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Sample records for influenza virus subtypes

  1. Influenza Type A Viruses and Subtypes

    MedlinePlus

    ... virus infection of humans, such as with Asian-origin highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) viruses currently circulating among poultry in Asia and the Middle East have been reported in 16 countries, often resulting in severe pneumonia with approximately 60% ...

  2. Oligonucleotide microarray for subtyping of influenza A viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotchenko, S. A.; Vasin, A. V.; Sandybaev, N. T.; Plotnikova, M. A.; Chervyakova, O. V.; Smirnova, E. A.; Kushnareva, E. V.; Strochkov, V. M.; Taylakova, E. T.; Egorov, V. V.; Koshemetov, J. K.; Kiselev, O. I.; Sansyzbay, A. R.

    2012-02-01

    Influenza is one of the most widespread respiratory viral diseases, infecting humans, horses, pigs, poultry and some other animal populations. Influenza A viruses (IAV) are classified into subtypes on the basis of the surface hemagglutinin (H1 to H16) and neuraminidase (N1 to N9) glycoproteins. The correct determination of IAV subtype is necessary for clinical and epidemiological studies. In this article we propose an oligonucleotide microarray for subtyping of IAV using universal one-step multisegment RT-PCR fluorescent labeling of viral gene segments. It showed to be an advanced approach for fast detection and identification of IAV.

  3. [On-microchip PCR for detection of influenza A viruses subtypes, circulating in the human population].

    PubMed

    Kostina, E V; Ryabinin, V A; Ternovoi, V A; Sinyakov, A N

    2015-01-01

    A oligonucleotide microchip was developed for revealing Influenza A viruses subtypes, circulating in human population: pandemic H1N1 swine influenza viruses, seasonal H1N1, H2N2, H3N2, H5N1, H9N2, H7N9. Typing of influenza virus was performed by on-microchip PCR. We used immobilized primers-probes selected for the neuraminidase gene that allows determining both subtype of neuraminidase and subtype of hemagglutinin. PMID:26050481

  4. [On-microchip PCR for detection of influenza A viruses subtypes, circulating in the human population].

    PubMed

    Kostina, E V; Ryabinin, V A; Ternovoi, V A; Sinyakov, A N

    2015-01-01

    A oligonucleotide microchip was developed for revealing Influenza A viruses subtypes, circulating in human population: pandemic H1N1 swine influenza viruses, seasonal H1N1, H2N2, H3N2, H5N1, H9N2, H7N9. Typing of influenza virus was performed by on-microchip PCR. We used immobilized primers-probes selected for the neuraminidase gene that allows determining both subtype of neuraminidase and subtype of hemagglutinin.

  5. A Complete Molecular Diagnostic Procedure for Applications in Surveillance and Subtyping of Avian Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chun-Hsien; Tsai, Hsiang-Jung; Chang, Chung-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The following complete molecular diagnostic procedure we developed, based on real-time quantitative PCR and traditional PCR, is effective for avian influenza surveillance, virus subtyping, and viral genome sequencing. Method. This study provides a specific and sensitive step-by-step procedure for efficient avian influenza identification of 16 hemagglutinin and 9 neuraminidase avian influenza subtypes. Result and Conclusion. This diagnostic procedure may prove exceedingly useful for virological and ecological advancements in global avian influenza research. PMID:25057497

  6. Type- and subtype-specific detection of influenza viruses in clinical specimens by rapid culture assay.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, T; Hall, H; Sánchez-Fauquier, A; Gamble, W C; Cox, N J

    1995-02-01

    A rapid culture assay which allows for the simultaneous typing and subtyping of currently circulating influenza A(H1N1), A(H3N2), and B viruses in clinical specimens was developed. Pools of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against influenza A and B viruses and MAbs HA1-71 and HA2-76, obtained by immunizing mice with the denatured hemagglutinin subfragments HA1 and HA2 of influenza virus A/Victoria/3/75, were used for immunoperoxidase staining of antigens in infected MDCK cells. MAb HA1-71 reacted exclusively with influenza A viruses of the H3 subtype, while MAb HA2-76 reacted with subtypes H1, H3, H4, H6, H8, H9, H10, H11, and H12, as determined with 78 human, 4 swine, and 10 avian influenza virus reference strains subtyped by the hemagglutination inhibition test. To determine if the technique can be used as a rapid diagnostic test, 263 known influenza virus-positive frozen nasal or throat swabs were inoculated into MDCK cells. After an overnight incubation, the cells were fixed and viral antigens were detected by immunoperoxidase staining. Influenza A viruses of the H1 and H3 subtypes were detected in 31 and 113 specimens, respectively. The subtypes of 10 influenza A virus-positive specimens could not be determined because they contained too little virus. Influenza B viruses were detected in 84 specimens, and 25 specimens were negative. We conclude that this assay is a rapid, convenient, non-labor-intensive, and relatively inexpensive test for detecting, typing, and subtyping influenza viruses in clinical specimens. PMID:7714186

  7. Integrating Decision Tree and Hidden Markov Model (HMM) for Subtype Prediction of Human Influenza A Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attaluri, Pavan K.; Chen, Zhengxin; Weerakoon, Aruna M.; Lu, Guoqing

    Multiple criteria decision making (MCDM) has significant impact in bioinformatics. In the research reported here, we explore the integration of decision tree (DT) and Hidden Markov Model (HMM) for subtype prediction of human influenza A virus. Infection with influenza viruses continues to be an important public health problem. Viral strains of subtype H3N2 and H1N1 circulates in humans at least twice annually. The subtype detection depends mainly on the antigenic assay, which is time-consuming and not fully accurate. We have developed a Web system for accurate subtype detection of human influenza virus sequences. The preliminary experiment showed that this system is easy-to-use and powerful in identifying human influenza subtypes. Our next step is to examine the informative positions at the protein level and extend its current functionality to detect more subtypes. The web functions can be accessed at http://glee.ist.unomaha.edu/.

  8. Comparative susceptibility of avian species to low pathogenic avian influenza viruses of the H13 subtype

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gulls are widely recognized reservoirs for low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses; however, the subtypes maintained in these populations and/or the transmission mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Although, a wide diversity of influenza viruses have been isolated from gulls, two hemag...

  9. Antigenic Characterization of Recombinant Hemagglutinin Proteins Derived from Different Avian Influenza Virus Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Matthias; Renzullo, Sandra; Brooks, Roxann; Ruggli, Nicolas; Hofmann, Martin A.

    2010-01-01

    Since the advent of highly pathogenic variants of avian influenza virus (HPAIV), the main focus of avian influenza research has been the characterization and detection of HPAIV hemagglutinin (HA) from H5 and H7 subtypes. However, due to the high mutation and reassortation rate of influenza viruses, in theory any influenza strain may acquire increased pathogenicity irrespective of its subtype. A comprehensive antigenic characterization of influenza viruses encompassing all 16 HA and 9 neuraminidase subtypes will provide information useful for the design of differential diagnostic tools, and possibly, vaccines. We have expressed recombinant HA proteins from 3 different influenza virus HA subtypes in the baculovirus system. These proteins were used to generate polyclonal rabbit antisera, which were subsequently employed in epitope scanning analysis using peptide libraries spanning the entire HA. Here, we report the identification and characterization of linear, HA subtype-specific as well as inter subtype-conserved epitopes along the HA proteins. Selected subtype-specific epitopes were shown to be suitable for the differentiation of anti-HA antibodies in an ELISA. PMID:20140098

  10. Universal antibodies against the highly conserved influenza fusion peptide cross-neutralize several subtypes of influenza A virus

    SciTech Connect

    Hashem, Anwar M.; Van Domselaar, Gary; Li, Changgui; Wang, Junzhi; She, Yi-Min; Cyr, Terry D.; Sui, Jianhua; He, Runtao; Marasco, Wayne A.; Li, Xuguang

    2010-12-10

    Research highlights: {yields} The fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza viral hemagglutinins. {yields} Anti-fusion peptide antibodies are universal antibodies that cross-react with all influenza HA subtypes. {yields} The universal antibodies cross-neutralize different influenza A subtypes. {yields} The universal antibodies inhibit the fusion process between the viruses and the target cells. -- Abstract: The fusion peptide of influenza viral hemagglutinin plays a critical role in virus entry by facilitating membrane fusion between the virus and target cells. As the fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza A and B viruses, it could be an attractive target for vaccine-induced immune responses. We previously reported that antibodies targeting the first 14 amino acids of the N-terminus of the fusion peptide could bind to virtually all influenza virus strains and quantify hemagglutinins in vaccines produced in embryonated eggs. Here we demonstrate that these universal antibodies bind to the viral hemagglutinins in native conformation presented in infected mammalian cell cultures and neutralize multiple subtypes of virus by inhibiting the pH-dependant fusion of viral and cellular membranes. These results suggest that this unique, highly-conserved linear sequence in viral hemagglutinin is exposed sufficiently to be attacked by the antibodies during the course of infection and merits further investigation because of potential importance in the protection against diverse strains of influenza viruses.

  11. [Analysis of the Genetic Evolution of Neuraminidases of Influenza A Subtype N9 Viruses].

    PubMed

    Wan, Yong; Tang, Hua

    2015-03-01

    This study analyzed the genetic evolution of neuraminidases (NAs) of influenza A subtype N9 viruses with the aim of determining the genetic origin of the novel avian A/H7N9 influenza virus. The NA sequences of influenza A subtype N9 viruses available from NCBI were used to construct a phylogenetic tree using the programs ClustalX 2.0 and MEGA 6.0. This analysis indicated that the novel avian A/H7N9 influenza virus is located in the modern Eurasian phylogenetic cluster. This cluster was then further analyzed by estimating the overall rate of evolutionary change and the selective pressure at the nucleotide level using the program BEAST 2.1.2 and the web interface Datamonkey, and by generating an amino acid sequence entropy plot using Bioedit software. In this cluster, the mean rate of nucleotide substitutions in NA was found to be 3.8354 x 10(-3) and the mean ratio of non-synonymous (dN) to synonymous (dS) substitutions per site (dN/dS) was 0.140413. A particularly high level of amino acid mutation entropy was identified at nucleotides 16, 19, 40, 53, 81, 84, 112, 256, 335, 359, and 401. This genetic evolution analysis suggests that the nucleotide substitutions that characterize the novel avian A/H7N9 influenza virus neuraminidase are likely to result from the overall genetic evolution of influenza A subtype N9 virus NAs, and not from selective stress. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the influenza A virus (A/duck/Siberia/700/1996(H11N9)) isolated in 1996 appears to be the common ancestor of the more recent influenza A subtype N9 viruses NAs.

  12. Seroepidemiological Evidence of Subtype H3N8 Influenza Virus Infection among Pet Dogs in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pei; Huang, San; Zeng, Weijie; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Lifang; Fu, Xinliang; Li, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    The H3N8 virus and the H3N2 virus are the main subtypes of canine influenza virus (CIV). H3N8 CIV mainly circulates in America, and H3N2 CIV mainly circulates in Asia. However, there was an outbreak of the Asian H3N2 virus in the United States (US) in 2015. Thus, it is important to evaluate the presence of subtype H3N8 virus in dogs in China. From May 2015 to November 2015, 600 sera from pet dogs were collected from Guangzhou, Shanghai, Beijing and Shenzhen for hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays and microneutralization (MN) assays. Fifty-two (8.66%) of the 600 sera were positive for the subtype H3N2 virus, which matched the previous reports. Five (0.83%) of 600 sera were positive for the subtype H3N8 virus (H3N8 EIV or H3N8 AIV or H3N8 CIV), which is the first report of subtype H3N8 virus infection among dogs in China and remind us to play more attention to this subtype virus. Therefore, further serological and virological surveillance of influenza virus infection among dogs in China is imperative. PMID:27414031

  13. Seroepidemiological Evidence of Subtype H3N8 Influenza Virus Infection among Pet Dogs in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Pei; Huang, San; Zeng, Weijie; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Lifang; Fu, Xinliang; Li, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    The H3N8 virus and the H3N2 virus are the main subtypes of canine influenza virus (CIV). H3N8 CIV mainly circulates in America, and H3N2 CIV mainly circulates in Asia. However, there was an outbreak of the Asian H3N2 virus in the United States (US) in 2015. Thus, it is important to evaluate the presence of subtype H3N8 virus in dogs in China. From May 2015 to November 2015, 600 sera from pet dogs were collected from Guangzhou, Shanghai, Beijing and Shenzhen for hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays and microneutralization (MN) assays. Fifty-two (8.66%) of the 600 sera were positive for the subtype H3N2 virus, which matched the previous reports. Five (0.83%) of 600 sera were positive for the subtype H3N8 virus (H3N8 EIV or H3N8 AIV or H3N8 CIV), which is the first report of subtype H3N8 virus infection among dogs in China and remind us to play more attention to this subtype virus. Therefore, further serological and virological surveillance of influenza virus infection among dogs in China is imperative. PMID:27414031

  14. Influenza A Subtype H3 Viruses in Feral Swine, United States, 2011–2012

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhixin; Baroch, John A.; Long, Li-Ping; Xu, Yifei; Cunningham, Frederick L.; Pedersen, Kerri; Lutman, Mark W.; Schmit, Brandon S.; Bowman, Andrew S.; DeLiberto, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether, and to what extent, influenza A subtype H3 viruses were present in feral swine in the United States, we conducted serologic and virologic surveillance during October 2011–September 2012. These animals were periodically exposed to and infected with A(H3N2) viruses, suggesting they may threaten human and animal health. PMID:24751326

  15. Simultaneous detection of influenza A, influenza B, and respiratory syncytial viruses and subtyping of influenza A H3N2 virus and H1N1 (2009) virus by multiplex real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Cui, Dawei; Zheng, Shufa; Yang, Shigui; Tong, Jia; Yang, Dagan; Fan, Jian; Zhang, Jie; Lou, Bin; Li, Xuefen; Zhuge, Xiaoling; Ye, Bo; Chen, Baode; Mao, Weilin; Tan, Yajun; Xu, Genyun; Chen, Zhenjin; Chen, Nan; Li, Lanjuan

    2011-04-01

    A multiplex real-time PCR assay was developed to simultaneously detect and discriminate influenza A virus subtypes, including novel H1N1 (2009) and seasonal H3N2 virus, influenza B virus, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in a single test tube, with detection sensitivity and specificity of 99% and 100%, respectively, for the four pathogens. PMID:21270233

  16. [Simultaneous detection of respiratory viruses and influenza A virus subtypes using multiplex PCR].

    PubMed

    Ciçek, Candan; Bayram, Nuri; Anıl, Murat; Gülen, Figen; Pullukçu, Hüsnü; Saz, Eylem Ulaş; Telli, Canan; Cok, Gürsel

    2014-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the respiratory viruses and subtyping of influenza A virus when positive by multiplex PCR in patients with flu-like symptoms, after the pandemic caused by influenza A (H1N1)pdm09. Nasopharyngeal swab samples collected from 700 patients (313 female, 387 male; age range: 24 days-94 yrs, median age: 1 yr) between December 2010 - January 2013 with flu-like symptoms including fever, headache, sore throat, rhinitis, cough, myalgia as defined by the World Health Organization were included in the study. Nucleic acid extractions (Viral DNA/RNA Extraction Kit, iNtRON, South Korea) and cDNA synthesis (RevertAid First Strand cDNA Synthesis Kits, Fermentas, USA) were performed according to the manufacturer's protocol. Multiplex amplification of nucleic acids was performed using DPO (dual priming oligonucleotide) primers and RV5 ACE Screening Kit (Seegene, South Korea) in terms of the presence of influenza A (INF-A) virus, influenza B (INF-B) virus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and the other respiratory viruses. PCR products were detected by automated polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis using Screen Tape multiple detection system. Specimens which were positive for viral nucleic acids have been further studied by using specific DPO primers, FluA ACE Subtyping and RV15 Screening (Seegene, South Korea) kits. Four INF-A virus subtypes [human H1 (hH1), human H3 (hH3), swine H1 (sH1), avian H5 (aH5)] and 11 other respiratory viruses [Adenovirus, parainfluenza virus (PIV) types 1-4, human bocavirus (HBoV), human metapneumovirus (HMPV), rhinovirus types A and B, human coronaviruses (HCoV) OC43, 229E/NL63] were investigated with those tests. In the study, 53.6% (375/700) of the patients were found to be infected with at least one virus and multiple respiratory virus infections were detected in 15.7% (59/375) of the positive cases, which were mostly (49/59, 83%) in pediatric patients. RSV and rhinovirus coinfections were the most prevalent (18

  17. Genetically Diverse Low Pathogenicity Avian Influenza A Virus Subtypes Co-Circulate among Poultry in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Gerloff, Nancy A.; Khan, Salah Uddin; Zanders, Natosha; Balish, Amanda; Haider, Najmul; Islam, Ausraful; Chowdhury, Sukanta; Rahman, Mahmudur Ziaur; Haque, Ainul; Hosseini, Parviez; Gurley, Emily S.; Luby, Stephen P.; Wentworth, David E.; Donis, Ruben O.; Sturm-Ramirez, Katharine; Davis, C. Todd

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus surveillance, poultry outbreak investigations and genomic sequencing were assessed to understand the ecology and evolution of low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) A viruses in Bangladesh from 2007 to 2013. We analyzed 506 avian specimens collected from poultry in live bird markets and backyard flocks to identify influenza A viruses. Virus isolation-positive specimens (n = 50) were subtyped and their coding-complete genomes were sequenced. The most frequently identified subtypes among LPAI isolates were H9N2, H11N3, H4N6, and H1N1. Less frequently detected subtypes included H1N3, H2N4, H3N2, H3N6, H3N8, H4N2, H5N2, H6N1, H6N7, and H7N9. Gene sequences were compared to publicly available sequences using phylogenetic inference approaches. Among the 14 subtypes identified, the majority of viral gene segments were most closely related to poultry or wild bird viruses commonly found in Southeast Asia, Europe, and/or northern Africa. LPAI subtypes were distributed over several geographic locations in Bangladesh, and surface and internal protein gene segments clustered phylogenetically with a diverse number of viral subtypes suggesting extensive reassortment among these LPAI viruses. H9N2 subtype viruses differed from other LPAI subtypes because genes from these viruses consistently clustered together, indicating this subtype is enzootic in Bangladesh. The H9N2 strains identified in Bangladesh were phylogenetically and antigenically related to previous human-derived H9N2 viruses detected in Bangladesh representing a potential source for human infection. In contrast, the circulating LPAI H5N2 and H7N9 viruses were both phylogenetically and antigenically unrelated to H5 viruses identified previously in humans in Bangladesh and H7N9 strains isolated from humans in China. In Bangladesh, domestic poultry sold in live bird markets carried a wide range of LPAI virus subtypes and a high diversity of genotypes. These findings, combined with the seven year

  18. Genetically Diverse Low Pathogenicity Avian Influenza A Virus Subtypes Co-Circulate among Poultry in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Gerloff, Nancy A; Khan, Salah Uddin; Zanders, Natosha; Balish, Amanda; Haider, Najmul; Islam, Ausraful; Chowdhury, Sukanta; Rahman, Mahmudur Ziaur; Haque, Ainul; Hosseini, Parviez; Gurley, Emily S; Luby, Stephen P; Wentworth, David E; Donis, Ruben O; Sturm-Ramirez, Katharine; Davis, C Todd

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus surveillance, poultry outbreak investigations and genomic sequencing were assessed to understand the ecology and evolution of low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) A viruses in Bangladesh from 2007 to 2013. We analyzed 506 avian specimens collected from poultry in live bird markets and backyard flocks to identify influenza A viruses. Virus isolation-positive specimens (n = 50) were subtyped and their coding-complete genomes were sequenced. The most frequently identified subtypes among LPAI isolates were H9N2, H11N3, H4N6, and H1N1. Less frequently detected subtypes included H1N3, H2N4, H3N2, H3N6, H3N8, H4N2, H5N2, H6N1, H6N7, and H7N9. Gene sequences were compared to publicly available sequences using phylogenetic inference approaches. Among the 14 subtypes identified, the majority of viral gene segments were most closely related to poultry or wild bird viruses commonly found in Southeast Asia, Europe, and/or northern Africa. LPAI subtypes were distributed over several geographic locations in Bangladesh, and surface and internal protein gene segments clustered phylogenetically with a diverse number of viral subtypes suggesting extensive reassortment among these LPAI viruses. H9N2 subtype viruses differed from other LPAI subtypes because genes from these viruses consistently clustered together, indicating this subtype is enzootic in Bangladesh. The H9N2 strains identified in Bangladesh were phylogenetically and antigenically related to previous human-derived H9N2 viruses detected in Bangladesh representing a potential source for human infection. In contrast, the circulating LPAI H5N2 and H7N9 viruses were both phylogenetically and antigenically unrelated to H5 viruses identified previously in humans in Bangladesh and H7N9 strains isolated from humans in China. In Bangladesh, domestic poultry sold in live bird markets carried a wide range of LPAI virus subtypes and a high diversity of genotypes. These findings, combined with the seven year

  19. Genetically Diverse Low Pathogenicity Avian Influenza A Virus Subtypes Co-Circulate among Poultry in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Gerloff, Nancy A; Khan, Salah Uddin; Zanders, Natosha; Balish, Amanda; Haider, Najmul; Islam, Ausraful; Chowdhury, Sukanta; Rahman, Mahmudur Ziaur; Haque, Ainul; Hosseini, Parviez; Gurley, Emily S; Luby, Stephen P; Wentworth, David E; Donis, Ruben O; Sturm-Ramirez, Katharine; Davis, C Todd

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus surveillance, poultry outbreak investigations and genomic sequencing were assessed to understand the ecology and evolution of low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) A viruses in Bangladesh from 2007 to 2013. We analyzed 506 avian specimens collected from poultry in live bird markets and backyard flocks to identify influenza A viruses. Virus isolation-positive specimens (n = 50) were subtyped and their coding-complete genomes were sequenced. The most frequently identified subtypes among LPAI isolates were H9N2, H11N3, H4N6, and H1N1. Less frequently detected subtypes included H1N3, H2N4, H3N2, H3N6, H3N8, H4N2, H5N2, H6N1, H6N7, and H7N9. Gene sequences were compared to publicly available sequences using phylogenetic inference approaches. Among the 14 subtypes identified, the majority of viral gene segments were most closely related to poultry or wild bird viruses commonly found in Southeast Asia, Europe, and/or northern Africa. LPAI subtypes were distributed over several geographic locations in Bangladesh, and surface and internal protein gene segments clustered phylogenetically with a diverse number of viral subtypes suggesting extensive reassortment among these LPAI viruses. H9N2 subtype viruses differed from other LPAI subtypes because genes from these viruses consistently clustered together, indicating this subtype is enzootic in Bangladesh. The H9N2 strains identified in Bangladesh were phylogenetically and antigenically related to previous human-derived H9N2 viruses detected in Bangladesh representing a potential source for human infection. In contrast, the circulating LPAI H5N2 and H7N9 viruses were both phylogenetically and antigenically unrelated to H5 viruses identified previously in humans in Bangladesh and H7N9 strains isolated from humans in China. In Bangladesh, domestic poultry sold in live bird markets carried a wide range of LPAI virus subtypes and a high diversity of genotypes. These findings, combined with the seven year

  20. Prevalence and subtypes of influenza A viruses in wild waterfowl in Norway 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Germundsson, Anna; Madslien, Knut I; Hjortaas, Monika Jankowska; Handeland, Kjell; Jonassen, Christine Monceyron

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of influenza A virus infection, and the distribution of different subtypes of the virus, were studied in 1529 ducks and 1213 gulls shot during ordinary hunting from August to December in two consecutive years, 2006 and 2007, in Norway. The study was based on molecular screening of cloacal and tracheal swabs, using a pan-influenza A RT-PCR. Samples found to be positive for influenza A virus were screened for the H5 subtype, using a H5 specific RT-PCR, and, if negative, further subtyped by a RT-PCR for the 3'-part of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene, encompassing almost the entire HA2, and the full-length of the neuraminidase (NA) gene, followed by sequencing and characterization. The highest prevalence (12.8%) of infection was found in dabbling ducks (Eurasian Wigeon, Common Teal and Mallard). Diving ducks (Common Goldeneye, Common Merganser, Red-breasted Merganser, Common Scoter, Common Eider and Tufted Duck) showed a lower prevalence (4.1%). In gulls (Common Gull, Herring Gull, Black-headed Gull, Lesser Black-headed Gull, Great Black-backed Gull and Kittiwake) the prevalence of influenza A virus was 6.1%. The infection prevalence peaked during October for ducks, and October/November for gulls. From the 16 hemagglutinin subtypes known to infect wild birds, 13 were detected in this study. Low pathogenic H5 was found in 17 dabbling ducks and one gull. PMID:20426812

  1. Receptor-Binding Profiles of H7 Subtype Influenza Viruses in Different Host Species

    PubMed Central

    Gambaryan, Alexandra S.; Matrosovich, Tatyana Y.; Philipp, Jennifer; Munster, Vincent J.; Fouchier, Ron A. M.; Cattoli, Giovanni; Capua, Ilaria; Krauss, Scott L.; Webster, Robert G.; Banks, Jill; Bovin, Nicolai V.; Klenk, Hans-Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Influenza viruses of gallinaceous poultry and wild aquatic birds usually have distinguishable receptor-binding properties. Here we used a panel of synthetic sialylglycopolymers and solid-phase receptor-binding assays to characterize receptor-binding profiles of about 70 H7 influenza viruses isolated from aquatic birds, land-based poultry, and horses in Eurasia and America. Unlike typical duck influenza viruses with non-H7 hemagglutinin (HA), all avian H7 influenza viruses, irrespective of the host species, displayed a poultry-virus-like binding specificity, i.e., preferential binding to sulfated oligosaccharides Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-4(6-O-HSO3)GlcNAc and Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)(6-O-HSO3)GlcNAc. This phenotype correlated with the unique amino acid sequence of the amino acid 185 to 189 loop of H7 HA and seemed to be dependent on ionic interactions between the sulfate group of the receptor and Lys193 and on the lack of sterical clashes between the fucose residue and Gln222. Many North American and Eurasian H7 influenza viruses displayed weak but detectable binding to the human-type receptor moiety Neu5Acα2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc, highlighting the potential of H7 influenza viruses for avian-to-human transmission. Equine H7 influenza viruses differed from other viruses by preferential binding to the N-glycolyl form of sialic acid. Our data suggest that the receptor-binding site of contemporary H7 influenza viruses in aquatic and terrestrial birds was formed after the introduction of their common precursor from ducks to a new host, presumably, gallinaceous poultry. The uniformity of the receptor-binding profile of H7 influenza viruses in various wild and domestic birds indicates that there is no strong receptor-mediated host range restriction in birds on viruses with this HA subtype. This notion agrees with repeated interspecies transmission of H7 influenza viruses from aquatic birds to poultry. PMID:22345462

  2. Protection Against H7 Subtype Influenza Virus Infection in Mice by Passive Transfer of Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo; Liu, Ming; Zheng, Shimin

    2015-10-01

    H7 subtype influenza viruses pose serious threats to both the poultry industry and public health. Recent human infections of avian H7N9 influenza viruses with substantial morbidity and mortality have raised concerns about this virus becoming a potential pandemic pathogen. Neutralizing antibodies have been proven to be highly effective in blocking influenza virus infections. In this study, in order to develop an antibody-based immunoprophylaxis against H7 subtype influenza virus, we first generated a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb) by using a pseudotyped lentiviral vector carrying the hemagglutinin protein of H7 subtype influenza virus. In vitro studies demonstrated that this neutralizing MAb completely inhibited the infection of an H7 subtype influenza virus to cells. The protective efficacy of this MAb was then further tested in a mouse model. It was shown that passive immunization of this MAb protected mice from local virus challenge. Results of the current study lay a foundation for the development of neutralizing MAb-mediated prophylactic strategies to combat human H7 influenza virus infections. PMID:26492625

  3. Prevalence of multiple subtypes of influenza A virus in Japanese wild raccoons.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Emi; Sashika, Mariko; Fujii, Kei; Kobayashi, Kohei; Bui, Vuong Nghia; Ogawa, Haruko; Imai, Kunitoshi

    2014-08-30

    Raccoons (Procyon lotor), which are not native to Japan, have been suspected to transmit various pathogens by frequent intrusion into agricultural and residential areas. To determine influenza A virus seropositivity in raccoons in Japan, we examined a total of 634 raccoons captured in 19 towns (A-S) from 2009 to 2012. Agar gel precipitation tests showed that the antibody prevalence was 1.89% (12/634). All positive raccoons were captured in three towns (A-C) located within a radius of approximately 30km, and 75% had antibodies to multiple subtypes (H1, H3-5, N1, N6, and N8). H3 and N8 antibodies were most frequently detected (75%). Among all the raccoons captured, 67% (8/12) were found in town A in 2009 and 2010, and all five raccoons captured in 2010 had H3 and N8 antibodies, suggesting that transmission of the subtype might occur. H5 and N1 antibodies were also detected in two raccoons captured in town A. Virus neutralization tests examining the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 subtype (four isolates of which have been detected in Japan to date) and the low PAIV (LPAIV) H5N3 subtype showed that raccoon sera highly cross-reacted with three H5N1 strains (clade 2.5: Ck/Yamaguchi/7/04; clade 2.3.2.1: Whooper swan/Hokkaido/1/08 and Whooper swan/Hamanaka/11), while they displayed a low cross-reactivity with the antisera to the clade 2.2 virus (Ck/Miyazaki/K11/07) and H5N3 LPAIV (Whistling swan/Shimane/499/83). Thus, the origin of the H5N1 virus was not clearly defined. The viral M gene was detected in four antibody-negative raccoons captured in three towns by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) with high Ct values, although no virus was isolated. This study is the first report showing that raccoons of Japan were infected with multiple subtypes of influenza A virus, including H5N1. It remains to be elucidated how raccoons play a role in persistence of influenza A virus in nature and if they could pose risks to animal

  4. Newly Emergent Highly Pathogenic H5N9 Subtype Avian Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Wang, Xingbo; Jin, Tao; Wang, Hailong; Si, Weiying; Yang, Hui; Wu, Jiusheng; Yan, Yan; Liu, Guang; Sang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Xiaopeng; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu; Yu, Xinfen; Pan, Jingcao; Gao, George F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The novel H7N9 avian influenza virus (AIV) was demonstrated to cause severe human respiratory infections in China. Here, we examined poultry specimens from live bird markets linked to human H7N9 infection in Hangzhou, China. Metagenomic sequencing revealed mixed subtypes (H5, H7, H9, N1, N2, and N9). Subsequently, AIV subtypes H5N9, H7N9, and H9N2 were isolated. Evolutionary analysis showed that the hemagglutinin gene of the novel H5N9 virus originated from A/Muscovy duck/Vietnam/LBM227/2012 (H5N1), which belongs to clade 2.3.2.1. The neuraminidase gene of the novel H5N9 virus originated from human-infective A/Hangzhou/1/2013 (H7N9). The six internal genes were similar to those of other H5N1, H7N9, and H9N2 virus strains. The virus harbored the PQRERRRKR/GL motif characteristic of highly pathogenic AIVs at the HA cleavage site. Receptor-binding experiments demonstrated that the virus binds α-2,3 sialic acid but not α-2,6 sialic acid. Identically, pathogenicity experiments also showed that the virus caused low mortality rates in mice. This newly isolated H5N9 virus is a highly pathogenic reassortant virus originating from H5N1, H7N9, and H9N2 subtypes. Live bird markets represent a potential transmission risk to public health and the poultry industry. IMPORTANCE This investigation confirms that the novel H5N9 subtype avian influenza A virus is a reassortant strain originating from H5N1, H7N9, and H9N2 subtypes and is totally different from the H5N9 viruses reported before. The novel H5N9 virus acquired a highly pathogenic H5 gene and an N9 gene from human-infecting subtype H7N9 but caused low mortality rates in mice. Whether this novel H5N9 virus will cause human infections from its avian host and become a pandemic subtype is not known yet. It is therefore imperative to assess the risk of emergence of this novel reassortant virus with potential transmissibility to public health. PMID:26085150

  5. Broad-spectrum detection of H5 subtype influenza A viruses with a new fluorescent immunochromatography system.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Akira; Takayama, Katsuyoshi; Nomura, Namiko; Munakata, Tsubasa; Yamamoto, Naoki; Tamura, Tsuruki; Yamada, Jitsuho; Hashimoto, Masako; Kuwahara, Kazuhiko; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Suda, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Yukuharu; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Kida, Hiroshi; Kohara, Michinori; Shibasaki, Futoshi

    2013-01-01

    Immunochromatography (IC) is an antigen-detection assay that plays an important role in the rapid diagnosis of influenza virus because the protocol is short time and easy to use. Despite the usability of IC, the sensitivity is approximately 10(3) pfu per reaction. In addition, antigen-antibody interaction-based method cannot be used for the detection of influenza viruses with major antigenic change. In this study, we established the use of fluorescent immunochromatography (FLIC) to detect a broad spectrum of H5 subtype influenza A viruses. This method has improved sensitivity 10-100 fold higher than traditional IC because of the use of fluorescent conjugated beads. Our Type-E FLIC kit detected all of the H5 subtype influenza viruses that were examined, as well as recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) proteins (rHAs) belonging to the Eurasian H5 subtype viruses and the Type-N diagnosed North American H5 subtype influenza A viruses. Thus, this kit has the improved potential to detect H5 subtype influenza viruses of different clades with both Type-E and Type-N FLIC kits. Compared with PCR-based diagnosis, FLIC has a strong advantage in usability, because the sample preparation required for FLIC is only mix-and-drop without any additional steps such as RNA extraction. Our results can provide new strategies against the spread and transmission of HPAI H5N1 viruses in birds and mammals including humans.

  6. Neutrality, cross-immunity and subtype dominance in avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Brown, Vicki L; Drake, John M; Barton, Heather D; Stallknecht, David E; Brown, Justin D; Rohani, Pejman

    2014-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) are considered a threat for their potential to seed human influenza pandemics. Despite their acknowledged importance, there are significant unknowns regarding AIV transmission dynamics in their natural hosts, wild birds. Of particular interest is the difference in subtype dynamics between human and bird populations-in human populations, typically only two or three subtypes cocirculate, while avian populations are capable of simultaneously hosting a multitude of subtypes. One species in particular-ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres)--has been found to harbour a very wide range of AIV subtypes, which could make them a key player in the spread of new subtypes in wild bird populations. Very little is known about the mechanisms that drive subtype dynamics in this species, and here we address this gap in our knowledge. Taking advantage of two independent sources of data collected from ruddy turnstones in Delaware Bay, USA, we examine patterns of subtype diversity and dominance at this site. We compare these patterns to those produced by a stochastic, multi-strain transmission model to investigate possible mechanisms that are parsimonious with the observed subtype dynamics. We find, in agreement with earlier experimental work, that subtype differences are unnecessary to replicate the observed dynamics, and that neutrality alone is sufficient. We also evaluate the role of subtype cross-immunity and find that it is not necessary to generate patterns consistent with observations. This work offers new insights into the mechanisms behind subtype diversity and dominance in a species that has the potential to be a key player in AIV dynamics in wild bird populations.

  7. Evidence for genetic variation of Eurasian avian influenza viruses, subtype H15: The first report of an H15N7 virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An avian influenza virus (AIV) subtype H15N7 was isolated in 2010 during wild bird surveillance conducted in Ukraine (A/mallard/Novomychalivka/2-23-12/10). This particular subtype combination has not been previously reported. Until now, only seven subtype H15 viruses have been isolated worldwide, ...

  8. Rapid and sensitive detection of avian influenza virus subtype H7 using NASBA.

    PubMed

    Collins, Richard A; Ko, Lung-Sang; Fung, King-Yip; Chan, Ka-Yun; Xing, Jun; Lau, Lok-Ting; Yu, Albert Cheung Hoi

    2003-01-10

    Nucleic acid sequence-based amplification with electrochemiluminescent detection (NASBA/ECL) is an isothermal technique allowing rapid amplification and detection of specific regions of nucleic acid from a diverse range of sources. It is especially suitable for amplifying RNA. A NASBA/ECL technique has been developed allowing the detection of RNA from avian influenza virus subtype H7 derived from allantoic fluid harvested from inoculated chick embryos and from cell cultures. Degenerate amplification primers and amplicon capture probes were designed enabling the detection of low and highly pathogenic avian influenza of the H7 subtype from the Eurasian and North American lineages and the Australian sub-lineage. The NASBA/ECL technique is specific for subtype H7 and does not cross-react with other influenza subtypes or with viruses containing haemagglutinin-like genes. The assay is 10- to 100-fold more sensitive than a commercially available antigen capture immunoassay system. The NASBA/ECL assay could be used in high throughput poultry screening programmes.

  9. Differentiation of human influenza A viruses including the pandemic subtype H1N1/2009 by conventional multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Yuki; Odagiri, Takashi; Okada, Takashi; Khandaker, Irona; Shimabukuro, Kozue; Sawayama, Rumi; Suzuki, Akira; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2010-09-01

    April 2009 witnessed the emergence of a novel H1N1 influenza A virus infecting the human population. Currently, pandemic and seasonal influenza viruses are co-circulating in human populations. Understanding the course of the emerging pandemic virus is important. It is still unknown how the novel virus co-circulates with or outcompetes seasonal viruses. Sustainable and detailed influenza surveillance is required throughout the world including developing countries. In the present study, a multiplex PCR using four primers was developed, which was designed to differentiate the pandemic H1N1 virus from the seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 viruses, to obtain amplicons of different sizes. Multiplex PCR analysis could clearly differentiate the three subtypes of human influenza A virus. This assay was performed using 206 clinical samples collected in 2009 in Japan. Between February and April, four samples were subtyped as seasonal H1N1 and four as seasonal H3N2. All samples collected after July were subtyped as pandemic H1N1. Currently, pandemic viruses seem to have replaced seasonal viruses almost completely in Japan. This is a highly sensitive method and its cost is low. Influenza surveillance using this assay would provide significant information on the epidemiology of both pandemic and seasonal influenza.

  10. Evidence for seasonal patterns in the relative abundance of avian influenza virus subtypes in blue-winged teal (Anas discors)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andrew M.; Poulson, Rebecca L.; González-Reiche, Ana S.; Wilcox, Benjamin R.; Walther, Patrick; Link, Paul; Carter, Deborah L.; Newsome, George M.; Müller, Maria L.; Berghaus, Roy D.; Perez, Daniel R.; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Stallknecht, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal dynamics of influenza A viruses (IAVs) are driven by host density and population immunity. Through an analysis of subtypic data for IAVs isolated from Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors), we present evidence for seasonal patterns in the relative abundance of viral subtypes in spring and summer/autumn.

  11. PB2 subunit of avian influenza virus subtype H9N2: a pandemic risk factor.

    PubMed

    Sediri, Hanna; Thiele, Swantje; Schwalm, Folker; Gabriel, Gülsah; Klenk, Hans-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses of subtype H9N2 that are found worldwide are occasionally transmitted to humans and pigs. Furthermore, by co-circulating with other influenza subtypes, they can generate new viruses with the potential to also cause zoonotic infections, as observed in 1997 with H5N1 or more recently with H7N9 and H10N8 viruses. Comparative analysis of the adaptive mutations in polymerases of different viruses indicates that their impact on the phylogenetically related H9N2 and H7N9 polymerases is higher than on the non-related H7N7 and H1N1pdm09 polymerases. Analysis of polymerase reassortants composed of subunits of different viruses demonstrated that the efficient enhancement of polymerase activity by H9N2-PB2 does not depend on PA and PB1. These observations suggest that the PB2 subunit of the H9N2 polymerase has a high adaptive potential and may therefore be an important pandemic risk factor. PMID:26560088

  12. Cross-reactivity between avian influenza A (H7N9) virus and divergent H7 subtypic- and heterosubtypic influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li; Wang, Dayan; Zhou, Hongli; Wu, Chao; Gao, Xin; Xiao, Yan; Ren, Lili; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Shu, Yuelong; Jin, Qi; Wang, Jianwei

    2016-01-01

    The number of human avian H7N9 influenza infections has been increasing in China. Understanding their antigenic and serologic relationships is crucial for developing diagnostic tools and vaccines. Here, we evaluated the cross-reactivities and neutralizing activities among H7 subtype influenza viruses and between H7N9 and heterosubtype influenza A viruses. We found strong cross-reactivities between H7N9 and divergent H7 subtypic viruses, including H7N2, H7N3, and H7N7. Antisera against H7N2, H7N3, and H7N7 could also effectively neutralize two distinct H7N9 strains. Two-way cross-reactivities exist within group 2, including H3 and H4, whereas one-way cross-reactivities were found across other groups, including H1, H10, H9, and H13. Our data indicate that the hemaglutinins from divergent H7 subtypes may facilitate the development of vaccines for distinct H7N9 infections. Moreover, serologic diagnoses for H7N9 infections need to consider possible interference from the cross-reactivity of H7N9 with other subtype influenza viruses. PMID:26907865

  13. Subtype-specific influenza A virus antibodies in Canada geese (Branta canadensis).

    PubMed

    Kistler, Whitney M; Stallknecht, David E; DeLiberto, Thomas J; Van Why, Kyle; Yabsley, Michael J

    2015-06-12

    Historically, surveillance for influenza A viruses (IAVs) in wild birds has relied on viral detection assays. This was largely due to poor performance of serological assays in wild birds; however, recently developed commercial serological assays have improved the ability to detect IAV antibodies in wild birds. Serological surveillance for IAV antibodies in Canada geese (Branta canadensis) has shown that, despite a low prevalence of virus isolations, Canada geese are frequently exposed to IAVs and that exposure increases with latitude, which follows virus isolation prevalence patterns observed in dabbling ducks. The objectives of this study were to further evaluate IAV antibodies in Canada geese using a subtype-specific serological assay to determine if Canada geese are exposed to subtypes that commonly circulate in dabbling ducks. We collected serum samples from Canada geese in Minnesota, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin and tested for antibodies to IAVs using a blocking ELISA. Positive samples were further tested by hemagglutination inhibition for 10 hemagglutinin IAV subtypes (H1-H10). Overall, we detected antibodies to NP in 24% (714/2919) of geese. Antibodies to H3, H4, H5, and H6 subtypes predominated, with H5 being detected most frequently. A decrease in H5 HI antibody prevalence and titers was observed from 2009 to 2012. We also detected similar exposure pattern in Canada geese from New Jersey, Minnesota, Washington and Wisconsin. Based on the published literature, H3, H4, and H6 viruses are the most commonly reported IAVs from dabbling ducks. These results indicate that Canada geese also are frequently exposed to viruses of the same HA subtypes; however, the high prevalence of antibodies to H5 viruses was not expected as H5 IAVs are generally not well represented in reported isolates from ducks.

  14. Surveillance for influenza virus subtypes H1, H2 and H3 among wild birds in Ukraine in 2006-2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Influenza is one of the most important and unpredictable diseases of humans, other mammals and birds. Influenza virus of H1, H2, and H3 subtypes circulate in humans and cause seasonal influenza. Similar subtypes are also circulating in the natural reservoir, wild aquatic birds, and und...

  15. Replication and transmission of mammalian-adapted H9 subtype influenza virus in pigs and quail

    PubMed Central

    Obadan, Adebimpe O.; Kimble, Brian J.; Rajao, Daniela; Lager, Kelly; Santos, Jefferson J. S.; Vincent, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a major pathogen of birds, swine and humans. Strains can jump between species in a process often requiring mutations and reassortment, resulting in outbreaks and, potentially, pandemics. H9N2 avian influenza is predominant in poultry across Asia and occasionally infects humans and swine. Pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) is endemic in humans and swine and has a history of reassortment in pigs. Previous studies have shown the compatibility of H9N2 and H1N1pdm for reassortment in ferrets, a model for human infection and transmission. Here, the effects of ferret adaptation of H9 surface gene segments on the infectivity and transmission in at-risk natural hosts, specifically swine and quail, were analysed. Reassortant H9N1 and H9N2 viruses, carrying seven or six gene segments from H1N1pdm, showed infectivity and transmissibility in swine, unlike the wholly avian H9N2 virus with ferret-adapted surface genes. In quail, only the reassortant H9N2 with the six internal gene segments from the H1N1pdm strain was able to infect and transmit, although less efficiently than the wholly avian H9N2 virus with ferret-adapted surface genes. These results highlight that ferret-adapted mutations on the haemagglutinin of H9 subtype virus do not restrict the ability of the virus to infect swine and quail, and that the ability to transmit in these species depends on the context of the whole virus. As such, this study emphasizes the threat that H9N2 reassortant viruses pose to humans and agricultural species and the importance of the genetic constellation of the virus to its ability to replicate and transmit in natural hosts of influenza. PMID:25986634

  16. Genetic analysis of H3 subtype influenza viruses isolated from domestic ducks in northern China during 2004-2005.

    PubMed

    Pu, Juan; Liu, Qin-Fang; Xia, Ying-Ju; Fan, Yu-Lei; Brown, Earl G; Tian, Fu-Lin; Liu, Jin-Hua

    2009-02-01

    The broad distribution and prevalence of H3 subtype influenza viruses in avian and mammalian hosts constitutes a global threat to both human and veterinary health. In this present study, six H3N8 influenza viruses isolated from domestic ducks during 2004-2005 in northern China were genetically and phylogenetically characterized. Sequence analysis showed that HA, NA, and M genes of all the six H3N8 isolates had a close relationship with those of Equine/Jilin/1/89 (H3N8) virus, which once caused outbreak in equine populations in northern China. The PB2 and PA genes of the viruses possessed the highest similarities with highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza viruses currently circulating in this region. These findings emphasize the importance of avian influenza virus surveillance in this region for understanding the genesis and emergency of novel reassortants with pandemic potential.

  17. Riems influenza a typing array (RITA): An RT-qPCR-based low density array for subtyping avian and mammalian influenza a viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Bernd; Hoffmann, Donata; Henritzi, Dinah; Beer, Martin; Harder, Timm C.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and sensitive diagnostic approaches are of the utmost importance for the detection of humans and animals infected by specific influenza virus subtype(s). Cascade-like diagnostics starting with the use of pan-influenza assays and subsequent subtyping devices are normally used. Here, we demonstrated a novel low density array combining 32 TaqMan® real-time RT-PCR systems in parallel for the specific detection of the haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) subtypes of avian and porcine hosts. The sensitivity of the newly developed system was compared with that of the pan-influenza assay, and the specificity of all RT-qPCRs was examined using a broad panel of 404 different influenza A virus isolates representing 45 different subtypes. Furthermore, we analysed the performance of the RT-qPCR assays with diagnostic samples obtained from wild birds and swine. Due to the open format of the array, adaptations to detect newly emerging influenza A virus strains can easily be integrated. The RITA array represents a competitive, fast and sensitive subtyping tool that requires neither new machinery nor additional training of staff in a lab where RT-qPCR is already established. PMID:27256976

  18. Phylogenetic analysis and pathogenicity of H3 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from live poultry markets in China.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongrui; Shi, Ying; Ruan, Tao; Li, Xuesong; Teng, Qiaoyang; Chen, Hongjun; Yang, Jianmei; Liu, Qinfang; Li, Zejun

    2016-01-01

    H3 subtype influenza A virus is one of the main subtypes that threats both public and animal health. However, the evolution and pathogenicity of H3 avian influenza virus (AIV) circulating in domestic birds in China remain largely unclear. In this study, seven H3 AIVs (four H3N2 and three H3N8) were isolated from poultry in live poultry market (LPM) in China. Phylogenetic analyses of full genomes showed that all viruses were clustered into Eurasian lineage, except N8 genes of two H3N8 isolates fell into North American lineage. Intriguingly, the N8 gene of one H3N8 and PB2, PB1, NP and NS of two H3N2 isolates have close relationship with those of the highly pathogenic H5N8 viruses circulating in Korea and United States, suggesting that the H3-like AIV may contribute internal genes to the highly pathogenic H5N8 viruses. Phylogenetic tree of HA gene and antigenic cross-reactivity results indicated that two antigenically different H3 viruses are circulating in LPM in China. Most of the H3 viruses replicated in mice lung and nasal turbinate without prior adaptation, and the representative H3 viruses infected chickens without causing clinical signs. The reassortment of H3 subtype influenza viruses warrants continuous surveillance in LPM in China. PMID:27270298

  19. Phylogenetic analysis and pathogenicity of H3 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from live poultry markets in China

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hongrui; Shi, Ying; Ruan, Tao; Li, Xuesong; Teng, Qiaoyang; Chen, Hongjun; Yang, Jianmei; Liu, Qinfang; Li, Zejun

    2016-01-01

    H3 subtype influenza A virus is one of the main subtypes that threats both public and animal health. However, the evolution and pathogenicity of H3 avian influenza virus (AIV) circulating in domestic birds in China remain largely unclear. In this study, seven H3 AIVs (four H3N2 and three H3N8) were isolated from poultry in live poultry market (LPM) in China. Phylogenetic analyses of full genomes showed that all viruses were clustered into Eurasian lineage, except N8 genes of two H3N8 isolates fell into North American lineage. Intriguingly, the N8 gene of one H3N8 and PB2, PB1, NP and NS of two H3N2 isolates have close relationship with those of the highly pathogenic H5N8 viruses circulating in Korea and United States, suggesting that the H3-like AIV may contribute internal genes to the highly pathogenic H5N8 viruses. Phylogenetic tree of HA gene and antigenic cross-reactivity results indicated that two antigenically different H3 viruses are circulating in LPM in China. Most of the H3 viruses replicated in mice lung and nasal turbinate without prior adaptation, and the representative H3 viruses infected chickens without causing clinical signs. The reassortment of H3 subtype influenza viruses warrants continuous surveillance in LPM in China. PMID:27270298

  20. Multiplex RT-PCR and indirect immunofluorescence assays for detection and subtyping of human influenza virus in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ben M'hadheb, Manel; Harrabi, Myriam; Souii, Amira; Jrad-Battikh, Nadia; Gharbi, Jawhar

    2015-03-01

    Influenza viruses are negative stranded segmented RNA viruses belonging to Orthomyxoviridae family. They are classified into three types A, B, and C. Type A influenza viruses are classified into subtypes according to the antigenic characters of the surface glycoproteins: hemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N). The aim of the present study is to develop a fast and reliable multiplex RT-PCR technique for detecting simultaneously the subtypes A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 of influenza virus. Our study included 398 patients (mean age 30.33 ± 19.92 years) with flu or flu-like syndromes, consulting physicians affiliated with collaborating teams. A multiplex RT-PCR detecting A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 influenza viruses and an examination by indirect immunofluorescence (IFI) were performed. In the optimized conditions, we diagnosed by IFI a viral infection in 90 patients (22.6 %): 85 cases of influenza type A, four cases of influenza type B, and only one case of coinfection with types A and B. An evaluation of the technique was performed on 19 clinical specimens positive in IFI, and we detected eight cases of A/H3N2, five cases of A/H1N1, one case of influenza virus type A which is not an H1N1 nor H3N2, and five negative cases. Multiplex RT-PCR is a sensitive technique allowing an effective and fast diagnosis of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in which the optimization often collides with problems of sensibility.

  1. Isolation of mixed subtypes of influenza A virus from a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Goyal, Sagar M; Jindal, Naresh; Chander, Yogesh; Ramakrishnan, Muthanan A; Redig, Patrick T; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2010-07-28

    From April 2007 to March 2008, cloacal swabs were obtained from 246 casualty raptors recovered by various wildlife rehabilitation centers in the United States. The swabs were placed in a virus transport medium and transported to the laboratory on ice packs. At the laboratory, the samples were pooled with each pool consisting of five samples. All pools (n = 50) were screened for the presence of avian influenza virus (AIV) using a real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR); one of the pools was found positive. All five samples in this pool were tested individually by rRT-PCR; one sample from a bald eagle was found positive. This sample was inoculated in embryonated chicken eggs for virus isolation and a hemagglutinating virus was isolated. Complete genome sequencing of the isolate revealed a mixed infection with H1N1 and H2N1 subtypes. Further analysis revealed that the PB1-F2 gene sequence of H1N1 virus had the N66S virulence-associated substitution. Further studies on ecology and epidemiology of AIV in raptors are needed to help understand their role in the maintenance and evolution of AIV.

  2. Isolation of mixed subtypes of influenza A virus from a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Goyal, Sagar M; Jindal, Naresh; Chander, Yogesh; Ramakrishnan, Muthanan A; Redig, Patrick T; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2010-01-01

    From April 2007 to March 2008, cloacal swabs were obtained from 246 casualty raptors recovered by various wildlife rehabilitation centers in the United States. The swabs were placed in a virus transport medium and transported to the laboratory on ice packs. At the laboratory, the samples were pooled with each pool consisting of five samples. All pools (n = 50) were screened for the presence of avian influenza virus (AIV) using a real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR); one of the pools was found positive. All five samples in this pool were tested individually by rRT-PCR; one sample from a bald eagle was found positive. This sample was inoculated in embryonated chicken eggs for virus isolation and a hemagglutinating virus was isolated. Complete genome sequencing of the isolate revealed a mixed infection with H1N1 and H2N1 subtypes. Further analysis revealed that the PB1-F2 gene sequence of H1N1 virus had the N66S virulence-associated substitution. Further studies on ecology and epidemiology of AIV in raptors are needed to help understand their role in the maintenance and evolution of AIV. PMID:20667110

  3. Isolation of mixed subtypes of influenza A virus from a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    From April 2007 to March 2008, cloacal swabs were obtained from 246 casualty raptors recovered by various wildlife rehabilitation centers in the United States. The swabs were placed in a virus transport medium and transported to the laboratory on ice packs. At the laboratory, the samples were pooled with each pool consisting of five samples. All pools (n = 50) were screened for the presence of avian influenza virus (AIV) using a real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR); one of the pools was found positive. All five samples in this pool were tested individually by rRT-PCR; one sample from a bald eagle was found positive. This sample was inoculated in embryonated chicken eggs for virus isolation and a hemagglutinating virus was isolated. Complete genome sequencing of the isolate revealed a mixed infection with H1N1 and H2N1 subtypes. Further analysis revealed that the PB1-F2 gene sequence of H1N1 virus had the N66S virulence-associated substitution. Further studies on ecology and epidemiology of AIV in raptors are needed to help understand their role in the maintenance and evolution of AIV. PMID:20667110

  4. Continuing Reassortant of H5N6 Subtype Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus in Guangdong.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Runyu; Wang, Zheng; Kang, Yinfeng; Wu, Jie; Zou, Lirong; Liang, Lijun; Song, Yingchao; Zhang, Xin; Ni, Hanzhong; Lin, Jinyan; Ke, Changwen

    2016-01-01

    First identified in May 2014 in China's Sichuan Province, initial cases of H5N6 avian influenza virus (AIV) infection in humans raised great concerns about the virus's prevalence, origin, and development. To evaluate both AIV contamination in live poultry markets (LPMs) and the risk of AIV infection in humans, we have conducted surveillance of LPMs in Guangdong Province since 2013 as part of environmental sampling programs. With environmental samples associated with these LPMs, we performed genetic and phylogenetic analyses of 10 H5N6 AIVs isolated from different cities of Guangdong Province from different years. Results revealed that the H5N6 viruses were reassortants with hemagglutinin (HA) genes derived from clade 2.3.4.4 of H5-subtype AIV, yet neuraminidase (NA) genes derived from H6N6 AIV. Unlike the other seven H5N6 viruses isolated in first 7 months of 2014, all of which shared remarkable sequence similarity with the H5N1 AIV in all internal genes, the PB2 genes of GZ693, GZ670, and ZS558 more closely related to H6N6 AIV and the PB1 gene of GZ693 to the H3-subtype AIV. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the environmental H5N6 AIV related closely to human H5N6 AIVs isolated in Guangdong. These results thus suggest that continued reassortment has enabled the emergence of a novel H5N6 virus in Guangdong, as well as highlight the potential risk of highly pathogenic H5N6 AIVs in the province.

  5. Continuing Reassortant of H5N6 Subtype Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus in Guangdong

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Runyu; Wang, Zheng; Kang, Yinfeng; Wu, Jie; Zou, Lirong; Liang, Lijun; Song, Yingchao; Zhang, Xin; Ni, Hanzhong; Lin, Jinyan; Ke, Changwen

    2016-01-01

    First identified in May 2014 in China's Sichuan Province, initial cases of H5N6 avian influenza virus (AIV) infection in humans raised great concerns about the virus's prevalence, origin, and development. To evaluate both AIV contamination in live poultry markets (LPMs) and the risk of AIV infection in humans, we have conducted surveillance of LPMs in Guangdong Province since 2013 as part of environmental sampling programs. With environmental samples associated with these LPMs, we performed genetic and phylogenetic analyses of 10 H5N6 AIVs isolated from different cities of Guangdong Province from different years. Results revealed that the H5N6 viruses were reassortants with hemagglutinin (HA) genes derived from clade 2.3.4.4 of H5-subtype AIV, yet neuraminidase (NA) genes derived from H6N6 AIV. Unlike the other seven H5N6 viruses isolated in first 7 months of 2014, all of which shared remarkable sequence similarity with the H5N1 AIV in all internal genes, the PB2 genes of GZ693, GZ670, and ZS558 more closely related to H6N6 AIV and the PB1 gene of GZ693 to the H3-subtype AIV. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the environmental H5N6 AIV related closely to human H5N6 AIVs isolated in Guangdong. These results thus suggest that continued reassortment has enabled the emergence of a novel H5N6 virus in Guangdong, as well as highlight the potential risk of highly pathogenic H5N6 AIVs in the province. PMID:27148209

  6. Small variations between species/subtypes attributed to reassortment evidenced from polymerase basic protein 1 with other seven proteins from influenza a virus.

    PubMed

    Yan, S; Wu, G

    2013-04-01

    This is a continuation of our studies previously published in this journal to use data analysis to explore why the reassortment of genetic segments from different host species and from different subtypes of influenza A viruses occurred frequently, which was considered the main reason for the generation of new strains. Of eleven proteins from influenza A virus, we have studied seven proteins in our previous studies. To get a full picture, 2352 polymerase basic proteins 1 from influenza A viruses were analysed. The results showed that the variations between host species/subtypes are smaller than those within host species/subtype. In combination with the results obtained from hemagglutinin, neuraminidase, nucleoprotein, matrix proteins 1 and 2, polymerase acidic protein and polymerase basic proteins 1 and 2, the results suggested that the predisposition to reassortment of genetic segments of influenza A virus from different host species and subtypes was mainly because of the small variations between the virus isolates.

  7. Molecular characterization of H6 subtype influenza viruses in southern China from 2009 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Zou, Shumei; Gao, Rongbao; Zhang, Ye; Li, Xiaodan; Chen, Wenbing; Bai, Tian; Dong, Libo; Wang, Dayan; Shu, Yuelong

    2016-01-01

    H6 avian influenza viruses (AIVs), which are prevalent in domestic and wild birds in Eurasian countries, have been isolated from pigs, a dog and a human. Routine virological surveillance at live poultry markets or poultry farms was conducted in southern China from 2009 to 2011. This study investigated the genetic and antigenic characteristics, analyzed the receptor-binding properties and evaluated the kinetics of infectivity of the AIVs in A549, MDCK and PK15 cells. A total of 14 H6N6 and 2 H6N2 isolates were obtained from four provinces in southern China. Genetic analysis indicated two distinct hemagglutinin lineages of the H6 strains cocirculating in southern China, and these strains facilitated active evolution and reassortment among multiple influenza virus subtypes from different avian species in nature. None of these isolates grouped with the novel Taiwan H6N1 virus responsible for human infection. Receptor-binding specificity assays showed that five H6 AIVs may have acquired the ability to recognize human receptors. Growth kinetics experiments showed that EV/HB-JZ/02/10(H6N2) and EV/JX/15/10(H6N6) initially reproduced faster and achieved higher titers than other viruses, suggesting that enhanced binding to α-2,6-linked sialic acids correlated with increased viral replication in mammalian cells. Overall, the results emphasize the need for continued surveillance of H6 outbreaks and extensive characterization of H6 isolates to better understand genetic changes and their implications. PMID:27436363

  8. Clinical and socioeconomic impact of different types and subtypes of seasonal influenza viruses in children during influenza seasons 2007/2008 and 2008/2009

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    /H3N2 viral subtype is significantly more severe than that due to influenza A/H1N1 subtype and influenza B virus, which indicates that the characteristics of the different viral types and subtypes should be adequately considered by health authorities when planning preventive and therapeutic measures. PMID:21992699

  9. Surveillance of Influenza A Virus and Its Subtypes in Migratory Wild Birds of Nepal.

    PubMed

    Karmacharya, Dibesh; Manandhar, Sulochana; Sharma, Ajay; Bhatta, Tarka; Adhikari, Pratikshya; Sherchan, Adarsh Man; Shrestha, Bishwo; Bista, Manisha; Rajbhandari, Rajesh; Oberoi, Mohinder; Bisht, Khadak; Hero, Jean-Marc; Dissanayake, Ravi; Dhakal, Maheshwar; Hughes, Jane; Debnath, Nitish

    2015-01-01

    Nepal boarders India and China and all three countries lie within the Central Asian Flyway for migratory birds. Novel influenza A H7N9 caused human fatalities in China in 2013. Subclinical infections of influenza A H7N9 in birds and the potential for virus dispersal by migratory birds prompted this study to assess avian H7N9 viral intrusion into Nepal. Surveillance of influenza A virus in migratory birds was implemented in early 2014 with assistance from the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO). Of 1811 environmental fecal samples collected from seven wetland migratory bird roosting areas, influenza A H9N2 was found in one sample from a ruddy shelduck in Koshi Tappu Wildlife Reserve located in southern Nepal. Avian H7N9 and other highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses were not detected. This study provides baseline data on the status of avian influenza virus in migratory bird populations in Nepal.

  10. [Characterization of M2 gene of H3N2 subtype swine influenza virus].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaodu; Chen, Peijun; Shen, Yang; Qiu, Yafeng; Deng, Xufang; Shi, Zixue; Peng, Lina; Luo, Jinyan; Liu, Chao; Ma, Zhiyong

    2010-01-01

    M2 protein of influenza A virus is encoded by a spliced mRNA derived from RNA segment 7 and plays an important role in influenza virus replication. It is also a target molecule of anti-virus drugs. We extracted the viral genome RNAs from MDCK cells infected with swine influenza A virus (SIV) H3N2 subtype and amplified the SIV M2 gene by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction using the isloated viral genome RNAs as template. The amplified cDNA was cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector pET-28a(+) (designated pET-28a(+)-M2) and a eukaryotic expression vector p3xFLAG-CMV-7.1 (designated p3xFLAG-CMV-7.1-M2), respectively. The resulted constructs were confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion and DNA sequencing analysis. We then transformed the plasmid pET-28a(+)-M2 into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) strain and expressed it by adding 1 mmol/L of IPTG (isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside). The recombinant M2 protein was purified from the induced bacterial cells using Ni(2+) affinity chromatography. Wistar rats were immunized with the purified M2 protein for producing polyclonal antibodies specific for it. Western blotting analysis and immunofluorescence analysis showed that the produced antibodies were capable of reacting with M2 protein expressed in p3xFLAG-CMV-7.1-M2-transfected cells as well as that synthesized in SIV-infected cells. We also transfected plasmid p3xFLAG-CMV-7.1-M2 into Vero cells and analyzed its subcellular localization by immunofluorescence. The M2 protein expressed in the Vero cells was 20 kDa in size and dominantly localized in the cytoplasm, showing a similar distribution to that in SIV-infected cells. Western blotting analysis of SIV-infected cells suggested that M2 was a late phase protein, which was detectable 12 h post-infection, later than NS1, NP and M1 proteins. It would be a potential molecular indicator of late phases replication of virus. Our results would be useful for studying the biological function of M2 protein in SIV

  11. Antigenic Characterization of H3 Subtypes of Avian Influenza A Viruses from North America

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Elizabeth; Long, Li-Ping; Zhao, Nan; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Baroch, John A.; Nolting, Jacqueline; Senter, Lucy; Cunningham, Frederick L.; Pharr, G. Todd; Hanson, Larry; Slemons, Richard; DeLiberto, Thomas J.; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Besides humans, H3 subtypes of influenza A viruses (IAVs) can infect various animal hosts including avian, swine, equine, canine, and sea mammals. These H3 viruses are both antigenically and genetically diverse. Here we characterized the antigenic diversity of contemporary H3 avian IAVs recovered from migratory birds in North America. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays were performed on 37 H3 isolates of avian IAVs recovered from 2007 to 2011 using generated reference chicken sera. These isolates were recovered from samples taken in the Atlantic, Mississippi, Central, and Pacific waterfowl migration flyways. Antisera to all the tested H3 isolates cross-reacted with each other, and, to a lesser extent, with those to H3 canine and H3 equine IAVs. Antigenic cartography showed that the largest antigenic distance among the 37 avian IAVs is about 4 units, and each unit corresponds to a 2log2 difference in the HI titer. However, none of the tested H3 IAVs cross-reacted with ferret sera derived from contemporary swine and human IAVs. Our results showed that the H3 avian IAVs we tested lacked significant antigenic diversity, and these viruses were antigenically different from those circulating in swine and human populations. This suggests that H3 avian IAVs in North American waterfowl are antigenically relatively stable. PMID:27309078

  12. Antigenic Characterization of H3 Subtypes of Avian Influenza A Viruses from North America.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Elizabeth; Long, Li-Ping; Zhao, Nan; Hall, Jeffrey S; Baroch, John A; Nolting, Jacqueline; Senter, Lucy; Cunningham, Frederick L; Pharr, G Todd; Hanson, Larry; Slemons, Richard; DeLiberto, Thomas J; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Besides humans, H3 subtypes of influenza A viruses (IAVs) can infect various animal hosts, including avian, swine, equine, canine, and sea mammal species. These H3 viruses are both antigenically and genetically diverse. Here, we characterized the antigenic diversity of contemporary H3 avian IAVs recovered from migratory birds in North America. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays were performed on 37 H3 isolates of avian IAVs recovered from 2007 to 2011 using generated reference chicken sera. These isolates were recovered from samples taken in the Atlantic, Mississippi, Central, and Pacific waterfowl migration flyways. Antisera to all the tested H3 isolates cross-reacted with each other and, to a lesser extent, with those to H3 canine and H3 equine IAVs. Antigenic cartography showed that the largest antigenic distance among the 37 avian IAVs is about four units, and each unit corresponds to a 2 log 2 difference in the HI titer. However, none of the tested H3 IAVs cross-reacted with ferret sera derived from contemporary swine and human IAVs. Our results showed that the H3 avian IAVs we tested lacked significant antigenic diversity, and these viruses were antigenically different from those circulating in swine and human populations. This suggests that H3 avian IAVs in North American waterfowl are antigenically relatively stable.

  13. Antigenic characterization of H3 subtypes of avian influenza A viruses from North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Elizabeth; Long, Li-Pong; Zhao, Nan; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Baroch, John A; Nolting, Jaqueline; Senter, Lucy; Cunningham, Frederick L; Pharr, G Todd; Hanson, Larry; Slemons, Richard; DeLiberto, Thomas J.; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Besides humans, H3 subtypes of influenza A viruses (IAVs) can infect various animal hosts, including avian, swine, equine, canine, and sea mammal species. These H3 viruses are both antigenically and genetically diverse. Here, we characterized the antigenic diversity of contemporary H3 avian IAVs recovered from migratory birds in North America. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays were performed on 37 H3 isolates of avian IAVs recovered from 2007 to 2011 using generated reference chicken sera. These isolates were recovered from samples taken in the Atlantic, Mississippi, Central, and Pacific waterfowl migration flyways. Antisera to all the tested H3 isolates cross-reacted with each other and, to a lesser extent, with those to H3 canine and H3 equine IAVs. Antigenic cartography showed that the largest antigenic distance among the 37 avian IAVs is about four units, and each unit corresponds to a 2 log 2 difference in the HI titer. However, none of the tested H3 IAVs cross-reacted with ferret sera derived from contemporary swine and human IAVs. Our results showed that the H3 avian IAVs we tested lacked significant antigenic diversity, and these viruses were antigenically different from those circulating in swine and human populations. This suggests that H3 avian IAVs in North American waterfowl are antigenically relatively stable.

  14. Antigenic Characterization of H3 Subtypes of Avian Influenza A Viruses from North America.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Elizabeth; Long, Li-Ping; Zhao, Nan; Hall, Jeffrey S; Baroch, John A; Nolting, Jacqueline; Senter, Lucy; Cunningham, Frederick L; Pharr, G Todd; Hanson, Larry; Slemons, Richard; DeLiberto, Thomas J; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Besides humans, H3 subtypes of influenza A viruses (IAVs) can infect various animal hosts, including avian, swine, equine, canine, and sea mammal species. These H3 viruses are both antigenically and genetically diverse. Here, we characterized the antigenic diversity of contemporary H3 avian IAVs recovered from migratory birds in North America. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays were performed on 37 H3 isolates of avian IAVs recovered from 2007 to 2011 using generated reference chicken sera. These isolates were recovered from samples taken in the Atlantic, Mississippi, Central, and Pacific waterfowl migration flyways. Antisera to all the tested H3 isolates cross-reacted with each other and, to a lesser extent, with those to H3 canine and H3 equine IAVs. Antigenic cartography showed that the largest antigenic distance among the 37 avian IAVs is about four units, and each unit corresponds to a 2 log 2 difference in the HI titer. However, none of the tested H3 IAVs cross-reacted with ferret sera derived from contemporary swine and human IAVs. Our results showed that the H3 avian IAVs we tested lacked significant antigenic diversity, and these viruses were antigenically different from those circulating in swine and human populations. This suggests that H3 avian IAVs in North American waterfowl are antigenically relatively stable. PMID:27309078

  15. Recognition of dual targets by a molecular beacon-based sensor: subtyping of influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Ching; Liao, Yu-Chieh; Lai, Yu-Hsuan; Lee, Chang-Chun David; Chuang, Min-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    A molecular beacon (MB)-based sensor to offer a decisive answer in combination with information originated from dual-target inputs is designed. The system harnesses an assistant strand and thermodynamically favored designation of unpaired nucleotides (UNs) to process the binary targets in "AND-gate" format and report fluorescence in "off-on" mechanism via a formation of a DNA four-way junction (4WJ). By manipulating composition of the UNs, the dynamic fluorescence difference between the binary targets-coexisting circumstance and any other scenario was maximized. Characteristic equilibrium constant (K), change of entropy (ΔS), and association rate constant (k) between the association ("on") and dissociation ("off") states of the 4WJ were evaluated to understand unfolding behavior of MB in connection to its sensing capability. Favorable MB and UNs were furthermore designed toward analysis of genuine genetic sequences of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) in an influenza A H5N2 isolate. The MB-based sensor was demonstrated to yield a linear calibration range from 1.2 to 240 nM and detection limit of 120 pM. Furthermore, high-fidelity subtyping of influenza virus was implemented in a sample of unpurified amplicons. The strategy opens an alternative avenue of MB-based sensors for dual targets toward applications in clinical diagnosis.

  16. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Subtype H5N1 Escaping Neutralization: More than HA Variation

    PubMed Central

    Höper, Dirk; Kalthoff, Donata; Hoffmann, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are one of the major threats in modern health care. Novel viruses arise due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift, leading to escape from the immune system and resulting in a serious problem for disease control. In order to investigate the escape process and to enable predictions of escape, we serially passaged influenza A H5N1 virus in vitro 100 times under immune pressure. The generated escape viruses were characterized phenotypically and in detail by full-genome deep sequencing. Mutations already found in natural isolates were detected, evidencing the in vivo relevance of the in vitro-induced amino acid substitutions. Additionally, several novel alterations were triggered. Altogether, the results imply that our in vitro system is suitable to study influenza A virus evolution and that it might even be possible to predict antigenic changes of influenza A viruses circulating in vaccinated populations. PMID:22090121

  17. Cleavage Activation of Human-adapted Influenza Virus Subtypes by Kallikrein-related Peptidases 5 and 12*

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Brian S.; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2013-01-01

    A critical step in the influenza virus replication cycle is the cleavage activation of the HA precursor. Cleavage activation of influenza HA enables fusion with the host endosome, allowing for release of the viral genome into the host cell. To date, studies have determined that HA activation is driven by trypsin-like host cell proteases, as well as yet to be identified bacterial proteases. Although the number of host proteases that can activate HA is growing, there is still uncertainty regarding which secreted proteases are able to support multicycle replication of influenza. In this study, we have determined that the kallikrein-related peptidases 5 and 12 are secreted from the human respiratory tract and have the ability to cleave and activate HA from the H1, H2, and H3 subtypes. Each peptidase appears to have a preference for particular influenza subtypes, with kallikrein 5 cleaving the H1 and H3 subtypes most efficiently and kallikrein 12 cleaving the H1 and H2 subtypes most efficiently. Cleavage analysis using HA cleavage site peptide mimics revealed that the amino acids neighboring the arginine cleavage site affect cleavage efficiency. Additionally, the thrombolytic zymogens plasminogen, urokinase, and plasma kallikrein have all been shown to cleave and activate influenza but are found circulating mainly as inactive precursors. Kallikrein 5 and kallikrein 12 were examined for their ability to activate the thrombolytic zymogens, and both resulted in activation of each zymogen, with kallikrein 12 being a more potent activator. Activation of the thrombolytic zymogens may therefore allow for both direct and indirect activation of the HA of human-adapted influenza viruses by kallikrein 5 and kallikrein 12. PMID:23612974

  18. Isolation and identification of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 in peafowl (Pavo cristatus).

    PubMed

    Ismail, Mahmoud Moussa; Khan, Owais Ahmed; Cattoli, Giovanni; Lu, Huaguang

    2010-03-01

    An outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus subtype H5N1 was first diagnosed in a "backyard" flock of peafowl (Pavo cristatus) raised on palace premises in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in December 3, 2007. The flock consisted of 40 peafowl, and their ages ranged from 3 to 5 years old. Affected birds suffered from depression, anorexia, and white diarrhea. Four dead birds were submitted for HPAI diagnosis at the Central Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in Riyadh. Brain and liver tissues and tracheal and cloacal swabs were taken from the dead birds and processed for a real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR test and virus isolation in specific-pathogen-free embryonating chicken eggs. The H5N1 subtype of avian influenza virus was isolated from the four dead birds and identified by a real-time RT-PCR before and after egg inoculation. The virus isolates were characterized as HPAI H5N1 virus by sequencing analysis. Phylogenetic comparisons revealed that the H5N1 viruses isolated from peafowl belong to the genetic clade 2.2 according to the World Health Organization nomenclature. The peafowl H5N1 virus falls into 2.2.2 sublineage II and clusters with the H5N1 viruses isolated from poultry in Saudi Arabia in 2007-08.

  19. Isolation and identification of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 in peafowl (Pavo cristatus).

    PubMed

    Ismail, Mahmoud Moussa; Khan, Owais Ahmed; Cattoli, Giovanni; Lu, Huaguang

    2010-03-01

    An outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus subtype H5N1 was first diagnosed in a "backyard" flock of peafowl (Pavo cristatus) raised on palace premises in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in December 3, 2007. The flock consisted of 40 peafowl, and their ages ranged from 3 to 5 years old. Affected birds suffered from depression, anorexia, and white diarrhea. Four dead birds were submitted for HPAI diagnosis at the Central Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in Riyadh. Brain and liver tissues and tracheal and cloacal swabs were taken from the dead birds and processed for a real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR test and virus isolation in specific-pathogen-free embryonating chicken eggs. The H5N1 subtype of avian influenza virus was isolated from the four dead birds and identified by a real-time RT-PCR before and after egg inoculation. The virus isolates were characterized as HPAI H5N1 virus by sequencing analysis. Phylogenetic comparisons revealed that the H5N1 viruses isolated from peafowl belong to the genetic clade 2.2 according to the World Health Organization nomenclature. The peafowl H5N1 virus falls into 2.2.2 sublineage II and clusters with the H5N1 viruses isolated from poultry in Saudi Arabia in 2007-08. PMID:20521659

  20. Emergence and Evolution of H10 Subtype Influenza Viruses in Poultry in China

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chi; Lam, Tommy Tsan-Yuk; Chai, Yujuan; Wang, Jia; Fan, Xiaohui; Hong, Wenshan; Zhang, Yu; Li, Lifeng; Liu, Yongmei; Smith, David K.; Webby, Richard J.; Peiris, Joseph S. M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cases of human infections with H10N8 viruses identified in late 2013 and early 2014 in Jiangxi, China, have raised concerns over the origin, prevalence, and development of these viruses in this region. Our long-term influenza surveillance of poultry and migratory birds in southern China in the past 12 years showed that H10 influenza viruses have been introduced from migratory to domestic ducks over several winter seasons at sentinel duck farms at Poyang Lake, where domestic ducks share their water body with overwintering migratory birds. H10 viruses were never detected in terrestrial poultry in our survey areas until August 2013, when they were identified at live-poultry markets in Jiangxi. Since then, we have isolated 124 H10N8 or H10N6 viruses from chickens at local markets, revealing an ongoing outbreak. Phylogenetic analysis of H10 and related viruses showed that the chicken H10N8 viruses were generated through multiple reassortments between H10 and N8 viruses from domestic ducks and the enzootic chicken H9N2 viruses. These chicken reassortant viruses were highly similar to the human isolate, indicating that market chickens were the source of human infection. Recently, the H10 viruses further reassorted, apparently with H5N6 viruses, and generated an H10N6 variant. The emergence and prevalence of H10 viruses in chickens and the occurrence of human infections provide direct evidence of the threat from the current influenza ecosystem in China. IMPORTANCE After the outbreak of avian-origin H7N9 influenza viruses in China, fatal human infections with a novel H10N8 virus were reported. Utilizing data from 12 years of influenza surveillance in southern China, we showed that H10 viruses were regularly introduced by migratory ducks to domestic ducks on Poyang Lake, a major aggregative site of migratory birds in Asia. The H10 viruses were maintained and amplified in domestic ducks and then transmitted to chickens and reassorted with enzootic H9N2 viruses

  1. Detection of Influenza Virus with Specific Subtype by Using Localized Surface Plasmons Excited on a Flat Metal Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Jun; Nagata, Kotaro; Ainai, Akira; Hasegawa, Hideki; Kano, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    We report on a method to determine subtype of influenza viruses by using surface plasmons localized in microscopic region on a flat metal surface. In this method, refractive index variation arisen from interactions between viruses and their monoclonal antibodies is measured. The developed sensor shows stability of refractive index in the order of 10-4 against sample exchange. In our experiment, A/H1N1 viruses are distinguished from A/H3N2 viruses by using monoclonal antibodies immobilized on the metal surface. Since the measurement probe has the volume of ˜6 al, the method has potential to handle multiple subtypes in the measurement of a sample with ultra small volume.

  2. Long-term variation in influenza A virus prevalence and subtype diversity in migratory mallards in northern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Latorre-Margalef, Neus; Tolf, Conny; Grosbois, Vladimir; Avril, Alexis; Bengtsson, Daniel; Wille, Michelle; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Fouchier, Ron A. M.; Olsen, Björn; Waldenström, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Data on long-term circulation of pathogens in wildlife populations are seldom collected, and hence understanding of spatial–temporal variation in prevalence and genotypes is limited. Here, we analysed a long-term surveillance series on influenza A virus (IAV) in mallards collected at an important migratory stopover site from 2002 to 2010, and characterized seasonal dynamics in virus prevalence and subtype diversity. Prevalence dynamics were influenced by year, but retained a common pattern for all years whereby prevalence was low in spring and summer, but increased in early autumn with a first peak in August, and a second more pronounced peak during October–November. A total of 74 haemagglutinin (HA)/neuraminidase (NA) combinations were isolated, including all NA and most HA (H1–H12) subtypes. The most common subtype combinations were H4N6, H1N1, H2N3, H5N2, H6N2 and H11N9, and showed a clear linkage between specific HA and NA subtypes. Furthermore, there was a temporal structuring of subtypes within seasons based on HA phylogenetic relatedness. Dissimilar HA subtypes tended to have different temporal occurrence within seasons, where the subtypes that dominated in early autumn were rare in late autumn, and vice versa. This suggests that build-up of herd immunity affected IAV dynamics in this system. PMID:24573857

  3. Characterization of low-pathogenic H5 subtype influenza viruses from Eurasia: implications for the origin of highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses.

    PubMed

    Duan, L; Campitelli, L; Fan, X H; Leung, Y H C; Vijaykrishna, D; Zhang, J X; Donatelli, I; Delogu, M; Li, K S; Foni, E; Chiapponi, C; Wu, W L; Kai, H; Webster, R G; Shortridge, K F; Peiris, J S M; Smith, Gavin J D; Chen, H; Guan, Y

    2007-07-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses are now endemic in many Asian countries, resulting in repeated outbreaks in poultry and increased cases of human infection. The immediate precursor of these HPAI viruses is believed to be A/goose/Guangdong/1/96 (Gs/GD)-like H5N1 HPAI viruses first detected in Guangdong, China, in 1996. From 2000 onwards, many novel reassortant H5N1 influenza viruses or genotypes have emerged in southern China. However, precursors of the Gs/GD-like viruses and their subsequent reassortants have not been fully determined. Here we characterize low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H5 subtype viruses isolated from poultry and migratory birds in southern China and Europe from the 1970s to the 2000s. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that Gs/GD-like virus was likely derived from an LPAI H5 virus in migratory birds. However, its variants arose from multiple reassortments between Gs/GD-like virus and viruses from migratory birds or with those Eurasian viruses isolated in the 1970s. It is of note that unlike HPAI H5N1 viruses, those recent LPAI H5 viruses have not become established in aquatic or terrestrial poultry. Phylogenetic analyses revealed the dynamic nature of the influenza virus gene pool in Eurasia with repeated transmissions between the eastern and western extremities of the continent. The data also show reassortment between influenza viruses from domestic and migratory birds in this region that has contributed to the expanded diversity of the influenza virus gene pool among poultry in Eurasia.

  4. Targeting the HA2 subunit of influenza A virus hemagglutinin via CD40L provides universal protection against diverse subtypes.

    PubMed

    Fan, X; Hashem, A M; Chen, Z; Li, C; Doyle, T; Zhang, Y; Yi, Y; Farnsworth, A; Xu, K; Li, Z; He, R; Li, X; Wang, J

    2015-01-01

    The influenza viral hemagglutinin (HA) is comprised of two subunits. Current influenza vaccine predominantly induces neutralizing antibodies (Abs) against the HA1 subunit, which is constantly evolving in unpredictable fashion. The other subunit, HA2, however, is highly conserved but largely shielded by the HA head domain. Thus, enhancing immune response against HA2 could potentially elicit broadly inhibitory Abs. We generated a recombinant adenovirus (rAd) encoding secreted fusion protein, consisting of codon-optimized HA2 subunit of influenza A/California/7/2009(H1N1) virus fused to a trimerized form of murine CD40L, and determined its ability of inducing protective immunity upon intranasal administration. We found that mice immunized with this recombinant viral vaccine were completely protected against lethal challenge with divergent influenza A virus subtypes including H1N1, H3N2, and H9N2. Codon-optimization of HA2 as well as the use of CD40L as a targeting ligand/molecular adjuvant were indispensable to enhance HA2-specific mucosal IgA and serum IgG levels. Moreover, induction of HA2-specific T-cell responses was dependent on CD40L, as rAd secreting HA2 subunit without CD40L failed to induce any significant levels of T-cell cytokines. Finally, sera obtained from immunized mice were capable of inhibiting 13 subtypes of influenza A viruses in vitro. These results provide proof of concept for a prototype HA2-based universal influenza vaccine. PMID:25052763

  5. Genome Sequence of a Novel H14N7 Subtype Influenza A Virus Isolated from a Blue-Winged Teal (Anas discors) Harvested in Texas, USA

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Andrew B.; Poulson, Rebecca L.; Carter, Deborah L.; Davis-Fields, Nicholas; Stallknecht, David E.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a novel H14N7 subtype influenza A virus (IAV) isolated from a blue-winged teal (Anas discors) harvested in Texas, USA. The genomic characteristics of this IAV strain with a previously undetected subtype combination suggest recent viral evolution within the New World wild-bird IAV reservoir. PMID:27284136

  6. Molecular Characterization of Subtype H11N9 Avian Influenza Virus Isolated from Shorebirds in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Renata; Fabrizio, Thomas; Vanstreels, Ralph Eric Thijl; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G; Durigon, Edison Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Migratory aquatic birds play an important role in the maintenance and spread of avian influenza viruses (AIV). Many species of aquatic migratory birds tend to use similar migration routes, also known as flyways, which serve as important circuits for the dissemination of AIV. In recent years there has been extensive surveillance of the virus in aquatic birds in the Northern Hemisphere; however in contrast only a few studies have been attempted to detect AIV in wild birds in South America. There are major flyways connecting South America to Central and North America, whereas avian migration routes between South America and the remaining continents are uncommon. As a result, it has been hypothesized that South American AIV strains would be most closely related to the strains from North America than to those from other regions in the world. We characterized the full genome of three AIV subtype H11N9 isolates obtained from ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres) on the Amazon coast of Brazil. For all gene segments, all three strains consistently clustered together within evolutionary lineages of AIV that had been previously described from aquatic birds in North America. In particular, the H11N9 isolates were remarkably closely related to AIV strains from shorebirds sampled at the Delaware Bay region, on the Northeastern coast of the USA, more than 5000 km away from where the isolates were retrieved. Additionally, there was also evidence of genetic similarity to AIV strains from ducks and teals from interior USA and Canada. These findings corroborate that migratory flyways of aquatic birds play an important role in determining the genetic structure of AIV in the Western hemisphere, with a strong epidemiological connectivity between North and South America.

  7. Molecular Characterization of Subtype H11N9 Avian Influenza Virus Isolated from Shorebirds in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado, Renata; Fabrizio, Thomas; Vanstreels, Ralph Eric Thijl; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.; Durigon, Edison Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Migratory aquatic birds play an important role in the maintenance and spread of avian influenza viruses (AIV). Many species of aquatic migratory birds tend to use similar migration routes, also known as flyways, which serve as important circuits for the dissemination of AIV. In recent years there has been extensive surveillance of the virus in aquatic birds in the Northern Hemisphere; however in contrast only a few studies have been attempted to detect AIV in wild birds in South America. There are major flyways connecting South America to Central and North America, whereas avian migration routes between South America and the remaining continents are uncommon. As a result, it has been hypothesized that South American AIV strains would be most closely related to the strains from North America than to those from other regions in the world. We characterized the full genome of three AIV subtype H11N9 isolates obtained from ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres) on the Amazon coast of Brazil. For all gene segments, all three strains consistently clustered together within evolutionary lineages of AIV that had been previously described from aquatic birds in North America. In particular, the H11N9 isolates were remarkably closely related to AIV strains from shorebirds sampled at the Delaware Bay region, on the Northeastern coast of the USA, more than 5000 km away from where the isolates were retrieved. Additionally, there was also evidence of genetic similarity to AIV strains from ducks and teals from interior USA and Canada. These findings corroborate that migratory flyways of aquatic birds play an important role in determining the genetic structure of AIV in the Western hemisphere, with a strong epidemiological connectivity between North and South America. PMID:26689791

  8. Molecular Characterization of Subtype H11N9 Avian Influenza Virus Isolated from Shorebirds in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Renata; Fabrizio, Thomas; Vanstreels, Ralph Eric Thijl; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G; Durigon, Edison Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Migratory aquatic birds play an important role in the maintenance and spread of avian influenza viruses (AIV). Many species of aquatic migratory birds tend to use similar migration routes, also known as flyways, which serve as important circuits for the dissemination of AIV. In recent years there has been extensive surveillance of the virus in aquatic birds in the Northern Hemisphere; however in contrast only a few studies have been attempted to detect AIV in wild birds in South America. There are major flyways connecting South America to Central and North America, whereas avian migration routes between South America and the remaining continents are uncommon. As a result, it has been hypothesized that South American AIV strains would be most closely related to the strains from North America than to those from other regions in the world. We characterized the full genome of three AIV subtype H11N9 isolates obtained from ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres) on the Amazon coast of Brazil. For all gene segments, all three strains consistently clustered together within evolutionary lineages of AIV that had been previously described from aquatic birds in North America. In particular, the H11N9 isolates were remarkably closely related to AIV strains from shorebirds sampled at the Delaware Bay region, on the Northeastern coast of the USA, more than 5000 km away from where the isolates were retrieved. Additionally, there was also evidence of genetic similarity to AIV strains from ducks and teals from interior USA and Canada. These findings corroborate that migratory flyways of aquatic birds play an important role in determining the genetic structure of AIV in the Western hemisphere, with a strong epidemiological connectivity between North and South America. PMID:26689791

  9. PLC-γ1 signaling plays a subtype-specific role in postbinding cell entry of influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liqian; Ly, Hinh; Liang, Yuying

    2014-01-01

    Host signaling pathways and cellular proteins play important roles in the influenza viral life cycle and can serve as antiviral targets. In this study, we report the engagement of host phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase γ1 (PLC-γ1) in mediating cell entry of influenza virus H1N1 but not H3N2 subtype. Both PLC-γ1-specific inhibitor and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) strongly suppress the replication of H1N1 but not H3N2 viruses in cell culture, suggesting that PLC-γ1 plays an important subtype-specific role in the influenza viral life cycle. Further analyses demonstrate that PLC-γ1 activation is required for viral postbinding cell entry. In addition, H1N1, but not H3N2, infection leads to the phosphorylation of PLC-γ1 at Ser 1248 immediately after infection and independent of viral replication. We have further shown that H1N1-induced PLC-γ1 activation is downstream of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. Interestingly, both H1N1 and H3N2 infections activate EGFR, but only H1N1 infection leads to PLC-γ1 activation. Taking our findings together, we have identified for the first time the subtype-specific interplay of host PLC-γ1 signaling and H1N1 virus that is critical for viral uptake early in the infection. Our study provides novel insights into how virus interacts with the cellular signaling network by demonstrating that viral determinants can regulate how the host signaling pathways function in virally infected cells.

  10. Isolation of Single-Stranded DNA Aptamers That Distinguish Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Subtype H1 from H5

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Sanggyu; Jeong, Yong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Surface protein hemagglutinin (HA) mediates the binding of influenza virus to host cell receptors containing sialic acid, facilitating the entry of the virus into host cells. Therefore, the HA protein is regarded as a suitable target for the development of influenza virus detection devices. In this study, we isolated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamers binding to the HA1 subunit of subtype H1 (H1-HA1), but not to the HA1 subunit of subtype H5 (H5-HA1), using a counter-systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (counter-SELEX) procedure. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and surface plasmon resonance studies showed that the selected aptamers bind tightly to H1-HA1 with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the aptamers were binding to H1-HA1 in a concentration-dependent manner, yet were not binding to H5-HA1. Interestingly, the selected aptamers contained G-rich sequences in the central random nucleotides region. Further biophysical analysis showed that the G-rich sequences formed a G-quadruplex structure, which is a distinctive structure compared to the starting ssDNA library. Using flow cytometry analysis, we found that the aptamers did not bind to the receptor-binding site of H1-HA1. These results indicate that the selected aptamers that distinguish H1-HA1 from H5-HA1 can be developed as unique probes for the detection of the H1 subtype of influenza virus. PMID:25901739

  11. European surveillance network for influenza in pigs: surveillance programs, diagnostic tools and Swine influenza virus subtypes identified in 14 European countries from 2010 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Simon, Gaëlle; Larsen, Lars E; Dürrwald, Ralf; Foni, Emanuela; Harder, Timm; Van Reeth, Kristien; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Reid, Scott M; Dan, Adam; Maldonado, Jaime; Huovilainen, Anita; Billinis, Charalambos; Davidson, Irit; Agüero, Montserrat; Vila, Thaïs; Hervé, Séverine; Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Chiapponi, Chiara; Urbaniak, Kinga; Kyriakis, Constantinos S; Brown, Ian H; Loeffen, Willie

    2014-01-01

    Swine influenza causes concern for global veterinary and public health officials. In continuing two previous networks that initiated the surveillance of swine influenza viruses (SIVs) circulating in European pigs between 2001 and 2008, a third European Surveillance Network for Influenza in Pigs (ESNIP3, 2010-2013) aimed to expand widely the knowledge of the epidemiology of European SIVs. ESNIP3 stimulated programs of harmonized SIV surveillance in European countries and supported the coordination of appropriate diagnostic tools and subtyping methods. Thus, an extensive virological monitoring, mainly conducted through passive surveillance programs, resulted in the examination of more than 9 000 herds in 17 countries. Influenza A viruses were detected in 31% of herds examined from which 1887 viruses were preliminary characterized. The dominating subtypes were the three European enzootic SIVs: avian-like swine H1N1 (53.6%), human-like reassortant swine H1N2 (13%) and human-like reassortant swine H3N2 (9.1%), as well as pandemic A/H1N1 2009 (H1N1pdm) virus (10.3%). Viruses from these four lineages co-circulated in several countries but with very different relative levels of incidence. For instance, the H3N2 subtype was not detected at all in some geographic areas whereas it was still prevalent in other parts of Europe. Interestingly, H3N2-free areas were those that exhibited highest frequencies of circulating H1N2 viruses. H1N1pdm viruses were isolated at an increasing incidence in some countries from 2010 to 2013, indicating that this subtype has become established in the European pig population. Finally, 13.9% of the viruses represented reassortants between these four lineages, especially between previous enzootic SIVs and H1N1pdm. These novel viruses were detected at the same time in several countries, with increasing prevalence. Some of them might become established in pig herds, causing implications for zoonotic infections.

  12. Human monoclonal ScFv specific to NS1 protein inhibits replication of influenza viruses across types and subtypes.

    PubMed

    Yodsheewan, Rungrueang; Maneewatch, Santi; Srimanote, Potjanee; Thueng-In, Kanyarat; Songserm, Thaweesak; Dong-Din-On, Fonthip; Bangphoomi, Kunan; Sookrung, Nitat; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Chaicumpa, Wanpen

    2013-10-01

    Currently, there is a need of new anti-influenza agents that target influenza virus proteins other than ion channel M2 and neuraminidase. Non-structural protein-1 (NS1) is a highly conserved multifunctional protein which is indispensable for the virus replication cycle. In this study, fully human single chain antibody fragments (HuScFv) that bound specifically to recombinant and native NS1 were produced from three huscfv-phagemid transformed Escherichia coli clones (nos. 3, 10 and 11) selected from a human ScFv phage display library. Western blot analysis, mimotope searching/epitope identification, homology modeling/molecular docking and phage mimotope ELISA inhibition indicated that HuScFv of clone no. 3 reacted with NS1 R domain important for host innate immunity suppression; HuScFv of clone nos. 10 and 11 bound to E domain sites necessary for NS1 binding to the host eIF4GI and CPSF30, respectively. The HuScFv of all clones could enter the influenza virus infected cells and interfered with the NS1 activities leading to replication inhibition of viruses belonging to various heterologous A subtypes and type B by 2-64-fold as semi-quantified by hemagglutination assay. Influenza virus infected cells treated with representative HuScFv (clone 10) had up-expression of IRF3 and IFN-β genes by 14.75 and 4.95-fold, respectively, in comparison with the controls, indicating that the antibodies could restore the host innate immune response. The fully human single chain antibodies have high potential for developing further as a safe (adjunctive) therapeutic agent for mitigating, if not abrogating, severe symptoms of influenza.

  13. Influenza-A Viruses in Ducks in Northwestern Minnesota: Fine Scale Spatial and Temporal Variation in Prevalence and Subtype Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Benjamin R.; Knutsen, Gregory A.; Berdeen, James; Goekjian, Virginia; Poulson, Rebecca; Goyal, Sagar; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Cardona, Carol; Berghaus, Roy D.; Swayne, David E.; Yabsley, Michael J.; Stallknecht, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Waterfowl from northwestern Minnesota were sampled by cloacal swabbing for Avian Influenza Virus (AIV) from July – October in 2007 and 2008. AIV was detected in 222 (9.1%) of 2,441 ducks in 2007 and in 438 (17.9%) of 2,452 ducks in 2008. Prevalence of AIV peaked in late summer. We detected 27 AIV subtypes during 2007 and 31 during 2008. Ten hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes were detected each year (i.e., H1, 3–8, and 10–12 during 2007; H1-8, 10 and 11 during 2008). All neuraminidase (NA) subtypes were detected during each year of the study. Subtype diversity varied between years and increased with prevalence into September. Predominant subtypes during 2007 (comprising ≥5% of subtype diversity) included H1N1, H3N6, H3N8, H4N6, H7N3, H10N7, and H11N9. Predominant subtypes during 2008 included H3N6, H3N8, H4N6, H4N8, H6N1, and H10N7. Additionally, within each HA subtype, the same predominant HA/NA subtype combinations were detected each year and included H1N1, H3N8, H4N6, H5N2, H6N1, H7N3, H8N4, H10N7, and H11N9. The H2N3 and H12N5 viruses also predominated within the H2 and H12 subtypes, respectively, but only were detected during a single year (H2 and H12 viruses were not detected during 2007 and 2008, respectively). Mallards were the predominant species sampled (63.7% of the total), and 531 AIV were isolated from this species (80.5% of the total isolates). Mallard data collected during both years adequately described the observed temporal and spatial prevalence from the total sample and also adequately represented subtype diversity. Juvenile mallards also were adequate in describing the temporal and spatial prevalence of AIV as well as subtype diversity. PMID:21931636

  14. Complex reassortment of multiple subtypes of avian influenza viruses in domestic ducks at the Dongting Lake Region of China.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guohua; Tan, Dan; Shi, Jianzhong; Cui, Pengfei; Jiang, Yongping; Liu, Liling; Tian, Guobin; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Li, Chengjun; Chen, Hualan

    2013-09-01

    To gain insight into the ecology of avian influenza viruses (AIV), we conducted active influenza virus surveillance in domestic ducks on farms located on the flyway of migratory birds in the Dongting Lake region of Hunan Province, China, from winter 2011 until spring 2012. Specimens comprising 3,030 duck swab samples and 1,010 environmental samples were collected from 101 duck farms. We isolated AIV of various HA subtypes, including H3, H4, H5, H6, H9, H10, H11, and H12. We sequenced the entire coding sequences of the genomes of 28 representative isolates constituting 13 specific subtypes. When the phylogenetic relationships among these isolates were examined, we observed that extensive reassortment events had occurred. Among the 28 Dongting Lake viruses, 21 genotypes involving the six internal genes were identified. Furthermore, we identified viruses or viral genes introduced from other countries, viral gene segments of unknown origin, and a novel HA/NA combination. Our findings emphasize the importance of farmed domestic ducks in the Dongting Lake region to the genesis and evolution of AIV and highlight the need for continued surveillance of domestic ducks in this region.

  15. Antigenic and genetic evolution of low-pathogenicity avian influenza viruses of subtype H7N3 following heterologous vaccination.

    PubMed

    Beato, Maria Serena; Xu, Yifei; Long, Li-Ping; Capua, Ilaria; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2014-05-01

    Outbreaks of low-pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) viruses of the H7N3 subtype were first detected in Italy in October 2002, and the virus continued to circulate between 2002 and 2004 in a densely populated poultry area in the northeast portion of that country. This virus circulated in unvaccinated and vaccinated poultry farms, and the infection was controlled in August 2003 by culling, control of movements, improved biosecurity, and heterologous vaccination. In 2004, H7N3 reoccurred in vaccinated poultry farms in which infection had been successfully controlled by the vaccination program. To shed light on this occurrence and the temporal pattern and genetic basis of antigenic drift for avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in the absence and presence of heterologous vaccination, a collection of H7N3 viruses isolated in 2002 and 2004 were characterized genetically and antigenically. Molecular analysis showed that viruses isolated in the 2004 outbreaks after the implementation of vaccination had acquired specific amino acid signatures, most of which were located at reported antibody binding sites of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein. Antigenic characterization of these 2004 isolates showed that they were antigenically different from those isolated prior to the implementation of vaccination. This is the first report on antigenic and genetic evolution of H7 LPAI viruses following the application of heterologous vaccination in poultry. These findings may have an impact on control strategies to combat AI infections in poultry based on vaccination.

  16. The origin of the PB1 segment of swine influenza A virus subtype H1N2 determines viral pathogenicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Metreveli, Giorgi; Gao, Qinshan; Mena, Ignacio; Schmolke, Mirco; Berg, Mikael; Albrecht, Randy A; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2014-08-01

    Swine appear to be a key species in the generation of novel human influenza pandemics. Previous pandemic viruses are postulated to have evolved in swine by reassortment of avian, human, and swine influenza viruses. The human pandemic influenza viruses that emerged in 1957 and 1968 as well as swine viruses circulating since 1998 encode PB1 segments derived from avian influenza viruses. Here we investigate the possible role in viral replication and virulence of the PB1 gene segments present in two swine H1N2 influenza A viruses, A/swine/Sweden/1021/2009(H1N2) (sw 1021) and A/swine/Sweden/9706/2010(H1N2) (sw 9706), where the sw 1021 virus has shown to be more pathogenic in mice. By using reverse genetics, we swapped the PB1 genes of these two viruses. Similar to the sw 9706 virus, chimeric sw 1021 virus carrying the sw 9706 PB1 gene was not virulent in mice. In contrast, replacement of the PB1 gene of the sw 9706 virus by that from sw 1021 virus resulted in increased pathogenicity. Our study demonstrated that differences in virulence of swine influenza virus subtype H1N2 are attributed at least in part to the PB1 segment.

  17. Characterization of the Pathogenesis of H10N3, H10N7, and H10N8 Subtype Avian Influenza Viruses Circulating in Ducks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miaomiao; Zhang, Xingxing; Xu, Kaidi; Teng, Qiaoyang; Liu, Qinfang; Li, Xuesong; Yang, Jianmei; Xu, Jianqing; Chen, Hongjun; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Li, Zejun

    2016-01-01

    Three H10 subtype avian influenza viruses were isolated from domestic ducks in China, designated as SH602/H10N8, FJ1761/H10N3 and SX3180/H10N7, with an intravenous pathogenicity index (IVPI) of 0.39, 1.60, and 1.27, respectively. These H10 viruses showed a complex pathology pattern in different species, although full genome characterizations of the viruses could not identify any molecular determinant underlying the observed phenotypes. Our findings describe the pathobiology of the three H10 subtype AIVs in chickens, ducks, and mice. FJ1761/H10N3 evolved E627K and Q591K substitutions in the gene encoding the PB2 protein in infected mice with severe lung damage, suggesting that H10 subtype avian influenza viruses are a potential threat to mammals. PMID:27678170

  18. A 4-year study of avian influenza virus prevalence and subtype diversity in ducks of Newfoundland, Canada.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyan; Wille, Michelle; Dobbin, Ashley; Robertson, Gregory J; Ryan, Pierre; Ojkic, Davor; Whitney, Hugh; Lang, Andrew S

    2013-10-01

    The island of Newfoundland, Canada, is at the eastern edge of North America and has migratory bird connections with the continental mainland as well as across the North Atlantic Ocean. Here, we report a 4-year avian influenza virus (AIV) epidemiological study in ducks in the St. John's region of Newfoundland. The overall prevalence of AIV detection in ducks during this study was 7.2%, with American Black Ducks contributing the vast majority of the collected samples and the AIV positives. The juvenile ducks showed a significantly higher AIV detection rate (10.6%) compared with adults (3.4%). Seasonally, AIV prevalence rates were higher in the autumn (8.4%), but positives were still detected in the winter (4.6%). Preliminary serology tests showed a high incidence of previous AIV infection (20/38, 52.6%). A total of 43 viruses were characterized for their HA-NA or HA subtypes, which revealed a large diversity of AIV subtypes and little recurrence of subtypes from year to year. Investigation of the movement patterns of ducks in this region showed that it is a largely non-migratory duck population, which may contribute to the observed pattern of high AIV subtype turnover. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 H1N1 and one H5N4 AIVs showed these viruses were highly similar to other low pathogenic AIV sequences from waterfowl in North America and assigned all gene segments into American-avian clades. Notably, the H1N1 viruses, which were identified in consecutive years, possessed homologous genomes. Such detection of homologous AIV genomes across years is rare, but indicates the role of the environmental reservoir in viral perpetuation.

  19. [Study of formation of amantidine and rimantidine resistant variants of influenza A2 subtype virus].

    PubMed

    Il'enko, V I

    1975-01-01

    Passages of influenza A2/Hong Kong/68 in developing chick embryos in the presence of amantadine and rimantadine were carried out and demonstrated rapid development of a resistant virus line under these conditions. Changes in the sensitivity of the virus to the drug were due to selection of resistant particles from genetically inhomogenous original virus strain. The rate of formation of the resistant population was shown to be clearly dependent upon the amount of amantadine inoculated into embryos. The resulting resistant lines retained this property throughout multiple virus passages in embryos without the drug. These biological and antigenic properties of the resulting variants did not differ from those of the initial A2/Hong Kong/68 strain. PMID:1241180

  20. Genetic relationship of H3 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from domestic ducks and wild birds in Korea and their pathogenic potential in chickens and ducks.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Gu; Kang, Hyun-Mi; Kim, Min-Chul; Paek, Mi-Ra; Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Kim, Bang-Sil; Kwon, Jun-Hun; Kim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Youn-Jeong

    2012-03-23

    The H3 subtype avian influenza virus (AIV) is one of the most frequently isolated subtypes in domestic ducks, live poultry markets, and wild birds in Korea. In 2002-2009, a total of 45 H3 subtype AIVs were isolated from the feces of clinically normal domestic ducks (n=28) and wild birds (n=17). The most prevalent subtypes in domestic ducks were H3N2 (35.7%), H3N6 (35.7%), H3N8 (25.0%), and H3N1 (3.6%, novel subtype in domestic duck in Korea). In contrast, H3N8 (70.6%) is the most prevalent subtype in wild birds in Korea. In the phylogenetic analysis, HA genes of the Korean H3 AIVs were divided into 3 groups (Korean duck, wild bird 1, and wild bird 2) and all viruses of duck origin except one were clustered in a single group. However, other genes showed extensive diversity and at least 17 genotypes were circulating in domestic ducks in Korea. When the analysis expanded to viruses of wild bird origin, the genetic diversity of Korean H3 AIVs became more complicated. Extensive reassortments may have occurred in H3 subtype influenza viruses in Korea. When we inoculated chickens and ducks with six selected viruses, some of the viruses replicated efficiently without pre-adaptation and shed a significant amount of viruses through oropharyngeal and cloacal routes. This raised concerns that H3 subtype AIV could be a new subtype in chickens in Korea. Continuous surveillance is needed to prepare the advent of a novel subtype AIV in Korea.

  1. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of avian influenza virus subtypes H5 and H7 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Avian influenza virus (AIV) subtypes H5 and H7 attracts particular attention because of the risk of their potential pathogenicity in poultry. The haemagglutination inhibition (HI) test is widely used as subtype specific test for serological diagnostics despite the laborious nature of this method. However, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) are being explored as an alternative test method. H5 and H7 specific monoclonal antibodies were experimentally raised and used in the development of inhibition ELISAs for detection of serological response specifically directed against AIV subtypes H5 and H7. The ELISAs were evaluated with polyclonal chicken anti-AIV antibodies against AIV subtypes: H1N2, H5N2, H5N7, H7N1, H7N7, H9N9, H10N4 and H16N3. Results Both the H5 and H7 ELISA proved to have a high sensitivity and specificity and the ELISAs detected H5 and H7 antibodies earlier during experimental infection than the HI test did. The reproducibility of the ELISA’s performed at different times was high with Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.96-0.98. Conclusions The ELISAs are a potential alternative to the HI test for screening of large amounts of avian sera, although only experimental sera were tested in this study. PMID:24256721

  2. Receptor mimicry by antibody F045-092 facilitates universal binding to the H3 subtype of influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Peter S.; Ohshima, Nobuko; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Yu, Wenli; Iba, Yoshitaka; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza viruses present a significant health challenge each year, as in the H3N2 epidemic of 2012-2013. Here, we describe an antibody, F045-092, that possesses broadly neutralizing activity against the entire H3 subtype and accommodates the natural variation and additional glycosylation in all strains tested from 1963 to 2011. Crystal structures of F045-092 in complex with HAs from 1975 and 2011 H3N2 viruses reveal the structural basis for its neutralization breadth through insertion of its 23-residue HCDR3 into the receptor-binding site that involves striking receptor mimicry. F045-092 extends its recognition to divergent subtypes, including H1, H2, and H13, using the enhanced avidity of its IgG to overcome lower affinity Fab binding, as observed with other receptor-binding site antibodies. This unprecedented level of antibody cross-reactivity against the H3 subtype can potentially inform on development of a pan-H3 vaccine or small molecule therapeutics. PMID:24717798

  3. Receptor mimicry by antibody F045–092 facilitates universal binding to the H3 subtype of influenza virus

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Peter S.; Ohshima, Nobuko; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Yu, Wenli; Iba, Yoshitaka; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-04-10

    Influenza viruses present a significant health challenge each year, as in the H3N2 epidemic of 2012–2013. Here we describe an antibody, F045–092, that possesses broadly neutralizing activity against the entire H3 subtype and accommodates the natural variation and additional glycosylation in all strains tested from 1963 to 2011. Crystal structures of F045–092 in complex with HAs from 1975 and 2011 H3N2 viruses reveal the structural basis for its neutralization breadth through insertion of its 23-residue HCDR3 into the receptor-binding site that involves striking receptor mimicry. F045–092 extends its recognition to divergent subtypes, including H1, H2 and H13, using the enhanced avidity of its IgG to overcome lower-affinity Fab binding, as observed with other antibodies that target the receptor-binding site. This unprecedented level of antibody cross-reactivity against the H3 subtype can potentially inform on development of a pan-H3 vaccine or small-molecule therapeutics.

  4. Contemporary Avian Influenza A Virus Subtype H1, H6, H7, H10, and H15 Hemagglutinin Genes Encode a Mammalian Virulence Factor Similar to the 1918 Pandemic Virus H1 Hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Li; Pujanauski, Lindsey M.; Davis, A. Sally; Schwartzman, Louis M.; Chertow, Daniel S.; Baxter, David; Scherler, Kelsey; Hartshorn, Kevan L.; Slemons, Richard D.; Walters, Kathie-Anne; Kash, John C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zoonotic avian influenza virus infections may lead to epidemics or pandemics. The 1918 pandemic influenza virus has an avian influenza virus-like genome, and its H1 hemagglutinin was identified as a key mammalian virulence factor. A chimeric 1918 virus expressing a contemporary avian H1 hemagglutinin, however, displayed murine pathogenicity indistinguishable from that of the 1918 virus. Here, isogenic chimeric avian influenza viruses were constructed on an avian influenza virus backbone, differing only by hemagglutinin subtype expressed. Viruses expressing the avian H1, H6, H7, H10, and H15 subtypes were pathogenic in mice and cytopathic in normal human bronchial epithelial cells, in contrast to H2-, H3-, H5-, H9-, H11-, H13-, H14-, and H16-expressing viruses. Mouse pathogenicity was associated with pulmonary macrophage and neutrophil recruitment. These data suggest that avian influenza virus hemagglutinins H1, H6, H7, H10, and H15 contain inherent mammalian virulence factors and likely share a key virulence property of the 1918 virus. Consequently, zoonotic infections with avian influenza viruses bearing one of these hemagglutinins may cause enhanced disease in mammals. PMID:25406382

  5. Genome sequence of a novel H14N7 subtype influenza A virus isolated from a blue-winged teal (Anas discors) harvested in Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andy M.; Reeves, Andrew; Poulson, Rebecca L.; Carter, Deborah L.; Davis-Fields, Nicholas; Stallknecht, David E.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a novel H14N7 subtype influenza A virus (IAV) isolated from a blue-winged teal (Anas discors) harvested in Texas, USA. The genomic characteristics of this IAV strain with a previously undetected subtype combination suggest recent viral evolution within the New World wild-bird IAV reservoir.                   

  6. Protection of chickens to antigenically variant avian influenza virus challenge after immunization with two antigenically unrelated strains of the same subtype

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antigenic diversity of avian influenza virus (AIV) within a subtype has been well established and is believed to be driven by the selection of immunologic escape mutants. In regions where vaccination against AIV has been implemented for prolonged periods (e.g. Vietnam and Egypt), vaccines which...

  7. Low pathogenic H7 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from domestic ducks in South Korea and the close association with isolates of wild birds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Park, Choi-Kyu; Lee, Youn-Jeong; Oem, Jae-Ku; Kang, Hyun-Mi; Choi, Jun-Gu; Lee, O-Soo; Bae, You-Chan

    2012-06-01

    We characterized low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses of the H7 subtype that were isolated from domestic ducks and wild birds in South Korea from 2008 to 2011. A total of 20 H7 viruses were collected from live-bird markets (LBMs), duck farms and wild-bird habitats using avian influenza (AI) surveillance and epidemiological approaches. A phylogenetic analysis of the H7 viruses that were isolated from domestic ducks and wild birds demonstrated that they were separated into 12 genotypes (A-D and Wb-1-8, respectively), indicating genetic diversity. These H7 viruses were related to the recently isolated Eurasian LPAI H7 viruses and various influenza viruses that are circulating in Asia, including southern China and South Korea. The same genotype was not found between domestic poultry and wild-bird isolates; however, most of the H7 viruses in poultry (genotypes B and C) were closely related to the H7 virus isolated from a wild bird (genotype Wb-3). Animal-challenge studies revealed that certain H7 AI viruses replicated well only in chickens or ducks depending on the genotype, indicating that the pathogenicity of H7 viruses has the potential to be altered due to multiple reassortments, and these viruses can potentially expand their host range. Our results are evidence of abundant and frequent reassortment between H7 viruses in poultry and wild birds and emphasize the continuing need to monitor the evolutionary genetics of the influenza virus in poultry and wild birds.

  8. Optical fiber sensor based on surface plasmon resonance for rapid detection of avian influenza virus subtype H6: Initial studies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xihong; Tsao, Yu-Chia; Lee, Fu-Jung; Tsai, Woo-Hu; Wang, Ching-Ho; Chuang, Tsung-Liang; Wu, Mu-Shiang; Lin, Chii-Wann

    2016-07-01

    A side-polished fiber optic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor was fabricated to expose the core surface and then deposited with a 40 nm thin gold film for the near surface sensing of effective refractive index changes with surface concentration or thickness of captured avian influenza virus subtype H6. The detection surface of the SPR optical fiber sensor was prepared through the plasma modification method for binding a self-assembled monolayer of isopropanol chemically on the gold surface of the optical fiber. Subsequently, N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide was activated to enable EB2-B3 monoclonal antibodies to capture A/chicken/Taiwan/2838V/00 (H6N1) through a flow injection system. The detection limit of the fabricated optical fiber sensor for A/chicken/Taiwan/2838V/00 was 5.14 × 10(5) EID50/0.1 mL, and the response time was 10 min on average. Moreover, the fiber optic sensor has the advantages of a compact size and low cost, thus rendering it suitable for online and remote sensing. The results indicated that the optical fiber sensor can be used for epidemiological surveillance and diagnosing of avian influenza subtype H6 rapidly. PMID:26996538

  9. Evidence for genetic variation of Eurasian avian influenza viruses of subtype H15: the first report of an H15N7 virus.

    PubMed

    Muzyka, Denys; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary; Starick, Elke; Fereidouni, Sasan

    2016-03-01

    Since the first detection of H15 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in Australia in 1979, only seven H15 strains have been reported. A new H15 AIV was detected in Ukraine in 2010, carrying the unique HA-NA subtype combination H15N7. This virus replicated efficiently in chicken eggs, and antisera against it reacted strongly with the homologous antigen, but with lower titers when using the reference Australian antigen. The amino acid motifs of the HA cleavage site and receptor-binding site were different from those in the Australian viruses. The new virus, together with an H15 virus from Siberia from 2008, constitutes a new clade of H15 AIV isolates. PMID:26650037

  10. Construction and Immunogenicity Evaluation of Recombinant Influenza A Viruses Containing Chimeric Hemagglutinin Genes Derived from Genetically Divergent Influenza A H1N1 Subtype Viruses

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Kara; Jiang, Zhiyong; Zhu, Longchao; Lawson, Steven R.; Langenhorst, Robert; Ransburgh, Russell; Brunick, Colin; Tracy, Miranda C.; Hurtig, Heather R.; Mabee, Leah M.; Mingo, Mark; Li, Yanhua; Webby, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Influenza A viruses cause highly contagious diseases in a variety of hosts, including humans and pigs. To develop a vaccine that can be broadly effective against genetically divergent strains of the virus, in this study we employed molecular breeding (DNA shuffling) technology to create a panel of chimeric HA genes. Methods and Results Each chimeric HA gene contained genetic elements from parental swine influenza A viruses that had a history of zoonotic transmission, and also from a 2009 pandemic virus. Each parental virus represents a major phylogenetic clade of influenza A H1N1 viruses. Nine shuffled HA constructs were initially screened for immunogenicity in mice by DNA immunization, and one chimeric HA (HA-129) was expressed on both a A/Puerto Rico/8/34 backbone with mutations associated with a live, attenuated phenotype (PR8LAIV-129) and a A/swine/Texas/4199-2/98 backbone (TX98-129). When delivered to mice, the PR8LAIV-129 induced antibodies against all four parental viruses, which was similar to the breadth of immunity observed when HA-129 was delivered as a DNA vaccine. This chimeric HA was then tested as a candidate vaccine in a nursery pig model, using inactivated TX98-129 virus as the backbone. The results demonstrate that pigs immunized with HA-129 developed antibodies against all four parental viruses, as well as additional primary swine H1N1 influenza virus field isolates. Conclusion This study established a platform for creating novel genes of influenza viruses using a molecular breeding approach, which will have important applications toward future development of broadly protective influenza virus vaccines. PMID:26061265

  11. Genetic characterization of influenza A virus subtypes H1N3 and H1N9 isolated from free-grazing ducks in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chaiyawong, Supassama; Boonyapisitsopa, Supanat; Jairak, Waleemas; Nonthabenjawan, Nutthawan; Tangwangvivat, Ratanaporn; Bunpapong, Napawan; Amonsin, Alongkorn

    2016-10-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) subtype H1 has been reported to infect birds, pigs and humans. In this study, we characterized IAVs subtype H1N3 and H1N9 isolated from free-grazing ducks in Thailand. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Thai IAV-H1 isolates cluster with avian Eurasian-lineage but not pandemic H1N1 viruses. Analysis of the viruses indicated low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) characteristics. This study is the first report of avian H1N3 and H1N9 in Thailand. Although Thai IAV-H1 viruses do not pose a risk of a pandemic, routine surveillance and genetic monitoring of IAVs should be conducted. PMID:27383209

  12. Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression and Hemagglutinin Subtype Influence the Infectivity of Type A Influenza Virus for Respiratory Dendritic Cells ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hargadon, Kristian M.; Zhou, Haixia; Albrecht, Randy A.; Dodd, Haley A.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Braciale, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a key role in antiviral immunity, functioning both as innate effector cells in early phases of the immune response and subsequently as antigen-presenting cells that activate the adaptive immune response. In the murine respiratory tract, there are several respiratory dendritic cell (RDC) subsets, including CD103+ DC, CD11bhi DC, monocyte/macrophage DC, and plasmacytoid DC. However, little is known about the interaction between these tissue-resident RDC and viruses that are encountered during natural infection in the respiratory tract. Here, we show both in vitro and in vivo that the susceptibility of murine RDC to infection with type A influenza virus varies with the level of MHC class II expression by RDC and with the virus strain. Both CD103+ and CD11bhi RDC, which express the highest basal level of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II, are highly susceptible to infection by type A influenza virus. However, efficient infection is restricted to type A influenza virus strains of the H2N2 subtype. Furthermore, enhanced infectivity by viruses of the H2N2 subtype is linked to expression of the I-E MHC class II locus product. These results suggest a potential novel role for MHC class II molecules in influenza virus infection and pathogenesis in the respiratory tract. PMID:21917972

  13. Human microRNAs profiling in response to influenza A viruses (subtypes pH1N1, H3N2, and H5N1)

    PubMed Central

    Makkoch, Jarika; Poomipak, Witthaya; Saengchoowong, Suthat; Khongnomnan, Kritsada; Praianantathavorn, Kesmanee; Jinato, Thananya; Poovorawan, Yong

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in regulation of gene silencing and are involved in many cellular processes including inhibition of infected viral replication. This study investigated cellular miRNA expression profiles operating in response to influenza virus in early stage of infection which might be useful for understanding and control of viral infection. A549 cells were infected with different subtypes of influenza virus (pH1N1, H3N2 and H5N1). After 24 h post-infection, miRNAs were extracted and then used for DNA library construction. All DNA libraries with different indexes were pooled together with equal concentration, followed by high-throughput sequencing based on MiSeq platform. The miRNAs were identified and counted from sequencing data by using MiSeq reporter software. The miRNAs expressions were classified into up and downregulated miRNAs compared to those found in non-infected cells. Mostly, each subtype of influenza A virus triggered the upregulated responses in miRNA expression profiles. Hsa-miR-101, hsa-miR-193b, hsa-miR-23b, and hsa-miR-30e* were upregulated when infected with all three subtypes of influenza A virus. Target prediction results showed that virus infection can trigger genes in cellular process, metabolic process, developmental process and biological regulation. This study provided some insights into the cellular miRNA profiling in response to various subtypes of influenza A viruses in circulation and which have caused outbreaks in human population. The regulated miRNAs might be involved in virus–host interaction or host defense mechanism, which should be investigated for effective antiviral therapeutic interventions. PMID:26518627

  14. [Isolation and Identification of a Quail-origin H9N2 Subtype of The Influenza Virus and Its Biologic Characterization].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Si, Weiying; Yuan, Zhuangchuan; Yan, Yan; Zhou, Jiyong

    2016-01-01

    A quail-origin subtype of the influenza virus was isolated from a human-infecting H7N9 subtype of the avian influenza virus found in a live poultry market and was given the name A/Quail/Hangzhou/1/ 2013 (H9N2). We analyzed the whole genome of this virus and its biologic characteristics. Sequence analyses suggested that the: HA and NS genes belonged to a CK/BJ/1/94-like lineage; NA, NP, PA and PB1 genes belonged to a SH/F/98-like lineage; M and PB2 genes belonged to a G1-like lineage. Analyses of key amino acids showed that the cleavage site in HA protein was PSRSSR ↓ GL, and that the HA protein had a human receptor-binding site with Leu226. Deletion of amino acids 69 - 73 was detected in the stalk of NA protein, the M2 protein had an Asn31 mutation, and the NS1 protein had two mutations at Ser42, Ala149. The intravenous pathogenicity of this virus was 0.36. A study in chickens suggested that all inoculated birds shed the virus from the trachea and cloaca on the third day post-infection (p. i. ) until 11 days. All chickens that had direct contact shed the virus on the second day p. i. until 8 days. Results of virus reisolation suggested that lung and tracheal tissues could shed the virus in 5 days, whereas the other organs could shed the virus in 3 days. These results suggest that this virus strain is H9N2 subtype LPAIV, whose lineage is prevalent in mainland China. This research provides evidence on how to monitor and prevent the H9N2 subtype of the avian influenza virus.

  15. Structure and Receptor Binding Preferences of Recombinant Hemagglutinins from Avian and Human H6 and H10 Influenza A Virus Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; Carney, Paul J.; Chang, Jessie C.; Villanueva, Julie M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During 2013, three new avian influenza A virus subtypes, A(H7N9), A(H6N1), and A(H10N8), resulted in human infections. While the A(H7N9) virus resulted in a significant epidemic in China across 19 provinces and municipalities, both A(H6N1) and A(H10N8) viruses resulted in only a few human infections. This study focuses on the major surface glycoprotein hemagglutinins from both of these novel human viruses. The detailed structural and glycan microarray analyses presented here highlight the idea that both A(H6N1) and A(H10N8) virus hemagglutinins retain a strong avian receptor binding preference and thus currently pose a low risk for sustained human infections. IMPORTANCE Human infections with zoonotic influenza virus subtypes continue to be a great public health concern. We report detailed structural analysis and glycan microarray data for recombinant hemagglutinins from A(H6N1) and A(H10N8) viruses, isolated from human infections in 2013, and compare them with hemagglutinins of avian origin. This is the first structural report of an H6 hemagglutinin, and our results should further the understanding of these viruses and provide useful information to aid in the continuous surveillance of these zoonotic influenza viruses. PMID:25673707

  16. Computational approach for predicting the conserved B-cell epitopes of hemagglutinin H7 subtype influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiangyu; Sun, Qi; Ye, Zhonghua; Hua, Ying; Shao, Na; Du, Yanli; Zhang, Qiwei; Wan, Chengsong

    2016-01-01

    An avian-origin influenza H7N9 virus epidemic occurred in China in 2013–2014, in which >422 infected people suffered from pneumonia, respiratory distress syndrome and septic shock. H7N9 viruses belong to the H7 subtype of avian-origin influenza viruses (AIV-H7). Hemagglutinin (HA) is a vital membrane protein of AIV that has an important role in host recognition and infection. The epitopes of HA are significant determinants of the regularity of epidemic and viral mutation and recombination mechanisms. The present study aimed to predict the conserved B-cell epitopes of AIV-H7 HA using a bioinformatics approach, including the three most effective epitope prediction softwares available online: Artificial Neural Network based B-cell Epitope Prediction (ABCpred), B-cell Epitope Prediction (BepiPred) and Linear B-cell Epitope Prediction (LBtope). A total of 24 strains of Euro-Asiatic AIV-H7 that had been associated with a serious poultry pandemic or had infected humans in the past 30 years were selected to identify the conserved regions of HA. Sequences were obtained from the National Center for Biotechnology Information and Global Initiative on Sharing Avian Influenza Data databases. Using a combination of software prediction and sequence comparisons, the conserved epitopes of AIV-H7 were predicted and clarified. A total of five conserved epitopes [amino acids (aa) 37–52, 131–142, 215–234, 465–484 and 487–505] with a suitable length, high antigenicity and minimal variation were predicted and confirmed. Each obtained a score of >0.80 in ABCpred, 60% in LBtope and a level of 0.35 in Bepipred. In addition, a representative amino acid change (glutamine235-to-leucine235) in the HA protein of the 2013 AIV-H7N9 was discovered. The strategy adopted in the present study may have profound implications on the rapid diagnosis and control of infectious disease caused by H7N9 viruses, as well as by other virulent viruses, such as the Ebola virus. PMID:27703505

  17. Replication of 2 subtypes of low-pathogenicity avian influenza virus of duck and gull origins in experimentally infected Mallard ducks.

    PubMed

    Daoust, P-Y; van de Bildt, M; van Riel, D; van Amerongen, G; Bestebroer, T; Vanderstichel, R; Fouchier, R A M; Kuiken, T

    2013-05-01

    Many subtypes of low-pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) virus circulate in wild bird reservoirs, but their prevalence may vary among species. We aimed to compare by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, virus isolation, histology, and immunohistochemistry the distribution and pathogenicity of 2 such subtypes of markedly different origins in Mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos): H2N3 isolated from a Mallard duck and H13N6 isolated from a Ring-billed Gull (Larus delawarensis). Following intratracheal and intraesophageal inoculation, neither virus caused detectable clinical signs, although H2N3 virus infection was associated with a significantly decreased body weight gain during the period of virus shedding. Both viruses replicated in the lungs and air sacs until approximately day 3 after inoculation and were associated with a locally extensive interstitial, exudative, and proliferative pneumonia. Subtype H2N3, but not subtype H13N6, went on to infect the epithelia of the intestinal mucosa and cloacal bursa, where it replicated without causing lesions until approximately day 5 after inoculation. Larger quantities of subtype H2N3 virus were detected in cloacal swabs than in pharyngeal swabs. The possible clinical significance of LPAI virus-associated pulmonary lesions and intestinal tract infection in ducks deserves further evaluation.

  18. Experimental infection of mallard ducks with different subtype H5 and H7 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV’s) remain a threat to poultry worldwide. Avian influenza viruses, including HPAIV, are usually non-pathogenic for ducks and other wild aquatic birds, with the exception of some Asian lineage H5N1 HPAIVs which can cause severe disease in ducks. With ...

  19. Molecular epidemiology of avian influenza virus and incidence of H5 and H9 virus subtypes among poultry in Egypt in 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Osman, N; Sultan, S; Ahmed, A I; Ibrahim, R S; El-Wanes, S A Abd; Ibrahim, E M

    2015-03-01

    Egypt has experienced outbreaks of avian influenza (AI) since 2006. A total of 3583 cloacal swabs were collected from chickens, ducks, geese and turkeys from commercial farms, backyards and local bird markets in Qena and Luxor governorates in South Egypt during 2009-2011. These samples were examined for the presence of AI virus (AIV) and positive samples were further subtyped for the H5 and H9 by real time RT-PCR. In this way, 202 (5.64%) samples were found to be AIV-positive of which 186 (92.08%) and 7 (3.46%) belonged to H5 and H9 subtypes, respectively. Higher infection rates were observed in backyard birds and birds from local bird markets in comparison to birds from commercial farms. In conclusion, the predominance of H5 infection indicates a need for continuous monitoring of AIV among avian species and the awareness against public health risk.

  20. Replication and transmission of mammalian-adapted H9 subtype influenza virus in pigs and quail

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Influenza A is a major pathogen of birds, swine, and humans. Strains can jump from one species to another in a process that often requires genetic mutation and genome reassortment and results in outbreaks and, potentially, pandemics. H9N2 avian influenza is one of the most predominant influenza subt...

  1. An analysis of microbiota-targeted therapies in patients with avian influenza virus subtype H7N9 infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Selective prophylactic decontamination of the digestive tract is a strategy for the prevention of secondary nosocomial infection in patients with avian influenza virus subtype H7N9 infection. Our aim was to summarize the effectiveness of these therapies in re-establishing a stable and diverse microbial community, and reducing secondary infections. Methods Comprehensive therapies were dependent on the individual clinical situation of subjects, and were divided into antiviral treatment, microbiota-targeted therapies, including pro- or pre-biotics and antibiotic usage, and immunotherapy. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) were used for real-time monitoring of the predominant intestinal microbiome during treatment. Clinical information about secondary infection was confirmed by analyzing pathogens isolated from clinical specimens. Results Different antibiotics had similar effects on the gut microbiome, with a marked decrease and slow recovery of the Bifidobacterium population. Interestingly, most fecal microbial DGGE profiles showed the relative stability of communities under the continual suppression of the same antibiotics, and significant changes when new antibiotics were introduced. Moreover, we found no marked increase in C-reactive protein, and no cases of bacteremia or pneumonia, caused by probiotic use in the patients, which confirmed that the probiotics used in this study were safe for use in patients with H7N9 infection. Approximately 72% of those who subsequently suffered exogenous respiratory infection by Candida species or multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and Klebsiella pneumoniae were older than 60 years. The combination of probiotics and prebiotics with antibiotics seemed to fail in these patients. Conclusions Elderly patients infected with the influenza A (H7N9) virus are considered a high-risk group for developing secondary bacterial infection. Microbiota restoration

  2. Expanded cocirculation of stable subtypes, emerging lineages, and new sporadic reassortants of porcine influenza viruses in swine populations in Northwest Germany.

    PubMed

    Harder, Timm C; Grosse Beilage, Elisabeth; Lange, Elke; Meiners, Carolin; Döhring, Stefanie; Pesch, Stefan; Noé, Thomas; Grund, Christian; Beer, Martin; Starick, Elke

    2013-10-01

    The emergence of the human 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) virus from swine populations refocused public and scientific attention on swine as an important source of influenza A viruses bearing zoonotic potential. Widespread and year-round circulation of at least four stable lineages of porcine influenza viruses between 2009 and 2012 in a region of Germany with a high-density swine population is documented here. European avian influenza virus-derived H1N1 (H1N1av) viruses dominated the epidemiology, followed by human-derived subtypes H1N2 and H3N2. H1N1pdm viruses and, in particular, recently emerging reassortants between H1N1pdm and porcine HxN2 viruses (H1pdmN2) were detected in about 8% of cases. Further reassortants between these main lineages were diagnosed sporadically. Ongoing diversification both at the phylogenetic and at the antigenic level was evident for the H1N1av lineage and for some of its reassortants. The H1avN2 reassortant R1931/11 displayed conspicuously distinct genetic and antigenic features and was easily transmitted from pig to pig in an experimental infection. Continuing diverging evolution was also observed in the H1pdmN2 lineage. These viruses carry seven genome segments of the H1N1pdm virus, including a hemagglutinin gene that encodes a markedly antigenically altered protein. The zoonotic potential of this lineage remains to be determined. The results highlight the relevance of surveillance and control of porcine influenza virus infections. This is important for the health status of swine herds. In addition, a more exhaustive tracing of the formation, transmission, and spread of new reassortant influenza A viruses with unknown zoonotic potential is urgently required.

  3. Antibodies to H5 subtype avian influenza virus and Japanese encephalitis virus in northern pintails (Anas acuta) sampled in Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andy M.; Spackman, Erica; Yeh, Jung-Yong; Fujita, Go; Konishi, Kan; Reed, John A.; Wilcox, Benjamin R.; Brown, Justin D.; Stallknecht, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Blood samples from 105 northern pintails (Anas acuta) captured on Hokkaido, Japan were tested for antibodies to avian influenza virus (AIV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and West Nile virus (WNV) to assess possible involvement of this species in the spread of economically important and potentially zoonotic pathogens. Antibodies to AIV were detected in 64 of 105 samples (61%). Of the 64 positives, 95% and 81% inhibited agglutination of two different H5 AIV antigens (H5N1 and H5N9), respectively. Antibodies to JEV and WNV were detected in five (5%) and none of the samples, respectively. Results provide evidence for prior exposure of migrating northern pintails to H5 AIV which couldhave implications for viral shedding and disease occurrence. Results also provide evidence for limited involvement of this species in the transmission and spread of flaviviruses during spring migration.

  4. Design of Multiplexed Detection Assays for Identification of Avian Influenza A Virus Subtypes Pathogenic to Humans by SmartCycler Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR ▿

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Ren, Peijun; Mardi, Sek; Hou, Lili; Tsai, Cheguo; Chan, Kwok Hung; Cheng, Peter; Sheng, Jun; Buchy, Philippe; Sun, Bing; Toyoda, Tetsuya; Lim, Wilina; Peiris, J. S. Malik; Zhou, Paul; Deubel, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) epidemics are the result of human-to-human or poultry-to-human transmission. Tracking seasonal outbreaks of IAV and other avian influenza virus (AIV) subtypes that can infect humans, aquatic and migratory birds, poultry, and pigs is essential for epidemiological surveillance and outbreak alerts. In this study, we performed four real-time reverse transcription-PCR (rRT-PCR) assays for identification of the IAV M and hemagglutinin (HA) genes from six known AIVs infecting pigs, birds, and humans. IAV M1 gene-positive samples tested by single-step rRT-PCR and a fluorogenic Sybr green I detection system were further processed for H5 subtype identification by using two-primer-set multiplex and Sybr green I rRT-PCR assays. H5 subtype-negative samples were then tested with either a TaqMan assay for subtypes H1 and H3 or a TaqMan assay for subtypes H2, H7, and H9 and a beacon multiplex rRT-PCR identification assay. The four-tube strategy was able to detect 10 RNA copies of the HA genes of subtypes H1, H2, H3, H5, and H7 and 100 RNA copies of the HA gene of subtype H9. At least six H5 clades of H5N1 viruses isolated in Southeast Asia and China were detected by that test. Using rRT-PCR assays for the M1 and HA genes in 202 nasopharyngeal swab specimens from children with acute respiratory infections, we identified a total of 39 samples positive for the IAV M1 gene and subtypes H1 and H3. When performed with a portable SmartCycler instrument, the assays offer an efficient, flexible, and reliable platform for investigations of IAV and AIV in remote hospitals and in the field. PMID:18971359

  5. design of multiplexed detection assays for identification of avian influenza a virus subtypes pathogenic to humans by SmartCycler real-time reverse transcription-PCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ren, Peijun; Mardi, Sek; Hou, Lili; Tsai, Cheguo; Chan, Kwok Hung; Cheng, Peter; Sheng, Jun; Buchy, Philippe; Sun, Bing; Toyoda, Tetsuya; Lim, Wilina; Peiris, J S Malik; Zhou, Paul; Deubel, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) epidemics are the result of human-to-human or poultry-to-human transmission. Tracking seasonal outbreaks of IAV and other avian influenza virus (AIV) subtypes that can infect humans, aquatic and migratory birds, poultry, and pigs is essential for epidemiological surveillance and outbreak alerts. In this study, we performed four real-time reverse transcription-PCR (rRT-PCR) assays for identification of the IAV M and hemagglutinin (HA) genes from six known AIVs infecting pigs, birds, and humans. IAV M1 gene-positive samples tested by single-step rRT-PCR and a fluorogenic Sybr green I detection system were further processed for H5 subtype identification by using two-primer-set multiplex and Sybr green I rRT-PCR assays. H5 subtype-negative samples were then tested with either a TaqMan assay for subtypes H1 and H3 or a TaqMan assay for subtypes H2, H7, and H9 and a beacon multiplex rRT-PCR identification assay. The four-tube strategy was able to detect 10 RNA copies of the HA genes of subtypes H1, H2, H3, H5, and H7 and 100 RNA copies of the HA gene of subtype H9. At least six H5 clades of H5N1 viruses isolated in Southeast Asia and China were detected by that test. Using rRT-PCR assays for the M1 and HA genes in 202 nasopharyngeal swab specimens from children with acute respiratory infections, we identified a total of 39 samples positive for the IAV M1 gene and subtypes H1 and H3. When performed with a portable SmartCycler instrument, the assays offer an efficient, flexible, and reliable platform for investigations of IAV and AIV in remote hospitals and in the field.

  6. Application of real-time RT-PCR for the quantitation and competitive replication study of H5 and H7 subtype avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Won; Suarez, David L

    2004-08-01

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses are endemic in wild birds and if transmitted to poultry can cause serious economic losses. In the study of AI, the quantitation of virus shed from infected birds is valuable in pathogenesis studies and to determine the effectiveness of vaccines, and is performed routinely by cultivation of virus containing samples using embryonating chicken eggs (ECE) and expressed by 50% egg infectious dose (EID(50)). Although, this assay is accurate and is the standard test for infectious virus titration, the method is laborious, requires a large number of ECE, and takes at least 7 days to determine results. In this study, a one-tube hydrolysis fluorescent probe based real-time RT-PCR (RRT-PCR) was applied for the quantitation of AI virus and compared with conventional virus titration method. A strong positive correlation was observed between the amount of RNA determined by quantitative RRT-PCR and the EID(50)s determined by conventional methods. This RRT-PCR test was further applied in the study of competitive replication of co-infected H5 and H7 subtype viruses in chickens. Using hemagglutinin subtype specific probes, we were able to determine the amount of individual subtype virus, which could not have easily been done with conventional methods. This RRT-PCR based quantitation of AI virus, which is specific, sensitive, easy to perform, and rapid, will be useful for virological, pathogenesis, and protection studies.

  7. Single assay for simultaneous detection and differential identification of human and avian influenza virus types, subtypes, and emergent variants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid and accurate detection, identification and genetic characterization are essential for effective surveillance and epidemiological tracking of influenza viruses. This report describes applications of a resequencing pathogen microarray (RPM) assay that is capable of simultaneous sequencing of su...

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin genes of twenty-six avian influenza viruses of subtype H9N2 isolated from chickens in China during 1996-2001.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongqi; Liu, Xiufan; Cheng, Jian; Peng, Daxin; Jia, Lijun; Huang, Yong

    2003-01-01

    The complete coding region of hemagglutinin genes from 26 influenza A viruses of H9N2 subtype isolated from chicken flocks in China during 1996-2001 was amplified and sequenced. Sequence analysis and phylogenetic studies of H9N2 subtype viruses on the basis of data of 26 viruses in this study and 71 selected strains available in the GenBank were conducted. The results revealed that all the mainland China isolates showed high homology (94.19%-100%) and were assigned to a special sublineage in the major Eurasian lineage, in contrast to the high heterogeneity of Hong Kong SAR isolates. All the 29 mainland China isolates and six Hong Kong SAR strains also had the following common characteristics: sharing the same sequence of proteolytic cleavage site with one additional basic amino acid, RSSR, with only two exceptions; having the same amino acid motif of the receptor-binding site, YWTNV/ALY; 23 of 28 isolates bearing seven potential glycosylation sites and the remaining five having six; and sharing characteristic deduced amino acid residues Asn-183 at the receptor-binding site and Ser-130 at the potential glycosylation site. We concluded that the H9N2 subtype influenza viruses circulating in chicken flocks in China since the 1990s and Ck/HK/G9/97-like viruses isolated in Hong Kong SAR should have a common origin, whereas Qu/HK/G1/97-like viruses including human strains isolated in Hong Kong SAR might originate from other places. The available evidence also suggests that the H9N2 viruses of special lineage themselves and factors prone to secondary infections may contribute to the widespread and dominant distribution of viruses of this subtype in chicken flocks in China and other Asian countries.

  9. Influenza Virus Infection of Marine Mammals.

    PubMed

    Fereidouni, Sasan; Munoz, Olga; Von Dobschuetz, Sophie; De Nardi, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Interspecies transmission may play a key role in the evolution and ecology of influenza A viruses. The importance of marine mammals as hosts or carriers of potential zoonotic pathogens such as highly pathogenic H5 and H7 influenza viruses is not well understood. The fact that influenza viruses are some of the few zoonotic pathogens known to have caused infection in marine mammals, evidence for direct transmission of influenza A virus H7N7 subtype from seals to man, transmission of pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses to seals and also limited evidence for long-term persistence of influenza B viruses in seal populations without significant genetic change, makes monitoring of influenza viruses in marine mammal populations worth being performed. In addition, such monitoring studies could be a great tool to better understand the ecology of influenza viruses in nature. PMID:25231137

  10. Isolation and genetic characterization of novel reassortant H6N6 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from chickens in eastern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haibo; Lu, Rufeng; Peng, Xiuming; Peng, Xiaorong; Cheng, Linfang; Jin, Changzhong; Lu, Xiangyun; Xie, Tiansheng; Yao, Hangping; Wu, Nanping

    2016-07-01

    H6 subtype avian influenza viruses (AIVs) possess the ability to cross the species barrier to infect mammals and pose a threat to human health. From June 2014 to July 2015, 12 H6N6 AIVs were isolated from chickens in live-poultry markets in Zhejiang Province, Eastern China. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these isolates received their genes from H6 and H9N2 subtype AIVs of poultry in China. These novel reassortant viruses showed moderate pathogenicity in mice and were able to replicate in mice without prior adaptation. Considering that novel reassorted H6N6 viruses were isolated from chickens in this study, it is possible that these chickens play an important role in the generation of novel reassorted H6N6 AIVs, and these results emphasize the need for continued surveillance of the H6N6 AIVs circulating in poultry. PMID:27101069

  11. Transmission of Avian Influenza A Viruses Between Animals and People

    MedlinePlus

    ... many different animals, including ducks, chickens, pigs, whales, horses, and seals. However, certain subtypes of influenza A ... pigs, and H7N7 and H3N8 virus infections of horses. Influenza A viruses that typically infect and transmit ...

  12. Paper-based enzyme-free immunoassay for rapid detection and subtyping of influenza A H1N1 and H3N2 viruses.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kin Fong; Huang, Chia-Hao; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Chang, Cheng-Kai; Chen, Kuan-Fu; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2015-07-01

    Development of rapid screening in the ambulatory environment is the most pressing needs for the control of spread of infectious disease. Despite there are many methods to detect the immunoassay results, quantitative measurement in rapid disease screening is still a great challenge for point-of-care applications. In this work, based on the internal structural protein, i.e., nucleoprotein (NP), and outer surface glycoproteins, i.e., H1 and H3, of the influenza viruses, specific and sensitive immunoassay on paper-based platform was evaluated and confirmed. Detection and subtyping of influenza A H1N1 and H3N2 viruses found in people were demonstrated by colorimetric paper-based sandwich immunoassay. Concentration-dependent response to influenza viruses was shown and the detection limits could achieve 2.7×10(3) pfu/assay for H1 detection and 2.7×10(4) pfu/assay for H3 detection, which are within the clinical relevant level. Moreover, detection of influenza virus from infected cell lysate and clinical samples was demonstrated to further confirm the reliability of the paper-based immunoassay. The use of paper for the development of diagnostic devices has the advantages of lightweight, ease-of-use, and low cost and paper-based immunoassay is appropriate to apply for rapid screening in point-of-care applications.

  13. Understanding of Drug-Target Interactions: A case Study in Influenza Virus A Subtype H5N1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Malaisree, Maturos; Decha, Panita; Laohpongspaisan, Chittima; Aruksakunwong, Ornjira; Intharathep, Pathumwadee; Pianwanit, Somsak; Sompornpisut, Pornthep; Parasuk, Vudhichai; Megnassan, Eugene; Frecer, Vladimir; Miertus, Stanislav; Hannongbua, Supot

    2007-12-01

    This study aims at gaining insight into molecular mechanisms of action of three drug targets of the life cycle of influenza virus A subtype H5N1, namely Hemagglutinin (H5), Neuraminidase (N1) and M2 ion channel (M2), using molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics techniques. In hemagglutinin, interest is focused on the high pathogenicity of the H5 due to the -RRRKK- insertion. MD simulations carried out for H5 in both high and low pathogenic forms (HPH5 and LPH5), aimed at understanding why HPH5 was experimentally observed to be 5-fold better cleaved by furin relative to the non-inserted sequence of LPH5. As the results, the cleavage loop of HPH5 was found to fit well and bind strongly into the catalytic site of human furin, serving as a conformation suitable for the proteolytic reaction. The second target, neuraminidase was studied by two different approaches. Firstly with MD simulations, rotation of the -NHAc and—OCHEt2 side chains of oseltamivir (OTV), leading directly to rearrangement of the catalytic cavity, was found to be a primary source of the lower susceptibility of OTV to neuraminidase subtype N1 than to N2 and N9. In addition, three inhibitiors, OTV, zanamivir (ZNV) and peramivir (PRV), complexed with neuraminidase subtype N1 were studied to understand the drug-target interactions. The structural properties, position and conformation of PRV and its side chains are uniformly preferential, i.e., its conformation fits very well with the N1 active site. At the N1 target, another approach, combinatorial chemistry, was used to design a library of new potent inhibitors, which well fit to the active site and the 150-loop residues of N1. Investigation was also extended to the M2 proton channel. Five different protonation states of the selectivity filter residue (His) where 0H, 1H, 2aH, 2dH and 4H represent the systems with none, mono-protonated, di-protonated at adjacent and opposite positions, and tetra-protonated, respectively, were taken into account both

  14. [Influenza virus].

    PubMed

    Juozapaitis, Mindaugas; Antoniukas, Linas

    2007-01-01

    Every year, especially during the cold season, many people catch an acute respiratory disease, namely flu. It is easy to catch this disease; therefore, it spreads very rapidly and often becomes an epidemic or a global pandemic. Airway inflammation and other body ailments, which form in a very short period, torment the patient several weeks. After that, the symptoms of the disease usually disappear as quickly as they emerged. The great epidemics of flu have rather unique characteristics; therefore, it is possible to identify descriptions of such epidemics in historic sources. Already in the 4th century bc, Hippocrates himself wrote about one of them. It is known now that flu epidemics emerge rather frequently, but there are no regular intervals between those events. The epidemics can differ in their consequences, but usually they cause an increased mortality of elderly people. The great flu epidemics of the last century took millions of human lives. In 1918-19, during "The Spanish" pandemic of flu, there were around 40-50 millions of deaths all over the world; "Pandemic of Asia" in 1957 took up to one million lives, etc. Influenza virus can cause various disorders of the respiratory system: from mild inflammations of upper airways to acute pneumonia that finally results in the patient's death. Scientist Richard E. Shope, who investigated swine flu in 1920, had a suspicion that the cause of this disease might be a virus. Already in 1933, scientists from the National Institute for Medical Research in London - Wilson Smith, Sir Christopher Andrewes, and Sir Patrick Laidlaw - for the first time isolated the virus, which caused human flu. Then scientific community started the exhaustive research of influenza virus, and the great interest in this virus and its unique features is still active even today.

  15. Efficacy of a high-growth reassortant H1N1 influenza virus vaccine against the classical swine H1N1 subtype influenza virus in mice and pigs.

    PubMed

    Wen, Feng; Yu, Hai; Yang, Fu-Ru; Huang, Meng; Yang, Sheng; Zhou, Yan-Jun; Li, Ze-Jun; Tong, Guang-Zhi

    2014-11-01

    Swine influenza (SI) is an acute, highly contagious respiratory disease caused by swine influenza A viruses (SwIVs), and it poses a potential global threat to human health. Classical H1N1 (cH1N1) SwIVs are still circulating and remain the predominant subtype in the swine population in China. In this study, a high-growth reassortant virus (GD/PR8) harboring the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from a novel cH1N1 isolate in China, A/Swine/Guangdong/1/2011 (GD/11) and six internal genes from the high-growth A/Puerto Rico/8/34(PR8) virus was generated by plasmid-based reverse genetics and tested as a candidate seed virus for the preparation of an inactivated vaccine. The protective efficacy of this vaccine was evaluated in mice and pigs challenged with GD/11 virus. Prime and boost inoculation of GD/PR8 vaccine yielded high-titer serum hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibodies and IgG antibodies for GD/11 in both mice and pigs. Complete protection of mice and pigs against cH1N1 SIV challenge was observed, with significantly fewer lung lesions and reduced viral shedding in vaccine-inoculated animals compared with unvaccinated control animals. Our data demonstrated that the GD/PR8 may serve as the seed virus for a promising SwIVs vaccine to protect the swine population.

  16. Encephalitis in a stone marten (Martes foina) after natural infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1.

    PubMed

    Klopfleisch, R; Wolf, P U; Wolf, C; Harder, T; Starick, E; Niebuhr, M; Mettenleiter, T C; Teifke, J P

    2007-01-01

    Recent outbreaks of disease in different avian species, caused by the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV), have involved infection by subtype H5N1 of the virus. This virus has also crossed species barriers and infected felines and humans. Here, we report the natural infection of a stone marten (Martes foina) from an area with numerous confirmed cases of H5N1 HPAIV infection in wild birds. Histopathological examination of tissues from this animal revealed a diffuse nonsuppurative panencephalitis with perivascular cuffing, multifocal gliosis and neuronal necrosis. Additionally, focal necrosis of pancreatic acinar cells was observed. Immunohistochemically, lesions in these organs were associated with avian influenza virus antigen in neurons, glial cells and pancreatic acinar cells. Thus, the microscopical lesions and viral antigen distribution in this stone marten differs from that recently described for cats naturally and experimentally infected with the same virus subtype. This is the first report of natural infection of a mustelid with HPAIV H5N1.

  17. Influenza A virus recycling revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Dowdle, W. R.

    1999-01-01

    Current textbooks link influenza pandemics to influenza A virus subtypes H2 (1889-91), H3 (1990), H1 (1918-20), H2 (1957-58) and H3 (1968), a pattern suggesting subtype recycling in humans. Since H1 reappeared in 1977, whatever its origin, some workers feel that H2 is the next pandemic candidate. This report reviews the publications on which the concept of influenza A virus subtype recycling is based and concludes that the data are inconsistent with the purported sequence of events. The three influenza pandemics prior to 1957-58 were linked with subtypes through retrospective studies of sera from the elderly, or through seroarchaeology. The pandemic seroarchaeological model for subtype H1 has been validated by the recent recovery of swine virus RNA fragments from persons who died from influenza in 1918. Application of the model to pre-existing H3 antibody among the elderly links the H3 subtype to the pandemic of 1889-91, not that of 1900 as popularly quoted. Application of the model to pre-existing H2 antibody among the elderly fails to confirm that this subtype caused a pandemic in the late 1800's, a finding which is consistent with age-related excess mortality patterns during the pandemics of 1957 (H2) and 1968 (H3). H2 variants should be included in pandemic planning for a number of reasons, but not because of evidence of recycling. It is not known when the next pandemic will occur or which of the 15 (or more) haemagglutinin subtypes will be involved. Effective global surveillance remains the key to influenza preparedness. PMID:10593030

  18. [Comparison of sequences of the hemagglutinin gene and phylogenetical analysis of H9 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from some regions in China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongqi; Cheng, Jian; Peng, Daxin; Jia, Lijun; Zhang, Rukuan; Liu, Xiufan

    2002-06-01

    In order to explore the genetic mutaions of the hemagglutinin(HA) gene and the law of molecular epidemiology of H9 subtype avian influenza viruses in China, 23 H9 subtype avian influenza viruses(AIVs) were isolated from 12 provinces of China in recent years. Their nucleotide sequences of cDNA of HA gene were determined by RT-PCR and sequencing. Their nucleotide and putaive amino acid sequences homology was compared. The results showed that their nucleotide sequence homology was from 94.1% to 100% and that amino acid sequence homology was 95.4% to 100%. The sequences of the HA gene of these isolates were analyzed and compared with that of another 8 isolates from reference. The similedty indicated that HK170499 isolated from Hong Kong was close to the 2 isolates of Japan. And of the 31 isolates with complete HA gene sequences there were 5 isolates, HA gene of which were loss of one potelltial glycosylation site, which were CKGS199, CKTJ196, CKT296, CKSH300 and CKBJ197. Then 1098 nucleotide regions (bases 55 to 1,152) of HA gene of 23 isolates in this study were analyzed phylogenetically and compared with sequences from 31 H9 subtype viruses available in the GenBank database. Although considerable variation at the cleavage sites of the different viruses was observed, giving 10 different amino acid motits, none had multiple basic amino acids that correlate with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) isolates. Examination of amino acid sequences involved in repeptor binding site(RBS) revealed that the amino acid residue at position 191 characteristically distributed in the 54 isolates, that is, this amino acid residue of the isolates of mainland China and several Hong Kong strains was Asn(N) and that of the others was His(H). And the 141 143 amino acid residues, involved in forming the potential glycosylation sites, had the similary characteristic distribution with the 191aa position. The isolates with Asn-191. excluding CKBJ197, had NVS in the position 141aa143aa

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of hemagglutinin genes of 40 H9N2 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from poultry in China from 2010 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Yan, Zhuan-Qiang; Liu, Jun; Ji, Jun; Chang, Shuang; Liu, Di; Qin, Jian-Ping; Ma, Jing-Yun; Bi, Ying-Zuo; Xie, Qing-Mei

    2012-08-01

    Avian influenza virus (H9N2) infection is a major problem of product performance in poultry worldwide. Vaccination is used to limit spread, but more knowledge is needed on the epidemiology of virus subtypes to improve vaccine design. In this study, 40 H9N2 subtype avian influenza viruses (AIVs) were isolated from vaccinated poultry flocks in China from 2010 to 2011. Hemagglutinin (HA) from different virus strains was sequenced and analyzed. We found that the HA genes of these strains shared nucleotide and deduced amino acid homologies that ranged from 90.1 to 92.9 and 91.4 to 95.0 %, respectively, when compared with vaccine strains. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the strains tested could be divided into two major groups. Group I consisted of 24 strains isolated mainly from Eastern and Central China. Group II consisted of 20 strains isolated from Southern China. The cleavage site within the HA protein contained two basic motifs, PSRSSR↓GLF for group I, and PARSSR↓GLF for group II. Additional potential glycosylation sites were found at amino acid position 295 in the HA1 of the isolates in group I, compared with isolates in group II and the vaccine strains. Furthermore, 38 out of the 40 isolates had a leucine residue at position 216 (aa 226 in H3), which was characteristic of human influenza virus-like receptor specificity. In the present study we found that geographical factors play a significant role in virus evolution, and emphasize the importance of continuing surveillance of H9N2 AIVs in chickens in China. PMID:22476906

  20. Characterization of Low Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Subtype H9N2 Isolated from Free-Living Mynah Birds (Acridotheres tristis) in the Sultanate of Oman.

    PubMed

    Body, Mohammad H; Alrarawahi, Abdulmajeed H; Alhubsy, Saif S; Saravanan, Nirmala; Rajmony, Sunil; Mansoor, Muhammad Khalid

    2015-06-01

    A low pathogenic avian influenza virus was identified from free-living birds (mynah, Acridotheres tristis) of the starling family. Virus was isolated by inoculation of homogenized suspension from lung, tracheal, spleen, and cloacal swabs into the allantoic cavity of embryonated chicken eggs. Subtype of the isolate was characterized as H9N2 by hemagglutination inhibition test using monospecific chicken antisera to a wide range of influenza reference strain. Pathogenicity of the isolate was determined by intravenous pathogenicity index. The virus was reisolated from experimentally infected chicken. Additionally, the isolate was subjected to reverse transcriptase PCR using partial hemagglutinin (HA) gene-specific primers and yielded an amplicon of 487 bp. HA gene sequence analysis revealed 99% sequence homology among mynah and chicken isolates from Oman. On phylogenetic analysis, isolates from mynah (A/mynnah/Oman/AIVS6/2005) and chicken (A/chicken/Oman/AIVS3/2006; A/chicken/Oman/AIVS7/2006) clustered together tightly, indicating these free-flying birds may be a source of introduction of H9N2 subtype in poultry bird in Oman. Moreover, the HA gene of H9N2 isolates from Oman resembled those of viruses of the G1-like lineage and were very similar to those from United Arab Emirates. PMID:26473686

  1. Identification and genetic analysis of H3N8 subtype influenza viruses isolated from domestic pigeons in Central China.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhong; Chen, Sunrui; Liu, Ziduo; Jin, Meilin

    2016-02-01

    A novel strain of H3N8 influenza virus was isolated from domestic pigeons during the avian influenza virus (AIV) surveillance in wet markets in Anhui, China, during 2013. The virus was characterized by whole-genome sequencing with subsequent genetic comparison and phylogenetic analysis. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the NA gene of AIV mapped to the North American lineage, and the remaining seven genes belong to a Eurasian lineage. These findings indicated that this H3N8 virus is a novel nature reassortant virus. Comparison of the hemagglutinin amino acid sequences indicated 9 substitutions. One substitution caused the loss of a potential glycosylation site, and six substitutions were not previously observed in avian H3 isolates. Q226 and T228 at the receptor binding sites suggested that Anhui-08 preferentially binds to a-2,3-linked sialic acid receptors, and the cleavage site sequence showed a low pathogenic feature. Animal experiments further confirmed that A/pigeon/Anhui/08/2013 (H3N8) is low or in pigeons. The results improve our understanding of these viruses as they evolve and also provide important information to aid ongoing risk assessment analyses because these zoonotic influenza viruses continue to circulate and adapt to new hosts.

  2. Neutralizing inhibitors in the airways of naïve ferrets do not play a major role in modulating the virulence of H3 subtype influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Job, Emma R; Pizzolla, Angela; Nebl, Thomas; Short, Kirsty R; Deng, Yi-Mo; Carolan, Louise; Laurie, Karen L; Brooks, Andrew G; Reading, Patrick C

    2016-07-01

    Many insights regarding the pathogenesis of human influenza A virus (IAV) infections have come from studies in mice and ferrets. Surfactant protein (SP)-D is the major neutralizing inhibitor of IAV in mouse airway fluids and SP-D-resistant IAV mutants show enhanced virus replication and virulence in mice. Herein, we demonstrate that sialylated glycoproteins, rather than SP-D, represent the major neutralizing inhibitors against H3 subtype viruses in airway fluids from naïve ferrets. Moreover, while resistance to neutralizing inhibitors is a critical factor in modulating virus replication and disease in the mouse model, it does not appear to be so in the ferret model, as H3 mutants resistant to either SP-D or sialylated glycoproteins in ferret airway fluids did not show enhanced virulence in ferrets. These data have important implications for our understanding of pathogenesis and immunity to human IAV infections in these two widely used animal models of infection. PMID:27110707

  3. Antigenicity and evolution amongst recent influenza viruses of H1N1 subtype.

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, F L; Caton, A J; Cox, N J; Kendal, A P; Brownlee, G G

    1983-01-01

    The sequence of the HA1 subunit region of the haemagglutinin gene of influenza A/USSR/90/77, and A/Brazil/11/78, A/Lackland/3/78, A/England/333/80 and A/India/6263/80 was determined by dideoxy-sequencing methods using total virion RNA and specific oligonucleotide primers for reverse transcriptase. These 1977-1980 strains share a minimum of 85% amino acid sequence homology with influenza A/PR/8/34. Most of the surface amino acid substitutions which occurred during the evolution of A/PR/8/34 to A/USSR/90/77 and subsequently in the 1978-1980 strains are located in the 4 antigenic sites previously defined by an analysis of laboratory-selected mutants of A/PR/8/34. We deduce an evolutionary pathway for the 1977-80 strains and suggest their different epidemic properties may be a consequence of only a few amino acid changes. PMID:6634412

  4. Monoclonal antibodies isolated from human B cells neutralize a broad range of H1 subtype influenza A viruses including swine-origin Influenza virus (S-OIV).

    PubMed

    Burioni, Roberto; Canducci, Filippo; Mancini, Nicasio; Clementi, Nicola; Sassi, Monica; De Marco, Donata; Diotti, Roberta Antonia; Saita, Diego; Sampaolo, Michela; Sautto, Giuseppe; Pianezze, Matteo; Clementi, Massimo

    2010-03-30

    The new H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus (S-OIV) strain is a global health problem. The elucidation of the virus-host relationship is crucial for the control of the new infection. Two human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments (HMab) neutralizing the novel H1N1 influenza strain at very low concentrations were cloned before the emergence of S-OIV from a patient who had a broad-range H1N1 serum neutralizing activity. The two HMabs neutralized all tested H1N1 strains, including S-OIV and a swine strain with IC(50) ranging from 2 to 7 microg/ml. Data demonstrate that infection with previously circulating H1N1 strains can elicit antibodies neutralizing S-OIV. Finally, the human genes coding for the neutralizing HMabs could be used for generating full human monoclonal IgGs that can be safely administered being potentially useful in the prophylaxis and the treatment of this human infection.

  5. High antiviral effects of hibiscus tea extract on the H5 subtypes of low and highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    BAATARTSOGT, Tugsbaatar; BUI, Vuong N.; TRINH, Dai Q.; YAMAGUCHI, Emi; GRONSANG, Dulyatad; THAMPAISARN, Rapeewan; OGAWA, Haruko; IMAI, Kunitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Viral neuraminidase inhibitors are widely used as synthetic anti-influenza drugs for the prevention and treatment of influenza. However, drug-resistant influenza A virus variants, including H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs), have been reported. Therefore, the discovery of novel and effective antiviral agents is warranted. We screened the antiviral effects of 11 herbal tea extracts (hibiscus, black tea, tencha, rosehip tea, burdock tea, green tea, jasmine tea, ginger tea, lavender tea, rose tea and oak tea) against the H5N1 HPAIV in vitro. Among the tested extracts, only the hibiscus extract and its fractionated extract (frHibis) highly and rapidly reduced the titers of all H5 HPAIVs and low pathogenic AIVs (LPAIVs) used in the pre-treatment tests of Madin–Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells that were inoculated with a mixture of the virus and the extract. Immunogold electron microscopy showed that anti-H5 monoclonal antibodies could not bind to the deformed H5 virus particles pretreated with frHibis. In post-treatment tests of MDCK cells cultured in the presence of frHibis after infection with H5N1 HPAIV, the frHibis inhibited viral replication and the expression of viral antigens and genes. Among the plants tested, hibiscus showed the most prominent antiviral effects against both H5 HPAIV and LPAIV. PMID:27193820

  6. Isolation and molecular characterization of reassortant H11N3 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from domestic ducks in Zhejiang Province in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haibo; Peng, Xiuming; Peng, Xiaorong; Wu, Nanping

    2016-10-01

    In July 2013, six H11N3 subtype avian influenza viruses (AIVs) were isolated from domestic ducks in Zhejiang Province in Eastern China. These strains were characterized by whole genome sequencing with subsequent phylogenetic analysis and genetic comparison. Phylogenetic analysis of all eight viral genes showed that these strains clustered in the AIV Eurasian lineage, and these strains received their genes from H11, H7, and H1 AIVs in Eastern China. These strains were found to be minimally pathogenic in mice, and were able to replicate in mice without prior adaptation. Continued surveillance is needed considering the important role of domestic ducks in AIV reassortment.

  7. SYBR green-based real-time reverse transcription-PCR for typing and subtyping of all hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of avian influenza viruses and comparison to standard serological subtyping tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsukamoto, K.; Javier, P.C.; Shishido, M.; Noguchi, D.; Pearce, J.; Kang, H.-M.; Jeong, O.M.; Lee, Y.-J.; Nakanishi, K.; Ashizawa, T.

    2012-01-01

    Continuing outbreaks of H5N1 highly pathogenic (HP) avian influenza virus (AIV) infections of wild birds and poultry worldwide emphasize the need for global surveillance of wild birds. To support the future surveillance activities, we developed a SYBR green-based, real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (rRT-PCR) for detecting nucleoprotein (NP) genes and subtyping 16 hemagglutinin (HA) and 9 neuraminidase (NA) genes simultaneously. Primers were improved by focusing on Eurasian or North American lineage genes; the number of mixed-base positions per primer was set to five or fewer, and the concentration of each primer set was optimized empirically. Also, 30 cycles of amplification of 1:10 dilutions of cDNAs from cultured viruses effectively reduced minor cross- or nonspecific reactions. Under these conditions, 346 HA and 345 NA genes of 349 AIVs were detected, with average sensitivities of NP, HA, and NA genes of 10 1.5, 10 2.3, and 10 3.1 50% egg infective doses, respectively. Utility of rRT-PCR for subtyping AIVs was compared with that of current standard serological tests by using 104 recent migratory duck virus isolates. As a result, all HA genes and 99% of the NA genes were genetically subtyped, while only 45% of HA genes and 74% of NA genes were serologically subtyped. Additionally, direct subtyping of AIVs in fecal samples was possible by 40 cycles of amplification: approximately 70% of HA and NA genes of NP gene-positive samples were successfully subtyped. This validation study indicates that rRT-PCR with optimized primers and reaction conditions is a powerful tool for subtyping varied AIVs in clinical and cultured samples. Copyright ?? 2012, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Genetic and antigenic characteristics of H4 subtype avian influenza viruses in Korea and their pathogenicity in quails, domestic ducks and mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun-Mi; Choi, Jun-Gu; Kim, Kwang-Il; Park, Ha-Young; Park, Choi-Kyu; Lee, Youn-Jeong

    2013-01-01

    In Korea, a nationwide surveillance programme was implemented in 2003 to identify highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (AIVs). AIVs belonging to one of the most common haemagglutinin subtypes, H4, were isolated from two domestic ducks and 52 wild birds between 2004 and 2010. These H4 AIVs could be further classified into three neuraminidase subtypes: H4N6 (94.4%), H4N2 (3.7%) and H4N3 (1.9%). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the H4 AIVs had a variety of genetic constellations, with at least nine different genotypes represented. The pathogenicity of these H4 viruses was assessed in quails, domestic ducks and mice. None of the H4 AIVs induced clinical signs in quails or domestic ducks. Viral shedding in quails was relatively high, and virus was recovered up to 5-7 days post-inoculation (p.i.) in oropharyngeal swabs, but the viruses replicated poorly in domestic ducks. Quails may act as an intermediate host in which AIVs are amplified and transmitted to other species. In mice, all of the AIVs were recovered efficiently at relatively high titres from the lungs up to 7 days p.i., demonstrating the potential for AIVs to infect mice directly without prior adaptation. None of the AIVs induced clinical signs nor was any lethal to infected mice. However, there was significant loss of body weight in mice infected with viruses of duck origin. It is suggested that the active surveillance of influenza viruses needs to be enhanced in domestic poultry as well as in wild birds, and that it should include assessment of pathogenicity in animal models.

  9. Avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is type A influenza, which is adapted to an avian host. Although avian influenza has been isolated from numerous avian species, the primary natural hosts for the virus are dabbling ducks, shorebirds, and gulls. The virus can be found world-wide in these species and in o...

  10. Unusual Influenza A Viruses in Bats

    PubMed Central

    Mehle, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A viruses infect a remarkably diverse number of hosts. Two completely new influenza A virus subtypes were recently discovered in bats, dramatically expanding the host range of the virus. These bat viruses are extremely divergent from all other known strains and likely have unique replication cycles. Phylogenetic analysis indicates long-term, isolated evolution in bats. This is supported by a high seroprevalence in sampled bat populations. As bats represent ~20% of all classified mammals, these findings suggests the presence of a massive cryptic reservoir of poorly characterized influenza A viruses. Here, we review the exciting progress made on understanding these newly discovered viruses, and discuss their zoonotic potential. PMID:25256392

  11. Coexistence of Avian Influenza Virus H10 and H9 Subtypes among Chickens in Live Poultry Markets during an Outbreak of Infection with a Novel H10N8 Virus in Humans in Nanchang, China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Maohong; Li, Xiaodan; Ni, Xiansheng; Wu, Jingwen; Gao, Rongbao; Xia, Wen; Wang, Dayan; He, Fenglan; Chen, Shengen; Liu, Yangqing; Guo, Shuangli; Li, Hui; Shu, Yuelong; Bethel, Jeffrey W; Liu, Mingbin; Moore, Justin B; Chen, Haiying

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the novel H10N8 virus in humans has raised concerns about its pandemic potential worldwide. We report the results of a cross-sectional study of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in live poultry markets (LPMs) in Nanchang, China, after the first human case of H10N8 virus infection was reported in the city. A total of 201 specimens tested positive for AIVs among 618 samples collected from 24 LPMs in Nanchang from December 2013 to January 2014. We found that the LPMs were heavily contaminated by AIVs, with H9, H10, and H5 being the predominant subtypes and more than half of the LPMs providing samples that were positive for the H10 subtype. Moreover, the coexistence of different subtypes was common in LPMs. Of the 201 positive samples, 20.9% (42/201) had mixed infections with AIVs of different HA subtypes. Of the 42 mixed infections, 50% (21/42) showed the coexistence of the H9 and H10 subtypes, with or without H5, and were from chicken samples. This indicated that the H10N8 virus probably originated from segment reassortment of the H9 and H10 subtypes. PMID:25766608

  12. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of H3 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from domestic ducks in Zhejiang Province in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haibo; Wu, Nanping; Peng, Xiaorong; Jin, Changzhong; Lu, Xiangyun; Cheng, Linfang; Yao, Hangping; Li, Lanjuan

    2014-08-01

    In 2013, 15 avian influenza viruses (AIVs), H3N2 (n = 7), H3N3 (n = 3), H3N6 (n = 3), and H3N8 (n = 2), were isolated from domestic ducks in Zhejiang Province in China. These strains were characterized by whole genome sequencing with subsequent phylogenetic analysis and genetic comparison. Phylogenetic analysis of all eight viral genes showed that these strains clustered in the AIV Eurasian lineage. Analysis of the neuraminidase (NA) gene indicates that a re-assortment event between H3 and H9N2 AIV occurred in these ducks. The molecular markers analyzed over the genome of all viruses indicated that these strains were low-pathogenic AIVs. Although there was no evidence of re-assortment in subtype H3 AIVs among the avian species' and mammalian hosts in this study, continued surveillance is needed considering the important role of domestic ducks in AIV re-assortment.

  13. The Detection of a Low Pathogenicity Avian Influenza Virus Subtype H9 Infection in a Turkey Breeder Flock in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Reid, Scott M; Banks, Jill; Ceeraz, Vanessa; Seekings, Amanda; Howard, Wendy A; Puranik, Anita; Collins, Susan; Manvell, Ruth; Irvine, Richard M; Brown, Ian H

    2016-05-01

    In April 2013, an H9N2 low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) virus was isolated in a turkey breeder farm in Eastern England comprising 4966 birds. Point-of-lay turkey breeding birds had been moved from a rearing site and within 5 days had shown rapid onset of clinical signs of dullness, coughing, and anorexia. Three houses were involved, two contained a total of 4727 turkey hens, and the third housed 239 male turkeys. Around 50% of the hens were affected, whereas the male turkeys demonstrated milder clinical signs. Bird morbidity rose from 10% to 90%, with an increase in mortality in both houses of turkey hens to 17 dead birds in one house and 27 birds in the second house by day 6. The birds were treated with an antibiotic but were not responsive. Postmortem investigation revealed air sacculitis but no infraorbital sinus swellings or sinusitis. Standard samples were collected, and influenza A was detected. H9 virus infection was confirmed in all three houses by detection and subtyping of hemagglutinating agents in embryonated specific-pathogen-free fowls' eggs, which were shown to be viruses of H9N2 subtype using neuraminidase inhibition tests and a suite of real-time reverse transcription PCR assays. LPAI virus pathotype was suggested by cleavage site sequencing, and an intravenous pathogenicity index of 0.00 confirmed that the virus was of low pathogenicity. Therefore, no official disease control measures were required, and despite the high morbidity, birds recovered and were kept in production. Neuraminidase sequence analysis revealed a deletion of 78 nucleotides in the stalk region, suggesting an adaptation of the virus to poultry. Hemagglutinin gene sequences of two of the isolates clustered with a group of H9 viruses containing other contemporary European H9 strains in the Y439/Korean-like group. The closest matches to the two isolates were A/turkey/Netherlands/11015452/11 (H9N2; 97.9-98% nucleotide identity) and A/mallard/Finland/Li13384/10 (H9N2; 97

  14. The Detection of a Low Pathogenicity Avian Influenza Virus Subtype H9 Infection in a Turkey Breeder Flock in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Reid, Scott M; Banks, Jill; Ceeraz, Vanessa; Seekings, Amanda; Howard, Wendy A; Puranik, Anita; Collins, Susan; Manvell, Ruth; Irvine, Richard M; Brown, Ian H

    2016-05-01

    In April 2013, an H9N2 low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) virus was isolated in a turkey breeder farm in Eastern England comprising 4966 birds. Point-of-lay turkey breeding birds had been moved from a rearing site and within 5 days had shown rapid onset of clinical signs of dullness, coughing, and anorexia. Three houses were involved, two contained a total of 4727 turkey hens, and the third housed 239 male turkeys. Around 50% of the hens were affected, whereas the male turkeys demonstrated milder clinical signs. Bird morbidity rose from 10% to 90%, with an increase in mortality in both houses of turkey hens to 17 dead birds in one house and 27 birds in the second house by day 6. The birds were treated with an antibiotic but were not responsive. Postmortem investigation revealed air sacculitis but no infraorbital sinus swellings or sinusitis. Standard samples were collected, and influenza A was detected. H9 virus infection was confirmed in all three houses by detection and subtyping of hemagglutinating agents in embryonated specific-pathogen-free fowls' eggs, which were shown to be viruses of H9N2 subtype using neuraminidase inhibition tests and a suite of real-time reverse transcription PCR assays. LPAI virus pathotype was suggested by cleavage site sequencing, and an intravenous pathogenicity index of 0.00 confirmed that the virus was of low pathogenicity. Therefore, no official disease control measures were required, and despite the high morbidity, birds recovered and were kept in production. Neuraminidase sequence analysis revealed a deletion of 78 nucleotides in the stalk region, suggesting an adaptation of the virus to poultry. Hemagglutinin gene sequences of two of the isolates clustered with a group of H9 viruses containing other contemporary European H9 strains in the Y439/Korean-like group. The closest matches to the two isolates were A/turkey/Netherlands/11015452/11 (H9N2; 97.9-98% nucleotide identity) and A/mallard/Finland/Li13384/10 (H9N2; 97

  15. Susceptibility of openbill storks (Anastomius oscitans) to highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1.

    PubMed

    Chaichoun, Kridsada; Wiriyarat, Withawat; Phonaknguen, Rassmeepen; Sariya, Ladawan; Taowan, Nam-aoy; Chakritbudsabong, Warunya; Chaisilp, Natnapat; Eiam-ampai, Krirat; Phuttavatana, Pilaipan; Ratanakorn, Parntep

    2013-09-01

    This investigation detailed the clinical disease, gross and histologic lesions in juvenile openbill storks (Anastomus oscitans) intranasally inoculated with an avian influenza virus, A/chicken/Thailand/vsmu-3 (H5N1), which is highly pathogenic for chickens. High morbidity and mortality were observed in openbill storks inoculated with HPAI H5N1 virus. Gross lesions from infected birds were congestion and brain hemorrhage (10/20), pericardial effusions, pericarditis and focal necrosis of the cardiac muscle (2/20), pulmonary edema and pulmonary necrosis, serosanguineous fluid in the bronchis (16/20), liver congestion (6/20), bursitis (5/20), subcutaneous hemorrhages (2/20) and pinpoint proventiculus hemorrhage (2/20). Real time RT-PCR demonstrated the presence of viral RNA in organs associated with the lesions: brain, trachea, lungs, liver, spleen and intestines. Similar to viral genome detection, virus was also isolated from these vital organs. Antibodies to influenza virus detected with a hemagglutination inhibition test, were found only in the openbill storks who died 8 days post-inoculation.

  16. First reported detection of a low pathogenicity avian influenza virus subtype H9 infection in domestic fowl in England.

    PubMed

    Parker, C D; Reid, S M; Ball, A; Cox, W J; Essen, S C; Hanna, A; Mahmood, S; Slomka, M J; Irvine, R M; Brown, I H

    2012-10-13

    In December 2010, infection with a H9N1 low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) virus was detected in a broiler breeder flock in East Anglia. Disease suspicion was based on acute drops in egg production in two of four sheds on the premises, poor egg shell quality and evidence of diarrhoea. H9N1 LPAI virus infection was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Sequencing revealed high nucleotide identity of 93.6 per cent and 97.9 per cent with contemporary North American H9 and Eurasian N1 genes, respectively. Attempted virus isolation in embryonated specific pathogen free (SPF) fowls' eggs was unsuccessful. Epidemiological investigations were conducted to identify the source of infection and any onward spread. These concluded that infection was restricted to the affected premises, and no contacts or movements of poultry, people or fomites could be attributed as the source of infection. However, the infection followed a period of extremely cold weather and snow which impacted on the biosecurity protocols on site, and also led to increased wild bird activity locally, including waterfowl and game birds around the farm buildings. Analysis of the N1 gene sequence suggested direct introduction from wild birds. Although H9 infection in poultry is not notifiable, H9N2 LPAI viruses have been associated with production and mortality episodes in poultry in many parts of Asia and the Middle East. In the present H9N1 outbreak, clinical signs were relatively mild in the poultry with no mortality, transient impact on egg production and no indication of zoonotic spread. However, this first reported detection of H9 LPAI virus in chickens in England was also the first H9 UK poultry case for 40 years, and vindicates the need for continued vigilance and surveillance of avian influenza viruses in poultry populations. PMID:22949546

  17. Evolution and ecology of influenza A viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, R G; Bean, W J; Gorman, O T; Chambers, T M; Kawaoka, Y

    1992-01-01

    In this review we examine the hypothesis that aquatic birds are the primordial source of all influenza viruses in other species and study the ecological features that permit the perpetuation of influenza viruses in aquatic avian species. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequence of influenza A virus RNA segments coding for the spike proteins (HA, NA, and M2) and the internal proteins (PB2, PB1, PA, NP, M, and NS) from a wide range of hosts, geographical regions, and influenza A virus subtypes support the following conclusions. (i) Two partly overlapping reservoirs of influenza A viruses exist in migrating waterfowl and shorebirds throughout the world. These species harbor influenza viruses of all the known HA and NA subtypes. (ii) Influenza viruses have evolved into a number of host-specific lineages that are exemplified by the NP gene and include equine Prague/56, recent equine strains, classical swine and human strains, H13 gull strains, and all other avian strains. Other genes show similar patterns, but with extensive evidence of genetic reassortment. Geographical as well as host-specific lineages are evident. (iii) All of the influenza A viruses of mammalian sources originated from the avian gene pool, and it is possible that influenza B viruses also arose from the same source. (iv) The different virus lineages are predominantly host specific, but there are periodic exchanges of influenza virus genes or whole viruses between species, giving rise to pandemics of disease in humans, lower animals, and birds. (v) The influenza viruses currently circulating in humans and pigs in North America originated by transmission of all genes from the avian reservoir prior to the 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic; some of the genes have subsequently been replaced by others from the influenza gene pool in birds. (vi) The influenza virus gene pool in aquatic birds of the world is probably perpetuated by low-level transmission within that species throughout the year. (vii

  18. Analytical validation of a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction test for Pan-American lineage H7 subtype Avian influenza viruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spackman, Erica; Ip, H.S.; Suarez, D.L.; Slemons, R.D.; Stallknecht, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    A real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction test for the identification of the H7 subtype in North American Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) was first reported in 2002; however, recent AIV surveillance efforts in wild birds and H7 outbreaks in poultry demonstrated that the 2002 test did not detect all H7 AIVs present in North and South America. Therefore, a new test, the 2008 Pan-American H7 test, was developed by using recently available H7 nucleotide sequences. The analytical specificity of the new assay was characterized with an RNA panel composed of 19 H7 viruses from around the world and RNA from all hemagglutinin subtypes except H16. Specificity for North and South American lineage H7 viruses was observed. Assay limits of detection were determined to be between 103 and 104 gene copies per reaction with in vitro transcribed RNA, and 100.0 and 10 0.8 50% egg infectious doses per reaction. The 2008 Pan-American H7 test also was shown to perform similarly to the 2002 test with specimens from chickens experimentally exposed to A/Chicken/BritishColumbia/314514-2/04 H7N3 highly pathogenic AIV. Furthermore, the 2008 test was able to detect 100% (n = 27) of the H7 AIV isolates recovered from North American wild birds in a 2006-2007 sample set (none of which were detected by the 2002 H7 test).

  19. The effect of the hexanic extracts of fig (Ficus carica) and olive (Olea europaea) fruit and nanoparticles of selenium on the immunogenicity of the inactivated avian influenza virus subtype H9N2

    PubMed Central

    Asl Najjari, Amir Hossein; Rajabi, Zolfaghar; Vasfi Marandi, Mehdi; Dehghan, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a contagious viral disease that is seen in avian, human and other mammals, so its control is important. Vaccination against influenza virus subtype H9N2 is one of the ways in controlling program, for this reason several vaccines has been produced. Recently, application of inactivated oil-emulsion vaccines in poultry for controlling low pathogenic avian influenza is increasing. At present, oils that are used as adjuvant in commercial vaccines are mineral oils, which not only lack immunizing effect, but also produce some detriments. The aim of this study is the evaluation the immunogenicity of vegetable oils, which are more metabolizable and safer than mineral oils. In this study the efficacy of hexanic extracts of fig (Ficus carica) and olive (Olea europaea) fruit and also nano-selenium on the immunogenicity of the inactivated avian influenza virus subtype H9N2 was evaluated in broiler chickens. The results indicated that the prepared emulsions could elicit a little degree of immunity, but they could not inhibit the anamnestic response and infection. With regard to the results, it seems that the intact mixture of fig and olive fruit hexanic extracts could not be administered as an immunoadjuvant in the vaccine, and about nano-selenium. In spite of positive effect on the immunogenicity of avian influenza virus subtype H9N2, it still needs more work. PMID:26893813

  20. The effect of the hexanic extracts of fig (Ficus carica) and olive (Olea europaea) fruit and nanoparticles of selenium on the immunogenicity of the inactivated avian influenza virus subtype H9N2.

    PubMed

    Asl Najjari, Amir Hossein; Rajabi, Zolfaghar; Vasfi Marandi, Mehdi; Dehghan, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a contagious viral disease that is seen in avian, human and other mammals, so its control is important. Vaccination against influenza virus subtype H9N2 is one of the ways in controlling program, for this reason several vaccines has been produced. Recently, application of inactivated oil-emulsion vaccines in poultry for controlling low pathogenic avian influenza is increasing. At present, oils that are used as adjuvant in commercial vaccines are mineral oils, which not only lack immunizing effect, but also produce some detriments. The aim of this study is the evaluation the immunogenicity of vegetable oils, which are more metabolizable and safer than mineral oils. In this study the efficacy of hexanic extracts of fig (Ficus carica) and olive (Olea europaea) fruit and also nano-selenium on the immunogenicity of the inactivated avian influenza virus subtype H9N2 was evaluated in broiler chickens. The results indicated that the prepared emulsions could elicit a little degree of immunity, but they could not inhibit the anamnestic response and infection. With regard to the results, it seems that the intact mixture of fig and olive fruit hexanic extracts could not be administered as an immunoadjuvant in the vaccine, and about nano-selenium. In spite of positive effect on the immunogenicity of avian influenza virus subtype H9N2, it still needs more work. PMID:26893813

  1. The effect of the hexanic extracts of fig (Ficus carica) and olive (Olea europaea) fruit and nanoparticles of selenium on the immunogenicity of the inactivated avian influenza virus subtype H9N2.

    PubMed

    Asl Najjari, Amir Hossein; Rajabi, Zolfaghar; Vasfi Marandi, Mehdi; Dehghan, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a contagious viral disease that is seen in avian, human and other mammals, so its control is important. Vaccination against influenza virus subtype H9N2 is one of the ways in controlling program, for this reason several vaccines has been produced. Recently, application of inactivated oil-emulsion vaccines in poultry for controlling low pathogenic avian influenza is increasing. At present, oils that are used as adjuvant in commercial vaccines are mineral oils, which not only lack immunizing effect, but also produce some detriments. The aim of this study is the evaluation the immunogenicity of vegetable oils, which are more metabolizable and safer than mineral oils. In this study the efficacy of hexanic extracts of fig (Ficus carica) and olive (Olea europaea) fruit and also nano-selenium on the immunogenicity of the inactivated avian influenza virus subtype H9N2 was evaluated in broiler chickens. The results indicated that the prepared emulsions could elicit a little degree of immunity, but they could not inhibit the anamnestic response and infection. With regard to the results, it seems that the intact mixture of fig and olive fruit hexanic extracts could not be administered as an immunoadjuvant in the vaccine, and about nano-selenium. In spite of positive effect on the immunogenicity of avian influenza virus subtype H9N2, it still needs more work.

  2. Genetic characterization of natural reassortant H4 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from domestic ducks in Zhejiang province in China from 2013 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haibo; Peng, Xiuming; Peng, Xiaorong; Cheng, Linfang; Lu, Xiangyun; Jin, Changzhong; Xie, Tiansheng; Yao, Hangping; Wu, Nanping

    2015-12-01

    The H4 subtype of the influenza virus was first isolated in 1999 from pigs with pneumonia in Canada. H4 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) are able to cross the species barrier to infect humans. In order to better understand the genetic relationships between H4 AIV strains circulating in Eastern China and other AIV strains from Asia, a survey of domestic ducks in live poultry markets was undertaken in Zhejiang province from 2013 to 2014. In this study, 23 H4N2 (n = 14) and H4N6 (n = 9) strains were isolated from domestic ducks, and all eight gene segments of these strains were sequenced and compared to reference AIV strains available in GenBank. The isolated strains clustered primarily within the Eurasian lineage. No mutations associated with adaption to mammalian hosts or drug resistance was observed. The H4 reassortant strains were found to be of low pathogenicity in mice and able to replicate in the lung of the mice without prior adaptation. Continued surveillance is required, given the important role of domestic ducks in reassortment events leading to new AIVs.

  3. [An overview on swine influenza viruses].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuai; Zhu, Wen-Fei; Shu, Yue-Long

    2013-05-01

    Swine influenza viruses (SIVs) are respiratory pathogens of pigs. They cause both economic bur den in livestock-dependent industries and serious global public health concerns in humans. Because of their dual susceptibility to human and avian influenza viruses, pigs are recognized as intermediate hosts for genetic reassortment and interspecies transmission. Subtypes H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 circulate in swine populations around the world, with varied origin and genetic characteristics among different continents and regions. In this review, the role of pigs in evolution of influenza A viruses, the genetic evolution of SIVs and interspecies transmission of SIVs are described. Considering the possibility that pigs might produce novel influenza viruses causing more outbreaks and pandemics, routine epidemiological surveillance of influenza viruses in pig populations is highly recommended.

  4. Avian influenza virus in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shelan; Sha, Jianping; Yu, Zhao; Hu, Yan; Chan, Ta-Chien; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Pan, Hao; Cheng, Wei; Mao, Shenghua; Zhang, Run Ju; Chen, Enfu

    2016-07-01

    The unprecedented epizootic of avian influenza viruses, such as H5N1, H5N6, H7N1 and H10N8, has continued to cause disease in humans in recent years. In 2013, another novel influenza A (H7N9) virus emerged in China, and 30% of those patients died. Pregnant women are particularly susceptible to avian influenza and are more likely to develop severe complications and to die, especially when infection occurs in the middle and late trimesters. Viremia is believed to occur infrequently, and thus vertical transmission induced by avian influenza appears to be rare. However, avian influenza increases the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including spontaneous abortion, preterm birth and fatal distress. This review summarises 39 cases of pregnant women and their fetuses from different countries dating back to 1997, including 11, 15 and 13 infections with H7N9, H5N1 and the 2009 pandemic influenza (H1N1), respectively. We analysed the epidemic features, following the geographical, population and pregnancy trimester distributions; underlying diseases; exposure history; medical timelines; human-to-human transmission; pathogenicity and vertical transmission; antivirus treatments; maternal severity and mortality and pregnancy outcome. The common experiences reported in different countries and areas suggest that early identification and treatment are imperative. In the future, vigilant virologic and epidemiologic surveillance systems should be developed to monitor avian influenza viruses during pregnancy. Furthermore, extensive study on the immune mechanisms should be conducted, as this will guide safe, rational immunomodulatory treatment among this high-risk population. Most importantly, we should develop a universal avian influenza virus vaccine to prevent outbreaks of the different subtypes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27187752

  5. Phylogenetic Analysis and Pathogenicity Assessment of Two Strains of Avian Influenza Virus Subtype H9N2 Isolated from Migratory Birds: High Homology of Internal Genes with Human H10N8 Virus.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ge; Liang, Chai Hong; Hua, Deng Guo; Song, Lei Yong; Xiang, Yang Guo; Guang, Chen; Lan, Chen Hua; Ping, Hua Yu

    2016-01-01

    Two human-infecting avian influenza viruses (AIVs), H7N9 and H10N8, have emerged in China, which further indicate that the H9N2 subtype of AIVs, as an internal gene donor, may have an important role in the generation of new viruses with cross-species transmissibility and pathogenicity. H9N2 viruses that contain such internal genes widely exist in poultry but are rarely reported in migratory birds. In this study, two strains of the H9N2 virus were isolated from fecal samples of migratory birds in 2014: one strain from Caizi Lake in Anhui Province and one from Chen Lake in Hubei Province of China. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed high homology of all six internal genes of these two strains with the internal genes of the human H10N8 virus in Jiangxi Province, as well as with the human H7N9 virus. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a possible origin of these two strains from poultry in South China. Both of the two viruses tested could replicated in respiratory organs of infective mice without adaption, by both strains of the H9N2 AIVs from wild birds, suggesting their potential capacity for directly infecting mammals. Our findings indicate the existence of H9N2 viruses that contain internal genes highly homologous with human H10N8 or H7N9 viruses. Wild birds can contribute to the spread of the H9N2 virus that contains the "harmful" internal gene complex, leading to gene rearrangement with other influenza viruses and to the generation of new pathogenic viruses. Therefore, strengthening AIV surveillance in wild birds can promote an understanding of the presence and prevalence of viruses and provide scientific evidence for the prevention and control of AIVs and human-infecting AIVs. PMID:26973600

  6. Phylogenetic Analysis and Pathogenicity Assessment of Two Strains of Avian Influenza Virus Subtype H9N2 Isolated from Migratory Birds: High Homology of Internal Genes with Human H10N8 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ge; Liang, Chai Hong; Hua, Deng Guo; Song, Lei Yong; Xiang, Yang Guo; Guang, Chen; Lan, Chen Hua; Ping, Hua Yu

    2016-01-01

    Two human-infecting avian influenza viruses (AIVs), H7N9 and H10N8, have emerged in China, which further indicate that the H9N2 subtype of AIVs, as an internal gene donor, may have an important role in the generation of new viruses with cross-species transmissibility and pathogenicity. H9N2 viruses that contain such internal genes widely exist in poultry but are rarely reported in migratory birds. In this study, two strains of the H9N2 virus were isolated from fecal samples of migratory birds in 2014: one strain from Caizi Lake in Anhui Province and one from Chen Lake in Hubei Province of China. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed high homology of all six internal genes of these two strains with the internal genes of the human H10N8 virus in Jiangxi Province, as well as with the human H7N9 virus. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a possible origin of these two strains from poultry in South China. Both of the two viruses tested could replicated in respiratory organs of infective mice without adaption, by both strains of the H9N2 AIVs from wild birds, suggesting their potential capacity for directly infecting mammals. Our findings indicate the existence of H9N2 viruses that contain internal genes highly homologous with human H10N8 or H7N9 viruses. Wild birds can contribute to the spread of the H9N2 virus that contains the “harmful” internal gene complex, leading to gene rearrangement with other influenza viruses and to the generation of new pathogenic viruses. Therefore, strengthening AIV surveillance in wild birds can promote an understanding of the presence and prevalence of viruses and provide scientific evidence for the prevention and control of AIVs and human-infecting AIVs. PMID:26973600

  7. Phylogenetic Analysis and Pathogenicity Assessment of Two Strains of Avian Influenza Virus Subtype H9N2 Isolated from Migratory Birds: High Homology of Internal Genes with Human H10N8 Virus.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ge; Liang, Chai Hong; Hua, Deng Guo; Song, Lei Yong; Xiang, Yang Guo; Guang, Chen; Lan, Chen Hua; Ping, Hua Yu

    2016-01-01

    Two human-infecting avian influenza viruses (AIVs), H7N9 and H10N8, have emerged in China, which further indicate that the H9N2 subtype of AIVs, as an internal gene donor, may have an important role in the generation of new viruses with cross-species transmissibility and pathogenicity. H9N2 viruses that contain such internal genes widely exist in poultry but are rarely reported in migratory birds. In this study, two strains of the H9N2 virus were isolated from fecal samples of migratory birds in 2014: one strain from Caizi Lake in Anhui Province and one from Chen Lake in Hubei Province of China. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed high homology of all six internal genes of these two strains with the internal genes of the human H10N8 virus in Jiangxi Province, as well as with the human H7N9 virus. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a possible origin of these two strains from poultry in South China. Both of the two viruses tested could replicated in respiratory organs of infective mice without adaption, by both strains of the H9N2 AIVs from wild birds, suggesting their potential capacity for directly infecting mammals. Our findings indicate the existence of H9N2 viruses that contain internal genes highly homologous with human H10N8 or H7N9 viruses. Wild birds can contribute to the spread of the H9N2 virus that contains the "harmful" internal gene complex, leading to gene rearrangement with other influenza viruses and to the generation of new pathogenic viruses. Therefore, strengthening AIV surveillance in wild birds can promote an understanding of the presence and prevalence of viruses and provide scientific evidence for the prevention and control of AIVs and human-infecting AIVs.

  8. Innate immune response to a H3N2 subtype swine influenza virus in newborn porcine trachea cells, alveolar macrophages, and precision-cut lung slices.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Ortega, Mario; Melo, Sandrine; Punyadarsaniya, Darsaniya; Ramé, Christelle; Olivier, Michel; Soubieux, Denis; Marc, Daniel; Simon, Gaëlle; Herrler, Georg; Berri, Mustapha; Dupont, Joëlle; Meurens, François

    2014-01-01

    Viral respiratory diseases remain of major importance in swine breeding units. Swine influenza virus (SIV) is one of the main known contributors to infectious respiratory diseases. The innate immune response to swine influenza viruses has been assessed in many previous studies. However most of these studies were carried out in a single-cell population or directly in the live animal, in all its complexity. In the current study we report the use of a trachea epithelial cell line (newborn pig trachea cells - NPTr) in comparison with alveolar macrophages and lung slices for the characterization of innate immune response to an infection by a European SIV of the H3N2 subtype. The expression pattern of transcripts involved in the recognition of the virus, interferon type I and III responses, and the host-response regulation were assessed by quantitative PCR in response to infection. Some significant differences were observed between the three systems, notably in the expression of type III interferon mRNA. Then, results show a clear induction of JAK/STAT and MAPK signaling pathways in infected NPTr cells. Conversely, PI3K/Akt signaling pathways was not activated. The inhibition of the JAK/STAT pathway clearly reduced interferon type I and III responses and the induction of SOCS1 at the transcript level in infected NPTr cells. Similarly, the inhibition of MAPK pathway reduced viral replication and interferon response. All together, these results contribute to an increased understanding of the innate immune response to H3N2 SIV and may help identify strategies to effectively control SIV infection. PMID:24712747

  9. Influenza A virus reassortment.

    PubMed

    Steel, John; Lowen, Anice C

    2014-01-01

    Reassortment is the process by which influenza viruses swap gene segments. This genetic exchange is possible due to the segmented nature of the viral genome and occurs when two differing influenza viruses co-infect a cell. The viral diversity generated through reassortment is vast and plays an important role in the evolution of influenza viruses. Herein we review recent insights into the contribution of reassortment to the natural history and epidemiology of influenza A viruses, gained through population scale phylogenic analyses. We describe methods currently used to study reassortment in the laboratory, and we summarize recent progress made using these experimental approaches to further our understanding of influenza virus reassortment and the contexts in which it occurs.

  10. Quantification of viral proteins of the avian H7 subtype of influenza virus: an isotope dilution mass spectrometry method applicable for producing more rapid vaccines in the case of an influenza pandemic.

    PubMed

    Santana, Wanda I; Williams, Tracie L; Winne, Emily K; Pirkle, James L; Barr, John R

    2014-05-01

    Vaccination is the most effective means to prevent influenza and its serious complications. Influenza viral strains undergo rapid mutations of the surface proteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) requiring vaccines to be frequently updated to include current circulating strains. It is nearly impossible to predict which strains will be circulating in the next influenza season. It is, therefore, imperative that the process of producing a vaccine be streamlined and as swift as possible. We have developed an isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) method to quantify HA and NA in H7N7, H7N2, and H7N9 influenza. The IDMS method involves enzymatic digestion of viral proteins and the specific detection of evolutionarily conserved target peptides. The four target peptides that were initially chosen for analysis of the HA protein of H7N2 and H7N7 subtypes were conserved and available for analysis of the H7N9 subtype that circulated in China in the spring of 2013. Thus, rapid response to the potential pandemic was realized. Quantification of a protein is performed by employing multiple peptides to ensure that the enzymatic digestion of the protein is efficient in the region of the target peptides, verify the accuracy of the measurement, and provide flexibility in the case of amino acid changes among newly emerging strains. The IDMS method is an accurate, sensitive, and selective method to quantify the amount of HA and NA antigens in primary liquid standards, crude allantoic fluid, purified virus samples, and final vaccine presentations.

  11. Transmission characteristics of low pathogenic avian influenza virus of H7N7 and H5N7 subtypes in layer chickens.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, J L; Elbers, A R W; Bouma, A; Koch, G; de Wit, J J; Stegeman, J A

    2012-03-23

    Low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIv) infections of H5 and H7 subtypes in poultry are notifiable to the OIE, hence surveillance programmes are implemented. The rate at which LPAIv strains spread within a flock determines the prevalence of infected birds and the time it takes to reach that prevalence and, consequently, optimal sample size and sampling frequency. The aim of this study was to investigate the transmission characteristics of an H7N7 and an H5N7 LPAIv in layer chickens. Two transmission experiments were performed, which consisted of 30 (first experiment) and 20 (second experiment) pairs of conventional layers, respectively. At the start of the experiments, one chicken per pair was inoculated with LPAIv and the other chicken was contact-exposed. Occurrence of infection was monitored by regularly collecting tracheal and cloacal swab samples, which were examined for the presence of virus RNA by RT-PCR. The results of the test were used to estimate the transmission rate parameter (β), the infectious period (T) and the basic reproduction ratio (R(0)). In addition, egg production and virus shedding patterns were quantified. For the H7N7 virus, the β, T and R(0) estimates were 0.10 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.04-0.18) day(-1), 7.1 (95% CI: 6.5-7.8) days and 0.7 (95% CI: 0.0-1.7), respectively. With the H5N7 virus, only a few inoculated chickens (5 out of 20) became infected and no transmission was observed. This study shows that transmission characteristics of LPAIv strains may vary considerably, which has to be taken into account when designing surveillance programmes. PMID:21982127

  12. New vaccines against influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Ko, Eun-Ju; Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Kwon, Young-Man; Tang, Yinghua; Cho, Min-Kyoung; Lee, Youn-Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most effective and cost-benefit interventions that prevent the mortality and reduce morbidity from infectious pathogens. However, the licensed influenza vaccine induces strain-specific immunity and must be updated annually based on predicted strains that will circulate in the upcoming season. Influenza virus still causes significant health problems worldwide due to the low vaccine efficacy from unexpected outbreaks of next epidemic strains or the emergence of pandemic viruses. Current influenza vaccines are based on immunity to the hemagglutinin antigen that is highly variable among different influenza viruses circulating in humans and animals. Several scientific advances have been endeavored to develop universal vaccines that will induce broad protection. Universal vaccines have been focused on regions of viral proteins that are highly conserved across different virus subtypes. The strategies of universal vaccines include the matrix 2 protein, the hemagglutinin HA2 stalk domain, and T cell-based multivalent antigens. Supplemented and/or adjuvanted vaccination in combination with universal target antigenic vaccines would have much promise. This review summarizes encouraging scientific advances in the field with a focus on novel vaccine designs. PMID:24427759

  13. New vaccines against influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Ko, Eun-Ju; Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Kwon, Young-Man; Tang, Yinghua; Cho, Min-Kyoung; Lee, Youn-Jeong; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most effective and cost-benefit interventions that prevent the mortality and reduce morbidity from infectious pathogens. However, the licensed influenza vaccine induces strain-specific immunity and must be updated annually based on predicted strains that will circulate in the upcoming season. Influenza virus still causes significant health problems worldwide due to the low vaccine efficacy from unexpected outbreaks of next epidemic strains or the emergence of pandemic viruses. Current influenza vaccines are based on immunity to the hemagglutinin antigen that is highly variable among different influenza viruses circulating in humans and animals. Several scientific advances have been endeavored to develop universal vaccines that will induce broad protection. Universal vaccines have been focused on regions of viral proteins that are highly conserved across different virus subtypes. The strategies of universal vaccines include the matrix 2 protein, the hemagglutinin HA2 stalk domain, and T cell-based multivalent antigens. Supplemented and/or adjuvanted vaccination in combination with universal target antigenic vaccines would have much promise. This review summarizes encouraging scientific advances in the field with a focus on novel vaccine designs.

  14. Digital genotyping of avian influenza viruses of H7 subtype detected in central Europe in 2007-2011.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Alexander; Cerníková, Lenka; Křivda, Vlastimil; Horníčková, Jitka

    2012-05-01

    The objective of our study was to provide a genotype analysis of H7N7 and H7N9 influenza A viruses (IAV) and infer their relationships to co-circulating non-H7 IAV genomes. The H7N7 strains were collected in central Europe (Hungary-1, Czech Republic-1, Slovenia-1 and Poland-4) and the H7N9 in the Czech Republic and Spain between 2007 and 2011. Hand in hand with this effort, a novel IAV genotype visualization approach called digital genotyping was developed. This approach relies on phylogenetic data summarization and transformation into a pixel array called a segment identity matrix. The digital genotyping revealed a complicated genetic interplay between the H7 and co-circulating non-H7 IAV genotypes. At the H7 IAV level the most obvious relationships were observed between one Polish H7N7/446/09 and Czech H7N7/11 viruses which, despite the special and temporal distance of 800 km and 15 months, retained at least 6/8 genome segments. Close relationships were also observed between the Czech H7N9, Polish and Slovenian H7N7 on one hand and Hungarian and Slovenian H7N7 isolates on the other. In addition the former genomes exhibited close interplays with the Czech H6N2/09 and H11N9/10-like viruses. The Czech and Spanish H7N9 genomes were completely different and 6/8 of the Czech H7N9-like segments were traced to either the Czech H3N8/07, H11N9/09 and Polish H7N7/09-like viruses. The results of digital genotyping correlated with the previous observations obtained on the Polish H7N7 isolates. As was demonstrated, the digital genotyping provides a well-arranged and easily interpretable output and may serve as an alternative genotyping tool useful for handling and analysing even a large panel of IAV genomes.

  15. Genetic characterization of avian influenza subtype H4N6 and H4N9 from live bird market, Thailand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A one year active surveillance program for influenza A viruses among avian species in a live-bird market (LBM) in Bangkok, Thailand was conducted in 2009. Out of 970 samples collected, influenza A virus subtypes H4N6 (n=2) and H4N9 (n=1), were isolated from healthy Muscovy ducks. All three viruses w...

  16. Human Influenza Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    Peteranderl, Christin; Herold, Susanne; Schmoldt, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza are the two faces of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in humans. As seasonal influenza occurs on an annual basis, the circulating virus strains are closely monitored and a yearly updated vaccination is provided, especially to identified risk populations. Nonetheless, influenza virus infection may result in pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, frequently complicated by bacterial coinfection. Pandemics are, in contrary, unexpected rare events related to the emergence of a reassorted human-pathogenic influenza A virus (IAV) strains that often causes increased morbidity and spreads extremely rapidly in the immunologically naive human population, with huge clinical and economic impact. Accordingly, particular efforts are made to advance our knowledge on the disease biology and pathology and recent studies have brought new insights into IAV adaptation mechanisms to the human host, as well as into the key players in disease pathogenesis on the host side. Current antiviral strategies are only efficient at the early stages of the disease and are challenged by the genomic instability of the virus, highlighting the need for novel antiviral therapies targeting the pulmonary host response to improve viral clearance, reduce the risk of bacterial coinfection, and prevent or attenuate acute lung injury. This review article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular basis of influenza infection and disease progression, the key players in pathogenesis driving severe disease and progression to lung failure, as well as available and envisioned prevention and treatment strategies against influenza virus infection. PMID:27486731

  17. Human Influenza Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    Peteranderl, Christin; Herold, Susanne; Schmoldt, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza are the two faces of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in humans. As seasonal influenza occurs on an annual basis, the circulating virus strains are closely monitored and a yearly updated vaccination is provided, especially to identified risk populations. Nonetheless, influenza virus infection may result in pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, frequently complicated by bacterial coinfection. Pandemics are, in contrary, unexpected rare events related to the emergence of a reassorted human-pathogenic influenza A virus (IAV) strains that often causes increased morbidity and spreads extremely rapidly in the immunologically naive human population, with huge clinical and economic impact. Accordingly, particular efforts are made to advance our knowledge on the disease biology and pathology and recent studies have brought new insights into IAV adaptation mechanisms to the human host, as well as into the key players in disease pathogenesis on the host side. Current antiviral strategies are only efficient at the early stages of the disease and are challenged by the genomic instability of the virus, highlighting the need for novel antiviral therapies targeting the pulmonary host response to improve viral clearance, reduce the risk of bacterial coinfection, and prevent or attenuate acute lung injury. This review article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular basis of influenza infection and disease progression, the key players in pathogenesis driving severe disease and progression to lung failure, as well as available and envisioned prevention and treatment strategies against influenza virus infection.

  18. Recent zoonoses caused by influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Alexander, D J; Brown, I H

    2000-04-01

    Influenza is a highly contagious, acute illness which has afflicted humans and animals since ancient times. Influenza viruses are part of the Orthomyxoviridae family and are grouped into types A, B and C according to antigenic characteristics of the core proteins. Influenza A viruses infect a large variety of animal species, including humans, pigs, horses, sea mammals and birds, occasionally producing devastating pandemics in humans, such as in 1918, when over twenty million deaths occurred world-wide. The two surface glycoproteins of the virus, haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), are the most important antigens for inducing protective immunity in the host and therefore show the greatest variation. For influenza A viruses, fifteen antigenically distinct HA subtypes and nine NA subtypes are recognised at present; a virus possesses one HA and one NA subtype, apparently in any combination. Although viruses of relatively few subtype combinations have been isolated from mammalian species, all subtypes, in most combinations, have been isolated from birds. In the 20th Century, the sudden emergence of antigenically different strains in humans, termed antigenic shift, has occurred on four occasions, as follows, in 1918 (H1N1), 1957 (H2N2), 1968 (H3N2) and 1977 (H1N1), each resulting in a pandemic. Frequent epidemics have occurred between the pandemics as a result of gradual antigenic change in the prevalent virus, termed antigenic drift. Currently, epidemics occur throughout the world in the human population due to infection with influenza A viruses of subtypes H1N1 and H3N2 or with influenza B virus. The impact of these epidemics is most effectively measured by monitoring excess mortality due to pneumonia and influenza. Phylogenetic studies suggest that aquatic birds could be the source of all influenza A viruses in other species. Human pandemic strains are thought to have emerged through one of the following three mechanisms: genetic reassortment (occurring as a

  19. Isolation of a Novel Swine Influenza Virus from Oklahoma in 2011 Which Is Distantly Related to Human Influenza C Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hause, Ben M.; Ducatez, Mariette; Collin, Emily A.; Ran, Zhiguang; Liu, Runxia; Sheng, Zizhang; Armien, Anibal; Kaplan, Bryan; Chakravarty, Suvobrata; Hoppe, Adam D.; Webby, Richard J.; Simonson, Randy R.; Li, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Of the Orthomyxoviridae family of viruses, only influenza A viruses are thought to exist as multiple subtypes and has non-human maintenance hosts. In April 2011, nasal swabs were collected for virus isolation from pigs exhibiting influenza-like illness. Subsequent electron microscopic, biochemical, and genetic studies identified an orthomyxovirus with seven RNA segments exhibiting approximately 50% overall amino acid identity to human influenza C virus. Based on its genetic organizational similarities to influenza C viruses this virus has been provisionally designated C/Oklahoma/1334/2011 (C/OK). Phylogenetic analysis of the predicted viral proteins found that the divergence between C/OK and human influenza C viruses was similar to that observed between influenza A and B viruses. No cross reactivity was observed between C/OK and human influenza C viruses using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays. Additionally, screening of pig and human serum samples found that 9.5% and 1.3%, respectively, of individuals had measurable HI antibody titers to C/OK virus. C/OK virus was able to infect both ferrets and pigs and transmit to naive animals by direct contact. Cell culture studies showed that C/OK virus displayed a broader cellular tropism than a human influenza C virus. The observed difference in cellular tropism was further supported by structural analysis showing that hemagglutinin esterase (HE) proteins between two viruses have conserved enzymatic but divergent receptor-binding sites. These results suggest that C/OK virus represents a new subtype of influenza C viruses that currently circulates in pigs that has not been recognized previously. The presence of multiple subtypes of co-circulating influenza C viruses raises the possibility of reassortment and antigenic shift as mechanisms of influenza C virus evolution. PMID:23408893

  20. Isolation of a novel swine influenza virus from Oklahoma in 2011 which is distantly related to human influenza C viruses.

    PubMed

    Hause, Ben M; Ducatez, Mariette; Collin, Emily A; Ran, Zhiguang; Liu, Runxia; Sheng, Zizhang; Armien, Anibal; Kaplan, Bryan; Chakravarty, Suvobrata; Hoppe, Adam D; Webby, Richard J; Simonson, Randy R; Li, Feng

    2013-02-01

    Of the Orthomyxoviridae family of viruses, only influenza A viruses are thought to exist as multiple subtypes and has non-human maintenance hosts. In April 2011, nasal swabs were collected for virus isolation from pigs exhibiting influenza-like illness. Subsequent electron microscopic, biochemical, and genetic studies identified an orthomyxovirus with seven RNA segments exhibiting approximately 50% overall amino acid identity to human influenza C virus. Based on its genetic organizational similarities to influenza C viruses this virus has been provisionally designated C/Oklahoma/1334/2011 (C/OK). Phylogenetic analysis of the predicted viral proteins found that the divergence between C/OK and human influenza C viruses was similar to that observed between influenza A and B viruses. No cross reactivity was observed between C/OK and human influenza C viruses using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays. Additionally, screening of pig and human serum samples found that 9.5% and 1.3%, respectively, of individuals had measurable HI antibody titers to C/OK virus. C/OK virus was able to infect both ferrets and pigs and transmit to naive animals by direct contact. Cell culture studies showed that C/OK virus displayed a broader cellular tropism than a human influenza C virus. The observed difference in cellular tropism was further supported by structural analysis showing that hemagglutinin esterase (HE) proteins between two viruses have conserved enzymatic but divergent receptor-binding sites. These results suggest that C/OK virus represents a new subtype of influenza C viruses that currently circulates in pigs that has not been recognized previously. The presence of multiple subtypes of co-circulating influenza C viruses raises the possibility of reassortment and antigenic shift as mechanisms of influenza C virus evolution.

  1. The genome of an influenza virus from a pilot whale: relation to influenza viruses of gulls and marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Groth, Marco; Lange, Jeannette; Kanrai, Pumaree; Pleschka, Stephan; Scholtissek, Christoph; Krumbholz, Andi; Platzer, Matthias; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Zell, Roland

    2014-06-01

    Influenza virus A/whale/Maine/328B/1984 (H13N2) was isolated from a diseased pilot whale. Since only a partial sequence was available, its complete genome was sequenced and compared to the sequences of subtype H13 influenza viruses from shorebirds and various influenza viruses of marine mammals. The data reveal a rare genotype constellation with all gene segments derived of an influenza virus adapted to gulls, terns and waders. In contrast, the phylogenetic trees indicate that the majority of influenza viruses isolated from marine mammals derived from influenza viruses adapted to geese and ducks. We conclude that A/whale/Maine/328B/1984 is the first record of an infection of a marine mammal from a gull-origin influenza virus. PMID:24704761

  2. Transmissibility of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus, subtype H5N1 in domestic poultry: a spatio-temporal estimation at the global scale.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhijie; Chen, Dongmei; Ward, Michael P; Jiang, Qingwu

    2012-11-01

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV), subtype H5N1 poses a serious threat not only to the poultry industry and wild birds but also to humans. Despite a large number of studies conducted on various aspects of this virus, its transmissibility is still poorly understood. This study quantifies the basic reproductive number (R0) of the global HPAIV H5N1 spread within domestic poultry during December 2003 to December 2009. Three different approaches were applied to estimate R0 for HPAIV H5N1: (i) epidemic doubling time; (ii) spatial distance-based nearest neighbour; and (iii) spatio-temporal distance-based nearest neighbour. These three approaches represent temporal (tR0), spatial (sR0) and spatio-temporal transmissibility (stR0), respectively. The joint application of these three approaches provides a more complete profile by characterising the transmissibility traits of infectious diseases from different perspectives. Estimates of tR0 gradually decreased over the six sequential epidemic waves (EWs) examined, suggesting that the implemented control measures were effective in reducing the number of outbreaks. However, sR0 and stR0 increased from EW1, peaked in EW3 and then gradually decreased during EW4-EW6, reflecting different aspects of disease transmissibility compared to tR0. The application of all three methods in the final EW6 showed R0 >1, suggesting that the control measures implemented did not completely interrupt the transmission cycle, and hence were insufficient to eliminate HPAIV H5N1. Close monitoring of HPAIV H5N1 outbreaks and enhanced control policies is advised. PMID:23242687

  3. Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Viruses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Humans Key Facts about Human Infections with Variant Viruses Interim Guidance for Clinicians on Human Infections Background, Risk Assessment & Reporting Reported Infections with Variant Influenza Viruses in the United States since 2005 Prevention Treatment ...

  4. Detection of highly pathogenic and low pathogenic avian influenza subtype H5 (Eurasian lineage) using NASBA.

    PubMed

    Collins, Richard A; Ko, Lung Sang; So, Ka Lun; Ellis, Trevor; Lau, Lok Ting; Yu, Albert Cheung Hoi

    2002-05-16

    Nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) is a technique that allows the rapid amplification of specific regions of nucleic acid obtained from a diverse range of sources. It is especially suitable for amplifying RNA sequences. A NASBA technique has been developed that allows the detection of avian influenza A subtype H5 from allantoic fluid harvested from inoculated chick embryos. The amplified viral RNA is detected by electrochemiluminescence. The NASBA technique described below is rapid and specific for the identification of influenza A subtype H5 viruses of the Eurasian lineage. More importantly, it can be used to distinguish highly pathogenic and low pathogenic strains of the H5 subtype.

  5. Serological and virological surveillance of avian influenza A virus H9N2 subtype in humans and poultry in Shanghai, China, between 2008 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Ju, L; Liu, P; Zhou, J; Lv, X; Li, L; Shen, H; Su, H; Jiang, L; Jiang, Q

    2015-03-01

    We report the serological evidence of low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H9N2 infection in an occupational poultry-exposed population and a general population. A serological survey of an occupational poultry-exposed population and a general population was conducted using a haemagglutinin-inhibiting (HI) assay in Shanghai, China, from January 2008 to December 2010. Evidence of higher anti-H9 antibodies was found in serum samples collected from poultry workers. During this period, 239 H9N2 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) were isolated from 9297 tracheal and cloacal paired specimens collected from the poultry in live poultry markets. In addition, a total of 733 influenza viruses were isolated from 1569 nasal and throat swabs collected from patients with influenza-like symptoms in a sentinel hospital, which include H3N2, H1N1, pandemic H1N1 and B, but no H9N2 virus was detected. These findings highlight the need for long-term surveillance of avian influenza viruses in occupational poultry-exposed workers.

  6. Serological and Virological Surveillance of Avian Influenza A Virus H9N2 Subtype in Humans and Poultry in Shanghai, China, Between 2008 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q; Ju, L; Liu, P; Zhou, J; Lv, X; Li, L; Shen, H; Su, H; Jiang, L; Jiang, Q

    2015-01-01

    We report the serological evidence of low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H9N2 infection in an occupational poultry-exposed population and a general population. A serological survey of an occupational poultry-exposed population and a general population was conducted using a haemagglutinin-inhibiting (HI) assay in Shanghai, China, from January 2008 to December 2010. Evidence of higher anti-H9 antibodies was found in serum samples collected from poultry workers. During this period, 239 H9N2 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) were isolated from 9297 tracheal and cloacal paired specimens collected from the poultry in live poultry markets. In addition, a total of 733 influenza viruses were isolated from 1569 nasal and throat swabs collected from patients with influenza-like symptoms in a sentinel hospital, which include H3N2, H1N1, pandemic H1N1 and B, but no H9N2 virus was detected. These findings highlight the need for long-term surveillance of avian influenza viruses in occupational poultry-exposed workers. PMID:24803167

  7. Novel reassortant highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N5) viruses in domestic ducks, China.

    PubMed

    Gu, Min; Liu, Wenbo; Cao, Yongzhong; Peng, Daxin; Wang, Xiaobo; Wan, Hongquan; Zhao, Guo; Xu, Quangang; Zhang, Wei; Song, Qingqing; Li, Yanfang; Liu, Xiufan

    2011-06-01

    In China, domestic ducks and wild birds often share the same water, in which influenza viruses replicate preferentially. Isolation of 2 novel reassortant highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N5) viruses from apparently healthy domestic ducks highlights the role of these ducks as reassortment vessels. Such new subtypes of influenza viruses may pose a pandemic threat.

  8. Use of fractional factorial design to study the compatibility of viral ribonucleoprotein gene segments of human H7N9 virus and circulating human influenza subtypes.

    PubMed

    Chin, Alex W H; Mok, Chris K P; Zhu, Huachen; Guan, Yi; Peiris, Joseph S M; Poon, Leo L M

    2014-09-01

    Avian H7N9 influenza viruses may pose a further threat to humans by reassortment with human viruses, which could lead to generation of novel reassortants with enhanced polymerase activity. We previously established a novel statistical approach to study the polymerase activity of reassorted vRNPs (Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2013;7:969-78). Here, we report the use of this method to study recombinant vRNPs with subunits derived from human H1N1, H3N2, and H7N9 viruses. Our results demonstrate that some reassortant vRNPs with subunits derived from the H7N9 and other human viruses can have much higher polymerase activities than the wild-type levels.

  9. Influenza A H3N2 subtype virus NS1 protein targets into the nucleus and binds primarily via its C-terminal NLS2/NoLS to nucleolin and fibrillarin

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Influenza A virus non-structural protein 1 (NS1) is a virulence factor, which is targeted into the cell cytoplasm, nucleus and nucleolus. NS1 is a multi-functional protein that inhibits host cell pre-mRNA processing and counteracts host cell antiviral responses. Previously, we have shown that the NS1 protein of the H3N2 subtype influenza viruses possesses a C-terminal nuclear localization signal (NLS) that also functions as a nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) and targets the protein into the nucleolus. Results Here, we show that the NS1 protein of the human H3N2 virus subtype interacts in vitro primarily via its C-terminal NLS2/NoLS and to a minor extent via its N-terminal NLS1 with the nucleolar proteins, nucleolin and fibrillarin. Using chimeric green fluorescence protein (GFP)-NS1 fusion constructs, we show that the nucleolar retention of the NS1 protein is determined by its C-terminal NLS2/NoLS in vivo. Confocal laser microscopy analysis shows that the NS1 protein colocalizes with nucleolin in nucleoplasm and nucleolus and with B23 and fibrillarin in the nucleolus of influenza A/Udorn/72 virus-infected A549 cells. Since some viral proteins contain NoLSs, it is likely that viruses have evolved specific nucleolar functions. Conclusion NS1 protein of the human H3N2 virus interacts primarily via the C-terminal NLS2/NoLS and to a minor extent via the N-terminal NLS1 with the main nucleolar proteins, nucleolin, B23 and fibrillarin. PMID:22909121

  10. Issues encountered in development of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for use in detecting influenza A virus subtype H5N1 exposure in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A potential mechanism by which highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses could become established in humans is through the infection of and adaptation in pigs. To detect the occurrence of such adaptation, monitoring of the pig populations in endemic H5N1 areas through serological screening woul...

  11. Novel reassortant influenza viruses between pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and other influenza viruses pose a risk to public health.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weili; Wang, Feibing; Dong, Bin; Ou, Changbo; Meng, Demei; Liu, Jinhua; Fan, Zhen-Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is characterized by eight single-stranded, negative sense RNA segments, which allows for gene reassortment among different IAV subtypes when they co-infect a single host cell simultaneously. Genetic reassortment is an important way to favor the evolution of influenza virus. Novel reassortant virus may pose a pandemic among humans. In history, three human pandemic influenza viruses were caused by genetic reassortment between avian, human and swine influenza viruses. Since 2009, pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (pdm/09 H1N1) influenza virus composed of two swine influenza virus genes highlighted the genetic reassortment again. Due to wide host species and high transmission of the pdm/09 H1N1 influenza virus, many different avian, human or swine influenza virus subtypes may reassert with it to generate novel reassortant viruses, which may result in a next pandemic among humans. So, it is necessary to understand the potential threat of current reassortant viruses between the pdm/09 H1N1 and other influenza viruses to public health. This study summarized the status of the reassortant viruses between the pdm/09 H1N1 and other influenza viruses of different species origins in natural and experimental conditions. The aim of this summarization is to facilitate us to further understand the potential threats of novel reassortant influenza viruses to public health and to make effective prevention and control strategies for these pathogens. PMID:26344393

  12. Novel reassortant influenza viruses between pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and other influenza viruses pose a risk to public health.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weili; Wang, Feibing; Dong, Bin; Ou, Changbo; Meng, Demei; Liu, Jinhua; Fan, Zhen-Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is characterized by eight single-stranded, negative sense RNA segments, which allows for gene reassortment among different IAV subtypes when they co-infect a single host cell simultaneously. Genetic reassortment is an important way to favor the evolution of influenza virus. Novel reassortant virus may pose a pandemic among humans. In history, three human pandemic influenza viruses were caused by genetic reassortment between avian, human and swine influenza viruses. Since 2009, pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (pdm/09 H1N1) influenza virus composed of two swine influenza virus genes highlighted the genetic reassortment again. Due to wide host species and high transmission of the pdm/09 H1N1 influenza virus, many different avian, human or swine influenza virus subtypes may reassert with it to generate novel reassortant viruses, which may result in a next pandemic among humans. So, it is necessary to understand the potential threat of current reassortant viruses between the pdm/09 H1N1 and other influenza viruses to public health. This study summarized the status of the reassortant viruses between the pdm/09 H1N1 and other influenza viruses of different species origins in natural and experimental conditions. The aim of this summarization is to facilitate us to further understand the potential threats of novel reassortant influenza viruses to public health and to make effective prevention and control strategies for these pathogens.

  13. Sialic acid content in human saliva and anti-influenza activity against human and avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Limsuwat, Nattavatchara; Suptawiwat, Ornpreya; Boonarkart, Chompunuch; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Auewarakul, Prasert

    2016-03-01

    It was shown previously that human saliva has higher antiviral activity against human influenza viruses than against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses, and that the major anti-influenza activity was associated with sialic-acid-containing molecules. To further characterize the differential susceptibility to saliva among influenza viruses, seasonal influenza A and B virus, pandemic H1N1 virus, and 15 subtypes of avian influenza virus were tested for their susceptibility to human and chicken saliva. Human saliva showed higher hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and neutralization (NT) titers against seasonal influenza A virus and the pandemic H1N1 viruses than against influenza B virus and most avian influenza viruses, except for H9N2 and H12N9 avian influenza viruses, which showed high HI and NT titers. To understand the nature of sialic-acid-containing anti-influenza factors in human saliva, α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acid was measured in human saliva samples using a lectin binding and dot blot assay. α2,6-linked sialic acid was found to be more abundant than α2,3-linked sialic acid, and a seasonal H1N1 influenza virus bound more efficiently to human saliva than an H5N1 virus in a dot blot analysis. These data indicated that human saliva contains the sialic acid type corresponding to the binding preference of seasonal influenza viruses.

  14. Sialic acid content in human saliva and anti-influenza activity against human and avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Limsuwat, Nattavatchara; Suptawiwat, Ornpreya; Boonarkart, Chompunuch; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Auewarakul, Prasert

    2016-03-01

    It was shown previously that human saliva has higher antiviral activity against human influenza viruses than against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses, and that the major anti-influenza activity was associated with sialic-acid-containing molecules. To further characterize the differential susceptibility to saliva among influenza viruses, seasonal influenza A and B virus, pandemic H1N1 virus, and 15 subtypes of avian influenza virus were tested for their susceptibility to human and chicken saliva. Human saliva showed higher hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and neutralization (NT) titers against seasonal influenza A virus and the pandemic H1N1 viruses than against influenza B virus and most avian influenza viruses, except for H9N2 and H12N9 avian influenza viruses, which showed high HI and NT titers. To understand the nature of sialic-acid-containing anti-influenza factors in human saliva, α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acid was measured in human saliva samples using a lectin binding and dot blot assay. α2,6-linked sialic acid was found to be more abundant than α2,3-linked sialic acid, and a seasonal H1N1 influenza virus bound more efficiently to human saliva than an H5N1 virus in a dot blot analysis. These data indicated that human saliva contains the sialic acid type corresponding to the binding preference of seasonal influenza viruses. PMID:26671828

  15. Genetic relatedness of H6 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from wild birds and domestic ducks in Korea and their pathogenicity in animals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Lee, Youn-Jeong; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Oem, Jae-Ku; Kim, Seong-Hee; Lee, Mun-Han; Lee, O-Soo; Park, Choi-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    We report the genetic characterization of H6 avian influenza (AI) viruses isolated from domestic ducks and wild birds in Korea between April 2008 and April 2009. A phylogenetic analysis showed that the H6N1 viruses of wild birds and domestic ducks were of the same genotype (K-1) and were similar to the H6N1 virus isolated from a live poultry market in 2003, as six of the eight gene segments of those viruses had a common source. However, the H6N2 viruses of domestic poultry were separated into four genotypes (K-2a, K-2b, K-2c and K-2d) by at least a triple reassortment between influenza viruses of low pathogenicity from Korean poultry (H9N2 and H3N2) and viruses from aquatic birds. In an experimental infection of animals, certain H6 AI viruses replicated well in chickens and mice without pre-adaptation, indicating that H6 virus pathogenicity has the potential to be altered due to multiple reassortments, and that these reassortments could result in interspecies transmission to mammals.

  16. Serological comparison of antibodies to avian influenza viruses, subtypes H5N2, H6N1, H7N3 and H7N9 between poultry workers and non-poultry workers in Taiwan in 2012.

    PubMed

    Huang, S Y; Yang, J R; Lin, Y J; Yang, C H; Cheng, M C; Liu, M T; Wu, H S; Chang, F Y

    2015-10-01

    In Taiwan, avian influenza virus (AIV) subtypes H5N2, H6N1 and H7N3 have been identified in domestic poultry, and several strains of these subtypes have become endemic in poultry. To evaluate the potential of avian-to-human transmission due to occupational exposure, an exploratory analysis of AIV antibody status in poultry workers was conducted. We enrolled 670 poultry workers, including 335 live poultry vendors (LPVs), 335 poultry farmers (PFs), and 577 non-poultry workers (NPWs). Serum antibody titres against various subtypes of viruses were analysed and compared. The overall seropositivity rates in LPVs and PFs were 2·99% (10/335) and 1·79% (6/335), respectively, against H5N2; and 0·6% (2/335) and 1·19% (4/335), respectively, for H7N3 virus. Of NPWs, 0·35% (2/577) and 0·17% (1/577) were seropositive for H5N2 and H7N3, respectively. Geographical analysis revealed that poultry workers whose workplaces were near locations where H5N2 outbreaks in poultry have been reported face greater risks of being exposed to viruses that result in elevated H5N2 antibody titres. H6N1 antibodies were detected in only one PF, and no H7N9 antibodies were found in the study subjects. Subclinical infections caused by H5N2, H6N1 and H7N3 viruses were thus identified in poultry workers in Taiwan. Occupational exposure is associated with a high risk of AIV infection, and the seroprevalence of particular avian influenza strains in humans reflects the endemic strains in poultry in this region.

  17. Virus-Vectored Influenza Virus Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Tripp, Ralph A.; Tompkins, S. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of an inactivated vaccine that has been licensed for >50 years, the influenza virus continues to cause morbidity and mortality worldwide. Constant evolution of circulating influenza virus strains and the emergence of new strains diminishes the effectiveness of annual vaccines that rely on a match with circulating influenza strains. Thus, there is a continued need for new, efficacious vaccines conferring cross-clade protection to avoid the need for biannual reformulation of seasonal influenza vaccines. Recombinant virus-vectored vaccines are an appealing alternative to classical inactivated vaccines because virus vectors enable native expression of influenza antigens, even from virulent influenza viruses, while expressed in the context of the vector that can improve immunogenicity. In addition, a vectored vaccine often enables delivery of the vaccine to sites of inductive immunity such as the respiratory tract enabling protection from influenza virus infection. Moreover, the ability to readily manipulate virus vectors to produce novel influenza vaccines may provide the quickest path toward a universal vaccine protecting against all influenza viruses. This review will discuss experimental virus-vectored vaccines for use in humans, comparing them to licensed vaccines and the hurdles faced for licensure of these next-generation influenza virus vaccines. PMID:25105278

  18. Active surveillance for avian influenza virus, Egypt, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Kayali, Ghazi; Kandeil, Ahmed; El-Shesheny, Rabeh; Kayed, Ahmed S; Gomaa, Mokhtar M; Maatouq, Asmaa M; Shehata, Mahmoud M; Moatasim, Yassmin; Bagato, Ola; Cai, Zhipeng; Rubrum, Adam; Kutkat, Mohamed A; McKenzie, Pamela P; Webster, Robert G; Webby, Richard J; Ali, Mohamed A

    2014-04-01

    Continuous circulation of influenza A(H5N1) virus among poultry in Egypt has created an epicenter in which the viruses evolve into newer subclades and continue to cause disease in humans. To detect influenza viruses in Egypt, since 2009 we have actively surveyed various regions and poultry production sectors. From August 2010 through January 2013, >11,000 swab samples were collected; 10% were positive by matrix gene reverse transcription PCR. During this period, subtype H9N2 viruses emerged, cocirculated with subtype H5N1 viruses, and frequently co-infected the same avian host. Genetic and antigenic analyses of viruses revealed that influenza A(H5N1) clade 2.2.1 viruses are dominant and that all subtype H9N2 viruses are G1-like. Cocirculation of different subtypes poses concern for potential reassortment. Avian influenza continues to threaten public and animal health in Egypt, and continuous surveillance for avian influenza virus is needed.

  19. Experimental co-infection of SPF chickens with low pathogenicity avian influenza virus (LPAIV) subtypes H9N2, H5N2 and H7N9, and infectious bronchitis virus (IBV)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) and infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) are two of the most important respiratory viruses affecting poultry worldwide, but little is known about the effect of co-infection of these two viruses in poultry. Low pathogenicity (LP) AIV can produce from mild to moderate upper r...

  20. Bacterial sinusitis and otitis media following influenza virus infection in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Ville T; Boyd, Kelli L; McAuley, Julie L; Rehg, Jerold E; McCullers, Jonathan A

    2006-05-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of otitis media, sinusitis, and pneumonia. Many of these infections result from antecedent influenza virus infections. In this study we sought to determine whether the frequency and character of secondary pneumococcal infections differed depending on the strain of influenza virus that preceded bacterial challenge. In young ferrets infected with influenza virus and then challenged with pneumococcus, influenza viruses of any subtype increased bacterial colonization of the nasopharynx. Nine out of 10 ferrets infected with H3N2 subtype influenza A viruses developed either sinusitis or otitis media, while only 1 out of 11 ferrets infected with either an H1N1 influenza A virus or an influenza B virus did so. These data may partially explain why bacterial complication rates are higher during seasons when H3N2 viruses predominate. This animal model will be useful for further study of the mechanisms that underlie viral-bacterial synergism.

  1. Novel reassortant influenza A(H5N8) viruses in domestic ducks, eastern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haibo; Peng, Xiaorong; Xu, Lihua; Jin, Changzhong; Cheng, Linfang; Lu, Xiangyun; Xie, Tiansheng; Yao, Hangping; Wu, Nanping

    2014-08-01

    Domestic ducks are natural reservoirs of avian influenza viruses and serve as reassortant hosts for new virus subtypes. We isolated 2 novel influenza A(H5N8) viruses from domestic ducks in eastern China, sequenced their genomes, and tested their pathogenicity in chickens and mice. Circulation of these viruses may pose health risks for humans.

  2. Pandemic Threat Posed by Avian Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Horimoto, Taisuke; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2001-01-01

    Influenza pandemics, defined as global outbreaks of the disease due to viruses with new antigenic subtypes, have exacted high death tolls from human populations. The last two pandemics were caused by hybrid viruses, or reassortants, that harbored a combination of avian and human viral genes. Avian influenza viruses are therefore key contributors to the emergence of human influenza pandemics. In 1997, an H5N1 influenza virus was directly transmitted from birds in live poultry markets in Hong Kong to humans. Eighteen people were infected in this outbreak, six of whom died. This avian virus exhibited high virulence in both avian and mammalian species, causing systemic infection in both chickens and mice. Subsequently, another avian virus with the H9N2 subtype was directly transmitted from birds to humans in Hong Kong. Interestingly, the genes encoding the internal proteins of the H9N2 virus are genetically highly related to those of the H5N1 virus, suggesting a unique property of these gene products. The identification of avian viruses in humans underscores the potential of these and similar strains to produce devastating influenza outbreaks in major population centers. Although highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses had been identified before the 1997 outbreak in Hong Kong, their devastating effects had been confined to poultry. With the Hong Kong outbreak, it became clear that the virulence potential of these viruses extended to humans. PMID:11148006

  3. Review: influenza virus in pigs.

    PubMed

    Crisci, Elisa; Mussá, Tufária; Fraile, Lorenzo; Montoya, Maria

    2013-10-01

    Influenza virus disease still remains one of the major threats to human health, involving a wide range of animal species and pigs play an important role in influenza ecology. Pigs were labeled as "mixing vessels" since they are susceptible to infection with avian, human and swine influenza viruses and genetic reassortment between these viruses can occur. After the H1N1 influenza pandemic of 2009 with a swine origin virus, the most recent research in "influenzology" is directed at improving knowledge of porcine influenza virus infection. This tendency is probably due to the fact that domestic pigs are closely related to humans and represent an excellent animal model to study various microbial infectious diseases. In spite of the role of the pig in influenza virus ecology, swine immune responses against influenza viruses are not fully understood. Considering these premises, the aim of this review is to focus on the in vitro studies performed with porcine cells and influenza virus and on the immune responses of pigs against human, avian and swine influenza viruses in vivo. The increased acceptance of pigs as suitable and valuable models in the scientific community may stimulate the development of new tools to assess porcine immune responses, paving the way for their consideration as the future "gold standard" large-animal model in immunology.

  4. Predicting Hotspots for Influenza Virus Reassortment

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Marius; Martin, Vincent; Cappelle, Julien; Hosseini, Parviez; Njabo, Kevin Y.; Abdel Aziz, Soad; Xiao, Xiangming; Daszak, Peter; Smith, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    The 1957 and 1968 influenza pandemics, each of which killed ≈1 million persons, arose through reassortment events. Influenza virus in humans and domestic animals could reassort and cause another pandemic. To identify geographic areas where agricultural production systems are conducive to reassortment, we fitted multivariate regression models to surveillance data on influenza A virus subtype H5N1 among poultry in China and Egypt and subtype H3N2 among humans. We then applied the models across Asia and Egypt to predict where subtype H3N2 from humans and subtype H5N1 from birds overlap; this overlap serves as a proxy for co-infection and in vivo reassortment. For Asia, we refined the prioritization by identifying areas that also have high swine density. Potential geographic foci of reassortment include the northern plains of India, coastal and central provinces of China, the western Korean Peninsula and southwestern Japan in Asia, and the Nile Delta in Egypt. PMID:23628436

  5. Synthesis of 1,2,3-triazolyl nucleoside analogs as potential anti-influenza A (H3N2 subtype) virus agents.

    PubMed

    Elayadi, Hanane; Smietana, Michael; Vasseur, Jean J; Balzarini, Jan; Lazrek, Hassan B

    2014-02-01

    Montmorillonite K10 impregnated with copper dichloride and potassium iodide (CuCl2 /KI/K10) was used as catalyst in the cycloaddition of azides and propargylnucleobases, to provide the corresponding 1,4-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazoles in good yield. All compounds 16-23 were evaluated for their antiviral activity in vitro. Compound 18 showed moderate inhibition against influenza virus A (H3N2). PMID:24272912

  6. Molecular characterization of novel reassortant H6N2 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from poultry in Eastern China, in 2014.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haibo; Peng, Xiuming; Peng, Xiaorong; Cheng, Linfang; Wu, Nanping

    2015-12-01

    During the surveillance for avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in live poultry markets in Eastern China, in 2014, seven H6N2 AIVs were isolated from poultry. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these strains received their genes from H6, H3, and H9 AIVs of poultry in China. These strains were found to demonstrate moderate pathogenicity in mice, and were able to replicate in mice without prior adaptation. Considering that novel reassorted H6N2 viruses were isolated from poultry in this study, it is possible that these chickens and ducks play an important role in the generation of novel reassorted H6N2 AIVs.

  7. Molecular characterization of a reassortant H11N9 subtype avian influenza virus isolated from a domestic duck in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haibo; Peng, Xiuming; Peng, Xiaorong; Wu, Nanping

    2015-10-01

    During surveillance for avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in live-poultry markets in Eastern China in 2013, an H11N9 AIV was isolated from a domestic duck. Phylogenetic analysis showed that this strain received its genes from H11, H3, H10, and H7 AIVs of poultry in China. This strain was found to be minimally pathogenic in mice and was able to replicate in mice without prior adaptation. Considering that the reassorted H11N9 viruses were isolated from domestic ducks in this study, it is possible that these ducks play an important role in the generation of novel reassorted H11 AIVs.

  8. Swine influenza viruses: an Asian perspective.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Ki; Pascua, Phillippe Noriel Q; Song, Min-Suk

    2013-01-01

    Swine influenza viruses (SIVs) are respiratory viral pathogens of pigs that are capable of causing serious global public health concerns in human. Because of their dual susceptibility to mammalian and avian influenza A viruses, pigs are the leading intermediate hosts for genetic reassortment and interspecies transmission and serve as reservoirs of antigenically divergent human viruses from which zoonotic stains with pandemic potential may arise. Pandemic influenza viruses emerging after the 1918 Spanish flu have originated in asia. Although distinct lineages of North American and European SIVs of the H1N1, H3N2, and HiN2 subtypes have been widely studied, less is known about the porcine viruses that are circulating among pig populations throughout Asia. The current review understanding of Contemporary viruses, human infection with SIVs, and the potential threat of novel pandemic strains are described, Furthermore, to best use the limited resources that are available for comprehensive genetic assessment of influenza, consensus efforts among Asian nations to increase epidemiosurveillance of swine herds is also strongly promoted.

  9. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Subtype H5N1 in Africa: A Comprehensive Phylogenetic Analysis and Molecular Characterization of Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Cattoli, Giovanni; Monne, Isabella; Fusaro, Alice; Joannis, Tony M.; Lombin, Lami H.; Aly, Mona M.; Arafa, Abdel S.; Sturm-Ramirez, Katharine M.; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Awuni, Joseph A.; Batawui, Komla B.; Awoume, Kodzo A.; Aplogan, Gilbert L.; Sow, Adama; Ngangnou, Andrè C.; El Nasri Hamza, Iman M.; Gamatié, Djibo; Dauphin, Gwenaelle; Domenech, Joseph M.; Capua, Ilaria

    2009-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus A/H5N1 was first officially reported in Africa in early 2006. Since the first outbreak in Nigeria, this virus spread rapidly to other African countries. From its emergence to early 2008, 11 African countries experienced A/H5N1 outbreaks in poultry and human cases were also reported in three of these countries. At present, little is known of the epidemiology and molecular evolution of A/H5N1 viruses in Africa. We have generated 494 full gene sequences from 67 African isolates and applied molecular analysis tools to a total of 1,152 A/H5N1 sequences obtained from viruses isolated in Africa, Europe and the Middle East between 2006 and early 2008. Detailed phylogenetic analyses of the 8 gene viral segments confirmed that 3 distinct sublineages were introduced, which have persisted and spread across the continent over this 2-year period. Additionally, our molecular epidemiological studies highlighted the association between genetic clustering and area of origin in a majority of cases. Molecular signatures unique to strains isolated in selected areas also gave us a clearer picture of the spread of A/H5N1 viruses across the continent. Mutations described as typical of human influenza viruses in the genes coding for internal proteins or associated with host adaptation and increased resistance to antiviral drugs have also been detected in the genes coding for transmembrane proteins. These findings raise concern for the possible human health risk presented by viruses with these genetic properties and highlight the need for increased efforts to monitor the evolution of A/H5N1 viruses across the African continent. They further stress how imperative it is to implement sustainable control strategies to improve animal and public health at a global level. PMID:19290041

  10. Multiple introductions of a reassortant H5N1 avian influenza virus of clade 2.3.2.1c with PB2 gene of H9N2 subtype into Indian poultry.

    PubMed

    Tosh, Chakradhar; Nagarajan, Shanmugasundaram; Kumar, Manoj; Murugkar, Harshad V; Venkatesh, Govindarajulu; Shukla, Shweta; Mishra, Amit; Mishra, Pranav; Agarwal, Sonam; Singh, Bharati; Dubey, Prashant; Tripathi, Sushil; Kulkarni, Diwakar D

    2016-09-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses are a threat to poultry in Asia, Europe, Africa and North America. Here, we report isolation and characterization of H5N1 viruses isolated from ducks and turkeys in Kerala, Chandigarh and Uttar Pradesh, India between November 2014 and March 2015. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses of haemagglutinin gene identified that the virus belonged to a new clade 2.3.2.1c which has not been detected earlier in Indian poultry. The virus possessed molecular signature for high pathogenicity to chickens, which was corroborated by intravenous pathogenicity index of 2.96. The virus was a reassortant which derives its PB2 gene from H9N2 virus isolated in China during 2007-2013. However, the neuraminidase and internal genes are of H5N1 subtype. Phylogenetic and network analysis revealed that after detection in China in 2013/2014, the virus moved to Europe, West Africa and other Asian countries including India. The analyses further indicated multiple introductions of H5N1 virus in Indian poultry and internal spread in Kerala. One of the outbreaks in ducks in Kerala is linked to the H5N1 virus isolated from wild birds in Dubai suggesting movement of virus probably through migration of wild birds. However, the outbreaks in ducks in Chandigarh and Uttar Pradesh were from an unknown source in Asia which also contributed gene pools to the outbreaks in Europe and West Africa. The widespread incidence of the novel H5N1 HPAI is similar to the spread of clade 2.2 ("Qinghai-like") virus in 2005, and should be monitored to avoid threat to animal and public health. PMID:27174088

  11. Antiviral Protein of Momordica charantia L. Inhibits Different Subtypes of Influenza A

    PubMed Central

    Pongthanapisith, Viroj; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Leelamanit, Wichet

    2013-01-01

    The new antiviral activity of the protein extracted from Momordica charantia was determined with different subtypes of influenza A. The protein was purified from the seed of M. charantia using an anion exchanger and a Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography (FPLC) system. At the concentration of 1.401 mg/mL, the protein did not exhibit cytotoxicity in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK) but inhibited 1 × 105 FFU influenza A/PR/8/34 H1N1 virus at 56.50%, 65.72%, and 100% inhibition by the protein treated before the virus (pretreated), the protein treated alongside with the virus (simultaneously treated), and the protein treated after the virus (posttreated) during incubation, respectively. Using 5, 25, and 100 TCID50 of influenza A/New Caledonia/20/99 H1N1, A/Fujian/411/01 H3N2 and A/Thailand/1(KAN-1)/2004 H5N1, the IC50 was calculated to be 100, 150, and 200; 75, 175, and 300; and 40, 75, and 200 μg/mL, respectively. Our present finding indicated that the plant protein inhibited not only H1N1 and H3N2 but also H5N1 subtype. As a result of the broad spectrum of its antiviral activity, this edible plant can be developed as an effective therapeutic agent against various and even new emerging subtypes of influenza A. PMID:23935676

  12. New World Bats Harbor Diverse Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Suxiang; Zhu, Xueyong; Li, Yan; Shi, Mang; Zhang, Jing; Bourgeois, Melissa; Yang, Hua; Chen, Xianfeng; Recuenco, Sergio; Gomez, Jorge; Chen, Li-Mei; Johnson, Adam; Tao, Ying; Dreyfus, Cyrille; Yu, Wenli; McBride, Ryan; Carney, Paul J.; Gilbert, Amy T.; Chang, Jessie; Guo, Zhu; Davis, Charles T.; Paulson, James C.; Stevens, James; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Holmes, Edward C.; Wilson, Ian A.; Donis, Ruben O.

    2013-01-01

    Aquatic birds harbor diverse influenza A viruses and are a major viral reservoir in nature. The recent discovery of influenza viruses of a new H17N10 subtype in Central American fruit bats suggests that other New World species may similarly carry divergent influenza viruses. Using consensus degenerate RT-PCR, we identified a novel influenza A virus, designated as H18N11, in a flat-faced fruit bat (Artibeus planirostris) from Peru. Serologic studies with the recombinant H18 protein indicated that several Peruvian bat species were infected by this virus. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that, in some gene segments, New World bats harbor more influenza virus genetic diversity than all other mammalian and avian species combined, indicative of a long-standing host-virus association. Structural and functional analyses of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase indicate that sialic acid is not a ligand for virus attachment nor a substrate for release, suggesting a unique mode of influenza A virus attachment and activation of membrane fusion for entry into host cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that bats constitute a potentially important and likely ancient reservoir for a diverse pool of influenza viruses. PMID:24130481

  13. TMPRSS2 Independency for Haemagglutinin Cleavage In Vivo Differentiates Influenza B Virus from Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Kouji; Ami, Yasushi; Nakajima, Noriko; Nakajima, Katsuhiro; Kitazawa, Minori; Anraku, Masaki; Takayama, Ikuyo; Sangsriratanakul, Natthanan; Komura, Miyuki; Sato, Yuko; Asanuma, Hideki; Takashita, Emi; Komase, Katsuhiro; Takehara, Kazuaki; Tashiro, Masato; Hasegawa, Hideki; Odagiri, Takato; Takeda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A and B viruses show clear differences in their host specificity and pandemic potential. Recent studies have revealed that the host protease TMPRSS2 plays an essential role for proteolytic activation of H1, H3, and H7 subtype strains of influenza A virus (IAV) in vivo. IAV possessing a monobasic cleavage site in the haemagglutinin (HA) protein replicates poorly in TMPRSS2 knockout mice owing to insufficient HA cleavage. In the present study, human isolates of influenza B virus (IBV) strains and a mouse-adapted IBV strain were analysed. The data showed that IBV successfully underwent HA cleavage in TMPRSS2 knockout mice, and that the mouse-adapted strain was fully pathogenic to these mice. The present data demonstrate a clear difference between IAV and IBV in their molecular mechanisms for spreading in vivo. PMID:27389476

  14. Novel vaccines against influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sang-Moo; Song, Jae-Min; Compans, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    Killed and live attenuated influenza virus vaccines are effective in preventing and curbing the spread of influenza epidemics when the strains present in the vaccines are closely matched with the predicted epidemic strains. These vaccines are primarily targeted to induce immunity to the variable major target antigen, hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus. However, current vaccines are not effective in preventing the emergence of new pandemic or highly virulent viruses. New approaches are being investigated to develop universal influenza virus vaccines as well as to apply more effective vaccine delivery methods. Conserved vaccine targets including the influenza M2 ion channel protein and HA stalk domains are being developed using recombinant technologies to improve the level of cross protection. In addition, recent studies provide evidence that vaccine supplements can provide avenues to further improve current vaccination. PMID:21968298

  15. Emergence of influenza A viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Webby, R J; Webster, R G

    2001-01-01

    Pandemic influenza in humans is a zoonotic disease caused by the transfer of influenza A viruses or virus gene segments from animal reservoirs. Influenza A viruses have been isolated from avian and mammalian hosts, although the primary reservoirs are the aquatic bird populations of the world. In the aquatic birds, influenza is asymptomatic, and the viruses are in evolutionary stasis. The aquatic bird viruses do not replicate well in humans, and these viruses need to reassort or adapt in an intermediate host before they emerge in human populations. Pigs can serve as a host for avian and human viruses and are logical candidates for the role of intermediate host. The transmission of avian H5N1 and H9N2 viruses directly to humans during the late 1990s showed that land-based poultry also can serve between aquatic birds and humans as intermediate hosts of influenza viruses. That these transmission events took place in Hong Kong and China adds further support to the hypothesis that Asia is an epicentre for influenza and stresses the importance of surveillance of pigs and live-bird markets in this area. PMID:11779380

  16. Variant (Swine Origin) Influenza Viruses in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Variant Influenza Viruses: Background and CDC Risk Assessment and Reporting Language: ... Background CDC Assessment Reporting Background On Variant Influenza Viruses Swine flu viruses do not normally infect humans. ...

  17. Tissue tropism of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 in naturally infected mute swans (Cygnus Olor ), domestic geese (Aser Anser var. domestica), pekin ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) and mulard ducks ( Cairina moschata x anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Szeredi, Levente; Dán, Adám; Pálmai, Nimród; Ursu, Krisztina; Bálint, Adám; Szeleczky, Zsófia; Ivanics, Eva; Erdélyi, Károly; Rigó, Dóra; Tekes, Lajos; Glávits, Róbert

    2010-03-01

    The 2006 epidemic due to highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) subtype H5N1 in Hungary caused the most severe losses in waterfowl which were, according to the literature at the time, supposed to be the most resistant to this pathogen. The presence of pathological lesions and the amount of viral antigen were quantified by gross pathology, histopathology and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in the organs of four waterfowl species [mute swans (n = 10), domestic geese (n = 6), mulard ducks (n = 6) and Pekin ducks (n = 5)] collected during the epidemic. H5N1 subtype HPAIV was isolated from all birds examined. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRRT-PCR) was also applied on a subset of samples [domestic geese (n = 3), mulard (n = 4) and Pekin duck (n = 4)] in order to compare its sensitivity with IHC. Viral antigen was detected by IHC in all cases. However, the overall presence of viral antigen in tissue samples was quite variable: virus antigen was present in 56/81 (69%) swan, 22/38 (58%) goose, 28/46 (61%) mulard duck and 5/43 (12%) Pekin duck tissue samples. HPAIV subtype H5N1 was detected by qRRT-PCR in all birds examined, in 19/19 (100%) goose, 7/28 (25%) mulard duck and 12/28 (43%) Pekin duck tissue samples. As compared to qRRTPCR, the IHC was less sensitive in geese and Pekin ducks but more sensitive in mulard ducks. The IHC was consistently positive above 4.31 log10 copies/reaction but it gave very variable results below that level. Neurotropism of the isolated virus strains was demonstrated by finding the largest amount of viral antigen and the highest average RNA load in the brain in all four waterfowl species examined.

  18. New aspects of influenza viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, M W; Arden, N H; Maassab, H F

    1992-01-01

    Influenza virus infections continue to cause substantial morbidity and mortality with a worldwide social and economic impact. The past five years have seen dramatic advances in our understanding of viral replication, evolution, and antigenic variation. Genetic analyses have clarified relationships between human and animal influenza virus strains, demonstrating the potential for the appearance of new pandemic reassortants as hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes are exchanged in an intermediate host. Clinical trials of candidate live attenuated influenza virus vaccines have shown the cold-adapted reassortants to be a promising alternative to the currently available inactivated virus preparations. Modern molecular techniques have allowed serious consideration of new approaches to the development of antiviral agents and vaccines as the functions of the viral genes and proteins are further elucidated. The development of techniques whereby the genes of influenza viruses can be specifically altered to investigate those functions will undoubtedly accelerate the pace at which our knowledge expands. PMID:1310439

  19. Avian influenza virus RNA extraction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficient extraction and purification of viral RNA is critical for down-stream molecular applications whether it is the sensitive and specific detection of virus in clinical samples, virus gene cloning and expression, or quantification of avian influenza (AI) virus by molecular methods from expe...

  20. Modified live virus vaccine induces a distinct immune response profile compared to inactivated influenza A virus vaccines in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic and antigenic diversity within H1 influenza A virus (IAV) subtypes circulating in swine is increasing. The need for cross-protective influenza vaccines in swine is necessary as the virus becomes more diverse. This study compared the humoral and cell-mediated immune response of modified live ...

  1. A Defective Interfering Influenza RNA Inhibits Infectious Influenza Virus Replication in Human Respiratory Tract Cells: A Potential New Human Antiviral

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Claire M.; Scott, Paul D.; O’Callaghan, Christopher; Easton, Andrew J.; Dimmock, Nigel J.

    2016-01-01

    Defective interfering (DI) viruses arise during the replication of influenza A virus and contain a non-infective version of the genome that is able to interfere with the production of infectious virus. In this study we hypothesise that a cloned DI influenza A virus RNA may prevent infection of human respiratory epithelial cells with infection by influenza A. The DI RNA (244/PR8) was derived by a natural deletion process from segment 1 of influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1); it comprises 395 nucleotides and is packaged in the DI virion in place of a full-length genome segment 1. Given intranasally, 244/PR8 DI virus protects mice and ferrets from clinical influenza caused by a number of different influenza A subtypes and interferes with production of infectious influenza A virus in cells in culture. However, evidence that DI influenza viruses are active in cells of the human respiratory tract is lacking. Here we show that 244/PR8 DI RNA is replicated by an influenza A challenge virus in human lung diploid fibroblasts, bronchial epithelial cells, and primary nasal basal cells, and that the yield of challenge virus is significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner indicating that DI influenza virus has potential as a human antiviral. PMID:27556481

  2. A Defective Interfering Influenza RNA Inhibits Infectious Influenza Virus Replication in Human Respiratory Tract Cells: A Potential New Human Antiviral.

    PubMed

    Smith, Claire M; Scott, Paul D; O'Callaghan, Christopher; Easton, Andrew J; Dimmock, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Defective interfering (DI) viruses arise during the replication of influenza A virus and contain a non-infective version of the genome that is able to interfere with the production of infectious virus. In this study we hypothesise that a cloned DI influenza A virus RNA may prevent infection of human respiratory epithelial cells with infection by influenza A. The DI RNA (244/PR8) was derived by a natural deletion process from segment 1 of influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1); it comprises 395 nucleotides and is packaged in the DI virion in place of a full-length genome segment 1. Given intranasally, 244/PR8 DI virus protects mice and ferrets from clinical influenza caused by a number of different influenza A subtypes and interferes with production of infectious influenza A virus in cells in culture. However, evidence that DI influenza viruses are active in cells of the human respiratory tract is lacking. Here we show that 244/PR8 DI RNA is replicated by an influenza A challenge virus in human lung diploid fibroblasts, bronchial epithelial cells, and primary nasal basal cells, and that the yield of challenge virus is significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner indicating that DI influenza virus has potential as a human antiviral. PMID:27556481

  3. Transmission of influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-05-01

    Influenza A viruses cause respiratory infections that range from asymptomatic to deadly in humans. Widespread outbreaks (pandemics) are attributable to 'novel' viruses that possess a viral hemagglutinin (HA) gene to which humans lack immunity. After a pandemic, these novel viruses form stable virus lineages in humans and circulate until they are replaced by other novel viruses. The factors and mechanisms that facilitate virus transmission among hosts and the establishment of novel lineages are not completely understood, but the HA and basic polymerase 2 (PB2) proteins are thought to play essential roles in these processes by enabling avian influenza viruses to infect mammals and replicate efficiently in their new host. Here, we summarize our current knowledge of the contributions of HA, PB2, and other viral components to virus transmission and the formation of new virus lineages. PMID:25812763

  4. Transmission of Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause respiratory infections that range from asymptomatic to deadly in humans. Widespread outbreaks (pandemics) are attributable to ‘novel’ viruses that possess a viral hemagglutinin (HA) gene to which humans lack immunity. After a pandemic, these novel viruses form stable virus lineages in humans and circulate until they are replaced by other novel viruses. The factors and mechanisms that facilitate virus transmission among hosts and the establishment of novel lineages are not completely understood, but the HA and basic polymerase 2 (PB2) proteins are thought to play essential roles in these processes by enabling avian influenza viruses to infect mammals and replicate efficiently in their new host. Here, we summarize our current knowledge of the contributions of HA, PB2, and other viral components to virus transmission and the formation of new virus lineages. PMID:25812763

  5. Inactivation of high and low pathogenic avian influenza virus H5 subtypes by copper ions incorporated in zeolite-textile materials.

    PubMed

    Imai, Kunitoshi; Ogawa, Haruko; Bui, Vuong Nghia; Inoue, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Jiro; Ohba, Masayoshi; Yamamoto, Yu; Nakamura, Kikuyasu

    2012-02-01

    The effect of cotton textiles containing Cu(2+) held by zeolites (CuZeo-textile) on the inactivation of H5 subtype viruses was examined. Allantoic fluid (AF) containing a virus (AF virus) (0.1 ml) was applied to the textile (3×3-cm), and incubated for a specific period at ambient temperature. After each incubation, 0.9 ml of culture medium was added followed by squeezing to recover the virus into the medium. The recovered virus was titrated using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells or 10-day-old embryonated chicken eggs. The highly pathogenic H5N1 and the low pathogenic H5N3 viruses were inactivated on the CuZeo-textile, even after short incubation. The titer of A/chicken/Yamaguchi/7/04 (H5N1) in MDCK cells and in eggs declined by >5.0 log(10) and 5.0 log(10), respectively, in 30 s. The titer of A/whooper swan/Hokkaido/1/08 (H5N1) in MDCK cells declined by 2.3 and 3.5 in 1 and 5 min, respectively. When A/whistling swan/Shimane/499/83 (H5N3) was treated on the CuZeo-textile for 10 min, the titer declined by >5.0 log(10) in MDCK cells and by >3.5 log(10) in eggs. In contrast, no decrease in the titers was observed on cotton textiles containing zeolites alone (Zeo-textile). Neither cytopathic effects nor NP antigens were detected in MDCK cells inoculated with the H5N1 virus treated on the CuZeo-textile. The viral genes (H5, N1, M, and NP) were amplified from the virus treated on the CuZeo-textile by RT-PCR. The hemagglutinating activity of the CuZeo-textile treated virus was unaffected, indicating that virus-receptor interactions were maintained. Electron microscopic analysis revealed a small number of particles with morphological abnormalities in the H5N3 virus samples recovered immediately from the CuZeo-textile, while no particles were detectable in the 10-min treated sample, suggesting the rapid destruction of virions by the Cu(2+) in the CuZeo-textile. The loss of infectivity of H5 viruses could, therefore, be due to the destruction of virions by Cu(2

  6. Influenza virus hemagglutinin stalk-based antibodies and vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Krammer, Florian; Palese, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies against the conserved stalk domain of the hemagglutinin are currently being discussed as promising therapeutic tools against influenza virus infections. Due to the conservation of the stalk domain these antibodies are able to broadly neutralize a wide spectrum of influenza virus strains and subtypes. Broadly protective vaccine candidates based on the epitopes of these antibodies, e.g. chimeric and headless hemagglutinin structures, are currently under development and show promising results in animals models. These candidates could be developed into universal influenza virus vaccines that protect from infection with drifted seasonal as well as novel pandemic influenza virus strains therefore obviating the need for annual vaccination, and enhancing our pandemic preparedness. PMID:23978327

  7. Analysis of H7 avian influenza viruses by antigenic cartography and correlation to protection by vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The H7 hemagglutinin subtype one of the most common subtypes of avian influenza virus (AIV) in poultry world wide and since it has the potential to become highly pathogenic it is among the priority subtypes for vaccination. Selection of the optimal vaccine seed strains may now be aided by antigenic...

  8. Susceptibility of avian species to north american H13 low pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gulls are widely recognized reservoirs for low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses; however, the subtypes maintained in these populations and/or the transmission mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Although, a wide diversity of influenza viruses have been isolated from gulls, two hemag...

  9. Enhanced Pneumonia With Pandemic 2009 A/H1N1 Swine Influenza Virus in Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. Swine influenza A viruses (SIV) in the major swine producing regions of North America consist of multiple subtypes of endemic H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 derived from swine, avian and human influenza viruses with a triple reassortant internal gene (TRIG) constellation (1). Genetic drift and r...

  10. Sampling strategies and biodiversity of influenza A subtypes in wild birds.

    PubMed

    Olson, Sarah H; Parmley, Jane; Soos, Catherine; Gilbert, Martin; Latorre-Margalef, Neus; Hall, Jeffrey S; Hansbro, Phillip M; Leighton, Frederick; Munster, Vincent; Joly, Damien

    2014-01-01

    Wild aquatic birds are recognized as the natural reservoir of avian influenza A viruses (AIV), but across high and low pathogenic AIV strains, scientists have yet to rigorously identify most competent hosts for the various subtypes. We examined 11,870 GenBank records to provide a baseline inventory and insight into patterns of global AIV subtype diversity and richness. Further, we conducted an extensive literature review and communicated directly with scientists to accumulate data from 50 non-overlapping studies and over 250,000 birds to assess the status of historic sampling effort. We then built virus subtype sample-based accumulation curves to better estimate sample size targets that capture a specific percentage of virus subtype richness at seven sampling locations. Our study identifies a sampling methodology that will detect an estimated 75% of circulating virus subtypes from a targeted bird population and outlines future surveillance and research priorities that are needed to explore the influence of host and virus biodiversity on emergence and transmission.

  11. Sampling strategies and biodiversity of influenza A subtypes in wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Sarah H.; Parmley, Jane; Soos, Catherine; Gilbert, Martin; Latore-Margalef, Neus; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Hansbro, Phillip M.; Leighton, Frank; Munster, Vincent; Joly, Damien

    2014-01-01

    Wild aquatic birds are recognized as the natural reservoir of avian influenza A viruses (AIV), but across high and low pathogenic AIV strains, scientists have yet to rigorously identify most competent hosts for the various subtypes. We examined 11,870 GenBank records to provide a baseline inventory and insight into patterns of global AIV subtype diversity and richness. Further, we conducted an extensive literature review and communicated directly with scientists to accumulate data from 50 non-overlapping studies and over 250,000 birds to assess the status of historic sampling effort. We then built virus subtype sample-based accumulation curves to better estimate sample size targets that capture a specific percentage of virus subtype richness at seven sampling locations. Our study identifies a sampling methodology that will detect an estimated 75% of circulating virus subtypes from a targeted bird population and outlines future surveillance and research priorities that are needed to explore the influence of host and virus biodiversity on emergence and transmission.

  12. Sampling Strategies and Biodiversity of Influenza A Subtypes in Wild Birds

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Sarah H.; Parmley, Jane; Soos, Catherine; Gilbert, Martin; Latorre-Margalef, Neus; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Hansbro, Phillip M.; Leighton, Frederick; Munster, Vincent; Joly, Damien

    2014-01-01

    Wild aquatic birds are recognized as the natural reservoir of avian influenza A viruses (AIV), but across high and low pathogenic AIV strains, scientists have yet to rigorously identify most competent hosts for the various subtypes. We examined 11,870 GenBank records to provide a baseline inventory and insight into patterns of global AIV subtype diversity and richness. Further, we conducted an extensive literature review and communicated directly with scientists to accumulate data from 50 non-overlapping studies and over 250,000 birds to assess the status of historic sampling effort. We then built virus subtype sample-based accumulation curves to better estimate sample size targets that capture a specific percentage of virus subtype richness at seven sampling locations. Our study identifies a sampling methodology that will detect an estimated 75% of circulating virus subtypes from a targeted bird population and outlines future surveillance and research priorities that are needed to explore the influence of host and virus biodiversity on emergence and transmission. PMID:24599502

  13. Imaging of influenza virus sialidase activity in living cells.

    PubMed

    Kurebayashi, Yuuki; Takahashi, Tadanobu; Otsubo, Tadamune; Ikeda, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Shunsaku; Takano, Maiko; Agarikuchi, Takashi; Sato, Tsubasa; Matsuda, Yukino; Minami, Akira; Kanazawa, Hiroaki; Uchida, Yuko; Saito, Takehiko; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Toshihiro; Kawamori, Fumihiko; Thomson, Robin; von Itzstein, Mark; Suzuki, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus is rich in variation and mutations. It would be very convenient for virus detection and isolation to histochemically detect viral infection regardless of variation and mutations. Here, we established a histochemical imaging assay for influenza virus sialidase activity in living cells by using a new fluorescent sialidase substrate, 2-(benzothiazol-2-yl)-4-bromophenyl 5-acetamido-3,5-dideoxy-α-D-glycero-D-galacto-2-nonulopyranosidonic acid (BTP3-Neu5Ac). The BTP3-Neu5Ac assay histochemically visualized influenza virus-infected cells regardless of viral hosts and subtypes. Influenza virus neuraminidase-expressed cells, viral focus formation, and virus-infected locations in mice lung tissues were easily, rapidly, and sensitively detected by the BTP3-Neu5Ac assay. Histochemical visualization with the BTP3-Neu5Ac assay is extremely useful for detection of influenza viruses without the need for fixation or a specific antibody. This novel assay should greatly improve the efficiency of detection, titration, and isolation of influenza viruses and might contribute to research on viral sialidase.

  14. Cloned Defective Interfering Influenza RNA and a Possible Pan-Specific Treatment of Respiratory Virus Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dimmock, Nigel J.; Easton, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Defective interfering (DI) genomes are characterised by their ability to interfere with the replication of the virus from which they were derived, and other genetically compatible viruses. DI genomes are synthesized by nearly all known viruses and represent a vast natural reservoir of antivirals that can potentially be exploited for use in the clinic. This review describes the application of DI virus to protect from virus-associated diseases in vivo using as an example a highly active cloned influenza A DI genome and virus that protects broadly in preclinical trials against different subtypes of influenza A and against non-influenza A respiratory viruses. This influenza A-derived DI genome protects by two totally different mechanisms: molecular interference with influenza A replication and by stimulating innate immunity that acts against non-influenza A viruses. The review considers what is needed to develop DI genomes to the point of entry into clinical trials. PMID:26184282

  15. Influenza A virus and secondary bacterial infection in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infection alone causes significant disease characterized by respiratory distress and poor growth in pigs. Endemic strains of IAV in North America pigs consist of the subtypes H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2. These circulating strains contain the triple reassortant internal gene (TRIG) c...

  16. Influenza A virus in pigs – protection, provocation and predisposition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endemic strains of influenza A virus (IAV) in North America pigs consist of the subtypes H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2. These circulating strains contain the triple reassortant internal gene (TRIG) cassette resulting from incorporation of genes from swine, avian, and human IAV's. Genetic drift and reassortme...

  17. Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus among wild birds in Mongolia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The central Asian country of Mongolia supports large populations of migratory water birds that migrate across much of Asia where highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus subtype H5N1 is endemic. This, together with the near absence of domestic poultry, makes Mongolia an ideal location to unde...

  18. Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Making a Candidate Vaccine Virus Related Links Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Get ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans Language: English Españ ...

  19. Influenza A virus among the hospitalized young children with acute respiratory infection. Is influenza A co infected with respiratory syncytial virus?

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Seyed Mohammad; Makvandi, Manoochehr; Najafi-Fard, Saied; Alavi, Leila

    2012-01-01

    Background: Both influenza A virus (IAV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) cause acute respiratory infection (ARI) in infants and young children. This study was conducted to determine Influenza A virus and its co infection with RSV among the hospitalized children with ARI. Methods: A total of 153 throat samples of the hospitalized young children aged between below one year and 5 years with the clinical signs of ARI were collected from the different hospitals in Khuzestan from June 2009 to April 2010. The samples were tested for Influenza A viruses by real time PCR. Positive IAV samples were tested for influenza A sub type H1N1 and for RSV by the nested PCR. Results: In this study, from the total 153 samples, 35 samples (22.9%) including 15 (42.8%) females and 20 (57.2%) males were positive for influenza A viruses. From the 35 positive samples for IAV, 14 were positive for swine H1N1 subtype. All the positive samples for influenza showed negative for RSV infection which revealed no coinfection with RSV. The prevalence of influenza A among age/sex groups was not significant. Conclusion: Influenza A is a prevalent viral agent isolated from young children with ARI. Influenza A subtype H1N1 was accounted for the 40 percent all laboratory-proven diagnoses of influenza in 2009. No evidence of coinfection of influenza A and RSV has been observed in the present study. PMID:24009929

  20. Nanomicroarray and Multiplex Next-Generation Sequencing for Simultaneous Identification and Characterization of Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ragupathy, Viswanath; Liu, Jikun; Wang, Xue; Vemula, Sai Vikram; El Mubarak, Haja Sittana; Ye, Zhiping; Landry, Marie L.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional methods for detection and discrimination of influenza viruses are time consuming and labor intensive. We developed a diagnostic platform for simultaneous identification and characterization of influenza viruses that uses a combination of nanomicroarray for screening and multiplex next-generation sequencing (NGS) assays for laboratory confirmation. The nanomicroarray was developed to target hemagglutinin, neuraminidase, and matrix genes to identify influenza A and B viruses. PCR amplicons synthesized by using an adapted universal primer for all 8 gene segments of 9 influenza A subtypes were detected in the nanomicroarray and confirmed by the NGS assays. This platform can simultaneously detect and differentiate multiple influenza A subtypes in a single sample. Use of these methods as part of a new diagnostic algorithm for detection and confirmation of influenza infections may provide ongoing public health benefits by assisting with future epidemiologic studies and improving preparedness for potential influenza pandemics. PMID:25694248

  1. Swine Influenza Virus: Emerging Understandings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: In March-April 2009, a novel pandemic H1N1 emerged in the human population in North America [1]. The gene constellation of the emerging virus was demonstrated to be a combination of genes from swine influenza A viruses (SIV) of North American and Eurasian lineages that had never before...

  2. Avian influenza virus and Newcastle disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) severely impact poultry egg production. Decreased egg yield and hatchability, as well as misshapen eggs, are often observed during infection with AIV and NDV, even with low-virulence strains or in vaccinated flocks. Data suggest that in...

  3. Avian influenza h6 viruses productively infect and cause illness in mice and ferrets.

    PubMed

    Gillim-Ross, Laura; Santos, Celia; Chen, Zhongying; Aspelund, Amy; Yang, Chin-Fen; Ye, Dan; Jin, Hong; Kemble, George; Subbarao, Kanta

    2008-11-01

    Influenza pandemic preparedness has focused on influenza virus H5 and H7 subtypes. However, it is not possible to predict with certainty which subtype of avian influenza virus will cause the next pandemic, and it is prudent to include other avian influenza virus subtypes in pandemic preparedness efforts. An H6 influenza virus was identified as a potential progenitor of the H5N1 viruses that emerged in Hong Kong in 1997. This virus continues to circulate in the bird population in Asia, and other H6 viruses are prevalent in birds in North America and Asia. The high rate of reassortment observed in influenza viruses and the prevalence of H6 viruses in birds suggest that this subtype may pose a pandemic risk. Very little is known about the replicative capacity, immunogenicity, and correlates of protective immunity for low-pathogenicity H6 influenza viruses in mammals. We evaluated the antigenic and genetic relatedness of 14 H6 influenza viruses and their abilities to replicate and induce a cross-reactive immune response in two animal models: mice and ferrets. The different H6 viruses replicated to different levels in the respiratory tracts of mice and ferrets, causing varied degrees of morbidity and mortality in these two models. H6 virus infection induced similar patterns of neutralizing antibody responses in mice and ferrets; however, species-specific differences in the cross-reactivity of the antibody responses were observed. Overall, cross-reactivity of neutralizing antibodies in H6 virus-infected mice did not correlate well with protection against heterologous wild-type H6 viruses. However, we have identified an H6 virus that induces protective immunity against viruses in the North American and Eurasian lineages.

  4. [Studies on sialidase and esterase in influenza viruses].

    PubMed

    Cabezas, J A

    1991-01-01

    The main contributions of the author and collaborators about sialidase (EC 3.2.1.18) of influenza virus types A and B and O-acetylesterase (EC 3.1.1.53) of type C are summarized. After a short introduction on the topic, the negative results obtained by the author on inhibitors are commented. Then, the peculiarities of the three procedures assayed, based on the NADH determination as a measurement for the sialidase activity, are discussed. The spectrofluorimetric measurement of NADH concentration is a more sensitive and convenient procedure than that by spectrophotometry, although it is less sensitive than that based on bioluminiscence. Sialidase activity is generally higher in influenza virus type A than in type B; however, some differences have been found between the three sub-types A analysed. Furthermore, thermal stability and stability against changes in the pH values are higher for influenza virus from ducks, followed by those from humans and, finally, by those from pigs. O-acetylesterase of influenza virus type C shows a broad specificity; it acts on O-acetyl-containing compounds which may not be sialic acids. It seems that this enzyme might contribute to facilitate the action of sialidase of influenza virus types A and B. The peculiarities of influenza virus type C suggest to include this type as a new genus in the future classification of viruses.

  5. Adaptation of Pandemic H2N2 Influenza A Viruses in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Udayan; Linster, Martin; Suzuki, Yuka; Krauss, Scott; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Fabrizio, Thomas P.; Bestebroer, Theo M.; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Webby, Richard J.; Wentworth, David E.; Fouchier, Ron A. M.

    2014-01-01

    The 1957 A/H2N2 influenza virus caused an estimated 2 million fatalities during the pandemic. Since viruses of the H2 subtype continue to infect avian species and pigs, the threat of reintroduction into humans remains. To determine factors involved in the zoonotic origin of the 1957 pandemic, we performed analyses on genetic sequences of 175 newly sequenced human and avian H2N2 virus isolates and all publicly available influenza virus genomes. PMID:25505070

  6. ATIVS: analytical tool for influenza virus surveillance.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Chieh; Ko, Chin-Yu; Tsai, Ming-Hsin; Lee, Min-Shi; Hsiung, Chao A

    2009-07-01

    The WHO Global Influenza Surveillance Network has routinely performed genetic and antigenic analyses of human influenza viruses to monitor influenza activity. Although these analyses provide supporting data for the selection of vaccine strains, it seems desirable to have user-friendly tools to visualize the antigenic evolution of influenza viruses for the purpose of surveillance. To meet this need, we have developed a web server, ATIVS (Analytical Tool for Influenza Virus Surveillance), for analyzing serological data of all influenza viruses and hemagglutinin sequence data of human influenza A/H3N2 viruses so as to generate antigenic maps for influenza surveillance and vaccine strain selection. Functionalities are described and examples are provided to illustrate its usefulness and performance. The ATIVS web server is available at http://influenza.nhri.org.tw/ATIVS/.

  7. Pre-infection of pigs with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae modifies outcomes of infection with European swine influenza virus of H1N1, but not H1N2, subtype.

    PubMed

    Deblanc, C; Gorin, S; Quéguiner, S; Gautier-Bouchardon, A V; Ferré, S; Amenna, N; Cariolet, R; Simon, G

    2012-05-25

    Swine influenza virus (SIV) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp) are widespread in farms and are major pathogens involved in the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). The aim of this experiment was to compare the pathogenicity of European avian-like swine H1N1 and European human-like reassortant swine H1N2 viruses in naïve pigs and in pigs previously infected with Mhp. Six groups of SPF pigs were inoculated intra-tracheally with either Mhp, or H1N1, or H1N2 or Mhp+H1N1 or Mhp+H1N2, both pathogens being inoculated at 21 days intervals in these two last groups. A mock-infected group was included. Although both SIV strains induced clinical signs when singly inoculated, results indicated that the H1N2 SIV was more pathogenic than the H1N1 virus, with an earlier shedding and a greater spread in lungs. Initial infection with Mhp before SIV inoculation increased flu clinical signs and pathogenesis (hyperthermia, loss of appetite, pneumonia lesions) due to the H1N1 virus but did not modify significantly outcomes of H1N2 infection. Thus, Mhp and SIV H1N1 appeared to act synergistically, whereas Mhp and SIV H1N2 would compete, as H1N2 infection led to the elimination of Mhp in lung diaphragmatic lobes. In conclusion, SIV would be a risk factor for the severity of respiratory disorders when associated with Mhp, depending on the viral subtype involved. This experimental model of coinfection with Mhp and avian-like swine H1N1 is a relevant tool for studying the pathogenesis of SIV-associated PRDC and testing intervention strategies for the control of the disease.

  8. Serologic evidence of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in northern sea otters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Zhu-Nan; Ip, Hon S.; Frost, Jessica F.; White, C. LeAnn; Murray, Michael J.; Carney, Paul J.; Sun, Xiang-Jie; Stevens, James; Levine, Min Z.; Katz, Jacqueline M.

    2014-01-01

    Sporadic epizootics of pneumonia among marine mammals have been associated with multiple animal-origin influenza A virus subtypes (1–6); seals are the only known nonhuman host for influenza B viruses (7). Recently, we reported serologic evidence of influenza A virus infection in free-ranging northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) captured off the coast of Washington, USA, in August 2011 (8). To investigate further which influenza A virus subtype infected these otters, we tested serum samples from these otters by ELISA for antibody-binding activity against 12 recombinant hemagglutinins (rHAs) from 7 influenza A hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes and 2 lineages of influenza B virus (Technical Appendix Table 1). Estimated ages for the otters were 2–19 years (Technical Appendix Table 2); we also tested archived serum samples from sea otters of similar ages collected from a study conducted during 2001–2002 along the Washington coast (9).

  9. No Virological Evidence for an Influenza A - like Virus in European Bats

    PubMed Central

    Fereidouni, S.; Kwasnitschka, L.; Buschmann, A. Balkema; Müller, T.; Freuling, C.; Schatz, J.; Pikula, J.; Bandouchova, H.; Hoffmann, R.; Ohlendorf, B.; Kerth, G.; Tong, S.; Donis, R.; Beer, M.; Harder, T.

    2016-01-01

    Summary New members of the influenza A virus genus have been detected recently in bats from South America. By molecular investigations, using a generic real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) that detects all previously known influenza A virus subtypes (H1–H16) and a newly developed RT-qPCR specific for the South American bat influenza-like virus of subtype H17 a total of 1571 samples obtained from 1369 individual bats of 26 species from Central Europe were examined. No evidence for the occurrence of such influenza viruses was found. Further attempts towards a more comprehensive evaluation of the role of bats in the ecology and epidemiology of influenza viruses should be based on more intense monitoring efforts. However, given the protected status of bats, not only in Europe, such activities need to be embedded into existing pathogen-monitoring programs PMID:24837569

  10. Complete genomic sequence of a novel reassortant H11N3 influenza virus isolated from domestic ducks in Jiangsu, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaoyang; Zhao, Guo; Gu, Xiaobing; Gu, Min; Hu, Jiao; Li, Qunhui; Zhao, Qingqing; Wang, Xiaoquan; Liu, Xiaowen; Liu, Xiufan

    2012-11-01

    For the first time we report the complete genomic sequence of an H11N3 influenza virus from domestic ducks in China. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the H11N3 virus was a novel reassortant with its genes from different subtypes of domestic duck-origin avian influenza viruses, which further underlined that domestic ducks play a key role in the genetic reassortment and evolution of influenza viruses in China.

  11. Reassortment ability of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus with circulating human and avian influenza viruses: public health risk implications.

    PubMed

    Stincarelli, Maria; Arvia, Rosaria; De Marco, Maria Alessandra; Clausi, Valeria; Corcioli, Fabiana; Cotti, Claudia; Delogu, Mauro; Donatelli, Isabella; Azzi, Alberta; Giannecchini, Simone

    2013-08-01

    Exploring the reassortment ability of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (A/H1N1pdm09) influenza virus with other circulating human or avian influenza viruses is the main concern related to the generation of more virulent or new variants having implications for public health. After different coinfection experiments in human A549 cells, by using the A/H1N1pdm09 virus plus one of human seasonal influenza viruses of H1N1 and H3N2 subtype or one of H11, H10, H9, H7 and H1 avian influenza viruses, several reassortant viruses were obtained. Among these, the HA of H1N1 was the main segment of human seasonal influenza virus reassorted in the A/H1N1pdm09 virus backbone. Conversely, HA and each of the three polymerase segments, alone or in combination, of the avian influenza viruses mainly reassorted in the A/H1N1pdm09 virus backbone. Of note, A/H1N1pdm09 viruses that reassorted with HA of H1N1 seasonal human or H11N6 avian viruses or carried different combination of avian origin polymerase segments, exerted a higher replication effectiveness than that of the parental viruses. These results confirm that reassortment of the A/H1N1pdm09 with circulating low pathogenic avian influenza viruses should not be misjudged in the prediction of the next pandemic.

  12. Emerging influenza viruses and the prospect of a universal influenza virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Krammer, Florian

    2015-05-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual seasonal epidemics and pandemics at irregular intervals. Several cases of human infections with avian and swine influenza viruses have been detected recently, warranting enhanced surveillance and the development of more effective countermeasures to address the pandemic potential of these viruses. The most effective countermeasure against influenza virus infection is the use of prophylactic vaccines. However, vaccines that are currently in use for seasonal influenza viruses have to be re-formulated and re-administered in a cumbersome process every year due to the antigenic drift of the virus. Furthermore, current seasonal vaccines are ineffective against novel pandemic strains. This paper reviews zoonotic influenza viruses with pandemic potential and technological advances towards better vaccines that induce broad and long lasting protection from influenza virus infection. Recent efforts have focused on the development of broadly protective/universal influenza virus vaccines that can provide immunity against drifted seasonal influenza virus strains but also against potential pandemic viruses.

  13. Antigenic and Molecular Characterization of Avian Influenza A(H9N2) Viruses, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Feeroz, Mohammed M.; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Smith, Gavin J.D.; Fourment, Mathieu; Walker, David; McClenaghan, Laura; Alam, S.M. Rabiul; Hasan, M. Kamrul; Seiler, Patrick; Franks, John; Danner, Angie; Barman, Subrata; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Human infection with avian influenza A(H9N2) virus was identified in Bangladesh in 2011. Surveillance for influenza viruses in apparently healthy poultry in live-bird markets in Bangladesh during 2008–2011 showed that subtype H9N2 viruses are isolated year-round, whereas highly pathogenic subtype H5N1 viruses are co-isolated with subtype H9N2 primarily during the winter months. Phylogenetic analysis of the subtype H9N2 viruses showed that they are reassortants possessing 3 gene segments related to subtype H7N3; the remaining gene segments were from the subtype H9N2 G1 clade. We detected no reassortment with subtype H5N1 viruses. Serologic analyses of subtype H9N2 viruses from chickens revealed antigenic conservation, whereas analyses of viruses from quail showed antigenic drift. Molecular analysis showed that multiple mammalian-specific mutations have become fixed in the subtype H9N2 viruses, including changes in the hemagglutinin, matrix, and polymerase proteins. Our results indicate that these viruses could mutate to be transmissible from birds to mammals, including humans. PMID:23968540

  14. A live attenuated cold adapted influenza A H7N3 virus vaccine provides protection against homologous and heterologous H7 viruses in mice and ferrets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The appearance of human infections caused by avian influenza A H7 subtype viruses underscore their pandemic potential and the need to develop vaccines to protect humans from viruses of this subtype. A live attenuated H7N3 virus vaccine was generated by reverse genetics using the HA and NA genes of ...

  15. Detection of Nonhemagglutinating Influenza A(H3) Viruses by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay in Quantitative Influenza Virus Culture

    PubMed Central

    Els, C.; Sprong, L.; van Beek, R.; van der Vries, E.; Osterhaus, A. D. M. E.; Rimmelzwaan, G. F.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of novel antiviral drugs against influenza virus in clinical trials, it is necessary to quantify infectious virus titers in respiratory tract samples from patients. Typically, this is achieved by inoculating virus-susceptible cells with serial dilutions of clinical specimens and detecting the production of progeny virus by hemagglutination, since influenza viruses generally have the capacity to bind and agglutinate erythrocytes of various species through their hemagglutinin (HA). This readout method is no longer adequate, since an increasing number of currently circulating influenza A virus H3 subtype (A[H3]) viruses display a reduced capacity to agglutinate erythrocytes. Here, we report the magnitude of this problem by analyzing the frequency of HA-deficient A(H3) viruses detected in The Netherlands from 1999 to 2012. Furthermore, we report the development and validation of an alternative method for monitoring the production of progeny influenza virus in quantitative virus cultures, which is independent of the capacity to agglutinate erythrocytes. This method is based on the detection of viral nucleoprotein (NP) in virus culture plates by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and it produced results similar to those of the hemagglutination assay using strains with good HA activity, including A/Brisbane/059/07 (H1N1), A/Victoria/210/09 (H3N2), other seasonal A(H1N1), A(H1N1)pdm09, and the majority of A(H3) virus strains isolated in 2009. In contrast, many A(H3) viruses that have circulated since 2010 failed to display HA activity, and infectious virus titers were determined only by detecting NP. The virus culture ELISA described here will enable efficacy testing of new antiviral compounds in clinical trials during seasons in which nonhemagglutinating influenza A viruses circulate. PMID:24622097

  16. Detection of nonhemagglutinating influenza a(h3) viruses by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in quantitative influenza virus culture.

    PubMed

    van Baalen, C A; Els, C; Sprong, L; van Beek, R; van der Vries, E; Osterhaus, A D M E; Rimmelzwaan, G F

    2014-05-01

    To assess the efficacy of novel antiviral drugs against influenza virus in clinical trials, it is necessary to quantify infectious virus titers in respiratory tract samples from patients. Typically, this is achieved by inoculating virus-susceptible cells with serial dilutions of clinical specimens and detecting the production of progeny virus by hemagglutination, since influenza viruses generally have the capacity to bind and agglutinate erythrocytes of various species through their hemagglutinin (HA). This readout method is no longer adequate, since an increasing number of currently circulating influenza A virus H3 subtype (A[H3]) viruses display a reduced capacity to agglutinate erythrocytes. Here, we report the magnitude of this problem by analyzing the frequency of HA-deficient A(H3) viruses detected in The Netherlands from 1999 to 2012. Furthermore, we report the development and validation of an alternative method for monitoring the production of progeny influenza virus in quantitative virus cultures, which is independent of the capacity to agglutinate erythrocytes. This method is based on the detection of viral nucleoprotein (NP) in virus culture plates by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and it produced results similar to those of the hemagglutination assay using strains with good HA activity, including A/Brisbane/059/07 (H1N1), A/Victoria/210/09 (H3N2), other seasonal A(H1N1), A(H1N1)pdm09, and the majority of A(H3) virus strains isolated in 2009. In contrast, many A(H3) viruses that have circulated since 2010 failed to display HA activity, and infectious virus titers were determined only by detecting NP. The virus culture ELISA described here will enable efficacy testing of new antiviral compounds in clinical trials during seasons in which nonhemagglutinating influenza A viruses circulate.

  17. Novel hemagglutinin-based influenza virus inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xintian; Zhang, Xuanxuan

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus has caused seasonal epidemics and worldwide pandemics, which caused tremendous loss of human lives and socioeconomics. Nowadays, only two classes of anti-influenza drugs, M2 ion channel inhibitors and neuraminidase inhibitors respectively, are used for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza virus infection. Unfortunately, influenza virus strains resistant to one or all of those drugs emerge frequently. Hemagglutinin (HA), the glycoprotein in influenza virus envelope, plays a critical role in viral binding, fusion and entry processes. Therefore, HA is a promising target for developing anti-influenza drugs, which block the initial entry step of viral life cycle. Here we reviewed recent understanding of conformational changes of HA in protein folding and fusion processes, and the discovery of HA-based influenza entry inhibitors, which may provide more choices for preventing and controlling potential pandemics caused by multi-resistant influenza viruses. PMID:23977436

  18. Initiation and regulation of immune responses to immunization with whole inactivated vaccines prepared from two genetically and antigenically distinct lineages of Egyptian influenza A virus subtype H5N1.

    PubMed

    Samy, Ahmed; El-Enbaawy, Mona I; El-Sanousi, Ahmed A; Nasef, Soad A; Hikono, Hirokazu; Saito, Takehiko

    2016-10-01

    Following the introduction of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus subtype H5N1, the Egyptian government implemented a massive poultry vaccination campaign as the cornerstone of its policies to control the virus. The efficacy of vaccination has been evaluated primarily by measuring titers of antibodies inhibiting the hemagglutinating activity of the viral hemagglutinin (HA). However, other aspects of the host response remain poorly understood. In the present study, in addition to hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers, cytokine profiles were examined and IFNγ concentrations were measured in vivo after immunization with a whole inactivated virus (WIV) prepared from a classical strain of clade 2.2.1.2 (C121) and an antigenic drift variant of clade 2.2.1.1 (V1063). The results revealed an earlier response and higher HI titers and IFNγ levels in sera from chickens immunized with C121, accompanied by significantly higher expression of IL8, IL10, and IL18 in the spleen and IL6 and IL10 in the bursa, compared to those immunized with V1063. Furthermore, stimulation of the HD11 cell line with C121 induced gradual upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which was observed at 24 hours post-inoculation (hpi), and became more pronounced at 48 and 72 hpi, accompanied by upregulation of IFNα. Conversely, V1063 induced very early transient higher expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines at 3 and 6 hpi accompanied by upregulation of IL10, which then decreased at 24, 48 and 72 hpi. In summary, our results provide evidence of a correlation between adaptive immune responses induced by WIVs and higher expression of IL10 and IL18 in addition to early induction of IFNα. These findings could be used to improve immune responses induced by WIVs. PMID:27449156

  19. Influenza: a virus of our times

    PubMed Central

    McCaughey, Conall

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are successful and omnipresent. Influenza A is a particularly important virus of humans. The article reviews the 2009 emergence of the pandemic influenza A virus, focusing on the potential origin of the virus and the distinctive clinical and epidemiological impact of the 2009 pandemic. PMID:21116418

  20. Influenza Hemagglutinin (HA) Stem Region Mutations That Stabilize or Destabilize the Structure of Multiple HA Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Byrd-Leotis, Lauren; Galloway, Summer E.; Agbogu, Evangeline

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza A viruses enter host cells through endosomes, where acidification induces irreversible conformational changes of the viral hemagglutinin (HA) that drive the membrane fusion process. The prefusion conformation of the HA is metastable, and the pH of fusion can vary significantly among HA strains and subtypes. Furthermore, an accumulating body of evidence implicates HA stability properties as partial determinants of influenza host range, transmission phenotype, and pathogenic potential. Although previous studies have identified HA mutations that can affect HA stability, these have been limited to a small selection of HA strains and subtypes. Here we report a mutational analysis of HA stability utilizing a panel of expressed HAs representing a broad range of HA subtypes and strains, including avian representatives across the phylogenetic spectrum and several human strains. We focused on two highly conserved residues in the HA stem region: HA2 position 58, located at the membrane distal tip of the short helix of the hairpin loop structure, and HA2 position 112, located in the long helix in proximity to the fusion peptide. We demonstrate that a K58I mutation confers an acid-stable phenotype for nearly all HAs examined, whereas a D112G mutation consistently leads to elevated fusion pH. The results enhance our understanding of HA stability across multiple subtypes and provide an additional tool for risk assessment for circulating strains that may have other hallmarks of human adaptation. Furthermore, the K58I mutants, in particular, may be of interest for potential use in the development of vaccines with improved stability profiles. IMPORTANCE The influenza A hemagglutinin glycoprotein (HA) mediates the receptor binding and membrane fusion functions that are essential for virus entry into host cells. While receptor binding has long been recognized for its role in host species specificity and transmission, membrane fusion and associated properties of HA

  1. Spatial, temporal, and species variation in prevalence of influenza A viruses in wild migratory birds.

    PubMed

    Munster, Vincent J; Baas, Chantal; Lexmond, Pascal; Waldenström, Jonas; Wallensten, Anders; Fransson, Thord; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Beyer, Walter E P; Schutten, Martin; Olsen, Björn; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Fouchier, Ron A M

    2007-05-11

    Although extensive data exist on avian influenza in wild birds in North America, limited information is available from elsewhere, including Europe. Here, molecular diagnostic tools were employed for high-throughput surveillance of migratory birds, as an alternative to classical labor-intensive methods of virus isolation in eggs. This study included 36,809 samples from 323 bird species belonging to 18 orders, of which only 25 species of three orders were positive for influenza A virus. Information on species, locations, and timing is provided for all samples tested. Seven previously unknown host species for avian influenza virus were identified: barnacle goose, bean goose, brent goose, pink-footed goose, bewick's swan, common gull, and guillemot. Dabbling ducks were more frequently infected than other ducks and Anseriformes; this distinction was probably related to bird behavior rather than population sizes. Waders did not appear to play a role in the epidemiology of avian influenza in Europe, in contrast to the Americas. The high virus prevalence in ducks in Europe in spring as compared with North America could explain the differences in virus-host ecology between these continents. Most influenza A virus subtypes were detected in ducks, but H13 and H16 subtypes were detected primarily in gulls. Viruses of subtype H6 were more promiscuous in host range than other subtypes. Temporal and spatial variation in influenza virus prevalence in wild birds was observed, with influenza A virus prevalence varying by sampling location; this is probably related to migration patterns from northeast to southwest and a higher prevalence farther north along the flyways. We discuss the ecology and epidemiology of avian influenza A virus in wild birds in relation to host ecology and compare our results with published studies. These data are useful for designing new surveillance programs and are particularly relevant due to increased interest in avian influenza in wild birds. PMID

  2. Selecting Viruses for the Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... which viruses are selected for use in vaccine production? The influenza viruses in the seasonal flu vaccine ... to get a good vaccine virus for vaccine production? There are a number of factors that can ...

  3. Influenza virus A (H1N1) in giant anteaters (Myrmecophaga tridactyla).

    PubMed

    Nofs, Sally; Abd-Eldaim, Mohamed; Thomas, Kathy V; Toplon, David; Rouse, Dawn; Kennedy, Melissa

    2009-07-01

    In February 2007, an outbreak of respiratory disease occurred in a group of giant anteaters (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) at the Nashville Zoo. Isolates from 2 affected animals were identified in March 2007 as a type A influenza virus related to human influenza subtype H1N1.

  4. The pathogenesis of H3N8 canine influenza virus in chickens and turkeys

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Canine influenza virus (CIV) of the H3N8 subtype has emerged in dog populations throughout the U.S. where it has become endemic in kennels and animal shelters in some regions of the U.S. CIV is believed to be an equine influenza that was transmitted to and adapted to dogs. It has not previously bee...

  5. [Internal epidemic influenza virus proteins: isolation and investigation].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, V T; Rakutina, R O; Kordiukova, L V; Manykin, A A; Fedorova, N V; Ksenofontov, A L; Slepushkin, A N

    2006-01-01

    The internal influenza virus proteins M1 and RNP free from surface protein impurities were isolated from subviral particles (virions free from HA and NA ectomenes). The spikeless particles had no propensity to aggregate in the solution at pH 5.0 as compared with native viruses. The subviral particles of B/Hong Kong/330/01 influenza virus, which belonged to B/Victoria/2/87-lineage, were obtained by proteolytic treatment with the enzyme bromelain under the same conditions as in cases of influenza B viruses of B/Jamagata/16/88 lineage. A chromatographic analysis of the tryptic hydrolyzates obtained for matrix (M1) proteins of A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) influenza viruses revealed differences that were greatest between the protein M1 molecules isolated from influenza viruses of different subtypes of hemagglutinine. These findings suggest there are variations in the structure of this conservative internal viral protein M1 during evolution.

  6. Evolutionary Dynamics and Global Diversity of Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rejmanek, Daniel; Hosseini, Parviez R.; Mazet, Jonna A. K.; Daszak, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The increasing number of zoonotic infections caused by influenza A virus (IAV) subtypes of avian origin (e.g., H5N1 and H7N9) in recent years underscores the need to better understand the factors driving IAV evolution and diversity. To evaluate the current feasibility of global analyses to contribute to this aim, we evaluated information in the public domain to explore IAV evolutionary dynamics, including nucleotide substitution rates and selection pressures, using 14 IAV subtypes in 32 different countries over a 12-year period (2000 to 2011). Using geospatial information from 39,785 IAV strains, we examined associations between subtype diversity and socioeconomic, biodiversity, and agricultural indices. Our analyses showed that nucleotide substitution rates for 11 of the 14 evaluated subtypes tended to be higher in Asian countries, particularly in East Asia, than in Canada and the United States. Similarly, at a regional level, subtypes H5N1, H5N2, and H6N2 exhibited significantly higher substitution rates in East Asia than in North America. In contrast, the selection pressures (measured as ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous evolutionary changes [dN/dS ratios]) acting on individual subtypes showed little geographic variation. We found that the strongest predictors for the detected subtype diversity at the country level were reporting effort (i.e., total number of strains reported) and health care spending (an indicator of economic development). Our analyses also identified major global gaps in IAV reporting (including a lack of sequences submitted from large portions of Africa and South America and a lack of geolocation information) and in broad subtype testing which, until addressed, will continue to hinder efforts to track the evolution and diversity of IAV around the world. IMPORTANCE In recent years, an increasing number of influenza A virus (IAV) subtypes, including H5N1, H7N9, and H10N8, have been detected in humans. High fatality rates have led

  7. Antibody Recognition of a Highly Conserved Influenza Virus Epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Ekiert, Damian C.; Bhabha, Gira; Elsliger, Marc-André; Friesen, Robert H.E.; Jongeneelen, Mandy; Throsby, Mark; Goudsmit, Jaap; Wilson, Ian A.; Scripps; Crucell

    2009-05-21

    Influenza virus presents an important and persistent threat to public health worldwide, and current vaccines provide immunity to viral isolates similar to the vaccine strain. High-affinity antibodies against a conserved epitope could provide immunity to the diverse influenza subtypes and protection against future pandemic viruses. Cocrystal structures were determined at 2.2 and 2.7 angstrom resolutions for broadly neutralizing human antibody CR6261 Fab in complexes with the major surface antigen (hemagglutinin, HA) from viruses responsible for the 1918 H1N1 influenza pandemic and a recent lethal case of H5N1 avian influenza. In contrast to other structurally characterized influenza antibodies, CR6261 recognizes a highly conserved helical region in the membrane-proximal stem of HA1 and HA2. The antibody neutralizes the virus by blocking conformational rearrangements associated with membrane fusion. The CR6261 epitope identified here should accelerate the design and implementation of improved vaccines that can elicit CR6261-like antibodies, as well as antibody-based therapies for the treatment of influenza.

  8. Immunosuppression During Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kantzler, G. B.; Lauteria, S. F.; Cusumano, C. L.; Lee, J. D.; Ganguly, R.; Waldman, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of a live attenuated influenza vaccine and subsequent challenge with virulent influenza virus on the delayed hypersensitivity skin test, and the in vitro response of lymphocytes were evaluated. Volunteers were skin tested before and after administration of vaccine or placebo and challenge with PPD (a purified protein derivative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis), candida, mumps, and trichophytin, and their lymphocytes were tested for [3H]thymidine uptake in response to phytohemagglutin. Of eight volunteers who showed evidence of viral replication after administration of the attenuated vaccine, four had a significant diminution in their skin test response, whereas 8 of 13 volunteers infected with virulent influenza virus showed a diminution. Of the 21 volunteers who were infected with either attenuated or virulent influenza virus, 12 showed suppression of their phytohemagglutin response. None of the volunteers who were given placebo vaccine, or who showed no evidence for viral replication after immunization or challenge, had a suppression of their skin test or phytohemagglutin responses. Although most of the infected volunteers demonstrated suppression of their T-cell function, there was no evidence of a similar suppression of B-cell function. PMID:16558116

  9. [Influenza].

    PubMed

    Drescher, H J

    1983-01-01

    Influenza is the last great uncontrolled plague of mankind. Pandemics and epidemics occur at regular time intervals. The influenza viruses are divided into the types A, B and C and show unique variability of their surface antigens (hemagglutinin and neuraminidase). Influenza viruses of type A show the largest degree of antigenic variation which, in turn, resulted in the definition of a number of subtypes, each comprising many strains. By comparison, influenza viruses of types B and C exhibit much less variation of their surface antigens. As a consequence, no subtypes but many different strains have been recognized. The degree of antigenic variation correlates with the epidemiologic significance of the virus types, type A being the most and type C the least important. Two different kinds of antigenic variation have been recognized: In the case of minor variation of one or both surface antigens, the term "antigenic drift" is employed. Antigenic drift occurs with all three types of virus, it is caused by point mutations which increase the chance of survival of mutants in the diseased host. In addition, influenza A viruses show sudden and complete changes of their surface antigens in regular time intervals, resulting in the appearance of new subtypes. This event is called "antigenic shift". The mechanisms responsible for antigenic shift are poorly understood, only. In addition to the recycling of preceding subtypes, reassortment resulting from double infection of cells with strains of human and animal origin are considered possible explanations. By use of modern DNA recombinant technology, the base sequences of a series of virus genes and, as a consequence, the amino acid sequence of the corresponding antigens have been determined. By means of monoclonal antibodies, the antigenic structure of many influenza antigens has been further elucidated. It can be expected that further research on the molecular basis of antigenic variation could finally result in an

  10. Characterization of an H4N2 avian influenza virus isolated from domestic duck in Dongting Lake wetland in 2009.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongbo; Chen, Quanjiao; Chen, Ze

    2012-02-01

    In January 2009, an H4N2 subtype of avian influenza virus [A/duck/Hunan/8-19/2009 (H4N2)] was isolated from domestic ducks in Dongting Lake wetland. The whole genome of the virus was sequenced and the results indicated that multiple gene segments of the virus had a high homology with viruses isolated from wild waterfowl, which indicated that the virus was probably transmitted from wild waterfowl to domestic ducks. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the each gene belonged to the Eurasian lineage of avian influenza viruses, but genetic reassortment occurs between viruses of different subtypes.

  11. Active surveillance for influenza A virus among swine, midwestern United States, 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Cesar A; Culhane, Marie; Juleen, Kevin; Stigger-Rosser, Evelyn; Ducatez, Mariette F; Webby, Richard J; Lowe, James F

    2013-06-01

    Veterinary diagnostic laboratories identify and characterize influenza A viruses primarily through passive surveillance. However, additional surveillance programs are needed. To meet this need, an active surveillance program was conducted at pig farms throughout the midwestern United States. From June 2009 through December 2011, nasal swab samples were collected monthly from among 540 groups of growing pigs and tested for influenza A virus by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Of 16,170 samples, 746 were positive for influenza A virus; of these, 18.0% were subtype H1N1, 16.0% H1N2, 7.6% H3N2, and 14.5% (H1N1)pdm09. An influenza (H3N2) and (H1N1)pdm09 virus were identified simultaneously in 8 groups. This active influenza A virus surveillance program provided quality data and increased the understanding of the current situation of circulating viruses in the midwestern US pig population.

  12. Emergence of mammalian species-infectious and -pathogenic avian influenza H6N5 virus with no evidence of adaptation.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jeong-Hyun; Kim, Eun-Ha; Song, Daesub; Choi, Young Ki; Kim, Jeong-Ki; Poo, Haryoung

    2011-12-01

    The migratory waterfowl of the world are considered to be the natural reservoir of influenza A viruses. Of the 16 hemagglutinin subtypes of avian influenza viruses, the H6 subtype is commonly perpetuated in its natural hosts and is of concern due to its potential to be a precursor of highly pathogenic influenza viruses by reassortment. During routine influenza surveillance, we isolated an unconventional H6N5 subtype of avian influenza virus. Experimental infection of mice revealed that this isolate replicated efficiently in the lungs, subsequently spread systemically, and caused lethality. The isolate also productively infected ferrets, with direct evidence of contact transmission, but no disease or transmission was seen in pigs. Although the isolate possessed the conserved receptor-binding site sequences of avian influenza viruses, it exhibited relatively low replication efficiencies in ducks and chickens. Our genetic and molecular analyses of the isolate revealed that its PB1 sequence showed the highest evolutionary relationship to those of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses and that its PA protein had an isoleucine residue at position 97 (a representative virulence marker). Further studies will be required to examine why our isolate has the virologic characteristics of mammalian influenza viruses but the archetypal receptor binding profiles of avian influenza viruses, as well as to determine whether its potential virulence markers (PB1 analogous to those of H5N1 viruses or isoleucine residue at position 97 within PA) could render it highly pathogenic in mice. PMID:21994462

  13. Influenza A Viruses of Human Origin in Swine, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Martha I; Schaefer, Rejane; Gava, Danielle; Cantão, Maurício Egídio; Ciacci-Zanella, Janice Reis

    2015-08-01

    The evolutionary origins of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus that caused the first outbreak of the 2009 pandemic in Mexico remain unclear, highlighting the lack of swine surveillance in Latin American countries. Although Brazil has one of the largest swine populations in the world, influenza was not thought to be endemic in Brazil's swine until the major outbreaks of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in 2009. Through phylogenetic analysis of whole-genome sequences of influenza viruses of the H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 subtypes collected in swine in Brazil during 2009-2012, we identified multiple previously uncharacterized influenza viruses of human seasonal H1N2 and H3N2 virus origin that have circulated undetected in swine for more than a decade. Viral diversity has further increased in Brazil through reassortment between co-circulating viruses, including A(H1N1)pdm09. The circulation of multiple divergent hemagglutinin lineages challenges the design of effective cross-protective vaccines and highlights the need for additional surveillance. PMID:26196759

  14. Influenza A Viruses of Human Origin in Swine, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Rejane; Gava, Danielle; Cantão, Maurício Egídio; Ciacci-Zanella, Janice Reis

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary origins of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus that caused the first outbreak of the 2009 pandemic in Mexico remain unclear, highlighting the lack of swine surveillance in Latin American countries. Although Brazil has one of the largest swine populations in the world, influenza was not thought to be endemic in Brazil’s swine until the major outbreaks of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in 2009. Through phylogenetic analysis of whole-genome sequences of influenza viruses of the H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 subtypes collected in swine in Brazil during 2009–2012, we identified multiple previously uncharacterized influenza viruses of human seasonal H1N2 and H3N2 virus origin that have circulated undetected in swine for more than a decade. Viral diversity has further increased in Brazil through reassortment between co-circulating viruses, including A(H1N1)pdm09. The circulation of multiple divergent hemagglutinin lineages challenges the design of effective cross-protective vaccines and highlights the need for additional surveillance. PMID:26196759

  15. Influenza A Viruses of Human Origin in Swine, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Martha I; Schaefer, Rejane; Gava, Danielle; Cantão, Maurício Egídio; Ciacci-Zanella, Janice Reis

    2015-08-01

    The evolutionary origins of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus that caused the first outbreak of the 2009 pandemic in Mexico remain unclear, highlighting the lack of swine surveillance in Latin American countries. Although Brazil has one of the largest swine populations in the world, influenza was not thought to be endemic in Brazil's swine until the major outbreaks of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in 2009. Through phylogenetic analysis of whole-genome sequences of influenza viruses of the H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 subtypes collected in swine in Brazil during 2009-2012, we identified multiple previously uncharacterized influenza viruses of human seasonal H1N2 and H3N2 virus origin that have circulated undetected in swine for more than a decade. Viral diversity has further increased in Brazil through reassortment between co-circulating viruses, including A(H1N1)pdm09. The circulation of multiple divergent hemagglutinin lineages challenges the design of effective cross-protective vaccines and highlights the need for additional surveillance.

  16. Protection and virus shedding of falcons vaccinated against highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus (H5N1).

    PubMed

    Lierz, Michael; Hafez, Hafez M; Klopfleisch, Robert; Lüschow, Dörte; Prusas, Christine; Teifke, Jens P; Rudolf, Miriam; Grund, Christian; Kalthoff, Donata; Mettenleiter, Thomas; Beer, Martin; Hardert, Timm

    2007-11-01

    Because fatal infections with highly pathogenic avian influenza A (HPAI) virus subtype H5N1 have been reported in birds of prey, we sought to determine detailed information about the birds' susceptibility and protection after vaccination. Ten falcons vaccinated with an inactivated influenza virus (H5N2) vaccine seroconverted. We then challenged 5 vaccinated and 5 nonvaccinated falcons with HPAI (H5N1). All vaccinated birds survived; all unvaccinated birds died within 5 days. For the nonvaccinated birds, histopathologic examination showed tissue degeneration and necrosis, immunohistochemical techniques showed influenza virus antigen in affected tissues, and these birds shed high levels of infectious virus from the oropharynx and cloaca. Vaccinated birds showed no influenza virus antigen in tissues and shed virus at lower titers from the oropharynx only. Vaccination could protect these valuable birds and, through reduced virus shedding, reduce risk for transmission to other avian species and humans.

  17. Heterogeneous and Dynamic Prevalence of Asymptomatic Influenza Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Furuya-Kanamori, Luis; Cox, Mitchell; Milinovich, Gabriel J.; Magalhaes, Ricardo J. Soares; Mackay, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza infection manifests in a wide spectrum of severity, including symptomless pathogen carriers. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of 55 studies to elucidate the proportional representation of these asymptomatic infected persons. We observed extensive heterogeneity among these studies. The prevalence of asymptomatic carriage (total absence of symptoms) ranged from 5.2% to 35.5% and subclinical cases (illness that did not meet the criteria for acute respiratory or influenza-like illness) from 25.4% to 61.8%. Statistical analysis showed that the heterogeneity could not be explained by the type of influenza, the laboratory tests used to detect the virus, the year of the study, or the location of the study. Projections of infection spread and strategies for disease control require that we identify the proportional representation of these insidious spreaders early on in the emergence of new influenza subtypes or strains and track how this rate evolves over time and space. PMID:27191967

  18. Heterogeneous and Dynamic Prevalence of Asymptomatic Influenza Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    Furuya-Kanamori, Luis; Cox, Mitchell; Milinovich, Gabriel J; Magalhaes, Ricardo J Soares; Mackay, Ian M; Yakob, Laith

    2016-06-01

    Influenza infection manifests in a wide spectrum of severity, including symptomless pathogen carriers. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of 55 studies to elucidate the proportional representation of these asymptomatic infected persons. We observed extensive heterogeneity among these studies. The prevalence of asymptomatic carriage (total absence of symptoms) ranged from 5.2% to 35.5% and subclinical cases (illness that did not meet the criteria for acute respiratory or influenza-like illness) from 25.4% to 61.8%. Statistical analysis showed that the heterogeneity could not be explained by the type of influenza, the laboratory tests used to detect the virus, the year of the study, or the location of the study. Projections of infection spread and strategies for disease control require that we identify the proportional representation of these insidious spreaders early on in the emergence of new influenza subtypes or strains and track how this rate evolves over time and space. PMID:27191967

  19. Virological Surveillance of Influenza Viruses during the 2008–09, 2009–10 and 2010–11 Seasons in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    El Moussi, Awatef; Pozo, Francisco; Ben Hadj Kacem, Mohamed Ali; Ledesma, Juan; Cuevas, Maria Teresa; Casas, Inmaculada; Slim, Amine

    2013-01-01

    Background The data contribute to a better understanding of the circulation of influenza viruses especially in North-Africa. Objective The objective of this surveillance was to detect severe influenza cases, identify their epidemiological and virological characteristics and assess their impact on the healthcare system. Method We describe in this report the findings of laboratory-based surveillance of human cases of influenza virus and other respiratory viruses' infection during three seasons in Tunisia. Results The 2008–09 winter influenza season is underway in Tunisia, with co-circulation of influenza A/H3N2 (56.25%), influenza A(H1N1) (32.5%), and a few sporadic influenza B viruses (11.25%). In 2010–11 season the circulating strains are predominantly the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 (70%) and influenza B viruses (22%). And sporadic viruses were sub-typed as A/H3N2 and unsubtyped influenza A, 5% and 3%, respectively. Unlike other countries, highest prevalence of influenza B virus Yamagata-like lineage has been reported in Tunisia (76%) localised into the clade B/Bangladesh/3333/2007. In the pandemic year, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 predominated over other influenza viruses (95%). Amino acid changes D222G and D222E were detected in the HA gene of A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in two severe cases, one fatal case and one mild case out of 50 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses studied. The most frequently reported respiratory virus other than influenza in three seasons was RSV (45.29%). Conclusion This article summarises the surveillance and epidemiology of influenza viruses and other respiratory viruses, showing how rapid improvements in influenza surveillance were feasible by connecting the existing structure in the health care system for patient records to electronic surveillance system for reporting ILI cases. PMID:24069267

  20. Unique Determinants of Neuraminidase Inhibitor Resistance among N3, N7, and N9 Avian Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min-Suk; Marathe, Bindumadhav M.; Kumar, Gyanendra; Wong, Sook-San; Rubrum, Adam; Zanin, Mark; Choi, Young-Ki; Webster, Robert G.; Govorkova, Elena A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human infections with avian influenza viruses are a serious public health concern. The neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (NAIs) are the frontline anti-influenza drugs and are the major option for treatment of newly emerging influenza. Therefore, it is essential to identify the molecular markers of NAI resistance among specific NA subtypes of avian influenza viruses to help guide clinical management. NAI-resistant substitutions in NA subtypes other than N1 and N2 have been poorly studied. Here, we identified NA amino acid substitutions associated with NAI resistance among influenza viruses of N3, N7, and N9 subtypes which have been associated with zoonotic transmission. We applied random mutagenesis and generated recombinant influenza viruses carrying single or double NA substitution(s) with seven internal genes from A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) virus. In a fluorescence-based NA inhibition assay, we identified three categories of NA substitutions associated with reduced inhibition by NAIs (oseltamivir, zanamivir, and peramivir): (i) novel subtype-specific substitutions in or near the enzyme catalytic site (R152W, A246T, and D293N, N2 numbering), (ii) subtype-independent substitutions (E119G/V and/or D and R292K), and (iii) substitutions previously reported in other subtypes (Q136K, I222M, and E276D). Our data show that although some markers of resistance are present across NA subtypes, other subtype-specific markers can only be determined empirically. IMPORTANCE The number of humans infected with avian influenza viruses is increasing, raising concerns of the emergence of avian influenza viruses resistant to neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (NAIs). Since most studies have focused on NAI-resistance in human influenza viruses, we investigated the molecular changes in NA that could confer NAI resistance in avian viruses grown in immortalized monolayer cells, especially those of the N3, N7, and N9 subtypes, which have caused human infections. We identified not only

  1. Reassortment patterns in Swine influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Khiabanian, Hossein; Trifonov, Vladimir; Rabadan, Raul

    2009-10-07

    Three human influenza pandemics occurred in the twentieth century, in 1918, 1957, and 1968. Influenza pandemic strains are the results of emerging viruses from non-human reservoirs to which humans have little or no immunity. At least two of these pandemic strains, in 1957 and in 1968, were the results of reassortments between human and avian viruses. Also, many cases of swine influenza viruses have reportedly infected humans, in particular, the recent H1N1 influenza virus of swine origin, isolated in Mexico and the United States. Pigs are documented to allow productive replication of human, avian, and swine influenza viruses. Thus it has been conjectured that pigs are the "mixing vessel" that create the avian-human reassortant strains, causing the human pandemics. Hence, studying the process and patterns of viral reassortment, especially in pigs, is a key to better understanding of human influenza pandemics. In the last few years, databases containing sequences of influenza A viruses, including swine viruses, collected since 1918 from diverse geographical locations, have been developed and made publicly available. In this paper, we study an ensemble of swine influenza viruses to analyze the reassortment phenomena through several statistical techniques. The reassortment patterns in swine viruses prove to be similar to the previous results found in human viruses, both in vitro and in vivo, that the surface glycoprotein coding segments reassort most often. Moreover, we find that one of the polymerase segments (PB1), reassorted in the strains responsible for the last two human pandemics, also reassorts frequently.

  2. DIVA vaccination strategies for avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccination for both low pathogenic and highly pathogenic avian influenza is commonly used for countries that have been endemic for avian influenza influenza virus, but stamping out policies are common for countries that are normally free of the disease. Stamping out policies of euthanizing infecte...

  3. An Anti-Influenza Virus Antibody Inhibits Viral Infection by Reducing Nucleus Entry of Influenza Nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Aerin; Yi, Kye Sook; Chang, So Young; Kim, Sung Hwan; Song, Manki; Choi, Jung Ah; Bourgeois, Melissa; Hossain, M Jaber; Chen, Li-Mei; Donis, Ruben O; Kim, Hyori; Lee, Yujean; Hwang, Do Been; Min, Ji-Young; Chang, Shin Jae; Chung, Junho

    2015-01-01

    To date, four main mechanisms mediating inhibition of influenza infection by anti-hemagglutinin antibodies have been reported. Anti-globular-head-domain antibodies block either influenza virus receptor binding to the host cell or progeny virion release from the host cell. Anti-stem region antibodies hinder the membrane fusion process or induce antibody-dependent cytotoxicity to infected cells. In this study we identified a human monoclonal IgG1 antibody (CT302), which does not inhibit both the receptor binding and the membrane fusion process but efficiently reduced the nucleus entry of viral nucleoprotein suggesting a novel inhibition mechanism of viral infection by antibody. This antibody binds to the subtype-H3 hemagglutinin globular head domain of group-2 influenza viruses circulating throughout the population between 1997 and 2007. PMID:26512723

  4. An Anti-Influenza Virus Antibody Inhibits Viral Infection by Reducing Nucleus Entry of Influenza Nucleoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Aerin; Yi, Kye Sook; Chang, So Young; Kim, Sung Hwan; Song, Manki; Choi, Jung Ah; Bourgeois, Melissa; Hossain, M. Jaber; Chen, Li-Mei; Donis, Ruben O.; Kim, Hyori; Lee, Yujean; Hwang, Do Been; Min, Ji-Young; Chang, Shin Jae; Chung, Junho

    2015-01-01

    To date, four main mechanisms mediating inhibition of influenza infection by anti-hemagglutinin antibodies have been reported. Anti-globular-head-domain antibodies block either influenza virus receptor binding to the host cell or progeny virion release from the host cell. Anti-stem region antibodies hinder the membrane fusion process or induce antibody-dependent cytotoxicity to infected cells. In this study we identified a human monoclonal IgG1 antibody (CT302), which does not inhibit both the receptor binding and the membrane fusion process but efficiently reduced the nucleus entry of viral nucleoprotein suggesting a novel inhibition mechanism of viral infection by antibody. This antibody binds to the subtype-H3 hemagglutinin globular head domain of group-2 influenza viruses circulating throughout the population between 1997 and 2007. PMID:26512723

  5. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells delineate immunogenicity of influenza vaccine subtypes.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shohei; Aoshi, Taiki; Tanimoto, Takeshi; Kumagai, Yutaro; Kobiyama, Kouji; Tougan, Takahiro; Sakurai, Kazuo; Coban, Cevayir; Horii, Toshihiro; Akira, Shizuo; Ishii, Ken J

    2010-03-31

    A variety of different vaccine types are available for H1N1 influenza A virus infections; however, their immunological mechanisms of action remain unclear. Here, we show that plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and type I interferon (IFN)-mediated signaling delineate the immunogenicity of live attenuated virus, inactivated whole-virus (WV), and split-virus vaccines. Although Toll-like receptor 7 acted as the adjuvant receptor for the immunogenicity of both live virus and WV vaccines, the requirement for type I IFN production by pDCs for the immunogenicity of the vaccines was restricted to WV. A split vaccine commonly used in humans failed to immunize naïve mice, but a pDC-activating adjuvant could restore immunogenicity. In blood from human adults, however, split vaccine alone could recall memory T cell responses, underscoring the importance of this adjuvant pathway for primary, but not secondary, vaccination. PMID:20424013

  6. A rapid method for immunotitration of influenza viruses using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, R; Pau, M G; Oerlemans, M; Ophorst, C; Vooys, A; Havenga, M; Goudsmit, J; UytdeHaag, F; Marzio, G

    2003-06-01

    Reliable assays for accurate titration of influenza virus in infectious samples are pivotal to both influenza research and vaccine development. A titration assay adopted commonly for this purpose is the plaque assay on Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, despite it being time and labour consuming. A novel assay is described for titration of influenza viruses based on the detection of intracellular viral nucleoprotein (NP) by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). By using a panel of viruses of different type, subtype and origin, it is demonstrated that there is a mathematical correlation between titres measured by immunotitration and by classical plaque assay on MDCK cells. Moreover, the availability of NP antibodies specific for type A or type B influenza virus ensures the specificity of the assay. Based on speed, accuracy and specificity, it is concluded that the FACS-based immunotitration of influenza virus represents a valid and efficient alternative to the classical plaque assay.

  7. Detection of influenza viruses in throat swab by using polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Yamada, A; Imanishi, J; Nakajima, E; Nakajima, K; Nakajima, S

    1991-01-01

    An assay protocol based on exploiting the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the direct detection of influenza virus in throat swab is described. By use of the mixture of H1 and H3 primers, it was possible to determine the subtype of the influenza A viruses simultaneously. No visible band was detected after PCR of influenza B or A (H2N2) viruses with a pair of H1 or H3 primers. The dilution experiment showed that the influenza viruses, as few as 1.3-6 plaque-forming units, were sufficient for detecting the HA gene by PCR. All throat swab samples from which influenza viruses had been isolated by conventional method were also positively detected by PCR method.

  8. Comparative mutational analyses of influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Peter Pak-Hang; Rogozin, Igor B.; Choy, Ka-Tim; Ng, Hoi Yee

    2015-01-01

    The error-prone RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) and external selective pressures are the driving forces for RNA viral diversity. When confounded by selective pressures, it is difficult to assess if influenza A viruses (IAV) that have a wide host range possess comparable or distinct spontaneous mutational frequency in their RdRPs. We used in-depth bioinformatics analyses to assess the spontaneous mutational frequencies of two RdRPs derived from human seasonal (A/Wuhan/359/95; Wuhan) and H5N1 (A/Vietnam/1203/04; VN1203) viruses using the mini-genome system with a common firefly luciferase reporter serving as the template. High-fidelity reverse transcriptase was applied to generate high-quality mutational spectra which allowed us to assess and compare the mutational frequencies and mutable motifs along a target sequence of the two RdRPs of two different subtypes. We observed correlated mutational spectra (τ correlation P < 0.0001), comparable mutational frequencies (H3N2:5.8 ± 0.9; H5N1:6.0 ± 0.5), and discovered a highly mutable motif “(A)AAG” for both Wuhan and VN1203 RdRPs. Results were then confirmed with two recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) viruses that possess RdRP derived from Wuhan or VN1203 (RG-PR8×WuhanPB2, PB1, PA, NP and RG-PR8×VN1203PB2, PB1, PA, NP). Applying novel bioinformatics analysis on influenza mutational spectra, we provide a platform for a comprehensive analysis of the spontaneous mutation spectra for an RNA virus. PMID:25404565

  9. Pathogenicity of H3N8 influenza viruses isolated from domestic ducks in chickens with or without Escherichia coli coinfections.

    PubMed

    Pu, Juan; Fan, Yu Lei; Wang, Zhe; Ma, Bo; Brown, Earl G; Liu, Jin Hua

    2012-09-01

    Influenza viruses from domestic aquatic birds can be transmitted to chickens, resulting in continued prevalence of the disease. H3 viruses are one of the most frequently identified subtypes in domestic ducks. Results from our previous serologic study suggested that H3 virus infections potentially exist in chickens with a wide geographical distribution in China. To better understand their pathogenic potential, two H3N8 influenza viruses isolated from domestic ducks were selected for experimental infections in chickens. We found that viral shedding lasted for at least 14 days postinfection for both viruses; however, one virus caused mortality in the chickens when coinfected with Escherichia coli. Sequencing of the viral HA gene isolated from the inoculated chickens revealed two amino acid mutations within the gene. These findings demonstrate the pathogenicity of the H3N8 domestic duck influenza viruses to chickens, highlighting the need for routine epidemiologic investigations of H3 subtype influenza viruses in chicken populations.

  10. Influenza virus activation of the interferon system

    PubMed Central

    Killip, Marian J.; Fodor, Ervin; Randall, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    The host interferon (IFN) response represents one of the first barriers that influenza viruses must surmount in order to establish an infection. Many advances have been made in recent years in understanding the interactions between influenza viruses and the interferon system. In this review, we summarise recent work regarding activation of the type I IFN response by influenza viruses, including attempts to identify the viral RNA responsible for IFN induction, the stage of the virus life cycle at which it is generated and the role of defective viruses in this process. PMID:25678267

  11. H9N2 avian influenza virus-derived natural reassortant H5N2 virus in swan containing the hemagglutinin segment from Eurasian H5 avian influenza virus with an in-frame deletion of four basic residues in the polybasic hemagglutinin cleavage site.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youling; Yuan, Xiaoyuan; Qi, Lihong; Zhang, Yuxia; Xu, Huaiying; Yang, Jinxing; Ai, Wu; Qi, Wenbao; Liao, Ming; Wang, Dan; Song, Minxun; Li, Feng

    2016-06-01

    We isolated a novel H5N2 avian influenza virus from swans in China. The virus was derived from a widespread H9N2 avian influenza virus but acquired the hemagglutinin gene from Eurasian H5 subtype with a naturally occurring in-frame deletion of four basic residues in the polybasic hemagglutinin cleavage site. PMID:26910357

  12. H3N2 influenza viruses from domestic chickens in Italy: an increasing role for chickens in the ecology of influenza?

    PubMed

    Campitelli, Laura; Fabiani, Concetta; Puzelli, Simona; Fioretti, Alessandro; Foni, Emanuela; De Marco, Alessandra; Krauss, Scott; Webster, Robert G; Donatelli, Isabella

    2002-02-01

    In Italy, multiple H3N2 influenza viruses were isolated from chickens with mild respiratory disease and were shown to replicate in the respiratory tracts of experimentally infected chickens; this finding is the first to show that H3N2 influenza viruses can replicate and cause disease in chickens. H3N2 influenza viruses in pigs on nearby farms seemed a likely source of the virus; however, antigenic and molecular analyses revealed that the gene segments of the viruses in chickens were mainly of Eurasian avian origin and were distinguishable from those isolated from pigs and wild aquatic birds in Italy. Thus, several different H3 influenza viruses were circulating in Italy, but we failed to identify the source of the chicken H3N2 influenza viruses that have disappeared subsequently from Italian poultry. Until recently, the transmission of influenza viruses (other than the H5 and H7 subtypes) from their reservoir in aquatic birds to chickens was rarely detected and highly pathogenic and non-pathogenic viruses were considered to be restricted to poultry species. However, the recent reports of the transmission of H9N2 and H5N1 influenza viruses to chickens in Hong Kong and, subsequently, to humans and our findings of the transmission of H3N2 influenza viruses to domestic chickens in Italy suggest an increased role for chickens as an intermediate host in the ecology of influenza.

  13. Virulence determinants of pandemic influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Tscherne, Donna M.; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause recurrent, seasonal epidemics and occasional global pandemics with devastating levels of morbidity and mortality. The ability of influenza A viruses to adapt to various hosts and undergo reassortment events ensures constant generation of new strains with unpredictable degrees of pathogenicity, transmissibility, and pandemic potential. Currently, the combination of factors that drives the emergence of pandemic influenza is unclear, making it impossible to foresee the details of a future outbreak. Identification and characterization of influenza A virus virulence determinants may provide insight into genotypic signatures of pathogenicity as well as a more thorough understanding of the factors that give rise to pandemics. PMID:21206092

  14. Serological and molecular prevalence of swine influenza virus on farms in northwestern Mexico.

    PubMed

    López-Robles, Guadalupe; Montalvo-Corral, Maricela; Burgara-Estrella, Alexel; Hernández, Jesús

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the epidemiological status of swine influenza viruses in pigs from northwestern Mexico in 2008-2009. A serological and molecular survey was conducted in 150 pigs from 15 commercial farms in Sonora, Mexico (northwestern region of Mexico). The serological data showed that 55% of the sera were positive for the H1N1 subtype, 59% for the H3N2 subtype, and 38% for both subtypes. Overall, 16.6% (25/150) of the samples were positive for type A influenza by qRT-PCR. The phylogenetic analysis of the H1 viruses circulating in northwestern Mexico were grouped into cluster α, from five other clusters previously described. The influenza virus H1 circulating in northwestern Mexico showed 97-100% identity at the nucleotide level among them, 89% identity with other North American strains, 88% with strains from central Mexico, and 85% with the pandemic A/H1N1p2009 virus. Meanwhile, a closer relationship with some influenza viruses from North America (97% nucleotide identity) was found for H3 subtype. In conclusion, our results demonstrated a high circulation of strains similar to those observed in the North American linage among commercial farms in northwestern Mexico, involving of a different lineage virus different to the influenza pandemic of 2009.

  15. [The prokaryotic expression and the establishment of the putative indirect ELISA assay for the HA gene for avian influenza virus (AIV) H5N1 subtype].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qi-sheng; Zhang, Xiao-yong; Liu, Hua-lei; Li, Peng; Chen, Pu-yan

    2005-02-01

    Using a pair of specific primers designed according to the relevant nucleotide sequence from GenBank, the HA1 gene of H5N1 subtype AIV was amplified with PCR method. The PCR product was cloned into pET-32a(+) to get a prokaryotic recombinant plasmid pET-HA1. The target gene was successfully expressed in the host cell BL21 (DE3) when induced with IPTG. The expression was optimized with proper inducing conditions of 0.8 mmol/L IPTG and 3 hours induction. The highest expression of the target protein added up to 32.7% of the total bacterial protein. Western blot analysis proved the recombinant protein has good reactive ability against H5N1 subtype AIV positive serum. The optional working circumstances for the iHA-ELISA assay (antigenicity concentration: 4 microg/mL; serum dilution: 1:200) was tried out with chess titration. The positive criterion of this ELISA assay is OD(the tested serum) > 0.5 and OD(the tested serum)/OD(the negative serum) > 2.0.

  16. The pathogenesis of H3N8 canine influenza virus in chickens, turkeys and ducks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Canine influenza virus (CIV) of the H3N8 subtype has emerged in dog populations throughout the U.S. where is has become endemic in kennels and animal shelters in some regions. It has not previously been determined whether the canine adapted virus can be transmitted to domestic poultry, which are su...

  17. Media Use and Communication Inequalities in a Public Health Emergency: A Case Study of 2009–2010 Pandemic Influenza A Virus Subtype H1N1

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Minsoo; McCloud, Rachel F.; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Studies have shown that differences among individuals and social groups in accessing and using information on health and specific threats have an impact on their knowledge and behaviors. These differences, characterized as communication inequalities, may hamper the strength of a society's response to a public health emergency. Such inequalities not only make vulnerable populations subject to a disproportionate burden of adversity, but also compromise the public health system's efforts to prevent and respond to pandemic influenza outbreaks. We investigated the effect of socioeconomic status (SES) and health communication behaviors (including barriers) on people's knowledge and misconceptions about pandemic influenza A(H1N1) (pH1N1) and adoption of prevention behaviors. Methods The data for this study came from a survey of 1,569 respondents drawn from a nationally representative sample of American adults during pH1N1. We conducted logistic regression analyses when appropriate. Results We found that (1) SES has a significant association with barriers to information access and processing, levels of pH1N1-related knowledge, and misconceptions; (2) levels of pH1N1-related knowledge are associated positively with the adoption of recommended prevention measures and negatively with the adoption of incorrect protective behaviors; and (3) people with higher SES, higher news exposure, and higher levels of pH1N1-related knowledge, as well as those who actively seek information, are less likely than their counterparts to adopt incorrect prevention behaviors. Conclusion Strategic public health communication efforts in public health preparedness and during emergencies should take into account potential communication inequalities and develop campaigns that reach across different social groups. PMID:25355975

  18. Rapid preparation of mutated influenza hemagglutinins for influenza virus pandemic prevention.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Ryosuke; Satomura, Atsushi; Yamada, Junki; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-03-01

    Influenza viruses have periodically caused pandemic due to frequent mutation of viral proteins. Influenza viruses have two major membrane glycoproteins: hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). Hemagglutinin plays a crucial role in viral entry, while NA is involved in the process of a viral escape. In terms of developing antiviral drugs, HA is a more important target than NA in the prevention of pandemic, since HA is likely to change the host specificity of a virus by acquiring mutations, thereby to increase the risk of pandemic. To characterize mutated HA functions, current approaches require immobilization of purified HA on plastic wells and carriers. These troublesome methods make it difficult to respond to emerging mutations. In order to address this problem, a yeast cell surface engineering approach was investigated. Using this technology, human HAs derived from various H1N1 subtypes were successfully and rapidly displayed on the yeast cell surface. The yeast-displayed HAs exhibited similar abilities to native influenza virus HAs. Using this system, human HAs with 190E and 225G mutations were shown to exhibit altered recognition specificities from human to avian erythrocytes. This system furthermore allowed direct measurement of HA binding abilities without protein purification and immobilization. Coupled with the ease of genetic manipulation, this system allows the simple and comprehensive construction of mutant protein libraries on yeast cell surface, thereby contributing to influenza virus pandemic prevention. PMID:26797882

  19. Live, attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vehicles are strong inducers of immunity toward influenza B virus

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Victor C.; Kleimeyer, Loren H.; McCullers, Jonathan A.

    2008-01-01

    Historically, vaccines developed toward influenza viruses of the B type using methodologies developed for influenza A viruses as a blueprint have not been equally efficacious or effective. Because most influenza research and public attention concerns influenza A viruses, these shortcomings have not been adequately addressed. In this manuscript, we utilized different influenza vaccine vehicles to compare immunogenicity and protection in mice and ferrets after vaccination against an influenza B virus. We report that plasmid DNA vaccines demonstrate low immunogenicity profiles and poor protection compared to either whole, inactivated influenza virus (IIV) or, live, attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccines. When mixed prime:boost regimens using LAIV and IIV were studied, we observed a boosting effect in mice after priming with LAIV that was not seen when IIV was used as the prime. In ferrets LAIV induced high antibody titers after a single dose and provided a boost in IIV-primed animals. Regimens including LAIV as a prime demonstrated enhanced protection, and adjuvantation was required for efficacy using the IIV preparation. Our results differ from generally accepted influenza A virus vaccine models, and argue that strategies for control of influenza B virus should be considered separately from those for influenza A virus. PMID:18708106

  20. Trends in global warming and evolution of nucleoproteins from influenza A viruses since 1918.

    PubMed

    Yan, S; Wu, G

    2010-12-01

    Global warming affects not only the environment where we live, but also all living species to different degree, including influenza A virus. We recently conducted several studies on the possible impact of global warming on the protein families of influenza A virus. More studies are needed in order to have a full picture of the impact of global warming on living organisms, especially its effect on viruses. In this study, we correlate trends in global warming with evolution of the nucleoprotein from influenza A virus and then analyse the trends with respect to northern/southern hemispheres, virus subtypes and sampling species. The results suggest that global warming may have an impact on the evolution of the nucleoprotein from influenza A virus.

  1. Multiyear Surveillance for Avian Influenza Virus in Waterfowl from Wintering Grounds, Texas Coast, USA

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Pamela J.; Budke, Christine M.; Peterson, Markus J.; Cox, Dayna; Roltsch, Emily; Merendino, Todd; Nelson, Matt

    2010-01-01

    We studied the prevalence of influenza A virus in wintering waterfowl from the Central Flyway on the Gulf Coast of Texas. Of 5,363 hunter-harvested migratory and resident waterfowl and wetland-associated game birds sampled during 3 consecutive hunting seasons (September–January 2006–07, 2007–08, and 2008–09), real-time reverse transcription–PCR detected influenza A matrix sequences in 8.5% of samples, H5 in 0.7%, and H7 in 0.6%. Virus isolation yielded 134 influenza A viruses, including N1–N9, H1–H7, H10, and H11 subtypes. Low-pathogenicity H7 subtype was isolated during January, September, and November 2007 and January 2008; low-pathogenicity H5 subtype was isolated during November and December 2007. PMID:20678315

  2. Structure and Function Analysis of an Antibody Recognizing All Influenza A Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Kallewaard, Nicole L; Corti, Davide; Collins, Patrick J; Neu, Ursula; McAuliffe, Josephine M; Benjamin, Ebony; Wachter-Rosati, Leslie; Palmer-Hill, Frances J; Yuan, Andy Q; Walker, Philip A; Vorlaender, Matthias K; Bianchi, Siro; Guarino, Barbara; De Marco, Anna; Vanzetta, Fabrizia; Agatic, Gloria; Foglierini, Mathilde; Pinna, Debora; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Blanca; Fruehwirth, Alexander; Silacci, Chiara; Ogrodowicz, Roksana W; Martin, Stephen R; Sallusto, Federica; Suzich, JoAnn A; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Zhu, Qing; Gamblin, Steven J; Skehel, John J

    2016-07-28

    Influenza virus remains a threat because of its ability to evade vaccine-induced immune responses due to antigenic drift. Here, we describe the isolation, evolution, and structure of a broad-spectrum human monoclonal antibody (mAb), MEDI8852, effectively reacting with all influenza A hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes. MEDI8852 uses the heavy-chain VH6-1 gene and has higher potency and breadth when compared to other anti-stem antibodies. MEDI8852 is effective in mice and ferrets with a therapeutic window superior to that of oseltamivir. Crystallographic analysis of Fab alone or in complex with H5 or H7 HA proteins reveals that MEDI8852 binds through a coordinated movement of CDRs to a highly conserved epitope encompassing a hydrophobic groove in the fusion domain and a large portion of the fusion peptide, distinguishing it from other structurally characterized cross-reactive antibodies. The unprecedented breadth and potency of neutralization by MEDI8852 support its development as immunotherapy for influenza virus-infected humans.

  3. Structure and Function Analysis of an Antibody Recognizing All Influenza A Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Kallewaard, Nicole L; Corti, Davide; Collins, Patrick J; Neu, Ursula; McAuliffe, Josephine M; Benjamin, Ebony; Wachter-Rosati, Leslie; Palmer-Hill, Frances J; Yuan, Andy Q; Walker, Philip A; Vorlaender, Matthias K; Bianchi, Siro; Guarino, Barbara; De Marco, Anna; Vanzetta, Fabrizia; Agatic, Gloria; Foglierini, Mathilde; Pinna, Debora; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Blanca; Fruehwirth, Alexander; Silacci, Chiara; Ogrodowicz, Roksana W; Martin, Stephen R; Sallusto, Federica; Suzich, JoAnn A; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Zhu, Qing; Gamblin, Steven J; Skehel, John J

    2016-07-28

    Influenza virus remains a threat because of its ability to evade vaccine-induced immune responses due to antigenic drift. Here, we describe the isolation, evolution, and structure of a broad-spectrum human monoclonal antibody (mAb), MEDI8852, effectively reacting with all influenza A hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes. MEDI8852 uses the heavy-chain VH6-1 gene and has higher potency and breadth when compared to other anti-stem antibodies. MEDI8852 is effective in mice and ferrets with a therapeutic window superior to that of oseltamivir. Crystallographic analysis of Fab alone or in complex with H5 or H7 HA proteins reveals that MEDI8852 binds through a coordinated movement of CDRs to a highly conserved epitope encompassing a hydrophobic groove in the fusion domain and a large portion of the fusion peptide, distinguishing it from other structurally characterized cross-reactive antibodies. The unprecedented breadth and potency of neutralization by MEDI8852 support its development as immunotherapy for influenza virus-infected humans. PMID:27453466

  4. Influenza B virus-specific CD8+ T-lymphocytes strongly cross-react with viruses of the opposing influenza B lineage.

    PubMed

    van de Sandt, Carolien E; Dou, YingYing; Vogelzang-van Trierum, Stella E; Westgeest, Kim B; Pronk, Mark R; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Fouchier, Ron A M; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Hillaire, Marine L B

    2015-08-01

    Influenza B viruses fall in two antigenically distinct lineages (B/Victoria/2/1987 and B/Yamagata/16/1988 lineage) that co-circulate with influenza A viruses of the H3N2 and H1N1 subtypes during seasonal epidemics. Infections with influenza B viruses contribute considerably to morbidity and mortality in the human population. Influenza B virus neutralizing antibodies, elicited by natural infections or vaccination, poorly cross-react with viruses of the opposing influenza B lineage. Therefore, there is an increased interest in identifying other correlates of protection which could aid the development of broadly protective vaccines. blast analysis revealed high sequence identity of all viral proteins. With two online epitope prediction algorithms, putative conserved epitopes relevant for study subjects used in the present study were predicted. The cross-reactivity of influenza B virus-specific polyclonal CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) populations obtained from HLA-typed healthy study subjects, with intra-lineage drift variants and viruses of the opposing lineage, was determined by assessing their in vitro IFN-γ response and lytic activity. Here, we show for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that CTLs directed to viruses of the B/Victoria/2/1987 lineage cross-react with viruses of the B/Yamagata/16/1988 lineage and vice versa.

  5. Isolation of herpesvirus and Newcastle disease virus from White Storks (Ciconia ciconia) maintained at four rehabilitation centres in northern Germany during 1983 to 2001 and failure to detect antibodies against avian influenza A viruses of subtypes H5 and H7 in these birds.

    PubMed

    Kaleta, Erhard F; Kummerfeld, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Herpesvirus isolations from peripheral white blood cells of 253 White Storks (Ciconia ciconia) were obtained during a long-term study (1983 to 2001). The storks lived for a few months to 20 years at four rehabilitation centres. Isolates were obtained from 83 of 253 storks. This herpesvirus is indigenous for storks and unrelated to any other avian herpesvirus. Significantly more herpesvirus isolates were obtained during spring than in autumn samplings. The intervals between the first and last virus isolation ranged from 1 to 15 years. Herpesvirus isolates were simultaneously obtained from white blood cells and from pharyngeal swabs of four of 34 storks but not from cloacal swabs. Neutralizing antibodies to stork herpesvirus were detected in 178 of 191 examined blood plasma samples. Neutralizing antibodies against stork herpesvirus did not correlate with herpesvirus viraemia. The results further substantiate the persistence of herpesvirus in White Storks and underline the previously unrecorded long periods of virus and antibody presence. Virulent avian paramyxovirus type 1 (APMV-1; Newcastle disease virus) was isolated from white blood cells during 1992 and 1993 from four healthy migrating storks, and possessed virulence markers on the cleavage site of the H and F genes. These properties resemble the NE type of APMV-1. Haemagglutination inhibition antibodies against APMV-1 were detected in 16 of 191 blood plasma samples. Avian influenza A virus was not isolated and antibodies against subtypes H5 and H7 were not detected.

  6. Epidemiologic implications of changes in the influenza virus genome.

    PubMed

    Kendal, A P

    1987-06-19

    Among the molecular maneuvers that enable the influenza virus to survive are antigenic variation and functional alterations. Two kinds of minor antigenic variations, producing new strains within type A virus subtypes, have been discovered: antigenic drift, in which the amino acid sequences of the antigens are changed; and antigenic camouflage, in which the antigens are glycosylated. Both kinds of variation are caused by mutations in the viral genome. These mutations produce slightly changed antigens, which many existing antibodies cannot recognize. Major antigenic variations (so-called antigenic shift) are produced by gene reassortment. Two subtypes, coinfecting a host, can reassort their eight ribonucleoprotein gene segments into as many as 256 different combinations. Such recombinations can produce new viruses with the potential for transmission in humans, but whose surface antigens are completely unmatched by antibodies in the population, permitting a pandemic to occur. Functional changes, caused by mutations, alter the interactions between the virus and the host, including virus binding to host receptor sites and fusion of viral and host membranes. All these mechanisms allow the influenza virus to survive in humans, probably perpetually.

  7. The genomic and epidemiological dynamics of human influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Rambaut, Andrew; Pybus, Oliver G.; Nelson, Martha I.; Viboud, Cecile; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2008-01-01

    The evolutionary interaction between influenza A virus and the human immune system, manifest as ‘antigenic drift’ of the viral haemagglutinin, is one of the best described patterns in molecular evolution. However, little is known about the genome-scale evolutionary dynamics of this pathogen. Similarly, how genomic processes relate to global influenza epidemiology, in which the A/H3N2 and A/H1N1 subtypes co-circulate, is poorly understood. Here through an analysis of 1,302 complete viral genomes sampled from temperate populations in both hemispheres, we show that the genomic evolution of influenza A virus is characterized by a complex interplay between frequent reassortment and periodic selective sweeps. The A/H3N2 and A/H1N1 subtypes exhibit different evolutionary dynamics, with diverse lineages circulating in A/H1N1, indicative of weaker antigenic drift. These results suggest a sink-source model of viral ecology in which new lineages are seeded from a persistent influenza reservoir, which we hypothesize to be located in the tropics, to sink populations in temperate regions. PMID:18418375

  8. Influenza Nucleoprotein Delivered with Aluminium Salts Protects Mice from an Influenza A Virus That Expresses an Altered Nucleoprotein Sequence

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Megan K. L.; David, Alexandria; Jin, Niyun; Noges, Laura; Wang, Jieru; Kappler, John W.; Marrack, Philippa

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus poses a difficult challenge for protective immunity. This virus is adept at altering its surface proteins, the proteins that are the targets of neutralizing antibody. Consequently, each year a new vaccine must be developed to combat the current recirculating strains. A universal influenza vaccine that primes specific memory cells that recognise conserved parts of the virus could prove to be effective against both annual influenza variants and newly emergent potentially pandemic strains. Such a vaccine will have to contain a safe and effective adjuvant that can be used in individuals of all ages. We examine protection from viral challenge in mice vaccinated with the nucleoprotein from the PR8 strain of influenza A, a protein that is highly conserved across viral subtypes. Vaccination with nucleoprotein delivered with a universally used and safe adjuvant, composed of insoluble aluminium salts, provides protection against viruses that either express the same or an altered version of nucleoprotein. This protection correlated with the presence of nucleoprotein specific CD8 T cells in the lungs of infected animals at early time points after infection. In contrast, immunization with NP delivered with alum and the detoxified LPS adjuvant, monophosphoryl lipid A, provided some protection to the homologous viral strain but no protection against infection by influenza expressing a variant nucleoprotein. Together, these data point towards a vaccine solution for all influenza A subtypes. PMID:23613928

  9. Influenza nucleoprotein delivered with aluminium salts protects mice from an influenza A virus that expresses an altered nucleoprotein sequence.

    PubMed

    Macleod, Megan K L; David, Alexandria; Jin, Niyun; Noges, Laura; Wang, Jieru; Kappler, John W; Marrack, Philippa

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus poses a difficult challenge for protective immunity. This virus is adept at altering its surface proteins, the proteins that are the targets of neutralizing antibody. Consequently, each year a new vaccine must be developed to combat the current recirculating strains. A universal influenza vaccine that primes specific memory cells that recognise conserved parts of the virus could prove to be effective against both annual influenza variants and newly emergent potentially pandemic strains. Such a vaccine will have to contain a safe and effective adjuvant that can be used in individuals of all ages. We examine protection from viral challenge in mice vaccinated with the nucleoprotein from the PR8 strain of influenza A, a protein that is highly conserved across viral subtypes. Vaccination with nucleoprotein delivered with a universally used and safe adjuvant, composed of insoluble aluminium salts, provides protection against viruses that either express the same or an altered version of nucleoprotein. This protection correlated with the presence of nucleoprotein specific CD8 T cells in the lungs of infected animals at early time points after infection. In contrast, immunization with NP delivered with alum and the detoxified LPS adjuvant, monophosphoryl lipid A, provided some protection to the homologous viral strain but no protection against infection by influenza expressing a variant nucleoprotein. Together, these data point towards a vaccine solution for all influenza A subtypes. PMID:23613928

  10. H5N1 influenza viruses: facts, not fear.

    PubMed

    Palese, Peter; Wang, Taia T

    2012-02-14

    The ongoing controversy over publication of two studies involving the transmission in ferrets of H5N1 (H5) subtype influenza viruses and the recommendations of the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity to redact key details in the manuscripts call for an examination of relevant scientific facts. In addition, there are calls in the media to destroy the viruses, curtail future research in this area, and protect the public from such "frightening" research efforts. Fear needs to be put to rest with solid science and not speculation.

  11. Visualizing influenza virus infection in living mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Weiqi; Dong, Zhenyuan; Li, Feng; Meng, Weixu; Feng, Liqiang; Niu, Xuefeng; Li, Chufang; Luo, Qinfang; Li, Zhengfeng; Sun, Caijun; Chen, Ling

    2013-01-01

    Preventing and treating influenza virus infection remain a challenge because of incomplete understanding of the host–pathogen interactions, limited therapeutics and lack of a universal vaccine. So far, methods for monitoring the course of infection with influenza virus in real time in living animals are lacking. Here we report the visualization of influenza viral infection in living mice using an engineered replication-competent influenza A virus carrying luciferase reporter gene. After intranasal inoculation, bioluminescence can be detected in the chest and nasopharyngeal passage of living mice. The intensity of bioluminescence in the chest correlates with the dosage of infection and the viral load in the lung. Bioluminescence in the chest of infected mice diminishes on antiviral treatment. This work provides a novel approach that enables real-time study of influenza virus infection and effects of antiviral therapeutics in living animals. PMID:24022374

  12. [Study on the histopathology of cats inoculated with H5N1 subtype high pathogenic avian influenza virus originated from tigers].

    PubMed

    Chang, Shuang; Ding, Zhuang; Yang, Song-Tao; Gao, Yu-Wei; Zou, Xiao-Huan; Wang, Tie-Cheng; Xia, Xian-Zhu

    2007-11-01

    In this study, the HPAIV A/Tiger/Harbin/01/2002 (H5N1) used was originated from tigers and propagated in SPF embryonated hen eggs. TCID5, of the virus was 10(-7.36)/0. 05mL on MDCK cell. The cats were inoculated through bronchus route and then, the cats of dead and control were collected for histopathological and immunohistochemistry examination. Meanwhile, the emulsion supernatant fluid of organs and the pharyngeal swab samples of the dead cats were collected for RT-PCR, survived cats and the control cats were tested for the presence of HI antibody by standard method. The results indicated that the damage of lungs from the dead cats were most obvious, the wide range of red consolidation focus emerged on the lobus pulmonis, the fused focus of infection caused injury of lungs. Histology under the microscope revealed diffuse alveolar damage, confluence phlegmasia pathology, infiltration of lymphomonocytes, sackful of infiltration of macrophages and manipulus protein-like effusion in the alveolar. By immunohistochemistry, the positively stained virus particles were found on the epithelial cells of bronchus and alveolus, and also in the endochylema of lymphomonocytes. The specific electophoretic band of 464bp amplified by RT-PCR from samples of pharyngeal swabs, lungs, kidneys, hearts and brains was as same as the theory value. HI antibody titers of the survived cat were 1:32.

  13. [Contribution to the antigenic study of influenza viruses in animals. I.--Neuraminidase of the equine influenza viruses (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Fontaine, M; Aymard-Henry, M

    1975-01-01

    From the Revised Nomenclature of WHO, the fowl influenza virus A/Duck/Ukraine/63 (Hav7 Neq2) has the same neuraminidase as the equine virus A/equi 2/Miami/63 (Heq2 Neq2); the A/Chicken Germany "N"/49 virus has the same neuraminidase as the equine virus A/equi 1/Prague/56. A comparative study of the antigenic specificities confirms that the Neq2 neuraminidases are closely connected, whatever their animal origin, and that the fowl strain Hav7 Neq2 can be used for the titration of anti Neq2 antibodies in the serums of animals immunized with the equine virus Heq2 Neq2. The Neqi neuraminidases of various animal origins are connected, but the neuraminidase of the fowl strain Hav2 Neqi is slightly inhibited by the anti Neq1 antibodies of animals immunized with the Heq1 Neq1 virus: to titrate the anti Neq1 antibodies of equine origin, the H72 Neq1 recombinant should therefore be used. The antigenic characterization of the different equine influenza strains isolated since 1967 by the study of their neuraminidase has been completed: The various neuraminidases, like the hemagglutinins of the various strains belonging to the sub-type A equi2 are closely connected; a minor antigenic variation, concerning the two surface antigens, seems to exist between the strain A equi 1/Prague/56 and the strain of the same subtype isolated in 1973.

  14. In vivo reassortment of influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Urbaniak, Kinga; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    The genetic material of influenza A virus consists of eight negative-sense RNA segments. Under suitable conditions, the segmented structure of the viral genome allows an exchange of the individual gene segments between different strains, causing formation of new reassorted viruses. For reassortment to occur, co-infection with two or more influenza virus strains is necessary. The reassortment is an important evolutionary mechanism which can result in antigenic shifts that modify host range, pathology, and transmission of the influenza A viruses. In this process, the influenza virus strain with epidemic and/or pandemic potential can be created. Cases of this kind were in 1957 (Asian flu), 1968 (Hong Kong flu) and recently in 2009 (Mexico). Viruses containing genes of avian, swine, and/or human origin are widespread around the world, for example the triple reassortant H1N1 virus causing the 2009 influenza pandemic in 2009 that has become a seasonal virus. The aim of the study is to present the mechanism of reassortment and the results of experimental co-infection with different influenza viruses.

  15. Influenza A virus infection in dogs: Epizootiology, evolution and prevention - A review.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xing; Ma, Ke; Liu, Yongjie

    2016-03-01

    Canine influenza virus (CIV) is an enveloped virus belonging to the genus Influenza virus A within the family Orthomyxoviridae. Prior to 2004, only sporadic outbreaks of canine influenza had been observed in dog populations around the world. However, in 2004 an H3N8 influenza virus of equine origin caused severe respiratory disease in racing greyhounds in Florida; subsequently, cases of dogs affected with various subtypes of CIV have been reported in many countries. Here, we performed a structured review of CIV, including its emergence, evolution and epizootiology. Although CIV causes a disease of low mortality, the potential public health threat it poses due to close contact between dogs and humans highlights the necessity of promoting surveillance for this virus. PMID:26919150

  16. Establishment of an H6N2 influenza virus lineage in domestic ducks in southern China.

    PubMed

    Huang, K; Bahl, J; Fan, X H; Vijaykrishna, D; Cheung, C L; Webby, R J; Webster, R G; Chen, H; Smith, Gavin J D; Peiris, J S M; Guan, Y

    2010-07-01

    Multiple reassortment events between different subtypes of endemic avian influenza viruses have increased the genomic diversity of influenza viruses circulating in poultry in southern China. Gene exchange from the natural gene pool to poultry has contributed to this increase in genetic diversity. However, the role of domestic ducks as an interface between the natural gene pool and terrestrial poultry in the influenza virus ecosystem has not been fully characterized. Here we phylogenetically and antigenically analyzed 170 H6 viruses isolated from domestic ducks from 2000 to 2005 in southern China, which contains the largest population of domestic ducks in the world. Three distinct hemagglutinin lineages were identified. Group I contained the majority of isolates with a single internal gene complex and was endemic in domestic ducks in Guangdong from the late 1990s onward. Group II was derived from reassortment events in which the surface genes of group I viruses were replaced with novel H6 and N2 genes. Group III represented H6 viruses that undergo frequent reassortment with multiple virus subtypes from the natural gene pool. Surprisingly, H6 viruses endemic in domestic ducks and terrestrial poultry seldom reassort, but gene exchanges between viruses from domestic ducks and migratory ducks occurred throughout the surveillance period. These findings suggest that domestic ducks in southern China mediate the interaction of viruses between different gene pools and facilitate the generation of novel influenza virus variants circulating in poultry.

  17. High pathogenicity avian influenza outbreaks since 2008 except multi-continental panzootic of H5 Goose/Guangdong-lineage viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 2008, seven countries from five continents have experienced highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) outbreaks in poultry due to viruses unrelated to H5 Goose/Guangdong lineage viruses. These have covered a range of virus subtypes and affected different production species from chickens to ost...

  18. Fluorescent immunochromatography for rapid and sensitive typing of seasonal influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Akira; Takayama, Katsuyoshi; Nomura, Namiko; Kajiwara, Naoki; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Tamura, Tsuruki; Yamada, Jitsuho; Hashimoto, Masako; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Suda, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Yukuharu; Kida, Hiroshi; Shibasaki, Futoshi

    2015-01-01

    Lateral flow tests also known as Immunochromatography (IC) is an antigen-detection method conducted on a nitrocellulose membrane that can be completed in less than 20 min. IC has been used as an important rapid test for clinical diagnosis and surveillance of influenza viruses, but the IC sensitivity is relatively low (approximately 60%) and the limit of detection (LOD) is as low as 10³ pfu per reaction. Recently, we reported an improved IC assay using antibodies conjugated with fluorescent beads (fluorescent immunochromatography; FLIC) for subtyping H5 influenza viruses (FLIC-H5). Although the FLIC strip must be scanned using a fluorescent reader, the sensitivity (LOD) is significantly improved over that of conventional IC methods. In addition, the antibodies which are specific against the subtypes of influenza viruses cannot be available for the detection of other subtypes when the major antigenicity will be changed. In this study, we established the use of FLIC to type seasonal influenza A and B viruses (FLIC-AB). This method has improved sensitivity to 100-fold higher than that of conventional IC methods when we used several strains of influenza viruses. In addition, FLIC-AB demonstrated the ability to detect influenza type A and influenza type B viruses from clinical samples with high sensitivity and specificity (Type A: sensitivity 98.7% (74/75), specificity 100% (54/54), Type B: sensitivity 100% (90/90), specificity 98.2% (54/55) in nasal swab samples) in comparison to the results of qRT-PCR. And furthermore, FLIC-AB performs better in the detection of early stage infection (under 13 h) than other conventional IC methods. Our results provide new strategies to prevent the early-stage transmission of influenza viruses in humans during both seasonal outbreaks and pandemics.

  19. Fluorescent Immunochromatography for Rapid and Sensitive Typing of Seasonal Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Akira; Takayama, Katsuyoshi; Nomura, Namiko; Kajiwara, Naoki; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Tamura, Tsuruki; Yamada, Jitsuho; Hashimoto, Masako; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Suda, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Yukuharu; Kida, Hiroshi; Shibasaki, Futoshi

    2015-01-01

    Lateral flow tests also known as Immunochromatography (IC) is an antigen-detection method conducted on a nitrocellulose membrane that can be completed in less than 20 min. IC has been used as an important rapid test for clinical diagnosis and surveillance of influenza viruses, but the IC sensitivity is relatively low (approximately 60%) and the limit of detection (LOD) is as low as 10³ pfu per reaction. Recently, we reported an improved IC assay using antibodies conjugated with fluorescent beads (fluorescent immunochromatography; FLIC) for subtyping H5 influenza viruses (FLIC-H5). Although the FLIC strip must be scanned using a fluorescent reader, the sensitivity (LOD) is significantly improved over that of conventional IC methods. In addition, the antibodies which are specific against the subtypes of influenza viruses cannot be available for the detection of other subtypes when the major antigenicity will be changed. In this study, we established the use of FLIC to type seasonal influenza A and B viruses (FLIC-AB). This method has improved sensitivity to 100-fold higher than that of conventional IC methods when we used several strains of influenza viruses. In addition, FLIC-AB demonstrated the ability to detect influenza type A and influenza type B viruses from clinical samples with high sensitivity and specificity (Type A: sensitivity 98.7% (74/75), specificity 100% (54/54), Type B: sensitivity 100% (90/90), specificity 98.2% (54/55) in nasal swab samples) in comparison to the results of qRT-PCR. And furthermore, FLIC-AB performs better in the detection of early stage infection (under 13h) than other conventional IC methods. Our results provide new strategies to prevent the early-stage transmission of influenza viruses in humans during both seasonal outbreaks and pandemics. PMID:25650570

  20. Defective interfering influenza viruses and host cells: establishment and maintenance of persistent influenza virus infection in MDBK and HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    De, B K; Nayak, D P

    1980-12-01

    WSN (H0N1) influenza virus upon undiluted passages in different species of cells, namely, bovine kidney (MDBK), chicken embryo (CEF), and HeLa cells, produced a varying amount of defective interfering (DI) virus which correlated well with the ability of the species of cell to produce infectious virus. However, the nature of the influenza DI viral RNA produced from a single clonal stock was essentially identical in all three cells types, suggesting that these cells do not exert a great selective pressure in the amplification of specific DI viral RNAs either at early or late passages. DI viruses produced from one subtype (H0N1) could interfere with the replication of infectious viruses belonging to other subtypes (H1N1, H3N2). DI viral RNAs could also replicate with the helper function of other subtype viruses. The persistent infection of MDBK and HeLa cells could be initiated by coinfecting cells with both temperature-sensitive mutants (ts-) and DI influenza viruses. Persistently infected cultures cultures at early passages (up to passage 7) showed a cyclical pattern of cell lysis and virus production (crisis), whereas, at later passages (after passage 20), they produced little or no virus and were resistant to infection by homologous virus but not by heterologous virus. The majority of persistently infected cells, however, contained the complete viral genome since they expressed viral antigens and produced infectious centers. Selection of a slow-growing temperature-sensitive variant rather than the presence of DI virus or interferon appears to be critical in maintaining persistent influenza infection in these cells.

  1. Isolation and full genome characterization of avian influenza subtype H9N2 from poultry respiratory disease outbreak in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Awad A; Parvin, Rokshana; Sultan, Hesham; Halami, Mohamed Y; Talaat, Shaimaa; Abd Elrazek, Alaa; Ibrahim, Mahmoud; Heenemann, Kristin; Vahlenkamp, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Low pathogenic avian influenza virus of subtype H9N2 is panzootic in multiple avian species causing respiratory manifestations and severe economic losses. H9N2 co-circulate simultaneously with high pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 in Egyptian chicken farms suggesting the possibility of reassortment. The aim of the present study was to isolate and characterize H9N2 from the recent outbreaks in chicken farms. Also the diversity of amantadine-resistant mutants among these isolates was tested by in situ ELISA and sequence analysis. Three influenza H9N2 viruses, designated A/chicken/Egypt/SCU8/2014, A/chicken/Egypt/SCU9/2014 and A/chicken/Egypt/SCU20/2014 were isolated from commercial broiler and broiler breeder chickens in specific pathogen free embryonated chicken eggs. The eight gene segments were amplified by RT-PCR, cloned, and subjected to full length sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of these viruses revealed a close relationship between Egyptian, Middle Eastern and Israel isolates with an average of 96-99 % nucleotide homology and identified an ancestor relationship to low pathogenic H9N2 Quail/HK/G1/1997 prototype. The internal segments of the currently isolated viruses were derived from the same sub-lineage with no new evidence of reassortment. The three isolates were sensitive to amantadine as suggested by absence of mutations of M2 and confirmed by a phenotypic assay. In conclusion, avian influenza H9N2 virus is circulating in Egyptian chicken farms causing respiratory manifestations. Continuous monitoring of the molecular epidemiology and its impact on the virulence as well as emergence of new strains are necessary.

  2. Detailed Report on 2014/15 Influenza Virus Characteristics, and Estimates on Influenza Virus Vaccine Effectiveness from Austria’s Sentinel Physician Surveillance Network

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) is influenced by the antigenic similarity between vaccine- and circulating strains. Material and Methods This paper presents data obtained by the Austrian sentinel surveillance system on the evolution of influenza viruses during the season 2014/15 and its impact on influenza vaccine effectiveness in primary care in Austria as estimated by a test-negative case control design. VE estimates were performed for each influenza virus type/subtype, stratified by underlying diseases and adjusted for age, sex and calendar week of infection. Results Detailed genetic and antigenic analyses showed that circulating A(H3N2) viruses were genetically distinct from the 2014/15 A(H3N2) vaccine component indicating a profound vaccine mismatch. The Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses were antigenically conserved and matched the respective vaccine component. Influenza B viruses were lineage-matched B/Yamagata viruses with a clade-level variation. Consistent with substantial vaccine mismatch for the A(H3N2) viruses a crude overall VE of only 47% was estimated, whereas the VE estimates for A(H1N1)pdm09 were 84% and for influenza B viruses 70%. Increased VE estimates were obtained after stratification by underlying diseases and adjustment for the covariates sex and age, whereby the adjustment for the calendar week of infection was the covariate exerting the highest influence on adjusted VE estimates. Conclusion In summary, VE data obtained in this study underscore the importance to perform VE estimates in the context of detailed characterization of the contributing viruses and also demonstrate that the calendar week of influenza virus infection is the most important confounder of VE estimates. PMID:26975056

  3. High doses of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus in chicken meat are required to infect ferrets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High pathogenicity avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) have caused fatal infections in mammals through consumption of infected bird carcasses or meat, but scarce information exists on the dose of virus required and the diversity of HPAIV subtypes involved. Ferrets were exposed to different HPAIV (H5 and H7 subtypes) through consumption of infected chicken meat. The dose of virus needed to infect ferrets through consumption was much higher than via respiratory exposure and varied with the virus strain. In addition, H5N1 HPAIV produced higher titers in the meat of infected chickens and more easily infected ferrets than the H7N3 or H7N7 HPAIV. PMID:24894438

  4. Methamphetamine reduces human influenza A virus replication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Hsiang; Wu, Kuang-Lun; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (meth) is a highly addictive psychostimulant that is among the most widely abused illicit drugs, with an estimated over 35 million users in the world. Several lines of evidence suggest that chronic meth abuse is a major factor for increased risk of infections with human immunodeficiency virus and possibly other pathogens, due to its immunosuppressive property. Influenza A virus infections frequently cause epidemics and pandemics of respiratory diseases among human populations. However, little is known about whether meth has the ability to enhance influenza A virus replication, thus increasing severity of influenza illness in meth abusers. Herein, we investigated the effects of meth on influenza A virus replication in human lung epithelial A549 cells. The cells were exposed to meth and infected with human influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) virus. The viral progenies were titrated by plaque assays, and the expression of viral proteins and cellular proteins involved in interferon responses was examined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining. We report the first evidence that meth significantly reduces, rather than increases, virus propagation and the susceptibility to influenza infection in the human lung epithelial cell line, consistent with a decrease in viral protein synthesis. These effects were apparently not caused by meth's effects on enhancing virus-induced interferon responses in the host cells, reducing viral biological activities, or reducing cell viability. Our results suggest that meth might not be a great risk factor for influenza A virus infection among meth abusers. Although the underlying mechanism responsible for the action of meth on attenuating virus replication requires further investigation, these findings prompt the study to examine whether other structurally similar compounds could be used as anti-influenza agents.

  5. History of Swine influenza viruses in Asia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huachen; Webby, Richard; Lam, Tommy T Y; Smith, David K; Peiris, Joseph S M; Guan, Yi

    2013-01-01

    The pig is one of the main hosts of influenza A viruses and plays important roles in shaping the current influenza ecology. The occurrence of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus demonstrated that pigs could independently facilitate the genesis of a pandemic influenza strain. Genetic analyses revealed that this virus was derived by reassortment between at least two parent swine influenza viruses (SIV), from the northern American triple reassortant H1N2 (TR) and European avian-like H1N1 (EA) lineages. The movement of live pigs between different continents and subsequent virus establishment are preconditions for such a reassortment event to occur. Asia, especially China, has the largest human and pig populations in the world, and seems to be the only region frequently importing pigs from other continents. Virological surveillance revealed that not only classical swine H1N1 (CS), and human-origin H3N2 viruses circulated, but all of the EA, TR and their reassortant variants were introduced into and co-circulated in pigs in this region. Understanding the long-term evolution and history of SIV in Asia would provide insights into the emergence of influenza viruses with epidemic potential in swine and humans.

  6. Antigenic characterization of an H3N2 swine influenza virus isolated from pigs with proliferative and necrotizing pneumonia in Quebec.

    PubMed Central

    Bikour, M H; Cornaglia, E; Weber, J M; Elazhary, Y

    1994-01-01

    A new strain of swine influenza A virus, designated A/Swine/Saint-Hyacinthe/150/90 has been isolated from pigs with severe proliferative and necrotizing pneumonia in Quebec. The antigenic characterization of the hemagglutinin was performed by hemagglutination inhibition test, immunoblot and indirect immunoprecipitation using polyclonal antisera. Only the last test was able to detect an antigenic relationship between the hemagglutinin of this isolate and an H3 subtype influenza virus. The immunoprecipitation test was a useful alternative for determining the hemagglutinin of influenza A virus subtypes. The neuraminidase inhibition test demonstrated a reactivity between the A/Swine/Saint-Hyacinthe/150/90 and antiserum against a N2 subtype influenza virus. Our results indicate that this new strain isolated for the first time in the porcine population of Canada is related to A/Sw/Hong Kong/76 H3N2 swine influenza virus. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:7889461

  7. Rapid production of a H₉ N₂ influenza vaccine from MDCK cells for protecting chicken against influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhenghua; Lu, Zhongzheng; Wang, Lei; Huo, Zeren; Cui, Jianhua; Zheng, Tingting; Dai, Qing; Chen, Cuiling; Qin, Mengying; Chen, Meihua; Yang, Rirong

    2015-04-01

    H9N2 subtype avian influenza viruses are widespread in domestic poultry, and vaccination remains the most effective way to protect the chicken population from avian influenza pandemics. Currently, egg-based H9N2 influenza vaccine production has several disadvantages and mammalian MDCK cells are being investigated as candidates for influenza vaccine production. However, little research has been conducted on low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) such as H9N2 replicating in mammalian cells using microcarrier beads in a bioreactor. In this study, we present a systematic analysis of a safe H9N2 influenza vaccine derived from MDCK cells for protecting chickens against influenza virus infection. In 2008, we isolated two novel H9N2 influenza viruses from chickens raised in southern China, and these H9N2 viruses were adapted to MDCK cells. The H9N2 virus was produced in MDCK cells in a scalable bioreactor, purified, inactivated, and investigated for use as a vaccine. The MDCK-derived H9N2 vaccine was able to induce high titers of neutralizing antibodies in chickens of different ages. Histopathological examination, direct immunofluorescence, HI assay, CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio test, and cytokine evaluation indicated that the MDCK-derived H9N2 vaccine evoked a rapid and effective immune response to protect chickens from influenza infection. High titers of H9N2-specific antibodies were maintained in chickens for 5 months, and the MDCK-derived H9N2 vaccine had no effects on chicken growth. The use of MDCK cells in bioreactors for LPAIV vaccine production is an attractive option to prevent outbreaks of LPAIV in poultry.

  8. H7N9 Influenza Virus Is More Virulent in Ferrets than 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Yum, Jung; Ku, Keun Bon; Kim, Hyun Soo; Seo, Sang Heui

    2015-12-01

    The novel H7N9 influenza virus has been infecting humans in China since February 2013 and with a mortality rate of about 40%. This study compared the pathogenicity of the H7N9 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses in a ferret model, which shows similar symptoms to those of humans infected with influenza viruses. The H7N9 influenza virus caused a more severe disease than did the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus. All of the ferrets infected with the H7N9 influenza virus had died by 6 days after infection, while none of those infected with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus died. Ferrets infected with the H7N9 influenza virus had higher viral titers in their lungs than did those infected with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus. Histological findings indicated that hemorrhagic pneumonia was caused by infection with the H7N9 influenza virus, but not with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus. In addition, the lung tissues of ferrets infected with the H7N9 influenza virus contained higher levels of chemokines than did those of ferrets infected with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus. This study suggests that close monitoring is needed to prevent human infection by the lethal H7N9 influenza virus.

  9. Surveillance and Analysis of Avian Influenza Viruses, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Simone; Tracey, John P.; Arzey, K. Edla; Selleck, Paul; O’Riley, Kim; Beckett, Emma L.; Bunn, Chris; Kirkland, Peter D.; Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Olsen, Bjorn; Hurt, Aeron C.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated carriage of avian influenza viruses by wild birds in Australia, 2005–2008, to assess the risks to poultry industries and human health. We collected 21,858 (7,357 cloacal, 14,501 fecal) samples and detected 300 viruses, representing a detection rate of ≈1.4%. Rates were highest in autumn (March–May) and differed substantially between bird types, areas, and years. We typed 107 avian influenza viruses and identified 19 H5, 8 H7, and 16 H9 (40% of typed viruses). All were of low pathogenicity. These viruses formed clearly different phylogenetic clades to lineages from Eurasia or North America, suggesting the potential existence of Australian lineages. H7 viruses were similar to highly pathogenic H7 strains that caused outbreaks in poultry in Australia. Several periods of increased detection rates (numbers or subtypes of viruses) were identified. This study demonstrates the need for ongoing surveillance to detect emerging pathogenic strains and facilitate prevention of outbreaks. PMID:21122219

  10. Prior infection of pigs with swine influenza viruses is a barrier to infection with avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    De Vleeschauwer, Annebel; Van Reeth, Kristien

    2010-12-15

    Although pigs are susceptible to avian influenza viruses (AIV) of different subtypes, the incidence of AIV infections in the field appears to be low. Swine H1N1, H3N2 and H1N2 influenza viruses (SIV) are enzootic worldwide and most pigs have antibodies to 1 or more SIV subtypes. This study aimed to examine whether infection-immunity to H1N1 or H3N2 SIV may (1) protect pigs against subsequent infections with AIV of various haemagglutinin and/or neuraminidase subtypes and/or (2) interfere with the serological diagnosis of AIV infection by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) or virus neutralization (VN) tests. Pigs were inoculated intranasally with an H1N1 or H3N2 SIV or left uninoculated. Four or 6 weeks later all pigs were challenged intranasally with 1 of 3 AIV subtypes (H4N6, H5N2 or H7N1). Fifteen out of 17 challenge control pigs shed the respective AIV for 4-6 days post-inoculation and 16 developed HI and VN antibodies. In contrast, 28 of the 29 SIV-immune pigs did not have detectable AIV shedding. Only 12 SIV-immune pigs developed HI antibodies to the AIV used for challenge and 14 had VN antibodies. Antibody titres to the AIV were low in both control and SIV-immune pigs. Our data show that prior infection of pigs with SIV is a barrier to infection with AIV of unrelated subtypes. Serological screening in regions where SIV is enzootic is only useful when the AIV strain for which the pigs need to be tested is known.

  11. Identification of reassortant pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in Korean pigs.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae Yeon; Park, Sung Jun; Kim, Hye Kwon; Rho, Semi; Nguyen, Giap Van; Song, Daesub; Kang, Bo Kyu; Moon, Hyung Jun; Yeom, Min Joo; Park, Bong Kyun

    2012-05-01

    Since the 2009 pandemic human H1N1 influenza A virus emerged in April 2009, novel reassortant strains have been identified throughout the world. This paper describes the detection and isolation of reassortant strains associated with human pandemic influenza H1N1 and swine influenza H1N2 (SIV) viruses in swine populations in South Korea. Two influenza H1N2 reassortants were detected, and subtyped by PCR. The strains were isolated using Madin- Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, and genetically characterized by phylogenetic analysis for genetic diversity. They consisted of human, avian, and swine virus genes that were originated from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus and a neuraminidase (NA) gene from H1N2 SIV previously isolated in North America. This identification of reassortment events in swine farms raises concern that reassortant strains may continuously circulate within swine populations, calling for the further study and surveillance of pandemic H1N1 among swine.

  12. Ultrasensitive detection of influenza viruses with a glycan-based impedimetric biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Hushegyi, András; Pihíková, Dominika; Bertók, Tomáš; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, René; Tkac, Jan

    2016-01-01

    An ultrasensitive impedimetric glycan-based biosensor for reliable and selective detection of inactivated, but intact influenza viruses H3N2 was developed. Such glycan-based approach has a distinct advantage over antibody-based detection of influenza viruses since glycans are natural viral receptors with a possibility to selectively distinguish between potentially pathogenic influenza subtypes by the glycan-based biosensors. Build-up of the biosensor was carefully optimized with atomic force microscopy applied for visualization of the biosensor surface after binding of viruses with the topology of an individual viral particle H3N2 analyzed. The glycan biosensor could detect a glycan binding lectin with a limit of detection (LOD) of 5 aM. The biosensor was finally applied for analysis of influenza viruses H3N2 with LOD of 13 viral particles in 1 μl, what is the lowest LOD for analysis of influenza viral particles by the glycan-based device achieved so far. The biosensor could detect H3N2 viruses selectively with a sensitivity ratio of 30 over influenza viruses H7N7. The impedimetric biosensor presented here is the most sensitive glycan-based device for detection of influenza viruses and among the most sensitive antibody or aptamer based biosensor devices. PMID:26765527

  13. Ultrasensitive detection of influenza viruses with a glycan-based impedimetric biosensor.

    PubMed

    Hushegyi, András; Pihíková, Dominika; Bertok, Tomas; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, René; Tkac, Jan

    2016-05-15

    An ultrasensitive impedimetric glycan-based biosensor for reliable and selective detection of inactivated, but intact influenza viruses H3N2 was developed. Such glycan-based approach has a distinct advantage over antibody-based detection of influenza viruses since glycans are natural viral receptors with a possibility to selectively distinguish between potentially pathogenic influenza subtypes by the glycan-based biosensors. Build-up of the biosensor was carefully optimized with atomic force microscopy applied for visualization of the biosensor surface after binding of viruses with the topology of an individual viral particle H3N2 analyzed. The glycan biosensor could detect a glycan binding lectin with a limit of detection (LOD) of 5 aM. The biosensor was finally applied for analysis of influenza viruses H3N2 with LOD of 13 viral particles in 1 μl, what is the lowest LOD for analysis of influenza viral particles by the glycan-based device achieved so far. The biosensor could detect H3N2 viruses selectively with a sensitivity ratio of 30 over influenza viruses H7N7. The impedimetric biosensor presented here is the most sensitive glycan-based device for detection of influenza viruses and among the most sensitive antibody or aptamer based biosensor devices.

  14. Spatial Dynamics of Human-Origin H1 Influenza A Virus in North American Swine

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Martha I.; Lemey, Philippe; Tan, Yi; Vincent, Amy; Lam, Tommy Tsan-Yuk; Detmer, Susan; Viboud, Cécile; Suchard, Marc A.; Rambaut, Andrew; Holmes, Edward C.; Gramer, Marie

    2011-01-01

    The emergence and rapid global spread of the swine-origin H1N1/09 pandemic influenza A virus in humans underscores the importance of swine populations as reservoirs for genetically diverse influenza viruses with the potential to infect humans. However, despite their significance for animal and human health, relatively little is known about the phylogeography of swine influenza viruses in the United States. This study utilizes an expansive data set of hemagglutinin (HA1) sequences (n = 1516) from swine influenza viruses collected in North America during the period 2003–2010. With these data we investigate the spatial dissemination of a novel influenza virus of the H1 subtype that was introduced into the North American swine population via two separate human-to-swine transmission events around 2003. Bayesian phylogeographic analysis reveals that the spatial dissemination of this influenza virus in the US swine population follows long-distance swine movements from the Southern US to the Midwest, a corn-rich commercial center that imports millions of swine annually. Hence, multiple genetically diverse influenza viruses are introduced and co-circulate in the Midwest, providing the opportunity for genomic reassortment. Overall, the Midwest serves primarily as an ecological sink for swine influenza in the US, with sources of virus genetic diversity instead located in the Southeast (mainly North Carolina) and South-central (mainly Oklahoma) regions. Understanding the importance of long-distance pig transportation in the evolution and spatial dissemination of the influenza virus in swine may inform future strategies for the surveillance and control of influenza, and perhaps other swine pathogens. PMID:21695237

  15. Spatial dynamics of human-origin H1 influenza A virus in North American swine.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Martha I; Lemey, Philippe; Tan, Yi; Vincent, Amy; Lam, Tommy Tsan-Yuk; Detmer, Susan; Viboud, Cécile; Suchard, Marc A; Rambaut, Andrew; Holmes, Edward C; Gramer, Marie

    2011-06-01

    The emergence and rapid global spread of the swine-origin H1N1/09 pandemic influenza A virus in humans underscores the importance of swine populations as reservoirs for genetically diverse influenza viruses with the potential to infect humans. However, despite their significance for animal and human health, relatively little is known about the phylogeography of swine influenza viruses in the United States. This study utilizes an expansive data set of hemagglutinin (HA1) sequences (n = 1516) from swine influenza viruses collected in North America during the period 2003-2010. With these data we investigate the spatial dissemination of a novel influenza virus of the H1 subtype that was introduced into the North American swine population via two separate human-to-swine transmission events around 2003. Bayesian phylogeographic analysis reveals that the spatial dissemination of this influenza virus in the US swine population follows long-distance swine movements from the Southern US to the Midwest, a corn-rich commercial center that imports millions of swine annually. Hence, multiple genetically diverse influenza viruses are introduced and co-circulate in the Midwest, providing the opportunity for genomic reassortment. Overall, the Midwest serves primarily as an ecological sink for swine influenza in the US, with sources of virus genetic diversity instead located in the Southeast (mainly North Carolina) and South-central (mainly Oklahoma) regions. Understanding the importance of long-distance pig transportation in the evolution and spatial dissemination of the influenza virus in swine may inform future strategies for the surveillance and control of influenza, and perhaps other swine pathogens.

  16. The Iminosugar UV-4 is a Broad Inhibitor of Influenza A and B Viruses ex Vivo and in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Warfield, Kelly L.; Barnard, Dale L.; Enterlein, Sven G.; Smee, Donald F.; Khaliq, Mansoora; Sampath, Aruna; Callahan, Michael V.; Ramstedt, Urban; Day, Craig W.

    2016-01-01

    Iminosugars that are competitive inhibitors of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) α-glucosidases have been demonstrated to have antiviral activity against a diverse set of viruses. A novel iminosugar, UV-4B, has recently been shown to provide protection against lethal infections with dengue and influenza A (H1N1) viruses in mice. In the current study, the breadth of activity of UV-4B against influenza was examined ex vivo and in vivo. Efficacy of UV-4B against influenza A and B viruses was shown in primary human bronchial epithelial cells, a principal target tissue for influenza. Efficacy of UV-4B against influenza A (H1N1 and H3N2 subtypes) and influenza B was demonstrated using multiple lethal mouse models with readouts including mortality and weight loss. Clinical trials are ongoing to demonstrate safety of UV-4B and future studies to evaluate antiviral activity against influenza in humans are planned. PMID:27072420

  17. Detection of evolutionarily distinct avian influenza a viruses in antarctica.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Aeron C; Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Butler, Jeffrey; Baas, Chantal; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Silva-de-la-Fuente, M Carolina; Medina-Vogel, Gonzalo; Olsen, Bjorn; Kelso, Anne; Barr, Ian G; González-Acuña, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Distinct lineages of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) are harbored by spatially segregated birds, yet significant surveillance gaps exist around the globe. Virtually nothing is known from the Antarctic. Using virus culture, molecular analysis, full genome sequencing, and serology of samples from Adélie penguins in Antarctica, we confirmed infection by H11N2 subtype AIVs. Their genetic segments were distinct from all known contemporary influenza viruses, including South American AIVs, suggesting spatial separation from other lineages. Only in the matrix and polymerase acidic gene phylogenies did the Antarctic sequences form a sister relationship to South American AIVs, whereas distant phylogenetic relationships were evident in all other gene segments. Interestingly, their neuraminidase genes formed a distant relationship to all avian and human influenza lineages, and the polymerase basic 1 and polymerase acidic formed a sister relationship to the equine H3N8 influenza virus lineage that emerged during 1963 and whose avian origins were previously unknown. We also estimated that each gene segment had diverged for 49 to 80 years from its most closely related sequences, highlighting a significant gap in our AIV knowledge in the region. We also show that the receptor binding properties of the H11N2 viruses are predominantly avian and that they were unable to replicate efficiently in experimentally inoculated ferrets, suggesting their continuous evolution in avian hosts. These findings add substantially to our understanding of both the ecology and the intra- and intercontinental movement of Antarctic AIVs and highlight the potential risk of an incursion of highly pathogenic AIVs into this fragile environment. IMPORTANCE Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) are typically maintained and spread by migratory birds, resulting in the existence of distinctly different viruses around the world. However, AIVs have not previously been detected in Antarctica. In this study, we

  18. Detection of evolutionarily distinct avian influenza a viruses in antarctica.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Aeron C; Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Butler, Jeffrey; Baas, Chantal; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Silva-de-la-Fuente, M Carolina; Medina-Vogel, Gonzalo; Olsen, Bjorn; Kelso, Anne; Barr, Ian G; González-Acuña, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Distinct lineages of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) are harbored by spatially segregated birds, yet significant surveillance gaps exist around the globe. Virtually nothing is known from the Antarctic. Using virus culture, molecular analysis, full genome sequencing, and serology of samples from Adélie penguins in Antarctica, we confirmed infection by H11N2 subtype AIVs. Their genetic segments were distinct from all known contemporary influenza viruses, including South American AIVs, suggesting spatial separation from other lineages. Only in the matrix and polymerase acidic gene phylogenies did the Antarctic sequences form a sister relationship to South American AIVs, whereas distant phylogenetic relationships were evident in all other gene segments. Interestingly, their neuraminidase genes formed a distant relationship to all avian and human influenza lineages, and the polymerase basic 1 and polymerase acidic formed a sister relationship to the equine H3N8 influenza virus lineage that emerged during 1963 and whose avian origins were previously unknown. We also estimated that each gene segment had diverged for 49 to 80 years from its most closely related sequences, highlighting a significant gap in our AIV knowledge in the region. We also show that the receptor binding properties of the H11N2 viruses are predominantly avian and that they were unable to replicate efficiently in experimentally inoculated ferrets, suggesting their continuous evolution in avian hosts. These findings add substantially to our understanding of both the ecology and the intra- and intercontinental movement of Antarctic AIVs and highlight the potential risk of an incursion of highly pathogenic AIVs into this fragile environment. IMPORTANCE Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) are typically maintained and spread by migratory birds, resulting in the existence of distinctly different viruses around the world. However, AIVs have not previously been detected in Antarctica. In this study, we

  19. Influenza vaccine effectiveness in Italy: Age, subtype-specific and vaccine type estimates 2014/15 season.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Caterina; Bella, Antonino; Alfonsi, Valeria; Puzelli, Simona; Palmieri, Anna Pina; Chironna, Maria; Pariani, Elena; Piatti, Alessandra; Tiberti, Donatella; Ghisetti, Valeria; Rangoni, Roberto; Colucci, Maria Eugenia; Affanni, Paola; Germinario, Cinzia; Castrucci, Maria Rita

    2016-06-01

    The 2014/15 influenza season in Europe was characterised by the circulation of influenza A(H3N2) viruses with an antigenic and genetic mismatch from the vaccine strain A/Texas/50/2012(H3N2) recommended for the Northern hemisphere for the 2014/15 season. Italy, differently from other EU countries where most of the subtyped influenza A viruses were H3N2, experienced a 2014/15 season characterized by an extended circulation of two influenza viruses: A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2), that both contributed substantially to morbidity. Within the context of the existing National sentinel influenza surveillance system (InfluNet) a test-negative case-control study was established in order to produce vaccine effectiveness (VE) estimates. The point estimates VE were adjusted by age group (<5; 5-15; 15-64; 65+ years), the presence of at least one chronic condition, target group for vaccination and need help for walking or bathing. In Italy, adjusted estimates of the 2014/15 seasonal influenza VE against medically attended influenza-like illness (ILI) laboratory-confirmed as influenza for all age groups were 6.0% (95%CI: -36.5 to 35.2%), 43.6% (95%CI: -3.7 to 69.3%), -84.5% (95%CI: (-190.4 to -17.2%) and 50.7% (95% CI: -2.5 to 76.3%) against any influenza virus, A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2) and B, respectively. These results suggest evidence of good VE against A(H1N1)pdm09 and B viruses in Italy and evidence of lack of VE against A(H3N2) virus due to antigenic and genetic mismatch between circulating A(H3N2) and the respective 2014/15 vaccine strain. PMID:27154392

  20. Knowns and unknowns of influenza B viruses.

    PubMed

    Koutsakos, Marios; Nguyen, Thi H O; Barclay, Wendy S; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Influenza B viruses (IBVs) circulate annually along with influenza A (IAV) strains during seasonal epidemics. IBV can dominate influenza seasons and cause severe disease, particularly in children and adolescents. Research has revealed interesting aspects of IBV and highlighted the importance of these viruses in clinical settings. Yet, many important questions remain unanswered. In this review, the clinical relevance of IBV is emphasized, unique features in epidemiology, host range and virology are highlighted and gaps in knowledge pinpointed. Multiple aspects of IBV epidemiology, evolution, virology and immunology are discussed. Future research into IBV is needed to understand how we can prevent severe disease in high-risk groups, especially children and elderly.

  1. Oral fluids as a live-animal sample for evaluating cross-reactivity and cross-protection following intranasal influenza A virus vaccination in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In North American swine there are numerous antigenically distinct influenza A virus (IAV) H1 subtypes currently circulating, making vaccine development difficult due to the inability to formulate a vaccine that provides broad cross-protection. Live-attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccines provide ...

  2. Transcriptional analysis of the innate immune response of ducks to different species-of-origin low pathogenic H7 avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Ducks represent an important reservoir for avian influenza (AI) viruses and are partly responsible for the worldwide dissemination of AI. Due to the ability of some low pathogenicity avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) of the hemagglutinin H7 subtype to mutate into a highly pathogenic form o...

  3. Targets for the Induction of Protective Immunity Against Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Bodewes, Rogier; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.

    2010-01-01

    The current pandemic caused by the new influenza A(H1N1) virus of swine origin and the current pandemic threat caused by the highly pathogenic avian influenza A viruses of the H5N1 subtype have renewed the interest in the development of vaccines that can induce broad protective immunity. Preferably, vaccines not only provide protection against the homologous strains, but also against heterologous strains, even of another subtype. Here we describe viral targets and the arms of the immune response involved in protection against influenza virus infections such as antibodies directed against the hemagglutinin, neuraminidase and the M2 protein and cellular immune responses directed against the internal viral proteins. PMID:21994606

  4. Pathogenicity and vaccine efficacy of different clades of Asian H5N1 avian influenza A viruses in domestic ducks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Ki; Seiler, Patrick; Forrest, Heather L; Khalenkov, Alexey M; Franks, John; Kumar, Mahesh; Karesh, William B; Gilbert, Martin; Sodnomdarjaa, R; Douangngeun, Bounlom; Govorkova, Elena A; Webster, Robert G

    2008-11-01

    Waterfowl represent the natural reservoir of all subtypes of influenza A viruses, including H5N1. Ducks are especially considered major contributors to the spread of H5N1 influenza A viruses because they exhibit diversity in morbidity and mortality. Therefore, as a preventive strategy against endemic as well as pandemic influenza, it is important to reduce the spread of H5N1 influenza A viruses in duck populations. Here, we describe the pathogenicity of dominant clades (clades 1 and 2) of H5N1 influenza A viruses circulating in birds in Asia. Four representatives of dominant clades of the viruses cause symptomatic infection but lead to different profiles of lethality in domestic ducks. We also demonstrate the efficacy, cross-protectiveness, and immunogenicity of three different inactivated oil emulsion whole-virus H5 influenza vaccines (derived by implementing reverse genetics) to the viruses in domestic ducks. A single dose of the vaccines containing 1 mug of hemagglutinin protein provides complete protection against a lethal A/Duck/Laos/25/06 (H5N1) influenza virus challenge, with no evidence of morbidity, mortality, or shedding of the challenge virus. Moreover, two of the three vaccines achieved complete cross-clade or cross-subclade protection against the heterologous avian influenza virus challenge. Interestingly, the vaccines induce low or undetectable titers of hemagglutination inhibition (HI), cross-HI, and/or virus neutralization antibodies. The mechanism of complete protection in the absence of detectable antibody responses remains an open question.

  5. Influenza virus: transmission between species and relevance to emergence of the next human pandemic.

    PubMed

    Webster, R G

    1997-01-01

    Although influenza viruses are not spread from human to human through the conventional food chain, this is not necessarily the case for the transmission of the precursors of the human pandemic influenza viruses. Aquatic birds of the world are the reservoirs for all influenza A viruses; the virus is spread by fecal-oral transmission in untreated water. Influenza A viruses are frequently transmitted to domestic poultry and two of the 15 subtypes H5 and H7 can become highly pathogenic and have the capacity to decimate commercial poultry flocks. Less frequently, avian influenza viruses are transmitted between species-to pigs, horses and sea mammals. This transmission involves mutational, reassortant or recombinational events and can occur through fecal contamination of unprocessed avian protein or through the water. The transmission of avian influenza viruses or virus genes to humans is postulated to occur through pigs that act as the intermediate host. This involves either multiple mutational or reassortant events and is believed to occur by airborne transmission. Once avian influenza viruses are established in mammals, they are transmitted from animal to animal by the respiratory airborne route. The transmission of avian influenza virus from their reservoir in wild aquatic birds to domestic poultry and to mammalian species including humans can be prevented by treatment of the water supply and of avian protein sources with disinfectants or by heating. Agricultural authorities have recommended the separation of wild aquatic and domestic poultry and of pig and poultry farming. It is theoretically possible to reduce the possibility of the next pandemic of influenza in humans by changes in agricultural practices so that ducks are separated from pigs and people.

  6. Innate immune evasion strategies of influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Benjamin G; Albrecht, Randy A; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2010-01-01

    Influenza viruses are globally important human respiratory pathogens. These viruses cause seasonal epidemics and occasional worldwide pandemics, both of which can vary significantly in disease severity. The virulence of a particular influenza virus strain is partly determined by its success in circumventing the host immune response. This article briefly reviews the innate mechanisms that host cells have evolved to resist virus infection, and outlines the plethora of strategies that influenza viruses have developed in order to counteract such powerful defences. The molecular details of this virus–host interplay are summarized, and the ways in which research in this area is being applied to the rational design of protective vaccines and novel antivirals are discussed. PMID:20020828

  7. Preservation of Influenza Virus Infectivity by Lyophilization

    PubMed Central

    Beardmore, W. B.; Clark, T. D.; Jones, K. V.

    1968-01-01

    A method of lyophilizing influenza virus in allantoic fluid with retention of high-titer of egg infectivity is described. Five strains of virus were lyophilized, and all were much more stable than fluid virus preparations, retaining 2 to 3 logs of infectivity after storage at 37 C for 60 to 95 days. Statistical analysis of an accelerated storage test by extrapolation of viral degradation indicates that the lyophilized viruses are stable indefinitely at or below room temperature. PMID:5645420

  8. Rapid genotyping of swine influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Mak, Polly W Y; Wong, Chloe K S; Li, Olive T W; Chan, Kwok Hung; Cheung, Chung Lam; Ma, Edward S; Webby, Richard J; Guan, Yi; Malik Peiris, Joseph S; Poon, Leo L M

    2011-04-01

    The emergence of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus highlighted the need for enhanced surveillance of swine influenza viruses. We used real-time reverse-transcription PCR-based genotyping and found that this rapid and simple genotyping method may identify reassortants derived from viruses of Eurasian avian-like, triple reassortant-like, and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus lineages.

  9. Rapid Genotyping of Swine Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Polly W.Y.; Wong, Chloe K.S.; Li, Olive T.W.; Chan, Kwok Hung; Cheung, Chung Lam; Ma, Edward S.; Webby, Richard J.; Guan, Yi; Peiris, Joseph S. Malik

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus highlighted the need for enhanced surveillance of swine influenza viruses. We used real-time reverse–transcription PCR–based genotyping and found that this rapid and simple genotyping method may identify reassortants derived from viruses of Eurasian avian-like, triple reassortant-like, and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus lineages. PMID:21470462

  10. Precursor genes of future pandemic influenza viruses are perpetuated in ducks nesting in Siberia.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, K; Takada, A; Ito, T; Imai, M; Takakuwa, H; Hatta, M; Ozaki, H; Tanizaki, T; Nagano, T; Ninomiya, A; Demenev, V A; Tyaptirganov, M M; Karatayeva, T D; Yamnikova, S S; Lvov, D K; Kida, H

    2000-01-01

    Influenza A viruses of different subtypes were isolated from fecal samples of ducks in their nesting areas in Siberia in summer from 1996 to 1998. Phylogenetic analysis of the NP genes of the isolates in Siberia and those in Hokkaido, Japan on their flyway of migration from Siberia to the south in autumn revealed that they belong to the Eurasian lineage of avian influenza viruses. It is noted that the genes of the isolates in Siberia are closely related to those of H5N1 influenza virus strains isolated from chickens and humans in Hong Kong in 1997 as well as to those of isolates from domestic birds in southern China. The results indicate that influenza viruses perpetuated in ducks nesting in Siberia should have contributed genes in the emergence of the H5N1 virus in Hong Kong. Vaccine prepared from avirulent A/duck/Hokkaido/4/96 (H5N3) influenza virus was potent enough to protect mice from challenge with lethal dose of the pathogenic H5N1 virus [19]. Intensive surveillance study of aquatic birds especially in Siberia is, therefore, stressed to provide information on the future pandemic influenza virus strains and for vaccine preparation.

  11. Characterization of a highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus isolated from an ostrich.

    PubMed

    Yang, Penghui; Dongmei; Wang, Cheng; Tang, Chong; Xing, Li; Luo, Deyan; Zhan, Zhongpeng; Duan, Yueqiang; Jia, Weihong; Peng, Daxin; Liu, Xiufan; Wang, Xiliang

    2010-06-11

    The continued spread of a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus among poultry and wild birds has posed a potential threat to human public health. An influenza pandemic happens, when a new subtype that has not previously circulated in humans emerges. Almost all of the influenza pandemics in history have originated from avian influenza viruses (AIV). Birds are significant reservoirs of influenza viruses. In the present study, we performed a survey of avian influenza virus in ostriches and H5N1 virus (A/Ostrich/SuZhou/097/03, China097) was isolated. This H5N1 virus is highly pathogenic to both chickens and mice. It is also able to replicate in the lungs of, and to cause death in, BALB/c mice following intranasal administration. It forms plaques in chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells in the absence of trypsin. The hemagglutinin (HA) gene of the virus is genetically similar to A/Goose/Guangdong/1/96(H5N1) and belongs to clade 0. The HA sequence contains multiple basic amino acids adjacent to the cleavage site, a motif associated with HPAI viruses. More importantly, the existence of H5N1 isolates in ostriches highlights the potential threat of wild bird infections to veterinary and public health. PMID:20497905

  12. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus (H5N1) Isolated from Whooper Swans, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Yuko; Mase, Masaji; Yoneda, Kumiko; Kimura, Atsumu; Obara, Tsuyoshi; Kumagai, Seikou; Yamamoto, Yu; Nakamura, Kikuyasu; Tsukamoto, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Shigeo

    2008-01-01

    On April 21, 2008, four whooper swans were found dead at Lake Towada, Akita prefecture, Japan. Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of the H5N1 subtype was isolated from specimens of the affected birds. The hemagglutinin (HA) gene of the isolate belongs to clade 2.3.2 in the HA phylogenetic tree. PMID:18760011

  13. Avian influenza virus with Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase combination H8N8, isolated in Russia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study reports the genome sequence of an avian influenza virus (AIV) subtype H8N8 isolated in Russia. The genome analysis shows that all genes belong to AIV Eurasian lineages. The PB2 gene was similar to a Mongolian low pathogenic (LP) AIV H7N1 and a Chinese high pathogenic (HP) AIV H5N2....

  14. Avian Influenza Virus with Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Combination H8N8, Isolated in Russia.

    PubMed

    Sivay, Mariya V; Sharshov, Kirill A; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary; Muzyka, Vladimir V; Shestopalov, Alexander M

    2014-01-01

    We report the genome sequence of an avian influenza virus (AIV) subtype H8N8, isolated in Russia. The genome analysis shows that all genes belong to AIV Eurasian lineages. The PB2 gene was similar to a Mongolian low-pathogenic (LP) AIV H7N1 and a Chinese high-pathogenic (HP) AIV H5N2.

  15. Electronic microarray assays for avian influenza and Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Lung, Oliver; Beeston, Anne; Ohene-Adjei, Samuel; Pasick, John; Hodko, Dalibor; Hughes, Kimberley Burton; Furukawa-Stoffer, Tara; Fisher, Mathew; Deregt, Dirk

    2012-11-01

    Microarrays are suitable for multiplexed detection and typing of pathogens. Avian influenza virus (AIV) is currently classified into 16 H (hemagglutinin) and 9 N (neuraminidase) subtypes, whereas Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strains differ in virulence and are broadly classified into high and low pathogenicity types. In this study, three assays for detection and typing of poultry viruses were developed on an automated microarray platform: a multiplex assay for simultaneous detection of AIV and detection and pathotyping of NDV, and two separate assays for differentiating all AIV H and N subtypes. The AIV-NDV multiplex assay detected all strains in a 63 virus panel, and accurately typed all high pathogenicity NDV strains tested. A limit of detection of 10(1)-10(3) TCID(50)/mL and 200-400 EID(50)/mL was obtained for NDV and AIV, respectively. The AIV typing assays accurately typed all 41 AIV strains and a limit of detection of 4-200 EID(50)/mL was obtained. Assay validation showed that the microarray assays were generally comparable to real-time RT-PCR. However, the AIV typing microarray assays detected more positive clinical samples than the AIV matrix real-time RT-PCR, and also provided information regarding the subtype. The AIV-NDV multiplex and AIV H typing microarray assays detected mixed infections and could be useful for detection and typing of AIV and NDV.

  16. Establishment and Lineage Replacement of H6 Influenza Viruses in Domestic Ducks in Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kai; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Jia; Cheung, Chung-Lam; Duan, Lian; Hong, Wenshan; Liu, Yongmei; Li, Lifeng; Smith, David K.; Chen, Honglin; Webster, Robert G.; Webby, Richard J.; Peiris, Malik

    2012-01-01

    Domestic ducks in southern China act as an important reservoir for influenza viruses and have also facilitated the establishment of multiple H6 influenza virus lineages. To understand the continuing evolution of these established lineages, 297 H6 viruses isolated from domestic ducks during 2006 and 2007 were genetically and antigenically analyzed. Phylogenetic analyses showed that group II duck H6 viruses had replaced the previously predominant group I lineage and extended their geographic distribution from coastal to inland regions. Group II H6 virus showed that the genesis and development of multiple types of deletions in the neuraminidase (NA) stalk region could occur in the influenza viruses from domestic ducks. A gradual replacement of the N2 NA subtype with N6 was observed. Significant antigenic changes occurred within group II H6 viruses so that they became antigenically distinguishable from group I and gene pool viruses. Gene exchange between group II H6 viruses and the established H5N1, H9N2, or H6N1 virus lineages in poultry in the region was very limited. These findings suggest that domestic ducks can facilitate significant genetic and antigenic changes in viruses established in this host and highlight gaps in our knowledge of influenza virus ecology and even the evolutionary behavior of this virus family in its aquatic avian reservoirs. PMID:22438558

  17. Establishment and lineage replacement of H6 influenza viruses in domestic ducks in southern China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Zhu, Huachen; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Jia; Cheung, Chung-Lam; Duan, Lian; Hong, Wenshan; Liu, Yongmei; Li, Lifeng; Smith, David K; Chen, Honglin; Webster, Robert G; Webby, Richard J; Peiris, Malik; Guan, Yi

    2012-06-01

    Domestic ducks in southern China act as an important reservoir for influenza viruses and have also facilitated the establishment of multiple H6 influenza virus lineages. To understand the continuing evolution of these established lineages, 297 H6 viruses isolated from domestic ducks during 2006 and 2007 were genetically and antigenically analyzed. Phylogenetic analyses showed that group II duck H6 viruses had replaced the previously predominant group I lineage and extended their geographic distribution from coastal to inland regions. Group II H6 virus showed that the genesis and development of multiple types of deletions in the neuraminidase (NA) stalk region could occur in the influenza viruses from domestic ducks. A gradual replacement of the N2 NA subtype with N6 was observed. Significant antigenic changes occurred within group II H6 viruses so that they became antigenically distinguishable from group I and gene pool viruses. Gene exchange between group II H6 viruses and the established H5N1, H9N2, or H6N1 virus lineages in poultry in the region was very limited. These findings suggest that domestic ducks can facilitate significant genetic and antigenic changes in viruses established in this host and highlight gaps in our knowledge of influenza virus ecology and even the evolutionary behavior of this virus family in its aquatic avian reservoirs.

  18. Epidemiological and Virological Characterization of Influenza B Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    Sharabi, Sivan; Drori, Yaron; Micheli, Michal; Friedman, Nehemya; Orzitzer, Sara; Bassal, Ravit; Glatman-Freedman, Aharona; Shohat, Tamar; Mendelson, Ella; Hindiyeh, Musa; Mandelboim, Michal

    2016-01-01

    While influenza A viruses comprise a heterogeneous group of clinically relevant influenza viruses, influenza B viruses form a more homogeneous cluster, divided mainly into two lineages: Victoria and Yamagata. This divergence has complicated seasonal influenza vaccine design, which traditionally contained two seasonal influenza A virus strains and one influenza B virus strain. We examined the distribution of the two influenza B virus lineages in Israel, between 2011-2014, in hospitalized and in non-hospitalized (community) influenza B virus-infected patients. We showed that influenza B virus infections can lead to hospitalization and demonstrated that during some winter seasons, both influenza B virus lineages circulated simultaneously in Israel. We further show that the influenza B virus Yamagata lineage was dominant, circulating in the county in the last few years of the study period, consistent with the anti-Yamagata influenza B virus antibodies detected in the serum samples of affected individuals residing in Israel in the year 2014. Interestingly, we found that elderly people were particularly vulnerable to Yamagata lineage influenza B virus infections. PMID:27533045

  19. Epidemiological and Virological Characterization of Influenza B Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Sharabi, Sivan; Drori, Yaron; Micheli, Michal; Friedman, Nehemya; Orzitzer, Sara; Bassal, Ravit; Glatman-Freedman, Aharona; Shohat, Tamar; Mendelson, Ella; Hindiyeh, Musa; Mandelboim, Michal

    2016-01-01

    While influenza A viruses comprise a heterogeneous group of clinically relevant influenza viruses, influenza B viruses form a more homogeneous cluster, divided mainly into two lineages: Victoria and Yamagata. This divergence has complicated seasonal influenza vaccine design, which traditionally contained two seasonal influenza A virus strains and one influenza B virus strain. We examined the distribution of the two influenza B virus lineages in Israel, between 2011–2014, in hospitalized and in non-hospitalized (community) influenza B virus-infected patients. We showed that influenza B virus infections can lead to hospitalization and demonstrated that during some winter seasons, both influenza B virus lineages circulated simultaneously in Israel. We further show that the influenza B virus Yamagata lineage was dominant, circulating in the county in the last few years of the study period, consistent with the anti-Yamagata influenza B virus antibodies detected in the serum samples of affected individuals residing in Israel in the year 2014. Interestingly, we found that elderly people were particularly vulnerable to Yamagata lineage influenza B virus infections. PMID:27533045

  20. Avian Influenza A (H7N9) Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . Avian Influenza H5 Viruses in the United States Updates and Publications Information ... Humans Examples of Human Infections with Avian Influenza Viruses Outbreaks Health Care and Laboratorian Guidance HPAI A ...

  1. Prevention and Treatment of Avian Influenza A Viruses in People

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Making a Candidate Vaccine Virus Related Links Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Get ... Button Past Newsletters Prevention and Treatment of Avian Influenza A Viruses in People Language: English Español ...

  2. DIESEL EXHAUST ENHANCES INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTIONS IN RESPIRATORY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several factors, such as age and nutritional status can affect the susceptibility to influenza infections. Moreover, exposure to air pollutants, such as diesel exhaust (DE), has been shown to affect respiratory virus infections in rodent models. Influenza virus primarily infects ...

  3. Epidemiology and Surveillance of Influenza Viruses in Uganda between 2008 and 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Mimbe, Derrick E.; Erima, Bernard; Mworozi, Edison A.; Millard, Monica; Kibuuka, Hannah; Bwogi, Josephine; Kiconco, Jocelyn; Tugume, Titus; Mulei, Sophia; Ikomera, Christine; Tsui, Sharon; Malinzi, Stephen; Kasasa, Simon; Coldren, Rodney; Byarugaba, Denis K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Influenza surveillance was conducted in Uganda from October 2008 to December 2014 to identify and understand the epidemiology of circulating influenza strains in out-patient clinic attendees with influenza-like illness and inform control strategies. Methodology Surveillance was conducted at five hospital-based sentinel sites. Nasopharyngeal and/or oropharyngeal samples, epidemiological and clinical data were collected from enrolled patients. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to identify and subtype influenza strains. Data were double-entered into an Epi Info 3.5.3 database and exported to STATA 13.0 software for analysis. Results Of the 6,628 patient samples tested, influenza virus infection was detected in 10.4% (n = 687/6,628) of the specimens. Several trends were observed: influenza circulates throughout the year with two peaks; the major one from September to November and a minor one from March to June. The predominant strains of influenza varied over the years: Seasonal Influenza A(H3) virus was predominant from 2008 to 2009 and from 2012 to 2014; Influenza A(H1N1)pdm01 was dominant in 2010; and Influenza B virus was dominant in 2011. The peaks generally coincided with times of higher humidity, lower temperature, and higher rainfall. Conclusion Influenza circulated throughout the year in Uganda with two major peaks of outbreaks with similar strains circulating elsewhere in the region. Data on the circulating strains of influenza and its patterns of occurrence provided critical insights to informing the design and timing of influenza vaccines for influenza prevention in tropical regions of sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27755572

  4. Susceptibility of avian species to North American H13 low pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Brown, Justin; Poulson, Rebecca; Carter, Deborah; Lebarbenchon, Camille; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary; Spackman, Erica; Shepherd, Eric; Killian, Mary; Stallknecht, David

    2012-12-01

    Gulls are widely recognized reservoirs for low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses; however, the subtypes maintained in these populations and/or the transmission mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Although, a wide diversity of influenza viruses have been isolated from gulls, two hemagglutinin subtypes (H13 and H16) are rarely detected in other avian groups, and existing surveillance data suggests they are maintained almost exclusively within gull populations. In order to evaluate the host range of these gull-adapted influenza subtypes and to characterize viral infection in the gull host, we conducted a series of challenge experiments, with multiple North American strains of H13 LPAI virus in ring-billed gulls (Larus delawarensis), mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), chickens (Gallus domesticus), and turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo). The susceptibility to H13 LPAI viruses varied between species and viral strain. Gulls were highly susceptible to H13 LPAI virus infection and excreted virus via the oropharynx and cloaca for several days. The quantity and duration of shedding was similar between the two routes. Turkeys and ducks were resistant to infection with most strains of H13 LPAI virus, but low numbers of inoculated birds were infected after challenge with specific viral strains. Chickens were refractory to infection with all strains of H13 LPAI virus they were challenged with. The experimental results presented herein are consistent with existing surveillance data on H13 LPAI viruses in birds, and indicate that influenza viruses of the H13 subtype are strongly host-adapted to gulls, but rare spill-over into aberrant hosts (i.e., turkeys and ducks) can occur.

  5. The Genetic Diversity of Influenza A Viruses in Wild Birds in Peru.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Martha I; Pollett, Simon; Ghersi, Bruno; Silva, Maria; Simons, Mark P; Icochea, Eliana; Gonzalez, Armando E; Segovia, Karen; Kasper, Matthew R; Montgomery, Joel M; Bausch, Daniel G

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the global ecology of avian influenza A viruses (AIVs) is impeded by historically low levels of viral surveillance in Latin America. Through sampling and whole-genome sequencing of 31 AIVs from wild birds in Peru, we identified 10 HA subtypes (H1-H4, H6-H7, H10-H13) and 8 NA subtypes (N1-N3, N5-N9). The majority of Peruvian AIVs were closely related to AIVs found in North America. However, unusual reassortants, including a H13 virus containing a PA segment related to extremely divergent Argentinian viruses, suggest that substantial AIV diversity circulates undetected throughout South America.

  6. The Genetic Diversity of Influenza A Viruses in Wild Birds in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Martha I.; Pollett, Simon; Ghersi, Bruno; Silva, Maria; Simons, Mark P.; Icochea, Eliana; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Segovia, Karen; Kasper, Matthew R.; Montgomery, Joel M.; Bausch, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the global ecology of avian influenza A viruses (AIVs) is impeded by historically low levels of viral surveillance in Latin America. Through sampling and whole-genome sequencing of 31 AIVs from wild birds in Peru, we identified 10 HA subtypes (H1-H4, H6-H7, H10-H13) and 8 NA subtypes (N1-N3, N5-N9). The majority of Peruvian AIVs were closely related to AIVs found in North America. However, unusual reassortants, including a H13 virus containing a PA segment related to extremely divergent Argentinian viruses, suggest that substantial AIV diversity circulates undetected throughout South America. PMID:26784331

  7. Detection of Evolutionarily Distinct Avian Influenza A Viruses in Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Butler, Jeffrey; Baas, Chantal; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Silva-de-la-Fuente, M. Carolina; Medina-Vogel, Gonzalo; Olsen, Bjorn; Kelso, Anne; Barr, Ian G.; González-Acuña, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Distinct lineages of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) are harbored by spatially segregated birds, yet significant surveillance gaps exist around the globe. Virtually nothing is known from the Antarctic. Using virus culture, molecular analysis, full genome sequencing, and serology of samples from Adélie penguins in Antarctica, we confirmed infection by H11N2 subtype AIVs. Their genetic segments were distinct from all known contemporary influenza viruses, including South American AIVs, suggesting spatial separation from other lineages. Only in the matrix and polymerase acidic gene phylogenies did the Antarctic sequences form a sister relationship to South American AIVs, whereas distant phylogenetic relationships were evident in all other gene segments. Interestingly, their neuraminidase genes formed a distant relationship to all avian and human influenza lineages, and the polymerase basic 1 and polymerase acidic formed a sister relationship to the equine H3N8 influenza virus lineage that emerged during 1963 and whose avian origins were previously unknown. We also estimated that each gene segment had diverged for 49 to 80 years from its most closely related sequences, highlighting a significant gap in our AIV knowledge in the region. We also show that the receptor binding properties of the H11N2 viruses are predominantly avian and that they were unable to replicate efficiently in experimentally inoculated ferrets, suggesting their continuous evolution in avian hosts. These findings add substantially to our understanding of both the ecology and the intra- and intercontinental movement of Antarctic AIVs and highlight the potential risk of an incursion of highly pathogenic AIVs into this fragile environment. PMID:24803521

  8. Sialylated immunoglobulin G can neutralize influenza virus infection through receptor mimicry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Chen, Xueling; Zhao, Conghui; Liu, Xingmu; Zhang, Zaiping; Li, Tongfei; Sun, Ruiman; Gu, Huan; Gu, Jiang

    2016-03-29

    Influenza viruses possess a great threat to human health, but there is still no effective drug to deal with the outbreak of possible new influenza subtypes. In this study, we first fractionated sialylated immunoglobulin G (IgG), mainly Fab sialylated fraction, with sambucus nigra agglutinin affinity chromatography. We then demonstrated that sialylated IgG possessed more effective neutralizing activity against 2009 A (H1N1) subtype than that of IgG mixture, and sialosides on the Fab is crucial in this neutralization reaction as when such residues were removed with neuraminidase A digestion the blocking effect was significantly reduced. It appears that sialic acid residues attached to Fab could serve as binding moieties to receptor binding site of influenza virus. These findings indicate that sialylated IgG probably is an effective anti-influenza broad-spectrum drug utilizing its receptor mimicry to competitively inhibit the attachment of influenza viruses with sialic acid receptors on target cells. This property would be particularly useful if it can be applied to prevent newly emerged influenza virus strain infections in future epidemics.

  9. Pre-infection of pigs with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae induces oxidative stress that influences outcomes of a subsequent infection with a swine influenza virus of H1N1 subtype.

    PubMed

    Deblanc, C; Robert, F; Pinard, T; Gorin, S; Quéguiner, S; Gautier-Bouchardon, A V; Ferré, S; Garraud, J M; Cariolet, R; Brack, M; Simon, G

    2013-03-23

    The severity of swine influenza is highly variable and can be exacerbated by many factors, such as a pre-infection of pigs with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp). The aim of this study was to investigate the oxidative stress induced by Mhp and the impact of this stress on the evolution of an infection with the European avian-like swine H1N1 influenza virus. Two experimental trials (E1 and E2), which differed only by the feed delivered to the animals, were conducted on SPF pigs. In each trial, one group of nine 6-week-old pigs was inoculated intra-tracheally with Mhp and H1N1 at 21 days intervals and a mock-infected group (8 pigs) was included. Clinical signs were observed, blood samples were collected throughout the study and pathogens were detected in nasal swabs and lung tissues. Results indicated that Mhp infection induced an oxidative stress in E1 and E2, but its level was more important in E2 than in E1 three weeks post-Mhp inoculation, before H1N1 infection. In both trials, a strong inflammatory response and a response to the oxidative stress previously induced by Mhp appeared after H1N1 infection. However, the severity of influenza disease was significantly more marked in E2 as compared to E1, as revealed by prolonged hyperthermia, stronger reduction in mean daily weight gain and earlier viral shedding. These results suggested that severity of flu syndrome and reduction in animal performance may vary depending on the level of oxidative stress at the moment of the influenza infection, and that host responses could be influenced by the feed.

  10. Cold-adapted pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza virus live vaccine elicits cross-reactive immune responses against seasonal and H5 influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yo Han; Byun, Young Ho; Lee, Yoon Jae; Lee, Yun Ha; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Seong, Baik Lin

    2012-05-01

    The rapid transmission of the pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza virus (pH1N1) among humans has raised the concern of a potential emergence of reassortment between pH1N1 and highly pathogenic influenza strains, especially the avian H5N1 influenza virus. Here, we report that the cold-adapted pH1N1 live attenuated vaccine (CApH1N1) elicits cross-reactive immunity to seasonal and H5 influenza A viruses in the mouse model. Immunization with CApH1N1 induced both systemic and mucosal antibodies with broad reactivity to seasonal and H5 strains, including HAPI H5N1 and the avian H5N2 virus, providing complete protection against heterologous and heterosubtypic lethal challenges. Our results not only accentuate the merit of using live attenuated influenza virus vaccines in view of cross-reactivity but also represent the potential of CApH1N1 live vaccine for mitigating the clinical severity of infections that arise from reassortments between pH1N1 and highly pathogenic H5 subtype viruses.

  11. A new class of synthetic anti-lipopolysaccharide peptides inhibits influenza A virus replication by blocking cellular attachment.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Julia; Schneider, Carola; Heinbockel, Lena; Brandenburg, Klaus; Reimer, Rudolph; Gabriel, Gülsah

    2014-04-01

    Influenza A viruses are a continuous threat to human health as illustrated by the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Since circulating influenza virus strains become increasingly resistant against currently available drugs, the development of novel antivirals is urgently needed. Here, we have evaluated a recently described new class of broad-spectrum antiviral peptides (synthetic anti-lipopolysaccharide peptides; SALPs) for their potential to inhibit influenza virus replication in vitro and in vivo. We found that particularly SALP PEP 19-2.5 shows high binding affinities for the influenza virus receptor molecule, N-Acetylneuraminic acid, leading to impaired viral attachment and cellular entry. As a result, replication of several influenza virus subtypes (H7N7, H3N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1) was strongly reduced. Furthermore, mice co-treated with PEP 19-2.5 were protected against an otherwise 100% lethal H7N7 influenza virus infection. These findings show that SALPs exhibit antiviral activity against influenza viruses by blocking virus attachment and entry into host cells. Thus, SALPs present a new class of broad-spectrum antiviral peptides for further development for influenza virus therapy. PMID:24486207

  12. Broadly neutralizing antibodies against influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Nick S.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite available antivirals and vaccines, influenza infections continue to be a major cause of mortality worldwide. Vaccination generally induces an effective, but strain-specific antibody response. As the virus continually evolves, new vaccines have to be administered almost annually when a novel strain becomes dominant. Furthermore, the sporadic emerging resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors among circulating strains suggests an urgent need for new therapeutic agents. Recently, several cross-reactive antibodies have been described, which neutralize an unprecedented spectrum of influenza viruses. These broadly neutralizing antibodies generally target conserved functional regions on the major influenza surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA). The characterization of their neutralization breadth and epitopes on HA could stimulate the development of new antibody-based antivirals and broader influenza vaccines. PMID:23583287

  13. Influenza A virus transmission via respiratory aerosols or droplets as it relates to pandemic potential.

    PubMed

    Richard, Mathilde; Fouchier, Ron A M

    2016-01-01

    Many respiratory viruses of humans originate from animals. For instance, there are now eight paramyxoviruses, four coronaviruses and four orthomxoviruses that cause recurrent epidemics in humans but were once confined to other hosts. In the last decade, several members of the same virus families have jumped the species barrier from animals to humans. Fortunately, these viruses have not become established in humans, because they lacked the ability of sustained transmission between humans. However, these outbreaks highlighted the lack of understanding of what makes a virus transmissible. In part triggered by the relatively high frequency of occurrence of influenza A virus zoonoses and pandemics, the influenza research community has started to investigate the viral genetic and biological traits that drive virus transmission via aerosols or respiratory droplets between mammals. Here we summarize recent discoveries on the genetic and phenotypic traits required for airborne transmission of zoonotic influenza viruses of subtypes H5, H7 and H9 and pandemic viruses of subtypes H1, H2 and H3. Increased understanding of the determinants and mechanisms of respiratory virus transmission is not only key from a basic scientific perspective, but may also aid in assessing the risks posed by zoonotic viruses to human health, and preparedness for such risks. PMID:26385895

  14. Influenza A virus transmission via respiratory aerosols or droplets as it relates to pandemic potential.

    PubMed

    Richard, Mathilde; Fouchier, Ron A M

    2016-01-01

    Many respiratory viruses of humans originate from animals. For instance, there are now eight paramyxoviruses, four coronaviruses and four orthomxoviruses that cause recurrent epidemics in humans but were once confined to other hosts. In the last decade, several members of the same virus families have jumped the species barrier from animals to humans. Fortunately, these viruses have not become established in humans, because they lacked the ability of sustained transmission between humans. However, these outbreaks highlighted the lack of understanding of what makes a virus transmissible. In part triggered by the relatively high frequency of occurrence of influenza A virus zoonoses and pandemics, the influenza research community has started to investigate the viral genetic and biological traits that drive virus transmission via aerosols or respiratory droplets between mammals. Here we summarize recent discoveries on the genetic and phenotypic traits required for airborne transmission of zoonotic influenza viruses of subtypes H5, H7 and H9 and pandemic viruses of subtypes H1, H2 and H3. Increased understanding of the determinants and mechanisms of respiratory virus transmission is not only key from a basic scientific perspective, but may also aid in assessing the risks posed by zoonotic viruses to human health, and preparedness for such risks.

  15. Experimental assessment of houseflies as vectors in avian influenza subtype H5N1 transmission in chickens.

    PubMed

    Wanaratana, S; Amonsin, A; Chaisingh, A; Panyim, S; Sasipreeyajan, J; Pakpinyo, S

    2013-06-01

    In this study, laboratory-reared houseflies were experimentally exposed to the high pathogenicity avian influenza virus (HPAI) subtype H5N1 virus to evaluate the houseflies as vectors in HPAI-H5N1 virus transmission in chickens. One hundred and fifty houseflies (Musca domestica L.) were equally allocated into three groups. Groups 2 and 3 were exposed to the HPAI-H5N1 virus by allowing the flies to consume food containing the virus for 15 min, while the flies in group 1 were allowed to consume H5N1-free food and would serve as a negative control group. Group 2 flies were euthanatized immediately after H5N1 exposure, while group 3 were held at room temperature for 24 hr and euthanatized. The houseflies in the transmission of the HPAI-H5N1 virus were examined by challenging three groups of housefly homogenates into layer chickens via the oral drop. Morbidity and mortality were observed for 14 days, and virus shedding monitored via oropharyngeal swabs (OS) and cloacal swabs (CS), which were collected daily and determined by real-time reverse transcription-PCR and virus titration. Experimental challenge showed that all the chickens of groups 2 and 3 died within 7 days of inoculation. The OS had higher concentrations of virus than CS. Moreover, the chickens of group 2 had higher concentrations of virus shedding than the chickens of group 3. Immunohistochemistry detected the nucleoprotein of the type A influenza virus in all tissue samples collected, including the trachea, duodenum, pancreas, and brain. In summary, this study demonstrates that houseflies could serve as vectors in HPAI-H5N1 virus transmission in chickens under experimental conditions.

  16. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of H7N3 avian influenza viruses isolated from poultry in Pakistan 1995-2004

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian Influenza Viruses (AIV) are among the most prominent emerging viruses affecting animal and public health. This report was designed to explore the genetic variation, which has occurred among AIVs of the H7N3 subtype in the Northeast, Central and Southern Regions of Pakistan during the last dec...

  17. Characaterization of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses isolated from poultry in Pakistan 2006-2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nine avian influenza viruses (AIV), H5N1 subtype, were isolated from dead poultry in the Karachi region of Pakistan from 2006-2008. The intravenous pathogenicity indices and HA protein cleavage sites of all nine viruses were consistent with highly pathogenic AIV. Based on phylogenetic analysis of ...

  18. Vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease is influenced by hemagglutinin and neuraminidase in whole inactivated influenza virus vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple subtypes and many antigenic variants of influenza A virus (IAV) co-circulate in swine in the USA, complicating effective use of commercial vaccines to control disease and transmission. Whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines may provide partial protection against IAV with substantial antigen...

  19. Serologic evidence of influenza A (H14) virus introduction into North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Latorre-Margalef, Neus; Ramey, Andy M.; Fojtik, Alinde; Stallknecht, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Although a diverse population of influenza A viruses (IAVs) is maintained among ducks, geese, shorebirds, and gulls, not all of the 16 avian hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes are equally represented (1). The 14th HA subtype, commonly known as the H14 subtype, was historically limited to isolates from the former Soviet Union in the 1980s (2) and was not subsequently detected until 2010, when isolated in Wisconsin, USA from long-tailed ducks and a white-winged scoter (3–5). In the United States, the H14 subtype has since been isolated in California (6), Mississippi, and Texas (7); and has been reported in waterfowl in Guatemala (7). In this study, we examined whether there was serologic evidence of H14 spread among ducks in North America before (2006–2010) and after (2011–2014) the initial detection of the H14 subtype virus on this continent.

  20. Persistence of Avian Influenza Viruses in Lake Sediment, Duck Feces, and Duck Meat ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nazir, Jawad; Haumacher, Renate; Ike, Anthony C.; Marschang, Rachel E.

    2011-01-01

    The persistence of 3 low-pathogenicity avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) (H4N6, H5N1, and H6N8) and one human influenza virus (H1N1) as well as Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and enteric cytopathogenic bovine orphan (ECBO) virus was investigated in lake sediment, duck feces, and duck meat at 30, 20, 10, and 0°C using a germ carrier technique. Virus-loaded germ carriers were incubated in each substrate, and residual infectivity of the eluted virus was quantified on cell culture after regular intervals for a maximum of 24 weeks. Data were analyzed by a linear regression model to calculate T90 values (time required for 90% loss of virus infectivity) and estimated persistence of the viruses. In general, the persistence of all of the viruses was highest in lake sediment, followed by feces, and was the lowest in duck meat at all temperatures. For the avian influenza virus subtypes, T90 values in sediment ranged from 5 to 11, 13 to 18, 43 to 54, and 66 to 394 days at 30, 20, 10, and 0°C, respectively, which were 2 to 5 times higher than the T90 values of the viruses in the feces and meat. Although the individual viruses vary in tenacity, the survival time of influenza viruses was shorter than that of NDV and ECBO virus in all substrates. The results of this study suggest that lake sediment may act as a long-term source of influenza viruses in the aquatic habitat, while the viruses may remain infectious for extended periods of time in duck feces and meat at low temperatures, allowing persistence of the viruses in the environment over winter. PMID:21622783

  1. Detection and typing of human-infecting influenza viruses in China by using a multiplex DNA biochip assay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongqiang; Qu, Jiuxin; Ba, Qi; Dong, Jiuhong; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Hong; Wu, Aiping; Wang, Dayan; Xia, Zanxian; Peng, Daxin; Shu, Yuelong; Cao, Bin; Jiang, Taijiao

    2016-08-01

    Rapid identification of the infections of specific subtypes of influenza viruses is critical for patient treatment and pandemic control. Here we report the application of multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) coupled with membrane-based DNA biochip to the detection and discrimination of the type (A and B) and subtype (human H1N1, human H3N2, avian H5N1 and avian H7N9) of influenza viruses in circulation in China. A multiplex one-step RT-PCR assay was designed to simultaneously amplify the HA and NA genes of the four subtypes of influenza A viruses and NS genes to discriminate type A and B viruses. PCR products were analyzed by a membrane-based biochip. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was determined at a range of 2-100 copies/reactions for each of the gene transcripts. Eighty one clinical samples, containing 66 positive samples with evident seasonal influenza virus infections, were tested, which gives the clinical sensitivity and specificity of 95.5% and 100% respectively. For the avian influenza samples, 3 out of 4 H5N1 samples and 2 out of 2 H7N9 avian samples were correctly identified. We argue this method could allow a rapid, reliable and inexpensive detection and differentiation of human-infecting influenza viruses. PMID:27150046

  2. Standard trivalent influenza virus protein vaccination does not prime antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in macaques.

    PubMed

    Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Amarasena, Thakshila H; Laurie, Karen L; Tan, Hyon-Xhi; Butler, Jeff; Parsons, Matthew S; Alcantara, Sheilajen; Petravic, Janka; Davenport, Miles P; Hurt, Aeron C; Reading, Patrick C; Kent, Stephen J

    2013-12-01

    Yearly vaccination with the trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) is recommended, since current vaccines induce little cross neutralization to divergent influenza strains. Whether the TIV can induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) responses that can cross-recognize divergent influenza virus strains is unknown. We immunized 6 influenza-naive pigtail macaques twice with the 2011-2012 season TIV and then challenged the macaques, along with 12 control macaques, serially with H1N1 and H3N2 viruses. We measured ADCC responses in plasma to a panel of H1 and H3 hemagglutinin (HA) proteins and influenza virus-specific CD8 T cell (CTL) responses using a sensitive major histocompatibility complex (MHC) tetramer reagent. The TIV was weakly immunogenic and, although binding antibodies were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), did not induce detectable influenza virus-specific ADCC or CTL responses. The H1N1 challenge elicited robust ADCC to both homologous and heterologous H1 HA proteins, but not influenza virus HA proteins from different subtypes (H2 to H7). There was no anamnestic influenza virus-specific ADCC or CTL response in vaccinated animals. The subsequent H3N2 challenge did not induce or boost ADCC either to H1 HA proteins or to divergent H3 proteins but did boost CTL responses. ADCC or CTL responses were not induced by TIV vaccination in influenza-naive macaques. There was a marked difference in the ability of infection compared to that of vaccination to induce cross-reactive ADCC and CTL responses. Improved vaccination strategies are needed to induce broad-based ADCC immunity to influenza.

  3. Prevalence and risk factors for H1N1 and H3N2 influenza A virus infections in Minnesota turkey premises.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Cesar A; Gramer, Marie; Lauer, Dale; Davies, Peter R

    2012-09-01

    Influenza virus infections can cause respiratory and systemic disease of variable severity and also result in economic losses for the turkey industry. Several subtypes of influenza can infect turkeys, causing diverse clinical signs. Influenza subtypes of swine origin have been diagnosed in turkey premises; however, it is not known how common these infections are nor the likely routes of transmission. We conducted a cross-sectional study to estimate the prevalence of influenza viruses and examine factors associated with infection on Minnesota turkey premises. Results from influenza diagnostic tests and turkey and pig premise location data were obtained from the Minnesota Poultry Testing Laboratory and the Minnesota Board of Animal Health, respectively, from January 2007 to September 2008. Diagnostic data from 356 premises were obtained, of which 17 premises tested positive for antibodies to influenza A virus by agar gel immunodiffusion assay and were confirmed as either H1N1 or H3N2 influenza viruses by hemagglutination and neuraminidase inhibition assays. Influenza infection status was associated with proximity to pig premises and flock size. The latter had a sparing effect on influenza status. This study suggests that H1N1 and H3N2 influenza virus infections of turkey premises in Minnesota are an uncommon event. The route of influenza virus transmission could not be determined; however, the findings suggest that airborne transmission should be considered in future studies.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide subtypes of Haemophilus influenzae type b from an outbreak of invasive disease.

    PubMed Central

    Inzana, T J; Pichichero, M E

    1984-01-01

    Thirty isolates of Haemophilus influenzae type b were obtained during an outbreak of invasive H. influenzae type b disease and were classified by the electrophoretic profile of their lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The LPS was extracted by a rapid micromethod and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. The isolates could be divided into 1 of 14 subtypes based on the profile of two to four bands. No subtype was predominant. However, all isolates obtained from duplicate sites of the same individual were of the same subtype. Isolates obtained from two patients (6 weeks apart) who attended the same day-care center differed in LPS subtype but were identical in their major outer membrane protein electrophoretic profile. Nasopharyngeal cultures were obtained from healthy children, their immediate families, and employees of the day-care center. Of 13 H. influenzae isolates examined from these contacts, only 1 was type b, which was obtained from a day-care worker and had the same LPS subtype and major outer membrane protein electrophoretic profile as one of the disease isolates. The remaining nasopharyngeal isolates were untypable, and most, but not all, were different in LPS pattern. Thus, LPS subtyping of H. influenzae type b may be useful in examining the predominance or transmission of a strain during an outbreak and may distinguish some strains not differentiated by outer membrane protein pattern. Images PMID:6333433

  5. Inhibition of influenza virus infection and hemagglutinin cleavage by the protease inhibitor HAI-2

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Brian S.; Chung, Changik; Cyphers, Soreen Y.; Rinaldi, Vera D.; Marcano, Valerie C.; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Biochemical and cell biological analysis of HAI-2 as an inhibitor of influenza HA cleavage activation. • Biochemical and cell biological analysis of HAI-2 as an inhibitor of influenza virus infection. • Comparative analysis of HAI-2 for vesicular stomatitis virus and human parainfluenza virus type-1. • Analysis of the activity of HAI-2 in a mouse model of influenza. - Abstract: Influenza virus remains a significant concern to public health, with the continued potential for a high fatality pandemic. Vaccination and antiviral therapeutics are effective measures to circumvent influenza virus infection, however, multiple strains have emerged that are resistant to the antiviral therapeutics currently on the market. With this considered, investigation of alternative antiviral therapeutics is being conducted. One such approach is to inhibit cleavage activation of the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA), which is an essential step in the viral replication cycle that permits viral-endosome fusion. Therefore, targeting trypsin-like, host proteases responsible for HA cleavage in vivo may prove to be an effective therapeutic. Hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor 2 (HAI-2) is naturally expressed in the respiratory tract and is a potent inhibitor of trypsin-like serine proteases, some of which have been determined to cleave HA. In this study, we demonstrate that HAI-2 is an effective inhibitor of cleavage of HA from the human-adapted H1 and H3 subtypes. HAI-2 inhibited influenza virus H1N1 infection in cell culture, and HAI-2 administration showed protection in a mouse model of influenza. HAI-2 has the potential to be an effective, alternative antiviral therapeutic for influenza.

  6. Nasal commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis counteracts influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Wen; Liu, Pei-Feng; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Kuo, Sherwin; Zhang, Xing-Quan; Schooley, Robert T; Rohde, Holger; Gallo, Richard L; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2016-06-16

    Several microbes, including Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis), a Gram-positive bacterium, live inside the human nasal cavity as commensals. The role of these nasal commensals in host innate immunity is largely unknown, although bacterial interference in the nasal microbiome may promote ecological competition between commensal bacteria and pathogenic species. We demonstrate here that S. epidermidis culture supernatants significantly suppressed the infectivity of various influenza viruses. Using high-performance liquid chromatography together with mass spectrometry, we identified a giant extracellular matrix-binding protein (Embp) as the major component involved in the anti-influenza effect of S. epidermidis. This anti-influenza activity was abrogated when Embp was mutated, confirming that Embp is essential for S. epidermidis activity against viral infection. We also showed that both S. epidermidis bacterial particles and Embp can directly bind to influenza virus. Furthermore, the injection of a recombinant Embp fragment containing a fibronectin-binding domain into embryonated eggs increased the survival rate of virus-infected chicken embryos. For an in vivo challenge study, prior Embp intranasal inoculation in chickens suppressed the viral titres and induced the expression of antiviral cytokines in the nasal tissues. These results suggest that S. epidermidis in the nasal cavity may serve as a defence mechanism against influenza virus infection.

  7. Nasal commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis counteracts influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui-Wen; Liu, Pei-Feng; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Kuo, Sherwin; Zhang, Xing-Quan; Schooley, Robert T.; Rohde, Holger; Gallo, Richard L.; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Several microbes, including Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis), a Gram-positive bacterium, live inside the human nasal cavity as commensals. The role of these nasal commensals in host innate immunity is largely unknown, although bacterial interference in the nasal microbiome may promote ecological competition between commensal bacteria and pathogenic species. We demonstrate here that S. epidermidis culture supernatants significantly suppressed the infectivity of various influenza viruses. Using high-performance liquid chromatography together with mass spectrometry, we identified a giant extracellular matrix-binding protein (Embp) as the major component involved in the anti-influenza effect of S. epidermidis. This anti-influenza activity was abrogated when Embp was mutated, confirming that Embp is essential for S. epidermidis activity against viral infection. We also showed that both S. epidermidis bacterial particles and Embp can directly bind to influenza virus. Furthermore, the injection of a recombinant Embp fragment containing a fibronectin-binding domain into embryonated eggs increased the survival rate of virus-infected chicken embryos. For an in vivo challenge study, prior Embp intranasal inoculation in chickens suppressed the viral titres and induced the expression of antiviral cytokines in the nasal tissues. These results suggest that S. epidermidis in the nasal cavity may serve as a defence mechanism against influenza virus infection. PMID:27306590

  8. Rapid detection and differentiation of swine-origin influenza A virus (H1N1/2009) from other seasonal influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiangqin; Wang, Xue; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Zhang, Panhe; Tang, Wei; Ye, Zhiping; Eichelberger, Maryna; Hewlett, Indira

    2012-11-09

    We previously developed a rapid and simple gold nanoparticle(NP)-based genomic microarray assay for identification of the avian H5N1 virus and its discrimination from other influenza A virus strains (H1N1, H3N2). In this study, we expanded the platform to detect the 2009 swine-origin influenza A virus (H1N1/2009). Multiple specific capture and intermediate oligonucleotides were designed for the matrix (M), hemagglutinin (HA), and neuraminidase (NA) genes of the H1N1/2009 virus. The H1N1/2009 microarrays were printed in the same format as those of the seasonal influenza H1N1 and H3N2 for the HA, NA, and M genes. Viral RNA was tested using capture-target-intermediate oligonucleotide hybridization and gold NP-mediated silver staining. The signal from the 4 capture-target-intermediates of the HA and NA genes was specific for H1N1/2009 virus and showed no cross hybridization with viral RNA from other influenza strains H1N1, H3N2, and H5N1. All of the 3 M gene captures showed strong affinity with H1N1/2009 viral RNA, with 2 out of the 3 M gene captures showing cross hybridization with the H1N1, H3N2, and H5N1 samples tested. The current assay was able to detect H1N1/2009 and distinguish it from other influenza A viruses. This new method may be useful for simultaneous detection and subtyping of influenza A viruses and can be rapidly modified to detect other emerging influenza strains in public health settings.

  9. Human T-cells directed to seasonal influenza A virus cross-react with 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) and swine-origin triple-reassortant H3N2 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Hillaire, Marine L B; Vogelzang-van Trierum, Stella E; Kreijtz, Joost H C M; de Mutsert, Gerrie; Fouchier, Ron A M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2013-03-01

    Virus-specific CD8(+) T-cells contribute to protective immunity against influenza A virus (IAV) infections. As the majority of these cells are directed to conserved viral proteins, they may afford protection against IAVs of various subtypes. The present study assessed the cross-reactivity of human CD8(+) T-lymphocytes, induced by infection with seasonal A (H1N1) or A (H3N2) influenza virus, with 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus [A(H1N1)pdm09] and swine-origin triple-reassortant A (H3N2) [A(H3N2)v] viruses that are currently causing an increasing number of human cases in the USA. It was demonstrated that CD8(+) T-cells induced after seasonal IAV infections exerted lytic activity and produced gamma interferon upon in vitro restimulation with A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2)v influenza A viruses. Furthermore, CD8(+) T-cells directed to A(H1N1)pdm09 virus displayed a high degree of cross-reactivity with A(H3N2)v viruses. It was concluded that cross-reacting T-cells had the potential to afford protective immunity against A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses during the pandemic and offer some degree of protection against infection with A(H3N2)v viruses.

  10. The serial intervals of seasonal and pandemic influenza viruses in households in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Levy, Jens W; Cowling, Benjamin J; Simmerman, James M; Olsen, Sonja J; Fang, Vicky J; Suntarattiwong, Piyarat; Jarman, Richard G; Klick, Brendan; Chotipitayasunondh, Tawee

    2013-06-15

    The serial interval (SI) of human influenza virus infections is often described by a single distribution. Understanding sources of variation in the SI could provide valuable information for understanding influenza transmission dynamics. Using data from a randomized household study of nonpharmaceutical interventions to prevent influenza transmission in Bangkok, Thailand, over 34 months between 2008 and 2011, we estimated the influence of influenza virus type/subtype and other characteristics of 251 pediatric index cases and their 315 infected household contacts on estimates of household SI. The mean SI for all households was 3.3 days. Relative to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 (3.1 days), the SI for influenza B (3.7 days) was 22% longer (95% confidence interval: 4, 43), or about half a day. The SIs for influenza viruses A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) were similar to that for A(H1N1)pdm09. SIs were shortest for older index cases (age 11-14 years) and for younger infected household contacts (age ≤15 years). Greater time spent in proximity to the index child was associated with shorter SIs. Differences in the SI might reflect differences in incubation period, viral shedding, contact, or susceptibility. These findings could improve parameterization of mathematical models to better predict the impact of epidemic or pandemic influenza mitigation strategies.

  11. The serial intervals of seasonal and pandemic influenza viruses in households in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Levy, Jens W; Cowling, Benjamin J; Simmerman, James M; Olsen, Sonja J; Fang, Vicky J; Suntarattiwong, Piyarat; Jarman, Richard G; Klick, Brendan; Chotipitayasunondh, Tawee

    2013-06-15

    The serial interval (SI) of human influenza virus infections is often described by a single distribution. Understanding sources of variation in the SI could provide valuable information for understanding influenza transmission dynamics. Using data from a randomized household study of nonpharmaceutical interventions to prevent influenza transmission in Bangkok, Thailand, over 34 months between 2008 and 2011, we estimated the influence of influenza virus type/subtype and other characteristics of 251 pediatric index cases and their 315 infected household contacts on estimates of household SI. The mean SI for all households was 3.3 days. Relative to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 (3.1 days), the SI for influenza B (3.7 days) was 22% longer (95% confidence interval: 4, 43), or about half a day. The SIs for influenza viruses A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) were similar to that for A(H1N1)pdm09. SIs were shortest for older index cases (age 11-14 years) and for younger infected household contacts (age ≤15 years). Greater time spent in proximity to the index child was associated with shorter SIs. Differences in the SI might reflect differences in incubation period, viral shedding, contact, or susceptibility. These findings could improve parameterization of mathematical models to better predict the impact of epidemic or pandemic influenza mitigation strategies. PMID:23629874

  12. Kinetics of Coinfection with Influenza A Virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Amber M.; Adler, Frederick R.; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; McAuley, Julie L.; McCullers, Jonathan A.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2013-03-21

    Secondary bacterial infections are a leading cause of illness and death during epidemic and pandemic influenza. Experimental studies suggest a lethal synergism between influenza and certain bacteria, particularly Streptococcus pneumoniae, but the precise processes involved are unclear. In this paper, to address the mechanisms and determine the influences of pathogen dose and strain on disease, we infected groups of mice with either the H1N1 subtype influenza A virus A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) or a version expressing the 1918 PB1-F2 protein (PR8-PB1-F2(1918)), followed seven days later with one of two S. pneumoniae strains, type 2 D39 or type 3 A66.1. We determined that, following bacterial infection, viral titers initially rebound and then decline slowly. Bacterial titers rapidly rise to high levels and remain elevated. We used a kinetic model to explore the coupled interactions and study the dominant controlling mechanisms. We hypothesize that viral titers rebound in the presence of bacteria due to enhanced viral release from infected cells, and that bacterial titers increase due to alveolar macrophage impairment. Dynamics are affected by initial bacterial dose but not by the expression of the influenza 1918 PB1-F2 protein. Finally, our model provides a framework to investigate pathogen interaction during coinfections and to uncover dynamical differences based on inoculum size and strain.

  13. Kinetics of Coinfection with Influenza A Virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Amber M.; Adler, Frederick R.; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; McAuley, Julie L.; McCullers, Jonathan A.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2013-03-21

    Secondary bacterial infections are a leading cause of illness and death during epidemic and pandemic influenza. Experimental studies suggest a lethal synergism between influenza and certain bacteria, particularly Streptococcus pneumoniae, but the precise processes involved are unclear. In this paper, to address the mechanisms and determine the influences of pathogen dose and strain on disease, we infected groups of mice with either the H1N1 subtype influenza A virus A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) or a version expressing the 1918 PB1-F2 protein (PR8-PB1-F2(1918)), followed seven days later with one of two S. pneumoniae strains, type 2 D39 or type 3 A66.1. We determinedmore » that, following bacterial infection, viral titers initially rebound and then decline slowly. Bacterial titers rapidly rise to high levels and remain elevated. We used a kinetic model to explore the coupled interactions and study the dominant controlling mechanisms. We hypothesize that viral titers rebound in the presence of bacteria due to enhanced viral release from infected cells, and that bacterial titers increase due to alveolar macrophage impairment. Dynamics are affected by initial bacterial dose but not by the expression of the influenza 1918 PB1-F2 protein. Finally, our model provides a framework to investigate pathogen interaction during coinfections and to uncover dynamical differences based on inoculum size and strain.« less

  14. [Differentiation of matrix proteins of influenza A viruses using enzyme immunoassay].

    PubMed

    Mohr, C; Döhner, L; Herrmann, B; Herrmann, H

    1978-01-01

    Matrix protein is known as a type-specific structural protein of influenza viruses. An attempt has been made to find out whether or not strain-specific components could be detected from matrix protein, in addition to its type-specific antigen determinants. The technique of enzyme immune assay was chosen as the optional method to differentiate between matrix proteins of various influenza-A viruses. Antigen titration was undertaken of several matrix proteins, using two specific anti-matrix-protein sera in each case. Information regarding serological relationships between the tested matrix proteins of various influenza-A viruses was obtained from a quotient between the titres of one antigen, on the one hand, and the two anti-matrix-protein sera used in titration, on the other. Two matrix protein sub-types were established in the context of the influenza-A viruses tested. Sub-type M1 was attributable to older strains (A/PR/8 and A/FM/1), whereas the matrix protein of sub-type M2 was found to be present in more recent strains (A/Hongkong and A/Port Chalmers).

  15. Influenza surveillance in birds in Italian wetlands (1992-1998): is there a host restricted circulation of influenza viruses in sympatric ducks and coots?

    PubMed

    De Marco, M A; Campitelli, L; Foni, E; Raffini, E; Barigazzi, G; Delogu, M; Guberti, V; Di Trani, L; Tollis, M; Donatelli, I

    2004-03-01

    We report the results of a 6-year serological and virological monitoring performed in ducks and coots in Italy, in order to assess the degree of influenza A virus circulation in these birds during wintering. A total of 1039 sera collected from 1992 to 1998 was screened by a double antibody sandwich blocking ELISA (NP-ELISA): seroprevalence of antibodies to influenza A viruses was significantly higher in ducks compared to coots (52.2% vs. 7.1%, respectively). The hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assay, performed on NP-ELISA positive sera, showed that 16.9% of these duck sera and 33.3% of these coot sera had antibodies to at least one influenza virus HA subtype: ducks showed HI antibodies against most of the HA subtypes, except for the H3, H4, H7, and H12; coots were seropositive to the H3 and H10 subtypes, only. From 1993 to 1998, 22 virus strains were obtained from 802 cloacal swabs, with an overall virus isolation frequency of 2.7%. Viruses belonging to the H1N1 subtype were by far the most commonly circulating strains (18/22) and were isolated mainly from ducks (17/18). The remaining viruses were representative of the H10N8, H5N2 and H3N8 subtypes. Our data indicate some differences between influenza A virus circulation in sympatric ducks and coots and a significant antigenic diversity between some reference strains and viruses recently isolated in Italy. PMID:15036528

  16. Influenza surveillance in birds in Italian wetlands (1992-1998): is there a host restricted circulation of influenza viruses in sympatric ducks and coots?

    PubMed

    De Marco, M A; Campitelli, L; Foni, E; Raffini, E; Barigazzi, G; Delogu, M; Guberti, V; Di Trani, L; Tollis, M; Donatelli, I

    2004-03-01

    We report the results of a 6-year serological and virological monitoring performed in ducks and coots in Italy, in order to assess the degree of influenza A virus circulation in these birds during wintering. A total of 1039 sera collected from 1992 to 1998 was screened by a double antibody sandwich blocking ELISA (NP-ELISA): seroprevalence of antibodies to influenza A viruses was significantly higher in ducks compared to coots (52.2% vs. 7.1%, respectively). The hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assay, performed on NP-ELISA positive sera, showed that 16.9% of these duck sera and 33.3% of these coot sera had antibodies to at least one influenza virus HA subtype: ducks showed HI antibodies against most of the HA subtypes, except for the H3, H4, H7, and H12; coots were seropositive to the H3 and H10 subtypes, only. From 1993 to 1998, 22 virus strains were obtained from 802 cloacal swabs, with an overall virus isolation frequency of 2.7%. Viruses belonging to the H1N1 subtype were by far the most commonly circulating strains (18/22) and were isolated mainly from ducks (17/18). The remaining viruses were representative of the H10N8, H5N2 and H3N8 subtypes. Our data indicate some differences between influenza A virus circulation in sympatric ducks and coots and a significant antigenic diversity between some reference strains and viruses recently isolated in Italy.

  17. Cross Protection against Influenza A Virus by Yeast-Expressed Heterologous Tandem Repeat M2 Extracellular Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Young-Tae; Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Jongsang; Kim, Cheol; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-01-01

    The influenza M2 ectodomain (M2e) is well conserved across human influenza A subtypes, but there are few residue changes among avian and swine origin influenza A viruses. We expressed a tandem repeat construct of heterologous M2e sequences (M2e5x) derived from human, swine, and avian origin influenza A viruses using the yeast expression system. Intramuscular immunization of mice with AS04-adjuvanted M2e5x protein vaccines was effective in inducing M2e-specific antibodies reactive to M2e peptide and native M2 proteins on the infected cells with human, swine, or avian influenza virus, mucosal and systemic memory cellular immune responses, and cross-protection against H3N2 virus. Importantly, M2e5x immune sera were found to confer protection against different subtypes of H1N1 and H5N1 influenza A viruses in naïve mice. Also, M2e5x-immune complexes of virus-infected cells stimulated macrophages to secrete cytokines via Fc receptors, indicating a possible mechanism of protection. The present study provides evidence that M2e5x proteins produced in yeast cells could be developed as a potential universal influenza vaccine. PMID:26366729

  18. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Infection of Mallards with Homo- and Heterosubtypic Immunity Induced by Low Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Fereidouni, Sasan R.; Starick, Elke; Beer, Martin; Wilking, Hendrik; Kalthoff, Donata; Grund, Christian; Häuslaigner, Rafaela; Breithaupt, Angele; Lange, Elke; Harder, Timm C.

    2009-01-01

    The potential role of wild birds as carriers of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) subtype H5N1 is still a matter of debate. Consecutive or simultaneous infections with different subtypes of influenza viruses of low pathogenicity (LPAIV) are very common in wild duck populations. To better understand the epidemiology and pathogenesis of HPAIV H5N1 infections in natural ecosystems, we investigated the influence of prior infection of mallards with homo- (H5N2) and heterosubtypic (H4N6) LPAIV on exposure to HPAIV H5N1. In mallards with homosubtypic immunity induced by LPAIV infection, clinical disease was absent and shedding of HPAIV from respiratory and intestinal tracts was grossly reduced compared to the heterosubtypic and control groups (mean GEC/100 µl at 3 dpi: 3.0×102 vs. 2.3×104 vs. 8.7×104; p<0.05). Heterosubtypic immunity induced by an H4N6 infection mediated a similar but less pronounced effect. We conclude that the epidemiology of HPAIV H5N1 in mallards and probably other aquatic wild bird species is massively influenced by interfering immunity induced by prior homo- and heterosubtypic LPAIV infections. PMID:19693268

  19. DESC1 and MSPL Activate Influenza A Viruses and Emerging Coronaviruses for Host Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Zmora, Pawel; Blazejewska, Paulina; Moldenhauer, Anna-Sophie; Welsch, Kathrin; Nehlmeier, Inga; Wu, Qingyu; Schneider, Heike; Bertram, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) TMPRSS2 cleaves and activates the influenza virus and coronavirus surface proteins. Expression of TMPRSS2 is essential for the spread and pathogenesis of H1N1 influenza viruses in mice. In contrast, H3N2 viruses are less dependent on TMPRSS2 for viral amplification, suggesting that these viruses might employ other TTSPs for their activation. Here, we analyzed TTSPs, reported to be expressed in the respiratory system, for the ability to activate influenza viruses and coronaviruses. We found that MSPL and, to a lesser degree, DESC1 are expressed in human lung tissue and cleave and activate the spike proteins of the Middle East respiratory syndrome and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronaviruses for cell-cell and virus-cell fusion. In addition, we show that these proteases support the spread of all influenza virus subtypes previously pandemic in humans. In sum, we identified two host cell proteases that could promote the amplification of influenza viruses and emerging coronaviruses in humans and might constitute targets for antiviral intervention. IMPORTANCE Activation of influenza viruses by host cell proteases is essential for viral infectivity and the enzymes responsible are potential targets for antiviral intervention. The present study demonstrates that two cellular serine proteases, DESC1 and MSPL, activate influenza viruses and emerging coronaviruses in cell culture and, because of their expression in human lung tissue, might promote viral spread in the infected host. Antiviral strategies aiming to prevent viral activation might thus need to encompass inhibitors targeting MSPL and DESC1. PMID:25122802

  20. Surveillance of avian influenza viruses in migratory birds in Egypt, 2003-09.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Atef; Saad, Magdi; Elassal, Emad; Amir, Ehab; Plathonoff, Chantal; Bahgat, Verina; El-Badry, Maha; Ahmed, Lu'ay S; Fouda, Mostafa; Gamaleldin, Mohammed; Mohamed, Nahed Abd-Elal; Salyer, Stephanie; Cornelius, Claire; Barthel, Robert

    2012-07-01

    Migratory (particularly aquatic) birds are the major natural reservoirs for type A influenza viruses. However, their role in transmitting highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses is unclear. Egypt is a "funnel" zone of wild bird migration pathways from Central Asia and Europe to Eastern and Central Africa ending in South Africa. We sought to detect and isolate avian influenza viruses in migratory birds in Egypt. During September 2003-February 2009, the US Naval Medical Research Unit Number 3, Cairo, Egypt, in collaboration with the Egyptian Ministry of Environment, obtained cloacal swabs from 7,894 migratory birds captured or shot by hunters in different geographic areas in Egypt. Samples were processed by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR for detection of the influenza A matrix gene. Positive samples were processed for virus isolation in specific-pathogen-free embryonated eggs and isolates were subtyped by PCR and partial sequencing. Ninety-five species of birds were collected. Predominant species were Green-Winged Teal (Anas carolinensis; 32.0%, n=2,528), Northern Shoveler (Anas clypeata; 21.4%, n=1,686), and Northern Pintail (Anas acuta; 11.1%, n=877). Of the 7,894 samples, 745 (9.4%) were positive for the influenza A matrix gene (mainly from the above predominant species). Thirteen of the 745 (1.7%) were H5-positive by PCR (11 were low-pathogenic avian influenza and two were HPAI H5N1). The prevalences of influenza A was among regions were 10-15%, except in Middle Egypt (4%). Thirty-nine influenza isolates were obtained from PCR-positive samples. Seventeen subtypes of avian influenza viruses (including H5N1 and H7N7) were classified from 39 isolates using PCR and partial sequencing. Only one HPAI H5N1 was isolated in February 2006, from a wild resident Great Egret (Ardea alba). No major die-offs or sick migratory birds were detected during the study. We identified avian influenza virus subtypes not previously reported in Egypt. The HPAI H5N1 isolated

  1. Ambient Influenza and Avian Influenza Virus during Dust Storm Days and Background Days

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei-Shih; Tsai, Feng Ta; Lin, Chien Kun; Yang, Chun-Yuh; Chan, Chang-Chuan; Young, Chea-Yuan; Lee, Chien-Hung

    2010-01-01

    Background The spread of influenza and highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1) presents a significant threat to human health. Avian influenza outbreaks in downwind areas of Asian dust storms (ADS) suggest that viruses might be transported by dust storms. Objectives We developed a technique to measure ambient influenza and avian influenza viruses. We then used this technique to measure concentrations of these viruses on ADS days and background days, and to assess the relationships between ambient influenza and avian influenza viruses, and air pollutants. Methods A high-volume air sampler was used in parallel with a filter cassette to evaluate spiked samples and unspiked samples. Then, air samples were monitored during ADS seasons using a filter cassette coupled with a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay. Air samples were monitored during ADS season (1 January to 31 May 2006). Results We successfully quantified ambient influenza virus using the filtration/real-time qPCR method during ADS days and background days. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the concentration of influenza virus in ambient air. In both the spiked and unspiked samples, the concentration of influenza virus sampled using the filter cassette was higher than that using the high-volume sampler. The concentration of ambient influenza A virus was significantly higher during the ADS days than during the background days. Conclusions Our data imply the possibility of long-range transport of influenza virus. PMID:20435545

  2. The NS1 gene from bat-derived influenza-like virus H17N10 can be rescued in influenza A PR8 backbone.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuejin; Tefsen, Boris; Li, Yan; Qi, Jianxun; Lu, Guangwen; Shi, Yi; Yan, Jinghua; Xiao, Haixia; Gao, George F

    2016-08-01

    Influenza A viruses have the potential to cause pandemics due to the introduction of novel subtypes against which human hosts have little or no preexisting immunity. Such viruses may result from reassortment between human and animal influenza viruses. Recently, new influenza-like viruses were identified in bats, raising the concern for a new reservoir of potentially harmful influenza viruses that could form reassortants with categorized human influenza A viruses. However, until now, it has not been possible to generate a recombinant reassortant virus containing a single functional gene or domain from H17N10 that could propagate. Here, we demonstrate that a recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) virus with NS1 gene from H17N10 influenza-like virus can be successfully rescued. We used luciferase reporter assays and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR to show that the NS1 protein from H17N10 inhibited Sendai-virus (SeV)-induced activation of IFN-β expression with an efficiency similar to NS1 from an H5N1 strain. Moreover, the crystal structure of the NS1 (H17N10) RNA-binding domain is also similar to that of other NS1s. These results demonstrate that H17N10 influenza-like virus indeed contains functional genes that are compatible with categorized influenza A viruses. Although the chance of this particular event occurring in nature seems negligible, further research is needed to address the possibility of the natural formation of reassortants. PMID:27217257

  3. Phylogenetic Analysis of H6 Influenza Viruses Isolated from Rosy-Billed Pochards (Netta peposaca) in Argentina Reveals the Presence of Different HA Gene Clusters ▿

    PubMed Central

    Rimondi, Agustina; Xu, Kemin; Craig, Maria Isabel; Shao, Hongxia; Ferreyra, Hebe; Rago, Maria Virginia; Romano, Marcelo; Uhart, Marcela; Sutton, Troy; Ferrero, Andrea; Perez, Daniel R.; Pereda, Ariel

    2011-01-01

    Until recently, influenza A viruses from wild waterfowl in South America were rarely isolated and/or characterized. To explore the ecology of influenza A viruses in this region, a long-term surveillance program was established in 2006 for resident and migratory water birds in Argentina. We report the characterization of 5 avian influenza viruses of the H6 hemagglutinin (HA) subtype isolated from rosy-billed pochards (Netta peposaca). Three of these viruses were paired to an N2 NA subtype, while the other two were of the N8 subtype. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses of the internal gene segments revealed a close relationship with influenza viruses from South America, forming a unique clade and supporting the notion of independent evolution from influenza A viruses in other latitudes. The presence of NS alleles A and B was also identified. The HA and NA genes formed unique clades separate from North American and Eurasian viruses, with the exception of the HA gene of one isolate, which was more closely related to the North American lineage, suggesting possible interactions between viruses of North American and South American lineages. Animal studies suggested that these Argentine H6 viruses could replicate and transmit inefficiently in chickens, indicating limited adaptation to poultry. Our results highlight the importance of continued influenza virus surveillance in wild birds of South America, especially considering the unique evolution of these viruses. PMID:21976652

  4. Serological evidence of equine influenza virus in horse stables in Kaduna, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    MESEKO, Clement A.; EHIZIBOLO, David O.; NWOKIKE, Edith C.; WUNGAK, Yiltawe S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Equine influenza virus (EIV) is a major cause of acute respiratory diseases in horses in most parts of the world that results in severe economic losses. Information on the epidemiology of EIV in tropical Africa is scanty. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect the presence of influenza A virus nucleoprotein (NP) in 284 horse sera in Kaduna State, Northern Nigeria. The ELISA-positive sera were further examined for hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibodies to two strains each of H3N8 and H7N3 subtypes of influenza A virus. The results showed that antibodies against influenza A virus nucleoprotein were detected in 60.9% (173 of 284) of horses examined by NP-ELISA. Equine H3 and H7 subtypes were detected in 60% (21 of 35) and 20% (7 of 35) of horse sera respectively across the stables. Adequate quarantine of all imported horses, a national equine influenza surveillance plan and an appropriate EIV control program in Nigeria are recommended to safeguard the large horse population. PMID:27703404

  5. Avian Influenza Virus (H5N1): a Threat to Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Peiris, J. S. Malik; de Jong, Menno D.; Guan, Yi

    2007-01-01

    Pandemic influenza virus has its origins in avian influenza viruses. The highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 is already panzootic in poultry, with attendant economic consequences. It continues to cross species barriers to infect humans and other mammals, often with fatal outcomes. Therefore, H5N1 virus has rightly received attention as a potential pandemic threat. However, it is noted that the pandemics of 1957 and 1968 did not arise from highly pathogenic influenza viruses, and the next pandemic may well arise from a low-pathogenicity virus. The rationale for particular concern about an H5N1 pandemic is not its inevitability but its potential severity. An H5N1 pandemic is an event of low probability but one of high human health impact and poses a predicament for public health. Here, we review the ecology and evolution of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses, assess the pandemic risk, and address aspects of human H5N1 disease in relation to its epidemiology, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management. PMID:17428885

  6. Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Virus in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Kandeil, Ahmed; El-Shesheny, Rabeh; Kayed, Ahmed S.; Maatouq, Asmaa M.; Cai, Zhipeng; McKenzie, Pamela P.; Webby, Richard J.; El Refaey, Samir; Kandeel, Amr; Ali, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    In Egypt, avian influenza A subtype H5N1 and H9N2 viruses are enzootic in poultry. The control plan devised by veterinary authorities in Egypt to prevent infections in poultry focused mainly on vaccination and ultimately failed. Recently, widespread H5N1 infections in poultry and a substantial increase in the number of human cases of H5N1 infection were observed. We summarize surveillance data from 2009 through 2014 and show that avian influenza viruses are established in poultry in Egypt and are continuously evolving genetically and antigenically. We also discuss the epidemiology of human infection with avian influenza in Egypt and describe how the true burden of disease is underestimated. We discuss the failures of relying on vaccinating poultry as the sole intervention tool. We conclude by highlighting the key components that need to be included in a new strategy to control avian influenza infections in poultry and humans in Egypt. PMID:26886164

  7. Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Virus in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Kayali, Ghazi; Kandeil, Ahmed; El-Shesheny, Rabeh; Kayed, Ahmed S; Maatouq, Asmaa M; Cai, Zhipeng; McKenzie, Pamela P; Webby, Richard J; El Refaey, Samir; Kandeel, Amr; Ali, Mohamed A

    2016-03-01

    In Egypt, avian influenza A subtype H5N1 and H9N2 viruses are enzootic in poultry. The control plan devised by veterinary authorities in Egypt to prevent infections in poultry focused mainly on vaccination and ultimately failed. Recently, widespread H5N1 infections in poultry and a substantial increase in the number of human cases of H5N1 infection were observed. We summarize surveillance data from 2009 through 2014 and show that avian influenza viruses are established in poultry in Egypt and are continuously evolving genetically and antigenically. We also discuss the epidemiology of human infection with avian influenza in Egypt and describe how the true burden of disease is underestimated. We discuss the failures of relying on vaccinating poultry as the sole intervention tool. We conclude by highlighting the key components that need to be included in a new strategy to control avian influenza infections in poultry and humans in Egypt.

  8. Evolution of canine and equine influenza (H3N8) viruses co-circulating between 2005 and 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Rivailler, Pierre; Perry, Ijeoma A.; Jang Yunho; Davis, C. Todd; Chen Limei; Dubovi, Edward J.; Donis, Ruben O.

    2010-12-05

    Influenza virus, subtype H3N8, was transmitted from horses to greyhound dogs in 2004 and subsequently spread to pet dog populations. The co-circulation of H3N8 viruses in dogs and horses makes bi-directional virus transmission between these animal species possible. To understand the dynamics of viral transmission, we performed virologic surveillance in dogs and horses between 2005 and 2008 in the United States. The genomes of influenza A H3N8 viruses isolated from 36 dogs and horses were sequenced to determine their origin and evolution. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that H3N8 influenza viruses from horses and dogs were monophyletic and distinct. There was no evidence of canine influenza virus infection in horses with respiratory disease or new introductions of equine influenza viruses into dogs in the United States. Analysis of a limited number of equine influenza viruses suggested substantial separation in the transmission of viruses causing clinically apparent influenza in dogs and horses.

  9. A genetically adjuvanted influenza B virus vector increases immunogenicity and protective efficacy in mice.

    PubMed

    Kittel, Christian; Wressnigg, Nina; Shurygina, Anna Polina; Wolschek, Markus; Stukova, Marina; Romanovskaya-Romanko, Ekatherina; Romanova, Julia; Kiselev, Oleg; Muster, Thomas; Egorov, Andrej

    2015-10-01

    The existence of multiple antigenically distinct types and subtypes of influenza viruses allows the construction of a multivalent vector system for the mucosal delivery of foreign sequences. Influenza A viruses have been exploited successfully for the expression of extraneous antigens as well as immunostimulatory molecules. In this study, we describe the development of an influenza B virus vector whose functional part of the interferon antagonist NS1 was replaced by human interleukin 2 (IL2) as a genetic adjuvant. We demonstrate that IL2 expressed by this viral vector displays immune adjuvant activity in immunized mice. Animals vaccinated with the IL2 viral vector showed an increased hemagglutination inhibition antibody response and higher protective efficacy after challenge with a wild-type influenza B virus when compared to mice vaccinated with a control virus. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to construct influenza B vaccine strains expressing immune-potentiating foreign sequences from the NS genomic segment. Based on these data, it is now hypothetically possible to create a trivalent (or quadrivalent) live attenuated influenza vaccine in which each component expresses a selected genetic adjuvant with tailored expression levels.

  10. KINETIC PROFILE OF INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION IN THREE RAT STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Influenza infection is a respiratory disease of viral origin that can cause major epidemics in man. The influenza virus infects and damages epithelial cells of the respiratory tract and causes pneumonia. Lung lesions of mice infected with influenza virus resembl...

  11. Phenolic Diterpenoid Derivatives as Anti-Influenza A Virus Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of diterpenoid derivatives based on podocarpic acid were synthesized and evaluated as anti-influenza A virus agents. Several of the novel podocarpic acid derivatives exhibited nanomolar activities against an H1N1 influenza A virus (A/Puerto Rico/8/34) that was resistant to two anti-influenza drugs, oseltamivir and amantadine. This class of compounds inhibits the influenza virus by targeting the viral hemagglutinin-mediated membrane fusion. These results indicated that podocarpic acid derivatives may serve as potential drug candidates to fight drug-resistant influenza A virus infections. PMID:25815159

  12. [Comparative study of the differential susceptibility of different cell lines to pandemic H1N1v influenza viruses and avian influenza, swine influenza, and human influenza viruses].

    PubMed

    Danilenko, D M; Smirnova, T D; Gudkova, T M; Eropkin, M Iu; Kiselev, O I

    2011-01-01

    The proliferation characteristics of influenza viruses of different origin were tested in various human and animal cell cultures. Pandemic H1N1v influenza and swine influenza viruses were shown to have a low infectious activity in virtually all the test lines. In spite of this, the replication of this group of viruses may be detected by de novo NP synthesis. These viruses are able to activate programmed cell death. Moreover, a low inoculative virus dose exerts a stimulating effect on cell proliferation in both suspension and monolayer cell lines.

  13. Interaction of nanodiamonds materials with influenza viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, V. T.; Ivanova, M. V.; Spitsyn, B. V.; Garina, K. O.; Trushakova, S. V.; Manykin, A. A.; Korzhenevsky, A. P.; Burseva, E. I.

    2012-02-01

    The perspectives of the application of modern materials contained nanodiamonds (ND) are considered in this study. The interaction between detonation paniculate ND, soot and influenza A and B viruses, fragments of cDNA were analyzed at the normal conditions. It was shown that these sorbents can interact with the following viruses: reference epidemic strains of influenza A(H1N1), A(H1N1)v, A(H3N2) and B viruses circulated in the word in 2000-2010. The allantoises, concentrated viruses, cDNA can be absorbed by ND sorbents and getting removed from water solutions within 20 min. ND sorbents can be used for the preparation of antivirus filters for water solution and for future diagnostic systems in virology.

  14. In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging of Influenza A Virus Infection and Characterization of Novel Cross-Protective Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Nicholas S.; Leyva-Grado, Victor H.; Tan, Gene S.; Eggink, Dirk; Hai, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a major human pathogen responsible for seasonal epidemics as well as pandemic outbreaks. Due to the continuing burden on human health, the need for new tools to study influenza virus pathogenesis as well as to evaluate new therapeutics is paramount. We report the development of a stable, replication-competent luciferase reporter influenza A virus that can be used for in vivo imaging of viral replication. This imaging is noninvasive and allows for the longitudinal monitoring of infection in living animals. We used this tool to characterize novel monoclonal antibodies that bind the conserved stalk domain of the viral hemagglutinin of H1 and H5 subtypes and protect mice from lethal disease. The use of luciferase reporter influenza viruses allows for new mechanistic studies to expand our knowledge of virus-induced disease and provides a new quantitative method to evaluate future antiviral therapies. PMID:23698304

  15. Novel Polyanions Inhibiting Replication of Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ciejka, Justyna; Milewska, Aleksandra; Wytrwal, Magdalena; Wojarski, Jacek; Golda, Anna; Ochman, Marek; Nowakowska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Novel sulfonated derivatives of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (NSPAHs) and N-sulfonated chitosan (NSCH) have been synthesized, and their activity against influenza A and B viruses has been studied and compared with that of a series of carrageenans, marine polysaccharides of well-documented anti-influenza activity. NSPAHs were found to be nontoxic and very soluble in water, in contrast to gel-forming and thus generally poorly soluble carrageenans. In vitro and ex vivo studies using susceptible cells (Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells and fully differentiated human airway epithelial cultures) demonstrated the antiviral effectiveness of NSPAHs. The activity of NSPAHs was proportional to the molecular mass of the chain and the degree of substitution of amino groups with sulfonate groups. Mechanistic studies showed that the NSPAHs and carrageenans inhibit influenza A and B virus assembly in the cell. PMID:26729490

  16. Circulating avian influenza viruses closely related to the 1918 virus have pandemic potential.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tokiko; Zhong, Gongxun; Russell, Colin A; Nakajima, Noriko; Hatta, Masato; Hanson, Anthony; McBride, Ryan; Burke, David F; Takahashi, Kenta; Fukuyama, Satoshi; Tomita, Yuriko; Maher, Eileen A; Watanabe, Shinji; Imai, Masaki; Neumann, Gabriele; Hasegawa, Hideki; Paulson, James C; Smith, Derek J; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2014-06-11

    Wild birds harbor a large gene pool of influenza A viruses that have the potential to cause influenza pandemics. Foreseeing and understanding this potential is important for effective surveillance. Our phylogenetic and geographic analyses revealed the global prevalence of avian influenza virus genes whose proteins differ only a few amino acids from the 1918 pandemic influenza virus, suggesting that 1918-like pandemic viruses may emerge in the future. To assess this risk, we generated and characterized a virus composed of avian influenza viral segments with high homology to the 1918 virus. This virus exhibited pathogenicity in mice and ferrets higher than that in an authentic avian influenza virus. Further, acquisition of seven amino acid substitutions in the viral polymerases and the hemagglutinin surface glycoprotein conferred respiratory droplet transmission to the 1918-like avian virus in ferrets, demonstrating that contemporary avian influenza viruses with 1918 virus-like proteins may have pandemic potential. PMID:24922572

  17. Circulating avian influenza viruses closely related to the 1918 virus have pandemic potential

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tokiko; Zhong, Gongxun; Russell, Colin A.; Nakajima, Noriko; Hatta, Masato; Hanson, Anthony; McBride, Ryan; Burke, David F.; Takahashi, Kenta; Fukuyama, Satoshi; Tomita, Yuriko; Maher, Eileen A.; Watanabe, Shinji; Imai, Masaki; Neumann, Gabriele; Hasegawa, Hideki; Paulson, James C.; Smith, Derek J.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Summary Wild birds harbor a large gene pool of influenza A viruses that have the potential to cause influenza pandemics. Foreseeing and understanding this potential is important for effective surveillance. Our phylogenetic and geographic analyses revealed the global prevalence of avian influenza virus genes whose proteins differ only a few amino acids from the 1918 pandemic influenza virus, suggesting that 1918-like pandemic viruses may emerge in the future. To assess this risk, we generated and characterized a virus composed of avian influenza viral segments with high homology to the 1918 virus. This virus exhibited higher pathogenicity in mice and ferrets than an authentic avian influenza virus. Further, acquisition of seven amino acid substitutions in the viral polymerases and the hemagglutinin surface glycoprotein conferred respiratory droplet transmission to the 1918-like avian virus in ferrets, demonstrating that contemporary avian influenza viruses with 1918 virus-like proteins may have pandemic potential. PMID:24922572

  18. Characterization of a novel H3N2 influenza virus isolated from domestic ducks in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Chong; Yu, Meng; Liu, Litao; Sun, Honglei

    2016-08-01

    Cases of human infection with a novel H7N9 avian influenza virus (AIV) were first reported in March 2013, which caused 115 deaths within a single year. Beyond that, other subtypes of H7 AIV were isolated from poultry in eastern China during the same period, including H7N7 and H7N2 AIV. In the present study, a subtype H3N2 AIV was isolated from ducks from Anhui Province, China. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses revealed that seven gene segments of this virus showed the highest sequence homology with that of the H7 subtype influenza virus, which is presumed to be the reassortants of the H3 and H7 subtypes AIV. The present study also reconfirmed that the reassortment between the H7 subtype and waterfowl-originating AIVs universally occurred in waterfowl. Animal inoculation tests showed that the virus has low pathogenicity in chickens; however, it could be replicated in the lungs of mice. The emergence of this H3N2 isolate emphasizes the importance of enhancing the surveillance of waterfowl-originating AIVs, the identification of novel reassortant strains, and characterization of their biological properties.

  19. The influenza fingerprints: NS1 and M1 proteins contribute to specific host cell ultrastructure signatures upon infection by different influenza A viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Terrier, Olivier; Moules, Vincent; Carron, Coralie; Cartet, Gaeelle; Frobert, Emilie; Yver, Matthieu; Traversier, Aurelien; Wolff, Thorsten; Naffakh, Nadia; and others

    2012-10-10

    Influenza A are nuclear replicating viruses which hijack host machineries in order to achieve optimal infection. Numerous functional virus-host interactions have now been characterized, but little information has been gathered concerning their link to the virally induced remodeling of the host cellular architecture. In this study, we infected cells with several human and avian influenza viruses and we have analyzed their ultrastructural modifications by using electron and confocal microscopy. We discovered that infections lead to a major and systematic disruption of nucleoli and the formation of a large number of diverse viral structures showing specificity that depended on the subtype origin and genomic composition of viruses. We identified NS1 and M1 proteins as the main actors in the remodeling of the host ultra-structure and our results suggest that each influenza A virus strain could be associated with a specific cellular fingerprint, possibly correlated to the functional properties of their viral components.

  20. Experimental infection with H1N1 European swine influenza virus protects pigs from an infection with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 human influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Busquets, Núria; Segalés, Joaquim; Córdoba, Lorena; Mussá, Tufaria; Crisci, Elisa; Martín-Valls, Gerard E; Simon-Grifé, Meritxell; Pérez-Simó, Marta; Pérez-Maíllo, Monica; Núñez, Jose I; Abad, Francesc X; Fraile, Lorenzo; Pina, Sonia; Majó, Natalia; Bensaid, Albert; Domingo, Mariano; Montoya, María

    2010-01-01

    The recent pandemic caused by human influenza virus A(H1N1) 2009 contains ancestral gene segments from North American and Eurasian swine lineages as well as from avian and human influenza lineages. The emergence of this A(H1N1) 2009 poses a potential global threat for human health and the fact that it can infect other species, like pigs, favours a possible encounter with other influenza viruses circulating in swine herds. In Europe, H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2 subtypes of swine influenza virus currently have a high prevalence in commercial farms. To better assess the risk posed by the A(H1N1) 2009 in the actual situation of swine farms, we sought to analyze whether a previous infection with a circulating European avian-like swine A/Swine/Spain/53207/2004 (H1N1) influenza virus (hereafter referred to as SwH1N1) generated or not cross-protective immunity against a subsequent infection with the new human pandemic A/Catalonia/63/2009 (H1N1) influenza virus (hereafter referred to as pH1N1) 21 days apart. Pigs infected only with pH1N1 had mild to moderate pathological findings, consisting on broncho-interstitial pneumonia. However, pigs inoculated with SwH1N1 virus and subsequently infected with pH1N1 had very mild lung lesions, apparently attributed to the remaining lesions caused by SwH1N1 infection. These later pigs also exhibited boosted levels of specific antibodies. Finally, animals firstly infected with SwH1N1 virus and latter infected with pH1N1 exhibited undetectable viral RNA load in nasal swabs and lungs after challenge with pH1N1, indicating a cross-protective effect between both strains.

  1. Genetic variation of the hemagglutinin of avian influenza virus H9N2.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao-feng; Han, Ping; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2011-05-01

    Avian influenza virus H9N2 has become the dominant subtype of influenza which is endemic in poultry. The hemagglutinin, one of eight protein-coding genes, plays an important role during the early stage of infection. The adaptive evolution and the positively selected sites of the HA (the glycoprotein molecule) of H9N2 subtype viruses were investigated. Investigating 68 hemagglutinin H9N2 avian influenza virus isolates in China and phylogenetic analysis, it was necessary that these isolates were distributed geographically from 1994, and were all derived from the Eurasian lineage. H9N2 avian influenza virus isolates from domestic poultry in China were distinct phylogenetically from those isolated in Hong Kong, including viruses which had infected humans. Seven amino acid substitutions (2T, 3T, 14T, 165D, 197A, 233Q, 380R) were identified in the HA possibly due to positive selection pressure. Apart from the 380R site, the other positively selected sites detected were all located near the receptor-binding site of the HA1 strain. Based on epidemiological and phylogenetics analysis, the H9N2 epidemic in China was divided into three groups: the 1994-1997 group, the 1998-1999 group, and the 2000-2007 group. By investigating these three groups using the maximum likelihood estimation method, there were more positive selective sites in the 1994-1997 and 1998-1999 epidemic group than the 2000-2007 groups. This indicates that those detected selected sites are changed during different epidemic periods and the evolution of H9N2 is currently slow. The antigenic determinant or other key functional amino acid sites should be of concern because their adjacent sites have been under positive selection pressure. The results provide further evidence that the pathogenic changes in the H9N2 subtype are due mainly to re-assortment with other highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

  2. Recombinant human interferon reduces titer of the 1918 pandemic and H5N1 influenza viruses in a guinea pig model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although H5N1 subtype influenza viruses have yet to acquire the ability to transmit efficiently among humans, the geographic expansion, genetic diversity and persistence of H5N1 viruses in birds indicates that pandemic potential of these viruses remains high. Vaccination remains the primary means f...

  3. Understanding molecular mechanisms of traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of influenza viruses infection by computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shuo; Yin, Ning; Pei, Jianfeng; Lai, Luhua

    2013-11-01

    The battle against influenza is an enduring one. For hundreds of years, people have fought such small viruses with practices such as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), however only recently has it been possible to use cutting-edge technology to investigate their mechanisms. Here, we re-created this ancient Chinese knowledge to explore the chemistry of herbs and elucidate their mechanism of action using molecular computational methods. Our results show that TCM compounds can inhibit influenza viral proteins in a multi-target/multi-component manner, revealing the versatility of TCM for treating different influenza virus subtypes, including the recently emerged H7N9.

  4. Detection of avian influenza viruses in wild waterbirds in the Rift Valley of Kenya using fecal sampling.

    PubMed

    Ofula, Victor O; Franklin, Alan B; Root, J Jeffrey; Sullivan, Heather J; Gichuki, Patrick; Makio, Albina; Bulimo, Wallace; Abong'o, Bernard O; Muchai, Muchane; Schnabel, David

    2013-06-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus A/H5N1 has been reported in 11 African countries. Migratory waterbirds have the potential of introducing A/H5N1 into east Africa through the Rift Valley of Kenya. We present the results of a wild bird surveillance system for A/H5N1 and other avian influenza viruses based on avian fecal sampling in Kenya. We collected 2630 fecal samples in 2008. Viral RNA was extracted from pools of 3-5 fecal samples and analyzed for presence of avian influenza virus RNA by real-time RT-PCR. Twelve (2.3%) of the 516 sample pools were positive for avian influenza virus RNA, 2 of which were subtyped as H4N6 viruses. This is the first report of avian influenza virus in wild birds in Kenya. This study demonstrates the success of this approach in detecting avian influenza virus in wild birds and represents an efficient surveillance system for avian influenza virus in regions with limited resources.

  5. Active Surveillance for Influenza A Virus among Swine, Midwestern United States, 2009–2011

    PubMed Central

    Corzo, Cesar A.; Juleen, Kevin; Stigger-Rosser, Evelyn; Ducatez, Mariette F.; Webby, Richard J.; Lowe, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Veterinary diagnostic laboratories identify and characterize influenza A viruses primarily through passive surveillance. However, additional surveillance programs are needed. To meet this need, an active surveillance program was conducted at pig farms throughout the midwestern United States. From June 2009 through December 2011, nasal swab samples were collected monthly from among 540 groups of growing pigs and tested for influenza A virus by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Of 16,170 samples, 746 were positive for influenza A virus; of these, 18.0% were subtype H1N1, 16.0% H1N2, 7.6% H3N2, and 14.5% (H1N1)pdm09. An influenza (H3N2) and (H1N1)pdm09 virus were identified simultaneously in 8 groups. This active influenza A virus surveillance program provided quality data and increased the understanding of the current situation of circulating viruses in the midwestern US pig population. PMID:23735740

  6. Development and characterization of a panel of cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies generated using H1N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chun-yan; Tang, Yi-gui; Qi, Zong-li; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Xiang-rong; Huo, Xue-ping; Li, Yan; Feng, Qing; Zhao, Peng-hua; Wang, Xin; Li, Yuan; Wang, Hai-fang; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Xin-jian

    2015-08-01

    To characterize the antigenic epitopes of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein of H1N1 influenza virus, a panel consisting of 84 clones of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were generated using the HA proteins from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 vaccine lysate and the seasonal influenza H1N1(A1) vaccines. Thirty-three (39%) of the 84 mAbs were found to be strain-specific, and 6 (7%) of the 84 mAbs were subtype-specific. Twenty (24%) of the 84 mAbs recognized the common HA epitopes shared by 2009 pandemic H1N1, seasonal A1 (H1N1), and A3 (H3N2) influenza viruses. Twenty-five of the 84 clones recognized the common HA epitopes shared by the 2009 pandemic H1N1, seasonal A1 (H1N1) and A3 (H3N2) human influenza viruses, and H5N1 and H9N2 avian influenza viruses. We found that of the 16 (19%) clones of the 84 mAbs panel that were cross-reactive with human respiratory pathogens, 15 were made using the HA of the seasonal A1 (H1N1) virus and 1 was made using the HA of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus. Immunohistochemical analysis of the tissue microarray (TMA) showed that 4 of the 84 mAb clones cross-reacted with human tissue (brain and pancreas). Our results indicated that the influenza virus HA antigenic epitopes not only induce type-, subtype-, and strain-specific monoclonal antibodies against influenza A virus but also cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies against human tissues. Further investigations of these cross-reactive (heterophilic) epitopes may significantly improve our understanding of viral antigenic variation, epidemics, pathophysiologic mechanisms, and adverse effects of influenza vaccines.

  7. Influenza viruses and the evolution of avian influenza virus H5N1.

    PubMed

    Skeik, Nedaa; Jabr, Fadi I

    2008-05-01

    Although small in size and simple in structure, influenza viruses are sophisticated organisms with highly mutagenic genomes and wide antigenic diversity. They are species-specific organisms. Mutation and reassortment have resulted in newer viruses such as H5N1, with new resistance against anti-viral medications, and this might lead to the emergence of a fully transmissible strain, as occurred in the 1957 and 1968 pandemics. Influenza viruses are no longer just a cause of self-limited upper respiratory tract infections; the H5N1 avian influenza virus can cause severe human infection with a mortality rate exceeding 50%. The case death rate of H5N1 avian influenza infection is 20 times higher than that of the 1918 infection (50% versus 2.5%), which killed 675000 people in the USA and almost 40 million people worldwide. While the clock is still ticking towards what seems to be inevitable pandemic influenza, on April 17, 2007 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first vaccine against the avian influenza virus H5N1 for humans at high risk. However, more research is needed to develop a more effective and affordable vaccine that can be given at lower doses.

  8. Prevalence and characterization of influenza viruses in diverse species in Los Llanos, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Erik A; Ciuoderis, Karl; Freiden, Pamela J; Seufzer, Bradley; Jones, Jeremy C; Johnson, Jordan; Parra, Rocio; Gongora, Agustin; Cardenas, Dario; Barajas, Diana; Osorio, Jorge E; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2013-01-01

    While much is known about the prevalence of influenza viruses in North America and Eurasia, their prevalence in birds and mammals in South America is largely unknown. To fill this knowledge gap and provide a baseline for future ecology and epidemiology studies, we conducted 2 years of influenza surveillance in the eastern plains (Los Llanos) region of Colombia. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) identified influenza viruses in wild birds, domestic poultry, swine and horses. Prevalence ranged from 2.6% to 13.4% across species. Swine showed the highest prevalence and were infected primarily with 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) viruses genetically related to those in humans. In addition, we isolated H5N2 viruses from two resident species of whistling ducks (genus Dendrocygna) that differed completely from previous South American isolates, instead genetically resembling North American wild bird viruses. Both strains caused low pathogenicity in chickens and mammals. The prevalence and subtype diversity of influenza viruses isolated from diverse species within a small area of Colombia highlights the need for enhanced surveillance throughout South America, including monitoring of the potential transmissibility of low-pathogenic H5N2 viruses from wild birds to domestic poultry and the emergence of reassortant viruses in domestic swine. PMID:26038461

  9. Strain-specific antiviral activity of iminosugars against human influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, S.; Miller, J. L.; Harvey, D. J.; Gu, Y.; Rosenthal, P. B.; Zitzmann, N.; McCauley, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Drugs that target host cell processes can be employed to complement drugs that specifically target viruses, and iminosugar compounds that inhibit host α-glucosidases have been reported to show antiviral activity against multiple viruses. Here the effect and mechanism of two iminosugar α-glucosidase inhibitors, N-butyl-deoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ) and N-nonyl-deoxynojirimycin (NN-DNJ), on human influenza A viruses was examined. Methods The viruses examined were a recently circulating seasonal influenza A(H3N2) virus strain A/Brisbane/10/2007, an older H3N2 strain A/Udorn/307/72, and A/Lviv/N6/2009, a strain representative of the currently circulating pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. Results The inhibitors had the strongest effect on Brisbane/10 and NN-DNJ was more potent than NB-DNJ. Both compounds showed antiviral activity in cell culture against three human influenza A viruses in a strain-specific manner. Consistent with its action as an α-glucosidase inhibitor, NN-DNJ treatment resulted in an altered glycan processing of influenza haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), confirmed by MS. NN-DNJ treatment was found to reduce the cell surface expression of the H3 subtype HA. The level of sialidase activity of NA was reduced in infected cells, but the addition of exogenous sialidase to the cells did not complement the NN-DNJ-mediated inhibition of virus replication. Using reassortant viruses, the drug susceptibility profile was determined to correlate with the origin of the HA. Conclusions NN-DNJ inhibits influenza A virus replication in a strain-specific manner that is dependent on the HA. PMID:25223974

  10. The evolution of H5N1 influenza viruses in ducks in southern China.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Deng, G; Li, Z; Tian, G; Li, Y; Jiao, P; Zhang, L; Liu, Z; Webster, R G; Yu, K

    2004-07-13

    The pathogenicity of avian H5N1 influenza viruses to mammals has been evolving since the mid-1980s. Here, we demonstrate that H5N1 influenza viruses, isolated from apparently healthy domestic ducks in mainland China from 1999 through 2002, were becoming progressively more pathogenic for mammals, and we present a hypothesis explaining the mechanism of this evolutionary direction. Twenty-one viruses isolated from apparently healthy ducks in southern China from 1999 through 2002 were confirmed to be H5N1 subtype influenza A viruses. These isolates are antigenically similar to A/Goose/Guangdong/1/96 (H5N1) virus, which was the source of the 1997 Hong Kong "bird flu" hemagglutinin gene, and all are highly pathogenic in chickens. The viruses form four pathotypes on the basis of their replication and lethality in mice. There is a clear temporal pattern in the progressively increasing pathogenicity of these isolates in the mammalian model. Five of six H5N1 isolates tested replicated in inoculated ducks and were shed from trachea or cloaca, but none caused disease signs or death. Phylogenetic analysis of the full genome indicated that most of the viruses are reassortants containing the A/Goose/Guangdong/1/96-like hemagglutinin gene and the other genes from unknown Eurasian avian influenza viruses. This study is a characterization of the H5N1 avian influenza viruses recently circulating in ducks in mainland China. Our findings suggest that immediate action is needed to prevent the transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses from the apparently healthy ducks into chickens or mammalian hosts.

  11. [Presence of antibodies against Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus subtype VI in patients with acute febrile illness].

    PubMed

    Contigiani, M S; de Basualdo, M; Cámara, A; Ramírez, A; Díaz, G; González, D; Medeot, S; Osuna, D

    1993-01-01

    In Argentina, there is no record of human cases produced by Dengue virus (Flavivirus), but Paraguay and Brasil (neighbouring countries) have notified human outbreaks of Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever. In this report, we inform the serological results of a limited human outbreak of a Dengue-like acute illness that occurred in General Belgrano Island, Formosa, Argentina in April 1989. This island is 35 km far from Clorinda city of Paraguay river, with a human population of 150 inhabitants. The weather of this area is humid with abundant rainfall, favouring mosquitoes proliferation. Two samples of serum from 28 human notified cases were studied using hemagglutination inhibition test (HI), complement fixation (CF), and plaque reduction neutralization (NT) test in Vero cell cultures. All tested sera were negative to Dengue, St. Louis encephalitis, Yellow Fever, Bussuquara, Rocio, Eastern and Western Equine Encephalitis arboviruses as well as Influenza and Rubella viruses. By contrast, infection with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE), subtype VI-AG80-663 strain was demonstrated (34.5% positive by HI, 39.1% by CF and 51.6% by NT). Seroconversion was detected by NT in six cases and only five were positive by CF. The 26.8% of the sera reacted also with VEE subtype I AB by NT. Considering that no cross reaction were detected in NT with these two subtypes, our results suggest that both viruses are concomitantly circulating in the studied area. Furthermore, the seroconversions detected with AG80-663 strain firmly indicate that during the outbreak this virus subtype was circulating in the island, although we could not assure that it was the causal agent of the acute disease.

  12. Impaired Wound Healing Predisposes Obese Mice to Severe Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Kevin B.; Vogel, Peter; Duan, Susu; Govorkova, Elena A.; Webby, Richard J.; McCullers, Jonathan A.

    2012-01-01

    (See the editorial commentary by Beck, on pages 172–3, and the article by Kim et al, on pages 244–51.) For the first time, obesity appeared as a risk factor for developing severe 2009 pandemic influenza infection. Given the increase in obesity, there is a need to understand the mechanisms underlying poor outcomes in this population. In these studies, we examined the severity of pandemic influenza virus in obese mice and evaluated antiviral effectiveness. We found that genetically and diet-induced obese mice challenged with either 2009 influenza A virus subtype H1N1 or 1968 subtype H3N2 strains were more likely to have increased mortality and lung pathology associated with impaired wound repair and subsequent pulmonary edema. Antiviral treatment with oseltamivir enhanced survival of obese mice. Overall, these studies demonstrate that impaired wound lung repair in the lungs of obese animals may result in severe influenza virus infection. Alternative approaches to prevention and control of influenza may be needed in the setting of obesity. PMID:22147799

  13. Using Sequence Data To Infer the Antigenicity of Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hailiang; Yang, Jialiang; Zhang, Tong; Long, Li-Ping; Jia, Kun; Yang, Guohua; Webby, Richard J.; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The efficacy of current influenza vaccines requires a close antigenic match between circulating and vaccine strains. As such, timely identification of emerging influenza virus antigenic variants is central to the success of influenza vaccination programs. Empirical methods to determine influenza virus antigenic properties are time-consuming and mid-throughput and require live viruses. Here, we present a novel, experimentally validated, computational method for determining influenza virus antigenicity on the basis of hemagglutinin (HA) sequence. This method integrates a bootstrapped ridge regression with antigenic mapping to quantify antigenic distances by using influenza HA1 sequences. Our method was applied to H3N2 seasonal influenza viruses and identified the 13 previously recognized H3N2 antigenic clusters and the antigenic drift event of 2009 that led to a change of the H3N2 vaccine strain. PMID:23820391

  14. Sex differences in H7N9 influenza A virus pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Julia; Otte, Anna; Thiele, Swantje; Lotter, Hannelore; Shu, Yuelong; Gabriel, Gülsah

    2015-12-01

    Sex, gender and age have an impact on incidence and severity of several infectious diseases. Here, we analyzed reported human cases of avian H7N9 influenza A virus infections for potential sex-dependent incidence and mortality. We report that females in their reproductive years display an increased tendency to die of H7N9 influenza than males (female-to-male ratio=1.2). Next, we challenged this potential sex-dependent difference in influenza disease outcome using a mouse infection model. In general, female mice underwent more severe disease than male mice upon infection with various influenza A virus subtypes, such as H7N9, 2009 pH1N1 and H3N2. However, morbidity and mortality were most significantly affected in H7N9 influenza virus infected female mice associated with an increased inflammatory host response. Thus, our mouse infection model described here might assist future investigations on the underlying mechanisms of sex-dependent disease outcome upon zoonotic H7N9 influenza virus infection. Moreover, our findings might help to guide patient management strategies and current vaccine recommendations.

  15. ClassyFlu: classification of influenza A viruses with Discriminatively trained profile-HMMs.

    PubMed

    Van der Auwera, Sandra; Bulla, Ingo; Ziller, Mario; Pohlmann, Anne; Harder, Timm; Stanke, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and rapid characterization of influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) sequences with respect to subtype and clade is at the basis of extended diagnostic services and implicit to molecular epidemiologic studies. ClassyFlu is a new tool and web service for the classification of IAV sequences of the HA and NA gene into subtypes and phylogenetic clades using discriminatively trained profile hidden Markov models (HMMs), one for each subtype or clade. ClassyFlu merely requires as input unaligned, full-length or partial HA or NA DNA sequences. It enables rapid and highly accurate assignment of HA sequences to subtypes H1-H17 but particularly focusses on the finer grained assignment of sequences of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses of subtype H5N1 according to the cladistics proposed by the H5N1 Evolution Working Group. NA sequences are classified into subtypes N1-N10. ClassyFlu was compared to semiautomatic classification approaches using BLAST and phylogenetics and additionally for H5 sequences to the new "Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Clade Classification Tool" (IRD-CT) proposed by the Influenza Research Database. Our results show that both web tools (ClassyFlu and IRD-CT), although based on different methods, are nearly equivalent in performance and both are more accurate and faster than semiautomatic classification. A retraining of ClassyFlu to altered cladistics as well as an extension of ClassyFlu to other IAV genome segments or fragments thereof is undemanding. This is exemplified by unambiguous assignment to a distinct cluster within subtype H7 of sequences of H7N9 viruses which emerged in China early in 2013 and caused more than 130 human infections. http://bioinf.uni-greifswald.de/ClassyFlu is a free web service. For local execution, the ClassyFlu source code in PERL is freely available. PMID:24404173

  16. ClassyFlu: classification of influenza A viruses with Discriminatively trained profile-HMMs.

    PubMed

    Van der Auwera, Sandra; Bulla, Ingo; Ziller, Mario; Pohlmann, Anne; Harder, Timm; Stanke, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and rapid characterization of influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) sequences with respect to subtype and clade is at the basis of extended diagnostic services and implicit to molecular epidemiologic studies. ClassyFlu is a new tool and web service for the classification of IAV sequences of the HA and NA gene into subtypes and phylogenetic clades using discriminatively trained profile hidden Markov models (HMMs), one for each subtype or clade. ClassyFlu merely requires as input unaligned, full-length or partial HA or NA DNA sequences. It enables rapid and highly accurate assignment of HA sequences to subtypes H1-H17 but particularly focusses on the finer grained assignment of sequences of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses of subtype H5N1 according to the cladistics proposed by the H5N1 Evolution Working Group. NA sequences are classified into subtypes N1-N10. ClassyFlu was compared to semiautomatic classification approaches using BLAST and phylogenetics and additionally for H5 sequences to the new "Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Clade Classification Tool" (IRD-CT) proposed by the Influenza Research Database. Our results show that both web tools (ClassyFlu and IRD-CT), although based on different methods, are nearly equivalent in performance and both are more accurate and faster than semiautomatic classification. A retraining of ClassyFlu to altered cladistics as well as an extension of ClassyFlu to other IAV genome segments or fragments thereof is undemanding. This is exemplified by unambiguous assignment to a distinct cluster within subtype H7 of sequences of H7N9 viruses which emerged in China early in 2013 and caused more than 130 human infections. http://bioinf.uni-greifswald.de/ClassyFlu is a free web service. For local execution, the ClassyFlu source code in PERL is freely available.

  17. Characterization and Sequencing of an H6N6 Avian Influenza Virus Isolated from Sansui Sheldrake Ducks in Guizhou, Southwestern China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiaqi; Ji, Xinqin; Xu, Houqiang; Ruan, Yong; Zhao, Jiafu

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of an H6N6 avian influenza virus (AIV) isolated from Sansui Sheldrake ducks in Guizhou Province, China, in 2014. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the H6N6 virus was a reassortant virus derived from three different H6 subtype lineages. The finding of this study will help us understand the epidemiology and the evolutionary characteristics of H6 subtypes of AIV in ducks in southwestern China. PMID:27174267

  18. Influenza Virus Evolution, Host Adaptation and Pandemic Formation

    PubMed Central

    Taubenberger, Jeffery K.; Kash, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Newly emerging or `re-emerging' viral diseases continue to pose significant global public health threats. Prototypic are influenza viruses that are major causes of human respiratory infections and mortality. Influenza viruses can cause zoonotic infections and adapt to humans leading to sustained transmission and emergence of novel viruses. Mechanisms by which viruses evolve in one host, cause zoonotic infection and adapt to a new host species remain unelucidated. Here we review evolution of influenza A viruses in their reservoir hosts and discuss genetic changes associated with introduction of novel viruses into humans leading to pandemics and the establishment of seasonal viruses. PMID:20542248

  19. A brief introduction to avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Spackman, Erica

    2014-01-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) causes a disease of high economic importance for poultry production worldwide. The earliest recorded cases of probable high-pathogenicity AIV in poultry were reported in Italy in the 1870s, and avian influenza has been recognized in domestic poultry through the modern era of poultry production. Approaches to control vary widely, but elimination of the disease in poultry is a common goal. The basics of AIV biology, clinical disease, molecular aspects, and AIV detection are briefly reviewed. PMID:24899420

  20. Type A influenza virus surveillance in free-flying, nonmigratory ducks residing on the eastern shore of Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slemons, R.D.; Hansen, W.R.; Converse, K.A.; Senne, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Virus surveillance in free-flying, nonmigratory ducks living on the eastern shore of Maryland indicated that influenza A viruses were introduced into the area or that the prevalence of endemic infections increased between July 15 and August 27, 1998. Cloacal swabs collected between May 28 and July 15, 1998, were negative for influenza A virus recovery (0/233), whereas 13.9% (29/209) of swabs collected between August 27 and September 2, 1998, were positive for influenza A virus recovery. Five hemagglutinin subtypes (H2, H3, H6, H9, and H12), six neuraminidase subtypes (N1, N2, N4, N5, N6, and N8), and nine HA-NA combinations were identified among 29 influenza A isolates. Interestingly, 18 of the 29 isolates initially appeared to contain two or more HA and/or NA subtypes. The free-flying, nonmigratory ducks served as excellent sentinels for the early detection of type A influenza viruses in the southern half of the Atlantic Migratory Waterfowl Flyway during the earliest phase of the yearly southern migration.

  1. Phylogenetic and pathogenic analysis of a novel H6N2 avian influenza virus isolated from a green peafowl in a wildlife park.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhaobin; Ci, Yanpeng; Ma, Yixin; Liu, Liling; Ma, Jianzhang; Li, D Yanbing; Chen, Hualan

    2014-12-01

    H6 subtype avian influenza virus, which has been circulating among different species, causes considerable concern for both veterinary medicine and public health. We isolated a strain of H6N2 avian influenza virus from healthy green peafowl (Pavo muticus) in Qinghuangdao Wildlife Park in Hebei Province, China, in 2012. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that the isolated H6N2 strain had the same gene constellation as southern China strains, which were predominantly isolated from waterfowl distributed in Shantou, Guangxi, and Hunan in 2001-2010. The isolate showed no and low pathogenicity in chickens and ducks, respectively. However, it replicated efficiently in the lungs and turbinate of infected mice, resulting in thickened alveolar septa and moderate interstitial pneumonia. This finding raises concerns that the H6N2 subtype maybe evolve into a novel endemic avian influenza virus. Therefore, periodical surveillance of avian influenza viruses must be undertaken to monitor the advent of novel viruses.

  2. Phylogenetic and pathogenic analysis of a novel H6N2 avian influenza virus isolated from a green peafowl in a wildlife park.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhaobin; Ci, Yanpeng; Ma, Yixin; Liu, Liling; Ma, Jianzhang; Li, D Yanbing; Chen, Hualan

    2014-12-01

    H6 subtype avian influenza virus, which has been circulating among different species, causes considerable concern for both veterinary medicine and public health. We isolated a strain of H6N2 avian influenza virus from healthy green peafowl (Pavo muticus) in Qinghuangdao Wildlife Park in Hebei Province, China, in 2012. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that the isolated H6N2 strain had the same gene constellation as southern China strains, which were predominantly isolated from waterfowl distributed in Shantou, Guangxi, and Hunan in 2001-2010. The isolate showed no and low pathogenicity in chickens and ducks, respectively. However, it replicated efficiently in the lungs and turbinate of infected mice, resulting in thickened alveolar septa and moderate interstitial pneumonia. This finding raises concerns that the H6N2 subtype maybe evolve into a novel endemic avian influenza virus. Therefore, periodical surveillance of avian influenza viruses must be undertaken to monitor the advent of novel viruses. PMID:25619010

  3. Long-term adaptation of the influenza A virus by escaping cytotoxic T-cell recognition

    PubMed Central

    Woolthuis, Rutger G.; van Dorp, Christiaan H.; Keşmir, Can; de Boer, Rob J.; van Boven, Michiel

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary adaptation of the influenza A virus (IAV) to human antibodies is well characterised. Much less is known about the long-term evolution of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, which are important antigens for clearance of infection. We construct an antigenic map of IAVs of all human subtypes using a compendium of 142 confirmed CTL epitopes, and show that IAV evolved gradually in the period 1932–2015, with infrequent antigenic jumps in the H3N2 subtype. Intriguingly, the number of CTL epitopes per virus decreases with more than one epitope per three years in the H3N2 subtype (from 84 epitopes per virus in 1968 to 64 in 2015), mostly attributed to the loss of HLA-B epitopes. We confirm these observations with epitope predictions. Our findings indicate that selection pressures imposed by CTL immunity shape the long-term evolution of IAV. PMID:27629812

  4. Long-term adaptation of the influenza A virus by escaping cytotoxic T-cell recognition.

    PubMed

    Woolthuis, Rutger G; van Dorp, Christiaan H; Keşmir, Can; de Boer, Rob J; van Boven, Michiel

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary adaptation of the influenza A virus (IAV) to human antibodies is well characterised. Much less is known about the long-term evolution of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, which are important antigens for clearance of infection. We construct an antigenic map of IAVs of all human subtypes using a compendium of 142 confirmed CTL epitopes, and show that IAV evolved gradually in the period 1932-2015, with infrequent antigenic jumps in the H3N2 subtype. Intriguingly, the number of CTL epitopes per virus decreases with more than one epitope per three years in the H3N2 subtype (from 84 epitopes per virus in 1968 to 64 in 2015), mostly attributed to the loss of HLA-B epitopes. We confirm these observations with epitope predictions. Our findings indicate that selection pressures imposed by CTL immunity shape the long-term evolution of IAV. PMID:27629812

  5. Simultaneous discrimination and detection of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal influenza A viruses using a rapid immunogold biosensor.

    PubMed

    Apiwat, Chayachon; Wiriyachaiporn, Natpapas; Maneeprakorn, Weerakanya; Dharakul, Tararaj; Thepthai, Charin; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Siritantikorn, Sontana; Horthongkham, Navin

    2014-07-01

    A rapid immunogold biosensor for the simultaneous discrimination of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal influenza A viruses was developed successfully. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that were specific for the hemagglutinin protein of the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus were produced, and the best mAb pairs were selected. Using an mAb that was specific for the influenza A nucleoprotein, a rapid immunogold biosensor for the discrimination and detection of A(H1N1)pdm09/seasonal influenza viruses was developed. When tested with 72 virus isolates, the system achieved 100 % detection of the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus without cross-reactivity against seasonal influenza A (H1, H3 subtypes) and B viruses, parainfluenza viruses, respiratory syncytial viruses, and adenoviruses. The detection limits for A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal strains were 5 × 10(2)-7.5 × 10(3) and 1 × 10(3)-7.5 × 10(5) TCID50/mL, respectively. When tested with 49 clinical specimens, the specificity was high (100 %). The sensitivity for the detection of A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal strains was 90 % and 100 %, respectively, which correlated with the results of real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction as a reference method. The ability of the system to detect and discriminate the A(H1N1)pdm09 strain from the seasonal strains suggests that this method may be beneficial for investigation of outbreaks and diagnostic applications. Furthermore, this method might be a useful platform for developing a rapid diagnostic system for the simultaneous discrimination of other influenza virus subtypes during future outbreaks. PMID:24402634

  6. Evidence for the Introduction, Reassortment, and Persistence of Diverse Influenza A Viruses in Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yvonne C. F.; Aban, Malet; Peck, Heidi; Lau, Hilda; Baas, Chantal; Deng, Yi-Mo; Spirason, Natalie; Ellström, Patrik; Hernandez, Jorge; Olsen, Bjorn; Barr, Ian G.; Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Gonzalez-Acuna, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Avian influenza virus (AIV) surveillance in Antarctica during 2013 revealed the prevalence of evolutionarily distinct influenza viruses of the H11N2 subtype in Adélie penguins. Here we present results from the continued surveillance of AIV on the Antarctic Peninsula during 2014 and 2015. In addition to the continued detection of H11 subtype viruses in a snowy sheathbill during 2014, we isolated a novel H5N5 subtype virus from a chinstrap penguin during 2015. Gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the H11 virus detected in 2014 had a >99.1% nucleotide similarity to the H11N2 viruses isolated in 2013, suggesting the continued prevalence of this virus in Antarctica over multiple years. However, phylogenetic analysis of the H5N5 virus showed that the genome segments were recently introduced to the continent, except for the NP gene, which was similar to that in the endemic H11N2 viruses. Our analysis indicates geographically diverse origins for the H5N5 virus genes, with the majority of its genome segments derived from North American lineage viruses but the neuraminidase gene derived from a Eurasian lineage virus. In summary, we show the persistence of AIV lineages in Antarctica over multiple years, the recent introduction of gene segments from diverse regions, and reassortment between different AIV lineages in Antarctica, which together significantly increase our understanding of AIV ecology in this fragile and pristine environment. IMPORTANCE Analysis of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) detected in Antarctica reveals both the relatively recent introduction of an H5N5 AIV, predominantly of North American-like origin, and the persistence of an evolutionarily divergent H11 AIV. These data demonstrate that the flow of viruses from North America may be more common than initially thought and that, once introduced, these AIVs have the potential to be maintained within Antarctica. The future introduction of AIVs from North America into the Antarctic

  7. Global migration of influenza A viruses in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The emergence of the 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic virus underscores the importance of understanding how influenza A viruses evolve in swine on a global scale. To reveal the frequency, patterns and drivers of the spread of swine influenza virus globally, we conducted the largest phylogenetic analysis of swin...

  8. Epidemic dynamics of two coexisting hepatitis C virus subtypes.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Hernández, Nuria; Torres-Puente, Manuela; Bracho, Maria Alma; García-Robles, Inmaculada; Ortega, Enrique; del Olmo, Juan; Carnicer, Fernando; González-Candelas, Fernando; Moya, Andrés

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects about 3% of the human population. Phylogenetic analyses have grouped its variants into six major genotypes, which have a star-like distribution and several minor subtypes. The most abundant genotype in Europe is the so-called genotype 1, with two prevalent subtypes, 1a and 1b. In order to explain the higher prevalence of subtype 1b over 1a, a large-scale sequence analysis (100 virus clones) has been carried out over 25 patients of both subtypes in two regions of the HCV genome: one comprising hypervariable region 1 and another including the interferon sensitivity-determining region. Neither polymorphism analysis nor molecular variance analysis (attending to intra- and intersubtype differences, age, sex and previous history of antiviral treatment) was able to show any particular difference between subtypes that might account for their different prevalence. Only the demographic history of the populations carrying both subtypes and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) for risk practice suggested that the route of transmission may be the most important factor to explain the observed difference.

  9. Multiple reassortment events among highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) viruses detected in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Gerloff, Nancy A; Khan, Salah Uddin; Balish, Amanda; Shanta, Ireen S; Simpson, Natosha; Berman, Lashondra; Haider, Najmul; Poh, Mee Kian; Islam, Ausraful; Gurley, Emily; Hasnat, Md Abdul; Dey, T; Shu, Bo; Emery, Shannon; Lindstrom, Stephen; Haque, Ainul; Klimov, Alexander; Villanueva, Julie; Rahman, Mahmudur; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Ziaur Rahman, Md; Luby, Stephen P; Zeidner, Nord; Donis, Ruben O; Sturm-Ramirez, Katharine; Davis, C Todd

    2014-02-01

    In Bangladesh, little is known about the genomic composition and antigenicity of highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) viruses, their geographic distribution, temporal patterns, or gene flow within the avian host population. Forty highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) viruses isolated from humans and poultry in Bangladesh between 2008 and 2012 were analyzed by full genome sequencing and antigenic characterization. The analysis included viruses collected from avian hosts and environmental sampling in live bird markets, backyard poultry flocks, outbreak investigations in wild birds or poultry and from three human cases. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the ancestors of these viruses reassorted (1) with other gene lineages of the same clade, (2) between different clades and (3) with low pathogenicity avian influenza A virus subtypes. Bayesian estimates of the time of most recent common ancestry, combined with geographic information, provided evidence of probable routes and timelines of virus spread into and out of Bangladesh.

  10. Stochastic Processes Are Key Determinants of Short-Term Evolution in Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Martha I; Simonsen, Lone; Viboud, Cecile; Miller, Mark A; Taylor, Jill; George, Kirsten St; Griesemer, Sara B; Ghedin, Elodie; Sengamalay, Naomi A; Spiro, David J; Volkov, Igor; Grenfell, Bryan T; Lipman, David J; Taubenberger, Jeffery K; Holmes, Edward C

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the evolutionary dynamics of influenza A virus is central to its surveillance and control. While immune-driven antigenic drift is a key determinant of viral evolution across epidemic seasons, the evolutionary processes shaping influenza virus diversity within seasons are less clear. Here we show with a phylogenetic analysis of 413 complete genomes of human H3N2 influenza A viruses collected between 1997 and 2005 from New York State, United States, that genetic diversity is both abundant and largely generated through the seasonal importation of multiple divergent clades of the same subtype. These clades cocirculated within New York State, allowing frequent reassortment and generating genome-wide diversity. However, relatively low levels of positive selection and genetic diversity were observed at amino acid sites considered important in antigenic drift. These results indicate that adaptive evolution occurs only sporadically in influenza A virus; rather, the stochastic processes of viral migration and clade reassortment play a vital role in shaping short-term evolutionary dynamics. Thus, predicting future patterns of influenza virus evolution for vaccine strain selection is inherently complex and requires intensive surveillance, whole-genome sequencing, and phenotypic analysis. PMID:17140286

  11. Animal models for influenza virus pathogenesis, transmission, and immunology

    PubMed Central

    Thangavel, Rajagowthamee R.; Bouvier, Nicole M.

    2014-01-01

    In humans, infection with an influenza A or B virus manifests typically as an acute and self-limited upper respiratory tract illness characterized by fever, cough, sore throat, and malaise. However, influenza can present along a broad spectrum of disease, ranging from sub-clinical or even asymptomatic infection to a severe primary viral pneumonia requiring advanced medical supportive care. Disease severity depends upon the virulence of the influenza virus strain and the immune competence and previous influenza exposures of the patient. Animal models are used in influenza research not only to elucidate the viral and host factors that affect influenza disease outcomes in and spread among susceptible hosts, but also to evaluate interventions designed to prevent or reduce influenza morbidity and mortality in man. This review will focus on the three animal models currently used most frequently in influenza virus research -- mice, ferrets, and guinea pigs -- and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each. PMID:24709389

  12. Cross talk between animal and human influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Makoto; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Although outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza in wild and domestic birds have been posing the threat of a new influenza pandemic for the past decade, the first pandemic of the twenty-first century came from swine viruses. This fact emphasizes the complexity of influenza viral ecology and the difficulty of predicting influenza viral dynamics. Complete control of influenza viruses seems impossible. However, we must minimize the impact of animal and human influenza outbreaks by learning lessons from past experiences and recognizing the current status. Here, we review the most recent influenza virology data in the veterinary field, including aspects of zoonotic agents and recent studies that assess the pandemic potential of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

  13. Surveillance of human influenza A(H3N2) virus from 1999 to 2009 in southern Italy.

    PubMed

    DE Donno, A; Idolo, A; Quattrocchi, M; Zizza, A; Gabutti, G; Romano, A; Grima, P; Donatelli, I; Guido, M

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of influenza virus co-infections in humans and changes in the genetic variability of A(H3N2) virus strains in southern Italy from 1999 to 2009. A partial sequence of the haemagglutinin (HA) gene by human influenza H3N2 strains identified in oropharyngeal swabs from patients with influenza-like illness was analysed by DNA sequencing and a phylogenetic analysis was performed. During the seasons 1999-2000, 2002-2003, 2004-2005 and 2008-2009, the influenza viruses circulating belonged to subtype H3N2. However, A(H1N1) subtype virus and B type were respectively prevalent during the 2000-2001, 2006-2007, 2007-2008 and 2001-2002, 2003-2004, 2005-2006 seasons. The HA sequences appeared to be closely related to the sequence of the influenza A vaccine strain. Only the 2002-2003 season was characterized by co-circulation of two viral lineages: A/New York/55/01(H3N2)-like virus of the previous season and A/Fujian/411/02(H3N2)-like virus, a new H3 variant. In this study, over the decade analysed, no significant change was seen in the sequences of the HA gene of H3 viruses isolated.

  14. Characterization of the Localized Immune Response in the Respiratory Tract of Ferrets following Infection with Influenza A and B Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Carolan, Louise A.; Rockman, Steve; Borg, Kathryn; Guarnaccia, Teagan; Reading, Patrick; Mosse, Jennifer; Kelso, Anne; Barr, Ian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The burden of infection with seasonal influenza viruses is significant. Each year is typically characterized by the dominance of one (sub)type or lineage of influenza A or B virus, respectively. The incidence of disease varies annually, and while this may be attributed to a particular virus strain or subtype, the impacts of prior immunity, population differences, and variations in clinical assessment are also important. To improve our understanding of the impacts of seasonal influenza viruses, we directly compared clinical symptoms, virus shedding, and expression of cytokines, chemokines, and immune mediators in the upper respiratory tract (URT) of ferrets infected with contemporary A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2), or influenza B virus. Gene expression in the lower respiratory tract (LRT) was also assessed. Clinical symptoms were minimal. Overall cytokine/chemokine profiles in the URT were consistent in pattern and magnitude between animals infected with influenza A and B viruses, and peak expression levels of interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p40, alpha interferon (IFN-α), IFN-β, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNAs correlated with peak levels of viral shedding. MCP1 and IFN-γ were expressed after the virus peak. Granzymes A and B and IL-10 reached peak expression as the virus was cleared and seroconversion was detected. Cytokine/chemokine gene expression in the LRT following A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection reflected the observations seen for the URT but was delayed 2 or 3 days, as was virus replication. These data indicate that disease severities and localized immune responses following infection with seasonal influenza A and B viruses are similar, suggesting that other factors are likely to modulate the incidence and impact of seasonal influenza. IMPORTANCE Both influenza A and B viruses cocirculate in the human population, and annual influenza seasons are typically dominated by an influenza A virus subtype or an influenza B virus lineage

  15. Investigation of avian influenza virus in poultry and wild birds due to novel avian-origin influenza A(H10N8) in Nanchang City, China.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xiansheng; He, Fenglan; Hu, Maohong; Zhou, Xianfeng; Wang, Bin; Feng, Changhua; Wu, Yumei; Li, Youxing; Tu, Junling; Li, Hui; Liu, Mingbin; Chen, Haiying; Chen, Shengen

    2015-01-01

    Multiple reassortment events within poultry and wild birds had resulted in the establishment of another novel avian influenza A(H10N8) virus, and finally resulted in human death in Nanchang, China. However, there was a paucity of information on the prevalence of avian influenza virus in poultry and wild birds in Nanchang area. We investigated avian influenza virus in poultry and wild birds from live poultry markets, poultry countyards, delivery vehicles, and wild-bird habitats in Nanchang. We analyzed 1036 samples from wild birds and domestic poultry collected from December 2013 to February 2014. Original biological samples were tested for the presence of avian influenza virus using specific primer and probe sets of H5, H7, H9, H10 and N8 subtypes by real-time RT-PCR. In our analysis, the majority (97.98%) of positive samples were from live poultry markets. Among the poultry samples from chickens and ducks, AIV prevalence was 26.05 and 30.81%, respectively. Mixed infection of different HA subtypes was very common. Additionally, H10 subtypes coexistence with N8 was the most prevalent agent during the emergence of H10N8. This event illustrated a long-term surveillance was so helpful for pandemic preparedness and response.

  16. Efficacy of canine influenza virus (H3N8) vaccine to decrease severity of clinical disease after co-challenge with canine influenza virus and Streptococcus equi subsp. Zooepidemicus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since first emerging into the North American canine population in 2004, canine influenza virus (CIV) subtype H3N8 has shown horizontal transmission among dogs, with a high level of adaptation to this species. Severity of disease is variable, and co-infection by other respiratory pathogens is an impo...

  17. The mechanism of poly-galloyl-glucoses preventing Influenza A virus entry into host cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hu; Liu, Ge; Xiang, Yang-Fei; Wang, Yu; Guo, Chao-Wan; Chen, Nan-Hao; Zhang, Ying-Jun; Wang, Yi-Fei; Kitazato, Kaio; Xu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) is essential for Influenza A virus infection, but its diversity of subtypes presents an obstacle to developing broad-spectrum HA inhibitors. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which poly-galloyl glucose (pGG) analogs inhibit influenza hemagglutinin (HA) in vitro and in silico. We found that (1) star-shaped pGG analogs exhibit HA-inhibition activity by interacting with the conserved structural elements of the receptor binding domain (RBD); (2) HA inhibition depends on the number of galloyl substituents in a pGG analog; the best number is four; and when PGG binds with two HA trimers at their conserved receptor binding domains (loop 130, loop 220, and 190-α-helix), PGG acts as a molecular glue by aggregating viral particles so as to prevent viral entry into host cells (this was revealed via an in silico simulation on the binding of penta-galloyl-glucose (PGG) with HA). pGGs are also effective on a broad-spectrum influenza A subtypes (including H1, H3, H5, H7); this suggests that pGG analogs can be applied to most influenza A subtypes as a prophylactic against influenza viral infections.

  18. Genetic analysis of H3N2 avian influenza viruses isolated from live poultry markets and poultry slaughterhouses in Shanghai, China in 2013.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dequan; Liu, Jian; Ju, Houbin; Ge, Feifei; Wang, Jian; Li, Xin; Zhou, Jinping; Liu, Peihong

    2015-08-01

    Five H3N2 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) were isolated from live poultry markets (LPMs) and poultry slaughterhouses in Shanghai, China in 2013. All viruses were characterized by whole-genome sequencing with subsequent genetic comparison and phylogenetic analysis. The hemagglutinin cleavage site of all viruses indicated that the five strains were low-pathogenic AIVs. Phylogenetic analysis of all eight viral genes showed that the five H3N2 viruses clustered in the Eurasian lineage of influenza viruses. The eight genes showed evidence of reassortment events between these H3 subtype viruses and other subtype viruses, especially H5 and H7 subtypes, probably in pigeons, domestic ducks, and wild birds. These findings emphasized the importance of AIV surveillance in LPMs and poultry slaughterhouses for understanding the genesis and emergence of novel reassortants with pandemic potential. PMID:25899857

  19. Genetic analysis of H3N2 avian influenza viruses isolated from live poultry markets and poultry slaughterhouses in Shanghai, China in 2013.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dequan; Liu, Jian; Ju, Houbin; Ge, Feifei; Wang, Jian; Li, Xin; Zhou, Jinping; Liu, Peihong

    2015-08-01

    Five H3N2 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) were isolated from live poultry markets (LPMs) and poultry slaughterhouses in Shanghai, China in 2013. All viruses were characterized by whole-genome sequencing with subsequent genetic comparison and phylogenetic analysis. The hemagglutinin cleavage site of all viruses indicated that the five strains were low-pathogenic AIVs. Phylogenetic analysis of all eight viral genes showed that the five H3N2 viruses clustered in the Eurasian lineage of influenza viruses. The eight genes showed evidence of reassortment events between these H3 subtype viruses and other subtype viruses, especially H5 and H7 subtypes, probably in pigeons, domestic ducks, and wild birds. These findings emphasized the importance of AIV surveillance in LPMs and poultry slaughterhouses for understanding the genesis and emergence of novel reassortants with pandemic potential.

  20. DIVA vaccination strategies for avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Suarez, David L

    2012-12-01

    Vaccination for both low pathogenicity avian influenza and highly pathogenic avian influenza is commonly used by countries that have become endemic for avian influenza virus, but stamping-out policies are still common for countries with recently introduced disease. Stamping-out policies of euthanatizing infected and at-risk flocks has been an effective control tool, but it comes at a high social and economic cost. Efforts to identify alternative ways to respond to outbreaks without widespread stamping out has become a goal for organizations like the World Organisation for Animal Health. A major issue with vaccination for avian influenza is trade considerations because countries that vaccinate are often considered to be endemic for the disease and they typically lose their export markets. Primarily as a tool to promote trade, the concept of DIVA (differentiate infected from vaccinated animals) has been considered for avian influenza, but the goal for trade is to differentiate vaccinated and not-infected from vaccinated and infected animals because trading partners are unwilling to accept infected birds. Several different strategies have been investigated for a DIVA strategy, but each has advantages and disadvantages. A review of current knowledge on the research and implementation of the DIVA strategy will be discussed with possible ways to implement this strategy in the field. The increased desire for a workable DIVA strategy may lead to one of these ideas moving from the experimental to the practical.

  1. Epidemiological Dynamics and Phylogeography of Influenza Virus in Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaowen; Tan, Yi; He, Mingliang; Lam, Tommy Tsan-Yuk; Lu, Xing; Viboud, Cécile; He, Jianfan; Zhang, Shunxiang; Lu, Jianhua; Wu, Chunli; Fang, Shishong; Wang, Xin; Xie, Xu; Ma, Hanwu; Nelson, Martha I.; Kung, Hsiang-fu; Holmes, Edward C.; Cheng, Jinquan

    2013-01-01

    Background. Understanding the epidemiological dynamics of influenza virus is central to surveillance and vaccine strain selection. It has been suggested that tropical and subtropical regions represent the global source of influenza epidemics. However, our understanding of the epidemiological dynamics of influenza virus in these regions is limited by a relative lack of long-term data. Methods. We analyzed epidemiological and virological data on influenza recorded over a period of 15 years from the metropolitan city of Shenzhen in subtropical southern China. We used wavelet analysis to determine the periodicity of influenza epidemics and molecular phylogeographic analysis to investigate the role of Shenzhen and southern China in the global evolution of influenza virus. Results. We show that southern China is unlikely to represent an epicenter of global influenza activity, because activity in Shenzhen is characterized by significant annual cycles, multiple viral introductions every year, limited persistence across epidemic seasons, and viruses that generally are not positioned on the trunk of the global influenza virus phylogeny. Conclusions. We propose that novel influenza viruses emerge and evolve in multiple geographic localities and that the global evolution of influenza virus is complex and does not simply originate from a southern Chinese epicenter. PMID:22930808

  2. Evaluation of the immunogenicity and protective effects of a trivalent chimeric norovirus P particle immunogen displaying influenza HA2 from subtypes H1, H3 and B.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xin; Yin, He; Shi, Yuhua; He, Xiaoqiu; Yu, Yongjiao; Guan, Shanshan; Kuai, Ziyu; Haji, Nasteha M; Haji, Nafisa M; Kong, Wei; Shan, Yaming

    2016-01-01

    The ectodomain of the influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinin (HA) stem is highly conserved across strains and has shown promise as a universal influenza vaccine in a mouse model. In this study, potential B-cell epitopes were found through sequence alignment and epitope prediction in a stem fragment, HA2:90-105, which is highly conserved among virus subtypes H1, H3 and B. A norovirus (NoV) P particle platform was used to express the HA2:90-105 sequences from subtypes H1, H3 and B in loops 1, 2 and 3 of the protrusion (P) domain, respectively. Through mouse immunization and microneutralization assays, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the chimeric NoV P particle (trivalent HA2-PP) were tested against infection with three subtypes (H1N1, H3N2 and B) of IAV in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. The protective efficacy of the trivalent HA2-PP was also evaluated preliminarily in vivo by virus challenge in the mouse model. The trivalent HA2-PP immunogen induced significant IgG antibody responses, which could be enhanced by a virus booster vaccination. Moreover, the trivalent HA2-PP immunogen also demonstrated in vitro neutralization of the H3 and B viruses, and in vivo protection against the H3 virus. Our results support the notion that a broadly protective vaccine approach using an HA2-based NoV P particle platform can provide cross-protection against challenge viruses of different IAV subtypes. The efficacy of the immunogen should be further enhanced for practicality, and a better understanding of the protective immune mechanism will be critical for the development of HA2-based multivalent vaccines. PMID:27222326

  3. Evaluation of the immunogenicity and protective effects of a trivalent chimeric norovirus P particle immunogen displaying influenza HA2 from subtypes H1, H3 and B

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xin; Yin, He; Shi, Yuhua; He, Xiaoqiu; Yu, Yongjiao; Guan, Shanshan; Kuai, Ziyu; Haji, Nasteha M; Haji, Nafisa M; Kong, Wei; Shan, Yaming

    2016-01-01

    The ectodomain of the influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinin (HA) stem is highly conserved across strains and has shown promise as a universal influenza vaccine in a mouse model. In this study, potential B-cell epitopes were found through sequence alignment and epitope prediction in a stem fragment, HA2:90-105, which is highly conserved among virus subtypes H1, H3 and B. A norovirus (NoV) P particle platform was used to express the HA2:90-105 sequences from subtypes H1, H3 and B in loops 1, 2 and 3 of the protrusion (P) domain, respectively. Through mouse immunization and microneutralization assays, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the chimeric NoV P particle (trivalent HA2-PP) were tested against infection with three subtypes (H1N1, H3N2 and B) of IAV in Madin–Darby canine kidney cells. The protective efficacy of the trivalent HA2-PP was also evaluated preliminarily in vivo by virus challenge in the mouse model. The trivalent HA2-PP immunogen induced significant IgG antibody responses, which could be enhanced by a virus booster vaccination. Moreover, the trivalent HA2-PP immunogen also demonstrated in vitro neutralization of the H3 and B viruses, and in vivo protection against the H3 virus. Our results support the notion that a broadly protective vaccine approach using an HA2-based NoV P particle platform can provide cross-protection against challenge viruses of different IAV subtypes. The efficacy of the immunogen should be further enhanced for practicality, and a better understanding of the protective immune mechanism will be critical for the development of HA2-based multivalent vaccines. PMID:27222326

  4. Lack of antigenic diversity in contemporary H7 avian-origin influenza A viruses from North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Subtype H7 avian–origin influenza A viruses (AIVs) have caused at least 500 confirmed human infections since 2003 and culling of >75 million birds in recent years. Understanding the antigenic diversity and genetic evolution of H7 AIVs is critical for developing effective strategies for disease prev...

  5. The molecular determinants of antibody recognition and antigenic drift in the H3 hemagglutinin of swine influenza A virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Influenza A virus (IAV) of the H3 subtype is an important pathogen that affects both humans and swine. The main intervention strategy for preventing infection is vaccination to induce neutralizing antibodies against the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA). However, due to antigenic drift, vaccin...

  6. Influenza virus vaccine for neglected hosts: horses and dogs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study provides information regarding vaccine research and the epidemiology of influenza virus in neglected hosts (horses and dogs). Equine influenza virus (EIV) causes a highly contagious disease in horses and other equids, and outbreaks have occurred worldwide. EIV has resulted in costly damage to the horse industry and has the ability of cross the host species barrier from horses to dogs. Canine influenza is a virus of equine or avian origin and infects companion animals that live in close contact with humans; this results in possible exposure to the seasonal epizootic influenza virus. There have been case reports of genetic reassortment between human and canine influenza viruses, which results in high virulence and the ability of transmission to ferrets. This emphasizes the need for vaccine research on neglected hosts to update knowledge on current strains and to advance technology for controlling influenza outbreaks for public health. PMID:27489801

  7. Influenza virus vaccine for neglected hosts: horses and dogs.

    PubMed

    Na, Woonsung; Yeom, Minjoo; Yuk, Huijoon; Moon, Hyoungjoon; Kang, Bokyu; Song, Daesub

    2016-07-01

    This study provides information regarding vaccine research and the epidemiology of influenza virus in neglected hosts (horses and dogs). Equine influenza virus (EIV) causes a highly contagious disease in horses and other equids, and outbreaks have occurred worldwide. EIV has resulted in costly damage to the horse industry and has the ability of cross the host species barrier from horses to dogs. Canine influenza is a virus of equine or avian origin and infects companion animals that live in close contact with humans; this results in possible exposure to the seasonal epizootic influenza virus. There have been case reports of genetic reassortment between human and canine influenza viruses, which results in high virulence and the ability of transmission to ferrets. This emphasizes the need for vaccine research on neglected hosts to update knowledge on current strains and to advance technology for controlling influenza outbreaks for public health.

  8. Influenza virus vaccine for neglected hosts: horses and dogs.

    PubMed

    Na, Woonsung; Yeom, Minjoo; Yuk, Huijoon; Moon, Hyoungjoon; Kang, Bokyu; Song, Daesub

    2016-07-01

    This study provides information regarding vaccine research and the epidemiology of influenza virus in neglected hosts (horses and dogs). Equine influenza virus (EIV) causes a highly contagious disease in horses and other equids, and outbreaks have occurred worldwide. EIV has resulted in costly damage to the horse industry and has the ability of cross the host species barrier from horses to dogs. Canine influenza is a virus of equine or avian origin and infects companion animals that live in close contact with humans; this results in possible exposure to the seasonal epizootic influenza virus. There have been case reports of genetic reassortment between human and canine influenza viruses, which results in high virulence and the ability of transmission to ferrets. This emphasizes the need for vaccine research on neglected hosts to update knowledge on current strains and to advance technology for controlling influenza outbreaks for public health. PMID:27489801

  9. New reassortant and enzootic European swine influenza viruses transmit efficiently through direct contact in the ferret model

    PubMed Central

    Fabrizio, Thomas P.; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Hansen, Mette Sif; Webby, Richard J.; Larsen, Lars E.

    2015-01-01

    The reverse zoonotic events that introduced the 2009 pandemic influenza virus into pigs have drastically increased the diversity of swine influenza viruses in Europe. The pandemic potential of these novel reassortments is still unclear, necessitating enhanced surveillance of European pigs with additional focus on risk assessment of these new viruses. In this study, four European swine influenza viruses were assessed for their zoonotic potential. Two of the four viruses were enzootic viruses of subtype H1N2 (with avian-like H1) and H3N2, and two were new reassortants, one with avian-like H1 and human-like N2 and one with 2009 pandemic H1 and swine-like N2. All viruses replicated to high titres in nasal wash and nasal turbinate samples from inoculated ferrets and transmitted efficiently by direct contact. Only the H3N2 virus transmitted to naïve ferrets via the airborne route. Growth kinetics using a differentiated human bronchial epithelial cell line showed that all four viruses were able to replicate to high titres. Further, the viruses revealed preferential binding to the 2,6-α-silalylated glycans and investigation of the antiviral susceptibility of the viruses revealed that all were sensitive to neuraminidase inhibitors. These findings suggested that these viruses have the potential to infect humans and further underline the need for continued surveillance as well as biological characterization of new influenza A viruses. PMID:25701826

  10. New reassortant and enzootic European swine influenza viruses transmit efficiently through direct contact in the ferret model.

    PubMed

    Fobian, Kristina; Fabrizio, Thomas P; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Hansen, Mette Sif; Webby, Richard J; Larsen, Lars E

    2015-07-01

    The reverse zoonotic events that introduced the 2009 pandemic influenza virus into pigs have drastically increased the diversity of swine influenza viruses in Europe. The pandemic potential of these novel reassortments is still unclear, necessitating enhanced surveillance of European pigs with additional focus on risk assessment of these new viruses. In this study, four European swine influenza viruses were assessed for their zoonotic potential. Two of the four viruses were enzootic viruses of subtype H1N2 (with avian-like H1) and H3N2, and two were new reassortants, one with avian-like H1 and human-like N2 and one with 2009 pandemic H1 and swine-like N2. All viruses replicated to high titres in nasal wash and nasal turbinate samples from inoculated ferrets and transmitted efficiently by direct contact. Only the H3N2 virus transmitted to naïve ferrets via the airborne route. Growth kinetics using a differentiated human bronchial epithelial cell line showed that all four viruses were able to replicate to high titres. Further, the viruses revealed preferential binding to the 2,6-α-silalylated glycans and investigation of the antiviral susceptibility of the viruses revealed that all were sensitive to neuraminidase inhibitors. These findings suggested that these viruses have the potential to infect humans and further underline the need for continued surveillance as well as biological characterization of new influenza A viruses.

  11. First Characterization of Avian Influenza Viruses from Greenland 2014.

    PubMed

    Hartby, Christina Marie; Krog, Jesper Schak; Merkel, Flemming; Holm, Elisabeth; Larsen, Lars Erik; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane

    2016-05-01

    In late February 2014, unusually high numbers of wild thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia) were found dead on the coast of South Greenland. To investigate the cause of death, 45 birds were submitted for laboratory examination in Denmark. Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) with subtypes H11N2 and low pathogenic H5N1 were detected in some of the birds. Characterization of the viruses by full genome sequencing revealed that all the gene segments belonged to the North American lineage of AIVs. The seemingly sparse and mixed subtype occurrence of low pathogenic AIVs in these birds, in addition to the emaciated appearance of the birds, suggests that the murre die-off was due to malnutrition as a result of sparse food availability or inclement weather. Here we present the first characterization of AIVs isolated in Greenland, and our results support the idea that wild birds in Greenland may be involved in the movement of AIV between North America and Europe.

  12. Subclinical Infection with Avian Influenza A H5N1 Virus in Cats

    PubMed Central

    Weikel, Joachim; Möstl, Karin; Revilla-Fernández, Sandra; Wodak, Eveline; Bagó, Zoltan; Vanek, Elisabeth; Benetka, Viviane; Hess, Michael; Thalhammer, Johann G.

    2007-01-01

    Avian influenza A virus subtype H5N1 was transmitted to domestic cats by close contact with infected birds. Virus-specific nucleic acids were detected in pharyngeal swabs from 3 of 40 randomly sampled cats from a group of 194 animals (day 8 after contact with an infected swan). All cats were transferred to a quarantine station and monitored for clinical signs, virus shedding, and antibody production until day 50. Despite unfamiliar handling, social distress and the presence of other viral and nonviral pathogens that caused illness and poor health and compromised the immune systems, none of the cats developed clinical signs of influenza. There was no evidence of horizontal transmission to other cats because only 2 cats developed antibodies against H5N1 virus. PMID:17479886

  13. A historical perspective of influenza A(H1N2) virus.

    PubMed

    Komadina, Naomi; McVernon, Jodie; Hall, Robert; Leder, Karin

    2014-01-01

    The emergence and transition to pandemic status of the influenza A(H1N1)A(H1N1)pdm09) virus in 2009 illustrated the potential for previously circulating human viruses to re-emerge in humans and cause a pandemic after decades of circulating among animals. Within a short time of the initial emergence of A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, novel reassortants were isolated from swine. In late 2011, a variant (v) H3N2 subtype was isolated from humans, and by 2012, the number of persons infected began to increase with limited person-to-person transmission. During 2012 in the United States, an A(H1N2)v virus was transmitted to humans from swine. During the same year, Australia recorded its first H1N2 subtype infection among swine. The A(H3N2)v and A(H1N2)v viruses contained the matrix protein from the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, raising the possibility of increased transmissibility among humans and underscoring the potential for influenza pandemics of novel swine-origin viruses. We report on the differing histories of A(H1N2) viruses among humans and animals.

  14. Mechanism of the antiviral effect of hydroxytyrosol on influenza virus appears to involve morphological change of the virus.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kentaro; Ogawa, Haruko; Hara, Ayako; Yoshida, Yukio; Yonezawa, Yutaka; Karibe, Kazuji; Nghia, Vuong Bui; Yoshimura, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Yu; Yamada, Manabu; Nakamura, Kuniyasu; Imai, Kunitoshi

    2009-07-01

    Hydroxytyrosol (HT), a small-molecule phenolic compound, inactivated influenza A viruses including H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, and H9N2 subtypes. HT also inactivated Newcastle disease virus but not bovine rotavirus, and fowl adenovirus, suggesting that the mechanism of the antiviral effect of HT might require the presence of a viral envelope. Pretreatment of MDCK cells with HT did not affect the propagation of H9N2 virus subsequently inoculated onto the cells, implying that HT targets the virus but not the host cell. H9N2 virus inactivated with HT retained unaltered hemagglutinating activity and bound to MDCK cells in a manner similar to untreated virus. Neuraminidase activity in the HT-treated virus also remained unchanged. However, in the cells inoculated with HT-inactivated H9N2 virus, neither viral mRNA nor viral protein was detected. Electron microscopic analysis revealed morphological abnormalities in the HT-treated H9N2 virus. Most structures found in the HT-treated virus were atypical of influenza virions, and localization of hemagglutinin was not necessarily confined on the virion surface. These observations suggest that the structure of H9N2 virus could be disrupted by HT. PMID:19501255

  15. Agar gel immunodiffusion assay to detect antibodies to Type A influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Jenson, Terra A

    2014-01-01

    The agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test is used to detect antibodies to Type A influenza group-specific antigens, i.e., the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) and matrix (M) proteins. Therefore, this test will detect antibodies to all influenza A virus subtypes. AGID is commonly used to screen poultry flocks for avian influenza virus infection. The AGID is a simple and economical serological test. All serological testing has its advantages and disadvantages which should be considered before choosing the optimal test for the laboratory needs. Each laboratory must evaluate the laboratory's resources, the volume of testing, the goal of testing, how the test results are used and what types of samples are being tested in order to select the optimal test.

  16. Comparison of three serological assays to determine the cross-reactivity of antibodies from eight genetically diverse U.S. swine influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Leuwerke, Brad; Kitikoon, Pravina; Evans, Richard; Thacker, Eileen

    2008-07-01

    Swine influenza virus is an economically important pathogen to the U.S. swine industry. New influenza subtypes and isolates within subtypes with different genetic and antigenic makeup have recently emerged in U.S. swineherds. As a result of the emergence of these new viruses, diagnosticians' ability to accurately diagnose influenza infection in pigs and develop appropriate vaccine strategies has become increasingly difficult. The current study compares the ability of subtype-specific commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), hemagglutination inhibition (HI), and serum neutralization (SN) assays to detect antibodies elicited by multiple isolates within different subtypes of influenza virus. Pigs were infected with genetically and antigenically different isolates of the 3 major circulating subtypes within populations of swine (H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2). Serum was collected when all pigs within a group collectively reached HI reciprocal titers >or=160 against that group's homologous challenge virus. The antibody cross-reactivity of the sera between isolates was determined using ELISA, HI, and SN assays. In addition, the correlation between the 3 assays was determined. The assays differed in their ability to detect antibodies produced by the viruses used in the study. The results provide important information to diagnostic laboratories, veterinarians, and swine producers on the ability of 3 common serological assays used in identifying infection with influenza in pigs. PMID:18599846

  17. Novel Reassortant H5N6 Influenza A Virus from the Lao People's Democratic Republic Is Highly Pathogenic in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Butler, Jeffrey; Stewart, Cameron R; Layton, Daniel S; Phommachanh, Phouvong; Harper, Jennifer; Payne, Jean; Evans, Ryan M; Valdeter, Stacey; Walker, Som; Harvey, Gemma; Shan, Songhua; Bruce, Matthew P; Rootes, Christina L; Gough, Tamara J; Rohringer, Andreas; Peck, Grantley R; Fardy, Sarah J; Karpala, Adam J; Johnson, Dayna; Wang, Jianning; Douangngeun, Bounlom; Morrissy, Christopher; Wong, Frank Y K; Bean, Andrew G D; Bingham, John; Williams, David T

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses of H5 subtype can cause highly pathogenic disease in poultry. In March 2014, a new reassortant H5N6 subtype highly pathogenic avian influenza virus emerged in Lao People's Democratic Republic. We have assessed the pathogenicity, pathobiology and immunological responses associated with this virus in chickens. Infection caused moderate to advanced disease in 6 of 6 chickens within 48 h of mucosal inoculation. High virus titers were observed in blood and tissues (kidney, spleen, liver, duodenum, heart, brain and lung) taken at euthanasia. Viral antigen was detected in endothelium, neurons, myocardium, lymphoid tissues and other cell types. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were elevated compared to non-infected birds. Our study confirmed that this new H5N6 reassortant is highly pathogenic, causing disease in chickens similar to that of Asian H5N1 viruses, and demonstrated the ability of such clade 2.3.4-origin H5 viruses to reassort with non-N1 subtype viruses while maintaining a fit and infectious phenotype. Recent detection of influenza H5N6 poultry infections in Lao PDR, China and Viet Nam, as well as six fatal human infections in China, demonstrate that these emergent highly pathogenic H5N6 viruses may be widely established in several countries and represent an emerging threat to poultry and human populations.

  18. Novel Reassortant H5N6 Influenza A Virus from the Lao People's Democratic Republic Is Highly Pathogenic in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Butler, Jeffrey; Stewart, Cameron R; Layton, Daniel S; Phommachanh, Phouvong; Harper, Jennifer; Payne, Jean; Evans, Ryan M; Valdeter, Stacey; Walker, Som; Harvey, Gemma; Shan, Songhua; Bruce, Matthew P; Rootes, Christina L; Gough, Tamara J; Rohringer, Andreas; Peck, Grantley R; Fardy, Sarah J; Karpala, Adam J; Johnson, Dayna; Wang, Jianning; Douangngeun, Bounlom; Morrissy, Christopher; Wong, Frank Y K; Bean, Andrew G D; Bingham, John; Williams, David T

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses of H5 subtype can cause highly pathogenic disease in poultry. In March 2014, a new reassortant H5N6 subtype highly pathogenic avian influenza virus emerged in Lao People's Democratic Republic. We have assessed the pathogenicity, pathobiology and immunological responses associated with this virus in chickens. Infection caused moderate to advanced disease in 6 of 6 chickens within 48 h of mucosal inoculation. High virus titers were observed in blood and tissues (kidney, spleen, liver, duodenum, heart, brain and lung) taken at euthanasia. Viral antigen was detected in endothelium, neurons, myocardium, lymphoid tissues and other cell types. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were elevated compared to non-infected birds. Our study confirmed that this new H5N6 reassortant is highly pathogenic, causing disease in chickens similar to that of Asian H5N1 viruses, and demonstrated the ability of such clade 2.3.4-origin H5 viruses to reassort with non-N1 subtype viruses while maintaining a fit and infectious phenotype. Recent detection of influenza H5N6 poultry infections in Lao PDR, China and Viet Nam, as well as six fatal human infections in China, demonstrate that these emergent highly pathogenic H5N6 viruses may be widely established in several countries and represent an emerging threat to poultry and human populations. PMID:27631618

  19. A Single Dose of an Avian H3N8 Influenza Virus Vaccine Is Highly Immunogenic and Efficacious against a Recently Emerged Seal Influenza Virus in Mice and Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Baz, Mariana; Paskel, Myeisha; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Zengel, James R.; Cheng, Xing; Treanor, John J.; Jin, Hong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT H3N8 influenza viruses are a commonly found subtype in wild birds, usually causing mild or no disease in infected birds. However, they have crossed the species barrier and have been associated with outbreaks in dogs, pigs, donkeys, and seals and therefore pose a threat to humans. A live attenuated, cold-adapted (ca) H3N8 vaccine virus was generated by reverse genetics using the wild-type (wt) hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from the A/blue-winged teal/Texas/Sg-00079/2007 (H3N8) (tl/TX/079/07) wt virus and the six internal protein gene segments from the ca influenza A virus vaccine donor strain, A/Ann Arbor/6/60 ca (H2N2), the backbone of the licensed seasonal live attenuated influenza vaccine. One dose of the tl/TX/079/07 ca vaccine induced a robust neutralizing antibody response against the homologous (tl/TX/079/07) and two heterologous influenza viruses, including the recently emerged A/harbor seal/New Hampshire/179629/2011 (H3N8) and A/northern pintail/Alaska/44228-129/2006 (H3N8) viruses, and conferred robust protection against the homologous and heterologous influenza viruses. We also analyzed human sera against the tl/TX/079/07 H3N8 avian influenza virus and observed low but detectable antibody reactivity in elderly subjects, suggesting that older H3N2 influenza viruses confer some cross-reactive antibody. The latter observation was confirmed in a ferret study. The safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the tl/TX/079/07 ca vaccine in mice and ferrets support further evaluation of this vaccine in humans for use in the event of transmission of an H3N8 avian influenza virus to humans. The human and ferret serology data suggest that a single dose of the vaccine may be sufficient in older subjects. IMPORTANCE Although natural infection of humans with an avian H3N8 influenza virus has not yet been reported, this influenza virus subtype has already crossed the species barrier and productively infected mammals. Pandemic preparedness is an

  20. Intranasal vaccination with H5, H7 and H9 hemagglutinins co-localized in a virus-like particle protects ferrets from multiple avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Tretyakova, Irina; Pearce, Melissa B; Florese, Ruth; Tumpey, Terrence M; Pushko, Peter

    2013-07-20

    Avian influenza H5, H7 and H9 viruses top the World Health Organization's (WHO) list of subtypes with the greatest pandemic potential. Here we describe a recombinant virus-like particle (VLP) that co-localizes hemagglutinin (HA) proteins derived from H5N1, H7N2, and H9N2 viruses as an experimental vaccine against these viruses. A baculovirus vector was configured to co-express the H5, H7, and H9 genes from A/Viet Nam/1203/2004 (H5N1), A/New York/107/2003 (H7N2) and A/Hong Kong/33982/2009 (H9N2) viruses, respectively, as well as neuraminidase (NA) and matrix (M1) genes from A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) virus. Co-expression of these genes in Sf9 cells resulted in production of triple-subtype VLPs containing HA molecules derived from the three influenza viruses. The triple-subtype VLPs exhibited hemagglutination and neuraminidase activities and morphologically resembled influenza virions. Intranasal vaccination of ferrets with the VLPs resulted in induction of serum antibody responses and efficient protection against experimental challenges with H5N1, H7N2, and H9N2 viruses.

  1. A CTL-based liposomal vaccine capable of inducing protection against heterosubtypic influenza viruses in HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Masanori; Kohyama, Shunsuke; Suda, Tatsuya; Yokoyama, Shoichi; Mori, Masahito; Kobayashi, Akiharu; Taneichi, Maiko; Uchida, Tetsuya

    2010-01-15

    The current vaccination strategy against influenza is to induce the production of antibodies directed against surface antigens of viruses. However, the frequent changes in the surface antigens of influenza viruses allow the viruses to avoid antibody-mediated immunity. On the other hand, it is known that cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) populations directed against internal antigens of influenza A virus are broadly cross-reactive to influenza virus subtypes. In the present study, liposomal conjugates with CTL epitope peptides derived from highly conserved internal antigens of influenza viruses were evaluated for their ability to protect against infection with influenza viruses. Liposomal conjugates with peptide M1 58-66, an HLA-A*0201-binding CTL epitope present within the amino-acid sequence of the M1 coding region, successfully induced antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cells and CTLs in HLA-A*0201-transgenic mice. Moreover, after nasal infection with either the H1N1 or H3N2 virus, viral replication in the lung was significantly inhibited in the immunized mice. These protective activities lasted at least 6months after the immunization. Thus, these results suggest that liposome-coupled CTL epitope peptides derived from highly conserved internal antigens of influenza viruses might be applicable to the development of vaccines that induce protection against infection with heterosubtypic influenza viruses.

  2. High-throughput neuraminidase substrate specificity study of human and avian influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhong; Cao, Hongzhi; Dao, Nguyet; Luo, Zheng; Yu, Hai; Chen, Yi; Baumgarth, Nicole; Cardona, Carol; Chen, Xi

    2011-01-01

    Despite the importance of neuraminidase (NA) activity in effective infection by influenza A viruses, limited information exists about the differences of substrate preferences of viral neuraminidases from different hosts or from different strains. Using a high-throughput screening format and a library of twenty α2–3- or α2–6-linked para-nitrophenol-tagged sialylgalactosides, substrate specificity of NAs on thirty-seven strains of human and avian influenza A viruses was studied using intact viral particles. Neuraminidases of all viruses tested cleaved both α2–3- and α2–6-linked sialosides but preferred α2–3-linked ones and the activity was dependent on the terminal sialic acid structure. In contrast to NAs of other subtypes of influenza A viruses which did not cleave 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-glycero-D-galacto-nonulosonic acid (Kdn) or 5-deoxy Kdn (5d–Kdn), NAs of all N7 subtype viruses tested had noticeable hydrolytic activities on α2–3-linked sialosides containing Kdn or 5d–Kdn. Additionally, group 1 NAs showed efficient activity in cleaving N-azidoacetylneuraminic acid from α2 –3-linked sialoside. PMID:21501853

  3. Characterization of uncultivable bat influenza virus using a replicative synthetic virus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Ma, Jingjiao; Liu, Qinfang; Bawa, Bhupinder; Wang, Wei; Shabman, Reed S; Duff, Michael; Lee, Jinhwa; Lang, Yuekun; Cao, Nan; Nagy, Abdou; Lin, Xudong; Stockwell, Timothy B; Richt, Juergen A; Wentworth, David E; Ma, Wenjun

    2014-10-01

    Bats harbor many viruses, which are periodically transmitted to humans resulting in outbreaks of disease (e.g., Ebola, SARS-CoV). Recently, influenza virus-like sequences were identified in bats; however, the viruses could not be cultured. This discovery aroused great interest in understanding the evolutionary history and pandemic potential of bat-influenza. Using synthetic genomics, we were unable to rescue the wild type bat virus, but could rescue a modified bat-influenza virus that had the HA and NA coding regions replaced with those of A/PR/8/1934 (H1N1). This modified bat-influenza virus replicated efficiently in vitro and in mice, resulting in severe disease. Additional studies using a bat-influenza virus that had the HA and NA of A/swine/Texas/4199-2/1998 (H3N2) showed that the PR8 HA and NA contributed to the pathogenicity in mice. Unlike other influenza viruses, engineering truncations hypothesized to reduce interferon antagonism into the NS1 protein didn't attenuate bat-influenza. In contrast, substitution of a putative virulence mutation from the bat-influenza PB2 significantly attenuated the virus in mice and introduction of a putative virulence mutation increased its pathogenicity. Mini-genome replication studies and virus reassortment experiments demonstrated that bat-influenza has very limited genetic and protein compatibility with Type A or Type B influenza viruses, yet it readily reassorts with another divergent bat-influenza virus, suggesting that the bat-influenza lineage may represent a new Genus/Species within the Orthomyxoviridae family. Collectively, our data indicate that the bat-influenza viruses recently identified are authentic viruses that pose little, if any, pandemic th