Science.gov

Sample records for inflammatory syndrome tb-iris

  1. Paradoxical Tuberculosis Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (TB-IRIS) in HIV Patients with Culture Confirmed Pulmonary Tuberculosis in India and the Potential Role of IL-6 in Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Brian O.; Chandrasekhar, Chockalingam; Venkatesan, Perumal; Menon, Pradeep A.; Subramanian, Sudha; Anbalagan, Selvaraj; Bhavani, Kannabiran P.; Sekar, Sathiyavelu; Padmapriyadarshini, Chandrasekaran; Kumar, Satagopan; Ravichandran, Narayanan; Raja, Krishnaraj; Bhanu, Kesavamurthy; Mahilmaran, Ayyamperumal; Sekar, Lakshmanan; Sher, Alan; Sereti, Irini; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence, manifestations, outcome and clinical predictors of paradoxical TB-IRIS in patients with HIV and culture confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in India have not been studied prospectively. Methods HIV+ patients with culture confirmed PTB started on anti-tuberculosis therapy (ATT) were followed prospectively after anti-retroviral therapy (ART) initiation. Established criteria for IRIS diagnosis were used including decline in plasma HIV RNA at IRIS event. Pre-ART plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations between baseline variables and IRIS. Results Of 57 patients enrolled, 48 had complete follow up data. Median ATT-ART interval was 28 days (interquartile range, IQR 14–47). IRIS events occurred in 26 patients (54.2%) at a median of 11 days (IQR: 7–16) after ART initiation. Corticosteroids were required for treatment of most IRIS events that resolved within a median of 13 days (IQR: 9–23). Two patients died due to CNS TB-IRIS. Lower CD4+ T-cell counts, higher plasma HIV RNA levels, lower CD4/CD8 ratio, lower hemoglobin, shorter ATT to ART interval, extra-pulmonary or miliary TB and higher plasma IL-6 and CRP levels at baseline were associated with paradoxical TB-IRIS in the univariate analysis. Shorter ATT to ART interval, lower hemoglobin and higher IL-6 and CRP levels remained significant in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Paradoxical TB–IRIS frequently complicates HIV-TB therapy in India. IL-6 and CRP may assist in predicting IRIS events and serve as potential targets for immune interventions. PMID:23691062

  2. HIV-1 tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lai, Rachel P J; Meintjes, Graeme; Wilkinson, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Patients co-infected with HIV-1 and tuberculosis (TB) are at risk of developing TB-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) following commencement of antiretroviral therapy (ART). TB-IRIS is characterized by transient but severe localized or systemic inflammatory reactions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens. Here, we review the risk factors and clinical management of TB-IRIS, as well as the roles played by different aspects of the immune response in contributing to TB-IRIS pathogenesis.

  3. HIV–tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome is characterized by Toll-like receptor and inflammasome signalling

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Rachel P. J.; Meintjes, Graeme; Wilkinson, Katalin A.; Graham, Christine M.; Marais, Suzaan; Van der Plas, Helen; Deffur, Armin; Schutz, Charlotte; Bloom, Chloe; Munagala, Indira; Anguiano, Esperanza; Goliath, Rene; Maartens, Gary; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; O'Garra, Anne; Wilkinson, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis (TB) initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) may develop immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS). No biomarkers for TB-IRIS have been identified and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here we perform transcriptomic profiling of the blood samples of patients with HIV-associated TB. We identify differentially abundant transcripts as early as week 0.5 post ART initiation that predict downstream activation of proinflammatory cytokines in patients who progress to TB-IRIS. At the characteristic time of TB-IRIS onset (week 2), the signature is characterized by over-representation of innate immune mediators including TLR signalling and TREM-1 activation of the inflammasome. In keeping with the transcriptional data, concentrations of plasma cytokines and caspase-1/5 are elevated in TB-IRIS. Inhibition of MyD88 adaptor and group 1 caspases reduces secretion of cytokines including IL-1 in TB-IRIS patients. These data provide insight on the pathogenesis of TB-IRIS and may assist the development of specific therapies. PMID:26399326

  4. Heart failure and cardiogenic shock associated with the TB-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Chris; Schrueder, Neshaad; Ntsekhe, Mpiko; Meintjes, Graeme

    2012-04-12

    Heart failure has not been described in the setting of TB-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). We describe a case of cardiogenic shock in the setting of TB-IRIS four weeks after commencement of antiretroviral therapy. Possible aetiologies and pathophysiology as well as suggested diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to this problem are discussed.

  5. Transient expansion of activated CD8+ T cells characterizes tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in patients with HIV: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background CD4+ T cell activation indicators have been reported to be a common phenomenon underlying diverse manifestations of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). However, we have found that a high frequency of circulating CD8+ T cells is a specific risk factor for mycobacterial IRIS. Therefore, we investigated whether CD8+ T cells from patients who develop TB IRIS were specifically activated. Methods We obtained PBMCs from HIV+ patients prior to and 4, 8, 12, 24, 52 and 104 weeks after initiating antiretroviral therapy. CD38 and HLADR expression on naive, central memory and effector memory CD8+ and CD4+ T cells were determined by flow cytometry. Absolute counts and frequencies of CD8+ T cell subsets were compared between patients who developed TB IRIS, who developed other IRIS forms and who remained IRIS-free. Results TB IRIS patients showed significantly higher counts of naive CD8+ T cells than the other groups at most time points, with a contraction of the effector memory subpopulation occurring later in the follow-up period. Activated (CD38+ HLADR+) CD8+ T cells from all groups decreased with treatment but transiently peaked in TB IRIS patients. This increase was due to an increase in activated naive CD8+ T cell counts during IRIS. Additionally, the CD8+ T cell subpopulations of TB IRIS patients expressed HLADR without CD38 more frequently and expressed CD38 without HLADR less frequently than cells from other groups. Conclusions CD8+ T cell activation is specifically relevant to TB IRIS. Different IRIS forms may involve different alterations in T cell subsets, suggesting different underlying inflammatory processes. PMID:23688318

  6. Paradoxical Reactions and the Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Church, L W Preston; Chopra, Amit; Judson, Marc A

    2017-03-01

    In HIV-infected individuals, paradoxical reactions after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) are associated with a variety of underlying infections and have been called the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). In cases of IRIS associated with tuberculosis (TB), two distinct patterns of disease are recognized: (i) the progression of subclinical TB to clinical disease after the initiation of ART, referred to as unmasking, and (ii) the progression or appearance of new clinical and/or radiographic disease in patients with previously recognized TB after the initiation of ART, the classic or "paradoxical" TB-IRIS. IRIS can potentially occur in all granulomatous diseases, not just infectious ones. All granulomatous diseases are thought to result from interplay of inflammatory cells and mediators. One of the inflammatory cells thought to be integral to the development of the granuloma is the CD4 T lymphocyte. Therefore, HIV-infected patients with noninfectious granulomatous diseases such as sarcoidosis may also develop IRIS reactions. Here, we describe IRIS in HIV-infected patients with TB and sarcoidosis and review the basic clinical and immunological aspects of these phenomena.

  7. Neurotuberculosis immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in the setting of HIV infection: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Jaganmohan, Deepasree; Chakkalakkoombil, Sunitha V; Beena, Anjana A; Krishnan, Nagarajan

    2016-01-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is an exaggerated immune response which can occur with various coinfections in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients, of which the most commonly implicated in central nervous system (CNS)-IRIS are progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), cryptococcosis, and tuberculosis (TB). TB-IRIS is a known complication of pulmonary TB or TB lymphadenitis coinfection in HIV infected patients who are on antituberculosis treatment (ATT) after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, development of IRIS in extrapulmonary TB such as CNS TB is very rare. Our case is that of an isolated CNS-TB-IRIS, presenting as increase in the size and perilesional edema of the ring enhancing lesions in the brain, which was observed in two sequential magnetic resonance imaging done over a period of 2 months in a retropositive patient who presented with clinical deterioration after commencement of ART. As prompt diagnosis was made and specific management aimed at IRIS was started without delay, the patient improved symptomatically. PMID:28104935

  8. [Auto-inflammatory syndromes].

    PubMed

    Grateau, Gilles

    2005-02-28

    Auto-inflammatory syndromes are a group of hereditary diseases characterised by intermittent bouts of clinical inflammation with focal organ involvement mainly: abdomen, musculoskeletal system and skin. The most frequent is familial Mediterranean fever, which affects patients of Mediterranean descent all over the world. Three other types have been recently clinically as well as genetically characterised. A thorough diagnosis is warranted, as clinical and therapeutic management is specific for each of these diseases, as underlied by a specific inflammatory pathway. This new group of diseases has already opened new avenues in our understanding of the inflammatory response.

  9. Auto-inflammatory fever syndromes.

    PubMed

    Padeh, Shai; Berkun, Yakov

    2007-08-01

    Human autoinflammatory diseases (except for PFAPA) are a heterogeneous group of genetically determined diseases characterized by seemingly unprovoked inflammation in the absence of autoimmune or infective causes (Table 2). The last decade has witnessed tremendous advances in the understanding of these disorders. These advances have allowed therapeutic interventions resulting in improvement in the short-term and long-term morbidity of all of these diseases. Future research into the molecular mechanisms underlying these inflammatory diseases should lead to a better understanding of inflammatory diseases in general and, it is hoped, to better and more targeted therapies.

  10. Auto inflammatory syndromes: Diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Stankovic, Katia; Grateau, Gilles

    2007-12-01

    Hereditary recurrent fevers are rare genetic diseases characterized by apparently spontaneous attacks of inflammation. They include familial Mediterranean fever (FMF); tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor periodic syndrome (TRAPS); hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome (HIDS); and hereditary periodic fevers related to mutations in the CIAS1 (cold induced autoinflammatory syndrome 1) gene, such as Muckle-Wells syndrome, familial cold urticaria, and CINCA/NOMID (chronic infantile neurological cutaneous and articular/neonatal-onset multisystemic inflammatory disease). Musculoskeletal manifestations are common. They may occur as features of the acute inflammatory attacks or persist for longer periods. Among them, the most common include arthritis of the large and medium-sized joints in FMF and CINCA, arthralgia in HIDS, and myalgia or pseudo-fasciitis in TRAPS. The outcome is usually favorable, although joint destruction may develop in CINCA or at the hip in FMF. The recurrent bouts of fever and accompanying clinical manifestations suggest the diagnosis, which can be confirmed by genetic testing. Among differential diagnoses, infection should be considered routinely. The treatment of the inflammatory attacks is nonspecific. New pathophysiological insights have led to the development of promising maintenance treatments designed to reduce the number and severity of the inflammatory attacks and to diminish the risk of secondary amyloidosis.

  11. Amyloidosis and auto-inflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed

    Grateau, Gilles; Jéru, Isabelle; Rouaghe, Saad; Cazeneuve, Cécile; Ravet, Nathalie; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Cuisset, Laurence; Dodé, Catherine; Delpech, Marc; Amselem, Serge

    2005-02-01

    Amyloidosis remains currently a severe potential complication of many chronic inflammatory disorders. It is not exactly know why some patients develop a progressive amyloidosis, whereas others do not although latent deposits may be present. A permanent acute phase response, ideally evaluated with serial measurement of serum protein SAA, the precursor of the AA protein deposited in tissues, seems to be a prerequisite to the development of inflammatory (AA) amyloidosis. Genetic factors have however been recently emphasized. Among persistent or emerging causes of AA amyloidosis, hereditary periodic fever syndromes also known as auto-inflammatory syndromes are a group of diseases characterised by intermittent bouts of clinical inflammation with focal organ involvement mainly: abdomen, musculoskeletal system and skin. The most frequent is familial Mediterranean fever which affects patients of Mediterranean descent all over the world. Three other types have been recently clinically as well as genetically characterised. A thorough diagnosis is warranted, as clinical and therapeutic management is specific for each of these diseases.

  12. Auto-inflammatory syndromes and oral health.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Hodgson, T; Lachmann, H

    2008-11-01

    Auto-inflammatory diseases (periodic syndromes) are rare childhood-onset disorders which are characterized by fluctuating or recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation affecting serosal surfaces, joints, eyes and/or skin without significant autoantibody production or an identifiable underlying infection. They are disorders of innate immunity and the underlying genetic defect has been identified in most of the syndromes. Diagnosis relies on clinical symptoms and evidence of an elevated acute phase response during attacks, supported by finding mutations in the relevant genes. Several syndromes can lead to systemic AA amyloidosis. Aphthous-like oral ulceration has been reported as one manifestation in several of the syndromes, including periodic fever, aphthous-stomatitis, pharyngitis, adenitis (PFAPA) familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever syndrome, tumour necrosis factor receptor associated periodic syndrome and pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA). Chronic jaw recurrent osteomyelitis has been recorded in chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis. Advances in the molecular pathogenesis of these syndromes and the regulation of innate immunity have enhanced diagnosis, and rationalized therapies. This article reviews the periodic fever syndromes relevant to oral health and the suggested association of FMF with Behçet's disease.

  13. Vitamin D, d-dimer, Interferon γ, and sCD14 Levels are Independently Associated with Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome: A Prospective, International Study☆

    PubMed Central

    Musselwhite, Laura W.; Andrade, Bruno B.; Ellenberg, Susan S.; Tierney, Ann; Belaunzaran-Zamudio, Pablo F.; Rupert, Adam; Lederman, Michael M.; Sanne, Ian; Sierra Madero, Juan G.; Sereti, Irini

    2016-01-01

    To determine the immunological profile most important for IRIS prediction, we evaluated 20 baseline plasma biomarkers in Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART). Patients were enrolled in a randomized, placebo-controlled ART initiation trial in South Africa and Mexico to test whether maraviroc could prevent IRIS. Participants were classified prospectively as having IRIS within 6 months of ART initiation. Twenty plasma biomarkers were measured at study enrollment for 267 participants. Biomarkers were tested for predicting IRIS with adjustment for covariates chosen through forward stepwise selection. Sixty-two participants developed IRIS and of these 19 were tuberculosis (TB)-IRIS. Baseline levels of vitamin D and higher d-dimer, interferon gamma (IFNγ), and sCD14 were independently associated with risk of IRIS in multivariate analyses. TB-IRIS cases exhibited a distinct biosignature from IRIS related to other pathogens, with increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), sCD14, IFNγ, and lower levels of Hb that could be captured by a composite risk score. Elevated markers of Type 1 T helper (Th1) response, monocyte activation, coagulation and low vitamin D were independently associated with IRIS risk. Interventions that decrease immune activation and increase vitamin D levels warrant further study. PMID:26981576

  14. Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome: Opening Pandora's Box

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    One of the purposes of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is to restore the immune system. However, it can sometimes lead to an aberrant inflammatory response and paradoxical clinical worsening known as the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). We describe a 23-year-old male, HIV1 infected with a rapid progression phenotype, who started ART with TCD4+ of 53 cells/mm3 (3,3%) and HIV RNA = 890000 copies/mL (6 log). Four weeks later he was admitted to the intensive care unit with severe sepsis. The diagnostic pathway identified progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, digestive Kaposi sarcoma, and P. aeruginosa bacteraemia. Five weeks after starting ART, TCD4+ cell count was 259 cells/mm3 (15%) and HIV RNA = 3500 copies/mL (4 log). He developed respiratory failure and progressed to septic shock and death. Those complications might justify the outcome but its autopsy opened Pandora's box: cerebral and cardiac toxoplasmosis was identified, as well as hemophagocytic syndrome, systemic candidiasis, and Mycobacterium avium complex infection. IRIS remains a concern and eventually a barrier to ART. Male gender, young age, low TCD4 cell count, and high viral load are risk factors. The high prevalence of subclinical opportunistic diseases highlights the need for new strategies to reduce IRIS incidence. PMID:28163944

  15. [Metabolic syndrome in inflammatory rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Malesci, D; Valentini, G; La Montagna, G

    2006-01-01

    Toward the end of the last century a better knowledge of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and their associations led investigators to propose the existence of a unique pathophysiological condition called "metabolic" or "insulin resistance syndrome". Among all, insulin-resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia are considered its most important treatment targets. Different definitions have been provided by World Health Organization (WHO) and by The Third Report of The National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP-ATP III). In particular, abdominal obesity, hypertension, low HDL cholesterol and hyperglicemia are the most common items used for its definition. The presence of MetS is effective in predicting the future risk of diabetes and coronaropathies. The evidence of a higher CV risk rate among different rheumatic inflammatory diseases has recently been associated with high prevalence of MetS in some cases. Rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis have the large series among arthritis, whereas systemic lupus erythematosus among connective tissue disorders. This review analyses all most important studies about the evidence of MetS in rheumatic patients and the main clinical and prognostic significance of this relation.

  16. Inflammatory lung disease in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Felice, Claudio; Rossi, Marcello; Leoncini, Silvia; Chisci, Glauco; Signorini, Cinzia; Lonetti, Giuseppina; Vannuccini, Laura; Spina, Donatella; Ginori, Alessandro; Iacona, Ingrid; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Ciccoli, Lucia; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder mainly linked to mutations in the gene encoding the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Respiratory dysfunction, historically credited to brainstem immaturity, represents a major challenge in RTT. Our aim was to characterize the relationships between pulmonary gas exchange abnormality (GEA), upper airway obstruction, and redox status in patients with typical RTT (n = 228) and to examine lung histology in a Mecp2-null mouse model of the disease. GEA was detectable in ~80% (184/228) of patients versus ~18% of healthy controls, with "high" (39.8%) and "low" (34.8%) patterns dominating over "mixed" (19.6%) and "simple mismatch" (5.9%) types. Increased plasma levels of non-protein-bound iron (NPBI), F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs), intraerythrocyte NPBI (IE-NPBI), and reduced and oxidized glutathione (i.e., GSH and GSSG) were evidenced in RTT with consequently decreased GSH/GSSG ratios. Apnea frequency/severity was positively correlated with IE-NPBI, F2-IsoPs, and GSSG and negatively with GSH/GSSG ratio. A diffuse inflammatory infiltrate of the terminal bronchioles and alveoli was evidenced in half of the examined Mecp2-mutant mice, well fitting with the radiological findings previously observed in RTT patients. Our findings indicate that GEA is a key feature of RTT and that terminal bronchioles are a likely major target of the disease.

  17. Subclinical Inflammatory Status in Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cortelazzo, Alessio; De Felice, Claudio; Guerranti, Roberto; Landi, Claudia; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Ciccoli, Lucia; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation has been advocated as a possible common central mechanism for developmental cognitive impairment. Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder, mainly caused by de novo loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding MeCP2. Here, we investigated plasma acute phase response (APR) in stage II (i.e., “pseudo-autistic”) RTT patients by routine haematology/clinical chemistry and proteomic 2-DE/MALDI-TOF analyses as a function of four major MECP2 gene mutation types (R306C, T158M, R168X, and large deletions). Elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate values (median 33.0 mm/h versus 8.0 mm/h, P < 0.0001) were detectable in RTT, whereas C-reactive protein levels were unchanged (P = 0.63). The 2-DE analysis identified significant changes for a total of 17 proteins, the majority of which were categorized as APR proteins, either positive (n = 6 spots) or negative (n = 9 spots), and to a lesser extent as proteins involved in the immune system (n = 2 spots), with some proteins having overlapping functions on metabolism (n = 7 spots). The number of protein changes was proportional to the severity of the mutation. Our findings reveal for the first time the presence of a subclinical chronic inflammatory status related to the “pseudo-autistic” phase of RTT, which is related to the severity carried by the MECP2 gene mutation. PMID:24511209

  18. Subclinical inflammatory status in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cortelazzo, Alessio; De Felice, Claudio; Guerranti, Roberto; Signorini, Cinzia; Leoncini, Silvia; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Zollo, Gloria; Landi, Claudia; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Ciccoli, Lucia; Bini, Luca; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation has been advocated as a possible common central mechanism for developmental cognitive impairment. Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder, mainly caused by de novo loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding MeCP2. Here, we investigated plasma acute phase response (APR) in stage II (i.e., "pseudo-autistic") RTT patients by routine haematology/clinical chemistry and proteomic 2-DE/MALDI-TOF analyses as a function of four major MECP2 gene mutation types (R306C, T158M, R168X, and large deletions). Elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate values (median 33.0 mm/h versus 8.0 mm/h, P < 0.0001) were detectable in RTT, whereas C-reactive protein levels were unchanged (P = 0.63). The 2-DE analysis identified significant changes for a total of 17 proteins, the majority of which were categorized as APR proteins, either positive (n = 6 spots) or negative (n = 9 spots), and to a lesser extent as proteins involved in the immune system (n = 2 spots), with some proteins having overlapping functions on metabolism (n = 7 spots). The number of protein changes was proportional to the severity of the mutation. Our findings reveal for the first time the presence of a subclinical chronic inflammatory status related to the "pseudo-autistic" phase of RTT, which is related to the severity carried by the MECP2 gene mutation.

  19. Inflammatory Lung Disease in Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Claudio; Rossi, Marcello; Chisci, Glauco; Lonetti, Giuseppina; Vannuccini, Laura; Spina, Donatella; Iacona, Ingrid; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Ciccoli, Lucia; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder mainly linked to mutations in the gene encoding the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Respiratory dysfunction, historically credited to brainstem immaturity, represents a major challenge in RTT. Our aim was to characterize the relationships between pulmonary gas exchange abnormality (GEA), upper airway obstruction, and redox status in patients with typical RTT (n = 228) and to examine lung histology in a Mecp2-null mouse model of the disease. GEA was detectable in ~80% (184/228) of patients versus ~18% of healthy controls, with “high” (39.8%) and “low” (34.8%) patterns dominating over “mixed” (19.6%) and “simple mismatch” (5.9%) types. Increased plasma levels of non-protein-bound iron (NPBI), F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs), intraerythrocyte NPBI (IE-NPBI), and reduced and oxidized glutathione (i.e., GSH and GSSG) were evidenced in RTT with consequently decreased GSH/GSSG ratios. Apnea frequency/severity was positively correlated with IE-NPBI, F2-IsoPs, and GSSG and negatively with GSH/GSSG ratio. A diffuse inflammatory infiltrate of the terminal bronchioles and alveoli was evidenced in half of the examined Mecp2-mutant mice, well fitting with the radiological findings previously observed in RTT patients. Our findings indicate that GEA is a key feature of RTT and that terminal bronchioles are a likely major target of the disease. PMID:24757286

  20. [Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and endothelial cell injury].

    PubMed

    Gando, Satoshi

    2004-12-01

    During recent years, evidences have been accumulated demonstrating bidirectional crosstalk between coagulation and inflammation. This review outlines the influences that coagulation and inflammation exert on each other to the endothelium and how these systems induce systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Then we discussed the implications of leucocyte-endothelial activation to endothelial cell injury followed by multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in patients with sustained SIRS. Last we demonstrated an important role of inflammatory circulation disturbance induced by endothelial cell injury for the pathogenesis of MODS in SIRS and sepsis.

  1. OTULIN deficiency causes auto-inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads

    2016-11-01

    Ubiquitin chains assembled via the N-terminal methionine (Met1 or linear ubiquitin), conjugated by the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC), participate in NF-κΒ-dependent inflammatory signaling and immune responses. A recent report in Cell finds that OTULIN, a deubiquitinase that selectively cleaves Met1-linked ubiquitin chains, is essential for restraining inflammation in vivo.

  2. [Auto-inflammatory syndromes and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Stankovic, Katia; Hentgen, Véronique; Grateau, Gilles

    2008-11-01

    In familial mediterranean fever (FMF), fertility is normal in treated patients. There is no abnormality of spermatogenesis under usual therapeutic doses of colchicine. The risk of early abortion is increased if inflammatory attacks occur during the pregnancy. It is recommended to continue colchicine treatment during the conception and the pregnancy. Careful follow-up must be organized, even more in patients with renal amyloidosis. Breast-feeding is allowed under colchicine with no risk for the baby. There is no indication for systematic amniocentesis in FMF patients treated with colchicine.

  3. Acute coronary syndromes as auto-inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    From the onset to the healing stage of acute coronary syndromes, an endless inflammation has been presented with complex, multiple cross-talk mechanisms at the molecular, cellular, and organ levels. Even though the early reperfusion treatment either by thrombolysis or percutaneous coronary intervention provides the excellent clinical benefits in patients with acute coronary syndromes, ischemia/ reperfusion injury may somewhat offset those great advantages. Inflammation, although potentially protective, has been deeply associated with those detrimental conditions. The hexagonal vascular inflammatory network which is composed of activated various leukocytes, vascular endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, platelets, excess reactive oxygen species, and cholesterol may contribute these vicious circles. To address these complex syndromes with more benefits regarding the prevention and treatment, this review comprehensively updates the pathogenesis of acute coronary syndromes from the view points of vascular inflammation.

  4. Simultaneous Combined Myositis, Inflammatory Polyneuropathy, and Overlap Myasthenic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Magy, Laurent; Corcia, Philippe; Ghorab, Karima; Richard, Laurence; Ciron, Jonathan; Duchesne, Mathilde; Vallat, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Immune-mediated neuromuscular disorders include pathologies of the peripheral nervous system, neuromuscular junction, and muscles. If overlap syndromes (or the association of almost two autoimmune disorders) are recognized, the simultaneous occurrence of several autoimmune neuromuscular disorders is rare. We describe two patients presenting the simultaneous occurrence of inflammatory neuropathy, myositis, and myasthenia gravis (with positive acetylcholine receptor antibodies). For each patient, we carried out a pathological analysis (nerve and muscle) and an electrophysiological study (and follow-up). To our knowledge, this is the first description of such a triple immune-mediated neuromuscular syndrome. We compared our observations with a few other cases of simultaneous diagnosis of two inflammatory neuromuscular disorders. PMID:28044116

  5. Obesity-Driven Gut Microbiota Inflammatory Pathways to Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante-Silva, Luiz H. A.; Galvão, José G. F. M.; da Silva, Juliane Santos de França; de Sales-Neto, José M.; Rodrigues-Mascarenhas, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The intimate interplay between immune system, metabolism, and gut microbiota plays an important role in controlling metabolic homeostasis and possible obesity development. Obesity involves impairment of immune response affecting both innate and adaptive immunity. The main factors involved in the relationship of obesity with inflammation have not been completely elucidated. On the other hand, gut microbiota, via innate immune receptors, has emerged as one of the key factors regulating events triggering acute inflammation associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Inflammatory disorders lead to several signaling transduction pathways activation, inflammatory cytokine, chemokine production and cell migration, which in turn cause metabolic dysfunction. Inflamed adipose tissue, with increased macrophages infiltration, is associated with impaired preadipocyte development and differentiation to mature adipose cells, leading to ectopic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance. This review focuses on the relationship between obesity and inflammation, which is essential to understand the pathological mechanisms governing metabolic syndrome. PMID:26635627

  6. Venipuncture Induced Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Presenting as Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pramod; Mittal, Manoj; Nair, Anugrah; Sultana, Waqia

    2016-01-01

    Venipuncture is one of the most commonly done medical procedures. We report a unique case of a 23-year-old young male who presented with features suggestive of inflammatory arthritis. The symptoms, which initially started on the right side, also involved the other side after a few weeks. Although the patient's symptoms and signs were simulating inflammatory arthritis, he had atypical features like poor response to anti-inflammatory medicines and normal laboratory parameters. His musculoskeletal ultrasonography was also not suggestive of arthritis. His history was reviewed and on direct questioning he revealed a history of venipuncture for blood sample withdrawal, done from right antecubital region for routine health check on the day prior to the onset of symptoms. Complex regional pain syndrome was suspected and triple-phase radioisotope bone scan was done which was highly suggestive of this diagnosis. The patient was managed with multidimensional approach and responded very well to the treatment. Complex regional pain syndrome is usually not thought of in the initial differential diagnosis of inflammatory arthritis. In this report we highlight the need to elicit the often overlooked history of trivial trauma like venipuncture, especially in atypical cases of arthritis. Also the role of newer diagnostic modalities in such cases is emphasized. PMID:27891152

  7. Crusted scabies-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the widely accepted association between crusted scabies and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infection, crusted scabies has not been included in the spectrum of infections associated with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in HIV-infected patients initiating antiretroviral therapy. Case presentation We report a case of a 28-year-old Mexican individual with late HIV-infection, who had no apparent skin lesions but soon after initiation of antiretroviral therapy, he developed an aggressive form of crusted scabies with rapid progression of lesions. Severe infestation by Sarcoptes scabiei was confirmed by microscopic examination of the scale and skin biopsy. Due to the atypical presentation of scabies in a patient responding to antiretroviral therapy, preceded by no apparent skin lesions at initiation of antiretroviral therapy, the episode was interpreted for the first time as “unmasking crusted scabies-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome”. Conclusion This case illustrates that when crusted scabies is observed in HIV-infected patients responding to antiretroviral therapy, it might as well be considered as a possible manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Patient context should be considered for adequate diagnosis and treatment of conditions exacerbated by antiretroviral therapy-induced immune reconstitution. PMID:23181485

  8. Plasma inflammatory cytokines correlate to the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abramov, Y; Schenker, J G; Lewin, A; Friedler, S; Nisman, B; Barak, V

    1996-07-01

    The objective of this study was to follow the kinetics of four inflammatory cytokines in the plasma and ascitic fluid of seven patients who developed severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) after induction of ovulation for in-vitro fertilization. Blood samples were obtained from these patients at three different times: upon hospitalization; when significant clinical improvement was evident; and after complete resolution. Samples were analysed for interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Ascitic fluid was obtained by therapeutic paracentesis from all study patients during the active phase and analysed for these cytokines. Two control groups were available: the first included 15 women undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation for in-vitro fertilization without developing OHSS, while the second consisted of 25 healthy women not undergoing ovulation induction or any other medical treatment. High concentrations of IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-alpha were detected in all individuals upon admission for severe OHSS. Concentrations dropped significantly along with clinical improvement, reaching normal values after complete resolution. A statistically significant correlation was found between plasma cytokine concentrations and certain biological characteristics of the syndrome such as leukocytosis, increased haematocrit, and elevated plasma 17-beta-oestradiol concentrations. Ascitic fluid obtained from the study patients contained high IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations, while other cytokines were unaltered. These results suggest close association between inflammatory cytokines and the pathophysiology of the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

  9. Inflammatory peeling skin syndrome caused a novel mutation in CDSN.

    PubMed

    Telem, Dana Fuchs; Israeli, Shirli; Sarig, Ofer; Sprecher, Eli

    2012-04-01

    Generalized peeling skin syndrome (PSS) is a rare autosomal recessive dermatosis manifesting with continuous exfoliation of the stratum corneum. The inflammatory (type B) subtype of PSS was recently found to be caused by deleterious mutations in the CDSN gene encoding corneodesmosin, a major component of desmosomal junctions in the uppermost layers of the epidermis. In the present study, we assessed a 10-month-old baby, who presented with generalized superficial peeling of the skin. Using PCR amplification and direct sequencing, we identified the third PSS-associated mutation in CDSN, a homozygous 4 bp duplication in the second exon of the gene (c.164_167dup GCCT; p.Thr57ProfsX6). These data further support the notion that corneodesmosin deficiency impairs cell-cell adhesion in the upper epidermis, paving the way for an abnormal inflammatory response due to epidermal barrier disruption.

  10. HIV Immune Recovery Inflammatory Syndrome and Central Nervous System Paracoccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Sérgio Monteiro; Roza, Thiago Henrique

    2017-04-01

    The immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is a deregulated inflammatory response to invading microorganisms. It is manifested when there is an abrupt change in host immunity from an anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive state to a pro-inflammatory state as a result of rapid depletion or removal of factors that promote immune suppression or inhibition of inflammation. The aim of this paper is to discuss and re-interpret the possibility of association of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) with IRIS in the central nervous system (CNS) in a case from Brazil published by Silva-Vergara ML. et al. (Mycopathologia 177:137-141, 6). An AIDS patient who was not receiving medical care developed pulmonary PCM successfully treated with itraconazole. The patient developed central nervous system PCM (NPCM) after starting the ARV therapy with recovery of immunity and control of HIV viral load, although it was not interpreted as IRIS by the authors, it fulfills the criteria for CNS IRIS. This could be the first case of NPCM associated with IRIS described. Although not frequent, IRIS must be considered in PCM patients and HIV, from endemic areas or patients that traveled to endemic areas, receiving ARV treatment and with worsening symptoms.

  11. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS): molecular pathophysiology and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Naoyuki; Hattori, Yuichi

    2006-07-01

    In recent years, extensive basic science research has led to a clear understanding of the molecular mechanisms contributing to the pathophysiology of sepsis. Sepsis is now defined as a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in which there is an identifiable focus of infection. SIRS can be also precipitated by non-infective events such as trauma, pancreatitis, and surgery. As a consequence of an overactive SIRS response, the function of various organ systems may be compromised, resulting in multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and death. Production and activation of multiple proinflammatory genes are likely to play a key role in the pathogenesis of MODS development. This review article focuses on the molecular mechanisms and components involved in the pathogenesis of severe sepsis. This includes cellular targets of sepsis-inducing bacterial products and their signaling pathways with a major emphasis on transcription factors and new therapeutic approaches to severe sepsis.

  12. Electrophysiological features of POEMS syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiuming; Qin, Xinyue; Zhang, Yuping; Huang, Cheng; Yu, Gang

    2014-04-01

    Polyneuropathy is often an initial manifestation of polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M protein and skin changes (POEMS) syndrome and therefore this disorder is frequently misdiagnosed as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). We reviewed electrophysiological data in 20 patients with POEMS syndrome and 36 matched patients with CIDP to compare the electrophysiological features of POEMS syndrome and CIDP. Compared with CIDP controls, POEMS patients demonstrated (1) less prolonged distal motor latency and less reduced motor nerve and sensory nerve conduction velocities, (2) greater reduction of amplitudes of compound motor action potentials (CMAP) in distal stimulation, and similar reduction of amplitudes of CMAP in proximal stimulation, (3) similar reduction of amplitudes of sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) in median and ulnar nerves, and a greater reduction of amplitudes of SNAP in tibial and peroneal nerves, (4) less temporal dispersion, (5) less frequent conduction block, (6) more frequent neurogenic injury in the muscles of the upper and lower limbs, and more frequent neurogenic injury in the muscles of the lower than upper limbs, (7) similar F wave and H reflex abnormalities, and (8) less frequent skin sympathetic response abnormalities. We concluded that before development of typical clinical manifestations, POEMS neuropathy can be distinguished from CIDP by neural electrophysiological examination. These electrophysiological features can be used for early diagnosis and initiating correct treatment of POEMS syndrome.

  13. The Transcriptome of the Fetal Inflammatory Response Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Madsen-Bouterse, Sally A.; Romero, Roberto; Tarca, Adi L.; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro.; Espinoza, Jimmy; Kim, Chong Jai; Kim, Jung-Sun; Edwin, Samuel S.; Gomez, Ricardo; Draghici, Sorin

    2012-01-01

    Problem The fetal inflammatory response syndrome (FIRS) is considered the counterpart of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), but similarities in their regulatory mechanisms are unclear. This study characterizes the fetal mRNA transcriptome of peripheral leukocytes to identify key biological processes and pathways involved in FIRS. Method of Study Umbilical cord blood from preterm neonates with FIRS (funisitis, plasma IL-6>11 pg/ml; n=10) and neonates with no evidence of inflammation (n=10) was collected at birth. Results Microarray analysis of leukocyte RNA revealed differential expression of 541 unique genes, changes confirmed by qRT-PCR for 41 or of 44 genes tested. Similar to SIRS and sepsis, ontological and pathway analyses yielded significant enrichment of biological processes including antigen processing and presentation, immune response, and processes critical to cellular metabolism. Results are comparable with microarray studies of endotoxin challenge models and pediatric sepsis, identifying 25 genes across all studies. Conclusions This study is the first to profile genome-wide expression in FIRS, which demonstrates a substantial degree of similarity with SIRS despite differences in fetal and adult immune systems. PMID:20059468

  14. Irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease and the microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Major, Giles; Spiller, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The review aims to update the reader on current developments in our understanding of how the gut microbiota impact on inflammatory bowel disease and the irritable bowel syndrome. It will also consider current efforts to modulate the microbiota for therapeutic effect. Recent findings Gene polymorphisms associated with inflammatory bowel disease increasingly suggest that interaction with the microbiota drives pathogenesis. This may be through modulation of the immune response, mucosal permeability or the products of microbial metabolism. Similar findings in irritable bowel syndrome have reinforced the role of gut-specific factors in this ‘functional’ disorder. Metagenomic analysis has identified alterations in pathways and interactions with the ecosystem of the microbiome that may not be recognized by taxonomic description alone, particularly in carbohydrate metabolism. Treatments targeted at the microbial stimulus with antibiotics, probiotics or prebiotics have all progressed in the past year. Studies on the long-term effects of treatment on the microbiome suggest that dietary intervention may be needed for prolonged efficacy. Summary The microbiome represents ‘the other genome’, and to appreciate its role in health and disease will be as challenging as with our own genome. Intestinal diseases occur at the front line of our interaction with the microbiome and their future treatment will be shaped as we unravel our relationship with it. PMID:24296462

  15. Irritable bowel syndrome in quiescent inflammatory bowel disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Burgell, R E; Asthana, A K; Gibson, P R

    2015-12-01

    Ongoing troublesome bowel symptoms despite quiescent inflammatory disease are a frequent management challenge when caring for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Even when active disease has been excluded the prevalence of residual gastrointestinal symptoms is surprisingly high and the cause often obscure. The presence of a concurrent functional disorder such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is associated with worse quality of life, worse physical functioning, higher prevalence of anxiety and greater health care utilization. Potential etiological mechanisms leading to the development of IBS like symptoms include the development of visceral hypersensitivity following the original inflammatory insult, alteration in cortical processing, dysbiosis and residual subacute inflammation. Therapeutic options for managing IBS in patients with IBD include dietary modification, interventions targeted at correction of visceral sensory dysfunction or cortical processing and modulation of the gut microbiota. As there are few studies specifically examining the treatment of IBS in patients with IBD, the majority of therapeutic interventions are extrapolated from the IBS literature. Given the frequency of residual functional symptoms in IBS, significantly more research is warranted in this field.

  16. Metabolic syndrome associated to non-inflammatory Achilles enthesopathy.

    PubMed

    Abate, Michele; Di Carlo, Luigi; Salini, Vincenzo; Schiavone, Cosima

    2014-01-01

    Enthesopathies are frequently found in rheumatic inflammatory diseases, but can be observed also in absence of systemic inflammation. Aging, overuse, and microtraumas can be responsible for enthesis-degenerative phenomena. Despite that Achilles enthesis is the more frequently affected, no systematic study on the risk factors associated to this enthesopathy has been yet performed. The aim of this paper was to assess whether the metabolic syndrome could be associated to entheseal lesions. Forty-five subjects with symptomatic non-inflammatory Achilles enthesopathy were compared to 45 asymptomatic controls. An ultrasound study of the Achilles enthesis was carried out, and the presence/absence of lesions (morphologic abnormalities, calcific deposits, enthesophytes, cortical abnormalities, and adjacent bursitis) was assessed. On the basis of history, comorbidities (osteoarthritis, diabetes, and hypertension) were recorded. In each subject, body mass index (BMI), glucose, total, and HDL cholesterol were also evaluated. All symptomatic subjects showed at ultrasound evaluation at least one structural entheseal alteration; pathologic features in asymptomatic subjects were found in 6/45 (13.3 %) of cases. Higher values of BMI and glucose were found in subjects with symptomatic enthesopathy. At multiple logistic regression analysis, the presence of high values of BMI and glucose was related to a higher probability to detect entheseal lesions. Metabolic syndrome and overweight may have a role in the pathogenesis of Achilles enthesopathy due to their synergistic worsening effect on other pathogenetic factors of tendon degeneration, such age and overuse. Therefore, subjects with metabolic syndrome practicing sports and other activities stressing the Achilles tendon should receive advice for more frequent controls.

  17. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Watad, Abdulla; David, Paula; Brown, Stav; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2017-01-01

    The autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA), presented by Shoenfeld and Agmon-Levin in 2011, is an entity that incorporates diverse autoimmune conditions induced by the exposure to various adjuvants. Adjuvants are agents that entail the capability to induce immune reactions. Adjuvants are found in many vaccines and used mainly to increase the response to vaccination in the general population. Silicone has also been reported to be able to induce diverse immune reactions. Clinical cases and series of heterogeneous autoimmune conditions including systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and rheumatoid arthritis have been reported to be induced by several adjuvants. However, only a small number of cases of autoimmune thyroid disorder have been included under the umbrella of ASIA syndrome. Indeed, clinical cases of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and/or subacute thyroiditis were observed after the exposure to vaccines as well as silicone implantation. In our review, we aimed to summarize the current knowledge on ASIA syndrome presented as endocrinopathies, focusing on autoimmune thyroid disorders associated with the various adjuvants. PMID:28167927

  18. Autoimmune or auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA): old truths and a new syndrome?

    PubMed

    Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2011-02-01

    There has been considerable interest in the role of environmental factors and the induction of autoimmunity and the ways by which they facilitate loss of tolerance. Clearly both genetic and environmental factors are incriminated, as evidenced by the lack of concordance in identical twins and the relatively recent identification of the shared epitope in rheumatoid arthritis. In this issue a new syndrome called 'Asia'-autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants has been proposed. It is an intriguing issue and one that is likely to be provocative and lead to further biologic and molecular investigations.

  19. Metabolic Syndrome and Selective Inflammatory Markers in Psoriatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vachatova, Simona; Andrys, Ctirad; Salavec, Miloslav; Ettler, Karel; Rehacek, Vit; Cermakova, Eva; Malkova, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The presented article studies the role of selected inflammatory and anti-inflammatory serum markers of psoriatic patients in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome (MS) and psoriasis. The study is based on the comparison between the group of psoriatic patients (74) and the control group (65). We found significantly higher BMI (p < 0.05) and diastolic blood pressure (p < 0.05) in the psoriatic patients. The values of waist circumference and BMI were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the male patients compared to the men in the control group. The analysis revealed significantly higher CRP (p < 0.001), Lp-PLA2 (p < 0.001), leptin (p < 0.01), and resistin (p < 0.01) levels in the psoriatic patients. Significantly higher levels of CRP (p < 0.01), Lp-PLA2 (p < 0.001), leptin (p < 0.01), and resistin (p < 0.05) were found in the patients with MS compared to the controls with MS. The level of adiponectin was significantly lower (p < 0.01) in the patients with MS. Finally, we found significantly higher level of Lp-PLA2 (p < 0.001) in the group of patients without MS compared to the controls without MS. In conclusion, observed inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers (CRP, adiponectin, leptin, resistin, and Lp-PLA2) are involved in both pathogenesis of MS and pathogenesis of psoriasis. The level of Lp-PLA2 indicates the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis (cardiovascular risk) in psoriatic patients. PMID:28097156

  20. Paradoxical Mycobacterium tuberculosis meningitis immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in an HIV-infected child.

    PubMed

    Kalk, Emma; Technau, Karl; Hendson, Willy; Coovadia, Ashraf

    2013-02-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome occurs in a subset of HIV-infected individuals as the immune system recovers secondary to antiretroviral therapy. An exaggerated and uncontrolled inflammatory response to antigens of viable or nonviable organisms is characteristic, with clinical deterioration despite improvement in laboratory indicators. We describe a fatal case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis meningitis immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in an HIV-infected child and review the literature.

  1. Psychological Interventions for Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ballou, Sarah; Keefer, Laurie

    2017-01-01

    Psychological interventions have been designed and implemented effectively in a wide range of medical conditions, including Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD). The psychological treatments for IBS and IBD with the strongest evidence base include: cognitive behavioral therapy, hypnosis, and mindfulness-based therapies. The evidence for each of these therapies is reviewed here for both IBS and IBD. In general, there is a stronger and larger evidence base to support the use of psychological interventions in IBS compared with IBD. This is likely due to the high level of psychiatric comorbidity associated with IBS and the involvement of the stress-response in symptom presentation of IBS. Further research in psychosocial interventions for IBD is necessary. Finally, the importance of conceptualizing both IBS and IBD in a biopsychosocial model is discussed and several resources for accessing Clinical Health Psychology materials and referrals are provided. PMID:28102860

  2. Immunopathology of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in Whipple's disease.

    PubMed

    Moos, Verena; Feurle, Gerhard E; Schinnerling, Katina; Geelhaar, Anika; Friebel, Julian; Allers, Kristina; Moter, Annette; Kikhney, Judith; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Kühl, Anja A; Erben, Ulrike; Fenollar, Florence; Raoult, Didier; Schneider, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    During antimicrobial treatment of classic Whipple's disease (CWD), the chronic systemic infection with Tropheryma whipplei, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), is a serious complication. The aim of our study was to characterize the immunological processes underlying IRIS in CWD. Following the definition of IRIS, we describe histological features of IRIS and immunological parameters of 24 CWD IRIS patients, 189 CWD patients without IRIS, and 89 healthy individuals. T cell reconstitution, Th1 reactivity, and the phenotype of T cells were described in the peripheral blood, and infiltration of CD4(+) T cells and regulatory T cells in the duodenal mucosa was determined. During IRIS, tissues were heavily infiltrated by CD3(+), predominantly CD45RO(+)CD4(+) T cells. In the periphery, initial reduction of CD4(+) cell counts and their reconstitution on treatment was more pronounced in CWD patients with IRIS than in those without IRIS. The ratio of activated and regulatory CD4(+) T cells, nonspecific Th1 reactivity, and the proportion of naive among CD4(+) T cells was high, whereas serum IL-10 was low during IRIS. T. whipplei-specific Th1 reactivity remained suppressed before and after emergence of IRIS. The findings that IRIS in CWD mainly are mediated by nonspecific activation of CD4(+) T cells and that it is not sufficiently counterbalanced by regulatory T cells indicate that flare-up of pathogen-specific immunoreactivity is not instrumental in the pathogenesis of IRIS in CWD.

  3. Irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease: interrelated diseases?

    PubMed

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2005-01-01

    In the past inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), celiac disease and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were regarded as completely separate disorders. Now, with the description of inflammation, albeit low-grade, in IBS, and of symptom overlap between IBS and celiac disease, this contention has come under question. Is there true overlap between these disorders? Despite the limitations of available data one cannot but be struck by some areas of apparent convergence: IBD and celiac disease in remission, lymphocytic colitis and microscopic inflammation in IBS, in general, and, especially, in the post-infectious IBS category. The convergence between latent celiac disease and sub-clinical IBD, on the one hand, and IBS, on the other, appears, based on available evidence, to be somewhat spurious and may largely relate to misdiagnosis, a phenomenon which may also explain the apparent evolution of IBS into IBD in some studies. Similarities between IBS and lymphocytic colitis are more striking and less readily dismissed; as for IBS, well documented instances of progression of lymphocytic colitis to full-blown IBD are infrequent, suggesting a true separation between this disorder and classical IBD. Do IBS and lymphocytic colitis represent different responses to similar triggers? Will some of the 'inflamed' IBS subgroup be reclassified as part of the spectrum of lymphocytic colitis in the future? Will inflammation emerge as a common underlying factor in the pathogenesis of IBS? The answer to these and many questions must await further study of this fascinating area.

  4. Potential inflammatory markers in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Dongmei; Li, Nanfang; Yao, Xiaoguang; Zhou, Ling

    2017-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is a complex chronic inflammatory respiratory disease with multiple pathogenic factors and high morbidity and mortality. Serum levels of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), and surfactant protein D (SPD) were investigated in OSAHS patients, to determine their clinical significance and correlation with the pathogenesis. Patients were classified into a mild and moderate OSAHS group (n = 25) and severe OSAHS group (n = 33). Twenty healthy patients served as a control group. Peripheral blood levels of NF-κB, HIF-1α, and SPD were determined by Western blot, and a correlation analysis was performed. Severe OSAHS patients received nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) therapy and were followed up after 2 months. NF-κB p65, HIF-1α, and SPD expression levels were determined after valid nCPAP therapy. NF-κB p65 and HIF-1α expression was significantly higher in severe OSAHS group than in the other two groups (p < 0.01), and was positively correlated with the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) (r = 0.696, p < 0.001; r = 0.634, p < 0.001). SPD expression was significantly lower in severe OSAHS group than in the control group (p < 0.01) and mild and moderate OSAHS group (p < 0.01), and was negatively correlated with AHI (r = −0.569, p < 0.001). OSAHS pathogenesis was associated with changes in NF-κB, HIF-1α, and SPD protein expression levels. nCPAP therapy could improve the clinical characteristics of the patients, lower serum NF-κB and HIF-1α levels, and increase serum SPD levels. We conclude that OSAHS is related to the expression of NF-κB, HIF-1, and SPD. PMID:27754829

  5. Predictors of systemic inflammatory response syndrome following percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ramaraju, Karunamoorthy; Paranjothi, Arun Kumar; Namperumalsamy, Dhinakar Babu; Chennakrishnan, Ilamparuthi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives: Sepsis remains one of the dreaded complications of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). To analyze prospectively the preoperative and intraoperative factors that predict the occurrence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in patients undergoing PCNL so that we can aggressively manage those patients from the preoperative period itself and avert the dangerous complications. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was carried out between August 2012 and March 2013 including all patients who underwent PCNL. Patients with infected collecting system, synchronous ureteric stones, stents, or percutaneous nephrostomy drainage were excluded from the study. Patients were evaluated with physical examination, urine analysis, urine culture and sensitivity, complete blood count, renal function test, X-ray kidney, ureter, and bladder (KUB), and plain and contrast-enhanced computerized tomography KUB. Patients who developed any two or above of the following in the postoperative period were considered to have developed SIRS. (1) Temperature >100.4°F (38°C) or <96.8°F (36°C). (2) Pulse rate >90/min. (3) Respiratory rate >20/min. (4) White blood cell count >12,000/ml or <4000/ml. Results: Of the 120 patients who underwent PCNL 29 (24.1%) developed features of SIRS. On univariate analysis, gender, diabetes mellitus, bladder urine culture, and serum creatinine were found to be statistically insignificant. Blood transfusion (P = 0.009), no of access tracts (P = 0.001), pelvic urine culture (P = 0.04), stone culture (P = 0.003), stone size (P = 0.001), age (P = 0.019), and operative time (P = 0.004) were found to be statistically significant. On multivariate regression analysis stone size, no of access tracts, operative time, and stone culture were found to be statistically significant with regard to the occurrence of SIRS. Conclusion: Patients with above-identified risk factors must be aggressively treated to prevent the occurrence of

  6. [SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome): clinical entity, definitions, and the significance].

    PubMed

    Kushimoto, S; Yamamoto, Y

    1999-01-01

    The clinical entity, definitions, and the significance of SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome) were reviewed. The term, SIRS was proposed to define sepsis and its sequelae clearly in 1991, in order to make early detection of the disease possible, and to improve the ability to compare innovative potential diagnostic and therapeutic modalities by standardizing terms. Although the criteria of SIRS is not strict and too sensitive, SIRS has been shown to be useful as a warning sign of severe condition in clinical setting. We also discussed about a new concept, CARS (compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome), which was characterized as anti-inflammatory mediators-dominant condition, in this issue.

  7. [Nosology of inflammatory diseases: lessons learned from the auto-inflammatory syndromes--a focus on skin manifestations].

    PubMed

    Lipsker, Dan; Ramot, Yuval; Ingber, Arieh

    2012-10-01

    Auto-inflammatory diseases were first described more than 10 years ago as inherited disorders, characterized by recurrent flares of inflammation due to an abnormality in the innate immune system. The understanding of the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of these disorders, and especially the fact that they are mediated by IL-1 secretion by stimulated monocytes/macrophages, facilitated significant progress in patient management. IL-1 inhibitors are especially effective, and indeed, a brief and complete response to IL-1 inhibition is probably one of the best signs of auto-inflammation. Cutaneous manifestations are frequent in the monogenic auto-inflammatory syndromes, and a careful analysis of those findings reveals that they are almost always the consequence of neutrophilic skin infiltration. The neutrophilic dermatoses are, therefore, the cutaneous manifestations of those disorders. Even when the neutrophilic dermatoses occur outside the setting of genetically determined auto-inflammatory disorders, they probably also result from auto-inflammatory mechanisms. The distinction between auto-inflammation and autoimmunity is essential for the proper treatment of the patients. Auto-inflammation will almost always respond to IL-1 inhibition, while immunospressors will not be beneficial. The aim of the current paper is to review these two sub-groups of inflammatory diseases, focusing on their cutaneous manifestations, and highlighting the connection between these syndromes and inflammation in general.

  8. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome: incidence and implications for mortality

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Richard M.; Richardson, James T.; Buchacz, Kate; Chmiel, Joan S.; Durham, Marcus D.; Palella, Frank J.; Wendrow, Andrea; Wood, Kathy; Young, Benjamin; Brooks, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe incidence of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) and its association with mortality in a large multisite US HIV-infected cohort applying an objective, comprehensive definition. Design We studied 2 610 patients seen during 1996–2007 who initiated or resumed highly active combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and, during the next 6 months, demonstrated a decline in plasma HIV-RNA viral load of at least 0.5 log10 copies/ml or an increase of at least 50% in CD4 cell count per microliter. We defined IRIS as the diagnosis of a type B or C condition [as per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 1993 AIDS case definition] or any new mucocutaneous disorder during this same 6-month period. Methods We assessed the incidence of IRIS and evaluated risk factors for IRIS using conditional logistic regression and for all-cause mortality using proportional hazards models. Results We identified 370 cases of IRIS (in 276 patients). Median and nadir CD4 cell counts at cART initiation were 90 and 43 cells/μl, respectively; median viral load was 2.7 log10 copies/ml. The most common IRIS-defining diagnoses were candidiasis (all forms), cytomegalovirus infection, disseminated Mycobacterium avium intracellulare, Pneumocystis pneumonia, varicella zoster, Kaposi’s sarcoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Only one case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was observed. IRIS was independently associated with CD4 cell count less than 50 cells/μl vs. at least 200 cells/μl [odds ratio (OR) 5.0] and a viral load of at least 5.0 log10 copies vs. less than 4.0 log10 copies (OR 2.3). IRIS with a type B-defining or type C-defining diagnosis approximately doubled the risk for all-cause mortality. Conclusion In this large US-based HIV-infected cohort, IRIS occurred in 10.6% of patients who responded to effective ART and contributed to increased mortality. PMID:22233655

  9. Erythema elevatum diutinum in acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Can it be an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Sheethal K; Marfatia, Yogesh S.

    2016-01-01

    A 47-year-old male with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) presented with multiple hyperpigmented papules and nodules on both ankles, dorsum of bilateral feet and soles. It was associated with mild itching and pain. The patient was diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in 2007. First-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) was started in 2009 to which he responded initially. He was shifted to second-line ART 11 months ago in March 2015 due to treatment failure as suggested by CD4 count of 50 cells/mm3. The present skin lesions started 2 months after the initiation of second-line ART. Differential diagnoses considered were Kaposi's sarcoma and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) related infections, but biopsy was suggestive of erythema elevatum diutinum (EED). Patient was started on oral dapsone 100 mg/day and increased to 200 mg/day to which he is responding gradually. In the present case, appearance of the lesions after initiation of second-line ART coupled with increase in CD4 count and decrease of viral load below undetectable level suggest that EED could be an IRIS. PMID:27190420

  10. Pathophysiological changes of inflammatory syndrome in multiple sclerosis after instituting therapeutic plasmapheresis.

    PubMed

    Vlaic, S; Poalelungi, V; Bălăeţ, M; Purcărea, V L; Bălăeţ, C; Coculescu, B I

    2017-01-01

    In autoimmune conditions affecting the central and peripheral CNS as well as in multiple sclerosis (MS), the inflammatory syndrome is present with the onset of this disease. The present paper aimed to highlight the inflammatory syndrome based on the leukergia test, the total blood viscosity test, blood filterability test as well as on other tests. The early instituting of the therapeutic plasmapheresis beneficially modified the clinical status, the biological and pathophysiological behavior of the patient's illness. Objective of the paper: The aim was to highlight the importance, advantages, and pathophysiological changes after therapeutic plasmapheresis in five cases, in patients hospitalized with the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. Material and method: In order to emphasize the inflammatory syndrome, the determination of leukergia assay, the total blood viscosity test and the blood filterability test were added to regular examinations, conducted on the batch of patients included in the study. Results and discussions: As a result of using therapeutic plasmapheresis, the inflammatory parameters in patients with multiple sclerosis improved beneficially as it was proven by the values of inflammatory tests before and after plasmapheresis. Conclusions: In the treatment of multiple sclerosis, plasmapheresis proved to be a medical method that significantly reduced autoimmune inflammatory "installed" syndrome.

  11. Pathophysiological changes of inflammatory syndrome in multiple sclerosis after instituting therapeutic plasmapheresis

    PubMed Central

    Vlaic, S; Poalelungi, V; Bălăeţ, M; Purcărea, VL; Bălăeţ, C; Coculescu, BI

    2017-01-01

    In autoimmune conditions affecting the central and peripheral CNS as well as in multiple sclerosis (MS), the inflammatory syndrome is present with the onset of this disease. The present paper aimed to highlight the inflammatory syndrome based on the leukergia test, the total blood viscosity test, blood filterability test as well as on other tests. The early instituting of the therapeutic plasmapheresis beneficially modified the clinical status, the biological and pathophysiological behavior of the patient’s illness. Objective of the paper: The aim was to highlight the importance, advantages, and pathophysiological changes after therapeutic plasmapheresis in five cases, in patients hospitalized with the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. Material and method: In order to emphasize the inflammatory syndrome, the determination of leukergia assay, the total blood viscosity test and the blood filterability test were added to regular examinations, conducted on the batch of patients included in the study. Results and discussions: As a result of using therapeutic plasmapheresis, the inflammatory parameters in patients with multiple sclerosis improved beneficially as it was proven by the values of inflammatory tests before and after plasmapheresis. Conclusions: In the treatment of multiple sclerosis, plasmapheresis proved to be a medical method that significantly reduced autoimmune inflammatory “installed” syndrome. PMID:28255377

  12. The biochemical origin of pain: the origin of all pain is inflammation and the inflammatory response. Part 2 of 3 - inflammatory profile of pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Omoigui, Sota

    2007-01-01

    Every pain syndrome has an inflammatory profile consisting of the inflammatory mediators that are present in the pain syndrome. The inflammatory profile may have variations from one person to another and may have variations in the same person at different times. The key to treatment of Pain Syndromes is an understanding of their inflammatory profile. Pain syndromes may be treated medically or surgically. The goal should be inhibition or suppression of production of the inflammatory mediators and inhibition, suppression or modulation of neuronal afferent and efferent (motor) transmission. A successful outcome is one that results in less inflammation and thus less pain. We hereby briefly describe the inflammatory profile for several pain syndromes including arthritis, back pain, neck pain, fibromyalgia, interstitial cystitis, migraine, neuropathic pain, complex regional pain syndrome/reflex sympathetic dystrophy (CRPS/RSD), bursitis, shoulder pain and vulvodynia. These profiles are derived from basic science and clinical research performed in the past by numerous investigators and serve as a foundation to be built upon by other researchers and will be updated in the future by new technologies such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Our unifying theory or law of pain states: the origin of all pain is inflammation and the inflammatory response. The biochemical mediators of inflammation include cytokines, neuropeptides, growth factors and neurotransmitters. Irrespective of the type of pain whether it is acute or chronic pain, peripheral or central pain, nociceptive or neuropathic pain, the underlying origin is inflammation and the inflammatory response. Activation of pain receptors, transmission and modulation of pain signals, neuro plasticity and central sensitization are all one continuum of inflammation and the inflammatory response. Irrespective of the characteristic of the pain, whether it is sharp, dull, aching, burning, stabbing, numbing or tingling, all pain

  13. The sick building syndrome as a part of the autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Israeli, Eitan; Pardo, Asher

    2011-06-01

    Sick building syndrome (SBS) is a term coined for a set of clinically recognizable symptoms and ailments without a clear cause reported by occupants of a building. In the 1990s the term "functional somatic syndromes" was applied to several syndromes, including SBS, multiple chemical sensitivity, repetition stress injury, the side effects of silicone breast implants, the Gulf War syndrome (GWS), chronic fatigue syndrome, the irritable bowel syndrome, and fibromyalgia. Recently, Shoenfeld and Agmon-Levin suggested that four conditions--siliconosis, macrophagic myofascitis, the GWS, and post-vaccination phenomena--which share clinical and pathogenic resemblances, may be included under a common syndrome entitled the "autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants". Comparison of the clinical manifestations, symptoms, and signs of the four conditions described by Shoenfeld and Agmon-Levin with those described for SBS shows that nine out of ten main symptoms are present in all 5 conditions. Shoenfeld and Agmon-Levin further propose several major and minor criteria, which, although requiring further validation, may aid in the diagnosis of this newly defined syndrome. We propose here that SBS may also be included as a part of "Shoenfeld's syndrome".

  14. [The systemic inflammatory response syndrome correction in acute destructive pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Agapov, M A; Khoreva, M V; Gorskiĭ, V A

    2011-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a disease of variable severity. In which some patients experience mild, self-limited attacks while others manifest a severe, highly morbid, and frequently lethal attack. The exact mechanisms by which diverse etiological factors induce an attack are still unclear. Recent studies have established the role played by inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. In our research we have estimated influence of not steroid anti-inflammatory preparation on synthesis pro-and anti-inflammatory Cytokines at healthy donors and at patients with Acute pancreatitis.

  15. Inflammatory fatigue and sickness behaviour - lessons for the diagnosis and management of chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arnett, S V; Clark, I A

    2012-12-10

    Persistent and severe fatigue is a common part of the presentation of a diverse range of disease processes. There is a growing body of evidence indicating a common inflammatory pathophysiology underlying many conditions where fatigue is a primary patient concern, including chronic fatigue syndrome. This review explores current models of how inflammatory mediators act on the central nervous system to produce fatigue and sickness behaviour, and the commonality of these processes in conditions as diverse as surgical trauma, infection, various cancers, inflammatory bowel disease, connective tissue diseases and autoimmune diseases. We also discuss evidence indicating chronic fatigue syndrome may have important pathophysiological similarities with cytokine mediated sickness behaviour, and what lessons can be applied from sickness behaviour to chronic fatigue syndrome with regards to the diagnosis and management.

  16. Early development of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome related to Pneumocystis pneumonia after antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Mok, Hoi Ping; Hart, Elizabeth; Venkatesan, Pradhib

    2014-04-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome is a recognized complication after the initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). We report a patient who developed life-threatening pulmonary immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) three days after initiation of cART. We reviewed published cases of IRIS after Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP), in particular the time from initiation of cART to IRIS event. The median duration from the initiation of cART to the onset of IRIS was 15 days in the 33 patients reviewed. This report alerts clinicians to the rapidity of the development of pulmonary IRIS following PCP after the initiation of cART.

  17. Infevers: an evolving mutation database for auto-inflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed

    Touitou, Isabelle; Lesage, Suzanne; McDermott, Michael; Cuisset, Laurence; Hoffman, Hal; Dode, Catherine; Shoham, Nitza; Aganna, Ebun; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Wise, Carol; Waterham, Hans; Pugnere, Denis; Demaille, Jacques; Sarrauste de Menthiere, Cyril

    2004-09-01

    The Infevers database (http://fmf.igh.cnrs.fr/infevers/) was established in 2002 to provide investigators with access to a central source of information about all sequence variants associated with periodic fevers: Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), TNF Receptor Associated Periodic Syndrome (TRAPS), Hyper IgD Syndrome (HIDS), Familial Cold Autoinflammatory Syndrome/Muckle-Wells Syndrome/Chronic Infantile Neurological Cutaneous and Articular Syndrome (FCAS/MWS/CINCA). The prototype of this group of disorders is FMF, a recessive disease characterized by recurrent bouts of unexplained inflammation. FMF is the pivotal member of an expanding family of autoinflammatory disorders, a new term coined to describe illnesses resulting from a defect of the innate immune response. Therefore, we decided to extend the Infevers database to genes connected with autoinflammatory diseases. We present here the biological content of the Infevers database, including the introduction of two new entries: Crohn/Blau and Pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA syndrome). Infevers has a range of query capabilities, allowing for simple or complex interrogation of the database. Currently, the database contains 291 sequence variants in related genes (MEFV, TNFRSF1A, MVK, CARD15, PSTPIP1, and CIAS1), consisting of published data and personal communications, which has revealed or refined the preferential mutational sites for each gene. This database will continue to evolve in its content and to improve in its presentation.

  18. Anti-inflammatory treatment of meconium aspiration syndrome: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Mokra, Daniela; Mokry, Juraj; Tonhajzerova, Ingrid

    2013-06-01

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is a major cause of respiratory insufficiency in the term and post-term newborns. There are several pathomechanisms participating in this disorder, particularly the airway obstruction, surfactant dysfunction, inflammation, lung edema, pulmonary vasoconstriction and bronchoconstriction. Inflammatory changes resulting from meconium aspiration cause severe impairment of lung parenchyma and surfactant, and influence the reactivity of both vascular and airway smooth muscle. Therefore, anti-inflammatory drugs may be of benefit in the management of MAS. This article reviews the pharmacological actions and side effects of various anti-inflammatory drugs used up to now in the experimental models of MAS and in the treatment of newborns with meconium aspiration.

  19. Blau syndrome, the prototypic auto-inflammatory granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Carine H; Maes, Anne; Foley, Kevin P; Bertin, John; Rose, Carlos D

    2014-01-01

    Blau syndrome is a monogenic disease resulting from mutations in the pattern recognition receptor NOD2, and is phenotypically characterized by the triad of granulomatous polyarthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. This paper reviews briefly the classical clinical features of the disease, as well as more recently described extra-triad symptoms. From an ongoing prospective multicenter study, we provide new data on the natural history of Blau syndrome, focusing on functional status and visual outcome. We also present an update of the range of different NOD2 mutations found in Blau syndrome as well as recent data on morphologic and immunohistochemical characteristics of the Blau granuloma. Finally, emerging insights into pathogenic mechanisms including activation of NOD2 signal transduction, and potential biomarkers of disease activity are discussed.

  20. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius infection associated with nodular skin lesions and systemic inflammatory response syndrome in a dog.

    PubMed

    Min, Sa-Hee; Kang, Min-Hee; Sur, Jung-Hyang; Park, Hee-Myung

    2014-05-01

    A 10-year-old Pekingese dog with atopic dermatitis was referred due to pyrexia, multiple skin nodules, anorexia, and depression. The dog was diagnosed as having systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) induced by bacterial dermatitis. This case presents diagnosis and treatment of SIRS with staphylococcal skin infection in a dog that was immunosuppressed due to long-term use of corticosteroid.

  1. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome presenting as secondary syphilis with polymorphous erythema and knee arthritis.

    PubMed

    Brochard, J; Khatchatourian, L; Woaye-Hune, P; Biron, C; Lefebvre, M; Denis-Musquer, M; Grange, P; Dupin, N; Raffi, F

    2017-03-08

    Syphilis and HIV are strongly linked to one another and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation can complicate matters. A 24-years-old homosexual man was hospitalized for fever, cough and headache. HIV infection had been diagnosed 5 years earlier but he discontinued ART for the last 2 years. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of inflammatory mediators in the pathophysiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Madhav; Moochhala, Shabbir

    2004-02-01

    Inflammatory response leading to organ dysfunction and failure continues to be the major problem after injury in many clinical conditions such as sepsis, severe burns, acute pancreatitis, haemorrhagic shock, and trauma. In general terms, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is an entirely normal response to injury. Systemic leukocyte activation, however, is a direct consequence of a SIRS and if excessive, can lead to distant organ damage and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). When SIRS leads to MODS and organ failure, the mortality becomes high and can be more than 50%. Acute lung injury that clinically manifests as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major component of MODS of various aetiologies. Inflammatory mediators play a key role in the pathogenesis of ARDS, which is the primary cause of death in these conditions. This review summarizes recent studies that demonstrate the critical role played by inflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, platelet activating factor (PAF), IL-10, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), C5a, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, substance P, chemokines, VEGF, IGF-I, KGF, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in the pathogenesis of ARDS. It is reasonable to speculate that elucidation of the key mediators in ARDS coupled with the discovery of specific inhibitors would make it possible to develop clinically effective anti-inflammatory therapy.

  3. Irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease overlap syndrome: pieces of the puzzle are falling into place

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Rani, Rafiz; Raja Ali, Raja Affendi

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a common gastrointestinal disorder involving the gut-brain axis, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a chronic relapsing inflammatory disorder, are both increasing in incidence and prevalence in Asia. Both have significant overlap in terms of symptoms, pathophysiology, and treatment, suggesting the possibility of IBS and IBD being a single disease entity albeit at opposite ends of the spectrum. We examined the similarities and differences in IBS and IBD, and offer new thoughts and approaches to the disease paradigm. PMID:27799880

  4. A review of the neuro- and systemic inflammatory responses in post concussion symptoms: Introduction of the "post-inflammatory brain syndrome" PIBS.

    PubMed

    Rathbone, Alasdair Timothy Llewelyn; Tharmaradinam, Surejini; Jiang, Shucui; Rathbone, Michel P; Kumbhare, Dinesh A

    2015-05-01

    Post-concussion syndrome is an aggregate of symptoms that commonly present together after head injury. These symptoms, depending on definition, include headaches, dizziness, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and cognitive impairment. However, these symptoms are common, occurring frequently in non-head injured controls, leading some to question the existence of post-concussion syndrome as a unique syndrome. Therefore, some have attempted to explain post-concussion symptoms as post-traumatic stress disorder, as they share many similar symptoms and post-traumatic stress disorder does not require head injury. This explanation falls short as patients with post-concussion syndrome do not necessarily experience many key symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. Therefore, other explanations must be sought to explain the prevalence of post-concussion like symptoms in non-head injury patients. Many of the situations in which post-concussion syndrome like symptoms may be experienced such as infection and post-surgery are associated with systemic inflammatory responses, and even neuroinflammation. Post-concussion syndrome itself has a significant neuroinflammatory component. In this review we examine the evidence of neuroinflammation in post-concussion syndrome and the potential role systemic inflammation plays in post-concussion syndrome like symptoms. We conclude that given the overlap between these conditions and the role of inflammation in their etiologies, a new term, post-inflammatory brain syndromes (PIBS), is necessary to describe the common outcomes of many different inflammatory insults. The concept of post-concussion syndrome is in its evolution therefore, the new term post-inflammatory brain syndromes provides a better understanding of etiology of its wide-array of symptoms and the wide array of conditions they can be seen in.

  5. POEMS Syndrome in a Juvenile Initially Diagnosed as Treatment Resistant Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Krish, Sonia N; Nguyen, Thy; Biliciler, Suur; Kumaravel, Manickam; Wahed, Amer; Risin, Semyon; Sheikh, Kazim A

    2015-12-01

    POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal protein, skin changes) is a disorder that mainly affects adults. We report a pediatric patient, initially considered to have Guillain-Barré syndrome, who continued to have progression of neuropathic disease leading to the diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Diagnosis of POEMS was established by an abnormal bone marrow biopsy, prompted by laboratory and imaging findings, which became abnormal later in the course of the disease. POEMS syndrome is extremely rare in children, and neuropathic features in this age group have not been previously described. This case illustrates that "Guillain-Barré syndrome-like" initial presentation for POEMS, which has not been previously reported. It also emphasizes that in children with progressive acquired neuropathies that are treatment unresponsive, POEMS syndrome should be considered.

  6. Cell surface adrenergic receptor stimulation modifies the endothelial response to SIRS. Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tighe, D; Moss, R; Bennett, D

    1996-11-01

    The complex pathway seen in patients with the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) does not readily respond to mediator blockade. All such trials conducted in SIRS patients have shown no benefit in reducing mortality. We have shown experimentally that in sepsis, the administration of beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists reduces hepatic cellular injury, whereas administration of an alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist increases hepatic cellular injury. Inflammatory mediators can cause a dose-related reversible change in target endothelial cells (ECs). There is a substantial body of literature describing the anti-inflammatory effects of beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. They reduce both the increased permeability and the production of inflammatory mediators from ECs. Cellular transduction processes are involved when adrenergic receptor agonists modify either the anti-inflammatory or proinflammatory response to sepsis in ECs. Inflammatory mediators and alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonists stimulate their trimeric G protein-linked receptors to produce diacylglycerol (DAG) and increase the intracellular concentration of calcium. DAG is involved in the production of both inflammatory proteins and lipids. In addition, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is activated which is also involved in the production of inflammatory proteins and lipids. beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists activate their trimeric G protein-linked receptors to produce the stimulatory G protein (Gs). Gs stimulates adenyl cyclase to form cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and activate protein kinase A (PKA). PKA is involved in activating gene transcription agents to produce anti-inflammatory proteins such as interleukin-10. PKA also inhibits phospholipase C and MAPK. Although promising, the use of beta-adrenoceptor agonists or agonists that increase cellular cAMP to activate the cells' endogenous anti-inflammatory pathway requires further study.

  7. [The sick building syndrome as a part of 'ASIA' (autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants)].

    PubMed

    Maoz-Segal, Ramit; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Israeli, Eitan; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-02-01

    The entity 'sick building syndrome' is poorly defined and comprises of a set of symptoms resulting from environmental exposure to a work or a living environment. The symptoms are mainly "allergic"-like and include nasal, eye, and mucous membrane irritation, dry skin as well as respiratory symptoms and general symptoms such as fatigue, lethargy, headaches and fever. The Autoimmune [Auto-inflammatory] Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants (ASIA) is a wider term which describes the role of various environmental factors in the pathogenesis of immune mediated diseases. Factors entailing an immune adjuvant activity such as infectious agents, silicone, aluminium salts and others were found in association with defined and non-defined immune mediated diseases. The sick building syndrome and ASIA share a similar complex of signs and symptoms and probably the same immunological mechanisms which further support a common denominator.

  8. Microparticles: Inflammatory and haemostatic biomarkers in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, L M L; Ferreira, C N; Sóter, M O; Sales, M F; Rodrigues, K F; Martins, S R; Candido, A L; Reis, F M; Silva, I F O; Campos, F M F; Gomes, K B

    2017-03-05

    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is associated with a chronic low-grade inflammation and predisposition to hemostatic and atherosclerotic complications. This case-control study evaluated the microparticles (MPs) profile in patients with the PCOS and related these MPs to clinical and biochemical parameters. MPs derived from platelets (PMPs), leuckocytes (LMPs) and endothelial cells (EMPs) were evaluated, as well as MPs expressing tissue factor (TFMPs), by flow cytometry, comparing women with PCOS (n = 50) and a healthy control group (n = 50). PCOS women presented increased total MPs, PMPs, LMPs and EMPs levels when compared to control group (all p < 0.05). TFMPs was similar between the groups (p = 0.379). In conclusion, these MPs populations could be useful biomarkers for association with thrombosis and cardiovascular disease in PCOS women.

  9. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS): where did it come from and is it still relevant today?

    PubMed

    Balk, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The concept of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) to describe the complex pathophysiologic response to an insult such as infection, trauma, burns, pancreatitis, or a variety of other injuries came from a 1991 consensus conference charged with the task of developing an easy-to-apply set of clinical parameters to aid in the early identification of potential candidates to enter into clinical trials to evaluate new treatments for sepsis. There was recognition that a diverse group of injuries produced a common inflammatory response in the host and provided attractive targets for new anti-inflammatory molecules designed to prevent further propagation and/or provide specific treatment. Effective application of these new anti-inflammatory strategies necessitated identification of early clinical markers that could be assessed in real-time and were likely to define a population of patients that would have a beneficial response to the targeted intervention. It was felt that early clinical manifestations might be more readily available to clinicians than more sophisticated and specific assays for inflammatory substances that were systemically released by the network of injurious inflammatory events. Therefore, the early definition of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) was built upon a foundation of basic clinical and laboratory abnormalities that were readily available in almost all clinical settings. With further refinement, it was hoped, that this definition would have a high degree of sensitivity, coupled with a reasonable degree of specificity. This manuscript reviews the derivation, application, utilization, potential benefits, and speculation regarding the future of the SIRS definition.

  10. [Target Molecule for a Demyelinating Type of Guillain-Barré Syndrome, Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Mori, Masahiro

    2015-11-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is classified into demyelinating type, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) and axonal form, acute axonal motor neuropathy (AMAN). It has been clearly established that the target molecule for the former is a ganglioside. In contrast, despite years of effort, the target molecule for the latter has not been identified. Recently, molecules around the nodes of Ranvier have entered the spotlight, and "moesin" was reported to be a target molecule for cytomegalovirus associated-AIDP.

  11. Quantitative Risk-Benefit Analysis of Probiotic Use for Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Bennett, William E

    2016-04-01

    Probiotics have seen widespread use for a variety of gastrointestinal problems, especially in two common disorders: irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. Since a wide variety of probiotic preparations has been used, and despite a large number of studies performed, a great deal of heterogeneity exists among them. Straightforward evidence-based recommendations for the use of probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease have thus been difficult to formulate. In an effort to improve understanding of the risk-benefit balance of probiotics in these conditions, this study (1) queried the US FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database for all reported adverse drug events related to probiotics in 2013, and (2) constructed risk-benefit planes for both irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease using a geometric approximation of the confidence region between risk and benefit. The results show that adverse events from probiotics vary widely by disease, and when they occur, they are mild and may be difficult to distinguish from the natural history of the underlying disorders they are used to treat. The risk-benefit plane for irritable bowel syndrome straddles the risk-benefit threshold, so patients can expect a balance between a low chance of risk and also a low chance of benefit. The risk-benefit plane for inflammatory bowel disease largely lies above the risk-benefit threshold, so patients may expect more benefit than risk in most cases. More standardized and high-quality research is needed to improve our understanding of risk and benefit for these complex biopharmaceuticals.

  12. Associations among Metabolic Syndrome, Ischemia, Inflammatory, Oxidatives, and Lipids Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Valle Gottlieb, Maria Gabriela; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica; Duarte, Marta M. F.; Moresco, Rafael Noal; Wiehe, Mário; Schwanke, Carla Helena Augustin; Bodanese, Luiz Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Context: Metabolic syndrome (MS) is described as a cluster of cardiometabolic risk factors. Studies suggest that ischemia-modified albumin (IMA) is a biomarker of cardiovascular diseases. IMA levels could be associated with cardiometabolic risks and represent a possible indication of microvascular dysfunction in MS patients. Objective: To confirm this possible association, we evaluated the association between IMA levels and MS. Design: We performed a case-control study (32 healthy individuals and 74 subjects with MS) to evaluate the association between MS, IMA, and other biomarkers [high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL), oxidized low-density lipoprotein autoantibodies (anti-OxLDL), IL-6, lipid profile, and glucose]. Results: The MS group showed higher levels of IMA (0.618 ± 0.1355) as well as higher levels of hs-CRP, OxLDL, anti-OxLDL, and IL-6 than did control subjects (IMA = 0.338 ± 0.0486) (P < 0.01). Multivariate analysis showed that IMA and MS association was independent of sex, age, diabetes mellitus 2, and hypercholesterolemia. Conclusion: We found an association between IMA and MS. Additional studies including prospective genetic variation approaches need to be performed to help elucidate this association between IMA and MS and its potential clinical role. PMID:20016051

  13. Pathology in euthermic bats with white nose syndrome suggests a natural manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meteyer, Carol U.; Barber, Daniel; Mandl, Judith N.

    2012-01-01

    White nose syndrome, caused by Geomyces destructans, has killed more than 5 million cave hibernating bats in eastern North America. During hibernation, the lack of inflammatory cell recruitment at the site of fungal infection and erosion is consistent with a temperature-induced inhibition of immune cell trafficking. This immune suppression allows G. destructans to colonize and erode the skin of wings, ears and muzzle of bat hosts unchecked. Yet, paradoxically, within weeks of emergence from hibernation an intense neutrophilic inflammatory response to G. destructans is generated, causing severe pathology that can contribute to death. We hypothesize that the sudden reversal of immune suppression in bats upon the return to euthermia leads to a form of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), which was first described in HIV-infected humans with low helper T lymphocyte counts and bacterial or fungal opportunistic infections. IRIS is a paradoxical and rapid worsening of symptoms in immune compromised humans upon restoration of immunity in the face of an ongoing infectious process. In humans with HIV, the restoration of adaptive immunity following suppression of HIV replication with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) can trigger severe immune-mediated tissue damage that can result in death. We propose that the sudden restoration of immune responses in bats infected with G. destructans results in an IRIS-like dysregulated immune response that causes the post-emergent pathology.

  14. Acute inflammatory bowel disease complicating chronic alcoholism and mimicking carcinoid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ballo, Piercarlo; Dattolo, Pietro; Mangialavori, Giuseppe; Ferro, Giuseppe; Fusco, Francesca; Consalvo, Matteo; Chiodi, Leandro; Pizzarelli, Francesco; Zuppiroli, Alfredo

    2012-05-01

    We report the case of a woman with a history of chronic alcohol abuse who was hospitalized with diarrhea, severe hypokalemia refractory to potassium infusion, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, alternations of high blood pressure with phases of hypotension, irritability and increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and cortisol. Although carcinoid syndrome was hypothesized, abdominal computed tomography and colonoscopy showed non-specific inflammatory bowel disease with severe colic wall thickening, and multiple colic biopsies confirmed non-specific inflammation with no evidence of carcinoid cells. During the following days diarrhea slowly decreased and the patient's condition progressively improved. One year after stopping alcohol consumption, the patient was asymptomatic and serum potassium was normal. Chronic alcohol exposure is known to have several deleterious effects on the intestinal mucosa and can favor and sustain local inflammation. Chronic alcohol intake may also be associated with high blood pressure, behavior disorders, abnormalities in blood pressure regulation with episodes of hypotension during hospitalization due to impaired baroreflex sensitivity in the context of an alcohol withdrawal syndrome, increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid as a result of malabsorption syndrome, and increased urinary cortisol as a result of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation. These considerations, together with the regression of symptoms and normalization of potassium levels after stopping alcohol consumption, suggest the intriguing possibility of a alcohol-related acute inflammatory bowel disease mimicking carcinoid syndrome.

  15. Acute Inflammatory Bowel Disease Complicating Chronic Alcoholism and Mimicking Carcinoid Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ballo, Piercarlo; Dattolo, Pietro; Mangialavori, Giuseppe; Ferro, Giuseppe; Fusco, Francesca; Consalvo, Matteo; Chiodi, Leandro; Pizzarelli, Francesco; Zuppiroli, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a woman with a history of chronic alcohol abuse who was hospitalized with diarrhea, severe hypokalemia refractory to potassium infusion, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, alternations of high blood pressure with phases of hypotension, irritability and increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and cortisol. Although carcinoid syndrome was hypothesized, abdominal computed tomography and colonoscopy showed non-specific inflammatory bowel disease with severe colic wall thickening, and multiple colic biopsies confirmed non-specific inflammation with no evidence of carcinoid cells. During the following days diarrhea slowly decreased and the patient's condition progressively improved. One year after stopping alcohol consumption, the patient was asymptomatic and serum potassium was normal. Chronic alcohol exposure is known to have several deleterious effects on the intestinal mucosa and can favor and sustain local inflammation. Chronic alcohol intake may also be associated with high blood pressure, behavior disorders, abnormalities in blood pressure regulation with episodes of hypotension during hospitalization due to impaired baroreflex sensitivity in the context of an alcohol withdrawal syndrome, increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid as a result of malabsorption syndrome, and increased urinary cortisol as a result of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation. These considerations, together with the regression of symptoms and normalization of potassium levels after stopping alcohol consumption, suggest the intriguing possibility of a alcohol-related acute inflammatory bowel disease mimicking carcinoid syndrome. PMID:22949895

  16. Multiphasic and multifocal cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in an HIV-infected patient: interplay of infection and immunity.

    PubMed

    Katchanov, Juri; Zimmermann, Ulrike; Branding, Gordian; Tintelnot, Kathrin; Müller, Markus; Arastéh, Keikawus; Stocker, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome affecting the lungs, and 10 months later the cervical lymph nodes, in the absence of cryptococcal meningitis, in advanced HIV infection. Our report demonstrates the organ-specificity of the timing of the inflammatory response and illustrates the organ-specific interplay of immunity and infection in cryptococcal disease.

  17. Human adjuvant-related syndrome or autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants. Where have we come from? Where are we going? A proposal for new diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Alijotas-Reig, J

    2015-09-01

    In 1964, Miyoshi reported a series of patients with diverse symptoms after receiving treatment with silicone or paraffin fillers. Miyoshi named this condition 'human adjuvant disease'. Since then, the literature has been flooded with case reports and case series of granulomatous and systemic autoimmune disorders related to vaccines, infection or other adjuvants such as silicone and other biomaterials. A new term -autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants--has recently been coined for a process that includes several clinical features previously described by Miyoshi plus other clinical and laboratory parameters related to exposure to diverse external stimuli. Disorders such as siliconosis, Gulf War syndrome, macrophagic myofasciitis syndrome, sick building syndrome and post-vaccination syndrome have been included in autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants. Disorders such as Spanish toxic oil syndrome and Ardystil syndrome could also be included. Furthermore, biomaterials other than silicone should also be considered as triggering factors for these adjuvant-related syndromes. New diagnostic criteria in this field have been proposed. Nevertheless, many of these criteria are too subjective, leading to some patients being diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome or other 'central sensitization syndromes'. Diagnostic criteria based only on objective clinical and laboratory data to be further discussed and validated are proposed herein.

  18. Rhodoccocus Equi Pneumonia and Paradoxical Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome in a Patient with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS)

    PubMed Central

    Zijoo, Ritika; Dirweesh, Ahmed; Karabulut, Nigahus

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 47 Final Diagnosis: Rhodococcus equi pneumonia • paradoxical immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome Symptoms: Cough • fever • shorthness of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Pulmonary infections are a major cause of mortality and morbidity in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and can progress rapidly to respiratory failure and death without appropriate therapy. Herein, we present a rare case of an advanced HIV infection and Rhodoccocus equi (R. equi) pneumonia in a young male who had severe paradoxical immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Case Report: A 47-year-old nonsmoking Hispanic man with advanced HIV infection presented with severe acute necrotizing pneumonia secondary to R. equi. Although his initial response to antimicrobial therapy was optimal, he became symptomatic again in spite of continuation of antibiotics as he developed severe paradoxical IRIS 3 weeks after starting a new highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). Conclusions: The diagnosis of IRIS remains challenging because of the wide variations in the clinical presentation and etiologies. In spite of its rarity as an opportunistic pathogen, we recommend that R. equi, an intracellular pathogen, be included in the differential list of pathogens associated with IRIS. PMID:28100903

  19. Inflammatory myopathy in a patient with Aicardi-Goutières syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tumienė, Birutė; Voisin, Norine; Preikšaitienė, Eglė; Petroška, Donatas; Grikinienė, Jurgita; Samaitienė, Rūta; Utkus, Algirdas; Reymond, Alexandre; Kučinskas, Vaidutis

    2017-03-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is an inflammatory disorder belonging to the recently characterized group of type I interferonopathies. The most consistently affected tissues in AGS are the central nervous system and skin, but various organ systems and tissues have been reported to be affected, pointing to the systemic nature of the disease. Here we describe a patient with AGS due to a homozygous p.Arg114His mutation in the TREX1 gene. The histologically proven inflammatory myopathy in our patient expands the range of clinical features of AGS. Histological signs of muscle biopsies in the proband, and in two other AGS patients described earlier, are similar to those seen in various autoimmune myositises and could be ascribed to inapproapriate IFN I activation. In view of signs of possible mitochondrial damage in AGS, we propose that mitochondrial DNA could be a trigger of autoimmune responses in AGS.

  20. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection triggers HMGB1 release to promote inflammatory cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Erzhen; Wang, Dang; Luo, Rui; Luo, Jingyi; Gao, Li; Chen, Huanchun; Fang, Liurong Xiao, Shaobo

    2014-11-15

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is an endogenous damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule involved in the pathogenesis of various infectious agents. Based on meta-analysis of all publicly available microarray datasets, HMGB1 has recently been proposed as the most significant immune modulator during the porcine response to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. However, the function of HMGB1 in PRRSV pathogenesis is unclear. In this study, we found that PRRSV infection triggers the translocation of HMGB1 from the nucleus to the extracellular milieu in MARC-145 cells and porcine alveolar macrophages. Although HMGB1 has no effect on PRRSV replication, HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and subsequent expression of inflammatory cytokines through receptors RAGE, TLR2 and TLR4. Our findings show that HMGB1 release, triggered by PRRSV infection, enhances the efficiency of virus-induced inflammatory responses, thereby providing new insights into the pathogenesis of PRRSV infection. - Highlights: • PRRSV infection triggers HMGB1 release from MARC-145 cells and PAMs. • HMGB1 does not significantly affect PRRSV proliferation. • HMGB1 is involved in PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and inflammatory responses. • HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced inflammatory responses through TLR2/4 and RAGE.

  1. Successful Treatment of immune Reconstitution Inflammatory syndrome-related Hemophagocytic Syndrome in an HIV Patient with Primary Effusion Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zorzou, Markela-P.; Chini, Maria; Lioni, Athina; Tsekes, Georgios; Nitsotolis, Thomas; Tierris, Ioannis; Panagiotou, Nicolaos; Rontogianni, Dimitra; Harhalakis, Nicolaos; Lazanas, Marios

    2016-01-01

    Although the connection of [secondary hemophagocytic syndrome (sHS)] with HIV has been well documented, optimal treatment regimen is not well established. This is due not only to the rarity of the syndrome, but also to the heterogeneity of the involved population. Most cases are related to opportunistic infections or malignancies in advanced stage, but many cases are also related to seroconversion, in the primary infection setting. Moreover, in the [antiretroviral treatment (ART)] era, rare cases of ART-related sHS have been reported. In these, often fatal cases, an [immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS)] process is involved, posing a serious challenge to the treating physician. We hereby report a case of successful treatment of an HIV patient with primary effusion lymphoma who experienced sHS shortly after ART onset. Our patient, treated with high dose dexamethasone and gamma globulin, achieved complete remission. This case might hint possible therapeutic insights in the treatment of IRIS-related sHS. PMID:28090281

  2. Cytokine profile in PFAPA syndrome suggests continuous inflammation and reduced anti-inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Stojanov, Silvia; Hoffmann, Florian; Kéry, Anja; Renner, Ellen D; Hartl, Dominik; Lohse, Peter; Huss, Kristina; Fraunberger, Peter; Malley, James D; Zellerer, Stephanie; Albert, Michael H; Belohradsky, Bernd H

    2006-06-01

    PFAPA syndrome is characterized by periodic episodes of high fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and/or cervical adenitis. It is of unknown etiology and manifests usually before 5 years of age. We determined serum and intracellular cytokine levels in six PFAPA patients (4 males, 2 females, mean age 8 years (+/- 1.2 SEM), range 4-13) during the symptom-free period as well as 6-12 hours and 18-24 hours after fever onset. Values were compared to age-matched, healthy controls. Febrile PFAPA attacks led to a significant increase in IL-6 and IFN-gamma serum concentrations compared to symptom-free periods and to controls, with IL-1beta, TNF-alpha and IL-12p70 levels being significantly higher than in controls. Lymphocytic IFN-gamma and CD8+ IL-2 production was consistently significantly elevated compared to healthy children. During the asymptomatic period, serum concentrations of IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha and IL-12p70 were significantly increased compared to controls. Intracellular TNF-alpha synthesis was not elevated at any time point. Soluble TNFRp55 levels were even lower in between febrile episodes, reaching values comparable to controls during attacks, whereas soluble TNFRp75 levels increased during attacks compared to healthy children. Anti-inflammatory IL-4 in serum was at all times lower in PFAPA patients compared to controls with no difference in levels of intracellular IL-4 and IL-10 or serum IL-10. The observed increase of pro-inflammatory mediators, even between febrile attacks, suggests a dysregulation of the immune response in PFAPA syndrome, with continuous pro-inflammatory cytokine activation and a reduced anti-inflammatory response.

  3. Metabolic syndrome, activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and inflammatory mediators in depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Martinac, Marko; Pehar, Davor; Karlović, Dalibor; Babić, Dragan; Marcinko, Darko; Jakovljević, Miro

    2014-03-01

    Depression has been associated with various cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension, obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia. In depressive disorder, hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and changes in the immune system have been observed. On the other hand, somatic diseases such as obesity, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and diabetes mellitus type 2 are now perceived as important comorbid conditions in patients with depression. The pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome and depression is complex and poorly researched; however, it is considered that the interaction of chronic stress, psychotrauma, hypercotisolism and disturbed immune functions contribute to the development of these disorders. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between depression and metabolic syndrome regarding the HPA axis dysfunction and altered inflammatory processes. Literature search in Medline and other databases included articles written in English published between 1985 and 2012. Analysis of the literature was conducted using a systematic approach with the search terms such as depression, metabolic syndrome, inflammation, cytokines, glucocorticoids, cortisol, and HPA axis. In conclusion, the relationship between depression and metabolic syndrome is still a subject of controversy. Further prospective studies are required to clarify the possible causal relationship between depression and metabolic syndrome and its components. Furthermore, it is important to explore the possibility of a common biologic mechanism in the pathogenesis of these two disorders, in which special attention should be paid to the immune system function, especially the possible specific mechanisms by which cytokines can induce and maintain depressive symptoms and metabolic disorders. The data presented here emphasize the importance of recognition and treatment of depressive disorders with consequent reduction in the incidence of metabolic syndrome, but

  4. Glycyrrhizin inhibits the manifestations of anti-inflammatory responses that appear in association with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS)-like reactions.

    PubMed

    Takei, Miwa; Kobayashi, Makiko; Herndon, David N; Pollard, Richard B; Suzuki, Fujio

    2006-09-01

    In association with the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), anti-inflammatory response syndrome is commonly manifested in patients with trauma, burn injury, and after major surgery. These patients are increasingly susceptible to infection with various pathogens due to the excessive release of anti-inflammatory cytokines from anti-inflammatory effector cells. Recently, CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) found in the sera of mice with pancreatitis was identified as an active molecule for SIRS-associated anti-inflammatory response manifestation. Also, the inhibitory activity of glycyrrhizin (GL) on CCL2 production was reported. Therefore, the effect of GL on SIRS-associated anti-inflammatory response manifestation was investigated in a murine SIRS model. Without any stimulation, splenic T cells from mice 5 days after SIRS induction produced cytokines associated with anti-inflammatory response manifestation. However, these cytokines were not produced by splenic T cells from SIRS mice previously treated with GL. In dual-chamber transwells, IL-4-producing cells were generated from normal T cells cultured with peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from SIRS mice. However, IL-4-producing cells were not generated from normal T cells in transwell cultures performed with PMN from GL-treated SIRS mice. CCL2 was produced by PMN from SIRS mice, while this chemokine was not demonstrated in cultures of PMN from SIRS mice treated with GL. These results indicate that GL has the capacity to suppress SIRS-associated anti-inflammatory response manifestation through the inhibition of CCL2 production by PMN.

  5. Associations of Amylin with Inflammatory Markers and Metabolic Syndrome in Apparently Healthy Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zongmeng; Mou, Haiwei; Yu, Zhijie; Li, Huaixing; Jiang, Peizhen; Yu, Danxia; Wu, Hongyu; Ye, Xingwang; Lin, Xu; Le, Yingying

    2011-01-01

    Background Cellular and animal studies implicate multiple roles of amylin in regulating insulin action, glucose and lipid metabolisms. However, the role of amylin in obesity related metabolic disorders has not been thoroughly investigated in humans. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the distribution of circulating amylin and its association with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and explore if this association is influenced by obesity, inflammatory markers or insulin resistance in apparently healthy Chinese. Methods A population-based sample of 1,011 Chinese men and women aged 35–54 years was employed to measure plasma amylin, inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein [CRP] and interleukin-6 [IL-6]), insulin, glucose and lipid profiles. MetS was defined according to the updated National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria for Asian-Americans. Results Plasma amylin concentrations were higher in overweight/obese participants than normal-weight counterparts (P<0.001) without sex difference. Circulating amylin was positively associated with CRP, IL-6, BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose, insulin, amylin/insulin ratio, HOMA-IR, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, while negatively associated with HDL cholesterol (all P<0.001). After multiple adjustments, the risk of MetS was significantly higher (odds ratio 3.71; 95% confidence interval: 2.53 to 5.46) comparing the highest with the lowest amylin quartile. The association remained significant even further controlling for BMI, inflammatory markers, insulin or HOMA-IR. Conclusions Our study suggests that amylin is strongly associated with inflammatory markers and MetS. The amylin-MetS association is independent of established risk factors of MetS, including obesity, inflammatory markers and insulin resistance. The causal role of hyperamylinemia in the development of MetS needs to be confirmed prospectively. PMID:21935471

  6. Intravenous Immunoglobulin with Enhanced Polyspecificity Improves Survival in Experimental Sepsis and Aseptic Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Djoumerska-Alexieva, Iglika; Roumenina, Lubka; Pashov, Anastas; Dimitrov, Jordan; Hadzhieva, Maya; Lindig, Sandro; Voynova, Elisaveta; Dimitrova, Petya; Ivanovska, Nina; Bockmeyer, Clemens; Stefanova, Zvetanka; Fitting, Catherine; Bläss, Markus; Claus, Ralf; von Gunten, Stephan; Kaveri, Srini; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Bauer, Michael; Vassilev, Tchavdar

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause for death worldwide. Numerous interventional trials with agents neutralizing single proinflammatory mediators have failed to improve survival in sepsis and aseptic systemic inflammatory response syndromes. This failure could be explained by the widespread gene expression dysregulation known as “genomic storm” in these patients. A multifunctional polyspecific therapeutic agent might be needed to thwart the effects of this storm. Licensed pooled intravenous immunoglobulin preparations seemed to be a promising candidate, but they have also failed in their present form to prevent sepsis-related death. We report here the protective effect of a single dose of intravenous immunoglobulin preparations with additionally enhanced polyspecificity in three models of sepsis and aseptic systemic inflammation. The modification of the pooled immunoglobulin G molecules by exposure to ferrous ions resulted in their newly acquired ability to bind some proinflammatory molecules, complement components and endogenous “danger” signals. The improved survival in endotoxemia was associated with serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines, diminished complement consumption and normalization of the coagulation time. We suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin preparations with additionally enhanced polyspecificity have a clinical potential in sepsis and related systemic inflammatory syndromes. PMID:26701312

  7. Common links between metabolic syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease: Current overview and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Michalak, Arkadiusz; Mosińska, Paula; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) features a constellation of central obesity, dyslipidemia, impaired glucose metabolism and often hypertension joined by insulin resistance and chronic inflammation. All these elements greatly raise patient's risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, resulting in an increased mortality. Metabolic syndrome affects approximately 20-25% of the world's adult population and thus it is essential to study its pathophysiology and seek new pharmacological targets. There is a thoroughly studied link between MS and inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) system, i.e. steatohepatitis. However, recent findings also indicate similarities in pathophysiological features between MS and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including adipose tissue dysregulation, inadequate immune response, and inflammation. In this review we aim to outline the pathophysiology of MS and emphasize the aspects revealed recently, such as mineralocorticoid activity, involvement of sex hormones and an accompanying increase in prolactin secretion. More importantly, we focus on the common links between MS and IBD. Finally, we describe new strategies and drug targets that may be utilized in MS therapy, namely adiponectin mimetics, GLP-1-based multi agonists, ABCA1 agonists and possible role of miRNA. We also discuss the possible utility of selected agents as adjuvants in IBD therapy.

  8. Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome Occurring in a Kidney Transplant Patient with Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ledesma, Kandria Jumil; Liu, Jessie

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) occurring in solid organ transplantation (SOT) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality usually due to delays in diagnosis, drug toxicity encountered with antimycobacterial therapy, and drug-drug interactions. TB in SOT patients may mimic other infectious and noninfectious posttransplant complications such as posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) and systemic cytomegalovirus infection. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is a host response resulting in paradoxical worsening of an infectious disease which occurs after the employment of effective therapy and reversal of an immunosuppressed state. We describe the development of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), a unique complication occurring during the treatment of extrapulmonary tuberculosis occurring after transplant which resulted from decreasing immunosuppression in a patient who received Alemtuzumab induction therapy. Although (IRIS) has been originally described in HIV/AIDS patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), solid organ transplant recipients with diagnosed or occult TB whose immune system may undergo immune reconstitution during their posttransplant course represent a new high risk group. PMID:28367350

  9. A Pro-Inflammatory Role for Nuclear Factor Kappa B in Childhood Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Israel, Lee P.; Benharoch, Daniel; Gopas, Jacob; Goldbart, Aviv D.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Childhood obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with an elevation of inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein (CRP) that correlates with specific morbidities and subsides following intervention. In adults, OSAS is associated with activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB). We explored the mechanisms underlying NF-kB activation, based on the hypothesis that specific NF-kB signaling is activated in children with OSAS. Design: Adenoid and tonsillar tissues from children with OSAS and matched controls were immunostained against NF-kB classical (p65 and p50) and alternative (RelB and p52) pathway subunits, and NF-kB-dependent cytokines: interleukin (IL)- 1α, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-8). Serum CRP levels were measured in all subjects. NF-kB induction was evaluated by a luciferase-NF-kB reporter assay in L428 cells constitutively expressing NF-kB and in Jurkat cells with inducible NF-kB expression. p65 translocation to the nucleus, reflecting NF-kB activation, was measured in cells expressing fluorescent NF-kB-p65-GFP (green fluorescent protein). Setting: Sleep research laboratory. Patients or Participants: Twenty-five children with OSAS and 24 without OSAS. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Higher expression of IL-1α and classical NF-kB subunits p65 and p50 was observed in adenoids and tonsils of children with OSAS. Patient serum induced NF-kB activity, as measured by a luciferase-NF-kB reporter assay and by induction of p65 nuclear translocation in cells permanently transfected with GFP-p65 plasmid. IL-1β showed increased epithelial expression in OSAS tissues. Conclusions: Nuclear factor kappa B is locally and systemically activated in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. This observation may motivate the search for new anti-inflammatory strategies for controlling nuclear factor kappa B activation in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Citation: Israel LP

  10. Anti-Inflammatory Dietary Combo in Overweight and Obese Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Amany Alsayed; Amine, Ezzat Khamis; Salem, Hesham Abd Elfattah; Abd El Fattah, Nesrin Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is of clinical and public health importance, affecting up to one in five women of reproductive age. It has significant and diverse clinical implications including reproductive, metabolic, and psychological features. Aim: The study was to investigate the effect of anti-inflammatory dietary combo on metabolic, endocrine, inflammatory, and reproductive profiles in overweight and obese women with PCOS. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 nonpregnant, overweight, and obese adult females with PCOS according to the Rotterdam criteria, were screened during the year 2012, and 75 completed the trial. At baseline and study end, fasting blood samples were drawn to measure biological markers, body fat percent (BFP), and visceral fat area (VFA) were assessed by the InBody720 device and anthropometric measurements were done for all participants who were subjected to an anti-inflammatory hypocaloric diet and physical activity for 12 weeks. Results: At study completion, we achieved moderate weight loss of (± 7%) and significant improvements in body composition, hormones and menstrual cyclicity, blood pressure, glucose homeostasis, dyslipidemia, C-reactive protein (CRP), and serum amyloid A (SAA) (surrogate measures of cardiovascular risk (CVR)). This was a clinically relevant weight loss that is associated with a reduced prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) and metabolic syndrome (MS) in the general population and improved fertility outcomes in PCOS. We achieved 63% regain of menstrual cyclicity and 12% spontaneous pregnancy rate within 12 week. Conclusions: We have explored an additional dietary treatment option with good prognostic metabolic and reproductive responses to weight loss that occur in overweight and obese PCOS. PMID:26258078

  11. High Intensity Interval Training Reduces the Levels of Serum Inflammatory Cytokine on Women with Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Steckling, F M; Farinha, J B; Santos, D L D; Bresciani, G; Mortari, J A; Stefanello, S T; Courtes, A A; Duarte, T; Duarte, M M M F; Moresco, R N; Cardoso, M S; Soares, F A A

    2016-11-01

    Objectives: This study investigate the effects of a high intensity interval training (HIIT) and 2 weeks of detraining in functional and body composition parameters, lipoproteins, glucose metabolismand inflammation markers in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome (MS). Design: 17 untrained women with MS underwent a HIIT program for 12 weeks. Methods: The training was performed in treadmills, 3 days per week, with intensity ranging from 70-90% of the maximum heart rate (HRmax) and 2 weeks untrained (inactive). Functional and body composition parameters were evaluated before and after the training, while maximal oxygen uptake, lipoprotein and inflammation markers were analyzed before, after training and also in detraining. Results: The HITT program resulted in changesparameters as glucose, HbA1cand NOx after training. In addition, a reduction in pro-inflammatory interleukins and an increase in IL-10 after the HIIT program were found. However, an increase in plasma levels of lipoprotein was found and body composition parameters remain unaltered.Besides, only 2 weeks of detraining are able to revert the effects on inflammatory parameters afforded by the HIIT program. Conclusions: The HIIT program used here positively affected inflammatory profile and other parameters, as glucose, HbA1cand NOx, on postmenopausal women with MS. Moreover, 2 weeks of detraining can reverse the beneficial effects of HIIT program. Our results point out the necessity to aply acontinuous HITT program, in order maintain the benefits detected, to post menopausal women with MS.

  12. Inflammatory and Antioxidant Pattern Unbalance in “Clopidogrel-Resistant” Patients during Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Anna Maria; Cecchettini, Antonella; Parodi, Guido; Marcucci, Rossella; Parolini, Marina; Romagnuolo, Ilaria; Citti, Lorenzo; Abbate, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    Background. In acute coronary syndrome (ACS), inflammation and redox response are associated with increased residual platelet reactivity (RPR) on clopidogrel therapy. We investigated whether clopidogrel interaction affects platelet function and modulates factors related to inflammation and oxidation in ACS patients differently responding to clopidogrel. Material and Methods. Platelet aggregation was measured in 29 ACS patients on dual (aspirin/clopidogrel) antiplatelet therapy. Nonresponders (NR) were defined as RPR ≥70% by ADP. Several inflammatory and redox parameters were assayed and platelet proteome was determined. Results. Eight (28%) out of 29 ACS patients resulted NR to clopidogrel. At 24 hours, the levels of Th2-type cytokines IL-4, IFNγ, and MCP-1 were higher in NR, while blood GSH (r-GSHbl) levels were lower in NR than responders (R). Proteomic analysis evidenced an upregulated level of platelet adhesion molecule, CD226, and a downregulation of the antioxidant peroxiredoxin-4. In R patients the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 decreased, while the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-1Ra increased. Conclusions. In patients with high RPR on clopidogrel therapy, an unbalance of inflammatory factors, platelet adhesion molecules, and circulatory and platelet antioxidant molecules was observed during the acute phase. Proinflammatory milieu persists in nonresponders for a long time after the acute event while antioxidant blood factors tend to conform to normal responsiveness. PMID:25873769

  13. Elevated Circulating Levels of Inflammatory Markers in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Al Shahi, Hamad; Shimada, Kazunori; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Yoshihara, Takuma; Sai, Eiryu; Shiozawa, Tomoyuki; Naito, Ryo; Aikawa, Tatsuro; Ouchi, Shohei; Kadoguchi, Tomoyasu; Miyazaki, Tetsuro; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Objective. We evaluated inflammatory cytokines and chemokine in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in patients with either acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods. We enrolled 20 ACS patients and 50 stable CAD patients without previous history of ACS who underwent cardiac catheterization. Patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of ≤30 mL/min/1.73 m2 and C-reactive protein of ≥1.0 mg/dL were excluded. Blood samples were collected from the patients just before catheterization, and PBMCs were isolated from the whole blood. The levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokine were measured by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoassays. Results. The expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin- (IL-) 6, IL-10, IL-23A, IL-27, and IL-37 was significantly higher in the ACS group than in the CAD group (P < 0.05). In contrast, the expression of IL-33 was significantly lower in the ACS group than in the CAD group (P < 0.05). The ACS patients had higher plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 in the ACS group than in the CAD group. Conclusion. Circulating levels of pro-/anti-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-23A, IL-27, IL-33, and IL-37, may be associated with the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in ACS patients. PMID:26504600

  14. Hemiconvulsion-Hemiplegia-Epilepsy syndrome associated with inflammatory-degenerative hystopathological findings in child with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Serino, Domenico; Camassei, Francesca Diomedi; Delalande, Olivier; Marras, Carlo E; Specchio, Nicola; Vigevano, Federico; Fusco, Lucia

    2014-05-01

    Hemiconvulsion-Hemiplegia (HH) syndrome represents an uncommon consequence of prolonged unilateral clonic or hemiconvulsive status epilepticus in childhood, usually occurring during a febrile illness, followed by ipsilateral hemiplegia. The subsequent appearance of focal seizures configures the so called Hemiconvulsion-Hemiplegia-Epilepsy (HHE) syndrome. The pathogenesis of HH/HHE syndrome is still unclear. We describe the case of a 4 year-old girl with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) whom developed HH/HHE syndrome with drug resistant seizures at the age of 21 months and underwent left cerebral hemispherotomy at the age of 3 years and 6 months. Histopathological findings showed the presence of an underlying inflammatory-degenerative process. Disregulation of the inflammatory cascade has been proposed as one of the possible pathogenetic mechanisms underlying HH/HHE syndrome. To our knowledge however, this is the first report of an association with a histologically documented inflammatory process. The clinical and histopathological findings of our reported case lend support to the possible role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of HH/HHE syndrome.

  15. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Breen, Elizabeth Crabb

    2002-09-01

    In persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and/or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the immune system becomes dysfunctional in many ways. There is both immunodeficiency due to the loss of CD4-positive T helper cells and hyperactivity as a result of B-cell activation. Likewise, both decreases and increases are seen in the production and/or activity of cytokines. Cytokine changes in HIV infection have been assessed by a variety of techniques, ranging from determination of cytokine gene expression at the mRNA level to secretion of cytokine proteins in vivo and in vitro. Changes in cytokine levels in HIV-infected persons can affect the function of the immune system, and have the potential to directly impact the course of HIV disease by enhancing or suppressing HIV replication. In particular, the balance between the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, which up-regulate HIV expression, and IL-10, which can act both as an anti-inflammatory cytokine and a B-cell stimulatory factor, may play an important role in the progression to AIDS. In light of its ability to suppress the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and, under some conditions, suppress HIV replication, increased IL-10 may be viewed as beneficial in slowing HIV disease progression. However, an association between increased IL-10 and the development of AIDS-associated B-cell lymphoma highlights the bifunctional nature of IL-10 as both an anti-inflammatory and B-cell-stimulatory cytokine that could have beneficial and detrimental effects on the course of HIV infection and AIDS.

  16. Deficiency of interleukin-1-receptor antagonist syndrome: a rare auto-inflammatory condition that mimics multiple classic radiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Thacker, Paul G; Binkovitz, Larry A; Thomas, Kristen B

    2012-04-01

    Deficiency of interleukin-1-receptor antagonist (DIRA) syndrome is a newly identified inflammatory disease of the skeleton and appendicular soft tissues presenting in early infancy that has yet to be reported in the radiology literature. The radiological manifestations of DIRA syndrome include multifocal osteitis of the ribs and long bones, heterotopic ossification and periarticular soft-tissue swelling. Thus, the pediatric radiologist should be made aware of this novel disease because its radiographic findings can mimic multiple other disease entities. With knowledge of the unique clinical presentation of DIRA syndrome and its multiple radiographic manifestations, the pediatric radiologist may be the first to suggest the correct diagnosis.

  17. Autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA)--animal models as a proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Tapias, Paola; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Israeli, Eitan; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-01-01

    ASIA syndrome, "Autoimmune (Auto-inflammatory) Syndromes Induced by Adjuvants" includes at least four conditions which share a similar complex of signs and symptoms and have been defined by hyperactive immune responses: siliconosis, macrophagic myofasciitis syndrome, Gulf war syndrome and post-vaccination phenomena. Exposure to adjuvants has been documented in these four medical conditions, suggesting that the common denominator to these syndromes is a trigger entailing adjuvant activity. An important role of animal models in proving the ASIA concept has been established. Experimentally animal models of autoimmune diseases induced by adjuvants are currently widely used to understand the mechanisms and etiology and pathogenesis of these diseases and might thus promote the development of new diagnostic, predictive and therapeutic methods. In the current review we wish to unveil the variety of ASIA animal models associated with systemic and organ specific autoimmune diseases induced by adjuvants. We included in this review animal models for rheumatoid arthritis-like disease, for systemic lupus erythematosus-like disease, autoimmune thyroid disease-like disease, antiphospholipid syndrome, myocarditis and others. All these models support the concept of ASIA, as the Autoimmune (Auto-inflammatory) Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants.

  18. Cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in HIV-1-infected individuals: proposed clinical case definitions.

    PubMed

    Haddow, Lewis J; Colebunders, Robert; Meintjes, Graeme; Lawn, Stephen D; Elliott, Julian H; Manabe, Yukari C; Bohjanen, Paul R; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Easterbrook, Philippa J; French, Martyn A; Boulware, David R

    2010-11-01

    Cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) may present as a clinical worsening or new presentation of cryptococcal disease after initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART), and is thought to be caused by recovery of cryptococcus-specific immune responses. We have reviewed reports of cryptococcal IRIS and have developed a consensus case definition specifically for paradoxical crytopcoccal IRIS in patients with HIV-1 and known cryptococcal disease before ART, and a separate definition for incident cryptococcosis developed during ART (termed ART-associated cryptococcosis), for which a proportion of cases are likely to be unmasking cryptococcal IRIS. These structured case definitions are intended to aid design of future clinical, epidemiological, and immunopathological studies of cryptococcal IRIS, to standardise diagnostic criteria, and to facilitate comparisons between studies. As for definitions of tuberculosis-associated IRIS, definitions for cryptococcal IRIS should be regarded as preliminary until further insights into the immunopathology of IRIS permit their refinement.

  19. Autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvant (ASIA) evolution after silicone implants. Who is at risk?

    PubMed

    Goren, Idan; Segal, Gad; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-10-01

    Silicone implants have been in use since the mid-twentieth century, especially in the field of reconstructive breast surgery, and have long been considered as biologically inert and harmless. However, growing body of evidence from the past two decades links silicone with subsequent autoimmunity-related complications, collectively known as autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvant--ASIA. Previous data suggest that while some patients tend to develop post-exposure autoimmune phenomena such as ASIA, other do not. However, thus far, no criteria for risk stratification were suggested. This current review summarizes the data linking silicone implants and autoimmunity, suggesting means of defining individuals who are at increased risk to develop silicone-induced ASIA, and therefore, a recommendation was made to avoid silicone implantation, e.g., individuals with previously diagnosed autoimmune disorders or with genetic preponderance for hyperactive immune system should not be considered as candidates for silicone implantation.

  20. Persistent inflammatory, immunosuppressed, catabolic syndrome (PICS): A new phenotype of multiple organ failure

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Martin D.; Moore, Frederick A.

    2015-01-01

    A new phenotype of multiple organ failure has appeared: Persistent Inflammatory, Immunosuppressed, Catabolic Syndrome (PICS). Comorbidities and age >65 years have been established as the leading risk factors for PICS. As the percentage of elderly people continues to increase the prevalence of PICS in our ICUs will surely grow. Malnutrition (despite appropriate supplementation), recurrent nosocomial infections, frailty, ventilator dependence, and an indolent death depicts the central theme that plagues PICS patients. Aligned with the recently awarded P50 grant by NIGMS entitled, “PICS: A New Horizon for Surgical Critical Care”, and the University Of Florida’s Sepsis and Critical Illness Research Center will investigate the genetic make-up of PICS patients, better understand frailty and the implication in trauma patients, and hopefully elucidate new therapies. Currently, there are no therapies to combat PICS aside from nutritional inference elaborated after reviewing the literature on Burns, Cachexia, and Sarcopenia. PMID:26086042

  1. Unmasking histoplasmosis immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in a patient recently started on antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nabeta, Henry W; Okia, Richard; Rhein, Joshua; Lukande, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is the most common endemic mycoses among HIV-infected people. Patients with suppressed cell immunity mainly due to HIV are at increased risk of disseminated disease. Dermatological manifestations of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) and cutaneous manifestations of histoplasmosis similar to an IRIS event have been previously described. We report the case of a 43-year-old male who presented with cutaneous disseminated histoplasmosis due to Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum 4 months after the onset of the antiretroviral therapy and some improvement in the immune reconstitution. After 2 weeks of amphotericin B and itraconazole therapy, the scheduled treatment involved fluconazole maintenance therapy, which resulted in an improvement of his skin lesions. PMID:28210571

  2. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome Kaposi sarcoma in the liver manifesting as acute obstructive hepatitis: another potential role for montelukast?

    PubMed

    Read, P J; Lucas, S; Morris, S; Kulasegaram, R

    2013-02-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome has been described in Kaposi sarcoma, but does not usually manifest as acute hepatitis. We describe a case of rapid obstructive jaundice after initiation of antiretroviral therapy, in which the liver biopsy confirmed hepatic Kaposi sarcoma, and the clinical course was altered by the addition of montelukast.

  3. [Irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease: Is there a connection?].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Perelló, Antonia; Balboa, Agustín

    2009-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders and is that with the greatest socioeconomic impact worldwide. Diagnosis of IBS is based on clinical criteria that have been modified over time, the Rome II criteria being those that are currently followed. Some of the symptoms of IBS are similar to those in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which can hamper or delay diagnosis. The use of inflammatory markers in stools (such as calprotectin) may help to distinguish between these two entities. A possible connection between IBS and IBD could be based on five points: (i) both disorders have similar symptoms; (ii) symptoms often overlap in the same patients; (iii) IBS and IBD have a common familial aggregation; (iv) some predisposing factors, such as a history of acute gastroenteritis, play a role in both disorders, and (v) importantly, signs of microinflammation are found in the bowels of patients with IBS. With regard to this latter point, an increase in inflammatory cells has been found in the intestinal mucosa of patients with IBS and, more specifically, mastocytes have been found to be increased in the jejunum and colon while CD3 and CD25 intraepithelial lymphocytes have be observed to be increased in the colon. Moreover, activated mastocytes are increased near to nerve endings in patients with IBS and this finding has been correlated with the intensity of both intestinal symptoms (abdominal pain) and psychological symptoms (depression and fatigue). A good model of microinflammation is post-infectious IBS, since the timing of the onset of the infectious process is known. In patients with post-infectious IBS, an increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes and enterochromaffin cells is initially found, which is reduced over time; consequently, although the symptoms of IBS persist, after 3 years no differences are detected in the number of inflammatory cells between IBS patients and controls. Among the various

  4. Effects of SCR-3 on the immunosuppression accompanied with the systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Niu, Jie; Ou, Shan; Ye, Zhan-Yong; Liu, Deng-Qun; Wang, Feng-Chao; Su, Yong-Ping; Wang, Jun-Ping

    2012-05-01

    Steroid receptor coactivator-3 (SRC-3) is a multifunctional protein that plays an important role in mammary gland growth, development, and tumorigenesis. In this study, SCR-3 gene knockout mice were used to study the effects of SCR-3 on the immunosuppression accompanied with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Bacterial clearance assay was performed by blood culture and frozen sections, and the results showed that the absence of SCR-3 protein serious damaged the innate immune system and the body's ability to inactivate or phagocytosis of bacteria was significantly decreased, and the absence of SCR-3 protein also weakened phagocytes' ability to degrade bacteria and their metabolites. Furthermore, animal model of inflammatory reaction was established and the immune function was determined, and the results revealed that SRC-3 protein may play an important role in maintenance of T-cells' immune function, and severe T-cell immune function disorder would be resulted once SRC-3 protein is missing. In addition, the results of our study showed the steady-state of lymphocyte subsets was destroyed after SIRS, leading the suppression of cellular immune function, and the absence of SCR-3 protein may aggravate the suppression of T-lymphocyte function. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that the absence of SCR-3 protein would aggravate immunosuppression. In addition, SRC-3 protein is a significant regulator of infection and inflammation, and SRC-3 protein play an essential role in the development of immunosuppression accompanied with SIRS.

  5. Cinnamaldehyde modulates LPS-induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome through TRPA1-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Saulo J F; Sousa, Fernanda I A B; Pereira, Domingos M S; Ferro, Thiago A F; Pereira, Ione C P; Silva, Bruna L R; Pinheiro, Aruanã J M C R; Mouchrek, Adriana Q S; Monteiro-Neto, Valério; Costa, Soraia K P; Nascimento, José L M; Grisotto, Marcos A G; da Costa, Robson; Fernandes, Elizabeth S

    2016-05-01

    Cinnamaldehyde is a natural essential oil suggested to possess anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory properties; and to activate transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels expressed on neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Here, we investigated the immunomodulatory effects of cinnamaldehyde in an in vivo model of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) induced by lipopolysaccharide. Swiss mice received a single oral treatment with cinnamaldehyde 1 h before LPS injection. To investigate whether cinnamaldehyde effects are dependent on TRPA1 activation, animals were treated subcutaneously with the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 5 min prior to cinnamaldehyde administration. Vehicle-treated mice were used as controls. Cinnamaldehyde ameliorated SIRS severity in LPS-injected animals. Diminished numbers of circulating mononuclear cells and increased numbers of peritoneal mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cell numbers were also observed. Cinnamaldehyde augmented the number of peritoneal Ly6C(high) and Ly6C(low) monocyte/macrophage cells in LPS-injected mice. Reduced levels of nitric oxide, plasma TNFα and plasma and peritoneal IL-10 were also detected. Additionally, IL-1β levels were increased in the same animals. TRPA1 antagonism by HC-030031 reversed the changes in the number of circulating and peritoneal leukocytes in cinnamaldehyde-treated animals, whilst increasing the levels of peritoneal IL-10 and reducing peritoneal IL-1β. Overall, cinnamaldehyde modulates SIRS through TRPA1-dependent and independent mechanisms.

  6. Symptomatology of irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease during the menstrual cycle

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Shishira; Barber, Matthew D.; Graff, Lesley A.; Shen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Gender-related physiological variations in gastrointestinal (GI) symptomatology have been observed in women of reproductive age. Many women experience cyclical changes in GI symptomatology during their menstrual cycle, particularly alteration in their bowel habits. Physiological studies of healthy women during the menstrual cycle showed a prolonged GI transit time during the luteal phase, either in the oro-cecum route or in the colon. Worsened GI symptoms, such as abdominal pain, bloating or diarrhea are observed in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) during menses. This may be due to elevated prostaglandin levels during menses, with an enhanced perception of viscera-somatic stimuli resulting in nausea, abdominal distension and pain. Also patients with IBS or IBD demonstrate a cyclical pattern more closely related to their bowel habits than healthy controls. Women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) also have exacerbated symptoms during menses; however, it is unclear whether this relates to physiological variation or disease exacerbation in IBS or IBD. Studies examining the association of the menstrual cycle and GI symptomatology in patients with IBS or IBD, have not yet clarified the underlying mechanisms. Moreover medications—such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and oral contraceptive pills used for dysmenorrhea and menstrual migraine in those patients have not well been controlled for in the previous studies, which can contribute to further bias. Understanding changes in GI symptomatology during the menstrual cycle may help to determine the true extent of disease exacerbation and proper management strategy. PMID:25788484

  7. Metabolism of Albumin after Continuous Venovenous Hemofiltration in Patients with Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Qin, Xiaodong; Li, Guanwei; Zhou, Bo; Gu, Guosheng; Hong, Zhiwu; Aa, JiYe; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    Background. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is characterized by a hypercatabolic state induced by inflammatory mediators. Continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) stabilizes the internal environment but also aggravates loss of amino acids. The effect of CVVH on protein dynamics is largely unknown. We adopted the stable isotopic tracer technology to investigate how CVVH changed serum albumin metabolism. Methods. Twenty SIRS patients were randomized into low- (2000 mL/h) and high- (4000 mL/h) volume CVVH groups according to the rate of replacement fluid. Eight patients with abdominal infection matched for age, sex, and laboratory index served as controls. Consecutive arterial blood samples were drawn during a primed-constant infusion of two stable isotopes to determine the albumin fractional synthesis rate (FSR) and fractional breakdown rate (FBR). Results. Before treatment, there was no significant difference of FSR and FBR among 3 groups. After CVVH, the albumin FSR in high- and low-volume groups was 7.75 ± 1.08% and 7.30 ± 0.89%, respectively, both higher than in the control (5.83 ± 0.94%). There was no significant difference in albumin FBR after treatment. Conclusions. Protein dynamic indicators could reflect protein synthesis and breakdown state directly and effectively. CVVH increased albumin synthesis, while the breakdown rate remained at a high level independently of the CVVH rate. PMID:25650044

  8. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs attenuate the vascular responses in aging metabolic syndrome rats

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Ruiz, María Esther; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Diaz-Diaz, Eulises; Pavón, Natalia; Guarner-Lans, Verónica

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Metabolic syndrome (MS) and aging are low-grade systemic inflammatory conditions, and inflammation is a key component of endothelial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) upon the vascular reactivity in aging MS rats. Methods: MS was induced in young male rats by adding 30% sucrose in drinking water over 6, 12, and 18 months. When the treatment was finished, the blood samples were collected, and aortas were dissected out. The expression of COX isoenzymes and PLA2 in the aortas was analyzed using Western blot analysis. The contractile responses of aortic rings to norepinephrine (1 μmol/L) were measured in the presence or absence of different NSAIDs (10 μmol/L for each). Results: Serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β) in control rats were remained stable during the aging process, whereas serum IL-6 in MS rats were significantly increased at 12 and 18 months. The levels of COX isoenzyme and PLA2 in aortas from control rats increased with the aging, whereas those in aortas from MS rats were irregularly increased with the highest levels at 6 months. Pretreatment with acetylsalicylic acid (a COX-1 preferential inhibitor), indomethacin (a non-selective COX inhibitor) or meloxicam (a COX-2 preferential inhibitor) decreased NE-induced contractions of aortic rings from MS rats at all the ages, with meloxicam being the most potent. Acetylsalicylic acid also significantly reduced the maximum responses of ACh-induced vasorelaxation of aortic rings from MS rats, but indomethacin and meloxicam had no effect. Conclusion: NSAIDs can directly affect vascular responses in aging MS rats. Understanding the effects of NSAIDs on blood vessels may improve the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and MS in the elders. PMID:25263337

  9. Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal cell-mediated immunity regulation in the Immune Restoration Inflammatory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Khakshooy, Allen; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Over one third of the patients sero-positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with signs of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and under treatment with anti-retroviral therapy (ART), develop the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). It is not clear what variables are that determine whether a patient with HIV/AIDS will develop ART-related IRIS, but the best evidence base thus far indicates that HIV/AIDS patients with low CD4 cell count, and HIV/AIDS patients whose CD4 count recovery shows a sharp slope, suggesting a particularly fast "immune reconstitution", are at greater risk of developing IRIS. Here, we propose the hypothesis that one important variable that can contribute to low CD4 cell count number and function in ART-treated HIV/AIDS patients is altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) cell-mediated immune (CMI) regulation. We discuss HPA-CMI deregulation in IRIS as the new frontier in comparative effectiveness research (CRE) for obtaining and utilizing the best evidence base for treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in specific clinical settings. We propose that our hypothesis about altered HPA-CMI may extend to the pathologies observed in related viral infection, including Zika PMID:27212842

  10. Diabetic foot syndrome: Immune-inflammatory features as possible cardiovascular markers in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Maida, Carlo; Pinto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcerations have been extensively reported as vascular complications of diabetes mellitus associated with a high degree of morbidity and mortality. Diabetic foot syndrome (DFS), as defined by the World Health Organization, is an “ulceration of the foot (distally from the ankle and including the ankle) associated with neuropathy and different grades of ischemia and infection”. Pathogenic events able to cause diabetic foot ulcers are multifactorial. Among the commonest causes of this pathogenic pathway it’s possible to consider peripheral neuropathy, foot deformity, abnormal foot pressures, abnormal joint mobility, trauma, peripheral artery disease. Several studies reported how diabetic patients show a higher mortality rate compared to patients without diabetes and in particular these studies under filled how cardiovascular mortality and morbidity is 2-4 times higher among patients affected by type 2 diabetes mellitus. This higher degree of cardiovascular morbidity has been explained as due to the observed higher prevalence of major cardiovascular risk factor, of asymptomatic findings of cardiovascular diseases, and of prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events in diabetic patients with foot complications. In diabetes a fundamental pathogenic pathway of most of vascular complications has been reported as linked to a complex interplay of inflammatory, metabolic and procoagulant variables. These pathogenetic aspects have a direct interplay with an insulin resistance, subsequent obesity, diabetes, hypertension, prothrombotic state and blood lipid disorder. Involvement of inflammatory markers such as IL-6 plasma levels and resistin in diabetic subjects as reported by Tuttolomondo et al confirmed the pathogenetic issue of the a “adipo-vascular” axis that may contribute to cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes. This “adipo-vascular axis” in patients with type 2 diabetes has been reported as characterized

  11. Inflammatory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Whitesell, Jackie

    2010-09-01

    Inflammatory neuropathies are acquired disorders of peripheral nerves and occasionally of the central nervous system that can affect individuals at any age. The course can be monophasic, relapsing, or progressive. Inflammatory neuropathies are classified as acute or chronic. The acute form reaches a nadir by 4 weeks and the chronic form over 8 weeks or greater. The most common example of an acute inflammatory neuropathy is acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP), which is part of the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). The most common chronic inflammatory neuropathy is chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculopathy (CIDP). Other chronic inflammatory neuropathies are multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and the Lewis-Sumner syndrome. The Fisher syndrome and Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis occur acutely and have clinical overlap with AIDP.

  12. Pro-inflammatory exoprotein characterization of toxic shock syndrome Staphylococcus aureus†

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Chi; Anderson, Michele J.; Kohler, Petra L.; Strandberg, Kristi L.; Olson, Michael E.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Peterson, Marnie L.

    2011-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) clonal type USA200 is the most widely disseminated Staphylococcus aureus colonizer of the nose and is a major cause of toxic shock syndrome (TSS). Exoproteins derived from these organisms have been suggested to contribute to their colonization and causation of human diseases, but have not been well-characterized. Two representative S. aureus USA200 isolates, MNPE (α-toxin positive) and CDC587 (α-toxin mutant), isolated from pulmonary post-influenza TSS and menstrual vaginal TSS, respectively, were evaluated. Biochemical, immunobiological and cell-based assays, including mass spectrometry, were used to identify key exoproteins derived from the strains that are responsible for pro-inflammatory and cytotoxic activity on human vaginal epithelial cells. Exoproteins associated with virulence were produced by both strains, and cytolysins (α-toxin and γ-toxin), superantigens, and proteases were identified as the major exoproteins, which caused epithelial cell inflammation and cytotoxicity. Exoprotein fractions from MNPE were more pro-inflammatory and cytotoxic than those from CDC587 due to high concentrations of α-toxin. CDC587 produced a small amount of α-toxin, despite the presence of a stop codon (TAG) at codon 113. Additional exotoxin identification studies of USA200 strain [S. aureus MN8 (α-toxin mutant)] confirmed that MN8 also produced low levels of α-toxin despite the same stop codon. The differences observed in virulence factor profiles of two USA200 strains provide insight into environmental factors that select for specific virulence factors. Cytolysins, superantigens, and proteases were identified as potential targets, where toxin neutralization may prevent or diminish epithelial damage associated with S. aureus. PMID:21749039

  13. The impact of inflammatory rheumatic diseases on the presentation, severity, and outcome of acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Goldenberg, Ilan; Matetzky, Shlomi; Grossman, Chagai; Elis, Avishay; Gavrielov-Yusim, Natalie; Livneh, Avi

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRD) have a high burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), leading to increased mortality and morbidity. However, it is not clear whether increased CVD mortality in IRD is due to a higher incidence or worse outcome of cardiovascular events (higher case fatality). In this observational case-control study, we assessed the outcome of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in patients with IRDs compared to matched controls without IRD, using data from the Acute Coronary Syndrome Israeli Survey (ACSIS), a large, national, real-life registry detailing the extent, severity, and outcome of ACS. Of 2,193 subjects enrolled to the ACSIS, 20 (nine men) were identified with IRD, including 11 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, five patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), three patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and one patient with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The study patients were compared to 120 matched control patients (adjusted for age and risk factors for CVD) without IRD. Compared to controls, IRD patients had similar clinical presentation and similar type of ACS and received identical initial treatment at the ER. The two groups had comparable rates of complications including major adverse cardiovascular events (death, recurrent myocardial infarction, stroke, major bleeding, and definite stent thrombosis) (10 vs. 11.7% in the study and control group, respectively, p > 0.05), re-hospitalization (20 vs. 21.1%, respectively, p > 0.05), and severe congestive heart failure (7.7 vs. 6.9%, respectively, p > 0.05) within 30 days. The outcome and prognosis of ACS in patients with IRD is not worse than that of control, supporting the higher prevalence of CVD in this population as the cause for their excess mortality.

  14. Correlation Between Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis and Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Shiu-Dong; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Hung, Peir-Haur; Chung, Chi-Jung; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Huang, Chao-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) has been investigated in Western countries and identified to be associated with chronic pelvic pain and inflammation. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is a complex syndrome that is significantly more prevalent in women than in men. Chronic pelvic pain is a main symptom of BPS/IC, and chronic inflammation is a major etiology of BPS/IC. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between BPS/IC and PID using a population-based dataset. We constructed a case–control study from the Taiwan National Health Insurance program. The case cohort comprised 449 patients with BPS/IC, and 1796 randomly selected subjects (about 1:4 matching) were used as controls. A Multivariate logistic regression model was constructed to estimate the association between BPS/IC and PID. Of the 2245 sampled subjects, a significant difference was observed in the prevalence of PID between BPS/IC cases and controls (41.7% vs 15.4%, P < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio (OR) for PID among cases was 3.69 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.89–4.71). Furthermore, the ORs for PID among BPS/IC cases were 4.52 (95% CI: 2.55–8.01), 4.31 (95% CI: 2.91–6.38), 3.00 (95% CI: 1.82–4.94), and 5.35 (95% CI: 1.88–15.20) in the <35, 35–49, 50–64, and >65 years age groups, respectively, after adjusting for geographic region, irritable bowel syndrome, and hypertension. Joint effect was also noted, specifically when patients had both PID and irritable bowel disease with OR of 10.5 (95% CI: 4.88–22.50). This study demonstrated a correlation between PID and BPS/IC. Clinicians treating women with PID should be alert to BPS/IC-related symptoms in the population. PMID:26579800

  15. Docosahexaenoic Acid, Inflammation, and Bacterial Dysbiosis in Relation to Periodontal Disease, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, and the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tabbaa, Maria; Golubic, Mladen; Roizen, Michael F.; Bernstein, Adam M.

    2013-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, has been used to treat a range of different conditions, including periodontal disease (PD) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). That DHA helps with these oral and gastrointestinal diseases in which inflammation and bacterial dysbiosis play key roles, raises the question of whether DHA may assist in the prevention or treatment of other inflammatory conditions, such as the metabolic syndrome, which have also been linked with inflammation and alterations in normal host microbial populations. Here we review established and investigated associations between DHA, PD, and IBD. We conclude that by beneficially altering cytokine production and macrophage recruitment, the composition of intestinal microbiota and intestinal integrity, lipopolysaccharide- and adipose-induced inflammation, and insulin signaling, DHA may be a key tool in the prevention of metabolic syndrome. PMID:23966110

  16. Tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome: case definitions for use in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Meintjes, Graeme; Lawn, Stephen D; Scano, Fabio; Maartens, Gary; French, Martyn A; Worodria, William; Elliott, Julian H; Murdoch, David; Wilkinson, Robert J; Seyler, Catherine; John, Laurence; van der Loeff, Maarten Schim; Reiss, Peter; Lynen, Lut; Janoff, Edward N; Gilks, Charles; Colebunders, Robert

    2008-08-01

    The immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) has emerged as an important early complication of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings, especially in patients with tuberculosis. However, there are no consensus case definitions for IRIS or tuberculosis-associated IRIS. Moreover, previously proposed case definitions are not readily applicable in settings where laboratory resources are limited. As a result, existing studies on tuberculosis-associated IRIS have used a variety of non-standardised general case definitions. To rectify this problem, around 100 researchers, including microbiologists, immunologists, clinicians, epidemiologists, clinical trialists, and public-health specialists from 16 countries met in Kampala, Uganda, in November, 2006. At this meeting, consensus case definitions for paradoxical tuberculosis-associated IRIS, ART-associated tuberculosis, and unmasking tuberculosis-associated IRIS were derived, which can be used in high-income and resource-limited settings. It is envisaged that these definitions could be used by clinicians and researchers in a variety of settings to promote standardisation and comparability of data.

  17. Coagulation response in dogs with and without systemic inflammatory response syndrome - preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Natali; Moritz, Andreas

    2013-02-01

    The impact of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) on all phases of coagulation is largely unknown in dogs. Fifty-six healthy dogs (controls) and 25 diseased dogs were included. Based on physical and hematological examination, dogs were classified as "no-SIRS" (n=7) or "SIRS" (n=18). Evaluated coagulation variables included platelets, coagulation times, fibrinogen, antithrombin (AT), FVIII, protein C, protein S, activated protein C (APC)-ratio, calculated from aPTT with and without presence of APC, and kaolin-activated thrombelastography (TEG). Overall, no-SIRS and SIRS were characterized by hypocoaguable state (P<0.001 compared to controls) i.e., prolonged coagulation times, decreased AT (median 59 U/L and 89 U/L versus 126 U/L), and FVIII (median 19 U/L and 70 U/L versus 102 U/L). In no-SIRS and SIRS, APC-ratio was significantly lower than in the controls (median 1.1 and 2.0 versus 2.5, P<0.01, P<0.001). Severe coagulopathies may be present in critically ill dogs without concurrent SIRS. APC-resistance is a frequent finding in severely diseased dogs.

  18. A burning issue: do sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) directly contribute to cardiac dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun; Wu, Shan

    2006-01-01

    Heart disease is among the leading causes of death in all populations. Cardiac dysfunctions are major complications in patients with advanced viral or bacterial infection, severe trauma and burns accompanied with multiple organ failure - collectively known as systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). SIRS, which is often subsequent to sepsis, is clinically featured by hypotension, tachypnea, hypo- or hyperthermia, leukocytosis and myocardial dysfunction. The striking association between inflammation and cardiac dysfunction not only prognoses likelihood of survival in patients with SIRS but also prompts the necessity of understanding the pathophysiology of cardiac dysfunction in SIRS, so that effective therapeutic regimen may be identified. Compelling evidence has shown significant and independent link among inflammation, sepsis, insulin resistance and cardiac dysfunction. Several cytokine signaling molecules have been speculated to play important roles in the onset of cardiac dysfunction under SIRS including endothelin-1 and toll-like receptor. Involvement of these pathways in cardiac dysfunction has been convincingly validated with transgenic studies. Nevertheless, the precise mechanism of action underscoring inflammation-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction is far from being clear. Given the substantial impact of inflammation and SIRS on health care, ecosystems and national economy, it is imperative to understand the cellular mechanisms responsible for cardiac contractile dysfunction under inflammation and sepsis so that new and effective therapeutic strategy against such devastating heart problems may be developed.

  19. Tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome: case definitions for use in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Meintjes, Graeme; Lawn, Stephen D; Scano, Fabio; Maartens, Gary; French, Martyn A; Worodria, William; Elliott, Julian H; Murdoch, David; Wilkinson, Robert J; Seyler, Catherine; John, Laurence; van der Loeff, Maarten Schim; Reiss, Peter; Lynen, Lut; Janoff, Edward N; Gilks, Charles; Colebunders, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) has emerged as an important early complication of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings, especially in patients with tuberculosis. However, there are no consensus case definitions for IRIS or tuberculosis-associated IRIS. Moreover, previously proposed case definitions are not readily applicable in settings where laboratory resources are limited. As a result, existing studies on tuberculosis-associated IRIS have used a variety of non-standardised general case definitions. To rectify this problem, around 100 researchers, including microbiologists, immunologists, clinicians, epidemiologists, clinical trialists, and public-health specialists from 16 countries met in Kampala, Uganda, in November, 2006. At this meeting, consensus case definitions for paradoxical tuberculosis-associated IRIS, ART-associated tuberculosis, and unmasking tuberculosis-associated IRIS were derived, which can be used in high-income and resource-limited settings. It is envisaged that these definitions could be used by clinicians and researchers in a variety of settings to promote standardisation and comparability of data. PMID:18652998

  20. Germline NLRP1 Mutations Cause Skin Inflammatory and Cancer Susceptibility Syndromes via Inflammasome Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Franklin L; Mamaï, Ons; Sborgi, Lorenzo; Boussofara, Lobna; Hopkins, Richard; Robinson, Kim; Szeverényi, Ildikó; Takeichi, Takuya; Balaji, Reshmaa; Lau, Aristotle; Tye, Hazel; Roy, Keya; Bonnard, Carine; Ahl, Patricia J; Jones, Leigh Ann; Baker, Paul; Lacina, Lukas; Otsuka, Atsushi; Fournie, Pierre R; Malecaze, François; Lane, E Birgitte; Akiyama, Masashi; Kabashima, Kenji; Connolly, John E; Masters, Seth L; Soler, Vincent J; Omar, Salma Samir; McGrath, John A; Nedelcu, Roxana; Gribaa, Moez; Denguezli, Mohamed; Saad, Ali; Hiller, Sebastian; Reversade, Bruno

    2016-09-22

    Inflammasome complexes function as key innate immune effectors that trigger inflammation in response to pathogen- and danger-associated signals. Here, we report that germline mutations in the inflammasome sensor NLRP1 cause two overlapping skin disorders: multiple self-healing palmoplantar carcinoma (MSPC) and familial keratosis lichenoides chronica (FKLC). We find that NLRP1 is the most prominent inflammasome sensor in human skin, and all pathogenic NLRP1 mutations are gain-of-function alleles that predispose to inflammasome activation. Mechanistically, NLRP1 mutations lead to increased self-oligomerization by disrupting the PYD and LRR domains, which are essential in maintaining NLRP1 as an inactive monomer. Primary keratinocytes from patients experience spontaneous inflammasome activation and paracrine IL-1 signaling, which is sufficient to cause skin inflammation and epidermal hyperplasia. Our findings establish a group of non-fever inflammasome disorders, uncover an unexpected auto-inhibitory function for the pyrin domain, and provide the first genetic evidence linking NLRP1 to skin inflammatory syndromes and skin cancer predisposition.

  1. Stigmatization toward irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease in an online cohort

    PubMed Central

    Taft, T. H.; Bedell, A.; Naftaly, J.; Keefer, L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Stigma is associated with many negative health outcomes. Research has examined perceived and internalized stigma in individuals with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but less has been done to evaluate levels of enacted stigma associated with these conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of enacted stigma toward IBS and IBD in the general population compared to an adult-onset asthma (AOA) control group. Methods Participants were recruited via social media and a research-dedicated website and completed all measures online. Participants were randomized to one of six clinical vignettes: (i) IBD male, (ii) IBD female, (iii) IBS male, (iv) IBS female, (v) AOA male, or (vi) AOA female. Participants read the assigned vignette and then completed measures of emotional empathy, level of familiarity, and enacted stigma. Key Results Participants reported higher levels of enacted stigma toward IBS compared to both IBD and AOA. No differences in stigma were found between IBD and AOA. Higher levels of familiarity were most strongly correlated with reduced IBD-related stigma, with weaker but still significant correlations between level of familiarity and IBS and AOA. Higher levels of emotional empathy were associated with reduced stigma for IBD, IBS, and AOA. Conclusions & Inferences Individuals with IBS experience greater levels of enacted stigma compared to IBD and AOA. This finding is consistent with previous research that has shown greater levels of perceived and internalized stigma in IBS compared to IBD. PMID:27501483

  2. State-of-the-art of irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease research in 2008

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Lynne V

    2008-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are two of the leading causes of chronic intestinal conditions in the world. This issue of World Journal of Gastroenterology (WJG) presents a series of papers from world experts who discuss the current knowledge and opinions on these important conditions. Although great strides have been made in the diagnosis, treatment and pathology of IBS and IBD; much has yet to be explained. The etiologies and risk factors of these multifactorial conditions remain elusive. Specific diagnostic biomarkers need to be developed and safer treatments developed. The burden of IBS and IBD on the healthcare system is felt with repeated medical care visits and high costs. IBS and IBD patients can account for 30%-50% of office visits at gastroenterology services/clinics. Over one million people have IBD in the United States, with 30 000 new cases being diagnosed every year. One-quarter million people in the UK are afflicted with IBD. The cost of medical care in the United States for IBD is estimated to be $1.8 billion/year. PMID:18461647

  3. Efficacies of Acupuncture and Anti-inflammatory Treatment for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hadianfard, Mohammadjavad; Bazrafshan, Esmaeel; Momeninejad, Hadi; Jahani, Navid

    2015-10-01

    This study compared the efficacies of acupuncture and anti-inflammatory treatment in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Fifty patients with mild to moderate CTS were randomly divided into two groups. Both groups received night wrist splints as the standard conservative treatment for 1 month. The acupuncture group also received eight sessions of acupuncture therapy (twice a week for 4 weeks). The control group received 400 mg of ibuprofen three times a day for 10 days. The visual analog scale (VAS) score, the score on the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire for Functional Status and Symptom Severity (BCTQ FUNCT and SYMPT), and the electrodiagnostic findings were evaluated at baseline and 1 month after treatment. At the final follow up, significant improvements were found in both groups (p < 0.05). Statistically significant improvements were observed in the VAS score, the score on the global BCTQ FUNCT and SYMPT, and the electrodiagnostic findings, but not in the distal motor latency (DML), in the acupuncture group (p < 0.05). Our findings indicate that acupuncture affected the score on the global BCTQ FUNCT and SYMPT, the VAS score, and the electrodiagnostic findings, except the DML, more than ibuprofen did and that acupuncture might be an effective treatment for CTS.

  4. Visceral hypersensitivity in inflammatory bowel diseases and irritable bowel syndrome: The role of proteases

    PubMed Central

    Ceuleers, Hannah; Van Spaendonk, Hanne; Hanning, Nikita; Heirbaut, Jelena; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; Joossens, Jurgen; Augustyns, Koen; De Man, Joris G; De Meester, Ingrid; De Winter, Benedicte Y

    2016-01-01

    Proteases, enzymes catalyzing the hydrolysis of peptide bonds, are present at high concentrations in the gastrointestinal tract. Besides their well-known role in the digestive process, they also function as signaling molecules through the activation of protease-activated receptors (PARs). Based on their chemical mechanism for catalysis, proteases can be classified into several classes: serine, cysteine, aspartic, metallo- and threonine proteases represent the mammalian protease families. In particular, the class of serine proteases will play a significant role in this review. In the last decades, proteases have been suggested to play a key role in the pathogenesis of visceral hypersensitivity, which is a major factor contributing to abdominal pain in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases and/or irritable bowel syndrome. So far, only a few preclinical animal studies have investigated the effect of protease inhibitors specifically on visceral sensitivity while their effect on inflammation is described in more detail. In our accompanying review we describe their effect on gastrointestinal permeability. On account of their promising results in the field of visceral hypersensitivity, further research is warranted. The aim of this review is to give an overview on the concept of visceral hypersensitivity as well as on the physiological and pathophysiological functions of proteases herein. PMID:28058009

  5. Mycobacterium avium complex suppurative parotitis in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus infection presenting with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Babiker, Zahir Osman Eltahir; Beeston, Christine; Purcell, Janet; Desai, Niranjan; Ustianowski, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    Restoration of the immune system following initiation of antiretroviral therapy can result in an adverse phenomenon known as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Herein, we report a case of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) suppurative parotitis associated with IRIS in a patient with advanced human immunodeficiency virus disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MAC parotitis in the setting of IRIS and clinicians should be aware of this condition.

  6. A case report of small bowel perforation secondary to cytomegalovirus related immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in an AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Delgado, Eva María; Villanueva-Lozano, Hiram; García Rojas-Acosta, Miguel J; Miranda-Maldonado, Ivett C; Ramos-Jiménez, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Non-traumatic small bowel perforation is rare in adults but carries a high morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis is made on clinical suspicion, and the most common causes in developing countries are infectious diseases, being cytomegalovirus infection in immunocompromised patients the main etiology. We describe a patient with a recently diagnosed advanced stage HIV infection and an intestinal perforation associated with cytomegalovirus immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome after highly active antiretroviral therapy initiation.

  7. Treatment of chronic immune-mediated neuropathies: chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, and the Lewis-Sumner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sederholm, Benson H

    2010-09-01

    Current treatment approaches for the management of chronic immune-mediated peripheral neuropathies are reviewed, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), and the Lewis-Sumner syndrome (LSS). A summary of existing evidence for commonly used treatment modalities, such as corticosteroids, intravenous immune globulin (IVIG), and plasma exchange is provided. Evidence for the use of additional immunosuppressant and immunomodulatory agents is also reviewed.

  8. Nivolumab-induced chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy mimicking rapid-onset Guillain-Barré syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryota; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Tomidokoro, Yasushi; Yanagiha, Kumi; Hirabayashi, Takumi; Ishii, Akiko; Okune, Mari; Inoue, Sae; Sekine, Ikuo; Tamaoka, Akira; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2016-09-01

    Nivolumab, an anti-programmed death-1-specific monoclonal antibody, has demonstrated a durable response and effect on overall survival and has become one of the standard treatments for patients with advanced melanoma. Reported herein is a case of nivolumab-induced chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, in which an 85-year-old woman with stage IV melanoma developed grade 1 paresthesia 2 weeks after the initial dose of nivolumab was administered. With continued treatment, the neurological deficiency deteriorated rapidly, mimicking Guillain-Barré syndrome, causing such a dramatic decrease in her activities of daily living that she could no longer function in daily life. Thus, nivolumab treatment was discontinued. A course of intravenous immunoglobulin infusion yielded a dramatic clinical improvement; in particular, improved motor control was observed within a few days. Her initial presentation was suggestive of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, a subtype of Guillain-Barré syndrome; however, the good response to steroids and exacerbation 8 weeks after the onset were suggestive of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy induced by nivolumab. This is the first case of Guillain-Barré syndrome-like autoimmune polyradiculoneuropathy induced by programmed death-1/programmed death-ligand 1 inhibitors. Although neurological adverse events related to nivolumab are rare, they can become severe, requiring early diagnosis and intervention. Intravenous immunoglobulin may be considered as an effective initial treatment for patients who develop acute autoimmune nervous system disorders due to nivolumab.

  9. Acute paretic syndrome in juvenile White Leghorn chickens resembles late stages of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies in humans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sudden limb paresis is a common problem in White Leghorn flocks, affecting about 1% of the chicken population before achievement of sexual maturity. Previously, a similar clinical syndrome has been reported as being caused by inflammatory demyelination of peripheral nerve fibres. Here, we investigated in detail the immunopathology of this paretic syndrome and its possible resemblance to human neuropathies. Methods Neurologically affected chickens and control animals from one single flock underwent clinical and neuropathological examination. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) alterations were characterised using standard morphological techniques, including nerve fibre teasing and transmission electron microscopy. Infiltrating cells were phenotyped immunohistologically and quantified by flow cytometry. The cytokine expression pattern was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). These investigations were accomplished by MHC genotyping and a PCR screen for Marek's disease virus (MDV). Results Spontaneous paresis of White Leghorns is caused by cell-mediated, inflammatory demyelination affecting multiple cranial and spinal nerves and nerve roots with a proximodistal tapering. Clinical manifestation coincides with the employment of humoral immune mechanisms, enrolling plasma cell recruitment, deposition of myelin-bound IgG and antibody-dependent macrophageal myelin-stripping. Disease development was significantly linked to a 539 bp microsatellite in MHC locus LEI0258. An aetiological role for MDV was excluded. Conclusions The paretic phase of avian inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuritis immunobiologically resembles the late-acute disease stages of human acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and is characterised by a Th1-to-Th2 shift. PMID:20109187

  10. Upregulation of skeletal muscle inflammatory genes links inflammation with insulin resistance in women with the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Poelkens, Fleur; Lammers, Gerwen; Pardoel, Elisabeth M; Tack, Cees J; Hopman, Maria T E

    2013-10-01

    The metabolic syndrome, a combination of interrelated metabolic risk factors, is associated with insulin resistance and promotes the development of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes mellitus. There is a close link between inflammation and metabolic disease, but the responsible mechanisms remain elusive. The aim of this study was to identify differentially expressed genes in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle tissue of women with the metabolic syndrome compared with healthy control women. Women with the metabolic syndrome (n = 19) and healthy control women (n = 20) were extensively phenotyped, insulin sensitivity was measured using a hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp, and a skeletal muscle biopsy was obtained. Gene expression levels were compared between the two groups by microarrays. The upregulated genes in skeletal muscle of the women with the metabolic syndrome were primarily enriched for inflammatory response-associated genes. The three most significantly upregulated of this group, interleukin 6 receptor (IL6R), histone deacetylase 9 (HDAC9) and CD97 molecule (CD97), were significantly correlated with insulin resistance. Taken together, these findings suggest an important role for a number of inflammatory-related genes in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance.

  11. Three cases of nephrotic syndrome associated with hematological malignancies characterized by glomerular endocapillary proliferation and massive inflammatory cel infiltration.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Ken; Shirai, Sayuri; Ito, Takafumi; Tanabe, Kazuaki; Kimura, Kenjiro

    2014-04-01

    Nephrotic syndrome often emerges with malignancy. Membranous nephropathy is generally associated with solid tumors, and minimal change disease is associated with Hodgkin's disease. However, the complication of malignancy cannot be predicted by simply using renal histological findings. We report here three cases of nephrotic syndrome associated with hematological malignancy. On histology, Cases 1 and 2 were membranous nephropathy, and Case 3 was minimal change disease. Cases 1 and 2 were found to have B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, while Case 3 had Hodgkin's lymphoma. In Cases 1 and 2, proteinuria diminished as chemotherapy was started. All three cases were characterized by glomerular endocapillary proliferation and massive glomerular infiltration of inflammatory cells. These three cases are reported because their histologically atypical findings might be a feature of hematological malignancy- associated nephrotic syndrome and of any help for diagnosis.

  12. Circulating Plasma microRNAs can differentiate Human Sepsis and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS).

    PubMed

    Caserta, Stefano; Kern, Florian; Cohen, Jonathan; Drage, Stephen; Newbury, Sarah F; Llewelyn, Martin J

    2016-06-20

    Systemic inflammation in humans may be triggered by infection, termed sepsis, or non-infective processes, termed non-infective systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). MicroRNAs regulate cellular processes including inflammation and may be detected in blood. We aimed to establish definitive proof-of-principle that circulating microRNAs are differentially affected during sepsis and non-infective SIRS. Critically ill patients with severe (n = 21) or non-severe (n = 8) intra-abdominal sepsis; severe (n = 23) or non-severe (n = 21) non-infective SIRS; or no SIRS (n = 16) were studied. Next-generation sequencing and qRT-PCR were used to measure plasma microRNAs. Detectable blood miRNAs (n = 116) were generally up-regulated in SIRS compared to no-SIRS patients. Levels of these 'circulating inflammation-related microRNAs' (CIR-miRNAs) were 2.64 (IQR: 2.10-3.29) and 1.52 (IQR: 1.15-1.92) fold higher for non-infective SIRS and sepsis respectively (p < 0.0001), hence CIR-miRNAs appeared less abundant in sepsis than in SIRS. Six CIR-miRNAs (miR-30d-5p, miR-30a-5p, miR-192-5p, miR-26a-5p, miR-23a-5p, miR-191-5p) provided good-to-excellent discrimination of severe sepsis from severe SIRS (0.742-0.917 AUC of ROC curves). CIR-miRNA levels inversely correlated with pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6 and others). Thus, among critically ill patients, sepsis and non-infective SIRS are associated with substantial, differential changes in CIR-miRNAs. CIR-miRNAs may be regulators of inflammation and warrant thorough evaluation as diagnostic and therapeutic targets.

  13. Metabolic syndrome, inflammation and atherosclerosis - the role of adipokines in health and in systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Santos, Maria José; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) events are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. It has been hypothesized that, in addition to the traditional CV risk factors, inflammation is a major contributor to atherogenesis. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) stands for a cluster of risk factors associated with insulin resistance and increased abdominal fat. Inflammation and MetS are intimately linked. Inflammatory biomarkers are frequently elevated in people with MetS and, conversely, the prevalence of MetS is higher in patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, such as Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Inflammatory cytokines impair insulin sensitivity and can induce an adverse lipoprotein profile as seen in MetS. Furthermore, the presence of MetS correlates with increased subclinical atherosclerosis, major adverse CV events and death, making an important contribution to the CV burden in inflammatory diseases. Adipose tissue has recently emerged as an active organ that produces and secretes numerous mediators - adipokines - particularly relevant in energy homeostasis, inflammation, immune regulation and angiogenesis. These mediators arise as a potential link between MetS, inflammation and atherogenesis. Understanding the complex regulation and function of adipokines in health and disease is a priority since it may lead to new preventive and therapeutic interventions aiming to decrease CV risk.

  14. Faecal calprotectin as a novel biomarker for differentiating between inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming-Hui; Chou, Jen-Wei; Chen, Shan-Ming; Tsai, Ming-Chang; Sun, Yu-Shu; Lin, Chun-Che; Lin, Ching-Pin

    2014-07-01

    The present study aimed to investigate faecal calprotectin as a diagnostic marker to differentiate between patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and those with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A total of 20 healthy control subjects, 26 patients with IBS and 58 patients with IBD, including 22 with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 36 with Crohn's disease (CD), were recruited for the present study. Calprotectin was analysed in stool samples, and C-reactive protein (CRP) and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were assessed in blood samples. CRP and calprotectin levels, and the ESR were observed to be significantly higher in patients with CD and UC compared with those of the healthy control subjects (P<0.0001). Furthermore, in patients with IBD and IBS, significant increases in faecal calprotectin and CRP levels were observed (694.8±685.0 µg/g in IBD vs. 85.8±136.1 µg/g in IBS and 0.851±1.200 mg/dl in IBD vs. 0.16±0.23 mg/dl in IBS, respectively; P<0.0001). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that, in patients with IBD, the levels of faecal calprotectin [0.931±0.029; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.874‑0.987] were significantly higher than that of CRP (0.865±0.041; 95% CI, 0.785‑0.946) and the ESR (0.869±0.042; 95% CI, 0.786‑0.952). These findings indicate that faecal calprotectin may represent a novel biomarker for diagnosing IBD and may be effective in distinguishing between IBD and IBS.

  15. Neither classical nor alternative macrophage activation is required for Pneumocystis clearance during immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo-Qian; Wang, Jing; Hoy, Zachary; Keegan, Achsah; Bhagwat, Samir; Gigliotti, Francis; Wright, Terry W

    2015-12-01

    Pneumocystis is a respiratory fungal pathogen that causes pneumonia (Pneumocystis pneumonia [PcP]) in immunocompromised patients. Alveolar macrophages are critical effectors for CD4(+) T cell-dependent clearance of Pneumocystis, and previous studies found that alternative macrophage activation accelerates fungal clearance during PcP-related immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). However, the requirement for either classically or alternatively activated macrophages for Pneumocystis clearance has not been determined. Therefore, RAG2(-/-) mice lacking either the interferon gamma (IFN-γ) receptor (IFN-γR) or interleukin 4 receptor alpha (IL-4Rα) were infected with Pneumocystis. These mice were then immune reconstituted with wild-type lymphocytes to preserve the normal T helper response while preventing downstream effects of Th1 or Th2 effector cytokines on macrophage polarization. As expected, RAG2(-/-) mice developed severe disease but effectively cleared Pneumocystis and resolved IRIS. Neither RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) nor RAG/IL-4Rα(-/-) mice displayed impaired Pneumocystis clearance. However, RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) mice developed a dysregulated immune response, with exacerbated IRIS and greater pulmonary function deficits than those in RAG2 and RAG/IL-4Rα(-/-) mice. RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) mice had elevated numbers of lung CD4(+) T cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, and NK cells but severely depressed numbers of lung CD8(+) T suppressor cells. Impaired lung CD8(+) T cell responses in RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) mice were associated with elevated lung IFN-γ levels, and neutralization of IFN-γ restored the CD8 response. These data demonstrate that restricting the ability of macrophages to polarize in response to Th1 or Th2 cytokines does not impair Pneumocystis clearance. However, a cell type-specific IFN-γ/IFN-γR-dependent mechanism regulates CD8(+) T suppressor cell recruitment, limits immunopathogenesis, preserves lung function, and enhances the resolution of PcP-related IRIS.

  16. Canakinumab reverses overexpression of inflammatory response genes in tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Torene, Rebecca; Nirmala, Nanguneri; Obici, Laura; Cattalini, Marco; Tormey, Vincent; Caorsi, Roberta; Starck-Schwertz, Sandrine; Letzkus, Martin; Hartmann, Nicole; Abrams, Ken; Lachmann, Helen; Gattorno, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore whether gene expression profiling can identify a molecular mechanism for the clinical benefit of canakinumab treatment in patents with tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS). Methods Blood samples were collected from 20 patients with active TRAPS who received canakinumab 150 mg every 4 weeks for 4 months in an open-label proof-of-concept phase II study, and from 20 aged-matched healthy volunteers. Gene expression levels were evaluated in whole blood samples by microarray analysis for arrays passing quality control checks. Results Patients with TRAPS exhibited a gene expression signature in blood that differed from that in healthy volunteers. Upon treatment with canakinumab, many genes relevant to disease pathogenesis moved towards levels seen in the healthy volunteers. Canakinumab downregulated the TRAPS-causing gene (TNF super family receptor 1A (TNFRSF1A)), the drug-target gene (interleukin (IL)-1B) and other inflammation-related genes (eg, MAPK14). In addition, several inflammation-related pathways were evident among the differentially expressed genes. Canakinumab treatment reduced neutrophil counts, but the observed expression differences remained after correction for this. Conclusions These gene expression data support a model in which canakinumab produces clinical benefit in TRAPS by increasing neutrophil apoptosis and reducing pro-inflammatory signals resulting from the inhibition of IL-1β. Notably, treatment normalised the overexpression of TNFRSF1A, suggesting that canakinumab has a direct impact on the main pathogenic mechanism in TRAPS. Trial registration number NCT01242813. PMID:27474763

  17. Polymorphisms in key pulmonary inflammatory pathways and the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Samuel M.; Grissom, Colin K.; Rondina, Matthew T.; Hoidal, John R.; Scholand, Mary Beth; Wolff, Roger K.; Morris, Alan H.; Paine, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Aim Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is an important clinical and public health problem. Why some at-risk individuals develop ARDS and others do not is unclear but may be related to differences in inflammatory and cell signaling systems. The Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (RAGE) and Granulocyte-Monocyte Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) pathways have recently been implicated in pulmonary pathophysiology; whether genetic variation within these pathways contributes to ARDS risk or outcome is unknown. Materials and Methods We studied 842 patients from three centers in Utah and 14 non-Utah ARDS Network centers. We studied patients at risk for ARDS and patients with ARDS to determine whether Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in the RAGE and GM-CSF pathways were associated with development of ARDS. We studied 29 SNPs in 5 genes within the two pathways and controlled for age, sepsis as ARDS risk factor, and severity of illness, while targeting a false discovery rate of ≤5%. In a secondary analysis we evaluated associations with mortality. Results Of 842 patients, 690 had ARDS, and 152 were at-risk. Sepsis was the risk factor for ARDS in 250 (30%) patients. When controlling for age, APACHE III score, sepsis as risk factor, and multiple comparisons, no SNPs were significantly associated with ARDS. In a secondary analysis, only rs743564 in CSF2 approached significance with regard to mortality (OR 2.17, unadjusted p = 0.005, adjusted p = 0.15). Conclusions Candidate SNPs within 5 genes in the RAGE and GM-CSF pathways were not significantly associated with development of ARDS in this multi-centric cohort. PMID:25513711

  18. Overlapping irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease: less to this than meets the eye?

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, Eamonn M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Though distinct in terms of pathology, natural history and therapeutic approach, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have some features in common. These include shared symptomatology and largely similar demographics. However, in most instances, clinical presentation, together with laboratory, imaging and endoscopic findings will readily permit the differentiation of active IBD from IBS. More problematic is the situation where a subject with IBD, in apparent remission, continues to complain of symptoms which, in aggregate, satisfy commonly employed criteria for the diagnosis of IBS. Access to methodologies, such the assay for levels of calprotectin in feces, now allows identification of ongoing inflammation in some such individuals and prompts appropriate therapy. More challenging is the IBD patient with persisting symptoms and no detectable evidence of inflammation; is this coincident IBS, IBS triggered by IBD or an even more subtle level of IBD activity unrecognized by available laboratory or imaging methods? Arguments can be advanced for each of these proposals; lacking definitive data, this issue remains unresolved. The occurrence of IBS-type symptoms in the IBD patient, together with some data suggesting a very subtle level of ‘inflammation‘ or ‘immune activation‘ in IBS, raises other questions: is IBS a prodromal form of IBD; and are IBS and IBD part of the spectrum of the same disease? All of the available evidence indicates that the answer to both these questions should be a resounding ‘no’. Indeed, the whole issue of overlap between IBS and IBD should be declared moot given their differing pathophysiologies, contrasting natural histories and divergent treatment paths. The limited symptom repertoire of the gastrointestinal tract may well be fundamental to the apparent confusion that has, of late, bedeviled this area. PMID:26929782

  19. Incidence of Paradoxical Tuberculosis-Associated Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome and Impact on Patient Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Maryline; Baudin, Elisabeth; Jani, Ilesh V.; Nunes, Elizabete; Verhoustraten, François; Calmy, Alexandra; Bastos, Rui; Bhatt, Nilesh B.; Michon, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Objectives and Design We used data from a randomized trial of HIV-tuberculosis co-infected patients in Mozambique to determine the incidence and predictors of paradoxical tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) occurring within 12 weeks of starting antiretroviral therapy, and to evaluate its association with patient outcome at 48 weeks. Methods HIV-tuberculosis co-infected and antiretroviral therapy-naïve adults with less than 250 CD4/mm3 were randomized to a nevirapine or efavirenz-based antiretroviral therapy initiated 4 to 6 weeks after starting tuberculosis treatment, and were then followed for 48 weeks. Tuberculosis cases were diagnosed using WHO guidelines, and tuberculosis-IRIS by case definitions of the International Network for the Study of HIV-associated IRIS. Results The 573 HIV-tuberculosis co-infected patients who initiated antiretroviral therapy had a median CD4 count of 92 cells/mm3 and HIV-1 RNA of 5.6 log10 copies/mL. Mortality at week 48 was 6.1% (35/573). Fifty-three (9.2%) patients presented a tuberculosis-IRIS within 12 weeks of starting antiretroviral therapy. Being female and having a low CD4 count, high HIV-1 RNA load, low body mass index and smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis were independently associated with tuberculosis-IRIS. After adjustment for baseline body mass index, CD4 count and hemoglobin, occurrence of tuberculosis-IRIS was independently associated with 48-week mortality (aOR 2.72 95%CI 1.14-6.54). Immunological and HIV-1 virological responses and tuberculosis treatment outcomes were not different between patients with and without tuberculosis-IRIS. Conclusion In this large prospective cohort, tuberculosis-IRIS occurrence within 12 weeks of starting antiretroviral therapy was independently associated with the mortality of HIV-tuberculosis co-infected patients at 48 weeks post antiretroviral therapy initiation. PMID:24367678

  20. Psychological adjustment and autonomic disturbances in inflammatory bowel diseases and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pellissier, Sonia; Dantzer, Cécile; Canini, Fréderic; Mathieu, Nicolas; Bonaz, Bruno

    2010-06-01

    Psychological factors and the autonomic nervous system (ANS) are implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This study aimed to assess, firstly the way IBS and IBD patients cope with their pathology according to their affective adjustment and secondly the possible links between these affective adjustments and ANS reactivity. Patients with Crohn's disease (CD; n=26), ulcerative colitis (UC; n=22), or IBS (n=27) were recruited and compared to 21 healthy subjects based on psychological variables (trait- and state anxiety, depressive symptomatology, negative mood, perceived stress, coping, health locus of control) and sympatho-vagal balance through heart-rate variability monitored at rest. A principal component analysis, performed on all affective variables, isolated a leading factor labelled as "affective adjustment". In each disease, patients were distributed into positive and negative affective adjustment. In all the diseases, a positive affect was associated with problem-focused coping, and a negative affect with emotion-focused coping and external health locus of control. Results show that the sympatho-vagal balance varied according to the disease. In CD presenting positive affectivity, an adapted high sympathetic activity was observed. In UC, a parasympathetic blunt was observed in the presence of negative affectivity and an equilibrated sympatho-vagal balance in the presence of positive affectivity. In contrast, in IBS, an important dysautonomia (with high sympathetic and low parasympathetic tone) was constantly observed whatever the affective adjustment. In conclusion, this study suggests that the equilibrium of the ANS is differentially adapted according to the disease. This equilibrium is conjugated with positive affective and cognitive adjustment in IBD (CD and UC) but not in IBS.

  1. Incidence and Prognostic Value of the Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome and Organ Dysfunctions in Ward Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zadravecz, Frank J.; Winslow, Christopher; Howell, Michael D.; Edelson, Dana P.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Tools that screen inpatients for sepsis use the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria and organ dysfunctions, but most studies of these criteria were performed in intensive care unit or emergency room populations. Objectives: To determine the incidence and prognostic value of SIRS and organ dysfunctions in a multicenter dataset of hospitalized ward patients. Methods: Hospitalized ward patients at five hospitals from November 2008 to January 2013 were included. SIRS and organ system dysfunctions were defined using 2001 International Consensus criteria. Patient characteristics and in-hospital mortality were compared among patients meeting two or more SIRS criteria and by the presence or absence of organ system dysfunction. Measurements and Main Results: A total of 269,951 patients were included in the study, after excluding 48 patients with missing discharge status. Forty-seven percent (n = 125,841) of the included patients met two or more SIRS criteria at least once during their ward stay. On ward admission, 39,105 (14.5%) patients met two or more SIRS criteria, and patients presenting with SIRS had higher in-hospital mortality than those without SIRS (4.3% vs. 1.2%; P < 0.001). Fourteen percent of patients (n = 36,767) had at least one organ dysfunction at ward admission, and those presenting with organ dysfunction had increased mortality compared with those without organ dysfunction (5.3% vs. 1.1%; P < 0.001). Conclusions: Almost half of patients hospitalized on the wards developed SIRS at least once during their ward stay. Our findings suggest that screening ward patients using SIRS criteria for identifying those with sepsis would be impractical. PMID:26158402

  2. Epidemiology of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis in cats hospitalized in a veterinary teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Babyak, Jonathan M; Sharp, Claire R

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the epidemiology of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis in cats hospitalized in a veterinary teaching hospital. DESIGN Observational study. ANIMALS 246 client-owned cats. PROCEDURES During a 3-month period, daily treatment records were evaluated for all hospitalized cats. Information extracted included signalment, temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, diagnostic test results, diagnosis, duration of hospitalization, and outcome (survival or death). Cats were classified into 1 of 4 disease categories (sepsis [confirmed infection and SIRS], infection [confirmed infection without SIRS], noninfectious SIRS [SIRS without a confirmed infection], and no SIRS [no SIRS or infection]). RESULTS Of the 246 cats, 26 and 3 were hospitalized 2 and 3 times, respectively; thus, 275 hospitalizations were evaluated. When SIRS was defined as the presence of ≥ 2 of 4 SIRS criteria, 17 cats had sepsis, 16 had infections, 81 had noninfectious SIRS, and 161 were classified in the no SIRS category at hospital admission. The prevalence of sepsis at hospital admission was 6.2 cases/100 admissions. Four cats developed sepsis while hospitalized, resulting in a sepsis incidence rate of 1.5 cases/100 hospital admissions. Four of 17 cats with sepsis at hospital admission and 3 of 4 cats that developed sepsis while hospitalized died or were euthanized, resulting in a mortality rate of 33.3% for septic cats; 239 hospitalizations resulted in survival, 28 resulted in euthanasia, and 8 resulted in death. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that many hospitalized cats have evidence of SIRS and some have sepsis. In cats, sepsis is an important clinical entity with a high mortality rate.

  3. Metabolic and inflammatory responses to the common sweetener stevioside and a glycemic challenge in horses with equine metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Elzinga, S E; Rohleder, B; Schanbacher, B; McQuerry, K; Barker, V D; Adams, A A

    2017-02-04

    Extracts derived from the leaves of the stevia plant (stevioside) are commonly used as sweeteners for humans and horses. Stevioside appears to be safe for human consumption, including for individuals with insulin dysregulation. In the horse, the safety or metabolic effects of stevioside on normal animals or on those with metabolic dysfunction are unknown. Furthermore, the inflammatory response to a glycemic challenge or to stevioside in horses is not well defined. Therefore, the objective of this study was to measure the effects of stevioside and a glycemic challenge on insulin, glucose, and inflammatory responses in horses with a common metabolic dysfunction (equine metabolic syndrome or EMS) compared with non-EMS controls. To accomplish this, 15 horses were selected; 8 EMS and 7 age-matched controls. An oral sugar test was performed using Karo corn syrup (karo) or stevioside in a random crossover design. Horses were given 0.15 mL/kg body weight of karo or its equivalent grams of sugar in stevia dissolved in water. Blood samples were collected by jugular venipuncture before administration of either stevia or karo and at 60 and 240 min after administration. Serum was used for glucose and insulin determination and plasma for isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) for inflammatory cytokine analysis via flow cytometry and reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Stevia appeared to stimulate lower glycemic and insulinemic responses when compared to karo, in particular in EMS horses. EMS and control horses had inverse inflammatory responses to administration of either stevia or karo with EMS horses having a proinflammatory response (P ≤ 0.05). These data provide evidence as to why horses with EMS may be predisposed to developing laminitis, potentially as a result of an exaggerated inflammatory response to glycemic and insulinemic responses. Furthermore, the data provide new avenues for exploring mechanisms behind the syndrome, in particular when using a

  4. Pathogenesis of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome affecting the central nervous system in patients infected with HIV.

    PubMed

    Martin-Blondel, Guillaume; Delobel, Pierre; Blancher, Antoine; Massip, Patrice; Marchou, Bruno; Liblau, Roland S; Mars, Lennart T

    2011-04-01

    Anti-retroviral therapy partially restores the immune function of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus, thereby drastically reducing morbidity and mortality. However, the clinical condition of a subset of patients on anti-retroviral therapy secondarily deteriorates due to an inflammatory process termed immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. This condition results from the restoration of the immune system that upon activation can be detrimental to the host. Among the various clinical manifestations, central nervous system involvement is associated with greater morbidity and mortality. This review covers the pathogenesis of this novel neuroinflammatory disease, including the nature of the provoking pathogens and the composition and specificity of the evoked immune responses. Our current perception of this neuroinflammatory disease supports therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating immune aggression without dampening the life-saving restoration of the immune response.

  5. Mast cells and nerves tickle in the tummy: implications for inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rijnierse, Anneke; Nijkamp, Frans P; Kraneveld, Aletta D

    2007-11-01

    Mast cells are well known as versatile cells capable of releasing and producing a variety of inflammatory mediators upon activation and are often found in close proximity of neurons. In addition, inflammation leads to local activation of neurons resulting in the release neuropeptides, which also play an important immune modulatory role by stimulation of immune cells. In intestinal disorders like inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), the number of mast cells is known to be much higher than in the normal intestine. Moreover, both these disorders are also reported to be associated with alterations in neuropeptide content and in neural innervation. Mutual association between mast cells and enteric nerves has been demonstrated to be increased in pathophysiological conditions and contribute to spreading and amplification of the response in IBD and IBS. In this review the focus lies on studies appointed to the direct interaction between mast cells and nerves in IBD, IBS, and animal models for these disorders so far.

  6. Oxidative and Nitrosative Stress and Immune-Inflammatory Pathways in Patients with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME)/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Gerwyn; Maes, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) / Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) has been classified as a disease of the central nervous system by the WHO since 1969. Many patients carrying this diagnosis do demonstrate an almost bewildering array of biological abnormalities particularly the presence of oxidative and nitrosative stress (O&NS) and a chronically activated innate immune system. The proposal made herein is that once generated chronically activated O&NS and immune-inflammatory pathways conspire to generate a multitude of self-sustaining and self-amplifying pathological processes which are associated with the onset of ME/CFS. Sources of continuous activation of O&NS and immune-inflammatory pathways in ME/CFS are chronic, intermittent and opportunistic infections, bacterial translocation, autoimmune responses, mitochondrial dysfunctions, activation of the Toll-Like Receptor Radical Cycle, and decreased antioxidant levels. Consequences of chronically activated O&NS and immune-inflammatory pathways in ME/CFS are brain disorders, including neuroinflammation and brain hypometabolism / hypoperfusion, toxic effects of nitric oxide and peroxynitrite, lipid peroxidation and oxidative damage to DNA, secondary autoimmune responses directed against disrupted lipid membrane components and proteins, mitochondrial dysfunctions with a disruption of energy metabolism (e.g. compromised ATP production) and dysfunctional intracellular signaling pathways. The interplay between all of these factors leads to self-amplifying feed forward loops causing a chronic state of activated O&NS, immune-inflammatory and autoimmune pathways which may sustain the disease. PMID:24669210

  7. Metabolic Syndrome and Inflammatory Responses to Long-Term Particulate Air Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiu-Chiuan; Schwartz, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Background Human data linking inflammation with long-term particulate matter (PM) exposure are still lacking. Emerging evidence suggests that people with metabolic syndrome (MS) may be a more susceptible population. Objectives Our goal was to examine potential inflammatory responses associated with long-term PM exposure and MS-dependent susceptibility. Methods We conducted secondary analyses of white blood cell (WBC) count and MS data from The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and PM10 (PM with aerodynamic diameter < 10 μm) data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Aerometric Information Retrieval System. Estimated 1-year PM10 exposures were aggregated at the centroid of each residential census-block group, using distance-weighted averages from all monitors in the residing and adjoining counties. We restricted our analyses to adults (20–89 years of age) with normal WBC (4,000–11,000 × 106/L), no existing cardiovascular disease, complete PM10 and MS data, and living in current residences > 1 year (n = 2,978; age 48.5 ± 17.8 years). Mixed-effects models were constructed to account for autocorrelation and potential confounders. Results After adjustment for demographics, socioeconomic factors, lifestyles, residential characteristics, and MS, we observed a statistically significant association between WBC count and estimated local PM10 levels (p = 0.035). Participants from the least polluted areas (1-year PM10 < 1st quartile cutoff: 27.8 μg/m3) had lower WBC counts than the others (difference = 145 × 106/L; 95% confidence interval, 10–281). We also noted a graded association between PM10 and WBC across subpopulations with increasing MS components, with 91 × 106/L difference in WBC for those with no MS versus 214, 338, and 461 × 106/L for those with 3, 4, and 5 metabolic abnormalities (trend-test p = 0.15). Conclusions Our study revealed a positive association between long-term PM exposure and hematological markers of

  8. Prolonged REM sleep restriction induces metabolic syndrome-related changes: Mediation by pro-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Venancio, Daniel Paulino; Suchecki, Deborah

    2015-07-01

    Chronic sleep restriction in human beings results in metabolic abnormalities, including changes in the control of glucose homeostasis, increased body mass and risk of cardiovascular disease. In rats, 96h of REM sleep deprivation increases caloric intake, but retards body weight gain. Moreover, this procedure increases the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), which may be involved with the molecular mechanism proposed to mediate insulin resistance. The goal of the present study was to assess the effects of a chronic protocol of sleep restriction on parameters of energy balance (food intake and body weight), leptin plasma levels and its hypothalamic receptors and mediators of the immune system in the retroperitoneal adipose tissue (RPAT). Thirty-four Wistar rats were distributed in control (CTL) and sleep restriction groups; the latter was kept onto individual narrow platforms immersed in water for 18h/day (from 16:00h to 10:00h), for 21days (SR21). Food intake was assessed daily, after each sleep restriction period and body weight was measured daily, after the animals were taken from the sleep deprivation chambers. At the end of the 21day of sleep restriction, rats were decapitated and RPAT was obtained for morphological and immune functional assays and expression of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) was assessed in skeletal muscle. Another subset of animals was used to evaluate blood glucose clearance. The results replicated previous findings on energy balance, e.g., increased food intake and reduced body weight gain. There was a significant reduction of RPAT mass (p<0.001), of leptin plasma levels and hypothalamic leptin receptors. Conversely, increased levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and expression of phosphorylated NFκ-β in the RPAT of SR21 compared to CTL rats (p<0.01, for all parameters). SR21 rats also displayed reduced glucose clearance and IRS-1 expression than CTL rats (p<0.01). The

  9. Fatal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome with human immunodeficiency virus infection and Candida meningitis: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Berkeley, Jennifer L; Nath, Avindra; Pardo, Carlos A

    2008-05-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is an increasingly recognized phenomenon of paradoxical worsening of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) upon initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). To date, there have been limited reports of IRIS in the central nervous system (CNS). Here, the authors describe a 43-year-old man with AIDS who presented with subacute meningitis. No pathogenic organism was identified by routine diagnostic tests, and he was treated empirically with an antituberculous regimen and initiated on HAART therapy. Soon after, he had a precipitous neurologic decline leading to his death. Postmortem evaluation showed a basilar Candida meningitis as well as vasculitis characterized by CD8+ T-cell infiltration, consistent with IRIS. The authors discuss the challenges in diagnosing fungal meningitides and the risks of initiating HAART therapy in those with possible undiagnosed underlying opportunistic infections. Additionally, the authors review the literature regarding CNS IRIS.

  10. Steroid-exacerbated HIV-associated cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome: 'Where a good intention turns bad'.

    PubMed

    Chabria, Shiven; Barakat, Lydia; Ogbuagu, Onyema

    2016-10-01

    A 51-year-old man with head and neck skin lesions was diagnosed with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) as his initial presentation of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Following initiation of antiretroviral therapy and subsequent full virologic suppression, his facial lesions worsened, consistent with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). He was started on glucocorticoids in an attempt to ameliorate the KS-IRIS but experienced paradoxical worsening of the KS lesions. Steroids were subsequently discontinued and he required chemotherapy for severe and cosmetically disfiguring skin lesions. This article describes the potential for worsening of KS lesions in individuals started on glucocorticoids for KS-IRIS as this has been reported rarely in published literature. The mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain poorly understood but potential explanations are offered in the case discussion. This article aims to raise clinician awareness on the harms of steroid use in patients with KS-IRIS.

  11. Cryptococcal breast abscess in an HIV-positive patient: arguments for reviewing the definition of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Haddow, Lewis J; Sahid, Faieza; Moosa, Mahomed-Yunus S

    2008-07-01

    Atypical manifestations of Cryptococcus neoformans disease have been reported in patients with HIV-1 infection as part of the spectrum of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). We describe a cryptococcal breast abscess in a patient presenting after 11 months of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The arguments for and against the case being a novel manifestation of IRIS are discussed. The potential hazards of using CD4 count as a surrogate marker of IRIS and the danger of misdiagnosing IRIS as failure of HAART are highlighted.

  12. The Role of Dietary Inflammatory Index in Cardiovascular Disease, Metabolic Syndrome and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Martínez-González, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an underlying pathophysiological process in chronic diseases, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. In fact, a number of systematic reviews have shown the association between inflammatory biomarkers, such as CRP, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-4, or IL-10, and cardio-metabolic diseases. Diet is one of the main lifestyle-related factors which modulates the inflammatory process. Different individual foods and dietary patterns can have a beneficial health effect associated with their anti-inflammatory properties. The dietary inflammatory index (DII) was recently developed to estimate the inflammatory potential of overall diet. The aim of this review is to examine the findings of recent papers that have investigated the association between the DII, cardio-metabolic risk factors and cardiovascular disease. The relevance of the DII score in the association between inflammation and cardio-metabolic diseases is critically appraised, as well as its role in the context of healthy dietary patterns. We conclude that the DII score seems to be a useful tool to appraise the inflammatory capacity of the diet and to better understand the relationships between diet, inflammation, and cardio-metabolic diseases. PMID:27527152

  13. The Role of Dietary Inflammatory Index in Cardiovascular Disease, Metabolic Syndrome and Mortality.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Martínez-González, Miguel A

    2016-08-03

    Inflammation is an underlying pathophysiological process in chronic diseases, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. In fact, a number of systematic reviews have shown the association between inflammatory biomarkers, such as CRP, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-4, or IL-10, and cardio-metabolic diseases. Diet is one of the main lifestyle-related factors which modulates the inflammatory process. Different individual foods and dietary patterns can have a beneficial health effect associated with their anti-inflammatory properties. The dietary inflammatory index (DII) was recently developed to estimate the inflammatory potential of overall diet. The aim of this review is to examine the findings of recent papers that have investigated the association between the DII, cardio-metabolic risk factors and cardiovascular disease. The relevance of the DII score in the association between inflammation and cardio-metabolic diseases is critically appraised, as well as its role in the context of healthy dietary patterns. We conclude that the DII score seems to be a useful tool to appraise the inflammatory capacity of the diet and to better understand the relationships between diet, inflammation, and cardio-metabolic diseases.

  14. In-line Filtration Decreases Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome, Renal and Hematologic Dysfunction in Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Michael; Dziuba, Friederike; Jack, Thomas; Köditz, Harald; Kaussen, Torsten; Bertram, Harald; Beerbaum, Philipp; Boehne, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) frequently leads to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) with concomitant organ malfunction. Infused particles may exacerbate inflammatory syndromes since they activate the coagulation cascade and alter inflammatory response or microvascular perfusion. In a randomized, controlled, prospective trial, we have previously shown that particle-retentive in-line filtration prevented major complications in critically ill children. Now, we investigated the effect of in-line filtration on major complications in the subgroup of cardiac patients. Children admitted to tertiary pediatric intensive care unit were randomized to either control or filter group obtaining in-line filtration throughout complete infusion therapy. Risk differences and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) of several complications such as SIRS, sepsis, mortality, various organ failure and dysfunction were compared between both groups using the Wald method. 305 children (n = 150 control, n = 155 filter group) with cardiac diseases were finally analyzed. The majority was admitted after cardiac surgery with CPB. Risk of SIRS (-11.3 %; 95 % CI -21.8 to -0.5 %), renal (-10.0 %; 95 % CI -17.0 to -3.0 %) and hematologic (-8.1 %; 95 % CI -14.2 to -0.2 %) dysfunction were significantly decreased within the filter group. No risk differences were demonstrated for occurrence of sepsis, any other organ failure or dysfunctions between both groups. Infused particles might aggravate a systemic hypercoagulability and inflammation with subsequent organ malfunction in pediatric cardiac intensive care patients. Particle-retentive in-line filtration might be effective in preventing SIRS and maintaining renal and hematologic function. In-line filtration offers a novel therapeutic option to decrease morbidity in cardiac intensive care.

  15. Pathogenesis of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome--endotoxin, inflammatory cells, and their mediators: cytokines and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Maier, R V

    2000-01-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) is caused by an overwhelming, uncontrolled systemic inflammatory response that is activated by a number of hostile stimuli including sepsis, hypovolemic shock, and severe trauma resulting in massive tissue injury. The indiscriminate activation of the inflammatory response due to these insults causes loss of the host's ability to localize the inflammation to the focus of the problem, leading to systemic inflammation and severe host tissue damage and subsequent MODS. While the major players, namely neutrophils, macrophages, endotoxin, cytokines, and oxidants have been known for some time, the disease processes responsible for the pathogenesis of MODS have only recently been elucidated. Our newly found knowledge has resulted in the development of novel therapeutic strategies to prevent or treat MODS, such as scavenging toxic oxygen species and inhibiting endotoxin, or cytokine production, or cytokine activity. Unfortunately, these strategies have not resulted in improved mortality rates among patients with MODS. The complex nature of the host response to severe insults combined with the fact that the host has multiple, redundant parallel systems to deal with various insults has made it difficult for clinical interventions to adequately ameliorate the disease process among patients at risk for MODS. The purpose of this article is to attempt to "dissect out" several individual components of the inflammatory response that play important roles in the development of MODS and to review some potentially beneficial approaches to combat these harmful processes.

  16. Anti-inflammatory Effects of Omega 3 and Omega 6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Cardiovascular Disease and Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tortosa-Caparrós, Esther; Navas-Carrillo, Diana; Marín, Francisco; Orenes-Piñero, Esteban

    2016-01-08

    A lipid excess produces a systemic inflammation process due to tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein synthesis. Simultaneously, this fat excess promotes the appearance of insulin resistance. All this contributes to the development of atherosclerosis and increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases. On the other hand, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (omega 3), and arachidonic acid (omega 6) have shown anti-inflammatory properties. Lately, an inverse relationship between omega-3 fatty acids, inflammation, obesity and cardiovascular diseases has been demonstrated. To check fatty acids effect, the levels of some inflammation biomarkers have been analyzed. Leptin, adiponectin and resistin represent a group of hormones associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases, obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance and are modified in obese-overweight people comparing to normal weight people. Omega-3 PUFAs have been shown to decrease the production of inflammatory mediators, having a positive effect in obesity and diabetes mellitus type-2. Moreover, they significantly decrease the appearance of cardiovascular disease risk factors. Regarding omega-6 PUFA, there is controversy whether their effects are pro- or anti-inflammatory. The aim of this manuscript is to provide a comprehensive overview about the role of omega-3 and omega-6 PUFAs in cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome.

  17. Posterior fossa syndrome with a large inflammatory ponto-mesencephalic lesion.

    PubMed

    Breit, S; Keserü, B; Nyffeler, T; Sturzenegger, M; Krestel, H

    2017-02-01

    Demonstration of a posterior fossa syndrome (PFS) in a 32-year-old male patient with clinically isolated syndrome which subsequently developed into relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis. The patient suffered from double vision, coordination problems including unsteady gait and atactic dysarthria, concentration difficulties, as well as adynamia and impaired decision making. The patient clinically presented a cerebellar and dysexecutive syndrome. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a contrast enhancing ponto-mesencephalic lesion with a volume of 4.8cm(3). Neuropsychological tests showed pronounced executive dysfunctions, reduced visuoconstructive skills, attentional deficits, echolalia, and non-fluent speech production. After cortisone and plasmapheresis, the cerebellar syndrome improved but manual fine motor skills and executive dysfunctions persisted. After three months, symptoms remitted except for a slight gait imbalance. After six months, neuropsychological tests were normal except for a moderate attention deficit. MRI revealed a clear regression of the ponto-mesencephalic lesion to a volume of 2.4cm(3) without contrast enhancement. This case report intends to provide an overview of the symptomatology and etiology of PFS and offers new insights into its pathomechanism demonstrating a pontine disconnection syndrome caused by a large demyelinating plaque.

  18. Fatal meningitis by Cryptococcus laurentii in a post-partum woman: A manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mittal, N; Vatsa, S; Minz, Aka

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis in immunocompetent post-partum women has been rarely reported. Immune restoration during post-partum period leads to unmasking of many opportunistic infections that may have been acquired during pregnancy but manifest itself in the post-partum period due to immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. This case highlights the importance of considering opportunistic pathogens in immunocompetent patients who may be undergoing immune restoration. We report here a fatal case of post-partum immunocompetent women who presented with clinical features of meningitis. Prognosis of the cryptococcal meningitis not only depends on the immune status of the patient but also on how early the disease is diagnosed in the course of illness.

  19. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in HIV and sporotrichosis coinfection: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lyra, Marcelo Rosandiski; Nascimento, Maria Letícia Fernandes Oliveira; Varon, Andréa Gina; Pimentel, Maria Inês Fernandes; Antonio, Liliane de Fátima; Saheki, Maurício Naoto; Bedoya-Pacheco, Sandro Javier; Valle, Antonio Carlos Francesconi do

    2014-01-01

    We report 2 cases of patients with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) associated with cutaneous disseminated sporotrichosis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. The patients received specific treatment for sporotrichosis. However, after 4 and 5 weeks from the beginning of antiretroviral therapy, both patients experienced clinical exacerbation of skin lesions despite increased T CD4+ cells (T cells cluster of differentiation 4 positive) count and decreased viral load. Despite this exacerbation, subsequent mycological examination after systemic corticosteroid administration did not reveal fungal growth. Accordingly, they were diagnosed with IRIS. However, the sudden withdrawal of the corticosteroids resulted in the recurrence of IRIS symptoms. No serious adverse effects could be attributed to prednisone. We recommend corticosteroid treatment for mild-to-moderate cases of IRIS in sporotrichosis and HIV coinfection with close follow-up.

  20. Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidants and Uncouplers of Oxidative Phosphorylation in Treatment of the Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS).

    PubMed

    Zakharova, Vlada V; Pletjushkina, Olga Yu; Zinovkin, Roman A; Popova, Ekaterina N; Chernyak, Boris V

    2017-05-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) development is accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction and excessive ROS production. Mitochondrial dysfunctions also occur in many SIRS-related diseases and may be critical for their pathogenesis; therefore, a use of mitochondria-targeted drugs is a promising trend in SIRS research and therapy. Here, we review recent studies concerning the application of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidants and uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation in animal models of SIRS and related diseases. We propose that a new class of uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation, lipophilic cations could be a base for a new generation of drugs for SIRS treatment. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 904-912, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Cryptococcal Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome in HIV-1–infected individuals: Literature Review and Proposed Clinical Case Definitions

    PubMed Central

    Haddow, Lewis J; Colebunders, Robert; Meintjes, Graeme; Lawn, Stephen D; Elliott, Julian H; Manabe, Yukari C; Bohjanen, Paul R; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Easterbrook, Philippa J; French, Martyn A; Boulware, David R

    2011-01-01

    Cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (C-IRIS) may present as a clinical deterioration or new presentation of cryptococcal disease following initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and is believed to be caused by recovery of cryptococcus-specific immune responses. We have reviewed the existing literature on C-IRIS to inform the development of a consensus case definition specific for paradoxical cryptococcal IRIS in patients with known cryptococcal disease prior to ART, and a second definition for incident cases of cryptococcosis developing during ART (here termed ART-associated cryptococcosis), a proportion of which are likely to be “unmasking” C-IRIS. These structured case definitions are intended for use in future clinical, epidemiologic and immunopathologic studies of C-IRIS, harmonizing diagnostic criteria, and facilitating comparisons between studies. As with tuberculosis-associated IRIS, these proposed definitions should be regarded as preliminary until further insights into the immunopathology of IRIS permit their refinement. PMID:21029993

  2. Infrapatellar bursitis with Mycobacterium malmoense related to immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in an HIV-positive patient.

    PubMed

    Leth, Steffen; Jensen-Fangel, Søren

    2012-11-27

    The immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after starting antiretroviral treatment for HIV infection can be caused by a great variety of pathogens. Among these are non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), with Mycobacterium avium complex being the most commonly described finding. Antimycobacterial treatment of NTM in cases of IRIS is controversial. We report the case of a 39-year-old man diagnosed with HIV-1 infection during admission to hospital with Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) and a CD4 cell count of 60/μl. The patient started antiretroviral treatment and made an uneventful recovery from the PCP diagnosis, but was readmitted after 2.5 months with a purulent infrapatellar bursitis on the left knee. A surgical procedure was performed and Mycobacterium malmoense was grown from the pus from the bursa. The patient recovered without supplemental antimycobacterial treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first report on IRIS caused by M malmoense.

  3. A Comparative Study of Quality of Life in Persons With Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Blagden, Sarah; Kingstone, Thomas; Soundy, Andrew; Lee, Rhonda; Singh, Sukhdev; Roberts, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder; however, it remains poorly understood. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, organic bowel disease characterized by young age of onset, debilitating symptoms, and invasive and toxic treatment options. This study aimed to determine the impact of IBS and IBD on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and the ways by which these conditions affect HRQoL, with the purpose of informing nurse specialists in gastroenterology who are best placed to support HRQoL improvements. Quality of life, symptom, and demographic data were collected from patients with IBS and IBD and tabulated and examined. Analysis of data demonstrated that HRQoL is significantly lower in IBS than in IBD. However, the ways by which these two conditions affect HRQoL differs, with greater impairments in social and emotional aspects of life in individuals with IBS. Bowel symptoms were the same or worse in IBD.

  4. Inflammatory Cytokine Profile Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Adult Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Hermosillo, Aldo; Molina-Ayala, Mario; Ramírez-Rentería, Claudia; Vargas, Guadalupe; Gonzalez, Baldomero; Isibasi, Armando; Archundia-Riveros, Irma; Mendoza, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the serum concentration of IL-6, IL-10, TNF, IL-8, resistin, and adiponectin in type 1 diabetic patients with and without metabolic syndrome and to determine the cut-off point of the estimated glucose disposal rate that accurately differentiated these groups. Design. We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation of all patients in our type 1 diabetes clinic from January 2012 to January 2013. Patients were considered to have metabolic syndrome when they fulfilled the joint statement criteria and were evaluated for clinical, biochemical, and immunological features. Methods. We determined serum IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF with flow cytometry and adiponectin and resistin concentrations with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in patients with and without metabolic syndrome. We also compared estimated glucose disposal rate between groups. Results. We tested 140 patients. Forty-four percent fulfilled the metabolic syndrome criteria (n = 61), 54% had central obesity, 30% had hypertriglyceridemia, 29% had hypoalphalipoproteinemia, and 19% had hypertension. We observed that resistin concentrations were higher in patients with MS. Conclusion. We found a high prevalence of MS in Mexican patients with T1D. The increased level of resistin may be related to the increased fat mass and could be involved in the development of insulin resistance. PMID:26273680

  5. Associations among gut permeability, inflammatory markers, and symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alterations in gastrointestinal (GI) permeability and immune measures are present in some patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) but the relationship to symptoms is poorly defined. In adults with IBS, we compared permeability, unstimulated peripheral blood monocyte (PBMC) interleukin-10 (IL-10...

  6. The Impact of Green Tea Supplementation on Anthropometric Indices and Inflammatory Cytokines in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mombaini, Esmat; Jafarirad, Sima; Husain, Durdana; Haghighizadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Padfar, Parivash

    2017-02-28

    The present study aimed to determine the effect of a green tea supplement on anthropometric indices and inflammatory factors in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). In this randomized clinical trial, 45 women with PCOS were randomly allocated into two groups receiving green tea tablets or placebo. The period of intervention was 45 days. The serum levels of interleukin 6, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and tumor necrosis factor α were measured before and after intervention period using the related kits. Anthropometric indices also were measured. The mean of body mass index, weight, waist circumference, and body fat percentage in the green tea group were reduced significantly. However, no significant difference was observed between the two groups. Also, there was no significant effect on the levels of inflammatory factors. The present results suggest that daily consumption of green tea tablets did not cause any effect on inflammation biomarkers in PCOS women. However, it may be effective as a complementary treatment for weight control in these women. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. The human intestinal microbiota of constipated-predominant irritable bowel syndrome patients exhibits anti-inflammatory properties

    PubMed Central

    Gobert, Alain P.; Sagrestani, Giulia; Delmas, Eve; Wilson, Keith T.; Verriere, Thomas G.; Dapoigny, Michel; Del’homme, Christophe; Bernalier-Donadille, Annick

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota of patients with constipated-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (C-IBS) displays chronic dysbiosis. Our aim was to determine whether this microbial imbalance instigates perturbation of the host intestinal mucosal immune response, using a model of human microbiota-associated rats (HMAR) and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced experimental colitis. The analysis of the microbiota composition revealed a decrease of the relative abundance of Bacteroides, Roseburia-Eubacterium rectale and Bifidobacterium and an increase of Enterobacteriaceae, Desulfovibrio sp., and mainly Akkermansia muciniphila in C-IBS patients compared to healthy individuals. The bacterial diversity of the gut microbiota of healthy individuals or C-IBS patients was maintained in corresponding HMAR. Animals harboring a C-IBS microbiota had reduced DSS colitis with a decreased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines from innate, Th1, and Th17 responses. The pre-treatment of conventional C57BL/6 mice or HMAR with A. muciniphila, but not with Escherichia coli, prior exposure to DSS also resulted in a reduction of colitis severity, highlighting that the anti-inflammatory effect of the gut microbiota of C-IBS patients is mediated, in part, by A. muciniphila. This work highlights a novel aspect of the crosstalk between the gut microbiota of C-IBS patients and host intestinal homeostasis. PMID:27982124

  8. Lung inflammatory and oxidative alterations after exogenous surfactant therapy fortified with budesonide in rabbit model of meconium aspiration syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mikolka, P; Kopincová, J; Košútová, P; Čierny, D; Čalkovská, A; Mokrá, D

    2016-12-22

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) triggers inflammatory and oxidative pathways which can inactivate both pulmonary surfactant and therapeutically given exogenous surfactant. Glucocorticoid budesonide added to exogenous surfactant can inhibit inflammation and thereby enhance treatment efficacy. Neonatal meconium (25 mg/ml, 4 ml/kg) was administered intratracheally (i.t.) to rabbits. When the MAS model was prepared, animals were treated with budesonide i.t. (Pulmicort, 0.25 mg/kg, M+B); with surfactant lung lavage (Curosurf®, 10 ml/kg, 5 mg phospholipids/ml, M+S) followed by undiluted Curosurf® i.t. (100 mg phospholipids/kg); with combination of budesonide and surfactant (M+S+B); or were untreated (M); or served as controls with saline i.t. instead of meconium (C). Animals were oxygen-ventilated for additional 5 h. Cell counts in the blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL), lung edema formation (wet/dry weight ratio), oxidative damage of lipids/ proteins and inflammatory expression profiles (IL-2, IL-6, IL-13, TNF-alpha) in the lung homogenate and plasma were determined. Combined surfactant+budesonide therapy was the most effective in reduction of neutrophil counts in BAL, oxidative damage, levels and mRNA expression of cytokines in the lung, and lung edema formation compared to untreated animals. Curosurf fortified with budesonide mitigated lung inflammation and oxidative modifications what indicate the perspectives of this treatment combination for MAS therapy.

  9. Altered Circulating Inflammatory Cytokines Are Associated with Anovulatory Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Women Resistant to Clomiphene Citrate Treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, LianLian; Qi, HongBo; Baker, Philip N; Zhen, QianNa; Zeng, Qing; Shi, Rui; Tong, Chao; Ge, Qian

    2017-03-01

    BACKGROUND Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common gynecological disease characterized by chronic oligoanovulation, clinical/biochemical hyperandrogenism, polycystic ovaries, and insulin resistance. Accumulating evidence has shown that PCOS-related ovarian dysfunction is the main cause of anovulatory infertility. Clomiphene citrate (CC) is the first-line therapy for PCOS patients; however, approximately 15-40% PCOS patients are resistant to CC treatment. It has been demonstrated that PCOS is a chronic pro-inflammatory state, as some pro-inflammatory cytokines were elevated in the peripheral circulation of PCOS patients, but whether altered inflammatory cytokines expression in PCOS patients is associated with blunted response to CC remains unknown. MATERIAL AND METHODS We recruited 44 CC-resistant PCOS patients, along with 55 age and body mass index (BMI)-matched CC-sensitive PCOS patients. Ovulation was induced by administrating 50-100 mg/day CC on days 5 to 9 of each menstrual cycle. The cytokine profiles were detected by cytokine antibody microarrays and further validated by ELISAs. RESULTS CC-resistant patients had higher levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) than the CC-sensitive individuals. A growth factor, angiopoietin-2, was significantly reduced [1.64 (0.93-1.95) vs. 1.08 (0.85-1.34), p<0.05], while a chemokine CXCL-16 was significantly increased (9.10±2.35 vs. 10.41±2.82, p<0.05) in CC-resistant patients compared to the CC-sensitive subjects. CXCL-16 was positively correlated with hsCRP (r=0.33, p<0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that angiopoietin-2 and CXCL-16 are associated with CC resistance. CONCLUSIONS Circulating cytokines are disturbed in CC-resistant PCOS patients. Altered angiopoietin-2 and CXCL-16 levels might compromise the responsiveness of the ovary to CC through up-regulating angiogenesis and inflammation.

  10. Effects of Bread with Nigella Sativa on Lipid Profiles, Apolipoproteins and Inflammatory Factor in Metabolic Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nigella sativa (N.sativa) has been used in traditional medicine and many studies have been performed in different communities in order to reveal the effects of it on medical disorders and chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of bread with N. Sativa on lipid profiles, apolipoproteins, and inflammatory factors in metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients. A randomized, double-blind, cross-over and clinical trial was conducted in 51 MetS patients of both sexes with age group of 20-65 years old in Chaloos, north of Iran. Patients were randomly divided in two groups. In phase 1, intervention group (A, n = 27) received daily a bread with N. sativa and wheat bran and control group (B, n = 24) received the same bread without N. sativa for 2 months. After 2 weeks of wash out period, phase 2 was started with switch the intervention between two groups. Measuring of lipid profiles, apolipoproteins and inflammatory factor was performed for all patients before and after two phases. In this study, treatment, sequence and time effects of intervention were evaluated and revealed that consumption of bread with N. sativa has no significant treatment and time effects on triglyceride (TG), cholesterol (CHOL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), apolipoprotein (APO)-A, APO-B and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (p > 0.05). Sequence effect was significant on CHOL, LDL, APO-A, and APO-B (p < 0.05) but was not significant on other parameters (p > 0.05). Consumption of bread with N. sativa has no a significant effect on lipid profiles, apolipoproteins and inflammatory factor in MetS patients. PMID:27152298

  11. Inflammatory arthritis in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes: a multicenter retrospective study and literature review of 68 cases.

    PubMed

    Mekinian, Arsène; Braun, Thorsten; Decaux, Olivier; Falgarone, Géraldine; Toussirot, Eric; Raffray, Loic; Omouri, Mohamed; Gombert, Bruno; De Wazieres, Benoit; Buchdaul, Anne-Laure; Ziza, Jean-Marc; Launay, David; Denis, Guillaume; Madaule, Serge; Rose, Christian; Grignano, Eric; Fenaux, Pierre; Fain, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    We describe the characteristics and outcome of inflammatory arthritis in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in a French multicenter retrospective study. Twenty-two patients with MDS (median age, 77.5 yr [interquartile range, 69-81]; 10 women) were included. Inflammatory arthritis presented as polyarthritis in 17 cases (77%) and with symmetric involvement in 15 cases (68%). At diagnosis, the median disease activity score 28 based on C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) was 4.5 [2-6.5]. Two patients had anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs), and 1 had radiologic erosions. The median time between the diagnoses of arthritis and MDS was 10 months [6-42], with a median articular symptom duration of 3 months [2-8]. The diagnosis of both diseases was concomitant in 6 cases (27%); arthritis preceded MDS in 12 cases (55%), and occurred after MDS in 4 (18%). While the number of swollen and tender joints significantly decreased during follow-up, as did the median DAS28-CRP (from 4.3 [3.8-4.6] at baseline to 2.9 [1.75-3.3]; p < 0.05), CRP remained elevated (CRP >20 mg/L) in 8 patients (42%). Nevertheless, radiographic progression and new ACPA positivity were not observed during a median follow-up of 29 months [9-76]. While most of the patients were treated with steroids (n = 16) for arthritis, additional treatment was administered in only 4 patients (hydroxychloroquine, n = 2; sulfasalazine [Salazopyrin] and etanercept, n = 1, respectively). Eleven patients died during follow-up from acute myeloid leukemia (n = 5); infections (n = 3); or cerebral bleeding, cardiorespiratory failure, or undetermined cause (n = 1, respectively). Inflammatory arthritis associated with MDS can have various presentations and is often seronegative and nonerosive. Steroids alone are the most common treatment in MDS-associated arthritis, but that treatment is insufficient to control arthritis. Steroid-sparing strategies need to be identified.

  12. Effects of Bread with Nigella Sativa on Lipid Profiles, Apolipoproteins and Inflammatory Factor in Metabolic Syndrome Patients.

    PubMed

    Mohtashami, Alireaz; Mahaki, Behzad; Azadbakht, Leila; Entezari, Mohammad Hasan

    2016-04-01

    Nigella sativa (N.sativa) has been used in traditional medicine and many studies have been performed in different communities in order to reveal the effects of it on medical disorders and chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of bread with N. Sativa on lipid profiles, apolipoproteins, and inflammatory factors in metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients. A randomized, double-blind, cross-over and clinical trial was conducted in 51 MetS patients of both sexes with age group of 20-65 years old in Chaloos, north of Iran. Patients were randomly divided in two groups. In phase 1, intervention group (A, n = 27) received daily a bread with N. sativa and wheat bran and control group (B, n = 24) received the same bread without N. sativa for 2 months. After 2 weeks of wash out period, phase 2 was started with switch the intervention between two groups. Measuring of lipid profiles, apolipoproteins and inflammatory factor was performed for all patients before and after two phases. In this study, treatment, sequence and time effects of intervention were evaluated and revealed that consumption of bread with N. sativa has no significant treatment and time effects on triglyceride (TG), cholesterol (CHOL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), apolipoprotein (APO)-A, APO-B and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (p > 0.05). Sequence effect was significant on CHOL, LDL, APO-A, and APO-B (p < 0.05) but was not significant on other parameters (p > 0.05). Consumption of bread with N. sativa has no a significant effect on lipid profiles, apolipoproteins and inflammatory factor in MetS patients.

  13. Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Bladder Tumor in a Patient with Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Marte, Antonio; Indolfi, Paolo; Ficociello, Carmine; Oreste, Matilde; Bottigliero, Gaetano; Gualdiero, Giovanna; Barone, Ciro; Vigliar, Elena; Indolfi, Cristiana; Casale, Fiorina

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare neoplasm described in several tissues and organs including genitourinary system, lung, head, and neck. The etiology of IMT is contentious, and whether it is a postinflammatory process or a true neoplasm remains controversial. To our knowledge, we report the first reported case of IMT of urinary bladder in a pediatric patient with Wolf-Hirschhorn (WHS). We also review the literature about patients with associated neoplasia. PMID:24024066

  14. Microbe-Induced Inflammatory Signals Triggering Acquired Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, J. Luis; Kotecha, Ritesh; Nakao, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    Acquired bone marrow failure syndromes encompass a unique set of disorders characterized by a reduction in the effective production of mature cells by the bone marrow (BM). In the majority of cases, these syndromes are the result of the immune-mediated destruction of hematopoietic stem cells or their progenitors at various stages of differentiation. Microbial infection has also been associated with hematopoietic stem cell injury and may lead to associated transient or persistent BM failure, and recent evidence has highlighted the potential impact of commensal microbes and their metabolites on hematopoiesis. We summarize the interactions between microorganisms and the host immune system and emphasize how they may impact the development of acquired BM failure. PMID:28286502

  15. Prognostic relations between inflammatory markers and mortality in diabetic patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, P L; Morinigo, J L; Pabon, P; Martin, F; Piedra, I; Palacios, I F; Martin-Luengo, C

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the differences in the inflammatory status between diabetic and non-diabetic patients and to evaluate the usefulness of C reactive protein, fibrinogen, and leucocyte count as predictors of death in diabetic patients with unstable coronary disease. Design: Nested case-control comparisons of the inflammatory status between diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Prospective cohort analysis of C reactive protein concentration, fibrinogen concentration, and leucocyte count as predictors of cardiovascular death in diabetic patients. Setting: Coronary care unit in Spain. Participants: 83 diabetic patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome and 83 sex and aged matched patients selected from 361 non-diabetic patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome. Main outcome measures: Plasma concentrations of C reactive protein and fibrinogen, and leucocyte count. Investigators contacted patients to assess clinical events. Results: Concentrations of C reactive protein and fibrinogen, and leucocyte count on admission were higher in diabetic than in non-diabetic patients (7 mg/l v 5 mg/l, p  =  0.020; 3.34 g/l v 2.90 g/l, p  =  0.013; and 8.8 × 109/l v 7.8 × 109/l, p  =  0.040). Among diabetic patients, these values were also higher in those who died during the 22 month follow up (13 mg/l v 6 mg/l, p  =  0.001; 3.95 g/l v 3.05 g/l, p < 0.001; and 11.4 × 109/l v 8.4 × 109/l, p  =  0.005). After adjustment for confounding factors, diabetic patients in the highest tertile of C reactive protein had a hazard ratio for cardiovascular death of 4.51 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.62 to 12.55). Similar hazard ratios were for fibrinogen 3.74 (95% CI 1.32 to 10.62) and for leucocyte count 3.64 (95% CI 1.37 to 9.68). Conclusions: Inflammation appears more evident in diabetic than in non-diabetic patients with acute coronary syndrome. C reactive protein concentration, fibrinogen concentration, and leucocyte count constitute

  16. A role for leptin in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and in immune response.

    PubMed

    Waelput, W; Brouckaert, P; Broekaert, D; Tavernier, J

    2002-09-01

    Leptin was originally identified as an adipocyte-derived cytokine with a key role in the regulation of the energy balance. Subsequent research has, however, revealed that leptin's biological action is not restricted to its effects on appetite and food intake, but rather has a much more pleiotropic character. Evidence is now accumulating that it has important functions in reproduction, hematopoiesis, HPA-axis endocrinology and angiogenesis. In this review, we have focused on the effects of leptin in the immune system, which can be found in both the antigen-specific immunity and in the inflammatory effector system.

  17. Trauma, Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome, Dietary Supplements, Illicit Steroid Use and a Questionable Malignant Hyperthermia Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Capacchione, John F.; Radimer, Matthew C.; Sagel, Jeffrey S.; Kraus, Gregory P.; Sambuughin, Nyamkhishig; Muldoon, Sheila M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle calcium regulation associated primarily, but not exclusively, with mutations in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor. Associated environmental factors, however, may also be important for expression of the syndrome. METHODS AND RESULTS A 24-yr-old trauma patient developed a fulminant MH crisis after a 3 minute exposure to sevoflurane. A thorough evaluation of underlying co-morbidities revealed a number of environmental factors that could have altered skeletal muscle calcium regulation, and may have potentially influenced the effects of volatile inhaled anesthetics. Since MH is a syndrome characterized by abnormal skeletal muscle calcium regulation, other factors that alter calcium homeostasis may exacerbate the impact of inhaled MH-triggering drugs. CONCLUSIONS While a thorough history of MH episodes in a proband and family is emphasized as part of a complete preanesthetic evaluation, obtaining a history of other environmental entities that may alter calcium regulation may be equally important to knowing the family history. PMID:19224800

  18. Pro-inflammatory chemokine C-C motif ligand 16 (CCL-16) dysregulation in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    DEL VALLE-PINERO, A. Y.; MARTINO, A. C.; TAYLOR, T. J.; MAJORS, B. L.; PATEL, N. S.; HEITKEMPER, M. M.; HENDERSON, W. A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a serious health problem that affects an estimated 10–15% of people worldwide and has economic consequences in the United States of over $30 billion annually. In the US, IBS affects all races and both sexes, with more females than males (2 : 1) reporting symptoms consistent with IBS. Although the etiology of this functional gastrointestinal disorder is unknown, literature suggests that a subclinical inflammatory component has a role in the etiologic mechanisms underlying IBS. The aim of this study was to evaluate the gene expression of inflammatory biomarkers in patients with and without IBS and among different IBS phenotypes. Methods Irritable bowel syndrome patients (n = 12) that met Rome III Criteria for IBS longer than 6 months were compared with healthy matched controls (n = 12). Peripheral whole blood from fasting participants was collected and RNA was extracted. The expression of 96 inflammatory genes was then analyzed using a custom quantitative real-time PCR array. Key Results CCL-16 gene expression was upregulated by 7.46-fold in IBS patients when compared with controls. CCL-16 was overexpressed by over 130-fold in IBS-constipation patients when compared with both controls and IBS-diarrhea patients. Conclusions & Inferences These results further suggest a subclinical inflammatory component underlying IBS. To better understand the phenotypic differences in IBS it is important to broaden the study of these inflammatory and other biomarkers. PMID:21951809

  19. Chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia following immunization with the hepatitis B vaccine: another angle of the 'autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants' (ASIA).

    PubMed

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Zafrir, Yaron; Kivity, Shaye; Balofsky, Ari; Amital, Howard; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2014-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to gather information regarding demographic and clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with either fibromyalgia (FM) or chronic fatigue (CFS) following hepatitis B vaccination (HBVv) and furthermore to apply the recently suggested criteria of autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndromes induced by adjuvants (ASIA), in the aim of identifying common characteristics that may suggest an association between fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue and HBV vaccination. Medical records of 19 patients with CFS and/or fibromyalgia following HBVv immunization were analyzed. All of which were immunized during 1990-2008 in different centers in the USA. All medical records were evaluated for demographics, medical history, the number of vaccine doses, as well as immediate and long term post-immunization adverse events and clinical manifestations. In addition, available blood tests, imaging results, treatments and outcomes were analyzed. ASIA criteria were applied to all patients. The mean age of patients was 28.6 ± 11 years, of which 68.4 % were females. 21.05 % had either personal or familial background of autoimmune disease. The mean latency period from the last dose of HBVv to onset of symptoms was 38.6 ± 79.4 days, ranging from days to a year. Eight (42.1 %) patients continued with the immunization program despite experiencing adverse events. Manifestations that were commonly reported included neurological manifestations (84.2 %), musculoskeletal (78.9 %), psychiatric (63.1 %), fatigue (63.1 %), gastrointestinal complains (58 %) and mucocutaneous manifestations (36.8 %). Autoantibodies were detected in 71 % of patients tested. All patients fulfilled the ASIA criteria. This study suggests that in some cases CFS and FM can be temporally related to immunization, as part of ASIA syndrome. The appearance of adverse event during immunization, the presence of autoimmune susceptibility and higher titers of autoantibodies all can be suggested as risk

  20. Inflammatory and immune markers associated with physical frailty syndrome: findings from Singapore longitudinal aging studies

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yanxia; Tan, Crystal Tze Ying; Nyunt, Ma Shwe Zin; Mok, Esther Wing Hei; Camous, Xavier; Kared, Hassen; Fulop, Tamas; Feng, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Chronic systematic inflammation and reduced immune system fitness are considered potential contributing factors to the development of age-related frailty, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. This exploratory study aimed to identify frailty-related inflammatory markers and immunological phenotypes in a cohort of community-dwelling adults aged ≥ 55 years. Frailty was assessed using two models, a Frailty Index and a categorical phenotype, and correlated with levels of circulating immune biomarkers and markers of senescence in immune cell subsets. We identified eight serological biomarkers that were associated with frailty, including sgp130, IL-2Rα, I-309, MCP-1, BCA-1, RANTES, leptin, and IL-6R. Frailty Index was inversely predicted by the frequency of CD3+, CD45RA+, and central memory CD4 cells, and positively predicted by the loss of CD28 expression, especially in CD8+ T cells, while frailty status was predicted by the frequency of terminal effector CD8+ T cells. In γ/δ T cells, frailty was negatively associated with CD27, and positively associated with IFNγ+TNFα- secretion by γ/δ2+ cells and IFNγ-TNFα+ secretion by γ/δ2- cells. Increased numbers of exhausted and CD38+ B cells, as well as CD14+CD16+ inflammatory monocytes, were also identified as frailty-associated phenotypes. This pilot study supports an association between inflammation, cellular immunity, and the process of frailty. These findings have significance for the early identification of frailty using circulating biomarkers prior to clinical manifestations of severe functional decline in the elderly. PMID:27119508

  1. Levels of Neopterin and other Inflammatory Markers in Obese and Non-Obese Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Agacayak, Elif; Tunc, Senem Yaman; Sak, Sibel; Basaranoglu, Serdar; Yüksel, Hatice; Turgut, Abdulkadir; Gul, Talip

    2015-01-01

    Background We aimed to measure the levels of inflammatory markers and neopterin in obese and non-obese patients with PCOS by using 2 separate control groups with matching body mass index (BMI). Material/Methods A total of 60 women of reproductive age with (n=30) and without (n=30) PCOS were included in this study. Based on their BMI, patients with PCOS were divided into 2 groups as obese (n=15) and non-obese (n=15) PCOS groups. In addition, 2 BMI-matched control groups were formed. Neopterin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (N/L ratio), and vitamin B12 were assessed by complete blood count. Results No significant difference was found between patients with PCOS and control subjects in neopterin, IL-6, TNF-α, and CRP levels. However, N/L ratio levels were significantly higher (p 0.045) and vitamin B12 levels were significantly lower (p 0.033) in patients with PCOS compared to control subjects. No statistically significant difference was found between obese and non-obese patients with PCOS and control subjects in neopterin, IL-6, TNF-α, and N/L ratio levels. However, CRP levels were significantly higher in obese patients with PCOS compared to obese control subjects (p 0.007). Conclusions It can be concluded that inflammatory activity is increased in patients with PCOS, can lead to an increased risk for atherosclerosis, and this increase is not caused by obesity but rather by the polycystic ovary syndrome itself. However, studies with larger sample sizes are needed in this area. PMID:26292090

  2. A rare case of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome presenting as secondary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Asma; Skalweit, Marion J

    2015-09-01

    Immune reconstitution syndrome has rarely been reported in the context of syphilis infection. We report a patient with AIDS (CD4 42 cells/mm(3), viral load 344,000 cp/ml), treated previously for secondary syphilis and started on an integrase inhibitor-based single-tablet antiretroviral treatment regimen. After four weeks of antiretroviral treatment, he presented with non-tender, non-blanching erythematous nodules on his chest, an elevated rapid plasma reagin (1:1024) and immune reconstitution (CD4 154 cells/mm(3), HIV-RNA 130 cp/ml). A detailed workup to exclude opportunistic infections including secondary and neurosyphilis was performed. The patient was continued on antiretroviral treatment and treated empirically for neurosyphilis given cerebrospinal lymphocytosis and dermatopathology suggesting treponemal antigen-driven B-cell hyperplasia. We favour a diagnosis of immune reconstitution in association with prior syphilis infection attributable to rapid and potent immune restoration afforded by integrase inhibitors.

  3. Altered Circulating Inflammatory Cytokines Are Associated with Anovulatory Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Women Resistant to Clomiphene Citrate Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, LianLian; Qi, HongBo; Baker, Philip N.; Zhen, QianNa; Zeng, Qing; Shi, Rui; Tong, Chao; Ge, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common gynecological disease characterized by chronic oligoanovulation, clinical/biochemical hyperandrogenism, polycystic ovaries, and insulin resistance. Accumulating evidence has shown that PCOS-related ovarian dysfunction is the main cause of anovulatory infertility. Clomiphene citrate (CC) is the first-line therapy for PCOS patients; however, approximately 15–40% PCOS patients are resistant to CC treatment. It has been demonstrated that PCOS is a chronic pro-inflammatory state, as some pro-inflammatory cytokines were elevated in the peripheral circulation of PCOS patients, but whether altered inflammatory cytokines expression in PCOS patients is associated with blunted response to CC remains unknown. Material/Methods We recruited 44 CC-resistant PCOS patients, along with 55 age and body mass index (BMI)-matched CC-sensitive PCOS patients. Ovulation was induced by administrating 50–100 mg/day CC on days 5 to 9 of each menstrual cycle. The cytokine profiles were detected by cytokine antibody microarrays and further validated by ELISAs. Results CC-resistant patients had higher levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) than the CC-sensitive individuals. A growth factor, angiopoietin-2, was significantly reduced [1.64 (0.93–1.95) vs. 1.08 (0.85–1.34), p<0.05], while a chemokine CXCL-16 was significantly increased (9.10±2.35 vs. 10.41±2.82, p<0.05) in CC-resistant patients compared to the CC-sensitive subjects. CXCL-16 was positively correlated with hsCRP (r=0.33, p<0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that angiopoietin-2 and CXCL-16 are associated with CC resistance. Conclusions Circulating cytokines are disturbed in CC-resistant PCOS patients. Altered angiopoietin-2 and CXCL-16 levels might compromise the responsiveness of the ovary to CC through up-regulating angiogenesis and inflammation. PMID:28246376

  4. Palmitoyl acyltransferase DHHC21 mediates endothelial dysfunction in systemic inflammatory response syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Richard S.; Yang, Xiaoyuan; Meegan, Jamie E.; Overstreet, Jonathan W.; Yang, Clement G.Y.; Elliott, John A.; Reynolds, Jason J.; Cha, Byeong J.; Pivetti, Christopher D.; Mitchell, David A.; Wu, Mack H.; Deschenes, Robert J.; Yuan, Sarah Y.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a hallmark of systemic inflammatory response underlying multiple organ failure. Here we report a novel function of DHHC-containing palmitoyl acyltransferases (PATs) in mediating endothelial inflammation. Pharmacological inhibition of PATs attenuates barrier leakage and leucocyte adhesion induced by endothelial junction hyperpermeability and ICAM-1 expression during inflammation. Among 11 DHHCs detected in vascular endothelium, DHHC21 is required for barrier response. Mice with DHHC21 function deficiency (Zdhhc21dep/dep) exhibit marked resistance to injury, characterized by reduced plasma leakage, decreased leucocyte adhesion and ameliorated lung pathology, culminating in improved survival. Endothelial cells from Zdhhc21dep/dep display blunted barrier dysfunction and leucocyte adhesion, whereas leucocytes from these mice did not show altered adhesiveness. Furthermore, inflammation enhances PLCβ1 palmitoylation and signalling activity, effects significantly reduced in Zdhhc21dep/dep and rescued by DHHC21 overexpression. Likewise, overexpression of wild-type, not mutant, PLCβ1 augments barrier dysfunction. Altogether, these data suggest the involvement of DHHC21-mediated PLCβ1 palmitoylation in endothelial inflammation. PMID:27653213

  5. IMMUNE RECONSTITUTION INFLAMMATORY SYNDROME (IRIS)-ASSOCIATED BURKITT LYMPHOMA FOLLOWING COMBINATION ANTI-RETROVIRAL THERAPY IN HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Vishnu, Prakash; Dorer, Russell P.; Aboulafia, David M.

    2015-01-01

    HIV/AIDS-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is defined as a paradoxical worsening or unmasking of infections and autoimmune diseases, following initiation of combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART). More recently, the case definition of IRIS has been broadened to include certain malignancies including Kaposi’s sarcoma, and less frequently Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Here in we describe 3 patients infected with HIV who began cART and within a median of 15 weeks each achieved non-detectable HIV viral loads, and yet within 6 months presented for medical attention with fevers, night sweats, weight loss and bulky lymphadenopathy. Laboratory studies included elevated lactate dehydrogenase and β-2 microglobulin levels and well preserved CD4+ lymphocyte counts in excess of 350 cells/µL. In each patient lymph node biopsies were diagnostic of Burkitt lymphoma (BL). Patients were managed with multi-agent chemotherapy in conjunction with cART. We also survey the medical literature of other cases of IRIS-associated BL. Although the pathogenesis of IRIS-associated BL is not well elucidated, chronic antigenic stimulation coupled with immune deterioration, followed by subsequent restoration of the immune response and aberrant cytokine expression may be a pathway to lymphomagenesis. IRIS-associated BL should be suspected in patients with normal or near normal CD4+ lymphocyte counts who develop progressive lymphadenopathy post-initiation of cART. PMID:25458079

  6. Symptomatic relapse of HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis: recurrent cryptococcal meningitis or Cryptococcus-related immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome?

    PubMed

    Jhamb, Rajat; Kashyap, Bineeta; Das, Shukla; Berry, Neha; Garg, Arun

    2014-04-01

    Cryptococcosis, a significant opportunistic infection, has become a global concern since the advent of immunosuppressive chemotherapy or in immunodeficient patients. Host responses range from a harmless colonization to disseminated disease. An accurate or definitive diagnosis in patients with cryptococcal meningitis is often delayed because of the similar clinical presentation and biochemical or cerebrospinal fluid findings to those of a variety of infectious and non-infectious aetiologies, most of which are also especially prevalent in developing countries. Rarely, patients with cryptococcal meningitis can develop immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) when initiated on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) the diagnosis which is often missed and can be fatal. Due to the similar presentation of infection and IRIS, it is often confused with the relapse of cryptococcal meningitis. We report a case of paradoxical recurrent meningitis in response to the initiation of cART in a patient diagnosed with cryptococcal meningitis and propose that the recurrent symptoms resulted from a therapy-induced reconstitution of the immune response against residual Cryptococcus neoformans.

  7. Cryptococcal meningitis accompanying lymphocytic inflammation predominantly in cerebral deep white matter: a possible manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Hiroya; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Kobayashi, Zen; Inaba, Akira; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2014-02-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is rarely complicated by immune-mediated leukoencephalopathy, but the precise pathomechanism is uncertain. A 72-year-old Japanese man treated with prednisolone for Sweet disease developed a subacute progression of meningitis, which was considered as neuro-Sweet disease. A treatment by methylprednisolone rapidly improved CSF findings with a remarkable decrease in lymphocyte numbers in the blood, but the patient's consciousness still worsened after the cessation of the treatment. The patient developed cryptococcal meningitis and MRI showed abnormal intensities predominantly in the cerebral deep white matter along with the recovery of lymphocyte numbers in the blood, which resulted in death. A postmortem examination of the brain revealed degenerative lesions, especially at the cerebral white matter and cortex adjacent to the leptomeninges abundantly infiltrated by Cryptococcus neoformans. In the affected cerebral deep white matter, perivascular infiltration of lymphocytes was prominent in coexistence with reactive astrocytes and vascular proliferation, but these findings were not observed in the subcortical and cortical lesions. Cryptococcus neoformans was not present within the brain parenchyma. This is the first report of a case suggesting that cryptococcal meningitis can accompany lymphocytic inflammation predominantly in cerebral deep white matter as a possible manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

  8. Impact of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) on mortality and morbidity in HIV-infected patients in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Hoyo-Ulloa, Irma; Belaunzarán-Zamudio, Pablo F.; Crabtree-Ramirez, Brenda; Galindo-Fraga, Arturo; Pérez-Aguinaga, María Eugenia; Sierra-Madero, Juan G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objectives To estimate the impact of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) on morbidity and mortality in patients starting highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Methods A retrospective cohort study of HIV-positive patients starting HAART was conducted at a tertiary care referral center in Mexico City. We estimated the incidence of IRIS, hospitalizations and death rates during the first 2 years of HAART. The relative risk of death (RR) and hospitalization for patients with IRIS were adjusted for relevant covariates using regression methods. Results During the 2-year follow-up period, 27% of patients developed IRIS (14 IRIS cases per 100 person-years). The relative risk of death among patients who developed IRIS was 3 times higher (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19–7.65, p = 0.03). After adjusting for previous opportunistic infections we still observed a higher death rate among patients with IRIS (RR 2.3, 95% CI 0.9–5.9, p = 0.09). An effect modification of IRIS over mortality was observed by previous opportunistic infection. Conclusions IRIS-associated mortality is strongly confounded by previous opportunistic infection. Patients with AIDS who eventually developed IRIS had the highest risk of death at the 2-year follow-up. PMID:21493116

  9. Leishmaniasis as a Manifestation of Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (IRIS) in HIV-Infected Patients: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Badaró, Roberto; Gonçalves, Larissa O.; Gois, Luana L.; Maia, Zuinara Pereira Gusmão; Benson, Constance; Grassi, Maria Fernanda Rios

    2016-01-01

    Introduction After the onset of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), some HIV-infected patients present a severe inflammation in response to a latent or a previously treated opportunistic pathogen termed immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Few reports of tegumentary and visceral leishmaniasis have been described in association with IRIS. Methods A systematic literature review of IRIS in association with leishmaniasis identified 34 reported cases. Results and Discussion The majority of these occurred in males 4 months following the onset of HAART. The mean CD4 count before HAART was 94 ± 77 cells/mm3, increasing to 5 times the initial value between the onset of HAART and IRIS presentation. Visceral leishmaniasis and post–kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis were the most commonly reported clinical manifestations, followed by tegumentary leishmaniasis and uveitis. Conclusions Commonly found characteristics included cutaneous involvement, regardless of Leishmania species; appearance of lesions unrelated to time of probable Leishmania infection; rapid recovery of CD4 count following HAART; and rapid progression. PMID:25331225

  10. Involvement of chronic epipharyngitis in autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA).

    PubMed

    Hotta, Osamu; Tanaka, Ayaki; Torigoe, Akira; Imai, Kazuaki; Ieiri, Norio

    2016-09-03

    The epipharynx is an immunologically active site even under normal conditions, and enhanced immunologic activation is prone to occur in response to an upper respiratory infection, air pollution, and possibly to vaccine adjuvants. Due to the potential link between the central nervous system and immune function, a relationship between epipharyngitis and autonomic nervous disturbance as well as autoimmune disease has been suggested. Various functional somatic symptoms have been described after human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, although a causal relationship has not been established. We examined the epipharynx in young women showing functional somatic symptoms following HPV vaccination. Surprisingly, despite having minimal symptoms involving the pharynx, all patients were found to have severe epipharyngitis. In addition, significant improvement in symptoms was seen in most patients who underwent epipharyngeal treatment. Thus, we speculate that the chronic epipharyngitis potentially caused by the vaccine adjuvant may be involved in the pathogenesis of functional somatic syndrome (FSS) post-HPV vaccination. Further, we suggest that epipharyngeal treatment may be effective for various types of FSS regardless of the initial cause, as well as for some autoimmune diseases, and that this may be an important direction in future research.

  11. Tumor necrosis factor- α and interleukin-6: potential interorgan inflammatory mediators contributing to destructive periodontal disease in obesity or metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Roozbeh; Ka, Khady; Huang, Ting; Khalili, Saeed; Nguyen, Bich Hong; Nicolau, Belinda; Tran, Simon D

    2013-01-01

    Obesity has become a worldwide health burden in the last two decades. Obesity has been associated with increased comorbidities, such as coronary artery disease, diabetes, and destructive periodontal disease. Obesity is also part of a group of risk factors occurring together in an individual, which is referred to as metabolic syndrome. Clinical studies have shown higher risk for destructive periodontal disease in obesity and metabolic syndrome. However, the role of obesity and metabolic syndrome in the onset and development of destructive periodontal disease has not yet been fully understood. In this review, we discuss a working model, which focuses on interorgan inflammation as a common etiological factor for destructive periodontal disease associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Specifically, we suggest that elevated levels of tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF- α ) or interleukin 6 (IL-6)--both adipokines and known risk factors for destructive periodontal disease--in obesity and metabolic syndrome contribute to the onset and development of destructive periodontal disease. The connections between destructive periodontal disease and systemic conditions, such as obesity or metabolic syndrome, are complex and potentially multidirectional. This review largely focuses on TNF- α and IL-6, inflammatory mediators, as potential common risk factors and does not exclude other biological mechanisms.

  12. Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia With Chronic Fatigue After HPV Vaccination as Part of the "Autoimmune/Auto-inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants": Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Tomljenovic, Lucija; Colafrancesco, Serena; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 14-year-old girl who developed postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) with chronic fatigue 2 months following Gardasil vaccination. The patient suffered from persistent headaches, dizziness, recurrent syncope, poor motor coordination, weakness, fatigue, myalgias, numbness, tachycardia, dyspnea, visual disturbances, phonophobia, cognitive impairment, insomnia, gastrointestinal disturbances, and a weight loss of 20 pounds. The psychiatric evaluation ruled out the possibility that her symptoms were psychogenic or related to anxiety disorders. Furthermore, the patient tested positive for ANA (1:1280), lupus anticoagulant, and antiphospholipid. On clinical examination she presented livedo reticularis and was diagnosed with Raynaud's syndrome. This case fulfills the criteria for the autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA). Because human papillomavirus vaccination is universally recommended to teenagers and because POTS frequently results in long-term disabilities (as was the case in our patient), a thorough follow-up of patients who present with relevant complaints after vaccination is strongly recommended.

  13. Inflammatory cells and cellular activation in the lower respiratory tract in Churg-Strauss syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schnabel, A.; Csernok, E.; Braun, J.; Gross, W.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—To obtain insight into the mechanisms of tissue injury in lung disease due to Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS), the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell profile and the levels in the BAL fluid of cell products released by activated eosinophils and neutrophils were assessed.
METHODS—Thirteen patients with active progressive CSS (n = 7) or CSS in partial remission (n = 6) underwent clinical staging and bronchoalveolar lavage. The levels of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and peroxidase activity in the BAL fluid were determined and the results were compared with those of 19 patients with pulmonary active Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) and nine control subjects.
RESULTS—In patients with progressive CSS the BAL cell profile was dominated by eosinophils, neutrophil elevation being the exception. The eosinophilia was associated with high ECP levels (4.39 ng/ml and 0.40 ng/ml in the two CSS groups compared with unmeasurable values in the controls). Individual patients with highly active CSS also had raised MPO levels, comparable to the levels in the most active WG patients. Peroxidase activity in the BAL fluid was 1.26 U/ml and 0.10 U/ml in the two groups of patients with CSS and 0.20 U/ml in the controls. Pulmonary disease in patients with WG was characterised by an extensive increase in MPO (0.30ng/ml versus 0.13 ng/ml in the controls) together with high peroxidase activity in the BAL fluid (4.37 U/ml), but only a small increase in ECP levels was seen. No correlation was found between the ECP and MPO levels in patients with CSS which suggests that eosinophil and neutrophil activation vary independently of each other.
CONCLUSIONS—These findings suggest that, in addition to eosinophil activation, neutrophil activation is an important feature in some patients with highly active CSS. The balance of neutrophil and eosinophil involvement appears to be variable and this may be one explanation for the individually variable treatment

  14. How Patients View Probiotics: Findings from a Multicenter Study of Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, MaryBeth; Brinich, Margaret A.; Geller, Gail; Harrison, Krista; Highland, Janelle; James, Katherine; Marshall, Patricia; McCormick, Jennifer B.; Tilburt, Jon; Achkar, Jean-Paul; Farrell, Ruth M.; Sharp, Richard R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have access to a growing number of probiotic products marketed to improve digestive health. It is unclear how patients make decisions about probiotics and what role they expect their gastroenterologists to play as they consider using probiotics. Understanding patients’ knowledge, attitudes and expectations of probiotics may help gastroenterologists engage patients in collaborative discussions about probiotics. Study Focus groups were conducted with patients with IBD and IBS at the Cleveland Clinic, Mayo Clinic and Johns Hopkins University. Inductive analytic methods were utilized to identify common themes and draw interpretations from focus group narratives. Results One hundred thirty-six patients participated in 22 focus groups between March and August 2009. Patients viewed probiotics as an appealing alternative to pharmaceutical drugs and understood probiotics as a more “natural,” low-risk therapeutic option. Many patients were hesitant to use them without consulting their gastroenterologists. Patients would weigh the risks and benefits of probiotics, their disease severity and satisfaction with current treatments when considering probiotic use. Conclusions Patients are interested in probiotics but have many unanswered questions about their use. Our findings suggest that patients with IBD and IBS will look to gastroenterologists and other clinicians as trustworthy advisors regarding the utility of probiotics as an alternative or supplement to pharmaceutical drugs. Gastroenterologists and other clinicians who care for patients with these diseases should be prepared to discuss the potential benefits and risks of probiotics and assist patients in making informed decisions about their use. PMID:21716123

  15. Paraneoplastic brainstem encephalomyelitis and atypical form of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in patient with testicular germinal tumor-is this an overlap syndrome? a case report.

    PubMed

    Gogol, Paweł; Gogol, Anna; Opuchlik, Andrzej; Dziewulska, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurologic syndromes are diagnosed when neurologic symptoms are associated with neoplasm and other causative factors are excluded. They may precede or be simultaneous to various types of neoplasms, mainly malignant. In men up to 45-50 years old the most common cancer causing the paraneoplastic syndrome is testicle tumor, manifesting usually as limbic/brain stem encephalitis and myelitis. Usually effective treatment of underlying neoplasm brings resolution of neurologic symptoms. But corticosteroids and intravenuous immunoglobulins are also used. In the presented case a 37-year-old man was primarily diagnosed and treated for progressive tetraparesis with signs of both upper and lower motor neuron dysfunction, associated with bulbar symptoms. Having various diagnostic procedures performed an atypical form of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuronopathy was primarily suspected, but eventually a discovery of endodermal sinus tumor in the testicle enabled to state the diagnosis of possible paraneoplastic syndrome. In spite of chemotherapy the patient died shortly after the diagnosis because of infectious complications. Histopathology displayed intense inflammatory changes in the brain stem as well as in cranial nerves and cervical spinal cord. The same immunological process evoked by various pathogenetic factors (infection vs. neoplasm) may cause similar clinical picture and hinder the diagnosis. Most importantly it may delay the proper way of treatment.

  16. Mortality in adult intensive care patients with severe systemic inflammatory response syndromes is strongly associated with the hypo-immune TNF -238A polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Pappachan, John V; Coulson, Tim G; Child, Nicholas J A; Markham, David J; Nour, Sarah M; Pulletz, Mark C K; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew J; de Courcey-Golder, Kim; Barton, Sheila J; Yang, Ian A; Holloway, John W

    2009-10-01

    The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is associated with activation of innate immunity. We studied the association between mortality and measures of disease severity in the intensive care unit (ICU) and functional polymorphisms in genes coding for Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), macrophage migratory inhibitory factor (MIF), tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and lymphotoxin-alpha (LTA). Two hundred thirty-three patients with severe SIRS were recruited from one general adult ICU in a tertiary centre in the UK. DNA from patients underwent genotyping by 5' nuclease assay. Genotype was compared to phenotype. Primary outcome was mortality in ICU. Minor allele frequencies were TLR4 +896G 7%, MIF 173C 16%, TNF -238A 10% and LTA +252G 34%. The frequency of the hypoimmune minor allele TNF -238A was significantly higher in patients who died in ICU compared to those who survived (p = 0.0063) as was the frequency of the two haplotypes LTA +252G, TNF -1031T, TNF -308G, TNF -238A and LTA +252G, TNF-1031T, TNF-308A and TNF-238A (p = 0.0120 and 0.0098, respectively). These findings re-enforce the view that a balanced inflammatory/anti-inflammatory response is the most important determinant of outcome in sepsis. Genotypes that either favour inflammation or its counter-regulatory anti-inflammatory response are likely to influence mortality and morbidity.

  17. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome is more associated with bacteremia in elderly patients with suspected sepsis in emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hsien-Ling; Han, Shih-Tsung; Yeh, Chun-Fu; Tzeng, I-Shaing; Hsieh, Tsung-Han; Wu, Chin-Chieh; Kuan, Jen-Tse; Chen, Kuan-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Early diagnosis of bacteremia for patients with suspected sepsis is 1 way to improve prognosis of sepsis. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) has long been utilized as a screening tool to detect bacteremia by front-line healthcare providers. The value of SIRS to predict bacteremia in elderly patients (≥65 years) with suspected sepsis has not yet been examined in emergency departments (EDs). We aimed to evaluate the performance of SIRS components in predicting bacteremia among elderly patients in EDs. We retrospectively evaluated patients with suspected sepsis and 2 sets of blood culture collected within 4 hours after admitting to ED in a tertiary teaching hospital between 2010 and 2012. Patients were categorized into 3-year age groups: young (18–64 years), young-old (65–74 years), and old patients (≥75 years). Vital signs and Glasgow Coma Scale with verbal response obtained at the triage, comorbidities, sites of infection, blood cultures, and laboratory results were retrieved via the electronic medical records. A total of 20,192 patients were included in our study. Among them, 9862 (48.9%) were the elderly patients (young-old and old patients), 2656 (13.2%) developed bacteremia. Among patients with bacteremia, we found the elderly patients had higher SIRS performance (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.40, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.90–3.03 in the young-old and aOR: 2.66, 95% CI: 2.19–3.23 in the old). Fever at the triage was most predictive of bacteremia, especially in the elderly patients (aOR: 2.19, 95% CI: 1.81–2.65 in the young-old and aOR: 2.27, 95% CI: 1.95–2.63 in the old), and tachypnea was not predictive of bacteremia among the elderly patients (all P > 0.2). The performance of SIRS to predict bacteremia was more suitable for elderly patients in EDs observed in this study. The elderly patients presented with more fever and less tachypnea when they had bacteremia. PMID:27930596

  18. Identification of genetic loci for basal cell nevus syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease in a single large pedigree.

    PubMed

    Panhuysen, Carolien I; Karban, Amir; Knodle Manning, Alisa; Bayless, Theodore M; Duerr, Richard H; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Epstein, Ervin H; Brant, Steven R

    2006-08-01

    Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome (BCNS) is an autosomal dominant disease. PTCH1 gene mutations have been found responsible in many but not all pedigrees. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a complex genetic disorder, disproportionate in Ashkenazim, and characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation. We revisited a large Ashkenazim pedigree, first reported in 1968, with multiple diagnoses of BCNS and IBD, and with a common genetic cause for both disorders proposed. We expanded the pedigree to four generations and performed a genome-wide linkage study for BCNS and IBD traits. Twelve members with BCNS, seven with IBD, five with both diagnoses and eight unaffected were genotyped. Both non-parametric (GENEHUNTER 2.1) and parametric (FASTLINK) linkage analyses were performed and a validation through simulation was performed. BCNS linked to chromosome 9q22 (D9S1120) just proximal to the PTCH1 gene (NPL=3.26, P=0.003; parametric two-point LOD=2.4, parametric multipoint LOD=3.7). Novel IBD linkage evidence was observed at chromosome 1p13 (D1S420, NPL 3.92, P=0.0047; parametric two-point LOD=1.9). Linkage evidence was also observed to previously reported IBD loci on 4q, (D4S2623, NPL 3.02, P=0.012; parametric two-point LOD=2.15), 10q23 (D10S1225 near DLG5, NPL 3.33, P=0.0085; parametric two-point LOD=1.3), 12 overlapping the IBD2 locus (D12S313, NPL 2.6, P=0.018; parametric two-point LOD=1.52), and 7q (D7S510 and D7S3046, NPL 4.06, P=0.0035; parametric two-point LOD=2.18). In this pedigree affected by both BCNS and IBD, the two traits and their respective candidate genetic loci segregate independently; BCNS maps to the PTCH1 gene and IBD maps to several candidate regions, mostly overlapping previously observed IBD loci.

  19. Steroids are a risk factor for Kaposi's sarcoma-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome and mortality in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Mónica; Iglesias, María C.; Ablanedo-Terrazas, Yuria; Ormsby, Christopher E.; Alvarado-de la Barrera, Claudia; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the association between Kaposi's sarcoma-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (KS-IRIS) and mortality, with the use of glucocorticoids in HIV-infected individuals. Design: Case–control study. Methods: We reviewed the medical records of 145 individuals with HIV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma receiving antiretroviral therapy. The association of different variables with KS-IRIS and Kaposi's sarcoma-related mortality was explored by univariate and multivariate analyses. The main exposure of interest was the use of glucocorticoids. We also compared the time to KS-IRIS and the time to death of individuals treated with glucocorticoids vs. those nontreated with glucocorticoids, and the time to death of individuals with KS-IRIS vs. those without KS-IRIS by hazards regression. Results: Sixty of 145 individuals received glucocorticoids (41.4%) for the management or suspicion of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. Fifty individuals had KS-IRIS (37%). The use of glucocorticoids was more frequent in individuals with KS-IRIS than in those without KS-IRIS (54.9 vs. 36.47%, P = 0.047). Kaposi's sarcoma-related mortality occurred in 17 cases (11.7%), and glucocorticoid use was more frequent in this group (76.47 vs. 36.7%, P = 0.003). Glucocorticoid use was a risk factor for mortality (adjusted odds ratio = 4.719, 95% confidence interval = 1.383–16.103, P = 0.0132), and was associated with shorter periods to KS-IRIS (P = 0.03) and death (P = 0.0073). KS-IRIS was a risk factor for mortality (P = 0.049). Conclusion: In HIV-infected individuals, the use of glucocorticoids is a risk factor for KS-IRIS and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated mortality. In addition, KS-IRIS is a risk factor for mortality. Therefore, glucocorticoid administration in this population requires careful consideration based on individualized risk–benefit analysis. PMID:26636923

  20. Extracellular phospholipases A2 in relation to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and systemic complications in severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hietaranta, A; Kemppainen, E; Puolakkainen, P; Sainio, V; Haapiainen, R; Peuravuori, H; Kivilaakso, E; Nevalainen, T

    1999-05-01

    The pathophysiology of severe acute pancreatitis (AP) resembles other conditions with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) such as sepsis predisposing to remote organ failure. Because extracellular phospholipases A2 (PLA2) have been implicated in AP, their serum concentrations were analyzed with respect to SIRS and systemic complications in patients with severe AP. The serum samples were collected daily for 12 days in 57 patients with severe AP. SIRS, early organ complications, local complications, and outcome of AP were recorded. Time-resolved fluoroimmunoassays were used for group I and group II PLA2 measurements. Thirty-nine (68.4%) patients fulfilled the criteria of SIRS within 12 days from admission. Pancreatic necrosis was detected in 43 (75.4%) patients. Infected necrosis was found preoperatively or at operation in five (8.8%) patients. Twenty-six (45.6%) and eight (14.0%) patients had respiratory or renal failure, respectively. Seven (12.3%) patients died of their disease. All patients with systemic complications fulfilled the criteria of SIRS. The increasing number of positive SIRS criteria was associated with increased frequency of systemic complications. Pancreatic necrosis was not significantly associated with SIRS. The serum concentration of group II PLA2 was significantly higher in patients with SIRS (p < 0.05) compared with patients without from day 7 onward. The concentration of group II PLA2 increased (p < 0.01) in patients with SIRS but decreased in patients without. The serum concentration of group II PLA2 did not differ significantly with respect to systemic complications. The concentration of group I PLA2 decreased (p < 0.05) similarly in patients with and without SIRS or systemic complications during follow-up, respectively. Early systemic complications of severe AP are associated with SIRS with increasing frequency as the number of positive SIRS criteria increases. Group II PLA2 but not group I PLA2 may have pathophysiologic

  1. [Role of anti-inflammatory drugs in the treatment of acute coronary syndromes. From athero-inflammation to athero-thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Altman, Raúl; Scazziota, Alejandra

    2003-01-01

    Coronary thrombosis is the most important cause of morbidity and mortality and the most severe manifestation of atherosclerosis. Knowledge of the pathophysiology of atheroma formation and the causes of atheroma accidents have allowed the development of new therapeutic measures for reducing thrombotic events after a coronary episode. Treating the thrombosis after plaque rupture is useful, but a late measure once coronary flow is disturbed. Therefore, treatment at an earlier stage, which we call athero-inflammation, a central event in atheroma progression leading to atherothrombosis, seems wise. There is evidence of an inflammatory component in the pathogenesis of atheroma rupture in acute coronary events. Earlier studies of anti-inflammatory medication have not demonstrated a reduction in thrombotic complications after an acute coronary episode. However, there are pathophysiological arguments and clinical findings that suggest that it would be advisable to include anti-inflammatory medications, especially those that inhibit preferentially COX-2, in the therapeutic arsenal for this pathology. We postulated that blocking athero-inflammation could prevent thrombosis. A pilot study was carried out in 120 patients with acute coronary syndrome without ST-segment elevation in which 60 patients were treated with meloxicam, a preferential COX-2 inhibitor. All patients received heparin and aspirin. During the stay in the coronary care unit, as well as after 90 days, meloxicam lowered composite outcomes (myocardial infarction, death and revascularization procedures) compared with the control group. These results and available pathophysiological and clinical evidence support the hypothesis of potential benefits of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with preferential inhibitory activity on COX-2 in patients with acute coronary syndromes. More trials are needed to confirm their preventive effect.

  2. Autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) after quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination in Colombians: a call for personalised medicine.

    PubMed

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Reyes, Benjamin; Perdomo-Arciniegas, Ana M; Camacho-Rodríguez, Bernardo; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    This was a case study in which 3 patients with autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) after quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination (HPV) were evaluated and described. All the patients were women. Diagnosis consisted of HLA-B27 enthesitis related arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematous, respectively. Our results highlight the risk of developing ASIA after HPV vaccination and may serve to increase the awareness of such a complication. Factors that are predictive of developing autoimmune diseases should be examined at the population level in order to establish preventive measures in at-risk individuals for whom healthcare should be personalized and participatory.

  3. [Inflammatory neuropathies and multineuritis].

    PubMed

    Kuntzer, Thierry; Chofflon, Michel

    2009-12-02

    Inflammatory neuropathies include those neuropathies in which the diagnosis, outcome and type of treatment are badly known, the reason of this review. They are expressed as diffuse (such as CIDP and ganglionopathies), multifocal (vasculitic neuropathy) or focal (MMN; plexopathies; immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome). These forms of neuropathies are important to be known because the beneficial therapeutic possibilities of immunosuppression.

  4. Activation of Adenosine 2A receptor inhibits neutrophil apoptosis in an autophagy-dependent manner in mice with systemic inflammatory response syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang-Wuyue; Yang, Ting; Zhao, Li; Ni, Zhenhong; Yang, Nan; He, Fengtian; Dai, Shuang-Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is an overwhelming whole body inflammation caused by infectious diseases or sterile insults. Neutrophils are the dominant participants during inflammation, and their survival and death determine the initiation as well as resolution of SIRS. Apoptosis and autophagy are two fundamental cellular processes that modulating cell fate, but their correlation and regulators in neutrophils under SIRS condition have not been elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that high dose of LPS induced both apoptosis and autophagy of neutrophils in a mouse SIRS model and LPS-stimulated neutrophils in vitro. Moreover, we found that the adenosine 2A receptor (A2AR), a known anti-inflammatory G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), could inhibit LPS-induced neutrophil apoptosis by suppressing the LPS-induced autophagy. Activation of A2AR suppressed LPS-induced autophagy by inhibiting the ROS-JNK pathway as well as promoting GPCR βϒ subunit–AKT signaling. The A2AR-inhibited autophagy suppressed apoptosis of neutrophils by blocking caspase8, caspase3 and PARP signaling. These findings not only increase our understandings of neutrophils’ fate and function in response to systemic inflammation, but also identify a novel anti-inflammatory role of A2AR in modulating neutrophils’ survival during inflammation. PMID:27647162

  5. Circulating leptin and inflammatory response in esophageal cancer, esophageal cancer-related cachexia-anorexia syndrome (CAS) and non-malignant CAS of the alimentary tract.

    PubMed

    Diakowska, Dorota; Krzystek-Korpacka, Malgorzata; Markocka-Maczka, Krystyna; Diakowski, Witold; Matusiewicz, Malgorzata; Grabowski, Krzysztof

    2010-08-01

    We investigated the association between esophageal cancer and cachexia-anorexia syndrome (CAS) of the alimentary tract and leptin, an adipocytokine crucial for body weight regulation, a modulator of inflammatory/immune response, implication of which in cancer and CAS development remains debatable. Circulating leptin was measured in 135 esophageal cancer patients (51 non-cachectic and 84 cachectic) and 83 controls (63 non-cachectic and 20 cachectic) and referred to cancer stage, CAS, and inflammatory and nutritional indices. Leptin was down-regulated in cancer patients and cachectic controls as compared to non-cachectic controls, with more pronounced hypoleptinemia in advanced cancers. Leptin correlated directly with BMI, TNF-alpha, albumin, and hemoglobin and indirectly with IL-6, IL-8, and hsCRP. The correlations, except for hsCRP, were more pronounced in females. BMI alone (females) and BMI and hsCRP (males) were independent predictors of leptin explaining over 60% of its variability. Following adjustment for BMI and gender, cancer-related CAS but not cancer itself negatively affected leptin. Leptin and BMI were independently associated with cancer-related and non-malignant CAS with diagnostic accuracy of 93% in identifying subjects with CAS. Pro-inflammatory, angiogenic and mitogenic properties of leptin do not seem to be important for esophageal cancer development but hypoleptinemia, independently from co-occurring reduction of adiposity, appears to be strongly associated with esophageal cancer-related CAS and non-malignant CAS of the alimentary tract.

  6. Management of recurrent inflammatory choroidal neovascular membrane secondary to Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome, using combined intravitreal injection of bevacizumab and triamcinolone acetate

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Sivakami A; Hebri, Sudhira P; Lootah, Afra M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of combined intravitreal injection of bevacizumab and intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide (IVTA) for recurrent inflammatory choroidal neovascular membrane (CNVM). It was a prospective interventional study of a young female, who was a known case of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome. She presented with an inflammatory choroidal neovascualar membrane and signs of panuveitis in the right eye. She underwent a complete ophthalmic examination. She was given intravitreal injection of bevacizumab and IVTA at different sites. There was complete regression of CNVM and ocular inflammation within a week. After six months, she had recurrence of CNVM in the same eye, which was treated similarly. There was a complete resolution of CNVM and ocular inflammation after the combination therapy and systemic steroids, until one year of follow-up. No serious systemic or ocular adverse events were noted. Combination therapy appears to be an effective and safe method in the management of recurrent inflammatory CNVM. PMID:23202396

  7. Toll-like receptor agonists partially restore the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and type I interferon in Sézary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Manfrere, Kelly C. G.; Torrealba, Marina P.; Miyashiro, Denis R.; Oliveira, Luanda M. S.; de Carvalho, Gabriel C.; Lima, Josenilson F.; Branco, Anna Claudia C. C.; Pereira, Nátalli Z.; Pereira, Juliana; Sanches, José A.; Sato, Maria N.

    2016-01-01

    Sézary syndrome (SS) carries a poor prognosis, and infections represent the most frequent cause of death in SS patients. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of innate immune receptors that induce protective immune responses against infections. We sought to evaluate the ability of TLR agonists to induce inflammatory cytokine, Th2 cytokine, and type I interferon (IFN-I) production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of untreated SS patients. We detected impaired IL-6, IL-10 and IL-13 secretion by PBMC induced by the agonists for TLR5, TLR3, TLR7 and TLR9 in SS patients, while it was partially recovered by TLR2/TLR4 and TLR7/8 agonists TNF secretion was restored following stimulation with TLR2/TLR4 agonists. IFN-γ was scarcely produced upon TLR activation in SS cells, albeit TLR 7/8 (CL097) enhanced their secretion at lower levels than the control group. TLR9 agonist efficiently induced IFN-I in SS patients, although this positive regulation was not observed for other cytokines, in direct contrast to the broad activity of CL097. Among the TLR agonists, TLR4 was able to induce pro-inflammatory, IL-10 and Th2 secretion, while TLR7-8 agonist induced the inflammatory cytokines, IFN-I and IFN-γ. These findings reveal a dysfunctional cytokine response upon both extracellular and intracellular TLR activation in SS patients, which was partially restored by TLRs agonists. PMID:27780938

  8. A Trypsin Inhibitor from Tamarind Reduces Food Intake and Improves Inflammatory Status in Rats with Metabolic Syndrome Regardless of Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Fabiana M. C.; Lima, Vanessa C. O.; Costa, Izael S.; Medeiros, Amanda F.; Serquiz, Alexandre C.; Lima, Maíra C. J. S.; Serquiz, Raphael P.; Maciel, Bruna L. L.; Uchôa, Adriana F.; Santos, Elizeu A.; Morais, Ana H. A.

    2016-01-01

    Trypsin inhibitors are studied in a variety of models for their anti-obesity and anti-inflammatory bioactive properties. Our group has previously demonstrated the satietogenic effect of tamarind seed trypsin inhibitors (TTI) in eutrophic mouse models and anti-inflammatory effects of other trypsin inhibitors. In this study, we evaluated TTI effect upon satiety, biochemical and inflammatory parameters in an experimental model of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Three groups of n = 5 male Wistar rats with obesity-based MetS received for 10 days one of the following: (1) Cafeteria diet; (2) Cafeteria diet + TTI (25 mg/kg); and (3) Standard diet. TTI reduced food intake in animals with MetS. Nevertheless, weight gain was not different between studied groups. Dyslipidemia parameters were not different with the use of TTI, only the group receiving standard diet showed lower very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and triglycerides (TG) (Kruskal–Wallis, p < 0.05). Interleukin-6 (IL-6) production did not differ between groups. Interestingly, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) was lower in animals receiving TTI. Our results corroborate the satietogenic effect of TTI in a MetS model. Furthermore, we showed that TTI added to a cafeteria diet may decrease inflammation regardless of weight loss. This puts TTI as a candidate for studies to test its effectiveness as an adjuvant in MetS treatment. PMID:27690087

  9. Acquired inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Ensrud, E R; Krivickas, L S

    2001-05-01

    The acquired demyelinating neuropathies can be divided into those with an acute onset and course and those with a more chronic course. The acute neuropathies present as Guillain-Barré syndrome and include acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP), Miller Fisher syndrome, acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN), acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN), and acute pandysautonomia. The chronic neuropathies are collectively known as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and include MADSAM (multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy, also know as Lewis-Sumner syndrome) and DADS (distal acquired demyelinating symmetric neuropathy) as variants. The clinical features, pathology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, and prognosis of these neuropathies are discussed.

  10. A sudden onset of a pseudo-neurological syndrome after HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvated vaccine: might it be an autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) presenting as a somatoform disorder?

    PubMed

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Castelli, Lucia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi; Bruni, Paola

    2014-12-01

    In last centuries, vaccines reduced the incidence of several infectious diseases. In last decades, some vaccines aimed at preventing also some cancers, where viruses play a causative role. However, several adverse events have been described after vaccines, but a causal relationship has been established only in a minority of cases. Here, we describe a pseudo-neurological syndrome occurred shortly after the administration of the bivalent HPV vaccine. Some autoimmune disorders, including neurological demyelinating diseases, have been reported after HPV vaccines, but the patient showed no organic lesions. The patient was diagnosed as having a functional somatoform syndrome, which was supposed to be autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA), seen the temporal link with vaccination and the presence of anti-phospholipid autoantibodies. Immunological mechanisms of vaccines-and of adjuvants-have not been completely elucidated yet, and although there is no evidence of statistical association with many post-vaccination events, a causal link with vaccine cannot be excluded in some individuals.

  11. The use of a gas chromatograph coupled to a metal oxide sensor for rapid assessment of stool samples from irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, S F; McGuire, N D; de Lacy Costello, B P J; Ewen, R J; Jayasena, D H; Vaughan, K; Ahmed, I; Probert, C S; Ratcliffe, N M

    2014-06-01

    There is much clinical interest in the development of a low-cost and reliable test for diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), two very distinct diseases that can present with similar symptoms. The assessment of stool samples for the diagnosis of gastro-intestinal diseases is in principle an ideal non-invasive testing method. This paper presents an approach to stool analysis using headspace gas chromatography and a single metal oxide sensor coupled to artificial neural network software. Currently, the system is able to distinguish samples from patients with IBS from patients with IBD with a sensitivity and specificity of 76% and 88% respectively, with an overall mean predictive accuracy of 76%.

  12. Choriodecidual inflammatory syndrome (CoDIS) is the leading, and under recognised, cause of early preterm delivery and second trimester miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Sebire, N J

    2001-04-01

    Severe preterm birth (delivery before 32 completed weeks of gestation), with or without preterm premature rupture of the membranes (PPROM), remains the leading cause of perinatal mortality. It is proposed that localized inflammation of the chorion and decidua in the membranes immediately above the internal cervical os, with or without amniotic cavity infection and inflammation, is the leading, but under recognised, cause of second trimester miscarriage and severe preterm delivery. The term 'CoDIS' (choriodecidual inflammatory syndrome), may provide a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiology than currently used terminology which over emphasizes the importance of overt intra-amniotic infection as opposed to localized extra-amniotic inflammation which stimulates uterine evacuation.

  13. Characterization of the inflammatory cells in ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms in patients with Marfan syndrome, familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and sporadic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    He, Rumin; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Sun, Wei; Papke, Christina L.; Duraisamy, Senthil; Estrera, Anthony L.; Safi, Hazim J.; Ahn, Chul; Buja, L. Maximilian; Arnett, Frank C.; Zhang, Jingwu; Geng, Yong-Jian; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to characterize the inflammatory infiltrate in ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAAs) in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS), familial TAA (FTAA), and non-familial TAA cases. Background TAAs are associated with a pathologic lesion termed medial degeneration, which was described as a noninflammtory lesion. TAAs are a complication of MFS and also can be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner of FTAA. Methods Full aortic segments were collected from patients undergoing elective repair with MFS (n=5), FTAA (n=6) and TAAs (n=9), along with control aortas (n=5). Immunohistochemistry staining was performed using antibodies directed against markers of lymphocytes and macrophages. Real-time PCR analysis was performed to quantify the expression level of T cell receptor β chain variable region gene. Results Immunohistochemisty of TAA aortas demonstrated that the media and adventitia from MFS, FTAA and sporadic cases had increased numbers of T lymphocytes and macrophages when compared with control aortas. The number of T cells and macrophages in the aortic media of the aneurysm correlated inversely with the patient’s age at the time of prophylactic surgical repair of the aorta. Surprisingly, T cell receptor profiling indicated a similar clonal nature of the T cells in the aortic wall in a majority of aneurysms, whether the patient had MFS, FTAA or sporadic disease. Conclusion These results indicate that infiltration of inflammatory cells contributes to the pathogenesis of TAAs. Superantigen-driven stimulation of T lymphocytes in the aortic tissues of the TAA patients may contribute to the initial immune response. Ultramini-Abstract This study sought to investigate the infiltration of T-lymphocytes and macrophage in the aortas of patients with MFS, FTAA and sporadic TAAs. The results indicate that infiltration of inflammatory cells contributes to the pathogenesis of TAAs and superantigen-driven stimulation of T-lymphocytes may contribute to

  14. Acute kidney injury and inflammatory immune reconstitution syndrome in mixed genotype (A/E) hepatitis B virus co-infection in HIV-associated lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Katsushi; Kohno, Kei; Shiono, Yosuke; Suzuki, Ikuko; Kato, Yuichi; Hiroshima, Yuki; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Ohtake, Hiroya; Iwaba, Akiko; Yamakawa, Mitsunori; Kato, Takeo

    2013-01-01

    We report a first case of HIV-associated lymphoma (HAL) presenting with acute kidney injury (AKI) and inflammatory immune reconstitution syndrome (IRIS). A 39-year-old male, treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for one month prior to admission, developed AKI, left testicular tumor, and recurrent swelling of the right parotid gland. A resected testicular tumor exhibited features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma. Renal biopsy showed hydro-degeneration of renal tubules, interstitial inflammatory cells, and a small number of lymphoma cells in the sub-capsule, compatible with acute interstitial nephritis. His renal dysfunction rapidly recovered following chemotherapy and combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). He developed pneumonia concomitantly with a decrease in HIV-RNA level and an increase in CD4+ cells after the first cycle of chemotherapy, which spontaneously resolved after the second cycle of chemotherapy without additional anti-infection drugs; thus, his pneumonia fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for IRIS. We suggest that IRIS may frequently develop during chemotherapy for HAL, but may be overlooked. He was coinfected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), which genotypes known as is associated with liver-related mortality and response to antiviral therapy; recently, an intimate interplay between HIV and HBV in the onset of lymphoma has been reported. Therefore, we addressed the HBV genotype in the patient. The analysis revealed that he exhibited a mixed genotype (A/E) not native to Japan and primarily found in Europe and North America or West Africa. These findings suggest that universal vaccination for juveniles against HBV is warranted in Japan.

  15. Functional Outcomes and Efficiency of Rehabilitation in a National Cohort of Patients with Guillain - Barré Syndrome and Other Inflammatory Polyneuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrescu, Roxana; Siegert, Richard John; Turner-Stokes, Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe functional outcomes, care needs and cost-efficiency of hospital rehabilitation for a UK cohort of inpatients with complex rehabilitation needs arising from inflammatory polyneuropathies. Subjects and Setting 186 patients consecutively admitted to specialist neurorehabilitation centres in England with Guillain-Barré Syndrome (n = 118 (63.4%)) or other inflammatory polyneuropathies, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (n = 15 (8.1%) or critical illness neuropathy (n = 32 (17.2%)). Methods Cohort analysis of data from the UK Rehabilitation Outcomes Collaborative national clinical dataset. Outcome measures include the UK Functional Assessment Measure, Northwick Park Dependency Score (NPDS) and Care Needs Assessment (NPCNA). Patients were analysed in three groups of dependency based on their admission NPDS score: ‘low’ (NPDS<10), ‘medium’ (NPDS 10–24) and ‘high’ (NPDS ≥25). Cost-efficiency was measured as the time taken to offset the cost of rehabilitation by savings in NPCNA-estimated costs of on-going care in the community. Results The mean rehabilitation length of stay was 72.2 (sd = 66.6) days. Significant differences were seen between the diagnostic groups on admission, but all showed significant improvements between admission and discharge, in both motor and cognitive function (p<0.0001). Patients who were highly dependent on admission had the longest lengths of stay (mean 97.0 (SD 79.0) days), but also showed the greatest reduction in on-going care costs (£1049 per week (SD £994)), so that overall they were the most cost-efficient to treat. Conclusions Patients with polyneuropathies have both physical and cognitive disabilities that are amenable to change with rehabilitation, resulting in significant reduction in on-going care-costs, especially for highly dependent patients. PMID:25402491

  16. Xanthine Oxidase Activity Is Associated with Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and Inflammatory and Oxidative Status Markers in Metabolic Syndrome: Effects of a Single Exercise Session

    PubMed Central

    Feoli, Ana Maria Pandolfo; Macagnan, Fabrício Edler; Piovesan, Carla Haas; Bodanese, Luiz Carlos; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The main goal of the present study was to investigate the xanthine oxidase (XO) activity in metabolic syndrome in subjects submitted to a single exercise session. We also investigated parameters of oxidative and inflammatory status. Materials/Methods. A case-control study (9 healthy and 8 MS volunteers) was performed to measure XO, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase activities, lipid peroxidation, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) content, glucose levels, and lipid profile. Body mass indices, abdominal circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and TG levels were also determined. The exercise session consisted of 3 minutes of stretching, 3 minutes of warm-up, 30 minutes at a constant dynamic workload at a moderate intensity, and 3 minutes at a low speed. The blood samples were collected before and 15 minutes after the exercise session. Results. Serum XO activity was higher in MS group compared to control group. SOD activity was lower in MS subjects. XO activity was correlated with SOD, abdominal circumference, body mass indices, and hsCRP. The single exercise session reduced the SOD activity in the control group. Conclusions. Our data support the association between oxidative stress and risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and suggest XO is present in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. PMID:24967004

  17. A Case of Cauda Equina Syndrome in Early-Onset Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Clinically Similar to Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Eun; Ha, Sam Yeol; Nam, Taek Kyun

    2014-01-01

    To present a case of cauda equina syndrome (CES) caused by chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) which seemed clinically similar to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type1 (CMT1). CIDP is an immune-mediated polyneuropathy, either progressive or relapsing-remitting. It is a non-hereditary disorder characterized by symmetrical motor and sensory deficits. Rarely, spinal nerve roots can be involved, leading to CES by hypertrophic cauda equina. A 34-year-old man presented with low back pain, radicular pain, bilateral lower-extremity weakness, urinary incontinence, and constipation. He had had musculoskeletal deformities, such as hammertoes and pes cavus, since age 10. Lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse thickening of the cauda equina. Electrophysiological testing showed increased distal latency, conduction blocks, temporal dispersion, and severe nerve conduction velocity slowing (3 m/s). We were not able to find genetic mutations at the PMP 22, MPZ, PRX, and EGR2 genes. The pathologic findings of the sural nerve biopsy revealed thinly myelinated nerve fibers with Schwann cells proliferation. We performed a decompressive laminectomy, intravenous IgG (IV-IgG) and oral steroid. At 1 week after surgery, most of his symptoms showed marked improvements except foot deformities. There was no relapse or aggravation of disease for 3 years. We diagnosed the case as an early-onset CIDP with cauda equine syndrome, whose initial clinical findings were similar to those of CMT1, and successfully managed with decompressive laminectomy, IV-IgG and oral steroid. PMID:25237436

  18. Febrile syndrome of unknown origin: Indications for (18)F-FDG PET/CT in inflammatory and infectious processes.

    PubMed

    García, J R

    2016-09-23

    Fever of unknown origin is defined as a body temperature greater than 38.3°C lasting more than three weeks for which the cause could not be found within one week of hospital admission. More than 200 causes have been reported, and these can be classified into four categories: infections, inflammatory diseases, oncologic processes, and miscellaneous conditions. Noninvasive diagnostic techniques are used in 69.2% of cases and invasive techniques in 30.8%. Structural imaging techniques show the morphological changes from infectious, inflammatory, and tumor-related processes, but they do not allow the detection of the early changes brought about by these processes. The metabolic information provided by (18)F-FDG PET/CT has a promising role in these patients. (18)F-FDG uptake is based on the cells' use of glucose as a source of energy, so it can be observed in infectious, inflammatory, and tumor-related processes. The established non-oncologic indications for (18)F-FDG PET/CT are sarcoidosis, osteomyelitis, spondylodiscitis, fever of unknown origin, and vasculitis, which together account for more than 85% of studies.

  19. Upregulated LINE-1 Activity in the Fanconi Anemia Cancer Susceptibility Syndrome Leads to Spontaneous Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Brégnard, Christelle; Guerra, Jessica; Déjardin, Stéphanie; Passalacqua, Frank; Benkirane, Monsef; Laguette, Nadine

    2016-06-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a genetic disorder characterized by elevated cancer susceptibility and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Using SLX4(FANCP) deficiency as a working model, we questioned the trigger for chronic inflammation in FA. We found that absence of SLX4 caused cytoplasmic DNA accumulation, including sequences deriving from active Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1), triggering the cGAS-STING pathway to elicit interferon (IFN) expression. In agreement, absence of SLX4 leads to upregulated LINE-1 retrotransposition. Importantly, similar results were obtained with the FANCD2 upstream activator of SLX4. Furthermore, treatment of FA cells with the Tenofovir reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTi), that prevents endogenous retrotransposition, decreased both accumulation of cytoplasmic DNA and pro-inflammatory signaling. Collectively, our data suggest a contribution of endogenous RT activities to the generation of immunogenic cytoplasmic nucleic acids responsible for inflammation in FA. The additional observation that RTi decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine production induced by DNA replication stress-inducing drugs further demonstrates the contribution of endogenous RTs to sustaining chronic inflammation. Altogether, our data open perspectives in the prevention of adverse effects of chronic inflammation in tumorigenesis.

  20. A role for leptin in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and in immune response, an update.

    PubMed

    Waelput, W; Brouckaert, P; Broekaert, D; Tavernier, J

    2006-01-01

    Leptin was originally identified as an adipocyte-derived cytokine with a key role in the regulation of the energy balance. Subsequent research revealed that leptin's biological action is not restricted to its effects on appetite and food intake, but instead has a much more pleiotropic character. There is now ample evidence that leptin has important functions in reproduction, hematopoiesis, HPA-axis endocrinology and angiogenesis. In this review we have focused on the effects of leptin in the antigen-specific immunity and in the inflammatory effector system.

  1. Advances in understanding adenosine as a plurisystem modulator in sepsis and the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS).

    PubMed

    Conlon, Beth A; Ross, James D; Law, William R

    2005-09-01

    Adenosine is a ubiquitous molecule that influences every physiological system studied thus far. In this review, we consider the influence of this purine nucleoside on some of the physiological systems affected during sepsis and SIRS. In the control of perfusion and cardiac output distribution, endogenous adenosine appears to play an important role in regulating perfusion in various vascular beds. Some of this control is mediated by stimulation of adenylyl cyclase, while part occurs by stimulating the production of nitric oxide. In the heart, adenosine may act as an inhibitory modulator of TNF-alpha expression. With regard to innate immune responses the effects of adenosine vary considerably, and are complex. However, the dominant responses relevant to SIRS indicate attenuation of inflammatory responses. Many of the effects of adenosine may also involve modulating oxyradical-mediated response. This occurs via increased oxyradical production via adenosine degradation (xanthine oxidase pathway), or limiting inflammatory oxyradical generation. Attempts to exploit the beneficial responses to adenosine have met with some success, and are considered here.

  2. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome and Fatal Cryptococcal Meningitis After Immunosuppression in a Patient With Elderly Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vasant, Dipesh H.; Limdi, Jimmy K.; Borg-Bartolo, Simon P.; Bonington, Alec

    2016-01-01

    Advanced age and associated comorbidities are-recognized predictors of life-threatening adverse outcomes, such as opportunistic infection following immunosuppressive therapy. We describe the case of an elderly patient with stricturing colonic Crohn’s disease and significant clinical comorbidities, initially controlled with corticosteroid induction followed by infliximab, whose course was complicated by fatal disseminated cryptococcal infection and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Our patient’s case highlights rare, but serious, complications of immunosuppression. In applying modern treatment paradigms to the elderly, the clinician must consider the potential for more pronounced adverse effects in this potentially vulnerable group, maximizing benefit and minimizing harm. PMID:27807560

  3. Clinicopathological correlates in HIV seropositive tuberculosis cases presenting with jaundice after initiating antiretroviral therapy with a structured review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The development of jaundice after initiation of HAART in HIV-TB co-infected patients is a challenging presentation in resource constrained settings, and is often attributed to drug induced liver injury (DILI).Some investigators have described hepatic tuberculosis Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (TB-IRIS) as a cause of liver disease in patients initiating HAART, which could also cause jaundice. Case presentations We report the clinical and histopathological features of five HIV-TB co-infected patients presenting with a syndrome of jaundice, tender hepatomegaly, bile canalicular enzyme rise and return of constitutional symptoms within 8 weeks of initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for advanced HIV infection at a rural clinic in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa. All five patients had been diagnosed with tuberculosis infection prior to HAART initiation and were on antituberculous medication at time of developing jaundice. There was evidence of multiple aetiologies of liver injury in all patients. However, based on clinical course and pathological findings, predominant hepatic injury was thought to be drug induced in one case and hepatic tuberculosis associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) in the other four. In these later 4 patients, liver biopsy findings included necrotising and non-necrotising granulomatous inflammation in the lobules and portal tracts. The granulomas demonstrated – in addition to epithelioid histiocytes and Langhans giant cells – neutrophils, plasma cells and large numbers of lymphocytes, which are not features of a conventional untreated tuberculous response. Conclusion In this high TB prevalent, low resource setting, TB-IRIS may be an important cause of jaundice post-HAART initiation. Clinicopathological correlation is essential for optimal diagnosis. Further multi-organ based histopathological studies in the context of immune reconstitution would be useful to clinicians in low

  4. A Case Report of Nonvasculitic Autoimmune Inflammatory Meningoencephalitis with Sensory Ganglionopathy: A Rare Presentation of Sjögren Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Simão; Oliveira, Rita; Santos, Luís; Valverde, Ana

    2017-01-01

    A 68-year-old Caucasian female was admitted to the emergency department with a progressive history of behavioural symptoms and anxiety followed by visual and auditory hallucinations, forgetfulness, and impaired gait in the previous 3 months. On examination she was psychotic and had a postural and rest tremor of the upper limbs, cogwheel rigidity of the four limbs, retropulsion on standing position, and inability to walk. During the following 2 weeks she developed xerostomia and unilateral parotiditis that improved with steroids. A simultaneous improvement of the cognitive abilities allowed for the detection of sensory ataxia of the lower limbs. Sensory ganglionopathy was then detected with electrophysiological studies. A diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome was suspected and confirmed by salivary gland scintigraphy, Schirmer's test, and submaxillary gland biopsy. We report a case of Sjögren syndrome associated with central and peripheral nervous system involvement, without sicca symptoms preceding the neurological clinical picture. The coexistence of ganglionopathy and a favourable response to immunosuppression are key features that can lead to the correct diagnosis in cases with atypical CNS symptoms, mimicking a rapidly progressive dementia. PMID:28182102

  5. Metabolic Syndrome and Inflammatory Biomarkers in Adults: A Population-Based Survey in Western Region of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Ali; Rashidi, Negin; Aghaei Meybodi, Hamidreza; Montazeri, Mahdi; Montazeri, Mohammad; Falsafi, Farid; Ghanavati, Reza; Forughi, Saeid; Alyari, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is evidence that inflammation may be involved in pathogenesis of MetS. Inflammatory biomarkers are moving to the forefront as the potent predictors of MetS. Objectives: The present study aimed to evaluate the association between MetS and some inflammatory biomarkers. Patients and Methods: This community-based cross-sectional study was conducted on 800 subjects aged above 35 years selected through random sampling in Borujerd (west of Iran) from 2011 to 2013. MetS was defined based on ATP III criteria and the subjects were divided into two groups (MetS and non-MetS groups). Waist circumference and Body Mass Index (BMI) were calculated. In addition, blood samples were taken and C-Reactive Protein (CRP), lipid profile, Fasting Blood Sugar (FBS), and Bleeding Time (BT) were measured. Then, the correlations between MetS and the above-mentioned variables were estimated. After all, the data were entered into the SPSS statistical software (v. 17) and analyzed using T-test, chi-square, median test, and spearman’s rank correlation. Results: In this study, 344 subjects (43%) met the ATP III criteria. The results showed a significant difference between MetS and non-MetS groups regarding BMI, white blood cell, total cholesterol, LDL, platelet, and high-sensitivity CPR (hs-CRP) (P < 0.0001, P = 0.040, P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001, and P = 0.045, respectively). Besides, waist circumference, Triglyceride (TG), FBS, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were significantly higher, while HDL was significantly lower in the MetS group (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: The incidence rate of MetS in our survey was higher compared to the previous reports. In addition, this incidence rate was higher in females in comparison to males. The results also showed a significant correlation between inflammatory biomarkers and MetS and that the higher levels of hs-CRP were associated with higher rate of MetS. PMID:25614859

  6. Novel insight into Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polineuropathy in APECED syndrome: molecular mechanisms and clinical implications in children.

    PubMed

    Valenzise, Mariella; Aversa, Tommaso; Salzano, Giuseppina; Zirilli, Giuseppina; De Luca, Filippo; Su, Maureen

    2017-01-19

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal-dystrophy (APECED) is a rare primary immunodeficiency disorder typically caused by homozygous AIRE gene mutation. It is characterized by the association of multiple autoimmune diseases, with a classical triad including chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism and adrenocortical failure. Its clinical spectrum has significantly enlarged in the last years with the apparence of new entities. One of these novel manifestations is the chronic inflammatory demyelinating polineuropathy (CIDP), that is characterized by involvement of peripheral nervous system, with nerve demyelination, progressive muscular weakness of both arms and legs and sensory loss. The identification of myelin protein zero as an important autoantigen (Ag) in CIDP may suggest the development of Ag-based therapies, such as Ag-specific DNA vaccination or infusion of Ag-coupled cells.

  7. An intriguing and hitherto unexplained co-occurrence: Depression and chronic fatigue syndrome are manifestations of shared inflammatory, oxidative and nitrosative (IO&NS) pathways.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michael

    2011-04-29

    There is a significant 'comorbidity' between depression and myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). Depressive symptoms frequently occur during the course of ME/CFS. Fatigue and somatic symptoms (F&S), like pain, muscle tension, and a flu-like malaise, are key components of depression. At the same time, depression and ME/CFS show major clinical differences, which allow to discriminate them with a 100% accuracy. This paper aims to review the shared pathways that underpin both disorders and the pathways that discriminate them. Numerous studies have shown that depression and ME/CFS are characterized by shared aberrations in inflammatory, oxidative and nitrosative (IO&NS) pathways, like systemic inflammation and its long-term sequels, including O&NS-induced damage to fatty acids, proteins and DNA; dysfunctional mitochondria; lowered antioxidant levels, like zinc and coenzyme Q10; autoimmune responses to neoepitopes formed by O&NS; lowered omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels; and increased translocation of gram-negative bacteria. Some IO&NS-related pathways, like the induction of indoleamine 2-3-dioxygenase, neurodegeneration and decreased neurogenesis, are more specific to depression, whereas other pathways, like the 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase/RNase L pathway, are specific to ME/CFS. Most current animal models of depression, e.g. those induced by cytokines, are not reminiscent of human depression but reflect a mixture of depressive and F&S symptoms. The latter symptoms, sometimes called sickness behavior, differ from depression and ME/CFS because the former is a (sub)acute response to infection-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines that aims to enhance recovery, whereas the latter are characterized by long-term sequels in multiple IO&NS pathways. Depression and ME/CFS are not 'comorbid' disorders, but should be regarded as 'co-associated disorders' that are clinical manifestations of shared pathways.

  8. Treatment and prevention of inflammatory responses and oxidative stress in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome using Chinese herbal medicines

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qin; Lin, Rong Jing; Hong, Xuchu; Ye, Lin; Lin, Qichang

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal medicines for the treatment and prevention of inflammatory responses and oxidative stress in obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). A total of 60 patients with OSAHS were randomly divided into two groups (n=30/group): The experimental group, who received the conventional treatment + oral administration of the traditional Chinese herbal formula, Jiawei Di Tan Tang; and the control group, who received the conventional treatment only. OSAHS patients were included in the current study if they presented with snoring and had an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of >30 in a polysomnography study, without comorbidities. The therapeutic course lasted 12 weeks in both groups. Alterations to the mean clinical symptom score, Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) and AHI scores, lowest nocturnal blood oxygen saturation (SaO2) and the serum levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and C-reactive protein (CRP) prior to and following treatment were observed. The mean clinical symptom score was significantly decreased in the experimental group post-treatment compared with the control group (P<0.05). In addition, the clinical symptoms in the experimental group were significantly improved following treatment compared with pre-treatment symptoms (P<0.05). Furthermore, the ESS and AHI scores, lowest nocturnal SaO2 and serum levels of SOD, MDA, IL-6, TNF-α and CRP were significantly improved in the experimental group post-treatment compared with the control group (P<0.05). These parameters in the experimental group were also significantly improved post-treatment compared with those pre-treatment (P<0.05). The results of the present study suggested that oral administration of the traditional Chinese herbal formula Jiawei Di Tan Tang was able to attenuate oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in patients with OSAHS, and thus may

  9. Mesenchymal Stem/Progenitors and Other Endometrial Cell Types From Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Display Inflammatory and Oncogenic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Piltonen, T. T.; Chen, J.; Erikson, D. W.; Spitzer, T. L. B.; Barragan, F.; Rabban, J. T.; Huddleston, H.; Irwin, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Endometrium in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) presents altered gene expression indicating progesterone resistance and predisposing to reduced endometrial receptivity and endometrial cancer. Objective: We hypothesized that an altered endocrine/metabolic environment in PCOS may result in an endometrial “disease phenotype” affecting the gene expression of different endometrial cell populations, including stem cells and their differentiated progeny. Design and Setting: This was a prospective study conducted at an academic medical center. Patients and Main Outcome Measures: Proliferative-phase endometrium was obtained from 6 overweight/obese PCOS (National Institutes of Health criteria) and 6 overweight/obese controls. Microarray analysis was performed on fluorescence-activated cell sorting-isolated endometrial epithelial cells (eEPs), endothelial cells, stromal fibroblasts (eSFs), and mesenchymal stem cells (eMSCs). Gene expression data were validated using microfluidic quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results: The comparison between eEPPCOS and eEPCtrl showed dysregulation of inflammatory genes and genes with oncogenic potential (CCL2, IL-6, ORM1, TNAIFP6, SFRP4, SPARC). eSFPCOS and eSFCtrl showed up-regulation of inflammatory genes (C4A/B, CCL2, ICAM1, TNFAIP3). Similarly, in eMSCPCOS vs eMSCCtrl, the most up-regulated genes were related to inflammation and cancer (IL-8, ICAM1, SPRR3, LCN2). Immunohistochemistry scoring showed increased expression of CCL2 in eEPPCOS and eSFPCOS compared with eEPCtrl and eSFCtrl and IL-6 in eEPPCOS compared with eEPCtrl. Conclusions: Isolated endometrial cell populations in women with PCOS showed altered gene expression revealing inflammation and prooncogenic changes, independent of body mass index, especially in eEPPCOS and eMSCPCOS, compared with controls. The study reveals an endometrial disease phenotype in women with PCOS with potential negative effects on endometrial function and long-term health

  10. Inflammatory peeling skin syndrome caused by homozygous genomic deletion in the PSORS1 region encompassing the CDSN gene.

    PubMed

    Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Furio, Laetitia; Igawa, Satomi; Honma, Masaru; Tron, Elodie; Malan, Valerie; Murakami, Masamoto; Hovnanian, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Peeling skin syndrome (PSS) type B is a rare recessive genodermatosis characterized by lifelong widespread, reddish peeling of the skin with pruritus. The disease is caused by small-scale mutations in the Corneodesmosin gene (CDSN) leading to premature termination codons. We report for the first time a Japanese case resulting from complete deletion of CDSN. Corneodesmosin was undetectable in the epidermis, and CDSN was unamplifiable by PCR. QMPSF analysis demonstrated deletion of CDSN exons inherited from each parent. Deletion mapping using microsatellite haplotyping, CGH array and PCR analysis established that the genomic deletion spanned 49-72 kb between HCG22 and TCF19, removing CDSN as well as five other genes within the psoriasis susceptibility region 1 (PSORS1) on 6p21.33. This observation widens the spectrum of molecular defects underlying PSS type B and shows that loss of these five genes from the PSORS1 region does not result in an additional cutaneous phenotype.

  11. Citrus Polyphenol Hesperidin Stimulates Production of Nitric Oxide in Endothelial Cells while Improving Endothelial Function and Reducing Inflammatory Markers in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rizza, Stefano; Muniyappa, Ranganath; Iantorno, Micaela; Kim, Jeong-a; Chen, Hui; Pullikotil, Philomena; Senese, Nicoletta; Tesauro, Manfredi; Lauro, Davide; Cardillo, Carmine

    2011-01-01

    Context: Hesperidin, a citrus flavonoid, and its metabolite hesperetin may have vascular actions relevant to their health benefits. Molecular and physiological mechanisms of hesperetin actions are unknown. Objective: We tested whether hesperetin stimulates production of nitric oxide (NO) from vascular endothelium and evaluated endothelial function in subjects with metabolic syndrome on oral hesperidin therapy. Design, Setting, and Interventions: Cellular mechanisms of action of hesperetin were evaluated in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) in primary culture. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover trial examined whether oral hesperidin administration (500 mg once daily for 3 wk) improves endothelial function in individuals with metabolic syndrome (n = 24). Main Outcome Measure: We measured the difference in brachial artery flow-mediated dilation between placebo and hesperidin treatment periods. Results: Treatment of BAEC with hesperetin acutely stimulated phosphorylation of Src, Akt, AMP kinase, and endothelial NO synthase to produce NO; this required generation of H2O2. Increased adhesion of monocytes to BAEC and expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in response to TNF-α treatment was reduced by pretreatment with hesperetin. In the clinical study, when compared with placebo, hesperidin treatment increased flow-mediated dilation (10.26 ± 1.19 vs. 7.78 ± 0.76%; P = 0.02) and reduced concentrations of circulating inflammatory biomarkers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A protein, soluble E-selectin). Conclusions: Novel mechanisms for hesperetin action in endothelial cells inform effects of oral hesperidin treatment to improve endothelial dysfunction and reduce circulating markers of inflammation in our exploratory clinical trial. Hesperetin has vasculoprotective actions that may explain beneficial cardiovascular effects of citrus consumption. PMID:21346065

  12. Genomic and Clinical Effects Associated with a Relaxation Response Mind-Body Intervention in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jacquart, Jolene; Scult, Matthew A.; Slipp, Lauren; Riklin, Eric Isaac Kagan; Lepoutre, Veronique; Comosa, Nicole; Norton, Beth-Ann; Dassatti, Allison; Rosenblum, Jessica; Thurler, Andrea H.; Surjanhata, Brian C.; Hasheminejad, Nicole N.; Kagan, Leslee; Slawsby, Ellen; Rao, Sowmya R.; Macklin, Eric A.; Fricchione, Gregory L.; Benson, Herbert; Libermann, Towia A.; Korzenik, Joshua; Denninger, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) can profoundly affect quality of life and are influenced by stress and resiliency. The impact of mind-body interventions (MBIs) on IBS and IBD patients has not previously been examined. Methods Nineteen IBS and 29 IBD patients were enrolled in a 9-week relaxation response based mind-body group intervention (RR-MBI), focusing on elicitation of the RR and cognitive skill building. Symptom questionnaires and inflammatory markers were assessed pre- and post-intervention, and at short-term follow-up. Peripheral blood transcriptome analysis was performed to identify genomic correlates of the RR-MBI. Results Pain Catastrophizing Scale scores improved significantly post-intervention for IBD and at short-term follow-up for IBS and IBD. Trait Anxiety scores, IBS Quality of Life, IBS Symptom Severity Index, and IBD Questionnaire scores improved significantly post-intervention and at short-term follow-up for IBS and IBD, respectively. RR-MBI altered expression of more genes in IBD (1059 genes) than in IBS (119 genes). In IBD, reduced expression of RR-MBI response genes was most significantly linked to inflammatory response, cell growth, proliferation, and oxidative stress-related pathways. In IBS, cell cycle regulation and DNA damage related gene sets were significantly upregulated after RR-MBI. Interactive network analysis of RR-affected pathways identified TNF, AKT and NF-κB as top focus molecules in IBS, while in IBD kinases (e.g. MAPK, P38 MAPK), inflammation (e.g. VEGF-C, NF-κB) and cell cycle and proliferation (e.g. UBC, APP) related genes emerged as top focus molecules. Conclusions In this uncontrolled pilot study, participation in an RR-MBI was associated with improvements in disease-specific measures, trait anxiety, and pain catastrophizing in IBS and IBD patients. Moreover, observed gene expression changes suggest that NF-κB is a target focus molecule in both IBS and IBD—and that

  13. Pro-inflammatory cytokines enhance ERAD and ATF6α pathway activity in salivary glands of Sjögren's syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Barrera, María-José; Aguilera, Sergio; Castro, Isabel; Cortés, Juan; Bahamondes, Verónica; Quest, Andrew F G; Molina, Claudio; González, Sergio; Hermoso, Marcela; Urzúa, Ulises; Leyton, Cecilia; González, María-Julieta

    2016-12-01

    Salivary gland (SG) acinar-cells are susceptible to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress related to their secretory activity and the complexity of synthesized secretory products. SGs of Sjögren's syndrome patients (SS)-patients show signs of inflammation and altered proteostasis, associated with low IRE1α/XBP-1 pathway activity without avert increases in apoptosis. Acinar-cells may avoid apoptosis by activation of the ATF6α pathway and ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in ATF6α pathway/ERAD activation and cell viability in labial salivary glands (LSG) of SS-patients. In biopsies from SS-patients increased ATF6α signaling pathway activity, as evidenced by generation of the ATF6f cleavage fragment, and increased expression of ERAD machinery components, such as EDEM1, p97, SEL1L, gp78, UBE2J1, UBE2G2, HERP and DERLIN1, were observed compared to controls. Alternatively, for pro- (active-caspase-3) and anti-apoptotic (cIAP2) markers no significant difference between the two experimental groups was detected. Increased presence of ATF6f and ERAD molecules correlated significantly with increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These observations were corroborated in vitro in 3D-acini treated with TNF-α and/or IFN-γ, where an increase in the expression and activation of the ATF6α sensor and ERAD machinery components was detected under ER stress conditions, while changes in cell viability and caspase-3 activation were not observed. Cytokine stimulation protected cells from death when co-incubated with an ERAD machinery inhibitor. Alternatively, when cytokines were eliminated from the medium prior to ERAD inhibition, cell death increased, suggesting that the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the medium is essential to maintain cell viability. In conclusion, the ATF6α pathway and the ERAD machinery are active in LSG of SS-patients. Both were also activated by TNF

  14. Brown-Sequard Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... vessel), or infectious or inflammatory diseases such as tuberculosis, or multiple sclerosis. × Definition Brown-Sequard syndrome (BSS) ... vessel), or infectious or inflammatory diseases such as tuberculosis, or multiple sclerosis. View Full Definition Treatment Generally ...

  15. Sequence Analysis of Kaposi Sarcoma–Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) MicroRNAs in Patients with Multicentric Castleman Disease and KSHV-Associated Inflammatory Cytokine Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Alex; Marshall, Vickie; Uldrick, Thomas; Leighty, Robert; Labo, Nazzarena; Wyvill, Kathy; Aleman, Karen; Polizzotto, Mark N.; Little, Richard F.; Yarchoan, Robert; Whitby, Denise

    2012-01-01

    Background Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes 12 pre-microRNAs that yield 25 mature microRNAs. We previously reported phylogenetic analysis of the microRNA-coding region of KSHV from Kaposi sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) patients. We observed a high level of conservation for most sequences but also a divergent cluster of 5 KSHV sequences, including 2 from MCD patients. Methods KSHV microRNA sequences from 23 MCD patients and 7 patients with a newly described KSHV-associated inflammatory cytokine syndrome (KICS) were examined by amplification, cloning, and sequencing of a 646-bp fragment of K12/T0.7 encoding microRNA-K12-10 and microRNA-K12-12 and a 2.8-kbp fragment containing the remaining 10 pre-microRNAs. Results Phylogenetic analysis showed a distinct variant cluster consisting exclusively of MCD and KICS patients in all trees. Pearson χ2 analysis revealed that 40 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at various loci were significantly associated with MCD and KICS risk. Cluster analysis of these SNPs generated several combinations of 3 SNPs as putative indicators of MCD and KICS risk. Conclusions These findings show that MCD and KICS patients frequently have unusual KSHV microRNA sequences and suggest an association between the observed sequence variation and risk of MCD and KICS. PMID:22448005

  16. Early Electrodiagnostic Features of Upper Extremity Sensory Nerves Can Differentiate Axonal Guillain-Barré Syndrome from Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Yong Seo; Shin, Ha Young; Kim, Jong Kuk; Nam, Tai-Seung; Shin, Kyong Jin; Bae, Jong-Seok; Suh, Bum Chun; Oh, Jeeyoung; Yoon, Byeol-A

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Serial nerve conduction studies (NCSs) are recommended for differentiating axonal and demyelinating Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), but this approach is not suitable for early diagnoses. This study was designed to identify possible NCS parameters for differentiating GBS subtypes. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 70 patients with GBS who underwent NCS within 10 days of symptom onset. Patients with axonal GBS and acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) were selected based on clinical characteristics and serial NCSs. An antiganglioside antibody study was used to increase the diagnostic certainty. Results The amplitudes of median and ulnar nerve sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) were significantly smaller in the AIDP group than in the axonal-GBS group. Classification and regression-tree analysis revealed that the distal ulnar sensory nerve SNAP amplitude was the best predictor of axonal GBS. Conclusions Early upper extremity sensory NCS findings are helpful in differentiating axonal-GBS patients with antiganglioside antibodies from AIDP patients. PMID:27819421

  17. Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells and Cytokines Gene Expression of the T Cells in AIDS Patients with Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome during Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Heling; Xie, Yirui; Su, Junwei; Huang, Ying; Xu, Lijun; Yin, Michael; Zhou, Qihui

    2017-01-01

    Background. The etiology of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) in AIDS patients after the initiation of HAART remains unknown. Several researches indicated that the development of IRIS is associated with the production and variation of cytokines, whose gene expression are closely related to the Ca2+/CN-nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) pathway. Methods. We studied the expression of NFAT isoforms and their major target cytokines genes in peripheral blood CD3+ T cells of subjects through fluorescence quantitative PCR and explored the expression changes of these genes before and after HAART. Results. After the initiation of HARRT, NFAT1, IL-6, and IL-8 gene expression showed a reversal trend in the CD3+ T cells of the IRIS group and changed from low expression before HARRT to high expression after HARRT. In particular, the relative gene expression of NFAT1 was markedly higher compared with the other three isoforms. The IRIS group also showed higher NFAT4, NFAT2, NFAT1, IL-1β, IL-10, IL-2, IL-18, and TNF-α gene expression than the non-IRIS group. Conclusion. This study suggested that high expression levels of IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12, and IL-18 can predict the risk of IRIS. The increased expression of NFAT1 and NFAT4 may promote the expression of cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α, which may promote the occurrence of IRIS. PMID:28316373

  18. Profile of inflammatory mediators in tonsils of patients with periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Patricia M; Araya, Andrea; Pérez, Claudio I; Maul, Ximena; Serrano, Carolina; Beltrán, Constanza; Harris, Paul R; Talesnik, Eduardo

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the levels of white blood cells and profile of proinflammatory Th1, Th2, Th17, and T regulatory tissue cytokines in the tonsils of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) patients to contribute to the pathophysiological understanding of the PFAPA syndrome. A cohort of PFAPA patients who had tonsillectomy during 2010 and 2011 was included and compared to control patients who had tonsillectomy for tonsillar hypertrophy. White blood cell counts were measured during flares in PFAPA patients and before tonsillectomy in the control group. Cytokine gene expression was analyzed in removed tonsils by real-time PCR. Nine PFAPA patients with a median age of 5.3 years (1.7-8 years) and 17 hypertrophic tonsils of patients with a median age of 4.8 years (2.3-8.4 years) participated in this study. Tonsillectomy was performed during afebrile period between PFAPA flares. Three of the nine patients had recurrent episodes of aphthous stomatitis without fever after tonsillectomy. Leukocyte and neutrophil counts were higher in PFAPA patients compared to controls (p < 0.05). Eosinophil counts were lower in PFAPA patients during flares (p = 0.006). IL-1β, TNF-α, TGF-β, IL-17, and IFN-γ levels were similar in the tonsils of patients and controls. IL-4 gene expression in the tonsils was lower in PFAPA patients compared to those of the controls (p = 0.04). Proinflammatory, effector, and regulatory cytokine gene expression in tonsil tissue of PFAPA children removed in a noninflammatory asymptomatic interval and in control patients were similar. However, IL-4 cytokine gene expression in the tonsils and peripheral blood eosinophils were lower in the PFAPA patients suggesting a potential pathogenesis pathway based on an inhibition of Th2 responses.

  19. An Elevated Fetal IL-6 Concentration Can Be Observed In Fetuses with Anemia Due To Rh Alloimmunization: Implications for the Understanding of the Fetal Inflammatory Response Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vaisbuch, Edi; Romero, Roberto; Gomez, Ricardo; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Hassan, Sonia S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The fetal inflammatory response syndrome (FIRS) has been described in the context of preterm labor and preterm PROM and is often associated with intra-amniotic infection/inflammation. This syndrome is characterized by systemic fetal inflammation and operationally-defined by an elevated fetal plasma interleukin (IL)-6. The objective of this study was to determine if FIRS can be found in fetuses with activation of their immune system, such as the one observed in Rh alloimmune-mediated fetal anemia. Methods Fetal blood sampling was performed in sensitized Rh-D negative women with suspected fetal anemia (n=16). Fetal anemia was diagnosed according to reference range nomograms established for the assessment of fetal hematologic parameters. An elevated fetal plasma IL-6 concentration was defined using a cutoff of >11 pg/mL. Concentrations of IL-6 were determined by immunoassay. Non-parametric statistics were used for analysis. Results 1) The prevalence of an elevated fetal plasma IL-6 was 25% (4/16); 2) there was an inverse relationship between the fetal hematocrit and IL-6 concentration - the lower the hematocrit, the higher the fetal IL-6 (r= −0.68, p=0.004); 3) fetuses with anemia had a significantly higher plasma IL-6 concentration than those without anemia (3.74 pg/ml, interquartile range (IQR) 1.18–2.63 vs. 1.46 pg/ml, IQR 1.76–14.7; p=0.02); 4) interestingly, all fetuses with an elevated plasma IL-6 concentration had anemia (prevalence 40%, 4/10), while in the group without anemia, none had an elevated fetal plasma IL-6. Conclusions An elevation in fetal plasma IL-6 can be observed in a subset of fetuses with anemia due to Rh alloimmunization. This observation suggests that the hallmark of FIRS can be caused by non-infection-related insults. Further studies are required to determine whether the prognosis of FIRS caused by intra-amniotic infection/inflammation is different from that induced by alloimmunization. PMID:20701435

  20. Anti-inflammatory effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) on non-obese diabetic mice with Sjogren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaomei; Xu, Bei; Wang, Yiping; Wei, Li

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) on non-obese diabetic mice (NOD mice) with Sjogren’s syndrome. Methods: 22 eight-week-old female NOD mice were randomly divided into 2 groups. Rosiglitazone and normal saline were administered in the PPAR-γ group and the control group respectively. At the age of 9, 12 and 15 weeks, one mouse in each group was sacrificed respectively, and the remaining mice were sacrificed at the age of 18 weeks. Blood were obtained by cardiac puncture, and salivary glands were resected. The degree of salivary gland damage and infiltration of lymphocytes were examined by H&E staining. The level of IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6 and TNF-α in serum were measured by ELISA. The mRNA expression level of IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6 and TNF-α in MSG were detected by Real-time PCR. Expression of PPAR-γ in the salivary glands was detected by Immunohistochemistry. Results: Compared with the control group, mice in the PPAR-γ group showed that (1) histopathologic changes in the salivary glands were significantly ameliorated; (2) at the age of 18 weeks, IL-6 [(25.86 ± 7.32) vs (37.41 ± 11.34)] and TNF-α [(56.88 ± 22.19) vs (78.61 ± 20.76)] were expressed significantly lower and IL-4 [(25.76 ± 12.65) vs (12.11 ± 3.70)] was expressed significantly higher in serum (P < 0.05); (3) the expression of TNF-α was significantly decreased and the expression of IL-4 was significantly increased in MSG (P < 0.05). Conclusion: PPAR-γ ameliorates Sjogren’s syndrome on NOD mice effectively. The mechanism may be related to the reduction of Th1 cytokines and change of T helper cell balance from Th1 to Th2. PMID:25197359

  1. Treatment of irritable bowel syndrome in outpatients with inflammatory bowel disease using a food and beverage intolerance, food and beverage avoidance diet.

    PubMed

    MacDermott, Richard P

    2007-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in the outpatient with chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a difficult but important challenge to recognize and treat. It is very helpful to have effective treatment approaches for IBS that are practical and use minimal medications. Because of the underlying chronic inflammation in IBD, IBS symptoms occur with increased frequency and severity, secondary to increased hypersensitivity to foods and beverages that stimulate the gastrointestinal tract. This paper discusses how to treat IBS in the IBD outpatient, with emphasis on using a food and beverage intolerance, avoidance diet. The adverse effects of many foods and beverages are amount dependent and can be delayed, additive, and cumulative. The specific types of foods and beverages that can induce IBS symptoms include milk and milk containing products; caffeine containing products; alcoholic beverages; fruits; fruit juices; spices; seasonings; diet beverages; diet foods; diet candies; diet gum; fast foods; condiments; fried foods; fatty foods; multigrain breads; sourdough breads; bagels; salads; salad dressings; vegetables; beans; red meats; gravies; spaghetti sauce; stews; nuts; popcorn; high fiber; and cookies, crackers, pretzels, cakes, and pies. The types of foods and beverages that are better tolerated include water; rice; plain pasta or noodles; baked or broiled potatoes; white breads; plain fish, chicken, turkey, or ham; eggs; dry cereals; soy or rice based products; peas; applesauce; cantaloupe; watermelon; fruit cocktail; margarine; jams; jellies; and peanut butter. Handouts that were developed based upon what worsens or helps IBS symptoms in patients are included to help patients learn which foods and beverages to avoid and which are better tolerated.

  2. Using eHealth strategies in delivering dietary and other therapies in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Ankersen, Dorit Vedel; Carlsen, Katrine; Marker, Dorte; Munkholm, Pia; Burisch, Johan

    2017-03-01

    Health-care systems around the world are facing increasing costs. Non-adherent, chronically ill patients are one such expense incurred by health-care providers. Web-based home-monitoring of patients-or eHealth-has been shown to increase adherence to medical therapy, facilitate contact between patients and health-care professionals, and reduce time to remission for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Web-based treatment is a supportive tool for the health-care provider in an out-patient clinic. eHealth web-programs, such as the Constant Care application, visualize disease activity in a traffic light system and empower patients to screen for disease activity, enabling them to respond appropriately to their symptoms. The eHealth screening procedure for monitoring both pediatric and adult IBD patients is based on a self-obtained symptom score, together with a fecal biomarker for inflammation (fecal calprotectin) that the patients can measure independently using their smart phone, providing both patient and physician with an immediate disease status that they can react to instantaneously. Likewise, web applications for IBD patients, web applications for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients and also IBD patients with co-existing IBS, have proven valuable for monitoring and treating IBS symptoms with a diet low in fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols (low-FODMAP diet). With careful disease monitoring via the web application and increased patient adherence, eHealth might be capable of improving the natural disease course of IBD and IBS.

  3. The role of inflammatory cytokines and ERK1/2 signaling in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome with related mental health disorders.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chao; Yang, Hualan; Zhao, Yanfang; Chen, Xiang; Dong, Yinying; Li, Long; Dong, Yehao; Cui, Jiefeng; Zhu, Tongyu; Zheng, Ping; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Dai, Jican

    2016-06-23

    Mental health disorders(MHD) in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) have been widely studied. However, the underlying role of inflammatory cytokines and their associated signaling pathways have not been investigated. Here, we report the potential role of cytokines and associated signaling pathways in CP/CPPS patients with MHD and in a CP/CPPS animal model. CP/CPPS patients (n = 810) and control subjects (n = 992) were enrolled in this case-control multicenter study, and serum cytokine levels were measured. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received multiple intracutaneous injections of an immuno-agent along with a pertussis-diphtheria-tetanus triple vaccine for autoimmune CP/CPPS development. The results revealed that, in CP/CPPS patients with significant MHD, elevated IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-13, and TNF-α serum levels were observed. The above five cytokines in CP/CPPS rats were significantly elevated in prostate tissue (p < 0.05), and IL-1β levels were elevated in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. In behavioral tests, CP/CPPS rats showed anxiety- and depression-like symptoms, and impaired spatial and associative memory performance (p < 0.05). In the CP/CPPS group, ERK1/2 phosphorylation levels were increased in the amygdala and nucleus accumbens, and decreased in the hippocampus, but not caudate nucleus. Thus, prostate-derived cytokines, especially IL-1β, cross the blood brain barrier and may lead to enhanced ERK1/2 signaling in several brain areas, possibly underlying induction of CP/CPPS-related MHD.

  4. The role of inflammatory cytokines and ERK1/2 signaling in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome with related mental health disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chao; Yang, Hualan; Zhao, Yanfang; Chen, Xiang; Dong, Yinying; Li, Long; Dong, Yehao; Cui, Jiefeng; Zhu, Tongyu; Zheng, Ping; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Dai, Jican

    2016-01-01

    Mental health disorders(MHD) in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) have been widely studied. However, the underlying role of inflammatory cytokines and their associated signaling pathways have not been investigated. Here, we report the potential role of cytokines and associated signaling pathways in CP/CPPS patients with MHD and in a CP/CPPS animal model. CP/CPPS patients (n = 810) and control subjects (n = 992) were enrolled in this case-control multicenter study, and serum cytokine levels were measured. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received multiple intracutaneous injections of an immuno-agent along with a pertussis-diphtheria-tetanus triple vaccine for autoimmune CP/CPPS development. The results revealed that, in CP/CPPS patients with significant MHD, elevated IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-13, and TNF-α serum levels were observed. The above five cytokines in CP/CPPS rats were significantly elevated in prostate tissue (p < 0.05), and IL-1β levels were elevated in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. In behavioral tests, CP/CPPS rats showed anxiety- and depression-like symptoms, and impaired spatial and associative memory performance (p < 0.05). In the CP/CPPS group, ERK1/2 phosphorylation levels were increased in the amygdala and nucleus accumbens, and decreased in the hippocampus, but not caudate nucleus. Thus, prostate-derived cytokines, especially IL-1β, cross the blood brain barrier and may lead to enhanced ERK1/2 signaling in several brain areas, possibly underlying induction of CP/CPPS-related MHD. PMID:27334333

  5. The natural history of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome and the evaluation of SIRS criteria as a predictor of severity in patients hospitalized through emergency services.

    PubMed

    Sun, D; Aikawa, N

    1999-03-01

    Based on the concept of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), a one-year retrospective study was carried out among a total of 2389 patients transported to the emergency room by ambulance. With respect to 351 patients who had all data necessary for evaluating SIRS criteria in 369 hospitalized patients, 200 met SIRS criteria within 24 hours of admission (24h-SIRS). The mortality rate for 24h-SIRS patients was significantly higher than that of non-SIRS patients. The mortality rate for 24h-SIRS patients increased sequentially as more SIRS criteria were met. In 235 patients who met SIRS criteria during hospitalization (overall-SIRS), 108 had sepsis. Of these, 60 developed severe sepsis, and 50 developed septic shock. The mortality rate for patients who had 3 or more consecutive days of SIRS was significantly higher than that for those with less than 3 consecutive SIRS days. Among 153 patients who had all data necessary for APACHEIII scoring within 24 hours of admission, the mortality rate for SIRS patients whose APACHEIII score was 50 or higher was 40.7%, significantly higher than that of other patients. In conclusion, SIRS criteria were demonstrated to be useful as indicators of severity and for predicting outcome in patients hospitalized through emergency services. Patients who met the following criteria were found to be a high-risk population among hospitalized emergency patients with SIRS: (1) Those who had three or more consecutive days of SIRS. (2) Those whose APACHEIII score was 50 or higher.

  6. More effects of extracorporeal magnetic innervation and terazosin therapy than terazosin therapy alone for non-inflammatory chronic pelvic pain syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Paick, J-S; Lee, S C; Ku, J H

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether extracorporeal magnetic innervation (ExMI) combined with alpha-blocker therapy is more effective than alpha-blocker monotherapy for patients with non-inflammatory chronic prostatitis (CP)/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS), category IIIB. Patients were randomized to either terazosin monotherapy (group 1, n=21) or terazosin combined with ExMI therapy (group 2, n=19). Patients in group 2 had 12 treatment sessions of ExMI twice a week during 6 weeks. None of the patients experienced any side effects from treatment. The changes in each domain of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (CPSI) measured on week 6 were not significantly different between the groups. However, the difference (median, 25-75th percentiles) between the two groups in total NIH-CPSI scores was -4 (-11.5, -2) for group 1 and -12 (-17.3, -2.3) for group 2, respectively (P=0.047). At 6 weeks, 47.6% (10 of 21) of group 1 had a >25% decrease in total NIH-CPSI compared with 78.9% (15 of 19) of group 2 (P=0.041). Also, more patients in group 2 (78.9%) were rated as responders with a 6-point decrease in NIH-CPSI compared with group 1 (47.6%) (P=0.041). The early results suggest that ExMI combined with alpha-blocker therapy has better effect than alpha-blocker monotherapy for the treatment of CP/CPPS.

  7. Can mean platelet volume and mean platelet volume/platelet count ratio be used as a diagnostic marker for sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Ates, Selma; Oksuz, Hafıze; Dogu, Bırsen; Bozkus, Fulsen; Ucmak, Hasan; Yanıt, Fadime

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether the mean platelet volume (MPV) and MPV/platelet (PLT) values can be used in the study of sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Methods: In this retrospective case-controlled study, 69 sepsis, 69 SIRS patients, and 72 control group who were treated in the years 2012-2013 were reviewed, and both the MPV and MPV/PLT rates were evaluated in all groups at Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University Intensive Care Unit, Kahramanmaras, Turkey. Results: Statistically significant difference was found between sepsis, SIRS, and control groups when comparing the MPV and MPV/PLT ratio (p<0.05), and no significant difference was found between sepsis and SIRS groups in terms of MPV and MPV/PLT ratio (p>0.05). Mean platelet volume values for sepsis and control groups was 10.07/8.731 femtoliter (fL) (p=0.000), and 9.45/8.731 fL (p=0.000) for SIRS and control groups. In the group of sepsis patients, the MPV was found to be at cut-off 8.915, sensitivity 71%, and specificity 63.9%. In the group of patients with SIRS, MPV was found to be at cut-off 8.85, sensitivity 69.6%, and specificity 62.5%. For the MPV/PLT values, the specificity and sensitivity were found to be insignificant. Conclusion: This study shows that although there was no significant reduction in the PLT values between the sepsis and SIRS patients, the MPV and MPV/PLT ratio values were found to have significant differences. However, the specificity and sensitivity of the values were not reliable standard to be used as a test. PMID:26446329

  8. The frequencies of Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and their HLA ligands in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy are similar to those in Guillian Barre syndrome but differ from those of controls, suggesting a role for NK cells in pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Blum, Stefan; Csurhes, Peter; McCombe, Pamela

    2015-08-15

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired inflammatory neuropathy, which has similar clinical and pathological features to Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS), but differs in time course. We investigated the frequency of genes encoding Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and their HLA ligands in subjects with CIDP, in subjects with GBS and in healthy controls. There were no differences in KIR gene frequency among the 3 groups. The gene frequencies for HLA-B Bw4-I were significantly greater in CIDP than HC, but did not differ from GBS. The frequency of the combination of 3DL1/HLA-B Bw4I was greater in CIDP than HC, but did not differ from that of GBS. These data raise the possibility of NK cell function being an important factor in the pathogenesis of CIDP.

  9. AB165. The role of inflammatory cytokines and MAPK signaling in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome with related mental health disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chao; Yang, Hualan; Zhao, Yanfang; Chen, Xiang; Dong, Yinying; Dong, Yehao; Cui, Jiefeng; Zhu, Tongyu; Zheng, Ping; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Dai, Jican

    2015-01-01

    Objective Mental health disorders (MHD) in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) have been widely studied. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and, in particular, role of inflammatory cytokines and their associated signaling pathways has not been investigated in detail. To determine the potential role of cytokines and associated signaling pathways in CP/CPPS patients with MHD and in a CP/CPPS animal model. Methods Between July 2012 and August 2013, 810 CP/CPPS patients and 992 control subjects were enrolled in this case-control multicenter study, and serum cytokine levels were measured. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received multiple intracutaneous injections (neck, tail, and pelvic limbs) of an immuno-agent along with a pertussis-diphtheria-tetanus triple vaccine for autoimmune CP/CPPS development. After 45 and 60 days behavioral analysis was performed, and prostate and specific brain areas related to MHD were subjected to RT-qPCR and Western blot analysis of cytokine signaling pathways. Moreover, histological prostate examination, and detection of IL-1β levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was performed. Results In CP/CPPS patients with significant MHD, elevated IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-13, and TNF-α serum levels were observed. The above five cytokines in CP/CPPS rats were significantly elevated in prostate tissue (P<0.05), and IL-1β levels were elevated in serum and CSF. In behavioral tests, CP/CPPS rats showed anxiety- and depression-like symptoms, and impaired spatial and associative memory performance (P<0.05). In the CP/CPPS group ERK1/2 phosphorylation levels were increased in the amygdala and nucleus accumbens, and decreased in the hippocampus and caudate nucleus. Lack of human CSF data in present research may limit the translational values of the results. Conclusions These data suggest that prostate-derived cytokines, especially IL-1β, cross the blood brain barrier and may lead to enhanced ERK1/2 signaling in several

  10. Deferoxamine attenuates lipid peroxidation, blocks interleukin-6 production, ameliorates sepsis inflammatory response syndrome, and confers renoprotection after acute hepatic ischemia in pigs.

    PubMed

    Vlahakos, Demetrios; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia; Siasiakou, Sofia; Kaklamanis, Loukas; Degiannis, Dimitrios; Demonakou, Maria; Smyrniotis, Vassilios

    2012-04-01

    We have previously shown that deferoxamine (DFO) infusion protected myocardium against reperfusion injury in patients undergoing open heart surgery, and reduced brain edema, intracranial pressure, and lung injury in pigs with acute hepatic ischemia (AHI). The purpose of this research was to study if DFO could attenuate sepsis inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and confer renoprotection in the same model of AHI in anesthetized pigs. Fourteen animals were randomly allocated to two groups. In the Group DFO (n=7), 150mg/kg of DFO dissolved in normal saline was continuously infused in animals undergoing hepatic devascularization and portacaval anastomosis. The control group (Group C, n=7) underwent the same surgical procedure and received the same volume of normal saline infusion. Animals were euthanized after 24h. Hematological, biochemical parameters, malondialdehyde (MDA), and cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α) were determined from sera obtained at baseline, at 12h, and after euthanasia. Hematoxylin-eosin and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling were used to evaluate necrosis and apoptosis, respectively, in kidney sections obtained after euthanasia. A rapid and substantial elevation (more than 100-fold) of serum IL-6 levels was observed in Group C reaching peak at the end of the experiment, associated with increased production of oxygen free radicals and lipid peroxidation (MDA 3.2±0.1nmol/mL at baseline and 5.5±0.9nmol/mL at the end of the experiment, P<0.05) and various manifestations of SIRS and multiple organ dysfunction (MOD), including elevation of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, severe hypotension, leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, hypoproteinemia, and increased serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase (fourfold), alkaline phosphatase (fourfold), alanine aminotransferase (14-fold), and ammonia (sevenfold). In sharp contrast, IL-6 production and lipid

  11. A Prospective Follow-Up of Adipocytokines in Cohort Patients With Gout: Association With Metabolic Syndrome But Not With Clinical Inflammatory Findings

    PubMed Central

    García-Méndez, Sergio; Rivera-Bahena, Carolina Bustos; Montiel-Hernández, José Luis; Xibillé-Friedmann, Daniel; Álvarez-Hernández, Everardo; Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris; Burgos-Vargas, Rubén; Vázquez-Mellado, Janitzia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the levels of leptin (Lep) and adiponectin (AdipoQ) in patients with gout and its relationship with joint inflammatory data and/or with metabolic syndrome (MetS) variables, during 1 year follow-up. Forty-one patients (40 males) with gout diagnosis, attending for the first time to a rheumatology department, were included. Evaluations were performed baseline, at 6 and 12 months. Variables included the following: demographic, clinical and laboratory data related to gout and associated diseases. Lep and AdipoQ determinations by the ELISA method were performed in frozen serum from each visit. The pharmacological and no-pharmacological treatment for gout and associated diseases was individualized for each patient according to published guidelines. Statistical analysis included Mann–Whitney U test, Fisher test, x2, ANOVA, Cochran Q, Pearson and Spearman correlation tests, as well as linear regression. In the baseline evaluation, 29.2% had MetS (hypertriglyceridemia 66%, hypertension 44% and obesity 37%); patients with MetS had higher C reactive protein (CRP) levels [34.1 ± 28.6 vs. 12.2 ± 11.2 mg/dL, P = 0.033]. Although not significant, also had higher Lep and lower AdipoQ levels (3.2 ± 3.0 vs. 1.9 ± 1.2 ng/mL, P = 0.142 and 40.5 ± 26.8 vs. 38.0 ± 24.9 ng/mL, P = 0.877, respectively). During follow-up, our patients had significant improvement in serum uric acid (sUA) levels and variables evaluating pain and joint swelling (P ≤ 0.05). Metabolic abnormalities tended to persist or even worsen during the monitoring period: significant increase in total cholesterol (P = 0.004), tendency to higher triglycerides (P = 0.883) and slight improvement in glycaemia (P = 0.052). Lep values increased significantly during follow-up (P = 0.001) while AdipoQ levels diminished slightly (P = 0.317). Neither Lep nor AdipoQ values showed important correlation (r > 0

  12. Enhancing of Women Functional Status with Metabolic Syndrome by Cardioprotective and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Combined Aerobic and Resistance Training

    PubMed Central

    Alsamir Tibana, Ramires; da Cunha Nascimento, Dahan; Frade de Sousa, Nuno Manuel; de Souza, Vinicius Carolino; Durigan, João; Vieira, Amilton; Bottaro, Martim; de Toledo Nóbrega, Otávio; de Almeida, Jeeser Alves; Navalta, James Wilfred; Franco, Octavio Luiz; Prestes, Jonato

    2014-01-01

    These data describe the effects of combined aerobic plus resistance training (CT) with regards to risk factors of metabolic syndrome (MetS), quality of life, functional capacity, and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in women with MetS. In this context, thirteen women (35.4±6.2 yr) completed 10 weeks of CT consisting of three weekly sessions of ∼60 min aerobic training (treadmill at 65–70% of reserve heart rate, 30 min) and resistance training (3 sets of 8–12 repetitions maximum for main muscle groups). Dependent variables were maximum chest press strength; isometric hand-grip strength; 30 s chair stand test; six minute walk test; body mass; body mass index; body adiposity index; waist circumference; systolic (SBP), diastolic and mean blood pressure (MBP); blood glucose; HDL-C; triglycerides; interleukins (IL) 6, 10 and 12, osteoprotegerin (OPG) and serum nitric oxide metabolite (NOx); quality of life (SF-36) and Z-Score of MetS. There was an improvement in muscle strength on chest press (p = 0.009), isometric hand-grip strength (p = 0.03) and 30 s chair stand (p = 0.007). There was a decrease in SBP (p = 0.049), MBP (p = 0.041), Z-Score of MetS (p = 0.046), OPG (0.42±0.26 to 0.38±0.19 ng/mL, p<0.05) and NOx (13.3±2.3 µmol/L to 9.1±2.3 µmol/L; p<0.0005). IL-10 displayed an increase (13.6±7.5 to 17.2±12.3 pg/mL, p<0.05) after 10 weeks of training. Combined training also increased the perception of physical capacity (p = 0.011). This study endorses CT as an efficient tool to improve blood pressure, functional capacity, quality of life and reduce blood markers of inflammation, which has a clinical relevance in the prevention and treatment of MetS. Trial Registration Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry (ReBec) - RBR-6gdyvz - http://www.ensaiosclinicos.gov.br/rg/?q=RBR-6gdyvz PMID:25379699

  13. Geraniol, alone and in combination with pioglitazone, ameliorates fructose-induced metabolic syndrome in rats via the modulation of both inflammatory and oxidative stress status.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sherehan M; El-Denshary, Ezzedin S; Abdallah, Dalaal M

    2015-01-01

    Geraniol (GO) potent antitumor and chemopreventive effects are attributed to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In the current study, the potential efficacy of GO (250 mg/kg) in ameliorating metabolic syndrome (MetS) induced by fructose in drinking water was elucidated. Moreover, the effect of pioglitazone (5 and 10 mg/kg; PIO) and the possible interaction of the co-treatment of GO with PIO5 were studied in the MetS model. After 4 weeks of treatment, GO and/or PIO reduced the fasting blood glucose and the glycemic excursion in the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. GO and PIO5/10 restrained visceral adiposity and partly the body weight gain. The decreased level of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-γ transcriptional activity in the visceral adipose tissue of MetS rats was increased by single treatment regimens. Though GO did not affect MetS-induced hyperinsulinemia, PIO5/10 lowered it. Additionally, GO and PIO5/10 suppressed glycated hemoglobin and the receptor for advanced glycated end products (RAGE). These single regimens also ameliorated hyperuricemia, the disrupted lipid profile, and the elevated systolic blood pressure evoked by MetS. The rise in serum transaminases, interleukin-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α, as well as hepatic lipid peroxides and nitric oxide (NO) was lowered by the single treatments to different extents. Moreover, hepatic non-protein thiols, as well as serum NO and adiponectin were enhanced by single regimens. Similar effects were reached by the combination of GO with PIO5; however, a potentiative interaction was noted on fasting serum insulin level, while synergistic effects were reflected as improved insulin sensitivity, as well as reduced RAGE and triglycerides. Therefore, GO via the transcriptional activation of PPAR-γ reduces inflammation and free radical injury produced by MetS. Thereby, these effects provide novel mechanistic insights on GO management of MetS associated critical risk factors

  14. [Autoinflammatory syndromes].

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, P; Gross, W L

    2009-06-01

    In its strict sense, the term "autoinflammatory syndromes" comprises the hereditary periodic fever syndromes (HPF), which are caused by mutations of pattern-recognition receptors (PRR) and perturbations of the cytokine balance. These include the crypyrinopathies, familial Mediterranean fever, TNF-receptor associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS), hyper-IgD and periodic syndrome (HIDS), pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome, NALP12-HPF, and the Blau syndrome. The diseases are characterized by spontaneous activation of cells of the innate immunity in the absence of ligands. Autoantibodies are usually not found. HPF clinically present with recurrent fever episodes and inflammation, especially of serosal and synovial interfaces and the skin. Intriguingly, PRR-mediated autoinflammtory mechanisms also play a role in a number of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  15. Autoinflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed

    Galeazzi, M; Gasbarrini, G; Ghirardello, A; Grandemange, S; Hoffman, H M; Manna, R; Podswiadek, M; Punzi, L; Sebastiani, G D; Touitou, I; Doria, A

    2006-01-01

    The autoinflammatory disorders are a new and expanding classification of inflammatory diseases characterized by recurrent episodes of systemic inflammation in the absence of pathogens, autoantibodies or antigen specific T cells. These disorders are caused by primary dysfunction of the innate immune system, without evidence of adaptive immune dysregulation. Innate immune abnormalities include aberrant responses to pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) like lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan, prominent neutrophilia in blood and tissues, and dysregulation of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1beta, TNF-alpha) or their receptors. The autoinflammatory diseases comprise both hereditary (Familial Mediterranean Fever, FMF; Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency, MKD; TNF Receptor Associated Periodic Syndrome, TRAPS; Cryopyrin Associated Periodic Syndrome, CAPS; Blau syndrome; Pyogenic sterile Arthritis, Pyoderma gangrenosum and Acne syndrome, PAPA; Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis, CRMO) and multifactorial (Crohn's and Behçet's diseases) disorders. Mutations responsible for FMF, TRAPS, CAPS, PAPA are in proteins involved in modulation of inflammation and apoptosis.

  16. Immunotherapy of idiopathic inflammatory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Donofrio, Peter D

    2003-09-01

    Evaluation of peripheral neuropathy is a common reason for referral to a neurologist. Recent advances in immunology have identified an inflammatory component in many neuropathies and have led to treatment trials using agents that attenuate this response. This article reviews the clinical presentation and treatment of the most common subacute inflammatory neuropathies, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and Fisher syndrome, and describes the lack of response to corticosteroids and the efficacy of treatment with plasma exchange and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, although sharing some clinical, electrodiagnostic, and pathologic similarities to GBS, improves after treatment with plasma exchange and IVIG and numerous immunomodulatory agents. Controlled trials in multifocal motor neuropathy have shown benefit after treatment with IVIG and cyclophosphamide. Also discussed is the treatment of less common inflammatory neuropathies whose pathophysiology involves monoclonal proteins or antibodies directed against myelin-associated glycoprotein or sulfatide. Little treatment data exist to direct the clinician to proper management of rare inflammatory neuropathies resulting from osteosclerotic myeloma; POEMS syndrome; vasculitis; Sjögren's syndrome; and neoplasia (paraneoplastic neuropathy).

  17. Allergic acute coronary syndrome (Kounis syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Lovely; Masrur, Shihab; Parker, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    Anaphylaxis rarely manifests as a vasospastic acute coronary syndrome with or without the presence of underlying coronary artery disease. The variability in the underlying pathogenesis produces a wide clinical spectrum of this syndrome. We present three cases of anaphylactic acute coronary syndrome that display different clinical variants of this phenomenon. The main pathophysiological mechanism of the allergic anginal syndromes is the inflammatory mediators released during a hypersensitivity reaction triggered by food, insect bites, or drugs. It is important to appropriately recognize and treat Kounis syndrome in patients with exposure to a documented allergen. PMID:26130889

  18. Why myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) may kill you: disorders in the inflammatory and oxidative and nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways may explain cardiovascular disorders in ME/CFS.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michael; Twisk, Frank Nm

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that disorders in inflammatory and oxidative and nitrosative (IO&NS) pathways and a lowered antioxidant status are important pathophysiological mechanisms underpinning myalgic encephalomyelitis / chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). Important precipitating and perpetuating factors for ME/CFS are (amongst others) bacterial and viral infections; bacterial translocation due to an increased gut permeability; and psychological stress. Recently, Jason et al (2006) reported that the mean age of patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome dying from heart failure, i.e. 58.7 years, is significantly lower than the age of those dying from heart failure in the general US population, i.e. 83.1 years. These findings implicate that ME/CFS is a risk factor to cardio-vascular disorder. This review demonstrates that disorders in various IO&NS pathways provide explanations for the earlier mortality due to cardiovascular disorders in ME/CFS. These pathways are: a) chronic low grade inflammation with extended production of nuclear factor kappa B and COX-2 and increased levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha; b) increased O&NS with increased peroxide levels, and phospholipid oxidation including oxidative damage to phosphatidylinositol; c) decreased levels of specific antioxidants, i.e. coenzyme Q10, zinc and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulphate; d) bacterial translocation as a result of leaky gut; e) decreased omega-3 polyunsatutared fatty acids (PUFAs), and increased omega-6 PUFA and saturated fatty acid levels; and f) the presence of viral and bacterial infections and psychological stressors. The mechanisms whereby each of these factors may contribute towards cardio-vascular disorder in ME/CFS are discussed. ME/CFS is a multisystemic metabolic-inflammatory disorder. The aberrations in IO&NS pathways may increase the risk for cardiovascular disorders.

  19. Spontaneous heparin-induced thrombocytopenia syndrome without any proximate heparin exposure, infection, or inflammatory condition: Atypical clinical features with heparin-dependent platelet activating antibodies.

    PubMed

    Okata, Takuya; Miyata, Shigeki; Miyashita, Fumio; Maeda, Takuma; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that a thromboembolic disorder resembling heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), so-called spontaneous HIT syndrome, can occur in patients without any history of heparin exposure. It is likely due to anti-platelet factor 4 (PF4)/polyanion antibodies induced by other polyanions, such as bacterial surfaces and nucleic acids. We describe an atypical case of spontaneous HIT syndrome. A 70-year-old man suddenly presented with acute cerebral sinus thrombosis (CST). Soon after the initiation of unfractionated heparin (UFH) for the treatment of CST, his platelet count fell precipitously and he developed deep vein thrombosis, a clinical picture consistent with rapid-onset HIT but without any proximate episodes of heparin exposure, infection, trauma, surgery, or other acute illness. Antigen assays and a washed platelet activation assay indicated that the patient already possessed anti-PF4/heparin IgG antibodies with heparin-dependent platelet activation properties on admission. Cessation of UFH and initiation of argatroban resulted in prompt recovery of his platelet count without further thromboembolic events. We identified two similar cases in the literature. However, these patients do not meet the recently proposed criteria for spontaneous HIT syndrome. Even in atypical cases, however, inappropriate or delayed diagnosis of HIT appears to be associated with worse outcomes. We propose that these atypical cases should be included in the category of spontaneous HIT syndrome.

  20. Plasma Inflammatory Cytokine IL-4, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α Levels Correlate with Pulmonary Function in Patients with Asthma-Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Overlap Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ai-Xia; Lu, Li-Wen; Liu, Wen-Juan; Huang, Mao

    2016-08-09

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to investigate the plasma inflammatory cytokine levels and their correlations with pulmonary function in patients with asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome (ACOS). MATERIAL AND METHODS Between January 2013 and December 2014, a total of 96 patients with asthma, acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD), or ACOS were enrolled, and 35 healthy people were included as a control group. Fasting plasma interleukin (IL)-4, IL-8, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Correlations between the plasma inflammatory cytokine levels and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), FEV1/predicted value ratio (FEV1%pred), and FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) were analyzed. RESULTS IL-4 and IL-8 levels showed statistically significant differences among the 3 groups of patients (both P<0.001); IL-4 level was significantly lower, while IL-8 level was significantly higher in the AECOPD group and ACOS group than those in the asthma group (all P<0.05). IL-10 level and TNF-α level were significantly different among the 3 patient groups (both P<0.001). IL-10 level was significantly different between each of the 2 groups (all P<0.001). TNF-α level in the asthma group was higher than in the AECOPD group and ACOS group (both P<0.001). IL-4 and IL-10 were positively and IL-8 and TNF-α were negatively related with FEV1, FEV1%pred, and FEV1/FVC. CONCLUSIONS Plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-4, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α are related with severity of airway diseases and could be potential markers for the evaluation of asthma, COPD, and ACOS.

  1. Clinical particularities and response to the anti-inflammatory effect of antiviral treatment in patients with Chronic Hepatitis C and Rheumatoid Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lilea, GC; Streba, CT; Baloseanu, CL; Vere, CC; Rogoveanu, I

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important cause for the development of serious hepatic disease such as chronic hepatitis and liver cirrhosis. Though the pathological mechanisms are poorly understood, it is well established that CHC plays an important role in several immune mediated conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis. We focused on the clinical particularities of patients with CHC and associated RS and we specifically investigated the anti-inflammatory role of IFN-alpha concerning the rheumatic symptoms. PMID:23346247

  2. [Inflammatory myopathies].

    PubMed

    Maurer, Britta

    2017-02-01

    Inflammatory myopathies comprise heterogeneous, often multisystemic autoimmune diseases with muscle involvement as a common feature. The prognosis largely depends on a timely diagnosis and initiation of therapy. Given the complexity of these rare diseases, when an inflammatory myopathy is suspected patients should be referred to an expert center with established algorithms for the diagnostic work-up. The differential diagnostic exclusion of myositis mimics should ideally be carried out in close collaboration with neurologists and neuropathologists. The choice of immunosuppressive treatment should primarily depend on disease severity and organ involvement but age and comorbidities also have to be taken into account.

  3. [Autoinflammatory syndromes/fever syndromes].

    PubMed

    Schedel, J; Bach, B; Kümmerle-Deschner, J B; Kötter, I

    2011-05-01

    Hereditary periodic (fever) syndromes, also called autoinflammatory syndromes, are characterized by relapsing fever and additional manifestations such as skin rashes, mucosal manifestations, or joint symptoms. Some of these disorders present with organ involvement and serological signs of inflammation without fever. There is a strong serological inflammatory response with an elevation of serum amyloid A (SAA), resulting in an increased risk of secondary amyloidosis. There are monogenic disorders (familial mediterranean fever (FMF), hyper-IgD-syndrome (HIDS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), "pyogenic arthritis, acne, pyoderma gangrenosum" (PAPA), and "pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA) where mutations in genes have been described, which in part by influencing the function of the inflammasome, in part by other means, lead to the induction of the production of IL-1β. In "early-onset of enterocolitis (IBD)", a functional IL-10 receptor is lacking. Therapeutically, above all, the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra is used. In case of TRAPS and PGA, TNF-antagonists (etanercept) may also be used; in FMF colchicine is first choice. As additional possible autoinflammatory syndromes, PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis), Schnitzler syndrome, Still's disease of adult and pediatric onset, Behçet disease, gout, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and Crohn's disease also are mentioned.

  4. [Autoantibodies of Inflammatory Myopathies: Update].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shigeaki

    2016-12-01

    Inflammatory myopathies are a heterogeneous group of immune-mediated diseases that involve the skeletal muscle as well as many other organs. In addition to a histological diagnosis at muscle biopsy, the clinical phenotypes of inflammatory myopathies can be defined by the presence of various autoantibodies that are originally detected by RNA or protein immunoprecipitation. However, the correlation between histological features and autoantibodies has not been fully elucidated. Immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM), which is characterized by significant necrotic and regeneration muscle fibers with minimal or no inflammatory cell infiltration, is associated with the presence of autoantibodies. IMNM is now classified as a distinct category of inflammatory myopathies, separate from polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and sporadic inclusion body myositis. Here, we divided the autoantibodies of inflammatory myopathies into the following categories: those associated with IMNM, those with activity against aminoacyl transfer RNA synthetase, those associated with dermatomyositis, and those related to other disorders, including overlap syndrome, inclusion body myositis, and primary biliary cirrhosis. The detection of autoantibodies against signal recognition particle or 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase is useful for the diagnosis of IMNM. The screening of autoantibodies has clinical relevance for managing patients with inflammatory myopathies.

  5. Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME), Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), and Chronic Fatigue (CF) are distinguished accurately: results of supervised learning techniques applied on clinical and inflammatory data.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michael; Twisk, Frank N M; Johnson, Cort

    2012-12-30

    There is much debate on the diagnostic classification of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME), Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and chronic fatigue (CF). Post-exertional malaise (PEM) is stressed as a key feature. This study examines whether CF and CFS, with and without PEM, are distinct diagnostic categories. Fukuda's criteria were used to diagnose 144 patients with chronic fatigue and identify patients with CFS and CF, i.e. those not fulfilling the Fukuda's criteria. PEM was rated by means of a scale with defined scale steps between 0 and 6. CFS patients were divided into those with PEM lasting more than 24h (labeled: ME) and without PEM (labeled: CFS). The 12-item Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (FF) Rating Scale was used to measure severity of illness. Plasma interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, and lysozyme, and serum neopterin were employed as external validating criteria. Using fatigue, a subjective feeling of infection and PEM we found that ME, CFS, and CF were distinct categories. Patients with ME had significantly higher scores on concentration difficulties and a subjective experience of infection, and higher levels of IL-1, TNFα, and neopterin than patients with CFS. These biomarkers were significantly higher in ME and CFS than in CF patients. PEM loaded highly on the first two factors subtracted from the data set, i.e. "malaise-sickness" and "malaise-hyperalgesia". Fukuda's criteria are adequate to make a distinction between ME/CFS and CF, but ME/CFS patients should be subdivided into ME (with PEM) and CFS (without PEM).

  6. Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... work? How does inflammatory bowel disease interfere with digestion? Who gets inflammatory bowel disease? How is inflammatory ... top How does inflammatory bowel disease interfere with digestion? When the small intestine becomes inflamed, as in ...

  7. Direct molecular detection of pathogens in blood as specific rule-in diagnostic biomarker in patients with presumed sepsis: our experience on a heterogeneous cohort of patients with signs of infective systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    PubMed

    Avolio, Manuela; Diamante, Paola; Modolo, Maria Luisa; De Rosa, Rita; Stano, Paola; Camporese, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    The practical value of blood cultures in the diagnosis of sepsis is impaired by a delay in the turnaround time to result and by the fact that blood culture positive can be found for only about 30% of these patients. Conventional laboratory signs of sepsis and acute phase protein biomarkers are sensitive and easy to use, but often also very nonspecific. Molecular diagnostic reflects currently the most promising avenue to decrease time to result and to influence decision making for antibiotic therapy in the septic host. In this study, we wish to highlight the impact of the LightCycler SeptiFast, a multipathogen probe-based real-time polymerase chain reaction, in the rapid etiological diagnosis of sepsis in patients with clinical and laboratory signs of bloodstream infections. We have evaluated prospectively 830 adult patients with suspected bloodstream infection and at least two criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome. In more than 50% of critically ill patients strongly suspected of having sepsis, we arrived to an etiological diagnosis only by the molecular method in a median time of 15 h, with specificity and predictive positive values of 96% and 94%, respectively. We highlight the role of DNAemia as time-critical, high-specificity, etiological, non-culture-based rule-in diagnostic biomarker in patients with presumed sepsis.

  8. Inflammatory glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Bodh, Sonam A.; Kumar, Vasu; Raina, Usha K.; Ghosh, B.; Thakar, Meenakshi

    2011-01-01

    Glaucoma is seen in about 20% of the patients with uveitis. Anterior uveitis may be acute, subacute, or chronic. The mechanisms by which iridocyclitis leads to obstruction of aqueous outflow include acute, usually reversible forms (e.g., accumulation of inflammatory elements in the intertrabecular spaces, edema of the trabecular lamellae, or angle closure due to ciliary body swelling) and chronic forms (e.g., scar formation or membrane overgrowth in the anterior chamber angle). Careful history and follow-up helps distinguish steroid-induced glaucoma from uveitic glaucoma. Treatment of combined iridocyclitis and glaucoma involves steroidal and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents and antiglaucoma drugs. However, glaucoma drugs can often have an unpredictable effect on intraocular pressure (IOP) in the setting of uveitis. Surgical intervention is required in case of medical failure. Method of Literature Search: Literature on the Medline database was searched using the PubMed interface. PMID:21713239

  9. Anti-inflammatory actions of acupuncture.

    PubMed Central

    Zijlstra, Freek J; van den Berg-de Lange, Ineke; Huygen, Frank J P M; Klein, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Acupuncture has a beneficial effect when treating many diseases and painful conditions, and therefore is thought to be useful as a complementary therapy or to replace generally accepted pharmacological intervention. The attributive effect of acupuncture has been investigated in inflammatory diseases, including asthma, rhinitis, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, epicondylitis, complex regional pain syndrome type 1 and vasculitis. Large randomised trials demonstrating the immediate and sustained effect of acupuncture are missing. Mechanisms underlying the ascribed immunosuppressive actions of acupuncture are reviewed in this communication. The acupuncture-controlled release of neuropeptides from nerve endings and subsequent vasodilative and anti-inflammatory effects through calcitonine gene-related peptide is hypothesised. The complex interactions with substance P, the analgesic contribution of beta-endorphin and the balance between cell-specific pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-10 are discussed. PMID:12775355

  10. PDGFRA-mutant syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Riccardo; Martini, Maurizio; Cenci, Tonia; Carbone, Arnaldo; Lanza, Paola; Biondi, Alberto; Rindi, Guido; Cassano, Alessandra; Larghi, Alberto; Persiani, Roberto; Larocca, Luigi M

    2015-07-01

    Germline PDGFRA mutations cause multiple heterogeneous gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors. In its familial form this disease, which was formerly termed intestinal neurofibromatosis/neurofibromatosis 3b (INF/NF3b), has been included among familial gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) because of its genotype, described when GIST was the only known PDGFRA-mutant gastrointestinal tumor. Shortly afterwards, however, inflammatory fibroid polyps also revealed PDGFRA mutations. Subsequently, gastrointestinal CD34+ 'fibrous tumors' of uncertain classification were described in a germline PDGFRA-mutant context. Our aim was to characterize the syndrome produced by germline PDGFRA mutations and establish diagnostic criteria and management strategies for this hitherto puzzling disease. We studied a kindred displaying multiple gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors, comparing it with published families/individuals with possible analogous conditions. We identified a novel inherited PDGFRA mutation (P653L), constituting the third reported example of familial PDGFRA mutation. In adult mutants we detected inflammatory fibroid polyps, gastric GISTs and gastrointestinal fibrous tumors of uncertain nosology. We demonstrate that the syndrome formerly defined as INF/NF3b (exemplified by the family reported herein) is simplistically considered a form of familial GIST, because inflammatory fibroid polyps often prevail. Fibrous tumors appear variants of inflammatory fibroid polyps. 'INF/NF3b' and 'familial GIST' are misleading terms which we propose changing to 'PDGFRA-mutant syndrome'. In this condition, unlike KIT-dependent familial GIST syndromes, if present, GISTs are stomach-restricted and diffuse Cajal cell hyperplasia is not observed. This restriction of GISTs to the stomach in PDGFRA-mutant syndrome: (i) focuses oncological concern on gastric masses, as inflammatory fibroid polyps are benign; (ii) supports a selective role of gastric environment for PDGFRA mutations to elicit GISTs

  11. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial of a Chemokine Receptor 5 (CCR5) Antagonist to Decrease the Occurrence of Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome in HIV-Infection: The CADIRIS Study

    PubMed Central

    Sierra-Madero, Juan G.; Ellenberg, Susan; Rassool, Mohammed S.; Tierney, Ann; Belaunzarán-Zamudio, Pablo F.; López-Martínez, Alondra; Piñeirúa-Menéndez, Alicia; Montaner, Luis J.; Azzoni, Livio; Benítez, César Rivera; Sereti, Irini; Andrade-Villanueva, Jaime; Mosqueda-Gómez, Juan L.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Sanne, Ian; Lederman, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (IRIS) is a common complication of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected patients. IRIS is associated with an increased risk of hospitalization and death. We ascertained whether CCR5 blockade using maraviroc reduces the risk of IRIS. Methods The CADIRIS study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial that accrued subjects from five clinical sites in Mexico and one in South Africa between November 2009 and January 2012, and followed them for one year. The primary outcome was occurrence of IRIS by 24 weeks. HIV-infected adults, naïve to ART, with CD4 cells <100/μL, and HIVRNA >1,000 copies/mL were eligible. We screened 362 subjects; 279 met inclusion criteria, 3 refused participation, and 276 were randomized. Participants received maraviroc 600 mg twice daily or placebo added to an ART regimen that included tenofovir, emtricitabine, and efavirenz for 48 weeks. Findings There were 276 patients randomized (140 received maraviroc and 136 placebo). There was no difference in the time to IRIS events between treatment arms (HR 1·08, 95% CI (0·66, 1·77), log-rank test p=0·743). In total, 64 (23%) patients had IRIS events, 33 (24%) in the maraviroc arm and 31 (23%) in the placebo arm (p=0·88). Interpretation Maraviroc had no significant effect on frequency, time or severity of IRIS events after ART initiation. Including a CCR5 inhibitor in an initial treatment regimen does not confer a meaningful protection from the occurrence of IRIS in persons with advanced HIV infection. Funding The trial was funded as investigator initiated research by Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USA. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov. ID: NCT00988780 (http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00988780) PMID:26366430

  12. SAPHO syndrome associated spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Takigawa, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Masato; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Misawa, Haruo; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Takahata, Tomohiro; Nakahara, Hiroyuki; Nakahara, Shinnosuke; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2008-10-01

    The concept of synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome has been well clarified, after Chamot et al. suggested this peculiar disorder in 1987. The most commonly affected site in SAPHO syndrome is the anterior chest, followed by the spine. However, the clinical course and taxonomic concept of SAPHO spinal lesions are poorly understood. This study was performed to analyze: (1) the detailed clinical course of spinal lesions in SAPHO syndrome, and (2) the relationship between SAPHO syndrome with spinal lesions and seronegative spondyloarthropathy. Thirteen patients with spondylitis in SAPHO syndrome were analyzed. The features of spinal lesions were a chronic onset with a slight inflammatory reaction, and slowly progressing non-marginal syndesmophytes at multi spinal levels, besides the coexistence of specific skin lesions. SAPHO syndrome, especially spinal lesions related to palmoplantar pustulosis, can be recognized as a subtype of seronegative spondyloarthropathy.

  13. [SAPHO syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gharsallah, I; Souissi, A; Dhahri, R; Boussetta, N; Sayeh, S; Métoui, L; Ajili, F; Louzir, B; Othmani, S

    2014-09-01

    SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis) syndrome is a rare entity characterized by the association of heterogeneous osteoarticular and cutaneous manifestations that have for common denominator an aseptic inflammatory process. The etiopathogeny of this disease is still a matter of debate. Although it has been related to the spondylarthritis family, an infectious origin is suggested. Diagnosis is based on the presence of at least one of the three diagnostic criteria proposed by Kahn. The treatment includes NSAIDs, antibiotics, corticosteroids, methotrexate and more recently the bisphosphonates and the TNFα inhibitors.

  14. [SAPHO syndrome].

    PubMed

    Heldmann, F; Kiltz, U; Baraliakos, X; Braun, J

    2014-10-01

    The SAPHO syndrome, an acronym for synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis, is a rare disease which affects bones, joints and the skin. The main osteoarticular features are hyperostosis and osteitis. Osteoarticular symptoms predominantly occur on the anterior chest wall but the spine and the peripheral skeleton can also be involved. The most important skin affections are palmoplantar pustulosis and severe acne. The etiology of this syndrome remains unclear but infectious, immunological and genetic factors are involved. The diagnostic features of SAPHO syndrome are clinical and radiological. The most important diagnostic procedure is Tc-99 m bone scintigraphy but conventional x-rays as well as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can also contribute to the final diagnosis. Bone histology and positron emission tomography CT (PET-CT) may help to differentiate SAPHO syndrome from malignancies and infectious osteomyelitis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the cornerstone of treatment. The results obtained using antibiotics and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), such as sulfasalazine and methotrexate are inconsistent. Bisphosphonates and anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) drugs have shown promising results in small studies but further research is still necessary.

  15. Isolated inflammatory myopathy with rimmed vacuoles presenting with dropped head.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hiroshi; Sugie, Kazuma; Terashima, Mari; Koizumi, Munehisa; Horikawa, Hirosei; Nishino, Ichizo; Nonaka, Ikuya; Ueno, Satoshi

    2009-12-01

    We describe an unusual case of inflammatory myopathy with rimmed vacuoles associated with dropped head syndrome. Muscle biopsy in our patient revealed variations in fiber size with fiber necrosis and regeneration, accompanied by many rimmed vacuoles and areas of endomysial cell infiltration. Electron microscopy demonstrated autophagic vacuoles and tubulofilamentous inclusions. This myopathy can cause dropped head syndrome in a subgroup of patients.

  16. The inflammatory microenvironment in MDS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Qian, Yaqin; Eksioglu, Erika; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K; Wei, Sheng

    2015-05-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a collection of pre-malignancies characterized by impaired proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells and a tendency to evolve into leukemia. Among MDS's pathogenic mechanisms are genetic, epigenetic, apoptotic, differentiation, and cytokine milieu abnormalities. Inflammatory changes are a prominent morphologic feature in some cases, with increased populations of plasma cells, mast cells, and lymphocytes in bone marrow aspirates. Accumulating evidence suggests that the bone marrow microenvironment contributes to MDS disease pathology, with microenvironment alterations and abnormality preceding, and facilitating clonal evolution in MDS patients. In this review, we focus on the inflammatory changes involved in the pathology of MDS, with an emphasis on immune dysfunction, stromal microenvironment, and cytokine imbalance in the microenvironment as well as activation of innate immune signaling in MDS patients. A better understanding of the mechanism of MDS pathophysiology will be beneficial to the development of molecular-targeted therapies in the future.

  17. Autoinflammatory syndromes: diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    During the last decades the description of autoinflammatory syndromes induced great interest among the scientific community. Mainly rheumatologists, immunologists and pediatricians are involved in the discovery of etiopathogenesis of these syndromes and in the recognition of affected patients. In this paper we will discuss the most important clues of monogenic and non-genetic inflammatory syndromes to help pediatricians in the diagnosis and treatment of these diseases. PMID:20813071

  18. Management of tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection in human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shui Shan; Meintjes, Graeme; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Leung, Chi Chiu

    2013-08-01

    The syndemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/tuberculosis (TB) co-infection has grown as a result of the considerable sociogeographic overlaps between the two epidemics. The situation is particularly worrisome in countries with high or intermediate TB burden against the background of a variable HIV epidemic state. Early diagnosis of TB disease in an HIV-infected person is paramount but suffers from lack of sensitive and specific diagnostic tools. Enhanced symptom screening is currently advocated, and the wide application of affordable molecular diagnostics is urgently needed. Treatment of TB/HIV co-infection involves the concurrent use of standard antiretrovirals and antimycobacterials during which harmful drug interaction may occur. The pharmacokinetic interaction between rifamycin and antiretrovirals is a case in point, requiring dosage adjustment and preferential use of rifabutin, if available. Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy is indicated, preferably at 2 weeks after starting TB treatment for patients with a CD4 of <50 cells/μL. Development of TB-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) is however more frequent with early antiretroviral therapy. The diagnosis of TB-IRIS is another clinical challenge, and cautious use of corticosteroids is suggested to improve clinical outcome. As a preventive measure against active TB disease, the screening for latent TB infection should be widely practiced, followed by at least 6-9 months of isoniazid treatment. To date tuberculin skin test remains the only diagnostic tool in high TB burden countries. The role of alternative tests, for example, interferon-γ release assay, would need to be better defined for clinical application.

  19. Anti-Inflammatory Iridoids of Botanical Origin

    PubMed Central

    Viljoen, A; Mncwangi, N; Vermaak, I

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a manifestation of a wide range of disorders which include; arthritis, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, inflammatory bowel syndrome, physical injury and infection amongst many others. Common treatment modalities are usually non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, paracetamol, indomethacin and ibuprofen as well as corticosteroids such as prednisone. These however, may be associated with a host of side effects due to non-selectivity for cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes involved in inflammation and those with selectivity may be highly priced. Thus, there is a continuing search for safe and effective anti-inflammatory molecules from natural sources. Research has confirmed that iridoids exhibit promising anti-inflammatory activity which may be beneficial in the treatment of inflammation. Iridoids are secondary metabolites present in various plants, especially in species belonging to the Apocynaceae, Lamiaceae, Loganiaceae, Rubiaceae, Scrophulariaceae and Verbenaceae families. Many of these ethnobotanicals have an illustrious history of traditional use alluding to their use to treat inflammation. Although iridoids exhibit a wide range of pharmacological activities such as cardiovascular, hepatoprotection, hypoglycaemic, antimutagenic, antispasmodic, anti-tumour, antiviral, immunomodulation and purgative effects this review will acutely focus on their anti-inflammatory properties. The paper aims to present a summary for the most prominent iridoid-containing plants for which anti-inflammatory activity has been demonstrated in vitro and / or in vivo. PMID:22414102

  20. [Syndromes 2. Pfeiffer syndrome].

    PubMed

    Freihofer, H P

    1998-07-01

    Acrocephalosyndactylias are syndromes characterized by abnormalities of the head (craniosynostosis), the face (hypertelorism, retromaxillism), hands and feet (cutaneous or bony syndactyly). Inheritance is autosomal dominant, but spontaneous cases are described also. The group is divided into several syndromes with varying penetrance and expressivity. As an example of an acrocephalosyndactylia is the Pfeiffer syndrome presented.

  1. How I Manage Heel Spur Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seder, Joseph I.

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses plantar fascitis and heel spurs, the two contributing causes of heel spur syndrome. Treatment methods, which include rest, anti-inflammatory medication, shoe padding, and, as a last resort, surgery are described. (Author/MT)

  2. The Schnitzler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The Schnitzler syndrome is a rare and underdiagnosed entity which is considered today as being a paradigm of an acquired/late onset auto-inflammatory disease. It associates a chronic urticarial skin rash, corresponding from the clinico-pathological viewpoint to a neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis, a monoclonal IgM component and at least 2 of the following signs: fever, joint and/or bone pain, enlarged lymph nodes, spleen and/or liver, increased ESR, increased neutrophil count, abnormal bone imaging findings. It is a chronic disease with only one known case of spontaneous remission. Except of the severe alteration of quality of life related mainly to the rash, fever and pain, complications include severe inflammatory anemia and AA amyloidosis. About 20% of patients will develop a lymphoproliferative disorder, mainly Waldenström disease and lymphoma, a percentage close to other patients with IgM MGUS. It was exceedingly difficult to treat patients with this syndrome until the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra became available. Anakinra allows a complete control of all signs within hours after the first injection, but patients need continuous treatment with daily injections. In many aspects, the Schnitzler syndrome resembles the genetically determined auto-inflammatory syndromes involving activating mutations of the NLRP3 inflammasome. This latter point and its consequences will be addressed. PMID:21143856

  3. The Schnitzler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lipsker, Dan

    2010-12-08

    The Schnitzler syndrome is a rare and underdiagnosed entity which is considered today as being a paradigm of an acquired/late onset auto-inflammatory disease. It associates a chronic urticarial skin rash, corresponding from the clinico-pathological viewpoint to a neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis, a monoclonal IgM component and at least 2 of the following signs: fever, joint and/or bone pain, enlarged lymph nodes, spleen and/or liver, increased ESR, increased neutrophil count, abnormal bone imaging findings. It is a chronic disease with only one known case of spontaneous remission. Except of the severe alteration of quality of life related mainly to the rash, fever and pain, complications include severe inflammatory anemia and AA amyloidosis. About 20% of patients will develop a lymphoproliferative disorder, mainly Waldenström disease and lymphoma, a percentage close to other patients with IgM MGUS. It was exceedingly difficult to treat patients with this syndrome until the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra became available. Anakinra allows a complete control of all signs within hours after the first injection, but patients need continuous treatment with daily injections.In many aspects, the Schnitzler syndrome resembles the genetically determined auto-inflammatory syndromes involving activating mutations of the NLRP3 inflammasome. This latter point and its consequences will be addressed.

  4. Skin manifestations in autoinflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed

    Braun-Falco, Markus; Ruzicka, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases encompass a group of inflammatory diseases that are non-infectious, non-allergic, non-autoimmune and non-immunodeficient. The term was initially coined for a small group of familial periodic fever syndromes of which familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common and best known. Genetic and molecular analyses demonstrated for the majority of these diseases an impairment of inflammasomes to cause an increased activity of an interleukin-1-dependent inflammatory response. Over the last years an increasing number of either rare hereditary syndromes or acquired common diseases could be summarized under the designation of autoinflammatory disease, thus creating an emerging new rubric of inflammatory diseases. Many of them display cutaneous manifestations as both concomitant or more rarely main symptoms. To name some of them like erysipelas-like erythema in FMF; urticaria-like rashes in tumor necrosis factor receptor 1- or cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (TRAPS, CAPS), hyperimmunoglobulin D syndrome (HIDS) or Schnitzler syndrome; pyoderma gangrenosum and acne in PAPA syndrome; or behçetoid aphthous ulcerations in HIDS and PFAPA syndrome. Based on the new insights into pathogenesis one increasingly realizes the good response of these diseases to IL-1 antagonist therapies.

  5. Acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Quek, Amy May Lin; Soon, Derek; Chan, Yee Cheun; Thamboo, Thomas Paulraj; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-06-15

    Inflammatory neuropathies have been reported to occur in association with nephrotic syndrome. Their underlying immuno-pathogenic mechanisms remain unknown. A 50-year-old woman concurrently presented with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and nephrotic syndrome secondary to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Both neuropathy and proteinuria improved after plasma exchange and steroids. Literature review of cases of concurrent inflammatory neuropathies and nephrotic syndrome revealed similar neuro-renal presentations. This neuro-renal condition may be mediated by autoantibodies targeting myelin and podocytes.

  6. Moebius Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... children with Moebius syndrome have some degree of autism. There are four recognized categories of Moebius syndrome: ... children with Moebius syndrome have some degree of autism. There are four recognized categories of Moebius syndrome: ...

  7. The inflammatory response in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bosmann, Markus; Ward, Peter A

    2013-03-01

    The pathophysiology of sepsis and its accompanying systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and the events that lead to multiorgan failure and death are poorly understood. It is known that, in septic humans and rodents, the development of SIRS is associated with a loss of the redox balance, but SIRS can also develop in noninfectious states. In addition, a hyperinflammatory state develops, together with impaired innate immune functions of phagocytes, immunosuppression, and complement activation, collectively leading to septic shock and lethality. Here, we discuss recent insights into the signaling pathways in immune and phagocytic cells that underlie sepsis and SIRS and consider how these might be targeted for therapeutic interventions to reverse or attenuate pathways that lead to lethality during sepsis.

  8. Metabolic syndrome, androgens, and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moulana, Mohadetheh; Lima, Roberta; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2011-04-01

    Obesity is one of the constellation of factors that make up the definition of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is also associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The presence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in men and women is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension. In men, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with reductions in testosterone levels. In women, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with increases in androgen levels. In men, reductions in androgen levels are associated with inflammation, and androgen supplements reduce inflammation. In women, increases in androgens are associated with increases in inflammatory cytokines, and reducing androgens reduces inflammation. This review discusses the possibility that the effects of androgens on metabolic syndrome and its sequelae may differ between males and females.

  9. Gardner-Diamond syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Joyce H; Yagerman, Sarah; Feng, Hao; Kim, Randie H; Meehan, Shane A; Lewin, Jesse

    2016-12-15

    Gardner-Diamond syndrome, which also is knownas autoerythrocyte sensitization disorder, is a raresyndrome of inflammatory, edematous papulesthat evolve into painful ecchymoses on the trunkand lower legs after a period of stress with no priorhistory of trauma. This syndrome usually occurs inwomen with a history of psychiatric disorders, themost common one being depression. Although theexact mechanism of injury is not well understood,it is hypothesized that these patients haveautoantibodies to phosphatidylserine, which is aphospholipid membrane component in erythrocytes.Treatment for this disorder includes symptomatictherapies and psychotropic medications to treat theunderlying psychiatric disorder.

  10. Observational Study of the Genetic Architecture of Neutrophil-Mediated Inflammatory Skin Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-26

    Other Specified Inflammatory Disorders of Skin or Subcutaneous Tissue; Pyoderma Gangrenosum; Erosive Pustular Dermatosis of the Scalp; Sweet's Syndrome; Behcet's Disease; Bowel-associated Dermatosis-arthritis Syndrome; Pustular Psoriasis; Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis; Keratoderma Blenorrhagicum; Sneddon-Wilkinson Disease; IgA Pemphigus; Amicrobial Pustulosis of the Folds; Infantile Acropustulosis; Transient Neonatal Pustulosis; Neutrophilic Eccrine Hidradenitis; Rheumatoid Neutrophilic Dermatitis; Neutrophilic Urticaria; Still's Disease; Erythema Marginatum; Unclassified Periodic Fever Syndromes / Autoinflammatory Syndromes; Dermatitis Herpetiformis; Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis; Bullous Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Inflammatory Epidermolysis Bullosa Aquisita; Neutrophilic Dermatosis of the Dorsal Hands (Pustular Vasculitis); Small Vessel Vasculitis Including Urticarial Vasculitis; Erythema Elevatum Diutinum; Medium Vessel Vasculitis

  11. [Antiglycolipid antibody in inflammatory neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Kusunoki, S

    1995-12-01

    Antiglycolipid antibody is frequently detected in the acute phase sera from patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (Guillain-Barré syndrome, GBS). The titer is highest in the serum sample taken first after the neurological onset, and decreases with clinical improvement. Antiglycolipid antibody may play a role in the pathogenetic mechanism of GBS. GM1 and GD1b are the antigens most commonly recognized. Monoclonal anti-GD1b antibody specifically bound to the paranodal myelin of the peripheral nervous system. Serum anti-GD1b antibody may cause demyelinative neuropathy by binding to the paranodal myelin of the peripheral nervous system. Anti-GQ1b IgG antibody is specifically raised in almost all the sera from Fisher syndrome and GBS with ophthalmoplegia. Anti-GQ1b monoclonal antibody immunostained specifically the paranodal myelin of the extramedullary portion of oculomotor, trochlear and abducens nerves, but no such staining was observed in the other peripheral nerves. Anti-GQ1b antibody may cause conduction block in the cranial nerves innervating the muscles for extraocular movement by binding to the paranodal myelin of those nerves. Anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibody is detected in the patients with GBS with very low or inexcitable compound muscle action potentials. The sera from patients with GBS subsequent to mycoplasma infection had antigalactocerebroside antibody. Further study on antiglycolipid antibody is needed for understanding the pathogenetic mechanism of GBS.

  12. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) - CDC Fact Sheet Untreated sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) can cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), a ... tubal blockage; •• Ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy outside the womb); •• Infertility (inability to get pregnant); •• Long-term pelvic/abdominal ...

  13. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Weström, L., Joesoef, R., Reynolds, G., Hagdu, A., Thompson, S.E. (1992). Pelvic inflammatory disease and fertility. A ... Weström, L., Joesoef, R., Reynolds, G., Hagdu, A., Thompson, S.E. (1992). Pelvic inflammatory disease and fertility. A ...

  14. Curcumin in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Shehzad, Adeeb; Rehman, Gauhar; Lee, Young Sup

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a yellow coloring agent extracted from turmeric is also used as a remedy for the treatment and prevention of inflammatory diseases. Acute and chronic inflammation is a major factor in the progression of obesity, type II diabetes, arthritis, pancreatitis, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and metabolic diseases, as well as certain types of cancer. Turmeric has a long history of use in Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. Recent studies on the efficacy and therapeutic applicability of turmeric have suggested that the active ingredient of tumeric is curcumin. Further, compelling evidence has shown that curcumin has the ability to inhibit inflammatory cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis through multiple molecular targets and mechanisms of action. Curcumin is safe, non-toxic, and mediates its anti-inflammatory effects through the down-regulation of inflammatory transcription factors, cytokines, redox status, protein kinases, and enzymes that all promote inflammation. In addition, curcumin induces apoptosis through mitochondrial and receptor-mediated pathways, as well as activation of caspase cascades. In the current study, the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin were evaluated relative to various chronic inflammatory diseases. Based on the available pharmacological data obtained from in vitro and in vivo research, as well as clinical trials, an opportunity exists to translate curcumin into clinics for the prevention of inflammatory diseases in the near future.

  15. [Psychophysiology of visceral pain syndromes].

    PubMed

    Häuser, W; Grandt, D

    2002-12-01

    Psychosomatics of visceral pain syndromes. From a psychosomatic point of view visceral pain syndromes can be classified into nociceptive (somatic and visceral) pain syndromes without and with maladaptive pain coping resp.psychic comorbidity, functional pain syndromes (typical symptom clusters without biochemical or structural abnormalities in clinical routine diagnostics) and psychic disorders with pain as main symptom. With regard to the etiology and the course of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) as representatives of somatic pain syndromes and of irritable bowel syndrome/chronic pelvic pain as representatives of functional pain syndromes empirically validated psychosocial aspects are summarized: Personality traits, illness behavior, daily hassles, life events and psychic comorbidity and effects of psychotherapy. Psychosocial factors are decisive in the etiology and the course of functional pain syndromes as determinants of their severity (psychosomatic disease in a narrow sense). Psychosocial factors are not decisive for the etiology, but for the course of IBD (psychosomatic disease in a broader sense). Within general pain therapy of visceral pain syndromes a biopsychosocial approach should be applied right from the beginning (psychosomatic basic care). Within special pain therapy of visceral pain syndromes a qualified psychiatric - psychotherapeutic diagnostics and co-therapy should be mandatory.

  16. Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Diefenbach, Karen A; Breuer, Christopher K

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is an important cause of gastrointestinal pathology in children and adolescents. The incidence of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease is increasing; therefore, it is important for the clinician to be aware of the presentation of this disease in the pediatric population. Laboratory tests, radiology studies, and endoscopic procedures are helpful in diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and differentiating between Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Once diagnosed, the goal of medical management is to induce remission of disease while minimizing the side effects of the medication. Specific attention needs to be paid to achieving normal growth in this susceptible population. Surgical management is usually indicated for failure of medical management, complication, or malignancy. Algorithms for diagnostic evaluation and treatment of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease are presented. The specific psychosocial issues facing these patients are also discussed in this review as are the future goals of research in the complex problem of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:16718840

  17. Effect and Treatment of Chronic Pain in Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pain is the most common reason patients with inflammatory arthritis see a rheumatologist. Patients consistently rate pain as one of their highest priorities, and pain is the single most important determinant of patient global assessment of disease activity. Although pain is commonly interpreted as a marker of inflammation, the correlation between pain intensity and measures of peripheral inflammation is imperfect. The prevalence of chronic, non-inflammatory pain syndromes such as fibromyalgia is higher among patients with inflammatory arthritis than in the general population. Inflammatory arthritis patients with fibromyalgia have higher measures of disease activity and lower quality of life than inflammatory patients who do not have fibromyalgia. This review article focuses on current literature involving the effects of pain on disease assessment and quality of life for patients with inflammatory arthritis. It also reviews non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic options for treatment of pain for patients with inflammatory arthritis, focusing on the implications of comorbidities and concurrent disease-modifying antirheumatic drug therapy. Although several studies have examined the effects of reducing inflammation for patients with inflammatory arthritis, very few clinical trials have examined the safety and efficacy of treatment directed specifically towards pain pathways. Most studies have been small, have focused on rheumatoid arthritis or mixed populations (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis plus osteoarthritis), and have been at high risk of bias. Larger, longitudinal studies are needed to examine the mechanisms of pain in inflammatory arthritis and to determine the safety and efficacy of analgesic medications in this specific patient population. PMID:23292816

  18. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, M. J.; Coursin, D. B.

    1993-01-01

    The multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), though newly described, has manifested itself in intensive care unit (ICU) patients for several decades. As the name implies, it is a syndrome in which more than one organ system fails. Failure of these multiple organ systems may or may not be related to the initial injury or disease process for which the patient was admitted to the ICU. MODS is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in current ICU practice. While the pathophysiology of MODS is not completely known, much evidence indicates that, during the initial injury which precipitates ICU admission, a chain of events is initiated which results in activation of several endogenous metabolic pathways. These pathways release compounds which, in and of themselves, are usually cytoprotective. However, an over exuberant activation of these endogenous systems results in an inflammatory response which can lead to development of failure in distant organs. As these organs fail, they activate and propagate the systemic inflammatory response. No therapy has proven entirely efficacious at modulating this inflammatory response and the incidence and severity of MODS. In current ICU practice, treatment is focused on prevention and treating individual organ dysfunction as it develops. With increased understanding of the pathophysiology of MODS therapy will come newer modalities which inhibit or interfere with the propagation of the endogenous systemic inflammatory response. These newer therapies hold great promise and already some are undergoing clinical investigation. PMID:7825351

  19. Dressler's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome may also be called postpericardiotomy syndrome, post-myocardial infarction syndrome and post-cardiac injury syndrome. With recent ... Dressler's syndrome. References LeWinter MM. Pericardial complications of myocardial infarction. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 27, ...

  20. [Diagnosis and Clinical Examination of Autoinflammatory Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ida, Hiroaki

    2015-05-01

    Autoinflammatory syndrome is characterized by: 1) episodes of seemingly unprovoked inflammation, 2) the absence of a high titer of autoantibodies or auto-reactive T cells, and 3) an inborn error of innate immunity. In this decade, many autoinflammatory syndromes have been reported in Japan, and so many Japanese physicians have become aware of this syndrome. Monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes present with excessive systemic inflammation including fever, rashes, arthritis, and organ-specific inflammation and are caused by defects in single genes encoding proteins that regulate innate inflammatory pathways. The main monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes are familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), Blau syndrome, and pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome. We diagnosed these syndromes as clinical manifestations and performed genetic screening. Many serum cytokines are elevated in patients with autoinflammatory syndrome, but this is not disease-specific. The pathogeneses of many autoinflammatory syndromes are known to be related to inflammasomes, which are multiprotein complexes that serve as a platform for caspase 1 activation and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 muturation. Especially, NLRP3 inflammasomes may play a crucial role in the intiation and progression of FMF and CAPS. In the future, we hope to discover new clinical examinations which can provide evidence of inflammasome activation independent of genetic screening. In this issue, I introduce autoinflammatory syndromes and discuss the diagnosis and clinical examination of these syndromes.

  1. [Chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies and their variants

    PubMed

    Vallat, J.-M.; Tabaraud, F.; Magy, L.; Macian, F.

    2002-12-01

    The Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathies (CIDP) constitute a syndrome whose incidence is difficult to evaluate, and is probably underestimated. In the course of this presentation, we deliberately restricted discussion to issues raised in recent years concerning the extent of this syndrome. We discuss diagnostic criteria, especially electrophysiological ones. As the criteria proposed by the ad hoc committee of the American Academy of Neurology in 1991 have been questioned due to lack of sensitivity, new ones have been proposed recently. We briefly discuss the different types of chronic dysimmune demyelinating neuropathy: not only the CIDP, but also the Lewis and Sumner syndrome or multifocal inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy and the multiple conduction block neuropathies. At last, we point out the consistent finding of axonal involvement in the course of a chronic demyelinating neuropathy; over time, it can become predominant, which may make diagnosis difficult by suggesting a chronic axonal neuropathy that may be assumed to be primary. Consideration of these points may help clinicians recognize more chronic dysimmune neuropathies, for which immunosuppressive therapy has been found to be effective.

  2. Hereditary auto-inflammatory disorders and biologics.

    PubMed

    Church, Leigh D; Churchman, Sarah M; Hawkins, Philip N; McDermott, Michael F

    2006-06-01

    The term auto-inflammatory disorders has been coined to describe a group of conditions characterized by spontaneously relapsing and remitting bouts of systemic inflammation without apparent involvement of antigen-specific T cells or significant production of auto-antibodies. The hereditary periodic fever syndromes are considered as the prototypic auto-inflammatory diseases, and genetic studies have yielded important new insights into innate immunity. DNA analysis has greatly enhanced the clinical characterization of these conditions, and elucidation of their molecular aetiopathogenesis has suggested that therapies may be aimed at specific targets within the immune cascade. The availability of biologic response modifiers such as inhibitors of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-1beta has greatly improved the outlook for some of these disorders, although effective therapies remain elusive in patients with certain conditions, including hyperimmunoglobulinaemia-D with periodic fever syndrome (HIDS) and a proportion of those with TNF-receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS). Indeed, outstanding challenges and the unique potential to further elucidate molecular mechanisms in innate immunity are illustrated by the dashed early hope that TNF blockade would be a panacea for TRAPS: not only is etanercept (Enbrel) ineffective in some cases, but there are anecdotal reports of this condition being greatly exacerbated by infliximab (Remicade).

  3. [Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cuenca Solanas, M

    1999-01-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) is a clinical situation that has been described as a result of the rapid progress and advances that have been made in recent decades in the physiology, diagnosis, and therapeutic support of critically ill patients. In 1991, in view of the confusing terminology used to characterize processes coursing with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), a consensus conference was held. A series of basic definitions were established and the term "multiple organ failure" was replace by MODS. In response to outside aggression, the organism tries to defend itself with two mechanisms: a non-specific humoral and cellular response called inflammation, and a specific antigenic response that modifies the genetic codes of cells of the defense system and constitutes an immunological response. At present it is thought that the inflammatory response is activated (SIRS) in response to an uncontrolled aggression, but an antiinflammatory response syndrome (ARS) exists as well. An exaggerated SIRS can lead to MODS. MODS usually debuts with pulmonary dysfunction. If the aggression persists, cardiovascular, renal, hepatic, coagulation, central nervous system, gastrointestinal metabolism, neuroendocrine and musculoskeletal failure follow. A series of causes often trigger this syndrome and certain factors favor it. Prevention of these causes and factors in fundamental for controlling the occurrence of MODS. At present, there is no clear treatment for MODS, although numerous studies designed to block the release of certain proinflammatory mediators or to neutralize antiinflammatory responses are being carried out.

  4. Short communication: Camel milk ameliorates inflammatory responses and oxidative stress and downregulates mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei-Wei; Kong, Gui-Qing; Ma, Ming-Ming; Li, Yan; Huang, Xiao; Wang, Li-Peng; Peng, Zhen-Yi; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Liu, Xiang-Yong; Wang, Xiao-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a complex syndrome disorder with high mortality rate. Camel milk (CM) contains antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties and protects against numerous diseases. This study aimed to demonstrate the function of CM in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ARDS in rats. Camel milk reduced the lung wet:dry weight ratio and significantly reduced LPS-induced increases in neutrophil infiltration, interstitial and intra-alveolar edema, thickness of the alveolar wall, and lung injury scores of lung tissues. It also had antiinflammatory and antioxidant effects on LPS-induced ARDS. After LPS stimulation, the levels of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-10, and IL-1β) in serum and oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase, and total antioxidant capacity) in lung tissue were notably attenuated by CM. Camel milk also downregulated mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Given these results, CM is a potential complementary food for ARDS treatment.

  5. Phosphorylation site analysis of the anti-inflammatory and mRNA-destabilizing protein tristetraprolin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tristetraprolin (TTP/TIS11/ZFP36) is a member of the CCCH zinc finger proteins, and is an anti-inflammatory protein. Mice deficient in TTP develop a profound inflammatory syndrome with erosive arthritis, autoimmunity, and myeloid hyperplasia. TTP binds to AU-rich elements with high affinity for UUAU...

  6. The challenge of autoinflammatory syndromes: with an emphasis on hyper-IgD syndrome.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Jos W M; Simon, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Autoinflammatory syndromes are disorders with an exaggerated inflammatory response, mostly in the absence of an appropriate trigger. Prototypic autoinflammatory syndromes are FMF, hyper-IgD syndrome (also known as mevalonate kinase deficiency), TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome. The clinical phenotypes partly overlap (with fever and acute phase response), but also differ between the various syndromes (e.g. regarding fever pattern, episodic vs chronic inflammation and accompanying clinical signs). In recent years, the genetic basis of quite a number of these relatively rare and mostly hereditary disorders has been elucidated. These genetic defects lead to either enhanced production of inflammatory mediators or to a lack of inhibition of these components of the innate immune system. Among these dysregulated inflammatory mediators, the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β stands out. Hence, targeted treatment with blockers of IL-1 action, such as recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra, anakinra) and mAb against IL-1β has met with impressive clinical results. In this article, hyper-IgD syndrome is discussed in more detail, based on 30 years of experience with this syndrome.

  7. Differential diagnosis and evaluation in pediatric inflammatory demyelinating disorders.

    PubMed

    Rostasy, Kevin; Bajer-Kornek, Barbara; Venkateswaran, Sunita; Hemingway, Cheryl; Tardieu, Marc

    2016-08-30

    Major advances have been made in the clinical and radiologic characterization of children presenting with the different forms of an acquired inflammatory demyelinating syndrome (ADS) such as acute disseminating encephalomyelitis, neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, and clinically isolated syndromes. Nevertheless, a proportion of cases that present with similar symptoms are due to a broad spectrum of other inflammatory disorders affecting the white matter, primary CNS tumors, or neurometabolic diseases. The clinician therefore has to be aware of the different forms of ADS, the risk factors for a chronic-relapsing course, and features that indicate an alternative diagnosis. The goal of this article is therefore to provide an outline of a pathway for evaluating pediatric patients with a presumed inflammatory demyelinating disorder and discussing the spectrum of the more common differential diagnoses.

  8. Skin gangrene as an extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease*

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Yumi Cristina; Capareli, Gabriela Cunha; Boin, Maria Fernanda Feitosa de Camargo; Lellis, Rute; de Freitas, Thaís Helena Proença; Simone, Karine

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases can commonly present many cutaneous lesions which can contribute to the diagnosis of the disease or its activity. The most frequent cutaneous or mucocutaneous manifestations suggesting ulcerative rectocolitis activity are erythema nodosum (3-10%), pyoderma gangrenosum (5-12%) and aphthous stomatitis (4%). Other reactive skin manifestations related to immunological mechanisms associated with the inflammatory bowel disease are: Sweet's syndrome, arthritis-dermatitis syndrome associated with inflammatory bowel disease and leukocytoclastic vasculitis. We describe the case of a young man with diagnosis of ulcerative rectocolitis, which presented an extensive cutaneous gangrene secondary to microvascular thrombosis. The case represents a dermatologic rarity and should be recognized as a cutaneous manifestation related to the hypercoagulability state observed in the disease's activity. PMID:25387503

  9. Skin gangrene as an extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Yumi Cristina; Capareli, Gabriela Cunha; Boin, Maria Fernanda Feitosa de Camargo; Lellis, Rute; Freitas, Thaís Helena Proença de; Simone, Karine

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases can commonly present many cutaneous lesions which can contribute to the diagnosis of the disease or its activity. The most frequent cutaneous or mucocutaneous manifestations suggesting ulcerative rectocolitis activity are erythema nodosum (3-10%), pyoderma gangrenosum (5-12%) and aphthous stomatitis (4%). Other reactive skin manifestations related to immunological mechanisms associated with the inflammatory bowel disease are: Sweet's syndrome, arthritis-dermatitis syndrome associated with inflammatory bowel disease and leukocytoclastic vasculitis. We describe the case of a young man with diagnosis of ulcerative rectocolitis, which presented an extensive cutaneous gangrene secondary to microvascular thrombosis. The case represents a dermatologic rarity and should be recognized as a cutaneous manifestation related to the hypercoagulability state observed in the disease's activity.

  10. Orbital inflammatory pseudotumors: etiology, differential diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Gabriela M

    2010-12-01

    Orbital inflammation is typically an idiopathic process that occasionally may be identified with a specific local or systemic disease as the causative agent. Orbital inflammatory pseudotumor (also known as idiopathic orbital inflammation syndrome, orbital pseudotumor, nonspecific orbital inflammation, and orbital inflammatory syndrome) is defined as an idiopathic tumor-like inflammation consisting of a pleomorphic cellular response and a fibrovascular tissue reaction. Various rheumatologic disorders are associated with orbital inflammation and must be ruled out in cases of orbital inflammatory pseudotumor, including Wegener's granulomatosis, giant cell arteritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, and rheumatoid arthritis. The mainstay of therapy is corticosteroid therapy, although there is an increasing trend toward use of antimetabolites, alkylating agents, cytotoxic agents, and other immunosuppressive agents.

  11. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... example, polycystic ovary syndrome can cause menstrual disturbances, weight gain beginning in adolescence, excess hair growth, and impaired insulin action and diabetes. Metabolic syndrome-a combination of ...

  12. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection and inflammation of the uterus, ovaries, and other female reproductive organs. It causes scarring ... United States. Gonorrhea and chlamydia, two sexually transmitted diseases, are the most common causes of PID. Other ...

  13. Inflammatory biomarkers for AMD.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Chloe M; Wright, Alan F

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness worldwide, affecting an estimated 50 million individuals aged over 65 years.Environmental and genetic risk-factors implicate chronic inflammation in the etiology of AMD, contributing to the formation of drusen, retinal pigment epithelial cell dysfunction and photoreceptor cell death. Consistent with a role for chronic inflammation in AMD pathogenesis, several inflammatory mediators, including complement components, chemokines and cytokines, are elevated at both the local and systemic levels in AMD patients. These mediators have diverse roles in the alternative complement pathway, including recruitment of inflammatory cells, activation of the inflammasome, promotion of neovascularisation and in the resolution of inflammation. The utility of inflammatory biomarkers in assessing individual risk and progression of the disease is controversial. However, understanding the role of these inflammatory mediators in AMD onset, progression and response to treatment may increase our knowledge of disease pathogenesis and provide novel therapeutic options in the future.

  14. Iliopsoas Syndrome in Dancers

    PubMed Central

    Laible, Catherine; Swanson, David; Garofolo, Garret; Rose, Donald J.

    2013-01-01

    patients responded to conservative treatment, and no patients required corticosteroid injections or surgical intervention. Conclusion: This is the largest series reported to date of iliopsoas syndrome in the dance population, treated noninvasively. This study supports that conservative treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication, activity modification, and a physical therapy regimen specific to the iliopsoas should be the primary treatment for patients with iliopsoas syndrome. Clinical Relevance: This study supports current literature and conservative treatment of iliopsoas syndrome diagnosis. Furthermore, this study gives specific information regarding incidence of iliopsoas syndrome in dance populations and provides a test for diagnosis and an algorithm for treatment. PMID:26535241

  15. Metabolic Syndrome, Inflammation and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, Rodolfo; Bolego, Chiara; Poli, Andrea; Cignarella, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    The inflammatory component of atherogenesis has been increasingly recognized over the last decade. Inflammation participates in all stages of atherosclerosis, not only during initiation and during evolution of lesions, but also with precipitation of acute thrombotic complications. The metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk for development of both cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes in humans. Central obesity and insulin resistance are thought to represent common underlying factors of the syndrome, which features a chronic low-grade inflammatory state. Diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome occurs using defined threshold values for waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose and dyslipidemia. The metabolic syndrome appears to affect a significant proportion of the population. Therapeutic approaches that reduce the levels of proinflammatory biomarkers and address traditional risk factors are particularly important in preventing cardiovascular disease and, potentially, diabetes. The primary management of metabolic syndrome involves healthy lifestyle promotion through moderate calorie restriction, moderate increase in physical activity and change in dietary composition. Treatment of individual components aims to control atherogenic dyslipidemia using fibrates and statins, elevated blood pressure, and hyperglycemia. While no single treatment for the metabolic syndrome as a whole yet exists, emerging therapies offer potential as future therapeutic approaches. PMID:17319458

  16. [Anti-inflammatory effects of tea-flavonoids].

    PubMed

    Hoensch, H; Oertel, R

    2012-12-01

    Tea flavonoids belong to the large group of polyphenols and display antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic activities. These phytochemicals are xenobiotics and are synthesized by tea plants such as Camellia sinensis and Camomilla recucita. These botanicals exhibit in vivo activities similar to that of biologicals which are widely used for chronic inflammatory diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, chronic inflammatory bowel disease). Epigallocathechin gallate and apigenin from these plants inhibit cytokines, chemokines and activated immune cells in vivo and in vitro. Clinical disorders with induced inflammatory pathways could benefit from flavonoid treatment. Dietary supplementation with specific tea-flavonoids could be used for Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and irritable bowel syndrome. Suppression of cytokine production could ultimately lead to inhibition of carcinogenesis. This mechanism could explain why flavonoids are effective in the prevention of intestinal neoplasia. This innovative new form of therapy should be tested in controlled, randomized clinical studies.

  17. Anemia in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Giannini, S; Martes, C

    2006-09-01

    Anemia is a frequent extraenteric complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis). A systematic review of the literature shows that the overall prevalence of anemia ranges from 8.8% to 73.7% but differs whether in a setting of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. A disabling complication of IBD, anemia worsens the patient's general condition and quality of life, and increases hospitalization rates. Different factors, including vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiency, bone marrow suppression secondary to drug therapy, autoimmune hemolytic anemia and the coexistence of myelodysplastic syndromes are involved in the pathogenesis of anemia in IBD. The main types of anemia in IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia accompanying chronic diseases. Correct diagnostic definition of anemia is a fundamental step in guiding the choice of therapeutic options, since the co-presence of different pathogenetic factors may sometimes require a more complex treatment plan. A review of anemia in IBD, its pathogenetic features, epidemiology, diagnosis and therapy based on evidence from recent studies is the focus of this article.

  18. Evolution of Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Okin, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The association of inflammation with modern human diseases (e.g. obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer) remains an unsolved mystery of current biology and medicine. Inflammation is a protective response to noxious stimuli that unavoidably occurs at a cost to normal tissue function. This fundamental tradeoff between the cost and benefit of the inflammatory response has been optimized over evolutionary time for specific environmental conditions. Rapid change of the human environment due to niche construction outpaces genetic adaptation through natural selection, leading increasingly to a mismatch between the modern environment and selected traits. Consequently, multiple tradeoffs that affect human physiology are not optimized to the modern environment, leading to increased disease susceptibility. Here we examine the inflammatory response from an evolutionary perspective. We discuss unique aspects of the inflammatory response and its evolutionary history that can help explain the association between inflammation and modern human diseases. PMID:22975004

  19. Inflammatory Manifestations of Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Catherine L.; Kataru, Raghu P.; Mehrara, Babak J.

    2017-01-01

    Lymphedema results from lymphatic insufficiency leading to a progressive inflammatory process that ultimately manifests as discomfort, recurrent infections, and, at times, secondary malignancy. Collectively, these morbidities contribute to an overall poor quality of life. Although there have been recent advances in microsurgical interventions, a conservative palliative approach remains the mainstay of treatment for this disabling disease. The absence of a cure is due to an incomplete understanding of the pathophysiological changes that result in lymphedema. A histological hallmark of lymphedema is inflammatory cell infiltration and recent studies with animal models and clinical biopsy specimens have suggested that this response plays a key role in the pathology of the disease. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the ongoing research in and the current understanding of the inflammatory manifestations of lymphedema. PMID:28106728

  20. Metabolic syndrome in rheumatic diseases: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Sidiropoulos, Prodromos I; Karvounaris, Stylianos A; Boumpas, Dimitrios T

    2008-01-01

    Subjects with metabolic syndrome--a constellation of cardiovascular risk factors of which central obesity and insulin resistance are the most characteristic--are at increased risk for developing diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. In these subjects, abdominal adipose tissue is a source of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, known to promote insulin resistance. The presence of inflammatory cytokines together with the well-documented increased risk for cardiovascular diseases in patients with inflammatory arthritides and systemic lupus erythematosus has prompted studies to examine the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in an effort to identify subjects at risk in addition to that conferred by traditional cardiovascular risk factors. These studies have documented a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome which correlates with disease activity and markers of atherosclerosis. The correlation of inflammatory disease activity with metabolic syndrome provides additional evidence for a link between inflammation and metabolic disturbances/vascular morbidity.

  1. Inflammatory Muscle Disease: A New Landscape.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Alain; Lannes, Béatrice; Goetz, Joëlle; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Lipsker, Dan; Arnaud, Laurent; Martin, Thierry; Gottenberg, Jacques Eric; Geny, Bernard; Sibilia, Jean

    2017-03-22

    Greater accuracy in clinical descriptions combined with advances in muscle histology and immunology have established that inflammatory muscle diseases (IMDs) resemble inflammatory joint diseases in that they constitute a highly heterogeneous group of conditions. The topographic distribution, severity, and tempo of onset vary widely, and the histological findings distinguish at least five different profiles, which may reflect different pathophysiological processes. Most IMDs are connective tissue diseases that can affect multiple organs, among which the most common targets are the skin, joints, and lungs. The extramuscular manifestations may antedate the muscular involvement and should therefore suggest a diagnosis of IMD even in the absence of obvious muscle disease. About 20 different autoantibodies have been identified in patients with IMD. Some are mutually exclusive and associated with specific combinations of clinical manifestations. Following the model of antisynthetase syndrome, about 10 syndromes associated with autoantibodies specific of IMD have been identified. Thus, polymyositis is now emerging as a rare entity that is often mistaken for more recently described patterns of IMD. No consensus exists to date about the classification of IMDs. Nevertheless, the clinical manifestations, autoantibody profile, and muscle histology can be used to distinguish patient subgroups with fairly homogeneous patterns of complications, treatment responses, and outcomes. These subgroups are also characterized by specific genetic and environmental factors. The advances made in the nosology of IMDs have benefited the diagnosis, personalization of treatment strategies, and understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms. They can be expected to assist in the development of specific treatments.

  2. Piriformis Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Generally, treatment for the disorder begins with stretching exercises and massage. Anti-inflammatory drugs may be ... Treatment Generally, treatment for the disorder begins with stretching exercises and massage. Anti-inflammatory drugs may be ...

  3. Dropped head syndrome as a presenting sign of scleromyositis.

    PubMed

    Garcin, Beatrice; Lenglet, Timothée; Dubourg, Odile; Mesnage, Valérie; Levy, Richard

    2010-05-15

    The isolated or prominent weakness of cervical extensor muscles is a relatively rare clinical sign known as "dropped head syndrome". It occurs in a variety of neuromuscular diseases. Here, we report the case of a 53 year old woman whose main symptom was a dropped head syndrome that led to the diagnosis of scleromyositis. Scleromyositis is a rare idiopathic inflammatory myopathy, which combines polymyositis and scleroderma symptoms. Although idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are listed as causes of dropped head syndrome, very few cases are reported in the literature. Furthermore, scleromyositis revealed by a dropped head syndrome has never been described. As this condition was totally reversed by a regiment of corticosteroids, it is thus of a diagnostic interest for neurologists to be aware of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, including scleromyositis, as a potentially treatable aetiology of dropped head syndrome.

  4. Syndrome in question: antisynthetase syndrome (anti-PL-7)*

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Ana Cláudia Cavalcante; Gige, Tatiana Cristina; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2016-01-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome is a rare autoimmune disease characterized by interstitial lung disease and/or inflammatory myositis, with positive antisynthetase antibodies (anti-Jo-1, anti-PL-7, anti-PL-12, ZO, OJ, anti-KE or KS). Other symptoms described include: non-erosive arthritis, fever, Raynaud's phenomenon, and "mechanic's hands." The first therapeutic option is corticotherapy, followed by other immunosuppressants. The prognosis of the disease is quite limited when compared to other inflammatory myopathies with negative antisynthetase antibodies. PMID:27828653

  5. Peripheral nerve proteins as potential autoantigens in acute and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jia Pei; Devaux, Jérôme; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-10-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is classified into acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and acute motor axonal neuropathy. Whereas autoantibodies to GM1 or GD1a induce the development of acute motor axonal neuropathy, pathogenic autoantibodies have yet to be identified in acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. This review highlights the importance of autoantibodies to peripheral nerve proteins in the physiopathology of acute and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies. Moreover, we listed up other potential antigens, which may become helpful biomarkers for acquired, dysimmune demyelinating neuropathies based on their critical functions during myelination and their implications in hereditary demyelinating neuropathies.

  6. Pelvic inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pelvic inflammatory disease is caused by infection of the upper female genital tract and is often asymptomatic. Pelvic inflammatory disease is the most common gynaecological reason for admission to hospital in the US, and is diagnosed in approximately 1% of women aged 16 to 45 years consulting their GP in England and Wales. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: How do different antimicrobial regimens compare when treating women with confirmed pelvic inflammatory disease? What are the effects of routine antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent pelvic inflammatory disease before intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) insertion? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up to date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the European Medicines Agency (EMA), and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 13 RCTs or systematic reviews of RCTs that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (oral, parenteral, different durations, different regimens) and routine antibiotic prophylaxis (before intrauterine device insertion in women at high risk or low risk). PMID:24330771

  7. Prostacyclin: An Inflammatory Paradox

    PubMed Central

    Stitham, Jeremiah; Midgett, Charles; Martin, Kathleen A.; Hwa, John

    2011-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) is a member of the prostaglandin family of bioactive lipids. Its best-characterized role is in the cardiovascular system, where it is released by vascular endothelial cells, serving as a potent vasodilator and inhibitor of platelet aggregation. In recent years, prostacyclin (PGI2) has also been shown to promote differentiation and inhibit proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition to these well-described homeostatic roles within the cardiovascular system, prostacyclin (PGI2) also plays an important role as an inflammatory mediator. In this review, we focus on the contribution of prostacyclin (PGI2) as both a pathophysiological mediator and therapeutic agent in three major inflammatory-mediated disease processes, namely rheumatoid arthritis, where it promotes disease progression (“pro-inflammatory”), along with pulmonary vascular disease and atherosclerosis, where it inhibits disease progression (“anti-inflammatory”). The emerging role of prostacyclin (PGI2) in this context provides new opportunities for understanding the complex molecular basis for inflammatory-related diseases, and insights into the development of current and future anti-inflammatory treatments. PMID:21687516

  8. Histiocytoid Sweet's syndrome in a patient with myelodsyplastic syndrome: report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, Michael M; Riahi, Ryan R; Rosen, Les B; Soine, Erik J

    2016-01-01

    The neutrophilic dermatoses are a group of disorders characterized by skin lesions for which histological examination reveals intense epidermal and/or dermal inflammatory infiltrates composed primarily of neutrophils without evidence of infection. The myelodysplastic syndromes consist of a heterogeneous group of malignant hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by dysplastic and inadequate blood cell production with a variable risk of transformation to acute leukemia. Rarely, histiocytoid Sweet's syndrome occurring in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome has been described. We present a case of a 66-year-old woman with a history of myelodysplastic syndrome who developed histiocytoid Sweet's syndrome. We also review the literature and characterize patients with myelodysplastic syndrome who have developed histiocytoid Sweet's syndrome.

  9. Progress in inflammatory neuropathy -the legacy of Dr Jack Griffin.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Eva L; Hughes, Richard A C; Willison, Hugh J

    2015-11-01

    The past quarter of a century has brought incredible advances in our understanding of inflammatory neuropathies, and the insights into Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) began in the 1990s with the seminal work of Dr Jack Griffin and his colleagues. In this essay, we provide a tribute to Jack, and review the recent progress in a field that he termed his personal favourite. In particular, we discuss the new developments in our understanding and diagnosis of inflammatory neuropathies, the recent emergence of the node of Ranvier and the paranode as sites of intensive investigation, and the mechanistic evidence that is providing a platform for therapeutic development studies.

  10. B-1 cells temper endotoxemic inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Barbeiro, Denise Frediani; Barbeiro, Hermes Vieira; Faintuch, Joel; Ariga, Suely K Kubo; Mariano, Mario; Popi, Ana Flávia; de Souza, Heraldo Possolo; Velasco, Irineu Tadeu; Soriano, Francisco Garcia

    2011-03-01

    Sepsis syndrome is caused by inappropriate immune activation due to bacteria and bacterial components released during infection. This syndrome is the leading cause of death in intensive care units. Specialized B-lymphocytes located in the peritoneal and pleural cavities are known as B-1 cells. These cells produce IgM and IL-10, both of which are potent regulators of cell-mediated immunity. It has been suggested that B-1 cells modulate the systemic inflammatory response in sepsis. In this study, we conducted in vitro and in vivo experiments in order to investigate a putative role of B-1 cells in a murine model of LPS-induced sepsis. Macrophages and B-1 cells were studied in monocultures and in co-cultures. The B-1 cells produced the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in response to LPS. In the B-1 cell-macrophage co-cultures, production of proinflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-6 and nitrite) was lower than in the macrophage monocultures, whereas that of IL-10 was higher in the co-cultures. Co-culture of B-1 IL-10(-/-) cells and macrophages did not reduce the production of the proinflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-6 and nitrite). After LPS injection, the mortality rate was higher among Balb/Xid mice, which are B-1 cell deficient, than among wild-type mice (65.0% vs. 0.0%). The Balb/Xid mice also presented a proinflammatory profile of TNF-α, IL-6 and nitrite, as well as lower levels of IL-10. In the early phase of LPS stimulation, B-1 cells modulate the macrophage inflammatory response, and the main molecular pathway of that modulation is based on IL-10-mediated intracellular signaling.

  11. Can Probiotics Cure Inflammatory Bowel Diseases?

    PubMed

    Korada, Siva Kumar; Yarla, Nagendra Sastry; Bishayee, Anupam; Aliev, Gjumrakch; Aruna Lakshmi, K; Arunasree, M K; Dananajaya, B L; Mishra, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, especially microbial dysbiosis play role in several GI ailments such as irritable bowel syndrome, colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel diseases, and antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Role of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is multifactorial as it involves loss of maintaining intestinal epithelial barrier integrity, increased release of pro-inflammatory molecules, and microbial dysbiosis in gut microflora. Some specific pathogens also play a key role in the IBD development. The origin and causation are still in unfathomable condition and the exact root cause is unknown. Recently probiotic studies have been gaining importance because of their positive responses in their IBD experimental results. According to joint Food and Agricultural Organisation/World Health Organisation working group, probiotics are defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amount confer health benefit on the host. These live beneficial microorganisms are considered helpful in improving gut colonization and perseverance thereby improves prophylactic effect. In the direction of IBD research, a number of studies are needed to standardize its methodology and its applicability on human usage. The particular review presents an overview of gut microflora and its impact on host health, types of IBD and existing therapies to treat this disorder, mechanism of several probiotic actions, role of probiotics in IBD prevention with their supporting evidences.

  12. [Inflammatory bowel diseases: an immunological approach].

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Sofía E; Beltrán, Caroll J; Peralta, Alexis; Rivas, Paola; Rojas, Néstor; Figueroa, Carolina; Quera, Rodrigo; Hermoso, Marcela A

    2008-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are inflammatory diseases with a multifactorial component that involve the intestinal tract. The two relevant IBD syndromes are Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). One factor involved in IBD development is a genetic predisposition, associated to NOD2/CARD15 and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) polymorphisms that might favor infectious enterocolitis that is possibly associated to the development of IBD. The identification of specific immunologic alterations in IBD and their relationship to the etiology of the disease is a relevant research topic. The role of intra and extracellular molecules, such as transcription factors and cytokines that are involved in the inflammatory response, needs to be understood. The relevance of immunologic molecules that might drive the immune response to a T helper (Th) 1, Th 2 or the recently described Th 17 phenotype, has been demonstrated in animal models and clinical studies with IBD patients. CD and UC predominantly behave with a Th 1 and Th 2 immune phenotype, respectively. Recently, an association between CD and Th 17 has been reported. The knowledge acquired from immunologic and molecular research will help to develop accurate diagnostic methods and efficient therapies.

  13. Castleman-Kojima disease (TAFRO syndrome) : a novel systemic inflammatory disease characterized by a constellation of symptoms, namely, thrombocytopenia, ascites (anasarca), microcytic anemia, myelofibrosis, renal dysfunction, and organomegaly : a status report and summary of Fukushima (6 June, 2012) and Nagoya meetings (22 September, 2012).

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Hiroshi; Takai, Kazue; Kojima, Masaru; Nakamura, Naoya; Aoki, Sadao; Nakamura, Shigeo; Kinoshita, Tomohiro; Masaki, Yasufumi

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a unique clinicopathologic variant of multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) has been identified in Japan. This disease is characterized by a constellation of symptoms, as listed in the title, and multiple lymphadenopathy of mild degree with a pathologic diagnosis of atypical CD, often posing diagnostic and therapeutic problems for pathologists and hematologists, respectively. These findings suggest that this disease represents a novel clinical entity belonging to systemic inflammatory disorders with a background of immunological abnormality beyond the ordinal spectrum of MCD. To define this disorder more clearly, Japanese participants presented clinicopathologic data at the Fukushima and Nagoya meetings. Many of the patients presented by the participants were significantly accompanied by a combination of thrombocytopenia, ascites (anasarca), pleural effusions, microcytic anemia, fever, myelofibrosis, renal dysfunction, and organomegaly (TAFRO). Multiple lymphadenopathies were generally of mild degree, less than 1.5 cm in diameter, and consistently featured the histopathology of mixed- or less hyaline vascular-type CD. Autoantibodies were often detected. However, this disease did not fulfill the diagnostic criteria for well-known autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus. Castleman-Kojima disease and TAFRO syndrome (the favored clinical term) were proposed for this disease. The patients were sensitive to steroid and anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody (tocilizumab), but some exhibited a deteriorated clinical course despite the treatment. The participants proposed a future nationwide survey and a Japanese consortium to facilitate further clinical and therapeutic studies of this novel disease. [J Clin Exp Hematop 53(1): 57-61, 2013].

  14. [Papillary edema in Muckle-Wells syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wirths, G; Grenzebach, U; Eter, N

    2015-09-01

    Papillary edema may occur isolated without functional impairment or secondary related to various syndromes, increased intracerebral pressure or associated with medicinal treatment. The Muckle-Wells syndrome is a rare disease, which among many other symptoms can lead to optic disc swelling and recurrent increase in intracerebral pressure. Besides familial cold-induced autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS) and neonatal onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID), the Muckle-Wells syndrome also belongs to the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). In most cases of CAP syndromes there is an underlying genetic disorder that leads to overproduction of interleukin-1β (IL-1β); therefore, typical symptoms include inflammation reactions, such as repeated skin rash, fatigue, fever, joint pain and conjunctivitis.

  15. "SAPHO syndrome and infections".

    PubMed

    Govoni, Marcello; Colina, Matteo; Massara, Alfonso; Trotta, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The syndrome of synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO) encompasses a broad spectrum of cutaneous manifestations associated with osteitic and hyperostotic lesions, which typically may involve the anterior chest wall (ACW). The aetiopathogenetic mechanisms as well as the nosographic framing of the disease are still not fully defined although an important role has been suggested for Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes). This germ might be able to stimulate both the innate and the T-cell-mediated immune system. The elicited immunological response could be an attempt to eliminate the germ thus inducing the perpetuation of the inflammation. Whether the osteo-articular changes seen in SAPHO could be attributable directly to the infection or to an inflammatory reaction induced by pathogenic material remains a debated issue. The current concept of SAPHO syndrome as a reactive infectious osteitis in genetic predisposed subjects seems appealing, but it has not been yet demonstrated.

  16. Vasculitis in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lally, Lindsay; Sammaritano, Lisa R

    2015-01-01

    The major manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are caused by thrombosis within the venous or arterial vasculature, whereas the vascular lesions in systemic vasculitis result from an inflammatory infiltrate in the vessel wall. There is an association between vascular thrombosis and inflammation, however, as vasculitis can occur in APS and thromboembolic complications are seen in systemic vasculitis. Although differentiating between vasculitis and antiphospholipid-associated thrombosis can be difficult, it may be crucial to do so given the different therapeutic implications for immunosuppression or anticoagulation. This article explores the relationship between thrombosis and inflammation as it relates to APS and systemic vasculitis.

  17. Controversies concerning the antiphospholipid syndrome in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Camarena Cabrera, Dulce María Albertina; Rodriguez-Jaimes, Claudia; Acevedo-Gallegos, Sandra; Gallardo-Gaona, Juan Manuel; Velazquez-Torres, Berenice; Ramírez-Calvo, José Antonio

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a non-inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by recurrent thrombotic events and/or obstetric complications associated with the presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies (anticardiolipin antibodies, anti-β2 glycoprotein-i antibodies, and/or lupus anticoagulant. Antiphospholipid antibodies are a heterogeneous group of autoantibodies associated with recurrent miscarriage, stillbirth, fetal growth restriction and premature birth. The diversity of the features of the proposed placental antiphospholipid antibodies fingerprint suggests that several disease processes may occur in the placentae of women with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in the form of immune responses: inflammatory events, complement activation, angiogenic imbalance and, less commonly, thrombosis and infarction. Because of the disparity between clinical and laboratory criteria, and the impact on perinatal outcome in patients starting treatment, we reviewed the aspects of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome related to obstetric complications and seronegative antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, and their treatment in obstetrics.

  18. Fatigue syndrome in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Górski, Witold; Piotrowski, Wojciech J

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. Most commonly it results in the formation of non-caseating granulomas in intrathoracic lymph nodes and lung parenchyma, but the clinical course and picture may be complicated by extrapulmonary involvement and many non-respiratory signs and symptoms which are directly related to the disease. In addition, sarcoidosis patients may suffer from a plethora of symptoms of uncertain or unknown origin. Fatigue is one of these symptoms, and according to some authors it is reported by the majority of patients with active sarcoidosis, but also by a smaller proportion of patients with inactive sarcoidosis, or even with complete clinical and radiological remission. Therefore the term fatigue syndrome is frequently used to name this clinical problem. The definition of fatigue syndrome in sarcoidosis is imprecise and the syndrome is usually recognized by use of validated questionnaires. In this review the uptodate knowledge in this field was presented and different challenges connected with this syndrome were described.

  19. Sweet's syndrome with idiopathic thrombocythemia

    PubMed Central

    Kaszewski, Sebastian; Protas-Drozd, Franciszka; Placek, Waldemar; Jakubowski, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of paraneoplastic skin syndromes associating neoplastic processes is assumed as the crucial aspect of dermatological practice. Knowledge of clinical findings of dermatoses suggesting coincidence of malignant proliferative processes facilitates diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. We would like to present a case of Sweet's syndrome, qualified for comparative paraneoplastic skin syndromes. Sweet's syndrome, acute, febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, was first described by Robert Douglas Sweet in 1964 as a disorder characterized by fever, skin lesions of erythematous-infiltrative character, leukocytosis with neutrophilia and dense infiltrations of dermis by mature neutrophils. Sweet's syndrome aetiology is not fully understood, although cytokine abnormalities suggest that Th1 lymphocytes play an important role in pathogenesis of the dermatosis. Factors inducing Sweet's syndrome include: haematopoietic hyperplasia; neoplasms: genitourinary, breast, gastrointestinal; infections of the respiratory and alimentary system; inflammatory bowel diseases; drugs; pregnancy and vaccinations. Systemic corticosteroids are the “gold standard” of Sweet's syndrome treatment; potassium iodide or colchicine may also be used. Indomethacin, clofazimine, cyclosporine A and sulfones are the second-line drugs. PMID:24683399

  20. Sweet's syndrome with idiopathic thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Kaszewski, Sebastian; Czajkowski, Rafał; Protas-Drozd, Franciszka; Placek, Waldemar; Jakubowski, Sebastian

    2014-02-01

    Diagnosis of paraneoplastic skin syndromes associating neoplastic processes is assumed as the crucial aspect of dermatological practice. Knowledge of clinical findings of dermatoses suggesting coincidence of malignant proliferative processes facilitates diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. We would like to present a case of Sweet's syndrome, qualified for comparative paraneoplastic skin syndromes. Sweet's syndrome, acute, febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, was first described by Robert Douglas Sweet in 1964 as a disorder characterized by fever, skin lesions of erythematous-infiltrative character, leukocytosis with neutrophilia and dense infiltrations of dermis by mature neutrophils. Sweet's syndrome aetiology is not fully understood, although cytokine abnormalities suggest that Th1 lymphocytes play an important role in pathogenesis of the dermatosis. Factors inducing Sweet's syndrome include: haematopoietic hyperplasia; neoplasms: genitourinary, breast, gastrointestinal; infections of the respiratory and alimentary system; inflammatory bowel diseases; drugs; pregnancy and vaccinations. Systemic corticosteroids are the "gold standard" of Sweet's syndrome treatment; potassium iodide or colchicine may also be used. Indomethacin, clofazimine, cyclosporine A and sulfones are the second-line drugs.

  1. Gut microbiome and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mazidi, Mohsen; Rezaie, Peyman; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Mobarhan, Majid Ghayour; Ferns, Gordon A

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiome contributes approximately 2kg of the whole body weight, and recent studies suggest that gut microbiota has a profound effect on human metabolism, potentially contributing to several features of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is defined by a clustering of metabolic disorders that include central adiposity with visceral fat accumulation, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, dysglycemia and non-optimal blood pressure levels. Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. It is estimated that around 20-25 percent of the world's adult population has metabolic syndrome. In this manuscript, we have reviewed the existing data linking gut microbiome with metabolic syndrome. Existing evidence from studies both in animals and humans support a link between gut microbiome and various components of metabolic syndrome. Possible pathways include involvement with energy homeostasis and metabolic processes, modulation of inflammatory signaling pathways, interferences with the immune system, and interference with the renin-angiotensin system. Modification of gut microbiota via prebiotics, probiotics or other dietary interventions has provided evidence to support a possible beneficial effect of interventions targeting gut microbiota modulation to treat components or complications of metabolic syndrome.

  2. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  3. Alport syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Autosomal dominant Alport syndrome (ADAS) -- This is the rarest type. Males and females have equally severe disease. Symptoms KIDNEYS With all types of Alport syndrome the kidneys are affected. The tiny blood vessels in the glomeruli of the kidneys are ...

  4. Reye syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome has occurred in children who were given aspirin when they had chickenpox or the flu. Reye syndrome has become very rare. This is because aspirin is no longer recommended for routine use in ...

  5. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  6. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... will order several other tests like blood tests, EEG, and brain scans. How Is Tourette Syndrome Treated? ... connected to Tourette syndrome, like ADHD and anxiety. Stress or being upset can make the tics worse, ...

  7. LEOPARD syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    LEOPARD syndrome is a very rare inherited disorder in which there are problems with the skin, face, ... LEOPARD syndrome is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. This means the person only needs the abnormal ...

  8. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... help with blood clotting. If you have a myelodysplastic syndrome, the stem cells do not mature into healthy ... can lead to infection, anemia, or easy bleeding. Myelodysplastic syndromes often do not cause early symptoms and are ...

  9. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Like for Kids With Marfan Syndrome? en español Síndrome de Marfan Evan couldn't wait for school ... for Marfan syndrome runs in families, getting passed down to children from parents who have the disease. ...

  10. Edwards' syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Doreen; Dearmun, Annette

    2016-12-08

    Edwards' syndrome is a serious genetic condition that affects fetal cellular functions, tissue development and organogenesis. Most infants with the syndrome are female, but there is no race predominance.

  11. Proteus Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donate Cash Donation Life Insurance Gift Matching Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome ... approved by the Proteus Syndrome Foundation Assessment and management of the orthopedic and other complications of Proteus ...

  12. Apert Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Datta, Saikat; Saha, Sandip; Kar, Arnab; Mondal, Souvonik; Basu, Syamantak

    2014-09-01

    Apert syndrome is one of the craniosynostosis syndromes which, due to its association with other skeletal anomalies, is also known as acrocephalosyndactyly. It is a rare congenital anomaly which stands out from other craniosynostosis due to its characteristic skeletal presentations.

  13. Follow-up in healthy schoolchildren and in adolescents with DOWN syndrome: psycho-environmental and genetic determinants of physical activity and its impact on fitness, cardiovascular diseases, inflammatory biomarkers and mental health; the UP&DOWN Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An objective diagnosis of sedentary behaviour as well as of the physical activity and fitness levels in youth and to better understand how lifestyle is associated with cardiovascular disease risk factors and other phenotypes is of clinical and public health interest, and might be informative for developing intervention studies focused on the promotion of physical activity in these population. The aim of this methodological paper is to describe the design and assessment in the UP&DOWN study. Methods/Design The UP&DOWN study is a multi-center follow-up design where 2225 Spanish primary and secondary schoolchildren from Cadiz and Madrid, respectively, as well as 110 Spanish adolescents with Down syndrome from Madrid and Toledo were recruited to be assessed. Nine main measurement categories are assessed: i) socio-demographic and early determinants; ii) environmental determinants; iii) physical activity and sedentary behaviour; iv) health-related fitness; v) blood pressure and resting heart rate; vi) mental health; vii) dietary patterns; viii) blood samples; and ix) genetic analysis. During the 3-yr follow-up study, socio-demographic and early determinants, and genetic analysis are only assessed in the first year. Blood sampling is assessed in the first year and the third year (2nd follow-up), and all the other measurements are assessed every year. Discussion The findings of the UP&DOWN study may help the Health Information Systems and policy makers to identify the target population for primary prevention and health promotion policies, and to develop and test preventive strategies. Moreover, these data will allow following the trends at population level, as well as to modify/adapt/create new evidence-based physical activity guidelines at national level. The findings will also serve as a scientific platform for interventional studies. PMID:24761982

  14. Inherited complement regulatory protein deficiency predisposes to human disease in acute injury and chronic inflammatory statesthe examples of vascular damage in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and debris accumulation in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Richards, Anna; Kavanagh, David; Atkinson, John P

    2007-01-01

    In this chapter, we examine the role of complement regulatory activity in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). These diseases are representative of two distinct types of complement-mediated injury, one being acute and self-limited, the other reflecting accumulation of chronic damage. Neither condition was previously thought to have a pathologic relationship to the immune system. However, alterations in complement regulatory protein genes have now been identified as major predisposing factors for the development of both diseases. In aHUS, heterozygous mutations leading to haploinsufficiency and function-altering polymorphisms in complement regulators have been identified, while in AMD, polymorphic haplotypes in complement genes are associated with development of disease. The basic premise is that a loss of function in a plasma or membrane inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway allows for excessive activation of complement on the endothelium of the kidney in aHUS and on retinal debris in AMD. These associations have much to teach us about the host's innate immune response to acute injury and to chronic debris deposition. We all experience cellular injury and, if we live long enough, will deposit debris in blood vessel walls (atherosclerosis leading to heart attacks and strokes), the brain (amyloid proteins leading to Alzheimer's disease), and retina (lipofuscin pigments leading to AMD). These are three common causes of morbidity and mortality in the developed world. The clinical, genetic, and immunopathologic understandings derived from the two examples of aHUS and AMD may illustrate what to anticipate in related conditions. They highlight how a powerful recognition and effector system, the alternative complement pathway, reacts to altered self. A response to acute injury or chronic debris accumulation must be appropriately balanced. In either case, too much activation or too little regulation promotes

  15. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  16. Fraser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kalpana Kumari, M K; Kamath, Sulata; Mysorekar, Vijaya V; Nandini, G

    2008-01-01

    Fraser syndrome or cryptophthalmos is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by major features such as cryptophthalmos, syndactyly and abnormal genitalia. The diagnosis of this syndrome can be made on clinical examination and perinatal autopsy. We present the autopsy findings of a rare case of Fraser syndrome in a male infant.

  17. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Opinion statement Chronic Inflammatory polyneuropathies are an important group of neuromuscular disorders that present chronically and progress over more than 8 weeks, being referred to as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Despite tremendous progress in elucidating disease pathogenesis, the exact triggering event remains unknown. Our knowledge regarding diagnosis and management of CIDP and its variants continues to expand, resulting in improved opportunities for identification and treatment. Most clinical neurologists will be involved in the management of patients with these disorders, and should be familiar with available therapies for CIDP. We review the distinctive clinical, laboratory, and electro-diagnostic features that aid in diagnosis. We emphasize the importance of clinical patterns that define treatment responsiveness and the most appropriate therapies in order to improve prognosis. PMID:23564314

  18. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  19. Pelvic inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Pelvic inflammatory disease is caused by infection of the upper female genital tract and is often asymptomatic. Pelvic inflammatory disease is the most common gynaecological reason for admission to hospital in the USA and is diagnosed in almost 2% of women aged 16 to 45 years consulting their GP in England and Wales. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of empirical treatment compared with treatment delayed until the results of microbiological investigations are known? How do different antimicrobial regimens compare? What are the effects of routine antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent pelvic inflammatory disease before intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) insertion? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found nine systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (oral, parenteral, empirical treatment, treatment guided by test results, different durations, outpatient, inpatient), and routine antibiotic prophylaxis (before intrauterine device insertion in women at high risk or low risk). PMID:19450319

  20. Keratoconus: an inflammatory disorder?

    PubMed

    Galvis, V; Sherwin, T; Tello, A; Merayo, J; Barrera, R; Acera, A

    2015-07-01

    Keratoconus has been classically defined as a progressive, non-inflammatory condition, which produces a thinning and steepening of the cornea. Its pathophysiological mechanisms have been investigated for a long time. Both genetic and environmental factors have been associated with the disease. Recent studies have shown a significant role of proteolytic enzymes, cytokines, and free radicals; therefore, although keratoconus does not meet all the classic criteria for an inflammatory disease, the lack of inflammation has been questioned. The majority of studies in the tears of patients with keratoconus have found increased levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. Eye rubbing, a proven risk factor for keratoconus, has been also shown recently to increase the tear levels of MMP-13, IL-6, and TNF-α. In the tear fluid of patients with ocular rosacea, IL-1α and MMP-9 have been reported to be significantly elevated, and cases of inferior corneal thinning, resembling keratoconus, have been reported. We performed a literature review of published biochemical changes in keratoconus that would support that this could be, at least in part, an inflammatory condition.

  1. Keratoconus: an inflammatory disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Galvis, V; Sherwin, T; Tello, A; Merayo, J; Barrera, R; Acera, A

    2015-01-01

    Keratoconus has been classically defined as a progressive, non-inflammatory condition, which produces a thinning and steepening of the cornea. Its pathophysiological mechanisms have been investigated for a long time. Both genetic and environmental factors have been associated with the disease. Recent studies have shown a significant role of proteolytic enzymes, cytokines, and free radicals; therefore, although keratoconus does not meet all the classic criteria for an inflammatory disease, the lack of inflammation has been questioned. The majority of studies in the tears of patients with keratoconus have found increased levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. Eye rubbing, a proven risk factor for keratoconus, has been also shown recently to increase the tear levels of MMP-13, IL-6, and TNF-α. In the tear fluid of patients with ocular rosacea, IL-1α and MMP-9 have been reported to be significantly elevated, and cases of inferior corneal thinning, resembling keratoconus, have been reported. We performed a literature review of published biochemical changes in keratoconus that would support that this could be, at least in part, an inflammatory condition. PMID:25931166

  2. Postperfusion lung syndrome: physiopathology and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2014-01-01

    Postperfusion lung syndrome is rare but can be lethal. The underlying mechanism remains uncertain but triggering inflammatory cascades have become an accepted etiology. A better understanding of the pathophysiology and the roles of inflammatory mediators in the development of the syndrome is imperative in the determination of therapeutic options and promotion of patients' prognosis and survival. Postperfusion lung syndrome is similar to adult respiratory distress syndrome in clinical features, diagnostic approaches and management strategies. However, the etiologies and predisposing risk factors may differ between each other. The prognosis of the postperfusion lung syndrome can be poorer in comparison to acute respiratory distress syndrome due to the secondary multiple organ failure and triple acid-base imbalance. Current management strategies are focusing on attenuating inflammatory responses and preventing from pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion injury. Choices of cardiopulmonary bypass circuit and apparatus, innovative cardiopulmonary bypass techniques, modified surgical maneuvers and several pharmaceutical agents can be potential preventive strategies for acute lung injury during cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:25372917

  3. [Hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases. Part II: cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes, pediatric systemic granulomatosis and PAPA syndrome].

    PubMed

    Aróstegui, Juan I; Yagüe, Jordi

    2008-03-29

    Hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases result from a genetically-based dysregulated inflammatory process, and are clinically characterized by recurrent or persistent systemic inflammatory episodes, which typically occur in the absence of infectious, neoplastic or autoimmune etiology. Elucidation of their molecular basis has enabled the use of genetic analyses to achieve an accurate and definitive diagnosis, and to establish a tailored treatment. The present review is the second and last part of an updated and comprehensive overview of hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases, and will introduce persistent, non-periodic autoinflammatory diseases, such as: a) the group of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), which includes familial cold-induced autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome, and CINCA-NOMID syndrome; b) the group of pediatric systemic granulomatosis, which includes both Blau syndrome and early-onset sarcoidosis, and c) the pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome.

  4. Inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMI).

    PubMed

    Maisch, Bernhard; Richter, Anette; Sandmöller, Andrea; Portig, Irene; Pankuweit, Sabine

    2005-09-01

    Cardiomyopathies are heart muscle diseases, which have been defined by their central hemodynamics and macropathology and divided in five major forms: dilated (DCM), hypertrophic (HCM), restrictive (RCM), right ventricular (RVCM), and nonclassifiable cardiomyopathies (NCCM). Furthermore, the most recent WHO/WHF definition also comprises, among the specific cardiomyopathies, inflammatory cardiomyopathy as a distinct entity, defined as myocarditis in association with cardiac dysfunction. Idiopathic, autoimmune, and infectious forms of inflammatory cardiomyopathy were recognized. Viral cardiomyopathy has been defined as viral persistence in a dilated heart. It may be accompanied by myocardial inflammation and then termed inflammatory viral cardiomyopathy (or viral myocarditis with cardiomegaly). If no inflammation is observed in the biopsy of a dilated heart (< 14 lymphocytes and macrophages/mm(2)), the term viral cardiomyopathy or viral persistence in DCM should be applied according to the WHF Task Force recommendations. Within the German heart failure net it is the authors' working hypothesis, that DCM shares genetic risk factors with other diseases of presumed autoimmune etiology and, therefore, the same multiple genes in combination with environmental factors lead to numerous different autoimmune diseases including DCM. Therefore, the authors' primary goal is to acquire epidemiologic data of patients with DCM regarding an infectious and inflammatory etiology of the disease. Circumstantial evidence points to a major role of viral myocarditis in the etiology of DCM. The common presence of viral genetic material in the myocardium of patients with DCM provides the most compelling evidence, but proof of causality is still lacking. In addition, autoimmune reactions have been described in many studies, indicating them as an important etiologic factor. Nevertheless, data on the proportion of patients, in whom both mechanisms play a role are still missing.A pivotal role for

  5. [Autoinflammatory syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ida, Hiroaki; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2009-03-01

    The autoinflammatory syndromes include a group of inherited diseases that are characterized by 1) seemingly unprovoked episodes of systemic inflammations, 2) absence of high titer of autoantibody or auto-reactive T cell, and 3) inborn error of innate immunity. In this article, we will focus on the clinical features, the pathogenesis related the genetic defects, and the therapeutic strategies in the representative disorders including familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), hyper-IgD with periodic fever syndrome (HIDS), syndrome of pyogenic arthritis with pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA), and Blau syndrome. Recent advances in genetics and molecular biology have proceeded our understanding of the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory syndromes.

  6. Vitamin D and inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kai; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2014-01-01

    Beyond its critical function in calcium homeostasis, vitamin D has recently been found to play an important role in the modulation of the immune/inflammation system via regulating the production of inflammatory cytokines and inhibiting the proliferation of proinflammatory cells, both of which are crucial for the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Several studies have associated lower vitamin D status with increased risk and unfavorable outcome of acute infections. Vitamin D supplementation bolsters clinical responses to acute infection. Moreover, chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular disease, asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, chronic kidney disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and others, tend to have lower vitamin D status, which may play a pleiotropic role in the pathogenesis of the diseases. In this article, we review recent epidemiological and interventional studies of vitamin D in various inflammatory diseases. The potential mechanisms of vitamin D in regulating immune/inflammatory responses in inflammatory diseases are also discussed. PMID:24971027

  7. Histiocytoid Sweet's syndrome presenting with annular erythematous plaques*

    PubMed Central

    Marcarini, Renata; de Araujo, Raquel Nardelli; Nóbrega, Monisa Martins; Medeiros, Karina Bittencourt; Gripp, Alexandre Carlos; Maceira, Juan Manuel Piñeiro

    2016-01-01

    Histiocytoid Sweet's Syndrome is a rare inflammatory disease described in 2005 as a variant of the classical Sweet's Syndrome (SS). Histopathologically, the dermal inflammatory infiltrate is composed mainly of mononuclear cells that have a histiocytic appearance and represent immature myeloid cells. We describe a case of Histiocytoid Sweet's Syndrome in an 18-year-old man. Although this patient had clinical manifestations compatible with SS, the cutaneous lesions consisted of erythematous annular plaques, which are not typical for this entity and have not been described in histiocytic form so far. The histiocytic subtype was confirmed by histopathological analysis that showed positivity for myeloperoxidase in multiple cells with histiocytic appearance. PMID:28300927

  8. [Fecal calprotectin in the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Lobatón, Triana; Rodríguez-Alonso, Lorena; Guardiola, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of inflammatory bowel diseases has classically been based on assessment of digestive symptoms. The development of these symptoms usually results in colonoscopy, which has a low diagnostic yield. Likewise, there is an increasing tendency to base treatment of inflammatory bowel disease on objective data, since the disappearance of signs of activity on colonoscopy (called « mucosal cure ») has been associated with sustained clinical remission and reduced rates of hospitalization and surgery. Consequently, there is a need for biomarkers that would aid the selection of those patients who would derive most benefit from an endoscopic examination. One substance that has been proposed as a biomarker of bowel inflammation is fecal calprotectin. This substance allows inflammatory bowel disease to be distinguished from irritable bowel syndrome and shows a better correlation with the degree of inflammation than clinical indicators and serological markers. In addition, it could also be useful to predict mucosal cure and the risk of recurrence.

  9. [Pathogenesis and Clinical Examination of Autoinflammatory Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ida, Hiroaki

    2015-10-01

    Autoinflammatory syndrome is characterized by: 1) episodes of seemingly unprovoked inflammation, 2) the absence of a high titer of autoantibodies or auto-reactive T cells, and 3) an inborn error of innate immunity. In this decade, many autoinflammatory syndromes have been reported in Japan, and so many Japanese physicians have become aware of this syndrome. Monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes present with excessive systemic inflammation including fever, rashes, arthritis, and organ-specific inflammation and are caused by defects in single genes encoding proteins that regulate innate inflammatory pathways. The main monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes are familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), Blau syndrome, and syndrome of pyogenic arthritis with pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA). We diagnosed these syndromes as clinical manifestations and performed genetic screening. Many serum cytokines are elevated in patients with autoinflammatory syndrome, but this is not disease-specific. The pathogeneses of many autoinflammatory syndromes are known to be related to inflammasomes, which are multiprotein complexes that serve as a platform for caspase 1 activation and interleukin-1β(IL-1β) and IL-18 maturation. Especially, NLRP3 inflammasomes may play a crucial role in the initiation and progression of FMF and CAPS. Recently, it was reported that NETs (neutrophil extracellular traps) derived from neutrophils may also play an important role in the pathogenesis of FMF. In the future, we hope to discover new clinical examinations which can provide evidence of inflammasome activation independent of genetic screening. In this issue, I introduce autoinflammatory syndromes and discuss the pathogenesis and clinical examination of these syndromes.

  10. Primary haemophagocytic syndrome in a young girl.

    PubMed

    Sasidharan, P K; Prasanth Varghese, C; Sandeep, P; Sreejith, R; Shaan, Mohammed; Shiji, P V; Satish, H; Feroz, M

    2011-01-01

    Haemophagocytic syndrome is a life-threatening systemic illness characterized by an uncontrolled inflammatory response. Patients present with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, jaundice and liver dysfunction, neurological manifestations and often pancytopenla. Bone marrow, lymph node, hepatic or splenic biopsy shows macrophages with Ingested blood cells or their precursors. Laboratory markers include elevated triglycerides and ferritin, low fibrinogen with normal or low erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Familial haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is an autosomal recessive disorder. Secondary haemophagocytic syndrome results from infections, malignancy and collagen vascular disorders. We describe a young girl with primary haemophagocytic syndrome.

  11. Complete remission of Schnitzler syndrome and Waldenström macroglobulinemia under rituximab-cyclophosphamide-dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Aouba, Achille; Pressiat, Claire; Pricopi, Maria; Georgin-Lavialle, Sophie; Boue, François; Lievre-Castilla, Maria-Angela; Marfaing-Koka, Anne; Prevot, Sophie; Decottignies, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    In Schnitzler syndrome, which is mostly diagnosed with a low and asymptomatic monoclonal peak, anakinra has always exhibited a complete but only transient control of the auto-inflammatory signs, which are induced by interleukin (IL)-1 auto-activation. We focused on the treatment of a case of Schnitzler syndrome with moderate macroglobulinemia peak. Anakinra failed to improve the severe inflammatory anaemia and the dysglobulinemia, but rituximab-dexamethasone-cyclophosphamide chemotherapy alone allowed a complete response. The correlation between the clinical, pro-inflammatory cytokines and dysglobulinemia complete controls with chemotherapy proves the following: (1) the dual action of this treatment in both the auto-inflammatory and dysglobulinemia components of the syndrome and (2) a different but entangled cytokine network in the pathogenesis of the auto-inflammatory and dysglobulinemia components of the syndrome.

  12. Chronic inflammatory systemic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Rainer H.; Schradin, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that during chronic inflammatory systemic diseases (CIDs) maladaptations of the immune, nervous, endocrine and reproductive system occur. Maladaptation leads to disease sequelae in CIDs. The ultimate reason of disease sequelae in CIDs remained unclear because clinicians do not consider bodily energy trade-offs and evolutionary medicine. We review the evolution of physiological supersystems, fitness consequences of genes involved in CIDs during different life-history stages, environmental factors of CIDs, energy trade-offs during inflammatory episodes and the non-specificity of CIDs. Incorporating bodily energy regulation into evolutionary medicine builds a framework to better understand pathophysiology of CIDs by considering that genes and networks used are positively selected if they serve acute, highly energy-consuming inflammation. It is predicted that genes that protect energy stores are positively selected (as immune memory). This could explain why energy-demanding inflammatory episodes like infectious diseases must be terminated within 3–8 weeks to be adaptive, and otherwise become maladaptive. Considering energy regulation as an evolved adaptive trait explains why many known sequelae of different CIDs must be uniform. These are, e.g. sickness behavior/fatigue/depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance, anorexia, malnutrition, muscle wasting—cachexia, cachectic obesity, insulin resistance with hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, alterations of steroid hormone axes, disturbances of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, hypertension, bone loss and hypercoagulability. Considering evolved energy trade-offs helps us to understand how an energy imbalance can lead to the disease sequelae of CIDs. In the future, clinicians must translate this knowledge into early diagnosis and symptomatic treatment in CIDs. PMID:26817483

  13. Inflammatory bowel disease unclassified

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ning; Chen, Wei-xing; Chen, Shao-hua; Xu, Cheng-fu; Li, You-ming

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are idiopathic, chronic, and inflammatory intestinal disorders. The two main types, ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD), sometimes mimic each other and are not readily distinguishable. The purpose of this study was to present a series of hospitalized cases, which could not initially be classified as a subtype of IBD, and to try to note roles of the terms indeterminate colitis (IC) and inflammatory bowel disease unclassified (IBDU) when such a dilemma arises. Methods: Medical records of 477 patients hospitalized due to IBD, during the period of January 2002 to April 2009, were retrospectively studied in the present paper. All available previous biopsies from endoscopies of these patients were reanalyzed. Results: Twenty-seven of 477 IBD patients (5.7%) had been initially diagnosed as having IBDU. Of them, 23 received colonoscopy and histological examinations in our hospital. A total of 90% (9/10) and 66.7% (4/6) of patients, respectively, had a positive finding via wireless capsule endoscopy (CE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE). The barium-swallow or small bowel follow-through (SBFT) was performed on 11 patients. Positive changes were observed under computer tomographic (CT) scanning in 89.5% (17/19) of patients. Reasonable treatment strategies were employed for all patients. Conclusions: Our data indicate that IBDU accounts for 5.7% of initial diagnoses of IBD. The definition of IBDU is valuable in clinical practice. For those who had no clear clinical, endoscopic, histological, or other features affording a diagnosis of either UC or CD, IBDU could be used parenthetically. PMID:21462383

  14. The Hyperferritinemic Syndrome: macrophage activation syndrome, Still’s disease, septic shock and catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Over the last few years, accumulating data have implicated a role for ferritin as a signaling molecule and direct mediator of the immune system. Hyperferritinemia is associated with a multitude of clinical conditions and with worse prognosis in critically ill patients. Discussion There are four uncommon medical conditions characterized by high levels of ferritin, namely the macrophage activation syndrome (MAS), adult onset Still’s disease (AOSD), catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (cAPS) and septic shock, that share a similar clinical and laboratory features, and also respond to similar treatments, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism. Ferritin is known to be a pro-inflammatory mediator inducing expression of pro-inflammatory molecules, yet it has opposing actions as a pro-inflammatory and as an immunosuppressant. We propose that the exceptionally high ferritin levels observed in these uncommon clinical conditions are not just the product of the inflammation but rather may contribute to the development of a cytokine storm. Summary Here we review and compare four clinical conditions and the role of ferritin as an immunomodulator. We would like to propose including these four conditions under a common syndrome entity termed “Hyperferritinemic Syndrome”. PMID:23968282

  15. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gorson, Kenneth C; Katz, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an immune disorder of the peripheral nervous system. This article highlights our current understanding of the condition along with its phenotypic variants that are encountered in clinical practice. The diagnostic evaluation of CIDP includes laboratory studies to detect associated medical conditions and electrodiagnostic studies to assess for demyelination. Current treatment options include corticosteroids, plasma exchange, and intravenous immune globulin, along with alternative therapies that may be used as corticosteroid-sparing agents or for treatment-refractory cases. Approximately 85% to 90% of patients eventually improve or stabilize with treatment, and the long-term prognosis of CIDP is favorable.

  16. [Inflammatory process, histopathological aspects].

    PubMed

    Diébold, J

    1995-01-01

    Inflammation occurs only in conjunctive tissue and is the result of a close cooperation of various cells: blood platelets, endothelial cells, leucocytes, mast cells, fibroblasts. Successive phases can be recognized, the first is characterized by vascular phenomenons defining the acute phase. The second by cellular reactions defining the chronic or granulomatous phase. Various morphological patterns can be recognized in acute or chronic inflammation. In addition, hypersensitivity is responsible of peculiar morphology of the inflammatory response. After tissue necrosis, tissular debris should be eliminated by detersion. Then, a granulation tissue develops representing the first step of the healing, which will not be described here.

  17. Autoinflammatory syndromes behind the scenes of recurrent fevers in children.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Donato

    2009-08-01

    Many children experience recurrent fevers with no easily identifiable source and only a careful follow-up helps in the early identification of other presenting symptoms of other defined conditions which require medical intervention. Autoinflammatory syndromes are rare childhood-onset disorders of the innate immunity in which recurrent flares of fever and inflammation affecting skin, joints, the gastrointestinal tube, or serous membranes are the most striking signs, without any evidence of autoantibody production or underlying infections. Among the pediatric conditions belonging to this group we can consider hereditary recurrent fevers (familial Mediterranean fever, mevalonate kinase deficiency syndrome, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes), pyogenic disorders (PAPA syndrome, CRMO syndrome, Majeed syndrome), immune-mediated granulomatous diseases (Blau syndrome, Crohn's disease), and idiopathic febrile syndromes (systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, PFAPA syndrome, Behçet syndrome). Their genetic background has only been partially elucidated and advances in their molecular pathogenesis are shedding new light on the innate immune system, whilst more and more diseases are being reconsidered at a pathogenetic level and included in this new chapter of postgenomic medicine. The diagnosis of most autoinflammatory syndromes relies on clinical history, demonstration of an increased acute-phase response during inflammatory attacks, and, possibly, genetic confirmation, which is still elusive especially for idiopathic febrile syndromes. This astonishing progress in the awareness and knowledge of autoinflammatory syndromes has anticipated the actual possibilities of medical intervention and rationalized treatment with targeted biologic agents.

  18. Rituximab-Associated Inflammatory Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, Christina; Harris, Penelope

    2016-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare disease of the immunosuppression that results from neurotropic invasion of the JC virus which leads to demyelination of oligodendrocytes. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), on the other hand, is a condition of inflammation that develops as the immune system reconstitutes. This case report describes a case of a 35-year-old HIV-negative male who presented with three weeks of right lower extremity paresthesias as well as right upper extremity apraxia. He was diagnosed with PML complicated by IRIS secondary to Rituximab, which he had completed four months prior to presentation. Despite the condition's poor prognosis, the patient recovered with only minor deficits. PMID:27965904

  19. [Nutritional therapy in inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Piquet, Marie-Astrid; Gloro, Romain; Justum, Anne-Marie; Reimund, Jean-Marie

    2006-02-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition and specific nutrient deficiencies are common in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), more particularly in Crohn's disease. In adults, the use of artificial nutrition is indicated in the event of malnutrition, short bowel syndrome, or IBD refractory to all other treatments. In children, enteral nutrition has a place as first-line treatment to avoid side effects of corticosteroids on growth. The use, as a therapeutic tool, of specific nutrients (n-3 fatty acids, glutamine, antioxydant vitamins and minerals, TGF-beta, probiotics...) seems interesting at the pathophysiological level. Nevertheless, these nutrients are still under evaluation and there are not enough available studies to recommend them in clinical routine. A very promising solution is the use of probiotics for the treatment of refractory pouchitis.

  20. [Atypical Cogan's syndrome. Based on a case].

    PubMed

    Nandu, A; Salu, P; Caspers, L; Gordts, F; Sennesael, J

    2004-01-01

    Cogan's syndrome is a systemic inflammatory disease that associates typical (interstitial keratitis) and atypical (such as anterior uveitis) ocular manifestations to vestibulo-auditory dysfunction. It has also a systemic vascular association of vasculitis type. We report a case of a 64 years old woman who presented an atypical form with anterior uveitis.

  1. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, R; Schneider, K; von Segesser, L; Turina, M

    1988-06-11

    348 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm were reviewed for typical features of inflammatory aneurysm (IAAA) (marked thickening of aneurysm wall, retroperitoneal fibrosis and rigid adherence of adjacent structures). IAAA was present in 15 cases (14 male, 1 female). When compared with patients who had ordinary aneurysms, significantly more patients complained of back or abdominal pain (p less than 0.01). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was highly elevated. Diagnosis was established in 7 of 10 computed tomographies. 2 patients underwent emergency repair for ruptured aneurysm. Unilateral ureteral obstruction was present in 4 cases and bilateral in 1. Repair of IAAA was performed by a modified technique. Histological examination revealed thickening of the aortic wall, mainly of the adventitial layer, infiltrated by plasma cells and lymphocytes. One 71-year-old patient operated on for rupture of IAAA died early, and another 78-year-old patient after 5 1/2 months. Control computed tomographies revealed spontaneous regression of inflammatory infiltration after repair. Equally, hydronephrosis due to ureteral obstruction could be shown to disappear or at least to decrease. IAAA can be diagnosed by computed tomography with high sensitivity. Repair involves low risk, but modification of technique is necessary. The etiology of IAAA remains unclear.

  2. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Savarese, R P; Rosenfeld, J C; DeLaurentis, D A

    1986-05-01

    Between January 1976 and December 1982, 181 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated surgically, and in 13 patients the aneurysms were found to be inflammatory. Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA) share important characteristics with typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms. Diagnosis and surgical management of IAAA are distinctive which suggests that IAAA should be considered separately, as a varient of typical abdominal aortic aneurysms. IAAA occur predominantly in males. The presenting symptoms are often idiosyncratic and include severe abdominal or back pain, or both, and ureteral obstruction; the diagnosis of IAAA should be considered when these symptoms are present. Although grossly and microscopically, the perianeurysmal fibrosis resembles idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis, the two conditions can be differentiated. At the present time, ultrasonography and computed tomography appear to offer reliable means for diagnosing IAAA. The presence of IAAA, whether established preoperatively or discovered unexpectedly at operation, necessitate certain modifications in the surgical approach, in order to avoid injuring the duodenum and the venous structures. Most patients can be successfully treated by resection and graft replacement. Rupture of the aneurysm in IAAA appears to be less frequent than in typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  3. The sterile inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Rock, Kenneth L; Latz, Eicke; Ontiveros, Fernando; Kono, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    The acute inflammatory response is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it plays a key role in initial host defense, particularly against many infections. On the other hand, its aim is imprecise, and as a consequence, when it is drawn into battle, it can cause collateral damage in tissues. In situations where the inciting stimulus is sterile, the cost-benefit ratio may be high; because of this, sterile inflammation underlies the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. Although there have been major advances in our understanding of how microbes trigger inflammation, much less has been learned about this process in sterile situations. This review focuses on a subset of the many sterile stimuli that can induce inflammation-specifically dead cells and a variety of irritant particles, including crystals, minerals, and protein aggregates. Although this subset of stimuli is structurally very diverse and might appear to be unrelated, there is accumulating evidence that the innate immune system may recognize them in similar ways and stimulate the sterile inflammatory response via common pathways. Here we review established and emerging data about these responses.

  4. The dark side of SAPHO syndrome.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Celia Coelho; Sousa, Mónica; Panarra, António; Riso, Nuno

    2011-12-21

    SAPHO syndrome (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis) is a relatively rare entity. The therapeutic approach of patients with SAPHO syndrome has included multiple drugs with varying success and incoherence responses. The therapy is still empirical today. SAPHO syndrome is commonly treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, bisphophonates and non-biologic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs. Recent reports showed successful treatment with tumour necrosis factor α (TNF α) antagonists, but there is still a dark side of SAPHO syndrome including a subgroup of patient's refractory to all the treatments that have been empirically experienced. A clinical report of a patient with SAPHO syndrome with 12 years of evolution is described. All the therapeutic approaches, including anti TNF α therapy, have not prevented the clinical and radiographic progression of the disease. Given that the disease affects mostly younger patients, new therapeutic strategies are necessary in order to avoid potentially irreversible joint and bone lesions.

  5. Churg-Strauss syndrome and hemorrhagic vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Rui Moreira; Cabral, Ana Rita; Monteiro, Antonio; Henriques, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a rare syndrome characterized by sinusitis, asthma and peripheral eosinophilia. This vasculitic syndrome affects medium and small-sized vessels, the lung being the most commonly affected organ, followed by the skin. The authors report a case of a 59-year-old male with a past history of asthma and allergic rhinitis. He presented necrohemorragic lesions in the distal phalanx of the 2nd, 3rd and 4th fingers of the left-hand and petechial lesions in the plant of both feet, accompanied by asthenia, anorexia and weight loss. The analytical study revealed leukocytosis with eosinophilia, elevated inflammatory parameters and p-ANCA positive antibodies. The diagnosis of CSS was established based on clinical and histopathological data. Cutaneous manifestations of hemorragic vasculitis are rare in CSS syndrome but can be the first manifestation of the disease. The recognition of this presentation is important for the early diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome. PMID:25386301

  6. [Pathophysiology of Ataxia in Fisher Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2016-12-01

    Fisher syndrome is regarded as a peculiar inflammatory neuropathy associated with ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia. The disorder is associated with preceding infection, cerebrospinal fluid albumino-cytological dissociation, and spontaneous recovery, and regarded as a variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome. The discovery of anti-GQ1b IgG antibodies led to dramatic advances in understanding the pathophysiology of Fisher syndrome. The lesions in Fisher syndrome are determined by expression of ganglioside GQ1b in the human nervous system. This review article focuses on the pathophysiology of ataxia in Fisher syndrome. Current evidence suggests that antibody attack on Group Ia neurons in the dorsal root ganglia is mainly responsible for the sensory ataxia. Involvement of the muscle spindles might also contribute to the development of ataxia.

  7. The dark side of SAPHO syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Celia Coelho; Sousa, Mónica; Panarra, António; Riso, Nuno

    2011-01-01

    SAPHO syndrome (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis) is a relatively rare entity. The therapeutic approach of patients with SAPHO syndrome has included multiple drugs with varying success and incoherence responses. The therapy is still empirical today. SAPHO syndrome is commonly treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, bisphophonates and non-biologic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs. Recent reports showed successful treatment with tumour necrosis factor α (TNF α) antagonists, but there is still a dark side of SAPHO syndrome including a subgroup of patient’s refractory to all the treatments that have been empirically experienced. A clinical report of a patient with SAPHO syndrome with 12 years of evolution is described. All the therapeutic approaches, including anti TNF α therapy, have not prevented the clinical and radiographic progression of the disease. Given that the disease affects mostly younger patients, new therapeutic strategies are necessary in order to avoid potentially irreversible joint and bone lesions. PMID:22670011

  8. Monogenic Autoinflammatory Syndromes: State of the Art on Genetic, Clinical, and Therapeutic Issues

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Luisa; Atteno, Mariangela; Compagnone, Adele; Caso, Paolo; Frediani, Bruno; Galeazzi, Mauro; Punzi, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes (MAISs) are caused by innate immune system dysregulation leading to aberrant inflammasome activation and episodes of fever and involvement of skin, serous membranes, eyes, joints, gastrointestinal tract, and nervous system, predominantly with a childhood onset. To date, there are twelve known MAISs: familial Mediterranean fever, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, familial cold urticaria syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome, CINCA syndrome, mevalonate kinase deficiency, NLRP12-associated autoinflammatory disorder, Blau syndrome, early-onset sarcoidosis, PAPA syndrome, Majeed syndrome, and deficiency of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. Each of these conditions may manifest itself with more or less severe inflammatory symptoms of variable duration and frequency, associated with findings of increased inflammatory parameters in laboratory investigation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the main genetic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of MAISs and their most recent classification with the ultimate goal of increasing awareness of autoinflammation among various internal medicine specialists. PMID:24282415

  9. Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Devi, Basanti; Behera, Binodini; Patro, Sibasish; Pattnaik, Subhransu S; Puhan, Manas R

    2013-05-01

    Gorlin Syndrome, a rare genodermatosis, otherwise known as Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is a multisystem disease affecting skin, nervous system, eyes, endocrine glands, and bones. It is characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, palmoplantar pits, jaw cysts, and bony deformities like kyphoscoliosis and frontal bossing. We would like to report a case of Gorlin syndrome with classical features, as this is a rare genodermatosis.

  10. Overgrowth Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Andrew C.; Kalish, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous multiple malformation syndromes associated with pathologic overgrowth have been described and, for many, their molecular bases elucidated. This review describes the characteristic features of these overgrowth syndromes, as well as the current understanding of their molecular bases, intellectual outcomes, and cancer predispositions. We review syndromes such as Sotos, Malan, Marshall–Smith, Weaver, Simpson–Golabi–Behmel, Perlman, Bannayan–Riley–Ruvalcaba, PI3K-related, Proteus, Beckwith–Wiedemann, fibrous dysplasia, Klippel–Trenaunay–Weber, and Maffucci. PMID:27617124

  11. Proteus Syndrome Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome Foundation The Proteus Syndrome Foundation , a 501c3 ... 1 Trial with ARQ 092 in Proteus Syndrome Proteus Syndrome Patient Registry The Proteus Syndrome Foundation Contact ...

  12. Serologic Evidence of Previous Campylobacter jejuni Infection in Patients with the Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-15

    with the Guillain- Barre 90PP0820 Syndrome Ban Mishu, M.D.; Amjad A. Ilyas, Ph.D.; Carol L. Koski, M.D.; Francine Vriesendorp, M.D.; Stuart D. Cook, M.D...U.S.A. Serologic Evidence of Previous Campylobacterjejuni Infection in Patients with the Guillain- Barre Syndrome Ban Mishu, MD; Amjad A. Ilyas, PhD...patients with the Guillain- The Guillain- Barre syndrome, sometimes called "acute Barr6 syndrome are likely to have had Campylobacter inflammatory

  13. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin in treating inflammatory neuromuscular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Min-Suk; Gold, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Intravenous immunoglobulin administration has long been used in the treatment of autoimmune neuromuscular disorders. Immunoglobulins may be administered by intramuscular, intravenous or subcutaneous routes. Methods: This is a report on the long-term clinical follow up of six patients with inflammatory neuromuscular disorders, that is, three chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), one multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), one inclusion body myositis (IBM) and one myasthenia gravis (MG), treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulins for a mean of 3.25 years. Results: One MMN and two CIDP patients received a weekly dose of subcutaneous immunoglobulins equivalent to intravenous immunoglobulin. One CIDP patient received a 50% dose reduction, the IBM patient received a 30% reduction and the MG patient a 20% reduction. The lower dose chosen in the majority of patients was based not only on clinical effects, but also on studies of primary immunodeficiency syndromes. One patient with CIDP showed clinical fluctuation, which was successfully treated with an adaptation of the dose of subcutaneous immunoglobulins, while the remaining patients with neuromuscular disorders had a stable clinical course for 2 years. No serious side effects were observed. Conclusions: Our results suggest that subcutaneous immunoglobulins can be an attractive alternative therapy in autoimmune neuromuscular disorders. PMID:26136842

  14. Inflammatory Biomarkers in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Daghestani, Hikmat N.; Kraus, Virginia B.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteoarthritis (OA) is highly prevalent and a leading cause of disability worldwide. Despite the global burden of OA, diagnostic tests and treatments for the molecular or early subclinical stages are still not available for clinical use. In recent years, there has been a large shift in the understanding of OA as a “wear and tear” disease to an inflammatory disease. This has been demonstrated through various studies using MRI, ultrasound, histochemistry, and biomarkers. It would of great value to be able to readily identify subclinical and/or sub-acute inflammation, particularly in such a way as to be appropriate for a clinical setting. Here we review several types of biomarkers associated with OA in human studies that point to a role of inflammation in OA. PMID:26521734

  15. Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the term used for a group of diseases with yet unknown etiology, prevalence of which is increasing almost everywhere in the world. The disease was almost non-existent four decades ago in the east, including the middle-east, while now a days it is seen more and more. In addition to the increasing prevalence, our knowledge about its pathogenesis, clinical course, diagnosis, and treatment has changed dramatically over the past couple of decades. This has changed our concept of this group of diseases, their diagnosis, treatment, and treatment goals. Considering the vast literature on the subject, it is timely to review major topics in IBD with a look on the regional progress and knowledge as well. This essay is aimed to cover this task. PMID:24829639

  16. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Mikami, Y; Kyogoku, M

    1994-08-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is a distinct clinicopathological entity, characterized by: (1) clinical presentation, such as back pain, weight loss, and increased ESR, (2) patchy and/or diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and (3) marked periaortic fibrosis resulting in thickening of the aneurysmal wall and occasional retroperitoneal fibrosis. Its pathogenesis is unknown, but some authors support the theory that IAAA is a subtype of atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm because of close relationship between IAAA and atherosclerotic change. In this article, we describe clinical and histological features of IAAA on the basis of the literature and our review of 6 cases of IAAA, emphasizing the similarity and difference between IAAA and atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. Our review supports that marked lamellar fibrosis completely replacing the media and adventitia, patchy lymphocytic infiltration (mostly B cells) and endarteritis obliterans are characteristic features of IAAA.

  17. Fatal inflammatory hypophysitis.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Elizabeth A; Perros, Petros

    2007-01-01

    A young female patient presented as an acute medical emergency with hypoglycaemia. Investigations revealed panhypopituitarism and an inflammatory pituitary mass. An antibody screen was negative for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies with cytoplasmic distribution (cANCA). Pituitary histology showed lymphocytic infiltration and a few Langerhan's cells. The pituitary mass rapidly expanded to involve the optic nerves and led to bilateral blindness. Later, the patient developed diarrhoea, a vasculitis rash, scleritis, and proteinuria. In subsequent investigations cANCA became positive. The patient responded to steroids and cyclophosphamide treatment and remained in partial remission for six months before dying of severe sepsis. This is the first description of Wegener's granulomatosis presenting with acute anterior pituitary failure in the absence of other organ involvement and negative serology.

  18. Anti-inflammatory effect of Houttuynia cordata injection.

    PubMed

    Lu, H M; Liang, Y Z; Yi, L Z; Wu, X J

    2006-03-08

    Houttuynia cordata (Saururaceae) injection (HCI) is a traditional Chinese medicine used in China. It was chosen as one of eight types of traditional Chinese medicine that play a unique role in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) owing to the effect of curbing inflammation. In order to validate this plausible anti-inflammatory property, the chemical composition of HCI has been analysed by GC/MS, 22 components were identified, and the inflammation induced by carrageenan in the rat pleurisy model and by xylene in the mice ear edema model was adopted to study the anti-inflammatory activity of HCI. Injection of carrageenan into the pleural cavity elicited an acute inflammatory response characterized by protein rich fluid accumulation and leukocyte infiltration in the pleural cavity. The peak inflammatory response was obtained at 24 h when the fluid volume, protein concentration, C-reactive protein and cell infiltration were maximums. The results showed that these parameters were attenuated by HCI at any dose and touched bottom at dose of 0.54 ml/100 g, although less strong than dexamethasone. This drug was also effective in inhibiting xylene induced ear edema, and the percentage of inhibition came to 50% at dose of 80 microl/20 g. The results clearly indicate that HCI have anti-inflammatory activity.

  19. Congenital insensitivity to pain and anhydrosis due to a rare mutation and that is complicated by inflammatory bowel disease and amyloidosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bakri, Faris G; Wahbeh, Ayman; Abu Sneina, Awni; Al Khader, Ali; Obeidat, Fatima; AlAwwa, Izzat; Buni, Maryam; Ki, Chang-Seok; Masri, Amira

    2016-10-01

    Patients with congenital insensitivity to pain and anhydrosis syndrome are at risk for renal amyloidosis and inflammatory bowel disease. Physicians caring for such patients should be aware of these complications.

  20. Tourette Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Look, Kathy

    Tourette Syndrome has a history of being misdiagnosed or undiagnosed due to its unusual and complex symptoms. This paper describes: the symptoms of Tourette Syndrome; its etiology; age of onset; therapeutic methods, such as drug therapy, psychotherapy, diet control, and hypnosis; educational implications; and employment prospects. Several…

  1. Cardiorenal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Kidney dysfunction in patients with heart failure and cardiovascular disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease are common. A recently proposed consensus definition of cardiorenal syndrome stresses the bidirectional nature of these heart-kidney interactions. The treatment of cardiorenal syndrome is challenging, however, promising new therapeutic options are currently being investigated in recent and ongoing clinical trials. PMID:20948701

  2. Down syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parents and caregivers should learn to help a person with Down syndrome deal with frustration. At the same time, it is important to encourage independence. Teen girls and women with Down syndrome are usually able to get pregnant. There is an increased risk of sexual abuse ...

  3. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... opportunity to exchange ideas, develop coping strategies and locate resources. Peer groups for girls with Turner syndrome can help reinforce your daughter's self-esteem and provide her with a social network of people who understand her experience with Turner syndrome. References ...

  4. Turner syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... at birth is often smaller than average. A child with Turner syndrome is much shorter than children who are the ... Growth hormone may help a child with Turner syndrome grow taller. ... started when the girl is 12 or 13 years old. These help trigger ...

  5. Wells Syndrome with Multiorgan Involvement Mimicking Hypereosinophilic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carlesimo, M; Fidanza, L; Mari, E; Feliziani, G; Narcisi, A; De Marco, G; Bartolazzi, A; Camplone, G

    2009-09-12

    Eosinophil-associated diseases represent a spectrum of heterogeneous disorders, where blood and cutaneous eosinophilia is the most important feature and eosinophils are the principal cause of cutaneous lesions. These diseases show some similarities in the clinical features but also many distinctive characteristics [Saurat et al., Dermatologia e malattie sessualmente trasmesse, Milano, Masson, 2000]. Wells syndrome is one of these disorders and is an uncommon recurrent inflammatory dermatosis, rarely associated to signs and symptoms of multiple organ involvement [Arch Dermatol 2006;142:1157-1161]. Hypereosinophilic syndrome, in contrast, constitutes a group of idiopathic disorders characterized by blood eosinophilia for at least 6 months, associated with single or multiple organ system dysfunction [Arch Dermatol 2006;142:1157-1161]. Clinically atypical Wells syndrome with multiorgan involvement is reported here. A correct diagnosis is difficult in this case, but clinical and histopathological features are compatible with this diagnosis. The reported condition likely represents a borderline hypereosinophilic disease, in which clinical features of both hypereosinophilic syndrome and Wells syndrome are present.

  6. Syndromic craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Derderian, Christopher; Seaward, James

    2012-05-01

    Although most cases of craniosynostosis are nonsyndromic, craniosynostosis is known to occur in conjunction with other anomalies in well-defined patterns that make up clinically recognized syndromes. Patients with syndromic craniosynostoses are much more complicated to care for, requiring a multidisciplinary approach to address all of their needs effectively. This review describes the most common craniosynostosis syndromes, their characteristic features and syndrome-specific functional issues, and new modalities utilized in their management. General principles including skull development, the risk of developing increased intracranial pressure in craniosynostosis syndromes, and techniques to measure intracranial pressure are discussed. Evolving techniques of the established operative management of craniosynostosis are discussed together with more recent techniques including spring cranioplasty and posterior cranial vault distraction osteogenesis.

  7. Linburg syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rennie, William R.J.; Muller, Hellmuth

    1998-01-01

    Objective To review the causes and demographics of Linburg syndrome. Design An illustrative case report and a demographic study. Setting Adult and pediatric orthopedic clinics at the Health Sciences Centre in Winnipeg. Patients One patient with Linburg syndrome and 200 patients and relatives presenting to adult and pediatric orthopedic clinics with conditions not involving their hands, wrists or forearms. Outcome measures The presence of the intertendinous anomaly and of carpal tunnel syndrome. Results Tendinous connection(s) between flexor pollicis longus and flexor digitorum profundus muscles were found in 20% of the study population. The anomaly was found in all age groups. No association was found between Linburg syndrome and the presence of carpal tunnel syndrome or previous injury to the hand or forearm. Conclusion Tendinous connection between flexor pollicis longus and flexor digitorum profundus muscles is a common anomaly that rarely causes clinical symptoms. PMID:9711164

  8. Three Cases of Acquired Simulated Brown Syndrome after Blowout Fracture Operations

    PubMed Central

    Ji, So Young; Yoo, Jae Hong; Ha, Won; Lee, Ji Won

    2015-01-01

    Brown syndrome is known as limited elevation of the affected eye during adduction. It is caused by a disorder of the superior oblique tendon, which makes it difficult for the eyeball to look upward, especially during adduction. It is classified into congenital true sheath Brown syndrome and acquired simulated Brown syndrome. Acquired simulated Brown syndrome can be caused by trauma, infection, or inflammatory conditions. The surgical restoration of blowout fractures can also lead to limitations of ocular motility, including Brown syndrome. We report on three patients with acquired simulated Brown syndrome, who complained of diplopia and limitation of ocular motility after operations to treat blowout fractures. PMID:26015892

  9. Escobar syndrome mimicing congenital patellar syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ezirmik, Naci; Yildiz, Kadri; Can, Cahit Emre

    2012-08-01

    Multiple pterygium syndrome (MPS) is a syndrome that is characterized abnormal face, short length and skin pterygiums on some body legions (servical, antecubital, popliteal, interdigital and on neck). It is also called as Pterygium Colli syndrome, Escobar syndrome or Pterygium syndrome. Escobar (multyple pterygium) syndrome is a rare syndrome. Intrauterin growth reterdation, abnormal face, wide-spead pterygiums that resulted in joint contractures, ptosis, chryptoorchidism, patellar dysplasia and foot deformities are seen on this syndrome. Primarly autosomal resesive crossing are observed; also autosomal dominant and X-linked crossing. This case were presented as it has components of Escobar syndrome and Isolated Patellar Aplasia syndrome in same time.

  10. Vitamin D in inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wöbke, Thea K.; Sorg, Bernd L.; Steinhilber, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Changes in vitamin D serum levels have been associated with inflammatory diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis (MS), atherosclerosis, or asthma. Genome- and transcriptome-wide studies indicate that vitamin D signaling modulates many inflammatory responses on several levels. This includes (i) the regulation of the expression of genes which generate pro-inflammatory mediators, such as cyclooxygenases or 5-lipoxygenase, (ii) the interference with transcription factors, such as NF-κB, which regulate the expression of inflammatory genes and (iii) the activation of signaling cascades, such as MAP kinases which mediate inflammatory responses. Vitamin D targets various tissues and cell types, a number of which belong to the immune system, such as monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs) as well as B- and T cells, leading to individual responses of each cell type. One hallmark of these specific vitamin D effects is the cell-type specific regulation of genes involved in the regulation of inflammatory processes and the interplay between vitamin D signaling and other signaling cascades involved in inflammation. An important task in the near future will be the elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms that are involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses by vitamin D on the molecular level by the use of techniques such as chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), ChIP-seq, and FAIRE-seq. PMID:25071589

  11. Histiocytoid Sweet’s syndrome in a patient with myelodsyplastic syndrome: report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shalaby, Michael M.; Riahi, Ryan R.; Rosen, Les B.; Soine, Erik J.

    2016-01-01

    The neutrophilic dermatoses are a group of disorders characterized by skin lesions for which histological examination reveals intense epidermal and/or dermal inflammatory infiltrates composed primarily of neutrophils without evidence of infection. The myelodysplastic syndromes consist of a heterogeneous group of malignant hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by dysplastic and inadequate blood cell production with a variable risk of transformation to acute leukemia. Rarely, histiocytoid Sweet’s syndrome occurring in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome has been described. We present a case of a 66-year-old woman with a history of myelodysplastic syndrome who developed histiocytoid Sweet’s syndrome. We also review the literature and characterize patients with myelodysplastic syndrome who have developed histiocytoid Sweet’s syndrome. PMID:26937301

  12. Monogenic Auto-inflammatory Syndromes: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Gholamreza; Khadem Azarian, Shahin; Nazeri, Sepideh; Mosayebian, Ali; Ghiasy, Saleh; Sadri, Ghazal; Mohebi, Ali; Khan Nazer, Nikoo Hossein; Afraei, Sanaz; Mirshafiey, Abbas

    2016-12-01

    Auto-inflammatory syndromes are a new group of distinct hereditable disorders characterized by episodes of seemingly unprovoked inflammation (most commonly in skin, joints, gut, and eye), the absence of a high titer of auto-antibodies or auto-reactive T cells, and an inborn error of innate immunity. A narrative literature review was carried out of studies related to auto-inflammatory syndromes to discuss the pathogenesis and clinical manifestation of these syndromes. This review showed that the main monogenic auto-inflammatory syndromes are familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD), Blau syndrome, TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), and pyogenic arthritis with pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA). The data suggest that correct diagnosis and treatment of monogenic auto-inflammatory diseases relies on the physicians' awareness. Therefore, understanding of the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of auto-inflammatory syndromes, and especially the fact that these disorders are mediated by IL-1 secretion stimulated by monocytes and macrophages, facilitated significant progress in patient management.

  13. Neuropsychiatric manifestations in inflammatory neuropathies: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Seri, Stefano; Cavanna, Andrea E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We conducted a systematic literature review on psychological and behavioral comorbidities in patients with inflammatory neuropathies. In Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS), psychotic symptoms are reported during early stages in 30% of patients. Typical associations include mechanical ventilation, autonomic dysfunction, inability to communicate, and severe weakness. Anxiety and depression are frequent comorbidities. Anxiety may increase post‐hospital admissions and be a predictor of mechanical ventilation. Posttraumatic stress disorder may affect up to 20% of ventilated patients. Sleep disturbances are common in early‐stage GBS, affecting up to 50% of patients. In chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, memory and quality of sleep may be impaired. An independent link between depression and pretreatment upper limb disability and ascites was reported in POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M‐protein, skin) syndrome, with an association with early death. Hematological treatment of POEMS appears effective on depression. Published literature on psychological/behavioral manifestations in inflammatory neuropathies remains scarce, and further research is needed. Muscle Nerve 54: 1–8, 2016 PMID:26999767

  14. Neuropsychiatric manifestations in inflammatory neuropathies: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rajabally, Yusuf A; Seri, Stefano; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a systematic literature review on psychological and behavioral comorbidities in patients with inflammatory neuropathies. In Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), psychotic symptoms are reported during early stages in 30% of patients. Typical associations include mechanical ventilation, autonomic dysfunction, inability to communicate, and severe weakness. Anxiety and depression are frequent comorbidities. Anxiety may increase post-hospital admissions and be a predictor of mechanical ventilation. Posttraumatic stress disorder may affect up to 20% of ventilated patients. Sleep disturbances are common in early-stage GBS, affecting up to 50% of patients. In chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, memory and quality of sleep may be impaired. An independent link between depression and pretreatment upper limb disability and ascites was reported in POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein, skin) syndrome, with an association with early death. Hematological treatment of POEMS appears effective on depression. Published literature on psychological/behavioral manifestations in inflammatory neuropathies remains scarce, and further research is needed. Muscle Nerve 54: 1-8, 2016.

  15. [HELLP syndrome].

    PubMed

    Vigil-De Gracia, Paulino

    2015-01-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are one of the most common complications of pregnancy, but one of the most serious expressions of this pathology is HELLP syndrome. The HELLP syndrome is characterized by the presence of hypertension disorder more a triad: microangiopathic hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count. Patient with HELLP syndrome is associated with increased maternal risk complications such as: cerebral hemorrhage, retinal detachment, hematoma/ hepatic rupture, acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation, placental abruption and therefore a maternal death. For all these reasons it is recommended to search for findings of HELLP syndrome in patients with hypertensive disorder of pregnancy. The main clinical confusion of HELLP syndrome is acute fatty liver of pregnancy, however there are parameters that help correct identification. The presence of HELLP syndrome involves a rapid termination of pregnancy and the administration of corticosteroids does not improve maternal morbidity and mortality but may help raise the platelet count, thus decreasing the need for transfusion and shorten hospital stay. Much of the decline in maternal morbidity and mortality associated with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy is in proper diagnosis and effective management of HELLP syndrome.

  16. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vanasse, Michel; Rossignol, Elsa; Hadad, Elie

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is characterized clinically by a progressive symmetrical weakness evolving over a period of at least 2 months. There is increased CSF protein and conduction block, reduced nerve conduction velocities, increased distal latencies, and/or absent F wave or prolonged F wave latency in two or more nerves. Incidence is lower in children (10 times less) than in adults, and the condition presents in an acute or subacute manner with frequent relapses. It is not associated with other systemic diseases such as neoplasia, diabetes mellitus, or monoclonal gammopathies. It appears to be immune-related as a variety of humoral and cellular autoimmune mechanisms have been implicated. Treatment is based on results obtained in randomized clinical trials (RCTs) conducted in adults as such studies are lacking in the pediatric population. The evolution of CIDP is more favorable in children than in adults, with 80-100% response rates to standard treatments (steroids, intravenous immunoglobulins, and/or plasmapheresis) and excellent outcome with complete functional recovery in most patients. Cases refractory to standard therapies do exist in children, for which azathioprine, methotrexate, and mycophenolate mofetil alone or more often in association with other treatments have been used. However, safety and efficacy data are still insufficient to give specific recommendations regarding the optimal choice.

  17. [Acute coronary syndrome after hornet bite, type II Kounis syndrome - a case report].

    PubMed

    Alihodzić, Hajriz; Ilić, Boris; Mladina, Nada; Mrsić, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Kounis syndrome is an accidental occurrence of acute coronary syndrome associated with anaphylaxis, where acute inflammatory mediators cause the spasm of coronary arteries with the erosion and rupture of atheromatous plaque. We present a 53-year-old male who during the treatment of anaphylaxis after a hornet bite developed acute anteroseptal myocardial infarction. The diagnosis of type II Kounis syndrome was proven by electrocardiographic abnormalities and biochemical markers with clinical manifestation of acute coronary syndrome, and was associated with anaphylaxis which demanded prehospital treatment of the patient after the hornet bite. Anaphylaxis after a hornet bite requires consideration of acute coronary syndrome if patients have chest pain and hemodynamic impairment, as these conditions occur infrequently but demand additional diagnostics and adequate treatment.

  18. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: Updates on an inflammatory CNS syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Daniela; Alper, Gulay; Van Haren, Keith; Kornberg, Andrew J; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Tenembaum, Silvia; Belman, Anita L

    2016-08-30

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an immune-mediated demyelinating CNS disorder with predilection to early childhood. ADEM is generally considered a monophasic disease. However, recurrent ADEM has been described and defined as multiphasic disseminated encephalomyelitis. ADEM often occurs postinfectiously, although a causal relationship has never been established. ADEM and multiple sclerosis are currently viewed as distinct entities, generally distinguishable even at disease onset. However, pathologic studies have demonstrated transitional cases of yet unclear significance. ADEM is clinically defined by acute polyfocal neurologic deficits including encephalopathy. MRI typically demonstrates reversible, ill-defined white matter lesions of the brain and often also the spinal cord, along with frequent involvement of thalami and basal ganglia. CSF analysis may reveal a mild pleocytosis and elevated protein, but is generally negative for intrathecal oligoclonal immunoglobulin G synthesis. In the absence of a specific diagnostic test, ADEM is considered a diagnosis of exclusion, and ADEM mimics, especially those requiring a different treatment approach, have to be carefully ruled out. The role of biomarkers, including autoantibodies like anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of ADEM is currently under debate. Based on the presumed autoimmune etiology of ADEM, the current treatment approach consists of early immunotherapy. Outcome of ADEM in pediatric patients is generally favorable, but cognitive deficits have been reported even in the absence of other neurologic sequelae. This review summarizes the current knowledge on epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, neuroimaging features, CSF findings, differential diagnosis, therapy, and outcome, with a focus on recent advances and controversies.

  19. Perinatal Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome and Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Beena G.; Madan, Ashima; Saha, Shampa; Schendel, Diana; Thorsen, Poul; Skogstrand, Kristin; Hougaard, David; Shankaran, Seetha; Carlo, Wally

    2010-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal inflammation is associated with several morbidities of prematurity. Its relationship to retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) has not been investigated. Our objective was to determine the relationship between cytokine levels and ROP in the first three postnatal weeks. Data for this study were derived from the NICHD Cytokine Study. Dried blood spots were obtained from infants <1000g on days 0-1, 3±1, 7±2, 14±3, and 21±3. Infants were classified into three groups – No, Mild, and Severe ROP. Multiplex Luminex assay was used to quantify 20 cytokines. Temporal profiles of cytokines were evaluated using mixed effects models after controlling for covariates. Of 1074 infants enrolled, 890 were examined for ROP and 877 included in the analysis. ROP was associated with several clinical characteristics on unadjusted analyses. Eight cytokines remained significantly different across ROP groups in adjusted analyses. IL-6 and IL-17 showed significant effects in early time periods (D0-3); TGF-β, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) in later time periods (D7-21) and IL-18, C-reactive protein (CRP) and neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) in both early and later time periods. We conclude that perinatal inflammation may be involved in the pathogenesis of ROP. PMID:20032809

  20. Neuroacanthocytosis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hans H; Danek, Adrian; Walker, Ruth H

    2011-10-25

    Neuroacanthocytosis (NA) syndromes are a group of genetically defined diseases characterized by the association of red blood cell acanthocytosis and progressive degeneration of the basal ganglia. NA syndromes are exceptionally rare with an estimated prevalence of less than 1 to 5 per 1'000'000 inhabitants for each disorder. The core NA syndromes include autosomal recessive chorea-acanthocytosis and X-linked McLeod syndrome which have a Huntington's disease-like phenotype consisting of a choreatic movement disorder, psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline, and additional multi-system features including myopathy and axonal neuropathy. In addition, cardiomyopathy may occur in McLeod syndrome. Acanthocytes are also found in a proportion of patients with autosomal dominant Huntington's disease-like 2, autosomal recessive pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and several inherited disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, namely abetalipoproteinemia (Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome) and hypobetalipoproteinemia leading to vitamin E malabsorption. The latter disorders are characterized by a peripheral neuropathy and sensory ataxia due to dorsal column degeneration, but movement disorders and cognitive impairment are not present. NA syndromes are caused by disease-specific genetic mutations. The mechanism by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration is not known. The association of the acanthocytic membrane abnormality with selective degeneration of the basal ganglia, however, suggests a common pathogenetic pathway. Laboratory tests include blood smears to detect acanthocytosis and determination of serum creatine kinase. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate striatal atrophy. Kell and Kx blood group antigens are reduced or absent in McLeod syndrome. Western blot for chorein demonstrates absence of this protein in red blood cells of chorea-acanthocytosis patients. Specific genetic testing is possible in all NA syndromes. Differential diagnoses

  1. Gerstmann's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Benton, A L

    1992-05-01

    Recent case reports describe the occurrence of a more or less pure Gerstmann syndrome in association with a focal lesion in the posterior perisylvian territory of the brain's left hemisphere. In addition, an electrocortical stimulation study reported the Gerstmann symptom combination and a number of other symptom combinations on stimulation of small areas in the left posterior parietotemporal cortex. The neuropsychological implications of these and other recent findings are considered in light of the variety of "syndromes" produced by lesions in this region, the rare occurrence of Gerstmann's syndrome, and its appearance as a consequence of lesions in diverse cerebral areas.

  2. Rapunzel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Altonbary, Ahmed Youssef; Bahgat, Monir Hussein

    2015-01-01

    Bezoars are concretions of human or vegetable fibers that accumulate in the gastrointestinal tract. Trichobezoars are common in patients with underlying psychiatric disorders who chew and swallow their own hair. Rapunzel syndrome is a rare form of gastric trichobezoar with a long tail extending into the small bowel. This syndrome was first described in 1968 by Vaughan et al. and since then till date just 64 cases have been described in the literature. We present the only documented case with Rapunzel syndrome in Egypt. PMID:27847892

  3. Inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus and regional odontodysplasia: A rare sorority

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, S. M. Ravi; Gupta, Swati; Kamarthi, Nagaraju; Goel, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal nevi are hamartomatous lesion and its association with other developmental defects particularly of the central nervous system, eye and skeletal system are well recognized. We report a rare case of inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus syndrome along with regional odontodysplasia; and to the best of our knowledge this is the second case reported in the literature. PMID:26752881

  4. [Leeching in the treatment of chronic inflammatory and dystrophic diseases of the salivary glands].

    PubMed

    Abal'masov, D V; Afanas'ev, V V; Pozharitskaia, M M

    2003-01-01

    Twenty patients with chronic inflammatory and dystrophic diseases of the salivary glands (sialadenitis, sialadenosis) were examined and treated using hirudotherapy. Positive clinical shifts were observed in 50% patients; the most pronounced therapeutic effect was observed in patients with sialadenosis. Hirudotherapy was ineffective in patients with chronic parenchymatous parotitis paralleled by Sjogren's syndrome.

  5. Neonatal Sepsis and Inflammatory Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Reis Machado, Juliana; Soave, Danilo Figueiredo; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; de Menezes, Liliana Borges; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida; Monteiro, Maria Luiza Gonçalves dos Reis; Antônia dos Reis, Marlene; Corrêa, Rosana Rosa Miranda; Celes, Mara Rúbia Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and its signs and symptoms are nonspecific, which makes the diagnosis difficult. The routinely used laboratory tests are not effective methods of analysis, as they are extremely nonspecific and often cause inappropriate use of antibiotics. Sepsis is the result of an infection associated with a systemic inflammatory response with production and release of a wide range of inflammatory mediators. Cytokines are potent inflammatory mediators and their serum levels are increased during infections, so changes from other inflammatory effector molecules may occur. Although proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines have been identified as probable markers of neonatal infection, in order to characterize the inflammatory response during sepsis, it is necessary to analyze a panel of cytokines and not only the measurement of individual cytokines. Measurements of inflammatory mediators bring new options for diagnosing and following up neonatal sepsis, thus enabling early treatment and, as a result, increased neonatal survival. By taking into account the magnitude of neonatal sepsis, the aim of this review is to address the role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of neonatal sepsis and its value as a diagnostic criterion. PMID:25614712

  6. [Anti-synthetase syndrome].

    PubMed

    Novak, Srdan

    2012-01-01

    Antysynthetase syndrome is considered as a group ofidiopathic inflammatory myositis with charcteristic serologic hallmark--antibodies which recognise the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetasses (ARS). Clinical picture of those patients contains myositis and/or intersticial lung disease (ILD) and/or arthritis and/or fever and/or Raynaud phenomenon and sometimes characteristic look of mechanic's hands. Myositis can be overt, sometimes even absent, while IBP is major cause of morbidity and determines the outcome of the disease. Untill now eight different any-synthetase autoantibodies are recognised, and most frequent are findings of anti-histidyl-tRNa synthetase antibodies. Patients with other ARS autoantibodies usually have severe ILD. Drug of choice are steroids in dosage of 1 mg/kg with immunosupresive agent (azatioprin or methotrexate) while in severe IBP cyclophosphamide is needed. Recently succsesful treatment with rituximab in combination with cyclophosphamide is reported.

  7. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mathey, Emily K; Pollard, John D

    2013-10-15

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is the commonest treatable neuropathy in the western world. Untreated it may result in severe disability but if diagnosed and treated early there is effective treatment for the majority of patients. Typical CIDP is readily recognised but the diagnosis of other subgroups can be more challenging. The pathology of polyradiculoneuropathies such as CIDP characteristically affects the most proximal regions of the peripheral nervous system, nerve roots and major plexuses. It is important to test these regions with electrodiagnostic studies since routine neurophysiology may not encounter regions of pathology. Although accepted as an autoimmune disorder with an underlying immunopathology involving T cell and B cell responses, there is no agreement on major target antigens; however recent studies have highlighted a role for molecules in non compact myelin which play an essential role in the formation and maintenance of the nodal structures and hence in the function of ion channels central to saltatory conduction. Controlled trials have proven the efficacy of corticosteroid, intravenous immunoglobulin and plasma exchange in the short term and intravenous immunoglobulin also in the long term. Immunosuppressive agents are widely used but their efficacy has not been proven in controlled trials. Recent trials have shown the importance of attempting treatment withdrawal in patients apparently in remission to conserve treatments that are very expensive and in short supply, since a significant proportion of patients may enter long lasting remission following short term therapy. For the relatively small group of patients who do not respond to these first line therapies new agents including monoclonal antibodies may have a role.

  8. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... during the development of the egg, sperm or embryo. Translocation Down syndrome is the only form of ... risk of passing along certain genetic conditions. The embryo is tested for genetic abnormalities before it's implanted ...

  9. Behcet's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Behcet's syndrome is a disease that involves vasculitis, which is inflammation of the blood vessels. It causes problems in many parts of the body. The ... National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  10. Hunter syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hunter syndrome is a disease in which long chains of sugar molecules (glycosaminoglycans, formerly called mucopolysaccharides ) are ... of the enzyme iduronate sulfatase. Without this enzyme, chains of sugar molecules build up in various body ...

  11. Horner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... birth Tumor of the hormonal and nervous systems (neuroblastoma) Unknown causes In some cases the cause of ... a tumor of the hormonal and nervous systems (neuroblastoma). There's no specific treatment for Horner syndrome. Often, ...

  12. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... a person is concentrating (like working on a computer) or relaxing (like listening to music). The type ... doctor who knows a lot about the nervous system). All kids who have Tourette syndrome have tics — ...

  13. Reye's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms such as confusion, seizures and loss of consciousness require emergency treatment. Early diagnosis and treatment of ... which can cause seizures, convulsions or loss of consciousness. The signs and symptoms of Reye's syndrome typically ...

  14. Tourette syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines are available to treat Tourette syndrome. The exact medicine that is used depends on the symptoms ... must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  15. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur in different parts of the body) can cause similar problems with cortisol balance. Common symptoms of Cushing's syndrome include upper body obesity, severe fatigue and muscle weakness, high blood pressure, ...

  16. HELLP syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... out of 1,000 pregnancies. In women with preeclampsia or eclampsia , the condition develops in 10 to ... have high blood pressure and are diagnosed with preeclampsia before they develop HELLP syndrome. In some cases, ...

  17. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help improve skills. They may include speech, physical, occupational, and/or educational therapy. With support and treatment, many people with Down syndrome live happy, productive lives. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  18. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a hormone that your adrenal gland makes. Sometimes, ... can cause your body to make too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome is rare. Some symptoms are Upper ...

  19. Aase syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... make ribosomal proteins) This condition is similar to Diamond-Blackfan anemia, and the 2 conditions should not ... chromosome 19 is found in some people with Diamond-Blackfan anemia. The anemia in Aase syndrome is ...

  20. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... do before that she or he can no longer do? How severe are your child's signs and ... as children become older — it's usually necessary throughout life. Treating Rett syndrome requires a team approach. Treatments ...

  1. Caplan syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... people with rheumatoid arthritis who have breathed in mining dust that contains coal. This lung disease is ... Caplan syndrome is caused by breathing in coal mining dust. This causes inflammation and can lead to ...

  2. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a condition in which your body's connective tissue is abnormal. Connective tissue helps support all parts of your body. It ... and develops. Marfan syndrome most often affects the connective tissue of the heart and blood vessels, eyes, bones, ...

  3. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood vessels, and other organs. One of these proteins is fibrillin. A problem with the ...

  4. Marfan syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... enable JavaScript. Marfan syndrome is a disorder of connective tissue. This is the tissue that strengthens the body's structures. Disorders of connective tissue affect the skeletal system, cardiovascular system, eyes, and ...

  5. Brown Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Does Brown syndrome cause eye problems besides abnormal eye movements? In the more severely affected cases of Brown ... acquired and congenital cases. In congenital cases, the eye movement problem is usually constant and unlikely to resolve ...

  6. Carcinoid syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... things such as blue cheese, chocolate, or red wine. Exams and Tests Most of these tumors are ... outlook is more favorable thanks to new treatment methods. Possible Complications Complications of carcinoid syndrome may include: ...

  7. Piriformis syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... the sciatic nerve. The syndrome, which affects more women than men, is uncommon. But when it occurs, it can cause sciatica . Causes The piriformis muscle is involved in nearly every movement you make with your lower body, from walking ...

  8. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... will probably do some painless exams — like taking measurements of the body, including an arm span. You ... doors" inside the heart that help direct the flow of blood). In someone with Marfan syndrome, those ...

  9. Metabolic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... obesity ). This body type may be described as "apple-shaped." Insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone produced ... Syndrome Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the ...

  10. Duane Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eye muscles. In Duane syndrome, the sixth cranial nerve that controls the lateral rectus muscle (the muscle ... abnormal innervation of a branch from the third cranial nerve, which normally controls the medial rectus muscle (the ...

  11. Menkes syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menkes syndrome, cells in the body can absorb copper, but they are unable to release it. It ... makes it hard for the body to distribute copper in food from the intestines into the bloodstream ...

  12. Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Eesha; Pandey, Ramesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of the connective tissue, with skeletal, ligamentous, orooculofacial, pulmonary, abdominal, neurological and the most fatal, cardiovascular manifestations. It has no cure but early diagnosis, regular monitoring and preventive lifestyle regimen ensure a good prognosis. However, the diagnosis can be difficult as it is essentially a clinical one, relying on family history, meticulous physical examination and investigation of involved organ systems. Patients of Marfan syndrome portray very typical physical and orofacial characteristics, suggesting obvious recognition, but due to variable phenotypic expression, cases often go unnoticed unless a full range of attributing features is apparent. Dental practitioners are very likely to encounter patients of Marfan syndrome at an early age as they frequently present for dental treatment. The present case report illustrates the preliminary screening of Marfan syndrome in a dental office followed by timely diagnosis and appropriate referrals. PMID:24336584

  13. Klinefelter syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Testosterone therapy may be prescribed. This can help: Grow body hair Improve appearance of muscles Improve concentration Improve mood and self esteem Increase energy and sex drive Increase strength Most men with this syndrome are not able to get ...

  14. Sjogren's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... to developing cavities if your mouth is dry. Yeast infections. People with Sjogren's syndrome are much more likely to develop oral thrush, a yeast infection in the mouth. Vision problems. Dry eyes ...

  15. Beals Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... have many of the skeletal (bone) and aortic enlargement problems as people with Marfan syndrome, and treatments ... appearance to the top of the ear Aortic enlargement and/or mitral valve regurgitation (occasionally) People with ...

  16. [Mobius syndrome].

    PubMed

    Vladuţiu, Cristina; Duma, Ionela

    2012-01-01

    Mobius syndrom, an anomaly in cranial nerve developement, presents with a remarkable clinical polymorphism. The rare occurence of this pathology and the questions raised by the diagnosis and treatment determined us to make this presentation.

  17. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... turnersyndrome. html • Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institutes of Child Health & Human Development (NIH): www. nichd. nih. gov/ health/ topics/ Turner_ Syndrome. cfm • Mayo Clinic: www. mayoclinic. com/ health/ turner- ...

  18. Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Cushing syndrome have: Round, red, full face ( moon face ) Slow growth rate (in children) Weight gain ... constitute endorsements of those other sites. Copyright 1997-2017, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial ...

  19. Systemic Inflammatory Response and Severe Thrombocytopenia after Endovascular Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Silvestrin, Valentina; Bonvini, Stefano; Antonello, Michele; Grego, Franco; Vettor, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    After Endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm, a systemic inflammatory response, named postimplantation syndrome, can develop. This syndrome is characterized by fever, leukocytosis, and elevated CRP plasma levels and its pathogenetic mechanisms are still unknown. Although this syndrome generally resolves within few days, some patients develop a persisting severe inflammatory reaction leading to mild or severe complications. Here we describe the case of a male patient who developed postimplantation inflammatory syndrome and severe thrombocytopenia after endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm. Treatment with prednisone (50 mg/bid) for two weeks did not improve the clinical and laboratory findings. We utilized danazol, a weak androgen that has been shown to be effective in the treatment of immune and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and after 12 days of treatment with danazol (200 mg/bid), the patient improved progressively and platelet number increased up to 53,000/μL. Patients undergoing endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm should be carefully monitored for the development of postimplantation syndrome. This clinical condition is relatively common after the endovascular repair of aortic aneurysm but is rarely observed after endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms. The different known therapeutical approaches are still empiric, with reported beneficial effects with the use of NSAID, corticosteroids, and danazol. PMID:28154580

  20. [HELLP syndrome].

    PubMed

    Filipowicz, Ewa; Staszków, Monika

    2015-01-01

    HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelet count) is a relatively rare complication of pregnancy. It usually develops in the IIId trimester or after delivery. HELLP syndrome is associated with increased maternal (placental abruption, disseminated intravascular coagulation, hepatic hematomas and rupture, and acute kidney injury) and neonatal (prematurity, low birth weight) risk complications. In this article the diagnosis, clinical picture and treatment of this disease have been shortly reviewed.

  1. SAPHO syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Sueli; Sampaio-Barros, Percival D

    2013-05-01

    SAPHO syndrome is a disorder characterized by Synovitis, Acne, Pustulosis, Hyperostosis, and Osteitis. As the osteoarticular and skin manifestations often do not occur simultaneously and there are no validated diagnostic criteria, the diagnosis can be difficult. Clinical and imaging investigation is necessary to establish the many differential diagnoses of SAPHO syndrome. The etiopathogenesis involves infectious (probably Propionibacterium acnes), immunologic, and genetic factors. Treatment is based on information gathered from case reports and small series, and is related to specific skin or articular symptoms.

  2. Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Amy E; Allanson, Judith E; Tartaglia, Marco; Gelb, Bruce D

    2013-01-26

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic multisystem disorder characterised by distinctive facial features, developmental delay, learning difficulties, short stature, congenital heart disease, renal anomalies, lymphatic malformations, and bleeding difficulties. Mutations that cause Noonan syndrome alter genes encoding proteins with roles in the RAS-MAPK pathway, leading to pathway dysregulation. Management guidelines have been developed. Several clinically relevant genotype-phenotype correlations aid risk assessment and patient management. Increased understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease could help development of pharmacogenetic treatments.

  3. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Matĕjovic, M; Novák, I; Srámek, V; Rokyta, R; Hora, P; Nalos, M

    1999-04-26

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the general term used for severe acute respiratory failure of diverse aetiology. It is associated with a high morbidity, mortality (50-70%), and financial costs. Regardless of aetiology, the basic pathogenesis of ARDS is a systemic inflammatory response leading to a diffuse inflammatory process that involves both lungs, thus causing diffuse alveolar and endothelial damage with increased pulmonary capillary permeability and excessive extravascular lung water accumulation. ARDS is commonly associated with sepsis and multiple organ failure. The clinical picture involves progressive hypoxaemia, radiographic evidence of pulmonary oedema, decreased lung compliance and pulmonary hypertension. Despite the scientific and technological progress in critical care medicine, there is no specific ARDS therapy available at the moment and its management remains supportive. Therapeutic goals include resolution of underlying conditions, maintenance of acceptable gas exchange and tissue oxygenation and prevention of iatrogenic lung injury. Many new specific therapeutic strategies have been developed, however, most of them require further scientific evaluation. The paper reviews definition, basic pathogenesis and pathophysiology of ARDS and discusses current concepts of therapeutic possibilities of ARDS.

  4. Macrophage polarization in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Cun; Zou, Xian-Biao; Chai, Yan-Fen; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Diversity and plasticity are two hallmarks of macrophages. M1 macrophages (classically activated macrophages) are pro-inflammatory and have a central role in host defense against infection, while M2 macrophages (alternatively activated macrophages) are associated with responses to anti-inflammatory reactions and tissue remodeling, and they represent two terminals of the full spectrum of macrophage activation. Transformation of different phenotypes of macrophages regulates the initiation, development, and cessation of inflammatory diseases. Here we reviewed the characters and functions of macrophage polarization in infection, atherosclerosis, obesity, tumor, asthma, and sepsis, and proposed that targeting macrophage polarization and skewing their phenotype to adapt to the microenvironment might hold great promise for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  5. Cardiac Syndrome X

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kawasaki Disease Long Q-T Syndrome Marfan Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Mitral Valve Prolapse Myocardial Bridge Myocarditis Obstructive Sleep Apnea Pericarditis Peripheral Vascular Disease Rheumatic Fever Sick Sinus Syndrome Silent Ischemia Stroke Sudden ...

  6. Russell-Silver syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Silver-Russell syndrome; Silver syndrome; RSS; Russell-Silver syndrome ... Organization for Rare Disorders -- rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/russell-silver-syndrome NIH/NLM Genetics Home Reference -- ghr. ...

  7. Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome) is a memory disorder that results from vitamin B1 deficiency and is associated with alcoholism. Korsakoff's syndrome damages ... syndrome) is a memory disorder that results from vitamin B1 deficiency and is associated with alcoholism. Korsakoff's syndrome damages ...

  8. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Metabolic Syndrome? Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of ... that may play a role in causing metabolic syndrome. Outlook Metabolic syndrome is becoming more common due to a ...

  9. Accelerated atherosclerosis in patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatologic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jison; Maron, David J; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Weyand, Cornelia M

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a complex inflammatory disease involving aberrant immune and tissue healing responses, which begins with endothelial dysfunction and ends with plaque development, instability and rupture. The increased risk for coronary artery disease in patients with rheumatologic diseases highlights how aberrancy in the innate and adaptive immune system may be central to development of both disease states and that atherosclerosis may be on a spectrum of immune-mediated conditions. Recognition of the tight association between chronic inflammatory disease and complications of atherosclerosis will impact the understanding of underlying pathogenic mechanisms and change diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in patients with rheumatologic syndromes as well as patients with coronary artery disease. In this review, we provide a summary of the role of the immune system in atherosclerosis, discuss the proposed mechanisms of accelerated atherosclerosis seen in association with rheumatologic diseases, evaluate the effect of immunosuppression on atherosclerosis and provide updates on available risk assessment tools, biomarkers and imaging modalities. PMID:27042216

  10. Osteoarthritis as an inflammatory disease (osteoarthritis is not osteoarthrosis!).

    PubMed

    Berenbaum, F

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) has long been considered a "wear and tear" disease leading to loss of cartilage. OA used to be considered the sole consequence of any process leading to increased pressure on one particular joint or fragility of cartilage matrix. Progress in molecular biology in the 1990s has profoundly modified this paradigm. The discovery that many soluble mediators such as cytokines or prostaglandins can increase the production of matrix metalloproteinases by chondrocytes led to the first steps of an "inflammatory" theory. However, it took a decade before synovitis was accepted as a critical feature of OA, and some studies are now opening the way to consider the condition a driver of the OA process. Recent experimental data have shown that subchondral bone may have a substantial role in the OA process, as a mechanical damper, as well as a source of inflammatory mediators implicated in the OA pain process and in the degradation of the deep layer of cartilage. Thus, initially considered cartilage driven, OA is a much more complex disease with inflammatory mediators released by cartilage, bone and synovium. Low-grade inflammation induced by the metabolic syndrome, innate immunity and inflammaging are some of the more recent arguments in favor of the inflammatory theory of OA and highlighted in this review.

  11. Develop Anti-Inflammatory Nanotherapies to Treat Cardiovascular Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jun

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of disease-related death in the world, accounting for 30 % global mortality. The majority of CVD is caused by atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease of major arteries featured by the deposition of lipids and cholesterol. Inflammation of atherosclerosis is mainly promoted by the pathological macrophages and monocytes, and modulating their functions has been proposed as a promising therapeutic target. This dissertation first presents the development of a novel simvastatin-loaded high-density lipoprotein (HDL) based nanoparticle ([S]-rHDL), which was able to deliver anti-inflammatory simvastatin preferentially to inflammatory monocytes in the blood and to macrophages in advanced atherosclerotic plaques, leading to the reduced inflammation in the tissue. Second, extensive in vivo characterization of [S]-rHDL in a mouse atherosclerosis model revealed that the anti-inflammatory capability of [S]-rHDL derived from its effects on blood monocytes, endothelial layer, monocyte recruitment, and plaque macrophage function. Third, a translational study that integrated the use of [S]-rHDL into oral statin treatment demonstrated a great potential for this nanomedicine as an attractive addition to the current high-dose oral statin standard-of-care for acute coronary syndrome. Finally, preliminary results suggested potential applications of the rHDL platform to other macrophage-implicated diseases.

  12. The Pathogenesis of ACLF: The Inflammatory Response and Immune Function.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Although systemic inflammation is a hallmark of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF), its role in the development of this syndrome is poorly understood. Here the author first summarizes the general principles of the inflammatory response. Inflammation can be triggered by exogenous or endogenous inducers. Important exogenous inducers include bacterial products such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and virulence factors. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns elicit inflammation through structural feature recognition (using innate pattern-recognition receptors [PRRs]), whereas virulence factors generally trigger inflammation via functional feature recognition. Endogenous inducers are called danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and include molecules released by necrotic cells and products of extracellular matrix breakdown. Danger-associated molecular patterns use different PRRs. The purpose of the inflammatory response may differ according to the type of stimulus: The aim of infection-induced inflammation is to decrease pathogen burden, whereas the DAMP-induced inflammation aims to promote tissue repair. An excessive inflammatory response can induce collateral tissue damage (a process called immunopathology). However immunopathology may not be the only mechanism of tissue damage; for example, organ failure can develop because of failed disease tolerance. In this review, the author also discusses how general principles of the inflammatory response can help us to understand the development of ACLF in different contexts: bacterial infection, severe alcoholic hepatitis, and cases in which there is no identifiable trigger.

  13. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Carpal tunnel syndrome is a collection of clinical symptoms and signs caused by compression of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. However, the severity of symptoms and signs does not often correlate well with the extent of nerve compression. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments, non-drug treatments, and surgical treatments for carpal tunnel syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to October 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 33 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: carpal tunnel release surgery (open and endoscopic), diuretics, local corticosteroids injection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), therapeutic ultrasound, and wrist splints.

  14. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Carpal tunnel syndrome is a neuropathy caused by compression of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. However, the severity of symptoms and signs does not often correlate well with the extent of nerve damage. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments, non-drug treatments, surgical treatments, and postoperative treatments for carpal tunnel syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 53 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, carpal tunnel release surgery (open and endoscopic), diuretics, internal neurolysis, local and systemic corticosteroids, massage therapy, nerve and tendon gliding exercises, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), pyridoxine, therapeutic ultrasound, and wrist splints. PMID:21718565

  15. Medial tibial stress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reshef, Noam; Guelich, David R

    2012-04-01

    MTSS is a benign, though painful, condition, and a common problem in the running athlete. It is prevalent among military personnel, runners, and dancers, showing an incidence of 4% to 35%. Common names for this problem include shin splints, soleus syndrome, tibial stress syndrome, and periostitis. The exact cause of this condition is unknown. Previous theories included an inflammatory response of the periosteum or periosteal traction reaction. More recent evidence suggests a painful stress reaction of bone. The most proven risk factors are hyperpronation of the foot, female sex, and history of previous MTSS. Patient evaluation is based on meticulous history taking and physical examination. Even though the diagnosis remains clinical, imaging studies, such as plain radiographs and bone scans are usually sufficient, although MRI is useful in borderline cases to rule out more significant pathology. Conservative treatment is almost always successful and includes several options; though none has proven more superior to rest. Prevention programs do not seem to influence the rate of MTSS, though shock-absorbing insoles have reduced MTSS rates in military personnel, and ESWT has shortened the duration of symptoms. Surgery is rarely indicated but has shown some promising results in patients who have not responded to all conservative options.

  16. Sepsis, systemic inflammatory response, and multiple organ dysfunction: the mystery continues.

    PubMed

    Fry, Donald E

    2012-01-01

    Human sepsis is thought to be systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) that is activated by invasive infection. The multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) is the identified failure of critical organ function in patients that have sustained SIRS. Because SIRS and MODS are consequences of the excessive activation of inflammation, extensive research and numerous clinical trials have pursued treatments that would modify the inflammatory response. This presentation reviews the normal local mechanisms of inflammation and provides a theoretical framework for the transition of the inflammatory process to a systemic level. Clinical trials with biomodulators to block or inhibit inflammation have generally failed to improve the outcomes in patients with severe sepsis, septic shock, and MODS. The role of counter-inflammatory signaling and the newer concept of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway are being investigated, and newer hypotheses are focusing upon the balancing of proinflammatory and counter-inflammatory mechanisms as important directions for newer therapies. It is concluded that failure to define novel and effective treatments reflects fundamental gaps in our understanding of inflammation and its regulation.

  17. Helpful or harmful? Potential effects of exercise on select inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jennifer L

    2013-11-01

    Inflammation has been characterized as a double-edged sword, requiring a balance between health as maintained by regular exercise and activities that would exacerbate inflammatory diseases. The influence of exercise on inflammation is complex and has been widely studied in both healthy patient populations as well as populations of patients with many inflammatory and/or autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Inflammatory markers can be affected by the type of exercise and muscle contraction, as well as the intensity, duration, and consistency of the exercise sessions. Because of these potentially important effects, many members of the general public, as well as some clinicians, believe that exercise could exacerbate symptoms and accelerate the progression of such conditions. The effects of different types of exercise have been studied among patients with inflammatory conditions such as ankylosing spondylitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia, and idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, as well as congestive heart failure, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome, which are considered low-grade systemic inflammatory diseases. This review will help exercise professionals and clinicians understand the effects of exercise on inflammatory markers, as well as offer effective treatment options and recommendations for patients exercising with rheumatic or inflammatory conditions.

  18. SAPHO syndrome in childhood. A case report.

    PubMed

    Vargas Pérez, Manuel; Sevilla Pérez, Belén

    2016-12-16

    The acronym of SAPHO syndrome (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis) combines a cluster of cutaneous and musculoskeletal manifestations, such as hyperostosis of bones of the anterior chest wall associated with acne fulminans and hidradenitis suppurativa. There are no validated diagnostic criteria in children. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are not always sufficient, and the use of corticosteroids, disease-modifying agents, tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors or bisphosphonates may be necessary. We present the case of a child with polyarticular involvement, osteoarthritis of the sternoclavicular joint with severe inflammatory disorders and acne conglobata, with an excellent response to intravenous pamidronate.

  19. Reconstruction magnetic resonance neurography in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Kazumoto; Sugiyama, Atsuhiko; Ito, Sho-ichi; Misawa, Sonoko; Sekiguchi, Yukari; Mitsuma, Satsuki; Iwai, Yuta; Watanabe, Keisuke; Shimada, Hitoshi; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Suhara, Tetsuya; Yokota, Hajime; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-02-01

    To study distribution and patterns of nerve hypertrophy in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), magnetic resonance neurography with 3-dimensional reconstruction of short tau inversion recovery images was performed in 33 patients. This technique clearly showed longitudinal morphological changes from the cervical roots to the nerve trunks in the proximal arm. Nerve enlargement was detected in 88% of the patients. According to the clinical subtype of CIDP, typical CIDP patients showed symmetric and root-dominant hypertrophy, whereas Lewis-Sumner syndrome patients had multifocal fusiform hypertrophy in the nerve trunks. The patterns of nerve hypertrophy presumably reflect the different pathophysiology of each CIDP subtype.

  20. Peeling skin syndrome: Current status.

    PubMed

    Garg, Kshitij; Singh, Devesh; Mishra, Devesh

    2010-03-15

    Peeling Skin Syndrome (PSS) is a rare genodermatoses characterized by asymptomatic, localized or generalized, continuous exfoliation of the stratum corneum; it may present at birth or in adulthood. We describe a patient having the type A non-inflammatory variant of PSS showing asymptomatic and continuous skin peeling from the neck, trunk, back, and extremities. Friction appeared to be an aggravating factor, but there was no seasonal variation. Histopathology in this condition reveals hyperkeratosis and splitting of the epidermis between the granular layer and the stratum corneum. No treatment for this disorder has been found to be effective so far.

  1. Haglund's syndrome. Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Jiménez Martín, Florencio; Alonso Valdazo, María Dolores; Díaz Peña, Gara; Fernández Leroy, Julia; Hernández Herrero, David; Díaz García, Fermín

    Haglund's syndrome produces posterior impingement of the heel, which is caused by a posterosuperior calcaneal exostosis, known as Haglund's deformity, associated with Achilles tendinitis and retrocalcaneal bursitis. Its pathogenesis is unknown. We report two cases that were diagnosed clinically and confirmed radiographically. One patient was treated conservatively and the other underwent surgery. The diagnosis is based on clinical signs and radiological images, using the measurement of the parallel pitch lines, in a lateral radiograph of the ankle. Initial treatment is usually conservative and includes anti-inflammatory or analgesic agents, physiotherapy and low-heeled, open-heeled shoes. If conservative treatment does not relieve the pain, surgery may be necessary.

  2. Focal, steroid responsive myositis causing dropped head syndrome.

    PubMed

    Biran, I; Cohen, O; Diment, J; Peyser, A; Bahnof, R; Steiner, I

    1999-06-01

    The dropped head syndrome, which occurs in a variety of neuromuscular disorders, is usually not due to an inflammatory process and generally either self-limited or nonresponsive to therapy. We present an 80-year-old woman who developed progressive neck weakness over a few months due to a focal and restricted inflammatory process involving the neck extensor muscles. She responded dramatically to treatment with immunosuppressive therapy.

  3. Pyogenic Arthritis, Pyoderma Gangrenosum, Acne, Suppurative Hidradenitis (PA-PASH) Syndrome: An Atypical Presentation of a Rare Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ursani, Mohammad A.; Appleyard, Joan; Whiteru, Onome

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 44 Final Diagnosis: PAPASH syndrome Symptoms: Recurrent skin ulcers • diarrhea • inflammatory arthritis Medication: Prednisone • anti-tumor necrosis factor Clinical Procedure: N/A Specialty: Rheumatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum (PG), acne, and suppurative hidradenitis (PA-PASH) syndrome has been linked to an auto-inflammatory pathway. We report a case that is an atypical presentation of a rare syndrome, which supports literature suggesting that different phenotypes of PG-related syndromes may be a variation of the same pathogenic spectrum. Interestingly, our patient displayed a positive proteinase-3 antibody (PR-3). The clinical relevance of this is unclear. In recent literature, antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) positivity has been reported in various inflammatory conditions other than ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). Case Report: A 44-year-old African American male with history of pyogenic arthritis, acne, suppurative hidradenitis, and chronic diarrhea presented for evaluation of painful ulcers located on the bilateral lower extremities, bilateral proximal interphalangeal joints, buttocks, and scrotum, and chronic diarrhea. Infectious etiologies for the ulcers were ruled out. Biopsy of an ulcer revealed PG. Colonoscopy revealed inflammation and ulceration with biopsy consistent with ulcerative colitis (UC). After treatment with prednisone, the ulcers healed within 4 weeks, and the chronic diarrhea resolved. Conclusions: Our patient displayed a variation of PA-PASH syndrome and UC. Previously reported cases of similar phenotypes of PG-related syndromes have not presented in this fashion. Furthermore, the literature does not report cases of PG-related syndromes with an elevation in PR-3 antibody. Elevation in PR-3 has been reported in various inflammatory disorders aside from AAV. The relevance of this is currently unclear. It may be possible that the milieus of these various

  4. [Personage-Turner syndrome--case report].

    PubMed

    Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Stepień, Adam; Staszewski, Jacek

    2011-08-01

    Personage-Turner syndrome or acute brachial radiculitis is rare syndrome. In typical cases it was manifested by strong pain of shoulder region and the weakness of muscles which are supplies by individual nerves or part of brachial plexus and in longer time with atrophy. Aetiology of this disease is unknown, probably on the autoimmuno-inflammatory background. Diagnosis is made on the typical clinical picture and in exclusion many illness with impairment brachial plexus. In presented case the course of disease as well as executed investigations suggested that discopathy could be the reason of paresis, however renewed estimation caused the change of the diagnosis.

  5. [Anticonvulsant Hypersensitivity Syndrome: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Valderrama Escudero, Felipe; Montoya González, Laura Elisa

    2014-01-01

    DRESS syndrome (skin reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) is an idiosyncratic drug reaction characterized by rash, fever, lymphadenopathy, and internal organ dysfunction. This case report is on a patient with bipolar affective disorder who presented with a systemic inflammatory response associated with the use of valproic acid, and an important activation of symptoms when used with other drugs with a different pharmacological action mechanism. The diagnosis of DRESS syndrome is primarily by exclusion, and its detection may be difficult, which could potentially become fatal for the patient.

  6. IL-1 blockade in autoinflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Adriana A; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2014-01-01

    Monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes present with excessive systemic inflammation including fever, rashes, arthritis, and organ-specific inflammation and are caused by defects in single genes encoding proteins that regulate innate inflammatory pathways. Pathogenic variants in two interleukin-1 (IL-1)-regulating genes, NLRP3 and IL1RN, cause two severe and early-onset autoinflammatory syndromes, CAPS (cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes) and DIRA (deficiency of IL-1 receptor antagonist). The discovery of the mutations that cause CAPS and DIRA led to clinical and basic research that uncovered the key role of IL-1 in an extended spectrum of immune dysregulatory conditions. NLRP3 encodes cryopyrin, an intracellular "molecular sensor" that forms a multimolecular platform, the NLRP3 inflammasome, which links "danger recognition" to the activation of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β. The success and safety profile of drugs targeting IL -1 in the treatment of CAPS and DIRA have encouraged their wider use in other autoinflammatory syndromes including the classic hereditary periodic fever syndromes (familial Mediterranean fever, TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome, and hyperimmunoglobulinemia D with periodic fever syndrome) and additional immune dysregulatory conditions that are not genetically well defined, including Still's, Behcet's, and Schnitzler diseases. The fact that the accumulation of metabolic substrates such as monosodium urate, ceramide, cholesterol, and glucose can trigger the NLRP3 inflammasome connects metabolic stress to IL-1β-mediated inflammation and provides a rationale for therapeutically targeting IL-1 in prevalent diseases such as gout, diabetes mellitus, and coronary artery disease.

  7. Can Myelodysplastic Syndromes Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myelodysplastic Syndromes Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Myelodysplastic Syndromes Be Prevented? Since smoking is linked to the ... Syndromes? Can Myelodysplastic Syndromes Be Prevented? More In Myelodysplastic Syndromes About Myelodysplastic Syndromes Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  8. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    NBCC syndrome; Gorlin-Goltz syndrome; Basal cell nevus syndrome; BCNS; Basal cell cancer - nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome ... Nevoid basal cell carcinoma nevus syndrome is a rare genetic condition. The gene linked to the syndrome is known as PTCH (" ...

  9. Pfeiffer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vogels, Annick; Fryns, Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  10. Preexcitation Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Atul; Sra, Jasbir; Akhtar, Masood

    2016-03-01

    The classic electrocardiogram in Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is characterized by a short PR interval and prolonged QRS duration in the presence of sinus rhythm with initial slurring. The clinical syndrome associated with above electrocardiogram finding and the history of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia is referred to as Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Various eponyms describing accessory or anomalous conduction pathways in addition to the normal pathway are collectively referred to as preexcitation syndromes. The latter form and associated eponyms are frequently used in literature despite controversy and disagreements over their actual anatomical existence and electrophysiological significance. This communication highlights inherent deficiencies in the knowledge that has existed since the use of such eponyms began. With the advent of curative ablation, initially surgical, and then catheter based, the knowledge gaps have been mostly filled with better delineation of the anatomic and electrophysiological properties of anomalous atrioventricular pathways. It seems reasonable, therefore, to revisit the clinical and electrophysiologic role of preexcitation syndromes in current practice.

  11. Sheehan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Keleştimur, Fahrettin

    2003-01-01

    Sheehan's syndrome occurs as a result of ischemic pituitary necrosis due to severe postpartum hemorrhage. It may be rarely seen without massive bleeding or after normal delivery. Improvement in obstetric care and availability of rapid blood transfusion coincided with a remarkable reduction in the frequency of Sheehan's syndrome particularly in western society. But it has recently been reported more often from well-developed countries. It is one of the most common causes of hypopituitarism in underdeveloped or developing countries. Enlargement of pituitary gland, small sella size, disseminated intravascular coagulation and autoimmunity have been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of Sheehan's syndrome in women who suffer from severe postpartum hemorrhage. The patients may seek medical advice because of various presentations ranging from non-specific symptoms to coma and the clinical manifestation may change from one patient to another. Failure of postpartum lactation and failure to resume menses after delivery are the most common presenting symptoms. Although a small percentage of patients with Sheehan's syndrome may cause abrupt onset severe hypopituitarism immediately after delivery, most patients have a mild disease and go undiagnosed and untreated for a long time. It may result in partial or panhypopituitarism and GH is one of the hormones lost earliest. The great majority of the patients has empty sella on CT or MRI. Lymphocytic hypophysitis should be kept in mind in differential diagnosis. In this review, the old and recent data regarding Sheehan's syndrome are presented.

  12. Membranous glomerulonephritis and Landry-Guillain-Barre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Murphy, B F; Gonzales, M F; Ebeling, P; Fairley, K F; Kincaid-Smith, P

    1986-10-01

    Two cases of idiopathic membranous glomerulonephritis associated with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (Landry-Guillian-Barre syndrome) are described. In both of the patients, the onset of the nephrotic syndrome coincided with the development of severe ascending sensorimotor neuropathy. Although this association has previously been reported in four other isolated cases, it is not generally recognized by nephrologists and may be of significance in the future understanding of the immunopathogenesis of both diseases.

  13. Apert's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jyothsna, Mandapati; Ahmed, Syed Basheer; Sree Lakshmi, Ketham Reddy

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Apert's syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by craniosynostosis, midfacial malforma­tion and symmetrical syndactyly of hands and feet. Craniofacial deformities include cone-shaped calvarium, fat forehead, prop-tosis, hypertelorism and short nose with a bulbous tip. Intraoral findings include high arched palate with pseudocleft, maxillary transverse and sagittal hypoplasia with concomitant dental crowding, skeletal and dental anterior open bite and several retained primary teeth. We report one such case of 14-year-old boy having all the classical features of Apert's syndrome with particular emphasis on brief review of genetic features. How to cite this article: Kumar GR, Jyothsna M, Ahmed SB, Lakshmi KRS. Apert's Syndrome. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(1):69-72. PMID:25206244

  14. Compartment syndromes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  15. A Rare Case of Azathioprine-Induced Sweet's Syndrome in a Patient with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Salem, Chaker B; Larif, Sofiene; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Aounallah, Amina; Sakhri, Jaballah; Hmouda, Houssem

    2015-01-01

    Sweet's syndrome has been reported in association with inflammatory diseases such as Crohn's disease. It has also been reported in association with several drugs. Here, we report a rare case of Sweet's syndrome induced by azathioprine in a patient with Crohn's disease.

  16. One-step surgical approach of a thoracic aortic aneurysm in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bernabeu, Eduardo; Josa, Miguel; Nomdedeu, Benet; Ramírez, José; García-Valentín, Antonio; Mestres, Carlos A; Mulet, Jaime

    2007-04-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by infections, thrombocytopenia, and eczema. We present a 33-year-old man with this syndrome who underwent a one-stage ascending aorta, aortic arch and descending aortic aneurysm repair under moderate hypothermia and continuous visceral and cerebral perfusion. Histologic examination showed the presence of an aortitis with granulomatous inflammatory response and multinucleated cells.

  17. Theories of schizophrenia: a genetic-inflammatory-vascular synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Daniel R; Gottesman, Irving I

    2005-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia, a relatively common psychiatric syndrome, affects virtually all brain functions yet has eluded explanation for more than 100 years. Whether by developmental and/or degenerative processes, abnormalities of neurons and their synaptic connections have been the recent focus of attention. However, our inability to fathom the pathophysiology of schizophrenia forces us to challenge our theoretical models and beliefs. A search for a more satisfying model to explain aspects of schizophrenia uncovers clues pointing to genetically mediated CNS microvascular inflammatory disease. Discussion A vascular component to a theory of schizophrenia posits that the physiologic abnormalities leading to illness involve disruption of the exquisitely precise regulation of the delivery of energy and oxygen required for normal brain function. The theory further proposes that abnormalities of CNS metabolism arise because genetically modulated inflammatory reactions damage the microvascular system of the brain in reaction to environmental agents, including infections, hypoxia, and physical trauma. Damage may accumulate with repeated exposure to triggering agents resulting in exacerbation and deterioration, or healing with their removal. There are clear examples of genetic polymorphisms in inflammatory regulators leading to exaggerated inflammatory responses. There is also ample evidence that inflammatory vascular disease of the brain can lead to psychosis, often waxing and waning, and exhibiting a fluctuating course, as seen in schizophrenia. Disturbances of CNS blood flow have repeatedly been observed in people with schizophrenia using old and new technologies. To account for the myriad of behavioral and other curious findings in schizophrenia such as minor physical anomalies, or reported decreased rates of rheumatoid arthritis and highly visible nail fold capillaries, we would have to evoke a process that is systemic such as the vascular and immune/inflammatory

  18. Flammer syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The new term Flammer syndrome describes a phenotype characterized by the presence of primary vascular dysregulation together with a cluster of symptoms and signs that may occur in healthy people as well as people with disease. Typically, the blood vessels of the subjects with Flammer syndrome react differently to a number of stimuli, such as cold and physical or emotional stress. Nearly all organs, particularly the eye, can be involved. Although the syndrome has some advantages, such as protection against the development of atherosclerosis, Flammer syndrome also contributes to certain diseases, such as normal tension glaucoma. The syndrome occurs more often in women than in men, in slender people than in obese subjects, in people with indoor rather than outdoor jobs, and in academics than in blue collar workers. Affected subjects tend to have cold extremities, low blood pressure, prolonged sleep onset time, shifted circadian rhythm, reduced feeling of thirst, altered drug sensitivity, and increased general sensitivity, including pain sensitivity. The plasma level of endothelin-1 is slightly increased, and the gene expression in lymphocytes is changed. In the eye, the retinal vessels are stiffer and their spatial variability larger; the autoregulation of ocular blood flow is decreased. Glaucoma patients with Flammer syndrome have an increased frequency of the following: optic disc hemorrhages, activated retinal astrocytes, elevated retinal venous pressure, optic nerve compartmentalization, fluctuating diffuse visual field defects, and elevated oxidative stress. Further research should lead to a more concise definition, a precise diagnosis, and tools for recognizing people at risk. This may ultimately lead to more efficient and more personalized treatment. PMID:25075228

  19. Hemophagocytic syndrome: a dilemma chasing the intensivists

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Adriana Façanha; Fernandes, Iracema de Cassia Oliveira Ferreira; Goes, Patricia de Freitas; Bousso, Albert; Ferreira, Cristiane Rubia

    2015-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis or hemophagocytic syndrome is represented by an uncontrolled inflammatory response characterized by marked histiocyte activation and a cytokine storm. The entity may present a primary or genetic type, and the secondary type is usually triggered by infectious diseases of any kind, autoimmune disease, or neoplasia. This entity, although well described and with definite diagnostic criteria, still remains misdiagnosed because of the overlap presentation with other inflammatory processes. The authors present the case of a 13-year-old girl who was submitted to an appendicectomy complicated with a pericolic abscess, which required a second operation in order to be drained surgically. During the postoperative period of this second surgical procedure, the patient remained febrile, developing cytopenias, and multiple organ failure. Unfortunately, she died despite the efforts of the intensive care staff. The autopsy findings were characteristic of hemophagocytic syndrome. The authors report the case to call attention to this diagnosis whenever unexpected outcomes of infections are experienced. PMID:26484319

  20. Radiobiology of the acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Macià I Garau, Miquel; Lucas Calduch, Anna; López, Enric Casanovas

    2011-07-06

    ACUTE RADIATION SYNDROME OR ACUTE RADIATION SICKNESS IS CLASSICALLY SUBDIVIDED INTO THREE SUBSYNDROMES: the hematopoietic, gastrointestinal and neurovascular syndrome but many other tissues can be damaged. The time course and severity of clinical signs and symptoms are a function of the overall body volume irradiated, the inhomogeneity of dose exposure, the particle type, the absorbed dose and the dose rate. Classical pathophysiology explain the failure of each of these organs and the timing of appearance of their signs and symptoms due to radiation-induced cytocidal effects of a great number of parenchymal cells of hierarchically organized tissues. Contemporaneously, many other radiation-induced effects has been described and all of them may lead to tissue injury with their corresponding signs and symptoms that can be expressed after short or long period of time. Radiation-induced multi-organ involvement is thought to be due to radiation-induced systemic inflammatory response mediated by released pro-inflammatory cytokines.