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  1. Phenotypes of murine leukemia virus-induced tumors: influence of 3' viral coding sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Ott, D E; Keller, J; Sill, K; Rein, A

    1992-01-01

    Murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) induce leukemias and lymphomas in mice. We have used fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis to determine the hematopoietic phenotypes of tumor cells induced by a number of MuLVs. Tumor cells induced by ecotropic Moloney, amphotropic 4070A, and 10A1 MuLVs and by two chimeric MuLVs, Mo(4070A) and Mo(10A1), were examined with antibodies to 13 lineage-specific cell surface markers found on myeloid cell, T-cell, and B-cell lineages. The chimeric Mo(4070A) and Mo(10A1) MuLVs, consisting of Moloney MuLV with the carboxy half of the Pol region and nearly all of the Env region of 4070A and 10A1, respectively, were constructed to examine the possible influence of these sequences on Moloney MuLV-induced tumor cell phenotypes. In some instances, these phenotypic analyses were supplemented by Southern blot analysis for lymphoid cell-specific genomic DNA rearrangements at the immunoglobulin heavy-chain, the T-cell receptor gamma, and the T-cell receptor beta loci. The results of our analysis showed that Moloney MuLV, 4070A, Mo(4070A), and Mo(10A1) induced mostly T-cell tumors. Moloney MuLV and Mo(4070A) induced a wide variety of T-cell phenotypes, ranging from immature to mature phenotypes, while 4070A induced mostly prothymocyte and double-negative (CD4- CD8-) T-cell tumors. The tumor phenotypes obtained with 10A1 and Mo(10A1) were each less variable than those obtained with the other MuLVs tested. 10A1 uniformly induced a tumor consisting of lineage marker-negative cells that lack lymphoid cell-specific DNA rearrangements and histologically appear to be early undifferentiated erythroid cell-like precursors. The Mo(10A1) chimera consistently induced an intermediate T-cell tumor. The chimeric constructions demonstrated that while 4070A 3' pol and env sequences apparently did not influence the observed tumor cell phenotypes, the 10A1 half of pol and env had a strong effect on the phenotypes induced by Mo(10A1) that resulted in a phenotypic

  2. TWIST1 and TWIST2 promoter methylation and protein expression in tumor stroma influence the epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like tumor budding phenotype in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Galván, José A; Helbling, Melina; Koelzer, Viktor H; Tschan, Mario P; Berger, Martin D; Hädrich, Marion; Schnüriger, Beat; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Dawson, Heather; Inderbitzin, Daniel; Lugli, Alessandro; Zlobec, Inti

    2015-01-20

    Tumor budding in colorectal cancer is likened to an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) characterized predominantly by loss of E-cadherin and up-regulation of E-cadherin repressors like TWIST1 and TWIST2. Here we investigate a possible epigenetic link between TWIST proteins and the tumor budding phenotype. TWIST1 and TWIST2 promoter methylation and protein expression were investigated in six cell lines and further correlated with tumor budding in patient cohort 1 (n = 185). Patient cohort 2 (n = 112) was used to assess prognostic effects. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) of tumor epithelium and stroma from low- and high-grade budding cancers was performed. In colorectal cancers, TWIST1 and TWIST2 expression was essentially restricted to stromal cells. LCM results of a high-grade budding case show positive TWIST1 and TWIST2 stroma and no methylation, while the low-grade budding case was characterized by negative stroma and strong hypermethylation. TWIST1 stromal cell staining was associated with adverse features like more advanced pT (p = 0.0044), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.0301), lymphatic vessel invasion (p = 0.0373), perineural invasion (p = 0.0109) and worse overall survival time (p = 0.0226). Stromal cells may influence tumor budding in colorectal cancers through expression of TWIST1. Hypermethylation of the tumor stroma may represent an alternative mechanism for regulation of TWIST1.

  3. Stressful presentations: mild cold stress in laboratory mice influences phenotype of dendritic cells in naïve and tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Kokolus, Kathleen M; Spangler, Haley M; Povinelli, Benjamin J; Farren, Matthew R; Lee, Kelvin P; Repasky, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    The ability of dendritic cells (DCs) to stimulate and regulate T cells is critical to effective anti-tumor immunity. Therefore, it is important to fully recognize any inherent factors which may influence DC function under experimental conditions, especially in laboratory mice since they are used so heavily to model immune responses. The goals of this report are to 1) briefly summarize previous work revealing how DCs respond to various forms of physiological stress and 2) to present new data highlighting the potential for chronic mild cold stress inherent to mice housed at the required standard ambient temperatures to influence baseline DCs properties in naïve and tumor-bearing mice. As recent data from our group shows that CD8(+) T cell function is significantly altered by chronic mild cold stress and since DC function is crucial for CD8(+) T cell activation, we wondered whether housing temperature may also be influencing DC function. Here we report that there are several significant phenotypical and functional differences among DC subsets in naïve and tumor-bearing mice housed at either standard housing temperature or at a thermoneutral ambient temperature, which significantly reduces the extent of cold stress. The new data presented here strongly suggests that, by itself, the housing temperature of mice can affect fundamental properties and functions of DCs. Therefore differences in basal levels of stress due to housing should be taken into consideration when interpreting experiments designed to evaluate the impact of additional variables, including other stressors on DC function.

  4. Stressful Presentations: Mild Cold Stress in Laboratory Mice Influences Phenotype of Dendritic Cells in Naïve and Tumor-Bearing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kokolus, Kathleen M.; Spangler, Haley M.; Povinelli, Benjamin J.; Farren, Matthew R.; Lee, Kelvin P.; Repasky, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of dendritic cells (DCs) to stimulate and regulate T cells is critical to effective anti-tumor immunity. Therefore, it is important to fully recognize any inherent factors which may influence DC function under experimental conditions, especially in laboratory mice since they are used so heavily to model immune responses. The goals of this report are to 1) briefly summarize previous work revealing how DCs respond to various forms of physiological stress and 2) to present new data highlighting the potential for chronic mild cold stress inherent to mice housed at the required standard ambient temperatures to influence baseline DCs properties in naïve and tumor-bearing mice. As recent data from our group shows that CD8+ T cell function is significantly altered by chronic mild cold stress and since DC function is crucial for CD8+ T cell activation, we wondered whether housing temperature may also be influencing DC function. Here we report that there are several significant phenotypical and functional differences among DC subsets in naïve and tumor-bearing mice housed at either standard housing temperature or at a thermoneutral ambient temperature, which significantly reduces the extent of cold stress. The new data presented here strongly suggests that, by itself, the housing temperature of mice can affect fundamental properties and functions of DCs. Therefore differences in basal levels of stress due to housing should be taken into consideration when interpreting experiments designed to evaluate the impact of additional variables, including other stressors on DC function. PMID:24575090

  5. Aberrant PGE₂ metabolism in bladder tumor microenvironment promotes immunosuppressive phenotype of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Daurkin, Irina; Vieweg, Johannes; Daaka, Yehia; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2011-07-01

    Bladder cancer is associated with enhanced inflammation and characterized by deregulated prostanoid metabolism. Here we examined prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) metabolism and myeloid cell subsets that infiltrate tumor tissue using two xenograft models of human bladder cancer. Human bladder tumor xenografts implanted into athymic nude mice become highly infiltrated with host CD11b myeloid cells of bone marrow origin. Fast growing SW780 bladder tumor xenografts were infiltrated with heterogeneous CD11b myeloid cell subsets including tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In contrast, majority of myeloid cells in tumor tissue from slow growing bladder cancer Urothel 11 displayed more immature, homogenous phenotype and comprised mostly MHC II class-negative myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We demonstrate that human bladder tumors secrete substantial amounts of PGE₂. Normal bone marrow myeloid cell progenitors cultured in the presence of a bladder tumor-conditioned medium, which is enriched for PGE₂, failed to differentiate into mature APCs and acquired phenotype of the myeloid-derived suppressor cells or inflammatory macrophages with up-regulated chemokine receptor CXCR4. Collectively our data demonstrate that enhanced cancer-related inflammation and deregulated PGE₂ metabolism in tumor microenvironment promote immunosuppressive pro-tumoral phenotype of myeloid cells in bladder cancer. These data also suggest that not only local tumor microenvironment but other factors such as stage of cancer disease and pace of tumor growth could markedly influence the phenotype, differentiation and immune function of myeloid cells in tumor tissue.

  6. Microenvironment influence on human colon adenocarcinoma phenotypes and matrix metalloproteinase-2, p53 and β-catenin tumor expressions from identical monoclonal cell tumor in the orthotopic model in athymic nude rats.

    PubMed

    Priolli, Denise Gonçalves; Abrantes, Ana Margarida; Neves, Silvia; Gonçalves, Ana Cristina; Lopes, Camila Oliveira; Martinez, Natalia Peres; Cardinalli, Izilda Aparecida; Ribeiro, Ana Bela Sarmento; Botelho, Maria Filomena

    2014-03-01

    The present study aims to identify differences between left and right colon adenocarcinoma arising from identical clonal cell and to find out if microenvironment has any influence on matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2), p53 and β-catenin tumor expressions. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Rats (RNU) were submitted to cecostomy to obtain the orthotopic model of right colon tumor (n = 10), while for the left colon model (n = 10), a colon diversion and distal mucous fistula in the descending colon was used. Cultivated human colon adenocarcinoma cells (WiDr) were inoculated in stomas submucosa. Histopathological analysis, real-time reverse transcription-PCR for β-catenin, p53 and MMP2, as well as immunohistochemical analysis for p53 and β-catenin expression were conducted. Central tendency, variance analysis and the Livak delta-delta-CT method were used for statistical analysis, adopting a 5% significance level. RESULTS. All tumors from the left colon exhibited infiltrative ulceration, while in the right colon tumor growth was predominantly exophytic (67%). In the left colon, tumor growth was undifferentiated (100%), while it was moderately differentiated in the right colon (83%). In right colon tumors, MMP2, p53, and β-catenin gene expressions were higher than compared to left colon (p = 4.59354E-05, p = 0.0035179, p = 0.00093798, respectively, for MMP2, p53 and β-catenin). β-catenin and p53 results obtained by real-time polymerase chain reaction were confirmed by immunohistochemistry assay (p = 0.01 and p = 0.001, respectively, for β-catenin and p53). CONCLUSION. Left and right human colon adenocarcinomas developed in animal models have distinct phenotypes even when they have the same clonal origin. Microenvironment has influenced p53, β-catenin, and MMP2 expression in animal models of colon cancer.

  7. Nature and Nurture: What Determines Tumor Metabolic Phenotypes?

    PubMed

    Mayers, Jared R; Vander Heiden, Matthew G

    2017-06-15

    Understanding the genetic basis of cancer has led to therapies that target driver mutations and has helped match patients with more personalized drugs. Oncogenic mutations influence tumor metabolism, but other tumor characteristics can also contribute to their metabolic phenotypes. Comparison of isogenic lung and pancreas tumor models suggests that use of some metabolic pathways is defined by lineage rather than by driver mutation. Lung tumors catabolize circulating branched chain amino acids (BCAA) to extract nitrogen for nonessential amino acid and nucleotide synthesis, whereas pancreatic cancer obtains amino acids from catabolism of extracellular protein. These differences in amino acid metabolism translate into distinct pathway dependencies, as genetic disruption of the enzymes responsible for utilization of BCAA nitrogen limits the growth of lung tumors, but not pancreatic tumors. These data argue that some cancer metabolic phenotypes are defined by cancer tissue-of-origin and environment and that these features constrain the influence of genetic mutations on metabolism. A better understanding of the factors defining tumor nutrient utilization could be exploited to help improve cancer therapy. Cancer Res; 77(12); 3131-4. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Different cytokine and stimulation conditions influence the expansion and immune phenotype of third-generation chimeric antigen receptor T cells specific for tumor antigen GD2.

    PubMed

    Gargett, Tessa; Brown, Michael P

    2015-04-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells are a novel immunotherapy for cancer. To achieve anti-tumor efficacy, these cells must survive, expand, and persist after infusion into patients, functions that are reportedly best achieved by cells with a stem or central-memory rather than effector-memory phenotype. We have developed third-generation CAR T cells specific for the tumor-associated antigen GD2 for use in a phase I clinical trial. We investigated the optimal cell culture conditions for CAR T-cell production, and here we describe the relative effects of 3 activation and cytokine conditions on CAR T-cell expansion, effector function and phenotype. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were activated by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 or anti-CD3 and Retronectin. Activated cells were transduced with the CAR-encoding retroviral vector and expanded in either interleukin (IL)-2 or IL-7 and IL-15. Immune phenotype and expansion were tracked throughout the culture, and transduction efficiency, and subsequent GD2-specific effector functions were evaluated by flow cytometry and cytotoxic T lymphocytes assay. CD3/Retronectin stimulation with IL-2 resulted in poorer activation, expansion and Th1 cytokine secretion of CAR T cells than CD3/CD28 stimulation with either IL-2 or IL-7 and IL-15. However, CAR T cells cultured in CD3/CD28/IL7/IL-15 and CD3/Retronectin/IL-2 had superior cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity and a more stem-like phenotype. The combination of CD3 and CD28 with IL-7 and IL-15 gave the best balance of CAR T-cell expansion and potent GD2-specific effector functions while retaining a stem/memory phenotype, and these growth conditions will therefore be used to manufacture CAR T cells for our phase I clinical trial. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Wnt5a Suppresses Tumor Formation and Redirects Tumor Phenotype in MMTV-Wnt1 Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Easter, Stephanie L.; Mitchell, Elizabeth H.; Baxley, Sarah E.; Desmond, Renee; Frost, Andra R.; Serra, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Wnt5a is a non-canonical signaling Wnt that has been implicated in tumor suppression. We previously showed that loss of Wnt5a in MMTV-PyVmT tumors resulted in a switch in tumor phenotype resulting in tumors with increased basal phenotype and high Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The object of this study was to test the hypothesis that Wnt5a can act to inhibit tumors formed by activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. To this end, we characterized tumor and non-tumor mammary tissue from MMTV-Wnt1 and double transgenic MMTV-Wnt1;MMTV-Wnt5a mice. Wnt5a containing mice demonstrated fewer tumors with increased latency when compared to MMTV-Wnt1 controls. Expression of markers for basal-like tumors was down-regulated in the tumors that formed in the presence of Wnt5a indicating a phenotypic switch. Reduced canonical Wnt signaling was detected in double transgenic tumors as a decrease in active β-catenin protein and a decrease in Axin2 mRNA transcript levels. In non-tumor tissues, over-expression of Wnt5a in MMTV-Wnt1 mammary glands resulted in attenuation of phenotypes normally observed in MMTV-Wnt1 glands including hyperbranching and increased progenitor and basal cell populations. Even though Wnt5a could antagonize Wnt/β-catenin signaling in primary mammary epithelial cells in culture, reduced Wnt/β-catenin signaling was not detected in non-tumor MMTV-Wnt1;Wnt5a tissue in vivo. The data demonstrate that Wnt5a suppresses tumor formation and promotes a phenotypic shift in MMTV-Wnt1 tumors. PMID:25401739

  10. Wnt5a suppresses tumor formation and redirects tumor phenotype in MMTV-Wnt1 tumors.

    PubMed

    Easter, Stephanie L; Mitchell, Elizabeth H; Baxley, Sarah E; Desmond, Renee; Frost, Andra R; Serra, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Wnt5a is a non-canonical signaling Wnt that has been implicated in tumor suppression. We previously showed that loss of Wnt5a in MMTV-PyVmT tumors resulted in a switch in tumor phenotype resulting in tumors with increased basal phenotype and high Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The object of this study was to test the hypothesis that Wnt5a can act to inhibit tumors formed by activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. To this end, we characterized tumor and non-tumor mammary tissue from MMTV-Wnt1 and double transgenic MMTV-Wnt1;MMTV-Wnt5a mice. Wnt5a containing mice demonstrated fewer tumors with increased latency when compared to MMTV-Wnt1 controls. Expression of markers for basal-like tumors was down-regulated in the tumors that formed in the presence of Wnt5a indicating a phenotypic switch. Reduced canonical Wnt signaling was detected in double transgenic tumors as a decrease in active β-catenin protein and a decrease in Axin2 mRNA transcript levels. In non-tumor tissues, over-expression of Wnt5a in MMTV-Wnt1 mammary glands resulted in attenuation of phenotypes normally observed in MMTV-Wnt1 glands including hyperbranching and increased progenitor and basal cell populations. Even though Wnt5a could antagonize Wnt/β-catenin signaling in primary mammary epithelial cells in culture, reduced Wnt/β-catenin signaling was not detected in non-tumor MMTV-Wnt1;Wnt5a tissue in vivo. The data demonstrate that Wnt5a suppresses tumor formation and promotes a phenotypic shift in MMTV-Wnt1 tumors.

  11. Aberrant PGE2 metabolism in bladder tumor microenvironment promotes immunosuppressive phenotype of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Daurkin, Irina; Vieweg, Johannes; Daaka, Yehia; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2011-01-01

    Bladder cancer is associated with enhanced inflammation and characterized by deregulated prostanoid metabolism. Here we examined prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) metabolism and myeloid cell subsets that infiltrate tumor tissue using two xenograft models of human bladder cancer. Human bladder tumor xenografts implanted into athymic nude mice become highly infiltrated with host CD11b myeloid cells of bone marrow origin. Fast growing SW780 bladder tumor xenografts were infiltrated with heterogeneous CD11b myeloid cell subsets including tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In contrast, majority of myeloid cells in tumor tissue from slow growing bladder cancer Urothel 11 displayed more immature, homogenous phenotype and comprised mostly MHC II class-negative myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We demonstrate that human bladder tumors secrete substantial amounts of PGE2. Normal bone marrow myeloid cell progenitors cultured in the presence of a bladder tumor-conditioned medium, which is enriched for PGE2, failed to differentiate into mature APCs and acquired phenotype of the myeloid-derived suppressor cells or inflammatory macrophages with up-regulated chemokine receptor CXCR4. Collectively our data demonstrate that enhanced cancer-related inflammation and deregulated PGE2 metabolism in tumor microenvironment promote immunosuppressive pro-tumoral phenotype of myeloid cells in bladder cancer. These data also suggest that not only local tumor microenvironment but other factors such as stage of cancer disease and pace of tumor growth could markedly influence the phenotype, differentiation and immune function of myeloid cells in tumor tissue. PMID:21315786

  12. The Nurture of Tumors Can Drive Their Metabolic Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Schug, Zachary T; Vande Voorde, Johan; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2016-03-08

    Many commonly accepted principles in tumor metabolism rely on in vitro studies performed under conditions which cannot faithfully recapitulate tumor heterogeneity. Davidson et al. (2016), in this issue of Cell Metabolism, and Hensley et al. (2016) find that the in vivo environment dictates the metabolic phenotype of lung tumors in patients and mouse models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Stochastic phenotypic interconversion in tumors can generate heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Simone, Giuseppina

    2017-03-01

    Phenotype variations define heterogeneity in biological and molecular systems, and play a crucial mechanistic role, and heterogeneity has been demonstrated in tumor cells. In this work, cells from blood of patients affected by colon cancer were analyzed and sorted using a microfluidic assay based on galactose-active moieties and incubated for culturing in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Based on the results of these experiments, a model based on Markov theory is implemented and discussed to explain the equilibrium existing between phenotypes of cell subpopulations sorted using the microfluidic assay. In combination with the experimental results, the model has many implications for tumor heterogeneity; For example, it displays interconversion of phenotypes, confirming the experiments. Such interconversion generates metastatic cells and implies that targeting circulating tumor cells (CTC) will not be an efficient method for prevention of tumor recurrence. Most importantly, understanding the transitions between cell phenotypes in the cell population can improve understanding of tumor generation and growth.

  14. Matrix stiffening promotes a tumor vasculature phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Bordeleau, Francois; Mason, Brooke N.; Lollis, Emmanuel Macklin; Mazzola, Michael; Zanotelli, Matthew R.; Somasegar, Sahana; Califano, Joseph P.; Montague, Christine; LaValley, Danielle J.; Huynh, John; Mencia-Trinchant, Nuria; Negrón Abril, Yashira L.; Hassane, Duane C.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Weiss, Robert S.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2017-01-01

    Tumor microvasculature tends to be malformed, more permeable, and more tortuous than vessels in healthy tissue, effects that have been largely attributed to up-regulated VEGF expression. However, tumor tissue tends to stiffen during solid tumor progression, and tissue stiffness is known to alter cell behaviors including proliferation, migration, and cell–cell adhesion, which are all requisite for angiogenesis. Using in vitro, in vivo, and ex ovo models, we investigated the effects of matrix stiffness on vessel growth and integrity during angiogenesis. Our data indicate that angiogenic outgrowth, invasion, and neovessel branching increase with matrix cross-linking. These effects are caused by increased matrix stiffness independent of matrix density, because increased matrix density results in decreased angiogenesis. Notably, matrix stiffness up-regulates matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, and inhibiting MMPs significantly reduces angiogenic outgrowth in stiffer cross-linked gels. To investigate the functional significance of altered endothelial cell behavior in response to matrix stiffness, we measured endothelial cell barrier function on substrates mimicking the stiffness of healthy and tumor tissue. Our data indicate that barrier function is impaired and the localization of vascular endothelial cadherin is altered as function of matrix stiffness. These results demonstrate that matrix stiffness, separately from matrix density, can alter vascular growth and integrity, mimicking the changes that exist in tumor vasculature. These data suggest that therapeutically targeting tumor stiffness or the endothelial cell response to tumor stiffening may help restore vessel structure, minimize metastasis, and aid in drug delivery. PMID:28034921

  15. Genetic and phenotypic diversity in breast tumor metastases.

    PubMed

    Almendro, Vanessa; Kim, Hee Jung; Cheng, Yu-Kang; Gönen, Mithat; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Argani, Pedram; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Sukumar, Saraswati; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-03-01

    Metastatic disease is the main cause of cancer-related mortality due to almost universal therapeutic resistance. Despite its high clinical relevance, our knowledge of how cancer cell populations change during metastatic progression is limited. Here, we investigated intratumor genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity during metastatic progression of breast cancer. We analyzed cellular genotypes and phenotypes at the single cell level by performing immunoFISH in intact tissue sections of distant metastatic tumors from rapid autopsy cases and from primary tumors and matched lymph node metastases collected before systemic therapy. We calculated the Shannon index of intratumor diversity in all cancer cells and within phenotypically distinct cell populations. We found that the extent of intratumor genetic diversity was similar regardless of the chromosomal region analyzed, implying that it may reflect an inherent property of the tumors. We observed that genetic diversity was highest in distant metastases and was generally concordant across lesions within the same patient, whereas treatment-naïve primary tumors and matched lymph node metastases were frequently genetically more divergent. In contrast, cellular phenotypes were more discordant between distant metastases than primary tumors and matched lymph node metastases. Diversity for 8q24 was consistently higher in HER2(+) tumors compared with other subtypes and in metastases of triple-negative tumors relative to primary sites. We conclude that our integrative method that couples ecologic models with experimental data in human tissue samples could be used for the improved prognostication of patients with cancer and for the design of more effective therapies for progressive disease. ©2014 AACR

  16. Influence of tumors on protective anti-tumor immunity and the effects of irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Foulds, Gemma A.; Radons, Jürgen; Kreuzer, Mira; Multhoff, Gabriele; Pockley, Alan G.

    2012-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immunity plays important roles in the development and progression of cancer and it is becoming apparent that tumors can influence the induction of potentially protective responses in a number of ways. The prevalence of immunoregulatory T cell populations in the circulation and tumors of patients with cancer is increased and the presence of these cells appears to present a major barrier to the induction of tumor immunity. One aspect of tumor-mediated immunoregulation which has received comparatively little attention is that which is directed toward natural killer (NK) cells, although evidence that the phenotype and function of NK cell populations are modified in patients with cancer is accumulating. Although the precise mechanisms underlying these localized and systemic immunoregulatory effects remain unclear, tumor-derived factors appear, in part at least, to be involved. The effects could be manifested by an altered function and/or via an influence on the migratory properties of individual cell subsets. A better insight into endogenous immunoregulatory mechanisms and the capacity of tumors to modify the phenotype and function of innate and adaptive immune cells might assist the development of new immunotherapeutic approaches and improve the management of patients with cancer. This article reviews current knowledge relating to the influence of tumors on protective anti-tumor immunity and considers the potential influence that radiation-induced effects might have on the prevalence, phenotype, and function of innate and adaptive immune cells in patients with cancer. PMID:23378947

  17. Abrupt transitions to tumor extinction: a phenotypic quasispecies model.

    PubMed

    Sardanyés, Josep; Martínez, Regina; Simó, Carles; Solé, Ricard

    2016-10-06

    The dynamics of heterogeneous tumor cell populations competing with healthy cells is an important topic in cancer research with deep implications in biomedicine. Multitude of theoretical and computational models have addressed this issue, especially focusing on the nature of the transitions governing tumor clearance as some relevant model parameters are tuned. In this contribution, we analyze a mathematical model of unstable tumor progression using the quasispecies framework. Our aim is to define a minimal model incorporating the dynamics of competition between healthy cells and a heterogeneous population of cancer cell phenotypes involving changes in replication-related genes (i.e., proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes), in genes responsible for genomic stability, and in house-keeping genes. Such mutations or loss of genes result into different phenotypes with increased proliferation rates and/or increased genomic instabilities. Despite bifurcations in the classical deterministic quasispecies model are typically given by smooth, continuous shifts (i.e., transcritical bifurcations), we here identify a novel type of bifurcation causing an abrupt transition to tumor extinction. Such a bifurcation, named as trans-heteroclinic, is characterized by the exchange of stability between two distant fixed points (that do not collide) involving tumor persistence and tumor clearance. The increase of mutation and/or the decrease of the replication rate of tumor cells involves this catastrophic shift of tumor cell populations. The transient times near bifurcation thresholds are also characterized, showing a power law dependence of exponent [Formula: see text] of the transients as mutation is changed near the bifurcation value. These results are discussed in the context of targeted cancer therapy as a possible therapeutic strategy to force a catastrophic shift by simultaneously delivering mutagenic and cytotoxic drugs inside tumor cells.

  18. Human Tumor-Infiltrating Myeloid Cells: Phenotypic and Functional Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Louise A.; Doherty, Glen A.; Sheahan, Kieran; Ryan, Elizabeth J.

    2017-01-01

    Our current understanding of human tumor-resident myeloid cells is, for the most part, based on a large body of work in murine models or studies enumerating myeloid cells in patient tumor samples using immunohistochemistry (IHC). This has led to the establishment of the theory that, by and large, tumor-resident myeloid cells are either “protumor” M2 macrophages or myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). This concept has accelerated our understanding of myeloid cells in tumor progression and enabled the elucidation of many key regulatory mechanisms involved in cell recruitment, polarization, and activation. On the other hand, this paradigm does not embrace the complexity of the tumor-resident myeloid cell phenotype (IHC can only measure 1 or 2 markers per sample) and their possible divergent function in the hostile tumor microenvironment. Here, we examine the criteria that define human tumor-infiltrating myeloid cell subsets and provide a comprehensive and critical review of human myeloid cell nomenclature in cancer. We also highlight new evidence characterizing their contribution to cancer pathogenesis based on evidence derived from clinical studies drawing comparisons with murine studies where necessary. We then review the mechanisms in which myeloid cells are regulated by tumors in humans and how these are being targeted therapeutically. PMID:28220123

  19. The influence of the microenvironment on the malignant phenotype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C. C.; Bissell, M. J.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.

    2000-01-01

    Normal tissue homeostasis is maintained by dynamic interactions between epithelial cells and their microenvironment. As tissue becomes cancerous, there are reciprocal interactions between neoplastic cells, adjacent normal cells such as stroma and endothelium, and their microenvironments. The current dominant paradigm wherein multiple genetic lesions provide both the impetus for, and the Achilles heel of, cancer might be inadequate to understand cancer as a disease process. In the following brief review, we will use selected examples to illustrate the influence of the microenvironment in the evolution of the malignant phenotype. We will also discuss recent studies that suggest novel therapeutic interventions might be derived from focusing on microenvironment and tumor cells interactions.

  20. The influence of the microenvironment on the malignant phenotype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C. C.; Bissell, M. J.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.

    2000-01-01

    Normal tissue homeostasis is maintained by dynamic interactions between epithelial cells and their microenvironment. As tissue becomes cancerous, there are reciprocal interactions between neoplastic cells, adjacent normal cells such as stroma and endothelium, and their microenvironments. The current dominant paradigm wherein multiple genetic lesions provide both the impetus for, and the Achilles heel of, cancer might be inadequate to understand cancer as a disease process. In the following brief review, we will use selected examples to illustrate the influence of the microenvironment in the evolution of the malignant phenotype. We will also discuss recent studies that suggest novel therapeutic interventions might be derived from focusing on microenvironment and tumor cells interactions.

  1. [Breast cancer in Morocco: phenotypic profile of tumors].

    PubMed

    Khalil, Ahmadaye Ibrahim; Bendahhou, Karima; Mestaghanmi, Houriya; Saile, Rachid; Benider, Abdellatif

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is most common in women and it is among the leading causes of cancer related deaths. The curability of this type of tumor is increasing thanks to screening programs and treatment advances which have certainly enhanced patient survival. But challenges remain, particularly in respect of phenotypic instability of cancer cells. The aim of this study was to analyse the phenotypic profile of breast cancer in patients treated at Mohammed VI Cancer Treatment Center over the years 2013-2014. We conducted a cross-sectional study over a two-year period, including the cases of breast cancer treated in our Center. Data were collected from patients medical records and analyzed using Epi Info software. 1277 patients were treated in our Center. 99.5% were females, mean age 50.20 ± 11.34 years. The most common histological type was invasive ductal carcinoma (80.7% of cases). It was diagnosed at an early stage (56,9%). The most common molecular phenotype was luminal A (41.4% of cases). Luminal B, HER2 and triple negatives occurred in 10.4%, 6.3%, 11.2% of cases respectively. The study of tumor phenotype in patients with breast cancer helps clinician make treatment choice and policy makers implement programs against this disease.

  2. Age at Diagnosis of Pheochromocytoma Differs According to Catecholamine Phenotype and Tumor Location

    PubMed Central

    Timmers, Henri J.; Lenders, Jacques W.M.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Tiebel, Oliver; Mannelli, Massimo; King, Kathryn S.; Vocke, Cathy D.; Linehan, W. Marston; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Pacak, Karel

    2011-01-01

    Context: Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PPGLs) are diagnosed earlier in patients with hereditary than sporadic disease. Whether other factors influence age at diagnosis is unclear. Objective: We examined ages at which PPGLs were diagnosed according to different catecholamine phenotypes and locations of tumors. Design & Setting: Retrospective multicenter study. Patients: Patients with PPGLs included 172 with and 183 without identified germline mutations or hereditary syndromes. Biochemical Measurements: Differences in plasma concentrations of metanephrine, a metabolite of epinephrine, were used to distinguish epinephrine-producing tumors from those lacking epinephrine production. Results: Patients with epinephrine-producing tumors were diagnosed 11 yr later (P < 0.001) than those with tumors lacking appreciable epinephrine production. Among patients without evidence of a hereditary condition, those with and without epinephrine-producing tumors had respective mean ± se ages of 50 ± 2 and 42 ± 2 yr (P < 0.001) at diagnosis. Patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 and neurofibromatosis type 1, all with epinephrine-producing tumors, were similarly diagnosed with disease at a later age than patients with tumors that lacked appreciable epinephrine production secondary to mutations of von Hippel-Lindau and succinate dehydrogenase genes (40 ± 2 vs. 31 ± 1 yr, P < 0.001). Among the latter patients, those with multifocal tumors were diagnosed earlier than those with solitary tumors (19 ± 3 vs. 34 ± 2 yr, P < 0.001). Conclusions: The variations in ages at diagnosis associated with different tumor catecholamine phenotypes and locations suggest origins of PPGLs from different chromaffin progenitor cells with variable susceptibility to disease causing mutations. Different optimal age cut-offs for mutation testing are indicated for patients with and without epinephrine-producing tumors (44–49 vs. 30–35 yr, respectively). PMID:21147885

  3. Tumor-Specific Microsatellite Instability: Do Distinct Mechanisms Underlie the MSI-L and EMAST Phenotypes?

    PubMed Central

    Hile, Suzanne E.; Shabashev, Samion; Eckert, Kristin A.

    2012-01-01

    Microsatellite DNA sequences display allele length alterations or microsatellite instability (MSI) in tumor tissues, and MSI is used diagnostically for tumor detection and classification. We discuss the known types of tumor-specific MSI patterns and the relevant mechanisms underlying each pattern. Mutation rates of individual microsatellites vary greatly, and the intrinsic DNA features of motif size, sequence, and length contribute to this variation. MSI is used for detecting mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient tumors, which display an MSI-High phenotype due to genome-wide microsatellite destabilization. Because several pathways maintain microsatellite stability, tumors that have undergone other events associated with moderate genome instability may display diagnostic MSI only at specific mono-, di- or tetranucleotide markers. We summarize evidence for such alternative MSI forms (A-MSI) in sporadic cancers, also referred to as MSI-Low and EMAST. While the existence of A-MSI is not disputed, there is disagreement about the origin and pathologic significance of this phenomenon. Although ambiguities due to PCR methods may be a source, evidence exists for other mechanisms to explain tumor-specific A-MSI. Some portion of A-MSI tumors may result from random mutational events arising during neoplastic cell evolution. However, this mechanism fails to explain the specificity of A-MSI for di- and tetranucleotide instability. We present evidence supporting the alternative argument that some A-MSI tumors arise by a distinct genetic pathway, and give examples of DNA metabolic pathways that, when altered, may be responsible for instability at specific microsatellite motifs. Finally, we suggest that A-MSI in tumors could be molecular signatures of environmental influences and DNA damage. Importantly, A-MSI occurs in several preneoplastic inflammatory states, including inflammatory bowel diseases, consistent with a role of oxidative stress in A-MSI. Understanding the biochemical basis

  4. Epigenetic states of cells of origin and tumor evolution drive tumor-initiating cell phenotype and tumor heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Chow, Kin-Hoe; Shin, Dong-Mi; Jenkins, Molly H; Miller, Emily E; Shih, David J; Choi, Seungbum; Low, Benjamin E; Philip, Vivek; Rybinski, Brad; Bronson, Roderick T; Taylor, Michael D; Yun, Kyuson

    2014-09-01

    A central confounding factor in the development of targeted therapies is tumor cell heterogeneity, particularly in tumor-initiating cells (TIC), within clinically identical tumors. Here, we show how activation of the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) pathway in neural stem and progenitor cells creates a foundation for tumor cell evolution to heterogeneous states that are histologically indistinguishable but molecularly distinct. In spontaneous medulloblastomas that arise in Patched (Ptch)(+/-) mice, we identified three distinct tumor subtypes. Through cell type-specific activation of the SHH pathway in vivo, we determined that different cells of origin evolved in unique ways to generate these subtypes. Moreover, TICs in each subtype had distinct molecular and cellular phenotypes. At the bulk tumor level, the three tumor subtypes could be distinguished by a 465-gene signature and by differential activation levels of the ERK and AKT pathways. Notably, TICs from different subtypes were differentially sensitive to SHH or AKT pathway inhibitors, highlighting new mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapies. In summary, our results show how evolutionary processes act on distinct cells of origin to contribute to tumoral heterogeneity, at both bulk tumor and TIC levels.

  5. Crosstalk between glial and glioblastoma cells triggers the "go-or-grow" phenotype of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ana Isabel; Anjo, Sandra I; Vieira de Castro, Joana; Serra, Sofia C; Salgado, António J; Manadas, Bruno; Costa, Bruno M

    2017-10-02

    Glioblastoma (GBM), the most malignant primary brain tumor, leads to poor and unpredictable clinical outcomes. Recent studies showed the tumor microenvironment has a critical role in regulating tumor growth by establishing a complex network of interactions with tumor cells. In this context, we investigated how GBM cells modulate resident glial cells, particularly their paracrine activity, and how this modulation can influence back on the malignant phenotype of GBM cells. Conditioned media (CM) of primary mouse glial cultures unexposed (unprimed) or exposed (primed) to the secretome of GL261 GBM cells were analyzed by proteomic analysis. Additionally, these CM were used in GBM cells to evaluate their impact in glioma cell viability, migration capacity and activation of tumor-related intracellular pathways. The proteomic analysis revealed that the pre-exposure of glial cells to CM from GBM cells led to the upregulation of several proteins related to inflammatory response, cell adhesion and extracellular structure organization within the secretome of primed glial cells. At the functional levels, CM derived from unprimed glial cells favored an increase in GBM cell migration capacity, while CM from primed glial cells promoted cells viability. These effects on GBM cells were accompanied by activation of particular intracellular cancer-related pathways, mainly the MAPK/ERK pathway, which is a known regulator of cell proliferation. Together, our results suggest that glial cells can impact on the pathophysiology of GBM tumors, and that the secretome of GBM cells is able to modulate the secretome of neighboring glial cells, in a way that regulates the "go-or-grow" phenotypic switch of GBM cells.

  6. Tumor-specific microsatellite instability: do distinct mechanisms underlie the MSI-L and EMAST phenotypes?

    PubMed

    Hile, Suzanne E; Shabashev, Samion; Eckert, Kristin A

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellite DNA sequences display allele length alterations or microsatellite instability (MSI) in tumor tissues, and MSI is used diagnostically for tumor detection and classification. We discuss the known types of tumor-specific MSI patterns and the relevant mechanisms underlying each pattern. Mutation rates of individual microsatellites vary greatly, and the intrinsic DNA features of motif size, sequence, and length contribute to this variation. MSI is used for detecting mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient tumors, which display an MSI-high phenotype due to genome-wide microsatellite destabilization. Because several pathways maintain microsatellite stability, tumors that have undergone other events associated with moderate genome instability may display diagnostic MSI only at specific di- or tetranucleotide markers. We summarize evidence for such alternative MSI forms (A-MSI) in sporadic cancers, also referred to as MSI-low and EMAST. While the existence of A-MSI is not disputed, there is disagreement about the origin and pathologic significance of this phenomenon. Although ambiguities due to PCR methods may be a source, evidence exists for other mechanisms to explain tumor-specific A-MSI. Some portion of A-MSI tumors may result from random mutational events arising during neoplastic cell evolution. However, this mechanism fails to explain the specificity of A-MSI for di- and tetranucleotide instability. We present evidence supporting the alternative argument that some A-MSI tumors arise by a distinct genetic pathway, and give examples of DNA metabolic pathways that, when altered, may be responsible for instability at specific microsatellite motifs. Finally, we suggest that A-MSI in tumors could be molecular signatures of environmental influences and DNA damage. Importantly, A-MSI occurs in several pre-neoplastic inflammatory states, including inflammatory bowel diseases, consistent with a role of oxidative stress in A-MSI. Understanding the biochemical basis of A

  7. Clinicopathological characteristics of duodenal epithelial neoplasms: Focus on tumors with a gastric mucin phenotype (pyloric gland-type tumors)

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuishi, Takehiro; Hamatani, Shigeharu; Hirooka, Shinichi; Fukasawa, Nei; Aizawa, Daisuke; Hara, Yuko; Dobashi, Akira; Goda, Kenichi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Saruta, Masayuki; Urashima, Mitsuyoshi; Ikegami, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    Objective Epithelial tumors less commonly occur in the duodenum than in the stomach or large intestine. The clinicopathological characteristics of duodenal epithelial tumors remain a matter of debate. We therefore studied resected specimens to investigate the clinicopathological characteristics of duodenal epithelial tumors. Materials and methods Among duodenal epithelial tumors resected endoscopically or surgically in our hospital, we studied the clinicopathological characteristics of 110 adenomas or intramucosal carcinomas. The grade of atypia of all tumors was classified into 3 groups according to the World Health Organization (WHO) 2010 classification. The tumors were immunohistochemically evaluated to determine the frequency of differentiation toward fundic glands. Results As for patient characteristics, there were 76 men (75.2%) and 25 women (24.8%), with a median age of 65 years (range, 34 to 84). The tumors most commonly arose in the first to second part of the duodenum. Many lesions were flat, and the median tumor diameter was 8.0 mm. The lesions were classified into 2 types according to mucin phenotype: intestinal-type tumors (98 lesions, 89.1%) and gastric-type tumors (12 lesions, 10.9%). Intestinal-type tumors were subdivided into 2 groups: tubular-type tumors (91 lesions, 82.7%) and tubulovillous-type tumors (7 lesions, 6.4%). Gastric-type tumors were classified into 2 types: foveolar type (3 lesions, 2.7%) and pyloric gland-type (PG) tumors (9 lesions, 8.2%). The grade of atypia was significantly higher in gastric-type tumors (p<0.01). PG tumors were gastric-type tumors characterized by pyloric glands and findings suggesting differentiation toward fundic glands. Conclusions About 10% of the duodenal tumors had a gastric-type mucin phenotype. Gastric-type tumors showed high-grade atypia. In particular, PG tumors showed similarities to PG tumors of the stomach, such as differentiation toward fundic glands. PMID:28376132

  8. Reproducibility of radiomics for deciphering tumor phenotype with imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Binsheng; Tan, Yongqiang; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Qi, Jing; Xie, Chuanmiao; Lu, Lin; Schwartz, Lawrence H

    2016-03-24

    Radiomics (radiogenomics) characterizes tumor phenotypes based on quantitative image features derived from routine radiologic imaging to improve cancer diagnosis, prognosis, prediction and response to therapy. Although radiomic features must be reproducible to qualify as biomarkers for clinical care, little is known about how routine imaging acquisition techniques/parameters affect reproducibility. To begin to fill this knowledge gap, we assessed the reproducibility of a comprehensive, commonly-used set of radiomic features using a unique, same-day repeat computed tomography data set from lung cancer patients. Each scan was reconstructed at 6 imaging settings, varying slice thicknesses (1.25 mm, 2.5 mm and 5 mm) and reconstruction algorithms (sharp, smooth). Reproducibility was assessed using the repeat scans reconstructed at identical imaging setting (6 settings in total). In separate analyses, we explored differences in radiomic features due to different imaging parameters by assessing the agreement of these radiomic features extracted from the repeat scans reconstructed at the same slice thickness but different algorithms (3 settings in total). Our data suggest that radiomic features are reproducible over a wide range of imaging settings. However, smooth and sharp reconstruction algorithms should not be used interchangeably. These findings will raise awareness of the importance of properly setting imaging acquisition parameters in radiomics/radiogenomics research.

  9. Reproducibility of radiomics for deciphering tumor phenotype with imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Binsheng; Tan, Yongqiang; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Qi, Jing; Xie, Chuanmiao; Lu, Lin; Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    2016-03-01

    Radiomics (radiogenomics) characterizes tumor phenotypes based on quantitative image features derived from routine radiologic imaging to improve cancer diagnosis, prognosis, prediction and response to therapy. Although radiomic features must be reproducible to qualify as biomarkers for clinical care, little is known about how routine imaging acquisition techniques/parameters affect reproducibility. To begin to fill this knowledge gap, we assessed the reproducibility of a comprehensive, commonly-used set of radiomic features using a unique, same-day repeat computed tomography data set from lung cancer patients. Each scan was reconstructed at 6 imaging settings, varying slice thicknesses (1.25 mm, 2.5 mm and 5 mm) and reconstruction algorithms (sharp, smooth). Reproducibility was assessed using the repeat scans reconstructed at identical imaging setting (6 settings in total). In separate analyses, we explored differences in radiomic features due to different imaging parameters by assessing the agreement of these radiomic features extracted from the repeat scans reconstructed at the same slice thickness but different algorithms (3 settings in total). Our data suggest that radiomic features are reproducible over a wide range of imaging settings. However, smooth and sharp reconstruction algorithms should not be used interchangeably. These findings will raise awareness of the importance of properly setting imaging acquisition parameters in radiomics/radiogenomics research.

  10. Reproducibility of radiomics for deciphering tumor phenotype with imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Binsheng; Tan, Yongqiang; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Qi, Jing; Xie, Chuanmiao; Lu, Lin; Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    2016-01-01

    Radiomics (radiogenomics) characterizes tumor phenotypes based on quantitative image features derived from routine radiologic imaging to improve cancer diagnosis, prognosis, prediction and response to therapy. Although radiomic features must be reproducible to qualify as biomarkers for clinical care, little is known about how routine imaging acquisition techniques/parameters affect reproducibility. To begin to fill this knowledge gap, we assessed the reproducibility of a comprehensive, commonly-used set of radiomic features using a unique, same-day repeat computed tomography data set from lung cancer patients. Each scan was reconstructed at 6 imaging settings, varying slice thicknesses (1.25 mm, 2.5 mm and 5 mm) and reconstruction algorithms (sharp, smooth). Reproducibility was assessed using the repeat scans reconstructed at identical imaging setting (6 settings in total). In separate analyses, we explored differences in radiomic features due to different imaging parameters by assessing the agreement of these radiomic features extracted from the repeat scans reconstructed at the same slice thickness but different algorithms (3 settings in total). Our data suggest that radiomic features are reproducible over a wide range of imaging settings. However, smooth and sharp reconstruction algorithms should not be used interchangeably. These findings will raise awareness of the importance of properly setting imaging acquisition parameters in radiomics/radiogenomics research. PMID:27009765

  11. MSC and Tumors: Homing, Differentiation, and Secretion Influence Therapeutic Potential.

    PubMed

    D'souza, Naomi; Burns, Jorge Sans; Grisendi, Giulia; Candini, Olivia; Veronesi, Elena; Piccinno, Serena; Horwitz, Edwin M; Paolucci, Paolo; Conte, Pierfranco; Dominici, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    : Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) are adult multipotent progenitors with fibroblast-like morphology able to differentiate into adipocytic, osteogenic, chondrogenic, and myogenic lineages. Due to these properties, MSC have been studied and introduced as therapeutics in regenerative medicine. Preliminary studies have also shown a possible involvement of MSC as precursors of cellular elements within tumor microenvironments, in particular tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAF). Among a number of different possible origins, TAF may originate from a pool of circulating progenitors from bone marrow or adipose tissue-derived MSC. There is growing evidence to corroborate that cells immunophenotypically defined as MSC are able to reside as TAF influencing the tumor microenvironment in a potentially bi-phasic and obscure manner: either promoting or inhibiting growth depending on tumor context and MSC sources. Here we focus on relationships between the tumor microenvironment, cancer cells, and MSC, analyzing their diverse ability to influence neoplastic development. Associated activities include MSC homing driven by the secretion of various mediators, differentiation towards TAF phenotypes, and reciprocal interactions with the tumor cells. These are reviewed here with the aim of understanding the biological functions of MSC that can be exploited for innovative cancer therapy.

  12. Factors influencing laboratory animal spontaneous tumor profiles.

    PubMed

    Hardisty, J F

    1985-01-01

    In chemical carcinogenicity and drug-safety testing, a carcinogen is defined as an agent that when administered by an appropriate route causes an increased incidence of tumors in experimental animals as compared to unexposed control animals. Although a carcinogen may cause the appearance of tumors in organs where tumors do not usually occur in a given strain, the usual response is to increase the types of tumors seen spontaneously and to shorten the period of latency. The use of carcinogenesis experiments for research and safety assessment requires properly designed and well-conducted experiments and a knowledge of background data and variations in tumor incidences of control animals. Many factors can influence the reported incidences of spontaneous tumors. These include species, strain, sex, age, and source of the experimental test animal; study duration; extent of the pathology examination; dietary and environmental conditions; qualifications and experience of the study pathologist; diagnostic criteria and nomenclature conventions; and quality assurance and review procedures. This paper discusses several factors which may influence the incidence of tumors in control and test animals, and provides examples to illustrate the potential for these factors to affect the data.

  13. Mouse Genetic Background Influences the Dental Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Konicki, William S.; Wright, J. Timothy; Suggs, Cynthia; Xue, Hui; Kuehl, Melissa A.; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; Gibson, Carolyn W.

    2014-01-01

    Dental enamel covers the crown of the vertebrate tooth and is considered to be the hardest tissue in the body. Enamel develops during secretion of an extracellular matrix by ameloblast cells in the tooth germ, prior to eruption of the tooth into the oral cavity. Secreted enamel proteins direct mineralization patterns during the maturation stage of amelogenesis as the tooth prepares to erupt. The amelogenins are the most abundant enamel proteins, and are required for normal enamel development. Phenotypic differences were observed between incisors from individual Amelx (Amelogenin) null mice that had a mixed 129xC57BL/6J genetic background, and between inbred wld-type (WT) mice with different genetic backgrounds (C57BL/6J, C3H/HEJ, FVB/NJ). We hypothesized this could be due to modifier genes, as human patients with a mutation in an enamel protein gene causing the enamel defect amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) also can have varied appearance of dentitions within a kindred. Enamel density measurements varied for all WT inbred strains midway during incisor development. Enamel thickness varied between some WT strains and, unexpectedly, dentin density varied extensively between incisors and molars of all WT and Amelx null strains studied. WT FVB/NJ incisors were more similar to Amelx null than to the other WT strains in incisor height/weight ratio and pattern of enamel mineralization. Strain-specific differences led to the conclusion that modifier genes may be implicated in determining both normal development and severity of enamel appearance in AI mouse models and may in future studies be related to phenotypic heterogeneity within human AI kindreds reported in the literature. PMID:24732779

  14. Elusive Identities and Overlapping Phenotypes of Proangiogenic Myeloid Cells in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Lewis, Claire E.; Naldini, Luigi; Brown, J. Martin; Ferrara, Napoleone; De Palma, Michele

    2010-01-01

    It is now established that bone marrow–derived myeloid cells regulate tumor angiogenesis. This was originally inferred from studies of human tumor biopsies in which a positive correlation was seen between the number of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, such as macrophages and neutrophils, and tumor microvessel density. However, unequivocal evidence was only provided once mouse models were used to examine the effects on tumor angiogenesis by genetically or pharmacologically targeting myeloid cells. Since then, identifying the exact myeloid cell types involved in this process has proved challenging because of myeloid cell heterogeneity and the expression of overlapping phenotypic markers in tumors. As a result, investigators often simply refer to them now as “bone marrow–derived myeloid cells.” Here we review the findings of various attempts to phenotype the myeloid cells involved and discuss the therapeutic implications of correctly identifying—and thus being able to target—this proangiogenic force in tumors. PMID:20167863

  15. Elusive identities and overlapping phenotypes of proangiogenic myeloid cells in tumors.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Lewis, Claire E; Naldini, Luigi; Brown, J Martin; Ferrara, Napoleone; De Palma, Michele

    2010-04-01

    It is now established that bone marrow-derived myeloid cells regulate tumor angiogenesis. This was originally inferred from studies of human tumor biopsies in which a positive correlation was seen between the number of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, such as macrophages and neutrophils, and tumor microvessel density. However, unequivocal evidence was only provided once mouse models were used to examine the effects on tumor angiogenesis by genetically or pharmacologically targeting myeloid cells. Since then, identifying the exact myeloid cell types involved in this process has proved challenging because of myeloid cell heterogeneity and the expression of overlapping phenotypic markers in tumors. As a result, investigators often simply refer to them now as "bone marrow-derived myeloid cells." Here we review the findings of various attempts to phenotype the myeloid cells involved and discuss the therapeutic implications of correctly identifying-and thus being able to target-this proangiogenic force in tumors.

  16. Gastrointestinal pacemaker cell tumor (GIPACT): gastrointestinal stromal tumors show phenotypic characteristics of the interstitial cells of Cajal.

    PubMed Central

    Kindblom, L. G.; Remotti, H. E.; Aldenborg, F.; Meis-Kindblom, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    The interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) form a complex cell network within the gastrointestinal tract wall where they function as a pacemaker system. Expression of the kit proto-oncogene is essential for the development of this system. The aim of our study was to examine the hypothesis that gastrointestinal stromal tumors differentiate toward cells with an ICC phenotype. Ultrastructurally, 58 stromal tumors were characterized and found to share many features with ICC. Seventy-eight stromal tumors were immunophenotyped, particularly with regard to the kit receptor. All 78 tumors revealed strong, homogeneous immunoreactivity for the kit receptor as did ICC of adjacent and control gastrointestinal walls. Focal hyperplasia and hypertrophy of kit receptor positive cells were also observed in the gastrointestinal wall adjacent to the tumors. CD34 immunoreactivity observed in interstitial cells surrounding Auerbach's ganglia suggests that a subpopulation of ICC is CD34 positive and may explain why 56 of 78 stromal tumors were CD34 positive. Thirty control tumors, including gastrointestinal leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas, were all negative for the kit receptor. We conclude that gastrointestinal stromal tumors show striking morphological and immunophenotypic similarities with ICC and that they may originate from stem cells that differentiate toward a pacemaker cell phenotype. We propose that the noncommittal name "gastrointestinal stromal tumor" be replaced by gastrointestinal pacemaker cell tumor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:9588894

  17. Phenotypic quality influences fertility in Gombe chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Jones, James Holland; Wilson, Michael L.; Murray, Carson; Pusey, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Summary Fertility is an important fitness component, but is difficult to measure in slowly reproducing, long-lived animals such as chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).We measured fertility and the effect of measured covariates on fertility in a 43-year sample of birth intervals of chimpanzees from the Gombe National Park, Tanzania using Cox proportional hazards regression with individual-level random effects.The birth hazard declined with mothers’ age at a rate of 0·84 per year following age at first reproduction. This value is somewhat stronger than previous estimates.Loss of the infant that opened the birth interval increased the birth hazard 134-fold.Birth intervals following the first complete birth interval were shorter than this first interval, while sex of the previous infant had no significant effect.Maternal dominance rank was significant at the P < 0·1 level when coded as high/middle/low but was highly significant when we simply considered high rank vs. others.Individual heterogeneity had a substantial impact on birth interval duration. We interpret this individual effect as a measure of phenotypic quality, controlling for the measured covariates such as dominance rank. This interpretation is supported by the correlation of individual heterogeneity scores with similar independent measures of body mass. PMID:20412347

  18. The CD44+/CD24- phenotype is enriched in basal-like breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Honeth, Gabriella; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Ringnér, Markus; Saal, Lao H; Gruvberger-Saal, Sofia K; Lövgren, Kristina; Grabau, Dorthe; Fernö, Mårten; Borg, Åke; Hegardt, Cecilia

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Human breast tumors are heterogeneous and consist of phenotypically diverse cells. Breast cancer cells with a CD44+/CD24- phenotype have been suggested to have tumor-initiating properties with stem cell-like and invasive features, although it is unclear whether their presence within a tumor has clinical implications. There is also a large heterogeneity between tumors, illustrated by reproducible stratification into various subtypes based on gene expression profiles or histopathological features. We have explored the prevalence of cells with different CD44/CD24 phenotypes within breast cancer subtypes. Methods Double-staining immunohistochemistry was used to quantify CD44 and CD24 expression in 240 human breast tumors for which information on other tumor markers and clinical characteristics was available. Gene expression data were also accessible for a cohort of the material. Results A considerable heterogeneity in CD44 and CD24 expression was seen both between and within tumors. A complete lack of both proteins was evident in 35% of the tumors, while 13% contained cells of more than one of the CD44+/CD24-, CD44-/CD24+ and CD44+/CD24+ phenotypes. CD44+/CD24- cells were detected in 31% of the tumors, ranging in proportion from only a few to close to 100% of tumor cells. The CD44+/CD24- phenotype was most common in the basal-like subgroup – characterized as negative for the estrogen and progesterone receptors as well as for HER2, and as positive for cytokeratin 5/14 and/or epidermal growth factor receptor, and particularly common in BRCA1 hereditary tumors, of which 94% contained CD44+/CD24- cells. The CD44+/CD24- phenotype was surprisingly scarce in HER2+ tumors, which had a predominantly CD24+ status. A CD44+/CD24- gene expression signature was generated, which included CD44 and α6-integrin (CD49f) among the top-ranked overexpressed genes. Conclusion We demonstrate an association between basal-like and particularly BRCA1 hereditary breast cancer and

  19. Gene expression in colon cancer: A focus on tumor site and molecular phenotype.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Pellatt, Daniel F; Mullany, Lila E; Wolff, Roger K; Herrick, Jennifer S

    2015-09-01

    Hundreds to thousands of genes are differentially expressed in tumors when compared to nontumor colonic tissue samples. We evaluated gene expression patterns to better understand differences in colon cancer by tumor site and tumor molecular phenotype. We analyzed RNA-seq data from tumor/normal paired samples from 175 colon cancer patients. We implemented a cross validation strategy with nonparametric tests to identify genes which displayed varying expression characteristics related to paired tumor/nontumor tissue across proximal and distal colon sites and by tumor molecular phenotypes, that is, TP53, KRAS, CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP), and microsatellite instability (MSI). We used Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to determine networks associated with deregulated genes in our data. Genes showed significant differences in expression characteristics at the 0.01 level in both validation groups between tumor subsite (116 genes), CIMP high versus CIMP low (79 genes), MSI versus microsatellite stable (MSS) (49 genes), TP53-mutated versus not mutated (17genes), and KRAS-mutated versus not mutated (1 gene). Deregulated genes for CIMP high and MSI tumors were often down-regulated. In contrast to CIMP high and MSI tumors, genes that were deregulated in TP53 were likely to be up-regulated. ERK1, WNT, growth factors and inflammation-related factors were focal points of both CIMP and MSI IPA networks. The MUC family of genes was up-regulated MSI networks. Numerous genes showed differences in expression between proximal and distal tumors, nontumor proximal and distal tissue, and tumor molecular phenotype. Deregulated mucin genes appear to play an important role in MSI tumors. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Role of Receptor Sialylation in the Ovarian Tumor Cell Phenotype

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    blocks apoptosis induced by the mammalian lectin, galectin - 3 , which our studies show is expressed in human ovarian tumor tissues and in ascitic fluid...omental cultures. • Optimized immunoblotting protocol for galectin - 3 in ascites • Determination that sialylation of Fas and TNFR1 blocks apoptotic...REPORT DATE 2. REPORT TYPE Annual report 3 . DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Role of receptor sialylation in the ovarian tumor cell

  1. Identification of intrinsic imaging phenotypes for breast cancer tumors: preliminary associations with gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Ahmed Bilal; Daye, Dania; Gavenonis, Sara; Mies, Carolyn; Feldman, Michael; Rosen, Mark; Kontos, Despina

    2014-08-01

    To present a method for identifying intrinsic imaging phenotypes in breast cancer tumors and to investigate their association with prognostic gene expression profiles. The authors retrospectively analyzed dynamic contrast material-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) images of the breast in 56 women (mean age, 55.6 years; age range, 37-74 years) diagnosed with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer between 2005 and 2010. The study was approved by the institutional review board and compliant with HIPAA. The requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. Primary tumors were assayed with a validated gene expression assay that provides a score for the likelihood of recurrence. A multiparametric imaging phenotype vector was extracted for each tumor by using quantitative morphologic, kinetic, and spatial heterogeneity features. Multivariate linear regression was performed to test associations between DCE MR imaging features and recurrence likelihood. To identify intrinsic imaging phenotypes, hierarchical clustering was performed on the extracted feature vectors. Multivariate logistic regression was used to classify tumors at high versus low or medium risk of recurrence. To determine the additional value of intrinsic phenotypes, the phenotype category was tested as an additional variable. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) were used to assess classification performance. There was a moderate correlation (r = 0.71, R(2) = 0.50, P < .001) between DCE MR imaging features and the recurrence score. DCE MR imaging features were predictive of recurrence risk as determined by the surrogate assay, with an Az of 0.77 (P < .01). Four dominant imaging phenotypes were detected, with two including only low- and medium-risk tumors. When the phenotype category was used as an additional variable, the Az increased to 0.82 (P < .01). Intrinsic imaging phenotypes exist for breast cancer tumors and correlate

  2. Lactate Activates HIF-1 in Oxidative but Not in Warburg-Phenotype Human Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Saedeleer, Christophe J.; Copetti, Tamara; Porporato, Paolo E.; Verrax, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Cancer can be envisioned as a metabolic disease driven by pressure selection and intercellular cooperativeness. Together with anaerobic glycolysis, the Warburg effect, formally corresponding to uncoupling glycolysis from oxidative phosphorylation, directly participates in cancer aggressiveness, supporting both tumor progression and dissemination. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a key contributor to glycolysis. It stimulates the expression of glycolytic transporters and enzymes supporting high rate of glycolysis. In this study, we addressed the reverse possibility of a metabolic control of HIF-1 in tumor cells. We report that lactate, the end-product of glycolysis, inhibits prolylhydroxylase 2 activity and activates HIF-1 in normoxic oxidative tumor cells but not in Warburg-phenotype tumor cells which also expressed lower basal levels of HIF-1α. These data were confirmed using genotypically matched oxidative and mitochondria-depleted glycolytic tumor cells as well as several different wild-type human tumor cell lines of either metabolic phenotype. Lactate activates HIF-1 and triggers tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth in vivo, an activity that we found to be under the specific upstream control of the lactate transporter monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) expressed in tumor cells. Because MCT1 also gates lactate-fueled tumor cell respiration and mediates pro-angiogenic lactate signaling in endothelial cells, MCT1 inhibition is confirmed as an attractive anticancer strategy in which a single drug may target multiple tumor-promoting pathways. PMID:23082126

  3. Clinically meaningful tumor reduction rates vary by prechemotherapy MRI phenotype and tumor subtype in the I-SPY 1 TRIAL (CALGB 150007/150012; ACRIN 6657).

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, Rita A; Yau, Christina; Rosen, Mark; Tandon, Vickram J; Hylton, Nola; Esserman, Laura J

    2013-11-01

    This study was designed to determine (1) rates of clinically meaningful tumor reduction in breast tumor size following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), (2) which receptor subtypes and MRI phenotypes are associated with clinically meaningful tumor reduction, and (3) whether MRI phenotype impacts concordance between pathologic and MRI size. We analyzed data from the I-SPY TRIAL, a multicenter, prospective NAC trial. Reduction in tumor size from >4 to ≤4 cm was considered clinically meaningful, as crossing this threshold was considered a reasonable cutoff for potential breast conservation therapy (BCT). MRI phenotypes were scored between one (well-defined) and five (diffuse) on pre-NAC MRIs. Of 174 patients with tumors >4 cm, 141 (81%) had clinically meaningful tumor reduction. Response to therapy varied by MRI phenotype (p = 0.003), with well-defined phenotypes more likely than diffuse phenotypes to have clinically meaningful tumor shrinkage (91 vs. 72%, p = 0.037). Her2+ and triple-negative (Tneg) tumors had the highest rate of clinically meaningful tumor reduction (p = 0.005). The concordance between tumor diameter on MRI and surgical pathology was highest for Her2+ and Tneg tumors, especially among tumors with solid imaging phenotypes (p = 0.004). NAC allows most patients with large breast tumors to have clinically meaningful tumor reduction, meaning response that would impact ability to undergo BCT. However, response varies by imaging and tumor subtypes. Concordance between tumor size on MRI and surgical pathology was higher in well-defined tumors, especially those with a Tneg subtype, and lower in HR+ diffuse tumors.

  4. Role of Receptor Sialylation in the Ovarian Tumor Cell Phenotype

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    appreciably over the last 3 decades. Most patients are initially responsive to treatment , however the majority develop tumor recurrence and succumb to...internalization (leftward peak shift in Par cells). Similar results were observed by immunocytochemistry (Fig 6B): TNFα treatment at 37ºC causes TNFR1... treatment at 37°C, full-length, surface TNFR1 (upper band, see inset, Fig 7) is lost in Par and EV, but not ST6-OE, cells. A similar decrease in

  5. Predictive genomics: a cancer hallmark network framework for predicting tumor clinical phenotypes using genome sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Edwin; Zaman, Naif; Mcgee, Shauna; Milanese, Jean-Sébastien; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali; O'Connor-McCourt, Maureen

    2015-02-01

    Tumor genome sequencing leads to documenting thousands of DNA mutations and other genomic alterations. At present, these data cannot be analyzed adequately to aid in the understanding of tumorigenesis and its evolution. Moreover, we have little insight into how to use these data to predict clinical phenotypes and tumor progression to better design patient treatment. To meet these challenges, we discuss a cancer hallmark network framework for modeling genome sequencing data to predict cancer clonal evolution and associated clinical phenotypes. The framework includes: (1) cancer hallmarks that can be represented by a few molecular/signaling networks. 'Network operational signatures' which represent gene regulatory logics/strengths enable to quantify state transitions and measures of hallmark traits. Thus, sets of genomic alterations which are associated with network operational signatures could be linked to the state/measure of hallmark traits. The network operational signature transforms genotypic data (i.e., genomic alterations) to regulatory phenotypic profiles (i.e., regulatory logics/strengths), to cellular phenotypic profiles (i.e., hallmark traits) which lead to clinical phenotypic profiles (i.e., a collection of hallmark traits). Furthermore, the framework considers regulatory logics of the hallmark networks under tumor evolutionary dynamics and therefore also includes: (2) a self-promoting positive feedback loop that is dominated by a genomic instability network and a cell survival/proliferation network is the main driver of tumor clonal evolution. Surrounding tumor stroma and its host immune systems shape the evolutionary paths; (3) cell motility initiating metastasis is a byproduct of the above self-promoting loop activity during tumorigenesis; (4) an emerging hallmark network which triggers genome duplication dominates a feed-forward loop which in turn could act as a rate-limiting step for tumor formation; (5) mutations and other genomic alterations have

  6. Iris phenotypes and pigment dispersion caused by genes influencing pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Michael G; Hawes, Norman L; Trantow, Colleen M; Chang, Bo; John, Simon W M

    2008-10-01

    Spontaneous mutations altering mouse coat colors have been a classic resource for discovery of numerous molecular pathways. Although often overlooked, the mouse iris is also densely pigmented and easily observed, thus representing a similarly powerful opportunity for studying pigment cell biology. Here, we present an analysis of iris phenotypes among 16 mouse strains with mutations influencing melanosomes. Many of these strains exhibit biologically and medically relevant phenotypes, including pigment dispersion, a common feature of several human ocular diseases. Pigment dispersion was identified in several strains with mutant alleles known to influence melanosomes, including beige, light, and vitiligo. Pigment dispersion was also detected in the recently arising spontaneous coat color variant, nm2798. We have identified the nm2798 mutation as a missense mutation in the Dct gene, an identical re-occurrence of the slaty light mutation. These results suggest that dysregulated events of melanosomes can be potent contributors to the pigment dispersion phenotype. Combined, these findings illustrate the utility of studying iris phenotypes as a means of discovering new pathways, and re-linking old ones, to processes of pigmented cells in health and disease.

  7. Disruptive mitochondrial DNA mutations in complex I subunits are markers of oncocytic phenotype in thyroid tumors.

    PubMed

    Gasparre, Giuseppe; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Bonora, Elena; Pennisi, Lucia Fiammetta; Toller, Matteo; Iommarini, Luisa; Ghelli, Anna; Moretti, Massimo; Betts, Christine M; Martinelli, Giuseppe Nicola; Ceroni, Alberto Rinaldi; Curcio, Francesco; Carelli, Valerio; Rugolo, Michela; Tallini, Giovanni; Romeo, Giovanni

    2007-05-22

    Oncocytic tumors are a distinctive class of proliferative lesions composed of cells with a striking degree of mitochondrial hyperplasia that are particularly frequent in the thyroid gland. To understand whether specific mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are associated with the accumulation of mitochondria, we sequenced the entire mtDNA in 50 oncocytic lesions (45 thyroid tumors of epithelial cell derivation and 5 mitochondrion-rich breast tumors) and 52 control cases (21 nononcocytic thyroid tumors, 15 breast carcinomas, and 16 gliomas) by using recently developed technology that allows specific and reliable amplification of the whole mtDNA with quick mutation scanning. Thirteen oncocytic lesions (26%) presented disruptive mutations (nonsense or frameshift), whereas only two samples (3.8%) presented such mutations in the nononcocytic control group. In one case with multiple thyroid nodules analyzed separately, a disruptive mutation was found in the only nodule with oncocytic features. In one of the five mitochondrion-rich breast tumors, a disruptive mutation was identified. All disruptive mutations were found in complex I subunit genes, and the association between these mutations and the oncocytic phenotype was statistically significant (P=0.001). To study the pathogenicity of these mitochondrial mutations, primary cultures from oncocytic tumors and corresponding normal tissues were established. Electron microscopy and biochemical and molecular analyses showed that primary cultures derived from tumors bearing disruptive mutations failed to maintain the mutations and the oncocytic phenotype. We conclude that disruptive mutations in complex I subunits are markers of thyroid oncocytic tumors.

  8. Graded activation of the MEK1/MT1-MMP axis determines renal epithelial cell tumor phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Mahimkar, Rajeev; Alfonso-Jaume, Maria Alejandra; Cape, Leslie M.; Dahiya, Rajvir; Lovett, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Activation of Raf/Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and elevated expression of membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) are associated with von Hippel–Lindau gene alterations in renal cell carcinoma. We postulated that the degree of MEK activation was related to graded expression of MT1-MMP and the resultant phenotype of renal epithelial tumors. Madin Darby canine kidney epithelial cells transfected with a MEK1 expression plasmid yielded populations with morphologic phenotypes ranging from epithelial, mixed epithelial/mesenchymal to mesenchymal. Clones were analyzed for MEK1 activity, MT1-MMP expression and extent of epithelial–mesenchymal transition. Phenotypes of the MDCK-MEK1 clones were evaluated in vivo with nu/nu mice. Tissue microarray of renal cell cancers was quantitatively assessed for expression of phosphorylated MEK1 and MT1-MMP proteins and correlations drawn to Fuhrman nuclear grade. Graded increases in the MEK signaling module were associated with graded induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition of the MDCK cells and induction of MT1-MMP transcription and synthesis. Inhibition of MEK1 and MT1-MMP activity reversed the epithelial–mesenchymal transition. Tumors generated by epithelial, mixed epithelial/mesenchymal and mesenchymal MDCK clones demonstrated a gradient of phenotypes extending from well-differentiated, fully encapsulated non-invasive tumors to tumors with an anaplastic morphology, high Fuhrman nuclear score, neoangiogenesis and invasion. Tumor microarray demonstrated a statistically significant association between the extent of phosphorylated MEK1, MT1-MMP expression and nuclear grade. We conclude that graded increases in the MEK1 signaling module are correlated with M1-MMP expression, renal epithelial cell tumor phenotype, invasive activity and nuclear grade. Phosphorylated MEK1 and MT1-MMP may represent novel, and mechanistic, biomarkers for the assessment of renal

  9. Graded activation of the MEK1/MT1-MMP axis determines renal epithelial cell tumor phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mahimkar, Rajeev; Alfonso-Jaume, Maria Alejandra; Cape, Leslie M; Dahiya, Rajvir; Lovett, David H

    2011-12-01

    Activation of Raf/Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and elevated expression of membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) are associated with von Hippel-Lindau gene alterations in renal cell carcinoma. We postulated that the degree of MEK activation was related to graded expression of MT1-MMP and the resultant phenotype of renal epithelial tumors. Madin Darby canine kidney epithelial cells transfected with a MEK1 expression plasmid yielded populations with morphologic phenotypes ranging from epithelial, mixed epithelial/mesenchymal to mesenchymal. Clones were analyzed for MEK1 activity, MT1-MMP expression and extent of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Phenotypes of the MDCK-MEK1 clones were evaluated in vivo with nu/nu mice. Tissue microarray of renal cell cancers was quantitatively assessed for expression of phosphorylated MEK1 and MT1-MMP proteins and correlations drawn to Fuhrman nuclear grade. Graded increases in the MEK signaling module were associated with graded induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition of the MDCK cells and induction of MT1-MMP transcription and synthesis. Inhibition of MEK1 and MT1-MMP activity reversed the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Tumors generated by epithelial, mixed epithelial/mesenchymal and mesenchymal MDCK clones demonstrated a gradient of phenotypes extending from well-differentiated, fully encapsulated non-invasive tumors to tumors with an anaplastic morphology, high Fuhrman nuclear score, neoangiogenesis and invasion. Tumor microarray demonstrated a statistically significant association between the extent of phosphorylated MEK1, MT1-MMP expression and nuclear grade. We conclude that graded increases in the MEK1 signaling module are correlated with M1-MMP expression, renal epithelial cell tumor phenotype, invasive activity and nuclear grade. Phosphorylated MEK1 and MT1-MMP may represent novel, and mechanistic, biomarkers for the assessment of renal cell

  10. Marker-free phenotyping of tumor cells by fractal analysis of reflection interference contrast microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Klein, Katharina; Maier, Timo; Hirschfeld-Warneken, Vera C; Spatz, Joachim P

    2013-01-01

    Phenotyping of tumor cells by marker-free quantification is important for cancer diagnostics. For the first time, fractal analysis of reflection interference contrast microscopy images of single living cells was employed as a new method to distinguish between different nanoscopic membrane features of tumor cells. Since tumor progression correlates with a higher degree of chaos within the cell, it can be quantified mathematically by fractality. Our results show a high accuracy in identifying malignant cells with a failure chance of 3%, which is far better than today's applied methods.

  11. Rat Prostate Tumor Cells Progress in the Bone Microenvironment to a Highly Aggressive Phenotype1

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Sofia Halin; Rudolfsson, Stina H; Bergh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer generally metastasizes to bone, and most patients have tumor cells in their bone marrow already at diagnosis. Tumor cells at the metastatic site may therefore progress in parallel with those in the primary tumor. Androgen deprivation therapy is often the first-line treatment for clinically detectable prostate cancer bone metastases. Although the treatment is effective, most metastases progress to a castration-resistant and lethal state. To examine metastatic progression in the bone microenvironment, we implanted androgen-sensitive, androgen receptor–positive, and relatively slow-growing Dunning G (G) rat prostate tumor cells into the tibial bone marrow of fully immune-competent Copenhagen rats. We show that tumor establishment in the bone marrow was reduced compared with the prostate, and whereas androgen deprivation did not affect tumor establishment or growth in the bone, this was markedly reduced in the prostate. Moreover, we found that, with time, G tumor cells in the bone microenvironment progress to a more aggressive phenotype with increased growth rate, reduced androgen sensitivity, and increased metastatic capacity. Tumor cells in the bone marrow encounter lower androgen levels and a higher degree of hypoxia than at the primary site, which may cause high selective pressures and eventually contribute to the development of a new and highly aggressive tumor cell phenotype. It is therefore important to specifically study progression in bone metastases. This tumor model could be used to increase our understanding of how tumor cells adapt in the bone microenvironment and may subsequently improve therapy strategies for prostate metastases in bone. PMID:26992916

  12. ONCOGENIC DRIVER GENES AND THE INFLAMMATORY MICROENVIRONMENT DICTATE LIVER TUMOR PHENOTYPE

    PubMed Central

    Matter, Matthias S.; Marquardt, Jens U.; Andersen, Jesper B.; Quintavalle, Cristina; Korokhov, Nikolay; Stauffer, Jim K.; Kaji, Kosuke; Decaens, Thomas; Quagliata, Luca; Elloumi, Fathi; Hoang, Tanya; Molinolo, Alfredo; Conner, Elizabeth A.; Weber, Achim; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Factor, Valentina M.; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) develops in the background of chronic liver inflammation caused by viral hepatitis and alcoholic or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. However, the impact of different types of chronic inflammatory microenvironments on the phenotypes of tumors generated by distinct oncogenes is largely unresolved. To address this issue, we generated murine liver tumors by constitutively active AKT-1 (AKT) and β-catenin (CAT) followed by induction of chronic liver inflammation by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). Also, the impact of DDC-induced chronic liver inflammation was compared between two liver tumor models using a combination of AKT-CAT or AKT-NRASG12V. Treatment with DDC and CCl4 significantly facilitated the adenoma-to-carcinoma conversion and accelerated the growth of AKT-CAT tumors. Furthermore, DDC treatment altered the morphology of AKT-CAT tumors and caused loss of lipid droplets. Transcriptome analysis of AKT-CAT tumors revealed that cellular growth and proliferation was mainly affected by chronic inflammation and caused upregulated of Cxcl16, Galectin-3 and Nedd9 among others. Integration with transcriptome profiles from human HCCs further demonstrated that AKT-CAT tumors generated in the context of chronic liver inflammation showed enrichment of poor prognosis gene sets or decrease of good prognosis gene sets. In contrast, DDC had a more subtle effect on AKT-NRASG12V tumors and primarily enhanced already existent tumor characteristics as supported by transcriptome analysis. However, it also reduced lipid droplets in AKT-NRASG12V tumors. Conclusion Our study suggests that liver tumor phenotype is defined by a combination of driving oncogenes but also the nature of chronic liver inflammation. PMID:26844528

  13. Expression of ZFX gene correlated with the central features of the neoplastic phenotype in human brain tumors with distinct phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Afzali, Azita; Emadi-Baygi, Modjtaba; Nikpour, Parvaneh; Nazemroaya, Fatemehe; Kheirollahi, Majid

    2015-01-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor zinc finger protein, X-linked (ZFX) acts as an important director of self-renewal in several stem cell types. Moreover, ZFX expression abnormally increases in various cancers and relates to tumor grade. We performed this study, to examine its role in the pathogenesis of astrocytoma and meningioma. We used real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method for evaluation of ZFX expression in 25 astrocytoma tumoral tissue and 25 meningioma tumoral tissues with different WHO grades. Furthermore, the association of gene expression with various clinic-pathological characteristics was examined. We found that there is a significant association between gene expression and different tumor grades, the presence or absence of invasion, forming and nonforming of glomeruloid vessels, the age over or under 50 and the presence or absence of calcification in astrocytomas. This is the first report that shows that ZFX was directly correlated with the central features of the neoplastic phenotype, including the growth of cancer cells, angiogenesis, and invasion. Regarding all the above-mentioned studies, it is highly plausible that silencing the expression of ZFX gene in gliomas has a major role in the therapeutic interventions of the disease in future.

  14. Inference of tumor evolution during chemotherapy by computational modeling and in situ analysis of genetic and phenotypic cellular diversity

    DOE PAGES

    Almendro, Vanessa; Cheng, Yu -Kang; Randles, Amanda; ...

    2014-02-01

    Cancer therapy exerts a strong selection pressure that shapes tumor evolution, yet our knowledge of how tumors change during treatment is limited. Here, we report the analysis of cellular heterogeneity for genetic and phenotypic features and their spatial distribution in breast tumors pre- and post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We found that intratumor genetic diversity was tumor-subtype specific, and it did not change during treatment in tumors with partial or no response. However, lower pretreatment genetic diversity was significantly associated with pathologic complete response. In contrast, phenotypic diversity was different between pre- and post-treatment samples. We also observed significant changes in the spatialmore » distribution of cells with distinct genetic and phenotypic features. We used these experimental data to develop a stochastic computational model to infer tumor growth patterns and evolutionary dynamics. Our results highlight the importance of integrated analysis of genotypes and phenotypes of single cells in intact tissues to predict tumor evolution.« less

  15. Inference of tumor evolution during chemotherapy by computational modeling and in situ analysis of genetic and phenotypic cellular diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Almendro, Vanessa; Cheng, Yu -Kang; Randles, Amanda; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Marusyk, Andriy; Ametller, Elisabet; Gonzalez-Farre, Xavier; Muñoz, Montse; Russnes, Hege  G.; Helland, Åslaug; Rye, Inga  H.; Borresen-Dale, Anne -Lise; Maruyama, Reo; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Dowsett, Mitchell; Jones, Robin  L.; Reis-Filho, Jorge; Gascon, Pere; Gönen, Mithat; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-02-01

    Cancer therapy exerts a strong selection pressure that shapes tumor evolution, yet our knowledge of how tumors change during treatment is limited. Here, we report the analysis of cellular heterogeneity for genetic and phenotypic features and their spatial distribution in breast tumors pre- and post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We found that intratumor genetic diversity was tumor-subtype specific, and it did not change during treatment in tumors with partial or no response. However, lower pretreatment genetic diversity was significantly associated with pathologic complete response. In contrast, phenotypic diversity was different between pre- and post-treatment samples. We also observed significant changes in the spatial distribution of cells with distinct genetic and phenotypic features. We used these experimental data to develop a stochastic computational model to infer tumor growth patterns and evolutionary dynamics. Our results highlight the importance of integrated analysis of genotypes and phenotypes of single cells in intact tissues to predict tumor evolution.

  16. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor antagonist attenuate tumor growth via polarization of neutrophils toward an antitumor phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sanjeeb; Noh, Jae Myoung; Kim, Shin-Yeong; Ham, Hwa-Yong; Kim, Yeon-Ja; Yun, Young-Jin; Kim, Min-Ju; Kwon, Min-Soo; Song, Dong-Keun; Hong, Chang-Won

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor microenvironments polarize neutrophils to protumoral phenotypes. Here, we demonstrate that the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) antagonist attenuate tumor growth via polarization of neutrophils toward an antitumoral phenotype. The ACEis or AGTR1 antagonist enhanced hypersegmentation of human neutrophils and increased neutrophil cytotoxicity against tumor cells. This neutrophil hypersegmentation was dependent on the mTOR pathway. In a murine tumor model, ACEis and AGTR1 antagonist attenuated tumor growth and enhanced neutrophil hypersegmentation. ACEis inhibited tumor-induced polarization of neutrophils to a protumoral phenotype. Neutrophil depletion reduced the antitumor effect of ACEi. Together, these data suggest that the modulation of Ang II pathway attenuates tumor growth via polarization of neutrophils to an antitumoral phenotype. PMID:26942086

  17. Skeletal muscle calcineurin: influence of phenotype adaptation and atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangenburg, E. E.; Williams, J. H.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Spangenberg, E. E. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Calcineurin (CaN) has been implicated as a signaling molecule that can transduce physiological stimuli (e.g., contractile activity) into molecular signals that initiate slow-fiber phenotypic gene expression and muscle growth. To determine the influence of muscle phenotype and atrophy on CaN levels in muscle, the levels of soluble CaN in rat muscles of varying phenotype, as assessed by myosin heavy chain (MHC)-isoform proportions, were determined by Western blotting. CaN levels were significantly greater in the plantaris muscle containing predominantly fast (IIx and IIb) MHC isoforms, compared with the soleus (predominantly type I MHC) or vastus intermedius (VI, contains all 4 adult MHC isoforms). Three months after a complete spinal cord transection (ST), the CaN levels in the VI muscle were significantly reduced, despite a significant increase in fast MHC isoforms. Surprisingly, the levels of CaN in the VI were highly correlated with muscle mass but not MHC isoform proportions in ST and control rats. These data demonstrate that CaN levels in skeletal muscle are highly correlated to muscle mass and that the normal relationship with phenotype is lost after ST.

  18. Skeletal muscle calcineurin: influence of phenotype adaptation and atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangenburg, E. E.; Williams, J. H.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Spangenberg, E. E. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Calcineurin (CaN) has been implicated as a signaling molecule that can transduce physiological stimuli (e.g., contractile activity) into molecular signals that initiate slow-fiber phenotypic gene expression and muscle growth. To determine the influence of muscle phenotype and atrophy on CaN levels in muscle, the levels of soluble CaN in rat muscles of varying phenotype, as assessed by myosin heavy chain (MHC)-isoform proportions, were determined by Western blotting. CaN levels were significantly greater in the plantaris muscle containing predominantly fast (IIx and IIb) MHC isoforms, compared with the soleus (predominantly type I MHC) or vastus intermedius (VI, contains all 4 adult MHC isoforms). Three months after a complete spinal cord transection (ST), the CaN levels in the VI muscle were significantly reduced, despite a significant increase in fast MHC isoforms. Surprisingly, the levels of CaN in the VI were highly correlated with muscle mass but not MHC isoform proportions in ST and control rats. These data demonstrate that CaN levels in skeletal muscle are highly correlated to muscle mass and that the normal relationship with phenotype is lost after ST.

  19. Intrinsic mitochondrial membrane potential and associated tumor phenotype are independent of MUC1 over-expression.

    PubMed

    Houston, Michele A; Augenlicht, Leonard H; Heerdt, Barbara G

    2011-01-01

    We have established previously that minor subpopulations of cells with stable differences in their intrinsic mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) exist within populations of mammary and colonic carcinoma cells and that these differences in Δψm are linked to tumorigenic phenotypes consistent with increased probability of participating in tumor progression. However, the mechanism(s) involved in generating and maintaining stable differences in intrinsic Δψm and how they are linked to phenotype are unclear. Because the mucin 1 (MUC1) oncoprotein is over-expressed in many cancers, with the cytoplasmic C-terminal fragment (MUC1 C-ter) and its integration into the outer mitochondrial membrane linked to tumorigenic phenotypes similar to those of cells with elevated intrinsic Δψm, we investigated whether endogenous differences in MUC1 levels were linked to stable differences in intrinsic Δψm and/or to the tumor phenotypes associated with the intrinsic Δψm. We report that levels of MUC1 are significantly higher in subpopulations of cells with elevated intrinsic Δψm derived from both mammary and colonic carcinoma cell lines. However, using siRNA we found that down-regulation of MUC1 failed to significantly affect either the intrinsic Δψm or the tumor phenotypes associated with increased intrinsic Δψm. Moreover, whereas pharmacologically mediated disruption of the Δψm was accompanied by attenuation of tumor phenotype, it had no impact on MUC1 levels. Therefore, while MUC1 over-expression is associated with subpopulations of cells with elevated intrinsic Δψm, it is not directly linked to the generation or maintenance of stable alterations in intrinsic Δψm, or to intrinsic Δψm associated tumor phenotypes. Since the Δψm is the focus of chemotherapeutic strategies, these data have important clinical implications in regard to effectively targeting those cells within a tumor cell population that exhibit stable elevations in intrinsic Δψm and are most

  20. Tumor-derived CCL-2 and CXCL-8 as possible prognostic markers of breast cancer: correlation with estrogen and progestrone receptor phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Ghoneim, H M; Maher, Sara; Abdel-Aty, Asmaa; Saad, A; Kazem, A; Demian, S R

    2009-01-01

    Prognosis of breast cancer is believed to be a multifactorial process best achieved by complex factors including host and tumor-derived biomarkers together with traditional clinicopathological parameters and tumor histologic markers. The present study aimed at evaluating the prognostic significance of chemokine ligand-2 (CCL-2) and interleukin-8 (CXCL-8) expression in extracts of breast carcinomas through correlation with clinicopathological aspects as well as estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) phenotyping. The study was conducted on 30 Egyptian breast cancer patients diagnosed by fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and subjected to modified radical mastectomy. Excised tissues were used to prepare tissue sections and extracts for histopathological and immunohistochemical studies. Expression of CCL-2 and CXCL-8 was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). 26 patients had invasive ductal carcinoma, grades II and III with metastasis to axillary lymph nodes and ER and PR positive phenotype. Expression of CCL-2 and CXCL-8 was significantly influenced by patient's age, menopausal status, nodal involvement, tumor grade and the ER phenotype. In contrast, it was not affected by either tumor size or PR staining pattern. Both chemokines correlated positively to each other and to tumor grade and negatively to age, menopausal status of patients and ER phenotyping. It is concluded that the angiogenic chemokine CXCL-8 and the macrophage chemoattractant CCL-2 might be useful prognostic markers where their routine follow up might be of importance in assessment of tumor aggressiveness in clinical settings.

  1. Intracellular Iron Chelation Modulates the Macrophage Iron Phenotype with Consequences on Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Christina; Akam, Eman Abureida; Rehwald, Claudia; Brüne, Bernhard; Tomat, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that macrophage polarization dictates the expression of iron-regulated genes. Polarization towards iron sequestration depletes the microenvironment, whereby extracellular pathogen growth is limited and inflammation is fostered. In contrast, iron release contributes to cell proliferation, which is important for tissue regeneration. Moreover, macrophages constitute a major component of the infiltrates in most solid tumors. Considering the pivotal role of macrophages for iron homeostasis and their presence in association with poor clinical prognosis in tumors, we approached the possibility to target macrophages with intracellular iron chelators. Analyzing the expression of iron-regulated genes at mRNA and protein level in primary human macrophages, we found that the iron-release phenotype is a characteristic of polarized macrophages that, in turn, stimulate tumor cell growth and progression. The application of the intracellular iron chelator (TC3-S)2 shifted the macrophage phenotype from iron release towards sequestration, as determined by the iron-gene profile and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Moreover, whereas the addition of macrophage supernatants to tumor cells induced tumor growth and metastatic behavior, the supernatant of chelator-treated macrophages reversed this effect. Iron chelators demonstrated potent anti-neoplastic properties in a number of cancers, both in cell culture and in clinical trials. Our results suggest that iron chelation could affect not only cancer cells but also the tumor microenvironment by altering the iron-release phenotype of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). The study of iron chelators in conjunction with the effect of TAMs on tumor growth could lead to an improved understanding of the role of iron in cancer biology and to novel therapeutic avenues for iron chelation approaches. PMID:27806101

  2. Consensus micro RNAs governing the switch of dormant tumors to the fast-growing angiogenic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Almog, Nava; Ma, Lili; Schwager, Christian; Brinkmann, Bastian G; Beheshti, Afshin; Vajkoczy, Peter; Folkman, Judah; Hlatky, Lynn; Abdollahi, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Tumor dormancy refers to a critical stage in cancer development in which tumor cells remain occult for a prolonged period of time until they eventually progress and become clinically apparent. We previously showed that the switch of dormant tumors to fast-growth is angiogenesis dependent and requires a stable transcriptional reprogramming in tumor cells. Considering microRNAs (miRs) as master regulators of transcriptome, we sought to investigate their role in the control of tumor dormancy. We report here the identification of a consensus set of 19 miRs that govern the phenotypic switch of human dormant breast carcinoma, glioblastoma, osteosarcoma, and liposarcoma tumors to fast-growth. Loss of expression of dormancy-associated miRs (DmiRs, 16/19) was the prevailing regulation pattern correlating with the switch of dormant tumors to fast-growth. The expression pattern of two DmiRs (miR-580 and 190) was confirmed to correlate with disease stage in human glioma specimens. Reconstitution of a single DmiR (miR-580, 588 or 190) led to phenotypic reversal of fast-growing angiogenic tumors towards prolonged tumor dormancy. Of note, 60% of angiogenic glioblastoma and 100% of angiogenic osteosarcoma over-expressing miR190 remained dormant during the entire observation period of ∼ 120 days. Next, the ability of DmiRs to regulate angiogenesis and dormancy-associated genes was evaluated. Transcriptional reprogramming of tumors via DmiR-580, 588 or 190 over-expression resulted in downregulation of pro-angiogenic factors such as TIMP-3, bFGF and TGFalpha. In addition, a G-CSF independent downregulation of Bv8 was found as a common target of all three DmiRs and correlated with decreased tumor recruitment of bone marrow-derived CD11b+ Gr-1+ myeloid cells. In contrast, antiangiogenic and dormancy promoting pathways such as EphA5 and Angiomotin were upregulated in DmiR over-expressing tumors. This work suggests novel means to reverse the malignant tumor phenotype into an

  3. Tumor Phenotype and Gene Expression during Early Mammary Tumor Development in Offspring Exposed to Alcohol in Utero

    PubMed Central

    Crismale-Gann, Catina; Stires, Hillary; Katz, Tiffany A.; Cohick, Wendie S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Alcohol exposure in utero increases susceptibility to carcinogen-induced mammary tumorigenesis in adult offspring and causes tumors with a more malignant phenotype. The present study was conducted to identify changes early in tumor development that might lead to this outcome. Methods Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were fed a liquid diet containing 6.7% ethanol (alcohol), an isocaloric liquid diet without alcohol (pair-fed), or rat chow ad libitum (ad lib) from gestation day 7 until parturition. At birth, female progeny were cross-fostered to control dams. Pups were weaned at postnatal day (PND) 21 and fed rat chow ad libitum for the remainder of the experiment. Female offspring were administered N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU; 50 mg/kg body weight) on PND 50. Mammary glands were palpated weekly and offspring were euthanized at 16 weeks post-NMU injection. Results At 16 weeks post-NMU, tumor multiplicity was greater in alcohol-exposed offspring compared with control groups. Estrogen receptor-α (ER) mRNA expression was decreased in tumors from alcohol-exposed offspring and these animals developed more ER-negative tumors relative to the pair-fed group. Alcohol-exposed offspring also tended to develop more progesterone receptor (PR)-positive tumors. All tumors were HER2-negative. PR positivity was associated with higher Ki67 expression, suggesting that PR-positive tumors were more proliferative. Tumors from alcohol-exposed animals exhibited increased mRNA expression of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) family members IGF-II and IGFBP-5. IGF-II and DNMT1 mRNA tended to be greater in the normal contralateral mammary glands of these animals. Conclusions These data indicate that alcohol exposure in utero may shift NMU-induced tumor development towards a more aggressive phenotype and that alterations in IGF-II expression may contribute to these changes. Additional studies should be aimed at epigenetic mechanisms that underlie IGF-II expression to further delineate

  4. Identification of Tumor Endothelial Cells with High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity and a Highly Angiogenic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Maishi, Nako; Ohga, Noritaka; Hida, Yasuhiro; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Iida, Junichiro; Shindoh, Masanobu; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Shinohara, Nobuo; Hida, Kyoko

    2014-01-01

    Tumor blood vessels play an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. It has been reported that tumor endothelial cells (TECs) exhibit highly angiogenic phenotypes compared with those of normal endothelial cells (NECs). TECs show higher proliferative and migratory abilities than those NECs, together with upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2). Furthermore, compared with NECs, stem cell markers such as Sca-1, CD90, and multidrug resistance 1 are upregulated in TECs, suggesting that stem-like cells exist in tumor blood vessels. In this study, to reveal the biological role of stem-like TECs, we analyzed expression of the stem cell marker aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in TECs and characterized ALDHhigh TECs. TECs and NECs were isolated from melanoma-xenografted nude mice and normal dermis, respectively. ALDH mRNA expression and activity were higher in TECs than those in NECs. Next, ALDHhigh/low TECs were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting to compare their characteristics. Compared with ALDHlow TECs, ALDHhigh TECs formed more tubes on Matrigel-coated plates and sustained the tubular networks longer. Furthermore, VEGFR2 expression was higher in ALDHhigh TECs than that in ALDHlow TECs. In addition, ALDH was expressed in the tumor blood vessels of in vivo mouse models of melanoma and oral carcinoma, but not in normal blood vessels. These findings indicate that ALDHhigh TECs exhibit an angiogenic phenotype. Stem-like TECs may have an essential role in tumor angiogenesis. PMID:25437864

  5. Phenotypes and enviromental factors: their influence in PCOS.

    PubMed

    Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Christakou, Charikleia; Marinakis, Evangelos

    2012-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex syndrome of unclear etiopathogenesis characterized by heterogeneity in phenotypic manifestations. The clinical phenotype of PCOS includes reproductive and hormonal aberrations, namely anovulation and hyperandrogenism, which coexist with metabolic disturbances. Reflecting the crosstalk between the reproductive system and metabolic tissues, obesity not only deteriorates the metabolic profile but also aggravates ovulatory dysfunction and hyperandrogenism. Although the pathogenesis of PCOS remains unclear, the syndrome appears to involve environmental and genetic components. Starting from early life and extending throughout lifecycle, environmental insults may affect susceptible women who finally demonstrate the clinical phenotype of PCOS. Diet emerges as the major environmental determinant of PCOS. Overnutrition leading to obesity is widely recognized to have an aggravating impact, while another detrimental dietary factor may be the high content of food in advanced glycated end products (AGEs). Environmental exposure to industrial products, particularly Bisphenol A (BPA), may also exacerbate the clinical course of PCOS. AGEs and BPA may act as endocrine disruptors in the pathogenesis of the syndrome. PCOS appears to mirror the harmful influence of the modern environment on the reproductive and metabolic balance of inherently predisposed individuals.

  6. Engagement of the Mannose Receptor by Tumoral Mucins Activates an Immune Suppressive Phenotype in Human Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Allavena, P.; Chieppa, M.; Bianchi, G.; Solinas, G.; Fabbri, M.; Laskarin, G.; Mantovani, A.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor-Associated Macrophages (TAMs) are abundantly present in the stroma of solid tumors and modulate several important biological processes, such as neoangiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation and invasion, and suppression of adaptive immune responses. Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) constitute a large family of transmembrane carbohydrate-binding receptors that recognize pathogens as well as endogenous glycoproteins. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that some CLRs can inhibit the immune response. In this study we investigated TAM-associated molecules potentially involved in their immune suppressive activity. We found that TAMs isolated from human ovarian carcinoma samples predominantly express the CLRs Dectin-1, MDL-1, MGL, DCIR, and most abundantly the Mannose Receptor (MR). Components of carcinomatous ascites and purified tumoral mucins (CA125 and TAG-72) bound the MR and induced its internalization. MR engagement by tumoral mucins and by an agonist anti-MR antibody modulated cytokine production by TAM toward an immune-suppressive profile: increase of IL-10, absence of IL-12, and decrease of the Th1-attracting chemokine CCL3. This study highlights that tumoral mucin-mediated ligation of the MR on infiltrating TAM may contribute to their immune suppressive phenotype. PMID:21331365

  7. Isolation of circulating epithelial and tumor progenitor cells with an invasive phenotype from breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Janice; Fan, Tina; Zhao, Qiang; Zeng, Wei; Zaslavsky, Eva; Chen, John J.; Frohman, Michael A.; Golightly, Marc G.; Madajewicz, Stefan; Chen, Wen-Tien

    2009-01-01

    Recent research advances show that tumor cell intravasation (entry into the circulation) and metastasis occur very early in breast cancer progression. Clinical studies also illustrate the potential importance of detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in outcomes of patients with metastatic breast cancer. Whether these cells exhibit the invasiveness and express tumor stem or progenitor markers, hallmark of the metastatic phenotype, is less well characterized. To detect CTCs with the invasive phenotype and to explore their molecular features, we applied a functional cell separation method, called collagen adhesion matrix (CAM) assay, as enrichment and identification steps. The CAM-coated device successfully recovered tumor cells spiked in one mL of blood with a 54%±9% (n=18) recovery rate and 0.5-35% purity, and detected invasive tumor cells in 10/10 blood samples (100% yield) from patients with metastatic breast cancer with a range of 18 to 256 CTCs/mL and average of 126±25 (mean±SD) CTCs/mL. CTCs were detected in blood samples of 28/54 (52%) stage I-III breast cancer patients with a mean count of 61 CTCs/mL. Furthermore, the relative frequency of these cells correlated to the staging, lymph node-status and survival of patients with early stage breast cancer. CAM-captured cells were capable of propagation in culture. Gene expression and multiplex flow cytometric analyses on CAM-captured cells demonstrated the existence of distinct populations of CTCs including these of epithelial lineage and stem or progenitor cells. Thus, CAM-initiated CTC detection provides advantages for examining invasiveness and tumor progenitor phenotypes. PMID:19662651

  8. Phenotypic heterogeneity and instability of human ovarian tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Jocelyn M.; Shaw, Patricia A.; Gedye, Craig; Bernardini, Marcus Q.; Neel, Benjamin G.; Ailles, Laurie E.

    2011-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model proposes that tumors have a hierarchical organization in which only some cells indefinitely self-renew and thereby sustain tumor growth. In addition, the CSC model requires that tumor-initiating cells (TICs) be prospectively isolatable on the basis of their phenotype. Previous studies have suggested that serous ovarian cancer (SOC) conforms to the CSC model, but these used arguably nonfidelitous immortalized cell lines, cultured primary cells, or passaged xenografts as the source of tumor cells. We developed a robust assay for quantifying TICs from primary SOC. Using this assay, we find that TICs are rare when assayed in either NOD/SCID or NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ−/− (NSG) mice. TIC frequency (TICf) varies substantially between patients, although it is similar in primary ovarian masses and omental metastases, suggesting that TICf is an intrinsic property of ovarian tumors. CD133 marks all TICs from several primary SOC cases. However, in other cases, substantial TIC activity is found in both the CD133+ and CD133− fractions, whereas still other cases have exclusively CD133− TICs. Furthermore, the TIC phenotype can change in xenografts: primary tumors in which all TICs are CD133+ can give rise to xenografts that contain substantial numbers of CD133− TICs. Our results highlight the need for quantitative rigor in the evaluation of TICs and for caution when using passaged xenografts for such studies. Furthermore, although our data suggest that SOC conforms to the CSC hypothesis, the heterogeneity of the TIC phenotype may complicate its clinical application. PMID:21451132

  9. Environmental influences on the behavioral phenotype of Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Horsler, Kate; Oliver, Chris

    2006-09-01

    Using observational methods, we examined the social influences on laughing and smiling behavior in children with Angelman syndrome by systematically manipulating aspects of social interaction. Seven boys and 4 girls who were between 4 and 11 years of age and who had a confirmed maternal deletion of chromosome 15q11-q13 completed the study. Each child was observed while repeatedly exposed to three conditions in which parameters of social interaction were manipulated. Laughing and smiling behavior varied across all children and was significantly heightened in a condition involving adult speech, touch, smiling, laughing, and eye contact. The findings highlight the importance of examining environmental and social influences on purported phenotypic behavior in genetic syndromes.

  10. Genomic and phenotypic profiles of two Brazilian breast cancer cell lines derived from primary human tumors

    PubMed Central

    CORRÊA, NATÁSSIA C.R.; KUASNE, HELLEN; FARIA, JERUSA A.Q.A.; SEIXAS, CIÇA C.S.; SANTOS, IRIA G.D.; ABREU, FRANCINE B.; NONOGAKI, SUELY; ROCHA, RAFAEL M.; SILVA, GERLUZA APARECIDA BORGES; GOBBI, HELENICE; ROGATTO, SILVIA R.; GOES, ALFREDO M.; GOMES, DAWIDSON A.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women worldwide. Research using breast cancer cell lines derived from primary tumors may provide valuable additional knowledge regarding this type of cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic profiles of MACL-1 and MGSO-3, the only Brazilian breast cancer cell lines available for comparative studies. We evaluated the presence of hormone receptors, proliferation, differentiation and stem cell markers, using immunohistochemical staining of the primary tumor, cultured cells and xenografts implanted in immunodeficient mice. We also investigated the ability of the cell lines to form colonies and copy number alterations by array comparative genomic hybridization. Histopathological analysis showed that the invasive primary tumor from which the MACL-1 cell line was derived, was a luminal A subtype carcinoma, while the ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) that gave rise to the MGSO-3 cell line was a HER2 subtype tumor, both showing different proliferation levels. The cell lines and the tumor xenografts in mice preserved their high proliferative potential, but did not maintain the expression of the other markers assessed. This shift in expression may be due to the selection of an ‘establishment’ phenotype in vitro. Whole-genome DNA evaluation showed a large amount of copy number alterations (CNAs) in the two cell lines. These findings render MACL-1 and MGSO-3 the first characterized Brazilian breast cancer cell lines to be potentially used for comparative research. PMID:23404580

  11. Bone marrow adipocytes promote the Warburg phenotype in metastatic prostate tumors via HIF-1α activation

    PubMed Central

    Diedrich, Jonathan D.; Rajagurubandara, Erandi; Herroon, Mackenzie K.; Mahapatra, Gargi; Hüttemann, Maik; Podgorski, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic adaptation is increasingly recognized as a key factor in tumor progression, yet its involvement in metastatic bone disease is not understood. Bone is as an adipocyte-rich organ, and a major site of metastasis from prostate cancer. Bone marrow adipocytes are metabolically active cells capable of shaping tumor metabolism via lipolysis and lipid transfer. In this study, using in vitro and in vivo models of marrow adiposity, we demonstrate that marrow fat cells promote Warburg phenotype in metastatic prostate cancer cells. We show increased expression of glycolytic enzymes, increased lactate production, and decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in tumor cells exposed to adipocytes that require paracrine signaling between the two cell types. We also reveal that prostate cancer cells are capable of inducing adipocyte lipolysis as a postulated mechanism of sustenance. We provide evidence that adipocytes drive metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells via oxygen-independent mechanism of HIF-1α activation that can be reversed by HIF-1α downregulation. Importantly, we also demonstrate that the observed metabolic signature in tumor cells exposed to adipocytes mimics the expression patterns seen in patients with metastatic disease. Together, our data provide evidence for a functional relationship between marrow adipocytes and tumor cells in bone that has likely implications for tumor growth and survival within the metastatic niche. PMID:27588494

  12. Generation of MHC class I diversity in primary tumors and selection of the malignant phenotype.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Federico; Romero, Irene; Aptsiauri, Natalia; Garcia-Lora, Angel M

    2016-01-15

    Intratumor heterogeneity among cancer cells is promoted by reversible or irreversible genetic alterations and by different microenvironmental factors. There is considerable experimental evidence of the presence of a variety of malignant cell clones with a wide diversity of major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) expression during early stages of tumor development. This variety of MHC-I phenotypes may define the evolution of a particular tumor. Loss of MHC-I molecules frequently results in immune escape of MHC-negative or -deficient tumor cells from the host T cell-mediated immune response. We review here the results obtained by our group and other researchers in animal models and humans, showing how MHC-I intratumor heterogeneity may affect local oncogenicity and metastatic progression. In particular, we summarize the data obtained in an experimental mouse cancer model of a methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma (GR9), in which isolated clones with different MHC-I expression patterns demonstrated distinct local tumor growth rates and metastatic capacities. The observed "explosion of diversity" of MHC-I phenotypes in primary tumor clones and the molecular mechanism ("hard"/irreversible or "soft"/reversible) responsible for a given MHC-I alteration might determine not only the metastatic capacity of the cells but also their response to immunotherapy. We also illustrate the generation of further MHC heterogeneity during metastatic colonization and discuss different strategies to favor tumor rejection by counteracting MHC-I loss. Finally, we highlight the role of MHC-I genes in tumor dormancy and cell cycle control. © 2014 UICC.

  13. Myoepithelial mRNA expression profiling reveals a common tumor-suppressor phenotype.

    PubMed

    Barsky, Sanford H

    2003-04-01

    A series of myoepithelial cell lines and xenografts derived from benign human myoepithelial tumors of diverse sources (salivary gland, breast, and lung) exhibit common mRNA expression profiles indicative of a tumor-suppressor phenotype. Previously established myoepithelial cell lines and xenografts (HMS-#; HMS-#X) were compared to nonmyoepithelial breast carcinoma cells (MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468, and inflammatory breast carcinoma samples, IBCr, and IBCw), a normal mammary epithelial cell line (HMEC) and individual cases of human breast cancer (zcBT#T), and matched normal human breast tissues (zcBT#N) (overall samples = 22). The global gene expression profile (22,000 genes) of these individual samples was examined using Affymetrix Microarray Gene Chips and subsequently analyzed with both Affymetrix and DChip algorithms. The myoepithelial cell lines/xenografts were distinct and very different from the nonmyoepithelial breast carcinoma cells and the normal breast and breast tumor biopsies. Two hundred and seven specifically selected genes represented a subset of genes that distinguished (P < 0.05) all the myoepithelial cell lines/xenografts from all the other samples and which themselves exhibited hierarchical clustering. Further analysis of these genes revealed increased expression in genes belonging to the classes of extracellular matrix proteins, angiogenic inhibitors, and proteinase inhibitors and decreased expression belonging to the classes of angiogenic factors and proteinases. Developmental genes were also differentially expressed (either over or underexpressed). These studies confirm our previous impression that human myoepithelial cells express a distinct tumor-suppressor phenotype.

  14. Genetic Variations Strongly Influence Phenotypic Outcome in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Jelcick, Austin S.; Yuan, Yang; Leehy, Barrett D.; Cox, Lakeisha C.; Silveira, Alexandra C.; Qiu, Fang; Schenk, Sarah; Sachs, Andrew J.; Morrison, Margaux A.; Nystuen, Arne M.; DeAngelis, Margaret M.; Haider, Neena B.

    2011-01-01

    Variation in genetic background can significantly influence the phenotypic outcome of both disease and non-disease associated traits. Additionally, differences in temporal and strain specific gene expression can also contribute to phenotypes in the mammalian retina. This is the first report of microarray based cross-strain analysis of gene expression in the retina investigating genetic background effects. Microarray analyses were performed on retinas from the following mouse strains: C57BL6/J, AKR/J, CAST/EiJ, and NOD.NON-H2-nb1 at embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5) and postnatal day 30.5 (P30.5). Over 3000 differentially expressed genes were identified between strains and developmental stages. Differential gene expression was confirmed by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Three major gene networks were identified that function to regulate retinal or photoreceptor development, visual perception, cellular transport, and signal transduction. Many of the genes in these networks are implicated in retinal diseases such as bradyopsia, night-blindness, and cone-rod dystrophy. Our analysis revealed strain specific variations in cone photoreceptor cell patterning and retinal function. This study highlights the substantial impact of genetic background on both development and function of the retina and the level of gene expression differences tolerated for normal retinal function. These strain specific genetic variations may also be present in other tissues. In addition, this study will provide valuable insight for the development of more accurate models for human retinal diseases. PMID:21779340

  15. Protumorigenic M2-like phenotype cell infiltration in the melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy.

    PubMed

    Strieder, Luciana; Carlos, Román; León, Jorge Esquiche; Ribeiro-Silva, Alfredo; Costa, Victor; Kaminagakura, Estela

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to report 2 cases of melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy (MNTI), emphasizing the analysis of intratumoral immune cells by immunohistochemistry. Case 1: A 6-month-old girl presented with a 3-cm tumor in the anterior region of the left maxilla. Case 2: A 4-month-old boy presented with a 4-cm tumor in the anterior region of the left maxilla. Microscopically, case 1 had predominantly neuroblast-like cells supported by fibrillary neuropil-like stroma arranged in an alveolar pattern, whereas case 2 exhibited scattered melanocyte-like and neuroblast-like cells supported by fibrovascular stroma. A large immunohistochemical panel for characterizing intratumoral macrophage and dendritic cell subsets was performed. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated positivity for HLA-DR, XIIIa, CD68, and CD163 (range 6%-50%) mainly on the fibrovascular stroma, suggesting M2 macrophage-like cell phenotype. CD138 was overexpressed in the tumor stroma. Results suggest the involvement of M2-polarized macrophages in the MNTI pathogenesis, which may act by modulating tumor growth and/or tumor stromal remodeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Phenotypically distinct helper NK cells are required for gp96-mediated anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sedlacek, Abigail L.; Kinner-Bibeau, Lauren B.; Binder, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    A number of Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs), in the extracellular environment, are immunogenic. Following cross-presentation of HSP-chaperoned peptides by CD91+ antigen presenting cells (APCs), T cells are primed with specificity for the derivative antigen-bearing cell. Accordingly, tumor-derived HSPs are in clinical trials for cancer immunotherapy. We investigate the role of NK cells in gp96-mediated anti-tumor immune responses given their propensity to lyse tumor cells. We show that gp96-mediated rejection of tumors requires a unique and necessary helper role in NK cells. This helper role occurs during the effector phase of the anti-tumor immune response and is required for T cell and APC function. Gp96 activates NK cells indirectly via APCs to a phenotype distinct from NK cells activated by other mechanisms such as IL-2. While NK cells have both lytic and cytokine producing properties, we show that gp96 selectively activates cytokine production in NK cells, which is important in the HSP anti-tumor immune response, and leaves their cytotoxic capacity unchanged. PMID:27431727

  17. SU-E-J-248: Contributions of Tumor and Stroma Phenotyping in Computer-Aided Diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H; Lan, L; Sennett, C; Giger, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To gain insight into the role of parenchyma stroma in the characterization of breast tumors by incorporating computerized mammographic parenchyma assessment into breast CADx in the task of distinguishing between malignant and benign lesions. Methods: This study was performed on 182 biopsy-proven breast mass lesions, including 76 benign and 106 malignant lesions. For each full-field digital mammogram (FFDM) case, our quantitative imaging analysis was performed on both the tumor and a region-of-interest (ROI) from the normal contralateral breast. The lesion characterization includes automatic lesion segmentation and feature extraction. Radiographic texture analysis (RTA) was applied on the normal ROIs to assess the mammographic parenchymal patterns of these contralateral normal breasts. Classification performance of both individual computer extracted features and the output from a Bayesian artificial neural network (BANN) were evaluated with a leave-one-lesion-out method using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis with area under the curve (AUC) as the figure of merit. Results: Lesion characterization included computer-extracted phenotypes of spiculation, size, shape, and margin. For parenchymal pattern characterization, five texture features were selected, including power law beta, contrast, and edge gradient. Merging of these computer-selected features using BANN classifiers yielded AUC values of 0.79 (SE=0.03) and 0.67 (SE=0.04) in the task of distinguishing between malignant and benign lesions using only tumor phenotypes and texture features from the contralateral breasts, respectively. Incorporation of tumor phenotypes with parenchyma texture features into the BANN yielded improved classification performance with an AUC value of 0.83 (SE=0.03) in the task of differentiating malignant from benign lesions. Conclusion: Combining computerized tumor and parenchyma phenotyping was found to significantly improve breast cancer diagnostic accuracy

  18. Exploring the quantitative relationship between metabolism and enzymatic phenotype by physiological modeling of glucose metabolism and lactate oxidation in solid tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Vaupel, Peter; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Shi, Kuangyu

    2015-03-01

    Molecular imaging using PET or hyperpolarized MRI can characterize tumor phenotypes by assessing the related metabolism of certain substrates. However, the interpretation of the substrate turnover in terms of a pathophysiological understanding is not straightforward and only semiquantitative. The metabolism of imaging probes is influenced by a number of factors, such as the microvascular structure or the expression of key enzymes. This study aims to use computational simulation to investigate the relationship between the metabolism behind molecular imaging and the underlying tumor phenotype. The study focused on the pathways of glucose metabolism and lactate oxidation in order to establish the quantitative relationship between the expression of several transporters (GLUT, MCT1 and MCT4), expression of the enzyme hexokinase (HK), microvasculature and the metabolism of glucose or lactate and the extracellular pH distribution. A computational model for a 2D tumor tissue phantom was constructed and the spatio-temporal evolution of related species (e.g. oxygen, glucose, lactate, protons, bicarbonate ions) was estimated by solving reaction-diffusion equations. The proposed model was tested by the verification of the simulation results using in vivo and in vitro literature data. The influences of different expression levels of GLUT, MCT1, MCT4, HK and microvessel distribution on substrate concentrations were analyzed. The major results are consistent with experimental data (e.g. GLUT is more influential to glycolytic flux than HK; extracellular pH is not correlated with MCT expressions) and provide theoretical interpretation of the co-influence of multiple factors of the tumor microenvironment. This computational simulation may assist the generation of hypotheses to bridge the discrepancy between tumor metabolism and the functions of transporters and enzymes. It has the potential to accelerate the development of multi-modal imaging strategies for assessment of tumor

  19. Phenotypic changes of acid adapted cancer cells push them toward aggressiveness in their evolution in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Damaghi, Mehdi; Gillies, Robert

    2016-09-16

    The inter- and intra-tumoral metabolic phenotypes of tumors are heterogeneous, and this is related to microenvironments that select for increased glycolysis. Increased glycolysis leads to decreased pH, and these local microenvironment effects lead to further selection. Hence, heterogeneity of phenotypes is an indirect consequence of altering microenvironments during carcinogenesis. In early stages of growth, tumors are stratified, with the most aggressive cells developing within the acidic interior of the tumor. However, these cells eventually find themselves at the tumor edge, where they invade into the normal tissue via acid-mediated invasion. We believe acid adaptation during the evolution of cancer cells in their niche is a Rubicon that, once crossed, allows cells to invade into and outcompete normal stromal tissue. In this study, we illustrate some acid-induced phenotypic changes due to acidosis resulting in more aggressiveness and invasiveness of cancer cells.

  20. Rumen microbial communities influence metabolic phenotypes in lambs

    PubMed Central

    Morgavi, Diego P.; Rathahao-Paris, Estelle; Popova, Milka; Boccard, Julien; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Boudra, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    The rumen microbiota is an essential part of ruminants shaping their nutrition and health. Despite its importance, it is not fully understood how various groups of rumen microbes affect host-microbe relationships and functions. The aim of the study was to simultaneously explore the rumen microbiota and the metabolic phenotype of lambs for identifying host-microbe associations and potential biomarkers of digestive functions. Twin lambs, separated in two groups after birth were exposed to practices (isolation and gavage with rumen fluid with protozoa or protozoa-depleted) that differentially restricted the acquisition of microbes. Rumen microbiota, fermentation parameters, digestibility and growth were monitored for up to 31 weeks of age. Microbiota assembled in isolation from other ruminants lacked protozoa and had low bacterial and archaeal diversity whereas digestibility was not affected. Exposure to adult sheep microbiota increased bacterial and archaeal diversity independently of protozoa presence. For archaea, Methanomassiliicoccales displaced Methanosphaera. Notwithstanding, protozoa induced differences in functional traits such as digestibility and significantly shaped bacterial community structure, notably Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae lower up to 6 folds, Prevotellaceae lower by ~40%, and Clostridiaceae and Veillonellaceae higher up to 10 folds compared to microbiota without protozoa. An orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis of urinary metabolome matched differences in microbiota structure. Discriminant metabolites were mainly involved in amino acids and protein metabolic pathways while a negative interaction was observed between methylotrophic methanogens Methanomassiliicoccales and trimethylamine N-oxide. These results stress the influence of gut microbes on animal phenotype and show the potential of metabolomics for monitoring rumen microbial functions. PMID:26528248

  1. V3 vasopressin receptor and corticotropic phenotype in pituitary and nonpituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    de Keyzer, Y; René, P; Lenne, F; Auzan, C; Clauser, E; Bertagna, X

    1997-01-01

    Pituitary corticotropic cells express a specific vasopressin receptor, called V1b or V3, through which vasopressin stimulates corticotropin secretion. We recently cloned a cDNA coding for this receptor and showed that it belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor family. V3 mRNA is readily detected by RT-PCR in normal human pituitaries and corticotropic pituitary adenomas but not in PRL or GH-secreting adenomas, thus demonstrating that, like POMC itself and the CRH receptor, V3 is a marker of the corticotropic phenotype. Nuclease protection experiments suggest that V3 is overexpressed in some corticotropic adenomas, and thus may play a role in tumor development by activating the phospholipase C-signalling pathway. In addition analysis of its expression in nonpituitary neuroendocrine tumors showed a striking association with carcinoids of the lung responsible for the ectopic ACTH syndrome.

  2. HIF-1α mediates tumor hypoxia to confer a perpetual mesenchymal phenotype for malignant progression.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Young-Gun; Christensen, Jared; Gu, Jie; Huang, L Eric

    2011-06-21

    Although tumor progression involves genetic and epigenetic alterations to normal cellular biology, the underlying mechanisms of these changes remain obscure. Numerous studies have shown that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is overexpressed in many human cancers and up-regulates a host of hypoxia-responsive genes for cancer growth and survival. We recently identified an alternative mechanism of HIF-1α function that induces genetic alterations by suppressing DNA repair. Here, we show that long-term hypoxia, which mimics the tumor microenvironment, drives a perpetual epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through up-regulation of the zinc finger E-box binding homeobox protein ZEB2, whereas short-term hypoxia induces a reversible EMT that requires the transcription factor Twist1. Moreover, we show that the perpetual EMT driven by chronic hypoxia depends on HIF-1α induction of genetic alterations rather than its canonical transcriptional activator function. These mesenchymal tumor cells not only acquire tumorigenicity but also display characteristics of advanced cancers, including necrosis, aggressive invasion, and metastasis. Hence, these results reveal a mechanism by which HIF-1α promotes a perpetual mesenchymal phenotype, thereby advancing tumor progression.

  3. The Transcription Factor p53 Influences Microglial Activation Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jayadev, Suman; Nesser, Nicole K.; Hopkins, Stephanie; Myers, Scott J.; Case, Amanda; Lee, Rona J.; Seaburg, Luke A.; Uo, Takuma; Murphy, Sean P.; Morrison, Richard S.; Garden, Gwenn A.

    2011-01-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases are influenced by the innate immune response in the central nervous system (CNS). Microglia, have pro-inflammatory and subsequently neurotoxic actions as well as anti-inflammatory functions that promote recovery and repair. Very little is known about the transcriptional control of these specific microglial behaviors. We have previously shown that in HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), the transcription factor p53 accumulates in microglia and that microglial p53 expression is required for the in vitro neurotoxicity of the HIV coat glycoprotein gp120. These findings suggested a novel function for p53 in regulating microglial activation. Here we report that in the absence of p53, microglia demonstrate a blunted response to interferon-γ, failing to increase expression of genes associated with classical macrophage activation or secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines. Microarray analysis of global gene expression profiles revealed increased expression of genes associated with anti-inflammatory functions, phagocytosis and tissue repair in p53 knockout (p53−/−) microglia compared with those cultured from strain matched p53 expressing (p53+/+) mice. We further observed that p53−/− microglia demonstrate increased phagocytic activity in vitro and expression of markers for alternative macrophage activation both in vitro and in vivo. In HAND brain tissue, the alternative activation marker CD163 was expressed in a separate subset of microglia than those demonstrating p53 accumulation. These data suggest that p53 influences microglial behavior, supporting the adoption of a pro-inflammatory phenotype, while p53 deficiency promotes phagocytosis and gene expression associated with alternative activation and anti-inflammatory functions. PMID:21598312

  4. [Cancer Cells as Dynamic System - Molecular and Phenotypic Changes During Tumor Formation, Progression and Dissemination].

    PubMed

    Sommerová, L; Ondroušková, E; Hrstka, R

    Dynamic, punctual and perfectly coordinated cellular response to internal and external stimuli is a crucial prerequisite for adaptation of mammalian cells to all changes that occur during cellular development under physiological conditions. Hijacking this ability is characteristic for tumor cells that are capable to adapt to unfavorable conditions which contribute to the formation and development of cancer during the process of tumor formation and progression. By changing key mechanisms, malignant cells can avoid cell death and thus allow development and spread of the tumor. The changes at the genetic level are manifested by various phenotypic characteristics, through which tumor cells are able to escape defense mechanisms, to acquire resistance to treatment, to invade and to create secondary tumors. In recent years, one of the most studied properties include changes in energy metabolism, when tumor cells specifically control reprogramming of the main metabolic pathways for their own benefit and to satisfy their increased needs not only for energy, but also for building materials required for increased proliferation. To adapt to extracellular conditions, it is necessary that cells undergo morphological changes, where modifications in the cell shape through reorganization of cytoskeletal filaments allow tumor cells to increase their invasiveness and other aggressive features. Clarifying these changes together with understanding of the switch in the genetic program within cancer cells, which allows them to overcome different stages of differentiation from cancer stem cells to fully differentiated cells, would be an important prerequisite for identification of the cancer cell "weaknesses" and may lead to improved cancer treatment. The ability of tumor cells to alter the rules of their own organism thus represents an important challenge for oncological research.Key words: cellular reprogramming - cancer cell plasticity - cancer metabolism - tumor heterogeneity

  5. Immunostimulatory early phenotype of tumor-associated macrophages does not predict tumor growth outcome in an HLA-DR mouse model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Riabov, Vladimir; Kim, David; Chhina, Surmeet; Alexander, Richard B; Klyushnenkova, Elena N

    2015-07-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) were shown to support the progression of many solid tumors. However, anti-tumor properties of TAM were also reported in several types of cancer. Here, we investigated the phenotype and functions of TAM in two transgenic mouse models of prostate cancer that display striking differences in tumor growth outcome. Mice expressing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as a self-antigen specifically in prostate (PSAtg mice) rejected PSA-expressing transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) tumors. However, the introduction of HLA-DRB1*1501 (DR2b) transgene presenting PSA-derived peptides in a MHC class II-restricted manner exacerbated the growth of TRAMP-PSA tumors in DR2bxPSA F 1 mice. Despite the difference in tumor growth outcome, tumors in both strains were equally and intensively infiltrated by macrophages on the first week after tumor challenge. TAM exhibited mixed M1/M2 polarization and simultaneously produced pro-inflammatory (TNFα, IL1β) and anti-inflammatory (IL10) cytokines. TAM from both mouse strains demonstrated antigen-presenting potential and pronounced immunostimulatory activity. Moreover, they equally induced apoptosis of tumor cells. In vivo depletion of macrophages in DR2bxPSA F 1 but not PSAtg mice aggravated tumor growth suggesting that macrophages more strongly contribute to anti-tumor immunity when specific presentation of PSA to CD4+ T cells is possible. In summary, we conclude that in the early stages of tumor progression, the phenotype and functional properties of TAM did not predict tumor growth outcome in two transgenic prostate cancer models. Furthermore, we demonstrated that during the initial stage of prostate cancer development, TAM have the potential to activate T cell immunity and mediate anti-tumor effects.

  6. Influence of the tumor microenvironment on angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Payne, Sarah J L; Jones, Louise

    2011-03-01

    It is becoming increasingly recognized that the host microenvironment is essential for regulating tumor cell behavior. The cellular stromal compartment can modulate angiogenesis either directly through enhanced secretion of pro-angiogenic factors or reduced secretion of antiangiogenic factors, or indirectly by modulating the surrounding extracellular matrix. Control of angiogenesis represents a critical step in cancer progression and is a potential therapeutic target. This article focuses on the role of the tumor microenvironment in the control of angiogenesis and how dissection of the molecular interactions may enhance prognostic and predictive power and facilitate therapeutic targeting.

  7. Chromosome X loci and spontaneous granulosa cell tumor development in SWR mice: epigenetics and epistasis at work for an ovarian phenotype.

    PubMed

    Dorward, Ann M; Yaskowiak, Edward S; Smith, Kerri N; Stanford, Kaitlyn R; Shultz, Kathryn L; Beamer, Wesley G

    2013-02-01

    Females of the SWR/Bm (SWR) inbred mouse strain possess a unique susceptibility to juvenile-onset tumors originating from the granulosa cells (GC) of the ovarian follicles. Tumor susceptibility is an inherited, polygenic trait in SWR females, minimally involving an oncogenic Granulosa cell tumor susceptibility (Gct) locus on chromosome (Chr) 4 (Gct1), and two GC tumor susceptibility modifier genes mapped to distinct regions of Chr X (Gct4 and Gct6). Shifts in the frequency of GC tumor initiation in the SWR female population from low penetrance to moderate penetrance, or phenotype switching between GC tumor-susceptible and GC tumor-resistant, is strongly influenced by the allelic contributions at Gct4 and Gct6. In addition to the allele-specific effects, GC tumor susceptibility is controlled by the mode of X-linked transmission with a dominant, paternal parent-of-origin effect. We took advantage of the robust paternal effect with a recombinant male progeny testing strategy to resolve the Gct4 locus interval to 1.345 million base (Mb) pairs. Based on the mapping resolution and the phenotype sensitivity to endogenous and exogenous androgen exposure, a promising candidate for Gct4 identity is the androgen receptor (Ar) gene. We explored the mechanism of allelic variation for Ar between SWR (low penetrance allele) and SJL/Bm (SJL) (moderate penetrance allele) using an SWR.SJL-X congenic strain resource and a quantitative gene expression method. We report the low GC tumor penetrance allele of the SWR strain correlates with significantly reduced Ar transcript levels in the female ovary at the pubertal transition.

  8. Inference of tumor evolution during chemotherapy by computational modeling and in situ analysis of genetic and phenotypic cellular diversity.

    PubMed

    Almendro, Vanessa; Cheng, Yu-Kang; Randles, Amanda; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Marusyk, Andriy; Ametller, Elisabet; Gonzalez-Farre, Xavier; Muñoz, Montse; Russnes, Hege G; Helland, Aslaug; Rye, Inga H; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Maruyama, Reo; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Dowsett, Mitchell; Jones, Robin L; Reis-Filho, Jorge; Gascon, Pere; Gönen, Mithat; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-02-13

    Cancer therapy exerts a strong selection pressure that shapes tumor evolution, yet our knowledge of how tumors change during treatment is limited. Here, we report the analysis of cellular heterogeneity for genetic and phenotypic features and their spatial distribution in breast tumors pre- and post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We found that intratumor genetic diversity was tumor-subtype specific, and it did not change during treatment in tumors with partial or no response. However, lower pretreatment genetic diversity was significantly associated with pathologic complete response. In contrast, phenotypic diversity was different between pre- and posttreatment samples. We also observed significant changes in the spatial distribution of cells with distinct genetic and phenotypic features. We used these experimental data to develop a stochastic computational model to infer tumor growth patterns and evolutionary dynamics. Our results highlight the importance of integrated analysis of genotypes and phenotypes of single cells in intact tissues to predict tumor evolution. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sphere-derived tumor cells exhibit impaired metastasis by a host-mediated quiescent phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Bleau, Anne-Marie; Zandueta, Carolina; Redrado, Miriam; Martínez-Canarias, Susana; Larzábal, Leyre; Montuenga, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    The spread of lung cancer cells to distant sites represents a common event associated with poor prognosis. A fraction of tumor cells named cancer stem cells (CSCs) have the ability to overcome therapeutic stress and remain quiescent. However, whether these CSCs have also the capacity to initiate and sustain metastasis remains unclear. Here, we used tumor sphere cultures (TSC) isolated from mouse and human lung cancer models to enrich for CSCs, and assessed their metastatic potential as compared to non-CSCs. As expected, TSC overexpressed a variety of stem cell markers and displayed chemoresistance. The CSC phenotype of TSC was confirmed by their higher growth ability in soft agar and tumorigenic potential in vivo, despite their reduced in vitro cell growth kinetics. Surprisingly, the appearance of spontaneous lung metastases was strongly delayed in mice injected with TSC as compared to non-TSC cells. Similarly, this finding was confirmed in several other models of metastasis, an effect associated with a retarded colonization activity. Interestingly, such delay correlated with a quiescent phenotype whose underlined mechanisms included an increase in p27 protein and lower phospho-ERK1/2 levels. Thus, these data suggest that cells enriched for CSC properties display an impaired metastatic activity, a finding with potential clinical implications. PMID:26318423

  10. Prediabetes Phenotype Influences Improvements in Glucose Homeostasis with Resistance Training

    PubMed Central

    Eikenberg, Joshua D.; Savla, Jyoti; Marinik, Elaina L.; Davy, Kevin P.; Pownall, John; Baugh, Mary E.; Flack, Kyle D.; Boshra, Soheir; Winett, Richard A.; Davy, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine if prediabetes phenotype influences improvements in glucose homeostasis with resistance training (RT). Methods Older, overweight individuals with prediabetes (n = 159; aged 60±5 yrs; BMI 33±4 kg/m2) completed a supervised RT program twice per week for 12 weeks. Body weight and composition, strength, fasting plasma glucose, 2-hr oral glucose tolerance, and Matsuda-Defronza estimated insulin sensitivity index (ISI) were assessed before and after the intervention. Participants were categorized according to their baseline prediabetes phenotype as impaired fasting glucose only (IFG) (n = 73), impaired glucose tolerance only (IGT) (n = 21), or combined IFG and IGT (IFG/IGT) (n = 65). Results Chest press and leg press strength increased 27% and 18%, respectively, following the 12-week RT program (both p<0.05). Waist circumference (-1.0%; pre 109.3±10.3 cm, post 108.2±10.6 cm) and body fat (-0.6%; pre 43.7±6.8%, post 43.1±6.8%) declined, and lean body mass (+1.3%; pre 52.0±10.4 kg, post 52.7±10.7 kg) increased following the intervention. Fasting glucose concentrations did not change (p>0.05) following the intervention. However, 2-hr oral glucose tolerance improved in those with IGT (pre 8.94±0.72 mmol/l, post 7.83±1.11 mmol/l, p<0.05) and IFG/IGT (pre 9.66±1.11mmol/l, post 8.60±2.00 mmol/l) but not in those with IFG (pre 6.27±1.28mmol/l, post 6.33± 1.55 mmol/l). There were no significant changes in ISI or glucose area under the curve following the RT program. Conclusions RT without dietary intervention improves 2-hr oral glucose tolerance in individuals with prediabetes. However, the improvements in glucose homeostasis with RT appear limited to those with IGT or combined IFG and IGT. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01112709 PMID:26840904

  11. Chronic inhibition of tumor cell-derived VEGF enhances the malignant phenotype of colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor-a (VEGF)-targeted therapies have become an important treatment for a number of human malignancies. The VEGF inhibitors are actually effective in several types of cancers, however, the benefits are transiently, and the vast majority of patients who initially respond to the therapies will develop resistance. One of possible mechanisms for the acquired resistance may be the direct effect(s) of VEGF inhibitors on tumor cells expressing VEGF receptors (VEGFR). Thus, we investigated here the direct effect of chronic VEGF inhibition on phenotype changes in human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Methods To chronically inhibit cancer cell-derived VEGF, human CRC cell lines (HCT116 and RKO) were chronically exposed (2 months) to an anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody (mAb) or were disrupted the Vegf gene (VEGF-KO). Effects of VEGF family members were blocked by treatment with a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (VEGFR-TKI). Hypoxia-induced apoptosis under VEGF inhibited conditions was measured by TUNEL assay. Spheroid formation ability was assessed using a 3-D spheroid cell culture system. Results Chronic inhibition of secreted/extracellular VEGF by an anti-VEGF mAb redundantly increased VEGF family member (PlGF, VEGFR1 and VEGFR2), induced a resistance to hypoxia-induced apoptosis, and increased spheroid formation ability. This apoptotic resistance was partially abrogated by a VEGFR-TKI, which blocked the compensate pathway consisted of VEGF family members, or by knockdown of Vegf mRNA, which inhibited intracellular function(s) of all Vegf gene products. Interestingly, chronic and complete depletion of all Vegf gene products by Vegf gene knockout further augmented these phenotypes in the compensate pathway-independent manner. These accelerated phenotypes were significantly suppressed by knockdown of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α that was up-regulated in the VEGF-KO cell lines. Conclusions Our findings suggest that chronic

  12. Clinical significance of phenotyping and karyotyping of circulating tumor cells in patients with advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Yilin; Zhang, Xiaotian; Ge, Sai; Gao, Jing; Gong, Jifang; Lu, Ming; Zhang, Qiyue; Cao, Yanshuo; Wang, Daisy Dandan; Lin, Peter Ping; Shen, Lin

    2014-08-30

    Karyotyping and phenotyping of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in therapeutic cancer patients is of particular clinical significance in terms of both identifying chemo-resistant CTC subtypes and understanding CTC evolution. The integrated subtraction enrichment (SET) and immunostaining-fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH) platform was applied to detect and characterize CTCs in patients with advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Status of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expressing and aneuploidy of chromosome 8 in CTCs enriched from the patients was examined by SET-iFISH following clinical chemotherapy or HER2-targeted therapy. CellSearch system was applied as a reference control. Phenotyping of CTCs in HER2 positive AGC patients demonstrated that HER2⁺ CTCs could be effectively eliminated in response to HER2-targeted therapy. Karytotyping of CTCs indicated that distinct CTCs with different ploidies of chromosomes 8 in AGC patients correlated to either sensitivity or resistance of paclitaxel or cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Examination of the copy number of chromosome 8 in CTCs provides a potential approach for predicting chemotherapeutic efficacy and monitoring chemo-resistance. Phenotyping and karyotyping of the enriched CTCs upon ploidy of chromosome 8 or HER2 expression is of clinical potential for monitoring chemo-resistance and evaluating therapeutic efficacy for AGC patients.

  13. Surprisal analysis of Glioblastoma Multiform (GBM) microRNA dynamics unveils tumor specific phenotype.

    PubMed

    Zadran, Sohila; Remacle, Francoise; Levine, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    Gliomablastoma multiform (GBM) is the most fatal form of all brain cancers in humans. Currently there are limited diagnostic tools for GBM detection. Here, we applied surprisal analysis, a theory grounded in thermodynamics, to unveil how biomolecule energetics, specifically a redistribution of free energy amongst microRNAs (miRNAs), results in a system deviating from a non-cancer state to the GBM cancer -specific phenotypic state. Utilizing global miRNA microarray expression data of normal and GBM patients tumors, surprisal analysis characterizes a miRNA system response capable of distinguishing GBM samples from normal tissue biopsy samples. We indicate that the miRNAs contributing to this system behavior is a disease phenotypic state specific to GBM and is therefore a unique GBM-specific thermodynamic signature. MiRNAs implicated in the regulation of stochastic signaling processes crucial in the hallmarks of human cancer, dominate this GBM-cancer phenotypic state. With this theory, we were able to distinguish with high fidelity GBM patients solely by monitoring the dynamics of miRNAs present in patients' biopsy samples. We anticipate that the GBM-specific thermodynamic signature will provide a critical translational tool in better characterizing cancer types and in the development of future therapeutics for GBM.

  14. Metabolomics profiling in plasma samples from glioma patients correlates with tumor phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Heimberger, Amy B.; Lu, Zhimin; Wu, Xifeng; Hodges, Tiffany R.; Song, Renduo; Shen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background Tumor-based molecular biomarkers have redefined in the classification gliomas. However, the association of systemic metabolomics with glioma phenotype has not been explored yet. Methods In this study, we conducted two-step (discovery and validation) metabolomic profiling in plasma samples from 87 glioma patients. The metabolomics data were tested for correlation with glioma grade (high vs low), glioblastoma (GBM) versus malignant gliomas, and IDH mutation status. Results Five metabolites, namely uracil, arginine, lactate, cystamine, and ornithine, significantly differed between high- and low-grade glioma patients in both the discovery and validation cohorts. When the discovery and validation cohorts were combined, we identified 29 significant metabolites with 18 remaining significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Those 18 significant metabolites separated high- from low-grade glioma patients with 91.1% accuracy. In the pathway analysis, a total of 18 significantly metabolic pathways were identified. Similarly, we identified 2 and 6 metabolites that significantly differed between GBM and non-GBM, and IDH mutation positive and negative patients after multiple comparison adjusting. Those 6 significant metabolites separated IDH1 mutation positive from negative glioma patients with 94.4% accuracy. Three pathways were identified to be associated with IDH mutation status. Within arginine and proline metabolism, levels of intermediate metabolites in creatine pathway were all significantly lower in IDH mutation positive than in negative patients, suggesting an increased activity of creatine pathway in IDH mutation positive tumors. Conclusion Our findings identified metabolites and metabolic pathways that differentiated tumor phenotypes. These may be useful as host biomarker candidates to further help glioma molecular classification. PMID:26967252

  15. Phenotype and function of tumor-associated neutrophils and their subsets in early-stage human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy B

    2017-03-10

    Neutrophils accumulate in many types of human and murine tumors and represent a significant portion of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells. Our current understanding of the role of neutrophils in tumor development has depended primarily on murine models of cancer. However, there are crucial species differences in the evolution of tumors, genetic diversity, immune and inflammatory responses, and intrinsic biology of neutrophils that might have a profound impact on the tumor development and function of neutrophils in mouse versus human tumors. To date, the majority of experimental approaches to study neutrophils in cancer patients have been limited to the examination of circulating blood neutrophils. The phenotype and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in humans, particularly in the early stages of tumor development, have not been extensively investigated. Thus, the long-term goal of our work has been to characterize human TANs and determine their specific role in tumor development. Here, we summarize our findings on human TANs obtained from human early stage lung cancer patients. We will describe the phenotypes of different TAN subsets identified in early stage lung tumors, as well as their functional dialog with T cells.

  16. Circulating estradiol defines the tumor phenotype in menopausal breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Schneider, José; Martín-Gutiérrez, Silvia; Tresguerres, Jesús A; García-Velasco, Juan A

    2009-09-20

    To correlate circulating hormone levels with the clinical and biological features of the tumors in menopausal breast cancer patients. Circulating hormone levels were measured in 161 previously untreated menopausal breast cancer patients within 72 h of their planned surgery. The obtained hormone levels were correlated with tumor size, histological and nuclear grade, histological score, axillary nodal status, DNA-ploidy and Ki67-, c-erb-B2-, p53, Bax-, VEGF- and Nup88-expression. The only statistically significant correlations found between circulating hormone levels and all tested variables were an inverse one between estradiol and the expression of the apoptosis-associated Bax gene (p=0.009), and again an inverse correlation between estradiol and the expression of c-erb-B2 (p=0.04). When comparing hormone levels with each other, a significant correlation between estradiol and progesterone (p<0.0001), an inverse one between estradiol and FSH (p=0.04) and a direct one between LH and prolactin (p=0.001) were found. Higher circulating estradiol levels in postmenopausal breast cancer patients are associated with molecular features usually defining a biologically less aggressive tumor phenotype.

  17. Versatile in vivo regulation of tumor phenotypes by dCas9-mediated transcriptional perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Christian J.; Bruno, Peter M.; Horlbeck, Max A.; Gilbert, Luke A.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Hemann, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted transcriptional regulation is a powerful tool to study genetic mediators of cellular behavior. Here, we show that catalytically dead Cas9 (dCas9) targeted to genomic regions upstream or downstream of the transcription start site allows for specific and sustainable gene-expression level alterations in tumor cells in vitro and in syngeneic immune-competent mouse models. We used this approach for a high-coverage pooled gene-activation screen in vivo and discovered previously unidentified modulators of tumor growth and therapeutic response. Moreover, by using dCas9 linked to an activation domain, we can either enhance or suppress target gene expression simply by changing the genetic location of dCas9 binding relative to the transcription start site. We demonstrate that these directed changes in gene-transcription levels occur with minimal off-target effects. Our findings highlight the use of dCas9-mediated transcriptional regulation as a versatile tool to reproducibly interrogate tumor phenotypes in vivo. PMID:27325776

  18. Distinct genetic profiles in colorectal tumors with or without the CpG island methylator phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Toyota, Minoru; Ohe-Toyota, Mutsumi; Ahuja, Nita; Issa, Jean-Pierre J.

    2000-01-01

    Colorectal cancers (CRCs) are characterized by multiple genetic (mutations) and epigenetic (CpG island methylation) alterations, but it is not known whether these evolve independently through stochastic processes. We have recently described a novel pathway termed CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in CRC, which is characterized by the simultaneous methylation of multiple CpG islands, including several known genes, such as p16, hMLH1, and THBS1. We have now studied mutations in K-RAS, p53, DPC4, and TGFβRII in a panel of colorectal tumors with or without CIMP. We find that CIMP defines two groups of tumors with significantly different genetic lesions: frequent K-RAS mutations were found in CIMP+ CRCs (28/41, 68%) compared with CIMP− cases (14/47, 30%, P = 0.0005). By contrast, p53 mutations were found in 24% (10/41) of CIMP+ CRCs vs. 60% (30/46) of CIMP− cases (P = 0.002). Both of these differences were independent of microsatellite instability. These interactions between CIMP, K-RAS mutations, and p53 mutations were preserved in colorectal adenomas, suggesting that they occur early in carcinogenesis. The distinct combinations of epigenetic and genetic alterations in each group suggest that activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes is related to the underlying mechanism of generating molecular diversity in cancer, rather than simply accumulate stochastically during cancer development. PMID:10639144

  19. Tumor stroma with senescence-associated secretory phenotype in steatohepatitic hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee San; Yoo, Jeong Eun; Kim, Haeryoung; Rhee, Hyungjin; Koh, Myoung Ju; Nahm, Ji Hae; Choi, Jin Sub; Lee, Kee-Ho; Park, Young Nyun

    2017-01-01

    Senescence secretome was recently reported to promote liver cancer in an obese mouse model. Steatohepatitic hepatocellular carcinoma (SH-HCC), a new variant of HCC, has been found in metabolic syndrome patients, and pericellular fibrosis, a characteristic feature of SH-HCC, suggests that alteration of the tumor stroma might play an important role in SH-HCC development. Clinicopathological characteristics and tumor stroma showing senescence and senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) were investigated in 21 SH-HCCs and 34 conventional HCCs (C-HCCs). The expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), p21Waf1/Cif1, γ-H2AX, and IL-6 was investigated by immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescence. SH-HCCs were associated with older age, higher body mass index, and a higher incidence of metabolic syndrome, compared to C-HCC (P <0.05, all). The numbers of α-SMA-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) (P = 0.049) and α-SMA-positive CAFs co-expressing p21Waf1/Cif1 (P = 0.038), γ-H2AX (P = 0.065), and IL-6 (P = 0.048) were greater for SH-HCCs than C-HCCs. Additionally, non-tumoral liver from SH-HCCs showed a higher incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and a higher number of α-SMA-positive stellate cells expressing γ-H2AX and p21Waf1/Cif1 than that from C-HCCs (P <0.05, all). In conclusion, SH-HCCs are considered to occur more frequently in metabolic syndrome patients. Therein, senescent and damaged CAFs, as well as non-tumoral stellate cells, expressing SASP including IL-6 may contribute to the development of SH-HCC. PMID:28273155

  20. NK Cells Preferentially Target Tumor Cells with a Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ames, Erik; Canter, Robert J; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Mac, Stephanie; Chen, Mingyi; Smith, Rachel C; Hagino, Takeshi; Perez-Cunningham, Jessica; Sckisel, Gail D; Urayama, Shiro; Monjazeb, Arta M; Fragoso, Ruben C; Sayers, Thomas J; Murphy, William J

    2015-10-15

    Increasing evidence supports the hypothesis that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are resistant to antiproliferative therapies, able to repopulate tumor bulk, and seed metastasis. NK cells are able to target stem cells as shown by their ability to reject allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells but not solid tissue grafts. Using multiple preclinical models, including NK coculture (autologous and allogeneic) with multiple human cancer cell lines and dissociated primary cancer specimens and NK transfer in NSG mice harboring orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenografts, we assessed CSC viability, CSC frequency, expression of death receptor ligands, and tumor burden. We demonstrate that activated NK cells are capable of preferentially killing CSCs identified by multiple CSC markers (CD24(+)/CD44(+), CD133(+), and aldehyde dehydrogenase(bright)) from a wide variety of human cancer cell lines in vitro and dissociated primary cancer specimens ex vivo. We observed comparable effector function of allogeneic and autologous NK cells. We also observed preferential upregulation of NK activation ligands MICA/B, Fas, and DR5 on CSCs. Blocking studies further implicated an NKG2D-dependent mechanism for NK killing of CSCs. Treatment of orthotopic human pancreatic cancer tumor-bearing NSG mice with activated NK cells led to significant reductions in both intratumoral CSCs and tumor burden. Taken together, these data from multiple preclinical models, including a strong reliance on primary human cancer specimens, provide compelling preclinical evidence that activated NK cells preferentially target cancer cells with a CSC phenotype, highlighting the translational potential of NK immunotherapy as part of a combined modality approach for refractory solid malignancies.

  1. Conditional inactivation of the mouse Wwox tumor suppressor gene recapitulates the null phenotype.

    PubMed

    Abdeen, Suhaib K; Del Mare, Sara; Hussain, Sadeeq; Abu-Remaileh, Muhannad; Salah, Zaidoun; Hagan, John; Rawahneh, Maysoon; Pu, Xin-An; Russell, Stacey; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S; Lian, Jane B; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2013-07-01

    WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) is highly conserved in both human and murine. WWOX spans the second most common human chromosomal fragile site, FRA16D, and is commonly inactivated in multiple human cancers. Modeling WWOX inactivation in mice revealed a complex phenotype including postnatal lethality, defects in bone metabolism and steroidogenesis and tumor suppressor function resulting in osteosarcomas. For better understanding of WWOX roles in different tissues at distinct stages of development and in pathological conditions, Wwox conditional knockout mice were generated in which loxp sites flank exon 1 in the Wwox allele. We demonstrated that Cre-mediated recombination using EIIA-Cre, a Cre line expressed in germline, results in postnatal lethality by age of 3 weeks and decreased bone mineralization resembling total ablation of WWOX as in conventional null mice. This animal model will be useful to study distinct roles of WWOX in multiple tissues at different ages.

  2. Circulating Tumor Cell Phenotype Predicts Recurrence and Survival in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poruk, Katherine E.; Valero, Vicente; Saunders, Tyler; Blackford, Amanda L.; Griffin, James F.; Poling, Justin; Hruban, Ralph H.; Anders, Robert A.; Herman, Joseph; Zheng, Lei; Rasheed, Zeshaan A.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Ahuja, Nita; Weiss, Matthew J.; Cameron, John L.; Goggins, Michael; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Wood, Laura D.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We assessed circulating tumor cells (CTCs) with epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes as a potential prognostic biomarker for patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Background PDAC is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. There is an urgent need to develop biomarkers that predict patient prognosis and allow for better treatment stratification. Methods Peripheral and portal blood samples were obtained from 50 patients with PDAC before surgical resection and filtered using the Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor cells method. CTCs were identified by immunofluorescence using commercially available antibodies to cytokeratin, vimentin, and CD45. Results Thirty-nine patients (78%) had epithelial CTCs that expressed cytokeratin but not CD45. Twenty-six (67%) of the 39 patients had CTCs which also expressed vimentin, a mesenchymal marker. No patients had cytokeratin-negative and vimentin-positive CTCs. The presence of cytokeratin-positive CTCs (P < 0.01), but not mesenchymal-like CTCs (P = 0.39), was associated with poorer survival. The presence of cytokeratin-positive CTCs remained a significant independent predictor of survival by multi-variable analysis after accounting for other prognostic factors (P < 0.01). The detection of CTCs expressing both vimentin and cytokeratin was predictive of recurrence (P = 0.01). Among patients with cancer recurrence, those with vimentin-positive and cytokeratin-expressing CTCs had decreased median time to recurrence compared with patients without CTCs (P = 0.02). Conclusions CTCs are an exciting potential strategy for understanding the biology of metastases, and provide prognostic utility for PDAC patients. CTCs exist as heterogeneous populations, and assessment should include phenotypic identification tailored to characterize cells based on epithelial and mesenchymal markers. PMID:26756760

  3. The influence of biomechanical properties and cannabinoids on tumor invasion.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Tim; Grabiec, Urszula; Ghadban, Chalid; Feese, Kerstin; Dehghani, Faramarz

    2017-01-02

    Cannabinoids are known to have an anti-tumorous effect, but the underlying mechanisms are only sparsely understood. Mechanical characteristics of tumor cells represent a promising marker to distinguish between tumor cells and the healthy tissue. We tested the hypothesis whether cannabinoids influence the tumor cell specific mechanical and migratory properties and if these factors are a prognostic marker for the invasiveness of tumor cells. 3 different glioblastoma cell lines were treated with cannabinoids and changes of mechanical and migratory properties of single cells were measured using atomic force microscopy and time lapse imaging. The invasiveness of cell lines was determined using a co-culture model with organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. We found that cannabinoids are capable of influencing migratory and mechanical properties in a cell line specific manner. A network analysis revealed a correlation between a "generalized stiffness" and the invasiveness for all tumor cell lines after 3 and 4 d of invasion time: r3d = -0.88 [-0.52;-0.97]; r4d = -0.90 [-0.59;-0.98]. Here we could show that a "generalized stiffness" is a profound marker for the invasiveness of a tumor cell population in our model and thus might be of high clinical relevance for drug testing. Additionally cannabinoids were shown to be of potential use for therapeutic approaches of glioblastoma.

  4. Out on a LIM: chronic kidney disease, podocyte phenotype and the Wilm's tumor interacting protein (WTIP).

    PubMed

    Sedor, John R; Madhavan, Sethu M; Kim, Jane H; Konieczkowski, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Normal function of the glomerular filtration barrier requires wild-type differentiation of the highly specialized glomerular epithelial cell, the podocyte. Podocytes express three distinct domains, consisting of a cell body, primary processes, and secondary foot processes (FP). These FP express slit diaphragms, which are highly specialized cell-cell contacts critical for filtration-barrier function. Foot processes are dynamic structures that reorganize within minutes through actin cytoskeletal rearrangement. Glomerular diseases are characterized by a persistent simplification in podocyte domain structure with loss of FP, a phenotype described as FP effacement. The generation of such phenotypic plasticity requires that signaling pathways in subcellular compartments be integrated dynamically for a cell to respond appropriately to information flow from its microenvironment. We have identified a LIM-domain-containing protein, Wilm's tumor interacting protein (WTIP), that regulates podocyte actin dynamics to maintain stable cell contacts. After glomerular injury, the WTIP molecule shuttles to the podocyte nucleus in response to changes in slit-diaphragm assembly, and changes gene transcription to permit podocyte remodeling. Defining regulatory pathways of podocyte differentiation identifies novel, druggable targets for chronic kidney diseases characterized by glomerular scarring.

  5. A 3D tension bioreactor platform to study the interplay between ECM stiffness and tumor phenotype.

    PubMed

    Cassereau, Luke; Miroshnikova, Yekaterina A; Ou, Guanqing; Lakins, Johnathon; Weaver, Valerie M

    2015-01-10

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) structure, composition, and stiffness have profound effects on tissue development and pathologies such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Accordingly, a variety of synthetic hydrogel systems have been designed to study the impact of ECM composition, density, mechanics, and topography on cell and tissue phenotype. However, these synthetic systems fail to accurately recapitulate the biological properties and structure of the native tissue ECM. Natural three dimensional (3D) ECM hydrogels, such as collagen or hyaluronic acid, feature many of the chemical and physical properties of tissue, yet, these systems have limitations including the inability to independently control biophysical properties such as stiffness and pore size. Here, we present a 3D tension bioreactor system that permits precise mechanical tuning of collagen hydrogel stiffness, while maintaining consistent composition and pore size. We achieve this by mechanically loading collagen hydrogels covalently-conjugated to a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane to induce hydrogel stiffening. We validated the biological application of this system with oncogenically transformed mammary epithelial cell organoids embedded in a 3D collagen I hydrogel, either uniformly stiffened or calibrated to create a gradient of ECM stiffening, to visually demonstrate the impact of ECM stiffening on transformation and tumor cell invasion. As such, this bioreactor presents the first tunable 3D natural hydrogel system that is capable of independently assessing the role of ECM stiffness on tissue phenotype.

  6. Decoding Tumor Phenotypes for ALK, ROS1, and RET Fusions in Lung Adenocarcinoma Using a Radiomics Approach.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Sohn, Insuk; Cho, Jong Ho; Lee, Ho Yun; Kim, Jae-Hun; Choi, Yoon-La; Kim, Hyeseung; Lee, Genehee; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Jhingook

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative imaging using radiomics can capture distinct phenotypic differences between tumors and may have predictive power for certain phenotypes according to specific genetic mutations. We aimed to identify the clinicoradiologic predictors of tumors with ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase), ROS1 (c-ros oncogene 1), or RET (rearranged during transfection) fusions in patients with lung adenocarcinoma.A total of 539 pathologically confirmed lung adenocarcinomas were included in this retrospective study. The baseline clinicopathologic characteristics were retrieved from the patients' medical records and the ALK/ROS1/RET fusion status was reviewed. Quantitative computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography imaging characteristics were evaluated using a radiomics approach. Significant features for the fusion-positive tumor prediction model were extracted from all of the clinicoradiologic features, and were used to calculate diagnostic performance for predicting 3 fusions' positivity. The clinicoradiologic features were compared between ALK versus ROS1/RET fusion-positive tumors to identify the clinicoradiologic similarity between the 2 groups.The fusion-positive tumor prediction model was a combination of younger age, advanced tumor stage, solid tumor on CT, higher values for SUV(max) and tumor mass, lower values for kurtosis and inverse variance on 3-voxel distance than those of fusion-negative tumors (sensitivity and specificity, 0.73 and 0.70, respectively). ALK fusion-positive tumors were significantly different in tumor stage, central location, SUV(max), homogeneity on 1-, 2-, and 3-voxel distances, and sum mean on 2-voxel distance compared with ROS1/RET fusion-positive tumors.ALK/ROS1/RET fusion-positive lung adenocarcinomas possess certain clinical and imaging features that enable good discrimination of fusion-positive from fusion-negative lung adenocarcinomas.

  7. Decoding Tumor Phenotypes for ALK, ROS1, and RET Fusions in Lung Adenocarcinoma Using a Radiomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Sohn, Insuk; Cho, Jong Ho; Lee, Ho Yun; Kim, Jae-Hun; Choi, Yoon-La; Kim, Hyeseung; Lee, Genehee; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Jhingook

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Quantitative imaging using radiomics can capture distinct phenotypic differences between tumors and may have predictive power for certain phenotypes according to specific genetic mutations. We aimed to identify the clinicoradiologic predictors of tumors with ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase), ROS1 (c-ros oncogene 1), or RET (rearranged during transfection) fusions in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. A total of 539 pathologically confirmed lung adenocarcinomas were included in this retrospective study. The baseline clinicopathologic characteristics were retrieved from the patients’ medical records and the ALK/ROS1/RET fusion status was reviewed. Quantitative computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography imaging characteristics were evaluated using a radiomics approach. Significant features for the fusion-positive tumor prediction model were extracted from all of the clinicoradiologic features, and were used to calculate diagnostic performance for predicting 3 fusions’ positivity. The clinicoradiologic features were compared between ALK versus ROS1/RET fusion-positive tumors to identify the clinicoradiologic similarity between the 2 groups. The fusion-positive tumor prediction model was a combination of younger age, advanced tumor stage, solid tumor on CT, higher values for SUVmax and tumor mass, lower values for kurtosis and inverse variance on 3-voxel distance than those of fusion-negative tumors (sensitivity and specificity, 0.73 and 0.70, respectively). ALK fusion-positive tumors were significantly different in tumor stage, central location, SUVmax, homogeneity on 1-, 2-, and 3-voxel distances, and sum mean on 2-voxel distance compared with ROS1/RET fusion-positive tumors. ALK/ROS1/RET fusion-positive lung adenocarcinomas possess certain clinical and imaging features that enable good discrimination of fusion-positive from fusion-negative lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:26469915

  8. Levels of Text Comprehension in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD): The Influence of Language Phenotype

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Rebecca; Norbury, Courtenay Frazier

    2014-01-01

    Many children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have reading comprehension difficulties, but the level of processing at which comprehension is most vulnerable and the influence of language phenotype on comprehension skill is currently unclear. We explored comprehension at sentence and passage levels across language phenotypes. Children with ASD…

  9. Levels of Text Comprehension in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD): The Influence of Language Phenotype

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Rebecca; Norbury, Courtenay Frazier

    2014-01-01

    Many children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have reading comprehension difficulties, but the level of processing at which comprehension is most vulnerable and the influence of language phenotype on comprehension skill is currently unclear. We explored comprehension at sentence and passage levels across language phenotypes. Children with ASD…

  10. Mechanical phenotyping of cells and extracellular matrix as grade and stage markers of lung tumor tissues.

    PubMed

    Panzetta, Valeria; Musella, Ida; Rapa, Ida; Volante, Marco; Netti, Paolo A; Fusco, Sabato

    2017-07-15

    The mechanical cross-talk between cells and the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) regulates the properties, functions and healthiness of the tissues. When this is disturbed it changes the mechanical state of the tissue components, singularly or together, and cancer, along with other diseases, may start and progress. However, the bi-univocal mechanical interplay between cells and the ECM is still not properly understood. In this study we show how a microrheology technique gives us the opportunity to evaluate the mechanics of cells and the ECM at the same time. The mechanical phenotyping was performed on the surgically removed tissues of 10 patients affected by adenocarcinoma of the lung. A correlation between the mechanics and the grade and stage of the tumor was reported and compared to the mechanical characteristics of the healthy tissue. Our findings suggest a sort of asymmetric modification of the mechanical properties of the cells and the extra-cellular matrix in the tumor, being the more compliant cell even though it resides in a stiffer matrix. Overall, the simultaneous mechanical characterization of the tissues constituents (cells and ECM) provided new support for diagnosis and offered alternative points of analysis for cancer mechanobiology. When the integrity of the mechanical cross-talk between cells and the extra-cellular matrix is disturbed cancer, along with other diseases, may initiate and progress. Here, we show how a new technique gives the opportunity to evaluate the mechanics of cells and the ECM at the same time. It was applied on surgically removed tissues of 10 patients affected by adenocarcinoma of the lung and a correlation between the mechanics and the grade and stage of the tumor was reported and compared to the mechanical characteristics of the healthy tissue. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Defining the Molecular Signature of Chemotherapy-Mediated Lung Tumor Phenotype Modulation and Increased Susceptibility to T-Cell Killing

    PubMed Central

    Gameiro, Sofia R.; Caballero, Jorge A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Chemotherapy with platinum doublets, including cisplatin plus vinorelbine, is standard of care for non–small-cell lung cancer. Sublethal exposure to certain chemotherapeutic agents has been demonstrated to alter the phenotype or biology of human tumor cells, rendering them more susceptible to cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)–mediated lysis. The effects of cisplatin/vinorelbine on tumor sensitivity to T-cell cytotoxicity and its molecular mechanisms, however, have not been fully elucidated. We examined the effect of this chemotherapy on growth, cell-surface phenotype, and CTL-mediated lysis of five distinct human lung carcinoma cell lines in vitro and examined the molecular mechanisms associated with enhanced CTL sensitivity. These studies demonstrate that sublethal exposure of human lung tumor cells to the platinum doublet modulates tumor cell phenotype and increases sensitivity to major histocompatibility complex–restricted perforin/granzyme–mediated CTL killing. These studies also demonstrate that exposure to chemotherapy markedly decreased the protein secretion ratio of transforming growth factor-β/interleukin (IL)-8. We examined the gene expression profile of two lung tumor cell lines to identify a shared gene signature in response to sublethal cisplatin/vinorelbine and found coordinate expression of only 16 transcripts, including those for cytokine/chemokine expression and apoptosis such as tumor necrosis factor-α, IL8, CXCL5, and B cell lymphoma-2–like genes (BCL-2). Overall, these results suggest that sublethal exposure to cisplatin/vinorelbine increases sensitivity to perforin/granzyme–mediated CTL killing by modulation of (a) tumor phenotype, (b) cytokine/chemokine milieu, and (c) the proapoptotic/antiapoptotic gene ratio. The data presented here propose a complex mechanism that is distinct from and complementary to that of immunogenic cell death. This molecular signature may be useful in predicting responses to immunotherapy as well as

  12. Expression of MTAP inhibits tumor-related phenotypes in HT1080 cells via a mechanism unrelated to its enzymatic function.

    PubMed

    Tang, Baiqing; Kadariya, Yuwaraj; Chen, Yibai; Slifker, Michael; Kruger, Warren D

    2014-11-11

    Methylthioadenosine Phosphorylase (MTAP) is a tumor suppressor gene that is frequently deleted in human cancers and encodes an enzyme responsible for the catabolism of the polyamine byproduct 5'deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA). To elucidate the mechanism by which MTAP inhibits tumor formation, we have reintroduced MTAP into MTAP-deleted HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Expression of MTAP resulted in a variety of phenotypes, including decreased colony formation in soft-agar, decreased migration, decreased in vitro invasion, increased matrix metalloproteinase production, and reduced ability to form tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Microarray analysis showed that MTAP affected the expression of genes involved in a variety of processes, including cell adhesion, extracellular matrix interaction, and cell signaling. Treatment of MTAP-expressing cells with a potent inhibitor of MTAP's enzymatic activity (MT-DADMe-ImmA) did not result in a MTAP- phenotype. This finding suggests that MTAP's tumor suppressor function is not the same as its known enzymatic function. To confirm this, we introduced a catalytically inactive version of MTAP, D220A, into HT1080 cells and found that this mutant was fully capable of reversing the soft agar colony formation, migration, and matrix metalloproteinase phenotypes. Our results show that MTAP affects cellular phenotypes in HT1080 cells in a manner that is independent of its known enzymatic activity. Copyright © 2015 Tang et al.

  13. Expression of MTAP Inhibits Tumor-Related Phenotypes in HT1080 Cells via a Mechanism Unrelated to Its Enzymatic Function

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Baiqing; Kadariya, Yuwaraj; Chen, Yibai; Slifker, Michael; Kruger, Warren D.

    2014-01-01

    Methylthioadenosine Phosphorylase (MTAP) is a tumor suppressor gene that is frequently deleted in human cancers and encodes an enzyme responsible for the catabolism of the polyamine byproduct 5′deoxy-5′-methylthioadenosine (MTA). To elucidate the mechanism by which MTAP inhibits tumor formation, we have reintroduced MTAP into MTAP-deleted HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Expression of MTAP resulted in a variety of phenotypes, including decreased colony formation in soft-agar, decreased migration, decreased in vitro invasion, increased matrix metalloproteinase production, and reduced ability to form tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Microarray analysis showed that MTAP affected the expression of genes involved in a variety of processes, including cell adhesion, extracellular matrix interaction, and cell signaling. Treatment of MTAP-expressing cells with a potent inhibitor of MTAP’s enzymatic activity (MT-DADMe-ImmA) did not result in a MTAP− phenotype. This finding suggests that MTAP’s tumor suppressor function is not the same as its known enzymatic function. To confirm this, we introduced a catalytically inactive version of MTAP, D220A, into HT1080 cells and found that this mutant was fully capable of reversing the soft agar colony formation, migration, and matrix metalloproteinase phenotypes. Our results show that MTAP affects cellular phenotypes in HT1080 cells in a manner that is independent of its known enzymatic activity. PMID:25387827

  14. Inference of tumor evolution during chemotherapy by computational modeling and in situ analysis of cellular diversity for genetic and phenotypic features

    PubMed Central

    Almendro, Vanessa; Cheng, Yu-Kang; Randles, Amanda; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Marusyk, Andriy; Ametller, Elisabet; Gonzalez-Farre, Xavier; Muñoz, Montse; Russnes, Hege G.; Helland, Åslaug; Rye, Inga H.; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Maruyama, Reo; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Dowsett, Mitchell; Jones, Robin L.; Reis-Filho, Jorge; Gascon, Pere; Gönen, Mithat; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cancer therapy exerts a strong selection pressure that shapes tumor evolution, yet our knowledge of how tumors change during treatment is limited. Here we report the analysis of cellular heterogeneity for genetic and phenotypic features and their spatial distribution in breast tumors pre- and post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We found that intratumor genetic diversity was tumor subtype-specific and it did not change during treatment in tumors with partial or no response. However, lower pre-treatment genetic diversity was significantly associated with complete pathologic response. In contrast, phenotypic diversity was different between pre- and post-treatment samples. We also observed significant changes in the spatial distribution of cells with distinct genetic and phenotypic features. We used these experimental data to develop a stochastic computational model to infer tumor growth patterns and evolutionary dynamics. Our results highlight the importance of integrated analysis of genotypes and phenotypes of single cells in intact tissues to predict tumor evolution. PMID:24462293

  15. THE INFLUENCE OF DIET ON TRANSPLANTED AND SPONTANEOUS MOUSE TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    Rous, Peyton

    1914-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the growth of grafts of transplantable tumors can be in many cases prevented or retarded by underfeeding the new host or by putting it on a special diet. The effect of such treatment on large tumors has been little studied; and the effect on metastases and recurrences has not been studied at all. Apart from certain clinical observations nothing is known as to the influence on spontaneous tumors of alterations in the diet. Experiments with transplanted rat and mouse tumors along the lines thus suggested show that large growths of certain strains are checked in their development by underfeeding the host upon a special diet (Sweet's modification of one of Mendel and Osborne's foods) or in some cases by simple underfeeding. Two metastasizing mouse tumors are instances in point. They stopped growing or grew very slowly in hosts underfed on the special diet. The Flexner-Jobling rat carcinoma, on the other hand, was unaffected by the most rigorous underfeeding on a mixed diet when this was begun after the tumor had been growing for a short period. Experiments to test the influence of underfeeding upon recurrences of this tumor gave results that varied from series to series of animals. The findings strongly indicate that generalizations from work with transplanted tumors as regards the effects of diet on spontaneous growths are unwarranted. By underfeeding on Sweet's food mice with spontaneous tumors, beginning some days prior to operation, it has proved possible in most cases to delay for a relatively long period the development of recurrences and the growth of tumor bits (grafts) disseminated at the time of surgical interference. The treatment entailed great loss of weight. Tumor mice kept on ordinary diet previous to operation, but put thereafter on an abundant ration of Sweet's food, developed recurrences as early as the tumor mice on ordinary diet; whereas the growth of auto-implants was, relatively speaking, much delayed. These results

  16. Metabolic phenotypes of obesity influence triglyceride and inflammation homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Alcala-Diaz, Juan F; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Gomez-Delgado, Francisco; Marin-Hinojosa, Carmen; Rodriguez-Cantalejo, Fernando; Delgado-Casado, Nieves; Perez-Caballero, Ana I; Fuentes-Jimenez, Francisco J; Camargo, Antonio; Tinahones, Francisco J; Ordovas, Jose M; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco; Lopez-Miranda, Jose

    2014-11-01

    We examined the degree of postprandial triglyceride (TG) response over the day, representing a highly dynamic state, with continuous metabolic adaptations, among normal-weight, overweight and obese patients, according to their metabolically healthy or abnormal status. A total of 1002 patients from the CORDIOPREV clinical trial (NCT00924937) were submitted to an oral fat load test meal with 0·7 g fat/kg body weight (12% saturated fatty acids (SFA), 10% polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), 43% monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), 10% protein and 25% carbohydrates). Serial blood test analysing lipid fractions and inflammation markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP)) were drawn at 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 h during postprandial state. We explored the dynamic response according to six body size phenotypes: (i) normal weight, metabolically healthy; (ii) normal weight, metabolically abnormal; (iii) overweight, metabolically healthy; (iv) overweight, metabolically abnormal; (v) obese, metabolically healthy; and (vi) obese, metabolically abnormal. Metabolically healthy patients displayed lower postprandial response of plasma TG and large triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins (TRLs)-TG, compared with those metabolically abnormal, independently whether or not they were obese (P < 0·001 and P < 0·001, respectively). Moreover, the area under the curve (AUC) of TG and AUC of large TRLs-TG were greater in the group of metabolically abnormal compared with the group of metabolically healthy (P < 0·001 and P < 0·001, respectively). Interestingly, metabolically abnormal subjects displayed higher postprandial response of plasma hs-CRP than did the subgroup of normal, overweight and obese, metabolically healthy patients (P < 0·001). Our findings showed that certain types of the metabolic phenotypes of obesity are more favourable modulating phenotypic flexibility after a dynamic fat load test, through TG metabolism and inflammation homoeostasis. To identify, these phenotypes may be

  17. Modeling tumor predisposing FH mutations in yeast: effects on fumarase activity, growth phenotype and gene expression profile.

    PubMed

    Kokko, Antti; Ylisaukko-Oja, Sanna S K; Kiuru, Maija; Takatalo, Maarit S; Salmikangas, Paula; Tuimala, Jarno; Arango, Diego; Karhu, Auli; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Jäntti, Jussi

    2006-03-15

    Heterozygous mutations in the fumarase (FH) gene cause the tumor predisposition syndrome hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (MIM 605839). While most families segregate a benign phenotype of multiple leiomyomas, others display a phenotype with early-onset renal cancer and leiomyosarcoma. Modifier genes may play a role in this, but an alternative explanation is simple genotype-phenotype association. FH mutations predisposing to cancer appear to be truncating or in fully conserved amino acids, suggesting that mutations severely affecting FH activity might predispose to malignancy. In the present study, we analyzed 2 conserved fumarase mutations in yeast. H153R has been described in 3 cancer predisposition families; whereas all 3 reported K187R families have displayed the benign phenotype. Examining H153R and K187R should clarify whether cancer-related FH mutations differ from their benign phenotype-associated counterparts. Yeast strains containing the 2 mutations, and knockout and wild type (WT) references, were created and the growth phenotypes studied on selected carbon sources to assess mitochondrial function. Additionally, Fum1 protein production and activity were measured, and the strains were subjected to transcriptional profiling. On nonfermentable lactate medium, the fumarase knockout strains did not grow, whereas the mutants showed no differences, as compared to WT yeast. Although both mutant strains produced fumarase, a considerable decrease in enzyme activity was seen in mutants with respect to WT. Transcription of the majority of Krebs cycle enzymes was downregulated in response to mutations in fumarase. In conclusion, both mutants displayed some, albeit greatly reduced, fumarase activity. This activity was sufficient to support normal growth on nonfermentable carbon source, unlike the deletion phenotype, demonstrating the significance of the residual activity. The findings support the hypothesis that modifier gene(s), rather than phenotype

  18. Simulating Brain Tumor Heterogeneity with a Multiscale Agent-Based Model: Linking Molecular Signatures, Phenotypes and Expansion Rate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Le; Strouthos, Costas G.; Wang, Zhihui; Deisboeck, Thomas S.

    2008-01-01

    We have extended our previously developed 3D multi-scale agent-based brain tumor model to simulate cancer heterogeneity and to analyze its impact across the scales of interest. While our algorithm continues to employ an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene-protein interaction network to determine the cells’ phenotype, it now adds an implicit treatment of tumor cell adhesion related to the model’s biochemical microenvironment. We simulate a simplified tumor progression pathway that leads to the emergence of five distinct glioma cell clones with different EGFR density and cell ‘search precisions’. The in silico results show that microscopic tumor heterogeneity can impact the tumor system’s multicellular growth patterns. Our findings further confirm that EGFR density results in the more aggressive clonal populations switching earlier from proliferation-dominated to a more migratory phenotype. Moreover, analyzing the dynamic molecular profile that triggers the phenotypic switch between proliferation and migration, our in silico oncogenomics data display spatial and temporal diversity in documenting the regional impact of tumorigenesis, and thus support the added value of multi-site and repeated assessments in vitro and in vivo. Potential implications from this in silico work for experimental and computational studies are discussed. PMID:20047002

  19. Tumor-associated macrophages of the M2 phenotype contribute to progression in gastric cancer with peritoneal dissemination.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takahisa; Fushida, Sachio; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Tsukada, Tomoya; Kinoshita, Jun; Oyama, Katsunobu; Miyashita, Tomoharu; Tajima, Hidehiro; Ninomiya, Itasu; Munesue, Seiichi; Harashima, Ai; Harada, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2016-10-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) of the M2 phenotype are known to promote tumor proliferation and to be associated with a poor prognosis in numerous cancers. Here, we investigated whether M2 macrophages participate in the development of peritoneal dissemination in gastric cancer. The characteristics of peritoneal macrophages in gastric cancer patients with or without peritoneal dissemination were examined by flow cytometry and the real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The effects of M2 macrophages on phenotypic changes of the gastric cancer cell line MKN45 were assessed with a direct or indirect co-culture system in vitro and an in vivo mouse xenograft model. The number of peritoneal macrophages with the M2 phenotype (CD68(+)CD163(+) or CD68(+)CD204(+)) was significantly higher in gastric cancer patients with peritoneal dissemination than in those without peritoneal dissemination. Higher expression of the M2-related messenger RNAs (IL-10, vascular endothelial growth factor A, vascular endothelial growth factor C, matrix metalloproteinase 1, and amphiregulin) and lower expression of M1-related messenger RNAs (TNF-α, CD80, CD86, and IL-12p40) were also confirmed in the TAMs. Macrophage co-culture with gastric cancer cells converted M1 phenotype into M2 phenotype. Moreover, the coexistence of MKN45 cells with M2 macrophages resulted in cancer cell proliferation and an acceleration of tumor growth in the xenograft model. Intraperitoneal TAMs in gastric cancer patients with peritoneal dissemination were polarized to the M2 phenotype, and could contribute to tumor proliferation and progression. Therefore, intraperitoneal TAMs are expected to be a promising target in the treatment of peritoneal dissemination in gastric cancer.

  20. Aquaporin 5 expression is frequent in prostate cancer and shows a dichotomous correlation with tumor phenotype and PSA recurrence.

    PubMed

    Pust, Alexandra; Kylies, Dominik; Hube-Magg, Claudia; Kluth, Martina; Minner, Sarah; Koop, Christina; Grob, Tobias; Graefen, Markus; Salomon, Georg; Tsourlakis, Maria Christina; Izbicki, Jakob; Wittmer, Corinna; Huland, Hartwig; Simon, Ronald; Wilczak, Waldemar; Sauter, Guido; Steurer, Stefan; Krech, Till; Schlomm, Thorsten; Melling, Nathaniel

    2016-02-01

    Aquaporin 5 (AQP5) is an androgen-regulated member of a family of small hydrophobic integral transmembrane water channel proteins regulating cellular water homeostasis and growth signaling. To evaluate its clinical impact and relationship with key genomic alterations in prostate cancer, AQP5 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray containing 12427 prostate cancers. The analysis revealed weak to moderate immunostaining in normal prostate epithelium. In prostate cancers AQP5 staining levels were more variable and also included completely negative and highly overexpressing cases. Negative, weak, moderate, and strong AQP5 staining was found in 25.0%, 32.5%, 32.5%, and 10.0% of 10239 interpretable tumors. Comparison of AQP5 expression levels with tumor characteristics showed a dichotomous pattern with both high and low staining levels being linked to unfavorable tumor phenotype. AQP5 was negative in 28%, 23%, 24%, and 35% of tumors with Gleason score ≤3 + 3, 3 + 4, 4 + 3 and ≥4 + 4, while the rate of strongly positive cases continuously increased from 7.0% over 10.0% and 12.0% to 13.0% in cancers with Gleason score ≤3 + 3, 3 + 4, 4 + 3 and ≥4 + 4. AQP5 expression was also related to ERG positivity and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) deletion (P < .0001 each). Strong AQP5 positivity was seen in 15.5% of ERG-positive and 5.8% of ERG-negative cancers (P < .0001) as well as in 14.7% of cancers with PTEN deletion and 9.4% of cancers without PTEN deletion. Remarkably, both negativity and strong positivity of AQP5 were linked to unfavorable disease outcome. This was however only seen in subgroups defined by TMPRSS2-ERG fusion and/or PTEN deletion. In summary, AQP5 can be both overexpressed and lost in subgroups of prostate cancers. Both alterations are linked to unfavorable outcome in molecularly defined cancer subgroups. It is hypothesized that this dichotomous role of AQP5 is due to two highly different mechanisms as to how the

  1. Expression of cell cycle regulator cdk2ap1 suppresses tumor cell phenotype by non-cell autonomous mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zolochevska, Olga; Figueiredo, Marxa L.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of expressing the cell cycle regulator cdk2ap1 in epithelial or stromal cell compartments to reduce SCC growth in vitro and in vivo. Cell autonomous and/or non-cell autonomous expression of cdk2ap1 reduced tumor growth and invasion and altered cell cycle, adhesion, invasion, angiogenesis, and apoptotic gene expression, as assessed by several in vitro phenotype assays, quantitative real time PCR, and in vivo molecular imaging using a novel three-way xenograft animal model. Our findings suggest that the interactions between cancer cells and fibroblasts that promote abnormal growth can be minimized by expressing cdk2ap1, supporting a novel concept by which tumor/growth suppressor genes can impact tumorigenesis phenotypes from non-cell autonomous interactions within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:19515604

  2. Phenotypic characterization of circulating tumor cells in triple negative breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Agelaki, Sofia; Dragolia, Melina; Markonanolaki, Harris; Alkahtani, Saad; Stournaras, Christos; Georgoulias, Vassilis; Kallergi, Galatea

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Patients with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), are considered as a poor prognosis group for whom no targeted therapies are currently available. The aim of the present study was to phenotypically characterize their CTCs in order to explore potential therapeutic targets. Methods PBMC's cytospins were prepared from 45 early (before and after adjuvant chemotherapy), 10 metastatic TNBC and 21 hormone receptor (HR) -positive patients. The expression of Cytokeratins (CK), ER, PR, EGFR and HER2 on CTCs was assessed using immunofluoresence staining and ARIOL analysis. Results In early stage TNBC, ER, PR, HER2 and EGFR expressing-CTCs were detected in 24.4%, 24.4%, 20% and 40% of patients before the initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy, and in 17.8%, 13.3% 6.7% and 51.1% respectively after the completion of adjuvant treatment. Triple staining experiments revealed distinct subpopulations of CTC expressed HR, and ErbB family receptors. In patients with metastatic disease, the frequency of HER2+ CTCs was significantly increased compared to adjuvant setting (60% vs 20%, p=0.014). The presence of CK+PR− CTCs, before adjuvant treatment was associated with reduced OS (p=0.032) and DFI (p=0.04). Furthermore, the frequency of ER-, PR- and HER2+ CTCs was higher in HR(+) than in TNBC tumors (57.1%, p=0.006; 52.4%, p=0.021 and 52.38%, p=0.009, respectively). Conclusions The CTCs in patients with early TNBC are phenotypically heterogeneous based on the expression of HR, EGFR and HER2 both before and after the completion of adjuvant chemotherapy whereas the presence of HER2+ CTCs prevails during disease evolution. These findings could be of clinical relevance in terms of CTC targeting. PMID:28029660

  3. Tumor phenotype and breast density in distinct categories of interval cancer: results of population-based mammography screening in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Interval cancers are tumors arising after a negative screening episode and before the next screening invitation. They can be classified into true interval cancers, false-negatives, minimal-sign cancers, and occult tumors based on mammographic findings in screening and diagnostic mammograms. This study aimed to describe tumor-related characteristics and the association of breast density and tumor phenotype within four interval cancer categories. Methods We included 2,245 invasive tumors (1,297 screening-detected and 948 interval cancers) diagnosed from 2000 to 2009 among 645,764 women aged 45 to 69 who underwent biennial screening in Spain. Interval cancers were classified by a semi-informed retrospective review into true interval cancers (n = 455), false-negatives (n = 224), minimal-sign (n = 166), and occult tumors (n = 103). Breast density was evaluated using Boyd’s scale and was conflated into: <25%; 25 to 50%; 50 to 75%; >75%. Tumor-related information was obtained from cancer registries and clinical records. Tumor phenotype was defined as follows: luminal A: ER+/HER2- or PR+/HER2-; luminal B: ER+/HER2+ or PR+/HER2+; HER2: ER-/PR-/HER2+; triple-negative: ER-/PR-/HER2-. The association of tumor phenotype and breast density was assessed using a multinomial logistic regression model. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Forty-eight percent of interval cancers were true interval cancers and 23.6% false-negatives. True interval cancers were associated with HER2 and triple-negative phenotypes (OR = 1.91 (95% CI:1.22-2.96), OR = 2.07 (95% CI:1.42-3.01), respectively) and extremely dense breasts (>75%) (OR = 1.67 (95% CI:1.08-2.56)). However, among true interval cancers a higher proportion of triple-negative tumors was observed in predominantly fatty breasts (<25%) than in denser breasts (28.7%, 21.4%, 11.3% and 14.3%, respectively; <0

  4. Circulating Tumor Cells: A Review of Present Methods and the Need to Identify Heterogeneous Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Millner, Lori M.; Linder, Mark W.; Valdes, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The measurement and characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) hold promise for advancing personalized therapeutics. CTCs are the precursor to metastatic cancer and thus have the potential to radically alter patient treatment and outcome. Currently, clinical information provided by the enumeration of CTCs is limited to predicting clinical outcome. Other areas of interest in advancing the practice of pathology include: using CTCs for early detection of potential metastasis, determining and monitoring the efficacy of individualized treatment regimens, and predicting site-specific metastasis. Important hurdles to overcome in obtaining this type of clinical information involve present limitations in defining, detecting, and isolating CTCs. Currently, CTCs are detected using epithelial markers. The definition of what distinguishes a CTC should be expanded to include CTCs with heterogeneous phenotypes, and markers should be identified to enable a more comprehensive capture. Additionally, most methods available for detecting CTCs do not capture functionally viable CTCs. Retaining functional viability would provide a significant advantage in characterizing CTC-subtypes that may predict the site of metastatic invasion and thus assist in selecting effective treatment regimens. In this review we describe areas of clinical interest followed by a summary of current circulating cell-separation technologies and present limitations. Lastly, we provide insight into what is required to overcome these limitations as they relate to applications in advancing the practice of pathology and laboratory medicine. PMID:23884225

  5. Multi-modality imaging of tumor phenotype and response to therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyflot, Matthew J.

    2011-12-01

    Imaging and radiation oncology have historically been closely linked. However, the vast majority of techniques used in the clinic involve anatomical imaging. Biological imaging offers the potential for innovation in the areas of cancer diagnosis and staging, radiotherapy target definition, and treatment response assessment. Some relevant imaging techniques are FDG PET (for imaging cellular metabolism), FLT PET (proliferation), CuATSM PET (hypoxia), and contrast-enhanced CT (vasculature and perfusion). Here, a technique for quantitative spatial correlation of tumor phenotype is presented for FDG PET, FLT PET, and CuATSM PET images. Additionally, multimodality imaging of treatment response with FLT PET, CuATSM, and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT is presented, in a trial of patients receiving an antiangiogenic agent (Avastin) combined with cisplatin and radiotherapy. Results are also presented for translational applications in animal models, including quantitative assessment of proliferative response to cetuximab with FLT PET and quantification of vascular volume with a blood-pool contrast agent (Fenestra). These techniques have clear applications to radiobiological research and optimized treatment strategies, and may eventually be used for personalized therapy for patients.

  6. Phenotypic Diversity in Chondromyxoid Fibroma Reveals Differentiation Pattern of Tumor Mimicking Fetal Cartilage Canals Development

    PubMed Central

    Zustin, Jozef; Akpalo, Hana; Gambarotti, Marco; Priemel, Matthias; Rueger, Johannes M.; Luebke, Andreas M.; Reske, Dennis; Lange, Claudia; Pueschel, Klaus; Lohmann, Christoph; Rüther, Wolfgang; Amling, Michael; Alberghini, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Chondromyxoid fibroma represents a rare benign cartilaginous tumor of young patients occurring in a subcortical metaphyseal location. The histogenesis of chondromyxoid fibroma has not yet been postulated, even though the conventional histology and recent immunohistochemical studies on phenotype of the mesenchymal cells and extracellular matrix components suggested its origin in immature cartilage. Therefore, we wished to compare the morphological pattern of immature cartilage tissue with chondromyxoid fibroma to investigate a possible developmental counterpart of chondromyxoid fibroma. Archival paraffin-embedded tissues from 4 fetal femora and 10 cases of chondromyxoid fibroma were analyzed simultaneously using histochemistry (safranin O) and established immunohistochemical antibodies (CD34, CD163, and smooth muscle actin). Vascularized cartilage canals growing into the fetal cartilage from the perichondrium displayed characteristic glomeruloid structures with central arterioles within the immature mesenchymal stroma and numerous superficial sinusoidal blood vessels accompanied by macrophage infiltration. Similarly, each case of chondromyxoid fibroma demonstrated admixture of two characteristic components: immature fibrous tissue of vascularized stroma with accumulation of macrophages in areas of superficial sinusoidal proliferation, and variable amounts of lobulated chondroid tissue. Based on the observed substantial morphological similarity between the cartilage canals and chondromyxoid fibroma, we suggest that the chondromyxoid fibroma represents a neoplasm originating from or mimicking the fetal cartilage canals within the immature cartilage. PMID:20671262

  7. Tumor and reproductive traits are linked by RNA metabolism genes in the mouse ovary: a transcriptome-phenotype association analysis.

    PubMed

    Urzúa, Ulises; Owens, Garrison A; Zhang, Gen-Mu; Cherry, James M; Sharp, John J; Munroe, David J

    2010-12-22

    The link between reproductive life history and incidence of ovarian tumors is well known. Periods of reduced ovulations may confer protection against ovarian cancer. Using phenotypic data available for mouse, a possible association between the ovarian transcriptome, reproductive records and spontaneous ovarian tumor rates was investigated in four mouse inbred strains. NIA15k-DNA microarrays were employed to obtain expression profiles of BalbC, C57BL6, FVB and SWR adult ovaries. Linear regression analysis with multiple-test control (adjusted p ≤ 0.05) resulted in ovarian tumor frequency (OTF) and number of litters (NL) as the top-correlated among five tested phenotypes. Moreover, nearly one-hundred genes were coincident between these two traits and were decomposed in 76 OTF(-) NL(+) and 20 OTF(+) NL(-) genes, where the plus/minus signs indicate the direction of correlation. Enriched functional categories were RNA-binding/mRNA-processing and protein folding in the OTF(-) NL(+) and the OTF(+) NL(-) subsets, respectively. In contrast, no associations were detected between OTF and litter size (LS), the latter a measure of ovulation events in a single estrous cycle. Literature text-mining pointed to post-transcriptional control of ovarian processes including oocyte maturation, folliculogenesis and angiogenesis as possible causal relationships of observed tumor and reproductive phenotypes. We speculate that repetitive cycling instead of repetitive ovulations represent the actual link between ovarian tumorigenesis and reproductive records.

  8. Tumor and reproductive traits are linked by RNA metabolism genes in the mouse ovary: a transcriptome-phenotype association analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The link between reproductive life history and incidence of ovarian tumors is well known. Periods of reduced ovulations may confer protection against ovarian cancer. Using phenotypic data available for mouse, a possible association between the ovarian transcriptome, reproductive records and spontaneous ovarian tumor rates was investigated in four mouse inbred strains. NIA15k-DNA microarrays were employed to obtain expression profiles of BalbC, C57BL6, FVB and SWR adult ovaries. Results Linear regression analysis with multiple-test control (adjusted p ≤ 0.05) resulted in ovarian tumor frequency (OTF) and number of litters (NL) as the top-correlated among five tested phenotypes. Moreover, nearly one-hundred genes were coincident between these two traits and were decomposed in 76 OTF(–) NL(+) and 20 OTF(+) NL(–) genes, where the plus/minus signs indicate the direction of correlation. Enriched functional categories were RNA-binding/mRNA-processing and protein folding in the OTF(–) NL(+) and the OTF(+) NL(–) subsets, respectively. In contrast, no associations were detected between OTF and litter size (LS), the latter a measure of ovulation events in a single estrous cycle. Conclusion Literature text-mining pointed to post-transcriptional control of ovarian processes including oocyte maturation, folliculogenesis and angiogenesis as possible causal relationships of observed tumor and reproductive phenotypes. We speculate that repetitive cycling instead of repetitive ovulations represent the actual link between ovarian tumorigenesis and reproductive records. PMID:21210965

  9. Phenotypes influencing low physical activity in maintenance dialysis.

    PubMed

    Panaye, Marine; Kolko-Labadens, Anne; Lasseur, Catherine; Paillasseur, Jean-Louis; Guillodo, Marie Paule; Levannier, Martial; Teta, Daniel; Fouque, Denis

    2015-01-01

    The "Pas à Pas" initiative aimed at evaluating the weekly physical activity (PA) and its determinants in a large cohort of dialysis patients. Physical inactivity is a risk factor for mortality in maintenance dialysis patients and is still poorly documented in this population. A prospective national epidemiological study was performed. A total of 1,163 patients on maintenance dialysis (hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis) were included. PA was recorded during seven consecutive days using a pedometer to measure daily step numbers. Median age was 63 years (Q1 51-Q3 75). Sixty-three percent were sedentary (<5000 steps/day) with a median of 3,688 steps/day (1,866-6,271)]. PA level was similar between hemodialysis patients and those on peritoneal dialysis (3,693 steps [1,896-6,307] vs. 3,320 [1,478-5,926], P = .33). In hemodialysis patients, PA was lower on dialysis days compared with nondialysis days (2,912 [1,439-5,232] vs. 4,054 [2,136-7,108], respectively, P < .01). PA gradually decreased with age, 57% being sedentary between 50 and 65 years and 83% of patients after 80 years. Beyond this age effect, we identified, for the first time, specific phenotypes of patients with lower PA, such as inflammation, cardiovascular disease, protein energy wasting, obesity, and diabetes. By contrast, previous kidney transplantation and a higher muscle mass were associated with higher PA. Dialysis patients present a very low level of PA with high sedentary. Acting on patient's modifiable phenotypes may help to increase PA to improve morbidity, mortality, and quality of life. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Phenotypic and Functional Maturation of Tumor Antigen-Reactive CD8+ T Lymphocytes in Patients Undergoing Multiple Course Peptide Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Daniel J.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2006-01-01

    Successful immunotherapy with peptide vaccines depends on the in vivo generation of sufficient numbers of anti-tumor T cells with appropriate phenotypic and functional characteristics to mediate tumor destruction. Herein, we report the induction of high frequencies of circulating CD8+ T cells (4.8% to 38.1%) directed against the native gp100:209-217 peptide derived from the gp100 melanoma-melanocyte tumor antigen in five HLA-A*0201 patients at high risk of recurrence of melanoma after multiple courses of immunization with modified gp100:209-217(210M) peptide in IFA. Longitudinal peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) analysis revealed a phenotypic shift of native peptide-specific CD8+ T cells from an early effector to an effector memory (CD27- CD28- CD62L- CD45RO+) phenotype with repeated immunizations and functional maturation that correlated with gp100:209-217 peptide-specific T-cell precursor frequencies. Postimmunization PBMC exhibited direct ex vivo recognition of melanoma cell lines in ELISPOT analysis, showed lytic capability against peptide-pulsed target cells, and proliferated in response to native peptide stimulation. One year after final immunization, circulating vaccine-specific CD8+ T cells persisted in patients’ PBMC with a maintained effector memory phenotype. The results herein demonstrate the efficacy of a multiple course peptide-immunization strategy for the generation of high frequencies of tumor antigen-specific T cells in vivo, and further show that continued peptide immunization results in the escalating generation of functionally mature, tumor-reactive effector memory CD8+ T lymphocytes. PMID:14676632

  11. HORMONAL INFLUENCES ON MAMMARY TUMORS OF THE RAT

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, Charles; Mainzer, Klaus

    1957-01-01

    Many members of the androstane series profoundly retarded the growth of a transplanted benign mammary fibroadenoma of the rat; the restraint of tumor growth was in direct proportion to the amount of the administered compound until its maximal effect was achieved. Certain steroids closely related to the androstane inhibitors accelerated the growth of the tumor. These effects of divergent sort depend on the molecular structure of the steroid. The molecular structure of androstane derivatives, which is of high significance in modifying the rate of growth of the benign mammary tumor, consists of multiple components. These include (a) the presence and number of ketone and hydroxyl groups in special orientation at specific sites, (b) the sites of dehydrogenation in the molecule, and (c) the presence, number, and state of hydrogenation of alkyl groups at designated molecular positions. These multiple factors determine whether androstane compounds will inhibit growth of the tumor, enhance it, or fail to influence its growth. The androstane compounds which caused either the restraint or the promotion of tumor growth had the common property of inducing proliferation of the normal mammary epithelium. Two mechanisms are involved in the restraint of growth of mammary fibroadenoma by androstane inhibitors. The primary effect is the abolition of action of phenolic estrogens and progesterone when dihydrotestosterone is administered concurrently, presumably through direct action at the tumor cell level A secondary contributory suppressive effect is the depression of ovarian activity, and consequently of the production of phenolic estrogens and progesterone, by these compounds. Transplanted mammary fibroadenoma in the rat possesses neoplastic traits and also some growth properties of normal mammary epithelium; inhibition of these latter by hormonal methods commonly retarded the growth of the tumor. But in hypophysectomized rats dihydrotestosterone failed to inhibit the growth of a

  12. Environmental Influences on the Behavioral Phenotype of Angelman Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horsler, Kate; Oliver, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Using observational methods, we examined the social influences on laughing and smiling behavior in children with Angelman syndrome by systematically manipulating aspects of social interaction. Seven boys and 4 girls who were between 4 and 11 years of age and who had a confirmed maternal deletion of chromosome 15q11-q13 completed the study. Each…

  13. Environmental Influences on the Behavioral Phenotype of Angelman Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horsler, Kate; Oliver, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Using observational methods, we examined the social influences on laughing and smiling behavior in children with Angelman syndrome by systematically manipulating aspects of social interaction. Seven boys and 4 girls who were between 4 and 11 years of age and who had a confirmed maternal deletion of chromosome 15q11-q13 completed the study. Each…

  14. Culture surface influence on T-cell phenotype and function.

    PubMed

    Hashimdeen, Shaikh Shimaz; Römhild, Andy; Schmueck, Michael; Kratz, Karl; Lendlein, Andreas; Kurtz, Andreas; Reinke, Petra

    2013-01-01

    When dealing with T lymphocyte culture there is currently very less information available about the interaction between T-cells and the culture system. In this study we look at the influence of the culture chamber on T-cell proliferation in two main aspects of the culture system, namely: culture chamber material and geometry. The study was carried out using unique polymeric closed cell culture inserts, which were processed via injection moulding from polystyrene (PS), polycarbonate (PC), polyetherurethane (PEU), polystyrene-co-acrylonitrile (PSAN) and polyetherimide (PEI). Furthermore culture chamber geometry was studied using commercially available 24, 12 and 6-well plates prepared from tissue culture plastic (TCP). For T lymphocyte stimulation two methods were used involving either EBV peptide pools or MACS iBead particles depending on the experiment performed. Culture was done with 1645 RPMI medium supplemented with foetal calf serum, penicillin, streptomycin and rhIL-2. We found four materials out of five we tested (PS, PC, PSAN and PEI) exhibited similar fold expansions with minimal influence on proportions of CD4 and CD8, while PEU had a negative influence on T cell growth along with adversely affected CD4/CD8 proportions. Changes in the geometry of TCP had no effect on T cell growth or maturation rather the size of geometry seems to have more influence on proliferation. T-cells appear to prefer smaller geometries during initial stages of culture while towards the end of the culture size becomes less significant to cell proliferation. The parameters tested in this study have significant influences on T-cell growth and are necessary to consider when designing and constructing expansion systems for antigen specific T lymphocytes. This is important when culturing T-cells for immunotherapeutic applications where antigen specificity, T-cell maturation and function should remain unaffected during culture.

  15. Genetic and phenotypic influences on copulatory plug survival in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mangels, R; Young, B; Keeble, S; Ardekani, R; Meslin, C; Ferreira, Z; Clark, N L; Good, J M; Dean, M D

    2015-01-01

    Across a diversity of animals, male seminal fluid coagulates upon ejaculation to form a hardened structure known as a copulatory plug. Previous studies suggest that copulatory plugs evolved as a mechanism for males to impede remating by females, but detailed investigations into the time course over which plugs survive in the female's reproductive tract are lacking. Here, we cross males from eight inbred strains to females from two inbred strains of house mice (Mus musculus domesticus). Plug survival was significantly affected by male genotype. Against intuition, plug survival time was negatively correlated with plug size: long-lasting plugs were small and relatively more susceptible to proteolysis. Plug size was associated with divergence in major protein composition of seminal vesicle fluid, suggesting that changes in gene expression may play an important role in plug dynamics. In contrast, we found no correlation to genetic variation in the protein-coding regions of five genes thought to be important in copulatory plug formation (Tgm4, Svs1, Svs2, Svs4 and Svs5). Our study demonstrates a complex relationship between copulatory plug characteristics and survival. We discuss several models to explain unexpected variation in plug phenotypes. PMID:26103947

  16. Factors influencing disease phenotype and penetrance in HFE haemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Rochette, J; Le Gac, G; Lassoued, K; Férec, C; Robson, K J H

    2010-09-01

    Haemochromatosis is predominantly associated with the HFE p.C282Y homozygous genotype, which is present in approximately 1 in 200 people of Northern European origin. However, not all p.C282Y homozygotes develop clinical features of haemochromatosis, and not all p.C282Y homozygotes even present abnormal iron parameters justifying venesection therapy. This situation was not apparent from initial genotype/phenotype correlation studies as there was a selection bias of patients. Only those patients with a significant iron burden were included in these early studies. It is now largely accepted that the p.C282Y/p.C282Y genotype is necessary for the development of HFE haemochromatosis. However, this genotype provides few clues as to why certain symptoms are associated with the disease. Expression of iron overload in people with this genotype depends on the complex interplay of environmental factors and modifier genes. In this review, we restrict our discussion to work done in humans giving examples of animal models where this has helped clarify our understanding. We discuss penetrance, explaining that this concept normally does not apply to autosomal recessive disorders, and discuss the usefulness of different biochemical markers in ascertaining iron burden. Hepcidin, a peptide synthesized primarily by the liver, has been identified as the central regulator in iron homeostasis. Consequently, understanding its regulation is the key. We conclude that the main goal now is to identify important modifiers that have a significant and unambiguous effect on iron storage.

  17. Salmonella-mediated tumor regression involves targeting of tumor myeloid suppressor cells causing a shift to M1-like phenotype and reduction in suppressive capacity.

    PubMed

    Kaimala, Suneesh; Mohamed, Yassir A; Nader, Nancy; Issac, Jincy; Elkord, Eyad; Chouaib, Salem; Fernandez-Cabezudo, Maria J; Al-Ramadi, Basel K

    2014-06-01

    The effectiveness of attenuated Salmonella in inhibiting tumor growth has been demonstrated in many therapeutic models, but the precise mechanisms remain incompletely understood. In this study, we show that the anti-tumor capacity of Salmonella depends on a functional MyD88-TLR pathway and is independent of adaptive immune responses. Since myeloid suppressor cells play a critical role in tumor growth, we investigated the consequences of Salmonella treatment on myeloid cell recruitment, phenotypic characteristics, and functional activation in spleen and tumor tissue of B16.F1 melanoma-bearing mice. Salmonella treatment led to increased accumulation of splenic and intratumoral CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid cells, exhibiting significantly increased expression of various activation markers such as MHC class II, costimulatory molecules, and Sca-1/Ly6A proteins. Gene expression analysis showed that Salmonella treatment induced expression of iNOS, arginase-1 (ARG1), and IFN-γ in the spleen, but down-regulated IL-4 and TGF-β. Within the tumor, expression of iNOS, IFN-γ, and S100A9 was markedly increased, but ARG1, IL-4, TGF-β, and VEGF were inhibited. Functionally, splenic CD11b(+) cells maintained their suppressive capacity following Salmonella treatment, but intratumoral myeloid cells had significantly reduced suppressive capacity. Our findings demonstrate that administration of attenuated Salmonella leads to phenotypic and functional maturation of intratumoral myeloid cells making them less suppressive and hence enhancing the host's anti-tumor immune response. Modalities that inhibit myeloid suppressor cells may be useful adjuncts in cancer immunotherapy.

  18. Circulating tumor cells with a putative stem cell phenotype in peripheral blood of patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulos, Panayiotis A; Polioudaki, Hara; Agelaki, Sofia; Kallergi, Galatea; Saridaki, Zacharenia; Mavroudis, Dimitris; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2010-02-01

    The CD44(+)/CD24(-/low) and ALDH1(+) cell phenotypes are associated with stemness and enhanced tumorigenic potential in breast cancer. We assessed the expression of CD44, CD24 and ALDH1 on tumor cells circulating in the peripheral blood (CTCs) of patients with metastatic breast cancer using triple-marker immunofluorescence microscopy. Among a total of 1439 CTCs identified in 20 (66.7%) out of 30 patients, 35.2% had the stem-like/tumorigenic phenotype CD44(+)/CD24(-/low), whereas 17.7% of the CTCs analyzed in seven patients, were ALDH1(high)/CD24(-/low). In conclusion, we report the existence of a subpopulation of CTCs with putative stem cell progenitor phenotypes in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

  19. Macrophage reprogramming: influence of latex beads with various functional groups on macrophage phenotype and phagocytic uptake in vitro.

    PubMed

    Akilbekova, Dana; Philiph, Rachel; Graham, Austin; Bratlie, Kaitlin M

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play a crucial role in initiating immune responses with various functions ranging from wound healing to antimicrobial actions. The type of biomaterial is suggested to influence macrophage phenotype. Here, we show that exposing M1- and M2-activated macrophages to polystyrene latex beads bearing different functional groups can alter secretion profiles, providing a possible method for altering the course of the host response. Macrophages were stimulated with either lipopolysaccharide or interleukin (IL) 4 and cultured for 24 h with 10 different latex beads. Proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α, monocyte chemotactic protein 1) and nitrite served as markers for the M1 phenotype and proangiogenic cytokine (IL-10) and arginase activity for M2 cells. The ability of the macrophages to phagocytize Escherichia coli particles and water contact angles of the polymers were also assessed. Different patterns of cytokine expression and phagocytosis activity were induced by the various particles. Particles did not polarize the cells toward one specific phenotype versus another, but rather induced changes in both pro- and anti-inflammatory markers. Our results suggest a dependence of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and phagocytic activities on material type and cytokine stimuli. These data also illustrate how biomaterials can be exploited to alter host responses for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications.

  20. Influence of age, irradiation and humanization on NSG mouse phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Knibbe-Hollinger, Jaclyn S; Fields, Natasha R; Chaudoin, Tammy R; Epstein, Adrian A; Makarov, Edward; Akhter, Sidra P; Gorantla, Santhi; Bonasera, Stephen J; Gendelman, Howard E; Poluektova, Larisa Y

    2015-09-09

    Humanized mice are frequently utilized in bench to bedside therapeutic tests to combat human infectious, cancerous and degenerative diseases. For the fields of hematology-oncology, regenerative medicine, and infectious diseases, the immune deficient mice have been used commonly in basic research efforts. Obstacles in true translational efforts abound, as the relationship between mouse and human cells in disease pathogenesis and therapeutic studies requires lengthy investigations. The interplay between human immunity and mouse biology proves ever more complicated when aging, irradiation, and human immune reconstitution are considered. All can affect a range of biochemical and behavioral functions. To such ends, we show age- and irradiation-dependent influences for the development of macrocytic hyper chromic anemia, myelodysplasia, blood protein reductions and body composition changes. Humanization contributes to hematologic abnormalities. Home cage behavior revealed day and dark cycle locomotion also influenced by human cell reconstitutions. Significant age-related day-to-day variability in movement, feeding and drinking behaviors were observed. We posit that this data serves to enable researchers to better design translational studies in this rapidly emerging field of mouse humanization.

  1. Influence of age, irradiation and humanization on NSG mouse phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Knibbe-Hollinger, Jaclyn S.; Fields, Natasha R.; Chaudoin, Tammy R; Epstein, Adrian A.; Makarov, Edward; Akhter, Sidra P.; Gorantla, Santhi; Bonasera, Stephen J.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Poluektova, Larisa Y.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Humanized mice are frequently utilized in bench to bedside therapeutic tests to combat human infectious, cancerous and degenerative diseases. For the fields of hematology-oncology, regenerative medicine, and infectious diseases, the immune deficient mice have been used commonly in basic research efforts. Obstacles in true translational efforts abound, as the relationship between mouse and human cells in disease pathogenesis and therapeutic studies requires lengthy investigations. The interplay between human immunity and mouse biology proves ever more complicated when aging, irradiation, and human immune reconstitution are considered. All can affect a range of biochemical and behavioral functions. To such ends, we show age- and irradiation-dependent influences for the development of macrocytic hyper chromic anemia, myelodysplasia, blood protein reductions and body composition changes. Humanization contributes to hematologic abnormalities. Home cage behavior revealed day and dark cycle locomotion also influenced by human cell reconstitutions. Significant age-related day-to-day variability in movement, feeding and drinking behaviors were observed. We posit that this data serves to enable researchers to better design translational studies in this rapidly emerging field of mouse humanization. PMID:26353862

  2. The Influence of Genetics on Cystic Fibrosis Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Michael R.; Drumm, Mitchell

    2012-01-01

    Technological advances in genetics have made feasible and affordable large studies to identify genetic variants that cause or modify a trait. Genetic studies have been carried out to assess variants in candidate genes, as well as polymorphisms throughout the genome, for their associations with heritable clinical outcomes of cystic fibrosis (CF), such as lung disease, meconium ileus, and CF-related diabetes. The candidate gene approach has identified some predicted relationships, while genome-wide surveys have identified several genes that would not have been obvious disease-modifying candidates, such as a methionine sulfoxide transferase gene that influences intestinal obstruction, or a region on chromosome 11 proximate to genes encoding a transcription factor and an apoptosis controller that associates with lung function. These unforeseen associations thus provide novel insight into disease pathophysiology, as well as suggesting new therapeutic strategies for CF. PMID:23209180

  3. Using Computer-extracted Image Phenotypes from Tumors on Breast MRI to Predict Breast Cancer Pathologic Stage

    PubMed Central

    Burnside, Elizabeth S.; Drukker, Karen; Li, Hui; Bonaccio, Ermelinda; Zuley, Margarita; Ganott, Marie; Net, Jose M.; Sutton, Elizabeth; Brandt, Kathleen R.; Whitman, Gary; Conzen, Suzanne; Lan, Li; Ji, Yuan; Zhu, Yitan; Jaffe, Carl; Huang, Erich; Freymann, John; Kirby, Justin; Morris, Elizabeth; Giger, Maryellen

    2015-01-01

    Background To demonstrate that computer-extracted image phenotypes (CEIPs) of biopsy-proven breast cancer on MRI can accurately predict pathologic stage. Methods We used a dataset of de-identified breast MRIs organized by the National Cancer Institute in The Cancer Imaging Archive. We analyzed 91 biopsy-proven breast cancer cases with pathologic stage (stage I = 22; stage II = 58; stage III = 11) and surgically proven nodal status (negative nodes = 46, ≥ 1 positive node = 44, no nodes examined = 1). We characterized tumors by (a) radiologist measured size, and (b) CEIP. We built models combining two CEIPs to predict tumor pathologic stage and lymph node involvement, evaluated them in leave-one-out cross-validation with area under the ROC curve (AUC) as figure of merit. Results Tumor size was the most powerful predictor of pathologic stage but CEIPs capturing biologic behavior also emerged as predictive (e.g. stage I+II vs. III demonstrated AUC = 0.83). No size measure was successful in the prediction of positive lymph nodes but adding a CEIP describing tumor “homogeneity,” significantly improved this discrimination (AUC = 0.62, p=.003) over chance. Conclusions Our results indicate that MRI phenotypes show promise for predicting breast cancer pathologic stage and lymph node status. PMID:26619259

  4. Tumor Associated Macrophage: A Review on the Phenotypes, Traits and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Suhashini; Jagannathan, Nithya

    2014-01-01

    The macrophages role within the tumor microenvironment has amended by a variety of factors, thus serves a vital role in tissue morphogenesis. The role of macrophages in health and disease differs enormously as the macrophage has shown dual functions. Macrophage has a basic role in antigen presentation serving as the first line of defense in diseases. However the presence of cytokines and growth factors, both together have regulated the macrophage to become negative effectors promoting tumor activity. Hence macrophages are a double edged weapon, and any imbalance in the regulatory mechanisms caused a shift from tumoricidal to tumorigenic activities. TAMs would be the main reason of the invasion in tumor microenvironment enhancing as well as tumor invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis promoting tumor genesis. Macrophages are the multifunctional cells which have conducted by the tumor cells to produce tumor promoting factors that enable the stimulation of angiogenesis, and tumor cell invasion. This fact has resulted initiation or promotion of tumor genesis, where the tumor has progressed to an upper malignant stage. The present review has focused on the tumor associated macrophages and their roles in tumor genesis. PMID:25250141

  5. Mesenchymal Tumors Can Derive from Ng2/Cspg4-Expressing Pericytes with β-Catenin Modulating the Neoplastic Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shingo; Tang, Yuning J; Wei, Qingxia; Hirata, Makoto; Weng, Angela; Han, Ilkyu; Okawa, Atsushi; Takeda, Shu; Whetstone, Heather; Nadesan, Puvindran; Kirsch, David G; Wunder, Jay S; Alman, Benjamin A

    2016-07-26

    The cell of origin for most mesenchymal tumors is unclear. One cell type that contributes to this lineages is the pericyte, a cell expressing Ng2/Cspg4. Using lineage tracing, we demonstrated that bone and soft tissue sarcomas driven by the deletion of the Trp53 tumor suppressor, or desmoid tumors driven by a mutation in Apc, can derive from cells expressing Ng2/Cspg4. Deletion of the Trp53 tumor suppressor gene in these cells resulted in the bone and soft tissue sarcomas that closely resemble human sarcomas, while stabilizing β-catenin in this same cell type caused desmoid tumors. Comparing expression between Ng2/Cspg4-expressing pericytes lacking Trp53 and sarcomas that arose from deletion of Trp53 showed inhibition of β-catenin signaling in the sarcomas. Activation of β-catenin inhibited the formation and growth of sarcomas. Thus, pericytes can be a cell of origin for mesenchymal tumors, and β-catenin dysregulation plays an important role in the neoplastic phenotype.

  6. Pheochromocytoma catecholamine phenotypes and prediction of tumor size and location by use of plasma free metanephrines.

    PubMed

    Eisenhofer, Graeme; Lenders, Jacques W M; Goldstein, David S; Mannelli, Massimo; Csako, Gyorgy; Walther, McClellan M; Brouwers, Frederieke M; Pacak, Karel

    2005-04-01

    Measurements of plasma free metanephrines (normetanephrine and metanephrine) provide a useful test for diagnosis of pheochromocytoma and may provide other information about the nature of these tumors. We examined relationships of tumor size, location, and catecholamine content with plasma and urinary metanephrines or catecholamines in 275 patients with pheochromocytoma. We then prospectively examined whether measurements of plasma free metanephrines could predict tumor size and location in an additional 16 patients. Relative proportions of epinephrine and norepinephrine in tumor tissue were closely matched by relative increases of plasma or urinary metanephrine and normetanephrine, but not by epinephrine and norepinephrine. Tumor diameter showed strong positive relationships with summed plasma concentrations or urinary outputs of metanephrine and normetanephrine (r = 0.81 and 0.77; P <0.001), whereas relationships with plasma or urinary catecholamines were weaker (r = 0.41 and 0.44). All tumors in which increases in plasma metanephrine were >15% of the combined increases of normetanephrine and metanephrine either had adrenal locations or appeared to be recurrences of previously resected adrenal tumors. Measurements of plasma free metanephrines predicted tumor diameter to within a mean of 30% of actual diameter, and high plasma concentrations of free metanephrine relative to normetanephrine accurately predicted adrenal locations. Measurements of plasma free metanephrines not only provide information about the likely presence or absence of a pheochromocytoma, but when a tumor is present, can also help predict tumor size and location. This additional information may be useful for clinical decision-making during tumor localization procedures.

  7. A phenotype from tumor stroma based on the expression of metalloproteases and their inhibitors, associated with prognosis in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eiró, Noemí; Fernandez-Garcia, Belen; Vázquez, Julio; del Casar, José M; González, Luis O; Vizoso, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to evaluate the impact of the phenotype of both mononuclear inflammatory cells (MICs) and cancer-associated fibroblast (CAFs) in early breast cancer patients, specifically assessed as to their expression of MMP/TIMP relative to their position within the tumor (i.e., localization at the tumor center or invasive front) and the occurrence of distant metastases.. An immunohistochemical study was performed using tissue arrays and specific antibodies against matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)−1, −2, −7, −9, −11, −13 and −14, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)−1, −2 and −3, both at tumor center and at invasive front, in 107 patients with primary ductal invasive breast tumors. Data were analyzed by unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis. Our results indicated that MMP-11 expression by MICs, and TIMP-2 expression by CAFs at either the tumor center or the invasive front, were the most potent independent prognostic factors for predicting the clinical outcome of patients. Using the unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis, we found well-defined clusters of cases identifying subgroups of tumors showing a high molecular profile of MMPs/TIMPs expression by stromal cells (CAFs and MICs), both at the tumor center and at the invasive front, which were strongly associated with a higher prevalence of distant metastasis. In addition, we found combinations of these clusters defining subpopulations of breast carcinomas differing widely in their clinical outcome. The results presented here identify biologic markers useful to categorize patients into different subgroups based on their tumor stroma, which may contribute to improved understanding of the prognosis of breast cancer patients. PMID:26140253

  8. ROBO1, a tumor suppressor and critical molecular barrier for localized tumor cells to acquire invasive phenotype: study in African-American and Caucasian prostate cancer models.

    PubMed

    Parray, Aijaz; Siddique, Hifzur R; Kuriger, Jacquelyn K; Mishra, Shrawan K; Rhim, Johng S; Nelson, Heather H; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Konety, Badrinath R; Koochekpour, Shahriar; Saleem, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    High-risk populations exhibit early transformation of localized prostate cancer (CaP) disease to metastasis which results in the mortality of such patients. The paucity of knowledge about the molecular mechanism involved in acquiring of metastatic behavior by primary tumor cells and non-availability of reliable phenotype-discriminating biomarkers are stumbling blocks in the management of CaP disease. Here, we determine the role and translational relevance of ROBO1 (an organogenesis-associated gene) in human CaP. Employing CaP-progression models and prostatic tissues of Caucasian and African-American patients, we show that ROBO1 expression is localized to cell-membrane and significantly lost in primary and metastatic tumors. While Caucasians exhibited similar ROBO1 levels in primary and metastatic phenotype, a significant difference was observed between tumor phenotypes in African-Americans. Epigenetic assays identified promoter methylation of ROBO1 specific to African-American metastatic CaP cells. Using African-American CaP models for further studies, we show that ROBO1 negatively regulates motility and invasiveness of primary CaP cells, and its loss causes these cells to acquire invasive trait. To understand the underlying mechanism, we employed ROBO1-expressing/ROBO1-C2C3-mutant constructs, immunoprecipitation, confocal-microscopy and luciferase-reporter techniques. We show that ROBO1 through its interaction with DOCK1 (at SH3-SH2-domain) controls the Rac-activation. However, loss of ROBO1 results in Rac1-activation which in turn causes E-Cadherin/β-catenin cytoskeleton destabilization and induction of cell migration. We suggest that ROBO1 is a predictive biomarker that has potential to discriminate among CaP types, and could be exploited as a molecular target to inhibit the progression of disease as well as treat metastasis in high-risk populations such as African-Americans.

  9. ROBO1, a tumor suppressor and critical molecular barrier for localized tumor cells to acquire invasive phenotype: Study in African-American and Caucasian prostate cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Parray, Aijaz; Siddique, Hifzur R.; Kuriger, Jacquelyn K.; Mishra, Shrawan K.; Rhim, Johng S.; Nelson, Heather H.; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Konety, Badrinath R.; Koochekpour, Shahriar; Saleem, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    High-risk populations exhibit early transformation of localized prostate cancer (CaP) disease to metastasis which results in the mortality of such patients. The paucity of knowledge about the molecular mechanism involved in acquiring of metastatic behavior by primary tumor cells and non-availability of reliable phenotype-discriminating biomarkers are stumbling blocks in the management of CaP disease. Here, we determine the role and translational relevance of ROBO1 (an organogenesis-associated gene) in human CaP. Employing CaP-progression models and prostatic tissues of Caucasian and African-American patients, we show that ROBO1 expression is localized to cell-membrane and significantly lost in primary and metastatic tumors. While Caucasians exhibited similar ROBO1 levels in primary and metastatic phenotype, a significant difference was observed between tumor phenotypes in African-Americans. Epigenetic assays identified promoter methylation of ROBO1 specific to African-American metastatic CaP cells. Using African-American CaP models for further studies, we show that ROBO1 negatively regulates motility and invasiveness of primary CaP cells, and its loss causes these cells to acquire invasive trait. To understand the underlying mechanism, we employed ROBO1-expressing/ROBO1-C2C3-mutant constructs, immunoprecipitation, confocal-microscopy and luciferase-reporter techniques. We show that ROBO1 through its interaction with DOCK1 (at SH3-SH2-domain) controls the Rac-activation. However, loss of ROBO1 results in Rac1-activation which in turn causes E-Cadherin/β-catenin cytoskeleton destabilization and induction of cell migration. We suggest that ROBO1 is a predictive biomarker that has potential to discriminate among CaP types, and could be exploited as a molecular target to inhibit the progression of disease as well as treat metastasis in high-risk populations such as African-Americans. PMID:24752651

  10. The association of tumor microsatellite instability phenotype with family history of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bapat, Bharati; Lindor, Noralane M; Baron, John; Siegmund, Kim; Li, Lin; Zheng, Yingye; Haile, Robert; Gallinger, Steve; Jass, Jeremy R; Young, Joanne P; Cotterchio, Michelle; Jenkins, Mark; Grove, John; Casey, Graham; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Bishop, D Timothy; Hopper, John L; Ahnen, Dennis; Newcomb, Polly A; Le Marchand, Loic; Potter, John D; Seminara, Daniela

    2009-03-01

    Family history is a strong predictor of colorectal cancer risk; however, a diagnosis of colorectal cancer among first-degree relatives has not been systematically investigated as a function of the colorectal cancer molecular subtypes related to tumor microsatellite instability (MSI) status. We investigated whether the observable familial colorectal cancer risks differed according to tumor MSI subtypes, stratified as MSI-High (>30% instability), MSI-Low (<30% instability), and MSS (no instability). Data from 3,143 population-based colorectal cancer cases from five institutions were assessed for family history according to the Amsterdam criteria and the Bethesda guidelines, age at diagnosis, sex, tumor location, and MSI status. The distribution of patient characteristics by MSI status was compared using polytomous logistic regression. Overall, 2.8% colorectal cancer cases met the Amsterdam criteria and 37% met the Bethesda guidelines. There were 14% MSI-High, 13% MSI-Low, and 73% MSS colorectal cancers. MSI-High (P<0.0001) and MSI-Low tumors (P=0.01) were more proximally located than MSS tumors. MSI-High tumors were more common among females (P<0.001). The highest proportion of MSI-High tumors occurred in cases<40 years of age whereas the age-dependent distribution of MSI-Low tumors was unchanged. MSI-High tumors showed a statistically significant association with increasing numbers of first-degree relatives with colorectal cancer (P=0.002); this association disappeared, however, when MSI-High cases meeting Amsterdam criteria were removed from the analysis. MSI-Low tumors did not show a similar association with family history of colorectal cancer. Familial risk associated with MSI-High tumors is primarily driven by the Amsterdam-criteria patients. MSI-Low tumors may represent a distinct subtype of colorectal cancer with respect to certain epidemiologic variables studied here.

  11. Phenotypic switching of Cryptococcus neoformans occurs in vivo and influences the outcome of infection

    PubMed Central

    Fries, Bettina C.; Taborda, Carlos P.; Serfass, Evan; Casadevall, Arturo

    2001-01-01

    Phenotypic switching has been linked to the virulence of many pathogens, including fungi. However, it has not been conclusively shown to occur in vivo or to influence the outcome of infection. Cryptococcus neoformans undergoes phenotypic switching in vitro to colony types that differ in their virulence in mice. In this study, we asked whether C. neoformans undergoes phenotypic switching in vivo and whether this phenomenon contributes to virulence. By using a small inoculum to preclude the introduction of variants that had already switched during in vitro propagation, we demonstrated that in vivo switching to a mucoid phenotype occurred in two mice strains and was associated with a lethal outcome. Phenotypic switching resulted in changes of the capsular polysaccharide that inhibited phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. This promoted a more vigorous inflammatory response and rapid demise. These data document in vivo switching in a fungus and associate this phenomenon with enhanced virulence and a lethal outcome. The importance of this finding is underscored by the increased likelihood of phenotypic switching in chronic cryptococcosis; thus this mechanism may account for the inability to eradicate the organism in immunocompromised hosts. PMID:11733559

  12. Enhanced detection and comprehensive in situ phenotypic characterization of circulating and disseminated heteroploid epithelial and glioma tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Daisy Dandan; Li, Linda; Lin, Peter Ping

    2015-01-01

    Conventional strategy of anti-EpCAM capture and immunostaining of cytokeratins (CKs) to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is limited by highly heterogeneous and dynamic expression or absence of EpCAM and/or CKs in CTCs. In this study, a novel integrated cellular and molecular approach of subtraction enrichment (SE) and immunostaining-FISH (iFISH) was successfully developed. Both large or small size CTCs and circulating tumor microemboli (CTM) in various biofluid samples including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of cancer patients and patient-derived-xenograft (PDX) mouse models were efficiently enriched and comprehensively identified and characterized by SE-iFISH. Non-hematopoietic CTCs with heteroploid chromosome 8 were detected in 87–92% of lung, esophageal and gastric cancer patients. Characterization of CTCs performed by CK18-iFISH showed that CK18, the dual epithelial marker and tumor biomarker, was strong positive in only 14% of lung and 24% of esophageal CTCs, respectively. Unlike conventional methodologies restricted only to the large and/or both EpCAM and CK positive CTCs, SE-iFISH enables efficient enrichment and performing in situ phenotypic and karyotypic identification and characterization of the highly heterogeneous CTC subtypes classified by both chromosome ploidy and the expression of various tumor biomarkers. Each CTC subtype may possess distinct clinical significance relative to tumor metastasis, relapse, therapeutic drug sensitivity or resistance, etc. PMID:26267323

  13. Filtration parameters influencing circulating tumor cell enrichment from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Coumans, Frank A W; van Dalum, Guus; Beck, Markus; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2013-01-01

    Filtration can achieve circulating tumor cell (CTC) enrichment from blood. Key parameters such as flow-rate, applied pressure, and fixation, vary largely between assays and their influence is not well understood. Here, we used a filtration system, to monitor these parameters and determine their relationships. Whole blood, or its components, with and without spiked tumor cells were filtered through track-etched filters. We characterize cells passing through filter pores by their apparent viscosity; the viscosity of a fluid that would pass with the same flow. We measured a ratio of 5·10(4)∶10(2)∶1 for the apparent viscosities of 15 µm diameter MDA-231 cells, 10 µm white cells and 90 fl red cells passing through a 5 µm pore. Fixation increases the pressure needed to pass cells through 8 µm pores 25-fold and halves the recovery of spiked tumor cells. Filtration should be performed on unfixed samples at a pressure of ∼10 mbar for a 1 cm(2) track-etched filter with 5 µm pores. At this pressure MDA-231 cells move through the filter in 1 hour. If fixation is needed for sample preservation, a gentle fixative should be selected. The difference in apparent viscosity between CTC and blood cells is key in optimizing recovery of CTC.

  14. Filtration Parameters Influencing Circulating Tumor Cell Enrichment from Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Markus; Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Filtration can achieve circulating tumor cell (CTC) enrichment from blood. Key parameters such as flow-rate, applied pressure, and fixation, vary largely between assays and their influence is not well understood. Here, we used a filtration system, to monitor these parameters and determine their relationships. Whole blood, or its components, with and without spiked tumor cells were filtered through track-etched filters. We characterize cells passing through filter pores by their apparent viscosity; the viscosity of a fluid that would pass with the same flow. We measured a ratio of 5·104∶102∶1 for the apparent viscosities of 15 µm diameter MDA-231 cells, 10 µm white cells and 90 fl red cells passing through a 5 µm pore. Fixation increases the pressure needed to pass cells through 8 µm pores 25-fold and halves the recovery of spiked tumor cells. Filtration should be performed on unfixed samples at a pressure of ∼10 mbar for a 1 cm2 track-etched filter with 5 µm pores. At this pressure MDA-231 cells move through the filter in 1 hour. If fixation is needed for sample preservation, a gentle fixative should be selected. The difference in apparent viscosity between CTC and blood cells is key in optimizing recovery of CTC. PMID:23658615

  15. Phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells in patients with metastatic castrationresistant prostate cancer: a report from the PETRUS prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Massard, Christophe; Oulhen, Marianne; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Auger, Nathalie; Foulon, Stéphanie; Abou-Lovergne, Aurélie; Billiot, Fanny; Valent, Alexander; Marty, Virginie; Loriot, Yohann; Fizazi, Karim; Vielh, Philippe; Farace, Francoise

    2016-01-01

    Molecular characterization of cancer samples is hampered by tumor tissue availability in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. We reported the results of prospective PETRUS study of biomarker assessment in paired primary prostatic tumors, metastatic biopsies and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Among 54 mCRPC patients enrolled, 38 (70%) had biopsies containing more than 50% tumour cells. 28 (52%) patients were analyzed for both tissue samples and CTCs. FISH for AR-amplification and TMPRSS2-ERG translocation were successful in 54% and 32% in metastatic biopsies and primary tumors, respectively. By comparing CellSearch and filtration (ISET)-enrichment combined to four color immunofluorescent staining, we showed that CellSearch and ISET isolated distinct subpopulations of CTCs: CTCs undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, CTC clusters and large CTCs with cytomorphological characteristics but no detectable markers were isolated using ISET. Epithelial CTCs detected by the CellSearch were mostly lost during the ISET-filtration. AR-amplification was detected in CellSearch-captured CTCs, but not in ISET-enriched CTCs which harbor exclusively AR gain of copies. Eighty-eight percent concordance for ERG-rearrangement was observed between metastatic biopsies and CTCs even if additional ERG-alteration patterns were detected in ISET-enriched CTCs indicating a higher heterogeneity in CTCs. Molecular screening of metastatic biopsies is achievable in a multicenter context. Our data indicate that CTCs detected by the CellSearch and the ISET-filtration systems are not only phenotypically but also genetically different. Close attention must be paid to CTC characterization since neither approach tested here fully reflects the tremendous phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity present in CTCs from mCRPC patients. PMID:27391263

  16. Maternal investment influences expression of resource polymorphism in amphibians: implications for the evolution of novel resource-use phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ryan A; Pfennig, David W

    2010-02-09

    Maternal effects--where an individual's phenotype is influenced by the phenotype or environment of its mother--are taxonomically and ecologically widespread. Yet, their role in the origin of novel, complex traits remains unclear. Here we investigate the role of maternal effects in influencing the induction of a novel resource-use phenotype. Spadefoot toad tadpoles, Spea multiplicata, often deviate from their normal development and produce a morphologically distinctive carnivore-morph phenotype, which specializes on anostracan fairy shrimp. We evaluated whether maternal investment influences expression of this novel phenotype. We found that larger females invested in larger eggs, which, in turn, produced larger tadpoles. Such larger tadpoles are better able to capture the shrimp that induce carnivores. By influencing the expression of novel resource-use phenotypes, maternal effects may play a largely underappreciated role in the origins of novelty.

  17. Nuclear maspin expression correlates with the CpG island methylator phenotype and tumor aggressiveness in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Ho; Cho, Nam-Yun; Bae, Jeong Mo; Kim, Kyung-Ju; Rhee, Ye-Young; Lee, Hye Seung; Kang, Gyeong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that nuclear expression of maspin (mammary serine protease inhibitor; also known as SERPINB5) in colorectal cancer (CRC) is associated with proximal colonic tumor location, mucinous and poorly differentiated histology, microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H), and poor prognosis. Based on these findings, there may be a potential association between nuclear maspin expression and the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in CRC, but no study has elucidated this issue. Here, we evaluated maspin protein expression status by immunohistochemistry in 216 MSI-H CRCs. CIMP status was also determined by methylation-specific quantitative PCR method (MethyLight) using eight CIMP markers (MLH1, NEUROG1, CRABP1, CACNA1G, CDKN2A (p16), IGF2, SOCS1, and RUNX3) in 216 MSI-H CRCs. Associations between maspin expression status and various pathological, molecular, and survival data were statistically analyzed. Among the 216 MSI-H CRCs, 111 (51%) cases presented nuclear maspin-positive tumors. Nuclear maspin-positive MSI-H CRCs were significantly associated with proximal tumor location (P = 0.003), tumor budding (P < 0.001), lymphovascular invasion (P = 0.001), perineural invasion (P = 0.008), absence of peritumoral lymphoid reaction (P = 0.045), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.003), distant metastasis (P = 0.005), advanced AJCC/UICC stage (stage III/IV) (P = 0.001), and CIMP-high (CIMP-H) status (P < 0.001). Patients with nuclear maspin-positive tumors showed worse disease-free survival than patients with nuclear maspin-negative tumors (log-rank P = 0.025). In conclusion, nuclear maspin expression is molecularly associated with CIMP-H rather than MSI-H, and clinicopathologically correlates with tumor aggressiveness in CRC.

  18. Resource amendments influence density and competitive phenotypes of Streptomyces in soil.

    PubMed

    Schlatter, Daniel; Fubuh, Alfred; Xiao, Kun; Hernandez, Dan; Hobbie, Sarah; Kinkel, Linda

    2009-04-01

    Carbon from plant rhizospheres is a source of energy for soil microbial communities in native habitats. Soil amendments have been used as a means for deliberately altering soil community composition in agricultural soils to enhance plant health. However, little information is available in agricultural or natural soils on how specific carbon compounds or quantities influence soil microbial communities. Streptomyces are important soil saprophytes noted for their ability to produce antibiotics and influence plant health. To explore how specific types and amounts of carbon compounds influence Streptomyces in soil, glucose, cellulose, and lignin were added alone and in combination with six other carbon substrates of varying complexity to mesocosms of native prairie soil for 9 months at amounts equivalent to natural inputs from plants. Estimated culturable population densities, antibiotic inhibitory phenotypes, and resource utilization profiles were examined for Streptomyces communities from each treatment. The type and quantity of carbon compounds influenced densities, proportions, antibiotic phenotypes, and substrate utilization profiles of Streptomyces. Cellulose and lignin inputs produced the largest Streptomyces densities. Also, Streptomyces communities receiving high-resource inputs were more inhibitory whereas those receiving low-resource inputs used substrates more efficiently. Knowledge of how the availability and quantity of particular carbon compounds influences Streptomyces communities and their function, specifically resource use and inhibitory phenotypes, may be helpful in understanding the roles of resource availability in Streptomyces community dynamics and the potential of Streptomyces to suppress pathogens and enhance plant fitness in native and agricultural soils.

  19. BRCA1-IRIS overexpression promotes and maintains the tumor initiating phenotype: implications for triple negative breast cancer early lesions.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Abhilasha; Paul, Bibbin T; Sullivan, Lisa M; Sims, Hillary; El Bastawisy, Ahmed; Yousef, Hend F; Zekri, Abdel-Rahman N; Bahnassy, Abeer A; ElShamy, Wael M

    2017-02-07

    Tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are cancer cells endowed with self-renewal, multi-lineage differentiation, increased chemo-resistance, and in breast cancers the CD44+/CD24-/ALDH1+ phenotype. Triple negative breast cancers show lack of BRCA1 expression in addition to enhanced basal, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and TIC phenotypes. BRCA1-IRIS (hereafter IRIS) is an oncogene produced by the alternative usage of the BRCA1 locus. IRIS is involved in induction of replication, transcription of selected oncogenes, and promoting breast cancer cells aggressiveness. Here, we demonstrate that IRIS overexpression (IRISOE) promotes TNBCs through suppressing BRCA1 expression, enhancing basal-biomarkers, EMT-inducers, and stemness-enforcers expression. IRISOE also activates the TIC phenotype in TNBC cells through elevating CD44 and ALDH1 expression/activity and preventing CD24 surface presentation by activating the internalization pathway EGFR→c-Src→cortactin. We show that the intrinsic sensitivity to an anti-CD24 cross-linking antibody-induced cell death in membranous CD24 expressing/luminal A cells could be acquired in cytoplasmic CD24 expressing IRISOE TNBC/TIC cells through IRIS silencing or inactivation. We show that fewer IRISOE TNBC/TICs cells form large tumors composed of TICs, resembling TNBCs early lesions in patients that contain metastatic precursors capable of disseminating and metastasizing at an early stage of the disease. IRIS-inhibitory peptide killed these IRISOE TNBC/TICs, in vivo and prevented their dissemination and metastasis. We propose IRIS inactivation could be pursued to prevent dissemination and metastasis from early TNBC tumor lesions in patients.

  20. Tumor-Derived Microvesicles Induce Proangiogenic Phenotype in Endothelial Cells via Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Taisuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Akiyama, Kosuke; Hirata, Naoya; Kitahara, Shuji; Maishi, Nako; Osawa, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kondoh, Miyako; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2012-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence indicates that tumor endothelial cells (TEC) differ from normal endothelial cells (NEC). Our previous reports also showed that TEC were different from NEC. For example, TEC have chromosomal abnormality and proangiogenic properties such as high motility and proliferative activity. However, the mechanism by which TEC acquire a specific character remains unclear. To investigate this mechanism, we focused on tumor-derived microvesicles (TMV). Recent studies have shown that TMV contain numerous types of bioactive molecules and affect normal stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment. However, most of the functional mechanisms of TMV remain unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we showed that TMV isolated from tumor cells were taken up by NEC through endocytosis. In addition, we found that TMV promoted random motility and tube formation through the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway in NEC. Moreover, the effects induced by TMV were inhibited by the endocytosis inhibitor dynasore. Our results indicate that TMV could confer proangiogenic properties to NEC partly via endocytosis. Conclusion We for the first time showed that endocytosis of TMV contributes to tumor angiogenesis. These findings offer new insights into cancer therapies and the crosstalk between tumor and endothelial cells mediated by TMV in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:22479517

  1. Ciliated Adenosquamous Carcinoma: Expanding the Phenotypic Diversity of Human Papillomavirus-Associated Tumors.

    PubMed

    Radkay-Gonzalez, Lisa; Faquin, William; McHugh, Jonathan B; Lewis, James S; Tuluc, Madalina; Seethala, Raja R

    2016-06-01

    This study describes a unique subset of ciliated, human papillomavirus (HPV) related, adenosquamous carcinomas (AsqCA) of the head and neck that in contrast to most AsqCA, often show areas with lower grade cytonuclear features. They are comprised of largely non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma components with cystic change, gland formation, mucin production, and cilia in tumor cells. Seven cases of ciliated AsqCA were retrieved. Site distribution was as follows: palatine tonsil--3/7, base of tongue--1/7, and neck (unknown primary site)--3/7. Despite the occasional resemblance to mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC), the tumors showed focal keratinizing morphology and atypia, and all tumors were negative for MAML2 rearrangements. Oropharyngeal and neck tumors were uniformly p16 positive and showed punctate staining by in situ hybridization for high risk HPV DNA. There were two distant metastases (lung), and one tumor related death. Thus, ciliated AsqCA are HPV-associated lesions that pose unique pitfalls, closely mimicking MEC and other salivary gland tumors. These tumors add to the list of those which defy the dogma that ciliated epithelium always equates to a benign process.

  2. Genotype-phenotype relationships in hepatocellular tumors from mice and man.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Sabine; Ittrich, Carina; Marx-Stoelting, Philip; Köhle, Christoph; Altug-Teber, Ozge; Riess, Olaf; Bonin, Michael; Jobst, Jürgen; Kaiser, Stephan; Buchmann, Albrecht; Schwarz, Michael

    2005-08-01

    Experimentally induced liver tumors in mice harbor activating mutations in either Catnb (beta-catenin) or Ha-ras, according to the carcinogenic treatment. We have now investigated by microarray analysis the gene expression profiles in tumors of the two genotypes. In total, 364 genes or expressed sequences with aberrant expression relative to normal liver were identified, but only 30 of these demonstrated unidirectional changes in both tumor types. Several functional clusters were identified that involve changes in amino acid utilization and ammonia disposition in Catnb-mutated tumors as opposed to alterations in lipid and cholesterol metabolism in Ha-ras-mutated tumors. Moreover, several genes coding for inhibitory molecules within the Wnt-signaling pathway were upregulated in Catnb-mutated tumors, suggesting induction of a negative feedback loop, whereas Ha-ras-mutated tumors showed alterations in the expression of several genes functional in monomeric G-protein signaling. We conclude that mouse hepatoma cells adopt different evolutionary strategies that allow for their selective outgrowth under variable environmental conditions. Human hepatocellular cancers (HCC) lack RAS mutations but are frequently mutated in CTNNB1, the human Catnb ortholog. The set of genes aberrantly expressed in Catnb-mutated mouse tumors was used to screen, by expression profiling, for dysregulation of orthologous genes within a panel of 25 HCCs, of which 10 were CTNNB1-mutated. HCCs with activated beta-catenin displayed a gene expression profile that was similar to Catnb-mutated mouse tumors but distinct from the other human HCCs. In conclusion, expression fingerprints may be used for diagnostic purposes and potential new therapeutic intervention strategies. Supplementary material for this article can be found on the HEPATOLOGY website (http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0270-9139/suppmat/index/html).

  3. Isolation and Characterization of Tumor Cells from the Ascites of Ovarian Cancer Patients: Molecular Phenotype of Chemoresistant Ovarian Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Latifi, Ardian; Luwor, Rodney B.; Bilandzic, Maree; Nazaretian, Simon; Stenvers, Kaye; Pyman, Jan; Zhu, Hongjian; Thompson, Erik W.; Quinn, Michael A.; Findlay, Jock K.; Ahmed, Nuzhat

    2012-01-01

    Tumor cells in ascites are a major source of disease recurrence in ovarian cancer patients. In an attempt to identify and profile the population of ascites cells obtained from ovarian cancer patients, a novel method was developed to separate adherent (AD) and non-adherent (NAD) cells in culture. Twenty-five patients were recruited to this study; 11 chemonaive (CN) and 14 chemoresistant (CR). AD cells from both CN and CR patients exhibited mesenchymal morphology with an antigen profile of mesenchymal stem cells and fibroblasts. Conversely, NAD cells had an epithelial morphology with enhanced expression of cancer antigen 125 (CA125), epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) and cytokeratin 7. NAD cells developed infiltrating tumors and ascites within 12–14 weeks after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections into nude mice, whereas AD cells remained non-tumorigenic for up to 20 weeks. Subsequent comparison of selective epithelial, mesenchymal and cancer stem cell (CSC) markers between AD and NAD populations of CN and CR patients demonstrated an enhanced trend in mRNA expression of E-cadherin, EpCAM, STAT3 and Oct4 in the NAD population of CR patients. A similar trend of enhanced mRNA expression of CD44, MMP9 and Oct4 was observed in the AD population of CR patients. Hence, using a novel purification method we demonstrate for the first time a distinct separation of ascites cells into epithelial tumorigenic and mesenchymal non-tumorigenic populations. We also demonstrate that cells from the ascites of CR patients are predominantly epithelial and show a trend towards increased mRNA expression of genes associated with CSCs, compared to cells isolated from the ascites of CN patients. As the tumor cells in the ascites of ovarian cancer patients play a dominant role in disease recurrence, a thorough understanding of the biology of the ascites microenvironment from CR and CN patients is essential for effective therapeutic interventions. PMID:23056490

  4. Using computer-extracted image phenotypes from tumors on breast magnetic resonance imaging to predict breast cancer pathologic stage.

    PubMed

    Burnside, Elizabeth S; Drukker, Karen; Li, Hui; Bonaccio, Ermelinda; Zuley, Margarita; Ganott, Marie; Net, Jose M; Sutton, Elizabeth J; Brandt, Kathleen R; Whitman, Gary J; Conzen, Suzanne D; Lan, Li; Ji, Yuan; Zhu, Yitan; Jaffe, Carl C; Huang, Erich P; Freymann, John B; Kirby, Justin S; Morris, Elizabeth A; Giger, Maryellen L

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate that computer-extracted image phenotypes (CEIPs) of biopsy-proven breast cancer on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can accurately predict pathologic stage. The authors used a data set of deidentified breast MRIs organized by the National Cancer Institute in The Cancer Imaging Archive. In total, 91 biopsy-proven breast cancers were analyzed from patients who had information available on pathologic stage (stage I, n = 22; stage II, n = 58; stage III, n = 11) and surgically verified lymph node status (negative lymph nodes, n = 46; ≥ 1 positive lymph node, n = 44; no lymph nodes examined, n = 1). Tumors were characterized according to 1) radiologist-measured size and 2) CEIP. Then, models were built that combined 2 CEIPs to predict tumor pathologic stage and lymph node involvement, and the models were evaluated in a leave-1-out, cross-validation analysis with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) as the value of interest. Tumor size was the most powerful predictor of pathologic stage, but CEIPs that captured biologic behavior also emerged as predictive (eg, stage I and II vs stage III demonstrated an AUC of 0.83). No size measure was successful in the prediction of positive lymph nodes, but adding a CEIP that described tumor "homogeneity" significantly improved discrimination (AUC = 0.62; P = .003) compared with chance. The current results indicate that MRI phenotypes have promise for predicting breast cancer pathologic stage and lymph node status. Cancer 2016;122:748-757. © 2015 American Cancer Society. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  5. Phenotypic characterization of telomerase-immortalized primary non-malignant and malignant tumor-derived human prostate epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Yongpeng; Li Hongzhen; Miki, Jun; Kim, Kee-Hong; Furusato, Bungo; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Chu, Wei-Sing; McLeod, David G.; Srivastava, Shiv; Ewing, Charles M.; Isaacs, William B.; Rhim, Johng S. . E-mail: jrhim@cpdr.org

    2006-04-01

    In vitro human prostate cell culture models are critical for clarifying the mechanism of prostate cancer progression and for testing preventive and therapeutic agents. Cell lines ideal for the study of human primary prostate tumors would be those derived from spontaneously immortalized tumor cells; unfortunately, explanted primary prostate cells survive only short-term in culture, and rarely immortalize spontaneously. Therefore, we recently have generated five immortal human prostate epithelial cell cultures derived from both the benign and malignant tissues of prostate cancer patients with telomerase, a gene that prevents cellular senescence. Examination of these cell lines for their morphologies and proliferative capacities, their abilities to grow in low serum, to respond to androgen stimulation, to grow above the agar layer, to form tumors in SCID mice, suggests that they may serve as valid, useful tools for the elucidation of early events in prostate tumorigenesis. Furthermore, the chromosome alterations observed in these immortalized cell lines expressing aspects of the malignant phenotypes imply that these cell lines accurately recapitulate the genetic composition of primary tumors. These novel in vitro models may offer unique models for the study of prostate carcinogenesis and also provide the means for testing both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents.

  6. FGFR3 has tumor suppressor properties in cells with epithelial phenotype

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to frequent mutations in certain cancers, FGFR3 gene is considered as an oncogene. However, in some normal tissues, FGFR3 can limit cell growth and promote cell differentiation. Thus, FGFR3 action appears paradoxical. Results FGFR3 expression was forced in pancreatic cell lines. The receptor exerted dual effects: it suppressed tumor growth in pancreatic epithelial-like cells and had oncogenic properties in pancreatic mesenchymal-like cells. Distinct exclusive pathways were activated, STATs in epithelial-like cells and MAP Kinases in mesenchymal-like cells. Both FGFR3 splice variants had similar effects and used the same intracellular signaling. In human pancreatic carcinoma tissues, levels of FGFR3 dropped in tumors. Conclusion In tumors from epithelial origin, FGFR3 signal can limit tumor growth, explaining why the 4p16.3 locus bearing FGFR3 is frequently lost and why activating mutations of FGFR3 in benign or low grade tumors of epithelial origin are associated with good prognosis. The new hypothesis that FGFR3 can harbor both tumor suppressive and oncogenic properties is crucial in the context of targeted therapies involving specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). TKIs against FGFR3 might result in adverse effects if used in the wrong cell context. PMID:23902722

  7. The positive is inside the negative: HER2-negative tumors can express the HER2 intracellular domain and present a HER2-positive phenotype.

    PubMed

    Panis, Carolina; Pizzatti, Luciana; Corrêa, Stephany; Binato, Renata; Lemos, Gabriela Ferreira; Herrera, Ana Cristina da Silva do Amaral; Seixas, Teresa Fernandes; Cecchini, Rubens; Abdelhay, Eliana

    2015-02-01

    Overexpression of human epithelial growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a poor prognostic factor in breast cancer. HER2 is a transmembrane receptor comprising an extracellular domain (ECD), a single transmembrane domain, and an intracellular domain (ICD) with tyrosine-kinase activity. Receptor dimerization triggers pivotal effector pathways in cancer, such as phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Currently, screening of HER2 in breast tumors for prognostic and therapeutic purposes involves immunohistochemical (IHC) phenotyping for the ECD, in which tumors with IHC scores below 2+ are reported as HER2-negative. We used a label-free liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) proteomic approach to compare plasma samples from patients with HER2-positive breast tumors and patients with HER2-negative tumors. Patients with HER2-negative tumors expressed higher circulating levels of calpain-10 than patients with HER2-positive tumors. Calpains cleave HER2, releasing its ECD and transforming phenotypically positive tumors into phenotypically negative tumors. Therefore, we investigated the expression of the ICD in HER2-negative samples that overexpressed calpain-10. We found that 16% of HER2-negative tumors were positive for HER2-ICD, which was associated with circulating HER2-ECD. HER2 gene amplification was also observed in some HER2-negative tumors. Positive staining for the PI3K pathway was observed in the HER2-negative, ICD-positive tumors, similar to the HER2-positive cohort. Microarray analysis revealed that HER2-negative, ICD-positive samples clustered between HER2-positive tumors and triple-negative tumors. Survival analysis revealed that outcome in women with HER2-negative, ICD-positive tumors was better than in women bearing HER2-negative, ICD-negative (triple negative) tumors but was quite similar to HER2-positive tumors and worse than women with luminal A tumors. Moreover, in vitro analyses revealed that MDA-MB 231, a triple negative cell line

  8. Osteopontin-CD44 signaling in the glioma perivascular niche enhances cancer stem cell phenotypes and promotes aggressive tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Pietras, Alexander; Katz, Amanda M.; Ekström, Elin J.; Wee, Boyoung; Halliday, John J.; Pitter, Kenneth L.; Werbeck, Jillian L.; Amankulor, Nduka M.; Huse, Jason T.; Holland, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Stem-like glioma cells reside within a perivascular niche and display hallmark radiation resistance. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying these properties will be vital for the development of effective therapies. Here we show that the stem cell marker CD44 promotes cancer stem cell phenotypes and radiation resistance. In a mouse model of glioma, Cd44−/− and Cd44+/− animals showed improved survival compared to controls. The CD44 ligand Osteopontin shared a perivascular expression pattern with CD44 and promoted glioma stem cell-like phenotypes. These effects were mediated via the γ-secretase regulated intracellular domain of CD44, which promoted aggressive glioma growth in vivo and stem cell-like phenotypes via CBP/p300-dependent enhancement of HIF-2α activity. In human glioblastoma multiforme, expression of CD44 correlated with hypoxia-induced gene signatures and poor survival. Together, these data suggest that in the glioma perivascular niche, Osteopontin promotes stem cell-like properties and radiation resistance in adjacent tumor cells via activation of CD44 signaling. PMID:24607407

  9. Wnt-beta-catenin pathway signals metastasis-associated tumor cell phenotypes in triple negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    De, Pradip; Carlson, Jennifer H.; Wu, Hui; Marcus, Adam; Leyland-Jones, Brian; Dey, Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells acquire metastasis-associated (MA) phenotypes following genetic alterations in them which cause deregulation of different signaling pathways. Earlier, we reported that an upregulation of the Wnt-beta-catenin pathway (WP) is one of the genetic salient features of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), and WP signaling is associated with metastasis in TNBC. Using cBioPortal, here we found that collective % of alteration(s) in WP genes, CTNNB1, APC and DVL1 among breast-invasive-carcinomas was 21% as compared to 56% in PAM50 Basal. To understand the functional relevance of WP in the biology of heterogeneous/metastasizing TNBC cells, we undertook this comprehensive study using 15 cell lines in which we examined the role of WP in the context of integrin-dependent MA-phenotypes. Directional movement of tumor cells was observed by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy and quantitative confocal-video-microscopy while matrigel-invasion was studied by MMP7-specific casein-zymography. WntC59, XAV939, sulindac sulfide and beta-catenin siRNA (1) inhibited fibronectin-directed migration, (2) decreased podia-parameters and motility-descriptors, (3) altered filamentous-actin, (4) decreased matrigel-invasion and (5) inhibited cell proliferation as well as 3D clonogenic growth. Sulindac sulfide and beta-catenin siRNA decreased beta-catenin/active-beta-catenin and MMP7. LWnt3ACM-stimulated proliferation, clonogenicity, fibronection-directed migration and matrigel-invasion were perturbed by WP-modulators, sulindac sulfide and GDC-0941. We studied a direct involvement of WP in metastasis by stimulating brain-metastasis-specific MDA-MB231BR cells to demonstrate that LWnt3ACM-stimulated proliferation, clonogenicity and migration were blocked following sulindac sulfide, GDC-0941 and beta-catenin knockdown. We present the first evidence showing a direct functional relationship between WP activation and integrin-dependent MA-phenotypes. By proving the functional relationship

  10. Assessment of different 3D culture systems to study tumor phenotype and chemosensitivity in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zeeberg, Katrine; Cardone, Rosa Angela; Greco, Maria Raffaella; Saccomano, Mara; Nøhr-Nielsen, Asbjørn; Alves, Frauke; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Reshkin, Stephan Joel

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly malignant disease with a very poor prognosis, due to the influence of the tumor stroma, which promotes tumor growth, early invasion and chemoradiation resistance. Efforts to develop models for identifying novel anticancer therapeutic compounds have been hampered by the limited ability of in vitro models to mimic these in vivo tumor-stroma interactions. This has led to the development of various three-dimensional (3D) culture platforms recapitulating the in vivo tumor-stroma crosstalk and designed to better understand basic cancer processes and screen drug action. However, a consensus for different experimental 3D platforms is still missing in PDAC. We compared four PDAC cell lines of different malignancy grown in 2D monolayers to three of the more commonly used 3D techniques (ultralow adhesion concave microwells, Matrigel inclusion and organotypic systems) and to tumors derived from their orthotopic implantation in mice. In these 3D platforms, we observed that cells grow with very different tumor morphologies and the organotypic setting most closely resembles the tumor cytoarchitecture obtained by orthotopically implanting the four cell lines in mice. We then analyzed the molecular and cellular responses of one of these cell lines to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) stimulation with EGF and inhibition with erlotinib and found that only in the 3D platforms, and especially the organotypic, cells: i) responded to EGF by changing the expression of signalling components underlying cell-stroma crosstalk and tissue architecture, growth, invasion and drug resistance (E-cadherin, EGFR, ezrin, β1 integrin, NHERF1 and HIF-1α) similar to those reported in vivo; ii) had stimulated growth and increased erlotinib sensitivity in response to EGF, more faithfully mimicking their known in vivo behaviour. Altogether, these results, indicate the organotypic as the most relevant physiological 3D system to study the

  11. Influence of radiographic phenotype on risk of hip osteoarthritis within families.

    PubMed

    Lanyon, P; Muir, K; Doherty, S; Doherty, M

    2004-03-01

    To determine whether the magnitude of the genetic influence on the development of hip osteoarthritis (OA) varies according to the radiographic phenotype within families. 331 families in which at least one sibling (index participant) had undergone total hip replacement for OA and whose preoperative x ray findings were available; 505 siblings of these index participants, who have high exposure to genetic risk of hip OA; and 1718 participants who had previously undergone intravenous urography, representative of the average general population exposure to genetic risk. Prevalence of hip OA was determined by individual radiographic features and minimum hip joint space. OA phenotype was partitioned according to pattern of femoral head migration and osteophyte bone response. Age adjusted odds ratios for hip OA in siblings, stratified according to phenotypic pattern in their index sibling, were assessed by unconditional logistic regression. The superior pattern of femoral head migration was more common in men, and the axial pattern more common in women. A poor bone response (absent osteophytosis) was associated with an indeterminate pattern of migration. The age adjusted odds ratios for definite hip OA were twofold higher in siblings of index participants who had no osteophyte response than in siblings whose index case had any degree of osteophyte (OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.12 to 3.76). The risk of the siblings from these families having undergone hip replacement themselves was threefold higher. Patterns of migration and bone response were not concordant within families, even among same sex siblings. Careful phenotypic characterisation is essential for genetic studies of hip OA. The results of these studies are likely to be influenced by the phenotypic pattern of hip disease, particularly osteophyte bone response.

  12. Single and combined influence of ACE and ACTN3 genotypes on muscle phenotypes in octogenarians.

    PubMed

    Garatachea, Nuria; Fiuza-Luces, Carmen; Torres-Luque, Gema; Yvert, Thomas; Santiago, Catalina; Gómez-Gallego, Félix; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Lucia, Alejandro

    2012-07-01

    We studied the single and combined influence of the ACE I/D and the ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms on muscle phenotypes (thigh muscles' cross-sectional area assessed with magnetic resonance imaging) and strength (maximal handgrip, 30-s chair stand test), functional ability during activities of daily living (Barthel index) and bone mineral density (proximal femur) in Caucasian (Spanish) community-dwelling old people [n = 81, 59 women; mean age 82.8 ± 4.8 years (range 71-93 years)]. We found no significantly differences in the aforementioned phenotypes across ACE and ACTN3 genotypes (all P > 0.05), except for handgrip in the ACE I/D recessive model (DD 19.5 ± 6.7 kg, ID 24.0 ± 9.1 kg, II 22.1 ± 7.9; P = 0.047), yet statistical significance disappeared after correction for multiple comparisons. Likewise, the analyses of the combined effects between genotypes did not yield any significant difference (all P > 0.05) between the two 'extreme' genotypes [theoretically 'power or muscularity oriented' [(ACTN3 RR + RX & ACE DD) versus 'non-power' (ACTN3 XX & ACE II + ID)]. The aforementioned analyses were adjusted by sex, age and physical activity levels as covariates. Logistic regression analysis revealed no significant association of single or combined effect of ACE and ACTN3 genotypes or genotype combination group (ACE + ACTN3) with sarcopenia (i.e. being in the lowest 25th sex-specific percentile for a combined score of the muscle and functional phenotypes we measured). Though ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms are candidates to modulate exercise-related phenotypes in adults, our data suggest that they do not exert a major influence in the muscle phenotypes of old people. More studies with larger sample sizes are needed.

  13. Tumor growth affects the metabonomic phenotypes of multiple mouse non-involved organs in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shan; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Yili; Zhang, Nijia; Hu, Sheng; Song, Dandan; Wu, Zhengshun; Wang, Yulan; Cui, Yanfang; Tang, Huiru

    2016-01-01

    The effects of tumorigenesis and tumor growth on the non-involved organs remain poorly understood although many research efforts have already been made for understanding the metabolic phenotypes of various tumors. To better the situation, we systematically analyzed the metabolic phenotypes of multiple non-involved mouse organ tissues (heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney) in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model at two different tumor-growth stages using the NMR-based metabonomics approaches. We found that tumor growth caused significant metabonomic changes in multiple non-involved organ tissues involving numerous metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, TCA cycle and metabolisms of amino acids, fatty acids, choline and nucleic acids. Amongst these, the common effects are enhanced glycolysis and nucleoside/nucleotide metabolisms. These findings provided essential biochemistry information about the effects of tumor growth on the non-involved organs. PMID:27329570

  14. p16 overexpression and 9p21 deletion are linked to unfavorable tumor phenotype in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kluth, Martina; Koop, Christina; Özden, Cansu; Taskin, Berivan; Hussein, Khakan; Lebeau, Annette; Witzel, Isabell; Wölber, Linn; Geist, Stefan; Paluchowski, Peter; Wilke, Christian; Heilenkötter, Uwe; Müller, Volkmar; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Simon, Ronald; Sauter, Guido; Terracciano, Luigi; Krech, Rainer Horst; von der Assen, Albert; Burandt, Eike

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of the p16 tumor suppressor, but also deletion of its gene locus 9p21, is linked to unfavorable tumor phenotype and poor prognosis in breast cancer. To better understand these contradictory observations, and to clarify the prognostic impact of p16 expression and 9p21 deletion, a tissue microarray (TMA) with 2,197 breast cancers was analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry (FISH) for 9p21 deletion and p16 expression. p16 immunostaining was weak in 25.6%, moderate in 7.1%, and strong in 12.7% of 1,684 evaluable cancers. Strong p16 staining was linked to advanced tumor stage (p = 0.0003), high-grade (p < 0.0001), high tumor cell proliferation (p < 0.0001), negative hormone receptor (ER/PR) status (p < 0.0001 each), and shorter overall survival (p = 0.0038). 9p21 deletion was found in 15.3% of 1,089 analyzable breast cancers, including 1.7% homozygous and 13.6% heterozygous deletions. 9p21 deletion was linked to adverse tumor features, including high-grade (p < 0.0001) and nodal positive cancers (p = 0.0063), high cell proliferation (p < 0.0001), negative hormone receptor (ER/PR) status (p ≤ 0.0006), and HER2 amplification (p = 0.0078). Patient outcome was worse in 9p21 deleted than in undeleted cancers (p = 0.0720). p16 expression was absent in cancers harboring homozygous 9p21 deletions, but no difference in p16 expression was found between cancers with (59.2% p16 positive) and without heterozygous 9p21 deletion (51.3% p16 positive, p = 0.0256). In summary, p16 expression is unrelated to partial 9p21 deletion, but both alterations are linked to aggressive breast cancer phenotype. High-level p16 expression is a strong predictor of unfavorable disease course in breast cancer. PMID:27835607

  15. p16 overexpression and 9p21 deletion are linked to unfavorable tumor phenotype in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lebok, Patrick; Roming, Magdalena; Kluth, Martina; Koop, Christina; Özden, Cansu; Taskin, Berivan; Hussein, Khakan; Lebeau, Annette; Witzel, Isabell; Wölber, Linn; Geist, Stefan; Paluchowski, Peter; Wilke, Christian; Heilenkötter, Uwe; Müller, Volkmar; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Simon, Ronald; Sauter, Guido; Terracciano, Luigi; Krech, Rainer Horst; von der Assen, Albert; Burandt, Eike

    2016-12-06

    Overexpression of the p16 tumor suppressor, but also deletion of its gene locus 9p21, is linked to unfavorable tumor phenotype and poor prognosis in breast cancer. To better understand these contradictory observations, and to clarify the prognostic impact of p16 expression and 9p21 deletion, a tissue microarray (TMA) with 2,197 breast cancers was analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry (FISH) for 9p21 deletion and p16 expression. p16 immunostaining was weak in 25.6%, moderate in 7.1%, and strong in 12.7% of 1,684 evaluable cancers. Strong p16 staining was linked to advanced tumor stage (p = 0.0003), high-grade (p < 0.0001), high tumor cell proliferation (p < 0.0001), negative hormone receptor (ER/PR) status (p < 0.0001 each), and shorter overall survival (p = 0.0038). 9p21 deletion was found in 15.3% of 1,089 analyzable breast cancers, including 1.7% homozygous and 13.6% heterozygous deletions. 9p21 deletion was linked to adverse tumor features, including high-grade (p < 0.0001) and nodal positive cancers (p = 0.0063), high cell proliferation (p < 0.0001), negative hormone receptor (ER/PR) status (p ≤ 0.0006), and HER2 amplification (p = 0.0078). Patient outcome was worse in 9p21 deleted than in undeleted cancers (p = 0.0720). p16 expression was absent in cancers harboring homozygous 9p21 deletions, but no difference in p16 expression was found between cancers with (59.2% p16 positive) and without heterozygous 9p21 deletion (51.3% p16 positive, p = 0.0256). In summary, p16 expression is unrelated to partial 9p21 deletion, but both alterations are linked to aggressive breast cancer phenotype. High-level p16 expression is a strong predictor of unfavorable disease course in breast cancer.

  16. Cancer risk and genotype-phenotype correlations in PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuis, Marry H; Kets, C Marleen; Murphy-Ryan, Maureen; Yntema, Helger G; Evans, D Gareth; Colas, Chrystelle; Møller, Pal; Hes, Frederik J; Hodgson, Shirley V; Olderode-Berends, Maran J W; Aretz, Stefan; Heinimann, Karl; Gómez García, Encarna B; Douglas, Fiona; Spigelman, Allan; Timshel, Susanne; Lindor, Noralane M; Vasen, Hans F A

    2014-03-01

    Patients with germline PTEN mutations are at high risk of developing benign and malignant tumours. We aimed to evaluate the cumulative risk of several types of cancer and of dysplastic cerebellar gangliocytoma (Lhermitte-Duclos disease, LDD). In addition, genotype-phenotype correlations in PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (PHTS) were assessed. Data on patients with PTEN mutations were collected from clinical genetic centres in Western Europe, Australia, and the USA. The cumulative risk of developing cancers of the breast, thyroid, endometrium, skin, kidneys, colorectum, and lungs, and also LDD was calculated by Kaplan-Meier methods. Associations between mutations and cancer were assessed by Chi square means. A total of 180 germline PTEN mutation carriers, 81 males (45%), from nine countries were included. The cumulative risk of developing any cancer and/or LDD at age 60 was 56% for males and 87% for females (p = 0.001). Females had significant higher risks of developing breast cancer, thyroid cancer, and LDD than males. The only genotype-phenotype correlation identified was a lower frequency of thyroid cancer in patients with missense mutations (p = 0.014). In conclusion, PHTS patients, particularly females, have a substantial risk of developing one or more tumours from a broad tumour spectrum. Major genotype-phenotype associations could not be identified.

  17. Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotypes Reveal Cell-Nonautonomous Functions of Oncogenic RAS and the p53 Tumor Suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Coppé, Jean-Philippe; Sun, Yu; Muñoz, Denise P; Goldstein, Joshua; Nelson, Peter S; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cell proliferation, essentially permanently, in response to oncogenic stimuli, including genotoxic stress. We modified the use of antibody arrays to provide a quantitative assessment of factors secreted by senescent cells. We show that human cells induced to senesce by genotoxic stress secrete myriad factors associated with inflammation and malignancy. This senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) developed slowly over several days and only after DNA damage of sufficient magnitude to induce senescence. Remarkably similar SASPs developed in normal fibroblasts, normal epithelial cells, and epithelial tumor cells after genotoxic stress in culture, and in epithelial tumor cells in vivo after treatment of prostate cancer patients with DNA-damaging chemotherapy. In cultured premalignant epithelial cells, SASPs induced an epithelial–mesenchyme transition and invasiveness, hallmarks of malignancy, by a paracrine mechanism that depended largely on the SASP factors interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Strikingly, two manipulations markedly amplified, and accelerated development of, the SASPs: oncogenic RAS expression, which causes genotoxic stress and senescence in normal cells, and functional loss of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Both loss of p53 and gain of oncogenic RAS also exacerbated the promalignant paracrine activities of the SASPs. Our findings define a central feature of genotoxic stress-induced senescence. Moreover, they suggest a cell-nonautonomous mechanism by which p53 can restrain, and oncogenic RAS can promote, the development of age-related cancer by altering the tissue microenvironment. PMID:19053174

  18. Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotypes Reveal Cell-Nonautonomous Functions of Oncogenic RAS and the p53 Tumor Suppressor

    SciTech Connect

    Coppé, Jean-Philippe; Patil, Christopher; Rodier, Francis; Sun, Yu; Munoz, Denise; Goldstein, Joshua; Nelson, Peter; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2008-10-24

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cell proliferation, essentially permanently, in response to oncogenic stimuli, including genotoxic stress. We modified the use of antibody arrays to provide a quantitative assessment of factors secreted by senescent cells. We show that human cells induced to senesce by genotoxic stress secrete myriad factors associated with inflammation and malignancy. This senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) developed slowly over several days and only after DNA damage of sufficient magnitude to induce senescence. Remarkably similar SASPs developed in normal fibroblasts, normal epithelial cells, and epithelial tumor cells after genotoxic stress in culture, and in epithelial tumor cells in vivo after treatment of prostate cancer patients with DNA-damaging chemotherapy. In cultured premalignant epithelial cells, SASPs induced an epithelial-mesenchyme transition and invasiveness, hallmarks of malignancy, by a paracrine mechanism that depended largely on the SASP factors interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Strikingly, two manipulations markedly amplified, and accelerated development of, the SASPs: oncogenic RAS expression, which causes genotoxic stress and senescence in normal cells, and functional loss of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Both loss of p53 and gain of oncogenic RAS also exacerbated the promalignant paracrine activities of the SASPs. Our findings define a central feature of genotoxic stress-induced senescence. Moreover, they suggest a cell-nonautonomous mechanism by which p53 can restrain, and oncogenic RAS can promote, the development of age-related cancer by altering the tissue microenvironment.

  19. Systematic analysis of gene properties influencing organ system phenotypes in mammalian perturbations.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Ingo; Prinz, Jeanette; Worf, Karolina; Campillos, Monica

    2014-11-01

    Diseases and adverse drug reactions are frequently caused by disruptions in gene functionality. Gaining insight into the global system properties governing the relationships between genotype and phenotype is thus crucial to understand and interfere with perturbations in complex organisms such as diseases states. We present a systematic analysis of phenotypic information of 5047 perturbations of single genes in mice, 4766 human diseases and 1666 drugs that examines the relationships between different gene properties and the phenotypic impact at the organ system level in mammalian organisms. We observe that while single gene perturbations and alterations of nonessential, tissue-specific genes or those with low betweenness centrality in protein-protein interaction networks often show organ-specific effects, multiple gene alterations resulting e.g. from complex disorders and drug treatments have a more widespread impact. Interestingly, certain cellular localizations are distinctly associated to systemic effects in monogenic disease genes and mouse gene perturbations, such as the lumen of intracellular organelles and transcription factor complexes, respectively. In summary, we show that the broadness of the phenotypic effect is clearly related to certain gene properties and is an indicator of the severity of perturbations. This work contributes to the understanding of gene properties influencing the systemic effects of diseases and drugs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Contrasting effects of an Mdm2 functional polymorphism on tumor phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, G J; Li, Y; Post, S M; Pant, V; Xiong, S; Larsson, C A; El-Naggar, A K; Johnson, D G; Lozano, G

    2017-09-18

    MDM2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is a potent inhibitor of the p53 tumor suppressor and is elevated in many human cancers that retain wild-type p53. MDM2 SNP309G is a functional polymorphism that results in elevated levels of MDM2 (due to enhanced SP1 binding to the MDM2 promoter) thus decreasing p53 activity. Mdm2(SNP309G/G) mice are more prone to spontaneous tumor formation than Mdm2(SNP309T/T) mice, providing direct evidence for the impact of this SNP in tumor development. We asked whether environmental factors impact SNP309G function and show that SNP309G cooperates with ionizing radiation to exacerbate tumor development. Surprisingly, ultraviolet B light or Benzo(a)pyrene exposure of skin shows that SNP309G allele actually protects against squamous cell carcinoma susceptibility. These contrasting differences led us to interrogate the mechanism by which Mdm2 SNP309 regulates tumor susceptibility in a tissue-specific manner. Although basal Mdm2 levels were significantly higher in most tissues in Mdm2(SNP309G/G) mice compared with Mdm2(SNP309T/T) mice, they were significantly lower in Mdm2(SNP309G/G) keratinocytes, the cell-type susceptible to squamous cell carcinoma. The assessment of potential transcriptional regulators in ENCODE ChIP-seq database identified transcriptional repressor E2F6 as a possible negative regulator of MDM2 expression. Our data show that E2F6 suppresses Mdm2 expression in cells harboring the SNP309G allele but not the SNP309T allele. Thus, Mdm2 SNP309G exhibits tissue-specific regulation and differentially impacts cancer risk.Oncogene advance online publication, 18 September 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.344.

  1. RB loss contributes to aggressive tumor phenotypes in MYC-driven triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Erik S; McClendon, A Kathleen; Franco, Jorge; Ertel, Adam; Fortina, Paolo; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K

    2015-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is characterized by multiple genetic events occurring in concert to drive pathogenic features of the disease. Here we interrogated the coordinate impact of p53, RB, and MYC in a genetic model of TNBC, in parallel with the analysis of clinical specimens. Primary mouse mammary epithelial cells (mMEC) with defined genetic features were used to delineate the combined action of RB and/or p53 in the genesis of TNBC. In this context, the deletion of either RB or p53 alone and in combination increased the proliferation of mMEC; however, the cells did not have the capacity to invade in matrigel. Gene expression profiling revealed that loss of each tumor suppressor has effects related to proliferation, but RB loss in particular leads to alterations in gene expression associated with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. The overexpression of MYC in combination with p53 loss or combined RB/p53 loss drove rapid cell growth. While the effects of MYC overexpression had a dominant impact on gene expression, loss of RB further enhanced the deregulation of a gene expression signature associated with invasion. Specific RB loss lead to enhanced invasion in boyden chambers assays and gave rise to tumors with minimal epithelial characteristics relative to RB-proficient models. Therapeutic screening revealed that RB-deficient cells were particularly resistant to agents targeting PI3K and MEK pathway. Consistent with the aggressive behavior of the preclinical models of MYC overexpression and RB loss, human TNBC tumors that express high levels of MYC and are devoid of RB have a particularly poor outcome. Together these results underscore the potency of tumor suppressor pathways in specifying the biology of breast cancer. Further, they demonstrate that MYC overexpression in concert with RB can promote a particularly aggressive form of TNBC.

  2. Assessment of Environmental and Hereditary Influence on Development of Pituitary Tumors Using Dermatoglyphic Traits and Their Potential as Screening Markers.

    PubMed

    Gradiser, Marina; Matovinovic Osvatic, Martina; Dilber, Dario; Bilic-Curcic, Ines

    2016-03-17

    The aim of this study was to assess environmental and hereditary influence on development of pituitary tumors using dermatoglyphic traits. The study was performed on 126 patients of both genders with pituitary tumors (60 non-functional and 66 functional pituitary tumor patients) in comparison to the control group of 400 phenotypically healthy individuals. Statistical analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits of digito-palmar dermatoglyphics was performed, and hormonal status was determined according to the standard protocols. Although we did not find markers that could specifically distinguish functional from non-functional tumors, we have found markers predisposing to the development of tumors in general (a small number of ridges between triradius of both hands, a smaller number of ridges between the triradius of c-d rc R), those for endocrine dysfunction (increased number of arches and reduced number of whorls, difference of pattern distribution in the I3 and I4 interdigital space), and some that could potentially be attributed to patients suffering from pituitary tumors (small number of ridges for variables FRR 5, smaller number of ridges in the FRL 4 of both hands and difference of pattern distribution at thenar of I1 and I2 interdigital space). The usage of dermatoglyphic traits as markers of predisposition of pituitary tumor development could facilitate the earlier detection of patients in addition to standard methods, and possibly earlier treatment and higher survival rate. Finally, our results are consistent with the hypothesis about multifactorial nature of pituitary tumor etiology comprised of both gene instability and environmental factors.

  3. Assessment of Environmental and Hereditary Influence on Development of Pituitary Tumors Using Dermatoglyphic Traits and Their Potential as Screening Markers

    PubMed Central

    Gradiser, Marina; Matovinovic Osvatic, Martina; Dilber, Dario; Bilic-Curcic, Ines

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess environmental and hereditary influence on development of pituitary tumors using dermatoglyphic traits. The study was performed on 126 patients of both genders with pituitary tumors (60 non-functional and 66 functional pituitary tumor patients) in comparison to the control group of 400 phenotypically healthy individuals. Statistical analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits of digito-palmar dermatoglyphics was performed, and hormonal status was determined according to the standard protocols. Although we did not find markers that could specifically distinguish functional from non-functional tumors, we have found markers predisposing to the development of tumors in general (a small number of ridges between triradius of both hands, a smaller number of ridges between the triradius of c–d rc R), those for endocrine dysfunction (increased number of arches and reduced number of whorls, difference of pattern distribution in the I3 and I4 interdigital space), and some that could potentially be attributed to patients suffering from pituitary tumors (small number of ridges for variables FRR 5, smaller number of ridges in the FRL 4 of both hands and difference of pattern distribution at thenar of I1 and I2 interdigital space). The usage of dermatoglyphic traits as markers of predisposition of pituitary tumor development could facilitate the earlier detection of patients in addition to standard methods, and possibly earlier treatment and higher survival rate. Finally, our results are consistent with the hypothesis about multifactorial nature of pituitary tumor etiology comprised of both gene instability and environmental factors. PMID:26999178

  4. LMTK3 expression in breast cancer: association with tumor phenotype and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Stebbing, Justin; Filipovic, Aleksandra; Ellis, Ian O; Green, Andrew R; D'Silva, Tanya Rapoz; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Coombes, R Charles; Wang, Tingting; Lee, Soo-Chin; Giamas, Georgios

    2012-04-01

    Interactions between kinases and the estrogen receptor α (ERα) are thought to be a critical signaling pathway in the majority of human breast cancers. We have recently identified a previously uncharacterized molecule, lemur tyrosine kinase-3 (LMTK3) as a prognostic and predictive oncogenic ERα regulator with a central role in endocrine resistance. Unusually this protein has undergone Darwinian positive selection between Chimpanzees and humans suggesting it may contribute to human susceptibility to ERα-positive tumors. Using over 600 European primary breast cancer cases, we wished to establish tumor characteristics associated with both cytoplasmic and nuclear LMTK3 expression, and then externally validate our observed European clinical outcomes with samples from Asian individuals receiving chemotherapy. Both nuclear and cytoplasmic expression correlated with tumor grade (P < 0.001) and in the Asian cohort, independent blinded analyses demonstrated that high basal LMTK3 expression was associated with advanced stage of primary breast cancers as well as decreased overall (P = 0.03) and disease-free survival (P = 0.006). In summary, higher LMTK3 expression is associated with more aggressive cancers. These data support our previous findings and suggest LMTK3 expression may be a reliable new biomarker in breast cancer.

  5. Levels of text comprehension in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD): the influence of language phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Rebecca; Norbury, Courtenay Frazier

    2014-11-01

    Many children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have reading comprehension difficulties, but the level of processing at which comprehension is most vulnerable and the influence of language phenotype on comprehension skill is currently unclear. We explored comprehension at sentence and passage levels across language phenotypes. Children with ASD and age-appropriate language skills (n = 25) demonstrated similar syntactic and semantic facilitation to typically developing peers. In contrast, few children with ASD and language impairments (n = 25) could read beyond the single word level. Those who could read sentences benefited from semantic coherence, but were less sensitive to syntactic coherence. At the passage level, the strongest predictor of comprehension was vocabulary knowledge. This emphasizes that the intimate relationship between language competence and both decoding skill and comprehension is evident at the sentence, as well as the passage level, for children with ASD.

  6. Autophagy is involved in TGF-β1-induced protective mechanisms and formation of cancer-associated fibroblasts phenotype in tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang-Lan; Mo, En-Pan; Yang, Liu; Du, Jun; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Zhang, Huan; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Xu, Jun; Cai, Shao-Hui

    2016-01-26

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) present in tumor microenvironment acts in a coordinated fashion to either suppress or promote tumor development. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of TGF-β1 on tumor microenvironment are not well understood. Our clinical data showed a positive association between TGF-β1 expression and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in tumor microenvironment of breast cancer patients. Thus we employed starved NIH3T3 fibroblasts in vitro and 4T1 cells mixed with NIH3T3 fibroblasts xenograft model in vivo to simulate nutritional deprivation of tumor microenvironment to explore the effects of TGF-β1. We demonstrated that TGF-β1 protected NIH3T3 fibroblasts from Star-induced growth inhibition, mitochondrial damage and cell apoptosis. Interestingly, TGF-β1 induced the formation of CAFs phenotype in starvation (Star)-treated NIH3T3 fibroblasts and xenografted Balb/c mice, which promoted breast cancer tumor growth. In both models, autophagy agonist rapamycin increased TGF-β1-induced protective effects and formation of CAFs phenotypes, while autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine, Atg5 knockdown or TGF-β type I receptor kinase inhibitor LY-2157299 blocked TGF-β1 induced these effects. Taken together, our results indicated that TGF-β/Smad autophagy was involved in TGF-β1-induced protective effects and formation of CAFs phenotype in tumor microenvironment, which may be used as therapy targets in breast cancer.

  7. Ethanol exposure induces the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype and lethal tumor metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Alvarez, Rosa; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Lin, Zhao; Lamb, Rebecca; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Rubin, Emanuel; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about how alcohol consumption promotes the onset of human breast cancer(s). One hypothesis is that ethanol induces metabolic changes in the tumor microenvironment, which then enhances epithelial tumor growth. To experimentally test this hypothesis, we used a co-culture system consisting of human breast cancer cells (MCF7) and hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts. Here, we show that ethanol treatment (100 mM) promotes ROS production and oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts, which is sufficient to induce myofibroblastic differentiation. Oxidative stress in stromal fibroblasts also results in the onset of autophagy/mitophagy, driving the induction of ketone body production in the tumor microenvironment. Interestingly, ethanol has just the opposite effect in epithelial cancer cells, where it confers autophagy resistance, elevates mitochondrial biogenesis and induces key enzymes associated with ketone re-utilization (ACAT1/OXCT1). During co-culture, ethanol treatment also converts MCF7 cells from an ER(+) to an ER(-) status, which is thought to be associated with “stemness,” more aggressive behavior and a worse prognosis. Thus, ethanol treatment induces ketone production in cancer-associated fibroblasts and ketone re-utilization in epithelial cancer cells, fueling tumor cell growth via oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS). This “two-compartment” metabolic model is consistent with previous historical observations that ethanol is first converted to acetaldehyde (which induces oxidative stress) and then ultimately to acetyl-CoA (a high-energy mitochondrial fuel), or can be used to synthesize ketone bodies. As such, our results provide a novel mechanism by which alcohol consumption could metabolically convert “low-risk” breast cancer patients to “high-risk” status, explaining tumor recurrence or disease progression. Hence, our findings have clear implications for both breast cancer prevention and therapy. Remarkably, our results

  8. Influence of Immune Privilege on Ocular Tumor Development

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Kyle C.; Chen, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms that maintain ocular immune privilege may contribute to ocular tumor progression by inhibiting tumoricidal immune responses. Consistent with that notion are observations from transplantable tumor models in mice demonstrating that the tumoricidal activity of CD8+ cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) may be inhibited directly by interfering with CTL effector function in the eye or indirectly by abrogating the effector function of CD8+ T cell-activated intratumoral macrophages that are critical for ocular tumor rejection. In addition, epigenetic gene regulation by factors within the ocular tumor environment favors the generation of tumor variants that are resistant to CD8+ CTL. Intratumoral macrophages may be essential for eliminating these variants because, unlike CTL, their tumoricidal activity is nonspecific. Hence, the inhibition of macrophage effector function within the eye, presumably to preserve immune privilege by minimizing ocular immunopathology, may hasten the outgrowth of tumor escape variants which contributes to ocular tumor progression. PMID:20370332

  9. Phospholipid Metabolites in Recurrent Glioblastoma: In Vivo Markers Detect Different Tumor Phenotypes before and under Antiangiogenic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hattingen, Elke; Bähr, Oliver; Rieger, Johannes; Blasel, Stella; Steinbach, Joachim; Pilatus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Metabolic changes upon antiangiogenic therapy of recurrent glioblastomas (rGBMs) may provide new biomarkers for treatment efficacy. Since in vitro models showed that phospholipid membrane metabolism provides specific information on tumor growth we employed in-vivo MR-spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) of human rGBMs before and under bevacizumab (BVZ) to measure concentrations of phosphocholine (PCho), phosphoethanolamine (PEth), glycerophosphocholine (GPC), and glyceroethanolamine (GPE). Methods 1H and 31P MRSI was prospectively performed in 32 patients with rGBMs before and under BVZ therapy at 8 weeks intervals until tumor progression. Patients were dichotomized into subjects with long overall survival (OS) (>median OS) and short OS (tumor tissue and their ratios were compared to contralateral normal-appearing tissue (control). Results Before BVZ, 1H-detectable choline signals (total GPC and PCho) in rGBMs were elevated but significance failed after dichotomizing. For metabolite ratios obtained by 31P MRSI, the short-OS group showed higher PCho/GPC (p = 0.004) in rGBMs compared to control tissue before BVZ while PEth/GPE was elevated in rGBMs of both groups (long-OS p = 0.04; short-OS p = 0.003). Under BVZ, PCho/GPC and PEth/GPE in the tumor initially decreased (p = 0.04) but only PCho/GPC re-increased upon tumor progression (p = 0.02). Intriguingly, in normal-appearing tissue an initial PEth/GPE decrease (p = 0.047) was followed by an increase at the time of tumor progression (p = 0.031). Conclusion An elevated PCho/GPC ratio in the short-OS group suggests that it is a negative predictive marker for BVZ efficacy. These gliomas may represent a malignant phenotype even growing under anti-VEGF treatment. Elevated PEth/GPE may represent an in-vivo biomarker more sensitive to GBM infiltration than MRI. PMID:23520454

  10. Phospholipid metabolites in recurrent glioblastoma: in vivo markers detect different tumor phenotypes before and under antiangiogenic therapy.

    PubMed

    Hattingen, Elke; Bähr, Oliver; Rieger, Johannes; Blasel, Stella; Steinbach, Joachim; Pilatus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic changes upon antiangiogenic therapy of recurrent glioblastomas (rGBMs) may provide new biomarkers for treatment efficacy. Since in vitro models showed that phospholipid membrane metabolism provides specific information on tumor growth we employed in-vivo MR-spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) of human rGBMs before and under bevacizumab (BVZ) to measure concentrations of phosphocholine (PCho), phosphoethanolamine (PEth), glycerophosphocholine (GPC), and glyceroethanolamine (GPE). (1)H and (31)P MRSI was prospectively performed in 32 patients with rGBMs before and under BVZ therapy at 8 weeks intervals until tumor progression. Patients were dichotomized into subjects with long overall survival (OS) (>median OS) and short OS (tumor tissue and their ratios were compared to contralateral normal-appearing tissue (control). Before BVZ, (1)H-detectable choline signals (total GPC and PCho) in rGBMs were elevated but significance failed after dichotomizing. For metabolite ratios obtained by (31)P MRSI, the short-OS group showed higher PCho/GPC (p = 0.004) in rGBMs compared to control tissue before BVZ while PEth/GPE was elevated in rGBMs of both groups (long-OS p = 0.04; short-OS p = 0.003). Under BVZ, PCho/GPC and PEth/GPE in the tumor initially decreased (p = 0.04) but only PCho/GPC re-increased upon tumor progression (p = 0.02). Intriguingly, in normal-appearing tissue an initial PEth/GPE decrease (p = 0.047) was followed by an increase at the time of tumor progression (p = 0.031). An elevated PCho/GPC ratio in the short-OS group suggests that it is a negative predictive marker for BVZ efficacy. These gliomas may represent a malignant phenotype even growing under anti-VEGF treatment. Elevated PEth/GPE may represent an in-vivo biomarker more sensitive to GBM infiltration than MRI.

  11. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Protein Synthesis Inhibitors as H-Ras-Nanocluster-Increasing Tumor Growth Inducers.

    PubMed

    Najumudeen, Arafath K; Posada, Itziar M D; Lectez, Benoit; Zhou, Yong; Landor, Sebastian K-J; Fallarero, Adyary; Vuorela, Pia; Hancock, John; Abankwa, Daniel

    2015-12-15

    Ras isoforms H-, N-, and K-ras are each mutated in specific cancer types at varying frequencies and have different activities in cell fate control. On the plasma membrane, Ras proteins are laterally segregated into isoform-specific nanoscale signaling hubs, termed nanoclusters. As Ras nanoclusters are required for Ras signaling, chemical modulators of nanoclusters represent ideal candidates for the specific modulation of Ras activity in cancer drug development. We therefore conducted a chemical screen with commercial and in-house natural product libraries using a cell-based H-ras-nanoclustering FRET assay. Next to established Ras inhibitors, such as a statin and farnesyl-transferase inhibitor, we surprisingly identified five protein synthesis inhibitors as positive regulators. Using commonly employed cycloheximide as a representative compound, we show that protein synthesis inhibition increased nanoclustering and effector recruitment specifically of active H-ras but not of K-ras. Consistent with these data, cycloheximide treatment activated both Erk and Akt kinases and specifically promoted H-rasG12V-induced, but not K-rasG12V-induced, PC12 cell differentiation. Intriguingly, cycloheximide increased the number of mammospheres, which are enriched for cancer stem cells. Depletion of H-ras in combination with cycloheximide significantly reduced mammosphere formation, suggesting an exquisite synthetic lethality. The potential of cycloheximide to promote tumor cell growth was also reflected in its ability to increase breast cancer cell tumors grown in ovo. These results illustrate the possibility of identifying Ras-isoform-specific modulators using nanocluster-directed screening. They also suggest an unexpected feedback from protein synthesis inhibition to Ras signaling, which might present a vulnerability in certain tumor cell types.

  12. Heterozygous Germline Mutations in the CBL Tumor-Suppressor Gene Cause a Noonan Syndrome-like Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Simone; De Luca, Alessandro; Stellacci, Emilia; Rossi, Cesare; Checquolo, Saula; Lepri, Francesca; Caputo, Viviana; Silvano, Marianna; Buscherini, Francesco; Consoli, Federica; Ferrara, Grazia; Digilio, Maria C.; Cavaliere, Maria L.; van Hagen, Johanna M.; Zampino, Giuseppe; van der Burgt, Ineke; Ferrero, Giovanni B.; Mazzanti, Laura; Screpanti, Isabella; Yntema, Helger G.; Nillesen, Willy M.; Savarirayan, Ravi; Zenker, Martin; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Gelb, Bruce D.; Tartaglia, Marco

    2010-01-01

    RAS signaling plays a key role in controlling appropriate cell responses to extracellular stimuli and participates in early and late developmental processes. Although enhanced flow through this pathway has been established as a major contributor to oncogenesis, recent discoveries have revealed that aberrant RAS activation causes a group of clinically related developmental disorders characterized by facial dysmorphism, a wide spectrum of cardiac disease, reduced growth, variable cognitive deficits, ectodermal and musculoskeletal anomalies, and increased risk for certain malignancies. Here, we report that heterozygous germline mutations in CBL, a tumor-suppressor gene that is mutated in myeloid malignancies and encodes a multivalent adaptor protein with E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, can underlie a phenotype with clinical features fitting or partially overlapping Noonan syndrome (NS), the most common condition of this disease family. Independent CBL mutations were identified in two sporadic cases and two families from among 365 unrelated subjects who had NS or suggestive features and were negative for mutations in previously identified disease genes. Phenotypic heterogeneity and variable expressivity were documented. Mutations were missense changes altering evolutionarily conserved residues located in the RING finger domain or the linker connecting this domain to the N-terminal tyrosine kinase binding domain, a known mutational hot spot in myeloid malignancies. Mutations were shown to affect CBL-mediated receptor ubiquitylation and dysregulate signal flow through RAS. These findings document that germline mutations in CBL alter development to cause a clinically variable condition that resembles NS and that possibly predisposes to malignancies. PMID:20619386

  13. Revisiting influences on tumor development focusing on laboratory housing.

    PubMed

    Alessio, Helaine M; Schweitzer, Natalie B; Snedden, Angela M; Callahan, Phyllis; Hagerman, Ann E

    2009-05-01

    Spontaneous tumors are reported to occur in 45% to 71% of Sprague-Dawley rats, yet few studies have considered the effect of the sedentary condition of standard laboratory cages on tumorigenesis. Tumor profiles and tumor promoting hormone prolactin were compared in female Sprague-Dawley rats (108) that were allocated into 3 groups: those housed without outside activity (SED group), with twice-weekly 1-h sessions of physical activity in large box (PA group), and with regular voluntary running-wheel exercise (EX). Compared with the EX group, SED rats had more and larger tumors throughout most of their lifespan; tumor profiles of PA rats were similar to those of the SED group. A larger percentage of animals in the SED group had tumors (54%), compared with EX rats (38%). At 64 wk, tumors in SED animals included thyroid carcinoma, malignancy, mammary fibroadenoma, cystadenoma, and granuloma, whereas benign mammary gland cysts were most common in EX. Prolactin levels were highest in SED animals at 24 and 52 wk. In conclusion, increased tumor number, increased tumor size, type of spontaneous tumor, and increased prolactin in rats were associated with standard laboratory housing, which limited physical activity, and were not primarily due to aging.

  14. Astrocytes Directly Influence Tumor Cell Invasion and Metastasis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Cossette, Stephanie M.; Rarick, Kevin R.; Gershan, Jill; Dwinell, Michael B.; Harder, David R.; Ramchandran, Ramani

    2013-01-01

    Brain metastasis is a defining component of tumor pathophysiology, and the underlying mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are not well understood. Current dogma is that tumor cells stimulate and activate astrocytes, and this mutual relationship is critical for tumor cell sustenance in the brain. Here, we provide evidence that primary rat neonatal and adult astrocytes secrete factors that proactively induced human lung and breast tumor cell invasion and metastasis capabilities. Among which, tumor invasion factors namely matrix metalloprotease-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 were partly responsible for the astrocyte media-induced tumor cell invasion. Inhibiting MMPs reduced the ability of tumor cell to migrate and invade in vitro. Further, injection of astrocyte media-conditioned breast cancer cells in mice showed increased invasive activity to the brain and other distant sites. More importantly, blocking the preconditioned tumor cells with broad spectrum MMP inhibitor decreased the invasion and metastasis of the tumor cells, in particular to the brain in vivo. Collectively, our data implicate astrocyte-derived MMP-2 and MMP-9 as critical players that facilitate tumor cell migration and invasion leading to brain metastasis. PMID:24324647

  15. Early influences on human energy regulation: thrifty genotypes and thrifty phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Andrew M

    2005-12-15

    Early influences on human ingestive behavior and other aspects of energy homeostasis can be defined according to two very different time scales: the evolutionary time frame responsible for selection of behavioral and metabolic traits embedded within the genome; and the life-course time frame responsible for setting the phenotype. Evolutionary influences: Famine has been a constant threat to human survival leading to the selection of thrifty genes. Thriftiness can take many forms: metabolic (an 'energy-sparing' super-efficient metabolism); adipogenic (a propensity to rapid fat gain); physiologic (an ability to switch off non-essential processes); gluttony (a tendency to gorge when food is available); sloth (a tendency to conserve energy through inactivity); or behavioral (hoarding, meanness, theft, etc). Life-course influences: The nutritional environment of the early embryo can have a major impact on its survival, and its immediate and later physiology. Subsequently, the fetus is sensitive to its nutrient supply that in turn is affected by maternal fuel supply and by the constraints of the utero-placental unit. Adaptive plasticity also continues through infancy. Ingestive behavior in terms of appetite and satiety could theoretically be affected by some of these metabolic adaptations. This paper will describe the key elements of the thrifty genotype and phenotype and review the evidence base relating these early effects to differences in ingestive behavior.

  16. Ly phenotype of T cells cytotoxic for syngeneic mouse mammary tumors: evidence for T cell interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Stutman, O; Shen, F W; Boyse, E A

    1977-01-01

    Specific cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) of lymph node cells from immunized C3Hf mice, against syngeneic C3H/Umc mammary tumor cells, assayed in vitro, is effected by T lymphocytes. This CMC response is biphasic, with an early peak attained within 6 hr and a second major peak beginning at about 18 hr. Effector cells of both the early minor and late major phases of the response belong to the Ly23 set. Other T cell sets evidently play no part in the early effector response. But specifically activated Ly1 cells help or amplify the major late-phase response. Nevertheless, the mixture of specifically activated Ly1 and Ly23 sets still does not completely reconstitute the late response, which implies that the Ly123 set is also needed for maximal expression of CMC in this system. These Ly123 cells must come from specifically immunized donors. It appears, therefore, that maximal CMC is achieved by the participation of specific Ly123 cells which in the late phase directly or indirectly give rise to Ly23 killer cells. Thus, although killing of syngeneic mammary tumor cells in the CMC assay is invariably effected by cells of the Ly23 set, specifically activated cells of the Ly1 set, and probably of the Ly123 set also, are participants in the interactions needed to produce a maximal CMC response. PMID:304579

  17. Phenotypic and Genetic Characterization of Circulating Tumor Cells by Combining Immunomagnetic Selection and FICTION Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Campos, María; Prior, Celia; Warleta, Fernando; Zudaire, Isabel; Ruíz-Mora, Jesús; Catena, Raúl; Calvo, Alfonso; Gaforio, José J.

    2008-01-01

    The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in breast cancer patients has been proven to have clinical relevance. Cytogenetic characterization of these cells could have crucial relevance for targeted cancer therapies. We developed a method that combines an immunomagnetic selection of CTCs from peripheral blood with the fluorescence immunophenotyping and interphase cytogenetics as a tool for investigation of neoplasm (FICTION) technique. Briefly, peripheral blood (10 ml) from healthy donors was spiked with a predetermined number of human breast cancer cells. Nucleated cells were separated by double density gradient centrifugation of blood samples. Tumor cells (TCs) were immunomagnetically isolated with an anti-cytokeratin antibody and placed onto slides for FICTION analysis. For immunophenotyping and genetic characterization of TCs, a mixture of primary monoclonal anti-pancytokeratin antibodies was used, followed by fluorescent secondary antibodies, and finally hybridized with a TOP2A/HER-2/CEP17 multicolor probe. Our results show that TCs can be efficiently isolated from peripheral blood and characterized by FICTION. Because genetic amplification of TOP2A and ErbB2 (HER-2) in breast cancer correlates with response to anthracyclines and herceptin therapies, respectively, this novel methodology could be useful for a better classification of patients according to the genetic alterations of CTCs and for the application of targeted therapies. (J Histochem Cytochem 56:667–675, 2008) PMID:18413646

  18. Pharmacologic or Genetic Targeting of Glutamine Synthetase Skews Macrophages toward an M1-like Phenotype and Inhibits Tumor Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Erika M; Menga, Alessio; Martín-Pérez, Rosa; Quinto, Annamaria; Riera-Domingo, Carla; De Tullio, Giacoma; Hooper, Douglas C; Lamers, Wouter H; Ghesquière, Bart; McVicar, Daniel W; Guarini, Attilio; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Castegna, Alessandra

    2017-08-15

    Glutamine-synthetase (GS), the glutamine-synthesizing enzyme from glutamate, controls important events, including the release of inflammatory mediators, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation, and autophagy. However, its role in macrophages remains elusive. We report that pharmacologic inhibition of GS skews M2-polarized macrophages toward the M1-like phenotype, characterized by reduced intracellular glutamine and increased succinate with enhanced glucose flux through glycolysis, which could be partly related to HIF1α activation. As a result of these metabolic changes and HIF1α accumulation, GS-inhibited macrophages display an increased capacity to induce T cell recruitment, reduced T cell suppressive potential, and an impaired ability to foster endothelial cell branching or cancer cell motility. Genetic deletion of macrophagic GS in tumor-bearing mice promotes tumor vessel pruning, vascular normalization, accumulation of cytotoxic T cells, and metastasis inhibition. These data identify GS activity as mediator of the proangiogenic, immunosuppressive, and pro-metastatic function of M2-like macrophages and highlight the possibility of targeting this enzyme in the treatment of cancer metastasis. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dual loss of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and complex I activity is necessary to recapitulate the metabolic phenotype of SDH mutant tumors.

    PubMed

    Lorendeau, Doriane; Rinaldi, Gianmarco; Boon, Ruben; Spincemaille, Pieter; Metzger, Kristine; Jäger, Christian; Christen, Stefan; Dong, Xiangyi; Kuenen, Sabine; Voordeckers, Karin; Verstreken, Patrik; Cassiman, David; Vermeersch, Pieter; Verfaillie, Catherine; Hiller, Karsten; Fendt, Sarah-Maria

    2017-09-01

    Mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) are associated with tumor development and neurodegenerative diseases. Only in tumors, loss of SDH activity is accompanied with the loss of complex I activity. Yet, it remains unknown whether the metabolic phenotype of SDH mutant tumors is driven by loss of complex I function, and whether this contributes to the peculiarity of tumor development versus neurodegeneration. We addressed this question by decoupling loss of SDH and complex I activity in cancer cells and neurons. We found that sole loss of SDH activity was not sufficient to recapitulate the metabolic phenotype of SDH mutant tumors, because it failed to decrease mitochondrial respiration and to activate reductive glutamine metabolism. These metabolic phenotypes were only induced upon the additional loss of complex I activity. Thus, we show that complex I function defines the metabolic differences between SDH mutation associated tumors and neurodegenerative diseases, which could open novel therapeutic options against both diseases. Copyright © 2016 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Association between body mass index and mortality for colorectal cancer survivors: overall and by tumor molecular phenotype.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Peter T; Newton, Christina C; Newcomb, Polly A; Phipps, Amanda I; Ahnen, Dennis J; Baron, John A; Buchanan, Daniel D; Casey, Graham; Cleary, Sean P; Cotterchio, Michelle; Farris, Alton B; Figueiredo, Jane C; Gallinger, Steven; Green, Roger C; Haile, Robert W; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Le Marchand, Loïc; Makar, Karen W; McLaughlin, John R; Potter, John D; Renehan, Andrew G; Sinicrope, Frank A; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Win, Aung Ko; Lindor, Noralane M; Limburg, Paul J

    2015-08-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) and BRAF mutation status are associated with colorectal cancer survival, whereas the role of body mass index (BMI) is less clear. We evaluated the association between BMI and colorectal cancer survival, overall and by strata of MSI, BRAF mutation, sex, and other factors. This study included 5,615 men and women diagnosed with invasive colorectal cancer who were followed for mortality (maximum: 14.7 years; mean: 5.9 years). Prediagnosis BMI was derived from self-reported weight approximately one year before diagnosis and height. Tumor MSI and BRAF mutation status were available for 4,131 and 4,414 persons, respectively. Multivariable hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated from delayed-entry Cox proportional hazards models. In multivariable models, high prediagnosis BMI was associated with higher risk of all-cause mortality in both sexes (per 5-kg/m(2); HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.06-1.15), with similar associations stratified by sex (Pinteraction: 0.41), colon versus rectum (Pinteraction: 0.86), MSI status (Pinteraction: 0.84), and BRAF mutation status (Pinteraction: 0.28). In joint models, with MS-stable/MSI-low and normal BMI as the reference group, risk of death was higher for MS-stable/MSI-low and obese BMI (HR, 1.32; P value: 0.0002), not statistically significantly lower for MSI-high and normal BMI (HR, 0.86; P value: 0.29), and approximately the same for MSI-high and obese BMI (HR, 1.00; P value: 0.98). High prediagnosis BMI was associated with increased mortality; this association was consistent across participant subgroups, including strata of tumor molecular phenotype. High BMI may attenuate the survival benefit otherwise observed with MSI-high tumors. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Nuclear Translocation of β-Catenin during Mesenchymal Stem Cells Differentiation into Hepatocytes Is Associated with a Tumoral Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Herencia, Carmen; Martínez-Moreno, Julio M.; Herrera, Concepción; Corrales, Fernando; Santiago-Mora, Raquel; Espejo, Isabel; Barco, Monserrat; Almadén, Yolanda; de la Mata, Manuel; Rodríguez-Ariza, Antonio; Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan R.

    2012-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin pathway controls biochemical processes related to cell differentiation. In committed cells the alteration of this pathway has been associated with tumors as hepatocellular carcinoma or hepatoblastoma. The present study evaluated the role of Wnt/β-catenin activation during human mesenchymal stem cells differentiation into hepatocytes. The differentiation to hepatocytes was achieved by the addition of two different conditioned media. In one of them, β-catenin nuclear translocation, up-regulation of genes related to the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, such as Lrp5 and Fzd3, as well as the oncogenes c-myc and p53 were observed. While in the other protocol there was a Wnt/β-catenin inactivation. Hepatocytes with nuclear translocation of β-catenin also had abnormal cellular proliferation, and expressed membrane proteins involved in hepatocellular carcinoma, metastatic behavior and cancer stem cells. Further, these cells had also increased auto-renewal capability as shown in spheroids formation assay. Comparison of both differentiation protocols by 2D-DIGE proteomic analysis revealed differential expression of 11 proteins with altered expression in hepatocellular carcinoma. Cathepsin B and D, adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, triosephosphate isomerase, inorganic pyrophosphatase, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A or lactate dehydrogenase β-chain were up-regulated only with the protocol associated with Wnt signaling activation while other proteins involved in tumor suppression, such as transgelin or tropomyosin β-chain were down-regulated in this protocol. In conclusion, our results suggest that activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway during human mesenchymal stem cells differentiation into hepatocytes is associated with a tumoral phenotype. PMID:22506042

  2. Multi-Phenotypic subtyping of circulating tumor cells using sequential fluorescent quenching and restaining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Daniel L.; Alpaugh, R. Katherine; Tsai, Susan; Tang, Cha-Mei; Stefansson, Steingrimur

    2016-09-01

    In tissue biopsies formalin fixed paraffin embedded cancer blocks are micro-sectioned producing multiple semi-identical specimens which are analyzed and subtyped proteomically, and genomically, with numerous biomarkers. In blood based biopsies (BBBs), blood is purified for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and clinical utility is typically limited to cell enumeration, as only 2–3 positive fluorescent markers and 1 negative marker can be used. As such, increasing the number of subtyping biomarkers on each individual CTC could dramatically enhance the clinical utility of BBBs, allowing in depth interrogation of clinically relevant CTCs. We describe a simple and inexpensive method for quenching the specific fluors of fluorescently stained CTCs followed by sequential restaining with additional biomarkers. As proof of principle a CTC panel, immunosuppression panel and stem cell panel were used to sequentially subtype individual fluorescently stained patient CTCs, suggesting a simple and universal technique to analyze multiple clinically applicable immunomarkers from BBBs.

  3. Multi-Phenotypic subtyping of circulating tumor cells using sequential fluorescent quenching and restaining

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Daniel L; Alpaugh, R. Katherine; Tsai, Susan; Tang, Cha-Mei; Stefansson, Steingrimur

    2016-01-01

    In tissue biopsies formalin fixed paraffin embedded cancer blocks are micro-sectioned producing multiple semi-identical specimens which are analyzed and subtyped proteomically, and genomically, with numerous biomarkers. In blood based biopsies (BBBs), blood is purified for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and clinical utility is typically limited to cell enumeration, as only 2–3 positive fluorescent markers and 1 negative marker can be used. As such, increasing the number of subtyping biomarkers on each individual CTC could dramatically enhance the clinical utility of BBBs, allowing in depth interrogation of clinically relevant CTCs. We describe a simple and inexpensive method for quenching the specific fluors of fluorescently stained CTCs followed by sequential restaining with additional biomarkers. As proof of principle a CTC panel, immunosuppression panel and stem cell panel were used to sequentially subtype individual fluorescently stained patient CTCs, suggesting a simple and universal technique to analyze multiple clinically applicable immunomarkers from BBBs. PMID:27647345

  4. Genetic Variation in Autophagy-Related Genes Influences the Risk and Phenotype of Buruli Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Capela, Carlos; Dossou, Ange Dodji; Silva-Gomes, Rita; Sopoh, Ghislain Emmanuel; Makoutode, Michel; Menino, João Filipe; Fraga, Alexandra Gabriel; Cunha, Cristina; Carvalho, Agostinho; Rodrigues, Fernando; Pedrosa, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a severe necrotizing human skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Clinically, presentation is a sum of these diverse pathogenic hits subjected to critical immune-regulatory mechanisms. Among them, autophagy has been demonstrated as a cellular process of critical importance. Since microtubules and dynein are affected by mycolactone, the critical pathogenic exotoxin produced by M. ulcerans, cytoskeleton-related changes might potentially impair the autophagic process and impact the risk and progression of infection. Genetic variants in the autophagy-related genes NOD2, PARK2 and ATG16L1 has been associated with susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases. Here, we investigated their association with BU risk, its severe phenotypes and its progression to an ulcerative form. Genetic variants were genotyped using KASPar chemistry in 208 BU patients (70.2% with an ulcerative form and 28% in severe WHO category 3 phenotype) and 300 healthy endemic controls. The rs1333955 SNP in PARK2 was significantly associated with increased susceptibility to BU [odds ratio (OR), 1.43; P = 0.05]. In addition, both the rs9302752 and rs2066842 SNPs in NOD2 gee significantly increased the predisposition of patients to develop category 3 (OR, 2.23; P = 0.02; and OR 12.7; P = 0.03, respectively, whereas the rs2241880 SNP in ATG16L1 was found to significantly protect patients from presenting the ulcer phenotype (OR, 0.35; P = 0.02). Our findings indicate that specific genetic variants in autophagy-related genes influence susceptibility to the development of BU and its progression to severe phenotypes.

  5. Influence of temperature on reproductive biology and phenotype of a ladybird, Menochilus sexmaculatus (Fabricius) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Dubey, A; Omkar; Mishra, G

    2016-05-01

    Body melanisation in insects is polygenic, resulting from genetic polymorphism or phenotypic plasticity, with diverse implications ranging from thermal budgeting to reproductive success. In this study, we assessed the, mate choice, reproductive success, and offspring colouration of typical (T) and melanic (M) morphs of the ladybird Menochilus sexmaculatus paired at three temperatures 15°C, 25°C and 35°C. Mating success of the two morphs and the consequences for offspring fitness and offspring phenotype under these temperature regimes were evaluated. Melanic adults of both sexes achieved significantly higher mating success at 15°C and 25°C, but at 35°C no influence of adult morph on mate selection was observed. Melanic females were more fecund than typical females at all temperatures. Offspring of melanic parents developed faster than those of typicals at 15°C and 25°C, but not at 35°C. Evidence was also found of phenotypic plasticity in colour form at 15°C and 35°C. At 25°C the parents of pure (T) and (M) morphs produced offspring of the same morph. However, low temperature induced partial melanisation among the offspring of typical parents (T). Whereas at 35°C the offspring of (T) parents became paler in colour with very fine zigzag lines on elytra, i.e. they decrease the degree of melanisation. Pure melanics (M) compensated for elevated temperature stress by producing offspring that were either pure melanic but small or large with reduced melanisation. Our results on offspring phenotype variation indicate that the degree of melanism in morphs is a result of environmentally regulated expression of the parental genotype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic Variation in Autophagy-Related Genes Influences the Risk and Phenotype of Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Capela, Carlos; Dossou, Ange Dodji; Silva-Gomes, Rita; Sopoh, Ghislain Emmanuel; Makoutode, Michel; Menino, João Filipe; Fraga, Alexandra Gabriel; Cunha, Cristina; Carvalho, Agostinho; Rodrigues, Fernando; Pedrosa, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Buruli ulcer (BU) is a severe necrotizing human skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Clinically, presentation is a sum of these diverse pathogenic hits subjected to critical immune-regulatory mechanisms. Among them, autophagy has been demonstrated as a cellular process of critical importance. Since microtubules and dynein are affected by mycolactone, the critical pathogenic exotoxin produced by M. ulcerans, cytoskeleton-related changes might potentially impair the autophagic process and impact the risk and progression of infection. Objective Genetic variants in the autophagy-related genes NOD2, PARK2 and ATG16L1 has been associated with susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases. Here, we investigated their association with BU risk, its severe phenotypes and its progression to an ulcerative form. Methods Genetic variants were genotyped using KASPar chemistry in 208 BU patients (70.2% with an ulcerative form and 28% in severe WHO category 3 phenotype) and 300 healthy endemic controls. Results The rs1333955 SNP in PARK2 was significantly associated with increased susceptibility to BU [odds ratio (OR), 1.43; P = 0.05]. In addition, both the rs9302752 and rs2066842 SNPs in NOD2 gee significantly increased the predisposition of patients to develop category 3 (OR, 2.23; P = 0.02; and OR 12.7; P = 0.03, respectively, whereas the rs2241880 SNP in ATG16L1 was found to significantly protect patients from presenting the ulcer phenotype (OR, 0.35; P = 0.02). Conclusion Our findings indicate that specific genetic variants in autophagy-related genes influence susceptibility to the development of BU and its progression to severe phenotypes. PMID:27128681

  7. A short-term treatment with tumor necrosis factor-alpha enhances stem cell phenotype of human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Mayu; Fujisawa, Takuo; Ono, Mitsuaki; Hara, Emilio Satoshi; Pham, Hai Thanh; Nakajima, Ryu; Sonoyama, Wataru; Kuboki, Takuo

    2014-02-28

    During normal pulp tissue healing, inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) or interleukins, act in the initial 48 hours (inflammatory phase) and play important roles not only as chemo-attractants of inflammatory cells and stem/progenitor cells but also in inducing a cascade of reactions toward tissue regeneration or reparative dentin formation or both. Previous reports have shown that inflammatory cytokines regulate the differentiation capacity of dental pulp stem/progenitor cells (DPCs), but none has interrogated the impact of these cytokines on the stem cell phenotype of stem/progenitor cells. This study investigated the effects of a short-term treatment with TNF-α on the stem cell phenotype and differentiation ability of human DPCs. An in vivo mouse model of pulp exposure was performed for analysis of expression of the mesenchymal stem cell marker CD146 in DPCs during the initial stage of inflammatory response. For in vitro studies, human DPCs were isolated and incubated with TNF-α for 2 days and passaged to eliminate TNF-α completely. Analysis of stem cell phenotype was performed by quantification of cells positive for mesenchymal stem cell markers SSEA-4 (stage-specific embryonic antigen 4) and CD146 by flow cytometry as well as by quantitative analysis of telomerase activity and mRNA levels of OCT-4 and NANOG. Cell migration, colony-forming ability, and differentiation toward odontogenesis and adipogenesis were also investigated. The pulp exposure model revealed a strong staining for CD146 during the initial inflammatory response, at 2 days after pulp exposure. In vitro experiments demonstrated that a short-term (2-day) treatment of TNF-α increased by twofold the percentage of SSEA-4+ cells. Accordingly, STRO-1, CD146, and SSEA-4 protein levels as well as OCT-4 and NANOG mRNA levels were also significantly upregulated upon TNF-α treatment. A short-term TNF-α treatment also enhanced DPC function, including the ability to

  8. The Tumor-Associated Variant RAD51 G151D Induces a Hyper-Recombination Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Carolyn G; Jensen, Ryan B; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Rothenberg, Eli; Morrical, Scott W; Wallace, Susan S; Sweasy, Joann B

    2016-08-01

    The RAD51 protein plays a key role in the homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks and is important for maintaining genome stability. Here we report on a novel human RAD51 variant found in an aggressive and therapy-refractive breast carcinoma. Expression of the RAD51 G151D variant in human breast epithelial cells increases the levels of homology-directed repair. Expression of RAD51 G151D in cells also promotes high levels of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges. In vitro, the purified RAD51 G151D protein directly and significantly enhances DNA strand exchange activity in the presence of RPA. In concordance with this result, co-incubation of G151D with BRCA2 resulted in a much higher level of strand-exchange activity compared to WT RAD51. Strikingly, the RAD51 G151D variant confers resistance to multiple DNA damaging agents, including ionizing radiation, mitomycin C, and doxorubicin. Our findings demonstrate that the RAD51 G151D somatic variant has a novel hyper-recombination phenotype and suggest that this property of the protein is important for the repair of DNA damage, leading to drug resistance.

  9. The Tumor-Associated Variant RAD51 G151D Induces a Hyper-Recombination Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Carolyn G.; Jensen, Ryan B.; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Rothenberg, Eli; Morrical, Scott W.; Wallace, Susan S.; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2016-01-01

    The RAD51 protein plays a key role in the homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks and is important for maintaining genome stability. Here we report on a novel human RAD51 variant found in an aggressive and therapy-refractive breast carcinoma. Expression of the RAD51 G151D variant in human breast epithelial cells increases the levels of homology-directed repair. Expression of RAD51 G151D in cells also promotes high levels of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges. In vitro, the purified RAD51 G151D protein directly and significantly enhances DNA strand exchange activity in the presence of RPA. In concordance with this result, co-incubation of G151D with BRCA2 resulted in a much higher level of strand-exchange activity compared to WT RAD51. Strikingly, the RAD51 G151D variant confers resistance to multiple DNA damaging agents, including ionizing radiation, mitomycin C, and doxorubicin. Our findings demonstrate that the RAD51 G151D somatic variant has a novel hyper-recombination phenotype and suggest that this property of the protein is important for the repair of DNA damage, leading to drug resistance. PMID:27513445

  10. Neonatal environment exerts a sustained influence on the development of the intestinal microbiota and metabolic phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Merrifield, Claire A; Lewis, Marie C; Berger, Bernard; Cloarec, Olivier; Heinzmann, Silke S; Charton, Florence; Krause, Lutz; Levin, Nadine S; Duncker, Swantje; Mercenier, Annick; Holmes, Elaine; Bailey, Mick; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2016-01-01

    The postnatal environment, including factors such as weaning and acquisition of the gut microbiota, has been causally linked to the development of later immunological diseases such as allergy and autoimmunity, and has also been associated with a predisposition to metabolic disorders. We show that the very early-life environment influences the development of both the gut microbiota and host metabolic phenotype in a porcine model of human infants. Farm piglets were nursed by their mothers for 1 day, before removal to highly controlled, individual isolators where they received formula milk until weaning at 21 days. The experiment was repeated, to create two batches, which differed only in minor environmental fluctuations during the first day. At day 1 after birth, metabolic profiling of serum by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy demonstrated significant, systemic, inter-batch variation which persisted until weaning. However, the urinary metabolic profiles demonstrated that significant inter-batch effects on 3-hydroxyisovalerate, trimethylamine-N-oxide and mannitol persisted beyond weaning to at least 35 days. Batch effects were linked to significant differences in the composition of colonic microbiota at 35 days, determined by 16 S pyrosequencing. Different weaning diets modulated both the microbiota and metabolic phenotype independently of the persistent batch effects. We demonstrate that the environment during the first day of life influences development of the microbiota and metabolic phenotype and thus should be taken into account when interrogating experimental outcomes. In addition, we suggest that intervention at this early time could provide ‘metabolic rescue' for at-risk infants who have undergone aberrant patterns of initial intestinal colonisation. PMID:26066712

  11. Does geographical location influence the phenotype of Fabry disease in women in Europe?

    PubMed

    Barba-Romero, M-A; Deegan, P; Giugliani, R; Hughes, D

    2010-02-01

    This study examines the relationship between phenotype and geographical location of patients with Fabry disease in Europe. Data were taken from patients enrolled in the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS), as of October 2007. A modified version of the Mainz Severity Score Index (FOS-MSSI) was used to classify patients according to the severity of disease. European patients were grouped depending on country of residence (northern or southern European countries). Results are presented from 762 patients enrolled in FOS in Europe (357 men and 405 women); 66% lived in northern and 34% in southern countries. Median age at onset of symptoms of Fabry disease was similar in both sexes. No differences in disease severity were seen among men, according to place of residence; however, women living in northern countries had higher severity scores (p < 0.001) than those in southern countries. In men and women, FOS-MSSI scores increased with age, irrespective of place of residence. The results suggest that expression of different phenotypic features in Fabry disease in women living in Europe may be influenced by extra-genetic or epigenetic factors. These factors might be related to dietary or environmental influences that differ according to the patient's country of residence.

  12. Combined influences of Gm and HLA phenotypes upon multiple sclerosis susceptibility and severity.

    PubMed Central

    Salier, J P; Sesboüé, R; Martin-Mondière, C; Daveau, M; Cesaro, P; Cavelier, B; Coquerel, A; Legrand, L; Goust, J M; Degos, J D

    1986-01-01

    In some Caucasian populations, multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility has been independently related to given alleles of HLA or Gm systems that respectively code for major histocompatibility complex class I and II antigens or immunoglobulin G heavy chains. Whether given combinations of alleles at both series of loci simultaneously influence MS susceptibility and/or severity was investigated by comparing 147 French MS patients and 226 geographically-matched healthy controls. The G2m(-23)/HLA-B35 phenotype and G1m(-1)/HLA-B7(-)/HLA-DR2 phenotype were respectively associated with significant protection against (relative risk = 0.05) and susceptibility to (relative risk = 4.3) MS. When considering MS severity, the presence of HLA-B7 antigen correlated with a more severe disease in Gm1/Gm3 heterozygous patients, but not in Gm3/Gm3 homozygous patients. Conversely, an HLA-B12-associated milder disease was restricted to Gm3/Gm3 homozygotes. These results demonstrate the combined influence on MS of genetic loci that are unlinked but immune response-associated. Combined Gm and HLA typing is very likely able to serve as a prognostic indicator in this disease. PMID:3461005

  13. Combined influences of Gm and HLA phenotypes upon multiple sclerosis susceptibility and severity.

    PubMed

    Salier, J P; Sesboüé, R; Martin-Mondière, C; Daveau, M; Cesaro, P; Cavelier, B; Coquerel, A; Legrand, L; Goust, J M; Degos, J D

    1986-08-01

    In some Caucasian populations, multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility has been independently related to given alleles of HLA or Gm systems that respectively code for major histocompatibility complex class I and II antigens or immunoglobulin G heavy chains. Whether given combinations of alleles at both series of loci simultaneously influence MS susceptibility and/or severity was investigated by comparing 147 French MS patients and 226 geographically-matched healthy controls. The G2m(-23)/HLA-B35 phenotype and G1m(-1)/HLA-B7(-)/HLA-DR2 phenotype were respectively associated with significant protection against (relative risk = 0.05) and susceptibility to (relative risk = 4.3) MS. When considering MS severity, the presence of HLA-B7 antigen correlated with a more severe disease in Gm1/Gm3 heterozygous patients, but not in Gm3/Gm3 homozygous patients. Conversely, an HLA-B12-associated milder disease was restricted to Gm3/Gm3 homozygotes. These results demonstrate the combined influence on MS of genetic loci that are unlinked but immune response-associated. Combined Gm and HLA typing is very likely able to serve as a prognostic indicator in this disease.

  14. The Use of Chelated Radionuclide (Samarium-153-Ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonate) to Modulate Phenotype of Tumor Cells and Enhance T Cell–Mediated Killing

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Mala; Wansley, Elizabeth K.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Yu, Sarah; Paik, Chang H.; Camphausen, Kevin; Becker, Michael D.; Goeckeler, William F.; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Exposing human tumor cells to sublethal doses of external beam radiation up-regulates expression of tumor antigen and accessory molecules, rendering tumor cells more susceptible to killing by antigen-specific CTLs. This study explored the possibility that exposure to palliative doses of a radiopharmaceutical agent could alter the phenotype of tumor cells to render them more susceptible to T cell – mediated killing. Experimental Design Here, 10 human tumor cell lines (4 prostate, 2 breast, and 4 lung) were exposed to increasing doses of the radiopharmaceutical samarium-153-ethylenediaminetetrame-thylenephosphonate (153Sm-EDTMP) used in cancer patients to treat pain due to bone metastasis. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and quantitative real-time PCR analysis for expression of five surface molecules and several tumor-associated antigens involved in prostate cancer were done. LNCaP human prostate cancer cells were exposed to153Sm-EDTMP and incubated with tumor-associated antigen-specific CTL in a CTL killing assay to determine whether exposure to 153Sm-EDTMP rendered LNCaP cells more susceptible to T cell – mediated killing. Results Tumor cells up-regulated the surface molecules Fas (100% of cell lines up-regulated Fas), carcinoembryonic antigen (90%), mucin-1 (60%), MHC class I (50%), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (40%) in response to 153Sm-EDTMP. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed additional up-regulated tumor antigens. Exposure to 153Sm-EDTMP rendered LNCaP cells more susceptible to killing by CTLs specific for prostate-specific antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen, and mucin-1. Conclusions Doses of 153Sm-EDTMP equivalent to palliative doses delivered to bone alter the phenotype of tumor cells, suggesting that153Sm-EDTMP may work synergistically with immuno-therapy to increase the susceptibility of tumor cells to CTL killing. PMID:18594006

  15. The use of chelated radionuclide (samarium-153-ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonate) to modulate phenotype of tumor cells and enhance T cell-mediated killing.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Mala; Wansley, Elizabeth K; Carrasquillo, Jorge A; Yu, Sarah; Paik, Chang H; Camphausen, Kevin; Becker, Michael D; Goeckeler, William F; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W

    2008-07-01

    Exposing human tumor cells to sublethal doses of external beam radiation up-regulates expression of tumor antigen and accessory molecules, rendering tumor cells more susceptible to killing by antigen-specific CTLs. This study explored the possibility that exposure to palliative doses of a radiopharmaceutical agent could alter the phenotype of tumor cells to render them more susceptible to T cell-mediated killing. Here, 10 human tumor cell lines (4 prostate, 2 breast, and 4 lung) were exposed to increasing doses of the radiopharmaceutical samarium-153-ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonate ((153)Sm-EDTMP) used in cancer patients to treat pain due to bone metastasis. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and quantitative real-time PCR analysis for expression of five surface molecules and several tumor-associated antigens involved in prostate cancer were done. LNCaP human prostate cancer cells were exposed to (153)Sm-EDTMP and incubated with tumor-associated antigen-specific CTL in a CTL killing assay to determine whether exposure to (153)Sm-EDTMP rendered LNCaP cells more susceptible to T cell-mediated killing. Tumor cells up-regulated the surface molecules Fas (100% of cell lines up-regulated Fas), carcinoembryonic antigen (90%), mucin-1 (60%), MHC class I (50%), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (40%) in response to (153)Sm-EDTMP. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed additional up-regulated tumor antigens. Exposure to (153)Sm-EDTMP rendered LNCaP cells more susceptible to killing by CTLs specific for prostate-specific antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen, and mucin-1. Doses of (153)Sm-EDTMP equivalent to palliative doses delivered to bone alter the phenotype of tumor cells, suggesting that (153)Sm-EDTMP may work synergistically with immunotherapy to increase the susceptibility of tumor cells to CTL killing.

  16. Emergence of the drug-resistant phenotype in tumor subpopulations: a hybrid model.

    PubMed

    Michelson, S; Slate, D

    1989-09-20

    A mathematical model is proposed that describes the emergence of drug resistance in a tumor cell population. The model is termed a hybrid in the sense that the population-wide dynamics are described by a stochastic birth-death-migration model with transition probabilities dependent on the deterministic distribution of drug within the average cell. In the model, the probability that a cell dies is proportional to the concentration of drug within the target site in the cell. The micropharmacology describing the distribution of drug within the average cell is described by a standard well-mixed compartment model. Possible mechanisms that can confer drug resistance on a cell are described: decreased drug uptake, increased drug efflux, intracellular metabolism or inactivation, or both, of a drug, and a change in the level or sensitivity of a target. The biologic mechanisms underlying resistance and potential strategies for overcoming it are discussed within the context of our model. Results from a numerical simulation are presented as verification of the initial theory.

  17. Macrophages are recruited to hypoxic tumor areas and acquire a Pro-Angiogenic M2-Polarized phenotype via hypoxic cancer cell derived cytokines Oncostatin M and Eotaxin

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Chakrapani; Tewari, Brij Nath; Kanchan, Ranjana Kumari; Baghel, Khemraj Singh; Nautiyal, Naveen; Shrivastava, Richa; Kaur, Harbeer; Bhatt, Madan Lal Bramha; Bhadauria, Smrati

    2014-01-01

    TAMs, a unique and distinct M2-skewed myeloid population of tumor stroma, exhibiting pro-tumor functions is fast emerging as a potential target for anti-cancer immunotherapy. Macrophage-recruitment and M2-polarization represent key TAMs-related phenomenon that are amenable to therapeutic intervention. However successful translation of these approaches into effective therapeutic regimen requires better characterization of tumor-microenvironment derived signals that regulate macrophage recruitment and their polarization. Owing to hypoxic milieu being a persistent feature of tumor-microenvironment and a major contributor to malignancy and treatment resistance, the current study was planned with an aim to decipher tumor cell responses to hypoxia vis-a-vis macrophage homing and phenotype switching. Here, we show that hypoxia-primed cancer cells chemoattract and polarize macrophages to pro-angiogenic M2-polarized subtype via Eotaxin and Oncostatin M. Concordantly, hypoxic regions of human breast-cancer specimen exhibited elevated Eotaxin and Oncostatin M levels with concurrently elevated M2-macrophage content. Blockade of Eotaxin/Oncostatin M not only prevented hypoxic breast-cancer cells from recruiting and polarizing macrophages towards an M2-polarized phenotype and retarded tumor progression in 4T1/BALB/c-syngenic-mice-model of breast-cancer but also enhanced the efficacy of anti-angiogenic Bevacizumab. The findings established these two cytokines as novel targets for devising effective anticancer therapy particularly for tumors that are refractory or develop resistance to anti-angiogenic therapeutics. PMID:25051364

  18. Phenotypic and functional analysis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes compared with tumor-associated lymphocytes from ascitic fluid and peripheral blood lymphocytes in patients with advanced ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Santin, A D; Hermonat, P L; Ravaggi, A; Bellone, S; Roman, J J; Smith, C V; Pecorelli, S; Radominska-Pandya, A; Cannon, M J; Parham, G P

    2001-01-01

    To investigate and compare the phenotype and function of lymphocytes collected from patients harboring advanced ovarian cancer, leukocytes from peripheral blood (n = 18), ascitic fluid (n = 13) and tumor tissues (n = 13) were evaluated for the relative proportions of lymphocyte subsets, including CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD19+, CD56 and the early (CD25) and late (HLA-DR) activation markers on CD3+ T cells. The ability to synthesize type 1 cytokines (IFN-gamma and IL-2) and a type 2 cytokine (IL-4) was assessed by flow cytometry. In all patients, T cells (CD3+) were the major leukocyte population detected in each tissue, with CD4+ T cells being dominant in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and tumor-associated lymphocytes (TAL) but not in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) (CD4:CD8 ratios: 3.0 vs. 2.0 vs. 1.0, respectively). CD19+ lymphocytes (B cells) and CD56+ lymphocytes (NK cells) were significantly higher in PBL compared to TAL and TIL (p < 0.05). TAL and TIL had a higher proportion of T cells expressing the late activation marker HLA-DR compared to PBL. In contrast, no significant differences were detected in PBL, TAL and TIL in the expression of the early activation marker CD25. Type 1 cytokines were the dominant type produced by in vitro stimulated T cells for each population, with a greater proportion of IFN-gamma+ T cells in TAL and TIL compared to PBL (p < 0.01), and a higher proportion of IL-2+ T cells in PBL compared with TAL and TIL (p < 0.05). Low percentages of IL-4+ T cells (i.e. Th2) were detected in each tissue. Taken together, these data demonstrate the recruitment and accumulation of high concentrations of antigen-experienced T lymphocytes in TAL and TIL compared to PBL. However, low surface expression of IL-2 receptor (i.e. CD25), as well as depressed intracellular IL-2 production in chronically stimulated TAL and TIL suggests that the impaired antitumor function commonly detected in these lymphocyte populations may be secondary to an acquired

  19. Phenotypic alterations in human saphenous vein culture induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha and lipoproteins: a preliminary development of an initial atherosclerotic plaque model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is a chronic progressive inflammatory disease of blood vessels particularly the arteries. The development of atherosclerotic plaques or atherogenesis is a complex process that is influenced by cardiovascular risk factors such as vascular inflammation and dyslipidemia. This study demonstrates the ability of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and low density lipoproteins (LDL) to induce atherosclerotic plaque in human saphenous vein (HSV) organ culture. Methods Normal HSV segments, from male patients who had coronary bypass graft, were cultured in DMEM containing 5% heat inactivated fetal bovine serum. TNF-α (5 ng/ml) was applied in combination with native LDL (nLDL) or oxidized LDL (oxLDL) at the dose of 50 μg/ml for 14 days. The phenotypic changes of the organ cultures characteristic of initial atherosclerotic plaques were evaluated. The effect of anti-atherogenic agent, 17-β estradiol (E2), was also determined. Results Histologic, histomorphometric, and immunohistochemical examinations revealed that HSV rings stimulated with TNF-α + nLDL or TNF-α + oxLDL can exhibit the essential morphological features of atherogenesis, including fibrous cap formation, cholesterol clefts, evident thickening of the intimal layer, increased proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMC) and migration to the subendothelial layer, significant SMC foam cell formation, and increased expression of adhesion molecules in the vascular wall. Addition of E2 (50 nM) to the culture significantly modulated the critical changes. Consistently, mRNA profiling of the HSV model revealed that 50 of 84 genes of atherosclerosis were up-regulated. Conclusions Phenotypic changes characteristic of the initial development of atherosclerotic plaques can be induced in HSV organ culture. PMID:24010774

  20. HORMONAL INFLUENCES ON MAMMARY TUMORS OF THE RAT

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, Charles; Torralba, Yolanda; Mainzer, Klaus

    1956-01-01

    A transplanted mammary fibroadenoma was found to grow in 95 per cent of intact adult female rats and the increment of tumor weights was progressive and logarithmic. The growth of the tumor was retarded by ovariectomy and still more when this was combined with adrenalectomy. In ovariectomized rats the growth of the tumor was stimulated by phenolic estrogens, this increase being enhanced when progesterone was added. In these responses to hormonal changes the mammary gland and the tumor resembled each other. Yet there are many differences between the growth of the fibroadenoma and that of the mammary gland. In contrast to the progressive growth which occurred in intact adult females there was a prolonged period of indolent growth of transplants in hypophysectomized rats; but after many weeks active growth began and the tumors eventually reached large size. During the period of quiescent growth the tumor was cytologically atrophic but after the growth spurt had started the microscopic appearance of the fibroadenoma resembled that of tumors growing in normal adult females. The mammary gland remained atrophic during both the slow and the accelerated phases of tumor growth, and so too with the other secondary sex expressions. In hypophysectomized rats estrone and progesterone, when combined, stimulated the growth of the tumor, and this growth was accelerated by the additional administration of lactogenic or growth hormones. None of these hormones, separately, stimulated the growth of the tumor. In ovariectomized rats other differences were demonstrated between the growth of the mammary gland and the fibroadenoma. Progesterone, injected alone, accelerated the growth of the tumor but not that of the mammary glands. The administration of phenolic estrogens exerted a biphasic effect on the growth of the tumor whilst that on the breast of its hosts was monophasic. With progressively increasing doses of these phenols there occurred primarily an augmentation of the rate of

  1. Tumor Suppressor and Aging Biomarker p16INK4a Induces Cellular Senescence without the Associated Inflammatory Secretory Phenotype*

    PubMed Central

    Coppé, Jean-Philippe; Rodier, Francis; Patil, Christopher K.; Freund, Adam; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by preventing the proliferation of cells that experience potentially oncogenic stimuli. Senescent cells often express p16INK4a, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, tumor suppressor, and biomarker of aging, which renders the senescence growth arrest irreversible. Senescent cells also acquire a complex phenotype that includes the secretion of many cytokines, growth factors, and proteases, termed a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). The SASP is proposed to underlie age-related pathologies, including, ironically, late life cancer. Here, we show that ectopic expression of p16INK4a and another cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21CIP1/WAF1, induces senescence without a SASP, even though they induced other features of senescence, including a stable growth arrest. Additionally, human fibroblasts induced to senesce by ionizing radiation or oncogenic RAS developed a SASP regardless of whether they expressed p16INK4a. Cells induced to senesce by ectopic p16INK4a expression lacked paracrine activity on epithelial cells, consistent with the absence of a functional SASP. Nonetheless, expression of p16INK4a by cells undergoing replicative senescence limited the accumulation of DNA damage and premature cytokine secretion, suggesting an indirect role for p16INK4a in suppressing the SASP. These findings suggest that p16INK4a-positive cells may not always harbor a SASP in vivo and, furthermore, that the SASP is not a consequence of p16INK4a activation or senescence per se, but rather is a damage response that is separable from the growth arrest. PMID:21880712

  2. The joint contribution of tumor phenotype and education to breast cancer survival disparity between Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women.

    PubMed

    Boone, S D; Baumgartner, K B; Joste, N E; Pinkston, C M; Yang, D; Baumgartner, R N

    2014-03-01

    Some studies suggest that Hispanic women are more likely to have ER- and triple-negative (ER-/PR-/HER2-) tumors and subsequently poorer prognosis than non-Hispanic white (NHW) women. In addition, only a handful of studies have examined period-specific effects of tumor phenotype and ethnicity on breast cancer survival, leaving the time-varying effects of hormonal status and ethnicity on breast cancer survival poorly defined. This study describes short and long-term breast cancer survival by ethnicity at 0-5 years and 5+ years post-diagnosis using data from the New Mexico Health, Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle cohort of Hispanic and NHW women ages 29-88 years newly diagnosed with stages I-IIIA breast cancer. The survival rate for Hispanics at 0-5 years was 82.2 % versus 94.3 % for NHW. Hispanics were more likely to have larger tumors, more advanced stage, and ER- phenotypes compared to NHW women. There was a significantly higher risk of breast cancer mortality in Hispanics over 5 years of follow-up compared to NHW (HR = 2.78, 95 % CI 1.39-5.56), adjusting for age, tumor phenotype, stage, and tumor size. This ethnic difference in survival, however, was attenuated and no longer statistically significant when additional adjustment was made for education, although a >1.5-fold increase in mortality was observed. In contrast, there was no difference between ethnic groups for survival after 5 years (HR = 1.08, 95 % CI 0.36-3.24). Our results indicate that the difference in survival between Hispanic and NHW women with breast cancer occurs in the first few years following diagnosis and is jointly associated with tumor phenotype and socio-demographic factors related to education.

  3. Genetic background of nonmutant Piebald-Virol-Glaxo rats does not influence nephronophthisis phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Yengkopiong, Jada Pasquale; Lako, Joseph Daniel Wani

    2013-01-01

    Background Nephronophthisis (NPHP), which affects multiple organs, is a hereditary cystic kidney disease (CKD), characterized by interstitial fibrosis and numerous fluid-filled cysts in the kidneys. It is caused by mutations in NPHP genes, which encode for ciliary proteins known as nephrocystins. The disorder affects many people across the world and leads to end-stage renal disease. The aim of this study was to determine if the genetic background of the nonmutant female Piebald-Virol-Glaxo (PVG/Seac–/–) rat influences phenotypic inheritance of NPHP from mutant male Lewis polycystic kidney rats. Methods Mating experiments were performed between mutant Lewis polycystic kidney male rats with CKD and nonmutant PVG and Wistar Kyoto female rats without cystic kidney disease to raise second filial and backcross 1 progeny, respectively. Rats that developed cystic kidneys were identified. Systolic blood pressure was determined in each rat at 12 weeks of age using the tail and cuff method. After euthanasia, blood samples were collected and chemistry was determined. Histological examination of the kidneys, pancreas, and liver of rats with and without cystic kidney disease was performed. Results It was established that the genetic background of nonmutant female PVG rats did not influence the phenotypic inheritance of the CKD from mutant male Lewis polycystic kidney rats. The disease arose as a result of a recessive mutation in a single gene (second filial generation, CKD = 13, non-CKD = 39, χ2 = 0.00, P ≥ 0.97; backcross 1 generation, CKD = 67, non-CKD = 72, χ2 = 0.18, P > 0.05) and inherited as NPHP. The rats with CKD developed larger fluid-filled cystic kidneys, higher systolic blood pressure, and anemia, but there were no extrarenal cysts and disease did not lead to early pup mortality. Conclusion The genetic background of the nonmutant PVG rats does not influence the genetic and phenotypic inheritance of CKD from mutant Lewis polycystic kidney rats. A single

  4. IFN‐λ3 polymorphism indirectly influences NK cell phenotype and function during acute HCV infection

    PubMed Central

    Depla, Marion; Pelletier, Sandy; Bédard, Nathalie; Brunaud, Camille; Bruneau, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Polymorphisms in the type III interferon IFN‐λ3 and the killer cell immunoglobulin‐like receptor (KIR) genes controlling the activity of natural killer (NK) cells can predict spontaneous resolution of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We hypothesized that IFN‐λ3 polymorphism may modulate NK cell function during acute HCV. Methods We monitored the plasma levels of type III IFNs in relation to the phenotype and the function of NK cells in a cohort of people who inject drugs (PWID) during acute HCV infection with different outcomes. Results Early acute HCV was associated with high variability in type III IFNs plasma levels and the favorable IFN‐λ3 CC genotype was associated with higher viral loads. Reduced expression of Natural Killer Group Protein 2A (NKG2A) was associated with lower IFN‐λ3 plasma levels and the CC genotype. IFN‐γ production by NK cells was higher in individuals with the CC genotype during acute infection but this did not prevent viral persistence. IFN‐λ3 plasma levels did not correlate with function of NK cells and IFN‐λ3 prestimulation did not affect NK cell activation and function. Conclusions These results suggest that IFN‐λ3 polymorphism indirectly influences NK cell phenotype and function during acute HCV but other factors may act in concert to determine the outcome of the infection. PMID:27621819

  5. Comparative analyses of the influence of developmental mode on phenotypic diversification rates in shorebirds

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Gavin H; Freckleton, Robert P; Székely, Tamás

    2006-01-01

    Phenotypic diversity is not evenly distributed across lineages. Here, we describe and apply a maximum-likelihood phylogenetic comparative method to test for different rates of phenotypic evolution between groups of the avian order Charadriiformes (shorebirds, gulls and alcids) to test the influence of a binary trait (offspring demand; semi-precocial or precocial) on rates of evolution of parental care, mating systems and secondary sexual traits. In semi-precocial species, chicks are reliant on the parents for feeding, but in precocial species the chicks feed themselves. Thus, where the parents are emancipated from feeding the young, we predict that there is an increased potential for brood desertion, and consequently for the divergence of mating systems. In addition, secondary sexual traits are predicted to evolve faster in groups with less demanding young. We found that precocial development not only allows rapid divergence of parental care and mating behaviours, but also promotes the rapid diversification of secondary sexual characters, most notably sexual size dimorphism (SSD) in body mass. Thus, less demanding offspring appear to facilitate rapid evolution of breeding systems and some sexually selected traits. PMID:16769632

  6. Comparative analyses of the influence of developmental mode on phenotypic diversification rates in shorebirds.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gavin H; Freckleton, Robert P; Székely, Tamás

    2006-07-07

    Phenotypic diversity is not evenly distributed across lineages. Here, we describe and apply a maximum-likelihood phylogenetic comparative method to test for different rates of phenotypic evolution between groups of the avian order Charadriiformes (shorebirds, gulls and alcids) to test the influence of a binary trait (offspring demand; semi-precocial or precocial) on rates of evolution of parental care, mating systems and secondary sexual traits. In semi-precocial species, chicks are reliant on the parents for feeding, but in precocial species the chicks feed themselves. Thus, where the parents are emancipated from feeding the young, we predict that there is an increased potential for brood desertion, and consequently for the divergence of mating systems. In addition, secondary sexual traits are predicted to evolve faster in groups with less demanding young. We found that precocial development not only allows rapid divergence of parental care and mating behaviours, but also promotes the rapid diversification of secondary sexual characters, most notably sexual size dimorphism (SSD) in body mass. Thus, less demanding offspring appear to facilitate rapid evolution of breeding systems and some sexually selected traits.

  7. Immunogenetic influence of Igh-1 phenotype on experimental herpes simplex virus type-1 corneal infection.

    PubMed

    Opremcak, E M; Wells, P A; Thompson, P; Daigle, J A; Rice, B A; Millin, J A; Foster, C S

    1988-05-01

    Patterns of herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) infection were studied in BALB/c congenic, Igh-1 disparate murine strains to establish the influence of Igh-1 phenotype on the development of keratopathy, trigeminal ganglionic latency and keratocyte permissivity. Eighty-two percent of C.AL-20 (Igh-1d) mice, 40% of BALB/cByJ (Igh-1a) mice and 12% of the C.B-17 (Igh-1b) mice developed herpes simplex keratitis (HSK) following corneal challenge with 2.5 X 10(4) PFU HSV-1 strain KOS. While disease frequency was directly proportional to HSV-1 challenge dose, relative resistance and susceptibility patterns in the congenic mice were constant and highly significant. F1 progeny from C.AL-20 X C.B-17 matings demonstrated the HSK pattern of the C.B-17 parent suggesting that Igh-1 linked resistance to HSK is dominantly inherited. Equivalent trigeminal ganglionic latency was established following ocular HSV-1 inoculation in the three congenic Igh-1 disparate murine strains. Cultured keratocytes from the three Igh-1 disparate murine strains demonstrated equivalent in vitro permissivity to HSV-1 replication. These data illustrate a strong correlation between Igh-1 phenotype and the development of a HSK in congenic mice. The susceptibility/resistance to HSK in these mice is unrelated to trigeminal ganglionic latency or keratocyte permissivity.

  8. Muscular dystrophy in dogs: does the crossing of breeds influence disease phenotype?

    PubMed

    Miyazato, L G; Moraes, J R E; Beretta, D C; Kornegay, J N

    2011-05-01

    Golden Retriever (GR) muscular dystrophy is an inherited degenerative muscle disease that provides an excellent model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy in humans. This study defined the histopathologic lesions, including the distribution of type I and II muscle fibers (FTI and FTII), in 12 dystrophic and 3 nondystrophic dogs between 7 and 15 months of age. The authors were interested in studying the influence on disease phenotype from crossing the base GR breed with Yellow Labrador Retrievers. The dystrophic dogs were divided according to breed: GRs and Golden Labrador Retrievers (GLRs). On hematoxylin and eosin staining, histopathologic lesions were more severe in GRs than GLRs. Six of eight GR muscles (75%) had a severe lesion grade (grade 3). In contrast, seven GLR muscles (87.5%) had mild lesions (grade 2), and only one had severe lesions (grade 3). Changes in fiber-type distribution were more pronounced in GRs versus GLRs. FTI:FTII ratio inversion was observed in three dystrophic GRs but only one GLR. The mean diameter of FTI and FTII was smaller in GRs and GLRs than in nondystrophic dogs (P < .01). The FTI of five GR muscles (62.5%) were larger than those of GLRs, whereas only one GLR muscle was larger (P < .05). The differential was less pronounced for FTII, with four GR muscles being larger and three GLR being larger. Observations indicate that crossing the base GR breed with Labrador Retrievers lessened the severity of the GR muscular dystrophy phenotype.

  9. [Influence of anesthesia procedure on malignant tumor outcome].

    PubMed

    Fukui, K; Werner, C; Pestel, G

    2012-03-01

    Malignant tumors are the second major cause of death in Germany. The essential therapy of operable cancer is surgical removal of primary tumors combined with adjuvant therapy. However, several consequences of surgery may promote metastasis, such as shedding of tumor cells into the circulation, decrease in tumor-induced antiangiogenesis factors, excessive release of growth factors for wound healing and suppression of immunity induced by surgical stress. In the last decade it has become clear that cell-mediated immunity controls the development of metastasis. Various perioperative factors, such as surgical stress, certain anesthetic and analgesic drugs and pain can suppress the patients' immune system perioperatively. On the other hand, by modifications of the anesthesia technique (e.g. regional anesthesia) and perioperative management to minimize immunosuppression, anesthesiologists can play a considerable role for a better outcome in patients having malignant tumors. Sufficient clinical evidence is not yet available to prove or disprove the hypothesis that anesthesia practice can improve cancer prognosis. Despite difficulties in study design, several prospective randomized trials are currently running and the results are awaited to elucidate this topic.

  10. PLC-β2 is modulated by low oxygen availability in breast tumor cells and plays a phenotype dependent role in their hypoxia-related malignant potential.

    PubMed

    Brugnoli, Federica; Grassilli, Silvia; Al-Qassab, Yasamin; Capitani, Silvano; Bertagnolo, Valeria

    2016-12-01

    Limited oxygen availability plays a critical role in the malignant progression of breast cancer by orchestrating a complex modulation of the gene transcription largely dependent on the tumor phenotype. Invasive breast tumors belonging to different molecular subtypes are characterized by over-expression of PLC-β2, whose amount positively correlates with the malignant evolution of breast neoplasia and supports the invasive potential of breast tumor cells. Here we report that hypoxia modulates the expression of PLC-β2 in breast tumor cells in a phenotype-related manner, since a decrease of the protein was observed in the BT-474 and MCF7 cell lines while an increase was revealed in MDA-MB-231 cells as a consequence of low oxygen availability. Under hypoxia, the down-modulation of PLC-β2 was mainly correlated with the decrease of the EMT marker E-cadherin in the BT-474 cells and with the up-regulation of the stem cell marker CD133 in MCF7 cells. The increase of PLC-β2 induced by low oxygen in MDA-MB-231 cells supports the hypoxia-related reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and sustains invasion capability. In all examined cell lines, but with an opposite role in the ER-positive and ER-negative cells, PLC-β2 was involved in the hypoxia-induced increase of HIF-1α, known to affect both EMT and CD133 expression. Our data include PLC-β2 in the complex and interconnected signaling pathways induced by low oxygen availability in breast tumor cells and suggest that the forced modulation of PLC-β2 programmed on the basis of tumor phenotype may prevent the malignant progression of breast neoplasia as a consequence of intra-tumoral hypoxia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Autophagy is involved in TGF-β1-induced protective mechanisms and formation of cancer-associated fibroblasts phenotype in tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang-Lan; Mo, En-Pan; Yang, Liu; Du, Jun; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Zhang, Huan; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Xu, Jun; Cai, Shao-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) present in tumor microenvironment acts in a coordinated fashion to either suppress or promote tumor development. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of TGF-β1 on tumor microenvironment are not well understood. Our clinical data showed a positive association between TGF-β1 expression and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in tumor microenvironment of breast cancer patients. Thus we employed starved NIH3T3 fibroblasts in vitro and 4T1 cells mixed with NIH3T3 fibroblasts xenograft model in vivo to simulate nutritional deprivation of tumor microenvironment to explore the effects of TGF-β1. We demonstrated that TGF-β1 protected NIH3T3 fibroblasts from Star-induced growth inhibition, mitochondrial damage and cell apoptosis. Interestingly, TGF-β1 induced the formation of CAFs phenotype in starvation (Star)-treated NIH3T3 fibroblasts and xenografted Balb/c mice, which promoted breast cancer tumor growth. In both models, autophagy agonist rapamycin increased TGF-β1-induced protective effects and formation of CAFs phenotypes, while autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine, Atg5 knockdown or TGF-β type I receptor kinase inhibitor LY-2157299 blocked TGF-β1 induced these effects. Taken together, our results indicated that TGF-β/Smad autophagy was involved in TGF-β1-induced protective effects and formation of CAFs phenotype in tumor microenvironment, which may be used as therapy targets in breast cancer. PMID:26716641

  12. Association between body mass index and mortality for colorectal cancer survivors: overall and by tumor molecular phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Peter T.; Newton, Christina C.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Phipps, Amanda I.; Ahnen, Dennis J.; Baron, John A.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Casey, Graham; Cleary, Sean P.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Farris, Alton B.; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Gallinger, Steven; Green, Roger C.; Haile, Robert W.; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Makar, Karen W.; McLaughlin, John R.; Potter, John D.; Renehan, Andrew G.; Sinicrope, Frank A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Win, Aung Ko; Lindor, Noralane M.; Limburg, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Microsatellite instability (MSI) and BRAF-mutation status are associated with colorectal cancer survival whereas the role of body mass index (BMI) is less clear. We evaluated the association between BMI and colorectal cancer survival, overall and by strata of MSI, BRAF-mutation, sex, and other factors. Methods This study included 5,615 men and women diagnosed with invasive colorectal cancer who were followed for mortality (maximum: 14.7 years; mean: 5.9 years). Pre-diagnosis BMI was derived from self-reported weight approximately 1-year before diagnosis and height. Tumor MSI and BRAF-mutation status were available for 4,131 and 4,414 persons, respectively. Multivariable hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated from delayed-entry Cox proportional hazards models. Results In multivariable models, high pre-diagnosis BMI was associated with higher risk of all-cause mortality in both sexes (per 5-kg/m2, HR = 1.10; 95% CI = 1.06 to 1.15), with similar associations stratified by sex (p-interaction: 0.41), colon vs rectum (p-interaction: 0.86), MSI status (p-interaction: 0.84), and BRAF-mutation status (p-interaction: 0.28). In joint models, with MS-stable/MSI-low and normal BMI as the reference group, risk of death was higher for MS-stable/MSI-low and obese BMI (HR: 1.32; p-value: 0.0002), not statistically significantly lower for MSI-high and normal BMI (HR: 0.86; p-value: 0.29), and approximately the same for MSI-high and obese BMI (HR: 1.00; p-value: 0.98). Conclusions High pre-diagnosis BMI was associated with increased mortality; this association was consistent across participant subgroups, including strata of tumor molecular phenotype. Impact High BMI may attenuate the survival benefit otherwise observed with MSI-high tumors. PMID:26038390

  13. Ameloblastin induces tumor suppressive phenotype and enhances chemosensitivity to doxorubicin via Src-Stat3 inactivation in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Toshinori; Kudo, Yasusei; Iizuka, Shinji; Tsunematsu, Takaaki; Umehara, Hanako; Shrestha, Madhu; Matsuo, Toshihiro; Kubo, Tadahiko; Shimose, Shouji; Arihiro, Koji; Ogawa, Ikuko; Ochi, Mitsuo; Takata, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Ameloblastin (AMBN), the most abundant non-amelogenin enamel matrix protein, plays a role in ameloblast differentiation. Previously, we found that AMBN promoted osteogenic differentiation via the interaction between CD63 and integrin β1, leading to the inactivation of Src; however, how AMBN affects the malignant behavior of osteosarcoma is still unclear. Osteosarcoma affects the bone and is associated with poor prognosis because of the high rate of pulmonary metastases and drug resistance. Here we demonstrated that stable overexpression of AMBN induced apoptosis and suppressed colony formation and cell migration via the inactivation of Src-Stat3 pathway in human osteosarcoma cells. Moreover, AMBN induced chemosensitivity to doxorubicin. Thus, AMBN induced a tumor suppressive phenotype and chemosensitivity to doxorubicin via the AMBN-Src-Stat3 axis in osteosarcoma. Indeed, immunohistochemical expression of AMBN was significantly correlated with better outcome of osteosarcoma patients. Our findings suggest that AMBN can be a new prognostic marker and therapeutic target for osteosarcoma combined with conventional doxorubicin treatment. PMID:28054649

  14. Targeting of EWS/FLI-1 by RNA interference attenuates the tumor phenotype of Ewing's sarcoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chansky, Howard A; Barahmand-Pour, Fariba; Mei, Qi; Kahn-Farooqi, Waqqar; Zielinska-Kwiatkowska, Anna; Blackburn, Michael; Chansky, Kari; Conrad, Ernest U; Bruckner, James D; Greenlee, Theodore K; Yang, Liu

    2004-07-01

    The defining cytogenetic abnormality of Ewing's sarcoma is the presence of a balanced t(11;22) translocation expressing the EWS/FLI-1 chimeric fusion protein. The effect of EWS/FLI-1 appears to be dominant negative since over-expression of EWS does not overcome the sarcoma phenotype. Previous studies have shown that EWS/FLI-1 as well as related sarcoma fusion proteins are necessary and sufficient to induce transformation both in vitro and in vivo. In this study we report that synthetic small interfering RNA (siRNA) specifically suppresses EWS/FLI-1 fusion gene expression in SK-ES Ewing's sarcoma cells. Knockdown of the EWS/FLI-1 fusion protein is correlated with decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. We demonstrate that Ewing's sarcoma tumors as well as Ewing's sarcoma cell lines predominantly express the CXCR4 chemokine receptor. Using an in vitro invasion assay, the SDF-1 ligand of CXCR4 was shown to be a potent stimulus of invasion by SK-ES cells. Knockdown of EWS/FLI-1 by RNA interference abrogates the invasiveness of SK-ES cells. These experiments suggest that targeted silencing of the EWS/FLI-1 fusion gene by siRNA represents a promising strategy to study the loss of EWS/FLI-1 protein in Ewing's sarcoma cells of otherwise identical genetic background.

  15. Detailed characterization of multiple myeloma circulating tumor cells shows unique phenotypic, cytogenetic, functional, and circadian distribution profile.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Bruno; Paino, Teresa; Sayagues, Jose-Maria; Garayoa, Mercedes; San-Segundo, Laura; Martín, Montserrat; Mota, Ines; Sanchez, María-Luz; Bárcena, Paloma; Aires-Mejia, Irene; Corchete, Luis; Jimenez, Cristina; Garcia-Sanz, Ramon; Gutierrez, Norma C; Ocio, Enrique M; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Vidriales, Maria-Belen; Orfao, Alberto; San Miguel, Jesús F

    2013-11-21

    Circulating myeloma tumor cells (CTCs) as defined by the presence of peripheral blood (PB) clonal plasma cells (PCs) are a powerful prognostic marker in multiple myeloma (MM). However, the biological features of CTCs and their pathophysiological role in MM remains unexplored. Here, we investigate the phenotypic, cytogenetic, and functional characteristics as well as the circadian distribution of CTCs vs paired bone marrow (BM) clonal PCs from MM patients. Our results show that CTCs typically represent a unique subpopulation of all BM clonal PCs, characterized by downregulation (P < .05) of integrins (CD11a/CD11c/CD29/CD49d/CD49e), adhesion (CD33/CD56/CD117/CD138), and activation molecules (CD28/CD38/CD81). Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of fluorescence-activated cell sorter-sorted CTCs also unraveled different cytogenetic profiles vs paired BM clonal PCs. Moreover, CTCs were mostly quiescent and associated with higher clonogenic potential when cocultured with BM stromal cells. Most interestingly, CTCs showed a circadian distribution which fluctuates in a similar pattern to that of CD34(+) cells, and opposite to stromal cell-derived factor 1 plasma levels and corresponding surface expression of CXC chemokine receptor 4 on clonal PCs, suggesting that in MM, CTCs may egress to PB to colonize/metastasize other sites in the BM during the patients' resting period.

  16. Breed-related differences in altered BRCA1 expression, phenotype and subtype in malignant canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Im, Keum-Soon; Kim, Il-Hwan; Kim, Na-Hyun; Lim, Ha-Young; Kim, Jong-Hyuk; Sur, Jung-Hyang

    2013-03-01

    BRCA1 is a high-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility gene and BRCA1-associated breast cancer has a high familial prevalence that is more common among certain populations of humans. A similar high prevalence also exists for canine mammary tumors (CMTs) and the objective of this study was to determine the breed-related differences in malignant CMTs. Comparative analyses of the expression of various prognostic factors for CMTs, including BRCA1, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) were conducted on 139 malignant CMT cases from five breeds with the highest prevalence of CMTs in Korea. Significant breed-related differences were observed in the expression of BRCA1 (P=0.003), histological grade (P=0.038), and extensive lymphatic invasion (P=0.042). The Shih Tzu breed had the highest proportion of dogs with malignant CMT and strong overexpression of BRCA1. Cytoplasmic and membranous expression of BRCA1 was associated with the ER negative (P=0.004), PR negative (P=0.046), and triple negative (ER, PR, and HER-2 negative; P=0.016) phenotype and the basal-like molecular subtype (P=0.019) in Shih Tzu dogs. Since these features are similar to BRCA1-related human breast cancer, dogs with BRCA1-associated CMT, particularly Shih Tzu dogs, may serve as a suitable spontaneous model, although additional molecular studies are needed.

  17. The family context of autism spectrum disorders: influence on the behavioral phenotype and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Smith, Leann E; Greenberg, Jan S; Mailick, Marsha R

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the findings from a longitudinal program of research examining the bidirectional influences of the family environment on the behavioral phenotype of autism, and describes a newly developed family psychoeducation program, titled Transitioning Together, designed to reduce family stress, address behavior problems, and improve the overall quality of life of adolescents with autism and their families. A case study is presented that illustrates how Transitioning Together helps reduce family stress and improve the overall quality of the family environment. The article concludes with a discussion of directions for future research on best practices in working with families of children, adolescents, and adults with autism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of the factors influencing the radiosensitivity of mouse ascites tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, M.; Tsuboi, A.; Tsuchiya, T.

    1983-02-01

    Factors influencing the radiosensitivity of the newly established mouse ascites tumor TMT-3 line were studied. In vivo radiosensitivity of the tumor cells decreased with the progression of the growth phase in mice. Oxygen depletion was the major cause of the decreased radiosensitivity. Polarographic measurement of the oxygen dissolved in suspension of various cell densities suggested that high cell density such as in the ascites might well cause severe hypoxia. Humoral factors in the ascites and cell-to-cell contact had no effect on tumor cell radiosensitivity when the influence of the repair of potentially lethal damage was excluded.

  19. Subadult experience influences adult mate choice in an arthropod: Exposed female wolf spiders prefer males of a familiar phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Hebets, Eileen A.

    2003-01-01

    Current sexual selection theory proposes several potential mechanisms driving the evolution of female mating preferences, few of which involve social interactions. Although vertebrate examples of socially influenced mating preferences do exist, the invertebrate examples are virtually nonexistent. Here I demonstrate that the mating preferences of female wolf spiders can be acquired through exposure as subadults to unrelated, sexually active adult males. I first conducted exposure trials during which subadult females of the wolf spider Schizocosa uetzi were allowed to interact with mature males of an experimentally manipulated phenotype (either black or brown forelegs). After maturation, these previously exposed females were paired with a male of either a familiar or unfamiliar manipulated phenotype for mate-choice trials. Subadult females that were exposed to directed courtship by mature males of a particular morphological phenotype were subsequently more likely to mate with a male of a familiar phenotype as adults. Furthermore, females that were exposed as subadults were more likely, as adults, to cannibalize a courting male with an unfamiliar phenotype. Unexposed females did not distinguish between phenotypes in either mate choice or cannibalism frequency. These results suggest a previously uncharacterized mechanism influencing the origin of female mating preferences and ultimately the evolution of male traits: subadult experience. This study also stresses the potential importance of learning and memory on adult mate choice in an arthropod. PMID:14597702

  20. Subadult experience influences adult mate choice in an arthropod: exposed female wolf spiders prefer males of a familiar phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hebets, Eileen A

    2003-11-11

    Current sexual selection theory proposes several potential mechanisms driving the evolution of female mating preferences, few of which involve social interactions. Although vertebrate examples of socially influenced mating preferences do exist, the invertebrate examples are virtually nonexistent. Here I demonstrate that the mating preferences of female wolf spiders can be acquired through exposure as subadults to unrelated, sexually active adult males. I first conducted exposure trials during which subadult females of the wolf spider Schizocosa uetzi were allowed to interact with mature males of an experimentally manipulated phenotype (either black or brown forelegs). After maturation, these previously exposed females were paired with a male of either a familiar or unfamiliar manipulated phenotype for mate-choice trials. Subadult females that were exposed to directed courtship by mature males of a particular morphological phenotype were subsequently more likely to mate with a male of a familiar phenotype as adults. Furthermore, females that were exposed as subadults were more likely, as adults, to cannibalize a courting male with an unfamiliar phenotype. Unexposed females did not distinguish between phenotypes in either mate choice or cannibalism frequency. These results suggest a previously uncharacterized mechanism influencing the origin of female mating preferences and ultimately the evolution of male traits: subadult experience. This study also stresses the potential importance of learning and memory on adult mate choice in an arthropod.

  1. Bioconjugated Manganese Dioxide Nanoparticles Enhance Chemotherapy Response by Priming Tumor-Associated Macrophages toward M1-like Phenotype and Attenuating Tumor Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Changrong; Zhang, Xiangzhong; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia promotes not only the invasiveness of tumor cells, but also chemoresistance in cancer. Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) residing at the site of hypoxic region of tumors have been known to cooperate with tumor cells, and promote proliferation and chemoresistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new strategies to alleviate tumor hypoxia and enhance chemotherapy response in solid tumors. Herein, we have taken advantage of high accumulation of TAMs in hypoxic regions of tumor and high reactivity of manganese dioxide nanoparticles (MnO2 NPs) toward hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for the simultaneous production of O2 and regulation of pH to effectively alleviate tumor hypoxia by targeted delivery of MnO2 NPs to the hypoxic area. Furthermore, we also utilized the ability of hyaluronic acid (HA) modification in reprogramming anti-inflammatory, pro-tumoral M2 TAMs to pro-inflammatory, antitumor M1 macrophages to further enhance the ability of MnO2 NPs to lessen tumor hypoxia and modulate chemoresistance. The HA-coated, mannanconjugated MnO2 particle (Man-HA-MnO2) treatment significantly increased tumor oxygenation and down-regulated hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the tumor. Combination treatment of the tumors with Man-HA-MnO2 NPs and doxorubicin significantly increased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of breast tumor, inhibited tumor growth and tumor cell proliferation as compared with chemotherapy alone. In addition, the reaction of Man-HA-MnO2 NPs toward endogenous H2O2 highly enhanced T1- and T2-MRI performance for tumor imaging and detection. PMID:26650065

  2. Distinct subpopulations of epithelial ovarian cancer cells can differentially induce macrophages and T regulatory cells toward a pro-tumor phenotype.

    PubMed

    Alvero, Ayesha B; Montagna, Michele K; Craveiro, Vinicius; Liu, Lanzhen; Mor, Gil

    2012-03-01

    Presence of immune infiltrates in the tumor does not always correlate with an anti-tumoral immune response. We previously identified two subpopulations of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells with differential cytokine profile. We hypothesize that these two subpopulations of EOC cells may differentially regulate the immune phenotype in the tumor microenvironment and therefore affect the immune response. Macrophages derived from CD14+ monocytes and naive CD4+T cells were treated with conditioned media from two subpopulations of EOC cells. Differentiation markers and phagocytic activity were measured by western blot analysis and flow cytometry. Cytokine levels were quantified using xMAP technology. Type I EOC cells are able to enhance macrophages' capacity for tumor repair and renewal by enhancing expression of scavenger receptors and by promoting the secretion of cytokines associated with tissue repair. On the other hand, type II EOC cells are able to create a tolerant microenvironment and prevent an immune response by inducing macrophages' to secrete IL-10 and by promoting the generation of T regs. We demonstrate that each ovarian cancer cell subpopulation can induce a unique phenotype of macrophages and T cells, both associated with tumor-supportive function. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Nutritional status influences peripheral immune cell phenotypes in healthy men in rural Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Alam, Iftikhar; Larbi, Anis; Pawelec, Graham

    2012-08-03

    Immune status is influenced by malnutrition, but how this factor interacts in developing countries and whether these differences are similar to those determined in industrialized countries, is unclear. To establish whether malnutrition-associated immune profiles in a developing country are similar to those in industrialized countries we analyzed peripheral blood immune cell phenotypes by polychromatic flow cytometry in 50 young and 50 elderly subjects. Data on anthropometrics and diet were collected through interviews. Plasma samples were analyzed for common clinical chemistry variables. Subjects in 4 BMI categories differed in their immune parameters demonstrating influence of nutritional status on immunity. This was greater within the young group and affected the CD4 subset more profoundly than the CD8 subset. No nutrition-associated differences were seen in B or NK cells. CD8+ cells as a percentage of CD3+ T cells were positively associated with plasma CRP levels but not other factors. We conclude that there are differences in the immune signatures of obese, overweight and underweight versus normal-weight young and elderly, which seem broadly similar to the more extensively-documented state reported in industrialized countries, despite the marked societal, nutritional and many other differences.

  4. Transplantation site influences the phenotypic differentiation of dopamine neurons in ventral mesencephalic grafts in Parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Fjodorova, Marija; Torres, Eduardo M; Dunnett, Stephen B

    2017-05-01

    Foetal midbrain progenitors have been shown to survive, give rise to different classes of dopamine neurons and integrate into the host brain alleviating Parkinsonian symptoms following transplantation in patients and animal models of the disease. Dopamine neuron subpopulations in the midbrain, namely A9 and A10, can be identified anatomically based on cell morphology and ascending axonal projections. G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium channel Girk2 and the calcium binding protein Calbindin are the two best available histochemical markers currently used to label (with some overlap) A9- and A10-like dopamine neuron subtypes, respectively, in tyrosine hydroxylase expressing neurons both in the midbrain and grafts. Both classes of dopamine neurons survive in grafts in the striatum and extend axonal projections to their normal dorsal and ventral striatal targets depending on phenotype. Nevertheless, grafts transplanted into the dorsal striatum, which is an A9 input nucleus, are enriched for dopamine neurons that express Girk2. It remains to be elucidated whether different transplantation sites favour the differential survival and/or development of concordant dopamine neuron subtypes within the grafts. Here we used rat foetal midbrain progenitors at two developmental stages corresponding to a peak in either A9 or A10 neurogenesis and examined their commitment to respective dopaminergic phenotypes by grafting cells into different forebrain regions that contain targets of either nigral A9 dopamine innervation (dorsal striatum), ventral tegmental area A10 dopamine innervation (nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex), or only sparse dopamine but rich noradrenaline innervation (hippocampus). We demonstrate that young (embryonic day, E12), but not older (E14), mesencephalic tissue and the transplant environment influence survival and functional integration of specific subtypes of dopamine neurons into the host brain. We also show that irrespective of donor age A9

  5. Disabling of the erbB Pathway Followed by IFN-γ Modifies Phenotype and Enhances Genotoxic Eradication of Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Yasuhiro; Tsuchiya, Hiromichi; Runkle, E. Aaron; Young, Peter D.; Ji, Mei Q.; Norton, Larry; Drebin, Jeffrey A.; Zhang, Hongtao; Greene, Mark I.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Reversion of the malignant phenotype of erbB2-transformed cells can be driven by anti-erbB2/neu monoclonal antibodies (mAb), which disrupt the receptor's kinase activity. We examined the biologic effects of IFN-γ alone or after anti-erbB2/neu mAb treatment of erbB2-positive cells. IFN-γ had no effect on its own. Treatment of the tumors with anti-erbB2/neu mAb followed by IFN-γ led to dramatic inhibition of tumor growth in vitro and in vivo with minimal mAb dosing. Sequential therapy enhanced the effects of chemotherapy. Moreover, IFN-γ with mAb treatment of mice with IFNγR knock down tumors did not demonstrate marked synergistic eradication effects, indicating an unexpected role of IFN-γ on the tumor itself. Additionally, mAb and IFN-γ treatment also in duced immune host responses that enhanced tumor eradication. Biochemical analyses identified loss of Snail expression in tumor cells, reflecting diminution of tumor stem cell-like properties as a consequence of altered activity of GSK3-β and KLF molecules. PMID:26365188

  6. Acquisition of tumor cell phenotypic diversity along the EMT spectrum under hypoxic pressure: Consequences on susceptibility to cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Terry, Stéphane; Buart, Stéphanie; Tan, Tuan Zea; Gros, Gwendoline; Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Lorens, James B; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia; Thiery, Jean Paul; Chouaib, Salem

    2017-01-01

    Tumor escape to immunosurveillance and resistance to immune attacks present a major hurdle in cancer therapy, especially in the current era of new cancer immunotherapies. We report here that hypoxia, a hallmark of most solid tumors, orchestrates carcinoma cell heterogeneity through the induction of phenotypic diversity and the acquisition of distinct epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) states. Using lung adenocarcinoma cells derived from a non-metastatic patient, we demonstrated that hypoxic stress induced phenotypic diversity along the EMT spectrum, with induction of EMT transcription factors (EMT-TFs) SNAI1, SNAI2, TWIST1, and ZEB2 in a hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF1A)-dependent or -independent manner. Analysis of hypoxia-exposed tumor subclones, with pronounced epithelial or mesenchymal phenotypes, revealed that mesenchymal subclones exhibited an increased propensity to resist cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), and natural killer (NK) cell-mediated lysis by a mechanism involving defective immune synapse signaling. Additionally, targeting EMT-TFs, or inhibition of TGF-β signaling, attenuated mesenchymal subclone susceptibility to immune attack. Together, these findings uncover hypoxia-induced EMT and heterogeneity as a novel driving escape mechanism to lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity, with the potential to provide new therapeutic opportunities for cancer patients.

  7. The Family Context of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Influence on the Behavioral Phenotype and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Leann E.; Greenberg, Jan; Mailick, Marsha R.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis In this review, we report the findings from our longitudinal program of research examining the bidirectional influences of the family environment on the behavioral phenotype of autism, and describe a newly developed family psychoeducation program, titled Transitioning Together, designed to reduce family stress, address behavior problems, and improve the overall quality of life of adolescents with autism and their families. In our search for characteristics of the family environment that influence the behavioral phenotype of adolescents and adults with autism, we focus on both positive dimensions of family life, such as warmth and positive remarks that may promote adaptive behavior in individuals with autism, as well as negative dimensions, such as high levels of criticism that may result in an escalation of behavior problems. We find that high levels of maternal warmth and positive remarks are associated with the abatement of behavior problems over time, while high levels of maternal criticism are associated with increasing levels of behavior problems in adolescents and adults with autism. These patterns of relationships have been replicated in a longitudinal study of families of children and adolescents with fragile X syndrome, and are consistent with other studies examining the impact of the family on the behavior of children with developmental disabilities. These findings suggest that the family environment is an important target for interventions not only to reduce family stress but also to improve the behavioral functioning of children, adolescents or adults with ASD. Building upon a well-developed intervention for families of individuals with psychiatric conditions, we report on the development of Transitioning Together, a psychoeducation program targeted to families with adolescents with autism who are approaching high school exit, a difficult transition stage for individuals with autism that is often marked by negative changes in behavior problems

  8. Nanotopographic Substrates of Poly (Methyl Methacrylate) Do Not Strongly Influence the Osteogenic Phenotype of Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Janson, Isaac A.; Kong, Yen P.; Putnam, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical, mechanical, and topographical features of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have all been documented to influence cell adhesion, gene expression, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Topography plays a key role in the architecture and functionality of various tissues in vivo, thus raising the possibility that topographic cues can be instructive when incorporated into biomaterials for regenerative applications. In the literature, there are discrepancies regarding the potential roles of nanotopography to enhance the osteogenic phenotype of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). In this study, we used thin film substrates of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) with nanoscale gratings to investigate the influence of nanotopography on the osteogenic phenotype of MSCs, focusing in particular on their ability to produce mineral similar to native bone. Topography influenced focal adhesion size and MSC alignment, and enhanced MSC proliferation after 14 days of culture. However, the osteogenic phenotype was minimally influenced by surface topography. Specifically, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression was not increased on nanotopographic films, nor was calcium deposition improved after 21 days in culture. Ca: P ratios were similar to native mouse bone on films with gratings of 415 nm width and 200 nm depth (G415) and 303 nm width and 190 nm depth (G303). Notably, all surfaces had Ca∶P ratios significantly lower than G415 films. Collectively, these data suggest that, PMMA films with nanogratings are poor drivers of an osteogenic phenotype. PMID:24594848

  9. Family history influences the tumor characteristics and prognosis of breast cancers developing during postmenopausal hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Fagerholm, Rainer; Faltinova, Maria; Aaltonen, Kirsi; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Heikkilä, Päivi; Halttunen-Nieminen, Mervi; Nevanlinna, Heli; Blomqvist, Carl

    2017-10-10

    Long term use of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) has been reported to increase breast cancer risk. On the other hand, observational studies suggest that breast cancers diagnosed during HT may have a more favorable prognosis. While family history is a risk factor for breast cancer, and genetic factors also influence prognosis, the role of family history in combination with HT use has been little studied. We investigated the relationship between HT, family history, and prognosis in 584 (267 exposed) familial and 952 (460 exposed) non-familial breast cancer cases, using three survival end points: death from breast cancer (BCS), distant disease free survival (DDFS), and local recurrence free survival (LRFS). Among non-familial cases, HT was associated with better BCS (HR 0.63, 95% CI 0.41-0.94; p = 0.025), and DDFS (HR 0.58, 95% CI 0.40-0.85; p = 0.005), with a consistent but not statistically significant effect in LRFS. This effect was not seen in familial cases (HR > 1.0), and family history was found to interact with HT in BCS (p(interaction) = 0.0067) (BC-death) and DDFS (p(interaction) = 0.0070). There was phenotypic heterogeneity between HT-associated tumors in familial and non-familial cases, particularly on estrogen receptor (ER) status, although the interaction between HT and family history appears to be at least partially independent of these markers (p = 0.0370 after adjustment for standard prognostic factors). If confirmed by further studies, our results suggest that family history should be taken into consideration in clinical counseling before beginning a HT regimen.

  10. Peripheral Neuroblastic Tumors with Genotype-Phenotype Discordance: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Groupand the International Neuroblastoma Pathology Committee

    PubMed Central

    Suganuma, Rie; Wang, Larry L.; Sano, Hideki; Naranjo, Arlene; London, Wendy B.; Seeger, Robert C.; Hogarty, Michael D.; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Look, A. Thomas; Park, Julie R.; Maris, John M.; Cohn, Susan L.; Amann, Gabriele; Beiske, Klaus; Cullinane, Catherine J.; d’Amore, Emanuele SG; Gambini, Claudio; Jarzembowski, Jason A.; Joshi, Vijay V.; Navarro, Samuel; Peuchmaur, Michel; Shimada, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Background Of 4,706 peripheral neuroblastic tumors (pNTs) registered on the Children’s Cancer Group and Children’s Oncology Group Neuroblastoma Study between 1989 and 2010, 51 cases (1.1%) had genotype-phenotype discordance characterized by MYCN amplification (indicating poor prognosis) and Favorable Histology (indicating better prognosis). Procedure To distinguish prognostic subgroups in the genotype-phenotype discordant pNTs, two subgroups, “conventional” and “bull’s eye”, were identified based on the nuclear morphology. The “conventional” tumors (35 cases) included: Neuroblastoma, Poorly differentiated subtype (NB-PD, 26 cases) with “salt-and-pepper” nuclei; Neuroblastoma, Differentiating subtype (4 cases); Ganglioneuroblastoma, Intermixed (3 cases); and Ganglioneuroma, Maturing subtype (2 cases). The “bull’s eye” tumors included NB-PD with prominent nucleoli (16 cases). Clinicopathologic characteristics of these two subgroups were analyzed. N-myc protein expression was tested immunohistochemically on available tumors. Results No significant difference was found between these two subgroups in the distribution of prognostic factors such as age at diagnosis, clinical stage, histopathology category/subtype, mitosis-karyorrhexis index, ploidy, 1p LOH, and unbalanced 11qLOH. However, prognosis of the patients with “conventional” tumors (5-year EFS 85.7±12.2%; OS 89.3±10.3%) was significantly better than those with “bull’s eye” tumors (EFS 31.3±13.0%; OS 42.9±16.2%) (P=0.0010 and 0.0008, respectively). Immunohistochemically all (11/11) tested “conventional” tumors were negative, and 10/11 tested “bull’s eye” tumors were positive for N-myc protein expression. Conclusions Based on the presence or absence of prominent nucleoli (the putative site of RNA synthesis/accumulation leading to N-myc protein expression), two prognostic subgroups, “conventional” with a better prognosis and “bull’s eye” with a poor

  11. The tumor suppressor TERE1 (UBIAD1) prenyltransferase regulates the elevated cholesterol phenotype in castration resistant prostate cancer by controlling a program of ligand dependent SXR target genes

    PubMed Central

    Fredericks, William J.; Sepulveda, Jorge; Lal, Priti; Tomaszewski, John E.; Lin, Ming-Fong; McGarvey, Terry; Rauscher, Frank J; Malkowicz, S. Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC) is characterized by persistent androgen receptor-driven tumor growth in the apparent absence of systemic androgens. Current evidence suggests that CRPC cells can produce their own androgens from endogenous sterol precursors that act in an intracrine manner to stimulate tumor growth. The mechanisms by which CRPC cells become steroidogenic during tumor progression are not well defined. Herein we describe a novel link between the elevated cholesterol phenotype of CRPC and the TERE1 tumor suppressor protein, a prenyltransferase that synthesizes vitamin K-2, which is a potent endogenous ligand for the SXR nuclear hormone receptor. We show that 50% of primary and metastatic prostate cancer specimens exhibit a loss of TERE1 expression and we establish a correlation between TERE1 expression and cholesterol in the LnCaP-C81 steroidogenic cell model of the CRPC. LnCaP-C81 cells also lack TERE1 protein, and show elevated cholesterol synthetic rates, higher steady state levels of cholesterol, and increased expression of enzymes in the de novo cholesterol biosynthetic pathways than the non-steroidogenic prostate cancer cells. C81 cells also show decreased expression of the SXR nuclear hormone receptor and a panel of directly regulated SXR target genes that govern cholesterol efflux and steroid catabolism. Thus, a combination of increased synthesis, along with decreased efflux and catabolism likely underlies the CRPC phenotype: SXR might coordinately regulate this phenotype. Moreover, TERE1 controls synthesis of vitamin K-2, which is a potent endogenous ligand for SXR activation, strongly suggesting a link between TERE1 levels, K-2 synthesis and SXR target gene regulation. We demonstrate that following ectopic TERE1 expression or induction of endogenous TERE1, the elevated cholesterol levels in C81 cells are reduced. Moreover, reconstitution of TERE1 expression in C81 cells reactivates SXR and switches on a suite of SXR target genes that

  12. Influence of paternal preconception exposures on their offspring: through epigenetics to phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Day, Jonathan; Savani, Soham; Krempley, Benjamin D; Nguyen, Matthew; Kitlinska, Joanna B

    2016-01-01

    Historically, research into congenital defects has focused on maternal impacts on the fetal genome during gestation and prenatal periods. However, recent findings have sparked interest in epigenetic alterations of paternal genomes and its effects on offspring. This emergent field focuses on how environmental influences can epigenetically alter gene expression and ultimately change the phenotype and behavior of progeny. There are three primary mechanisms implicated in these changes: DNA methylation, histone modification, and miRNA expression. This paper provides a summary and subsequent review of past research, which highlights the significant impact of environmental factors on paternal germ cells during the lifetime of an individual as well as those of future generations. These findings support the existence of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance of paternal experiences. Specifically, we explore epidemiological and laboratory studies that demonstrate possible links between birth defects and paternal age, environmental factors, and alcohol consumption. Ultimately, our review highlights the clinical importance of these factors as well as the necessity for future research in the field. PMID:27335698

  13. Influence of paternal preconception exposures on their offspring: through epigenetics to phenotype.

    PubMed

    Day, Jonathan; Savani, Soham; Krempley, Benjamin D; Nguyen, Matthew; Kitlinska, Joanna B

    2016-01-01

    Historically, research into congenital defects has focused on maternal impacts on the fetal genome during gestation and prenatal periods. However, recent findings have sparked interest in epigenetic alterations of paternal genomes and its effects on offspring. This emergent field focuses on how environmental influences can epigenetically alter gene expression and ultimately change the phenotype and behavior of progeny. There are three primary mechanisms implicated in these changes: DNA methylation, histone modification, and miRNA expression. This paper provides a summary and subsequent review of past research, which highlights the significant impact of environmental factors on paternal germ cells during the lifetime of an individual as well as those of future generations. These findings support the existence of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance of paternal experiences. Specifically, we explore epidemiological and laboratory studies that demonstrate possible links between birth defects and paternal age, environmental factors, and alcohol consumption. Ultimately, our review highlights the clinical importance of these factors as well as the necessity for future research in the field.

  14. The influence of an innovative locomotor strategy on the phenotypic diversification of triggerfish (family: Balistidae).

    PubMed

    Dornburg, Alex; Sidlauskas, Brian; Santini, Francesco; Sorenson, Laurie; Near, Thomas J; Alfaro, Michael E

    2011-07-01

    Innovations in locomotor morphology have been invoked as important drivers of vertebrate diversification, although the influence of novel locomotion strategies on marine fish diversification remains largely unexplored. Using triggerfish as a case study, we determine whether the evolution of the distinctive synchronization of enlarged dorsal and anal fins that triggerfish use to swim may have catalyzed the ecological diversification of the group. By adopting a comparative phylogenetic approach to quantify median fin and body shape integration and to assess the tempo of functional and morphological evolution in locomotor traits, we find that: (1) functional and morphological components of the locomotive system exhibit a strong signal of correlated evolution; (2) triggerfish partitioned locomotor morphological and functional spaces early in their history; and (3) there is no strong evidence that a pulse of lineage diversification accompanied the major episode of phenotypic diversification. Together these findings suggest that the acquisition of a distinctive mode of locomotion drove an early radiation of shape and function in triggerfish, but not an early radiation of species.

  15. Does incubation temperature fluctuation influence hatchling phenotypes in reptiles? A test using parthenogenetic geckos.

    PubMed

    Andrewartha, Sarah J; Mitchell, Nicola J; Frappell, Peter B

    2010-01-01

    Many lineages of parthenogenetic organisms have persisted through significant environmental change despite the constraints imposed by their fixed genotype and limited evolutionary potential. The ability of parthenogens to occur sympatrically with sexual relatives may in part be due to phenotypic plasticity in their responses to their environment, especially with respect to incubation temperature--a maternally selected trait. Here we measured the incubation temperatures selected by two lineages of triploid parthenogenic geckos in the Heteronotia binoei complex by allowing them to deposit clutches along a thermal gradient. The average nest temperature selected was 28.4 degrees C, with no significant differences between parthenogenic races or individual clones. To investigate the effect of nest-temperature variability on physiological and morphological traits, we incubated eggs from different races at one of four incubation regimes (32 degrees +/- 0 degrees, +/- 3 degrees , +/- 5 degrees , or +/- 9 degrees C). Embryos incubated at constant 32 degrees C developed faster than embryos reared under increasing extremes of diel temperature fluctuation (+/- 3 degrees , +/- 5 degrees C), and incubation at 32 degrees +/- 9 degrees C was unsuccessful. Incubation regime had no effect on the body size, preferred substrate temperature, or mass-specific .V(O2) of hatchlings. However, parthenogenic race had a significant effect on egg mass, tail length, snout-to-vent length, total length, and .V(O2) . We conclude that developmental traits are strongly influenced by clonal genotypes in this parthenogenic complex but are well buffered against fluctuations in incubation temperature.

  16. Influence of quorum sensing in multiple phenotypes of the bacterial pathogen Chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    de Oca-Mejía, Marielba Montes; Castillo-Juárez, Israel; Martínez-Vázquez, Mariano; Soto-Hernandez, Marcos; García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2015-03-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum is a bacterial pathogen that communicates through quorum sensing (QS), via the C6-homoserine lactone signal (C6-HSL). It is well known that the production of the pigment violacein is controlled by QS in this microorganism, in fact QS-dependent violacein production is widely used as a marker to evaluate the efficiency of potential anti-QS molecules, such as those extracted from plants. In addition to violacein, the production of chitinase is also known to be controlled by QS, but besides those two phenotypes there is a lack of experimental studies aimed to discover additional process controlled by QS in this organism; therefore, in this work the production of exoprotease, aggregation, biofilm formation, swarming motility, H2O2 resistance as well as carbon and nitrogen utilization was determined in the wild-type strain and the QS negative mutant CVO26. Our results indicate that alkaline exoprotease activity is QS controlled in this organism, that QS increases aggregation, biofilm formation, swarming, that may increase H2O2 stress tolerance, and that it may influence the utilization of several carbon and nitrogen sources.

  17. Muscarinic signaling influences the patterning and phenotype of cholinergic amacrine cells in the developing chick retina

    PubMed Central

    Stanke, Jennifer J; Lehman, Bret; Fischer, Andy J

    2008-01-01

    Background Many studies in the vertebrate retina have characterized the differentiation of amacrine cells as a homogenous class of neurons, but little is known about the genes and factors that regulate the development of distinct types of amacrine cells. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to characterize the development of the cholinergic amacrine cells and identify factors that influence their development. Cholinergic amacrine cells in the embryonic chick retina were identified by using antibodies to choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Results We found that as ChAT-immunoreactive cells differentiate they expressed the homeodomain transcription factors Pax6 and Islet1, and the cell-cycle inhibitor p27kip1. As differentiation proceeds, type-II cholinergic cells, displaced to the ganglion cell layer, transiently expressed high levels of cellular retinoic acid binding protein (CRABP) and neurofilament, while type-I cells in the inner nuclear layer did not. Although there is a 1:1 ratio of type-I to type-II cells in vivo, in dissociated cell cultures the type-I cells (ChAT-positive and CRABP-negative) out-numbered the type-II cells (ChAT and CRABP-positive cells) by 2:1. The relative abundance of type-I to type-II cells was not influenced by Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), but was affected by compounds that act at muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. In addition, the abundance and mosaic patterning of type-II cholinergic amacrine cells is disrupted by interfering with muscarinic signaling. Conclusion We conclude that: (1) during development type-I and type-II cholinergic amacrine cells are not homotypic, (2) the phenotypic differences between these subtypes of cells is controlled by the local microenvironment, and (3) appropriate levels of muscarinic signaling between the cholinergic amacrine cells are required for proper mosaic patterning. PMID:18254959

  18. Tumors with unmethylated MLH1 and the CpG island methylator phenotype are associated with a poor prognosis in stage II colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Tao; Liu, Yanliang; Li, Kai; Wan, Weiwei; Pappou, Emmanouil P.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Kerner, Zachary; Baylin, Stephen B.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Ahuja, Nita

    2016-01-01

    We previously developed a novel tumor subtype classification model for duodenal adenocarcinomas based on a combination of the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) and MLH1 methylation status. Here, we tested the prognostic value of this model in stage II colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Tumors were assigned to CIMP+/MLH1-unmethylated (MLH1-U), CIMP+/MLH1-methylated (MLH1-M), CIMP−/MLH1-U, or CIMP−/MLH1-M groups. Age, tumor location, lymphovascular invasion, and mucin production differed among the four patient subgroups, and CIMP+/MLH1-U tumors were more likely to have lymphovascular invasion and mucin production. Kaplan-Meier analyses revealed differences in both disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) among the four groups. In a multivariate analysis, CIMP/MLH1 methylation status was predictive of both DFS and OS, and DFS and OS were shortest in CIMP+/MLH1-U stage II CRC patients. These results suggest that tumor subtype classification based on the combination of CIMP and MLH1 methylation status is informative in stage II CRC patients, and that CIMP+/MLH1-U tumors exhibit aggressive features and are associated with poor clinical outcomes. PMID:27880934

  19. Filter Characteristics Influencing Circulating Tumor Cell Enrichment from Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Markus; Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.

    2013-01-01

    A variety of filters assays have been described to enrich circulating tumor cells (CTC) based on differences in physical characteristics of blood cells and CTC. In this study we evaluate different filter types to derive the properties of the ideal filter for CTC enrichment. Between 0.1 and 10 mL of whole blood spiked with cells from tumor cell lines were passed through silicon nitride microsieves, polymer track-etched filters and metal TEM grids with various pore sizes. The recovery and size of 9 different culture cell lines was determined and compared to the size of EpCAM+CK+CD45−DNA+ CTC from patients with metastatic breast, colorectal and prostate cancer. The 8 µm track-etched filter and the 5 µm microsieve had the best performance on MDA-231, PC3-9 and SKBR-3 cells, enriching >80% of cells from whole blood. TEM grids had poor recovery of ∼25%. Median diameter of cell lines ranged from 10.9–19.0 µm, compared to 13.1, 10.7, and 11.0 µm for breast, prostate and colorectal CTC, respectively. The 11.4 µm COLO-320 cell line had the lowest recovery of 17%. The ideal filter for CTC enrichment is constructed of a stiff, flat material, is inert to blood cells, has at least 100,000 regularly spaced 5 µm pores for 1 ml of blood with a ≤10% porosity. While cell size is an important factor in determining recovery, other factors must be involved as well. To evaluate a filtration procedure, cell lines with a median size of 11–13 µm should be used to challenge the system. PMID:23626725

  20. Filter characteristics influencing circulating tumor cell enrichment from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Coumans, Frank A W; van Dalum, Guus; Beck, Markus; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2013-01-01

    A variety of filters assays have been described to enrich circulating tumor cells (CTC) based on differences in physical characteristics of blood cells and CTC. In this study we evaluate different filter types to derive the properties of the ideal filter for CTC enrichment. Between 0.1 and 10 mL of whole blood spiked with cells from tumor cell lines were passed through silicon nitride microsieves, polymer track-etched filters and metal TEM grids with various pore sizes. The recovery and size of 9 different culture cell lines was determined and compared to the size of EpCAM+CK+CD45-DNA+ CTC from patients with metastatic breast, colorectal and prostate cancer. The 8 µm track-etched filter and the 5 µm microsieve had the best performance on MDA-231, PC3-9 and SKBR-3 cells, enriching >80% of cells from whole blood. TEM grids had poor recovery of ∼25%. Median diameter of cell lines ranged from 10.9-19.0 µm, compared to 13.1, 10.7, and 11.0 µm for breast, prostate and colorectal CTC, respectively. The 11.4 µm COLO-320 cell line had the lowest recovery of 17%. The ideal filter for CTC enrichment is constructed of a stiff, flat material, is inert to blood cells, has at least 100,000 regularly spaced 5 µm pores for 1 ml of blood with a ≤10% porosity. While cell size is an important factor in determining recovery, other factors must be involved as well. To evaluate a filtration procedure, cell lines with a median size of 11-13 µm should be used to challenge the system.

  1. Influence of selenium on the growth of N-nitrosomethylurea-induced mammary tumor cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Lewko, W.M.; McConnell, K.P.

    1985-10-01

    Selenium is an essential dietary trace element which has anticancer properties. Among its effects in rats, selenium has been shown to inhibit the development of carcinogen-induced mammary tumors by interfering with the post-initiation, promotion phase of carcinogenesis. We studied the effects of selenium on the growth of rat mammary tumor cells in primary culture. The objective was to determine whether selenium had any direct influence on cell growth which might explain its influence on tumor development. Rat mammary tumors were induced by N-nitrosomethylurea. The addition of low concentrations of sodium selenite, less than 1.0 ..mu..g/ml, stimulated tumor cell proliferation. Protein synthesis and the production of type IV collagen increased within the first hour of exposure, prior to any measurable increase in DNA synthesis. Concentrations of selenite greater than 1.0 ..mu..g/ml inhibited cell proliferation, the synthesis of protein, and the replication of DNA in a dose-related manner. These studies demonstrated that selenium has the potential to influence the post-initiation phase of rat mammary tumorigenesis by directly altering the growth of tumor cells, possibly through the regulation of protein synthesis.

  2. Bluetongue virus genetic and phenotypic diversity: towards identifying the molecular determinants that influence virulence and transmission potential.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Peter; Van Vuuren, Moritz; Stokstad, Maria; Myrmel, Mette; Venter, Estelle H

    2012-12-28

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is the prototype member of the Orbivirus genus in the family Reoviridae and is the aetiological agent of the arthropod transmitted disease bluetongue (BT) that affects both ruminant and camelid species. The disease is of significant global importance due to its economic impact and effect on animal welfare. Bluetongue virus, a dsRNA virus, evolves through a process of quasispecies evolution that is driven by genetic drift and shift as well as intragenic recombination. Quasispecies evolution coupled with founder effect and evolutionary selective pressures has over time led to the establishment of genetically distinct strains of the virus in different epidemiological systems throughout the world. Bluetongue virus field strains may differ substantially from each other with regards to their phenotypic properties (i.e. virulence and/or transmission potential). The intrinsic molecular determinants that influence the phenotype of BTV have not clearly been characterized. It is currently unclear what contribution each of the viral genome segments have in determining the phenotypic properties of the virus and it is also unknown how genetic variability in the individual viral genes and their functional domains relate to differences in phenotype. In order to understand how genetic variation in particular viral genes could potentially influence the phenotypic properties of the virus; a closer understanding of the BTV virion, its encoded proteins and the evolutionary mechanisms that shape the diversity of the virus is required. This review provides a synopsis of these issues and highlights some of the studies that have been conducted on BTV and the closely related African horse sickness virus (AHSV) that have contributed to ongoing attempts to identify the molecular determinants that influence the virus' phenotype. Different strategies that can be used to generate BTV mutants in vitro and methods through which the causality between particular genetic

  3. Cannibalism as an interacting phenotype: precannibalistic aggression is influenced by social partners in the endangered Socorro Isopod (Thermosphaeroma thermophilum).

    PubMed

    Bleakley, B H; Welter, S M; McCauley-Cole, K; Shuster, S M; Moore, A J

    2013-04-01

    Models for the evolution of cannibalism highlight the importance of asymmetries between individuals in initiating cannibalistic attacks. Studies may include measures of body size but typically group individuals into size/age classes or compare populations. Such broad comparisons may obscure the details of interactions that ultimately determine how socially contingent characteristics evolve. We propose that understanding cannibalism is facilitated by using an interacting phenotypes perspective that includes the influences of the phenotype of a social partner on the behaviour of a focal individual and focuses on variation in individual pairwise interactions. We investigated how relative body size, a composite trait between a focal individual and its social partner, and the sex of the partners influenced precannibalistic aggression in the endangered Socorro isopod, Thermosphaeroma thermophilum. We also investigated whether differences in mating interest among males and females influenced cannibalism in mixed sex pairs. We studied these questions in three populations that differ markedly in range of body size and opportunities for interactions among individuals. We found that relative body size influences the probability of and latency to attack. We observed differences in the likelihood of and latency to attack based on both an individual's sex and the sex of its partner but found no evidence of sexual conflict. The instigation of precannibalistic aggression in these isopods is therefore a property of both an individual and its social partner. Our results suggest that interacting phenotype models would be improved by incorporating a new conditional ψ, which describes the strength of a social partner's influence on focal behaviour.

  4. Phenotypic characterization of circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood of patients with small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Messaritakis, Ippokratis; Politaki, Eleni; Kotsakis, Athanasios; Dermitzaki, Eleftheria-Kleio; Koinis, Filippos; Lagoudaki, Eleni; Koutsopoulos, Anastasios; Kallergi, Galatea; Souglakos, John

    2017-01-01

    Background To evaluate the phenotypic heterogeneity of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) based on the expression of proliferative, apoptotic and Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transmission (EMT) markers during front-line treatment in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and to evaluate their clinical relevance. Methods CTCs from 108 chemotherapy-naïve patients with SCLC were analyzed by double immunofluorescence staining using anti-Ki67, anti-M30, anti-Vimentin along with anti-CKs antibodies. In 83 patients CTCs were also enumerated using the CellSearch. Results Sequential samples were available from 76 and 48 patients after one-treatment cycle and on disease progression (PD), respectively, for immunofluorescence and from 50 and 36 patients after one-cycle and on PD, respectively, for CellSearch. At baseline, 60.2% of the patients had detectable CTCs by either method. Both proliferative (CK67+) and non-proliferative (Ki67-), apoptotic (M30+) and non-apoptotic (M30-) as well as EMT (Vim+) CTCs were present in the same patient. Among 22 patients without detectable CTCs by CellSearch, CK+/Ki67+ and CK+/Vim+ CTCs could be detected in 6 (27.3%) and 6 (27.3%) patients, respectively. One-chemotherapy cycle reduced both the incidence of detection (p<0.001) and the absolute number (p<0.001) of CTCs; conversely, on PD both the incidence of detection and the number of CTCs were significantly increased (p = 0.002 and p = 0.04, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that the increased number of Vim+ CTCs at baseline and of non-apoptotic CTCs on PD could be emerged as independent prognostic factors associated with decreased OS(p = 0.009 and p = 0.023, respectively). Conclusions CK+/Ki67+, CK+/M30+ and CK+/Vim+ CTCs represent distinct subpopulations of CTCs in patients with SCLC, can be detected even in the absence of detectable CTCs by CellSearch; CK+/Ki67+ and CK+/Vim+ CTCs are associated with unfavorable clinical outcome. PMID:28719656

  5. MicroRNA-132 induces temozolomide resistance and promotes the formation of cancer stem cell phenotypes by targeting tumor suppressor candidate 3 in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhen-Xiu; Yin, Wen-Bo; Wang, Zhong-Yu

    2017-09-07

    The prognosis of patients suffering from glioblastoma [also referred to as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)] is dismal despite multimodal therapy. Chemotherapy with temozolomide may suppress tumor growth for a certain period of time (a few months); however, invariable tumor recurrence suggests that glioblastoma initiating cells (GICs) render these tumors persistant. Thus, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of action of GICs as regards their role in the progression of GBM is important as such knowledge will be helpful in the discovery of novel drug targets, as well as in the design of novel therapeutic strategies for more effective treatment of the disease. In this study, we found that tumor suppressor candidate 3 (TUSC3) was downregulated in temozolomide-resistant U87MG cells (U87MG-res cells) and its restoration sensitized U87MG-res cells to temozolomide. TUSC3 was able to inhibit the formation of GIC phenotypes in the U87MG-res cells. The overexpression of microRNA (miR)‑132 inhibited TUSC3 protein expression in the U87MG cells. However, its overexpression did not degrade TUSC3 mRNA expression in the cells. miR‑132 was upregulated in the U87MG-res cells and its overexpression induced temozolomide resistance and the formation of cancer stem cell phenotypes in the U87MG cells. Thus, our data indicate that miR-132 induces temozolomide resistance and promotes the formation of cancer stem cell phenotypes by targeting TUSC3 in glioblastoma.

  6. Time-lapse phenotyping of invasive glioma cells ex vivo reveals subtype-specific movement patterns guided by tumor core signaling.

    PubMed

    Fayzullin, Artem; Tuvnes, Frode A; Skjellegrind, Håvard K; Behnan, Jinan; Mughal, Awais A; Langmoen, Iver A; Vik-Mo, Einar O

    2016-12-10

    The biology of glioblastoma invasion and its mechanisms are poorly understood. We demonstrate using time-lapse microscopy that grafting of glioblastoma (GBM) tumorspheres into rodent brain slices results in experimental ex vivo tumors with invasive properties that recapitulate the invasion observed after orthotopic transplantation into the rodent brain. The migratory movements and mitotic patterns were clearly modified by signals extrinsic to the invading cells. The cells migrated away from the tumorspheres, and removal of the spheres reduced the directed invasive movement. The cell cultures contained different populations of invasive cells that had distinct morphology and invasive behavior patterns. Grafts of the most invasive GBM culture contained 91±8% cells with an invasive phenotype, characterized by small soma with a distinct leading process. Conversely, the majority of cells in less invasive GBM grafts were phenotypically heterogeneous: only 6.3±4.1% of the cells had the invasive phenotype. Grafts of highly and moderately invasive cultures had different proportions of cells that advanced into the brain slice parenchyma during the observation period: 89.2±2.2% and 23.1±6.8%, respectively. In grafts with moderately invasive properties, most of the cells (76.8±6.8%) invading the surrounding brain tissue returned to the tumor bulk or stopped centrifugal migration. Our data suggest that the invasion of individual GBM tumors can be conditioned by the prevalence of a cell fraction with particular invasive morphology and by signaling between the tumor core and invasive cells. These findings can be important for the development of new therapeutic strategies that target the invasive GBM cells. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Metabolomics as a tool for target identification in strain improvement: the influence of phenotype definition.

    PubMed

    Braaksma, Machtelt; Bijlsma, Sabina; Coulier, Leon; Punt, Peter J; van der Werf, Mariët J

    2011-01-01

    For the optimization of microbial production processes, the choice of the quantitative phenotype to be optimized is crucial. For instance, for the optimization of product formation, either product concentration or productivity can be pursued, potentially resulting in different targets for strain improvement. The choice of a quantitative phenotype is highly relevant for classical improvement approaches, and even more so for modern systems biology approaches. In this study, the information content of a metabolomics dataset was determined with respect to different quantitative phenotypes related to the formation of specific products. To this end, the production of two industrially relevant products by Aspergillus niger was evaluated: (i) the enzyme glucoamylase, and (ii) the more complex product group of secreted proteases, consisting of multiple enzymes. For both products, six quantitative phenotypes associated with activity and productivity were defined, also taking into account different time points of sampling during the fermentation. Both linear and nonlinear relationships between the metabolome data and the different quantitative phenotypes were considered. The multivariate data analysis tool partial least-squares (PLS) was used to evaluate the information content of the datasets for all the different quantitative phenotypes defined. Depending on the product studied, different quantitative phenotypes were found to have the highest information content in specific metabolomics datasets. A detailed analysis of the metabolites that showed strong correlation with these quantitative phenotypes revealed that various sugar derivatives correlated with glucoamylase activity. For the reduction of protease activity, mainly as-yet-unidentified compounds correlated.

  8. Linking of mPGES-1 and iNOS activates stem-like phenotype in EGFR-driven epithelial tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Terzuoli, Erika; Finetti, Federica; Costanza, Filomena; Giachetti, Antonio; Ziche, Marina; Donnini, Sandra

    2017-03-01

    Inflammatory prostaglandin E-2 (PGE-2) favors cancer progression in epithelial tumors characterized by persistent oncogene input. However, its effects on tumor cell stemness are poorly understood at molecular level. Here we describe two epithelial tumor cells A431 and A459, originating from human lung and skin tumors, in which epithelial growth factor (EGF) induces sequential up-regulation of mPGES-1 and iNOS enzymes, producing an inflammatory intracellular milieu. We demonstrated that concerted action of EGF, mPGES-1 and iNOS causes sharp changes in cell phenotype demonstrated by acquisition of stem-cell features and activation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). When primed with EGF, epithelial tumor cells transfected with mPGES-1 or iNOS to ensure steady enzyme levels display major stem-like and EMT markers, such as reduction in E-cadherin with a concomitant rise in vimentin, ALDH-1, CD133 and ALDH activity. Tumorsphere studies with these cells show increased sphere number and size, enhanced migratory and clonogenic capacity and sharp changes in EMT markers, indicating activation of this process. The concerted action of the enzymes forms a well-orchestrated cascade where expression of iNOS depends on overexpression of mPGES-1. Indeed, we show that through its downstream effectors (PGE-2, PKA, PI3K/Akt), mPGES-1 recruits non-canonical transcription factors, thus facilitating iNOS production. In conclusion, we propose that the initial event leading to tumor stem-cell activation may be a leveraged intrinsic mechanism in which all players are either inherent constituents (EGF) or highly inducible proteins (mPGES-1, iNOS) of tumor cells. We suggest that incipient tumor aggressiveness may be moderated by reducing pivotal input of mPGES-1.

  9. Interleukin-6 Induced “Acute” Phenotypic Microenvironment Promotes Th1 Anti-Tumor Immunity in Cryo-Thermal Therapy Revealed By Shotgun and Parallel Reaction Monitoring Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ting; Liu, Ping; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Kun; Yang, Li; Moritz, Robert L.; Yan, Wei; Xu, Lisa X.

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-thermal therapy has been emerged as a promising novel therapeutic strategy for advanced breast cancer, triggering higher incidence of tumor regression and enhanced remission of metastasis than routine treatments. To better understand its anti-tumor mechanism, we utilized a spontaneous metastatic mouse model and quantitative proteomics to compare N-glycoproteome changes in 94 serum samples with and without treatment. We quantified 231 highly confident N-glycosylated proteins using iTRAQ shotgun proteomics. Among them, 53 showed significantly discriminated regulatory patterns over the time course, in which the acute phase response emerged as the most enhanced pathway. The anti-tumor feature of the acute response was further investigated using parallel reaction monitoring target proteomics and flow cytometry on 23 of the 53 significant proteins. We found that cryo-thermal therapy reset the tumor chronic inflammation to an “acute” phenotype, with up-regulation of acute phase proteins including IL-6 as a key regulator. The IL-6 mediated “acute” phenotype transformed IL-4 and Treg-promoting ICOSL expression to Th1-promoting IFN-γ and IL-12 production, augmented complement system activation and CD86+MHCII+ dendritic cells maturation and enhanced the proliferation of Th1 memory cells. In addition, we found an increased production of tumor progression and metastatic inhibitory proteins under such “acute” environment, favoring the anti-metastatic effect. Moreover, cryo-thermal on tumors induced the strongest “acute” response compared to cryo/hyperthermia alone or cryo-thermal on healthy tissues, accompanying by the most pronounced anti-tumor immunological effect. In summary, we demonstrated that cryo-thermal therapy induced, IL-6 mediated “acute” microenvironment shifted the tumor chronic microenvironment from Th2 immunosuppressive and pro-tumorigenic to Th1 immunostimulatory and tumoricidal state. Moreover, the magnitude of “acute” and

  10. HER2 isoforms co-expression differently tunes mammary tumor phenotypes affecting onset, vasculature and therapeutic response

    PubMed Central

    Balboni, Tania; Ianzano, Marianna L.; Laranga, Roberta; Landuzzi, Lorena; Giusti, Veronica; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Santini, Donatella; Taffurelli, Mario; Di Oto, Enrico; Asioli, Sofia; Amici, Augusto; Pupa, Serenella M.; De Giovanni, Carla; Tagliabue, Elda; Iezzi, Manuela; Nanni, Patrizia; Lollini, Pier-Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Full-length HER2 oncoprotein and splice variant Delta16 are co-expressed in human breast cancer. We studied their interaction in hybrid transgenic mice bearing human full-length HER2 and Delta16 (F1 HER2/Delta16) in comparison to parental HER2 and Delta16 transgenic mice. Mammary carcinomas onset was faster in F1 HER2/Delta16 and Delta16 than in HER2 mice, however tumor growth was slower, and metastatic spread was comparable in all transgenic mice. Full-length HER2 tumors contained few large vessels or vascular lacunae, whereas Delta16 tumors presented a more regular vascularization with numerous endothelium-lined small vessels. Delta16-expressing tumors showed a higher accumulation of i.v. injected doxorubicin than tumors expressing full-length HER2. F1 HER2/Delta16 tumors with high full-length HER2 expression made few large vessels, whereas tumors with low full-length HER2 and high Delta16 contained numerous small vessels and expressed higher levels of VEGF and VEGFR2. Trastuzumab strongly inhibited tumor onset in F1 HER2/Delta16 and Delta16 mice, but not in full-length HER2 mice. Addiction of F1 tumors to Delta16 was also shown by long-term stability of Delta16 levels during serial transplants, in contrast full-length HER2 levels underwent wide fluctuations. In conclusion, full-length HER2 leads to a faster tumor growth and to an irregular vascularization, whereas Delta16 leads to a faster tumor onset, with more regular vessels, which in turn could better transport cytotoxic drugs within the tumor, and to a higher sensitivity to targeted therapeutic agents. F1 HER2/Delta16 mice are a new immunocompetent mouse model, complementary to patient-derived xenografts, for studies of mammary carcinoma onset, prevention and therapy. PMID:28903354

  11. Adjuvant Cationic Liposomes Presenting MPL and IL-12 Induce Cell Death, Suppress Tumor Growth, and Alter the Cellular Phenotype of Tumors in a Murine Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) process and present antigens to T lymphocytes, inducing potent immune responses when encountered in association with activating signals, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Using the 4T1 murine model of breast cancer, cationic liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and interleukin (IL)-12 were administered by intratumoral injection. Combination multivalent presentation of the Toll-like receptor-4 ligand MPL and cytotoxic 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trmethylammonium-propane lipids induced cell death, decreased cellular proliferation, and increased serum levels of IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. The addition of recombinant IL-12 further suppressed tumor growth and increased expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and interferon-γ. IL-12 also increased the percentage of cytolytic T cells, DC, and F4/80+ macrophages in the tumor. While single agent therapy elevated levels of nitric oxide synthase 3-fold above basal levels in the tumor, combination therapy with MPL cationic liposomes and IL-12 stimulated a 7-fold increase, supporting the observed cell cycle arrest (loss of Ki-67 expression) and apoptosis (TUNEL positive). In mice bearing dual tumors, the growth of distal, untreated tumors mirrored that of liposome-treated tumors, supporting the presence of a systemic immune response. PMID:25179345

  12. Serum stimulation, cell-cell interactions, and extracellular matrix independently influence smooth muscle cell phenotype in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, S.; Shanley, J. R.; Fox, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    Vascular injury profoundly alters the vessel wall microenvironment, and smooth muscle cells respond with cell cycle re-entry, loss of contractile elements, extracellular matrix remodeling, and altered signaling by endogenous growth factors and their receptors. Environmental cues include stimulation by exogenous mitogens and both cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Modeling this process in smooth muscle cells in vitro, these environmental determinants were varied independently and the phenotypic consequences assessed. Mitogenic stimulation with serum promoted the synthesis of collagen and fibronectin and the expression of fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 and suppressed the content of smooth muscle alpha-actin, myosin heavy chain, and basic fibroblast growth factor. Low cell density (reduced cell-cell contact) was also associated with enhanced extracellular matrix protein production, increased fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 expression, and reduced contractile protein and basic fibroblast growth factor content. The influence of serum stimulation and reduced cell-cell contact were independent and additive. Provision of a type I collagen matrix blunted the influence of serum and cell-cell contact on collagen synthesis but had minor effects on other measures of phenotype. Environmental factors thus independently influence smooth muscle cell phenotype, including endogenous growth factor expression and responsiveness, which can in turn influence the microenvironment of the vessel wall after injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8702006

  13. Influence of abnormally high leptin levels during pregnancy on metabolic phenotypes in progeny mice.

    PubMed

    Makarova, Elena N; Chepeleva, Elena V; Panchenko, Polina E; Bazhan, Nadezhda M

    2013-12-01

    Maternal obesity increases the risk of obesity in offspring, and obesity is accompanied by an increase in blood leptin levels. The "yellow" mutation at the mouse agouti locus (A(y)) increases blood leptin levels in C57BL preobese pregnant mice without affecting other metabolic characteristics. We investigated the influence of the A(y) mutation or leptin injection at the end of pregnancy in C57BL mice on metabolic phenotypes and the susceptibility to diet-induced obesity (DIO) in offspring. In both C57BL-A(y) and leptin-treated mice, the maternal effect was more pronounced in male offspring. Compared with males born to control mothers, males born to A(y) mothers displayed equal food intake (FI) but decreased body weight (BW) gain after weaning, equal glucose tolerance, and enhanced FI-to-BW ratios on the standard diet but the same FI and BW on the high-fat diet. Males born to A(y) mothers were less responsive to the anorectic effect of exogenous leptin and less resistant to fasting (were not hyperphagic and gained less weight during refeeding after food deprivation) compared with males born to control mothers. However, all progeny displayed equal hypothalamic expression of Agouti gene-related protein (AgRP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and equal plasma leptin and glucose levels after food deprivation. Leptin injections in C57BL mice on day 17 of pregnancy decreased BW in both male and female offspring but inhibited FI and DIO only in male offspring. Our results show that hyperleptinemia during pregnancy has sex-specific long-term effects on energy balance regulation in progeny and does not predispose offspring to developing obesity.

  14. Factors Influencing the Phenotypic Expression of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Genetic Carriers.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sánchez, Inmaculada; Romero-Puche, Antonio José; García-Molina Sáez, Esperanza; Sabater-Molina, María; López-Ayala, José María; Muñoz-Esparza, Carmen; López-Cuenca, David; de la Morena, Gonzalo; Castro-García, Francisco José; Gimeno-Blanes, Juan Ramón

    2017-07-04

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a disorder with variable expression. It is mainly caused by mutations in sarcomeric genes but the phenotype could be modulated by other factors. The aim of this study was to determine whether factors such as sex, systemic hypertension, or physical activity are modifiers of disease severity and to establish their role in age-related penetrance of HCM. We evaluated 272 individuals (mean age 49 ± 17 years, 57% males) from 72 families with causative mutations. The relationship between sex, hypertension, physical activity, and left ventricular hypertrophy was studied. The proportion of affected individuals increased with age. Men developed the disease 12.5 years earlier than women (adjusted median, 95%CI, -17.52 to -6.48; P < .001). Hypertensive patients were diagnosed with HCM later (10.8 years of delay) than normotensive patients (adjusted median, 95%CI, 6.28-17.09; P < .001). Individuals who performed physical activity were diagnosed with HCM significantly earlier (7.3 years, adjusted median, 95%CI, -14.49 to -1.51; P = .016). Sex, hypertension, and the degree of physical activity were not significantly associated with the severity of left ventricular hypertrophy. Adjusted survival both free from sudden death and from the combined event were not influenced by any of the exploratory variables. Men and athletes who are carriers of sarcomeric mutations are diagnosed earlier than women and sedentary individuals. Hypertensive carriers of sarcomeric mutations have a delayed diagnosis. Sex, hypertension, and physical activity are not associated with disease severity in carriers of HCM causative mutations. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of HLA and disease susceptibility: Chromosome 6 genes and sex influence long-QT phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Weitkamp, L.R.; Moss, A.J.; Hall, W.J.; Robinson, J.L.; Guttormsen, S.A.; Lewis, R.A.; MacCluer, J.W.; Schwartz, P.J.; Locati, E.H.; Tzivoni, D.

    1994-12-01

    The long-QT (LQT) syndrome is a genetically complex disorder that is characterized by syncope and fatal ventricular arrhythmias. LQT syndrome, as defined by a prolonged electrocardiographic QT interval, has a higher incidence in females than in males and does not exhibit Mendelian transmission patterns in all families. Among those families that are nearly consistent with Mendelian transmission, linkage between a locus for LQT syndrome and the H-ras-1 locus on the short arm of chromosome 11 has been reported in some families but not in others. Earlier analyses suggesting that LQT syndrome might be caused by a gene in the HLA region of chromosome 6 were not confirmed by standard linkage analyses. Here, we present an analysis of HLA haplotype sharing among affected pedigree members, showing an excess of haplotype sharing in a previously published Japanese pedigree and possibly also in 15 families of European descent. The haplotypes shared by affected individuals derive from both affected and unaffected parents. In an analysis of independent (unrelated) HLA haplotypes, we also found a nonrandom distribution of HLA-DR genes in LQT syndrome patients compared with controls, suggesting an association between the LQT phenotype and specific HLA-DR genes. Our data indicate that DR2 has a protective effect and, particularly in males, that DR7 may increase susceptibility to the LQT syndrome. Thus, LQT syndrome may be influenced by genes on chromosomes 11 and 6, possibly with a sex-specific effect. These results provide a model for an effect of HLA-region genes inherited from either parent on the expression of an illness that may be determined principally by alleles at loci not linked to HLA.

  16. [Immunohistochemical hormonal mismatch and human epidermal growth factor type 2 [HER2] phenotype of brain metastases in breast cancer carcinoma compared to primary tumors].

    PubMed

    Joubert, C; Boissonneau, S; Fina, F; Figarella-Branger, D; Ouafik, L; Fuentes, S; Dufour, H; Gonçalves, A; Charaffe-Jauffret, E; Metellus, P

    2016-06-01

    Phenotype changes between primary tumor and the corresponding brain metastases are recent reported data. Breast cancer, with biological markers predicting prognosis and guiding therapeutic strategy remains an interesting model to observe and evaluate theses changes. The objective of our study was to compare molecular features (estrogen receptor [ER], progesterone receptor [PR], and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2, [HER2]) between brain metastases and its primary tumor in patients presenting with pathologically confirmed breast cancer. This retrospective study was based on the immunohistochemical analysis of the brain metastases paraffin embedded samples stored in our institutional tumor bank, after surgical resection. The level of expression of hormonal receptors and HER2 on brain metastases were centrally reviewed and compared to the expression status in primary breast cancer from medical records. Forty-four samples of brain metastases were available for analysis. Hormonal receptor modification status was observed in 11/44 brain metastases (25%) for ER and 6/44 (13.6%) for PR. A modification of HER2 overexpression was observed in brain metastases in 6/44 (13.6%). Molecular subtype modification was shown in 17 cases (38.6%). A significant difference was demonstrated between time to develop brain metastases in cases without status modification (HER2, ER and PR) (med=49.5months [7.8-236.4]) and in cases in which brain metastases status differs from primary tumor (med=27.5months [0-197.3]), (P=0.0244, IC95=3.09-51.62, Mann and Whitney test). the main interest of this study was to focus on the molecular feature changes between primary tumor and their brain metastases. Time to develop brain metastases was correlated to phenotypic changes in brain metastases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Heparanase-mediated Loss of Nuclear Syndecan-1 Enhances Histone Acetyltransferase (HAT) Activity to Promote Expression of Genes That Drive an Aggressive Tumor Phenotype*

    PubMed Central

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Hurst, Douglas R.; Pisano, Claudio; Mizumoto, Shuji; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2011-01-01

    Heparanase acts as a master regulator of the aggressive tumor phenotype in part by enhancing expression of proteins known to drive tumor progression (e.g. VEGF, MMP-9, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and RANKL). However, the mechanism whereby this enzyme regulates gene expression remains unknown. We previously reported that elevation of heparanase levels in myeloma cells causes a dramatic reduction in the amount of syndecan-1 in the nucleus. Because syndecan-1 has heparan sulfate chains and because exogenous heparan sulfate has been shown to inhibit the activity of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) enzymes in vitro, we hypothesized that the reduction in nuclear syndecan-1 in cells expressing high levels of heparanase would result in increased HAT activity leading to stimulation of protein transcription. We found that myeloma cells or tumors expressing high levels of heparanase and low levels of nuclear syndecan-1 had significantly higher levels of HAT activity when compared with cells or tumors expressing low levels of heparanase. High levels of HAT activity in heparanase-high cells were blocked by SST0001, an inhibitor of heparanase. Restoration of high syndecan-1 levels in heparanase-high cells diminished nuclear HAT activity, establishing syndecan-1 as a potent inhibitor of HAT. Exposure of heparanase-high cells to anacardic acid, an inhibitor of HAT activity, significantly suppressed their expression of VEGF and MMP-9, two genes known to be up-regulated following elevation of heparanase. These results reveal a novel mechanistic pathway driven by heparanase expression, which leads to decreased nuclear syndecan-1, increased HAT activity, and up-regulation of transcription of multiple genes that drive an aggressive tumor phenotype. PMID:21757697

  18. A Pyloric Gland-Phenotype Ovarian Mucinous Tumor Resembling Lobular Endocervical Glandular Hyperplasia in a Patient with Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Na; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Kim, Jiyoon; Park, In Ah; Shin, Jin Ho; Chai, Yun; Kim, Kyu-Rae

    2017-03-01

    We describe an ovarian mucinous neoplasm that histologically resembles lobular endocervical glandular hyperplasia (LEGH) containing pyloric gland type mucin in a patient with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS). Although ovarian mucinous tumors rarely occur in PJS patients, their pyloric gland phenotype has not been clearly determined. The histopathologic features of the ovarian mucinous tumor were reminiscent of LEGH. The cytoplasmic mucin was stained with periodic acid-Schiff reaction after diastase treatment but was negative for Alcian blue pH 2.5, suggesting the presence of neutral mucin. Immunohistochemically, the epithelium expressed various gastric markers, including MUC6, HIK1083, and carbonic anhydrase-IX. Multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification detected a germline heterozygous deletion mutation at exons 1-7 of the STK11 gene (c.1-?_920+?del) in peripheral blood leukocytes and mosaic loss of heterozygosity in ovarian tumor tissue. Considering that LEGH and/or gastric-type cervical adenocarcinoma can be found in patients with PJS carrying germline and/or somatic STK11 mutations, our case indicates that STK11 mutations have an important role in the proliferation of pyloric-phenotype mucinous epithelium at various anatomical locations.

  19. A Pyloric Gland-Phenotype Ovarian Mucinous Tumor Resembling Lobular Endocervical Glandular Hyperplasia in a Patient with Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Na; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Kim, Jiyoon; Park, In Ah; Shin, Jin Ho; Chai, Yun; Kim, Kyu-Rae

    2017-01-01

    We describe an ovarian mucinous neoplasm that histologically resembles lobular endocervical glandular hyperplasia (LEGH) containing pyloric gland type mucin in a patient with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS). Although ovarian mucinous tumors rarely occur in PJS patients, their pyloric gland phenotype has not been clearly determined. The histopathologic features of the ovarian mucinous tumor were reminiscent of LEGH. The cytoplasmic mucin was stained with periodic acid-Schiff reaction after diastase treatment but was negative for Alcian blue pH 2.5, suggesting the presence of neutral mucin. Immunohistochemically, the epithelium expressed various gastric markers, including MUC6, HIK1083, and carbonic anhydrase-IX. Multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification detected a germline heterozygous deletion mutation at exons 1–7 of the STK11 gene (c.1-?_920+?del) in peripheral blood leukocytes and mosaic loss of heterozygosity in ovarian tumor tissue. Considering that LEGH and/or gastric-type cervical adenocarcinoma can be found in patients with PJS carrying germline and/or somatic STK11 mutations, our case indicates that STK11 mutations have an important role in the proliferation of pyloric-phenotype mucinous epithelium at various anatomical locations. PMID:27550049

  20. Development of a three-dimensional multiscale agent-based tumor model: simulating gene-protein interaction profiles, cell phenotypes and multicellular patterns in brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le; Athale, Chaitanya A; Deisboeck, Thomas S

    2007-01-07

    Experimental evidence suggests that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated activation of the signaling protein phospholipase Cgamma plays a critical role in a cancer cell's phenotypic decision to either proliferate or to migrate at a given point in time. Here, we present a novel three-dimensional multiscale agent-based model to simulate this cellular decision process in the context of a virtual brain tumor. Each tumor cell is equipped with an EGFR gene-protein interaction network module that also connects to a simplified cell cycle description. The simulation results show that over time proliferative and migratory cell populations not only oscillate but also directly impact the spatio-temporal expansion patterns of the entire cancer system. The percentage change in the concentration of the sub-cellular interaction network's molecular components fluctuates, and, for the 'proliferation-to-migration' switch we find that the phenotype triggering molecular profile to some degree varies as the tumor system grows and the microenvironment changes. We discuss potential implications of these findings for experimental and clinical cancer research.

  1. Sex and age as determinants of rat T-cell phenotypic characteristics: influence of peripubertal gonadectomy.

    PubMed

    Arsenović-Ranin, Nevena; Kosec, Duško; Pilipović, Ivan; Nacka-Aleksić, Mirjana; Bufan, Biljana; Stojić-Vukanić, Zorica; Leposavić, Gordana

    2017-03-09

    The study examined the influence of age, sex and peripubertal gonadectomy on a set of T-cell phenotypic parameters. Rats of both sexes were gonadectomised at the age of 1 month and peripheral blood and spleen T lymphocytes from non-gonadectomised and gonadectomised 3- and 11-month-old rats were examined for the expression of differentiation/activation (CD90/CD45RC) and immunoregulatory markers. Peripheral blood T lymphocytes from non-gonadectomised rats showed age-dependent sexual dimorphisms in (1) total count (lower in female than male 11-month-old rats); (2) CD4+:CD8 + cell ratio (higher in female than male rats of both ages); (3) the proportion of recent thymic emigrants in CD8 + T cells (lower in female than male 3-month-old rats) and (4) the proportions of mature naïve and memory/activated cells (irrespective of age, the proportion of naïve cells was higher, whereas that of memory/activated cells was lower in females). Gonadectomy influenced magnitudes or direction of these sex differences. Additionally, sex differences in peripheral blood T-lymphocyte parameters did not fully correspond to those observed in T-splenocyte parameters, suggesting the compartment-specific regulation of the major T-cell subpopulations' and their subsets' composition. Furthermore, there was no sexual dimorphism in the proportion of either CD25 + Foxp3 + cells among CD4 + or CD161+ (NKT) cells within CD8 + T lymphocytes. However, there was gonadal hormone-independent age-associated sexual dimorphism in the proportion of CD161 + cells (NKT cells) in CD8 + T splenocytes. Overall, the study revealed age-dependent variations in sexual dimorphisms in T-cell parameters relevant for immune response efficacy and showed that they are T-cell compartment-specific and partly gonadal hormone-related.

  2. FOXL2 Mutation Analysis of Ovarian Sex Cord-Stromal Tumors: Genotype-Phenotype Correlation With Diagnostic Considerations.

    PubMed

    Buza, Natalia; Wong, Serena; Hui, Pei

    2017-07-11

    Correlation of FOXL2 mutation status with morphologic features and reticulin staining patterns was performed in a comprehensive single-institutional cohort of ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors. Fifty-one cases were included, 35 of which were morphologically diagnosed as adult granulosa cell tumor, 4 as Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor, 11 as fibroma/fibrothecoma and 1 as a thecoma. Of the adult granulosa cell tumors, 31 (88.6%) harbored FOXL2 mutation. Abundant pale cytoplasm was seen in 51.6% (16/31) of FOXL2 mutated tumors, compared with 6.7% (1/15) among FOXL2 wild type tumors (P=0.003). Nearly half of FOXL2 negative tumors showed individual pericellular reticulin staining pattern, while none of the FOXL2 positive cases demonstrated this feature (P=0.0001). Nested reticulin pattern was observed in 67.7% of FOXL2 positive tumors, compared with 20% of FOXL2 negative cases (P=0.004). Indeterminate reticulin staining pattern was seen in nearly one third of cases in both groups. Nested reticulin pattern was 87.5% specific and 67.7% sensitive for FOXL2 mutation, while individual reticulin pattern was 100% specific for absence of FOXL2 mutation. No statistical significance was observed between the 2 groups in tumor size, mitotic activity, nuclear atypia, and nuclear grooves. Follow-up was available for 44 patients ranging from 0.3 to 259 months (mean: 67.5 mo). Two patients developed recurrence, both of them harbored FOXL2 mutation. In conclusion, the pathology diagnosis of sex cord-stromal tumors continues to be difficult, and reticulin staining remains a valuable tool as an initial step in the diagnostic work-up. Individual pericellular reticulin pattern essentially rules out adult granulosa cell tumor, while cases with indeterminate or nested patterns can be subjected to FOXL2 mutation testing to aid the diagnosis.

  3. The Influence of Frontal Lobe Tumors and Surgical Treatment on Advanced Cognitive Functions.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shengyu; Wang, Yinyan; Jiang, Tao

    2016-07-01

    Brain cognitive functions affect patient quality of life. The frontal lobe plays a crucial role in advanced cognitive functions, including executive function, meta-cognition, decision-making, memory, emotion, and language. Therefore, frontal tumors can lead to serious cognitive impairments. Currently, neurosurgical treatment is the primary method to treat brain tumors; however, the effects of the surgical treatments are difficult to predict or control. The treatment may both resolve the effects of the tumor to improve cognitive function or cause permanent disabilities resulting from damage to healthy functional brain tissue. Previous studies have focused on the influence of frontal lesions and surgical treatments on patient cognitive function. Here, we review cognitive impairment caused by frontal lobe brain tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. INFLUENCE OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING COMPOUNDS (EDCS) ON MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT AND TUMOR SUSCEPTIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influence of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDCs) on Mammary Gland Development and Tumor Susceptibility.

    Suzanne E. Fenton1, and Jennifer Rayner1,2

    1 Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL/ORD, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, and 2 Department of Environmen...

  5. INFLUENCE OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING COMPOUNDS (EDCS) ON MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT AND TUMOR SUSCEPTIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influence of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDCs) on Mammary Gland Development and Tumor Susceptibility.

    Suzanne E. Fenton1, and Jennifer Rayner1,2

    1 Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL/ORD, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, and 2 Department of Environmen...

  6. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... excessively in the body. Normally, the body controls cell growth and division. New cells are created to replace ... room for healthy replacements. If the balance of cell growth and death is disturbed, a tumor may form. ...

  7. Does index tumor predominant location influence prognostic factors in radical prostatectomies?

    PubMed

    Billis, Athanase; Freitas, Leandro L L; Costa, Larissa B E; Angelis, Camila M; Carvalho, Kelson R; Magna, Luis A; Ferreira, Ubirajara

    2017-01-01

    To find any influence on prognostic factors of index tumor according to predominant location. Prostate surgical specimens from 499 patients submitted to radical retropubic prostatectomy were step-sectioned. Each transverse section was subdivided into 2 anterolateral and 2 posterolateral quadrants. Tumor extent was evaluated by a semi-quantitative point-count method. The index tumor (dominant nodule) was recorded as the maximal number of positive points of the most extensive tumor area from the quadrants and the predominant location was considered anterior (anterolateral quadrants), posterior (posterolateral quadrants), basal (quadrants in upper half of the prostate), apical (quadrants in lower half of the prostate), left (left quadrants) or right (right quadrants). Time to biochemical recurrence was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier product-limit analysis and prediction of shorter time to biochemical recurrence using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. Index tumors with predominant posterior location were significantly associated with higher total tumor extent, needle and radical prostatectomy Gleason score, positive lymph nodes and preoperative prostate-specific antigen. Index tumors with predominant basal location were significantly associated with higher preoperative prostate-specific antigen, pathological stage higher than pT2, extra-prostatic extension, and seminal vesicle invasion. Index tumors with predominant basal location were significantly associated with time to biochemical recurrence in Kaplan-Meier estimates and significantly predicted shorter time to biochemical recurrence on univariate analysis but not on multivariate analysis. The study suggests that index tumor predominant location is associated with prognosis in radical prostatectomies, however, in multivariate analysis do not offer advantage over other well-established prognostic factors. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  8. Does index tumor predominant location influence prognostic factors in radical prostatectomies?

    PubMed Central

    Billis, Athanase; Freitas, Leandro L. L.; Costa, Larissa B. E.; de Angelis, Camila M.; Carvalho, Kelson R.; Magna, Luis A.; Ferreira, Ubirajara

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To find any influence on prognostic factors of index tumor according to predominant location. Materials and Methods Prostate surgical specimens from 499 patients submitted to radical retropubic prostatectomy were step-sectioned. Each transverse section was subdivided into 2 anterolateral and 2 posterolateral quadrants. Tumor extent was evaluated by a semi-quantitative point-count method. The index tumor (dominant nodule) was recorded as the maximal number of positive points of the most extensive tumor area from the quadrants and the predominant location was considered anterior (anterolateral quadrants), posterior (posterolateral quadrants), basal (quadrants in upper half of the prostate), apical (quadrants in lower half of the prostate), left (left quadrants) or right (right quadrants). Time to biochemical recurrence was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier product-limit analysis and prediction of shorter time to biochemical recurrence using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. Results Index tumors with predominant posterior location were significantly associated with higher total tumor extent, needle and radical prostatectomy Gleason score, positive lymph nodes and preoperative prostate-specific antigen. Index tumors with predominant basal location were significantly associated with higher preoperative prostate-specific antigen, pathological stage higher than pT2, extra-prostatic extension, and seminal vesicle invasion. Index tumors with predominant basal location were significantly associated with time to biochemical recurrence in Kaplan-Meier estimates and significantly predicted shorter time to biochemical recurrence on univariate analysis but not on multivariate analysis. Conclusions The study suggests that index tumor predominant location is associated with prognosis in radical prostatectomies, however, in multivariate analysis do not offer advantage over other well-established prognostic factors. PMID:28379672

  9. A mutation in the neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor-suppressor gene, giving rise to widely different clinical phenotypes in two unrelated individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Bourn, D.; Carter, S.A.; Goodship, J.; Strachan, T. ); Evans, G.R.; Coakham, H.

    1994-07-01

    The authors have sought mutations in the recently identified neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) tumor-suppressor gene in a large panel of NF2 patients, using PCR-based SSCP and heteroduplex analysis, followed by cloning and sequencing of appropriate PCR products. Two unrelated NF2 patients were found to have identical nonsense mutations caused by a C-to-T transition in a CpG dinucleotide that is a potential mutational hot spot in the NF2 tumor-suppressor gene. Unexpectedly, the two individuals had widely different clinical phenotypes, representing the severe Wishart and mild Gardner clinical subtypes. Analysis of DNA samples from different tissues of the mildly affected patient suggests that he is a somatic mosaic for the mutation. 26 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Matrix Rigidity Regulates the Transition of Tumor Cells to a Bone-Destructive Phenotype through Integrin β3 and TGF-β Receptor Type II

    PubMed Central

    Ruppender, Nazanin S.; Guo, Ruijing; Dadwal, Ushashi C.; Cannonier, Shellese; Basu, Sandip; Guelcher, Scott A.; Sterling, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients frequently develop skeletal metastases that significantly impact quality of life. Since bone metastases remain incurable, a clearer understanding of molecular mechanisms regulating skeletal metastases is required to develop new therapeutics that block establishment of tumors in bone. While many studies have suggested that the microenvironment contributes to bone metastases, the factors mediating tumors to progress from a quiescent to a bone-destructive state remain unclear. In this study, we hypothesized that the “soil” of the bone microenvironment, specifically the rigid mineralized extracellular matrix, stimulates the transition of the tumor cells to a bone-destructive phenotype. To test this hypothesis, we synthesized 2D polyurethane (PUR) films with elastic moduli ranging from the basement membrane (70 MPa) to cortical bone (3800 MPa) and measured expression of genes associated with mechanotransduction and bone metastases. We found that expression of Integrin β3 (Iβ3), as well as tumor-produced factors associated with bone destruction (Gli2 and parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP)), significantly increased with matrix rigidity, and that blocking Iβ3 reduced Gli2 and PTHrP expression. To identify the mechanism by which Iβ3 regulates Gli2 and PTHrP (both are also known to be regulated by TGF-β), we performed Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and immunoprecipitation, which indicated that Iβ3 co-localized with TGF-β Receptor Type II (TGF-β RII) on rigid but not compliant films. Finally, transplantation of tumor cells expressing Iβ3 shRNA into the tibiae of athymic nude mice significantly reduced PTHrP and Gli2 expression, as well as bone destruction, suggesting a crucial role for tumor-produced Iβ3 in disease progression. This study demonstrates that the rigid mineralized bone matrix can alter gene expression and bone destruction in an Iβ3/TGF-β-dependent manner, and suggests that Iβ3 inhibitors are a potential

  11. Human SPF45, a Splicing Factor, Has Limited Expression in Normal Tissues, Is Overexpressed in Many Tumors, and Can Confer a Multidrug-Resistant Phenotype to Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sampath, Janardhan; Long, Pandy R.; Shepard, Robert L.; Xia, Xiaoling; Devanarayan, Viswanath; Sandusky, George E.; Perry, William L.; Dantzig, Anne H.; Williamson, Mark; Rolfe, Mark; Moore, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    Our effort to identify novel drug-resistant genes in cyclophosphamide-resistant EMT6 mouse mammary tumors led us to the identification of SPF45. Simultaneously, other groups identified SPF45 as a component of the spliceosome that is involved in alternative splicing. We isolated the human homologue and examined the normal human tissue expression, tumor expression, and the phenotype caused by overexpression of human SPF45. Our analyses revealed that SPF45 is expressed in many, but not all, normal tissues tested with predominant expression in normal ductal epithelial cells of the breast, liver, pancreas, and prostate. Our analyses using tissue microarrays and sausages of tumors indicated that SPF45 is highly expressed in numerous carcinomas including bladder, breast, colon, lung, ovarian, pancreatic, and prostate. Interestingly, this study revealed that overexpression of SPF45 in HeLa, a cervical carcinoma cell line, resulted in drug resistance to doxorubicin and vincristine, two chemotherapeutic drugs commonly used in cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing tumor overexpression of an alternate splicing factor resulting in drug resistance. PMID:14578179

  12. Relationship between whole-body tumor burden, clinical phenotype, and quality of life in patients with neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Merker, Vanessa L; Bredella, Miriam A; Cai, Wenli; Kassarjian, Ara; Harris, Gordon J; Muzikansky, Alona; Nguyen, Rosa; Mautner, Victor F; Plotkin, Scott R

    2014-06-01

    Patients with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1), NF2, and schwannomatosis share a predisposition to develop multiple nerve sheath tumors. Previous studies have demonstrated that patients with NF1 and NF2 have reduced quality of life (QOL), but no studies have examined the relationship between whole-body tumor burden and QOL in these patients. We administered a QOL questionnaire (the SF-36) and a visual analog pain scale (VAS) to a previously described cohort of adult neurofibromatosis patients undergoing whole-body MRI. One-sample t-tests were used to compare norm-based SF-36 scores to weighted population means. Spearman correlation coefficients and multiple linear regression analyses controlling for demographic and disease-specific clinical variable were used to relate whole-body tumor volume to QOL scales. Two hundred forty-five patients (142 NF1, 53 NF2, 50 schwannomatosis) completed the study. Subjects showed deficits in selected subscales of the SF-36 compared to adjusted general population means. In bivariate analysis, increased tumor volume was significantly associated with pain in schwannomatosis patients, as measured by the SF-36 bodily pain subscale (rho = -0.287, P = 0.04) and VAS (rho = 0.34, P = 0.02). Regression models for NF2 patients showed a positive relationship between tumor burden and increased pain, as measured by the SF-36 (P = 0.008). Patients with NF1, NF2, and schwannomatosis suffer from reduced QOL, although only pain shows a clear relationship to patient's overall tumor burden. These findings suggest that internal tumor volume is not a primary contributor to QOL and emphasize the need for comprehensive treatment approaches that go beyond tumor-focused therapies such as surgery by including psychosocial interventions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Induction of mammary tumors in rat by intraperitoneal injection of NMU: histopathology and estral cycle influence.

    PubMed

    Rivera, E S; Andrade, N; Martin, G; Melito, G; Cricco, G; Mohamad, N; Davio, C; Caro, R; Bergoc, R M

    1994-11-11

    In order to obtain an experimental model we induced mammary tumors in female Sprague-Dawley rats. The carcinogen N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU) was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) at doses of 50 mg/kg body weight when animals were 50, 80 and 110 days old. Tumor sizes were measured with a caliper and their growth parameters and histopathological properties were tested. For 100 rats, 88.4% of developed lesions were ductal carcinomas, histologically classified as 52.8% cribiform variety, 30.6% solid carcinoma. Metastases in liver, spleen and lung were present. Other primary tumors were detected with low incidence. The influence of the rat estrous cycle during the first exposure to intraperitoneal NMU injection was studied. The latency period in estrus, proestrus and diestrus was 82 +/- 15, 77 +/- 18 and 79 +/- 18 days, respectively. Tumor incidence was significantly higher in estrus (95.2%) than proestrus (71.4%) or diestrus (77.4), (P < 0.01). Mean number or tumors per animal was similar among the three groups (4.4 +/- 3.2, 3.8 +/- 3.6, 3.2 +/- 1.8). The procedure described appears to be the simplest method for inducing experimental mammary tumors in rats.

  14. Melanoma Cells Block PEDF Production in Fibroblasts to Induce the Tumor-Promoting Phenotype of Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Nwani, Nkechiyere G; Deguiz, Maria L; Jimenez, Benilde; Vinokour, Elena; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Ugolkov, Andrey; Mazar, Andrew P; Volpert, Olga V

    2016-04-15

    Loss of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF, SERPINF1) in cancer cells is associated with poor prognosis and metastasis, but the contribution of stromal PEDF to cancer evolution is poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the role of fibroblast-derived PEDF in melanoma progression. We demonstrate that normal dermal fibroblasts expressing high PEDF levels attenuated melanoma growth and angiogenesis in vivo, whereas PEDF-depleted fibroblasts exerted tumor-promoting effects. Accordingly, mice with global PEDF knockout were more susceptible to melanoma metastasis. We also demonstrate that normal fibroblasts in close contact with PEDF-null melanoma cells lost PEDF expression and tumor-suppressive properties. Further mechanistic investigations underlying the crosstalk between tumor and stromal cells revealed that melanoma cells produced PDGF-BB and TGFβ, which blocked PEDF production in fibroblasts. Notably, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) isolated from patient-derived tumors expressed markedly low levels of PEDF. Treatment of patient CAF and TGFβ-treated normal fibroblasts with exogenous PEDF decreased the expression of CAF markers and restored PEDF expression. Finally, expression profiling of PEDF-depleted fibroblasts revealed induction of IL8, SERPINB2, hyaluronan synthase-2, and other genes associated with tumor promotion and metastasis. Collectively, our results demonstrate that PEDF maintains tumor-suppressive functions in fibroblasts to prevent CAF conversion and illustrate the mechanisms by which melanoma cells silence stromal PEDF to promote malignancy. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2265-76. ©2016 AACR.

  15. The influence of gene flow and drift on genetic and phenotypic divergence in two species of Zosterops in Vanuatu

    PubMed Central

    Clegg, Sonya M.; Phillimore, Albert B.

    2010-01-01

    Colonization of an archipelago sets the stage for adaptive radiation. However, some archipelagos are home to spectacular radiations, while others have much lower levels of diversification. The amount of gene flow among allopatric populations is one factor proposed to contribute to this variation. In island colonizing birds, selection for reduced dispersal ability is predicted to produce changing patterns of regional population genetic structure as gene flow-dominated systems give way to drift-mediated divergence. If this transition is important in facilitating phenotypic divergence, levels of genetic and phenotypic divergence should be associated. We consider population genetic structure and phenotypic divergence among two co-distributed, congeneric (Genus: Zosterops) bird species inhabiting the Vanuatu archipelago. The more recent colonist, Z. lateralis, exhibits genetic patterns consistent with a strong influence of distance-mediated gene flow. However, complex patterns of asymmetrical gene flow indicate variation in dispersal ability or inclination among populations. The endemic species, Z. flavifrons, shows only a partial transition towards a drift-mediated system, despite a long evolutionary history on the archipelago. We find no strong evidence that gene flow constrains phenotypic divergence in either species, suggesting that levels of inter-island gene flow do not explain the absence of a radiation across this archipelago. PMID:20194170

  16. The influence of gene flow and drift on genetic and phenotypic divergence in two species of Zosterops in Vanuatu.

    PubMed

    Clegg, Sonya M; Phillimore, Albert B

    2010-04-12

    Colonization of an archipelago sets the stage for adaptive radiation. However, some archipelagos are home to spectacular radiations, while others have much lower levels of diversification. The amount of gene flow among allopatric populations is one factor proposed to contribute to this variation. In island colonizing birds, selection for reduced dispersal ability is predicted to produce changing patterns of regional population genetic structure as gene flow-dominated systems give way to drift-mediated divergence. If this transition is important in facilitating phenotypic divergence, levels of genetic and phenotypic divergence should be associated. We consider population genetic structure and phenotypic divergence among two co-distributed, congeneric (Genus: Zosterops) bird species inhabiting the Vanuatu archipelago. The more recent colonist, Z. lateralis, exhibits genetic patterns consistent with a strong influence of distance-mediated gene flow. However, complex patterns of asymmetrical gene flow indicate variation in dispersal ability or inclination among populations. The endemic species, Z. flavifrons, shows only a partial transition towards a drift-mediated system, despite a long evolutionary history on the archipelago. We find no strong evidence that gene flow constrains phenotypic divergence in either species, suggesting that levels of inter-island gene flow do not explain the absence of a radiation across this archipelago.

  17. Comparative Analyses of QTLs Influencing Obesity and Metabolic Phenotypes in Pigs and Humans.

    PubMed

    Pant, Sameer D; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Jacobsen, Mette J; Cirera, Susanna; Kogelman, Lisette J A; Bruun, Camilla S; Mark, Thomas; Jørgensen, Claus B; Grarup, Niels; Appel, Emil V R; Galjatovic, Ehm A A; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Guerin, Maryse; Huby, Thierry; Lesnik, Philipppe; Meuwissen, Theo H E; Kadarmideen, Haja N; Fredholm, Merete

    2015-01-01

    The pig is a well-known animal model used to investigate genetic and mechanistic aspects of human disease biology. They are particularly useful in the context of obesity and metabolic diseases because other widely used models (e.g. mice) do not completely recapitulate key pathophysiological features associated with these diseases in humans. Therefore, we established a F2 pig resource population (n = 564) designed to elucidate the genetics underlying obesity and metabolic phenotypes. Segregation of obesity traits was ensured by using breeds highly divergent with respect to obesity traits in the parental generation. Several obesity and metabolic phenotypes were recorded (n = 35) from birth to slaughter (242 ± 48 days), including body composition determined at about two months of age (63 ± 10 days) via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanning. All pigs were genotyped using Illumina Porcine 60k SNP Beadchip and a combined linkage disequilibrium-linkage analysis was used to identify genome-wide significant associations for collected phenotypes. We identified 229 QTLs which associated with adiposity- and metabolic phenotypes at genome-wide significant levels. Subsequently comparative analyses were performed to identify the extent of overlap between previously identified QTLs in both humans and pigs. The combined analysis of a large number of obesity phenotypes has provided insight in the genetic architecture of the molecular mechanisms underlying these traits indicating that QTLs underlying similar phenotypes are clustered in the genome. Our analyses have further confirmed that genetic heterogeneity is an inherent characteristic of obesity traits most likely caused by segregation or fixation of different variants of the individual components belonging to cellular pathways in different populations. Several important genes previously associated to obesity in human studies, along with novel genes were identified. Altogether, this study provides novel insight that

  18. Locoregional Tumor Progression After Radiation Therapy Influences Overall Survival in Pediatric Patients With Neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Pai Panandiker, Atmaram S.; McGregor, Lisa; Krasin, Matthew J.; Wu Shengjie; Xiong Xiaoping; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: There is renewed attention to primary site irradiation and local control for patients with high-risk neuroblastoma (NB). We conducted a retrospective review to identify factors that might predict for locoregional tumor control and its impact on overall survival. Methods and Materials: Between July 2000 through August 2006, a total of 44 pediatric patients with NB received radiation therapy (RT) with curative intent using computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning. The median age was 3.4 years and the median cumulative dose was 23.4 Gy. Overall survival and locoregional tumor control were measured from the start of RT to the date of death or event as determined by CT/magnetic resonance imaging/meta-iodobenzylguanidine. The influence of age at irradiation, gender, race, cumulative radiation dose, International Neuroblastoma Staging System stage, treatment protocol and resection status was determined with respect to locoregional tumor control. Results: With a median follow-up of 34 months +- 21 months, locoregional tumor progression was observed in 11 (25%) and was evenly divided between primary site and adjacent nodal/visceral site failure. The influence of locoregional control reached borderline statistical significance (p = 0.06). Age (p = 0.5), dose (p = 0.6), resection status (p = 0.7), and International Neuroblastoma Staging System stage (p = 0.08) did not influence overall survival. Conclusions: Overall survival in high-risk neuroblastoma is influenced by locoregional tumor control. Despite CT-based planning, progression in adjacent nodal/visceral sites appears to be common; this requires further investigation regarding target volume definitions, dose, and the effects of systemic therapy.

  19. Phenotypic Transition as a Survival Strategy of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    ICHIKAWA, Tomotsugu; OTANI, Yoshihiro; KUROZUMI, Kazuhiko; DATE, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Malignant glioma is characterized by rapid proliferation, invasion into surrounding central nervous system tissues, and aberrant vascularization. There is increasing evidence that shows gliomas are more complex than previously thought, as each tumor comprises considerable intratumoral heterogeneity with mixtures of genetically and phenotypically distinct subclones. Heterogeneity within and across tumors is recognized as a critical factor that limits therapeutic progress for malignant glioma. Recent genotyping and expression profiling of gliomas has allowed for the creation of classification schemes that assign tumors to subtypes based on similarity to defined expression signatures. Also, malignant gliomas frequently shift their biological features upon recurrence and progression. The ability of glioma cells to resist adverse conditions such as hypoxia and metabolic stress is necessary for sustained tumor growth and strongly influences tumor behaviors. In general, glioma cells are in one of two phenotypic categories: higher proliferative activity with angiogenesis, or higher migratory activity with attenuated proliferative ability. Further, they switch phenotypic categories depending on the situation. To date, a multidimensional approach has been employed to clarify the mechanisms of phenotypic shift of glioma. Various molecular and signaling pathways are involved in phenotypic shifts of glioma, possibly with crosstalk between them. In this review, we discuss molecular and phenotypic heterogeneity of glioma cells and mechanisms of phenotypic shifts in regard to the glioma proliferation, angiogenesis, and invasion. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie phenotypic shifts of glioma may provide new insights into targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:27169497

  20. Phenotypic Transition as a Survival Strategy of Glioma.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Otani, Yoshihiro; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Date, Isao

    2016-07-15

    Malignant glioma is characterized by rapid proliferation, invasion into surrounding central nervous system tissues, and aberrant vascularization. There is increasing evidence that shows gliomas are more complex than previously thought, as each tumor comprises considerable intratumoral heterogeneity with mixtures of genetically and phenotypically distinct subclones. Heterogeneity within and across tumors is recognized as a critical factor that limits therapeutic progress for malignant glioma. Recent genotyping and expression profiling of gliomas has allowed for the creation of classification schemes that assign tumors to subtypes based on similarity to defined expression signatures. Also, malignant gliomas frequently shift their biological features upon recurrence and progression. The ability of glioma cells to resist adverse conditions such as hypoxia and metabolic stress is necessary for sustained tumor growth and strongly influences tumor behaviors. In general, glioma cells are in one of two phenotypic categories: higher proliferative activity with angiogenesis, or higher migratory activity with attenuated proliferative ability. Further, they switch phenotypic categories depending on the situation. To date, a multidimensional approach has been employed to clarify the mechanisms of phenotypic shift of glioma. Various molecular and signaling pathways are involved in phenotypic shifts of glioma, possibly with crosstalk between them. In this review, we discuss molecular and phenotypic heterogeneity of glioma cells and mechanisms of phenotypic shifts in regard to the glioma proliferation, angiogenesis, and invasion. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie phenotypic shifts of glioma may provide new insights into targeted therapeutic strategies.

  1. The transcriptome of lung tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells reveals a tumor-supporting phenotype and a microRNA signature with negative impact on clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Pyfferoen, Lotte; Brabants, Elisabeth; De Cabooter, Nancy; Heyns, Kelly; Deswarte, Kim; Vanheerswynghels, Manon; De Prijck, Sofie; Waegemans, Glenn; Hammad, Hamida; De Wever, Olivier; Mestdagh, Pieter; Lambrecht, Bart N.; Vermaelen, Karim Y.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Targeting immunomodulatory pathways has ushered a new era in lung cancer therapy. Further progress requires deeper insights into the biology of immune cells in the lung cancer micro-environment. Dendritic cells (DCs) represent a heterogeneous and highly plastic immune cell system with a central role in controlling immune responses. The intratumoral infiltration and activation status of DCs are emerging as clinically relevant parameters in lung cancer. In this study, we used an orthotopic preclinical model of lung cancer to dissect how the lung tumor micro-environment affects tissue-resident DCs and extract novel biologically and clinically relevant information. Lung tumor-infiltrating leukocytes expressing generic DC markers were found to predominantly consist of CD11b+ cells that, compare with peritumoral lung DC counterparts, strongly overexpress the T-cell inhibitory molecule PD-L1 and acquire classical surface markers of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Transcriptome analysis of these CD11b+ tumor-infiltrating DCs (TIDCs) indicates impaired antitumoral immunogenicity, confirms the skewing toward TAM-related features, and indicates exposure to a hypoxic environment. In parallel, TIDCs display a specific microRNA (miRNA) signature dominated by the prototypical lung cancer oncomir miR-31. In vitro, hypoxia drives intrinsic miR-31 expression in CD11b+ DCs. Conditioned medium of miR-31 overexpressing CD11b+ DCs induces pro-invasive lung cancer cell shape changes and is enriched with pro-metastatic soluble factors. Finally, analysis of TCGA datasets reveals that the TIDC-associated miRNA signature has a negative prognostic impact in non-small cell lung cancer. Together, these data suggest a novel mechanism through which the lung cancer micro-environment exploits the plasticity of the DC system to support tumoral progression. PMID:28197369

  2. Multiple cues influence multiple traits in the phenotypically plastic melanization of the cabbage white butterfly.

    PubMed

    Stoehr, Andrew M; Wojan, Erin M

    2016-11-01

    Phenotypic plasticity, or the ability of organisms to produce different phenotypes depending upon environmental factors, may be adaptive in varying environments. However, because environments differ in many ways and organisms consist of many traits perfect phenotype-environment matches are unlikely. Studies that investigate multiple interacting environmental factors and the plastic responses of multiple traits should increase our understanding of the limits of adaptive plasticity. We experimentally examined the effects of variation in temperature and photoperiod on the seasonally plastic, and likely adaptive, melanization of a temperate butterfly, Pieris rapae. Although several melanin-based traits changed in response to temperature and photoperiodic variation, these traits tended to fall into two 'trait groups' consisting of traits covarying positively. However, these two trait groups responded to environmental factors, particularly temperature, in independent and sometimes opposing ways, with one increasing and the other decreasing in melanization with increased temperature. In some cases, plastic responses were complex and non-linear. Furthermore, when temperature and photoperiod were manipulated orthogonally, we sometimes detected interactive effects on melanization. These complex responses to two environmental cues may reflect sub-optimal responses or may occur if the two cues together provide more reliable information about future conditions than would either cue alone. Our results highlight the limits of studies of phenotypic plasticity that consider only single environmental factors and limit treatments to just two levels.

  3. Genetic markers that influence feed efficiency phenotypes also affect cattle temperament as measured by flight speed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The measure of flight speed for cattle has been shown to be a predictive indicator of temperament and has also been associated with feed efficiency phenotypes, thus, genetic markers associated with both traits may assist with the selection of animals with calmer disposition and economic value. Chrom...

  4. BBS proteins interact genetically with the IFT pathway to influence SHH-related phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qihong; Seo, Seongjin; Bugge, Kevin; Stone, Edwin M; Sheffield, Val C

    2012-05-01

    There are numerous genes for which loss-of-function mutations do not produce apparent phenotypes even though statistically significant quantitative changes to biological pathways are observed. To evaluate the biological meaning of small effects is challenging. Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by obesity, retinopathy, polydactyly, renal malformations, learning disabilities and hypogenitalism, as well as secondary phenotypes including diabetes and hypertension. BBS knockout mice recapitulate most human phenotypes including obesity, retinal degeneration and male infertility. However, BBS knockout mice do not develop polydacyly. Here we showed that the loss of BBS genes in mice result in accumulation of Smoothened and Patched 1 in cilia and have a decreased Shh response. Knockout of Bbs7 combined with a hypomorphic Ift88 allele (orpk as a model for Shh dysfuction) results in embryonic lethality with e12.5 embryos having exencephaly, pericardial edema, cleft palate and abnormal limb development, phenotypes not observed in Bbs7(-/-) mice. Our results indicate that BBS genes modulate Shh pathway activity and interact genetically with the intraflagellar transport (IFT) pathway to play a role in mammalian development. This study illustrates an effective approach to appreciate the biological significance of a small effect.

  5. Mimicking the tumor microenvironment to regulate macrophage phenotype and assessing chemotherapeutic efficacy in embedded cancer cell/macrophage spheroid models.

    PubMed

    Tevis, Kristie M; Cecchi, Ryan J; Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2017-03-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are critical stromal components intimately involved with the progression, invasion, and metastasis of cancer cells. To address the need for an in vitro system that mimics the clinical observations of TAM localizations and subsequent functional performance, a cancer cell/macrophage spheroid model is described. The central component of the model is a triple negative breast cancer spheroid embedded in a three-dimensional collagen gel. Macrophages are incorporated in two different ways. The first is a heterospheroid, a spheroid containing both tumor cells and macrophages. The heterospheroid mimics the population of TAMs infiltrated into the tumor mass, thus being exposed to hypoxia and metabolic gradients. In the second model, macrophages are diffusely seeded in the collagen surrounding the spheroid, thus modeling TAMs in the cancer stroma. The inclusion of macrophages as a heterospheroid changes the metabolic profile, indicative of synergistic growth. In contrast, macrophages diffusely seeded in the collagen bear the same profile regardless of the presence of a tumor cell spheroid. The macrophages in the heterospheroid secrete EGF, a cytokine critical to tumor/macrophage co-migration, and an EGF inhibitor decreases the metabolic activity of the heterospheroid, which is not observed in the other systems. The increased secretion of IL-10 indicates that the heterospheroid macrophages follow an M2/TAM differentiation pathway. Lastly, the heterospheroid exhibits resistance to paclitaxel. In summary, the collagen embedded heterospheroid model promotes TAM-like characteristics, and will be of utility in cancer biology and drug discovery.

  6. An optimized disaggregation method for human lung tumors that preserves the phenotype and function of the immune cells.

    PubMed

    Quatromoni, Jon G; Singhal, Sunil; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik; Hancock, Wayne W; Albelda, Steven M; Eruslanov, Evgeniy

    2015-01-01

    Careful preparation of human tissues is the cornerstone of obtaining accurate data in immunologic studies. Despite the essential importance of tissue processing in tumor immunology and clinical medicine, current methods of tissue disaggregation have not been rigorously tested for data fidelity. Thus, we critically evaluated the current techniques available in the literature that are used to prepare human lung tumors for immunologic studies. We discovered that these approaches are successful at digesting cellular attachments and ECMs; however, these methods frequently alter the immune cell composition and/or expression of surface molecules. We thus developed a novel approach to prepare human lung tumors for immunologic studies by combining gentle mechanical manipulation with an optimized cocktail of enzymes used at low doses. This enzymatic digestion cocktail optimized cell yield and cell viability, retrieved all major tumor-associated cell populations, and maintained the expression of cell-surface markers for lineage definition and in vivo effector functions. To our knowledge, we present the first rigorously tested disaggregation method designed for human lung tumors.

  7. Influence of pulsed electromagnetic and pulsed vector magnetic potential field on the growth of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Loja, Tomas; Stehlikova, Olga; Palko, Lukas; Vrba, Kamil; Rampl, Ivan; Klabusay, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Tumor diseases cause 20% of deaths in Europe and they are the second most common cause of death and morbidity after cardiovascular diseases. Thus, tumor cells are target of many therapeutic strategies and tumor research is focused on searching more efficient and specific drugs as well as new therapeutic approaches. One of the areas of tumor research is an issue of external fields. In our work, we tested influence of a pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) and a hypothetic field of the pulsed vector magnetic potential (PVMP) on the growth of tumor cells; and further the possible growth inhibition effect of the PVMP. Both unipolar and bipolar PEMF fields of 5 mT and PVMP fields of 0 mT at frequencies of 15 Hz, 125 Hz and 625 Hz were tested on cancer cell lines derived from various types of tumors: CEM/C2 (acute lymphoblastic leukemia), SU-DHL-4 (B-cell lymphoma), COLO-320DM (colorectal adenocarcinoma), MDA-BM-468 (breast adenocarcinoma), and ZR-75-1 (ductal carcinoma). Cell morphology was observed, proliferation activity using WST assay was measured and simultaneous proportion of live, early apoptotic and dead cells was detected using flow cytometry. A PEMF of 125 Hz and 625 Hz for 24 h-48 h increased proliferation activity in the 2 types of cancer cell lines used, i.e. COLO-320DM and ZR-75-1. In contrast, any of employed methods did not confirm a significant inhibitory effect of hypothetic PVMP field on tumor cells.

  8. The timing of surgery after neoadjuvant radiotherapy influences tumor dissemination in a preclinical model

    PubMed Central

    Leroi, Natacha; Sounni, Nor Eddine; Van Overmeire, Eva; Blacher, Silvia; Marée, Raphael; Van Ginderachter, Jo; Lallemand, François; Lenaerts, Eric; Coucke, Philippe; Noel, Agnès; Martinive, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant radiotherapy (neoRT) used in cancer treatments aims at improving local tumor control and patient overall survival. The neoRT schedule and the timing of the surgical treatment (ST) are empirically based and influenced by the clinician's experience. The current study examines how the sequencing of neoRT and ST affects metastatic dissemination. In a breast carcinoma model, tumors were exposed to different neoRT schedules (2x5Gy or 5x2Gy) followed by surgery at day 4 or 11 post-RT. The impact on the tumor microenvironment and lung metastases was evaluated through immunohistochemical and flow cytometry analyses. After 2x5Gy, early ST (at day 4 post-RT) led to increased size and number of lung metastases as compared to ST performed at day 11. Inversely, after 5x2Gy neoRT, early ST protected the mice against lung metastases. This intriguing relationship between tumor aggressiveness and ST timing could not be explained by differences in classical parameters studied such as hypoxia, vessel density and matrix remodeling. The study of tumor-related inflammation and immunity reveals an increased circulating NK cell percentage following neoRT as compared to non irradiated mice. Then, radiation treatment and surgery were applied to tumor-bearing NOD/SCID mice. In the absence of NK cells, neoRT appears to increase lung metastatic dissemination as compared to non irradiated tumor-bearing mice. Altogether our data demonstrate that the neoRT schedule and the ST timing affect metastasis formation in a pre-clinical model and points out the potential role of NK cells. These findings highlight the importance to cautiously tailor the optimal window for ST following RT. PMID:26440148

  9. Role of the tumor suppressor ARF in macrophage polarization: Enhancement of the M2 phenotype in ARF-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Herranz, Sandra; Través, Paqui G; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2012-11-01

    The ARF locus is frequently inactivated in human cancer. The oncosuppressor ARF has indeed been described as a general sensor for different situation of cellular stress. We have previously demonstrated that ARF deficiency severely impairs inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo, establishing a role for ARF in the regulation of innate immunity. The aim of the present work was to get further insights into the immune functions of ARF and to evaluate its possible contribution to the polarization of macrophages toward the M1 or M2 phenotype. Our results demonstrate that resting Arf(-/-) macrophages express high levels of Ym1 and Fizz-1, two typical markers of alternatively-activated macrophages (M2). Additionally, Arf(-/-) peritoneal macrophages showed an impaired response to lipopolysaccharide (a classical inducer of M1 polaryzation) and a reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines. Moreover, upon stimulation with interleukin-4 (IL-4), an inducer of the M2 phenotype, well established M2 markers such as Fizz-1, Ym1 and arginase-1 were upregulated in Arf(-/-) as compared with wild type macrophages. Accordingly, the cytokine and chemokine profile associated with the M2 phenotype was significantly overexpressed in Arf(-/-) macrophages responding to IL-4. In addition, multiple pro-angiogenic factors such as VEGF and MMP-9 were also increased. In summary, these results indicate that ARF contributes to the polarization and functional plasticity of macrophages.

  10. Fc block treatment, dead cells exclusion, and cell aggregates discrimination concur to prevent phenotypical artifacts in the analysis of subpopulations of tumor-infiltrating CD11b(+) myelomonocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Kuonen, Francois; Touvrey, Cedric; Laurent, Julien; Ruegg, Curzio

    2010-11-01

    It is well established that cancer cells can recruit CD11b(+) myeloid cells to promote tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth. Increasing interest has emerged on the identification of subpopulations of tumor-infiltrating CD11b(+) myeloid cells using flow cytometry techniques. In the literature, however, discrepancies exist on the phenotype of these cells (Coffelt et al., Am J Pathol 2010;176:1564-1576). Since flow cytometry analysis requires particular precautions for accurate sample preparation and trustable data acquisition, analysis, and interpretation, some discrepancies might be due to technical reasons rather than biological grounds. We used the syngenic orthotopic 4T1 mammary tumor model in immunocompetent BALB/c mice to analyze and compare the phenotype of CD11b(+) myeloid cells isolated from peripheral blood and from tumors, using six-color flow cytometry. We report here that the nonspecific antibody binding through Fc receptors, the presence of dead cells and cell doublets in tumor-derived samples concur to generate artifacts in the phenotype of tumor-infiltrating CD11b(+) subpopulations. We show that the heterogeneity of tumor-infiltrating CD11b(+) subpopulations analyzed without particular precautions was greatly reduced upon Fc block treatment, dead cells, and cell doublets exclusion. Phenotyping of tumor-infiltrating CD11b(+) cells was particularly sensitive to these parameters compared to circulating CD11b(+) cells. Taken together, our results identify Fc block treatment, dead cells, and cell doublets exclusion as simple but crucial steps for the proper analysis of tumor-infiltrating CD11b(+) cell populations.

  11. Viral proliferation and expression of tumor-related gene in different chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with different tumorigenic phenotypes of avian leukosis virus subgroup J.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yajin; Liu, Litao; Niu, Yujuan; Qu, Yue; Li, Ning; Sun, Wei; Lv, Chuanwei; Wang, Pengfei; Zhang, Guihua; Liu, Sidang

    2016-10-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) causes a neoplastic disease in infected chickens. The ALV-J strain NX0101, which was isolated from broiler breeders in 2001, mainly induced formation of myeloid cell tumors. However, strain HN10PY01, which was recently isolated from laying hens, mainly induces formation of myeloid cell tumors and hemangioma. To identify the molecular pathological mechanism underlying changes in host susceptibility and tumor classification induced by these two types of ALV-J strains, chicken embryo fibroblasts derived from chickens with different genetic backgrounds (broiler breeders and laying hens) and an immortalized chicken embryo fibroblasts (DF-1) were prepared and infected with strain NX0101 or HN10PY01, respectively. The 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) and levels of ALV group-specific antigen p27 and heat shock protein 70 in the supernatant collected from the ALV-J infected cells were detected. Moreover, mRNA expression levels of tumor-related genes p53, c-myc, and Bcl-2 in ALV-J-infected cells were quantified. The results indicated that the infection of ALV-J could significantly increase mRNA expression levels of p53, c-myc, and Bcl-2 Strain HN10PY01 exhibited a greater influence on the three tumor-related genes in each of the three types of cells when compared with strain NX0101, and the TCID50 and p27 levels in the supernatant collected from HN10PY01-infected cells were higher than those collected from NX0101-infected cells. These results indicate that the infection of the two ALV-J strains influenced the gene expression levels in the infected cells, while the newly isolated strain HN10PY01 showed higher replication ability in cells and induced higher expression levels of tumor-related genes in infected cells. Furthermore, virus titers and expression levels of tumor-related genes and cellular stress responses of cells with different genetic backgrounds when infected with each of the two ALV-J strain were different

  12. Growth hormone-releasing hormone-producing pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in a multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 family with an uncommon phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sala, Elisa; Ferrante, Emanuele; Verrua, Elisa; Malchiodi, Elena; Mantovani, Giovanna; Filopanti, Marcello; Ferrero, Stefano; Pietrabissa, Andrea; Vanoli, Alessandro; La Rosa, Stefano; Zatelli, Maria C; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Verga, Uberta

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to describe a multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) family characterized by primary hyperparathyroidism, in association with acromegaly because of ectopic growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) secretion by a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in a young man and with a bronchial carcinoid in his mother. We investigate the clinical, radiological imaging, histopathologic findings, and therapy. An 18-year-old man successfully underwent subtotal parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism. A subsequent genetic analysis showed a MEN1 gene mutation. Three years later, acromegaly because of ectopic GHRH secretion was diagnosed (pituitary MRI negative and elevated GHRH levels). A search for an ectopic tumor was unsuccessful and somatostatin analog therapy was started. Successively, scintigraphy with somatostatin analogs (68-Ga-DOTATOC-PET) showed three focal areas in the pancreatic tail. Distal pancreatectomy showed multiple pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and hormonal status was normalized. Afterwards, the evaluation of the patient's mother, carrying the same mutation, indicated a primary hyperparathyroidism and a 4 cm lung mass. The patient underwent subtotal pneumonectomy and the histological analysis was consistent with the diagnosis of a typical bronchial carcinoid. In conclusion, an atypical phenotype may be recorded in MEN1 families, thus emphasizing the importance of the new imaging and surgical techniques in the diagnosis and treatment of such a rare disease.

  13. Genetic modifiers of sickle cell anemia in the BABY HUG cohort: influence on laboratory and clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Vivien A; Luo, Zhaoyu; Flanagan, Jonathan M; Howard, Thad A; Thompson, Bruce W; Wang, Winfred C; Kutlar, Abdullah; Ware, Russell E

    2013-07-01

    The recently completed BABY HUG trial investigated the safety and efficacy of hydroxyurea in infants with sickle cell anemia (SCA). To investigate the effects of known genetic modifiers, genomic DNA on 190 randomized subjects were analyzed for alpha thalassemia, beta-globin haplotype, polymorphisms affecting endogenous fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels (XmnI, BCL11A, and HBS1L-MYB), UGT1A1 promoter polymorphisms, and the common G6PD A(-) mutation. At study entry, infants with alpha thalassemia trait had significantly lower mean corpuscular volume, total bilirubin, and absolute reticulocyte count. Beta-globin haplotypes associated with milder disease had significantly higher hemoglobin and %HbF. BCL11A and XmnI polymorphisms had significant effects on baseline HbF, while UGT1A1 promoter polymorphisms significantly influenced baseline serum bilirubin. At study exit, subjects randomized to placebo still exhibited laboratory effects of alpha thalassemia and other modifiers, while those assigned hydroxyurea had treatment effects that exceeded most genetic influences. The pain phenotype was influenced by HbF modifiers in both treatment groups. These data document that genetic polymorphisms do modify laboratory and clinical phenotypes even in very young patients with SCA. The hydroxyurea effects are more potent, however, indicating that treatment criteria should not be limited to certain genetic subsets, and supporting the use of hydroxyurea for all young patients with SCA.

  14. Phenotypic Plasticity Influences the Size, Shape and Dynamics of the Geographic Distribution of an Invasive Plant

    PubMed Central

    Pichancourt, Jean-Baptiste; van Klinken, Rieks D.

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has long been suspected to allow invasive species to expand their geographic range across large-scale environmental gradients. We tested this possibility in Australia using a continental scale survey of the invasive tree Parkinsonia aculeata (Fabaceae) in twenty-three sites distributed across four climate regions and three habitat types. Using tree-level responses, we detected a trade-off between seed mass and seed number across the moisture gradient. Individual trees plastically and reversibly produced many small seeds at dry sites or years, and few big seeds at wet sites and years. Bigger seeds were positively correlated with higher seed and seedling survival rates. The trade-off, the relation between seed mass, seed and seedling survival, and other fitness components of the plant life-cycle were integrated within a matrix population model. The model confirms that the plastic response resulted in average fitness benefits across the life-cycle. Plasticity resulted in average fitness being positively maintained at the wet and dry range margins where extinction risks would otherwise have been high (“Jack-of-all-Trades” strategy JT), and fitness being maximized at the species range centre where extinction risks were already low (“Master-of-Some” strategy MS). The resulting hybrid “Jack-and-Master” strategy (JM) broadened the geographic range and amplified average fitness in the range centre. Our study provides the first empirical evidence for a JM species. It also confirms mechanistically the importance of phenotypic plasticity in determining the size, the shape and the dynamic of a species distribution. The JM allows rapid and reversible phenotypic responses to new or changing moisture conditions at different scales, providing the species with definite advantages over genetic adaptation when invading diverse and variable environments. Furthermore, natural selection pressure acting on phenotypic plasticity is predicted to result in

  15. Hemodynamic Influence on Smooth Muscle Cell Kinetics and Phenotype During Early Vein Graft Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Klein, Benjamin; Destephens, Anthony; Dumeny, Leanne; Hu, Qiongyao; He, Yong; O'Malley, Kerri; Jiang, Zhihua; Tran-Son-Tay, Roger; Berceli, Scott

    2017-03-01

    Pathologic vascular adaptation following local injury is the primary driver for accelerated intimal hyperplasia and an occlusive phenotype. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation within the wall, and migration into the developing intima, is a major component of this remodeling response. The primary objective in the current study was to investigate the effect of the local biomechanical forces on early vein graft adaptation, specifically focusing on the spatial and temporal response of SMC proliferation and conversion from a contractile to synthetic architecture. Taking advantage of the differential adaptation that occurs during exposure to divergent flow environments, vein grafts were implanted in rabbits to create two distinct flow environments and harvested at times ranging from 2 h to 28 days. Using an algorithm for the virtual reconstruction of unfixed, histologic specimens, immunohistochemical tracking of DNA synthesis, and high-throughput transcriptional analysis, the spatial and temporal changes in graft morphology, cell proliferation, and SMC phenotype were catalogued. Notable findings include a burst of cell proliferation at 7 days post-implantation, which was significantly augmented by exposure to a reduced flow environment. Compared to the adjacent media, proliferation rates were 3-fold greater in the intima, and a specific spatial distribution of these proliferating cells was identified, with a major peak in the sub-endothelial region and a second peak centering on the internal elastic lamina. Genomic markers of a contractile SMC phenotype were reduced as early as 2 h post-implantation and reached a nadir at 7 days. Network analysis of upstream regulatory pathways identified GATA6 and KLF5 as important transcription factors that regulate this shift in SMC phenotype.

  16. Sporadic inclusion body myositis: phenotypic variability and influence of HLA-DR3 in a cohort of 57 Australian cases.

    PubMed

    Needham, M; James, I; Corbett, A; Day, T; Christiansen, F; Phillips, B; Mastaglia, F L

    2008-09-01

    There have been few studies of the variability in the clinical phenotype in sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) and it is not known whether the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype influences the phenotype and course of the disease. We studied a large cohort of patients with sIBM in order to determine the degree of phenotypic variability and different modes of presentation, as well as the influence of HLA haplotypes. A cross-sectional study of 57 biopsy-proven sIBM cases from three Australian centres was performed. Patients were interviewed and examined by a single investigator, and had HLA typing and autoantibody studies. Although the initial symptoms in the majority of cases were attributable to quadriceps weakness (79%), a proportion of patients presented due to finger weakness (12%), foot drop (7%) or dysphagia (1.8%). Although the majority had the classic combination of quadriceps and forearm muscle involvement, some patients had predominantly forearm weakness with sparing of the quadriceps, or severe involvement of the anterior tibial muscles. Asymmetrical involvement was common (82%), particularly of the forearm muscles, with the non-dominant side being more severely affected in most cases. Carriage of the HLA-DRB1*0301 (DR3) allele was associated with lower quadriceps muscle strength and a more rapid decline in strength. The findings emphasise the variability in the mode of presentation, patterns of muscle involvement and clinical course of sIBM in this population, and indicate that the HLA-DRB1*0301 (DR3) allele may influence the rate of progression as well as susceptibility to the disease.

  17. Genotypic influence of α-deletions on the phenotype of Indian sickle cell anemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sanjay; Pandey, Sweta; Mishra, Rahasya Mani; Sharma, Monica

    2011-01-01

    Background Some reports have shown that co-inheritance of α-thalassemia and sickle cell disease improves hematological parameters and results in a relatively mild clinical picture for patients; however, the exact molecular basis and clinical significance of the interaction between α-thalassemia and sickle cell disease in India has not yet been described. There is little agreement on the clinical effects of α-thalassemia on the phenotype of sickle cell disease. Methods Complete blood count and red cell indices were measured by an automated cell analyzer. Quantitative assessment of hemoglobin variants HbF, HbA, HbA2, and HbS was performed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). DNA extraction was performed using the phenol-chloroform method, and molecular study for common α-deletions was done by gap-PCR. Results Out of 60 sickle cell anemia patients, the α-thalassemia genotype was found in 18 patients. Three patients had the triplicated α-genotype (Anti α-3.7 kb), and the remaining patients did not have α-deletions. This study indicates that patients with co-existing α-thalassemia and sickle cell disease had a mild phenotype, significantly improved hematological parameters, and fewer blood transfusions than the patients with sickle cell anemia without co-existing α-deletions. Conclusion Co-existence of α-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia has significant effects on the phenotype of Indian sickle cell patients. PMID:22065975

  18. Ocean acidification influences host DNA methylation and phenotypic plasticity in environmentally susceptible corals.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Hollie M; Davidson, Jennifer M; Gates, Ruth D

    2016-10-01

    As climate change challenges organismal fitness by creating a phenotype-environment mismatch, phenotypic plasticity generated by epigenetic mechanisms (e.g., DNA methylation) can provide a temporal buffer for genetic adaptation. Epigenetic mechanisms may be crucial for sessile benthic marine organisms, such as reef-building corals, where ocean acidification (OA) and warming reflect in strong negative responses. We tested the potential for scleractinian corals to exhibit phenotypic plasticity associated with a change in DNA methylation in response to OA. Clonal coral fragments of the environmentally sensitive Pocillopora damicornis and more environmentally robust Montipora capitata were exposed to fluctuating ambient pH (7.9-7.65) and low pH (7.6-7.35) conditions in common garden tanks for ~6 weeks. M. capitata responded weakly, or acclimated more quickly, to OA, with no difference in calcification, minimal separation of metabolomic profiles, and no change in DNA methylation between treatments. Conversely, P. damicornis exhibited diminished calcification at low pH, stronger separation in metabolomic profiles, and responsiveness of DNA methylation to treatment. Our data suggest corals differ in their temporal dynamics and sensitivity for environmentally triggered real-time epigenetic reprogramming. The generation of potentially heritable plasticity via environmental induction of DNA methylation provides an avenue for assisted evolution applications in corals under rapid climate change.

  19. [Phenotype of frailty: the influence of each item in determining frailty in community-dwelling elderly - The Fibra Study].

    PubMed

    Silva, Silvia Lanziotti Azevedo da; Neri, Anita Liberalesso; Ferrioli, Eduardo; Lourenço, Roberto Alves; Dias, Rosângela Corrêa

    2016-11-01

    The phenotype of frailty is used to assess frailty among the elderly by examining the following items: weight loss; exhaustion; low level of physical activity; weakness; and slow gait speed. The aim of the study was to evaluate the contribution of each item to determine the frailty syndrome among elderly Brazilians. The analysis was done using Multinomial Logistic Regression. The total sample of 5532 randomly selected elderly people in many cities in Brazil between December 2008 and September 2009 was assessed using the phenotype of frailty. The most frequent items were level of physical activity, followed by muscular weakness and slow gait speed. Items that were more likely to develop frailty, when positive, were slow gait speed (OR = 10.50, 95%CI 8.55 - 12.90, p <0.001) and muscular weakness (OR = 7.31, 95%CI 6,02 - 8,86, p <0.001). The final model with five items explained 99.6% of frailty in the sample. These results suggested that the level of physical activity, weakness and slow gait speed were the items that most influence the determination of frailty, however the application of all items of the phenotype of frailty is the best way to assess frailty.

  20. OBESITY PHENOTYPE INFLUENCES TREND IN PULMONARY FUNCTION INDICES RECOVERY FOLLOWING ABDOMINAL SURGERY: PRELIMINARY REPORT FROM A NIGERIAN POPULATION.

    PubMed

    Akinremi, A A; Orotokun, A E; Sanya, A O

    2014-09-01

    Obesity phenotypes are known to have varying effects on pulmonary function but their effects on trends of pulmonary function indices' recovery among abdominal surgery patients is unclear. To investigate the influence of obesity phenotype on pulmonary function trend among abdominal surgery patients. An observational study involving 28 female patients aged 20-60 years who were never-smokers. Participants were classified into four groups namely: healthy BMI without abdominal obesity; healthy BMI with abdominal obesity; overweight/obese without abdominal obesity; and overweight/obese with abdominal obesity. Pulmonary function indices (FEV1, FVC and PEF) were taken day-1 pre-op; 5(th), 6(th) and 7(th) day post-surgery. Data were summarized using mean and standard deviation, while Kruskal-Wallis and Jonckheere trend test were used to test for differences and trend across the groups at p < 0.05. Participants were comparable in age and height. Pre-op, group IV had the lowest pulmonary function indices and group I had the highest FEV1, FVC. At 7-day post-op, there was significant difference in pulmonary function indices across the groups, while trend test showed that obesity pattern had significant effect on the trend of FEV1, FVC and PER with group I having the highest values, followed by group III and group II, while group IV had the lowest values. Obesity phenotype had significant effect on trend of pulmonary function indices among participants. Patients with abdominal obesity, irrespective of BMI, had poor pulmonary function.

  1. Accumulation of FOXP3+T-cells in the tumor microenvironment is associated with an epithelial-mesenchymal-transition-type tumor budding phenotype and is an independent prognostic factor in surgically resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wartenberg, Martin; Zlobec, Inti; Perren, Aurel; Koelzer, Viktor Hendrik; Gloor, Beat; Lugli, Alessandro; Eva, Karamitopoulou

    2015-01-01

    Here we explore the role of the interplay between host immune response and epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT)-Type tumor-budding on the outcome of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). CD4+, CD8+, and FOXP3+T-cells as well as iNOS+ (M1) and CD163+-macrophages (M2) were assessed on multipunch tissue-microarrays containing 120 well-characterized PDACs, precursor lesions (PanINs) and corresponding normal tissue. Counts were normalized for the percentage of tumor/spot and associated with the clinico-pathological features, including peritumoral (PTB) and intratumoral (ITB) EMT-Type tumor-budding and outcome. Increased FOXP3+T-cell-counts and CD163-macrophages and decreased CD8+T-cell-counts were observed in PDACs compared with normal tissues and PanINs (p < 0.0001). Increased peritumoral FOXP3+T-cell-counts correlated significantly with venous invasion, distant metastasis, R1-status, high-grade ITB, PTB and independently with reduced survival. Increased intratumoral FOXP3+T-cells correlated with lymphatic invasion, N1-stage, PTB and marginally with adverse outcome. High peritumoral CD163-counts correlated with venous invasion, PTB and ITB. High intratumoral CD163-counts correlated with higher T-stage and PTB. PDAC-microenvironment displays a tumor-favoring immune-cell composition especially in the immediate environment of the tumor-buds that promotes further growth and indicates a close interaction of the immune response with the EMT-process. Increased peritumoral FOXP3+T-cell density is identified as an independent adverse prognostic factor in PDAC. Patients with phenotypically aggressive PDACs may profit from targeted immunotherapy against FOXP3. PMID:25669968

  2. What is influencing the phenotype of the common homozygous polymerase-γ mutation p.Ala467Thr?

    PubMed Central

    Neeve, Vivienne C. M.; Samuels, David C.; Bindoff, Laurence A.; van den Bosch, Bianca; Van Goethem, Gert; Smeets, Hubert; Lombès, Anne; Jardel, Claude; Hirano, Michio; DiMauro, Salvatore; De Vries, Maaike; Smeitink, Jan; Smits, Bart W.; de Coo, Ireneus F. M.; Saft, Carsten; Klopstock, Thomas; Keiling, Bianca-Cortina; Czermin, Birgit; Abicht, Angela; Lochmüller, Hanns; Hudson, Gavin; Gorman, Grainne G.; Turnbull, Doug M.; Taylor, Robert W.; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Chinnery, Patrick F.

    2012-01-01

    Polymerase-γ (POLG) is a major human disease gene and may account for up to 25% of all mitochondrial diseases in the UK and in Italy. To date, >150 different pathogenic mutations have been described in POLG. Some mutations behave as both dominant and recessive alleles, but an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern is much more common. The most frequently detected pathogenic POLG mutation in the Caucasian population is c.1399G>A leading to a p.Ala467Thr missense mutation in the linker domain of the protein. Although many patients are homozygous for this mutation, clinical presentation is highly variable, ranging from childhood-onset Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome to adult-onset sensory ataxic neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoparesis. The reasons for this are not clear, but familial clustering of phenotypes suggests that modifying factors may influence the clinical manifestation. In this study, we collected clinical, histological and biochemical data from 68 patients carrying the homozygous p.Ala467Thr mutation from eight diagnostic centres in Europe and the USA. We performed DNA analysis in 44 of these patients to search for a genetic modifier within POLG and flanking regions potentially involved in the regulation of gene expression, and extended our analysis to other genes affecting mitochondrial DNA maintenance (POLG2, PEO1 and ANT1). The clinical presentation included almost the entire phenotypic spectrum of all known POLG mutations. Interestingly, the clinical presentation was similar in siblings, implying a genetic basis for the phenotypic variability amongst homozygotes. However, the p.Ala467Thr allele was present on a shared haplotype in each affected individual, and there was no correlation between the clinical presentation and genetic variants in any of the analysed nuclear genes. Patients with mitochondrial DNA haplogroup U developed epilepsy significantly less frequently than patients with any other mitochondrial DNA haplotype. Epilepsy was reported

  3. What is influencing the phenotype of the common homozygous polymerase-γ mutation p.Ala467Thr?

    PubMed

    Neeve, Vivienne C M; Samuels, David C; Bindoff, Laurence A; van den Bosch, Bianca; Van Goethem, Gert; Smeets, Hubert; Lombès, Anne; Jardel, Claude; Hirano, Michio; Dimauro, Salvatore; De Vries, Maaike; Smeitink, Jan; Smits, Bart W; de Coo, Ireneus F M; Saft, Carsten; Klopstock, Thomas; Keiling, Bianca-Cortina; Czermin, Birgit; Abicht, Angela; Lochmüller, Hanns; Hudson, Gavin; Gorman, Grainne G; Turnbull, Doug M; Taylor, Robert W; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Chinnery, Patrick F; Horvath, Rita

    2012-12-01

    Polymerase-γ (POLG) is a major human disease gene and may account for up to 25% of all mitochondrial diseases in the UK and in Italy. To date, >150 different pathogenic mutations have been described in POLG. Some mutations behave as both dominant and recessive alleles, but an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern is much more common. The most frequently detected pathogenic POLG mutation in the Caucasian population is c.1399G>A leading to a p.Ala467Thr missense mutation in the linker domain of the protein. Although many patients are homozygous for this mutation, clinical presentation is highly variable, ranging from childhood-onset Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome to adult-onset sensory ataxic neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoparesis. The reasons for this are not clear, but familial clustering of phenotypes suggests that modifying factors may influence the clinical manifestation. In this study, we collected clinical, histological and biochemical data from 68 patients carrying the homozygous p.Ala467Thr mutation from eight diagnostic centres in Europe and the USA. We performed DNA analysis in 44 of these patients to search for a genetic modifier within POLG and flanking regions potentially involved in the regulation of gene expression, and extended our analysis to other genes affecting mitochondrial DNA maintenance (POLG2, PEO1 and ANT1). The clinical presentation included almost the entire phenotypic spectrum of all known POLG mutations. Interestingly, the clinical presentation was similar in siblings, implying a genetic basis for the phenotypic variability amongst homozygotes. However, the p.Ala467Thr allele was present on a shared haplotype in each affected individual, and there was no correlation between the clinical presentation and genetic variants in any of the analysed nuclear genes. Patients with mitochondrial DNA haplogroup U developed epilepsy significantly less frequently than patients with any other mitochondrial DNA haplotype. Epilepsy was reported

  4. Retinoblastoma-binding protein 2 (RBP2) is frequently expressed in neuroendocrine tumors and promotes the neoplastic phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, E C; Trillo-Tinoco, J; Struckhoff, A P; Vijayaraghavan, J; Del Valle, L; Crabtree, J S

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), which can have survival rates as low as 4%, currently have limited therapeutic interventions available highlighting the dire need for the identification of novel biological targets for use as new potential drug targets. One such potential target is retinoblastoma-binding protein 2 (RBP2), an H3K4 demethylase whose overexpression has been linked to cancer formation and metastasis in non-endocrine tumor types. We measured RBP2 mRNA and protein levels in enteropancreatic NETs by measuring RBP2 in matched human normal and NET tissue samples. Further, proliferation, migration, invasion and colony formation assays were performed in the physiologically relevant NET cell lines βlox5, H727 and QGP-1 to understand the role of RBP2 and its demethylase activity on end points of tumorigenesis. Our data indicate a strong correlation between RBP2 mRNA and protein expression in NET specimens. RBP2 was overexpressed relative to tissue-matched normal controls in 80% of the human tumors measured. In vitro studies showed RBP2 overexpression significantly increased proliferation, migration, invasion and colony formation, whereas knockdown significantly decreases the same parameters in a demethylase-independent manner. The cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p57 decreased with RBP2 overexpression and increased upon its depletion, suggesting a regulatory role for RBP2 in cellular proliferation. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that the aberrant overexpression of RBP2 is a frequent contributing factor to tumor formation and metastasis in enteropancreatic NETs. PMID:27548814

  5. Retinoblastoma-binding protein 2 (RBP2) is frequently expressed in neuroendocrine tumors and promotes the neoplastic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Maggi, E C; Trillo-Tinoco, J; Struckhoff, A P; Vijayaraghavan, J; Del Valle, L; Crabtree, J S

    2016-08-22

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), which can have survival rates as low as 4%, currently have limited therapeutic interventions available highlighting the dire need for the identification of novel biological targets for use as new potential drug targets. One such potential target is retinoblastoma-binding protein 2 (RBP2), an H3K4 demethylase whose overexpression has been linked to cancer formation and metastasis in non-endocrine tumor types. We measured RBP2 mRNA and protein levels in enteropancreatic NETs by measuring RBP2 in matched human normal and NET tissue samples. Further, proliferation, migration, invasion and colony formation assays were performed in the physiologically relevant NET cell lines βlox5, H727 and QGP-1 to understand the role of RBP2 and its demethylase activity on end points of tumorigenesis. Our data indicate a strong correlation between RBP2 mRNA and protein expression in NET specimens. RBP2 was overexpressed relative to tissue-matched normal controls in 80% of the human tumors measured. In vitro studies showed RBP2 overexpression significantly increased proliferation, migration, invasion and colony formation, whereas knockdown significantly decreases the same parameters in a demethylase-independent manner. The cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p57 decreased with RBP2 overexpression and increased upon its depletion, suggesting a regulatory role for RBP2 in cellular proliferation. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that the aberrant overexpression of RBP2 is a frequent contributing factor to tumor formation and metastasis in enteropancreatic NETs.

  6. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype at invasion front of squamous cell carcinoma of the penis influences oncological outcomes.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Isabela Werneck; Souza, Maria José L; da Costa, Walter Henriques; Amâncio, Alice M; Fonseca, Francisco Paulo; Zequi, Stenio de Cassio; Lopes, Ademar; Guimarães, Gustavo Cardoso; Soares, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Our aims were to evaluate epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) as a useful prognostic marker in penile carcinoma (PC), and establish an objective criterion to define EMT in PC specimens. A total of 149 consecutive cases surgically treated for PC were retrospectively selected. E-cadherin (E-CAD) and vimentin immunohistochemical expressions were evaluated. A combined analysis was performed using both markers to determine EMT status. To establish a normal control to E-CAD expression, we included 14 cases from circumcisions from patients without any neoplastic disease and 77 cases of tumor-free margins. The analyses of tumor samples were evaluated in 2 different areas of the tumor. The first one was in the tumor core. The second analyses were performed on the deepest infiltrative edge of the tumor, nominated invasion front. Cases were classified into EMT absent group, partial EMT group and complete EMT group. Overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were analyzed. Kaplan-Meier curves and the log-rank test were used. Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine which variables influenced survival. Tumor specimens presented a significant loss of expression of E-CAD when compared with normal epithelium. Vimentin expression in more than 10% of tumor cells was observed in 50 cases. EMT status was associated with histologic grade, pattern of invasion, lymph node metastasis, and perineural and vascular invasion. Further, 10-year OS and CSS rates in patients with presence and absence of complete EMT status were 38.0% and 55.6%; and 48.0% and 91.9%, respectively. EMT status significantly affected CSS and OS rates even after patients were grouped based on lymph node involvement status. The presence of complete EMT status was associated with both CSS and OS rates. Patients in the complete EMT group had a higher risk of death from cancer (hazard ratio = 7.6, P<0.001) and overall death (hazard ratio = 3.0, P<0.001). Our study represents an evidence of the

  7. Role of Tumor Microenvironment and the FGF Signaling Axis on Differentiation and Emergence of the Neuroendocrine Phenotype in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    Fen Wang CaFGFR I carrier plasmid NMG1025 pGL2-PE-178 Dr. Amparo Cano2 E-cadherin promoter Luciferase construct NMG 1027 pS2 Dr. Aguilar-Cordova 3...51 1, 2003. Cano A, Perez-Moreno MA, Rodrigo I, Locascio A, Blanco MJ, del Barrio MG, Portillo F , and Nieto MA. The transcription factor Snail...phenotype. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry 91(4):671-683, 2004. Foster BA, Evangelou AI, Gingrich JR, Kaplan PJ, DeMayo F , and Greenberg NM. Enforced

  8. Environmental influences on the Indo-Pacific octocoral Isis hippuris Linnaeus 1758 (Alcyonacea: Isididae): genetic fixation or phenotypic plasticity?

    PubMed

    Rowley, Sonia J; Pochon, Xavier; Watling, Les

    2015-01-01

    As conspicuous modular components of benthic marine habitats, gorgonian (sea fan) octocorals have perplexed taxonomists for centuries through their shear diversity, particularly throughout the Indo-Pacific. Phenotypic incongruence within and between seemingly unitary lineages across contrasting environments can provide the raw material to investigate processes of disruptive selection. Two distinct phenotypes of the Isidid Isis hippurisLinnaeus, 1758 partition between differing reef environments: long-branched bushy colonies on degraded reefs, and short-branched multi/planar colonies on healthy reefs within the Wakatobi Marine National Park (WMNP), Indonesia. Multivariate analyses reveal phenotypic traits between morphotypes were likely integrated primarily at the colony level with increased polyp density and consistently smaller sclerite dimensions at the degraded site. Sediment load and turbidity, hence light availability, primarily influenced phenotypic differences between the two sites. This distinct morphological dissimilarity between the two sites is a reliable indicator of reef health; selection primarily acting on colony morphology, porosity through branching structure, as well as sclerite diversity and size. ITS2 sequence and predicted RNA secondary structure further revealed intraspecific variation between I. hippuris morphotypes relative to such environments (ΦST = 0.7683, P < 0.001). This evidence suggests-but does not confirm-that I. hippuris morphotypes within the WMNP are two separate species; however, to what extent and taxonomic assignment requires further investigation across its full geographic distribution. Incongruence between colonies present in the WMNP with tenuously described Isis alternatives (Isis reticulataNutting, 1910, Isis minorbrachyblastaZou, Huang & Wang, 1991), questions the validity of such assignments. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses confirm early taxonomic suggestion that the characteristic jointed axis of the Isididae is in

  9. Environmental influences on the Indo–Pacific octocoral Isis hippuris Linnaeus 1758 (Alcyonacea: Isididae): genetic fixation or phenotypic plasticity?

    PubMed Central

    Pochon, Xavier; Watling, Les

    2015-01-01

    As conspicuous modular components of benthic marine habitats, gorgonian (sea fan) octocorals have perplexed taxonomists for centuries through their shear diversity, particularly throughout the Indo–Pacific. Phenotypic incongruence within and between seemingly unitary lineages across contrasting environments can provide the raw material to investigate processes of disruptive selection. Two distinct phenotypes of the Isidid Isis hippuris Linnaeus, 1758 partition between differing reef environments: long-branched bushy colonies on degraded reefs, and short-branched multi/planar colonies on healthy reefs within the Wakatobi Marine National Park (WMNP), Indonesia. Multivariate analyses reveal phenotypic traits between morphotypes were likely integrated primarily at the colony level with increased polyp density and consistently smaller sclerite dimensions at the degraded site. Sediment load and turbidity, hence light availability, primarily influenced phenotypic differences between the two sites. This distinct morphological dissimilarity between the two sites is a reliable indicator of reef health; selection primarily acting on colony morphology, porosity through branching structure, as well as sclerite diversity and size. ITS2 sequence and predicted RNA secondary structure further revealed intraspecific variation between I. hippuris morphotypes relative to such environments (ΦST = 0.7683, P < 0.001). This evidence suggests—but does not confirm—that I. hippuris morphotypes within the WMNP are two separate species; however, to what extent and taxonomic assignment requires further investigation across its full geographic distribution. Incongruence between colonies present in the WMNP with tenuously described Isis alternatives (Isis reticulata Nutting, 1910, Isis minorbrachyblasta Zou, Huang & Wang, 1991), questions the validity of such assignments. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses confirm early taxonomic suggestion that the characteristic jointed axis of the

  10. Influence of internal fixation systems on radiation therapy for spinal tumor.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingfeng; Yan, Lei; Wang, Jianping; Cai, Lin; Hu, Dongcai

    2015-07-08

    In this study, the influence of internal fixation systems on radiation therapy for spinal tumor was investigated in order to derive a theoretical basis for adjustment of radiation dose for patients with spinal tumor and internal fixation. Based on a common method of internal fixation after resection of spinal tumor, different models of spinal internal fixation were constructed using the lumbar vertebra of fresh domestic pigs and titanium alloy as the internal fixation system. Variations in radiation dose in the vertebral body and partial spinal cord in different types of internal fixation were studied under the same radiation condition (6 MV and 600 mGy) in different fixation models and compared with those irradiated based on the treatment planning system (TPS). Our results showed that spinal internal fixation materials have great impact on the radiation dose absorbed by spinal tumors. Under the same radiation condition, the influence of anterior internal fixation material or combined anterior and posterior approach on radiation dose at the anterior border of the vertebral body was the greatest. Regardless of the kinds of internal fixation method employed, radiation dose at the anterior border of the vertebral body was significantly different from that at other positions. Notably, the influence of posterior internal fixation material on the anterior wall of the vertebral canal was the greatest. X-ray attenuation and scattering should be taken into consideration for most patients with bone metastasis that receive fixation of metal implants. Further evaluation should then be conducted with modified TPS in order to minimize the potentially harmful effects of inappropriate radiation dose.

  11. Ethanol exposure induces the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype and lethal tumor metabolism: implications for breast cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Alvarez, Rosa; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Lin, Zhao; Lamb, Rebecca; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Rubin, Emanuel; Lisanti, Michael P

    2013-01-15

    Little is known about how alcohol consumption promotes the onset of human breast cancer(s). One hypothesis is that ethanol induces metabolic changes in the tumor microenvironment, which then enhances epithelial tumor growth. To experimentally test this hypothesis, we used a co-culture system consisting of human breast cancer cells (MCF7) and hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts. Here, we show that ethanol treatment (100 mM) promotes ROS production and oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts, which is sufficient to induce myofibroblastic differentiation. Oxidative stress in stromal fibroblasts also results in the onset of autophagy/mitophagy, driving the induction of ketone body production in the tumor microenvironment. Interestingly, ethanol has just the opposite effect in epithelial cancer cells, where it confers autophagy resistance, elevates mitochondrial biogenesis and induces key enzymes associated with ketone re-utilization (ACAT1/OXCT1). During co-culture, ethanol treatment also converts MCF7 cells from an ER(+) to an ER(-) status, which is thought to be associated with "stemness," more aggressive behavior and a worse prognosis. Thus, ethanol treatment induces ketone production in cancer-associated fibroblasts and ketone re-utilization in epithelial cancer cells, fueling tumor cell growth via oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS). This "two-compartment" metabolic model is consistent with previous historical observations that ethanol is first converted to acetaldehyde (which induces oxidative stress) and then ultimately to acetyl-CoA (a high-energy mitochondrial fuel), or can be used to synthesize ketone bodies. As such, our results provide a novel mechanism by which alcohol consumption could metabolically convert "low-risk" breast cancer patients to "high-risk" status, explaining tumor recurrence or disease progression. Hence, our findings have clear implications for both breast cancer prevention and therapy. Remarkably, our results also show that

  12. X-chromosomal inactivation directly influences the phenotypic manifestation of X-linked protoporphyria

    PubMed Central

    Brancaleoni, V.; Balwani, M.; Granata, F.; Graziadei, G.; Missineo, P.; Fiorentino, V.; Fustinoni, S.; Cappellini, M.D.; Naik, H.; Desnick, R.J.; Di Pierro, E.

    2015-01-01

    X-linked protoporphyria (XLP), a rare erythropoietic porphyria, results from terminal exon gain-of-function mutations in the ALAS2 gene causing increased ALAS2 activity and markedly increased erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels. Patients present with severe cutaneous photosensitivity and may develop liver dysfunction. XLP was originally reported as X-linked dominant with 100% penetrance in males and females. We characterized 11 heterozygous females from six unrelated XLP families and show markedly varying phenotypic and biochemical heterogeneity, reflecting the degree of X-chromsomal inactivation of the mutant gene. ALAS2 sequencing identified the specific mutation and confirmed heterozygosity among the females. Clinical history, plasma and erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels were determined. Methylation assays of the androgen receptor and zinc-finger MYM type 3 short tandem repeat polymorphisms estimated each heterozygotes X-chromosomal inactivation pattern. Heterozygotes with equal or increased skewing, favoring expression of the wild-type allele had no clinical symptoms and only slightly increased erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentrations and/or frequency of protoporphyrin-containing peripheral blood fluorocytes. When the wild-type allele was preferentially inactivated, heterozygous females manifested the disease phenotype and had both higher erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels and circulating fluorocytes. These findings confirm that the previous dominant classification of XLP is inappropriate and genetically misleading, as the disorder is more appropriately designated XLP. PMID:25615817

  13. HFE p.H63D polymorphism does not influence ALS phenotype and survival.

    PubMed

    Chiò, Adriano; Mora, Gabriele; Sabatelli, Mario; Caponnetto, Claudia; Lunetta, Christian; Traynor, Bryan J; Johnson, Janel O; Nalls, Mike A; Calvo, Andrea; Moglia, Cristina; Borghero, Giuseppe; Monsurrò, Maria Rosaria; La Bella, Vincenzo; Volanti, Paolo; Simone, Isabella; Salvi, Fabrizio; Logullo, Francesco O; Nilo, Riva; Giannini, Fabio; Mandrioli, Jessica; Tanel, Raffaella; Murru, Maria Rita; Mandich, Paola; Zollino, Marcella; Conforti, Francesca L; Penco, Silvana; Brunetti, Maura; Barberis, Marco; Restagno, Gabriella

    2015-10-01

    It has been recently reported that the p.His63Asp polymorphism of the HFE gene accelerates disease progression both in the SOD1 transgenic mouse and in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. We have evaluated the effect of HFE p.His63Asp polymorphism on the phenotype in 1351 Italian ALS patients (232 of Sardinian ancestry). Patients were genotyped for the HFE p.His63Asp polymorphism (CC, GC, and GG). All patients were also assessed for C9ORF72, TARDBP, SOD1, and FUS mutations. Of the 1351 ALS patients, 363 (29.2%) were heterozygous (GC) for the p.His63Asp polymorphism and 30 (2.2%) were homozygous for the minor allele (GG). Patients with CC, GC, and GG polymorphisms did not significantly differ by age at onset, site of onset of symptoms, and survival; however, in SOD1 patients with CG or GG polymorphism had a significantly longer survival than those with a CC polymorphism. Differently from what observed in the mouse model of ALS, the HFE p.His63Asp polymorphism has no effect on ALS phenotype in this large series of Italian ALS patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Phenotypic heterogeneity influences the behavior of rat aortic smooth muscle cells in collagen lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Orlandi, Augusto . E-mail: orlandi@uniroma2.it; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Gabbiani, Giulio; Spagnoli, Luigi Giusto; Ehrlich, Paul H.

    2005-12-10

    Phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in atherosclerosis and restenosis involves responses to the surrounding microenvironment. SMCs obtained by enzymatic digestion from tunica media of newborn, young adult (YA) and old rats and from the thickened intima (TI) and underlying media of young adult rat aortas 15 days after ballooning were entrapped in floating populated collagen lattice (PCL). TI-SMCs elongated but were poor at PCL contraction and remodeling and expressed less {alpha}2 integrin compared to other SMCs that appeared more dendritic. During early phases of PCL contraction, SMCs showed a marked decrease in the expression of {alpha}-smooth muscle actin and myosin. SMCs other than TI-SMCs required 7 days to re-express {alpha}-smooth muscle actin and myosin. Only TI-SMCs in PCL were able to divide in 48 h, with a greater proportion in S and G2-M cell cycle phases compared to other SMCs. Anti-{alpha}2 integrin antibody markedly inhibited contraction but not proliferation in YA-SMC-PLCs; anti-{alpha}1 and anti-{alpha}2 integrin antibodies induced a similar slight inhibition in TI-SMC-PCLs. Finally, TI-SMCs rapidly migrated from PCL on plastic reacquiring their epithelioid phenotype. Heterogeneity in proliferation and cytoskeleton as well the capacity to remodel the extracellular matrix are maintained, when SMCs are suspended in PCLs.

  15. Extraordinary transgressive phenotypes of hybrid tomato are influenced by epigenetics and small silencing RNAs.

    PubMed

    Shivaprasad, Padubidri V; Dunn, Ruth M; Santos, Bruno Acm; Bassett, Andrew; Baulcombe, David C

    2012-01-18

    Hybrid organisms may fail to develop, be sterile or they may be more vigorous than either of the parents. Examples of hybrid vigour or hybrid necrosis in the F1 are often not inherited stably in subsequent generations if they are associated with overdominance. There can also be transgressive phenotypes that are inherited stably in these later generations, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here we have investigated the possibility that stable transgressive phenotypes in the progeny of crosses between cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cv. M82) and a wild relative (Solanum pennellii, accession LA716) are associated with micro or small interfering(si) RNAs. We identified loci from which these small(s)RNAs were more abundant in hybrids than in either parent and we show that accumulation of such transgressive sRNAs correlated with suppression of the corresponding target genes. In one instance this effect was associated with hypermethylation of the corresponding genomic DNA. Our results illustrate a potential role of transgressive sRNAs in plant breeding and in natural evolution with wild plants.

  16. Extraordinary transgressive phenotypes of hybrid tomato are influenced by epigenetics and small silencing RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Shivaprasad, Padubidri V; Dunn, Ruth M; Santos, Bruno ACM; Bassett, Andrew; Baulcombe, David C

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid organisms may fail to develop, be sterile or they may be more vigorous than either of the parents. Examples of hybrid vigour or hybrid necrosis in the F1 are often not inherited stably in subsequent generations if they are associated with overdominance. There can also be transgressive phenotypes that are inherited stably in these later generations, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here we have investigated the possibility that stable transgressive phenotypes in the progeny of crosses between cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cv. M82) and a wild relative (Solanum pennellii, accession LA716) are associated with micro or small interfering(si) RNAs. We identified loci from which these small(s)RNAs were more abundant in hybrids than in either parent and we show that accumulation of such transgressive sRNAs correlated with suppression of the corresponding target genes. In one instance this effect was associated with hypermethylation of the corresponding genomic DNA. Our results illustrate a potential role of transgressive sRNAs in plant breeding and in natural evolution with wild plants. PMID:22179699

  17. Phenotypic and genomic analysis of multiple myeloma minimal residual disease tumor cells: a new model to understand chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Bruno; Corchete, Luis A; Vidriales, Maria-Belen; Puig, Noemi; Maiso, Patricia; Rodriguez, Idoia; Alignani, Diego; Burgos, Leire; Sanchez, Maria-Luz; Barcena, Paloma; Echeveste, Maria-Asuncion; Hernandez, Miguel T; García-Sanz, Ramón; Ocio, Enrique M; Oriol, Albert; Gironella, Mercedes; Palomera, Luis; De Arriba, Felipe; Gonzalez, Yolanda; Johnson, Sarah K; Epstein, Joshua; Barlogie, Bart; Lahuerta, Juan José; Blade, Joan; Orfao, Alberto; Mateos, María-Victoria; San Miguel, Jesús F

    2016-04-14

    Persistence of chemoresistant minimal residual disease (MRD) plasma cells (PCs) is associated with inferior survival in multiple myeloma (MM). Thus, characterization of the minor MRD subclone may represent a unique model to understand chemoresistance, but to our knowledge, the phenotypic and genetic features of the MRD subclone have never been investigated. Here, we compared the antigenic profile of MRD vs diagnostic clonal PCs in 40 elderly MM patients enrolled in the GEM2010MAS65 study and showed that the MRD subclone is enriched in cells overexpressing integrins (CD11a/CD11c/CD29/CD49d/CD49e), chemokine receptors (CXCR4), and adhesion molecules (CD44/CD54). Genetic profiling of MRD vs diagnostic PCs was performed in 12 patients; 3 of them showed identical copy number alterations (CNAs), in another 3 cases, MRD clonal PCs displayed all genetic alterations detected at diagnosis plus additional CNAs that emerged at the MRD stage, whereas in the remaining 6 patients, there were CNAs present at diagnosis that were undetectable in MRD clonal PCs, but also a selected number of genetic alterations that became apparent only at the MRD stage. The MRD subclone showed significant downregulation of genes related to protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum, as well as novel deregulated genes such as ALCAM that is prognostically relevant in MM and may identify chemoresistant PCs in vitro. Altogether, our results suggest that therapy-induced clonal selection could be already present at the MRD stage, where chemoresistant PCs show a singular phenotypic signature that may result from the persistence of clones with different genetic and gene expression profiles. This trial was registered atwww.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01237249. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  18. Molecular cytogenetic anomalies and phenotype alterations in a newly established cell line from Wilms tumor with diffuse anaplasia.

    PubMed

    Faussillon, Marine; Murakami, Ichiro; Bichat, Magalie; Telvi, Louise; Jeanpierre, Cécile; Nezelof, Christian; Jaubert, Francis; Gogusev, Jean

    2008-07-01

    The novel continuous cell line WT-Pe.1 was established in vitro from Wilms tumor with histological features of diffuse anaplasia. The cultures grew as poorly differentiated epithelial-like cells with pleomorphic polygonal shapes and formation of typical monolayers. WT-Pe.1 cells were immunoreactive for cytokeratin, vimentin, laminin, villin, CD10, and CD24 proteins. Conventional cytogenetic analysis by RHG-banding revealed a hypotriploid karyotype with numerous abnormalities including ring chromosomes, double-minutes, homogeneous staining regions, radial structures, dicentrics, and several marker chromosomes. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis revealed DNA copy numbers losses on chromosome segments 1p, 3p, 6q, 9q34.1 approximately q34.3, 11q24 approximately q25, 14q12 approximately qter, 16q, 18q, and 22q11 approximately q13; gain of genomic material was localized on chromosome arms 1q, 4p, 6q, and 7p and the entire chromosome 12. With DNA from the original tumor, copy number losses were detected on chromosomes 1p, 14q, 16q, 17q, and 22q and gains were observed on 1q, 4p, 8q, 12p, 12q, and chromosome 14p. Copy number amplifications of distinct loci were found on 1q21.1 and 4p15.3, as well as an elevated copy number of cyclin D2 (CCND2) and cyclin D associated kinase (CDK4) genes on chromosome 12 (confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization).

  19. Expression of CD133 and CD44 in glioblastoma stem cells correlates with cell proliferation, phenotype stability and intra-tumor heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Daniel V.; Filiz, Gulay; Daniel, Paul M.; Hollande, Frédéric; Dworkin, Sebastian; Amiridis, Stephanie; Kountouri, Nicole; Ng, Wayne; Morokoff, Andrew P.

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a heterogeneous tumor of the brain with a poor prognosis due to recurrence and drug resistance following therapy. Genome-wide profiling has revealed the existence of distinct GBM molecular subtypes that respond differently to aggressive therapies. Despite this, molecular subtype does not predict recurrence or drug resistance and overall survival is similar across subtypes. One of the key features contributing to tumor recurrence and resistance to therapy is proposed to be an underlying subpopulation of resistant glioma stem cells (GSC). CD133 expression has been used as a marker of GSCs, however recent evidence suggests the relationship between CD133 expression, GSCs and molecular subtype is more complex than initially proposed. The expression of CD133, Olig2 and CD44 was investigated using patient derived glioma stem-like cells (PDGCs) in vitro and in vivo. Different PDGCs exhibited a characteristic equilibrium of distinct CD133+ and CD44+ subpopulations and the influence of environmental factors on the intra-tumor equilibrium of CD133+ and CD44+ cells in PDGCs was also investigated, with hypoxia inducing a CD44+ to CD133+ shift and chemo-radiotherapy inducing a CD133+ to CD44+ shift. These data suggest that surveillance and modulation of intra-tumor heterogeneity using molecular markers at initial surgery and surgery for recurrent GBM may be important for more effective management of GBM. PMID:28241049

  20. Does climate at different scales influence the phenology and phenotype of the River Warbler Locustella fluviatilis?

    PubMed

    Kanuscák, Pavel; Hromada, Martin; Tryjanowski, Piotr; Sparks, Tim

    2004-09-01

    Weather and climatic conditions may impact on the phenology and morphology of birds, and thereby affect their survival rate and population dynamics. We examined the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), precipitation in the Sahel zone, temperatures in the wintering grounds, on the migration route, and in the breeding area in relation to arrival dates and six morphological measures (wing, tarsus, bill, and tail lengths, body mass, body condition) in a Slovak population of the River Warbler Locustella fluviatilis. Arrival dates did not change significantly over the study period, but were significantly positively correlated with NAO, although not with temperatures in wintering areas, migration route or breeding area, nor with Sahel precipitation. Four of the six morphological traits changed during the study period and part of the change in condition index can be attributed to climatic variables. We suggest changes in birds' phenotype vary with food availability, which fluctuate according to climate events.

  1. Cloning and assisted reproductive techniques: influence on early development and adult phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Randall R; Tamashiro, Kellie L K; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo

    2005-06-01

    Over the past 40 years, our increased understanding and development of cell and molecular biology has allowed even greater advances in reproductive biology. This is most evident by the development of various aspects of assisted reproductive techniques (ART), generation of transgenic animals, and most recently generation of mammals through somatic cell cloning. To date, cloning from adult somatic cells has been successful in at least 10 mammalian species. Although generating viable cloned mammals from adult cells is technically feasible and the list of successes will only continue to grow with time, prenatal and perinatal mortality is high and live cloned offspring have not been without health problems. The success of many of the proposed applications of the cloning technique obviously depends upon the health and survival of founder animals generated by nuclear transfer. This article summarizes the health consequences of cloning in mice, and discusses possible mechanisms through which these conditions may arise. In addition, we discuss the effects of ART in animal models and in humans. ART also involves some of the same procedures used in cloning, and there are reports that offspring generated by ART sometimes display aberrant phenotypes as well. It is important to point out that although these techniques do sometimes produce abnormalities, the majority of offspring are born apparently normal and survive to adulthood. Additionally, we must emphasize that the effects of ART and cloning observed in animal models do not necessarily indicate that they will occur in humans. In this article, we review studies examining the phenotype of animals generated by cloning and various ART, and discuss clinical implications of these findings.

  2. Phenotyping of myocardial fibrosis in hypertensive patients with heart failure. Influence on clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Ravassa, Susana; López, Begoña; Querejeta, Ramón; Echegaray, Kattalin; San José, Gorka; Moreno, María U; Beaumont, Francisco J; González, Arantxa; Díez, Javier

    2017-04-01

    Myocardial fibrosis is associated with alterations in the cross-linking and deposition of collagen type I (CCL and CD, respectively). We aimed to evaluate whether the combination of circulating biomarkers of CCL [the carboxy-terminal telopeptide of collagen type I to matrix metalloproteinase-1 ratio (CITP : MMP-1)] and CD [the carboxy-terminal propeptide of procollagen type I (PICP)] identifies myocardial fibrosis phenotypes with distinct clinical outcome in hypertensive patients with heart failure. Endomyocardial biopsies and blood samples from 38 patients (small cohort), and blood samples from 203 patients (large cohort) were analyzed. Myocardial CCL and CD were assessed by histological methods. Serum PICP, CITP, and MMP-1 were determined by ELISA. Small cohort: CITP : MMP-1 cutoff 1.968 or less and PICP cutoff at least 110.8 ng/ml were used for predicting high CCL and severe CD, respectively. Large cohort: as defined by the above thresholds, patients were categorized into four subgroups based on the presence (+) or absence (-) of high CCL and severe CD. Compared with CCL-CD-, the adjusted hazard ratios for a composite end point of heart failure hospitalization or cardiovascular death over 5 years in CCL-CD+, CCL+CD-, and CCL+CD+ were 1.11 (P = 0.79), 1.99 (P = 0.07), and 2.18 (P = 0.04), respectively (P for trend = 0.005). In addition, the categorization based on CCL and CD yielded integrated discrimination (P = 0.03) and net reclassification (P = 0.01) improvements for the mentioned outcome. The combination of low serum CITP : MMP-1 ratio and high serum PICP identifies hypertensive patients with heart failure presenting with a phenotype of myocardial fibrosis characterized by the concurrence of excessive CCL and CD and associated with poor outcome.

  3. Alteration of catecholamine phenotype in transgenic mice influences expression of adrenergic receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Ota, A; Togari, A; Morita, S; Mizuguchi, T; Sawada, H; Yamada, K; Nagatsu, I; Matsumoto, S; Fujita, K

    1995-08-01

    Agonist-induced regulation of adrenergic receptors (ARs) has an important role in controlling physiological functions in response to changes in catecholamine stimulation. We previously generated transgenic mice expressing phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) under the control of a human dopamine beta-hydroxylase gene promoter to switch catecholamine specificity from the norepinephrine phenotype to the epinephrine phenotype. In the present study, we first examined changes in catecholamine metabolism in peripheral tissues innervated by sympathetic neurons of the transgenic mice. In the transgenic target tissues, a high-level expression of PNMT led to a dramatic increase in the epinephrine levels, whereas the norepinephrine levels were decreased to 48.6-87.9% of the nontransgenic control levels. Analysis of plasma catecholamines in adrenalectomized mice showed large amounts of epinephrine derived from sympathetic neurons in the transgenic mice. Subsequently, we performed radioligand binding assays with (-)-[125I]iodocyanopindolol to determine changes in binding sites of beta-AR subtypes. In transgenic mice, the number of beta 2-AR binding sites was 56.4-74.9% of their nontransgenic values in the lung, spleen, submaxillary gland, and kidney, whereas the beta 1-AR binding sites were regulated in a different fashion among these tissues. Moreover, northern blot analysis of total RNA from the lung tissues showed that down-regulation of beta 2 binding sites was accompanied by a significant decrease in steady-state levels of the receptor mRNA. These results strongly suggest that alteration of catecholamine specificity in the transgenic sympathetic neurons leads to regulated expression of the beta-AR subtypes in their target tissues.

  4. The influence of glycosaminoglycans and crosslinking agents on the phenotype of hepatocytes cultured on collagen gels.

    PubMed

    Kataropoulou, Margarita; Henderson, Catherine; Grant, Helen

    2003-02-01

    The use of primary hepatocyte cultures as in vitro models for studying xenobiotic metabolism and toxicity is limited by the loss of liver-specific differentiated functions with time in culture and the inability of the cells to proliferate. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of incorporating 20% chondroitin-6-sulphate (Ch6SO4), a glycosaminoglycan (GAG), into collagen gels (0.3% w/v) and crosslinking the gels with either 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) or 1,6-diaminohexane (DAH) on the expression of glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) and the activity of cytochrome P450 in hepatocytes cultured for 48 hours and 7 days. Hepatocytes were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats by collagenase perfusion. Cell homogenates were immunoblotted against class alpha and pi GST subunits. To measure cytochrome P450 activity, testosterone hydroxylation was assessed. Viability of the cultured cells was assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy using the vital stain carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA). Cells cultured on gels crosslinked with EDAC were dead by 48 hours as judged by lack of CFDA-derived fluorescence and absence of GST bands on the immunoblots. The viability and morphology of the cells were unaffected by any of the other components of the substrata tested. Expression of GSTs indicated that the hepatocyte phenotype was stable for at least 48 hours. The addition of GAG did not improve the phenotype at either 48 hours or 7 days in culture, but the combination of GAG and DAH crosslinking improved GST expression in the 7-day cultures. However, the hepatocyte cytochrome P450 activity did not show any improvement on any of the gels. The combination of GAG and DAH crosslinking provided the most stable substratum environment in terms of GST expression in hepatocytes.

  5. The influence of menstrual risk factors on tumor characteristics and survival in postmenopausal breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Orgéas, Chantal C; Hall, Per; Rosenberg, Lena U; Czene, Kamila

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Hormonal factors are implicated in tumor progression and it is possible that factors influencing breast cancer induction could affect prognosis. Our study investigated the effects of menstrual risk factors on tumor characteristics and survival in postmenopausal breast cancer. Methods We used a nationwide, population-based, case-case design of 2,640 Swedish women who were 50 to 74 years old and had postmenopausal breast cancer during 1993 to 1995. Follow-up was conducted until 31 December 2000. We used polytomous multiple logistic regression to investigate the relationships between menstrual factors (age at menarche, cycle length, irregular menstruation, lifetime number of menstrual cycles, and age at menopause), tumor characteristics (size, grade, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor [PR] status, lymph node involvement, and histology), and Cox proportional hazards modeling for 5-year survival. Results Younger ages at menarche were significantly associated with grade and lymph node involvement. Women with an age at menarche of 11 years or younger had a more than twofold excess risk of medium-grade (odds ratio [OR] = 2.05; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00 to 4.18) and high-grade (OR = 2.04; 95% CI 1.01 to 4.16) tumors. Early menarche significantly increased the risk of lymph node metastases. Survival was poorest in women with the earliest age at menarche, with a 72% increased risk of dying within 5 years after diagnosis (hazard ratio = 1.72; 95% CI 1.02 to 2.89). No significant associations were observed for other menstrual factors with tumor characteristics or survival. Conclusions Age at menarche has a significant impact on breast cancer prognosis and survival. It remains to be established whether the associations are attributable to age at menarche directly or are associated with the early-life physiological events of breast development and carcinogenesis also taking place during childhood and puberty, as menarche is only the culmination of

  6. Varying hydric conditions during incubation influence egg water exchange and hatchling phenotype in the red-eared slider turtle.

    PubMed

    Delmas, Virginie; Bonnet, Xavier; Girondot, Marc; Prévot-Julliard, Anne-Caroline

    2008-01-01

    Environmental conditions within the nest, notably temperature and moisture of substrate, exert a powerful influence during embryogenesis in oviparous reptiles. The influence of fluctuating nest temperatures has been experimentally examined in different reptile species; however, similar experiments using moisture as the key variable are lacking. In this article, we examine the effect of various substrate moisture regimes during incubation on different traits (egg mass, incubation length, and hatchling mass) in a chelonian species with flexible-shelled eggs, the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans). Our results show that the rate of water uptake by the eggs was higher in wet than in dry substrate and varied across development. More important, during the first third of development, the egg mass changes were relatively independent of the soil moisture level; they became very sensitive to moisture levels during the other two-thirds. Moreover, hydric conditions exerted a strong influence on the eggs' long-term sensitivity to the moisture of the substrate. Even short-term episodes of high or low levels of moisture modified permanently their water sensitivity, notably through modification of eggshell shape and volume, and in turn entailed significant effects on hatchling mass (and hence offspring quality). Such complex influences of fluctuating moisture levels at various incubation stages on hatchling phenotype better reflect the natural situation, compared to experiments based on stable, albeit different, moisture levels.

  7. Non-human primate models of alcohol-related phenotypes: the influence of genetic and environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Barr, Christina S

    2013-01-01

    Because of their complex social structures, behaviors, and genetic similarities to humans, nonhuman primates are useful for studying how genetic factors influence alcohol consumption. The neurobiological systems that influence addiction vulnerability may do so by acting on alcohol response, reward pathways, behavioral dyscontrol, and vulnerability to stress and anxiety. Rhesus macaques show individual differences in alcohol response and temperament, and such differences are influenced by genetic variants that are similar functionally to those present in humans. Genes at which variation moderates these phenotypes include those encoding monoamine oxidase A (MAOA-LPR), the serotonin transporter (HTTLPR), corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH-248C/T and -2232 C/G), Neuropeptide Y (NPY-1002 T/G), and the μ-opioid receptor (OPRM1 C77G). These provide opportunities for modeling how genetic and environmental factors (i.e., stress, individual's sex, or alcohol exposure) interact to influence alcohol consumption. Studies in primates may also reveal selective factors have driven maintenance or fixation of alleles that increase risk for alcohol use disorders in modern humans.

  8. Polarisation of Tumor-Associated Macrophages toward M2 Phenotype Correlates with Poor Response to Chemoradiation and Reduced Survival in Patients with Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Enrica; Pedone Anchora, Luigi; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Tropeano, Giovanna; Fagotti, Anna; Scambia, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Objective we investigate the prognostic role of pre-treatment ratio between Type 1 (M1) and Type 2 (M2) tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) patients treated with chemoradiation (CT/RT). Methods 84 consecutive LACC patients treated with cisplatin-based CT/RT for a total dose of 50.0 Gy, followed by radical surgery were analysed. Double-staining immunohistochemistry of CD163/p-STAT, CD68/pSTAT1, CD163/c-MAF, and CD68/c-MAF was performed on tumor samples taken at the time of diagnosis. TAMs with CD163+pSTAT1+, or CD68+pSTAT1+ were defined M1; CD163+c-MAF+ or CD68+c-MAF+ defined the M2 phenotype. The number of M1 and M2 cells was counted at low magnification by evaluating for each case the same tumour area. The ratio between M1 and M2 (M1/M2) was finally calculated. Results At diagnosis, we observed a direct correlation between the number of circulating monocytes and of TAMs (p-value = 0.001). Patients with high M1/M2 experienced more frequently complete pathologic response (no residual tumor) to CT/RT, compared to cases with low M1/M2 (55.0% Vs 29.5%; p-value = 0.029). At multivariate analysis M1/M2 (OR = 2.067; p-value = 0.037) emerged as independent predictor of pathologic response to CT/RT. Women with high M1/M2 showed a longer 5-yrs Disease-free (67.2% Vs. 44.3%; p-value = 0.019), and 5-yrs Overall (69.3% Vs. 46.9%; p-value = 0.037) survival, compared to cases with low M1/M2. The presence of a high M1/M2 ratio was independently associated with an unfavourable survival outcome in multivariate analysis. Conclusions polarisation of TAMs toward a M2 phenotype, as reflected by a lower M1/M2 ratio, is an independent predictor of poor response to CT/RT, and shorter survival in LACC. PMID:26335330

  9. Maternal Genetic Mutations as Gestational and Early Life Influences in Producing Psychiatric Disease-Like Phenotypes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gleason, Georgia; Zupan, Bojana; Toth, Miklos

    2011-01-01

    Risk factors for psychiatric disorders have traditionally been classified as genetic or environmental. Risk (candidate) genes, although typically possessing small effects, represent a clear starting point to elucidate downstream cellular/molecular pathways of disease. Environmental effects, especially during development, can also lead to altered behavior and increased risk for disease. An important environmental factor is the mother, demonstrated by the negative effects elicited by maternal gestational stress and altered maternal care. These maternal effects can also have a genetic basis (e.g., maternal genetic variability and mutations). The focus of this review is “maternal genotype effects” that influence the emotional development of the offspring resulting in life-long psychiatric disease-like phenotypes. We have recently found that genetic inactivation of the serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1AR) and the fmr1 gene (encoding the fragile X mental retardation protein) in mouse dams results in psychiatric disease-like phenotypes in their genetically unaffected offspring. 5-HT1AR deficiency in dams results in anxiety and increased stress responsiveness in their offspring. Offspring of 5-HT1AR deficient dams display altered development of the hippocampus, which could be linked to their anxiety-like phenotype. Maternal inactivation of fmr1, like its inactivation in the offspring, results in a hyperactivity-like condition and is associated with receptor alterations in the striatum. These data indicate a high sensitivity of the offspring to maternal mutations and suggest that maternal genotype effects can increase the impact of genetic risk factors in a population by increasing the risk of the genetically normal offspring as well as by enhancing the effects of offspring mutations. PMID:21629836

  10. Nuances in diet quality and quantity influence phenotypic dimorphism during honey bee (Apis mellifera) caste determination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nutrition intake during the larval stage of holometabolous insect’s influences and fuels growth throughout metamorphosis. In social insects, differences in larval nutrition can regulate a profound reproductive division of labor. Provisioning by nurse bees differs between worker-destined and queen-de...

  11. The platelet interactivity phenotype of Streptococcus sanguis influences the course of experimental endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Herzberg, M C; MacFarlane, G D; Gong, K; Armstrong, N N; Witt, A R; Erickson, P R; Meyer, M W

    1992-01-01

    A strain of Streptococcus sanguis that induced rabbit platelets to aggregate in vitro (Agg+ phenotype) was hypothesized to be a more virulent pathogen than an Agg- strain in experimental endocarditis in rabbits. A left ventricular catheter was implanted, and then an Agg+ or Agg- strain was inoculated intravenously. Vegetations formed on the aortic semilunar valves but were unaffected by the duration of implantation of the catheter. Vegetations enlarged by accumulating platelets and their mass increased directly with the duration of endocarditis. Inoculation of the Agg+ strain consistently caused endocarditis with significantly larger vegetations, a more severe clinical course (including febrile episodes, hematological changes, and signs of myocardial ischemia), more gross lesions in major organs, and greater mortality than inoculation with the Agg- strain, saline, or the Agg+ strain pretreated with monospecific rabbit immunoglobulin G or Fab fragments against its platelet aggregation-associated protein (PAAP; class II). In experimental endocarditis, PAAP expressed by Agg+ S. sanguis appeared to be an important virulence factor. Images PMID:1398992

  12. Length of normal alleles of C9ORF72 GGGGCC repeat do not influence disease phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Nicola J.; Heckman, Michael G.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Baker, Matt C.; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Rayaprolu, Sruti; Stewart, Heather; Finger, Elizabeth; Volkening, Kathryn; Seeley, William W.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Kertesz, Andrew; Bigio, Eileen H.; Lippa, Carol; Knopman, David S.; Kretzschmar, Hans A.; Neumann, Manuela; Caselli, Richard J.; White, Charles L.; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Strong, Michael J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Boylan, Kevin; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Ross, Owen A.; Rademakers, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Expansions of the non-coding GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) gene were recently identified as the long sought-after cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) on chromosome 9p. In this study we aimed to determine whether the length of the normal - unexpanded - allele of the GGGGCC repeat in C9ORF72 plays a role in the presentation of disease or affects age at onset in C9ORF72 mutation carriers. We also studied whether the GGGGCC repeat length confers risk or affects age at onset in FTD and ALS patients without C9ORF72 repeat expansions. C9ORF72 genotyping was performed in 580 FTD, 995 ALS and 160 FTD-ALS patients and 1444 controls, leading to the identification of 211 patients with pathogenic C9ORF72 repeat expansions and an accurate quantification of the length of the normal alleles in all patients and controls. No meaningful association between the repeat length of the normal alleles of the GGGGCC repeat in C9ORF72 and disease phenotype or age at onset was observed in C9ORF72 mutation carriers or non-mutation carriers. PMID:22840558

  13. Influence of Sex on Suicidal Phenotypes in Affective Disorder Patients with Traumatic Childhood Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Carlberg, Laura; Swoboda, Patrick; Ludwig, Birgit; Koller, Romina; Kapusta, Nestor D.; Aigner, Martin; Haslacher, Helmuth; Schmöger, Michaela; Kasper, Siegfried; Schosser, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In the current study, we aimed to investigate the impact of childhood trauma on suicidal behaviour phenotypes in a group of patients with diagnosed affective disorder (unipolar or bipolar affective disorder). Patients and Methods Patients with and without a history of childhood abuse, measured by Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), were assessed to explore risks for suicidal behaviour (including suicide attempt, self-harm and non-suicidal self-injury). The tested sample consisted of 258 patients (111 males and 147 females, in-patients and out-patients at the Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Vienna and University Hospital Tulln, Lower Austria). Psychiatric diagnoses were derived from the SCAN (Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry) interview. In addition, patients were administered the Lifetime Parasuicidal Count (LPC), Suicidal Behaviour Questionnaire (SBQ-R), and Viennese Suicide Risk Assessment Scale (VISURIAS) questionnaires. Results In contrast to male suicide attempters, female suicide attempters showed both significantly higher total CTQ scores (p<0.001), and higher CTQ subscores (emotional, physical and sexual abuse, as well as emotional and physical neglect) in comparison to the non-suicidal control group. Besides, females with a history of self-harming behaviour (including suicidal intention) and Non-Suicidal-Self Injury (NSSI) had significantly higher CTQ total scores (p<0.001) than the control group. Conclusion These findings suggest gender differences in suicidal behaviour after being exposed to childhood trauma. PMID:26366559

  14. Male phenotypic quality influences offspring sex ratio in a polygynous ungulate

    PubMed Central

    Røed, Knut H; Holand, Øystein; Mysterud, Atle; Tverdal, Aage; Kumpula, Jouko; Nieminen, Mauri

    2006-01-01

    Evolutionary models of sex ratio adjustment applied to mammals have ignored that females may gain indirect genetic benefits from their mates. The differential allocation hypothesis (DAH) predicts that females bias the sex ratio of their offspring towards (more costly) males when breeding with an attractive male. We manipulated the number of available males during rut in a polygynous ungulate species, the reindeer (Rangifer tarandus), and found that a doubling of average male mass (and thus male attractiveness) in the breeding herd increased the proportion of male offspring from approximately 40 to 60%. Paternity analysis revealed indeed that males of high phenotypic quality sired more males, consistent with the DAH. This insight has consequences for proper management of large mammal populations. Our study suggests that harvesting, by generating a high proportion of young, small and unattractive mates, affects the secondary sex ratio due to differential allocation effects in females. Sustainable management needs to consider not only the direct demographic changes due to harvest mortality and selection, but also the components related to behavioural ecology and opportunities for female choice. PMID:17254998

  15. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand induces the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in macrophages and re-educates tumor-associated macrophages to an antitumor phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; Wang, Dongsheng; Liu, Dan; Liu, Min; Ge, Yehua; Jiang, Minghong; Liu, Yanxin; Zheng, Dexian

    2015-09-15

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising candidate for cancer therapy, because it can induce apoptosis in various tumor cells but not in most normal cells. Although it is well known that TRAIL and its receptors are expressed in many types of normal cells, including immune cells, their immunological effects and regulatory mechanisms are still obscure. In the present study, we demonstrated that TRAIL affected the activity of NF-κB (nuclear factor-κB) and the expression of its downstream proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β (interleukin-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor α in macrophages. TRAIL also induced microRNA-146a (miR-146a) expression in an NF-κB-dependent manner. As a result, miR-146a was involved as a negative-feedback regulator in the down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokine expression. In addition, the suppression of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activities by trichostatin A improved miR-146a expression due to the up-regulation of the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB at the miR-146a promoter in TRAIL-induced macrophages, suggesting that histone acetylation was involved in the suppression of miR-146a expression. Further investigation revealed that the HDAC subtype HDAC1 directly regulated the expression of miR-146a in TRAIL-stimulated macrophages. Finally, the TRAIL-sensitive human non small cell lung carcinoma cell line NCI-H460 was used to elucidate the physiological significance of TRAIL with respect to tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). We demonstrated that TRAIL re-educated TAMs to an M1-like phenotype and induced cytotoxic effects in the tumor cells. These data provide new evidence for TRAIL in the immune regulation of macrophages and may shed light on TRAIL-based antitumor therapy in human patients. © 2015 Gao et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution

  16. Environmental and genetic factors influence the relationship between circulating IL-10 and obesity phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Bassols, Judit; Botas, Patricia; Moreno-Navarrete, Jose M; Delgado, Elias; Ortega, Francisco; Ricart, Wifredo; Fernandez-Real, Jose M

    2010-03-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a centrally operating anti-inflammatory cytokine that plays a crucial role in the regulation of the innate immune system. It has strong inactivating properties on the inflammatory host response and has been related with viral persistence. We aimed to evaluate the association among circulating IL-10, obesity phenotypes, IL-10 and IL-10R1 gene polymorphisms, and the environmental exposure to viral infection. IL-10 -819C/T gene promoter and IL-10 receptor-1 -243A/G gene polymorphisms were studied in 760 subjects, whereas the former was also investigated in a replication study of 676 subjects. The association of circulating IL-10 levels (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) with the serum IgG against adenoviruses and enteroviruses was evaluated in a subset of 189 subjects. Circulating levels of IL-10 were increased in obese people and were positively associated with weight, BMI, waist, waist-to-hip ratio, fat mass, systolic pressure, and, interestingly, the titer of adenoviruses and enteroviruses. Obese subjects with adenovirus titer over the median had the highest circulating IL-10 concentration. Both obesity and adenovirus titer were independently associated with IL-10 variance. Nonmorbid obese T carriers for the -819CT IL-10 gene polymorphism had significantly higher BMI and waist circumference, and those with normal fasting glucose had increased fasting triglycerides. G carriers for the -536AG IL-10R1 gene polymorphism had higher systolic and diastolic pressures, and IL-10 levels; and obese G carriers had an increased waist-to-hip ratio. In summary, circulating IL-10 levels were associated not only with obesity status but also with genetic factors and with the exposure to environmental pathogens.

  17. Multiple biological activities of lactic acid in cancer: influences on tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Dhup, Suveera; Dadhich, Rajesh Kumar; Porporato, Paolo Ettore; Sonveaux, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    High rate of glycolysis is a metabolic hallmark of cancer. While anaerobic glycolysis promotes energy production under hypoxia, aerobic glycolysis, the Warburg effect, offers a proliferative advantage through redirecting carbohydrate fluxes from energy production to biosynthetic pathways. To fulfill tumor cell needs, the glycolytic switch is associated with elevated glucose uptake and lactic acid release. Altered glucose metabolism is the basis of positron emission tomography using the glucose analogue tracer [18F]- fluorodeoxyglucose, a widely used clinical application for tumor diagnosis and monitoring. On the other hand, high levels of lactate have been associated with poor clinical outcome in several types of human cancers. Although lactic acid was initially considered merely as an indicator of the glycolytic flux, many evidences originally from the study of normal tissue physiology and more recently transposed to the tumor situation indicate that lactic acid, i.e. the lactate anion and protons, directly contributes to tumor growth and progression. Here, we briefly review the current knowledge pertaining to lactic acidosis and metastasis, lactate shuttles, the influence of lactate on redox homeostasis, lactate signaling and lactate-induced angiogenesis in the cancer context. The monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4 have now been confirmed as prominent facilitators of lactate exchanges between cancer cells with different metabolic behaviors and between cancer and stromal cells. We therefore address the function and regulation of MCTs, highlighting MCT1 as a novel anticancer target. MCT1 inhibition allows to simultaneously disrupt metabolic cooperativity and angiogenesis in cancer with a same agent, opening a new path for novel anticancer therapies.

  18. Perioperative problems in patients with brainstem tumors and their influence on patient outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bharati, Sachidanand J; Pandia, Mihir Prakash; Rath, Girija Prasad; Bithal, Parmod Kumar; Dash, Hari Hara; Dube, Surya K

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Patients with brainstem tumors have many associated systemic abnormalities and are prone to develop perioperative complications. We studied the problems associated with brainstem tumors and their influence on the postoperative neurological outcome. Material and Methods: Retrospective review of records of patients who underwent surgery for brainstem tumors over a period of 8 years was done. Preoperative variables, perioperative complications and neurological outcome as assessed by Glasgow Outcome Scale at the time of hospital discharge were noted. Association between perioperative factors and the unfavorable neurological outcome was evaluated. Results: Data of 70 patients were retrieved, 7 patients were excluded from the study because of incomplete data and data analysis was carried out for 63 patients. We found that lower cranial nerve palsies (32%) and hydrocephalus (43%) were common preoperatively. Various intraoperative problems encountered were hemodynamic instability (56%), major blood loss requiring blood transfusion (40%) and venous air embolism (11%), and postoperative problems were meningitis (51%), hypokalemia (38%), chest infection (21%), seizure (11%), deterioration of Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, 11%), hyponatremia (8%), hydrocephalus (6%), respiratory distress (3%) and operatives site hematoma (3%). Fifty-six (89%) patients had favorable outcome at hospital discharge whereas, 7 (11%) had an unfavorable outcome. There was no association between pre- and intra-operative factors and the neurological outcome. Deterioration of GCS, chest infection, and the need for reintubation and tracheostomy were associated with unfavorable neurological outcome. Conclusion: Patients of brainstem tumors are at increased risk of perioperative complications. Some of the postoperative complications were associated with unfavorable neurological outcome. PMID:27275044

  19. Influence of administration route on tumor uptake and biodistribution of etoposide loaded solid lipid nanoparticles in Dalton's lymphoma tumor bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Harivardhan Reddy, L; Sharma, R K; Chuttani, K; Mishra, A K; Murthy, R S R

    2005-07-20

    The study evaluates the capability of tripalmitin nanoparticles in enhancing the tumor uptake of etoposide, and the influence of administration route on the biodistribution and tumor uptake of etoposide loaded tripalmitin (ETPL) nanoparticles in Dalton's lymphoma tumor bearing mice. ETPL nanoparticles were prepared by melt-emulsification and high pressure homogenization followed by the spray drying of nanodispersion. Characterization of the nanoparticles was done by particle size analysis, zeta potential measurement and scanning electron microscopy. The size of ETPL nanoparticles was 387 nm and possessed negative charge. Etoposide and ETPL nanoparticles were radiolabeled with 99mTc with high labeling efficiency. The labeled complexes showed good in vitro stability in the presence of DTPA/cysteine and serum stability. Etoposide and ETPL nanoparticles were injected by subcutaneous, intravenous or intraperitoneal routes and their biodistribution and tumor uptake were determined. Subcutaneous injection reduced the distribution of ETPL nanoparticles to all the tissues studied whereas after intraperitoneal injection, the distribution of ETPL nanoparticles to tissues was higher than free etoposide. The intravenous injection resulted in lower concentrations of ETPL nanoparticles in the organs of RES compared to free etoposide. ETPL nanoparticles experienced significantly high brain distribution after intraperitoneal injection indicating its potential use in targeting etoposide to brain tumors. After subcutaneous injection, the tissue distribution of ETPL nanoparticles increased with time indicating their accumulation at the injection site for a longer time. The tumor uptake of both etoposide and ETPL nanoparticles was significantly high after subcutaneous injection (P<0.001) compared to the other routes of administration. The tumor concentration of ETPL nanoparticles after subcutaneous injection was 59 folds higher than that obtained after intravenous and 8 folds higher

  20. Visual phenotype of multiple sclerosis in the Afro-Caribbean population and the influence of migration to metropolitan France.

    PubMed

    Merle, H; Smadja, D; Merle, S; Olindo, S; Signate, A; Donnio, A; Richer, R; Bonnan, M; Cabre, P

    2005-01-01

    To describe the visual phenotype of multiple sclerosis (MS) in the Afro-Caribbean population living in Martinique (French West Indies) and to specify the influence of the migration to metropolitan France on ocular impairment. Prospective consecutive observational case series. A complete ophthalmologic examination was performed. A total of 112 patients of Afro-Caribbean origin with MS satisfying McDonald's diagnostic criteria, divided into 53 cases (47.3%), the non-migrant patients (group NM), who had never left the Caribbean basin, and 59 cases (52.7%), the migrant patients (group M), who had lived in metropolitan France for at least 1 year before age 15. MS first manifested as an impairment of the optic nerve in 41 cases (36.6%): 25 cases (47.1%) in group NM and 16 cases (27.1%) in group M. Visual function was recovered in 13/25 cases (52%) in group NM compared to 13/16 cases (81%) in group M. Two-thirds of patients presented with a clinical ocular impairment, which was bilateral in 58.5% of cases in group NM. Fourteen cases (12.5%) met the criteria of neuromyelitis optica, nine cases (17%) in group NM and five cases (8.5%) in group M. In group NM, when the initial visual attack did not regress, the visual Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score was 5+/-1.5 ; 75% of patients had monocular blindness and 50% binocular. In the non-migrants (group NM), MS manifested more frequently with an optical neuropathy, the ocular impairment was more severe, and corresponded to neuromyelitis optica in 17% of the cases; a visual presentation and the absence of complete recovery from the first attack represented a factor of poor prognosis. This series is the largest description of the visual phenotype of MS in patients of African origin. The results confirm the preferential impairment of the optic nerve in the black population in the course of the disease. The migration towards an area of high prevalence of MS influences the visual phenotype in terms of a lower incidence and

  1. Interface between breast cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment using platelet-rich plasma to promote tumor angiogenesis - influence of platelets and fibrin bundles on the behavior of breast tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Sheila Siqueira; Sumikawa, Joana Tomomi; Castro, Eloísa Dognani; Batista, Fabricio Pereira; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar; Oliveira, Lilian Carolina; Guerra, Izabel Monastério; Peres, Giovani Bravin; Cavalheiro, Renan Pelluzzi; Juliano, Luiz; Nazário, Afonso Pinto; Facina, Gil; Tsai, Siu Mui; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello

    2017-02-07

    Cancer progression is associated with an evolving tissue interface of direct epithelial-tumor microenvironment interactions. In biopsies of human breast tumors, extensive alterations in molecular pathways are correlated with cancer staging on both sides of the tumor-stroma interface. These interactions provide a pivotal paracrine signaling to induce malignant phenotype transition, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We explored how the direct contact between platelets-fibrin bundles primes metastasis using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) as a source of growth factors and mimics the provisional fibrin matrix between actively growing breast cancer cells and the tumor stroma. We have demonstrated PRP functions, modulating cell proliferation that is tumor-subtype and cancer cell-type-specific. Epithelial and stromal primary cells were prepared from breast cancer biopsies from 21 women with different cancer subtypes. Cells supplemented with PRP were immunoblotted with anti-phospho and total Src-Tyr-416, FAK-Try-925, E-cadherin, N-cadherin, TGF-β, Smad2, and Snail monoclonal antibodies. Breast tumor cells from luminal B and HER2 subtypes showed the most malignant profiles and the expression of thrombin and other classes of proteases at levels that were detectable through FRET peptide libraries. The angiogenesis process was investigated in the interface obtained between platelet-fibrin-breast tumor cells co-cultured with HUVEC cells. Luminal B and HER2 cells showed robust endothelial cell capillary-like tubes ex vivo. The studied interface contributes to the attachment of endothelial cells, provides a source of growth factors, and is a solid substrate. Thus, replacement of FBS supplementation with PRP supplementation represents an efficient and simple approach for mimicking the real multifactorial tumor microenvironment.

  2. Interface between breast cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment using platelet-rich plasma to promote tumor angiogenesis - influence of platelets and fibrin bundles on the behavior of breast tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Sheila Siqueira; Sumikawa, Joana Tomomi; Castro, Eloísa Dognani; Batista, Fabricio Pereira; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar; Oliveira, Lilian Carolina; Guerra, Izabel Monastério; Peres, Giovani Bravin; Cavalheiro, Renan Pelluzzi; Juliano, Luiz; Nazário, Afonso Pinto; Facina, Gil; Tsai, Siu Mui; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello

    2017-01-01

    Cancer progression is associated with an evolving tissue interface of direct epithelial-tumor microenvironment interactions. In biopsies of human breast tumors, extensive alterations in molecular pathways are correlated with cancer staging on both sides of the tumor-stroma interface. These interactions provide a pivotal paracrine signaling to induce malignant phenotype transition, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We explored how the direct contact between platelets-fibrin bundles primes metastasis using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) as a source of growth factors and mimics the provisional fibrin matrix between actively growing breast cancer cells and the tumor stroma. We have demonstrated PRP functions, modulating cell proliferation that is tumor-subtype and cancer cell-type-specific. Epithelial and stromal primary cells were prepared from breast cancer biopsies from 21 women with different cancer subtypes. Cells supplemented with PRP were immunoblotted with anti-phospho and total Src-Tyr-416, FAK-Try-925, E-cadherin, N-cadherin, TGF-β, Smad2, and Snail monoclonal antibodies. Breast tumor cells from luminal B and HER2 subtypes showed the most malignant profiles and the expression of thrombin and other classes of proteases at levels that were detectable through FRET peptide libraries. The angiogenesis process was investigated in the interface obtained between platelet-fibrin-breast tumor cells co-cultured with HUVEC cells. Luminal B and HER2 cells showed robust endothelial cell capillary-like tubes ex vivo. The studied interface contributes to the attachment of endothelial cells, provides a source of growth factors, and is a solid substrate. Thus, replacement of FBS supplementation with PRP supplementation represents an efficient and simple approach for mimicking the real multifactorial tumor microenvironment. PMID:28187434

  3. Hodgkin lymphoma incidence in California Hispanics: influence of nativity and tumor Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Glaser, S L; Clarke, C A; Chang, E T; Yang, J; Gomez, S L; Keegan, T H

    2014-06-01

    For classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), migrant studies could elucidate contributions of environmental factors (including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)) to the lower rates in non-whites. Given the well-described etiologic complexity of HL, this research requires a large, immigrant population, such as California Hispanics. With 1988-2004 California Cancer Registry data (2,595 Hispanic, 8,637 white HL cases) and tumor cell EBV status on a subset (218 Hispanics, 656 whites), we calculated ethnicity- and nativity-specific HL incidence rates simultaneously by age, sex, and histologic subtype, and tumor cell EBV prevalence. Compared with white rates, Hispanic HL rates were lower overall (70 %) and for nodular sclerosis HL, particularly among young adults (60-65 % for females). However, they were higher among children (200 %) and older adults, and for mixed cellularity HL. Compared with rates in foreign-born Hispanics, rates in US-born Hispanics were higher among young adults (>threefold in females), lower for children and adults over age 70, and consistently intermediate compared with rates in whites. EBV tumor prevalence was 67, 32, and 23 % among foreign-born Hispanics, US-born Hispanics, and whites, respectively, although with variation by age, sex, and histology. Findings strongly implicate environmental influences, such as nativity-related sociodemographic differences, on HL occurrence. In addition, lower young adult rates and higher EBV prevalence in US-born Hispanics than in whites raise questions about the duration/extent of environmental change for affecting HL rates and also point to ethnic differences in genetic susceptibility. Lesser variation in mixed cellularity HL rates and greater variation in rates for females across groups suggest less modifiable factors interacting with environmental influences.

  4. Method of hyperthermia and tumor size influence effectiveness of doxorubicin release from thermosensitive liposomes in experimental tumors.

    PubMed

    Willerding, Linus; Limmer, Simone; Hossann, Martin; Zengerle, Anja; Wachholz, Kirsten; Ten Hagen, Timo L M; Koning, Gerben A; Sroka, Ronald; Lindner, Lars H; Peller, Michael

    2016-01-28

    Systemic chemotherapy of solid tumors could be enhanced by local hyperthermia (HT) in combination with thermosensitive liposomes (TSL) as drug carriers. In such an approach, effective HT of the tumor is considered essential for successful triggering local drug release and targeting of the drug to the tumor. To investigate the effect of HT method on the effectiveness of drug delivery, a novel laser-based HT device designed for the use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was compared systematically with the frequently used cold light lamp and water bath HT. Long circulating phosphatidyldiglycerol-based TSL (DPPG2-TSL) with encapsulated doxorubicin (DOX) were used as drug carrier enabling intravascular drug release. Experiments were performed in male Brown Norway rats with a syngeneic soft tissue sarcoma (BN 175) located on both hind legs. One tumor was heated while the second tumor remained unheated as a reference. Six animals were investigated per HT method. DPPG2-TSL were injected i.v. at a stable tumor temperature above 40°C. Thereafter, temperature was maintained for 60min. Total DOX concentration in plasma, tumor tissue and muscle was determined post therapy by HPLC. Finally, the new laser-based device was tested in a MRI environment at 3T using DPPG2-TSL with encapsulated Gd-based contrast agent. All methods showed effective DOX delivery by TSL with 4.5-23.1ng/mg found in the heated tumors. In contrast, DOX concentration in the non-heated tumors was 0.5±0.1ng/mg. Independent of used HT methods, higher DOX levels were found in the smaller tumors. In comparison water bath induced lowest DOX delivery but still showing fourfold higher DOX concentrations compared to the non-heated tumors. With the laser-based applicator, a 13 fold higher DOX deposition was possible for large tumors and a 15 fold higher for the small tumors, respectively. Temperature gradients in the tumor tissue were higher with the laser and cold light lamp (-0.3°C/mm to -0.5°C/mm) compared to

  5. Activation of tumor suppressor LKB1 by honokiol abrogates cancer stem-like phenotype in breast cancer via inhibition of oncogenic Stat3.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, S; Nagalingam, A; Muniraj, N; Bonner, M Y; Mistriotis, P; Afthinos, A; Kuppusamy, P; Lanoue, D; Cho, S; Korangath, P; Shriver, M; Begum, A; Merino, V F; Huang, C-Y; Arbiser, J L; Matsui, W; Győrffy, B; Konstantopoulos, K; Sukumar, S; Marignani, P A; Saxena, N K; Sharma, D

    2017-06-05

    Tumor suppressor and upstream master kinase Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) plays a significant role in suppressing cancer growth and metastatic progression. We show that low-LKB1 expression significantly correlates with poor survival outcome in breast cancer. In line with this observation, loss-of-LKB1 rendered breast cancer cells highly migratory and invasive, attaining cancer stem cell-like phenotype. Accordingly, LKB1-null breast cancer cells exhibited an increased ability to form mammospheres and elevated expression of pluripotency-factors (Oct4, Nanog and Sox2), properties also observed in spontaneous tumors in Lkb1(-/-) mice. Conversely, LKB1-overexpression in LKB1-null cells abrogated invasion, migration and mammosphere-formation. Honokiol (HNK), a bioactive molecule from Magnolia grandiflora increased LKB1 expression, inhibited individual cell-motility and abrogated the stem-like phenotype of breast cancer cells by reducing the formation of mammosphere, expression of pluripotency-factors and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity. LKB1, and its substrate, AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) are important for HNK-mediated inhibition of pluripotency factors since LKB1-silencing and AMPK-inhibition abrogated, while LKB1-overexpression and AMPK-activation potentiated HNK's effects. Mechanistic studies showed that HNK inhibited Stat3-phosphorylation/activation in an LKB1-dependent manner, preventing its recruitment to canonical binding-sites in the promoters of Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2. Thus, inhibition of the coactivation-function of Stat3 resulted in suppression of expression of pluripotency factors. Further, we showed that HNK inhibited breast tumorigenesis in mice in an LKB1-dependent manner. Molecular analyses of HNK-treated xenografts corroborated our in vitro mechanistic findings. Collectively, these results present the first in vitro and in vivo evidence to support crosstalk between LKB1, Stat3 and pluripotency factors in breast cancer and effective anticancer modulation

  6. MicroRNA Expression Profile Identifies High Grade, Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Tumors at Elevated Risk to Progress to an Invasive Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lenherr, Sara M.; Tsai, Sheaumei; Silva Neto, Brasil; Sullivan, Travis B.; Cimmino, Cara B.; Logvinenko, Tanya; Gee, Jason; Huang, Wei; Libertino, John A.; Summerhayes, Ian C.; Rieger-Christ, Kimberly M.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify a panel of microRNAs (miRNAs) differentially expressed in high-grade non-muscle invasive (NMI; TaG3–T1G3) urothelial carcinoma that progress to muscle-invasive disease compared to those that remain non-muscle invasive, whether recurrence happens or not. Eighty-nine high-grade NMI urothelial carcinoma lesions were identified and total RNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissue. Patients were categorized as either having a non-muscle invasive lesion with no evidence of progression over a 3-year period or as having a similar lesion showing progression to muscle invasion over the same period. In addition, comparison of miRNA expression levels between patients with and without prior intravesical therapy was performed. Total RNA was pooled for microarray analysis in each group (non-progressors and progressors), and qRT-PCR of individual samples validated differential expression between non-progressive and progressive lesions. MiR-32-5p, -224-5p, and -412-3p were associated with cancer-specific survival. Downregulation of miR-203a-3p and miR-205-5p were significantly linked to progression in non-muscle invasive bladder tumors. These miRNAs include those implicated in epithelial mesenchymal transition, previously identified as members of a panel characterizing transition from the non-invasive to invasive phenotype in bladder tumors. Furthermore, we were able to identify specific miRNAs that are linked to postoperative outcome in patients with high grade NMI urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) that progressed to muscle-invasive (MI) disease. PMID:28218662

  7. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors with KIT exon 9 mutations: Update on genotype-phenotype correlation and validation of a high-resolution melting assay for mutational testing.

    PubMed

    Künstlinger, Helen; Huss, Sebastian; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine; Binot, Elke; Kleine, Michaela Angelika; Loeser, Heike; Mittler, Jens; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Hohenberger, Peter; Reichardt, Peter; Büttner, Reinhard; Wardelmann, Eva; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich

    2013-11-01

    KIT exon 9 mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are highly relevant and have direct therapeutic implications. In this context, we established and validated a fast and sensitive high-resolution melting assay. Analyzing 126 primary and 18 metastatic KIT exon 9-mutated cases from our registry, we demonstrate that the mutational spectrum of exon 9 is broader than previously thought and describe 3 novel mutations. Including these cases and the common p.A502_Y503dup mutation, we provide a comprehensive list of all known KIT exon 9 mutations according to the Human Genome Variation Society nomenclature. Two of the newly described mutations were associated with an aggressive phenotype and tumor progression while being treated with 400 mg imatinib, indicating that also GIST with rare exon 9 mutations could be treated with increased imatinib dosage. On the basis of >1500 GISTs from our registry, we have determined the frequency of KIT exon 9 mutations to be 9.2% among all GISTs and 22.5% among small-bowel cases. We describe for the first time that nearly 20% of exon 9-mutated GIST occur in the stomach or rectum. Furthermore, we provide first evidence that exon 9-mutated GISTs metastasize significantly more often to the peritoneum than to the liver. Performing extensive statistical analyses on data from our registry and from the literature, we demonstrate that KIT exon 9 mutations are neither associated with intermediate-risk/high-risk status nor overrepresented among metastatic lesions. Thus, we conclude that exon 9 mutations per se do not have prognostic relevance.

  8. Influence of total parenteral nutrition on tumor growth and polyamine biosynthesis of fibrosarcoma-bearing rats after induced cachexia.

    PubMed

    Grossie, V B; Ota, D M; Ajani, J A; Chang, T H; Patenia, D; Nishioka, K

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a protein-free diet (PF) or a restricted intake of chow (RI) and subsequent host repletion with total parenteral nutrition (PF-TPN, RI-TPN) on tumor growth and polyamine metabolism of fibrosarcoma-bearing rats was examined. Host weight was significantly reduced by PF and RI. Tumor growth was reduced in malnourished rats with the PF regimen resulting in the greatest decrease. Rats receiving TPN after 14 days of the RI or PF regimens had higher host weight and plasma albumin levels than malnourished rats. Tumor growth during TPN was evaluated as the percent increase and compared with that of the respective malnourished rats. The percent increase for RI-TPN rats was significantly greater although a trend toward an increase was also evident for PF-TPN rats. Tumor ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity and putrescine levels were increased for PF rats and decreased for RI rats while tumor ODC activity was consistently increased by TPN. Tumor growth, ODC activity, and putrescine levels were simultaneously increased only for those rats fed the RI regimen prior to TPN. These results show a disparity in tumor ODC activity, putrescine levels, and tumor growth in malnourished rats. The results of this study suggest that the nutritional origin of cachexia influences the response of the tumor to TPN and emphasizes the importance of considering the methods to induce malnutrition in designing therapuetic regimens.

  9. Single-neuron NMDA receptor phenotype influences neuronal rewiring and reintegration following traumatic injury.

    PubMed

    Patel, Tapan P; Ventre, Scott C; Geddes-Klein, Donna; Singh, Pallab K; Meaney, David F

    2014-03-19

    Alterations in the activity of neural circuits are a common consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI), but the relationship between single-neuron properties and the aggregate network behavior is not well understood. We recently reported that the GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are key in mediating mechanical forces during TBI, and that TBI produces a complex change in the functional connectivity of neuronal networks. Here, we evaluated whether cell-to-cell heterogeneity in the connectivity and aggregate contribution of GluN2B receptors to [Ca(2+)]i before injury influenced the functional rewiring, spontaneous activity, and network plasticity following injury using primary rat cortical dissociated neurons. We found that the functional connectivity of a neuron to its neighbors, combined with the relative influx of calcium through distinct NMDAR subtypes, together contributed to the individual neuronal response to trauma. Specifically, individual neurons whose [Ca(2+)]i oscillations were largely due to GluN2B NMDAR activation lost many of their functional targets 1 h following injury. In comparison, neurons with large GluN2A contribution or neurons with high functional connectivity both independently protected against injury-induced loss in connectivity. Mechanistically, we found that traumatic injury resulted in increased uncorrelated network activity, an effect linked to reduction of the voltage-sensitive Mg(2+) block of GluN2B-containing NMDARs. This uncorrelated activation of GluN2B subtypes after injury significantly limited the potential for network remodeling in response to a plasticity stimulus. Together, our data suggest that two single-cell characteristics, the aggregate contribution of NMDAR subtypes and the number of functional connections, influence network structure following traumatic injury.

  10. Clinical study on the influence of motion and other factors on stereotactic radiotherapy in the treatment of adrenal gland tumor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingsheng; Li, Fengtong; Dong, Yang; Song, Yongchun; Yuan, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the adrenal tumor motion law and influence factors in the treatment of adrenal gland tumor and provide a reference value basis for determining the planning target volume margins for therapy. Materials and methods The subjects considered in this study were 38 adrenal tumor patients treated with CyberKnife with the placement of 45 gold fiducials. Fiducials were implanted into each adrenal tumor using β-ultrasonic guidance. Motion amplitudes of gold fiducials were measured with a Philips SLS simulator and motion data in the left–right, anterior–posterior, and cranio–caudal directions were obtained. Multiple linear regression models were used to analyze influencing factors. t-Test was used for motion amplitude comparison of different tumor locations along the z-axis. Results The motion distances were 0.1–0.4 cm (0.27±0.07 cm), 0.1–0.5 cm (0.31±0.11 cm), and 0.5–1.2 cm (0.87±0.21 cm) along the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively. Motion amplitude along the z-axis may be affected by tumor location, but movement along the other axes was not affected by age, height, body mass, location, and size. Conclusion The maximum motion distance was along the z-axis. Therefore, this should be the main consideration when defining the planning target volume safety margin. Due to the proximity of the liver, adrenal gland tumor motion amplitude was smaller on the right than the left. This study analyzed adrenal tumor motion amplitude data to evaluate how motion and other factors influence the treatment of adrenal tumor with a goal of providing a reference for stereotactic radiotherapy boundary determination. PMID:27486331

  11. Differential influence of anticancer treatments and angiogenesis on the seric titer of autoantibody used as tumor and metastasis biomarker.

    PubMed

    Defresne, Florence; Bouzin, Caroline; Guilbaud, Céline; Dieu, Marc; Delaive, Edouard; Michiels, Carine; Raes, Martine; Feron, Olivier

    2010-07-01

    Early detection of tumor-specific autoantibodies (auto-Abs) has the potential to be used for cancer screening and diagnosis. Whether auto-Ab may be useful to track metastatic progression or response to treatment is, however, largely unknown. To address these issues, the serological proteome was analyzed in an invasive but treatment-responsive mouse tumor model. Among 40 serum-reactive proteins identified by multiplex analysis, we chose to focus on glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), a chaperone protein involved in the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. We first validated GRP78 as a protein overexpressed and mislocalized in tumor cells. We then documented that an increase in GRP78 auto-Ab titer preceded the detection of a palpable tumor mass, correlated with metastatic progression, and was influenced by the onset of tumor neovascularization. We also found that chemotherapy and radiotherapy, both leading to inhibition of tumor growth, oppositely influenced the anti-GRP78 immune response. Whereas radiation increased the concentration of GRP78 auto-Ab by three-fold, the auto-Ab titer was reduced in response to bolus or metronomic administration of cyclophosphamide. Finally, we established a decrease in auto-Ab-producing B lymphocytes in response to chemotherapy and the overexpression of GRP78 together with a strong immunoglobulin response in irradiated tumors. In conclusion, we identified GRP78 auto-Ab as an early marker of tumor and metastatic progressions. However, the multiple influences of anticancer treatments on the humoral immune system calls for caution when exploiting such auto-Ab as markers of the tumor response.

  12. Loss of Somatostatin Receptor Subtype 2 in Prostate Cancer Is Linked to an Aggressive Cancer Phenotype, High Tumor Cell Proliferation and Predicts Early Metastatic and Biochemical Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Hennigs, Jan K.; Müller, Julia; Adam, Matti; Spin, Joshua M.; Riedel, Emilia; Graefen, Markus; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Sauter, Guido; Huland, Hartwig; Schlomm, Thorsten; Minner, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) is the most frequently expressed SSTR subtype in normal human tissues. SSTR2 expression is differentially regulated in various tumor types and therapeutic somatostatin analogs binding to SSTR2 are in clinical use. In prostate cancers highly contradictory results in terms of SSTR2 expression and its consequences have been published over the past years. The aim of this study was to clarify prevalence and clinical significance of SSTR2 expression in prostate cancer. Therefore, quantitative immunohistochemistry (IHC) using a tissue microarray containing samples from 3,261 prostate cancer patients with extensive clinical and molecular cancer characteristics and oncological follow-up data was performed. IHC data was compared to publicly available Gene Expression Omnibus datasets of human prostate cancer gene expression arrays. While membranous SSTR2 staining was always seen in normal prostate epithelium, SSTR2 staining was absent in more than half (56.1%) of 2,195 interpretable prostate cancer samples. About 13% of all analyzed prostate cancers showed moderate to strong cytoplasmic and membranous SSTR2 staining. Staining intensities were inversely correlated with high Gleason grade, advanced pT category, high tumor cell proliferation (p<0.0001 each), high pre-operative PSA levels, (p = 0.0011) and positive surgical margins (p = 0.006). In silico analysis confirmed lower SSTR2 gene expression in prostate cancers vs. normal adjacent tissue (p = 0.0424), prostate cancer metastases vs. primary cancers (p = 0.0011) and recurrent vs. non-recurrent prostate cancers (p = 0.0438). PSA-free survival gradually declined with SSTR2 staining intensity (p<0.0001). SSTR2-negative cancers were more likely to develop metastases over time (p<0.05). In conclusion, most prostate cancers are indeed SSTR2-negative and loss of SSTR2 strongly predicts an unfavorable tumor phenotype and poor prognosis. Therefore, SSTR2 expression seems

  13. Context dependent reversion of tumor phenotype by connexin-43 expression in MDA-MB231 cells and MCF-7 cells: Role of β-catenin/connexin43 association

    SciTech Connect

    Talhouk, Rabih S.; Fares, Mohamed-Bilal; Rahme, Gilbert J.; Hariri, Hanaa H.; Rayess, Tina; Dbouk, Hashem A.; Bazzoun, Dana; Al-Labban, Dania; El-Sabban, Marwan E.

    2013-12-10

    Connexins (Cx), gap junction (GJ) proteins, are regarded as tumor suppressors, and Cx43 expression is often down regulated in breast tumors. We assessed the effect of Cx43 over-expression in 2D and 3D cultures of two breast adenocarcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. While Cx43 over-expression decreased proliferation of 2D and 3D cultures of MCF-7 by 56% and 80% respectively, MDA-MB-231 growth was not altered in 2D cultures, but exhibited 35% reduction in 3D cultures. C-terminus truncated Cx43 did not alter proliferation. Untransfected MCF-7 cells formed spherical aggregates in 3D cultures, and MDA-MB-231 cells formed stellar aggregates. However, MCF-7 cells over-expressing Cx43 formed smaller sized clusters and Cx43 expressing MDA-MB-231 cells lost their stellar morphology. Extravasation ability of both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells was reduced by 60% and 30% respectively. On the other hand, silencing Cx43 in MCF10A cells, nonneoplastic human mammary cell line, increased proliferation in both 2D and 3D cultures, and disrupted acinar morphology. Although Cx43 over-expression did not affect total levels of β-catenin, α-catenin and ZO-2, it decreased nuclear levels of β-catenin in 2D and 3D cultures of MCF-7 cells, and in 3D cultures of MDA-MB-231 cells. Cx43 associated at the membrane with α-catenin, β-catenin and ZO-2 in 2D and 3D cultures of MCF-7 cells, and only in 3D conditions in MDA-MB-231 cells. This study suggests that Cx43 exerts tumor suppressive effects in a context-dependent manner where GJ assembly with α-catenin, β-catenin and ZO-2 may be implicated in reducing growth rate, invasiveness, and, malignant phenotype of 2D and 3D cultures of MCF-7 cells, and 3D cultures of MDA-MB-231 cells, by sequestering β-catenin away from nucleus. - Highlights: • Cx43 over-expressing MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 were grown in 2D and 3D cultures. • Proliferation and growth morphology were affected in a context dependent manner. • Extravasation ability of both MCF

  14. Population density and phenotypic attributes influence the level of nematode parasitism in roe deer.

    PubMed

    Body, Guillaume; Ferté, Hubert; Gaillard, Jean-Michel; Delorme, Daniel; Klein, François; Gilot-Fromont, Emmanuelle

    2011-11-01

    The impact of parasites on population dynamics is well documented, but less is known on how host population density affects parasite spread. This relationship is difficult to assess because of confounding effects of social structure, population density, and environmental conditions that lead to biased among-population comparisons. Here, we analyzed the infestation by two groups of nematodes (gastro-intestinal (GI) strongyles and Trichuris) in the roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) population of Trois Fontaines (France) between 1997 and 2007. During this period, we experimentally manipulated population density through changes in removals. Using measures collected on 297 individuals, we quantified the impact of density on parasite spread after taking into account possible influences of date, age, sex, body mass, and weather conditions. The prevalence and abundance of eggs of both parasites in females were positively related to roe deer density, except Trichuris in adult females. We also found a negative relationship between parasitism and body mass, and strong age and sex-dependent patterns of parasitism. Prime-age adults were less often parasitized and had lower fecal egg counts than fawns or old individuals, and males were more heavily and more often infected than females. Trichuris parasites were not affected by weather, whereas GI strongyles were less present after dry and hot summers. In the range of observed densities, the observed effect of density likely involves a variation of the exposure rate, as opposed to variation in host susceptibility.

  15. Hyperinsulinemia and obese phenotype differently influence blood pressure in young normotensive patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mioni, Roberto; Cà, Anna Dalla; Turra, Jenni; Azzolini, Sara; Xamin, Nadia; Bleve, Luigi; Maffei, Pietro; Vettor, Roberto; Fallo, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    To differentiate the impact of insulin levels/resistance per se from that of excess weight on blood pressure (BP) daily changes, we evaluated, using 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in a cohort of young normotensive patients affected by polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). A cross-sectional study was performed. Fifty-four patients were studied according to (a) insulinemic state: 32 hyperinsulinemic and/or insulin-resistant (h-INS) and 22 normoinsulinemic (n-INS) patients; and (b) body mass index (BMI): 22 obese (BMI > 30) and 32 lean (18.0 < BMI < 24.9) patients. Each subject's SBP and DBP and heart rate (HR) were measured by ABPM. Supine and upright plasma renin activity (PRA), and aldosterone levels were also assayed. Patients in the h-INS group showed higher 24-h, daytime, and nighttime diastolic blood pressure (DBP), higher nighttime systolic blood pressure (SBP) levels, as well as an increased 24-h, daytime and nighttime HR, compared to both obese and lean patients in the n-INS group. In relation to BMI, only 24-h, daytime, and nighttime DBP were higher in obese than in lean patients. At variance, when both h-INS and obesity were considered, 24-h SBP and DBP were higher in h-INS obese subjects than in the other groups. In multivariate analysis, insulin (max peak), area under the curve of insulin and insulin sensitivity index was independently associated with SBP. (1) Within a normotensive range, hyperinsulinemia and/or insulin resistance influence daily BP variation more than obesity does, suggesting a pivotal role of insulin on BP control in PCOS; (2) altered insulinemic state and ABPM-derived higher nighttime BP and HR may represent early markers to identify PCOS subjects prone to high cardiovascular risk.

  16. Divergent influence of microRNA-21 deletion on murine colitis phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng; Dong, Fengshi; Arendovich, Nikolai; Zhang, Jing; Huang, Yong; Kwon, John H

    2014-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) acting as negative regulators of gene expression are differentially expressed in intestinal tissues of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Assessing the functions of miRNAs in murine colitis facilitates elucidating the role of specific miRNAs in human IBD. We aimed to determine the miRNA signature of several models of colitis and to assess the influence of miR-21 on intestinal inflammation. miR-21-deficient mouse and littermate controls were assessed in the standard DSS, TNBS, and CD4+ T-cell transfer models of colitis. RNAs of mouse colon and CD4+CD45RB High cells were analyzed by miRNA and mRNA microarray, and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. T helper (Th) cell polarization was accessed by flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Alterations in miRNA expression were identified for acute and chronic DSS and TNBS colitis, respectively. The expression of miRs-21, -142-3p, and -223 were distinct between DSS and TNBS models while overlap of numerous miRNAs was found. Importantly, miRs-19b, -192, and -215, that are decreased in IBD, were decreased in these models of colitis. miR-21, which is increased in IBD, was increased in TNBS colitis. Furthermore, the deletion of miR-21 resulted in the exacerbation of both the TNBS and T-cell transfer models of colitis. CD4+CD45RB High T cells from miR-21 mice were prone to Th1 polarization. MiRNAs are differentially expressed in both human IBD and murine colitis, with overlap of several IBD-associated miRNAs. The demonstration that miR-21-/- deletion exacerbated CD4+ T-cell-mediated models of colitis provide further evidence that miRNAs play significant roles in the pathogenesis of IBD.

  17. Size matters: How population size influences genotype–phenotype association studies in anonymized data

    PubMed Central

    Denny, Joshua C.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Roden, Dan M.; Malin, Bradley A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Electronic medical records (EMRs) data is increasingly incorporated into genome-phenome association studies. Investigators hope to share data, but there are concerns it may be “re-identified” through the exploitation of various features, such as combinations of standardized clinical codes. Formal anonymization algorithms (e.g., k-anonymization) can prevent such violations, but prior studies suggest that the size of the population available for anonymization may influence the utility of the resulting data. We systematically investigate this issue using a large-scale biorepository and EMR system through which we evaluate the ability of researchers to learn from anonymized data for genome- phenome association studies under various conditions. Methods We use a k-anonymization strategy to simulate a data protection process (on data sets containing clinical codes) for resources of similar size to those found at nine academic medical institutions within the United States. Following the protection process, we replicate an existing genome-phenome association study and compare the discoveries using the protected data and the original data through the correlation (r2) of the p-values of association significance. Results Our investigation shows that anonymizing an entire dataset with respect to the population from which it is derived yields significantly more utility than small study-specific datasets anonymized unto themselves. When evaluated using the correlation of genome-phenome association strengths on anonymized data versus original data, all nine simulated sites, results from largest-scale anonymizations (population ∼ 100;000) retained better utility to those on smaller sizes (population ∼ 6000—75;000). We observed a general trend of increasing r2 for larger data set sizes: r2 = 0.9481 for small-sized datasets, r2 = 0.9493 for moderately-sized datasets, r2 = 0.9934 for large-sized datasets. Conclusions This research implies that regardless of the

  18. The Influence of Tumor Size on Oncologic Outcomes for Patients with Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma after Radical Nephroureterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaohong; Fang, Dong; Hao, Han; Gong, Yanqing; Zhang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reached diverse conclusions about the influence of tumor size on the oncologic outcomes in patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). In this study, we retrospectively analyzed the records of 687 patients and evaluated how tumor size affected the prognosis of patients with UTUC after surgery. Clinicopathologic characteristics and oncological outcomes were compared according to tumor size (≤3 cm versus >3 cm). During a median follow-up period of 65 months (range 3–144 months), 225 patients (32.8%) died from UTUC and 228 patients (33.2%) experienced intravesical recurrence (IVR). Patients with a larger tumor size tended to have a significantly higher percentage of being male (p = 0.011), tobacco consumption (p = 0.036), lack of preoperative ureteroscopy history (p = 0.003), renal pelvic location (p < 0.001), tumor necrosis (p = 0.003), advanced tumor stage (p < 0.001), higher tumor grade (p = 0.003), and lymph node metastasis (p = 0.018). Univariate analysis revealed that a tumor size >3 cm was significantly associated with worse cancer-specific survival (p = 0.002) and IVR (p = 0.011). However, the influence was not statistically significant after controlling for other factors in the multivariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR] 1.124, p = 0.414 and HR 1.196, p = 0.219). In conclusion, UTUC patients with a larger tumor present aggressive biological characteristics and tend to have a worse prognosis. PMID:28070508

  19. Vision 20/20: Molecular-guided surgical oncology based upon tumor metabolism or immunologic phenotype: Technological pathways for point of care imaging and intervention

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Keith D.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Strong, Theresa V.; Draney, Daniel R.; Feldwisch, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Surgical guidance with fluorescence has been demonstrated in individual clinical trials for decades, but the scientific and commercial conditions exist today for a dramatic increase in clinical value. In the past decade, increased use of indocyanine green based visualization of vascular flow, biliary function, and tissue perfusion has spawned a robust growth in commercial systems that have near-infrared emission imaging and video display capabilities. This recent history combined with major preclinical innovations in fluorescent-labeled molecular probes, has the potential for a shift in surgical practice toward resection guidance based upon molecular information in addition to conventional visual and palpable cues. Most surgical subspecialties already have treatment management decisions partially based upon the immunohistochemical phenotype of the cancer, as assessed from molecular pathology of the biopsy tissue. This phenotyping can inform the surgical resection process by spatial mapping of these features. Further integration of the diagnostic and therapeutic value of tumor metabolism sensing molecules or immune binding agents directly into the surgical process can help this field mature. Maximal value to the patient would come from identifying the spatial patterns of molecular expression in vivo that are well known to exist. However, as each molecular agent is advanced into trials, the performance of the imaging system can have a critical impact on the success. For example, use of pre-existing commercial imaging systems are not well suited to image receptor targeted fluorophores because of the lower concentrations expected, requiring orders of magnitude more sensitivity. Additionally the imaging system needs the appropriate dynamic range and image processing features to view molecular probes or therapeutics that may have nonspecific uptake or pharmacokinetic issues which lead to limitations in contrast. Imaging systems need to be chosen based upon objective

  20. Influence of the bacterial phenotypes on the clinical manifestations in Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia patients: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Togawa, Atsushi; Toh, Hiromi; Onozawa, Kyoko; Yoshimura, Michinobu; Tokushige, Chiemi; Shimono, Nobuyuki; Takata, Tohru; Tamura, Kazuo

    2015-07-01

    Ninety-four episodes of Klebsiella pneumoniae bloodstream infection were identified at a university hospital in Japan. After excluding extended-spectrum beta lactamase-producing strains, 83 blood isolates from these patients were assayed in terms of their bacterial phenotypes such as the mucoid and hypermucoviscosity phenotypes. Bacterial phenotypes were correlated with the patients' clinical manifestations. The hypermucoviscosity phenotype was significantly associated with septic shock at the onset of infections (odds ratio, 15.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-468.12), but was not associated with liver abscess formation. Mortality was determined by the presence of septic shock. RmpA gene was associated with the induction of the hypermucoviscosity phenotype. These results reveal unique roles of bacterial phenotypes on the patient's clinical condition in K. pneumoniae bacteremia.

  1. Intraoperative Spillage of Favorable Histology Wilms Tumor Cells: Influence of Irradiation and Chemotherapy Regimens on Abdominal Recurrence. A Report From the National Wilms Tumor Study Group

    SciTech Connect

    Kalapurakal, John A.; Li, Sierra M.; Breslow, Norman E.; Beckwith, J. Bruce; Ritchey, Michael L.; Shamberger, Robert C.; Haase, Gerald M.; Thomas, Patrick R.M.; Grundy, Paul; Green, Daniel M.; D'Angio, Giulio J.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: We undertook this study to determine (1) the frequency with which spilled tumor cells of favorable histology produced intra-abdominal disease in patients treated with differing chemotherapy regimens and abdominal radiation therapy (RT) and (2) the patterns of relapse and outcomes in such patients. Methods and Materials: The influence of RT dose (0, 10, and 20 Gy), RT fields (flank, whole abdomen), and chemotherapy with dactinomycin and vincristine (2 drugs) vs. added doxorubicin (three drugs) on intra-abdominal tumor recurrence rates was analyzed by logistic regression in 450 patients. Each patient was considered at risk for two types of failure: flank and subdiaphragmatic beyond-flank recurrence, with the correlation between the two outcomes accounted for in the analyses. Results: The crude odds ratio for the risk of recurrence relative to no RT was 0.35 (0.15-0.78) for 10Gy and 0.08 (0.01-0.58) for 20Gy. The odds ratio for the risk of recurrence for doxorubicin to two drugs after adjusting for RT was not significant. For Stage II patients (NWTS-4), the 8-year event rates with and without spillage, respectively, were 79% and 87% for relapse-free survival (p = 0.07) and 90% and 95% for overall survival (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Irradiation (10 Gy or 20 Gy) reduced abdominal tumor recurrence rates after tumor spillage. Tumor spillage in Stage II patients reduced relapse-free survival and overall survival, but only the latter was of statistical significance. These data provide a basis for assessing the risks vs. benefits when considering treatment for children with favorable histology Wilms tumor and surgical spillage.

  2. The influence of swimming demand on phenotypic plasticity and morphological integration: a comparison of two polymorphic charr species.

    PubMed

    Peres-Neto, Pedro R; Magnan, Pierre

    2004-06-01

    In northern freshwater lakes, several fish species have populations composed of discrete morphs, usually involving a divergence between benthic and limnetic morphs. Although it has been suggested that swimming demand plays an important role in morphological differentiation, thus influencing habitat selection, it is unclear how it affects reaction norms, patterns in character correlation, and levels of morphological integration. We examined whether swimming demand could induce morphological plasticity in the directions expected under divergent habitat selection, and evaluated its influence on the morphological integration in Arctic charr ( Salvelinus alpinus) and brook charr ( S. fontinalis), two congeneric species exhibiting conspicuous and subtle resource polymorphism, respectively. We found that changes in morphology were induced by differential swimming demands in both species. The length of the pectoral fin was the character that responded most strongly according to the predicted morphological expectations under divergent habitat selection. High levels of morphological plasticity, relatively low levels of integration, and differences found in the morphological correlation structure among water velocity treatments suggest that constraints on morphological change are unlikely in either species, thus allowing great potential for phenotypic flexibility in both species. The magnitude of character integration, however, was larger for Arctic charr than for brook charr. This latter result is discussed in the light of the differences in the level of polymorphism between the two species in the wild. The results of the present study indicate that swimming demand alone may not be sufficient to generate the polymorphism encountered in nature. Given that both diet and swimming demands can induce morphological changes, it would be important to conduct experiments targeting the interaction between the morphological modules related to trophic and swimming demands.

  3. THE EFFECT OF HEPATIC LIPASE ON CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE IN HUMANS IS INFLUENCED BY THE UNDERLYING LIPOPROTEIN PHENOTYPE

    PubMed Central

    BRUNZELL, JOHN D.; ZAMBON, ALBERTO; DEEB, SAMIR S.

    2012-01-01

    Increased or decreased hepatic lipase (HL) activity has been associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). This is consistent with the findings that gene variants that influence HL activity were associated with increased CAD risk in some population studies but not in others. In this review, we will explain the conditions that influence the effects of HL on CAD. Increased HL is associated with smaller and denser LDL (sdLDL) and HDL (HDL3) particles, while decreased HL is associated with larger and more buoyant LDL and HDL particles. The effect of HL activity on CAD risk is dependent on the underlying lipoprotein phenotype or disorder. Central obesity with hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is associated with high HL activity that leads to the formation of sdLDL that is proatherogenic. In the absence of HTG, where large buoyant cholesteryl ester-enriched LDL is prominent, elevation of HL does not raise the risk for CAD. In HTG patients, drug therapy that decreases HL activity selectively decreases sdLDL particles, an antiatherogenic effect. Drug therapy that raises HDL2 cholesterol has not decreased the risk for CAD. In trials where inhibition of cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) or HL occurs, the increase in HDL2 most likely is due to inhibition of catabolism of HDL2 and impairment of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). In patients with isolated hypercholesterolemia, but with normal triglyceride levels and big-buoyant LDL particles, an increase in HL activity is beneficial; possibly because it increases RCT. Drugs that lower HL activity might decrease the risk for CAD only in hypertriglyceridemic patients with sdLDL by selectively clearing sdLDL particles from plasma, which would override the potentially pro-atherogenic effect on RCT. PMID:21986251

  4. Sources of Variation Influencing Concordance between Functional MRI and Direct Cortical Stimulation in Brain Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Melanie A.; Tam, Fred; Garavaglia, Marco M.; Hare, Gregory M. T.; Cusimano, Michael D.; Schweizer, Tom A.; Das, Sunit; Graham, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Object: Preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) remains a promising method to aid in the surgical management of patients diagnosed with brain tumors. For patients that are candidates for awake craniotomies, surgical decisions can potentially be improved by fMRI but this depends on the level of concordance between preoperative brain maps and the maps provided by the gold standard intraoperative method, direct cortical stimulation (DCS). There have been numerous studies of the concordance between fMRI and DCS using sensitivity and specificity measures, however the results are variable across studies and the key factors influencing variability are not well understood. Thus, the present work addresses the influence of technical factors on fMRI and DCS concordance. Methods: Motor and language mapping data were collected for a group of glioma patients (n = 14) who underwent both preoperative fMRI and intraoperative DCS in an awake craniotomy procedure for tumor removal. Normative fMRI data were also acquired in a healthy control group (n = 12). The fMRI and DCS mapping data were co-registered; true positive (TP), true negative (TN), false positive (FP), and false negative (FN) occurrences were tabulated over the exposed brain surface. Sensitivity and specificity were measured for the total group, and for the motor and language sub-groups. The influence of grid placement, fMRI statistical thresholding, and task standardization were assessed. Correlations between proportions of agreement and error were also carefully scrutinized to evaluate concordance in more detail. Results: Concordance was significantly better for motor vs. language mapping. There was an inverse relationship between TP and TN with increasing statistical threshold, and FP dominated the total error. Sensitivity and specificity were reduced when tasks were not standardized across fMRI and DCS. Conclusions: Although the agreement between fMRI and DCS is good, variability is introduced by

  5. A case of familial tumoral calcinosis/hyperostosis-hyperphosphatemia syndrome due to a compound heterozygous mutation in GALNT3 demonstrating new phenotypic features

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrescu, Claudia E.; Kelly, Marilyn H.; Khosravi, Azarmindokht; Hart, Thomas C.; Brahim, Jaime; White, Kenneth E.; Farrow, Emily G.; Nathan, Muriel H.; Murphey, Mark D.; Collins, Michael T.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Familial tumoral calcinosis (FTC) and hyperostosis-hyperphosphatemia syndrome (HHS) are caused by mutations in FGF23, GALNT3, or KLOTHO. They are characterized by hyperphosphatemia, increased phosphate reabsorption, and elevated or inappropriately normal serum 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-D); FTC is associated with calcific masses, and HHS with diaphyseal hyperostosis. Methods A 36-year-old woman presented with abnormal dental x-rays at age 12, and was hyperphosphatemic at 22. She underwent radiographic, biochemical and genetic testing, and medical treatment. Results Serum phosphorus was 7.3 mg/dl (2.5-4.8), TmP/GFR 6.99 mg/100 ml (2.97-4.45), 1,25-D3 35 pg/ml (22-67). Radiographs revealed tooth anomalies, thyroid cartilage calcification, calcific masses in vertebral spaces, calcification of the interstitial septae of the soft tissue in the lower extremities, and cortical thickening of the long bones. Her total hip Z-Score was 1.9. C-terminus serum FGF23 was 1210 RU/ml (20-108), but intact FGF23 was 7.4 pg/ml (10-50). DNA sequencing determined she was a compound heterozygote for mutations in GALNT3. Treatment with niacinamide and acetazolamide decreased TmP/GFR and serum phosphate, which was paralleled by a decrease in serum C-terminus FGF23. Conclusions This case broadens the spectrum of phenotypic and genotypic features of FTC/HHS, and suggests treatments to decrease renal phosphate reabsorption in the setting of a low intact FGF23. PMID:18982401

  6. Influence of large peritumoral vessels on outcome of radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Lu, David S K; Raman, Steven S; Limanond, Piyaporn; Aziz, Donya; Economou, James; Busuttil, Ronald; Sayre, James

    2003-10-01

    The effect of large vessels (>/=3 mm) contiguous to hepatic tumors was evaluated with respect to clinical tumor recurrence rates after radiofrequency (RF) ablation. The first 105 malignant liver tumors treated by RF ablation therapy at our institution with pathologic analysis or a minimum of 6 months of clinical follow-up were reviewed. The original pretreatment imaging studies were reviewed by a radiologist who was blinded to the cases, and, based on lesion contiguity to vessels of at least 3 mm, the lesions were categorized as perivascular or nonperivascular. Treatment outcomes with respect to local tumor recurrence between these two groups were then compared. Logistic regression analysis was performed to take into account other variables and to determine whether this categorization was an independent predictor of treatment outcome. There were 74 nonperivascular tumors and 31 perivascular tumors. Mean tumor size was 2.4 cm and mean follow-up was 11.3 months. Residual or locally recurrent tumors were documented in 20 of 105 cases (19%). In the nonperivascular group, five of 74 (7%) had either incompletely treated tumor (manifested within 6 months) or local recurrence beyond 6 months. In the perivascular group, 15 of 31 (48%) had incompletely treated or locally recurrent tumor (P <.001). Subanalysis of lesion size (61 tumors tumors 2.6-4 cm, and 11 tumors >4 cm), tumor type (40 hepatocellular carcinomas, 48 colorectal metastases, and 17 other metastases), access (53 intraoperative, 52 percutaneous), and RF device (45 Radiotherapeutics electrodes, 18 Rita electrodes, and 42 Radionics electrodes) showed similar results. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that presence or absence of a large peritumoral vessel is an independent, and the dominant, predictor of treatment outcome. The presence of vessels at least 3 mm in size contiguous to hepatic tumors is a strong independent predictor of incomplete tumor destruction by RF ablation. Modified

  7. Influence of a nucleotide oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) polymorphism and NOD2 mutant alleles on Crohn's disease phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Cantó, Elisabet; Ricart, Elena; Busquets, David; Monfort, David; García-Planella, Esther; González, Dolors; Balanzó, Joaquim; Rodríguez-Sánchez, José L; Vidal, Sílvia

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To examine genetic variation of nucleotide oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) and NOD2, their respective influences on Crohn's disease phenotype and gene-gene interactions. METHODS: (ND1+32656*1) NOD1 polymorphism and SNP8, SNP12 and SNP13 of NOD2 were analyzed in 97 patients and 50 controls. NOD2 variants were determined by reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. NOD1 genotyping and NOD2 variant confirmation were performed by specific amplification and sequencing. RESULTS: The distribution of NOD1 polymorphism in patients was different from controls (P = 0.045) and not altered by existence of NOD2 mutations. In this cohort, 30.92% patients and 6% controls carried at least one NOD2 variant (P < 0.001) with R702W being the most frequent variant. Presence of at least one NOD2 mutation was inversely associated with colon involvement (9.09% with colon vs 36.4% with ileal or ileocolonic involvement, P = 0.04) and indicative of risk of penetrating disease (52.63% with penetrating vs 25.64% with non-penetrating or stricturing behavior, P = 0.02). L1007finsC and double NOD2 mutation conferred the highest risk for severity of disease (26.3% with penetrating disease vs 3.8% with non-penetrating or stricturing behavior presented L1007finsC, P = 0.01 and 21.0% with penetrating disease vs 2.5% with non-penentrating or stricturing behavior carried double NOD2 mutation, P = 0.007). Exclusion of patients with NOD2 mutations from phenotype/NOD1-genotype analysis revealed higher prevalence of *1*1 genotype in groups of younger age at onset and colonic location. CONCLUSION: This study suggests population differences in the inheritance of risk NOD1 polymorphism and NOD2 mutations. Although no interaction between NOD1-NOD2 was noticed, a relationship between disease location and Nod-like receptor molecules was established. PMID:17907287

  8. Metastatic spine tumor surgery: does perioperative blood transfusion influence postoperative complications?

    PubMed

    Zaw, Aye Sandar; Kantharajanna, Shashidhar B; Maharajan, Karthikeyan; Tan, Barry; Saparamadu, Amarasinghe A; Kumar, Naresh

    2017-09-16

    The question of independent association between allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) and postoperative complications in cancer surgeries has been controversial and remains so. In metastatic spine tumor surgery (MSTS), previous studies investigated the influence of ABT on survival, but not on postoperative complications. We aimed to evaluate the influence of perioperative ABT on postoperative complications and infections in patients undergoing MSTS. This retrospective study included 247 patients who underwent MSTS at a single tertiary institution between 2005 and 2014. The outcome measures were postoperative complications and infections within 30 days after MSTS. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess influence of blood transfusion on the outcomes after adjusting for potential confounders. Of 247 patients, 133 (54%) received ABT with overall median (range) of 2 (0-10) units. The adjusted odds of developing any postoperative complication was 2.27 times higher in patients with transfusion (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17-4.38; p = 0.01) and 1.24 times higher odds per every unit increase in blood transfusion (95% CI, 1.05-1.46; p < 0.01). Exposure to blood transfusion also increased the odds of having overall postoperative infections (odds ratio, 3.58; 95% CI, 1.15-11.11; p = 0.02) and there were 1.24 times higher odds per every unit increase in transfusion (95% CI, 1.01-1.54; p = 0.04). This study adds evidence to the literature implicating ABT to be influential on postoperative complications and infections in patients undergoing MSTS. Appropriate blood management measures should, therefore, be given a crucial place in the care of these patients so as to reduce any putative effect of blood transfusion. © 2017 AABB.

  9. Factors Influencing the Inhibitory Effect of Selenium on Mice Inoculated with Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greeder, Glenn A.; Milner, J. A.

    1980-08-01

    Selenium, administered to mice with Ehrlich ascites tumors, effectively limited tumor growth. The response was dependent on the chemical form and dose of selenium administered. At the doses administered, there were no detectable adverse effects to the host.

  10. Influence of polymorphisms in the prion protein gene on the pathogenesis and neuropathological phenotype of sheep scrapie after oral infection.

    PubMed

    González, L; Pitarch, J L; Martin, S; Thurston, L; Simmons, H; Acín, C; Jeffrey, M

    2014-01-01

    The prion protein gene (Prnp) plays a crucial role in the susceptibility of sheep to scrapie in terms of attack rate and/or incubation period. However, the influence of Prnp on the pathogenesis of the disease, specifically the involvement of tissues of the lymphoreticular system (LRS), pathways of neuroinvasion and neuropathological phenotypes, remains controversial. This study reports the onset and progression of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(d)) accumulation in the LRS and nervous tissues of sheep of six different Prnp genotypes infected by oral administration of the same mixed scrapie brain homogenate. Sheep homozygous for glutamine (Q) at codon 171 of PrP, with either valine (V) or alanine (A) at codon 136 (i.e. VRQ/VRQ, VRQ/ARQ and ARQ/ARQ), showed early and consistent PrP(d) accumulation in LRS tissues of the pharynx and gut. In contrast, LRS involvement was minimal, inconsistent and occurred late in the incubation period in sheep heterozygous for arginine (R) at codon 171 (i.e. VRQ/ARR and ARQ/ARR). Despite this difference, all five groups were susceptible to infection and developed clinical disease, albeit with significantly different incubation periods (shortest in VRQ/VRQ and longest in ARQ/ARR sheep). The remaining group of ARR/ARR homozygous sheep did not show evidence of infection at the end of the experiment or at previous predetermined time points. As for LRS tissues, the sites of initial PrP(d) accumulation in the brain were determined immunohistochemically. These were the same in all susceptible sheep (except for ARR/ARR sheep), regardless of their Prnp genotype which, together with an early and consistent accumulation of PrP(d) in circumventricular organs and a late or inconsistent involvement of the enteric and autonomic nervous system and of the spinal cord, suggests neuroinvasion occurring via the blood. The neuropathological phenotype (PrP(d) profile in the central nervous system) of clinically affected sheep was similar in the three V

  11. Low-intensity infrared laser radiation influence on the tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheida, A. A.; Efimova, E. G.

    2005-08-01

    Infrared laser radiation of low intensity in exposition dose of 25-35 mJicm2 does not cause progress the tumor process. Moreover, disturbing the blood flow in the tumor due to changing synthesis of norepinephrine and histamine this radiation contributes to the damage of the tumor tissue accompanied by the beginning of adaptation reaction in the organism.

  12. Clinical staging in bitches with mammary tumors: Influence of type and histological grade

    PubMed Central

    Gundim, Lígia F.; de Araújo, Camila P.; Blanca, William T.; Guimarães, Ednaldo C.; Medeiros, Alessandra A.

    2016-01-01

    Breast tumors are the most common tumors in dogs and the study of disease prognostic factors is important for establishing the appropriate treatment protocols. The purpose of this study was to clinically stage mammary tumors of bitches and correlate the stages with histological type and grade. The tumors of 63 dogs were clinically staged based on the findings of tumor sizing, lymph node evaluation, and radiographic examination. After surgical excision, the tumors were classified histologically and graded. The relationship between the tumor grade, stage, and histological type was evaluated using a binomial test. Stage I tumors were the most numerous (31.75%), followed by tumors at stages II, III, IV, and V. Animals with histological grade I carcinomas presented stage I, II, or III tumors more frequently and stage IV and V tumors less frequently. The number of animals with simple carcinomas that were at stage I of the disease was greater than that at stage V. Carcinomas in the mixed tumors were less aggressive; however, the small number of animals in stage V of the disease made any statistical association impossible. The complex carcinomas presented with the invasion of the lymph nodes and less cellular differentiation in a larger number of animals than did simple carcinomas. Histological grading proved to be the best parameter for the prognostic evaluation of the breast carcinomas. PMID:27733787

  13. [Influence of malignant tumors occurring in the reproductive age on spermiogenesis: studies on patients with testicular tumor and lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Molnár, Zsuzsanna; Benyó, Mátyás; Bazsáné Kassai, Zsuzsa; Lévai, Írisz; Varga, Attila; Jakab, Attila

    2014-08-17

    The application of chemo- and radiotherapy results in good survival prognosis for young men with malignant tumors, but long-term gonadoxic effect has to be considered. In addition, malignant disease itself has a negative impact on spermiogenesis. The aim of the authors was to examine the spermiogenetic effect of the most common tumors occurring in the reproductive age in men: testicular cancer, Hodgkin disease and non-Hodgkin disease. Spermiogram of men with testicular cancer (N = 68), Hodgkin disease (N = 37) and non-Hodgkin disease (N = 14) who were referred for sperm cryopreservation were analysed in the Reproductive Andrology Laboratory of the authors. Azoospermia was found in 11.8% of all patients (N = 119), while 58.8% of the patients had oligozoospermia even before the treatment. Sperm concentration of men with testicular cancer was significantly lower than those with lymphomas (32.8 M/mL vs. 24.9 M/mL, p = 0.03). There was no difference in sperm concentration between the Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma groups. Spermiogenetic defect is more pronounced in men with testicular cancer than those with lymphomas. Cryopreservation before treatment for fertility preservation should be offered for all reproductive aged men with malignant disease, especially for those with testicular cancer.

  14. Of mothers and myelin: Aberrant myelination phenotypes in mouse model of Angelman syndrome are dependent on maternal and dietary influences.

    PubMed

    Grier, Mark D; Carson, Robert P; Lagrange, Andre H

    2015-09-15

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a number of neurological problems, including developmental delay, movement disorders, and epilepsy. AS results from the loss of UBE3A (an imprinted gene) expressed from the maternal chromosome in neurons. Given the ubiquitous expression of Ube3a and the devastating nature of AS, the role of environmental and maternal effects has been largely ignored. Severe ataxia, anxiety-like behaviors and learning deficits are well-documented in patients and AS mice. More recently, clinical imaging studies of AS patients suggest myelination may be delayed or reduced. Utilizing a mouse model of AS, we found disrupted expression of cortical myelin proteins, the magnitude of which is influenced by maternal status, in that the aberrant myelination in the AS pups of AS affected mothers were more pronounced than those seen in AS pups raised by unaffected (Ube3a (m+/p-)) Carrier mothers. Furthermore, feeding the breeding mothers a higher fat (11% vs 5%) diet normalizes these myelin defects. These effects are not limited to myelin proteins. Since AS mice have abnormal stress responses, including altered glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression, we measured GR expression in pups from Carrier and affected AS mothers. AS pups had higher GR expression than their WT littermates. However, we also found an effect of maternal status, with reduced GR levels in pups from affected mothers compared to genotypically identical pups raised by unaffected Carrier mothers. Taken together, our findings suggest that the phenotypes observed in AS mice may be modulated by factors independent of Ube3a genotype.

  15. Of mothers and myelin: Aberrant myelination phenotypes in mouse model of Angelman Syndrome are dependent on maternal and dietary influences

    PubMed Central

    Grier, Mark D.; Carson, Robert P.; Lagrange, Andre H.

    2015-01-01

    Angelman Syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a number of neurological problems, including developmental delay, movement disorders and epilepsy. AS results from the loss of UBE3A (an imprinted gene) expressed from the maternal chromosome in neurons. Given the ubiquitous expression of Ube3a and the devastating nature of AS, the role of environmental and maternal effects has been largely ignored. Severe ataxia, anxiety-like behaviors and learning deficits are well-documented in patients and AS mice. More recently, clinical imaging studies of AS patients suggest myelination may be delayed or reduced. Utilizing a mouse model of AS, we found disrupted expression of cortical myelin proteins, the magnitude of which is influenced by maternal status, in that the aberrant myelination in the AS pups of AS affected mothers were more pronounced than those seen in AS pups raised by unaffected (Ube3a (m+/p-)) Carrier mothers. Furthermore, feeding the breeding mothers a higher fat (11% vs 5%) diet normalizes these myelin defects. These effects are not limited to myelin proteins. Since AS mice have abnormal stress responses, including altered glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression, we measured GR expression in pups from Carrier and affected AS mothers. AS pups had higher GR expression than their WT littermates. However, we also found an effect of maternal status, with reduced GR levels in pups from affected mothers compared to genotypically identical pups raised by unaffected Carrier mothers. Taken together, our findings suggest that the phenotypes observed in AS mice may be modulated by factors independent of Ube3a genotype. PMID:26028516

  16. Haemostaseome-associated SNPs: has the thrombotic phenotype a greater influence than ethnicity? GMT study from Aquitaine including Basque individuals.

    PubMed

    Freyburger, Geneviève; Labrouche, Sylvie; Hubert, Christophe; Bauduer, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    The Genetic Markers for Thrombosis (GMT) study compared the relative influence of ethnicity and thrombotic phenotype regarding the distribution of SNPs implicated in haemostasis pathophysiology ("haemostaseome"). We assessed 384 SNPs in three groups, each of 480 subjects: 1) general population of Aquitaine region (Southwestern France) used as control; 2) patients with venous thromboembolism from the same area; and 3) autochthonous Basques, a genetic isolate, who demonstrate unusual characteristics regarding the coagulation system. This study sought to evaluate i) the value of looking for a large number of genes in order to identify new genetic markers of thrombosis, ii) the value of investigating low risk factors and potential preferential associations, iii) the impact of ethnicity on the characterisation of markers for thrombosis. We did not detect any previously unrecognised SNP significantly associated with thrombosis risk or any preferential associations of low-risk factors in patients with thrombosis. The sum of ϰ² values for our 110 significant SNPs demonstrated a smaller genetic distance between patients and controls (321 cumulated ϰ² value) than between Basques and controls (1,570 cumulated ϰ² value). Hence, our study confirms the genetic particularity of Basques especially regarding a significantly lower expression of the non-O blood group (p< 0.0004). This is mitigated by a higher prevalence of factor II Leiden (p< 0.02) while factor V Leiden prevalence does not differ. Numerous other differences covering a wide range of proteins of the haemostaseome may result in an overall different genetic risk for venous thromboembolism.

  17. Influence of vascular normalization on interstitial flow and delivery of liposomes in tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Deniz; Yonucu, Sirin; Yilmaz, Defne; Burcin Unlu, Mehmet

    2015-02-01

    Elevated interstitial fluid pressure is one of the barriers of drug delivery in solid tumors. Recent studies have shown that normalization of tumor vasculature by anti-angiogenic factors may improve the delivery of conventional cytotoxic drugs, possibly by increasing blood flow, decreasing interstitial fluid pressure, and enhancing the convective transvascular transport of drug molecules. Delivery of large therapeutic agents such as nanoparticles and liposomes might also benefit from normalization therapy since their transport depends primarily on convection. In this study, a mathematical model is presented to provide supporting evidence that normalization therapy may improve the delivery of 100 nm liposomes into solid tumors, by both increasing the total drug extravasation and providing a more homogeneous drug distribution within the tumor. However these beneficial effects largely depend on tumor size and are stronger for tumors within a certain size range. It is shown that this size effect may persist under different microenvironmental conditions and for tumors with irregular margins or heterogeneous blood supply.

  18. Extracellular domain shedding influences specific tumor uptake and organ distribution of the EGFR PET tracer 89Zr-imgatuzumab

    PubMed Central

    Pool, Martin; Kol, Arjan; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N.; Gerdes, Christian A.; de Jong, Steven; de Vries, Elisabeth G.E.; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anton G.T.

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical positron emission tomography (PET) imaging revealed a mismatch between in vivo epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression and EGFR antibody tracer tumor uptake. Shed EGFR ectodomain (sEGFR), which is present in cancer patient sera, can potentially bind tracer and therefore influence tracer kinetics. To optimize EGFR-PET, we examined the influence of sEGFR levels on tracer kinetics and tumor uptake of EGFR monoclonal antibody 89Zr-imgatuzumab in varying xenograft models. Human cancer cell lines A431 (EGFR overexpressing, epidermoid), A549 and H441 (both EGFR medium expressing, non-small cell lung cancer) were xenografted in mice. Xenografted mice received 10, 25 or 160 μg 89Zr-imgatuzumab, co-injected with equal doses 111In-IgG control. MicroPET scans were made 24, 72 and 144 h post injection, followed by biodistribution analysis. sEGFR levels in liver and plasma samples were determined by ELISA. 89Zr-imgatuzumab uptake in A431 tumors was highest (29.8 ± 5.4 %ID/g) in the 160 μg dose group. Contrary, highest uptake in A549 and H441 tumors was found at the lowest (10 μg) 89Zr-imgatuzumab dose. High 89Zr-imgatuzumab liver accumulation was found in A431 xenografted mice, which decreased with antibody dose increments. 89Zr-imgatuzumab liver uptake in A549 and H441 xenografted mice was low at all doses. sEGFR levels in liver and plasma of A431 bearing mice were up to 1000-fold higher than levels found in A549, H441 and non-tumor xenografted mice. 89Zr-imgatuzumab effectively visualizes EGFR-expressing tumors. High sEGFR levels can redirect 89Zr-imgatuzumab to the liver, in which case tumor visualization can be improved by increasing tracer antibody dose. PMID:27602494

  19. Versican G3 Promotes Mouse Mammary Tumor Cell Growth, Migration, and Metastasis by Influencing EGF Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Du, William Weidong; Yang, Burton B.; Shatseva, Tatiana A.; Yang, Bing L.; Deng, Zhaoqun; Shan, Sze Wan; Lee, Daniel Y.; Seth, Arun; Yee, Albert J.

    2010-01-01

    Increased versican expression in breast tumors is predictive of relapse and has negative impact on survival rates. The C-terminal G3 domain of versican influences local and systemic tumor invasiveness in pre-clinical murine models. However, the mechanism(s) by which G3 influences breast tumor growth and metastasis is not well characterized. Here we evaluated the expression of versican in mouse mammary tumor cell lines observing that 4T1 cells expressed highest levels while 66c14 cells expressed low levels. We exogenously expressed a G3 construct in 66c14 cells and analyzed its effects on cell proliferation, migration, cell cycle progression, and EGFR signaling. Experiments in a syngeneic orthotopic animal model demonstrated that G3 promoted tumor growth and systemic metastasis in vivo. Activation of pERK correlated with high levels of G3 expression. In vitro, G3 enhanced breast cancer cell proliferation and migration by up-regulating EGFR signaling, and enhanced cell motility through chemotactic mechanisms to bone stromal cells, which was prevented by inhibitor AG 1478. G3 expressing cells demonstrated increased CDK2 and GSK-3β (S9P) expression, which were related to cell growth. The activity of G3 on mouse mammary tumor cell growth, migration and its effect on spontaneous metastasis to bone in an orthotopic model was modulated by up-regulating the EGFR-mediated signaling pathway. Taken together, EGFR-signaling appears to be an important pathway in versican G3-mediated breast cancer tumor invasiveness and metastasis. PMID:21079779

  20. Synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy for rat brain tumor palliation—influence of the microbeam width at constant valley dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serduc, Raphaël; Bouchet, Audrey; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Laissue, Jean A.; Spiga, Jenny; Sarun, Sukhéna; Bravin, Alberto; Fonta, Caroline; Renaud, Luc; Boutonnat, Jean; Siegbahn, Erik Albert; Estève, François; Le Duc, Géraldine

    2009-11-01

    To analyze the effects of the microbeam width (25, 50 and 75 µm) on the survival of 9L gliosarcoma tumor-bearing rats and on toxicity in normal tissues in normal rats after microbeam radiation therapy (MRT), 9L gliosarcomas implanted in rat brains, as well as in normal rat brains, were irradiated in the MRT mode. Three configurations (MRT25, MRT50, MRT75), each using two orthogonally intersecting arrays of either 25, 50 or 75 µm wide microbeams, all spaced 211 µm on center, were tested. For each configuration, peak entrance doses of 860, 480 and 320 Gy, respectively, were calculated to produce an identical valley dose of 18 Gy per individual array at the center of the tumor. Two, 7 and 14 days after radiation treatment, 42 rats were killed to evaluate histopathologically the extent of tumor necrosis, and the presence of proliferating tumors cells and tumor vessels. The median survival times of the normal rats were 4.5, 68 and 48 days for MRT25, 50 and 75, respectively. The combination of the highest entrance doses (860 Gy per array) with 25 µm wide beams (MRT25) resulted in a cumulative valley dose of 36 Gy and was excessively toxic, as it led to early death of all normal rats and of ~50% of tumor-bearing rats. The short survival times, particularly of rats in the MRT25 group, restricted adequate observance of the therapeutic effect of the method on tumor-bearing rats. However, microbeams of 50 µm width led to the best median survival time after 9L gliosarcoma MRT treatment and appeared as the better compromise between tumor control and normal brain toxicity compared with 75 µm or 25 µm widths when used with a 211 µm on-center distance. Despite very high radiation doses, the tumors were not sterilized; viable proliferating tumor cells remained present at the tumor margin. This study shows that microbeam width and peak entrance doses strongly influence tumor responses and normal brain toxicity, even if valley doses are kept constant in all groups. The use of

  1. Synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy for rat brain tumor palliation-influence of the microbeam width at constant valley dose.

    PubMed

    Serduc, Raphaël; Bouchet, Audrey; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Laissue, Jean A; Spiga, Jenny; Sarun, Sukhéna; Bravin, Alberto; Fonta, Caroline; Renaud, Luc; Boutonnat, Jean; Siegbahn, Erik Albert; Estève, François; Le Duc, Géraldine

    2009-11-07

    To analyze the effects of the microbeam width (25, 50 and 75 microm) on the survival of 9L gliosarcoma tumor-bearing rats and on toxicity in normal tissues in normal rats after microbeam radiation therapy (MRT), 9L gliosarcomas implanted in rat brains, as well as in normal rat brains, were irradiated in the MRT mode. Three configurations (MRT25, MRT50, MRT75), each using two orthogonally intersecting arrays of either 25, 50 or 75 microm wide microbeams, all spaced 211 microm on center, were tested. For each configuration, peak entrance doses of 860, 480 and 320 Gy, respectively, were calculated to produce an identical valley dose of 18 Gy per individual array at the center of the tumor. Two, 7 and 14 days after radiation treatment, 42 rats were killed to evaluate histopathologically the extent of tumor necrosis, and the presence of proliferating tumors cells and tumor vessels. The median survival times of the normal rats were 4.5, 68 and 48 days for MRT25, 50 and 75, respectively. The combination of the highest entrance doses (860 Gy per array) with 25 microm wide beams (MRT25) resulted in a cumulative valley dose of 36 Gy and was excessively toxic, as it led to early death of all normal rats and of approximately 50% of tumor-bearing rats. The short survival times, particularly of rats in the MRT25 group, restricted adequate observance of the therapeutic effect of the method on tumor-bearin