin-33 and Adenosine 5' triphosphate. As such, hemolysis represents a major inflammatory mechanism that potentially contributes to the clinical manifestations that have been associated with the hemolytic diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension and leg ulcers, and likely plays a role in specific complications of sickle cell disease such as endothelial activation, vaso-occlusive processes and tissue injury.

  2. Obesity, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Iantorno, M; Campia, U; Di Daniele, N; Nistico, S; Forleo, G B; Cardillo, C; Tesauro, M

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in obese individuals. Obesity dramatically increases the risk of development of metabolic and cardiovascular disease. This risk appears to originate from disruption in adipose tissue function leading to a chronic inflammatory state and to dysregulation of the endocrine and paracrine actions of adipocyte-derived factors. These, in turn, impair vascular homeostasis and lead to endothelial dysfunction. An altered endothelial cell phenotype and endothelial dysfunction are common among all obesity-related complications. A crucial aspect of endothelial dysfunction is reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. A systemic pro-inflammatory state in combination with hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, oxidative stress and activation of the renin angiotensin system are systemic disturbances in obese individuals that contribute independently and synergistically to decreasing NO bioavailability. On the other hand, pro-inflammatory cytokines are locally produced by perivascular fat and act through a paracrine mechanism to independently contribute to endothelial dysfunction and smooth muscle cell dysfunction and to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in obese individuals. The promising discovery that obesity-induced vascular dysfunction is, at least in part, reversible, with weight loss strategies and drugs that promote vascular health, has not been sufficiently proved to prevent the cardiovascular complication of obesity on a large scale. In this review we discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying inflammation and vascular damage in obese patients.

  3. Stretching Impacts Inflammation Resolution in Connective Tissue.

    PubMed

    Berrueta, Lisbeth; Muskaj, Igla; Olenich, Sara; Butler, Taylor; Badger, Gary J; Colas, Romain A; Spite, Matthew; Serhan, Charles N; Langevin, Helene M

    2016-07-01

    Acute inflammation is accompanied from its outset by the release of specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs), including resolvins, that orchestrate the resolution of local inflammation. We showed earlier that, in rats with subcutaneous inflammation of the back induced by carrageenan, stretching for 10 min twice daily reduced inflammation and improved pain, 2 weeks after carrageenan injection. In this study, we hypothesized that stretching of connective tissue activates local pro-resolving mechanisms within the tissue in the acute phase of inflammation. In rats injected with carrageenan and randomized to stretch versus no stretch for 48 h, stretching reduced inflammatory lesion thickness and neutrophil count, and increased resolvin (RvD1) concentrations within lesions. Furthermore, subcutaneous resolvin injection mimicked the effect of stretching. In ex vivo experiments, stretching of connective tissue reduced the migration of neutrophils and increased tissue RvD1 concentration. These results demonstrate a direct mechanical impact of stretching on inflammation-regulation mechanisms within connective tissue.

  4. Effects of inflammation on stem cells: together they strive?

    PubMed Central

    Kizil, Caghan; Kyritsis, Nikos; Brand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation entails a complex set of defense mechanisms acting in concert to restore the homeostatic balance in organisms after damage or pathogen invasion. This immune response consists of the activity of various immune cells in a highly complex manner. Inflammation is a double-edged sword as it is reported to have both detrimental and beneficial consequences. In this review, we discuss the effects of inflammation on stem cell activity, focusing primarily on neural stem/progenitor cells in mammals and zebrafish. We also give a brief overview of the effects of inflammation on other stem cell compartments, exemplifying the positive and negative role of inflammation on stemness. The majority of the chronic diseases involve an unremitting phase of inflammation due to improper resolution of the initial pro-inflammatory response that impinges on the stem cell behavior. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of crosstalk between the inflammatory milieu and tissue-resident stem cells is an important basis for clinical efforts. Not only is it important to understand the effect of inflammation on stem cell activity for further defining the etiology of the diseases, but also better mechanistic understanding is essential to design regenerative therapies that aim at micromanipulating the inflammatory milieu to offset the negative effects and maximize the beneficial outcomes. PMID:25739812

  5. Mouse lung slices: An ex vivo model for the evaluation of antiviral and anti-inflammatory agents against influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; An, Liwei; Liu, Ge; Li, Xiaoyu; Tang, Wei; Chen, Xulin

    2015-08-01

    The influenza A virus is notoriously known for its ability to cause recurrent epidemics and global pandemics. Antiviral therapy is effective when treatment is initiated within 48h of symptom onset, and delaying treatment beyond this time frame is associated with decreased efficacy. Research on anti-inflammatory therapy to ameliorate influenza-induced inflammation is currently underway and seems important to the impact on the clinical outcome. Both antiviral and anti-inflammatory drugs with novel mechanisms of action are urgently needed. Current methods for evaluating the efficacy of anti-influenza drugs rely mostly on transformed cells and animals. Transformed cell models are distantly related to physiological and pathological conditions. Although animals are the best choices for preclinical drug testing, they are not time- or cost-efficient. In this study, we established an ex vivo model using mouse lung slices to evaluate both antiviral and anti-inflammatory agents against influenza virus infection. Both influenza virus PR8 (H1N1) and A/Human/Hubei/3/2005 (H3N2) can replicate efficiently in mouse lung slices and trigger significant cytokine and chemokine responses. The induction of selected cytokines and chemokines were found to have a positive correlation between ex vivo and in vivo experiments, suggesting that the ex vivo cultured lung slices may closely resemble the lung functionally in an in vivo configuration when challenged by influenza virus. Furthermore, a set of agents with known antiviral and/or anti-inflammatory activities were tested to validate the ex vivo model. Our results suggested that mouse lung slices provide a robust, convenient and cost-efficient model for the assessment of both antiviral and anti-inflammatory agents against influenza virus infection in one assay. This ex vivo model may predict the efficacy of drug candidates' antiviral and anti-inflammatory activities in vivo.

  6. Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of Carica papaya.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Saurabh; Cabot, Peter J; Shaw, P Nicholas; Hewavitharana, Amitha K

    2016-07-01

    Chronic inflammation is linked with the generation and progression of various diseases such as cancer, diabetes and atherosclerosis, and anti-inflammatory drugs therefore have the potential to assist in the treatment of these conditions. Carica papaya is a tropical plant that is traditionally used in the treatment of various ailments including inflammatory conditions. A literature search was conducted by using the keywords "papaya", "anti-inflammatory and inflammation" and "immunomodulation and immune" along with cross-referencing. Both in vitro and in vivo investigation studies were included. This is a review of all studies published since 2000 on the anti-inflammatory activity of papaya extracts and their effects on various immune-inflammatory mediators. Studies on the anti-inflammatory activities of recognized phytochemicals present in papaya are also included. Although in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that papaya extracts and papaya-associated phytochemicals possess anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, clinical studies are lacking.

  7. Anti-inflammatory Strategies to Prevent Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Jialal, I; Devaraj, S

    2015-08-01

    Diabetes is a proinflammatory state and inflammation is crucial in the genesis of vascular complications. While there are many anti-inflammatory strategies, most of which have been shown to reduce inflammation in diabetes, there is sparse data on reduction in cardiovascular events (CVEs). To date, the only anti-inflammatory strategies that have been shown to reduce CVE in diabetes include statins, angiotensin receptor blockers, metformin, and pioglitazone. We also discuss the role of novel emerging therapies.

  8. Cerulein Pancreatitis: Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Cerulein pancreatitis is similar to human edematous pancreatitis, manifesting with dysregulation of digestive enzyme production and cytoplasmic vacuolization, the death of acinar cells, edema formation, and infiltration of inflammatory cells into the pancreas. Reactive oxygen species are involved in nuclear factor-κB activation, cytokine expression, apoptosis and pathogenesis of pancreatitis. There is recent evidence that cerulein activates NADPH oxidase, which is a major source of reactive oxygen species during inflammation and apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cells. In addition, the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway has been suggested as being involved in inflammatory signaling in the pancreas. This review discusses the involvement of oxidative stress in inflammation and apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cells stimulated with cerulein as an in vitro model of pancreatitis. PMID:20485614

  9. Inflammation in intervertebral disc degeneration and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Molinos, Maria; Almeida, Catarina R.; Caldeira, Joana; Cunha, Carla; Gonçalves, Raquel M.; Barbosa, Mário A.

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is one of the major causes of low back pain, a problem with a heavy economic burden, which has been increasing in prevalence as populations age. Deeper knowledge of the complex spatial and temporal orchestration of cellular interactions and extracellular matrix remodelling is critical to improve current IVD therapies, which have so far proved unsatisfactory. Inflammation has been correlated with degenerative disc disease but its role in discogenic pain and hernia regression remains controversial. The inflammatory response may be involved in the onset of disease, but it is also crucial in maintaining tissue homeostasis. Furthermore, if properly balanced it may contribute to tissue repair/regeneration as has already been demonstrated in other tissues. In this review, we focus on how inflammation has been associated with IVD degeneration by describing observational and in vitro studies as well as in vivo animal models. Finally, we provide an overview of IVD regenerative therapies that target key inflammatory players. PMID:25673296

  10. Resolution of inflammation in obesity-induced liver disease.

    PubMed

    Rius, Bibiana; López-Vicario, Cristina; González-Périz, Ana; Morán-Salvador, Eva; García-Alonso, Verónica; Clária, Joan; Titos, Esther

    2012-01-01

    Low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue is recognized as a critical event in the development of obesity-related co-morbidities. This chronic inflammation is powerfully augmented through the infiltration of macrophages, which together with adipocytes, perpetuate a vicious cycle of inflammatory cell recruitment and secretion of free fatty acids and deleterious adipokines that predispose to greater incidence of metabolic complications. In the last decade, many factors have been identified to contribute to mounting unresolved inflammation in obese adipose tissue. Among them, pro-inflammatory lipid mediators (i.e., leukotrienes) derived from the omega-6 polyunsaturated arachidonic acid have been shown to play a prominent role. Of note, the same lipid mediators that initially trigger the inflammatory response also signal its termination by stimulating the formation of anti-inflammatory signals. Resolvins and protectins derived from the omega-3 polyunsaturated docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids have emerged as a representative family of this novel class of autacoids with dual anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving properties that act as "stop-signals" of the inflammatory response. This review discusses the participation of these endogenous autacoids in the resolution of adipose tissue inflammation, with a special emphasis in the amelioration of obesity-related metabolic dysfunctions, namely insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  11. Computational approach to characterize causative factors and molecular indicators of chronic wound inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, Sridevi; Wallqvist, Anders; Reifman, Jaques; Mitrophanov, Alexander Y

    2014-02-15

    Chronic inflammation is rapidly becoming recognized as a key contributor to numerous pathologies. Despite detailed investigations, understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating inflammation is incomplete. Knowledge of such critical regulatory processes and informative indicators of chronic inflammation is necessary for efficacious therapeutic interventions and diagnostic support to clinicians. We used a computational modeling approach to elucidate the critical factors responsible for chronic inflammation and to identify robust molecular indicators of chronic inflammatory conditions. Our kinetic model successfully captured experimentally observed cell and cytokine dynamics for both acute and chronic inflammatory responses. Using sensitivity analysis, we identified macrophage influx and efflux rate modulation as the strongest inducing factor of chronic inflammation for a wide range of scenarios. Moreover, our model predicted that, among all major inflammatory mediators, IL-6, TGF-β, and PDGF may generally be considered the most sensitive and robust indicators of chronic inflammation, which is supported by existing, but limited, experimental evidence.

  12. Aging-related inflammation in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Greene, M A; Loeser, R F

    2015-11-01

    It is well accepted that aging is an important contributing factor to the development of osteoarthritis (OA). The mechanisms responsible appear to be multifactorial and may include an age-related pro-inflammatory state that has been termed "inflamm-aging." Age-related inflammation can be both systemic and local. Systemic inflammation can be promoted by aging changes in adipose tissue that result in increased production of cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα). Numerous studies have shown an age-related increase in blood levels of IL-6 that has been associated with decreased physical function and frailty. Importantly, higher levels of IL-6 have been associated with an increased risk of knee OA progression. However, knockout of IL-6 in male mice resulted in worse age-related OA rather than less OA. Joint tissue cells, including chondrocytes and meniscal cells, as well as the neighboring infrapatellar fat in the knee joint, can be a local source of inflammatory mediators that increase with age and contribute to OA. An increased production of pro-inflammatory mediators that include cytokines and chemokines, as well as matrix-degrading enzymes important in joint tissue destruction, can be the result of cell senescence and the development of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Further studies are needed to better understand the basis for inflamm-aging and its role in OA with the hope that this work will lead to new interventions targeting inflammation to reduce not only joint tissue destruction but also pain and disability in older adults with OA.

  13. A data-driven acute inflammation therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Acute inflammation is a severe medical condition defined as an inflammatory response of the body to an infection. Its rapid progression requires quick and accurate decisions from clinicians. Inadequate and delayed decisions makes acute inflammation the 10th leading cause of death overall in United States with the estimated cost of treatment about $17 billion annually. However, despite the need, there are limited number of methods that could assist clinicians to determine optimal therapies for acute inflammation. We developed a data-driven method for suggesting optimal therapy by using machine learning model that is learned on historical patients' behaviors. To reduce both the risk of failure and the expense for clinical trials, our method is evaluated on a virtual patients generated by a mathematical model that emulates inflammatory response. In conducted experiments, acute inflammation was handled with two complimentary pro- and anti-inflammatory medications which adequate timing and doses are crucial for the successful outcome. Our experiments show that the dosage regimen assigned with our data-driven method significantly improves the percentage of healthy patients when compared to results by other methods used in clinical practice and found in literature. Our method saved 88% of patients that would otherwise die within a week, while the best method found in literature saved only 73% of patients. At the same time, our method used lower doses of medications than alternatives. In addition, our method achieved better results than alternatives when only incomplete or noisy measurements were available over time as well as it was less affected by therapy delay. The presented results provide strong evidence that models from the artificial intelligence community have a potential for development of personalized treatment strategies for acute inflammation. PMID:24565439

  14. Targeting inflammation in diabetes: Newer therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Neeraj Kumar; Kant, Saket

    2014-10-15

    Inflammation has been recognised to both decrease beta cell insulin secretion and increase insulin resistance. Circulating cytokines can affect beta cell function directly leading to secretory dysfunction and increased apoptosis. These cytokines can also indirectly affect beta cell function by increasing adipocyte inflammation.The resulting glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity further enhance the inflammatory process resulting in a vicious cycle. Weight reduction and drugs such as metformin have been shown to decrease the levels of C-Reactive Protein by 31% and 13%, respectively. Pioglitazone, insulin and statins have anti-inflammatory effects. Interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists are in trials and NSAIDs such as salsalate have shown an improvement in insulin sensitivity. Inhibition of 12-lipo-oxygenase, histone de-acetylases, and activation of sirtuin-1 are upcoming molecular targets to reduce inflammation. These therapies have also been shown to decrease the conversion of pre-diabetes state to diabetes. Drugs like glicazide, troglitazone, N-acetylcysteine and selective COX-2 inhibitors have shown benefit in diabetic neuropathy by decreasing inflammatory markers. Retinopathy drugs are used to target vascular endothelial growth factor, angiopoietin-2, various proteinases and chemokines. Drugs targeting the proteinases and various chemokines are pentoxifylline, inhibitors of nuclear factor-kappa B and mammalian target of rapamycin and are in clinical trials for diabetic nephropathy. Commonly used drugs such as insulin, metformin, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, glucagon like peptide-1 agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors also decrease inflammation. Anti-inflammatory therapies represent a potential approach for the therapy of diabetes and its complications.

  15. NFAT Gene Family in Inflammation and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pan, M.-G.; Xiong, Y.; Chen, F.

    2013-01-01

    Calcineurin-NFAT signaling is critical for numerous aspects of vertebrate function during and after embryonic development. Initially discovered in T cells, the NFAT gene family, consisting of five members, regulates immune system, inflammatory response, angiogenesis, cardiac valve formation, myocardial development, axonal guidance, skeletal muscle development, bone homeostasis, development and metastasis of cancer, and many other biological processes. In this review we will focus on the NFAT literature relevant to the two closely related pathological systems: inflammation and cancer. PMID:22950383

  16. Targeting inflammation in diabetes: Newer therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Neeraj Kumar; Kant, Saket

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation has been recognised to both decrease beta cell insulin secretion and increase insulin resistance. Circulating cytokines can affect beta cell function directly leading to secretory dysfunction and increased apoptosis. These cytokines can also indirectly affect beta cell function by increasing adipocyte inflammation.The resulting glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity further enhance the inflammatory process resulting in a vicious cycle. Weight reduction and drugs such as metformin have been shown to decrease the levels of C-Reactive Protein by 31% and 13%, respectively. Pioglitazone, insulin and statins have anti-inflammatory effects. Interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists are in trials and NSAIDs such as salsalate have shown an improvement in insulin sensitivity. Inhibition of 12-lipo-oxygenase, histone de-acetylases, and activation of sirtuin-1 are upcoming molecular targets to reduce inflammation. These therapies have also been shown to decrease the conversion of pre-diabetes state to diabetes. Drugs like glicazide, troglitazone, N-acetylcysteine and selective COX-2 inhibitors have shown benefit in diabetic neuropathy by decreasing inflammatory markers. Retinopathy drugs are used to target vascular endothelial growth factor, angiopoietin-2, various proteinases and chemokines. Drugs targeting the proteinases and various chemokines are pentoxifylline, inhibitors of nuclear factor-kappa B and mammalian target of rapamycin and are in clinical trials for diabetic nephropathy. Commonly used drugs such as insulin, metformin, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, glucagon like peptide-1 agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors also decrease inflammation. Anti-inflammatory therapies represent a potential approach for the therapy of diabetes and its complications. PMID:25317247

  17. Suppression of local and systemic responses in streptococcal cell wall-induced acute inflammation of the air pouch by cyclosporine A. Comparison with the effects of two anti-inflammatory bis-benzimidazoles.

    PubMed Central

    Dieter Geratz, J.; Pryzwansky, K. B.; Schwab, J. H.; Anderle, S. K.; Tidwell, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    Injection of streptococcus group A cell wall-derived peptidoglycan polysaccharide into a subcutaneous air pouch causes local outpouring of neutrophils and macrophages and distant hemopoietic proliferation in spleen and bone marrow. Cyclosporine A (CyA) suppressed neutrophil accumulation and all cell lines of hemopoiesis. trans-1,2-Bis(5-amidino-2-benzimidazolyl)ethene (BBE) also interfered with neutrophil exudation, yet reduced only the erythroid component of the hemopoietic process. The ethane analogue of BBE, on the other hand, did not prevent neutrophil emigration, but held down splenic erythropoiesis and myelopoiesis. All three compounds stimulated streptococcus group A cell wall-derived peptidoglycan polysaccharide uptake by pouch macrophages. CyA being the least active, BBE and its ethane analogue also produced a shift of wear-and-tear pigment from large numbers of small splenic macro-phages into small numbers of large macrophages. The pouch model is very useful in the study of anti-inflammatory compounds and has furnished the first evidence of CyA interference with massive neutrophilic infiltration and with hemopoietic signals. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:8475995

  18. Microbe- and danger-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Broggi, Achille; Granucci, Francesca

    2015-02-01

    The ability of the immune system to give rise to an effective response against pathogens while maintaining tolerance towards self-tissues has always been an object of keen interest for immunologist. Over the years, different theories have been proposed to explain if and how the immune system is able to discriminate between self and non-self, including the Infectious Non-self theory from Charles Janeway and Polly Matzinger's Danger theory. Nowadays we know Janeway's theory is largely true, however the immune system does respond to injured, stressed and necrotic cells releasing danger signals (DAMPs) with a potent inflammatory response. To avoid unwanted prolonged autoimmune reactions, though, danger-induced inflammation should be tightly regulated. In the present review we discuss how prototypic DAMPs are able to induce inflammation and the peculiarity of danger-induced inflammation, as opposed to a complete immune response to fight pathogen invasions.

  19. Silencing nociceptor neurons reduces allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Sébastien; Abdulnour, Raja-Elie E.; Burkett, Patrick R.; Lee, Seungkyu; Cronin, Shane J.F.; Pascal, Maud A.; Laedermann, Cedric; Foster, Simmie L.; Tran, Johnathan V.; Lai, Nicole; Chiu, Isaac M.; Ghasemlou, Nader; DiBiase, Matthew; Roberson, David; Von Hehn, Christian; Agac, Busranour; Haworth, Oliver; Seki, Hiroyuki; Penninger, Josef M.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Bean, Bruce P.; Levy, Bruce D.; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lung nociceptors initiate cough and bronchoconstriction. To elucidate if these fibers also contribute to allergic airway inflammation we stimulated lung nociceptors with capsaicin and observed increased neuropeptide release and immune cell infiltration. In contrast, ablating Nav1.8+ sensory neurons or silencing them with QX-314, a charged sodium channel inhibitor that enters via large pore ion channels to specifically block nociceptors, substantially reduced ovalbumin or house dust mite-induced airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. We also discovered that IL-5, a cytokine produced by activated immune cells, acts directly on nociceptors to induce release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP then stimulates CD4+ and resident innate lymphoid type 2 cells, creating an inflammatory signaling loop that promotes allergic inflammation. Our results indicate that nociceptors amplify pathological adaptive immune responses and that silencing these neurons with QX-314 interrupts this neuro-immune interplay, revealing a potential new therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:26119026

  20. Neurovascular aspects of skin neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Aubdool, Aisah A; Brain, Susan D

    2011-12-01

    Neurogenic inflammation is involved in skin inflammation. It is hypothesized that it is involved in the pathogenesis of the common chronic cutaneous vascular disorder rosacea, but the exact mechanism of action is currently unknown. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) are widely expressed on primary sensory neuron endings and non-neuronal cells such as keratinocytes. Here we describe the potential for TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors to be involved in the pathophysiology of rosacea due to their polymodal activation, including cold and hot temperature, pungent products from vegetable and spices, reactive oxygen species, and mechanical stimuli. We discuss the role of both receptors and the sensory neuropeptides that they release in inflammation and pain sensation and evidence suggesting that both TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors may be promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of the inflammatory symptoms of rosacea.

  1. [Inflammatory myopathies].

    PubMed

    Maurer, Britta

    2017-02-01

    Inflammatory myopathies comprise heterogeneous, often multisystemic autoimmune diseases with muscle involvement as a common feature. The prognosis largely depends on a timely diagnosis and initiation of therapy. Given the complexity of these rare diseases, when an inflammatory myopathy is suspected patients should be referred to an expert center with established algorithms for the diagnostic work-up. The differential diagnostic exclusion of myositis mimics should ideally be carried out in close collaboration with neurologists and neuropathologists. The choice of immunosuppressive treatment should primarily depend on disease severity and organ involvement but age and comorbidities also have to be taken into account.

  2. GLYCOGEN SYNTHASE KINASE-3 REGULATES MICROGLIAL MIGRATION, INFLAMMATION, AND INFLAMMATION-INDUCED NEUROTOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Yuskaitis, Christopher J.; Jope, Richard S.

    2009-01-01

    Microglia play a prominent role in the brain’s inflammatory response to injury or infection by migrating to affected locations, secreting inflammatory molecules, and phagocytosing damaged tissue. However, because severe or chronic neuroinflammation exacerbates many neurological conditions, controlling microglia actions may provide therapeutic benefits in a diverse array of diseases. Since glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) promotes inflammatory responses in peripheral immune cells, we investigated if inhibitors of GSK3 attenuated microglia responses to inflammatory stimuli. Treatment of BV-2 microglia with GSK3 inhibitors greatly reduced the migration of microglia in both a scratch assay and in a transwell migration assay. Treatment of BV-2 microglia with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated the production of interleukin-6 and increased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO production. Each of these microglia responses to inflammatory stimulation were greatly attenuated by GSK3 inhibitors. However, GSK3 inhibitors did not cause a general impairment of microglia functions, as the LPS-induced stimulated expression of cylcooxygenase-2 was unaltered. Regulation of microglia functions were also evident in cultured mouse hippocampal slices where GSK3 inhibitors reduced cytokine production and microglial migration, and provided protection from inflammation-induced neuronal toxicity. These findings demonstrate that GSK3 promotes microglial responses to inflammation and that the utilization of GSK3 inhibitors provides a means to limit the inflammatory actions of microglia. PMID:19007880

  3. Hyaluronan, Inflammation, and Breast Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Schwertfeger, Kathryn L.; Cowman, Mary K.; Telmer, Patrick G.; Turley, Eva A.; McCarthy, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer-induced inflammation in the tumor reactive stroma supports invasion and malignant progression and is contributed to by a variety of host cells including macrophages and fibroblasts. Inflammation appears to be initiated by tumor cells and surrounding host fibroblasts that secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM) to create a pro-inflammatory “cancerized” or tumor reactive microenvironment that supports tumor expansion and invasion. The tissue polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) is an example of an ECM component within the cancerized microenvironment that promotes breast cancer progression. Like many ECM molecules, the function of native high-molecular weight HA is altered by fragmentation, which is promoted by oxygen/nitrogen free radicals and release of hyaluronidases within the tumor microenvironment. HA fragments are pro-inflammatory and activate signaling pathways that promote survival, migration, and invasion within both tumor and host cells through binding to HA receptors such as CD44 and RHAMM/HMMR. In breast cancer, elevated HA in the peri-tumor stroma and increased HA receptor expression are prognostic for poor outcome and are associated with disease recurrence. This review addresses the critical issues regarding tumor-induced inflammation and its role in breast cancer progression focusing specifically on the changes in HA metabolism within tumor reactive stroma as a key factor in malignant progression. PMID:26106384

  4. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lon, Hoi-Kei; Liu, Dongyang; Jusko, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is an array of immune responses to infection and injury. It results from a complex immune cascade and is the basis of many chronic diseases such as arthritis, diabetes, and cancer. Numerous mathematical models have been developed to describe the disease progression and effects of anti-inflammatory drugs. This review illustrates the state of the art in modeling the effects of diverse drugs for treating inflammation, describes relevant biomarkers amenable to modeling, and summarizes major advantages and limitations of the published pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) models. Simple direct inhibitory models are often used to describe in vitro effects of anti-inflammatory drugs. Indirect response models are more mechanism based and have been widely applied to the turnover of symptoms and biomarkers. These, along with target-mediated and transduction models, have been successfully applied to capture the PK/PD of many anti-inflammatory drugs and describe disease progression of inflammation. Biologics have offered opportunities to address specific mechanisms of action, and evolve small systems models to quantitatively capture the underlying physiological processes. More advanced mechanistic models should allow evaluation of the roles of some key mediators in disease progression, assess drug interactions, and better translate drug properties from in vitro and animal data to patients. PMID:23140121

  5. Epoxygenated Fatty Acids Inhibit Retinal Vascular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Capozzi, Megan E.; Hammer, Sandra S.; McCollum, Gary W.; Penn, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of elevating epoxygenated fatty acids on retinal vascular inflammation. To stimulate inflammation we utilized TNFα, a potent pro-inflammatory mediator that is elevated in the serum and vitreous of diabetic patients. In TNFα-stimulated primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells, total levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), but not epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs), were significantly decreased. Exogenous addition of 11,12-EET or 19,20-EDP when combined with 12-(3-adamantane-1-yl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid (AUDA), an inhibitor of epoxide hydrolysis, inhibited VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression and protein levels; conversely the diol product of 19,20-EDP hydrolysis, 19,20-DHDP, induced VCAM1 and ICAM1 expression. 11,12-EET and 19,20-EDP also inhibited leukocyte adherence to human retinal microvascular endothelial cell monolayers and leukostasis in an acute mouse model of retinal inflammation. Our results indicate that this inhibition may be mediated through an indirect effect on NFκB activation. This is the first study demonstrating a direct comparison of EET and EDP on vascular inflammatory endpoints, and we have confirmed a comparable efficacy from each isomer, suggesting a similar mechanism of action. Taken together, these data establish that epoxygenated fatty acid elevation will inhibit early pathology related to TNFα-induced inflammation in retinal vascular diseases. PMID:27966642

  6. Preventative oral methylthioadenosine is anti-inflammatory and reduces DSS-induced colitis in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methylthioadenosine (MTA) is a precursor of the methionine salvage pathway and has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties in various models of acute and chronic inflammation. However, the anti-inflammatory properties of MTA in models of intestinal inflammation are not defined. We hypothesiz...

  7. Virus-mimetic polyplex particles for systemic and inflammation-specific targeted delivery of large genetic contents.

    PubMed

    Kang, S; Lu, K; Leelawattanachai, J; Hu, X; Park, S; Park, T; Min, I M; Jin, M M

    2013-11-01

    Systemic and target-specific delivery of large genetic contents has been difficult to achieve. Although viruses effortlessly deliver kilobase-long genome into cells, its clinical use has been hindered by serious safety concerns and the mismatch between native tropisms and desired targets. Nonviral vectors, in contrast, are limited by low gene transfer efficiency and inherent cytotoxicity. Here we devised virus-mimetic polyplex particles (VMPs) based on electrostatic self-assembly among polyanionic peptide (PAP), cationic polymer polyethyleneimine (PEI) and nucleic acids. We fused PAP to the engineered ligand-binding domain of integrin αLβ2 to target intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), an inducible marker of inflammation. Fully assembled VMPs packaged large genetic contents, bound specifically to target molecules, elicited receptor-mediated endocytosis and escaped endosomal pathway, resembling intracellular delivery processes of viruses. Unlike conventional PEI-mediated transfection, molecular interaction-dependent gene delivery of VMPs was unaffected by the presence of serum and achieved higher efficiency without toxicity. By targeting overexpressed ICAM-1, VMPs delivered genes specifically to inflamed endothelial cells and macrophages both in vitro and in vivo. Simplicity and versatility of the platform and inflammation-specific delivery may open up opportunities for multifaceted gene therapy that can be translated into the clinic and treat a broad range of debilitating immune and inflammatory diseases.

  8. Persistent low-grade inflammation and regular exercise.

    PubMed

    Astrom, Maj-Briit; Feigh, Michael; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2010-01-01

    Persistent low-grade systemic inflammation is a feature of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), type 2 diabetes and dementia and evidence exists that inflammation is a causal factor in the development of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. Regular exercise offers protection against all of these diseases and recent evidence suggests that the protective effect of exercise may to some extent be ascribed to an anti-inflammatory effect of regular exercise. Visceral adiposity contributes to systemic inflammation and is independently associated with the occurrence of CVD, type 2 diabetes and dementia. We suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of exercise may be mediated via a long-term effect of exercise leading to a reduction in visceral fat mass and/or by induction of anti-inflammatory cytokines with each bout of exercise.

  9. Curcumin, inflammation, and chronic diseases: how are they linked?

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Yue, Yuan; Zheng, Xi; Zhang, Kun; Chen, Shaohua; Du, Zhiyun

    2015-05-20

    It is extensively verified that continued oxidative stress and oxidative damage may lead to chronic inflammation, which in turn can mediate most chronic diseases including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular, neurological, inflammatory bowel disease and pulmonary diseases. Curcumin, a yellow coloring agent extracted from turmeric, shows strong anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities when used as a remedy for the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. How oxidative stress activates inflammatory pathways leading to the progression of chronic diseases is the focus of this review. Thus, research to date suggests that chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, and most chronic diseases are closely linked, and the antioxidant properties of curcumin can play a key role in the prevention and treatment of chronic inflammation diseases.

  10. Inflammation in the development of lung cancer: epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Engels, Eric A

    2008-04-01

    The lung is a site for repeated or chronic inflammatory insults. Epidemiologic research has provided evidence to support the hypothesis that tissue damage caused by inflammation can initiate or promote the development of lung cancer, possibly in conjunction with tobacco use. For example, some studies suggest an increased risk of lung cancer among persons with lung infections, such as tuberculosis, bacterial pneumonia, or inflammatory lung diseases. Elevated serum levels of C-reactive protein, an inflammation marker, are associated with heightened lung cancer risk. Recent studies also demonstrate increased lung cancer risk among immunosuppressed individuals infected with HIV. Other research indicates an association between genetic polymorphisms in the inflammation pathway, which might modulate the inflammatory response and lung cancer risk.

  11. Inflamed leukocyte-mimetic nanoparticles for molecular imaging of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyue; Wong, Richard; Khalidov, Ildar; Wang, Andrew Y; Leelawattanachai, Jeerapond; Wang, Yi; Jin, Moonsoo M

    2011-10-01

    Dysregulated host inflammatory response causes many diseases, including cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and sepsis. Sensitive detection of the site of inflammation will, therefore, produce a wide-ranging impact on disease diagnosis and treatment. We hypothesized that nanoprobes designed to mimic the molecular interactions occurring between inflamed leukocytes and endothelium may possess selectivity toward diverse host inflammatory responses. To incorporate inflammation-sensitive molecular interactions, super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were conjugated with integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 I domain, engineered to mimic activated leukocytes in physiology. Whole body optical and magnetic resonance imaging in vivo revealed that leukocyte-mimetic nanoparticles localized preferentially to the vasculature within and in the invasive front of the tumor, as well as to the site of acute inflammation. This study explored in vivo detection of tumor-associated vasculature with systemically injected inflammation-specific nanoparticles, presenting a possibility of tumor detection by inflamed tumor microenvironment.

  12. [Vascular depression in the elderly. Does inflammation play a role?].

    PubMed

    Viscogliosi, Giovanni; Andreozzi, Paola; Chiriac, Iulia Maria; Ettorre, Evaristo; Vulcano, Achiropita; Servello, Adriana; Marigliano, Benedetta; Marigliano, Vincenzo

    2011-06-01

    Vascular depression in the elderly. Does inflammation play a role?Depression is the most common comorbidity in the elderly, and it is a major determinant of disability. The late-onset depression in highly associated to cardiovascular disease. Depressive symptoms may follow vascular brain damage, especially when mood regulating areas are affected. However depression is strongly associated to vascular disease even when there is no manifest brain damage. Recently great attention has been given to chronic inflammation, both related to depression and vascular disease. Both experimental and clinical evidence shows that a rise in the concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and glucocorticoids in depressed patients is associated with defect in serotonergic function. Chronic inflammation may underlie many forms of depression associated with vascular disease and metabolic syndrome. The importance of the inflammation hypothesis of depression lies is that psychotropic drugs may have central anti-inflammatory action, and that new generation of central anti-inflammatory drugs may be useful in depression treatment.

  13. Mechanistic Simulations of Inflammation: Current State and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Vodovotz, Yoram; Constantine, Gregory; Rubin, Jonathan; Csete, Marie; Voit, Eberhard O.; An, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation is a normal, robust physiological process. It can also be viewed as a complex system that senses and resolves homeostatic perturbations initiated from within the body (for example, in autoimmune disease) or from the outside (for example, in infections). Virtually all acute and chronic diseases are either driven or modulated by inflammation. The complex interplay between beneficial and harmful arms of the inflammatory response may underlie the lack of fully effective therapies for many diseases. Mathematical modeling is emerging as a frontline tool for understanding the complexity of the inflammatory response. A series of articles in this issue highlights various modeling approaches to inflammation in the larger context of health and disease, from intracellular signaling to whole-animal physiology. Here we discuss the state of this emerging field. We note several common features of inflammation models, as well as challenges and prospects for future studies. PMID:18835282

  14. The role of pro-inflammatory S100A9 in Alzheimer's disease amyloid-neuroinflammatory cascade.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Klechikov, Alexey G; Gharibyan, Anna L; Wärmländer, Sebastian K T S; Jarvet, Jüri; Zhao, Lina; Jia, Xueen; Narayana, Vinod K; Shankar, S K; Olofsson, Anders; Brännström, Thomas; Mu, Yuguang; Gräslund, Astrid; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A

    2014-04-01

    Pro-inflammatory S100A9 protein is increasingly recognized as an important contributor to inflammation-related neurodegeneration. Here, we provide insights into S100A9 specific mechanisms of action in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Due to its inherent amyloidogenicity S100A9 contributes to amyloid plaque formation together with Aβ. In traumatic brain injury (TBI) S100A9 itself rapidly forms amyloid plaques, which were reactive with oligomer-specific antibodies, but not with Aβ and amyloid fibrillar antibodies. They may serve as precursor-plaques for AD, implicating TBI as an AD risk factor. S100A9 was observed in some hippocampal and cortical neurons in TBI, AD and non-demented aging. In vitro S100A9 forms neurotoxic linear and annular amyloids resembling Aβ protofilaments. S100A9 amyloid cytotoxicity and native S100A9 pro-inflammatory signaling can be mitigated by its co-aggregation with Aβ, which results in a variety of micron-scale amyloid complexes. NMR and molecular docking demonstrated transient interactions between native S100A9 and Aβ. Thus, abundantly present in AD brain pro-inflammatory S100A9, possessing also intrinsic amyloidogenic properties and ability to modulate Aβ aggregation, can serve as a link between the AD amyloid and neuroinflammatory cascades and as a prospective therapeutic target.

  15. Inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMI).

    PubMed

    Maisch, Bernhard; Richter, Anette; Sandmöller, Andrea; Portig, Irene; Pankuweit, Sabine

    2005-09-01

    Cardiomyopathies are heart muscle diseases, which have been defined by their central hemodynamics and macropathology and divided in five major forms: dilated (DCM), hypertrophic (HCM), restrictive (RCM), right ventricular (RVCM), and nonclassifiable cardiomyopathies (NCCM). Furthermore, the most recent WHO/WHF definition also comprises, among the specific cardiomyopathies, inflammatory cardiomyopathy as a distinct entity, defined as myocarditis in association with cardiac dysfunction. Idiopathic, autoimmune, and infectious forms of inflammatory cardiomyopathy were recognized. Viral cardiomyopathy has been defined as viral persistence in a dilated heart. It may be accompanied by myocardial inflammation and then termed inflammatory viral cardiomyopathy (or viral myocarditis with cardiomegaly). If no inflammation is observed in the biopsy of a dilated heart (< 14 lymphocytes and macrophages/mm(2)), the term viral cardiomyopathy or viral persistence in DCM should be applied according to the WHF Task Force recommendations. Within the German heart failure net it is the authors' working hypothesis, that DCM shares genetic risk factors with other diseases of presumed autoimmune etiology and, therefore, the same multiple genes in combination with environmental factors lead to numerous different autoimmune diseases including DCM. Therefore, the authors' primary goal is to acquire epidemiologic data of patients with DCM regarding an infectious and inflammatory etiology of the disease. Circumstantial evidence points to a major role of viral myocarditis in the etiology of DCM. The common presence of viral genetic material in the myocardium of patients with DCM provides the most compelling evidence, but proof of causality is still lacking. In addition, autoimmune reactions have been described in many studies, indicating them as an important etiologic factor. Nevertheless, data on the proportion of patients, in whom both mechanisms play a role are still missing.A pivotal role for

  16. Macrophages from the synovium of active rheumatoid arthritis exhibit an activin A-dependent pro-inflammatory profile.

    PubMed

    Soler Palacios, Blanca; Estrada-Capetillo, Lizbeth; Izquierdo, Elena; Criado, Gabriel; Nieto, Concha; Municio, Cristina; González-Alvaro, Isidoro; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Pablos, Jose Luis; Corbí, Angel L; Puig-Kröger, Amaya

    2015-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease whose pathogenesis and severity correlates with the presence of macrophage-derived pro-inflammatory cytokines within the inflamed synovium. Macrophage-derived cytokines fuel the pathological processes in RA and are targets of clinically successful therapies. However, although macrophage polarization determines cytokine production, the polarization state of macrophages in RA joints remains poorly defined. To dissect the molecular basis for the tissue-damaging effects of macrophages in RA joints, we undertook the phenotypic and transcriptomic characterization of ex vivo isolated CD14(+) RA synovial fluid (RA-SF) macrophages. Flow cytometry and gene profiling indicated that RA-SF macrophages express pro-inflammatory polarization markers (MMP12, EGLN3, CCR2), lack expression of markers associated with homeostatic and anti-inflammatory polarization (IGF1, HTR2B) and exhibit a transcriptomic profile that resembles the activin A-dependent gene signature of pro-inflammatory in vitro-generated macrophages. In fact, high levels of Smad-activating activin A were found in RA-SF and, accordingly, the Smad signalling pathway was activated in ex vivo-isolated RA-SF macrophages. In vitro experiments on monocytes and macrophages indicated that RA-SF promoted the acquisition of pro-inflammatory markers (INHBA, MMP12, EGLN3, CCR2) but led to a significant reduction in the expression of genes associated with homeostasis and inflammation resolution (FOLR2, SERPINB2, IGF1, CD36), thus confirming the pro-inflammatory polarization ability of RA-SF. Importantly, the macrophage-polarizing ability of RA-SF was inhibited by an anti-activin A-neutralizing antibody, thus demonstrating that activin A mediates the pro-inflammatory macrophage-polarizing ability of RA-SF. Moreover, and in line with these findings, multicolour immunofluorescence evidenced that macrophages within RA synovial membranes (RA-SM) also express pro-inflammatory

  17. Comparative study of flavonoids in experimental models of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rotelli, Alejandra Ester; Guardia, Teresita; Juárez, Américo Osvaldo; de la Rocha, Nadir Ernesto; Pelzer, Lilian Eugenia

    2003-12-01

    The anti-inflammatory activities of flavonols (quercetin, rutin and morin) and flavanones (hesperetin and hesperidin) were investigated in animal models of acute and chronic inflammation. Rutin was only effective in the chronic process, principally in adjuvant arthritis. On neurogenic inflammation induced by xylene, only the flavanones were effective; besides, these compounds were the most effective on subchronic process. The most important compound in reducing paw oedema induced by carrageenan was quercetin.

  18. Inflammation: depression fans the flames and feasts on the heat.

    PubMed

    Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K; Derry, Heather M; Fagundes, Christopher P

    2015-11-01

    Depression and inflammation fuel one another. Inflammation plays a key role in depression's pathogenesis for a subset of depressed individuals; depression also primes larger cytokine responses to stressors and pathogens that do not appear to habituate. Accordingly, treatment decisions may be informed by attention to questions of how (pathways) and for whom (predispositions) these links exist, which are the focus of this article. When combined with predisposing factors (moderators such as childhood adversity and obesity), stressors and pathogens can lead to exaggerated or prolonged inflammatory responses. The resulting sickness behaviors (e.g., pain, disturbed sleep), depressive symptoms, and negative health behaviors (e.g., poor diet, a sedentary lifestyle) may act as mediating pathways that lead to further, unrestrained inflammation and depression. Depression, childhood adversity, stressors, and diet can all influence the gut microbiome and promote intestinal permeability, another pathway to enhanced inflammatory responses. Larger, more frequent, or more prolonged inflammatory responses could have negative mental and physical health consequences. In clinical practice, inflammation provides a guide to potential targets for symptom management by signaling responsiveness to certain therapeutic strategies. For example, a theme across research with cytokine antagonists, omega-3 fatty acids, celecoxib, and exercise is that anti-inflammatory interventions have a substantially greater impact on mood in individuals with heightened inflammation. Thus, when inflammation and depression co-occur, treating them in tandem may enhance recovery and reduce the risk of recurrence. The bidirectional links between depression, inflammation, and disease suggest that effective depression treatments could have a far-reaching impact on mood, inflammation, and health.

  19. Interleukin 32, inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jin Tae; Son, Dong Ju; Lee, Chong Kil; Yoon, Do-Young; Lee, Dong Hun; Park, Mi Hee

    2017-02-14

    Interleukin-32 (IL-32) is a novel cytokine involved in inflammation and cancer development. IL-32 gene consists of eight small exons, and IL-32 mRNA has nine alternative spliced isoforms, and was thought to be secreted because it contains an internal signal sequence and lacks a transmembrane region. IL-32 is initially expressed selectively in activated T cells by mitogen and activated NK cells and their expression is strongly augmented by microbes, mitogens, and other cytokines. The IL-32 is induced mainly by pathogens and pro-inflammatory cytokines, but IL-32 is more prominent in immune cells than in non-immune tissues. The IL-32 transcript is expressed in various human tissues and organs such as the spleen, thymus, leukocyte, lung, small intestine, colon, prostate, heart, placenta, liver, muscle, kidney, pancreas, and brain. Cytokines are critical components of cell signaling pathways that are involved in the regulation of cell growth, metabolism, hormone signaling, immune regulation and a variety of other physiological functions. Earlier studies have demonstrated that IL-32 regulates cell growth, metabolism and immune regulation and is therefore involved in the pathologic regulator or protectant of inflammatory diseases. Previous studies defined that IL-32 is upregulated in the patients with several inflammatory diseases, and is induced by inflammatory responses. However, several reports suggested that IL-32 is downregulated in several inflammatory diseases including asthma, HIV infection disease, neuronal diseases, metabolic disorders, experimental colitis and metabolic disorders. IL-32 is also involved in various cancer malignancies including renal cancer, esophageal cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma, lung cancer, gastric cancer, breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, lymphoma, osteosarcoma, breast cancer, colon cancer and thyroid carcinoma. Other studies suggested that IL-32 decreases tumor development including cervical cancer, colon cancer and prostate cancer

  20. Postischemic Inflammation in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Consoli, Arturo; Arnaboldi, Marco; Consoli, Domenico

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia is caused by arterial occlusion due to a thrombus or an embolus. Such occlusion induces multiple and concomitant pathophysiological processes that involve bioenergetic failure, acidosis, loss of cell homeostasis, excitotoxicity, and disruption of the blood-brain barrier. All of these mechanisms contribute to neuronal death, mainly via apoptosis or necrosis. The immune system is involved in this process in the early phases after brain injury, which contributes to potential enlargement of the infarct size and involves the penumbra area. Whereas inflammation and the immune system both exert deleterious effects, they also contribute to brain protection by stimulating a preconditioning status and to the concomitant repair of the injured parenchyma. This review describes the main phases of the inflammatory process occurring after arterial cerebral occlusion, with an emphasis on the role of single mediators. PMID:28079313

  1. Histiocytoses: emerging neoplasia behind inflammation.

    PubMed

    Haroche, Julien; Cohen-Aubart, Fleur; Rollins, Barret J; Donadieu, Jean; Charlotte, Frédéric; Idbaih, Ahmed; Vaglio, Augusto; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Emile, Jean-François; Amoura, Zahir

    2017-02-01

    Histiocytoses are disorders characterised by inflammation and the accumulation of cells derived from the monocyte and macrophage lineages, which results in tissue damage. Although they are often considered rare disorders with protean clinical manifestations, considerable advances in the understanding of their genetics have led to increased clinical recognition of these conditions, and fuelled further insights into their pathogenesis. In this Review, we describe insights into the cells of origin, molecular pathology, clinical features, and treatment strategies for some of the most common histiocytic disorders, including Langerhans cell histiocytosis, Erdheim-Chester disease, and Rosai-Dorfman disease. With the discovery of recurrent mutations affecting the mitogen-activated protein kinase and mTOR-AKT pathways in some of these histiocytoses, our understanding of these diseases has now evolved from the concept of a primary inflammatory condition to that of a clonal neoplastic disease. This understanding has led to the development of effective mechanism-based therapeutic strategies for patients with histiocytic diseases.

  2. The inflammatory inception of gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Jaime A; Bizama, Carolina; García, Patricia; Ferreccio, Catterina; Javle, Milind; Miquel, Juan F; Koshiol, Jill; Roa, Juan C

    2016-04-01

    Gallbladder cancer is a lethal disease with notable geographical variations worldwide and a predilection towards women. Its main risk factor is prolonged exposure to gallstones, although bacterial infections and other inflammatory conditions are also associated. The recurrent cycles of gallbladder epithelium damage and repair enable a chronic inflammatory environment that promotes progressive morphological impairment through a metaplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma, along with cumulative genome instability. Inactivation of TP53, which is mutated in over 50% of GBC cases, seems to be the earliest and one of the most important carcinogenic pathways involved. Increased cell turnover and oxidative stress promote early alteration of TP53, cell cycle deregulation, apoptosis and replicative senescence. In this review, we will discuss evidence for the role of inflammation in gallbladder carcinogenesis obtained through epidemiological studies, genome-wide association studies, experimental carcinogenesis, morphogenetic studies and comparative studies with other inflammation-driven malignancies. The evidence strongly supports chronic, unresolved inflammation as the main carcinogenic mechanism of gallbladder cancer, regardless of the initial etiologic trigger. Given this central role of inflammation, evaluation of the potential for GBC prevention removing causes of inflammation or using anti-inflammatory drugs in high-risk populations may be warranted.

  3. Smoking, inflammatory patterns, and postprandial hypertriglyceridemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Smoking is associated with increased postprandial hypertriglyceridemia (PPT). Inflammation and insulin resistance are potential "drivers" for this phenomenon. We tested whether inflammatory patterns and/or insulin resistance explain the effect of smoking on PPT. Methods: Men and women i...

  4. OTULIN deficiency causes auto-inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads

    2016-11-01

    Ubiquitin chains assembled via the N-terminal methionine (Met1 or linear ubiquitin), conjugated by the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC), participate in NF-κΒ-dependent inflammatory signaling and immune responses. A recent report in Cell finds that OTULIN, a deubiquitinase that selectively cleaves Met1-linked ubiquitin chains, is essential for restraining inflammation in vivo.

  5. Epigenetic regulation in dental pulp inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hui, T; Wang, C; Chen, D; Zheng, L; Huang, D; Ye, L

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries, trauma, and other possible factors could lead to injury of the dental pulp. Dental infection could result in immune and inflammatory responses mediated by molecular and cellular events and tissue breakdown. The inflammatory response of dental pulp could be regulated by genetic and epigenetic events. Epigenetic modifications play a fundamental role in gene expression. The epigenetic events might play critical roles in the inflammatory process of dental pulp injury. Major epigenetic events include methylation and acetylation of histones and regulatory factors, DNA methylation, and small non-coding RNAs. Infections and other environmental factors have profound effects on epigenetic modifications and trigger diseases. Despite growing evidences of literatures addressing the role of epigenetics in the field of medicine and biology, very little is known about the epigenetic pathways involved in dental pulp inflammation. This review summarized the current knowledge about epigenetic mechanisms during dental pulp inflammation. Progress in studies of epigenetic alterations during inflammatory response would provide opportunities for the development of efficient medications of epigenetic therapy for pulpitis. PMID:26901577

  6. Collagen hydrolysate inhibits zymosan-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Anita; Cozijnsen, Miranda; de Vrij, Gerrit; Garssen, Johan

    2013-07-01

    During the past years, evidence accumulated showing that glycine comprises anti-inflammatory activities. These effects occur, at least in part, via the activation of glycine-gated chloride channels (GlyR). Glycine is one of the major structural units of collagen, making up about 30% of the amino acids. This study aims to investigate the anti-inflammatory potential of collagen hydrolysate (CH) using the zymosan-induced ear-skin inflammation mouse model. After oral intake of 12.5, 25 or 50 mg CH the plasma levels of glycine increased in a concentration-dependent manner. CH was able to counteract zymosan-induced ear-skin inflammation locally (ear swelling) as well as systemically (IL-6 production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated whole blood cells). The LPS-stimulated IL-6 production in whole blood correlated positively with the ear swelling response. This correlation was abolished by strychnine (a glycine receptor antagonist), indicating the involvement of GlyR. Collectively, these data show that CH is able to modulate inflammatory responses both locally as well as systemically. This effect might be constituted by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokine production via GlyR.

  7. Acupuncture to Reduce HIV-Associated Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Barbara; Keithley, Joyce K.; Johnson, Angela; Fogg, Louis; Adeyemi, Oluwatoyin; Sha, Beverly E.; Snell, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. HIV infection is associated with systemic inflammation that can increase risk for cardiovascular events. Acupuncture has been shown to have immunomodulatory effects and to improve symptoms in persons with inflammatory conditions. Objective. To test the anti-inflammatory effects of an acupuncture protocol that targets the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAIP), a neural mechanism whose activation has been shown to reduce the release of proinflammatory cytokines, in persons with HIV-associated inflammation. Design, Setting, Participants, and Interventions. Double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted in an outpatient clinic located in a medically underserved urban neighborhood. Twenty-five clinically-stable HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral therapy were randomized to receive once weekly CAIP-based acupuncture or sham acupuncture. Main Outcome Measures. Outcomes included plasma concentrations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein and D-dimer and fasting lipids. Results. Twenty-five participants completed the protocol (treatment group n = 12, control group n = 13). No adverse events related to the acupuncture protocol were observed. Compared to baseline values, the two groups did not significantly differ in any outcome measures at the end of the acupuncture protocol. Conclusions. CAIP-based acupuncture did not favorably modulate inflammatory or lipid parameters. Additional studies are warranted of CAIP-based protocols of different frequencies/durations. PMID:25922615

  8. Airway Inflammation and Hypersensitivity Induced by Chronic Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Yu Ru; Kwong, Kevin; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Airway hypersensitivity, characterized by enhanced excitability of airway sensory nerves, is a prominent pathophysiological feature in patients with airway inflammatory diseases. Although the underlying pathogenic mechanism is not fully understood, chronic airway inflammation is believed to be primarily responsible. Cigarette smoking is known to cause chronic airway inflammation, accompanied by airway hyperresponsiveness. Experimental evidence indicates that enhanced excitability of vagal bronchopulmonary sensory nerves and increased tachykinin synthesis in these nerves resulting from chronic inflammation are important contributing factors to the airway hyperresponsiveness. Multiple inflammatory mediators released from various types of structural and inflammatory cells are involved in the smoking-induced airway inflammation, which is mainly regulated by redox-sensitive signaling pathways and transcription factors. Furthermore, recent studies have reported potent sensitizing and stimulatory effects of these inflammatory mediators such as prostanoids and reactive oxygen species on these sensory nerves. In summary, these studies using cigarette smoking as an experimental approach have identified certain potentially important cell signaling pathways and underlying mechanisms of the airway hypersensitivity induced by chronic airway inflammation. PMID:21397052

  9. Central inflammation and sickness-like behavior induced by the food contaminant deoxynivalenol: a PGE2-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Girardet, Clémence; Bonnet, Marion S; Jdir, Rajae; Sadoud, Medhi; Thirion, Sylvie; Tardivel, Catherine; Roux, Julien; Lebrun, Bruno; Mounien, Lourdes; Trouslard, Jérôme; Jean, André; Dallaporta, Michel; Troadec, Jean-Denis

    2011-11-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most abundant trichothecenes found on cereals, has been implicated in mycotoxicoses in both humans and farm animals. Low-dose toxicity is characterized by reduced weight gain, diminished nutritional efficiency, and immunologic effects. The levels and patterns of human food commodity contamination justify that DON consumption constitutes a public health issue. DON stability during processing and cooking explains its large presence in human food. We characterized here DON intoxication by showing that the toxin concomitantly affects feeding behavior, body temperature, and locomotor activity after both per os and central administration. Using c-Fos expression mapping, we identified the neuronal structures activated in response to DON and observed that the pattern of neuronal populations activated by the toxin resembled those induced by inflammatory signals. By real-time PCR, we report the first evidences for a DON-induced central inflammation, attested by the strong upregulation of interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2, and microsomal prostaglandin synthase-1 (mPGES-1) messenger RNA. However, silencing prostaglandins E2 signaling pathways using mPGES-1 knockout mice, which are resistant to cytokine-induced sickness behavior, did not modify the responses to the toxin. These results reveal that, despite strong similarities, behavioral changes observed after DON intoxication differ from classical sickness behavior evoked by inflammatory cytokines.

  10. Depression and immunity: inflammation and depressive symptoms in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gold, Stefan M; Irwin, Michael R

    2009-05-01

    An increasing body of evidence suggests that patients who have major depressive disorder show alterations in immunologic markers including increases in proinflammatory cytokine activity and inflammation. Inflammation of the central nervous system is a pathologic hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS). Patients affected by this disease also show a high incidence of depression. Accumulating evidence from animal studies suggests that some aspects of depression and fatigue in MS may be linked to inflammatory markers. This article reviews the current knowledge in the field and illustrates how the sickness behavior model may be applied to investigate depressive symptoms in inflammatory neurologic diseases.

  11. The Science of Fatty Acids and Inflammation123

    PubMed Central

    Fritsche, Kevin L

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is believed to play a central role in many of the chronic diseases that characterize modern society. In the past decade, our understanding of how dietary fats affect our immune system and subsequently our inflammatory status has grown considerably. There are compelling data showing that high-fat meals promote endotoxin [e.g., lipopolysaccharide (LPS)] translocation into the bloodstream, stimulating innate immune cells and leading to a transient postprandial inflammatory response. The nature of this effect is influenced by the amount and type of fat consumed. The role of various dietary constituents, including fats, on gut microflora and subsequent health outcomes in the host is another exciting and novel area of inquiry. The impact of specific fatty acids on inflammation may be central to how dietary fats affect health. Three key fatty acid–inflammation interactions are briefly described. First, the evidence suggests that saturated fatty acids induce inflammation in part by mimicking the actions of LPS. Second, the often-repeated claim that dietary linoleic acid promotes inflammation was not supported in a recent systematic review of the evidence. Third, an explanation is offered for why omega-3 (n–3) polyunsaturated fatty acids are so much less anti-inflammatory in humans than in mice. The article closes with a cautionary tale from the genomic literature that illustrates why extrapolating the results from inflammation studies in mice to humans is problematic. PMID:25979502

  12. Inflammation and its genesis in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nichols, David P; Chmiel, James F

    2015-10-01

    The host inflammatory response in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease has long been recognized as a central pathological feature and an important therapeutic target. Indeed, many believe that bronchiectasis results largely from the oxidative and proteolytic damage comprised within an exuberant airway inflammatory response that is dominated by neutrophils. In this review, we address the longstanding argument of whether or not the inflammatory response is directly attributable to impairment of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator or only secondary to airway obstruction and chronic bacterial infection and challenge the importance of this distinction in the context of therapy. We also review the centrality of neutrophils in CF lung pathophysiology and highlight more recent data that suggest the importance of other cell types and signaling beyond NF-κB activation. We discuss how protease and redox imbalance are critical factors in CF airway inflammation and end by reviewing some of the more promising therapeutic approaches now under development.

  13. Nouvelle cuisine: platelets served with inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Rick; Zufferey, Anne; Boilard, Eric; Semple, John W

    2015-06-15

    Platelets are small cellular fragments with the primary physiological role of maintaining hemostasis. In addition to this well-described classical function, it is becoming increasingly clear that platelets have an intimate connection with infection and inflammation. This stems from several platelet characteristics, including their ability to bind infectious agents and secrete many immunomodulatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as their expression of receptors for various immune effector and regulatory functions, such as TLRs, which allow them to sense pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Furthermore, platelets contain RNA that can be nascently translated under different environmental stresses, and they are able to release membrane microparticles that can transport inflammatory cargo to inflammatory cells. Interestingly, acute infections can also result in platelet breakdown and thrombocytopenia. This report highlights these relatively new aspects of platelets and, thus, their nonhemostatic nature in an inflammatory setting.

  14. Homeostasis, Inflammation, and Disease Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Kotas, Maya E.; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2015-01-01

    While modernization has dramatically increased lifespan, it has also witnessed the increasing prevalence of diseases such as obesity, hypertension and type 2 diabetes. Such chronic, acquired diseases result when normal physiologic control goes awry and may thus be viewed as failures of homeostasis. However, while nearly every process in human physiology relies on homeostatic mechanisms for stability, only some have demonstrated vulnerability to dysregulation. Additionally, chronic inflammation is a common accomplice of the diseases of homeostasis, yet the basis for this connection is not fully understood. Here we review the design of homeostatic systems and discuss universal features of control circuits that operate at the cellular, tissue and organismal levels. We suggest a framework for classification of homeostatic signals that is based on different classes of homeostatic variables they report on. Finally, we discuss how adaptability of homeostatic systems with adjustable set points creates vulnerability to dysregulation and disease. This framework highlights the fundamental parallels between homeostatic and inflammatory control mechanisms and provides a new perspective on the physiological origin of inflammation. PMID:25723161

  15. Focal brain inflammation and autism.

    PubMed

    Theoharides, Theoharis C; Asadi, Shahrzad; Patel, Arti B

    2013-04-09

    Increasing evidence indicates that brain inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric diseases. Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by social and learning disabilities that affect as many as 1/80 children in the USA. There is still no definitive pathogenesis or reliable biomarkers for ASD, thus significantly curtailing the development of effective therapies. Many children with ASD regress at about age 3 years, often after a specific event such as reaction to vaccination, infection, stress or trauma implying some epigenetic triggers, and may constitute a distinct phenotype. ASD children respond disproportionally to stress and are also affected by food and skin allergies. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is secreted under stress and together with neurotensin (NT) stimulates mast cells and microglia resulting in focal brain inflammation and neurotoxicity. NT is significantly increased in serum of ASD children along with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). NT stimulates mast cell secretion of mtDNA that is misconstrued as an innate pathogen triggering an auto-inflammatory response. The phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene mutation, associated with the higher risk of ASD, which leads to hyper-active mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling that is crucial for cellular homeostasis. CRH, NT and environmental triggers could hyperstimulate the already activated mTOR, as well as stimulate mast cell and microglia activation and proliferation. The natural flavonoid luteolin inhibits mTOR, mast cells and microglia and could have a significant benefit in ASD.

  16. Inflammation and pharmacological treatment in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Kaštelan, Snježana; Tomić, Martina; Gverović Antunica, Antonela; Salopek Rabatić, Jasminka; Ljubić, Spomenka

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the most common microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus, is estimated to be the leading cause of new blindness in the working population of developed countries. Primary interventions such as intensive glycemic control, strict blood pressure regulation, and lipid-modifying therapy as well as local ocular treatment (laser photocoagulation and pars plana vitrectomy) can significantly reduce the risk of retinopathy occurrence and progression. Considering the limitations of current DR treatments development of new therapeutic strategies, it becomes necessary to focus on pharmacological treatment. Currently, there is increasing evidence that inflammatory processes have a considerable role in the pathogenesis of DR with multiple studies showing an association of various systemic as well as local (vitreous and aqueous fluid) inflammatory factors and the progression of DR. Since inflammation is identified as a relevant mechanism, significant effort has been directed to the development of new concepts for the prevention and treatment of DR acting on the inflammatory processes and the use of pharmacological agents with anti-inflammatory effect. Inhibiting the inflammatory pathway could be an appealing treatment option for DR in future practices, and as further prospective randomized clinical trials accumulate data, the role and guidelines of anti-inflammatory pharmacologic treatments will become clearer.

  17. The Yin and Yang of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Blackman, Marcia A.; Yates, Jennifer L.; Spencer, Cody M.; Vomhof-DeKrey, Emilie E.; Cooper, Andrea M.; Leadbetter, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is an essential protective part of the body’s response to infection, yet many diseases are the product of inflammation. For example, inflammation can lead to autoimmune disease and tissue damage, and is a key element in chronic health conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and also drives changes associated with aging. Animal models of infectious and chronic disease are important tools with which to dissect the pathways whereby inflammatory responses are initiated and controlled. Animal models therefore provide a prism through which the role of inflammation in health and disease can be viewed, and are important means by which to dissect mechanisms and identify potential therapies to be tested in the clinic. A meeting, “The Yin and Yang of Inflammation” was organized by Trudeau Institute and was held April 4–6′ 2014. The main goal was to bring together experts from biotechnology and academic organizations to examine and describe critical pathways in inflammation and place these pathways within the context of human disease. A group of ~80 scientists met for three days of intense formal and informal exchanges. A key focus was to stimulate interactions between basic research and industry. PMID:25323997

  18. Ghrelin receptor regulates adipose tissue inflammation in aging

    PubMed Central

    Buras, Eric D.; Yu, Kaijiang; Wang, Ruitao; Smith, C. Wayne; Wu, Huaizhu; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Sun, Yuxiang

    2016-01-01

    Aging is commonly associated with low-grade adipose inflammation, which is closely linked to insulin resistance. Ghrelin is the only circulating orexigenic hormone which is known to increase obesity and insulin resistance. We previously reported that the expression of the ghrelin receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), increases in adipose tissues during aging, and old Ghsr−/− mice exhibit a lean and insulin-sensitive phenotype. Macrophages are major mediators of adipose tissue inflammation, which consist of pro-inflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 subtypes. Here, we show that in aged mice, GHS-R ablation promotes macrophage phenotypical shift toward anti-inflammatory M2. Old Ghsr−/− mice have reduced macrophage infiltration, M1/M2 ratio, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in white and brown adipose tissues. We also found that peritoneal macrophages of old Ghsr−/− mice produce higher norepinephrine, which is in line with increased alternatively-activated M2 macrophages. Our data further reveal that GHS-R has cell-autonomous effects in macrophages, and GHS-R antagonist suppresses lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in macrophages. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that ghrelin signaling has an important role in macrophage polarization and adipose tissue inflammation during aging. GHS-R antagonists may serve as a novel and effective therapeutic option for age-associated adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. PMID:26837433

  19. Ghrelin receptor regulates adipose tissue inflammation in aging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ligen; Lee, Jong Han; Buras, Eric D; Yu, Kaijiang; Wang, Ruitao; Smith, C Wayne; Wu, Huaizhu; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Sun, Yuxiang

    2016-01-01

    Aging is commonly associated with low-grade adipose inflammation, which is closely linked to insulin resistance. Ghrelin is the only circulating orexigenic hormone which is known to increase obesity and insulin resistance. We previously reported that the expression of the ghrelin receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), increases in adipose tissues during aging, and old Ghsr(-/-) mice exhibit a lean and insulin-sensitive phenotype. Macrophages are major mediators of adipose tissue inflammation, which consist of pro-inflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 subtypes. Here, we show that in aged mice, GHS-R ablation promotes macrophage phenotypical shift toward anti-inflammatory M2. Old Ghsrp(-/-) mice have reduced macrophage infiltration, M1/M2 ratio, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in white and brown adipose tissues. We also found that peritoneal macrophages of old Ghsrp(-/-) mice produce higher norepinephrine, which is in line with increased alternatively-activated M2 macrophages. Our data further reveal that GHS-R has cell-autonomous effects in macrophages, and GHS-R antagonist suppresses lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in macrophages. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that ghrelin signaling has an important role in macrophage polarization and adipose tissue inflammation during aging. GHS-R antagonists may serve as a novel and effective therapeutic option for age-associated adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance.

  20. Inflammation in rosacea and acne: Implications for patient care.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Alan B

    2011-06-01

    Rosacea and acne are chronic inflammatory skin conditions that share an inflammatory pathogenesis, but clinically remain quite distinct. Although many have long assumed that these conditions are primarily infectious, emerging evidence suggests that inflammation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of these disorders. Part of the innate immune system, the antimicrobial and proinflammatory cathelicidins, may be downregulated by both azelaic acid and sub antimicrobial doxycycline. In acne, the creation of papules, pustules and nodules is clearly mediated through immune mechanisms, and the antiinflammatory effects of retinoids play a key role in management. Recent observations help us understand in greater detail the role that inflammation plays in these two diseases, and the mechanisms by which commonly used medications exert their effect by modulating inflammatory processes. This review will present and synthesize recently acquired information as it relates to inflammatory acne and rosacea pathogenesis and clinical management.

  1. Role of inflammation and its mediators in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Rong; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Shihao; Nanda, Anil; Li, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke and other forms of ischemic brain injury. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammatory response is a double-edged sword, as it not only exacerbates secondary brain injury in the acute stage of stroke but also beneficially contributes to brain recovery after stroke. In this article, we provide an overview on the role of inflammation and its mediators in acute ischemic stroke. We discuss various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses in different phases after ischemic stroke and the possible reasons for their failures in clinical trials. Undoubtedly, there is still much to be done in order to translate promising pre-clinical findings into clinical practice. A better understanding of the dynamic balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses and identifying the discrepancies between pre-clinical studies and clinical trials may serve as a basis for designing effective therapies. PMID:24006091

  2. Inflammation Shapes Stem Cells and Stemness during Infection and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Stella; Achilleos, Charis; Panayiotou, Theofano; Strati, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    The outcome of an inflammatory incident can hang in the balance between restoring health and tissue integrity on the one hand, and promoting aberrant tissue homeostasis and adverse outcomes on the other. Both microbial-related and sterile inflammation is a complex response characterized by a range of innate immune cell types, which produce and respond to cytokine mediators and other inflammatory signals. In turn, cells native to the tissue in question can sense these mediators and respond by migrating, proliferating and regenerating the tissue. In this review we will discuss how the specific outcomes of inflammatory incidents are affected by the direct regulation of stem cells and cellular plasticity. While less well appreciated than the effects of inflammatory signals on immune cells and other differentiated cells, the effects are crucial in understanding inflammation and appropriately managing therapeutic interventions. PMID:27853732

  3. Anti-inflammatory effects of fibrates: an overview.

    PubMed

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Athyros, Vasilios G; Karagiannis, Asterios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Several cardiovascular drugs exert anti-inflammatory effects and accumulating data suggest that fibrates also share this property. This review summarizes the mechanisms implicated in the anti-inflammatory actions of fibrates. We also provide an overview of the existing clinical studies addressing the effects of fibrates on markers of inflammation. Several, but not all, studies reported that fibrates exert anti-inflammatory actions. The small number of patients included in some studies, as well as differences in diagnoses and duration of follow up might partly explain this discrepancy. It is also possible that fibrates differ substantially in terms of anti-inflammatory effects. It is not clear whether an anti-inflammatory action of fibrates is clinically relevant. Future studies should assess whether the anti-inflammatory actions of fibrates (or for that matter, other drugs) will translate into a reduced risk of vascular disease.

  4. Dual role of inflammatory mediators in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shrihari, TG

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation is the body’s response to noxious stimuli such as infectious, physiological or chemical agents, it releases various inflammatory mediators via immune cells such as neutrophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes. These inflammatory mediators are growth factors, chemokines, and cytokines. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) activate transcriptional factors (NF-KB, STAT-3) and bring about cellular proliferation, genomic instability, angiogenesis, resistance to apoptosis, invasion, and metastasis. The presence of inflammatory mediators in the tumour microenvironment inhibits or promotes inflammation-induced cancer, depending on various stages of immune surveillance of the tumor i.e. by immunoediting, immunoprocessing, and immunoevasion. Myeloid derived suppressor cells are immature myeloid progenitor cells. They are the major immune-suppressor cells in the tumour inflammatory microenvironment that activate transcriptional factor NF-KB, STAT-3 to bring about tumour progression. Another gene which the micro RNA’s are noncoding RNA molecules is found to have a link with inflammation and cancer. This article discusses the roles of inflammatory mediators involved in antitumour or protumour activity within the context of the tumour microenvironment. PMID:28275390

  5. Brain Structures Implicated in Inflammation-Associated Depression.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Neil A

    2017-01-01

    Systemic inflammation rapidly impairs mood, motivation, and cognition inducing a stereotyped cluster of symptoms collectively known as "sickness behaviors." When inflammation is severe or chronic, these behavioral changes can appear indistinguishable from major depressive disorder (MDD). Human and rodent neuroimaging combined with experimental inflammatory challenges has clarified the neural circuitry associated with many of the key features of inflammation-induced-sickness behavior, and in so doing revealed often-remarkable commonalities with circuit abnormalities observed in MDD. This review aims to provide the first synthesis of this work illustrating areas of convergence and divergence with the MDD literature as well as highlighting areas for future study.

  6. Triggers of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kerrebijn, K F

    1986-01-01

    Most asthmatics have hyperresponsive airways. This makes them more sensitive than non-asthmatics to bronchoconstricting environmental exposures which, in their turn, may enhance responsiveness. Airway inflammation is considered to be a key determinant of airway hyperresponsiveness: the fact that chronic airway inflammation in cystic fibrosis does not lead to airway hyperresponsiveness of any importance indicates, however, that the role of airway inflammation is complex and incompletely elucidated. The main inducers of airway inflammation are viral infections, antigens, occupational stimuli and pollutants. Although exercise, airway cooling and hyper- or hypotonic aerosols are potent stimuli of bronchoconstriction, it is questionable if airway inflammation is involved in their mode of action. Each of the above-mentioned stimuli is discussed, with emphasis laid on the relation of symptoms to mechanisms.

  7. Chronic inflammatory systemic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Rainer H.; Schradin, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that during chronic inflammatory systemic diseases (CIDs) maladaptations of the immune, nervous, endocrine and reproductive system occur. Maladaptation leads to disease sequelae in CIDs. The ultimate reason of disease sequelae in CIDs remained unclear because clinicians do not consider bodily energy trade-offs and evolutionary medicine. We review the evolution of physiological supersystems, fitness consequences of genes involved in CIDs during different life-history stages, environmental factors of CIDs, energy trade-offs during inflammatory episodes and the non-specificity of CIDs. Incorporating bodily energy regulation into evolutionary medicine builds a framework to better understand pathophysiology of CIDs by considering that genes and networks used are positively selected if they serve acute, highly energy-consuming inflammation. It is predicted that genes that protect energy stores are positively selected (as immune memory). This could explain why energy-demanding inflammatory episodes like infectious diseases must be terminated within 3–8 weeks to be adaptive, and otherwise become maladaptive. Considering energy regulation as an evolved adaptive trait explains why many known sequelae of different CIDs must be uniform. These are, e.g. sickness behavior/fatigue/depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance, anorexia, malnutrition, muscle wasting—cachexia, cachectic obesity, insulin resistance with hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, alterations of steroid hormone axes, disturbances of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, hypertension, bone loss and hypercoagulability. Considering evolved energy trade-offs helps us to understand how an energy imbalance can lead to the disease sequelae of CIDs. In the future, clinicians must translate this knowledge into early diagnosis and symptomatic treatment in CIDs. PMID:26817483

  8. Fetal inhibition of inflammation improves disease phenotypes in harlequin ichthyosis.

    PubMed

    Cottle, Denny L; Ursino, Gloria M A; Ip, Sally Chi Ieng; Jones, Lynelle K; Ditommaso, Tia; Hacking, Douglas F; Mangan, Niamh E; Mellett, Natalie A; Henley, Katya J; Sviridov, Dmitri; Nold-Petry, Claudia A; Nold, Marcel F; Meikle, Peter J; Kile, Benjamin T; Smyth, Ian M

    2015-01-15

    Harlequin ichthyosis (HI) is a severe skin disease which leads to neonatal death in ∼50% of cases. It is the result of mutations in ABCA12, a protein that transports lipids required to establish the protective skin barrier needed after birth. To better understand the life-threatening newborn HI phenotype, we analysed the developing epidermis for consequences of lipid dysregulation in mouse models. We observed a pro-inflammatory signature which was characterized by chemokine upregulation in embryonic skin which is distinct from that seen in other types of ichthyosis. Inflammation also persisted in grafted HI skin. To examine the contribution of inflammation to disease development, we overexpressed interleukin-37b to globally suppress fetal inflammation, observing considerable improvements in keratinocyte differentiation. These studies highlight inflammation as an unexpected contributor to HI disease development in utero, and suggest that inhibiting inflammation may reduce disease severity.

  9. Cellular and molecular pathways linking inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Porta, Chiara; Larghi, Paola; Rimoldi, Monica; Totaro, Maria Grazia; Allavena, Paola; Mantovani, Alberto; Sica, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Several experimental and epidemiological evidence indicate that, irrespective of the trigger for the development (chronic infection/inflammation or genetic alteration), a "smouldering" inflammation is associated with the most of, if not all, tumours and supports their progression. Several evidence have highlighted that tumours promote a constant influx of myelomonocytic cells that express inflammatory mediators supporting pro-tumoral functions. Myelomonocytic cells are key orchestrators of cancer-related inflammation associated with proliferation and survival of malignant cells, subversion of adaptive immune response, angiogenesis, stroma remodelling and metastasis formation. Although the connection between inflammation and cancer is unequivocal the mechanistic basis of such association are largely unknown. Recent advances in the understanding of the cellular and molecular pathways involved in cancer-related inflammation as well as their potential relevance as diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic targets are herein discussed.

  10. Polymicrobial synergy and dysbiosis in inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Richard J.; Hajishengallis, George

    2014-01-01

    Uncontrolled inflammation of the periodontal area may arise when complex microbial communities transition from a commensal to a pathogenic entity. Communication among constituent species leads to polymicrobial synergy among metabolically compatible organisms that acquire functional specialization within the developing community. Keystone pathogens, even at low abundance, elevate community virulence and the resulting dysbiotic community targets specific aspects of host immunity to further disable immune surveillance while promoting an overall inflammatory response. Inflammophilic organisms benefit from proteinaceous substrates derived from inflammatory tissue breakdown. Inflammation and dysbiosis reinforce each other and the escalating environmental changes further select for a pathobiotic community. We have synthesized the polymicrobial synergy and dysbiotic components of the process into a new model for inflammatory diseases. PMID:25498392

  11. Polymicrobial synergy and dysbiosis in inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Richard J; Hajishengallis, George

    2015-03-01

    Uncontrolled inflammation of the periodontal area may arise when complex microbial communities transition from a commensal to a pathogenic entity. Communication among constituent species leads to polymicrobial synergy between metabolically compatible organisms that acquire functional specialization within the developing community. Keystone pathogens, even at low abundance, elevate community virulence, and the resulting dysbiotic community targets specific aspects of host immunity to further disable immune surveillance while promoting an overall inflammatory response. Inflammophilic organisms benefit from proteinaceous substrates derived from inflammatory tissue breakdown. Inflammation and dysbiosis reinforce each other, and the escalating environmental changes further select for a pathobiotic community. We have synthesized the polymicrobial synergy and dysbiotic components of the process into a new model for inflammatory diseases.

  12. Natural killer cells in inflammatory heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ong, SuFey; Rose, Noel R; Čiháková, Daniela

    2017-02-01

    Despite of a multitude of excellent studies, the regulatory role of natural killer (NK) cells in the pathogenesis of inflammatory cardiac disease is greatly underappreciated. Clinical abnormalities in the numbers and functions of NK cells are observed in myocarditis and inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMi) as well as in cardiac transplant rejection [1-6]. Because treatment of these disorders remains largely symptomatic in nature, patients have little options for targeted therapies [7,8]. However, blockade of NK cells and their receptors can protect against inflammation and damage in animal models of cardiac injury and inflammation. In these models, NK cells suppress the maturation and trafficking of inflammatory cells, alter the local cytokine and chemokine environments, and induce apoptosis in nearby resident and hematopoietic cells [1,9,10]. This review will dissect each protective mechanism employed by NK cells and explore how their properties might be exploited for their therapeutic potential.

  13. The Immunological Basis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Francesca A. R.; Rodrigues, Bruno L.; Ayrizono, Maria de Lourdes S.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic ailments, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis being the most important. These diseases present an inflammatory profile and they differ according to pathophysiology, the affected area in the gastrointestinal tract, and the depth of the inflammation in the intestinal wall. The immune characteristics of IBD arise from abnormal responses of the innate and adaptive immune system. The number of Th17 cells increases in the peripheral blood of IBD patients, while Treg cells decrease, suggesting that the Th17/Treg proportion plays an important role in the development and maintenance of inflammation. The purpose of this review was to determine the current state of knowledge on the immunological basis of IBD. Many studies have shown the need for further explanation of the development and maintenance of the inflammatory process. PMID:28070181

  14. Exploitation of the nicotinic anti-inflammatory pathway for the treatment of epithelial inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Scott, David A; Martin, Michael

    2006-12-14

    Discoveries in the first few years of the 21st century have led to an understanding of important interactions between the nervous system and the inflammatory response at the molecular level, most notably the acetylcholine (ACh)-triggered, alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (alpha7nAChR)-dependent nicotinic anti-inflammatory pathway. Studies using the alpha7nAChR agonist, nicotine, for the treatment of mucosal inflammation have been undertaken but the efficacy of nicotine as a treatment for inflammatory bowel diseases remains debatable. Further understanding of the nicotinic anti-inflammatory pathway and other endogenous anti-inflammatory mechanisms is required in order to develop refined and specific therapeutic strategies for the treatment of a number of inflammatory diseases and conditions, including periodontitis, psoriasis, sarcoidosis, and ulcerative colitis.

  15. Fruit polyphenols, immunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    González-Gallego, Javier; García-Mediavilla, M Victoria; Sánchez-Campos, Sonia; Tuñón, María J

    2010-10-01

    Flavonoids are a large class of naturally occurring compounds widely present in fruits, vegetables and beverages derived from plants. These molecules have been reported to possess a wide range of activities in the prevention of common diseases, including CHD, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, gastrointestinal disorders and others. The effects appear to be related to the various biological/pharmacological activities of flavonoids. A large number of publications suggest immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties of these compounds. However, almost all studies are in vitro studies with limited research on animal models and scarce data from human studies. The majority of in vitro research has been carried out with single flavonoids, generally aglycones, at rather supraphysiological concentrations. Few studies have investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of physiologically attainable flavonoid concentrations in healthy subjects, and more epidemiological studies and prospective randomised trials are still required. This review summarises evidence for the effects of fruit and tea flavonoids and their metabolites in inflammation and immunity. Mechanisms of effect are discussed, including those on enzyme function and regulation of gene and protein expression. Animal work is included, and evidence from epidemiological studies and human intervention trials is reviewed. Biological relevance and functional benefits of the reported effects, such as resistance to infection or exercise performance, are also discussed.

  16. Metabolic Syndrome, Inflammation and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, Rodolfo; Bolego, Chiara; Poli, Andrea; Cignarella, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    The inflammatory component of atherogenesis has been increasingly recognized over the last decade. Inflammation participates in all stages of atherosclerosis, not only during initiation and during evolution of lesions, but also with precipitation of acute thrombotic complications. The metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk for development of both cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes in humans. Central obesity and insulin resistance are thought to represent common underlying factors of the syndrome, which features a chronic low-grade inflammatory state. Diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome occurs using defined threshold values for waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose and dyslipidemia. The metabolic syndrome appears to affect a significant proportion of the population. Therapeutic approaches that reduce the levels of proinflammatory biomarkers and address traditional risk factors are particularly important in preventing cardiovascular disease and, potentially, diabetes. The primary management of metabolic syndrome involves healthy lifestyle promotion through moderate calorie restriction, moderate increase in physical activity and change in dietary composition. Treatment of individual components aims to control atherogenic dyslipidemia using fibrates and statins, elevated blood pressure, and hyperglycemia. While no single treatment for the metabolic syndrome as a whole yet exists, emerging therapies offer potential as future therapeutic approaches. PMID:17319458

  17. Insights into inflammatory bowel disease using Toxoplasma gondii as an infectious trigger

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Charlotte E; Cohen, Sara B; Denkers, Eric Y

    2014-01-01

    Oral infection of certain inbred mouse strains with the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii triggers inflammatory pathology resembling lesions seen during human inflammatory bowel disease, in particular Crohn's disease (CD). Damage triggered by the parasite is largely localized to the distal portion of the small intestine, and as such is one of only a few models for ileal inflammation. This is important because ileal involvement is a characteristic of CD in over two-thirds of patients. The disease induced by Toxoplasma is mediated by Th1 cells and the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ. Inflammation is dependent upon IL-23, also identified by genome-wide association studies as a risk factor in CD. Development of lesions is concomitant with emergence of E. coli that display enhanced adhesion to the intestinal epithelium and subepithelial translocation. Furthermore, depletion of gut flora renders mice resistant to Toxoplasma-triggered ileitis. Recent findings suggest complex CCR2-dependent interactions between lamina propria T cells and intraepithelial lymphocytes in fueling proinflammatory pathology in the intestine. The advantage of the Toxoplasma model is that disease develops rapidly (within 7–10 days of infection) and can be induced in immunodeficient mice by adoptive transfer of mucosal T cells from infected donors. We propose that Toxoplasma acts as a trigger setting into motion a series of events culminating in loss of tolerance in the intestine and emergence of pathogenic T cell effectors. The Toxoplasma trigger model is providing new leaps in our understanding of immunity in the intestine. PMID:22064707

  18. Emotional Family Resemblances? Darwin's Contributions to a Theory of Emotions and Emotional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesse, Petra

    A family resemblance model of emotions is proposed which uses Darwin's discussion of emotions and Eleanor Rosch's and the philosopher